Citation
Bonaire reporter

Material Information

Title:
Bonaire reporter
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince
Publisher:
George DeSalvo
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Language:
English

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright George DeSalvo. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Aggregations:
Caribbean Newspapers, dLOC
University of Florida

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agon rki Apnl23mMay 7,2010; Year 17, Issue l

The PLOTiR
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_____ TT OePORTER
0 TE


m r oe timo


In a landmark vote the Dutch
Second Chamber voted in
favor of all 10 Kingdom Consen-
sus Laws last Thursday paving
the way for a new organization
of the Dutch Kingdom: Bonaire,
Sint Eustatius and Saba, the
BES Islands, to become an inte-
gral part of Holland while Cura-
gao and St. Maarten become
independent "countries" in the
Dutch Kingdom. The Nether-
lands Antilles, formed over 50
years ago during the Dutch proc-
ess of decolonization of its over-
seas possessions, will disappear.
"An historic day," all agreed
following the vote. "Long live the
Kingdom," exclaimed Antillean
Prime Minister Emily de Jongh-
Elhage at the end of her speech in
the Second Chamber shortly be-
fore the voting.
It wasn't a "love-in" by any
means. Feelings were running high
in the Second Chamber after state-
ments by Socialist Party member
Ronald van Raak in which he
stated he would vote against the
laws because he felt he was being
put under pressure. "We are being
forced into a trap and that trap is
called 10-10-10. The laws are not
ready, the countries are not ready
and the people are not ready."

The eruption of Mount Ey-
jafjallajokull in Iceland on April
14, and the resulting volcanic ash
cloud over Northern Europe has
caused severe disruption of
flights in Northern Europe and
upset meetings and delayed for-
malities that would confirm
Bonaire's integration as a


"special municipality" into the
Netherlands.
"It's like a spray can of ash com-
ing from Iceland," Accu-
Weather.com Senior Meteorolo-
gist Margusity said.
There were no departures or
arrivals at Amsterdam's Schi-
phol Airport from last Thursday.
At press time some flights were
resuming.
The last eruption under the gla-
cier at Eyjafjallajokull occurred in
1821 and lasted, on and off, until
1823. Some experts predicted that
another prolonged eruption could
affect air traffic for up to six
months.

0Airlines are taking the
threat of the ask cloud seriously,
while losing $100 million a day.
In 1989, KLM Flight 867 flying
from Amsterdam to Narita, Japan,
flew through a thick cloud of vol-
canic ash from Mount Redoubt in
Anchorage, Alaska, causing all
four of its engines to fail. The
crew was able to restart its engines
after dropping to an altitude of
14,000 feet and safely landed the
plane. The ash caused more than
$80 (!) million in damage to the
aircraft but no lives were lost.
In June 1982 a London to Auck-
land British Airways Boeing 747
encountered an ash plume from
the erupting Mount Galunggung in
Java, Indonesia. At first the pilots
were unaware of exactly what had
happened.
A strange St Elmo's Fire-like
light had appeared on the cockpit
windscreen and sulphur-smelling
smoke started filling the passenger


SJust like the 70's notorious spy, Phil- ,.,
lip Agee, Americans in Bonaire can IsIl I CUMPMY
rely on the "1956 Treaty of Friend-
ship, Commerce and Navigation be- IA f
tween the Kingdom of the Netherlands
and the United States of America." Ex
-CIA agent Agee's notorious exploits
were the subject of his book, Inside the
Company: CL4 Diary. The book's appen-
dix listed the names of more than 250
CIA operatives, one of those agents was, .
according to former US President George
H.W. Bush, killed as a result. In 1977,
Agee fled to the Netherlands to avoid
prosecution. Once in the Netherlands,
Agee continued to fight deportation to
the US. He discovered that since he was a US citizen, he could
use the Treaty of Friendship to demand a hearing before the
Dutch equivalent of a US immigration court. But ultimately, the
Netherlands deported Agee, and later, the US stripped him of his
US passport.
Dutch and US residency Equivalence
If you're a US citizen, the treaty means you have the same right
to reside in the Dutch territories in the Caribbean as a European
Dutch citizen (A European Dutch citizen is someone born or
naturalized in the Netherlands.). This gives Americans in the
Netherlands Antilles more rights than other foreigners. It has not
been considered if the treaty would still apply once the BES Is-
lands are integrated with the Netherlands.
When the US and the Netherlands signed the Treaty of Friend-
ship, it gave citizens and businesses in each country reciprocal
rights in both countries. The idea was to encourage economic and
cultural relations between the US, the Netherlands and its territo-
ries.
In general, the terms of the treaty haven't been observed by
Antillean Immigration officials, with Americans usually being
considered in the same category as other foreigners. Its obser-
vance can have implications not only for the duration of non-
resident American visits, but also for rights for children born to
Americans in the Antilles, residency permits and social benefits.
While some of the treaty's provisions no longer apply in the
Netherlands, the treaty still applies to the Dutch Antilles and
Aruba.
Recently, a court in St. Maarten confirmed that the Treaty of
Friendship guarantees US citizens the same rights as European
Dutch citizens in the Dutch Caribbean territories. European
Dutch citizens may stay for six months at a time in the Dutch
Caribbean territories without applying for a residence permit.
The court declared that US citizens ought to have the same enti-
tlement. By Mark Nestmann (The Nestmann Group, Ltd.)
info@inestmann.com.


cabin. Then, within minutes, all
four engines failed. The plane
managed to glide sufficiently out
of the ash plume for three of the
four engines to restart. The air-
craft's captain said, "It was very
frightening, all the engines
stopped for 14 to 15 minutes. We
glided the aircraft about 80 nauti-


cal miles and went down from
37,000 feet to about 12,000 feet."
The Bonaire meetings and
events are to be rescheduled.

10The visit of Dutch care-
taker State Secretary of King-
dom Relations, Ank Bijleveld-
(Continued on page 6)


Table of Contents
This Week's Stories


I,-


s a 4S C U FIALr

SaE FW I C: !
Me be:Ameia Scey-o n -ra SCrt


WANT TO FEEL SAFERP

Si/iIUpm 5STTIS


*Transport of Money *Vehicle patrols
and Valuables *Burglar Alarms
*Private Investigations *Fire Alarm Systems


InBsns


Kaya Nikiboko Nord 37A, PO Box 225 Tel: (599) 717- 8125
Fax (599) 717- 6125 E-mail sss@bonairelive.com

Page 2


SCOOTER & BIKE
SALES & REPAIR
SPeugeot, Kymco
loekie, Giant
-- Gazelle Brands
Parts and accessories for
any brand scooter or bike
\ Bike Clothes for Everyone
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Sdo Across from INPO
,/ Open: 8:30-12:30, 2:00-5:30
I Owner Operated

freewieler@flamingotv.net


Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


I


I


Treaty of Friendship Netherlands-US 2
"After Party"to Open in Bonaire 3
RichterArt Open House 3
SGB Students' Carib Inn Mural 6
Jazz Guitarist many Moreira at Bonaire
Jazz Festival 9
Better Food For Better Kids 10
More Storage For Bonaire 11
Rincon Day Schedule 11
Windmills coming soon (cover) 13
Lionfish Galore 15
Hospitality Students to Italy 15
Picture YourselfWinner2009 16
500 Animals Sterilized Free 17

Departments
Flotsam & Jetsam 2
Bom On Bonaire (Mimra Soliana) 4
Sudoku Puzzle 7
Bonaire Voices (Sts. John and Paul) 7
Letters -Bat Mystery Solved? 7
Bonaire On Wheels-'Chevy Truck 9
Bon Qui #28- (Queens) 11
Whats Happening, Cruise Ship
Schedule 12
Reporter Masthead 12
Classifieds 13
NEW! Tide Table, Sun rise and set times,
Moon phase 13
Shopping & Service Guides 14
Panchito Kid's Comer 15
Body Talk (Women, Birth Control, HRT&
Yeast) 16
Picture Yourself--ji 16
Panchito Kid's ComerAnswers 17
Bon Qui Answer 17
Sudoku Solution 17
Bubbles-Do You Know? -Algae 18
Pet of the Week (Cai & Kitty Nora) 18
Sky Park (North Star) 19
The Stars have It 19

How to contact us
Letters to the Editor:
Reporter@bonairenews.com
Story tip or idea:
info@bonairenews.com
The Publisher:
George@bonairenews.com
Box 407, Bonaire,
Neth. Antilles.
Phone 790-8988
Phone 790-6518 / 786-6518
Available on-line at:
www.bonairereporter.com

Printed Every Fortnight,
On-line Every day, 24/7

Next edition printing on
May 4, 2010,

Story and Ad deadline:
May 1, 2010,12 noon











"After Party" Co
",After Party" is a hilariously
"A funny and sometimes poignant
play in Papiamentu (with Dutch subti-
tles via a beamer) about a group of
women, forever friends, who decide to
buy a big old beautiful house and live
together in their elder years. Their chil-
dren have grown up and their husbands
have passed away. The play opened to a
packed house at the Teatro Luna Blou in
Otrabanda in Curacao on March 21,
2009, and continued playing to packed
houses. It went on to tour in all the big
cities of Holland.
This is an outstanding piece of play-
writing by one of Bonaire's cultural
champions. Bonaire's Jackie Bernabela,
the director and co-author with Albert
Schoobaar of the play, says, "My girl
friends, whom I've known for years,
were my inspiration for this play."
Bernabela has directed plays in Bonaire
and in Holland, is a drama teacher and
has translated plays into Papiamentu for
local actors and audiences. "After Party"
was sponsored as part of Teatro Luna
Blou's Artists in Residence Program.
Jackie's girlfriends have all kept in
touch over the years and most of them
were in the front row of the theatre on
opening night, laughing their heads off as
they recognized the words and antics of
themselves and the others. "I put myself
into one of the characters too," said
Jackie, "the one who was always losing
her things."
The actresses playing the friends come


Jackie Bernabela portrait by Henk Roozendaal
from a group of extremely talented and
experienced actors in Curaqao. "They
were the Betty Davises and the Katherine
Hepburns of the 60s and 70s," declared
Jackie. They gave stellar performances -
perfect timing, talking over each other -
like real conversations in real life. Each
was comfortable in his or her role. This
same cast will be performing in Bonaire.
Sponsors are: Prince Bernard Cultural
Funds, Giro Bank and Kooijman Bon-
aire.
"After Party, a play in Papiamentu with
Dutch subtitles.
Performances on Saturday, Sunday or
Monday, May 1, 2, 3 in the auditorium
(Sala) at the SGB High School at 8 pm.
Tickets are NAf 25 and are available in
advance at SKAL (Bonaire Museum) or at
the door. For more information call
SKAL at 717-8868 and ask for Jackie
or Hubert Vis. L.D.


-j.lj


Bonaire, N. A. April 19,
2010
T he Richter Art Gallery
announced today that it
will be holding its first "Open
House" on Saturday, April 24,
2010, to introduce Bonaire's
art lovers to its newly remod- Gallery
eled space. OPEN
The Open House will take
place from 2 pm until 7 pm on 7 .
April 24th and in addition to a ."
range of fine art, will feature -
wine and snacks for those visit-
ing. -. rr' -
The Richter Art Gallery, lo- .' "' -- *


cated in Belnem, is owned and operated by
local Bonaire artists, Linda Richter and Jake
Richter and is located on the second floor of
a specially constructed extension built onto
their home.
The gallery features a variety of fine art
and unique works, all created by the Rich-
ters. Linda Richter specializes in fine oil
painting and has developed a special style
she refers to as "Nature Portraits." Linda
has won numerous awards and accolades
for her representations of the bright, color-
ful world around us. Linda has both original
oil paintings as well as limited edition prints
of her works for sale at the Richter Art Gal-
lery.
Jake Richter's experience as a nature pho-
tographer and journalist has been applied to
digital media using a process he describes
as "digital painting," where he uses his pho-
tos as a starting point to create images


which stir the imagination and soul. Limited
edition prints of Jake's works are also avail-
able at the gallery.
For those familiar with the works of the
Richters, there will be a number of new
recently created works on exhibition as
well.
The Richter Art Gallery is open regularly
Tuesday through Fridays, from 2 pm until
5:30 pm, and at other times by prearranged
appointment. To make an appointment to
visit the Richter Art Gallery, one only needs
to call or e-mail. The gallery's phone num-
ber is +599-7 17-4112 and e-mail address is
info@RichterArt.com.
The Richter Art Gallery is located at Kaya
R. Statius van Eps 17 (also known as the
"Road to Sorobon"), in the Belnem area of
Bonaire. More information about the Rich-
ter Art Gallery can also be found at http://
www.RichterArt.com. 0 Press release


S1058 m2

a e Oceanfront
By Owner Property

Bonaire.com Property_

Located in the neighborhood of Hato just a few steps north
of the Black Durgon Inn, two adjacent lots of long lease land offer
a total of 1058 square meters and a shore front 25 meters wide.
The natural coral beach is lined with mature coconut palms.
Existing structures include an older home known
as Ultimo Cas and a beach bungalow.


Contact: C. Sweetnam Mail : UC.CHER@BonaireLive corn
Phone : 717-8336 Price : Visit Website

www.4SaleByOwnerBonaire.com


Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


Open House

Saturday, April 24, 2010

2:00PM 7:00PM

at the Richter Art Gallery


Please join us atour irs t-ever Open House
fora few hours of wine, snacks, and fine art.
Featuring works ofart by Linda Richter and Jake Richter









Located in Belnem at Kaya R. Statius van Eps 17, on the Rood to Sorobon
Web: www.RichterArt.com E-Mail: inifoiRchrerArr.com Phone:717-4112

Regular Open Hours:Tuesdays-Fridays from 2:00pm to 5:30pm
Private appointments available

Please nore the Gj.Ilry located on the second Roo, accessible by a wide circu fOr srairse











bum mbr5mb fS. 2 1A MIrm Soiam


4T |was born in Nort di Sa-
I lina and when I was a
year and two months old, the
owners of Pension Jeta, Julieta
Hart and Juchi Nicolaas, took
me in as they had no children of
their own. I grew up here, in
Pension Jeta, and when I was 18
I got a baby boy, Ermilio. I was
working in the pension, cleaning
the rooms, and we also had a
little toko (shop) where I sold
sodas. I never lived with my
own mama. My love and affec-
tion are for Julieta and Juchi.
My words of love I cannot ex-
press to my own parents; they
belong forever to Julieta and
Juchi.
While I was growing up we
also had a kunuku at Kibra 'i
Montana. Every day we got up
early to take care of the animals:
the goats, the turkeys, the chick-
ens and the ducks. That's how
my love for animals was born.
When Julieta got older she
couldn't see very well anymore
and had difficulty walking so I
took care of her. I was working


in housekeeping at Sunset Beach
Hotel. In the meantime I had
two more children, Lindley and
Mirnalyn. Whenever I'd ask my
own mother to look after the
children she would tell me to
take my kids and get lost, but
Julieta and Juchi always took
care of my children with great
pleasure and love. Anytime I
needed something for my chil-
dren, they immediately bought it
and that's why my kids are
spoiled.
Then I met somebody and I
went to live with him in Antriol.
Lindley and Mimalyn came with
me, but Ermilio stayed with Juli-
eta and Juchi. With that boy-
friend I had another baby girl,
Francheska. But the relationship
didn't last a year and so I moved
back with the children to Pen-
sion Jeta.
Some time later I met someone
new and we all moved to a gov-
ernment house in Kaya Pueblo:
me and the children, all the dogs
and cats and goats, the Loras
and a flamingo. Seven years


"... My whole life is dedicated to the ani-
mals. I get very angry when I see somebody
hit their animal or when they throw stones at
it. Then I scream, 'Why are you doing that?'"


later we got married.
When we went to
live in Kaya Pueblo,
Julieta got sick and I
took care of her until
she passed away.
Juchi stayed behind,
all by himself, but
every day I went to
see him, help him
and I did whatever I
could do for him.
Then Juchi got
sick. He should have
gone to see a doctor,
but he didn't like
doctors and when he
had to be operated in
Curagao it was al-
ready too late. We
went to Curagao, but
he died there. He
went there alive and


he came back dead.
Then we all moved
to Pension Jeta which I had in-
herited from my 'parents.'
After Hurricane Lenny in
1999, Sunset Beach Hotel closed
down and I went to work at
Plaza Resort, also in housekeep-
ing." She smiles ;ir,,'ir111/ii i
"Asi es la vida... (that's life).
Everything went well except for
the relationship between me and
my husband. I was 35, 36 years
old. In the end we divorced.
Nowadays I'm still here in


Francheska and doggie Noris, Mirna Soliana and her kitty Lulu


Pension Jeta. I live with my son
Lindley, 'DJ Toad,' who was
recently elected the best DJ on
Bonaire. He is 21 years old. He
is famous! Yes he is! My daugh-
ter Mimalyn, who's 20, and her
little son Sarjiet moved back in
with me some months ago.
Mimalyn is still studying at
SBO and she also works at Ro-
cargo. Last year she participated
in the Mama Modelo contest and
was the first runner up.


Francheska is 16, almost 17 and
she's studying at SGB. My eld-
est son Ermilio lives in Holland
with his girlfriend and his
daughter Ermilia. My own fa-
ther, Papai, is 80 now and he
lives with me as well. I take care
of him and I go to the doctor in
Curagao with him.
I am working at the Wing
Cheung Supermarket and also as
a housekeeper for an American
(Continued on page 5)


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Tel. (305) 599-8866
Fax (305) 599-2808


International Freight (Car) BV
The ONLY company offering
direct weekly consolidation
services from Europe/Holland
to Bonaire
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Jupiterweg 1A (Ecopark)
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Tel 31-(0) 168-40-94 94
Fax 31-(0) 168-40 94 70


Page 4 Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


r


~..... ..~ ~,,,,~~, ....... ~ ~............~~ .~~....~ ..~.,


c
I
-
~


Page 4


Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010










Born on Bonaire (Continued from page 4)
lady and for a Makamba lady."
Mirna Soliana is a very strong
woman, a flamboyant and beautiful
character and in every way true to
herself But... above all she's Bon-
aire's one and only Dr. Doolittle,
because her life is all about ani-
mals. Her house, which is part of
Pension Jeta, is spotless, in spite of
the fact that it's home to a whole
bunch of animals who live together
in absolute and perfect harmony.
It's like a world within a world, a
glimpse ofparadise and a very
touching experience.
"I told you before that my love
for animals was born when I was
little. Now I have 15 dogs, seven
cats, two turtles, two land turtles,
20 goats, one Lora, one Prikichi
and two doves. In the morning I put
out water, bread and rice and I hit a


pot with a spoon or I clap my hands
and then they all come: the chu-
chubis, the mofis, the barika hel,
the chuchubi pretu, the trupial and
the doves. They fight and eat and
drink and bathe. I work for my ani-
mals; I get paid on Friday and that
same day all my money is gone, but
I get all the food for them. I get a
bag full of chicken skin every day
from Kentucky Fried Chicken. I fry
it for the dogs and mix it with rice
or funchi. Every two weeks I buy a
big bag of dog food for NAf 50 and
for the cats I buy a small bag of dry
food. I get the potato peels from
Peking Restaurant and overripe
fruits from Wing Cheung for the
goats, the turtles and the birds. The
men who own the yellow M&M
van also bring me dog and cat food
that's a bit outdated. And the turtles
eat the same food as Mirna!"


Mirna and friends at the beach


She laughs. "When I go to Curagao with my father
for him to see the doctor, I spend two hours at the pet
shop and I go loco, loco (crazy) because I want them
all. I go to the vet whenever it's necessary and all my
animals have been sterilized. Marjolijn, who works
with Jan, the vet in Nikiboko, has helped me to have all
my pets sterilized. The Animal Shelter helped me too.
They had the veterinarian in Kaminda Lagun sterilize
some of my cats; they help me with medicines and
sometimes with food as well.
And last year on Animal Day I won the contest or-
ganized by the Shelter for who took the best care of
their animals and I won one minute of free shopping at
Cultimara. I shopped for NAf 434, 29. Whoa!
Once I organized a big party on Animal Day. I sent
out the invitations and 25 people showed up with their
animals: goats wearing shirts, turtles with a ribbon,
every animal nicely dressed up and in the end each
animal got a little package containing a food bowl plus
food and a little stuffed animal to take home.
Every now and then people come to me with a puppy
which they don't want anymore. They ask me, 'Mirna,
do you want my puppy?' And I never say no. I tell
them 'bring it to me!' When I see an animal out on the
streets without a collar I take it home and take care of
it. My whole life is dedicated to the animals. I get very
angry when I see somebody hit their animal or when
they throw stones at it. Then I scream, 'Why are you
doing that?'
Almost every Sunday I go to the sea with the dogs
and my baby goat, Nero. We -15 dogs, a goat and I -
walk from Nort di Salina to Sunset Beach. The goat is
not a great swimmer, but he moves his legs in a certain
way so he stays afloat. My dogs will never bite a cat or
a goat and they never fight over food. They all know
which plate is theirs and they wait quietly for their turn.
They have to eat decently and behave, because they are
friends. When I'm at work they lay quietly outside, but
when I come home they start dancing chica, chica
chic!" She i.'./ her hips and roars with laughter.
"If I go out it's to Sunset with my dogs, and when I
sleep the cats keep me company in bed. When I am
sad, I sit here with my dogs and cats and talk to them
and make them coffee. And when I dance, they dance
with me.
There are lots of people on Bonaire who are good to
their animals and to those who aren't I want to say,
'Don't kill them, don't throw them in the mondi, bring
them to me.' I love animals; I feel a great and profound
love for animals and if they.
don't have an owner I will be
their mama."
U Story & photos by Greta
Kooistra


Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


Page 5











Flotsam and Jetsam (Conti. from page 2) islands and that he very much liked Rico and University


Schouten, to Bonaire and the
Antilles has been delayed due to
the closure of Amsterdam's Schi-
phol Airport.
In Bonaire, the State Secretary
had hoped to sign an agreement
with the Island Executive Coun-
cil about the division of tasks
between the Island Territory and
the Netherlands. Bonaire broke
off negotiations late June, 2009,
when the new Executive Council
took office. Bijleveld-Schouten's
spokesman said it wasn't sure
when the meeting with Bonaire
would take place, but in any case
it would be at a later date.

1)THE HAGUE-Queen's
Commissioner Henk Kamp is
positive that the BES islands,
Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba,
will be ready for their new status
as public entities of the Nether-
lands as scheduled. "We will
surely make this date," stated
Kamp on the Dutch radio program
One on the Day (EMn op de dag)
earlier this month. "We started on
January 1, 2009. Two years is
more than enough," he added.
The Commissioner said he ex-
pected the standard of living to
improve on the three islands after
their new status. "The standard of
living is already a lot better when
compared to other islands in the
Caribbean region, but there's al-
ways room for improvement.
We will work on that in the com-
ing years," he said. Kamp's three-
year contract ends December 31,
2011. Kamp, who lives in Bonaire,
said he would like to conclude his
task after the islands become part
of the Netherlands.
However, he didn't exclude the
possibility that his party, the liberal
democratic VVD party, apparently
experiencing a popular resurgence,
would ask him to return and be-
come a Minister if his party would
make it into the new Dutch cabi-
net. He referred to the job of Min-
ister as the "most beautiful job
there is," but added that he also
wanted to finish his work on the


living in Bonaire.

ISt. Maarten, Curaqao and
Aruba residents will no longer
have easy entry to Bonaire, Saba
and St. Eustatius when the latter
three islands become integrated
with Netherlands.
The same admittance regulations
that the Netherlands Antilles and
Aruba currently apply to Dutch
Europeans based on the Aruban
and Antillean Admittance and Ex-
pulsion law will become applicable
to Dutch citizens, even if they are
Antillean-born, living on Aruba,
Curagao and St. Maarten when
they want to enter the BES islands.

1Education officials are opti-
mistic as they report substan-
tially higher achievements at the
Foundation Based Education
(FBE) level on Bonaire, St.
Eustatius and Saba. Math and
reading achievements of children
in groups seven and eight in FBE
schools on all three islands have
improved considerably in the past
six months. The achievements of
students in group four are also on a
reasonable level. If schools are
able to maintain this level of aca-
demic increase, students will have
better chances in secondary educa-
tion.

lThe Government of the Neth-
erlands Antilles Department of
Environment and Nature Senior
Policy Advisor Paul Hoetjes re-
ports that the Caribbean is finally
granted special area status under
Marpol Annex V, meaning that
after May 1, 2011, no more gar-
bage may be dumped from ships
except organic waste under cer-
tain conditions. In the past it was
only plastic waste that was for-
bidden, but now all other gar-
bage is forbidden (also (paper,
dunnage, linings, metals).

IThe Meteorological Service of
the Netherlands Antilles and Aruba
(Met Office), in cooperation with
the US National Oceanic and At-
mospheric Administration
(NOAA), University of Puerto


of Hawaii Sea Level a
Centre (UHSLC),
will install a sea
level monitor sta-
tion on Curaqao to
help safeguard the
population on the
ABC islands in case
of a tsunami threat.
It is part of a net-
work of seismo-
graphs and sea-level
sensors to serve as
an early warning
system.
The project will
be financed entirely
by NOAA and local
officials will receive
the necessary train-
ing. In addition to
tsunamis, the system
can also serve to
monitor possible sea
surges caused by
hurricanes, for ex- SGB stude
ample. was officially
worked i
1Caretaker Dutch worked
Minister for Social
T. here are t
Affairs and Employ- he
ment, Piet Hein thepool whi
Donner, started his reaction of tea
visit to Bonaire, St. Keila Me
Eustatius and Saba
(BES islands) with a visit to Saba.
He will continue to Statia and Bon-
aire. The discussions will be built
on a number of decisions made
during his last November visit.
Pension AOV levels, minimum
wage including labor market
policies and programs after the
transition are to be resolved.
He did confirm that last time it
had been agreed that cost-of-living
indexing could be incorporated
into the base figures, as local rep-
resentatives made it clear that it
was important to factor this in to
improve living conditions, espe-
cially for pensioners.
He added that the new Caribbean
system would not be the same as
what is offered in the Netherlands.

1Insel Air has been told by
Curaqao Judge Spreeuwenberg
to correct two of the 12 allega-


'nts have been decorating a wall at Carib Inn and last week the wall
opened on Carib Inn owner Bruce Bowker's birthday. The students
on this wallfor a couple of months and the results are beautiful
It blends in nicely with the garden at Carib Inn.
wo more wall paintings that can be admired at Carib Inn: one near
'ch is the contest competitor, and one in the bathroom. Under the di-
icher Karine deWit, the students were Xiao Min Wu, Beverly Martis,
nsche, Farahnaz Cecilia, Jenny Agudelo and Chesron Granviel.


tions made by Insel Air Director
Edward Heerenveen and supervi-
sory board member Henry
"Boebsi" van der Kwast against
Dutch Antilles Express (DAE).
The judge believed two of Insel's
statements could not be substanti-
ated and ordered withdrawal of the
comments within 72 hours or face
a fine of NAf 10.000 per day for
non-compliance. The correction is
to appear in local newspapers.
"These (March 2010) allegations
of financial problems are not based
on concrete, verified data of DAE.
The statements on aircraft mainte-
nance are not confirmed by an
investigation by aviation authori-
ties," said the judge.

b'The rains of the last two
weeks broke the long drought in
Bonaire and caused an explosion
of green and tree blossoms. The


yellow blooms of the Kibracha tree
were more dramatic than the fabled
cherry blossoms of Washington,
DC. People who have been feed-
ing wild birds and feral animals
should continue to do so until the
plant and fruits that these animals
depend on are mature, perhaps up
to two months more.
In nearby Venezuela heavy
downpours swept away two people
and flooded homes in the central
part of the country .

IThe 2010 season will produce
an above-average eight hurri-
canes, four of them major, posing
a heightened threat to the area, the
Colorado State University hurri-
cane forecasting team predicted
last Wednesday, its second forecast
in four months for 2010.

(Continued on page 8)


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Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010





















13CF i WA I F? I A *

NfCIO ImC IE4S


SAINT JOHN AND SAINT PAUL FESTIVALS


Rincon artist Nochi Coffie in front of one of his paintings of a traditional Rincon home


T wo common festivals here on Bon-
aire are the Saint John Day, June 23
and 24, and Saint Paul Day, June 27 and
28, celebrations. Artist Nochi Coffie ex-
plains:
"The Saint John celebration starts at 9
o'clock at night on June 23 in Rincon in
front of Tropicana Bar with different mu-
sical groups performing. They follow a pre
-planned route to the Toko (grocery store)
Magdalena, KOS BON SO snack bar, Rose
Inn Terrace and last but not least my
house."
Nochi's real name is Juan (or John) G.N.
(Nochi) Coffie, and at his house they cele-
brate Saint John day in the original way,
with music and dancing and three ready-to-
light fires laid for the fire jumping.
"The musical groups continue visiting the
different houses in Rincon where a John or
Juan lives. This goes on until the next
morning, June 24, which is Saint John's
Day.
At 10 am the groups visit the foundation
for disabled people (F.K.P.D, Fundashon
Kuido pa Personanan Desabilitd) and the
COCARI Foundation (foundation for
elderly people in Rincon). In the afternoon
the celebrations will continue at the Oranje
Bar where the musical groups will eat and
drink. Later, after a good rest, they will visit
the Polar Bar and then finish the Saint John
celebration at the Rincon Community
Center where there is more fire jumping."
Juan (Nochi) Coffie (52) a Bonairean,
bom in Rincon, works at S.K.A.L. (Sekshon
Cultura, Arte i Lectura), the Culture, Art
and Lecture office, which coordinates local
and international cultural presentations. He
is an artist, a painter, composer of cultural
songs. He tells us more about the festivals.


"I'm coordinator of the Saint John and Saint
Paul Day celebrations and it's something I
really love and cherish. I celebrate the Saint
John festival every year at my own house.
The musical groups will visit houses
especially with people living there named
Juan, Juanita, Pablo, Pedro or Petricia.
The origin of these celebrations began
with our ancestors who used to work on the
plantations, on the sea or in other countries.
Around the times of celebration of Saint
John and Saint Paul Days those who were
abroad would come home to celebrate with
family and friends. They made up songs to
tell what they'd experienced while they
were working on the plantations, sailing or
working in other countries.
These festivals start with different
preparations: collecting wood for the fire
jumping, families preparing food and drink
for the visitors. At night everything starts
with serenades at the different houses. They
celebrated these festivals as part of their
identity, then afterwards they combined it
with the Catholic religious celebration. The


DO YOU SUDOKU?

To solve the puzzle, enter the
numbers 1 through 9 to the par-
tially filled in puzzle without re-
peating a number in any row, col-
umn or 3 x 3 region. Answer on
page 17.


J.
-


2 6
58 2
9 1 6
6 4
9 7
56 71 8
2 3
7462 3


Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


idea of the fire is more to call the rain and
the jumping is to liberate them from bad
spirits.
The celebrations continued until the next
day because nobody had to go back to work
in those times. It was a holiday for every
body, and nobody used to work like we do
today in our modem time. During these
festivals everything was for free and not
commercialized. Music was a way to bring
happiness and everybody gets to drink and
eat because everybody cooperates with
everything.
This is still a tradition in Rincon but not
like in the past. Although times have
changed these festivals have continued to
reflect the original style of the people. Not
everybody can stay up until late at night or
until the next day because they have to
work as the cost of living is getting higher.
Back then, when the festival celebrations
were over the people went back to work,
either on the plantation, on the sea or to the
country where they came from.
The Saint Paul Day Celebration on June
27 starts with music and songs by Elvin at
Toko Magdalena in Rincon, then continues
to the Galan Cicilia house, the Polar Bar,
and the homes of Pablo Sint Jago and
Patricia Frans. The next day, June 28th' the
celebration continues at the Rincon
Community Center, COCARI, Kas di
Hadrei (Cozy Comer), Kos Bon So and then
back to the Community Center as the
finishing point.
During these celebrations we can
experience the various talented cultural,
folkloric musicians and song writers,
especially our youth as they accompany the
adults. They get the opportunity for a better
future in our community. A suggestion is
that we work together with FUDECU
(Fundashon Deporte i Cultura) a
foundation for sport and culture, to create
more singers for our festivals like the
Bonairean Tumba, Simadan, Saint John and
Saint Paul festivals."
Mark the dates on your calendar and
enjoy the Saint John celebration on June
23rd and 24th and Saint Paul on June 27t
and 28. 0
Story & Photo by Siomara Albertus


Send your comments to
The Bonaire Reporter, P.O.
Box 407, Bonaire, or email
reporter @bonairenews.com.


Plants, Trees,

Tours and More
"Almost a solid hectare of growing
potted plants and trees. Thirty minute
tours. Bonaire born and
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Reasonable prices starting from
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cally assisted." Captain Don

Open from Friday thru Sunday and all
holidays. 10 am till 4 pm nonstop

Captain Don's Island Grower NV
103 Kaminda Lagun (road to Lagun)
(Look for the blue rock and dive
flag)
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Page 7


Bonairean Voices is sponsored by B We keep making things

B .3 Cconvenient for you!

M CB OGME With 5 branches and 10 ATMs located
S\.1\DLJRO & CURIE'S BANK.B H()O\ IREN.V. ...I r throughout the island and our
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Website:www-mcbbonaire.com* Emri info@mcbbonaire.com www.mcbb-home.com service anytime, any day, anywhere.


LettCers t,


o jEditor


BAT MYSTERY SOLVED?
Dear Editor,
I know one small reason why M.Coombs
is seeing fewer bats. They are visiting me.
(Reporter, April 9-23, 2010, Issue 7, page
8) Some months ago I saw a bat in my
kitchen eating a banana from my fruit bowl
in the kitchen. Every evening since I cut
bananas on a plate and leave them on my
kitchen island. They start arriving at 7:30
and by 10 pm I have a kitchen full of
swooping bats eating in flight but also sit-
ting on the bananas and eating. It is a very
beautiful sight and I have made many vid-
eos.
For many years I have cooked rice and
spaghetti for the birds and iguanas. With
all my leftovers and fruit they eat well
every lunchtime. I am very happy to hear
all the stories of people caring on Bonaire.
One reason why this is a fantastic place to
live.
Barbara v O.




-Ot 9 '














Flotsam & Jetsam (Continued from page 6)
Sensational Seas Two, a DVD grand
tour of the planet's watery realms includes
a slide show from one of Bonaire's own
photographers, Ellen Muller. The produc-
tion is a cooperative effort between film-
makers, musicians, graphic designers, writ-
ers and programmers all divers who do-
nated their skills and art to produce a spec-
tacular collection of underwater images for
the benefit of marine environmental causes.
"I know Ellen's work and how rare many
of her images from Bonaire are, so I was
thrilled when she agreed to contribute them
to the production," said Anna DeLoach, co-
producer of the DVD.

Storehouse Mangazina, the "Lock It
and Pocket" storage facility on Kaya Gob.
Debrot across from the north hotel row has


opened two new buildings. It of
nomical way to store everything
gear to SUVs.


ILarry Baillie, a pioneer in
east side boat diving, has a nei


Panga dive boat, the MAD 1, (pictured
above, that handles six to eight divers. His
new adventure, "Mad About Diving," will
take you north for a two-tank dive and bring
you to areas that are very seldom visited.
Private and custom charters are available.
Phone 717-5246 or 780-9156 for details and
reservations. Email:
larrvy larryswildsidediving.com

P Have you any comments about the
new Reporter feature, Kid's Corner? It's
a companion to the Panchito website
www.panchitobonaire.com which is a great
resource for anyone on Bonaire who has
youngsters.
Try the puzzle on page 15 to improve
your Papiamentu, even if you're not a
youngster.


fers an eco- The cruise ship season is winding
ng from dive down, to the relief of residents driving
downtown and to the dismay of the mer-
chants and tour guides who service the
cruise visitors. There are just four ship calls
MAD photo in the next two weeks. This has been Bon-
aire's busiest cruise ship season. The cruise
ship schedules can always be found on the
Happenings page (page 12 this week).

1 We have redesigned the traditional tide
tables to add information on sunrise, sun-
set and moon phase. The column has ap-
S peared in The Reporter from its Port Call
days. We invite comments. See page 13.

) Visit the Day of Health for the Bo-
nairean population, on April 24 at the
Bonaire Bonaire Basics facility on Kaya Korona.
w 26' Apex Health practitioners will be presenting a


variety of demonstrations. Entrance is free.
Directions or further information can be
obtained by calling 717-2458 or mailing
ron.sewell(Fadiamond-waters.com. See the
poster at the bottom of this page for addi-
tional information.

SBonaire's Classical Music Board will
present another of its outstanding and in-
spiring classical concerts on April 27th, at
8 pm in Cacique Hall at Plaza Resort.
This time four musicians will amaze you
with their talents. They are:
Alissa Margulis, a highly gifted
young violinist cited by Yuri Bashmet
as "one of the most promising violin-
ists of her generation." She is a prize-
winner of many competitions.
German Marcano playing the cello.
He is the brother of Bonaire's jazz
singer, Andreina Marcano, and ob-
tained his Bachelor of Music Degree
at the prestigious Surrey University,
England. He formerly occupied the
principal cello chair with the Sim6n
Bolivar Symphonic Orchestra.
Armand Simon born of Aruban par-
ents in the Netherlands. As a pianist,
he has performed in the Americas,
Europe and the US. In 2006 Simon
was asked to perform for Queen
Beatrix of the Netherlands.
And the prize winner of the piano
competition Aruba, currently under-
way, will also be there
See the poster on page 15 or go to
www.classicalmusicbonaire.com for more
details. Get tickets early. This will be an-
other sellout.


0 For an exceptional Papiamentu-
language experience (with Dutch subti-
tles) be sure to attend the play "After
Party" at the SGB High School on one of
the three nights of the performances, May
1,2 or 3. See story on page 3.

Happy coincidence? Last Friday, April
16, Green Label Garden Center cele-
brated three birthdays: Owner Ap and two
of his employee colleagues, Luis and Rob.
A big BBQ was organized to celebrate.
Happy birthday, gentlemen.

Join in a unique musical entertain-
ment experience on Sunday, May 2nd at
the first "Shut Up & Listen" concert
featuring the vivacious and talented
Becky Alter, a frequent performer on
Bonaire. The concert series aims to let
the audience focus on the singer without
the distractions presented in a typical bar
scene performance. See the poster on page
18 for details.

I Here's a Special for Reporter
readers: if you are a first time diner at
Bistro de Paris present this newspaper
and receive free wine, beer or soft drink
with your lunch or dinner. See the Bistro
ad on page 10.

1 Need news between issues of The Re-
porter? "Raw News" is available as it
happens on the bonairereporter.com web-
site. And it's still free!

1 Don't forget to tell our advertisers, "I
heard about you in The Reporter. "E
G./L. D.


You are cordially invited to attend the Bonaire
contribution to
World Tal Chl Qigong Day


Saturday:24 April 2010
starting :8.00 am till 12.00 pm.



Mrs Marugia Janga, Commissioner for Health,
has kindly agreed to conmend
World Tai Cii Qigong Day, to the citizens of
Bonaire and will open the event.


a a
Bonaire's Largest and Best Stocked supermarket

Always: Fresh Fruit, Vegetables,

Dairy, Bread and Meat


Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


Page 8

















Jan Cecilia from Rincon and his Golden Chevrolet Truck
The 68th of a series of Bonaire Reporter articles by J@n Brouwer, featuring some ofBon-
aire's interesting vehicles that are "on wheels." On course for 100+


Rincon/
Bonaire -

So it was
on one
of those clear
and quiet
days in the
second part of
the month of
April that I
drove my
Bonairean
blue four-
stroke, off-
road motorcy-
cle over the
narrow road
along the
leeward coast


in the direc-
tion of the ruins of the manor house of Kar-
pata.
The vision over the sea was bright and clear
and the plants and trees were showing their
light green and fresh leaves. Almost all naked
flowering kibrahacha trees showed their bright
yellow blossoms.(Kibrahacha is Papiamentu
for: break the axe, so called because of the
strength of the wood of the tree./jb) Some huge
ponds on and along the road were already
overfilled with fallen flowers from the trees.
There was no cruise ship today and people
seemed to have forgotten the beauty of the
local nature. I passed the manor of Karpata and
drove towards Gotomeer.
I stopped and parked the big thumper along
the road to take some photographs of a group
of flamingos. They were as close as 20 feet
from me and my motor bicycle. Luckily there
was already more water in the lake due to the
very heavy rainfall. Two weeks ago the chil-
dren from Tera Kora were playing on the un-
paved roads, protecting themselves against the
dust with handkerchiefs bound around their
mouth. Now nature was screaming out life
because of the abundance of rainfall.

I restarted the engine and drove in towards
the kunuku (famn//b) of Mr. Cecilia. The gate
was closed. Two rows of old blue and yellow
license plates were mounted on the used elec-
tricity poles that hold the gate. No activity, no
noises. Just the sound of birds and growing
green.

I drove in the direction of Rincon and passed
Dos Pos. Then I arrived at the house of the
Cecilia family. I had not made any appoint-
ment, but the car was there. Mr. Cecilia's
spouse informed me that her husband just left
to his kunuku. He'd passed me in his neutral
white vehicle, but I did not recognize the car.
So Mrs. Cecilia and I had a little talk. I had
met her husband before and she had already
been informed by him about my visit one day.
I asked for permission to shoot some photo-
graphs.

After a little time Julien Cecilia returned. We
shook hands and he immediately started talk-
ing about his truck. Mr. Cecilia, better known
as "Jan," has owned the car for ages now. It is
a Chevrolet, built by the General Motors Cor-
poration, produced in 1968. He opens the bon-
net. There is a huge, but simple, six-cylinder,
in-line overhead valve engine mounted on the
Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


I-liupleLn irAr khne toit (hen-


stiff ladder chassis.
After some 40 years Jan has a little cooling
problem caused by the radiator now. This is
why he drove the white anonymous car to his
"rancho." The problem has to be cured very
quickly because Jan really needs his truck.
Every day he starts it, drives it over the hill in
the direction of the Gotomeer, stops at Dos
Pos, fills the huge empty barrels in the back of
his truck with deep well water and drives it to
his rancho to quench the thirst of his herd of
goats and all the chickens.

The Chevrolet truck is fitted with an impres-
sive Bonairean-made metal "roof rack." In the
bed there is a thick layer of sheet metal to
carry the heavy water barrels. There is no lux-
ury at all. No air conditioning for this Rincon
car, nothing but the absolutely necessary ca-
bles and wires for ignition and lights. The
cabin is not that water tight any more, but who
cares. As long as the engine runs that is fine
with Jan.

Mr. Cecilia is a happy and a lucky man. He
was born on Bonaire, in Rincon. So he is a real
Rincohero and he is proud of it. His house,
situated along the road from Rincon to the
Goto Lake, is built in front of the house where
he was born.
Mr. Cecilia and his wife are retired now. The
kids have grown up. It is just the two of them
and the easy country life. And the six-cylinder
Chevrolet Custom fits perfectly into this life
style. Let's hope Mr. and Mrs. Cecilia and
their truck will stay together for a lot more
decades more.

The Chevrolet (GMC) company produced its
first pick up truck way back in 1924. Jan's
gold sprayed full-size pick up truck was pro-
duced in 1968. It is a so- called single cabin,
long-bed truck. The Chevrolet Custom is a C-
model. C-model stands for "conventional,"
which means: two-wheel drive, as K-model
stands for four-wheel drive. The power is sup-
plied by a straight six, measuring 250 or 292
cubic inches, which stands for 4.1 or 4.8 liters.
Jan and I just do not know
exactly and we do not care.
As long as the engine enables
the truck to carry the barrels
with well water from Dos Pos
to the rancho that is fine with
us. Story & photo by J@n
Brouwer


JtAas fioSwm vhLm&w7s


Jazz guitarist and vocalist
Manny Moreira will perform
the main act on Friday, 28 May, dur-
ing the 2010 Bonaire Heineken Jazz
Festival. Moreira has often been called
the US' Jazz Ambassador, even though
he was born to Brazilian parents just 10
hours after they arrived in the US.
Some of the artists and musicians with
whom he has performed and/or recorded
include: Gerry Mulligan, Bucky Pizza-
relli, Ron Carter, Phil Woods, Eliie Go-
mez, Gil Goldstein, Grady Tate, Michel
Petruciani, Gilberto Gil, Will Lee, Ear-
tha Kitt, The Temptations, Helen
Reddy, Jane Duboc and Johnny Ven-
tura.
Moreira's performance on Bonaire
can be seen on Friday, 28 May at the
Plaza Resort Tipsy Seagull. After the
Plaza concert is over there will be a jam
session at Sense Restaurant, across the
street from Plaza.
The Jazz Festival will open Thurs-
day night, 27 May, at Fort Orange
with a night of Jazz and Poetry and
then on Saturday night there will be a
stellar concert with jazz trumpeter
Arturo Sandaval. There will be a
Sunday Jazz Brunch at Divi Flamingo
Hotel on May 30.

2010 Bonaire Heineken Jazz
Festival Schedule
Thursday, 27 May: Jazz and Poetry
with Kafia Brabu, Merietza Haak-
mat and Henk van Twillert and Hans
van Schie at Fort Oranje
Friday, 28 May: Concert staring


Manny Moreira along with Joke Bruijs
and Frits Landesbergen and Angelo's
New Generation Dancers at Plaza Re-
sort Tipsy Seagull followed by late
night jam session at Sense Restaurant at
23:30
Saturday, 29 May: Concert starring
Arturo Sandoval with the Silver Bullet
Steel band and BEKU at Plaza Resort
Tipsy Seagull, followed by late night
jam session at Sense Restaurant at 23:30
Sunday, 30 May: Brunch jam ses-
sion with many of the musicians at Divi
Flamingo Hotel

For more information about the festi-
val visit www.bonairejazz.com. U
Press release


Join us on Earth Dayi


Date: 24h of April 2010


Meeting place : Jong Bonaire
Bus leaves at 7:15 am
Return : 12:30 pm


ST B offers drinks so just bring your container



hr-IMm mM: 717-.HM

Page 9


rmob~s0












Betr Food or Beter


"HT healthy Food" was the focus of
l Wednesday April 7's fun-filled
workshop at our Public Library. The event,
filled to capacity, and sponsored by "Better
Food For Better Kids" foundation and Bib-
lioteka Publiko, was a great success.

The children (aged 6-12 ) were fascinated
as Chef Patrice Rannou of Bistro de Paris
showed them how to prepare fruit shish
kabobs on a skewer.
Artist Janice Huckaby contributed paints
and a beautiful hand painted flowerpot that
served as an inspiration for the children
when they each painted their own terra cotta
pot for veggie growing.
Healthy food tasting was next. Manager
Sara Matera from Divi Flamingo Beach
Resort sponsored the first dish by Chef
Amin Darmaoen: deliciously prepared fish
with bell peppers. All of the kids ate the fish
although some veggies were left behind.
Next up for tasting was a wonderful Bo-
nairean chicken stew with fresh vegetables
made by volunteer Glenda Pikerie. It was a
very popular recipe since most kids ate eve-
rything and some asked for a second and
even a third portion. The absolute favorite
was the all-natural cake made with un-
bleached flour, cocoa, brown sugar, honey,
yoghurt, egg and a bit of olive oil made by
Lola of Capriccio's. In combination with
homemade whipped cream made with
brown sugar this recipe received the most
gold stars from the kids.
After the painted pots had dried, Mieke
and John Le Noble donated seeds and time
to show the kids how to sow the seeds.
Every child went home with his or her own
decorated plantar-pot and newly planted
seeds.


----U


Laraine Abbey-Katzev, founder of
"Better Food For Better Kids," is a pro-
fessional nurse and is a Master's Degree
nutritionist. The foundation's mission is to
inspire and motivate Bonaireans to re-
turn to healthier eating with natural
whole-foods meals and to create healthy
school meal programs to serve nutritious
meals to all students through the schools.
Laraine says we need to eat more veggies,
fruits and whole grains. We must reduce the
amounts of sugar, white flour, and deep
fried foods and avoid preservatives and arti-
ficial colors and flavors. These products can
cause serious physical, behavioral and learn-
ing problems. Laraine continues, "People
have to become conscious of what they are


Learning Eating Habits
For Improved Nutrition


Bistro de Paris ChefOwner Patrice Rannou demonstratesfoodpreparation
Bistro de Paris Chef/Owner Patrice Rannou demonstrates food preparation


eating. It does not mean you can never have
soda pop, candy, chips, cake or pastechi, but
these must be once in a while snacks, not
everyday meals. Fried foods, white flour,
and sugar are very low in nutrients and be-
cause nutrients are the fuel of health, we
have to make sure to eat more of the healthy
stuff. Often enough there are good alterna-
tives for snacks. Be careful with 'light' or
diet products though. Good fats are impor-
tant for health like avocado, nuts and seeds.
Diet sweeteners are chemicals that are also
causing many health problems."
This fun filled afternoon was made possi-
ble by "Better Food For Better Kids." We
also received a helping hand from: Green
Label Garden Center and It Rains Fishes.


The next "Healthy Food" workshop will
be aimed at teenagers. If you are interested
in this subject or the workshops please con-
tact Laraine Abbey-Katzev at:
info(2tbetterfoodforbetterkids.com or Sharon
Bol at sharon(Abiebbonaire.com. 0 Story &
photos by BFFBC Foundation


ILE....... ..m......m.....m.


AI Fresc
Between
One street
Re
inf
rOp


o or Air Conditioned Dining
n Downtown and Hotel Row
inland-Kaya Gob. Debrot 46
reservations: 717-7070
fo@bistrodeparis.com
)en Monday -Saturday


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PIEA RLCGlFTS AN -FASHIOIN
www. bestpearlsbonaire.com
MaLn Sneer Kays Crdial 32. Bonrua Teld: 796 7481


Paradise






FUL, DIGITAL SERVICIEIS
FUJI MINI-LAB
KODAK & FUJI FILM
SLIDES, E-6 PROCESSING
PASSPORT PHOTOS
BATTERIES, CAMERAS
FRAMES, PHOTO AL-
BUMS

Les Galeries Shopping Center
Bordering the parking lot) 717
5890


Page 10


I you JUns-






Antllean ne Company


1 09-660-739

Antillean Wine Company
(699) 09-660-7539
Fax (5991 717-2950
m" wine@antilleanwine.com


Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


AIX f f CI
C o z y B o 11 --l


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MORE STORAGE FOR BONAIRE



S.- I


This is not an artist's rendition but an actual photo of the
Storehouse-Mangazina Self Storage facility


Response to the first phase of The
Storehouse-Mangazina Self Stor-
age facility on Kaya Debrot, opposite
"Hotel Row" has been gratifying. The
first building with 55 available units was
full within four months of opening. With
two more buildings completed on April
1, there are an additional 91 units to of-
fer. The most rewarding fact is that 32%
of its clients are Bonairean, 28% are local
businesses and another 19% are Bonaire
residents.
The Storehouse's goal in establishing a
business has always been to provide a
service that the people of the island could
use, and they have accomplished that.
In addition to serving the local popula-
tion's needs, they also offer a great ser-
vice for frequent tourists and part time
residents, who comprise 21% of their
clientele. Small closet-size units are
available to store dive gear, bicycles and
small items while the large units are per-


fect for storing a truck or car while peo-
ple are off island. The owners say that
they appreciate the community support
and look forward to continuing to serve
the island's needs. They will be adding a
new access control system in May which
will enhance monitoring capability and
allow clients greater flexibility in the
hours they will have access to their units.
The entrance to the facility is at Kaya
Gob. N Debrot 124B, diagonally across
from the WEB power plant. Call (599)
700-1753 or email
info @bonaireselfstorage.com. Press
release


T"1i : WULIIUIIVUOI
TIGASINA
STORING EVERYTHING UNDER THE SUN


*Stop the silent destruction of y


Termite Treatment *
Fleas & Tick's *
Plant Treatment *
Ant Treatment *


^K~ff^f 11 f MM fy^TMM"m'rI^B
mo CnRn..BtYuCantHie


Now Selng:
O h_ Gre en

Orchids 'abI


n this 22nd annual Rincon Day,
Friday, April 30, people of the
town of Rincon turn back the clock and
show us what Bonaire was in years gone
by. This event is so much fun that fellow
Antilleans come from the other islands,
costumed and ready to perform and join
the parade. Everyone strolls the streets,
stopping for a drink, a snack or a chat.
Music is everywhere. All ages feel part of
the action and there are smiles all over,
even from the hard working stand holders
who always have time to stop and visit.
There will be local music, dancing, a pa-
rade, food, historical displays and a
friendly and lively ambiance. Rincon is
the oldest town in Bonaire and proudly
emphasizes its history and culture, even
sporting its own flag.
General Schedule
The night before, Thursday, April 29,
between 4 and 7 pm the Children's Pa-
rade in the streets of the town. After-
wards, enjoy local musical groups playing
krioyo music.
Friday, April 30
Playa to Rincon 17 k Run, Main spon-
sor Maduro & Curiels Bank Bonaire. Start
at Kralendijk Stadium, Start Times: Speed
walk & 50+ Race at 6 am. Road Race and
Estafette Teams at 6:30 am. Finish at
Rose Inn, Rincon. Sign up at the Stadium
or call Richard Pietersz (Comcabon) 780-
7225 or 717-862
8 am- Mass at the Catholic Church,
Rincon
1O-11am Official opening at the
Plaza Commerce. During the day there
will be entertainment and activities non-
stop on five different stages around the
town. Stands will sell local food and
drinks.
Between 3-4 pm, there will be an Old
Time Parade with groups from the island
and abroad, singing and dancing.
After 5pm Simidan Parade every-
one invited to join
Entertainment during the day will fea-
ture different musical and dancing groups
from Bonaire, Curagao and Aruba. From
Bonaire: Foyan Boyz, Rincon Krioyo,
Watapana, Tutti Frutti. From Curagao and
Aruba: Rincon Boys, Karabela, Grupo
Komper, Grupo Betico, Dancing Grupo
Kristal, Fashion Dancers and St. Cruz
Folklore Dance Group.
See you there! U Press release/L.D.


BonQuiz #28
A SPECIAL PLACE


his particular bench near the down-
town waterfront commemorates
and gives thanks to a special woman in
the history of the Netherlands Antilles and
the Netherlands. The plaque in the photo
is attached to the bench..
She was born in 1880 and died in 1962.
When her father, King Willem the Third,
died in 1890, she was too young to take
the throne, and so her mother acted as
Regent for her until 1898.
Her 50-year reign took her through two
World Wars, with the Dutch Government
working in exile in London during WWII,
and the decolonization of the Dutch colo-
nial empire in Indonesia. She abdicated in
1948.
Seafarers leaving or arriving on Bonaire
would be greeted here by their family
members who would sit and wave to them
as they came and went from Kralendijk.

Q) What is the name of
this person after whom this
bench is named?
Q) What is the name of the
Queen who followed her?


Answer on page 17



BonQuiz appears
regularly in The Re-
....
porter. It's prepared by
Christie Dovale of
Island Tours. To ar-
range a tour, contact
her via her website:
IslandToursBonaire.com Phone 717-
4435 or 795-3456
Email: christiedovale@,hotmail.com.


Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


PROFESSIONAL
ST CONTROL N V
Aruba Bonalre Curac


Page 11


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page 12


Rooi Lamoenchi Kunuku Park
Tours $21 (includes tax). Discounts for
residents and local people. Tel. 717-
8489, 540-9800.
Parke Publico children's play-
ground open every day into the cooler
evening hours.
Saturday
* Rincon Marsh-6 am-2 pm.
Enjoy a Bonairean breakfast while you
shop, fresh fruits and vegetables, gifts,
local sweets, snacks, arts, handicrafts,
candles, incense, drinks, music. Big
March first Saturday of the month-
www.infobonaire. com/rincon.
* Wine Tasting at Antillean Wine
Company's warehouse on Kaya Indus-
tria, second Saturday of the month, 7-
9 pm. Snacks and tasting of six wines
for $10 (NAf17,50) per person. Tel. 560
-7539.
Soldachi Tours-See the real
Bonaire and be transported back in time.
Learn about the history, culture and na-
ture by Bonaireans from Rincon. Call
Maria Koeks for more information-796
-7870.
Monday
* Soldachi Tours of Rincon, the
heart of Bonaire, 9 am-noon. $20-Call
Maria, 717-6435-best island tour value
* Meet the Captain Night at Cap-
tain Don's Habitat Bar- Get up close
and personal with Bonaire's dive pio-
neer. The Captain's will autograph your
copy of his newest book Reef Windows.

Friday
* Harbour Village Tennis, Social
Round Robin 7-10 pm. $10 per person.
Cash bar. All invited. Call Elisabeth Vos at
565-5225

FREE SLIDE/VIDEO SHOWS
Sunday- Creature Feature- John and
Suzie Wall of Buddy's Digital photo
center present a multimedia slide presen-
tation about Buddy's House Reef pool
bar Buddy Dive, 6:30-7 pm, 717-5080
Monday-Dee Scarr's Touch the Sea
Slide Presentation, Capt. Don's Habi-
tat, 8:30 pm. 717-8529
Tuesday-- Bonaire Land and Ocean
presentation by Fish-Eye Photo staff,
7pm on the big screen inside the Sunset
Bar and Grill at Den Laman Condos.
Wednesday Sea Turtle Conserva-
tion Bonaire (STCB) presents an in-
formative slide show: Sea Turtles of
Bonaire, at 7pm -every 2nd and 4th
Wednesday at Bruce Bowker's Carib
Inn (717-8819)


BONAIRE'S TRADITIONS
Kas Krioyo Rincon-Step into Bonaire's


April 27,
Tuesday 2010 Ocean Dream 0800-1600 1422
Thurs- April 29,
day 2010 Caribbean Princess 1100-1900 3100
May 3,
Monday 2010 Sea Princess 1200-1900 2016


past in this venerable old home that has been
restored and furnished so it appears the family
has just stepped out. Local ladies will tell you
the story. Open Monday thru Friday, 9-12, 2-
4. Weekends by appointment. Call 717-2445.
Mangasina di Rei, Rincon. Enjoy the view
from "The King's Storehouse." Learn about
Bonaire's culture. Visit homes from the 17th
century. Daily. Call 717-4060/ 790-2018
Bonaire Museum on Kaya J. v.d. Ree, be-
hind the Catholic Church in town. Open
weekdays from 8 am-noon, 1:30-5 pm. Tel.
717-8868
Washington-Slagbaai National Park,
Museum and Visitors' Center. Open
daily 8 am-5 pm. Closed on December
25th. and January 1st. Call 788 9015
or 796 -5681
CLUBS and MEETINGS
AA meetings -every Wednesday at
7pm. Phone: 786-4651 or 786-7971
Al-Anon meetings every Monday
evening at 7 pm. Call 790-7272
Bridge Club Wednesdays, 7:15
pm- All levels, NAf2,50, call Renata
at 796-5591 to find out the evening's
location.
Darts Club plays every other Sunday
at City Cafe. Registration at 4, games at
5. Tel. 717-2950, 560-7539.

The Hash House Harriers running
and walking club meets every second
Wednesday for a one hour walk
throughout Bonaire. The location
changes each week. The contact number
is 700-4361

JCI First Wednesday of the Month-
Junior Chamber International Bonaire
(JCI Bonaire, formerly known as Bon-
aire Jaycees) meets at the ABVO build-
ing, Kaminda Jato Baco 36 from 7:30 to
9:30 pm. Everyone is welcome. Contact:
Renata Domacass6 516-4252.

Kiwanis Club meets at APNA Plaza,
Kaya International, every other Tues-
day, 7 pm. Tel. 717-5595, Jeannette
Rodriguez.
Lions Club meets every 2nd and 4th
Thursday of the month at 8 pm at Kaya
Sabana #1. All Lions welcome. For
more information call 510-0710.

Rotary lunch meetings Wednesdays, 12
noon-2 pm Divi Flamingo Beach Re-
sort upstairs in Peter Hughes meeting
room above the dive shop. All Rotarians
welcome. Tel. 717-2066

Toastmasters Club meets every two
weeks. For more information call Cru-
sita de Palm at 786-3827 or Lucia Marti-
nez Beck, at 786-2953.


Who's Who on The Bonaire Reporter
Take The Reporter Home-1-year subscription: By mail to US $70; By mail to
Europe $150. By Internet, Free (asking a $35 donation.) For information about
subscriptions, stories or advertising in The Bonaire Reporter, PO Box 407,
Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles; phone (599) 790-6518, 786-6125, E-mail:
info@bonairereporter.com
The Bonaire Reporter, George DeSalvo, Publisher. Laura DeSalvo, Editor in
Chief. Address: P. O. Box 407, Bonaire, Neth. Antilles. Available on-line at:
www.bonairereporter.com Published every two weeks
Reporters: Siomara Albertus, Stephanie Bennett, BFFBC Foundation, J@n
Brouwer, Kelsey Burlingame, Christie Dovale, Johannetta Gordijn, Jack Hork-
heimer, Greta Kooistra, Jane Madden, Mark Nestmann, Panchito, Michael Thies-
sen.
Unattributed photos are by the editor or publisher.
Distribution: Yuchi Molina (Rincon), Elisabeth Silberie & Georgina Sanchez
(Playa), Divi-Divi Airline
Housekeeping: JRA. Printed by: DeStad Drukkerij, Curaqao

Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


CHURCH SERVICES

Protestant Congregation of Bonaire:
Kralendijk, Wilhelminaplein. In Papia-
mentu, Dutch, English, Sundays, 10 am.
Rincon, Kaya C.D. Crestian, in Papia-
mentu, Sundays, 8:30 am.
Children's club, Saturdays, 5 pm, in
Kralendijk
Sunday School, Sundays, 4 pm, in Rin-
con. Bible Study and Prayer meetings,
Thursday, at 8 pm, Kralendijk.
New Apostolic Church: Centro di
Bario Nord Salifia, Sundays, 10 am.
Services in Dutch. 700-0379.
International Bible Church of Bon-
aire, at SGB High School auditorium
(Kaya Frater Odulfinus, off Kaya
Korona.) Sunday services in English at
9 am; Sunday evening prayer meeting at
Pastor's home, 7 pm. Friday, 6 to 8 pm,
Light & Life Club, children 5 to 12
yrs. Tel. 717-8332.
Catholic: San Bernardus in Kralendijk
- Services, Sunday at 8 am and 7 pm in
Papiamentu, 717-8304.
Our Lady ofCoromoto in Antriol, Sat-
urday at 6 pm in English. Mass in Papia-
mentu on Sunday at 9 am and 6 pm. 717
-4211.
Assembly of God (Asemblea di Dios):
Kaya Triton (Den Cheffi). In English,
Dutch & Papiamentu on Sunday at 10
am. Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30
pm. 717-2194
Ministerio di Kristu Hesus Services
Sunday mornings at 10 am at Jong Bonaire
Youth Center in English, Dutch and Papia-
mentu. Preaching the full gospel. Contact:
786-2557.

Prayer and Intercession Church, in
English. A full Gospel Church located
temporarily at Kaya Alexandrit # 20,
Santa Barbara, Republiek. Services are
held on Sunday mornings from 10am
until 11:30am. Bible studies in English
are on Monday nights from 7 to 8 pm.
Contact: 717-3322

The Church of Jesus Christ of Lat-
ter-day Saints: Kaya Sabana #26, Sun-
days: 9 am Sacrament Ser-
vices (Translation to English and
Papiamentu upon request) 10:20 Sun-
day School, 11:15 RS/YM/YW/PH
Primary held from 10:20-12 noon Visi-
tors Welcome: Call 701-9522 for Infor-
mation

Send event info to:
The Bonaire Reporter
reporter@bonairenews.com
Tel:790-6518, 786-6125



















IS YOUR HOUSE NEW TO
YOU?
S Make it more livable
from the start.

FENG SHUI CONSULTATIONS
Also interior or exterior design advice,
clearings, blessings, energy, healing,
China-trained. Experienced. Inexpensive.
Call Donna at 795-9332.


S FELMAR
Cleaning Services
a Apartments, Hotels,
Houses, Offices & More.
Efficient Work,
s --' Good References.
Tel. 786-0019

Bonaire Images
Elegant greeting cards and beautiful
boxed note cards are now available at Chat
-N-Browse next to Lover's Ice Cream and
Sand Dollar Grocery. Photography by
Shelly Craig www.bonaireimages.com

For Quality House
and Office Cleaning
CALL JRA
Serving Bonaire for more
than 15 years
Honest, Reliable, Efficient,
Thorough, Low rates, Ref-
erences. One time or many
Phone 785-9041 ... and relax.

LUNCH TO GO
Starting from NAf6,50 per meal.
Call CHINA NOBO 717-8981.
Web site:
www.chinanobobonaire.com


Zapataria Rincon
Shoe and Purse Repair
Kaya Grandi 36


flOTD OR
BON lAr RE
DO SOMETHING DIFFERENT
KAYAKING CAVING CLIMBING RAPPELLING
ABSEILEN MOUNTAIN BIKING NATIONAL
PARK TOURS ISLAND TOURS BIRDWATCHING
Tel (599) 791-6272 785-6272
hanss@outdoorbonaire.com
],II..r.ouldoorbonaire.com

Desiree Seaver
Haircuts
Yoga
Bonaire Salt products
Jewelry
Arts & Things
+599 786-6416
A Place For You info@aplaceforyoubonaire co

B Does your English need a little
"polishing" for your work in the
tourist industry? Call 788-7919 for
help with conversational English.

Property Services Bonaire B.V. Taking
care of your properties (while you are off
island). Email for information and prices:
property servicesbonaire(Tahotmail.com

JANART GALLERY
Kaya Gloria 7, Bonaire Local Art, Art
Supplies, Framing, and Art Classes. Open
Tu.-We.-Th. & Sat 10 am- 5 pm Friday 1- 7
pm; or phone 717-5246 for appt.


Living Accommodations

FOR RENT 2 bedroom apartment.
Great location Abraham Blvd. NAf
1350/ month long term. Laundry facil-
ity on premises. 788-3837

For long term rental, furnished one
bedroom apartment in Playa, avail-
able immediately, call: 788-7600

For rent at Hato, apartment max
2 persons. Free. Minimum stay 4
months. No airco, no pets allowed.
Inclusive; gas/water/electricity/
interet/linen/selibon/fumished/garden/
parking place/terrace/TV connection
Rent per month ALL IN NAf 1150,-
-.own entrance. Deposit NAf 1150,--
Call 717 2529 or 796 2529
-------------------------------------
At Hato for rent studio max 1 per-
son. Free from 15 April. Minimum
stay 4 months. Inclusive,, water, elec-
tricity, internet & tv connec-
tion, linen, Selibon, furnished, gar-
den, parking area, private terrace, no
pets, no airco allowed. Rent NAf 750,-
Call 717 2529 or 796 2529

MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE Telescope & UW
Video System: Meade 90mm ETX
series with Tripod, 2 cases, lots of eye-
pieces, and control software NAf
500
Light & Motion Mako Housing with
Pelican Case, lights, external monitor,
LCD back, Sony PC-100 video camera
- NAf 800. Contact Jake at 717-4112
or info@irichterart.com

For Sale: Scooter Parts for Gilera,
Runner, Aprela, Honda, Yamaha and
Peugeot. Call 560-3734, Curacao

For Sale: Pinball Machine Jokerz
- NAF 595 or best offer. Over NAF
1500 invested in new circuit boards,
parts etc. Needs finishing up with
some wiring etc. Call 717-8819 8 am
to 5 pm

For Sale: Brand new Haynes Re-
pair Manual Jeep Wrangler 1987
thru 2003, all models: Ang 50,00. Call
796-3637 or email-
digitalisl956@hotmail.com/

For Sale: Old book in Dutch lan-
guage: "Oude bouwwerken in de Ned-
erlandse Antillen, [1968]. 50 pages:
Ang 15,00.
Spare wheel for a Toyota Hilux:
Ang 50,00. Call 796-3637 or email
digitalisl956@hotmail.com/

WANTED
Young woman, mature, responsi-
ble, single with a regular work, two
years in the island is looking for a
house to take care for long term,
one year experience in this field.
Tel 788-3423


Bonaire Reporter Classifieds-Are still free
Got something to buy or sell?
Non-Business Classified Ads (up to 4 lines/ 20 words): FREE
Commercial Ads only NAf1,10 per word, for each two-week issue.
Call 790-6518 or 790-8988 or email info@bonairereporter.com


Day High



Fri 23

Sat 24

Sun 25

Mon 26

Tue 27
00:17
Wed 28 0.95 ft
01:10
Thu 29 0.97 ft
02:02
Fri 30 0.97 ft


Low High


02:12
0.09 ft
03:34
0.06 ft
05:01
0.01 ft
06:30 -
0.06 ft
07:54 -
0.16 ft
09:07 -
0.25 ft
10:09 -
0.32 ft
11:02 -
0.37 ft


07:33
0.68 ft
08:29
0.53 ft
09:33
0.37 ft
10:51
0.22 ft
12:29
0.13 ft
14:22
0.09 ft
16:10
0.12 ft
17:27
0.16 ft


Low High


15:10 -
0.25 ft
15:41 -
0.20 ft
16:13 -
0.14 ft
16:45 -
0.08 ft
17:17 -
0.01 ft
17:52
0.05 ft
18:34
0.11 ft
19:36
0.16 ft


Sun-
rise


21:04 06:19
0.57 ft AST
21:49 06:19
0.69 ft AST
22:37 06:18
0.80 ft AST
23:26 06:18
0.89 ft AST
06:17
AST
Full 06:17
Moon AST
06:16
AST
06:16
AST


Sunset


18:48
AST
18:48
AST
18:48
AST
18:48
AST
18:49
AST
18:49
AST
18:49
AST
18:49
AST


May


02:54
Sat 01 0.95 ft
03:43
Sun 02 0.91ft
04:30
Mon 03 0.86 ft
05:13
Tue 04 0.79 ft

Wed 05

Last
Thu 06 Quarter-

Fri 07


11:49 -
0.38 ft
12:31 -
0.37 ft
13:08 -
0.34 ft
13:40 -
0.30 ft
00:16
0.23 ft

01:19
0.23 ft
02:25
0.22 ft


18:12
0.21 ft
18:47
0.25 ft
19:18
0.29 ft
19:47
0.34 ft
05:53
0.71 ft

06:31
0.62 ft
07:09
0.51 ft


LOST
Lost? Forgotten? At the end of March
my repaired Smithsonian black and gray
wet suit disappeared. Did you find it?
J(n Brouwer, digital-
isl956(@hotmail.com, Call 796-3637.

Porch Sale: Sat & Sun April 24 & 25,
10am-4pm. Kaya Emerenciana 19, Niki-
boko Furniture; Stove; Fridge; etc. EVE-
RYTHING MUST GO

Get Results Fast

Commercial ads are
Inexpensive
Non-commercial ads are Free
The Bonaire Reporter
Email
Reporter@BonaireNews.com

Tel. 790-6518, 786-6125


20:53 06:16
0.19 ft AST
22:06 06:15
0.21 ft AST
23:13 06:15
0.22 ft AST
06:14
AST
14:08- 20:15 06:14
0.25 ft 0.39 ft AST


14:32 -
0.20 ft
14:52 -
0.14 ft


20:42
0.45 ft
21:08
0.52 ft


06:14
AST
06:13
AST


18:49
AST
18:49
AST
18:50
AST
18:50
AST
18:50
AST

18:50
AST
18:50
AST


sometime, very soon, we were told,
WEB, Bonaire's water and electric
utility will switch over to their new power
system, Electricity will be generated by the
new (bio)diesel dynamos in the powerhouse
near Karpata as well as from the 13 wind
turbines near the east coast. The Hato power
plant will not feed electricity to the island
grid but will still produce the power for wa-
ter desalination. The TWR plant in Belnem
will continue to operate.
Hopefully, that will mean an end to the
frequent power outages WEB customers
have been suffering,
We'd like to provide an exact date, but
there's been no official word. The best guess
is in mid-May, 2010. U G.D.


Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


16 Flights a day
between
Bonaire and
Curagao DIVI DIV


Divi Divi Air


24 hours a day
Call
(5999 839-1515)
Or (5999 .i: iiiiii; .


KRALENDIJK TIDES (Heights in feet, FT)
Remember: Winds and weather canfI ifi, ...rl 1, .. the local tide's height and time


Page 13











SHOPPING and SERVICE GUIDE


AIRLINES
Divi Divi Air. Bonaire's "on time airline" with 16
flights a day between Bonaire and Curaqao. Your first
choice for inter-island travel. Now flying to Aruba.

AIRTOURS
The Bonaire Aero Club invites you to see Bonaire
from the air. Take a one-hour flight with up to three
persons. Ideal for photography or environmental study
or see your house.

APPLIANCES /TV/ ELECTRONICS and
COMPUTERS
City Shop, the mega store, has the island's widest
selection of large and small home appliances, furniture,
TV, computers, cell phones and more. Fast service and
in-store financing too.

BANKS

Maduro and Curiel's Bank provides the greatest
number of services, branches and ATMs of any Bon-
aire bank. They also offer investments and insurance.

BEAUTY PARLOR

Hair Affair. Expert hair cutting, styling, facials and
facial waxing.

BICYCLE / SCOOTER/ QUADS

De Freewieler sells bikes and all kinds of bike acces-
sories. They do professional repairs on almost anything
on two wheels. Have your keys made here too.

BOOKS

Reef Windows is Captain Don's latest book and fea-
tures the true stories of the naming of many Bonaire
dive sites. A great souvenir as well.

DENTURE REPAIR

All Denture Lab-for the best denture care by an ex-
perienced professional. Repairs while you wait. Next
to Botika Korona on Kaya J. G. Hernandez.

DINING

Bistro di Paris A real French restaurant with afford-
able prices and friendly Bonairean ambiance
Owned and operated by a French Chef
On Kaya Gob. Debrot mile north of town
Pasa Bon Pizza is Bonaire's best. Freshly prepared
pizzas made with the finest ingredients. Salads, desserts.
Eat in or take away. Nice bar too. 780-1111 Call ahead to
eat-in or take out, Next to Bistro (above)
Lunchroom de Bonairiaan-Breakfast & lunch
prepared and served by Stichting Project students under
professional guidance. Monday-Friday, 9-2. Kaya Gob.
N.Debrot, opposite Divi Flamingo.


DIVING
Carib Inn is the popular 10-room inn with top-notch
dive shop and well stocked retail store. Best book trade
on Bonaire. Good prices on regulator repair, dive com-
puter H.Q.

ScubaVision Document your Bonaire vacation above
and below the water with a custom DVD by Bonaire's
top videographer, Hendrik Wuyts


GARDEN SUPPLIES AND SERVICES

Green Label has everything you need to start or main-
tain your garden. They can design, install and maintain it
and offer plants, irrigation supplies and garden chemi-
cals. Now in new expanded location off Kaya Industria.

Captain Don's Plants, Trees and More sells genuine
acclimated Bonaire plants. Take a 30-inute tour too.
Strong plants for strong Bonaire gardens.

HEALTH

Harmony House-The herb and mineral center. Help
your body heal itself.

Natural Way Health Store-The place where all the
hard to find natural and healthy products are. Upstairs
from Botika Bonaire, on Kaya Grandi.

HOME CARE

Bonaire Second Home Care can handle all the needs
of second home owners on Bonaire including inspec-
tion, management and cleaning.

INTERNET AND CELLULAR SERVICE

MIO offers by far the clearest, most reliable phone
signal on the island PLUS WIRELESS HIGH-SPEED
INTERNET almost everywhere on Bonaire.

LIQUEUR

Taste a Cactus when you try Cadushy of Bonaire
Liqueur. Available in many shops and markets it
makes the perfect souvenir of the island.

PEST CONTROL

Professional Pest Control. Call Peter to get rid of all
those nasty pets like termites, fleas, ticks and ants that
want to invade your home. Call now and save your
investment in your home.

PHOTO FINISHING

Paradise Photo in the Galeries Shopping Center
downtown offers fast, fine processing for prints, slides,
items and services. Full digital services.


REAL ESTATE / RENTAL AGENTS

Bonaire Sunshine Homes is the realtor with a local
touch. Ask them to show you the good value homes
they list. Call them if you are thinking of selling your
home.

Caribbean Homes, "the Refreshing Realtor," spe-
cializing in luxury homes, condos, lots, rentals and
property management.

Sunbelt Realty offers full real estate, rental, and insur-
ance services. If you want a home or to invest in Bon-
aire, stop in and see them.

RETAIL
Benetton, world famous designer clothes available
now in Bonaire at prices less than those in US. For
men, women and children.

Best Buddies and Pearls-Stunning fresh water
pearl jewelry, fashion, gifts, t shirts. Wonderful ser-
vice, free gift wrap.

STORAGE

The Storehouse (Mangazina in Papiamentu) offers
Secure Storage For Vehicles, Household Items, Diving
And Sporting Gear, Business Files or Inventory.
Across from the northern hotel row.

SECURITY
Special Security Services will provide that extra
measure of protection when you need it. Always reli-
able.

SHIPPING
Rocargo Freight Air and sea shipments in/out of
Bonaire. Customs agents. Professional and efficient.
FedEx agent. What would we do without their su-
perb services?

SUPERMARKETS
Warehouse Supermarket on Kaya Industria-
Biggest air conditioned market with the, largest selec-
tion and lowest prices on the island.

WATER TAXI
Get to Klein Bonaire by Ferry. Ride the Kantika di
Amor or Skiff. Hotel pickup. Easiest landing on Klein
Bonaire with built-in ramp

WINES
Antillean Wine Company. You've tried the rest;
now try the best: best prices, highest quality wines
from around the world, kept in a cooled warehouse.
Free delivery. Kaya Industria 23, Mon.-Sat. 9 am-noon.

To learn more about these businesses check their ad in
The Reporter
Fortnightly Advertisers in The Bonaire Reporter are
included in the guides. Free!
Call 790-6518, 786-6518


AFFORDABLE

* Domain Registrations
* E-mail Hosting
* Anti-Spam & Anti-Virus
* Web Site Design
* Web Site Hosting
* Marketing Consulting
* Internet Consulting
* Photographic Services
* Graphic Design

S NetTech N.V.
info@NetTech.an
www. NetTech an
Tel: 717-6773
Fax: 717-7854


Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


Scuba Sales
Repair Replacement
New Gear Accessories

Check CARIB INN First.
Great Prices -Great Stock

Always Great Values
Dive gear specials



CARIB INN
Since 1980
PADI 5 STAR GOLD PALM
717-8819 8 am to 5 pm daily
(next to Divi Flamingo Hotel)


Pasa Bon Pizza

&Bar

780-1111
Water Front

ToTown kayaGob Debrra \Hole.


Not Just Great Pizzas!


Call ahead
to

Pre Order

Open Wednesday to Sunday
5 PM to 11 PM


Hair Affair

We do our best to
make your hair and make-
up wishes come true!!
You can also come in for facials and
facial waxing.
We use and sell L'Oreal products
Is your plan to marry on the island?
We can make you beautiful and stay
beautiful for your happiest day.

Personal attention by Janneke
Appointment by tel: 717-5990
or just walk in.
Downtown, near the waterfront
next to Little Havana


Page 14












N Hospitality Students Get Ready for Italy


N o\\ Slicha n oui Paplanciniu ind EilL-
_l llandu_11i_2 skills \\ il s lii I// Ilf i -nI -
lkh cicao0 of Bona01 l opiI kids \\cbsiuc. Pan-
diioboiuiic coin Tomn Aillli Tio Tom
I on inS //' i/ .'I, of ."2 J iulll ll 2llIl ,
\\ \\ .).iiichilol)o(ii.iiie.c iin

Panchifo Kid's Corner(Pa lapirrnu)
www panchilobonare corn
infob onairefeponer cor


The Italy bound group with SGB teacher Ezzy Semeleer, Forma's Nuny de
Windt and Sara Matera of the Culinaire Foundation


AVUA
LUS
BARBULETE
MESA


AvION
PORTA
5UICH


HELlr.OPTER
BEPNTANA
VABI


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Panchifo Kir's Corner(Englifsh)
vwwi panchllobonare comr
Infog@onaWreieporler com


T he first meeting with the students
who are going to Italy for a three-
week trainee period was held recently in
the school restaurant, Chez Nous. This
year a group of eight students will be
granted the opportunity to undergo an
intensive and rewarding learning experi-
ence for three weeks. During these weeks
the students will receive extensive train-
ing at a professional training institute in
the region of Modena, Emilia Romagna,
Italy.


During the coming months the students
will be holding fundraising activities to
collect enough funds for their trip to Italy.
The group consists of Angelique de
Lanoy and Shermen Winklaar from Fun-
dashon FORMA. From SGB the students
are Leonard Janga, Pierina Joven, Sohay-
lor Molina, Corvan Veld, Sonia Winklaar
and Gervin Trinidad.
The students will be accompanied by
Mr. Ezzy Semeleer of SGB and Nuny de
Windt from Fundashon FORMA. E


The students leave for Italy on May 30. Press release


TREE
ROOP
INSECT
CLUE


WATER
UGHiT
BUTTERFLY
TABLE


PLANE
DOOR
SW T Ci-I


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HELICOPTE R
WlDOV
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Sm EEl
FL UIVbE
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BALL
GARDEN
GOAL


Soltiio.ns onr page 17


_ B onaire's
lionfish
are multiply-
ing. On Satur-
day we went
diving at Baby
Beach and to
our surprise
we saw five
lionfish in an
area of about
five square
meters.Three
are in this
photo. U
Johannetta
Gordijn


Thanks to Ike Friends of Ile Classical Music Board Bonoire far continuing to sponsor ehis Fntastic proml
&a InternationaArb PaROCARGO t val20 --0
********1





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Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


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Page 15











Picture Yourself With The Re orter...

1H _a


David F Colvard (left) sent us this photo of "Living Legend" pioneer underwa-
ter cinematographer, Stan Waterman (center), and Women Divers Hall of
Fame past president, Martha Watkins-Gilkes (right).
They were all visiting a village in Fiji earlier this month. David gave The Bonaire
Reporter to John, the son of the acting village chief, which he greatly appreciated
since they only get western visitors when the NAI'A ( a Fiji based live-aboard vessel)
is in port. The visitors wore the traditional "man skirt" for the kava ceremony.
WIN GREAT PRIZES! Take a copy of The Bonaire Reporter with you on your next trip or when
you return to your home. Then take a photo of yourself with the newspaper in hand. THE BEST PHO-
TOS OF THE YEAR WILL WIN THE PRIZES. Mail photos to Bonaire Reporter, Box 407, Bonaire,
Netherlands Antilles (AN). E-mail to: info @bonairereporter.com.


2009 Winners
~ --C-YI ~ I


R ''' PubIici CicijcoiiDc o I ikkjd i ch imcc icifl-
ii inner%~ Bwd miid NmjiicLoiutl ~h%%Io jic o%% ci it '-,mid DoIlli


Having had such an amazing
response from the yeast arti-
cles, I decided to write one more, spe-
cifically aimed at women. Women
have, since the inception of birth con-
trol pills (BCPs), been subjected to a
yeast/fungal overgrowth and have suf-
fered endlessly for many years.

Initially birth control was seen as a
God-send, no more unwanted pregnan-
cies and to some degree far more sex-
ual freedom for women. Noresterone
and synthetic estrogens are regularly
used in the management of human fe-
male hormone therapy. However, there
is conclusive scientific data that oral
contraceptives will induce the defi-
ciency of the following nutrients Vi-
tamin C, B12, B6, B2, Folic acid, Mag-
nesium and Zinc.
Another fact is that synthetic estro-
gens can actually aggravate blood clots
and coronary heart disease, increase
cholesterol and can contribute to the
acceleration of breast cancer or any
other estrogen-dependant tumor.
We also now know that BCPs and
HRT can cause chronic candida infec-
tions, the catalyst for a host of prob-
lems in women inducing cravings for
sugars, potatoes, cakes, sodas and bis-
cuits, foodstuffs that feed candida and
in turn produce mycotoxins that induce
irritation and inflammation within the
body.
A particularly vulnerable area for
women is of course the breasts a
natural source of lactose (the sugar
found in mammalian milk), but also a
potential food source of sugars for sys-
temic fungus. Ductal carcinoma actu-
ally means cancer/fungus in the gland
or duct of the breast, and it is very clear
that a yeast/fungal overgrowth could
spell disaster for any woman.
Although the BCP is a huge contrib-
uting factor (not the only one!) the
problem is far bigger and a lot more
complex and affects everybody, men,
women and children, and yes also our
pets. You may never have taken BCPs
or HRT, yet you could still have a yeast
overgrowth! WHY?
Let's have a look at our meat. The
normal food of cattle is grasses, shrubs
and hay food that have a high fibre
content and low to moderate glycemic
index. Corn genetically comes from
South America, while cows and pigs


come from Europe. Animals grow in an
environment that matches their dietary
needs, yet they are given corn (cheap
and easy to grow) which they are un-
able to digest and the farmer has to add
yeast to the feed for further breakdown,
which done incorrectly, could lead to
'grain sickness'. Yeast thrives in the
sugary corn environment and will fer-
ment in the hot, wet environment of the
stomach of the cow.
Cows are also given birth control for
weight gain. The animal grows larger
and this increases its market value,
reaching its slaughter weight in just
over five months instead of a year.
Could it be that our yeast and birth
control treated meat accounts for the
sexual prematurity of our children, our
high cancer rates, obesity and possibly
the large number of gastro-intestinal
disorders that seem to be present in so
many people?
Remember, our meats are 'grown' for
money, not for nutrition. 0
Stephanie Bennett

Next issue: You Can Only Manage
What You Can Measure!

Author Stephanie Bennett was born in
Cape Town, South Africa, where she
studied herbs, minerals and nutrition.
Before moving to Bonaire she continued
her studies in UK,
and now researches
health issues that
particularly affect
people on Bonaire
and other Carib-
bean Islands.


Harmony House
rhe Herb and Mineral Center
For appointments Tel. 788 0030
Are you healthy by choice or by
Chance?
BiologicalTerrain Assessment
Unusual Herbal Teas
*Nutritional Advice
Herbs from around the world


Opening Hours
Monday Friday
9am 1pm


Stephanie Bennett SNHSDip.
(Krnesiotogy & Diabetes Risk Assessment)
Kaya Papa Cornes #2
(Parking and entrance in Kaya Gloria)


Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


Body Talk

WOMEN, BIRTH CONTROL, HRT AND YEAST


Page 16











500 Animals Sterilized Free!


T he 500th sterilization of dogs and
cats on Bonaire is a fact! In May
2009 the Bonaire Animal Shelter started
a big project called "Bonny Superdog."
The goal was to sterilize 500 dogs and
cats for free. The owner doesn't have to
pay. In this way, the Shelter wanted to
contribute towards solving the over-
population of dogs and cats problem on
the island. Too many animals cause a
variety of problems for people and the
animals: the animals roam around, they
are not fed, they get sick or hurt and
they become aggressive. Consequently,
too many animals have to be euthanized
every year... a sad and unacceptable
fact.

Number 500 Kisha from Amboina
Number 500 was Kisha, a dog owned
by Mrs. Silda Beaumont from Amboina.
Kisha is a female dog of about two
years old and she's had some very beau-
tiful puppies. "I don't want her to have
anymore puppies and that's why I had
her sterilized," Mrs. Beaumont says. "I
made the appointment with the veteri-
narian myself and then I called the peo-
ple from the Shelter who came to pick her
up, and after the operation they brought
her back. She's doing great. I love ani-
mals; to me an animal is just like a person,
a child. The love I feel for a child, I feel
for an animal too.
Since 2002
In 2002 the Animal Shelter set up a fund
for free sterilization. Ever since then, pet
owners can have their dog or cat sterilized


Mrs. Silda Beaumont from Amboina
and her dog Kisha


for free. The Shelter pays the bill. In 2004
the Shelter organized a special campaign
during which foreign veterinarians steril-
ized Bonaire's cats and dogs for free. In
two weeks' time about 250 animals were
neutered and spayed. After those two
weeks the campaign went on and the local
vets took care of the sterilization.


Nature Films Documentaries Trvel Adventre Advertising TV Broadcast
Underwater Stock footage HDV Digital Photo Weddings
DVD Reproductions DVD Mastering and Authoring
Courses and Seminars.


infoscubavision.info Ph: (599) 717.2844 Cell: 786.2844
Kaya Grandi #6 Photo Tours -


rILA


Bonny Superdog
However, the Animal Shelter felt things
weren't moving fast enough. The island
was still overloaded with stray dogs and
cats and an excessive amount of animals
were being brought into the Shelter. An
extra boost was needed. And so, the pro-
ject of Bonny Superdog was born. The
Shelter sought a lot of publicity to make
pet owners aware of the Bonny Superdog
campaign. All over the island posters were
hung by volunteers and, thanks to WEB
NV, flyers were delivered to each and
every house on Bonaire. Also radio and
TV commercials were broadcast and the
Shelter put ads in the local papers and
people could inform themselves through
the website of the Shelter -
www.animalshelterbonaire.com

The Campaign Continues
So far, the campaign has been very suc-
cessful. Pet owners can still have their
dogs and cats sterilized for free. And...
every pet owner gets a T-shirt and a
bumper sticker as well. Call for more in-
formation: the veterinarians at 717-4255
or 717-3338 or the Shelter at 717-4989. E
Story & photo by Greta Kooistra


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i M j .i ,t f a u E I A a ( AK& e QK u,
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-*ps P. T Ai.SE W
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*u.jF~a ET4Q.


Bon Quiz (from page 11)


Q) What is the name of this person,
after whom this bench is named, and
Q) What is the name of the Queen
who followed?
A) Queen Wilhelmina
A) Queen Juliana


Sudoku Solution
Puzzle on page 6

7 6 83 5 21 9 4
2 1 3 9 4 6 7 5 8
4 9 5 8 71 3 2 6
5 4 9 1 8 7 2 6 3
6 3 7 12 9 4 8 1 5
1 8 2 5 6 3 9 4 7
3 5 6 7 1 9 4 8 2
8 21 4 3 5 6 7 9
9 7 4 6 2 8 5 3 1

Regular


Water Taxi

TO KLEIN BONAIRE
From Bonaire Nautico Marina


HOTEL

PICKUP

1 A SERVICE
TRIPS
eli Every
IDay

THE ONLY
WALKON / WALKOFF
Catamaran Kantika diAmor
Up to 27 people and supported by
a brand new larger sister
Catamaran Kantika Too
Up to 50 people
Daily trips via resorts 10 am, 12, 2
pm Except Sundays at 10 am only
Also available for group trips

YACHTSMEN!
Tie up dockside
for min. $10/day+tax
(max 1.90 meter draft),
Water and 115/220 v.
Dinghy tie up at north-inside
dock at US$1 weekly up from
Monday till Monday.
BONAIRE NAUTICO MARINA
At It Rains Fishes Restaurant
Call Henk at 560-7254 / Bob 786-5399
www.bonairenauticomarina /VHF 68
info@bonairenauticomarina.com


Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


Page 17










Pet of the Week


Young Cai just happened to be visiting
the Bonaire Animal Shelter with his
mom, Amanda, when we stopped by to take
some photos of our "pets of the week."
What a good model he is, especially when
he gets to hold one of the residents of the
Cat Cage. The lucky kitty he's holding is
"Nora."
Cat Cage Expert, Jane Madden writes
about Nora:
"This all white cat is Nora, sister of Nad-
ine that you did a piece on a while ago who
did get adopted. Nora is still with us and is
just as sweet, if not sweeter, than her sister
was. Nora is about seven months old and
a very playful young girl who screams
around at 100 miles an hour playing with
any toy that she can find...
But...the minute you scoop her up she is a
cuddly little lamb who just beams at you
with her big amber eyes and purrs like a
little engine. She would be a perfect fit in a
home with children who want a cat to play
with, or with an adult family who likes to
entertain and be entertained by a wonderful
pussycat."
Nora has been checked out by the vet, has
had her test for feline leukemia, worming,
shots and is in perfect health. The cat adop-
tion fee ofNAf 75 includes all this plus
sterilization. Such a deal and you have a
proven healthy and social animal to bring


HAVE YOUR DOG

STERILIZED


Cai and Kitty Nora


home. When you're visiting Rincon Day,
Friday April 30, look for the Animal Shel-
ter stand selling all sorts of interesting
"Bonaire brocante," household items, books,
and bric a brac. See you there. U
Story & photo by Laura DeSalvo


Call for information

717 49 89
DIERENASIEL ANIMAL SHELTER BONAIRE
WWWJUIIMNASHELIERBONAIR.CON


O Bubble F
Os

Did you know...
that you might be wearing algae right
now? Extracts from algae are used as dye
to color clothes. It's also likely that you
had algae for lunch or dinner. If you ex-
amine the labels of items in your kitchen,
you will most likely find the terms,
alginatee" and "carrageenan," on many
of the labels. Carrageenans are com-
pounds extracted from red algae that are
used to stabilize and gel foods and phar-
maceuticals. Brown algae contain algi-
nates that make foods thicker and cream-
ier and add to shelf life. They are also
used to prevent ice crystals from forming
in ice cream! Alginates and carrageenans
are used in puddings, and milkshakes.
The popular color additive beta-carotene
often comes from green algae. Many
people don't realize that seaweed is har-
vested from the oceans. A substance
called algin is extracted and is used in
lipstick, toothpaste and ice cream.
Substances from marine plants and ani-
mals are used in many products, includ-
ing some medicines, fertilizers, gasoline,
cosmetics, and livestock feed. Oil from
the orange roughly, a deep-sea fish from
New Zealand, is used in making sham-
poo. The remains of diatoms, algae with
hard shells, are used in making pet litter,
cosmetics, pool filters and tooth polish.
Just think, next time you are walking
around the grocery store that you have
algae and other marine organisms to


om the Biokl


thank for a
lot of the r'
products
that you
see! U
Kelsey
Burlin-
game
Reference:
http://see-the-
sea.org/facts/
facts-body.htm
Burlingame isfrom Evergreen State College
and is studying Tropical Marine Ecology and
Conservation with CIEE Research Station
Bonaire ,1 / /I..'." .. rg).


Page 18


TpEdiPOR"TER wL-
XpEdiVoaQ -l--'i-tEEClM


-Ap

taad ~~


Kaya Grandi 29, Kralendijk-Bonaire N.A. tel: 717 5107
Store hours Tuesday through Saturdays
from 9a.m.-12:30p.m. and 2:00p.m.-6:30 p.m.


-I COLO7RS
uyj BEN ETTON


Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


I


i


mmmrm


r-
















*to find it... just look up
What You Know and What You Don't Know About the Most
Famous Star in
the Sky"

If I asked you right
now to name the
brightest star in the
night sky. What would
you say? The North
Star? Well if you did
think again. If you said
Sirius, you're right.
Don't feel bad though
because most people
think the North Star is
the brightest star even
though there are more than 50 other stars visible to the naked eye which are even
brighter. So why do so many people think the North Star is the brightest star? Well,
probably because it's the most famous star because it's mentioned more often than
any other star. Why? Well, its position in the sky is what makes it the most impor-
tant and thus the most famous star. Let me explain.
Face north any night during April and May between the hours of 8 and 10 pm,
Sky Park time, where you'll easily see the four stars which make up the Big Dip-
per's cup and the three stars which make up its handle. And once you've found the
Big Dipper you can use it to find the North Star. Because all you have to do is take
the two stars at the end of the cup which are called the pointer stars, mentally meas-
ure the distance between them and then shoot an imaginary arrow five and a half
times that distance through them and that arrow will always land smack dab on the
North Star. And once you've found it you'll notice that it is indeed not the brightest
star in the heavens and is in fact no brighter than the two pointer stars we used to
find it.
So why is it so important? Simple. #1 the North Star is always due north and #2
wherever you happen to be in the northern hemisphere it will always be the same
number of degrees above the horizon as your latitude above the Earth's equator.
So before the invention of the compass the North Star was extremely important to
navigators and explorers to determine not only which direction was north but ex-
actly how far north of the equator they were, a kind of ancient GPS. And wherever
you are you can also use the North Star to determine where north is and just how
far north above the equator you are. How?
Well we measure the distance from the equator to the North Pole in degrees of
latitude. The equator is 0 degrees and the North Pole is 90 degrees. We also meas-
ure the distance from any flat horizon to over head in degrees. O degrees is at the
horizon, 90 degrees is overhead. So if you were at the North Pole tonight the North
Star would appear 90 degrees above the horizon, directly over head. If you were in
London however it would appear 52 degrees above the horizon, New York, 40 de-
grees, Miami, 25 degrees, Bonaire, 12 degrees.
So to see how many degrees north you are above the equator first find the North
Star above a flat horizon, then hold your fist out at arm's
length. A fist will measure 10 degrees. So one fist means
you're 10 degrees above the equator and so on. Simple and
fabulous. So just remember if you get lost at night simply look
for the North Star because it will always be due north. And if
it's not you're either south of the equator or on the wrong
planet. U Jack Horkheimer



Get A Better Payoff From Your Advertising

Advertise in The Reporter 3,000 copies every
issue-

Thousands More Readers On the Internet
Call Laura at 790-6518
Email: Laura@bonairenews.com


Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010


ARIES (Mar. 21- April 20) If you are
in the midst of a financial deal, this is
your lucky day. Unreliable people will
be negative about your ideas. Don't give
in too quickly. If you put your mind to it,
you could entertain or host a multitude
of social events. Your lucky day this
week will be Tuesday.
TAURUS (Apr. 21- May 21) You
won't have much time for your mate this
week. If you act with anger you may
blow the relationship. Don't overspend
on friends or children. This could be a
serious relation ship.
Your lucky day this week will be Mon-
day.
GEMINI (May 22-June 21) You
might find added popularity with those
around you this week. Advancement can
be yours if you are assertive in your ap-
proach. Get busy on projects that im-
prove your own image; you'll have the
discipline to succeed. You can make or
break your personal relationship this
week. Your lucky day this week will be
Monday.
CANCER (June 22-July 22) Talk to
someone you trust if you need advice
about broaching the subject. Strong will-
power will come to your rescue. Don't
confide in any relatives whom you know
have a tendency to meddle in other peo-
ple's affairs. You'll regret every word for
some time to come. Your lucky day this
week will be Monday.
LEO (July 23-Aug 22) Do not get
involved in joint financial ventures.
Problems with appliances or electrical
gad gets will drive you crazy. You will
enjoy physical activities more than you
think. The only thing you'll accomplish
is a bad reputation.
Your lucky day this week will be Sat-
urday.
VIRGO (Aug. 23 -Sept. 23) Outdoor
sports events should entice you. You'll
stay out of trouble if you pick projects
that will benefit the whole family. This
might not be a day for hasty decisions.
Relatives may play an important role in
your social activities. Your lucky day
this week will be Wednesday.
LIBRA (Sept. 24 -Oct. 23) It may be
a disappointing day emotionally. Your


Astrologer Michael Thiessen
he last weeks ofApril 2010

best gains will come through helping
others emotionally. Any contributions
you make to organizations will enhance
your reputation and bring you offers.
Don't settle for less than the best. Your
lucky day this week will be Thursday.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24 Nov. 22) Try
not to take everything so seriously. Op-
portunities for romance will develop
through group endeavors; however, the
association isn't likely to last. Opportuni-
ties for romance will develop through
activities with large groups. The locks,
stove, gas, or electric wires may not be
secure.
Your lucky day this week will be Tues-
day.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23 -Dec.
21) Don't let your partner start any argu-
ments. Passion should be redirected
positively. You can offer your help to
others but back off if they appear to be
offended by your persistence. Do not get
involved in joint financial ventures. You
may find travel to be most rewarding.
Your lucky day this week will be Sun-
day.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22.- Jan.
20) Visitors may drop by unexpectedly,
resulting in tension with your lover.
Look into ways that you can make extra
cash. Your home environment appears to
be a little shaky. Look into physical ac-
tivities that will help get rid of some of
that tension you may be feeling. Your
lucky day this week will be Friday.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 -Feb. 19) Your
need to put great detail into everything
you do may cause you to miss the over-
all picture. Emotionally, things may not
run so smoothly. Listen to the advice
given by others. You might not be as
reserved on an emotional level as you'd
like. Your lucky day this week will be
Thursday.
PISCES (Feb. 20-Mar. 20) Partner-
ships could be tense. Don't push your
luck. Trips, educational pursuits, or pro-
jects that could lead to new outlooks
should be on your agenda. Insincere ges-
tures of friendliness are likely to occur.
Catch up on any correspondence you've
neglected. Your lucky day this week will
be Tuesday.


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Page 20


Bonaire Reporter- April 23 May 7, 2010













DINING GUIDE
RESTAURANT PRICE RANGE / WHEN OPEN FEATURES
Want your restaurant listed here? It's easy and not expensive Call The Reporterat 717-8988 or 791-7252 for info
Bella Vista Restaurant Moderate. Breakfast and Lunch Magnificent Theme Nights: Saturday: Beach Grill; Monday: Caribbean
Sea Side Restaurant at Buddy Dive Resort Dinner during Theme nights only. Night; Friday: Manager's Rum Punch Party
717-5080, ext. 525 Open every day and All-You-Can-Eat B.B.Q
Bistro de Paris Moderate Real French Cooking in an informal setting
Kaya Gob. N. Debrot 46 Lunch and Dinner Superb dishes prepared with care and love by a French chef
(half-way between hotel row and town) 717-7070 Closed Sunday Owner-operated Eat in or Take away
Brasserie Bonaire Low- Moderate Lunch and Dinner Lots of parking in big mall lot
Royal Palm Galleries Open 11 am -2:30 pm 5:30-9 pm Kitchen Open non-stop llam-6 pm
Kaya Grandi 26, Next to Re/Max, 717-4321 Closed Saturday and Sunday Breezy terrace with airco inside
Calabas i Restaurant & Moderate-Expensive Get a view of the beach and turquoise sea while enjoying a breakfast buffet
At th ii aig ea Resran an aerfront Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner or a la carte lunch and dinner at the 'Chibi Chibi' restaurant & bar. Inspiring
At the D17-8285 Flamingo eac Resort. Waterfront Open 7 days vistas and the highest standard of cuisine.
Croccantino Italian Restaurant Moderate-Expensive Tuscan chef prepares exquisite dishes. Authentic ingredients and romantic
Downtown at Kaya Grandi 48 Dinner setting make dining a delight. Be served in a garden setting under floating
717-5025 Closed Monday umbrellas or in air-conditioned comfort. Takeouttoo.
On th Den Laman Moderate-Expensivner Creative cuisine on the seaside. Top chefs from Amsterdam cook in an open
On the water, just off the traffic circle Breakfast, Lunch Dinner modem kitchen featuring induction cooking. Seafood a specialty.
717-4106 Open 7 days modem kitchen featuring indition cooking. Seafood a specialty
The Great Escape Moderate Bar-Restaurant poolside -under the thatched roof. Cuban Chef prepares
EEG Blvd #97-across from Belmar Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner Caribbean cuisine. Champagne brunch on Sundays 10 am to noon.
717-7488 Open 7 days Happy hours 5 to 7 every day.
Hilltop at Caribbean Club Bonaire Moderate-Expensive Quiet country setting, lovely landscaping, friendly staff
On the Tourist Road, 2 mi. north of Town Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Happy Hour from 5-7 pm, BBQ on Tuesdays
717-7901 Closed Sunday Gourmet chef creates unique daily specials
The Last Bite Bakery Low-Moderate Enjoy a delicious dessert or savory baked meal in the comfort of your home
Home Delivery or Take Out Orders taken 8 am-4 pm; Deliveries 6-7:30 or resort. This unique bakery offers gourmet class items -always from
717-3293 pm Closed Sunday scratch- for take out or delivery only.
The Lost Penguin Low-Moderate Watch the bustle of downtown from this street side Caribbean-style bistro
Across from MCB Bank in downtown Kralendijk Breakfast, Lunch, Early Dinner owned and run by a European educated Master Chef
Call 717-8003. Closed Tuesdays & Wednesdays and his wife.
Pasa Bon Pizza Low-Moderate Bonaire's best. The Real Thing! Freshly prepared pizzas made with the finest in-
On Kaya Gob. Debrot Open from 5-11 pm Wednesday-Sunday gredients. Salads, desserts. Eat m or take away. Nice bar too.
1 mile north of town center. 790-1111Open from 5-1pm Wednesday-Sunday Call ahead to eat-in or take out 790-1111


S > 0 P P I N GF G I D E See advertisements in this issue
APPLIANCES/ TV/ ELECTRONICS/ COMPUTERS GARDEN SUPPLIES AND SERVICES RESORTS & ACTIVITIES
City Shop, the mega store, has the island's widest Green Label has everything you need to start or main- Buddy Dive Resort offers diving, Adventure Fun
selection of large and small home appliances. Fast tain your garden. They can design, install and maintain tours including kayaking, mountain biking, cave snor-
service and in-store financing too. it and offer plants, irrigation supplies and garden keling and exploration.
chemicals.
ART GALLERY GIFTS, SOUVENIRS AND LIQUOR RETAIL
Cinnamon Art Gallery non-profit gallery for local art- The Bonaire Gift Shop has an wide selection of Benetton, world famous designer clothes available
ists has continuous shows. Each month a new artist is gifts, souvenirs, liquor, dive watches, digital cameras, now in Bonaire at prices less than those in US. For
featured. Stop by. Free entry. things for the home, T-shirts all at low prices, men, women and children.
BANKS HOTELS SECURITY
Maduro and Curiel's Bank provides the greatest Golden Reef Inn is the affordable alternative with Special Security Services will provide that extra
number of services, branches and ATMs of any Bon- fully equipped studio apartments in a quiet Bonaire measure of protection when you need it. Always reli-
aire bank. They also offer investments and insurance, neighborhood. Just a 3-minute walk to diving and the able.
sea.
BEAUTY PARLOR e SHIPPING
Hair Affair. Expert hair cutting, styling, facials, The Great Escape
Hair Affair. Exsiert h nair care.utt Under new management. Quiet and tranquil setting Rocargo Freight Air and sea shipments in/out of
waxing and prossional nail care withpooland luxuriant garden in Belnem. Cyber Bonaire. Customs agents. Professional and efficient.
BICYCLE I SCOOTER/ QUADS Caf6, DVD rentals, restaurant and bar. FedEx agent.
De Freewieler rents scooters and quads; profession- MEK MAHIN P SUPERMARKETS
ally repairs almost anything on two wheels. Sells top b-Botte Construction Bonaire N., offers Tropical Flamino is convenient, clean, mode,
brand bikes. Have your keys made here. b c b- Botterop Construction Bonaire N.V., offers Toical Flm is convenient, clean, modem,
brand bikes. Have your keys made here. outstanding fabrication of all metal products, includ- efficient and has the lowest prices on Bonaire. Lo-
BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION ing stainless. Complete machine shop too. cated behind NAPA.
APA Construction are professional General Visit Warehouse Bonaire to shop in a large, spotless
Contractors. They also specialize in creating patios PHOTO FINISHING supermarket. You'll find American and European
and walkways with fabulous sprayed and stamped Paradise Photo in the Galeries Shopping Center of- brand products. THE market for provisioning.
concrete pavement. fers fast, fine processing for prints, slides, items and
services for your picture-taking pleasure. VILLAS
DIVING Bonaire Oceanfront villa for up to nine people: five
Carib Inn is the popular 10-room inn with top-notch REAL ESTATE I RENTAL AGENTS kitchens, five bathrooms. Ideal for divers.
dive shop and well stocked retail store. Best book trade Harbourtown Real Estate is Bonaire's oldest real
on Bonaire. Good prices on regulator repair, dive com- estate agent. They specialize in professional cus- WATER TAXI
puter H.Q tomer services and top notch properties. Get to Klein Bonaire by Ferry. Ride the Kantika di
Photo Tours Divers-Yellow Submarine -low Amor or Skiff. Hotel pickup.
prices on the seaside at Kralendijk, at Caribbean Mike Boom & Associates Broad assortment of
Club, Caribbean Court and the Hamlet Oasis. Join homes and properties. View on their website www. WINES
their cleanup dives and BBQ. bonairerealtv.com or office in town Antillean Wine Company. You've tried the rest;
WannaDive They make diving fun while maintain- now try the best: best prices, highest quality wines
ing tihe highest profession sta r. n to at Re/Max Paradise Homes: International/US connec- from around the world, kept in a cooled warehouse.
City Cafe and at Eden Beach. tions. 5% of profits donated to local community. Free delivery.
FITNESS Sunbelt Realty offers full real estate, rental, and in- YOGA
Bonfysio offers comprehensive fitness programs to surance services. If you want a home or to invest in Yoga For You. Join certified instructors Desirde and
suit your needs wheterthey be weight loss, sports or Bonaire, stop in and see them. Don for a workout that will refresh mind and body.
just keeping in shape. Convenient schedule. Private lessons too. Closed during June.
REPAIRS
Fit 4 Life at the Plaza Resort Mall. Classes in Pi- Bon Handyman is here if you need something fixed ATTENTION BUSINESSMENRWOMEN:
lates, Aerobics, TaeBo and more. Professional train- or built. Ultra reliable, honest and experienced. Elec- Put your ad in Theonaire eporter.
ers, fitness machines and classes for all levels. trical, plumbing, woodworking, etc. 717-2345 Phone/Fax 717-8988, Cel 791-7252


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 20
















San Diego, California, U.S.A.


Here
is a
picture of
Becky
Stark-
weather
taking a
break at
Mile
Marker 14
to read The
Bonaire
Reporter at
the San
Diego
Rock 'n
Roll Mara-
thon on
June 5.
Becky and
another
Bonaire
regular,
Warren
Wagner, ran and finished the marathon. Becky designated Support Bonaire, Inc. as
one of the four charities she was running for. Warren finished in 5 hours, and
Becky finished in 6:02. In all, 17,100 out of 20,400 finished the race. Becky cred-
its Warren and Delno Tromp for encouraging her to run her first marathon at age


N~"IEE SEE-I- 4C> F=I K:>
WU- "IHFO I-EH F0 C:> EH TU


Airport:
Car Rental Agencies,
Airport Arrivals Area
Banks:
MCB (Playa & Hato),
RBTT
Restaurants:
Bistro de Paris
Brasserie Bonaire
Capriccio
Chez Lucille
City Cafe
Croccantino
Den Laman
Garden Cafe
Hilltop at Caribbean Club
Kentucky Fried Chicken
Lost Penguin
Lover's Ice Cream
Pasa Bon Pizza
Subway
Wil's Tropical Grill
Shops:
Bonaire Gift Shop
City Shop
DeFreewieler
INPO
Paradise Photo
Photo Tours, Playa
Exito Bakery
Bonaire Super Store
Hotels:


Buddy Dive
Capt. Don's Habitat
Carib Inn
Caribbean Club Bonaire
Dive Inn
Divi Flamingo
Eden Park Hotel
Harbour Village
Plaza
Sand Dollar
Supermarkets:
Cultimara
Consales
More for Less
Progresso
Sand Dollar Grocery
Tropical Flamingo
Warehouse
Others:
Bonfysio
Botika Korona
Bestuurscollege
Caribbean Laundry
Customs
Fit 4 Life
Hair Affair
Harbour Village Marina
Parliament
Rocargo
San Francisco Hospital
TCB
Telbo


Yellow Submarine
Bookstores:
Bonaire Boekhandel,
Flamingo Bookstore
Realty Offices:
Harbourtown
Re/Max
Sunbelt
RINCON:
Chinese Store,
Joi Fruit Store,
Lemari Grocery
Rincon Bakery.


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 13












-Fj .,1, T 6?~ORTER


Immediate action is needed
to improve Bonaire's Fla-
mingo Airport runway, warned
Dutch Minister of Traffic and
Water Management (V&W)
Camiel Eurlings last week. If
nothing is done, the runway won't
comply with international safety
norms within one to two years,
stated Eurlings in response to
questions posed in the Dutch Par-
liament's Second Chamber relat-
ing to the 2010 budget. 8.7 mil-
lion had been reserved for the
project in 2010.

"A small team was on island
last week to explore possibilities
for a new flavor of Bonaire
tourism personal recovery.
It's well known that the climate
and pace of Bonaire is beneficial
to people recovering from certain
illnesses. Organizers would offer
a "package" consisting of KLM
business class airfare, resort ac-
commodations and specialized
medical care. The program would
be offered by the Dutch personal
recovery specialists U-Center.

"'Dutch State Secretary Ank
Bijleveld-Schouten said a Dutch
salvage company will be called
in to recover the body of the
heroic pilot Robert Mansell and
the Divi Divi aircraft that re-
cently sank southwest of Klein
Bonaire. The cause of the acci-
dent is to be investigated as well
when the aircraft is raised. The
salvage company and cost of the
operation haven't been revealed.
Following the failure of one
engine Captain Mansell had to
ditch his twin engine Britten-
Norman Islander commuter plane
just west of Klein Bonaire. All
nine passengers escaped unhurt
and were quickly rescued, but
Mansell was knocked uncon-
scious and went to the bottom
with the airplane when the pas-


A Bonaire Reporter -' 4 i Table of Contents


Question


sengers were unable to release his
safety harness. The sea bottom is
between 150 and 200 meters deep
in that area and Dutch naval ships
in the Caribbean don't have the
capability to salvage at that depth.
The American navy research
ship Henson offered its help but
permission from US authorities
had not been received yet, accord-
ing to acting Bonaire Lt. Gover-
nor Peter Silberie.

"The identity of the pilot of
the airplane that blew up in the
air west of Bonaire has been
identified as 26 year-old Juan
Carlos Saldana. A large quantity
of cocaine and another body of an
older man, yet unidentified, were
found amidst the wreckage.
Saldana was originally from Bo-
gota, Colombia but had been liv-
ing in Venezuela.

IBonaire, Sint Eustatius and
Saba will be relieved of the
costs involved in disaster man-
agement, crisis management
and medical care after they
have been integrated into the
Netherlands. This policy was
defined in the "Explanatory
Memorandum" attached to the
BES Security Act which was sent
to the Dutch Lower House last
week.
In the event that one of the is-
lands needs disaster assistance the
Netherlands is ready to handle the
cost and to offer any necessary
physical assistance in the form of
manpower and material.

,According to Cynthia Ortega-
Martijn, a Christian Union mem-
ber of the Dutch lower chamber,
the Netherlands should negoti-
ate with Bonaire again if the
population rejects the integra-
tion process already underway.
Dutch State Secretary Ank Bi-
jleveld of Kingdom Relations and
a few Lower Chamber-members
said that they would not re-
negotiate. There is only one op-
tion left and that is independence.
However, the Netherlands cannot
decide on this based on the UN-
regulations, says Ortega-Martijn.

SEvery year, around 1,000
Antillean students arrive in the


Netherlands to study. In order to
look into possible ways of im-
proving study program informa-
tion for Antillean students, staff at
the Dutch information websites
www.studvchoice.nl and
www.studiekeuze 123.nl.
Dutch officials visited the Neth-
erlands Antilles and Aruba from
November 10-18 to talk to pro-
spective students, deans and study
advisers in order to identify prob-
lem areas and needs. Antillean
students who come to the Nether-
lands to follow an advanced pro-
gram are faced with a major tran-
sition. They must relocate to the
Netherlands, live a long way
away from their home and come
to grips with a different culture.

"'The government of Aruba


q


rescinded its decision that for-
eign workers had to leave the
island after three years. The
new Eman Cabinet has put an end
to the so-called "Swiss model," in
which expatriates could only
work on Aruba for three years.
This implies that immigrants
could apply for Dutch nationality
after a stay of five years.
The number of illegal foreigners
in Aruba is estimated to be 5,000-
8,000.

0"The Dutch Government is
considering hiring "flying doc-
tors" to provide medical assis-
tance in the BES islands of Bon-
aire, St. Eustatius and Saba ex-
plained Dutch Minister of Public
Health, Well-being and Sports,
(Continued on page 9)


imes are tough for Carib- f4
bean tourism. The eco-
nomic recovery, especially in the
US, has been slow and airlines are /
cutting back flights. Budgets for
promotion are tight. f
So how can the agencies re-
sponsible for attracting visitors to
their island approach the prob- ..
lem? These days Internet advertis-
ing and social networks compli-
ment the traditional methods.
One technique that Bonaire has
excelled in is to get "free" public-
ity in the press and on the Internet from travel writers and news
reporters The TCB's partners in the Americas and Europe are ex-
perts at making that happen.
Choosing what to publicize is tricky though. Obviously, every-
one wants to report the good news.
But what about the not so good news? Crime, environmental
damage, political shenanigans, or illnesses all affect both the is-
land's people and their important guests, the tourists.
The question to our readers:
What is the most effective way to promote Bonaire?
1. Present only good news
2. Present all news
3. Present good news and only the not-so-good-news that
has been okayedd" by island tourism authorities
We ask our readers, both on island and around the world, to sit
down right after reading this and give us your opinion. Please.
Email to reporter @bonairenews.com
Mail to Reporter, Box 407, Bonaire Netherlands Antilles
Or phone (599) 790-6518 or (599) 786-6518.


A special treat every year for senior citizens groups is
an end of the year dinner where they can all get
together to socialize and enjoy a delicious meal. This year
115 elderly from the senior citizen activity centers from A R GR I L L
Rincon, Antriol, North Salina and from Kai Minima will
be dining at the Sunset Grill Restaurant on December 9.
And everyone will get a gift from the Bonaire Gift Shop. _
Although the organizers got a very good deal from Kirk -
iGosden at Sunset Grill, a little more money is needed to ono Or shoE'
make this evening come true. You can help brighten our
elders' holiday season with a donation. An easy way is
to drop it off at Mike Gaynor's Chat n' Browse at the
Roundabout near Sunset Beach. For more information
Scall Delno Tromp at 09-693-1407 or 717-8334.



Page 2


SSCOOTER & BIKE
SALES & REPAIR
zPeugeot, Kymco
---loekie, Giant
Gazelle Brands


Parts and accessories for
any brand scooter or bike
Bike Clothes for Everyone

Kaya Grandi #61
Across from INPO
Open: 8:30-12:30, 2:00-5:30
Owner Operated


l 'freewieler@flamingotv. net


Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009


This Week's Stories

Bonaire Reporter Question 2
Help Seniors Celebrate 2
Kwartiermakers & Counterparts
(Immigration, Naturalization) 3
Windsurfing Scandinavia 6
Bonaire Referendum Survey 8
Second Thoughts-Booi 8
Referendum Preview? 8
Bonaire Ambassadors (Valenteijn) 8
Insurance for 60+ 9
RSC Donates Computers to JB 10
CIEE Mangrove Study 10
Eli Deli Opens 11
2009 Job Market 11
Letters to the Editor- Cruise ship privi-
leges, Sun lotion damage, Kudos to Re-
porter 12
10 Years-Green Label 15
BES Tax Plan 17
Ludo Nicolaas Honored 17
Sailing Kids 2C
Tree Planting 2C

Weekly Features

Flotsam & Jetsam 2
On the Island Since (Brigitte&Wllied
Kersting) 4
Bonairean Voices (Public Library) 7
Sudoku Puzzle 7
Bon Quiz #18 (Chapel) 7
Body Talk -Climate 12
Picture Yourself (Cruising-Jamaica) 13
Classifieds 13
Tide Table 13
Reporter Masthead 14
What's Happening 14
Pet of the Week (Petunia) 15
Bubbles (Flamingo Tongues) 15
Shopping & Service Guides 16
BonQuiz Answer 17
Sudoku Answer 17
Bonaire On Wheels (Wheel Me On) 18
Sky Park (December Dates) 19
Caf6 Astrology (Astrology) 19
How to contact us
Letters to the Editor:
Reporter@bonairenews.com
Story tip or idea:
info@bonairenews.com
The Publisher:
George@bonairenews.com
Box 407, Bonaire,
Neth. Antilles.
Phone 790-8988
Phone 790-6518 / 786-6518
Available on-line at:
www.bonairereporter.com
Printed Every Fortnight,
On-line Every day, 24/7
Next edition printing on
December 8, 2009.
Story and Ad deadline:
December 5, 2009.


I














If Bonaire's second Referendum had
been held last week the Dutch minis-
try workers might be packing their bags to
return to Holland.
According to the outcome of a random
survey of 365 people on Bonaire, carried
out by CURISES students (Curaqao Insti-
tute for Social and Economic Studies of
the University of the Netherlands Antil-
les), about restructuring of the Dutch
Kingdom, more than 65% of the island's
population would choose a "free associa-
tion" with the Netherlands instead of the
"integration" currently underway.
The key question asked "Should the
direct relationship with the Netherlands
be free association instead of integra-
tion?" is similar to the proposed ques-
tion the Referendum Committee had pre-
sented in its report earlier this month. If
Bonaireans vote the same way in the
March 2010 Referendum, it would trash
much of the work now underway by the
Dutch Government and create an uncer-
tain future for the island.
The students released the outcome of
their survey last week which they said has
a sample error of 4.9%. The Bonaire Gov-
ernment did not participate in the setup or
influence the poll.

THE SURVEY
Critics and survey assessment profes-
sionals applauded the initiative but found
fault with the approach of the students'
survey. They felt the results were inappro-
priately portrayed as showing a clear level


How informed are you about the Referendum?


sions, support payments, taxes, OB, in-
. c Age mix of survey respondents eluding laws dealing with marijuana,
.2~o abortion, euthanasia etc. To be fair the
25.o0 -'/- question has to give both the cost and the
benefit.


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In general, as the age of
the respondents increased
their opinion leaned more
towards integration


Dutch Inufnoenwis Inmrosing on aorgairs


WB25 26-35 36-45 46-55 56-65 66+


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of support for the current government's Di
positions. de
The survey revealed that over 91% of all
the respondents were either badly in- lea


Second Thoughts

At a press lunch on Sunday, November
15, Senator Ramonsito Booi an-
nounced he was stepping down as the UPB
party leader and retiring from political activ-
ism to spend more time at his Warahama
kunuku. Surrounded by close family mem-
bers, party associates and a large press contin-
gent from several islands, he appeared close
to tears at times as he related the history of
the party and the role he, his supporters and
even his adversaries played over the years.
The hearty local food and a variety of bev-
erages created a relaxed atmosphere and rap-
port with the press. There was even a tour of
the kunuku's animal pens and shade houses.

But less than a week later Senator Booi
changed his mind. Last Saturday night, No-
vember 21, at a gathering at party headquar-
ters in Sabana, he said that "he resigned to the
will of God and the party" and will stay at the
helm of the UPB. With the slogan, No%,
UPB. More than ever," he agreed to lead his
party's campaign for the parliamentary elec-
tions on January 22, 2010. U G.D.


rmed (Malu) or more or less informed
[as o menos). If this is the case, then
ey say the answers to the survey's three
y questions become meaningless:
. agree with the current content of the
laso director' with Holland -- since 9 of
10 respondents have little or no idea
what this means, the value of the answer
becomes suspect.
What the UPB Government ,i,.. g.,,,..j
with Holland does not seem to be good
for Bonaire.- The same logic applies
here. If you do not know what the is-
sues are, how can you know if you are
'or or against them?
'Laso direkto' with Holland must be
free association' The term 'free asso-
ciation' is a fuzzy concept that has been
discussed but never clearly defined in
he case of Bonaire. There are several
examples of 'free association' arrange-
ments in the world, but each is unique
and the result of extensive negotiation
between the governments involved.

IMPLICATION OF THE RESULTS
It is clear that both the integration side
d the free association side have to edu-
te the public. The free association sup-
rters have been most vocal, are politi-
lly organized and making use of the
ternet to present their viewpoint. The
utch say they must remain clear of the
bate because of UN rules. Beset by
egations of misconduct and a changing
adership the UPB (green party) has not


Kunukero Booi


vigorously defended the integration posi-
tion it promoted for several years.


* The influence of Holland is becoming
greater in Bonaire. Of course it is.


WAS THE SURVEY WELL DONE? What is the implication of this? Good
Not according to research professional or bad? There is no way to tell.
who reviewed the results. According to The present Dutch government posi-
them several of the questions violated tion is that Bonaire can have a referendum
one of the basic rules of surveying in that but if the citizenry does not accept what
they telegraphed the answer expected. has already been negotiated, Holland will
For example: not cooperate any longer and will stop
* I believe that Holland should have eve- paying for various projects.
; 1i i,, i to say about Bonaire.
This option has never been on the table UNBALANCE
and no one seems to have even presented Questions about the unanimous agree-
it. The question almost demands a ment in 2006 of the Island Council with
'disagree' response. becoming a municipality, the fact of a
A fairer question might have been: I signed agreement to continue along this
believe that Holland should have a larger path, and the amount of money being sen
say in Bonaire affairs in return for the by Holland were not presented in the sur-
Dutch government paying off our debt, vey. That creates an unbalance in any
investing in our infrastructure and provid- conclusions reached. How many of the
ing additional services for our community respondents would continue to send
* IfBonaire becomes a municipality of money to a store that changed the produce
Holland then pensions, support pay- after the order was placed and if the store
ments etc. MUST BE THE SAME as in never shipped the product?
Holland.
This is another self-answering question. THE US DOLLAR AS LOCAL CUR-
What is missing is the information relat- RENCY
ing to higher taxes, higher cost for car In a related question the survey found
registration, higher OB and other costs that most people support the conversion
that would be required to pay for this from the Antilles Guilder to the US Dol-
equality. lar: 55.5% were in favor, 25.2% opposed
A fairer question might have been: If and 19.6% don't care.
Bonaire becomes a municipality there The Referendum debate is just begin-
should betotal equality with Holland in ning. The Reporter will be listening. 0
every regard, this would mean equal pen- G.D.


New Bonaire Ambassadors
Christ and Anneke Valentelin


T CB recently awarded Christ and
Anneke Vlenteijn of Holland Silver
Ambassador Medals in honor of their 16
consecutive years of visits to Bonaire.
Happily it coincided with their 45th


1

l


t




t


wedding anniversary. They were awarded
their medals and certificates by TCB's
Helen Thod6. Congratulations, new
Ambassadors! 0 Press release


Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009


Page 8













1%j AII
p pISI55


Date Day


Thursday


November 26,
2009


Ship name


Caribbean Princess


Time


1100-1900


3100


November 29, C
Sunday 2009 Maasdam 0800-1700 1258 c
C
November 30,
Monday 2009 AidaAura 0800-1600 1260 o
n


December 11, Enchantment of the
Friday 2009 Seas 0700-1530 1950


REGULAR EVENTS
By appointment Rooi
Lamoenchi Kunuku Park Tours $21
(includes tax). Discounts for residents
and local people. Tel. 717-8489, 540-
9800.
Parke Publico children's play-
ground open every day into the cooler
evening hours.
Saturday
* Rincon Marshe-6 am-2 pm.
Enjoy a Bonairean breakfast while you
shop, fresh fruits and vegetables, gifts,
local sweets, snacks, arts, handicrafts,
candles, incense, drinks, music. Big
March first Saturday of the month-
www.infobonaire.com/rincon.
* Flea Market at Parke Publico
every first Saturday of the month, 3 to
7 pm. Everyone welcome to buy and to
sell. NAfl10 per selling table.(NAf 5
goes to up-keep the park). NGOs can
have a free table. More information and
reservations for a spot call Vicky Bisses-
sar 786-1592.
* Wine Tasting at Antillean Wine
Company's warehouse on Kaya Indus-
tria, second Saturday of the month, 7-9
pm. Snacks and tasting of six wines for
$10 (NAf17,50) per person. Tel. 560-
7539.
Soldachi Tours-See the real
Bonaire and be transported back in time.
Learn about the history, culture and na-
ture by Bonaireans from Rincon. Call
Maria Koeks for more information-796-
7870.
Monday
* Soldachi Tours of Rincon, the heart
of Bonaire, 9 am-noon. $20-Call Maria,
717-6435-best island tour value

Friday
* Harbour Village Tennis, Social
Round Robin 7-10 pm. $10 per person.
Cash bar. All invited. Call Elisabeth Vos at
565-5225

FREE SLIDE/VIDEO SHOWS
Sunday- Creature Feature- John and
Suzie Wall of Buddy's Digital photo
center present a multimedia slide presen-
tation about Buddy's House Reef pool
bar Buddy Dive, 6:30-7 pm, 717-5080

Tuesday-- Bonaire Land and Ocean
presentation by Fish-Eye Photo staff,
7pm on the big screen inside the Sunset
Bar and Grill at Den Laman Condos.

Wednesday- Sea Turtle Conservation


Thursday, / l]Nov. 26"-"A"erican












Frda Nv.27-Gr een Labl's' 10nl















stoygnepge15


Bonaire presents the Sea Turtles of Bon-
aire Slide Vi1. .., every 2nd & 4th
Wednesday at Bruce Bowker's Carib Inn
(717-8819) at 7pm.
BONAIRE'S TRADITIONS
Kas Krioyo Rincon-Step into Bonaire's past
in this venerable old home that has been re-
stored and furnished so it appears the family
has just stepped out. Local ladies will tell you
the stoly. Open Monday thru Friday, 9 -12,2-
4. Weekends by appointment. Call 717-2445.
Mangasina diRei, Rincon. Enjoy the view
from "The King's Storehouse." Learn about
Bonaire's culture. Visit homes from the 17th
century. Daily. Call 7174060 / 790-2018
Bonaire Museum on Kaya J. v.d. Ree, behind
the Catholic Church in town. Open weekdays
from 8 am-noon, 1:30-5 pm. Tel. 717-8868
Washington-Slagbaai National Park,
Museum and Visitors' Center. Open
daily 8 am-5 pm. Closed on December
25th. and January 1st. Call 788 9015 or
796 5681

CLUBS and MEETINGS
AA meetings -every Wednesday at
7pm. Phone: 786-4651 or 786-7971
Al-Anon meetings every Monday
evening at 7 pm. Call 790-7272
Weekly Bonaire Talker Gathering
and Dinner at Gibi's Tuesday 6:30
pm call 567-0655 for directions.
Bridge Club Wednesdays, 7:15
pm- All levels, NAf2,50, call Renata at
796-5591 to find out the evening's loca-
tion.
Darts Club plays every other Sunday
at City Cafe. Registration at 4, games at
5. Tel. 717-2950, 560-7539.
JCI First Wednesday of the Month-
Junior Chamber International Bonaire
(JCI Bonaire, formerly known as Bonaire
Jaycees) meets at the ABVO building,
Kaminda Jato Baco 36 from 7:30 to 9:30
pm. Everyone is welcome. Contact: Re-
nata Domacass6 516-4252.
Kiwanis Club meets at APNA Plaza,
Kaya International, every other Tues-
day, 7 pm. Tel. 717-5595, Jeannette
Rodriguez.
Lions Club meets every 2nd and 4th
Thursday of the month at 8 pm at Kaya
Sabana #1. All Lions welcome. For more
information call 510-0710.
Rotary lunch meetings Wednesdays, 12
noon-2 pm Divi Flamingo Beach Re-
sort upstairs in Peter Hughes meeting
room above the dive shop. All Rotarians
welcome. Tel. 717-2066
Toastmasters Club meets every two
weeks. For more information call Crusita
de Palm at 786-3827 or Lucia Martinez
Beck, at 786-2953.


CHURCH SERVICES
Protestant Congregation of Bonaire:
Kralendijk, Wilhelminaplein. In Papia-
mentu, Dutch, English, Sundays, 10 am.
Rincon, Kaya C.D. Crestian, in Papia-
mentu, Sundays, 8:30 am.
Children's club, Saturdays, 5 pm, in
Kralendijk
Sunday School, Sundays, 4 pm, in Rin-
con. Bible Study and Prayer meetings,
Thursday, at 8 pm, Kralendijk.
New Apostolic Church: Centro di
Bario Nord Salifia, Sundays, 10 am.
Services in Dutch. 700-0379.
International Bible Church of Bonaire,
at SGB High School auditorium (Kaya
Frater Odulfinus, off Kaya
Korona.) Sunday services in English at 9
am; Sunday evening prayer meeting at
Pastor's home, 7 pm. Friday, 6 to 8 pm,
Light & Life Club, children 5 to 12
yrs. Tel. 717-8332.
Catholic: San Bernardus in Kralendijk-
Services, Sunday at 8 am and 7 pm in
Papiamentu, 717-8304.
Our Lady of Coromoto in Antriol, Satur-
day at 6 pm in English. Mass in Papia-
mentu on Sunday at 9 am and 6 pm. 717-
4211.
Assembly of God (Asemblea di Dios):
Kaya Triton (Den Cheffi). In English,
Dutch & Papiamentu on Sunday at 10
am. Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30
pm. 717-2194
Ministerio di Kristu Hesus Services
Sunday mornings at 10 am at Jong Bonaire
Youth Center in English, Dutch and Papia-
mentu. Preaching the full gospel. Contact:
786-2557.
Prayer and Intercession Church, in
English. A full Gospel Church located
temporarily at Kaya Alexandrit # 20,
Santa Barbara, Republiek. Services are
held on Sunday mornings from 10am
until 11:30am. Bible studies in English
are on Monday nights from 7 to 8 pm.
Contact: 717-3322
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter
-day Saints: Kaya Sabana #26, Sun-
days: 9 am Sacrament Ser-
vices (Translation to English and Papia-
mentu upon request) 10:20 Sunday
School, 11:15 RS/YM/YW/PH Primary
held from 10:20-12 noon Visitors Wel-
come: 701-9522 for Information


Send event info to:
The Bonaire Reporter
Email reporter@bonairenews.com
Tel:790-6518, 786-6125
or 790-8988


Who's Who on The Bonaire Reporter
Take The Reporter Home-1-year subscription: By mail to US $70; By mail to
Europe $150. By Internet $35 donation. For information about subscriptions, sto-
ries or advertising in The Bonaire Reporter, PO Box 407, Bonaire, Netherlands
Antilles; phone (599) 790-6518, 786-6125, E-mail: info@bonairereporter.com
The Bonaire Reporter, George DeSalvo, Publisher. Laura DeSalvo, Editor in
Chief. Address: P. 0. Box 407, Bonaire, Neth. Antilles. Available on-line at:
www.bonairereporter.com Published every two weeks
Reporters: Siomara E. Albertus, Stephanie Bennett, J@On Brouwer, Christie
Dovale, Ap van Eldik, Annie Heese, Jack Horkheimer, Molly Bartikoski-Keamy,
Greta Kooistra, Ruben Petrisie, Jane Townsend, Inge Vos, Pamela Williams
Unattributed photos are by the editor or publisher.
Distribution: Yuchi Molina (Rincon), Elisabeth Silberie (Playa), Divi-Divi Air-
line
Housekeeping: JRA. Printed by: DeStad Drukkerij, Curaqao
2009 The Bonaire Reporter


Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009












DINING GUIDE
RESTAURANT PRICE RANGE / WHEN OPEN FEATURES
Want your restaurant listed here? It's easy and not expensive Call The Reporterat 717-8988 or 791-7252 for info
Bella Vista Restaurant Moderate. Breakfast and Lunch Magnificent Theme Nights: Saturday: Beach Grill; Monday: Caribbean
Sea Side Restaurant at Buddy Dive Resort Dinner during Theme nights only. Night; Friday: Manager's Rum Punch Party
717-5080, ext. 525 Open every day and All-You-Can-Eat B.B.Q
Bistro de Paris Moderate Real French Cooking in an informal setting
Kaya Gob. N. Debrot 46 Lunch and Dinner Superb dishes prepared with care and love by a French chef
(half-way between hotel row and town) 717-7070 Closed Sunday Owner-operated Eat in or Take away
Brasserie Bonaire Low- Moderate Lunch and Dinner Lots of parking in big mall lot
Royal Palm Galleries Open 11 am -2:30 pm 5:30-9 pm Kitchen Open non-stop llam-6 pm
Kaya Grandi 26, Next to Re/Max, 717-4321 Closed Saturday and Sunday Breezy terrace with airco inside
Calabas Restaurant & Moderate-Expensive Get a view of the beach and turquoise sea while enjoying a breakfast buffet
A Chibi Chibi Resaurant and Berfr Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner or a la carte lunch and dinner at the 'Chibi Chibi' restaurant & bar. Inspiring
At the Divi 717-8285 Flamingo eac Resort. Waterfront Open 7 days vistas and the highest standard of cuisine.

Croccantino Italian Restaurant Moderate-Expensive Tuscan chef prepares exquisite dishes. Authentic ingredients and romantic
Downtown at Kaya Grandi 48 Dinner setting make dining a delight. Be served in a garden setting under floating
717-5025 Closed Monday umbrellas or in air-conditioned comfort. Takeout too.
On th water mant th traffic circle Br te-Exensiver Creative cuisine on the seaside. Top chefs from Amsterdam cook in an open
On the water, just off the traffic circle Breakfast, Lunch Dinner modem kitchen featuring induction cooking. Seafood a specialty.

The Great Escape Moderate Bar-Restaurant poolside -under the thatched roof. Cuban Chef prepares
EEG Blvd #97-across from Belmar Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner Caribbean cuisine. Champagne brunch on Sundays 10 am to noon.
717-7488 Open 7 days Happy hours 5 to 7 every day.
Hilltop at Caribbean Club Bonaire Moderate-Expensive Quiet country setting, lovely landscaping, friendly staff
On the Tourist Road, 2 mi. north of Town Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Happy Hour from 5-7 pm, BBQ on Tuesdays
717-7901 Closed Sunday Gourmet chef creates unique daily specials
The Last Bite Bakery Low-Moderate Enjoy a delicious dessert or savory baked meal in the comfort of your home
Home Delivery or Take Out Orders taken 8 am-4 pm; Deliveries 6-7:30 or resort. This unique bakery offers gourmet class items -always from
717-3293 pm Closed Sunday scratch- for take out or delivery only.
The Lost Penguin Low-Moderate Watch the bustle of downtown from this street side Caribbean-style bistro
Across from MCB Bank in downtown Kralendijk Breakfast, Lunch, Early Dinner owned and run by a European educated Master Chef
Call 717-8003. Closed Tuesdays & Wednesdays and his wife.
Pasa Bon Pizza Low-Moderate Bonaire's best. The Real Thing! Freshly prepared pizzas made with the finest in-
On Kaya Gob. Debrot Open from 5-11 m Wednesday-Sunday gredients. Salads, desserts. Eat in or take away. Nice bar too.
1 mile north of town center. 790-1111 OpenCall ahead to eat-in or take out 790-1111


SH 0 PP I NF G G U I>D E See advertisements in this issue
APPLIANCES/ TV/ ELECTRONICS/ COMPUTERS GARDEN SUPPLIES AND SERVICES RESORTS & ACTIVITIES
City Shop, the mega store, has the island's widest Green Label has everything you need to start or main- Buddy Dive Resort offers diving, Adventure Fun
selection of large and small home appliances. Fast tain your garden. They can design, install and maintain tours including kayaking, mountain biking, cave snor-
service and in-store financing too. it and offer plants, irrigation supplies and garden keling and exploration.
chemicals.
ART GALLERY GIFTS, SOUVENIRS AND LIQUOR RETAIL
Cinnamon Art Gallery non-profit gallery for local art- The Bonaire Gift Shop has an wide selection of Benetton, world famous designer clothes available
ists has continuous shows. Each month a new artist is gifts, souvenirs, liquor, dive watches, digital cameras, now in Bonaire at prices less than those in US. For
featured. Stop by. Free entry. things for the home, T-shirts all at low prices. men, women and children.
BANKS HOTELS SECURITY
Maduro and Curiel's Bank provides the greatest Golden Reef Inn is the affordable alternative with Special Security Services will provide that extra
number of services, branches and ATMs of any Bon- fully equipped studio apartments in a quiet Bonaire measure of protection when you need it. Always reli-
aire bank. They also offer investments and insurance, neighborhood. Just a 3-minute walk to diving and the able.
sea.
BEAUTY PARLOR seaSHIPPING
Hair Affair. E ert hair cutting, styling, facialsUnder new management. Quiet and tranquil setting Rocargo Freight Air and sea shipments in/out of
waxing and professional nail care. with pool and luxuriant garden in Belnem. Cyber Bonaire. Customs agents. Professional and efficient.
BICYCLE / SCOOTER/ QUADS Caf6, DVD rentals, restaurant and bar. FedEx agent.
De Freewieler rents scooters and quads; profession- METALWORK AND MACHINE SHOP SUPERMARKETS
ally repairs almost anything on two wheels. Sells top ME b-Botterop Construction Bonaire N., offers Tropical FlaminOo is convenient, clean, modem,
brand bikes. Have your keys made here. outstanding fabrication of all metal products, includ- efficient and has the lowest prices on Bonaire. Lo-
BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION ing stainless. Complete machine shop too. cated behind NAPA.
APA Construction are professional General Visit Warehouse Bonaire to shop in a large, spotless
Contractors. They also specialize in creating patios PHOTO FINISHING supermarket. You' 11find American and European
and walkways with fabulous sprayed and stamped Paradise Photo in the Galeries Shopping Center of- brand products. THE market for provisioning.
concrete pavement. fers fast, fine processing for prints, slides, items and
services for your picture-taking pleasure. VILLAS
DIVING Bonaire Oceanfront villa for up to nine people: five
Carib Inn is the popular 10-room inn with top-notch REAL ESTATE / RENTAL AGENTS kitchens, five bathrooms. Ideal for divers.
dive shop and well stocked retail store. Best book trade Harbourtown Real Estate is Bonaire's oldest real
on Bonaire. Good prices on regulator repair, dive com- estate agent. They specialize in professional cus- WATER TAXI
puter H.Q tomer services and top notch properties. Get to Klein Bonaire by Ferry. Ride the Kantika di
Photo Tours Divers-Yellow Submarine -low Amor or Skiffy. Hotel pickup.
prices on the seaside at Kralendijk, at Caribbean Mike Boom & Associates Broad assortment of
Club, Caribbean Court and the Hamlet Oasis. Join homes and properties. View on their website www. WINES
their cleanup dives and BBQ. bonairerealty.com or office in town Antillean Wine Company. You've tried the rest;
WannaDive They make diving fun while maintain- now try the best: best prices, highest quality wines
ing the highest professional standards. In town at Re/Max Paradise Homes: Intemational/US connec- from around the world, kept in a cooled warehouse.
City Cafe and at Eden Beach. tions. 5% of profits donated to local community. Free delivery.
FITNESS Sunbelt Realty offers full real estate, rental, and in- YOGA
Bonfysio offers comprehensive fitness programs to surance services. If you want a home or to invest in Yoga For You. Join certified instructors Desirde and
suit your needs whether they be weight loss, sports or Bonaire, stop in and see them. Don for a workout that will refresh mind and body.
just keeping in shape. Convenient schedule. Private lessons too. Closed during June.
REPAIRS
Fit 4 Life at the Plaza Resort Mall. Classes in Pi- Bon Handyman is here if you need something fixed ATTENTION BUSINESSMENWR OMEN:
lates, Aerobics, TaeBo and more. Professional train- or built. Ultra reliable, honest and experienced. Elec- Put your ad in The Bonaire reporter.
ers, fitness machines and classes for all levels. trical, plumbing, woodworking, etc. 717-2345 Phone/Fax 717-8988, Cel 791-7252


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 20














Complaining Stops Here Finding Balance
lP .


Up until now this series has highlighted a number of problems in the Bonaire
tourism and development program and has tried to throw light on several areas.
In this last installment of the Finding Balance for Bonaire series, we will briefly sum-
marize the issues uncovered in our investigations and will then move away from the
complaining stage toward some concrete suggestions.
After a review of the key observations, we would like to propose a structural ap-
proach to sustainable development for Bonaire so its inhabitants can prosper long-term.
Long-term is defined as 'our children, their children and all the children who follow
them. '


Key Observations
One of the most obvious points from the investigation is that many people and many
groups are running in many directions toward development without the benefit of a co-
herent, coordinated vision or plan. Efforts today seem to be on an 'ad hoc' basis. At
one time the island seemed to be following the 1997-2007 sustainable development plan
that was created by Tourism Corporation Bonaire, but that plan, and others like the
Pourier Report which were written for sustainable development, seem to have been
abandoned.


1. Need for Vision
The only 'vision' that can be detected
today emerges from recent speeches by
government leaders who want to in-
crease tourism 'drastically' and bring in
large mega-hotels. It is interesting to
note that this desire for 500+ bed hotels
flies in the face of current tourism trends
around the world.
Today, many hotels and most desti-
nations like Cozumel are trying to
move away from mega-hotels and re-
duce the 'density' of tourists in a sin-
gle location. Why? Because today's
'upscale,' ideal tourist wants a more inti-
mate experience and they want a socially
and environmentally responsible experi-
ence. Many destinations have also


What's in a Vision?
A solid vision is one that defines
the short and long-term limits of
what is sustainable for this particular
island, including the maximum level
of tourists, maximum number of di-
vers, maximum number of cruise
ships. It is not just words and hopes
for the future but is based on studies
of the environment and infrastructure
and the pressures that tourism puts on
them. It is called 'carrying capacity'
and it defines the LIMITS to the is-
lands' ability to withstand use or ac-
tivities. As protection improves or
worsens, the limits must be revised.


learned that smaller, intimate, responsible resorts do less damage to the environment
and infrastructure. Just what Bonaire currently has to offer.
A sustainable vision is also based on the culture and the desires of the entire com-
munity. Just how far can tourism grow before the influx of immigrants needed to fill
the jobs dilutes the local culture to unacceptable levels? Studies must be done to track
the needs and desires of the community and changes in these attitudes must be moni-
tored over time.
But a "vision statement," like the 1997 TCB document that was a subject of an earlier
article, means nothing without a Plan that has support from all sectors on the island --
Public and Private, Commercial and Non-profit. And a Plan must have the force of law
behind it to make it function.


2. Need for a Plan
To make recently proposed 'drastic
changes' to the island's tourism with-
out a clear and approved plan is dan-
gerous. 'Ad hoc' changes like doubling
the number of hotel beds without in-
creasing advertising to create demand
and without major improvements in in-
frastructure will only destroy the fragile
market that exists today.


What kind of Plan?
Elements of a solid, long-term is-
land plan would include scaled im-
provements over time in infrastruc-
ture, transport, environmental protec-
tion and monitoring, marketing and
promotion and sustained community
integration. Also included in the plan
must be a determination of how much
the island must invest to reach its
goals-at each step--and where the
island will find the necessary funding.


3. Misunderstood Numbers
The current leaders of Bonaire's tourism and development seem to be ignoring the
fact that Bonaire's existing hotels are not operating at acceptable occupancy or
room revenue rates to be truly profitable. Some are barely hanging on, and few have
the resources to train their staffs or upgrade their facilities. These numbers mean that
more beds are possibly the worst solution to the problem.
Also being ignored is the fact that in 2004 many of Bonaire's flights from the US ar-
rived half full so that American Eagle reduced its service and when it was time for Air
Jamaica to cut destinations just to stay in business, Bonaire was one of the first go.

4. Missing Numbers
Another key observation is that there seems to be a serious lack of consumer infor-
mation, including why and how tourists are making their destination decision and what
their satisfaction level is with the Bonaire product. Some data are collected on entry
cards, but it is processed so slowly that it is of little value. And one hotel operator, Bel-
lafonte Property Management, has taken a leadership role to start the process and learn
more about Bonaire's customers. Other sources are the Caribbean and World Tourism
Associations which have huge databanks of tourist information available at reasonable
prices. These sources would give some insight into our relative position in the market
and the strengths and weaknesses of our competition.


Page 6


1or onaire

f 4/Conclusion


S5. No Responsibility
-/ By ignoring the numbers, failing to thoroughly under-
stand market dynamics and blaming the problems on the
- lack of airlift and too few hotel rooms, Bonaire's leaders
have failed to take responsibility for the situation.


6. Lost Direction
In the process of moving toward mega hotels it appears that the government wants to
move toward 'mass tourism.' In a recent speech the island was promised 'drastic
changes in the level of Bonaire's tourism.'
This direction is opposite the one stated in the 2003 Bonaire Investment Guide pub-
lished by DEZA (Economics Dept.). There it states: "Development is predicated upon
the philosophy that Bonaire's economic growth must be controlled, sustainable and
quality balanced, with significant benefits for the Bonairean population, and respecting
Bonaire's nature, culture and identity." A move toward mega-hotels and mass tour-
ism is a move into a totally new direction for which the island is ill prepared.

Proposal for Finding Balance
The situation has reached a critical point: air service has been lost, hotels are oper-
ating below reasonable expectations, planning has become ad hoc to fill gaps but
does not come from a strong, agreed upon basis.
Action is needed and needed quickly. The following suggestion would provide a
mechanism to mobilize and motivate all the stakeholders and should result in a Five-
Year Development Plan that will allow the island to move forward in a manner that is
controllable and sustainable.
In a previous article we suggested a Public-Private Partnership to address the is-
land's needs. This group should be created by the Island Government but would be
non-political in nature. This may not be easy on Bonaire where almost everything has a
political component, but statesmanship is called for here and must be shown by all
parties. The need is so great and the potential effects so profound that all segments of
the community must feel that their voice has been heard.
Members of the Partnership would serve voluntarily or as a part of their regular jobs.
The process itself should take no more than six months so that the Development Plan
can be published and adopted by all stakeholders. The Island Government will need to
resolve that the Plan is the official government policy and include enforcement provi-
sions so that the members know that the ultimate program will be executed.
The World Tourism Organization actually recommends PPPs and this group even
publishes an evaluation of 208 successful PPPs from 205 countries.


Public-Private
Partnership

The proposed PPP is outlined below. Certainly other members of the community will
have ideas to improve this structure, but it is a starting place.
At the head of the PPP would be a Director, appointed by the Board of TCB. This
Director would have the responsibility to coordinate all the activities of the PPP and to
create a unified Five-year Development Plan as a result of its activities. The Director
would be provided with an Advisory Board of three or four people with expertise in
Economics, Marketing, Tourism and Planning.
Eight workgroups would be created to address the specific areas of their expertise
quickly and efficiently. With the exception of group number four (infrastructure) each
group would consist of a maximum of five members so that meeting schedules and dis-
cussions can be streamlined.
Each of the eight workgroups would be charged with providing the Director and the
other groups with goals and plans for the next five years.
1. Transport The goals of this group would be to monitor capacity and load factors
and recommend any changes that would be needed. The group would also be ex-
pected to maintain contact and build relationships with airlines (passenger and
freight) and cruise lines. Possible members would be from BIA, Airline and Cruise
Agents, Shipping Companies.
2. Environment Clearly, the island must protect the very reason that tourists come to
Bonaire in the first place: our unique environment below and above the sea. This
group would advise on the impact of various levels of development, review the im-
pact of all potential projects and would be challenged to recommend positive meth-
ods to allow for sane, non-destructive growth. Possible members: STINAPA, Ali-
ansa di Naturalesa, DROB, Fishermen, other NGOs with an interest in the environ-
ment, resident experts.
3. Economy The tourism sector represents approximately 70% of the island's econ-
omy. Therefore it is essential that all plans be looked at with a professional eye
toward the immediate and long-term impact on the island's economy and the fi-
nancing of the plan. Suggested members: DEZA, Bonaire Bankers Association,
AKIB, resident economists.
4. Infrastructure Growth in tourism will bring with it new and constantly changing
(Continued on page 7)

Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005











- 0 --


Volunteer Deborah with "Enrico" and "Frant e"L'


What would the Bonaire Ani-
mal Shelter be without its
devoted volunteers? On a recent Satur-
day, due to vacations, sickness, sched-
ules and other things, the only volun-
teer who could come to help was Deb-
orah. Although only a youngster herself
(she's 12) she does a considerable job -
cleaning, feeding and playing with the
cats and dogs so they can remain social
with people. Not only is she doing a
fine service but she's learning responsi-
bility and helping others with no finan-
cial remuneration (pay). Thank you,
Deborah! You're doing great!
Here's Deborah in the puppy cage
with "Enrico" and "Frances," his good
friend. Enrico, along with his brother,
"Jose," "Roberto," and "Pedro," were
born on April 16 in someone's yard.
Their mom had decided to find a place
where people were to have her puppies.
The kind people, knowing they could-
n't keep the dogs themselves, brought
them into the Shelter where they knew
they could have a good chance at life.
The pups are all healthy and full of fun
and enthusiasm. They've had their vet
exam, gotten their shots and are all roly
poly funny guys. You may see them at
the Bonaire Animal Shelter on the La-
goen Road, open Monday through Fri-
day, 10 am to 2 pm. Tel. 717-4989.
Do you love animals and want to
make a difference? Come visit the
Shelter and see why volunteers are so


portant to keeping the pets happy
and social. Volunteers may pick their
own hours too. They may be some of
the best times you'll have on Bonaire!
Call Shelter Manager Jurrie Mellema at
717-4989. OL.D.


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 18












A Force for Good













W090i4orl i0&mA

AMFO and the NGO Platform
Would you like to help your community? Do you see a problem that needs a
solution? Do you have an idea for a specific project? Does your project pro-
vide a social benefit to others? Are you motivated to organize and inspire others to
join you? Then you can make a difference on Bonaire! It all starts with an idea.
Here are some successful, innovative programs that started with an idea from a
motivated person like you.


It All Starts with an Idea -PartII


I-


Combat Domestic Violence
"I think to myself, if I can just help one person leave a bad
situation .... ,"says an ex-battered wife who now volunteers
at Skagit Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault Services in
Washington State, the non-profit agency that helped save
her. She had returned to her abusive husband seven times
before she was able to leave him for good. This agency is
one of many that help victims of rape and domestic violence
by providing shelter, counseling and legal support. Another
group sponsors The Voices and Faces Project to get out
the message, "There is nothing that you could ever do to
make it OK for someone to rape you." R.A.I.N.N. is a na-
tional free hotline for rape and incest victims that helps
bring rapists to justice.


What happens to the children of violent,
abusive or negligent families? That's the
concern of a California program, Forget
Me Not Farm, where abused and ne-
glected children can learn caring, compas-
sion, and gentleness through their work
with plants and animals. To nurture a
seedling to full growth or to bottle feed
and cuddle with a young, orphaned calf
may be all it takes to break the cycle of
abuse that is too often the legacy of these
children.




Free Schooling
Helping women become better educated and employed is a popular focus of vol-
unteer groups. The New Opportunity School for Women in Kentucky provides
free courses in writing, math, computer and job skills for women, especially low-
income, middle-aged women who want to get off welfare and get ajob. In Pennsyl-
vania, TOP/WIN (Tradeswomen of Purpose/Women In Non-Traditional Work)
trains women to qualify for construction and skilled trade jobs so they can support


Continued on page 11


Feed and Train
Many people get the idea for a community project from where they work or volun-
teer. Robert Egger helped at a soup kitchen for the poor before he decided that just
giving out donated food wasn't the solution. "If you want to help a kid, get their
parent a decent job," says Robert. So he began DC Central Kitchen which offers
food as well as food training to the homeless and poor. The food meets their imme-
diate needs, but then they learn cooking and food handling skills to help them get
jobs in the restaurant and catering industry. When he first received some funding
for the project in 1989, he bought a refrigerated truck and collected leftovers from
the inaugural balls that had celebrated the beginning of George H.W. Bush's presi-
dency! A spin-off training program came next. "I noticed that school cafeterias
were closed for most of the day and that restaurants and catering business threw out
as much as 30% of their food," Mr. Egger explains. Campus Kitchens Project was
created to use kitchens in public schools, colleges, and universities to train students
how to prepare donated food, which is then delivered to hungry people in each local
area.


Connect to the Land
One prison counselor, Catharine Sneed, believed that the prisoners would benefit
from working outdoors in a garden where they might learn to nurture instead of de-
stroy. So she encouraged the jail to convert old farmland into The Garden Project.
She says proudly, "Seventy-five percent of Garden Project participants do not re-
turn to jail. .. When people have a connection to land, they have hope in their
lives." More gardens were made, and then the Tree Corps was created, which has
planted more than 10,000 street trees-mostly in poor neighborhoods.


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 10










On the Island Since (Continued from page 4)
time with our sons too. Michael just fin-
ished Hotel Management and Tobias is
studying Tourism and Event Management.
Both of them prefer to come here instead
of our going to visit them there.
In 1993 Wilfried learned Papiamentu and
when people speak slowly he understands
it well, but when they go fast he doesn't
get a word. I can read Papiamentu, but I
don't speak it. For three years we've been
learning Spanish at the Venezuelan Insti-
tute. Latin we know as we both studied it
for seven years. But the Spanish grammar
at this age is quite hard! Still, I feel we
have to make the effort as so many people
here come from Latin countries and we
want to be able to communicate with them.
Bonaire gave us so much that we felt we
wanted to give something back. We de-
cided to volunteer at the animal shelter and
now we're at the cruise ship market selling
T-shirts, but... we also give information
about the island to the tourists. People do
have a lot of questions so Wilfried and I
participated in the course TCB organized
in Papiamentu, 'Turismo; nos bida, nos
future,' and both of us got our diploma.
There's going to be a follow up and we'll
do that one too.
We are very enthusiastic about the island
and we love to pass the information on to
the tourists. This year many cruise ship
passengers are from Latin countries and
it's great to see how they react when you
address them in their own language. Tour-
ists feel more accepted when you try to
speak their language and they don't expect
you to be perfect. It's the effort that
counts! The atmosphere at the market is
great and the one thing all the tourists are
talking about is how clean the island is.
Thanks to SELIBON, a terrific company."
Brigitte and Wilfried are very socially
involved people. Bright as they are, they
see things from a good perspective. They
are optimistic with a lot of energy and
because of the way they've traveled the
world, they have a broad view, which
makes them an asset to the island.
"We enjoy the beauty of Bonaire every
day. It's sad to say, but other islands have
lost a great deal of their charm because of
over population and too much construc-
tion. Bonaire is still good, but they have to
keep an eye on the developments and
make sure we won't get stuck with ruins of
buildings. We've seen that too often in
Portugal and Spain.
The other day I read a letter to the editor
in The Reporter about keeping Sunset
Beach for the local people and we totally
agreed with the writer. Sunset Beach used
to be the place were we spent the week-
ends; the children learned how to swim
there, they learned how to snorkel and it
was the hangout where everybody would
meet Bonaireans, Americans and the
Dutch it was a social event, a mixture of
cultures and all social levels, lots of fun!
Sunset Beach should be given back to
the local people. If we want to get some-
thing good out of this economic crisis -
this is the opportunity. We could have a
place where everyone young and old and
of all backgrounds and cultures could
spend the weekend together. Some time
ago Wilfried saw the famous old poster at
the tax office a picture of Sunset Beach
and the text, 'Unhurried Unspoiled -
Unforgettable.' We could have that back.
There won't be another chance now is
the time!
There's also something else that I feel


we need here: a place where people can '
announce all the local events that are tak- ,
ing place on the island, in three languages.
Let's say there could be a special an-
nouncement board at all the big supermar-
kets where everybody comes and each and
everyone who's organizing something a
little league tournament, a fundraising, a
beauty contest, a cake baking contest -
whatever little local thing could be hung
there for everyone to know, to go and see
and to participate and learn about the cul-
ture of this island, so that all of us will be
involved in what's going on in our com-
munity. There's way more to Bonaire then
diving!
Life on Bonaire is just different. It's
slower and we enjoy intensely meeting
people of all cultures. That wouldn't be
possible in Germany at our age. Also,
we're walking, snorkeling and swimming
and there are a lot of fitness places where
older people can go too. Both of us need
regular check-ups by specialists and we
found highly qualified specialists the
same level as in Germany on Curagao, so
for special medical treatment we don't
have to go back to Germany. When you're
60+ in Europe there isn't much going on
anymore socially as friends don't like to
drive at night and prefer to stay at home.
Here we live outside most of the day and


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at night there are always several happy
hours. In Germany we used to go to con-
certs and theaters, but here there are vari-
ous events taking place on a regular basis
too. We went to the Jazz Festival for four
nights in a row and we met everybody
there.
We can grow old here we definitely
want to. Wilfried and I have traveled ex-


tensively all our lives -
been interested in meet-
ing other cultures. We
are globe trotters -we
still are but Bonaire
has become the center
of our life."E
Story & Photos by
Greta Kooistra


we've always


it


KAYA INTERNATIONAL #36
BONAIRE. KRALENDIJK
TEL:717-4630/717-3666
FAX; 717-4650
E-:MATLmnfocityshopnvygmail.com


Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009


I i A // CI



SA OFFCIAL


, 4 ". .


2%. ~ a
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Page 5











(Tonky in Greece Continued from page 9)
wind for competition, and many sailors
thought of this as an extra day to get
over the tiredness of the ferry trip.
Day 2 followed and there was no
wind again. We spent the day on the
beach, waiting for a change in weather
conditions, but it was useless. After a
windless Day 3, the organizers ap-
proached us to ask if we were willing to
stay in Paros if the event would be ex-
tended to two more days on June 13 and
14. They told us that these two days
would be very windy according to the
weather forecast. We talked about it.
And since it would not interfere with
the next stop in Mykonos (June 17), we
agreed to stay. Thank God we stayed
because there really was WIND."

The European Professional
Freestyle Tour report
for the event said:
"Finally this morning the riders got a
warm welcome of 16 knots of wind.
The first start was at noon with Tonky
Frans (F2/Gaastra) against Fillipo Bu-
ratti (RRD/Simmer). In this heat al-
ready you could see that Tonky was hot
to go for his second win on the Greek
tour. On his way through the ladder nei-
ther Andreas Olanderson (JP/NP) nor
the very sympatico Dutch guy Kevin


Mevissen (JP/NP) could stop him. (King of the Caribbean 2005) where we


At the semi final the dancing style of
Tonky combined with lots of the hottest
freestyle moves like the Chachoo,
Grubby-Diablo and Flaka put him in the
finals to meet the current tour leader,
Andre Paskowski (F2/North Sails).
Coming to the final, Tonky started the
heat like it was never seen before on the
European Tour. Within the first two
minutes he showed everything possible
in these difficult conditions as the wind
started to become very gusty. But in the
second half of the heat, Tonky ap-
peared nervous despite having the title
almost in his hands. Andre showed a
couple of winning moves, like a switch
puneta. But Tonky saved the best for
the end of the heat, and one more time
his incredible loose and relaxed style in
combination with the hottest technical
freestyle moves in windsurfing freestyle
brought him the second title on the
European Freestyle Pro Tour."

Tonky happy with his win:
"I am very happy with my second
title. It feels great because I worked so
hard for it. It is also a funny thing that
my opponent in the final heat was An-
dre Paskowski. We were scheduled to
compete against each other in Bonaire


unfortunately did not get the chance
because of lack of wind. Now I finally
got the chance to show him what I had
in store for him a month ago in Bon-
aire!"

Tonky continued his tour in
Mykonos
"On Wednesday June 15, we took the
ferry from Paros to Mykonos, heading
to the next event. From the moment I
arrived I did not like the wind that
much, but I knew I had to do my best
because I would definitely go for the
top position. As opposed to the Paros
event where we arrived just one day
prior to the competition, we got there in



time at Mykonos to train a little bit be-
fore the event. This is a good thing to
do because then one gets acquainted
with the water and also the wind.
I had a very good heat in the first
elimination. People on the beach told
me that they did not expect anything
else of me since they have read stories
about my prior achievements on the
other Greek islands. At that moment I
realized that the expectations people
had of me were very high and that peo-


ple had their eyes on me. I had to go
against Kevin Mevissen again in the
semi-finals where I won again. My next
opponent during the final of the single
elimination was my F2 team rider, An-
dre Paskowski (again!). I won the sin-
gle elimination and tomorrow there will
be the double elimination where the
winner of Mykonos will be an-
nounced."

The European Professional
Freestyle Tour report for the
event read:
"The crowd was screaming when
Kevin Mevissen and Tonky Frans
started their heat, coming to the shore
and doing almost a synchronic perform-

Continued on page 22

ance of spock one handed, grubby and
spock 5400 on their first leg in. On their
way out huge forwards one handed and
planning flakas as well as flaka Diablo
made the crowd on the beach almost go
crazy. As Kevin took the victory in the
first final, the guys had to go one more
time against each other, and Kevin was
hot. At the end the decision was close
but it was Kevin who deserved to win


(Continued on page 22)


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 17

































2005 The Bonaire Reporter
Published weekly. For information about subscriptions, stories or
advertising in The Bonaire Reporter, phone (599) 717-8988, 791-
7252, fax 717-8988, E-mail to: Reporter@bonairenews.com The
Bonaire Reporter, George DeSalvo, Publisher. Laura DeSalvo, Edi-
tor in Chief. Address: Kaya Gob. Debrot 200-6; Bonaire, Neth. An-
tilles. Available on-line at: www.bonairereporter.com
Reporters: Boi Antoin, Albert Bianculli, Barbara Mason Bian-
culli, S.C., Dodo, Jack Horkheimer, Anna Kleimer, Greta Kooistra,
Michael Thiessen Ap van Eldik
Features Editor: Greta Kooistra Translations: Peggy Bakker,
Sue Ellen Felix
Production: Barbara Lockwood
Distribution: Yuchi Molina (Rincon), Elizabeth Silberie (Playa);
Housekeeping: Jaidy Rojas Acevedo. Printed by: DeStad Druk-
kerij Curacao


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 16











Flotsam & Jetsam (Continued from page 2)
Ab Klink.
Klink is currently analyzing the potential
to curb the cost of treating BES island pa-
tients abroad by flying in doctors. He as-
sured better medical provisions and an im-
proved health care system for the three is-
lands that should become part of the Neth-
erlands as "public entities" in 2010.

Five of the 13 custodians of the Bon-
aire jail left for the Netherlands for two
weeks. Rene Borg Linden, Ditmar Palm,
Silberie Humphrey, Roy Burleson and Ar-
lene Dorothea, as interns, will check out the
jails in Lelystad and Almere. The intern-
ship is intended to show "what else can be
accomplished in the Bonaire jail." The in-
terns will study safety, daily routine, hy-
giene and the intake process of inmates.
Their study will include interviewing pris-
oners and intake procedures.

The Dutch economy grew by 0.4% in
the third quarter of this year, compared
with the previous quarter, meaning the
country is now officially out of recession.
The new figures from Central Bureau for
Statistics (CBS) revealed the first period of
economic growth in a year. On an annual
basis, however, the economy contracted by
3.7%. "According to normal definitions, the
Netherlands is now out of recession," the
CBS said in a press statement.

POEnvironmental NGOs have been hit
hard by the economic downturn and this
has had an impact on their effectiveness. In
a recent survey of 800 US-based non-
profits, 75% reported feeling the effects of
the downturn, with more than half already
experiencing significant cuts in funding
from both government and private founda-
tion sources.

According to the figures being re-
ported to this newspaper the number
of lionfish being reported just about
doubles every seven days. Elsmarie
Beukenboom, Director of STINAPA,
agrees that more and more Lionfish are
being identified in the waters of Bonaire.
STINAPA considers the fish a danger to
the indigenous fish of Bonaire.
Divers have reported the sightings and
the Marine Park has gone into a state of
alert. Beukenboom says, "Lionfish are
everywhere. They have appeared in Los
Roques (islands 200 miles to the east)
and along Venezuela's Falcon state
coast." If swimmers see a Lionfish they
should report it to STINAPA headquar-
ters at 717-8444. They should not attempt
to capture it themselves.

P Fine original art is available on
Bonaire. Check out page 18 for a glimpse
of Ronald Verhoven's work or go to ronald-
verhoven@msn.com

A The Second
Hamburger BBQ
competition will
be on December i
5 at Flamingo TV
on Kaya Korona, 5 4
from 3pm on- _
wards.
Anyone is allowed to participate, but
space is limited to 20 competitors. Regis-
tration forms are available at the offices of
Flamingo TV. Those wanting more infor-
mation can call 511-4216
The idea is for the contest to be a family
event. There will be games for kids and
even a mini-cake decorating contest for
those aged 4-10, all for FREE! Sinterklaas


0 The Social Insurance Bank (SVB) has introduced insurance for people
over 60. Up until now SVB insurance was cut off when someone became 60 years-
old. Their only alternative then was expensive private insurance or a "PP, poor per-
sons" card.
According to Health Minister Omayra Leeflang, the announcement of the new
package on October 1 is "the redemption of sins against the elderly." PP recipients
will be included.
To be covered by SVB, a 60-plus person must apply at SVB to validate his/her
rights. He/she must sign an authorization form allowing SVB to submit his/her in-
formation to the Inspectorate of Taxes for verification. A previously insured worker,
turning 60, will remain insured after applying.
SVB is obliged to accept all pensioners, regardless of their taxable income and no
matter the nature of their illness. Under the premium base, taxable income has to be
no more than two years old. The pensioner will authorize SVB to gather information
from the Inspectorate of Taxes, where his/her identity number and/or CRIB-number
is recorded for verification.
The insured will pay a premium of 10.4% up to a limit of NAJ 478 per month.
For example, if a person's income were NAJ 2.000 per month, he she would pay
10.4%t of that amount or NAJ 208 per month. If the person is receiving an AOV
pension, on application, he/she can authorize SVB to withhold the premium for sick-
ness insurance from his or her old age pension. For a retired couple each must pay
his or her own premium.
A 60-plusser who does not receive a pension or if his/her pension is not sufficient
is obligated to pay his/her own premium. Visit the SVB for full information,


will also be making a special stop.
In addition, there will be local bands pro-
viding great music.

There will be a great end of the year
Christmas concert on Saturday, December
19 at 7:30 pm at the Cacique Hall, Plaza
Resort Bonaire. The Classical Music Board
of Bonaire will present Musicians from
Bonaire for Bonaire.
The program will include light European,
American and Antillean classical music;
sing-alongs and more! Plus an after party.
Performances:
Krusa Musika : Linda Anthony, soprano;
Joke Dekkers, alto; Hans Faassen, piano and
bass; Erik van Silfhout, tenor and violin. With
Special guests: Joke Dekkers, alto, and Hans
van der Veen, trumpet.
The End of the Year Choir with 35 sing-
ers. A combined effort from Ars Kantandi
and Kreator, conductor Frans Lauxen; piano
Sue Felix
Radjwant Gonesh, piano solo il. .idil-
lean dances.
The first presentation in the D iL. 1.1 il k
of a Portatief, a wooden pipe or.i_ ll.i p.c.I
by Frans Lauxen.
Tutti Frutti the pearls of Rinc illi 1.1 -
sical ballads and dances from B.i.c Cl .!.
an after party with Tutti Frutti.
Tickets are only NAf 25 at E l, ,! .,.Il
Toys, Flamingo Bookstore ( K.,- .1 ii...I

Kwartiermakers and Counterpar,n
(Continued ..
Minister of Justice of the Ne- Ic. iLin.. -in-
tilles is responsible).

The organization of the nev i .ii ) l,-
ing set up by George Menschc .i.ii .Ic .i. *_
and others on Bonaire and in i Ic !. ii,ci -
lands. Both men agree on the ,..!.1.,h- 1 I!i,
cooperation. "We are really v .! ii_ c!!
together. Good cooperation d.c *c iL mic.
that we always agree on ever- 1i!,.i ii .I .c
mean that we are willing to li ri i. c..i l
other, that there is trust betw ii u.i ..r.I li.,11
we are working together on tlin ..Ii.I..l ..I
problems. The basis is mutue I ic 'c. .rii'.l
that's the way it should be!"
Story and photo .'". i .. i .



Inge Vos is a re-
cent arrival on Bon-
aire. She has ex-
perience in Commu-
nications and writes
for Dutch language
newspapers.


and the reception at Plaza Resort Bonaire.
They will be NAf 35 at the door.
Children under 12, accompanied by par-
ents pay NAf 10. A full house is expected.
Get tickets early and don't be late!

What's a gift everyone will love? A
Jong Bonaire 2010 calendar. On sale at the
Warehouse Bonaire Supermarket at the cost
price. Buy several.

IOur last issue had a few errors. UPB
leader Yonchi Dortalina's name and our
granddaughter's second middle name, Tal-
lan, were misspelled. The photo in the coral
spawning article was taken by Johannetta
Gordijn. We apologize for the mistakes. 0
G./L. D.


I...TWF
JHealing Touch Worldwide Foundation, Inc.


This Month- Dec.
Energy Work Classes
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By a Top American
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1-Healin2 Touch (Level 1) Class
on Dec. 18, 2009
A one day intensive course for giving
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Instructor: Susan Reed -DeSalvo, LVN,
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Tuition NAJ 150 ($85) in Bonaire
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Class, Evenings, Dec. 22 and 29th,
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Tuition NAf 150 ($85) in Bonaire
(regular USA fee is $350)

Register today by mailing Susan at
blueskyz(Widiom.com 001 707 928-
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790-8988


Bonaire's Largest and Best Stocked supermarket

Always: Fresh Fruit, Vegetables,
Dairy, Bread and Meat


Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009


Page 9











(Tonky in Greece Continued from page 9)
wind for competition, and many sailors
thought of this as an extra day to get
over the tiredness of the ferry trip.
Day 2 followed and there was no
wind again. We spent the day on the
beach, waiting for a change in weather
conditions, but it was useless. After a
windless Day 3, the organizers ap-
proached us to ask if we were willing to
stay in Paros if the event would be ex-
tended to two more days on June 13 and
14. They told us that these two days
would be very windy according to the
weather forecast. We talked about it.
And since it would not interfere with
the next stop in Mykonos (June 17), we
agreed to stay. Thank God we stayed
because there really was WIND."

The European Professional
Freestyle Tour report
for the event said:
"Finally this morning the riders got a
warm welcome of 16 knots of wind.
The first start was at noon with Tonky
Frans (F2/Gaastra) against Fillipo Bu-
ratti (RRD/Simmer). In this heat al-
ready you could see that Tonky was hot
to go for his second win on the Greek
tour. On his way through the ladder nei-
ther Andreas Olanderson (JP/NP) nor
the very sympatico Dutch guy Kevin


Mevissen (JP/NP) could stop him. (King of the Caribbean 2005) where we


At the semi final the dancing style of
Tonky combined with lots of the hottest
freestyle moves like the Chachoo,
Grubby-Diablo and Flaka put him in the
finals to meet the current tour leader,
Andre Paskowski (F2/North Sails).
Coming to the final, Tonky started the
heat like it was never seen before on the
European Tour. Within the first two
minutes he showed everything possible
in these difficult conditions as the wind
started to become very gusty. But in the
second half of the heat, Tonky ap-
peared nervous despite having the title
almost in his hands. Andre showed a
couple of winning moves, like a switch
puneta. But Tonky saved the best for
the end of the heat, and one more time
his incredible loose and relaxed style in
combination with the hottest technical
freestyle moves in windsurfing freestyle
brought him the second title on the
European Freestyle Pro Tour."

Tonky happy with his win:
"I am very happy with my second
title. It feels great because I worked so
hard for it. It is also a funny thing that
my opponent in the final heat was An-
dre Paskowski. We were scheduled to
compete against each other in Bonaire


unfortunately did not get the chance
because of lack of wind. Now I finally
got the chance to show him what I had
in store for him a month ago in Bon-
aire!"

Tonky continued his tour in
Mykonos
"On Wednesday June 15, we took the
ferry from Paros to Mykonos, heading
to the next event. From the moment I
arrived I did not like the wind that
much, but I knew I had to do my best
because I would definitely go for the
top position. As opposed to the Paros
event where we arrived just one day
prior to the competition, we got there in



time at Mykonos to train a little bit be-
fore the event. This is a good thing to
do because then one gets acquainted
with the water and also the wind.
I had a very good heat in the first
elimination. People on the beach told
me that they did not expect anything
else of me since they have read stories
about my prior achievements on the
other Greek islands. At that moment I
realized that the expectations people
had of me were very high and that peo-


ple had their eyes on me. I had to go
against Kevin Mevissen again in the
semi-finals where I won again. My next
opponent during the final of the single
elimination was my F2 team rider, An-
dre Paskowski (again!). I won the sin-
gle elimination and tomorrow there will
be the double elimination where the
winner of Mykonos will be an-
nounced."

The European Professional
Freestyle Tour report for the
event read:
"The crowd was screaming when
Kevin Mevissen and Tonky Frans
started their heat, coming to the shore
and doing almost a synchronic perform-

Continued on page 22

ance of spock one handed, grubby and
spock 5400 on their first leg in. On their
way out huge forwards one handed and
planning flakas as well as flaka Diablo
made the crowd on the beach almost go
crazy. As Kevin took the victory in the
first final, the guys had to go one more
time against each other, and Kevin was
hot. At the end the decision was close
but it was Kevin who deserved to win


(Continued on page 22)


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 17











(It starts with an Idea. Continued from page 10)
their families and break free of poverty.
They learn the skills needed to become
plumbers, heavy machine operators, elec-
tricians, machinists, carpenters and con-
struction workers. A TOP/WIN graduate e
says, "I'm a better mother now than in the
past... I've doubled my income. My daughter looks at me and she's very proud -
and I am too of the person I've become." Women Venture also teaches women
how to get rewarding, higher paying jobs, how to find careers that interest them and
how to start and grow their own businesses.

Can you help?
Non-profit organizations serve people in Gandhi once said,
a variety of ways. For instance, the people "The best way to find
being helped might be "receivers," that is, yourself is to lose yourself
they receive food, shelter, clothing, medi- in the service of others."
cine, etc. to provide for their immediate
needs. An example of this type is the relief sent to tsunami victims. In another kind
of program, the people might be "learners" in specially designed training or educa-
tion classes, perhaps on how to keep a family budget, how to be a better father, or
how to control a gambling addiction. These organizations try to find out why a
problem exists and then intervene with a development program. Finally, the people
might be "builders" in self-help projects where they provide the labor, tools or ma-
terials to create a garden for their community.

What kind of service can YOU provide?

Anything is possible on Bonaire. Funds are available to start
short or long-term projects that respond to local needs and
provide social benefits to the community.


What are the planning steps necessary
for a successful program and project?
First, contact the target group that you would like to help. Build their trust and find
out what they need.
What are their real problems? Make sure your idea isn't already being done by an-
other group. Discuss your hopes with any other groups that may have joint interests
or benefit from your project. Consider all these ideas and plan your project.


Who will help you?
Who has the needed expertise and skills? Brainstorm solutions with the community
and target group.
Who do you want to serve and why? Decide just what you hope to do and how you
will do it. List your activities.
How much will they cost?
Do some research on prices and develop a budget. Be realistic about your program
and budget-only promise what can realistically be delivered. Write guidelines for
record keeping, as well as for monitoring and evaluating your project so your group
is sure to be efficient and productive.
How will responsibilities be distributed? How will you ensure financial account-
ability? Explore fund-raising options. Have a long-term strategy and plans for self-
sufficiency. Make an appointment with the NGO Platform Bonaire (717-2366)
to present your plan and ask for their assistance in getting available funding
from AMFO, the Antillean Co-Financing Organization. The Platform can also
help you prepare your proposal and become a registered foundation.
1 Barbara Mason Bianculli



Voluntary action has the power to change
society through a community of caring citizens.

As Martin Luther King, Jr. preached,
"Everybody can be great because everybody can serve. You
only need a heart full of grace, a soul generated by love."

It all starts with an idea. And your good idea will lead to a better
Bonaire.



CONTACT INFORMATION


A ME


*FO



FIDflma eonnlau


AMFO: Kaya Gob. N. Debrot #31, Bonaire. Tel. 717-7776,
Fax 717-7779, website: www.samfo.org, email: info-
bon@samfo.org

NGO Platforma Bonaire: Kaya Korona 5-C. Tel. 717-
2366, Fax 7172367, website: www.ngobonaire.org, email:
Platform@ngobonaire.org


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 11











Pet of the Weekk
T his young lady, Finn, nine years old, is a
regular volunteer at the Bonaire Animal
Shelter. Finn is a student at the Pelican School and
you will find here at the Shelter every Wednesday,
helping out with all the pets. Here she is with new
arrival, "Petunia," a seven-week-old puppy who
came into the Shelter with her brother. Their
mother was hit and killed by a car but luckily the
puppies were found and brought into the Shelter.
Finn's job that day was to bathe both puppies and
she did a fine job. Petunia's brother already has
been adopted but he and Petunia will have to stay
on until they are a little older and stronger. Both
puppies are healthy and in perfect shape for their
age. They've had their tests, worming and will be
sterilized when they're old enough. You can al-
ways be sure that adopting a dog or cat from the
Shelter assures you of a "nearly perfect" pet -
healthy and social.
You may see "Petunia" and the other pets up
for adoption at the Shelter on the Lagoen Road,
open Monday through Saturday, 9 amto 1 pm, 3 to 5 pm. Tel. 717-4989.
Can you help? The Shelter is looking for a volunteer to sell at the Shelter stand
at the Cruise Ship Market at Wilhelmina Park on cruise ship visitor days. It's an
extremely worthwhile job because all the proceeds go towards keeping the Shelter open
to take in unwanted pets. You will be selling tee shirts, license plates, calendars and
Germaine Nijdam hand painted signs. If you can help please call Amina at 786-1905.
It's a fun job too, other volunteers report.
Don't forget the Shelter Fundraiser, Art Auction and Indonesian Dinner, this
Friday, November 27. More information on page 14 (Happenings).
Laura DeSalvo

Sterilization Campaign Update sg ..
On May 15 the Animal Shelter started a
large scale campaign to reduce the
amount of stray and street dogs on Bon-
aire. This project is called, "Bonny, the
Superdog," and so far more than 300 dogs .
have been sterilized. w
Number 300 was the dog from the Wing
Cheung Supermarket on Kaya Korona.
The dog's name is Wong a sturdy Rott-
weiler look-a-like who had given birth to
a fairly large amount of puppies. Wong's
owners felt it was time for Wong to retire
and decided to have her sterilized. The
operation went well and when Wong got
home she was welcomed with a big bowl.
of chicken legs.
Every dog a Superdog!
So, in the meantime more than 300 dogs
have been sterilized, but the goal of "Bonny, the Superdog" sterilization project is to steril-
ize 500 dogs. This way, the Bonaire Animal Shelter hopes to contribute to changing many
dogs' lives into Superdog lives!
For more information about this free sterilization campaign you can contact the Shelter at:
Dierenasiel Bonaire, Kaminda Lagun 26, Bonaire. Phone 717-4989,
www.animalshelterbonaire.com, www.bonnysuperdog.com, animalshelter@flamingotv.net,
r Greta Kooistra



10-Years For Green Label

T his Friday, 27th of November, the Green Label Garden Center will celebrate a happy
10 years in business on Bonaire and the opening of its new shop.
In the words of founder and owner Ap van Eldik: "Wow! Time sure flies when you're
busy!"
I remember as if it were yesterday when we opened our old shop on Kaya Nicolaas, a
crowd outside watching us put up the sign.
A lot has happened since that time, to us and to Bonaire. Especially during the last three
years we have had so many changes that sometimes we had the feeling it went too fast.
But, let's face it, the old shop became far too small, and we found our great new property
on Kaya Industria and we moved over here. But that still wasn't enough, so we built our own
building and with the guiding hands of our shop manager, Mr. Johan van Blerk, we were able
to open our very own shop with more space and even more green at the end of the same prop-
erty.
This never would have been possible without the really appre-
ciated support of YOU, our very much respected loyal clients.
We, the team of Green Label, would like to thank you for this
support and want to invite all of our loyal clients to take a look
at this new shop and raise our glasses to 10 years of support,
Friday 27th of November from 5 to 8 at our property on Kaya
Industria, behind the TIS supermarket. Bon Bini! E
Ap van Eldik


Opubbls from the Blologlst


Did You Know...
The Flamingo Tongue Snail
uses its stomach as a foot?
Maxing out at about one inch long, the
flamingo tongue snail is a (once) rare but
beautiful sight on the coral reefs of Bon-
aire. This stomach-footed creature
crawls along the branches of coral,
munching on the polyps with its radula.
However, this sea snail does not destroy
the coral, eating just enough so the pol-
yps often grow back. It's only when
their population explodes that they pose
a threat to coral reefs. The colors on the
flamingo tongue snail are not a part of
the shell, rather a layer of mantle tissue
that covers the shell. The tissue encom-
passing the shell works similarly to a
fish's gills, exchanging oxygen and car-
bon dioxide for it to breathe. The animal

*Stop the silent destri


; ." f R


will retract its mantle flaps when at-
tacked, revealing its true white colored
shell. U
Pamela Williams

Williams attends the University of Colo-
rado at Boulder. While majoring in Ecol-
ogy and Evolutionary Fi. ...-, back in the
US she decided to come to the CIEE Re-
search
Station in
Bonaire to
learn more
about how
to make a
cillc'I/tc '
in the de-
clining
coral reef
ecosys-
tems.


action of your


Termite Treatment *
Fleas & Tick's *
Plant Treatment *
Ant Treatment *


You C Y


Page 15


PROFESSIONAL
ST CONTROL N V
Aruba Bonalre Curacgo


Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009












f5 56 Different Nations!
l heeahe census department of Bonaire (Bevolking) has re-
Sleased current figures for the number of foreigners living
on the island and their respective countries (including Holland). As of June 2005,
there were 56 different countries (including Holland) represented. Of the 14,163
total population listed, there are 2,718 foreigners living on Bonaire. Of the re-
mainder, 11,445 are considered Nederlandse, or those holding Dutch passports.
In 2003 Bevolking figures show: total population 13,380 and foreign born -
2,335 an increase this year of 383 foreign residents.
It's important to keep in mind that foreign-born persons now having Dutch
nationality are lumped together in the 11,445 figure. That includes European
Dutch, Antillean Dutch and all those from other countries who have become
naturalized Dutch citizens. Many of the foreign residents on the island have opted
to have Dutch passports, and once someone from another country receives a Dutch
passport they are listed as Nederlandse and no longer are registered in their country
category, according to Bevolking
This year there are 56 countries represented; in 2003 there were 47. The new
countries now represented are: Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Pakistan, Paraguay, Po-
land, Russia, Sudan and Tunisia.

The Top Ten *No figures available for 2004.
COUNTRIES JUNE 2005 *2003 DIFFERENCE
1. Holland 11,445 11,045 plus 400
2. Dominican 557 441 plus 116+
Republic
3. Colombia 477 411 plus 66
4. Venezuela 463 540 minus 77+
5. US 224 191 plus 32+
6. Peru 210 164 plus 46t
7. Surinam 187 106 plus 81+
8. China 119 89 plus 30+
9. Haiti 53 36 plus 17t
10. Germany 40 34 plus 6t


The next 10 countries in ranking order


*No figures available for 2004.


COUNTRY JUNE 2005 2003* CHANGE
11. Portugal 39 59 minus 20+
12. Lebanon 31 20 plus 11I
13. Guyana 28 18 plus 10+
14. UK 26 19 plus 7+
15. Italy 22 20 plus 2+
15. Canada 22 26 minus 4+
16. India 21 20 plus 1t
17. France 16 12 plus 4+
17. Switzerland 15 17 minus 2+
18. Ecuador 14 10 plus 4+
19. Cuba 14 11 plus 3+
20. Trinidad & 13 15 minus 2+
Tobago
Although their figures and rankings have fluctuated slightly, the top 10 countries
this year are the same as those in 2003, except for Portugal which has gone from #9
to #11.
But in the next 10 (#11 through #20), Switzerland, which was not in the top 20 in
2003 is now on the list as #17, and Belgium, which was #19, is now #21 and off
that list.

The populations of the rest of the nations represented are (except for Belgium)
single digit numbers:
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Barbados, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica,
Czech, Denmark, Dominica, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Honduras, Iceland, Jamaica,
Morocco, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Poland, Russia, Salva-
dor, Slovenia, Spain, Sudan, Tunis, Uruguay, South Africa and Sweden.


Many thanks to Bevolking for giving us these figures. DL.D.


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 8


















*to find it... just look up

Dates to Remember in December: Several Cosmic Goodies
Await Your Viewing Pleasure























In addition to all the holiday gift gifting going on, December will be gifting us with
several goodies from the cosmos. Because December is one of those peculiar
months which will have two full moons, one of which will be on New Year's Eve. Plus
two wonderful planets will share opposite sides of the sky before midnight. And what
may be the best meteor shower of the year, the Geminids, will give us something to ooh
and aah about.
On Tuesday, December 1st just after sunset you will see an almost, just a few hours
away from full, Moon rising. It will slowly travel up the sky and reach its highest point
around midnight. And as it slowly starts to descend it will officially turn full Tuesday
morning at 2:30 am Eastern Time and will finally set at sunrise. Full moon number two
will occur on New Year's Eve, Thursday, December 31st. Called the Long Night Moon,
because the hours of darkness are always longest at this time of year in the northern
hemisphere, it will also rise just after sunset and be visible in the sky all night long,
reaching its highest point around midnight, and will be super high and will look almost
like a floodlight attached to the top of the sky illuminating the landscape below as we
ring in the New Year. The next dates I'd like you to mark down are late evening Sunday,
December 13th and midnight to dawn Monday the 14th when the annual Geminid me-
teor shower may be the best of the year. Interestingly, unlike all other meteor showers
which are usually better after midnight, the Geminid meteor shower is frequently good
before midnight. But like all meteor showers, the longer you stay outthelngstyohe more meteors
you'll see.
And now for you planet aficionados, you'll have two really good ones to choose from
before midnight. To see the first simply look toward the west just after sunset and you'll
see dazzlingly bright, king of the planets, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter, 11 times the width
of our planet Earth which is always fun to see through even the smallest of telescopes
because you can watch four of his largest moons as they change place in orbit around
the planet hour after hour. And as Jupiter sets in late evening you can turn around and
face east and between 10 and 11 yhoull see the 4,000-mile-wide rouge-gold planet Mars
rising. And Mars is the one to watch because it is zooming closer and closer to us every
single day. And it will be brighter each successive night. In fact it will grow almost two
times brighter from December 1st to the 31st. So trace the progress of Mars and Jupiter
this month, watch the Geminid meteor shower on the 13th and 14th and bathe under the
light of two full Moons in one month's time. Cosmic goodies indeed. i
Jack Horkheimer


By Annie
Heese

December-2009


SAGITTARIUS (23 November 21 De-
cember) Happy Birthday Sagittarius! En-
ergy, verve, and confidence are with you this
month, until the last week of the month when
your life winds down, quite appropriately!
Until then, it's hustle and bustle, and matters
are definitely working in your favor. A love
interest has your best interests at heart just
now. A proposal involving money comes to
you in the last week of December. Writers and
artists are especially inspired during this pe-
riod.
CAPRICORN (22 December 20 Janu-
ary) Issues revolving around your family and
the past capture much of your attention this
month. While others are racing around you,
preparing for the holidays, you are enjoying a
sense of peace. The last week of the month
begins a power period that you take with you
into the New Year. Tremendous energy and
initiative is with you as you embark on a jour-
ney of internal change and personal discovery.
It feels like you can move mountains.
AQUARIUS (21 January 19 February)
December is ripe with opportunity for envi-
sioning new projects and goals for your future.
Friends, acquaintances, and groups will cer-
tainly keep you busy. Romance, however, is
mostly quiet until after the 7th, when Venus,
the goddess of love, enters your sign and stays
there into the New Year, bestowing beautiful
energy for attracting what and who you want
into your life.
PISCES (20 February 20 March) In most
ways, December is a high profile month for
you, except for on a romantic level, which is
satisfyingly private. You may be put "in
charge" of a private matter. Secrets are re-
vealed-and revealing. Intense energy comes
from a friend in the last week of the month.
It's virtually impossible to escape professional
attention this month. The 12-16 is especially
fortunate for work and financial matters.
ARIES (21 March 20 April) is very re-
warding this month, yet you still manage to
find ways to break the routine. You are very
busy expanding your horizons, whether it's
through actual travel or "armchair travel". At
times, you may come across as opinionated,
but it's more likely enthusiasm for sharing
your thoughts. Romance is to be found when
you are enjoying non-routine activities. De-
cember presents a nice balance of recognition
and accomplishment.
TAURUS (21 April 21 May) Sharing,
intimacy, finances, and power plays all figure
strongly for you in December. In the first three
weeks of the month, you are thinking strategi-
cally, making plans, and watching others
around you more than you are participating.
You stand to gain much from your observa-
tions! The last week of the month brings with
it buzz of travel or educational opportunities,
most likely involving a partner, who has been


going through a lot of changes recently
GEMINI (22 May 21 June) Balancing
your needs with those of a significant other
involves plenty of negotiating and back-and-
forth before arriving at any conclusions this
month. Times like these require a certain
amount of tact and a need to let others take
center stage for the time being. A loan or re-
payment is likely to make headlines for you
towards the end of December.
CANCER (22 June 23 July) You simply
can't wait until the New Year to begin fulfill-
ing your resolutions regarding health, fitness,
and lifestyle changes. The time is now! You
are raring to go, ready to completely rework
your routines. You have more energy than
usual for work, projects, and anything that
involves reorganizing and restructuring. Tak-
ing care of details is what's on your mind now.
The last week of December brings intense
energy to a partnership or significant relation-
ship.
LEO (24 July 23 August) The first three
weeks of December are exciting and stimulat-
ing for you. This is a decidedly romantic and
creative period for you. You have special mag-
netic appeal, extra energy, and a real yen for
excitement now. Creative Leos will be on a
roll, producing more than ever, and publishing
opportunities may be forthcoming. The last
week of December features a job offer or op-
portunity, possibly a work-at-home endeavor.
VIRGO (24 August 23 September) A
scurry of activity in and around the home or
with family is in store for you this month. You
are busy with preparations, repairs, and re-
organizing-and enjoying every minute of it!
It's a fabulous time to get your "nest" in order
and functioning smoothly. The last week of
December is positively intense for romance
and intimacy. An exciting proposal or opportu-
nity regarding love, recreation, and creativity
comes your way.
LIBRA (24 September 23 October) An
especially busy-mostly pleasantly so-period
is in store for you in the first three weeks of
December. It can get a little hectic, with many
errands to run, more ideas than you can realis-
tically implement, and plenty of contact with
friends, siblings, and neighbors. It's a time of
networking, and you're coming across very
smoothly. The last week of the month (and
year!) is revealing and perhaps intense for
family matters.
SCORPIO (24 October 22 November) In
many ways, December is a "money month" for
you. You enjoy extra energy and enthusiasm
for increasing your income. It's an excellent
opportunity period for a bonus or raise that
truly makes a difference in your life! If you're
waiting for money in the form of a loan or
repayment of a debt to you, it's likely to arrive
around the Full Moon on the 12th. 0


h,, K'.L u bin inf p7i. 71' 2844 -cdl: 78 .
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Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009


Page 19


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Page 3











The Realtor's Corner



Get Rid of Clutter


Before you put your house on the
market, start removing clutter.
The kitchen is a good place to begin.
First, take everything off the counters.
Put the toaster in a cabinet and take it
out only when you use it. Store every-
thing in cabinets and drawers. If you
don't have enough cabinet space to put
everything, put those dishes, pots and
pans that rarely get used into a box and
put that box in storage.
You see, homebuyers may open all
your cabinets and drawers, especially
in the kitchen. They want to be sure
there is enough room for their "stuff."
If your kitchen cabinets, pantries, and
drawers look jammed full, it sends a
negative message to the buyer that


water leaks that may cause a home-
buyer to hesitate in buying your home.
Closets are great for accumulating
clutter. We are talking about extra
clothes and shoes things you rarely
wear but cannot bear to be without.
Sometimes there are shoeboxes full of
"stuff' or other accumulated personal


(Tonky in Greece Continued from page 17)
on this day."

Tonky talks about his second
place in Mykonos:
"I was satisfied with my second posi-
tion, and I am happy for Kevin. He de-
served this win after the competitions
that took place today. In windsurfing


Tonky performs a chaco
in Mykonos


one can never be too sure about one's
position. Your achievements do not de-
pend only on professionalism and con-
sistency (though they will get you a
long way!) but it also depends on fac-
tors that you have no control over like
the wind and the water. The challenge
is now even greater for me on the EFPT
tour. I will definitely go for the top po-
sition in the next event!"
Tonky's next event will be in Pozo
(Grand Canaria). This is an event of
the Professional Windsurfing Associa-
tion (PWA). There Tonky will meet
the other professional Bonairean wind-
surfers and Ricardo Campello, Kauli
Seadi, Kevin Mevissen and Andre Pas-
kowski. If the wind cooperates, things
will get really hot there. Stay tuned for


Anna Kleimer is with RE/MAX Paradise Homes. She and her
husband, Art, owned and operated their real estate company in
Vail, Colorado for 12 years. Wi., 1. .1 ,Il, / i ., she has an in-
tuitive understanding of properties ,. la' il( ,, i, location, price
range and amenities. Call her at 717-7362 or 786-8607.


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 22












GROUPER CORNER


Blue water diving is thrilling and
adventurous. It is not for the inex-
perienced or faint hearted diver. Attempt-
ing this activity requires training, detailed
knowledge of the surrounding underwater
terrain and familiarity with the ever chang-
ing sea conditions. You must also have a
definite target to reach after your descent
from the surface. Disorientation, caused by
the lack of any visual contact with the ad-
joining reef, can initiate anxiety and bring
on panic for those individuals not properly
prepared for this phenomenon.
Bonaire, known as "The Home of Div-
ing Freedom," has a reef system that can
easily be reached from any point on its
shore. The leeward side of this boomerang
shaped island has more than 60 marked
and described dive sites accessible on a


year-round basis. In addition, Klein Bon-
aire, the small, circular, uninhabited island
one mile off the coast, has at least 25
shoreline dive sites around its protected
coastline. Furthermore, the entire coast of
Bonaire and Klein Bonaire, down to 200
feet (60 meters), is protected as an under-
water marine park. Why would you chal-
lenge yourself with a "blue water dive"
when you can park your car or tie your
small boat to a permanent mooring, any-
where you choose and simply enter the
sea? The answer is easy; there are great
rewards for the effort.

One such place is Grouper Comer. The
natural world has many mysteries. As a
naturalist, I have many questions. Finding
the answers can be a lifelong pursuit.


Sometimes one simple observation reveals
a seemingly obvious solution that has pre-
viously eluded me. These revelations defy
logic and when analyzed lead to other
questions. Today, observing the social in-
teractions of the usually solitary species of
sea bass we know as Groupers has kindled
my desire to find more clues to their be-
havior patterns. My diving partner has led
me to a meeting ground of hundreds of
groupers that we normally see as solitary
and wary specimens on the reef slope, hid-
ing in caves or sheltering in wrecks. Here
each fish is oblivious to our presence and
tolerates our close approach. Why are they
here? Is this their safe haven? Have they
always congregated here? Is this a sea-
sonal behavior? What are they doing?


We are entering a secret world out of
sight of the surrounding reef structure. We
descend through the "blue water" to an
underwater garden that is seldom, if ever,
visited by human invaders. Perhaps our
presence on this rare occasion is as much a
surprise to the fish as their behavior is to
us. I feel as if I have entered an exclusive
social society or "after hours club" where
individuals, as strangers, gather to meet
each other, interact for a few hours, and
then go back to their respective homes and
mates.
Groupers are well built with strong,
heavy bodies. They all have large mouths
and big fleshy lips with jutting lower jaws.
Sharp teeth line the inside of their mouth
(Continued on page 15)


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 3












I F:e3' -t E4B -<-


Volunteer Deborah with "Enrico" and "Frances"


What would the Bonaire Ani-
mal Shelter be without its
devoted volunteers? On a recent Satur-
day, due to vacations, sickness, sched-
ules and other things, the only volun-
teer who could come to help was Deb-
orah. Although only a youngster herself
(she's 12) she does a considerable job -
cleaning, feeding and playing with the
cats and dogs so they can remain social
with people. Not only is she doing a
fine service but she's learning responsi-
bility and helping others with no finan-
cial remuneration (pay). Thank you,
Deborah! You're doing great!
Here's Deborah in the puppy cage
with "Enrico" and "Frances," his good
friend. Enrico, along with his brother,
"Jose," "Roberto," and "Pedro," were
born on April 16 in someone's yard.
Their mom had decided to find a place
where people were to have her puppies.
The kind people, knowing they could-
n't keep the dogs themselves, brought
them into the Shelter where they knew
they could have a good chance at life.
The pups are all healthy and full of fun
and enthusiasm. They've had their vet
exam, gotten their shots and are all roly
poly funny guys. You may see them at
the Bonaire Animal Shelter on the La-
goen Road, open Monday through Fri-
day, 10 am to 2 pm. Tel. 717-4989.
Do you love animals and want to
make a difference? Come visit the
Shelter and see why volunteers are so


portant to keeping the pets happy
and social. Volunteers may pick their
own hours too. They may be some of
the best times you'll have on Bonaire!
Call Shelter Manager Jurrie Mellema at
717-4989. L.D.


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 18



























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location-privacy & security. Phone
(Bon) (599) 717 3293 (UIS) (570) 586


CAPT. DON'S ISLAND GROWER -- ......
0098. May 20 until Jan. 8th.
Trees and plants, Bonaire grown. info@pelicanreefbonaire.com or w
8000m2 nursery. Specializing in gar- pelcanreefbonairecom -
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Kaminda Lagoen 103, Island Growers
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Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 14


WHAUS HAPPENING

Exploring

Lac



L ac Bay is full of
hidden places. On
Sunday, July 3rd the
group, "Amigunan di
Naturalesa" ("Friends of
the Environment"), is
arranging a boat trip that
will let you discover
them. The meeting point
is Boka di Coco (across
from the Mangrove/
Kayak Center on the dirt
road to Cai). The high-
light will be a stop at the
place called Den Puitu.
Plan for a minimum of
one hour for the trip
which will end at Cai.
Transportation back to
Boca di Coco via land
will be provided.
Participants can choose
what time they want to go, beginning at 7 am through the afternoon. The boats can
handle six persons and there will be two boats.
The price is NAf25 for adults and NAfl5 for children. This includes the boat trip,
land transportation, juice, water and a choice of two kinds of soups. Also the first
groups, from 7 to 10 in the morning, will have coffee or tea with real Bonairean
pancakes.
The proceeds will go to benefit the Bonaire participants in Vierdaagse Nijmegen
(Four Day Walk at Nijmegen, Holland). To sign up pass by the Extra newspaper
office. (tel. 717-8482). OB6iAntoin


JANART GALLERY
Kaya Gloria 7, Bonaire Local Art,
Art Supplies, Framing, and Art
Classes. Open Tu-We-Th & Sat 10 am-
5 pm Friday 1- 7 pm; or phone 717-
5246 for appt.



BONAIRENET
The leading consumer and business
information source on Bonaire. Tele-
phone (599) 717-7160. For on-line yel-
low pages directory information go to
http://www.yellowpagesbonaire.com


lww.














ARTISTIC EXPRESSION?


Dear Editor:
Graffiti comes in many forms: Spray painting a wall or flat '
surface, carving into a tree or even a table. Almost everyone
dislikes it, and in many countries there are laws against it. It is *
ugly. When one takes a drive along Bonaire's east coast, graf-
fiti has shown up even there. Not spray painting, but ugly
sculptures of litter and garbage that someone has left as a -4
monument to their ego.
These same people would probably be appalled if someone -.
did the same thing in front of their house. Bonaire is everyone's
house and should be viewed as such. Most likely the people doing this are non -
Bonairean and show a disrespect for the nature of Bonaire. What is so ironic is that
they spend a lot of time collecting this garbage to pile up when they could be put-
ting in a truck or bags to help in some way to clean up Bonaire instead of making
eyesores along one of Bonaire's natural coasts.
When these piles of garage are torn down, the landscape instantly looks natural
again as opposed to graffiti all along the shore line. If you really need to make
"sculptures" from garbage do it in your own front yard, not Bonaire's. Spend the
time cleaning up, not making an ugly mess.
B.B.


SELIBON SERVICE


a


AVlom


Dear Editor:
A few weeks ago one of the plastic rims
of the wheel of my garbage container cracked and the solid rubber tire came off. I
managed to get it onto the street (It was pick-up day). In my mind I was already
searching for a solution to this small but nasty problem. I wondered if I could buy
the wheels somewhere or if I had to call SELIBON and see what they could do. My
daily work made me forget about it. At the end of the day I went to get my empty
container. What a pleasant surprise! There were two brand new wheels under my
container! This must have been done by the truck attendants because I did not yet
phone or contact anybody about this. I mean: if you want to talk about service, this
is GREAT SERVICE! I thank SELIBON for helping me out so quickly and thank
you guys a lot. I'd like to say, "KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK!" 1 Rogier van den
Brink


WEB INCREASE

Dear Editor:
Are you finding yourself with less money at the end of
the month?
Well, take a good look at your electric bill and you'll
discover that the percentage of SURCHARGE on your
usage is WAY BEYOND what was originally predicted, and appears to be going
up MORE every month.


For example: (from my personal bills)
Billing Date Usage Surcharge


March 2005
April 2005
May 2005


NAJ55,72
69,76
71,42


NAJ13,56
33,31
48,49


Percent

24.33 %
47.74 %
67.89 %


Where will it end?
Is it really true that these increases are NOT being passed on to residents in
Curaqao?
If so, why is only little Dushi Bonaire being made to cover the costs of Curoil? Is
our government or WEB doing anything to find a cheaper alternative for fuel? Can
we import from Venezuela? What can WE do as individuals to lighten or alleviate
this burden? Obviously, conservation is not enough as the surcharge will eat up any
potential savings on usage.
Will we ever be free from Curaqao's heavy hand?
A 'Sweaty' Local


Reader comments limited to 500 words will be considered for inclusion in the
"Letters" department. All letters must be signed However, we will withhold
names on request.


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


L--__________.._____---^_____^______._....l...,


II


I


Page 5













UYXTSAN AND jETsAH


Sea Princess


Projections show an increase of
cruise tourism of more or less
75%, says Ronella Croes, head of the
Tourist Corporation Bonaire (TCB). The
TCB considers that a very positive devel-
opment. For the 2006-2007 cruise ship
season many additional ships will call at
Bonaire, including the Princess Line's
love boats, Sea Princess and Crown Prin-
cess. Other ships making first calls at
Bonaire will be the Arcadia, Rijndam and
Prinsendamships, the Crystal Line's ships
Crystal Symphony and Crystal Serenity.
These growth figures are cited as one of
the reasons a facelift of Bonaire's water-
front and a new facility for receiving Ro/
Ro (from roll-on/roll-off ships like the
Don Andres and Dona Luisa) container
cargo is necessary. The new container
pier, if it is built, may be either at WEB
or south of BOPEC near Karpata. The
island government has commissioned a
feasibility study in the matter.
Proponents of the plan say a more at-
tractive waterfront area, devoid of con-
tainers, would enhance tourism, i.e.: at-
tract even more cruise ships. Opponents
say that the money for a new cargo pier
would be better spent on road repair or
other island projects and that the benefits
of cruise tourism are questionable.

*A Travel agents in America, Canada
and Europe told CDNN (Caribbean
Diver's News Network) that thousands of
tourists and scuba diving travelers are


canceling planned holidays to Aruba.
CNN (Flamingo TV Channel 10) even
broadcast a report about a Bonaire
dive accident to infer that disappearances
are common in the ABC islands. While
Bonaire's Public Prosecutor Ernst Wes-
selius issued a statement that no crime
was involved in that case, the TCB has
yet to counter the damaging media frenzy
that consumed the American CNN and
Fox News networks last week.
The cancellations follow reports that
police and government officials in Aruba
have deliberately concealed evidence re-
lated to the disappearance of 18-year-old
Natalee Holloway to protect the island's
tourism industry.

PA Due to a typographical error in
The Bonaire Reporter edition of June 17-
24, Continental's weekly flights which
begin on Saturday, December 17, were
printed as daily. We apologize for any
inconvenience this may have caused.


A4 Beginning June 16th, Flamingo Air-
port will sell departure tax cards at a
new booth located centrally in the ticket-
ing and check-in area. An Internet facil-
ity for passenger use will soon be added
on the other side of the booth.


Ab The Papiamentu daily newspaper,
Extra, reported that the departure tax to
Curacao will soon be raised from
NAf 10 to NAf 12,50. Aruba-bound trav-
elers do NOT have to pay the $20 interna-
tional tariff, but just NAfl10. However,
Bonaire-bound passengers from Aruba
pay NAf36,90 in Aruba.

Ab In May, Flamingo Airport
(officially Bonaire International Air-
port-BIA) passed a strict evaluation by
the US's Transportation Security Ad-
ministration (TSA) with flying colors.
BIA is currently seeking to expand its
security staff having taken over the job
from the SSV. VSBO level graduates and
higher are invited to apply.

Ab Air Jamaica, which has slashed
service to Bonaire to one flight a week,
has also announced they will be cutting
back on food service on their Florida and
Caribbean routes, serving a snack and
beverage instead of a full meal, to save on
food service costs. However, hard liquor,
beer and wine will be sold on all flights,
except to first class passengers, the airline
said. Air Jamaica is trying to save $2 mil-
lion annually but says it needs to cut
costs, eventually by $50 million, to sur-
vive. Executive chairman Dr. Vincent
Lawrence says the decision was difficult
but necessary.

4 TCB-NY reported that for the 12th
consecutive year Bonaire has been voted
by the readers of Scuba Diving maga-
zine as the best shore diving destination
in the world. According to the July 2005
issue of the magazine which reported the
results of Scuba Diving's Top 100 Read-
ers' Choice Awards, "Bonaire has topped
the shore-diving category in our annual
'Top 100 Readers' Choice Awards' an
unbroken string of No. 1 titles that started
in 1994." This year Bonaire received a
score of 96.9, topping the runner-up in
this category by more than four
points. As part of the writeup on Bonaire


the magazine included beautiful photogra-
phy and cited "abundant grunts" and
"dense corals" as just two examples of the
marine life that divers will find at any of
the island's dive sites.

PA One of Bonaire's most frequented
shore diving sites, the Windjammer, has
been closed for several months. A small
Bonaire dive resort reports that two dive
groups of six persons each have cancelled
their planned trips to Bonaire because
they will not be able to dive the Windjam-
mer.
Access to the sea is being prevented by
guards at the BOPEC oil terminal, which
is owned by the Venezuelan national oil
company PEDVESA.
Bonaire is unique in the world of diving
destinations because it offers convenient
access from shore to the majority of its
dive sites. Most shore divers book into the
smaller resorts, rent vehicles and spend
weeks diving economically using the dive
resorts' universally offered "unlimited
dive packages." Their car gives them ac-
cess to the islands restaurants, shopping
and above-water attractions as well.

A4 An avid Windjammer diver sought a
legal opinion in Holland to determine if
the BOPEC oil depot has the right to ban
divers from the Windjammer site located
offshore their property. This is a summary
of the Dutch reply with an English trans-
lation:
De zee tot aan de stranden is eigen-
dom van het Land, niet van Bonaire
en dus naar alle waarschijnlijkheid
ook niet van BOPEC; The sea, in-
cluding the beaches, is property of
the Dutch Antilles (Central) govern-
ment, NOT of the island Bonaire
and also NOT of BOPEC.
Als er een verbod tot duiken zou
zijn, of om de zee in te gaan, zou dat
een regeling moeten zijn die door
Bonaire als eilandgebied in het
leven is geroepen en niet door
(Continued on page 4)


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 2












A Force for Good












oflpisal cur vciafc


AMFO and the NGO Platform
Would you like to help your community? Do you see a problem that needs a
solution? Do you have an idea for a specific project? Does your project pro-
vide a social benefit to others? Are you motivated to organize and inspire others to
join you? Then you can make a difference on Bonaire! It all starts with an idea.
Here are some successful, innovative programs that started with an idea from a
motivated person like you.


It All Starts with an Idea -Partll


Combat Domestic Violence
"I think to myself, if I can just help one person leave a bad
situation ... ,"says an ex-battered wife who now volunteers
at Skagit Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault Services in
Washington State, the non-profit agency that helped save
her. She had returned to her abusive husband seven times
before she was able to leave him for good. This agency is
one of many that help victims of rape and domestic violence
by providing shelter, counseling and legal support. Another
group sponsors The Voices and Faces Project to get out
the message, "There is nothing that you could ever do to
make it OK for someone to rape you." R.A.I.N.N. is a na-
tional free hotline for rape and incest victims that helps
bring rapists to justice.


What happens to the children of violent,
abusive or negligent families? That's the
concern of a California program, Forget
Me Not Farm, where abused and ne-
glected children can learn caring, compas-
sion, and gentleness through their work
with plants and animals. To nurture a
seedling to full growth or to bottle feed
and cuddle with a young, orphaned calf
may be all it takes to break the cycle of
abuse that is too often the legacy of these
children.




Free Schooling
Helping women become better educated and employed is a popular focus of vol-
unteer groups. The New Opportunity School for Women in Kentucky provides
free courses in writing, math, computer and job skills for women, especially low-
income, middle-aged women who want to get off welfare and get a job. In Pennsyl-
vania, TOP/WIN (Tradeswomen of Purpose/Women In Non-Traditional Work)
trains women to qualify for construction and skilled trade jobs so they can support


Continued on page 11


Feed and Train
Many people get the idea for a community project from where they work or volun-
teer. Robert Egger helped at a soup kitchen for the poor before he decided that just
giving out donated food wasn't the solution. "If you want to help a kid, get their
parent a decent job," says Robert. So he began DC Central Kitchen which offers
food as well as food training to the homeless and poor. The food meets their imme-
diate needs, but then they learn cooking and food handling skills to help them get
jobs in the restaurant and catering industry. When he first received some funding
for the project in 1989, he bought a refrigerated truck and collected leftovers from
the inaugural balls that had celebrated the beginning of George H.W. Bush's presi-
dency! A spin-off training program came next. "I noticed that school cafeterias
were closed for most of the day and that restaurants and catering business threw out
as much as 30% of their food," Mr. Egger explains. Campus Kitchens Project was
created to use kitchens in public schools, colleges, and universities to train students
how to prepare donated food, which is then delivered to hungry people in each local
area.


Connect to the Land
One prison counselor, Catharine Sneed, believed that the prisoners would benefit
from working outdoors in a garden where they might learn to nurture instead of de-
stroy. So she encouraged the jail to convert old farmland into The Garden Project.
She says proudly, "Seventy-five percent of Garden Project participants do not re-
turn to jail. .. When people have a connection to land, they have hope in their
lives." More gardens were made, and then the Tree Corps was created, which has
planted more than 10,000 street trees-mostly in poor neighborhoods.


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 10












bblwdfa~


n 1986 my husband and I
i went on a cruise with the
whole family: my mother, my
father who was already severely
ill at the time and our son, Mi-
chael. We visited Aruba and
Curagao for the first time. In 1989
we spent the Christmas holidays
with Michael and baby boy To-
bias on Curagao and still we had
not seen Bonaire.
When my mother and I went
for a vacation to Curagao again in
1991 we came to Bonaire for one
day. We took a guided tour and
when the bus stopped at this cer-
tain spot in Sabadeco there was
this house under construction and
my mother said to me, 'This is the
place where I want to live and
stay until the end of my life,' and
within three days she bought the
house.
When we made the cruise in
1986 my parents had been look-
ing for a place in the Caribbean
for my mom to live, as my father
knew that his days were num-
bered. My mother had arthritis
and rheumatism in a very bad way
- she was practically in a wheel-


chair but here she felt so much
better. The language was also an
important issue because people of
her generation didn't speak Eng-
lish or French. She only spoke
German and Dutch.
From the time my mother
bought the house we've spent
every holiday on Bonaire and our
eldest son, Michael, would go to
Papa Comes school. Both our
children loved being here and at a
very young age they already
spoke English and Dutch. When
my mother passed away in 1999,
our boys inherited her house and
we inherited the friendships that
she had with Bonairean, Colom-
bian and Dutch people.
Although my mother had passed
away, we kept on coming to Bon-
aire three to four times a year and
we'd stay at her house. Both my
husband and I were still working
in Germany. Wilfried had his own
practice as an internist and cardi-
ologist and I had my practice as a
homeopathic doctor, specializing
in pain management. In 1991
Wilfried was very ill and in 2004
he suffered a cardiac arrest and


then he stopped working in 2005.
I had an accident that same year
and in 2007 I had to give up my
practice.
Our greatest wish was to come
and live here. We felt this island '
was our destiny. So we came and .
lived in my mother's house dur-
ing the time our own house was
under construction. It seemed like '
a long vacation. When she moved .
here my mother had brought a lot
of our furniture, so we felt at
home. But... the most beautiful
thing was that my mother's I
friends and their children became "-
our friends. To us," she smiles a
big smile and raises her hands,
"that's the most wonderful thing -
about Bonaire: the intense rela- .
tionship we have with the people
here. In the Bonairean and Co-
lombian community there's this
feeling of togetherness, of unity
and these people made us part of
it. We never felt like tourists
when my mother was still alive.
We were my mother's children
and therefore we belonged to the '
community. They made us part of / -
their families. It's something very


It's sad to say, but other islands have lost a great deal of their
charm because of over population and too much construction. Bon-
aire is still good, but they have to keep an eye on the developments
and make sure we won't get stuck with ruins of buildings..."


S ROCARGO

ELN Services N.V.


For AIlfYur Shipping-Needs -


Kaya Ind~tA-2,1 Kralendijk- Bonfo .oA.c
717-8922 FAX 717-5791 Email:info@rocargo.com


-


The Kerstings and their dog, Tino
special and intense, vacation. We still have a house
Now Bonaire is our home and there because we want to spend
when we go to Germany it's for (Continued on page 5)


* ~ N7


ROCARGO SERVICES, N.V.


.. .


Full service door to door by air
and by sea.
Customs clearance, transportation,
warehousing.
International and local relocation.
Packing material in stock.
Qualified and professional personnel.
Timely, accurate and reliable
ISO 9001: 2000 Certified


Fe&Ex
- Express


F The World On Time



Offering DAILY
Express Services from
and to Bonaire
For shipment tracking
www.fedex.com


AWCAR FRWOT 1.M

Amcar Freight, Inc.

The ONLY company
offering direct weekly
consolidation services
from Miami, USA
to Bonaire


www.amcarfreight.com
7860 N.W. 80th Street
Medley, Florida 33166
Tel. (305) 599-8866
Fax (305) 599-2808


International Freight (Car) BV
The ONLY company offering
direct weekly consolidation
services from Europe/Holland
to Bonaire
www.ifc-consolidators.nl
Jupiterweg 1A (Ecopark)
4761 RW Moerdijk, Holland
Tel 31-(0) 168-40-94 94
Fax 31-(0) 168-40 94 70


Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009


Page 4





















































As I alerted you earlier this
month one of the most spec-
tacular, super close meetings of the
planets you'll ever see will occur this
week and next. And in fact this Sunday
and Monday the two planets closest to
the Sun won't be this close again until
the year 2070.
Think about Sky
Park skies earlier
this month. Back
then on Sunday June "...starting
12, if you faced west and lasting f
northwest, 30 to 45
minutes after sunset Mercury, Ve
while there was still will be onl'
twilight out, you
would have seen the apart from
brightest planet of
them all, planet #2
from the Sun, Venus, and planet #1
from the Sun, Mercury, peeking just
above the horizon. And on a straight
line with Mercury and Venus up to
their left, planet #6, ringed Saturn.
And if you watched night after night
you would have seen all three of them
steadily move closer and closer to each
other, Saturn descending and Mercury
ascending to meet brilliant Venus.
But this week the changes are really
dramatic because starting Friday, the
24th and lasting for three nights, Mer-
cury, Venus and Saturn will be only
two degrees apart from each other. On
Saturday the three are at their absolute
closest to each other and could fit in a
circle only one and a half degrees wide,
so close you could cover all three with
your pinky finger held out at arm's
length.
But the best is yet to come because
on Sunday the 26th Mercury and Venus


Fr
fo1
ni
y
. e


will be less than one half of one degree
apart. And to top that, on Monday the
27t they'll be only one tenth of one
degree apart, at their closest until 2070!
So close that the Old Farmer's Almanac
claims they may even appear to merge
into one star.
Once again, this Friday, Saturday and
Sunday, Mercury,
Venus and Saturn
will form a super
riday, the 24 close trio, and on
r three nights Monday you won't
see Mercury and
is and Saturn Venus this close for
two degrees another 65 years!
Of course we must
;ach other." remind you that this
is all an optical illu-
sion and that they
only appear close from our vantage
point here on Earth. In reality on Mon-
day when Mercury and Venus appear
to almost merge, Mercury will be 95
million miles away while Venus will
be 142 million miles away and Saturn
will be a whopping almost one billion
miles away.
Don't miss this super spectacular
planetary gathering. Start watching this
week but make sure that you don't miss
this Friday, Saturday, Sunday and fi-
nally, Monday. And if you've got a
small telescope or binoculars, get them
out now because the change from night
to night will absolutely stun you. But
don't fret if you miss this weekend be-
cause Mercury and Venus will still be
really close all next week too! If you've
never engaged in planet watching be-
fore this weekend now is the time to
start. I mean who wants to wait until
2070? 1 Jack Horkheimer


For the week:
June 24 to July 1, 2005
By Astrologer Michael Thiessen


ARIES (Mar. 21- April 20) Try not to overreact to the loss. You can come into
money; however, perhaps not under the best circumstances. Take a close look at
documents before signing on the dotted line. Don't be too quick to judge those you
live with. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday.
TAURUS (Apr. 21- May 21) Female members of your family may be difficult
to deal with. You can make excellent career moves if you are open to the opportu-
nities that exist. You will find that social activities will lead you into passionate
meetings. Uncertainties regarding your love life will surface if you have neglected
your mate. Your lucky day this week will be Sunday.
GEMINI (May 22-June 21) You must make them stand on their own two feet
regardless of how much you want to make things better for them. Go out with
friends. Eliminate situations that are no longer to your advantage. Travel will initi-
ate new friendships or love connections. Your lucky day this week will be Mon-
day.
CANCER (June 22-July 22) Strength will come from your ability to overtake
just about anyone. Put your thoughts into some trendy new ideas. You need a
change and you need to earn more cash. Time is money and you must be ready to
take action in order to reach your highest potential. Your lucky day this week will
be Monday.
LEO (July 23-Aug 22) You are best not to confront situations that deal with in-
laws or relatives. Correspondence may not clear up issues. You will have to face
each issue separately and in person. Minor health problems may lower your vital-
ity. Your lucky day this week will be Saturday.
VIRGO (Aug. 23 -Sept. 23) Entertain in your home and make aesthetic en-
hancements that will please those who reside with you. Trips will be exciting. You
will be a bit of a spendthrift this week. However, you should be concerned about
what they want in return. Your lucky day this week will be Sunday.
LIBRA (Sept. 24 -Oct. 23) You can pick up valuable information if you listen
to those with more experience. Your ideas may be a little ahead of their time; don't
push them, instead just continue working on development. You can't make things
better if you don't know what to fix. Don't ignore any emotional issues that could
be causing problems. Your lucky day this week will be Monday.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24 Nov. 22) Your ability to charm others will put you in the
limelight at social functions. You may want to get involved in some kind of crea-
tive group. You will find yourself tied to the phone. Spend time with friends or
family. Your lucky day this week will be Monday.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23 -Dec. 21) Your efforts will be rewarded handsomely.
Unexpected bills will leave you a little short. You may attract attention if you get
out socially. Entertainment could be pleasing if it is of an energetic nature. Your
lucky day this week will be Monday.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22- Jan. 20) Rely on yourself and you will look good to
superiors. Family trips or projects should be on your mind. Relatives will not agree
with the way you are dealing with your personal problems. Unexpected bills may
set you back. Your lucky day this week will be Friday.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 -Feb. 19) Catch up on correspondence. Don't forget that
your budget is limited right now. Don't be critical or overly opinionated with dis-
likes; it could cause disapproval and unwanted opposition. Daydreaming will be
your downfall. Your lucky day this week will be Thursday.
PISCES (Feb. 20-Mar. 20) You will need to take a look at the renovations that
are necessary and try to find the cheapest way to get things done. Problems with
ear, nose, or the throat are likely. You will find that money could slip through your
fingers. Opportunities to make advancements through good business sense are evi-
dent. Your lucky day this week will be Saturday. 1


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


*to find it, just look up


An Absolutely Spectacular Super Close Meeting of
Three Planets Occurs This Week and Next


Page 23










IACHT GA AD AGES


LOOKING FOR

TROUBLE

Local newspapers carried a
story last week that said Bon-
aire's lighthouses had been made ob-
solete by modem navigation equip-
ment and that it was unimportant
that our lighthouses be kept in re-
pair. Several have been put out of
service by the theft of their solar pan-
els used to charge the batteries that
power the light. One of the lights cur-
rently out of service is on Klein Bon-
aire.
The use of radar by ships in fog was
supposed to end collisions at sea, but
the Andrea Doria-Stockholm disaster Willemstoren Lighthouse
is just one of many where modem
gear has proven to be no substitute for vision.
It's inconceivable to imagine the damage to Bonaire should a tanker run
aground on Bonaire or Klein Bonaire and spill its contents. The ULCC ships
(Supertankers) that call at BOPEC dwarf most of the ships that have been respon-
sible for major oil spills. Perhaps the most famous oil spill of the 20th century is
the Torrey Canyon disaster off Britain in 1967. The Torrey Canyon had only 1/10
the capacity of many of the ships passing close to Bonaire.
Consider what happened last week in broad daylight:
The bulk cargo carrier ship Terry Uno sank eight miles south of Curaqao's Wil-
lemstad Harbour after it collided with cargo ship Caribbean Star of Curaqao, but
its 10 Philippine crew members were rescued. The Caribbean Star reported the
collision with the other ship. Both ships are registered in Panama. Once on land
the crew was received by the Seafarers Centre and housed at the Trupial Inn.
Fritzroy Doran of Maritime Affairs says a Coast Guard video tape shows that
Caribbean Star failed to give right of way to Terry Uno, after having just off-
loaded a cargo of cement at Fuik Bay, and rammed the vessel.
There was apparently nobody on the bridge of Caribbean Star at the time. The
Terry Uno did not appear to maneuver to avoid the collision. The Terry Uno sank
and the Caribbean Star, which suffered considerable damage, is now in the Cura-
qao dry dock for repairs. The oil and other waste from the wreck was sufficiently
off shore that none has yet come ashore.
Clothes and other personal items needed were purchased for Terry Uno 's ship-
wrecked crew with local businesses giving a special discount. A church service
and barbecue was also organized for them at the US Forward Operation Location
(FOL) base.0 G.D.

KRALENDIJK TIDES (Heights in feet, FT)
Remember: Winds and weather can further influence the local tides


DATE TIME HEIGHT
6-24 2:24 2.1FT. 11:54
6-25 3:20 2.0FT. 12:25
6-26 4:13 1.8FT. 12:56
6-27 5:21 1.6FT. 13:21
6-28 2:33 1.3FT. 6:23
6-29 4:13 1.2FT. 7:49
6-30 5:37 1.OFT. 9:29
6-29 4:13 1.2FT. 7:49
6-30 5:37 1.OFT. 9:29
7-01 6:36 0.9FT. 21:51


0.7FT.
0.7FT.
0.8FT.
0.9FT.
1.5FT.
1.3FT.
1.1FT.
1.3FT.
1.1FT.
2.0FT.


21:23
13:33
13:29
12:50
13:29
12:50


1.4FT.
1.OFT. 20:37 1.5FT.
1.OFT. 20:51 1.7FT.
1.1FT. 21:20 1.8FT.
1.OFT. 20:51 1.7FT.
1.1FT. 21:20 1.8FT.


COEF
101
96
88
77
65
56
51
5
5
5


W e follow our hometown wind-
surfing superstar, Tonky
Frans, on his European professional
windsurfing tour.

Tonky, about winning the
Rhodes event:
"I had a great time in Rhodes. Luck-
ily I was one of the windsurfers who
was scheduled late for the first heat. I
could thus sit and watch the abilities of
the other sailors. With this information
in my mind I decided which moves I
definitely had to show to score high.
And so I did! I got through the single
elimination safely in second position.
On the last day I had my final heat
for the top position. I had to compete
against Kevin Mevissen, a good friend
of mine with whom I am travelling to-
gether this season, and also a very good
windsurfer! In spite of the fact that it
was a tough heat and that Kevin has a
lot of windsurfing experience in Rho-
des, I won this event and got first prize!
I am very happy with this achievement
because it is a good start which gives
me more self confidence in the Euro-
pean tour!
During the intermission, my board
sponsor, F2, put on a demonstration of
the F2 boards. I have seen the latest
models for freestyle boards of 2006
and the design ideas for 2007! The dis-
tributors were especially happy to see
me since I am one of the few F2 riders
who does not live in Europe and who
selects the events that he will partici-


Tonky smiles after his win in Paros,


pate at in Europe! In addition to this
demonstration there was also a try-out-
boards-opportunity where I gave a
show for the folks on the beach. The
wind cooperated so I showed them the
craziest of moves and I could hear
them clapping their hands and jamming
after each of my moves."

After his victory in Rhodes,
Tonky continued his tour in
Paros.
"We took the ferry at midnight from
Rhodes and arrived very early in the
morning in Paros. It was not the great-
est of all trips, but it was the logical
choice (with all the windsurfing gear),
and when you are in a group, you talk
and laugh, and you have no time to
think about the ferry beating against
the waves and no time to sleep either.
On my first day in Paros I slept the
whole day. The event would start the
next day. But there was not enough
(Continued on page 17)


I V E S E L M A K N G P O R C A L:S


Antee
Angie
Another World
Angel B
Augustine

Bright Sea
Bounty

Carylar
Camissa, Chan Is.
Cape Kathryn

Endangered
Species
Endorphin
Felicity
Flying Cloud, USA
Freestyle


Guaicamar I, Ven.

Jan Gerardus
L'Quila, BVI
Luna C. USA
Madam
Maggi
Mainly
Moonrise
Mystic Jade

Natural Selection
Pyewacket
Rusty Bucket

Santa Maria
Sandpiper, USA
Scintella
Sea Witch


Sirius
Sola 2
Sylvia K
Sylvester


Ti Amo, USA
T'zadde
Triumphant Lady

Ulu Ulu, USA
Ulysses
Unicorn, Norway

Varedhuni, Ger.
Windancer
Ya-T, B VI
Yanti Paratzi
Zahi, Malta
Zeelander


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 9









-A.


Windsurfing Tour 2009 Whsdswg


The European Season.... Continued
from last issue
Ruben Petrisie is a professional wind-
surfer from Bonaire who represents the
island in European windsurfing competi-
tions. His professionalism, good humor
and talents make him a great ambassador
for our island. In this issue he reports on
the Scandinavian windsurfing scene.

Sweden
Including waiting time at Istanbul and
Prague, Turkey to Stockholm was
about 18 hours, where a driver picked me
up. We drove for a another three hours
through Sweden all the way to Motala
Varamon.
The next morning I headed to the event
site, a 10-minute walk along the sandy
shore line of Lake Varamon. After a
Swedish breakfast I was scheduled to join
a slalom race, with winds blowing around
5 knots.
The weather was so nice and warm for a
Swedish summer that I ignored a wetsuit
and went Kona racing in my shorts. I took
second place in the light technical old
school slalom style race, advancing to the
next round and advanced through the
whole afternoon into the finals.
Before the finals there was a super long
distance race. I thought that this was go-
ing to be a real long distance to be cruis-
ing on a Kona in gear number one. So I
wasn't sure if I wanted to join, but one of
the kids suggested we go together and
share a tandem board (a board for dual
sailing). I thought that's not so bad, we
can chit chat along the way, and it's al-
ways good to experience new things.


After being in the first seven at mark
number one we struggled with tacking
both sails on one board at the same time
while staying upwind so we lost a couple
of spots. After the long distance I took it
easy as I was a bit tired. It got colder and
there was even less wind for the slalom
finals.
In the late afternoon I went to prepare
the sounds and my music for a special
presentation of the events sound track.
The crowd enjoyed it so much I had to
repeat it three times. The coolest thing is
when everyone sang along between some
parts of the track. I was invited by the
organizer to stay a bit longer, and I did.
The next day the wind blew so strong
that I struggled with the Kona equipment.
I couldn't even finish the race with a 9.0
on a Kona long board. That same after-
noon Rossi and I did a freestyle show for
the crowds.
The next days were pretty mellow; we
had good windsurf sessions and talked
about interesting business subjects. It was


super fun hanging out with America's don't be surprised to see a few Germans
eldest windsurfer, Bruce Matlack. out there who drive all the way up to en-
joy this windsurf spot or fjord as well.


Denmark
It was super-duper cool this time and
there was more sunshine than expected. I
actually thought I'd brought some with
me.
I spent most of my days in Skodstrup, a
village with a farm like feeling.
I hit the road trips with Denmark's most
talented female freestyler, Xenia Kessler,
who showed me some of the spots Den-
mark offers. We visited Ebeltoft, close to
a port where a huge ferry from Copenha-
gen brings in some nice sets of waves.
At Alro we were out with a few local
freestylers until late afternoon. This spot
offers flat to choppy conditions with gusty
winds.
Hvide Sande in Ringkobing fjord offers
shore side winds with choppy to flat con-
ditions perfect for freestyle sessions and
free riders. You may spot a few schools
on the coast line of this lake and, mmm,


Hanstholm / Klitmoller / The Cold
Hawaii?
From the east to the west coast of Jut-
land it takes about two and a half hours
by car. Conditions were good enough to
score some wave rides while Germans
and Danish sailors shared the spot and the
parking lot.
I had some studio time with windsurfer,
deejay and producer, Anders Ponsaing.
We worked on a fun club track that will
be released on my demo this fall.
A big thanks to the Kesslers who made
my stay as comfortable as possible
Thanks for reading. Go explore. U

Ruben BNG'
Petrisie, NB50 S i


*u A Fresco or Air Conditioned Dining
Between Downtown and Hotel Row
Reservations: 717-7070
4 info@bistrodeparis.com
Open Monday -Saturday


q


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-- I




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Page 6


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(599) 09-660-7539
Fax (599) 717-2950
wine@antillearwvine.com


Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009


'' I"'! -"


ooking
01 osphere


I 'Ir, 1, 1 t (, I C I I ( t

r y
i7g Kir 5th Ami'iversa I
g


I IF


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mdm LA


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Sl56 Different Nations!

laT he census department of Bonaire (Bevolking) has re-
1 leased current figures for the number of foreigners living
on the island and their respective countries (including Holland). As of June 2005,
there were 56 different countries (including Holland) represented. Of the 14,163
total population listed, there are 2,718 foreigners living on Bonaire. Of the re-
mainder, 11,445 are considered Nederlandse, or those holding Dutch passports.
In 2003 Bevolking figures show: total population- 13,380 and foreign born -
2,335 an increase this year of 383 foreign residents.
It's important to keep in mind that foreign-born persons now having Dutch
nationality are lumped together in the 11,445 figure. That includes European
Dutch, Antillean Dutch and all those from other countries who have become
naturalized Dutch citizens. Many of the foreign residents on the island have opted
to have Dutch passports, and once someone from another country receives a Dutch
passport they are listed as Nederlandse and no longer are registered in their country
category, according to Bevolking
This year there are 56 countries represented; in 2003 there were 47. The new
countries now represented are: Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Pakistan, Paraguay, Po-
land, Russia, Sudan and Tunisia.

The Top Ten *No figures available for 2004.
COUNTRIES JUNE 2005 *2003 DIFFERENCE
1. Holland 11,445 11,045 plus 400
2. Dominican 557 441 plus 116t
Republic
3. Colombia 477 411 plus 66
4. Venezuela 463 540 minus 77+
5. US 224 191 plus 32+
6. Peru 210 164 plus 46+
7. Surinam 187 106 plus 81+
8. China 119 89 plus 30+
9. Haiti 53 36 plus 17t
10. Germany 40 34 plus 6t


The next 10 countries in ranking order


*No figures available for 2004.


COUNTRY JUNE 2005 2003* CHANGE
11. Portugal 39 59 minus 20+
12. Lebanon 31 20 plus 11I
13. Guyana 28 18 plus 10+
14. UK 26 19 plus 7+
15. Italy 22 20 plus 2t
15. Canada 22 26 minus 4+
16. India 21 20 plus 1+
17. France 16 12 plus 4+
17. Switzerland 15 17 minus 2+
18. Ecuador 14 10 plus 4t
19. Cuba 14 11 plus 3t
20. Trinidad & 13 15 minus 2+
Tobago
Although their figures and rankings have fluctuated slightly, the top 10 countries
this year are the same as those in 2003, except for Portugal which has gone from #9
to #11.
But in the next 10 (#11 through #20), Switzerland, which was not in the top 20 in
2003 is now on the list as #17, and Belgium, which was #19, is now #21 and off
that list.

The populations of the rest of the nations represented are (except for Belgium)
single digit numbers:
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Barbados, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica,
Czech, Denmark, Dominica, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Honduras, Iceland, Jamaica,
Morocco, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Poland, Russia, Salva-
dor, Slovenia, Spain, Sudan, Tunis, Uruguay, South Africa and Sweden.


Many thanks to Bevolking for giving us these figures. DL.D.


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 8











(Continued from page 2)
BOPEC; Whenever there is a re-
striction to dive or enter the sea,
then the government of the Island of
Bonaire should have made that rule.
NOT BOPEC.
Er is een bijna theoretische kans dat
het Land ground aan BOPEC in erf-
pacht heeft uitgegeven en dat
BOPEC in de hoedanigheid van
erfpachter eisen stelt aan te water
gaan. Geadviseerd wordt dan ook
contact over deze kwestie op te ne-
men met het havenkantoor in Kral-
endijk te Bonaire (havenmeesters
Sint Jago en Statie) om hierover
zekerheid te verkrijgen. In the event
that BOPEC owns/rents the
ground it therefore can make de-
mands about how to or enter the sea
(over its land). It is advised to go to
the Harbor office (Harbormasters
Statie and St. Jago) in Kralendijk to
be certain.

A According to a report in the Curagao
Papiamentu daily, La Prensa, former
Minister Klaas de Vries, and other
Dutch Parliamentarians, said they are
against creating Kingdom Islands dur-
ing a Parliamentary contact plan meeting
in The Hague. This is in direct conflict
with the outcome of the Referenda held in
Bonaire and Saba. Bonaire's Ramonsito
Booi and Ray Hassell of Saba voiced
their objections.
The Dutch MPs said they had a problem
with the different government forms
voted by the various Antillean islands:
Curagao and St. Maarten chose for auton-
omy within the Kingdom, much like
Aruba, while St. Eustatius wants to stay
in the Netherlands Antilles.


Judge Bob Wit


PA Judge Bob Wit, who has served in
the Antillean court system for many
years, is most critical of the pending
Antillean Exclusion law. He thinks it is
illegal and will not stand a court test.
"Dutch xenophobia is the cause of the
discriminatory rules," he says. Ironically,
it is an exclusion that is easily circum-
vented. He adds, "If the regulation is nev-
ertheless introduced, then it is clear that
Antillean Dutch will enter Europe (and on
to Holland) by means of the back door.
European countries must allow them in
(as Dutch/EU passport holders). How-
ever, a Curagaoan can go to Spain (for
example) which must let him enter. (He
can then leisurely proceed to The Nether-
lands as there are no border controls
among EU countries.) It is an impossible
regulation for a problem (drug smug-
gling) which is already on the mend."
According to Wit, it is easier for a
country of 16 million to handle 5,000 An-
tillean problem youngsters than for an
island of 130,000 people. "They say that
the measure is to help these poor young-
sters. But I can't see how they can say
that they are helping these youngsters by
threatening to send them back when there


A The Fun-
dashon for Art and
Culture will hold its
13th Annual Art
Day on Sunday,
July 3. Plan to
spend time at Wil-
helmina Park to en-
joy the art exhibits,
music, performing
arts, food and drinks. '
JanArt will sponsor
the children's art
contest as in the past.
All children are in-
vited to go by the _.
JanArt tent and, I
draw a picture for Participants in last year's Art Day. Janice Huckaby of Jan
the art contest to be Art in the background
held that day. Sup-
plies are provided at no cost. Prizes will go to children in different age categories.
Anyone interested in exhibiting at the event can contact volunteers at 717-6420 cell
786-6420, or email artandculture65@hotmail.com.


is no future for them here in the Antilles."
People who are opposed to the Antil-
lean Exclusion Regulations can protest at
the w ebsite: liiiJ .. . .,i-.,11 .,-
amsterdam.nl/
protesteertegenverdonksbeleid.html


five-day event. The Bonaire Reporter's
editor in chief will accompany the team
for on-the-site reporting.

A The model in this week's Benetton
ad page 12 is Mikeely Obersi. 1G./L.D


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 4














Complaining Stops Here Finding Balance
lP .


Up until now this series has highlighted a number of problems in the Bonaire
tourism and development program and has tried to throw light on several areas.
In this last installment of the F,, i,, Balance for Bonaire series, we will briefly sum-
marize the issues uncovered in our investigations and will then move away from the
complaining stage toward some concrete suggestions.
After a review of the key observations, we would like to propose a structural ap-
proach to sustainable development for Bonaire so its inhabitants can prosper long-term.
Long-term is defined as 'our children, their children and all the children who follow
them. '


Key Observations
One of the most obvious points from the investigation is that many people and many
groups are running in many directions toward development without the benefit of a co-
herent, coordinated vision or plan. Efforts today seem to be on an 'ad hoc' basis. At
one time the island seemed to be following the 1997-2007 sustainable development plan
that was created by Tourism Corporation Bonaire, but that plan, and others like the
Pourier Report which were written for sustainable development, seem to have been
abandoned.


1. Need for Vision
The only 'vision' that can be detected
today emerges from recent speeches by
government leaders who want to in-
crease tourism 'drastically' and bring in
large mega-hotels. It is interesting to
note that this desire for 500+ bed hotels
flies in the face of current tourism trends
around the world.
Today, many hotels and most desti-
nations like Cozumel are trying to
move away from mega-hotels and re-
duce the 'density' of tourists in a sin-
gle location. Why? Because today's
'upscale,' ideal tourist wants a more inti-
mate experience and they want a socially
and environmentally responsible experi-
ence. Many destinations have also


What's in a Vision?
A solid vision is one that defines
the short and long-term limits of
what is sustainable for this particular
island, including the maximum level
of tourists, maximum number of di-
vers, maximum number of cruise
ships. It is not just words and hopes
for the future but is based on studies
of the environment and infrastructure
and the pressures that tourism puts on
them. It is called 'carrying capacity'
and it defines the LIMITS to the is-
lands' ability to withstand use or ac-
tivities. As protection improves or
worsens, the limits must be revised.


learned that smaller, intimate, responsible resorts do less damage to the environment
and infrastructure. Just what Bonaire currently has to offer.
A sustainable vision is also based on the culture and the desires of the entire com-
munity. Just how far can tourism grow before the influx of immigrants needed to fill
the jobs dilutes the local culture to unacceptable levels? Studies must be done to track
the needs and desires of the community and changes in these attitudes must be moni-
tored over time.
But a "vision statement," like the 1997 TCB document that was a subject of an earlier
article, means nothing without a Plan that has support from all sectors on the island --
Public and Private, Commercial and Non-profit. And a Plan must have the force of law
behind it to make it function.


2. Need for a Plan
To make recently proposed 'drastic
changes' to the island's tourism with-
out a clear and approved plan is dan-
gerous. 'Ad hoc' changes like doubling
the number of hotel beds without in-
creasing advertising to create demand
and without major improvements in in-
frastructure will only destroy the fragile
market that exists today.


What kind of Plan?
Elements of a solid, long-term is-
land plan would include scaled im-
provements over time in infrastruc-
ture, transport, environmental protec-
tion and monitoring, marketing and
promotion and sustained community
integration. Also included in the plan
must be a determination of how much
the island must invest to reach its
goals-at each step--and where the
island will find the necessary funding.


3. Misunderstood Numbers
The current leaders of Bonaire's tourism and development seem to be ignoring the
fact that Bonaire's existing hotels are not operating at acceptable occupancy or
room revenue rates to be truly profitable. Some are barely hanging on, and few have
the resources to train their staffs or upgrade their facilities. These numbers mean that
more beds are possibly the worst solution to the problem.
Also being ignored is the fact that in 2004 many of Bonaire's flights from the US ar-
rived half full so that American Eagle reduced its service and when it was time for Air
Jamaica to cut destinations just to stay in business, Bonaire was one of the first go.

4. Missing Numbers
Another key observation is that there seems to be a serious lack of consumer infor-
mation, including why and how tourists are making their destination decision and what
their satisfaction level is with the Bonaire product. Some data are collected on entry
cards, but it is processed so slowly that it is of little value. And one hotel operator, Bel-
lafonte Property Management, has taken a leadership role to start the process and learn
more about Bonaire's customers. Other sources are the Caribbean and World Tourism
Associations which have huge databanks of tourist information available at reasonable
prices. These sources would give some insight into our relative position in the market
and the strengths and weaknesses of our competition.


Page 6


tor onaire

-Conclusion


5. No Responsibility
By ignoring the numbers, failing to thoroughly under-
stand market dynamics and blaming the problems on the
. lack of airlift and too few hotel rooms, Bonaire's leaders
have failed to take responsibility for the situation.


6. Lost Direction
In the process of moving toward mega hotels it appears that the government wants to
move toward 'mass tourism.' In a recent speech the island was promised 'drastic
changes in the level of Bonaire's tourism.'
This direction is opposite the one stated in the 2003 Bonaire Investment Guide pub-
lished by DEZA (Economics Dept.). There it states: "Development is predicated upon
the philosophy that Bonaire's economic growth must be controlled, sustainable and
quality balanced, with significant benefits for the Bonairean population, and respecting
Bonaire's nature, culture and identity." A move toward mega-hotels and mass tour-
ism is a move into a totally new direction for which the island is ill prepared.

Proposal for Finding Balance
The situation has reached a critical point: air service has been lost, hotels are oper-
ating below reasonable expectations, planning has become ad hoc to fill gaps but
does not come from a strong, agreed upon basis.
Action is needed and needed quickly. The following suggestion would provide a
mechanism to mobilize and motivate all the stakeholders and should result in a Five-
Year Development Plan that will allow the island to move forward in a manner that is
controllable and sustainable.
In a previous article we suggested a Public-Private Partnership to address the is-
land's needs. This group should be created by the Island Government but would be
non-political in nature. This may not be easy on Bonaire where almost everything has a
political component, but statesmanship is called for here and must be shown by all
parties. The need is so great and the potential effects so profound that all segments of
the community must feel that their voice has been heard.
Members of the Partnership would serve voluntarily or as a part of their regular jobs.
The process itself should take no more than six months so that the Development Plan
can be published and adopted by all stakeholders. The Island Government will need to
resolve that the Plan is the official government policy and include enforcement provi-
sions so that the members know that the ultimate program will be executed.
The World Tourism Organization actually recommends PPPs and this group even
publishes an evaluation of 208 successful PPPs from 205 countries.


Public-Private
Partnership

The proposed PPP is outlined below. Certainly other members of the community will
have ideas to improve this structure, but it is a starting place.
At the head of the PPP would be a Director, appointed by the Board of TCB. This
Director would have the responsibility to coordinate all the activities of the PPP and to
create a unified Five-year Development Plan as a result of its activities. The Director
would be provided with an Advisory Board of three or four people with expertise in
Economics, Marketing, Tourism and Planning.
Eight workgroups would be created to address the specific areas of their expertise
quickly and efficiently. With the exception of group number four (infrastructure) each
group would consist of a maximum of five members so that meeting schedules and dis-
cussions can be streamlined.
Each of the eight workgroups would be charged with providing the Director and the
other groups with goals and plans for the next five years.
1. Transport The goals of this group would be to monitor capacity and load factors
and recommend any changes that would be needed. The group would also be ex-
pected to maintain contact and build relationships with airlines (passenger and
freight) and cruise lines. Possible members would be from BIA, Airline and Cruise
Agents, Shipping Companies.
2. Environment Clearly, the island must protect the very reason that tourists come to
Bonaire in the first place: our unique environment below and above the sea. This
group would advise on the impact of various levels of development, review the im-
pact of all potential projects and would be challenged to recommend positive meth-
ods to allow for sane, non-destructive growth. Possible members: STINAPA, Ali-
ansa di Naturalesa, DROB, Fishermen, other NGOs with an interest in the environ-
ment, resident experts.
3. Economy The tourism sector represents approximately 70% of the island's econ-
omy. Therefore it is essential that all plans be looked at with a professional eye
toward the immediate and long-term impact on the island's economy and the fi-
nancing of the plan. Suggested members: DEZA, Bonaire Bankers Association,
AKIB, resident economists.
4. Infrastructure Growth in tourism will bring with it new and constantly changing
(Continued on page 7)

Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005










rohe 6 06-*ORTER
Kaa ob Dbrt 00- -mil rpot- bnaree s S S 17888 SIC 19


Colombia
20%
56 Different Nations
Represented on Bonaire
Page 8


Haiti
2%


Surinam
8%
Peru
9%



USA
9%


Venezulea
20%


AMFO/NGO Platform Finding A Balance Bonaire Reporter
It All Starts With for Bonaire Survey
An Idea- Part II Complaining StopsPage 7
Page 10 Here Grouper Corner
Page 10 Page 6 & 7 Page 3

















Wheel Me On President Julia Hollenbeck Visits Bonaire
The 58th of a series of Bonaire Reporter articles by J@n Brouwer, featuring some of Bonaire's
interesting vehicles that are "on wheels."


Bonaire/Kralendijk -
Just recently, Julia Hollen-
beck, president of "Wheel
Me On.," an American non-
profit organization that promotes
traveling for persons using
wheelchairs, visited the island of
Bonaire. Her goal was to inspect
the island for wheelchair friend-
liness and encourage access for
persons with disabilities (PWD),
and after one day of intensive
exploring, the impressions were
very positive.

It was Chris and Yvonne from
the Samur sailboat who asked
me whether I would like to drive
and guide Julia Hollenbeck for
one day around the island. As I
had followed the Bonaire in
depth and guiding skills course
organized by Sue Felix in 2008,
to me it was a challenge to drive
Julia around and inform her
about my beloved island.

The day before I had cleaned
and prepared my vehicle, a dou-
ble cabin Hilux, and I had
thought about how to get her in
and out of the car. Maybe an
upside down beer case could
function as a step.

Then, quite early, the next
morning the Ruby Princess
cruise ship arrived on Bonaire.
Fortunately, the harbor authori-
ties had given me permission to
drive my car on the pier, as close
to the ship as I was allowed.
Crewmembers of the Ruby Prin-
cess had helped Julia off the im-
pressive ship. Yvonne from the
Samur and I welcomed Julia.
She appeared to be a very
friendly and open-minded per-
son, loaded with enthusiasm.


Then Harold, a member of the
crew on the ship explained to me
how to take the wheelchair
partly apart and fold it up to put
it in the back of the vehicle. It
was only the day before that the
idea popped up to combine the
tour around the island with an
article in the "Bonaire on
Wheels" series.

So Julia Hollenbeck showed
me her wheelchair: a very
sturdy, and very light four-
wheeled vehicle made by Inva-
care in the US. Julia won it when
earning the title of "Ms. Wheel-
chair Tennessee 2003!" The
whole unit was completely fold-
able. The arm rests, wheels and
leg rests were removable, or you
could easily fold the footrests to
collapse the chair completely.
The rims were Sunrims, to be
exact, and were fitted with
stainless steel spokes (according
to Julia, "Many have offered to
swap their wheels with me."),
and the grey Primo Orion tires
contained 73 PSI of air for a
smooth and light ride. The alu-
minum frame of the wheelchair
was anodized red and Julia kept
the dual wheeliee poppers" at the
rear in an upright position unless
a "pusher" wanted them off or
down. These wheels are really
sharp looking, a nice piece of
work, and state-of-the art.

I loaded her and the wheelchair
into my vehicle, then I started
the engine and we were ready for
takeoff. The tour would be inter-
esting: long, and intensive. First,
we made a stop on the little ele-
vation along the coast near the
airport. Then we stopped at the
salt pier, the slave huts and the


King William lighthouse. We
drove to several beaches at Soro-
bon and we watched the local
fishermen in the natural harbor.
We passed the mangroves and
spotted many flamingos. Then
we returned to Kralendijk, only
to start the second part of our
tour: the road along the coast to
Bopec (Bonairean Petroleum
Company), Goto Lake with
even more flamingos to see, the
Dos Pos water mill and the
lovely and safe little old village
of Rincon.
We made a stop at the Blo-
Karts on the track of Land Sail-
ing Bonaire. We had a talk with
Nelson Croft and Naomi from
the BloKart enterprise and we
learned it was even possible for
PWD using mobility devices like
in wheelchairs to have fun in a
two-seater BloKart. During that
time, it was only I who did some
quick loops around the racetrack
- always fun, never boring.
Last but not least we climbed
Seru Grandi (by truck of course)
and we enjoyed the panoramic
view: the mountains in the north,
the wild coast and the light
house of Spelonk, the flats of the
south and the snowy mountains
of the Cargill Salt Company, the
city of Kralendijk and the cruise
ship on the pier, Klein Bonaire.
What an impressive view for
both of us. Then, unfortunately,
it was time to go back to the
Ruby Princess.

All in all it took us some five
hours and almost a hundred kilo-
meters to get a serious first im-
pression of the island. During
our trip Julia became more and
more enthusiastic as she noticed
the pavements were in a good


Julia Hollenbeck, smiling as always, president of Wheel Me On.
A non profit organization that promotes traveling for wheel
chaired people.


condition. Here and there, we
found a spacious toilet accessible
for persons using wheelchairs.
Some restaurants appeared to be
wheelchair friendly and we even
found some special parking
spaces, reserved for PWD.

Unfortunately, I was not able
to arrange a meeting in time be-
tween the sympathetic president
of Wheel Me On... and a Bo-
nairean citizen named Oswald
Melcherts. He is the man using
the wheelchair with the Surinam
flag mounted on it and is the one
behind the MiVaBo (Stichting
Minder Validen Bonaire/
Foundation for Less Valid Per-
sons Bonaire). It is Oswald and
his non-profit organization that
do their utmost best to make
Bonaire as wheelchair friendly
as possible. Oswald's goal is to
make Bonaire 100% wheelchair
friendly and accessible. More-
over, the results are there.

The next day I had a talk with
Oswald. Full of enthusiasm, he
starts talking about the island
and the mission of his organiza-
tion. He informs me about
wheelchair friendly restaurants
such as "It Rains Fishes" and he
indicates some parking areas


reserved for PWD using wheels.
The only known public toilet for
PWD in the capital of the island
is situated in the hospital of
Kralendijk. Even Oswald Mel-
cherts does not know of the exis-
tence of such a special facility,
for instance, in the remote vil-
lage of Rincon. Therefore, there
are definitely results, but there is
also a lot of work remaining to
do.

The next time Julia visits our
island, I shall arrange a meeting
and a tour for the two of them:
Julia and Oswald in the car and
two foldable wheelchairs in the
back. It will definitely be fun to
drive over the lovely island with
those two brave knights!

For more information just hop
to www.wheelmeon.org or con-
tact Oswald: omel-
cherts(@hotmail.com. U

Story & photo by
J@n Brouwer


Ronald
Verhoeven

Paintings
Bonaire



Tel. 7172886
Cel. 7884263


E-mail-
ronaldverhoeven@
msn.com


Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009


Page 18











I ACHIGAND ATERPOR AGE


LOOKING FOR

TROUBLE

L local newspapers carried a
story last week that said Bon-
aire's lighthouses had been made ob-
solete by modem navigation equip-
ment and that it was unimportant W
that our lighthouses be kept in re-
pair. Several have been put out of
service by the theft of their solar pan-
els used to charge the batteries that
power the light. One of the lights cur-
rently out of service is on Klein Bon-
aire.
The use of radar by ships in fog was
supposed to end collisions at sea, but
the Andrea Doria-Stockhohnlm disaster Willemstoren Lighthouse
is just one of many where modem
gear has proven to be no substitute for vision.
It's inconceivable to imagine the damage to Bonaire should a tanker run
aground on Bonaire or Klein Bonaire and spill its contents. The ULCC ships
(Supertankers) that call at BOPEC dwarf most of the ships that have been respon-
sible for major oil spills. Perhaps the most famous oil spill of the 20th century is
the Torrey Canyon disaster off Britain in 1967. The Torrey Canyon had only 1/10
the capacity of many of the ships passing close to Bonaire.
Consider what happened last week in broad daylight:
The bulk cargo carrier ship Terry Uno sank eight miles south of Curaqao's Wil-
lemstad Harbour after it collided with cargo ship Caribbean Star of Curaqao, but
its 10 Philippine crew members were rescued. The Caribbean Star reported the
collision with the other ship. Both ships are registered in Panama. Once on land
the crew was received by the Seafarers Centre and housed at the Trupial Inn.
Fritzroy Doran of Maritime Affairs says a Coast Guard video tape shows that
Caribbean Star failed to give right of way to Terry Uno, after having just off-
loaded a cargo of cement at Fuik Bay, and rammed the vessel.
There was apparently nobody on the bridge of Caribbean Star at the time. The
Terry Uno did not appear to maneuver to avoid the collision. The Terry Uno sank
and the Caribbean Star, which suffered considerable damage, is now in the Cura-
gao dry dock for repairs. The oil and other waste from the wreck was sufficiently
off shore that none has yet come ashore.
Clothes and other personal items needed were purchased for Terry Uno 's ship-
wrecked crew with local businesses giving a special discount. A church service
and barbecue was also organized for them at the US Forward Operation Location
(FOL) base.[] G.D.

KRALENDIJK TIDES (Heights in feet, FT)
Remember: Winds and weather can f, tul c influence the local tides


DATE TIME HEIGHT
6-24 2:24 2.1FT. 11:54
6-25 3:20 2.0FT. 12:25
6-26 4:13 1.8FT. 12:56
6-27 5:21 1.6FT. 13:21
6-28 2:33 1.3FT. 6:23
6-29 4:13 1.2FT. 7:49
6-30 5:37 1.0FT. 9:29
6-29 4:13 1.2FT. 7:49
6-30 5:37 1.0FT. 9:29
7-01 6:36 0.9FT. 21:51


0.7FT.
0.7FT.
0.8FT.
0.9FT.
1.5FT.
1.3FT.
1.1FT.
1.3FT.
1.1FT.
2.0FT.


21:23
13:33
13:29
12:50
13:29
12:50


1.4FT.
1.0FT. 20:37 1.5FT.
1.0FT. 20:51 1.7FT.
1.1FT. 21:20 1.8FT.
1.0FT. 20:51 1.7FT.
1.1FT. 21:20 1.8FT.


COEF
101
96
88
77
65
56
51
5
5
5


W e follow our hometown wind-
surfing superstar, Tonky
Frans, on his European professional
windsurfing tour.

Tonky, about winning the
Rhodes event:
"I had a great time in Rhodes. Luck-
ily I was one of the windsurfers who
was scheduled late for the first heat. I
could thus sit and watch the abilities of
the other sailors. With this information
in my mind I decided which moves I
definitely had to show to score high.
And so I did! I got through the single
elimination safely in second position.
On the last day I had my final heat
for the top position. I had to compete
against Kevin Mevissen, a good friend
of mine with whom I am travelling to-
gether this season, and also a very good
windsurfer! In spite of the fact that it
was a tough heat and that Kevin has a
lot of windsurfing experience in Rho-
des, I won this event and got first prize!
I am very happy with this achievement
because it is a good start which gives
me more self confidence in the Euro-
pean tour!
During the intermission, my board
sponsor, F2, put on a demonstration of
the F2 boards. I have seen the latest
models for freestyle boards of 2006
and the design ideas for 2007! The dis-
tributors were especially happy to see
me since I am one of the few F2 riders
who does not live in Europe and who
selects the events that he will partici-


*A








Tonky smiles after his win in Paros,

pate at in Europe! In addition to this
demonstration there was also a try-out-
boards-opportunity where I gave a
show for the folks on the beach. The
wind cooperated so I showed them the
craziest of moves and I could hear
them clapping their hands and jamming
after each of my moves."

After his victory in Rhodes,
Tonky continued his tour in
Paros.
"We took the ferry at midnight from
Rhodes and arrived very early in the
morning in Paros. It was not the great-
est of all trips, but it was the logical
choice (with all the windsurfing gear),
and when you are in a group, you talk
and laugh, and you have no time to
think about the ferry beating against
the waves and no time to sleep either.
On my first day in Paros I slept the
whole day. The event would start the
next day. But there was not enough
(Continued on page 17)


7 VE SELS MAK NG A P O R CAL : .


Antee
Angie
Another World
Angel B
Augustine

Bright Sea
Bounty

Carylar
Camissa, Chan Is.
Cape Kathryn

Endangered
Species
Endorphin
Felicity
Flying Cloud, USA
Freestyle


Guaicamar I, Ven.

Jan Gerardus
L'Quila, BVI
Luna C. USA
Madam
Maggi
Mainly
Moonrise
Mystic Jade

Natural Selection
Pyewacket
Rusty Bucket

Santa Maria
Sandpiper, USA
Scintella
Sea Witch


Sirius
Sola 2
Sylvia K
Sylvester

Ti Amo, USA
T'zadde
Triumphant Lady

Ulu Ulu, USA
Ulysses
Unicorn, Norway

Varedhuni, Ger.
Windancer
Ya-T, B VI
Yanti Paratzi
Zahi, Malta
Zeelander


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 9











SHSaturday- Discover Our Diversity

raSlide Show, pool bar Buddy Dive, 7
pm 717-5080


WEEKLY MOVIE 5HOWTINES

Late Show
Cal/to make sure (Usually 9 pm)
Kingdom of Heaven
(Orlando Bloom)
Early Show (Usually 7 pm)
State of the Union

Kaya Prinses Marie
Behind Exito Bakery
Tel. 717-2400
Tickets NAf10,50 (incl. Tax)
High Schoolers NAf 7,75
NEW FILMS BEGIN FRIDAY
CLOSED MONDAY TUESDAY
AND WEDNESDAY
SATURDAY 4 PM
Because of Winn-Dixie


THIS WEEK

Wednesday, June 22-Symposium:
Is teenage pregnancy a problem or
something normal? (Embaraso
hubenil un problema of algu nor-
mal?) Medical, legal and emotional
topics presented by experts on the sub-
ject. At Scouting Central, near the start
of the Nikiboko North road. 8 am-1
pm. Youngsters especially invited. For
more information contact: Roxiana
Goeloe, tel: 717-2436; Marisela Flem-
ming: tel: 717-8976; Polli Winklaar:
tel: 717-8839
Friday, June 24- Opening
"Cultural Growth" SGB art stu-
dents exhibit, free -ARTEBON, 7 pm,
refreshments & snacks. Continues Sat-
urday, Sunday, June 25, 26, 9 am to 5
pm. See page 12
Saturday, June 25-Combat Pov-
erty Conference, at ABVO conference
room, 9 to 5. Call 717-4666, email
fesbo @telbonet.an by June 22.
Until June 28 -Wilna Groenenboom
Art Exhibit, The Cinnamon Art Gal-
lery is at Kaya A.P. L. Brion #1, just
off Kaya Grandi, behind Banco di
Caribe. Open weekdays 9 am to noon,
2 to 5 pm. Call 717-7103 or 786-9563.
Friday, June 24-St. John's Day
Wednesday, June 29-St. Peter's
Day
Friday, July 1-Captain Dons 80th
Birthday Party

COMING
Saturday, July 2-Rincon Marsh6

Sunday, July 3-Lac Bay discovery
boat trip. Meet at Boka di Coco
(across from Mangrove/Kayak Center
on dirt road to Cai) 7 am to mid-
afternoon. Sponsored by "Amigunan di
Naturalesa" ("Friends of the Environ-
ment) to benefit Bonaire participants
in Vierdaagse Nijmegen (Four Day
Walk at Nijmegen, Holland). Sign up
at Extra newspaper office. (tel. 717-
8482). Adults, NAJ25; Children
NA15. See page 22.

Sunday, July 3-The Fundashon for
Art and Culture will hold its 13th An-


MICRO MOVIE REVIEW
Seen recently in
Movieland Cinema:

XXX (Triple X); STATE N
OF THE UNION by Lee
Tamahori, starring Ice Cube, Samuel L.
Jackson and William Dafoe. An endless
sequence of explosions and chases with
a deafening soundtrack and yet I man-
aged to sleep halfway through the film
only to wake up and find that I hadn't
missed anything. It has cliched dia-
logues, unbelievable fight sequences
and a sloppy storyline that threatens to
nullify all the positive aspects of the
movie if there are any. Sorry to say but
this was probably one of the worst mov-
ies I've ever seen. If you're yearning for
a good nap go and see it, otherwise
don't waste your precious time. 1 Dodo

nual Art Day with art exhibits, music,
performing arts, food and drinks. Any-
one interested in exhibiting at the event
can contact volunteers at 717-6420 cell
786-6420, or email artandcul-
ItIICi' 5 (holii il coin
Monday, July 4-US holiday. Fire-
works at some resorts
July 17-24 Diva's Women Wind-
surf Week- Learn to windsurf clinic
Contact Ann Phelan 786-3134 or email
ann@tbonairewindsurfing.com www.
bonairecaribbean.com 3 local scholar-
ships still available for teen or local
women. To apply contact Ann Phelan.
The International Bonaire Sailing
Regatta October 9 15, 2005

EVERY WEEK
Saturday Rincon Marsh3 opens at 6
am 2 pm. Enjoy a Bonairean break-
fast while you shop: fresh fruits and
vegetables, gifts, local sweets and
snacks, arts and handicrafts, candles,
incense, drinks and music. www.
infobonaire.com/rincon
Sunday -Live music 6 to 9 pm while
enjoying a great dinner in colorful
tropical ambiance at the Chibi Chibi
Restaurant & Bar. Open daily 5 to 10
pm. Live Fla-Bingo-great prizes, 7
pm, Divi Flamingo
Monday -Soldachi Tour of Rincon,
the heart of Bonaire, 9 am-noon. $20-
Call Maria 717-6435
Tuesday -Harbour Village Tennis,
Social Round Robin 7 to 10 pm. $10
per person. Cash bar. All invited. Call
Elisabeth Vos at 565-5225 /717-7500,
ext. 14.
Wednesday -Meditation at Donkey
Beach from 7:30 to 8:30 pm. Open to
all. Call S.H.Y. 790-9450
Friday -Manager's Rum Punch
Party, Buddy Dive Resort, 5:30-6:30 pm
Friday- Open House with Happy
Hour at the JanArt Gallery at Kaya
Gloria #7, from 5-7 pm.
Daily- The Divi Flamingo Casino is
open daily for hot slot machines, rou-
lette and blackjack, Monday to Satur-
day 8 pm- 4 am; Sunday 7 pm- 3 am.
Every day by appointment -Rooi
Lamoenchi Kunuku Park Tours Bo-
nairean kunuku. $12 (NAJ12 for resi-
dents). Tel 717-8489, 540-9800.
FREE SLIDE/VIDEO SHOWS


Sunday Bonaire Holiday -Multi-
media dual-projector production by
Albert Bianculli, 8.30 pm, Capt. Don's
Habitat.
Monday Dee Scarr's Touch the Sea
slide experience. Aquarius Conference
Center, Capt. Don's Habitat, 8:30-
9:30pm.
Wednesday (2nd and 4t) Turtle
Conservation Slide Show by Andy
Uhr. Carib Inn seaside veranda, 7
pm
Thursday from June 16 to July 28,
Basic Fish ID Yellow Submarine Dive
Shop at 6:30 pm
Friday- Week in Review Video Pres-
entation by the Toucan Dive Shop at
Plaza's Tipsy Seagull, 5 pm. 717-2500.


CLUBS and MEETINGS
AA meetings -every Wednesday; Phone
717-6105; 560-7267 or717-3902.
Al-Anon meetings every Monday
evening at 7 pm. Call 790-7272
Weekly BonaireTalker Gathering
and Dinner at Gibi's Tuesday -
6:30pm call 567-0655 for directions.
Bridge Club Wednesdays, 7:30 pm
at the Union Building on Kaya Korona,
across from the RBTT Bank and next
to Kooyman's. All levels invited NAf5
enty fee. Call Cathy 566-4056.
Darts Club plays every other Sunday
at City Cafl. Registration at 4, games
at 5. Tel. 717-2950, 560-7539.
JCI. First Wednesday of the Month-
Junior Chamber International Bonaire
(JCI Bonaire or formerly known as
Bonaire Jaycees) meets at the ABVO
building, Kaminda Jato Baco 36 from
7:30 to 9:30pm. Everyone is welcome.
Contact: Renata Domacass6 516-4252.
Kiwanis Club meets at APNA Plaza,
Kaya International, every other Tues-
day, 7 pm. Tel. 717-5595, Jeannette
Rodriguez.
Lions Club meets every 2 ndand 4th
Thursday of the month at 8 pm at
Kaya Sabana #1. All Lions are wel-
come.
Rotary lunch meetings Wednesday,
12 noon-2 pm Rendez-Vous Restau-
rant, Kaya L.D. Gerharts #3. All Ro-
tarians are welcome. Tel. 717-8454

BONAIRE'S TRADITIONS
MangasinadiRei, Rincon. Enjo ihc %icU'
from "The King's Storehouse." Learn about



Bonaire's culture. Visit typical homes from
the 17th century. Daily. Call 717-4060 /
790-2018
Visit the Bonaire Museum on Kaya J. v.d.
Ree, behind the Catholic Church in town
Open weekdays from 8 am-noon, 1:30-5
pm. Tel. 717-8868
Washington-Slagbaai National Park,
Museum and Visitors' Center. Open
daily 8 am-5 pm. Closed on some holi-
days. 717-8444/785-0017
Sunday at Cai- Live music and danc-
ing starts about 12 noon at Lac Cai.
Dance to the music of Bonaire's popular
musicians.
Rincon Marsh&- every Saturday 6
am to 3 pm. Open market in Bonaire's
historic town.


Soldachi Tours show you the Rincon
area. Alta Mira Nature Walking
Tour at 6:30 am. Town Walking
tour at 9:30, Bus Tour at 10. Call
Maria at 717-6435 to reserve.

CHURCH SERVICES
International Bible Church of Bonaire -
Kaya Amsterdam 3 (near the traffic circle)
Sunday Services at 9 am; Sunday
Prayer Meeting at 7:00 pm in English
Tel. 717-8332
Protestant Congregation of Bonaire.
Wilhelminaplein. Services in Papia-
mentu, Dutch and English on Sundays
at 10 am. Thursday Prayer Meeting
and Bible Study at 8 pm. Rev. Jonk-
man. 717-2006
The Church of Jesus Christ of Lat-
ter Day Saints, Kaya Sabana #26 Sun-
days 8:30 11:30 am. Services in
Papiamentu, Spanish and English.
Catholic San Bernardus in Kral-
endijk Services on Sunday at 8 am
and 7 pm in Papiamentu 717-8304.
Saturday at 6 pm at Our Lady of
Coromoto in Antriol, in English. Mass
in Papiamentu on Sunday at 9 am and
6 pm. 717-4211.
Assembly of God (Asemblea di
Dios), Kaya Triton (Den Cheffi). In
English, Dutch & Papiamentu on Sun-
day at 10
am. Wednesday Prayer Meeting at
7:30 pm. 717-2194
New Apostolic Church, Meets at
Kaminda Santa Barbara #1, Sundays,
9:30 am. Services in Dutch. 717-7116.


Send events to The Bonaire Reporter
Email reporter@jbonairenews.com
Tel/Fax. 717-8988, Cel. 791-7252


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 19






















ON THE ISLAND SINCE ... M M.SLpbr1YS


I Hanm 1U1[ietI'L i anim is V Kl U~[ e in [dceni (J


S wo days after I arrived I went
1 to the Dive Inn to look for a
buddy to dive with, I met a Dutch
woman who was here for a vacation
with a girlfriend. A year and a half
later they came back to Bonaire and
stayed at my house. Two years later the
girlfriend came back with another girl-
friend this time... and that was Ans
Klein Heerenbrink!" He laughs: "It
sounds like a soap opera, but as we say,
'By coincidence the best marriages are
born,' and it proved to be right because
we've been together for eight years
now."'
"The moment I saw Hans," Ans fills
in, 'there was this sparkle! It was Feb-
ruary '95 and after that vacation we
kept in touch frequently. In September
that year I came a second time, and it
became very clear what we felt for each
other. That year I spent Christmas and
New Years with Hans on Bonaire, and
in '96 I came for three months to see
whether I could find a job here. Hans
came to Holland twice to meet my fam-
ily, so it was a lot of traveling back and
forth until I finally came here March
29th 1997, 'Nos Dia,' as we call it!

I started working full time at the hos-
pital and I still think it's a great job. I
have wonderful colleagues and we have
a good, close contact with the patients.
In Holland I was a nurse specializing in
cardio care. Here I've become all-
round. We have 30 beds; I've seen eve-
rything. I also do the air ambulance.
You become inventive, and everyone
always looks for the best solution.
There's very good cooperation between
nurses and doctors. My colleagues are
from Aruba, Surinam, Holland and Co-
lombia. It's a colorful mix, but it works
really well! I love my job! Even when
we're not working we're always to-
gether, doing fun things like brunch on
the beach, walking all over the island,
fixing old furniture, gardening, paint-
ing, cooking together, and we love to
shop together! But being lazy and not
doing anything is also wonderful!"
Hans Rietveld and Ans Klein Heeren-
brink match. There's no other way to
say it when you see people that bring
out the best of each other; who are just
nice and il,.. ;. ,,. lh,. ,, each other's
equal, down to earth, but still, there is
magic; they make each other more
beautiful.
"Before Bonaire," Hans says, "I'd
been living in Curaqao from '85 to '92.
I worked for DOW (what now is
DROB- public works) and for the Cura-
qao Road Construction Company. I
don't like sitting in the same chair for
30 years so when I saw this ad asking


for a head for DOW on Bonaire I sent
my CV and was immediately accepted.
Two months later I moved to Bonaire-
incredibly fast! I'm a civil engineer. In
Holland I worked for several munici-
palities. By the end of the 70s and the
beginning of the 80s, I traveled to India,
Nepal, Thailand, Burma, Sri Lanka,
Egypt and Mexico. After seeing all
those places I wanted to live some-
where else. I saw an ad for DOW on
Curaqao and responded, but it took 20
months to happen. Originally it was for
a three-year contract, but I got so ad-
dicted to the Caribbean way of life that


"In those days the island
was booming, and the
economy grew 10% annu-
ally! Many people thought
it was going too fast and
they were afraid Bonaire
would change into a
second St. Martin."

now it's been 20 years in the Antilles!
It was a challenging job being the
head of DOW on Bonaire. In those days
the island was booming, and the econ-
omy grew 10% annually! Many people
thought it was going too fast and they
were afraid Bonaire would change into
a second St. Martin. Then the Pourier
Committee started working on this
process, 'Economic growth, but consid-
ering the preservation of culture and
nature.' The report was accepted by the
Eilandsraad (Island Council) in the be-
ginning of '93, but then it had to be
translated into official laws concerning
education, economics, finance, judicial
and technical matters, etc. all the de-
partments the government manages.
The writing of the laws was done by us,
the top officials, as well as our regular
jobs, without the help of consultants. I
was also indirectly involved in the reor-
ganization of the government, which
was done by a consultant. My days
were full. The government reorganiza-
tion was an incredibly time-consuming
operation. Alas, I wasn't there when
they finished it. My contract was fup,
people were transferred, our group was
neutralized because another political
party took over. Nevertheless, as it of-
ten happens in the Antilles, the plan
was carried through in many ways, but
never officially.
So I left, but I had a tremendous repu-
tation and started my own company as a
civil and technical consultant and it
went very well. I prepared, conducted,


did the manage- .
ment and super-
vision of projects '? .
like the construc-:, '
tion of the Bank .I
of the Dutch An-
tilles, the build-
ing of Consales'
cool and freezer
house and the
construction of
the Kaminda
Djabou road. At
the beginning of the century it became
very slow. All of Bonaire was strug-
gling, and I got my share of it too.
However, two years ago I joined a
group of consultants, Multifunction
Management. We use each other's
knowledge and experience, so we can
offer a broad spectrum of services. I
feel that economically we're going in
the right direction, poco poco, but not
bad at all!
I'm also involved in monument care.
My love for the old historic houses be-
gan in Curaqao where Jay Haviser, Mi-
chael Newton, Maup Lanjouw, Bart de
Boer, I and others founded a group to
clear away the overgrowth from the old
ruins, then measure and register the
houses. On Bonaire in 1996 I met
Christie Dovale who was also interested
in doing something with the old monu-
ments. Christie and Laurie Dovale, Pat-
rick Strauss and I set up a foundation
and started frantically registering those
places to which we could give the status
of 'protected monument.' But, alas, the
initiative was smothered by the politi-
cians' lack of interest. We became so
unmotivated that the group fell apart...
until the middle of 2003 when Jay Hav-
iser and I had a conversation. He
formed, within DROB, an informal
committee with himself, Hubert Vis
and Alca St. Jago, with the aim of set-
ting up a historic site preservation
group, and he asked for my help. So I
thought why don't we reactivate the
'Foundation Monument Care Bonaire'
and go from there. Through the notary,
however, we found out that there was
another monument care foundation,
founded by the previous notary, Mr.
Knuf.
The present notary, Mr. Maartense,
advised us to reactivate this foundation
because it had the oldest rights. Board
members are Peter Paulussen, Evert
Piar and I. Members are Linda Anthony
and Anthony Nicolaas. We needed a
protective law, like an island decree,
but immediately we were told by the
government that they didn't have the
time to compose one, so we did it our-
selves. The concept for a monument


management plan together with the
concept decree was presented to Deputy
Dortalina. Now we're almost there, and
the definite versions of the management
plan and the decree can be presented to
the Executive Council. After that we
can become active and start to raise
funds.
Why am I doing this? I want to con-
tribute to the Bonairean community by
conserving the cultural inheritance, and
I'm extra motivated because I love the
subject! We're talking mostly about all
those little original houses against the
background of the kunuku and the ones
in the barios, but also of course big
buildings like the Pasangrahan, Bes-
tuurscollege and the Protestant Church.
After the renovation of the old houses
we're planning to find tenants for them
through Fundashon Cas Bonairiano so
that people can live in them again. A
building needs occupation and mainte-
nance to bring out its beauty. Lately it
has become a big issue; the demolish-
ing of Hausmann's Folly has opened
people's eyes! Luckily I also have an-
other source that allows me to 'fight'
for these subjects; I'm writing for the
Amigoe, and often B6i Antoin and I
join forces, with good results!
I'm very happy here. You never know
about the future, but we would like to
stay here. Bonaire has space and it's the
people, the island itself. To be in the
middle of nowhere and you don't see a
soul! I get a kick when I drive on Kaya
Grandi on a Sunday afternoon and I
don't see anybody! In Holland there are
500 people for every square kilometer,
here not even 50! That's a big differ-
ence! Here the people are warm and
caring and they take time to greet you. I
don't think we
should have ..j
Holland make
the rules for this
island. That will
go too far! This
is the land
where life is
good!' []Greta
Kooistra
Greta Inoistra


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 21







F _ I


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


Nab 4. OMANI-
-.0


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 15














ARTISTIC EXPRESSION?


Dear Editor:
Graffiti comes in many forms: Spray painting a wall or flat f ,
surface, carving into a tree or even a table. Almost everyone
dislikes it, and in many countries there are laws against it. It is
ugly. When one takes a drive along Bonaire's east coast, graf-
fiti has shown up even there. Not spray painting, but ugly
sculptures of litter and garbage that someone has left as a
monument to their ego.
These same people would probably be appalled if someone
did the same thing in front of their house. Bonaire is everyone's
house and should be viewed as such. Most likely the people doing this are non -
Bonairean and show a disrespect for the nature of Bonaire. What is so ironic is that
they spend a lot of time collecting this garbage to pile up when they could be put-
ting in a truck or bags to help in some way to clean up Bonaire instead of making
eyesores along one of Bonaire's natural coasts.
When these piles of garage are torn down, the landscape instantly looks natural
again as opposed to graffiti all along the shore line. If you really need to make
"sculptures" from garbage do it in your own front yard, not Bonaire's. Spend the
time cleaning up, not making an ugly mess.
B.B.


SELIBON SERVICE


~t~elI v'
rwrslo En


Dear Editor:
A few weeks ago one of the plastic rims
of the wheel of my garbage container cracked and the solid rubber tire came off. I
managed to get it onto the street (It was pick-up day). In my mind I was already
searching for a solution to this small but nasty problem. I wondered if I could buy
the wheels somewhere or if I had to call SELIBON and see what they could do. My
daily work made me forget about it. At the end of the day I went to get my empty
container. What a pleasant surprise! There were two brand new wheels under my
container! This must have been done by the truck attendants because I did not yet
phone or contact anybody about this. I mean: if you want to talk about service, this
is GREAT SERVICE! I thank SELIBON for helping me out so quickly and thank
you guys a lot. I'd like to say, "KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK!" 1 Rogier van den
Brink


WEB INCREASE

Dear Editor:
Are you finding yourself with less money at the end of
the month?
Well, take a good look at your electric bill and you'll
discover that the percentage of SURCHARGE on your
usage is WAY BEYOND what was originally predicted, and appears to be going
up MORE every month.


For example: (from my personal bills)
Billing Date Usage Surcharge


March 2005
April 2005
May 2005


NAf55,72
69,76
71,42


NAf13,56
33,31
48,49


Percent

24.33 %
47.74 %
67.89 %


Where will it end?
Is it really true that these increases are NOT being passed on to residents in
Curaqao?
If so, why is only little Dushi Bonaire being made to cover the costs of Curoil? Is
our government or WEB doing anything to find a cheaper alternative for fuel? Can
we import from Venezuela? What can WE do as individuals to lighten or alleviate
this burden? Obviously, conservation is not enough as the surcharge will eat up any
potential savings on usage.
Will we ever be free from Curaqao's heavy hand?
A 'Sweaty' Local


Reader comments limited to 500 words will be considered for inclusion in the
"Letters" department. All letters must be signed However, we will withhold
names on request.


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


|


Page 5

































(Grouper Corner Continued from page 3)
and palate and securely hold any prey that
is captured. Like most fish carnivores they
swallow their victim whole, after ambush-
ing them, and inhale the prey with a swift
powerful suction created by the rapid gap-
ing cavity of their large hinged jaws and
extended lips. Body shape varies, but most
of the grouper family have long, well pro-
portioned profiles for their size. The
smaller specimens, like the Coney, grow to
a maximum of 16-18 inches (45 cm), and
the rare gigantic "Jewfish" can occasion-
ally be seen in the Caribbean up to 8 feet
(2.5 meters) in length and weigh over 600-
800 pounds (360 kilos). The Nassau grou-
per has a higher back which is even more
pronounced in the Marbled grouper. All
possess a long dorsal fin with sharp spines
in the front portion that can be held erect
when excited; the rear section is soft and
flexible.
Today we are not observing these eat-
ing machines feeding. Instead, they are
socializing and displaying a dazzling
mix of "outfits," often changing colors
and flashing different body markings in
a matter of seconds. The atmosphere is
very relaxed, and body grooming is a high
priority. With well developed swim blad-
ders groupers are capable of hovering at a
specific location above a coral formation
for long periods of time if left unmolested.
You can observe the gentle giants in this
stationary, trancelike position being at-
tended by a group of small fish and shrimp
at a "cleaning station." Each of the clean-
ers concentrates on removing an assort-
ment of external parasites, dead skin and
mucus from their "clients," including
around their eyes and nostrils.
Here, just off the shore of Klein Bon-
aire, there are innumerable "cleaning
shops" open for business. This cleaning
symbiosis emphasizes the role of coopera-
tion in nature as opposed to the "eat or be
eaten" daily struggle for existence. The
client fish will even open its mouth, extend


its jaws and flare its gills to allow the
cleaners easy access to all internal areas
where pests like creepy little bloodsuckers
burrow into the soft flesh. This tactile
stimulation and the pleasure of touch, a
rare sensation in the wild kingdom of the
sea, could be a primary incentive for cli-
ents to attend cleaning stations. In com-
parison, for humans, the soothing touch of
the massage therapist provides therapeutic
value as well as psychological and emo-
tional comfort. For the grouper, the chang-
ing body patterns and color intensity may
be a sign of mood shifts during the clean-
ing process. Having the parasites removed
may also improve the health and ulti-
mately the reproductive success for the
fish. When satisfied, the client gives a gen-
tle twitch to signal the attendants to stop
and then departs from the cleaning station.
The vacancy is immediately filled by an-
other individual waiting for the next ap-
pointment. Here you will observe many
other fish customers patiently circling the
area awaiting their turn.
Sex and sexual games are also a part
of this gathering. This afternoon, we are
lucky to see two of these previously de-
scribed interactions on our short one-hour
dive. The sexual orientation of members of
the grouper species is a bit different from
our human nature and may be difficult to
comprehend, but let's try. Most groupers
start life as females. This sexual develop-
ment strategy, known as protogynous her-
maphrodites, allows individuals to repro-
duce first as females and later, at a larger
size, change into males when certain uni-
dentified social or environmental factors
are met. Juvenile growth rates, feeding
habits and habitat shifts are not fully docu-
mented, but after groupers reach a length
of six inches (15 cm) they migrate to the
more complex reef structures from the
nursery locations, leaving behind an all-
female population in the shallows.
This form of sex switching is considered
by many experts to be a superior reproduc-


tive tactic, enabling populations to adapt
easily to short-term environmental fluctua-
tions. Most of the larger members of the
species make a complete and non-
reversible sex change, while the smaller
members function actively in both the
male and female roles. Groupers enjoy
relatively long lives, and the larger speci-
mens have been documented to live as
long as 37 years. Mature groupers show a
strong homing tendency and often return
to a specific reef or favorite wreck site.
Now we come to the juicy parts of our
encounter. Extended courtship behaviors
are repeated from late morning to the
middle of the afternoon prior to spawn-
ing. On this visit, in our voyeur role, we
witness two of the more common pre-
coital foreplay described in several studies.
When the males approach the females,
their heads and gill flaps turn pale, in
sharp contrast with the remainder of their
darker bodies. Females, clearly swollen
with eggs, huddle close to the protection of
the bottom reef structures. "Vent nuzzling"
occurs when a male moves slowly along-
side a female from the rear and inspects or
nudges her vent area at the posterior of her
abdomen. The female responds by rolling
her body and angling her vent region away
from the suitor. The persistent male swims
underneath and attempts the same strategy
from the opposite side. At this point, the
female generally eases away.
In another courtship behavior, "turn and
rise," the male approaches the side of a
female, who is hovering off the bottom or
slowly rising. As he gets close, he posi-
tions himself parallel to the female and the
couple slowly rotates together as much as
half a turn before she swims off. The male
then moves to another female and repeats
the maneuver. These courtship behaviors
continue and color patterns intensify as the
afternoon progresses.
Spawning usually takes place at or
just before sunset and varies within
members of the species. For example,


female Nassau groupers form discreet
groups serviced by a single male. Male
Tiger and Yellowfin groupers, however,
defend small territories where they are
approached by females ready to spawn.
Many of the larger groupers travel long
distances during one or more months each
year to mate in huge spawning aggrega-
tions at breeding grounds used for centu-
ries by their ancestors. The migrations are
usually synchronized by the onset of the
full moon during the cooler months. These
traditional rendezvous sites are generally
located near coral promontories or along
outer reef shelves at depths over 100 feet
(30 m), like this location.

We plan to revisit Grouper Comer, at the
appropriate times, to complete our quest
for more answers and witness other inti-
mate moments in the lives of these excit-
ing creatures. We welcome you to join us
and read about them in future articles. 1
Photos and Story by Albert Bianculli
2005


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 15











Nd Mo


SURE CAUSE OF BAD SNORKELING VISIBILITY

umar o m--


Dear Editor,
As a regular swimmer I visit Bongo's Beach
during my lunch breaks. I could not help noticing
the invasion of the cruise ship tourists. They are
all over: in the restaurant, at the pool, on the
beach, on the pier and its slippery stairs, and, of
course, in the water.
You know what happens if, let's say, 100 per-
sons swim around the pier for a few hours? The
water turns completely white, like milk.
Vision zero, and a terrible smell like a cheap
after-shave is hanging above the water.
Only after 10 meters from the pier or so, visi-
bility becomes better again.
The cause of this phenomenon can only be the
sun lotion (sun screen, suntan lotion) people are
obviously using in a great measure.
When I tried "Googling" pollution + sun lotion
+ water in different settings I only found items
about protecting yourself against polluted water.
If you search for water-proof or water-resistant
sun lotion, all people are interested in is having
to rub yourself as little as possible.
Not a word about the consequences for the wa-
ter itself.
Finally, however, I did find some items about
natural lotions which are friendly to the environ-
ment. So they exist!

I know that it is forbidden by STINAPA to use
sun lotion if you are going to kayak in the man-
groves. Signs say so at the Kayak Center and at
Lac.
Is it not strange then that this prohibition is not
valid for the sea? Jibe City for instance is very
close to the mangroves but does not know about
the prohibition of using sun lotion.
I think that next to some causes of damaging
the reefs, there is another one to take care of:
making people see what the consequences are of
using sun lotion that is not water-resistant.
It will become a hard task because the funny
thing was that most of those people who were
swimming over there in the milk with their snor-
kels did not even bother to go more than 10 me-
ters away from the pier. They just kept snorkel-
ing, seeing nothing but white!
Maybe they spread the word that snorkeling on
Bonaire is not something to do because of the
terrible visibility.
Problem solved!


Note: A study sponsored by the E
Commission determined there is ev
sun blocking lotions can harm the re
hlpp % % % .telegraph.co.uk/news/w
europe/2018159/European-Commis
lotions-could-kill-colourful-corals.h
Currently only biodegradable sun
permitted in Cozumel's marine park


R. Sanders

uropean
idence that
eefs. See
orldnews/
ssion-Suntan-
itml
screens are
Xcaret -Ed.


WHY ARE CRUISE VISITORS SO PRIVILEGED?


Dear Editor:
Quite a few vacationers, many of whom have
come to Bonaire year after year, are asking some
serious questions. It was announced that every-
one on Bonaire should try to make sure the peo-
ple getting off cruise ships are shown a wonder-
ful time so when they leave after a few hours
here, they do so with a very good impression of
Bonaire.
The people who are vacationing here for a
week or two and spend 100's of times more
money ask what about their impression of Bon-
aire? Does no one care what they think? Roads
are blocked off so they cannot get around town
easily. Tour buses make driving to places such as
Karpata take an hour instead of minutes because
tour buses will not allow anyone to pass and stop
every few minutes. Beaches are overrun with
cruise ship passengers taking away space so va-
cationers are pushed aside. The water in front of
these beaches is an oil slick from sun tan lotion,
proven to be very harmful to corals. These pas-
sengers walk down the roads instead of using
sidewalks, making driving difficult. A huge
amount of money is being spent on a pier which
is questionable if it will pay for itself while other
areas of Bonaire are left to decay. Why do these
cruise ship people pay a pittance (which has only
started this year!) when everyone else pays a
huge departure tax and at least $5.50 per day just
to be here? Why do cruise ship passengers pay
nothing to use the Bonaire National Marine Park
when others have to pay a minimum of $10?

So the bottom line is why do people who
spend a few dollars get such high preference over
those who spend thousands and are far less a
problem to the overall environment of Bonaire?
These are just some of the questions that are
being asked by our best guests coming to Bon-
aire.
Bruce Bowker

THE BONAIRE REPORTER ON LINE

Dear Editor:
We have been reading The Bonaire Reporter
(on-line) for a long time. We love Bonaire and
your publication is just wonderful -- a great way
to stay in touch with what is going on, and a
good long-distance reminder of Bonaire's daily
life.
After saying that, I'm a little embarrassed to ad-
mit that I haven't looked in several months --
sometimes it's hard to accept that we can't always
afford to visit.
So today I found a few things on the (new) Bon-
aire Reporter home page on the web.
First, I think the raw news is great! It's a little
like the Flotsam and Jetsam section. Very inter-
esting.
And today we see little Ava Rose Tallan
Wuyts. Beautiful. May she have a happy life.
( i,,, Ischay, Boston, MA4


Page 12


Body LTalk

How DOES THIS CLIMATE AFFECT YOUR BODY?


I am
pretty
sure all of
us will
agree that
at the mo-
ment it is
very hot
and dry
here on
Bonaire,
and we are
perspiring
like mad.
Ten min-
utes after
walking
out of a
shower I
am ready to go back for another
one. Does one ever get used to
this?
Very few people realize just
how many vitamins and minerals
are lost from the body on a daily
basis due to this excessive per-
spiring. Don't get me wrong, per-
spiring is good as, together with
the kidneys, toxins are expelled
from the body. Just look at the
color of your first urine in the
morning. The darker the color,
the more toxins in your body.
Drinking a fair amount of water
throughout the day helps with
urinating and perspiration, but
unfortunately also adds to a loss
of vitamins and minerals that,
unless a very large portion of
your daily food intake is raw, is
not being replenished. The end
result of a loss of vitamins and
minerals is initially minor prob-
lems like fatigue, headaches,
body cramps, colds and suscepti-
bility to minor viruses like eye
infection, a stomach virus, fevers
or the "kissing disease."
The importance of minerals to
the human body has been largely
ignored for too long. If the cells
of the body do not receive their
proper nourishment or when they
cannot rid themselves of toxic
waste, a disease process will be-
gin and the automatic alarm sys-
tem activates symptoms. The
body's inability to rid itself of
toxic waste is perhaps the biggest
contributor to disease and can so


easily be rectified by
supplementing with minerals. The
reason we keep on getting the
same health problems is that dis-
eased cells (without proper nour-
ishment) are replaced by weak
cells instead of strong healthy
cells.
The most effective mineral sup-
plements are the 12 Biochemic
Cell Salts available worldwide
under brand names like New Era
and Highlands. These cell salts
provide inorganic elements in a
form that ensures easy absorption
into the body and can be used
safely by children and adults
alike. Their uses are endless and
I suggest you first reach for your
minerals before taking any over-
the-counter medication. For more
information you could contact me
on 788-0030 or visit our website
www.harmonvhousebonaire.com/
html/minerals.html
Next issue Do negative emo-
tions rule your life? U
Stephanie Bennett

Author Stephanie Bennett was
born in Cape Town, South Africa,
where she studied herbs, minerals
and nutrition. Before moving to
Bonaire she continued her studies
in UK, and now
researches
health issues
that particu-
larly il,.,. t peo-
ple on Bonaire
and other Car-
ibbean Islands.


Em- -

Regain your Physical and Emotional Health
the way nature intended.
Herbs from all over the world
Mineral Supplements
Herbal painkillers
Natural anti-inflammatory creams
Dengue Fever prevention & treatment
Mosquito after-bite cream

Tel. 788 0030 for an appointment

HARMONY HOUSE
Stephanie Bennett S.N.H.S Di
Kinesiology & Diabetes Management
Kaya Pape Comes #2, Antriol
www harmornyhousebonainre om
Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009


I
















San Diego, California, U.S.A.


Here
is a
picture of
Becky
Stark-
weather
taking a
break at
Mile
Marker 14
to read The
Bonaire
Reporter at
the San
Diego
Rock 'n
Roll Mara-
thon on
June 5.
Becky and
another
Bonaire
regular,
Warren
Wagner, ran and finished the marathon. Becky designated Support Bonaire, Inc. as
one of the four charities she was running for. Warren finished in 5 hours, and
Becky finished in 6:02. In all, 17,100 out of 20,400 finished the race. Becky cred-
its Warren and Delno Tromp for encouraging her to run her first marathon at age


N~ HERSEE TF-I-4C> =I NrD>
WHEFROEP4RTE


Airport:
Car Rental Agencies,
Airport Arrivals Area
Banks:
MCB (Playa & Hato),
RBTT
Restaurants:
Bistro de Paris
Brasserie Bonaire
Capriccio
Chez Lucille
City Cafe
Croccantino
Den Laman
Garden Cafe
Hilltop at Caribbean Club
Kentucky Fried Chicken
Lost Penguin
Lover's Ice Cream
Pasa Bon Pizza
Subway
Wil's Tropical Grill
Shops:
Bonaire Gift Shop
City Shop
DeFreewieler
INPO
Paradise Photo
Photo Tours, Playa
Exito Bakery
Bonaire Super Store
Hotels:


Buddy Dive
Capt. Don's Habitat
Carib Inn
Caribbean Club Bonaire
Dive Inn
Divi Flamingo
Eden Park Hotel
Harbour Village
Plaza
Sand Dollar
Supermarkets:
Cultimara
Consales
More for Less
Progresso
Sand Dollar Grocery
Tropical Flamingo
Warehouse
Others:
Bonfysio
Botika Korona
Bestuurscollege
Caribbean Laundry
Customs
Fit 4 Life
Hair Affair
Harbour Village Marina
Parliament
Rocargo
San Francisco Hospital
TCB
Telbo


Yellow Submarine
Bookstores:
Bonaire Boekhandel,
Flamingo Bookstore
Realty Offices:
Harbourtown
Re/Max
Sunbelt
RINCON:
Chinese Store,
Joi Fruit Store,
Lemari Grocery
Rincon Bakery.


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 13












(Continued from page 2)
BOPEC; Whenever there is a re-
striction to dive or enter the sea,
then the government of the Island of
Bonaire should have made that rule.
NOT BOPEC.
Er is een bijna theoretische kans dat
het Land grond aan BOPEC in erf-
pacht heeft uitgegeven en dat
BOPEC in de hoedanigheid van
erfpachter eisen stelt aan te water
gaan. Geadviseerd wordt dan ook
contact over deze kwestie op te ne-
men met het havenkantoor in Kral-
endijk te Bonaire (havenmeesters
Sint Jago en Statie) om hierover
zekerheid te verkrijgen. In the event
that BOPEC owns/rents the
ground it therefore can make de-
mands about how to or enter the sea
(over its land). It is advised to go to
the Harbor office (Harbormasters
Statie and St. Jago) in Kralendijk to
be certain.

A According to a report in the Curagao
Papiamentu daily, La Prensa, former
Minister Klaas de Vries, and other
Dutch Parliamentarians, said they are
against creating Kingdom Islands dur-
ing a Parliamentary contact plan meeting
in The Hague. This is in direct conflict
with the outcome of the Referenda held in
Bonaire and Saba. Bonaire's Ramonsito
Booi and Ray Hassell of Saba voiced
their objections.
The Dutch MPs said they had a problem
with the different government forms
voted by the various Antillean islands:
Curagao and St. Maarten chose for auton-
omy within the Kingdom, much like
Aruba, while St. Eustatius wants to stay
in the Netherlands Antilles.


Judge Bob Wit


A Judge Bob Wit, who has served in
the Antillean court system for many
years, is most critical of the pending
Antillean Exclusion law. He thinks it is
illegal and will not stand a court test.
"Dutch xenophobia is the cause of the
discriminatory rules," he says. Ironically,
it is an exclusion that is easily circum-
vented. He adds, "If the regulation is nev-
ertheless introduced, then it is clear that
Antillean Dutch will enter Europe (and on
to Holland) by means of the back door.
European countries must allow them in
(as Dutch/EU passport holders). How-
ever, a Curacaoan can go to Spain (for
example) which must let him enter. (He
can then leisurely proceed to The Nether-
lands as there are no border controls
among EU countries.) It is an impossible
regulation for a problem (drug smug-
gling) which is already on the mend."
According to Wit, it is easier for a
country of 16 million to handle 5,000 An-
tillean problem youngsters than for an
island of 130,000 people. "They say that
the measure is to help these poor young-
sters. But I can't see how they can say
that they are helping these youngsters by
threatening to send them back when there


A The Fun-
dashon for Art and
Culture will hold its
13th Annual Art
Day on Sunday,
July 3. Plan to
spend time at Wil-
helmina Park to en-
joy the art exhibits,
music, performing
arts, food and drinks.
JanArt will sponsor
the children's art
contest as in the past.
All children are in-
vited to go by the
JanArt tent and
draw a picture for Participants in last year's Art Day. Janice Huckaby of Jan
the art contest to be Art in the background
held that day. Sup-
plies are provided at no cost. Prizes will go to children in different age categories.
Anyone interested in exhibiting at the event can contact volunteers at 717-6420 cell
786-6420, or email artandculture65 @hotmail.com.


is no future for them here in the Antilles."
People who are opposed to the Antil-
lean Exclusion Regulations can protest at
the website: http://www.sabana-
amsterdam.nl/
protesteertegenverdonksbeleid.html


five-day event. The Bonaire Reporter's
editor in chief will accompany the team
for on-the-site reporting.

A The model in this week's Benetton
ad page 12 is Mikeely Obersi. G./L.D


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 4











BES w Plan

T he key features of the tax proposals for the BES islands were recently re-
leased. Their objective is to maintain existing tax levels and to simplify the
structure. Note that this structure will not apply to Bonaire if the island government
chooses a different association with Holland than preciously agreed.

Income and Payroll Taxes:
Antillean income and payroll taxes remain with a new fee structure that includes
income tax and AOV (retirement) and AWW (Widows and Orphans) insurance pre-
miums. The first $9,000 (approximately NAJ 16.000) is tax free. The child deduc-
tion is set at $1,250 per child, up to $2,500 per taxpayer.
The tax rate is set at 3.6 % for the first $26,396 (approximately NAJ 47.500) and
30.4 % for the excess. The base rate doesn't include insurance premiums but the top
rate does. The deductions for student study and mortgage payments remain.
The deals that pensionados got are gone. This means that penshonados also will be
taxed at 30.4%. Although initially the intention was not to tax capital gains, capital
gains taxes are back in the proposed legislation.
An exemption is included for the first $5,000 of interest in interest and dividends.
As under the current legislation if a taxpayer has a substantial interest (5%) of the
shares or profit in a NV or BV or any other body having share capital, there is a tax.
But the tax was slashed from the current rate of 15% plus surcharge to 5%.
A yield tax is levied on the proceeds of shares and dividend rights and benefits of a
foundation, purpose or common fund assets. The rate of income tax is 5%. The yield
tax is applicable to entities that are located in the BES islands.

Land Tax:
Property tax is levied on true property values. The value is renewable every five
years. The levy is 20% on a basis of 4% of the actual value, effectively making the
tax rate 0.9% of the actual value. Exemptions will include the main residence serving
as your home, kunuku houses with a value not exceeding $50,000 and for property
used for agricultural or commercial forestry purposes

Tax Shelter Safeguards:
A considerable number of safeguards have been incorporated into the law to pre-
vent the islands from becoming a tax haven. Only bona-fide BES companies should
be able to qualify.

General Use Tax:
A general use tax (ABB) is introduced to replace import duties and sales taxes. The
rate will amount from 6- 8%. However, vehicles are charged a rate of 25%, except


for highly energy-efficient cars, in which
case the rate is zero. The ABB is levied on
goods and services. The tax is applied only
once and not at each transfer as in a Value
Added Tax. There is no tax on bread,
grain, potatoes and rice.

The Real Estate Transfer Tax is in-
creased from 4% to 5%.
Bonaire has an excise tax but Saba
and St. Eustatius don't. On Bonaire,
there will be an excise tax on wine,
smoking tobacco, cigars and cigarillos.

This is a brief summary of the BES
islands tax proposal before the Dutch
legislature. For more information people
are advised to email info(@an.pwc.comor
consult an accountant. U G.D.


Sudoku Solution

427368195

369 571 428

518 294 376
' 642 715 983
S891 423 657

735986214

984 652 731
173 849 562

256 137 849


Ludo Nicolaas Honored Bonaire government photo
W hen The Reporter wanted to learn
W about how the Bonaire and Antilles
Governments were organized we were told,
"Ask Ludovico (Ludo) Nicolaas." We did,
learned a lot and discovered a man who truly
loved and understood statecraft and Govern-
ment. Recently he was honored with a reception
for his 25 years of government service.
At the reception which included his family,
Deputy Frensel Janga presented him with a cer-
tificate of honor and an "envelope."
Ludovico has been in local government since
1983, after working temporarily in Pijnacker,
Holland. From 1983 to 1987 he worked at the
Central Government Welfare, Ambtenaar Wel-
zijnszaken. From 1990 to 1992 worked for An-
tillenhuis Den Haag as officer in charge of the
Antillenhuis publications and was involved in
helping organize events and aiding the Plenipo- i
tentiary Minister. From 1992 until today he's
worked with the government of Bonaire. Ludo Nicolaas' two lives: hon-
From 1992 to 2000 Ludo worked inAfdeling ored public servant and musical
V .... h, i,, en Bestuursondersteuning performer (inset)
(government protocol and press office). During
that period he handled the visits of important people to Bonaire such as the Queen,
Prince Willem Alexander and Princess Maxima and the President of Germany. As
well he was responsible for the government's press office. Most recently he's served
as the portfolio advisor for the Deputy involved with economic matters. Ludo is not
only an exemplary public servant, he's a longtime member of the great band, Glen




--7,-77-F-7

Question (from page 7):
Q) Which religious order worshipped in the
chapel?
A) De zusters van Roosendaal


Regular *

Water Taxi

TO KLEIN BONAIRE
From Bonaire Nautico Marina

IMHOTEL
PICKUP

L i SERVICE
TRIPS
Every
Day
THE ONLY
WALKON / WALKOFF
Catamaran Kantika di Amor
Up to 27 people and supported by
a brand new larger sister
Catamaran Kantika Too
Up to 50 people
Daily trips via resorts 10 am, 12, 2
pm Except Sundays at 10 am only
Also available for group trips
YACHTSMEN!
Tie up dockside
for min. $10/day+tax
(max 1.90 meter draft),
Water and 115/220 v.
Dinghy tie up at north-inside
dock at US$10 weekly up from
Monday till Monday.
BONAIRE NAUTICO MARINA
At It Rains Fishes Restaurant
Call Henk at 560-7254 / Bob 786-5399
www.bonairenauticomarina/VHF 68
info@bonairenauticomarina.com


Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009


Page 17











(Finding A Balance. Continued from page 6)
pressures on the island infrastruc-
ture (roads, schools, electricity and
water, health, etc.) These pres-
sures must be identified and quan-
tified so that the island can keep
pace with its growth. Infrastruc-
ture is expensive but cannot be
overlooked. Once the island has a
definite plan with a sound basis for
expectations of success, funding
for infrastructure may be much
easier to obtain. Suggestions for
this large group would be: DROB,
WEB, SELIBON, TELBO, the
schools, Public Health, the hospi-
tal and healthcare professionals,
Police and Social Services. Given
the wide range of these concerns it
would probably be necessary to
split this group into Physical Infra-
structure and Social Infrastructure sub groups
5. Community Involvement This group would contact island stakeholders not di-
rectly represented in other groups to first determine the desired direction of the
population. Later the group would work to see what opportunities exist to gain
wider community participation in the tourist product. For instance Regatta and the
windsurf events could be included in all promotional media, community participa-
tion in websites and other promotions (e.g. restaurant and retail outlets) could help
share costs and provide more reasons to visit the island. Marsh6 di Rincon, Jong
Bonaire visiting teen program and various other NGO-based activities could be
used as attractions providing a constantly updated menu of events and opportunities
on the island. Representatives could be from BRA, AKIB, CURO, KvK, FESBO
etc)
6. Customer Promotion. This group would identify information sources and obtain
necessary data, analyze the data and prepare a description of customer groups and
their needs (e.g. current Bonaire tourists versus new potential tourists, divers, snor-
kelers, windsurfers, families etc). Other responsibilities include identifying possi-
ble promotional activities and agencies to strengthen the current public relations
efforts, developing a Five-year Promotional Plan and, eventually, guiding the devel-
opment of that plan. Potential members: TCB, travel agents, hotels and profes-
sional marketers and Internet experts living on the island.
7. Packaging and Co-op efforts. This group would work with airline Marketing De-
partments, Cruise Ship companies, Tour Packagers, equipment manufacturers,
credit card companies and other partners to be sure that Bonaire takes advantage of
all opportunities for others to share in the cost and returns from our efforts. Poten-
tial members: travel agent, hotels, CURO, airlines, marketing professionals.
By starting with experts in the field and keeping the groups small and efficient, a
plan could be developed within a very short period of time. Regular communica-
tion between the workgroups would be necessary so that all can evaluate the impact
of other groups on their areas of competence and, in the end, arrive at an acceptable
long-term solution. The issue is important enough and urgent enough to encourage
cooperation and quick action.


Summary
In this series we have tried to analyze Bonaire's development and its tourism product
from a number of different angles in order to try to gain perspective on the current
situation and find a balance for future growth. It is our hope that a balance between
progress and protection can be found so that development does not harm the is-
land or the island's population.
In addition to preventing harm, balance is needed to improve the economic position
of current residents and businesses. No one wants to stifle growth that will reduce air-
lift to the island, but we also don't want to see unplanned, uncontrolled growth that
will destroy the existing businesses, create the need for too many foreign workers as
happened in Aruba; or that will stress the islands' infrastructure or ruin the environ-
mental resources that bring the tourists in the first place.
We are optimistic about the chances for success if the entire community works to-
gether to establish the goals and then set the direction with a clear, long-term Develop-
ment Plan and planning process.
Next we will present some comments from our readers about this series of articles
To help get the process started, please take the time to answer the questions in the
Bonaire Reporter Survey. We want to hear from both tourists and residents on these
important issues. Thanks for your help.
O The authors of this article are market research professionals living in Bonaire.


The Bonaire Reporter Survey.
What do YOU think about Bonaire?

s a reader of The Bonaire Reporter you must care about the island.
Maybe you could help us with some of the consumer 'needs' research
mentioned in this series. It doesn't matter if you are a tourist or a resident.
Please fill out this questionnaire and mail it to Bonaire Reporter, Kaya Gob. De-
brot 200-6, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN) or go on-line to http//www.
bonairenews.com/survey.htm and e-mail your form to survey@bonairereporter.
com

1. Your nationality: Antillean .US Netherlands Other:

2. Your age: DUnder25 .26-40 .41-60 Over60
3. Your sex: DM OF
4. Marital status .DSingle .Married Widowed/Divorced .In relationship
5. Years Scuba Diving l year or less 2-5years 5-10years Morethan
10 years
6. Years windsurfing D 1 year or less 2-5 years 5-10 years Morethan
10 years
7. Are you a [OTourist O.Part time resident [OFull time resident [Native Bo-
nairean
8. How much time do you spend on Bonaire in an average year?
D 1-2 weeks D3 to 4 weeks 1 to 2 months 2 to 6 months
O 6 to 12 months
9. Number of people in your household or group when you are on Bonaire:

10. What year did you first come to Bonaire:
11. Why did you first come to Bonaire? .born here Oparents moved here
Found a job here scuba diving tourist windsurfing tourist Other


12. What do you like MOST about Bonaire?



13. What do you like LEAST about Bonaire?



14. How satisfied are you with the following? Rate your degree of satisfac-
tions from 1 to 4, where 4 is extremely satisfied and 1 is not at all satis-
fied. Circle the appropriate number for each item.
Satisfaction
Low High


friendliness of the people
number of hotels
quality of hotels
number of restaurants
quality of restaurants
number of cultural activities
quality of cultural activities
activities for children
condition of the reefs
quality of the diving
quality of the environment
cleanliness of the island
quality of the roads
Internet service
telephone service
water and electric service
number of tourists
service attitude at businesses
personal safety
number of activities available
quality of activities available
number of diving locations
airline service to the island
quality of your Bonaire experience
Other
Other


1 2
1 2
1 2


15. What 'needs' do you have that are not currently being met by Bonaire?
Or, said another way, what could Bonaire do to get you to spend more
time on the island or for you to enjoy your time on Bonaire more?


16. What could Bonaire do to improve its tourism product so more people
would want to come to Bonaire? D


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 7











Bonaire Reporter Classifieds- Are still free
Got something to buy or sell?
Non-Business Classified Ads (up to 4 lines/ 20 words): FREE
Commercial Ads only NA/1 per word, for each two-week issue.
Call 790-6518 or 790-6125 or email


V CAPT. DON'S ISLAND
GROWER
Trees and plants, Bonaire
grown.
8000m2 nursery. Specializ-
ing in garden/septic pumps and irrigation.
Kaminda Lagoen 103, Island Growers
NV (Capt. Don & Janet). 786-0956

- FELMAR
Cleaning Services
Apartments, Hotels,
Houses, Offices & More.
[ Efficient Work,
Good References.
Tel. 786-0019

Property Services Bonaire B.V.
Taking care of your properties
(while you are off island). Email for
information and prices:
propertvservicesbonairet,.hotmail.com

Bonaire Images
Elegant greeting cards and beautiful
boxed note cards are now available at Chat
-N-Browse next to Lover's Ice Cream and
Sand Dollar Grocery. Photography by
Shelly Craig www.bonaireimages.com

GREAT CLEANING SERVICE
For Quality House and Office
Cleaning ....... CALL JRA
Serving Bonaire for more than 15 years
Honest, Reliable, Efficient, Thorough,
Low rates, References. One time or many
Phone 785-9041 ... and relax.

4 LUNCH TO GO
Starting from NAf6 per meal.
_a--- Call CHINA NOBO 717-8981.
Web site:
www. chinanobobonaire. corn

A Unique Haircut experience at
r The Windsurf Place,
Sorobon, with Desiree.
Open weekdays from 12
noon, Weekends by ap-
pointment.
Phone: 786-6416
info(&aplaceforvoubonaire.com

IS YOUR HOUSE NEW TO
YOU?
4^ Make it more livable
from the start.

FENG SHUI CONSULTATIONS
Also interior or exterior design advice,
clearings, blessings, energy, healing,
China-trained. Experienced. Inexpensive.
Call Donna at 795-9332.


OUTD<@ R
ONAIRE
DO SOMETHING DIFFERENT
KAYAKING CAVING CLIMBING -APPELLJNG a
ABSEILEN MOUNTAIN BIKING NATIONAL
PARK TOURS ISLAND TOURS BIRDWATCHING
Tel (599) 791-6272 / 785-6272
hans@'ouldoorbonaire.com
wtr,,,,j.ouldoorbonaire.com

For sale: Painting of Anton Heybotr
- 'Boat' in black and yellow, framed,
1.10 x .79 cm. NAf 5000.-
'Windmachine', one speed, NAf 4( -
For sale: Hand embroidered antique
Indian tapestry, 1.25 x 1.65 cm, NAf
300.- Phone 786-3117.
of Ja
For rent at Hato, 2 studios for 1 per- Th
son. Minimum stay 4 months, no airco And
Incl.; gas/water/electricity/intemet/linen/
selibon/furnished/garden/parking place/
terrace/ Rent per month NAf 650,-- or
600,--Deposit NAf 750 or 600,-- 717
2529 or 796 2529

For rent at Hato, studio for 1 per-
son. Minimum stay 4 months, no airco.
Incl.; Gas/water/electricity/internet/
linen/selibon/furnished/garden/parking
place/terrace/ Rent per month NAf
600,-- Deposit NAf 600,-- Call 717-
2529 or 796- 2529

Porch Sale, Saturday 28-11-09 Sat-
urday from 8-4pm. Bikes, sliding
doors, (fish)books, clothes, electric
stuff, weights for diving, diving stuff, 2
garden tables, paintings, wooden gifts
etc.. Kaya Utrecht 25, Hato.

1/2 Container to USA. Need to send
something to the USA? I have half a
container going to the U.S. in Dec.
$1,300. Call 795-1277

Free Packing boxes, from the 13th to
20th of December contact me at
info(isoundfound.com for details.

Two Large Airline Approved Dog
Kennels Needed Please call 528- 1304.

WANTED Used sewing machine in
good condition with all working parts.
Call 528-1304.

NexStar 8 GPS Telescope Star gaz-
ing for anyone. All accessories included
- tripod, 4 eye pieces, star finder, AC
adapter. Almost new. Call 717-7278
for more information. NAf 1300


Put your ad here and get results
Fast.


ucy Diaz, with her lovely daughter, Elesier Angel, last October took a cruise aboard
the Carnival "Freedom" and they visited a couple of places among others the island
imaica.
iey took the opportunity to visit the very famous "Dunn's Falls River" in Ocho Rios.
of course they brought with them The Bonaire Reporter. U

WIN GREAT PRIZES! Take a copy of The Bonaire Reporter with you on your next trip or when you
return to your home. Then take a photo of yourself with the newspaper in hand. THE BEST PHOTOS OF
THE YEAR WILL WIN THE PRIZES. Mail photos to Bonaire Reporter, Box 407, Bonaire, Netherlands
Antilles (AN). E-mail to: info@bonairereporter.com.
KRALENDIJK TIDES (Heights in feet, FT)
Remember: Winds and weather can f ,, in1,l...I... the local tide's height and time


DATE Time Ht. Time Ht. Time Ht.


11-27 1:25
11-28 1:14
11-29 1:01
11-30 11:06
12-01 11:43
12-02 12:22
12-03 13:12
12-03 13:12
12-04 13:59
12-05 0:18
12-06 0:56
12-07 1:23
12-08 1:42
12-09 1:49
12-10 1:40


1.0OFT.
1.0OFT.
1.0OFT.
2.1FT.
2.1FT.
2.1FT.
2.1FT.
2.1FT.
2.1FT.
0.7FT.
0.7FT.
0.8FT.
0.9FT.
1.0OFT.
1.0OFT.


9:50
10:06
10:31
20:48
21:43
22:28
23:06
23:06
23:44
14:56
15:54
17:01
8:46
8:45
9:07


1.8FT.
1.9FT.
2.0FT.
0.9FT.
0.8FT.
0.7FT.
0.7FT.
0.7FT.
0.7FT.
2.0FT.
1.9FT.
1.7FT.
1.5FT.
1.6FT.
1.8FT.


18:21
19:14
20:05


Time Ht. COEF


1.1FT. 20:18
1.OFT. 21:47
0.9FT. 23:05


1.2FT.
1.1FT.
1.OFT.


13:18 1.4FT. 18:05 1.6FT.
15:13 1.2FT. 19:22 1.4FT.
16:32 1.1FT. 20:28 1.3FT.


S I SEC:IHAL


E Ft VIIC E S



WANT TO FEEL SAFER P

SI uNOr Arif s


sport of Money *Vehicle patrols
Valuables eBurglar Alarms
ite Investigations *Fire Alarm Systems


-


Kaya Nikiboko Nord 37A, PO Box 225 Tel: (599) 717- 8125
Fax (599) 717- 6125 E-mail sss@bonairelive.com


DENGUE FEVER
If you have some or all of the following symptoms,
you may have Dengue Fever.
High Fever Aching joints and muscles
Severe headache Pain behind the eyes
Backache Nausea with possible vomiting
For more information and advice on treatment &
prevention of Dengue Fever call the helpline.


DENGUE HELPLINE
+599 790 6500
Powered by iO


16 Flights a day
between
Bonaire and
Curagao


Divi Divi Air
Reservations
24 hours a day
Call
(5999 839-1515)
Or (5999


Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009


Page 13











(It starts with an bdea. Continuedfrom page 10)
their families and break free of poverty.

They learn the skills needed to become
plumbers, heavy machine operators, elec-U
tricians, machinists, carpenters and con-
struction workers. A TOP/WIN graduate
says, "I'm a better mother now than in the
past... I've doubled my income. My daughter looks at me and she's very proud -
and I am too of the person I've become." Women Venture also teaches women
how to get rewarding, higher paying jobs, how to find careers that interest them and
how to start and grow their own businesses.

Can you help?
Non-profit organizations serve people in Gandhi once said,
a variety of ways. For instance, the people "The best way to find
being helped might be "receivers," that is, yourself is to lose yourself
they receive food, shelter, clothing, medi- in the service of others."
cine, etc. to provide for their immediate
needs. An example of this type is the relief sent to tsunami victims. In another kind
of program, the people might be "learners" in specially designed training or educa-
tion classes, perhaps on how to keep a family budget, how to be a better father, or
how to control a gambling addiction. These organizations try to find out why a
problem exists and then intervene with a development program. Finally, the people
might be "builders" in self-help projects where they provide the labor, tools or ma-
terials to create a garden for their community.

What kind of service can YOU provide?

Anything is possible on Bonaire. Funds are available to start
short or long-term projects that respond to local needs and
provide social benefits to the community.


What are the planning steps necessary
for a successful program and project?
First, contact the target group that you would like to help. Build their trust and find
out what they need.
What are their real problems? Make sure your idea isn't already being done by an-
other group. Discuss your hopes with any other groups that may have joint interests
or benefit from your project. Consider all these ideas and plan your project.


Who will help you?
Who has the needed expertise and skills? Brainstorm solutions with the community
and target group.
Who do you want to serve and why? Decide just what you hope to do and how you
will do it. List your activities.
How much will they cost?
Do some research on prices and develop a budget. Be realistic about your program
and budget-only promise what can realistically be delivered. Write guidelines for
record keeping, as well as for monitoring and evaluating your project so your group
is sure to be efficient and productive.
How will responsibilities be distributed? How will you ensure financial account-
ability? Explore fund-raising options. Have a long-term strategy and plans for self-
sufficiency. Make an appointment with the NGO Platform Bonaire (717-2366)
to present your plan and ask for their assistance in getting available funding
from AMFO, the Antillean Co-Financing Organization. The Platform can also
help you prepare your proposal and become a registered foundation.
1 Barbara Mason Bianculli



Voluntary action has the power to change
society through a community of caring citizens.

As Martin Luther King, Jr. preached,
"Everybody can be great because everybody can serve. You
only need a heart full of grace, a soul generated by love."

It all starts with an idea. And your good idea will lead to a better
Bonaire.



CONTACT INFORMATION


AME


*FO



Ftaeicnnna 1iora'u


AMFO: Kaya Gob. N. Debrot #31, Bonaire. Tel. 717-7776,
Fax 717-7779, website: www.samfo.org, email: info-
bon samfo.org

NGO Platforma Bonaire: Kaya Korona 5-C. Tel. 717-
2366, Fax 7172367, website: www.ngobonaire.org, email:
Platform@ngobonaire.org


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 11





















































As I alerted you earlier this
month one of the most spec-
tacular, super close meetings of the
planets you'll ever see will occur this
week and next. And in fact this Sunday
and Monday the two planets closest to
the Sun won't be this close again until
the year 2070.
Think about Sky
Park skies earlier
this month. Back
then on Sunday June "...starting
12, ifyou faced west and lasting
northwest, 30 to 45
minutes after sunset Mercury, Ve
while there was still will be onl
twilight out, you
would have seen the apart front
brightest planet of
them all, planet #2
from the Sun, Venus, and planet #1
from the Sun, Mercury, peeking just
above the horizon. And on a straight
line with Mercury and Venus up to
their left, planet #6, ringed Saturn.
And if you watched night after night
you would have seen all three of them
steadily move closer and closer to each
other, Saturn descending and Mercury
ascending to meet brilliant Venus.
But this week the changes are really
dramatic because starting Friday, the
24th and lasting for three nights, Mer-
cury, Venus and Saturn will be only
two degrees apart from each other. On
Saturday the three are at their absolute
closest to each other and could fit in a
circle only one and a half degrees wide,
so close you could cover all three with
your pinky finger held out at arm's
length.
But the best is yet to come because
on Sunday the 26th Mercury and Venus


will be less than one half of one degree
apart. And to top that, on Monday the
27t they'll be only one tenth of one
degree apart, at their closest until 2070!
So close that the Old Farmer's Almanac
claims they may even appear to merge
into one star.
Once again, this Friday, Saturday and


Friday, the 24t
for three nights
Snus and Saturn
y two degrees
i each other."


Sunday, Mercury,
Venus and Saturn
will form a super
close trio, and on
Monday you won't
see Mercury and
Venus this close for
another 65 years!
Of course we must
remind you that this
is all an optical illu-
sion and that they


only appear close from our vantage
point here on Earth. In reality on Mon-
day when Mercury and Venus appear
to almost merge, Mercury will be 95
million miles away while Venus will
be 142 million miles away and Saturn
will be a whopping almost one billion
miles away.
Don't miss this super spectacular
planetary gathering. Start watching this
week but make sure that you don't miss
this Friday, Saturday, Sunday and fi-
nally, Monday. And if you've got a
small telescope or binoculars, get them
out now because the change from night
to night will absolutely stun you. But
don't fret if you miss this weekend be-
cause Mercury and Venus will still be
really close all next week too! If you've
never engaged in planet watching be-
fore this weekend now is the time to
start. I mean who wants to wait until
2070? 0 Jack Horkheimer


THE 3TARS


For the week:
June 24 to July 1, 2005
By Astrologer Michael Thiessen


ARIES (Mar. 21- April 20) Try not to overreact to the loss. You can come into
money; however, perhaps not under the best circumstances. Take a close look at
documents before signing on the dotted line. Don't be too quick to judge those you
live with. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday.
TAURUS (Apr. 21- May 21) Female members of your family may be difficult
to deal with. You can make excellent career moves if you are open to the opportu-
nities that exist. You will find that social activities will lead you into passionate
meetings. Uncertainties regarding your love life will surface if you have neglected
your mate. Your lucky day this week will be Sunday.
GEMINI (May 22-June 21) You must make them stand on their own two feet
regardless of how much you want to make things better for them. Go out with
friends. Eliminate situations that are no longer to your advantage. Travel will initi-
ate new friendships or love connections. Your lucky day this week will be Mon-
day.
CANCER (June 22-July 22) Strength will come from your ability to overtake
just about anyone. Put your thoughts into some trendy new ideas. You need a
change and you need to earn more cash. Time is money and you must be ready to
take action in order to reach your highest potential. Your lucky day this week will
be Monday.
LEO (July 23-Aug 22) You are best not to confront situations that deal with in-
laws or relatives. Correspondence may not clear up issues. You will have to face
each issue separately and in person. Minor health problems may lower your vital-
ity. Your lucky day this week will be Saturday.
VIRGO (Aug. 23 -Sept. 23) Entertain in your home and make aesthetic en-
hancements that will please those who reside with you. Trips will be exciting. You
will be a bit of a spendthrift this week. However, you should be concerned about
what they want in return. Your lucky day this week will be Sunday.
LIBRA (Sept. 24 -Oct. 23) You can pick up valuable information if you listen
to those with more experience. Your ideas may be a little ahead of their time; don't
push them, instead just continue working on development. You can't make things
better if you don't know what to fix. Don't ignore any emotional issues that could
be causing problems. Your lucky day this week will be Monday.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24 Nov. 22) Your ability to charm others will put you in the
limelight at social functions. You may want to get involved in some kind of crea-
tive group. You will find yourself tied to the phone. Spend time with friends or
family. Your lucky day this week will be Monday.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23 -Dec. 21) Your efforts will be rewarded handsomely.
Unexpected bills will leave you a little short. You may attract attention if you get
out socially. Entertainment could be pleasing if it is of an energetic nature. Your
lucky day this week will be Monday.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22- Jan. 20) Rely on yourself and you will look good to
superiors. Family trips or projects should be on your mind. Relatives will not agree
with the way you are dealing with your personal problems. Unexpected bills may
set you back. Your lucky day this week will be Friday.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 -Feb. 19) Catch up on correspondence. Don't forget that
your budget is limited right now. Don't be critical or overly opinionated with dis-
likes; it could cause disapproval and unwanted opposition. Daydreaming will be
your downfall. Your lucky day this week will be Thursday.
PISCES (Feb. 20-Mar. 20) You will need to take a look at the renovations that
are necessary and try to find the cheapest way to get things done. Problems with
ear, nose, or the throat are likely. You will find that money could slip through your
fingers. Opportunities to make advancements through good business sense are evi-
dent. Your lucky day this week will be Saturday. 1


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


*to find it, just look up


An Absolutely Spectacular Super Close Meeting of
Three Planets Occurs This Week and Next


Page 23
















The Immigration and Na
For some time now people have been
working behind the scenes on improvements
and projects for the period after the transi-
tion date of 10-10-10, when Bonaire may
become a public body (bijzondere ge-
meente) within the Netherlands. In several
areas ofpolicy, local government and local
organizations are working together with the
people from the Regional Service Centre
(RSC). In the coming months The Bonaire
Reporter will describe the activities of the
Dutch Ministry Representatives in the RSC
and their Bonairean counterparts as they
work together so that, at the planned
"transition time of l0-10-10, local people,
Bonaireans, will handle the tasks of that
department.
For the first report we will describe how
the work of the Immigration and Naturali-
zation Organization (IND) is progressing.

George Mensch6, Head of Bonaire's
Burgerzaken (Civil Registry) and
Bonaire's Organization of Admission, the
Toelatingsorganisatie, (which local people
often refer to just as Bevolking) and Jan de
Jong, a Kwartiermaker from the RSC, are
working together on the new Immigration
and Naturalization Organization (IND)
for Bonaire. The IND has the following
tasks:
* The admission of foreigners
* The settlement of requests for
naturalization
* The extension of visas
* Providing legal protections and en-
forcing proper procedures.


turalization Organization
Simplifying the Tasks -
From 13 counters to just one

With the motto, "Transformation Before
Transition," considerable changes have
already been made to the foreigners' admis-
sion process on Bonaire. The goal is to have
good functioning organizations with quali-
fied workers at the transition date of 10-10-
10.
One of the major changes is the reduction
of the numerous "counters" the applicant
has to visit to obtain the necessary permits
to work and live here. In the past there were
13 different counters. Now there's just one.
The new Organization of Admission, be-
gun in July 2009, is working with the new
Foreigner Management System (FMS) soft-
ware. The system has been developed with
the input of the employees of all the organi-
zations involved.
Further changes due to the new organiza-
tion are:
The present Admission Statues will be
applied more strictly.
The employees will carry more respon-
sibilities, for instance in the near future
qualified employees can sign a permit them-
selves. Currently this is a task of the
Gezaghebber (Lt. Governor).
More responsibilities require more
knowledge and experience. A lot of empha-
sis is being put into education and training
"on the job."
Due to the FMS, a good digital data
base is building.


Jan de Jong started the job ofKwartier-
maker Immigration and Naturalization in
June 2009.
In the Netherlands Jan worked with the
Police Department for 20 years. After that he
joined IND where he also workedfor nearly
20 years. In several management jobs he
built his knowledge and experience in this
area. "The job here on Bonaire fits me per-
fectly. Ifind it a real challenge to contribute
to the new IND organization, to work to-
gether and to develop things in a creative
way. We hope the organization ends up with
a lot of satisfied customers."

* Tasks will become work place inde-
pendent after the introduction of the FMS
on Saba and Statia. Back office employees
will be able to support each other when
necessary, even if off island.
* For special issues Bonaire can rely on
IND in the Netherlands for support.


George Mensche has been working with
the governmental organization on Bonaire
for 12 years. He worked at Legal Affairs for
four years. After that, he worked at the Bu-
reau of the Island Secretary for three years,
to continue his career at the post of Head
Burgerzaken. He's been doing that job for
five years. "For me, the challenge of co-
building this new organization came right on
time. I love to help the organization and the
employees to grow. Change is never easy for
people, but change also means progression.
If people are given more responsibilities, they
achieve more and they gain more fun out of
the job."
* All governmental organizations on
Bonaire that are involved meet regularly to
exchange information and share problems
or questions.
After the transition date the Minister of
Justice of the Netherlands becomes respon-
sible for the IND on Bonaire (currently the
(Continued at the bottom of column 2 on page 9)


CARIBBEAN HOMES

BONAIRE COM

Pristine ocean front villa .

Private sandy beach

Infinity pool

4 beds. 32 baths

Charming guest cottage

320m2 (3,444 sq. ft.)
of living space

Situated on a 943m2
(10,150 sq. ft.) size lot





US$ 1,700,000


Kaya Rotterdam 4

Hato


Phone (599) 717 4686 www.caribbeanhomesbonaire.com Kaya Isla Riba (Next to City Caf6)

Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 Page 3


77 0
,-,:,watmakcrs and Cc












THE BONAIRE GARDNER


The Very Special Neem Tree


T his article
will be about
just one tree, but a
very special one, the
Neem tree. There is
a lot to say about this
tree, and there are
only two ways of
looking at it. Either
you love it or you
hate it. I belong to
the first category.
Why? Because it
grows very fast,
doesn't get any
known diseases,
doesn't need a lot of
water, grows well in
the strong wind, and,
the most important
thing, it grows into a
very nice big shade
tree. But more and
more people on Bon-
aire see it as a weed
that spreads its seed-
lings everywhere,
breaks your walls
and makes a big
mess by its falling
leaves. This can also
be true, but there are
a lot of ways that
you can avoid those problems. I'll write
about that next time, but first I want to
tell you some more things about this
very special tree.
Its botanical name is Azadiradita
indic. That tells us that it is originally
from India. In that country the Neem is
a sacred tree and has been known for
thousands of years for its healing prop-
erties. Ghandi was known to hold
prayers meetings under a giant Neem,
and in his daily diet was a Neem chut-
ney. In India they call the tree "The Vil-
lage Pharmacy!"
The British spread the tree around the
world, and in a lot of countries nowa-
days there are big plantations with only
Neem trees. They are used in reforesta-


W elcome to new baby
Angie who was
born on Saturday, June 11, in
Bonaire. Her parents are City
Shop's Hamoudy Dabousi
and his wife Ruba. She joins
her sisters, Nadia and Talin.
Congratulations and best
wishes to all! O


Readers are invited to send their photos of their
anniversaries, engagements or
weddings to The Reporter.


tion projects for its hard wood, but most
of all for its bark, leaves, flowers, seed
pods and even the roots.
A wide variety of healing products are
made from them. Products from the
Neem are used in medicines for heart
problems, eczema, psoriasis, herpes,
hair loss and in pest controls against
more than 200 different insects, espe-
cially for big crops. In India people still
brush their teeth with the Neem leaves,
and the Neem oil made from the seeds
is used for hundreds of reasons.
The fragrant flower is a base for a
very nice perfume (not for sale at our
shop!). Not bad for a tree that is seen as
a weed!
This brings us also to the discussion


as to whether a Neem is good protec-
tion against mosquitoes and the mealy
bugs on Bonaire. I personally have
never seen proof of it, but I certainly
believe it helps when you have a big
Neem in your garden. I think the mos-
quitoes are driven away by this tree, but
not killed or destroyed. I will try to fol-
low the fast growing use of this beauti-
ful tree, and hopefully it will give us a
good solution against the hardy mealy
bugs or Pies-Pies!
For people who are interested, here
are some nice Websites to learn more
about this fascinating tree: www.
maxpages.com/neemtree or www.
neemtree.info.
Next time I'll write more about the
use of the Neem. O Ap van Eldik


I NVITAT

Exhibition by the students
of the SGB High School

Cultural Growth
at ARTEBON

Opening on Friday, June
24 at 7 pm by
The Minister of Education
& Culture Maritsa D. Silberie

Saturday, June 25 and
Sunday, June 26
9am to 5pm

ARTEBON Center
Kaya Playa Lechi
(waterfront promenade)
Show by VSBO and HAVO
students

We hope you will come


ION


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 12


Ap van Eldik owns Green Label
Landscaping which designs, con-
structs and maintains residential and
commercial gardens. Two nurseries
and a garden shop in Kralendijk
carry terra cotta pots from Mexico
and South America. Phone 717-3410.
NOW OPEN SATURDAYS, NON-
STOP 9 TO 4.


ANNoUNI ClmM[TMI









Eli Deli Opens


A t last there's a world
class delicatessen on
Bonaire. It's Eli Deli on the
traffic circle by the old Sunset
Beach Hotel and is run by
Ana, her husband Eugene and
daughter Eli, an SGB student.
The shop offers 23 different
kinds of cheeses. Take your
pick: they're from Italy,
Sweden, Belgium, Holland,
England and Spain. Beautiful
hams are Serrano, Parma,
Ardenne, Hungarian. There's
Spanish salami and chorizo,
linburgse, york ham and
pastrami to mention a few.
Buy them by the slice to
take home or have them made
into hot or cold sandwiches
and accompany that with their
homemade salads and olives.
Eli Deli is open for
breakfast too. They have a
omelets, croissants and .
espresso type coffees.
On the shelves are rice from
India, Spain and Italy, pastas,
olive oils, and sardines.
Ana, from Portugal, is
married to Eugene from Bonaire and
during their 11 years in Holland Ana at
first worked in the hotel business as a
chef but during the last seven years she
immersed herself in working in a
delicatessen in Rotterdam, the
Vermeijden Deli.
The family returned to Bonaire two


years ago and now they've realized their
dream to have their own delicatessen on
Bonaire.
And we all could not be happier!
Eli's Deli is open Monday-Friday, 7-6,
Saturday 8-4 and Sunday 8-noon. Tel.
717-3997. U Laura DeSalvo


Db [LaJTLaLctE


T his year's Sixth Annual Study and Job Fair (beroepnmarkt) on Saturday the
14th of November the was an opportunity for all youngsters and their families
to see what their future could be. How very fortunate that such a fair exists for young
people to be able to see for themselves what a grand selection there is from which to
choose.
Do you want to be a banker, a nurse, a fireman, find a school of higher education?
This is your chance. The rooms and patios of Jong Bonaire thronged with people
eager to get information from the exhibitors.
This year there were dozens of exhibitors and lots of people to talk about their sub-
ject, to answer questions and especially to show their enthusiasm. There were repre-
sentatives from banks, the police and fire departments, the Coast Guard, insurance
companies, phone companies, STINAPA, the high school, TCB, and many many
more from on island and off.
This amazing fair was put together by the Ban Boneiru Bek Foundation. They de-
serve a big thank you. 0 Laura DeSalvo


Bonaire Sunshine Homes, Banco di Caribe & RBTT Bank proudly present


THE AFFORDABLE HOMES SHOW


Date : 28th November 2009
Time : 09:00 17:00 Exhibition of the building system
11:00 12:30 Product workshop on the building Monair
Environmental/Cost Effectiveness/Structural Integrity
Place: Bonaire Sunshine Homes Building at Kaya Lib. S. SJI s hin
Bolivar 26 Item..
Banco di Caribe and RBBT will take mortgage
applications and pre-approve on site


BANK


XAMCo CASm imagine mO for Iyourself.


28F1gO --"
^WTBttQ

FwaRON


Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009


EXPO


KZE (:) I


Page 11












THE BONAIRE GARDNER


The Very Special Neem Tree


T his article
will be about I
just one tree, but a .
very special one, the J '
Neem tree. There is
a lot to say about this
tree, and there are
only two ways of
looking at it. Either
you love it or you
hate it. I belong to
the first category.
Why? Because it
grows very fast,
doesn't get any
known diseases, w
doesn't need a lot of
water, grows well in '
the strong wind, and,
the most important 04
thing, it grows into a .
very nice big shade '
tree. But more and
more people on Bon-
aire see it as a weed
that spreads its seed-
lings everywhere,
breaks your walls
and makes a big .
mess by its falling '.. .' - "
leaves. This can also -.
be true, but there are t ". *
a lot of ways that r .
you can avoid those problems. I'll write
about that next time, but first I want to
tell you some more things about this
very special tree.
Its botanical name is Azadiradita
indic. That tells us that it is originally
from India. In that country the Neem is
a sacred tree and has been known for
thousands of years for its healing prop-
erties. Ghandi was known to hold
prayers meetings under a giant Neem,
and in his daily diet was a Neem chut-
ney. In India they call the tree "The Vil-
lage Pharmacy!"
The British spread the tree around the
world, and in a lot of countries nowa-
days there are big plantations with only
Neem trees. They are used in reforesta-


W welcome to new baby
Angie who was
born on Saturday, June 11, in
Bonaire. Her parents are City
Shop's Hamoudy Dabousi
and his wife Ruba. She joins
her sisters, Nadia and Talin.
Congratulations and best
wishes to all! 1


Readers are limited to send their photos of their
ann iiiersaries, enigagenments orn
weddings to The Reporter.


tion projects for its hard wood, but most
of all for its bark, leaves, flowers, seed
pods and even the roots.
A wide variety of healing products are
made from them. Products from the
Neem are used in medicines for heart
problems, eczema, psoriasis, herpes,
hair loss and in pest controls against
more than 200 different insects, espe-
cially for big crops. In India people still
brush their teeth with the Neem leaves,
and the Neem oil made from the seeds
is used for hundreds of reasons.
The fragrant flower is a base for a
very nice perfume (not for sale at our
shop!). Not bad for a tree that is seen as
a weed!
This brings us also to the discussion


as to whether a Neem is good protec-
tion against mosquitoes and the mealy
bugs on Bonaire. I personally have
never seen proof of it, but I certainly
believe it helps when you have a big
Neem in your garden. I think the mos-
quitoes are driven away by this tree, but
not killed or destroyed. I will try to fol-
low the fast growing use of this beauti-
ful tree, and hopefully it will give us a
good solution against the hardy mealy
bugs or Pies-Pies!
For people who are interested, here
are some nice Websites to learn more
about this fascinating tree: www.
maxpages.com/neemtree or www.
neemtree.info.
Next time I'll write more about the
use of the Neem. 1 Ap van Eldik


I N V I TAT


Exhibition by the student-.
of the SGB High School
Cultural Growth
at ARTEBON

Opening on Friday, June
24 at 7 pm by
The Minister of Education
, Culture Maritsa D. Siibere

Saturday, June 25 and
Sunday, June 26
9am to 5pm

ARTEBON Center
Kaya Playa Lechi
(waterfront promenade
Show by VSBO and Hv-,
students

We hope you will come


Page 12


ION


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1,2005
Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Ap van Eldik owns Green Label
Landscaping which designs, con-
structs and maintains residential and
commercial gardens. Two nurseries
and a ... ,i shop in Kralendijk
carry terra cotta pots from Mexico
and South America. Phone 717-3410.
NOW OPEN SATURDAYS, NON-
STOP 9 TO 4.


ANNOUNCEMEMM











Saturday- Discover Our Diversity

WHfA S HAPPENING
Slide Show, pool bar Buddy Dive, 7
pm 717-5080


WEELY H E NOI NIES

Late Show
Callto make sure (Usually 9pm)
Kingdom of Heaven
(Orlando Bloom)
Early Show (Usually 7 pm)
State of the Union

Kaya Prinses Marie
Behind Exito Bakery
Tel. 717-2400
Tickets NAf10,50 (incl. Tax)
High Schoolers NAf 7,75
NEW FILMS BEGIN FRIDAY
CLOSED MONDAY TUESDAY
AND WEDNESDAY
SATURDAY 4 PM
Because of Winn-Dixie


THIS WEEK

Wednesday, June 22-Symposium:
Is teenage pregnancy a problem or
something normal? (Embaraso
hubenil un problema ofalgu nor-
mal?) Medical, legal and emotional
topics presented by experts on the sub-
ject. At Scouting Central, near the start
of the Nikiboko North road. 8 am-1
pm. Youngsters especially invited. For
more information contact: Roxiana
Goeloe, tel: 717-2436; Marisela Flem-
ming: tel: 717-8976; Polli Winklaar:
tel: 717-8839
Friday, June 24- Opening
"Cultural Growth" SGB art stu-
dents exhibit, free -ARTEBON, 7 pm,
refreshments & snacks. Continues Sat-
urday, Sunday, June 25, 26, 9 am to 5
pm. See page 12
Saturday, June 25-Combat Pov-
erty Conference, at ABVO conference
room, 9 to 5. Call 717-4666, email
fesbo@telbonet.an by June 22.
Until June 28 -Wilna Groenenboom
Art Exhibit, The Cinnamon Art Gal-
lery is at Kaya A.P. L. Brion #1, just
off Kaya Grandi, behind Banco di
Caribe. Open weekdays 9 am to noon,
2 to 5 pm. Call 717-7103 or 786-9563.
Friday, June 24-St. John's Day
Wednesday, June 29-St. Peter's
Day
Friday, July 1-Captain Dons 80th
Birthday Party

COMING
Saturday, July 2-Rincon Marsh3

Sunday, July 3-Lac Bay discovery
boat trip. Meet at Boka di Coco
(across from Mangrove/Kayak Center
on dirt road to Cai) 7 am to mid-
afternoon. Sponsored by "Amigunan di
Naturalesa" ("Friends of the Environ-
ment) to benefit Bonaire participants
in Vierdaagse Nijmegen (Four Day
Walk at Nijmegen, Holland). Sign up
at Extra newspaper office. (tel. 717-
8482). Adults, NAf25; Children
NAf15. Seepage 22.

Sunday, July 3-The Fundashon for
Art and Culture will hold its 13th An-


MICRO MOVIE REVIEW
Seen recently in
Movieland Cinema:

XXX (Triple X); STATE
OF THE UNION by Lee
Tamahori, starring Ice Cube, Samuel L.
Jackson and William Dafoe. An endless
sequence of explosions and chases with
a deafening soundtrack and yet I man-
aged to sleep halfway through the film
only to wake up and find that I hadn't
missed anything. It has cliched dia-
logues, unbelievable fight sequences
and a sloppy storyline that threatens to
nullify all the positive aspects of the
movie if there are any. Sorry to say but
this was probably one of the worst mov-
ies I've ever seen. If you're yearning for
a good nap go and see it, otherwise
don't waste your precious time. O Dodo

nual Art Day with art exhibits, music,
performing arts, food and drinks. Any-
one interested in exhibiting at the event
can contact volunteers at 717-6420 cell
786-6420, or email artandcul-
ture65 @thotmail.com.
Monday, July 4-US holiday. Fire-
works at some resorts
July 17-24 Diva's Women Wind-
surf Week- Learn to windsurf clinic
Contact Ann Phelan 786-3134 or email
ann@bonairewindsurfing.com www.
bonairecaribbean.com 3 local scholar-
ships still available for teen or local
women. To apply contact Ann Phelan.
The International Bonaire Sailing
Regatta October 9 15, 2005

EVERY WEEK
Saturday Rincon Marsh3 opens at 6
am 2 pm. Enjoy a Bonairean break-
fast while you shop: fresh fruits and
vegetables, gifts, local sweets and
snacks, arts and handicrafts, candles,
incense, drinks and music. www.
infobonaire.com/rincon
Sunday -Live music 6 to 9 pm while
enjoying a great dinner in colorful
tropical ambiance at the Chibi Chibi
Restaurant & Bar. Open daily 5 to 10
pm. Live Fla-Bingo-great prizes, 7
pm, Divi Flamingo
Monday -Soldachi Tour of Rincon,
the heart of Bonaire, 9 am-noon. $20-
Call Maria 717-6435
Tuesday -Harbour Village Tennis,
Social Round Robin 7 to 10 pm. $10
per person. Cash bar. All invited. Call
Elisabeth Vos at 565-5225 /717-7500,
ext. 14.
Wednesday -Meditation at Donkey
Beach from 7:30 to 8:30 pm. Open to
all. Call S.H.Y. 790-9450
Friday -Manager's Rum Punch
Party, Buddy Dive Resort, 5:30-6:30 pm
Friday- Open House with Happy
Hour at the JanArt Gallery at Kaya
Gloria #7, from 5-7 pm.
Daily- The Divi Flamingo Casino is
open daily for hot slot machines, rou-
lette and blackjack, Monday to Satur-
day 8 pm- 4 am; Sunday 7 pm- 3 am.
Every day by appointment -Rooi
Lamoenchi Kunuku Park Tours Bo-
nairean kunuku. $12 (NAfl2 for resi-
dents). Tel 717-8489, 540-9800.
FREE SLIDE/VIDEO SHOWS


Sunday Bonaire Holiday -Multi-
media dual-projector production by
Albert Bianculli, 8.30 pm, Capt. Don's
Habitat.
Monday Dee Scarr's Touch the Sea
slide experience. Aquarius Conference
Center, Capt. Don's Habitat, 8:30-
9:30pm.
Wednesday (2nd and 4th) Turtle
Conservation Slide Show by Andy
Uhr. Carib Inn seaside veranda, 7
pm
Thursday from June 16 to July 28,
Basic Fish ID Yellow Submarine Dive
Shop at 6:30 pm
Friday- Week in Review Video Pres-
entation by the Toucan Dive Shop at
Plaza's Tipsy Seagull, 5 pm. 717-2500.


CLUBS and MEETINGS
AA meetings -every Wednesday; Phone
717-6105; 560-7267 or717-3902.
Al-Anon meetings every Monday
evening at 7 pm. Call 790-7272
Weekly BonaireTalker Gathering
and Dinner at Gibi's Tuesday -
6:30pm call 567-0655 for directions.
Bridge Club Wednesdays, 7:30 pm
at the Union Building on Kaya Korona,
across from the RBTT Bank and next
to Kooyman's. All levels invited NAf5
entry fee. Call Cathy 566-4056.
Darts Club plays every other Sunday
at City Caf6. Registration at 4, games
at 5. Tel. 717-2950, 560-7539.
JCI. First Wednesday of the Month-
Junior Chamber International Bonaire
(JCI Bonaire or formerly known as
Bonaire Jaycees) meets at the ABVO
building, Kaminda Jato Baco 36 from
7:30 to 9:30pm. Everyone is welcome.
Contact: Renata Domacass6 516-4252.
Kiwanis Club meets at APNA Plaza,
Kaya International, every other Tues-
day, 7 pm. Tel. 717-5595, Jeannette
Rodriguez.
Lions Club meets every 2nd and 4th
Thursday of the month at 8 pm at
Kaya Sabana #1. All Lions are wel-
come.
Rotary lunch meetings Wednesday,
12 noon-2 pm Rendez-Vous Restau-
rant, Kaya L.D. Gerharts #3. All Ro-
tarians are welcome. Tel. 717-8454

BONAIRE'S TRADITIONS
Mangasina di Rei, Rincon. Enjoy the view
from "The King's Storehouse." Learn about



Bonaire's culture. Visit typical homes from
the 17th century. Daily. Call 7174060 /
790-2018
Visit the Bonaire Museum onKaya J. v.d.
Ree, behind the Catholic Church intown
Open weekdays from 8 am-noon, 1:30-5
pm. Tel. 717-8868
Washington-Slagbaai National Park,
Museum and Visitors' Center. Open
daily 8 am-5 pm. Closed on some holi-
days. 717-8444/785-0017
Sunday at Cai- Live music and danc-
ing starts about 12 noon at Lac Cai.
Dance to the music of Bonaire's popular
musicians.
Rincon Marsh&- every Saturday 6
am to 3 pm. Open market in Bonaire's
historic town.


Soldachi Tours show you the Rincon
area. Alta Mira Nature Walking
Tour at 6:30 am. Town Walking
tour at 9:30, Bus Tour at 10. Call
Maria at 717-6435 to reserve.

CHURCH SERVICES
International Bible Church of Bonaire -
Kaya Amsterdam 3 (near the traffic circle)
Sunday Services at 9 am; Sunday
Prayer Meeting at 7:00 pm in English
Tel. 717-8332
Protestant Congregation of Bonaire.
Wilhelminaplein. Services in Papia-
mentu, Dutch and English on Sundays
at 10 am. Thursday Prayer Meeting
and Bible Study at 8 pm. Rev. Jonk-
man. 717-2006
The Church of Jesus Christ of Lat-
ter Day Saints, Kaya Sabana #26 Sun-
days 8:30 11:30 am. Services in
Papiamentu, Spanish and English.
Catholic San Bernardus in Kral-
endijk Services on Sunday at 8 am
and 7 pm in Papiamentu 717-8304.
Saturday at 6 pm at Our Lady of
Coromoto in Antriol, in English. Mass
in Papiamentu on Sunday at 9 am and
6 pm. 717-4211.
Assembly of God (Asemblea di
Dios), Kaya Triton (Den Cheffi). In
English, Dutch & Papiamentu on Sun-
day at 10
am. Wednesday Prayer Meeting at
7:30 pm. 717-2194
New Apostolic Church, Meets at
Kaminda Santa Barbara #1, Sundays,
9:30 am. Services in Dutch. 717-7116.

******
Send events to The Bonaire Reporter
Email reporter@bonairenews.com
Tel/Fax. 717-8988, Cel. 791-7252


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 19













IUASAII AND JETYAR


Sea Princess


P rojections show an increase of
cruise tourism of more or less
75%, says Ronella Croes, head of the
Tourist Corporation Bonaire (TCB). The
TCB considers that a very positive devel-
opment. For the 2006-2007 cruise ship
season many additional ships will call at
Bonaire, including the Princess Line's
love boats, Sea Princess and Crown Prin-
cess. Other ships making first calls at
Bonaire will be the Arcadia, Rijndam and
Prinsendamships, the Crystal Line's ships
Crystal Symphony and Crystal Serenity.
These growth figures are cited as one of
the reasons a facelift of Bonaire's water-
front and a new facility for receiving Ro/
Ro (from roll-on/roll-off ships like the
Don Andres and Dona Luisa) container
cargo is necessary. The new container
pier, if it is built, may be either at WEB
or south of BOPEC near Karpata. The
island government has commissioned a
feasibility study in the matter.
Proponents of the plan say a more at-
tractive waterfront area, devoid of con-
tainers, would enhance tourism, i.e.: at-
tract even more cruise ships. Opponents
say that the money for a new cargo pier
would be better spent on road repair or
other island projects and that the benefits
of cruise tourism are questionable.

A Travel agents in America, Canada
and Europe told CDNN (Caribbean
Diver's News Network) that thousands of
tourists and scuba diving travelers are


canceling planned holidays to Aruba.
CNN (Flamingo TV Channel 10) even
broadcast a report about a Bonaire
dive accident to infer that disappearances
are common in the ABC islands. While
Bonaire's Public Prosecutor Ernst Wes-
selius issued a statement that no crime
was involved in that case, the TCB has
yet to counter the damaging media frenzy
that consumed the American CNN and
Fox News networks last week.
The cancellations follow reports that
police and government officials in Aruba
have deliberately concealed evidence re-
lated to the disappearance of 18-year-old
Natalee Holloway to protect the island's
tourism industry.

A Due to a typographical error in
The Bonaire Reporter edition of June 17-
24, Continental's weekly flights which
begin on Saturday, December 17, were
printed as daily. We apologize for any
inconvenience this may have caused.


A Beginning June 16th, Flamingo Air-
port will sell departure tax cards at a
new booth located centrally in the ticket-
ing and check-in area. An Internet facil-
ity for passenger use will soon be added
on the other side of the booth.


b The Papiamentu daily newspaper,
Extra, reported that the departure tax to
Curacao will soon be raised from
NAf10 to NAf12,50. Aruba-bound trav-
elers do NOT have to pay the $20 intera-
tional tariff, but just NAfl0. However,
Bonaire-bound passengers from Aruba
pay NAf36,90 in Aruba.

b In May, Flamingo Airport
(officially Bonaire International Air-
port-BIA) passed a strict evaluation by
the US's Transportation Security Ad-
ministration (TSA) with flying colors.
BIA is currently seeking to expand its
security staff having taken over the job
from the SSV. VSBO level graduates and
higher are invited to apply.

b Air Jamaica, which has slashed
service to Bonaire to one flight a week,
has also announced they will be cutting
back on food service on their Florida and
Caribbean routes, serving a snack and
beverage instead of a full meal, to save on
food service costs. However, hard liquor,
beer and wine will be sold on all flights,
except to first class passengers, the airline
said. Air Jamaica is trying to save $2 mil-
lion annually but says it needs to cut
costs, eventually by $50 million, to sur-
vive. Executive chairman Dr. Vincent
Lawrence says the decision was difficult
but necessary.

4 TCB-NY reported that for the 12th
consecutive year Bonaire has been voted
by the readers of Scuba Diving maga-
zine as the best shore diving destination
in the world. According to the July 2005
issue of the magazine which reported the
results of Scuba Diving's Top 100 Read-
ers' Choice Awards, "Bonaire has topped
the shore-diving category in our annual
'Top 100 Readers' Choice Awards' an
unbroken string of No. 1 titles that started
in 1994." This year Bonaire received a
score of 96.9, topping the runner-up in
this category by more than four
points. As part of the writeup on Bonaire


the magazine included beautiful photogra-
phy and cited "abundant grunts" and
"dense corals" as just two examples of the
marine life that divers will find at any of
the island's dive sites.

A One of Bonaire's most frequented
shore diving sites, the Windjammer, has
been closed for several months. A small
Bonaire dive resort reports that two dive
groups of six persons each have cancelled
their planned trips to Bonaire because
they will not be able to dive the Windjam-
mer.
Access to the sea is being prevented by
guards at the BOPEC oil terminal, which
is owned by the Venezuelan national oil
company PEDVESA.
Bonaire is unique in the world of diving
destinations because it offers convenient
access from shore to the majority of its
dive sites. Most shore divers book into the
smaller resorts, rent vehicles and spend
weeks diving economically using the dive
resorts' universally offered "unlimited
dive packages." Their car gives them ac-
cess to the islands restaurants, shopping
and above-water attractions as well.

A An avid Windjammer diver sought a
legal opinion in Holland to determine if
the BOPEC oil depot has the right to ban
divers from the Windjammer site located
offshore their property. This is a summary
of the Dutch reply with an English trans-
lation:
De zee tot aan de stranden is eigen-
dom van het Land, niet van Bonaire
en dus naar alle waarschijnlijkheid
ook niet van BOPEC; The sea, in-
cluding the beaches, is property of
the Dutch Antilles (Central) govern-
ment, NOT of the island Bonaire
and also NOT of BOPEC.
Als er een verbod tot duiken zou
zijn, of om de zee in te gaan, zou dat
een regeling moeten zijn die door
Bonaire als eilandgebied in het
leven is geroepen en niet door
(Continued on page 4)


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 2











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GI I GM E With 4 branches and 10 ATMs located
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fl D0A Ea l E k
trv o C c. F=--


BIBLIOTEKA PUIBLIKO BONEIRU
(PUBLIC LIBRARY OF BONAIRE)


w" DO YOU SUDOKU?
I i.1h To solve the puzzle, enter the numbers 1 through 9
... ........ to the partially filled in puzzle without repeating a
number in any row, column or 3 x 3 region. Answer
on page 17. Supplied by Molly Bartikoski-Kearney


These days reading programs seem to be
promoted everywhere you turn. Televi-
sion, radio, ads in the newspapers and magazines I
tell us how essential reading is to the develop-
ment of the mind. Reading is the key to success.
Parents are encouraged to help their children
read and even they themselves are being moti-
vated to read.
In the last column we talked about nutrition in
schools And while giving the teachers a chance
to read the article and make their comments
we're going to talk about what else can help the
increase the brain's capacity. Have you got the
jnii\\ ci \' c' Of course, it's READING.
I visited our public library, wondering if there
is enough material to feed our reading commu-
nity. It reminds me of the time I was a high
school junior and we used the library as our sec-
ond home. It was fun to do your homework and
be able to pick all sorts of reading materials for
your projects. Well, what I can say today is that
our library is in need of improvement. I had an
interview with Library Interim Manager, Mrs.
Sharon Bol (38), about the library's situation.
"The library is working hard to create more
activities for children and youngsters," Sharon
said. "We send our personnel out to work in the
field to help improve the reading habits of our
community. Our main focus is kids between the ages
6-12. We feel that this group needs our support t
most. It does not mean that we forget about the oth
groups in our community.
In the last few months the Library has started the fo
lowing programs:
Lesa Ku Mi, PromdMi Drumi (Read to me befo
I go to sleep) is a monthly book reading for
kids. Prominent Bonaireans like Lt. Governor
Glenn Thod6, B6i Antoin and Mama Smile
have each read their favorite story to an eager
audience. In this way the Library also tries to
stimulate parents to read to their children.
Free Library cards: The Rotary Club Bonaire
sponsored free library cards for about 1,864
elementary school children and 971 SGB high
school students. Over 100 enthusiastic children
visit the Library every month. As of this mo-
ment the Library has welcomed almost 900
new members. Youngsters have until the end
November 2009 to receive their free library
card.
Dictation Papiamentu: This event took place
November 18th. There were a total of 36 p;
ticipants, and seven schools were represent
by students.
Kinderboekenweek (Children's Book Week): T
festival opened on November 15th. It was
festive occasion with performances by a mag
cian, actors and dance groups and several a
thors told stories. During the week all t
schools paid a visit to the Library and listen
to very talented, local storytellers like Ilvie
Carolina, Tante Poppy, Denise de Jongh, M
rela Wanner and Gaby Mercera.
Internet caf6: Recently the Library received thi
computers and a printer. The computers can
used free of charge.

Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009


.j : r -


&^-s^kfltni


Almost all children love to have someone read to them

of The Library wants to offer services to the whole com-
he munity. That is why employees of the library also visit
4er the elderly every month to read stories to them. A group
from the Literacy program (FORMA) receives special
ol- attention and visits the Library every month. In Novem-
ber there will be a photo contest for SGB students. The
re Library also plans to organize book readings or presen-
tations with poets and writers for adults.
r The Library has a long wish list: a brand new building,
an adequate facility where all the reading material is
r safe from moisture, sand and dust; a system that is fully
computerized. A public library should offer our Bo-
nairean community all kinds of services. Rooms to
study and books for our junior and senior high school-
children are lacking right now. More new books for
h adults and children need to be purchased. Another big
en wish is a Library bus that can visit all the different
neighborhoods, to bring the books closer to where the
people are. As you can tell there is still a lot of work that
of needs to be done, but we are on the right track."
In every country reading is found to be important. In
reading and writing lies the foundation of every civiliza-
on tion. If we want a new and improved library, we have to
ar- fight for it. If you have ideas on how to improve the
ed Library, your ideas are more than welcome.
The Library uses the saying: "Reading is to the mind
he what exercise is to the body." Yes, reading is mental
a nutrition.
gi-
iu- Our Nutrition in School article will continue in the next
he issue.E SiomaraAlbertus.


For her next column
Siomara will inter-
view teachers on the
island for their opin-
ions on the Nutrition
program.


Send your com-
ments to The Bon-
aire Reporter, P.O.
Box 407, Bonaire,
or email reporter
a(bonairenews.
com.


2 8 9

3

5 4 7

6 1 3

9 2 5

7 4

8 6 1

2

5 1 4



BonQuiz #18

In 1856 sev-
1856 sev- Christie Dovale photo
eral Dutch
orders of nuns,
religious "sisters,"
established a
school in Bonaire.
Over the years the
St. Francis Con-
vent was reno-
vated and cur-
rently it's being
used as office
space and examin-
ing rooms for
some of the island's physicians.
The building is located between the St. James
Medical School, near the Catholic church in Playa,
and Cultimara supermarket, located on the north
side of Kaya L.D. Gerharts.
Over the years more than 30 girls from Bonaire
have joined Catholic religious orders. Since the con-
vent closed all of the Dutch nuns returned to their
homeland in the Netherlands, and the Bonairean
sisters now live within the community.
Behind the convent is a gem of a tiny chapel that
most people hardly notice as they whisk by, to and
from town. But during the week, if you stroll into the
gardens, you may find the chapel open, and if not I
know that one of the nurses will open it up for you to
take a peek. The chapel was renovated with dona-
tions.
Q) What was the name of the order of Dutch
nuns who worshipped in the chapel?
Answer on page 17

BonQuiz appears regularly in
The Reporter. It's prepared by
Christie Dovale of Christie
Dovale Island Tours. Contact
her to arrange a tour, Phone 717
-4435 or 795-3456 or email:
christiedovale@thotmail.com.


Page t



























JANART GALLERY
Kaya Gloria 7, Bonaire Local Art,
Art Supplies, Framing, and Art
Classes. Open Tu-We-Th & Sat 10 am-
5 pm Friday 1- 7 pm; or phone 717-
5246 for appt.



BONAIRENET
The leading consumer and business
information source on Bonaire. Tele-
phone (599) 717-7160. For on-line yel-
low pages directory information go to
http % % .yellowpagesbonaire.com



CAPT. DON'S ISLAND GROWER
Trees and plants, Bonaire grown.
8000m2 nursery. Specializing in gar-
den/septic pumps and irrigation.
Kaminda Lagoen 103, Island Growers
NV (Capt. Don and Janet). Phone:
786-0956 or 787-0956


Compaq w i d e screen Laptop
Computer, 512MB,DVD/CDRW,
Wireless LAN, 2.5yr WARRANTY,
FREE CARRYING CASE US$1,500
tel:791-4606 after 5pm







For Rent: Comfortable 2-bedroom
beach villa-weekly or monthly-choice
location-privacy & security. Phone
(Bon) (599) 717 3293; (US) (570) 586
0098. May 20 until Jan. 8th.
info@pelicanreefbonaire.com or www.
pelicanreefbonaire.com -


Got something to buy or sell?

REACH MORE READERS than any other WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
by advertising in THE BONAIRE REPORTER

Non-Commercial Classified Ads (up to 4 lines/ 20 words):
FREE FREE FREE FREE

Commercial Ads only NAf0.70 per word, per week.
Free adds run for 2 weeks.
Call or fax 717-8988 or email ads@bonairereporter.com


N~ -S *.F-- C


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 14


WHArS HAPPENING

Exploring
Lac



L ac Bay is full of
hidden places. On
Sunday, July 3rd the
group, "Amigunan di
Naturalesa" ("Friends of
the Environment"), is
arranging a boat trip thai
will let you discover
them. The meeting point
is Boka di Coco (across
from the Mangrove/
Kayak Center on the d Hi t
road to Cai). The high-
light will be a stop at the
place called Den Puitu.
Plan for a minimum of
one hour for the trip
which will end at Cai.
Transportation back to
Boca di Coco via land
will be provided.
Participants can choose
what time they want to go, beginning at 7 am through the afternoon. The boats can
handle six persons and there will be two boats.
The price is NAf25 for adults and NAJfl5 for children. This includes the boat trip,
land transportation, juice, water and a choice of two kinds of soups. Also the first
groups, from 7 to 10 in the morning, will have coffee or tea with real Bonairean
pancakes.
The proceeds will go to benefit the Bonaire participants in Vierdaagse Nimegen
(Four Day Walk at Nijmegen, Holland). To sign up pass by the Extra newspaper
office. (tel. 717-8482). OB6iAntoin























































































Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 16


2005 The Bonaire Reporter
Published weekly. For information about subscriptions, stories or
advertising in The Bonaire Reporter, phone (599) 717-8988, 791-
7252, fax 717-S088, E-mail to: Reporter, iboinairene% s.com The
Bonaire Reporter, George DeSalvo, Publisher. Laura DeSalvo, Edi-
tor in Chief. Address: Kaya Gob. Debrot 200-6; Bonaire, Neth. An-
tilles. Available on-line at: www.bonairereporter.com
Reporters: Boi Antoin, Albert Bianculli, Barbara Mason Bian-
culli, S.C., Dodo, Jack Horkheimer, Anna Kleimer, Greta Kooistra,
Michael Thiessen Ap van Eldik
Features Editor: Greta Kooistra Translations: Peuuy Bakker,
Sue Ellen Felix
Production: Barbara Lockwood
Distribution: Yuchi Molina (Rincon), Elizabeth Silberie (Playa);
Housekeeping: Jaidy Rojas Ace\ edo Printed by: DeStad Druk-
kerij Curaiiao











St 27No.Dec, ff,2009; Volume t6, Issue 24




Tht REPORTER

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Colombia
20%
56 Different Nations
Represented on Bonaire
Page 8


Haiti
2%


Surinam
8%
Peru
9%


9SA
9%


Venezulea
20%


AMFO/NGO Platform Finding A Balance Bonaire Reporter
It All Starts With for Bonaire Survey
An Idea Part II Complaining StopsPage 7
Complaining Stops
Pe 10 Here Grouper Corner
age 10 Page 6 & 7 Page 3











(Finding A Balance. Continued from page 6)
pressures on the island infrastruc-
ture (roads, schools, electricity and
water, health, etc.) These pres-
sures must be identified and quan-
tified so that the island can keep
pace with its growth. Infrastruc-
ture is expensive but cannot be
overlooked. Once the island has a
definite plan with a sound basis for
expectations of success, funding
for infrastructure may be much
easier to obtain. Suggestions for
this large group would be: DROB,
WEB, SELIBON, TELBO, the
schools, Public Health, the hospi-
tal and healthcare professionals,
Police and Social Services. Given
the wide range of these concerns it
would probably be necessary to
split this group into Physical Infra-
structure and Social Infrastructure sub groups
5. Community Involvement This group would contact island stakeholders not di-
rectly represented in other groups to first determine the desired direction of the
population. Later the group would work to see what opportunities exist to gain
wider community participation in the tourist product. For instance Regatta and the
windsurf events could be included in all promotional media, community participa-
tion in websites and other promotions (e.g. restaurant and retail outlets) could help
share costs and provide more reasons to visit the island. Marsh6 di Rincon, Jong
Bonaire visiting teen program and various other NGO-based activities could be
used as attractions providing a constantly updated menu of events and opportunities
on the island. Representatives could be from BRA, AKIB, CURO, KvK, FESBO
etc)
6. Customer Promotion. This group would identify information sources and obtain
necessary data, analyze the data and prepare a description of customer groups and
their needs (e.g. current Bonaire tourists versus new potential tourists, divers, snor-
kelers, windsurfers, families etc). Other responsibilities include identifying possi-
ble promotional activities and agencies to strengthen the current public relations
efforts, developing a Five-year Promotional Plan and, eventually, guiding the devel-
opment of that plan. Potential members: TCB, travel agents, hotels and profes-
sional marketers and Internet experts living on the island.
7. Packaging and Co-op efforts. This group would work with airline Marketing De-
partments, Cruise Ship companies, Tour Packagers, equipment manufacturers,
credit card companies and other partners to be sure that Bonaire takes advantage of
all opportunities for others to share in the cost and returns from our efforts. Poten-
tial members: travel agent, hotels, CURO, airlines, marketing professionals.
By starting with experts in the field and keeping the groups small and efficient, a
plan could be developed within a very short period of time. Regular communica-
tion between the workgroups would be necessary so that all can evaluate the impact
of other groups on their areas of competence and, in the end, arrive at an acceptable
long-term solution. The issue is important enough and urgent enough to encourage
cooperation and quick action.


Summary
In this series we have tried to analyze Bonaire's development and its tourism product
from a number of different angles in order to try to gain perspective on the current
situation and find a balance for future growth. It is our hope that a balance between
progress and protection can be found so that development does not harm the is-
land or the island's population.
In addition to preventing harm, balance is needed to improve the economic position
of current residents and businesses. No one wants to stifle growth that will reduce air-
lift to the island, but we also don't want to see unplanned, uncontrolled growth that
will destroy the existing businesses, create the need for too many foreign workers as
happened in Aruba; or that will stress the islands' infrastructure or ruin the environ-
mental resources that bring the tourists in the first place.
We are optimistic about the chances for success if the entire community works to-
gether to establish the goals and then set the direction with a clear, long-term Develop-
ment Plan and planning process.
Next we will present some comments from our readers about this series of articles
To help get the process started, please take the time to answer the questions in the
Bonaire Reporter Survey. We want to hear from both tourists and residents on these
important issues. Thanks for your help.
D The authors of this article are market research professionals living in Bonaire.


The Bonaire Reporter Survey.
What do YOU think about Bonaire?

As a reader of The Bonaire Reporter you must care about the island.
Maybe you could help us with some of the consumer 'needs' research
mentioned in this series. It doesn't matter if you are a tourist or a resident.
Please fill out this questionnaire and mail it to Bonaire Reporter, Kaya Gob. De-
brot 200-6, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN) or go on-line to hup \\ \\
bonairenews.com/survey.htm and e-mail your form to SItln cc aboiiiiCI'cpo1c i
com

1. Your nationality: Antillean US D Netherlands Other:

2. Your age: Under 25 1.26-40 1.41-60 Over 60
3. Your sex: DM .F
4. Marital status Single [.Married Widowed/Divorced In relationship
5. Years Scuba Diving 1 year or less D.2-5 years 5-10 years More than
10 years
6. Years windsurfing 1 year or less 2-5 years 5-10 years More than
10 years
7. Are you a [ Tourist Part time resident [ Full time resident .[Native Bo-
nairean
8. How much time do you spend on Bonaire in an average year?
D 1-2 weeks 3 to 4 weeks 1 to 2 months 2 to 6 months
D 6 to 12 months
9. Number of people in your household or group when you are on Bonaire:

10. What year did you first come to Bonaire:
11. Why did you first come to Bonaire? .Dborn here parents moved here
D found a job here scuba diving tourist windsurfing tourist Other


12. What do you like MOST about Bonaire?



13. What do you like LEAST about Bonaire?



14. How satisfied are you with the following? Rate your degree of satisfac-
tions from 1 to 4, where 4 is extremely satisfied and 1 is not at all satis-
fied. Circle the appropriate number for each item.
Satisfaction
Low High


friendliness of the people
number of hotels
quality of hotels
number of restaurants
quality of restaurants
number of cultural activities
quality of cultural activities
activities for children
condition of the reefs
quality of the diving
quality of the environment
cleanliness of the island
quality of the roads
Internet service
telephone service
water and electric service
number of tourists
service attitude at businesses
personal safety
number of activities available
quality of activities available
number of diving locations
airline service to the island
quality of your Bonaire experience
Other
Other


1 2
1 2
1 2


15. What 'needs' do you have that are not currently being met by Bonaire?
Or, said another way, what could Bonaire do to get you to spend more
time on the island or for you to enjoy your time on Bonaire more?


16. What could Bonaire do to improve its tourism product so more people
would want to come to Bonaire? D


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 7














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fhI h-flkhhbV Salba Nos Lora Plants Trees


Bonaire's sailing history goes back
into the eons of time when the first
inhabitants arrived by boat. Since then Bon-
aire's sailors have distinguished themselves
on merchant and war ships, serving on the
oceans of the world.
Today on the island the sailing tradition
continues in part with the Bonaire Sailing
School (BSSA), established more than 10
years ago. A group of 15 kids, very enthusi-
astic and talented, spend one to two days a
week practicing their sailing skills in the
harbor. The youngest, at seven or eight,
begin sailing the Optimists. Then at 12 or
13 they can sail the Sunfish or Splash class
boats. Most of them have been sailing for
more than a year. In fact, one of the mem-
bers, Kevin Dijkhoff, grandson of the win-
ner of the first Bonaire Regatta, Ebo Doma-
cass6e, has been sailing for the last 10
years.
So we have very talented sailors but not
enough good boats. What can we do? As
long time instructor Artie DeVries explains,
"The Sunfish Worlds are coming up in
Curagao in 2011 and we want to send our
top sailors. Two years ago the boats just fell
apart. So we got some donated. The Opti-
mist fleet is okay for training. We have one
or two good Optimist racing boats, but we
need at least one or more Sunfish as all of
the current ones are leaking. This is our first
priority."
The BSSA members participate mightily
against Curagao sailors despite the disparity
in level of equipment. Curagao's equipment
is top of the line.
Our sailors need five good used Sunfish
(NAf 3.000 apiece) and two new racing
Sunfish (NAf 7.500). They need dagger
boards and rudders. They are looking for
Page 20


Young Optimist sailors ready to launch

sponsors at every financial level. If you
want to see for yourself, go down to Regatta
House on a Thursday after 3 to see the Sun-
fish and Splash sailors. On Friday about the
same time you can see the Optimists sail.
They all sail on Sundays as well from 10 to
around noon. The kids receive expert in-
struction by Artie and Tom Nuijten.
They have a website in English and
Dutch: WWW.BonaireSailingSchool.com.
Or call Artie deVries (tel. 717-7972,
artiedevries(a)lhotmail.com) or Ton Nuijten
(tel. 717-4052, lauraenton( a)hotmail.com).M
Laura DeSalvo


n Friday, November
6, 30 young indige-
nous fruit trees were planted
in the area of the Tras Mon-
tafia botanical garden, Tera
Bara. The Fundashon Salba
Nos Lora is doing this so that -'
more food can be found by I
the birds in the mondi. Hope-
fully, this will set an example
for the birds and the loras
will no longer need to hunt
for food in the fruit trees in
the kunukus or gardens in
residential areas, where the
loras are considered a nui-
sance. The plantings will Danilo Christ
also enrich and add to Bon-
aire's nature. This tree plant-
ing operation is made possi-
ble with help from Vogel-
bescherming Netherlands.
Three employees of LVV
will make sure that all trees ,
will be well cared for.
On National Arbor Day,
November 22, the foundation t
planted another hundred trees ,
along the "Kaya di Lora" in ..,,
the open air museum of Man-
gazina di Rei. l,
Salba Nos Lora chose the
tree sites and the types of trees with care.
There had to be loras in the vicinity, the
young trees must be protected from goats
and donkeys, and during the first years the
trees will be watered in the dry season. The
place must also be accessible to visitors.
The foundation will place signs so that visi-
tors can learn about the lora and the trees.
The native trees, once established, should
B


need little water and have fruits in the dry
season. The trees that are being planted are:
calbas, wayaka, watakeli, kibrahacha, pal'i
sia, taki, oliba, pal'i lora, and palu palu
pretu special.

Salba Nos Lora urges all residents of Bon-
aire to plant a tree or to donate to the foun-
dation. U Press release
Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009


nI
howl






















ON THE ISLAND SINCE . .
i~~ ~ ~ ~~~~~6etme 10m 1U1[tI'Iihimi 1992 ~[Jm tI]I]mi]im


T wo days after I arrived I went
I to the Dive Inn to look for a
buddy to dive with, I met a Dutch
woman who was here for a vacation
with a girlfriend. A year and a half
later they came back to Bonaire and
stayed at my house. Two years later the
girlfriend came back with another girl-
friend this time... and that was Ans
Klein Heerenbrink!" He laughs: "It
sounds like a soap opera, but as we say,
'By coincidence the best marriages are
born,' and it proved to be right because
we've been together for eight years
now."
"The moment I saw Hans," Ansfills
in, 'there was this sparkle! It was Feb-
ruary '95 and after that vacation we
kept in touch frequently. In September
that year I came a second time, and it
became very clear what we felt for each
other. That year I spent Christmas and
New Years with Hans on Bonaire, and
in '96 I came for three months to see
whether I could find a job here. Hans
came to Holland twice to meet my fam-
ily, so it was a lot of traveling back and
forth until I finally came here March
29h 1997, 'Nos Dia,' as we call it!

I started working full time at the hos-
pital and I still think it's a great job. I
have wonderful colleagues and we have
a good, close contact with the patients.
In Holland I was a nurse specializing in
cardio care. Here I've become all-
round. We have 30 beds; I've seen eve-
rything. I also do the air ambulance.
You become inventive, and everyone
always looks for the best solution.
There's very good cooperation between
nurses and doctors. My colleagues are
from Aruba, Surinam, Holland and Co-
lombia. It's a colorful mix, but it works
really well! I love my job! Even when
we're not working we're always to-
gether, doing fun things like brunch on
the beach, walking all over the island,
fixing old furniture, gardening, paint-
ing, cooking together, and we love to
shop together! But being lazy and not
doing anything is also wonderful!"
Hans Rietveld andAns Klein Heeren-
brink match. There's no other way to
say it when you see people that bring
out the best of each other; who are just
nice and gentle together, each other's
equal, down to earth, but still, there is
magic; they make each other more
beautiful.
"Before Bonaire," Hans says, "I'd
been living in Curaqao from '85 to '92.
I worked for DOW (what now is
DROB- public works) and for the Cura-
qao Road Construction Company. I
don't like sitting in the same chair for
30 years so when I saw this ad asking


for a head for DOW on Bonaire I sent
my CV and was immediately accepted.
Two months later I moved to Bonaire-
incredibly fast! I'm a civil engineer. In
Holland I worked for several munici-
palities. By the end of the 70s and the
beginning of the 80s, I traveled to India,
Nepal, Thailand, Burma, Sri Lanka,
Egypt and Mexico. After seeing all
those places I wanted to live some-
where else. I saw an ad for DOW on
Curaqao and responded, but it took 20
months to happen. Originally it was for
a three-year contract, but I got so ad-
dicted to the Caribbean way of life that


"In those days the island
was booming, and the
economy grew 10% annu-
ally! Many people thought
it was going too fast and
they were afraid Bonaire
would change into a
second St. Martin."

now it's been 20 years in the Antilles!
It was a challenging job being the
head of DOW on Bonaire. In those days
the island was booming, and the econ-
omy grew 10% annually! Many people
thought it was going too fast and they
were afraid Bonaire would change into
a second St. Martin. Then the Pourier
Committee started working on this
process, 'Economic growth, but consid-
ering the preservation of culture and
nature.' The report was accepted by the
Eilandsraad (Island Council) in the be-
ginning of '93, but then it had to be
translated into official laws concerning
education, economics, finance, judicial
and technical matters, etc. all the de-
partments the government manages.
The writing of the laws was done by us,
the top officials, as well as our regular
jobs, without the help of consultants. I
was also indirectly involved in the reor-
ganization of the government, which
was done by a consultant. My days
were full. The government reorganiza-
tion was an incredibly time-consuming
operation. Alas, I wasn't there when
they finished it. My contract was fup,
people were transferred, our group was
neutralized because another political
party took over. Nevertheless, as it of-
ten happens in the Antilles, the plan
was carried through in many ways, but
never officially.
So I left, but I had a tremendous repu-
tation and started my own company as a
civil and technical consultant and it
went very well. I prepared, conducted,


did the manage-
ment and super-
vision of projects
like the construc-
tion of the Bank
of the Dutch An-
tilles, the build-
ing of Consales'
cool and freezer
house and the
construction of
the Kaminda
Djabou road. At
the beginning of the century it became
very slow. All of Bonaire was strug-
gling, and I got my share of it too.
However, two years ago I joined a
group of consultants, Multifunction
Management. We use each other's
knowledge and experience, so we can
offer a broad spectrum of services. I
feel that economically we're going in
the right direction, poco poco, but not
bad at all!
I'm also involved in monument care.
My love for the old historic houses be-
gan in Curaqao where Jay Haviser, Mi-
chael Newton, Maup Lanjouw, Bart de
Boer, I and others founded a group to
clear away the overgrowth from the old
ruins, then measure and register the
houses. On Bonaire in 1996 I met
Christie Dovale who was also interested
in doing something with the old monu-
ments. Christie and Laurie Dovale, Pat-
rick Strauss and I set up a foundation
and started frantically registering those
places to which we could give the status
of 'protected monument.' But, alas, the
initiative was smothered by the politi-
cians' lack of interest. We became so
unmotivated that the group fell apart...
until the middle of 2003 when Jay Hav-
iser and I had a conversation. He
formed, within DROB, an informal
committee with himself, Hubert Vis
and Alca St. Jago, with the aim of set-
ting up a historic site preservation
group, and he asked for my help. So I
thought why don't we reactivate the
'Foundation Monument Care Bonaire'
and go from there. Through the notary,
however, we found out that there was
another monument care foundation,
founded by the previous notary, Mr.
Knuf.
The present notary, Mr. Maartense,
advised us to reactivate this foundation
because it had the oldest rights. Board
members are Peter Paulussen, Evert
Piar and I. Members are Linda Anthony
and Anthony Nicolaas. We needed a
protective law, like an island decree,
but immediately we were told by the
government that they didn't have the
time to compose one, so we did it our-
selves. The concept for a monument


management plan together with the
concept decree was presented to Deputy
Dortalina. Now we're almost there, and
the definite versions of the management
plan and the decree can be presented to
the Executive Council. After that we
can become active and start to raise
funds.
Why am I doing this? I want to con-
tribute to the Bonairean community by
conserving the cultural inheritance, and
I'm extra motivated because I love the
subject! We're talking mostly about all
those little original houses against the
background of the kunuku and the ones
in the barios, but also of course big
buildings like the Pasangrahan, Bes-
tuurscollege and the Protestant Church.
After the renovation of the old houses
we're planning to find tenants for them
through Fundashon Cas Bonairiano so
that people can live in them again. A
building needs occupation and mainte-
nance to bring out its beauty. Lately it
has become a big issue; the demolish-
ing of Hausmann's Folly has opened
people's eyes! Luckily I also have an-
other source that allows me to 'fight'
for these subjects; I'm writing for the
Amigoe, and often B6i Antoin and I
join forces, with good results!
I'm very happy here. You never know
about the future, but we would like to
stay here. Bonaire has space and it's the
people, the island itself. To be in the
middle of nowhere and you don't see a
soul! I get a kick when I drive on Kaya
Grandi on a Sunday afternoon and I
don't see anybody! In Holland there are
500 people for every square kilometer,
here not even 50! That's a big differ-
ence! Here the people are warm and
caring and they take time to greet you. I
don't think we
should have
Holland make
the rules for this
island. That will
go too far! This
is the land
where life is
good!' []Greta
Kooistra


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 21











The Realtor's Corner



Get Rid of Clutter


B efore you put your house on the
market, start removing clutter.
The kitchen is a good place to begin.
First, take everything off the counters.
Put the toaster in a cabinet and take it
out only when you use it. Store every-
thing in cabinets and drawers. If you
don't have enough cabinet space to put
everything, put those dishes, pots and
pans that rarely get used into a box and
put that box in storage. water leaks that may cause a home-
You see, homebuyers may open all buyer to hesitate in buying your home.
your cabinets and drawers, especially Closets are great for accumulating
in the kitchen. They want to be sure clutter. We are talking about extra
there is enough room for their "stuff." clothes and shoes things you rarely
If your kitchen cabinets, pantries, and wear but cannot bear to be without.
drawers look jammed full, it sends a Sometimes there are shoeboxes full of
negative message to the buyer that "stuff' or other accumulated personal


(Tonky in Greece Continued from page 17)
on this day."

Tonky talks about his second
place in Mykonos:
"I was satisfied with my second posi-
tion, and I am happy for Kevin. He de-
served this win after the competitions
that took place today. In windsurfing


Kevin Mevissen and Tonky-


Tonky performs a chaco
in Mykonos


one can never be too sure about one's
position. Your achievements do not de-
pend only on professionalism and con-
sistency (though they will get you a
long way!) but it also depends on fac-
tors that you have no control over like
the wind and the water. The challenge
is now even greater for me on the EFPT
tour. I will definitely go for the top po-
sition in the next event!"
Tonky's next event will be in Pozo
(Grand Canaria). This is an event of
the Professional Windsurfing Associa-
tion (PWA). There Tonky will meet
the other professional Bonairean wind-
surfers and Ricardo Campello, Kauli
Seadi, Kevin Mevissen and Andre Pas-
kowski. If the wind cooperates, things
will get really hot there. Stay tuned for


Anna Kleimer is with RE/MAX Paradise Homes. She and her
husband, Art, owned and operated their real estate company in
Vail, Colorado for 12 years. Working with buyers, she has an in-
tuitive understanding of properties right for them location, price
range and amenities. Call her at 717-7362 or 786-8607.


Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005


Page 22












I along with an upgraded server for the sys-
L I tem. Electricity for the equipment was also
. upgraded along with new erko (air condi-
tioning) and a new roof for the computer
ilab.
S1la "Most of the equipment in the computer lab


Jona Chirino, manager of JB; Jorge Ferron of Breathe IT; kwartiermaker for youth and family Marga Drewes; Glenda Bern-
abela from the board of JB; JB Foundation President Rene Hakkenberg;
IT specialists, Leonard Blackman and Fernando Hatermink.


With the help of the Dutch Ministry for Youth and Family, Jong Bonaire has
completely upgraded its computer lab at the youth center. Regional Service
Center (RSC) kwartiermaker Marga Drewes helped the center make the application
for the project and was on hand recently for the grand opening.

"On behalf of the Ministry and the RSC it gives us great pleasure to contribute to-
ward Bonaire's future," said Drewes at the opening of the computer lab. "Fast com-
puters that work well are important for our young people to learn and better prepare
for their future.
"This is just the first of many investments that the Ministry plans to help improve
the services available to the families and youth of Bonaire," Drewes said during the
opening of the renovated facility.
With the grant from the RSC Jong Bonaire was able to install 26 new computers



CIEE Mangrove Study Begins
In recent weeks work has begun
on the construction of
"exclusion" cages along Kaminda di
Sorobon as part of a year-long study
to determine the possible impacts of
grazing and trampling by goats and
donkeys on mangrove habitat. The *"
cages are designed to deter grazing
and trampling by fencing off small
areas (1 meter square). The cages will '
be constructed of polyethylene mesh '
attached to small diameter poles and I
the height of the cages will be such to Young mangroves
prevent grazing from above.
Once the cages are built, regular sampling will assess the plant density and biomass
within the cages as well as invertebrate presence and sediment characteristics.
The study is being conducted by Dr. Amanda Hollebone of the CIEE Research
Station Bonaire and Scott Hausmann, a retired US wetland expert, with approval of
STINAPA and the government of Bonaire. For additional information on the study
please contact CIEE Research Station Bonaire at 717-4140. U Press release


was six years old and many of the com-
puters were no longer working. Even if a
computer was working it was very slow,"
said Rene Hakkenberg, voorzitter
(President) for the Jong Bonaire bestuur
(Directorate). "It had become difficult for
the members to do their homework."
"The computer lab is one of the most popu-
lar activities at Jong Bonaire," said manager
Jona Chirino. No%% the facility can better
meet the needs of our members but also
other groups in the community who need to
rent such a facility for training."
The new system also has updated software
and new educational programs for the
teens to improve their language and other


skills. Some of the funds from the RSC will also be used to purchase more educa-
tional software.
"The resources of the RSC are very much appreciated and it has been very helpful
and productive working with this group," said Hakkenberg. "Our island and also Jong
Bonaire have very limited resources. On our own we could not have made these im-
portant improvements to the youth center."
In 2010 there will be more improvements to both the Jong Bonaire facility and its
programs that will also be sponsored by the Ministry.
The new computer system was developed and installed by Breathe IT, under the
direction of Jorge Ferr6n and his two specialists, Leonard Blackman and Fernando
Hatermink. Pourier Construction made the roof and construction repairs while the
center was closed for Regatta. MESA arranged for the electrical upgrades and Stree-
fkerkTek managed the project. U Story and photo by Jane Townsend





Jim

IA


New arrival


'UNTDS *LORS^
OF RNETTONi


Kaya Grandi 29, Kralendijk-Bonaire N.A. tel: 717 5107
Store hours Tuesday through Saturdays
from 9a.m.-12:30p.m. and 2:00p.m.-6:30 p.m.


Nni UvIIMIVYUOE

F 1GASINA
ORING EVERYTHING UNDER THE SUN
Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009


mr:
aa'a rw
, _ ./* ; .
? >1J


Page u10











SHOPPING and SERVICE GUIDE


AIRLINES
Divi Divi Air. Bonaire's "on time airline" with 16
flights a day between Bonaire and Curagao. Your
first choice for inter-island travel. Now flying to
Aruba.

APPLIANCES /TV/ ELECTRONICS and
COMPUTERS
City Shop, the mega store, has the island's widest
selection of large and small home appliances, furni-
ture, TV, computers, cell phones and more. Fast ser-
vice and in-store financing too.

BANKS
Maduro and Curiel's Bank provides the greatest
number of services, branches and ATMs of any Bon-
aire bank. They also offer investments and insur-
ance.

BEAUTY PARLOR
Hair Affair. Expert hair cutting, styling, facials and
facial waxing.

BICYCLE / SCOOTER/ QUADS
De Freewieler sells bikes and all kinds of bike ac-
cessories. They do professional repairs on almost
anything on two wheels. Have your keys made
here too.

CONTRACTOR
Equinox Bonaire-A USA licensed contractor for
hotels, restaurants, residential. On Time-Done
Right.

DINING

Bistro di Paris A real French restaurant with af-
fordable prices and friendly Bonairean ambiance
Owned and operated by a French Chef
On Kaya Gob. Debrot
mile north of town center

Pasa Bon Pizza is Bonaire's best. Freshly prepared
pizzas made with the finest ingredients. Salads, desserts.
Eat in or take away. Nice bar too. 780-1111 Call ahead
to eat-in or take out, Next to Bistro (above)
Lunchroom de Bonairiaan-Breakfast & lunch
prepared and served by Stichting Project students
under professional guidance. Monday-Friday, 9-2.
Kaya Gob. N.Debrot, opposite Divi Flamingo.

DIVING
Carib Inn is the popular 10-room inn with top-notch
dive shop and well stocked retail store. Best book
trade on Bonaire. Good prices on regulator repair,
dive computer H.Q.

ScubaVision Document your Bonaire vacation
above and below the water with a custom DVD by
Bonaire's top videographer, Hendrik Wuyts


WannaDive They make diving fun. In town at
City Cafe, at Eden Beach and Windsock Apart-
ments .

GARDEN SUPPLIES AND SERVICES
Green Label has everything you need to start or
maintain your garden. They can design, install and
maintain it and offer plants, irrigation supplies and
garden chemicals. Now in new expanded location off
Kaya Industria.

HEALTH
Harmony House-The herb and mineral center.
Help your body heal itself.

Natural Way Health Store-The place where all
the hard to find natural and healthy products are.
Upstairs from Botika Bonaire, on Kaya Grandi.

HOME CARE
Bonaire Second Home Care can handle all the
needs of second home owners on Bonaire including
inspection, management and cleaning.

INTERNET AND CELLULAR SERVICE
Digicel has the most subscribers, widest choice of
calling plans and interesting phones. Visit their of-
fice on downtown Kaya Grandi and see for yourself.

MIO offers by far the clearest, most reliable phone
signal on the island PLUS WIRELESS HIGH-
SPEED INTERNET almost everywhere on Bonaire.

PEST CONTROL
Professional Pest Control. Call Peter to get rid of
all those nasty pets like termites, fleas, ticks and ants
that want to invade your home. Call now and save
your investment in your home.

PHOTO FINISHING
Paradise Photo in the Galeries Shopping Center
downtown offers fast, fine processing for prints,
slides, items and services. Full digital services.

REAL ESTATE / RENTAL AGENTS
Bonaire Sunshine Homes is the realtor with a local
touch. Ask them to show you the good value homes
they list. Call them if you are thinking of selling
your home.

Caribbean Homes, "the Refreshing Realtor," spe-
cializing in luxury homes, condos, lots, rentals and
property management.

Sunbelt Realty offers full real estate, rental, and
insurance services. If you want a home or to invest
in Bonaire, stop in and see them.


RETAIL
Benetton, world famous designer clothes available
now in Bonaire at prices less than those in US. For
men, women and children.

Best Buddies and Pearls-Stunning fresh water
pearl jewelry, fashion, gifts, t shirts. Wonderful ser-
vice, free gift wrap.

STORAGE
The Storehouse (Mangazina in Papiamentu) offers
Secure Storage For Vehicles, Household Items, Div-
ing And Sporting Gear, Business Files or Inventory.
Across from the northern hotel row.


SECURITY
Special Security Services will provide that extra
measure of protection when you need it. Always
reliable.

SHIPPING
Rocargo Freight Air and sea shipments in/out of
Bonaire. Customs agents. Professional and efficient.
FedEx agent. What would we do without their
superb services?

SUPERMARKETS

Warehouse Supermarket on Kaya Industria-
Biggest air conditioned market with the, largest se-
lection and lowest prices on the island.

WATER TAXI
Get to Klein Bonaire by Ferry. Ride the Kantika
di Amor or N,-'i'. Hotel pickup. Easiest landing on
Klein Bonaire with built-in ramp

WINES
Antillean Wine Company. You've tried the rest;
now try the best: best prices, highest quality wines
from around the world, kept in a cooled warehouse.
Free delivery. Kaya Industria 23, Mon.-Sat. 9 am-
noon.

To learn more about these businesses check their ad
in this issue of The Reporter

Fortnightly Advertisers in The Bonaire Reporter are
included in the guides. Free!
Call 790-6518, 786-6518
Or email Reporter@BonaireNews.com


Let visitors and residents know
about your business or restaurant
with an ad in The Reporter.


Scuba Sales
Repair Replacement
New Gear Accessories

Check CARIB INN First.
Great Prices -Great Stock

Always Great Values
Dive gear specials ,



- CARIB INN
Since 1980
PADI 5 STAR GOLD PALM
717-8819 8 am to 5 pm daily
(next to Divi Flamingo Hotel)


Pasa Bon Pizza

& Bar

780-1111
Water Front

ToTown U k aG Cob Debrr.I Holt.


Not Just Great Pizzas!


Call ahead
to
Pre Order

Open Wednesday to Sunday
5 PM to 11 PM


AFFORDABLE
* Domain Registrations
* E-mail Hosting
* Anti-Spam & Anti-Virus
* Web Site Design
* Web Site Hosting
* Marketing Consulting
* Internet Consulting
* Photographic Services
* Graphic Design

5 NetTech N.V.
info@NetTech.an
www.NetTech. an
Tel: 717-6773
< Fax: 717-7854


Hair Affair

We do our best to
make your hair and make-
up wishes come true!!
You can also come in for facials and
facial waxing.
We use and sell L'Oreal products
Is your plan to marry on the island?
We can make you beautiful and stay
beautiful for your happiest day.

Personal attention by Janneke
Appointment by tel: 717-5990
or just walk in.
Downtown, near the waterfront
next to Little Havana
Tues-Fri: 9-12, 2-6 Sat: 9-2 non stop


Bonaire Reporter- Nov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009


Page 16




Full Text

PAGE 1

June 24 to July 1, 2005 Volume 12, Issue 24 SINCE 1994 Kaya Gob. Debrot 200 • E-mail: re porter@bonairenews.com • 717-8988 PART 7

PAGE 2

Page 2 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 P rojections show an increase of cruise tourism of more or less 75%, says Ronella Croes, head of the Tourist Corporation Bonaire (TCB). The TCB considers that a very positive development. For the 2006-2007 cruise ship season many additional ships will call at Bonaire, including the Princess Line's love boats, Sea Princess and Crown Princess . Other ships making first calls at Bonaire will be the Arcadia, Rijndam and Prinsendamships , the Crystal Line's ships Crystal Symphony and Crystal Serenity . These growth figures are cited as one of the reasons a facelift of Bonaire’s waterfront and a new facility for receiving Ro/ Ro (from roll-on/roll-off ships like the Don Andres and Dona Luisa ) container cargo is necessary. The new container pier, if it is built, may be either at WEB or south of BOPEC near Karpata . The island government has commissioned a feasibility study in the matter. Proponents of the plan say a more attractive waterfront area, devoid of containers, would enhance tourism, i.e.: attract even more cruise ships. Opponents say that the money for a new cargo pier would be better spent on road repair or other island projects and that the benefits of cruise tourism are questionable. Travel agents in America, Canada and Europe told CDNN (Caribbean Diver’s News Network) that thousands of tourists and scuba diving travelers are canceling planned holidays to Aruba. CNN (Flamingo TV Channel 10) even broadcast a report about a Bonaire dive accident to infer that disappearances are common in the ABC islands. While Bonaire’s Public Prosecutor Ernst Wesselius issued a statement that no crime was involved in that case, the TCB has yet to counter the damaging media frenzy that consumed the American CNN and Fox News networks last week. The cancellations follow reports that police and government officials in Aruba have deliberately concealed evidence related to the disappearance of 18-year-old Natalee Holloway to protect the island's tourism industry. Due to a typographical error in The Bonaire Reporter edition of June 1724, Continental’s weekly flights which begin on Saturday, December 17, were printed as daily . We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused. Beginning June 16th, Flamingo Airport will sell departure tax cards at a new booth located centrally in the ticketing and check-in area. An Internet facility for passenger use will soon be added on the other side of the booth. The Papiamentu daily newspaper, Extra , reported that the departure tax to Curaçao will soon be raised from NAƒ10 to NAƒ12,50. Aruba-bound travelers do NOT have to pay the $20 international tariff, but just NAƒ10. However, Bonaire-bound passengers from Aruba pay NAƒ36,90 in Aruba. In May, Flamingo Airport (officially Bonaire International Airport-BIA) passed a strict evaluation by the US’s Transportation Security Administration (TSA) with flying colors. BIA is currently seeking to expand its security staff having taken over the job from the SSV. VSBO level graduates and higher are invited to apply. Air Jamaica , which has slashed service to Bonaire to one flight a week, has also announced they will be cutting back on food service on their Florida and Caribbean routes, serving a snack and beverage instead of a full meal, to save on food service costs. However, hard liquor, beer and wine will be sold on all flights, except to first class passengers, the airline said. Air Jamaica is trying to save $2 million annually but says it needs to cut costs, eventually by $50 million, to survive. Executive chairman Dr. Vincent Lawrence says the decision was difficult but necessary. TCB-NY reported that for the 12th consecutive year Bonaire has been voted by the readers of Scuba Diving magazine as the best shore diving destination in the world. According to the July 2005 issue of the magazine which reported the results of Scuba Diving's Top 100 Readers' Choice Awards, "Bonaire has topped the shore-diving category in our annual 'Top 100 Readers' Choice Awards' an unbroken string of No. 1 titles that started in 1994." This year Bonaire received a score of 96.9, topping the runner-up in this category by more than four points. As part of the writeup on Bonaire the magazine included beautiful photography and cited "abundant grunts" and "dense corals" as just two examples of the marine life that divers will find at any of the island's dive sites. One of Bonaire’s most frequented shore diving sites, the Windjammer , has been closed for several months. A small Bonaire dive resort reports that two dive groups of six persons each have cancelled their planned trips to Bonaire because they will not be able to dive the Windjammer . Access to the sea is being prevented by guards at the BOPEC oil terminal, which is owned by the Venezuelan national oil company PEDVESA. Bonaire is unique in the world of diving destinations because it offers convenient access from shore to the majority of its dive sites. Most shore divers book into the smaller resorts, rent vehicles and spend weeks diving economically using the dive resorts’ universally offered “unlimited dive packages.” Their car gives them access to the islands restaurants, shopping and above-water attractions as well. An avid Windjammer diver sought a legal opinion in Holland to determine if the BOPEC oil depot has the right to ban divers from the Windjammer site located offshore their property. This is a summary of the Dutch reply with an English translation: De zee tot aan de stranden is eigendom van het Land, niet van Bonaire en dus naar alle waarschijnlijkheid ook niet van BOPEC; The sea, including the beaches, is property of the Dutch Antilles (Central) government, NOT of the island Bonaire and also NOT of BOPEC. Als er een verbod tot duiken zou zijn, of om de zee in te gaan, zou dat een regeling moeten zijn die door Bonaire als eilandgebied in het leven is geroepen en niet door (Continued on page 4) IN THIS ISSUE Grouper Corner 3 Letters (Graffiti, Selibon, Web Increase) 5 Finding a Balance for Bonaire Conclusion, Complaining Stops Here 6 Bonaire Reporter Survey 7 56 Different Nations 8 Looking for Trouble (Lighthouses) 9 Tonky Triumphs in Greece 9 Gardner (Neem Tree) 12 Announcement (Angie Dabousi) 12 Invitation—Cultural Growth Art 12 What’s Happening—Exploring Lac 22 Realtor’s Corner (Get Rid of Clutter) 22 WEEKLY FEATURES: Flotsam & Jetsam 2 Vessel List & Tide Table 9 AMFO/NGO Platform -It Starts with an Idea, Part II 10 Picture Yourself (San Diego, US) 13 Where to Find The Reporter 13 Classifieds 14 Pet of the Week (volunteer Deborah) 18 Reporter Masthead 16 What’s Happening 19 Dodo (Triple X, State of Union) 19 Shopping & Dining Guides 20 On the Island Since (Rietveld & Heerenbrink) 21 Bonaire Sky Park (3 planets) 23 The Stars Have It 23 Sea Princess

PAGE 3

Page 3 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 B lue water diving is thrilling and adventurous. It is not for the inexperienced or faint hearted diver. Attempting this activity requires training, detailed knowledge of the surrounding underwater terrain and familiarity with the ever changing sea conditions. You must also have a definite target to reach after your descent from the surface. Disorientation, caused by the lack of any visual contact with the adjoining reef, can initiate anxiety and bring on panic for those individuals not properly prepared for this phenomenon. Bonaire, known as “The Home of Diving Freedom,” has a reef system that can easily be reached from any point on its shore. The leeward side of this boomerang shaped island has more than 60 marked and described dive sites accessible on a year-round basis. In addition, Klein Bonaire, the small, circular, uninhabited island one mile off the coast, has at least 25 shoreline dive sites around its protected coastline. Furthermore, the entire coast of Bonaire and Klein Bonaire, down to 200 feet (60 meters), is protected as an underwater marine park. Why would you challenge yourself with a “blue water dive” when you can park your car or tie your small boat to a permanent mooring, anywhere you choose and simply enter the sea? The answer is easy; there are great rewards for the effort. One such place is Grouper Corner. The natural world has many mysteries. As a naturalist, I have many questions. Finding the answers can be a lifelong pursuit. Sometimes one simple observation reveals a seemingly obvious solution that has previously eluded me. These revelations defy logic and when analyzed lead to other questions. Today, observing the social interactions of the usually solitary species of sea bass we know as Groupers has kindled my desire to find more clues to their behavior patterns. My diving partner has led me to a meeting ground of hundreds of groupers that we normally see as solitary and wary specimens on the reef slope, hiding in caves or sheltering in wrecks. Here each fish is oblivious to our presence and tolerates our close approach. Why are they here? Is this their safe haven? Have they always congregated here? Is this a seasonal behavior? What are they doing? We are entering a secret world out of sight of the surrounding reef structure. We descend through the “blue water” to an underwater garden that is seldom, if ever, visited by human invaders. Perhaps our presence on this rare occasion is as much a surprise to the fish as their behavior is to us. I feel as if I have entered an exclusive social society or “after hours club” where individuals, as strangers, gather to meet each other, interact for a few hours, and then go back to their respective homes and mates. Groupers are well built with strong, heavy bodies. They all have large mouths and big fleshy lips with jutting lower jaws. Sharp teeth line the inside of their mouth (Continued on page 15) A now rare Nassau Grouper Tiger grouper in transition from spots to stripes

PAGE 4

Page 4 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 (Continued from page 2) BOPEC; Whenever there is a restriction to dive or enter the sea, then the government of the Island of Bonaire should have made that rule. NOT BOPEC. Er is een bijna theoretische kans dat het Land grond aan BOPEC in erfpacht heeft uitgegeven en dat BOPEC in de hoedanigheid van erfpachter eisen stelt aan te water gaan. Geadviseerd wordt dan ook contact over deze kwestie op te nemen met het havenkantoor in Kralendijk te Bonaire (havenmeesters Sint Jago en Statie) om hierover zekerheid te verkrijgen. In the event that BOPEC owns/rents the ground it therefore can make demands about how to or enter the sea (over its land). It is advised to go to the Harbor office (Harbormasters Statie and St. Jago) in Kralendijk to be certain. According to a report in the Curaçao Papiamentu daily, La Prensa , former Minister Klaas de Vries, and other Dutch Parliamentarians, said they are against creating Kingdom Islands during a Parliamentary contact plan meeting in The Hague. This is in direct conflict with the outcome of the Referenda held in Bonaire and Saba. Bonaire's Ramonsito Booi and Ray Hassell of Saba voiced their objections. The Dutch MPs said they had a problem with the different government forms voted by the various Antillean islands: Curaçao and St. Maarten chose for autonomy within the Kingdom, much like Aruba, while St. Eustatius wants to stay in the Netherlands Antilles. Judge Bob Wit, who has served in the Antillean court system for many years, is most critical of the pending Antillean Exclusion law . He thinks it is illegal and will not stand a court test. “Dutch xenophobia is the cause of the discriminatory rules,” he says. Ironically, it is an exclusion that is easily circumvented. He adds, “If the regulation is nevertheless introduced, then it is clear that Antillean Dutch will enter Europe (and on to Holland) by means of the back door. European countries must allow them in (as Dutch/EU passport holders). However, a Curaçaoan can go to Spain (for example) which must let him enter. (He can then leisurely proceed to The Netherlands as there are no border controls among EU countries.) It is an impossible regulation for a problem (drug smuggling) which is already on the mend.” According to Wit, it is easier for a country of 16 million to handle 5,000 Antillean problem youngsters than for an island of 130,000 people. “They say that the measure is to help these poor youngsters. But I can’t see how they can say that they are helping these youngsters by threatening to send them back when there is no future for them here in the Antilles.” People who are opposed to the Antillean Exclusion Regulations can protest at the website: http://www.sabanaamsterdam.nl/ protesteertegenverdonksbeleid.html Welcome to new advertisers Bill Clinton Computers , an authorized Dell reseller and DHL , now operating as a part of Bonaire Air Services. This Saturday, Bonaire’s Culinary Team will leave for the “Taste of the Caribbean” culinary Olympics , being held in Miami. Our team of four chefs and a bartender will compete with the finest chefs in the Caribbean during the five-day event. The Bonaire Reporter’s editor in chief will accompany the team for on-the-site reporting. The model in this week’s Benetton ad page 12 is Mikeely Obersi. G./L.D The Fundashon for Art and Culture will hold its 13th Annual Art Day on Sunday, July 3 . Plan to spend time at Wilhelmina Park to enjoy the art exhibits, music, performing arts, food and drinks. JanArt will sponsor the children’s art contest as in the past. All children are invited to go by the JanArt tent and draw a picture for the art contest to be held that day. Supplies are provided at no cost. Prizes will go to children in different age categories. Anyone interested in exhibiting at the event can contact volunteers at 717-6420 cell 786-6420, or email artandculture65@hotmail.com. Participants in last year’s Art Day. Janice Huckaby of Jan Art in the background. Jan Art photo Amigoe photo Judge Bob Wit

PAGE 5

Page 5 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 OPINIONS and LETTERS:THE Op-Ed PAGE ARTISTIC EXPRESSION? Dear Editor: Graffiti comes in many forms: Spray painting a wall or flat surface, carving into a tree or even a table. Almost everyone dislikes it, and in many countries there are laws against it. It is ugly. When one takes a drive al ong Bonaire's east coast, graffiti has shown up even there. Not spray painting, but ugly sculptures of litter and garbage that someone has left as a monument to their ego. These same people would probably be appalled if someone did the same thing in front of their house. Bonaire is everyone's house and should be viewed as such. Most likely the people doing this are non Bonairean and show a disrespect for the nature of Bonaire. What is so ironic is that they spend a lot of time collecting this garbage to pile up when they could be putting in a truck or bags to help in some way to clean up Bonaire instead of making eyesores along one of Bonaire's natural coasts. When these piles of garage are torn do wn, the landscape instantly looks natural again as opposed to graffiti all along the shore line. If you really need to make "sculptures” from garbage do it in your own front yard, not Bonaire's. Spend the time cleaning up, not making an ugly mess. B.B. SELIBON SERVICE Dear Editor: A few weeks ago one of the plastic rims of the wheel of my garbage container cr acked and the solid rubber tire came off. I managed to get it onto the street (It was pick-up day). In my mind I was already searching for a solution to this small but nasty problem. I wondered if I could buy the wheels somewhere or if I had to call SELIBON and see what they could do. My daily work made me forget about it. At the end of the day I went to get my empty container. What a pleasant surprise! There were two brand new wheels under my container! This must have been done by the truck attendants because I did not yet phone or contact anybody about this. I mean: if you want to talk about service, this is GREAT SERVICE! I thank SELIBON for helping me out so quickly and thank you guys a lot. I’d like to say, “KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK!” Rogier van den Brink WEB INCREASE Dear Editor: Are you finding yourself with less money at the end of the month? Well, take a good look at your electric bill and you'll discover that the percentage of SURCHARGE on your usage is WAY BEYOND what was originally predicted, and appears to be going up MORE every month. For example: (from my personal bills) Billing Date Usage Surcharge Percent March 2005 NAƒ55,72 NAƒ13,56 24.33 % April 2005 69,76 33,31 47.74 % May 2005 71,42 48,49 67.89 % Where will it end? Is it really true that these increases are NOT being passed on to residents in Curaçao? If so, why is only little Dushi Bonaire being made to cover the costs of Curoil? Is our government or WEB doing anything to find a cheaper alternative for fuel? Can we import from Venezuela? What can WE do as individuals to lighten or alleviate this burden? Obviously, conservation is not enough as the surcharge will eat up any potential savings on usage. Will we ever be free from Curaçao's heavy hand? A 'Sweaty' Local Reader comments limited to 500 words will be considered for inclusion in the “Letters” department. All letters must be signed. However, we will withhold names on request.

PAGE 6

Page 6 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 Key Observations One of the most obvious points from the investigation is that many people and many groups are running in many directions toward development without the benefit of a coherent, coordinated vision or plan. Efforts today seem to be on an ‘ad hoc’ basis. At one time the island seemed to be following the 1997-2007 sustainable development plan that was created by Tourism Corporation Bonaire, but that plan, and others like the Pourier Report which were written for sustainable development, seem to have been abandoned. 1. Need for Vision The only ‘vision’ that can be detected today emerges from recent speeches by government leaders who want to increase tourism ‘drastically’ and bring in large mega-hotels. It is interesting to note that this desire for 500+ bed hotels flies in the face of current tourism trends around the world. Today, many hotels and most destinations like Cozumel are trying to move away from mega-hotels and reduce the ‘density’ of tourists in a single location . Why? Because today’s ‘upscale,’ ideal tourist wants a more intimate experience and they want a socially and environmentally responsible experience. Many destinations have also learned that smaller, intimate, responsible resorts do less damage to the environment and infrastructure. Just what Bonaire currently has to offer. A sustainable vision is also based on the culture and the desires of the entire community . Just how far can tourism grow before the influx of immigrants needed to fill the jobs dilutes the local culture to unacceptable levels? Studies must be done to track the needs and desires of the community and changes in these attitudes must be monitored over time. But a “vision statement,” like the 1997 TCB document that was a subject of an earlier article, means nothing without a Plan that has support from all sectors on the island -Public and Private, Commercial and Non-profit. And a Plan must have the force of law behind it to make it function. 2. Need for a Plan To make recently proposed ‘drastic changes’ to the island’s tourism without a clear and approved plan is dangerous. ‘Ad hoc’ changes like doubling the number of hotel beds without increasing advertising to create demand and without major improvements in infrastructure will only destroy the fragile market that exists today. 3. Misunderstood Numbers The current leaders of Bonaire’s tourism and development seem to be ignoring the fact that Bonaire’s existing hotels are not operating at acceptable occupancy or room revenue rates to be truly profitable . Some are barely hanging on, and few have the resources to train their staffs or upgrade their facilities. These numbers mean that more beds are possibly the worst solution to the problem. Also being ignored is the fact that in 2004 many of Bonaire’s flights from the US arrived half full so that American Eagle reduced its service and when it was time for Air Jamaica to cut destinations just to stay in business, Bonaire was one of the first go. 4. Missing Numbers Another key observation is that there seems to be a serious lack of consumer information , including why and how tourists are making their destination decision and what their satisfaction level is with the Bonaire product. Some data are collected on entry cards, but it is processed so slowly that it is of little value. And one hotel operator, Bellafonte Property Management, has taken a leadership role to start the process and learn more about Bonaire’s customers. Other sources are the Caribbean and World Tourism Associations which have huge databanks of tourist information available at reasonable prices. These sources would give some insight into our relative position in the market and the strengths and weaknesses of our competition. 5. No Responsibility By ignoring the numbers, failing to thoroughly understand market dynamics and blaming the problems on the lack of airlift and too few hotel rooms, Bonaire’s leaders have failed to take responsibility for the situation. 6. Lost Direction In the process of moving toward mega hotels it appears that the government wants to move toward ‘mass tourism.’ In a recent speech the island was promised ‘drastic changes in the level of Bonaire’s tourism.’ This direction is opposite the one stated in the 2003 Bonaire Investment Guide published by DEZA (Economics Dept.). There it states: “Development is predicated upon the philosophy that Bonaire’s economic growth must be controlled, sustainable and quality balanced, with significant benefits for the Bonairean population, and respecting Bonaire’s nature, culture and identity.” A move toward mega-hotels and mass tourism is a move into a totally new direction for which the island is ill prepared . U p until now this series has highlighted a number of problems in the Bonaire tourism and development program and has tried to throw light on several areas. In this last installment of the Finding Balance for Bonaire series, we will briefly summarize the issues uncovered in our investigations and will then move away from the complaining stage toward some concrete suggestions. After a review of the key observations, we would like to propose a structural approach to sustainable development for Bonaire so its inhabitants can prosper long-term. Long-term is defined as ‘our children, their children and all the children who follow them.’ Proposal for Finding Balance The situation has reached a critical point: air service has been lost, hotels are operating below reasonable expectations, planning has become ad hoc to fill gaps but does not come from a strong, agreed upon basis. Action is needed and needed quickly. The following suggestion would provide a mechanism to mobilize and motivate all the stakeholders and should result in a FiveYear Development Plan that will allow the island to move forward in a manner that is controllable and sustainable. In a previous article we suggested a Public-Private Partnership to address the island’s needs. This group should be created by the Island Government but would be non-political in nature. This may not be easy on Bonaire where almost everything has a political component, but statesmanship is called for here and must be shown by all parties. The need is so great and the potential effects so profound that all segments of the community must feel that their voice has been heard. Members of the Partnership would serve voluntarily or as a part of their regular jobs. The process itself should take no more than six months so that the Development Plan can be published and adopted by all stakeholders. The Island Government will need to resolve that the Plan is the official government policy and include enforcement provisions so that the members know that the ultimate program will be executed. The World Tourism Organization actually recommends PPPs and this group even publishes an evaluation of 208 successful PPPs from 205 countries. What kind of Plan? Elements of a solid, long-term island plan would include scaled improvements over time in infrastructure, transport, environmental protection and monitoring, marketing and promotion and sustained community integration. Also included in the plan must be a determination of how much the island must invest to reach its goals—at each step--and where the island will find the necessary funding. What’s in a Vision? A solid vision is one that defines the short and long-term limits of what is sustainable for this particular island, including the maximum level of tourists, maximum number of divers, maximum number of cruise ships. It is not just words and hopes for the future but is based on studies of the environment and infrastructure and the pressures that tourism puts on them. It is called ‘carrying capacity’ and it defines the LIMITS to the islands’ ability to withstand use or activities. As protection improves or worsens, the limits must be revised. Public-Private Partnership The proposed PPP is outlined below. Certainly other members of the community will have ideas to improve this structure, but it is a starting place. At the head of the PPP would be a Director, appointed by the Board of TCB. This Director would have the responsibility to coordinate all the activities of the PPP and to create a unified Five-year Development Plan as a result of its activities. The Director would be provided with an Advisory Board of three or four people with expertise in Economics, Marketing, Tourism and Planning. Eight workgroups would be created to address the specific areas of their expertise quickly and efficiently. With the exception of group number four (infrastructure) each group would consist of a maximum of five members so that meeting schedules and discussions can be streamlined. Each of the eight workgroups would be charged with providing the Director and the other groups with goals and plans for the next five years. 1. Transport The goals of this group would be to monitor capacity and load factors and recommend any changes that would be needed. The group would also be expected to maintain contact and build relationships with airlines (passenger and freight) and cruise lines. Possible members would be from BIA, Airline and Cruise Agents, Shipping Companies. 2. Environment Clearly, the island must protect the very reason that tourists come to Bonaire in the first place: our unique environment below and above the sea. This group would advise on the impact of various levels of development, review the impact of all potential projects and would be challenged to recommend positive methods to allow for sane, non-destructive growth. Possible members: STINAPA, Aliansa di Naturalesa, DROB, Fishermen, other NGOs with an interest in the environment, resident experts. 3. Economy The tourism sector represents approximately 70% of the island’s economy. Therefore it is essential that all plans be looked at with a professional eye toward the immediate and long-term impact on the island’s economy and the financing of the plan. Suggested members: DEZA, Bonaire Bankers Association, AKIB, resident economists. 4. Infrastructure Growth in tourism will bring with it new and constantly changing (Continued on page 7)

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Page 7 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 (Finding A Balance. Continued from page 6) pressures on the island infrastructure (roads, schools, electricity and water, health, etc.) These pressures must be identified and quantified so that the island can keep pace with its growth. Infrastructure is expensive but cannot be overlooked. Once the island has a definite plan with a sound basis for expectations of success, funding for infrastructure may be much easier to obtain. Suggestions for this large group would be: DROB, WEB, SELIBON, TELBO, the schools, Public Health, the hospital and healthcare professionals, Police and Social Services. Given the wide range of these concerns it would probably be necessary to split this group into Physical Infrastructure and Social Infrastructure sub groups 5. Community Involvement This group would contact island stakeholders not directly represented in other groups to first determine the desired direction of the population. Later the group would work to see what opportunities exist to gain wider community participation in the tourist product. For instance Regatta and the windsurf events could be included in all promotional media, community participation in websites and other promotions (e.g. restaurant and retail outlets) could help share costs and provide more reasons to visit the island. Marshé di Rincon, Jong Bonaire visiting teen program and various other NGO-based activities could be used as attractions providing a constantly updated menu of events and opportunities on the island. Representatives could be from BRA, AKIB, CURO, KvK, FESBO etc) 6. Customer Promotion . This group would identify information sources and obtain necessary data, analyze the data and prepare a description of customer groups and their needs (e.g. current Bonaire tourists versus new potential tourists, divers, snorkelers, windsurfers, families etc). Othe r responsibilities include identifying possible promotional activities and agencies to strengthen the current public relations efforts, developing a Five-year Promotional Plan and, eventually, guiding the development of that plan. Potential members: TCB, travel agents, hotels and professional marketers and Internet experts living on the island. 7. Packaging and Co-op efforts . This group would work with airline Marketing Departments, Cruise Ship companies, Tour Packagers, equipment manufacturers, credit card companies and other partners to be sure that Bonaire takes advantage of all opportunities for others to share in the cost and returns from our efforts. Potential members: travel agent, hotels, CURO, airlines, marketing professionals. By starting with experts in the field and keeping the groups small and efficient, a plan could be developed within a very short period of time. Regular communication between the workgroups would be necessary so that all can evaluate the impact of other groups on their areas of competence and, in the end, arrive at an acceptable long-term solution. The issue is important enough and urgent enough to encourage cooperation and quick action. The Bonaire Reporter Survey. What do YOU think about Bonaire? A s a reader of The Bonaire Reporter you must care about the island. Maybe you could help us with some of the consumer ‘needs’ research mentioned in this series. It doesn’t matter if you are a tourist or a resident. Please fill out this questionnaire and mail it to Bonaire Reporter, Kaya Gob. Debrot 200-6, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN) or go on-line to http//www. bonairenews.com/survey.htm and e-mail your form to survey@bonairereporter. com 1. Your nationality: Antillean US Netherlands Other: ____________________________ 2. Your age: Under 25 26-40 41-60 Over 60 3. Your sex: M F 4. Marital status Single Married Widowed/Divorced In relationship 5. Years Scuba Diving 1 year or less 2-5 years 5-10 years More than 10 years 6. Years windsurfing 1 year or less 2-5 years 5-10 years More than 10 years 7. Are you a Tourist Part time resident Full time resident Native Bonairean 8. How much time do you spend on Bonaire in an average year? 1-2 weeks 3 to 4 weeks 1 to 2 months 2 to 6 months 6 to 12 months 9. Number of people in your household or group when you are on Bonaire: __________ 10. What year did you first come to Bonaire: ____________ 11.Why did you first come to Bonaire? born here parents moved here found a job here scuba diving tourist windsurfing tourist Other ___________________________________________________________ 12.What do you like MOST about Bonaire? 13.What do you like LEAST about Bonaire? 14.How satisfied are you with the following? Rate your degree of satisfactions from 1 to 4, where 4 is extremely satisfied and 1 is not at all satisfied. Circle the appropriate number for each item. Satisfaction Low High a. friendliness of the people 1 2 3 4 b. number of hotels 1 2 3 4 c. quality of hotels 1 2 3 4 d. number of restaurants 1 2 3 4 e. quality of restaurants 1 2 3 4 f. number of cultural activities 1 2 3 4 g. quality of cultural activities 1 2 3 4 h. activities for children 1 2 3 4 i. condition of the reefs 1 2 3 4 j. quality of the diving 1 2 3 4 k. quality of the environment 1 2 3 4 l. cleanliness of the island 1 2 3 4 m. quality of the roads 1 2 3 4 n. Internet service 1 2 3 4 o. telephone service 1 2 3 4 p. water and electric service 1 2 3 4 q. number of tourists 1 2 3 4 r. service attitude at businesses 1 2 3 4 s. personal safety 1 2 3 4 t. number of activities available 1 2 3 4 u. quality of activities available 1 2 3 4 v. number of diving locations 1 2 3 4 w. airline service to the island 1 2 3 4 x. quality of your Bonaire experience 1 2 3 4 y. Other_______________________ 1 2 3 4 z. Other_______________________ 1 2 3 4 15.What ‘needs’ do you have that are not currently being met by Bonaire? Or, said another way, what could Bonaire do to get you to spend more time on the island or for you to enjoy your time on Bonaire more? 16. What could Bonaire do to improve its tourism product so more people would want to come to Bonaire? Marian Walthie photo Summary In this series we have tried to analyze Bonaire’s development and its tourism product from a number of different angles in order to try to gain perspective on the current situation and find a balance for future growth. It is our hope that a balance between progress and protection can be found so that development does not harm the island or the island’s population . In addition to preventing harm, balance is needed to improve the economic position of current residents and businesses. No one wants to stifle growth that will reduce airlift to the island, but we also don’t want to see unplanned, uncontrolled growth that will destroy the existing businesses, create the need for too many foreign workers as happened in Aruba; or that will stress the islands’ infrastructure or ruin the environmental resources that bring the tourists in the first place. We are optimistic about the chances for success if the entire community works together to establish the goals and then set the direction with a clear, long-term Development Plan and planning process. Next we will present some comments from our readers about this series of articles To help get the process started, please take the time to answer the questions in the Bonaire Reporter Survey. We want to hear from both tourists and residents on these important issues. Thanks for your help. The authors of this article are market research professionals living in Bonaire. Marian Walthie photo Another Bonaire Dawn

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Page 8 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 T he census department of Bonaire (Bevolking) has released current figures for the number of foreigners living on the island and their respective countries (including Holland). As of June 2005, there were 56 different countries (including Holland) represented. Of the 14,163 total population listed, there are 2,718 foreigners living on Bonaire. Of the remainder, 11,445 are considered Nederlandse, or those holding Dutch passports. In 2003 Bevolking figures show: total population – 13,380 and foreign born 2,335 – an increase this year of 383 foreign residents. It’s important to keep in mind that fo reign-born persons now having Dutch nationality are lumped toge ther in the 11,445 figure. That includes European Dutch, Antillean Dutch and all those from other countries who have become naturalized Dutch citizens . Many of the foreign residents on the island have opted to have Dutch passports, and once someone from another country receives a Dutch passport they are listed as Nederlandse and no longer are registered in their country category, according to Bevolking This year there are 56 countries repres ented; in 2003 there were 47. The new countries now represented are: Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Pakistan, Paraguay, Poland, Russia, Sudan and Tunisia. The next 10 countries in ranking order Although their figures and rankings have fluctuated slightly, the top 10 countries this year are the same as those in 2003, except for Portugal which has gone from #9 to #11. But in the next 10 (#11 through #20), Switzerland, which was not in the top 20 in 2003 is now on the list as #17, and Belgium, which was #19, is now #21 and off that list. The populations of the rest of the nations represented are (except for Belgium) single digit numbers: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Barbados, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Czech, Denmark, Dominica, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Honduras, Iceland, Jamaica, Morocco, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Poland, Russia, Salvador, Slovenia, Spain, Sudan, Tunis, Uruguay, South Africa and Sweden. Many thanks to Bevolking for giving us these figures. L.D. CO V E R ST O R Y COUNTRIES JUNE 2005 *2003 DIFFERENCE 1. Holland 11,445 11,045 plus 400 2. Dominican Republic 557 441 plus 116 3. Colombia 477 411 plus 66 4. Venezuela 463 540 minus 77 5. US 224 191 plus 32 6. Peru 210 164 plus 46 7. Surinam 187 106 plus 81 8. China 119 89 plus 30 9. Haiti 53 36 plus 17 10. Germany 40 34 plus 6 COUNTRY JUNE 2005 2003* CHANGE 11. Portugal 39 59 minus 20 12. Lebanon 31 20 plus 11 13. Guyana 28 18 plus 10 14. UK 26 19 plus 7 15. Italy 22 20 plus 2 15. Canada 22 26 minus 4 16. India 21 20 plus 1 17. France 16 12 plus 4 17. Switzerland 15 17 minus 2 18. Ecuador 14 10 plus 4 19. Cuba 14 11 plus 3 20. Trinidad & Tobago 13 15 minus 2 The Top Ten *No figures available for 2004. *No figures available for 2004.

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Page 9 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 KRALENDIJK TIDES (Heights in feet, FT) Remember: Winds and weather can further influence the local tides DATE TIME HEIGHT COEF 6-24 2:24 2.1FT. 11:54 0.7FT. 101 6-25 3:20 2.0FT. 12:25 0.7FT. 96 6-26 4:13 1.8FT. 12:56 0.8FT. 88 6-27 5:21 1.6FT. 13:21 0.9FT. 21:23 1.4FT. 77 6-28 2:33 1.3FT. 6:23 1.5FT. 13:33 1.0FT. 20:37 1.5FT. 65 6-29 4:13 1.2FT. 7:49 1.3FT. 13:29 1.0FT. 20:51 1.7FT. 56 6-30 5:37 1.0FT. 9:29 1.1FT. 12:50 1.1FT. 21:20 1.8FT. 51 6-29 4:13 1.2FT. 7:49 1.3FT. 13:29 1.0FT. 20:51 1.7FT. 5 6-30 5:37 1.0FT. 9:29 1.1FT. 12:50 1.1FT. 21:20 1.8FT. 5 7-01 6:36 0.9FT. 21:51 2.0FT. 5 VESSELS MAKING A PORT CALL : Antee Angie Another World Angel B Augustine Bright Sea Bounty Carylar Camissa, Chan Is. Cape Kathryn Endangered Species Endorphin Felicity Flying Cloud, USA Freestyle Guaicamar I, Ven. Jan Gerardus L’Quila, BVI Luna C. USA Madam Maggi Mainly Moonrise Mystic Jade Natural Selection Pyewacket Rusty Bucket Santa Maria Sandpiper, USA Scintella Sea Witch Sirius Sola 2 Sylvia K Sylvester Ti Amo, USA T’zadde Triumphant Lady Ulu Ulu, USA Ulysses Unicorn, Norway Varedhuni, Ger. Windancer Ya-T, BVI Yanti Paratzi Zahi, Malta Zeelander YACHTING AND WATERSPORTS PAGES L ocal newspapers carried a story last week that said Bonaire’s lighthouses had been made obsolete by modern navigation equipment and that it was unimportant that our lighthouses be kept in repair. Several have been put out of service by the theft of their solar panels used to charge the batteries that power the light. One of the lights currently out of service is on Klein Bonaire. The use of radar by ships in fog was supposed to end collisions at sea, but the Andrea Doria-Stockholm disaster is just one of many where modern gear has proven to be no substitute for vision. It’s inconceivable to imagine the da mage to Bonaire should a tanker run aground on Bonaire or Klein Bonaire and spill its contents. The ULCC ships (Supertankers) that call at BOPEC dwarf most of the ships that have been responsible for major oil spills. Perhaps the most famous oil spill of the 20th century is the Torrey Canyon disaster off Britain in 1967. The Torrey Canyon had only 1/10 the capacity of many of the ships passing close to Bonaire. Consider what happened last week in broad daylight: The bulk cargo carrier ship Terry Uno sank eight miles south of Curaçao’s Willemstad Harbour after it collided with cargo ship Caribbean Star of Curaçao, but its 10 Philippine crew members were rescued. The Caribbean Star reported the collision with the other ship. Both ships are registered in Panama. Once on land the crew was received by the Seafarers Ce ntre and housed at the Trupial Inn. Fritzroy Doran of Maritime Affairs says a Coast Guard video tape shows that Caribbean Star failed to give right of way to Terry Uno , after having just offloaded a cargo of cement at Fuik Bay, and rammed the vessel. There was apparently nobody on the bridge of Caribbean Star at the time. The Terry Uno did not appear to maneuver to avoid the collision. The Terry Uno sank and the Caribbean Star, which suffered considerable damage, is now in the Curaçao dry dock for repairs. The oil and other waste from the wreck was sufficiently off shore that none has yet come ashore. Clothes and other personal items needed were purchased for Terry Uno’s shipwrecked crew with local businesses givi ng a special discount. A church service and barbecue was also organized for them at the US Forward Operation Location (FOL) base. G.D. W e follow our hometown windsurfing superstar, Tonky Frans, on his European professional windsurfing tour. Tonky, about winning the Rhodes event: “I had a great time in Rhodes. Luckily I was one of the windsurfers who was scheduled late for the first heat. I could thus sit and watch the abilities of the other sailors. With this information in my mind I decided which moves I definitely had to show to score high. And so I did! I got through the single elimination safely in second position. On the last day I had my final heat for the top position. I had to compete against Kevin Mevissen, a good friend of mine with whom I am travelling together this season, and also a very good windsurfer! In spite of the fact that it was a tough heat and that Kevin has a lot of windsurfing experience in Rhodes, I won this event and got first prize! I am very happy with this achievement because it is a good start which gives me more self confidence in the European tour! During the intermission, my board sponsor, F2, put on a demonstration of the F2 boards. I have seen the latest models for freestyle boards of 2006 and the design ideas for 2007! The distributors were especially happy to see me since I am one of the few F2 riders who does not live in Europe and who selects the events that he will participate at in Europe! In addition to this demonstration there was also a try-outboards-opportunity where I gave a show for the folks on the beach. The wind cooperated so I showed them the craziest of moves and I could hear them clapping their hands and jamming after each of my moves.” After his victory in Rhodes, Tonky continued his tour in Paros. “We took the ferry at midnight from Rhodes and arrived very early in the morning in Paros. It was not the greatest of all trips, but it was the logical choice (with all the windsurfing gear), and when you are in a group, you talk and laugh, and you have no time to think about the ferry beating against the waves and no time to sleep either. On my first day in Paros I slept the whole day. The event would start the next day. But there was not enough (Continued on page 17) Tonky smiles after his win in Paros, Willemstoren Lighthouse

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Page 10 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 Feed and Train Many people get the idea for a community project from where they work or volunteer. Robert Egger helped at a soup kitchen for the poor before he decided that just giving out donated food wasn’t the solution. “If you want to help a kid, get their parent a decent job,” says Robert. So he began DC Central Kitchen which offers food as well as food training to the ho meless and poor. The food meets their immediate needs, but then they learn cooking and food handling skills to help them get jobs in the restaurant and catering indu stry. When he first received some funding for the project in 1989, he bought a refrig erated truck and collected leftovers from the inaugural balls that had celebrated the beginning of George H.W. Bush's presidency! A spin-off training program came next. "I noticed that school cafeterias were closed for most of the day and that restaurants and catering business threw out as much as 30% of their food," Mr. Egger explains. Campus Kitchens Project was created to use kitchens in public schools, colleges, and universities to train students how to prepare donated food, which is then delivered to hungry people in each local area. Connect to the Land One prison counselor, Catharine Sneed, beli eved that the prisoners would benefit from working outdoors in a garden where they might learn to nurture instead of destroy. So she encouraged the jail to convert old farmland into The Garden Project. She says proudly, “Seventy-five percent of Garden Project participants do not return to jail. . . When people have a connection to land, they have hope in their lives." More gardens were made, and then the Tree Corps was created, which has planted more than 10,000 street trees—mostly in poor neighborhoods. Combat Domestic Violence "I think to myself, if I can just help one person leave a bad situation . . . ,"says an ex-battered wife who now volunteers at Skagit Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault Services in Washington State, the non-profit agency that helped save her. She had returned to her abusive husband seven times before she was able to leave him for good. This agency is one of many that help victims of rape and domestic violence by providing shelter, counseling and legal support. Another group sponsors The Voices and Faces Project to get out the message, “There is nothing that you could ever do to make it OK for someone to rape you.” R.A.I.N.N . is a national free hotline for rape and incest victims that helps bring rapists to justice. What happens to the children of violent, abusive or negligent families? That’s the concern of a California program, Forget Me Not Farm , where abused and neglected children can learn caring, compassion, and gentleness through their work with plants and animals. To nurture a seedling to full growth or to bottle feed and cuddle with a young, orphaned calf may be all it takes to break the cycle of abuse that is too often the legacy of these children. Free Schooling Helping women become better educated an d employed is a popular focus of volunteer groups. The New Opportunity School for Women in Kentucky provides free courses in writing, math, computer and job skills for women, especially lowincome, middle-aged women who want to get off welfare and get a job. In Pennsylvania, TOP/WIN (Tradeswomen of Purpose/Women In Non-Traditional Work) trains women to qualify for construction and skilled trade jobs so they can support (Continued on page 11) W ould you like to help your community? Do you see a problem that needs a solution? Do you have an idea for a sp ecific project? Does your project provide a social benefit to others? Are you motivated to organize and inspire others to join you? Then you can make a difference on Bonaire! It all starts with an idea. Here are some successful, innovative progra ms that started with an idea from a motivated person like you. It All Starts with an Idea -Part II Continued on page 11

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Page 11 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 (It starts with an Idea. Continued from page 10) their families and break free of poverty. They learn the skills needed to become plumbers, heavy machine operators, electricians, machinists, carpenters and construction workers. A TOP/WIN graduate says, "I'm a better mother now than in the past... I've doubled my income. My daughter looks at me and she's very proud — and I am too — of the person I've become.” Women Venture also teaches women how to get rewarding, higher paying jobs, ho w to find careers that interest them and how to start and grow their own businesses. Can you help? Non-profit organizations serve people in a variety of ways. For instance, the people being helped might be “ receivers, ” that is, they receive food, shelter, clothing, medicine, etc. to provide for their immediate needs. An example of this type is the relief sent to tsunami victims. In another kind of program, the people might be “ learners ” in specially designed training or education classes, perhaps on how to keep a family budget, how to be a better father, or how to control a gambling addiction. These organizations try to find out why a problem exists and then intervene with a development program. Finally, the people might be “ builders ” in self-help projects where they provide the labor, tools or materials to create a garden for their community. What are the planning steps necessary for a successful program and project? First, contact the target group that you would like to help. Build their trust and find out what they need. What are their real problems? Make sure your idea isn’t already being done by another group. Discuss your hopes with any other groups that may have joint interests or benefit from your project. Consider all these ideas and plan your project. Who will help you? Who has the needed expertise and skills? Brainstorm solutions with the community and target group. Who do you want to serve and why? Decide just what you hope to do and how you will do it. List your activities. How much will they cost? Do some research on prices and develop a budget. Be realistic about your program and budget—only promise what can realistical ly be delivered. Write guidelines for record keeping, as well as for monitoring and evaluating your project so your group is sure to be efficient and productive. How will responsibilities be distributed? How will you ensure financial accountability? Explore fund-raising options. Have a long-term strategy and plans for selfsufficiency. Make an appointment with the NGO Platform Bonaire (717-2366) to present your plan and ask for their assistance in getting available funding from AMFO, the Antillean Co-Financing Organization. The Platform can also help you prepare your proposal and become a registered foundation. Barbara Mason Bianculli CONTACT INFORMATION AMFO: Kaya Gob. N. Debrot #31, Bonaire. Tel. 717-7776, Fax 717-7779, website: www.samfo.org, email: infobon@samfo.org NGO Platforma Bonaire : Kaya Korona 5-C. Tel. 7172366, Fax 7172367, website: www.ngobonaire.org, email: Platform@ngobonaire.org Gandhi once said, "The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others." What kind of service can YOU provide? Anything is possible on Bonaire. Funds are available to start short or long-term projects that respond to local needs and provide social benefits to the community. Voluntary action has the power to change society through a community of caring citizens. As Martin Luther King, Jr. preached, "Everybody can be great because everybody can serve. You only need a heart full of grace, a soul generated by love." It all starts with an idea. And your good idea will lead to a better Bonaire.

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Page 12 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 Exhibition by the students of the SGB High School Cultural Growth at ARTEBON Opening on Friday, June 24 at 7 pm by The Minister of Education & Culture Maritsa D. Silberie Saturday, June 25 and Sunday, June 26 9am to 5pm ARTEBON Center Kaya Playa Lechi (waterfront promenade) Show by VSBO and HAVO students We hope you will come T his article will be about just one tree, but a very special one, the Neem tree. There is a lot to say about this tree, and there are only two ways of looking at it. Either you love it or you hate it. I belong to the first category. Why? Because it grows very fast, doesn't get any known diseases, doesn’t need a lot of water, grows well in the strong wind, and, the most important thing, it grows into a very nice big shade tree. But more and more people on Bonaire see it as a weed that spreads its seedlings everywhere, breaks your walls and makes a big mess by its falling leaves. This can also be true, but there are a lot of ways that you can avoid those problems. I’ll write about that next time, but first I want to tell you some more things about this very special tree. Its botanical name is Azadiradita indic. That tells us that it is originally from India. In that country the Neem is a sacred tree and has been known for thousands of years for its healing properties. Ghandi was known to hold prayers meetings under a giant Neem, and in his daily diet was a Neem chutney. In India they call the tree “The Village Pharmacy!” The British spread the tree around the world, and in a lot of countries nowadays there are big plantations with only Neem trees. They are used in reforestation projects for its hard wood, but most of all for its bark, leaves, flowers, seed pods and even the roots. A wide variety of healing products are made from them. Products from the Neem are used in medicines for heart problems, eczema, ps oriasis, herpes, hair loss and in pest controls against more than 200 different insects, especially for big crops. In India people still brush their teeth with the Neem leaves, and the Neem oil made from the seeds is used for hundreds of reasons. The fragrant flower is a base for a very nice perfume (not for sale at our shop!). Not bad for a tree that is seen as a weed! This brings us also to the discussion as to whether a Neem is good protection against mosquitoes and the mealy bugs on Bonaire. I personally have never seen proof of it, but I certainly believe it helps when you have a big Neem in your garden. I think the mosquitoes are driven away by this tree, but not killed or destroyed. I will try to follow the fast growing use of this beautiful tree, and hopefully it will give us a good solution against the hardy mealy bugs or Pies-Pies! For people who are interested, here are some nice Websites to learn more about this fascinating tree: www. maxpages.com/neemtree or www. neemtree.info. Next time I'll write more about the use of the Neem. Ap van Eldik Ap van Eldik owns Green Label Landscaping which designs, constructs and maintains residential and commercial gardens. Two nurseries and a garden shop in Kralendijk carry terra cotta pots from Mexico and South America. Phone 717-3410. NOW OPEN SATURDAYS, NONSTOP 9 TO 4. W elcome to new baby Angie who was born on Saturday, June 11, in Bonaire. Her parents are City Shop’s Hamoudy Dabousi and his wife Ruba. She joins her sisters, Nadia and Talin. Congratulations and best wishes to all! Readers are invited to send their photos of their anniversaries, engagements or weddings to The Reporter. INVITATION The Very Special Neem Tree

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Page 13 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 Airport: Car Rental Agencies, Airport Arrivals Area Banks: MCB (Playa & Hato), RBTT Restaurants: Bistro de Paris Brasserie Bonaire Capriccio Chez Lucille City Cafe Croccantino Den Laman Garden Café Hilltop at Caribbean Club Kentucky Fried Chicken Lost Penguin Lover’s Ice Cream Pasa Bon Pizza Subway Wil’s Tropical Grill Shops: Bonaire Gift Shop City Shop DeFreewieler INPO Paradise Photo Photo Tours, Playa Exito Bakery Bonaire Super Store Hotels: Buddy Dive Capt. Don’s Habitat Carib Inn Caribbean Club Bonaire Dive Inn Divi Flamingo Eden Park Hotel Harbour Village Plaza Sand Dollar Supermarkets: Cultimara Consales More for Less Progresso Sand Dollar Grocery Tropical Flamingo Warehouse Others: Bonfysio Botika Korona Bestuurscollege Caribbean Laundry Customs Fit 4 Life Hair Affair Harbour Village Marina Parliament Rocargo San Francisco Hospital TCB Telbo Yellow Submarine Bookstores: Bonaire Boekhandel, Flamingo Bookstore Realty Offices : Harbourtown Re/Max Sunbelt RINCON: Chinese Store, Joi Fruit Store, Lemari Grocery Rincon Bakery. H ere is a picture of Becky Starkweather taking a break at Mile Marker 14 to read The Bonaire Reporter at the San Diego Rock ‘n Roll Marathon on June 5. Becky and another Bonaire regular, Warren Wagner, ran and finished the marathon. B ecky designated Support Bonaire, Inc. as one of the four charities she was running for. Warren finished in 5 hours, and Becky finished in 6:02. In all, 17,100 out of 20,400 fi nished the race. Becky credits Warren and Delno Tromp for encouragin g her to run her first marathon at age 44. WIN GREAT PRIZES! Take a copy of The Bonaire Reporter with you on your next trip or when you return to your home. Then take a photo of yourself with the newspaper in hand. THE BEST PHOTOS OF THE YEAR WILL WIN THE PRIZES. Mail photos to Bonaire Reporter, Kaya Gob. Debrot 2006, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN). E-mail to: picture@bonairereporter. com. (All 2004 photos are eligible.)

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Page 14 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 JANART GALLERY Kaya Gloria 7, Bonaire Local Art, Art Supplies, Framing, and Art Classes. Open Tu-We-Th & Sat 10 am5 pm Friday 17 pm; or phone 7175246 for appt. BONAIRENET The leading consumer and business information source on Bonaire. Telephone (599) 717-7160 . For on-line yellow pages directory information go to http://www.yellowpagesbonaire.com CAPT. DON’S ISLAND GROWER Trees and plants, Bonaire grown . 8000m2 nursery. Specializing in garden/septic pumps and irrigation. Kaminda Lagoen 103, Island Growers NV (Capt. Don and Janet). Phone: 786-0956 or 787-0956 Bonaire Images Elegant greeting cards and beautiful boxed note cards are now available at Chat-N-Browse nest to Lovers Ice Cream and Sand Dollar. Photography by Shelly Craig www.bonaireimages.com MOVING INTO A NEW HOUSE? Make it more livable from the start. FENG SHUI CONSULTATIONS Interior or exterior design advice, clearings, blessings, energy, healing, Chinatrained. Experienced. Inexpensive. Call Donna at 785-9332 . LUNCH TO GO Starting from NAƒ5 per meal. Call CHINA NOBO 717-8981 For Sale Compaq w i d e screen Laptop Computer, 512MB,DVD/CDRW, Wireless LAN, 2.5yr WARRANTY, FREE CARRYING CASE US$1,500 tel:791-4606 after 5pm Property, Sales & Rentals For Rent: Comfortable 2-bedroom beach villa -weekly or monthly-choice location-privacy & security. Phone (Bon) (599) 717 3293; (US) (570) 586 0098. May 20 until Jan. 8th. info@pelicanreefbonaire.com or www. pelicanreefbonaire.com Wanted Wanted: Good 4-door car between 1995 and 2000 model year, less than NAƒ7.000. Call 786-0042 Wanted : The book, “The First Bonaireans,” by Jay Haviser. Tel. 7867531 or email R5659R@dds.nl Volunteers needed to index back issues of The Bonaire Reporter (English) and Extra (Papiamentu). Call George at 717-8988 or 786-6125. Put your ads here. Non-business ads are free. Got something to buy or sell? REACH MORE READERS than any other WEEKLY NEWSPAPER by advertising in THE BONAIRE REPORTER Non-Commercial Classified Ads (up to 4 lines/ 20 words): FREE FREE FREE FREE Commercial Ads only NAƒ0.70 per word, per week. Free adds run for 2 weeks. Call or fax 717-8988 or email ads@bonairereporter.com L ac Bay is full of hidden places. On Sunday, July 3rd the group, “ Amigunan di Naturalesa ” (“Friends of the Environment”), is arranging a boat trip that will let you discover them. The meeting point is Boka di Coco (across from the Mangrove/ Kayak Center on the dirt road to Cai). The highlight will be a stop at the place called Den Puitu . Plan for a minimum of one hour for the trip which will end at Cai. Transportation back to Boca di Coco via land will be provided. Participants can choose what time they want to go, beginning at 7 am through the afternoon. The boats can handle six persons and there will be two boats. The price is NAƒ25 for adults and NAƒ15 for children. This includes the boat trip, land transportation, juice, wa ter and a choice of two kinds of soups. Also the first groups, from 7 to 10 in the morning, will have coffee or tea with real Bonairean pancakes. The proceeds will go to benefit the Bonaire participants in Vierdaagse Nijmegen (Four Day Walk at Nijmegen, Holland). To sign up pass by the Extra newspaper office. (tel. 717-8482). Bòi Antoin Exploring Lac

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Page 15 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 ( Grouper Corner Continued from page 3) and palate and securely hold any prey that is captured. Like most fish carnivores they swallow their victim whole, after ambushing them, and inhale the prey with a swift powerful suction created by the rapid gaping cavity of their large hinged jaws and extended lips. Body shape varies, but most of the grouper family have long, well proportioned profiles for their size. The smaller specimens, like the Coney, grow to a maximum of 16-18 inches (45 cm), and the rare gigantic “Jewfish” can occasionally be seen in the Caribbean up to 8 feet (2.5 meters) in length and weigh over 600800 pounds (360 kilos). The Nassau grouper has a higher back which is even more pronounced in the Marbled grouper. All possess a long dorsal fin with sharp spines in the front portion that can be held erect when excited; the rear section is soft and flexible. Today we are not observing these eating machines feeding. Instead, they are socializing and displaying a dazzling mix of “outfits,” often changing colors and flashing different body markings in a matter of seconds. The atmosphere is very relaxed, and body grooming is a high priority. With well developed swim bladders groupers are capable of hovering at a specific location above a coral formation for long periods of time if left unmolested. You can observe the gentle giants in this stationary, trancelike position being attended by a group of small fish and shrimp at a “cleaning station.” Each of the cleaners concentrates on removing an assortment of external parasites, dead skin and mucus from their “clients,” including around their eyes and nostrils. Here, just off the shore of Klein Bonaire, there are innumerable “cleaning shops” open for business . This cleaning symbiosis emphasizes the role of cooperation in nature as opposed to the “eat or be eaten” daily struggle for existence. The client fish will even open its mouth, extend its jaws and flare its gills to allow the cleaners easy access to all internal areas where pests like creepy little bloodsuckers burrow into the soft flesh. This tactile stimulation and the pleasure of touch, a rare sensation in the wild kingdom of the sea, could be a primary incentive for clients to attend cleaning stations. In comparison, for humans, the soothing touch of the massage therapist provides therapeutic value as well as psychological and emotional comfort. For the grouper, the changing body patterns and color intensity may be a sign of mood shifts during the cleaning process. Having the parasites removed may also improve the health and ultimately the reproductive success for the fish. When satisfied, the client gives a gentle twitch to signal the attendants to stop and then departs from the cleaning station. The vacancy is immediately filled by another individual waiting for the next appointment. Here you will observe many other fish customers patiently circling the area awaiting their turn. Sex and sexual games are also a part of this gathering . This afternoon, we are lucky to see two of these previously described interactions on our short one-hour dive. The sexual orientation of members of the grouper species is a bit different from our human nature and may be difficult to comprehend, but let’s try. Most groupers start life as females. This sexual development strategy, known as protogynous hermaphrodites, allows individuals to reproduce first as females and later, at a larger size, change into males when certain unidentified social or environmental factors are met. Juvenile growth rates, feeding habits and habitat shifts are not fully documented, but after groupers reach a length of six inches (15 cm) they migrate to the more complex reef structures from the nursery locations, leaving behind an allfemale population in the shallows. This form of sex switching is considered by many experts to be a superior reproductive tactic, enabling populations to adapt easily to short-term environmental fluctuations. Most of the larger members of the species make a complete and nonreversible sex change, while the smaller members function actively in both the male and female roles. Groupers enjoy relatively long lives, and the larger specimens have been documented to live as long as 37 years. Mature groupers show a strong homing tendency and often return to a specific reef or favorite wreck site. Now we come to the juicy parts of our encounter. Extended courtship behaviors are repeated from late morning to the middle of the afternoon prior to spawning . On this visit, in our voyeur role, we witness two of the more common precoital foreplay described in several studies. When the males approach the females, their heads and gill flaps turn pale, in sharp contrast with the remainder of their darker bodies. Females, clearly swollen with eggs, huddle close to the protection of the bottom reef structures. “Vent nuzzling” occurs when a male moves slowly alongside a female from the rear and inspects or nudges her vent area at the posterior of her abdomen. The female responds by rolling her body and angling her vent region away from the suitor. The persistent male swims underneath and attempts the same strategy from the opposite side. At this point, the female generally eases away. In another courtship behavior, “turn and rise,” the male approaches the side of a female, who is hovering off the bottom or slowly rising. As he gets close, he positions himself parallel to the female and the couple slowly rotates together as much as half a turn before she swims off. The male then moves to another female and repeats the maneuver. These courtship behaviors continue and color patterns intensify as the afternoon progresses. Spawning usually takes place at or just before sunset and varies within members of the species . For example, female Nassau groupers form discreet groups serviced by a single male. Male Tiger and Yellowfin groupers, however, defend small territories where they are approached by females ready to spawn. Many of the larger groupers travel long distances during one or more months each year to mate in huge spawning aggregations at breeding grounds used for centuries by their ancestors. The migrations are usually synchronized by the onset of the full moon during the cooler months. These traditional rendezvous sites are generally located near coral promontories or along outer reef shelves at depths over 100 feet (30 m), like this location. We plan to revisit Grouper Corner, at the appropriate times, to complete our quest for more answers and witness other intimate moments in the lives of these exciting creatures. We welcome you to join us and read about them in future articles. Photos and Story by © Albert Bianculli 2005 Nice teeth and a characteristic underbite on this grouper Transition phase, red mouth Tiger grouper

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Page 16 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 ©2005 The Bonaire Reporter Published weekly . For information about subscriptions, stories or advertising in The Bonaire Reporter , phone (599) 717-8988, 7917252, fax 717-8988, E-mail to: Reporter@bonairenews.com The Bonaire Reporter , George DeSalvo, Publisher. Laura DeSalvo, Editor in Chief. Address: Kaya Gob. Debrot 200-6; Bonaire, Neth. Antilles. Available on-line at: www.bonairereporter.com Reporters: Bòi Antoin, Albert Bianculli, Barbara Mason Bianculli, S.C., Dodo, Jack Horkheimer, Anna Kleimer, Greta Kooistra, Michael Thiessen Ap van Eldik Features Editor: Greta Kooistra Translations: Peggy Bakker, Sue Ellen Felix Production: Barbara Lockwood Distribution: Yuchi Molina (Rincon), Elizabeth Silberie (Playa); Housekeeping: Jaidy Rojas Acevedo. Printed by: DeStad Drukkerij , Curaçao

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Page 17 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 ( Tonky in Greece Continued from page 9) wind for competition, and many sailors thought of this as an extra day to get over the tiredness of the ferry trip. Day 2 followed and there was no wind again. We spent the day on the beach, waiting for a change in weather conditions, but it was useless. After a windless Day 3, the organizers approached us to ask if we were willing to stay in Paros if the event would be extended to two more days on June 13 and 14. They told us that these two days would be very windy according to the weather forecast. We talked about it. And since it would not interfere with the next stop in Mykonos (June 17), we agreed to stay. Thank God we stayed because there really was WIND.” The European Professional Freestyle Tour report for the event said: “Finally this morning the riders got a warm welcome of 16 knots of wind. The first start was at noon with Tonky Frans (F2/Gaastra) against Fillipo Buratti (RRD/Simmer). In this heat already you could see that Tonky was hot to go for his second win on the Greek tour. On his way through the ladder neither Andreas Olanderson (JP/NP) nor the very sympatico Dutch guy Kevin Mevissen (JP/NP) could stop him. At the semi final the dancing style of Tonky combined with lots of the hottest freestyle moves like the Chachoo, Grubby-Diablo and Flaka put him in the finals to meet the current tour leader, Andre Paskowski (F2/North Sails). Coming to the final, Tonky started the heat like it was never seen before on the European Tour. Within the first two minutes he showed everything possible in these difficult conditions as the wind started to become very gusty. But in the second half of the heat, Tonky appeared nervous despite having the title almost in his hands. Andre showed a couple of winning moves, like a switch puneta. But Tonky saved the best for the end of the heat, and one more time his incredible loose and relaxed style in combination with the hottest technical freestyle moves in windsurfing freestyle brought him the second title on the European Freestyle Pro Tour.” Tonky happy with his win: “I am very happy with my second title. It feels great because I worked so hard for it. It is also a funny thing that my opponent in the final heat was Andre Paskowski. We were scheduled to compete against each other in Bonaire (King of the Caribbean 2005) where we unfortunately did not get the chance because of lack of wind. Now I finally got the chance to show him what I had in store for him a month ago in Bonaire!” Tonky continued his tour in Mykonos “On Wednesday June 15, we took the ferry from Paros to Mykonos, heading to the next event. From the moment I arrived I did not like the wind that much, but I knew I had to do my best because I would definitely go for the top position. As opposed to the Paros event where we arrived just one day prior to the competition, we got there in time at Mykonos to train a little bit before the event. This is a good thing to do because then one gets acquainted with the water and also the wind. I had a very good heat in the first elimination. People on the beach told me that they did not expect anything else of me since they have read stories about my prior achievements on the other Greek islands. At that moment I realized that the expectations people had of me were very high and that people had their eyes on me. I had to go against Kevin Mevissen again in the semi-finals where I won again. My next opponent during the final of the single elimination was my F2 team rider, Andre Paskowski (again!). I won the single elimination and tomorrow there will be the double elimination where the winner of Mykonos will be announced.” The European Professional Freestyle Tour report for the event read: “The crowd was screaming when Kevin Mevissen and Tonky Frans started their heat, coming to the shore and doing almost a synchronic performance of spock one handed, grubby and spock 540° on their first leg in. On their way out huge forwards one handed and planning flakas as well as flaka Diablo made the crowd on the beach almost go crazy. As Kevin took the victory in the first final, the guys had to go one more time against each other, and Kevin was hot. At the end the decision was close but it was Kevin who deserved to win (Continued on page 22) Continued on page 22

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Page 18 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 W hat would the Bonaire Animal Shelter be without its devoted volunteers? On a recent Saturday, due to vacations, sickness, schedules and other things, the only volunteer who could come to help was Deborah. Although only a youngster herself (she’s 12) she does a considerable job – cleaning, feeding and playing with the cats and dogs so they can remain social with people. Not only is she doing a fine service but she’s learning responsibility and helping others with no financial remuneration (pay). Thank you, Deborah! You’re doing great! Here’s Deborah in the puppy cage with “Enrico” and “Frances,” his good friend. Enrico, along with his brother, “Jose,” “Roberto,” and “Pedro,” were born on April 16 in someone’s yard. Their mom had decided to find a place where people were to have her puppies. The kind people, knowing they couldn’t keep the dogs themselves, brought them into the Shelter where they knew they could have a good chance at life. The pups are all healthy and full of fun and enthusiasm. They’ve had their vet exam, gotten their shots and are all roly poly funny guys. You may see them at the Bonaire Animal Shelter on the Lagoen Road, open Monday through Friday, 10 am to 2 pm. Tel. 717-4989. Do you love animals and want to make a difference? Come visit the Shelter and see why volunteers are so important to keeping the pets happy and social . Volunteers may pick their own hours too. They may be some of the best times you’ll have on Bonaire! Call Shelter Manager Jurrie Mellema at 717-4989. L.D. Volunteer Deborah with “Enrico” and “Frances”

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Page 19 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 THIS WEEK Wednesday, June 22 -Symposium: Is teenage pregnancy a problem or something normal? ( Embaraso hubenil un problema of algu normal?) Medical, legal and emotional topics presented by experts on the subject. At Scouting Central, near the start of the Nikiboko North road. 8 am-1 pm. Youngsters especially invited. For more information contact: Roxiana Goeloe, tel: 717-2436; Marisela Flemming: tel: 717-8976; Polli Winklaar: tel: 717-8839 Friday, June 24 — Opening “Cultural Growth” SGB art students exhibit, free ARTEBON, 7 pm, refreshments & snacks. Continues Saturday, Sunday, June 25, 26, 9 am to 5 pm. See page 12 Saturday, June 25 — Combat Poverty Conference, at ABVO conference room, 9 to 5. Call 717-4666, email fesbo@telbonet.an by June 22. Until June 28 Wilna Groenenboom Art Exhibit, The Cinnamon Art Gallery is at Kaya A.P. L. Brion #1, just off Kaya Grandi, behind Banco di Caribe. Open weekdays 9 am to noon, 2 to 5 pm. Call 717-7103 or 786-9563. Friday, June 24 —St. John’s Day Wednesday, June 29 —St. Peter’s Day Friday, July 1 —Captain Dons 80th Birthday Party COMING Saturday, July 2 —Rincon Marshé Sunday, July 3 — Lac Bay discovery boat trip. Meet at Boka di Coco (across from Mangrove/Kayak Center on dirt road to Cai) 7 am to midafternoon. Sponsored by “ Amigunan di Naturalesa ” (“Friends of the Environment) to benefit Bonaire participants in Vierdaagse Nijmegen (Four Day Walk at Nijmegen, Holland). Sign up at Extra newspaper office. (tel. 7178482). Adults, NAƒ25; Children NAƒ15. See page 22. Sunday, July 3 —The Fundashon for Art and Culture will hold its 13th Annual Art Day with art exhibits, music, performing arts, food and drinks. Anyone interested in exhibiting at the event can contact volunteers at 717-6420 cell 786-6420, or email artandculture65@hotmail.com. Monday, July 4 —US holiday. Fireworks at some resorts July 17-24 Diva’s Women Windsurf Week Learn to windsurf clinic Contact Ann Phelan 786-3134 or email ann@bonairewindsurfing.com www. bonairecaribbean.com 3 local scholarships still available for teen or local women. To apply contact Ann Phelan. The International Bonaire Sailing Regatta October 9 – 15, 2005 EVERY WEEK Saturday Rincon Marshé opens at 6 am 2 pm. Enjoy a Bonairean breakfast while you shop: fresh fruits and vegetables, gifts, local sweets and snacks, arts and handicrafts, candles, incense, drinks and music. www. infobonaire.com/rincon Sunday Live music 6 to 9 pm while enjoying a great dinner in colorful tropical ambiance at the Chibi Chibi Restaurant & Bar . Open daily 5 to 10 pm. Live Fla Bingogreat prizes, 7 pm, Divi Flamingo Monday -Soldachi Tour of Rincon, the heart of Bonaire, 9 am-noon. $20Call Maria 717-6435 Tuesday -Harbour Village Tennis, Social Round Robin 7 to 10 pm. $10 per person. Cash bar. All invited. Call Elisabeth Vos at 565-5225 /717-7500, ext. 14. Wednesday Meditation at Donkey Beach from 7:30 to 8:30 pm. Open to all. Call S.H.Y. 790-9450 Friday -Manager’s Rum Punch Party, Buddy Dive Resort, 5:30-6:30 pm FridayOpen House with Happy Hour at the JanArt Gallery at Kaya Gloria #7, from 5-7 pm. DailyThe Divi Flamingo Casino is open daily for hot slot machines, roulette and black jack, Monday to Saturday 8 pm– 4 am; Sunday 7 pm– 3 am. Every day by appointment -Rooi Lamoenchi Kunuku Park Tours Bonairean kunuku. $12 (NAƒ12 for residents). Tel 717-8489, 540-9800. FREE SLIDE/VIDEO SHOWS SaturdayDiscover Our Diversity Slide Show, pool bar Buddy Dive, 7 pm 717-5080 Sunday Bonaire Holiday Multimedia dual-projector productio n by Albert Bianculli, 8.30 pm, Capt. Don’s Habitat. Monday Dee Scarr’s Touch the Sea slide experience. Aquarius Conference Center, Capt. Don’s Habitat, 8:30– 9:30pm. Wednesday (2nd and 4th) Turtle Conservation Slide Show by Andy Uhr. Carib Inn seaside veranda, 7 pm Thursday from June 16 to July 28, Basic Fish ID Yellow Submarine Dive Shop at 6:30 pm FridayWeek in Review Video Presentation by the Toucan Dive Shop at Plaza’s Tipsy Seagull , 5 pm. 717-2500. CLUBS and MEETINGS AA meetings every Wednesday ; Phone 717-6105; 560-7267 or 7173902. Al-Anon meetings every Monday evening at 7 pm. Call 790-7272 Weekly BonaireTalker Gathering and Dinner at Gibi's Tuesday 6:30pm call 567-0655 for directions. Bridge Club Wednesdays , 7:30 pm at the Union Building on Kaya Korona, across from the RBTT Bank and next to Kooyman’s. All levels invited. NAƒ5 entry fee. Call Cathy 566-4056. Darts Club plays every other Sunday at City Café. Registration at 4, games at 5. Tel. 717-2950, 560-7539. JCI. First Wednesday of the MonthJunior Chamber International Bonaire (JCI Bonaire or formerly known as Bonaire Jaycees) meets at the ABVO building, Kaminda Jato Baco 36 from 7:30 to 9:30pm. Everyone is welcome. Contact: Renata Domacassé 516-4252. Kiwanis Club meets at APNA Plaza, Kaya International, every other Tuesday, 7 pm . Tel. 717-5595, Jeannette Rodriguez. Lions Club meets every 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month at 8 pm at Kaya Sabana #1. All Lions are welcome. Rotary lunch meetings Wednesday , 12 noon-2 pm Rendez-Vous Restaurant, Kaya L.D. Gerharts #3. All Rotarians are welcome. Tel. 717-8454 BONAIRE’S TRADITIONS Mangasina di Rei, Rincon . Enjoy the view from “The King’s Storehouse.” Learn about Bonaire’s culture . Visit typical homes from the 17th century. Daily. Call 717-4060 / 790-2018 Visit the Bonaire Museum on Kaya J. v.d. Ree, behind the Catholic Church in town. Open weekdays from 8 am-noon, 1:30-5 pm. Tel. 717-8868 Washington-Slagbaai National Park, Museum and Visitors’ Center. Open daily 8 am-5 pm. Closed on some holidays. 717-8444/785-0017 Sunday at Cai Live music and dancing starts about 12 noon at Lac Cai. Dance to the music of Bonaire’s popular musicians. Rincon Marshéevery Saturday 6 am to 3 pm. Open market in Bonaire’s historic town. Soldachi Tours show you the Rincon area. Alta Mira Nature Walking Tour at 6:30 am. Town Walking tour at 9:30, Bus Tour at 10 . Call Maria at 717-6435 to reserve. CHURCH SERVICES International Bible Church of Bonaire – Kaya Amsterdam 3 (near the traffic circle) Sunday Services at 9 am; Sunday Prayer Meeting at 7:00 pm in English. Tel. 717-8332 Protestant Congregation of Bonaire . Wilhelminaplein. Services in Papiamentu, Dutch and English on Sundays at 10 am. Thursday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 8 pm . Rev. Jonkman. 717-2006 The Church of Jesu s Christ of Latter Day Saints, Kaya Sabana #26 Sundays 8:30 11:30 am. Services in Papiamentu, Spanish and English. Catholic San Bernardus in Kralendijk – Services on Sunday at 8 am and 7 pm in Papiamentu 717-8304 . Saturday at 6 pm at Our Lady of Coromoto in Antriol, in English . Mass in Papiamentu on Sunday at 9 am and 6 pm. 717-4211. Assembly of God (Asemblea di Dios), Kaya Triton (Den Cheffi). In English, Dutch & Papiamentu on Sunday at 10 am. Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 pm . 717-2194 New Apostolic Church, Meets at Kaminda Santa Barbara #1, Sundays, 9:30 am. Services in Dutch. 717-7116. ****** Send events to The Bonaire Reporter Email reporter@bonairenews.com Tel/Fax. 717-8988, Cel. 791-7252 Kaya Prinses Marie Behind Exito Bakery Tel. 717-2400 Tickets NAƒ10,50 (incl. Tax) High Schoolers NAƒ7,75 NEW FILMS BEGIN FRIDAY CLOSED MONDAY TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY SATURDAY 4 PM Because of Winn-Dixie Late Show Call to make sure (Usually 9 pm ) Kingdom of Heaven (Orlando Bloom) Early Show (Usually 7 pm) State of the Union MICRO MOVIE REVIEW Seen recently in Movieland Cinema: XXX (Triple X); STATE OF THE UNION by Lee Tamahori, starring Ice Cube, Samuel L. Jackson and William Dafoe. An endless sequence of explosions and chases with a deafening soundtrack and yet I managed to sleep halfway through the film only to wake up and find that I hadn't missed anything. It has clichéd dialogues, unbelievable fight sequences and a sloppy storyline that threatens to nullify all the positive aspects of the movie if there are any. Sorry to say but this was probably one of the worst movies I've ever seen. If you're yearning for a good nap go and see it, otherwise don't waste your precious time. Dodo

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Page 20 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 APPLIANCES/ TV/ ELECTRONICS/ COMPUTERS City Shop, the mega store, has the island’s widest selection of large and small home appliances. Fast service and in-store financing too. ART GALLERY Cinnamon Art Gallery non-profit gallery for local artists has continuous shows. Each month a new artist is featured. Stop by. Free entry. BANKS Maduro and Curiel’s Bank provides the greatest number of services, branches and ATMs of any Bonaire bank. They also offer investments and insurance. BEAUTY PARLOR Hair Affair . Expert hair cutting, styling, facials, waxing and professional nail care. BICYCLE / SCOOTER/ QUADS De Freewieler rents scooters and quads; professionally repairs almost anything on two wheels. Sells top brand bikes. Have your keys made here. BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION APA Construction are professional General Contractors. They also sp ecialize in creating patios and walkways with fabulous sprayed and stamped concrete pavement. DIVING Carib Inn is the popular 10-room inn with top-notch dive shop and well stocked retail store. Best book trade on Bonaire. Good prices on regulator repair, dive computer H.Q. Photo Tours Divers-Yellow Submarine low prices on the seaside at Kralendijk, at Caribbean Club, Caribbean Court and the Hamlet Oasis . Join their cleanup dives and BBQ. WannaDive They make diving fun while maintaining the highest professional standards. In town at City Café and at Eden Beach. FITNESS Bonfysio offers comprehensive fitness programs to suit your needs whether they be weight loss, sports or just keeping in shape. Convenient schedule. Fit 4 Life at the Plaza Resort Mall. Classes in Pilates, Aerobics, TaeBo and more. Professional trainers, fitness machines and classes for all levels. GARDEN SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Green Label has everything you need to start or maintain your garden. They can design, install and maintain it and offer plants, irrigation supplies and garden chemicals. GIFTS, SOUVENIRS AND LIQUOR The Bonaire Gift Shop has an wide selection of gifts, souvenirs, liquor, dive watches, digital cameras, things for the home, T-shirts all at low prices. HOTELS Golden Reef Inn is the affordable alternative with fully equipped studio apartments in a quiet Bonaire neighborhood. Just a 3-minute walk to diving and the sea. The Great Escape Under new management. Quiet and tranquil setting with pool and luxuriant garden in Belnem. Cyber Café, DVD rentals, restaurant and bar. METALWORK AND MACHINE SHOP b c bBotterop Construction Bonaire N.V. , offers outstanding fabrication of all metal products, including stainless. Complete machine shop too. PHOTO FINISHING Paradise Photo in the Galeries Shopping Center offers fast, fine processing for prints, slides, items and services for your picture-taking pleasure. REAL ESTATE / RENTAL AGENTS Harbourtown Real Estate is Bonaire’s oldest real estate agent. They specialize in professional customer services and top notch properties. Mike Boom & Associates Broad assortment of homes and properties. View on their website www. bonairerealty.com or office in town Re/Max Paradise Homes: International/US connections. 5% of profits donated to local community. Sunbelt Realty offers full real estate, rental, and insurance services. If you want a home or to invest in Bonaire, stop in and see them. REPAIRS Bon Handyman is here if you need something fixed or built. Ultra reliable, honest and experienced. Electrical, plumbing, woodworking, etc. 717-2345 RESORTS & ACTIVITIES Buddy Dive Resort offers diving, Adventure Fun tours including kayaking, mountain biking, cave snorkeling and exploration. RETAIL Benetton, world famous designer clothes available now in Bonaire at prices less than those in US. For men, women and children. SECURITY Special Security Services will provide that extra measure of protection when you need it. Always reliable. SHIPPING Rocargo Freight Air and sea shipments in/out of Bonaire. Customs agents. Pr ofessional and efficient. FedEx agent. SUPERMARKETS Tropical Flamingo is convenient, clean, modern, efficient and has the lowest prices on Bonaire. Located behind NAPA. Visit Warehouse Bonaire to shop in a large, spotless supermarket. You’ll find American and European brand products. THE market for provisioning. VILLAS Bonaire Oceanfront villa for up to nine people: five kitchens, five bathrooms. Ideal for divers. WATER TAXI Get to Klein Bonaire by Ferry. Ride the Kantika di Amor or Skiffy . Hotel pickup. WINES Antillean Wine Company. You’ve tried the rest; now try the best: best prices, highest quality wines from around the world, kept in a cooled warehouse. Free delivery. YOGA Yoga For You . Join certified instructors Desirée and Don for a workout that will refresh mind and body. Private lessons too. Closed during June. ATTENTION BUSINESSMEN/WOMEN: Put your ad in The Bonaire Reporter. Phone/Fax 717-8988, Cel 791-7252 RESTAURANT PRICE RANGE / WHEN OPEN FEATURES Want your restaurant listed here? It’s easy and not expensive Call The Reporter at 717-8988 or 791-7252 for info Bella Vista Restaurant Sea Side Restaurant at Buddy Dive Resort 717-5080, ext. 525 Moderate. Breakfast and Lunch Dinner during Theme nights only. Open every day Magnificent Theme Nights : Saturday: Beach Grill; Monday: Caribbean Night; Friday: Manager’s Rum Punch Party and All-You-Can-Eat B.B.Q Bistro de Paris Kaya Gob. N. Debrot 46 (half-way between hotel row and town) 717-7070 Moderate Lunch and Dinner Closed Sunday Real French Cooking in an informal setting Superb dishes prepared with care and love by a French chef Owner-operated Eat in or Take away Brasserie Bonaire Royal Palm Galleries Kaya Grandi 26, Next to Re/Max, 717-4321 LowModerate Lunch and Dinner Open 11 am -2:30 pm 5:30-9 pm Closed Saturday and Sunday Lots of parking in big mall lot Kitchen Open non-stop 11am-6 pm Breezy terrace with airco inside Calabas Restaurant & Chibi Chibi Restaurant and Bar At the Divi Flamingo Beach Resort. Waterfront 717-8285 Moderate-Expensive Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Open 7 days Get a view of the beach and turquoise sea while enjoying a breakfast buffet or à la carte lunch and dinner at the 'Chibi Chibi' restaurant & bar. Inspiring vistas and the highest standard of cuisine . Croccantino Italian Restaurant Downtown at Kaya Grandi 48 717-5025 Moderate-Expensive Dinner Closed Monday Tuscan chef prepares exquisite dishes. Authentic ingredients and romantic setting make dining a delight. Be served in a garden setting under floating umbrellas or in air-conditioned comfort. Take out too. Den Laman On the water, just off the traffic circle 717-4106 Moderate-Expensive Breakfast, Lunch Dinner Open 7 days Creative cuisine on the seaside . Top chefs from Amsterdam cook in an open modern kitchen featuring induction cooking. Seafood a specialty. The Great Escape EEG Blvd #97—across from Belmar 717-7488 Moderate Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner Open 7 days Bar-Restaurant poolside —under the thatched roof. Cuban Chef prepares Caribbean cuisine. Champagne brunch on Sundays 10 am to noon. Happy hours 5 to 7 every day. Hilltop at Caribbean Club Bonaire On the Tourist Road, 2 mi. north of Town 717-7901 Moderate-Expensive Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Closed Sunday Quiet country setting, lovely landscaping, friendly staff Happy Hour from 5-7 pm, BBQ on Tuesdays Gourmet chef creates unique daily specials The Last Bite Bakery Home Delivery or Take Out 717-3293 Low-Moderate Orders taken 8 am-4 pm; Deliveries 6-7:30 pm , Closed Sunday Enjoy a delicious dessert or savory baked meal in the comfort of your home or resort. This unique bakery offers gourmet class items -always from scratchfor take out or delivery only. The Lost Penguin Across from MCB Bank in downtown Kralendijk Call 717-8003. Low-Moderate Breakfast, Lunch, Early Dinner Closed Tuesdays & Wednesdays Watch the bustle of downtown from this street side Caribbean-style bistro owned and run by a European educated Master Chef and his wife. Pasa Bon Pizza On Kaya Gob. Debrot ½ mile north of town center. 790-1111 Low-Moderate Open from 5-11 pm Wednesday-Sunday Bonaire’s best. The Real Thing! Freshly prepared pizzas made with the finest ingredients. Salads, desserts. Eat in or take away. Nice bar too. Call ahead to eat-in or take out 790-1111

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Page 21 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 “T wo days after I arrived I went to the Dive Inn to look for a buddy to dive with, I met a Dutch woman who was here for a vacation with a girlfriend. A year and a half later they came back to Bonaire and stayed at my house. Two years later the girlfriend came back with another girlfriend this time… and that was Ans Klein Heerenbrink!” He laughs: “It sounds like a soap opera, but as we say, ‘By coincidence the best marriages are born,’ and it proved to be right because we’ve been together for eight years now.” “The moment I saw Hans,” Ans fills in , ‘there was this sparkle! It was February ’95 and after that vacation we kept in touch frequently. In September that year I came a second time, and it became very clear what we felt for each other. That year I spent Christmas and New Years with Hans on Bonaire, and in ’96 I came for three months to see whether I could find a job here. Hans came to Holland twice to meet my family, so it was a lot of traveling back and forth until I finally came here March 29th 1997, ‘Nos Dia,’ as we call it! I started working full time at the hospital and I still think it’s a great job. I have wonderful colleagues and we have a good, close contact with the patients. In Holland I was a nurse specializing in cardio care. Here I’ve become allround. We have 30 beds; I’ve seen everything. I also do the air ambulance. You become inventive, and everyone always looks for the best solution. There’s very good cooperation between nurses and doctors. My colleagues are from Aruba, Surinam, Holland and Colombia. It’s a colorful mix, but it works really well! I love my job! Even when we’re not working we’re always together, doing fun things like brunch on the beach, walking all over the island, fixing old furniture, gardening, painting, cooking together, and we love to shop together! But being lazy and not doing anything is also wonderful!” Hans Rietveld and Ans Klein Heerenbrink match. There’s no other way to say it when you see people that bring out the best of each other; who are just nice and gentle together, each other’s equal, down to earth, but still, there is magic; they make each other more beautiful . “Before Bonaire,” Hans says , “I’d been living in Curaçao from ’85 to ’92. I worked for DOW (what now is DROBpublic works) and for the Curaçao Road Construction Company. I don’t like sitting in the same chair for 30 years so when I saw this ad asking for a head for DOW on Bonaire I sent my CV and was immediately accepted. Two months later I moved to Bonaireincredibly fast! I’m a civil engineer. In Holland I worked for several municipalities. By the end of the 70s and the beginning of the 80s, I traveled to India, Nepal, Thailand, Burma, Sri Lanka, Egypt and Mexico. After seeing all those places I wanted to live somewhere else. I saw an ad for DOW on Curaçao and responde d, but it took 20 months to happen. Originally it was for a three-year contract , but I got so addicted to the Caribbean way of life that now it’s been 20 years in the Antilles! It was a challenging job being the head of DOW on Bonaire. In those days the island was booming, and the economy grew 10% annually! Many people thought it was going too fast and they were afraid Bonaire would change into a second St. Martin. Then the Pourier Committee started working on this process, ‘Economic growth, but considering the preservation of culture and nature.’ The report was accepted by the Eilandsraad (Island Council) in the beginning of ’93, but then it had to be translated into official laws concerning education, economics, finance, judicial and technical matters, etc. all the departments the government manages. The writing of the laws was done by us, the top officials, as well as our regular jobs, without the help of consultants. I was also indirectly involved in the reorganization of the government, which was done by a consultant. My days were full. The government reorganization was an incredibly time-consuming operation. Alas, I wasn’t there when they finished it. My contract was fup, people were transferred, our group was neutralized because another political party took over. Nevertheless, as it often happens in the Antilles, the plan was carried through in many ways, but never officially. So I left, but I had a tremendous reputation and started my own company as a civil and technical consultant and it went very well. I prepared, conducted, did the management and supervision of projects like the construction of the Bank of the Dutch Antilles, the building of Consales’ cool and freezer house and the construction of the Kaminda Djabou road. At the beginning of the century it became very slow. All of Bonaire was struggling, and I got my share of it too. However, two years ago I joined a group of consultants, Multifunction Management. We use each other’s knowledge and experience, so we can offer a broad spectrum of services. I feel that economically we’re going in the right direction, poco poco , but not bad at all! I’m also involved in monument care. My love for the old historic houses began in Curaçao where Jay Haviser, Michael Newton, Maup Lanjouw, Bart de Boer, I and others founded a group to clear away the overgrowth from the old ruins, then measure and register the houses. On Bonaire in 1996 I met Christie Dovale who was also interested in doing something with the old monuments. Christie and Laurie Dovale, Patrick Strauss and I set up a foundation and started frantically registering those places to which we could give the status of ‘protected monument.’ But, alas, the initiative was smothered by the politicians’ lack of interest. We became so unmotivated that the group fell apart… until the middle of 2003 when Jay Haviser and I had a conversation. He formed, within DROB, an informal committee with himself, Hubert Vis and Alca St. Jago, with the aim of setting up a historic site preservation group, and he asked for my help. So I thought why don’t we reactivate the ‘Foundation Monument Care Bonaire’ and go from there. Through the notary, however, we found out that there was another monument care foundation, founded by the previous notary, Mr. Knuf. The present notary, Mr. Maartense, advised us to reactivate this foundation because it had the oldest rights. Board members are Peter Paulussen, Evert Piar and I. Members are Linda Anthony and Anthony Nicolaas. We needed a protective law, like an island decree, but immediately we were told by the government that they didn’t have the time to compose one, so we did it ourselves. The concept for a monument management plan together with the concept decree was presented to Deputy Dortalina. Now we’re almost there, and the definite versions of the management plan and the decree can be presented to the Executive Council. After that we can become active and start to raise funds. Why am I doing this? I want to contribute to the Bonairean community by conserving the cultur al inheritance, and I’m extra motivated because I love the subject! We’re talking mostly about all those little original houses against the background of the kunuku and the ones in the barios , but also of course big buildings like the Pasangrahan , Bestuurscollege and the Protestant Church. After the renovation of the old houses we’re planning to find tenants for them through Fundashon Cas Bonairiano so that people can live in them again. A building needs occupation and maintenance to bring out its beauty. Lately it has become a big issue; the demolishing of Hausmann’s Folly has opened people’s eyes! Luckily I also have another source that allows me to ‘fight’ for these subjects; I’m writing for the Amigoe, and often Bòi Antoin and I join forces, with good results! I’m very happy here. You never know about the future, but we would like to stay here. Bonaire has space and it’s the people, the island itself. To be in the middle of nowhere and you don’t see a soul! I get a kick when I drive on Kaya Grandi on a Sunday afternoon and I don’t see anybody! In Holland there are 500 people for every square kilometer, here not even 50! That’s a big difference! Here the people are warm and caring and they take time to greet you. I don’t think we should have Holland make the rules for this island. That will go too far! This is the land where life is good!’ Greta Kooistra “ In those days the island was booming, and the economy grew 10% annually! Many people thought it was going too fast and they were afraid Bonaire would change into a second St. Martin.” Greta Kooistra September 10th 1992 Hans Rietveld and Ans Klein Heerenbrink

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Page 22 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 ( Tonky in Greece Continued from page 17) on this day.” Tonky talks about his second place in Mykonos: “I was satisfied with my second position, and I am happy for Kevin. He deserved this win after the competitions that took place today. In windsurfing one can never be too sure about one’s position. Your achievements do not depend only on professionalism and consistency (though they will get you a long way!) but it also depends on factors that you have no control over like the wind and the water. The challenge is now even greater for me on the EFPT tour. I will definitely go for the top position in the next event!” Tonky’s next event will be in Pozo (Grand Canaria). This is an event of the Professional Windsurfing Association (PWA). There Tonky will meet the other professional Bonairean windsurfers and Ricardo Campello, Kauli Seadi, Kevin Mevissen and Andre Paskowski. If the wind cooperates, things will get really hot there. Stay tuned for the Tonky reports from Spain. story and photos by S.C. B efore you put your house on the market, start removing clutter. The kitchen is a good place to begin. First, take everything off the counters. Put the toaster in a cabinet and take it out only when you use it. Store everything in cabinets and drawers. If you don’t have enough cabinet space to put everything, put those dishes, pots and pans that rarely get used into a box and put that box in storage. You see, homebuyers may open all your cabinets and dr awers, especially in the kitchen. They want to be sure there is enough room for their "stuff." If your kitchen cabinets, pantries, and drawers look jammed full, it sends a negative message to the buyer that there’s not enough storage space. So have as much "empty space" as possible. If you have a "junk drawer," get rid of the junk. If you have a rarely used crock pot, put it in storage. Do this with every cabinet and drawer. Create open space. If there is a large amount of foodstuffs crammed into the shelves or pantry, begin using them, especially canned goods. Canned goods are heavy and you don’t want to be lugging them to a new house, anyway – or have to pay a mover to do so. Let what you have on the shelves determine your menus and use up as much as you can. Beneath the sink is very critical, too. Make sure it’s as empty as possible, removing all extra cleaning supplies. Scrub the area down as well and see whether there are any tell-tale signs of water leaks that may cause a homebuyer to hesitate in buying your home. Closets are great for accumulating clutter. We are talking about extra clothes and shoes – things you rarely wear but cannot bear to be without. Sometimes there are shoeboxes full of "stuff" or other accumulated personal items. They can make your closets look "crammed full." Do without these items for a couple of months by putting them in a box in storage. Many people have too much furniture in some rooms. To give the illusion of space, keep furnishings to a minimum by storing any excess furniture. Garages, lofts and sheds accumulate not only clutter, but junk. Clear out these areas, making them as empty as possible so that buyers can imagine what they would do with the space. Remove anything that is not essential and take it to the storage area. Anna Kleimer Anna Kleimer is with RE/MAX Paradise Homes. She and her husband, Art, owned and operated their real estate company in Vail, Colorado for 12 years. Working with buyers, she has an intuitive understanding of properties right for them location, price range and amenities. Call her at 717-7362 or 786-8607. Tonky performs a chaco in Mykonos Kevin Mevissen and Tonky“You see, homebuyers may open all your cabinets and drawers, especially in the kitchen. They want to be sure there is enough room for their "stuff." If your kitchen cabinets, pantries, and drawers look jammed full, it sends a negative message to the buyer that there’s not enough storage space.” Tonky heads out!

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Page 23 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 *to find it, just look up For the week: June 24 to July 1, 2005 By Astrologer Michael Thiessen A s I alerted you earlier this month one of the most spectacular, super close meetings of the planets you'll ever see will occur this week and next. And in fact this Sunday and Monday the two planets closest to the Sun won't be this close again until the year 2070. Think about Sky Park skies earlier this month. Back then on Sunday June 12, if you faced west northwest, 30 to 45 minutes after sunset while there was still twilight out, you would have seen the brightest planet of them all, planet #2 from the Sun , Venus , and planet #1 from the Sun, Mercury , peeking just above the horizon. And on a straight line with Mercury and Venus up to their left, planet #6, ringed Saturn . And if you watched night after night you would have seen all three of them steadily move closer and closer to each other, Saturn descending and Mercury ascending to meet brilliant Venus. But this week the changes are really dramatic because starting Friday, the 24th and lasting for three nights, Mercury, Venus and Saturn will be only two degrees apart fr om each other. On Saturday the three are at their absolute closest to each other and could fit in a circle only one and a half degrees wide, so close you could cover all three with your pinky finger held out at arm’s length. But the best is yet to come because on Sunday the 26th Mercury and Venus will be less than one half of one degree apart. And to top that, on Monday the 27th they'll be only one tenth of one degree apart, at their closest until 2070! So close that the Old Farmer's Almanac claims they may even appear to merge into one star. Once again, this Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Mercury, Venus and Saturn will form a super close trio, and on Monday you won't see Mercury and Venus this close for another 65 years! Of course we must remind you that this is all an optical illusion and that they only appear close from our vantage point here on Earth. In reality on Monday when Mercury and Venus appear to almost merge, Mercury will be 95 million miles away while Venus will be 142 million miles away and Saturn will be a whopping almost one billion miles away. Don't miss this super spectacular planetary gathering. Start watching this week but make sure that you don't miss this Friday, Saturday, Sunday and finally, Monday. And if you've got a small telescope or binoculars, get them out now because the change from night to night will absolutely stun you. But don't fret if you miss this weekend because Mercury and Venus will still be really close all next week too! If you've never engaged in planet watching before this weekend now is the time to start. I mean who wants to wait until 2070? Jack Horkheimer ARIES (Mar. 21April 20) Try not to overr eact to the loss. You can come into money; however, perhaps not under the be st circumstances. Take a close look at documents before signing on the dotted line. Don't be too quick to judge those you live with. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday. TAURUS (Apr. 21May 21) Female members of your family may be difficult to deal with. You can make excellent car eer moves if you are open to the opportunities that exist. You will find that social activities will lead you into passionate meetings. Uncertainties regarding your love life will surface if you have neglected your mate. Your lucky day this week will be Sunday. GEMINI (May 22-June 21) You must make them stand on their own two feet regardless of how much you want to make things better for them. Go out with friends. Eliminate situations that are no longer to your advantage. Travel will initiate new friendships or love connections. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Strength will come from your ability to overtake just about anyone. Put your thoughts into some trendy new ideas. You need a change and you need to earn more cash. Time is money and you must be ready to take action in order to reach your highest potential. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. LEO (July 23-Aug 22) You are best not to confront situations that deal with inlaws or relatives. Correspondence may not clear up issues. You will have to face each issue separately and in person. Mino r health problems may lower your vitality. Your lucky day this week will be Saturday. VIRGO (Aug. 23 -Sept. 23) Entertain in your home and make aesthetic enhancements that will please those who reside with you. Trips will be exciting. You will be a bit of a spendthrift this week. However, you should be concerned about what they want in return. Your lucky day this week will be Sunday. LIBRA (Sept. 24 -Oct. 23) You can pick up valuable information if you listen to those with more experience. Your ideas may be a little ahead of their time; don't push them, instead just continue working on development. You can't make things better if you don't know what to fix. Don't ignore any emotional issues that could be causing problems. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. SCORPIO (Oct. 24 Nov. 22) Your ability to charm others will put you in the limelight at social functions. You may want to get involved in some kind of creative group. You will find yourself tied to the phone. Spend time with friends or family. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23 -Dec. 21) Your efforts will be rewarded handsomely. Unexpected bills will leave you a little short. You may attract attention if you get out socially. Entertainment could be pleasing if it is of an energetic nature. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. CAPRICORN (Dec 22Jan. 20) Rely on yourself and you will look good to superiors. Family trips or projects should be on your mind. Relatives will not agree with the way you are dealing with your personal problems. Un expected bills may set you back. Your lucky day this week will be Friday. AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 -Feb. 19) Catch up on correspondence. Don't forget that your budget is limited right now. Don't be critical or overly opinionated with dislikes; it could cause disapproval and unwanted opposition. Daydreaming will be your downfall. Your lucky day this week will be Thursday. PISCES (Feb. 20-Mar. 20) You will need to take a look at the renovations that are necessary and try to find the cheapest way to get things done. Problems with ear, nose, or the throat are likely. You will find that money could slip through your fingers. Opportunities to make advancements through good business sense are evident. Your lucky day this week will be Saturday. “...starting Friday, the 24th and lasting for three nights Mercury, Venus and Saturn will be only two degrees apart from each other.” An Absolutely Spectacular Super Close Meeting of Three Planets Occurs This Week and Next



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June 24 to July 1, 2005 Volume 12, Issue 24 SINCE 1994 Kaya Gob. Debrot 200 • E-mail: re porter@bonairenews.com • 717-8988 PART 7

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Page 2 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 P rojections show an increase of cruise tourism of more or less 75%, says Ronella Croes, head of the Tourist Corporation Bonaire (TCB). The TCB considers that a very positive development. For the 2006-2007 cruise ship season many additional ships will call at Bonaire, including the Princess Line's love boats, Sea Princess and Crown Princess . Other ships making first calls at Bonaire will be the Arcadia, Rijndam and Prinsendamships , the Crystal Line's ships Crystal Symphony and Crystal Serenity . These growth figures are cited as one of the reasons a facelift of Bonaire’s waterfront and a new facility for receiving Ro/ Ro (from roll-on/roll-off ships like the Don Andres and Dona Luisa ) container cargo is necessary. The new container pier, if it is built, may be either at WEB or south of BOPEC near Karpata . The island government has commissioned a feasibility study in the matter. Proponents of the plan say a more attractive waterfront area, devoid of containers, would enhance tourism, i.e.: attract even more cruise ships. Opponents say that the money for a new cargo pier would be better spent on road repair or other island projects and that the benefits of cruise tourism are questionable. Travel agents in America, Canada and Europe told CDNN (Caribbean Diver’s News Network) that thousands of tourists and scuba diving travelers are canceling planned holidays to Aruba. CNN (Flamingo TV Channel 10) even broadcast a report about a Bonaire dive accident to infer that disappearances are common in the ABC islands. While Bonaire’s Public Prosecutor Ernst Wesselius issued a statement that no crime was involved in that case, the TCB has yet to counter the damaging media frenzy that consumed the American CNN and Fox News networks last week. The cancellations follow reports that police and government officials in Aruba have deliberately concealed evidence related to the disappearance of 18-year-old Natalee Holloway to protect the island's tourism industry. Due to a typographical error in The Bonaire Reporter edition of June 1724, Continental’s weekly flights which begin on Saturday, December 17, were printed as daily . We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused. Beginning June 16th, Flamingo Airport will sell departure tax cards at a new booth located centrally in the ticketing and check-in area. An Internet facility for passenger use will soon be added on the other side of the booth. The Papiamentu daily newspaper, Extra , reported that the departure tax to Curaçao will soon be raised from NAƒ10 to NAƒ12,50. Aruba-bound travelers do NOT have to pay the $20 international tariff, but just NAƒ10. However, Bonaire-bound passengers from Aruba pay NAƒ36,90 in Aruba. In May, Flamingo Airport (officially Bonaire International Airport-BIA) passed a strict evaluation by the US’s Transportation Security Administration (TSA) with flying colors. BIA is currently seeking to expand its security staff having taken over the job from the SSV. VSBO level graduates and higher are invited to apply. Air Jamaica , which has slashed service to Bonaire to one flight a week, has also announced they will be cutting back on food service on their Florida and Caribbean routes, serving a snack and beverage instead of a full meal, to save on food service costs. However, hard liquor, beer and wine will be sold on all flights, except to first class passengers, the airline said. Air Jamaica is trying to save $2 million annually but says it needs to cut costs, eventually by $50 million, to survive. Executive chairman Dr. Vincent Lawrence says the decision was difficult but necessary. TCB-NY reported that for the 12th consecutive year Bonaire has been voted by the readers of Scuba Diving magazine as the best shore diving destination in the world. According to the July 2005 issue of the magazine which reported the results of Scuba Diving's Top 100 Readers' Choice Awards, "Bonaire has topped the shore-diving category in our annual 'Top 100 Readers' Choice Awards' an unbroken string of No. 1 titles that started in 1994." This year Bonaire received a score of 96.9, topping the runner-up in this category by more than four points. As part of the writeup on Bonaire the magazine included beautiful photography and cited "abundant grunts" and "dense corals" as just two examples of the marine life that divers will find at any of the island's dive sites. One of Bonaire’s most frequented shore diving sites, the Windjammer , has been closed for several months. A small Bonaire dive resort reports that two dive groups of six persons each have cancelled their planned trips to Bonaire because they will not be able to dive the Windjammer . Access to the sea is being prevented by guards at the BOPEC oil terminal, which is owned by the Venezuelan national oil company PEDVESA. Bonaire is unique in the world of diving destinations because it offers convenient access from shore to the majority of its dive sites. Most shore divers book into the smaller resorts, rent vehicles and spend weeks diving economically using the dive resorts’ universally offered “unlimited dive packages.” Their car gives them access to the islands restaurants, shopping and above-water attractions as well. An avid Windjammer diver sought a legal opinion in Holland to determine if the BOPEC oil depot has the right to ban divers from the Windjammer site located offshore their property. This is a summary of the Dutch reply with an English translation: De zee tot aan de stranden is eigendom van het Land, niet van Bonaire en dus naar alle waarschijnlijkheid ook niet van BOPEC; The sea, including the beaches, is property of the Dutch Antilles (Central) government, NOT of the island Bonaire and also NOT of BOPEC. Als er een verbod tot duiken zou zijn, of om de zee in te gaan, zou dat een regeling moeten zijn die door Bonaire als eilandgebied in het leven is geroepen en niet door (Continued on page 4) IN THIS ISSUE Grouper Corner 3 Letters (Graffiti, Selibon, Web Increase) 5 Finding a Balance for Bonaire Conclusion, Complaining Stops Here 6 Bonaire Reporter Survey 7 56 Different Nations 8 Looking for Trouble (Lighthouses) 9 Tonky Triumphs in Greece 9 Gardner (Neem Tree) 12 Announcement (Angie Dabousi) 12 Invitation—Cultural Growth Art 12 What’s Happening—Exploring Lac 22 Realtor’s Corner (Get Rid of Clutter) 22 WEEKLY FEATURES: Flotsam & Jetsam 2 Vessel List & Tide Table 9 AMFO/NGO Platform -It Starts with an Idea, Part II 10 Picture Yourself (San Diego, US) 13 Where to Find The Reporter 13 Classifieds 14 Pet of the Week (volunteer Deborah) 18 Reporter Masthead 16 What’s Happening 19 Dodo (Triple X, State of Union) 19 Shopping & Dining Guides 20 On the Island Since (Rietveld & Heerenbrink) 21 Bonaire Sky Park (3 planets) 23 The Stars Have It 23 Sea Princess

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Page 3 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 B lue water diving is thrilling and adventurous. It is not for the inexperienced or faint hearted diver. Attempting this activity requires training, detailed knowledge of the surrounding underwater terrain and familiarity with the ever changing sea conditions. You must also have a definite target to reach after your descent from the surface. Disorientation, caused by the lack of any visual contact with the adjoining reef, can initiate anxiety and bring on panic for those individuals not properly prepared for this phenomenon. Bonaire, known as “The Home of Diving Freedom,” has a reef system that can easily be reached from any point on its shore. The leeward side of this boomerang shaped island has more than 60 marked and described dive sites accessible on a year-round basis. In addition, Klein Bonaire, the small, circular, uninhabited island one mile off the coast, has at least 25 shoreline dive sites around its protected coastline. Furthermore, the entire coast of Bonaire and Klein Bonaire, down to 200 feet (60 meters), is protected as an underwater marine park. Why would you challenge yourself with a “blue water dive” when you can park your car or tie your small boat to a permanent mooring, anywhere you choose and simply enter the sea? The answer is easy; there are great rewards for the effort. One such place is Grouper Corner. The natural world has many mysteries. As a naturalist, I have many questions. Finding the answers can be a lifelong pursuit. Sometimes one simple observation reveals a seemingly obvious solution that has previously eluded me. These revelations defy logic and when analyzed lead to other questions. Today, observing the social interactions of the usually solitary species of sea bass we know as Groupers has kindled my desire to find more clues to their behavior patterns. My diving partner has led me to a meeting ground of hundreds of groupers that we normally see as solitary and wary specimens on the reef slope, hiding in caves or sheltering in wrecks. Here each fish is oblivious to our presence and tolerates our close approach. Why are they here? Is this their safe haven? Have they always congregated here? Is this a seasonal behavior? What are they doing? We are entering a secret world out of sight of the surrounding reef structure. We descend through the “blue water” to an underwater garden that is seldom, if ever, visited by human invaders. Perhaps our presence on this rare occasion is as much a surprise to the fish as their behavior is to us. I feel as if I have entered an exclusive social society or “after hours club” where individuals, as strangers, gather to meet each other, interact for a few hours, and then go back to their respective homes and mates. Groupers are well built with strong, heavy bodies. They all have large mouths and big fleshy lips with jutting lower jaws. Sharp teeth line the inside of their mouth (Continued on page 15) A now rare Nassau Grouper Tiger grouper in transition from spots to stripes

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Page 4 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 (Continued from page 2) BOPEC; Whenever there is a restriction to dive or enter the sea, then the government of the Island of Bonaire should have made that rule. NOT BOPEC. Er is een bijna theoretische kans dat het Land grond aan BOPEC in erfpacht heeft uitgegeven en dat BOPEC in de hoedanigheid van erfpachter eisen stelt aan te water gaan. Geadviseerd wordt dan ook contact over deze kwestie op te nemen met het havenkantoor in Kralendijk te Bonaire (havenmeesters Sint Jago en Statie) om hierover zekerheid te verkrijgen. In the event that BOPEC owns/rents the ground it therefore can make demands about how to or enter the sea (over its land). It is advised to go to the Harbor office (Harbormasters Statie and St. Jago) in Kralendijk to be certain. According to a report in the Curaçao Papiamentu daily, La Prensa , former Minister Klaas de Vries, and other Dutch Parliamentarians, said they are against creating Kingdom Islands during a Parliamentary contact plan meeting in The Hague. This is in direct conflict with the outcome of the Referenda held in Bonaire and Saba. Bonaire's Ramonsito Booi and Ray Hassell of Saba voiced their objections. The Dutch MPs said they had a problem with the different government forms voted by the various Antillean islands: Curaçao and St. Maarten chose for autonomy within the Kingdom, much like Aruba, while St. Eustatius wants to stay in the Netherlands Antilles. Judge Bob Wit, who has served in the Antillean court system for many years, is most critical of the pending Antillean Exclusion law . He thinks it is illegal and will not stand a court test. “Dutch xenophobia is the cause of the discriminatory rules,” he says. Ironically, it is an exclusion that is easily circumvented. He adds, “If the regulation is nevertheless introduced, then it is clear that Antillean Dutch will enter Europe (and on to Holland) by means of the back door. European countries must allow them in (as Dutch/EU passport holders). However, a Curaçaoan can go to Spain (for example) which must let him enter. (He can then leisurely proceed to The Netherlands as there are no border controls among EU countries.) It is an impossible regulation for a problem (drug smuggling) which is already on the mend.” According to Wit, it is easier for a country of 16 million to handle 5,000 Antillean problem youngsters than for an island of 130,000 people. “They say that the measure is to help these poor youngsters. But I can’t see how they can say that they are helping these youngsters by threatening to send them back when there is no future for them here in the Antilles.” People who are opposed to the Antillean Exclusion Regulations can protest at the website: http://www.sabanaamsterdam.nl/ protesteertegenverdonksbeleid.html Welcome to new advertisers Bill Clinton Computers , an authorized Dell reseller and DHL , now operating as a part of Bonaire Air Services. This Saturday, Bonaire’s Culinary Team will leave for the “Taste of the Caribbean” culinary Olympics , being held in Miami. Our team of four chefs and a bartender will compete with the finest chefs in the Caribbean during the five-day event. The Bonaire Reporter’s editor in chief will accompany the team for on-the-site reporting. The model in this week’s Benetton ad page 12 is Mikeely Obersi. G./L.D The Fundashon for Art and Culture will hold its 13th Annual Art Day on Sunday, July 3 . Plan to spend time at Wilhelmina Park to enjoy the art exhibits, music, performing arts, food and drinks. JanArt will sponsor the children’s art contest as in the past. All children are invited to go by the JanArt tent and draw a picture for the art contest to be held that day. Supplies are provided at no cost. Prizes will go to children in different age categories. Anyone interested in exhibiting at the event can contact volunteers at 717-6420 cell 786-6420, or email artandculture65@hotmail.com. Participants in last year’s Art Day. Janice Huckaby of Jan Art in the background. Jan Art photo Amigoe photo Judge Bob Wit

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Page 5 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 OPINIONS and LETTERS:THE Op-Ed PAGE ARTISTIC EXPRESSION? Dear Editor: Graffiti comes in many forms: Spray painting a wall or flat surface, carving into a tree or even a table. Almost everyone dislikes it, and in many countries there are laws against it. It is ugly. When one takes a drive al ong Bonaire's east coast, graffiti has shown up even there. Not spray painting, but ugly sculptures of litter and garbage that someone has left as a monument to their ego. These same people would probably be appalled if someone did the same thing in front of their house. Bonaire is everyone's house and should be viewed as such. Most likely the people doing this are non Bonairean and show a disrespect for the nature of Bonaire. What is so ironic is that they spend a lot of time collecting this garbage to pile up when they could be putting in a truck or bags to help in some way to clean up Bonaire instead of making eyesores along one of Bonaire's natural coasts. When these piles of garage are torn do wn, the landscape instantly looks natural again as opposed to graffiti all along the shore line. If you really need to make "sculptures” from garbage do it in your own front yard, not Bonaire's. Spend the time cleaning up, not making an ugly mess. B.B. SELIBON SERVICE Dear Editor: A few weeks ago one of the plastic rims of the wheel of my garbage container cr acked and the solid rubber tire came off. I managed to get it onto the street (It was pick-up day). In my mind I was already searching for a solution to this small but nasty problem. I wondered if I could buy the wheels somewhere or if I had to call SELIBON and see what they could do. My daily work made me forget about it. At the end of the day I went to get my empty container. What a pleasant surprise! There were two brand new wheels under my container! This must have been done by the truck attendants because I did not yet phone or contact anybody about this. I mean: if you want to talk about service, this is GREAT SERVICE! I thank SELIBON for helping me out so quickly and thank you guys a lot. I’d like to say, “KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK!” Rogier van den Brink WEB INCREASE Dear Editor: Are you finding yourself with less money at the end of the month? Well, take a good look at your electric bill and you'll discover that the percentage of SURCHARGE on your usage is WAY BEYOND what was originally predicted, and appears to be going up MORE every month. For example: (from my personal bills) Billing Date Usage Surcharge Percent March 2005 NAƒ55,72 NAƒ13,56 24.33 % April 2005 69,76 33,31 47.74 % May 2005 71,42 48,49 67.89 % Where will it end? Is it really true that these increases are NOT being passed on to residents in Curaçao? If so, why is only little Dushi Bonaire being made to cover the costs of Curoil? Is our government or WEB doing anything to find a cheaper alternative for fuel? Can we import from Venezuela? What can WE do as individuals to lighten or alleviate this burden? Obviously, conservation is not enough as the surcharge will eat up any potential savings on usage. Will we ever be free from Curaçao's heavy hand? A 'Sweaty' Local Reader comments limited to 500 words will be considered for inclusion in the “Letters” department. All letters must be signed. However, we will withhold names on request.

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Page 6 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 Key Observations One of the most obvious points from the investigation is that many people and many groups are running in many directions toward development without the benefit of a coherent, coordinated vision or plan. Efforts today seem to be on an ‘ad hoc’ basis. At one time the island seemed to be following the 1997-2007 sustainable development plan that was created by Tourism Corporation Bonaire, but that plan, and others like the Pourier Report which were written for sustainable development, seem to have been abandoned. 1. Need for Vision The only ‘vision’ that can be detected today emerges from recent speeches by government leaders who want to increase tourism ‘drastically’ and bring in large mega-hotels. It is interesting to note that this desire for 500+ bed hotels flies in the face of current tourism trends around the world. Today, many hotels and most destinations like Cozumel are trying to move away from mega-hotels and reduce the ‘density’ of tourists in a single location . Why? Because today’s ‘upscale,’ ideal tourist wants a more intimate experience and they want a socially and environmentally responsible experience. Many destinations have also learned that smaller, intimate, responsible resorts do less damage to the environment and infrastructure. Just what Bonaire currently has to offer. A sustainable vision is also based on the culture and the desires of the entire community . Just how far can tourism grow before the influx of immigrants needed to fill the jobs dilutes the local culture to unacceptable levels? Studies must be done to track the needs and desires of the community and changes in these attitudes must be monitored over time. But a “vision statement,” like the 1997 TCB document that was a subject of an earlier article, means nothing without a Plan that has support from all sectors on the island -Public and Private, Commercial and Non-profit. And a Plan must have the force of law behind it to make it function. 2. Need for a Plan To make recently proposed ‘drastic changes’ to the island’s tourism without a clear and approved plan is dangerous. ‘Ad hoc’ changes like doubling the number of hotel beds without increasing advertising to create demand and without major improvements in infrastructure will only destroy the fragile market that exists today. 3. Misunderstood Numbers The current leaders of Bonaire’s tourism and development seem to be ignoring the fact that Bonaire’s existing hotels are not operating at acceptable occupancy or room revenue rates to be truly profitable . Some are barely hanging on, and few have the resources to train their staffs or upgrade their facilities. These numbers mean that more beds are possibly the worst solution to the problem. Also being ignored is the fact that in 2004 many of Bonaire’s flights from the US arrived half full so that American Eagle reduced its service and when it was time for Air Jamaica to cut destinations just to stay in business, Bonaire was one of the first go. 4. Missing Numbers Another key observation is that there seems to be a serious lack of consumer information , including why and how tourists are making their destination decision and what their satisfaction level is with the Bonaire product. Some data are collected on entry cards, but it is processed so slowly that it is of little value. And one hotel operator, Bellafonte Property Management, has taken a leadership role to start the process and learn more about Bonaire’s customers. Other sources are the Caribbean and World Tourism Associations which have huge databanks of tourist information available at reasonable prices. These sources would give some insight into our relative position in the market and the strengths and weaknesses of our competition. 5. No Responsibility By ignoring the numbers, failing to thoroughly understand market dynamics and blaming the problems on the lack of airlift and too few hotel rooms, Bonaire’s leaders have failed to take responsibility for the situation. 6. Lost Direction In the process of moving toward mega hotels it appears that the government wants to move toward ‘mass tourism.’ In a recent speech the island was promised ‘drastic changes in the level of Bonaire’s tourism.’ This direction is opposite the one stated in the 2003 Bonaire Investment Guide published by DEZA (Economics Dept.). There it states: “Development is predicated upon the philosophy that Bonaire’s economic growth must be controlled, sustainable and quality balanced, with significant benefits for the Bonairean population, and respecting Bonaire’s nature, culture and identity.” A move toward mega-hotels and mass tourism is a move into a totally new direction for which the island is ill prepared . U p until now this series has highlighted a number of problems in the Bonaire tourism and development program and has tried to throw light on several areas. In this last installment of the Finding Balance for Bonaire series, we will briefly summarize the issues uncovered in our investigations and will then move away from the complaining stage toward some concrete suggestions. After a review of the key observations, we would like to propose a structural approach to sustainable development for Bonaire so its inhabitants can prosper long-term. Long-term is defined as ‘our children, their children and all the children who follow them.’ Proposal for Finding Balance The situation has reached a critical point: air service has been lost, hotels are operating below reasonable expectations, planning has become ad hoc to fill gaps but does not come from a strong, agreed upon basis. Action is needed and needed quickly. The following suggestion would provide a mechanism to mobilize and motivate all the stakeholders and should result in a FiveYear Development Plan that will allow the island to move forward in a manner that is controllable and sustainable. In a previous article we suggested a Public-Private Partnership to address the island’s needs. This group should be created by the Island Government but would be non-political in nature. This may not be easy on Bonaire where almost everything has a political component, but statesmanship is called for here and must be shown by all parties. The need is so great and the potential effects so profound that all segments of the community must feel that their voice has been heard. Members of the Partnership would serve voluntarily or as a part of their regular jobs. The process itself should take no more than six months so that the Development Plan can be published and adopted by all stakeholders. The Island Government will need to resolve that the Plan is the official government policy and include enforcement provisions so that the members know that the ultimate program will be executed. The World Tourism Organization actually recommends PPPs and this group even publishes an evaluation of 208 successful PPPs from 205 countries. What kind of Plan? Elements of a solid, long-term island plan would include scaled improvements over time in infrastructure, transport, environmental protection and monitoring, marketing and promotion and sustained community integration. Also included in the plan must be a determination of how much the island must invest to reach its goals—at each step--and where the island will find the necessary funding. What’s in a Vision? A solid vision is one that defines the short and long-term limits of what is sustainable for this particular island, including the maximum level of tourists, maximum number of divers, maximum number of cruise ships. It is not just words and hopes for the future but is based on studies of the environment and infrastructure and the pressures that tourism puts on them. It is called ‘carrying capacity’ and it defines the LIMITS to the islands’ ability to withstand use or activities. As protection improves or worsens, the limits must be revised. Public-Private Partnership The proposed PPP is outlined below. Certainly other members of the community will have ideas to improve this structure, but it is a starting place. At the head of the PPP would be a Director, appointed by the Board of TCB. This Director would have the responsibility to coordinate all the activities of the PPP and to create a unified Five-year Development Plan as a result of its activities. The Director would be provided with an Advisory Board of three or four people with expertise in Economics, Marketing, Tourism and Planning. Eight workgroups would be created to address the specific areas of their expertise quickly and efficiently. With the exception of group number four (infrastructure) each group would consist of a maximum of five members so that meeting schedules and discussions can be streamlined. Each of the eight workgroups would be charged with providing the Director and the other groups with goals and plans for the next five years. 1. Transport The goals of this group would be to monitor capacity and load factors and recommend any changes that would be needed. The group would also be expected to maintain contact and build relationships with airlines (passenger and freight) and cruise lines. Possible members would be from BIA, Airline and Cruise Agents, Shipping Companies. 2. Environment Clearly, the island must protect the very reason that tourists come to Bonaire in the first place: our unique environment below and above the sea. This group would advise on the impact of various levels of development, review the impact of all potential projects and would be challenged to recommend positive methods to allow for sane, non-destructive growth. Possible members: STINAPA, Aliansa di Naturalesa, DROB, Fishermen, other NGOs with an interest in the environment, resident experts. 3. Economy The tourism sector represents approximately 70% of the island’s economy. Therefore it is essential that all plans be looked at with a professional eye toward the immediate and long-term impact on the island’s economy and the financing of the plan. Suggested members: DEZA, Bonaire Bankers Association, AKIB, resident economists. 4. Infrastructure Growth in tourism will bring with it new and constantly changing (Continued on page 7)

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Page 7 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 (Finding A Balance. Continued from page 6) pressures on the island infrastructure (roads, schools, electricity and water, health, etc.) These pressures must be identified and quantified so that the island can keep pace with its growth. Infrastructure is expensive but cannot be overlooked. Once the island has a definite plan with a sound basis for expectations of success, funding for infrastructure may be much easier to obtain. Suggestions for this large group would be: DROB, WEB, SELIBON, TELBO, the schools, Public Health, the hospital and healthcare professionals, Police and Social Services. Given the wide range of these concerns it would probably be necessary to split this group into Physical Infrastructure and Social Infrastructure sub groups 5. Community Involvement This group would contact island stakeholders not directly represented in other groups to first determine the desired direction of the population. Later the group would work to see what opportunities exist to gain wider community participation in the tourist product. For instance Regatta and the windsurf events could be included in all promotional media, community participation in websites and other promotions (e.g. restaurant and retail outlets) could help share costs and provide more reasons to visit the island. Marshé di Rincon, Jong Bonaire visiting teen program and various other NGO-based activities could be used as attractions providing a constantly updated menu of events and opportunities on the island. Representatives could be from BRA, AKIB, CURO, KvK, FESBO etc) 6. Customer Promotion . This group would identify information sources and obtain necessary data, analyze the data and prepare a description of customer groups and their needs (e.g. current Bonaire tourists versus new potential tourists, divers, snorkelers, windsurfers, families etc). Othe r responsibilities include identifying possible promotional activities and agencies to strengthen the current public relations efforts, developing a Five-year Promotional Plan and, eventually, guiding the development of that plan. Potential members: TCB, travel agents, hotels and professional marketers and Internet experts living on the island. 7. Packaging and Co-op efforts . This group would work with airline Marketing Departments, Cruise Ship companies, Tour Packagers, equipment manufacturers, credit card companies and other partners to be sure that Bonaire takes advantage of all opportunities for others to share in the cost and returns from our efforts. Potential members: travel agent, hotels, CURO, airlines, marketing professionals. By starting with experts in the field and keeping the groups small and efficient, a plan could be developed within a very short period of time. Regular communication between the workgroups would be necessary so that all can evaluate the impact of other groups on their areas of competence and, in the end, arrive at an acceptable long-term solution. The issue is important enough and urgent enough to encourage cooperation and quick action. The Bonaire Reporter Survey. What do YOU think about Bonaire? A s a reader of The Bonaire Reporter you must care about the island. Maybe you could help us with some of the consumer ‘needs’ research mentioned in this series. It doesn’t matter if you are a tourist or a resident. Please fill out this questionnaire and mail it to Bonaire Reporter, Kaya Gob. Debrot 200-6, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN) or go on-line to http//www. bonairenews.com/survey.htm and e-mail your form to survey@bonairereporter. com 1. Your nationality: Antillean US Netherlands Other: ____________________________ 2. Your age: Under 25 26-40 41-60 Over 60 3. Your sex: M F 4. Marital status Single Married Widowed/Divorced In relationship 5. Years Scuba Diving 1 year or less 2-5 years 5-10 years More than 10 years 6. Years windsurfing 1 year or less 2-5 years 5-10 years More than 10 years 7. Are you a Tourist Part time resident Full time resident Native Bonairean 8. How much time do you spend on Bonaire in an average year? 1-2 weeks 3 to 4 weeks 1 to 2 months 2 to 6 months 6 to 12 months 9. Number of people in your household or group when you are on Bonaire: __________ 10. What year did you first come to Bonaire: ____________ 11.Why did you first come to Bonaire? born here parents moved here found a job here scuba diving tourist windsurfing tourist Other ___________________________________________________________ 12.What do you like MOST about Bonaire? 13.What do you like LEAST about Bonaire? 14.How satisfied are you with the following? Rate your degree of satisfactions from 1 to 4, where 4 is extremely satisfied and 1 is not at all satisfied. Circle the appropriate number for each item. Satisfaction Low High a. friendliness of the people 1 2 3 4 b. number of hotels 1 2 3 4 c. quality of hotels 1 2 3 4 d. number of restaurants 1 2 3 4 e. quality of restaurants 1 2 3 4 f. number of cultural activities 1 2 3 4 g. quality of cultural activities 1 2 3 4 h. activities for children 1 2 3 4 i. condition of the reefs 1 2 3 4 j. quality of the diving 1 2 3 4 k. quality of the environment 1 2 3 4 l. cleanliness of the island 1 2 3 4 m. quality of the roads 1 2 3 4 n. Internet service 1 2 3 4 o. telephone service 1 2 3 4 p. water and electric service 1 2 3 4 q. number of tourists 1 2 3 4 r. service attitude at businesses 1 2 3 4 s. personal safety 1 2 3 4 t. number of activities available 1 2 3 4 u. quality of activities available 1 2 3 4 v. number of diving locations 1 2 3 4 w. airline service to the island 1 2 3 4 x. quality of your Bonaire experience 1 2 3 4 y. Other_______________________ 1 2 3 4 z. Other_______________________ 1 2 3 4 15.What ‘needs’ do you have that are not currently being met by Bonaire? Or, said another way, what could Bonaire do to get you to spend more time on the island or for you to enjoy your time on Bonaire more? 16. What could Bonaire do to improve its tourism product so more people would want to come to Bonaire? Marian Walthie photo Summary In this series we have tried to analyze Bonaire’s development and its tourism product from a number of different angles in order to try to gain perspective on the current situation and find a balance for future growth. It is our hope that a balance between progress and protection can be found so that development does not harm the island or the island’s population . In addition to preventing harm, balance is needed to improve the economic position of current residents and businesses. No one wants to stifle growth that will reduce airlift to the island, but we also don’t want to see unplanned, uncontrolled growth that will destroy the existing businesses, create the need for too many foreign workers as happened in Aruba; or that will stress the islands’ infrastructure or ruin the environmental resources that bring the tourists in the first place. We are optimistic about the chances for success if the entire community works together to establish the goals and then set the direction with a clear, long-term Development Plan and planning process. Next we will present some comments from our readers about this series of articles To help get the process started, please take the time to answer the questions in the Bonaire Reporter Survey. We want to hear from both tourists and residents on these important issues. Thanks for your help. The authors of this article are market research professionals living in Bonaire. Marian Walthie photo Another Bonaire Dawn

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Page 8 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 T he census department of Bonaire (Bevolking) has released current figures for the number of foreigners living on the island and their respective countries (including Holland). As of June 2005, there were 56 different countries (including Holland) represented. Of the 14,163 total population listed, there are 2,718 foreigners living on Bonaire. Of the remainder, 11,445 are considered Nederlandse, or those holding Dutch passports. In 2003 Bevolking figures show: total population – 13,380 and foreign born 2,335 – an increase this year of 383 foreign residents. It’s important to keep in mind that fo reign-born persons now having Dutch nationality are lumped toge ther in the 11,445 figure. That includes European Dutch, Antillean Dutch and all those from other countries who have become naturalized Dutch citizens . Many of the foreign residents on the island have opted to have Dutch passports, and once someone from another country receives a Dutch passport they are listed as Nederlandse and no longer are registered in their country category, according to Bevolking This year there are 56 countries repres ented; in 2003 there were 47. The new countries now represented are: Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Pakistan, Paraguay, Poland, Russia, Sudan and Tunisia. The next 10 countries in ranking order Although their figures and rankings have fluctuated slightly, the top 10 countries this year are the same as those in 2003, except for Portugal which has gone from #9 to #11. But in the next 10 (#11 through #20), Switzerland, which was not in the top 20 in 2003 is now on the list as #17, and Belgium, which was #19, is now #21 and off that list. The populations of the rest of the nations represented are (except for Belgium) single digit numbers: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Barbados, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Czech, Denmark, Dominica, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Honduras, Iceland, Jamaica, Morocco, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Poland, Russia, Salvador, Slovenia, Spain, Sudan, Tunis, Uruguay, South Africa and Sweden. Many thanks to Bevolking for giving us these figures. L.D. CO V E R ST O R Y COUNTRIES JUNE 2005 *2003 DIFFERENCE 1. Holland 11,445 11,045 plus 400 2. Dominican Republic 557 441 plus 116 3. Colombia 477 411 plus 66 4. Venezuela 463 540 minus 77 5. US 224 191 plus 32 6. Peru 210 164 plus 46 7. Surinam 187 106 plus 81 8. China 119 89 plus 30 9. Haiti 53 36 plus 17 10. Germany 40 34 plus 6 COUNTRY JUNE 2005 2003* CHANGE 11. Portugal 39 59 minus 20 12. Lebanon 31 20 plus 11 13. Guyana 28 18 plus 10 14. UK 26 19 plus 7 15. Italy 22 20 plus 2 15. Canada 22 26 minus 4 16. India 21 20 plus 1 17. France 16 12 plus 4 17. Switzerland 15 17 minus 2 18. Ecuador 14 10 plus 4 19. Cuba 14 11 plus 3 20. Trinidad & Tobago 13 15 minus 2 The Top Ten *No figures available for 2004. *No figures available for 2004.

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Page 9 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 KRALENDIJK TIDES (Heights in feet, FT) Remember: Winds and weather can further influence the local tides DATE TIME HEIGHT COEF 6-24 2:24 2.1FT. 11:54 0.7FT. 101 6-25 3:20 2.0FT. 12:25 0.7FT. 96 6-26 4:13 1.8FT. 12:56 0.8FT. 88 6-27 5:21 1.6FT. 13:21 0.9FT. 21:23 1.4FT. 77 6-28 2:33 1.3FT. 6:23 1.5FT. 13:33 1.0FT. 20:37 1.5FT. 65 6-29 4:13 1.2FT. 7:49 1.3FT. 13:29 1.0FT. 20:51 1.7FT. 56 6-30 5:37 1.0FT. 9:29 1.1FT. 12:50 1.1FT. 21:20 1.8FT. 51 6-29 4:13 1.2FT. 7:49 1.3FT. 13:29 1.0FT. 20:51 1.7FT. 5 6-30 5:37 1.0FT. 9:29 1.1FT. 12:50 1.1FT. 21:20 1.8FT. 5 7-01 6:36 0.9FT. 21:51 2.0FT. 5 VESSELS MAKING A PORT CALL : Antee Angie Another World Angel B Augustine Bright Sea Bounty Carylar Camissa, Chan Is. Cape Kathryn Endangered Species Endorphin Felicity Flying Cloud, USA Freestyle Guaicamar I, Ven. Jan Gerardus L’Quila, BVI Luna C. USA Madam Maggi Mainly Moonrise Mystic Jade Natural Selection Pyewacket Rusty Bucket Santa Maria Sandpiper, USA Scintella Sea Witch Sirius Sola 2 Sylvia K Sylvester Ti Amo, USA T’zadde Triumphant Lady Ulu Ulu, USA Ulysses Unicorn, Norway Varedhuni, Ger. Windancer Ya-T, BVI Yanti Paratzi Zahi, Malta Zeelander YACHTING AND WATERSPORTS PAGES L ocal newspapers carried a story last week that said Bonaire’s lighthouses had been made obsolete by modern navigation equipment and that it was unimportant that our lighthouses be kept in repair. Several have been put out of service by the theft of their solar panels used to charge the batteries that power the light. One of the lights currently out of service is on Klein Bonaire. The use of radar by ships in fog was supposed to end collisions at sea, but the Andrea Doria-Stockholm disaster is just one of many where modern gear has proven to be no substitute for vision. It’s inconceivable to imagine the da mage to Bonaire should a tanker run aground on Bonaire or Klein Bonaire and spill its contents. The ULCC ships (Supertankers) that call at BOPEC dwarf most of the ships that have been responsible for major oil spills. Perhaps the most famous oil spill of the 20th century is the Torrey Canyon disaster off Britain in 1967. The Torrey Canyon had only 1/10 the capacity of many of the ships passing close to Bonaire. Consider what happened last week in broad daylight: The bulk cargo carrier ship Terry Uno sank eight miles south of Curaçao’s Willemstad Harbour after it collided with cargo ship Caribbean Star of Curaçao, but its 10 Philippine crew members were rescued. The Caribbean Star reported the collision with the other ship. Both ships are registered in Panama. Once on land the crew was received by the Seafarers Ce ntre and housed at the Trupial Inn. Fritzroy Doran of Maritime Affairs says a Coast Guard video tape shows that Caribbean Star failed to give right of way to Terry Uno , after having just offloaded a cargo of cement at Fuik Bay, and rammed the vessel. There was apparently nobody on the bridge of Caribbean Star at the time. The Terry Uno did not appear to maneuver to avoid the collision. The Terry Uno sank and the Caribbean Star, which suffered considerable damage, is now in the Curaçao dry dock for repairs. The oil and other waste from the wreck was sufficiently off shore that none has yet come ashore. Clothes and other personal items needed were purchased for Terry Uno’s shipwrecked crew with local businesses givi ng a special discount. A church service and barbecue was also organized for them at the US Forward Operation Location (FOL) base. G.D. W e follow our hometown windsurfing superstar, Tonky Frans, on his European professional windsurfing tour. Tonky, about winning the Rhodes event: “I had a great time in Rhodes. Luckily I was one of the windsurfers who was scheduled late for the first heat. I could thus sit and watch the abilities of the other sailors. With this information in my mind I decided which moves I definitely had to show to score high. And so I did! I got through the single elimination safely in second position. On the last day I had my final heat for the top position. I had to compete against Kevin Mevissen, a good friend of mine with whom I am travelling together this season, and also a very good windsurfer! In spite of the fact that it was a tough heat and that Kevin has a lot of windsurfing experience in Rhodes, I won this event and got first prize! I am very happy with this achievement because it is a good start which gives me more self confidence in the European tour! During the intermission, my board sponsor, F2, put on a demonstration of the F2 boards. I have seen the latest models for freestyle boards of 2006 and the design ideas for 2007! The distributors were especially happy to see me since I am one of the few F2 riders who does not live in Europe and who selects the events that he will participate at in Europe! In addition to this demonstration there was also a try-outboards-opportunity where I gave a show for the folks on the beach. The wind cooperated so I showed them the craziest of moves and I could hear them clapping their hands and jamming after each of my moves.” After his victory in Rhodes, Tonky continued his tour in Paros. “We took the ferry at midnight from Rhodes and arrived very early in the morning in Paros. It was not the greatest of all trips, but it was the logical choice (with all the windsurfing gear), and when you are in a group, you talk and laugh, and you have no time to think about the ferry beating against the waves and no time to sleep either. On my first day in Paros I slept the whole day. The event would start the next day. But there was not enough (Continued on page 17) Tonky smiles after his win in Paros, Willemstoren Lighthouse

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Page 10 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 Feed and Train Many people get the idea for a community project from where they work or volunteer. Robert Egger helped at a soup kitchen for the poor before he decided that just giving out donated food wasn’t the solution. “If you want to help a kid, get their parent a decent job,” says Robert. So he began DC Central Kitchen which offers food as well as food training to the ho meless and poor. The food meets their immediate needs, but then they learn cooking and food handling skills to help them get jobs in the restaurant and catering indu stry. When he first received some funding for the project in 1989, he bought a refrig erated truck and collected leftovers from the inaugural balls that had celebrated the beginning of George H.W. Bush's presidency! A spin-off training program came next. "I noticed that school cafeterias were closed for most of the day and that restaurants and catering business threw out as much as 30% of their food," Mr. Egger explains. Campus Kitchens Project was created to use kitchens in public schools, colleges, and universities to train students how to prepare donated food, which is then delivered to hungry people in each local area. Connect to the Land One prison counselor, Catharine Sneed, beli eved that the prisoners would benefit from working outdoors in a garden where they might learn to nurture instead of destroy. So she encouraged the jail to convert old farmland into The Garden Project. She says proudly, “Seventy-five percent of Garden Project participants do not return to jail. . . When people have a connection to land, they have hope in their lives." More gardens were made, and then the Tree Corps was created, which has planted more than 10,000 street trees—mostly in poor neighborhoods. Combat Domestic Violence "I think to myself, if I can just help one person leave a bad situation . . . ,"says an ex-battered wife who now volunteers at Skagit Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault Services in Washington State, the non-profit agency that helped save her. She had returned to her abusive husband seven times before she was able to leave him for good. This agency is one of many that help victims of rape and domestic violence by providing shelter, counseling and legal support. Another group sponsors The Voices and Faces Project to get out the message, “There is nothing that you could ever do to make it OK for someone to rape you.” R.A.I.N.N . is a national free hotline for rape and incest victims that helps bring rapists to justice. What happens to the children of violent, abusive or negligent families? That’s the concern of a California program, Forget Me Not Farm , where abused and neglected children can learn caring, compassion, and gentleness through their work with plants and animals. To nurture a seedling to full growth or to bottle feed and cuddle with a young, orphaned calf may be all it takes to break the cycle of abuse that is too often the legacy of these children. Free Schooling Helping women become better educated an d employed is a popular focus of volunteer groups. The New Opportunity School for Women in Kentucky provides free courses in writing, math, computer and job skills for women, especially lowincome, middle-aged women who want to get off welfare and get a job. In Pennsylvania, TOP/WIN (Tradeswomen of Purpose/Women In Non-Traditional Work) trains women to qualify for construction and skilled trade jobs so they can support (Continued on page 11) W ould you like to help your community? Do you see a problem that needs a solution? Do you have an idea for a sp ecific project? Does your project provide a social benefit to others? Are you motivated to organize and inspire others to join you? Then you can make a difference on Bonaire! It all starts with an idea. Here are some successful, innovative progra ms that started with an idea from a motivated person like you. It All Starts with an Idea -Part II Continued on page 11

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Page 11 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 (It starts with an Idea. Continued from page 10) their families and break free of poverty. They learn the skills needed to become plumbers, heavy machine operators, electricians, machinists, carpenters and construction workers. A TOP/WIN graduate says, "I'm a better mother now than in the past... I've doubled my income. My daughter looks at me and she's very proud — and I am too — of the person I've become.” Women Venture also teaches women how to get rewarding, higher paying jobs, ho w to find careers that interest them and how to start and grow their own businesses. Can you help? Non-profit organizations serve people in a variety of ways. For instance, the people being helped might be “ receivers, ” that is, they receive food, shelter, clothing, medicine, etc. to provide for their immediate needs. An example of this type is the relief sent to tsunami victims. In another kind of program, the people might be “ learners ” in specially designed training or education classes, perhaps on how to keep a family budget, how to be a better father, or how to control a gambling addiction. These organizations try to find out why a problem exists and then intervene with a development program. Finally, the people might be “ builders ” in self-help projects where they provide the labor, tools or materials to create a garden for their community. What are the planning steps necessary for a successful program and project? First, contact the target group that you would like to help. Build their trust and find out what they need. What are their real problems? Make sure your idea isn’t already being done by another group. Discuss your hopes with any other groups that may have joint interests or benefit from your project. Consider all these ideas and plan your project. Who will help you? Who has the needed expertise and skills? Brainstorm solutions with the community and target group. Who do you want to serve and why? Decide just what you hope to do and how you will do it. List your activities. How much will they cost? Do some research on prices and develop a budget. Be realistic about your program and budget—only promise what can realistical ly be delivered. Write guidelines for record keeping, as well as for monitoring and evaluating your project so your group is sure to be efficient and productive. How will responsibilities be distributed? How will you ensure financial accountability? Explore fund-raising options. Have a long-term strategy and plans for selfsufficiency. Make an appointment with the NGO Platform Bonaire (717-2366) to present your plan and ask for their assistance in getting available funding from AMFO, the Antillean Co-Financing Organization. The Platform can also help you prepare your proposal and become a registered foundation. Barbara Mason Bianculli CONTACT INFORMATION AMFO: Kaya Gob. N. Debrot #31, Bonaire. Tel. 717-7776, Fax 717-7779, website: www.samfo.org, email: infobon@samfo.org NGO Platforma Bonaire : Kaya Korona 5-C. Tel. 7172366, Fax 7172367, website: www.ngobonaire.org, email: Platform@ngobonaire.org Gandhi once said, "The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others." What kind of service can YOU provide? Anything is possible on Bonaire. Funds are available to start short or long-term projects that respond to local needs and provide social benefits to the community. Voluntary action has the power to change society through a community of caring citizens. As Martin Luther King, Jr. preached, "Everybody can be great because everybody can serve. You only need a heart full of grace, a soul generated by love." It all starts with an idea. And your good idea will lead to a better Bonaire.

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Page 12 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 Exhibition by the students of the SGB High School Cultural Growth at ARTEBON Opening on Friday, June 24 at 7 pm by The Minister of Education & Culture Maritsa D. Silberie Saturday, June 25 and Sunday, June 26 9am to 5pm ARTEBON Center Kaya Playa Lechi (waterfront promenade) Show by VSBO and HAVO students We hope you will come T his article will be about just one tree, but a very special one, the Neem tree. There is a lot to say about this tree, and there are only two ways of looking at it. Either you love it or you hate it. I belong to the first category. Why? Because it grows very fast, doesn't get any known diseases, doesn’t need a lot of water, grows well in the strong wind, and, the most important thing, it grows into a very nice big shade tree. But more and more people on Bonaire see it as a weed that spreads its seedlings everywhere, breaks your walls and makes a big mess by its falling leaves. This can also be true, but there are a lot of ways that you can avoid those problems. I’ll write about that next time, but first I want to tell you some more things about this very special tree. Its botanical name is Azadiradita indic. That tells us that it is originally from India. In that country the Neem is a sacred tree and has been known for thousands of years for its healing properties. Ghandi was known to hold prayers meetings under a giant Neem, and in his daily diet was a Neem chutney. In India they call the tree “The Village Pharmacy!” The British spread the tree around the world, and in a lot of countries nowadays there are big plantations with only Neem trees. They are used in reforestation projects for its hard wood, but most of all for its bark, leaves, flowers, seed pods and even the roots. A wide variety of healing products are made from them. Products from the Neem are used in medicines for heart problems, eczema, ps oriasis, herpes, hair loss and in pest controls against more than 200 different insects, especially for big crops. In India people still brush their teeth with the Neem leaves, and the Neem oil made from the seeds is used for hundreds of reasons. The fragrant flower is a base for a very nice perfume (not for sale at our shop!). Not bad for a tree that is seen as a weed! This brings us also to the discussion as to whether a Neem is good protection against mosquitoes and the mealy bugs on Bonaire. I personally have never seen proof of it, but I certainly believe it helps when you have a big Neem in your garden. I think the mosquitoes are driven away by this tree, but not killed or destroyed. I will try to follow the fast growing use of this beautiful tree, and hopefully it will give us a good solution against the hardy mealy bugs or Pies-Pies! For people who are interested, here are some nice Websites to learn more about this fascinating tree: www. maxpages.com/neemtree or www. neemtree.info. Next time I'll write more about the use of the Neem. Ap van Eldik Ap van Eldik owns Green Label Landscaping which designs, constructs and maintains residential and commercial gardens. Two nurseries and a garden shop in Kralendijk carry terra cotta pots from Mexico and South America. Phone 717-3410. NOW OPEN SATURDAYS, NONSTOP 9 TO 4. W elcome to new baby Angie who was born on Saturday, June 11, in Bonaire. Her parents are City Shop’s Hamoudy Dabousi and his wife Ruba. She joins her sisters, Nadia and Talin. Congratulations and best wishes to all! Readers are invited to send their photos of their anniversaries, engagements or weddings to The Reporter. INVITATION The Very Special Neem Tree

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Page 13 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 Airport: Car Rental Agencies, Airport Arrivals Area Banks: MCB (Playa & Hato), RBTT Restaurants: Bistro de Paris Brasserie Bonaire Capriccio Chez Lucille City Cafe Croccantino Den Laman Garden Café Hilltop at Caribbean Club Kentucky Fried Chicken Lost Penguin Lover’s Ice Cream Pasa Bon Pizza Subway Wil’s Tropical Grill Shops: Bonaire Gift Shop City Shop DeFreewieler INPO Paradise Photo Photo Tours, Playa Exito Bakery Bonaire Super Store Hotels: Buddy Dive Capt. Don’s Habitat Carib Inn Caribbean Club Bonaire Dive Inn Divi Flamingo Eden Park Hotel Harbour Village Plaza Sand Dollar Supermarkets: Cultimara Consales More for Less Progresso Sand Dollar Grocery Tropical Flamingo Warehouse Others: Bonfysio Botika Korona Bestuurscollege Caribbean Laundry Customs Fit 4 Life Hair Affair Harbour Village Marina Parliament Rocargo San Francisco Hospital TCB Telbo Yellow Submarine Bookstores: Bonaire Boekhandel, Flamingo Bookstore Realty Offices : Harbourtown Re/Max Sunbelt RINCON: Chinese Store, Joi Fruit Store, Lemari Grocery Rincon Bakery. H ere is a picture of Becky Starkweather taking a break at Mile Marker 14 to read The Bonaire Reporter at the San Diego Rock ‘n Roll Marathon on June 5. Becky and another Bonaire regular, Warren Wagner, ran and finished the marathon. B ecky designated Support Bonaire, Inc. as one of the four charities she was running for. Warren finished in 5 hours, and Becky finished in 6:02. In all, 17,100 out of 20,400 fi nished the race. Becky credits Warren and Delno Tromp for encouragin g her to run her first marathon at age 44. WIN GREAT PRIZES! Take a copy of The Bonaire Reporter with you on your next trip or when you return to your home. Then take a photo of yourself with the newspaper in hand. THE BEST PHOTOS OF THE YEAR WILL WIN THE PRIZES. Mail photos to Bonaire Reporter, Kaya Gob. Debrot 2006, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN). E-mail to: picture@bonairereporter. com. (All 2004 photos are eligible.)

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Page 14 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 JANART GALLERY Kaya Gloria 7, Bonaire Local Art, Art Supplies, Framing, and Art Classes. Open Tu-We-Th & Sat 10 am5 pm Friday 17 pm; or phone 7175246 for appt. BONAIRENET The leading consumer and business information source on Bonaire. Telephone (599) 717-7160 . For on-line yellow pages directory information go to http://www.yellowpagesbonaire.com CAPT. DON’S ISLAND GROWER Trees and plants, Bonaire grown . 8000m2 nursery. Specializing in garden/septic pumps and irrigation. Kaminda Lagoen 103, Island Growers NV (Capt. Don and Janet). Phone: 786-0956 or 787-0956 Bonaire Images Elegant greeting cards and beautiful boxed note cards are now available at Chat-N-Browse nest to Lovers Ice Cream and Sand Dollar. Photography by Shelly Craig www.bonaireimages.com MOVING INTO A NEW HOUSE? Make it more livable from the start. FENG SHUI CONSULTATIONS Interior or exterior design advice, clearings, blessings, energy, healing, Chinatrained. Experienced. Inexpensive. Call Donna at 785-9332 . LUNCH TO GO Starting from NAƒ5 per meal. Call CHINA NOBO 717-8981 For Sale Compaq w i d e screen Laptop Computer, 512MB,DVD/CDRW, Wireless LAN, 2.5yr WARRANTY, FREE CARRYING CASE US$1,500 tel:791-4606 after 5pm Property, Sales & Rentals For Rent: Comfortable 2-bedroom beach villa -weekly or monthly-choice location-privacy & security. Phone (Bon) (599) 717 3293; (US) (570) 586 0098. May 20 until Jan. 8th. info@pelicanreefbonaire.com or www. pelicanreefbonaire.com Wanted Wanted: Good 4-door car between 1995 and 2000 model year, less than NAƒ7.000. Call 786-0042 Wanted : The book, “The First Bonaireans,” by Jay Haviser. Tel. 7867531 or email R5659R@dds.nl Volunteers needed to index back issues of The Bonaire Reporter (English) and Extra (Papiamentu). Call George at 717-8988 or 786-6125. Put your ads here. Non-business ads are free. Got something to buy or sell? REACH MORE READERS than any other WEEKLY NEWSPAPER by advertising in THE BONAIRE REPORTER Non-Commercial Classified Ads (up to 4 lines/ 20 words): FREE FREE FREE FREE Commercial Ads only NAƒ0.70 per word, per week. Free adds run for 2 weeks. Call or fax 717-8988 or email ads@bonairereporter.com L ac Bay is full of hidden places. On Sunday, July 3rd the group, “ Amigunan di Naturalesa ” (“Friends of the Environment”), is arranging a boat trip that will let you discover them. The meeting point is Boka di Coco (across from the Mangrove/ Kayak Center on the dirt road to Cai). The highlight will be a stop at the place called Den Puitu . Plan for a minimum of one hour for the trip which will end at Cai. Transportation back to Boca di Coco via land will be provided. Participants can choose what time they want to go, beginning at 7 am through the afternoon. The boats can handle six persons and there will be two boats. The price is NAƒ25 for adults and NAƒ15 for children. This includes the boat trip, land transportation, juice, wa ter and a choice of two kinds of soups. Also the first groups, from 7 to 10 in the morning, will have coffee or tea with real Bonairean pancakes. The proceeds will go to benefit the Bonaire participants in Vierdaagse Nijmegen (Four Day Walk at Nijmegen, Holland). To sign up pass by the Extra newspaper office. (tel. 717-8482). Bòi Antoin Exploring Lac

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Page 15 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 ( Grouper Corner Continued from page 3) and palate and securely hold any prey that is captured. Like most fish carnivores they swallow their victim whole, after ambushing them, and inhale the prey with a swift powerful suction created by the rapid gaping cavity of their large hinged jaws and extended lips. Body shape varies, but most of the grouper family have long, well proportioned profiles for their size. The smaller specimens, like the Coney, grow to a maximum of 16-18 inches (45 cm), and the rare gigantic “Jewfish” can occasionally be seen in the Caribbean up to 8 feet (2.5 meters) in length and weigh over 600800 pounds (360 kilos). The Nassau grouper has a higher back which is even more pronounced in the Marbled grouper. All possess a long dorsal fin with sharp spines in the front portion that can be held erect when excited; the rear section is soft and flexible. Today we are not observing these eating machines feeding. Instead, they are socializing and displaying a dazzling mix of “outfits,” often changing colors and flashing different body markings in a matter of seconds. The atmosphere is very relaxed, and body grooming is a high priority. With well developed swim bladders groupers are capable of hovering at a specific location above a coral formation for long periods of time if left unmolested. You can observe the gentle giants in this stationary, trancelike position being attended by a group of small fish and shrimp at a “cleaning station.” Each of the cleaners concentrates on removing an assortment of external parasites, dead skin and mucus from their “clients,” including around their eyes and nostrils. Here, just off the shore of Klein Bonaire, there are innumerable “cleaning shops” open for business . This cleaning symbiosis emphasizes the role of cooperation in nature as opposed to the “eat or be eaten” daily struggle for existence. The client fish will even open its mouth, extend its jaws and flare its gills to allow the cleaners easy access to all internal areas where pests like creepy little bloodsuckers burrow into the soft flesh. This tactile stimulation and the pleasure of touch, a rare sensation in the wild kingdom of the sea, could be a primary incentive for clients to attend cleaning stations. In comparison, for humans, the soothing touch of the massage therapist provides therapeutic value as well as psychological and emotional comfort. For the grouper, the changing body patterns and color intensity may be a sign of mood shifts during the cleaning process. Having the parasites removed may also improve the health and ultimately the reproductive success for the fish. When satisfied, the client gives a gentle twitch to signal the attendants to stop and then departs from the cleaning station. The vacancy is immediately filled by another individual waiting for the next appointment. Here you will observe many other fish customers patiently circling the area awaiting their turn. Sex and sexual games are also a part of this gathering . This afternoon, we are lucky to see two of these previously described interactions on our short one-hour dive. The sexual orientation of members of the grouper species is a bit different from our human nature and may be difficult to comprehend, but let’s try. Most groupers start life as females. This sexual development strategy, known as protogynous hermaphrodites, allows individuals to reproduce first as females and later, at a larger size, change into males when certain unidentified social or environmental factors are met. Juvenile growth rates, feeding habits and habitat shifts are not fully documented, but after groupers reach a length of six inches (15 cm) they migrate to the more complex reef structures from the nursery locations, leaving behind an allfemale population in the shallows. This form of sex switching is considered by many experts to be a superior reproductive tactic, enabling populations to adapt easily to short-term environmental fluctuations. Most of the larger members of the species make a complete and nonreversible sex change, while the smaller members function actively in both the male and female roles. Groupers enjoy relatively long lives, and the larger specimens have been documented to live as long as 37 years. Mature groupers show a strong homing tendency and often return to a specific reef or favorite wreck site. Now we come to the juicy parts of our encounter. Extended courtship behaviors are repeated from late morning to the middle of the afternoon prior to spawning . On this visit, in our voyeur role, we witness two of the more common precoital foreplay described in several studies. When the males approach the females, their heads and gill flaps turn pale, in sharp contrast with the remainder of their darker bodies. Females, clearly swollen with eggs, huddle close to the protection of the bottom reef structures. “Vent nuzzling” occurs when a male moves slowly alongside a female from the rear and inspects or nudges her vent area at the posterior of her abdomen. The female responds by rolling her body and angling her vent region away from the suitor. The persistent male swims underneath and attempts the same strategy from the opposite side. At this point, the female generally eases away. In another courtship behavior, “turn and rise,” the male approaches the side of a female, who is hovering off the bottom or slowly rising. As he gets close, he positions himself parallel to the female and the couple slowly rotates together as much as half a turn before she swims off. The male then moves to another female and repeats the maneuver. These courtship behaviors continue and color patterns intensify as the afternoon progresses. Spawning usually takes place at or just before sunset and varies within members of the species . For example, female Nassau groupers form discreet groups serviced by a single male. Male Tiger and Yellowfin groupers, however, defend small territories where they are approached by females ready to spawn. Many of the larger groupers travel long distances during one or more months each year to mate in huge spawning aggregations at breeding grounds used for centuries by their ancestors. The migrations are usually synchronized by the onset of the full moon during the cooler months. These traditional rendezvous sites are generally located near coral promontories or along outer reef shelves at depths over 100 feet (30 m), like this location. We plan to revisit Grouper Corner, at the appropriate times, to complete our quest for more answers and witness other intimate moments in the lives of these exciting creatures. We welcome you to join us and read about them in future articles. Photos and Story by © Albert Bianculli 2005 Nice teeth and a characteristic underbite on this grouper Transition phase, red mouth Tiger grouper

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Page 16 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 ©2005 The Bonaire Reporter Published weekly . For information about subscriptions, stories or advertising in The Bonaire Reporter , phone (599) 717-8988, 7917252, fax 717-8988, E-mail to: Reporter@bonairenews.com The Bonaire Reporter , George DeSalvo, Publisher. Laura DeSalvo, Editor in Chief. Address: Kaya Gob. Debrot 200-6; Bonaire, Neth. Antilles. Available on-line at: www.bonairereporter.com Reporters: Bòi Antoin, Albert Bianculli, Barbara Mason Bianculli, S.C., Dodo, Jack Horkheimer, Anna Kleimer, Greta Kooistra, Michael Thiessen Ap van Eldik Features Editor: Greta Kooistra Translations: Peggy Bakker, Sue Ellen Felix Production: Barbara Lockwood Distribution: Yuchi Molina (Rincon), Elizabeth Silberie (Playa); Housekeeping: Jaidy Rojas Acevedo. Printed by: DeStad Drukkerij , Curaçao

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Page 17 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 ( Tonky in Greece Continued from page 9) wind for competition, and many sailors thought of this as an extra day to get over the tiredness of the ferry trip. Day 2 followed and there was no wind again. We spent the day on the beach, waiting for a change in weather conditions, but it was useless. After a windless Day 3, the organizers approached us to ask if we were willing to stay in Paros if the event would be extended to two more days on June 13 and 14. They told us that these two days would be very windy according to the weather forecast. We talked about it. And since it would not interfere with the next stop in Mykonos (June 17), we agreed to stay. Thank God we stayed because there really was WIND.” The European Professional Freestyle Tour report for the event said: “Finally this morning the riders got a warm welcome of 16 knots of wind. The first start was at noon with Tonky Frans (F2/Gaastra) against Fillipo Buratti (RRD/Simmer). In this heat already you could see that Tonky was hot to go for his second win on the Greek tour. On his way through the ladder neither Andreas Olanderson (JP/NP) nor the very sympatico Dutch guy Kevin Mevissen (JP/NP) could stop him. At the semi final the dancing style of Tonky combined with lots of the hottest freestyle moves like the Chachoo, Grubby-Diablo and Flaka put him in the finals to meet the current tour leader, Andre Paskowski (F2/North Sails). Coming to the final, Tonky started the heat like it was never seen before on the European Tour. Within the first two minutes he showed everything possible in these difficult conditions as the wind started to become very gusty. But in the second half of the heat, Tonky appeared nervous despite having the title almost in his hands. Andre showed a couple of winning moves, like a switch puneta. But Tonky saved the best for the end of the heat, and one more time his incredible loose and relaxed style in combination with the hottest technical freestyle moves in windsurfing freestyle brought him the second title on the European Freestyle Pro Tour.” Tonky happy with his win: “I am very happy with my second title. It feels great because I worked so hard for it. It is also a funny thing that my opponent in the final heat was Andre Paskowski. We were scheduled to compete against each other in Bonaire (King of the Caribbean 2005) where we unfortunately did not get the chance because of lack of wind. Now I finally got the chance to show him what I had in store for him a month ago in Bonaire!” Tonky continued his tour in Mykonos “On Wednesday June 15, we took the ferry from Paros to Mykonos, heading to the next event. From the moment I arrived I did not like the wind that much, but I knew I had to do my best because I would definitely go for the top position. As opposed to the Paros event where we arrived just one day prior to the competition, we got there in time at Mykonos to train a little bit before the event. This is a good thing to do because then one gets acquainted with the water and also the wind. I had a very good heat in the first elimination. People on the beach told me that they did not expect anything else of me since they have read stories about my prior achievements on the other Greek islands. At that moment I realized that the expectations people had of me were very high and that people had their eyes on me. I had to go against Kevin Mevissen again in the semi-finals where I won again. My next opponent during the final of the single elimination was my F2 team rider, Andre Paskowski (again!). I won the single elimination and tomorrow there will be the double elimination where the winner of Mykonos will be announced.” The European Professional Freestyle Tour report for the event read: “The crowd was screaming when Kevin Mevissen and Tonky Frans started their heat, coming to the shore and doing almost a synchronic performance of spock one handed, grubby and spock 540° on their first leg in. On their way out huge forwards one handed and planning flakas as well as flaka Diablo made the crowd on the beach almost go crazy. As Kevin took the victory in the first final, the guys had to go one more time against each other, and Kevin was hot. At the end the decision was close but it was Kevin who deserved to win (Continued on page 22) Continued on page 22

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Page 18 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 W hat would the Bonaire Animal Shelter be without its devoted volunteers? On a recent Saturday, due to vacations, sickness, schedules and other things, the only volunteer who could come to help was Deborah. Although only a youngster herself (she’s 12) she does a considerable job – cleaning, feeding and playing with the cats and dogs so they can remain social with people. Not only is she doing a fine service but she’s learning responsibility and helping others with no financial remuneration (pay). Thank you, Deborah! You’re doing great! Here’s Deborah in the puppy cage with “Enrico” and “Frances,” his good friend. Enrico, along with his brother, “Jose,” “Roberto,” and “Pedro,” were born on April 16 in someone’s yard. Their mom had decided to find a place where people were to have her puppies. The kind people, knowing they couldn’t keep the dogs themselves, brought them into the Shelter where they knew they could have a good chance at life. The pups are all healthy and full of fun and enthusiasm. They’ve had their vet exam, gotten their shots and are all roly poly funny guys. You may see them at the Bonaire Animal Shelter on the Lagoen Road, open Monday through Friday, 10 am to 2 pm. Tel. 717-4989. Do you love animals and want to make a difference? Come visit the Shelter and see why volunteers are so important to keeping the pets happy and social . Volunteers may pick their own hours too. They may be some of the best times you’ll have on Bonaire! Call Shelter Manager Jurrie Mellema at 717-4989. L.D. Volunteer Deborah with “Enrico” and “Frances”

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Page 19 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 THIS WEEK Wednesday, June 22 -Symposium: Is teenage pregnancy a problem or something normal? ( Embaraso hubenil un problema of algu normal?) Medical, legal and emotional topics presented by experts on the subject. At Scouting Central, near the start of the Nikiboko North road. 8 am-1 pm. Youngsters especially invited. For more information contact: Roxiana Goeloe, tel: 717-2436; Marisela Flemming: tel: 717-8976; Polli Winklaar: tel: 717-8839 Friday, June 24 — Opening “Cultural Growth” SGB art students exhibit, free ARTEBON, 7 pm, refreshments & snacks. Continues Saturday, Sunday, June 25, 26, 9 am to 5 pm. See page 12 Saturday, June 25 — Combat Poverty Conference, at ABVO conference room, 9 to 5. Call 717-4666, email fesbo@telbonet.an by June 22. Until June 28 Wilna Groenenboom Art Exhibit, The Cinnamon Art Gallery is at Kaya A.P. L. Brion #1, just off Kaya Grandi, behind Banco di Caribe. Open weekdays 9 am to noon, 2 to 5 pm. Call 717-7103 or 786-9563. Friday, June 24 —St. John’s Day Wednesday, June 29 —St. Peter’s Day Friday, July 1 —Captain Dons 80th Birthday Party COMING Saturday, July 2 —Rincon Marshé Sunday, July 3 — Lac Bay discovery boat trip. Meet at Boka di Coco (across from Mangrove/Kayak Center on dirt road to Cai) 7 am to midafternoon. Sponsored by “ Amigunan di Naturalesa ” (“Friends of the Environment) to benefit Bonaire participants in Vierdaagse Nijmegen (Four Day Walk at Nijmegen, Holland). Sign up at Extra newspaper office. (tel. 7178482). Adults, NAƒ25; Children NAƒ15. See page 22. Sunday, July 3 —The Fundashon for Art and Culture will hold its 13th Annual Art Day with art exhibits, music, performing arts, food and drinks. Anyone interested in exhibiting at the event can contact volunteers at 717-6420 cell 786-6420, or email artandculture65@hotmail.com. Monday, July 4 —US holiday. Fireworks at some resorts July 17-24 Diva’s Women Windsurf Week Learn to windsurf clinic Contact Ann Phelan 786-3134 or email ann@bonairewindsurfing.com www. bonairecaribbean.com 3 local scholarships still available for teen or local women. To apply contact Ann Phelan. The International Bonaire Sailing Regatta October 9 – 15, 2005 EVERY WEEK Saturday Rincon Marshé opens at 6 am 2 pm. Enjoy a Bonairean breakfast while you shop: fresh fruits and vegetables, gifts, local sweets and snacks, arts and handicrafts, candles, incense, drinks and music. www. infobonaire.com/rincon Sunday Live music 6 to 9 pm while enjoying a great dinner in colorful tropical ambiance at the Chibi Chibi Restaurant & Bar . Open daily 5 to 10 pm. Live Fla Bingogreat prizes, 7 pm, Divi Flamingo Monday -Soldachi Tour of Rincon, the heart of Bonaire, 9 am-noon. $20Call Maria 717-6435 Tuesday -Harbour Village Tennis, Social Round Robin 7 to 10 pm. $10 per person. Cash bar. All invited. Call Elisabeth Vos at 565-5225 /717-7500, ext. 14. Wednesday Meditation at Donkey Beach from 7:30 to 8:30 pm. Open to all. Call S.H.Y. 790-9450 Friday -Manager’s Rum Punch Party, Buddy Dive Resort, 5:30-6:30 pm FridayOpen House with Happy Hour at the JanArt Gallery at Kaya Gloria #7, from 5-7 pm. DailyThe Divi Flamingo Casino is open daily for hot slot machines, roulette and black jack, Monday to Saturday 8 pm– 4 am; Sunday 7 pm– 3 am. Every day by appointment -Rooi Lamoenchi Kunuku Park Tours Bonairean kunuku. $12 (NAƒ12 for residents). Tel 717-8489, 540-9800. FREE SLIDE/VIDEO SHOWS SaturdayDiscover Our Diversity Slide Show, pool bar Buddy Dive, 7 pm 717-5080 Sunday Bonaire Holiday Multimedia dual-projector productio n by Albert Bianculli, 8.30 pm, Capt. Don’s Habitat. Monday Dee Scarr’s Touch the Sea slide experience. Aquarius Conference Center, Capt. Don’s Habitat, 8:30– 9:30pm. Wednesday (2nd and 4th) Turtle Conservation Slide Show by Andy Uhr. Carib Inn seaside veranda, 7 pm Thursday from June 16 to July 28, Basic Fish ID Yellow Submarine Dive Shop at 6:30 pm FridayWeek in Review Video Presentation by the Toucan Dive Shop at Plaza’s Tipsy Seagull , 5 pm. 717-2500. CLUBS and MEETINGS AA meetings every Wednesday ; Phone 717-6105; 560-7267 or 7173902. Al-Anon meetings every Monday evening at 7 pm. Call 790-7272 Weekly BonaireTalker Gathering and Dinner at Gibi's Tuesday 6:30pm call 567-0655 for directions. Bridge Club Wednesdays , 7:30 pm at the Union Building on Kaya Korona, across from the RBTT Bank and next to Kooyman’s. All levels invited. NAƒ5 entry fee. Call Cathy 566-4056. Darts Club plays every other Sunday at City Café. Registration at 4, games at 5. Tel. 717-2950, 560-7539. JCI. First Wednesday of the MonthJunior Chamber International Bonaire (JCI Bonaire or formerly known as Bonaire Jaycees) meets at the ABVO building, Kaminda Jato Baco 36 from 7:30 to 9:30pm. Everyone is welcome. Contact: Renata Domacassé 516-4252. Kiwanis Club meets at APNA Plaza, Kaya International, every other Tuesday, 7 pm . Tel. 717-5595, Jeannette Rodriguez. Lions Club meets every 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month at 8 pm at Kaya Sabana #1. All Lions are welcome. Rotary lunch meetings Wednesday , 12 noon-2 pm Rendez-Vous Restaurant, Kaya L.D. Gerharts #3. All Rotarians are welcome. Tel. 717-8454 BONAIRE’S TRADITIONS Mangasina di Rei, Rincon . Enjoy the view from “The King’s Storehouse.” Learn about Bonaire’s culture . Visit typical homes from the 17th century. Daily. Call 717-4060 / 790-2018 Visit the Bonaire Museum on Kaya J. v.d. Ree, behind the Catholic Church in town. Open weekdays from 8 am-noon, 1:30-5 pm. Tel. 717-8868 Washington-Slagbaai National Park, Museum and Visitors’ Center. Open daily 8 am-5 pm. Closed on some holidays. 717-8444/785-0017 Sunday at Cai Live music and dancing starts about 12 noon at Lac Cai. Dance to the music of Bonaire’s popular musicians. Rincon Marshéevery Saturday 6 am to 3 pm. Open market in Bonaire’s historic town. Soldachi Tours show you the Rincon area. Alta Mira Nature Walking Tour at 6:30 am. Town Walking tour at 9:30, Bus Tour at 10 . Call Maria at 717-6435 to reserve. CHURCH SERVICES International Bible Church of Bonaire – Kaya Amsterdam 3 (near the traffic circle) Sunday Services at 9 am; Sunday Prayer Meeting at 7:00 pm in English. Tel. 717-8332 Protestant Congregation of Bonaire . Wilhelminaplein. Services in Papiamentu, Dutch and English on Sundays at 10 am. Thursday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 8 pm . Rev. Jonkman. 717-2006 The Church of Jesu s Christ of Latter Day Saints, Kaya Sabana #26 Sundays 8:30 11:30 am. Services in Papiamentu, Spanish and English. Catholic San Bernardus in Kralendijk – Services on Sunday at 8 am and 7 pm in Papiamentu 717-8304 . Saturday at 6 pm at Our Lady of Coromoto in Antriol, in English . Mass in Papiamentu on Sunday at 9 am and 6 pm. 717-4211. Assembly of God (Asemblea di Dios), Kaya Triton (Den Cheffi). In English, Dutch & Papiamentu on Sunday at 10 am. Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 pm . 717-2194 New Apostolic Church, Meets at Kaminda Santa Barbara #1, Sundays, 9:30 am. Services in Dutch. 717-7116. ****** Send events to The Bonaire Reporter Email reporter@bonairenews.com Tel/Fax. 717-8988, Cel. 791-7252 Kaya Prinses Marie Behind Exito Bakery Tel. 717-2400 Tickets NAƒ10,50 (incl. Tax) High Schoolers NAƒ7,75 NEW FILMS BEGIN FRIDAY CLOSED MONDAY TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY SATURDAY 4 PM Because of Winn-Dixie Late Show Call to make sure (Usually 9 pm ) Kingdom of Heaven (Orlando Bloom) Early Show (Usually 7 pm) State of the Union MICRO MOVIE REVIEW Seen recently in Movieland Cinema: XXX (Triple X); STATE OF THE UNION by Lee Tamahori, starring Ice Cube, Samuel L. Jackson and William Dafoe. An endless sequence of explosions and chases with a deafening soundtrack and yet I managed to sleep halfway through the film only to wake up and find that I hadn't missed anything. It has clichéd dialogues, unbelievable fight sequences and a sloppy storyline that threatens to nullify all the positive aspects of the movie if there are any. Sorry to say but this was probably one of the worst movies I've ever seen. If you're yearning for a good nap go and see it, otherwise don't waste your precious time. Dodo

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Page 20 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 APPLIANCES/ TV/ ELECTRONICS/ COMPUTERS City Shop, the mega store, has the island’s widest selection of large and small home appliances. Fast service and in-store financing too. ART GALLERY Cinnamon Art Gallery non-profit gallery for local artists has continuous shows. Each month a new artist is featured. Stop by. Free entry. BANKS Maduro and Curiel’s Bank provides the greatest number of services, branches and ATMs of any Bonaire bank. They also offer investments and insurance. BEAUTY PARLOR Hair Affair . Expert hair cutting, styling, facials, waxing and professional nail care. BICYCLE / SCOOTER/ QUADS De Freewieler rents scooters and quads; professionally repairs almost anything on two wheels. Sells top brand bikes. Have your keys made here. BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION APA Construction are professional General Contractors. They also sp ecialize in creating patios and walkways with fabulous sprayed and stamped concrete pavement. DIVING Carib Inn is the popular 10-room inn with top-notch dive shop and well stocked retail store. Best book trade on Bonaire. Good prices on regulator repair, dive computer H.Q. Photo Tours Divers-Yellow Submarine low prices on the seaside at Kralendijk, at Caribbean Club, Caribbean Court and the Hamlet Oasis . Join their cleanup dives and BBQ. WannaDive They make diving fun while maintaining the highest professional standards. In town at City Café and at Eden Beach. FITNESS Bonfysio offers comprehensive fitness programs to suit your needs whether they be weight loss, sports or just keeping in shape. Convenient schedule. Fit 4 Life at the Plaza Resort Mall. Classes in Pilates, Aerobics, TaeBo and more. Professional trainers, fitness machines and classes for all levels. GARDEN SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Green Label has everything you need to start or maintain your garden. They can design, install and maintain it and offer plants, irrigation supplies and garden chemicals. GIFTS, SOUVENIRS AND LIQUOR The Bonaire Gift Shop has an wide selection of gifts, souvenirs, liquor, dive watches, digital cameras, things for the home, T-shirts all at low prices. HOTELS Golden Reef Inn is the affordable alternative with fully equipped studio apartments in a quiet Bonaire neighborhood. Just a 3-minute walk to diving and the sea. The Great Escape Under new management. Quiet and tranquil setting with pool and luxuriant garden in Belnem. Cyber Café, DVD rentals, restaurant and bar. METALWORK AND MACHINE SHOP b c bBotterop Construction Bonaire N.V. , offers outstanding fabrication of all metal products, including stainless. Complete machine shop too. PHOTO FINISHING Paradise Photo in the Galeries Shopping Center offers fast, fine processing for prints, slides, items and services for your picture-taking pleasure. REAL ESTATE / RENTAL AGENTS Harbourtown Real Estate is Bonaire’s oldest real estate agent. They specialize in professional customer services and top notch properties. Mike Boom & Associates Broad assortment of homes and properties. View on their website www. bonairerealty.com or office in town Re/Max Paradise Homes: International/US connections. 5% of profits donated to local community. Sunbelt Realty offers full real estate, rental, and insurance services. If you want a home or to invest in Bonaire, stop in and see them. REPAIRS Bon Handyman is here if you need something fixed or built. Ultra reliable, honest and experienced. Electrical, plumbing, woodworking, etc. 717-2345 RESORTS & ACTIVITIES Buddy Dive Resort offers diving, Adventure Fun tours including kayaking, mountain biking, cave snorkeling and exploration. RETAIL Benetton, world famous designer clothes available now in Bonaire at prices less than those in US. For men, women and children. SECURITY Special Security Services will provide that extra measure of protection when you need it. Always reliable. SHIPPING Rocargo Freight Air and sea shipments in/out of Bonaire. Customs agents. Pr ofessional and efficient. FedEx agent. SUPERMARKETS Tropical Flamingo is convenient, clean, modern, efficient and has the lowest prices on Bonaire. Located behind NAPA. Visit Warehouse Bonaire to shop in a large, spotless supermarket. You’ll find American and European brand products. THE market for provisioning. VILLAS Bonaire Oceanfront villa for up to nine people: five kitchens, five bathrooms. Ideal for divers. WATER TAXI Get to Klein Bonaire by Ferry. Ride the Kantika di Amor or Skiffy . Hotel pickup. WINES Antillean Wine Company. You’ve tried the rest; now try the best: best prices, highest quality wines from around the world, kept in a cooled warehouse. Free delivery. YOGA Yoga For You . Join certified instructors Desirée and Don for a workout that will refresh mind and body. Private lessons too. Closed during June. ATTENTION BUSINESSMEN/WOMEN: Put your ad in The Bonaire Reporter. Phone/Fax 717-8988, Cel 791-7252 RESTAURANT PRICE RANGE / WHEN OPEN FEATURES Want your restaurant listed here? It’s easy and not expensive Call The Reporter at 717-8988 or 791-7252 for info Bella Vista Restaurant Sea Side Restaurant at Buddy Dive Resort 717-5080, ext. 525 Moderate. Breakfast and Lunch Dinner during Theme nights only. Open every day Magnificent Theme Nights : Saturday: Beach Grill; Monday: Caribbean Night; Friday: Manager’s Rum Punch Party and All-You-Can-Eat B.B.Q Bistro de Paris Kaya Gob. N. Debrot 46 (half-way between hotel row and town) 717-7070 Moderate Lunch and Dinner Closed Sunday Real French Cooking in an informal setting Superb dishes prepared with care and love by a French chef Owner-operated Eat in or Take away Brasserie Bonaire Royal Palm Galleries Kaya Grandi 26, Next to Re/Max, 717-4321 LowModerate Lunch and Dinner Open 11 am -2:30 pm 5:30-9 pm Closed Saturday and Sunday Lots of parking in big mall lot Kitchen Open non-stop 11am-6 pm Breezy terrace with airco inside Calabas Restaurant & Chibi Chibi Restaurant and Bar At the Divi Flamingo Beach Resort. Waterfront 717-8285 Moderate-Expensive Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Open 7 days Get a view of the beach and turquoise sea while enjoying a breakfast buffet or à la carte lunch and dinner at the 'Chibi Chibi' restaurant & bar. Inspiring vistas and the highest standard of cuisine . Croccantino Italian Restaurant Downtown at Kaya Grandi 48 717-5025 Moderate-Expensive Dinner Closed Monday Tuscan chef prepares exquisite dishes. Authentic ingredients and romantic setting make dining a delight. Be served in a garden setting under floating umbrellas or in air-conditioned comfort. Take out too. Den Laman On the water, just off the traffic circle 717-4106 Moderate-Expensive Breakfast, Lunch Dinner Open 7 days Creative cuisine on the seaside . Top chefs from Amsterdam cook in an open modern kitchen featuring induction cooking. Seafood a specialty. The Great Escape EEG Blvd #97—across from Belmar 717-7488 Moderate Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner Open 7 days Bar-Restaurant poolside —under the thatched roof. Cuban Chef prepares Caribbean cuisine. Champagne brunch on Sundays 10 am to noon. Happy hours 5 to 7 every day. Hilltop at Caribbean Club Bonaire On the Tourist Road, 2 mi. north of Town 717-7901 Moderate-Expensive Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Closed Sunday Quiet country setting, lovely landscaping, friendly staff Happy Hour from 5-7 pm, BBQ on Tuesdays Gourmet chef creates unique daily specials The Last Bite Bakery Home Delivery or Take Out 717-3293 Low-Moderate Orders taken 8 am-4 pm; Deliveries 6-7:30 pm , Closed Sunday Enjoy a delicious dessert or savory baked meal in the comfort of your home or resort. This unique bakery offers gourmet class items -always from scratchfor take out or delivery only. The Lost Penguin Across from MCB Bank in downtown Kralendijk Call 717-8003. Low-Moderate Breakfast, Lunch, Early Dinner Closed Tuesdays & Wednesdays Watch the bustle of downtown from this street side Caribbean-style bistro owned and run by a European educated Master Chef and his wife. Pasa Bon Pizza On Kaya Gob. Debrot ½ mile north of town center. 790-1111 Low-Moderate Open from 5-11 pm Wednesday-Sunday Bonaire’s best. The Real Thing! Freshly prepared pizzas made with the finest ingredients. Salads, desserts. Eat in or take away. Nice bar too. Call ahead to eat-in or take out 790-1111

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Page 21 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 “T wo days after I arrived I went to the Dive Inn to look for a buddy to dive with, I met a Dutch woman who was here for a vacation with a girlfriend. A year and a half later they came back to Bonaire and stayed at my house. Two years later the girlfriend came back with another girlfriend this time… and that was Ans Klein Heerenbrink!” He laughs: “It sounds like a soap opera, but as we say, ‘By coincidence the best marriages are born,’ and it proved to be right because we’ve been together for eight years now.” “The moment I saw Hans,” Ans fills in , ‘there was this sparkle! It was February ’95 and after that vacation we kept in touch frequently. In September that year I came a second time, and it became very clear what we felt for each other. That year I spent Christmas and New Years with Hans on Bonaire, and in ’96 I came for three months to see whether I could find a job here. Hans came to Holland twice to meet my family, so it was a lot of traveling back and forth until I finally came here March 29th 1997, ‘Nos Dia,’ as we call it! I started working full time at the hospital and I still think it’s a great job. I have wonderful colleagues and we have a good, close contact with the patients. In Holland I was a nurse specializing in cardio care. Here I’ve become allround. We have 30 beds; I’ve seen everything. I also do the air ambulance. You become inventive, and everyone always looks for the best solution. There’s very good cooperation between nurses and doctors. My colleagues are from Aruba, Surinam, Holland and Colombia. It’s a colorful mix, but it works really well! I love my job! Even when we’re not working we’re always together, doing fun things like brunch on the beach, walking all over the island, fixing old furniture, gardening, painting, cooking together, and we love to shop together! But being lazy and not doing anything is also wonderful!” Hans Rietveld and Ans Klein Heerenbrink match. There’s no other way to say it when you see people that bring out the best of each other; who are just nice and gentle together, each other’s equal, down to earth, but still, there is magic; they make each other more beautiful . “Before Bonaire,” Hans says , “I’d been living in Curaçao from ’85 to ’92. I worked for DOW (what now is DROBpublic works) and for the Curaçao Road Construction Company. I don’t like sitting in the same chair for 30 years so when I saw this ad asking for a head for DOW on Bonaire I sent my CV and was immediately accepted. Two months later I moved to Bonaireincredibly fast! I’m a civil engineer. In Holland I worked for several municipalities. By the end of the 70s and the beginning of the 80s, I traveled to India, Nepal, Thailand, Burma, Sri Lanka, Egypt and Mexico. After seeing all those places I wanted to live somewhere else. I saw an ad for DOW on Curaçao and responde d, but it took 20 months to happen. Originally it was for a three-year contract , but I got so addicted to the Caribbean way of life that now it’s been 20 years in the Antilles! It was a challenging job being the head of DOW on Bonaire. In those days the island was booming, and the economy grew 10% annually! Many people thought it was going too fast and they were afraid Bonaire would change into a second St. Martin. Then the Pourier Committee started working on this process, ‘Economic growth, but considering the preservation of culture and nature.’ The report was accepted by the Eilandsraad (Island Council) in the beginning of ’93, but then it had to be translated into official laws concerning education, economics, finance, judicial and technical matters, etc. all the departments the government manages. The writing of the laws was done by us, the top officials, as well as our regular jobs, without the help of consultants. I was also indirectly involved in the reorganization of the government, which was done by a consultant. My days were full. The government reorganization was an incredibly time-consuming operation. Alas, I wasn’t there when they finished it. My contract was fup, people were transferred, our group was neutralized because another political party took over. Nevertheless, as it often happens in the Antilles, the plan was carried through in many ways, but never officially. So I left, but I had a tremendous reputation and started my own company as a civil and technical consultant and it went very well. I prepared, conducted, did the management and supervision of projects like the construction of the Bank of the Dutch Antilles, the building of Consales’ cool and freezer house and the construction of the Kaminda Djabou road. At the beginning of the century it became very slow. All of Bonaire was struggling, and I got my share of it too. However, two years ago I joined a group of consultants, Multifunction Management. We use each other’s knowledge and experience, so we can offer a broad spectrum of services. I feel that economically we’re going in the right direction, poco poco , but not bad at all! I’m also involved in monument care. My love for the old historic houses began in Curaçao where Jay Haviser, Michael Newton, Maup Lanjouw, Bart de Boer, I and others founded a group to clear away the overgrowth from the old ruins, then measure and register the houses. On Bonaire in 1996 I met Christie Dovale who was also interested in doing something with the old monuments. Christie and Laurie Dovale, Patrick Strauss and I set up a foundation and started frantically registering those places to which we could give the status of ‘protected monument.’ But, alas, the initiative was smothered by the politicians’ lack of interest. We became so unmotivated that the group fell apart… until the middle of 2003 when Jay Haviser and I had a conversation. He formed, within DROB, an informal committee with himself, Hubert Vis and Alca St. Jago, with the aim of setting up a historic site preservation group, and he asked for my help. So I thought why don’t we reactivate the ‘Foundation Monument Care Bonaire’ and go from there. Through the notary, however, we found out that there was another monument care foundation, founded by the previous notary, Mr. Knuf. The present notary, Mr. Maartense, advised us to reactivate this foundation because it had the oldest rights. Board members are Peter Paulussen, Evert Piar and I. Members are Linda Anthony and Anthony Nicolaas. We needed a protective law, like an island decree, but immediately we were told by the government that they didn’t have the time to compose one, so we did it ourselves. The concept for a monument management plan together with the concept decree was presented to Deputy Dortalina. Now we’re almost there, and the definite versions of the management plan and the decree can be presented to the Executive Council. After that we can become active and start to raise funds. Why am I doing this? I want to contribute to the Bonairean community by conserving the cultur al inheritance, and I’m extra motivated because I love the subject! We’re talking mostly about all those little original houses against the background of the kunuku and the ones in the barios , but also of course big buildings like the Pasangrahan , Bestuurscollege and the Protestant Church. After the renovation of the old houses we’re planning to find tenants for them through Fundashon Cas Bonairiano so that people can live in them again. A building needs occupation and maintenance to bring out its beauty. Lately it has become a big issue; the demolishing of Hausmann’s Folly has opened people’s eyes! Luckily I also have another source that allows me to ‘fight’ for these subjects; I’m writing for the Amigoe, and often Bòi Antoin and I join forces, with good results! I’m very happy here. You never know about the future, but we would like to stay here. Bonaire has space and it’s the people, the island itself. To be in the middle of nowhere and you don’t see a soul! I get a kick when I drive on Kaya Grandi on a Sunday afternoon and I don’t see anybody! In Holland there are 500 people for every square kilometer, here not even 50! That’s a big difference! Here the people are warm and caring and they take time to greet you. I don’t think we should have Holland make the rules for this island. That will go too far! This is the land where life is good!’ Greta Kooistra “ In those days the island was booming, and the economy grew 10% annually! Many people thought it was going too fast and they were afraid Bonaire would change into a second St. Martin.” Greta Kooistra September 10th 1992 Hans Rietveld and Ans Klein Heerenbrink

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Page 22 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 ( Tonky in Greece Continued from page 17) on this day.” Tonky talks about his second place in Mykonos: “I was satisfied with my second position, and I am happy for Kevin. He deserved this win after the competitions that took place today. In windsurfing one can never be too sure about one’s position. Your achievements do not depend only on professionalism and consistency (though they will get you a long way!) but it also depends on factors that you have no control over like the wind and the water. The challenge is now even greater for me on the EFPT tour. I will definitely go for the top position in the next event!” Tonky’s next event will be in Pozo (Grand Canaria). This is an event of the Professional Windsurfing Association (PWA). There Tonky will meet the other professional Bonairean windsurfers and Ricardo Campello, Kauli Seadi, Kevin Mevissen and Andre Paskowski. If the wind cooperates, things will get really hot there. Stay tuned for the Tonky reports from Spain. story and photos by S.C. B efore you put your house on the market, start removing clutter. The kitchen is a good place to begin. First, take everything off the counters. Put the toaster in a cabinet and take it out only when you use it. Store everything in cabinets and drawers. If you don’t have enough cabinet space to put everything, put those dishes, pots and pans that rarely get used into a box and put that box in storage. You see, homebuyers may open all your cabinets and dr awers, especially in the kitchen. They want to be sure there is enough room for their "stuff." If your kitchen cabinets, pantries, and drawers look jammed full, it sends a negative message to the buyer that there’s not enough storage space. So have as much "empty space" as possible. If you have a "junk drawer," get rid of the junk. If you have a rarely used crock pot, put it in storage. Do this with every cabinet and drawer. Create open space. If there is a large amount of foodstuffs crammed into the shelves or pantry, begin using them, especially canned goods. Canned goods are heavy and you don’t want to be lugging them to a new house, anyway – or have to pay a mover to do so. Let what you have on the shelves determine your menus and use up as much as you can. Beneath the sink is very critical, too. Make sure it’s as empty as possible, removing all extra cleaning supplies. Scrub the area down as well and see whether there are any tell-tale signs of water leaks that may cause a homebuyer to hesitate in buying your home. Closets are great for accumulating clutter. We are talking about extra clothes and shoes – things you rarely wear but cannot bear to be without. Sometimes there are shoeboxes full of "stuff" or other accumulated personal items. They can make your closets look "crammed full." Do without these items for a couple of months by putting them in a box in storage. Many people have too much furniture in some rooms. To give the illusion of space, keep furnishings to a minimum by storing any excess furniture. Garages, lofts and sheds accumulate not only clutter, but junk. Clear out these areas, making them as empty as possible so that buyers can imagine what they would do with the space. Remove anything that is not essential and take it to the storage area. Anna Kleimer Anna Kleimer is with RE/MAX Paradise Homes. She and her husband, Art, owned and operated their real estate company in Vail, Colorado for 12 years. Working with buyers, she has an intuitive understanding of properties right for them location, price range and amenities. Call her at 717-7362 or 786-8607. Tonky performs a chaco in Mykonos Kevin Mevissen and Tonky“You see, homebuyers may open all your cabinets and drawers, especially in the kitchen. They want to be sure there is enough room for their "stuff." If your kitchen cabinets, pantries, and drawers look jammed full, it sends a negative message to the buyer that there’s not enough storage space.” Tonky heads out!

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Page 23 Bonaire Reporter June 24 to July 1, 2005 *to find it, just look up For the week: June 24 to July 1, 2005 By Astrologer Michael Thiessen A s I alerted you earlier this month one of the most spectacular, super close meetings of the planets you'll ever see will occur this week and next. And in fact this Sunday and Monday the two planets closest to the Sun won't be this close again until the year 2070. Think about Sky Park skies earlier this month. Back then on Sunday June 12, if you faced west northwest, 30 to 45 minutes after sunset while there was still twilight out, you would have seen the brightest planet of them all, planet #2 from the Sun , Venus , and planet #1 from the Sun, Mercury , peeking just above the horizon. And on a straight line with Mercury and Venus up to their left, planet #6, ringed Saturn . And if you watched night after night you would have seen all three of them steadily move closer and closer to each other, Saturn descending and Mercury ascending to meet brilliant Venus. But this week the changes are really dramatic because starting Friday, the 24th and lasting for three nights, Mercury, Venus and Saturn will be only two degrees apart fr om each other. On Saturday the three are at their absolute closest to each other and could fit in a circle only one and a half degrees wide, so close you could cover all three with your pinky finger held out at arm’s length. But the best is yet to come because on Sunday the 26th Mercury and Venus will be less than one half of one degree apart. And to top that, on Monday the 27th they'll be only one tenth of one degree apart, at their closest until 2070! So close that the Old Farmer's Almanac claims they may even appear to merge into one star. Once again, this Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Mercury, Venus and Saturn will form a super close trio, and on Monday you won't see Mercury and Venus this close for another 65 years! Of course we must remind you that this is all an optical illusion and that they only appear close from our vantage point here on Earth. In reality on Monday when Mercury and Venus appear to almost merge, Mercury will be 95 million miles away while Venus will be 142 million miles away and Saturn will be a whopping almost one billion miles away. Don't miss this super spectacular planetary gathering. Start watching this week but make sure that you don't miss this Friday, Saturday, Sunday and finally, Monday. And if you've got a small telescope or binoculars, get them out now because the change from night to night will absolutely stun you. But don't fret if you miss this weekend because Mercury and Venus will still be really close all next week too! If you've never engaged in planet watching before this weekend now is the time to start. I mean who wants to wait until 2070? Jack Horkheimer ARIES (Mar. 21April 20) Try not to overr eact to the loss. You can come into money; however, perhaps not under the be st circumstances. Take a close look at documents before signing on the dotted line. Don't be too quick to judge those you live with. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday. TAURUS (Apr. 21May 21) Female members of your family may be difficult to deal with. You can make excellent car eer moves if you are open to the opportunities that exist. You will find that social activities will lead you into passionate meetings. Uncertainties regarding your love life will surface if you have neglected your mate. Your lucky day this week will be Sunday. GEMINI (May 22-June 21) You must make them stand on their own two feet regardless of how much you want to make things better for them. Go out with friends. Eliminate situations that are no longer to your advantage. Travel will initiate new friendships or love connections. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Strength will come from your ability to overtake just about anyone. Put your thoughts into some trendy new ideas. You need a change and you need to earn more cash. Time is money and you must be ready to take action in order to reach your highest potential. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. LEO (July 23-Aug 22) You are best not to confront situations that deal with inlaws or relatives. Correspondence may not clear up issues. You will have to face each issue separately and in person. Mino r health problems may lower your vitality. Your lucky day this week will be Saturday. VIRGO (Aug. 23 -Sept. 23) Entertain in your home and make aesthetic enhancements that will please those who reside with you. Trips will be exciting. You will be a bit of a spendthrift this week. However, you should be concerned about what they want in return. Your lucky day this week will be Sunday. LIBRA (Sept. 24 -Oct. 23) You can pick up valuable information if you listen to those with more experience. Your ideas may be a little ahead of their time; don't push them, instead just continue working on development. You can't make things better if you don't know what to fix. Don't ignore any emotional issues that could be causing problems. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. SCORPIO (Oct. 24 Nov. 22) Your ability to charm others will put you in the limelight at social functions. You may want to get involved in some kind of creative group. You will find yourself tied to the phone. Spend time with friends or family. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23 -Dec. 21) Your efforts will be rewarded handsomely. Unexpected bills will leave you a little short. You may attract attention if you get out socially. Entertainment could be pleasing if it is of an energetic nature. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. CAPRICORN (Dec 22Jan. 20) Rely on yourself and you will look good to superiors. Family trips or projects should be on your mind. Relatives will not agree with the way you are dealing with your personal problems. Un expected bills may set you back. Your lucky day this week will be Friday. AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 -Feb. 19) Catch up on correspondence. Don't forget that your budget is limited right now. Don't be critical or overly opinionated with dislikes; it could cause disapproval and unwanted opposition. Daydreaming will be your downfall. Your lucky day this week will be Thursday. PISCES (Feb. 20-Mar. 20) You will need to take a look at the renovations that are necessary and try to find the cheapest way to get things done. Problems with ear, nose, or the throat are likely. You will find that money could slip through your fingers. Opportunities to make advancements through good business sense are evident. Your lucky day this week will be Saturday. “...starting Friday, the 24th and lasting for three nights Mercury, Venus and Saturn will be only two degrees apart from each other.” An Absolutely Spectacular Super Close Meeting of Three Planets Occurs This Week and Next



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P.O. Box 407, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles, Phone 790-6518, 7 86-6518, www.bonairereporter.com email: reporter@bonairenews.com Since 1994 On-line every day, 24/7 Printed every fortnight Laura DeSalvo photo

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Page 2 Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 I mmediate action is needed to improve Bonaire’s Flamingo Airport runway , warned Dutch Minister of Traffic and Water Management (V&W ) Camiel Eurlings last week. If nothing is done, the runway won’t comply with international safety norms within one to two years, stated Eurlings in response to questions posed in the Dutch Parliament’s Second Chamber relating to the 2010 budget. €8.7 million had been reserved for the project in 2010. A small team was on island last week to explore possibilities for a new flavor of Bonaire tourism – personal recovery. It’s well known that the climate and pace of Bonaire is beneficial to people recovering from certain illnesses. Organizers would offer a “package” consisting of KLM business class airfare, resort accommodations and specialized medical care. The program would be offered by the Dutch personal recovery specialists U-Center. Dutch State Secretary Ank Bijleveld-Schouten said a Dutch salvage company will be called in to recover the body of the heroic pilot Robert Mansell and the Divi Divi aircraft that recently sank southwest of Klein Bonaire. The cause of the accident is to be investigated as well when the aircraft is raised. The salvage company and cost of the operation haven’t been revealed. Following the failure of one engine Captain Mansell had to ditch his twin engine BrittenNorman Islander commuter plane just west of Klein Bonaire. All nine passengers escaped unhurt and were quickly rescued, but Mansell was knocked unconscious and went to the bottom with the airplane when the passengers were unable to release his safety harness. The sea bottom is between 150 and 200 meters deep in that area and Dutch naval ships in the Caribbean don’t have the capability to salvage at that depth. The American navy research ship Henson offered its help but permission from US authorities had not been received yet, according to acting Bonaire Lt. Governor Peter Silberie. The identity of the pilot of the airplane that blew up in the air west of Bonaire has been identified as 26 year-old Juan Carlos Saldana. A large quantity of cocaine and another body of an older man, yet unidentified, were found amidst the wreckage. Saldana was originally from Bogotá, Colombia but had been living in Venezuela. Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba will be relieved of the costs involved in disaster management, crisis management and medical care after they have been integrated into the Netherlands. This policy was defined in the "Explanatory Memorandum" attached to the BES Security Act which was sent to the Dutch Lower House last week. In the event that one of the islands needs disaster assistance the Netherlands is ready to handle the cost and to offer any necessary physical assistance in the form of manpower and material. According to Cynthia OrtegaMartijn, a Christian Union member of the Dutch lower chamber , the Netherlands should negotiate with Bonaire again if the population rejects the integration process already underway . Dutch State Secretary Ank Bijleveld of Kingdom Relations and a few Lower Chamber-members said that they would not renegotiate. There is only one option left and that is independence. However, the Netherlands cannot decide on this based on the UNregulations, says Ortega-Martijn. Every year, around 1,000 Antillean students arrive in the Table of Contents This Week’s Stories Bonaire Reporter Question 2 Help Seniors Celebrat e 2 Kwartiermakers & Counterparts (Immigration, Naturalization) 3 Windsurfing Scandinavia 6 Bonaire Referendum Survey 8 Second Thoughts-Booi 8 Referendum Preview? 8 Bonaire Ambassadors (Valenteijn) 8 Insurance for 60+ 9 RSC Donates Computers to JB 10 CIEE Mangrove Study 10 Eli Deli Opens 11 2009 Job Market 11 Letters to the Editor— Cruise ship privileges, Sun lotion damage, Kudos to Reporter 12 10 Years-Green Label 15 BES Tax Plan 17 Ludo Nicolaas Honored 17 Sailing Kids 20 Tree Planting 20 Weekly Features Flotsam & Jetsam 2 On the Island Since (Brigitte & Wilfried Kersting) 4 Bonairean Voices (Public Library) 7 Sudoku Puzzle 7 Bon Quiz #18 (Chapel) 7 Body Talk Climate 12 Picture Yourself (Cruising–Jamaica) 13 Classifieds 13 Tide Table 13 Reporter Masthead 14 What’s Happening 14 Pet of the Week (Petunia) 15 Bubbles (Flamingo Tongues) 15 Shopping & Service Guides 16 BonQuiz Answer 17 Sudoku Answer 17 Bonaire On Wheels (Wheel Me On) 18 Sky Park (December Dates ) 19 Café Astrology (Astrology) 19 How to contact us Letters to the Editor: Reporter@bonairenews.com Story tip or idea: info@bonairenews.com The Publisher: George@bonairenews.com Box 407, Bonaire, Neth. Antilles. Phone 790-8988 Phone 790-6518 / 786-6518 Available on-line at: www.bonairereporter.com Printed Every Fortnight, On-line Every day, 24/7 Next edition printing on December 8, 2009. Story and Ad deadline: December 5, 2009. SCOOTER & BIKE SALES & REPAIR Peugeot, Kymco Loekie, Giant Gazelle Brands Parts and accessories for any brand scooter or bike Bike Clothes for Everyone Kaya Grandi #61 Across from INPO Open: 8:30-12:30, 2:00-5:30 Owner Operated freewieler@flamingotv.net A Bonaire Reporter Question T imes are tough for Caribbean tourism. The economic recovery, especially in the US, has been slow and airlines are cutting back flights. Budgets for promotion are tight. So how can the agencies responsible for attracting visitors to their island approach the problem? These days Internet advertising and social networks compliment the traditional methods. One technique that Bonaire has excelled in is to get “free” publicity in the press and on the Internet from travel writers and news reporters The TCB’s partners in the Americas and Europe are experts at making that happen. Choosing what to publicize is tricky though. Obviously, everyone wants to report the good news. But what about the not so good news? Crime, environmental damage, political shenanigans, or illnesses all affect both the island’s people and their important guests, the tourists. The question to our readers: What is the most effectiv e way to promote Bonaire? 1. Present only good news 2. Present all news 3. Present good news and only the not-so-good-news that has been “okayed” by island tourism authorities We ask our readers, both on island and around the world, to sit down right after reading this and give us your opinion. Please. Email to reporter@bonairenews.com Mail to Reporter, Box 407, Bonaire Netherlands Antilles Or phone (599) 790-6518 or (599) 786-6518. Netherlands to study . In order to look into possible ways of improving study program information for Antillean students, staff at the Dutch information websites www.studychoice.nl and www.studiekeuze123.nl. Dutch officials visited the Netherlands Antilles and Aruba from November 10-18 to talk to prospective students, deans and study advisers in order to identify problem areas and needs. Antillean students who come to the Netherlands to follow an advanced program are faced with a major transition. They must relocate to the Netherlands, live a long way away from their home and come to grips with a different culture. The government of Aruba rescinded its decision that foreign workers had to leave the island after three years. The new Eman Cabinet has put an end to the so-called “Swiss model,” in which expatriates could only work on Aruba for three years. This implies that immigrants could apply for Dutch nationality after a stay of five years. The number of illegal foreigners in Aruba is estimated to be 5,0008,000. The Dutch Government is considering hiring “flying doctors” to provide medical assistance in the BES islands of Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba explained Dutch Minister of Public Health, Well-being and Sports, (Continued on page 9) A special treat every year fo r senior citizens groups is an end of the year dinner where they can all get together to socialize and enjoy a delicious meal. This year 115 elderly from the senior citizen activity centers from Rincon, Antriol, North Salina and from Kai Minima will be dining at the Sunset Grill Restaurant on December 9. And everyone will get a gift from the Bonaire Gift Shop . Although the organizers got a very good deal from Kirk Gosden at Sunset Grill, a little more money is needed to make this evening come true. You can help brighten our elders’ holiday season with a donation. An easy way is to drop it off at Mike Gaynor’s Chat n’ Browse at the roundabout near Sunset Beach. For more information call Delno Tromp at 09-693-1407 or 717-8334.

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Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 Page 3 For some time now people have been working behind the scenes on improvements and projects for the period after the transition date of 10-10-10, when Bonaire may become a public body ( bijzondere gemeente ) within the Netherlands. In several areas of policy, local government and local organizations are working together with the people from the Regional Service Centre (RSC). In the coming months The Bonaire Reporter will describe the activities of the Dutch Ministry Representatives in the RSC and their Bonairean counterparts as they work together so that, at the planned “transition time of 10-10-10,” local people, Bonaireans, will handle the tasks of that department. For the first report we will describe how the work of the Immigration and Naturalization Organization (IND) is progressing. G eorge Mensché, Head of Bonaire’s Burgerzaken (Civil Registry) and Bonaire’s Organization of Admission, the Toelatingsorganisatie, (which local people often refer to just as Bevolking ) and Jan de Jong, a Kwartiermaker from the RSC, are working together on the new Immigration and Naturalization Organization (IND ) for Bonaire. The IND has the following tasks: The admission of foreigners The settlement of requests for naturalization The extension of visas Providing legal protections and enforcing proper procedures. Simplifying the Tasks From 13 counters to just one With the motto, “Transformation Before Transition,” considerable changes have already been made to the foreigners’ admission process on Bonaire. The goal is to have good functioning organizations with qualified workers at the transition date of 10-1010. One of the major changes is the reduction of the numerous “counters” the applicant has to visit to obtain the necessary permits to work and live here. In the past there were 13 different counters. Now there’s just one. The new Organization of Admission, begun in July 2009, is working with the new Foreigner Management System (FMS) software. The system has been developed with the input of the employees of all the organizations involved. Further changes due to the new organization are: The present Admission Statues will be applied more strictly. The employees will carry more responsibilities, for instance in the near future qualified employees can sign a permit themselves . Currently this is a task of the Gezaghebber (Lt. Governor). More responsibilities require more knowledge and experience. A lot of emphasis is being put into education and training “on the job.” Due to the FMS, a good digital data base is building. George Mensché has been working with the governmental organ ization on Bonaire for 12 years . He worked at Legal Affairs for four years. After that, he worked at the Bureau of the Island Secretary for three years, to continue his career at the post of Head Burgerzaken. He’s been doing that job for five years. “For me, the challenge of cobuilding this new organiz ation came right on time. I love to help th e organization and the employees to grow. Change is never easy for people, but change also means progression. If people are given more responsibilities, they achieve more and they gain more fun out of the job.” Jan de Jong started the job of Kwartiermaker Immigration and Naturalization in June 2009. In the Netherlands Jan worked with the Police Department for 20 years . After that he joined IND where he also worked for nearly 20 years. In several management jobs he built his knowledge and experience in this area. “The job here on Bonaire fits me perfectly. I find it a real challenge to contribute to the new IND organization, to work together and to develop things in a creative way. We hope the organ ization ends up with a lot of satisfied customers.” Tasks will become work place independent after the introduction of the FMS on Saba and Statia. Back office employees will be able to support each other when necessary, even if off island. For special issues Bonaire can rely on IND in the Netherlands for support. All governmental organizations on Bonaire that are involved meet regularly to exchange information and share problems or questions. After the transition date the Minister of Justice of the Netherlands becomes responsible for the IND on Bonaire (currently the (Continued at the bottom of column 2 on page 9) The Immigration and Naturalization Organization The First of a Series About Cooperation Towards Takeover

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Page 4 Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 “I n 1986 my husband and I went on a cruise with the whole family: my mother, my father who was already severely ill at the time and our son, Michael. We visited Aruba and Curaçao for the first time. In 1989 we spent the Christmas holidays with Michael and baby boy Tobias on Curaçao and still we had not seen Bonaire. When my mother and I went for a vacation to Curaçao again in 1991 we came to Bonaire for one day. We took a guided tour and when the bus stopped at this certain spot in Sabadeco there was this house under construction and my mother said to me, ‘This is the place where I want to live and stay until the end of my life,’ and within three days she bought the house. When we made the cruise in 1986 my parents had been looking for a place in the Caribbean for my mom to live, as my father knew that his days were numbered. My mother had arthritis and rheumatism in a very bad way – she was practically in a wheelchair but here she felt so much better. The language was also an important issue because people of her generation didn’t speak English or French. She only spoke German and Dutch. From the time my mother bought the house we’ve spent every holiday on Bonaire and our eldest son, Michael, would go to Papa Cornes school. Both our children loved being here and at a very young age they already spoke English and Dutch. When my mother passed away in 1999, our boys inherited her house and we inherited the friendships that she had with Bonairean, Colombian and Dutch people. Although my mother had passed away, we kept on coming to Bonaire three to four times a year and we’d stay at her house. Both my husband and I were still working in Germany. Wilfried had his own practice as an internist and cardiologist and I had my practice as a homeopathic doctor, specializing in pain management. In 1991 Wilfried was very ill and in 2004 he suffered a cardiac arrest and then he stopped working in 2005. I had an accident that same year and in 2007 I had to give up my practice. Our greatest wish was to come and live here. We felt this island was our destiny. So we came and lived in my mother’s house during the time our own house was under construction. It seemed like a long vacation. When she moved here my mother had brought a lot of our furniture, so we felt at home. But… the most beautiful thing was that my mother’s friends and their children became our friends. To us,” she smiles a big smile and raises her hands, “ that’s the most wonderful thing about Bonaire: the intense relationship we have with the people here. In the Bonairean and Colombian community there’s this feeling of togetherness, of unity and these people made us part of it. We never felt like tourists when my mother was still alive. We were my mother’s children and therefore we belonged to the community. They made us part of their families. It’s something very special and intense. Now Bonaire is our home and when we go to Germany it’s for vacation. We still have a house there because we want to spend (Continued on page 5) “ It’s sad to say, but other islands have lost a great deal of their charm because of over population and too much construction. Bonaire is still good, but they have to keep an eye on the developments and make sure we won’t get stuck with ruins of buildings...” ROCARGO SERVICES, N.V. International Freight (Car) BV The ONLY company offering direct weekly consolidation services from Europe/Holland to Bonaire www.ifc-consolidators.nl Jupiterweg 1A (Ecopark) 4761 RW Moerdijk, Holland Tel 31-(0) 168-40-94 94 Fax 31-(0) 168-40 94 70 Offering DAILY Express Services from and to Bonaire For shipment tracking www.fedex.com The World On Time Kaya Industria 12, KralendijkBonaire—N.A. 717-8922 FAX 717-5791 Email:info@rocargo.com Amcar Freight, Inc. The ONLY company offering direct weekly consolidation services from Miami, USA to Bonaire www.amcarfreight.com 7860 N.W. 80th Street Medley, Florida 33166 Tel. (305) 599-8866 Fax (305) 599-2808 For All Your Shipping Needs Full service door to door by air and by sea. Customs clearance, transportation, warehousing. International and local relocation. Packing material in stock. Qualified and professional personnel. Timely, accurate and reliable ISO 9001: 2000 Certified from l to r. (standing at the back): Freek Sijsling, Sennen Berends and Harry van den Ouweelen, in front (left to right) Horst Lehmann and Douglas the team of Boat Yard Bonaire The Kerstings and their dog, Tino

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Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 Page 5 time with our sons too. Michael just finished Hotel Management and Tobias is studying Tourism and Event Management. Both of them prefer to come here instead of our going to visit them there. In 1993 Wilfried learned Papiamentu and when people speak slowly he understands it well, but when they go fast he doesn’t get a word. I can read Papiamentu, but I don’t speak it. For three years we’ve been learning Spanish at the Venezuelan Institute. Latin we know as we both studied it for seven years. But the Spanish grammar at this age is quite hard! Still, I feel we have to make the effort as so many people here come from Latin countries and we want to be able to communicate with them. Bonaire gave us so much that we felt we wanted to give something back. We decided to volunteer at the animal shelter and now we’re at the cruise ship market selling T-shirts, but… we also give information about the island to the tourists. People do have a lot of questions so Wilfried and I participated in the course TCB organized in Papiamentu, ‘ Turismo; nos bida, nos future,’ and both of us got our diploma. There’s going to be a follow up and we’ll do that one too. We are very enthusiastic about the island and we love to pass the information on to the tourists. This year many cruise ship passengers are from Latin countries and it’s great to see how they react when you address them in their own language. Tourists feel more accepted when you try to speak their language and they don’t expect you to be perfect. It’s the effort that counts! The atmosphere at the market is great and the one thing all the tourists are talking about is how clean the island is. Thanks to SELIBON, a terrific company.” Brigitte and Wilfried ar e very socially involved people. Bright as they are, they see things from a good perspective. They are optimistic with a lot of energy and because of the way they’ve traveled the world, they have a broad view, which makes them an asset to the island. “We enjoy the beauty of Bonaire every day. It’s sad to say, but other islands have lost a great deal of their charm because of over population and too much construction. Bonaire is still good, but they have to keep an eye on the developments and make sure we won’t get stuck with ruins of buildings. We’ve seen that too often in Portugal and Spain. The other day I read a letter to the editor in The Reporter about keeping Sunset Beach for the local people and we totally agreed with the writer. Sunset Beach used to be the place were we spent the weekends; the children learned how to swim there, they learned how to snorkel and it was the hangout where everybody would meet – Bonaireans, Americans and the Dutch – it was a social event, a mixture of cultures and all social levels, lots of fun! Sunset Beach should be given back to the local people. If we want to get something good out of this economic crisis – this is the opportunity. We could have a place where everyone young and old and of all backgrounds and cultures – could spend the weekend together. Some time ago Wilfried saw the famous old poster at the tax office – a picture of Sunset Beach and the text, ‘Unhurried – Unspoiled – Unforgettable.’ We could have that back. There won’t be another chance – now is the time! There’s also something else that I feel we need here: a place where people can announce all the local events that are taking place on the island, in three languages. Let’s say there could be a special announcement board at all the big supermarkets where everybody comes and each and everyone who’s organizing something – a little league tournament, a fundraising, a beauty contest, a cake baking contest – whatever little local thing – could be hung there for everyone to know, to go and see and to participate and learn about the culture of this island, so that all of us will be involved in what’s going on in our community. There’s way more to Bonaire then diving! Life on Bonaire is just different. It’s slower and we enjoy intensely meeting people of all cultures. That wouldn’t be possible in Germany at our age. Also, we’re walking, snorkeling and swimming and there are a lot of fitness places where older people can go too. Both of us need regular check-ups by specialists and we found highly qualified specialists – the same level as in Germany – on Curaçao, so for special medical treatment we don’t have to go back to Germany. When you’re 60+ in Europe there isn’t much going on anymore socially as friends don’t like to drive at night and prefer to stay at home. Here we live outside most of the day and at night there are always several happy hours. In Germany we used to go to concerts and theaters, but here there are various events taking place on a regular basis too. We went to the Jazz Festival for four nights in a row and we met everybody there. We can grow old here – we definitely want to. Wilfried and I have traveled extensively – all our lives – we’ve always been interested in meeting other cultures. We are globe trotters –we still are but Bonaire has become the center of our life.” Story & Photos by Greta Kooistra On the Island Since (Continued from page 4) Brigitte and Wilfried Kersting

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Page 6 Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 La Terassa, Kaya Grandi 23N (floor above Botica) 717-3353, 510-2318 Open MondaySaturday 10 am—6 pm nonstop Health Store Organic Products Sugarless Treats Unsalted Items Dried Fruits Herbal Teas 100% Natural Juices And more... High Quality, Healthy, Natural Products MAKING YOUR SPACE A BETTER PLACE USA LICENSED CONTRACTOR / 30 YEARS WORLDWIDE CONSTRUCTION EXPERIENCE HOURLY RATES – 7 DAYS INSTALLATIONS – RE PAIRS – REMODELS <>HOTELS <> RESTAURANTS <> <>RESIDENTIAL<> TELE 717 -3527 FAX 717-3528 CELL 701-3527 EMAIL: EQUINOXBONAIRE@AOL.COM BONAIRE VENTURES B.V. On time <> Done Right Al Fresco or Air Conditioned Dining Between Downtown and Hotel Row One street inland—Kaya Gob. Debrot 46 Reservations: 717-7070 info@bistrodeparis.com Open Monday -Saturday The European Season …. Continued from last issue Ruben Petrisie is a professional windsurfer from Bonaire who represents the island in European windsurfing competitions. His professionalism, good humor and talents make him a great ambassador for our island. In this issue he reports on the Scandinavian windsurfing scene. Sweden I ncluding waiting time at Istanbul and Prague, Turkey to Stockholm was about 18 hours, where a driver picked me up. We drove for a another three hours through Sweden all the way to Motala Varamon. The next morning I headed to the event site, a 10-minute walk along the sandy shore line of Lake Varamon. After a Swedish breakfast I was scheduled to join a slalom race, with winds blowing around 5 knots. The weather was so nice and warm for a Swedish summer that I ignored a wetsuit and went Kona racing in my shorts. I took second place in the light technical old school slalom style r ace, advancing to the next round and advanced through the whole afternoon into the finals. Before the finals there was a super long distance race. I thought that this was going to be a real long distance to be cruising on a Kona in gear number one. So I wasn’t sure if I wanted to join, but one of the kids suggested we go together and share a tandem board (a board for dual sailing). I thought that’s not so bad, we can chit chat along the way, and it’s always good to experience new things. After being in the first seven at mark number one we struggled with tacking both sails on one board at the same time while staying upwind so we lost a couple of spots. After the long distance I took it easy as I was a bit tired. It got colder and there was even less wind for the slalom finals. In the late afternoon I went to prepare the sounds and my music for a special presentation of the events sound track. The crowd enjoyed it so much I had to repeat it three times. The coolest thing is when everyone sang along between some parts of the track. I was invited by the organizer to stay a bit longer, and I did. The next day the wind blew so strong that I struggled with the Kona equipment. I couldn’t even finish the race with a 9.0 on a Kona long board. That same afternoon Rossi and I did a freestyle show for the crowds. The next days were pretty mellow; we had good windsurf sessions and talked about interesting business subjects. It was super fun hanging out with America’s eldest windsurfer, Bruce Matlack. Denmark It was super-duper cool this time and there was more sunshine than expected. I actually thought I’d brought some with me. I spent most of my days in Skødstrup, a village with a farm like feeling. I hit the road trips with Denmark’s most talented female freestyler, Xenia Kessler, who showed me some of the spots Denmark offers. We visited Ebeltoft, close to a port where a huge ferry from Copenhagen brings in some nice sets of waves. At Alrø we were out with a few local freestylers until late af ternoon. This spot offers flat to choppy conditions with gusty winds. Hvide Sande in Ringkøbing fjord offers shore side winds with choppy to flat conditions perfect for freestyle sessions and free riders. You may spot a few schools on the coast line of this lake and, mmm, don’t be surprised to see a few Germans out there who drive all the way up to enjoy this windsurf spot or fjord as well. Hanstholm / Klitmøller / The Cold Hawaii? From the east to the west coast of Jutland it takes about two and a half hours by car. Conditions were good enough to score some wave rides while Germans and Danish sailors shared the spot and the parking lot. I had some studio time with windsurfer, deejay and producer, Anders Ponsaing. We worked on a fun club track that will be released on my demo this fall. A big thanks to the Kesslers who made my stay as comfortable as possible Thanks for reading. Go explore. Ruben ‘ BNG’ Petrisie, NB50 Beach start Tandem windsurfing with the local youngsters Photos by Kona Nordic

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Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 Page 7 Bonairean Voices is sponsored by With 4 branches and 10 ATMs located throughout the island and our Internet Banking, MCB@Home, at your service anytime, any day, anywhere. BIBLIOTEKA PÚBLIKO BONEIRU (PUBLIC LIBRARY OF BONAIRE) T hese days reading programs seem to be promoted everywhere you turn. Television, radio, ads in the newspapers and magazines tell us how essential reading is to the development of the mind. Reading is the key to success. Parents are encouraged to help their children read and even they themselves are being motivated to read. In the last column we talked about nutrition in schools . And while giving the teachers a chance to read the article and make their comments we‘re going to talk about what else can help the increase the brain’s capacity. Have you got the answer yet? Of course, it’s READING. I visited our public library, wondering if there is enough material to feed our reading community. It reminds me of the time I was a high school junior and we used the library as our second home. It was fun to do your homework and be able to pick all sorts of reading materials for your projects. Well, what I can say today is that our library is in need of improvement. I had an interview with Library Interim Manager, Mrs. Sharon Bol (38), about the library’s situation. “The library is working hard to create more activities for children and youngsters,” Sharon said. “We send our personnel out to work in the field to help improve the reading habits of our community. Our main focus is kids between the ages of 6-12. We feel that this group needs our support the most. It does not mean that we forget about the other groups in our community. In the last few months the Library has started the following programs: Lesa Ku Mi, Promé Mi Drumi (Read to me before I go to sleep) is a monthly book reading for kids. Prominent Bonaireans like Lt. Governor Glenn Thodé, Bòi Antoin and Mama Smile have each read their favorite story to an eager audience. In this way the Library also tries to stimulate parents to re ad to their children. Free Library cards: The Rotary Club Bonaire sponsored free library cards for about 1,864 elementary school children and 971 SGB high school students. Over 100 enthusiastic children visit the Library every month. As of this moment the Library has welcomed almost 900 new members. Youngsters have until the end of November 2009 to receive their free library card. Dictation Papiamentu: This event took place on November 18th. There were a total of 36 participants, and seven schools were represented by students. Kinderboekenweek ( Children’s Book Week): The festival opened on November 15th. It was a festive occasion with pe rformances by a magician, actors and dance groups and several authors told stories. During the week all the schools paid a visit to the Library and listened to very talented, local storytellers like Ilviena Carolina, Tante Poppy, Denise de Jongh, Morela Wanner and Gaby Mercera. Internet café: Recently the Library received three computers and a printer. The computers can be used free of charge. The Library wants to offer services to the whole community. That is why employees of the library also visit the elderly every month to read stories to them. A group from the Literacy progra m (FORMA) receives special attention and visits the Library every month. In November there will be a photo contest for SGB students. The Library also plans to organize book readings or presentations with poets and writers for adults. The Library has a long wish list: a brand new building, an adequate facility where all the reading material is safe from moisture, sand and dust; a system that is fully computerized. A public library should offer our Bonairean community all kinds of services. Rooms to study and books for our junior and senior high schoolchildren are lacking right now. More new books for adults and children need to be purchased. Another big wish is a Library bus that can visit all the different neighborhoods, to bring the books closer to where the people are. As you can tell there is still a lot of work that needs to be done, but we are on the right track.” In every country reading is found to be important. In reading and writing lies the foundation of every civilization. If we want a new and improved library, we have to fight for it. If you have ideas on how to improve the Library, your ideas are more than welcome. The Library uses the saying : “Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body .” Yes, reading is mental nutrition. Our Nutrition in School article will continue in the next issue. Siomara Albertus . For her next column Siomara will interview teachers on the island for their opinions on the Nutrition program . Send your comments to The Bonaire Reporter, P.O. Box 407, Bonaire, or email reporter @bonairenews. com . To solve the puzzle, ente r the numbers 1 through 9 to the partially filled in puzzle without repeating a number in any row, column or 3 x 3 region. Answer on page 17. Supplied by Molly Bartikoski-Kearney I n 1856 several Dutch orders of nuns, religious “sisters,” established a school in Bonaire. Over the years the St. Francis Convent was renovated and currently it’s being used as office space and examining rooms for some of the island’s physicians. The building is located between the St. James Medical School, near the Catholic church in Playa, and Cultimara supermarket, located on the north side of Kaya L.D. Gerharts. Over the years more than 30 girls from Bonaire have joined Catholic religious orders. Since the convent closed all of the Dutch nuns returned to their homeland in the Netherlands, and the Bonairean sisters now live within the community. Behind the convent is a gem of a tiny chapel that most people hardly notice as they whisk by, to and from town. But during the week, if you stroll into the gardens, you may find the chapel open, and if not I know that one of the nurses will open it up for you to take a peek. The chapel was renovated with donations. Q) What was the name of the order of Dutch nuns who worshipped in the chapel? Answer on page 17 BonQuiz appears regularly in The Reporter. It’s prepared by Christie Dovale of Christie Dovale Island Tours . Contact her to arrange a tour, Phone 717 -4435 or 795-3456 or email: christiedovale@hotmail.com. Sharon Bol photo Christie Dovale photo Almost all children love to have someone read to them

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Page 8 Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 I f Bonaire’s second Referendum had been held last week the Dutch ministry workers might be packing their bags to return to Holland. According to the outcome of a random survey of 365 people on Bonaire, carried out by CURISES students (Curaçao Institute for Social and Economic Studies of the University of the Netherlands Antilles), about restructuring of the Dutch Kingdom, more than 65% of the island’s population would choose a “free association” with the Netherlands instead of the “integration” currently underway. The key question asked “Should the direct relationship with the Netherlands be free association instead of integration?” – is similar to the proposed question the Referendum Committee had presented in its report earlier this month. If Bonaireans vote the same way in the March 2010 Referendum, it would trash much of the work now underway by the Dutch Government and create an uncertain future for the island. The students released the outcome of their survey last week which they said has a sample error of 4.9%. The Bonaire Government did not participate in the setup or influence the poll. THE SURVEY Critics and survey assessment professionals applauded the initiative but found fault with the approach of the students’ survey. They felt the results were inappropriately portrayed as showing a clear level of support for the current government’s positions. The survey revealed that over 91% of the respondents were either badly informed ( Malu ) or more or less informed ( Mas o ménos ). If this is the case, then they say the answers to the survey’s three key questions become meaningless: 1. I agree with the current content of the 'laso directo' with Holland -since 9 of 10 respondents have little or no idea what this means, the value of the answer becomes suspect. 2. What the UPB Government negotiated with Holland does not seem to be good for Bonaire .The same logic applies here. If you do not know what the issues are, how can you know if you are for or against them? 3. 'Laso direkto' with Holland must be 'free association' The term 'free association' is a fuzzy concept that has been discussed but never clearly defined in the case of Bonaire. There are several examples of ‘free association’ arrangements in the world, but each is unique and the result of extensive negotiation between the governments involved. IMPLICATION OF THE RESULTS It is clear that both the integration side and the free association side have to educate the public. The free association supporters have been most vocal, are politically organized and making use of the Internet to present their viewpoint. The Dutch say they must remain clear of the debate because of UN rules. Beset by allegations of misconduct and a changing leadership the UPB (green party) has not vigorously defended the integration position it promoted for several years. WAS THE SURVEY WELL DONE? Not according to research professional who reviewed the results. According to them several of the questions violated one of the basic rules of surveying in that they telegraphed the answer expected. For example: I believe that Holland should have everything to say about Bonaire. This option has never been on the table and no one seems to have even presented it. The question almost demands a 'disagree' response. A fairer question might have been: I believe that Holland should have a larger say in Bonaire affairs in return for the Dutch government paying off our debt, investing in our infrastructure and providing additional services for our community If Bonaire becomes a municipality of Holland then pensions, support payments etc. MUST BE THE SAME as in Holland . This is another self-answering question. What is missing is the information relating to higher taxes, higher cost for car registration, higher OB and other costs that would be required to pay for this equality. A fairer question might have been: If Bonaire becomes a municipality there should be total equality with Holland in every regard, this would mean equal pensions, support payments, taxes, OB, including laws dealing with marijuana, abortion, euthanasia etc. To be fair the question has to give both the cost and the benefit. The influence of Holland is becoming greater in Bonaire . Of course it is. What is the implication of this? Good or bad? There is no way to tell. The present Dutch government position is that Bonaire can have a referendum but if the citizenry does not accept what has already been negotiated, Holland will not cooperate any longer and will stop paying for various projects. UNBALANCE Questions about the unanimous agreement in 2006 of the Island Council with becoming a municipality, the fact of a signed agreement to continue along this path, and the amount of money being sent by Holland were not presented in the survey. That creates an unbalance in any conclusions reached. How many of the respondents would continue to send money to a store that changed the product after the order was placed and if the store never shipped the product? THE US DOLLAR AS LOCAL CURRENCY In a related question the survey found that most people support the conversion from the Antilles Guilder to the US Dollar: 55.5% were in favor, 25.2% opposed and 19.6% don’t care. The Referendum debate is just beginning. The Reporter will be listening. G.D. How informed are you about the Referendum? In general, as the age of the respondents increased their opinion leaned more towards integration A t a press lunch on Sunday, November 15, Senator Ramonsito Booi announced he was stepping down as the UPB party leader and retiring from political activism to spend more time at his Warahama kunuku. Surrounded by close family members, party associates and a large press contingent from several islands, he appeared close to tears at times as he related the history of the party and the role he, his supporters and even his adversaries play ed over the years. The hearty local food and a variety of beverages created a relaxed atmosphere and rapport with the press. There was even a tour of the kunuku’s animal pens and shade houses. But less than a week later Senator Booi changed his mind. Last Saturday night, November 21, at a gathering at party headquarters in Sabana, he said that “he resigned to the will of God and the party” and will stay at the helm of the UPB. With the slogan, “Now, UPB. More than ever,” he agreed to lead his party’s campaign for the parliamentary elections on January 22, 2010. G.D. T CB recently awarded Christ and Anneke Vlenteijn of Holland Silver Ambassador Medals in honor of their 16 consecutive years of visits to Bonaire. Happily it coincided with their 45th wedding anniversary. They were awarded their medals and certificates by TCB’s Helen Thodé. Congratulations, new Ambassadors! Press release Kunukero Booi TCB photo

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Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 Page 9 This Month– Dec. Energy Work Classes At Bonaire Basics By a Top American Healing Touch Instructor (http://www.htwfoundation.org ) 1-Healing Touch (Level 1) Class on Dec. 18, 2009 A one day intensive course for giving you the skills to support good health and heal yourself, loved ones and others. Instructor: Susan Reed -DeSalvo, LVN, HTCP/I, CMTSusan Reed is a Wellness Coach and Nurse with over 25 years experience and an Energy Medicine Instructor. In the hospital environment Susan specializes in ICU, cardiology, cardiac rehab fitness, behavioral health, dialysis and wound care. Tuition NAƒ 150 ($85) in Bonaire ($350 in USA) + $30 for materials 2Energetic Touch Techniques Class, Evenings, Dec. 22 and 29th, 2009 for advanced practitioners Tuition NAƒ 150 ($85) in Bonaire (regular USA fee is $350) Register today by emailing Susan at blueskyz@idiom.com 001 707 9286565 local contact George DeSalvo 790-8988 Ab Klink. Klink is currently analyzing the potential to curb the cost of treating BES island patients abroad by flying in doctors. He assured better medical provisions and an improved health care system for the three islands that should become part of the Netherlands as “public entities” in 2010. Five of the 13 custodians of the Bonaire jail left for the Netherlands for two weeks. Rene Borg Linden, Ditmar Palm, Silberie Humphrey, Roy Burleson and Arlene Dorothea, as interns, will check out the jails in Lelystad and Almere. The internship is intended to show “what else can be accomplished in the Bonaire jail.” The interns will study safety, daily routine, hygiene and the intake process of inmates. Their study will include interviewing prisoners and intake procedures. The Dutch economy grew by 0.4% in the third quarter of this year, compared with the previous quarter, meaning the country is now officially out of recession. The new figures from Central Bureau for Statistics (CBS) revealed the first period of economic growth in a year. On an annual basis, however, the economy contracted by 3.7%. “According to normal definitions, the Netherlands is now out of recession,” the CBS said in a press statement. Environmental NGOs have been hit hard by the economic downturn and this has had an impact on their effectiveness. In a recent survey of 800 US-based nonprofits, 75% reported feeling the effects of the downturn, with more than half already experiencing significant cuts in funding from both government and private foundation sources. According to the figures being reported to this newspaper the number of lionfish being reported just about doubles every seven days . Elsmarie Beukenboom, Director of STINAPA, agrees that more and more Lionfish are being identified in the waters of Bonaire. STINAPA considers the fish a danger to the indigenous fish of Bonaire. Divers have reported the sightings and the Marine Park has gone into a state of alert. Beukenboom says, “Lionfish are everywhere. They have appeared in Los Roques (islands 200 miles to the east) and along Venezuela’s Falcon state coast.” If swimmers see a Lionfish they should report it to STINAPA headquarters at 717-8444. They should not attempt to capture it themselves. Fine original art is available on Bonaire . Check out page 18 for a glimpse of Ronald Verhoven’s work or go to ronaldverhoven@msn.com The Second Hamburger BBQ competition will be on December 5 at Flamingo TV on Kaya Korona, from 3pm onwards. Anyone is allowed to participate, but space is limited to 20 competitors. Registration forms are available at the offices of Flamingo TV. Those wanting more information can call 511-4216 The idea is for the contest to be a family event. There will be games for kids and even a mini-cake decorating contest for those aged 4-10, all for FREE! Sinterklaas will also be making a special stop. In addition, there will be local bands providing great music. There will be a great end of the year Christmas concert on Saturday, December 19 at 7:30 pm at the Cacique Hall, Plaza Resort Bonaire. The Classical Music Board of Bonaire will present Musicians from Bonaire for Bonaire. The program will include light European, American and Antillean classical music; sing-alongs and more! Plus an after party. Performances: Krusa Musika : Linda Anthony, soprano; Joke Dekkers, alto; Hans Faassen, piano and bass; Erik van Silfhout, tenor and violin. With Special guests: Joke Dekkers, alto, and Hans van der Veen, trumpet. The End of the Year Choir with 35 singers. A combined effort from Ars Kantandi and Kreator, conductor Frans Lauxen; piano Sue Felix Radjwant Gonesh , piano solo with Antillean dances. The first presentation in the Dutch Antilles of a Portatief , a wooden pipe organ, played by Frans Lauxen. Tutti Frutti the pearls of Rincon, with classical ballads and dances from Bonaire well as an after party with Tutti Frutti. Tickets are only NAƒ 25 at Books and Toys, Flamingo Bookstore ( Kaya Grandi) and the reception at Plaza Resort Bonaire. They will be NAƒ 35 at the door. Children under 12 , accompanied by parents pay NAƒ 10. A full house is expected. Get tickets early and don’t be late! What’s a gift everyone will love? A Jong Bonaire 2010 calendar. On sale at the Warehouse Bonaire Supermarket at the cost price. Buy several. Our last issue had a few errors. UPB leader Yonchi Dortalina’s name and our granddaughter’s second middle name, Tallan , were misspelled. The photo in the coral spawning article was taken by Johannetta Gordijn . We apologize for the mistakes. G./L. D. Flotsam & Jetsam (Continued from page 2) Minister of Justice of the Netherlands Antilles is responsible). The organization of the new IND is being set up by George Mensché, Jan de Jong and others on Bonaire and in the Netherlands. Both men agree on the quality of the cooperation. “We are really working well together. Good cooperation doesn’t mean that we always agree on everything. It does mean that we are willing to listen to each other, that there is trust between us and that we are working together on the solutions of problems. The basis is mutual respect and that’s the way it should be!” Story and photo by Inge Vos Kwartiermakers and Counterparts (Continued from page 3) Inge Vos is a recent arrival on Bonaire. She has experience in Communications and writes for Dutch language newspapers . The Social Insurance Bank (SVB) ha s introduced insurance for people over 60. Up until now SVB insurance was cut off when someone became 60 yearsold. Their only alternative then was expens ive private insurance or a “PP, poor persons” card. According to Health Minister Omayra Leeflang, the announcement of the new package on October 1 is “the redemption of sins against the elderly.” PP recipients will be included. To be covered by SVB, a 60-plus person must apply at SVB to validate his/her rights. He/she must sign an authorization form allowing SVB to submit his/her information to the Inspectorate of Taxes for verification. A previously insured worker, turning 60, will remain insured after applying. SVB is obliged to accept all pensioners, re gardless of their taxable income and no matter the nature of their illness. Under the premium base, taxable income has to be no more than two years old. The pensioner will authorize SVB to gather information from the Inspectorate of Taxes, where his/her identity number and/or CRIB-number is recorded for verification. The insured will pay a premium of 10.4% up to a limit of NAƒ 478 per month. For example, if a person’s income were NAƒ 2.000 per month, he she would pay 10.4%t of that amount or NAƒ 208 per month. If the person is receiving an AOV pension, on application, he/she can authorize SVB to withhold the premium for sickness insurance from his or her old age pension. For a retired couple each must pay his or her own premium. A 60-plusser who does not receive a pension or if his/her pension is not sufficient is obligated to pay his/her own premium. Visit the SVB for full information,

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Page 10 Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 W ith the help of the Dutch Ministry for Youth and Family, Jong Bonaire has completely upgraded its computer lab at the youth center. Regional Service Center (RSC) kwartiermaker Marga Drewes helped the center make the application for the project and was on hand recently for the grand opening. “On behalf of the Ministry and the RSC it gives us great pleasure to contribute toward Bonaire’s future,” said Drewes at th e opening of the computer lab. “Fast computers that work well are important for our young people to learn and better prepare for their future. “This is just the first of many investments that the Ministry plans to help improve the services available to the families and youth of Bonaire,” Drew es said during the opening of the renovated facility. With the grant from the RSC Jong Bonaire was able to install 26 new computers along with an upgraded server for the system. Electricity for the equipment was also upgraded along with new erko (air conditioning) and a new roof for the computer lab. “Most of the equipment in the computer lab was six years old and many of the computers were no longer working. Even if a computer was working it was very slow,” said Rene Hakkenberg, voorzitter (President) for the Jong Bonaire bestuur (Directorate). “It had become difficult for the members to do their homework.” “The computer lab is one of the most popular activities at Jong Bonaire,” said manager Jona Chirino. “Now the facility can better meet the needs of our members but also other groups in the community who need to rent such a facility for training.” The new system also has updated software and new educational programs for the teens to improve their language and other skills. Some of the funds from the RSC will also be used to purchase more educational software. “The resources of the RSC are very much appreciated and it has been very helpful and productive working with this group,” said Hakkenberg. “Our island and also Jong Bonaire have very limited resources. On our own we could not have made these important improvements to the youth center.” In 2010 there will be more improvements to both the Jong Bonaire facility and its programs that will also be sponsored by the Ministry. The new computer system was developed and installed by Breathe IT, under the direction of Jorge Ferrón and his two specialists, Leonard Blackman and Fernando Hatermink. Pourier Construction made the roof and construction repairs while the center was closed for Regatta. MESA arrang ed for the electrical upgrades and StreefkerkTek managed the project. Story and photo by Jane Townsend I n recent weeks work has begun on the construction of “exclusion” cages along Kaminda di Sorobon as part of a year-long study to determine the possible impacts of grazing and trampling by goats and donkeys on mangrove habitat. The cages are designed to deter grazing and trampling by fencing off small areas (1 meter square). The cages will be constructed of polyethylene mesh attached to small diameter poles and the height of the cages will be such to prevent grazing from above. Once the cages are built, regular sampling will assess the plant density and biomass within the cages as well as invertebrate presence and sediment characteristics. The study is being conducted by Dr. Amanda Hollebone of the CIEE Research Station Bonaire and Scott Hausmann, a retired US wetland expert, with approval of STINAPA and the government of Bonaire. For additional information on the study please contact CIEE Research St ation Bonaire at 717-4140. Press release Jona Chirino, manager of JB; Jorge Ferron of Breathe IT; kwartiermaker for youth and family Marga Drewes; Glenda Bernabela from the board of JB; JB Foundation President Rene Hakkenberg; IT specialists, Leonard Blackman and Fernando Hatermink. Bonaire's First “Personal” Self Storage Facility Storage space from closet size to garage size. Monthly, yearly and long term contracts. Mangasina di Boneiru, B.V. P.O. Box 50 Kaya Gob. Debrot 124B Behind the yellow “Rum Factory” Across from Hamlet Oasis. Call 700-1753 WWW.BONAIRESELFSTORAGE .COM E-mail: info@ bonaireselfstorage.com Secure Storage For Vehicles, Household Items, Diving And Sporting Gear, Business Files or Inventory Young mangroves

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Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 Page 11 Date : 28th November 2009 Time : 09:00 – 17:00 Exhibition of the building system 11:00 – 12:30 Product workshop on the building Environmental/Cost Effectiven ess/Structural Integrity Place: Bonaire Sunshine Homes Building at Kaya Lib. S. Bolivar 26 Banco di Caribe and RBBT will take mortgage applications and pre-approve on site A t last there’s a world class delicatessen on Bonaire. It’s Eli Deli on the traffic circle by the old Sunset Beach Hotel and is run by Ana, her husband Eugene and daughter Eli, an SGB student. The shop offers 23 different kinds of cheeses. Take your pick: they’re from Italy, Sweden, Belgium, Holland, England and Spain. Beautiful hams are Serrano, Parma, Ardenne, Hungarian. There’s Spanish salami and chorizo, linburgse, york ham and pastrami to mention a few. Buy them by the slice to take home or have them made into hot or cold sandwiches and accompany that with their homemade salads and olives. Eli Deli is open for breakfast too. They have omelets, croissants and espresso type coffees. On the shelves are rice from India, Spain and Italy, pastas, olive oils, and sardines. Ana, from Portugal, is married to Eugene from Bonaire and during their 11 year s in Holland Ana at first worked in the hotel business as a chef but during the last seven years she immersed herself in working in a delicatessen in Rotterdam, the Vermeijden Deli. The family returned to Bonaire two years ago and now they’ve realized their dream to have their own delicatessen on Bonaire. And we all could not be happier! Eli’s Deli is open Monday-Friday, 7-6, Saturday 8-4 and Sunday 8-noon. Tel. 717-3997. Laura DeSalvo T his year’s Sixth Annual Study and Job Fair ( beroepnmarkt ) on Saturday the 14th of November the was an opportunity for all youngsters and their families to see what their future could be. How very fortunate that such a fair exists for young people to be able to see for themselves what a grand selection there is from which to choose. Do you want to be a banker, a nurse, a fireman, find a school of higher education? This is your chance. The rooms and patios of Jong Bonaire thronged with people eager to get information from the exhibitors. This year there were dozens of exhibitors an d lots of people to talk about their subject, to answer questions and especially to show their enthusiasm. There were representatives from banks, the police and fire departments, the Coast Guard, insurance companies, phone companies, STINAPA, the high school, TCB, and many many more from on island and off. This amazing fair was put together by the Ban Boneiru Bek Foundation. They deserve a big thank you. Laura DeSalvo Herman van Leeuwen photo

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Page 12 Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 I am pretty sure all of us will agree that at the moment it is very hot and dry here on Bonaire, and we are perspiring like mad. Ten minutes after walking out of a shower I am ready to go back for another one. Does one ever get used to this? Very few people realize just how many vitamins and minerals are lost from the body on a daily basis due to this excessive perspiring. Don’t get me wrong, perspiring is good as, together with the kidneys, toxins are expelled from the body. Just look at the color of your first urine in the morning. The darker the color, the more toxins in your body. Drinking a fair amount of water throughout the day helps with urinating and perspiration, but unfortunately also adds to a loss of vitamins and minerals that, unless a very large portion of your daily food intake is raw, is not being replenished. The end result of a loss of vitamins and minerals is initially minor problems like fatigue, headaches, body cramps, colds and susceptibility to minor viruses like eye infection, a stomach virus, fevers or the “kissing disease.” The importance of minerals to the human body has been largely ignored for too long. If the cells of the body do not receive their proper nourishment or when they cannot rid themselves of toxic waste, a disease process will begin and the automatic alarm system activates symptoms. The body’s inability to rid itself of toxic waste is perhaps the biggest contributor to disease and can so easily be rectified by supplementing with minerals. The reason we keep on getting the same health problems is that diseased cells (without proper nourishment) are replaced by weak cells instead of strong healthy cells. The most effective mineral supplements are the 12 Biochemic Cell Salts available worldwide under brand names like New Era and Highlands. These cell salts provide inorganic elements in a form that ensures easy absorption into the body and can be used safely by children and adults alike. Their uses are endless and I suggest you first reach for your minerals before taking any overthe-counter medication. For more information you could contact me on 788-0030 or visit our website www.harmonyhousebonaire.com/ html/minerals.html Next issue – Do negative emotions rule your life? Stephanie Bennett Author Stephanie Bennett was born in Cape Town, South Africa, where she studied herbs, minerals and nutrition. Before moving to Bonaire she continued her studies in UK, and now researches health issues that particularly affect people on Bonaire and other Caribbean Islands. SURE CAUSE OF BAD SNORKELING VISIBILITY Dear Editor, As a regular swimmer I visit Bongo’s Beach during my lunch breaks. I could not help noticing the invasion of the cruise ship tourists. They are all over: in the restaurant, at the pool, on the beach, on the pier and its slippery stairs, and, of course, in the water. You know what happens if, let’s say, 100 persons swim around the pier for a few hours? The water turns completely white, like milk. Vision zero, and a terri ble smell like a cheap after-shave is hanging above the water. Only after 10 meters from the pier or so, visibility becomes better again. The cause of this phenomenon can only be the sun lotion (sun screen, suntan lotion) people are obviously using in a great measure . When I tried “Googling” pollution + sun lotion + water in different settings I only found items about protecting yourself against polluted water. If you search for water-proof or water-resistant sun lotion, all people are interested in is having to rub yourself as little as possible. Not a word about the consequences for the water itself. Finally, however, I did find some items about natural lotions which are friendly to the environment. So they exist! I know that it is forbidden by STINAPA to use sun lotion if you are going to kayak in the mangroves. Signs say so at the Kayak Center and at Lac. Is it not strange then that this prohibition is not valid for the sea? Jibe City for instance is very close to the mangroves but does not know about the prohibition of using sun lotion. I think that next to some causes of damaging the reefs, there is another one to take care of: making people see what the consequences are of using sun lotion that is not water-resistant. It will become a hard task because the funny thing was that most of those people who were swimming over there in th e milk with their snorkels did not even bother to go more than 10 meters away from the pier. They just kept snorkeling, seeing nothing but white! Maybe they spread the wo rd that snorkeling on Bonaire is not something to do because of the terrible visibility. Problem solved! R. Sanders Note: A study sponsored by the European Commission determined ther e is evidence that sun blocking lotions can harm the reefs. See http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/ europe/2018159/European-Commission-Suntanlotions-could-kill-colourful-corals.html Currently only biodegra dable sunscreens are permitted in Cozumel's marine park, Xcaret Ed. WHY ARE CRUISE VISITORS SO PRIVILEGED? Dear Editor: Quite a few vacationers, many of whom have come to Bonaire year after year, are asking some serious questions. It was announced that everyone on Bonaire should try to make sure the people getting off cruise ships are shown a wonderful time so when they leave after a few hours here, they do so with a very good impression of Bonaire. The people who are vacationing here for a week or two and spend 100's of times more money ask what about their impression of Bonaire? Does no one care what they think? Roads are blocked off so they cannot get around town easily. Tour buses make driving to places such as Karpata take an hour instead of minutes because tour buses will not allow anyone to pass and stop every few minutes. Beaches are overrun with cruise ship passengers taking away space so vacationers are pushed aside. The water in front of these beaches is an oil slick from sun tan lotion, proven to be very harmful to corals. These passengers walk down the roads instead of using sidewalks, making driving difficult. A huge amount of money is being spent on a pier which is questionable if it will pay for itself while other areas of Bonaire are left to decay. Why do these cruise ship people pay a pittance (which has only started this year!) when everyone else pays a huge departure tax and at least $5.50 per day just to be here? Why do cruise ship passengers pay nothing to use the Bonaire National Marine Park when others have to pay a minimum of $10? So the bottom line is why do people who spend a few dollars get such high preference over those who spend thousands and are far less a problem to the overall environment of Bonaire? These are just some of the questions that are being asked by our best guests coming to Bonaire. Bruce Bowker THE BONAIRE REPORTER ON LINE Dear Editor: We have been reading The Bonaire Reporter (on-line) for a long time. We love Bonaire and your publication is just wonderful -a great way to stay in touch with what is going on, and a good long-distance reminder of Bonaire's daily life. After saying that, I'm a little embarrassed to admit that I haven't looked in several months -sometimes it's hard to accept that we can't always afford to visit. So today I found a few things on the (new) Bonaire Reporter home page on the web. First, I think the raw news is great! It's a little like the Flotsam and Jetsam section. Very interesting. And today we see little Ava Rose Tallan Wuyts. Beautiful. May she have a happy life. Chris Ischay, Boston, MA HOW DOES THIS CLIMATE AFFECT YOUR BODY?

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Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 Page 13 Bonaire Reporter Classifieds— Are still free Got something to buy or sell? Non-Business Classified Ads (up to 4 lines/ 20± words): FREE Commercial Ads only NA ƒ 1 per word, for each two-week issue. Call 790-6518 or 790-6125 or email For sale: Painting of Anton Heyboer 'Boat' in black and yellow, framed, size 1.10 x .79 cm. NAƒ 5000 .'Windmachine', one speed, NAƒ 40.-. For sale: Hand embroidered antique Indian tapestry, 1.25 x 1.65 cm, NAƒ 300 .Phone 786-3117. —————————————For rent at Hato, 2 studios for 1 person. Minimum stay 4 months. no airco Incl.; gas/water/electricity/internet/linen/ selibon/furnished/garden/parking place/ terrace/ Rent per month NAƒ 650,-or 600,--Deposit NAƒ 750 or 600,-717 2529 or 796 2529 _____________________________ For rent at Hato , studio for 1 person. Minimum stay 4 months. no airco. Incl.; Gas/water/ electricity/internet/ linen/selibon/furnished/garden/parking place/terrace/ Rent per month NAƒ 600,-Deposit NAƒ 600,-Call 7172529 or 7962529 _____________________________ Porch Sale , Saturday 28-11-09 Saturday from 8-4pm. Bikes, sliding doors, (fish )books, clothes, electric stuff, weights for diving, diving stuff, 2 garden tables, paintings, wooden gifts etc.. Kaya Utrecht 25, Hato . _____________________________ 1/2 Container to USA. Need to send something to the USA? I have half a container going to the U.S. in Dec. $1,300. Call 795-1277 —————————————— Free Packing boxes, from the 13th to 20th of December contact me at info@soundfound.com for details. ——————————————— Two Large Airline Approved Dog Kennels Needed – Please call 5281304. _____________________________ WANTED Used sewing machine in good condition with all working parts. Call 528-1304. _____________________________ NexStar 8 GPS Telescope Star gazing for anyone. All accessories included tripod, 4 eye pieces, star finder, AC adapter. Almost new. Call 717-7278 for more information. NAƒ 1300 _____________________________ Put your ad here and get results Fast . Tel (599) 791-6272 / 785-6272 hans@outdoorbonaire.com www.outdoorbonaire.com Property Services Bonaire B.V. Taking care of your properties (while you are off island). Email for information and prices: propertyservicesbonaire@hotmail.com Bonaire Images Elegant greeting cards and beautiful boxed note cards are now available at Chat -N-Browse next to Lover’s Ice Cream and Sand Dollar Grocery. Photography by Shelly Craig www.bonaireimages.com GREAT CLEANING SERVICE For Quality House and Office Cleaning ……. CALL JRA Serving Bonaire for more than 15 years Honest, Reliable, Efficient, Thorough, Low rates, References. One time or many Phone 785-9041 … and relax. LUNCH TO GO Starting from NAƒ6 per meal. Call CHINA NOBO 717-8981. Web site: www.chinanobobonaire.com KRALENDIJK TIDES (Heights in feet, FT) Remember: Winds and weather can further influence the local tide’s height and time 16 Flights a day between Bonaire and Curaçao Divi Divi Air Reservations 24 hours a day Call (5999 839-1515) Or (5999 L ucy Diaz, with her lovely daughter, Elesiêr A ngel, last October took a cruise aboard the Carnival " Freedom " and they visited a couple of places among others the island of Jamaica. They took the opportunity to visit the very famous "Dunn's Falls River" in Ocho Rios. And of course they brought with them The Bonaire Reporter . Transport of Money and Valuables Private Investigations Vehicle patrols Burglar Alarms Fire Alarm Systems In Business Over 26 years Kaya Nikiboko Nord 37A, PO Box 225 Tel: (599) 7178125 Fax (599) 7176125 E-mail sss@bonairelive.com WIN GREAT PRIZES! Take a copy of The Bonaire Reporter with you on your next trip or when you return to your home. Then take a photo of yourself with the newspaper in hand. THE BEST PHOTOS OF THE YEAR WILL WIN THE PRIZES. Mail photos to Bonaire Reporter , Box 407, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN). E-mail to: in fo@bonairereporter.com. DATE Time Ht. Time Ht. Time Ht. Time Ht. ` COEF 11-27 1:25 1.0FT. 9:50 1.8FT. 18:21 1.1FT. 20:18 1.2FT. 38 11-28 1:14 1.0FT. 10:06 1.9FT. 19:14 1.0FT. 21:47 1.1FT. 48 11-29 1:01 1.0FT. 10:31 2.0FT. 20:05 0.9FT. 23:05 1.0FT. 60 11-30 11:06 2.1FT. 20:48 0.9FT. 73 12-01 11:43 2.1FT. 21:43 0.8FT. 84 12-02 12:22 2.1FT. 22:28 0.7FT. 93 12-03 13:12 2.1FT. 23:06 0.7FT. 98 12-03 13:12 2.1FT. 23:06 0.7FT. 98 12-04 13:59 2.1FT. 23:44 0.7FT. 100 12-05 0:18 0.7FT. 14:56 2.0FT. 97 12-06 0:56 0.7FT. 15:54 1.9FT. 90 12-07 1:23 0.8FT. 17:01 1.7FT. 81 12-08 1:42 0.9FT. 8:46 1.5FT. 13:18 1.4FT. 18:05 1.6FT. 70 12-09 1:49 1.0FT. 8:45 1.6FT. 15:13 1.2FT. 19:22 1.4FT. 60 12-10 1:40 1.0FT. 9:07 1.8FT. 16:32 1.1FT. 20:28 1.3FT. 54 A Unique Haircut experience at The Windsurf Place, Sorobon, with Desiree. Open weekdays from 12 noon, Weekends by appointment. Phone: 786-6416 info@aplaceforyoubonaire.com CAPT. DON’S ISLAND GROWER Trees and plants, Bonaire grown . 8000m2 nursery. Specializing in garden/septic pumps and irrigation. Kaminda Lagoen 103, Island Growers NV (Capt. Don & Janet). 786-0956 ________________________________ IS YOUR HOUSE NEW TO YOU? Make it more livable from the start. FENG SHUI CONSULTATIONS Also interior or exterior design advice, clearings, blessings, energy, healing, China-trained. Experienced. Inexpensive. Call Donna at 795-9332 . FELMAR Cleaning Services Apartments, Hotels, Houses, Offices & More. Efficient Work, Good References. Tel. 786-0019

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Page 14 Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 Thursday, Nov. 26 – American Thanksgiving Day Friday, Nov. 27 – Green Label’s 10year Anniversary party, 5-8 pm, at the shop, Kaya Industria 28, behind TIS. See story on page 15 Friday, November 27 – Bonaire Animal Shelter Bi-Ann ual Fundraiser: Indonesian Dinner and Art Auction. Dinner 6 pm, Art Auction 8 pm. Dinner is NAƒ 55 per person. Auction is free. Plaza Hotel. Tickets at: Asecom NV (7173207), Jacobs Architekten NV (787 -0466), Jan Kerklaan (786-3454), Animal Shelter Bonaire (717-4989). Or by email: paulwichers @flamingotv.net\ Saturday, November 28 – Sanikolas (Sint Nicholaas) and Swarte Pieten (Black Petes) arrive at Town Pier at 9:30 am. The 15th year organized by Fundashon Ata Sanikolas i Swartepiet and SEBIKI. Fun and games in Wilhelmina Park. Saturday, Nov. 28 – Affordable Homes Expo, 8:30am-5 pm, Bonaire Sunshine Homes, opposite San Bernardo church and Scarlet’s Flower shop Saturday, Nov. 28 Opening of Exhibition by Hortence Brouwn, Feelings.” Plaza Resort, 7-9 pm. Music performances by Hans Faassen and Guus Gerritsen. Exhibit ends Jan. 8, 2010 Sunday, Nov. 29 – Last “Taste of Bonaire” of the year. Anniversary Celebration of the Bonaire National Marine Park, Wilhelmina Park, 6-9pm. Saturday, Dec. 5 – Big monthly Rincon Market, 6 am to 2 pm. Stands selling gifts, local foods, arts, handicrafts, candles. Music too. Saturday, Dec. 5 – Flea Market at Parke Publico, 3 – 7 pm. Everyone welcome to buy and to sell. NAƒ10 per selling tables (NAƒ5 goes to upkeep of the park). NGOs can have a free table. Call Vicky Bissessar 786-1592. Saturday, Dec. 5 – Burger Contest, at Flamingo TV. More information on page 9. REGULAR EVENTS By appointment – Rooi Lamoenchi Kunuku Park Tours $21 (includes tax). Discounts for residents and local people. Tel. 717-8489, 5409800. Parke Publico children’s playground open every day into the cooler evening hours. Saturdays Rincon Marshé —6 am-2 pm. Enjoy a Bonairean breakfast while you shop, fresh fruits and vegetables, gifts, local sweets, snacks, arts, handicrafts, candles, incense, drinks, music. Big Marché first Saturday of the month— www.infobonaire.com/rincon. Flea Market at Parke Publico every first Saturday of the month, 3 to 7 pm. Everyone welcome to buy and to sell. NAƒ10 per selling table.(NAƒ 5 goes to up-keep the park). NGOs can have a free table. More information and reservations for a spot call Vicky Bissessar 786-1592 . Wine Tasting at Antillean Wine Company’s warehouse on Kaya Industria, second Saturday of the month , 7-9 pm. Snacks and tasting of six wines for $10 (NAƒ17,50) per person. Tel. 5607539. Soldachi Tours— See the real Bonaire and be transported back in time. Learn about the history, culture and nature by Bonaireans from Rincon. Call Maria Koeks for more information—7967870. Mondays Soldachi Tours of Rincon, the heart of Bonaire, 9 am-noon. $20-Call Maria, 717-6435-best island tour value Fridays Harbour Village Tennis, Social Round Robin 7-10 pm. $10 per pers on. Cash bar. All invited. Call Elisabeth Vos at 565-5225 FREE SLIDE/VIDEO SHOWS Sunday– Creature Feature– John and Suzie Wall of Buddy’s Digital photo center present a multimedia slide presentation about Buddy’s House Reef pool bar Buddy Dive , 6:30-7 pm, 717-5080 Tuesday -Bonaire Land and Ocean presentation by Fish-Eye Photo staff, 7pm on the big screen inside the Sunset Bar and Grill at Den Laman Condos. Wednesday– Sea Turtle Conservation Bonaire presents the Sea Turtles of Bonaire Slide Show , every 2nd & 4th Wednesday at Bruce Bowker's Carib Inn (717-8819) at 7pm. BONAIRE’S TRADITIONS Kas Krioyo Rincon— Step into Bonaire’s past in this venerable old home that has been restored and furnished so it appears the family has just stepped out. Local ladies will tell you the story. Open Monday thru Friday, 9 –12, 24. Weekends by appointment. Call 717-2445. Mangasina di Rei, Rincon . Enjoy the view from “The King’s Storehouse.” Learn about Bonaire’s culture. Visit homes from the 17th century. Daily. Call 717-4060 / 790-2018 Bonaire Museum on Kaya J. v.d. Ree, behind the Catholic Church in town. Open weekdays from 8 am-noon, 1:30-5 pm. Tel. 717-8868 Washington-Slagbaai National Park, Museum and Visitors’ Center. Open daily 8 am-5 pm. Closed on December 25th. and January 1st. Call 788 9015 or 796 5681 CLUBS and MEETINGS AA meetings every Wednesday at 7pm. Phone: 786-4651 or 786-7971 Al-Anon meetings every Monday evening at 7 pm. Call 790-7272 Weekly Bonaire Talker Gathering and Dinner at Gibi's Tuesday 6:30 pm call 567-0655 for directions. Bridge Club Wednesdays , 7:15 pm— All levels, NAƒ2,50, call Renata at 796-5591 to find out the evening’s location. Darts Club plays every other Sunday at City Café. Registration at 4, games at 5. Tel. 717-2950, 560-7539. JCI First Wednesday of the MonthJunior Chamber International Bonaire (JCI Bonaire, formerly known as Bonaire Jaycees) meets at the ABVO building, Kaminda Jato Baco 36 from 7:30 to 9:30 pm. Everyone is welcome. Contact: Renata Domacassé 516-4252. Kiwanis Club meets at APNA Plaza, Kaya International, every other Tuesday, 7 pm . Tel. 717-5595, Jeannette Rodriguez. Lions Club meets every 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month at 8 pm at Kaya Sabana #1. All Lions welcome. For more information call 510-0710. Rotary lunch meetings Wednesdays , 12 noon-2 pm Divi Flamingo Beach Resort upstairs in Peter Hughes meeting room above the dive shop. All Rotarians welcome. Tel. 717-2066 Toastmasters Club meets every two weeks. For more information call Crusita de Palm at 786-3827 or Lucia Martinez Beck, at 786-2953. CHURCH SERVICES Protestant Congregation of Bonaire: Kralendijk, Wilhelminaplein. In Papiamentu, Dutch, English, Sundays, 10 am. Rincon, Kaya C.D. Crestian, in Papiamentu, Sundays, 8:30 am. Children’s club, Saturdays, 5 pm, in Kralendijk Sunday School, Sundays, 4 pm, in Rincon. Bible Study and Prayer meetings, Thursdays, at 8 pm, Kralendijk. New Apostolic Church: Centro di Bario Nord Saliña , Sundays, 10 am. Services in Dutch. 700-0379 . International Bible Church of Bonaire, at SGB High School auditorium (Kaya Frater Odulfinus, off Kaya Korona.) Sunday services in English at 9 am; Sunday evening prayer meeting at Pastor's home, 7 pm. Fridays, 6 to 8 pm, Light & Life Club, children 5 to 12 yrs. Tel. 717-8332. Catholic: San Bernardus in Kralendijk – Services, Sunday at 8 am and 7 pm in Papiamentu, 717-8304. Our Lady of Coromoto in Antriol , Saturday at 6 pm in English. Mass in Papiamentu on Sunday at 9 am and 6 pm. 7174211. Assembly of God (Asemblea di Dios): Kaya Triton (Den Cheffi). In English, Dutch & Papiamentu on Sunday at 10 am. Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 pm . 717-2194 Ministerio di Kristu Hesus Services Sunday mornings at 10 am at Jong Bonaire Youth Center in English, Dutch and Papiamentu. Preaching the full gospel. Contact: 786-2557. Prayer and Intercession Church, in English. A full Gospel Church l ocated temporarily at Kaya Alexandrit # 20, Santa Barbara, Republiek. Services are held on Sunday mornings from 10am until 11:30am. Bible studies in English are on Monday nights from 7 to 8 pm. Contact: 717-3322 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter -day Saints : Kaya Sabana #26, Sundays: 9 am Sacrament Services (Translation to English and Papiamentu upon request) 10:20 Sunday School, 11:15 RS/YM/YW/PH Primary held from 10:20-12 noon Visitors Welcome: 701-9522 for Information Send event info to: The Bonaire Reporter Email reporter@bonairenews.com Tel:790-6518, 786-6125 or 790-8988 Who’s Who on The Bonaire Reporter Take The Reporter Home—1-year subscription: By mail to US $70; By mail to Europe $150. By Internet $35 donation. For information about subscriptions, stories or advertising in The Bonaire Reporter , PO Box 407, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles; phone (599) 790-6518, 786-6125, E-mail: info@bonairereporter.com The Bonaire Reporter, George DeSalvo, Publisher. Laura DeSalvo, Editor in Chief. Address: P. O. Box 407, Bona ire, Neth. Antilles. Available on-line at: www.bonairereporter.com Published every two weeks Reporters: Siomara E. Albertus, Stephanie Bennett, J@n Brouwer, Christie Dovale, Ap van Eldik, Annie Heese, Jack Horkheimer, Molly Bartikoski-Kearny, Greta Kooistra, Ruben Petrisie, Jane Townsend, Inge Vos, Pamela Williams Unattributed photos are by the editor or publisher. Distribution: Yuchi Molina (Rincon), Elisabeth S ilberie (Playa), Divi-Divi Airline Housekeeping: JRA. Printed by: DeStad Drukkerij, Curaçao ©2009 The Bonaire Reporter Date Day Ship name Time PAX Thursday November 26, 2009 Caribbean Princess 1100-1900 3100 Sunday November 29, 2009 Maasdam 0800-1700 1258 Monday November 30, 2009 AidaAura 0800-1600 1260 Monday November 30, 2009 Artemis 0800-1800 1200 Tuesday December 1, 2009 Ocean Dream 0800-1600 1422 Wednesday December 2, 2009 Sea Princess 1200 1900 2016 Tuesday December 8, 2009 Ocean Dream 0800-1600 1422 Thursday December 10, 2009 Sea Cloud II 0900-2400 150 Thursday December 10, 2009 Ruby Princess 1100-1900 3100 Friday December 11, 2009 Enchantment of the Seas 0700 1530 1950 Cruise Ship Calls -Informa tion provided by the TCB Crafts Markets at Wilhelmina Park on Cruise Ship Visiting Days—usually 10am until ship departure.

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Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 Page 15 T his young lady, Finn, nine years old, is a regular volunteer at the Bonaire Animal Shelter. Finn is a student at the Pelican School and you will find here at the Shelter every Wednesday, helping out with all the pets. Here she is with new arrival, “Petunia,” a seven-week-old puppy who came into the Shelter with her brother. Their mother was hit and killed by a car but luckily the puppies were found and brought into the Shelter. Finn’s job that day was to bathe both puppies and she did a fine job. Petunia’s brother already has been adopted but he and Petunia will have to stay on until they are a little older and stronger. Both puppies are healthy and in perfect shape for their age. They’ve had their tests, worming and will be sterilized when they’re old enough. You can always be sure that adopting a dog or cat from the Shelter assures you of a “nearly perfect” pet – healthy and social. You may see “Petunia” and the other pets up for adoption at the Shelter on the Lagoen Road, open Monday through Saturday, 9 am to 1 pm, 3 to 5 pm. Tel. 717-4989. Can you help? The Shelter is looking for a volunteer to sell at the Shelter stand at the Cruise Ship Market at Wilhelmina Park on cruise ship visitor days. It’s an extremely worthwhile job because all the pr oceeds go towards keeping the Shelter open to take in unwanted pets. You will be sellin g tee shirts, license plates, calendars and Germaine Nijdam hand painted signs. If you can help please call Amina at 786-1905. It’s a fun job too, other volunteers report . Don’t forget the Shelter Fundraiser, Art Auction and Indonesian Dinner, this Friday, November 27. More information on page 14 (Happenings). Laura DeSalvo Sterilization Campaign Update On May 15 the Animal Shelter started a large scale campaign to reduce the amount of stray and street dogs on Bonaire. This project is called, “Bonny, the Superdog,” and so far more than 300 dogs have been sterilized. Number 300 was the dog from the Wing Cheung Supermarket on Kaya Korona. The dog’s name is Wong – a sturdy Rottweiler look-a-like who had given birth to a fairly large amount of puppies. Wong’s owners felt it was time for Wong to retire and decided to have her sterilized. The operation went well and when Wong got home she was welcomed with a big bowl of chicken legs. Every dog a Superdog! So, in the meantime more than 300 dogs have been sterilized, but the goal of “Bonny, the Superdog” sterilization project is to sterilize 500 dogs. This way, the Bonaire Animal Shelter hopes to contribute to changing many dogs’ lives into Superdog lives! For more information about this free sterilization campaign you can contact the Shelter at: Dierenasiel Bonaire, Kaminda Lagun 26, Bonaire. Phone 717-4989, www.animalshelterbonaire.com, www.bonnysuperdog.com, animalshelter@flamingotv.net , Greta Kooistra Did You Know... The Flamingo Tongue Snail uses its stomach as a foot? Maxing out at about one inch long, the flamingo tongue snail is a (once) rare but beautiful sight on the coral reefs of Bonaire. This stomach-footed creature crawls along the branches of coral, munching on the polyps with its radula. However, this sea snail does not destroy the coral, eating just enough so the polyps often grow back. It’s only when their population explodes that they pose a threat to coral reefs. The colors on the flamingo tongue snail are not a part of the shell, rather a layer of mantle tissue that covers the shell. The tissue encompassing the shell works similarly to a fish’s gills, exchanging oxygen and carbon dioxide for it to breathe. The animal will retract its mantle flaps when attacked, revealing its true white colored shell. Pamela Williams Williams attends the University of Colorado at Boulder. While majoring in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology back in the US she decided to come to the CIEE Research Station in Bonaire to learn more about how to make a difference in the declining coral reef ecosystems. Green Turtle Petunia • • Stop the silent destruction of your home Stop the silent destruction of your home • • T his Friday, 27th of November, the Green Label Garden Center will celebrate a happy 10 years in business on Bonaire and the opening of its new shop. In the words of founder and owner Ap van Eldik: “Wow! Time sure flies when you're busy!” I remember as if it were yesterday when we opened our old shop on Kaya Nicolaas, a crowd outside watching us put up the sign. A lot has happened since that time, to us and to Bonaire. Especially during the last three years we have had so many changes that sometimes we had the feeling it went too fast. But, let's face it, the old shop became far too small, and we found our great new property on Kaya Industria and we moved over here. But that still wasn't enough, so we built our own building and with the guiding hands of our shop manager, Mr. Johan van Blerk, we were able to open our very own shop with more space and even more green at the end of the same property. This never would have been possible without the really appreciated support of YOU, our very much respected loyal clients. We, the team of Green Label, would like to thank you for this support and want to invite all of our loyal clients to take a look at this new shop and raise our glasses to 10 years of support, Friday 27th of November from 5 to 8 at our property on Kaya Industria, behind the TIS supermarket. Bon Bini! Ap van Eldik http://reddog-diving.com/ Flamingo Tongue Snail Shelter photo

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Page 16 Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 Hair Affair We do our best to make your hair and makeup wishes come true!! You can also come in for facials and facial waxing . We use and sell L’Oreal products Is your plan to marry on the island? We can make you beautiful and stay beautiful for your happiest day. Personal attention by Janneke Appointment by tel: 717-5990 or just walk in. Downtown, near the waterfront next to Little Havana Tues-Fri: 9-12, 2-6 Sat: 9-2 non stop AIRLINES Divi Divi Air. Bonaire’s “on time airline” with 16 flights a day between Bonaire and Curaçao. Your first choice for inter-isla nd travel. Now flying to Aruba. APPLIANCES /TV/ ELECTRONICS and COMPUTERS City Shop , the mega store, has the island’s widest selection of large and small home appliances, furniture, TV, computers, cell phones and more. Fast service and in-store financing too. BANKS Maduro and Curiel’s Bank provides the greatest number of services, branches and ATMs of any Bonaire bank. They also o ffer investments and insurance. BEAUTY PARLOR Hair Affair . Expert hair cutting, styling, facials and facial waxing. BICYCLE / SCOOTER/ QUADS De Freewieler sells bikes and all kinds of bike accessories. They do professional repairs on almost anything on two wheels. Have your keys made here too. CONTRACTOR Equinox Bonaire— A USA licensed contractor for hotels, restaurant s, residential. On Time—Done Right. DINING Bistro di Paris A real French restaurant with affordable prices and friendly Bonairean ambiance Owned and operated by a French Chef On Kaya Gob. Debrot ½ mile north of town center Pasa Bon Pizza is Bonaire’s best. Freshly prepared pizzas made with the finest ingredients. Salads, desserts. Eat in or take away. Nice bar too. 780-1111 Call ahead to eat-in or take out, Next to Bistro (above) Lunchroom de Bonairiaan— Breakfast & lunch prepared and served by Stichting Project students under professional guidance. Monday-Friday, 9-2. Kaya Gob. N.Debrot, opposite Divi Flamingo. DIVING Carib Inn is the popular 10-room inn with top-notch dive shop and well stocked retail store. Best book trade on Bonaire. Good pric es on regulator repair, dive computer H.Q. ScubaVision Document your Bonaire vacation above and below the water with a custom DVD by Bonaire’s top videographer, Hendrik Wuyts WannaDive They make diving fun. In town at City Café, at Eden Beach and Windsock Apartments . GARDEN SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Green Label has everything you need to start or maintain your garden. They can design, install and maintain it and offer plants, irrigation supplies and garden chemicals. Now in new expanded location off Kaya Industria. HEALTH Harmony House— The herb and mineral center. Help your body heal itself. Natural Way Health Store— The place where all the hard to find natural and healthy products are. Upstairs from Botika Bonaire, on Kaya Grandi. HOME CARE Bonaire Second Home Care can handle all the needs of second home owners on Bonaire including inspection, management and cleaning. INTERNET AND CELLULAR SERVICE Digicel has the most subscribers, widest choice of calling plans and interesting phones. Visit their office on downtown Kaya Grandi and see for yourself. MIO offers by far the clearest, most reliable phone signal on the island PLUS WIRELESS HIGHSPEED INTERNET almost ever ywhere on Bonaire. PEST CONTROL Professional Pest Control . Call Peter to get rid of all those nasty pets like termites, fleas, ticks and ants that want to invade your home. Call now and save your investment in your home. PHOTO FINISHING Paradise Photo in the Galeries Shopping Center downtown offers fast, fine processing for prints, slides, items and services. Full digital services . REAL ESTATE / RENTAL AGENTS Bonaire Sunshine Homes is the realtor with a local touch. Ask them to show you the good value homes they list. Call them if you are thinking of selling your home. Caribbean Homes, “the Refreshing Realtor,” specializing in luxury homes, condos, lots, rentals and property management. Sunbelt Realty offers full real es tate, rental, and insurance services. If you want a home or to invest in Bonaire, stop in and see them. RETAIL Benetton, world famous designer clothes available now in Bonaire at prices less than those in US. For men, women and children. Best Buddies and Pearls —Stunning fresh water pearl jewelry, fashion, gifts, t shirts. Wonderful service, free gift wrap. STORAGE The Storehouse (Mangazina in Papiamentu ) offers Secure Storage For Vehicles, Household Items, Diving And Sporting Gear, Business Files or Inventory. Across from the northern hotel row. SECURITY Special Security Services will provide that extra measure of protection when you need it. Always reliable. SHIPPING Rocargo Freight Air and sea shipments in/out of Bonaire. Customs agents. Pr ofessional and efficient. FedEx agent. What would we do without their superb services? SUPERMARKETS Warehouse Supermarket on Kaya Industria— Biggest air conditioned market with the, largest selection and lowest prices on the island. WATER TAXI Get to Klein Bonaire by Ferry. Ride the Kantika di Amor or Skiffy . Hotel pickup. Easiest landing on Klein Bonaire with built-in ramp WINES Antillean Wine Company. You’ve tried the rest; now try the best: best prices, highest quality wines from around the world, kept in a cooled warehouse. Free delivery. Kaya Industria 23, Mon.-Sat. 9 amnoon. To learn more about these businesses check their ad in this issue of The Reporter Fortnightly Advertisers in The Bonaire Reporter are included in the guides. Free! Call 790-6518, 786-6518 Or email Reporter@BonaireNews.com Check CARIB INN First. Great Prices –Great Stock Scuba Sales Repair Replacement New Gear Accessories Always Great Values Dive gear specials CARIB INN Since 1980 PADI 5 STAR GOLD PALM 717-8819 8 am to 5 pm daily (next to Divi Flamingo Hotel) Let visitors and residents know about your business or restaurant with an ad in The Reporter . AFFORDABLE NetTech N.V.info@NetTech.an www.NetTech.an Tel:717-6773 Fax:717-7854Bonaire’s Official Web Site Developer!Domain Registrations E-mail Hosting Anti-Spam & Anti-Virus Web Site Design Web Site Hosting Marketing Consulting Internet Consulting Photographic Services Graphic Design Bonaire’s Official Web Site Developer

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Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 Page 17 B e pampered for breakfast or lunch by youngsters in training for the world of the professional restaurant business by the Stichting Project. Delicious menu, Good prices On Kaya Gob. N. Debrot – opposite the Divi Flamingo Hotel Open: Weekdays 9.00-14.00 Question (from page 7): Q) Which religious order worshipped in the chapel? A) De zusters van Roosendaal. FULL DIGITAL SERVICES FUJI MINI-LAB KODAK & FUJI FILM SLIDES E-6 PROCESSING PASSPORT PHOTOS BATTERIES CAMERAS FRAMES PHOTO ALBUMS GREETING CARDS DIGITAL AND MORE... Les Galeries Shopping Center (Bordering the parking lot) Tel. 717-5890 Open M-F 8:30-12, 2-6 pm, Sat. 9-12 From Bonaire Nautico Marina BONAIRE NAUTICO MARINA At It Rains Fishes Restaurant Call Henk at 560-7254 / Bob 786-5399 www.bonairenauticomarina /VHF 68 info@bonairenauticomarina.com THE ONLY WALKON / WALKOFF Catamaran Kantika di Amor Up to 27 people and supported by a brand new larger sister Catamaran Kantika Too Up to 50 people TRIPS Every Day (max 1.90 meter draft), Dinghy tie up at north-inside dock at US$10 weekly up from Monday till Monday. Water and 115/220 v. Daily trips via resorts 10 am, 12 , 2 pm Except Sundays at 10 am only Also available for group trips W hen The Reporter wanted to learn about how the Bonaire and Antilles Governments were organized we were told, “Ask Ludovico (Ludo) Nicolaas.” We did, learned a lot and discovered a man who truly loved and understood statecraft and Government. Recently he was hon ored with a reception for his 25 years of government service. At the reception which included his family, Deputy Frensel Janga pr esented him with a certificate of honor and an “envelope.” Ludovico has been in local government since 1983, after working temporarily in Pijnacker, Holland. From 1983 to 1987 he worked at the Central Government Welfare, Ambtenaar Welzijnszaken . From 1990 to 1992 worked for Antillenhuis Den Haag as offi cer in charge of the Antillenhuis publications and was involved in helping organize events and aiding the Plenipotentiary Minister. From 1992 until today he’s worked with the government of Bonaire. From 1992 to 2000 Ludo worked in Afdeling Voorlichting en Bestuursondersteuning (government protocol and press office ) . During that period he handled the visits of important people to Bonaire such as the Queen, Prince Willem Alexander and Princess Maxi ma and the President of Germany. As well he was responsible for the government’s press office. Most recently he’s served as the portfolio advisor for the Deputy involv ed with economic matters. Ludo is not only an exemplary public servant, he’s a longtime member of the great band, Glen Ludo Nicolaas’ two lives: honored public servant and musical performer (inset) T he key features of the tax proposals for the BES islands were recently released. Their objective is to maintain existing tax levels and to simplify the structure. Note that this structure will not apply to Bonaire if the island government chooses a different association w ith Holland than preciously agreed. Income and Payroll Taxes: Antillean income and payroll taxes remain with a new fee structure that includes income tax and AOV (retirement) and AW W (Widows and Orphans) insurance premiums. The first $9,000 (approximately NAƒ 16.000) is tax free. The child deduction is set at $1,250 per child, up to $2,500 per taxpayer. The tax rate is set at 3.6 % for the first $26,396 (approximately NAƒ 47.500) and 30.4 % for the excess. The base rate doesn ’t include insurance premiums but the top rate does. The deductions for student study and mortgage payments remain. The deals that pensionados got are gone. This means that penshonados also will be taxed at 30.4%. Although initially the inten tion was not to tax capital gains, capital gains taxes are back in the proposed legislation. An exemption is included for the first $5,000 of interest in interest and dividends. As under the current legislation if a taxpay er has a substantial interest (5%) of the shares or profit in a NV or BV or any other body having share capital, there is a tax. But the tax was slashed from the current rate of 15% plus surcharge to 5%. A yield tax is levied on the proceeds of shar es and dividend rights and benefits of a foundation, purpose or common fund assets. The rate of income tax is 5%. The yield tax is applicable to entities that are located in the BES islands. Land Tax: Property tax is levied on true property values. The value is renewable every five years. The levy is 20% on a basis of 4% of the actual value, effectively making the tax rate 0.9% of the actual value. Exemptions will include the main residence serving as your home, kunuku houses with a value not exceeding $50,000 and for property used for agricultural or commercial forestry purposes Tax Shelter Safeguards: A considerable number of safeguards have been incorporated into the law to prevent the islands from becoming a tax haven. Only bona-fide BES companies should be able to qualify. General Use Tax: A general use tax (ABB) is introduced to replace import duties and sales taxes. The rate will amount from 68%. However, vehi cles are charged a rate of 25%, except for highly energy-efficient cars, in which case the rate is zero. The ABB is levied on goods and services. The tax is applied only once and not at each transfer as in a Value Added Tax. There is no tax on bread, grain, potatoes and rice. The Real Estate Transfer Tax is increased from 4% to 5%. Bonaire has an excise tax but Saba and St. Eustatius don’t. On Bonaire, there will be an excise tax on wine, smoking tobacco, cigars and cigarillos . This is a brief summary of the BES islands tax proposal before the Dutch legislature. For more information people are advised to email info@an.pwc.comor consult an accountant . G.D. 427 368 195 369 571 428 518 294 376 642 715 983 891 423 657 735 986 214 984 652 731 173 849 562 256 137 849 Puzzle on page 7 Bonaire government photo

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Page 18 Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 Bonaire/Kralendijk – J ust recently, Julia Hollenbeck, president of “Wheel Me On.,” an American nonprofit organization that promotes traveling for persons using wheelchairs, visited the island of Bonaire. Her goal was to inspect the island for wheelchair friendliness and encourage access for persons with disabilities (PWD), and after one day of intensive exploring, the impressions were very positive. It was Chris and Yvonne from the Samur sailboat who asked me whether I would like to drive and guide Julia Hollenbeck for one day around the island. As I had followed the Bonaire in depth and guiding skills course organized by Sue Felix in 2008, to me it was a challenge to drive Julia around and inform her about my beloved island. The day before I had cleaned and prepared my vehicle, a double cabin Hilux, and I had thought about how to get her in and out of the car. Maybe an upside down beer case could function as a step. Then, quite early, the next morning the Ruby Princess cruise ship arrived on Bonaire. Fortunately, the harbor authorities had given me permission to drive my car on the pier, as close to the ship as I was allowed. Crewmembers of the Ruby Princess had helped Julia off the impressive ship. Yvonne from the Samur and I welcomed Julia. She appeared to be a very friendly and open-minded person, loaded with enthusiasm. Then Harold, a member of the crew on the ship explained to me how to take the wheelchair partly apart and fold it up to put it in the back of the vehicle. It was only the day before that the idea popped up to combine the tour around the island with an article in the “Bonaire on Wheels” series. So Julia Hollenbeck showed me her wheelchair: a very sturdy, and very light fourwheeled vehicle made by Invacare in the US. Julia won it when earning the title of “Ms. Wheelchair Tennessee 2003!” The whole unit was completely foldable. The arm rests, wheels and leg rests were removable, or you could easily fold the footrests to collapse the chair completely. The rims were Sunrims, to be exact, and were fitted with stainless steel spokes (according to Julia, “Many have offered to swap their wheels with me.”), and the grey Primo Orion tires contained 73 PSI of air for a smooth and light ride. The aluminum frame of the wheelchair was anodized red and Julia kept the dual “wheelie poppers” at the rear in an upright position unless a “pusher” wanted them off or down. These wheels are really sharp looking, a nice piece of work, and state-of-the art. I loaded her and the wheelchair into my vehicle, then I started the engine and we were ready for takeoff. The tour would be interesting: long, and intensive. First, we made a stop on the little elevation along the coast near the airport. Then we stopped at the salt pier, the slave huts and the King William lighthouse. We drove to several beaches at Sorobon and we watched the local fishermen in the natural harbor. We passed the mangroves and spotted many flamingos. Then we returned to Kralendijk, only to start the second part of our tour: the road along the coast to Bopec (Bonairean Petroleum Company), Goto Lake with even more flamingos to see, the Dos Pos water mill and the lovely and safe little old village of Rincon. We made a stop at the BloKarts on the track of Land Sailing Bonaire. We had a talk with Nelson Croft and Naomi from the BloKart enterprise and we learned it was even possible for PWD using mobility devices like in wheelchairs to have fun in a two-seater BloKart. During that time, it was only I who did some quick loops around the racetrack always fun, never boring. Last but not least we climbed Seru Grandi (by truck of course) and we enjoyed the panoramic view: the mountains in the north, the wild coast and the light house of Spelonk, the flats of the south and the snowy mountains of the Cargill Salt Company, the city of Kralendijk and the cruise ship on the pier, Klein Bonaire. What an impressive view for both of us. Then, unfortunately, it was time to go back to the Ruby Princess. All in all it took us some five hours and almost a hundred kilometers to get a serious first impression of the island. During our trip Julia became more and more enthusiastic as she noticed the pavements were in a good condition. Here and there, we found a spacious toilet accessible for persons using wheelchairs. Some restaurants appeared to be wheelchair friendly and we even found some special parking spaces, reserved for PWD. Unfortunately, I was not able to arrange a meeting in time between the sympathetic president of Wheel Me On… and a Bonairean citizen named Oswald Melcherts. He is the man using the wheelchair with the Surinam flag mounted on it and is the one behind the MiVaBo (Stichting Minder Validen Bonaire/ Foundation for Less Valid Persons Bonaire). It is Oswald and his non-profit organization that do their utmost best to make Bonaire as wheelchair friendly as possible. Oswald’s goal is to make Bonaire 100% wheelchair friendly and accessible. Moreover, the results are there. The next day I had a talk with Oswald. Full of enthusiasm, he starts talking about the island and the mission of his organization. He informs me about wheelchair friendly restaurants such as “It Rains Fishes” and he indicates some parking areas reserved for PWD using wheels. The only known public toilet for PWD in the capital of the island is situated in the hospital of Kralendijk. Even Oswald Melcherts does not know of the existence of such a special facility, for instance, in the remote village of Rincon. Therefore, there are definitely results, but there is also a lot of work remaining to do. The next time Julia visits our island, I shall arrange a meeting and a tour for the two of them: Julia and Oswald in the car and two foldable wheelchairs in the back. It will definitely be fun to drive over the lovely island with those two brave knights! For more information just hop to www.wheelmeon.org or contact Oswald: omelcherts@hotmail.com. Story & photo by J@n Brouwer The 58th of a series of Bonaire Reporter articles by J@n Brouwer, featuring some of Bonaire’s interesting vehicles that are “on wheels.” Julia Hollenbeck, smiling as alwa ys, president of Wheel Me On. A non profit organization that promotes traveling for wheel chaired people.

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Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 Page 19 Dates to Remember in December: Several Cosmic Goodies Await Your Viewing Pleasure I n addition to all the holiday gift gifting going on, December will be gifting us with several goodies from the cosmos. Because December is one of those peculiar months which will have two full moons , one of which will be on New Year's Eve. Plus two wonderful planets will share opposite sides of the sky before midnight. And what may be the best meteor shower of the year, the Geminids , will give us something to ooh and aah about. On Tuesday, December 1st just after suns et you will see an almost, just a few hours away from full, Moon rising. It will slowly travel up the sky and reach its highest point around midnight. And as it slowly starts to descend it will officially turn full Tuesday morning at 2:30 am Eastern Time and will finally set at sunrise. Full moon number two will occur on New Year's Eve, T hursday, December 31st. Called the Long Night Moon , because the hours of darkness are always longest at this time of year in the northern hemisphere, it will also rise just after sunset and be visible in the sky all night long, reaching its highest point around midnight, and will be super high and will look almost like a floodlight attached to the top of the sky illuminating the landscape below as we ring in the New Year. The next dates I'd like you to mark down are late evening Sunday, December 13th and midnight to dawn Monday the 14th when the annual Geminid meteor shower may be the best of the year. Interestingly, unlike all other meteor showers which are usually better after midnight, the Geminid meteor shower is frequently good before midnight. But like all meteor showers, the longer you stay out, the more meteors you'll see. And now for you planet aficionados, you'll have two really good ones to choose from before midnight. To see the first simply look toward the west just after sunset and you'll see dazzlingly bright, king of the planets, 88,000 mile wide Jupiter, 11 times the width of our planet Earth which is always fun to see through even the smallest of telescopes because you can watch four of his largest moons as they change place in orbit around the planet hour after hour. And as Jupiter se ts in late evening you can turn around and face east and between 10 and 11 you'll see the 4,000-mile-wide rouge-gold planet Mars rising. And Mars is the one to watch because it is zooming closer and closer to us every single day. And it will be brighter each successive night. In fact it will grow almost two times brighter from December 1st to the 31st. So trace the progress of Mars and Jupiter this month, watch the Geminid meteor shower on the 13th and 14th and bathe under the light of two full Moons in one month's time. Cosmic goodies indeed. Jack Horkheimer *to find it... just look up SAGITTARIUS (23 November 21 December) Happy Birthday Sagittarius! Energy, verve, and confidence are with you this month, until the last week of the month when your life winds down, quite appropriately! Until then, it’s hustle and bustle, and matters are definitely working in your favor. A love interest has your best interests at heart just now. A proposal involving money comes to you in the last week of December. Writers and artists are especially inspired during this period. CAPRICORN (22 December 20 January) Issues revolving around your family and the past capture much of your attention this month. While others are racing around you, preparing for the holidays, you are enjoying a sense of peace. The last week of the month begins a power period that you take with you into the New Year. Tremendous energy and initiative is with you as you embark on a journey of internal change and personal discovery. It feels like you can move mountains. AQUARIUS (21 January 19 February) December is ripe with opportunity for envisioning new projects and goals for your future. Friends, acquaintances, and groups will certainly keep you busy. Romance, however, is mostly quiet until after the 7th, when Venus, the goddess of love, enters your sign and stays there into the New Year, bestowing beautiful energy for attracting what and who you want into your life. PISCES (20 February 20 March) In most ways, December is a high profile month for you, except for on a romantic level, which is satisfyingly private. You may be put “in charge” of a private matter. Secrets are revealed—and revealing. Intense energy comes from a friend in the last week of the month. It’s virtually impossible to escape professional attention this month. The 12-16 is especially fortunate for work and financial matters. ARIES (21 March 20 April) is very rewarding this month, ye t you still manage to find ways to break the routine. You are very busy expanding your horizons, whether it’s through actual travel or “armchair travel”. At times, you may come across as opinionated, but it’s more likely enthusiasm for sharing your thoughts. Romance is to be found when you are enjoying non-routine activities. December presents a nice balance of recognition and accomplishment. TAURUS (21 April 21 May) Sharing, intimacy, finances, and power plays all figure strongly for you in December. In the first three weeks of the month, you are thinking strategically, making plans, an d watching others around you more than you are participating. You stand to gain much from your observations! The last week of the month brings with it buzz of travel or educational opportunities, most likely involving a partner, who has been going through a lot of changes recently GEMINI (22 May 21 June) Balancing your needs with those of a significant other involves plenty of negotiating and back-andforth before arriving at any conclusions this month. Times like these require a certain amount of tact and a need to let others take center stage for the time being. A loan or repayment is likely to make headlines for you towards the end of December. CANCER (22 June 23 July) You simply can’t wait until the New Year to begin fulfilling your resolutions rega rding health, fitness, and lifestyle changes. The time is now! You are raring to go, ready to completely rework your routines. You have more energy than usual for work, projects, and anything that involves reorganizing and restructuring. Taking care of details is what’s on your mind now. The last week of December brings intense energy to a partnership or significant relationship. LEO (24 July 23 August) The first three weeks of December are exciting and stimulating for you. This is a decidedly romantic and creative period for you. You have special magnetic appeal, extra energy, and a real yen for excitement now. Creative Leos will be on a roll, producing more th an ever, and publishing opportunities may be fo rthcoming. The last week of December features a job offer or opportunity, possibly a work -at-home endeavor. VIRGO (24 August 23 September ) A scurry of activity in and around the home or with family is in store for you this month. You are busy with preparations, repairs, and reorganizing—and enjoying every minute of it! It’s a fabulous time to get your “nest” in order and functioning smoothly. The last week of December is positively intense for romance and intimacy. An exciting proposal or opportunity regarding love, recreation, and creativity comes your way. LIBRA (24 September 23 October) An especially busy—mostly pleasantly so—period is in store for you in the first three weeks of December. It can get a little hectic, with many errands to run, more ideas than you can realistically implement, and plenty of contact with friends, siblings, and neighbors. It’s a time of networking, and you’re coming across very smoothly. The last week of the month (and year!) is revealing and perhaps intense for family matters. SCORPIO (24 October 22 November) In many ways, December is a “money month” for you. You enjoy extra energy and enthusiasm for increasing your income. It’s an excellent opportunity period for a bonus or raise that truly makes a difference in your life! If you’re waiting for money in the form of a loan or repayment of a debt to you, it’s likely to arrive around the Full Moon on the 12th. N e w DV D A v a i l a b l e B o n a i r e T a Du s h i December–2009 By Annie Heese Wide selection of cheeses and hams from around the world, homemade salads & olives, hot & cold sandwiches, breakfasts Open M-F: 7-6; Sat. 8-4; Sun. 8-12 At the Bonaire District Shopping Mart, Traffic Circle, Kaya Gob. N. Debrot #66 info@elideli.com / 4delivery@elideli.c om Tel/Fax 717-3997

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Page 20 Bonaire ReporterNov. 27-Dec. 11, 2009 B onaire’s sailing history goes back into the eons of time when the first inhabitants arrived by boat. Since then Bonaire’s sailors have distinguished themselves on merchant and war ships, serving on the oceans of the world. Today on the island the sailing tradition continues in part with the Bonaire Sailing School (BSSA), established more than 10 years ago. A group of 15 kids, very enthusiastic and talented, spend one to two days a week practicing their sailing skills in the harbor. The youngest, at seven or eight, begin sailing the Optimists. Then at 12 or 13 they can sail the Sunfish or Splash class boats. Most of them have been sailing for more than a year. In fact, one of the members, Kevin Dijkhoff, grandson of the winner of the first Bonaire Regatta, Ebo Domacassée, has been sailing for the last 10 years. So we have very talented sailors but not enough good boats. What can we do? As long time instructor Artie DeVries explains, “The Sunfish Worlds are coming up in Curaçao in 2011 and we want to send our top sailors. Two years ago the boats just fell apart. So we got some donated. The Optimist fleet is okay for training. We have one or two good Optimist racing boats, but we need at least one or more Sunfish as all of the current ones are leaking. This is our first priority.” The BSSA members participate mightily against Curaçao sailors despite the disparity in level of equipment. Curaçao’s equipment is top of the line. Our sailors need five good used Sunfish (NAƒ 3.000 apiece) and two new racing Sunfish (NAƒ 7.500). They need dagger boards and rudders. They are looking for sponsors – at every financial level. If you want to see for yourself, go down to Regatta House on a Thursday after 3 to see the Sunfish and Splash sailors. On Friday about the same time you can see the Optimists sail. They all sail on Sundays as well from 10 to around noon. The kids receive expert instruction by Artie and Tom Nuijten. They have a website in English and Dutch: WWW.Bonaire SailingSchool.com. Or call Artie deVries (tel. 717-7972, artiedevries@hotmail.com ) or Ton Nuijten (tel. 717-4052, lauraenton@hotmail.com ). Laura DeSalvo O n Friday, November 6, 30 young indigenous fruit trees were planted in the area of the Tras Montaña botanical garden, Tera Bara. The Fundashon Salba Nos Lora is doing this so that more food can be found by the birds in the mondi. Hopefully, this will set an example for the birds and the loras will no longer need to hunt for food in the fruit trees in the kunukus or gardens in residential areas, where the loras are considered a nuisance. The plantings will also enrich and add to Bonaire’s nature. This tree planting operation is made possible with help from Vogelbescherming Netherlands. Three employees of LVV will make sure that all trees will be well cared for. On National Arbor Day, November 22, the foundation planted another hundred trees along the "Kaya di Lora" in the open air museum of Mangazina di Rei. Salba Nos Lora chose the tree sites and the types of trees with care. There had to be loras in the vicinity, the young trees must be protected from goats and donkeys, and during the first years the trees will be watered in the dry season. The place must also be accessible to visitors. The foundation will place signs so that visitors can learn about the lora and the trees. The native trees, once established, should need little water and have fruits in the dry season. The trees that are being planted are: calbas, wayaka, watakeli, kibrahacha, pal'i sia, taki, oliba, pal'i lora, and palu palu pretu spesial. Salba Nos Lora urges all residents of Bonaire to plant a tree or to donate to the foundation. Press release Young Optimist sailors ready to launch Danilo Christiaan, Mama Sm ile and Elsmarie Beukenboom Marian Walthie photos



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P.O. Box 407, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles, Phone 790-6518, 7 86-6125, www.bonairereporter.com email: reporter@bonairenews.com Since 1994 On-line every day, 24/7 Printed every fortnight

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Page 2 Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 I n a landmark vote the Dutch Second Chamber voted in favor of all 10 Kingdom Consensus Laws last Thursday paving the way for a new organization of the Dutch Kingdom : Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba, the BES Islands, to become an integral part of Holland while Curaçao and St. Maarten become independent “countries” in the Dutch Kingdom. The Netherlands Antilles, formed over 50 years ago during the Dutch process of decolonization of its overseas possessions, will disappear. “An historic day,” all agreed following the vote. “Long live the Kingdom,” exclaimed Antillean Prime Minister Emily de JonghElhage at the end of her speech in the Second Chamber shortly before the voting. It wasn’t a “love-in” by any means. Feelings were running high in the Second Chamber after statements by Socialist Party member Ronald van Raak in which he stated he would vote against the laws because he felt he was being put under pressure. “We are being forced into a trap and that trap is called 10-10-10. The laws are not ready, the countries are not ready and the people are not ready.” The eruption of Mount Eyjafjallajokull in Iceland on April 14, and the resulting volcanic ash cloud over Northern Europe has caused severe disruption of flights in Northern Europe and upset meetings and delayed formalities that would confirm Bonaire’s integration as a “special municipality” into the Netherlands. "It's like a spray can of ash coming from Iceland," AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Margusity said. There were no departures or arrivals at Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport from last Thursday. At press time some flights were resuming. The last eruption under the glacier at Eyjafjallajokull occurred in 1821 and lasted, on and off, until 1823. Some experts predicted that another prolonged eruption could affect air traffic for up to six months. Airlines are taking the threat of the ask cloud seriously, while losing $100 million a day . In 1989, KLM Flight 867 flying from Amsterdam to Narita, Japan, flew through a thick cloud of volcanic ash from Mount Redoubt in Anchorage, Alaska, causing all four of its engines to fail. The crew was able to restart its engines after dropping to an altitude of 14,000 feet and safely landed the plane. The ash caused more than $80 (!) million in damage to the aircraft but no lives were lost. In June 1982 a London to Auckland British Airways Boeing 747 encountered an ash plume from the erupting Mount Galunggung in Java, Indonesia. At first the pilots were unaware of exactly what had happened. A strange St Elmo's Fire-like light had appeared on the cockpit windscreen and sulphur-smelling smoke started filling the passenger Table of Contents This Week’s Stories Treaty of Friendship Netherlands-US 2 “After Party” to Open in Bonaire 3 Richter Art Open House 3 SGB Students’ Carib Inn Mural 6 Jazz Guitarist many Moreira at Bonaire Jazz Festival 9 Better Food For Better Kids 10 More Storage For Bonaire 11 Rincon Day Schedule 11 Windmills coming soon (cover ) 13 Lionfish Galore 15 Hospitality Students to Italy 15 Picture Yourself Winner 2009 16 500 Animals Sterilized Free 17 Departments Flotsam & Jetsam 2 Born On Bonaire (Mirna So liana) 4 Sudoku Puzzle 7 Bonaire Voices (Sts. John and Paul) 7 Letters –Bat Mystery Solved? 7 Bonaire On Wheels– ‘Chevy Truck 9 Bon Quiz #28(Queens) 11 What’s Happening, Cruise Ship Schedule 12 Reporter Masthead 12 Classifieds 13 NEW! Tide Table, Sun rise and set times, Moon phase 13 Shopping & Service Guides 14 Panchito Kid’s Corner 15 Body Talk (Women, Birth Control, HRT & Yeast) 16 Picture Yourself—Fiji 16 Panchito Kid’s Corner Answers 17 Bon Quiz Answer 17 Sudoku Solution 17 Bubbles-Do You Know? -Algae 18 Pet of the Week (Cai & Kitty Nora) 18 Sky Park (North Star) 19 The Stars have It 19 How to contact us Letters to the Editor: Reporter@bonairenews.com Story tip or idea: info@bonairenews.com The Publisher: George@bonairenews.com Box 407, Bonaire, Neth. Antilles. Phone 790-8988 Phone 790-6518 / 786-6518 Available on-line at: www.bonairereporter.com Printed Every Fortnight, On-line Every day, 24/7 Next edition printing on May 4, 2010, Story and Ad deadline: May 1, 2010, 12 noon SCOOTER & BIKE SALES & REPAIR Peugeot, Kymco Loekie, Giant Gazelle Brands Parts and accessories for any brand scooter or bike Bike Clothes for Everyone Kaya Grandi #61 Across from INPO Open: 8:30-12:30, 2:00-5:30 Owner Operated freewieler@flamingotv.net Transport of Money and Valuables Private Investigations Vehicle patrols Burglar Alarms Fire Alarm Systems In Business Over 26 years Kaya Nikiboko Nord 37A, PO Box 225 Tel: (599) 7178125 Fax (599) 7176125 E-mail sss@bonairelive.com Just like the 70’s notorious spy, Phillip Agee, Americans in Bonaire can rely on the "1956 Treaty of Friendship, Commerce and Navigation between the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the United States of America." Ex -CIA agent Agee’s notorious exploits were the subject of his book, Inside the Company: CIA Diary . The book's appendix listed the names of more than 250 CIA operatives, one of those agents was, according to former US President George H.W. Bush, killed as a result. In 1977, Agee fled to the Netherlands to avoid prosecution. Once in the Netherlands, Agee continued to fight deportation to the US. He discovered that since he was a US citizen, he could use the Treaty of Friendship to demand a hearing before the Dutch equivalent of a US immigration court. But ultimately, the Netherlands deported Agee, and later, the US stripped him of his US passport. Dutch and US residency Equivalence If you're a US citizen, the treaty means you have the same right to reside in the Dutch territories in the Caribbean as a European Dutch citizen (A European Dutch citizen is someone born or naturalized in the Netherlands.). This gives Americans in the Netherlands Antilles more rights than other foreigners. It has not been considered if the treaty would still apply once the BES Islands are integrated with the Netherlands. When the US and the Netherland s signed the Treaty of Friendship, it gave citizens and busine sses in each country reciprocal rights in both countries. The idea was to encourage economic and cultural relations between the US, the Netherlands and its territories. In general, the terms of the treaty haven’t been observed by Antillean Immigration officials, with Americans usually being considered in the same category as other foreigners. Its observance can have implications not only for the duration of non– resident American visits, but also for rights for children born to Americans in the Antilles, residency permits and social benefits. While some of the treaty's provisions no longer apply in the Netherlands, the treaty still applies to the Dutch Antilles and Aruba . Recently, a court in St. Maarten confirmed that the Treaty of Friendship guarantees US citizen s the same rights as European Dutch citizens in the Dutch Caribbean territories. European Dutch citizens may stay for six months at a time in the Dutch Caribbean territories without applying for a residence permit. The court declared that US citi zens ought to have the same entitlement. By Mark Nestmann ( The Nestmann Group, Ltd.) info@nestmann.com . cabin. Then, within minutes, all four engines failed. The plane managed to glide sufficiently out of the ash plume for three of the four engines to restart. The aircraft’s captain said, “It was very frightening, all the engines stopped for 14 to 15 minutes. We glided the aircraft about 80 nautical miles and went down from 37,000 feet to about 12,000 feet.” The Bonaire meetings and events are to be rescheduled. The visit of Dutch caretaker State Secretary of Kingdom Relations, Ank Bijleveld-(Continued on page 6) Prime Minister Emily de Jongh-Elhage accepts congratulations from wellwishers. Bonaire’s Ramonsito Booi at right Ramsay Soemanta/ Studio FVS

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Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 Page 3 Bonaire, N. A. – April 19, 2010 T he Richter Art Gallery announced today that it will be holding its first “Open House” on Saturday, April 24, 2010, to introduce Bonaire’s art lovers to its newly remodeled space. The Open House will take place from 2 pm until 7 pm on April 24th and in addition to a range of fine art, will feature wine and snacks for those visiting. The Richter Art Gallery, located in Belnem, is owned and operated by local Bonaire artists, Linda Richter and Jake Richter and is located on the second floor of a specially constructed extension built onto their home. The gallery features a variety of fine art and unique works, all created by the Richters. Linda Richter specializes in fine oil painting and has developed a special style she refers to as “Nature Portraits.” Linda has won numerous awards and accolades for her representations of the bright, colorful world around us. Linda has both original oil paintings as well as limited edition prints of her works for sale at the Richter Art Gallery. Jake Richter’s experience as a nature photographer and journalist has been applied to digital media using a process he describes as “digital painting,” where he uses his photos as a starting point to create images which stir the imagination and soul. Limited edition prints of Jake’s works are also available at the gallery. For those familiar with the works of the Richters, there will be a number of new recently created works on exhibition as well. The Richter Art Gallery is open regularly Tuesday through Fridays, from 2 pm until 5:30 pm, and at other times by prearranged appointment. To make an appointment to visit the Richter Art Gallery, one only needs to call or e-mail. The gallery’s phone number is +599-7 17-4112 and e-mail address is info@RichterArt.com. The Richter Art Gallery is located at Kaya R. Statius van Eps 17 (also known as the “Road to Sorobon”), in the Belnem area of Bonaire. More information about the Richter Art Gallery can also be found at http:// www.RichterArt.com. Press release Richter Art photo “A fter Party” is a hilariously funny and sometimes poignant play in Papiamentu (with Dutch subtitles via a beamer ) about a group of women, forever friends, who decide to buy a big old beautiful house and live together in their elder years. Their children have grown up and their husbands have passed away. The play opened to a packed house at the Teatro Luna Blou in Otrabanda in Curacao on March 21, 2009, and continued playing to packed houses. It went on to tour in all the big cities of Holland. This is an outstanding piece of playwriting by one of Bonaire’s cultural champions. Bonaire’s Jackie Bernabela, the director and co-author with Albert Schoobaar of the play, says, “My girl friends, whom I’ve known for years, were my inspiration for this play.” Bernabela has directed plays in Bonaire and in Holland, is a drama teacher and has translated plays into Papiamentu for local actors and audiences. “After Party” was sponsored as part of Teatro Luna Blou’s Artists in Residence Program. Jackie’s girlfriends have all kept in touch over the years and most of them were in the front row of the theatre on opening night, laughing their heads off as they recognized the words and antics of themselves and the others. “I put myself into one of the characters too,” said Jackie, “the one who was always losing her things.” The actresses playing the friends come from a group of extremely talented and experienced actors in Curaçao. “They were the Betty Davises and the Katherine Hepburns of the 60s and 70s,” declared Jackie. They gave stellar performances perfect timing, talking over each other – like real conversations in real life. Each was comfortable in his or her role. This same cast will be performing in Bonaire. Sponsors are: Prince Bernard Cultural Funds, Giro Bank and Kooijman Bonaire. “After Party, a play in Papiamentu with Dutch subtitles. Performances on Saturday, Sunday or Monday, May 1, 2, 3 in the auditorium ( Sala ) at the SGB High School at 8 pm. Tickets are NAf 25 and are available in advance at SKAL (Bon aire Museum) or at the door. For more information call SKAL at 717-8868 and ask for Jackie or Hubert Vis. L.D. Jackie Bernabela portrait by Henk Roozendaal

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Page 4 Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 “I was born in Nort di Salina and when I was a year and two months old, the owners of Pension Jeta, Julieta Hart and Juchi Nicolaas, took me in as they had no children of their own. I grew up here, in Pension Jeta, and when I was 18 I got a baby boy, Ermilio. I was working in the pension, cleaning the rooms, and we also had a little toko (shop) where I sold sodas. I never lived with my own mama. My love and affection are for Julieta and Juchi. My words of love I cannot express to my own parents; they belong forever to Julieta and Juchi. While I was growing up we also had a kunuku at Kibra’i Montana . Every day we got up early to take care of the animals: the goats, the turkeys, the chickens and the ducks. That’s how my love for animals was born. When Julieta got older she couldn’t see very well anymore and had difficulty walking so I took care of her. I was working in housekeeping at Sunset Beach Hotel. In the meantime I had two more children, Lindley and Mirnalyn. Whenever I’d ask my own mother to look after the children she would tell me to take my kids and get lost, but Julieta and Juchi always took care of my children with great pleasure and love. Anytime I needed something for my children, they immediately bought it and that’s why my kids are spoiled. Then I met somebody and I went to live with him in Antriol. Lindley and Mirnalyn came with me, but Ermilio stayed with Julieta and Juchi. With that boyfriend I had another baby girl, Francheska. But the relationship didn’t last a year and so I moved back with the children to Pension Jeta. Some time later I met someone new and we all moved to a government house in Kaya Pueblo: me and the children, all the dogs and cats and goats, the Loras and a flamingo. Seven years later we got married. When we went to live in Kaya Pueblo, Julieta got sick and I took care of her until she passed away. Juchi stayed behind, all by himself, but every day I went to see him, help him and I did whatever I could do for him. Then Juchi got sick. He should have gone to see a doctor, but he didn’t like doctors and when he had to be operated in Curaçao it was already too late. We went to Curaçao, but he died there. He went there alive and he came back dead. Then we all moved to Pension Jeta which I had inherited from my ‘parents.’ After Hurricane Lenny in 1999, Sunset Beach Hotel closed down and I went to work at Plaza Resort, also in housekeeping.” She smiles thoughtfully: “ Asi es la vida … (that’s life). Everything went well except for the relationship between me and my husband. I was 35, 36 years old. In the end we divorced. Nowadays I’m still here in Pension Jeta. I live with my son Lindley, ‘DJ Toad,’ who was recently elected the best DJ on Bonaire. He is 21 years old. He is famous! Yes he is! My daughter Mirnalyn, who’s 20, and her little son Sarjiet moved back in with me some months ago. Mirnalyn is still studying at SBO and she also works at Rocargo. Last year she participated in the Mama Modelo contest and was the first runner up. Francheska is 16, almost 17 and she’s studying at SGB. My eldest son Ermilio lives in Holland with his girlfriend and his daughter Ermilia. My own father, Papai, is 80 now and he lives with me as well. I take care of him and I go to the doctor in Curaçao with him. I am working at the Wing Cheung Supermarket and also as a housekeeper for an American (Continued on page 5) “… My whole life is dedicated to the animals. I get very angry when I see somebody hit their animal or when they throw stones at it. Then I scream, ‘Why are you doing that?’” ROCARGO SERVICES, N.V. International Freight (Car) BV The ONLY company offering direct weekly consolidation services from Europe/Holland to Bonaire www.ifc-consolidators.nl Jupiterweg 1A (Ecopark) 4761 RW Moerdijk, Holland Tel 31-(0) 168-40-94 94 Fax 31-(0) 168-40 94 70 Offering DAILY Express Services from and to Bonaire For shipment tracking www.fedex.com The World On Time Kaya Industria 12, KralendijkBonaire—N.A. 717-8922 FAX 717-5791 Email:info@rocargo.com Amcar Freight, Inc. The ONLY company offering direct weekly consolidation services from Miami, USA to Bonaire www.amcarfreight.com 7860 N.W. 80th Street Medley, Florida 33166 Tel. (305) 599-8866 Fax (305) 599-2808 For All Your Shipping Needs Full service door to door by air and by sea. Customs clearance, transportation, warehousing. International and local relocation. Packing material in stock. Qualified and professional personnel. Timely, accurate and reliable ISO 9001: 2000 Certified Francheska and doggie Noris, Mirn a Soliana and her kitty Lulu

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Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 Page 5 lady and for a Makamba lady.” Mirna Soliana is a very strong woman, a flamboyant and beautiful character and in every way true to herself. But… above all she’s Bonaire’s one and only Dr. Doolittle, because her life is all about animals. Her house, which is part of Pension Jeta, is spotless, in spite of the fact that it’s home to a whole bunch of animals who live together in absolute and perfect harmony. It’s like a world within a world, a glimpse of paradise and a very touching experience. “I told you before that my love for animals was born when I was little. Now I have 15 dogs, seven cats, two turtles, two land turtles, 20 goats, one Lora, one Prikichi and two doves. In the morning I put out water, bread and rice and I hit a pot with a spoon or I clap my hands and then they all come: the chuchubis, the mofis, the barika hel, the chuchubi pretu, the trupial and the doves. They fight and eat and drink and bathe. I work for my animals; I get paid on Friday and that same day all my money is gone, but I get all the food for them. I get a bag full of chicken skin every day from Kentucky Fried Chicken. I fry it for the dogs and mix it with rice or funchi. Every two weeks I buy a big bag of dog food for NAƒ 50 and for the cats I buy a small bag of dry food. I get the potato peels from Peking Restaurant and overripe fruits from Wing Cheung for the goats, the turtles and the birds. The men who own the yellow M&M van also bring me dog and cat food that’s a bit outdated. And the turtles eat the same food as Mirna!” Born on Bonaire (Continued from page 4) She laughs. “ When I go to Curaçao with my father for him to see the doctor, I spend two hours at the pet shop and I go loco, loco (crazy) because I want them all. I go to the vet whenever it’s necessary and all my animals have been sterilized. Marjolijn, who works with Jan, the vet in Nikiboko, has helped me to have all my pets sterilized. The Animal Shelter helped me too. They had the veterinarian in Kaminda Lagun sterilize some of my cats; they help me with medicines and sometimes with food as well. And last year on Animal Day I won the contest organized by the Shelter for who took the best care of their animals and I won one minute of free shopping at Cultimara. I shopped for NAƒ 434, 29. Whoa! Once I organized a big party on Animal Day. I sent out the invitations and 25 people showed up with their animals: goats wearing shirts, turtles with a ribbon, every animal nicely dressed up and in the end each animal got a little package containing a food bowl plus food and a little stuffed animal to take home. Every now and then people come to me with a puppy which they don’t want anymore. They ask me, ‘Mirna, do you want my puppy?’ And I never say no. I tell them ‘bring it to me!’ When I see an animal out on the streets without a collar I take it home and take care of it. My whole life is dedicated to the animals. I get very angry when I see somebody hit their animal or when they throw stones at it. Then I scream, ‘Why are you doing that?’ Almost every Sunday I go to the sea with the dogs and my baby goat, Nero. We -15 dogs, a goat and I walk from Nort di Salina to Sunset Beach. The goat is not a great swimmer, but he moves his legs in a certain way so he stays afloat. My d ogs will never bite a cat or a goat and they never fight over food. They all know which plate is theirs and they wait quietly for their turn. They have to eat decently and behave, because they are friends. When I’m at work they lay quietly outside, but when I come home they start dancing – chica, chica chic!” She wiggles her hips and roars with laughter. “If I go out it’s to Sunset with my dogs, and when I sleep the cats keep me company in bed. When I am sad, I sit here with my dogs and cats and talk to them and make them coffee. And when I dance, they dance with me. There are lots of people on Bonaire who are good to their animals and to those who aren’t I want to say, ‘Don’t kill them, don’t throw them in the mondi, bring them to me.’ I love animal s; I feel a great and profound love for animals and if they don’t have an owner I will be their mama.” Story & photos by Greta Kooistra Mirna and friends at the beach

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Page 6 Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 Schouten, to Bonaire and the Antilles has been delayed due to the closure of Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport. In Bonaire, the State Secretary had hoped to sign an agreement with the Island Executive Council about the division of tasks between the Island Territory and the Netherlands. Bonaire broke off negotiations late June, 2009, when the new Executive Council took office. Bijleveld-Schouten’s spokesman said it wasn’t sure when the meeting with Bonaire would take place, but in any case it would be at a later date. THE HAGUE— Queen’s Commissioner Henk Kamp is positive that the BES islands, Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba, will be ready for their new status as public entities of the Netherlands as scheduled. “We will surely make this date,” stated Kamp on the Dutch radio program One on the Day ( Eén op de dag ) earlier this month. “We started on January 1, 2009. Two years is more than enough,” he added. The Commissioner said he expected the standard of living to improve on the three islands after their new status. “The standard of living is already a lot better when compared to other islands in the Caribbean region, but there’s always room for improvement. We will work on that in the coming years,” he said. Kamp’s threeyear contract ends December 31, 2011. Kamp, who lives in Bonaire, said he would like to conclude his task after the islands become part of the Netherlands. However, he didn’t exclude the possibility that his party, the liberal democratic VVD party, apparently experiencing a popular resurgence, would ask him to return and become a Minister if his party would make it into the new Dutch cabinet. He referred to the job of Minister as the “most beautiful job there is,” but added that he also wanted to finish his work on the islands and that he very much liked living in Bonaire. St. Maarten, Curaçao and Aruba residents will no longer have easy entry to Bonaire, Saba and St. Eustatius when the latter three islands become integrated with Netherlands . The same admittance regulations that the Netherlands Antilles and Aruba currently apply to Dutch Europeans based on the Aruban and Antillean Admittance and Expulsion law will become applicable to Dutch citizens, even if they are Antillean-born, living on Aruba, Curaçao and St. Maarten when they want to enter the BES islands. Education officials are optimistic as they report substantially higher achievements at the Foundation Based Education (FBE) level on Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba. Math and reading achievements of children in groups seven and eight in FBE schools on all three islands have improved considerably in the past six months. The achievements of students in group four are also on a reasonable level. If schools are able to maintain this level of academic increase, students will have better chances in secondary education. The Government of the Netherlands Antilles Department of Environment and Nature Senior Policy Advisor Paul Hoetjes reports that the Caribbean is finally granted special area status under Marpol Annex V, meaning that after May 1, 2011, no more garbage may be dumped from ships except organic waste under certain conditions. In the past it was only plastic waste that was forbidden, but now all other garbage is forbidden (also (paper, dunnage, linings, metals). The Meteorological Service of the Netherlands Antilles and Aruba (Met Office), in cooperation with the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), University of Puerto Rico and University of Hawaii Sea Level Centre (UHSLC), will install a sea level monitor station on Curaçao to help safeguard the population on the ABC islands in case of a tsunami threat. It is part of a network of seismographs and sea-level sensors to serve as an early warning system. The project will be financed entirely by NOAA and local officials will receive the necessary training. In addition to tsunamis, the system can also serve to monitor possible sea surges caused by hurricanes, for example. Caretaker Dutch Minister for Social Affairs and Employment, Piet Hein Donner, started his visit to Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba (BES islands) with a visit to Saba. He will continue to Statia and Bonaire. The discussions will be built on a number of decisions made during his last November visit. Pension AOV levels, minimum wage including labor market policies and programs after the transition are to be resolved. He did confirm that last time it had been agreed that cost-of-living indexing could be incorporated into the base figures, as local representatives made it clear that it was important to factor this in to improve living conditions, especially for pensioners. He added that the new Caribbean system would not be the same as what is offered in the Netherlands. Insel Air has been told by Curaçao Judge Spreeuwenberg to correct two of the 12 allegations made by Insel Air Director Edward Heerenveen and supervisory board member Henry “Boebsi” van der Kwast against Dutch Antilles Express (DAE). The judge believed two of Insel’s statements could not be substantiated and ordered withdrawal of the comments within 72 hours or face a fine of NAƒ 10.000 per day for non-compliance. The correction is to appear in local newspapers. “These (March 2010) allegations of financial problems are not based on concrete, verified data of DAE. The statements on aircraft maintenance are not confirmed by an investigation by aviation authorities,” said the judge. The rains of the last two weeks broke the long drought in Bonaire and caused an explosion of green and tree blossoms . The yellow blooms of the Kibracha tree were more dramatic than the fabled cherry blossoms of Washington, DC. People who have been feeding wild birds and feral animals should continue to do so until the plant and fruits that these animals depend on are mature, perhaps up to two months more. In nearby Venezuela heavy downpours swept away two people and flooded homes in the central part of the country . The 2010 season will produce an above-average eight hurricanes , four of them major, posing a heightened threat to the area, the Colorado State University hurricane forecasting team predicted last Wednesday, its second forecast in four months for 2010. Flotsam and Jetsam (Conti. from page 2) (Continued on page 8) SGB students have been decorating a wall at Carib Inn and last week the wall was officially opened on Carib Inn owner Bruce Bowker’s birthday. The students worked on this wall for a couple of months and the results are beautiful. It blends in nicely with th e garden at Carib Inn. There are two more wall paintings that can be admired at Carib Inn: one near the pool which is the contest competitor, and one in the bathroom. Under the direction of teacher Karine deWit, the students were Xiao Min Wu, Beverly Martis, Keila Mensche, Farahnaz Cecilia, Jenny Agudelo and Chesron Granviel . Bruce Bowker photo

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Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 Page 7 T wo common festivals here on Bonaire are the Saint John Day , June 23 and 24, and Saint Paul Day , June 27 and 28, celebrations. Artist Nochi Coffie explains: “The Saint John celebration starts at 9 o’clock at night on June 23 in Rincon in front of Tropicana Bar with different musical groups performing. They follow a pre -planned route to the Toko (grocery store) Magdalena, KOS BON SO snack bar, Rose Inn Terrace and last but not least my house.” Nochi’s real name is Juan (or John) G.N. (Nochi) Coffie, and at his house they celebrate Saint John day in the original way, with music and dancing and three ready-tolight fires laid for the fire jumping. “The musical groups continue visiting the different houses in Rincon where a John or Juan lives. This goes on until the next morning, June 24, which is Saint John’s Day. At 10 am the groups visit the foundation for disabled people (F.K.P.D, Fundashon Kuido pa Personanan Desabilitá ) and the COCARI Foundation (foundation for elderly people in Rincon). In the afternoon the celebrations will continue at the Oranje Bar where the musical groups will eat and drink. Later, after a good rest, they will visit the Polar Bar and then finish the Saint John celebration at the Rincon Community Center where there is more fire jumping.” Juan (Nochi) Coffie (52) a Bonairean, born in Rincon, works at S.K.A.L. ( Sekshon Cultura, Arte i Lectura ), the Culture, Art and Lecture office, which coordinates local and international cultural presentations. He is an artist, a painter, composer of cultural songs. He tells us more about the festivals. “I’m coordinator of the Saint John and Saint Paul Day celebrations and it’s something I really love and cherish. I celebrate the Saint John festival every year at my own house. The musical groups will visit houses especially with people living there named Juan, Juanita, Pablo, Pedro or Petricia. The origin of these celebrations began with our ancestors who used to work on the plantations, on the sea or in other countries. Around the times of celebration of Saint John and Saint Paul Days those who were abroad would come home to celebrate with family and friends. They made up songs to tell what they’d experienced while they were working on the plantations, sailing or working in other countries. These festivals start with different preparations: collecting wood for the fire jumping, families preparing food and drink for the visitors. At night everything starts with serenades at the different houses. They celebrated these festivals as part of their identity, then afterwards they combined it with the Catholic religious celebration. The idea of the fire is more to call the rain and the jumping is to liberate them from bad spirits. The celebrations continued until the next day because nobody had to go back to work in those times. It was a holiday for every body, and nobody used to work like we do today in our modern time. During these festivals everything was for free and not commercialized. Music was a way to bring happiness and everybody gets to drink and eat because everybody cooperates with everything. This is still a tradition in Rincon but not like in the past. Although times have changed these festivals have continued to reflect the original style of the people. Not everybody can stay up until late at night or until the next day because they have to work as the cost of living is getting higher. Back then, when the festival celebrations were over the people went back to work, either on the plantation, on the sea or to the country where they came from. The Saint Paul Day Celebration on June 27 starts with music and songs by Elvin at Toko Magdalena in Rincon, then continues to the Galan Cicilia house, the Polar Bar, and the homes of Pablo Sint Jago and Patricia Frans. The next day, June 28th, the celebration continues at the Rincon Community Center, COCARI, Kas di Hadrei (Cozy Corner), Kos Bon So and then back to the Community Center as the finishing point. During these celebrations we can experience the various talented cultural, folkloric musicians and song writers, especially our youth as they accompany the adults. They get the opportunity for a better future in our community. A suggestion is that we work together with FUDECU ( Fundashon Deporte i Cultura ) a foundation for sport and culture, to create more singers for our festivals like the Bonairean Tumba, Simadan, Saint John and Saint Paul festivals.” Mark the dates on your calendar and enjoy the Saint John celebration on June 23rd and 24th and Saint Paul on June 27th and 28. Story & Photo by Siomara Albertus Send your comments to The Bonaire Reporter, P.O. Box 407, Bonaire, or email reporter @bonairenews.com . SAINT JOHN AND SAINT PAUL FESTIVALS Bonairean Voices is sponsored by With 5 branches and 10 ATMs located throughout the island and our Internet Banking, MCB@Home, at your service anytime, any day, anywhere. Captain Don’s Island Grower NV 103 Kaminda Lagun ( road to Lagun) (Look for the blue rock and dive flag) Phone: 786-0956 Plants, Trees, Tours and More Open from Friday thru Sunday and all holidays. 10 am till 4 pm nonstop “Almost a solid hectare of growing potted plants and trees. Thirty minute tours. Bonaire born and raised, strong plants for beautiful Bonaire gardens. Reasonable prices starting from NAƒ 5. Landscaping designs, graphically assisted.” — Captain Don To solve the puzzle, enter the numbers 1 through 9 to the partially filled in puzzle without repeating a number in any row, column or 3 x 3 region. Answer on page 17. Rincon artist Nochi Coffie in front of one of his paintings of a traditional Rincon home BAT MYSTERY SOLVED? Dear Editor, I know one small reason why M.Coombs is seeing fewer bats. They are visiting me. ( Reporter, April 9-23, 2010, Issue 7, page 8) Some months ago I saw a bat in my kitchen eating a banana from my fruit bowl in the kitchen. Every evening since I cut bananas on a plate and leave them on my kitchen island. They start arriving at 7:30 and by 10 pm I have a kitchen full of swooping bats eating in flight but also sitting on the bananas and eating. It is a very beautiful sight and I have made many videos. For many years I have cooked rice and spaghetti for the birds and iguanas. With all my leftovers and fruit they eat well every lunchtime. I am very happy to hear all the stories of people caring on Bonaire. One reason why this is a fantastic place to live. Barbara v O.

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Page 8 Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 Sensational Seas Two, a DVD grand tour of the planet’s watery realms includes a slide show from one of Bonaire’s own photographers, Ellen Muller. The production is a cooperative effort between filmmakers, musicians, graphic designers, writers and programmers all divers – who donated their skills and art to produce a spectacular collection of underwater images for the benefit of marine environmental causes. “I know Ellen’s work and how rare many of her images from Bonaire are, so I was thrilled when she agreed to contribute them to the production,” said Anna DeLoach, coproducer of the DVD. Storehouse Mangazina, the “Lock It and Pocket” storage facility on Kaya Gob. Debrot across from the north hotel row has opened two new buildings. It offers an economical way to store everything from dive gear to SUVs. Larry Baillie, a pioneer in Bonaire east side boat diving, has a new 26’ Apex Panga dive boat, the MAD 1, (pictured above, that handles six to eight divers. His new adventure, “Mad About Diving,” will take you north for a two-tank dive and bring you to areas that are very seldom visited. Private and custom charters are available. Phone 717-5246 or 780-9156 for details and reservations. Email: larry@larryswildsidediving.com Have you any comments about the new Reporter feature, Kid’s Corner? It’s a companion to the Panchito website www.panchitobonaire.com which is a great resource for anyone on Bonaire who has youngsters. Try the puzzle on page 15 to improve your Papiamentu, even if you’re not a youngster. The cruise ship season is winding down, to the relief of residents driving downtown and to the dismay of the merchants and tour guides who service the cruise visitors. There are just four ship calls in the next two weeks. This has been Bonaire’s busiest cruise ship season. The cruise ship schedules can always be found on the Happenings page (page 12 this week). We have redesigned the traditional tide tables to add information on sunrise, sunset and moon phase . The column has appeared in The Reporter from its Port Call days. We invite comments. See page 13. Visit the Day of Health for the Bonairean population, on April 24 at the Bonaire Basics facility on Kaya Korona. Health practitioners will be presenting a variety of demonstrations. Entrance is free . Directions or further information can be obtained by calling 717-2458 or emailing ron.sewell@diamond-waters.com . See the poster at the bottom of this page for additional information. Bonaire’s Classical Music Board will present another of its outstanding and inspiring classical concerts on April 27th, at 8 pm in Cacique Hall at Plaza Resort. This time four musicians will amaze you with their talents. They are: Alissa Margulis, a highly gifted young violinist cited by Yuri Bashmet as “one of the most promising violinists of her generation.” She is a prizewinner of many competitions. German Marcano playing the cello. He is the brother of Bonaire’s jazz singer, Andreina Marcano, and obtained his Bachelor of Music Degree at the prestigious Surrey University, England. He formerly occupied the principal cello chair with the Simón Bolívar Symphonic Orchestra . Armand Simon born of Aruban parents in the Netherlands. As a pianist, he has performed in the Americas, Europe and the US. In 2006 Simon was asked to perform for Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands. And the prize winner of the piano competition Aruba, currently underway, will also be there See the poster on page 15 or go to www.classicalmusicbonaire.com for more details. Get tickets early. This will be another sellout. For an exceptional Papiamentulanguage experience (with Dutch subtitles) be sure to attend the play “After Party ” at the SGB High School on one of the three nights of the performances, May 1,2 or 3. See story on page 3. Happy coincidence? Last Friday, April 16, Green Label Garden Center celebrated three birthdays : Owner Ap and two of his employee colleagues, Luis and Rob . A big BBQ was organized to celebrate. Happy birthday, gentlemen. Join in a unique musical entertainment experience on Sunday, May 2nd at the first “Shut Up & Listen” concert featuring the vivacious and talented Becky Alter , a frequent performer on Bonaire. The concert series aims to let the audience focus on the singer without the distractions presented in a typical bar scene performance. See the poster on page 18 for details. Here’s a Special for Reporter readers: if you are a first time diner at Bistro de Paris present this newspaper and receive free wine, beer or soft drink with your lunch or dinner. See the Bistro ad on page 10. Need news between issues of The Reporter? “ Raw News” is available as it happens on the bonairereporter.com website. And it’s still free! Don’t forget to tell our advertisers, “I heard about you in The Reporter.” G./L. D. Flotsam & Jetsam (Continued from page 6) MAD photo

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Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 Page 9 Rincon/ Bonaire – S o it was on one of those clear and quiet days in the second part of the month of April that I drove my Bonairean blue fourstroke, offroad motorcycle over the narrow road along the leeward coast in the direction of the ruins of the manor house of Karpata. The vision over the sea was bright and clear and the plants and trees were showing their light green and fresh leaves. Almost all naked flowering kibrahacha trees showed their bright yellow blossoms.( Kibrahacha is Papiamentu for: break the axe, so called because of the strength of the wood of the tree ./jb ) Some huge ponds on and along the road were already overfilled with fallen flowers from the trees. There was no cruise ship today and people seemed to have forgotten the beauty of the local nature. I passed the manor of Karpata and drove towards Gotomeer. I stopped and parked the big thumper along the road to take some photographs of a group of flamingos. They were as close as 20 feet from me and my motor bicycle. Luckily there was already more water in the lake due to the very heavy rainfall. Two weeks ago the children from Tera Kora were playing on the unpaved roads, protecting themselves against the dust with handkerchiefs bound around their mouth. Now nature was screaming out life because of the abundance of rainfall. I restarted the engine and drove in towards the kunuku (farm/ jb ) of Mr. Cecilia. The gate was closed. Two rows of old blue and yellow license plates were mounted on the used electricity poles that hold the gate. No activity, no noises. Just the sound of birds and growing green. I drove in the direction of Rincon and passed Dos Pos. Then I arrived at the house of the Cecilia family. I had not made any appointment, but the car was there. Mr. Cecilia’s spouse informed me that her husband just left to his kunuku. He’d passed me in his neutral white vehicle, but I did not recognize the car. So Mrs. Cecilia and I had a little talk. I had met her husband before and she had already been informed by him about my visit one day. I asked for permission to shoot some photographs. After a little time Julien Cecilia returned. We shook hands and he immediately started talking about his truck. Mr. Cecilia, better known as “Jan,” has owned the car for ages now. It is a Chevrolet, built by the General Motors Corporation, produced in 1968. He opens the bonnet. There is a huge, but simple, six-cylinder, in-line overhead valve engine mounted on the stiff ladder chassis. After some 40 years Jan has a little cooling problem caused by the radiator now. This is why he drove the white anonymous car to his “rancho.” The problem has to be cured very quickly because Jan really needs his truck. Every day he starts it, drives it over the hill in the direction of the Gotomeer, stops at Dos Pos, fills the huge empty barrels in the back of his truck with deep well water and drives it to his rancho to quench the thirst of his herd of goats and all the chickens. The Chevrolet truck is fitted with an impressive Bonairean-made metal “roof rack.” In the bed there is a thick layer of sheet metal to carry the heavy water barrels. There is no luxury at all. No air conditioning for this Rincon car, nothing but the absolutely necessary cables and wires for ignition and lights. The cabin is not that water tight any more, but who cares. As long as the engine runs that is fine with Jan. Mr. Cecilia is a happy and a lucky man. He was born on Bonaire, in Rincon. So he is a real Rincoñero and he is proud of it. His house, situated along the road from Rincon to the Goto Lake, is built in front of the house where he was born. Mr. Cecilia and his wife are retired now. The kids have grown up. It is just the two of them and the easy country life. And the six-cylinder Chevrolet Custom fits perfectly into this life style. Let’s hope Mr. and Mrs. Cecilia and their truck will stay together for a lot more decades more. The Chevrolet (GMC) company produced its first pick up truck way back in 1924. Jan’s gold sprayed full-size pick up truck was produced in 1968. It is a socalled single cabin, long-bed truck. The Chevrolet Custom is a Cmodel. C-model stands for “conventional,” which means: two-wheel drive, as K-model stands for four-wheel drive. The power is supplied by a straight six, measuring 250 or 292 cubic inches, which stands for 4.1 or 4.8 liters. Jan and I just do not know exactly and we do not care. As long as the engine enables the truck to carry the barrels with well water from Dos Pos to the rancho that is fine with us. Story & photo by J@n Brouwer The 68th of a series of Bonaire Reporter articles by J@n Brouwer, featuring some of Bonaire’s interesting vehicles that are “on wheels.” On course for 100+ The golden workhorse of a Chevy J azz guitarist and vocalist Manny Moreira will perform the main act on Friday, 28 May, during the 2010 Bonaire Heineken Jazz Festival . Moreira has often been called the US’ Jazz Ambassador, even though he was born to Brazilian parents just 10 hours after they arrived in the US. Some of the artists and musicians with whom he has performed and/or recorded include: Gerry Mulligan, Bucky Pizzarelli, Ron Carter, Phil Woods, Eliie Gomez, Gil Goldstein, Grady Tate, Michel Petruciani, Gilberto Gil, Will Lee, Eartha Kitt, The Temptations, Helen Reddy, Jane Duboc and Johnny Ventura. Moreira’s performance on Bonaire can be seen on Friday, 28 May at the Plaza Resort Tipsy Seagull. After the Plaza concert is over there will be a jam session at Sense Restaurant, across the street from Plaza. The Jazz Festival will open Thursday night, 27 May, at Fort Orange with a night of Jazz and Poetry and then on Saturday night there will be a stellar concert with jazz trumpeter Arturo Sandaval. There will be a Sunday Jazz Brunch at Divi Flamingo Hotel on May 30. 2010 Bonaire Heineken Jazz Festival Schedule Thursday, 27 May: Jazz and Poetry with Kaña Brabu, Merietza Haakmat and Henk van Twillert and Hans van Schie at Fort Oranje Friday, 28 May: Concert staring Manny Moreira along with Joke Bruijs and Frits Landesbergen and Angelo’s New Generation Dancers at Plaza Resort Tipsy Seagull followed by late night jam session at Sense Restaurant at 23:30 Saturday, 29 May: Concert starring Arturo Sandoval with the Silver Bullet Steel band and BEKU at Plaza Resort Tipsy Seagull, followed by late night jam session at Sense Restaurant at 23:30 Sunday, 30 May: Brunch jam session with many of the musicians at Divi Flamingo Hotel For more information about the festival visit www.bonairejazz.com. Press release Jazz Fest photo

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Page 10 Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 Al Fresco or Air Conditioned Dining Between Downtown and Hotel Row One street inland—Kaya Gob. Debrot 46 Reservations: 717-7070 info@bistrodeparis.com Open Monday -Saturday “H ealthy Food” was the focus of Wednesday April 7’s fun-filled workshop at our Public Library. The event, filled to capacity, and sponsored by “Better Food For Better Kids” foundation and Biblioteka Públiko, was a great success. The children (aged 6-12 ) were fascinated as Chef Patrice Rannou of Bistro de Paris showed them how to prepare fruit shish kabobs on a skewer. Artist Janice Huckaby contributed paints and a beautiful hand painted flowerpot that served as an inspiration for the children when they each painted their own terra cotta pot for veggie growing. Healthy food tasting was next. Manager Sara Matera from Divi Flamingo Beach Resort sponsored the first dish by Chef Amin Darmaoen : deliciously prepared fish with bell peppers. All of the kids ate the fish although some veggies were left behind. Next up for tasting was a wonderful Bonairean chicken stew with fresh vegetables made by volunteer Glenda Pikerie. It was a very popular recipe since most kids ate everything and some asked for a second and even a third portion. The absolute favorite was the all-natural cake made with unbleached flour, cocoa, brown sugar, honey, yoghurt, egg and a bit of olive oil made by Lola of Capriccio’s. In combination with homemade whipped cream made with brown sugar this recipe received the most gold stars from the kids. After the painted pots had dried, Mieke and John Le Noble donated seeds and time to show the kids how to sow the seeds. Every child went home with his or her own decorated plantar-pot and newly planted seeds. Laraine Abbey-Katzev, founder of “Better Food For Better Kids,” is a professional nurse and is a Master’s Degree nutritionist. The foundation’s mission is to inspire and motivate Bonaireans to return to healthier eating with natural whole-foods meals and to create healthy school meal programs to serve nutritious meals to all students through the schools. Laraine says we need to eat more veggies, fruits and whole grains. We must reduce the amounts of sugar, white flour, and deep fried foods and avoid preservatives and artificial colors and flavors. These products can cause serious physical, behavioral and learning problems. Laraine continues, “People have to become conscious of what they are eating. It does not mean you can never have soda pop, candy, chips, cake or pastechi, but these must be once in a while snacks, not everyday meals. Fried foods, white flour, and sugar are very low in nutrients and because nutrients are the fuel of health, we have to make sure to eat more of the healthy stuff. Often enough there are good alternatives for snacks. Be careful with ‘light’ or diet products though. Good fats are important for health like avocado, nuts and seeds. Diet sweeteners are chemicals that are also causing many health problems.” This fun filled afternoon was made possible by “Better Food For Better Kids.” We also received a helping hand from: Green Label Garden Center and It Rains Fishes . The next “Healthy Food” workshop will be aimed at teenagers. If you are interested in this subject or the workshops please contact Laraine Abbey-Katzev at: info@betterfoodforbetterkids.com or Sharon Bol at sharon@biebbonaire.com . Story & photos by BFFBC Foundation Learning Eating Habits For Improved Nutrition Bistro de Paris Chef/Owner Patrice Rannou demonstrates food preparation FULL DIGITAL SERVICES FUJI MINI-LAB KODAK & FUJI FILM SLIDES, E-6 PROCESSING PASSPORT PHOTOS BATTERIES, CAMERAS FRAMES, PHOTO ALBUMS Les Galeries Shopping Center (Bordering the parking lot) 7175890

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Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 Page 11 Sunbelt Realty N.V. Kaya L.D. Gerharts 8 717 65 60 info@sunbelt.an|www.sunbelt.an • • Stop the silent destruction of your home Stop the silent destruction of your home • • A SPECIAL PLACE T his particular bench near the downtown waterfront commemorates and gives thanks to a special woman in the history of the Netherlands Antilles and the Netherlands. The plaque in the photo is attached to the bench.. She was born in 1880 and died in 1962. When her father, King Willem the Third, died in 1890, she was too young to take the throne, and so her mother acted as Regent for her until 1898. Her 50-year reign took her through two World Wars, with the Dutch Government working in exile in London during WWII, and the decolonization of the Dutch colonial empire in Indonesia. She abdicated in 1948. Seafarers leaving or arriving on Bonaire would be greeted here by their family members who would sit and wave to them as they came and went from Kralendijk. Q) What is the name of this person after whom this bench is named? Q) What is the name of the Queen who followed her? Answer on page 17 BonQuiz appears regularly in The Reporter. It’s prepared by Christie Dovale of Island Tours. To arrange a tour, contact her via her website: IslandToursBonaire.com Phone 7174435 or 795-3456 Email: christiedovale@hotmail.com. R esponse to the first phase of The Storehouse-Mangazina Self Storage facility on Kaya Debrot, opposite “Hotel Row” has been gratifying. The first building with 55 available units was full within four months of opening. With two more buildings completed on April 1, there are an additional 91 units to offer. The most rewarding fact is that 32% of its clients are Bonairean, 28% are local businesses and another 19% are Bonaire residents. The Storehouse’s goal in establishing a business has always been to provide a service that the people of the island could use, and they have accomplished that. In addition to serving the local population's needs, they also offer a great service for frequent tourists and part time residents, who comprise 21% of their clientele. Small closet–size units are available to store dive gear, bicycles and small items while the large units are perfect for storing a truck or car while people are off island. The owners say that they appreciate the community support and look forward to continuing to serve the island's needs. They will be adding a new access control system in May which will enhance monitoring capability and allow clients greater flexibility in the hours they will have access to their units. The entrance to the facility is at Kaya Gob. N Debrot 124B, diagonally across from the WEB power plant. Call (599) 700-1753 or email info@bonaireselfstorage.com. Press release This is not an artist’s rendition but an actual photo of the Storehouse-Mangazina Self Storage facility O n this 22nd annual Rincon Day, Friday, April 30, people of the town of Rincon turn back the clock and show us what Bonaire was in years gone by. This event is so much fun that fellow Antilleans come from the other islands, costumed and ready to perform and join the parade. Everyone strolls the streets, stopping for a drink, a snack or a chat. Music is everywhere. All ages feel part of the action and there are smiles all over, even from the hard working stand holders who always have time to stop and visit. There will be local music, dancing, a parade, food, historical displays and a friendly and lively ambiance. Rincon is the oldest town in Bonaire and proudly emphasizes its history and culture, even sporting its own flag. General Schedule The night before, Thursday, April 29 , between 4 and 7 pm the C hildren’s Parade in the streets of the town. Afterwards, enjoy local musical groups playing krioyo music. Friday, April 30 Playa to Rincon 17 k Run , Main sponsor Maduro & Curiels Bank Bonaire. Start at Kralendijk Stadium, Start Times: Speed walk & 50+ Race at 6 am. Road Race and Estafette Teams at 6:30 am. Finish at Rose Inn, Rincon. Sign up at the Stadium or call Richard Pietersz (Comcabon) 7807225 or 717-862 8 am – Mass at the Catholic Church, Rincon 10-11am – Official opening at the Plaza Commerce . During the day there will be entertainment and activities nonstop on five different stages around the town. Stands will sell local food and drinks. Between 3-4 pm , there will be an Old Time Parade with groups from the island and abroad, singing and dancing. After 5 pm – Simidan Parade – everyone invited to join Entertainment during the day will feature different musical and dancing groups from Bonaire, Curaçao and Aruba. From Bonaire: Foyan Boyz, Rincon Krioyo, Watapana, Tutti Frutti. From Curaçao and Aruba: Rincon Boys, Karabela, Grupo Komper, Grupo Betico, Dancing Grupo Kristal, Fashion Dancers and St. Cruz Folklore Dance Group. See you there! Press release/L.D. Rincon Day 2009 Storehouse photo

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Page 12 Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 CLOSE-IN EVENTS Thursday , April 22—Coral Reefs and Climate Change by John Ware, PhD, President at Sea Services Inc., 7 pm, CIEE Station on Kaya Gob. N. Debrot 26 Saturday, April 24 — STCB Beach Cleanup at Washikemba . Meet at Jong Bonaire at 7 am. Info 717-8444See poster on page 9. Health Day –World Tai Chi Qigong Day at Bonaire Basics. 8amnoon. Free. See page 8 Richter Art Gallery Open House, 2-7 pm. See page 3. Sunday, April 25 — STINAPA Earth Day Walk At Ticiurus Hill, Dos Pos. 7 am, for two hoursFree . Call 717-8444 by 4/23 to sign up. Tuesday, April 27 —Classical Music Board Bonaire presents Four Musicians , from the 4th International Aruba Piano Festival 2010, 8 pm, Cacique Hall, Plaza. See page 8, 15 Wednesday, April 28 — "Fish, Fishing, Diving, and the Management of Coral Reefs" by Ayana Elizabeth Johnson, Marine Biology PhD student Scripps Institution of Oceanography. 7 pm , CIEE, Kaya Gob. N. Debrot 26. 2 6 Friday, April 30 – Rincon Day/Queen’s Day. Schedule page 11 Island Holiday shops closed . Saturday, May 1– Saturday Plaza Panchito (for kids), Voyager Events at the new traffic circle. Movie: The Tooth Fairy, 6-8:30. Free. Saturday, May 1, Sunday, May 2, Monday May 3“ After Party” Highly acclaimed play by Jackie Bernabela in Papiamentu (with Dutch Subtitles. SGB auditorium, 8 pm. Tickets NAf 25. More page 3. Sunday, May 2— “Shut-Up and Listen,” Singer Becky Alter and guest , 6:30 pm. More on page 8, 18. May 27-30 Bonaire Heineken Jazz Festival 2010. Schedule on page 9 Date Day Ship name Time PAX REGULAR EVENTS Rooi Lamoenchi Kunuku Park Tours $21 (includes tax). Discounts for residents and local people. Tel. 7178489, 540-9800. Parke Publico children’s playground open every day into the cooler evening hours. Saturdays Rincon Marshé —6 am-2 pm. Enjoy a Bonairean breakfast while you shop, fresh fruits and vegetables, gifts, local sweets, snacks, arts, handicrafts, candles, incense, drinks, music. Big Marché first Saturday of the month— www.infobonaire.com/rincon. Wine Tasting at Antillean Wine Company’s warehouse on Kaya Industria, second Saturday of the month , 79 pm. Snacks and tasting of six wines for $10 (NAƒ17,50) per person. Tel. 560 -7539. Soldachi Tours— See the real Bonaire and be transported back in time. Learn about the history, culture and nature by Bonaireans from Rincon. Call Maria Koeks for more information—796 -7870. Mondays Soldachi Tours of Rincon, the heart of Bonaire, 9 am-noon. $20-Call Maria, 717-6435-best island tour value Meet the Captain Night at Captain Don’s Habitat Bar– Get up close and personal with Bonaire’s dive pioneer. The Captain’s will autograph your copy of his newest book Reef Windows . Fridays Harbour Village Tennis, Social Round Robin 7-10 pm. $10 per person. Cash bar. All invited. Call Elisabeth Vos at 565-5225 FREE SLIDE/VIDEO SHOWS Sunday– Creature Feature– John and Suzie Wall of Buddy’s Digital photo center present a multimedia slide presentation about Buddy’s House Reef pool bar Buddy Dive , 6:30-7 pm, 717-5080 Monday -Dee Scarr’s Touch the Sea Slide Presentation, Capt. Don’s Habitat, 8:30 pm. 717-8529 Tuesday -Bonaire Land and Ocean presentation by Fish-Eye Photo staff, 7pm on the big screen inside the Sunset Bar and Grill at Den Laman Condos. Wednesday Sea Turtle Conservation Bonaire (STCB) presents an informative slide show: Sea Turtles of Bonaire, at 7pm -every 2nd and 4th Wednesday at Bruce Bowker's Carib Inn (717-8819) BONAIRE’S TRADITIONS Kas Krioyo Rincon— Step into Bonaire’s past in this venerable old home that has been restored and furnished so it appears the family has just stepped out. Local ladies will tell you the story. Open Monday thru Friday, 9 –12, 24. Weekends by appointment. Call 717-2445. Mangasina di Rei, Rincon . Enjoy the view from “The King’s Storehouse.” Learn about Bonaire’s culture. Visit homes from the 17th century. Daily. Call 717-4060 / 790-2018 Bonaire Museum on Kaya J. v.d. Ree, behind the Catholic Ch urch in town. Open weekdays from 8 am-noon, 1:30-5 pm. Tel. 717-8868 Washington-Slagbaai National Park, Museum and Visitors’ Center. Open daily 8 am-5 pm. Closed on December 25th. and January 1st. Call 788 9015 or 796 5681 CLUBS and MEETINGS AA meetings every Wednesday at 7pm. Phone: 786-4651 or 786-7971 Al-Anon meetings every Monday evening at 7 pm. Call 790-7272 Bridge Club Wednesdays , 7:15 pm— All levels, NAƒ2,50, call Renata at 796-5591 to find out the evening’s location. Darts Club plays every other Sunday at City Café. Registration at 4, games at 5. Tel. 717-2950, 560-7539. The Hash House Harriers running and walking club meets every second Wednesday for a one hour walk throughout Bonaire. The location changes each week. The contact number is 700-4361 JCI First Wednesday of the MonthJunior Chamber International Bonaire (JCI Bonaire, formerly known as Bonaire Jaycees) meets at the ABVO building, Kaminda Jato Baco 36 from 7:30 to 9:30 pm. Everyone is welcome. Contact: Renata Domacassé 516-4252. Kiwanis Club meets at APNA Plaza, Kaya International, every other Tuesday, 7 pm . Tel. 717-5595, Jeannette Rodriguez. Lions Club meets every 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month at 8 pm at Kaya Sabana #1. All Lions welcome. For more information call 510-0710. Rotary lunch meetings Wednesdays , 12 noon-2 pm Divi Flamingo Beach Resort upstairs in Peter Hughes meeting room above the dive shop. All Rotarians welcome. Tel. 717-2066 Toastmasters Club meets every two weeks. For more information call Crusita de Palm at 786-3827 or Lucia Martinez Beck, at 786-2953. CHURCH SERVICES Protestant Congregation of Bonaire: Kralendijk, Wilhelminaplein. In Papiamentu, Dutch, English, Sundays, 10 am. Rincon, Kaya C.D. Crestian, in Papiamentu, Sundays, 8:30 am. Children’s club, Saturdays, 5 pm, in Kralendijk Sunday School, Sundays, 4 pm, in Rincon. Bible Study and Prayer meetings, Thursdays, at 8 pm, Kralendijk. New Apostolic Church: Centro di Bario Nord Saliña, Sundays, 10 am. Services in Dutch. 700-0379 . International Bible Church of Bonaire, at SGB High School auditorium (Kaya Frater Odulfinus, off Kaya Korona.) Sunday services in English at 9 am; Sunday evening prayer meeting at Pastor's home, 7 pm. Fridays, 6 to 8 pm, Light & Life Club, children 5 to 12 yrs. Tel. 717-8332. Catholic: San Bernardus in Kralendijk – Services, Sunday at 8 am and 7 pm in Papiamentu, 717-8304. Our Lady of Coromoto in Antriol , Saturday at 6 pm in English. Mass in Papiamentu on Sunday at 9 am and 6 pm. 717 -4211. Assembly of God (Asemblea di Dios): Kaya Triton (Den Cheffi). In English, Dutch & Papiamentu on Sunday at 10 am. Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 pm . 717-2194 Ministerio di Kristu Hesus Services Sunday mornings at 10 am at Jong Bonaire Youth Center in English, Dutch and Papiamentu. Preaching the full gospel. Contact: 786-2557. Prayer and Intercession Church, in English. A full Gospel Church l ocated temporarily at Kaya Alexandrit # 20, Santa Barbara, Republiek. Services are held on Sunday mornings from 10am until 11:30am. Bible studies in English are on Monday nights from 7 to 8 pm. Contact: 717-3322 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints : Kaya Sabana #26, Sundays: 9 am Sacrament Services (Translation to English and Papiamentu upon request) 10:20 Sunday School, 11:15 RS/YM/YW/PH Primary held from 10:20-12 noon Visitors Welcome: Call 701-9522 for Information Who’s Who on The Bonaire Reporter Take The Reporter Home—1-year subscription: By mail to US $70; By mail to Europe $150. By Internet, Free (asking a $35 donation.) For information about subscriptions, stories or advertising in The Bonaire Reporter , PO Box 407, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles; phone (599) 790-6518, 786-6125, E-mail: info@bonairereporter.com The Bonaire Reporter, George DeSalvo, Publisher. Laura DeSalvo, Editor in Chief. Address: P. O. Box 407, Bona ire, Neth. Antilles. Available on-line at: www.bonairereporter.com Published every two weeks Reporters: Siomara Albertus, Stephanie Bennett , BFFBC Foundation, J@n Brouwer, Kelsey Burlingame , Christie Dovale, Johannetta Gordijn, Jack Horkheimer, Greta Kooistra, Jane Madden, Mark Nestmann, Panchito, Michael Thiessen. Unattributed photos are by the editor or publisher. Distribution: Yuchi Molina (Rincon), Elisabeth Silberie & Georgina Sanchez (Playa), Divi-Divi Airline Housekeeping: JRA. Printed by: DeStad Drukke rij, Curaçao Tuesday Ocean Dream 1422 Thursday April 29, 2010 Caribbean Princess 1100-1900 3100 Monday May 3, 2010 Sea Princess 1200-1900 2016 Tuesday May 4, Ocean Dream 0800-1600 1422 Cruise Ship Calls -Informa tion provided by the TCB Send event info to: The Bonaire Reporter reporter@bonairenews.com Tel:790-6518, 786-6125 Crafts Markets at Wilhelmina Park on Cruise Ship Visiting Days— usually 10am until ship departure.

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Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 Page 13 Bonaire Reporter Classifieds— Are still free Got something to buy or sell? Non-Business Classified Ads (up to 4 lines/ 20± words): FREE Commercial Ads only NA ƒ 1,10 per word, for each two-week issue. Call 790-6518 or 790-8988 or email info@bonairereporter.com Living Accommodations ——————————————— FOR RENT 2 bedroom apartment. Great location Abraham Blvd. NAƒ 1350/ month long term. Laundry facility on premises. 788-3837 ——————————————–For long term rental , furnished one bedroom apartment in Playa, available immediately, call: 788-7600 —————————————— For rent at Hato, apartment max 2 persons. Free. Minimum stay 4 months. No airco, no pets allowed. Inclusive; gas/water/electricity/ internet/linen/selibon/furnished/garden/ parking place/terrace/TV connection Rent per month ALL IN NAƒ 1150,-.own entrance. Deposit NAƒ 1150,-Call 717 2529 or 796 2529 ------------------------------------At Hato for rent studio max 1 person. Free from 15 April. Minimum stay 4 months. Inclusive, , water, electricity, internet & tv connection, linen, Selibon, furnished, garden, parking area, private terrace. no pets, no airco allowed. Rent NAƒ 750,Call 717 2529 or 796 2529 ——————————————— MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE – Telescope & UW Video System: Meade 90mm ETX series with Tripod, 2 cases, lots of eyepieces, and control software – NAƒ 500 Light & Motion Mako Housing with Pelican Case, lights, external monitor, LCD back, Sony PC-100 video camera – NAƒ 800. Contact Jake at 717-4112 or info@richterart.com ———————–———-——— For Sale: Scooter Parts for Gilera, Runner, Aprela, Honda, Yamaha and Peugeot. Call 560-3734 , Curaçao —————————————— For Sale: Pinball Machine Jokerz NA 595 or best offer. Over NA 1500 invested in new circuit boards, parts etc. Needs finishing up with some wiring etc. Call 717-8819 8 am to 5 pm ———————————— For Sale: Brand new Haynes Repair Manual Jeep Wrangler 1987 thru 2003, all models: Ang 50,00. Call 796-3637 or emaildigitalis1956@hotmail.com/ —————————————— For Sale: Old book in Dutch language: " Oude bouwwerken in de Nederlandse Antillen, [1968 ]. 50 pages: Ang 15,00. Spare wheel for a Toyota Hilux: Ang 50,00. Call 796-3637 or email digitalis1956@hotmail.com/ ———————————— WANTED Young woman, mature, responsible, single with a regular work, two years in the island is looking for a house to take care for long term , one year experience in this field. Tel 788-3423 ——————————————— Tel (599) 791-6272 / 785-6272 hans@outdoorbonaire.com www.outdoorbonaire.com Bonaire Images Elegant greeting cards and beautiful boxed note cards are now available at Chat -N-Browse next to Lover’s Ice Cream and Sand Dollar Grocery. Photography by Shelly Craig www.bonaireimages.com ——————————————— For Quality House and Office Cleaning .. CALL JRA Serving Bonaire for more than 15 years Honest, Reliable, Efficient, Thorough, Low rates, References. One time or many Phone 785-9041 … and relax. ———————————— LUNCH TO GO Starting from NAƒ6,50 per meal. Call CHINA NOBO 717-8981. Web site: www.chinanobobonaire.com __________________________ 16 Flights a day between Bonaire and Curaçao Divi Divi Air Reservations 24 hours a day Call (5999 839-1515) Or (5999 IS YOUR HOUSE NEW TO YOU? Make it more livable from the start. FENG SHUI CONSULTATIONS Also interior or exterior design advice, clearings, blessings, energy, healing, China-trained. Experienced. Inexpensive. Call Donna at 795-9332 . JANART GALLERY Kaya Gloria 7, Bonaire Local Art, Art Supplies, Framing, and Art Classes. Open Tu.-We.-Th. & Sat 10 am5 pm Friday 17 pm; or phone 717-5246 for appt. Zapataria Rincon Shoe and Purse Repair – Kaya Grandi 36 FELMAR Cleaning Services Apartments, Hotels, Houses, Offices & More. Efficient Work, Good References. Tel. 786-0019 Property Services Bonaire B.V. Taking care of your properties (while you are off island). Email for information and prices: propertyservicesbonaire@hotmail.com LOST Lost? Forgotten? At the end of March my repaired Smithsonian black and gray wet suit disappeared. Did you find it? J@n Brouwer, digitalis1956@hotmail.com , Call 796-3637. ———————-———— Porch Sale: Sat & Sun April 24 & 25, 10am-4pm. Kaya Emerenciana 19, Nikiboko Furniture; Stove; Fridge; etc. EVERYTHING MUST GO ——————————————Get Results Fast Commercial ads are Inexpensive Non-commercial ads are Free The Bonaire Reporter Email Reporter@BonaireNews.com Tel. 790-6518, 786-6125 Does your English need a little "polishing " for your work in the tourist industry? Call 788-7919 for help with conversational English. Day High High High Sunrise Sunset Low Low Fri 23 02:12 0.09 ft 07:33 0.68 ft 15:10 0.25 ft 21:04 0.57 ft 06:19 AST 18:48 AST Sat 24 03:34 0.06 ft 08:29 0.53 ft 15:41 0.20 ft 21:49 0.69 ft 06:19 AST 18:48 AST Sun 25 05:01 0.01 ft 09:33 0.37 ft 16:13 0.14 ft 22:37 0.80 ft 06:18 AST 18:48 AST Mon 26 06:30 0.06 ft 10:51 0.22 ft 16:45 0.08 ft 23:26 0.89 ft 06:18 AST 18:48 AST Tue 27 07:54 0.16 ft 12:29 0.13 ft 17:17 0.01 ft 06:17 AST 18:49 AST Wed 28 00:17 0.95 ft 09:07 0.25 ft 14:22 0.09 ft 17:52 0.05 ft Full Moon 06:17 AST 18:49 AST Thu 29 01:10 0.97 ft 10:09 0.32 ft 16:10 0.12 ft 18:34 0.11 ft 06:16 AST 18:49 AST Fri 30 02:02 0.97 ft 11:02 0.37 ft 17:27 0.16 ft 19:36 0.16 ft 06:16 AST 18:49 AST May Sat 01 02:54 0.95 ft 11:49 0.38 ft 18:12 0.21 ft 20:53 0.19 ft 06:16 AST 18:49 AST Sun 02 03:43 0.91 ft 12:31 0.37 ft 18:47 0.25 ft 22:06 0.21 ft 06:15 AST 18:49 AST Mon 03 04:30 0.86 ft 13:08 0.34 ft 19:18 0.29 ft 23:13 0.22 ft 06:15 AST 18:50 AST Tue 04 05:13 0.79 ft 13:40 0.30 ft 19:47 0.34 ft 06:14 AST 18:50 AST Wed 05 00:16 0.23 ft 05:53 0.71 ft 14:08 0.25 ft 20:15 0.39 ft 06:14 AST 18:50 AST Thu 06 Last Quarter01:19 0.23 ft 06:31 0.62 ft 14:32 0.20 ft 20:42 0.45 ft 06:14 AST 18:50 AST Fri 07 02:25 0.22 ft 07:09 0.51 ft 14:52 0.14 ft 21:08 0.52 ft 06:13 AST 18:50 AST Desiree Seaver Haircuts Yoga Bonaire Salt products Jewelry Arts & Things +599 786-6416 info@aplaceforyoubonaire.coKRALENDIJK TIDES (Heights in feet, FT) Remember: Winds and weather can further influence the local tide’s height and time S ometime, very soon, we were told, WEB, Bonaire’s water and electric utility will switch over to their new power system, Electricity will be generated by the new (bio)diesel dynamos in the powerhouse near Karpata as well as from the 13 wind turbines near the east coast. The Hato power plant will not feed electricity to the island grid but will still produce the power for water desalination. The TWR plant in Belnem will continue to operate. Hopefully, that will mean an end to the frequent power outages WEB customers have been suffering, We’d like to provide an exact date, but there’s been no official word. The best guess is in mid-May, 2010. G.D.

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Page 14 Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 Hair Affair We do our best to make your hair and makeup wishes come true!! You can also come in for facials and facial waxing . We use and sell L’Oreal products Is your plan to marry on the island? We can make you beautiful and stay beautiful for your happiest day. Personal attention by Janneke Appointment by tel: 717-5990 or just walk in. Downtown, near the waterfront next to Little Havana AIRLINES Divi Divi Air. Bonaire’s “on time airline” with 16 flights a day between Bonaire and Curaçao. Your first choice for inter-island travel. Now flying to Aruba. AIRTOURS The Bonaire Aero Club invites you to see Bonaire from the air. Take a one-hour flight with up to three persons. Ideal for photography or environmental study or see your house. APPLIANCES /TV/ ELECTRONICS and COMPUTERS City Shop , the mega store, has the island’s widest selection of large and small home appliances, furniture, TV, computers, cell phones and more. Fast service and in-store financing too. BANKS Maduro and Curiel’s Bank provides the greatest number of services, branches and ATMs of any Bonaire bank. They also offer investments and insurance. BEAUTY PARLOR Hair Affair . Expert hair cutting, styling, facials and facial waxing. BICYCLE / SCOOTER/ QUADS De Freewieler sells bikes and all kinds of bike accessories. They do professional repairs on almost anything on two wheels. Have your keys made here too. BOOKS Reef Windows is Captain Don’s latest book and features the true stories of the naming of many Bonaire dive sites. A great souvenir as well. DENTURE REPAIR All Denture Lab —for the best denture care by an experienced professional. Repairs while you wait. Next to Botika Korona on Kaya J. G. Hernandez. DINING Bistro di Paris A real French restaurant with affordable prices and friendly Bonairean ambiance Owned and operated by a French Chef On Kaya Gob. Debrot ½ mile north of town Pasa Bon Pizza is Bonaire’s best. Freshly prepared pizzas made with the finest ingredients. Salads, desserts. Eat in or take away. Nice bar too. 780-1111 Call ahead to eat-in or take out, Next to Bistro (above) Lunchroom de Bonairiaan— Breakfast & lunch prepared and served by Stichting Project students under professional guidance. Monday-Friday, 9-2. Kaya Gob. N.Debrot, opposite Divi Flamingo. DIVING Carib Inn is the popular 10-room inn with top-notch dive shop and well stocked re tail store. Best book trade on Bonaire. Good prices on regulator repair, dive computer H.Q. ScubaVision Document your Bonaire vacation above and below the water with a custom DVD by Bonaire’s top videographer, Hendrik Wuyts GARDEN SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Green Label has everything you need to start or maintain your garden. They can design, install and maintain it and offer plants, irrigation supplies and garden chemicals. Now in new expanded location off Kaya Industria. Captain Don’s Plan ts, Trees and More sells genuine acclimated Bonaire plants. Take a 30-inute tour too. Strong plants for strong Bonaire gardens. HEALTH Harmony House— The herb and mineral center. Help your body heal itself. Natural Way Health Store— The place where all the hard to find natural and healthy products are. Upstairs from Botika Bonaire, on Kaya Grandi. HOME CARE Bonaire Second Home Care can handle all the needs of second home owners on Bonaire including inspection, management and cleaning. INTERNET AND CELLULAR SERVICE MIO offers by far the clearest, most reliable phone signal on the island PLUS WIRELESS HIGH-SPEED INTERNET almost everywhere on Bonaire. LIQUEUR Taste a Cactus when you try Cadushy of Bonaire Liqueur. Available in many shops and markets it makes the perfect souvenir of the island. PEST CONTROL Professional Pest Control . Call Peter to get rid of all those nasty pets like termites, fleas, ticks and ants that want to invade your home. Call now and save your investment in your home. PHOTO FINISHING Paradise Photo in the Galeries Shopping Center downtown offers fast, fine pr ocessing for prints, slides, items and services. Full digital services . REAL ESTATE / RENTAL AGENTS Bonaire Sunshine Homes is the realtor with a local touch. Ask them to show you the good value homes they list. Call them if you are thinking of selling your home. Caribbean Homes, “the Refreshing Realtor,” specializing in luxury homes, condos, lots, rentals and property management. Sunbelt Realty offers full real estate, rental, and insurance services. If you want a home or to invest in Bonaire, stop in and see them. RETAIL Benetton, world famous designer clothes available now in Bonaire at prices less than those in US. For men, women and children. Best Buddies and Pearls —Stunning fresh water pearl jewelry, fashion, gifts, t shirts. Wonderful service, free gift wrap. STORAGE The Storehouse ( Mangazina in Papiamentu ) offers Secure Storage For Vehicles, Household Items, Diving And Sporting Gear, Business Files or Inventory. Across from the northern hotel row. SECURITY Special Security Services will provide that extra measure of protection when you need it. Always reliable. SHIPPING Rocargo Freight Air and sea shipments in/out of Bonaire. Customs agents. Pr ofessional and efficient. FedEx agent. What would we do without their superb services? SUPERMARKETS Warehouse Supermarket on Kaya Industria— Biggest air conditioned market with the, largest selection and lowest prices on the island. WATER TAXI Get to Klein Bonaire by Ferry. Ride the Kantika di Amor or Skiffy . Hotel pickup. Easiest landing on Klein Bonaire with built-in ramp WINES Antillean Wine Company. You’ve tried the rest; now try the best: best prices, highest quality wines from around the world, kept in a cooled warehouse. Free delivery. Kaya Industria 23, Mon.-Sat. 9 am-noon. To learn more about these businesses check their ad in The Reporter Fortnightly Advertisers in The Bonaire Reporter are included in the guides. Free! Call 790-6518, 786-6518 Check CARIB INN First. Great Prices –Great Stock Scuba Sales Repair Replacement New Gear Accessories Always Great Values Dive gear specials CARIB INN Since 1980 PADI 5 STAR GOLD PALM 717-8819 8 am to 5 pm daily (next to Divi Flamingo Hotel) AFFORDABLE NetTech N.V.info@NetTech.an www.NetTech.an Tel:717-6773 Fax:717-7854Bonaire’s Official Web Site Developer!Domain Registrations E-mail Hosting Anti-Spam & Anti-Virus Web Site Design Web Site Hosting Marketing Consulting Internet Consulting Photographic Services Graphic Design Bonaire’s Official Web Site Developer

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Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 Page 15 N ew! Sharpen your Papiamentu and English language skills with this puzzle from the creator of Bonaire’s top kids’ website, Panchitobonaire.com . Tony Angila, “Tio Tony.” (Story in The Reporter of 22 January 2010) Solutions on page 17 www.panchitobonaire.com T he first meeting with the students who are going to Italy for a threeweek trainee period was held recently in the school restaurant, Chez Nous. This year a group of eight students will be granted the opportunity to undergo an intensive and rewarding learning experience for three weeks. During these weeks the students will receive extensive training at a professional training institute in the region of Modena, Emilia Romagna, Italy. The students leave for Italy on May 30. During the coming months the students will be holding fundraising activities to collect enough funds for their trip to Italy. The group consists of Angelique de Lanoy and Shermen Winklaar from Fundashon FORMA. From SGB the students are Leonard Janga, Pierina Joven, Sohaylor Molina, Corvan Veld, Sonia Winklaar and Gervin Trinidad. The students will be accompanied by Mr. Ezzy Semeleer of SGB and Nuny de Windt from Fundashon FORMA. Press release The Italy bound group with SGB teach er Ezzy Semeleer, Forma’s Nuny de Windt and Sara Matera of the Culinaire Foundation Herman van Leeuwen photo B onaire’s lionfish are multiplying. On Saturday we went diving at Baby Beach and to our surprise we saw five lionfish in an area of about five square meters.Three are in this photo. Johannetta Gordijn FORMA photo

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Page 16 Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 D avid F Colvard (left) sent us this photo of "Living Legend" pioneer underwater cinematographer, Stan Waterman (center), and Women Divers Hall of Fame past president, Martha Watkins-Gilkes (right). They were all visiting a village in Fiji earlier this month. David gave The Bonaire Reporter to John, the son of the acting village chief, which he greatly appreciated since they only get western visitors when the NAI'A ( a Fiji based live-aboard vessel) is in port. The visitors wore the traditional "man skirt" for the kava ceremony. WIN GREAT PRIZES! Take a copy of The Bonaire Reporter with you on your next trip or when you return to your home. Then take a photo of y ourself with the newspaper in hand. THE BEST PHOTOS OF THE YEAR WILL WIN THE PRIZES. Mail photos to Bonaire Reporter , Box 407, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN). E-mail to: info@bonairereporter.com. R eporter Publisher George DeSalvo hands a dinner certificate to Bistro di Paris restaurant to 2009 Picture Yourself winners Brad and Nancy Louth, who are owners at Sand Dollar. H aving had such an amazing response from the yeast articles, I decided to write one more, specifically aimed at women. Women have, since the inception of birth control pills (BCPs), been subjected to a yeast/fungal overgrowth and have suffered endlessly for many years. Initially birth control was seen as a God-send, no more unwanted pregnancies and to some degree far more sexual freedom for women . Noresterone and synthetic estrogens are regularly used in the management of human female hormone therapy. However, there is conclusive scientific data that oral contraceptives will induce the deficiency of the following nutrients – Vitamin C, B12, B6, B2, Folic acid, Magnesium and Zinc. Another fact is that synthetic estrogens can actually aggravate blood clots and coronary heart disease, increase cholesterol and can contribute to the acceleration of breast cancer or any other estrogen-dependant tumor. We also now know that BCPs and HRT can cause chronic candida infections, the catalyst for a host of problems in women inducing cravings for sugars, potatoes, cakes, sodas and biscuits, foodstuffs that feed candida and in turn produce mycotoxins that induce irritation and inflammation within the body. A particularly vulnerable area for women is of course the breasts – a natural source of lactose (the sugar found in mammalian milk), but also a potential food source of sugars for systemic fungus. Ductal carcinoma actually means cancer/fungus in the gland or duct of the breast, and it is very clear that a yeast/fungal overgrowth could spell disaster for any woman. Although the BCP is a huge contributing factor (not the only one!) the problem is far bigger and a lot more complex and affects everybody, men, women and children, and yes also our pets. You may never have taken BCPs or HRT, yet you could still have a yeast overgrowth! WHY? Let’s have a look at our meat. The normal food of cattle is grasses, shrubs and hay – food that have a high fibre content and low to moderate glycemic index. Corn genetically comes from South America, while cows and pigs come from Europe. Animals grow in an environment that matches their dietary needs, yet they are given corn (cheap and easy to grow) wh ich they are unable to digest and the farmer has to add yeast to the feed for further breakdown, which done incorrectly, could lead to ‘grain sickness’. Yeast thrives in the sugary corn environment and will ferment in the hot, wet environment of the stomach of the cow. Cows are also given birth control for weight gain. The animal grows larger and this increases its market value, reaching its slaughter weight in just over five months instead of a year. Could it be that our yeast and birth control treated meat accounts for the sexual prematurity of our children, our high cancer rates, obesity and possibly the large number of gastro-intestinal disorders that seem to be present in so many people? Remember, our meat s are ‘grown’ for money, not for nutrition. Stephanie Bennett Next issue: You Can Only Manage What You Can Measure! Author Stephanie Bennett was born in Cape Town, South Africa, where she studied herbs, minerals and nutrition. Before moving to Bonaire she continued her studies in UK, and now researches health issues that particularly affect people on Bonaire and other Caribbean Islands. WOMEN, BIRTH CONTROL, HRT AND YEAST Winning photo G r a n d P r i z e

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Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 Page 17 Puzzle Solutions Puzzle on page 15 B e pampered for breakfast or lunch by youngsters in training for the world of the professional restaurant business by the Stichting Project. Delicious menu, Good prices On Kaya Gob. N. Debrot – opposite the Divi Flamingo Hotel From Bonaire Nautico Marina BONAIRE NAUTICO MARINA At It Rains Fishes Restaurant Call Henk at 560-7254 / Bob 786-5399 www.bonairenauticomarina /VHF 68 info@bonairenauticomarina.com THE ONLY WALKON / WALKOFF Catamaran Kantika di Amor Up to 27 people and supported by a brand new larger sister Catamaran Kantika Too Up to 50 people TRIPS Every Day (max 1.90 meter draft), Dinghy tie up at north-inside dock at US$10 weekly up from Monday till Monday. Water and 115/220 v. Daily trips via resorts 10 am, 12 , 2 pm Except Sundays at 10 am only Also available for group trips Puzzle on page 6 Bon Quiz ( from page 11 ) Q) What is the name of this person, after whom this bench is named, and Q) What is the name of the Queen who followed? A) Queen Wilhelmina A) Queen Juliana T he 500th sterilization of dogs and cats on Bonaire is a fact! In May 2009 the Bonaire Animal Shelter started a big project called “Bonny Superdog.” The goal was to sterilize 500 dogs and cats for free. The owner doesn’t have to pay. In this way, the Shelter wanted to contribute towards solving the overpopulation of dogs and cats problem on the island. Too many animals cause a variety of problems for people and the animals: the animals roam around, they are not fed, they get sick or hurt and they become aggressive. Consequently, too many animals have to be euthanized every year… a sad and unacceptable fact. Number 500 – Kisha from Amboina Number 500 was Kisha, a dog owned by Mrs. Silda Beaumont from Amboina. Kisha is a female dog of about two years old and she’s had some very beautiful puppies. “I don’t want her to have anymore puppies and that’s why I had her sterilized,” Mrs. Beaumont says. “I made the appointment with the veterinarian myself and then I called the people from the Shelter who came to pick her up, and after the operation they brought her back. She’s doing great. I love animals; to me an animal is just like a person, a child. The love I feel for a child, I feel for an animal too. Since 2002 In 2002 the Animal Shelter set up a fund for free sterilization. Ever since then, pet owners can have their dog or cat sterilized for free. The Shelter pays the bill. In 2004 the Shelter organized a special campaign during which foreign veterinarians sterilized Bonaire’s cats and dogs for free. In two weeks’ time about 250 animals were neutered and spayed. After those two weeks the campaign went on and the local vets took care of the sterilization. Bonny Superdog However, the Animal Shelter felt things weren’t moving fast enough. The island was still overloaded with stray dogs and cats and an excessive amount of animals were being brought into the Shelter. An extra boost was needed. And so, the project of Bonny Superdog was born. The Shelter sought a lot of publicity to make pet owners aware of the Bonny Superdog campaign. All over the island posters were hung by volunteers and, thanks to WEB NV, flyers were delivered to each and every house on Bonaire. Also radio and TV commercials were broadcast and the Shelter put ads in the local papers and people could inform themselves through the website of the Shelter – www.animalshelterbonaire.com The Campaign Continues So far, the campaign has been very successful. Pet owners can still have their dogs and cats sterilized for free. And… every pet owner gets a T-shirt and a bumper sticker as well. Call for more information: the veterinarians at 717-4255 or 717-3338 or the Shelter at 717-4989. Story & photo by Greta Kooistra Mrs. Silda Beaumont from Amboina and her dog Kisha

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Page 18 Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 Did you know… that you might be wearing algae right now? Extracts from algae are used as dye to color clothes. It’s also likely that you had algae for lunch or dinner. If you examine the labels of items in your kitchen, you will most likely find the terms, " alginate " and " carrageenan ," on many of the labels. Carrageenans are compounds extracted from red algae that are used to stabilize and gel foods and pharmaceuticals. Brown algae contain alginates that make foods thicker and creamier and add to shelf life. They are also used to prevent ice crystals from forming in ice cream! Alginates and carrageenans are used in puddings, and milkshakes. The popular color additive beta-carotene often comes from green algae. Many people don't realize that seaweed is harvested from the oceans. A substance called algin is extracted and is used in lipstick, toothpaste and ice cream. Substances from marine plants and animals are used in many products, including some medicines, fertilizers, gasoline, cosmetics, and livestock feed. Oil from the orange roughy, a deep-sea fish from New Zealand, is used in making shampoo. The remains of diatoms , algae with hard shells, are used in making pet litter, cosmetics, pool filters and tooth polish. Just think, next time you are walking around the grocery store that you have algae and other marine organisms to thank for a lot of the products that you see! Kelsey Burlingame Reference: http://see-thesea.org/facts/ facts-body.htm Burlingame is from E vergreen State College and is studying Tropical Marine Ecology and Conservation with CIEE Research Station Bonaire (http://cieebonaire.org). Y oung Cai just happened to be visiting the Bonaire Animal Shelter with his mom, Amanda, when we stopped by to take some photos of our “pets of the week.” What a good model he is, especially when he gets to hold one of the residents of the Cat Cage. The lucky kitty he’s holding is “Nora.” Cat Cage Expert, Jane Madden writes about Nora : “This all white cat is Nora, sister of Nadine that you did a piece on a while ago who did get adopted. Nora is still with us and is just as sweet, if not sweeter, than her sister was. Nora is about seven months old and a very playful young girl who screams around at 100 miles an hour playing with any toy that she can find ... But... the minute you scoop her up she is a cuddly little lamb who just beams at you with her big amber eyes and purrs like a little engine. She would be a perfect fit in a home with children who want a cat to play with, or with an adult family who likes to entertain and be entertained by a wonderful pussycat.” Nora has been checked out by the vet, has had her test for feline leukemia, worming, shots and is in perfect health. The cat adoption fee of NAƒ 75 includes all this plus sterilization. Such a deal and you have a proven healthy and social animal to bring home. When you’re visiting Rincon Day, Friday April 30, look for the Animal Shelter stand selling all sorts of interesting “Bonaire brocante,” household items, books, and bric a brac. See you there. Story & photo by Laura DeSalvo Cai and Kitty Nora

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Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 Page 19 What You Know and What You Don't Know About the Most Famous Star in the Sky" I f I asked you right now to name the brightest star in the night sky. What would you say? The North Star? Well if you did think again. If you said Sirius , you're right. Don't feel bad though because most people think the North Star is the brightest star even though there are more than 50 other stars visible to the naked eye which are even brighter. So why do so many people think the North Star is the brightest star? Well, probably because it's the most famous star because it's mentioned more often than any other star. Why? Well, its position in the sky is what makes it the most important and thus the most famous star. Let me explain. Face north any night during April and May between th e hours of 8 and 10 pm, Sky Park time, where you'll easily see the four stars which make up the Big Dipper's cup and the three stars which make up its handle. And once you've found the Big Dipper you can use it to find the North St ar. Because all you have to do is take the two stars at the end of the cup which ar e called the pointer stars, mentally measure the distance between them and then sh oot an imaginary arrow five and a half times that distance through them and that arrow will always land smack dab on the North Star. And once you've found it you'll notice that it is indeed not the brightest star in the heavens and is in fact no brig hter than the two pointer stars we used to find it. So why is it so important? Simple. #1 the North Star is always due north and #2 wherever you happen to be in the northern hemisphere it will always be the same number of degrees above the horizon as your latitude above the Earth's equator . So before the invention of the compass the North Star was extremely important to navigators and explorers to determine not only which direction was north but exactly how far north of the equator they we re, a kind of ancient GPS. And wherever you are you can also use the North Star to determine where north is and just how far north above the equator you are. How? Well we measure the distance from the equator to the North Pole in degrees of latitude. The equator is 0 degrees and the No rth Pole is 90 degrees. We also measure the distance from any flat horizon to ov er head in degrees. O degrees is at the horizon, 90 degrees is overhead. So if you were at the North Pole tonight the North Star would appear 90 degrees above the hori zon, directly over head. If you were in London however it would appear 52 degrees above the horizon, New York, 40 degrees, Miami, 25 degrees, Bonaire, 12 degrees . So to see how many degrees north you are above the equator first find the North Star above a flat horizon, then hold your fist out at arm's length. A fist will measure 10 degrees . So one fist means you're 10 degrees above the equator and so on. Simple and fabulous. So just remember if you get lost at night simply look for the North Star because it will always be due north. And if it's not you're either south of the equator or on the wrong planet. Jack Horkheimer *to find it... just look up Get A Better Payoff From Your Advertising Advertise in The Reporter 3,000 copies every issueThousands More Readers On the Internet Call Laura at 790-6518 Email: Laura@bonairenews.com ARIES (Mar. 21April 20) If you are in the midst of a financial deal, this is your lucky day. Unreliable people will be negative about your ideas. Don't give in too quickly. If you put your mind to it, you could entertain or host a multitude of social events. Your lucky day this week will be Tuesday. TAURUS (Apr. 21May 21) You won't have much time for your mate this week. If you act with anger you may blow the relationship. Don't overspend on friends or children. This could be a serious relation ship. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. GEMINI (May 22-June 21) You might find added popularity with those around you this week. Advancement can be yours if you are a ssertive in your approach. Get busy on projects that improve your own image; you'll have the discipline to succeed. You can make or break your personal relationship this week. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Talk to someone you trust if you need advice about broaching the subject. Strong willpower will come to your rescue. Don't confide in any relatives whom you know have a tendency to meddle in other people's affairs. You'll regret every word for some time to come. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. LEO (July 23-Aug 22) Do not get involved in joint financial ventures. Problems with appliances or electrical gad gets will drive you crazy. You will enjoy physical activities more than you think. The only thing you'll accomplish is a bad reputation. Your lucky day this week will be Saturday. VIRGO (Aug. 23 -Sept. 23) Outdoor sports events should entice you. You'll stay out of trouble if you pick projects that will benefit the whole family. This might not be a day for hasty decisions. Relatives may play an important role in your social activities. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday. LIBRA (Sept. 24 -Oct. 23) It may be a disappointing day emotionally. Your best gains will come through helping others emotionally. Any contributions you make to organizations will enhance your reputation and bring you offers. Don't settle for less than the best. Your lucky day this week will be Thursday. SCORPIO (Oct. 24 Nov. 22) Try not to take everything so seriously. Opportunities for romance will develop through group endeavors; however, the association isn't likely to last. Opportunities for romance will develop through activities with large groups. The locks, stove, gas, or electric wires may not be secure. Your lucky day this week will be Tuesday. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23 -Dec. 21) Don't let your partner start any arguments. Passion should be redirected positively. You can offer your help to others but back off if they appear to be offended by your persistence. Do not get involved in joint financial ventures. You may find travel to be most rewarding. Your lucky day this week will be Sunday. CAPRICORN (Dec 22.Jan. 20) Visitors may drop by unexpectedly, resulting in tension with your lover. Look into ways that you can make extra cash. Your home environment appears to be a little shaky. Look into physical activities that will help get rid of some of that tension you may be feeling. Your lucky day this week will be Friday. AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 -Feb. 19) Your need to put great detail into everything you do may cause you to miss the overall picture. Emotionally, things may not run so smoothly. Listen to the advice given by others. You might not be as reserved on an emotional level as you'd like. Your lucky day this week will be Thursday. PISCES (Feb. 20-Mar. 20) Partnerships could be tense. Don't push your luck. Trips, educational pursuits, or projects that could lead to new outlooks should be on your agenda. Insincere gestures of friendliness are likely to occur. Catch up on any correspondence you've neglected. Your lucky day this week will be Tuesday. By Astrologer Michael Thiessen For the last weeks of April 2010

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Page 20 Bonaire ReporterApril 23 May 7, 2010 E D