Citation
St. John tradewinds

Material Information

Title:
St. John tradewinds
Alternate title:
Saint John tradewinds
Portion of title:
Tradewinds
Uncontrolled:
St. John tradewinds newspaper
Place of Publication:
St. John, V.I
Publisher:
Tradewinds Newspaper Inc.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly[1998-]
Monthly[ FORMER <1979-1987 (Jan).>]
Bimonthly[ FORMER 1987 (Feb)-1997]
bimonthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 35 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Saint John (V.I.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States Virgin Islands -- Saint John

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Description based on: vol. 3, no. 5, May 1979; title from caption.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering varies.
General Note:
Successor to The St. John Drum.

Record Information

Rights Management:
Copyright Tradewinds Newspaper Inc.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
52130251 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text



May 30-June 5, 2011
� Copyright 2011


ST. JOHN


The Community Newspaper Since 1972 * St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands


Bryson
Mays Sets
New Course
Record at
Power Swim

Sixteen-year-old
Bryson Mays of St.
Croix came ashore at
Hawksnest Beach first in
the 8th Annual Beach to
Beach Power Swim on
Sunday morning, May 29,
topping a field of about
200 swimmers. Mays,
who swam the three and
half mile course from
Maho Bay, also won the
swimming race last year,
but this time around he
set a new course second
of one hour 10 minutes
and 32 seconds. See
next week's Tradewinds
for more pictures, a list
of top finishers and full
story.


St. John Tradewinds News
Photo by Jaime Elliott


STJ Public

School

Principals

To Change
Pages 2-3
Selengut's
Maho Bay
Camps Will
End in 2012
Page 5
Cruz Bay Noise
Answers Still
Being Sought
Page 6
Sun Comes Out
for 20th Annual
Folklife Festival
- Pages 4 and 24
CZM Approves
New WAPA Power
Line to St. John
Page 7


MaLindaMEDIA


RESERVE YOUR AD SPACE FOR 2012!
ISSUE NO. 6 IS IN THE WORKS.
email: mnelson@malindamediallc.com for more information.


$1.00







2 St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011


Guy Benjamin School PTO Not Happy


About Losing Principal Dionne Wells


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
News of the transfer of Guy
Benjamin School principal Dionne
Wells was met with frustration and
anger last week.
While DOE did not officially an-
nounce the transfer until a May 26
press conference, rumors about the
new assignments were widespread
and GBS parent teacher association
members discussed the issue at its
My 18 meeting.
"We have a very active PTO at
GBS and last Wednesday, May 18,
we had at least 30 people in atten-
dance," said Trish Meyers, a GBS
parent. "I made an announcement
at the meeting that I was aware that
Ms. Wells was going to be trans-
ferred out of Guy Benjamin Ele-
mentary School. As to be expected,
people were shocked, angry, disap-
pointed and frustrated."
"The general feeling from teach-
ers, parents, and many students are
that we are very proud of Wells'
achievements and the advance-
ments that GBS has made over the
last four years under her leader-
ship," said Meyers. "We are very
proud of our extremely capable, tal-
ented and intelligent teaching staff.
These teachers have been strongly
supported by Ms. Wells and the
students are flourishing with Ms.
Wells as principal."
Working with Coral Bay Com-
munity Council and St. John School
of the Arts officials, Wells was able
to win a five year 21st Century Af-


"Even the most resilient child can lose their
spirit to succeed if someone who they rely on
and look up to is removed, then replaced with
an individual who felt it was less than an honor
to be leading them."

- Trish Meyers, parent of student at Guy Benjamin Elementary School


ter School program grant, Meyers
explained.
"Ms. Wells initiated and sup-
ported the very successful after
school program at GBS," said the
PTO member. "Ms. Wells initiated
a yearly summer program to im-
prove children's writing skills and
is very active in keeping the cost af-
fordable so any child can attend, no
matter what their financial abilities
are. Wells believes in the children
at GBS and we believe she could
do so much more for them if she
was allowed to remain as principal
for many years to come."
What worries the PTA more than
anything is the possibility that the
new principal at GBS will not want
to be there. Taking over the helm
from Wells is Whitman Browne,
who used to be the principal of Ev-
elyn Marcelli Elementary School
on St. Thomas. Marcelli is closing
at the end of the school year and
Browne will report to GBS next
year.
Browne, who lives on St. Thom-
as, has been quoted in several local


publications as viewing his new
assignment as "punitive and politi-
cal." GBS parents do not want their
principal to view his job as punish-
ment, Meyers explained.
It 11 would be a travesty to damp-
en that light by hiring a principal
who did not want to be placed at
GBS or felt it was a punishment,"
said Meyers. "We all know that
Ms. Wells could have a positive
influence on the staff and students
at Julius E. Sprauve, but the teach-
ers and children at Guy Benjamin
School do not deserve to lose their
leader."
"Eventhe most resilient child can
lose their spirit to succeed if some-
one who they rely on and look up to
is removed, then replaced with an
individual who felt it was less than
an honor to be leading them," Mey-
ers said. "If the Department of Edu-
cation insists on transferring Ms.
Wells even after hearing our plea,
we feel like we deserve no less than
a replacement that is enthusiastic,
grateful, and thrilled to be princi-
Continued on Page 18


EDITOR/PUBLISHER
MaLinda Nelson
mahnda@tradewnds. vi

NEWS EDITOR
Jaime Elliott
jazme@tradewinds.vi

WRITERS
Andrea Milam, Mauri Elbel

ADVERTISING
advertising@tradewinds.vi

CIRCULATION
Rohan Roberts


COLUMNISTS
& CONTRIBUTORS
Chuck Pishko, Malik Stevens, Adam
Lynch, Tristan Ewald, Paul Devine,
Andrew Rutnik, Craig Barshinger,
Maggie Wessinger

SUBSCRIPTIONS
U.S. & U.S.V.I. only
$70.00 per year

THIRD CLASS PERMIT
U.S. Postage PAID
Permit No. 3
St. John, VI 00831


NEWSLINE
Tel. (340) 776-6496
Fax (340) 693-8885
www.tradewinds. vi
editor@tradewinds. vi

MAILING ADDRESS
Tradewinds Publishing
P.O. Box 1500
St. John, VI 00831

� COPYRIGHT 2011
All rights reserved No reproduction of
news stories, letters, columns, photo-
graphs or advertisements allowed without
written permission from the publisher


Public Presentations on Local Shark

Research Set for May 30 and June 1
The Coral Bay Community Council is welcoming back the is-
land's shark researchers.
Bryan DeAngelis and Dr. Greg Skomal will be hosting two pre-
sentations for the public this year to share their research.
"A Review of USVI Shark Research from 2004 to Present" will
be presented at the Maho Bay Campground pavilion on Monday,
May 30, at 7:30 p.m. and on Wednesday, June 1, at Estate Concor-
dia at 6:30 p.m.
The shark researchers are returning this week for their sixth year
of juvenile shark research in Coral Bay and Fish Bay. Attendees
can learn about the 12 inches to two feet long juvenile sharks that
live in the island's shallow bay nurseries. Everyone is welcome.
For more information call the CBCC office at 776-2099.

Delinquent Real Property List Published

The territory's delinquent real property list that has been pub-
lished applies only to those property owners who have been delin-
quent in their payments of real property taxes for 10 or more years,
according to the Office of the Lieutenant Governor.
The list was published in the St. CroixAvis on Wednesday, May
25, and will be published in the Virgin Islands Daily News on Fri-
day, May 27. The delinquent real property list can also be viewed
on the Lt. Governor's website, www.ltg.gov.vi.
Publication of the delinquent list is mandated by VIC T33
�2496, which requires the Lieutenant Governor to publish the
names of all delinquent real property tax owners. Property owners
whose names appear on this list or who know that their properties
are in delinquent status are encouraged to contact the Office of the
Tax Collector in their district to make arrangements for payment.
For more information, contact the Office of the Tax Collector at
776-6737 on St. John.

GHS Graduation Scheduled for June 10
The Gifft Hill School graduation ceremony for the Class of 2011
will be Friday, June 10, at 5:30 p.m. on Trayser Field at GHS.
University of the Virgin Islands President Dr. David Hall will
deliver the commencement address. Please call 776-1730 for more
information.

"Saturday Night Fever" Is June 11

The Lime Inn will host a disco extravaganza fund raiser to ben-
efit Chris Chapman on Saturday, June 11, at 9 p.m. .
Friends of the long-time island massage therapist are planning
to boogie down at the Lime Inn after the restaurant staff removes
the tables. Adonis will spin the tunes, finger foods will be served
and the 80s will be revisited. Tickets are $30 and available at Con-
nections and St. John Hardware.

UU Hosting Beach Clean Up June 12
The Unitarian Universalists of St. John are hosting a beach
cleanup on June 12 at Cinnamon Bay.
Stop by from 9 a.m. to noon for a cleanup and laughter yoga.
Bring a sack lunch, gloves, a swimsuit and work clothes. Meet at
the watersports area. For more information call 776-6332.



def 1-800-222-TIPS (8477)
"US'V '" Remain Totally Anonymous
Collect Rewards in Cash
SSTOPPERSUSVI Help Our Community be Safe


TRADEWINDS PUBLISHING LLC
The Community Newspaper Since 1972







St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011


Dept. of Ed Shakes Up School Administration

Wells will transfer to JESS; Francis to transfer to STT for 2011-12 school year


"The administrative changes were made to
address concerns and create better alignment
amongst schools. Reviewing of schools'
performance data, district performances data
and information from administrators were
used to get a sense of where administrators
might best fill the needs."
- LaVerne Terry, Education Commissioner


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Department of Education offi-
cials unveiled changes to the ad-
ministration of many schools in
both the St. Thomas/St. John and
St. Croix Districts last week.
Both public schools on St. John
will be run by new principals next
year. After five years at the Julius
E. Sprauve School, Principal Ma-
rio Francis is being transferred to
Edith Williams Alternative Acad-
emy on St. Thomas next year.
Guy Benjamin School princi-
pal Dionne Wells will be replac-
ing Francis as principal of JESS.
Whitmore Browne, the principal
of Evelyn Marcelli Elementary
School on St. Thomas - which
is closing at the end of the school
year - will be new the GBS prin-
cipal next year.
While rumors of transfers have
been whispered for weeks, the of-
ficial announcements about the
new assignments came during a
DOE press conference at the Cur-
riculum Center on Thursday after-
noon, May 26.
Officials cited budget cuts and


strict No Child Left Behind bench-
marks for some of the transfers.
DOE has cut millions from its
budget and is still looking for an
additional $2.9 million in savings
by the end of the fiscal year, Com-
missioner LaVerne Terry explained
in last week's press conference.
"The general fund has contin-
ued to decline and recently the
department was required to re-
duce its budget by three percent
to $6.8 million," said Terry. "We
anticipate additional budget cuts
for the upcoming years. It should
be noted personnel cost makes up
approximately 90 percent of the
department's budget."
There are also several schools
in both districts which have never
met Annual Year Progress, require-
ments which will only get more
difficult for schools to meet in the
future, Terry explained.
"Since 2007, we have had three
elementary schools which have
never made AYP and six second-
ary schools which have never
made AYP," said the DOE Com-
missioner. "This year, schools
must reach higher standards to


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Julius E. Sprauve School will welcome Di-
onne Wells as the school's new principal next
year and should expect additional changes as
well.
Current JESS principal Mario Francis will
report to the Edith William Alternative Acad-
emy starting next school year while Whitman
Browne from St. Thomas will take over the
helm of Guy Benjamin School, being vacat-
ed by Wells.


Dionne Wells


meet AYP. Instead of 37.7 percent
of students reading at grade level
to reach AYP in the third grade,
starting next year it will 53.3 to
meet AYP"
"This new higher standard will
put additional stress on all schools
and especially on the schools
which have never made AYP or
barely made AYP," said Terry.
DOE officials also outlined the
department's two year initiative to
improve the entire school system.
T%% o years ago we undertook
an initiative to not just improve
schools, but to improve the entire
system," said Terry. "In order to
get rapid and sustained improve-
ment we must look at the system
as a whole. Instead of looking at
each school staff in isolation, we
looked at the staff as a whole to see
how best to utilize our resources."
The administration transfers
were made in the best interest of
each school and were not politi-


Among the announcements issued at a De-
partment of Education press conference on
May 26, DOE Commissioner LaVerne Terry
said that the Cruz Bay public elementary and
public school will be restructured.
"The Julius E. Sprauve School is one of
the schools that we are looking at restructur-
ing," said Terry. "Initial reviews that we're
looking at are primarily at the instructional
program as well as the way the school is ar-
ranged. There may be other changes coming
in the future."


I.
K


Mario Francis


cally motivated, Terry added.
"The administrative changes
were made to address concerns and
create better alignment amongst
schools," she said. "Reviewing of
schools' performance data, district
performances data and informa-
tion from administrators were used
to get a sense of where administra-
tors might best fill the needs. Some
will say these moves are politically
and personally motivated and I say
'You are wrong.'"
"This is not the first time admin-
istrators have been transferred,"
Terry said. "It's very common and
this year should be considered no
different than any other year. The
Virgin Islands is a political place
and as we all know it's hard to
separate any major decision from
politics."
"As much as we say it was not
politically motivated, there will be
those in the community who will
not believe us," Terry said.


"I believe that there is going to be a meet-
ing next week on St. John to talk about other
things we are proposing at the school," Terry
said.
DOE will host a meeting for parents of
JESS 8th graders on Thursday evening, June
2, according to DOE St. Thomas/St. John In-
sular Superintendent Jeanette Smith-Barry.
"We have set a meeting for parents of
eighth graders at JESS on Thursday night and
information on that meeting will be forth-
coming," said Smith-Barry.


New Principal Is Just One of Many Changes Expected at JESS


In announcing the closure of
Marcelli on St. Thomas, Terry said
the department looked at schools
with less than 200 students.
"We were faced with the real-
ity that we needed to address the
fact that we have some very small
schools using an abundance of re-
sources," said the DOE Commis-
sioner. "Likewise, we knew that
some of these schools required
major repairs for which there are
no resources to address. We re-
viewed each of these schools and
made the decision to close the
Marcelli School."
GBS in Coral Bay is one of
those schools in the district with
less than 200 students. Terry did
not discuss closing the elementary
school, but did leave the door open
for future "difficult decisions."
"It's not sound to operate small
schools when other schools can
take those students," Terry said.
"There may be many other tough
decisions in the future. The com-
munity wants and has demanded
that we improve the school system
and better prepare our students for
their futures."
"Our fiscal resources are
scarce," said Terry. "Changes are
necessary, painful, but necessary.
No matter what we do, the best
interest of the student is placed
ahead of all other considerations."




INDEX
Church Directory ............... 18
Classified Ads ................... 19
Community Calendar ...........20
Crossword Puzzle ...............20
Ferry Schedules .................18
Letters ........................... 14-15
Police Log ........................... 17
Real Estate ....................21-23



Thursday, June 2nd



340-776-6496



editor@tradewinds.vi






4 St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011


St John Tradewinds News Photos by Jaime Elliott


888-693-7676~ll free
340-695-7676 tel 340-693-8923 fax
www.islandgel a sin c. ain
ukahy iWlandgelauamSin r.comn


We offer a unique seetlion of 2 it 6
bedroom villas, all with spectacular
vies and prilie piols. Each villa is
Iuily furnuisli!, ijdudiig a gvurmct
Wiidicn, and nI.lttis he op-n ir Iropi-
cal fc.ingof die island. A.irpotfl & Nuicr
tAi nike'it j-p renul, dckidltireet-
ini pr,. ie .hhi .inid h.u.wkerinp are
all available
creating unfwrgMtable vacations
since 1996.
Woniact Iati Ma.iL.iAdiJif ror
a.ssWance wlili Jll ,,r i-r.Iri,. ilredi.
Vii t ou r i oremail us o sele
your private -Island Getaway."


H d St. John


Hardware
AT THE MARK ETPLAC E
Plumbing Fixtures. Electrical Supplies. Power Tools
Paint Supplies & Custom Paint Colors
Pool Supplies . ART Supplies . Gardening Supplies
PH: 693-8780 FAX: 776-6685 Mon-Fri 7 to 5 Saturdays 8 to 12


Koko and the Sunshine Band entertained the crowds at the 20th Annual St. John
Folklife Festival last week.



Sun Shines on 20th Annual St. John


Folklife Festival at Annaberg Ruins


Continued from Back Page

crafts made with local seeds and
other organic material. Justin Tod-
man showed off his broom making
skills and Elizabeth Aubain dis-
played her woven bags, belts and
hats.
Olivia Christian and Golda Her-
mon braved the heat of the small
kitchen structure at Annaberg,
whipping up fresh dumb bread
in coal pots cooking over locally
made charcoal.
Gardener Charles "Kalo" Jack-
son toured students around the An-
naberg garden which was teeming
with everything from sugar cane
and coconut to cherries and lem-
ongrass.
"My favorite part of the whole
day was picking cherries from the
garden," said one Lockheart El-
ementary School student.
It wasn't all fun and games
though. Students also toured the
ruins and had to answer questions
about the plantation's history.
"The students were so well
behaved," said Georges. "I think
they really had a good time and


Students learned the history of the plantation while en-
joying live music and lunch during the festival.


they even learned some things too.
I love having the kids up here be-
cause there is so much to soak in
and enjoy."
After an exciting night-time
show under the stars at Annaberg,


which featured the St. John Cul-
tural Dancers, St. Thomas Heritage
Dancers and the Dominican Asso-
ciation Dancers, the 20th annual
St. John Folklife Festival wrapped
up another great year.






St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011


Maho Bay Campground Eyes Last Season;


Eco-resort's Lease Will Expire July 2012


"Flexible Zoning" Means
Maho Bay Could Be Home
To Resort or Villas, or Both
By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
With Maho Bay Campground's lease set to expire
on July 31, 2012, a rare 13.8 parcel of land on the
pristine North Shore of St. John is on the market.
The land is surrounded by V.I. National Park and
includes 850 feet of sandy white shoreline in addi-
tion to incredible views. Offered by Islandia Real
Estate, the land is listed as Estate Abraham's Fancy,
but is billed as Estate Maho Bay on the company's
website.
The asking price is $23 million and the possibili-
ties for the property are many, according to www.
islandiarealestate.com.
"One of the last remaining privately owned beach
front properties on St. John's North Shore is of-
fered for sale," according to the site. "This privately
owned north shore beachfront property offers flex-
ible zoning for any number of uses or a combina-
tion thereof; exclusive family estate holding, private
planned residential community, ultimate upscale
beachfront resort."
Continued on Page 16


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
St. John could be welcoming an-
other luxury resort to its shores. Or 25
new sprawling villas could be dotting a
hillside on the North Shore in the next
few years.
Those are just two possibilities for
what could replace Maho Bay Camp-
ground (see side bar on this page),
when the eco-resort's lease expires in
July 2012.
Although the exact future of the
campground - and the 13.8 protected
acres on the North Shore it sits upon
- remains undetermined, officials are
not taking reservations after June 2012,
setting up this next high season to be
Maho's last one.
The campground, which opened in
1976, is nestled on 13.8 privately owned
acres on the island's North Shore and
includes a sandy beach with 850 feet of
shoreline. The campground consists of
mostly low-impact wooden structures,


walkways and winding stairways, soft-
sided tents, a dining and yoga pavilions
and a popular arts program.
Maho Bay Camps latest online
newsletter, issued last week, included a
letter from owner Stanley Selengut ad-
vising of the campground's impending
closure.
"I am sorry to report that negotia-
tions to extend our 37-year lease have
been so far unsuccessful," Selengut
wrote. "Unless the landowners decide
otherwise, Maho will close before July
31, 2012."
While the date of Maho's lease end-
ing has been known for years, many
visitors and residents hoped a land
conservation would be able to purchase
the property and continue leasing to the
campground.
With a price tag of $23 million,
however, a buyer for the property has
not been found.
Trust for Public Land, which ac-
quired more than 400 acres nearby for


NEW Roulette


C. Southland

\^ Gaming


PAYING EVERY DAY!
Sunday 4pm - 12am M
Monday through Thursday, 12pm - 12am r es ponsibly
Friday & Saturday, 12pm - lam


protection last year, was leading the
drive to purchase the land. At this time,
however, the non-profit conservation
organization is no longer in negotia-
tions with the land owners, explained
Maho Camps vice president Adrian
Davis.
"Trust for Public Land is no longer
in negotiations with the land owners,"
said Davis. "Hopefully someone will
come out and purchase the land and
lease it to Maho Bay Camps, but that
will not be Trust for Public Land at this
time."
Funds collected by TPL for Maho
Bay Camps were used to begin nego-
tiation, Davis added.
"Anyone who donated money to
TPL has gotten a letter about the end of
negotiations," said Davis. "The money
they donated was for the beginning of
negotiations and appraisals. It was nev-
er promised that they would purchase
it or that people would get their money
Continued on Page 21






6 St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011


ise
*f T7


iutllying America's Parad
.90 / ,i, u/tVr1/i ,7/ ' r, e T .Arrt r ' '\/


* Home of Josephine's Gr
* Landscape Design/Insta
* Irrigation & Maintenance


Seaview Vacation Homes, I


Short lerm-Full Service Since 19085
VACATION VILLA MANAGEMENT
24 years of on island rental service

e: info@seaviewhomes.com
w: www.seaviewhomes.com







ST. JOHN
--"" magaz ine

2008, 2009, 2010, 2011
9 Gold Addy Award Magazine Design


Chamber Continues To Seek Solutions

To Night Noise Issue Plaguing Cruz Bay


I


Administrator Leona Smith.


By Andrea Milam
eenrs St. John Tradewinds
Anyone who's driven by Cruz Bay after the sun
llation goes down knows that the town can be a noisy place.
Now downtown businesses, via the St. Thomas/St.
John Chamber of Commerce's St. John Chapter, are
fighting for stricter enforcement of the Virgin Islands'
noise ordinance.
"The law needs to be worded much better than it is,
and enforcement needs to be across the board," said
Castaways owner Jeff Quinlan. "The law is very gen-
eralized."
While Quinlan has been approached by V.I. Police
Department officers despite his efforts to keep noise at
his bar to a minimum, he's witnessed officers ignoring
blaringly loud music emitting from other downtown
establishments and even from cars, he said.
"It's painful to drive by these places even with the
windows rolled up in my car," agreed St. John Cham-
ber board representative Don Porter.
Businesses from Estate Lindholm to Lavender Hill,
n t both just outside of Cruz Bay on opposite ends of the
town, have faced issues with the noise level, Cruz
Bay Boutique Hotel owner David Guidi explained.
o m "There are a few places that are so loud at three
and four in the morning that it spoils it for everybody
else," said Guidi, who suggested that VIPD officers
making use of noise meters would help solve the
problem.
Jd t Castaways owner Quinlan lauded the FBI and DEA
on their recent drug busts, saying it's reduced the size
of the crowd that usually hangs out across the street
from his bar allegedly selling drugs.
gnas "We've noticed a huge difference," he said. "If lo-
cal police followed that trend and enforced the No
Loitering sign there, it would help to solve the prob-
04 lem."
While it's up to the VIPD to enforce the law, the
Department of Licensing and Consumer Affairs,
which grants the business licenses determining which
establishments can play loud music - within the lim-
nc. its of the law - should also be involved in the discus-
sion of making Cruz Bay a quieter place, said St. John


VIPD's "Click It or Ticket" Campaign To Promote Safety


St. John Tradewinds
Governor John deJongh pro-
claimed May 23 through June 5 a
"Click It or Ticket" mobilization
period in the Virgin Islands.
During these designated two
weeks, police will ramp up en-
forcement of seat belt laws, which
have been shown to reduce the risk
of injury or death caused by motor
vehicle crashes.
With the safety and security of
residents and visitors to the ter-
ritory as a paramount concern,


initiatives like this one assist in
raising awareness on potentially
life-saving measures in the event
of an accident. A majority of Vir-
gin Islanders regularly travel in
motor vehicles on our territory's
roads and are encouraged to al-
ways practice safe driving habits.
In 2009, seat belts in passen-
ger vehicles saved approximately
12,713 lives. Regular seat belt use
is the single most effective way to
protect individuals while driving;
using a seat belt is also required by


law in the Virgin Islands.
In the territory and across the
nation, law enforcement officers
will actively participate in the
Click It or Ticket initiative and
will monitor the public on seatbelt
use, day and night.
Checkpoints will be established
throughout the terriotry. Increased
enforcement of seat belt laws, cou-
pled with publicity, has proven to
be an effective method to increase
seat belt usage and decrease fatal
crashes.


"There are a few places that
are so loud at three and four in
the morning that it spoils it for
everybody else," said Guidi, who
suggested that VIPD officers
making use of noise meters would
help solve the problem.
- David Guidi, owner
Cruz Bay Boutique Hotel


Chamber members agreed to invite VIPD and
DLCA representatives to next month's meeting in or-
der to further the discussion.
Also on the agenda was the issue of the approved
gas station project near Power Boyd, where excava-
tion has reportedly begun.
"Gasoline will have to go over Jacob's Ladder,"
said Porter. "It's a potential serious disaster."
"We really need to step up our objection," added
Cid Hamling.
Chamber members agreed to follow up on a ru-
mored opposition to the project by a neighboring
property owner, who claims the gas station's plans
encroach on her land.
On the heels of Administrator Smith's announce-
ment that VI. Port Authority board member Robert
O'Connor will soon recommend restricted parking at
the VIPA-owned U.S. Customs lot, Chamber Chapter
members agreed to formally recommend that parking
at the lot be restricted to two hours during the day and
three hours during the evening.
Chamber members also lamented the recent pro-
posal of a bill to add a one cent import fee per pound
to everything arriving in the territory aside from food
and medicine.
"It sounds innocuous, but it's a little deceptive,"
said Porter. "It gets interesting with things like build-
ing materials."
"It's not a good bill," added Hamling.


r e s t a u r a
open 7 days a week
693.7755 or www.Iatapastjohn.cc


uItom Emb o

&_ Supplier of wholesale and retail embr
Hats - Polos - Tees - Bags
Logos - Monograms - Stock and custom d
t our 'Factory Outlet retail store:
Town & Country Center I
Coral Bay, St. John







St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011 7


WAPA Gets Green Light for New Electrical Cable to Frank Bay


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
St. John will be connected to St. Thomas
by a second cable soon.
In a short decision meeting on Tuesday
evening, May 24, at St. Ursula's Senior Citi-
zens Center, the St. John Coastal Zone Man-
agement Committee voted unanimously to
grant the V.I. Water And Power Authority a
modification request to install a new electri-
cal cable from Red Hook to Frank Bay.
St. John CZM Committee members Ger-
ry Hills, Andrew Penn and Madaline Sewer
voted in favor of the modification request.
Committee member Edmund Roberts was
absent.
The committee tabled the request at its
April 28 decision meeting at the Westin
Resort and Villas because the group could
not get a clear answer about three seemingly
unused utility poles and a rusty chain link
fence in the Frank Bay area.
The poles have since been removed and
a new fence will installed in the area soon,
according to WAPA officials.
At the April CZM meeting, Amy Dempsey
of Biolmpacts showed the committee pic-
tures of the existing pipeline and images of
the new cable's proposed location. The new
cable would "provide redundancy so that if
the other cables are lost or damaged, there
will be full electrical power for the island of
St. John," according to the request.


St. John Tradewinds News Photo Jaime Elliott


St. John CZM Committee tabled WAPA's request the first time around
while it waited for the utility to remove three unused poles in Frank Bay,
above.


WAPA Engineer Cordelle Jacobs, how-
ever, was unable to answer questions from
the committee regarding the utility poles
in Frank Bay, prompting the committee to
table the request.


Under questioning from committee mem-
bers Penn and Hills, Jacobs admitted not
knowing details of WAPA's St. John substa-
tion.
"My boss couldn't make it here today,"


Jacobs said at the April meeting.
This time around, the WAPA engineer
was able to answer to tell committee mem-
bers that the poles had been cut down and a
new fence will be installed around the high-
voltage junction box in Frank Bay.
"The poles were removed, the grass was
cut and we will be replacing the fence with a
new fence within the next few weeks," said
Jacobs. "Since there is a junction box there
we must have it fenced it. We can't have the
area just be open."
WAPA will also be removing three un-
used water pipes from the Frank Bay area,
Jacobs added.
The seawater intake pipes are a two-inch
PVC line, a 10-inch flexible line and a 10-
inch rigid line. All three will be removed
and the beach will be "raked back to its
original condition," according to informa-
tion from Department of Planning and Nat-
ural Resources' Coastal Zone Management
Program.
Once the clean-up work is completed,
WAPA will start installing the new electrical
cable from Red Hook, St. Thomas to Frank
Bay, St. John.
The project will start in the Red Hook
area where WAPA will expand the existing
beach manhole before laying the line with
a cable installation barge. With divers and
video equipment, WAPA will lay the cable
Continued on Page 17


spg _
rPgt � ood
Preferred
Guest


BAC bSYQS


Present this ad and receive $10 off any 50-minute treatment. *
Take your mind and body to a better place with a
Westin WORKOUTM or Spa Service.
Full range of cardio and strength equipment
Daily, weekly, and annual membership packages
Massages, facials, body wraps, manicures and pedicures
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL
340.693.8000, EXT1903/1904


THEWESTIN
ST. JOHN
RESORT & VILLAS








*Spa Services Discounts are available to residents of the US Virgin Islands
and Puerto Rico with valid ID. A copy of this ad and ID must be presented
when making appointment. Limit one per customer. -2011 Starwood
Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. All rights reserved. Westin is the registered
trademark of Starwood Hotels &Resorts Worldwide, Inc., or its affiliates.


Rudy's Branched Coral Designs
Bracelets Rings Earrings Jackets Necklaces
18k gold 14k gold sterling
with and without diamonds


R&I PATTON goldsmithing
Mongoose Junction
776-6548 pattongold.com






8 St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011


Renovations on Pace at Maho Bay Beach Pavilion


- 4
--: . -


4.
- - - . - -- .-
*-F-.- -.-, ' ^ ' - *


With a new roof,
reinforced concrete walls
and new wooden fencing,
renovations to the beach
pavilion at Maho Bay
are right on schedule,
according to V.I. National
Park officials.




St John Tradewinds News
Photos by Jaime Elliott


JESS Young Authors:

The Sunrise That Brought Carnival
by Kemisha Hoheb

St. John Tradewinds
Julius E. Sprauve School students in the fourth ;ih,. ,iih sixth
grades took part in the author-in-residence program this school
year with award winning author Cristina Kessler with help from a
$1,000 donation by the Rotary Club of St. John.
St. John Tradewinds is privileged to be able print the work cre-
ated by several students for the next few weeks. This story was
written by JESS sixth grader Kemisha Hoheb.

The Sunrise That Brought Carnival
by Kemisha Hoheb
6:30 in the morning. The day began with a sunrise that helped
the rooster wake me up in a flash to get ready for Carnival. The
shining orange color made the room bright as it came through my
window.
I usually take a half-an-hour bubble bath but since I overslept
I could only take a 10 minute bath. Next I made me a ham and
cheese sandwich to carry with me, but I really wanted egg.
Now it was time to get dressed. I had to wear a blue Hawaiian
shirt that had white flowers all over it. I also had to choose what
type of black pants I wanted to wear, so I chose my skinny jeans.
And I chose to wear my black and white Converse. I was ready to
hit the door and go to Carnival.
I play the Double Second which is two pans. When I play it,
it makes me feel like I'm in my own world. I always think about
what my mother told me when she played it when she was 11, the
same age as me.
She said it made her feel like she was rich, had a big house
and could relax. And that the sounds of the pan always calmed her
down. And now it does that for me. My mom brought this special
talent to me that I didn't know I had.
I made it in time to do a little steel pan practice with my band
called The Love City Pan Dragons, thanks to the sunrise. The or-
ange sunrise that struck my bedroom had turned the sky blue. I
know that the sunrise had an amazing part in Carnival. It brought
light to the fantastic festival. Now everybody is having a great time
- especially me.
And it brought a smile to my mother's face.



(),,,/(lf %,,,t,,,i(t [) ,iii.>' ,;, , ,,.,C , I / rVw,, mcf.S ,,,t .,,,











Sun Dog Cafe
Lunch Dinner Wi-FI Happy Wednesday
Daily Weekdays Hi Spot Hour Night Jam
llam-4:30 5:30-9 pm e \rf l 4:20.5:30 7:30-10:30 pm


Consignment Shop
* 1 A-f , ^frde&&, ?&each B &oat


LeAVINq ISLAND ?
Iv s7 RING y(OR TH-INqS TO RS
FOR QULtIC-K SALe!


FLind s @ The Lutmberuard
MoayU - Frialpy 11-7i / 244-8888
"Where things keep coming antd going"


ROBERT CRANE
= ARCHITECT, A.I.A.

P.O. BOX 370
CRUZ BAY, ST. JOHN
U.S.V.I. 00831



(340) 776-6356
-(340)






St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011 9


St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Jaime Elliott


JESS physical education teacher Lecia Richmond posed
with V.I. boxing great Julian Jackson, center, during the
conference at the Westin.


18th Annual "Let's Talk" Conference

Teaches JESS Students About Life
By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Julius E. Sprauve School ninth graders enjoyed a fun and educational
conference on Friday, May 20, at the Westin Resort and Villas which
covered topics from fitness to bullying.
The 18th annual ninth grade conference titled, "Let's Talk," was or-
ganized by Fran Jacobson and JESS physical education teacher Lecia
Richmond.
School safety coordinator Lavalle Campbell and Virgin Islands box-
ing great Julian Jackson were among the day's presenters. Students also
learned about gang life and violence, teen pregnancy and nutrition dur-
ing the day-long conference.

Expedia Names Caneel Bay Resort

One of World's Top-Ranked Hotels
St. John Tradewinds
Expedia� has named Caneel Bay, A Rosewood Resort among the
top-ranked hotels on this year's Expedia Insiders' SelectiM list.
The Insiders' Select list formally recognizes individual hotels world-
wide that consistently deliver excellent service, a great overall experi-
ence and a notable value. The full list represents only 500 of Expedia's
top-ranked hotels selected from the more than 130,000 properties offered
by Expedia�, the world's largest online travel company.
"Offering our guests a memorable vacation and superior service is
our top priority at Caneel Bay," said Managing Director Nikolay Hotze.
"We are honored that Expedia travelers have recognized our efforts and
we look forward to continuing this level of service to all of our guests
in the future."
The 2011 Expedia Insiders' SelectiM list is compiled based on the
more than 500,000 annual Guest Reviews collected by Expedia, com-
bined with a value rating and the local market expertise of more than 500
Expedia employees in local markets worldwide, resulting in an easy-to-
browse list that provides travelers with a powerful way to find the perfect
hotel using the trusted insight of other travelers like them.
The list showcases the diverse selection of travel destinations and ho-
tel properties. For more information, visit www.expedia.com/insidersse-
lect.


'USVIReTools For Work'

Conference 2011

-- . . -i.


Strategies for Re-Employment &
Economic Recovery


U.. . . - -
-= .-


Guest Speakers: Scott Gray, Sherry Rudolph, Harry DeBeziers, and
Columbus Copeland
To Register or for More Information:
Visit: www.vidol.gov to download the registration form.
Email: rapidresponse@vidol.gov or
Call Barbara Wheatley on STT/STJ at 340.776.3700
On STX call Prudence Tuitt at 340.773.1440
The VI Department of Labor is an Equal Opportunity Employer with Equal Opportunity Programs.


1/br


(/XAM


May 12, 1997 - December 22, 2004











Love, Mom, Dad, your brothers
and sisters, and family and friends
















Serving Breakfast & Dinner
Outdoor Dining Overlooking Salt Pond Bay


Call Us for Seasonal Hours
340.693.5855
St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands


Breakfast Served: 8:00-10:OOam
Happy Hour: 5:00-6:00pm
Dinner Served: 6:00-9:00pm


10 St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011


U


Bok choy, above at left, and passion fruit flowers, at right,
GHS' verdant garden.


are just two of the rewards of


St. John Tradewinds
With less than two full weeks of classes remaining,
the 7th and 8th graders at Gifft Hill School have been
busy bringing closure to many projects in the Educa-
tion And Resiliency Through Horticulture program.
"We have pulled up the end of our incredibly suc-
cessful bok choy and collard greens for one last stir
fry, have chopped basil for one last pesto pasta, have
rolled bins up the hill for our growing compost area,
and have added layers of cardboard and mulch around
all of the new fruit in the outdoor classroom.," said
EARTH coordinator Kris Bennett.
Students have also been working to complete the
outdoor classroom, but keep finding thinking of new
ideas for the area, Bennett explained.
"The outdoor classroom has become sort of a run-


ning joke these days in terms of completion," said
Bennett. "Every time we think we are finished, either
Laura or I or one of the kids thinks of another idea.
So every week we continue to add plants, rearrange
rocks, move paths, etc."
"It only gets better," she said.
New additions to the outdoor classroom include
additional lemongrass, pigeon peas, more passion-
fruit, ginger, sugar cane, dwarf bananas and sorrel.
GHS students in the school's EARTH program
were also looking forward to enjoying the fruits of
their labor, literally.
"We look forward to making limeade next week
from our very productive lime trees and are encour-
aged by the amazing recent growth of the passionfruit
vines," said Bennett.


WAPA Reminds Residents Not To Touch Power Lines


St. John Tradewinds
The Virgin Islands Water and
Power Authority reminded the
public last week not to touch
power lines that may be lying
on the ground or dangling from
a pole.
"We need the public to un-
derstand that there are potential
shock hazards associated with
electrical distribution equip-
ment," said Hugo Hodge WA-


PA's Executive Director. "Please
stay away from electrical trans-
mission and distribution power
lines. High voltage transmission
and distribution lines carry a lot
of energy or power and must be
treated very carefully or the re-
sults can be fatal."
WAPA's line personnel are
specially trained to handle this
kind of work and have the prop-
er personal protective equipment


to do so. If a power line falls on
your car, stay inside unless the
car catches fire. In such a case,
jump clear of the car without
touching metal and the ground
at the same time.
If someone comes in contact
with a live power line, the only
safe thing to do is call WAPA
immediately. WAPA's emergen-
cy number is 774-1424 on St.
Thomas/St. John.


"W11 IN E IVIMHAZI O
UOU ARE M ETW )L~


PREMIUM DRY
DOG FOOD
CURBSIDE DELIVERY AVAILABLE

HIGHEST QUALITY PET COLLARS,
LEADS, IREATS, SPORTING WEAR
AND MUCH, MUCH \ORE.
340.777.9588
WW W.SIJOHNI MALS. CO


I' S^^
) .)UMM IlMAO)
1, LAN PE U F


GHS EARTH Program

Expands Outdoor Classroom






St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011 11


SJSA Hosting Summer Arts Camp
"Spirits of the Tainos" June 20-July 1
St. John School of the Arts will be hosting a two-week Summer
Arts Camp entitled Spirits of the Tainos from Monday, June 20,
through July 1.
The camp will meet Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. Students will take a look at the archeological findings of
the Taino Indians from excavations at Trunk and Cinnamon Bays
and hike to the petroglyphs for further understanding of these
people.
Through acting, movement and music as well as making in-
struments and masks, students will show their interpretation of
the knowledge gained with a production promoting artistic free-
dom and expression.
This camp is more suited for children between the ages of 7
and 10. Tuition is $250 with $25 off the total if for referring some-
one who signs up. There will also be a $25 family discount per
registered family member (immediate family only). Contact Kim
Wild at 779-4322 for more information.

George "Santa" Blecher Fundraising
Raffle Tickets Available at Aqua
Bistro; Drawing Set for June 26
George Belcher has been Love City's Santa for 20 years and
volunteered for the St. John Kids And The Sea program for more
than a decade.
Belcher was diagnosed with Guillian-Barre Syndrome in No-
vember 2010 and has been out of work for the past six months.
With medical bills and everyday expenses becoming too much
to bear, friends are hosting a raffle drawing to raise money for
Belcher.
Buy raffle tickets for the chance to win great prizes at Keep
Me Posted, Aqua Bistro and Connections in both Cruz Bay and
Coral Bay.
The drawing will be at Aqua Bistro on Sunday, June 26, from
noon to 6 p.m. For more information call 775-1727.



ATTENTION ST. JOHN HOMEOWNERS

HIRING PROFESSIONALS
TO MAINTAIN YOUR HOME IS
* NOT AN EXTRAVAGANCE
ITIS

BUSINESS S 14SE

CONTACT THE PROFESSION ALS AT


St. John's Premier Property Management
Company Providing:
COMPREHENSIVE MAINTENANCE
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
GUEST SERVICES
I.3411 " 'I? , I. . 'n l l i innna II hin i | .iii l. maA n .l( . .iinl, hn Iomi
' 14. .t3 . %1 l-..lin \ 11ll %31 I unim.-l, .i % ( ..nm pkl t- iu 14.1.


Pan-o-Rama Kicks off St. John Festival 2011























A dozen steel pan bands from St. Thomas and St.
John put on an impressive show at Winston Wells
ball field on Saturday afternoon, May 28, for Pan-o-
Rama, the first event of St. John Festival 2011. "An
Astronomical and Cultural Splendor in Heaven for
Festival 2011" officially got underway over the weekend
with a huge crowd gathered to hear the tunes and
enjoy fried chicken and johnny cakes. Pan-o-Rama
participants included the Joseph Gomez Pan Blasters
led by Liston "Matey" Sewer, Ulla Muller Panatics led
by Sean Steele and the home favorite Love City Pan
Dragons and Love City Baby Dragons, both led by
Samuel Lawrence. The next Festival 2011 event is
Friday, June 17, when the island's seniors will strut their
stuff at the Senior Variety Show at the Winston Wells
ball field starting at 7 p.m.


licensed architect
AIA member
NCARB certified


professional design
and
development services


mongoose junction, po box 1772
st. John, us virgin Islands 00831
tel (340) 693-7665, fax (340) 693-8411
barefootarchitects.com


]PIO)]PE R KINGGM
LANDSCAPE DESIGN & INSTALLATION
Need a landscape design or just refreshing deck plants?
We can work with your budget!
Beautiful tropical plants arriving weekly.
Call us with your plant needs.
Get a tour and review our portfolio of satisfied clients.

Tel. 340-643-6348
www.propertykingusvi.com * lonski@propertykingusvi.com
Fax 340-715-3313
You've tried the rest... now hire the BESTI








IT'S A/C TIME AGAIN!
Luckily, Bob's A/C & Refrigeration is here on St. John
with prices from $35-65/hour .. . . on skill vel required).
FINANCING AVAILABLE
"Just ask us. We'll work with you."

Bob's A/C & Refrigeration
P.O. Box 37 St. John, VI, 00831 . 340-514-7850






. ..,:, Summer Arts Camp

June ZU Julgl I r 9:00 - 3:00 Ages7 '-


WhatisaZermi?


12 St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011


Ivanna Eudora Kean ROTC by Bill Stelzer


"Life Supersaturated" at Bajo el Sol Jun 3


An Invitation for You and I>abq...
A babu's organic state is bliss...
Wha, not treat uour bundle of jou to

5155f U 5ab6

join

. lizabeth owan
and Cha9sen

Blissful Baby Yoga will
help you connect with Mondaus
your baby and ease any L
discomfort or restless- May 9-June 1 5
ness allowing for a I 1 :50-1 2:00
more peaceful calm
baby

St. Jokn 5ckool of the Arts
779-+ 22


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Mark those calenders for Fri-
day, June 3, to check out a rare
one-artist show at Bajo el Sol in
Mongoose Junction.
Stop by the gallery from 5 to 8
p.m. and check out about a dozen
photographs by St. John artist Bill
Stelzer. While Stelzer is adept in
a variety of mediums, the June 3
Bajo show will focus on a body of
work he's calling "Life Supersatu-
rated."
"They are basically images that
I've taken in travels around the
world," said Stelzer.
Every continent except Antarc-
tica is represented in the show,
but the photographs, taken over
the past decade, are not just travel
snapshots. Stelzer uses his 25 years
of experience in Photoshop and
other programs, to layer texture
and depth into the photos, creating
painterly images full of emotion.
"I put the images on a computer
and use the latest computer graph-
ics technology and my background
of 25 years in computer graphics
to push them into this more artistic
and painterly realm," said Stelzer.
"I kind of leverage what happens
after the shot into more of what
would normally happen before


shot. A lot of time you go out with
all this expensive equipment and
lenses and things, but I only had
this little camera."
"But with that little camera you
can get these perfect shots that are
often more interesting and sponta-
neous than if you tried to set it up,"
Stelzer said.
Stelzer then takes the images
and uses various filters and com-
puter graphic techniques to create
rich textures in the photos, using
Photoshop for a lot more than per-
fecting images.
"I take the image and go to the
computer and use different filters,
but I use them in an artistic man-
ner," said the artist. "So you are
using all these tools of Photoshop,
but you are using them in an artis-
tic manner instead of using them
to improve photos. I build and lay-
er the image and almost turn them
into brush strokes."
If it's difficult to imagine what
Stelzer is doing, there is a good
reason for that.
"It's kind of hard to describe
because there aren't many people
doing this on a professional artistic
level," he said. "Alot of these tools
are used by professionals, but they
are used to clean things up or to fix
something not right in the image."


While it might be difficult to
explain his technique, Stelzer's
end results are images that speak
louder than photographs, but are
just as accessible.
"It looks like a photograph at
first, but then you realize there is
more to it," said Stelzer. "It's liter-
ally saturated, but I'm also using
the computer in an artistic instead
of a technical way. I use the com-
puter as a paint brush and use the
camera as a sketch book."
Because Photoshop can be, and
often is, used to make a model's
cellulite disappear or create that
perfect sunset for a beach wedding
on a hazy day, Stelzer's artistic
aims with the medium were taken
lightly for a long time.
"This is something I've always
wanted to do, but there is so much
push back when someone says,
'That looks nice, but you did it in
Photoshop,'" said the artist. "It's
seen as cheating. It was always
frustrating because I didn't have
a lot of camera gear and my skills
were in Photoshop - that's what I
was good at."
"I couldn't use those skills in an
artistic manner because everyone
kept saying, 'Oh you did that in
Photoshop,'" Stelzer said. "Like
Continued on Next Page






St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011 13


Continued from Previous Page
that made it not count or something."
It took a tragedy for Stelzer to finally stop
caring how other people viewed his Photo-
shop work.
"Honestly, it was a few days after Annie
Love died, that I just started going in and
doing this," he said. "It was so cool. Every-
thing else was like work, but this is what I
loved."
With a free-flowing form, Stelzer likens
the process of creating supersaturated im-
ages to painting.
"It's like an exploration because when
you are painting something you kind of
don't know what it is going to exactly look
like in the end," said Stelzer. "If you go with
all that photography equipment you have a
pretty good idea of what you're going to get.
But with this complex software you can get
that same level of unpredictability and reac-
tion within that system and it takes on a life
of its own."
"You can think you want to push it in


this direction or that direction, in terms of
texture and color, but it's so unpredictable,"
he said. "You are exploring and you don't
know what will happen until you push it in
one direction and see. Then something un-
expected will happen and you go down that
road instead."
For all of the images in "Life Supersatu-
rated" Stelzer used only instamatic film
cameras with fixed focus and fixed lenses.
"The standard way to do this to bring in
lights and filters and have assistance and
have back light and all this to take a picture,"
said Stelzer. "You can get incredible images
that way, but you can also lose spontaneity
or you can lose a moment that you would be
able to catch with a handheld camera."
No%% when I'm taking photos, I take
ones that aren't there on their own, but I
know I can turn it into a painting because it
has certain elements," he said. "I use layers
and color and shape and emotions and I'm
always thinking how I can capture some-
one's emotions and thoughts and light."


Edge of the Sahara Desert, Africa
by Bill Stelzer
Stelzer is heavily influenced by Danish
painter Hugo Larson who spent three years
painting scenes of everyday life in the Dan-
ish West Indies in the early 1900s.
"In the 1900s when Hugo was painting
he would go around and set up his easel and
would paint people doing what they were


doing," said the artist. "He would just cap-
ture these everyday scenes and I wanted to
do a modem version of that. My photos are
not posed, they are people doing every day
things, but I turn that into iconic, captivating
images through all the things I do in Photo-
shop."
"I'm basically creating a painting out of
a photograph instead of out of a scene," said
Stelzer. "I am preserving these everyday mo-
ments, but heightening them. You wouldn't
look at it twice, but once it becomes a paint-
ing, it's captivating."
Stelzer's work has been shown in a vari-
ety of venues from the Caribbean Museum
Center in St. Croix to the Elaine I. Sprauve
Library in Cruz Bay, but the Bajo show is
Stelzer's first solo exhibition.
Stop by Bajo el Sol at Mongoose Junction
on Friday, June 3, for Stelzer's "Life Super-
saturated" show. For more about Stelzer's
work check out www.lifesuperstaurated.
com. For more information about Bajo el
Sol, call the gallery at 693-7070.


Encore Hosting Art Opening June 3;

Eunice Summer Sculptures Available


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Dr. Iris Kern is hosting an ex-
citing show of never before seen
sculptures, limited edition prints
and vintage collectables, and live
music and refreshments on Friday,
June 3.
Kern's art gallery and consign-
ment shop Encore, located across
the street from DaLivio's Res-
taurant, will present "a night of
something new" from 5 to 8 p.m.
on June 3.
In addition to Kern's already
impressive collection, check out
sculptures by Eunice Summer,
limited edition prints by Steve
Hanks, antique English equestrian
pictures, Oriental scrolls and more.
While the show includes a wide
variety of work, there is one over-
arching theme, Kern explained.
"This is artwork that has never
been seen in the Virgin Islands,"
she said. "These are not all island
artists, but it's about time the is-
land was exposed to people doing
art elsewhere in the world."
"Some of the work in the show
is by island artists, but some is
not," said Kern. "There are also
vintage pieces and collectables
that are old and lovely."
The show includes works by
Hanks, a well known West Coast
watercolorist known for his ro-


mantic light and soft, feminine
paintings. The limited edition
Hanks prints in the Encore show
include certificates of authenticity,
Kern explained.
While many people might
know Summer's painting's, the lo-
cal artist's sculptures have never
been showed before, according to
Kern.
"The whole show is really an
interesting mix of stuff and fortu-
nately, two items are coming from
private collections," she said.
"Summer's sculptures are amazing
and I'm so excited to have them in
the show."
The evening will also include
live music by Eddie Bruce and
Rich Greengold, refreshments and
the chance to shop Kern's col-
lection of clothing, jewelry and
collectables in Encore. Kern was
bubbling with excitement at the
chance to show new work on Love
City.
"The focus was to bring art that
has not been seen before," she said.
"That is not in any way to imply
anything negative about our local
artists. But they have their venues
and people know their work and
where they can get it."
"I think there is enough inter-
est in art that people will open up
to new kinds of art as well," said
Kern.


Sun Power Loans for


Solar Water Heaters


at. he G^_

0'.%



Virgin Islands
Energy Office
www.vienergy.org


* No money down

* Low Interest loan

o Up to $2,500

in rebate



Don 'tpay to heat Your Water; do it free, use the

sun.Contact the Energy Office at 713-8436 on St.

Croix and 714-8436 on St. Thomas or visit the web-

site at vienergy.org for more information


Using solar makes


for a cleaner, greener


Virgin Islands.


U U






14 St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011


Keeping Track of Crime


2010
Homicides: 0
Shootings: 0
Stabbings: 0
Armed Robberies: 1
Arsons: 0
1st Degree Burglaries: 3
2nd Degree Burglaries: 22
3rd Degree Burglaries: 70
Grand Larcenies: 67
Rapes: 0


2011-TO-DATE
Homicides: 0
Shootings: 0
Stabbings: 0
Armed Robberies: 0
Arsons: 0
1st Degree Burglaries: 0
2nd Degree Burglaries: 3
3rd Degree Burglaries: 10
Grand Larcenies: 23
Rapes: 1


Crossword Answers - Puzzle on Page 20

TSA R F L I PPED A B R|A|H A M
RUMOR E T I RE E TOOMANY
I N A M DE A S TE RN T U N I NGS
PUT A S S A Y S R P N E E
S NP I NBAC A C AC L L
O COuNT R U T HO0F
ABBOT BERN I CE I N
SAUDI ARAB I A V OS
C ASS I LI FT UP
O DD NNE WH I CH A E ETY
K NEL LE HAN E Y LE S
OFPIET PP ING 5B O ELI
TAO I ST RATM SU L FA EDO
0 T I M I R I SP ER E RED
ACM E R I CHARD RUSSE
A BO^VE A 0j-T' H E|R S I'N^^
D 'CEN T 0o|~ S'T
V AT SU^B~SB O TOOLE IONE
E RAS U RE Y E M E NM R I NG U E
R E V E R E D AV I A T E D S T U R M
B R EW E R S A T R 0 N S MO P E S


Letters To St. John Tradewinds


We Are Running Out of Time: 500 Jobs To Be Cut


WHAT DO



YOU THINK?

Send your letter to editor@tradewinds.vi


NEXT DEADLINE:

THURSDAY, JUNE 2"ND


In my State of the Territory Address in January,
2011, I said to the Virgin Islands community - and
to our newly elected Senators - that our territory was
at a "tipping point."
I said then that the financial and budgetary chal-
lenges we faced left us but two choices: to make very
tough decisions to manage the crisis ourselves; or to
allow our future to be swept away by the external
forces let loose by the Great Recession in ways that
would be increasingly beyond our control and which
would set us back for generations.
I vowed then, and have worked tirelessly since
then, to be sure that we kept control of our future.To
do so I have argued that we must change how we view
our challenges and how together we meet them.
My Administration proposed many methods and
means to close the current year's budget shortfall and
to prepare for the even vaster budget crisis that looms
before us in the next fiscal year. These proposals were
developed not with the goal of leaving everything "as
is"- that would not work. Rather, our proposals were
developed with the overarching goal of shared sacri-
fice.
Our aim was to do what needed to be done in a
way that was spread fairly across the community with
minimal employee dismissals, cuts in programs or
services, unpaid holidays and tax increases. These
proposals were not met with the required action, nor
were they replaced with other meaningful alterna-
tives. No, the Senate repeatedly rebuffed these sug-
gestions leaving us where we find ourselves today.
And that is back at the "tipping point," but with less
time and fewer options. But I will not permit the inac-
tion of others to determine our future.
Our Virgin Islands' economy is essentially a closed
economy. Our financial survival is interdependent.
This reality is surely understood by us all. And yet
far too many who make up our interdependent whole
have acted as if their own actions could be held apart,
as if they did not need to be part of the solution of our
common crisis.
I ask the following - if you are given the choice
between postponing getting a raise for a couple of
years or losing your job entirely, which would you
choose? If you are a union leader, would you rather
have hundreds of your members dismissed or have
your members agree to give up their pay on a few
holidays when they are not working anyway? And as
a business owner, why oppose a two year increase in
your gross receipts tax if the result is you lose your
business in substantial part because your customers
have lost their jobs? To me, the answers to these ques-
tions are clear.
The 29th Legislature's unwillingness to act to ad-
dress fully our budget crisis has put us in an increas-
ingly difficult situation. I have said repeatedly that
the Legislature does not have to agree with all of my
proposals. However, if the Senators do not agree with
what has been proposed to them, they cannot just say
"no."
They have a responsibility to develop their own


ideas and proposals to resolve the projected short-
falls. The Government's most recent cash flow projec-
tions, which I have shared with the Senate President,
include actual revenue collections and expenditures
through the second quarter of this fiscal year, and the
budget cuts imposed by the Legislature to the Execu-
tive Branch departments and agencies along with the
Superior and Supreme Courts.
However, even with these projected revenues, we
are still facing a General Fund FY 2011 budget short-
fall of $17.4 million and a FY 2012 budget shortfall
of approximately $90.1 million. With this shortfall
the Government cannot continue to operate as it has
operated to date.
Expectations and attitudes must change. Behavior
and rhetoric must change. That is the duty of lead-
ership. Government leaders must deal with reality.
What choices we have, the real cost of those choices,
what money we have - is central to that reality.
We cannot print money. We cannot just appropriate
it and believe the obligation is funded. This govern-
ment gets money, gets funds, only two ways. We ei-
ther collect it in the taxes we collect from ourselves or
we borrow it from the monies that would otherwise be
there to pay for what we need, and what our children
and grandchildren need, in the future.
Those are our choices. Without collecting more, we
must spend less. Spending less in the Virgin Islands
Government, where a substantial percentage of our
expenses are the expenses of paying our employees
and providing them the benefits they have been af-
forded, means one and only one thing - a reduction
in the workforce, employee dismissals.
The dismissal of no fewer than 500 employees is
now both inevitable and fast approaching. This action
cannot be delayed if the savings to be realized are to
be used to meet a portion of this current year's budget
deficit.
The dismissals will be effective no later than June
30. These dismissals will have a ripple effect. They
will have a crippling effect on many families and lo-
cal businesses. Donations to charities and civic as-
sociations will be impacted. All will feel this blow.
I know this and so do you. And still, I know that a
collaborative effort can do much to help us resolve
the immediate fiscal crisis, to address future financial
issues and future dismissals.
Further delay will not do. I recently sent a letter to
Senate President Ronald Russell restating my call that
we gather together to develop a plan that will more
fully resolve our budget crisis. We cannot wait until
after a review of the April collections; we need not
gather more information, we must reject all meaning-
less delay tactics. More information will not change
our reality.
My Administration has worked very hard to avoid
reaching this point. We have used stimulus funds, we
have borrowed, we have initiated capital projects to
pump money into the economy, we have provided
small business assistance, continued to cut execu-
Continued on Next Page







St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011 15


Letters To St. John Tradewinds


I am sorry to report that negotiations to extend our
37-year lease have been so far unsuccessful. Unless
the landowners decide otherwise, Maho will close be-
fore July 31, 2012.
The land has been on the market for two years with
a current asking price of $23 million. Should it fail
to sell by April of next year, we could still receive a
temporary reprieve to operate through the 2013-win-
ter season.
Yet, with only a few months notice, one can imag-
ine how difficult it will be for our guests to plan their
vacation. For example, I can no longer take bookings
one year in advance. Currently, reservations are lim-


I was surprised and alarmed to learn that the Water
and Power Authority has proposed a reverse osmosis
desalinization water plant for the Fortsberg area in
Coral Bay, St. John. My reaction being triggered by
the primary reason given for its need, its size, as well
as its location.
The earlier proposed Calabash Boom R/O plant
was strongly opposed by all of the environment agen-
cies - Virgin Islands Fish and Wildlife Service, the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Ma-
rine Fisheries Service, because of the anticipated en-
vironmental degradation to the waters of Coral Bay
such a plant would cause.
The Need for the Plant
With regard to the earlier proposed Calabash
Boom R/O plant, the application for its construction
was subsequently withdrawn by the developer when
it discovered that the combination of an on-site well
and the roof catchment areas of the development were
deemed to be sufficient to handle the potable water
needs of the community. Therefore it is somewhat
puzzling to learn that one of the primary reasons for
the WAPA R/O is the apparent water needs of the
apartments at Calabash Boom.
Size of the Plant
It appears that WAPA's proposed plant is perhaps
10+ times larger than that proposed for Calabash
Boom. It is difficult to gage the exact size because the
WAPA commissioned document that is intended to
set forth an environmental assessment has a number
of discrepancies as to its exact size.
Regardless, the Calabash Boom plant would have
discharged some 20,000 gallons per day of highly sa-
line brine waste-water into the bay, while the WAPA
report indicates that its plant will discharge some-
where between 150,000 gallons and 225,000 gallons
of waste water per day.
Plant Location
Making matters worse is the fact that the plant is


ited to this coming season only.
Whatever happens, I am proud that during the past
35 years Maho has gained a world-wide reputation
as one of the first and leading eco-resorts. Those of
you who have repeatedly chosen Maho as your prime
vacation site will be as sad as I am that this great run
ends.
Maho still has another year at least, and if you want
to join what could be our last hurrah, I will do my best
to give you the experience you have come to cherish.

With sincere regards,
Stanley Selengut


being proposed for Fortsberg, some 4,000 feet to the
north and west of the Calabash Boom area placing it
deeper into the bay where there is even less flushing
and less chance for the highly brine content of the
waste-water to be diluted to a harmless level.
The WAPA commissioned report suggests the pre-
vailing currents will take this waste water discharge
to the south and out of the bay, but casual observa-
tions of our bay suggests that the normal prevailing
trade winds will drive the currents containing this
briny solution deeper into the bay, into Coral Harbor
and around the comer to the Virgin Islands Coral Reef
Monument at Hurricane Hole.
There is no question that potable water on St. John
and in Coral Bay is a precious and important com-
modity. But, given the size and proposed location of
the WAPA desalinization plant, one is left to question
the cost of this opportunity - in terms of its environ-
mental impact on Coral Bay.
Are we willing to "kill the goose that laid the gold-
en egg?" Coral Bay is a treasure, with its beautiful
clear waters. Do we really wish to add this level of
stress to the marine environment?
Clearly, another location for this plant should be
considered, one that does not impose upon the wa-
ters of Coral Bay and Hurricane Hole the inevitable
environmental disaster that is so apparent in this pro-
posal.
The good news is that WAPA's Environmental
Assessment Report must be carefully reviewed, its
assertions validated and its deficiencies identified
and addressed. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
is charged with assuring that this is done and in that
process must consult with the various environmental
agencies and must permit public input - all prior to
this project being allowed to proceed.
Sincerely,
Bruce Schoonover



1-800-222-TIPS (8477)
Remain Totally Anonymous
Collect Rewards in Cash
I HIelp Our Community be Safe


Future of Maho Bay Camps Unsettled


500 Jobs To Be Cut


Continued from Page 14
tive branch appropriations and,
finally, we have proposed aus-
terity measures designed to eq-
uitably spread the sacrifice of
changes that will cost us all.
I believe our community ex-
pected and continues to expect
this level of leadership. Surely
the community deserves leader-
ship. We have made hard deci-
sions and we have harder ones


yet to make. Not one of these
future decisions will be popu-
lar, but they are unavoidable.
We will have hard times
ahead. Let us not abandon our
future by failing work together,
by failing to make the decisions
today that cannot be postponed
to tomorrow. We can avoid the
worst outcomes if we work to-
gether. Let us do just that.
Governor John deJongh Jr.


Too Much Sunshine or Rain

Life is different living on an island versus the mainland. Native
folks pray for rain while visitors wish for sun. Water is precious for
everyday use while it is taken for granted abroad.
If it was up to a government board to regulate the weather, we
would all be in trouble. Thank goodness the almighty didn't give us
that control. But I'm sure that He hears our requests. Let's listen in on
a typical day with our Lord.
Telephone rings.
God: Good morning. How can I help you?
Tourist: Yes, I would like to ask how long will it rain today?
God: Well the animals and plants need water.
Tourist: That's good, but can you bring out the sun soon? Beep,
beep.
God: Hold on. I have another call coming in. Good morning.
Local: Yes, my cistern isn't full and the grass is brown. Can you
increase the rain?
God: Hand on a sec. Are you still there?
Tourist: Yes, I have a full schedule and limited time. Maybe let-
ting it rain at night would be better.
God: I'll see what I can do. One moment.
Local: Harvest time is coming and the crops need more rain.
God: I'll get right on it.
Hangs up. Ponders. On one hand more rain, on the other more sun.
I know what I'll do. I'll make it rain and be sunny at the same time.
A few hours later, the phone rings again.
God: Hello.
Local: What in the world are you doing? Before the crops get a
chance to soak in the rain, it evaporates.
God: Hold on. Switches lines.
God: Hello.
Tourist: Amm. Excuse me. How am I supposed to get a suntan
with all this rain?
For several minutes God switches back and forth listening to the
complaints. Finally he says, "I have a solution. It won't rain and the
sun won't shine again."
There was silence on both lines.
Then the local and the tourist said, "God, we like it the way you
had it before. Continue the good work. Good bye."
After they hang up, God thinks to himself "Maybe I should send
snow."
Give Thanks,
Emmanuel Prince


Gera' Bay R40 Plant Would Cause Environmental Disaster






16 St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011


4!:


Festival & Cultural Organization ofSt. John
P.O. Box 1515, Cruz Bay
St. Jofin, q 'irgin Islands 00831-1515


-I,-

1;2K ,


'EmaiL s6"hn tivaf "otmai com -





-'cstivat'l emc.:

" An Astronomical and Cultural Splendor in Heaven for Festival 2011"

'restir'al (q age Honoree: Ira 'i ade 't ifavriffe

Festival food Fair "wonoree: Yoyce Sprauve

,festival Parafc :farsfial: Eifa O'Connor- freemann


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
SATURDAY, May 28.2011 SUNDAY, June 26, 2011
Pan-o-Rama Food Fair & Coronation
4 P.M. AT WINSTON WELLS BALL FIELD I P.M. AT FRANKLIN A. PCWELL. Si, PARK
CONTAfr PERSON: IlA WADE (340) 690-7428 CONTACT PI IE-N I*N- LEONA SMITH i.:4r 'l" 3'; |i G. L
FRIDAY, June 17, 2011 Boat Races
Senior Variety Show 3 P.M. AT CRUZ BAY HA- iA IK
7 P.M. AT WINSTON WELLS BALL FrELI', CONTACT PERSON: SLIM (340) 771- 2498
CONTACT PFI'IPN: JANE JOHANNES (340) 77C-- 4.1. WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2011
SATURDAY, June 18, 2011 Festival Village Opening
Festival Bike Race 7 P.M. AT CIUZ BAY PAHKItNG �T L
8 A.M. AT ST. JOHN NATIONAL PAtK CO'r.nAT PERSON: JANE JO-HL, NNEs '1,4. 776-645o0
CONTACT PERSON: JANE THILL 4oh*j " C-A4''7 SUNDAY, July 3, 2011
SUNDAY, June 19, 2011 Cultural Day
St John Festival Prince & Princess 2011 Pageant 3 P.M. AT FI ANKLIN A. POWE LL. S. PAHK
6 1.M. AT WINSTON WELLS BALL FIELD C .JNTAk T PERSON: ALECIA WELLS (340) s44-9IGG
C' NTA T I PE ON: IA) HtAINE RICHARDS f'44I) 1124804 MONDAY, July 4, 2011
FRIDAY, June 24, 2011 J'ouvert
Festival Musical Mix featuring Tarrus Riley & Others 4 .M. AT ST. JOHN NATIONAL PAHIK
9 P.M. AT WINS TON WELLS BALL FIELD) Festival Parade 2011
CSW PRODUCTIONS: 340- 43-4847/ 340 -690-302 I A.M. AT ST. JOHN NATIONAL PAItK
CONTACT PERSON: LUCINDA IJVRt.EN(:t40 1 643-8074 CONTACT PERSON: NATALIE 'THOL~.s r'40I, i 11>- 1 25
SATURDAY, June 25, 2011 Festival Fireworks Display
St. John Festival Queen 2011 Selection Pageant 9 P.M. AT Cu u BAY HARIWoW
8 P.M. AT WINSTON WELLS BALL FIELD CONTACTT rrElmN: MALINA NELSON (340) 7,1
CONTACT PERSON: ENTD Douw.\Y I:4rm i.L.-7o'93

t"\ N( *II R1N:)Lo N I : \' i WS . B. fI A)\if: I I"-'I Y' 13 '1 I * *
S" F \- A .[ He L']IN1: NU i. i * >.' ) pi . * N I U


St. John Tradewinds Photo File


A luxury resort on the
hillside of Maho Bay could
be a reality in the future.

"Flexible Zoning"
Means Maho Bay

Could Be Home
To Resort or Villas

Continued from Page 5

With almost 14 acres, Estate
Maho Bay would make the "ul-
timate" in private family com-
pounds, according to the website.
"With unsurpassed views, com-
plete privacy and easy access,
Maho Bay would make the perfect
location for a family compound
nestled in the natural beauty of the
Caribbean," according to www.is-
landiarealestate.com.
The site also claims Maho's lo-
cation as "well-suited for a luxury
resort development."
"The property's most valuable
asset is its 850-foot shoreline, in-
cluding a crescent shaped beach of
powdery white sand," according to
the website. "There are only two
existing beachfront resorts on St.
John. The Westin Resort and Vil-
las on the island's southshore with
its man-made beach on Great Cruz
Bay, and the Caneel Bay Resort."
"Maho Bay's natural beachfront
is on par with Caneel's famed white
beaches," according to www.islan-
diarealestate.com.
The property could also be di-
vided into either 13 one acre-plus
parcels for residences or 25 half-
acre-plus sites, according to the
site.
"The combination of resort
and private residences exist, mak-
ing this property truly unique and
open to many development possi-
bilities," according to www.islan-
diarealestate.com.
For more information call Islan-
dia at 776-6666.







St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011 17


WAPA's Electrical Cable to Frank Bay

Continued from Page 7
across Pillsbury Sound, pass Steven's Cay at a depth of 60 feet, avoid
coral around Ming Rock and come shore in Frank Bay.
"Divers will maneuver the cable around any sensitive areas as neces-
sary during the monitoring dive," according to information from DPNR.
"The cable will first be videoed where it landed and then videoed once
it has been relocated. The entire laying procedure will be monitored and
the lay videoed."
Giving WAPA the green light to install the electrical cable, Hills
praised the utility for being "extremely responsive and quick" in ad-
dressing the Frank Bay pole issue.
Along with its approval, the St. John CZM Committee required WAPA
to meet 13 special conditions. Most of the conditions pertain to the pro-
tection of sea turtles, calling for the use of siltation barriers which do not
entangle the protected species and requiring all vessels working on the
project to operate at "no wake" speeds.
"Operation of any mechanical construction equipment shall cease im-
mediately if a sea turtle is seen within a 50-foot radius of the equipment,"
according to one of the special conditions. "Activities may not resume
until the protected species has departed the project area of its own voli-
tion."
Once installed, the new cable is designed to provide St. John will a
redundant line in case the other two lines from St. Thomas - one from
Great Bay placed in 2003 and a second from Red Hook which was placed
in 1995 - are lost or damaged, according to information from DPNR.
WAPA is expected to start the project in June, according to Jacobs.


Notary Public Applications Online

The Lieutenant Governor's Office announced last week that no-
tary public applications are now available online.
New and renewal applications, as well as the Notary Public
handbook, can be accessed at the Lieutenant Governor's website,
www.ltg.gov.vi.
Online availability of the documents enables the Lt. Gov.'s Of-
fice to be more responsive to inquiries about the notary public ap-
plication process and responsibilities.
For more information, contact the Lieutenant Governor's Office
at 774-2991 for the St. Thomas/St. John district.



Lt. Governor Reminds Business Owners

To File Franchise Taxes by June 30

Lieutenant Governor Gregory Francis last week reminded and
strongly encouraged corporate citizens to satisfy the franchise tax
and annual filing requirements of Titles 13 and 26 of the Virgin Is-
lands Code which requires every registered corporation (domestic
and foreign) to pay a franchise tax to the Office of the Lieutenant
Governor on or before June 30 of every year.
Statutory filing requirements and annual fees also apply to LLC,
LLP, and LLLP organizations. Non-profit corporations are required
to file Annual Reports and Financial Statements.
Failure to comply with the annual requirements will result in the
assessment of penalties and interest, non-issuance of a Certificate
of Good Standing or even administrative/involuntary dissolution.
Checks and money orders must be made payable to the Govern-
ment of the Virgin Islands. For more information, please contact
the Office of the Lieutenant Governor's Division of Corporations
and Trademarks at 776-8515 on St. Thomas.


St. John Tradewinds
Crime Stoppers is asking the
community's help to solve the
following crimes. If anyone
knows something, they should
say something. Even the small-
est bit of information may be
just what law enforcement needs
to solve these cases.
St. John
Sometime between May 2
around 6:30 a.m. and May 13
around 5 p.m., the residence at
61 Enighed was burglarized. The
burglar(s) broke into the north-
western bedroom by removing
the A/C unit from the northern


window. About $7,000 worth of
jewelry was stolen from a wood-
en box that had been hidden in
the bedroom closet. The box con-
tained two white and gold brace-
lets with the names Dejenne and
Nyree on them, as well as many
other unique pieces. For a com-
plete list of the jewelry that was
stolen, visit our website. The
minimum reward for the arrest
of a burglary suspect is $714
plus 10 percent of the value of
any property recovered
St. Thomas
Sometime between Monday,
May 16, at 6 p.m. and 6 a.m. the


next day, the owner of Al's Caf6
at 78-79 Kronprindsens Gade
discovered that his restaurant
had been burglarized. The bur-
glar entered and exited from the
western glass window. Although
it wasn't immediately known
what was stolen, the cash regis-
ter was broken.
Citizens can submit informa-
tion on these or any other crimes
at www. Crime StoppersUSVI.
org or by calling 1-800-222-
TIPS (8477). Tips are complete-
ly anonymous, and our stateside
operators speak several languag-
es.


Police Log







LAND LINE: 911 /

POLICE DEPT: 340-693-8880 / FIRE: 340-776-6333

Friday, May 20 moved a tool from his residence, na resident r/ hearing shots fired.
3:05 p.m. - A Coral Bay resi- Petit larceny. Illegal discharge of firearm.
dent c/r a disturbance. Police as- 11:34 a.m. - A Coral Bay Thursday, May 25
distance. resident r/ a disturbance. Distur- 7:23 a.m. -AnEstate FishBay
Saturday, May 21 bance of the peace. resident r/ an accidental injury.
9:04a.m.-Acitizenr/anauto 1:40 p.m. - A St. Thomas 9:13 a.m. - An Estate Power
collision with a pedestrian in the resident p/r having a disturbance Boyd resident c/requesting po-
area of Cruz Bay. Auto colli- with two males. Disturbance of lice assistance. Police assis-
sion. the peace. tance.
2:55 p.m. - A citizen c/r that 10:25 p.m. - An Estate Beth- 12:25 p.m. - A citizen c/r a
he was assaulted by his son. any resident r/ that an excava- disturbance in the area of Mon-
Simple assault. tor was parked on her property goose Junction. Disturbance of
Sunday, May 22 without authorization. Police as- the peace.
4:01 p.m. - A visitor c/r an distance. 2:50 p.m. - A citizen p/r that
auto collision in the area of Tuesday, May 24 he was assaulted. Simple as-
North Shore Road. Auto colli- 12:40 a.m. - An Estate Pas- sault.
sion. tory resident p/r that a woman 3:45 p.m. - A Lind Point
Monday, May 23 entered his residence, ransacked resident p/r that her vehicle was
8:50 a.m. - An Estate Adrian same and removed items from damaged. Damage to vehicle.
resident p/requesting police as- his refrigerator. Unlawful entry. 4:00 p.m. - Badge #1105 p/
distance with his tenant. Police 9:56 a.m. - An Estate Grun- at Leander Jurgen Command
assistance. wald resident r/ that she was as- with one minor under arrest and
10:20 a.m. - A New York resi- saulted by an unknown female, charged with illegal discharge of
dent p/r that while parked at Salt Simple assault and battery. a firearm. Minor was released
Pond Bay someone stole money 2:02 p.m. - An Estate Bethany into the custody of his parents.
from his vehicle. Petit larceny. resident c/r a trespasser. Distur- 10:20 p.m. - A citizen r/ shots
10:40 a.m. - An Estate Pasto- bance of the peace. fired in the area of Coral Bay. Il-
ry resident p/r that someone re- 6:15 p.m. - An Estate Caroli- legal discharge of firearm.





CRIME STOPPPERS U.S.V.I.

Organization Seeks Information on Recent Crimes







18 St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011


CRUZ BAY TO RED HOOK
Every hour on the hour from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m.

RED HOOK TO CRUZ BAY
Every hour on the hour from 6 a.m. to 12 a.m.

CRUZ BAY TO DOWNTOWN CHARLOTTE AMALIE

Leaves Cruz Bay Leaves Charlotte Amalie
8:45 a.m. 10 a.m.
11:15 a.m. 1 p.m.
3:45 p.m. 5:30 p.m







St. John Tradewinds



Business Directory
11 a


Accommodations
Caribbean Villas & Resorts
tel. 1-800-338-0987
or locally 340-776-6152

Island Getaways
888-693-7676, islandgetaway-
sinc.com
kathy@islandgetawaysinc.com

Suite St. John Villas/Condos
tel. 1-800-348-8444
or locally at 340-779-4486

VIVA Vacations
tel. 779-4250
P.O. Box 1747, STJ, VI 00831


Jewelry
R&I PATTON goldsmithing
Located in Mongoose Junction
776-6548 or (800) 626-3445
Chat@pattongold.com

Landscaping
Alfredo's Landscaping
tel. 774-1655 cell 513-2971
P.O. Box 91, St. John, VI 00831

Coral Bay Garden Center
tel. 693-5579 fax 714-5628
P.O. Box 1228, STJ, VI 00831

PROPERTYKING
tel. 643-6348
Landscaping & Irrigation


rcnitecture
Crane, Robert - Architect, AIA
tel. 776-6356 Propert1y Mgmt
P.O. Box 370, STJ, VI 00831 Cimmaron Property
Management
Barefoot Architect, Inc. tel. 340-715-2666
tel. 693-7665 fax 693-8411 St. John's Premier Property
P.O. Box 1772, STJ, VI 00831 Manager


Islandia Real Estate
tel. 776-6666 fax 693-8499
P.O. Box 56, STJ, VI 00831
info@islandiarealestate.com

John McCann & Associates
tel. 693-3399 fax 888-546-1115
Located at Wharfside Landing
www.RealEstateOnStJohn.com


Restaurants
Concordia Cafe, 693-5855
Happy Hour 4:30-6pm
Dinner 6-8:30pm Tues-Sat

Fish Trap Restaurant
and Seafood Market
tel. 693-9994, Closed Mondays

La Tapa Restaurant
tel. 693-7755
Open 7 Days a Week

Skinny Legs
"A Pretty OK Place"
tel. 340-779-4982
www.skinnylegs.com


R n .eavieS w v acation Homes, Inc. SuD
Banking tel. 340-776-6805; 888-625-2963 un Dog Cafe
Scotiabank www.seaviewhomes.com Located at Mongoose Junction
#1 Mortgage Lender in the VI
The Marketplace (340) 776-6552 Real Estate Retail

American Paradise Real Estate atail
BeautV/Spa tel. 693-8352 fax 693-8818 Saltwater Gy Consignment
Westin Resorts & Villas P.O. Box 8313, STJ, VI 00831 (340) 244-8888
Spa Services info@americanparadise.com Located in The Lumberyard


tel. 693-8000, ext. 1903/1904

Construction
St. John Hardware
tel. 693-8780 fax 776-6685
Located at The Marketplace


Insurance
Theodore Tunick & Company
Phone 775-7001 / Fax 775-7002
www.theodoretunick.com


Cruz Bay Realty
tel. 693-8808 fax 693-9812
P.O. Box 66, STJ, VI 00831
info@cruzbayrealty.com

Debbie Hayes, GRI
tel. 714-5808 or 340-642-5995
debbiehayes @debbiehayes.com
www.stjohnvirealestate.com

Holiday Homes of St. John
tel. 776-6776 fax 693-8665
P.O. Box 40, STJ, VI 00831
info@holidayhomesVI.com


St. Johnimals
Island Pet Outfitter
340-777-9588
Located at Wharfside Village


Services
C4th Custom Embroidery
tel. 779-4047
Located in Coral Bay


GBS PTO Unhappy About Losing Principal Wells


Continued from Page 2

pal at Guy Benjamin Elementary. The future
leaders of our island deserve that."
GBS PTA circulated a petition calling for
Wells to be reinstated at the Coral Bay el-
ementary school, which has garnered more
than 300 signatures.
DOE officials understand GBS parents'
and teachers' frustration, but still need to
make the changes they saw necessary, ex-
plained St. Thomas/St. John District Insular
Superintendent Jeanette Smith-Barry at a
May 26 DOE press conference.
"With respect to the changes, there is no
principal who necessarily jumped up and
down with excitement about the moves be-
cause principals make close bonds with their
staff, students and parents" said Smith-Barry.
"A school is more than a building. It has to do
with developing close relationships that are
not easy to break."
"When news comes of a transfer, it is sel-
dom welcome news," said the insular super-
intendent.
Wells did not welcome the news of the
transfer herself at first, according to Smith-
Barry.
"Ms. Wells was reluctant at first, but she
has welcomed the challenge at JESS," Smith-
Barry said. "I know it is not easy for her to
leave GBS, or easy for the GBS family to
let her go, but she too realizes that change is
inevitable. She has welcomed the challenge


Baha'i Community of St. John
For Devotions and Study Circles,call 714-1641
7:30 p.m. Friday; Study Circles 9 a.m. Sunday
776-6316, 776-6254

Bethany Moravian Church
11 a.m., Sunday School 776-6291

Calvary Baptist Church
13 ABC Coral Bay, 776-6304
Sunday School 10 a.m.,
Sunday evening 6 p.m., Thursday 7 p.m.

Christian Ministry
Cinnamon Bay Beach
Inter-Denominational, Sunday 8:30 a.m.

Christian Science Society
10:45 a.m. Sunday- Marketplace
Wednesday Testimonials
7:45 p.m. on last Wed. of Month

The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints
Sun. 9 a.m., on St. Thomas . 776-2379
Sun., 5 p.m., STJ, Lumberyard

Cruz Bay Baptist Church
Sunday 11 a.m., 6 p.m. 776-6315

Emmaus Moravian Church
Coral Bay, Sun. 9 a.m. 776-6713

Jehovah's Witness
7:30 p.m. Tuesday; 7 p.m.
Saturday I . ..ir- 10 a.m. Sunday,
340-715-053


and I am hoping that the GBS staff will ac-
cept that and that the JESS staff will welcome
her."
Although Browne has objected to his as-
signment at GBS, it is his assignment, Smith-
Barry added.
"While he had objected to this assignment,
I hope that Mr. Browne will welcome the
family at GBS and I know the GBS family
will welcome him," she said. "Any principal
should be proud to be a principal at GB S. It
is an excellent school with a great staff who
work really well together."
"It's just a wonderful place to be," said
Smith-Barry.
Browne's relocation was not politically
motivated, Smith-Barry added.
"I take strong exception to folks who are
considering this as some sort of dumping ac-
tivity," she said. "It is not and I would say
to folks in the community which one of the
moves of the principals would folks not have
considered political."
N Io\ c. happen and we wantto underscore
that in some cases when you make a change
of one principal for a very good reason, it au-
tomatically affects other principals," said the
insular superintendent. "It doesn't mean that
there was something wrong. Some moves
came about because of the definite need to
make other moves."
GBS PTA officials were planning a meet-
ing at the school on Tuesday, May 31, but the
date was not yet confirmed as of press time.


Missionary Baptist Church
9:30 a.m. Sunday Services, 10:45 Worship,
Tuesday 7 p.m. Bible Study 693-8884

Nazareth Lutheran Church
Sunday 9 a.m., Sunday School 8 a.m.
776-6731

Our Lady of Mount Carmel
Sat. 6 p.m., Sun. 7:30 & 9:30 a.m., Spanish Mass
5:30 p.m.; Monday and Tuesday, 7 p.m.;
Wednesday and Friday, 8:30 a.m. 776-6339

St. John Methodist Church
Sunday 10 a.m, 693-8830

Seventh Day Adventist
Saturday, 779-4477

St. John Pentecostal Church
Sunday 11:05 a.m., 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer 7:30 p.m.,
Thursday Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
779-1230

St. Ursula's Episcopal Church
Sunday 9 a.m.; Bible Class, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m.
777-6306

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship
9:45 a.m. Sunday, 776-6332

Word of Faith Church
Word of Faith International
Christian Center, Sundays 7:30 a.m.
Gifft Hill School
Call 774-8617






St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011 19


Classifieds I


marketplace

EVERYTHING
YOU NEED
ON EVERY LEVEL

GREAT PLACE
TO SHOP, DINE
AND WORK

COME JOIN US
WE HAVE
SPACES AVAILABLE
RETAIL or OFFICE

340-776-6455


STORAGE:
SECURED LOCKERS
Sizes to 10' x 12'
Autos, Boats, Trailers.
Call For Rates: 779-4445
www.properyachts.com


COMMERCIAL
SPACES AVAILABLE
AT RAINTREE COURT
large or small retail or
office spaces.
Call Albert at 693-8590


New Office / Retail
Space for Lease
Excellent Location near
Town and Westin
Join busy Bank, Day Spa
& Gourmet Market
448 sq. ft. 1-3 person
office or retail $1,450/mo.
1,036 ft. 3-5 person office
or retail $2,450/mo.
Call Marty at 776-7777
or email: martv~gislandia
realestate.com




BUILDING
OR RENOVATING?
I have spa pumps, filters,
spa misc. for sale. Also
large and small shop tools.
CALL 690-5709


2 or 3 BR House for
rent - Month-to-month.
Bordeaux Mountain,
beautiful island home,
with amazing views of
BVIs. Available 6/1-
12/31, Rent from $2,000-
$2,500 + Electric. Contact
Mark for more info at
732-804-0600, or email
mark @markofexcellence.
com


SCENIC PROPERTIES
340-693-7777
Cruz Bay:
* Efficiency apt $950
* One bedroom, one bath
w/d, $1000
* One bedroom, one bath
w/d, $1000
* One bedroom, one bath
$1300
* Two bedroom, one bath
w/d, $1600
* Three bedroom house,
W/D, great view $3500
Coral Bay:
* Efficiency apt $700
* One bedroom, one bath
$900
* One bedroom, one bath
$1250

Check out www.stjohnlive.
corn for more details.


Beautiful, secluded stu-
dio cottage in Carolina,
spectacular views of Coral
Bay and Drake's Passage.
$1500/mo available 1 July,
2011. Please call Kiana
512.535.7185 or email
kianamandeville @hotmail.com





Quarter acre off Gifft Hill
Road. Wooded lot on
moderate slope. Boundary
line 80 feet fom paved
estate road. Elevation
and rainfall a plus. Near
utilities. $85,000 firm.
Call 340-626-9770
or 340-776-6930.


3 bedroom/2 bathroom
apartment for rent. Semi-
furnished. Located in Es-
tate Adrian. Call Gertrude
or Rufus after 5 p.m. at
776-6994 or Julia at 776-
6667. Leave message if
needed. No pets.




RELIABLE MOBILE
AUTO REPAIR:
Professional and experi-
enced. Brakes, CV Joints,
Suspensions, Shocks,
Alternators, Timing Belts,
General Engine, Repair,
Foreign & Domestic.
All Work Guaranteed.
Call 227-9574

Get the picture with DISH
NETWORK Always online
with HUGHESNET
Service on St. John
info@dishanddat.com
340 779 4001


NO JOB TOO SMALL!
Maintenance / handyman
to help with carpentry,
painting etc. References,
reasonable rates, experi-
enced. Doug 693-7346



LOST OR STOLEN
DOG

* Last Seen: Chocolate
Hole on Saturday,
May 14, 2011
* Answers to: "Leo"
and "Leopold"
* Breed: American Pitt
Bull Terrier
* Age: 10 months
* Face: Half white/Half
white
* Color: White with
brown spots
If you have him please
return him to owner
contact Victor
Johansson 340-693-9574
leave message


COMMERCIAL SPACE AVAILABLE

At The Lumberyard




UNUSUAL


OPPORTUNITY


first floor space available



Downtown Cruz Bay
Where St. John Does Business

For Space Call Nick

340-771-3737


BUYING?




SELLING?




RENTING?




SEEKING?


Call: 340-776-6496
Email: advertising@tradewinds.vi



GET RESULTS!

VISA & MasterCard Accepted







20 St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011


Community Calendar


St. John Tradewinds welcomes notices of community-orient-
ed, not-for-profit events for inclusion in this weekly listing. Call
776-6496, e-mail editor@tradewinds.vi or fax 693-8885.



Monday, May 30
- John's Folly Learning Institute is hosting a pig roast fund
raiser on Memorial Day, Monday, May 30. Stop by the Coral Bay
triangle food stand starting at 4:30 p.m. on May 30 for roasted pig,
chicken and fish served up with all the traditional trimmings and
fresh local juices.
- Check out "A Review of USVI Shark Research from 2004
to Present," Maho Bay Campground pavilion on Monday, May
30, at 7:30 p.m. and on Wednesday, June 1, at Estate Concordia
at 6:30 p.m.
Friday, June 10
- Gifft Hill School is pleased to announce the Graduation Cer-
emony for the Class of 2011 on Friday, June 10, at 5:30 p.m. on
Trayser Field. University of the Virgin Islands President Dr. David
Hall will give the commencement address. Please call 776-1730
for more information.
Saturday, June 11
- Stop by the Lime Inn on Saturday night, June 11, at 9 p.m.
for a disco extravaganza fund raiser to benefit Chris Chapman.
Sunday, June 12
- The Unitarian Universalists of St. John are hosting a beach
cleanup on Sunday, June 12, at Cinnamon Bay. Stop by from 9
a.m. to noon for a cleanup and laughter yoga. Bring a sack lunch,
gloves, a swimsuit and work clothes. Meet at the watersports area.
For more information call 776-6332.
June 20-Julyl
- St. John School of the Arts will be hosting a two-week Sum-
mer Arts Camp entitled Spirits of the Tainos from Monday, June
20, through July 1. The camp will meet Monday through Friday
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. This camp is more suited for children be-
tween the ages of 7 and 10. Tuition is $250 with $25 off the total
if for referring someone who signs up. There will also be a $25
family discount per registered family member (immediate family
only). Contact Kim Wild at 779-4322 for more information.






ALCHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS
Alcoholics Anonymous meets as scheduled: Sundays, 9:45
a.m. at Hawksnest Bay Beach; Closed meetings for alcohol-
ics only at Nazareth Lutheran Church in Cruz Bay at 6 p.m
on Tuesday; Open meetings on Mondays, Wednesdays and
Friday at 6 p.m. at Nazareth Lutheran Church; Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays at 6 p.m. at Moravian Church, Coral
Bay.

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS
Narcotics Anonymous has open meetings from 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. every Saturday at St. Ursula's Church.

AL-ANON MEETINGS
Al-Anon meets on St. John every Tuesday at 1 p.m. at the
picnic table at the VINP ball field.


PREMIER Crossword

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


NATIONAL PASTRY
FILLING

ACROSS
1 Pre-Soviet autocrats
6 Did a somersault
13 President Lincoln
20 Gossipy bit
21 Many a nest egg user
22 An excess of
23 Start of a riddle
25 Guitar string settings
26 "- lid on it!"
27 Analytic writings
28 Fault-find
29 Mary Lincoln, - Todd
30 V8 vegetable
32 Prefix with tourist
34 Bogie co-star Lauren
36 Classic Pontiac
37 Riddle, part 2
42 Head monk
45 F. Scott Fitzgerald's "-
Bobs Her Hair"
46 On Ventura Blvd., e.g.
47 Riddle, part 3
49 Annoy
51 "Help!," asea
54 Dell products
55 Vulgar
56 Bit of acne
57 Elevate
60 Weird
62 Austin-to-Waco dir.
63 Riddle, part 4
66 Sounded a funeral bell
68 Title role for Alan Ladd
69 Lacking vision organs
70 Riddle, part 5
72 Prefix with chemical


73 "Y"-wearing collegian
74 Lao-tzu follower
75 Zodiac beast
76 Kind of drug that inhib-
its bacteria
78 Tokyo of old
80 Giant star Mel
81 Camera - (Cannes
prize)
82 Riddle, part 6
85 Tiptop
88 Gere of film
90 Charlotte -
91 End of the riddle
95 Sizable box
96 Not half bad
97 Need to tango
98 Deems appropriate
102 Sizable tub
103 Stand-ins
105 "Masada" star Peter
109 Skye of Hollywood
110 Puzzle paper smudge
112 Riddle's answer
115 Venerated
116 Piloted
117 Drang's counterpart
118 People making
95-Down
119 Customers
120 Is pouty
DOWN
1 Stumbles
2 Dawn
3 Rare Italian violin
4 Cupid, Mars, or Jupiter
5 Mr., in Mumbai
6 Not trite
7 Grazing fields


By Frank A. Longo


8 With 9-Down, "So sad"
9 See 8-Down
10 Co. honcho
11 Always, to a poet
12 Wild animal's lair
13 "- girl!" ("All right!")
14 Kind of whiskey
15 1988 and 2008 presi-
dential candidate
16 Parisian bud
17 Actress Daryl
18 Texas' - State
University
19 Me, -, and I
24 Like Erte's art
28 Bashful
31 Room under a roof
32 List-curtailing abbr.
33 Deep rift
35 Windy City rail org.
37 Discontinue
38 Poet's eyes
39 Half of bi-
40 "Held Up" actress Long
41 Insect leg count
42 Certain viper
43 Some cooking grease
44 Greyhound station, e.g.
45 "Sayonara" star Marion
48 Pulitzer-winning jour-
nalist Peter
50 Numerical suffix
51 2011 Super Bowl team
52 Exteriors
53 CIA spoof film of 1974
56 Gusto
57 Quit irking
58 State of fury
59 Dossier
61 Mid sixth-century year


63 Fanciful notion
64 Solo in sci-fi
65 Shrouded
66 13-stringed Japanese
zither
67 "- Miz"
68 Finch type
71 Master hand
72 Politician Aaron and
actor Raymond
76 Sail support
77 Eagle nest
79 Lyric work
81 Dolores - Rio
82 I, to Franz
83 Cow or sow
84 Chances on
85 "Greetings, Galba!"
86 Official reprimand
87 More like an adult
89 "Was - blame?"
91 It often ends in "-ly"
92 - of bad news
93 Musical span
94 USN officers
95 Pub potable
98 Huskies' burdens
99 Get all misty
100 Become used (to)
101 Abounds
104 Inn furniture
105 Leave off
106 Split
107 "I'm - your tricks!"
108 Portentous sign
111 Ply needle and
thread
112 Shrill bark
113 Sister of Zsa Zsa
114 Belief: Suffix







St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011 21


Maho Bay Camps

Continued from Page 5

back if they did not purchase it."
While there are several possibilities for
Maho to continue operations in its cur-
rent capacity, right now resort officials are
viewing its next season as the last. Maho's
policy is to accept reservations one year in
advance, a policy which is ending as of June
1, according to the resort's vice president.
"We have a lease that currently ends at
the end of July 2012," Davis said. "We are
not taking reservations for any time after
June 2012."
One possibility for Maho to continue is
if the land owners extend the lease an extra
year, Davis explained.
"The land owners have the right to extend
the lease one year to July 2013, but they
do not have to let us know until April 30,
2012," he said. "On April 30, they can say,
'yes' and we have to operate or they can say,
'no' and we have 90 days to close."
"We are operating under the assumption
that our lease ends next July and this will be
our last operational season unless at the last
minute they tell us we'll be open," he said.
"Then we'll find some way to get through
the season. With only 90 days notice, we're
going to be hard-pressed to get the resort
where it needs to be and get people here to
work."
Selengut also addressed the lease exten-
sion issue, and the difficulty posed by a last
minute decision, in his letter.
"The land has been on the market for two
years with a current asking price of $23 mil-
lion," Selengut wrote. "Should it fail to sell
by April of next year, we could still receive
a temporary reprieve to operate through the
2013-winter season. Yet, with only a few
months notice, one can imagine how dif-
ficult it will be for our guests to plan their
vacation."
"For example, I can no longer take book-
ings one year in advance," the Maho Camps
owner wrote. "Currently, reservations are
limited to this coming season only."
The resort's popular trash to treasure art
department, which includes recycled glass
blowing and woven bags from recycled
linens, will likely not be transferred to Se-


lengut's Estate Concordia property, Davis
explained.
"We are doing our best to find someone
who would be willing to the take the art
program at their facility and we would help
set that up," he said. "We would like to put
the art center at Concordia, but with only
42 units, there is not enough to support the
program. There are 112 rentals at Maho and
only 42 at Concordia, so we might not be
able to have all the programs."
"It's just not a large enough property, al-
though we have been trying to expand it,"
said Davis.
As soon as Selengut's letter hit the inter-
net, Davis started to get inundated with calls
from people asking what they could do to
save Maho, he explained.
"A lot of people are asking what happened
to Trust for Public Land and what they can
do to help," said the Maho Camps vice pres-
ident. "Right now I don't have an answer for
anyone. They can try to find a land trust or
someone with that kind of money interested
in buying the land and continue leasing it
to us."
"Then we could make donations to offset
the purchase price," said Davis.
The other option to save Maho's future
is to get the one-year extension, giving of-
ficials extra time to find a buyer willing to
continue the campground's lease, Davis
added.
"What we would like to see is to get the
extra year and find out sooner rather than
later so we'll have more time and people
will have more time to find a land conser-
vation organization or a buyer," he said. "I
would hate to see another major large devel-
opment go up in the place of Maho."
"It's a sad day, especially that do not
know what do to," said Davis. "We always
knew there was an end to the lease, but no
one really believed it would come."
The campground's future is unknown,
but its success in setting the standard for
eco-conscious travel is certain.
"Whatever happens, I am proud that
during the past 35 years Maho has gained
a world-wide reputation as one of the first
and leading eco-resorts," Selengut wrote.
"Those of you who have repeatedly chosen
Maho as your prime vacation site will be as
sad as I am that this great run ends."


ISLA VISTA
Exceptionally Private/Gated Villa atop Caneel Hill.
Offered at $4.9 M.


DEBBIE HAYES, OWNER/BROKER
OFFICE: 340 714 5808
CELL: 340 642 5995
WWW.STJOHNVI REALESTATE.COM
DEBBIEHAYES@DEBBIEHAYES.COM


mAWL
IBP--.
a
IShasI


(r i. ijiOminTi D. E B 1 , 1 i R OL N5Ei[,)iU. 5*. I R6jl N|[5 Li*ua ,i[ VuNL 5 ohiKm


John McCann &' Assoc:.,


www.RealEstateOnStJohn.com
office 340.693 3399 toll free 1.888StJohn8 (785.6468) fax 888.546 1115


FEATURED LISTINGS


pr
* AVALcEC ft �Z t.F
'WU .1 *i 'V 1
Ng u~e atv V -X.w Vm.o ..
P 'ar 8c % and co ri m Ths
V'4 off0 geres k tdiM Ltge pod ni
ho ) S. tt a i R�wAy Ht c r1 >reV9
e-y SaOut lJ- Bil� If"'., �Sa o -9�


* CAPTAINS CABEI! E~t]bRsheld b-

oadoor se'.abig Inng tewi lasie id1

1l8,a.ooo


HOMES


CORAL, BAWYA wte o nh r CMr
aL| xt gr , L C- 1 - I r. I-Vq)^ D
T.A .-H- Wr.. 4,w C.. LD
I-C3*AV *vW A nt Jr .A x�'kL
Li* Kuap kh tin d or t,4 to iwca w1t
cat yre ra Just sAssOO


*PANAORMAIC SUNSET' * DRASTIC REDCDT1OM 1 R
a qa A/CBJ A C n iwl k- pwv 3f 3. Zti a
�f o 2 If.-4is Maww crstnH^*kfS^B wt -^ rba lu m ^'*l *
Top ote aihB fo es tr lt.aaMUM" par* r . -lif-t
peai 2�Msooo *^ w to sess-i�o 8 . .** -. "
po&a $2ASLOAM No 0*Wa 1'4
* REkDUCE! BonusW Pri me ru n ertrd hanm an C L Bay wrth ani EcWI LOF Or- Ity OM
*REDUCED1 (t vaie *h thas 4K MA Nan le as 2 rti cr kmep as 1 hf te e&Aa wIafivme *ca Only SLM00


CONDOMINIUMS


*PocD TO SEU so ll l *WY sM1 ew IBR 1iBA
mmiakui 3r 3t urt di tmr ath friAt. 1C s "4nd brwres
ML frmia rF bte ttan J Ped I.a o . Scc wruonr,.
W . nrt & v -M#N k/saiue n-,fjt� j.r^j4 mnaiiA'C ERt JAe ^^^B^
am i z-.r p!�e Fca j S525M.l'" ^8.00V ^^ J ^
* MASONY 1 Ndron 1 at- so. n & s~om rm doc Ke. WA to town At S29POt
* SoLD! PtLory Conadi. 2BR ISA lop tocr uit. Comrnmon poll Low fe�. S$1S7OM.
enumo - v LAND w o ^^ - - COMMERCIAL --
* MOM ABIUNEI VAKR aon B* *WAIWfltM11 + I -mt*cn =esn *.OUUOI scUn oum.H C oS*a
Wrtart mt �t�! 7ri-Cin krg term irvi 4Mnp k11 ct of Pte rat e k-a�btCT VI&l BOAT AND EqBlWET Wm& mn litw
" wpal - ,t, ,n- Lm . n , - - ! . cU rw&. %E!A 3 L. a .. " . m B.Qw
Wd~i �u4 1" "I N ,,z4 N,0 CI4NhXqA _t6-4 .LX�* � k.. a Q1 M1 D wbaw
bnvurti �c� -r,� ,4(c - ;-,= at4~ o gt i t 4 4%s Tmmtvsofl _pmrf SU.Mlffi m��'Uot� >st 1W.OW
nx& orza .4- ni J= Va 0 SEt i f E RfljD - ncn d 9Ea-to0O
D,ia wdTao-=u MY uQsWx .irE wzum -1 Top m b unw s o


LUXURY VILLAS WITH SPECTACULAR VIEWS
JUNGIli STONI .CINNAMON BRIliZ:E -RHIAPSODY ST. JOIN .C(:CX DIE MI-R
PI.A(-.& Pl1 .N IF .AS HkISAN CARIBi. .( INNAMNION BAY I.S IA IAI- SOflri I'M .M
VISTA CARIBE - SEAVIEW - LAVENDER HILL - BATTERY HILL -GALLOWS POINT
SUITE ST. JOHN MANAGEMENT
www.suitestjohn.com * www.gallowspoint.com
1-800-348-8444
Call Us for a Tour of Our Exclusive Properties





St. John Tradewinds Subscriptions
Call 340-776-6496. We Accept VISA or MasterCard.






















*Beach Uottage" - Nestled into
the wooded hillside ovedooking
Great Cruz Bay, this cozy and
handsome 2 bedroom cottage
features a flexible layout with
separate one bedroom apart-
ment on lower level, A grassy
landscaped lawn leads to the
beach access directly below for
boating. Additional access is
deeded at the community beach
and dinghy landing just steps
down the road. $945,000


"Bordeaux Mountain House"
a spectacular mountain top loca-
tion with cool breezes, excep-
tional BVI views, privacy &
tranquility. yet this custom
designed villa is only a Short ride
to Cruz Bay, Coral Bay and the
north shore National Park
Beaches. This gated estate resi-
dence features an elegant stone
& masonry main house plus a
large guest house. pool & spa all
on level terrain. $2.495M


"arolmna Uottage'" - really
cute two bedroom house wirn
nice water views of Coral Harbor
and Hurricane Hole. Faces east
to catch tna cooling Irade wind
breezes, Paved driveway and
parking area. Partial furnishings
included Anice localionc doseto
Coral Bay with large deck and
room to expand or add a pool.
There is a laundry room on the
lower level and space to add
another bedroom. $575,000.


"EM Glo" - I his new masonry home nas an ideal location in every way.
Midway between Cruz Bay & Coral Bay this 4 bedroom home is perched on
a lal ridge just above Upper Peter Bay & has National Park land to the north
and east to insure quiet and privacy. Graceful arches frame the sweeping
views from Lovango Cay to Jost van Dyke. A large deck with pool is
accessed from the living room & master bedroom. Features include custom
C a Cmahoaany doors & windows air condimioned bedrooms- A an office 2.39M.
S '- "Calypso by The Sea" -is a charming Caribbean siyle beachlroni villa will
. an impressive rental history located in tranquil Johnson's Bay Eslates - a
truly picturesque & idyllic tropical site. Two master suites separated by a
central great room which includes kitchen, dining and living areas, all
opening up to an oversize deck with covered outdoor dining and a sunken
s spa. Located right on a sandy beach with good snorlelihng. $1.295M.


"Squire's Cottage" - Is a delightful and whimsical stone collage wdh
separate guest quarters in Chocolale Hole West. a short drive from Cruz
Bay Features include Fine local slone and brick work Turtisn Iravertine
floors brick courtyard Custom light fixtures large closets custom haid
wood doors 8 windows, stainless appliances. carthedral ceilings. stale roof
and deeded rights to two beaches The one level main house is
handicapped friendly Separate guest apanment S1.1M
"Fish Beach" - a brand New Meditlerranean Style two bedroom luxury pool
villa at Cocoloba Beach Estates, private waterfront neighborhood with
community beach parcel & dock bordering the National Park near Reef Bay
Sye near all the amenities of Cruz Bay. Villa features premium finishes and
F cook s kitchen with stone counlertops and stainless steel appliances and
luxunous baths. Beaches are just a stroll away. $995,000.
nB "Cloud 9 Villa" - Spectacular sunsets and breathtaking views over PiiSllury
I Sound to St. Thomas ana south over Great Cruz Bay are nighlighnis of this
masonry home with pool spa. air conditioning Wi-Fi & large, new sun deck
with gazebo The lot is almost fiat and Iopical landscaping abounds Two
bedrooms adloin the pool deck and a comfy loft is accessed from tre living
room A cool location high on Gift Hill and Access is paved all ine way Clotid
9 Villa is a very popular vacation rental $1.35M11
S"Glucksberg Gazebo" - a wooded lot with large Irees & a nifty large gazebo
type structure with hip rool 12 voll solar panels. screened walls & sludy floor.
Tnis is a great spot Ior gardening and growing orchids All wood com ponenls
are pressure treated, rafters are oversued 2 x 12 all lunrs 8 looters are lag
bolted & Hurricane lies at the rafters Included are brand new soiar panel
sstlem with power inverter and USB and other adapters 5159.,000


"VOYAGES BUILDING" - combination commercial and residential property in the heart of Coral Bay.
Located next to the Cocolotia Shopping Center, this is an ideal location for a restaurant, relail shops,
or professional offices. First floor restaurant space is fully equipped and ready to go and there are
two, two bedroom apartments on the second floor with a pool on the property. Just across the road
from the waterfront with views of anchored boats, cool breezes and parking $1.9M.
Mango Terrace Villas - Brand new and spacious condos on a hillside overlookNreg rie larquisse
waters of the Caribbean, All units have spacious interiors, ample decks from whici to enjoy the cool
easterly breezes & expansive water views. Amenities include private laundry, private decks, granite,
counters, travertine floors, large shared pool and deck. Only six units in two buildings with proximity
io Cnjr Bay Town & Frank Bay beach Reasonable financing available $499,000 to $1.2M1
"Gallow's Point 11B" - Great opportunity to own one of these n.ghly desirable. walk 10 Cruz Bay
condoiiniums. This well appointed, air conditioned garden unit has pleasant active views of Cruz
Bay Harbor. On site services include shuttle bus, gourmet restaurant, convenience store, generator,
concierge services. pool, spa. private beach with dock and floating platform. Just $485,000
Great Deals: Seagrape Hill - 585,000 & $99,000, Upper Carolina lot wilh beaaullful BVI and Coral
Bay v ews just $169,000, Bethany building lot over looking the Westin reduced to $99,000, Hansen
Bay - 18 acre waterfront development with subdivision permit, greal ocean views. $2.99M


1 g0g6921 9 34-9380 9 ww-rzarat.co


CALYPSO del SOL - Successful rental villa w/excellent Chocolate Hole views, 3 bd/bath suites, A/C, newer masonry
construction, beautiful pool & hot tub, terrific Ig. screened porch. $1,950,000.


CBR HOME LISTINGS
EXCITING NEWS OF ST. JOHN - BLUE TANG IS FOR
SALE!- A delightful 2 bdrm/2 bath pool villa nestled high
on the hillside in the prime neighborhood of Great Cruz
Bay. Offering privacy, vibrant sunsets, gourmet kitchen,
60' covered veranda & sunny pool. Catered To's top rental
villa. $1,295,000.
DRASTIC PRICE REDUCTION!! - SEASCAPE has
a fabulous location on Bovacoap Pt! Spacious 2 bdrm
main house w/lap pool & spa, plus a separate caretaker.
Panoramic views, privacy & successful vacation rental.
ONLY $995,000.
PRICE SLASHED!! - VILLA ROMANCE - New,
exquisitely crafted, luxury villa, features a 30' pool in a
tropical courtyard setting, four private bed/bath suites,
chef's kitchen, A/C, gated entry and custom details
throughout. All the bells & whistles for $1,999,000.
RILEY'S RETREAT - Amazing views of St. Thomas &
sunsets from this beautifully remodeled 6 bedroom, 5 bath
villa w/high quality amenities, pool, spa, close to town.
$1,899,000.
A BEST BUY! - Well built, poured concrete cottage w/
lovely _R p ' ' . Tile
floor CONRA T "tters,
flat f7r gardening & concrete slab in place for future
garage & expansion. Only $320,000.
NEW on the Market! - CARA MIA - Stone 3 bd/3.5
bath pool villa in prestigious Pt. Rendezvous. Equal sized
bdrms, full A/C, brick patios, mahogany doors, travertine
floors, slate roof, popular turn-key rental villa. $1,925,000.
Reduced! REEF BAY VIEW - Absolutely stunning east-
erly views of the Nat'l Pk & cooling tradwinds can be yours.
4 bd/3 bath, pool, spa, rental history. $1,395,000.
GOLDEN DRAGON - Beautiful stone villa w/exceptional
craftsmanship. 4 bds/4 baths, infinity pool, multi patios &
decks, lush gardens, Pt. Rendezvous. $1,775,000.
LIZARD HILL - A one of a kind villa, high above Cinna-
mon Bay & surrounded by Nat'l Pk. land. Enjoy the exclu-
sive privacy, views to die for, gorgeous gardens, & easy
access from this 3 bd/3 bath, with pool & caretaker's cot-
tage nestled on over 1 acre in Catherineberg. $3,100,000.
GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY - Apt. building
w/adjacent parcels for additional development in Cruz Bay,
newly renovated & well maintained. Only $490,000.
WATERFRONT with DOCK - Masonry 3 bed/2bath
home on Ig. flat lot, with direct access to Fish Bay at your
doorstep. Now only $920,000.
AURORA - Enjoy 180 views, from Great Cruz to St.
Thomas, from this masonry 4 bd/ 4 bath villa in Contant
Pt. Great privacy, pool, multiple outdoor patios, excellent
vacation rental history. $1,995,000.
GREAT EXPECTATIONS - 7 bd/7.5 baths, 2 swimming
pools, 2 hot tubs, tennis court, walk to Chocolate Hole
beach, impressive vacation rental history. $2,999,500.


REDUCED! - Well built Bordeaux Mt. home with 3 bd/
2 bath, Ig. covered porch, southerly views, Ig. trees, very
gentle slope, room for expansion. $525,000.
CHOCOLATE HOLE - Unique ruins of 1700's Great
House, with a 1960's home on a beautiful 1.42 acre lot.
$799,000.
POINT RENDEZVOUS - Newer masonry villa w/easterly
views to Ram Head, 3 bd, 2 baths, Ig. covered deck, spa,
vacation rental history, room for expansion. $1,595,000.
WINDSONG - Stately Boatman Pt. villa, w/separate
cottage, situated on a lac parcel w/panoramic views. 6
bdrms., 7 baths, huge pool, fully furnished. $3,495,000.
BOATMAN POINT - Masonry 4 bd. home on spectacular
1 ac. waterfront site with amazing views & outstanding
neighborhood. $2,795,000.
CBR BUSINESS LISTINGS
JOE'S DINER - St. John's oldest restaurant is looking for
a new owner. Serving breakfast, lunch & drinks since 1972,
and located in the center of Cruz Bay. Call CBR.
CBR CONDO LISTINGS
LAVENDER HILL - Tropical 2 bd/2bath penthouse unit
w/wrap-around deck, pool & sunset views. $899,000.
SELENE'S - Ideal in town location, w/parking, for living/
rental or business. Terrific views. Reduced to $399K!
GALLOWS POINT CONDO - Waterfront, 1 bd/lbath
condo in resort setting, pool, beach. Only $485K.
CBR LAND LISTINGS
BARGAIN in PASTORY! - Moderate slope, 1/3 acre,
close to town. Only $76,500.
Oversized WATERFRONT parcel in Dreekets Bay w/
amazing BVI views! A bargain at $695K.
LUSH BORDEAUX MT. parcels w/views. $150K-$285K.
SUNSET VIEWS - close to town, easy build. Only $215K.
LOTSTO CHOOSE FROM in Fish Bay- Starting at $108K.
KLEIN BAY - Prestigious area w/common beach. $675K.
SIDE-BY-SIDE flat parcels in Johnston Bay- $220K ea.
CAROLINA, EDEN, CALABASH - Nice selection of
affordable parcels. Starting at $84K.
CRUZBAYTOWN-Walkto Frank Bay, R-4 zoning. $249K.
GLUCKSBERG - Gentle grade, 1/2 ac., Ig. trees. $125K.
ZOOTENVAAL-HurricaneHoleviews, pavedroad.$400K.
PARCEL 300-69C GREAT CRUZ BAY - Prime 1.05 acre
site w/fantastic harbor views, walk to dinghy landing & ar-
chitectural plans. A steal at $595K.
WATERFRONT on MONTE BAY- Spectacular 13.44 ac.
site, ideal for private estate or subdivision. $2,900,000.
AFFORDABLEPARCELS-inEst.Grunwald&Adrian.Easy
building sites, close to town. Starting at $89,000. Call Today!
DITLEFF POINT - Extraordinary sites on magnificent
peninsula w/sandy beach, gated entry, beautiful landscap-
ing, and incredible views. Prices start at $695,000.
PT. RENDEZVOUS- Outstanding views. $275K & $415K.
BANK OWNED PARCELS - Chocolate Hole, priced to
SELL! $195K & 225K. GREAT BUYS!


DIRTLEFF POINT
ST. JOHN, US VIRGIN ISLANDS INFO@DITLEFFPOINT.COM












oOaLy noat* o1 0 |
S "The Company that gives back to St. John"



L ocated at tl)(8He
^^^^^^^ij~g^^~gggfj^^yp-1^^ l- ^^


"HALF MOON HOUSE" Reef Bay
Beachfront is the dramatic setting for
this uniquely modern home. Extremely
private with incomparable views and
masterful construc-
tion throughout,
this 5 bedroom, 4.5
bath home is an ar-
tistic statement in a
world class setting.
Call for details
VILLA SERENDIPITY - spectacular
270' views to St. Thomas/St. Croix w/
a quiet hilltop location & great rental
. history. 4 spa-
cious bdrms each
E w/ their own bath.
-J Great pool deck!
AC or open win-
dows & sliders
to the Caribbean
$1,850,000 breezes.
"90 DAY SPECIAL" - $300,000 Price
Reduction! Fabulous views across
Coral Bay to BVI in masonry 3 br/3.5
bth home. Private, pool, hot tub,
r stone walls, solar
water heater, hur-
ricane shutters
custom cabinets,
10k generator
plus cottage (NC)
$1,000,000 on property.


CATHERINEBERG'S "CINNAMON
RIDGE" 5 bedroom villa on 1+ private
acre, bordered by National Park, features
4 stunning
4 north shore
. views, pool
w/waterfall,
spa, easy
access to
Cinnamon
$4,900,000 Bay beach.
"CARIBBEAN COVE VILLA"- Private,
swimmable pocket beach and big views
across pristine
Hurricane Hole
to Tortola at
this 3 bdrm,
2.5 bath villa!
Possible boat
mooring in
front of home!
$1,699,500
"LITTLE PLANTATION" IS A BEST
BUY! 4 bedroom private rental home-
Sawesome
down island
& Coral
Bay views!
Turn key!
Originally
$1,700,000
now priced
$795,000 to sell.


GATEHOUSE, a 2 bedroom, exquisite
villa in Peter Bay Estates. Large lot
gives greatviews and breezes. Michael
Oxman
O plans
avail-
able for
expan-
sion. In-
Scredible
$3,150,000 Value!
"POINCIANA" is an island classic
home on 1.24 acres of prime waterfront
overlookingHart Ba 3 bedroom popu-
lar rental
with
one of
the best
views of
the south
shore.
$1,500,000
"TREE FROG COTTrAGE" Charm-
ing 1 x 1 home, surrounded by lush
tropical forest with views of Coral
Bay and the
BVI. Close to
shopping and
restaurants,
but very pri-
vate. Good
short term
$540,000 rental history.


BEACHFRONT "LIME TREE BAY"
HAS WHITE SAND BEACH! East End
5 bdrm stone
& masonry
home on 4+
subdividable
acres (zoned
R-2) steps to
-_ beach. Gor-
geous water
$2,850,000 views!
"WHALE WATCH" - Enjoy pristine
East End in this lovely, 2 bedroom
villa with big water views. Downstairs
apartment of-
fers addition-
al living & in-
come space.
Hear the
sound of the
waves lap-
$1,275,000 ping below.
UPPER CAROLINA 3X3 - Recently
upgraded
& well kept
house with
3 income
producing
m units. Easy
access
to Cruz
Bay and
$595,000 beaches.


"CORAL POINT BEACH HOUSE"
for the active waterfront lifestyle.
Ridgetop,
waterfront,
open air sol-
id masonry
3 bedroom
home. Must
be seen to
S be appreci-
$2,400,000 ated.
"WINDWARDSIDE" CALABASH
BOOM offers 2 cottages with hot tubs
in private setting. Panoramic views
- - over harbor to
BVIs. Charming
brick courtyard,
l_ ush tropical
landscaping,
and outdoor
L) f- ' showers. Excel-
$1,275,000 lent rentals.

INVESTMENT POTENTIAL; APART-
MENT COMPLEX 3 finished 2 bdrm
units w/ per-
* mits in place
for 5 more.
High cash
flow, all ma-
sonry building,
water views,
S2.350.000 brAozAs


"VISTAERO" offers total privacy with
breathtaking views over Rendezvous
Bay & St.
Thomas. 5
spacious bed-
room suites,
huge pool, ga-
zebo & hot tub
make this a
top rental villa.
$2,295,000
"SEAVIEW" vacation villa. Charming
4 Bedroom, masonry home in excellent
condition with large pool in convenient
condo live in or continue suChoco-essful
late Hole








E Great Cruz Bay &
deeded
rig h ts
to two
nearby
$1,150,000 beaches.

"CORAL BREEZE" Well kept 2br, 2ba
condo live in or continue successful
short term rental. Beautiful views of
Great Cruz Bay &
beyond. Convenient
to town & recently
added common
pool and deck make
Bethany Condos unit
S475 000 R a nrmat invpstmpnt


LOTS OF LAND LISTINGS MOTIVATED SELLERS SOME SELLER FINANCING!!
ESTATE MANDAHL $85,000 PRIVATEER BAYIHANSEN BAY hillside & WATERFRONT from $275,000 UPPER MONTE BAY hillsides from $799,000 GREAT CRUZ BAY WATERFRONT!
ESTATE CAROLINA from $115,000 SABA BAY 19 ac. WATERFRONT $9,990,000 BOATMAN PT./RENDEZVOUS WATERFRONT $825,000 ALSO
CONCORDIA PRESERVE from $275,000 PETER BAY/NORTHSHORE from $1,500,000 VIRGIN GRAND ESTATES from $499,000 WESTIN TIMESHARES
DREEKETS BAY hillside & WATERFRONT from $300,000 LOVANGO CAY WATERFRONT North & south shores from $285,000 CHOCOLATE HOLE WATERFRONT $285,000 ONE MONTH FRACTIONALS


owner/broker $895,000
from $2,000 per week
FROM $59,000


C INFO 'e DiDey. I m- r s er ofeaete for the 9I E c 9


PRICED RIGHT at appraised value, Inn BAREFOOT New 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath SUSANNABERG! New masonry home MAMEY PEAK 1.05 acres, 1x1 Main UNBELIEVABLE NEW PRICE FOR BLUE
Love is a charming 5BR/5BA rental villa guest cottage in quaint neighborhood, on FLAT lot plus separate rental cottage. House and 1x1 Guest Cottage. Flat slope HEAVEN! Cute Caribbean home overlook-
in Great Cruz Bay. $1,090,000 $449,000 Borders Nat'l Park. $695,000 & stunning views. $600,000 ing Rendezvous Bay. 3BR/3BR $527,000


UNBEATABLE VALUE! ALLESANDRA
Luxurious masonry villa, views of 3 bays,
3BR/3BA, 2 car garage NOW $1,769,000
ISLANDS END Nat'l Pk beaches
close by. 5BR/5.5BA, HOA common
dock $1,850,000
PRICE SLASHED! Cinnamon Day
Dreams, 3 BR/2.5BA, on North shore in
Catherineberg, 1 acre, $1,795,000.
MYSTIC RIDGE 4 BR/4.5BA, dramatic
views, short distance to North Shore
beaches, cooling breezes $1,990,000.


MARIA BLUFF WATERFRONT
BUILDING SITE IN GREAT CRUZ
BAY! Year round sunsets, lights of St.
Thomas, and 2200 beautiful Caribbean
Sea views. Private setting.1.03 acres
$995,000


CARIBBEAN COTTAGE catering to
short term rental guests. Price includes
adjacent lot. $599,000
CHOCOLATE HOLE Income produc-
ing 2 unit, flat yard, walking distance to
Beach, Island stone. $875,000
SOLAR B & B! "Garden By The Sea"
is a quaint Caribbean home. Owners'
apartment & 3 A/C units. $1,800,000
MILL RIDGE Attention to detail,
Classic Caribbean architecture, masonry
2BR/2BR, garage & pool. $1,595,000


ESTATE CAROLINA A variety of
opportunities. Prices start at $130,000
PASTORY .34 acre improved
property with cistern and rustic living
accommodations. Expansive STT
views. Plans available. $350,000


HOMES
SIDE! Dramatic waterfront RAINBOW PLANTATION Large 1.6 NEW GLUCKSBERG! Cute starter
a, 1.05 acres, path to water's acre lot, 5BR/5BA & pool. Extensive cottage on a wooded lot abuts a green belt.
he surf. $1,500,000 native stone terraces. Now $1,095,000 1 BR/1 BA with a/c. .23 acres $240,000
VAY Immaculate 2BR/2.5BA AMANI Spectacular 180� views, CVISTA Elegant 4 BDR/4BA villa in
a w/ pool, successful short Maria Bluff, 3BR/3BR main plus guest Rendezvous. Stunning residence
$1,450,000 cottage $1,695,000 BRING AN OFFER! exudes comfort & class. Now $3,575,000
ROLINA Live on property in NEW! IXORA Ajax Peak, bordered AMARILLA VILLA 3 BR, 3.5 BA villa,
lent & complete your home. by Natl. Pk, adjacent to North Shore superior craftsmanship, 1800 views,
cing available. $299,000 beach access, pool, 5 BR. $1,700,000 pool & hot tub $2,595,000
S PERCH Masonry FUN & CONTENTMENT 1800 views. YOUR OWN SECLUDED BEACH
iol villa, panoramic water Tiled pool deck, 2 large AC. suites & "Rendezview" features 4 BR/4BA with a
ate guest cottage. $1,269,000 mahogany hardwoods. $1,165,000 lower 3BR beach house. $2,275,000
LAND
bER OPPORTUNITIES! CONCORDIA Private and serene yet ESTATE RENDEZVOUS! Stunning
11 acres, $469,000, conveniently located to NPS views of Rendezvous Bay $380,000
&Ditleff, 18 acres, $6,900,000 beaches..81 acres $299,000 VIRGIN GRAND ESTATES Gated
y, .5 acre, $2,450,000 GRUNWALD Improved and community, fabulous views, Stamped
Y .5 acre, water views, unimproved. Views of south shore. concrete roads, & underground utilities.
it $96,130 Prices start at $150,000 Prices start at $430,000.


T�__1







24 St. John Tradewinds, May 30-June 5, 2011


St. John Tradewinds News Photos by Jaime Elliott


(clockwise from top left) VINP Ranger Denise Georges organizes the festival each year,
local crafts, JESS second graders had a blast, Olivia Christian made dumb bread, Hugo Roller
shared bush tea samples, and Elizabeth Aubain showed off her woven bags and hats.


Sun Shines on 20th Annual St. John Folklife Festival


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
After almost a week of rain, the skies
cleared on Thursday morning, May 26,
just in time for the sun to shine down on
the first day of the 20th annual St. John
Folklife Festival.
The festival continued on Friday, May
27, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and again on
Saturday evening, May 28, from 6 to 9
p.m.
Launched more than two decades ago
by V.I. National Park Ranger Denise
Georges, the annual festival is hosted
each year at the Annaberg Sugar Mill Ru-
ins, bringing together music, traditional
crafts and history. The festival is usually
put on during the month of February as a


celebration of Black History Month, but
had to be rescheduled this year due to a
sickness in Georges' family.
Although being celebrated a few
months later, judging by the smiles on
festival-goers faces, the event didn't suf-
fer from the delay.
With a theme of "A Cultural Potpourri
for All A We" the festival this year fo-
cused on the commonality of the African
Caribbean Diaspora.
Presenters included Dr. Rita Pratt,
Director of African Bahamian Diaspora
at Henderson College; V.I. Cultural In-
stitute Director Myron Jackson; author,
storyteller, linguist and historian Dr. Gil-
bert Sprauve; Annice Canton, librarian
and educator; poet and author Tregenza


Roach; and VINP Caribbean Historian
Milagros Flores.
"Discussions were really all about
the Caribbean-wide commonalities that
include the natural and cultural heritage
shared within the region," said Georges.
Students from Julius E. Sprauve, Guy
Benjamin and Gifft Hill Schools on St.
John as well as Lockheart Elementary
and St. Thomas/St. John Seventh Day
Adventist Schools were among the at-
tendees this year. The event was free and
open to the public.
The festival featured dance per-
formances by Lockheart Elementary
School, St. Lucia Association Dancers,
Dominican Association Dancers, St.
Thomas Heritage Dancers and St. John


Cultural Dancers.
Koko and the Sunshine Band provid-
ed live music from the shade of the stone
mill at Annaberg while Irvin "Brownie"
Browne returned as emcee extraordinaire
once again.
Traditional crafts and food were also
available during the fair. Hugo Roller
of Coral Bay Garden Center handed out
samples of herbs for bush tea and basil
starters. Mario Benjamin showed stu-
dents how to knit seine nets and Yolanda
Morten displayed her fine craftwork. So-
nia Sprauve was selling her hand-made
hot sauces and guavaberry jams.
Delroy "Ital" Anthony set up his
hand-made mockojumbie sculptures and
Continued on Page 4




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EBPQSFV9P_OAJYX8 INGEST_TIME 2011-08-09T14:09:53Z PACKAGE UF00093999_00146
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

CZM Approves New WAPA Power Line to St. JohnPage 7Cruz Bay Noise Answers Still Being SoughtPage 6Selengut's Maho Bay Camps Will End in 2012Page 5 STJ Public School Principals To ChangePages 2-3Sixteen-year-old Bryson Mays of St. Croix came ashore at the 8th Annual Beach to Beach Power Swim on Sunday morning, May 29, 200 swimmers. Mays, who swam the three and half mile course from Maho Bay, also won the swimming race last year, set a new course recond of one hour 10 minutes and 32 seconds. See next week's Tradewinds for more pictures, a list story. St. John Tradewinds News Sun Comes Out for 20th Annual Folklife Festival Pages 4 and 24 RESERVE YOUR AD SPACE FOR 2012!ISSUE NO. 6 IS IN THE WORKS.email: mnelson@malindamediallc.com for more information. May 30-June 5, 2011 Copyright 2011 Bryson Mays Sets New Course Record at Power Swim

PAGE 2

By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds News of the transfer of Guy Benjamin School principal Dionne Wells was met with frustration and anger last week. nounce the transfer until a May 26 press conference, rumors about the new assignments were widespread and GBS parent teacher association members discussed the issue at its My 18 meeting. “We have a very active PTO at GBS and last Wednesday, May 18, we had at least 30 people in attendance,” said Trish Meyers, a GBS parent. “I made an announcement at the meeting that I was aware that Ms. Wells was going to be transferred out of Guy Benjamin Elementary School. As to be expected, people were shocked, angry, disappointed and frustrated.” “The general feeling from teachers, parents, and many students are that we are very proud of Wells’ achievements and the advancements that GBS has made over the last four years under her leader ship,” said Meyers. “We are very proud of our extremely capable, talented and intelligent teaching staff. These teachers have been strongly supported by Ms. Wells and the Wells as principal.” Working with Coral Bay Community Council and St. John School ter School program grant, Meyers explained. “Ms. Wells initiated and supported the very successful after school program at GBS,” said the PTO member. “Ms. Wells initiated a yearly summer program to improve children’s writing skills and is very active in keeping the cost affordable so any child can attend, no are. Wells believes in the children at GBS and we believe she could do so much more for them if she was allowed to remain as principal for many years to come.” What worries the PTA more than anything is the possibility that the new principal at GBS will not want to be there. Taking over the helm from Wells is Whitman Browne, who used to be the principal of Evelyn Marcelli Elementary School on St. Thomas. Marcelli is closing at the end of the school year and Browne will report to GBS next year. Browne, who lives on St. Thomas, has been quoted in several local publications as viewing his new assignment as “punitive and political.” GBS parents do not want their principal to view his job as punishment, Meyers explained. “It would be a travesty to dampen that light by hiring a principal who did not want to be placed at GBS or felt it was a punishment,” said Meyers. “We all know that Ms. Wells could have a positive at Julius E. Sprauve, but the teachers and children at Guy Benjamin School do not deserve to lose their leader.” “Even the most resilient child can lose their spirit to succeed if someone who they rely on and look up to is removed, then replaced with an individual who felt it was less than an honor to be leading them,” Meyers said. “If the Department of Education insists on transferring Ms. Wells even after hearing our plea, we feel like we deserve no less than a replacement that is enthusiastic, grateful, and thrilled to be princiThe Lime Inn will host a disco extravaganza fund raiser to benFriends of the long-time island massage therapist are planning to boogie down at the Lime Inn after the restaurant staff removes and the 80s will be revisited. Tickets are $30 and available at Connections and St. John Hardware."Saturday Night Fever" Is June 11 EDITOR/PUBLISHER MaLinda Nelson malinda@tradewinds.vi NEWS EDITOR Jaime Elliott jaime@tradewinds.vi WRITERS Andrea Milam, Mauri Elbel ADVERTISING advertising@tradewinds.vi CIRCULATION Rohan Roberts COLUMNISTS & CONTRIBUTORS Chuck Pishko, Malik Stevens, Adam Lynch, Tristan Ewald, Paul Devine, Andrew Rutnik, Craig Barshinger, Maggie Wessinger SUBSCRIPTIONS U.S. & U.S.V.I. only $70.00 per year THIRD CLASS PERMIT U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 3 St. John, VI 00831 NEWSLINE www.tradewinds.vi editor@tradewinds.vi MAILING ADDRE SS Tradewinds Publishing St. John, VI 00831 COPYRIGHT 2011All rights reserved. No reproduction of news stories, letters, columns, photographs or advertisements allowed without written permission from the publisher. TRADEWINDS PUBLISHING LLCThe Community Newspaper Since 1972 GHS Graduation Scheduled for June 102 St. John Tradewinds, Delinquent Real Property List PublishedThe Gifft Hill School graduation ceremony for the Class of 2011 University of the Virgin Islands President Dr. David Hall will deliver the commencement address. Please call 776-1730 for more information. The Coral Bay Community Council is welcoming back the island's shark researchers. Bryan DeAngelis and Dr. Greg Skomal will be hosting two presentations for the public this year to share their research. “A Review of USVI Shark Research from 2004 to Present” will be presented at the Maho Bay Campground pavilion on Monday, The shark researchers are returning this week for their sixth year of juvenile shark research in Coral Bay and Fish Bay. Attendees can learn about the 12 inches to two feet long juvenile sharks that live in the island's shallow bay nurseries. Everyone is welcome. Public Presentations on Local Shark Research Set for May 30 and June 1The territory's delinquent real property list that has been published applies only to those property owners who have been delin quent in their payments of real property taxes for 10 or more years, The list was published in the St. Croix Avis on Wednesday, May Virgin Islands Daily News on Friday, May 27. The delinquent real property list can also be viewed on the Lt. Governor’s website, www.ltg.gov.vi. Publication of the delinquent list is mandated by VIC T33 names of all delinquent real property tax owners. Property owners whose names appear on this list or who know that their properties Tax Collector in their district to make arrangements for payment. 776-6737 on St. John.“Even the most resilient child can lose their spirit to succeed if someone who they rely on and look up to is removed, then replaced with an individual who felt it was less than an honor to be leading them.” Guy Benjamin School PTO Not Happy About Losing Principal Dionne WellsThe Unitarian Universalists of St. John are hosting a beach cleanup on June 12 at Cinnamon Bay. Bring a sack lunch, gloves, a swimsuit and work clothes. Meet at the watersports area. For more information call 776-6332.UU Hosting Beach Clean Up June 12Continued on Page 18

PAGE 3

By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds Julius E. Sprauve School will welcome Dionne Wells as the school’s new principal next year and should expect additional changes as well. Current JESS principal Mario Francis will report to the Edith William Alternative Academy starting next school year while Whitman Browne from St. Thomas will take over the helm of Guy Benjamin School, being vacat ed by Wells. Among the announcements issued at a Department of Education press conference on May 26, DOE Commissioner LaVerne Terry said that the Cruz Bay public elementary and public school will be restructured. “The Julius E. Sprauve School is one of the schools that we are looking at restructur ing,” said Terry. “Initial reviews that we’re looking at are primarily at the instructional program as well as the way the school is ar ranged. There may be other changes coming in the future.” “I believe that there is going to be a meet ing next week on St. John to talk about other things we are proposing at the school,” Terry said. DOE will host a meeting for parents of JESS 8th graders on Thursday evening, June 2, according to DOE St. Thomas/St. John Insular Superintendent Jeanette Smith-Barry. “We have set a meeting for parents of eighth graders at JESS on Thursday night and information on that meeting will be forthcoming,” said Smith-Barry. By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds cials unveiled changes to the administration of many schools in both the St. Thomas/St. John and St. Croix Districts last week. Both public schools on St. John will be run by new principals next E. Sprauve School, Principal Mario Francis is being transferred to Edith Williams Alternative Academy on St. Thomas next year. Guy Benjamin School princi pal Dionne Wells will be replac ing Francis as principal of JESS. Whitmore Browne, the principal of Evelyn Marcelli Elementary School on St. Thomas — which is closing at the end of the school year — will be new the GBS principal next year. While rumors of transfers have been whispered for weeks, the ofnew assignments came during a DOE press conference at the Cur riculum Center on Thursday after noon, May 26. strict No Child Left Behind benchmarks for some of the transfers. DOE has cut millions from its budget and is still looking for an missioner LaVerne Terry explained in last week’s press conference. “The general fund has contin ued to decline and recently the department was required to reduce its budget by three percent to $6.8 million,” said Terry. “We anticipate additional budget cuts for the upcoming years. It should be noted personnel cost makes up department’s budget.” There are also several schools in both districts which have never met Annual Year Progress, require ments which will only get more future, Terry explained. “Since 2007, we have had three elementary schools which have never made AYP and six secondary schools which have never made AYP,” said the DOE Commissioner. “This year, schools must reach higher standards to meet AYP. Instead of 37.7 percent of students reading at grade level to reach AYP in the third grade, meet AYP.” “This new higher standard will put additional stress on all schools and especially on the schools which have never made AYP or barely made AYP,” said Terry. department’s two year initiative to improve the entire school system. “Two years ago we undertook an initiative to not just improve schools, but to improve the entire system,” said Terry. “In order to get rapid and sustained improve ment we must look at the system as a whole. Instead of looking at each school staff in isolation, we looked at the staff as a whole to see how best to utilize our resources.” The administration transfers were made in the best interest of each school and were not politi cally motivated, Terry added. “The administrative changes were made to address concerns and create better alignment amongst schools,” she said. “Reviewing of schools’ performance data, district performances data and informa tion from administrators were used to get a sense of where administra will say these moves are politically and personally motivated and I say ‘You are wrong.’” istrators have been transferred,” Terry said. “It’s very common and this year should be considered no different than any other year. The Virgin Islands is a political place and as we all know it’s hard to separate any major decision from politics.” “As much as we say it was not politically motivated, there will be those in the community who will not believe us,” Terry said. In announcing the closure of Marcelli on St. Thomas, Terry said the department looked at schools with less than 200 students. “We were faced with the real ity that we needed to address the fact that we have some very small schools using an abundance of resources,” said the DOE Commissioner. “Likewise, we knew that some of these schools required major repairs for which there are no resources to address. We reviewed each of these schools and made the decision to close the Marcelli School.” GBS in Coral Bay is one of those schools in the district with less than 200 students. Terry did not discuss closing the elementary school, but did leave the door open “It’s not sound to operate small schools when other schools can take those students,” Terry said. “There may be many other tough decisions in the future. The community wants and has demanded that we improve the school system and better prepare our students for their futures.” scarce,” said Terry. “Changes are necessary, painful, but necessary. No matter what we do, the best interest of the student is placed ahead of all other considerations.”“The administrative changes were made to address concerns and create better alignment amongst schools. Reviewing of schools’ performance data, district performances data and information from administrators were used to get a sense of where administrators Thursday, June 2nd INDEXChurch Directory .................18 Community Calendar ...........20 Crossword Puzzle ...............20 Ferry Schedules .................18 Letters ...........................14-15 Police Log ...........................17 St. John Tradewinds, Dept. of Ed Shakes Up School AdministrationWells will transfer to JESS; Francis to transfer to STT for 2011-12 school year New Principal Is Just One of Many Changes Expected at JESSDionne Wells Mario Francis

PAGE 4

crafts made with local seeds and other organic material. Justin Todman showed off his broom making skills and Elizabeth Aubain displayed her woven bags, belts and hats. Olivia Christian and Golda Her mon braved the heat of the small kitchen structure at Annaberg, whipping up fresh dumb bread in coal pots cooking over locally made charcoal. Gardener Charles “Kalo” Jackson toured students around the Annaberg garden which was teeming with everything from sugar cane and coconut to cherries and lem ongrass. “My favorite part of the whole day was picking cherries from the garden,” said one Lockheart Elementary School student. It wasn’t all fun and games though. Students also toured the ruins and had to answer questions about the plantation’s history. “The students were so well behaved,” said Georges. “I think they really had a good time and they even learned some things too. I love having the kids up here because there is so much to soak in and enjoy.” After an exciting night-time show under the stars at Annaberg, which featured the St. John Cultural Dancers, St. Thomas Heritage Dancers and the Dominican Association Dancers, the 20th annual St. John Folklife Festival wrapped up another great year.4 St. John Tradewinds, Continued from Back Page Sun Shines on 20th Annual St. John Folklife Festival at Annaberg RuinsStudents learned the history of the plantation while en joying live music and lunch during the festival. St. John TradewindsKoko and the Sunshine Band entertained the crowds at the 20th Annual St. John Folklife Festival last week.

PAGE 5

By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds St. John could be welcoming annew sprawling villas could be dotting a hillside on the North Shore in the next few years. Those are just two possibilities for what could replace Maho Bay Campground (see side bar on this page), when the eco-resort’s lease expires in July 2012. Although the exact future of the campground — and the 13.8 protected acres on the North Shore it sits upon not taking reservations after June 2012, setting up this next high season to be Maho’s last one. The campground, which opened in acres on the island’s North Shore and shoreline. The campground consists of mostly low-impact wooden structures, walkways and winding stairways, softsided tents, a dining and yoga pavilions and a popular arts program. Maho Bay Camps latest online newsletter, issued last week, included a letter from owner Stanley Selengut advising of the campground’s impending closure. “I am sorry to report that negotia tions to extend our 37-year lease have been so far unsuccessful,” Selengut wrote. “Unless the landowners decide otherwise, Maho will close before July 31, 2012.” While the date of Maho’s lease ending has been known for years, many visitors and residents hoped a land conservation would be able to purchase the property and continue leasing to the campground. With a price tag of $23 million, however, a buyer for the property has not been found. Trust for Public Land, which acquired more than 400 acres nearby for protection last year, was leading the drive to purchase the land. At this time, organization is no longer in negotia tions with the land owners, explained Maho Camps vice president Adrian Davis. “Trust for Public Land is no longer in negotiations with the land owners,” said Davis. “Hopefully someone will come out and purchase the land and lease it to Maho Bay Camps, but that will not be Trust for Public Land at this time.” Funds collected by TPL for Maho Bay Camps were used to begin negotiation, Davis added. “Anyone who donated money to TPL has gotten a letter about the end of negotiations,” said Davis. “The money they donated was for the beginning of negotiations and appraisals. It was never promised that they would purchase it or that people would get their money St. John Tradewinds, Continued on Page 16Maho Bay Campground Eyes Last Season; Eco-resort’s Lease Will Expire July 2012 By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds With Maho Bay Campground’s lease set to expire on July 31, 2012, a rare 13.8 parcel of land on the pristine North Shore of St. John is on the market. The land is surrounded by V.I. National Park and tion to incredible views. Offered by Islandia Real Estate, the land is listed as Estate Abraham’s Fancy, but is billed as Estate Maho Bay on the company’s website. The asking price is $23 million and the possibilities for the property are many, according to www. islandiarealestate.com. “One of the last remaining privately owned beach front properties on St. John’s North Shore is offered for sale,” according to the site. “This privately ible zoning for any number of uses or a combina tion thereof; exclusive family estate holding, private planned residential community, ultimate upscale beachfront resort.”“Flexible Zoning” Means Maho Bay Could Be Home To Resort or Villas, or BothContinued on Page 21

PAGE 6

By Andrea Milam St. John Tradewinds Anyone who’s driven by Cruz Bay after the sun goes down knows that the town can be a noisy place. Now downtown businesses, via the St. Thomas/St. John Chamber of Commerce’s St. John Chapter, are noise ordinance. “The law needs to be worded much better than it is, and enforcement needs to be across the board,” said Castaways owner Jeff Quinlan. “The law is very generalized.” While Quinlan has been approached by V.I. Police blaringly loud music emitting from other downtown establishments and even from cars, he said. “It’s painful to drive by these places even with the windows rolled up in my car,” agreed St. John Chamber board representative Don Porter. Businesses from Estate Lindholm to Lavender Hill, both just outside of Cruz Bay on opposite ends of the town, have faced issues with the noise level, Cruz Bay Boutique Hotel owner David Guidi explained. “There are a few places that are so loud at three and four in the morning that it spoils it for everybody making use of noise meters would help solve the problem. Castaways owner Quinlan lauded the FBI and DEA on their recent drug busts, saying it’s reduced the size of the crowd that usually hangs out across the street from his bar allegedly selling drugs. “We’ve noticed a huge difference,” he said. “If local police followed that trend and enforced the No Loitering sign there, it would help to solve the problem.” While it’s up to the VIPD to enforce the law, the Department of Licensing and Consumer Affairs, which grants the business licenses determining which establishments can play loud music — within the lim its of the law — should also be involved in the discussion of making Cruz Bay a quieter place, said St. John Administrator Leona Smith. Chamber members agreed to invite VIPD and DLCA representatives to next month’s meeting in or der to further the discussion. Also on the agenda was the issue of the approved gas station project near Power Boyd, where excava tion has reportedly begun. “Gasoline will have to go over Jacob’s Ladder,” said Porter. “It’s a potential serious disaster.” “We really need to step up our objection,” added Cid Hamling. Chamber members agreed to follow up on a rumored opposition to the project by a neighboring property owner, who claims the gas station’s plans encroach on her land. On the heels of Administrator Smith’s announce ment that V.I. Port Authority board member Robert O’Connor will soon recommend restricted parking at the VIPA-owned U.S. Customs lot, Chamber Chapter members agreed to formally recommend that parking at the lot be restricted to two hours during the day and three hours during the evening. Chamber members also lamented the recent proposal of a bill to add a one cent import fee per pound to everything arriving in the territory aside from food and medicine. “It sounds innocuous, but it’s a little deceptive,” said Porter. “It gets interesting with things like building materials.” “It’s not a good bill,” added Hamling.6 St. John Tradewinds, Experienced . Personalized . Professional . ProvenSeaview Vacation Homes, Inc. Short Term-Full Service Since 1985 VACATION VILLA MANAGEMENT24 years of on island rental servicee: info@seaviewhomes.com w: www.seaviewhomes.com t: 340-776-6805; toll-free 1-888-625-2963 “There are a few places that are so loud at three and four in the morning that it spoils it for everybody else,” said Guidi, who making use of noise meters would help solve the problem.– David Guidi, owner Cruz Bay Boutique Hotel Open TuesdaySunday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tel: 693-5579Beautifying America’s Paradise 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 Gold Addy Award Magazine DesignSt. John Tradewinds Governor John deJongh pro“Click It or Ticket” mobilization period in the Virgin Islands. During these designated two weeks, police will ramp up enforcement of seat belt laws, which have been shown to reduce the risk of injury or death caused by motor vehicle crashes. With the safety and security of residents and visitors to the ter ritory as a paramount concern, initiatives like this one assist in raising awareness on potentially life-saving measures in the event of an accident. A majority of Vir gin Islanders regularly travel in motor vehicles on our territory’s roads and are encouraged to always practice safe driving habits. ger vehicles saved approximately 12,713 lives. Regular seat belt use is the single most effective way to protect individuals while driving; using a seat belt is also required by law in the Virgin Islands. In the territory and across the will actively participate in the Click It or Ticket initiative and will monitor the public on seatbelt use, day and night. Checkpoints will be established throughout the terriotry. Increased enforcement of seat belt laws, coupled with publicity, has proven to be an effective method to increase seat belt usage and decrease fatal crashes.VIPD's "Click It or Ticket" Campaign To Promote SafetyChamber Continues To Seek Solutions To Night Noise Issue Plaguing Cruz Bay

PAGE 7

St. John Tradewinds, By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds St. John will be connected to St. Thomas by a second cable soon. In a short decision meeting on Tuesday evening, May 24, at St. Ursula’s Senior Citi zens Center, the St. John Coastal Zone Management Committee voted unanimously to grant the V.I. Water And Power Authority a cal cable from Red Hook to Frank Bay. St. John CZM Committee members Ger ry Hills, Andrew Penn and Madaline Sewer Committee member Edmund Roberts was absent. The committee tabled the request at its April 28 decision meeting at the Westin Resort and Villas because the group could not get a clear answer about three seemingly unused utility poles and a rusty chain link fence in the Frank Bay area. The poles have since been removed and a new fence will installed in the area soon, At the April CZM meeting, Amy Dempsey of BioImpacts showed the committee pictures of the existing pipeline and images of the new cable’s proposed location. The new cable would “provide redundancy so that if the other cables are lost or damaged, there will be full electrical power for the island of St. John,” according to the request. WAPA Engineer Cordelle Jacobs, however, was unable to answer questions from the committee regarding the utility poles in Frank Bay, prompting the committee to table the request. Under questioning from committee mem bers Penn and Hills, Jacobs admitted not knowing details of WAPA’s St. John substation. “My boss couldn’t make it here today,” Jacobs said at the April meeting. This time around, the WAPA engineer was able to answer to tell committee mem bers that the poles had been cut down and a new fence will be installed around the highvoltage junction box in Frank Bay. “The poles were removed, the grass was cut and we will be replacing the fence with a new fence within the next few weeks,” said Jacobs. “Since there is a junction box there we must have it fenced it. We can’t have the area just be open.” WAPA will also be removing three unused water pipes from the Frank Bay area, Jacobs added. The seawater intake pipes are a two-inch inch rigid line. All three will be removed and the beach will be “raked back to its original condition,” according to informa tion from Department of Planning and Natural Resources’ Coastal Zone Management Program. Once the clean-up work is completed, WAPA will start installing the new electrical cable from Red Hook, St. Thomas to Frank Bay, St. John. The project will start in the Red Hook area where WAPA will expand the existing beach manhole before laying the line with a cable installation barge. With divers and video equipment, WAPA will lay the cable WAPA Gets Green Light for New Electrical Cable to Frank Bay Present this ad and receive $10 o any 50-minute treatment.* FOR MORE INF ORMATION, PLEASE CALL .., EXT WR-FitnessClub TW 3.2011.indd 1 3/23/11 6:44 PM St. John Tradewinds while it waited for the utility to remove three unused poles in Frank Bay, Continued on Page 17

PAGE 8

8 St. John Tradewinds, St. John Tradewinds Julius E. Sprauve School students in the fourth through sixth grades took part in the author-in-residence program this school year with award winning author Cristina Kessler, with help from a $1,000 donation by the Rotary Club of St. John. St. John Tradewinds is privileged to be able print the work created by several students for the next few weeks. This story was written by JESS sixth grader Kemisha Hoheb. The Sunrise That Brought Carnival by Kemisha Hoheb shining orange color made the room bright as it came through my window. I usually take a half-an-hour bubble bath but since I overslept I could only take a 10 minute bath. Next I made me a ham and cheese sandwich to carry with me, but I really wanted egg. Now it was time to get dressed. I had to wear a blue Hawaiian type of black pants I wanted to wear, so I chose my skinny jeans. And I chose to wear my black and white Converse. I was ready to hit the door and go to Carnival. I play the Double Second which is two pans. When I play it, it makes me feel like I’m in my own world. I always think about what my mother told me when she played it when she was 11, the same age as me. She said it made her feel like she was rich, had a big house and could relax. And that the sounds of the pan always calmed her down. And now it does that for me. My mom brought this special talent to me that I didn’t know I had. I made it in time to do a little steel pan practice with my band called The Love City Pan Dragons, thanks to the sunrise. The or ange sunrise that struck my bedroom had turned the sky blue. I know that the sunrise had an amazing part in Carnival. It brought light to the fantastic festival. Now everybody is having a great time — especially me. And it brought a smile to my mother’s face. crane ROBERT CRANEARCHITECT, A.I.A.P .O. BOX 370 CRUZ BAY, ST. JOHN U.S.V.I. 00831(340) 776-6356 Consignment Shop Home, Garden, Beach & Boat LEAVING ISLAND ? BRING YOUR THINGS TO US FOR QUICK SALE! Find Us @ The Lumberyard Monday Friday 11 7 / 244-8888 “Where things keep coming and going” JESS Y oung Authors: The Sunrise That Brought Carnivalby Kemisha Hoheb Renovations on Pace at Maho Bay Beach Pavilion With a new roof, reinforced concrete walls and new wooden fencing, pavilion at Maho Bay are right on schedule, according to V.I. National St. John Tradewinds News

PAGE 9

St. John Tradewinds, St. John Tradewinds conference at the Westin. St. John Tradewinds Expedia has named Caneel Bay, A Rosewood Resort among the top-ranked hotels on this year’s Expedia Insiders’ Select list. The Insiders’ Select list formally recognizes individual hotels worldwide that consistently deliver excellent service, a great overall experi top-ranked hotels selected from the more than 130,000 properties offered by Expedia, the world’s largest online travel company. “Offering our guests a memorable vacation and superior service is our top priority at Caneel Bay,” said Managing Director Nikolay Hotze. “We are honored that Expedia travelers have recognized our efforts and we look forward to continuing this level of service to all of our guests in the future.” The 2011 Expedia Insiders’ Select list is compiled based on the Expedia employees in local markets worldwide, resulting in an easy-tohotel using the trusted insight of other travelers like them. The list showcases the diverse selection of travel destinations and hotel properties. For more information, visit www.expedia.com/insidersse lect.Expedia Names Caneel Bay Resort One of World's Top-Ranked HotelsBy Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds Julius E. Sprauve School ninth graders enjoyed a fun and educational conference on Friday, May 20, at the Westin Resort and Villas which The 18th annual ninth grade conference titled, “Let’s Talk,” was or ganized by Fran Jacobson and JESS physical education teacher Lecia Richmond. School safety coordinator Lavalle Campbell and Virgin Islands boxing great Julian Jackson were among the day’s presenters. Students also learned about gang life and violence, teen pregnancy and nutrition dur ing the day-long conference.18th Annual “Let’s Talk” Conference Teaches JESS Students About Life In Memory ofJavon Jade AlfredLive a happy life. We miss you. We love you. and sisters, and family and friends

PAGE 10

WAPA Reminds Residents Not To Touch Power LinesSt. John Tradewinds With less than two full weeks of classes remaining, the 7th and 8th graders at Gifft Hill School have been busy bringing closure to many projects in the Educa tion And Resiliency Through Horticulture program. “We have pulled up the end of our incredibly successful bok choy and collard greens for one last stir fry, have chopped basil for one last pesto pasta, have rolled bins up the hill for our growing compost area, and have added layers of cardboard and mulch around all of the new fruit in the outdoor classroom.,” said EARTH coordinator Kris Bennett. Students have also been working to complete the ideas for the area, Bennett explained. “The outdoor classroom has become sort of a running joke these days in terms of completion,” said Laura or I or one of the kids thinks of another idea. So every week we continue to add plants, rearrange rocks, move paths, etc.” “It only gets better,” she said. New additions to the outdoor classroom include additional lemongrass, pigeon peas, more passionfruit, ginger, sugar cane, dwarf bananas and sorrel. GHS students in the school’s EARTH program were also looking forward to enjoying the fruits of their labor, literally. “We look forward to making limeade next week from our very productive lime trees and are encour aged by the amazing recent growth of the passionfruit vines,” said Bennett.10 St. John Tradewinds, PREMIUM DRY DOG FOOD Curbside Delivery Available Highest quality pet collars, leads, treats, sporting wear and MUCH, MUCH more. 340.777.9588 www.stjohnimals.com GHS' verdant garden.St. John Tradewinds The Virgin Islands Water and Power Authority reminded the public last week not to touch power lines that may be lying on the ground or dangling from a pole. “We need the public to understand that there are potential shock hazards associated with electrical distribution equipment,” said Hugo Hodge WAPA’s Executive Director. “Please stay away from electrical transmission and distribution power lines. High voltage transmission and distribution lines carry a lot of energy or power and must be treated very carefully or the results can be fatal.” WAPA’s line personnel are specially trained to handle this kind of work and have the proper personal protective equipment to do so. If a power line falls on your car, stay inside unless the jump clear of the car without touching metal and the ground at the same time. If someone comes in contact with a live power line, the only safe thing to do is call WAPA immediately. WAPA’s emergency number is 774-1424 on St. Thomas/St. John.GHS EARTH Program Expands Outdoor Classroom Sunday Brunch 9am-1pm LIVE Classical Guitar MusicServing Breakfast & Dinner Outdoor Dining Overlooking Salt Pond BayCall Us for Seasonal Hours 340.693.5855 St. John, U.S. Virgin IslandsBreakfast Served: 8:00-10:00am Happy Hour: 5:00-6:00pm Dinner Served: 6:00-9:00pm

PAGE 11

St. John Tradewinds, George Belcher has been Love City’s Santa for 20 years and volunteered for the St. John Kids And The Sea program for more than a decade. Belcher was diagnosed with Guillian-Barre Syndrome in November 2010 and has been out of work for the past six months. With medical bills and everyday expenses becoming too much Belcher. Me Posted, Aqua Bistro and Connections in both Cruz Bay and Coral Bay. The drawing will be at Aqua Bistro on Sunday, June 26, from ATTENTION ST. JOHN HOMEOWNERSHIRING PROFESSIONALS TO MAINT AIN YOUR HOME ISNOT AN EXTRAVAGANCEI T ISSMART BUSINESS SENSE CONTACT THE PROFESSIONALS AT Cimmaron Property ManagementS t. John’s Premier Property M anagement Company Providing:COMPREHENSIVE MAINTENANCE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT GUEST SERVICES (340) 715-2666 / www.cimmaronstjohn.com / info@cimmaronstjohn.com P.O. Box 37, St. John, VI 00831 / Lumberyard Complex – Cruz Bay George "Santa" Blecher Fundraising Rafe Tickets Available at Aqua Bistro; Drawing Set for June 26 SJSA Hosting Summer Arts Camp "Spirits of the Tainos" June 20-July 1St. John School of the Arts will be hosting a two-week Summer Arts Camp entitled Spirits of the Tainos from Monday, June 20, through July 1. the Taino Indians from excavations at Trunk and Cinnamon Bays and hike to the petroglyphs for further understanding of these people. Through acting, movement and music as well as making instruments and masks, students will show their interpretation of the knowledge gained with a production promoting artistic freedom and expression. This camp is more suited for children between the ages of 7 registered family member (immediate family only). Contact Kim Pan-o-Rama Kicks off St. John Festival 2011 John put on an impressive show at Winston Wells Astronomical and Cultural Splendor in Heaven for with a huge crowd gathered to hear the tunes and enjoy fried chicken and johnny cakes. Pan-o-Rama participants included the Joseph Gomez Pan Blasters Samuel Lawrence. The next Festival 2011 event is Friday, June 17, when the island's seniors will strut their stuff at the Senior Variety Show at the Winston Wells

PAGE 12

12 St. John Tradewinds, By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds Mark those calenders for Friday, June 3, to check out a rare one-artist show at Bajo el Sol in Mongoose Junction. p.m. and check out about a dozen photographs by St. John artist Bill Stelzer. While Stelzer is adept in a variety of mediums, the June 3 Bajo show will focus on a body of work he’s calling “Life Supersaturated.” “They are basically images that I’ve taken in travels around the world,” said Stelzer. Every continent except Antarctica is represented in the show, but the photographs, taken over the past decade, are not just travel of experience in Photoshop and other programs, to layer texture and depth into the photos, creating painterly images full of emotion. “I put the images on a computer and use the latest computer graphics technology and my background to push them into this more artistic and painterly realm,” said Stelzer. “I kind of leverage what happens after the shot into more of what would normally happen before shot. A lot of time you go out with all this expensive equipment and lenses and things, but I only had this little camera.” “But with that little camera you can get these perfect shots that are often more interesting and spontaneous than if you tried to set it up,” Stelzer said. Stelzer then takes the images puter graphic techniques to create rich textures in the photos, using Photoshop for a lot more than per fecting images. “I take the image and go to the but I use them in an artistic manner,” said the artist. “So you are using all these tools of Photoshop, but you are using them in an artistic manner instead of using them to improve photos. I build and layer the image and almost turn them into brush strokes.” Stelzer is doing, there is a good reason for that. “It’s kind of hard to describe because there aren’t many people doing this on a professional artistic level,” he said. “A lot of these tools are used by professionals, but they something not right in the image.” explain his technique, Stelzer’s end results are images that speak louder than photographs, but are just as accessible. “It looks like a photograph at more to it,” said Stelzer. “It’s liter ally saturated, but I’m also using the computer in an artistic instead of a technical way. I use the computer as a paint brush and use the camera as a sketch book.” Because Photoshop can be, and often is, used to make a model’s cellulite disappear or create that perfect sunset for a beach wedding on a hazy day, Stelzer’s artistic aims with the medium were taken lightly for a long time. “This is something I’ve always wanted to do, but there is so much push back when someone says, ‘That looks nice, but you did it in Photoshop,’” said the artist. “It’s seen as cheating. It was always frustrating because I didn’t have a lot of camera gear and my skills were in Photoshop — that’s what I was good at.” “I couldn’t use those skills in an artistic manner because everyone kept saying, ‘Oh you did that in Photoshop,’” Stelzer said. “Like IT’s A/C TIME AGAIN! Luckily, Bob’s A/C & Refrigeration is here on St. John with prices from $35-65/hour (depending on skill level required).FINANCING A VAILABLE “Just ask us. We’ll work with you.”Bob’s A/C & RefrigerationP.O. Box 37 St. John, VI, 00831 . 340-514-7850 Continued on Next Page

PAGE 13

that made it not count or something.” caring how other people viewed his Photoshop work. “Honestly, it was a few days after Annie Love died, that I just started going in and doing this,” he said. “It was so cool. Everything else was like work, but this is what I loved.” the process of creating supersaturated images to painting. “It’s like an exploration because when you are painting something you kind of don’t know what it is going to exactly look like in the end,” said Stelzer. “If you go with all that photography equipment you have a pretty good idea of what you’re going to get. But with this complex software you can get that same level of unpredictability and reaction within that system and it takes on a life of its own.” “You can think you want to push it in this direction or that direction, in terms of texture and color, but it’s so unpredictable,” he said. “You are exploring and you don’t know what will happen until you push it in one direction and see. Then something unexpected will happen and you go down that road instead.” For all of the images in “Life Supersatu“The standard way to do this to bring in have back light and all this to take a picture,” said Stelzer. “You can get incredible images that way, but you can also lose spontaneity or you can lose a moment that you would be able to catch with a handheld camera.” “Now when I’m taking photos, I take ones that aren’t there on their own, but I know I can turn it into a painting because it has certain elements,” he said. “I use layers and color and shape and emotions and I’m always thinking how I can capture someone’s emotions and thoughts and light.” painter Hugo Larson who spent three years painting scenes of everyday life in the Danhe would go around and set up his easel and would paint people doing what they were doing,” said the artist. “He would just capture these everyday scenes and I wanted to do a modern version of that. My photos are not posed, they are people doing every day things, but I turn that into iconic, captivating images through all the things I do in Photoshop.” “I’m basically creating a painting out of a photograph instead of out of a scene,” said Stelzer. “I am preserving these everyday moments, but heightening them. You wouldn’t look at it twice, but once it becomes a paint ing, it’s captivating.” Stelzer’s work has been shown in a variety of venues from the Caribbean Museum Center in St. Croix to the Elaine I. Sprauve Library in Cruz Bay, but the Bajo show is Stop by Bajo el Sol at Mongoose Junction on Friday, June 3, for Stelzer’s “Life Super saturated” show. For more about Stelzer’s work check out www.lifesuperstaurated. com. For more information about Bajo el By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds Dr. Iris Kern is hosting an exciting show of never before seen sculptures, limited edition prints and vintage collectables, and live music and refreshments on Friday, June 3. Kern’s art gallery and consignment shop Encore, located across the street from DaLivio’s Restaurant, will present “a night of on June 3. In addition to Kern’s already impressive collection, check out sculptures by Eunice Summer, limited edition prints by Steve Hanks, antique English equestrian pictures, Oriental scrolls and more. While the show includes a wide variety of work, there is one overarching theme, Kern explained. “This is artwork that has never been seen in the Virgin Islands,” she said. “These are not all island artists, but it’s about time the island was exposed to people doing art elsewhere in the world.” “Some of the work in the show is by island artists, but some is not,” said Kern. “There are also vintage pieces and collectables that are old and lovely.” The show includes works by Hanks, a well known West Coast watercolorist known for his romantic light and soft, feminine paintings. The limited edition Hanks prints in the Encore show Kern explained. While many people might know Summer’s painting’s, the local artist’s sculptures have never been showed before, according to Kern. “The whole show is really an interesting mix of stuff and fortunately, two items are coming from private collections,” she said. “Summer’s sculptures are amazing and I’m so excited to have them in the show.” The evening will also include live music by Eddie Bruce and Rich Greengold, refreshments and the chance to shop Kern’s collection of clothing, jewelry and collectables in Encore. Kern was bubbling with excitement at the chance to show new work on Love City. “The focus was to bring art that has not been seen before,” she said. “That is not in any way to imply anything negative about our local artists. But they have their venues and people know their work and where they can get it.” “I think there is enough inter est in art that people will open up to new kinds of art as well,” said Kern.St. John Tradewinds, Encore Hosting Art Opening June 3; Eunice Summer Sculptures Available Sun Power Loans for Solar Water HeatersNo money down Low Interest loan Up to $2,500 in rebateDon’t pay to heat Your Water; do it free, use the for a cleaner, greener Virgin Islands. Continued from Previous Page

PAGE 14

14 St. John Tradewinds, Crossword Answers — Puzzle on Page 20 WHAT DO YOU THINK?Send your letter to editor@tradewinds.viNEXT DEADLINE: THURSDAY , JUNE 2ND Keeping Track of Crime 2011-TO-DATEHomicides: 0 Shootings: 0 Arsons: 0 1st Degree Burglaries: 0 2nd Degree Burglaries: 3 3rd Degree Burglaries: 10 Grand Larcenies: 23 Rapes: 1 Letters To St. John TradewindsIn my State of the Territory Address in January, 2011, I said to the Virgin Islands community — and to our newly elected Senators — that our territory was at a “tipping point.” tough decisions to manage the crisis ourselves; or to allow our future to be swept away by the external forces let loose by the Great Recession in ways that would be increasingly beyond our control and which would set us back for generations. I vowed then, and have worked tirelessly since then, to be sure that we kept control of our future.To do so I have argued that we must change how we view our challenges and how together we meet them. My Administration proposed many methods and means to close the current year’s budget shortfall and to prepare for the even vaster budget crisis that looms developed not with the goal of leaving everything “as is”— that would not work. Rather, our proposals were developed with the overarching goal of shared sacriOur aim was to do what needed to be done in a way that was spread fairly across the community with minimal employee dismissals, cuts in programs or services, unpaid holidays and tax increases. These proposals were not met with the required action, nor were they replaced with other meaningful alterna tives. No, the Senate repeatedly rebuffed these sugAnd that is back at the “tipping point,” but with less time and fewer options. But I will not permit the inac tion of others to determine our future. Our Virgin Islands’ economy is essentially a closed This reality is surely understood by us all. And yet far too many who make up our interdependent whole have acted as if their own actions could be held apart, as if they did not need to be part of the solution of our common crisis. I ask the following — if you are given the choice between postponing getting a raise for a couple of years or losing your job entirely, which would you choose? If you are a union leader, would you rather have hundreds of your members dismissed or have your members agree to give up their pay on a few holidays when they are not working anyway? And as a business owner, why oppose a two year increase in your gross receipts tax if the result is you lose your business in substantial part because your customers have lost their jobs? To me, the answers to these questions are clear. dress fully our budget crisis has put us in an increas the Legislature does not have to agree with all of my proposals. However, if the Senators do not agree with what has been proposed to them, they cannot just say “no.” They have a responsibility to develop their own ideas and proposals to resolve the projected shorttions, which I have shared with the Senate President, include actual revenue collections and expenditures budget cuts imposed by the Legislature to the Execu tive Branch departments and agencies along with the Superior and Supreme Courts. However, even with these projected revenues, we are still facing a General Fund FY 2011 budget shortfall of $17.4 million and a FY 2012 budget shortfall the Government cannot continue to operate as it has operated to date. Expectations and attitudes must change. Behavior and rhetoric must change. That is the duty of lead ership. Government leaders must deal with reality. What choices we have, the real cost of those choices, what money we have — is central to that reality. We cannot print money. We cannot just appropriate it and believe the obligation is funded. This government gets money, gets funds, only two ways. We either collect it in the taxes we collect from ourselves or we borrow it from the monies that would otherwise be there to pay for what we need, and what our children and grandchildren need, in the future. Those are our choices. Without collecting more, we must spend less. Spending less in the Virgin Islands Government, where a substantial percentage of our expenses are the expenses of paying our employees forded, means one and only one thing — a reduction in the workforce, employee dismissals. now both inevitable and fast approaching. This action cannot be delayed if the savings to be realized are to be used to meet a portion of this current year’s budget The dismissals will be effective no later than June 30. These dismissals will have a ripple effect. They will have a crippling effect on many families and local businesses. Donations to charities and civic associations will be impacted. All will feel this blow. I know this and so do you. And still, I know that a collaborative effort can do much to help us resolve issues and future dismissals. Further delay will not do. I recently sent a letter to Senate President Ronald Russell restating my call that we gather together to develop a plan that will more fully resolve our budget crisis. We cannot wait until after a review of the April collections; we need not gather more information, we must reject all meaning less delay tactics. More information will not change our reality. My Administration has worked very hard to avoid reaching this point. We have used stimulus funds, we have borrowed, we have initiated capital projects to pump money into the economy, we have provided small business assistance, continued to cut execu Continued on Next PageWe Are Running Out of Time: 500 Jobs To Be Cut

PAGE 15

Life is different living on an island versus the mainland. Native folks pray for rain while visitors wish for sun. Water is precious for everyday use while it is taken for granted abroad. If it was up to a government board to regulate the weather, we would all be in trouble. Thank goodness the almighty didn’t give us that control. But I’m sure that He hears our requests. Let’s listen in on a typical day with our Lord. Telephone rings. God: Good morning. How can I help you? T ourist: Yes, I would like to ask how long will it rain today? God: Well the animals and plants need water. T ourist: That’s good, but can you bring out the sun soon? Beep, beep. God: Hold on. I have another call coming in. Good morning. Local: Yes, my cistern isn’t full and the grass is brown. Can you increase the rain? God: Hand on a sec. Are you still there? T ourist: Yes, I have a full schedule and limited time. Maybe let ting it rain at night would be better. God: I’ll see what I can do. One moment. Local: Harvest time is coming and the crops need more rain. God: I’ll get right on it. Hangs up. Ponders. On one hand more rain, on the other more sun. I know what I’ll do. I’ll make it rain and be sunny at the same time. A few hours later, the phone rings again. God: Hello. Local: What in the world are you doing? Before the crops get a chance to soak in the rain, it evaporates. God: Hold on. Switches lines. God: Hello. T ourist: Amm. Excuse me. How am I supposed to get a suntan with all this rain? For several minutes God switches back and forth listening to the complaints. Finally he says, “I have a solution. It won’t rain and the sun won’t shine again.” There was silence on both lines. Then the local and the tourist said, “God, we like it the way you had it before. Continue the good work. Good bye.” After they hang up, God thinks to himself “Maybe I should send snow.” Give Thanks, Emmanuel Prince St. John Tradewinds, tive branch appropriations and, terity measures designed to eqchanges that will cost us all. I believe our community expected and continues to expect this level of leadership. Surely the community deserves leader ship. We have made hard deci sions and we have harder ones yet to make. Not one of these future decisions will be popular, but they are unavoidable. We will have hard times ahead. Let us not abandon our future by failing work together, by failing to make the decisions today that cannot be postponed to tomorrow. We can avoid the worst outcomes if we work together. Let us do just that. Governor John deJongh Jr.500 Jobs To Be CutI am sorry to report that negotiations to extend our 37-year lease have been so far unsuccessful. Unless the landowners decide otherwise, Maho will close before July 31, 2012. The land has been on the market for two years with a current asking price of $23 million. Should it fail to sell by April of next year, we could still receive a temporary reprieve to operate through the 2013-winter season. Yet, with only a few months notice, one can imag vacation. For example, I can no longer take bookings one year in advance. Currently, reservations are lim ited to this coming season only. Whatever happens, I am proud that during the past you who have repeatedly chosen Maho as your prime vacation site will be as sad as I am that this great run ends. Maho still has another year at least, and if you want to join what could be our last hurrah, I will do my best to give you the experience you have come to cherish. W ith sincere regards, Stanley SelengutToo Much Sunshine or Rain Future of Maho Bay Camps Unsettled Letters To St. John Tradewinds I was surprised and alarmed to learn that the Water and Power Authority has proposed a reverse osmosis desalinization water plant for the Fortsberg area in Coral Bay, St. John. My reaction being triggered by the primary reason given for its need, its size, as well as its location. The earlier proposed Calabash Boom R/O plant was strongly opposed by all of the environment agencies — Virgin Islands Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service, because of the anticipated environmental degradation to the waters of Coral Bay such a plant would cause. The Need for the Plant With regard to the earlier proposed Calabash Boom R/O plant, the application for its construction was subsequently withdrawn by the developer when it discovered that the combination of an on-site well and the roof catchment areas of the development were needs of the community. Therefore it is somewhat puzzling to learn that one of the primary reasons for the WAPA R/O is the apparent water needs of the apartments at Calabash Boom. Size of the Plant It appears that WAPA’s proposed plant is perhaps 10+ times larger than that proposed for Calabash WAPA commissioned document that is intended to set forth an environmental assessment has a number of discrepancies as to its exact size. Regardless, the Calabash Boom plant would have discharged some 20,000 gallons per day of highly saline brine waste-water into the bay, while the WAPA report indicates that its plant will discharge someof waste water per day. Plant Location Making matters worse is the fact that the plant is being proposed for Fortsberg, some 4,000 feet to the north and west of the Calabash Boom area placing it and less chance for the highly brine content of the waste-water to be diluted to a harmless level. The WAPA commissioned report suggests the prevailing currents will take this waste water discharge to the south and out of the bay, but casual observations of our bay suggests that the normal prevailing trade winds will drive the currents containing this briny solution deeper into the bay, into Coral Harbor and around the corner to the Virgin Islands Coral Reef Monument at Hurricane Hole. There is no question that potable water on St. John and in Coral Bay is a precious and important commodity. But, given the size and proposed location of the WAPA desalinization plant, one is left to question the cost of this opportunity — in terms of its environmental impact on Coral Bay. Are we willing to “kill the goose that laid the golden egg?” Coral Bay is a treasure, with its beautiful clear waters. Do we really wish to add this level of stress to the marine environment? Clearly, another location for this plant should be considered, one that does not impose upon the waters of Coral Bay and Hurricane Hole the inevitable environmental disaster that is so apparent in this proposal. The good news is that WAPA’s Environmental Assessment Report must be carefully reviewed, its and addressed. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is charged with assuring that this is done and in that process must consult with the various environmental agencies and must permit public input — all prior to this project being allowed to proceed. Sincerely, Bruce SchoonoverCoral Bay R/O Plant Would Cause Environmental Disaster Continued from Page 14

PAGE 16

16 St. John Tradewinds, St. John Tradewinds Photo FileA luxury resort on the hillside of Maho Bay could Continued from Page 5“Flexible Zoning” Means Maho Bay Could Be Home To Resort or Villas With almost 14 acres, Estate Maho Bay would make the “ultimate” in private family compounds, according to the website. “With unsurpassed views, complete privacy and easy access, Maho Bay would make the perfect location for a family compound nestled in the natural beauty of the Caribbean,” according to www.islandiarealestate.com. The site also claims Maho’s location as “well-suited for a luxury resort development.” “The property’s most valuable cluding a crescent shaped beach of powdery white sand,” according to the website. “There are only two existing beachfront resorts on St. John. The Westin Resort and Villas on the island’s southshore with its man-made beach on Great Cruz Bay, and the Caneel Bay Resort.” “Maho Bay’s natural beachfront is on par with Caneel’s famed white beaches,” according to www.islandiarealestate.com. The property could also be divided into either 13 one acre-plus acre-plus sites, according to the site. “The combination of resort and private residences exist, making this property truly unique and open to many development possibilities,” according to www.islandiarealestate.com. For more information call Islandia at 776-6666.

PAGE 17

St. John Tradewinds, EM E RG E NCY NUMB E RS:LAND LINE: 911 / CELLULAR: 340-776-9110 POLICE DEPT : 340-693-8880 / FIRE: 340-776-6333 Friday, May 20 dent c/r a disturbance. Police assistance. Saturday, May 21 collision with a pedestrian in the area of Cruz Bay. Auto collision. he was assaulted by his son. Simple assault. Sunday, May 22 auto collision in the area of North Shore Road. Auto collision. Monday, May 23 resident p/requesting police assistance with his tenant. Police assistance. dent p/r that while parked at Salt Pond Bay someone stole money from his vehicle. Petit larceny. ry resident p/r that someone removed a tool from his residence. Petit larceny. resident r/ a disturbance. Distur bance of the peace. resident p/r having a disturbance with two males. Disturbance of the peace. any resident r/ that an excavator was parked on her property without authorization. Police assistance. T uesday, May 24 tory resident p/r that a woman entered his residence, ransacked same and removed items from his refrigerator. Unlawful entry. wald resident r/ that she was assaulted by an unknown female. Simple assault and battery. resident c/r a trespasser. Distur bance of the peace. Thursday, May 25 resident r/ an accidental injury. Boyd resident c/requesting police assistance. Police assistance. disturbance in the area of Mongoose Junction. Disturbance of the peace. he was assaulted. Simple assault. resident p/r that her vehicle was damaged. Damage to vehicle. at Leander Jurgen Command with one minor under arrest and charged with illegal discharge of into the custody of his parents. St. John Tradewinds Crime Stoppers is asking the community’s help to solve the following crimes. If anyone knows something, they should say something. Even the small est bit of information may be just what law enforcement needs to solve these cases. St. John Sometime between May 2 6I Enighed was burglarized. The burglar(s) broke into the northwestern bedroom by removing the A/C unit from the northern window. About $7,000 worth of jewelry was stolen from a wooden box that had been hidden in the bedroom closet. The box contained two white and gold brace lets with the names Dejenne and Nyree on them, as well as many other unique pieces. For a complete list of the jewelry that was stolen, visit our website. The minimum reward for the arrest of a burglary suspect is $714 plus 10 percent of the value of any property recovered St. Thomas Sometime between Monday, May 16, at 6 p.m. and 6 a.m. the next day, the owner of Al’s Caf discovered that his restaurant had been burglarized. The bur glar entered and exited from the western glass window. Although it wasn’t immediately known what was stolen, the cash register was broken. Citizens can submit informa tion on these or any other crimes at www.CrimeStoppersUSVI. org or by calling 1-800-222TIPS (8477). Tips are complete ly anonymous, and our stateside operators speak several languag es.CRIME STOPPPERS U.S.V.I.Organization Seeks Information on Recent CrimesNotary Public Applications OnlineWAPA's Electrical Cable to Frank Baytary public applications are now available online. New and renewal applications, as well as the Notary Public handbook, can be accessed at the Lieutenant Governor’s website, www.ltg.gov.vi. Online availability of the documents enables the Lt. Gov.’s Ofplication process and responsibilities. Continued from Page 7 across Pillsbury Sound, pass Steven’s Cay at a depth of 60 feet, avoid coral around Ming Rock and come shore in Frank Bay. “Divers will maneuver the cable around any sensitive areas as necessary during the monitoring dive,” according to information from DPNR. it has been relocated. The entire laying procedure will be monitored and the lay videoed.” Giving WAPA the green light to install the electrical cable, Hills praised the utility for being “extremely responsive and quick” in addressing the Frank Bay pole issue. Along with its approval, the St. John CZM Committee required WAPA to meet 13 special conditions. Most of the conditions pertain to the protection of sea turtles, calling for the use of siltation barriers which do not entangle the protected species and requiring all vessels working on the project to operate at “no wake” speeds. “Operation of any mechanical construction equipment shall cease imaccording to one of the special conditions. “Activities may not resume until the protected species has departed the project area of its own volition.” Once installed, the new cable is designed to provide St. John will a redundant line in case the other two lines from St. Thomas — one from Great Bay placed in 2003 and a second from Red Hook which was placed WAPA is expected to start the project in June, according to Jacobs.Lt. Governor Reminds Business Owners To File Franchise Taxes by June 30Lieutenant Governor Gregory Francis last week reminded and strongly encouraged corporate citizens to satisfy the franchise tax lands Code which requires every registered corporation (domestic Governor on or before June 30 of every year. Failure to comply with the annual requirements will result in the of Good Standing or even administrative/involuntary dissolution. Checks and money orders must be made payable to the Government of the Virgin Islands. For more information, please contact

PAGE 18

pal at Guy Benjamin Elementary. The future leaders of our island deserve that.” GBS PTA circulated a petition calling for Wells to be reinstated at the Coral Bay elementary school, which has garnered more than 300 signatures. and teachers’ frustration, but still need to make the changes they saw necessary, explained St. Thomas/St. John District Insular Superintendent Jeanette Smith-Barry at a May 26 DOE press conference. “With respect to the changes, there is no principal who necessarily jumped up and down with excitement about the moves because principals make close bonds with their staff, students and parents” said Smith-Barry. “A school is more than a building. It has to do with developing close relationships that are not easy to break.” “When news comes of a transfer, it is seldom welcome news,” said the insular super intendent. Wells did not welcome the news of the Barry. has welcomed the challenge at JESS,” SmithBarry said. “I know it is not easy for her to leave GBS, or easy for the GBS family to let her go, but she too realizes that change is inevitable. She has welcomed the challenge and I am hoping that the GBS staff will accept that and that the JESS staff will welcome her.” Although Browne has objected to his assignment at GBS, it is his assignment, SmithBarry added. “While he had objected to this assignment, I hope that Mr. Browne will welcome the family at GBS and I know the GBS family will welcome him,” she said. “Any principal should be proud to be a principal at GBS. It is an excellent school with a great staff who work really well together.” “It’s just a wonderful place to be,” said Smith-Barry. Browne’s relocation was not politically motivated, Smith-Barry added. “I take strong exception to folks who are considering this as some sort of dumping activity,” she said. “It is not and I would say to folks in the community which one of the moves of the principals would folks not have considered political.” “Moves happen and we want to underscore that in some cases when you make a change of one principal for a very good reason, it automatically affects other principals,” said the insular superintendent. “It doesn’t mean that there was something wrong. Some moves make other moves.” ing at the school on Tuesday, May 31, but the 18 St. John Tradewinds, AccommodationsCaribbean Villas & Resorts Island Getaways sinc.com kathy@islandgetawaysinc.com Suite St. John Villas/Condos tel. 1-800-348-8444 VIVA Vacations P.O. Box 1747, STJ, VI 00831ArchitectureCrane, Robert Architect, AIA P.O. Box 370, STJ, VI 00831 Barefoot Architect, Inc. P.O. Box 1772, STJ, VI 00831BankingScotiabank #1 Mortgage Lender in the VI Beauty/SpaW estin Resorts & Villas Spa Services ConstructionSt. John Hardware Located at The MarketplaceInsuranceTheodore T unick & Company www.theodoretunick.com JewelryR&I PATTON goldsmithing Located in Mongoose Junction Chat@pattongold.comLandscapingAlfredo’s Landscaping Coral Bay Garden Center P.O. Box 1228, STJ, VI 00831 PROPERTYKING tel. 643-6348 Landscaping & IrrigationProperty MgmtCimmaron Property Management St. John’s Premier Property Manager Seaview Vacation Homes, Inc. www.seaviewhomes.comReal EstateAmerican Paradise Real Estate P.O. Box 8313, STJ, VI 00831 info@americanparadise.com Cruz Bay Realty P.O. Box 66, STJ, VI 00831 info@cruzbayrealty.com Debbie Hayes, GRI debbiehayes@debbiehayes.com www.stjohnvirealestate.com Holiday Homes of St. John P.O. Box 40, STJ, VI 00831 info@holidayhomesVI.com Islandia Real Estate info@islandiarealestate.com John McCann & Associates Located at Wharfside Landing www.RealEstateOnStJohn.comRestaurantsConcordia Cafe, 693-5855 Fish Trap Restaurant and Seafood Market La Tapa Restaurant Open 7 Days a Week Skinny Legs “A Pretty OK Place” www.skinnylegs.com Sun Dog Cafe Located at Mongoose JunctionRetailSaltwater Gypsy Consignment (340) 244-8888 Located in The Lumberyard St. Johnimals Located at Wharfside VillageServicesC4th Custom Embroidery Located in Coral Bay St. John TradewindsBusiness Directory Ferry Schedules Cruz Bay and Charlotte Amalie CRUZ BAY TO RED HOOK RED HOOK TO CRUZ BAY CRUZ BAY TO DOWNTOWN CHARLOTTE AMALIE Leaves Cruz Bay 8:45 a.m. 11:15 a.m. 3:45 p.m. Leaves Charlotte Amalie 10 a.m. 1 p.m. 5:30 p.mGBS PTO Unhappy About Losing Principal WellsContinued from Page 2 Baha’i Community of St. John For Devotions and Study Circles,call 714-1641 Bethany Moravian Church Calvary Baptist Church 13 ABC Coral Bay, 776-6304 Sunday School 10 a.m., Sunday evening 6 p.m., Thursday 7 p.m. Christian Ministry Cinnamon Bay Beach Christian Science Society Wednesday Testimonials The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Cruz Bay Baptist Church Emmaus Moravian Church Jehovah’s Witness Saturdays (Espaol), 10 a.m. Sundays, Missionary Baptist Church Nazareth Lutheran Church 776-6731 Our Lady of Mount Carmel St. John Methodist Church Seventh Day Adventist St. John Pentecostal Church St. Ursula’s Episcopal Church 777-6306 Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Word of Faith Church Word of Faith International Gifft Hill School Call 774-8617

PAGE 19

St. John Tradewinds, Commerical Space Available COMMERCIAL SPACE AVAILABLEAt The LumberyardUNUSUAL OPPORTUNITYfirst floor space availableDowntown Cruz Bay Where St. John Does BusinessFor Space Call Nick 340-771-3737 SCENIC PROPERTIES 340-693-7777 Cruz Bay: One bedroom, one bath w/d, $1000 One bedroom, one bath w/d, $1000 One bedroom, one bath $1300 Two bedroom, one bath w/d, $1600 Three bedroom house, Coral Bay: One bedroom, one bath One bedroom, one bath Check out www.stjohnlive. com for more details. For Rent 2 or 3 BR House for rent – Month-to-month. Bordeaux Mountain, beautiful island home, with amazing views of BVIs. Available 6/112/31, Rent from $2,000Mark for more info at 732-804-0600, or email mark@markofexcellence. com EVERYTHING YOU NEED ON EVERY LEVEL GREAT PLACE TO SHOP, DINE AND WORK COME JOIN US WE HAVE SPACES AVAILABLE RETAIL or OFF ICE 340-776-6455 BUYING? SELLING? RENTING? SEEKING?Call: 340-776-6496 Email: advertising@tradewinds.viGET RESULTS!VISA & MasterCard Accepted Com/Ofce/Storage STORAGE: SECURED LOCKERS Sizes to 10’ x 12’ Autos, Boats, Trailers. www.properyachts.com COMMERCIAL SPACES AVAILABLE AT RAINTREE COURT large or small retail or LOST OR STOLEN DOG Last Seen: Chocolate Hole on Saturday, May 14, 2011 Answers to: "Leo" and "Leopold" Breed: American Pitt Bull Terrier Age: 10 months Face: Half white/Half white Color: White with brown spots If you have him please return him to owner contact Victor leave message NO JOB TOO SMALL! Maintenance / handyman to help with carpentry, painting etc. References, reasonable rates, experi Lost & Found Services Space for Lease Excellent Location near Town and Westin Join busy Bank, Day Spa & Gourmet Market 448 sq. ft. 1-3 person Call Marty at 776-7777 marty@islandia realestate.com Get the picture with DISH NETWORK Always online with HUGHESNET Service on St. John info@dishanddat.com RELIABLE MOBILE AUTO REPAIR: Professional and experienced. Brakes, CV Joints, Suspensions, Shocks, Alternators, Timing Belts, General Engine, Repair, Foreign & Domestic. All Work Guaranteed. Call 227-9574 3 bedroom/2 bathroom apartment for rent. Semifurnished. Located in Es tate Adrian. Call Gertrude 6667. Leave message if needed. No pets. For Rent Beautiful, secluded studio cottage in Carolina, spectacular views of Coral Bay and Drake’s Passage. 2011. Please call Kiana kianamandeville@hotmail.com Construction BUILDING OR RENOVATING? spa misc. for sale. Also large and small shop tools. CALL 690-5709 Land for Sale Quarter acre off Gifft Hill Road. Wooded lot on moderate slope. Boundary line 80 feet fom paved estate road. Elevation and rainfall a plus. Near

PAGE 20

20 St. John Tradewinds, St. John Tradewinds welcomes notices of community-orient NATIONAL PASTRY FILLINGACROSS 1 Pre-Soviet autocrats 13 President Lincoln 21 Many a nest egg user 22 An excess of 23 Start of a riddle 25 Guitar string settings 27 Analytic writings 34 Bogie co-star Lauren 37 Riddle, part 2 42 Head monk 47 Riddle, part 3 49 Annoy 54 Dell products 55 Vulgar 70 Riddle, part 5 74 Lao-tzu follower 78 Tokyo of old 80 Giant star Mel prize) 85 Tiptop 97 Need to tango 98 Deems appropriate 103 Stand-ins 109 Skye of Hollywood 110 Puzzle paper smudge 112 Riddle’s answer 115 Venerated 117 Drang’s counterpart 118 People making 95-Down 119 Customers 120 Is pouty 2 Dawn 3 Rare Italian violin 4 Cupid, Mars, or Jupiter 9 See 8-Down 10 Co. honcho 11 Always, to a poet 12 Wild animal’s lair 14 Kind of whiskey 15 1988 and 2008 presidential candidate 17 Actress Daryl 28 Bashful 31 Room under a roof 33 Deep rift 35 Windy City rail org. 37 Discontinue 38 Poet’s eyes 41 Insect leg count 42 Certain viper 43 Some cooking grease 44 Greyhound station, e.g. 48 Pulitzer-winning journalist Peter 51 2011 Super Bowl team 57 Quit irking 58 State of fury 59 Dossier zither 71 Master hand 72 Politician Aaron and actor Raymond 79 Lyric work 82 I, to Franz 83 Cow or sow 84 Chances on 87 More like an adult 93 Musical span 99 Get all misty 104 Inn furniture 105 Leave off 108 Portentous sign 111 Ply needle and thread 113 Sister of Zsa Zsa PREMIER Crossword ALCHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS a.m. at Hawksnest Bay Beach; Closed meetings for alcoholics only at Nazareth Lutheran Church in Cruz Bay at 6 p.m on Tuesdays; Open meetings on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 6 p.m. at Nazareth Lutheran Church; Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6 p.m. at Moravian Church, Coral Bay. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS p.m. every Saturday at St. Ursula’s Church. AL-ANON MEETINGS Al-Anon meets on St. John every Tuesday at 1 p.m. at the Monday, May 30 — John's Folly Learning Institute is hosting a pig roast fund raiser on Memorial Day, Monday, May 30. Stop by the Coral Bay fresh local juices. — Check out “A Review of USVI Shark Research from 2004 to Present,” Maho Bay Campground pavilion on Monday, May Friday, June 10 — Gifft Hill School is pleased to announce the Graduation Cer Trayser Field. University of the Virgin Islands President Dr. David Hall will give the commencement address. Please call 776-1730 for more information. Saturday, June 11 Sunday, June 12 — The Unitarian Universalists of St. John are hosting a beach a.m. to noon for a cleanup and laughter yoga. Bring a sack lunch, gloves, a swimsuit and work clothes. Meet at the watersports area. For more information call 776-6332. June 20-July1 — St. John School of the Arts will be hosting a two-week Summer Arts Camp entitled Spirits of the Tainos from Monday, June 20, through July 1. The camp will meet Monday through Friday family discount per registered family member (immediate family

PAGE 21

back if they did not purchase it.” While there are several possibilities for Maho to continue operations in its cur viewing its next season as the last. Maho’s policy is to accept reservations one year in advance, a policy which is ending as of June 1, according to the resort’s vice president. “We have a lease that currently ends at the end of July 2012,” Davis said. “We are not taking reservations for any time after June 2012.” One possibility for Maho to continue is if the land owners extend the lease an extra year, Davis explained. “The land owners have the right to extend the lease one year to July 2013, but they do not have to let us know until April 30, 2012,” he said. “On April 30, they can say, ‘yes’ and we have to operate or they can say, “We are operating under the assumption that our lease ends next July and this will be our last operational season unless at the last minute they tell us we’ll be open,” he said. going to be hard-pressed to get the resort where it needs to be and get people here to work.” Selengut also addressed the lease exten minute decision, in his letter. “The land has been on the market for two years with a current asking price of $23 mil lion,” Selengut wrote. “Should it fail to sell by April of next year, we could still receive a temporary reprieve to operate through the 2013-winter season. Yet, with only a few months notice, one can imagine how difvacation.” “For example, I can no longer take bookings one year in advance,” the Maho Camps owner wrote. “Currently, reservations are limited to this coming season only.” The resort’s popular trash to treasure art department, which includes recycled glass blowing and woven bags from recycled linens, will likely not be transferred to Selengut’s Estate Concordia property, Davis explained. who would be willing to the take the art program at their facility and we would help set that up,” he said. “We would like to put the art center at Concordia, but with only 42 units, there is not enough to support the program. There are 112 rentals at Maho and only 42 at Concordia, so we might not be able to have all the programs.” “It’s just not a large enough property, although we have been trying to expand it,” said Davis. As soon as Selengut’s letter hit the inter net, Davis started to get inundated with calls from people asking what they could do to save Maho, he explained. “A lot of people are asking what happened to Trust for Public Land and what they can do to help,” said the Maho Camps vice president. “Right now I don’t have an answer for someone with that kind of money interested in buying the land and continue leasing it to us.” “Then we could make donations to offset the purchase price,” said Davis. The other option to save Maho’s future is to get the one-year extension, giving ofcontinue the campground’s lease, Davis added. “What we would like to see is to get the later so we’ll have more time and people vation organization or a buyer,” he said. “I would hate to see another major large devel opment go up in the place of Maho.” “It’s a sad day, especially that do not know what do to,” said Davis. “We always knew there was an end to the lease, but no one really believed it would come.” The campground’s future is unknown, but its success in setting the standard for eco-conscious travel is certain. “Whatever happens, I am proud that and leading eco-resorts,” Selengut wrote. “Those of you who have repeatedly chosen Maho as your prime vacation site will be as sad as I am that this great run ends.”St. John Tradewinds, Providing professional rental management and marketing services for St. John’ s finest vacation villas and condominiums.For reservations For St. John or brochures business call1-800-338-0987 340-776-6152Vi e w o u r v i l la s a t w w w . c a r i b b e a n v i l l a . c o m Lumberyard Complex P .O. Box 458 St. John USVI 00831 C a r i b b e a nV i l l a s & R e s o r t sM A N A G E M E N T C O . St. John Tradewinds SubscriptionsCall 340-776-6496. We Accept VISA or MasterCard.Maho Bay CampsContinued from Page 5 ISLA VISTA Exceptionally Private/Gated Villa atop Caneel Hill. Offered at $5.4M. EXCLUSIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICE IN THE VIRGIN ISLANDSdebbie Hayes, owner/broker Ofce: 340 714 5808 Cell: 340 642 5995www.StJohnVIRealEstate.com DH@DH. Contact DEBBIE HAYES, GRI, Your Licensed U.S. Virgin Islands Real Estate Broker Offered at $4.9 M.

PAGE 22

We ’ re Sold on St. John!Fo unded in 1985 .cruzba yrealty .comV oted Best St. John Real Estat e Agency! Gretchen Labrenz Margie Labrenz Susanne Kir kT amm y P olloc k CBR HOME LISTINGSEXCITING NEWS OF ST. JOHN – BLUE TANG IS FOR SALE! – A delightful 2 bdrm/2 bath pool villa nestled high on the hillside in the prime neighborhood of Great Cruz Bay. Offering privacy, vibrant sunsets, gourmet kitchen, 60' covered veranda & sunny pool. Catered To’s top rental villa. $1,295,000. DRASTIC PRICE REDUCTION!! – SEASCAPE has a fabulous location on Bovacoap Pt! Spacious 2 bdrm main house w/lap pool & spa, plus a separate caretaker. Panoramic views, privacy & successful vacation rental. ONLY $995,000 . PRICE SLASHED!! – VILLA ROMANCE – New, exquisitely crafted, luxury villa, features a 30' pool in a tropical courtyard setting, four private bed/bath suites, chef’s kitchen, A/C, gated entry and custom details throughout. All the bells & whistles for $1,999,000 . RILEY’S RETREAT – Amazing views of St. Thomas & sunsets from this beautifully remodeled 6 bedroom, 5 bath villa w/high quality amenities, pool, spa, close to town. $1,899,000. A BEST BUY! – Well built, poured concrete cottage w/ lovely covered wraparound porch in Est. Carolina. Tile oors, louvered windows w/complete hurricane shutters, at lot for gardening & concrete slab in place for future garage & expansion. Only $320,000. NEW on the Market! – CARA MIA – Stone 3 bd/3.5 bath pool villa in prestigious Pt. Rendezvous. Equal sized bdrms, full A/C, brick patios, mahogany doors, travertine oors, slate roof, popular turn-key rental villa. $1,925,000. Reduced! REEF BAY VIEW – Absolutely stunning east erly views of the Nat’l Pk & cooling tradwinds can be yours. 4 bd/3 bath, pool, spa, rental history. $1,395,000. GOLDEN DRAGON – Beautiful stone villa w/exceptional craftsmanship. 4 bds/4 baths, innity pool, multi patios & decks, lush gardens, Pt. Rendezvous. $1,775,000. LIZARD HILL – A one of a kind villa, high above Cinna mon Bay & surrounded by Nat’l Pk. land. Enjoy the exclu sive privacy, views to die for, gorgeous gardens, & easy access from this 3 bd/3 bath, with pool & caretaker’s cot tage nestled on over 1 acre in Catherineberg. $3,100,000. GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY – Apt. building w/adjacent parcels for additional development in Cruz Bay, newly renovated & well maintained. Only $490,000. WATERFRONT with DOCK – Masonry 3 bed/2bath home on lg. at lot, with direct access to Fish Bay at your doorstep. Now only $920,000. AURORA – Enjoy 180 views, from Great Cruz to St. Thomas, from this masonry 4 bd/ 4 bath villa in Contant Pt. Great privacy, pool, multiple outdoor patios, excellent vacation rental history. $1,995,000. GREAT EXPECTATIONS – 7 bd/7.5 baths, 2 swimming pools, 2 hot tubs, tennis court, walk to Chocolate Hole beach, impressive vacation rental history. $2,999,500. REDUCED! – Well built Bordeaux Mt. home with 3 bd/ 2 bath, lg. covered porch, southerly views, lg. trees, very gentle slope, room for expansion. $525,000. CHOCOLATE HOLE – Unique ruins of 1700’s Great House, with a 1960’s home on a beautiful 1.42 acre lot. $799,000. POINT RENDEZVOUS – Newer masonry villa w/easterly views to Ram Head, 3 bd, 2 baths, lg. covered deck, spa, vacation rental history, room for expansion. $1,595,000. WINDSONG – Stately Boatman Pt. villa, w/separate cottage, situated on a 1ac parcel w/panoramic views. 6 bdrms., 7 baths, huge pool, fully furnished. $3,495,000. BOATMAN POINT – Masonry 4 bd. home on spectacular 1 ac. waterfront site with amazing views & outstanding neighborhood. $2,795,000.CBR BUSINESS LISTINGSJOE’S DINER – St. John’s oldest restaurant is looking for a new owner. Serving breakfast, lunch & drinks since 1972, and located in the center of Cruz Bay. Call CBR.CBR CONDO LISTINGSLAVENDER HILL – Tropical 2 bd/2bath penthouse unit w/wrap-around deck, pool & sunset views. $899,000. SELENE’S – Ideal in town location, w/parking, for living/ rental or business. Terric views. Reduced to $399K! GALLOWS POINT CONDO – Waterfront, 1 bd/1bath condo in resort setting, pool, beach. Only $485K.CBR LAND LISTINGSBARGAIN in PASTORY! – Moderate slope, 1/3 acre, close to town. Only $76,500. Oversized WATERFRONT parcel in Dreekets Bay w/ amazing BVI views! A bargain at $695K. LUSH BORDEAUX MT. parcels w/views. $150K–$285K. SUNSET VIEWS – close to town, easy build. Only $215K. LOTS TO CHOOSE FROM in Fish Bay – Starting at $108K. KLEIN BAY – Prestigious area w/common beach. $675K. SIDE-BY-SIDE at parcels in Johnston Bay – $220K ea. CAROLINA, EDEN, CALABASH – Nice selection of affordable parcels. Starting at $84K. CRUZ BAY TOWN – Walk to Frank Bay, R-4 zoning. $249K. GLUCKSBERG – Gentle grade, 1/2 ac., lg. trees. $125K. ZOOTENVAAL – Hurricane Hole views, paved road. $400K. PARCEL 300-69C GREAT CRUZ BAY – Prime 1.05 acre site w/fantastic harbor views, walk to dinghy landing & ar chitectural plans. A steal at $595K. WATERFRONT on MONTE BAY – Spectacular 13.44 ac. site, ideal for private estate or subdivision. $2,900,000. AFFORDABLE PARCELS – in Est. Grunwald & Adrian. Easy building sites, close to town. Starting at $89,000. Call Today! DITLEFF POINT – Extraordinary sites on magnicent peninsula w/sandy beach, gated entry, beautiful landscap ing, and incredible views. Prices start at $695,000. PT. RENDEZVOUS – Outstanding views. $275K & $415K. BANK OWNED PARCELS – Chocolate Hole, priced to SELL! $195K & 225K. GREAT BUYS ! CALYPSO del SOL – Successful rental villa w/excellent Chocolate Hole views, 3 bd/bath suites, A/C, newer masonry construction, beautiful pool & hot tub, terric lg. screened porch. $1,950,000. CONTRACTED

PAGE 23

HOMES Voted “BEST REAL ESTATE AGENCY ON ST. JOHN” 2008 UNBEATABLE VALUE! ALLESANDRA Luxurious masonry villa, views of 3 bays, 3BR/3BA, 2 car garage NOW $1,769,000 ISLANDS END Nat'l Pk beaches close by. 5BR/5.5BA, HOA common dock $1,850,000 PRICE SLASHED! Cinnamon Day Dreams, 3 BR/2.5BA, on North shore in Catherineberg, 1 acre, $1,795,000. MYSTIC RIDGE 4 BR/4.5BA, dramatic views, short distance to North Shore beaches, cooling breezes $1,990,000. CARIBBEAN COTTAGE catering to short term rental guests. Price includes adjacent lot. $599,000 CHOCOLATE HOLE Income producing 2 unit, flat yard, walking distance to Beach, Island stone. $875,000 SOLAR B & B! “Garden By The Sea” is a quaint Caribbean home. Owners’ apartment & 3 A/C units. $1,800,000 MILL RIDGE Attention to detail, Classic Caribbean architecture, masonry 2BR/2BR, garage & pool. $1,595,000 NEW CLIFFSIDE! Dramatic waterfront 2BR/2BA villa, 1.05 acres, path to water's edge, hear the surf. $1,500,000 MILES AWAY Immaculate 2BR/2.5BA masonry villa w/ pool, successful short term rental. $1,450,000 NEW CAROLINA Live on property in small apartment & complete your home. Owner financing available. $299,000 PELICAN'S PERCH Masonry 3BR/3BA pool villa, panoramic water views, separate guest cottage. $1,269,000 RAINBOW PLANTATION Large 1.6 acre lot, 5BR/5BA & pool. Extensive native stone terraces. Now $1,095,000 AMANI Spectacular 180 views, Maria Bluff, 3BR/3BR main plus guest cottage $1,695,000 BRING AN OFFER! NEW! IXORA Ajax Peak, bordered by Natl. Pk, adjacent to North Shore beach access, pool, 5 BR. $1,700,000 FUN & CONTENTMENT 180 views. Tiled pool deck, 2 large AC. suites & mahogany hardwoods. $1,165,000 NEW GLUCKSBERG! Cute starter cottage on a wooded lot abuts a green belt. 1 BR/1BA with a/c. .23 acres $240,000 CVISTA Elegant 4 BDR/4BA villa in Rendezvous. Stunning residence exudes comfort & class. Now $3,575,000 AMARILLA VILLA 3 BR, 3.5 BA villa, superior craftsmanship, 180 views, pool & hot tub $2,595,000 YOUR OWN SECLUDED BEACH "Rendezview" features 4 BR/4BA with a lower 3BR beach house. $2,275,000 PRICED RIGHT at appraised value, Inn Love is a charming 5BR/5BA rental villa in Great Cruz Bay. $1,090,000 BAREFOOT New 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath guest cottage in quaint neighborhood. $449,000 SUSANNABERG! New masonry home on FLAT lot plus separate rental cottage. Borders Nat’l Park. $695,000 MAMEY PEAK 1.05 acres, 1x1 Main House and 1x1 Guest Cottage. Flat slope & stunning views. $600,000 UNBELIEVABLE NEW PRICE FOR BLUE HEAVEN! Cute Caribbean home overlooking Rendezvous Bay. 3BR/3BR $527,000 MARIA BLUFF WATERFRONT BUILDING SITE IN GREAT CRUZ BAY! Year round sunsets, lights of St. Thomas, and 220 beautiful Caribbean Sea views. Private setting.1.03 acres $995,000 ESTATE CAROLINA A variety of opportunities. Prices start at $130,000 PASTORY .34 acre improved property with cistern and rustic living accommodations. Expansive STT views. Plans available. $350,000 DEVELOPER OPPORTUNITIES! Susannaberg, 11 acres, $469,000, Rendezvous & Ditleff, 18 acres, $6,900,000 and Cruz Bay, .5 acre, $2,450,000 FISH BAY .5 acre, water views. Prices start at $96,130 CONCORDIA Private and serene yet conveniently located to NPS beaches..81 acres $299,000 GRUNWALD Improved and unimproved. Views of south shore. Prices start at $150,000 ESTATE RENDEZVOUS! Stunning views of Rendezvous Bay $380,000 VIRGIN GRAND ESTATES Gated community, fabulous views, Stamped concrete roads, & underground utilities. Prices start at $430,000. LAND INFO@HolidayHomesVI.com TOLL FREE: WWW.HOLIDAYHOMESVI.COM “90 DAY SPECIAL” – $300,000 Price Reduction! Fabulous views across Coral Bay to BVI in masonry 3 br/3.5 bth home. Private, pool, hot tub, stone walls, solar water heater, hur ricane shutters custom cabinets, 10k generator plus cottage (NC) on property. “ LITTLE PLANTATION” IS A BEST BUY! 4 bedroom private rental homeawesome down island & Coral Bay views! Turn key! Originally $1,700,000 now priced to sell. “TREE FROG COTTAGE” Charming 1 x 1 home, surrounded by lush tropical forest with views of Coral Bay and the BVI. Close to shopping and restaurants, but very private. Good short term rental history. UPPER CAROLINA 3X3 – Recently upgraded & well kept house with 3 income producing units. Easy access to Cruz Bay and beaches. V ILLA S ERENDIPITY spectacular 270 views to St. Thomas/St. Croix w/ a quiet hilltop location & great rental history. 4 spacious bdrms each w/ their own bath. Great pool deck! AC or open windows & sliders to the Caribbean breezes. “ CARIBBEAN COVE VILLA” Private, swimmable pocket beach and big views across pristine Hurricane Hole to Tortola at this 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath villa! Possible boat mooring in front of home! “POINCIANA” is an island classic home on 1.24 acres of prime waterfront overlooking Hart Bay. 3 bedroom popular rental with one of the best views of the south shore. “WHALE W ATC H” – Enjoy pristine East End in this lovely, 2 bedroom villa with big water views. Downstairs apartment offers additional living & income space. Hear the sound of the waves lapping below. “ WINDWARDSIDE” CALABASH BOOM offers 2 cottages with hot tubs in private setting. Panoramic views over harbor to BVIs. Charming brick courtyard, lush tropical landscaping, and outdoor showers. Excellent rentals. “SEAVIEW” vacation villa. Charming 4 Bedroom, masonry home in excellent condition with large pool in convenient Chocolate Hole with deeded rights to two nearby beaches. “ H ALF MOON H OUSE” Reef Bay Beachfront is the dramatic setting for this uniquely modern home. Extremely private with incomparable views and masterful construction throughout, this 5 bedroom, 4.5 bath home is an ar tistic statement in a world class setting. CAT H ERINEBERG’S “CINNAMON RIDGE” 5 bedroom villa on 1+ private acre, bordered by National Park, features stunning north shore views, pool w/waterfall, spa, easy access to Cinnamon Bay beach. GATEH OUSE, a 2 bedroom, exquisite villa in Peter Bay Estates. Large lot gives great views and breezes. Michael Oxman plans available for expansion. Incredible Value! BEACH FRONT “LIME TREE BAY” H AS WH ITE SAND BEACH ! East End 5 bdrm stone & masonry home on 4+ subdividable acres (zoned R-2) steps to beach. Gor geous water views! “CORAL POINT BEACH HOUSE” for the active waterfront lifestyle. Ridgetop, waterfront, open air solid masonry 3 bedroom home. Must be seen to be appreciated. “ VISTAERO” offers total privacy with breathtaking views over Rendezvous Bay & St. Thomas. 5 spacious bedroom suites, huge pool, gazebo & hot tub make this a top rental villa. “The Company that gives back to St. John” $1,699,500$1,500,000 “ CORAL BREEZE’’ Well kept 2br, 2ba condo live in or continue successful short term rental. Beautiful views of Great Cruz Bay & beyond. Convenient to town & recently added common pool and deck make Bethany Condos unit 6 a great investment. $475,000 $795,000 PRICE REDUCED! $2,400,000 DVD $2,850,000 Call for details $595,000 DVD DVD $1,850,000 $4,900,000$3,150,000 DVD $1,150,000 $1,000,000 DVD DVD $2,295,000$1,275,000 NEW LISTING$540,000 INVESTMENT POTENTIAL; APART MENT COMPLEX 3 nished 2 bdrm units w/ per mits in place for 5 more. High cash ow, all masonry building, water views, breezes. $2,350,000 $1,275,000 C ALABASH BOOM hillside $475,000 FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF ALL ST. JOHN MLS PROPERTIES, DVD TOURS OF THE PROPERTIES, AND/OR A COPY OF OUR NEWSLETTER CALL OR E-MAIL US. ESTATE MANDAH L $85,000E STATE CAROLINA from $115,000C ONCORDIA PRESERVE from $275,000D REEK ETS BAY hillside & WATERFRONT from $300,000 P RIVATEER BAY / HANSEN BAY hillside & WATERFRONT from $275,000S ABA BAY 19 ac. WATERFRONT $9,990,000P ETER BAY /NORT H S H ORE from $1,500,000 L OVANGO CAY WATERFRONT North & south shores from $285,000 UPPER MONTE BAY hillsides from $799,000B OATMAN PT ./RENDEZVOUS WATERFRONT $825,000V IRGIN GRAND ESTATES from $499,000CHOCOLATE HOLE WATERFRONT $285,000 G REAT CRUZ BAY WATERFRONT! owner/broker $895,000A LSO WESTIN TIMESH ARES from $2,000 per weekONE MONTH FRACTIONALS FROM $59,000 LOTS OF LAND LISTINGS!! MOTIVATED SELLERS!! SOME SELLER FINANCING!!

PAGE 24

24 St. John Tradewinds, By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds After almost a week of rain, the skies cleared on Thursday morning, May 26, just in time for the sun to shine down on Folklife Festival. The festival continued on Friday, May 27, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and again on p.m. Launched more than two decades ago by V.I. National Park Ranger Denise Georges, the annual festival is hosted each year at the Annaberg Sugar Mill Ruins, bringing together music, traditional crafts and history. The festival is usually put on during the month of February as a celebration of Black History Month, but had to be rescheduled this year due to a sickness in Georges’ family. Although being celebrated a few months later, judging by the smiles on festival-goers faces, the event didn’t suffer from the delay. With a theme of “A Cultural Potpourri for All A We” the festival this year focused on the commonality of the African Caribbean Diaspora. Presenters included Dr. Rita Pratt, Director of African Bahamian Diaspora at Henderson College; V.I. Cultural Institute Director Myron Jackson; author, storyteller, linguist and historian Dr. Gilbert Sprauve; Annice Canton, librarian and educator; poet and author Tregenza Roach; and VINP Caribbean Historian Milagros Flores. “Discussions were really all about the Caribbean-wide commonalities that include the natural and cultural heritage shared within the region,” said Georges. Students from Julius E. Sprauve, Guy Benjamin and Gifft Hill Schools on St. John as well as Lockheart Elementary and St. Thomas/St. John Seventh Day Adventist Schools were among the attendees this year. The event was free and open to the public. The festival featured dance per formances by Lockheart Elementary School, St. Lucia Association Dancers, Dominican Association Dancers, St. Thomas Heritage Dancers and St. John Cultural Dancers. Koko and the Sunshine Band provided live music from the shade of the stone mill at Annaberg while Irvin “Brownie” Browne returned as emcee extraordinaire once again. Traditional crafts and food were also available during the fair. Hugo Roller of Coral Bay Garden Center handed out samples of herbs for bush tea and basil starters. Mario Benjamin showed students how to knit seine nets and Yolanda nia Sprauve was selling her hand-made hot sauces and guavaberry jams. Delroy “Ital” Anthony set up his hand-made mocko jumbie sculptures and Continued on Page 4Sun Shines on 20th Annual St. John Folklife Festival