Citation
St. John tradewinds

Material Information

Title:
St. John tradewinds
Alternate title:
Saint John tradewinds
Portion of title:
Tradewinds
Uncontrolled:
St. John tradewinds newspaper
Place of Publication:
St. John, V.I
Publisher:
Tradewinds Newspaper Inc.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly[1998-]
Monthly[ FORMER <1979-1987 (Jan).>]
Bimonthly[ FORMER 1987 (Feb)-1997]
bimonthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 35 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Saint John (V.I.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States Virgin Islands -- Saint John

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Description based on: vol. 3, no. 5, May 1979; title from caption.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering varies.
General Note:
Successor to The St. John Drum.

Record Information

Rights Management:
Copyright Tradewinds Newspaper Inc.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
52130251 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text



February 21-27, 2011
� Copyright 2011


ST. JOHN


The Community Newspaper Since 1972 * St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands


No Sidewalk,

No Festival

and Now No

Shelia's Pot
Frank Powell Sr.
Park Renovations
Fence In 32-year
Food Vendor from
Serving the Public
By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Not only has the fence sur-
rounding Frank Powell Park in
Cruz Bay made walking near
the waterfront difficult and dan-
gerous and forced the St. John
Arts Festival to be relocated,
the obstruction has also closed
down a beloved St. John eat-
ery.
In anticipation of renova-
tions to the park, government
contractor Apex Construction
erected a tall beige fence around
the entire park including the
sidewalk on the waterfront and
bandstand on Monday, Febru-
ary 7. The fence will remain in
place until renovations are com-
pleted, which is scheduled to be
some time in June, according to
government officials.


St. JohnTradewinds News Photos by Jaime Elliott


The tall beige fence surrounding Frank Powell Park, above, has shut long-time food vendor
Sheila Liburd out of business.


With no sidewalk to use, pe-
destrians have been forced into
the street, along with cars, safari
taxis and buses. And the fence has
also shut down Sheila's Pot.
Sheila Liburd has been serving


up delectable local fare near the
bandstand in the Cruz Bay park
for more than 30 years. Late last
month, however, she was asked
to relocate and then informed, via
her attorney, that she might not be


able to reopen.
In a letter from Department of
Housing, Parks and Recreation
Commissioner St. Claire Wil-
liams, dated January 26, but not
Continued Inside on Page 3


MaiindaMEDIA


RESERVE YOUR AD SPACE FOR 2012!
ISSUE NO. 6 IS IN THE WORKS.
email: mnelson@malindamediallc.com for more information.


$1.00


Threatened by

Development,

the Future of

Haulover Hangs

in the Balance
Page 7
11th St. John Arts
Festival To Unveils
"Mini Expo" Format
Page 5
Safety Takes
Center Stage at
Bicycle Rodeo
Only 2 of 30 bicyclists
pass safety inspection
Page 6
More Than 125
Couples Renew
Vows on Valentines
Page 4
Celia Kalousek
Is New Executive
Director of SJCF
Page 8
GHS Auction Mar. 12
Page 9







2 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011


Lucinda Sewer Millin


Janette Millin-Young


Historical


Bits & Pieces

by Chuck Pishko


Celebrating Black History Month
The Millins-Their Second Century of Community Service


St. John Tradewinds
Last week Senator Janette
Millin-Young began visiting the
public schools on St. Croix and
St. Thomas to see firsthand the en-
vironment in which our teaching
professionals work and our chil-


dren study and learn daily.
As chairperson of the Senate
Committee on Education, Youth
and Culture she rightly believes
that the job can't be done from
behind a desk. This brand new
Senator doesn't enter upon this


task with a blank slate. The Millin
legacy precedes her.
Her grandmother, Lucinda Sew-
er Million, was born in Coral Bay,
St. John, in 1892. She married Al-
lan A. Million and had three chil-
Continued on Page 18


TRADEWINDS PUBLISHING LLC
The Community Newspaper Since 1972


EDITOR/PUBLISHER
MaLinda Nelson
mahnda@tradewnds. vi
NEWS EDITOR
Jaime Elliott
jazme@tradewinds.vz
WRITERS
Andrea Milam, Mauri Elbel
ADVERTISING
advertising@tradewinds.vi
CIRCULATION
Rohan Roberts


COLUMNISTS
& CONTRIBUTORS
Chuck Pishko, Malik Stevens, Adam
Lynch, Tristan Ewald, Paul Devine,
Andrew Rutnik, Craig Barshinger,
Coral Breuning
SUBSCRIPTIONS
U.S. & U.S.V.I. only
$70.00 per year
THIRD CLASS PERMIT
U.S. Postage PAID
Permit No. 3
St. John, VI 00831


NEWSLINE
Tel. (340) 776-6496
Fax (340) 693-8885
www.tradewinds. vi
editor@tradewinds. vi
MAILING ADDRESS
Tradewinds Publishing
P.O. Box 1500
St. John, VI 00831

� COPYRIGHT 2010/2011
All rights reserved No reproduction of
news stories, letters, columns, photo-
graphs or advertisements allowed without
written permission from the publisher


Meet the Filmmakers of "Taking Root"

at Screening on February 22 at SJSA

The St. John Film Society is hosting a free screening on Tues-
day, February 22, at 7:30 p.m. at the St. John School of the Arts, at
which the filmmakers will be present as well.
Stop by SJSA in Cruz Bay at 7:30 p.m. to watch "Taking Root:
The Vision of Wangari Maathai," an 80-minute film by Lisa Mer-
ton and Alan Dater. The filmmakers will be present for questions
and answers after the screening.
This award-winning documentary tells the dramatic story of
Kenyan Nobel Prize Laureate Wangari Maathai whose simple act
of planting trees grew into a nationwide movement to safeguard
the environment, protect human rights and defend democracy - a
movement for which this charismatic woman became an iconic
inspiration.

Next Chamber Chapter Meeting Feb. 22
Cheryl Francis, Junior Achievement of the Virgin Islands Chair;
Jason Charles, Project Manager; Bonny Corbeil, JAVI Board
Member; and Pastor Themba, Acting JAVI Executive Director,
will be making a presentation to the Chamber of Commerce-St.
John Chapter on Tuesday, February 22, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at
the Cruz Bay Battery. See page 12 for more informaiton.

VINP Postpones 20th Annual Folklife

New Date Not Yet Scheduled
The management of Virgin Islands National Park regrets to in-
form the visiting public that this year's Annual Folklife Festival,
which was scheduled for February 24, 25 and 26, has been post-
poned to a later date, to be announced.
This action was taken due to unforeseen circumstances which
hampered final planning of the event.
This annual program has been well-attended in the past, and
VINP officials are looking forward to presenting a great educa-
tional and inspiring program this year as well.
Before setting a new date, VINP management will confer with
school officials in order to maximize attendance by students.
The VINP officials wish to thank all who look forward to this
program for their understanding. For more information contact
VINP Ranger Denise Georges at 776-6201, ext. 239.

Whale Watching Feb. 27 and Mar. 7
The Environmental Association of St. Thomas/St. John will
host its annual whale watch on three days in February and March.
The all-day sails will be on Sunday, February 27 and March 7,
aboard the catamaran KeKoa. Eco-guides will be aboard to edu-
cate participants about whales, dolphin, sea birds and other marine
life. A snorkel and swimming stop, including a discussion of what
can be done to help stop the spreading of lionfish in local waters
will be made available as well.
Tickets are $55 for members and $65 for non-members and can
be purchased at Dockside Bookstore at Havensight Mall, Barefoot
Buddha Cafe and Red Hook Plaza.
Participants are to meet at the Red Hook Ferry Dock at 8:30
a.m. the day of the sail. For details, call 774-1837 or 777-7190.

GHS "Culturalypso" Set for March 5
Gifft Hill School announces "Culturalypso," a school-wide
community carnival, on Saturday, March 5, from 2 to 4 p.m. There
will be free activities, a bouncy house and food for purchase avail-
able. Call 776-1730 for information.







St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011


St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Jaime Elliott


When arriving on St. John, visitors and locals are
greeted by a tall beige fence surrounding Frank Powell Sr.
Park which also blocks the sidewalk, forcing pedestrians
into the street.


Frank Powell Sr. Park Renovations Fence In Sheila's Pot


Continued from Front Page
delivered to Liburd until January
31, she was asked to relocate her
vending business no later than
February 5.
"In an effort to assist you in ac-
quiring another location to conduct
your vending business, an alterna-
tive site in the vicinity of Nature's
Nook has been identified and
recommended," Williams wrote.
"Thank you for your cooperation
in this matter. Any inconvenience
is deeply regretted."
Liburd, however, had no inten-
tion of relocating. Instead, when
word spread of her imminent clo-
sure, a petition circulated across
St. John and garnered more than
300 signatures to keep Sheila's Pot
open in its current location.
"I got five days notice to pack
up and leave," said Liburd. "This
is my busy season and my liveli-
hood. They want me out of the
park."
No resolution was reached and
Liburd had no choice but to watch
her vending business be blocked


St. John Tradewinds
V.I. Police Department of-
ficials on St. John arrested two
persons on separate assault
charges last week.
One suspect threatened a vic-
tim and the other case involved
domestic violence.
Victor Rosa, 31, was arrested


"They want me out of the park...When you
are in a place for 10 years, it is supposed to be
grand-fathered in. This year will be 32 years I
am here, November 8."
- Shelia Liburd,
owner of Shelia's Pot food stand


off by the fence on February 7.
On February 14, Governor John
deJongh visited St. John for meet-
ings and Liburd approached him
with her petitions.
"I talked to the governor for a
short while, but he didn't really
say anything," said Liburd. "We
were going to talk more when he
got out of the meeting. But I didn't
see him again."
Several phone calls from St.
John Tradewinds to Government
House requesting comment went
unanswered last week.
Renovations to the park are
needed and part of the work en-
tails burying underground utilities,


explained St. John Administrator
Leona Smith.
"The park is being renovated
and everyone had to be out of the
park," said Smith. "You can't be in
there when they are doing the un-
derground electricity. The renova-
tions are long-needed and it's the
first thing you see when you get
off the boat."
The park's central Cruz Bay lo-
cation, is exactly why renovations
should have been planned for off-
season, according to St. John hom-
eowner Ronnie Lee.
"Why are they doing this now
at the height of season?" he asked.
"It just doesn't make sense."


just before 3 a.m. Tuesday, Feb-
ruary 15, and charged with Ag-
gravated Assault and Battery,
Domestic Violence for grabbing
his wife by the shirt and slapping
her in the face. Bail was denied
due to the domestic charge.
Buster Brady, 50, was arrest-
ed shortly before 8 p.m. Mon-


day, February 14, and charged
with Third Degree Assault for
threatening a victim with a ma-
chete. Brady's bail was set at
$25,000.
Both suspects were remanded
to the Bureau of Corrections
on St. Thomas pending further
court action.


The government's failure to
give Liburd adequate notice is
"terrible," Lee added.
"To shut her down virtually
overnight is awful," he said. "I
think it's terrible. She has been
around for so many years with lo-
cal flavor and has been frequented
by locals and tourists."
"Sheila belongs in the park,"
said Lee.
When Liburd's attorney Henry
Smock tried to express those senti-
ments to Commissioner Williams,
however, he was informed of sev-
eral "areas of concern" regarding
the location of Sheila's Pot, ac-


2011

RAIN DATA
at Trunk Bay



January
0.80 inches

Average
3.17 Inches

Total YTD
0.80 Inches

Average YTD
3.17 Inches


cording to Liburd.
"This is not just for four months,
this is for ever," said Liburd. "They
want me out of the park perma-
nently."
After three decades in business
in the same location, and with her
strong faith, Liburd believes that
everything will work out, she ex-
plained.
"I believe in God and have faith
that something will be worked
out," Liburd said. "When you are
in a place for 10 years, it is sup-
posed to be grand-fathered in. This
year will be 32 years I am here,
November 8."




INDEX
Church Directory ............... 18
Classified Ads ... ........... 19
CommunityCalendar ...........20
Crossword Puzzle ............. 20
Ferry Schedules ............... 18
Historical Bits & Pieces ........2
Letters ......................... 14-15
Police Log ........................ 17
Real Estate .................. 21-23
Rhythm & Views ............... 13



Thursday, Feb. 24th



340-776-6496



editor@tradewinds.vi


Rosa and Brady Arrested on Assault Charges






4 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011


St. John Tradewinds News Photos by Triopical Focus


VIiVA! Vi fis, Inc.
Providing Professional
Property Management,
& Short-Term Rentals
on St. John for
over 10 years
Loca4d at Boulon Clmer
on the 3rd ROOt
(Next to oIp'n Markel)
(340) 77M.42A5
ww.VlVcaAftlonm.com


H d St. John


Hardware
AT THE MARK ETPLAC E
Plumbing Fixtures. Electrical Supplies. Power Tools
Paint Supplies & Custom Paint Colors
Pool Supplies . ART Supplies . Gardening Supplies
PH: 693-8780 FAX: 776-6685 Mon-Fri 7 to 5 Saturdays 8 to 12


Couples gathered on Trunk Bay beach at sunset, above, on Valentine's Day to renew
their vows during the ninth annual Celebration of Love.



More Than 125 Couples Renew Vows


at Valentine's Day Beach Celebration


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Valentine's Day on Love City
brings bouquets of roses, oversized
stuffed animals, balloons and hun-
dreds of people to Trunk Bay for
one simple reason - to reaffirm
their love.
For the ninth year in a row,
Cathy and Billy Dove and the is-
land's barefoot minister Anne Ma-
rie Porter hosted more than 125
couples in a Celebration of Love
vow renewal ceremony on Mon-
day, February 14, on Trunk Bay
beach.
In total more than 2,000 years
of marriage were represented on
the alabaster sands of Trunk Bay.
The Doves, who moved to Florida
last year, weren't about to miss the
event and added their 39 years of
wedded bliss to the tally.
"I'm here because where else
would I be," said Cathy Dove. "I
love this. We have been renewing
our vows for the past nine years
and it feels as good now as it did
back then."
The Celebration of Love was
started in 2003 when a friend of


Love City's barefoot minister Anne Marie Porter, above,
led the vow renewal on Trunk Bay beach on February 14.


the Doves suggested they take ad-
vantage of their 30 anniversary to
renew their vows.
"We were celebrating our 30th
anniversary and a priest friend
said, 'Why don't you renew your
vows,'" said Dove. "I told Anne
Marie and we thought it might be
a good opportunity to show the
youth of the island that marriage
is important to everyone. As we


continued talking about, we came
up with this idea of a Celebration
of Love."
From the first gathering nine
years ago which drew 70 couples,
the number of participants has
steadily grown, with this year's
event drawing the biggest crowd
to date. Locals and visitors alike
- many of whom plan their vaca-
Continued from Back Page






St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011


St. John Arts Festival 0





_4T









St. John Arts Festival




*1' s~ s ^ ^ ^ '
C ^; �^ ,^ , �� ^ < ^ g /....


11th St. John Art Festival Unveils New

"Mini Expo" Format at VINP Ball Field


St. John Tradewinds
The llth Annual St. John Arts
Festival, which kicks off this week,
will host its music, food and crafts
events in the V.I. National Park ball
field instead of the little Frank Pow-
ell Sr. Park.
With this transition comes a
whole new look of the arrangement
of booths into "Expo Islands" of five
booths each, surrounding a raised
band stand and each with a flying
pennant to create a festive atmo-
sphere.
Unlike previous years, there is a
broadening of types of exhibits this
year to include high-quality glass,
pottery and hand-woven fabrics from
Maho Bay artists. Their participation
was not possible with the cramped
spacing of booths in the little park.
Also, special exhibits from senior
citizen crafts people and schools will
have their own "islands."
It is amazing how what seemed to
be a blah, desert-like venue at first


sight with no shade, has been trans-
formed into a promising Mini St.
John Expo, thanks to the help and
cooperation of Department of Public
Works St. John Deputy Director Ira
Wade and St. John Deputy Director
of Sports, Parks and Recreation Hu-
bert Muscoso.
The novel "exhibition island"
concept of exhibition booths togeth-
er with a large shade tent for visitors
is going to be fantastic.
Caribbean Food and Crafts Exhi-
bition will take place all this week in
the V.I. National Park ball field from
10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Caribbean Mu-
sic Concerts are scheduled through-
out the week as well from 12:30 to 4:
30 p.m. Inner Visions play on Mon-
day, Echo People on Tuesday, Koko
and the Sunshine Band on Wednes-
day, Sambacombo on Thursday and
Musical Vibrations on Friday.
St. John School of the Arts is host-
ing a special student performance on
Monday night, February 21, from 6


to 9 p.m. St. John Film Society is
screen "Taking Root: The Vision of
Wangari Maathai" on Tuesday night
at 7:30 p.m. at SJSA.
Stop by Cinnamon Bay archeol-
ogy museum on Thursday, February
22, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. for a look
at "Taino Heritage" featuring a time-
line of artifacts and a film depicting
the migration of Tainos from South
America to the Caribbean islands.
Art galleries across the island
will host daily shows of fine paint-
ings, sculptures, jewelry and ceram-
ics. Many restaurants throughout St.
John will feature live music for the
week as well. Schedule on page 11.
Printed St. John Arts Festival pro-
grams are available at Connections
in both Cruz Bay and Coral Bay.
This is a whole Inac% look" show
and the only Arts Festival in the
U.S. Virgin Islands. Do not miss this
unique festival celebrating the is-
lands and learn about the true culture
of the people - it's very special.


NEW Roulette


4( Southland

\" Gaming


PAYING EVERY DAY!
Sunday 4pm - 12am M
Monday through Thursday, 12pm - 12am r es ponsibly
Friday & Saturday, 12pm - lam














Home of Josephine's Greens
Landscape Design/Installation
Irrigation & Maintenance


We Offff a 1wIiqm seiLC6M) Of 2 10 6
bedmroo villas, all viih spectacular
vke, an% l1~e pioKt Each villa is
fullyJ fur= ic.i~uiia go.urnict
hIIhc aind P 1c It* t fliq ,pvii aiir Irwpi-
eal fciiigof the isb . ist I 1 & wiler
txii service, fre~ rental~s, tock~ii& greet-
ing. ride he1 and housekeeping are

Grialng unfwrgttlable muwiumi
since 1"~6.

Visii outweb sue r cm21 usios eleci
�our private -Island Getaiwv.-


r e s t a u r a n t
open 7 days a week
693.7755 or www.latapastjohn.com


Seaview Vacation Homes, Inc.

ShortTerm-Full Service Since 1985
VACATION VILLA MANAGEMENT
24 years of on island rental service

e: info@seaviewhomes.com
w: www.seaviewhomes.com
t: 340-776-6805; toll-free 1-888-625-2963


I ~'


~


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Abicycle safety rodeo hosted by
the VI. Police Department's Com-
munity Integration Team (CIT) on
Saturday, February 12, intended to
make children safer riders, but also
raised concerns among the island's
competitive adult bikers.
"The goal was for the kids to
learn safety rules of the road for
bicycles," said Linda Bechstein,
St. John CIT chairperson. "Our
original report was that kids out
in Coral Bay were running with
cars on the road with their bicycles
and we wanted to stop that. The
intention was to make children
riding bicycles safe and to be hon-
est I didn't even think about the
adults."
CIT, VIPD officers and offi-
cials from the Bureau of Motor
Vehicles (BMV) gathered in the
Coral Bay ball field first and then
took the rodeo to Cruz Bay at the
V.I. National Park ball field. The
day was also intended to raise
awareness about laws regarding
bicycles, which stipulate the need
for license plates, warning signals,
reflectors and more.
A total of about 30 children at-
tended both rodeos, of which only
two were able to get their bicycles
inspected. The other children were
turned away because they didn't
have the required safety features
and licensing requirements.
All bicycles must be registered
with BMV, to the tune of $15 each
per year, and must feature a bell or
horn attached to the frame of the
bike, a light on the rear of the bi-
cycle and a license plate. The chil-
dren who were unable to get in-
spected were turned away because
they didn't have all of the equip-
ment, Bechstein explained.
A lot of what is needed is rela-
tively inexpensive," said the St.
John CIT chairperson. "But they
are not available on St. John, so
you have to go to St. Thomas. We
have discussed as a group obtain-
ing some bells and horns and mak-
ing them available to people who
can't afford them or offer them at
a discounted rate."


St. John Tradewinds News Photo Courtesy of VIPD


VIPD Sgt. Clayton Browne (center) and Bicycle Officer


Earl Mills (right) give a young
instructions.

CIT has urged VIPD to enforce
the long-ignored laws after a two-
month grace period to give riders
a chance to comply, explained
Bechstein.
Children are also not allowed
to ride on public streets under the
age of 12 without adult supervi-
sion, according to the V.I. Code.
Children were able to complete an
obstacle course, after which they
were given bicycle helmets cour-
tesy of the St. John Accommoda-
tions Council.
Adult competitive bicyclists,
however, might even have a more
difficult time complying with the
decades old V.I. laws.
"I think it's a great idea for
kids and I'm all for safety proce-
dures," said one rider, who wished
to not be identified. "But for adult
riders there are quite a few of us
with high-tech racing bikes and
trying to comply with this law is
going to be difficult to impossible.
These laws were written 20 years
ago and bike designs today are
so high-tech, when you put these
things on it that aren't supposed to
be there, it could affect the perfor-
mance of the bike and the safety of
the rider."
"There might not even be room
enough on new bikes to put all of


St. John rider safety


the equipment required," said the
bicyclist.
Updating the bicycle safety law
might be the way to go since the
existing law also doesn't address
what is probably the most danger-
ous element of bike riding today,
according to the St. John cyclist.
"A new law, reflective of 2011
bikes and concerns, could include
something like no headphones,
which is a major safety concern,"
said the rider. "That would be
more sensible than making every-
one get a license plate and a light.
I'm all for trying to comply with
safety regulations, but the regula-
tions should be realistic and up-to-
date, and the existing law isn't."
The day did give children an
opportunity to interact with VIPD
officers in a positive environment,
according to Bechstein.
"As a whole, a lot of the day was
just about children being comfort-
able talking with police officers
and having a friendly conversa-
tion with them," said Bechstein.
It \ as about being instructed how
to do the right thing instead of be-
ing told they were doing the wrong
thing."
CIT members will focus next on
preparing for a summer activities
fair in May, Bechstein added.


RYAWWWWOW


tllying America's Paradise
.KT/ t/ ir/YFe1thT/I r (. ItT '//*r r


888-693-7676 iill frn-
340-693-7676 tel 340-693-8923 fax
Sww.islandgelawaysnic.comI
kathv(i islandzglamsinc.con


fduitom geLw2o1JEz/

iY 1 Supplier of wholesale and retail embroidery
Hats - Polos - Tees - Bags
Logos - Monograms - Stock and custom designs
Visit our Factory Outlet retail store:
Town & Country Center 7
Coral Bay, St. John 7 9 4


6 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011



Safety Takes Center Stage at Bicycle


Rodeo Hosted by CIT and VIPD

- Only 2 of 30 Participants Pass Inspection







St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 7


Threatened by Development, Future of Haulover Hangs in Balance


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
More than three acres of pris-
tine land on the East End could be
the site of major development, or
be preserved for future generations
and the St. John community could
help determine which becomes re-
ality.
The 3.6 acres are spread over
four parcels of land located on
both sides of the narrow Haulover
isthmus on the East End. The east-
ern portion of the land abuts V.I.
National Park property and is lo-
cated close to the V.I. Coral Reef
National Monument.
South Haulover beach, on
Round Bay, is on one parcel of the
property, and the stunning snor-
keling spot on North Haulover on
Dreekets Bay, is on another parcel
of the land in question.
The wetland habitat on the land
is a significant resource to protect
and there could be archaeological
significance as well, according to
Rafe Boulon, V.I. National Park
Chief of Resource Management.
"The wetland habitat there is
pretty important to protect and we
we've neer done any archaeologi-
cal studies there so there could be


"The park is tied up right now - along with Friends of VINP and
Trust for Public Land - with getting the various Maho acquisitions
funded, which is a multi-year commitment they've already made.
They do not feel they can start the process of requesting funding for
Haulover for at least a few more years."
- Rafael Muilenburg,
Attorney for Family Properties Caribbean LLC (FPC)


pre-history ruins in the area as
well," said Boulon.
While the property doesn't ac-
tually abut the V.I. Coral Reef
National Monument, it's proxim-
ity means any development on the
land would certainly impact the
fragile area, Boulon added.
"That is a significant nursery
reef habitat and there are impor-
tant sea grass beds that would
certainly be impacted by develop-
ment in the area as well as the park
on the north side of the property,"
he said.
The land is owned by Family
Properties Caribbean LLC (FPC)
a long-time client of Morrisette
and Muilenburg LLP, Attorneys at
Law. The land is zoned R-2 (resi-
dential medium-density), which


allows for two dwelling units per
quarter-acre. The developers have
expressed an interest in applying
for a Group Dwelling permit to get
the "highest and best use" of the
land, according to Attorney Rafael
Muilenburg.
"Various people have been
looking at these parcels, with sev-
eral showings recently, including
certain stateside developers," he
said. "Zoning of all the parcels is
R-2, so we believe that the 'high-
est and best use' (and the likely
form of development) would be to
construct at least 20 condominium
dwelling units - up to 28, given
that there are 3.6 acres with two
dwellings potentially allowed on
each quarter acre."
"The condo units would prob-


ably be clustered on the hill adja-
cent to the VINP-facing east, prob-
ably using a group dwelling permit
as permitted by DPNR regula-
tions," said Muilenburg. "Parking
and other amenities (tennis courts
possibly) could go on the flat land
adjacent to the trail up to the north
beach. Needless to say, for those
who love Haulover in its natural
state, this would not be a great out-
come."
FPC, however, is looking to sell
the property, Muilenburg added.
"The seller has recently dropped
the market price of the Haulover
parcels from approximately $3
million down to $1.9 million," said
the attorney. "We believe some-
thing is likely to happen soon on
this that will forever remove the


possibility of conservation."
To avoid a new condominium
development on St. John, FPC
principal David Prevo is willing to
sell the land for conservation at the
discounted price of $800,000, ac-
cording to Muilenburg.
"David is a longtime fan of the
Park, and is intrigued about the
benefits for FPC's nearby devel-
opment at Dreekets Bay of dedi-
cating this piece as conservation
property," Muilenburg said. "As
such, FPC would be willing to sell
it for conservation at the amount
they paid for it about 10 years ago,
plus property taxes and other costs
incurred, approximately $800,000
total, which is half or less of the
likely market price."
FPC can't afford to just donate
the land to V.I. National Park and
in turn the VINP's hands are tied
due to the Estate Maho Bay acqui-
sition, Muilenburg explained.
Two years ago the national non-
profit Trust for Public Land raised
the money needed to purchase the
400-plus acre Estate Maho Bay -
the largest expansion of the park
since its inception more than 50
years ago - to eventually sell to
Continued on Page 16


Rudy's Branched Coral Designs
Bracelets Rings Earrings Jackets Necklaces
18k gold 14k gold sterling
with and without diamonds


R&I PATITN goldsmithing
Mongoose Junction
776-6548 pattongold.com


Renew your Spirits


RcIIIAciatc VI I F Ixiilv A-ml l. Iiiiii'll Olt.
Sl, ml .1 I i I Sl l l i' lpa wl rlll







* ivl'isll [Inl'k ll ad li|i p lvt 1 l\ a III-IN
on spa treatments

For more information, please call
340.693.8000, ext 1903/1904.

This is how it should feel."

THEWESTIN
ST. JOHN
RESORT & VILLAS


Spa Services Discounts are available to residents of the US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico with valid ID. ID must be presented when making
appointment. Valid 6/01/09-10/31/09. �Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. All rights reserved. Westin is the registered trademark of
Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc., or its affiliates.







8 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011



Kalousek Takes Over Reins of St. John Community Foundation


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
The St. John Community Foundation has a new helms-
woman.
After serving as the group's resource developer since
March 2010, Celia Kalousek officially took over the group's
reins on Monday, February 7. Former SJCF executive direc-
tor Paul Devine, who led the group for three years, stepped
down on February 4.
"I decided to retire," said Devine. "I tried to retire before
I took the job and then decided to do it. I went into it with
my feet dragging a little but after the first few months it was
one of the best jobs I've ever had."
Devine led the group following former SJCF director
Carole DeSenne's passing and helped the organization grow
both in its volunteer base and programs.
"I really enjoyed building the community foundation up
from what it was before," said Devine. "We didn't have too
many programs going and now we have 12 major programs
and we continue to grow."
Handing over leadership to Kalousek will ensure the con-
tinued growth of SJCF, Devine added.
"Celia is so professional and experienced and her abilities
are tremendous," he said. "We're blessed to have her taking
over the position and she's really going to make SJCF even
better."
Devine is transitioning to the SJCF board of directors,
which also counts Lonnie Willis, Senator at Large Craig
Barshigner, Harry Daniels, Jessica Richards-Daly, Ronnie
Jones, Leslie Smith, Rob Crane, Oswin Sewer and Alecia
Wells among its ranks.
Kalousek has been working with and supporting local
non-profit organizations for years, having most recently
launched the organization Community Service Involvement
in order to revamp volunteer requirements in high schools.
"All local high schools require a minimum hour of volun-
teer time in order for students to graduate," said Kalousek.
"In 1998 the requirement was 500 hours and then in 2003
they dropped that to 100 hours because kids were having a
really hard time meeting the requirement."


St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Jaime Elliott

Celia Kalousek

"In 2009 we hosted a non-profit expo to put everyone
together," said the SJCF executive director. \\ lui \ C found
out was that the non-profits weren't ready for the students,
so we began training the non-profits to handle the students
and keep them engaged. We're already seeing a lot of im-
provement there."
Kalousek has also worked closely with COAST, a lo-
cal substance abuse prevention group, as well as the Island
Green Building Association. Collaborating with various
island organizations is exactly the trend Kalousek plans to
foster at SJCF.
"My two main things are promoting volunteerism and be-
ing a volunteer coordinator," she said. f11 \ c know you want
to volunteer, we can farm you out to whatever organization
needs you. We are not operating in a vacuum and we don't
want to duplicate what another organization is doing, but we
can support their efforts with volunteers and resources."
SJCF's programs like Dial-A-Ride and aluminum can re-
cycling will also be boosted under Kalousek's leadership.
"We're focusing on growing the programs we have going
already," she said. "For Dial-a-Ride we now have a commu-
nity bus and have been expanding our route. Our recycling
efforts are being expanded into a full Go Green Initiative


through which we are collaborating with other island orga-
nizations in order to expand the entire island's environmen-
tal programs."
The new executive director of SJCF is in the process of
obtaining her Master's Degree in educational psychology
at the University of the Virgin Islands. Her studies at UVI
relate directly to her work at SJCF.
"One of my professors is the director of United Way in
the Virgin Islands and my research project will be turned in
as a grant request as soon as the class wraps up," she said.
Kalousek is also focused on getting the community more
involved in directing the community foundation, she add-
ed.
"We really want to hear what the public wants as far as
programs and plans for the future," said Kalousek. "I see a
lot more collaboration as far as working with the commu-
nity. We have so many talented and willing people on this
island and if we focused that, we could achieve amazing
results."
SJCF's annual meeting is scheduled for Monday, March
28, at the Fish Trap Restaurant. A dinner will be hosted at
6 p.m. with the meeting kicking off at 7 p.m. and the com-
munity is invited.
"Come to dinner or the meeting or both and tell us what
is important to you," Kalousek said. "We have two and a
half acres at Bellevue where we're planning to build a com-
munity center and we just got a grant to clear the area. We
have so many ideas of what we can do there, but we want to
know what the community wants."
Kalousek is keeping the organization's website, www.
sjcf.org, up to date and residents can register to volunteer in
any area of interest right on the site. For Kalousek, volun-
teering is something intrinsic to a healthy community.
"It's simple - be a part of the change you want to see
happen," she said. "We all have something to give. Even if
all you have is time, that could be really valuable to some-
one else."
For more information about SJCF or to volunteer, call
Kalousek at 693-9410 or stop by the office on the third floor
of The Marketplace.


PROP) P]K]INGTM

LANDSCAPE DESIGN & INSTALLATION

Need a landscape design or just refreshing deck plants?
We can work with your budget!
Beautiful tropical plants arriving weekly.
Call us with your plant needs.
Get a tour and review our portfolio of satisfied clients.

Tel. 340-643-6348
www.propertykingusvi.com * lonski@propertykingusvi.com
Fax 340-715-3313
You've tried the rest... now hire the BEST!


licensed architect
AIA member
NCARB certified


professional design
and
development services



mongoose junction, po box 1772
st. John, us virgin Islands 00831
tel (340) 693-7665, fax (340) 693-8411
barefootarchitects.com


ATTENTION ST. JOHN HOMEOW NERS

HIRING PROFESSIONALS
TO MAINTAIN YOUR HOME IS
4 NOT AN EXTRAVAGANCE
&IT IS




CONTACT THE PROFESSIONALS AT


St. John's Premier Property Management
Company Providing:
COMPREHENSIVE MAINTENANCE
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
GUEST SERVICES
i.'41h "l " - - .1i 1s ' l -11 I ,lu l. l in . ' ini III I . llllll.. i a. n ll. hn .nii
I'It I l.. 3" 1 l..lin. \ [1 1l111%31 1 lunl .lia % ( ..nllplk - ( ui/ Il..\
































"Peace at Dusk" by Bob Schlesinger, featured photographer at GHS' 25th Annual Auction.


GHS Marks Silver Anniversary


of Annual Auction; Full Night


of Fun Is Planned for March 12


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Gifft Hill School officials are
gearing up to celebrate a milestone
at their annual auction on Satur-
day, March 12, at the Westin Re-
sort and Villas.
The night marks the silver an-
niversary of the annual auction to
support the island school, which
began as the Pine Peace School 33
years ago. That small school grew
into today's kindergarten through
12th grade GHS, following a
merger with the Coral Bay School
in 2004.
The March 12 auction will hon-
or the school's founding members
while raising money for the GHS
scholarship fund, upon which 60
percent of the student body relies,
according to Molly Murrill, GHS'
development director assistant.
"First and foremost we are hon-
oring the founding families of Pine
Peace School which was started
33 years ago," said Murrill. "Ja-
net and Andy Rutnik, Donald and
Debbie Schnell, Dorothy and Peter
Muilenburg and Viktor and Anna
Johansson were the families which
started it all."


The theme of the 25th annual
auction, which kicks off at 5:30
p.m. with cocktails and a silent
auction, is "Honoring Our Past,
Celebrating Our Future." The
event will keep guests entertained
throughout the night with a live
auction and a few exciting games.
The silent auction will give
guests a chance to bid on a bevy
of items, from original paintings
to handcrafted birdhouses. Fea-
tured artists this year include John
Dickson, Les Anderson, Janet Rut-
nik, Bernice Shaller and Lisa Etre
among others. The night's featured
photographer is Bob Schlessinger
of Tropical Focus, who has pre-
pared a wide range of images
highlighting his diverse talent be-
hind the lens.
Darron and Hope Mares, from
Mares Auction Group, will be back
again this year leading the live
auction which includes a number
of enticing travel packages, jew-
elry and more. The night will also
feature a screening of Steve Si-
monsen's video about GHS, which
the renowned local photographer
unveils each year at the event.
"Steve's video is also a high-


light of the night," said Murrill.
"It really hits home the point of
why we are raising money for the
school."
Last year's auction raised
$140,000 and GHS officials are
hoping to top that on March 12. To
reach their goal, school officials
have games and raffles planned for
the evening.
Tickets for the auction are $125
each and tables of 10 are available
for $1,000. GHS officials are urg-
ing guests to pre-register with their
credit cards and contact informa-
tion to avoid long lines at the en-
trance, Murrill added.
"Guests who pre-register their
tables will enjoy the discounted
table price of $900," Murrill said.
"It's just a little incentive to get
people to pre-register so we don't
have those lines piling up when
guests arrive."
Last year's popular game the
"Wall of Wine" is back again.
GHS secures donations of bottles
of wine - last year the "wall"
featured 100 bottles - and then
plays a "last man standing" type
of game.
Continued on Page 16


St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 9


1 A D P T U FT
5W A F1D VII GER


WAGWEAR

ON SALE
HIGHER QUALITY PET COLLARS,
LEADS, IREATS, PORTING WEAR
AND MIH, AIUCH MORE.

340.777.9588
w w .S OHNIn fALS.. COu


Gold Addy Award ST. JO HN
Best Magazine Design I . J
magazine


It's ALL Good!

Casual Dining in the Gracious Courtgards
of Mongoose Junction


Join us[or Lunch 14:30 Doily

Dinner i served 5:1900 pm Weekdays

HaPPV Hour 2/1 plus S Of Beers4:2(130

Established and Aspiring Musion, Wednesday Night lam 0 10:30

Free Wireless.t.rnel r our Guests


Senring5t. Jokn





Sun Dog Cafe
Z"-'Ifw To Go Orders 695-8-+0 menus: sundogcafe.com


10 1"W IN wf &oM
U 'UE AmE lvi P) L






10 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011


V.I. RC&D Council Seeking Students

for 2011 Georgia Conservation Camp


St. John Tradewinds
The V.I. Resource Conserva-
tion & Development Council, Inc.
(V.I. RC&D) is seeking 10 Vir-
gin Islands' high school students
between the ages of 15 and 18 to
attend the 2011 Natural Resourc-
es Conservation Workshop from
June 5 to 9, at the Abraham Bald-
win Agricultural College in Tifton,
Georgia.
The week-long conservation
camp is usually only open to Geor-
gia students; but through the spon-
sorship of V.I. RC&D and the VI.
Urban Forestry Council, over 48
USVI students have participated
in this valuable and unique learn-
ing experience since 2003.
V.I. RC&D is looking for youth


who are mature and interested in
the natural sciences and/or agri-
culture. Students selected to par-
ticipate will be exposed to various
natural resources: soil; water; air;
plants; minerals; and animals.
Student applicants must be be-
tween 15 and 18 years of age, but
not a graduating senior at the time
of the camp. Students must fill out
a registration and medical applica-
tion form, provide copies of valid
insurance and proof of citizenship
with photo ID (e.g. valid pass-
port), and submit a one-page essay
describing their interest in natural
resources and/or agriculture and
why they wish to participate in the
conservation camp.
Information on the conservation


Sun Power Loans for


Solar Water Heaters


camp and application packages are
available from the V.I. RC&D Of-
fice, located in the Merrill Lynch
Building in Gallows Bay, or by
calling the office at 692-9632 x. 5.
Application packages can also
be downloaded from the VI.
RC&D website at www.usvircd.
org. The application deadline is
March 31. Additional information
on the Georgia Natural Resources
Conservation Workshop and the
Abraham Baldwin Agricultural
College is also available at www.
abac.edu/psbo/nrcw/.
This project is generously
funded by a grant from the VI.
Department of Agriculture Urban
& Community Forestry Assistance
Program.


U U


Virgin Islands
Energy Office
www.vienergy.org


St John Tradewinds News Photo Courtesy of V.I. Audubon Society


This year's V.I. Audubon Plant Sale has been moved
from its usual home in Frank Powell Sr. Park, above, to the
Nazareth Lutheran Church.


V.I. Audubon Plant Sale To Be

March 5 at Lutheran Church


St. John Tradewinds
The V.I. Audubon Society has
been raising money for the past 13
years through its plant sale.
The funds are used to spon-
sor numerous programs for local
school children on St. John, pres-
ervation and restoration efforts at
the Small Pond at Frank Bay - a
Virgin Islands-designated Wildlife
and Marine Sanctuary and area ad-
opted by the Audubon Society -
and participate in events on Earth
Day and Reef Fest hosted by the
Friends of the V.I. National Park.
This year's plant sale will be on
Saturday, March 5, from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. at the Nazareth Lutheran


Church in Cruz Bay.
Once again Audubon will offer
a wide variety of plants for sale.
Anyone looking to add palms, co-
leus, bay trees, desert rose, agaves,
ground covers, orchids and other
garden favorites to their land-
scapes, should make sure to stop
by the plant sale. Tomato plants
and herbs will also be for sale.
Anyone who would like to do-
nate plants (plants in pots only,
please) for the sale, just drop them
off at the church yard on March
5 between 8 and 9 a.m. For fur-
ther information contact co-chairs
Dave Spoth at (716) 472-6888 or
Mary Moroney at 779-8091.


2011 Summer Food Program
Applications Available
The V.I. Department of Education's State Office of Special Nu-
trition Programs announces the availability of the FY 2011 Sum-
mer Food Service Program (SFSP).
School age children two years through 18 years may receive
free meals through SFSP. Persons 19 years of age and over who
have been identified to have a mental or physical disability, as de-
termined by a State or Local Educational Agency, and who partici-
pates during the school year in a public or private non-profit school
program established for the mentally or physically disabled, is also
eligible to receive meals.
Any public or non-profit organization interested in obtaining a
Sponsor Application Package or more information may contact the
State Office of Special Nutrition Programs at 774-9373.


* No money down

* Low Interest loan

o Up to $2,500

in rebate



Don'tpay to heat Your Water; do it free, use the

sun.Contact the Energy Office at 713-8436 on St.
Croix and 714-8436 on St. Thomas or visit the web-

site at vienergy.org for more information


Using solar makes


for a cleaner, greener


Virgin Islands.







St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 11


Join Eddie Bruce and Friends

sfor Drumming Showcase on Thurs-
The community is invited to come out and join Eddie Bruce and
friends in a weekly drumming showcase at Cinnamon Bay amphi-
theater on Thursday evenings starting at 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Friends of V.I. National Park, the weekly show-
case highlights drumming, dancing and more with audience partic-
ipation always welcome. Great fun for the entire family awaits at
Cinnamon Bay amphitheater, each Thursday night through April.


Fire Service Revokes Burning Permits

VI. Fire Service's Fire Marshal Leon Battiste notified the pub-
lic last week that effective Monday, February 14, all previously
issued burning permits were revoked.
There will be no issuance of new burning permits throughout
the St. Thomas/St. John district until further notice. Residents are
urged to be mindful of dry weather conditions and circumstances
which make burning rubbish at this time extremely hazardous.
Battiste apologized for any inconvenience.




St. John Arts Festival

Restaurant Live Music Series


Saturday, February 19
6 30pm-9 30pm Skinny Legs, Hot Club of Coral B
6 30pm-9 30pm Morgan's Mango, Luba
7pm-10pm Rhumblines, Lauren
Sunday, February 20
10am-2pm Miss Lucy's Brunch, Sambacomi
10am-1 pm Concordia Brunch, Bo
3 30pm-6 30pm Aqua Bistro, Lauren
6 30pm-9 30pm Shipwreck Landing
Hot Club of Coral Bay
6 30pm-8 30pm Ocean Grill David Laabs
Monday, February 21
6pm-9pm Ocean Grill Chris Carsel
6 30pm-9 30pm LaTapa, Sambacombo
7pmrn-10pm High Tide, Steven Sloan
7pm-10pm Rhumblines, David Laabs


a




b


Tuesday, February 22
6 30pm-9 30pm Morgan's Mango, Greg Kmslow
7pm-10pm Island Blues, Lauren and Bo
7pm-10pm High Tide, T-Bird
7pmrn-10pm Shipwreck Landing, Chris Carsel
Wednesday, February 23
5 30pm-7pm Coconut Coast Studio,
St. John Flutes
7pm-10pm Island Blues, James Cobb
7pmrn-10pm High Tide, Chris Carsel
7pm-10pm Sun Dog Cafe, Open Mike
Thursday, February 24
6pm-9pm Banana Deck, Lemuel Callwood
6pm-9pm Miss Lucy's, Rich & Gregg
6 30pm-9 30pm Skinny Legs, Lauren
6 30pm-9 30pm Ocean Grill, Rascio
6 30pm-9 30pm Morgan's Mango, Mark Wallace
7pmrn-10pm High Tide, Steve Sloan
Friday, February 25
5 30pm-8 30pm Aqua Bistro, Mark Wallace
6pm-9pm Ocean Grill, Luba
6 30pm-9 30pm Morgan's Mango, Lauren
7pm-10pm High Tide, John Lee
7pm-10pm Skinny Legs, Chris Carsel


y String Swing Vocals
Piano Vocal
Guitar Vocal

0 Latin Jazz
Guitar
Guitar Vocal

String Swing Vocals
Classical/Contemp Guitar

Guitar Vocal
Latin Jazz
Guitar Vocal
Classical/Contemp Guitar

Guitar
Guitar Vocals
Guitar Vocal
Guitar Vocal


Flute Duet
Guitar Vocal
Guitar Vocal
Guitars Vocals

Steel Pan
Jazz
Guitar Vocal
Steel Pan
Guitar Vocal
Guitar Vocal

Guitar Vocal
Piano Vocal
Guitar Vocal
Guitar Vocal
Guitar Vocal


League Keeps St. John Youth Playing Flag Football

By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds .
After six years of enjoying flag football in a league - -
hosted by the St. John American Legion, local youth "'I - ', -
were in danger of sitting on the sidelines this season.
As squeals of laughter from a group of boys gath-
ered at the Winston Wells ball field can attest, that
is no longer the case. Da Football League is in full
swing and the four teams already have two games .-
under their belt. Launched by Kent Wessinger, the
league is formatted to mirror the men's flag football
league, which was created by Brummel Germain.
"I was playing catch with my son one day and
within 15 minutes, all of a sudden 25 kids were here St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Jaime Eli
wanting to play," said Wessinger. "I sat up in the
bleachers watching and I really felt this fragrance of Wessinger, center, launched Da Footba
despair. The garbage was overflowing, there were rats League to keep island 8- to 12-year-olds (
around and these kids had nothing to do." the field, instead of the sideline.
"I knew I had an opportunity to help and give life
to these kids," Wessinger said. Da Football League will also play its playoff a
Now that scent of despair has been replaced with superbowl games when the men's football leag
laughter and the sounds of football practice and does in the last week of April. Practices are Wedn<
games. Da Football League, for youth between 8 and day from 4 to 5:30 p.m.
12, has four teams, modeled after the men's league. Each team has three coaches, one adult and t
The Junior Bulldogs, Jr. Wildcats, Jr. Boondocks and high school students, who are getting volunteer hoi
Jr. Storm square off on Tuesday and Friday afternoon toward their graduation requirements. Other th
at 5 and 6 p.m., just before the men's games, which Wessinger, Germain, Sergio Adams and Ganson P
start at 7 p.m. lack are also adult coaches.
"I wanted to make sure the kids felt like they were While the league keeps the kids playing, it al
important," said Wessinger. "The kids play two games helps them to dream big.
before the men's games start. The field is chalked and "I just like to play football," said Kyriq Browne
there are people in the stands and the PA system is sixth grader at JESS and member of the Jr. Wildca
on." 1 want to be a quarterback when I grow up."


liott

II
on


nd
ue
es-

wo
irs
an
ol-

so

, a
its.


Starfish M A R ET - K


YoLtr 1B-est Cioice for Prov " * _

If you are in need of provisioning for villas, hotels, marinas or boats, let Starfish Market
and Starfish Gourmet & Wines supply your customers or cater your next event.


We DELIVER.
Our full service supermarket offers Choice Cut Meats, Fresh Seafood, huge
variety of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables, a full service Deli with a Prepared
Foods department and an on-site Bakery where breads and pastries are baked
throughout the day making them always fresh!

You can easily get what you need at Starfish Market.
Starfish Gourmet & Wines has the largest selection of Wines, Liquor and Beer
on island at a good price and un-matched personal service. Compliment your
beverages with gourmet cheeses, appetizers and snacks. Come on by to speak
to us about your special order needs.

Both Starfish Market Store Manager Nedra Ephraim at 340-779-4949 or
Starfish Gourmet & Wines Manager Paul Tsakares at 340-715-3663 will
happily accommodate your provisioning needs.

Starfish Market - Located at the Marketplace
Open Every Day 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.


Starfish

MARKET









STARFISH
GIULull It WlI S


aZ



b,







12 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011


Roundaboutat right took
the second regatta of the
season, Island Hopper, 1
hosted by The St. John
Yacht Club.
. . - �


-_ -? - _ -- . -
St. John Tradewinds News Photo
Courtesy of Jim Furneaux - - ' --.


Roundabout Takes Second Straight


Regatta in Winning Island Hopper


By Jim Furneaux
St. John Tradewinds
The St. John Yacht Club's Island Hopper regatta
winner, Paul Stoeken of St. Thomas, skippered his
JC-24, Roundabout to a second straight victory in
convincing fashion Saturday, February 12.
In January, Stoeken and his crew won the club's
Duke's Trophy Race.
The regatta experienced perfect sailing weather for
most of the race with 12 to 15 knot winds in three
to four foot seas. The participants were however sub-
jected to a passing storm late in the race which tested
the racer's mettle.
The start between Two Brothers rocks and Lovan-
go Cay was very competitive but Roundabout took an
early lead by the first mark at Rata Rocks. Zing and
Southbound vied for second as the fleet sailed back
down past Lovango, Mingo and Grass Cays and then
around Thatch Cay.
As the sailor's approached the west end of Grass
Cay, Zing's skipper George Stuckert took the aggres-
sive approach of passing between Boss Rock and


Grass Cay to put the vessel securely in second place.
Stuckert's move was somewhat daring as Boss Rock
is notorious for the number of boats that have come a
cropper on its well hidden danger zone.
The fleet then sailed back up around Carvel Rock
then back down around Grass Cay and finally past
Stephens Cay to the finish in front of Gallows Point.
The course measured a total of 17.5 miles.
The final result was Roundabout in first, Zing in
second and Larry Boxerman's Southbound was the
third boat. Roundabout's skipper, Stoeken, a sailing
instructor from St. Thomas, was presented the Bill
Morris Trophy by Lee Morris, widow of the late past
St. Yacht Club Commodore for whom the trophy is
named.
The next St. John Yacht Club regatta is the Around
St. John Race currently scheduled for April 10. The
organizers are considering switching the date to Sat-
urday, April 9, and hope to hear from racers about
their preferences.
For more information call SJYC Commodore Scott
Barnett at 693-8577.


Junior Achievement Program

To Be Discussed at Next STJ

Chamber Chapter Meeting

Feb. 22 at Cruz Bay Battery

St. John Tradewinds
Cheryl Francis, Junior Achievement of the Virgin Islands
Chair, (and the Lt. Governor's wife); Jason Charles, Project Man-
age, Bonny Corbeil, JAVI Board Member, and Pastor Themba,
Acting JAVI Executive Director, will be making a presentation at
the monthly meeting of the St. John Chapter of the St. Thomas/St.
John Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday, February 22, from 5:30
to 6:30 p.m. at the Cruz Bay Battery.
The Junior Achievement of the Virgin Islands (JAVI) Program
is designed to introduce students to the principles of budgets,
taxes, savings and spending. Through experience-based learning
with professional development programs and volunteers from the
community, students learn about the relationship between educa-
tion and successful participation in the economy.
JAVI Programs partner with local businesses and Educators to
teach students the economics of life.
The St. John business community is invited to hear about this
exciting program and to consider being involved as either a JAVI
Program volunteer or help the program "grow" JAVI for other
class levels and skill building.
At present they have two 7th and 8th grade classes slated to be-
gin at Julius E. Sprauve School soon, with their ultimate goal be-
ing to reach out to all of the children and offer these much needed
skills at other levels.
"Please consider the great impact you can make as a St. John
business person for our children's future success," said chamber
board member Kate Norfleet. "They hope to not only educate our
St. John community on the great need for this program for our
children but to get business people 'on board' to consider being
directly involved in doing the programs in the classrooms."
"There is only a six week/one-and-a-half-hour direct time com-
mitment in doing this, and JAVI does a great training session that
is both informative and fun," said Norfleet. "A sample training
kit will be available and training will happen on St. John when
enough volunteers have signed up. The St. John Chapter looks
forward to seeing you on Tuesday."


4ROBERT CRANE
S ARCHITECT, A.I.A.

P.O. BOX 370
CRUZ BAY, ST. JOHN
U.S.V.I. 00831



(340) 776-6356


Serving Breakfast & Dinner
Outdoor Dining Overlooking Salt Pond Bay


Call Us for Seasonal Hours
340.693.5855
St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands


Breakfast Served: 8:00-10:OOam
Happy Hour: 5:00-6:00pm
Dinner Served: 6:00-9:00pm













L Rhythm & Views
An outlook on young adult interests and concerns
L by Coral Breuning


An Amazing Class Trip to Italy


St. John Tradewinds
I recently came back from a
school trip to Italy with the Gifft
Hill School. It was truly amazing!
The sights were fantastic, the food
was incredible and the people were
friendly and interesting.
St. John is an exotic place to live
but Italy is right up there on the list
of amazing places in the world. We
spent 11 awesome days exploring
Venice, Florence and Rome.
I vividly remember flying in
to Venice. Soaring over the in-
credible snow-capped mountains
which penetrated the sky below is
an image I will never forget. The
Venice airport was small and a
little dreary, but dreary was soon
outweighed by the sights that we
passed on the water taxi on the
way to our hotel.
Now don't get me wrong, you
don't take a water taxi every-
where; you actually do a lot of
walking. There are endless steps
and cobblestone streets. But it was
great to get away from cars, be re-
sponsible for your own transporta-
tion and work off all those calories
from the delicious food.
In Venice, we stayed at a quaint
hotel that had everything you need-
ed. From the hotel, we explored St.
Marks Square and the Ducal Pal-
ace. The palace had the most in-
credible art I have ever seen.
How would feel if you had gold-
flaked ceilings? Well just standing
under them made me feel special.
I couldn't imagine being the artist
laying horizontal for hours upon
hours to create it. We saw the
Grand Canal and some churches
too.
The buildings were fantastic
and the true Italian food was also
incredible. American food has
nothing on Italian; even the Coca-
Cola was better there. The gelato,
like ice cream only richer and bet-
ter, was so good. We spent many
days gelato hunting throughout the
trip. It was so delicious!
Florence was our next stop,
which was a nice change. The
temperature was warmer and the


St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Coral Breuning


The sights in Venice, above, were truly awe-inspiring.


sun greeted us as we stepped off
the fast train. Our hotel was almost
in the center of the bustling town,
making it easy to explore all day.
The first thing we absolutely
had to see was the Duomo. It's
pretty hard to miss a large tower-
ing dome above the middle of the
city. Florence was the place to
shop, and especially for leather in
particular. In parts of the city, an
aroma of leather wafted through
the streets and the smell of rich
food accompanied it.
A big part of Florence was the
David, the famous sculpture, as
well as the Uffizi Galleries, a mu-
seum of various art forms and art-
ists. The Pitti Palace and Boboli
Gardens were also impressive. All
were truly amazing, really simply
mind-blowing.
The last city we visited was also
the biggest, Rome. Rome was huge
compared to the previous cities
and busier too. Our first site was
St. Peters Cathedral. The inside of
the cathedral was so amazing; the
art on the walls which looked like
paintings were really mosaics. It
was intense to see how this huge
amount of small squares was as-
sembled to make a single master-
piece.
After St. Peters, we went to-


ward the bridges in search of food;
the sun was starting to set and the
lights were just coming on in the
city. We had a great meal followed
by the best gelato on the trip. I have
never seen so many flavors in one
store. I spent at least five minutes
deciding on what flavor to try.
The next day in Rome we vis-
ited the Vatican where we spent
endless hours looking at all the art-
work. I never knew how amazing
"art" could be. The Coliseum and
the Pantheon were also interesting
places to visit. Rome was a great
city to experience.
If I could go to Italy again, I
would go in a heartbeat. There was
so much to do and so many places
to explore. The culture was intrigu-
ing and the people interesting and
friendly. I can't even come close
to really explaining how amaz-
ing it was, you have to experience
yourself. I miss the food and sights
already, I can't wait to go back.
Editor's Note:
This is Coral's final column for
St. John Tradewinds, at least un-
til next year The Gifft Hill School
student is now off in the icy clime
of Wisconsin where she is attend-
ing a semester ofschool. Meet our
new student "Rhythm and Views"
writer next month.


St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 13



N A :s.. *
Paitigs colae orgnlpit


18adScaPi4



ABSOLUTE BEST DEAL ON ST. JOHN!
Breathtaking panoramic
views of BVI, Hurricane Hole
and Coral Bay from this high
elevation, downhill-build
parcel, in quiet, upscale
neighborhood of Upper
Carolina. Paved road access,
deeded beach. Sacrifice at
$169K. Seller financing with
great terms! e-mail Carl at
cjnpc@optonline.net
or call 516.459.6480.




SST. JOHN
r - magazine

2010 Gold Addy Award
Magazine Design






02/19/1957- 1228/2005


Your name,
your love,
your
wisdom,
your spirit

lives on.


Lowe Dwainet Ange*a Chisdtuna BrymeJadmn and Constaucs


(b4o) 774169B







14 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011


WHAT DO YOU


THINK?

Send your letter to editor@tradewinds.vi
NEXT DEADLINE:
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24TH



.. 1-800-222-TIPS (8477)
Collect Rewards In Cash
STOPPERS USVI Help Our Community be Safe



Keeping Track of Crime

2010 2011-TO-DATE
Homicides: 0 Homicides: 0
Shootings: 0 Shootings: 0
Stabbings: 0 Stabbings: 0
Armed Robberies: 1 Armed Robberies: 0
Arsons: 0 Arsons: 0
1st Degree Burglaries: 3 1st Degree Burglaries: 0
2nd Degree Burglaries: 22 2nd Degree Burglaries: 2
3rd Degree Burglaries: 70 3rd Degree Burglaries: 2
Grand Larcenies: 67 Grand Larcenies: 6
Rapes: 0 Rapes: 0


Crossword Answers - Puzzle on Page 20

SWABS BAABAA T AC I MAX
C I L I A ALBERT H BO GORE
OTTO I BLOTCH ERN OT I S
WHAT Y SOUTH I NKAGATHA
LAR IATS I RON ORC
CHR IST 1 ESHOULDHAVE
A SP AT LAS TO WNE ALLOW
CLASP EM 1 R I EWE
T I T LEDADETECT I VENO V E L
SMEARON DEED SHE L L
THATHADTODOWITH


Letters To St. John Tradewinds


Fourth Graders Put On an Amazing Production


The St. John School of the Arts Broadway Comes
to St. John event on Friday was an exciting success.
The performance by the 4th graders from our island
schools, Gifft Hill, Guy Benjamin, Julius E. Sprauve
and the students from the School of the Arts had the
audience cheering at both performances as we raised
over $30,000 for the school!
The 52 students who worked for two weeks learn-
ing acting, singing, dancing and puppetry under the
tutelage of five Broadway performers, Laura Barnao,
Donna Drake, Michael Shawn Lewis, Rhonda Miller
and John Tartaglia, made the original musical produc-
tion "Dream, Wish, Believe" a rousing success. We're
more than grateful to the performers who willingly
gave both their time and the money for their expenses
and transportation to St. John.
We're indebted to Mike Ryan, the general manager
of the Westin Resort and Villas, for making the entire
evening possible and to Donald Sussman, our Super
Star Angel. We're grateful, too, to the 100 Angels
who contributed $200 each to attend the performance


and "dine-around."
We're especially indebted to the seven restaurants
who, not only wined and dined our "Angels" but gra-
ciously sacrificed income from the general public to
make the dine-around possible. Our heartfelt thanks
to La Tapa, Lime Inn, Morgan's Mango, Ocean Grill,
Rhumb Lines, Waterfront Grill and Zozo's. All of us
on the Board of Directors at St. John School of the
Arts urge the readers of Tradewinds to do what we
are going to do by patronizing these seven restaurants
throughout the year.
It's the one way we can say a real and big Thank
You to the restaurants that literally "stepped up to the
plate" to give our St. John youngsters a meaningful
educational experience.
If you were among the hundreds who saw the
show, we hope you'll join us next year for an equally
exciting production.
Ronnie Lee, Vice President
On behalf of the Board of Directors
St. John School of the Arts


Throwing Out the Baby with the Bath Water


I am writing about the highly inappropriate, heart-
less manner, which the St. John Animal Care Center
Board members have practiced with regard to the em-
ployment change of Ms. Connie Joseph.
With all due respect ladies and gentlemen, have
you board members lost your minds? The St. John
ACC is not the first organization to realize a need to
embrace technology, and it won't be the last. If a de-
termination was made to modify or eliminate a posi-
tion, as was apparently made last fall, there was no
need to wait until months and months later, then sud-
denly walk in to a person's work place and fire that
person on the spot.
This type of termination, and it was a termination,
should be reserved for an employee whose perfor-
mance is very highly unsatisfactory. If there was no
longer funding to pay for a manager, then why was
Connie not simply laid off?
Also, how could such a hasty action benefit the
homeless animals of our island, much less their car-
ing, dependable, loyal keeper? Why not hire an IT
consultant on a contract, or on a part time basis, to get
the ball rolling in a new direction?
Why not temporarily cut back the manager's paid


hours, until additional funding is secured on-line, or
via other means? These options could have at least
been discussed with the manager, before walking in
and firing her in the course of her routine work day.
Yes, it is no secret to any of us that Connie has
health challenges. However, many of us do, right?
What has always impressed me is the fact that she
still gets all of her duties done; day in and day out, no
matter what it takes.
Connie does not have a lazy bone in her body; she
knows the people of this island, and she cares about
the welfare of our animals. It would take at least two
able bodied people to replace her, and I am not sure
they would be willing to stick with it, once they have
to face the unpleasant realities, including the type of
physical abuse of our animals which Connie has to of-
ten face, and which the legal system mostly ignores.
St. John Animal Care Center Board Members -
you have thrown out the proverbial baby with the bath
water. You have also alienated many of the center's
supporters. Please re-think your decision before it is
too late.
Very Sincerely,
Susan Mann


ST LE E NN A 0 E BAE Mathayom Private Chefs Crew Makes Friends Gala Delicious


REA ROE ERAT EIKI NG
UTNE N E EDA AS EAT N EH
M A NY NV EN M E MEMBERS
EAT ANTI STEELIE
iA N DTH[EN THE RE Wa ER E N U N S
SCAR I N E D I SON DONUT
AMMO NYE MUSTNT ERASE
WEEP GAL S P EAKS DARES


Mathayom Private Chefs would like to thank all of
our stellar staff who so generously donated their time
and efforts towards making this year's Friends of Vir-
gin Islands National Park Gala such a huge success:
Chef Steve Yerger, Chris Keefer, Jose Sanchez,
Adam Raftery, Chef Erica Miner, Fletcher Kelley,
Amanda Arquit, Kaete Billipp, Christian Doyle,
Sarah Swan, Lindsey Soper, Meaghan Enright, Mike
Gargoulio, Dane Tarr and Micah Miksch.


Waterfront Bistro and Baked in the Sun for provid-
ing desserts.
A special thanks to Jeremy King of Low Key Dive
Shop and Jaana Martin for providing the means to get
actual Roti wrappers from Tortola.
We could not have done it without you! Thanks for
looking good and making us look good, too.
Mathayom "Mat" Vacharat
Mathayom Private Chefs






St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 15


Letters to Tradewinds


It's Time for Leaders To Get To Know
the St. John Community
Where are the leaders of this community and what are they thinking?
Last week's Tradewinds was very interesting. There was an article
and a letter from a visitor about a cop roughing up a lady for not wearing
her seat belt properly, under the "Make every visitor feel special" sign.
So the leaders of the community corrected the problem, by removing
the sign.
On the next page was the article about Frank Powell Sr. Park being
closed and fenced off for the rest of the season. What it didn't say was
the sidewalks around the park were going to be fenced off also.
So now our leaders are proposing to have hundreds of people every
hour getting off the ferry and walking in the road, amongst the cars,
trucks, safari buses and Vitran buses while dragging suitcases.
We are in a very fragile economic environment and not only are our
leaders proposing to raise the gross receipts tax and the room tax and
force us to pay two years of property taxes in one year, but they are
making it very difficult to maintain a visitor based-business on St. John.
Which is the only kind of business that we have.
The timing of this project not only affects the small businesses that
set up in the park, and the businesses adjacent to it, but it affects every
business on St. John. I suggest either putting this project off until after
St. John Festival or moving the ferry operation to the Creek dock until
the project is completed, soon come.
I think that it is time that the leaders of this community get out amongst
the people and get to know this community, see how it functions and start
to try and make it better.
Greg Miller


February Is Dental Health Month in V.I.


St. John Tradewinds
Governor John deJongh proclaimed the month of
February as "Dental Health Month" in the U.S. Virgin
Islands, a time to concentrate on efforts to promote
dental health education.
Good physical and mental health can be achieved
through healthy habits learned early and practiced
throughout life, including regular dental care. The
American Dental Health Association advises main-
taining dental health by eating well, practicing good


hygiene and getting regular check-ups. Good dental
health habits are essential to one's overall well be-
ing.
The Virgin Islands Department of Health, through
its Division of Dental Health Services, annually marks
the observance of Dental Health Month by conducting
dental health screenings, examinations, public educa-
tion and related activities in the territory's schools.
The future of the territory is dependent on the good
health of our children, the leaders of tomorrow.


Onesie the Cat Is Missing

After maintaining a feeding station in Estate Susanaberg for a decade,
an island cat lover has lost one of her beloved kitties.
The grey and white neutered male island cat, Onesie, has not been
seen for three weeks and her human and cat friends are worried. Onesie
is a timid elderly cat. He has a very close cat friend who has been terribly
depressed since he has gone missing.
He might have been trapped and relocated on accident. Anyone who
has spotted Onesie or knows of his whereabouts is asked to contact the
St. John Tradewinds at 776-6496 or email editor@tradewinds.vi.
Onesie and his friends thank you!


Correction:
The phone number of the Julius E. Sprauve School, listed in
the February 7-13 issue of St. John Tradewinds was incorrect. The
school's phone number is 776-6336. Tradewinds apologizes for
the error.







16 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011


GHS Auction Silver Anniversary
Continued from Page 9
"Guests get into the game by purchasing $50
chances - last year they were the flashing lights
- and play a heads or tails game which whittles
down the audience little by little until there are
four or five people left," said Murrill. "Then the
games continues until there is only one person left
standing, and that person wins the 'wall.'"
The school made a lot of money on last year's
Wall of Wine because the winner, Dustin Prud-
homme, turned around and donated the wine right
back to the school, Murrill added.
"Ultimately we were able to auction the wine
off in a live auction and raised a lot of money for
the school," she said.
Residents are encouraged to donate bottles of
wine for the game. Starfish Wine and Gourmet
will donate 10 percent of the purchase price of
wines for the GHS auction right to the school's
scholarship fund, Murrill added.
Another game at the auction will allow guests
the chance to take home a stunning diamond and
silver necklace from R&I Patton. Guests can pur-
chase $25 glasses of champagne, fine wine or spe-
cialty cocktail in order to get a raffle number, and
have a chance to win the necklace.
The popular golden ticket from last year is
back again as well, Murrill added.
"Golden tickets are $100 each and when you
purchase a ticket you are given a list of the travel
packages which are going to be auctioned off,"
said the GHS development director assistant.
"Last year we had about 15 items on the list and
the golden ticket winner is able to choose which
travel package they want. Then we don't auction
that item off and the winner gets it."
"The packages can be valued at up to $5,000,"
said Murrill. "Last year Jonathan Doran won and
he chose the Beaver Creek trip so we didn't auc-
tion that off."
After the festivities at the Westin wrap up, GHS
officials are taking the fun over to La Plancha del
Mar in Mongoose Junction, for an after party and
a chance to raise even more money for GHS.
"We're having the after party this year at La
Plancha del Mar; we'll have a DJ, a few more
raffle prizes and we'll dance the night away," said
Murrill. "We're sort of toting this as a party and
you don't have to be an auction guest to attend.
Auction guests will have free entrance, and we're
asking the public to make a donation in order to
join the party."
The night would not be possible without the
generosity of the Westin Resort, which is the
event's biggest sponsor, Murrill explained.
"Westin is our biggest supporter with the lo-
cation, the food and the staff," she said. "We
couldn't do this without them."
The auction is GHS' main fundraising event
of the year and comes together thanks to a team
of hardworking parent volunteers. GHS is still
accepting donations for live and silent auctions.
Call the school at 776-1730 to pre-register, pur-
chase golden tickets and to donate.


Future of Haulover

Hangs in the Balance
Continued from Page 7
VINP, Muilenburg explained.
"The park is tied up right now -
along with Friends of VINP and Trust
for Public Land - with getting the vari-
ous Maho acquisitions funded, which
is a multi-year commitment they've al-
ready made," said Muilenburg. "They
do not feel they can start the process of
requesting funding for Haulover for at
least a few more years."
With that road a dead end, Muilen-
burg and FPC have been pursuing a
different route to getting the resources
at Haulover protected. Muilenburg and
Prevo have been working with another
national conservation group, called The
Conservation Fund, to acquire the land
for eventual transfer to VINP.
A boundary adjustment by VINP -
which it does not have the funding to
implement - is the first step, Muilen-
burg added.
"Without the boundary adjustment,
TCF cannot buy the parcels, since they
are not yet in the park's system for funds
allocation, and they need to get assur-
ance of prompt repayment," said the at-
torney. "A real 'catch-22' and the clock
is ticking for development."
Which is where the community
comes into the picture. Muilenburg has
outlined a conservation land structure
in which supporters would essentially
make zero-interest loans or outright do-
nations to TCF, which would then use
the funds to buy Haulover from FPC.


"We have proposed a structure in
which interested residents, the 'Friends
of Haulover,' would make donations
or zero-interest 'conservation loans,'
through the nonprofit group we've been
working with, TCF," said the attorney.
"TCF then would use the money to buy
the property and hold it until the VINP
buys it, at which point the loans to the
St. John supporters would be repaid us-
ing the VINP funds."
"Or we may be able to 'buy out' the
loan people if we get more donations
later on," Muilenburg said.
The proposal's advantages include
TCF's national prominence, its ability
to take over responsibility for liability,
insurance and other expenses and its
501c3 status - allowing a tax deduc-
tion for donations - and avoiding the
need to form a new entity, explained
Muilenburg.
The proposal, however, relies on the
future assurance of VINP's commitment
to purchase the land and then repay the
loans.
"The VINP will issue us a letter of as-
surance stating their intent to purchase
the property, acknowledging that the
investors are relying on the park's as-
surance, and stating that Haulover will
be the park's top priority for funding
once the Maho purchases are funded,"
said Muilenburg. "The park believes
that would likely take five to 10 years,
though officials cannot commit to a defi-
nite period."
"This would need to be a medium- to
long-term commitment, but the money
will eventually be repaid," said the at-
torney. "If the VINP should fail to fol-


low through, TCF would be able to sell
it to a conservation buyer to get funds to
repay the loans.
Muilenburg is looking for substantial
donations - $100,000 or more - from
residents interested in preserving Haulo-
ver. So far the local attorney has raised
about $200,000 and is hoping to attract
more donors.
"We are hoping for donations or loan
commitments in the range of $100,000
or more to make this happen, and to pre-
vent the group from becoming too large,
which makes coordination unwieldy,"
Muilenburg said. "But we will consider
smaller amounts if needed. In addition
to loans, we are hoping some people
will be able to donate funds - the ad-
vantage there is that they would receive
a tax writeoff for the amounts donated."
"So far we have $200,000 in commit-
ments toward the $800,000 needed," he
said. "Of that $100,000 is in loan funds
an the other $100,000 is in donations."
Muilenburg is working as the threat
of development inches closer with the
opportunity to preserve a special piece
of St. John hanging in the balance.
"This is a chance to really make a dif-
ference for the VINP and for St. John,"
said Muilenburg. "I'd imagine we could
get the VINP to erect a bench or plaque
on the site honoring those who have
been financially involved. But the sat-
isfaction of keeping Haulover natural
and undeveloped would be the biggest
reward."
To contribute toward the conservation
of Haulover or for more information on
TCF proposal, call Muilenburg at 693-
8255 or email rafo@stjohnvilaw.com.






St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 17


David Dorney Will Be Guest Speaker

at UU's February 27 Sunday Service
The Unitarian Universalists of St. John meets at 9:45 a.m. each
Sunday in the Great Room at Gifft Hill School.
On February 27 the guest speaker is David Domey, whose talk is
titled, "Enough' ain't near enough." For transportation from Cruz
Bay, call 776-6332. Childcare is available upon prior request. For
more information, visit www.uufstjohn.org.

ACC Sets New Shelter Visiting Hours
The Animal Care Center of St. John announces new hours for
the shelter. Visiting hours at ACC's shelter are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tuesday through Saturday. The shelter is closed Sunday and Mon-
day. For more information call the ACC at 774-1625.

Annual Plant Sale Set for March 5
The V.I. Audubon Society will host its annual plant sale on
March 5, at Nazareth Lutheran Church.
Mary Moroney and Dave Spoth are chairing the plant sale this
year. One gallon pots are needed, and can be dropped off at Elaine
Estern's studio. The group is trying to propagate more native and
non-invasive plants to sell this year.
With that in mind, anyone who has Bay Rhum trees, any edible
fruit or vegetables potted, are asked to donate these to the sale.
Spoth will also be propagating some vegetables and ornamentals
for the sale and orchids will be ordered.

25th Annual GHS Auction March 12

The 25th Annual Gifft Hill School Auction will be Saturday,
March 12, at the Westin Resort and Villas. For more information
call the GHS development office at 340-776-1730 or email ghsde-
velopment@mac.com.

Two Film Screenings Set for March 15
St. John Film Society is hosting a free film screening and a spe-
cial tribute on Tuesday, March 15, at 7:30 p.m. at the St. John
School of the Arts.
A Tribute to Annie Love will start at 7:30. An eight-minute film
by Jeremy Garza and Trent Myers, which documents the event
which took place at Rhumb Lines in memory of Annie Love on
June 6, 2009.
"Heart of the Sea," a 57-minute film by Lisa Denkera and Char-
lotte Lagarde. The film is a portrait of Rell "Kapolioka'ehukai"
Sunn, who died in 1998 of breast cancer at the age of 47.

Intermediate Bookkeeping Course

To Begin March 29 at UVICELL
The University of the Virgin Islands - Community Engagement
and Lifelong Learning Center will be offering a course for indi-
viduals interested learning bookkeeping in order to function as an
entry-level bookkeeper or manage their own books.
On St. Thomas, Intermediate Bookkeeping will be from 6 to 9
p.m. on Tuesdays and Wednesdays beginning March 29. All ses-
sions will be at the UVICELL Center on St. Thomas.
Participants will learn how to prepare basic financial statements,
journalize and post accrual, reconcile a bank statement, prepare
payroll and much more.
For more information or to register, call the UVICELL Center at
693-1100 or visit cell.uvi.edu.


No Parking Exception




With the new "No
Parking" signs clearly
erected in the Cruz
Bay roundabout, at
91 left, it seems there is
an exception for some
vehicles as this photo,
snapped by a reader,
attests.


.- ... -.-- _ _ ---
S- St. John Tradewinds News Photo



Police Log



Friday, February 11 post office. Auto accident. Leader Jurgen Command and
9:11 p.m. - An Estate Grun- 6:13 p.m. - An Estate Power later transported to the Bureau
wald resident p/r that her land- Boyd resident r/ a disturbance, of Corrections on St. Thomas.
lord turned off the water in her Disturbance of the peace. 8:56 a.m. - A citizen r/ an
apartment. Landlord/tenant dis- 6:43 p.m. - A Coral Bay resi- auto accident in the area of Es-
pute. dent r/ an auto accident in the tate Pine Peace. Auto accident.
10:17 p.m. - A Calabash area of Cocoloba. Auto acci- 1:51 p.m. - A citizen p/r that
Boom resident p/r that he was dent. he was threatened in the area of
assaulted by a female tenant. 7:07 p.m. - A Coral Bay resi- Coral Bay. Disturbance of the
Simple assault, dent r/ that he was assaulted. As- peace, threats.
11:00 p.m. - An Estate Little sault in the third. 5:04 p.m. - A citizen r/ an auto
Plantation resident p/r that her 10:30 p.m. - Badge #98 p/ at accident in the area of South
vehicle was struck while driv- Leander Jurgen Command with Shore Road near the Bureau of
ing on Centerline Road. Hit and one Buster Brady of Estate Lit- Motor Vehicles. Auto accident.
run. tle Plantation under arrest and Wednesday, February 16
Saturday, February 12 charged with assault in the third. 9:23 p.m. - Badge #747 p/
3:04 a.m. - A citizen c/r a Bail was set at $25,000 by order at Leander Jurgen Command
male and female fighting on of the court. He was detained at with one Irvin Marsh under ar-
Maho Bay. Disturbance of the Leander Jurgen Command and rest and charged with delaying
peace, D.V. later transported to the Bureau and obstructing an officer in his
3:31 a.m. - An Estate Power of Corrections on St. Thomas. duties. Bail was set at $500 by
Boyd resident r/ that her neice 9:06 p.m. - A citizen r/ a order of the court. He was de-
destroyed her door. disturbance in the area of Dol- tained at Leander Jurgen Com-
3:15 p.m. - An Estate Grun- phinMarket. Disturbance of the mand and later transported to
wald resident c/r that her land- peace. the Bureau of Corrections on St.
lord turned off the water in her Tuesday, February 15 Thomas.
apartment. Police assistance. 1:13 a.m. - A citizen r/ that Thursday, February 17
8:17 p.m. - An Estate Enighed she was assaulted at Guinea 2:20 p.m. - A citizen p/r an
resident c/r that her peace was Grove Apartments. Aggravated aggravated assault and battery,
disturbed. Disturbance of the assault and battery, D.V. D.V Aggravated assault and
peace. 2:45 a.m. - Badge #515 with battery, D.V
Monday, February 14 Unit 431 p/ at Leander Jurgen 5:14 p.m. -An Estate Enighed
7:20 a.m. - V.I. Fire Service Command with one Victor Rosa resident c/r a disturbance with
r/ damage to a vehicle at the of Guinea Grove Apartments her brother. Disturbance of the
Cruz Bay station. Damage to a under arrest and charged with peace.
vehicle, aggravated assault and battery, 5:20 p.m. - A citizen p/r an
4:43 p.m. - A citizen r/ an D.V No bail was set by order auto accident in the area of The
auto accident in the area of the of the court. He was detained at Marketplace. Auto accident.








18 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011


CRUZ BAY TO RED HOOK
Every hour on the hour from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m.

RED HOOK TO CRUZ BAY
Every hour on the hour from 6 a.m. to 12 a.m.

CRUZ BAY TO DOWNTOWN CHARLOTTE AMALIE

Leaves Cruz Bay Leaves Charlotte Amalie
8:45 a.m. 10 a.m.
11:15 a.m. 1 p.m.
3:45 p.m. 5:30 p.m







St. John Tradewinds



Business Directory


Accommodations Jewelry
Caribbean Villas & Resorts R&I PATTON goldsmithing
tel. 1-800-338-0987 Located in Mongoose Junction
or locally 340-776-6152 776-6548 or (800) 626-3445
Chat@pattongold.com


Island Getaways
888-693-7676, islandgetaway-
sinc.com
kathy@islandgetawaysinc.com

Suite St. John Villas/Condos
tel. 1-800-348-8444
or locally at 340-779-4486

VIVA Vacations
tel. 779-4250
P.O. Box 1747, STJ, VI 00831


Landscaping
Alfredo's Landscaping
tel. 774-1655 cell 513-2971
P.O. Box 91, St. John, VI 00831

Coral Bay Garden Center
tel. 693-5579 fax 714-5628
P.O. Box 1228, STJ, VI 00831

PROPERTYKING
tel. 643-6348
T A ; & ITi


Architecture p .
Crane, Robert - Architect, AIA
tel. 776-6356 Propert1y Mgmt
P.O. Box 370, STJ, VI 00831 Cimmaron Property
Management
Barefoot Architect, Inc. tel. 340-715-2666
tel. 693-7665 fax 693-8411 St. John's Premier Property
P.O. Box 1772, STJ, VI 00831 Manager


i- Seaview Vacation Homes, Inc.
Banking tel. 340-776-6805; 888-625-2963
Scotiabank www.seaviewhomes.com
#1 Mortgage Lender in the VI
The Marketplace (340) 776-6552 Real Estate

American Paradise Real Estate
Beauty/Spa tel. 693-8352 fax 693-8818
Westin Resorts & Villas P.O. Box 8313, STJ, VI 00831
Spa Services info@americanparadise.com


tel. 693-8000, ext. 1903/1904


Construction
St. John Hardware
tel. 693-8780 fax 776-6685
Located at The Marketplace


Insurance
Theodore Tunick & Company
Phone 775-7001 / Fax 775-7002
www.theodoretunick.com


Cruz Bay Realty
tel. 693-8808 fax 693-9812
P.O. Box 66, STJ, VI 00831
info@cruzbayrealty.com

Debbie Hayes, GRI
tel. 714-5808 or 340-642-5995
debbiehayes @debbiehayes.com
www.stjohnvirealestate.com

John Foster Real Estate
tel. 714-5808 or 340-642-5995
debbiehayes @debbiehayes.com
www.stjohnvirealestate.com


Holiday Homes of St. John
tel. 776-6776 fax 693-8665
P.O. Box 40, STJ, VI 00831
info@holidayhomesVI.com

Islandia Real Estate
tel. 776-6666 fax 693-8499
P.O. Box 56, STJ, VI 00831
info@islandiarealestate.com

John McCann & Associates
tel. 693-3399 fax 888-546-1115
Located at Wharfside Landing
www.RealEstateOnStJohn.corn


Restaurants
Concordia Cafe, 693-5855
Happy Hour 4:30-6pm
Dinner 6-8:30pm Tues-Sat

Fish Trap Restaurant
and Seafood Market
tel. 693-9994, Closed Mondays

La Tapa Restaurant
tel. 693-7755
Open 7 Days a Week

Skinny Legs
"A Pretty OK Place"
tel. 340-779-4982
www.skinnylegs.com

Sun Dog Cafe
tel. 693-8340
Located at Mongoose Junction


Retail
Saltwater Gypsy Consignment
(340) 244-8888
Located in The Lumberyard

St. Johnimals
Island Pet Outfitter
340-777-9588
Located at Wharfside Village


Services
C4th Custom Embroidery
tel. 779-4047
Located in Coral Bay


Continued from Page 2
dren. One of whom was Henry A. Million, a
successful businessman and the 3rd elected
VI. Lieutenant Governor.
Lucinda Sewer Millin began her teaching
career with the Moravians in 1910 and then
taught at the Naval Academy. The move to
the Naval Academy was not a simple shift to
a new administration but a major upheaval
and total change in the basic education sys-
tem - European to American.
The first naval governor, J. H. Oliver,
reported to the Secretary of the Navy on
August 1, 1917, that the current education
system was inadequate. There were no trade
or agriculture schools. A large proportion of
the children here grow up without hope of
improving their lot in life.
Admiral Oliver further reported there
was little money in the Colonial Treasury
to support the Moravian schools responsible
for education outside the towns. And finally
monies must be provided to build schools,
buy furniture and equipment, and hire and
pay instructors.
Doctor Isaac Dookhan in "A History of
the Virgin Islands," states that "the great-
est achievement of the naval administration
was in the field of education."
The governor provided all of the above
improvements. In addition, there was an im-
proved American curriculum with greater
emphasis on junior and senior high school
education.


Mrs. Million worked in the new public
schools until 1923. She then established her
own private school where she educated Vir-
gin Islanders for 35 years. In 1954 at a time
in life when most are considering retirement,
she changed careers, to become the first
woman elected to the Virgin Islands Legis-
lature. She served five terms until 1964.
In my opinion her greatest legislative
achievement was the establishment of a
home for the aged. She was widely respect-
ed and admired and used these talents to ca-
jole her fellow senators into approval.
In recognition of her outstanding contri-
butions to and concern for the elderly, the
institution was named the Lucinda Millin
Home for the Aged. Thus her concerns for
the most valuable segment of our people,
our youth and elderly, were the focus of her
life.
Those concerns are now the focus of her
granddaughter and the daughter of Henry A.
Million, Senator Janette Millin-Young. She
has begun her legislative career on a posi-
tive note by getting to know one of her con-
stituency, the education system.
The Culture responsibilities of her Com-
mittee represent the glue that holds together
the young and old. It represents that neces-
sary link between our future and the mean-
ingful heritage that gives our society its
critical anchor. Senator Millin-Young has a
tough job ahead of her but she has the cul-
tural heritage to see it through.


Chrc Dietr I


Baha'i Community of St. John
For Devotions and Study Circles,call 714-1641
7:30 p.m. Friday; Study Circles 9 a.m. Sunday
776-6316, 776-6254

Bethany Moravian Church
11 a.m., Sunday School 776-6291

Calvary Baptist Church
13 ABC Coral Bay, 776-6304
Sunday School 10 a.m.,
Sunday evening 6 p.m., Thursday 7 p.m.

Christian Ministry
Cinnamon Bay Beach
Inter-Denominational, Sunday 8:30 a.m.

Christian Science Society
10:45 a.m. Sunday- Marketplace
Wednesday Testimonials
7:45 p.m. on last Wed. of Month

The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints
Sun. 9 a.m., on St. Thomas . 776-2379
Sun., 5 p.m., STJ, Lumberyard

Cruz Bay Baptist Church
Sunday 11 a.m., 6 p.m. 776-6315

Emmaus Moravian Church
Coral Bay, Sun. 9 a.m. 776-6713

Jehovah's Witness
7:30 p.m. Tuesday; 7 p.m.
Saturday (Espafol), 10 a.m. Sunday, 340-715-0530


Missionary Baptist Church
9:30 a.m. Sunday Services, 10:45 Worship,
Tuesday 7 p.m. Bible Study 693-8884

Nazareth Lutheran Church
Sunday 9 a.m., Sunday School 8 a.m.
776-6731

Our Lady of Mount Carmel
Sat. 6 p.m., Sun. 7:30 & 9:30 a.m., Spanish Mass
5:30 p.m.; Monday and Tuesday, 7 p.m.;
Wednesday and Friday, 8:30 a.m. 776-6339

St. John Methodist Church
Sunday 10 a.m, 693-8830

Seventh Day Adventist
Saturday, 779-4477

St. John Pentecostal Church
Sunday 11:05 a.m., 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer 7:30 p.m.,
Thursday Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
779-1230

St. Ursula's Episcopal Church
Sunday 9 a.m.; Bible Class, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m.
777-6306

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship
9:45 a.m. Sunday, 776-6332

Word of Faith Church
Word of Faith International
Christian Center, Sundays 7:30 a.m.
Giffi Hill SchoolCall 774-8617


Celebrating Black History Month






St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 19


__I _Classifieds I


marlketplace

EVERYTHING
YOU NEED
ON EVERY LEVEL

GREAT PLACE
TO SHOP, DINE
AND WORK

COME JOIN US
WE HAVE
SPACES AVAILABLE
RETAIL or OFFICE

340-776-6455


STORAGE:
SECURED LOCKERS
Sizes to 10' x 12'
Autos, Boats, Trailers.
Call For Rates: 779-4445
www.properyachts.com


Offices near
Mongoose Junction,
starting at $370/mo.
Bright, secure building
AC, Ample parking
693-7040


COMMERCIAL
SPACES AVAILABLE
AT RAINTREE COURT
large or small retail or
office spaces.
Call Albert at 693-8590




SALVAGED: 42-foot
ketch Desperado in Coral
Bay Harbor at 18.20.72
North and 64.42.80 West.
Registration # 1562-TB. Hull
I.D. 7292101. Call Richard
Conners 340-244-6649.




SUZUKI ISLAND
CAR FOR SALE:
Partially Renovated
$1500 OBO
Richard 340-642-5358


Get a Tan and a Paycheck!
Full time, part time, lots of benefits, free scuba,
snorkeling, sailing trips to the BVI, etc. Growing
watersports company has immediate openings:
* Beach Attendants at Westin Resort
* Retail Store Staff
* PADI Instructors

Cruz Bay Watersports 776-6857


S R F

SYMONS RESI-PLY FORMING PANELS FOR SALE
Used on one house
and stored, good
condition, over one
hundred panels,
scaffold brackets
included. Call for
pricing and leave
message. (340)
- 693-8991 or (508)
6 " 509-4002


Cruz Bay-Nice, furnished
house, great view, 2
Bedrooms A/C, 2 Bath,
W&D. Pets considered.
March 1. $1950/mo. Year
lease. (340) 690-4532


FISH BAY
LONG TERM
AVAILABLE NOW:
Furnished 3/2 native stone
home w/covered decks,
View w/privacy on 1.22
ac. 3k/mo 970-382-6683
Power on earthlink.net


SCENIC PROPERTIES
340-693-7777

Cruz Bay:
* Large three bedroom
house, 2 bath, w/d,
great view, $3500.00
Coral Bay:
* One bedroom, one
bath, $1250.00


RELIABLE MOBILE
AUTO REPAIR:
Professional and experi-
enced. Brakes, CV Joints,
Suspensions, Shocks,
Alternators, Timing Belts,
General Engine, Repair,
Foreign & Domestic.
All Work Guaranteed.
Call 227-9574


ST. JOHN BUSINESS
OWNERS Affordable
Reliable Internet.
1Mb service $70/mo.
info @dishanddat.com
340 779 4001


Year round, reliable,
experienced with a
vehicle. Repairs, painting,
landscaping, etc. Refs.
available. $20/hour.
Gerry Londergan
643-2541 or 776-6579.


1-800-222-TIPS (8477�
AW.W TUW Am-~.,--i C.
".1P 0- Oo-ft b. aft


FOR SALE: GREAT LOCATION! EASY ACCESS
1 bedroom cottage landscaped with BEATIFUL Garden
on 1/2 acre with view. Driveway and retaining walls done,
Septic in, Excavation for bigger house done
$305,000; 340-626-8485; christyloomis@yahoo.com




BUYING?

SELLING?

RENTING?

SEEKING?

Call: 340-776-6496
Email: advertising@tradewinds.vi


GET RESULTS!
VISA & MasterCard Accepted


IN SOUTHEAST
DOMINICA, BOETICA
16.5 serene, ocean-view
acres of cultivated farm
land and virgin forests.
$164,000. 5.2 abutting
acres, $69,000.
Contact Tina Alexander
767-449-8593
or www.islandguests.com




SUNSET RIDGE
VILLAS
April 30 to May 14
(timeshare weeks 18 &
19), Sat - Sat Sleeps 6.
Two separate buildings
with private courtyard
and plunge pool. Large
common pool overlooking
Cruz Bay and St. Thomas.
Rent $2,800
or buy for $9,000.
Call 717-203-3716 or
pete @worksiteplus.com


I Employment


\..FSOPERS USVI


Employment


T


COMMERCIAL SPACE AVAILABLE

At The Lumberyard





UNUSUAL


OPPORTUNITY


first floor space available



Downtown Cruz Bay
Where St. John Does Business


For Space Call Nick

340-771-3737








20 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011


Community Calendar


St. John Tradewinds welcomes notices of community-orient-
ed, not-for-profit events for inclusion in this weekly listing. Call
776-6496, e-mail editor@tradewinds.vi or fax 693-8885.


Tuesday, February 22
The next meeting of the St. John Chapter of the St. Thomas/St.
John Chamber of Commerce will be at the Cruz Bay Battery from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
St. John Film Society is hosting a free screening at 7:30 p.m. at
the St. John School of the Arts.
Saturday, February 26
The Virgin Islands Disciples of Christ will host Women's Day
at the Ivanna Eudora Kean Auditorium from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Come and enjoy a day of spiritual enrichment and fun. Tickets
are $20 and can be purchased from church members. For more
information call 774-4459.
Saturday, March 5
The V.I. Audubon Society will host its annual plant sale at
Nazareth Lutheran Church. Gifft Hill School announces "Cultura-
lypso," a school-wide community carnival, from 2 to 4 p.m. There
will be free activities, a bouncey house and food for purchase
available.
Saturday, March 12
The 25th Annual Gifft Hill School Auction will be at the Westin
Resort and Villas.
Tuesday, March 15
St. John Film Society is hosting a free film screening and a spe-
cial tribute at 7:30 p.m. at the St. John School of the Arts.
March 18-19
The 9th annual Johnnie Walker Blues Festival will feature two
nights of celebrity concerts in the Coral Bay ball field starting at
8p.m.
Monday, March 28,
SJCF's annual meeting is scheduled at the Fish Trap Restau-
rant. A dinner will be hosted at 6 p.m. with the meeting kicking off
at 7 p.m. and the community is invited.
Starting March 29
UVICELL will be offering a course for individuals interested
learning bookkeeping in order to function as an entry-level book-
keeper. The course will be from 6 to 9 p.m. on Tuesdays and
Wednesday at UVICELL.




ALCHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS
Alcoholics Anonymous meets as scheduled: Sundays, 9:45
a.m. at Hawksnest Bay Beach; Closed meetings for alcohol-
ics only at Nazareth Lutheran Church in Cruz Bay at 6 p.m
on Tuesday; Open meetings on Mondays, Wednesdays and
Friday at 6 p.m. at Nazareth Lutheran Church; Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays at 6 p.m. at Moravian Church, Coral
Bay.

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS
Narcotics Anonymous has open meetings from 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. every Saturday at St. Ursula's Church.

AL-ANON MEETINGS
Al-Anon meets on St. John every Tuesday at 1 p.m. at the
picnic table at the VINP ball field.


PREMIER Crossword

1 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 1


MYSTERY SISTERS

ACROSS
1 Sailors' mops
6 Black sheep sound,
in song
12 Tic - (tiny mint)
15 Huge-screen film for-
mat
19 Tiny hairs
20 Physicist Einstein
21 "Def Comedy Jam"
airer
22 Horror film staple
23 German king called
"the Great"
24 Irregular spot
25 Suffix with north or
south
26 Giant in elevators
27 Start of a riddle
31 Lassos
32 Press agent?
33 Tolkien monster
34 Riddle, part 2
42 Viper type
45 Book of maps
46 "Ye olde" settlement
47 Have - tolerance for
48 Brooch part
51 Arabian royal
53 "Woe -" (Patricia T.
O'Conner grammar
book)
55 Flock mother
56 Riddle, part 3
63 Apply heavily
64 Skillful feat
65 Beach find
66 Riddle, part 4


72 Fifth-cen. pope
75 Central Sicilian city
76 Microscopic creatures
80 Riddle, part 5
86 Stephen of "Ondine"
87 Kind of deer
88 Q.E.D. part
89 Just managing, with
"out"
90 - Reader (eclectic
magazine)
92 "I - break!"
96 "Have -"
(host's invitation)
99 Bible bk. after Ezra
100 End of the riddle
105 Have lunch
106 Prefix with 4-Down or
70-Down
107 Metallic playing mar-
ble
111 Riddle's answer
117 Injury reminder
118 Gerund ender
119 Menlo Park inventor
120 Cruller's kin
121 It fills barrels
122 19th-century humorist
Bill
123 "No, you -!"
124 Rub away
125 Cry
126 "My - Sal"
127 Utters
128 Is fearless

DOWN
1 Angry look
2 SWAK part
3 Sacrifice site
40f living things


By Frank A. Longo


5 Vocalized for the doctor
6 Get paid to watch Junior
7 Other: Pref.
8 Leigh Hunt's "- Ben
Adhem"
9 "Miss Lulu -" (old novel,
play, and film)
10 Bunker of TV
11 Desirous
12 In - (aware of a
secret)
13 "- -Ca-Dabra"
(1974 hit)
14 Certain central African
15 "Understood, man"
16 Flame-fancying flier
17 Opera tune
18 Crosses (out)
28 Spanish for "other"
29 Section of Lower
Manhattan
30 Suffix with dull
35 Dogs may pull it
36 Not exciting
37 "- true?"
38 Prof.'s place
39 Anacin rival
40 A or I, e.g.
41 Tom of "Adam's Rib"
42 Put-ons
43 Not at all fat
44 Meat spread
49 Ballot lists
50 Part of m.p.h.
52 Bureaucratic form-filling
54 How some things
are carved
57 - job on
58 Picnic crasher
59 Co. top dog
60 Nugent of rock


61 Oath reply
62 "Rats!"
67 Giggle part
68 Raggedy - (doll)
69 Genetic stuff
70 Giant fight
71 The Monkees' "-
Believer"
72 Play, as a mandolin
73 Eta-iota link
74 Rimes with Grammys
77 "Oh, to - England"
78 Outstanding
79 D-I filler
81 Just sit there
82 Cook Paula
83 British baby buggy
84 Allay
85 "Up and -!"
("Rise and shine!")
91 Visine unit
93 The gospel
94 Car ding
95 Pregame songs
97 Removes (oneself)
98 Four: Pref.
101 Purring one
102 Tethered
103 Made grooves on, as
the edge of a coin
104 Spanish Mrs.
108 Moon-related
109 Currently occupied
110 "90210" actor Rob
111 Highest point
112 A person goes by one
113 New Age music star
114 Escalate
115 This, in Havana
116 Policy guru
117 Cutting tool







St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 21


CALL TODAY

340-774-3939


TWO INCREDIBLE THREE-ACRE HILLSIDE LOTS
-Adjacent to National Park lands (and short walk to the beach) with
spectacular views of Francis Bay and west (sunsets). Gentle grade, and
easy build. These lots are ideal/unique for one seeking a private estate/
compound within the National Park, desiring lots of land /gardens/privacy
with convenient beach access.

- Inquire about February 24th bid deadline and March 10th Auction (and
Rules) as this lot will be sold to highest qualified Bid!

*(Nearly 3 acre Beachfront access lot available separately for $3.8 million.)





ISLA VISTA
Exceptionally Private/Gated Villa atop Caneel Hill.
Offered at $5.4M.


DEBBIE HAYES, OWNER/BROKER
OFFICE: 340 714 5808
CELL: 340 642 5995
WWW.STJOHNVIREALESTATE.COM
DEBBIEHAYES@ DEBBIEHAYES.COM


1-LS


St. John TRADEWINDS Newspaper
Send Check Payable to Tradewinds Publishing, P.O. Box 1500, St. John, VI 00831
1 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION $70.00 USD

Name

Address


John McCann & Assoc.:E;


www.RealEstateOnStJohn.com
office 340.693 3399 toll free 1.888StJohnB (785.6468) fax 888.546.1115


FEATURED LISTINGS


* AVALCN~a ft �Z.

�''wc%;%and cz~ nm ~
.i ;,!-, g'zvrwj~ ktd'wm Lwge pat O
vc.y suctsMki R J e,1~99somc


* LIL CATJ( E AE ti) ~ db


HOMES


*COMJ SkJW~ rTw25w* kpw C
0eI...1;' U., ,r.
k. ' . d5 . Jr-. W F. 4r C.kk
uA KW~ k' *a d~ cw to w.v wriv
ci yr epwf J.51 SZ� =


* PANAGRAMIC SWISVTS 9 DRASTIC RPC1~ h
4Q qiI A ~C BRi SB en fimh POPU- 3br 3, ~~
_11' 2 Iwul~s 14x' ,,rtvw c~d-rsnIF,
Tcp & the aim firmhei I-Mrr'-.L.lf
po&a $26SASWO No 0*S89,
0 kEIDUcM Hmioumff Prnum wa mwitwtd hcmm n Car a~y vwrfR avl tX1Lc ' OT I 0IIory 52"U
0 EIIEDU Gem vaki wt iti 4R MA4 N" Lhe as 2 tots or kmip m I h t~e _N go~ M &-,rom n O~y SUSAW


CONDOMINIUMS


OPFCED TO S[WIIJl " L111: � 11 1 *FWHY QM1 New IBR IBA
umaku 3br 3i Lt ,d 'a, wh fwrLl-I4c and brom wuh _
F"f "t P~%~~ -pixed .o sv Sdi ud rr
am I ,-*cK.p( ~SUM iOO9
*MASONRY be I tv-x� Jxw & s~ voew Com rWc. W oun m
" SOWD I'4l3Iory giCiodu! 2UR 1SA Lop %wo iwmt Cormmon polL Low rov� $179000.
LAND - COMMERCIAL -
" NAME biVYiWf VAMM on Brm*w 6 WAI*RfM1- -1 .'fi =es~ a, *Rf1XJUO S(MA DWC ME"$&



D~aw Tato~i OPUr $25%= &Et Unm - Topbbw w


LUXURY VILLAS WITH SPECTACULAR VIEWS
JUNGll STONI -CINNAMON BRIli:ZE -RIIAPSODY ST. JOHN .CC'(X DE MI-R
IP .A(. & PI I. N I .IAS HIISAS ( AKRII. .( INNANMON BAY I.S IIA I. .SO(frfl I'M .M
VISTA CARIBE - SEAVIEW - LAVENDER HILL - BATTERY HILL -GALLOWS POINT
SUITE ST. JOHN MANAGEMENT
www.suitestjohn.com * www.gallowspoint.com
1-800-348-8444
Call Us for a Tour of Our Exclusive Properties


ST. JOHN TRADEWINDS SUBSCRIPTIONS
CALL 340-776-6496 WE ACCEPT VISA OR MASTERCARD
























private Mediterranean style pool
villa on a 2 acre parcel in
prestigious Estate Catherine-
berg with exceptional views of
St. John's North Shore. The
main house has a large great
room with both indoor & outdoor
living/dining, 2 spacious bed-
rooms with en-suite baths, &
large pool deck. Separate
caretaker's cottage has 2 bed-
rooms There is also a parking
garage and work shop $3 5M


"Olucksberg Gazebo"
Wooded lot with large trees & a
nifty large gazebo type structure
with hip roof, screened walls &
sturdy floor. A great spot for
gardening. All wood is pressure
treated, rafters are oversized 2
x 12, joints & footers are lag
bolted & Hurricane ties at the
rafters. Included in sale are
new 90 watt solar panel system
with charge regulator and 1200
watt inverter. All this for just
$169,000


"Someday Ise if, a well built,
cuJstomf pool vilifi in a l ush,
tropical sefliriN with great views
overlooking Coral Bay & theS Sir
Frances Drake Channel. A

level has a welI-eq~zpped
kitch~en ccxz living area 3 large
covered outdoor dining area with
urionistfucied vieva & cociiirg
Iradev,~irnd The 3 bedrooms are
private & feature en suite baths.
The lower level bedroom is a
sta~nd alone studio ap $1.399M


"Fish Beach" - a new Mediterranean Style two bedroom pool villa in
Cocoloba Beach Estates. A private waterfront neighborhood with
community beach parcel & dock bordering the National Park near
Reef Bay yet near all the amenities of Cruz Bay Features premium
finishes including Iravertine floors. tile roof, antique brick & coral
patios cook's kitchen with stone countertops & srainless appliances
Park beaches are nearby. Unbeatable value at only $995,000.


"Plumarla- a well-appointed & succes.sful short term rental villa willh
two bedrooms 9 loft offering panoramic views of P.il~buijr Sou rd & Si.
Thomas with beaullifuli sunsets every night Aga Led designi ensujres tfle
uLitimate in privacy for the pool & outdoor living area The~ villa & luish
tropical gardens surrounding the FLAT yard harve been well maiantained
puhEE~~r~j~by on- island owners There are plans~ for an additicirial inasler suite.
~j Large storage area can store two cars or a boat $1.299M
.Ridgstop' - is a 1wG-storV two-bedroomn privare g~iraway vac-ati'n
rental nestled in the hills overlooking Coral Bay From its locale in
island s beautiful beaches hiking trails restaurants arid eridertain.
ment A shared swimming pool with~ deck and gazebo is located
adjacent to the house and is used by only four othie lhon-keG Pidgetop
is a great buy at only S649.500.
W 'Sundance, & Moonsong" - Two houses for the price of onea in
desita Ile Estate Chocolate Hole. Both Sundance and MoonsoNg are
successful short term rentals within walking distance to Hatt4 Say
beach and just a few minutes from Cruz Bay on paved roads.
Suncdance is 3 bedrooms with a pool & spa with a large sundeclic
Mo oqis 2 bedrooms with a spa. Just reduced to $1.275.000
. Bordeaux Mountain House" enjoys a spectacular rrlutnlaln top
location with coaling breezes exceptional views privacy~ and
tranbquility yet thlis custom designed villa is only a short ride 10 Cruz
jqBay. Coral Bay arnd the riortri shore Nationa~l Paric Beachies This
gated estate residence includes~ ark elegant saire anid masonry main
house plus a large gue~st fouse poolI arid spa all on level terrain.
Finest quality consirdtiori 117rOUgNou1 and leriflic Bv1 v'ie'vis MUST SEE
TO APPRECIATE' $2.49511,11
~Caroll no Cottage- - Really cute two bedroom house with nice water
~~ views of Coral Harbor and Hurricane Ho~ce. Faces east to catch 11hei
cooling trade wind breezes. Pa~ei eddrivewar auid park iIng are.@ Partial
furnishidngs included. A nice location close to Coral %ay with [arge
deck and room to expand or a~ddapool- Thereis aIlaundry room on
the lower levtel anid space to add another bedroom- $575t090,

DEVELOPMENTICOMMERCIAL PROPERTIES: Estate Pastry -Perfect deal for a spe Phume
builder - 3 lots for the price of one at just just $375,000. Hanson Day 7A is an 18 acre parcial with~
studies done and a 15 lot sub division~ permit. All Wos have water views and breezes and 4 Wos are
on tile flat top of a hidge with almost 360 degree views. Just reduced from $3.18M to S2.99M. Estate
Zootenvaal 20 acres over looking the marine preserve at Bork Creek just east of Coral "a $7M.
Adjoinring 5 acre pancel with 4 cottages and white sand! beach also available. NEW - 4.5 Acres
Above Newfound Bay - Make an Offer. Onle acre subdividable parcel on Bordeaux hill with great
viewsrfor$1 .1 M. Chocolate Holo lot with duel bay viewsto Great Cru2 C horcolate Role $695,000
U pper C arolI ino lot~ wihexpansisve panoramicviewsof the Britis \Argins Hurricarie Hole. �^Oral BaY
and the Caribbean Sea. High elevation, cool traidewind breezes and a downhill build. Paved roads
deeded beach access at Johnsi' Bav & a areat price- Seller witi offer some finianciria S169.000


1 g0g6921 9 34-9380 9 ww-rzarat.co


REEF BAY VIEW - is a classic Caribbean style 4 bd/3 bath pool villa with pristine National Park views of Reef Bay
& Ram Head, and the white sandy beach below. Consisting of 3 hip roofed buildings, connected by decks & covered
walkways, white walls & turqoise accents. Reduced to $1,395,000.


CBR HOME LISTINGS
SEASCAPE - Fabulous location on Bovacap Point!
Spacious 2 bd main house w/lap pool & spa, plus a sep-
arate caretaker's cottage. Panoramic views, privacy &
successful vacation rental. $1,095,000.
GOLDEN DRAGON - Beautiful stone villa w/exceptional
craftsmanship. 4 bds/4 baths, infinity pool, multi patios &
decks, lush gardens, Pt. Rendezvous location. Reduced
to $1,925,000.
LIZARD HILL - A one of a kind villa, high above Cinna-
mon Bay & surrounded by Nat'l Pk. land. Enjoy the exclu-
sive privacy, views to die for, gorgeous gardens, & easy
access from this 3 bd/3 bath, with pool & caretaker's cot-
tage nestled on over 1 acre in Catherineberg. $3,100,000.
BLUE TANG - Charming, turnkey, rental villa in Great
Cruz Bay. Privacy, vibrant sunsets, 60' covered deck
overlooking sunny pool, 2 bd/2 baths, great kitchen,
excellent floor plan, & terrific location. $1,295,000.
GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY - Apt. building
w/adjacent parcels in Cruz Bay, newly renovated & well
maintained. Only $490,000.
WATERFRONT with DOCK - Masonry 3 bed/2bath
home on Ig. flat lot, with direct access to Fish Bay at your
doorstep. Now only $920,000.
AURORA - Enjoy 180 views, from Great Cruz to St.
Thomas, from this masonry 4 bd/ 4 bath villa in Contant
Pt. Great privacy, pool, multiple outdoor patios, excellent
vacation rental history. $1,995,000.
VILLA ROMANCE- New, exquisitely crafted, luxury villa,
features a 30' pool in a tropical courtyard setting, 4 private
bed/bath suites, chef's kitchen, A/C, gated entry & custom
details throughout. All the bells & whistles for $2,150,000.
GREAT EXPECTATIONS - 7 bd/7.5 baths, 2 swimming
pools, 2 hot tubs, tennis court, walk to Chocolate Hole
beach, impressive vacation rental history. $2,999,500.
CALYPSO del SOL - Successful rental villa w/excellent
Chocolate Hole views, 3 bd/bath suites, A/C, newer
masonry construction, beautiful pool & hot tub, terrific Ig.
screened porch. $1,950,000.
REDUCED! - Well built Bordeaux Mt. home w/ 3 bd/2
bath, Ig. covered porch, southerly views, Ig. trees, very
gentle slope, room for expansion. $525,000.
CHOCOLATEHOLE- Uniqueruinsof 1700'sGreatHouse,
with a 1960's home on a beautiful 1.42 acre lot. $799,000.
POINT RENDEZVOUS - Newer masonry villa w/easterly
views to Ram Head, 3 bd, 2 baths, Ig. covered deck, spa,
vacation rental history, room for expansion. $1,595,000.
WINDSONG - Stately Boatman Pt. villa, w/separate
cottage, situated on a lac parcel w/panoramic views. 6
bdrms., 7 baths, huge pool, fully furnished. $3,495,000.


A BEST BUY! - Well built, poured concrete cottage w/
lovely covered wraparound orch in Est Tile
floors COT,,TD ters,
flat o in ace or uture
garage & expansion. Only $349,000.
STONE HOUSE - Spectacular Coral Bay views, 3 bd/
3 baths, gorgeous stonework, covered rotunda, freeform
pool, vacation rental history, easy access. $1,620,000.
BOATMAN POINT - Masonry 4 bd. home on spectacular
1 ac. waterfront site with amazing views & outstanding
neighborhood. $2,795,000.
CBR BUSINESS LISTINGS
JOE'S DINER - St. John's oldest restaurant is looking for
a new owner. Serving breakfast, lunch & drinks since 1972,
and located in the center of Cruz Bay. Call CBR.
FABRIC MILL - Very successful Mongoose Junction
business, est. 1982. $150,000 includes inventory, equip-
ment, & owner will train.
SILVER IGUANA - Beachfront shop w/eclectic collection
of sterling silver jewelry & locally crafted gifts. $75,000.
CBR CONDO LISTINGS
LAVENDER HILL - Tropical 2 bd/2bath penthouse unit
w/wrap-around deck, pool & sunset views. $849,000.
bath COED bd/2

CRUZ VIEWS CONDO - Nice 2 bedroom unit w/full A/C,
sunset views, common pool, good rental history. $450,000.
SELENE'S- Ideal in town location, w/parking, for living/
rental or business. Terrific views. Reduced to $399K!
GALLOWS POINT CONDO - Waterfront, 1 bd/lbath
condo in resort setting, pool, beach. Only $485K.
CBR LAND LISTINGS
LUSH BORDEAUX MT. parcels w/views. $150K-$285K.
SUNSET VIEWS- close to town, easy build. Only $215K.
LOTSTO CHOOSE FROM in Fish Bay- Starting at $108K.
KLEIN BAY - Prestigious area w/common beach. $675K.
SIDE-BY-SIDE flat parcels in Johnston Bay- $220K ea.
CAROLINA, EDEN, CALABASH - Nice selection of
affordable parcels. Starting at $99K.
CRUZBAYTOWN-Walkto Frank Bay, R-4 zoning. $249K.
GLUCKSBERG - Gentle grade, 1/2 ac., Ig. trees. $125K.
ZOOTENVAAL-HurricaneHoleviews, pavedroad.$400K.
GREAT CRUZ BAY - Prime 1.05 acre site w/fantastic
harbor views & architectural plans. A stealat $595K.
WATERFRONT on MONTE BAY- Spectacular 13.44 ac.
site, ideal for private estate or subdivision. $2,900,000.
AFFORDABLEPARCELS-inEst.Grunwald&Adrian.Easy
building sites, close to town. Starting at $89,000. CallToday!
DITLEFF POINT - Extraordinary sites on magnificent
peninsula w/sandy beach, gated entry, beautiful landscap-
ing, and incredible views. Prices start at $695,000.
PT. RENDEZVOUS- Outstanding views. $415K.


DITLEFF POINT
ST. JOHN, US VIRGIN ISLANDS INFOODITLEFFPOIN-T.COM


CRUZ BAY A -once in a fifedore- offering of spectacular estate homesites on coveted Ditieff Point
�3rfj REALTY, INQ Newt Video Tour - wiriv. ditieffireinilL over


I I-m











JLML
OIL at* J 0 mm-wu
es back to St. John"

COMPLETE REAL ESTATE SERVICES 9 ST. JOHN'S OLDEST REAL ESTATE FIRM 0 SERVING ST. JOHN FOR 50 YEARS!

Located at the Marketplace - (340) 776-6776 - (340) 774-8088 - INFO@HolidayHomesVI.com �1�
-1 -







TOLL FREE: 1-800-905-6824 or 1-800-526-9193 * www.HOLIDAYHOMESVI.COM ra


CATHERINEBERG'S "CINNAMON
RIDGE" 5 bedroom villa on 1+ private
-' , acre, bordered
'" by National
S"" . Park, features
S.... ..... stunning north
shore views,
pool w/waterfall,
spa, easy access
to Cinnamon
$4,900,000 Bay beach.
"PARADISE ON THE ROCKS" Tropi-
cal living, big views & masonry home-
centrally-located on Ajax Peak. Two
units: - 2 bed-
rooms, 2 baths
& Great Room
upstairs; private
entry 1 bedroom
apartment down-
stairs. Rent one,
.1 i65.000 live in the other!


GATEHOUSE, a 2 bedroom, exquisite
villa in Peter Bay Estates. Large lot
gives great
views and
breezes.
Michael Ox-
man plans
available for
expansion.
Incredible
$3,250,000 Value!
"SEAVIEW" vacation villa. Charming
4 Bedroom, masonry home in excellent
condition with large pool in convenient
S beaChoco-
late Hole
deeded
rig h ts
to two
. nearby
S I. 150.000 beaches.


"SEA TURTLE VILLA" is a contempo-
rary Skytop home with amazing water
views, 2 master suites, 3 baths, tropical
� landscaping,
pool, & open
architecture
set amidst se-
cluded privacy.
Great vacation
villa or island
$1,500,000 home!
"90 DAY SPECIAL" - $300,000 Price
Reduction! Fabulous views across
Coral Bay to BVI in masonry 3 br/3.5
bth home. Private, pool, hot tub,
stone walls, solar
water heater, hur-
ricane shutters
- custom cabinets,
10k generator
plus cottage (NC)
$1,000,000 on property.


"WINDWARDSIDE" CALABASH
BOOM offers 2 cottages with hot tubs
yin private setting.
Panoramic views
over harbor to
BVIs. Charming
brick courtyard,
lush tropical
, landscaping, and
outdoor showers.
$1,275,000 Excellent rentals.
WALK TO BRUNCH & BEACH plus
ENJOY SOOTHING SURF SOUND
from this unique, masonry & stone
custom crafted, gated villa with pan-
oramic wa-
ter views.
Flexible
floorplan
features 4
bdrms plus
$995,000 cottage.


"SOUTHERN CROSS"- Big south-
shore views - Danish-style stone
home w/ wrap-around covered
porches & 3 bdrm & 2 baths. Stun-
ning cabinetry &
exposed concrete
beams & sills. Ex-
ceptional privacy
in lush setting.
Additional land
$1,259,000 available.
"VILLA MOLLO" A nature lovers
dream, walk to 2 beaches! 3BR/2BA
villa sits on the water's edge of a salt
pond and features custom stone and
Swood
work
a n d
amazing
Carib-
S59.0 vibean
$595.000 views.


"CASA YAYA" - Big-view villa on top
the world in Coral Bay. 3 bdrm, 2 bath
one level living w/ the BVI at your front
door. Entertain
by the infinity-
edge pool and
enjoy the indoor/
outdoor great
room with dra-
matic views from
$1,200,000 every room.

"CONCH VILLAS": Why pay rent?
Opportunity to own a 2br, 1 ba &/or
a lbr, lba condo
close to Cruz Bay!
Purchase one for
yourself and stop
throwing money
away on rent or
$205,000 & purchase both for
ao nt Aenn wIlititnil in-m-


'MILL VISTA - CAROLINA" Easy access & build on Centerline Rd. $ 115,000 "ESTATE CONCORDIA" hillside sites with stunning views
ranging from the BVIs, down St. John's eastern coast to
'FISH BAY" Views, breezes and paved access CONTRACTED Ram's Head , St. Croix. From $275,000
'LEAST EXPENSIVE WATERFRONT"! Gentle slope, 4 min. walk to beach $ 285,000 "UPPER MONTE BAY ESTATES" 7 Spectacular private
'SUGAR APPLE WEST" Harbor views gentle 1/2 ac. with Topo $ 299,000 parcels above Rendezvous Bay; paved road, stone walls
'CONTANT" lot with Great Cruz Harbor View. Owner Realtor CONTRACTED & underground utilities. From $799,000
'CALABASH BOOM" .4 ac. GREAT views, private. Topo map $ 475,000 "NORTHSHORE PROPERTIES" Peter Bay & Hawksnest/
'BOATMAN POINT WATERFRONT" Sunset Views and Gentle Site. $ 825,000 Denis Bay exquisite home sites with breathtaking views
over the North Shore, BVI & many cays in between. Call
EAST END LAND Parcels in Privateer Bay and on far East End. Coral Bay views and for a tour today. Call for Prices
underground utilities. From $265,000 "PETER BAY ESTATES" Exquisite home sites with
'CHOCOLATE HOLE" Breezes and views to St. Thomas. From $285,000 breathtaking views over the North Shore, BVI & cays
'VIRGIN GRAND ESTATES" Gated sub-division, sunset views. Can build FRACTIONAL between. Prices from $1,750,000
HOME! Paved roads. 3 from $499,000 BEST BUY BEACH FRONT "GREAT CRUZ BAY" private
'LOVANGO CAY" Waterfront & hillside properties; upscale amenities including barge dock access, quiet upscale neighborhood, awesome views.
docks, paved roads, undrgrd utilities beach & views. From $275,000 Owner/broker. PRICE REDUCED. $i13 $998,000


oEi.i.Icr rINIIMniinr
WITH GREAT TERMS!
"HAULOVER" BEACHFRONT 3.71
acre sub-dividable borders National
Park! AMAZING VIEWS! $1,900,000
"SABA BAY" WATERFRONT &
HILLSIDE Incredible BVI views! 12
acre sub-divideable waterfront lot
for $9,999,000 plus 4 hillside lots
available from $699,000
"DREEKETS BAY ESTATES"
spectacular BVI views, excellent roads,
underground utilities, stone walls,
planters, common beach. Minutes from
Coral Bay. 12 lots from $399,000


Ask about "MUST SELL BEST
BUY" SITUATIONS
Call or email today for info!

OWN A MONTH (OR MORE) in
a 3 or 4 bedroom luxury home.
Magnificent views and sunsets from
3 homes with all amenities, pools
w/waterfalls and spas. Deeded 1
month ownerships from $59,000
WESTIN RESORT TIMESHARES:
Own a week, a month, or more &
enjoy all the resort amenities! Most
unit sizes and weeks available.
Priced from $2,000


FOR A COPLT LIS OFALS.JH MS 'oE~ D VDe TO UR OF' THE PRPRIS 9'RACP F0 RNWLTE AL REMI S
L, INF @HdyoeVo -Aprve supiro elett o h 17Eooi eeomn omsin


Toll-free 888-757-7325 * info@americanparadise.com * www.americanparadise.com


RAINBOW PLANTATION A private, family WATERFRONT RETREAT Privateer NEW! ISLAI
estate house on 1.6 acres. Features one of Bay. 3BR/3BA casual beach house close by.
the largest private pools on St. John (w/diving steps from the water. Paved roads & u/g dock $1,850,
board). PRICE REDUCED $1,095,000 utilities. $975,000

NEW! Caribbean cottage that currently AMANI Spectacular 1800 views, APPROXI
caters to short term rental guests. Listed prestigious Maria Bluff, 3BR/3BR in the main WATER at F
price includes adjacent vacant lot for building, plus guest cottage $1,795,000 water views!
expansion. $599,000 SUSANNABERG! New masonry level is a 3 B
UNBELIEVABLE NEW PRICE FOR home on FLAT lot plus separate rental $675,000
BLUE HEAVEN! Cute Caribbean home cottage. Borders Nat'l Park. $750,000 NEW IN C
overlooking Rendezvous Bay. Popular VILLA TESORI Luxurious custom house with
vacation rental. 3BR/3BR $527,000 home, uncompromising quality, exquisite cottage. Com
AMOROSA A brilliant Tuscan inspired finishings, sweeping views. 5BR/5BA. driveway, val
villa in Peter Bay. Sweeping views, $4,250,000 NEW! IXOI
deeded walking path to the beach, 4BR, UNBEATABLE VALUE! ALLESAN- Natl. Pk, adj
5BA. Live webcam & virtual tour @ DRA Luxurious masonry villa, renovated access, 3 p
americanparadise.com $7,450,000 in 2007, views of 3 bays, 3BR/3BA, 2 car walkways, po
NEW! Income producing 2 unit in garage REDUCED TO $1,769,000 NEW! "R
Chocolate Hole. Large flat yard, walking MYSTIC RIDGE 4 BR/4.5BA, dramatic 2BR, 2.5 B
distance to Chocolate Hole Beach. Island views, short distance to North Shore successful sh
stone incorporated throughout. $875,000 beaches, cooling breezes $1,990,000. Point Rendez


IDS END Nat'l Pk beaches NEW! PELICAN'S PERCH Masonry FUN & CONTENTMENT 1800 views.
5BR/5.5BA, HOA common 3BR/3BA pool villa with panoramic water Tiled pool deck, 2 large AC. suites &
000 views and separate guest cottage. mahogany hardwoods. Plans for 3 more

HOMES $1,269,000 bdrms. $1,235,000
MATELY 150' FROM THE BAREFOOT New 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath ZOOTENVAAL! Newly built multi unit
'ebble Beach with fabulous guest cottage in quaint neighborhood. tasteful masonry home sited on 1.36
Beautiful woodwork; upper $599,000. FLAT acres. Expand or subdivide. Private
R unit & lower is a 1 BR unit. PRICE SLASHED FOR NORTH with large yard. $925,000
SHORE ! Cinnamon Day Dreams, 3 SOLAR POWERED BED & BREAK-
AROLINA Masonry 2x2 main BR/2.5BA, in Nat'l Pk boundaries in FAST! "Garden By The Sea" is a quaint
2x1 lower apt & separate Catherineberg. 1 acre. $1,795,000. Caribbean home. Owners' apartment &
iplete solar systems. Paved AMARILLA VILLA 3 BR, 3.5 BA villa, 3 income producing A/C units.
ley views. $600,000 superior craftsmanship, Spanish tile roof, $1,800,000.
RA on Ajax Peak, bordered by 1800 views, large pool & hot tub $2,595,000 NEW IN CAROLINA! Beautiful, peace-
acent to North Shore beach MAMEY PEAK 1.05 acres, 1x1 Main ful mostly flat parcel with end of road
avilions linked by decks & House and 1x1 Guest Cottage. Flat slope privacy. Masonry 3x2 upper unit and 1x1
ol, 5 BR. $1,700,000 and stunning views. One of a kind fixer lower unit. $750,000
ILES AWAY "Immaculate upper!!! $795,000 CVISTA Magnificent open air 4 bdrm
A masonry villa w/ pool, MILL RIDGE Attention to detail, Classic villa above Rendezvous Bay. Stunning
ort term rental, in prestigious Caribbean architecture, masonry 2BR/2BR, residence exudes comfort, class &
vous. $1,450,000 office/3rd BR, garage & pool. $1,595,000 elegance. $3,895,000


S� C)141) )S1SC 4 S IL A 11 E I a A* �I 3iiA S *� C)S 4I RC 1AI


"

"

"


0







24 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011


Cathy and Billy Dove, second from right
and far right, pose with sand sculpture artist
Larry Safady, second from left.


St. John Tradewinds News Photos by Tropical Focus

Maria Ines Elliff and Carlos Di Blasi


Michael and Barbie Barry


Chuck and Terry Pishko


Dove, at left, shares the microphone with
Jackie Levine, who renewed her vows with
husband Howard after 62 years of marriage.


Michael Banzahf on flute.


More Than 120 Couples Renew Vows at Valentine's Day Celebration


Continued from Page 4
tions to coincide with the event - come back to renew
their vows year after year. Cathy Dove knows why, she
said.
"Doing this really makes a difference," she said. "We
had a good marriage before we renewed our vows, we
really did. But doing this for the past nine years has
changed mine and my husband's lives."
"Things are so much better," said Dove. "It abso-
lutely makes our marriage stronger and better, which I
didn't think was possible."
A rainy morning on February 14 cleared for a perfect
afternoon ceremony on Trunk Bay. Even the no-see-
ums stayed away so as not to distract from the event's
focus. Couples were greeted with the sound of Michael
Banzhaf's flute as they walked the path down to the
beach.
On the shoreline, a sand sculpture of sea turtles wel-


comed couples to the event. The sculpture was crafted
by Larry Safady, who spent the entire painstakingly
making the sand creation.
"I saw the flyer about this and I thought it was so
cool," said Safady. "They all do this for free, I thought I
could donate my time and skill for them."
Safady, who was helped by the Doves, started his
sculpture at 10 a.m. and wrapped up the finishing
touches just before the event's 5 p.m. start.
Porter, who passes up the chance to officiate at what
surely are in demand sunset Valentine's Day ceremo-
nies to oversee the vow renewal, is continually inspired
to give her time, she explained.
"To me this is the most meaningful way a couple
could choose to celebrate Valentine's Day," said Porter.
"There is no more meaningful thing for a couple to do
on this day than to reassert their love and commitment
to each other."


After 21 years of marriage, this year was the first
time Steve and Janet Simonsen chose to join in the Cel-
ebration of Love.
"We're here because it's a good time to do it," said
Janet Simonsen.
"We are super in love this year more than ever," said
Steve Simonsen. "This seemed like the thing to do."
With the Caribbean sun beginning its descent to the
horizon, couples gathered on Trunk Bay and gazed into
each other's eyes.
"It's so important once a year to look your mate in
the eye and reaffirm your love," said Dove.
Following Porter's vow renewal ceremony, each
bride was given a long stem rose and each couple a
thick-stock certificate of marriage vow renewal to take
home.
For more information about the Celebration of Love,
check out www.vivows.com.




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EIQ6ZV4YP_RPHQ2N INGEST_TIME 2011-08-30T20:59:34Z PACKAGE UF00093999_00133
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

Celia Kalousek Is New Executive Director of SJCFPage 8GHS Auction Mar. 12Page 911th St. John Arts Festival To Unveils “Mini Expo” FormatPage 5 RESERVE YOUR AD SPACE FOR 2012!ISSUE NO. 6 IS IN THE WORKS.email: mnelson@malindamediallc.com for more information. February 21-27, 2011 Copyright 2011St. JohnTradewinds News Photos by Jaime ElliottThe tall beige fence surrounding Frank Powell Park, above, has shut long-time food vendor Sheila Liburd out of business. By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds Not only has the fence sur rounding Frank Powell Park in Cruz Bay made walking near gerous and forced the St. John Arts Festival to be relocated, the obstruction has also closed down a beloved St. John eat ery. In anticipation of renovations to the park, government contractor Apex Construction erected a tall beige fence around the entire park including the sidewalk on the waterfront and bandstand on Monday, February 7. The fence will remain in place until renovations are completed, which is scheduled to be some time in June, according to Continued Inside on Page 3More Than 125 Couples Renew Vows on ValentinesPage 4 No Sidewalk, No Festival and Now No Shelia’s PotFrank Powell Sr. Park Renovations Fence In 32-year Food Vendor from Serving the Public Threatened by Development, the Future of Haulover Hangs in the BalancePage 7 Safety Takes Center Stage at Bicycle RodeoOnly 2 of 30 bicyclists pass safety inspectionPage 6 With no sidewalk to use, pedestrians have been forced into the street, along with cars, safari taxis and buses. And the fence has also shut down Sheila’s Pot. Sheila Liburd has been serving up delectable local fare near the bandstand in the Cruz Bay park for more than 30 years. Late last month, however, she was asked to relocate and then informed, via her attorney, that she might not be able to reopen. In a letter from Department of Housing, Parks and Recreation Commissioner St. Claire Williams, dated January 26, but not

PAGE 2

2 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011St. John Tradewinds Last week Senator Janette Millin-Young began visiting the public schools on St. Croix and vironment in which our teaching professionals work and our children study and learn daily. As chairperson of the Senate Committee on Education, Youth and Culture she rightly believes that the job can’t be done from behind a desk. This brand new Senator doesn’t enter upon this task with a blank slate. The Millin legacy precedes her. Her grandmother, Lucinda Sewer Millin, was born in Coral Bay, St. John, in 1892. She married Allan A. Millin and had three chilThe management of Virgin Islands National Park regrets to inform the visiting public that this year’s Annual Folklife Festival, which was scheduled for February 24, 25 and 26, has been postponed to a later date, to be announced. This action was taken due to unforeseen circumstances which This annual program has been well-attended in the past, and tional and inspiring program this year as well. Before setting a new date, VINP management will confer with program for their understanding. For more information contact VINP Ranger Denise Georges at 776-6201, ext. 239. Continued on Page 18Whale Watching Feb. 27 and Mar. 7The St. John Film Society is hosting a free screening on Tuesday, February 22, at 7:30 p.m. at the St. John School of the Arts, at Stop by SJSA in Cruz Bay at 7:30 p.m. to watch “Taking Root: and answers after the screening. This award-winning documentary tells the dramatic story of Kenyan Nobel Prize Laureate Wangari Maathai whose simple act of planting trees grew into a nationwide movement to safeguard the environment, protect human rights and defend democracy – a movement for which this charismatic woman became an iconic inspiration.GHS “Culturalypso” Set for March 5Gifft Hill School announces “Culturalypso,” a school-wide community carnival, on Saturday, March 5, from 2 to 4 p.m. There will be free activities, a bouncy house and food for purchase available. Call 776-1730 for information. Meet the Filmmakers of “Taking Root” at Screening on February 22 at SJSAThe Environmental Association of St. Thomas/St. John will host its annual whale watch on three days in February and March. The all-day sails will be on Sunday, February 27 and March 7, aboard the catamaran KeKoa. Eco-guides will be aboard to educate participants about whales, dolphin, sea birds and other marine life. A snorkel and swimming stop, including a discussion of what will be made available as well. Tickets are $55 for members and $65 for non-members and can be purchased at Dockside Bookstore at Havensight Mall, Barefoot Buddha Cafe and Red Hook Plaza. Participants are to meet at the Red Hook Ferry Dock at 8:30 a.m. the day of the sail. For details, call 774-1837 or 777-7190.VINP Postpones 20th Annual Folklife New Date Not Yet ScheduledCheryl Francis, Junior Achievement of the Virgin Islands Chair; Jason Charles, Project Manager; Bonny Corbeil, JAVI Board Member; and Pastor Themba, Acting JAVI Executive Director, will be making a presentation to the Chamber of Commerce-St. John Chapter on Tuesday, February 22, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Cruz Bay Battery. See page 12 for more informaiton.Next Chamber Chapter Meeting Feb. 22 EDITOR/PUBLISHER MaLinda Nelson malinda@tradewinds.vi NEWS EDITOR Jaime Elliott jaime@tradewinds.vi WRITERS Andrea Milam, Mauri Elbel ADVERTISING advertising@tradewinds.vi CIRCULATION Rohan Roberts COLUMNISTS & CONTRIBUTORS Chuck Pishko, Malik Stevens, Adam Lynch, Tristan Ewald, Paul Devine, Andrew Rutnik, Craig Barshinger, Coral Breuning SUBSCRIPTIONS U.S. & U.S.V.I. only $70.00 per year THIRD CLASS PERMIT U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 3 St. John, VI 00831 NEWSLINE Tel. (340) 776-6496 Fax (340) 693-8885 www.tradewinds.vi editor@tradewinds.vi MAILING ADDRE SS Tradewinds Publishing P.O. Box 1500 St. John, VI 00831 COPYRIGHT 2010/2011All rights reserved. No reproduction of news stories, letters, columns, photographs or advertisements allowed without written permission from the publisher. TRADEWINDS PUBLISHING LLCThe Community Newspaper Since 1972 Historical Bits & Piecesby Chuck Pishko Celebrating Black History Month The Millins—Their Second Century of Community Service Lucinda Sewer Millin Janette Millin-Young

PAGE 3

delivered to Liburd until January 31, she was asked to relocate her vending business no later than February 5. “In an effort to assist you in acyour vending business, an alterna tive site in the vicinity of Nature’s recommended,” Williams wrote. “Thank you for your cooperation in this matter. Any inconvenience is deeply regretted.” Liburd, however, had no inten tion of relocating. Instead, when word spread of her imminent closure, a petition circulated across St. John and garnered more than 300 signatures to keep Sheila’s Pot open in its current location. up and leave,” said Liburd. “This is my busy season and my liveli hood. They want me out of the park.” No resolution was reached and Liburd had no choice but to watch her vending business be blocked off by the fence on February 7. On February 14, Governor John deJongh visited St. John for meet ings and Liburd approached him with her petitions. “I talked to the governor for a short while, but he didn’t really say anything,” said Liburd. “We were going to talk more when he got out of the meeting. But I didn’t see him again.” Several phone calls from St. John Tradewinds to Government unanswered last week. Renovations to the park are needed and part of the work entails burying underground utilities, explained St. John Administrator Leona Smith. “The park is being renovated and everyone had to be out of the park,” said Smith. “You can’t be in there when they are doing the underground electricity. The renovations are long-needed and it’s the off the boat.” The park’s central Cruz Bay location, is exactly why renovations should have been planned for offseason, according to St. John homeowner Ronnie Lee. “Why are they doing this now at the height of season?” he asked. “It just doesn’t make sense.” The government’s failure to “terrible,” Lee added. “To shut her down virtually overnight is awful,” he said. “I think it’s terrible. She has been around for so many years with loby locals and tourists.” “Sheila belongs in the park,” said Lee. When Liburd’s attorney Henry Smock tried to express those sentiments to Commissioner Williams, however, he was informed of several “areas of concern” regarding the location of Sheila’s Pot, according to Liburd. “This is not just for four months, this is for ever,” said Liburd. “They want me out of the park perma nently.” After three decades in business in the same location, and with her strong faith, Liburd believes that everything will work out, she explained. “I believe in God and have faith that something will be worked out,” Liburd said. “When you are in a place for 10 years, it is supposed to be grand-fathered in. This year will be 32 years I am here, November 8.”“They want me out of the parkWhen you are in a place for 10 years, it is supposed to be grand-fathered in. This year will be 32 years I am here, November 8.”– Shelia Liburd, owner of Shelia’s Pot food stand 2011 RAIN DATAat Trunk BayJanuary0.80 inchesAverage3.17 InchesTotal YTD0.80 InchesAverage YTD3.17 Inches St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 3 Thursday, Feb. 24th Continued from Front PageINDEXChurch Directory .................18 Community Calendar ...........20 Crossword Puzzle ...............20 Ferry Schedules .................18 Historical Bits & Pieces ........2 Letters ...........................14-15 Police Log ...........................17 Real Estate ....................21-23 Rhythm & Views .................13Frank Powell Sr. Park Renovations Fence In Sheila’s Pot St. John Tradewinds V.I. Police Department ofpersons on separate assault charges last week. One suspect threatened a victim and the other case involved domestic violence. Victor Rosa, 31, was arrested just before 3 a.m. Tuesday, February 15, and charged with Aggravated Assault and Battery, Domestic Violence for grabbing his wife by the shirt and slapping her in the face. Bail was denied due to the domestic charge. Buster Brady, 50, was arrested shortly before 8 p.m. Monday, February 14, and charged with Third Degree Assault for threatening a victim with a machete. Brady’s bail was set at $25,000. Both suspects were remanded to the Bureau of Corrections on St. Thomas pending further court action.Rosa and Brady Arrested on Assault Charges St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Jaime ElliottWhen arriving on St. John, visitors and locals are greeted by a tall beige fence surrounding Frank Powell Sr. Park which also blocks the sidewalk, forcing pedestrians into the street.

PAGE 4

By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds Valentine’s Day on Love City stuffed animals, balloons and hundreds of people to Trunk Bay for their love. For the ninth year in a row, Cathy and Billy Dove and the island’s barefoot minister Anne Marie Porter hosted more than 125 couples in a Celebration of Love vow renewal ceremony on Monday, February 14, on Trunk Bay beach. In total more than 2,000 years of marriage were represented on the alabaster sands of Trunk Bay. The Doves, who moved to Florida last year, weren’t about to miss the event and added their 39 years of wedded bliss to the tally. “I’m here because where else would I be,” said Cathy Dove. “I love this. We have been renewing our vows for the past nine years and it feels as good now as it did back then.” The Celebration of Love was started in 2003 when a friend of the Doves suggested they take advantage of their 30 anniversary to renew their vows. “We were celebrating our 30th anniversary and a priest friend said, ‘Why don’t you renew your vows,’” said Dove. “I told Anne Marie and we thought it might be a good opportunity to show the youth of the island that marriage is important to everyone. As we continued talking about, we came up with this idea of a Celebration of Love.” years ago which drew 70 couples, the number of participants has steadily grown, with this year’s event drawing the biggest crowd to date. Locals and visitors alike — many of whom plan their vaca-4 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 Continued from Back Page led the vow renewal on Trunk Bay beach on February 14.St. John Tradewinds News Photos by Triopical FocusCouples gathered on Trunk Bay beach at sunset, above, on Valentine’s Day to renew their vows during the ninth annual Celebration of Love. More Than 125 Couples Renew Vows at Valentine’s Day Beach Celebration

PAGE 5

St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 5 11th St. John Art Festival Unveils New “Mini Expo” Format at VINP Ball FieldSt. John Tradewinds The 11th Annual St. John Arts Festival, which kicks off this week, will host its music, food and crafts events in the V.I. National Park ball ell Sr. Park. With this transition comes a whole new look of the arrangement booths each, surrounding a raised pennant to create a festive atmo sphere. Unlike previous years, there is a broadening of types of exhibits this pottery and hand-woven fabrics from Maho Bay artists. Their participation was not possible with the cramped spacing of booths in the little park. Also, special exhibits from senior citizen crafts people and schools will have their own “islands.” It is amazing how what seemed to sight with no shade, has been transformed into a promising Mini St. John Expo, thanks to the help and cooperation of Department of Public Works St. John Deputy Director Ira Wade and St. John Deputy Director of Sports, Parks and Recreation Hubert Muscoso. The novel “exhibition island” concept of exhibition booths togeth er with a large shade tent for visitors is going to be fantastic. Caribbean Food and Crafts Exhibition will take place all this week in 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Caribbean Music Concerts are scheduled throughout the week as well from 12:30 to 4: 30 p.m. Inner Visions play on Monday, Echo People on Tuesday, Koko and the Sunshine Band on Wednesday, Sambacombo on Thursday and Musical Vibrations on Friday. St. John School of the Arts is hosting a special student performance on Monday night, February 21, from 6 to 9 p.m. St. John Film Society is screen “Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai” on Tuesday night at 7:30 p.m. at SJSA. Stop by Cinnamon Bay archeol ogy museum on Thursday, February 22, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. for a look at “Taino Heritage” featuring a timethe migration of Tainos from South America to the Caribbean islands. Art galleries across the island ings, sculptures, jewelry and ceram ics. Many restaurants throughout St. John will feature live music for the week as well. Schedule on page 11. Printed St. John Arts Festival programs are available at Connections in both Cruz Bay and Coral Bay. This is a whole “new look” show and the only Arts Festival in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Do not miss this lands and learn about the true culture of the people — it’s very special.

PAGE 6

6 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 Experienced . Personalized . Professional . ProvenSeaview Vacation Homes, Inc. Short Term-Full Service Since 1985 VACATION VILLA MANAGEMENT24 years of on island rental servicee: info@seaviewhomes.com w: www.seaviewhomes.com t: 340-776-6805; toll-free 1-888-625-2963 By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds A bicycle safety rodeo hosted by the V.I. Police Department’s Community Integration Team (CIT) on Saturday, February 12, intended to make children safer riders, but also raised concerns among the island’s competitive adult bikers. “The goal was for the kids to learn safety rules of the road for bicycles,” said Linda Bechstein, St. John CIT chairperson. “Our original report was that kids out in Coral Bay were running with cars on the road with their bicycles and we wanted to stop that. The intention was to make children riding bicycles safe and to be honest I didn’t even think about the adults.” cials from the Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV) gathered in the took the rodeo to Cruz Bay at the day was also intended to raise awareness about laws regarding bicycles, which stipulate the need for license plates, warning signals, A total of about 30 children attended both rodeos, of which only two were able to get their bicycles inspected. The other children were turned away because they didn’t All bicycles must be registered with BMV, to the tune of $15 each per year, and must feature a bell or horn attached to the frame of the bike, a light on the rear of the bicycle and a license plate. The children who were unable to get inspected were turned away because ment, Bechstein explained. A lot of what is needed is relatively inexpensive,” said the St. John CIT chairperson. “But they are not available on St. John, so you have to go to St. Thomas. We have discussed as a group obtaining some bells and horns and making them available to people who can’t afford them or offer them at a discounted rate.” CIT has urged VIPD to enforce the long-ignored laws after a twomonth grace period to give riders a chance to comply, explained Bechstein. Children are also not allowed to ride on public streets under the age of 12 without adult supervision, according to the V.I. Code. Children were able to complete an obstacle course, after which they were given bicycle helmets cour tesy of the St. John Accommodations Council. Adult competitive bicyclists, however, might even have a more decades old V.I. laws. “I think it’s a great idea for kids and I’m all for safety procedures,” said one rider, who wished with high-tech racing bikes and trying to comply with this law is These laws were written 20 years ago and bike designs today are so high-tech, when you put these things on it that aren’t supposed to be there, it could affect the perfor mance of the bike and the safety of the rider.” “There might not even be room enough on new bikes to put all of bicyclist. Updating the bicycle safety law might be the way to go since the existing law also doesn’t address what is probably the most danger ous element of bike riding today, according to the St. John cyclist. bikes and concerns, could include something like no headphones, which is a major safety concern,” said the rider. “That would be more sensible than making everyone get a license plate and a light. I’m all for trying to comply with safety regulations, but the regulations should be realistic and up-todate, and the existing law isn’t.” The day did give children an opportunity to interact with VIPD according to Bechstein. “As a whole, a lot of the day was just about children being comfortand having a friendly conversation with them,” said Bechstein. “It was about being instructed how to do the right thing instead of being told they were doing the wrong thing.” CIT members will focus next on preparing for a summer activities fair in May, Bechstein added.Safety Takes Center Stage at Bicycle Rodeo Hosted by CIT and VIPD— Only 2 of 30 Participants Pass Inspection Open TuesdaySunday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tel: 693-5579Beautifying America’s Paradise St. John Tradewinds News Photo Courtesy of VIPD Earl Mills (right) give a young St. John rider safety instructions.

PAGE 7

St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 7 Threatened by Development, Future of Haulover Hangs in BalanceBy Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds More than three acres of pristine land on the East End could be the site of major development, or be preserved for future generations and the St. John community could help determine which becomes reality. The 3.6 acres are spread over four parcels of land located on both sides of the narrow Haulover isthmus on the East End. The eastern portion of the land abuts V.I. National Park property and is located close to the V.I. Coral Reef National Monument. South Haulover beach, on Round Bay, is on one parcel of the property, and the stunning snor keling spot on North Haulover on Dreekets Bay, is on another parcel The wetland habitat on the land and there could be archaeological Rafe Boulon, V.I. National Park Chief of Resource Management. “The wetland habitat there is pretty important to protect and we we’ve neer done any archaeologi cal studies there so there could be pre-history ruins in the area as well,” said Boulon. While the property doesn’t actually abut the V.I. Coral Reef National Monument, it’s proximity means any development on the land would certainly impact the fragile area, Boulon added. reef habitat and there are impor tant sea grass beds that would certainly be impacted by develop ment in the area as well as the park on the north side of the property,” he said. The land is owned by Family Properties Caribbean LLC (FPC) a long-time client of Morrisette and Muilenburg LLP, Attorneys at Law. The land is zoned R-2 (residential medium-density), which allows for two dwelling units per expressed an interest in applying for a Group Dwelling permit to get the “highest and best use” of the land, according to Attorney Rafael Muilenburg. “Various people have been looking at these parcels, with several showings recently, including certain stateside developers,” he said. “Zoning of all the parcels is R-2, so we believe that the ‘highest and best use’ (and the likely form of development) would be to construct at least 20 condominium dwelling units — up to 28, given that there are 3.6 acres with two dwellings potentially allowed on “The condo units would probably be clustered on the hill adja cent to the VINP-facing east, probably using a group dwelling permit as permitted by DPNR regula tions,” said Muilenburg. “Parking and other amenities (tennis courts adjacent to the trail up to the north beach. Needless to say, for those who love Haulover in its natural state, this would not be a great outcome.” FPC, however, is looking to sell the property, Muilenburg added. “The seller has recently dropped the market price of the Haulover parcels from approximately $3 million down to $1.9 million,” said the attorney. “We believe something is likely to happen soon on this that will forever remove the possibility of conservation.” To avoid a new condominium development on St. John, FPC principal David Prevo is willing to sell the land for conservation at the discounted price of $800,000, according to Muilenburg. “David is a longtime fan of the Park, and is intrigued about the opment at Dreekets Bay of dedicating this piece as conservation property,” Muilenburg said. “As such, FPC would be willing to sell it for conservation at the amount they paid for it about 10 years ago, plus property taxes and other costs incurred, approximately $800,000 total, which is half or less of the likely market price.” FPC can’t afford to just donate the land to V.I. National Park and in turn the VINP’s hands are tied sition, Muilenburg explained. Two years ago the national nonthe money needed to purchase the 400-plus acre Estate Maho Bay — the largest expansion of the park since its inception more than 50 years ago — to eventually sell to Continued on Page 16 WR-FitnessClub TW 6.09.indd 1 6/10/09 12:42:29 PM “The park is tied up right now — along with Friends of VINP and Trust for Public Land — with getting the various Maho acquisitions funded, which is a multi-year commitment they’ve already made. They do not feel they can start the process of requesting funding for Haulover for at least a few more years.”– Rafael Muilenburg,

PAGE 8

8 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds The St. John Community Foundation has a new helmswoman. After serving as the group’s resource developer since reins on Monday, February 7. Former SJCF executive direc tor Paul Devine, who led the group for three years, stepped down on February 4. “I decided to retire,” said Devine. “I tried to retire before I took the job and then decided to do it. I went into it with one of the best jobs I’ve ever had.” Devine led the group following former SJCF director Carole DeSenne’s passing and helped the organization grow both in its volunteer base and programs. “I really enjoyed building the community foundation up from what it was before,” said Devine. “We didn’t have too many programs going and now we have 12 major programs and we continue to grow.” Handing over leadership to Kalousek will ensure the continued growth of SJCF, Devine added. “Celia is so professional and experienced and her abilities are tremendous,” he said. “We’re blessed to have her taking over the position and she’s really going to make SJCF even better.” Devine is transitioning to the SJCF board of directors, which also counts Lonnie Willis, Senator at Large Craig Barshigner, Harry Daniels, Jessica Richards-Daly, Ronnie Jones, Leslie Smith, Rob Crane, Oswin Sewer and Alecia Wells among its ranks. Kalousek has been working with and supporting local launched the organization Community Service Involvement teer time in order for students to graduate,” said Kalousek. they dropped that to 100 hours because kids were having a together,” said the SJCF executive director. “What we found and keep them engaged. We’re already seeing a lot of improvement there.” Kalousek has also worked closely with COAST, a local substance abuse prevention group, as well as the Island Green Building Association. Collaborating with various island organizations is exactly the trend Kalousek plans to foster at SJCF. “My two main things are promoting volunteerism and being a volunteer coordinator,” she said. “If we know you want to volunteer, we can farm you out to whatever organization needs you. We are not operating in a vacuum and we don’t want to duplicate what another organization is doing, but we can support their efforts with volunteers and resources.” SJCF’s programs like Dial-A-Ride and aluminum can recycling will also be boosted under Kalousek’s leadership. “We’re focusing on growing the programs we have going already,” she said. “For Dial-a-Ride we now have a commu nity bus and have been expanding our route. Our recycling efforts are being expanded into a full Go Green Initiative through which we are collaborating with other island organizations in order to expand the entire island’s environmen tal programs.” The new executive director of SJCF is in the process of obtaining her Master’s Degree in educational psychology at the University of the Virgin Islands. Her studies at UVI relate directly to her work at SJCF. “One of my professors is the director of United Way in the Virgin Islands and my research project will be turned in Kalousek is also focused on getting the community more involved in directing the community foundation, she added. “We really want to hear what the public wants as far as programs and plans for the future,” said Kalousek. “I see a lot more collaboration as far as working with the commu nity. We have so many talented and willing people on this island and if we focused that, we could achieve amazing results.” SJCF’s annual meeting is scheduled for Monday, March 28, at the Fish Trap Restaurant. A dinner will be hosted at 6 p.m. with the meeting kicking off at 7 p.m. and the community is invited. “Come to dinner or the meeting or both and tell us what is important to you,” Kalousek said. “We have two and a half acres at Bellevue where we’re planning to build a community center and we just got a grant to clear the area. We have so many ideas of what we can do there, but we want to know what the community wants.” Kalousek is keeping the organization’s website, www. sjcf.org, up to date and residents can register to volunteer in any area of interest right on the site. For Kalousek, volunteering is something intrinsic to a healthy community. “It’s simple — be a part of the change you want to see happen,” she said. “We all have something to give. Even if all you have is time, that could be really valuable to someone else.” For more information about SJCF or to volunteer, call of The Marketplace. Kalousek T akes Over Reins of St. John Community Foundation St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Jaime ElliottCelia Kalousek ATTENTION ST. JOHN HOMEOWNERSHIRING PROFESSIONALS TO MAINT AIN YOUR HOME ISNOT AN EXTRAVAGANCEI T ISSMART BUSINESS SENSE CONTACT THE PROFESSIONALS AT Cimmaron Property ManagementS t. John’s Premier Property M anagement Company Providing:COMPREHENSIVE MAINTENANCE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT GUEST SERVICES (340) 715-2666 / www.cimmaronstjohn.com / info@cimmaronstjohn.com P.O. Box 37, St. John, VI 00831 / Lumberyard Complex – Cruz Bay

PAGE 9

St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 9 By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds gearing up to celebrate a milestone at their annual auction on Satur day, March 12, at the Westin Resort and Villas. The night marks the silver anniversary of the annual auction to support the island school, which began as the Pine Peace School 33 years ago. That small school grew into today’s kindergarten through 12th grade GHS, following a merger with the Coral Bay School in 2004. The March 12 auction will honor the school’s founding members while raising money for the GHS scholarship fund, upon which 60 percent of the student body relies, according to Molly Murrill, GHS’ development director assistant. “First and foremost we are honoring the founding families of Pine Peace School which was started 33 years ago,” said Murrill. “Janet and Andy Rutnik, Donald and Debbie Schnell, Dorothy and Peter Muilenburg and Viktor and Anna Johansson were the families which started it all.” The theme of the 25th annual auction, which kicks off at 5:30 p.m. with cocktails and a silent auction, is “Honoring Our Past, Celebrating Our Future.” The event will keep guests entertained throughout the night with a live auction and a few exciting games. The silent auction will give guests a chance to bid on a bevy of items, from original paintings to handcrafted birdhouses. Featured artists this year include John Dickson, Les Anderson, Janet Rutnik, Bernice Shaller and Lisa Etre among others. The night’s featured photographer is Bob Schlessinger of Tropical Focus, who has prepared a wide range of images highlighting his diverse talent behind the lens. Darron and Hope Mares, from Mares Auction Group, will be back again this year leading the live auction which includes a number of enticing travel packages, jewelry and more. The night will also feature a screening of Steve Simonsen’s video about GHS, which the renowned local photographer unveils each year at the event. “Steve’s video is also a highlight of the night,” said Murrill. “It really hits home the point of why we are raising money for the school.” Last year’s auction raised hoping to top that on March 12. To the evening. Tickets for the auction are $125 each and tables of 10 are available ing guests to pre-register with their credit cards and contact information to avoid long lines at the entrance, Murrill added. “Guests who pre-register their tables will enjoy the discounted table price of $900,” Murrill said. “It’s just a little incentive to get people to pre-register so we don’t have those lines piling up when guests arrive.” Last year’s popular game the “Wall of Wine” is back again. GHS secures donations of bottles of wine — last year the “wall” featured 100 bottles — and then plays a “last man standing” type of game.GHS Marks Silver Anniversary of Annual Auction; Full Night of Fun Is Planned for March 12Continued on Page 16 Gold Addy Award Best Magazine Design Wagwear ON SALEHighest quality pet collars, leads, treats, sporting wear and MUCH, MUCH more. 340.777.9588 www.stjohnimals.com

PAGE 10

St. John Tradewinds The V.I. Audubon Society has been raising money for the past 13 years through its plant sale. The funds are used to sponsor numerous programs for local school children on St. John, preservation and restoration efforts at the Small Pond at Frank Bay — a Virgin Islands-designated Wildlife and Marine Sanctuary and area adopted by the Audubon Society — and participate in events on Earth Day and Reef Fest hosted by the Friends of the V.I. National Park. This year’s plant sale will be on Saturday, March 5, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Nazareth Lutheran Church in Cruz Bay. Once again Audubon will offer a wide variety of plants for sale. Anyone looking to add palms, coleus, bay trees, desert rose, agaves, ground covers, orchids and other garden favorites to their landscapes, should make sure to stop by the plant sale. Tomato plants and herbs will also be for sale. Anyone who would like to donate plants (plants in pots only, please) for the sale, just drop them off at the church yard on March 5 between 8 and 9 a.m. For fur ther information contact co-chairs Dave Spoth at (716) 472-6888 or Mary Moroney at 779-8091.10 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 V.I. RC&D Council Seeking Students for 2011 Georgia Conservation Camp V.I. Audubon Plant Sale T o Be March 5 at Lutheran Church Sun Power Loans for Solar Water HeatersNo money down Low Interest loan Up to $2,500 in rebateDon’t pay to heat Your Water; do it free, use the for a cleaner, greener Virgin Islands. St. John Tradewinds The V.I. Resource Conservation & Development Council, Inc. (V.I. RC&D) is seeking 10 Vir gin Islands’ high school students between the ages of 15 and 18 to attend the 2011 Natural Resources Conservation Workshop from June 5 to 9, at the Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College in Tifton, Georgia. The week-long conservation camp is usually only open to Geor gia students; but through the sponsorship of V.I. RC&D and the V.I. Urban Forestry Council, over 48 USVI students have participated ing experience since 2003. V.I. RC&D is looking for youth who are mature and interested in the natural sciences and/or agriculture. Students selected to par ticipate will be exposed to various natural resources: soil; water; air; plants; minerals; and animals. Student applicants must be between 15 and 18 years of age, but not a graduating senior at the time a registration and medical applica tion form, provide copies of valid insurance and proof of citizenship with photo ID (e.g. valid passport), and submit a one-page essay describing their interest in natural resources and/or agriculture and why they wish to participate in the conservation camp. Information on the conservation camp and application packages are available from the V.I. RC&D OfBuilding in Gallows Bay, or by Application packages can also be downloaded from the V.I. RC&D website at www.usvircd. org. The application deadline is March 31. Additional information on the Georgia Natural Resources Conservation Workshop and the Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College is also available at www. abac.edu/psbo/nrcw/. This project is generously funded by a grant from the V.I. Department of Agriculture Urban & Community Forestry Assistance Program.2011 Summer Food Program Applications AvailableSt. John Tradewinds from its usual home in Frank Powell Sr. Park, above, to the Nazareth Lutheran Church. trition Programs announces the availability of the FY 2011 Summer Food Service Program (SFSP). School age children two years through 18 years may receive free meals through SFSP. Persons 19 years of age and over who termined by a State or Local Educational Agency, and who partici program established for the mentally or physically disabled, is also eligible to receive meals. Sponsor Application Package or more information may contact the

PAGE 11

By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds hosted by the St. John American Legion, local youth were in danger of sitting on the sidelines this season. is no longer the case. Da Football League is in full swing and the four teams already have two games under their belt. Launched by Kent Wessinger, the league, which was created by Brummel Germain. “I was playing catch with my son one day and within 15 minutes, all of a sudden 25 kids were here wanting to play,” said Wessinger. “I sat up in the bleachers watching and I really felt this fragrance of around and these kids had nothing to do.” “I knew I had an opportunity to help and give life to these kids,” Wessinger said. Now that scent of despair has been replaced with laughter and the sounds of football practice and games. Da Football League, for youth between 8 and 12, has four teams, modeled after the men’s league. The Junior Bulldogs, Jr. Wildcats, Jr. Boondocks and at 5 and 6 p.m., just before the men’s games, which start at 7 p.m. “I wanted to make sure the kids felt like they were important,” said Wessinger. “The kids play two games there are people in the stands and the PA system is on.” Da Football League will also play its playoff and superbowl games when the men’s football league does in the last week of April. Practices are Wednesday from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Each team has three coaches, one adult and two high school students, who are getting volunteer hours Wessinger, Germain, Sergio Adams and Ganson Pollack are also adult coaches. While the league keeps the kids playing, it also helps them to dream big. sixth grader at JESS and member of the Jr. Wildcats. St. JohnTradewinds News Photo by Jaime ElliottWessinger, center, launched Da Football League to keep island 8to 12-year-olds on St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 11 League Keeps St. John Youth Playing Flag Football If you are in need of provisioning for villas, hotels, marinas or boats, let Starsh Market and Starsh Gourmet & Wines supply your customers or cater your next event. – We DELIVER.Our full service supermarket offers Choice Cut Meats, Fresh Seafood, huge variety of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables, a full service Deli with a Prepared Foods department and an on-site Bakery where breads and pastries are baked throughout the day making them always fresh! You can easily get what you need at Starfish Market.Starsh Gourmet & Wines has the largest selection of Wines, Liquor and Beer on island at a good price and un-matched personal service. Compliment your beverages with gourmet cheeses, appetizers and snacks. Come on by to speak to us about your special order needs. Both Starsh Market Store Manager Nedra Ephraim at 340-779-4949 or Starsh Gourmet & Wines Manager Paul Tsakares at 340-715-3663 will happily accommodate your provisioning needs. Starfish Market – Located at the Marketplace Open Every Day 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. R e s t a ur a n t L i v e M us i c S e r i e sS at u r d a y , F eb r u a r y 1 9 6 : 3 0 p m – 9 : 3 0 p m S k i n n y L eg s, H o t C l u b o f C o r a l B a y S t r i n g S w i n g V o c a l s 6 : 3 0 p m – 9 : 3 0 p m M o r g a n ’ s M a n g o , L u b a P i a n o V o c a l 7 p m – 1 0 p m R h u m b l i n e s , L a u r e n G u i t a r V o c a l S u n d a y , F e b r u ar y 2 0 1 0 a m – 2 p m M i ss L u c y ’ s B r u n c h , S a m b a c o m b o L a t i n J a z z 1 0 a m – 1 p m C o n c o r d i a B r u n c h , B o G u i t a r 3 : 3 0 p m – 6 : 3 0 p m A q u a B i st r o , L a u r e n G u i t a r V o c a l 6 : 3 0 p m – 9 : 3 0 p m S h i p w r e c k L an d i n g H o t C l u b o f C o r a l B a y S t r i n g S w i n g V o c a l s 6 : 3 0 p m – 8 : 3 0 p m O c e a n G r i l l , D a v i d La a b s C l a s s i c a l / C o n t e m p . G u i t a r M o n d a y , F e b r u a r y 2 1 6 p m – 9 p m O c e a n G r i l l , C h r i s C a r s e l G u i t a r V o c a l 6 : 3 0 p m – 9 : 3 0 p m L a T a p a, S a m b a c o m b o L a t i n J a z z 7 p m – 1 0 p m H i g h T i d e , S t e v e n S l o a n G u i t a r V o c a l 7 p m – 1 0 p m R h u m b l i n e s , D a v i d La a b s C l a s s i c a l / C o n t e m p . G u i t a r T u e s d a y , F e b r u a r y 2 2 6 : 3 0 p m – 9 : 3 0 p m M o r g a n ’ s M a n g o , G r e g K i n s l o w G u i t a r 7 p m – 1 0 p m I s l a n d B l u es, L a u r e n a n d B o G u i t a r V o c a l s 7 p m – 1 0 p m H i g h T i d e , T B i r d G u i t a r V o c a l 7 p m – 1 0 p m S h i p w r e c k L an d i n g , C h r i s C a r s e l G u i t a r V o c a l W e d n es d a y , F e b r u ar y 2 3 5 : 3 0 p m – 7 p m C o c o n u t C o a st S t u d i o , S t . J o h n F l u t e s F l u t e D u e t 7 p m – 1 0 p m I sl an d B l u e s, J a m e s C o b b G u i t a r V o c a l 7 p m – 1 0 p m H i g h T i d e , C h r i s C a r s e l G u i t a r V o c a l 7 p m – 1 0 p m S u n D o g C af , O p e n M i k e G u i t a r s V o c a l s T h u r s d a y , F e b r u a r y 2 4 6 p m – 9 p m B an an a D ec k , L e m u e l C a l l w o o d S t e e l P a n 6 p m – 9 p m M i ss L u c y ’ s, R i c h & G r e g g J a z z 6 : 3 0 p m – 9 : 3 0 p m S k i n n y L eg s, L a u r e n G u i t a r V o c a l 6 : 3 0 p m – 9 : 3 0 p m O c e a n G r i l l , R a s c i o S t e e l P a n 6 : 3 0 p m – 9 : 3 0 p m M o r g a n ’ s M a n g o , M a r k W a l l a c e G u i t a r V o c a l 7 p m – 1 0 p m H i g h T i d e , S t e v e S l o a n G u i t a r V o c a l F r i d ay , F e b r u a r y 2 5 5 : 3 0 p m – 8 : 3 0 p m A q u a B i s t r o , M a r k W a l l a c e G u i t a r V o c a l 6 p m – 9 p m O c e a n G r i l l , L u b a P i a n o V o c a l 6 : 3 0 p m – 9 : 3 0 p m M o r g a n ’ s M a n g o , L a u r e n G u i t a r V o c a l 7 p m – 1 0 p m H i g h T i d e , J o h n L e e G u i t a r V o c a l 7 p m – 1 0 p m S k i n n y L eg s, C h r i s C a r s e l G u i t a r V o c a l The community is invited to come out and join Eddie Bruce and friends in a weekly drumming showcase at Cinnamon Bay amphitheater on Thursday evenings starting at 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by Friends of V.I. National Park, the weekly showcase highlights drumming, dancing and more with audience participation always welcome. Great fun for the entire family awaits at Cinnamon Bay amphitheater, each Thursday night through April.Join Eddie Bruce and Friends sfor Drumming Showcase on Thurs-lic last week that effective Monday, February 14, all previously issued burning permits were revoked. There will be no issuance of new burning permits throughout the St. Thomas/St. John district until further notice. Residents are urged to be mindful of dry weather conditions and circumstances which make burning rubbish at this time extremely hazardous. Battiste apologized for any inconvenience.Fire Service Revokes Burning Permits

PAGE 12

12 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 Junior Achievement Program To Be Discussed at Next STJ Chamber Chapter Meeting Feb. 22 at Cruz Bay Battery Roundabout at right took the second regatta of the season, Island Hopper, hosted by The St. John Yacht Club.St. John Tradewinds News Photo Courtesy of Jim FurneauxSt. John Tradewinds Cheryl Francis, Junior Achievement of the Virgin Islands Chair, (and the Lt. Governor’s wife); Jason Charles, Project Manage, Bonny Corbeil, JAVI Board Member, and Pastor Themba, Acting JAVI Executive Director, will be making a presentation at the monthly meeting of the St. John Chapter of the St. Thomas/St. John Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday, February 22, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Cruz Bay Battery. The Junior Achievement of the Virgin Islands (JAVI) Program is designed to introduce students to the principles of budgets, taxes, savings and spending. Through experience-based learning with professional development programs and volunteers from the community, students learn about the relationship between education and successful participation in the economy. JAVI Programs partner with local businesses and Educators to teach students the economics of life. The St. John business community is invited to hear about this exciting program and to consider being involved as either a JAVI Program volunteer or help the program “grow” JAVI for other class levels and skill building. At present they have two 7th and 8th grade classes slated to begin at Julius E. Sprauve School soon, with their ultimate goal being to reach out to all of the children and offer these much needed skills at other levels. “Please consider the great impact you can make as a St. John business person for our children’s future success,” said chamber St. John community on the great need for this program for our children but to get business people ‘on board’ to consider being directly involved in doing the programs in the classrooms.” “There is only a six week/one-and-a-half-hour direct time commitment in doing this, and JAVI does a great training session that kit will be available and training will happen on St. John when enough volunteers have signed up. The St. John Chapter looks forward to seeing you on Tuesday.” crane ROBERT CRANEARCHITECT, A.I.A.P .O. BOX 370 CRUZ BAY, ST. JOHN U.S.V.I. 00831(340) 776-6356 Sunday Brunch 9am-1pm LIVE Classical Guitar MusicServing Breakfast & Dinner Outdoor Dining Overlooking Salt Pond BayCall Us for Seasonal Hours 340.693.5855 St. John, U.S. Virgin IslandsBreakfast Served: 8:00-10:00am Happy Hour: 5:00-6:00pm Dinner Served: 6:00-9:00pm By Jim Furneaux St. John Tradewinds The St. John Yacht Club’s Island Hopper regatta winner, Paul Stoeken of St. Thomas, skippered his JC-24, Roundabout to a second straight victory in convincing fashion Saturday, February 12. In January, Stoeken and his crew won the club’s Duke’s Trophy Race. The regatta experienced perfect sailing weather for most of the race with 12 to 15 knot winds in three to four foot seas. The participants were however subjected to a passing storm late in the race which tested the racer’s mettle. The start between Two Brothers rocks and Lovango Cay was very competitive but Roundabout took an Zing and Southbound down past Lovango, Mingo and Grass Cays and then around Thatch Cay. As the sailor’s approached the west end of Grass Cay, Zing’s skipper George Stuckert took the aggressive approach of passing between Boss Rock and Grass Cay to put the vessel securely in second place. Stuckert’s move was somewhat daring as Boss Rock is notorious for the number of boats that have come a cropper on its well hidden danger zone. The course measured a total of 17.5 miles. Roundabout Zing in second and Larry Boxerman’s Southbound was the third boat. Roundabout’s skipper, Stoeken, a sailing instructor from St. Thomas, was presented the Bill Morris Trophy by Lee Morris, widow of the late past St. Yacht Club Commodore for whom the trophy is named. The next St. John Yacht Club regatta is the Around St. John Race currently scheduled for April 10. The organizers are considering switching the date to Saturday, April 9, and hope to hear from racers about their preferences. For more information call SJYC Commodore Scott Barnett at 693-8577.Roundabout T akes Second Straight Regatta in W inning Island Hopper

PAGE 13

St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 13 St. John Tradewinds I recently came back from a school trip to Italy with the Gifft Hill School. It was truly amazing! The sights were fantastic, the food was incredible and the people were friendly and interesting. St. John is an exotic place to live but Italy is right up there on the list of amazing places in the world. We spent 11 awesome days exploring Venice, Florence and Rome. to Venice. Soaring over the incredible snow-capped mountains which penetrated the sky below is an image I will never forget. The Venice airport was small and a little dreary, but dreary was soon outweighed by the sights that we passed on the water taxi on the way to our hotel. Now don’t get me wrong, you don’t take a water taxi everywhere; you actually do a lot of walking. There are endless steps and cobblestone streets. But it was great to get away from cars, be responsible for your own transportation and work off all those calories from the delicious food. hotel that had everything you needed. From the hotel, we explored St. ace. The palace had the most incredible art I have ever seen. How would feel if you had goldunder them made me feel special. I couldn’t imagine being the artist laying horizontal for hours upon hours to create it. We saw the Grand Canal and some churches too. The buildings were fantastic and the true Italian food was also incredible. American food has nothing on Italian; even the CocaCola was better there. The gelato, like ice cream only richer and better, was so good. We spent many days gelato hunting throughout the trip. It was so delicious! Florence was our next stop, which was a nice change. The temperature was warmer and the sun greeted us as we stepped off the fast train. Our hotel was almost in the center of the bustling town, making it easy to explore all day. had to see was the Duomo. It’s pretty hard to miss a large tower ing dome above the middle of the city. Florence was the place to shop, and especially for leather in particular. In parts of the city, an aroma of leather wafted through the streets and the smell of rich food accompanied it. A big part of Florence was the David, the famous sculpture, as seum of various art forms and artists. The Pitti Palace and Boboli Gardens were also impressive. All were truly amazing, really simply mind-blowing. The last city we visited was also the biggest, Rome. Rome was huge compared to the previous cities St. Peters Cathedral. The inside of the cathedral was so amazing; the art on the walls which looked like paintings were really mosaics. It was intense to see how this huge sembled to make a single master piece. After St. Peters, we went toward the bridges in search of food; the sun was starting to set and the lights were just coming on in the city. We had a great meal followed by the best gelato on the trip. I have The next day in Rome we visited the Vatican where we spent endless hours looking at all the artwork. I never knew how amazing “art” could be. The Coliseum and the Pantheon were also interesting places to visit. Rome was a great city to experience. If I could go to Italy again, I would go in a heartbeat. There was so much to do and so many places to explore. The culture was intriguing and the people interesting and friendly. I can’t even come close to really explaining how amazing it was, you have to experience yourself. I miss the food and sights already, I can’t wait to go back. Editor’s Note: St. John Tradewinds, at least unnew student “Rhythm and Views” writer next month. 2010 Gold Addy Award Magazine Design St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Coral BreuningThe sights in Venice, above, were truly awe-inspiring. ABSOLUTE BEST DEAL ON ST. JOHN! Breathtaking panoramic views of BVI, Hurricane Hole and Coral Bay from this high elevation, downhill-build parcel, in quiet, upscale neighborhood of Upper Carolina. Paved road access, great terms! e-mail Carl at cjnpc@optonline.net or call 516.459.6480. Your name, your love, your wisdom, your spirit lives on. Love Dwaine, Angela, Christina, Bryce-Jaden, and Constance CONST ANCE PETER 02/19/195712/28/2005 Rhythm & ViewsAn outlook on young adult interests and concerns by Coral BreuningAn Amazing Class Trip to Italy

PAGE 14

14 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 Crossword Answers — Puzzle on Page 20 Keeping Track of Crime 2011-TO-DATEHomicides: 0 Shootings: 0 Stabbings: 0 1st Degree Burglaries: 0 2nd Degree Burglaries: 2 3rd Degree Burglaries: 2 Grand Larcenies: 6 Rapes: 0 Letters To St. John TradewindsWHAT DO YOU THINK?Send your letter to editor@tradewinds.viNEXT DEADLINE: THURSDAY , FEBRUAR Y 24THThe St. John School of the Arts Broadway Comes to St. John event on Friday was an exciting success. The performance by the 4th graders from our island schools, Gifft Hill, Guy Benjamin, Julius E. Sprauve and the students from the School of the Arts had the audience cheering at both performances as we raised over $30,000 for the school! The 52 students who worked for two weeks learn ing acting, singing, dancing and puppetry under the Donna Drake, Michael Shawn Lewis, Rhonda Miller and John Tartaglia, made the original musical production “Dream, Wish, Believe” a rousing success. We’re more than grateful to the performers who willingly gave both their time and the money for their expenses and transportation to St. John. We’re indebted to Mike Ryan, the general manager of the Westin Resort and Villas, for making the entire evening possible and to Donald Sussman, our Super Star Angel. We’re grateful, too, to the 100 Angels who contributed $200 each to attend the performance and “dine-around.” We’re especially indebted to the seven restaurants who, not only wined and dined our “Angels” but gramake the dine-around possible. Our heartfelt thanks to La Tapa, Lime Inn, Morgan’s Mango, Ocean Grill, Rhumb Lines, Waterfront Grill and Zozo’s. All of us on the Board of Directors at St. John School of the Arts urge the readers of Tradewinds to do what we are going to do by patronizing these seven restaurants throughout the year. It’s the one way we can say a real and big Thank You to the restaurants that literally “stepped up to the plate” to give our St. John youngsters a meaningful educational experience. If you were among the hundreds who saw the exciting production. Ronnie Lee, Vice President On behalf of the Board of Directors St. John School of the ArtsFourth Graders Put On an Amazing Production Mathayom Private Chefs would like to thank all of our stellar staff who so generously donated their time and efforts towards making this year’s Friends of Vir gin Islands National Park Gala such a huge success: Chef Steve Yerger, Chris Keefer, Jose Sanchez, Adam Raftery, Chef Erica Miner, Fletcher Kelley, Sarah Swan, Lindsey Soper, Meaghan Enright, Mike Gargoulio, Dane Tarr and Micah Miksch. Waterfront Bistro and Baked in the Sun for providing desserts. A special thanks to Jeremy King of Low Key Dive Shop and Jaana Martin for providing the means to get actual Roti wrappers from Tortola. We could not have done it without you! Thanks for looking good and making us look good, too. Mathayom “Mat” Vacharat Mathayom Private Chefs I am writing about the highly inappropriate, heart less manner, which the St. John Animal Care Center Board members have practiced with regard to the employment change of Ms. Connie Joseph. With all due respect ladies and gentlemen, have you board members lost your minds? The St. John embrace technology, and it won’t be the last. If a determination was made to modify or eliminate a position, as was apparently made last fall, there was no need to wait until months and months later, then sudperson on the spot. This type of termination, and it was a termination, should be reserved for an employee whose perfor mance is very highly unsatisfactory. If there was no longer funding to pay for a manager, then why was Connie not simply laid off? homeless animals of our island, much less their car ing, dependable, loyal keeper? Why not hire an IT consultant on a contract, or on a part time basis, to get the ball rolling in a new direction? Why not temporarily cut back the manager’s paid hours, until additional funding is secured on-line, or via other means? These options could have at least been discussed with the manager, before walking in Yes, it is no secret to any of us that Connie has health challenges. However, many of us do, right? What has always impressed me is the fact that she still gets all of her duties done; day in and day out, no matter what it takes. Connie does not have a lazy bone in her body; she knows the people of this island, and she cares about the welfare of our animals. It would take at least two able bodied people to replace her, and I am not sure they would be willing to stick with it, once they have to face the unpleasant realities, including the type of physical abuse of our animals which Connie has to often face, and which the legal system mostly ignores. St. John Animal Care Center Board Members — you have thrown out the proverbial baby with the bath water. You have also alienated many of the center’s supporters. Please re-think your decision before it is too late. Very Sincerely, Susan MannThrowing Out the Baby with the Bath WaterMathayom Private Chefs Crew Makes Friends Gala Delicious

PAGE 15

St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 15 Letters to Tradewinds The phone number of the Julius E. Sprauve School, listed in the February 7-13 issue of St. John Tradewinds was incorrect. The school’s phone number is 776-6336. Tradewinds apologizes for the error.Correction: Where are the leaders of this community and what are they thinking? Last week’s Tradewinds was very interesting. There was an article and a letter from a visitor about a cop roughing up a lady for not wearing her seat belt properly, under the “Make every visitor feel special” sign. So the leaders of the community corrected the problem, by removing the sign. On the next page was the article about Frank Powell Sr. Park being closed and fenced off for the rest of the season. What it didn’t say was the sidewalks around the park were going to be fenced off also. So now our leaders are proposing to have hundreds of people every hour getting off the ferry and walking in the road, amongst the cars, trucks, safari buses and Vitran buses while dragging suitcases. We are in a very fragile economic environment and not only are our leaders proposing to raise the gross receipts tax and the room tax and force us to pay two years of property taxes in one year, but they are Which is the only kind of business that we have. The timing of this project not only affects the small businesses that set up in the park, and the businesses adjacent to it, but it affects every business on St. John. I suggest either putting this project off until after St. John Festival or moving the ferry operation to the Creek dock until the project is completed, soon come. I think that it is time that the leaders of this community get out amongst the people and get to know this community, see how it functions and start to try and make it better. Greg Miller St. John Tradewinds Governor John deJongh proclaimed the month of February as “Dental Health Month” in the U.S. Virgin Islands, a time to concentrate on efforts to promote dental health education. Good physical and mental health can be achieved through healthy habits learned early and practiced throughout life, including regular dental care. The American Dental Health Association advises main taining dental health by eating well, practicing good hygiene and getting regular check-ups. Good dental health habits are essential to one’s overall well being. The Virgin Islands Department of Health, through its Division of Dental Health Services, annually marks the observance of Dental Health Month by conducting dental health screenings, examinations, public educa tion and related activities in the territory’s schools. The future of the territory is dependent on the good health of our children, the leaders of tomorrow.February Is Dental Health Month in V.I.It’s Time for Leaders To Get To Know the St. John CommunityOnesie the Cat Is MissingAfter maintaining a feeding station in Estate Susanaberg for a decade, an island cat lover has lost one of her beloved kitties. The grey and white neutered male island cat, Onesie, has not been seen for three weeks and her human and cat friends are worried. Onesie is a timid elderly cat. He has a very close cat friend who has been terribly depressed since he has gone missing. He might have been trapped and relocated on accident. Anyone who has spotted Onesie or knows of his whereabouts is asked to contact the St. John Tradewinds at 776-6496 or email editor@tradewinds.vi. Onesie and his friends thank you!

PAGE 16

“Guests get into the game by purchasing $50 — and play a heads or tails game which whittles down the audience little by little until there are games continues until there is only one person left standing, and that person wins the ‘wall.’” The school made a lot of money on last year’s Wall of Wine because the winner, Dustin Prudhomme, turned around and donated the wine right back to the school, Murrill added. “Ultimately we were able to auction the wine off in a live auction and raised a lot of money for the school,” she said. Residents are encouraged to donate bottles of will donate 10 percent of the purchase price of wines for the GHS auction right to the school’s scholarship fund, Murrill added. Another game at the auction will allow guests the chance to take home a stunning diamond and silver necklace from R&I Patton. Guests can pur have a chance to win the necklace. The popular golden ticket from last year is back again as well, Murrill added. “Golden tickets are $100 each and when you purchase a ticket you are given a list of the travel packages which are going to be auctioned off,” said the GHS development director assistant. “Last year we had about 15 items on the list and the golden ticket winner is able to choose which travel package they want. Then we don’t auction that item off and the winner gets it.” “The packages can be valued at up to $5,000,” said Murrill. “Last year Jonathan Doran won and he chose the Beaver Creek trip so we didn’t auction that off.” After the festivities at the Westin wrap up, GHS Mar in Mongoose Junction, for an after party and a chance to raise even more money for GHS. “We’re having the after party this year at La Plancha del Mar; we’ll have a DJ, a few more Murrill. “We’re sort of toting this as a party and you don’t have to be an auction guest to attend. Auction guests will have free entrance, and we’re asking the public to make a donation in order to join the party.” The night would not be possible without the generosity of the Westin Resort, which is the event’s biggest sponsor, Murrill explained. “Westin is our biggest supporter with the location, the food and the staff,” she said. “We couldn’t do this without them.” The auction is GHS’ main fundraising event of the year and comes together thanks to a team of hardworking parent volunteers. GHS is still accepting donations for live and silent auctions. Call the school at 776-1730 to pre-register, pur chase golden tickets and to donate.16 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 GHS Auction Silver AnniversaryContinued from Page 9 VINP, Muilenburg explained. “The park is tied up right now — along with Friends of VINP and Trust for Public Land — with getting the variis a multi-year commitment they’ve already made,” said Muilenburg. “They do not feel they can start the process of least a few more years.” With that road a dead end, Muilenburg and FPC have been pursuing a different route to getting the resources at Haulover protected. Muilenburg and Prevo have been working with another national conservation group, called The for eventual transfer to VINP. A boundary adjustment by VINP — which it does not have the funding to burg added. “Without the boundary adjustment, TCF cannot buy the parcels, since they are not yet in the park’s system for funds allocation, and they need to get assur ance of prompt repayment,” said the attorney. “A real ‘catch-22’ and the clock is ticking for development.” Which is where the community comes into the picture. Muilenburg has outlined a conservation land structure in which supporters would essentially make zero-interest loans or outright donations to TCF, which would then use the funds to buy Haulover from FPC. “We have proposed a structure in which interested residents, the ‘Friends of Haulover,’ would make donations or zero-interest ‘conservation loans,’ working with, TCF,” said the attorney. “TCF then would use the money to buy the property and hold it until the VINP buys it, at which point the loans to the St. John supporters would be repaid using the VINP funds.” “Or we may be able to ‘buy out’ the loan people if we get more donations later on,” Muilenburg said. The proposal’s advantages include TCF’s national prominence, its ability to take over responsibility for liability, insurance and other expenses and its 501c3 status — allowing a tax deduction for donations — and avoiding the need to form a new entity, explained Muilenburg. The proposal, however, relies on the future assurance of VINP’s commitment to purchase the land and then repay the loans. “The VINP will issue us a letter of assurance stating their intent to purchase the property, acknowledging that the investors are relying on the park’s assurance, and stating that Haulover will be the park’s top priority for funding once the Maho purchases are funded,” said Muilenburg. “The park believes nite period.” “This would need to be a mediumto long-term commitment, but the money will eventually be repaid,” said the attorney. “If the VINP should fail to follow through, TCF would be able to sell it to a conservation buyer to get funds to repay the loans. Muilenburg is looking for substantial donations — $100,000 or more — from residents interested in preserving Haulover. So far the local attorney has raised about $200,000 and is hoping to attract more donors. “We are hoping for donations or loan commitments in the range of $100,000 or more to make this happen, and to prevent the group from becoming too large, which makes coordination unwieldy,” Muilenburg said. “But we will consider smaller amounts if needed. In addition to loans, we are hoping some people will be able to donate funds — the advantage there is that they would receive a tax writeoff for the amounts donated.” “So far we have $200,000 in commit ments toward the $800,000 needed,” he said. “Of that $100,000 is in loan funds an the other $100,000 is in donations.” Muilenburg is working as the threat of development inches closer with the opportunity to preserve a special piece of St. John hanging in the balance. “This is a chance to really make a difference for the VINP and for St. John,” said Muilenburg. “I’d imagine we could on the site honoring those who have isfaction of keeping Haulover natural and undeveloped would be the biggest reward.” To contribute toward the conservation of Haulover or for more information on TCF proposal, call Muilenburg at 6938255 or email raf@stjohnvilaw.com.Future of Haulover Hangs in the BalanceContinued from Page 7

PAGE 17

The V.I. Audubon Society will host its annual plant sale on March 5, at Nazareth Lutheran Church. Mary Moroney and Dave Spoth are chairing the plant sale this year. One gallon pots are needed, and can be dropped off at Elaine Estern’s studio. The group is trying to propagate more native and non-invasive plants to sell this year. With that in mind, anyone who has Bay Rhum trees, any edible fruit or vegetables potted, are asked to donate these to the sale. Spoth will also be propagating some vegetables and ornamentals for the sale and orchids will be ordered. St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 17 Police LogFriday, February 11 9:11 p.m. An Estate Grunwald resident p/r that her landlord turned off the water in her apartment. Landlord/tenant dispute. 10:17 p.m. A Calabash Boom resident p/r that he was assaulted by a female tenant. Simple assault. 11:00 p.m. An Estate Little Plantation resident p/r that her vehicle was struck while driving on Centerline Road. Hit and run. Saturday, February 12 3:04 a.m. A citizen c/r a Maho Bay. Disturbance of the peace, D.V. 3:31 a.m. An Estate Power Boyd resident r/ that her neice destroyed her door. 3:15 p.m. An Estate Grunwald resident c/r that her landlord turned off the water in her apartment. Police assistance. 8:17 p.m. An Estate Enighed resident c/r that her peace was disturbed. Disturbance of the peace. Monday, February 14 7:20 a.m. V.I. Fire Service r/ damage to a vehicle at the Cruz Bay station. Damage to a vehicle. 4:43 p.m. A citizen r/ an auto accident in the area of the 6:13 p.m. An Estate Power Boyd resident r/ a disturbance. Disturbance of the peace. 6:43 p.m. A Coral Bay resident r/ an auto accident in the area of Cocoloba. Auto accident. 7:07 p.m. A Coral Bay resident r/ that he was assaulted. Assault in the third. 10:30 p.m. Badge #98 p/ at Leander Jurgen Command with one Buster Brady of Estate Little Plantation under arrest and charged with assault in the third. Bail was set at $25,000 by order of the court. He was detained at Leander Jurgen Command and later transported to the Bureau of Corrections on St. Thomas. 9:06 p.m. A citizen r/ a disturbance in the area of Dolphin Market. Disturbance of the peace. T uesday, February 15 1:13 a.m. A citizen r/ that she was assaulted at Guinea Grove Apartments. Aggravated assault and battery, D.V. 2:45 a.m. Badge #515 with Unit 431 p/ at Leander Jurgen Command with one Victor Rosa of Guinea Grove Apartments under arrest and charged with aggravated assault and battery, D.V. No bail was set by order of the court. He was detained at Leander Jurgen Command and later transported to the Bureau of Corrections on St. Thomas. 8:56 a.m. A citizen r/ an auto accident in the area of Estate Pine Peace. Auto accident. 1:51 p.m. A citizen p/r that he was threatened in the area of Coral Bay. Disturbance of the peace, threats. 5:04 p.m. A citizen r/ an auto accident in the area of South Shore Road near the Bureau of Motor Vehicles. Auto accident. W ednesday, February 16 9:23 p.m. Badge #747 p/ at Leander Jurgen Command with one Irvin Marsh under ar rest and charged with delaying duties. Bail was set at $500 by order of the court. He was detained at Leander Jurgen Command and later transported to the Bureau of Corrections on St. Thomas. Thursday, February 17 2:20 p.m. A citizen p/r an aggravated assault and battery, D.V. Aggravated assault and battery, D.V. 5:14 p.m. An Estate Enighed resident c/r a disturbance with her brother. Disturbance of the peace. 5:20 p.m. A citizen p/r an auto accident in the area of The Marketplace. Auto accident. The 25th Annual Gifft Hill School Auction will be Saturday, March 12, at the Westin Resort and Villas. For more information velopment@mac.com.25th Annual GHS Auction March 12The Animal Care Center of St. John announces new hours for the shelter. Visiting hours at ACC’s shelter are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. The shelter is closed Sunday and Monday. For more information call the ACC at 774-1625.Intermediate Bookkeeping Course To Begin March 29 at UVICELLThe University of the Virgin Islands Community Engagement and Lifelong Learning Center will be offering a course for individuals interested learning bookkeeping in order to function as an entry-level bookkeeper or manage their own books. On St. Thomas, Intermediate Bookkeeping will be from 6 to 9 p.m. on Tuesdays and Wednesdays beginning March 29. All sessions will be at the UVICELL Center on St. Thomas. journalize and post accrual, reconcile a bank statement, prepare payroll and much more. For more information or to register, call the UVICELL Center at 693-1100 or visit cell.uvi.edu. ACC Sets New Shelter Visiting Hours Annual Plant Sale Set for March 5The Unitarian Universalists of St. John meets at 9:45 a.m. each Sunday in the Great Room at Gifft Hill School. On February 27 the guest speaker is David Dorney, whose talk is titled, “Enough’ ain’t near enough.” For transportation from Cruz more information, visit www.uufstjohn.org.David Dorney Will Be Guest Speaker at UU’s February 27 Sunday Service No Parking ExceptionWith the new “No Parking” signs clearly erected in the Cruz Bay roundabout, at left, it seems there is an exception for some vehicles as this photo, snapped by a reader, attests.St. John Tradewinds News Photo cial tribute on Tuesday, March 15, at 7:30 p.m. at the St. John School of the Arts. by Jeremy Garza and Trent Myers, which documents the event which took place at Rhumb Lines in memory of Annie Love on June 6, 2009. Sunn, who died in 1998 of breast cancer at the age of 47.Two Film Screenings Set for March 15

PAGE 18

dren. One of whom was Henry A. Millin, a successful businessman and the 3rd elected V.I. Lieutenant Governor. Lucinda Sewer Millin began her teaching career with the Moravians in 1910 and then taught at the Naval Academy. The move to the Naval Academy was not a simple shift to a new administration but a major upheaval and total change in the basic education system — European to American. reported to the Secretary of the Navy on August 1, 1917, that the current education or agriculture schools. A large proportion of the children here grow up without hope of improving their lot in life. Admiral Oliver further reported there was little money in the Colonial Treasury to support the Moravian schools responsible monies must be provided to build schools, pay instructors. Doctor Isaac Dookhan in “A History of the Virgin Islands,” states that “the great est achievement of the naval administration The governor provided all of the above improvements. In addition, there was an improved American curriculum with greater emphasis on junior and senior high school education. Mrs. Millin worked in the new public schools until 1923. She then established her own private school where she educated Vir gin Islanders for 35 years. In 1954 at a time in life when most are considering retirement, woman elected to the Virgin Islands LegisIn my opinion her greatest legislative achievement was the establishment of a home for the aged. She was widely respected and admired and used these talents to cajole her fellow senators into approval. In recognition of her outstanding contri butions to and concern for the elderly, the institution was named the Lucinda Millin Home for the Aged. Thus her concerns for the most valuable segment of our people, our youth and elderly, were the focus of her life. Those concerns are now the focus of her granddaughter and the daughter of Henry A. Millin, Senator Janette Millin-Young. She has begun her legislative career on a positive note by getting to know one of her constituency, the education system. The Culture responsibilities of her Committee represent the glue that holds together the young and old. It represents that necessary link between our future and the mean ingful heritage that gives our society its critical anchor. Senator Millin-Young has a tough job ahead of her but she has the cultural heritage to see it through.18 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 AccommodationsCaribbean Villas & Resorts tel. 1-800-338-0987 or locally 340-776-6152 Island Getaways 888-693-7676, islandgetaway sinc.com kathy@islandgetawaysinc.com Suite St. John Villas/Condos tel. 1-800-348-8444 or locally at 340-779-4486 VIVA Vacations tel. 779-4250 P.O. Box 1747, STJ, VI 00831ArchitectureCrane, Robert Architect, AIA tel. 776-6356 P.O. Box 370, STJ, VI 00831 Barefoot Architect, Inc. tel. 693-7665 fax 693-8411 P.O. Box 1772, STJ, VI 00831BankingScotiabank #1 Mortgage Lender in the VI The Marketplace (340) 776-6552 Beauty/SpaW estin Resorts & Villas Spa Services tel. 693-8000, ext. 1903/1904ConstructionSt. John Hardware tel. 693-8780 fax 776-6685 Located at The MarketplaceInsuranceTheodore T unick & Company Phone 775-7001 / Fax 775-7002 www.theodoretunick.com JewelryR&I PATTON goldsmithing Located in Mongoose Junction 776-6548 or (800) 626-3445 Chat@pattongold.comLandscapingAlfredo’s Landscaping tel. 774-1655 cell 513-2971 P.O. Box 91, St. John, VI 00831 Coral Bay Garden Center tel. 693-5579 fax 714-5628 P.O. Box 1228, STJ, VI 00831 PROPERTYKING tel. 643-6348 Landscaping & IrrigationProperty MgmtCimmaron Property Management tel. 340-715-2666 St. John’s Premier Property Manager Seaview Vacation Homes, Inc. tel. 340-776-6805; 888-625-2963 www.seaviewhomes.comReal EstateAmerican Paradise Real Estate tel. 693-8352 fax 693-8818 P.O. Box 8313, STJ, VI 00831 info@americanparadise.com Cruz Bay Realty tel. 693-8808 fax 693-9812 P.O. Box 66, STJ, VI 00831 info@cruzbayrealty.com Debbie Hayes, GRI tel. 714-5808 or 340-642-5995 debbiehayes@debbiehayes.com www.stjohnvirealestate.com John Foster Real Estate tel. 714-5808 or 340-642-5995 debbiehayes@debbiehayes.com www.stjohnvirealestate.com Holiday Homes of St. John tel. 776-6776 fax 693-8665 P.O. Box 40, STJ, VI 00831 info@holidayhomesVI.com Islandia Real Estate tel. 776-6666 fax 693-8499 P.O. Box 56, STJ, VI 00831 info@islandiarealestate.com John McCann & Associates tel. 693-3399 fax 888-546-1115 Located at Wharfside Landing www.RealEstateOnStJohn.comRestaurantsConcordia Cafe, 693-5855 Happy Hour 4:30-6pm Dinner 6-8:30pm Tues-Sat Fish Trap Restaurant and Seafood Market tel. 693-9994, Closed Mondays La Tapa Restaurant tel. 693-7755 Open 7 Days a Week Skinny Legs “A Pretty OK Place” tel. 340-779-4982 www.skinnylegs.com Sun Dog Cafe tel. 693-8340 Located at Mongoose JunctionRetailSaltwater Gypsy Consignment (340) 244-8888 Located in The Lumberyard St. Johnimals 340-777-9588 Located at Wharfside VillageServicesC4th Custom Embroidery tel. 779-4047 Located in Coral Bay St. John TradewindsBusiness Directory Ferry Schedules Cruz Bay and Charlotte Amalie CRUZ BAY TO RED HOOK Every hour on the hour from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. RED HOOK TO CRUZ BAY Every hour on the hour from 6 a.m. to 12 a.m. CRUZ BAY TO DOWNTOWN CHARLOTTE AMALIE Leaves Cruz Bay 8:45 a.m. 11:15 a.m. 3:45 p.m. Leaves Charlotte Amalie 10 a.m. 1 p.m. 5:30 p.m Baha’i Community of St. John For Devotions and Study Circles,call 714-1641 7:30 p.m. Fridays; Study Circles 9 a.m. Sundays 776-6316, 776-6254 Bethany Moravian Church 11 a.m., Sunday School 776-6291 Calvary Baptist Church 13 ABC Coral Bay, 776-6304 Sunday School 10 a.m., Sunday evening 6 p.m., Thursday 7 p.m. Christian Ministry Cinnamon Bay Beach Inter-Denominational, Sunday 8:30 a.m. Christian Science Society 10:45 a.m. SundayMarketplace Wednesday Testimonials 7:45 p.m. on last Wed. of Month The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Sun. 9 a.m., on St. Thomas . 776-2379 Sun., 5 p.m., STJ, Lumberyard Cruz Bay Baptist Church Sunday 11 a.m., 6 p.m. 776-6315 Emmaus Moravian Church Coral Bay, Sun. 9 a.m. 776-6713 Jehovah’s Witness 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; 7 p.m. Saturdays (Espaol), 10 a.m. Sundays, 340-715-0530 Missionary Baptist Church 9:30 a.m. Sunday Services, 10:45 Worship, Tuesday 7 p.m. Bible Study 693-8884 Nazareth Lutheran Church Sunday 9 a.m., Sunday School 8 a.m. 776-6731 Our Lady of Mount Carmel Sat. 6 p.m., Sun. 7:30 & 9:30 a.m., Spanish Mass 5:30 p.m.; Monday and Tuesday, 7 p.m.; Wednesday and Friday, 8:30 a.m. 776-6339 St. John Methodist Church Sunday 10 a.m, 693-8830 Seventh Day Adventist Saturdays, 779-4477 St. John Pentecostal Church Sunday 11:05 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays Prayer 7:30 p.m., Thursdays Bible Study 7:30 p.m. 779-1230 St. Ursula’s Episcopal Church Sunday 9 a.m.; Bible Class, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. 777-6306 Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 9:45 a.m. Sunday, 776-6332 Word of Faith Church Word of Faith International Christian Center, Sundays 7:30 a.m. Gifft Hill SchoolCall 774-8617 Church Directory Celebrating Black History MonthContinued from Page 2

PAGE 19

St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 19 Cruz Bay Watersports 776-6857Get a Tan and a Paycheck! snorkeling, sailing trips to the BVI, etc. Growing watersports company has immediate openings: Employment SUZUKI ISLAND CAR FOR SALE: Partially Renovated $1500 OBO Richard 340-642-5358 ST . JOHN BUSINESS OWNERS Affordable Reliable Internet. 1Mb service $70/mo. info@dishanddat.com 340 779 4001 RELIABLE MOBILE AUTO REPAIR: Professional and experi enced. Brakes, CV Joints, Suspensions, Shocks, Alternators, Timing Belts, General Engine, Repair, Foreign & Domestic. All Work Guaranteed. Call 227-9574 Land For Sale Commerical Space Available COMMERCIAL SPACE AVAILABLEAt The LumberyardUNUSUAL OPPORTUNITYfirst floor space availableDowntown Cruz Bay Where St. John Does BusinessFor Space Call Nick 340-771-3737 Employment SCENIC PROPERTIES 340-693-7777 Cruz Bay: Large three bedroom house, 2 bath, w/d, great view, $3500.00 Coral Bay: One bedroom, one bath, $1250.00 For Rent SAL VAGED: 42-foot ketch Desperado in Coral Bay Harbor at 18.20.72 North and 64.42.80 West. Registration # 1562-TB. Hull I.D. 7292101. Call Richard Conners 340-244-6649. EVERYTHING YOU NEED ON EVERY LEVEL GREAT PLACE TO SHOP, DINE AND WORK COME JOIN US WE HAVE SPACES AVAILABLE RETAIL or OFF ICE 340-776-6455 FISH BA Y LONG TERM AVAILABLE NOW :Furnished 3/2 native stone home w/covered decks, View w/privacy on 1.22 ac. 3k/mo 970-382-6683 Power_on@earthlink.net Cruz Bay-Nice, furnished house, great view, 2 Bedrooms A/C, 2 Bath, W&D. Pets considered. March 1. $1950/mo. Year lease. (340) 690-4532 For Sale Used on one house and stored, good condition, over one hundred panels, scaffold brackets included. Call for pricing and leave message. (340) 693-8991 or (508) 509-4002 SYMONS RESI-PLY FORMING PANELS FOR SALE FOR SALE: GREAT LOCATION! EASY ACCESS 1 bedroom cottage landscaped with BEATIFUL Garden on acre with view. Driveway and retaining walls done, Septic in, Excavation for bigger house done $305,000; 340-626-8485; christyloomis@yahoo.com Vehicle For Sale Notice Year round, reliable, experienced with a vehicle. Repairs, painting, landscaping, etc. Refs. available. $20/hour. Gerry Londergan 643-2541 or 776-6579. IN SOUTHEAST DOMINICA, BOETICA 16.5 serene, ocean-view acres of cultivated farm land and virgin forests. $164,000. 5.2 abutting acres, $69,000. Contact Tina Alexander 767-449-8593 or www.islandguests.com Com/Ofce/Storage Services Timeshare SUNSET RIDGE VILLAS April 30 to May 14 (timeshare weeks 18 & 19), Sat Sat Sleeps 6. Two separate buildings with private courtyard and plunge pool. Large common pool overlooking Cruz Bay and St. Thomas. Rent $2,800 or buy for $9,000. Call 717-203-3716 or pete@worksiteplus.com Mongoose Junction, starting at $370/mo. Bright, secure building AC, Ample parking 693-7040 STORAGE: SECURED LOCKERS Sizes to 10’ x 12’ Autos, Boats, Trailers. Call For Rates: 779-4445 www.properyachts.com COMMERCIAL SPACES AVAILABLE AT RAINTREE COURT large or small retail or Call Albert at 693-8590 BUYING? SELLING? RENTING? SEEKING?Call: 340-776-6496 Email: advertising@tradewinds.viGET RESULTS!VISA & MasterCard Accepted Land For Sale

PAGE 20

20 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 ALCHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS Alcoholics Anonymous meets as scheduled: Sundays, 9:45 a.m. at Hawksnest Bay Beach; Closed meetings for alcoholics only at Nazareth Lutheran Church in Cruz Bay at 6 p.m on Tuesdays; Open meetings on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 6 p.m. at Nazareth Lutheran Church; Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6 p.m. at Moravian Church, Coral Bay. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS Narcotics Anonymous has open meetings from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. every Saturday at St. Ursula’s Church. AL-ANON MEETINGS Al-Anon meets on St. John every Tuesday at 1 p.m. at the T uesday, February 22 The next meeting of the St. John Chapter of the St. Thomas/St. John Chamber of Commerce will be at the Cruz Bay Battery from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. St. John Film Society is hosting a free screening at 7:30 p.m. at the St. John School of the Arts. Saturday, February 26 The Virgin Islands Disciples of Christ will host Women’s Day at the Ivanna Eudora Kean Auditorium from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Come and enjoy a day of spiritual enrichment and fun. Tickets are $20 and can be purchased from church members. For more information call 774-4459. Saturday, March 5 The V.I. Audubon Society will host its annual plant sale at Nazareth Lutheran Church. Gifft Hill School announces “Cultura lypso,” a school-wide community carnival, from 2 to 4 p.m. There will be free activities, a bouncey house and food for purchase available. Saturday, March 12 The 25th Annual Gifft Hill School Auction will be at the Westin Resort and Villas. T uesday, March 15 cial tribute at 7:30 p.m. at the St. John School of the Arts. March 18-19 The 9th annual Johnnie Walker Blues Festival will feature two 8 p.m. Monday, March 28, SJCF’s annual meeting is scheduled at the Fish Trap Restaurant. A dinner will be hosted at 6 p.m. with the meeting kicking off at 7 p.m. and the community is invited. Starting March 29 UVICELL will be offering a course for individuals interested learning bookkeeping in order to function as an entry-level bookkeeper. The course will be from 6 to 9 p.m. on Tuesdays and Wednesdays at UVICELL. St. John Tradewinds welcomes notices of community-orient 776-6496, e-mail editor@tradewinds.vi or fax 693-8885.MYSTERY SISTERSACROSS 1 Sailors’ mops 6 Black sheep sound, in song 12 Tic — (tiny mint) mat 20 Physicist Einstein 21 “Def Comedy Jam” airer 23 German king called “the Great” 24 Irregular spot south 26 Giant in elevators 27 Start of a riddle 31 Lassos 32 Press agent? 33 Tolkien monster 34 Riddle, part 2 42 Viper type 45 Book of maps 46 “Ye olde” settlement 47 Have — tolerance for 48 Brooch part 53 “Woe —” (Patricia T. O’Conner grammar book) 55 Flock mother 56 Riddle, part 3 64 Skillful feat 66 Riddle, part 4 72 Fifth-cen. pope 75 Central Sicilian city 76 Microscopic creatures 80 Riddle, part 5 86 Stephen of “Ondine” 87 Kind of deer 88 Q.E.D. part “out” magazine) (host’s invitation) 100 End of the riddle 105 Have lunch 70-Down 107 Metallic playing marble 111 Riddle’s answer 117 Injury reminder 118 Gerund ender 120 Cruller’s kin Bill 124 Rub away 125 Cry 126 “My — Sal” 127 Utters 128 Is fearless DOWN 4 Of living things 5 Vocalized for the doctor 6 Get paid to watch Junior 7 Other: Pref. 8 Leigh Hunt’s “— Ben 10 Bunker of TV 11 Desirous 12 In — (aware of a secret) 13 “— -Ca-Dabra” 15 “Understood, man” 17 Opera tune 18 Crosses (out) 28 Spanish for “other” Manhattan 35 Dogs may pull it 36 Not exciting 37 “— true?” 38 Prof.’s place 42 Put-ons 43 Not at all fat 44 Meat spread 50 Part of m.p.h. 54 How some things are carved 57 — job on 58 Picnic crasher 60 Nugent of rock 61 Oath reply 67 Giggle part 68 Raggedy — (doll) 71 The Monkees’ “— Believer” 72 Play, as a mandolin 73 Eta-iota link 74 Rimes with Grammys 77 “Oh, to — England” 78 Outstanding 81 Just sit there 82 Cook Paula 83 British baby buggy 101 Purring one 102 Tethered 103 Made grooves on, as the edge of a coin 104 Spanish Mrs. 108 Moon-related 111 Highest point 114 Escalate 115 This, in Havana 116 Policy guru 117 Cutting tool PREMIER Crossword

PAGE 21

St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 21 ST. JOHN TRADEWINDS SUBSCRIPTIONSCALL 340-776-6496 WE ACCEPT VISA OR MASTERCARD Providing professional rental management and marketing services for St. John’ s finest vacation villas and condominiums.For reservations For St. John or brochures business call1-800-338-0987 340-776-6152Vi e w o u r v i l la s a t w w w . c a r i b b e a n v i l l a . c o m Lumberyard Complex P .O. Box 458 St. John USVI 00831 C a r i b b e a nV i l l a s & R e s o r t sM A N A G E M E N T C O . ISLA VISTA Exceptionally Private/Gated Villa atop Caneel Hill. Offered at $5.4M. EXCLUSIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICE IN THE VIRGIN ISLANDSdebbie Hayes, owner/broker Ofce: 340 714 5808 Cell: 340 642 5995www.StJohnVIRealEstate.com DH@DH. Contact DEBBIE HAYES, GRI, Your Licensed U.S. Virgin Islands Real Estate Broker (340) 774-3939 fax www.usvi-realestate.com tel (340) 774-3939 Located at Caneel Hill Excellent business opportunity. Well established res taurant and minigolf course. Breath taking views of Pills bury sound and St Thomas from dining terrace, no better place to enjoy a good meal and view the sunset. Zoned B-2 which allows a multitude of commercial uses; ie retail, hotel,condos,apts., plenty of room for any of these uses on this 1.11 acre parcel.Adjacent 1 acre B-2 parcel avail able. Just Reduced to $3,900,000 Spectacular view location for variety of B-2 uses. Hotel, condo, retail, offices, or a combination of all suits this one of a kind lot. Owner has plans for condo/hotel development, with feasibility study and preliminary plans. Zoning allows for 80 persons per acre, for a multi-story de velopment. Panoramic views of Pillsbury Sound and West to St. Thomas, and south to St Croix. Minutes from Cruz Bay. Just Reduced to $2,800,000 Waterfront lot located on Chocolate Hole Pond. Easily accessible lot with gentle slope to waters edge, easy build.. Located a stones throw away from the planned prestigious high end Pond Bay Club Development. This quiet residential neighborhood has great breezes and deeded access to Chocolate Hole beach. $475,000 Mostly Flat 1/2 acre + lot, part of Guavaberry Farms Sub-division. Overlooks fresh water pond, off main road for easy access. Good breezes and quiet neighborhood with covenants and restrictions. Last lot in 7 parcel sub-division. $185,000 Spectacular view from this 1/2 acre + Fortsberg lot(s). Moderate grade, with sweeping views of East End,Tortola, and Coral Bay. Easy access off main sub-division road. Priced to sell at $350,000. Adjacent 1/2 acre lot also available for joining parcels together to make a very private 1 acre + lot for Just $700,000. PLEASE VISIT OUR NEW OFFICES LOCATED AT 6B CANEEL HILL ADJACENT TO ASOLARE RESTUARANT, THE GATEWAY TO THE VIRGIN ISLANDS NATIONAL PARK, OR CONTACT ANDY RUTNIK AT 340-774-3939 or EMAIL:ANDREWRUTNIK@GMAIL.COM TWO INCREDIBLE THREE-ACRE HILLSIDE LOTS– Adjacent to National Park lands (and short walk to the beach) with spectacular views of Francis Bay and west (sunsets). Gentle grade, and easy build. These lots are ideal/unique for one seeking a private estate/ compound within the National Park, desiring lots of land /gardens/privacy with convenient beach access. – Inquire about February 24th bid deadline and March 10th Auction (and *(Nearly 3 acre Beachfront access lot available separately for $3.8 million.)* CALL TODAY340-774-3939 St. John TRADEWINDS Newspaper Send Check Payable to Tradewinds Publishing, P.O. Box 1500, St. John, VI 00831 1 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION $70.00 USD Name ____________________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________

PAGE 22

We ’ re Sold on St. John! .cruzba yrealty .com Gretchen Labrenz Margie Labrenz Susanne Kir kT amm y P olloc kF ounded in 1985 CBR HOME LISTINGSSEASCAPE – Fabulous location on Bovacap Point! Spacious 2 bd main house w/lap pool & spa, plus a sep arate caretaker’s cottage. Panoramic views, privacy & sucessful vacation rental. $1,095,000. GOLDEN DRAGON – Beautiful stone villa w/exceptional craftsmanship. 4 bds/4 baths, innity pool, multi patios & decks, lush gardens, Pt. Rendezvous location. Reduced to $1,925,000. LIZARD HILL – A one of a kind villa, high above Cinna mon Bay & surrounded by Nat’l Pk. land. Enjoy the exclu sive privacy, views to die for, gorgeous gardens, & easy access from this 3 bd/3 bath, with pool & caretaker’s cot tage nestled on over 1 acre in Catherineberg. $3,100,000. BLUE TANG – Charming, turnkey, rental villa in Great Cruz Bay. Privacy, vibrant sunsets, 60' covered deck overlooking sunny pool, 2 bd/2 baths, great kitchen, excellent oor plan, & terric location. $1,295,000. GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY – Apt. building w/adjacent parcels in Cruz Bay, newly renovated & well maintained. Only $490,000. WATERFRONT with DOCK – Masonry 3 bed/2bath home on lg. at lot, with direct access to Fish Bay at your doorstep. Now only $920,000. AURORA – Enjoy 180 views, from Great Cruz to St. Thomas, from this masonry 4 bd/ 4 bath villa in Contant Pt. Great privacy, pool, multiple outdoor patios, excellent vacation rental history. $1,995,000. VILLA ROMANCE – New, exquisitely crafted, luxury villa, features a 30’ pool in a tropical courtyard setting, 4 private bed/bath suites, chef’s kitchen, A/C, gated entry & custom details throughout. All the bells & whistles for $2,150,000. GREAT EXPECTATIONS – 7 bd/7.5 baths, 2 swimming pools, 2 hot tubs, tennis court, walk to Chocolate Hole beach, impressive vacation rental history. $2,999,500. CALYPSO del SOL – Successful rental villa w/excellent Chocolate Hole views, 3 bd/bath suites, A/C, newer masonry construction, beautiful pool & hot tub, terric lg. screened porch. $1,950,000. REDUCED! – Well built Bordeaux Mt. home w/ 3 bd/2 bath, lg. covered porch, southerly views, lg. trees, very gentle slope, room for expansion. $525,000. CHOCOLATE HOLE – Unique ruins of 1700’s Great House, with a 1960’s home on a beautiful 1.42 acre lot. $799,000. POINT RENDEZVOUS – Newer masonry villa w/easterly views to Ram Head, 3 bd, 2 baths, lg. covered deck, spa, vacation rental history, room for expansion. $1,595,000. WINDSONG – Stately Boatman Pt. villa, w/separate cottage, situated on a 1ac parcel w/panoramic views. 6 bdrms., 7 baths, huge pool, fully furnished. $3,495,000. A BEST BUY! – Well built, poured concrete cottage w/ lovely covered wraparound porch in Est. Carolina. Tile oors, louvered windows w/complete hurricane shutters, at lot for gardening & concrete slab in place for future garage & expansion. Only $349,000. STONE HOUSE – Spectacular Coral Bay views, 3 bd/ 3 baths, gorgeous stonework, covered rotunda, freeform pool, vacation rental history, easy access. $1,620,000. BOATMAN POINT – Masonry 4 bd. home on spectacular 1 ac. waterfront site with amazing views & outstanding neighborhood. $2,795,000.CBR BUSINESS LISTINGSJOE’S DINER – St. John’s oldest restaurant is looking for a new owner. Serving breakfast, lunch & drinks since 1972, and located in the center of Cruz Bay. Call CBR. FABRIC MILL – Very successful Mongoose Junction business, est. 1982. $150,000 includes inventory, equip ment, & owner will train. SILVER IGUANA – Beachfront shop w/eclectic collection of sterling silver jewelry & locally crafted gifts. $75,000.CBR CONDO LISTINGSLAVENDER HILL – Tropical 2 bd/2bath penthouse unit w/wrap-around deck, pool & sunset views. $849,000. BETHANY CONDO – Spacious, free-standing 2 bd/2 bath unit w/ amazing views, new common pool. $449,000. CRUZ VIEWS CONDO – Nice 2 bedroom unit w/full A/C, sunset views, common pool, good rental history. $450,000. SELENE’S – Ideal in town location, w/parking, for living/ rental or business. Terric views. Reduced to $399K! GALLOWS POINT CONDO – Waterfront, 1 bd/1bath condo in resort setting, pool, beach. Only $485K .CBR LAND LISTINGSLUSH BORDEAUX MT. parcels w/views. $150K–$285K. SUNSET VIEWS – close to town, easy build. Only $215K. LOTS TO CHOOSE FROM in Fish Bay – Starting at $108K. KLEIN BAY – Prestigious area w/common beach. $675K. SIDE-BY-SIDE at parcels in Johnston Bay – $220K ea. CAROLINA, EDEN, CALABASH – Nice selection of affordable parcels. Starting at $99K. CRUZ BAY TOWN – Walk to Frank Bay, R-4 zoning. $249K. GLUCKSBERG – Gentle grade, 1/2 ac., lg. trees. $125K. ZOOTENVAAL – Hurricane Hole views, paved road. $400K. GREAT CRUZ BAY – Prime 1.05 acre site w/fantastic harbor views & architectural plans. A steal at $595K. WATERFRONT on MONTE BAY – Spectacular 13.44 ac. site, ideal for private estate or subdivision. $2,900,000. AFFORDABLE PARCELS – in Est. Grunwald & Adrian. Easy building sites, close to town. Starting at $89,000. Call Today! DITLEFF POINT – Extraordinary sites on magnicent peninsula w/sandy beach, gated entry, beautiful landscap ing, and incredible views. Prices start at $695,000. PT. RENDEZVOUS – Outstanding views. $415K. REEF BAY VIEW – is a classic Caribbean style 4 bd/3 bath pool villa with pristine National Park views of Reef Bay & Ram Head, and the white sandy beach below. Consisting of 3 hip roofed buildings, connected by decks & covered walkways, white walls & turqoise accents . Reduced to $1,395,000. CONTRACTED CONTRACTED

PAGE 23

HOMES NEW! Caribbean cottage that currently caters to short term rental guests. Listed price includes adjacent vacant lot for expansion. $599,000 UNBELIEVABLE NEW PRICE FOR BLUE HEAVEN! Cute Caribbean home overlooking Rendezvous Bay. Popular vacation rental. 3BR/3BR $527,000 AMOROSA A brilliant Tuscan inspired villa in Peter Bay. Sweeping views, deeded walking path to the beach, 4BR, 5BA. Live webcam & virtual tour @ americanparadise.com $7,450,000 NEW! Income producing 2 unit in Chocolate Hole. Large flat yard, walking distance to Chocolate Hole Beach. Island stone incorporated throughout. $875,000 AMANI Spectacular 180 views, prestigious Maria Bluff, 3BR/3BR in the main building, plus guest cottage $1,795,000 SUSANNABERG! New masonry home on FLAT lot plus separate rental cottage. Borders Nat’l Park. $750,000 VILLA TESORI Luxurious custom home, uncompromising quality, exquisite finishings, sweeping views. 5BR/5BA. $4,250,000 UNBEATABLE VALUE! ALLESANDRA Luxurious masonry villa, renovated in 2007, views of 3 bays, 3BR/3BA, 2 car garage REDUCED TO $1,769,000 MYSTIC RIDGE 4 BR/4.5BA, dramatic views, short distance to North Shore beaches, cooling breezes $1,990,000. APPROXIMATELY 150' FROM THE WATER at Pebble Beach with fabulous water views! Beautiful woodwork; upper level is a 3 BR unit & lower is a 1 BR unit. $675,000 NEW IN CAROLINA Masonry 2x2 main house with 2x1 lower apt & separate cottage. Complete solar systems. Paved driveway, valley views. $600,000 NEW! IXORA on Ajax Peak, bordered by Natl. Pk, adjacent to North Shore beach access, 3 pavilions linked by decks & walkways, pool, 5 BR. $1,700,000 NEW! “MILES AWAY ”Immaculate 2BR, 2.5 BA masonry villa w/ pool, successful short term rental, in prestigious Point Rendezvous. $1,450,000 BAREFOOT New 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath guest cottage in quaint neighborhood. $599,000. PRICE SLASHED FOR NORTH SHORE ! Cinnamon Day Dreams, 3 BR/2.5BA, in Nat’l Pk boundaries in Catherineberg. 1 acre. $1,795,000. AMARILLA VILLA 3 BR, 3.5 BA villa, superior craftsmanship, Spanish tile roof, 180 views, large pool & hot tub $2,595,000 MAMEY PEAK 1.05 acres, 1x1 Main House and 1x1 Guest Cottage. Flat slope and stunning views. One of a kind fixer upper!!! $795,000 MILL RIDGE Attention to detail, Classic Caribbean architecture, masonry 2BR/2BR, office/3rd BR, garage & pool. $1,595,000 ZOOTENVAAL! Newly built multi unit tasteful masonry home sited on 1.36 FLAT acres. Expand or subdivide. Private with large yard. $925,000 SOLAR POWERED BED & BREAKFAST! “Garden By The Sea” is a quaint Caribbean home. Owners’ apartment & 3 income producing A/C units. $1,800,000. NEW IN CAROLINA! Beautiful, peaceful mostly flat parcel with end of road privacy. Masonry 3x2 upper unit and 1x1 lower unit. $750,000 CVISTA Magnificent open air 4 bdrm villa above Rendezvous Bay. Stunning residence exudes comfort, class & elegance. $3,895,000 CONDOS . HOMES . LAND . FRACTIONALS . COMMERCIALView all St. John MLS properties at our website at www.americanparadise.com Voted “BEST REAL ESTATE AGENCY ON ST. JOHN” 2008 RAINBOW PLANTATION A private, family estate house on 1.6 acres. Features one of the largest private pools on St. John (w/diving board). PRICE REDUCED $1,095,000 WATERFRONT RETREAT Privateer Bay. 3BR/3BA casual beach house steps from the water. Paved roads & u/g utilities. $975,000 FUN & CONTENTMENT 180 views. Tiled pool deck, 2 large AC. suites & mahogany hardwoods. Plans for 3 more bdrms. $1,235,000 NEW! ISLANDS END Nat'l Pk beaches close by. 5BR/5.5BA, HOA common dock $1,850,000 NEW! PELICAN'S PERCH Masonry 3BR/3BA pool villa with panoramic water views and separate guest cottage. $1,269,000 INFO@HolidayHomesVI.com TOLL FREE: WWW.HOLIDAYHOMESVI.COM FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF ALL ST. JOHN MLS PROPERTIES, DVD TOURS OF THE PROPERTIES, AND/OR A COPY OF OUR NEWSLETTER CALL OR E-MAIL US. “The Company that gives back to St. John” “ CONCH VILLAS” : Why pay rent? Opportunity to own a 2br, 1ba &/or a 1br, 1ba condo close to Cruz Bay! Purchase one for yourself and stop throwing money away on rent or purchase both for additional income. $205,000 & $230,000 “ PARADISE ON THE ROCKS ” Tropical living, big views & masonry homecentrally-located on Ajax Peak. Two units: 2 bedrooms, 2 baths & Great Room upstairs; private entry 1 bedroom apartment downstairs. Rent one, live in the other! “SEAVIEW” vacation villa. Charming 4 Bedroom, masonry home in excellent condition with large pool in convenient Chocolate Hole with deeded rights to two nearby beaches. “90 DAY SPECIAL” – $300,000 Price Reduction! Fabulous views across Coral Bay to BVI in masonry 3 br/3.5 bth home. Private, pool, hot tub, stone walls, solar water heater, hur ricane shutters custom cabinets, 10k generator plus cottage (NC) on property. WALK TO BRUNCH & BEACH plus ENJOY SOOTHING SURF SOUND from this unique, masonry & stone custom crafted, gated villa with panoramic water views. Flexible floorplan features 4 bdrms plus cottage. “VILLA MOLLO” A nature lovers dream, walk to 2 beaches! 3BR/2BA villa sits on the water’s edge of a salt pond and features custom stone and wood work and amazing Caribbean views. CATHERINEBERG’S “CINNAMON RIDGE” 5 bedroom villa on 1+ private acre, bordered by National Park, features stunning north shore views, pool w/waterfall, spa, easy access to Cinnamon Bay beach. GATEHOUSE, a 2 bedroom, exquisite villa in Peter Bay Estates. Large lot gives great views and breezes. Michael Oxman plans available for expansion. Incredible Value! “ SEA TURTLE VILLA” is a contemporary Skytop home with amazing water views, 2 master suites, 3 baths, tropical landscaping, pool, & open architecture set amidst secluded privacy. Great vacation villa or island home! “WINDWARDSIDE” CALABASH BOOM offers 2 cottages with hot tubs in private setting. Panoramic views over harbor to BVIs. Charming brick courtyard, lush tropical landscaping, and outdoor showers. Excellent rentals. “SOUTHERN C ROSS”Big southshore views Danish-style stone home w/ wrap-around covered porches & 3 bdrm & 2 baths. Stunning cabinetry & exposed concrete beams & sills. Exceptional privacy in lush setting. Additional land available. “CASA YAYA” – Big-view villa on top the world in Coral Bay. 3 bdrm, 2 bath one level living w/ the BVI at your front door. Entertain by the innityedge pool and enjoy the indoor/ outdoor great room with dramatic views from every room. $595,000 $1,500,000 $1,165,000 $1,200,000 $1,150,000 $1,259,000 $4,900,000 $3,250,000 $995,000 $1,000,000 DVD DVD $1,275,000 DVD NEW LISTING NEW LISTING PRICE REDUCED OWN A MONTH (OR MORE) in a 3 or 4 bedroom luxury home. Magnicent views and sunsets from 3 homes with all amenities, pools w/waterfalls and spas. Deeded 1 month ownerships from $59,000 WESTIN RESORT TIMESHARES: Own a week, a month, or more & enjoy all the resort amenities! Most unit sizes and weeks available. Priced from $2,000 “MILL VISTA – CAROLINA” Easy access & build on Centerline Rd. $ 115,000 “FISH BAY” Views, breezes and paved access $ 260,000 “LEAST EXPENSIVE WATERFRONT”! Gentle slope, 4 min. walk to beach $ 285,000 “SUGAR APPLE WEST” Harbor views gentle ac. with Topo $ 299,000 “CONTANT” lot with Great Cruz Harbor View. Owner Realtor $ 375,000 “CALABASH BOOM” .4 ac. GREAT views, private. Topo map $ 475,000 “BOATMAN POINT WATERFRONT” Sunset Views and Gentle Site. $ 825,000 “ ESTATE CONCORDIA” hillside sites with stunning views ranging from the BVIs, down St. John’s eastern coast to Ram’s Head , St. Croix. From $275,000 “ UPPER MONTE BAY ESTATES” 7 Spectacular private parcels above Rendezvous Bay; paved road, stone walls & underground utilities. From $799,000 “ NORTHSHORE PROPERTIES” Peter Bay & Hawksnest/ Denis Bay exquisite home sites with breathtaking views over the North Shore, BVI & many cays in between. Call for a tour today. Call for Prices “ PETER BAY ESTATES” Exquisite home sites with breathtaking views over the North Shore, BVI & cays between. Prices from $1,750,000 BEST BUY BEACH FRONT “GREAT CRUZ BAY” private dock access, quiet upscale neighborhood, awesome views. Owner/broker. PRICE REDUCED. $1,300,000 $998,000 EAST END LAND Parcels in Privateer Bay and on far East End. Coral Bay views and underground utilities. From $265,000 “ CHOCOLATE HOLE” Breezes and views to St. Thomas. From $285,000 “VIRGIN GRAND ESTATES” Gated sub-division, sunset views. Can build FRACTIONAL HOME! Paved roads. 3 from $499,000 “ LOVANGO CAY” Waterfront & hillside properties; upscale amenities including barge docks, paved roads, undrgrd utilities beach & views. From $275,000 SELLER FINANCING WITH GREAT TERMS! “HAULOVER” BEACHFRONT 3.71 acre sub-dividable borders National Park! AMAZING VIEWS! $1,900,000 “SABA BAY” WATERFRONT & HILLSIDE Incredible BVI views! 12 acre sub-divideable waterfront lot for $9,999,000 plus 4 hillside lots available from $699,000 “DREEKETS BAY ESTATES” spectacular BVI views, excellent roads, underground utilities, stone walls, planters, common beach. Minutes from Coral Bay. 12 lots from $399,000 Ask about “MUST SELL BEST BUY” SITUATIONS Call or email today for info! CONTRACTED CONTRACTED HH-RVSD TW 2.21.2011.indd 1 2/18/11 12:48 PM

PAGE 24

24 St. John Tradewinds, February 21-27, 2011 More Than 120 Couples Renew Vows at Valentine’s Day CelebrationMichael and Barbie Barry tions to coincide with the event — come back to renew their vows year after year. Cathy Dove knows why, she said. “Doing this really makes a difference,” she said. “We had a good marriage before we renewed our vows, we really did. But doing this for the past nine years has changed mine and my husband’s lives.” “Things are so much better,” said Dove. “It absolutely makes our marriage stronger and better, which I didn’t think was possible.” A rainy morning on February 14 cleared for a perfect afternoon ceremony on Trunk Bay. Even the no-seeums stayed away so as not to distract from the event’s focus. Couples were greeted with the sound of Michael beach. On the shoreline, a sand sculpture of sea turtles welcomed couples to the event. The sculpture was crafted by Larry Safady, who spent the entire painstakingly making the sand creation. cool,” said Safady. “They all do this for free, I thought I could donate my time and skill for them.” Safady, who was helped by the Doves, started his touches just before the event’s 5 p.m. start. surely are in demand sunset Valentine’s Day ceremo nies to oversee the vow renewal, is continually inspired to give her time, she explained. “To me this is the most meaningful way a couple could choose to celebrate Valentine’s Day,” said Porter. “There is no more meaningful thing for a couple to do on this day than to reassert their love and commitment to each other.” time Steve and Janet Simonsen chose to join in the Celebration of Love. “We’re here because it’s a good time to do it,” said Janet Simonsen. “We are super in love this year more than ever,” said Steve Simonsen. “This seemed like the thing to do.” With the Caribbean sun beginning its descent to the horizon, couples gathered on Trunk Bay and gazed into each other’s eyes. “It’s so important once a year to look your mate in Following Porter’s vow renewal ceremony, each bride was given a long stem rose and each couple a home. For more information about the Celebration of Love, check out www.vivows.com. Continued from Page 4 St. John Tradewinds News Photos by Tropical FocusMaria Ines Elliff and Carlos Di Blasi Dove, at left, shares the microphone with Jackie Levine, who renewed her vows with husband Howard after 62 years of marriage. Chuck and Terry Pishko Cathy and Billy Dove, second from right and far right, pose with sand sculpture artist Larry Safady, second from left.