Citation
St. John tradewinds

Material Information

Title:
St. John tradewinds
Alternate title:
Saint John tradewinds
Portion of title:
Tradewinds
Uncontrolled:
St. John tradewinds newspaper
Place of Publication:
St. John, V.I
Publisher:
Tradewinds Newspaper Inc.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly[1998-]
Monthly[ FORMER <1979-1987 (Jan).>]
Bimonthly[ FORMER 1987 (Feb)-1997]
bimonthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 35 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Saint John (V.I.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States Virgin Islands -- Saint John

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Description based on: vol. 3, no. 5, May 1979; title from caption.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering varies.
General Note:
Successor to The St. John Drum.

Record Information

Rights Management:
Copyright Tradewinds Newspaper Inc.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
52130251 ( OCLC )

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Full Text



February 7-13, 2011
� Copyright 2011


ST. JOHN


The Community Newspaper Since 1972 * St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands


-We hold the pen
Representing more top-rated carriers than any other agent.
Theodore Tunick & Company Serving the Virgin Islands since 1962
The Marketplace / Suite 302 / Cruz Bay / St. John / Phone 775-7001 / Fax 775-7002 / www.theodoretunick.com


$1.00


Great Vibes at
Love City Live!
Hundreds of fans packed the Winston
Wells ball field on Saturday night, January
29, for the first annual Love City Live!
reggae festival. The line-up consisted of
Exodus from St. John, Melame Gange and
Black Star from St. Croix, Love City's own
Inner Visions, at right, and headliners Third
World. Stephen Cat Coore of Third World,
above, rocked out while unveiling the
band's new album "Patriots." Grasshopper
Pickering of Inner Visions presented Third
World's Coore and Richard Baley with a
lifetime achievement award, top right, for
the band's years of dedication.
Tradewinds News Photos Courtesy of Love City Live!


Judge Tosses
V.I. Unity Day
Group Property
Tax Law Suit
Page 3
Group Fight at
Ivanna Eudora
Kean High School
Prompts Emergency
Meeting for PTA
Page 3
Woman Arrested
for Not Properly
Wearing Seatbelt
Gifft Hill Resident is
charged with Aggravated
Assault, Resisting
Arrest and Delaying and
Obstructing a Police Officer
in the course of his duties
Page 4
New St. John
Ambulance Boat
Nears Completion
Page 5
RELAY
FOR LIFE 13 DAYS
E TOGO!







2 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011


St. John Tradewinds
Every year at this time everyone scrambles, looking
for the appropriate person to honor during Black His-
tory Month. We often look far and wide for a suitable
candidate not already honored.
I think I've found a worthy candidate thanks to the
St. John Historical Society.
At the group's last meeting, Bruce Schoonover
gave a great presentation on the Civilian Conservation
Corp (CCC) - the 1930s New Deal program every-
one loved.
It put young men to work in the depth of the Great
Depression when one in four people were unemployed
and anarchy became a worrisome alternative. The
CCC program employed more than 500,000 men by
the end of 1935.
The U.S. Forest Service and this nation's National
Parks were the largest agencies involved. Over 28,000
miles of new trails were constructed and 114,000
miles of existing trails maintained. Eight million acres
of trees were planted and 88,000 miles of telephone
lines strung.
More than 63,000 buildings were constructed, in-
cluding picnic shelters, trail shelters, restrooms, cab-
ins, lookout towers, and museums. Serious blights af-
fecting this nation's forests were addressed and forest
fires were fought more expeditiously.
Yet when the CCC's were introduced on St. John,
the program failed. Schoonover quoted a National
Geographic article from September 1940 stating, "the


EDITOR/PUBLISHER
MaLinda Nelson
mahnda@tradewnds. vi

NEWS EDITOR
Jaime Elliott
jaime@tradewinds.vi

WRITERS
Andrea Milam, Mauri Elbel

ADVERTISING
advertising@tradewinds.vi

CIRCULATION
Rohan Roberts


Life in the 1930s in Coral Bay and the
East End was not easy, but there was
plenty of fish to keep residents sated.

camp had to be dissolved for lack of recruits."
How come the CCC program went so well in the
states but failed here?
Last Monday the VI. Audubon Society honored
John Achzet, who died this fall, with a picnic and a
new bench at Hawksnest Beach. Achzet was a person
who worked long and hard at whatever he did without
drawing attention to himself - an unassuming effec-
tive worker who accomplished much for St. John.
At this picnic I talked with David and Barbara
Grove, longtime snowbirds, who will present a pro-
gram at the St. John Historical Society meeting about
Continued on Page 18


COLUMNISTS
& CONTRIBUTORS
Chuck Pishko, Malik Stevens, Adam
Lynch, Tristan Ewald, Paul Devine,
Andrew Rutnik, Craig Barshinger,
Coral Breuning

SUBSCRIPTIONS
U.S. & U.S.V.I. only
$70.00 per year

THIRD CLASS PERMIT
U.S. Postage PAID
Permit No. 3
St. John, VI 00831


NEWSLINE
Tel. (340) 776-6496
Fax (340) 693-8885
www.tradewinds. vi
editor@tradewinds. vi

MAILING ADDRESS
Tradewinds Publishing
P.O. Box 1500
St. John, VI 00831

� COPYRIGHT 2010/2011
All rights reserved No reproduction of
news stories, letters, columns, photo-
graphs or advertisements allowed without
written permission from the publisher


Historical


Bits & Pieces

by Chuck Pishko


Celebrating Black History Month

A hard but happy life


Take "A Look Back" on February 8
The St. John Historical Society will take "A Look Back," at its
next meeting on Tuesday, February 8, at the Bethany Moravian
Church Hall at 7 p.m.
The St. John Historical Society invites everyone to a "look
back" at the Virgin Islands through the eyes of the first civilian
Governor Paul M. Pearson.
Society members Barbara and David Grove will present an ear-
ly 1930s portrait of the Virgin Islands based on the papers, images,
and letters of Gov. Pearson, who was Barbara's maternal grand-
father.
The Groves will present the story of the severely depressed con-
ditions Pearson found when he arrived in March 1931, his admin-
istration's efforts until he left his post in August 1935, and the po-
litical intrigue and opposition he encountered in the Virgin Islands
and in Washington, DC, during his term.

CZM Meeting for Coral Bay Sediment

Detention Pond Is Feb. 9 at JESS
A meeting of the St. John Committee of the VI. Coastal Zone
Management Commission has been scheduled for Wednesday,
February 9, at 6 p.m. at the Julius E. Sprauve School.
The item on the agenda is the public hearing for Major CZM
Permit application no. CZJ-01-10(L). The applicant is the VI. Re-
source and Development Council, Inc. The applicant proposes the
construction of a stormwater sediment detention pond.
Plans for the proposed project are on file for review by appoint-
ment at the Department of Planning and Natural Resources, Divi-
sion of CZM, Cyril E. King Airport, Terminal Building, second
floor, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through
Friday. For more information call 774-3320.

Devine To Speak at Next IGBA Meeting
The Island Green Building Association will host a public pre-
sentation on Wednesday, February 9, on the second floor The Mar-
ketplace with refreshments at 5 p.m. and the speaker from 5:30 to
6:30 p.m.
Dr. Barry Devine, resident-scientist and author of Island Peak
to Coral Reef The Plant and Marine Communities of the Virgin
Islands, will give a presentation based on his popular book which
he uses to demonstrate the connectivity between land and seas.
Learn how everyone's actions play a part in every ecosystem
and how sustainable building and living today can safeguard the
island's quality of life for tomorrow.

"The Road to College" on February 10
Parents and students are invited to hear Chris Teare speak about
"The Road to College: A Parent's Eye View," sponsored by Friends
of the Elaine I. Sprauve Public Library, on Thursday, February 10,
at 7 p.m., at the library.
Teare is Director of College Counseling at Antilles School on
St. Thomas and is a member of the National Association for Col-
lege Admissions Counseling, the Southern Association for College
Admissions Counseling, and the Association of College Counsel-
ors in Independent Schools.
He has written a series of newspaper columns, "Finding A Col-
lege That Fits," for the Virgin Islands Daily News. He has also
written for Education Week and Independent School magazine, and
is a member of the Fiske College Guide Editorial Advisory Group.
Teare can be heard on his show "Making the College Choice" on
Radio ONE AM 1000, Wednesdays at 4 p.m.
For more information call 776-6359.


TRADEWINDS PUBLISHING LLC
The Community Newspaper Since 1972







St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011


Group Fight at Ivanna Eurdora Kean High School Prompts PTA Meeting

Little done to ease parents' concerns on relations between St. John, St. Thomas students


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Ivanna Eudora Kean High
School principal Dr. Sharon Mc-
Collum did little to ease parents'
frustration during a Parent Teacher
Association meeting on Tuesday
evening, February 1, at the Julius
E. Sprauve School cafeteria.
Parents were up in arms over
a group fight at the IEK campus
in late January between St. John
students and St. Thomas students.
Many parents called into local talk
radio stations, venting their frus-
trations over the on-going tension
between St. John and St. Thomas
students who attend high school
together in Red Hook.
The issue drew about 80 par-
ents to the February 1 PTA meet-
ing, who were hoping to voice
their concerns and receive answers
to their questions. Many par-
ents, however, never even got the
chance to speak during the almost
three hour meeting and left the
JESS cafeteria feeling just as frus-
trated as when they entered.
"She didn't even give us a
chance to speak," said one IEK
parent following the meeting.
Her sentiment was echoed by
many other parents at the meeting


who were looking for answers to
the ongoing violence and tensions
at IEK.
Instead, parents heard from New
York City Equity Assistance Cen-
ter officials about drop out preven-
tion, and gang and bullying signs
from Dr. Johnny Pervis of the Uni-
versity of Central Arkansas.
Following their presentations,
McCollum introduced school po-
lice officers, IEK hall monitors,
Dean of Students, teachers, the
school's senior guidance counsel-
lor and school security manager
Lavelle Campbell. The IEK of-
ficials discussed general issues at
the school, but failed to address
the issue which prompted so many
parents to attend the PTA meeting.
While the late January incident
was not discussed in detail at the
meeting, a fight had broken out at
some point during the school day
between about 10 students, half
of whom were from St. John and
other half from Smith Bay.
One St. John student's face was
cut in the melee, which McCollum
emphatically denied was a "riot."
"I resent the fact of anyone
saying there was a riot at Ivanna
Eudora Kean," said the principal.
"There was no riot at that school.


"You are concerned and you should be
concerned. But out of the 200 students we
have from St. John, it's only about 20 to 25
students who are wreaking havoc. They won't
let it go."
- Dr. Sharon McCollum, principal,
Ivanna Eudora Kean High School


Ten children are not going to cause
a riot."
Of the about 200 St. John stu-
dents who attend IEK, about 20
are repeatedly in trouble, McCol-
lum explained.
"You are concerned and you
should be concerned," McCollum
said. "But out of the 200 students
we have from St. John, it's only
about 20 to 25 students who are
wreaking havoc. They won't let it
go."
Tensions between St. John and
St. Thomas students at IEK seem
to be nothing new, according to
parent alumni at the meeting who
said fights between the two groups
have been going on since the
1980s.
While not offering a solution to
the problem, McCollum said the
school is and has been working on


the issue.
"It's been said that the school
isn't doing anything about this and
that is not true," said the principal.
"I don't have a magic wand. We
will do everything we can."
Instead of the usual 10 day sus-
pension for fighting, the students
in the January incident were given
work to do after school, according
to IEK officials.
While most of the students at-
tended the first several days of
the after-school work, no St. John
students showed up on January 31
and only one was present on Feb-
ruary 1, according to McCollum.
"We're trying to keep your kids
in school and not give them sus-
pension, but when we give you al-
ternatives you need to make sure
you're kid is there," she said. "A
big part of our problem in this


community is a lack of control at
home. The message must be loud
and clear - as a parent this will
not be tolerated."
Another factor in on-going ten-
sion at the school is IEK's lack of a
gym, according to McCollum.
Previously inter-island school
groups would compete in games.
With no gym, however, school
officials have no way to break up
cliques, the principal explained.
"We do not have a gym; we do
not have a track; we do not have
any athletic facilities," McCol-
lum said. "We need a track and we
need a gym."
While parents and school offi-
cials might not see eye to eye, they
must all work together in the face
of teen violence and school ten-
sion, explained McCollum.
"We need to walk out of here as
the trinity of community, school
and home," she said. "Get on the
radio and talk about what we can
do and what you are doing at home.
Maybe we can be the example that
heals the entire Virgin Islands."
"This is bigger than Smith Bay
and St. John," said the principal.
"We need to take our streets back
and take our schools back. The part
of the puzzle that I need is you."


Judge Gomez Tosses Out V.I. Unity Day Group's Property Tax Law Suit


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
The V.I. Unity Day Group will
not have its day in court on Mon-
day, February 7, just as members
had feared.
District Judge Curtis Gomez
threw out the group's lawsuit
against the VI. government on
Monday, January 31. Unity Day
Group members filed the suit in
April 2008 on grounds that prop-
erty revaluations conducted on the
island were based on flawed data.
In his opinion, Gomez ruled
that future tax bills might not be
based on that data since the VI.
Code stipulates that all properties
must be assessed every five years
and the data in question began be-
ing collected six years ago.
"Given the assessment scheme
set forth in the Code, it is not pre-
ordained that the plaintiffs will
receive tax bills using the Bear-


ingPoint assessment system that
is challenged in their complaint,"
Gomez wrote in his opinion, as
quoted in the V.I. Daily News.
While the government is in a
new revaluation cycle, however,
the data BearingPoint collected -
which the V.I. Unity Day Group
alleges is seriously flawed - will
be the base of future revaluations,
according to the group's attorney
James Derr.
"I think the judge's error is in
confusing the collection of the
data and the creation of the data-
base with the analysis of the data,"
said Derr.
Although Gomez ruled that the
group's case was moot because
BearingPoint's data is not likely
to be used for the required revalu-
ations in the future without being
altered, Derr maintained that the
data needs to be thrown out.
"Gomez's opinion states there


is no likelihood of BearingPoint's
data being used in the new revalua-
tion cycle, but he's wrong because
the data collected is still in the da-
tabase," said Derr. "The Tax As-
sessor has stated that she intends
to use that data the next time she
issues tax bills at the new rates."
"The contract between Bearing-
Point and the government about
cyclical reinspection said 10 per-
cent of all existing properties per
year should be revisited and cor-
rected," Derr said. "Using the 2006
base year, that means some of that
data, which we say is wrong, could
be used as late as 2016."
Unity Day Group planned to
file a motion for reconsideration
requesting Gomez to amend his
ruling and allow the case to go
forward on the basis of that flawed
data, Derr explained.
"The argument we'll make
is that part of the case should be


allowed to go forward and we
should be allowed to challenge the
accuracy of the data that was col-
lected," he said.
"We will be pointing out that
there are two things - the data
itself and then what you do with
that data," said Derr. "What you
do with that data is moot now, but
we still contend that the govern-
ment should not be allowed to use
that underlying data."
The Unity Day Group had 14
days from January 31 to file the
motion for reconsideration. Once
filed, Gomez will rule whether to
amend his opinion or deny the mo-
tion. If the motion is denied, Derr
planned to file an appeal with the
3rd Circuit, he explained.
Controversy over property
taxes in the Virgin Islands has
been swirling since 2000, when
a group of property owners filed
Coninued on Page 16


INDEX
Church Directory ............... 18
Classified Ads ................... 19
CommunityCalendar ...........20
Crime Stoppers ................ 17
Crossword Puzzle ............. 20
Ferry Schedules ............... 18
Historical Bits & Pieces ........2
Letters ......................... 14
P police Log ...........................17
Real Estate ....................21-23




Thursday, Feb. 10th



340-776-6496



editor@tradewinds.vi







4 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011


Woman Charged with Aggravated Assault,

Resisting Arrest, Delaying and Obstructing

Police Officer in Seat Belt Enforcement


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By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
During an incident that shocked
at least one tourist family and
several onlookers in Cruz Bay's
Franklin Powell Park, a 54-year-
old St. John woman was arrested
on Saturday morning, January 29,
around 11:30 a.m. in front of the
Loredon Boynes Sr. ferry dock.
Susan Ingrid Ellis, of Es-
tate Gifft Hill, was arrested and
charged with aggravated assault
and battery, resisting arrest and de-
laying and obstructing an officer in
the course of his duties, according
to VI. Police Department spokes-
person Melody Rames.
The arrest stemmed from Ellis'
refusal to properly attach her seat
belt, according to Rames.
"The individual was stopped
and asked to wear her seat belt
properly," said Rames. "The ar-
resting officer said that she had
been told on several occasions to
wear her seat belt."
After being pulled over near the
Cruz Bay ferry dock, Ellis alleg-
edly assaulted the VIPD officer
with sheets of paper, according to
Rames.
"She assaulted the officer by
throwing documents at him at the
location where she was stopped,"
said the VIPD spokesperson. "She
was placed under arrest and taken
to the station. Once at the station,


Susan Ingrid Ellis


the suspect was observed again as-
saulting the officer."
Ellis was detained at Leander
Jurgen Command and later trans-
ported to the Bureau of Correc-
tions on St. Thomas. She report-
edly spent two nights in jail on St.
Thomas and was released follow-
ing her advice of rights hearing in
V.I. Superior Court on Monday,
January 31.
Ellis did not file a complaint
against the VIPD for use of force,
according to Rames. Several indi-
viduals, however, witnessed the ar-
resting officer throw Ellis against
her vehicle and one tourist found
the sight so disturbing she wrote
a letter to St. John Tradewinds re-


garding the incident.
"I witnessed the arrest of a
women about 50+ years of age on
Saturday, January 29, 2011 down
at the ferry dock by a very heavy
handed armed local cop," Deb
Schimmel wrote in a letter to the
editor (see age 14 for full letter).
"It was very disturbing to witness
myself as well as my children."
"My kids were like 'what is
he going to do to her' as he threw
her up against her car, handcuffed
her and then took her away, leav-
ing her car parked in front of the
dock," Schimmel wrote.
The arresting officer did submit
a use of force report about the ar-
rest, Rames explained.
"The suspect has not filed a
grievance against the arresting of-
ficer, who did submit a use of force
as per procedure," said Rames.
"When an officer says 'You are ar-
rested' and that person says 'Okay,
let's go' and they go with you, that
is complying. Anything above that
- if the person says, 'I can't go
right now' and you put your hand
on their elbow - that is consid-
ered use of force."
"Anything that is against that
person's entire will, that is use of
force and will be in an officer's
report which is sent to internal
affairs," said Rames. "The person
who was arrested did not file any
complaint against the officer.


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VIPD and CIT Hosting Bicycle Rodeo

Feb. 12 - All Bicycles Must Be Registered

and Have Official License Plates


St. John Tradewinds
The St. John Citizens' Inte-
gration Team and the VI. Police
Department, in conjunction with
the St. John Administrator's Of-
fice, are hosting a Bicycle Rodeo
on Saturday, February 12.
In an effort to bring all bicy-
cle owners into compliance with
rules and regulations, the CIT
and VIPD will host two registra-
tion drives on February 12.
All bicycle owners must reg-
ister their bicycles and obtain li-


cense plates for their bikes.
Representative from the De-
partment of Motor Vehicles will
be present at the Coral Bay ball
field on February 12 between 9
a.m. and 12 p.m. to register bi-
cycles. There is a $16 registra-
tion fee, which covers registra-
tion cards and license plates for
bicycles for the year.
VIPD officials will host a
safety course for children, who
will receive free bicycle helmets
upon completion. The rodeo then


moves to the V.I. National Park
ball field from 1 to 4 p.m.
After the February 12 Bicycle
Rodeo, VIPD officials will en-
force bicycle registration regula-
tions, explained St. John Admin-
istrator Leona Smith.
"All bicycles must be regis-
tered and have license plates,"
said Smith. "There are no ex-
ceptions. We are trying to give
people a chance to come into
compliance before the enforce-
ment begins."






St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011


New St. John Ambulance Boat Nearing Completion


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
By the middle of March St.
John will once again have its own
ambulance boat and the vessel will
far surpass the old Star of Life,
which has been out of commission
for months.
As the VI. Government has
been shelling out $500 a day to
keep a water taxi at its disposal for
emergency medical transportation
from St. John to St. Thomas, Gold
Coast Yachts on St. Croix has been
crafting the finest ambulance boat
in the world, according to compa-
ny president and co-founder Rich-
ard Difede.
"This is probably the best laid
out and structurally sound am-
bulance boat in the world," said
Difede. "We tried to find other am-
bulance boats to compare it to, and
there weren't any out there."
With nothing to truly work
from, Gold Coast Yachts' vice
president, co-founder and yacht


designer Roger Hatfield set about
designing a custom ambulance
boat specifically for the needs of
St. John patients.
"We looked at everything -
the route, the docks, we talked to
EMTs on St. John and St. Thomas
and we looked at capacity," said
Difede. "We discussed things that
were wrong with the previous
Star of Life and then we designed
a vessel just to fit the needs of St.
John."
The $787,000 vessel is a 50-
foot composite catamaran which
includes a 300-square-foot climate
controlled patient compartment
capable of transporting six stretch-
ers at once. There are custom cabi-
nets for supplies and equipment
for four or more EMTs as well.
"Provision will be made for
ceiling hung IVs, supplied oxygen,
defibrillators, cardiac monitor-
ing, locking drug compartments,
waste and sharps disposal, litter
Continued on Page 16


st. Jonn Iraaewinas News Hendering Courtesy ot uold coast Yachts


The 50-foot catamaran ambulance boat is being designed by Gold Coast Yachts on St,
Croix specifically for St. John and its medical transportation needs.


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By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
When Cynthia Smith was fill-
ing her tires at E&C Gas Station
last month, she didn't expect to
wind up with a new volunteer po-
sition.
But that is exactly what hap-
pened. Smith crossed paths with
St. John Relay for Life event chair
Mary Bartolucci who asked her to
consider chairing the group's Ac-
tivities Committee.
"She said it was fun and I
should do it," said Smith. "I told
her to let me think about it and
while I was considering it, a friend
of mine passed away from cancer.
I was wondering what I could do
to honor his memory."
"You can write letters and give
condolences, but I thought 'What
a better way to honor him than
to give back in this way,'" said
Smith.
As chairperson of the activi-
ties committee for the first ever
St. John Relay for Life Ameri-
can Cancer Society fundraiser on
February 19, Smith is in charge
of most of the fun that will occur
during the 18-hour event at the
Winston Wells ball field.
Smith, a central figure in the
Epiphany Theater Company and
owner of Paradise Aqua Tours and
One Horn Butt Fish, definitely
knows a thing or two about fun.
She and Activities Committee


assistant Laurie Crandall have a
bevy of exciting activities set up
for Relay for Life participants of
all ages.
The little ones will not want
to miss the face painting, balloon
making and blindfolded musi-
cal chairs. Smith is also planning
to host a "water pong" contest
among the youngsters as well as
card games. A fortune teller will
even be on hand to predict their
long futures.
For adults, a limbo contest will
have them showing off their flex-
ibility while a tug of war will have
Relay for Life participants flexing
their muscles. Musical chairs for
adults will incorporate a scaven-
ger hunt before they can take seat,
Smith explained.
Throughout the course of the
evening, teams will be able to
participate in themed laps for the
chance to win some fun prizes. A
Mardi Gras and Carnival lap will
get teams warmed up for the night,
and the best themed participant
will take home a special little to-
ken. Other themes for laps during
the event include toga, superhero,
hula hoop, Victoria's Secret and
stiletto.
"We're also going to have a hot
potato lap," said Smith. "We're
asking team members to bring
their sleaziest little number, clean,
in a ziplock bag. Members during
this lap will hand over the bags


With Okay from VIPA, Dinghy Dock Repairs To Be Made


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
The gaping holes in the Cruz Bay dinghy docks
were set to be fixed over the weekend.
The docks were severely damaged in the wake of
several tropical storms which slammed St. John in the
fall. Following months of inaction and governmental
red tape, members of the St. John Chapter of the St.
Thomas/St. John Chamber of Commerce were able
to hammer out a private/public partnership agreement
with the V.I. Port Authority to get the okay to repair
the docks last week.
Chamber Chapter members agreed to pay for ma-
terials and do the actual work themselves. Dan Boyd
oversaw the work and John Russell made a generous
contribution towards covering the cost of lumber,
according to St. John Chamber Representative Kate
Norfleet.
Chamber Chapter members met with VIPA Execu-
tive Director Ken Hobsen on Friday afternoon, Feb-


ruary 4, in Cruz Bay to sign a Hold Harmless Agree-
ment so they could get to work on Saturday, February
5.
Norfleet sent out an email asking for volunteers
on Friday morning, which was immediately met with
numerous offers of food, drinks and labor, she ex-
plained.
As of press time, chapter members were slated
to work on the dinghy dock on the Battery side of
the Loredon Boynes Ferry Dock in Cruz Bay start-
ing at 10:30 a.m. on February 5. Wharfside Village
owner Ed McKenzie agreed to take care of repairs of
the dinghy dock on the Wharfside Village side of the
ferry dock, according to Norfleet.
St. John Administrator Leona Smith also helped
VIPA and the local chamber chapter reach the private/
partnership agreement as well, Norfleet added.
"Without Dan, John, Leona and the cooperation of
VIPA, this would not be happening so our thank you's
to them are huge," she said.


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Tug of War, Balloon Making and More:

Relay for Life will Feature Fun for All Ages


until the music stops and then they
have to wear the outfit in their
hand."
There are 12 themed laps
planned for the night and Smith
will give team captains a list of
items they will need to bring to the
event if the team wishes to partici-
pate, she explained.
"When the teams arrive, I'll
have a checklist and will check
off if they have all of the items,"
said Smith. "That way, we'll know
how many teams are taking part
and we'll tell them what time the
themed laps will be starting."
Teams should check in with the
activities booth at the Relay for
Life to check out the full schedule
of games for the night. The Relay
for Life will also include live mu-
sic with numerous bands and an
amazing performance by Cirque-
tacular, an awe-inspiring troop of
artists.
Smith is open to any additional
ideas for games and activities for
the night. She is also looking for
donations to award to theme lap
winners. To help out the first ever
St. John Relay for Life's activi-
ties committee, call Smith at 513-
0514.
"Call me with great ideas for
fun games," she said. "We want
to have as much fun as we possi-
bly can while we're doing the Re-
lay for Life, which is such a great
cause."







St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 7


Frank Powell Sr. Park Closing February 7 for Renovations


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Say goodbye to the Frank-
lin Powell Park for the next few
months.
Renovations to the park are
slated to begin on Monday, Feb-
ruary 7, and wrap up sometime in
June. The date of the renovations
will force the 11th Annual St. John
Arts Festival to find a new home
in the VI. National Park ball field,
when it kicks off February 18.
The work will be done in a
"manner that minimizes disrup-
tions" to the popular businesses
which line the park, JJ's Texas
Coast Cafe, Coral Bay Jewelers
and Sparky's, according to a state-
ment from Government House.
"The work will start Mon-
day, February 7, and is scheduled
for completion by the middle of
June," according to the statement.
"During that time, the park will be
closed to the public, but provisions
will be made to avoid disrupting
the public's access to nearby busi-
nesses."
"This work will be undertaken
in a manner that minimizes dis-
ruptions for the businesses that
surround the park and the neigh-


boring community," Department
of Public Works Commissioner
Smalls said in the prepared state-
ment. "We have discussed these
objectives with the contractor, and
are confident they understand and
will be responsive."
Smalls did not return repeat-
ed phone calls from St. John
Tradewinds requesting additional
information and renderings of
the renovations for the Cruz Bay
park.
Apex Construction will be do-
ing the work, which is expected
to include installation of an un-
derground electrical system for
new lighting and new paving and
landscaping. The project will cost
$336,792 and should be completed
by June 14, according to St. John
Administrator Leona Smith.
While plans to renovate the
park have been discussed for
years, the news of the impending
work did not reach St. John Arts
Festival Founder Frank Langley's
ears until the end of January, al-
most a month after he obtained
a permit, booked bands, printed
booklets and updated the website
www.stjohnartsfestival.org.
Langley also questioned the


St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Jaime Elliott


Franklin A. Powell Sr. Park, above, in Cruz Bay will be
closed during renovations which should commence on
February 7 and are expected to continue until sometime in
mid-June.


need to cordon off the park -
which is usually the first thing
tourists see when entering Cruz
Bay - at the height of busy sea-
son.
"Beyond my festival being
changed to a new location, this
impacts tourism," said Langley.
"Nothing worse could be imag-


ined than for visitors arriving from
the ferry to be greeted with a con-
struction gang with jackhammers
digging up the only green spot left
in Cruz Bay."
Despite his disappointment,
Langley is optimistic that the fes-
tival will be a success at its new
home in the VINP ball field, he


added.
"The show must go on," said
the festival founder. "Given the
cooperation of Leona Smith and
(DPW St. John Deputy Directory)
Ira Wade, we'll be able to recon-
struct our own little park in the big
ball field. Ira Wade will be erecting
a bandstand for the 40-piece 73rd
Army Band which will perform
on February 19 starting at 12:30
p.m."
The St. John Arts Festival will
continue on Sunday, February 20,
with a gospel concert at the ball
field and the Caribbean Ritual
Dancers performing that night at
the Westin Resort and Villas.
For a full schedule of events
for the festival, check out www.
stjohnartsfestival.org.
In the prepared statement from
Government House, Smalls apolo-
gized for the expected disruptions
caused by the almost five months
of renovations.
"We apologize forthe imposition
that will be caused by this beautifi-
cation project that is long over-due
and sorely needed to recapture the
park's charm and its importance as
a central focal point," Smalls said
in the statement.


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8 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011



Finishing Touches To Be Put on Almost Completed Cruz Bay Roundabout


By Andrea Milam
St. John Tradewinds
Now that work is nearly com-
pleted at the Cruz Bay roundabout
and the utility pole has been re-
moved from the circle's center, the
St. John chapter of the St. Thomas/
St. John Chamber of Commerce is
looking into beautifying the center
of the circle itself, along with the
small planted area where the Texa-
co gas station used to be located.
St. John chamber members met
recently with St. John Administra-
tor Leona Smith, officials from the
V.I. Police Department and the VI.
Department of Public Works, and
architect Glen Speer, who will be
working on the design.
The idea of planting the center
circle was immediately discounted
due to the need for large trucks to
ramp up in the center in order to
traverse the roundabout, and the
necessity of clear visibility across
the entire circle. Maintenance of
plants was another issue, explained
DPW Materials Program Manager
Thomas Jones.
"It's about visibility but it's
also about maintenance," he said.
"You'd have to maintain that on a
weekly basis, and you don't want
something you constantly have to
keep after."
Chamber members suggested a
compass rose design for the cen-
ter circle, explained Chamber of
Commerce St. John representative
Kate Norfleet.
"One suggestion was that we
put in the compass rose built out
of stone, and I thought it might be
cool to do really heavy glass bricks
from Maho," she said. "Glen's
proposal for the currently planted




0 %r


"We'll put the [no
parking] signs in the
middle, and the white
hash mark that cur-
rently goes around
the circle will be
painted yellow. Once
you cross that yellow
line to park, police
can give you a ticket."

- Thomas Jones,
DPW Materials Program Manager


Once Innovative completes burying cables from the JESS workshop annex to the new
Fatty Crab restaurant, the Cruz Bay roundabout should be officially finished.


area involves shorter plants toward
where the hillside meets the circle,
with the possibility of shade trees
further up the hill. There might
also be a meandering walkway to
the lower sidewalk, which would
help keep pedestrians out of the
center of the circle."
Once Speer completes his de-
signs and formulates a cost esti-
mate, the Chamber will take over
the responsibility of fundraising.
A wine sip event has been sug-
gested as a possible fundraiser for
the project, along with the option


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for local businesses to "sponsor"
sections of the area where the gas
station was formerly located.
"One suggestion that came out
was larger businesses can sponsor
the walk around area, so maybe
they'd have a seating area with
their logo in stone, or something
like that, to commemorate the busi-
nesses that have the wherewithal
and the funds to do more signifi-
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Norfleet was hesitant to specu-
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delivered.
DPW wholeheartedly supports
the final beautification, according
to DPW Materials Program Man-
ager Thomas Jones.
"We haven't gotten anything
solid from them to approve, but
the commissioner will probably
approve it," said Jones.
As for the roundabout construc-
tion, eight months after the con-
tract was scheduled to close, the
punch list is still being worked
on. While all utilities were buried
in the area, DPW is still waiting


on Innovative to bury its cables
from the Julius E. Sprauve School
workshop annex to the new Fatty
Crab restaurant.
"The conduit's already in the
ground, so that won't stop us from
moving forward," said Jones. "It's
all on Innovative now."
Another issue that has cropped
up at the roundabout is people
parking their vehicles in the center
circle. Jones brought "no parking"
signs over from St. Thomas last
week, and DPW St. John Deputy
Director Ira Wade was expected to
have them installed within a few
days.
"We'll put the signs in the
middle, and the white hash mark
that currently goes around the
circle will be painted yellow," said
Jones. "Once you cross that yel-
low line to park, police can give
you a ticket."
Cars parking in the center of the
roundabout disrupt drivers' vis-
ibility, Jones added.











Local Lionfish Battle Is Continuing-


70 Fish Caught of St. John and Counting


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
While the lionfish threat is seri-
ous and is here, there is hope.
That was the message Karl Py-
tlik shared with about 70 residents
who attended a lionfish response
symposium at the Mongoose Junc-
tion courtyard on Tuesday night,
February 1.
Pytlik, the Caribbean Oceanic
Restoration and Education Foun-
dation's St. John coordinator, has
been on the front lines in the fight
against the invasive fish species on
St. John.
Scientists believe lionfish were
introduced to the Atlantic Ocean
in the wake of Hurricane Andrew
when a fish tank was dumped into
the sea. Since then, the native In-
dian Ocean fish has wreaked havoc
in waters from Florida to the Baha-
mas.
With no natural predators, the
fish devastates reefs by devouring
reef fish, vital to the health of coral.
Pytlik shared images from the Ba-
hamas where reefs are covered in
algae and fish are all but absent.
The dire situation in the Baha-
mas could be avoided in local wa-
ters, according to Pytlik.
"So far there have been 70 lion-
fish caught off St. John and about
1,500 across the territory," he said.
"Basically the biggest thing we can
do is raise community awareness
and get people to help and volun-
teer."
Many residents did just that
at the February 2 meeting, Pytlik
added.
"We had a lot of people who
signed up and volunteered and we
had a lot of people who have boats
who are willing to lend their re-
sources," he said.
While National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration of-
ficials have pushed eating the fish
in other areas, the lionfish diet will
not work in the Virgin Islands, ac-
cording to Pytlik.
"We have tested seven fish for
ciguatera poisoning from the reefs
and four were positive for the
toxin," he said. "We're warning
against eating the fish here."
Instead, the best way to combat
the fish seems to be vigilance.


St. John Tradewinds News Photo File


A total of 70 lionfish have been nabbed in waters off St.
John as officials gear up to combat the species' expected
impacts on local reefs.


"Every fish that gets sighted and
marked and called into us, we are
removing," said Pytlik. "We do
have a chance to keep their num-
bers down. We need people trained
to remove the fish and we need ev-
eryone to report all sightings."
It's difficult to tell what impacts
lionfish have already had on local
reefs, Pytlik added.
"It's a little hard to tell about the
impact right now, but you can fig-
ure that those fish are eating quite
a bit of the reef fish out there," he
said.
With a coordinated effort be-
tween the British and U.S. Virgin
Islands, Puerto Rico and Turks
and Caicos, the CORE Foundation
has a comprehensive lionfish plan
which draws on as many resources
as possible, explained Pytlik.
"We're trying to bring as many
resources out of the community as
we can," he said. "We definitely
need more funding, but we do have
a real management plan. We need
to draw on everyone for this."
By affecting the health of reefs,
lionfish could potentially affect the
entire tourism industry, according
to Pytlik.
"This really affects everyone,"
he said. "In some areas, like the
Bahamas, there has been a 25 per-
cent drop in the scuba industry just
in the past few years. That is the
equivalent to something like $30
million."


"And if people aren't diving,
they're not staying in hotels or eat-
ing in restaurants or shopping in
stores," Pytlik said. "It could really
hurt us. It could affect everyone,
not just the dive industry."
Dire impacts like seen in the
Bahamas are still a few years away
in the Virgin Islands, but Pytlik is
trying to make sure those dead reef
images are never seen in local wa-
ters.
"We are working as hard we can
to avoid what happened in waters
closer to Florida, where these fish
came out of the blue," he said. "We
have a chance to stay ahead of it
here."
To help in the battle against li-
onfish swimmers and snorkelers
should carry markers - available
at local dive shops, Friends of the
Park Store, St. John Spice and
more - and call the CORE hotline
to report all sightings. Scuba divers
can get trained to remove the fish
and anyone with a vessel can host
divers searching for the fish.
Call CORE's hotline at 340-201-
2342 to report a sighting of a lion-
fish. Pytlik will be hosting a series
of lionfish seminars this season on
Wednesday nights rotating between
Maho Bay Camps and Estate Con-
cordia Preserve. Call the resorts to
confirm Pytlik's schedule. For more
information, to volunteer or register
for a lionfish training email Pytlik
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10 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011


Hercules Pate Rebuilding After Fire

41 The old Hercul6s
Pat6 in Cruz Bay
. ..... . was destroyed by fire
last summer. Last
month, however,
Hercules started
building a new, bigger,
wooden structure
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be serving up his
scrumptious pates
soon.

St. John Tradewinds News
Photo by Jaime Elliott


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New Officers for 2011

Elected for Animal

Care Center of St. John
St. John Tradewinds
In conformity with the by-laws of the Animal Care Center of St. John,
the general membership approved by acclimation a Slate of Officers at
the annual meeting on January 26.
The slate, prepared by a duly constituted Nominating Committee,
recommended candidates for the four officer positions required by the
ACC's By-Laws as follows:
President, B.J. Harris; Vice-President, Karin Schlesinger; Secretary,
Sheila Karcher; Treasurer, Monica Munro.
The criteria taken into account in preparing the Slate of Officers were
that each person on the proposed Slate of Officers is a full-time resident
of St. John; each person on the proposed Slate has displayed civility
in working with fellow members; each person has displayed caring for
animals in a concrete manner; e.g., owns pets, has adopted island cats
or dogs, maintains a feeding station, helps with on- and off-island adop-
tions, lends a hand at the shelter if and when needed; each person on
the Slate has on-island business experience; each person is willing to
understand and work with the USVI Government; each person respects
the West Indian culture of our islands.
The number of ACC board members was reduced to eight from 15 at
the regular January meeting of the board. The purpose of the reduction is
to effect a more efficient governing organization.
The four non-officer board members include three sitting members:
Dean Baldwin, Elaine Campbell, and Diana Ripley. Incumbent Oriel
Smith, whose term was expiring, was re-elected by majority vote at the
annual meeting.
Sheila Karcher, a former ACC board member and officer, was elected
to return by majority vote. Smith and Karcher will each commence a
two-year term. Voting for non-officer board members was by paper bal-
lot. In addition to the two recommended candidates, two write-in votes
were provided for on the ballot.
A list of ACC achievements for 2010 was handed out at the annual
meeting at the Gifft Hill School Great Room. Retiring Treasurer John
Fuller described the many new internet connections that ACC has joined
for raising its funding levels.
For residents who were unable to attend the annual meeting, the list of
achievements and of internet connections will be included in the spring
newsletter. To be added to the subscriber list, please email stjacc@is-
lands.vi.
Some of the organizational challenges facing the 2011 board include a
careful review and possible revision of the by-laws, development and su-
pervision of a nascent "pack" committee system, and laying the ground-
work for building a larger shelter.


KATS Hosting Two Adult Sailing
Classes Starting Feb. 9 and 12
Kids And The Sea, St. John is hosting two adults sailing classes
next month; one starting on Wednesday, February 9, and running
for four Wednesdays and the other starting on Saturday, February
12, and running for four weeks as well.
Both classes will begin at 1 p.m. and will feature Pearson En-
signs, 23-foot keel boats. The cost is $200 for the four sessions
and the funds go to support the KATS St. John youth sailing pro-
gram.
Anyone interested should call Marie Naisby at 714-7433 or
410-271-1196 to register.







St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 11


VITEMA Shares New Hazard Mitigation Plan


St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Courtesy of GHS


GHS students and faculty celebrated 100 percent
participation in the Seeds for Success Fund Drive on
the Trayser Field, above.


GHS Seeds for Success Matching

Fund Drive Nets $276,000 Total


St. John Tradewinds
The Second Annual Gifft
Hill School "Seeds for Suc-
cess" matching fund drive was
a smashing success.
GHS was generously sup-
ported by the school commu-
nity as well as the community
at large and raised $276,000
which qualified for the entire
matching fund from its unbe-
lievably big-hearted donors.
The school is most proud
to report that its students and
faculty achieved 100 percent
participation in the program,
donating $10,555 which, with
matching and $10,000 bonuses
in each category, turned into a
whopping $125,550.


The funds raised through
"Seeds for Success" will sup-
port teacher salaries, academic
and athletic programming,
and will go a long way toward
offsetting the $650,000 GHS
awarded in scholarships and fi-
nancial assistance this year.
GHS thanks everyone who
supported the school in this
effort and those who sponsor
scholarships, donate to the auc-
tion and give various in-kind
donations.
St. John is truly a communi-
ty school in every way, and the
contributions it receives make
all the difference for students
- the future leaders of the is-
land and world beyond.


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Five residents added their con-
cerns for inclusion in the V.I Ter-
ritorial Management Agency's
updated hazardous mitigation plan
during a Wednesday evening, Feb-
ruary 2, meeting at the Julius E.
Sprauve School cafeteria.
VITEMA hosted a series of
meetings across the territory last
week as it moves ahead with cre-
ating an updated State Hazard
Mitigation Plan, as required by the
Federal Emergency Management
Agency.
"Everything in government
has guidelines and regulations,"
said Jonetta Darden, VITEMA's
Deputy Director for Grants Man-
agement. "We must have a State
Hazard Mitigation Plan in place
which is a requirement of FEMA.
We have hired a consultant to as-
sist us in creating the plan and to
make sure that it's accepted by
FEMA."
"If it's not accepted, all bets are
off," said Darden.
VITEMA officials are work-
ing to identify harzardous areas
throughout the territory, in order
to develop mitigation strategies to
reduce long-term risks, explained
Jeffrey Euwema, a consultant with
the Concil for Information and
Planning Alternatives, who was
contracted by VITEMA.
"The plan is based on commu-
nity input and defines the strategy


Tradewinds News Photo by Jaime Elliott

VITEMA consultant
Jeffrey Euwema talks to
residents.

of reduction of losses due to haz-
ards," said Euwema. "The plan
will serve as a guideline during
disaster declarations to put us on
the docket for funding."
From storm water improve-
ments to general planning and
even zoning variances, VITEMA's
State Hazard Mitigation Plan will
be designed to identify potential
risks in order to avoid devastating
damage in the wake of a hurricane,
earthquake or landslide, according
to Euwema.
"Things like a review of the
storm water drainage problems
which impacted the Westin, the
infrastructure at Guy Benjamin
School which floods consistently,
the plan will identify hazards and


then actions to mitigate those haz-
ards," he said. "We are looking for
tangible impacts to reduce haz-
ards."
Once the strategies are outlined,
the mitigation projects will be pri-
oritized in order of importance to
be accomplished when funding
becomes available, Euwema ex-
plained.
"There is really no limit on
what type of projects could be in-
cluded in the plan," he said. "Pie
in the sky projects like burying the
cables in Charlotte Amalie, was
actually funded by VITEMA. Big
ticket items are a possibility."
The State Harzard Mitigation
Plan will also include maintenance
provisions, like bi-annual meet-
ings, to keep it viable in the future,
Euwma added.
A draft of the plan must be pre-
sented to FEMA by March, and
a final plan is due by the end of
March.
It's not too late for residents to
offer their opinions on the plan.
VITEMA officials hoped to have
a draft of the plan up on their
website, www.vitema.gov, by this
week. Officials also hoped to have
a mechanism in place for residents
to post comments about the plan
on its site as well.
For more information about
VITEMA's State Hazard Mitiga-
tion Plan, call the agency's Grants
Management Division at 774-
2244.


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12 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011


Robert C. Byrd Scholarship Available


St. John Tradewinds
St. Thomas/St. John School District Superinten-
dent Jeanette Smith-Barry announced that applica-
tions are now being accepted for the 2011 Robert C.
Byrd Scholarship.
Graduating students who have been accepted to a
college or university for attendance in the fall of 2011
are eligible for this four-year scholarship.
Annually administered by the VI. Department of
Education, the Robert C. Byrd Scholarship program
complies with section 419E of the Higher Education
Act of 1965. As part of this program five Byrd schol-
ars receive awards of $1,500 per year, which can be


renewed for a maximum of eight consecutive univer-
sity or college semesters upon submission of required
evidence showing maintenance of eligibility.
Applications are available from guidance coun-
selors at the various public and private high schools,
the Office of the Commissioner of Education, the V.I.
Board of Education, the Curriculum Center in Anna's
Retreat, and downloadable at www.doe.vi. Complet-
ed applications should be submitted to the Office of
the Insular Superintendent no later than 5:00 p.m. on
Friday, April 1, 2011.
For more information contact J. Nicole Smith-
Thompson at 775-2250, extension 8520.


L


I. A


L


Premiere Performance
Friday, February 18, 6:00 Westin Ballroom
100 tickets Available at $200


2nd performance to follow at 8:00 pm
Free to the General Public
Donations Welcomed

St. John School of the Arts
~II


St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Courtesy of HTA


(L to R) Lisa Hamilton, President, HTA; Finn Bolding
Thomson, Director FEE; Jamie Irving, Clean Islands;
Lourdes Diaz, Vice President of FEE; Jan Eriksen, Presi-
dent of FEE, and Valerie Peters, Coral World.

HTA Works with Officials To Obtain
Eco-label Awards for Local Beaches


A







Dream, Wish, Believe


dards we are being respectful of
island residents, visitors and the
environment," said Maggie Day,
Environmental Committee Chair-
person. "It means our beaches and
beach facilities are safe and clean,
the marine resources are preserved
and protected and through signage
and educational outreach, we en-
courage everyone to learn about
our beautiful beaches, bays and
shorelines."
The process of acquiring Blue
Flag certification involves some
local investment. The Department
of Tourism and Hovensa have both
contributed to this effort.
The USVI could be flying the
flag as early as December 2011.
The destination will be one of only
a few Caribbean islands with this
distinction.
For additional information on
the Blue Flag Program visit www.
blueflag.org or call the HTA at
774-6835.


St. John Goes to Broadway Raffle! $100/Ticket
Round Trip Air Fare for Two to New York City, Three Night Hotel
Accommodations, Dinners, Tickets to Three Broadway
Musicals, plus one Backstage Tour - .


JFLI Is Hosting Field Trip Food Sale
Fundraiser on Weekends at Firefoods
John's Folly Learning Institute officials are planning another exciting
field trip to Puerto Rico this summer. To help offset the cost, JFLI found-
er Alvis Christian is hosting food sales Friday through Sunday starting
February 11.
Stop by Fire Foods at the Coral Bay triangle between 3 and 11 p.m.
Friday and Sundays and between 11 a.m. and 11 p.m. Saturday for
some great local food and drinks, and help a worthy cause.


P


L


St. John Tradewinds
Three members of the Founda-
tion for Environmental Education
(FEE) arrived in the territory last
week to evaluate five beaches that
could soon be named Blue Flag lo-
cations.
Blue Flag is an exclusive eco-
label awarded to beaches and ma-
rinas worldwide which meet the
established criteria of the program.
The effort is being led by the Envi-
ronmental Sub-Committee of the
USVI Hotel and Tourism Associa-
tion.
The beaches being evaluated
for the pilot phase are Emerald
Beach, Magens Bay, Great Bay,
Trunk Bay, and Pelican Cove. The
Blue Flag designation is based on
compliance with 32 criteria cover-
ing the aspects of environmental
education and information, water
quality, environmental manage-
ment, and safety and services.
"By meeting Blue Flag stan-







St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 13


Affordable Prices and Made to Order Food

Make Jake's the Place - Day or Night


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Feel like pancakes at midnight? How about a Philly
cheese steak at 8 a.m.?
There is only one place on St. John to go for both
early-morning and late-night cravings - Jake's.
The restaurant, upstairs at the Lumberyard in the
old Chilly Billy's location, is open daily from 7:30
a.m. to 4 a.m. and serves up its entire menu the whole
time. That means breakfast all day and night, as well
as their selection of burgers, sandwiches, wraps and
salads.
If those hours don't get one in their perennially
open doors, the price and quality of the food surely
will. Prices at Jake's range from $16 for a juicy eight-
ounce steak and eggs to $10 chicken sandwiches. But
beyond the affordable prices, everything on the menu
is freshly made to order.
When Shaun and Carl Stevens closed the doors on
their Cruz Bay late-night haunt the Front Yard, they
wasted no time in opening Jake's. Named after the
couple's son, who was just a year old when they first
opened in May 2008, the restaurant is based on good
food for an affordable price.
"They were knocking down the Front Yard build-
ing and we had to go," said Carl Stevens.
"We asked ourselves, 'What next,'" said Shaun Ste-
vens. "We weren't sure whether to stay here, go back
to the states, go to work somewhere else or what."
Then the upstairs at the Lumberyard became avail-
able and the couple had their answer.
"We figured the island needed a few inexpensive
alternatives to the fine dining scene," said Shaun Ste-
vens. "There aren't many places where you can come
and have a full sit down dinner for under $20. It's not
super fancy, but it's really good."
"You need some place to go for breakfast at 2 p.m.
or 2 a.m.," said Carl Stevens. "When we were doing
the Front Yard, we woke up late and I could never get
breakfast anywhere in the afternoon. Plus we're carry-
ing on the Front Yard tradition with the late nights."
While literally everything on the menu is good,
some items simply can not be missed. Of the break-
fast offerings, the corned beef hash is a huge hit. With
the corned beef slow roasted for 13, then tossed with
Jake's spiced home fries and served up with two eggs
and toast, it's not a surprise that it's one of the most
popular items on the menu.
Other breakfast choices include a scrumptious
burrito brimming with eggs, home fries, tomato and
cheese, fluffy Belgian waffles and cinnamon spiced
French toast.
On the lunch and dinner side of things, a favorite
dish at Jake's is Philly cheese steak.
"We've had people from Philly come in and say it's
better than Pat's," said Carl Stevens.
With thinly sliced beef, onion and bell peppers
smothered in a Swiss and American cheese blend on
a toasted roll, it's draw is no surprise. Other favorites
include a chicken, bacon and ranch wrap and savory
bacon cheeseburgers.
While the economic downturn kicked into high


St John TradewndsNew Photo byJai....me Elliott
St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Jaime Elliott


Jake's owners Carl and Shaun Stevens
take a moment out of the busy schedule to
smile for the camera.


gear shortly after they opened Jake's, the Stevens
have more than weathered the storm and business is
now better than ever.
The couple get plenty of help in their venture with
a terrific staff and the little man after whom the res-
taurant in named.
"Jake's in pre-school now, but he logged a lot of
hours in the three years we've been open," said Shaun
Stevens. "He loves it here. He makes breakfast and he
makes a mean Bloody Mary - there is no alcohol in
it, but there could be anything else."
Jake's is equally popular with other children, as
well as their parents. The kid's menu offers chicken
nuggets, grilled cheese and hot dogs with chips each
for only $6 and on the breakfast side of things, happy
face pancakes for $5 are a big hit with the little ones.
Parents also enjoy how their kids love the restau-
rant's coloring books and video games, giving them at
least a few minutes of quiet time. And the restaurant's
real bartenders do make a mean Bloody Mary for the
grown-ups.
The bar prices at Jake's are another hit with the
crowd all hours of the day. Well drinks, and their vod-
ka is Stoli, are $3; and so are all of the beers, includ-
ing Sierra Nevada.
The ethos driving the restaurant is simple, accord-
ing to Carl Stevens.
"I want people to have good service and leave here
with a full belly and having had a great experience,"
he said.
"It's really rewarding to have people love our
food," said Shaun Stevens. "That feels really good.
Plus, it's super fun to have Jake's name on the sign."
Stop by the restaurant pretty much any time of the
night or day for great fare. For more information or
for take out orders call the restaurant at 777-7115.


BROADWAY


RAFFLE TICKETS


Purchase a raffle ticket for a chance to win
a Broadway Package worth over $5,000:
2 Round Trip Airfare to New York (from St. John or US)
2 Tickets to "Chicago" (Orchestra seating) & backstage tour
2 Tickets to "La Cage Aux Folles" (Orchestra seating)
2 Tickets to "Priscilla: Queen of Desert" (Orchestra seating)
Dinner for two at the famous Sardi's
Dinner for two at Etcetera, Etcetera
3 Night Accommodations at W Hotel in New York - Times Square

Raffle Tickets: $100.00 each
Only 200 raffle tickets will sold
Raffle ticket sales will start
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7TH
4 TO 6 P.M.
STARFISH GOURMET & WINES
(Meet the five Broadway actors from 5 to 6 p.m.)

$200.00 per ticket . Only 30 Angel tickets are left!

ANGEL SPONSORSHIP TICKETS

Angel sponsorship tickets include:
* (1) Entry into "DREAM, WISH, BELIEVE." - An original produc-
tion with music, dance and puppets performed by 52 students
from JESS, GBS, GHS and SJSA. Award-nominated Broadway actors
will be working with the children to present this show
* A champagne reception following the performance
* Dinner for 1 following the performance at an island restaurant


ANGEL TICKET PERFORMANCE
Friday, February 18th at 6 p.m.
Westin Resort Ballroom


FREE PUBLIC PERFORMANCE
Friday, February 18th at 8 p.m.
Westin Resort Ballroom


Paintings, _l , o i prints









. : .


(N4o) 774169,


-'U.---
Ir1IJ~







14 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011




Letters To St. John Tradewinds


St. Lucia Relief Drive Thanks

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all St. Johnians and
St. Lucians who so generously contributed towards the St. Lucia Re-
lief Drive. Your support was highly appreciated.
Special thanks to Lucinda Francis, Brenda Eugene, Rochelle Eu-
gene, Faustines Francis, Alexander Francis, Verona and Family, Lucy
Hippolyte, Castaways, Damian Knight, Dale Abraham, Cid Hamling,
Theodora Moorehead, Cristol Harris, lous and wife (Windy Level)
Vern Eugene, Captain Vic, Pine Peace Mini Mart, and myself, Bredna
Francis, who spearheaded the drive.
Once again, thanks to all. Special thanks to Cristol Harris.
From the heart of Brenda Francis



Keeping Track of Crime


2010
Homicides: 0
Shootings: 0
Stabbings: 0
Armed Robberies: 1
Arsons: 0

1st Degree Burglaries: 3
2nd Degree Burglaries: 22

3rd Degree Burglaries: 70
Grand Larcenies: 67
Rapes: 0


2011-TO-DATE
Homicides: 0
Shootings: 0
Stabbings: 0
Armed Robberies: 0
Arsons: 0
1st Degree Burglaries: 0
2nd Degree Burglaries: 2
3rd Degree Burglaries: 1
Grand Larcenies: 5
Rapes: 0


Crossword Answers - Puzzle on Page 20

AB OV E Z E RO S H A L OM R I N G
NA V I GATOR M ANTRA E D E R
ALEX A N D E R R D I N F LEE
I RENE ARR EER I EST
CHAN R I C KE Y H ENDED RS ON
OAR P I TCHES A A AETGN I
I I E 0TE Y N ESR J D E I
NE NA SA MOEB A T S P
CO O POL I TA N AG Z I N-E


A M IO I L ACS DE A
MAN TTA CLO D







E NOS UN L I K TEETERSON

L ENS POP LAR AGREEMENT


Visiting Family Disturbed by VIPD Arrest of Woman at Dock


I witnessed the arrest of a
women about 50+ years of age on
Saturday, January 29, 2011 down
at the ferry dock by a very heavy
handed armed local cop. It was
very disturbing to witness by my-
self as well as my children.
I have visited the island for
the last six years and never expe-
rienced anything like this on the
island let alone at approximately
11:30 a.m. My children said they
never want to come back and I
don't blame them, and agree with


what they are thinking.
Part of my concern was the fact
that he did not call for a female of-
ficer to back him up. My kids were
like "what is he going to do to her"
as he threw her up against her car,
handcuffed her and then took her
away, leaving her car parked in
front of the docks.
It was still parked in the place
where she had stopped at 1 p.m.
which is when we left on the ferry.
The irony of the whole thing was
this all took place under the giant


banner out in front reading "Make
every visitor feel special - Tour-
ism it's all of us!" I bet she felt
special.
Please look into this I would
like to know what became of her.
Maybe the cop could have handled
it better. It sure made me want to
keep from spending my money
on St. John, since it may be going
into the pockets of the corrupt lo-
cal few.
Deb Schimmel


If VITEMA is indeed committed to the idea of
community participation, then it should be a reason-
able expectation that any criticisms offered here will
not simply be met with self-defensive reactions that
are all too common at government-sponsored hear-
ings of this type. What is anticipated is that a far more
meaningful level of internal analysis will be forth-
coming to facilitate a continuing dialogue meant to
address any perceived insufficiencies in the agency's
ongoing efforts. That process in which awareness
is followed by agenda which formulates policy and
that leads to implementation necessarily requires an
eventual evaluation to determine the effectiveness of
those efforts. My comments here are offered with that
objective in mind.
Unfortunately no overview of the State Hazard
Mitigation Plan was included as part of the article
notifying the public of this town hall meeting. While
such a review might have somewhat taxed the staff
to compile a one or two page entry for the newspaper
readership, the obvious benefit of an informed public
prepared to offer more specific recommendations and
well founded opinions would have outweighed the re-
quired efforts. Indeed, why was not even a referenced
web site included to guide those interested to review
the existing plan? Regardless of these faults, my ob-
jective is not to simply chastise VITEMA concerning
these missteps in soliciting public input.
One of the greatest shortcomings of many exist-
ing plans in government agencies is that their basis
usually is premised on data covering at most 100 to
200 year time lines. The inadequacy of such limited
historical analysis almost certainly assures a commu-
nity that the severity of damage from unanticipated
levels of disaster is guaranteed to generate greater de-
grees of havoc and result in far more losses that could
have been preventable had they simply been deemed
likely.
While the evidence to determine the extent of such


rare and extreme events may be only deduced from
careful geological studies of physical details obscured
by great spans of time, the challenge of such an effort
should not deter us from more accurately predicting
their likelihood and magnitude. As an issue of public
policy, concerns of this nature, once realized, need to
become part of that agenda that determines the direc-
tion which policymakers ultimately must pursue.
Perhaps of equal importance would be the required
effort to establish such rare but catastrophic events as
ongoing concern for the general public. As an exam-
ple, though pole houses elevated along coastal com-
munities in parts of Asia were once common sites,
modem construction techniques employing ground
floors have become the norm. Had the older consider-
ations in construction continued it is likely that many
thousands of lives might have been saved in the tsu-
nami that struck Southeast Asia a few years ago.
One of the more obvious deficiencies in our local
communities is that, without municipal governments,
an entire level of localized government, normally fac-
tored into the national FEMA framework, does not
even exist. The consequences invariably impact the
response time, as well a the accuracy and amount of
relevant information required to determine the type
and appropriate level of assistance. This results in a
heightened sense of isolation that citizens experience
after a disaster and amplifies the remoteness of our
various communities simply because our more cen-
tralized government, by design, is rendered less re-
sponsive.
The recent storm activity during the 2010 hurricane
season, while severe in comparison to most events
of the last several decades, cannot be considered a
"worst case scenario." The existing infrastructure,
and greater considerations of development now in
place are clearly neither adequate in design nor prop-
erly placed to avoid the more severe levels of damage
Continued on Next Page


Guest Opinion


Sound Planning Necessary for New Hazard Mitigation Plan







St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 15


New Hazard Mitigation Plan
Continued from Previous Page
that natural disasters of greater magnitudes would certainly produce.
Hazard mitigation, to be effective under such conditions, would first
require the same type of Multi-hazards Demonstration Project that was
prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey for California. One element of
the project, the Arkstorm scenario, was based on anticipated precipita-
tion levels that would occur on average every 500 to 1,000 years. Absent
such risk analysis, continued development in accordance with existing
zoning laws, can only amplify the costs of future disasters, and this in
turn will further escalate already excessively high insurance rates, inevi-
tably affecting all property owners.
Without being prepared to comment directly on the existing plan now
in effect, I'll direct my comments to what I believe should be accom-
plished in any newer version that results from the efforts now under-
way. If the new plan is to be comprehensive in its assessment then there
must be an emphasis on providing insights into the overall spectrum of
possibilities that might befall the territory. Earthquakes, tsunamis, wind-
storms, flooding and the eventual consequences of sea level rise brought
on by climate change all need to be factored into a disaster policy that
anticipates both severity and frequency.
Vague understanding of these phenomenon lull people into a false
sense of confidence. The principal value of the plan must be to raise
awareness enough so that individuals are both able and motivated enough
to make informed decisions on where best to invest in homes, business-
es, and what construction methods best offer the likelihood of survival,
should a disaster occur. Equally important should be the establishment of
a set of criteria that lists key considerations in determining the locations
of essential government facilities that will be instrumental in providing
services in the aftermath.
As a final consideration, the previous hurricane season made one thing
abundantly clear, and that is that the state of roadways, drainage systems
and construction techniques on steep hillsides are nowhere near adequate
to withstand even above average rainfall patterns.
The type of construction that created Centerline Road here on St. John
was perhaps adequate for light duty traffic; but over the years traffic and
payloads have increased to where even frequent maintenance is of lim-
ited benefit. The cut and fill operation that established the road did not
provide the type of compaction necessary to assure the stability of the
surface area under today's conditions. The fill side of the road in numer-
ous places is continually sliding downhill, and even new paving is add-
ing to the weight factor that is instrumental in this ongoing process.
As the road bed settles, higher volumes of water cross the road and
quickly erode and undermine the already limited soft shoulders that bor-
der the paved surface. The situation is further amplified by numerous
catch basins that have been sealed off, and others that are blocked by
falling debris in areas that should have retaining walls.
Private developers rarely consider the use of retaining walls to control
erosion, and devices such as gabion baskets are of limited effectiveness
when high volumes of water dislodge the backfill. The fact is that steep
slopes require extensive efforts to maintain structural improvements and
currently the building codes are not adequately addressing such consid-
erations. How a Hazard Mitigation Plan affects building methods and
codes should be the very basis of how it is evaluated for effectiveness.
Sound planning is the foundation of a stable community. A good repu-
tation over time establishes such areas with a high degree of desirabil-
ity into the decision making process of those that consider establishing
their families and businesses there. All of us look forward to living in
a good neighborhood that is considered safe and well served by those
government services that are essential to stability, then those natural oc-
currences that can result in disaster, will be less damaging in their effects
and less costly in the recovery process that follows.
To accomplish such ends will require not only a revised plan, but an
emergency management agency that functions not merely in reaction to
disasters, but far more proactively in spreading the gospel that "an ounce
of prevention is worth a pound of cure."
Hugo Roller, Coral Bay, St. John


New VIPD Theme Song : "Don't Run, Don't Hide"


St. John Tradewinds
The Virgin Islands Police
Department has its own theme
song.
On the heels of the release of
its first action documentary, "VI
Cops," which documents a night
in the life of Saturated Patrol of-
ficers, the song, which is about
a minute and a half long and
written and produced by local
Band-O-Rama and Road March
Champions Fusion Band is set
to a reggae beat and sends out a
strong message to the criminals.
The documentary "VI Cops"
has aired on the government ac-
cess channel and has the nation-


ally known "Bad Boys" theme
accompanying the live action.
In order for VI Cops to have its
own local flavor Jerry Viale, the
manager of Fusion Band was
asked to make a jingle. He cre-
ated a song called "Don't Run,
Don't Hide," with a catchy
rhythm and a strong message
of anti-violence and the conse-
quences of crime.
VIPD Commissioner No-
velle Francis said he liked the
new theme song "a lot." He an-
ticipated the theme song to be
another source of pride for the
police officers and for the com-
munity.


"After all, we may be the
only police department in the
entire world with its own theme
song," said Francis.
A second VI Cops will be
filmed in the near future, Francis
added. The public has praised
the show saying that they now
have a better understanding of
what officers are faced with ev-
ery night as they patrol the com-
munity, according to the com-
missioner.
The show improves the rela-
tionship between the communi-
ty and the police and is another
effective method of community
policing, Francis added.


Enighed Parking Lot Taking Shape


Crews poured concrete entrance and
exit ramps, above and at left, last week at
the Enighed Pond Marine Facility public
parking lot, which is shaping up. The free
parking lot should be open within the
next few weeks and is expected to ease
congestion woes in Cruz Bay.


St. John Tradewinds News Photos by Jaime Elliott


Correction:


The "Gomez Lifts Property Tax Injunction," article in the January 31-February 6, 2011, issue of St.
John Tradewinds incorrectly identified Judge Curtis Gomez. Gomez is Presiding District Judge.







16 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011


V.I. Unity Day Group

Property Tax Law Suit
Continued from Page 3

suit against the government alleg-
ing the system it was using was
unfair.
Following several years of inac-
tion, the court issued an injunction
freezing property taxes at 1998
rates, determined to be the last
year tax rates were accurate. The
court also required the govern-
ment to conduct a territory-wide
property revaluation and create a
viable Board of Tax Review.
The government contracted
BearingPoint, which began revalu-
ating properties across the Virgin
Islands in June 2004. BearingPoint
wrapped up the revaluations in
2008, but many property owners
on St. John found errors in those
revaluations, which prompted the
Unity Day Group's lawsuit.
In January, Gomez lifted the
injunction ruling that the Board of
Tax Review was functioning prop-
erly and the mandated revaluations
were complete. V.I. Unity Day
Group members, however, did not
settle with the government and in-
stead walked out of mediation.
"Unity Day Group left me-
diation because the government
would not deal with the fact that
the data itself is bad and Bearing
Point's ways and methods did not
work," Unity Day Group Prop-
erty Tax Committee member Pam
Gaffin previously told St. John
Tradewinds. "We want to say that
what Bearing Point did on St. John
was incorrect. The results did not
meet standards and we need to
start from scratch."
Unity Day Group members
pointed to the hundreds of com-
plaints St. John property owners
had with their revaluations.
"Out of 1,700 houses, there
were 700 informal appeals filed
on St. John saying something was
wrong with their assessments,"
Gaffin said.
Under Gomez's ruling, the gov-
ernment will issue 2007 tax bills,
at the 1998 level, in February. The
2008 bills, also at the 1998 rate,
will be issued this summer.
The 2009 bills, the last bills
which will reflect the 1998 rates,
and 2010 bills, which will reflect
newly assessed rates, will both be
issued in 2012.


St. John Ambulance Boat
Continued from Page 5


retention, safety belts for squad benches and
more," according to information from Gold
Coast Yachts.
A state-of-the-art captain's compartment
will allow the vessel to be operated in almost
any conditions.
"The captain's compartment will be sepa-
rated from the patient treatment area and
feature exceptional visibility in an elevated
wheel house, deck entrance/exit doors, re-
mote engine controls, independent air con-
ditioning, dual helm seats, complete marine
navigation array, emergency frequency mo-
bile radios, sirens, intercom and public ad-
dress systems, a satellite vessel locator as
well as a bathroom with sink and toilet," ac-


SPECIFICATIONS:
* LOA 50'
* BOA 20'2"
* DRAFT 3'
* LIGHT SHIP WEIGHT 21,000 lbs
* PATIENT CAPACITY 6 Stretchers
* EMT/PARAMEDICS 4 to 8
* CREW Captain and 1 crew
* ENGINES 2 X QSB 425 hp
* TOP SPEED Up to 30 knots
* CRUISE SPEED 26 knots
* RANGE 500 KNM @ 20 knots, 650 KNM @
15 knots
* TANKAGE 2 X 125 gal. fuel, 1 X 100 gal.
water, 1 X 35 gal. waste
* STEERING Hydraulic
* AC ELEC 11 kw Northern Lights generator, 5
kw outback inverter
* HVAC 18,000 BTU - helm, 48,000 BTU -
patient compartment
* ELECTRONICS Raymarine
* p. 2/5
* HULLS ANDSUPERSTRUCTURE

CONSTRUCTION
Hulls, decks, roof and cabin built of Corecell foam,
glass and CPD epoxy resin using resin infusion
and vacuum-bag. All primary structural components
and amenities built using West System construction
methods.

Interior/Exterior Finish:
* Dupont polyurethane paint over Dupont epoxy
primer--commercial yacht finish
* Paint & Graphics:
* Gloss white hulls and superstructure
* Reflective Blue Star of Life and Ambulance
markings on exterior of cabin and roof
* Orange belt stripe with Blue pinstripe edges
* 2 - Coats of Micron 66 bottom paint - Blue
* Hull markings as per USCG minimum require-
ments.

DECK FITTINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Cleats:
* 6 - 12" Stainless
* 6 - 18" S.S. rub strakes

Liferails/Posts:
* 2 - 1.5" aluminum cabin side rails
* 1 - 1.5" aluminum stern deck rail
* 2 - 1.5" aluminum interior ceiling handrails

Deck Hatches:
* 2 - Bomar aluminum engine room access
hatches
* 2 - Custom composite engine removal hatches


cording to Gold Coast Yachts' information.
With twin QSB 425-horse power engines,
the ambulance boat will be capable of speeds
up to 30 knots and a cruising speed of 26
knots, according to vessel specifications from
Gold Coast Yachts.
The vessel was being prepped for painting
as of press time and Difede hoped the am-
bulance boat would be primed by Monday,
February 7.
"If we prime it this weekend, we can paint
it next week and that will move us toward a
launch sometime in the middle of February,"
he said. "Then we'll need it on the dock for
about three weeks for commissioning for fi-
nal engine, electrical, mechanical and plumb-
ing hookups."
Gold Coast Yachts started construction of
the vessel in October and expects the boat to
be docked at St. John by the end of March.


* 4 - Lewmar 50 hull access hatches

Windows/Doors:
* 11 - 3/8" tempered glass American Marine
Windows
* 2 - American Marine locking helm station
doors w/ windows
* 1 - American Marine extra wide locking cabin
entrance door w/ window
* 2 - Teak Isle interior doors
* 1 - Lewmar opening portlight for head

Steering and Rudders:
* 30" Edson Destroyer wheel, Hynautic H-41
hydraulic pump, Teleflex HC rams in series
driving Edson tiller arms
* Custom composite rudders on Schedule 160
S.S. pipe w/ UHMW bearings

GROUND/MOORING TACKLE/FENDERS
* 1 - FX 55 Fortress anchor, 15'-3/8" chain and
200'-3/4" rode
* 1 - 44 lb Lewmar Claw anchor, 15'-3/8" chain
and 200'-3/4" rode
* 4 - 50'-3/4" dock lines
*4 - Scanmarin fenders
* Full length commercial duty rub rail port and
starboard

ENGINE
2 - QSB 425 hp Cummins diesels with ZF 280A
straight drive transmissions, 4 bladed fixed bronze
props, 21/4" Aquamet 22 shaft, PYI shaft seals.
ETS electronic controls plus secondary electronic
controls, 6" Vernatone wet exhaust, (2) 125 gal. alu-
minum fuel tanks with fuel filters. Copper fuel lines.
Elec fuel sender and gauges. Instrument panel w/
oil pressure, water temp, alarms, tachometers and
engine hour meters. Fixed FE-241 fire suppression
system. Soundproofing.

ACCOMMODATIONS
Patient Compartment:
* Large rear access door
* 295 sq ft patient compartment
* High capacity independent control HVAC
system
Custom cabinets w/ interior lights TBD
* 2 cushioned squad benches and 4 cushioned
squad seats with retention belts
* Space for six stretchers
* Stretcher retention straps and cups
* Ceiling mounted IV holders
* 110V outlets as required
* Ceiling light dimmers
* 2 - 12V outlets
* 2 - full length ceiling handrails


The new vessel will be welcome news for
residents, who have been due reliable medi-
cal transportation for a long time, explained
Senator at Large Craig Barshinger.
"This boat is long overdue and St. John
residents are anxious for it," said Barshinger.
"The current ambulance boat is broken down
and the government rents a water taxi for
$500 per day, even when no runs are made."
Residents should be excited about the new
vessel, Difede added.
"It's a rough crossing there and to have a
good boat - the best in the world - will be
a really good thing," he said.
For the full specifications of the new am-
bulance boat, plus artist rendering and pho-
tographs of the construction process, check
out Gold Coast Yachts' website at www.
goldcoastyachts.com and click on "under
construction."


* Locking drug compartment
* Waste and sharps disposal compartments
* Install DOH supplied oxygen system
* Install other DOH supplied monitors/equip-
ment
* Door to Captain's Compartment
* Easy wash painted interior with wet deck
drains
* Switched exhaust vent

Captains Compartment:
* Interior Captain's Compartment entrance door
* 2 - Exterior entrance/exit doors
* Elevated wheel house
* 360 degree window viewing
* Primary and secondary engine controls
* Custom helm station with dual helm seats, AC/
DC electrical panel, Raymarine electronics,
* Emergency 800 MHz mobile radio, VHF
marine radio w/ intercom and public address
system, satellite
* Bessel locator, spotlight and stern deck video
camera, 2 - 12V outlet
* Independent climate-control
* Cushioned squad bench
* Bathroom with sink and toilet

VESSEL SAFETY EQUIPMENT/FEATURES
* Three watertight bulkheads per hull
* Composite construction positive buoyancy.
In no conditions can the vessel be fully sub-
merged.
* 1 - 24" Ring buoy (orange) w/ bracket
* 25 -Adult Type 1 PFDs
* 10- Child's Type 1 PFDs
* 6 - Red hand-held flares
* 6 - Orange smoke hand-held flares
* 3 - 10 lb ABC (B II) Fire Extinguisher w/ holder
* Watertight container (flares, flashlight &
whistle)
* Viking 25 man canister life raft
* Caribe 10X Dinghy w/ 15 hp outboard motor
* 1000 Ibs lift boom
* 2 - Defibrillators
* Install Purchaser supplied oxygen system p.
5/5
* EPIRB
* Star of Life and Ambulance graphics
* Flashing emergency lights
* PA system
* Reference handbook

MISCELLANEOUS
* Buckets, scrub brush, sponges, toilet paper
holder, Oil/Garbage discharge plaques, teak
trim


ST. JOHN AMBULANCE BOAT DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS







St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 17


CPR Classes Available to Community
Are you trained in CPR and AED use? How recent is your
training? CPR classes are being offered for the community on
the second Saturday of each month. Learn the current methods of
CPR, AED use, and the Heimlich Maneuver. Get certified in this
life-saving skill. This is a one day, three hour class.
Contact Bob Malacarne to sign up or for more information at
626-5118 or email training @astjohnrescue.com.


L- jonn / rauewinus ews rnolo


Couples are invited to say "I do" again on February
14 at Trunk Bay.


Free Vow Renewal Ceremony Feb. 14
It's that time of year again! Love City's own Barefoot Minister
Anne Marine Porter is hosting a free marriage vow renewal cer-
emony on Monday, February 14, at Trunk Bay Beach at 5 p.m.
For more information call Porter at 693-5153 or 626-4658.

Boat Going St. Croix Agriculture Fair
The community is invited to join the Love City Pan Dragons as
they travel to the St. Croix Agriculture Fair by ferry.
The boat leaves on Thursday, February 17, at 1:30 p.m. from
the Cruz Bay bulkhead and returns on Monday, February 21, at 2
p.m. The cost for adults is $85 round-trip and $65 for one-way. For
children the cost is $65 round-trip and $50 for one-way.
Transportation will be provided by Native Son Inc. Tickets can
be purchased at Courtesy Car Rental or on board.

Property Tax Waiver Ends Feb. 2011
Tax Collector Valencio Jackson advised Virgin Islands property
owners that pursuant to Act. No. 7241, penalties and interest will
be charged on the revised 2006 bills beginning February 16.
The revised 2006 property tax bills were issued in July 2010
and became delinquent on November 15, 2010. In accordance
with prior legislation, property tax payers were not required to pay
any penalty and interest on the 2006R tax bills.
"Notwithstanding the penalty and interest provisions of Title 29
Virgin Islands Code, section 2494, no interest or penalty may be
levied on any assessment for the property tax years 2006, 2007,
and 2008 for six months after the date of issuance of the respective
year's tax assessment," according to Act 7241.
Accordingly, Virgin Islands property owners are encouraged to
pay their 2006 property tax bills before February 16, 2011 in order
to avoid the assessment of penalty and interest. After that date,
penalty and interest charges will be assessed.
For more information, call the Tax Collector at 776-6737.


Police Log



Friday, January 28 Sunday, January 30 ter's iPod. Grand larceny.
10:40 a.m. -An Estate Hansen 1:30 a.m. - A citizen p/r loud Wednesday, February 2
Bay resident p/requesting police music coming from Cruz Bay. 2:20 a.m. - A citizen p/r loud
assistance. Police assistance. Disturbance of the peace. music and a disturbance of the
2:55 p.m. - A citizen p/r that 1:55 a.m. - A citizen p/r a dis- peace. Disturbance of the peace.
her son was assaulted. Simple turbance with a female. Distur- 8:57 a.m. - A citizen p/r a
assault. bance of the peace. domestic violence matter and a
11:15 p.m. - A citizen p/r a 2:00 a.m. -A citizen p/r a dis- violation of a court order. Viola-
domestic disturbance with his turbance with a female. Distur- tion of a court order, D.V
wife. Disturbance of the peace, bance of the peace. 5:25 p.m. - An Estate Con-
D.V 12:26 p.m. - A citizen c/r tant resident p/r being threat-
Saturday, January 29 hearing shots fired in the area of ened. Disturbance of the peace,
11:15 .m. - Susan Ellis of no Gifft Hill. Illegal discharge of threats.
known address p/ at Leander Ju- firearm. Thursday, February 3
rgen Command under arrest and Monday, January 31 No time given - A citizen p/r
charged with aggravated assault 1:09 p.m. - A citizen p/r tele- an accident in the area of the
and battery, disobeying a lawful phone harassment. Telephone Boulon Center. Auto accident.
order and resisting arrest. Ag- harassment. 7:10 p.m. - An Estate Bethany
gravated assault. 1:39 p.m. - A citizen p/r a dog resident p/r that he was punched
12:47 p.m. - A Calabash bite. Dog bite. by an unknown male in the area
Boom resident p/r a disturbance 6:45 p.m. - A citizen p/r hear- of Wharfside Village. Assault
of the peace. Disturbance of the ing shots fired in the area of and battery.
peace, threats. Johnson's Bay. Illegal discharge 7:50 p.m. - An Estate Bethany
12:59 p.m. - A citizen r/ an of firearm. resident p/r that she lost her wal-
auto accident on North Shore Tuesday, February 1 let in the area of Red Hook. Lost
Road, in the area of Caneel Bay 8:17 a.m. - A citizen p/r lost wallet.
Resort. Auto accident, documents. Lost documents. 8:50 p.m. -A citizen p/r a male
4:05 p.m. - A citizen r/ being 6:25 p.m. - A citizen p/r an chasing another male with a ma-
threatened in the area of Cruz auto accident in the area of Cruz chete in the area of Wharfside
Bay. Disturbance of the peace, Bay. Auto accident. Village. Assault in the third.
threats. 6:40 p.m. - A citizen p/r that 11:00 p.m. - A citizen p/ to
7:10 p.m. - A Calabash Boom someone is harassing her niece, supply supplemental informa-
resident r/ being threatened in Harassment. tion about his assault. Assault in
the area of Cruz Bay. Threats, 11:17 p.m. - A citizen p/r that the third, supplemental informa-
harassment. someone stole her minor daugh- tion.




CRIME STOPPPERS U.S.V.I.

Organization Seeks Information on Recent Crimes


St. John Tradewinds
Crime Stoppers is asking the community's help
to solve the following crimes. If anyone knows
something, they should say something as law en-
forcement needs all eyes and ears. Even the small-
est bit of information may be just what is needed
to solve these cases.
St. John
On Tuesday, January 11, at 2:02 p.m., police
were dispatched to Merchants Commercial Bank
on St. John in response to a robbery. Sources
stated that two armed men stormed into the bank,
robbed it of an undisclosed sum of money, and es-
caped in a blue GMC Jimmy. Both suspects were
masked. One was wearing a blue jump suit and
white sneakers. The minimum cash reward for the
arrest of a bank robber is $900 plus 10 percent of
any cash recovered. The maximum cash reward is
$2,500.


St. Thomas
On Thursday, January 27, at 7:45 a.m. on 2nd
Street, a woman who had just dropped her child
off at day care was robbed of her gold chain as she
was getting back into her car. The suspect, who
ran eastward toward Oswald Harris Court, is de-
scribed as a light-skinned Hispanic male, 18 to 25
years old and about 5' 8" tall. The minimum cash
reward for the arrest of a robber is $900.
Tips helped law enforcement make five addi-
tional arrests in January. Let's continue to make
the community a safer place to live by telling
law enforcement about these or any other crimes
at www.CrimeStoppersUSVI.org or by calling
1-800-222-TIPS (8477).
Tips are completely anonymous, and the state-
side operators are multi-lingual. Only anonymous
callers to Crime Stoppers are eligible for these
cash rewards.








18 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011


CRUZ BAY TO RED HOOK
Every hour on the hour from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m.

RED HOOK TO CRUZ BAY
Every hour on the hour from 6 a.m. to 12 a.m.

CRUZ BAY TO DOWNTOWN CHARLOTTE AMALIE

Leaves Cruz Bay Leaves Charlotte Amalie
8:45 a.m. 10 a.m.
11:15 a.m. 1 p.m.
3:45 p.m. 5:30 p.m







St. John Tradewinds



Business Directory


Accommodations Jewelry
Caribbean Villas & Resorts R&I PATTON goldsmithing
tel. 1-800-338-0987 Located in Mongoose Junction
or locally 340-776-6152 776-6548 or (800) 626-3445
Chat@pattongold.com


Island Getaways
888-693-7676, islandgetaway-
sinc.com
kathy@islandgetawaysinc.com

Suite St. John Villas/Condos
tel. 1-800-348-8444
or locally at 340-779-4486

VIVA Vacations
tel. 779-4250
P.O. Box 1747, STJ, VI 00831


Landscaping
Alfredo's Landscaping
tel. 774-1655 cell 513-2971
P.O. Box 91, St. John, VI 00831

Coral Bay Garden Center
tel. 693-5579 fax 714-5628
P.O. Box 1228, STJ, VI 00831

PROPERTYKING
tel. 643-6348
T A ; & ITi


Architecture p .
Crane, Robert - Architect, AIA
tel. 776-6356 Propert1y Mgmt
P.O. Box 370, STJ, VI 00831 Cimmaron Property
Management
Barefoot Architect, Inc. tel. 340-715-2666
tel. 693-7665 fax 693-8411 St. John's Premier Property
P.O. Box 1772, STJ, VI 00831 Manager


i- Seaview Vacation Homes, Inc.
Banking tel. 340-776-6805; 888-625-2963
Scotiabank www.seaviewhomes.com
#1 Mortgage Lender in the VI
The Marketplace (340) 776-6552 Real Estate

American Paradise Real Estate
Beauty/Spa tel. 693-8352 fax 693-8818
Westin Resorts & Villas P.O. Box 8313, STJ, VI 00831
Spa Services info@americanparadise.com


tel. 693-8000, ext. 1903/1904


Construction
St. John Hardware
tel. 693-8780 fax 776-6685
Located at The Marketplace


Insurance
Theodore Tunick & Company
Phone 775-7001 / Fax 775-7002
www.theodoretunick.com


Cruz Bay Realty
tel. 693-8808 fax 693-9812
P.O. Box 66, STJ, VI 00831
info@cruzbayrealty.com

Debbie Hayes, GRI
tel. 714-5808 or 340-642-5995
debbiehayes @debbiehayes.com
www.stjohnvirealestate.com

John Foster Real Estate
tel. 714-5808 or 340-642-5995
debbiehayes @debbiehayes.com
www.stjohnvirealestate.com


Holiday Homes of St. John
tel. 776-6776 fax 693-8665
P.O. Box 40, STJ, VI 00831
info@holidayhomesVI.com

Islandia Real Estate
tel. 776-6666 fax 693-8499
P.O. Box 56, STJ, VI 00831
info@islandiarealestate.com

John McCann & Associates
tel. 693-3399 fax 888-546-1115
Located at Wharfside Landing
www.RealEstateOnStJohn.comr


Restaurants
Concordia Cafe, 693-5855
Happy Hour 4:30-6pm
Dinner 6-8:30pm Tues-Sat

Fish Trap Restaurant
and Seafood Market
tel. 693-9994, Closed Mondays

La Tapa Restaurant
tel. 693-7755
Open 7 Days a Week

Skinny Legs
"A Pretty OK Place"
tel. 340-779-4982
www.skinnylegs.com

Sun Dog Cafe
tel. 693-8340
Located at Mongoose Junction


Retail
Saltwater Gypsy Consignment
(340) 244-8888
Located in The Lumberyard

St. Johnimals
Island Pet Outfitter
340-777-9588
Located at Wharfside Village


Services
C4th Custom Embroidery
tel. 779-4047
Located in Coral Bay


Black History Month
Continued from Page 2
Barbara's maternal grandfather, Governor
Paul M. Pearson, our first civilian governor,
who served the islands well (1930-1935).
The program will be on Tuesday, February
8, at 7 p.m. at the Bethany Moravian Church.
In our conversations, the genuine love and
concerns which Governor Pearson held for
these island were made very clear. He espe-
cially gained respect and admiration for all
St. Johnians, including those people isolated
in the Coral Bay and East End quarters.
I urge everyone to attend this program
which is based on materials the Groves have
gathered from the Governor's personal pa-
pers.
These two encounters led me to the need
to honor and remember the people of Coral
Bay and East End quarters, who toughed
it through the difficult times of the 1930s,
more than satisfied with their lot. They knew
that the surrounding seas and earth provided
by our higher power gave them the greatest
contentment of life.
The surrounding bays and seas were teem-
ing with fish and everyone fished using lines,
nets and pots. They would salt fish for later
use, sell some fish, and give what was left
to friends and neighbors. Their neighbors in
turn would give them excess fruits and veg-
etables from their gardens.
Generally they were involved in recipro-
cal "gift-giving" wherein people would give
whatever they had in excess and bring back


The author, at left, is pictured
with Reverend Al Sharpton during
a Minority Business Development
meeting in Albany, NY.


the gifts or things that the recipient had in
excess. Some people made baskets which
were taken to the St. Thomas Cooperative for
cash. Others made charcoal for exchange or
sale. While still others gathered sand, rock,
and gravel for sale on St. Thomas.
That contentment and satisfaction are
sorely lacking in our world today and we
need to appreciate what we have and where
it comes from.
Talk to St. Johnians or Virgin Islanders
anywhere and you'll find and appreciate the
caring and sharing that caused these East
Enders to reject programs like the CCC and
to earn the respect and love of all who visit
here including Governor Paul M. Pearson.


Chrc Dietr I


Baha'i Community of St. John
For Devotions and Study Circles,call 714-1641
7:30 p.m. Friday; Study Circles 9 a.m. Sunday
776-6316, 776-6254

Bethany Moravian Church
11 a.m., Sunday School 776-6291

Calvary Baptist Church
13 ABC Coral Bay, 776-6304
Sunday School 10 a.m.,
Sunday evening 6 p.m., Thursday 7 p.m.

Christian Ministry
Cinnamon Bay Beach
Inter-Denominational, Sunday 8:30 a.m.

Christian Science Society
10:45 a.m. Sunday- Marketplace
Wednesday Testimonials
7:45 p.m. on last Wed. of Month

The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints
Sun. 9 a.m., on St. Thomas . 776-2379
Sun., 5 p.m., STJ, Lumberyard

Cruz Bay Baptist Church
Sunday 11 a.m., 6 p.m. 776-6315

Emmaus Moravian Church
Coral Bay, Sun. 9 a.m. 776-6713

Jehovah's Witness
7:30 p.m. Tuesday; 7 p.m.
Saturday (Espafol), 10 a.m. Sunday, 340-715-0530


Missionary Baptist Church
9:30 a.m. Sunday Services, 10:45 Worship,
Tuesday 7 p.m. Bible Study 693-8884

Nazareth Lutheran Church
Sunday 9 a.m., Sunday School 8 a.m.
776-6731

Our Lady of Mount Carmel
Sat. 6 p.m., Sun. 7:30 & 9:30 a.m., Spanish Mass
5:30 p.m.; Monday and Tuesday, 7 p.m.;
Wednesday and Friday, 8:30 a.m. 776-6339

St. John Methodist Church
Sunday 10 a.m, 693-8830

Seventh Day Adventist
Saturday, 779-4477

St. John Pentecostal Church
Sunday 11:05 a.m., 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer 7:30 p.m.,
Thursday Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
779-1230

St. Ursula's Episcopal Church
Sunday 9 a.m.; Bible Class, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m.
777-6306

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship
9:45 a.m. Sunday, 776-6332

Word of Faith Church
Word of Faith International
Christian Center, Sundays 7:30 a.m.
Giffi Hill SchoolCall 774-8617







St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 19


__I _Classifieds I


marlketplace

EVERYTHING
YOU NEED
ON EVERY LEVEL

GREAT PLACE
TO SHOP, DINE
AND WORK

COME JOIN US
WE HAVE
SPACES AVAILABLE
RETAIL or OFFICE

340-776-6455


Offices near
Mongoose Junction,
starting at $370/mo.
Bright, secure building
AC, Ample parking
693-7040


COMMERCIAL
SPACES AVAILABLE
AT RAINTREE COURT
large or small retail or
office spaces.
Call Albert at 693-8590


STORAGE:
SECURED LOCKERS
Sizes to 10' x 12'
Autos, Boats, Trailers.
Call For Rates: 779-4445
www.properyachts.com




SALVAGED: 42-foot
ketch Desperado in Coral
Bay Harbor at 18.20.72
North and 64.42.80 West.
Registration # 1562-TB. Hull
I.D. 7292101. Call Richard
Conners 340-244-6649.




SUZUKI ISLAND
CAR FOR SALE:
Partially Renovated
$1500 OBO
Richard 340-642-5358


Watersports Jobs!
Full time, part time, lots of benefits, free scuba,
snorkeling, sailing trips to the BVI, etc. Growing
watersports company has immediate openings:
* Beach Attendants at Westin Resort
* Retail Store Staff
* PADI Instructors

Cruz Bay Watersports 776-6857


S .


SYMONS RESI-PLY FORMING PANELS FOR SALE
Used on one house
and stored, good
condition, over one
hundred panels,
scaffold brackets
included. Call for
pricing and leave
message. (340)
' * .. 693-8991 or (508)
S . " 509-4002


Cruz Bay-Nice, furnished
house, great view, 2
Bedrooms A/C, 2 Bath,
W&D. Pets considered.
March 1. $1950/mo. Year
lease. (340) 690-4532


FISH BAY
LONG TERM
AVAILABLE NOW:
Furnished 3/2 native stone
home w/covered decks,
View w/privacy on 1.22
ac. 3k/mo 970-382-6683
Power on t@earthlink.net



SCENIC
PROPERTIES
340-693-7777

Cruz Bay:
* Large three bedroom
house, w/d, great
view, $3500.00

Coral Bay:
* One bedroom, one
bath, $1250.00


RELIABLE MOBILE
AUTO REPAIR:
Professional and experi-
enced. Brakes, CV Joints,
Suspensions, Shocks,
Alternators, Timing Belts,
General Engine, Repair,
Foreign & Domestic.
All Work Guaranteed.
Call 227-9574


CARETAKER
Reliable caretaker
available to take care
of your property while
living on premises.
Estate experience.
Local references.
(340) 714-7076.


Year round, reliable,
experienced with a
vehicle. Repairs, painting,
landscaping, etc. Refs.
available. $20/hour.
Gerry Londergan
643-2541 or 776-6579.


I Employment


IN SOUTHEAST
DOMINICA, BOETICA
16.5 serene, ocean-view
acres of cultivated farm
land and virgin forests.
$164,000. 5.2 abutting
acres, $69,000.
Contact Tina Alexander
767-449-8593
or www.islandguests.com




SUNSET RIDGE
VILLAS
April 30 to May 14
(timeshare weeks 18 &
19), Sat - Sat Sleeps 6.
Two separate buildings
with private courtyard
and plunge pool. Large
common pool overlooking
Cruz Bay and St. Thomas.
Rent $3,000 or buy for
$12,000.
Call 717-203-3716 or
pete worksiteplus.com


PUBLIC NOTICE
PURSUANT TO VIRGIN ISLANDS COC. TITLE 12, CHAPTER 21, A
MEETING OF THE ST. JOHN COMMITTEE OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
COASTAL ZONE KAMAGEMENT COMMISSION HAS BEEN
SCHEDULED FOR WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2011, AT 6:00 PM AT
THE JULIUS SPRAUVE SCHOOL, CRUZ BAY. ST. JOHN, VIRGIN
I3LAND3.
THE ITEM ON THE AGENA 1 THE PUBLIC HEARING FOR MAJOR
CM PE MW APPUCAKO NO- CZ.J.-1.1(LI THE APPLICANT IS
THE VWIGIN LANDS RESOURCE AND DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL,
INC. THE APPLICANT PROPOSES THE CONSTRUCTION OF A
STORMWATER SEDIMENT DETENTION POND.
PLANS FOR THE PROPOSED PROJECT ARE ON FILE FOR REVIEW
BY APPOINTMENT AT THE DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND
NATURAL RESOURCES, DViSION OF CZM, CYRIL E. lKINGW AIRPORT,
TERMINAL BUILDINGECOND FLOOR, ST. THOMAS, VIRGIN
ISLANS0, (340) 77-3320. BETWEEN THE HOURS OF t1:0 AM. AND
<:00 P.M., MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY EXCEPT HOLIDAYS.

ROeERT S. MATCHES
COMMUISONER




DSIAufl Hffl81


5EIIUEik


Ehiwmiy aiEtID


Employment


COMMERCIAL SPACE AVAILABLE

At The Lumberyard





UNUSUAL


OPPORTUNITY


first floor space available



Downtown Cruz Bay
Where St. John Does Business


For Space Call Nick

340-771-3737







20 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011


Community Calendar


St. John Tradewinds welcomes notices of community-orient-
ed, not-for-profit events for inclusion in this weekly listing. Call
776-6496, e-mail editor@tradewinds.vi or fax 693-8885.


Monday, February 7
St. John School of the
Arts will kick off the sale of
"Broadway" raffle tickets from
4 to 6 p.m. in front of Starfish
Gourmet Market at The
Marketplace.
Meet the five Broadway pro-
fessionals who will teach island
fourth graders singing, danc-
ing, puppetry and choreogra-
phy to produce a show entitled
"Dream, Wish, Believe," dur-
ing a meet and greet in front
of Starfish Gourmet at 5 p.m.
Tuesday, February 8
The St. John Historical Soci-
ety will take "A Look Back," at
its next meeting at the Bethany
Moravian Church at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, February 9
The Island Green Building
Association will host a public
presentation on the second floor
The Marketplace with refresh-
ments at 5 p.m. and the speaker
from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
A meeting of the St. John
Committee of the VI. Coastal
Zone Management Commis-
sion has been scheduled for 6
p.m. at the Julius E. Sprauve
School.


Thursday, February 10
Parents and students are in-
vited to hear Chris Teare speak
about "The Road to College:
A Parent's Eye View," spon-
sored by Friends of the Elaine
I Sprauve Library at 7 p.m. at
the library.
Monday, February 14
Love City's own Barefoot
Minister Anne Marine Porter is
hosting a free marriage vow re-
newal ceremony at Trunk Bay
Beach at 5 p.m.
Friday, February 18
Five Broadway profession-
als along with island fourth
graders will put on two shows
at the Westin Resort ballroom.
The first show, at 6 p.m., will
be for St. John "Angels," fol-
lowed by a reception and then
a gourmet dinner at an island
restaurant. The 8 p.m. show is
open to the public.
Saturday, February 19
St. John Relay for Life will
be at Winston Wells ball field.
Tuesday, February 22
The next STT/STJ Chamber
of Commerce St. John Chapter
meeting will be on at 5:30 p.m.
at Ocean Grill Upstairs.


ALCHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS
Alcoholics Anonymous meets as scheduled: Sundays, 9:45
a.m. at Hawksnest Bay Beach; Closed meetings for alcohol-
ics only at Nazareth Lutheran Church in Cruz Bay at 6 p.m
on Tuesday; Open meetings on Mondays, Wednesdays and
Friday at 6 p.m. at Nazareth Lutheran Church; Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays at 6 p.m. at Moravian Church, Coral
Bay.
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS
Narcotics Anonymous has open meetings from 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. every Saturday at St. Ursula's Church.

AL-ANON MEETINGS
Al-Anon meets on St. John every Tuesday at 1 p.m. at the
picnic table at the VINP ball field, and every Thursday at 5:30
p.m. at St. Ursula's Multi-purpose center.

ALATEEN MEETINGS
Alateen will meet on Mondays at St. Ursula's Church from
6 to 7 p.m. and is open to anyone interested in attending.


PREMIER Crossword

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


"BOTTOMS UP!"
ACROSS
1 Like positive numbers
10 "Peace"
16 Toll, as a bell
20 Person at the helm
21 "Om," e.g.
22 River of Hesse
23 Composer of the opera
"Prince Igor"
25 Hightail it
26 "Z" actress Papas
27 Musical reworking:
Abbr.
28 Most macabre
30 Martial arts actor
Jackie
31 Baseball's all-time
leader in stolen bases
36 Boat rower's need
37 Throws
39 Ship's back
40 Giant in insurance
41 Glancing piercingly
43 Syr. neighbor
44 Next year's srs.
45 Suffix with east or west
46 Organism on a slide
48 Fraction of a fl. oz.
51 Longtime Hearst publi-
cation
59 Call for help
60 Ryder of "Heathers"
61 Introduce, as a new
year
62 - Gay (old war plane)
65 Theme of this puzzle
69 Go with the flow
70 Medium of many all-
talk stations


72 Asimov and Newton
74 Anti-trafficking gp.
75 Tomatoey seafood
soup
81 - -cone (cooling treat)
82 Divide up by type
83 Suffix with prefect
84 Bolted
86 - Lankan
87 Acacia's kin
94 Spring zodiac sign
97 Onyx or opal
98 Certain fishing pot
99 "Yummy" pair
100 Locale of the
Venezuelan city
Porlamar
103 "- a Lady"
104 Autumn zodiac sign
105 Ocean off FL
106 Legendary furrier
108 Prong
109 Carnivorous
North American rodent
116 Right fielder Slaughter
117 Dissimilar to
118 Rocks atop
119 Camera part
120 Willow family member
121 Consensus
DOWN
1 Tennis' Ivanovic
2 "South Pacific" song
3 Like some swimming
strokes
4 Female fox
5 New York City cardinal
Edward
6 Writer Grey
7 Airport abbr.


By Frank A. Longo


8 Future fry
9 Bruins great
10 Campfire snacks
11 Actor Hamlin
12 "It's - -brainer"
13 English "Inc."
14 Situate
15 Like horses
16 Shoots a rifle again
17 Least busy
18 "Kinsey" star Liam
19 - Green, Scotland
24 Dried by heat
29 Raise
30 Machine tooth
31 U.S. 1, e.g.
32 Bitterly cold
33 Guerrilla Guevara
34 Is sporting
35 Violinist Zimbalist
37 Salon option
38 "I can just see -"
42 French "the"
43 "- bad boy!"
44 Drinking binges
46 Slanting
47 - & Lomb
48 Angry rant
49 Hidden marksman
50 Tetra- plus one
51 Swindling guy
52 City in south Chile
53 Lace loops
54 "Starpeace" singer
Yoko
55 Rapper Tone -
56 Fluid in a pen
57 "Oh, clever!"
58 Last British letter
59 Clothing lines
63 "Well, - -di-dah!"


64 Boise's county
66 Sly-fox filler
67 "Take me as -
68 Body of eau
71 Call - evening
73 Composer
John Philip -
76 It's a plus
77 Shearer of the screen
78 - de coeur
79 Saran, say
80 Clue seeker: Abbr.
84 Backslide
85 "And hurry!"
87 - Yello
(soft drink brand)
88 Stevedores' org.
89 Everest, e.g.: Abbr.
90 Munic. law
91 Put in a new home
92 Writer Ralph Waldo -
93 Quaint suffix with poet
94 Dutch beer
95 Wisconsin city
96 Easy-to-attach patch
97 "Buon -!" (Italian
"Good day!")
98 Nehemiah-Job linkup
101 Equip for use
102 "May - favor?"
103 Squall, e.g.
106 Skill, in Sicily
107 Captain Hook's
henchman
110 High Swiss peak
111 RSVP part
112 K-12 org.
113 Violin tuner
114 Ballad's end?
115 Doc with an otoscope







St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 21


CALL TODAY

340-774-3939


TWO INCREDIBLE THREE-ACRE HILLSIDE LOTS
-Adjacent to National Park lands (and short walk to the beach) with
spectacular views of Francis Bay and west (sunsets). Gentle grade, and
easy build. These lots are ideal/unique for one seeking a private estate/
compound within the National Park, desiring lots of land /gardens/privacy
with convenient beach access.

- Inquire about February 24th bid deadline and March 10th Auction (and
Rules) as this lot will be sold to highest qualified Bid!

*(Nearly 3 acre Beachfront access lot available separately for $3.8 million.)



(340)774 939axw wusi-re lest!IecImIl(340)


John McCann &Assoc..,


www.RealEstateOnStJohn.com
office 340.693.3399 loll free 1.88StJohn8 (785.6468) fax 888.5461115


FEATURED


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ISLA VISTA
I Exceptional 5 bedrm,
4.5 bath Gated Villa
atop Caneel Hill. Seller is
Licensed Real Estate Broker.

SVILLALLURE
Impressive 5 bedrm,
7 bath European Style
Villa in Coral Bay


OFFICE: 340 714 5808 wal
CELL: 340 642 5995 Q-
WWW.STJOHNVIREALESTATE.COM l
DEBBIEHAYES@DEBBIEHAYES.COM


St. John TRADEWINDS Newspaper
Send Check Payable to Tradewinds Publishing, P.O. Box 1500, St. John, VI 00831
1 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION $70.00 USD

Name

Address


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4


"The Point at Pirlvartmir" - The
eastern i mosi po~r~i of SI John irn
the U S Virgiu, Islanrisl is the
locationi co Si John's newest
upscale subdirv~or, minimrum 101
Sizes of I acre paved ioad5 &
underground ubties. AN building
sites have great breezes and
unlimmhed views 1o the Britishi
Virgin,, from Tortola IoPeler &
Norman Islands & rnarly are
waterfronti This is a sutb-driviriiof
forinre, discerning buyer Pnice5
Iiiange from $575,000 to $9.1 5M.


"Palm Terrace Villas"- Some of the most spacious condos to be
found on St. John. Completed in 2005 with beautiful views, generous
balconies, common sun deck and pool area, walk to town and Frank
Bay Beach. The two bedroom unit is over 1700 sq. ft. All units feature
large kitchens, granite countertops, stainless appliances large
closets & private laundry. These condos have it all, $695,000 to $999,


DEVELOPMENTICOMMERCIAL PROPERTIES. Hanksen Say 7A is an 18 acie parcel wiih studies
dones anid a 15 lot sub divsion permit. All lots have water views anid breezes and 4 lots are on the
flat top of a ridge with almost 360 degree views- Just reduced from $.3.118M to $2.99M. Estate
Zootenvaal 20 acres. over looking the marine preserve at Bork Creek just east of Coral "a $71M.
Adjoininig 6 acre parcel with 4 cottages and white sand beach also available. LItJ. Plantation with
over 7 acres with preliminary subdivson pernfi aund road cut to the top of the prop~lty Great water
views to 1iIt Briujsh Virgins 'rorn every lot - now just $11,1M, NEW - Five Acres Above Newfound
Bayr - Mam e an Offer. One acre subdividlable parcel on Bordeaux ML with great views kw $1.1 M
Esntat Pasorty - near Cruz Say. Three adjoining lots at Estate Pastory with possible water views
and clerille grade% Great spot for a contractor to build somne spec homes OF a famnily corlouind with,
&Pv~rat hinma Sa~llir finau,6n6 nrinihi Starfina at �000.000 .aah w S376 000 fm all throwIllI


1 g0g6921 9 34-9380 9 ww-rzarat.co


-.-
SEASCAPE - Fabulous location on Bovacap Point! Spacious 2 bd main house w/lap pool & spa, plus a separate care-
taker's cottage. Panoramic views, privacy & successful vacation rental. $1,095,000.


CBR HOME LISTINGS
GOLDEN DRAGON - Beautiful stone villa w/exceptional
craftsmanship. 4 bds/4 baths, infinity pool, multi patios &
decks, lush gardens, Pt. Rendezvous location. Reduced
to $1,925,000.
LIZARD HILL - A one of a kind villa, high above Cinna-
mon Bay & surrounded by Nat'l Pk. land. Enjoy the exclu-
sive privacy, views to die for, gorgeous gardens, & easy
access from this 3 bd/3 bath, with pool & caretaker's cot-
tage nestled on over 1 acre in Catherineberg. $3,100,000.
BLUE TANG - Charming, turnkey, rental villa in Great
Cruz Bay. Privacy, vibrant sunsets, 60' covered deck
overlooking sunny pool, 2 bd/2 baths, great kitchen,
excellent floor plan, & terrific location. $1,295,000.
GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY - Apt. building
w/adjacent parcels in Cruz Bay, newly renovated & well
maintained. Only $490,000.
WATERFRONT with DOCK - Masonry 3 bed/2bath
home on Ig. flat lot, with direct access to Fish Bay at your
doorstep. Now only $920,000.
AURORA - Enjoy 180 views, from Great Cruz to St.
Thomas, from this masonry 4 bd/ 4 bath villa in Contant
Pt. Great privacy, pool, multiple outdoor patios, excellent
vacation rental history. $1,995,000.
VILLA ROMANCE- New, exquisitely crafted, luxury villa,
features a 30' pool in a tropical courtyard setting, 4 private
bed/bath suites, chef's kitchen, A/C, gated entry & custom
details throughout. All the bells & whistles for $2,150,000.
GREAT EXPECTATIONS - 7 bd/7.5 baths, 2 swimming
pools, 2 hot tubs, tennis court, walk to Chocolate Hole
beach, impressive vacation rental history. $2,999,500.
CHEZ SHELL - Charming 3 bd/3 bath, w/ gorgeous sun-
set vit v fully
decor N, A/C,
custom cabinetry, inviting spa & excellent floor plan. $999K.
CALYPSO del SOL - Successful rental villa w/excellent
Chocolate Hole views, 3 bd/bath suites, A/C, newer
masonry construction, beautiful pool & hot tub, terrific Ig.
screened porch. $1,950,000.
REDUCED! - Well built Bordeaux Mt. home w/ 3 bd/2
bath, Ig. covered porch, southerly views, Ig. trees, very
gentle slope, room for expansion. $525,000.
CHOCOLATE HOLE- Uniqueruinsof1700'sGreatHouse,
with a 1960's home on a beautiful 1.42 acre lot. $799,000.
POINT RENDEZVOUS - Newer masonry villa w/easterly
views to Ram Head, 3 bd, 2 baths, Ig. covered deck, spa,
vacation rental history, room for expansion. $1,595,000.
REDUCED! REEF BAY VIEW - Absolutely stunning
easterly views of the Nat'l. Pk. & cooling tradewinds, can
be yours. 4 bd/3 bath, pool, spa, rental history. $1,395,000.
WINDSONG - Stately Boatman Pt. villa, w/separate
cottage, situated on a lac parcel w/panoramic views. 6
bdrms., 7 baths, huge pool, fully furnished. $3,495,000.


A BEST BUY! - Well built, poured concrete cottage w/
lovely W2. Tile
floors C - -ters,
flat lot for gardening & concrete slab in place for future
garage & expansion. Only $349,000.
STONE HOUSE - Spectacular Coral Bay views, 3 bd/
3 baths, gorgeous stonework, covered rotunda, freeform
pool, vacation rental history, easy access. $1,620,000.
BOATMAN POINT - Masonry 4 bd. home on spectacular
1 ac. waterfront site with amazing views & outstanding
neighborhood. $2,795,000.
CBR BUSINESS LISTINGS
JOE'S DINER -St. John's oldest restaurant is looking for
a new owner. Serving breakfast, lunch & drinks since 1972,
and located in the center of Cruz Bay. Call CBR.
FABRIC MILL - Very successful Mongoose Junction
business, est. 1982. $150,000 includes inventory, equip-
ment, & owner will train.
SILVER IGUANA- Beachfront shop w/eclectic collection
of sterling silver jewelry & locally crafted gifts. $75,000.
CBR CONDO LISTINGS
LAVENDER HILL - Tropical 2 bd/2bath penthouse unit
w/wrap-around deck, pool & sunset views. $849,000.
BET bd/2

CRUZ VIEWS CONDO - Nice 2 bedroom unit w/full A/C,
sunset views, common pool, good rental history. $475,000.
SELENE'S- Ideal in town location, w/parking, for living/
rental or business. Terrific views. Reduced to $399K!
CBR LAND LISTINGS
LUSH BORDEAUX MT. parcels w/views. $150K-$285K.
SUNSET VIEWS- close to town, easy build. Only $215K.
LOTSTO CHOOSE FROM in Fish Bay- Starting at $108K.
KLEIN BAY -Prestigious area w/common beach. $675K.
SIDE-BY-SIDE flat parcels in Johnston Bay- $220K ea.
CAROLINA, EDEN, CALABASH - Nice selection of
affordable parcels. Starting at $99K.
CRUZBAYTOWN-Walkto Frank Bay, R-4 zoning. $249K.
GLUCKSBERG - Gentle grade, 1/2 ac., Ig. trees. $125K.
ZOOTENVAAL-HurricaneHoleviews, pavedroad.$400K.
GREAT CRUZ BAY - Prime 1.05 acre site w/fantastic
harbor views & architectural plans. A steal at $595K.
WATERFRONT on MONTE BAY - Spectacular 13.44 ac.
site, ideal for private estate or subdivision. $2,900,000.
AFFORDABLEPARCELS-inEst.Grunwald&Adrian.Easy
building sites, close to town. Starting at $89,000. CallToday!
BANK OWNED PARCELS - Chocolate Hole, priced to
SELL! $261,500 & 235,000. GREAT BUYS!
DITLEFF POINT - Extraordinary sites on magnificent
peninsula w/sandy beach, gated entry, beautiful landscap-
ing, and incredible views. Prices start at $695,000.
PT. RENDEZVOUS- Outstanding views. $415K.


"Brisas del Mar" has beautiful "Beach Cottage" - Nestled into
panoramic views from every the wooded hillside overlooking
room looking over Coral Bay & Great Cruz Bay. this cozy and
Hurricane Hole to the British handsome two bedroom
Virgins. There is an open floor cottage features a flexible
plan with custom kitchen. 2 layout with separate one
bedrooms on the main floor and bedroom apartment on lower
a spiral stair case to the third level. Stroll across the grassy
bedroom suile which has its landscaped lawn to the beach
own balcony The pool & spa access directly below for
deck.S face the cooling easterly boating Additional access is
Irade wi.nds and nsing sun and deeded at the community beach
moon A good snort lerm rental and dinghy landing lusl steps
or lamiv homr S1 45M down the road $945,000


"Colibri" - Superb sunset and water views from [his three bedroom
waterfront home in Great Cruz Bay Fealures include native
stonework large pool deck wiln gazebo masonry construction air
conditioning, water views from every room and pool and loIs of room
for expansion Deeded nights 10 beach and dinghy landing A
complete refurbishing has just been completed including expansion
of intenor space and a completely new chefs kitch-en 13.795,000.
|Limin' Time" - The perfect Caribbean cottage wilh a sandy pocket
beach on Great Cruz Bay & a very large pool & deck Completely
redesigned and refurbished in 2009 belier than new with new high
end fixtures furnishings and new pool wilh the perfect location in this
well established neighborhood Keep your yacht moored within sight
" - ." ';_-- and just pull your dinghy up on the Deacn Swim and snorkel without
11 - /driving Lots of space for parking or boat slorage $1.75M.
[ "Amorita" is a beautiful, all masonry home in upscale Chocolate
Hole North with large pool deck, spa & southeast exposure to catch
- the tradewind breezes. Water views of Hart Bay and the Soutlh Shore
and lust a short walk to the Westin Resort Features include
mahogany trim, hand painted bathroom sinks, stone arches,vaulted
cypress ceilings screened gallery. arched courtyard entrance, fruit
trees deeded access to Hart Bay & Chocolale Hole. $875,000.

S."Coyaba" - means heavenly in Arawal and this newly conslruced
S3bedroom home is just that On a flat one acre iol CoyVabm offers
water views of the Canbbean Sea and the bay below Trhe large open-
style great room kitchen and dining area and Doaroorms are located
on one level Enjoy the sounds of the surf logeller with breezy
easterly trade winds from your pool deck Priced o10 sell at $4,413,000.
SSeashore Allure Condos" - These new waierfrorit Conilos se.l a
higher bar for quality in St John condos Just oonmpleted inese aret
a "must see with such features as travertine Iles Brazilian hardwood
floors, nablve stone work. graceful arches framing waler riews. Solid
S mahogany doors. custom cabinets spa jer tubs high nd appliances,
and twice fired Brazilian clay roof tiles The sounds of the surf Irade
wind breezes beaclifront location make these condos a tropical
dream come true Walk lo Cruz Bay downrown I1.97M to $3 39M


DITLEFF POINT
ST. JOHN, US VIRGIN ISLANDS INFOODITLEFFPOIN-T.COM


CRUZ BAY A -once in a fifetimeri offering of spectacular estate homesilles; on coveted Diftleff Point
�3rfj REALTY, INC. Newt Video Tour - wisriv, diffelipeliaL com











JLML
OIL at* J 0 mm-wu
es back to St. John"

COMPLETE REAL ESTATE SERVICES 9 ST. JOHN'S OLDEST REAL ESTATE FIRM 0 SERVING ST. JOHN FOR 50 YEARS!

Located at the Marketplace - (340) 776-6776 - (340) 774-8088 - INFO@HolidayHomesVI.com �1�
-1 -







TOLL FREE: 1-800-905-6824 or 1-800-526-9193 * www.HOLIDAYHOMESVI.COM ra


"HALF MOON HOUSE" Reef Bay
Beachfront is the dramatic setting
for this uniquely modern home. Ex-
tremely private with incomparable
C views and master-
ful construction
bedroom, 4.5 bath
home is an artis-
tic statement in a
Call for details world class setting.
"SEABISCUIT" is a winner! Charming
2x2 Caribbean style masonry villa with
panoramic
views, very pri-
vate pool & hot
tub. Breezy lo-
cation conve-
nient to Coral
Bay. Walk to
shoreline wa-
$995,000 tersports.


"RIVENDELL", a Peter Bay Villa of
classic
style. 4
bedrooms,
4.5 baths,
walk to the
beach and
great views
make this
� a super
$5,750,000 package.
"SAGO COTTAGE" adorable Caribbean
style ma-
sonry cot-
tage with
wonder-
ful down
island
views and
great rent-
. al history.


"VILLA ANDREA" in gated Virgin
Grand Estates HAS IT ALL! Pan-
oramic water
views in a pri-
vate setting, 4
o wl master suites,
S A/C through-
out, and a
large pool
with expan-
$2,890,000 sive decks.
CORAL BAY INCOME PRODUCER
Beautiful water view from both decks
of well built home. Flexible floorplan
can be 2
units or
combined
as 3 bed-
room home.
Convenient
to town!
$689.900 Great rental!


WATERFRONT ON DEVERS BAY!
"CHOCOLATE BLISS" (5x5) Private, ex-
0 tremely quiet
masonry!
stone home
UNDER has all the
CONTRACT amenities one
would desire
on over an
acre of gently
$2,500,000 sloped land.
"FISH BAY" 4X2 INCREDIBLE VALUE!
Huge panoramic views and a quiet, pri-
vate, breezy
... location
-that borders
Nature Con-
servancy
property
make this
home a
$595,000 must see!


"VILLA MARBELLA" Own this stun-
ning 3 bedroom and 3.5 bath custom
Virgin Grand Estates villa. View pool
| and large veran-
* " da. Great rentals
& sunsets over
St. Thomas &
Pillsbury Sound.
One level liv-
S.ing w/ fabulous
$2,400,000 Great room!
UPPER CAROLINA 3X3 - Recently up-
graded &
well kept
house with
3 income
producing
units. Easy
to Cruz
- Bay and
S595.000 beaches.


WATERFRONT "LA DOLCE VITA" is
an exceptionally
charming 2 bdrm
property on the
water's edge with
the possibility of
boat mooring. 376
ft. pristine shore-
line. Panoramic.
W-1 zoning allows
$1,995,000 commercial uses.
GRANDE BAY RESORT: In-town - 3
bedroom, 2 bathroom corner condo.
of harbor &
walk to shops.
featuring pool,
exercise room,
underground park-
$949,000 ing, and elevators.


"MILL VISTA - CAROLINA" Easy access & build on Centerline Rd. $ 115,000 "ESTATE CONCORDIA" hillside sites with stunning views SELLER FINANCING Ask about "MUST SELL BEST
"FISH BAY" Views, breezes and paved access CONTRACTED ranging from the BVIs, down St. John's eastern coast to WITH GREAT TERMS! BUY" SITUATIONS
"FISH BAY" Views, breezes and paved access CONTRACTED Ram's Head, St. Croix. From $335,000
"LEAST EXPENSIVE WATERFRONT"! Gentle slope, 4 min. walk to beach $ 285,000 "UPPER MONTE BAY ESTATES" 7 Spectacular private "HAULOVER" BEACHFRONT 3.71 Call or e-mail today for info!
"SUGAR APPLE WEST" Harbor views gentle 1/2 ac. with Topo $ 299,000 parcels above Rendezvous Bay; paved road, stone walls acre sub-dividable borders National
"CONTANT" lot with Great Cruz Harbor View. Owner Realtor CONTRACTED & underground utilities. From $799,000 Park! AMAZING VIEWS! $1,900,000 OWN A MONTH (OR MORE) in
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Residents and guests enjoyed Cheryl and David McDaniel's beautiful Fish Bay
home while toasting to a successful year of Friends of VINP and raising funds to
keep the organization's work vibrant. See full story next issue.




Full Text

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Group Fight at Ivanna Eudora Kean High School Prompts Emergency Meeting for PTAPage 3 The Marketplace / Suite 302 / Cruz Bay / St. John / Phone 775-7001 / Fax 775-7002 / www.theodoretunick.com The Marketplace / Suite 302 / Cruz Bay / St. John / Phone 775-7001 / Fax 775-7002 / www.theodoretunick.com13 DAYS TO GO! February 7-13, 2011 Copyright 2011Great Vibes at Love City Live!Hundreds of fans packed the Winston Woman Arrested for Not Properly Wearing SeatbeltGifft Hill Resident is charged with Aggravated Assault, Resisting Arrest and Delaying and Obstructing a Police Ofcer in the course of his dutiesPage 4Judge T osses V.I. Unity Day Group Property T ax Law SuitPage 3 New St. John Ambulance Boat Nears CompletionPage 5

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2 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011St. John Tradewinds Every year at this time everyone scrambles, looking for the appropriate person to honor during Black History Month. We often look far and wide for a suitable candidate not already honored. I think I’ve found a worthy candidate thanks to the St. John Historical Society. At the group’s last meeting, Bruce Schoonover gave a great presentation on the Civilian Conservation Corp (CCC) — the 1930s New Deal program everyone loved. It put young men to work in the depth of the Great Depression when one in four people were unemployed and anarchy became a worrisome alternative. The CCC program employed more than 500,000 men by the end of 1935. The U.S. Forest Service and this nation’s National Parks were the largest agencies involved. Over 28,000 miles of new trails were constructed and 114,000 miles of existing trails maintained. Eight million acres of trees were planted and 88,000 miles of telephone lines strung. More than 63,000 buildings were constructed, including picnic shelters, trail shelters, restrooms, cabins, lookout towers, and museums. Serious blights affecting this nation’s forests were addressed and forest Yet when the CCC’s were introduced on St. John, the program failed. Schoonover quoted a National Geographic article from September 1940 stating, “the camp had to be dissolved for lack of recruits.” How come the CCC program went so well in the states but failed here? Last Monday the V.I. Audubon Society honored John Achzet, who died this fall, with a picnic and a new bench at Hawksnest Beach. Achzet was a person who worked long and hard at whatever he did without drawing attention to himself — an unassuming effective worker who accomplished much for St. John. At this picnic I talked with David and Barbara Grove, longtime snowbirds, who will present a program at the St. John Historical Society meeting about The Island Green Building Association will host a public preketplace with refreshments at 5 p.m. and the speaker from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Dr. Barry Devine, resident-scientist and author of Island Peak to Coral Reef, The Plant and Marine Communities of the Virgin Islands, will give a presentation based on his popular book which he uses to demonstrate the connectivity between land and seas. Learn how everyone’s actions play a part in every ecosystem and how sustainable building and living today can safeguard the island’s quality of life for tomorrow. Continued on Page 18 The St. John Historical Society will take “A Look Back,” at its next meeting on Tuesday, February 8, at the Bethany Moravian Church Hall at 7 p.m. The St. John Historical Society invites everyone to a “look Governor Paul M. Pearson. Society members Barbara and David Grove will present an ear ly 1930s portrait of the Virgin Islands based on the papers, images, and letters of Gov. Pearson, who was Barbara’s maternal grandfather. The Groves will present the story of the severely depressed conditions Pearson found when he arrived in March 1931, his admin istration’s efforts until he left his post in August 1935, and the political intrigue and opposition he encountered in the Virgin Islands and in Washington, DC, during his term. T ake “A Look Back” on February 8 Devine T o Speak at Next IGBA MeetingParents and students are invited to hear Chris Teare speak about “The Road to College: A Parent’s Eye View,” sponsored by Friends of the Elaine I. Sprauve Public Library, on Thursday, February 10, at 7 p.m., at the library. Teare is Director of College Counseling at Antilles School on St. Thomas and is a member of the National Association for College Admissions Counseling, the Southern Association for College Admissions Counseling, and the Association of College Counselors in Independent Schools. He has written a series of newspaper columns, “Finding A College That Fits,” for the Virgin Islands Daily News. He has also written for Education Week and Independent School magazine, and is a member of the Fiske College Guide Editorial Advisory Group. Teare can be heard on his show “Making the College Choice” on Radio ONE AM 1000, Wednesdays at 4 p.m. For more information call 776-6359. “The Road to College” on February 10 EDITOR/PUBLISHER MaLinda Nelson malinda@tradewinds.vi NEWS EDITOR Jaime Elliott jaime@tradewinds.vi WRITERS Andrea Milam, Mauri Elbel ADVERTISING advertising@tradewinds.vi CIRCULATION Rohan Roberts COLUMNISTS & CONTRIBUTORS Chuck Pishko, Malik Stevens, Adam Lynch, Tristan Ewald, Paul Devine, Andrew Rutnik, Craig Barshinger, Coral Breuning SUBSCRIPTIONS U.S. & U.S.V.I. only $70.00 per year THIRD CLASS PERMIT U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 3 St. John, VI 00831 NEWSLINE Tel. (340) 776-6496 Fax (340) 693-8885 www.tradewinds.vi editor@tradewinds.vi MAILING ADDRE SS Tradewinds Publishing P.O. Box 1500 St. John, VI 00831 COPYRIGHT 2010/2011All rights reserved. No reproduction of news stories, letters, columns, photographs or advertisements allowed without written permission from the publisher. TRADEWINDS PUBLISHING LLCThe Community Newspaper Since 1972 Historical Bits & Piecesby Chuck Pishko Celebrating Black History Month A hard but happy life A meeting of the St. John Committee of the V.I. Coastal Zone Management Commission has been scheduled for Wednesday, February 9, at 6 p.m. at the Julius E. Sprauve School. The item on the agenda is the public hearing for Major CZM Permit application no. CZJ-01-10(L). The applicant is the V.I. Resource and Development Council, Inc. The applicant proposes the construction of a stormwater sediment detention pond. ment at the Department of Planning and Natural Resources, Division of CZM, Cyril E. King Airport, Terminal Building, second Friday. For more information call 774-3320.CZM Meeting for Coral Bay Sediment Detention Pond Is Feb. 9 at JESS

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By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds The V.I. Unity Day Group will not have its day in court on Monday, February 7, just as members had feared. District Judge Curtis Gomez threw out the group’s lawsuit against the V.I. government on Monday, January 31. Unity Day April 2008 on grounds that property revaluations conducted on the In his opinion, Gomez ruled that future tax bills might not be based on that data since the V.I. Code stipulates that all properties and the data in question began being collected six years ago. “Given the assessment scheme set forth in the Code, it is not preordained that the plaintiffs will receive tax bills using the Bear ingPoint assessment system that is challenged in their complaint,” Gomez wrote in his opinion, as quoted in the V.I. Daily News. While the government is in a new revaluation cycle, however, the data BearingPoint collected — which the V.I. Unity Day Group be the base of future revaluations, according to the group’s attorney James Derr. “I think the judge’s error is in confusing the collection of the data and the creation of the database with the analysis of the data,” said Derr. Although Gomez ruled that the group’s case was moot because BearingPoint’s data is not likely to be used for the required revaluations in the future without being altered, Derr maintained that the data needs to be thrown out. “Gomez’s opinion states there is no likelihood of BearingPoint’s data being used in the new revaluation cycle, but he’s wrong because the data collected is still in the database,” said Derr. “The Tax Assessor has stated that she intends to use that data the next time she issues tax bills at the new rates.” “The contract between Bearing Point and the government about cyclical reinspection said 10 per cent of all existing properties per year should be revisited and cor rected,” Derr said. “Using the 2006 base year, that means some of that data, which we say is wrong, could be used as late as 2016.” Unity Day Group planned to requesting Gomez to amend his ruling and allow the case to go data, Derr explained. “The argument we’ll make is that part of the case should be allowed to go forward and we should be allowed to challenge the accuracy of the data that was collected,” he said. “We will be pointing out that there are two things — the data itself and then what you do with that data,” said Derr. “What you do with that data is moot now, but we still contend that the government should not be allowed to use that underlying data.” The Unity Day Group had 14 motion for reconsideration. Once amend his opinion or deny the motion. If the motion is denied, Derr 3rd Circuit, he explained. Controversy over property taxes in the Virgin Islands has been swirling since 2000, when By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds Ivanna Eudora Kean High School principal Dr. Sharon McCollum did little to ease parents’ frustration during a Parent Teacher Association meeting on Tuesday evening, February 1, at the Julius E. Sprauve School cafeteria. Parents were up in arms over in late January between St. John students and St. Thomas students. Many parents called into local talk radio stations, venting their frustrations over the on-going tension between St. John and St. Thomas students who attend high school together in Red Hook. The issue drew about 80 par ents to the February 1 PTA meet ing, who were hoping to voice their concerns and receive answers to their questions. Many par ents, however, never even got the chance to speak during the almost three hour meeting and left the JESS cafeteria feeling just as frustrated as when they entered. “She didn’t even give us a chance to speak,” said one IEK parent following the meeting. Her sentiment was echoed by many other parents at the meeting who were looking for answers to the ongoing violence and tensions at IEK. Instead, parents heard from New York City Equity Assistance Cention, and gang and bullying signs from Dr. Johnny Pervis of the University of Central Arkansas. Following their presentations, McCollum introduced school poDean of Students, teachers, the school’s senior guidance counsellor and school security manager Lavelle Campbell. The IEK ofthe school, but failed to address the issue which prompted so many parents to attend the PTA meeting. While the late January incident was not discussed in detail at the some point during the school day between about 10 students, half of whom were from St. John and other half from Smith Bay. One St. John student’s face was cut in the melee, which McCollum emphatically denied was a “riot.” “I resent the fact of anyone saying there was a riot at Ivanna Eudora Kean,” said the principal. “There was no riot at that school. Ten children are not going to cause a riot.” Of the about 200 St. John students who attend IEK, about 20 are repeatedly in trouble, McCollum explained. “You are concerned and you should be concerned,” McCollum said. “But out of the 200 students we have from St. John, it’s only about 20 to 25 students who are wreaking havoc. They won’t let it go.” Tensions between St. John and St. Thomas students at IEK seem to be nothing new, according to parent alumni at the meeting who have been going on since the 1980s. While not offering a solution to the problem, McCollum said the school is and has been working on the issue. “It’s been said that the school isn’t doing anything about this and that is not true,” said the principal. “I don’t have a magic wand. We will do everything we can.” Instead of the usual 10 day susin the January incident were given work to do after school, according While most of the students atthe after-school work, no St. John students showed up on January 31 and only one was present on February 1, according to McCollum. “We’re trying to keep your kids in school and not give them suspension, but when we give you alternatives you need to make sure you’re kid is there,” she said. “A big part of our problem in this community is a lack of control at home. The message must be loud and clear — as a parent this will not be tolerated.” Another factor in on-going tension at the school is IEK’s lack of a gym, according to McCollum. Previously inter-island school groups would compete in games. With no gym, however, school cliques, the principal explained. “We do not have a gym; we do not have a track; we do not have any athletic facilities,” McCollum said. “We need a track and we need a gym.” cials might not see eye to eye, they must all work together in the face of teen violence and school tension, explained McCollum. “We need to walk out of here as the trinity of community, school and home,” she said. “Get on the radio and talk about what we can do and what you are doing at home. Maybe we can be the example that heals the entire Virgin Islands.” “This is bigger than Smith Bay and St. John,” said the principal. “We need to take our streets back and take our schools back. The part of the puzzle that I need is you.” “You are concerned and you should be concerned. But out of the 200 students we have from St. John, it’s only about 20 to 25 students who are wreaking havoc. They won’t let it go.” St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 3 Thursday, Feb. 10th INDEX Coninued on Page 16Group Fight at Ivanna Eurdora Kean High School Prompts PTA MeetingLittle done to ease parents’ concerns on relations between St. John, St. Thomas students Judge Gomez T osses Out V.I. Unity Day Group’s Property T ax Law Suit

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VIPD and CIT Hosting Bicycle Rodeo Feb. 12 — All Bicycles Must Be Registered and Have Ofcial License Plates St. John Tradewinds The St. John Citizens’ Integration Team and the V.I. Police Department, in conjunction with the St. John Administrator’s Ofon Saturday, February 12. In an effort to bring all bicycle owners into compliance with rules and regulations, the CIT and VIPD will host two registra tion drives on February 12. All bicycle owners must register their bicycles and obtain license plates for their bikes. Arepresentative from the Department of Motor Vehicles will be present at the Coral Bay ball a.m. and 12 p.m. to register bicycles. There is a $16 registration fee, which covers registra tion cards and license plates for bicycles for the year. safety course for children, who will receive free bicycle helmets upon completion. The rodeo then moves to the V.I. National Park After the February 12 Bicycle force bicycle registration regula tions, explained St. John Administrator Leona Smith. “All bicycles must be registered and have license plates,” said Smith. “There are no exceptions. We are trying to give people a chance to come into compliance before the enforcement begins.”4 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds During an incident that shocked at least one tourist family and several onlookers in Cruz Bay’s Franklin Powell Park, a 54-yearold St. John woman was arrested on Saturday morning, January 29, around 11:30 a.m. in front of the Loredon Boynes Sr. ferry dock. Susan Ingrid Ellis, of Estate Gifft Hill, was arrested and charged with aggravated assault and battery, resisting arrest and dethe course of his duties, according to V.I. Police Department spokesperson Melody Rames. The arrest stemmed from Ellis’ refusal to properly attach her seat belt, according to Rames. “The individual was stopped and asked to wear her seat belt properly,” said Rames. “The ar been told on several occasions to wear her seat belt.” After being pulled over near the Cruz Bay ferry dock, Ellis allegwith sheets of paper, according to Rames. throwing documents at him at the location where she was stopped,” said the VIPD spokesperson. “She was placed under arrest and taken to the station. Once at the station, the suspect was observed again asEllis was detained at Leander Jurgen Command and later transported to the Bureau of Corrections on St. Thomas. She reportedly spent two nights in jail on St. Thomas and was released following her advice of rights hearing in V.I. Superior Court on Monday, January 31. against the VIPD for use of force, according to Rames. Several individuals, however, witnessed the ar her vehicle and one tourist found the sight so disturbing she wrote a letter to St. John Tradewinds regarding the incident. “I witnessed the arrest of a women about 50+ years of age on Saturday, January 29, 2011 down at the ferry dock by a very heavy handed armed local cop,” Deb Schimmel wrote in a letter to the editor (see age 14 for full letter). “It was very disturbing to witness myself as well as my children.” “My kids were like ‘what is he going to do to her’ as he threw her up against her car, handcuffed her and then took her away, leaving her car parked in front of the dock,” Schimmel wrote. a use of force report about the ar rest, Rames explained. grievance against the arresting ofas per procedure,” said Rames. rested’ and that person says ‘Okay, let’s go’ and they go with you, that is complying. Anything above that — if the person says, ‘I can’t go right now’ and you put your hand on their elbow — that is considered use of force.” “Anything that is against that person’s entire will, that is use of report which is sent to internal affairs,” said Rames. “The person Woman Charged with Aggravated Assault, Resisting Arrest, Delaying and Obstructing Police Ofcer in Seat Belt Enforcement

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By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds By the middle of March St. John will once again have its own ambulance boat and the vessel will far surpass the old Star of Life, which has been out of commission for months. As the V.I. Government has been shelling out $500 a day to keep a water taxi at its disposal for emergency medical transportation from St. John to St. Thomas, Gold Coast Yachts on St. Croix has been in the world, according to compa ny president and co-founder Richard Difede. “This is probably the best laid out and structurally sound ambulance boat in the world,” said bulance boats to compare it to, and there weren’t any out there.” With nothing to truly work from, Gold Coast Yachts’ vice president, co-founder and yacht designing a custom ambulance St. John patients. “We looked at everything — the route, the docks, we talked to EMTs on St. John and St. Thomas and we looked at capacity,” said Difede. “We discussed things that were wrong with the previous Star of Life and then we designed John.” The $787,000 vessel is a 50foot composite catamaran which includes a 300-square-foot climate controlled patient compartment capable of transporting six stretch ers at once. There are custom cabi nets for supplies and equipment for four or more EMTs as well. “Provision will be made for ceiling hung IVs, supplied oxygen, ing, locking drug compartments, waste and sharps disposal, litter St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 5 Continued on Page 16 New St. John Ambulance Boat Nearing Completion

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By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds The gaping holes in the Cruz Bay dinghy docks The docks were severely damaged in the wake of several tropical storms which slammed St. John in the fall. Following months of inaction and governmental red tape, members of the St. John Chapter of the St. Thomas/St. John Chamber of Commerce were able to hammer out a private/public partnership agreement with the V.I. Port Authority to get the okay to repair the docks last week. Chamber Chapter members agreed to pay for materials and do the actual work themselves. Dan Boyd oversaw the work and John Russell made a generous contribution towards covering the cost of lumber, according to St. John Chamber Representative Kate Chamber Chapter members met with VIPA Execu tive Director Ken Hobsen on Friday afternoon, February 4, in Cruz Bay to sign a Hold Harmless Agreement so they could get to work on Saturday, February 5. on Friday morning, which was immediately met with numerous offers of food, drinks and labor, she explained. As of press time, chapter members were slated to work on the dinghy dock on the Battery side of the Loredon Boynes Ferry Dock in Cruz Bay starting at 10:30 a.m. on February 5. Wharfside Village owner Ed McKenzie agreed to take care of repairs of the dinghy dock on the Wharfside Village side of the St. John Administrator Leona Smith also helped VIPA and the local chamber chapter reach the private/ “Without Dan, John, Leona and the cooperation of VIPA, this would not be happening so our thank you’s to them are huge,” she said.6 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 Experienced . Personalized . Professional . ProvenSeaview Vacation Homes, Inc. Short Term-Full Service Since 1985 VACATION VILLA MANAGEMENT24 years of on island rental servicee: info@seaviewhomes.com w: www.seaviewhomes.com t: 340-776-6805; toll-free 1-888-625-2963 By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds ing her tires at E&C Gas Station last month, she didn’t expect to wind up with a new volunteer position. But that is exactly what happened. Smith crossed paths with St. John Relay for Life event chair Mary Bartolucci who asked her to consider chairing the group’s Activities Committee. “She said it was fun and I should do it,” said Smith. “I told her to let me think about it and while I was considering it, a friend of mine passed away from cancer. I was wondering what I could do to honor his memory.” “You can write letters and give condolences, but I thought ‘What a better way to honor him than to give back in this way,’” said Smith. As chairperson of the activiSt. John Relay for Life American Cancer Society fundraiser on February 19, Smith is in charge of most of the fun that will occur during the 18-hour event at the Epiphany Theater Company and owner of Paradise Aqua Tours and knows a thing or two about fun. She and Activities Committee assistant Laurie Crandall have a bevy of exciting activities set up for Relay for Life participants of all ages. The little ones will not want to miss the face painting, balloon making and blindfolded musical chairs. Smith is also planning to host a “water pong” contest among the youngsters as well as card games. A fortune teller will even be on hand to predict their long futures. For adults, a limbo contest will ibility while a tug of war will have their muscles. Musical chairs for adults will incorporate a scavenger hunt before they can take seat, Smith explained. Throughout the course of the evening, teams will be able to participate in themed laps for the chance to win some fun prizes. A Mardi Gras and Carnival lap will get teams warmed up for the night, and the best themed participant will take home a special little token. Other themes for laps during the event include toga, superhero, hula hoop, Victoria’s Secret and stiletto. “We’re also going to have a hot potato lap,” said Smith. “We’re asking team members to bring their sleaziest little number, clean, in a ziplock bag. Members during this lap will hand over the bags until the music stops and then they hand.” There are 12 themed laps planned for the night and Smith will give team captains a list of items they will need to bring to the event if the team wishes to participate, she explained. “When the teams arrive, I’ll have a checklist and will check off if they have all of the items,” said Smith. “That way, we’ll know how many teams are taking part and we’ll tell them what time the themed laps will be starting.” Teams should check in with the activities booth at the Relay for Life to check out the full schedule of games for the night. The Relay for Life will also include live music with numerous bands and an amazing performance by Cirquetacular, an awe-inspiring troop of artists. Smith is open to any additional ideas for games and activities for the night. She is also looking for donations to award to theme lap St. John Relay for Life’s activities committee, call Smith at 5130514. “Call me with great ideas for fun games,” she said. “We want to have as much fun as we possibly can while we’re doing the Relay for Life, which is such a great cause.”Tug of War, Balloon Making and More: Relay for Life will Feature Fun for All AgesWith Okay from VIP A, Dinghy Dock Repairs T o Be Made Open TuesdaySunday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tel: 693-5579Beautifying America’s Paradise

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St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 7 Frank Powell Sr. Park Closing February 7 for RenovationsBy Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds Say goodbye to the Franklin Powell Park for the next few months. Renovations to the park are slated to begin on Monday, February 7, and wrap up sometime in June. The date of the renovations will force the 11th Annual St. John when it kicks off February 18. The work will be done in a “manner that minimizes disruptions” to the popular businesses which line the park, JJ’s Texas Coast Cafe, Coral Bay Jewelers and Sparky’s, according to a state ment from Government House. “The work will start Monday, February 7, and is scheduled for completion by the middle of June,” according to the statement. “During that time, the park will be closed to the public, but provisions will be made to avoid disrupting the public’s access to nearby businesses.” “This work will be undertaken in a manner that minimizes disruptions for the businesses that surround the park and the neighboring community,” Department of Public Works Commissioner Smalls said in the prepared state ment. “We have discussed these objectives with the contractor, and will be responsive.” Smalls did not return repeat ed phone calls from St. John Tradewinds requesting additional information and renderings of the renovations for the Cruz Bay park. Apex Construction will be doing the work, which is expected to include installation of an underground electrical system for new lighting and new paving and landscaping. The project will cost $336,792 and should be completed by June 14, according to St. John Administrator Leona Smith. While plans to renovate the park have been discussed for years, the news of the impending work did not reach St. John Arts Festival Founder Frank Langley’s ears until the end of January, almost a month after he obtained a permit, booked bands, printed booklets and updated the website www.stjohnartsfestival.org. Langley also questioned the need to cordon off the park — tourists see when entering Cruz Bay — at the height of busy season. “Beyond my festival being changed to a new location, this impacts tourism,” said Langley. “Nothing worse could be imag ined than for visitors arriving from the ferry to be greeted with a construction gang with jackhammers digging up the only green spot left in Cruz Bay.” Despite his disappointment, Langley is optimistic that the festival will be a success at its new added. “The show must go on,” said the festival founder. “Given the cooperation of Leona Smith and (DPW St. John Deputy Directory) Ira Wade, we’ll be able to reconstruct our own little park in the big a bandstand for the 40-piece 73rd Army Band which will perform on February 19 starting at 12:30 p.m.” The St. John Arts Festival will continue on Sunday, February 20, with a gospel concert at the ball Dancers performing that night at the Westin Resort and Villas. For a full schedule of events for the festival, check out www. stjohnartsfestival.org. In the prepared statement from Government House, Smalls apologized for the expected disruptions of renovations. “We apologize for the imposition cation project that is long over-due and sorely needed to recapture the park’s charm and its importance as a central focal point,” Smalls said in the statement. WR-FitnessClub TW 6.09.indd 1 6/10/09 12:42:29 PM

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8 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 crane ROBERT CRANEARCHITECT, A.I.A.P .O. BOX 370 CRUZ BAY, ST. JOHN U.S.V.I. 00831(340) 776-6356 By Andrea Milam St. John Tradewinds Now that work is nearly completed at the Cruz Bay roundabout and the utility pole has been removed from the circle’s center, the St. John chapter of the St. Thomas/ St. John Chamber of Commerce is looking into beautifying the center of the circle itself, along with the small planted area where the Texaco gas station used to be located. St. John chamber members met recently with St. John Administra V.I. Police Department and the V.I. Department of Public Works, and architect Glen Speer, who will be working on the design. The idea of planting the center circle was immediately discounted due to the need for large trucks to ramp up in the center in order to traverse the roundabout, and the necessity of clear visibility across the entire circle. Maintenance of plants was another issue, explained DPW Materials Program Manager Thomas Jones. “It’s about visibility but it’s also about maintenance,” he said. “You’d have to maintain that on a weekly basis, and you don’t want something you constantly have to keep after.” Chamber members suggested a compass rose design for the center circle, explained Chamber of Commerce St. John representative “One suggestion was that we put in the compass rose built out of stone, and I thought it might be cool to do really heavy glass bricks from Maho,” she said. “Glen’s proposal for the currently planted area involves shorter plants toward where the hillside meets the circle, with the possibility of shade trees further up the hill. There might also be a meandering walkway to the lower sidewalk, which would help keep pedestrians out of the center of the circle.” Once Speer completes his designs and formulates a cost estimate, the Chamber will take over the responsibility of fundraising. A wine sip event has been suggested as a possible fundraiser for the project, along with the option for local businesses to “sponsor” sections of the area where the gas station was formerly located. “One suggestion that came out was larger businesses can sponsor the walk around area, so maybe they’d have a seating area with their logo in stone, or something like that, to commemorate the businesses that have the wherewithal late on a cost or timeline for the delivered. DPW wholeheartedly supports to DPW Materials Program Manager Thomas Jones. “We haven’t gotten anything solid from them to approve, but the commissioner will probably approve it,” said Jones. As for the roundabout construction, eight months after the contract was scheduled to close, the punch list is still being worked on. While all utilities were buried in the area, DPW is still waiting on Innovative to bury its cables from the Julius E. Sprauve School workshop annex to the new Fatty Crab restaurant. “The conduit’s already in the ground, so that won’t stop us from moving forward,” said Jones. “It’s all on Innovative now.” Another issue that has cropped up at the roundabout is people parking their vehicles in the center circle. Jones brought “no parking” signs over from St. Thomas last week, and DPW St. John Deputy Director Ira Wade was expected to have them installed within a few days. “We’ll put the signs in the middle, and the white hash mark that currently goes around the circle will be painted yellow,” said Jones. “Once you cross that yellow line to park, police can give you a ticket.” Cars parking in the center of the roundabout disrupt drivers’ visibility, Jones added.Finishing T ouches T o Be Put on Almost Completed Cruz Bay Roundabout Sunday Brunch 9am-1pm LIVE Classical Guitar MusicServing Breakfast & Dinner Outdoor Dining Overlooking Salt Pond BayCall Us for Seasonal Hours 340.693.5855 St. John, U.S. Virgin IslandsBreakfast Served: 8:00-10:00am Happy Hour: 5:00-6:00pm Dinner Served: 6:00-9:00pm “We’ll put the [no parking] signs in the middle, and the white hash mark that currently goes around the circle will be painted yellow. Once you cross that yellow line to park, police can give you a ticket.”

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By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds ous and is here, there is hope. That was the message Karl Pytlik shared with about 70 residents symposium at the Mongoose Junction courtyard on Tuesday night, February 1. Pytlik, the Caribbean Oceanic Restoration and Education Foundation’s St. John coordinator, has St. John. introduced to the Atlantic Ocean in the wake of Hurricane Andrew the sea. Since then, the native Inin waters from Florida to the Bahamas. With no natural predators, the Pytlik shared images from the Bahamas where reefs are covered in The dire situation in the Bahamas could be avoided in local waters, according to Pytlik. “So far there have been 70 lion1,500 across the territory,” he said. “Basically the biggest thing we can do is raise community awareness and get people to help and volunteer.” Many residents did just that at the February 2 meeting, Pytlik added. “We had a lot of people who signed up and volunteered and we had a lot of people who have boats who are willing to lend their resources,” he said. While National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ofnot work in the Virgin Islands, according to Pytlik. ciguatera poisoning from the reefs and four were positive for the toxin,” he said. “We’re warning Instead, the best way to combat marked and called into us, we are removing,” said Pytlik. “We do have a chance to keep their numbers down. We need people trained eryone to report all sightings.” reefs, Pytlik added. “It’s a little hard to tell about the said. With a coordinated effort between the British and U.S. Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico and Turks and Caicos, the CORE Foundation which draws on as many resources as possible, explained Pytlik. “We’re trying to bring as many resources out of the community as need more funding, but we do have a real management plan. We need to draw on everyone for this.” By affecting the health of reefs, entire tourism industry, according to Pytlik. “This really affects everyone,” he said. “In some areas, like the Bahamas, there has been a 25 per cent drop in the scuba industry just in the past few years. That is the equivalent to something like $30 million.” “And if people aren’t diving, they’re not staying in hotels or eating in restaurants or shopping in stores,” Pytlik said. “It could really hurt us. It could affect everyone, not just the dive industry.” Dire impacts like seen in the Bahamas are still a few years away in the Virgin Islands, but Pytlik is trying to make sure those dead reef images are never seen in local waters. “We are working as hard we can to avoid what happened in waters came out of the blue,” he said. “We have a chance to stay ahead of it here.” To help in the battle against lishould carry markers — available at local dive shops, Friends of the Park Store, St. John Spice and more — and call the CORE hotline to report all sightings. Scuba divers and anyone with a vessel can host Call CORE’s hotline at 340-2012342 to report a sighting of a lionWednesday nights rotating between Maho Bay Camps and Estate Concordia Preserve. Call the resorts to information, to volunteer or register St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 9 Gold Addy Award Best Magazine Design Local Lionsh Battle Is Continuing — 70 Fish Caught of St. John and Counting NOW OPENHighest quality pet collars, leads, treats, sporting wear and MUCH, MUCH more. 340.777.9588 www.stjohnimals.com

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St. John Tradewinds In conformity with the by-laws of the Animal Care Center of St. John, the annual meeting on January 26. The slate, prepared by a duly constituted Nominating Committee, ACC’s By-Laws as follows: President, B.J. Harris; Vice-President, Karin Schlesinger; Secretary, Sheila Karcher; Treasurer, Monica Munro. of St. John; each person on the proposed Slate has displayed civility in working with fellow members; each person has displayed caring for animals in a concrete manner; e.g., owns pets, has adopted island cats or dogs, maintains a feeding station, helps with onand off-island adoptions, lends a hand at the shelter if and when needed; each person on the Slate has on-island business experience; each person is willing to understand and work with the USVI Government; each person respects the West Indian culture of our islands. The number of ACC board members was reduced to eight from 15 at the regular January meeting of the board. The purpose of the reduction is Dean Baldwin, Elaine Campbell, and Diana Ripley. Incumbent Oriel Smith, whose term was expiring, was re-elected by majority vote at the annual meeting. to return by majority vote. Smith and Karcher will each commence a lot. In addition to the two recommended candidates, two write-in votes were provided for on the ballot. A list of ACC achievements for 2010 was handed out at the annual meeting at the Gifft Hill School Great Room. Retiring Treasurer John Fuller described the many new internet connections that ACC has joined for raising its funding levels. For residents who were unable to attend the annual meeting, the list of achievements and of internet connections will be included in the spring lands.vi. Some of the organizational challenges facing the 2011 board include a careful review and possible revision of the by-laws, development and supervision of a nascent “pack” committee system, and laying the groundwork for building a larger shelter.10 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 New Ofcers for 2011 Elected for Animal Care Center of St. John Sun Power Loans for Solar Water HeatersNo money down Low Interest loan Up to $2,500 in rebateDon’t pay to heat Your Water; do it free, use the for a cleaner, greener Virgin Islands. Kids And The Sea, St. John is hosting two adults sailing classes next month; one starting on Wednesday, February 9, and running for four Wednesdays and the other starting on Saturday, February 12, and running for four weeks as well. Both classes will begin at 1 p.m. and will feature Pearson Ensigns, 23-foot keel boats. The cost is $200 for the four sessions and the funds go to support the KATS St. John youth sailing program. Anyone interested should call Marie Naisby at 714-7433 or 410-271-1196 to register.KA TS Hosting T wo Adult Sailing Classes Starting Feb. 9 and 12 Herculs Pat Rebuilding After Fire

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By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds Five residents added their concerns for inclusion in the V.I Ter ritorial Management Agency’s updated hazardous mitigation plan during a Wednesday evening, February 2, meeting at the Julius E. Sprauve School cafeteria. VITEMA hosted a series of meetings across the territory last week as it moves ahead with creating an updated State Hazard Mitigation Plan, as required by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. “Everything in government has guidelines and regulations,” said Jonetta Darden, VITEMA’s Deputy Director for Grants Management. “We must have a State Hazard Mitigation Plan in place which is a requirement of FEMA. We have hired a consultant to assist us in creating the plan and to make sure that it’s accepted by FEMA.” “If it’s not accepted, all bets are off,” said Darden. ing to identify harzardous areas throughout the territory, in order to develop mitigation strategies to reduce long-term risks, explained Jeffrey Euwema, a consultant with the Concil for Information and Planning Alternatives, who was contracted by VITEMA. “The plan is based on commuof reduction of losses due to hazards,” said Euwema. “The plan will serve as a guideline during disaster declarations to put us on the docket for funding.” From storm water improvements to general planning and even zoning variances, VITEMA’s State Hazard Mitigation Plan will be designed to identify potential risks in order to avoid devastating damage in the wake of a hurricane, earthquake or landslide, according to Euwema. “Things like a review of the storm water drainage problems which impacted the Westin, the infrastructure at Guy Benjamin the plan will identify hazards and then actions to mitigate those hazards,” he said. “We are looking for tangible impacts to reduce hazards.” Once the strategies are outlined, the mitigation projects will be prioritized in order of importance to be accomplished when funding becomes available, Euwema explained. “There is really no limit on what type of projects could be included in the plan,” he said. “Pie in the sky projects like burying the cables in Charlotte Amalie, was actually funded by VITEMA. Big ticket items are a possibility.” The State Harzard Mitigation Plan will also include maintenance provisions, like bi-annual meet ings, to keep it viable in the future, Euwma added. A draft of the plan must be presented to FEMA by March, and March. It’s not too late for residents to offer their opinions on the plan. a draft of the plan up on their website, www.vitema.gov, by this a mechanism in place for residents to post comments about the plan on its site as well. For more information about VITEMA’s State Hazard Mitiga tion Plan, call the agency’s Grants Management Division at 7742244. St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 11 VITEMA Shares New Hazard Mitigation Plan ATTENTION ST. JOHN HOMEOWNERSHIRING PROFESSIONALS TO MAINT AIN YOUR HOME ISNOT AN EXTRAVAGANCEI T ISSMART BUSINESS SENSE CONTACT THE PROFESSIONALS AT Cimmaron Property ManagementS t. John’s Premier Property M anagement Company Providing:COMPREHENSIVE MAINTENANCE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT GUEST SERVICES (340) 715-2666 / www.cimmaronstjohn.com / info@cimmaronstjohn.com P.O. Box 37, St. John, VI 00831 / Lumberyard Complex – Cruz Bay St. John Tradewinds The Second Annual Gifft Hill School “Seeds for Success” matching fund drive was a smashing success. GHS was generously supported by the school commu nity as well as the community at large and raised $276,000 matching fund from its unbelievably big-hearted donors. The school is most proud to report that its students and faculty achieved 100 percent participation in the program, donating $10,555 which, with matching and $10,000 bonuses in each category, turned into a whopping $125,550. The funds raised through “Seeds for Success” will support teacher salaries, academic and athletic programming, and will go a long way toward offsetting the $650,000 GHS nancial assistance this year. GHS thanks everyone who supported the school in this effort and those who sponsor scholarships, donate to the auction and give various in-kind donations. St. John is truly a communi ty school in every way, and the contributions it receives make all the difference for students — the future leaders of the island and world beyond. GHS Seeds for Success Matching Fund Drive Nets $276,000 T otal

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12 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 Robert C. Byrd Scholarship Available St. John Tradewinds Three members of the Foundation for Environmental Education (FEE) arrived in the territory last could soon be named Blue Flag locations. Blue Flag is an exclusive ecolabel awarded to beaches and marinas worldwide which meet the established criteria of the program. The effort is being led by the Environmental Sub-Committee of the USVI Hotel and Tourism Association. The beaches being evaluated for the pilot phase are Emerald Beach, Magens Bay, Great Bay, Trunk Bay, and Pelican Cove. The Blue Flag designation is based on compliance with 32 criteria cover ing the aspects of environmental education and information, water quality, environmental manage ment, and safety and services. “By meeting Blue Flag standards we are being respectful of island residents, visitors and the environment,” said Maggie Day, Environmental Committee Chair person. “It means our beaches and beach facilities are safe and clean, the marine resources are preserved and protected and through signage and educational outreach, we encourage everyone to learn about our beautiful beaches, bays and shorelines.” The process of acquiring Blue local investment. The Department of Tourism and Hovensa have both contributed to this effort. The destination will be one of only a few Caribbean islands with this distinction. For additional information on the Blue Flag Program visit www. 774-6835. St. John Tradewinds St. Thomas/St. John School District Superinten dent Jeanette Smith-Barry announced that applica tions are now being accepted for the 2011 Robert C. Byrd Scholarship. Graduating students who have been accepted to a college or university for attendance in the fall of 2011 are eligible for this four-year scholarship. Annually administered by the V.I. Department of Education, the Robert C. Byrd Scholarship program complies with section 419E of the Higher Education ars receive awards of $1,500 per year, which can be renewed for a maximum of eight consecutive univer sity or college semesters upon submission of required evidence showing maintenance of eligibility. Applications are available from guidance counselors at the various public and private high schools, Board of Education, the Curriculum Center in Anna’s Retreat, and downloadable at www.doe.vi. Complet the Insular Superintendent no later than 5:00 p.m. on Friday, April 1, 2011. For more information contact J. Nicole SmithThompson at 775-2250, extension 8520.HTA Works with Ofcials To Obtain Eco-label Awards for Local BeachesJFLI Is Hosting Field Trip Food Sale Fundraiser on Weekends at Firefoods er Alvis Christian is hosting food sales Friday through Sunday starting February 11. Stop by Fire Foods at the Coral Bay triangle between 3 and 11 p.m. Fridays and Sundays and between 11 a.m. and 11 p.m. Saturdays for some great local food and drinks, and help a worthy cause.

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St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 13 “Broadway Comes to St. John” is a funderaiser for St. John School Chelsea Drug Store or SJSA. For more information call 779-4322. Angel Ticket PerformanceFriday, February 18th at 6 p.m. Westin Resort BallroomBy Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds Feel like pancakes at midnight? How about a Philly cheese steak at 8 a.m.? There is only one place on St. John to go for both early-morning and late-night cravings — Jake’s. The restaurant, upstairs at the Lumberyard in the old Chilly Billy’s location, is open daily from 7:30 a.m. to 4 a.m. and serves up its entire menu the whole time. That means breakfast all day and night, as well as their selection of burgers, sandwiches, wraps and salads. If those hours don’t get one in their perennially open doors, the price and quality of the food surely will. Prices at Jake’s range from $16 for a juicy eightounce steak and eggs to $10 chicken sandwiches. But beyond the affordable prices, everything on the menu is freshly made to order. When Shaun and Carl Stevens closed the doors on their Cruz Bay late-night haunt the Front Yard, they wasted no time in opening Jake’s. Named after the opened in May 2008, the restaurant is based on good food for an affordable price. “They were knocking down the Front Yard building and we had to go,” said Carl Stevens. “We asked ourselves, ‘What next,’” said Shaun Stevens. “We weren’t sure whether to stay here, go back to the states, go to work somewhere else or what.” Then the upstairs at the Lumberyard became avail able and the couple had their answer. vens. “There aren’t many places where you can come and have a full sit down dinner for under $20. It’s not super fancy, but it’s really good.” “You need some place to go for breakfast at 2 p.m. or 2 a.m.,” said Carl Stevens. “When we were doing the Front Yard, we woke up late and I could never get breakfast anywhere in the afternoon. Plus we’re carrying on the Front Yard tradition with the late nights.” While literally everything on the menu is good, some items simply can not be missed. Of the breakfast offerings, the corned beef hash is a huge hit. With the corned beef slow roasted for 13, then tossed with Jake’s spiced home fries and served up with two eggs and toast, it’s not a surprise that it’s one of the most popular items on the menu. Other breakfast choices include a scrumptious burrito brimming with eggs, home fries, tomato and French toast. On the lunch and dinner side of things, a favorite dish at Jake’s is Philly cheese steak. “We’ve had people from Philly come in and say it’s better than Pat’s,” said Carl Stevens. With thinly sliced beef, onion and bell peppers smothered in a Swiss and American cheese blend on a toasted roll, it’s draw is no surprise. Other favorites include a chicken, bacon and ranch wrap and savory bacon cheeseburgers. While the economic downturn kicked into high gear shortly after they opened Jake’s, the Stevens have more than weathered the storm and business is now better than ever. The couple get plenty of help in their venture with taurant in named. “Jake’s in pre-school now, but he logged a lot of hours in the three years we’ve been open,” said Shaun Stevens. “He loves it here. He makes breakfast and he makes a mean Bloody Mary — there is no alcohol in it, but there could be anything else.” Jake’s is equally popular with other children, as well as their parents. The kid’s menu offers chicken nuggets, grilled cheese and hot dogs with chips each for only $6 and on the breakfast side of things, happy face pancakes for $5 are a big hit with the little ones. Parents also enjoy how their kids love the restaurant’s coloring books and video games, giving them at least a few minutes of quiet time. And the restaurant’s real bartenders do make a mean Bloody Mary for the grown-ups. The bar prices at Jake’s are another hit with the crowd all hours of the day. Well drinks, and their vodka is Stoli, are $3; and so are all of the beers, includ ing Sierra Nevada. The ethos driving the restaurant is simple, accord ing to Carl Stevens. “I want people to have good service and leave here with a full belly and having had a great experience,” he said. “It’s really rewarding to have people love our food,” said Shaun Stevens. “That feels really good. Plus, it’s super fun to have Jake’s name on the sign.” Stop by the restaurant pretty much any time of the night or day for great fare. For more information or for take out orders call the restaurant at 777-7115.Affordable Prices and Made to Order Food Make Jake’s the Place — Day or NightBroadway Purchase a raffle ticket for a chance to win a Broadway Package worth over $5,000:2 Round Trip Airfare to New York (from St. John or US) 2 Tickets to “Chicago” (Orchestra seating) & backstage tour 2 Tickets to “La Cage Aux Folles” (Orchestra seating) 2 Tickets to “Priscilla: Queen of Desert” (Orchestra seating) Dinner for two at the famous Sardi’s Dinner for two at Etcetera, Etcetera 3 Night Accommodations at W Hotel in New York – Times Square Raffle Tickets: $100.00 each Only 200 raffle tickets will soldRaffle ticket sales will start Monday, February 7th 4 to 6 p.m. (Meet the five Broadway actors from 5 to 6 p.m.) $200.00 per ticket . Only 30 Angel tickets are left!Angel sponsorship tickets include:(1) Entry into “DREAM, WISH, BELIEVE.” — An original production with music, dance and puppets performed by 52 students from JESS, GBS, GHS and SJSA. Award-nominated Broadway actors will be working with the children to present this show A champagne reception following the performance Dinner for 1 following the peformance at an island restaurant Free Public PerformanceFriday, February 18th at 8 p.m. Westin Resort Ballroom

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14 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 Crossword Answers — Puzzle on Page 20 Keeping Track of Crime 2011-TO-DATE Letters To St. John TradewindsSt. Lucia Relief Drive Thanks I witnessed the arrest of a women about 50+ years of age on Saturday, January 29, 2011 down at the ferry dock by a very heavy handed armed local cop. It was very disturbing to witness by myself as well as my children. I have visited the island for the last six years and never experienced anything like this on the island let alone at approximately 11:30 a.m. My children said they never want to come back and I don’t blame them, and agree with what they are thinking. Part of my concern was the fact that he did not call for a female oflike “what is he going to do to her” as he threw her up against her car, handcuffed her and then took her away, leaving her car parked in front of the docks. It was still parked in the place where she had stopped at 1 p.m. which is when we left on the ferry. The irony of the whole thing was this all took place under the giant banner out in front reading “Make every visitor feel special — Tour ism it’s all of us!” I bet she felt special. Please look into this I would like to know what became of her. Maybe the cop could have handled it better. It sure made me want to keep from spending my money on St. John, since it may be going into the pockets of the corrupt local few. Deb SchimmelVisiting Family Disturbed by VIPD Arrest of Woman at DockI would like to take this opportunity to thank all St. Johnians and St. Lucians who so generously contributed towards the St. Lucia Relief Drive. Your support was highly appreciated. Special thanks to Lucinda Francis, Brenda Eugene, Rochelle Eugene, Faustines Francis, Alexander Francis, Verona and Family, Lucy Hippolyte, Castaways, Damian Knight, Dale Abraham, Cid Hamling, Theodora Moorehead, Cristol Harris, Ious and wife (Windy Level) Vern Eugene, Captain Vic, Pine Peace Mini Mart, and myself, Bredna Francis, who spearheaded the drive. Once again, thanks to all. Special thanks to Cristol Harris. From the heart of Brenda Francis If VITEMA is indeed committed to the idea of community participation, then it should be a reasonable expectation that any criticisms offered here will not simply be met with self-defensive reactions that are all too common at government-sponsored hear ings of this type. What is anticipated is that a far more meaningful level of internal analysis will be forthcoming to facilitate a continuing dialogue meant to ongoing efforts. That process in which awareness is followed by agenda which formulates policy and that leads to implementation necessarily requires an eventual evaluation to determine the effectiveness of those efforts. My comments here are offered with that objective in mind. Unfortunately no overview of the State Hazard Mitigation Plan was included as part of the article notifying the public of this town hall meeting. While such a review might have somewhat taxed the staff to compile a one or two page entry for the newspaper well founded opinions would have outweighed the required efforts. Indeed, why was not even a referenced web site included to guide those interested to review the existing plan? Regardless of these faults, my objective is not to simply chastise VITEMA concerning these missteps in soliciting public input. One of the greatest shortcomings of many existing plans in government agencies is that their basis usually is premised on data covering at most 100 to 200 year time lines. The inadequacy of such limited historical analysis almost certainly assures a commu nity that the severity of damage from unanticipated levels of disaster is guaranteed to generate greater degrees of havoc and result in far more losses that could have been preventable had they simply been deemed likely. While the evidence to determine the extent of such rare and extreme events may be only deduced from careful geological studies of physical details obscured by great spans of time, the challenge of such an effort should not deter us from more accurately predicting their likelihood and magnitude. As an issue of public policy, concerns of this nature, once realized, need to become part of that agenda that determines the direction which policymakers ultimately must pursue. Perhaps of equal importance would be the required effort to establish such rare but catastrophic events as ongoing concern for the general public. As an example, though pole houses elevated along coastal communities in parts of Asia were once common sites, modern construction techniques employing ground ations in construction continued it is likely that many thousands of lives might have been saved in the tsunami that struck Southeast Asia a few years ago. communities is that, without municipal governments, an entire level of localized government, normally factored into the national FEMA framework, does not even exist. The consequences invariably impact the response time, as well a the accuracy and amount of relevant information required to determine the type and appropriate level of assistance. This results in a heightened sense of isolation that citizens experience various communities simply because our more centralized government, by design, is rendered less responsive. The recent storm activity during the 2010 hurricane season, while severe in comparison to most events of the last several decades, cannot be considered a “worst case scenario.” The existing infrastructure, and greater considerations of development now in place are clearly neither adequate in design nor properly placed to avoid the more severe levels of damage Guest OpinionSound Planning Necessary for New Hazard Mitigation PlanContinued on Next Page

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St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 15 Enighed Parking Lot Taking Shape New VIPD Theme Song : “Don’t Run, Don’t Hide” that natural disasters of greater magnitudes would certainly produce. require the same type of Multi-hazards Demonstration Project that was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey for California. One element of the project, the Arkstorm scenario, was based on anticipated precipita tion levels that would occur on average every 500 to 1,000 years. Absent such risk analysis, continued development in accordance with existing zoning laws, can only amplify the costs of future disasters, and this in turn will further escalate already excessively high insurance rates, inevi tably affecting all property owners. Without being prepared to comment directly on the existing plan now in effect, I’ll direct my comments to what I believe should be accom plished in any newer version that results from the efforts now under way. If the new plan is to be comprehensive in its assessment then there must be an emphasis on providing insights into the overall spectrum of possibilities that might befall the territory. Earthquakes, tsunamis, windon by climate change all need to be factored into a disaster policy that anticipates both severity and frequency. Vague understanding of these phenomenon lull people into a false awareness enough so that individuals are both able and motivated enough to make informed decisions on where best to invest in homes, businesses, and what construction methods best offer the likelihood of survival, should a disaster occur. Equally important should be the establishment of a set of criteria that lists key considerations in determining the locations of essential government facilities that will be instrumental in providing services in the aftermath. abundantly clear, and that is that the state of roadways, drainage systems and construction techniques on steep hillsides are nowhere near adequate to withstand even above average rainfall patterns. The type of construction that created Centerline Road here on St. John payloads have increased to where even frequent maintenance is of lim provide the type of compaction necessary to assure the stability of the ous places is continually sliding downhill, and even new paving is adding to the weight factor that is instrumental in this ongoing process. As the road bed settles, higher volumes of water cross the road and quickly erode and undermine the already limited soft shoulders that bor catch basins that have been sealed off, and others that are blocked by falling debris in areas that should have retaining walls. Private developers rarely consider the use of retaining walls to control erosion, and devices such as gabion baskets are of limited effectiveness slopes require extensive efforts to maintain structural improvements and currently the building codes are not adequately addressing such considerations. How a Hazard Mitigation Plan affects building methods and codes should be the very basis of how it is evaluated for effectiveness. Sound planning is the foundation of a stable community. A good reputation over time establishes such areas with a high degree of desirabil ity into the decision making process of those that consider establishing their families and businesses there. All of us look forward to living in a good neighborhood that is considered safe and well served by those government services that are essential to stability, then those natural occurrences that can result in disaster, will be less damaging in their effects and less costly in the recovery process that follows. To accomplish such ends will require not only a revised plan, but an emergency management agency that functions not merely in reaction to disasters, but far more proactively in spreading the gospel that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Hugo Roller, Coral Bay, St. John St. John Tradewinds The Virgin Islands Police Department has its own theme song. On the heels of the release of Cops,” which documents a night in the life of Saturated Patrol ofa minute and a half long and written and produced by local Band-O-Rama and Road March Champions Fusion Band is set to a reggae beat and sends out a strong message to the criminals. The documentary “VI Cops” has aired on the government access channel and has the nationally known “Bad Boys” theme accompanying the live action. In order for VI Cops to have its manager of Fusion Band was asked to make a jingle. He created a song called “Don’t Run, Don’t Hide,” with a catchy rhythm and a strong message of anti-violence and the consequences of crime. VIPD Commissioner Novelle Francis said he liked the new theme song “a lot.” He anticipated the theme song to be another source of pride for the munity. “After all, we may be the only police department in the entire world with its own theme song,” said Francis. A second VI Cops will be added. The public has praised the show saying that they now have a better understanding of ery night as they patrol the community, according to the commissioner. The show improves the relationship between the community and the police and is another effective method of community policing, Francis added.New Hazard Mitigation PlanContinued from Previous Page The “Gomez Lifts Property Tax Injunction,” article in the January 31-February 6, 2011, issue of St. John TradewindsCorrection:

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retention, safety belts for squad benches and more,” according to information from Gold Coast Yachts. A state-of-the-art captain’s compartment will allow the vessel to be operated in almost any conditions. “The captain’s compartment will be separated from the patient treatment area and feature exceptional visibility in an elevated wheel house, deck entrance/exit doors, remote engine controls, independent air conditioning, dual helm seats, complete marine navigation array, emergency frequency mobile radios, sirens, intercom and public address systems, a satellite vessel locator as well as a bathroom with sink and toilet,” according to Gold Coast Yachts’ information. With twin QSB 425-horse power engines, the ambulance boat will be capable of speeds up to 30 knots and a cruising speed of 26 Gold Coast Yachts. The vessel was being prepped for painting as of press time and Difede hoped the ambulance boat would be primed by Monday, February 7. “If we prime it this weekend, we can paint it next week and that will move us toward a launch sometime in the middle of February,” he said. “Then we’ll need it on the dock for nal engine, electrical, mechanical and plumbing hookups.” Gold Coast Yachts started construction of the vessel in October and expects the boat to be docked at St. John by the end of March. The new vessel will be welcome news for residents, who have been due reliable medi cal transportation for a long time, explained Senator at Large Craig Barshinger. “This boat is long overdue and St. John residents are anxious for it,” said Barshinger. “The current ambulance boat is broken down and the government rents a water taxi for $500 per day, even when no runs are made.” Residents should be excited about the new vessel, Difede added. “It’s a rough crossing there and to have a good boat — the best in the world — will be a really good thing,” he said. bulance boat, plus artist rendering and photographs of the construction process, check out Gold Coast Yachts’ website at www. goldcoastyachts.com and click on “under construction.” suit against the government alleging the system it was using was unfair. Following several years of inac tion, the court issued an injunction freezing property taxes at 1998 rates, determined to be the last year tax rates were accurate. The court also required the government to conduct a territory-wide property revaluation and create a viable Board of Tax Review. The government contracted BearingPoint, which began revaluating properties across the Virgin Islands in June 2004. BearingPoint wrapped up the revaluations in 2008, but many property owners on St. John found errors in those revaluations, which prompted the Unity Day Group’s lawsuit. In January, Gomez lifted the injunction ruling that the Board of Tax Review was functioning properly and the mandated revaluations were complete. V.I. Unity Day Group members, however, did not settle with the government and instead walked out of mediation. “Unity Day Group left mediation because the government would not deal with the fact that the data itself is bad and Bearing Point’s ways and methods did not work,” Unity Day Group Property Tax Committee member Pam St. John Tradewinds. “We want to say that what Bearing Point did on St. John was incorrect. The results did not meet standards and we need to start from scratch.” Unity Day Group members pointed to the hundreds of complaints St. John property owners had with their revaluations. “Out of 1,700 houses, there on St. John saying something was wrong with their assessments,” Under Gomez’s ruling, the government will issue 2007 tax bills, at the 1998 level, in February. The 2008 bills, also at the 1998 rate, will be issued this summer. The 2009 bills, the last bills newly assessed rates, will both be issued in 2012. 16 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 V.I. Unity Day Group Property T ax Law SuitContinued from Page 3St. John Ambulance BoatContinued from Page 5 SPECIFICATIONS: patient compartment CONSTRUCTION Interior/Exterior Finish: DECK FITTINGS AND EQUIPMENT Cleats: Liferails/Posts: Deck Hatches: hatches Windows/Doors: Steering and Rudders: GROUND /MOORING TACKLE/FENDERS starboard ENGINE ACCOMMODATIONS Patient Compartment: Waste and sharps disposal compartments ment drains Captains Compartment: VESSEL SAFETY EQUIPMENT/FEATURES MISCELLANEOUS trimST. JOHN AMBULANCE BOAT DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS

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St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 17 Police LogFriday, January 28 10:40 a.m. An Estate Hansen Bay resident p/requesting police assistance. Police assistance. 2:55 p.m. A citizen p/r that her son was assaulted. Simple assault. 11:15 p.m. A citizen p/r a domestic disturbance with his wife. Disturbance of the peace, D.V. Saturday, January 29 11:15 .m. Susan Ellis of no known address p/ at Leander Jurgen Command under arrest and charged with aggravated assault and battery, disobeying a lawful order and resisting arrest. Aggravated assault. 12:47 p.m. A Calabash Boom resident p/r a disturbance of the peace. Disturbance of the peace, threats. 12:59 p.m. A citizen r/ an auto accident on North Shore Road, in the area of Caneel Bay Resort. Auto accident. 4:05 p.m. A citizen r/ being threatened in the area of Cruz Bay. Disturbance of the peace, threats. 7:10 p.m. A Calabash Boom resident r/ being threatened in the area of Cruz Bay. Threats, harassment. Sunday, January 30 1:30 a.m. A citizen p/r loud music coming from Cruz Bay. Disturbance of the peace. 1:55 a.m. A citizen p/r a disturbance with a female. Distur bance of the peace. 2:00 a.m. A citizen p/r a disturbance with a female. Distur bance of the peace. 12:26 p.m. A citizen c/r Gifft Hill. Illegal discharge of Monday, January 31 1:09 p.m. A citizen p/r telephone harassment. Telephone harassment. 1:39 p.m. A citizen p/r a dog bite. Dog bite. 6:45 p.m. A citizen p/r hear Johnson’s Bay. Illegal discharge T uesday, February 1 8:17 a.m. A citizen p/r lost documents. Lost documents. 6:25 p.m. A citizen p/r an auto accident in the area of Cruz Bay. Auto accident. 6:40 p.m. A citizen p/r that someone is harassing her niece. Harassment. 11:17 p.m. A citizen p/r that someone stole her minor daughter’s iPod. Grand larceny. W ednesday, February 2 2:20 a.m. A citizen p/r loud music and a disturbance of the peace. Disturbance of the peace. 8:57 a.m. A citizen p/r a domestic violence matter and a violation of a court order. Violation of a court order, D.V. 5:25 p.m. An Estate Contant resident p/r being threatened. Disturbance of the peace, threats. Thursday, February 3 No time given A citizen p/r an accident in the area of the Boulon Center. Auto accident. 7:10 p.m. An Estate Bethany resident p/r that he was punched by an unknown male in the area of Wharfside Village. Assault and battery. 7:50 p.m. An Estate Bethany resident p/r that she lost her wallet in the area of Red Hook. Lost wallet. 8:50 p.m. A citizen p/r a male chasing another male with a machete in the area of Wharfside Village. Assault in the third. 11:00 p.m. A citizen p/ to supply supplemental information about his assault. Assault in the third, supplemental information. St. John Tradewinds Crime Stoppers is asking the community’s help to solve the following crimes. If anyone knows something, they should say something as law enforcement needs all eyes and ears. Even the smallest bit of information may be just what is needed to solve these cases. St. John On Tuesday, January 11, at 2:02 p.m., police were dispatched to Merchants Commercial Bank on St. John in response to a robbery. Sources stated that two armed men stormed into the bank, robbed it of an undisclosed sum of money, and escaped in a blue GMC Jimmy. Both suspects were masked. One was wearing a blue jump suit and white sneakers. The minimum cash reward for the arrest of a bank robber is $900 plus 10 percent of any cash recovered. The maximum cash reward is $2,500. St. Thomas On Thursday, January 27, at 7:45 a.m. on 2nd Street, a woman who had just dropped her child off at day care was robbed of her gold chain as she was getting back into her car. The suspect, who ran eastward toward Oswald Harris Court, is described as a light-skinned Hispanic male, 18 to 25 years old and about 5’ 8” tall. The minimum cash reward for the arrest of a robber is $900. tional arrests in January. Let’s continue to make the community a safer place to live by telling law enforcement about these or any other crimes at www.CrimeStoppersUSVI.org or by calling 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). Tips are completely anonymous, and the stateside operators are multi-lingual. Only anonymous callers to Crime Stoppers are eligible for these cash rewards. CRIME STOPPPERS U.S.V.I.Organization Seeks Information on Recent Crimes Tax Collector Valencio Jackson advised Virgin Islands property owners that pursuant to Act. No. 7241, penalties and interest will be charged on the revised 2006 bills beginning February 16. The revised 2006 property tax bills were issued in July 2010 and became delinquent on November 15, 2010. In accordance with prior legislation, property tax payers were not required to pay any penalty and interest on the 2006R tax bills. “Notwithstanding the penalty and interest provisions of Title 29 Virgin Islands Code, section 2494, no interest or penalty may be levied on any assessment for the property tax years 2006, 2007, and 2008 for six months after the date of issuance of the respective year’s tax assessment,” according to Act 7241. Accordingly, Virgin Islands property owners are encouraged to pay their 2006 property tax bills before February 16, 2011 in order to avoid the assessment of penalty and interest. After that date, penalty and interest charges will be assessed. For more information, call the Tax Collector at 776-6737.Boat Going St. Croix Agriculture FairThe community is invited to join the Love City Pan Dragons as they travel to the St. Croix Agriculture Fair by ferry. The boat leaves on Thursday, February 17, at 1:30 p.m. from the Cruz Bay bulkhead and returns on Monday, February 21, at 2 p.m. The cost for adults is $85 round-trip and $65 for one-way. For children the cost is $65 round-trip and $50 for one-way. Transportation will be provided by Native Son Inc. Tickets can be purchased at Courtesy Car Rental or on board.Property T ax Waiver Ends Feb. 2011Are you trained in CPR and AED use? How recent is your training? CPR classes are being offered for the community on the second Saturday of each month. Learn the current methods of life-saving skill. This is a one day, three hour class. Contact Bob Malacarne to sign up or for more information at CPR Classes A vailable to Community Free Vow Renewal Ceremony Feb. 14It’s that time of year again! Love City’s own Barefoot Minister Anne Marine Porter is hosting a free marriage vow renewal cer emony on Monday, February 14, at Trunk Bay Beach at 5 p.m. For more information call Porter at 693-5153 or 626-4658.

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18 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 AccommodationsCaribbean Villas & Resorts tel. 1-800-338-0987 or locally 340-776-6152 Island Getaways 888-693-7676, islandgetaway sinc.com Suite St. John Villas/Condos tel. 1-800-348-8444 or locally at 340-779-4486 VIVA Vacations tel. 779-4250 P.O. Box 1747, STJ, VI 00831ArchitectureCrane, Robert Architect, AIA tel. 776-6356 P.O. Box 370, STJ, VI 00831 Barefoot Architect, Inc. tel. 693-7665 fax 693-8411 P.O. Box 1772, STJ, VI 00831BankingScotiabank #1 Mortgage Lender in the VI The Marketplace (340) 776-6552 Beauty/SpaW estin Resorts & Villas Spa Services tel. 693-8000, ext. 1903/1904ConstructionSt. John Hardware tel. 693-8780 fax 776-6685 Located at The MarketplaceInsuranceTheodore T unick & Company Phone 775-7001 / Fax 775-7002 www.theodoretunick.com JewelryR&I PATTON goldsmithing Located in Mongoose Junction 776-6548 or (800) 626-3445 LandscapingAlfredo’s Landscaping tel. 774-1655 cell 513-2971 P.O. Box 91, St. John, VI 00831 Coral Bay Garden Center tel. 693-5579 fax 714-5628 P.O. Box 1228, STJ, VI 00831 PROPERTYKING tel. 643-6348 Landscaping & IrrigationProperty MgmtCimmaron Property Management tel. 340-715-2666 St. John’s Premier Property Manager Seaview Vacation Homes, Inc. tel. 340-776-6805; 888-625-2963 www.seaviewhomes.comReal EstateAmerican Paradise Real Estate tel. 693-8352 fax 693-8818 P.O. Box 8313, STJ, VI 00831 Cruz Bay Realty tel. 693-8808 fax 693-9812 P.O. Box 66, STJ, VI 00831 Debbie Hayes, GRI tel. 714-5808 or 340-642-5995 www.stjohnvirealestate.com John Foster Real Estate tel. 714-5808 or 340-642-5995 www.stjohnvirealestate.com Holiday Homes of St. John tel. 776-6776 fax 693-8665 P.O. Box 40, STJ, VI 00831 Islandia Real Estate tel. 776-6666 fax 693-8499 P.O. Box 56, STJ, VI 00831 John McCann & Associates tel. 693-3399 fax 888-546-1115 Located at Wharfside Landing www.RealEstateOnStJohn.comRestaurantsConcordia Cafe, 693-5855 Happy Hour 4:30-6pm Dinner 6-8:30pm Tues-Sat Fish Trap Restaurant and Seafood Market tel. 693-9994, Closed Mondays La Tapa Restaurant tel. 693-7755 Open 7 Days a Week Skinny Legs “A Pretty OK Place” tel. 340-779-4982 www.skinnylegs.com Sun Dog Cafe tel. 693-8340 Located at Mongoose JunctionRetailSaltwater Gypsy Consignment (340) 244-8888 Located in The Lumberyard St. Johnimals 340-777-9588 Located at Wharfside VillageServicesC4th Custom Embroidery tel. 779-4047 Located in Coral Bay St. John TradewindsBusiness Directory Ferry Schedules Cruz Bay and Charlotte Amalie CRUZ BAY TO RED HOOK RED HOOK TO CRUZ BAY CRUZ BAY TO DOWNTOWN CHARLOTTE AMALIE Leaves Cruz Bay Leaves Charlotte Amalie Baha’i Community of St. John For Devotions and Study Circles,call 714-1641 7:30 p.m. Fridays; Study Circles 9 a.m. Sundays 776-6316, 776-6254 Bethany Moravian Church 11 a.m., Sunday School 776-6291 Calvary Baptist Church 13 ABC Coral Bay, 776-6304 Sunday School 10 a.m., Sunday evening 6 p.m., Thursday 7 p.m. Christian Ministry Cinnamon Bay Beach Inter-Denominational, Sunday 8:30 a.m. Christian Science Society 10:45 a.m. SundayMarketplace Wednesday Testimonials 7:45 p.m. on last Wed. of Month The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Sun. 9 a.m., on St. Thomas . 776-2379 Sun., 5 p.m., STJ, Lumberyard Cruz Bay Baptist Church Sunday 11 a.m., 6 p.m. 776-6315 Emmaus Moravian Church Coral Bay, Sun. 9 a.m. 776-6713 Jehovah’s Witness 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; 7 p.m. Saturdays (Espaol), 10 a.m. Sundays, 340-715-0530 Missionary Baptist Church 9:30 a.m. Sunday Services, 10:45 Worship, Tuesday 7 p.m. Bible Study 693-8884 Nazareth Lutheran Church Sunday 9 a.m., Sunday School 8 a.m. 776-6731 Our Lady of Mount Carmel Sat. 6 p.m., Sun. 7:30 & 9:30 a.m., Spanish Mass 5:30 p.m.; Monday and Tuesday, 7 p.m.; Wednesday and Friday, 8:30 a.m. 776-6339 St. John Methodist Church Sunday 10 a.m, 693-8830 Seventh Day Adventist Saturdays, 779-4477 St. John Pentecostal Church Sunday 11:05 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays Prayer 7:30 p.m., Thursdays Bible Study 7:30 p.m. 779-1230 St. Ursula’s Episcopal Church Sunday 9 a.m.; Bible Class, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. 777-6306 Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 9:45 a.m. Sunday, 776-6332 Word of Faith Church Word of Faith International Christian Center, Sundays 7:30 a.m. Gifft Hill SchoolCall 774-8617 Church Directory Barbara’s maternal grandfather, Governor who served the islands well (1930-1935). The program will be on Tuesday, February 8, at 7 p.m. at the Bethany Moravian Church. In our conversations, the genuine love and concerns which Governor Pearson held for these island were made very clear. He especially gained respect and admiration for all St. Johnians, including those people isolated in the Coral Bay and East End quarters. I urge everyone to attend this program which is based on materials the Groves have gathered from the Governor’s personal papers. These two encounters led me to the need to honor and remember the people of Coral Bay and East End quarters, who toughed that the surrounding seas and earth provided by our higher power gave them the greatest contentment of life. The surrounding bays and seas were teemto friends and neighbors. Their neighbors in turn would give them excess fruits and vegetables from their gardens. Generally they were involved in reciprocal “gift-giving” wherein people would give whatever they had in excess and bring back the gifts or things that the recipient had in excess. Some people made baskets which were taken to the St. Thomas Cooperative for cash. Others made charcoal for exchange or sale. While still others gathered sand, rock, and gravel for sale on St. Thomas. That contentment and satisfaction are sorely lacking in our world today and we need to appreciate what we have and where it comes from. Talk to St. Johnians or Virgin Islanders caring and sharing that caused these East Enders to reject programs like the CCC and to earn the respect and love of all who visit here including Governor Paul M. Pearson.Black History Month Continued from Page 2

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St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 19 Public Notice Cruz Bay Watersports 776-6857Watersports Jobs! snorkeling, sailing trips to the BVI, etc. Growing watersports company has immediate openings: Employment SUZUKI ISLAND CAR FOR SALE: Partially Renovated $1500 OBO Richard 340-642-5358 RELIABLE MOBILE AUTO REPAIR: Professional and experi enced. Brakes, CV Joints, Suspensions, Shocks, Alternators, Timing Belts, General Engine, Repair, Foreign & Domestic. All Work Guaranteed. Call 227-9574 Land For Sale Commerical Space Available COMMERCIAL SPACE AVAILABLEAt The LumberyardUNUSUAL OPPORTUNITYfirst floor space availableDowntown Cruz Bay Where St. John Does BusinessFor Space Call Nick 340-771-3737 Next Classied DEADLINE: Thursday, February 10th Employment SCENIC PROPERTIES 340-693-7777 Cruz Bay: Large three bedroom house, w/d, great view, $3500.00 Coral Bay: One bedroom, one bath, $1250.00 For Rent SAL VAGED: 42-foot ketch Desperado in Coral Bay Harbor at 18.20.72 North and 64.42.80 West. Registration # 1562-TB. Hull I.D. 7292101. Call Richard Conners 340-244-6649. EVERYTHING YOU NEED ON EVERY LEVEL GREAT PLACE TO SHOP, DINE AND WORK COME JOIN US WE HAVE SPACES AVAILABLE RETAIL or OFF ICE 340-776-6455 FISH BA Y LONG TERM AVAILABLE NOW :Furnished 3/2 native stone home w/covered decks, View w/privacy on 1.22 ac. 3k/mo 970-382-6683 Cruz Bay-Nice, furnished house, great view, 2 Bedrooms A/C, 2 Bath, W&D. Pets considered. March 1. $1950/mo. Year lease. (340) 690-4532 For Sale Used on one house and stored, good condition, over one hundred panels, scaffold brackets included. Call for pricing and leave message. (340) 693-8991 or (508) 509-4002 SYMONS RESI-PLY FORMING PANELS FOR SALE CARET AKER Reliable caretaker available to take care of your property while living on premises. Estate experience. Local references. (340) 714-7076. Vehicle For Sale Notice Year round, reliable, experienced with a vehicle. Repairs, painting, landscaping, etc. Refs. available. $20/hour. Gerry Londergan 643-2541 or 776-6579. IN SOUTHEAST DOMINICA, BOETICA 16.5 serene, ocean-view acres of cultivated farm land and virgin forests. $164,000. 5.2 abutting acres, $69,000. Contact Tina Alexander 767-449-8593 or www.islandguests.com Com/Ofce/Storage Services Timeshare SUNSET RIDGE VILLAS April 30 to May 14 (timeshare weeks 18 & 19), Sat Sat Sleeps 6. Two separate buildings with private courtyard and plunge pool. Large common pool overlooking Cruz Bay and St. Thomas. Rent $3,000 or buy for $12,000. Call 717-203-3716 or Mongoose Junction, starting at $370/mo. Bright, secure building AC, Ample parking 693-7040 STORAGE: SECURED LOCKERS Sizes to 10’ x 12’ Autos, Boats, Trailers. Call For Rates: 779-4445 www.properyachts.com COMMERCIAL SPACES AVAILABLE AT RAINTREE COURT large or small retail or Call Albert at 693-8590

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20 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 ALCHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS Alcoholics Anonymous meets as scheduled: Sundays, 9:45 a.m. at Hawksnest Bay Beach; Closed meetings for alcoholics only at Nazareth Lutheran Church in Cruz Bay at 6 p.m on Tuesdays; Open meetings on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 6 p.m. at Nazareth Lutheran Church; Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6 p.m. at Moravian Church, Coral Bay. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS Narcotics Anonymous has open meetings from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. every Saturday at St. Ursula’s Church. AL-ANON MEETINGS Al-Anon meets on St. John every Tuesday at 1 p.m. at the p.m. at St. Ursula’s Multi-purpose center. ALATEEN MEETINGS Alateen will meet on Mondays at St. Ursula’s Church from 6 to 7 p.m. and is open to anyone interested in attending. Monday, February 7 St. John School of the Arts will kick off the sale of Gourmet Market at The Marketplace. fessionals who will teach island fourth graders singing, dancing, puppetry and choreography to produce a show entitled “Dream, Wish, Believe,” dur ing a meeet and greet in front T uesday, February 8 The St. John Historical Society will take “A Look Back,” at its next meeting at the Bethany Moravian Church at 7 p.m. W ednesday, February 9 The Island Green Building Association will host a public The Marketplace with refreshments at 5 p.m. and the speaker from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. A meeting of the St. John Committee of the V.I. Coastal Zone Management Commission has been scheduled for 6 p.m. at the Julius E. Sprauve School. Thursday, February 10 Parents and students are invited to hear Chris Teare speak about “The Road to College: A Parent’s Eye View,” sponsored by Friends of the Elaine I Sprauve Library at 7 p.m. at the library. Monday, February 14 Love City’s own Barefoot Minister Anne Marine Porter is hosting a free marriage vow renewal ceremony at Trunk Bay Beach at 5 p.m. Friday, February 18 Five Broadway professionals along with island fourth graders will put on two shows at the Westin Resort ballroom. be for St. John “Angels,” followed by a reception and then a gourmet dinner at an island restaurant. The 8 p.m. show is open to the public. Saturday, February 19 St. John Relay for Life will T uesday, February 22 The next STT/STJ Chamber of Commerce St. John Chapter meeting will be on at 5:30 p.m. at Ocean Grill Upstairs. St. John Tradewinds welcomes notices of community-orient “BOTTOMS UP!”ACROSS leader in stolen bases cation talk stations soup DOWN strokes henchman PREMIER Crossword

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St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 21 ST. JOHN TRADEWINDS SUBSCRIPTIONSCALL 340-776-6496 WE ACCEPT VISA OR MASTERCARD Providing professional rental management and marketing services for St. John’ s finest vacation villas and condominiums.For reservations For St. John or brochures business call1-800-338-0987 340-776-6152Vi e w o u r v i l la s a t w w w . c a r i b b e a n v i l l a . c o m Lumberyard Complex P .O. Box 458 St. John USVI 00831 C a r i b b e a nV i l l a s & R e s o r t sM A N A G E M E N T C O . EXCLUSIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICE IN THE VIRGIN ISLANDSOfce: 340 714 5808 Cell: 340 642 5995www.StJohnVIRealEstate.com DH@DH. ISLA VISTAExceptional 5 bedrm, 4.5 bath Gated Villa atop Caneel Hill. Seller is Licensed Real Estate Broker.VILLALLUREImpressive 5 bedrm, 7 bath European Style Villa in Coral Bay Contact DEBBIE HAYES, GRI, Your Licensed U.S. Virgin Islands Real Estate Broker DebbieHayes-TW 11.15.2010.indd 1 11/2/10 6:59:46 PM (340) 774-3939 fax www.usvi-realestate.com tel (340) 774-3939 Located at Caneel Hill Excellent business opportunity. Well established res taurant and minigolf course. Breath taking views of Pills bury sound and St Thomas from dining terrace, no better place to enjoy a good meal and view the sunset. Zoned B-2 which allows a multitude of commercial uses; ie retail, hotel,condos,apts., plenty of room for any of these uses on this 1.11 acre parcel.Adjacent 1 acre B-2 parcel avail able. Just Reduced to $3,900,000 Spectacular view location for variety of B-2 uses. Hotel, condo, retail, offices, or a combination of all suits this one of a kind lot. Owner has plans for condo/hotel development, with feasibility study and preliminary plans. Zoning allows for 80 persons per acre, for a multi-story de velopment. Panoramic views of Pillsbury Sound and West to St. Thomas, and south to St Croix. Minutes from Cruz Bay. Just Reduced to $2,800,000 Waterfront lot located on Chocolate Hole Pond. Easily accessible lot with gentle slope to waters edge, easy build.. Located a stones throw away from the planned prestigious high end Pond Bay Club Development. This quiet residential neighborhood has great breezes and deeded access to Chocolate Hole beach. $475,000 Mostly Flat 1/2 acre + lot, part of Guavaberry Farms Sub-division. Overlooks fresh water pond, off main road for easy access. Good breezes and quiet neighborhood with covenants and restrictions. Last lot in 7 parcel sub-division. $185,000 Spectacular view from this 1/2 acre + Fortsberg lot(s). Moderate grade, with sweeping views of East End,Tortola, and Coral Bay. Easy access off main sub-division road. Priced to sell at $350,000. Adjacent 1/2 acre lot also available for joining parcels together to make a very private 1 acre + lot for Just $700,000. PLEASE VISIT OUR NEW OFFICES LOCATED AT 6B CANEEL HILL ADJACENT TO ASOLARE RESTUARANT, THE GATEWAY TO THE VIRGIN ISLANDS NATIONAL PARK, OR CONTACT ANDY RUTNIK AT 340-774-3939 or EMAIL:ANDREWRUTNIK@GMAIL.COM TWO INCREDIBLE THREE-ACRE HILLSIDE LOTS– Adjacent to National Park lands (and short walk to the beach) with spectacular views of Francis Bay and west (sunsets). Gentle grade, and easy build. These lots are ideal/unique for one seeking a private estate/ compound within the National Park, desiring lots of land /gardens/privacy with convenient beach access. – Inquire about February 24th bid deadline and March 10th Auction (and *(Nearly 3 acre Beachfront access lot available separately for $3.8 million.)* CALL TODAY340-774-3939 St. John TRADEWINDS Newspaper Send Check Payable to Tradewinds Publishing, P.O. Box 1500, St. John, VI 00831 1 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION $70.00 USD Name ____________________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________

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We ’ re Sold on St. John! .cruzba yrealty .com Gretchen Labrenz Margie Labrenz Susanne Kir kT amm y P olloc kF ounded in 1985 CBR HOME LISTINGSGOLDEN DRAGON – Beautiful stone villa w/exceptional craftsmanship. 4 bds/4 baths, innity pool, multi patios & decks, lush gardens, Pt. Rendezvous location. Reduced to $1,925,000. LIZARD HILL – A one of a kind villa, high above Cinna mon Bay & surrounded by Nat’l Pk. land. Enjoy the exclu sive privacy, views to die for, gorgeous gardens, & easy access from this 3 bd/3 bath, with pool & caretaker’s cot tage nestled on over 1 acre in Catherineberg. $3,100,000. BLUE TANG – Charming, turnkey, rental villa in Great Cruz Bay. Privacy, vibrant sunsets, 60' covered deck overlooking sunny pool, 2 bd/2 baths, great kitchen, excellent oor plan, & terric location. $1,295,000. GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY – Apt. building w/adjacent parcels in Cruz Bay, newly renovated & well maintained. Only $490,000. WATERFRONT with DOCK – Masonry 3 bed/2bath home on lg. at lot, with direct access to Fish Bay at your doorstep. Now only $920,000. AURORA – Enjoy 180 views, from Great Cruz to St. Thomas, from this masonry 4 bd/ 4 bath villa in Contant Pt. Great privacy, pool, multiple outdoor patios, excellent vacation rental history. $1,995,000. VILLA ROMANCE – New, exquisitely crafted, luxury villa, features a 30’ pool in a tropical courtyard setting, 4 private bed/bath suites, chef’s kitchen, A/C, gated entry & custom details throughout. All the bells & whistles for $2,150,000. GREAT EXPECTATIONS – 7 bd/7.5 baths, 2 swimming pools, 2 hot tubs, tennis court, walk to Chocolate Hole beach, impressive vacation rental history. $2,999,500. CHEZ SHELL – Charming 3 bd/3 bath, w/ gorgeous sun set views & prime Great Cruz Bay location. This beautifully decorated & maintained rental villa has marble oors, A/C, custom cabinetry, inviting spa & excellent oor plan. $999K. CALYPSO del SOL – Successful rental villa w/excellent Chocolate Hole views, 3 bd/bath suites, A/C, newer masonry construction, beautiful pool & hot tub, terric lg. screened porch. $1,950,000. REDUCED! – Well built Bordeaux Mt. home w/ 3 bd/2 bath, lg. covered porch, southerly views, lg. trees, very gentle slope, room for expansion. $525,000. CHOCOLATE HOLE – Unique ruins of 1700’s Great House, with a 1960’s home on a beautiful 1.42 acre lot. $799,000. POINT RENDEZVOUS – Newer masonry villa w/easterly views to Ram Head, 3 bd, 2 baths, lg. covered deck, spa, vacation rental history, room for expansion. $1,595,000. REDUCED! REEF BAY VIEW – Absolutely stunning easterly views of the Nat’l. Pk. & cooling tradewinds, can be yours. 4 bd/3 bath, pool, spa, rental history. $1,395,000. WINDSONG – Stately Boatman Pt. villa, w/separate cottage, situated on a 1ac parcel w/panoramic views. 6 bdrms., 7 baths, huge pool, fully furnished. $3,495,000. A BEST BUY! – Well built, poured concrete cottage w/ lovely covered wraparound porch in Est. Carolina. Tile oors, louvered windows w/complete hurricane shutters, at lot for gardening & concrete slab in place for future garage & expansion. Only $349,000. STONE HOUSE – Spectacular Coral Bay views, 3 bd/ 3 baths, gorgeous stonework, covered rotunda, freeform pool, vacation rental history, easy access. $1,620,000. BOATMAN POINT – Masonry 4 bd. home on spectacular 1 ac. waterfront site with amazing views & outstanding neighborhood. $2,795,000.CBR BUSINESS LISTINGSJOE’S DINER – St. John’s oldest restaurant is looking for a new owner. Serving breakfast, lunch & drinks since 1972, and located in the center of Cruz Bay. Call CBR. FABRIC MILL – Very successful Mongoose Junction business, est. 1982. $150,000 includes inventory, equip ment, & owner will train. SILVER IGUANA – Beachfront shop w/eclectic collection of sterling silver jewelry & locally crafted gifts. $75,000.CBR CONDO LISTINGSLAVENDER HILL – Tropical 2 bd/2bath penthouse unit w/wrap-around deck, pool & sunset views. $849,000. BETHANY CONDO – Spacious, free-standing 2 bd/2 bath unit w/ amazing views, new common pool. $449,000. CRUZ VIEWS CONDO – Nice 2 bedroom unit w/full A/C, sunset views, common pool, good rental history. $475,000. SELENE’S – Ideal in town location, w/parking, for living/ rental or business. Terric views. Reduced to $399K!CBR LAND LISTINGSLUSH BORDEAUX MT. parcels w/views. $150K–$285K. SUNSET VIEWS – close to town, easy build. Only $215K. LOTS TO CHOOSE FROM in Fish Bay – Starting at $108K. KLEIN BAY – Prestigious area w/common beach. $675K. SIDE-BY-SIDE at parcels in Johnston Bay – $220K ea. CAROLINA, EDEN, CALABASH – Nice selection of affordable parcels. Starting at $99K. CRUZ BAY TOWN – Walk to Frank Bay, R-4 zoning. $249K. GLUCKSBERG – Gentle grade, 1/2 ac., lg. trees. $125K. ZOOTENVAAL – Hurricane Hole views, paved road. $400K. GREAT CRUZ BAY – Prime 1.05 acre site w/fantastic harbor views & architectural plans. A steal at $595K. WATERFRONT on MONTE BAY – Spectacular 13.44 ac. site, ideal for private estate or subdivision. $2,900,000. AFFORDABLE PARCELS – in Est. Grunwald & Adrian. Easy building sites, close to town. Starting at $89,000. Call Today! BANK OWNED PARCELS – Chocolate Hole, priced to SELL! $261,500 & 235,000. GREAT BUYS ! DITLEFF POINT – Extraordinary sites on magnicent peninsula w/sandy beach, gated entry, beautiful landscap ing, and incredible views. Prices start at $695,000. PT. RENDEZVOUS – Outstanding views. $415K. SEASCAPE – Fabulous location on Bovacap Point! Spacious 2 bd main house w/lap pool & spa, plus a separate care taker’s cottage. Panoramic views, privacy & sucessful vacation rental. $1,095,000. CONTRACTED CONTRACTED CONTRACTED

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HOMES AMANI Spectacular 180 views, prestigious Maria Bluff, 3BR/3BR in the main building, plus guest cottage $1,795,000 WATERFRONT RETREAT Privateer Bay. 3BR/3BA casual beach house steps from the water. Paved roads & u/g utilities. $975,000 APPROXIMATELY 150' FROM THE WATER at Pebble Beach with fabulous water views! Beautiful woodwork; upper level is a 3 BR unit & lower is a 1 BR unit. $675,000 SUSANNABERG! New masonry home on FLAT lot plus separate rental cottage. Borders Nat’l Park. $750,000 RAINBOW PLANTATION A private, family estate house on 1.6 acres. Features one of the largest private pools on St. John (w/diving board & wet bar). PRICE REDUCED $1,095,000 NEW IN CAROLINA Masonry 2x2 main house with 2x1 lower apt & separate cottage. Complete solar systems. Paved driveway, valley views. $600,000 BAREFOOT New 2BR/1.5BA cottage in quaint neighborhood. $599,000. NEW! IXORA on Ajax Peak, bordered by Natl. Pk, adjacent to North Shore beach access, 3 pavilions linked by decks and walkways, lap pool, 5 bdrms. $1,700,000 UNBELIEVABLE NEW PRICE FOR BLUE HEAVEN! Cute Caribbean home overlooking Rendezvous Bay. Popular vacation rental. 3BR/3BA. $527,000 FUN & CONTENTMENT 180 views. Tiled pool deck, 2 large AC. suites & mahogany hardwoods. Plans for 3 more bdrms. $1,235,000 NEW! “MILES AWAY ”Immaculate 2BR, 2.5 BA masonry villa w/ pool, successful short term rental, in prestigious Point Rendezvous. $1,450,000 MAMEY PEAK 1.05 acres, 1x1 Main House and 1x1 Guest Cottage. Flat slope and stunning views. One of a kind fixer upper!!! $795,000 NEW! Caribbean cottage in Carolina, that currently caters to short term rental guests. Price includes adjacent vacant lot for expansion. $599,000 MILL RIDGE Attention to detail, Classic Caribbean architecture, masonry 2 bedroom, 2 bath, office/3rd bedroom, garage & pool. $1,595,000 ZOOTENVAAL! Newly built multi unit tasteful masonry home sited on 1.36 FLAT acres. Expand or subdivide. Private with large yard. $925,000 NEW IN CAROLINA! Beautiful, peaceful mostly flat parcel with end of road privacy. Masonry 3x2 upper unit and 1x1 lower unit. $750,000 UNBEATABLE VALUE! ALLESANDRA Luxurious masonry villa, renovated in 2007, views of 3 bays, 3BR/3BA, 2 car garage REDUCED TO $1,769,000 SOLAR POWERED BED & BREAKFAST! “Garden By The Sea” is a quaint Caribbean home. Owners’ apartment & 3 income producing A/C units. $1,800,000. NEW! Income producing 2 unit in Chocolate Hole. Large flat yard, walking distance to Chocolate Hole Beach. $875,000 PRICE SLASHED FOR NORTH SHORE ! Cinnamon Day Dreams, 3 BR/2.5BA, in Nat’l Pk boundaries in Catherineberg. 1 acre. Rare offering at $1,795,000. CONDOS . HOMES . LAND . FRACTIONALS . COMMERCIALView all St. John MLS properties at our website at www.americanparadise.com Voted “BEST REAL ESTATE AGENCY ON ST. JOHN” 2008 VILLA TESORI Luxurious custom home, uncompromising quality, exquisite finishings, sweeping views. 5BR/5BA. $4,250,000 AMOROSA A brilliant Tuscan inspired villa in Peter Bay. Sweeping views, deeded walking path to the beach, 4BR, 5BA. Live webcam & virtual tour @ americanparadise.com $7,450,000 CVISTA Magnificent open air 4 bdrm villa above Rendezvous Bay. Stunning residence exudes comfort, class & elegance. $3,895,000 AMARILLA VILLA 3 BR, 3.5 BA villa, superior craftsmanship, Spanish tile roof, 180 views, large pool & hot tub $2,595,000 MYSTIC RIDGE 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath, dramatic views, short distance to North Shore beaches, cooling breezes $1,990,000. INFO@HolidayHomesVI.com TOLL FREE: WWW.HOLIDAYHOMESVI.COM “ HALF MOON HOUSE” Reef Bay Beachfront is the dramatic setting for this uniquely modern home. Extremely private with incomparable views and master ful construction throughout, this 5 bedroom, 4.5 bath home is an artistic statement in a world class setting. “ RIVENDELL” , a Peter Bay Villa of classic style. 4 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, walk to the beach and great views make this a super package. “VILLA ANDREA” in gated Virgin Grand Estates HAS IT ALL! Panoramic water views in a private setting, 4 master suites, A/C throughout, and a large pool with expansive decks. WATERFRONT ON DEVERS BAY! “CHOCOLATE BLISS” (5x5) Private, extremely quiet masonry/ stone home has all the amenities one would desire on over an acre of gently sloped land. “VILLA M ARBELLA” Own this stunning 3 bedroom and 3.5 bath custom Virgin Grand Estates villa. View pool and large veranda. Great rentals & sunsets over St. Thomas & Pillsbury Sound. One level living w/ fabulous Great room! WATERFRONT ”LA DOLCE VITA” is an exceptionally charming 2 bdrm property on the water’s edge with the possibility of boat mooring. 376 ft. pristine shoreline. Panoramic. W-1 zoning allows commercial uses. FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF ALL ST. JOHN MLS PROPERTIES, DVD TOURS OF THE PROPERTIES, AND/OR A COPY OF OUR NEWSLETTER CALL OR E-MAIL US. “The Company that gives back to St. John”$2,890,000 “SEABISCUIT” is a winner! Charming 2x2 Caribbean style masonry villa with panoramic views, very private pool & hot tub. Breezy location convenient to Coral Bay. Walk to shoreline watersports. “SAGO COTTAGE” adorable Caribbean style masonry cottage with wonder ful down island views and great rental history. CORAL BAY INCOME PRODUCER Beautiful water view from both decks of well built home. Flexible oorplan can be 2 units or combined as 3 bedroom home. Convenient to town! Great rental! “ FISH BAY” 4X2 INCREDIBLE VALUE! Huge panoramic views and a quiet, private, breezy location that borders Nature Conservancy property make this home a must see! UPPER CAROLINA 3X3 – Recently upgraded & well kept house with 3 income producing units. Easy access to Cruz Bay and beaches. DVD $995,000 Call for details $5,750,000 DVD G RANDE B AY R ESORT: In-town 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom corner condo. Terric views of harbor & walk to shops. Fully-furnished featuring pool, exercise room, underground parking, and elevators. $949,000 $2,400,000 $1,995,000 $2,500,000 $975,000 $689,900 DVD $595,000 $595,000 DVD DVD NEW LISTING OWN A MONTH (OR MORE) in a 3 or 4 bedroom luxury home. Magnicent views and sunsets from 3 homes with all amenities, pools w/waterfalls and spas. Deeded 1 month ownerships from $59,000 WESTIN RESORT TIMESHARES: Own a week, a month, or more & enjoy all the resort amenities! Most unit sizes and weeks available. Priced from $3,750 “MILL VISTA – CAROLINA” Easy access & build on Centerline Rd. $ 115,000 “FISH BAY” Views, breezes and paved access $ 260,000 “LEAST EXPENSIVE WATERFRONT”! Gentle slope, 4 min. walk to beach $ 285,000 “SUGAR APPLE WEST” Harbor views gentle ac. with Topo $ 299,000 “CONTANT” lot with Great Cruz Harbor View. Owner Realtor $ 375,000 “CALABASH BOOM” .4 ac. GREAT views, private. Topo map $ 475,000 “BOATMAN POINT WATERFRONT” Sunset Views and Gentle Site. $ 1,095,000 “ ESTATE CONCORDIA” hillside sites with stunning views ranging from the BVIs, down St. John’s eastern coast to Ram’s Head , St. Croix. From $335,000 “ UPPER MONTE BAY ESTATES” 7 Spectacular private parcels above Rendezvous Bay; paved road, stone walls & underground utilities. From $799,000 “ NORTHSHORE PROPERTIES” Peter Bay & Hawksnest/ Denis Bay exquisite home sites with breathtaking views over the North Shore, BVI & many cays in between. Call for a tour today. Call for Prices “ PETER BAY ESTATES” Exquisite home sites with breathtaking views over the North Shore, BVI & cays between. Prices from $1,750,000 BEST BUY BEACH FRONT “GREAT CRUZ BAY” private dock access, quiet upscale neighborhood, awesome views. Owner/broker. PRICE REDUCED. $1,300,000 $998,000 EAST END LAND Parcels in Privateer Bay and on far East End. Coral Bay views and underground utilities. From $265,000 “ CHOCOLATE HOLE” Breezes and views to St. Thomas. From $285,000 “VIRGIN GRAND ESTATES” Gated sub-division, sunset views. Can build FRACTIONAL HOME! Paved roads. 3 from $499,000 “ LOVANGO CAY” Waterfront & hillside properties; upscale amenities including barge docks, paved roads, undrgrd utilities beach & views. From $275,000 SELLER FINANCING WITH GREAT TERMS! “HAULOVER” BEACHFRONT 3.71 acre sub-dividable borders National Park! AMAZING VIEWS! $1,900,000 “SABA BAY” WATERFRONT & HILLSIDE Incredible BVI views! 12 acre sub-divideable waterfront lot for $9,999,000 plus 4 hillside lots available from $699,000 “DREEKETS BAY ESTATES” spectacular BVI views, excellent roads, underground utilities, stone walls, planters, common beach. Minutes from Coral Bay. 12 lots from $399,000 Ask about “MUST SELL BEST BUY” SITUATIONS Call or email today for info! CONTRACTED CONTRACTED UNDER CONTRACT HH-TW 2.7.2011.indd 1 2/3/11 3:03 PM

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24 St. John Tradewinds, February 7-13, 2011 Friends of the V.I. National Park Celebrate Year of Success at 7th Annual Gala See full story next issue.


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