Citation
St. John tradewinds

Material Information

Title:
St. John tradewinds
Alternate title:
Saint John tradewinds
Portion of title:
Tradewinds
Uncontrolled:
St. John tradewinds newspaper
Place of Publication:
St. John, V.I
Publisher:
[Tradewinds Newspaper Inc.]
Tradewinds Newspaper Inc.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly[1998-]
Monthly[ FORMER <1979-1987 (Jan).>]
Bimonthly[ FORMER 1987 (Feb)-1997]
bimonthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 35 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Saint John (V.I.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States Virgin Islands -- Saint John

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Description based on: vol. 3, no. 5, May 1979; title from caption.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering varies.
General Note:
Successor to The St. John Drum.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Tradewinds Newspaper Inc.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
52130251 ( OCLC )

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Full Text


December 20-January 2, 2011
� Copyright 2010/2011


ST. JOHN


The Community Newspaper Since 1972 * St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands


The Perfect,
Last-Minute
Holiday Gift:
St. John

Magazine
The fifth edition of St.
John Magazine hit island
newsstands on Thursday
night, December 16.
The stunning underwater
photo cover is by St.
John photographer Steve
Simsonsen. Simonsen's
photographs have appeared
on all five covers of the
magazine.



St. John Tradewinds News Photo
Graphic Courtesy of MaLinda Media


Westin
Breeze
Hits Reef
Some of 23 Staff
Members Injured
Page 2

kTjhiii


Sis Frank Leaves
Lifetime of Love
and Memories
Page 4



REMEMBER.

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2 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011


Westin's Breeze Runs Aground


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Less than two weeks after the
General II ran aground on a rocky
outcropping near the entrance to
Enighed Pond Marine Facility, a
Westin Resort and Villas ferry ran
hard aground in the same area on
Friday morning, December 16.
The 71-foot Westin Breeze had
23 passengers, one crew member
and the captain on board when it
went hard aground right inside of
the red buoy off Moorehead Point.
"We had 23 associates on the
boat," said Westin Resort manager
Mike Ryan. "It was our associate
run from St. Thomas."
The passengers and the one
crew member were evacuated
from Westin Breeze by local boat-
ers and brought to the resort where
they were checked out by St. John
Rescue officials, explained Ryan.
"We had all of our associates
checked out here at the hotel by
St. John Rescue and Dr. James
Clayton who were on the prop-
erty," said Ryan. "They were also
all transported to Myrah Keating
Smith Community Health Center
for follow up examinations."
Myrah Keating Smith Commu-
nity Health Center officials con-
firmed last week that some passen-
gers were being treated for back
and neck strains.
"We're seeing people with back
strain and neck sprains," said the
MKSCHC official. "There are
no life threatening injuries or se-
vere bleeding or anything. We're
just doing X-Rays and looking at
sprains and strains."


Tradewinds News Photo by Mares Crane

The ferry was carrying 23
associates from St. Thomas
when it ran aground, above,
Friday morning, December
16.

U.S. Coast Guard officials re-
ceived a call around 9:15 a.m. on
December 16 that a vessel was in
distress in the area of Moorehead
Point, according Roberto Castro-
dad, USCG spokesperson.
"As the information came in,
we found out we were dealing
with a passenger vessel," Castro-
dad said. "The vessel was heading
to St. John and had entered the
channel just off Moorehead Point
when it went hard aground. There
were several vessels on the scene
assisting and taking passengers off
the ferry."
USCG officials deployed their
25-foot response boat from its
Marine Safety Detachment in St.
Thomas, Castrodad explained.
"When our Coast Guard boat ar-
rived on scene all of the passengers
and the one crew member were off
of the boat and the only one on the
vessel was the captain," said the
USCG spokesperson. "Our per-
sonnel went on board to see what
was going on and they saw that
the vessel was taking on water."
A vessel from the St. Thomas


P 1


EDITOR/PUBLISHER
MaLinda Nelson
mahnda@tradewinds.vi

NEWS EDITOR
Jaime Elliott
jaime@tradewinds.vi

WRITERS
Andrea Milam, Mauri Elbel

ADVERTISING
advertising@tradewinds.vi

CIRCULATION
Rohan Roberts


COLUMNISTS
& CONTRIBUTORS
Sis Frank, Chuck Pishko,
Malik Stevens, Adam Lynch,
Tristan Ewald, Paul Devine,
Andrew Rutnik

SUBSCRIPTIONS
U.S. & U.S.V.I. only
$70.00 per year

THIRD CLASS PERMIT
U.S. Postage PAID
Permit No. 3
St. John, VI 00831


NEWSLINE
Tel. (340) 776-6496
Fax (340) 693-8885
www. tradewinds. vi
editor@tradewinds.vi

MAILING ADDRESS
Tradewinds Publishing
P.O. Box 1500
St. John, VI 00831

� COPYRIGHT 2010/2011
All rights reserved No reproduction of
news stories, letters, columns, photo-
graphs or advertisements allowed without
written permission from the publisher


marine salvage company Sea Tow
was en route to the scene of the ac-
cident, according to Castrodad.
"Sea Tow was on its way to see
if it was possible to salvage the
boat," said Castrodad. "There was
no indication of the vessel leaking
oil or fuel but that is one of the
things that we'll be monitoring.
We'll be investigating the cause of
the incident as well."
As of press time, Sea Tow had
removed Westin Breeze from the
reef and was making its way to
Tortola, according to Ryan.
"It's my understanding that at
this time Sea Tow did temporary
repairs and is on its way towing
Westin Breeze to Tortola," said the
resort manager.
Westin Breeze is owned and
operated by Inter-Island Boat Ser-
vices, according to Ryan, who did
not have any information on the
identity of the captain of the vessel
or what caused the accident.
"I have no idea what happened,"
said Ryan. "It's under investiga-
tion."
Ryan thanked local boaters who
helped rescue passengers from the
ferry.
"I want to thank the local boat-
ers who actually rescued the as-
sociates from the boat and trans-
ported them back to the hotel,"
said Ryan.
The ferry grounding capped
a tough several months for Wes-
tin Resort officials as they spent
months recovering from dam-
age to ballrooms, property, tennis
courts and the pool from October
floods.


TRADEWINDS PUBLISHING LLC
The Community Newspaper Since 1972


Christmas Morning at Powell Park
The Annual St. John Serenade in the Park set for Saturday, De-
cember 25, at 5 a.m. at Frank Powell Park in Cruz Bay. Come by
and bring an instrument and that Christmas cheer! Anyone inter-
ested in donating local breakfast items should call 693-8102.

IEK Christmas Concert Set for Dec. 21
The Ivanna Eudora Kean High School Music Department pres-
ents its annual Christmas Concert titled, "A Time to Celebrate" at
6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, December 21, in the cafeteria.

Lionfish Presentation at Maho Dec. 22
Karl Pytlik will be giving a presentation on the lionfish and
CORE's management plan at Maho Bay Camps on Wednesday,
December 22, at 7:30 p.m. in the main dining pavilion.
This will not be a diver training. Pytlik has also invited Ziggy
Livnat to present his documentary, "Learning to Sea," which de-
tails the similarities of sea life in the Red Sea and the Caribbean.
Pytlik will be giving a second presentation at Estate Concordia
Preserve on December 27 at 7:30 p.m.

New Year's Eve Party Set for Kids
Sisterhood/Brotherhood Agenda is hosting a New Year's Eve
Youth Extravaganza at the Housing Parks and Recreation Build-
ing in Cruz Bay on Friday, December 31, from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Parents, please register children in person starting at 8 p.m. Busi-
nesses, please help Virgin Islands youth be safe and successful.
Call Angela at 714-7076 for more information.

Friends of Library Meeting Jan. 12
The public is invited to join Friends of the Elaine I. Sprauve
Library on Jan. 12, at 6 p.m. at the library for its annual meeting.
The featured speaker is Brad Baldridge, of Baldridge College
Solutions, who will speak about financial planning for parents. For
more information call 776-6359.

Donations Needed for St. Thomas

Family Devastated by Explosion

St. John Properties is accepting donations for members of the
David family, who lost everything they own last week after an
explosion at their Bovoni apartment.
Stop by the upstairs office in the St. John Properties Building,
located next to Mongoose Junction, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday to drop off toys, clothing, and more to the
family. There are three girls and five boys, ranging in age from 16
to 1, in addition to the mother in the family.
For more information call St. John Properties at 244-7418.

New 90-day Gross Receipts Tax Amnesty

Period - Deadline Is January 25, 2011
Director of the VI. Bureau of Internal Revenue Claudette Wat-
son-Anderson, CPA, announced last week that the new, 90-day
gross receipts tax amnesty went into effect upon the implementa-
tion of Act 7233, which was signed into law by Governor John
deJongh on October 26.
Watson-Anderson urged taxpayers to file and pay delinquent
gross receipts taxes before the deadline of January 25, 2011. All
delinquent gross receipts returns are eligible for the amnesty.
For more information, call the Delinquent Accounts and Re-
turns Branch on at 715-1040, extension 2232.







St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 3


St. John Tradewinds News Photos by Jaime Elliott


St. John residents of all ages enjoyed the Coral Bay sing-along. Seniors from the
Adrian Senior Citizens' Center, above, sang "O Holy Night." Children swarmed Santa
Claus, at right, after he arrived on the back of a fire truck.



Annual Community Sing-Along Ushers in Christmas in Coral Bay


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Voices singing Christmas carols
and Santa riding in on a fire truck
can mean only one thing in Coral
Bay - the annual Community
Carol Sing and Tree Lighting Cer-
emony.
Residents of all ages from East
End to Mandhal gathered outside
of Sputnik's in Coral Bay for the
annual Community Christmas Pro-
gram on Wednesday, December 15,
at 6:30 p.m. Still spry and looking
dapper in a bright red shirt, George
January lit the tree to get the night
underway.
Emcee Joan Thomas introduced
each neighborhood and kept the
crowd entertained throughout the
night with her witty jokes.
The entire crowd joined to sing
the first carol of the night "Hark
the Herald Angels Sing," followed
by St. John Montessori School stu-
dents who sang impressive rendi-
tions of holiday favorites "Jingle
Bells" and "Frosty the Snow-
man."
Emmaus Moravian Church
members offered renditions of
several Christmas hymns, fol-
lowed by Upper Carolina residents
decked out in antlers, who sang
"Jingle Bells."
Many Upper Carolina residents
came out for the carol sing-along


Upper Carolina residents, above, donned antlers to sing
"Jingle Bells," to get the annual community sing-along
underway.


because of one of their neighbors,
explained Caroline Rogers.
Carey Mercurio, who has been
dealing with serious landslide is-
sues on her property, never thought
about missing the annual event,
she explained.
"I came out because it's a great
time to get together with our won-
derful neighbors and share in the
holiday joy," said Mercurio.
That was all the convincing it
took Rogers, a 25-year St. John
resident, to attend her first ever


community Christmas Program.
"I thought if Carey could make
an effort to come out and do this,
the least I could do was come
down too," Rogers said.
The annual sing-along in Cor-
al Bay dates back more than 50
years, to a time when residents on
the quiet island would gather to
bring some Holiday cheer to the
neighborhood, explained Edmund
Roberts, who gave a short history
of the tradition.
Esteemed educator Guy Benja-


min also discussed the history of
the event and explained how close
neighbors were back in the 1960s.
"If I had sugar and you needed
some, I would give it to you," said
Benjamin.
John's Folly Learning Institute
founder Alvis Christian works
hard to make sure that neighbors
continue to join together in song
each Christmas time.
"This is a tradition that was
started by the elders many years
ago and is what starts the Christ-
mas celebration on the island,"
said Christian. "I want to do my
part to make sure that this tradition
continues."
For Pam Dolson, who read two
passages about the Christmas mir-
acle, it just isn't Christmas without
the annual sing-along.
"This is my Christmas," said
Dolson. "This makes it official for
me. Now it's Christmas."
Joining the celebration for the
first time this year was a group
from the Adrian Senior Citizen's
Center, who sang "O Holy Night,"
and "The Light of the Lord."
Neighbors from John's Folly,
Bordeaux and Calabash Boom also
took their turns singing Christmas
carols. A large group from Skinny
Legs, which donated refreshments
for the evening, sang "I Saw Three
Ships," "Santa Claus is Coming


To Town," and "Winter Wonder-
land."
The whole crowdjoined in sing-
ing "Joy to the World" and flashing
lights from the Coral Bay Fire Sta-
tion across the streets sent children
in a frenzy. Perched on the back of
the truck was Santa Claus himself,
who handed out donated toys to
all of the youngsters and took last
minute requests.




INDEX

Classified Ads ...............22-23
Community Calendar ...........24
Crime Stoppers ...................20
Crossword Puzzle ...............24
Ferry Schedules ............... 22
Letters ......................... 16-17
Police Log ......................... 21
Real Estate .................. 25-27
Rhythm & Views .................12




Thursday, Dec. 30th



340-776-6496



editor@tradewinds.vi







4 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011


St. John Tradewinds News Photo File


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Members of Steel Unlimited with Sis Frank, center, in New York at Lincoln Center, 1974.


Local Legend Sis Frank Leaves Behind


Lifetime of Island Love and Memories


By Mauri Elbel
St. John Tradewinds
When Ruth "Sis" Frank passed
away on Thanksgiving Day, she
left behind a collection of warm
memories which still live on in
the minds and hearts of those who
loved her.
From her unmistakable laugh
and signature "Sis-isms" that
could be heard echoing through
the streets of Cruz Bay for more
than 50 years to her genuine love
of the arts, the island and its chil-
dren, Sis was as much a part of St.
John as it was of her.
"Sis fell in love with the island
people and their culture which she
shared for almost 52 years," said
Jan Kinder, a close friend of 26
years. "My life has been forever
touched by her presence. As our
friendship grew closer over the
years, we began caring for and
loving each other more like fam-
ily."
Phillip "Grasshopper" Picker-
ing, leader of St. John's premier
reggae band Inner Visions and
new member of SJSA Board of Di-
rectors, knew Sis from the time he
was a young boy and throughout


his teenage years playing in Steel
Unlimited, the steel pan band suc-
cess Sis managed alongside band
director Rudy Wells.
"When we looked at Sis, we
never saw color," Pickering said.
"When we looked at Sis, we saw
ourselves. She was one of us and
she embraced us."
From the moment he met Sis,
Pickering recalls the overwhelm-
ing compassion in her eyes and the
unwavering sense of reassurance
and encouragement she provided
to so many of the island's youth
over the years.
"She came to St. John and re-
ally looked at the community and
became a part of it and became a
part of the people," he said. "She
and Rudy took a group of kids
who would normally have been on
the street corner and getting into
trouble and gave them something
to do. Sis is going to be missed
dearly and we will all remember
Sis just as Sis was - as an inspi-
ration to everybody."
Rudy Wells fondly recalls the
time he first met Sis - when she
would come to Cruz Bay Park to
listen to him teach steel pan music


to local youth on weekends.
"She was very impressed by
what I was doing with the chil-
dren," he said. "She asked me if
I was a musician and I told her,
'No, I just do this because as a kid
in Trinidad I got involved in steel
bands and I've been with steel
band all my life'."
After a few months of listening
to Wells creating steel pan music
with the children on the weekends,
a friendship was forged. Soon Sis
organized a scholarship for Wells
which allowed him to study his
passion at the Berklee College of
Music. When he returned six years
later, the two worked together to
make Steel Unlimited and then
Steel Unlimited II the pride and
joy of the island.
"Sis was the person I depended
on - she became a part of this
with me," he said. "She had a love
for children that was unbeatable."
Sis and Wells helped broaden
the horizons for St. John youth -
Steel Unlimited performed at the
Rose Bowl parade, Disneyland,
the Lincoln Center and Shea Sta-
dium while Steel Unlimited II put
Continued on Page 21


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St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011


St. John Community Says Goodbye to Sis Frank


Music wafted from the St. John School of the Arts on Saturday,
December 18, as friends and loved ones celebrated the life of Ruth "Sis"
Frank, who died on November 25. Approximately 500 people gathered
for the memorial party to pay tribute to the SJSA founder, who impacted
countless lives over her more than 52 years on St John. Musicians played
' all afternoon as a slide show of touching personal pictures played. Guy
, I Benjamin, Bonny Corbeil and Phillip "Grasshoppper" Pickering shared
t, - \ memories of Frank, who will be sorely missed. -


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St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Jaime Elliott


While the trailer in BMV parking lot, above, was originally supposed to house a branch
of the V.I. Energy Office, UVI CES will take it over next month.


UVI's CES Opening Office in Bureau

of Motor Vehicles Parking Lot in January


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
University of the Virgin Islands will have a pres-
ence on St. John in the new year.
While the university continues to negotiate with
management of The Marketplace, the school's Co-
operative Extension Services is moving ahead with
plans to open an office in the brightly painted trailer
in the Bureau of Motor Vehicles parking lot, accord-
ing to Carlos Robles, extension specialist and acting
CES supervisor for St. John and St. Thomas.
"The entire university has been in talks with The
Marketplace for a space to meet with program par-
ticipants and distribute information," said Robles.
"CES is currently working on an area near inspection
lane, in the trailer there run by solar power. We are in
the process of getting ready to move into that facility
while we await the facility at The Marketplace."
CES officials will use the office as a space to of-


fer publications about its programs and as place to
meet with its clients in the areas of agriculture, urban
gardening, farming, natural resources and family and
consumer sciences, Robles explained.
"We're also going to offer sewing classes, nutrition
programs and other non-credit courses that everyone
can take for a nominal fee or for free," he said.
Although CES had an office on St. John for years,
officials were forced to shut its doors several years
ago because the space, located above Fashion Palace,
was not handicapped accessible, according to Rob-
les.
UVI's CES St. John office should be open in the
BMV parking lot by the end of January 2011 and of-
ficials hope to be in The Marketplace several months
later, Robles added.
"At The Marketplace, we're looking at the old gym
space on the third floor," he said. "We're hoping to be
over there a few months down the road."


Antonio Powell Arrested for Domestic Violence


St. John Tradewinds
V.I. Police Department officers on
St. John arrested Antonio Powell, 28,
around 8 a.m. Sunday, December 12, and
charged him with Aggravated Assault
and Battery, Domestic Violence.
Powell repeatedly punched a female
victim on her body and face causing cuts
and scratches, according to the initial
police report. The suspect and victim are
romantically involved, police added.


The incident occurred at an Estate
Grunwald residence. The victim was
transported by private vehicle to the My-
rah Keating Smith Community Health
Center for treatment.
Powell is a St. Thomas native who was
residing in Estate Adrian on St. John.
Bail for Powell was denied due to the
domestic violence charge and he was
remanded to the Bureau of Corrections
pending further court action.


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St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 7


Estate Adrian Gas Station Proposal Draws No Opposition


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Unlike plans for a proposed gas station
atop Jacob's Ladder, Guilderoy Sprauve's
public hearing for a zoning variance request
on Tuesday evening, December 14, in order
to build an automated service station on his
Estate Adrian property didn't draw any op-
position.
While only two residents - out of the
three who attended the hearing - spoke
during the meeting, both were in favor of
the project.
"I live about 300 feet up the road and I
think it's a great project," said Brian Smith
said. "I usually feel so upset about where
St. John is today with just one gas station.
I want to hear about how we can assist this
guy to pull this project off."
"We need more than one gas station,"
said Smith.
Julia Sommersall, who also lives nearby,
gave her thumbs-up to the project as well.
"They asked me my concerns about this
project and they were very sensitive to my
feelings," said Sommersall. "Mr. Sprauve
was very informative and told me about this


St. John Tradewinds News Rendering Courtesy of Guilderoy Sprauve


Guilderoy Sprauve of Jixter LLC requested a zoning variance in order to
construct a six-pump automated gas station and convenience store at his
Estate Adrian property, like the rendering above.


meeting. He seems reasonable and I think
the project is workable."
Sprauve presented his plans for a six
pump automated service station and con-


venience store at Parcel No. 17 J-1 Estate
Adrian during a Department of Planning
and Natural Resources zoning variance re-
quest public hearing at St. Ursula's Multi-


purpose Center.
The parcel is currently zoned R-1 (resi-
dential low density) which does not allow
for a gas station. Sprauve is requesting a
variance in order to construct a six-pump
automated gas station and convenience store
on the roughly 20,000-square foot plot.
Sprauve's entire lot is six acres, but he is
only planning to develop the 20,000-square
foot parcel of the land.
The parcel is located on Centerline Road,
adjacent to the Love City Home and Garden
Center, on land previously used by the Sev-
enth Day Adventist Church for evangelistic
meetings. Other than a tent and temporary
stage erected by the church, the property is
empty.
The other side of the property is abutted
by an empty lot, which is also owned by the
Sprauve family, according to the developer.
Much of the area is already home to indus-
try, explained Sprauve, who owns Jixter
LLC with his brother Gerren.
"Every other property in that area is an
industrial operation," Sprauve said.
When creating the project, Sprauve saw
Continued on Page 20


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Chocolate Hole Gas Station Permit Approval

Likely with Long List of Special Conditions


St. John Taxi Medallion Goes

For $50,100 at Public Auction,

Veteran's Goes for $20,100

St. John Tradewinds
Driving a taxi on St. John will put one back a cool $50,100.
That was the winning of two bids received at a Thursday, De-
cember 16, public auction for St. John Taxi Medallions at the Of-
fice of the Lieutenant Governor, according to VI. Taxicab Com-
mission officials.
The opening bid was $35,000, and officials had no problem ob-
taining that. All bidders were pre-approved and Kevin Williams
posted the winning bid of $50,100. He had to post 10 percent on
the spot with the remainder to be paid no later than the close of
business that day.
The V.I. Taxicab Commission was ordered by the VI. Superior
Court to host the public auction, after no one attended a Marshal's
Sale of the medallion, according to Judith Wheatley, the executive
director of the VI. Taxicab Commission.
"The bank had a credit bid and they repossessed the medallion,"
said Wheatley. "The bank can't use the medallion so they hosted
a Marshal's Sale. But they advertised that sale online and no one
showed up."
"So the court ordered the Taxicab Commission to proceed with
the public auction," Wheatley said.
In addition to the public auction, the Taxicab Commission also
hosted its annual Veteran's Medallion auction earlier on Thursday,
December 16.
Edmund Roberts had the sole and winning bid of $20,100 to
take home the medallion. The minimum bid for the Veteran's Auc-
tion was $20,000 and while the Taxicab Commission had many
inquires, Roberts was the sole bidder, Wheatley added.


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
While a proposal to construct a 24-hour gas station
in Estate Chocolate Hole was met with opposition
from most residents, the land is zoned for such uses
and the development looks likely to be okayed.
Nedal Salem, principal of #481-1 Estate Chocolate
Hole Realty Inc., plans to construct a four-pump 24-
hour gas station and a three-story building with a con-
venience store and two apartments on his .473-acre
site adjacent to the Greenleaf Commons parking lot
atop Jacob's Ladder.
At a November meeting with the developer and
Department of Planning and Natural Resources offi-
cials concerning the development, most residents op-
posed the location of the station and raised concerns
over the steepness of the site.
The area, however, is zoned B-3, business scat-
tered, which allows gas stations among myriad other
commercial uses. While the developer's permit is cur-
rently pending, it seemed likely to be approved with
a long list of special conditions, according to DPNR's
terminal facilities coordinator Kent Bernier Jr.
"We took into consideration all of the comments


25th Annual GHS Auction Set for March 12


St. John Tradewinds
The 25th Annual Gifft Hill School Auction will
be Saturday, March 12, at the Westin Resort and


Villas. For more information call the GHS devel-
opment office at 340-776-1730 or email ghsdevel-
opment@mac.com.


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mentioned by residents during the November meet-
ing," said Bernier. "We put those into a list of special
conditions that he must answer, explain, meet and
turn in before he can move forward. We are trying
to make sure that all of our 'I's' are dotted and 'T's'
crossed."
For foes of the project, there is a possibility the de-
velopment could be stopped. Despite having the nec-
essary zoning, overwhelming community opposition
could convince DPNR Commissioner Bob Mathes to
deny the permit, explained DPNR's Division of Com-
prehensive and Coastal Zone Planning director Mar-
jorie Emmanuel.
"We had a similar situation on St. Croix where a
property was rezoned for a particular use, not a gas
station, and then that property was sold to someone
else," said Emmanuel. "The new owner applied for a
gas station which residents in the area were against.
Even though the zoning was correct for the station,
there was overwhelming opposition to the develop-
ment and the developer ended up withdrawing his ap-
plication."
"In this case, it would be a decision by the commis-
sioner," said Emmanuel.







St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 9


First Windmill on St. John


Rises on Bordeaux Mountain


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St. John Tradewinds
Love City's first wind generator
rose more than 40 feet into the sky
last week.
Doug White, who owns Solar
Supply with his wife Leslie, over-
saw the project, while Chris Clark
of Eclectic Electric did the wiring
and Julio's Construction built the
concrete foundation.
The island's first ever wind-
mill, a Skystream 2.4 kW wind
generator, arose on Ellen and Ed-
ward Robert's Bordeaux Mountain
property.
"It's a Skystream 2.4 kW wind
generator on a 45 foot tower," said
White. "It should produce, I would
say, 500 kW hours a month de-
pending on the wind speed. We're
estimating an average of 12 miles
per hour."
"Sometimes it's not blowing at
all up there but 15 to 20 miles per
hour is not unusual either for Bor-
deaux," White said.
After spending more than a year
in the permitting process, watch-
ing the tower rise last week was a
triumph, explained White.
"It took us over a year to get the
necessary permits," he said. "We


The first windmill on St.
John, at left atop a 45-foot
tower, rose on Bordeaux
Mountain last week.

needed a Fish and Wildlife permit,
an earth change permit and a build-
ing permit. We were definitely out
there in the forefront."
The 45-foot tower supports the
windmill's six-foot blades and is
anchored by a concrete footing,
"to keep it from turning over," said
White.
The wind generator shouldn't
emit much noise, but is "very vis-
ible from the Bordeaux lookout,"
said the owner of Solar Supply, the
Skystream dealer in the Virgin Is-
lands.


In addition to the windmill, the
Roberts have also installed a solar
hot water heater and two kW of so-
lar power, White added.
"The Roberts are really com-
mitted to renewable energy and we
kind of pushed the envelope with
this project," he said.
While Robert's is the first wind-
mill on St. John, a second one is
expected to be erected on the south
shore, explained White, who did
not have specifics on the project.
And more wind generators on
St. John are sure to follow.
"I think for the people who live
in areas like Bordeaux, if you have
the wind resources and you can
meet the setback requirements,
it's certainly a viable option for re-
newable energy," said White.
Wind generators must be set
back from the property line one
and half times the height of the
tower, White explained.
"You need a pretty good amount
of property to put up that kind of
wind generator," he said. "There
are other generators that can be put
up in a smaller space."
For more details about the
Skystream windmill or other Solar
Supply products, call 775-7483.


Festival Committee Celebrates with Gift Giving


Julius E. Sprauve
School students show
off some presents they
received from St. John
Festival and Cultural
Organizations members
on Friday, December
17, at the Cruz Bay
public school.
Merry Christmas!





St. John Tradewinds News
Photo by Tom Oat


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10 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011


Stone Masonry Erecting

Modern and Eco Bus

Shelters Across St. John

By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
Four new bus stops on St. John are sure to make taking VIT-
RAN much more enjoyable.
The project was initiated by the Department of Public Works,
which contracted the job to Stone Masonry to the tune of $147,085,
according to St. John Administrator Leona Smith.
The concrete bus shelters are located at Estate Susanaberg,
George Simmons Terrace, the Emmaus Moravian Church and
Estate Hard Labor and all include renewable energy sources, ex-
plained Smith.
"All shelters will have solar panels on the top of the roof, which
will allow the shelters to be lit at night," said the administrator.
"These bus shelters are very sturdy and attractive and I encourage
the public to utilize them."
Next year, DPW officials plan to implement GPS into all VIT-
RAN buses, enabling riders to follow the bus route and know of
any delays in the schedule, Smith added.
"Going forward residents will be able to use GPS next year to
track the movement and time of the bus arrival and departure at
each shelter," said Smith. "This is good news and technology is
the way to go. We are moving in the right direction and other proj-
ects are in the making for this administration on the island of St.
John."


Love City Pan Dragons, above, wowed the crowd gathered at the Westin Resort and
Villas to hear the steel pan group's Christmas Concert.

Love City Pan Dragons Perform Festive Holiday Concert


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
More than 50 residents and visitors joined the Love
City Pan Dragons in kicking off the holiday season
on Sunday afternoon, December 12, with the group's
annual Christmas concert at the Westin Resort and
Villas.
Led by instructor and arranger Samuel Lawrence,
the group played a variety of traditional and local
holiday songs. From the Christmas standard, "O Holy
Night" by Adolph Adams to the upbeat "Pan," by
Cool Session Brass, the crowd was tapping their toes
and bopping their heads to the beat.


The fun even continued between sets when dur-
ing the short intermission, one Love City Pan Dragon
student gave a special show. Taking the baton from
Samuel, the pan player gave a dead-on impersonation
of the one-of-a-kind instructor, which had the whole
crowd in stitches.
The difficulty level of songs rose during the second
set with the Pan Dragons showing off their consid-
erable skill with such songs as "Can Can" by Cole
Porter and "Pan in Mas" composed by Lawrence him-
self.
The program wrapped up with the holiday favorite
"Winter Wonderland" to thunderous applause.


Brenda, Irene, Kim, George Sawyer (special guest artist,) Devin, Jo Anne, Linda, Ron and Rudy


St. John Tradewinds News Photo bV Jaime Elliott


Rudy and Irene Patton wish

to thank you ALL.




We realize that without your support,
sending in your friends, guests and
clients, we would not still be making
our jewelry at Mongoose Junction.
Thirty-seven years and counting!




Happy Holidays from all of us at

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Not 8 Tuff Miles


Relay for Life is A Community


and Family Event, Not a Race


By Jaime Elliott
St. John Tradewinds
With February 19 inching ever closer, organizers
of the first ever St. John Relay for Life continue to
add exciting events to the night's activities, but some
Love City residents are still not clear on the day's in-
tention.
While Relay for Life is the premier American Can-
cer Society fund raising event, the event is not a race,
explained Mary Bartolucci, St. John Relay for Life
event chair.
"Relay for Life is not a race and is not even an ath-
letic event, it is a family, community 18-hour event,"
said Bartolucci. "The theme is that cancer never
sleeps, which is why the event goes through the night.
It started years ago when a physician did a continu-
ous jogging event in order to raise money for cancer
research."
"This is not 8 Tuff Miles," Bartolucci said. "Some-
one from the team just has to be on the track at all
times."
The event, which starts at 4 p.m. on Saturday,
February 19, at the Winston Wells ball field, features
teams of between 12 and 15 participants, who each
raise a minimum of $100 for the American Cancer
Society. During the event, one team member must be
on the track at all times, whether walking, jogging or
running.
The event kicks off at 4 p.m. with an opening cer-
emony followed by survivors taking to the track for
the first lap. Relay for Life focuses on celebrating
survivors and fighting back against cancer, explained
Bartolucci.
"A survivor is anyone who has ever been told 'You
have cancer,' whether they are in treatment or have
finished treatment or not," she said. "They do the first
lap and after that the teams take over with one person
from each team on the track at all times."
Survivors are also in for a treat with the Relay for
Life survivors dinner, which starts at 6 p.m. All sur-
vivors and one caretaker each, should sign up for the
dinner, which is going to be quite a feast.
"It's going to be a beautiful gourmet dinner," said
Bartolucci. "We have Ted Robinson, from Ted's Sup-
per Club, Alex Ewald from La Tapa, the guys from La
Plancha del Mar and Zozo's each doing courses."
At 9 p.m. the night turns emotional with the light-
ing of luminaries, which are lit in honor of those who
have lost their battle with cancer, those who continue
to fight and those who have beaten the disease.
The luminaries are lit at 9 p.m. and will be arranged
on the bleachers to share a special message with the
Relay for Life crowd.
The entire night will be full of games, events, chil-
dren's activities and great music for all ages. Philip
"Grasshopper" Pickering is helming the entertain-
ment committee, so participants can expect the very
best of island entertainment.


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Relay for Life focuses on messages
of hope, celebration and fighting against
cancer.

A stunning show by Cirque-Tacular is sure to be a
highlight of the evening, Bartolucci added.
"The Mongoose Merchants Association is spon-
soring Cirque-Tacular, which is an amazing aerial
troop," said the Relay for Life event chair. "We've
never seen anything like this on St. John. It's going to
be an amazing show."
Music and activities will take participants through
the night until the event wraps up at 10 a.m. with a
closing ceremony.
While many aspects of the event have already been
covered, Relay for Life organizers are still looking for
sponsors, explained Bartolucci.
"The community can help out by forming teams,
and providing donations and sponsorships," said the
event chair. "We need to find accommodations for the
Cirque-Tacular performers, who just need two bed-
rooms for four or five nights."
United Airlines is providing transportation for the
performers, Rocky Coast has offered discounted T-
shirts which Skinny Legs is buying for all teams and
volunteers. St. John Market, which is opening a new
deli, is providing food for the volunteers, explained
Bartolucci.
Survivors should register for the survivors' dinner
by mailing Beverly Biziewski at bevjb@vipowernet.
net or Elaine Estern at elaine@coconutcoaststudeios.
com.
For more information, or to donate or volunteer,
check out the St. John Relay for Life website at www.
stjohnrelay.org or call Bartolucci at 774-1484 or 642-
1629. The group is also Facebook, to sign up and be-
come a fan.


St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 11



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12 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011


Rhythm & Views
An outlook on young adult interests and concerns
by Coral Breuning

Mid-Term Exams and the New Year


St. John Tradewinds
In this ever-changing world I feel you must give
thanks for what you've got, especially during this time
of year. Among many great things, I'd like to give
thanks for the end of hurricane season, holiday break
from school, and the beautiful "winter" weather.
Although I am thankful for our holiday break at
Gifft Hill School, midterm exams always create anxi-
ety over studying. When talking to other students, we
agree that about three weeks before midterms, the
teachers kick it into over-drive and start loading up
the homework.
Students start freaking out because of the excess


work and the building stress of midterm exams. We
students do, however, learn many lessons during
these three weeks.
Procrastination is one of the many lessons we
learn. Everyone procrastinates. It's so easy to put
things on the back burner. You realize the uselessness
of procrastination when you are stuck at one o'clock
in the morning finishing your history projects and lab
reports. I sometimes feel that we need a class on pro-
crastination, because we tend to forget how awful it
is.
A big problem that comes with midterms is test
Continued on Page 20


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St. John TradewindsNews Photo Courtesy of Island Treasure Map
Patty Beach, at left, and Sally Pedrick, at right,
celebrate after winning the 2010 Island Map Contest.



Patty Beach Wins 2010 Island
Treasure Map Contest
St. John Tradewinds
The winner of the 2010 Island Treasure Maps contest is Patty
Beach.
Beach lives on her boat "The Seven Sisters" with her husband
Billy Beach. The two spend their time between Coral Bay, St.
John, St. Croix - where they own a home - and Rochester, New
York where the two hail from.
Beach plans on sharing her prizes with her friend Sally Pedrick
who accompanied her on the five scavenger hunts across St. John
earlier this year to solve the riddle and become eligible for the
contest.
Beach and Pedrick will share a whole pot luck of prizes includ-
ing a week long stay at one of Catered To's villas.
Congratulations to Beach and good luck to next year's Treasure
Map participants who will contend for best photo.














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St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 13


Kwanzaa Celebration Set for Dec. 26 in Cruz Bay


St. John Tradewinds
Sigma Theta Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Al-
pha Sorority, Inc. will host its 16th Annual Commu-
nity Kwanzaa Celebration on Saturday, December 26,
at 6 p.m. at the Franklin Powell Park in Cruz Bay.
The public is cordially invited to join the sorority
members as they take time to celebrate Kwanzaa. The
program has grown tremendously from the first cel-
ebration held in 1995.
This year promises to be festive and fun as in times
past with local artists and students from the various
schools, dancers, and other performers such as the
Love City Leapers, Love City Pan Dragons Youth
Steel Orchestra, St. Thomas Majorettes, to name a
few.
St. John students who participated in Alpha Kappa
Alpha's Earn Set Potential Kids Club will be recog-


nized for their exemplification of the Kwanzaa prin-
ciple Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics) meaning: to
build and maintain stores, shops and other businesses
and to profit from them together.
Over the past four years the students have par-
ticipated in workshops and other activities geared
towards helping them learn how to save and invest
money towards their future.
"Kwanzaa Celebration does not replace Christmas
or other religious holidays, it is a time for us to come
together to reaffirm our commitment in our African
heritage and to focus on the goodness of life, culture,
community and family," said Laurel Hewitt-Sewer,
president of Sigma Theta Omega Chapter.
Additional participants for this program are wel-
come and can contact Elisa Hodge at eghodge@ya-
hoo.com or 774-8675 or 771-5332 22.


Go Wild With Christmas for the Animals on January 8


St. John Tradewinds
The annual fundraising gala to
benefit the islands' only animal
shelter, the St. John Animal Care
Center, will take place in the eve-
ning on Saturday, January 8, at a
breathtaking villa in Estate Choco-
late Hole.
Tickets are on sale now for
$100 each. Event attendees can
submit ticket stubs at the door for
a chance to win a Biras Creek get-
away. Only 150 event tickets will
be sold.
Ticket holders will be shuttled
from the Westin Resort and Vil-
las' time share entrance road to the
fountained courtyard entry of the
sprawling, elegant Hall residence.
With a two-level pool, poolside


bars and large decks, the resi-
dence is a perfect venue to watch
the night rise and to celebrate the
ACC's continued efforts to help
the community and the animals.
As darkness approaches, so
will the wild side. Guests are en-
couraged to support the evening's
"Walk on the Wild Side" theme be
wearing animal inspired clothing.
Dress is "island fancy" and party
favors to adorn outfits will be pro-
vided. Local chefs and restaurants
are providing a menu of delicious
appetizers, salads, entrees and des-
serts.
Prizes will be raffled off as well,
including: Dine Around St. John
packages; three-courses, plus wine
for four people from St. John Ca-


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Alter-cars available irm 3-0 until 5:00
Vacation Camp i open to Wiaod rm idents
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Please call 77-1730 for mere
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plaHned 0F1sringc
'Eeaeh Ia. with Sand Castle
Competilion and Valleyball
* t classes including drawini
painting, sculpture and pottery
@Field daiwith kickball/relay
races/assorted games
*Stor l mae and iounial wrilin
SVisit to te Haliieal Pari le
participate in scheduled activities
*PaI Partat the Headrasteis
house
SNusic. Movement. Improvisalirn
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tering; a one-week stay at the Rose
Estate in Great Cruz Bay; a com-
mission for a custom oil painting
by Livy Hitchcock; a legal Will by
Kathy Depree and more. Winners
need not be present. One event at-
tendee who purchases one or more
raffle tickets may win the Wild
Card prize, a full-day charter on
Southern Hospitality.
Event tickets are available for
sale from the ACC, Catered To,
Connections and St. John Hard-
ware. Raffle tickets can be pur-
chased in advance at www.stjacc.
org.
For more information contact
the ACC at 774-1625 or online
at www.stjacc.org. The ACC is a
501(c)(3) non-profit organization.


Students from Julius E. Spruave School's first
grade got a special visit from Santa Dog during their
weekly reading time at Elaine I. Sprauve Library.

Santa Dog Joins Reading Time

at Elaine L Sprauve Library

St. John Tradewinds
Friends of Elaine I. Sprauve Library volunteers Miles Stair,
Heather Ruhsam and Joy Stillman brought a special friend along
with them to the library last week.
While the trio regularly read to youngsters at the library, they
brought along Santa Dog on Thursday morning, December 16.
Santa Dog was able to visit with Julius E. Sprauve School first
graders and Head Start students as the volunteers read Holiday-
themed books.


St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Carol McGuinness


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14 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011


Tourism Launches Local TV Campaign to Promote Customer Service


St. John Tradewinds
As a component of its ongoing local tour-
ism awareness campaign, the Department
of Tourism launched five new television
spots designed to raise the level of customer
service in the territory and promote the cus-
tomer service pledge.
The ads will air locally on the Govern-
ment Access Channel and other local cable
channels and began running last week.
"Until now our tourism awareness mes-
sage has been promoted locally in print,
radio and online, so we are very excited to
broaden our audience even further by add-
ing television to our media mix," said DOT
Commissioner Beverly Nicholson-Doty.
"Television also provides us a great op-
portunity to visually dramatize interactions
with our visitors and illustrate how improv-
ing our customer service skills not only en-
hances the visitor's experience but also fos-
ters a greater sense of personal ownership in
our tourism product."
Each spot features a mocko jumbie char-
acter who intervenes when poor service
is being delivered and "inspires" the ser-
vice provider to take the customer service
pledge.


Andrew Moore, at left, and an actress enjoy lunch at Sun Dog Cafe in
an outtake from DOT's new advertising campaign promoting customer
service.


In the spots, taking the pledge results in
the delivery of superior customer service,
produces satisfied customers and fills the
service provider with pride. The interactions
depicted in the ads came directly from com-
ments received by mystery shoppers who
visited the territory in 2009 to rate the level
of service in the USVI.


The mystery shopper study, commis-
sioned by DOT, revealed that although the
USVI scored 82 percent across 10 customer
service standards, a score of 90 percent or
above is what it will take to ensure that visi-
tors return and recommend the destination
to others.
Mystery shoppers "shopped" 10 sectors


throughout the territory including hotels,
taxis, restaurants, retail and the general pub-
lic, among others.
"As members of a tourism-based commu-
nity, providing exceptional customer service
is essential to the success of our destination
and our future prosperity," said Nicholson-
Doty. "Equally important is the level of ser-
vice we provide each other as residents of
the Virgin Islands which is why we encour-
age the public at large to take the pledge and
make the USVI a more hospitable place for
all of us."
In addition to placing the ads on local
television, the department planned to incor-
porate them into school presentations to en-
courage dialogue about exploring attitudes
and cultural differences as it relates to tour-
ism.
The spots may currently be viewed on-
line at www.usvimarketing.com. The spots
were produced by Tell Tale Pictures, a film
and digital production company based on
St. John.
For more information on the Department
of Tourism's customer service pledge and
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St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 15


Ninth Annual St. John Blues Festival Adds Second Star Studded Show


St. John Tradewinds
Steve Simon, the creator, pro-
ducer and Blues Boss of the world-
renowned Johnnie Walker St. John
Blues Festival proudly announced
that the 9th annual Johnnie Walk-
er Blues Festival will have two
nights of celebrity concerts in the
Coral Bay ball field - on Friday
evening, March 18, and Saturday
evening, March 19, both starting
at 8 p.m.
"With record breaking atten-
dance year after year, we have
decided to add another evening of
world class Blues under the stars
this coming March," said Simon.
"For the very first time the John-
nie Walker St. John Blues Festi-
val will be held on two consecu-
tive nights with two star studded
shows."
The Friday night show will
showcase Blues Challenge winner
Grady Champion and his band, the
Superhero herself Candye Kane
and Blind Pig Records recording
artist Albert Cummings.
Taking the stage at 8 p.m. on
Saturday evening will be Telarc
recording artists Moreland & Ar-
buckle, the "Queen of Memphis"
Reba Russell and her band and
then the man who inspired John
Belushi to create the Blues Broth-
ers, Curtis Salgado and his Big
Band.
Tickets will go on sale right
after January 1, 2011, and will be
available on St. John at Connec-
tions in Cruz Bay, Connections in
Coral Bay, Chelsea Drugs in the
Marketplace and on St. Thomas at
Chelsea Drugs in Red Hook.
Advance tickets are $25 for
each night or $45 for a two-night
pass. Tickets purchased at the gate
will be $30 each night. All chil-
dren under 16 are admitted free.
There will be $5 safari taxi rides
to the Coral Bay ball field from
the Cruz Bay passenger ferry dock
and from the Coral Bay ball field
to the Cruz Bay passenger ferry
dock all night long both evenings.
There will also be a late night
ferry from Cruz Bay to Red Hook
at 1 a.m. after both shows.
Food and beverages will be
available both nights so bring a
blanket or bring a chair but please
be cool - no coolers.
The 9th Annual Johnnie Walker
St. John Blues Festival is pre-
sented by Johnnie Walker, The


Lumberyard Complex, Merchants
Commercial Bank, the U.S.V.I
Department of Tourism, Rotary


of St. John, The Gifft Hill School,
Shipwreck Landing Restaurant,
Rhumblines, The Beach Bar, Sun


Dog Cafe, Jeff and Bonnie Simon
and Steve and Helen Simon.
For additional information


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more coverage than any other carrier on island.

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16 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011



Letters To St. John Tradewinds


Community Came Out Strong
for St. Lucia Food Drive
VIVA! Villas sends a big thank you to the St. John community for
the many donations to the company's St. Lucia food drive last month.
We collected 14 cases of food/linens and received $1,000 in cash
donations. The items are all being sent down this week to St. Lucia in
hopes the families will receive everything for the holidays
Angie Smith
VIVA! Villas



Keeping Track of Crime


2009 2010 TO-DATE
Homicides: 1 Homicides: 0
Shootings: 0 Shootings: 0
Stabbings: 0 Stabbings: 0
Armed Robberies: 5 Armed Robberies: 1
Arsons: 0 Arsons: 0
1st Degree Burglaries: 6 1st Degree Burglaries: 2
2nd Degree Burglaries: 17 2nd Degree Burglaries: 20
3rd Degree Burglaries: 70 3rd Degree Burglaries: 69
Grand Larcenies: 67 Grand Larcenies: 63
Rapes: 1 Rapes: 0


* *1.





Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content 6
Available from Commercial News Providers



S..


-

* *3. 0


1.T


I am sure that all of us who knew
Sis Frank feel a certain numbness
at her passing, simply because her
presence remains with us through
all of her good deeds throughout
her life on St. John.
I'll always remember coming
back to St. John after an absence of
30 years and, realizing the contrast
between back then and now, won-
dering if we could bring it back if
only for a week, by searching out
the "real" islanders and staging a
cultural festival.
After buying a small cottage,
I mentioned my desire to Sang
Khauv, who suggested I should
talk to Sis Frank at the St. John
School of the Arts.
Sis invited me to meet with her
one morning, and sitting at the
small table as you entered the little
theater, I presented my thoughts to
Sis based on a festival I had started
in New Zealand. She was all for it
and arranged a meeting with Julien
Harley, the St. John Administrator,
and Corine Matthias, his secretary.
They too liked the idea and chose
February, Black History Month, as
the preferred month.
Thereafter, Sis provided contact
after contact to help build a team
of like-minded enthusiasts and
volunteers. I didn't know anyone
and without Sis' unrelenting en-
couragement and support, the fes-


(L to R) St. John Arts Festival organizers Sis Frank, Andro
Childs, Jude Woodcock, Frank Langley, Jim Provost, Terri
Provost, Karl Foster, Elaine Estern and Clarence Cuthber-
ston celebrate the first festival in 2001 at Morgan's Mango.


tival would have remained just a
good idea.
After applying my analysis
skills to marrying available art-
ists and musicians to the limited
venues on St. John (there was no
town hall) a program was pulled
together and published for Febru-
ary 17-23, 2001, with the theme
"Something Different," suggested
by Harley.
There were events everywhere
and anywhere possible: The
School of the Arts, Cruz Bay Park,
restaurants, art galleries and stu-
dios, Cruz Bay ball field, The Mar-
ketplace (before it was finished).


There were band concerts every
day in the afternoon and evening
and small groups at the restaurants
and art galleries, and church choirs
sang on Sunday.
The Festival took root and was
adapted and refined over the past
11 years to become an established,
"looked forward to" real St. John
cultural event.
Which is what I mean when
I say, "Her presence is still with
us."
This year's St. John Art's Festi-
val will be February 19 to 25.

Frank Langley


I do not have a boat and can therefore be objective
in the case of our boating community. Last week, we
were invited on a sailing ride by friends.
When coming into the Coral Bay harbor, I was
amazed how poor the place looked. This surprised me
because sailing and other boating is a very important
attraction of our islands; it is like a magnet for tourists
from all over the world.
This of course means an important source of busi-
ness income and substantial landing and registration
fees going to the treasury. The dock is in a very de-
plorable condition: pieces of concrete missing, part
of the pier is made of wood. I did not realize that this
part is actually floating and moves with the waves.
Not knowing this, I lost balance when the pier
moved and I fell into the water. Fortunately, I just lost
one shoe in the deep mud but the fall was very un-
pleasant.
I discussed the harbor and boating community with
some bystanders and I was amazed to hear that the


government is not only negligent, it even looks hos-
tile against the boaters.
Permits for any repair take a very long time and
some of them are not even granted, like the one to
expend the solid part of the pier. This is not a question
of money.
The government collects fees but gives nothing
back to the boaters. Even repairs which would be
made by the boaters for free including the materials,
are frequently not granted. Several years back, even
charters were not permitted for most applicants.
Consequently, many charters moved to British Vir-
gin Islands. There is no garbage bin in close vicinity
of the harbor. The boaters do not usually have surface
transportation and dispose of their garbage with dif-
ficulties.
Boating is very important for the Virgin Islands.
Please give them support.
Z. Hruza


No Arts Festival Save for Sis


Boating Community Needs Support


=W


w


\






St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 17


The night before last as my sons and I prepared
for bed, they were pushing me hard to be honest with
them about Santa Claus. Otis is 10-years-old and An-
drew is seven. I was doing my best to evade the bar-
rage of questions with comments like, "What do you
think?" and "Do you think he is real?" Finally Otis
said sternly, "Mom, stop asking us the same question
we are asking you!"
I smiled awkwardly. He continued, "We know that
you know, so tell us the truth. Is he real?"
I give my final attempt at saving grace with, "I
guess it depends on what you mean by real."
To which Otis replies, "OK, for example, we know
the tooth fairy comes into the house and takes the
tooth from under the pillow and leaves a gift. Does
Santa actually come into the house and leave gifts in
the stockings?"
At this point my mind twists and turns into various
configurations, I am trying to wrap my head around
the conversation I am having with my sons.
On one hand I am thinking that ten is kind of old
for having this conversation. Why haven't his friends
told him the truth? Why do I have to be the one to
break it to him? Maybe there is no right age to learn
the truth about Santa.
My mind continues to spin. I think I was seven (An-
drew's age) when my mother told me Santa wasn't
real. I can remember it like it was yesterday. She was
ironing in the basement just outside the laundry room,
in my childhood home. I was asking the same ques-
tions my sons were now asking me. She was trying to
evade the question. I was persistent.
Finally she said what I feared most. Santa was not
real. I was destroyed. I was filled with loss and sad-
ness yet I knew she was telling the (her) truth, but it
didn't seem fair. Or right.
My mind spins back to my kids, I actually feel a
little queasy. Otis has just asserted that "We know the
tooth fairy comes....." I am stuck with my same ques-
tion of what do we mean by real. Not in the spirit of
further evasion, but for real.
Here, within this inquiry, there is hope for believ-
ing in goodness and joy. Yet still I am not prepared to
lie about who puts the gifts in the stockings. And the
boys are no longer letting me dodge the issue. I can
feel the tears welling up in my eyes and after Otis
asks me one more time with much intensity and seri-
ousness, "Who puts the gifts in our stockings?!?!?" I
reply meekly, "I do."
Tears now running down my cheeks. The boys,
wide eyed, quiet as church mice, looking at me. The
bedroom is still. Time stops. Quiet all around. Finally
one of them asks me why I am crying and I reply that
I am not sure.


Andrew puts his head in my lap and these words
come out of my mouth, "Of course he can not get to
all the houses, he relies on parents to help him out."
And Andrew chimes in with his sweet high pitched,
little boy voice, "He probably goes to places like Hai-
ti where the parents aren't able to help out." I let this
comment linger, not responding verbally, letting it fill
the air around us.
Now Otis has joined the cluster on my lap and un-
der my arms. The boys are spilling out, all legs and
arms across the bed. There is a small feeling of relief.
The boys are now discussing their new awareness and
adjusting the mythology to fit.
Probably the reindeer don't actually fly. And Ru-
dolph, well he certainly doesn't have a glowing red
nose. It's likely that Santa focuses on the kids in need
up north near his factory and maybe he ships toys to
places like Africa and Haiti. Their voices blending in
with the heaviness in my heart and the uncertainty I
feel in letting them continue to believe.
And still growing and welling stronger inside me
and all around us is the vastness of possibility, so
close to being lost, now restored.
This morning as I write about it, I wonder if this is
some odd version of what Christmas is really about.
Believing in something magical, something that
brings good things to people in need. Hope, some-
thing we all need. I now know why I was crying.
I need to believe in the Greater Good, in the Holy
Spirit, I need to believe in you and me. I need hope to
stay alive. I need to see and feel the light, in myself,
in my children, in my family, in my neighbors and the
people I do not know. I need to believe. Especially
during the darkest hour, the reminders are ever more
important to me.
I guess this is the story about someone raised
Christian, raised to celebrate Christmas as the cel-
ebration of the birth of Christ. Someone who was told
at a young age that Santa was not real. Then found
meaning in things ancient as an adult. Seasons. Moon
cycles. Solstices and Equinox's. Someone that then
become a mother and saw again the ease with which
children believe and carry hope in their hearts. This
story is mine. It is my children's. I suspect part of it
may be yours too.
I no longer will celebrate Solstice separate from
Christmas. I no longer need to believe that Christ is
more real than Santa. I hold all this as true. Jesus.
Santa. The Great Mother Earth. You. Me. Love. Light.
Hope.
I offer my light up to the darkness that surrounds
us.
Blessed Be,
Karn Anderson


Letters To St. John Tradewinds


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18 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011



V.I. Receives $1.5 Million To Help Students Attend College


St. John Tradewinds
The University of the Virgin Is-
lands has received a $1.5 million
grant to increase the number of
students in the Virgin Islands who
enter colleges and universities.
A total of $1 million in scholar-
ships will be available to eligible


students for the 2010-2011 aca-
demic year. UVI, in collaboration
with the Virgin Islands Board of
Education and the Office of the
Governor, received the grant from
the U.S. Department of Education
College Access Challenge Grant
(CACG) Program. This is a marked


increase over the $330,000, two-
year grant that was previously
awarded to the territory in 2008.
This grant allows UVI and its
community partners to provide in-
formation to students and families
about postsecondary education
benefits, opportunities, planning


and career preparation, and to of-
fer need-based scholarships to stu-
dents.
Scholarships in the amount of
$5,000 will be available for stu-
dents who demonstrate a need and
meet the grant's criteria for appli-
cation. Scholarships can be used at
any accredited college or univer-
sity. Grant awards will be distrib-
uted between the St. Thomas/St.
John and St. Croix districts.
Through the grant, targeted in-
terventions will be implemented to
address the disparity in the catego-
ries of students most underrepre-
sented in accessing post-secondary
training.
It also allows UVI to collabo-
rate with the American Counsel-
ing Association of the Virgin Is-
lands to implement professional
development training and to pro-
vide support to guidance coun-
selors at middle and secondary
schools. Scholarships applications


and awards will be administered
through the V.I. Board of Educa-
tion.
Denise Lake, the grant's educa-
tional outreach coordinator from
its inception, has vast experience in
implementing federal grant-based
programs. She works closely with
educators to enhance students' and
their families' awareness of the
benefits of college and methods
of accessing and financing higher
education.
The CACG primarily seeks to
focus on students who may be at
risk of not enrolling in or complet-
ing college and who are first-time
college attendees.
For more information contact
Educational Outreach Coordinator
Lake at 340-692-4101 or CACG
Program Project Investigator and
Associate St. Croix Campus Ad-
ministrator for Student Affairs
Miriam Osborne Elliott at 340-
692-4188.


Holiday and Christmas Festival Leave
St. John Tradewinds
Governor John deJongh signed a proclamation granting admin-
istrative leave to non-essential government employees during the
Christmas holidays, St. Croix Christmas Festival and the 2011 In-
augural Celebration in January.
Administrative leave has been granted territory-wide from 12
noon to 5 p.m. on both Friday, December 24, and on Friday, De-
cember 31, to celebrate the Christmas season and to ring in the
New Year.
To encourage greater participation in the annual St. Croix Fes-
tival celebration, deJongh's proclamation granted territory-wide
administrative leave from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, January 7, the
day of the Children's Parade.
St. Croix only will also be granted administrative leave from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday, January 5, for both the St. Croix
Christmas Festival J'ouvert and the Festival Food, Arts and Crafts
Fair.
To celebrate the 2011 Inaugural, deJongh has granted territory-
wide administrative leave on January 3 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. St.
Croix only will be granted administrative leave on January 4 from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for post-inaugural activities and on January 5, ad-
ministrative leave will be granted only to employees on St. John to
participate in post-inaugural activities.
Holiday Administrative Leave
December 24 and 31: Territory-wide administrative leave 12
noon- 5 p.m.
January 3: Territory-wide administrative leave 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
January 4: St. Croix only administrative leave 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
January 5: St. Croix and St. John only administrative leave 8
a.m. - 5 p.m.
January 7: Territory-wide administrative leave 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
The administrative leave as provided for in the proclamation
does not apply to essential government employees, employees on a
regular or rotating shift and employees on annual or sick leave.






St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 19


WAPA Approves St. John Cable


St. John Tradewinds
The V.I. Water and Power Au-
thority Governing Board last
month and approved a major step
in the utility's long-term plan to
increase electric transmission ca-
pacity and reliability to St. John.
The Authority authorized man-
agement to negotiate and enter
into an agreement in an amount
not to exceed $3,308,000 with
Kerite Cable Services of Con-
necticut to manufacture, install,
test, and commission a 34.5 kV
underwater cable from Red Hook
Pond, St. Thomas to Frank Bay, St.
John. Kerite has been in the power
cabling business since 1854.
Clinton Hedrington, Director
of Transmission and Distribution,
explained that the submarine ca-
ble will improve restoration time
on the transmission system to St.
John because it will be completely
underground from St. Thomas'
east end substation. The cable will
have a full load capacity of 22 to
27 megawatts of power.
Presently, the peak St. John de-
mand is about 10.5 megawatts. The
new cable will increase the capac-
ity of an existing smaller cable by
172 percent and will allow growth
on St. John for 30 years, Hedring-
ton explained.
The new cable will carry the en-
tire load of the island in the event
that the first 34.5kV cable installed
five years ago fails or is out of ser-
vice for maintenance. The project
is expected to be in operation by
June 2011 and will complete the
34.5 kV underground circuit from
St. Thomas' east end to St. John.
Board members also approved
a contract award to Asplundh Tree


Expert Company for supervision,
materials, labor, supplies, tools,
equipment, and transportation to
trim or remove trees and brush,
and to perform right-of-way clean-
ing and other utility forestry ser-
vices in the territory. The 18-month
contract, to be funded by WAPA's
operating budget in the amount of
$1,290,557, covers services for the
remaining months of fiscal year
2011, and for FY 2012.
During the Executive Director's
Report to the Board, Hugo Hodge,
reported on the successful EDIN-
USVI Workshop, which was No-
vember 15 and 16. The two-day
meeting took place on the St.
Croix campus of the University of
the Virgin Islands and provided a
discussion forum for invited gov-
ernment, utility, education, and
business leaders, environmental
groups, clean energy advocates
and developers; and others.
In the third collaborative session
since the territory was designated
an Energy in Developing Islands
partner earlier this year, experts
from the U.S. Departments of En-
ergy and the Interior, the National
Renewable Energy Laboratory, the
V.I. Energy Office, WAPA, and the
private sector, reported on prog-
ress and opportunities in energy
efficiency, transportation, and re-
newable energy generation and
transmission, Hodge explained.
Local working groups of pub-
lic and private sector members
teleconference weekly with their
federal counterparts to discuss and
take action on initiatives to meet
the mandated goal of reducing fos-
sil fuel usage in the territory by 60
percent by the year 2025.


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Governor deJongh Announces


Scaled Back Inaugural Festivities


St. John Tradewinds
Governor John deJongh has announced that in-
augural festivities scheduled for January 3-5, 2011
will be significantly downsized when compared to
those of the past.
After consulting with Lt. Governor Gregory
Francis and the co-chairs of the Inaugural Commit-
tee, deJongh said that several activities have been
eliminated altogether, including the Inaugural Lun-
cheons and Inaugural Balls previously held on all
three islands, as well as the post-Inaugural ceremo-
nies on the islands of St. Croix and St. John.
"Although there is a $200,000 appropriation for
these events, we believe it sends the wrong message
to our community for us to stage an elaborate cel-
ebration at a time when we have had to borrow to
sustain government services for the last two years,"
said the governor. "We no longer have this option
and yet may have to implement additional austerity
measures in the current fiscal year."
Many of the territory's residents are suffering to
make ends meet and to pay their fixed obligations
due to the continuing effect of the economic reces-
sion, explained deJongh.
"It is simply not right for us to put on a celebra-
tion to the tune of $200,000," he said.
In making the announcement, the governor noted
that the scaled back 2011 Inaugural in no way di-
minishes the hard work of the members of the Inau-
gural Committee.
"Greg and I, and Cecile and Cheryl, appreciate all
that has been done by everyone involved to plan out


this event to celebrate the beginning of our second
term in office," said deJongh. "However, the times
in which we live dictate that we continue to tighten
our belts."
The governor expressed appreciation to the In-
augural co-chairmen for the three islands including
Madeline Stevens-Webster and Philomina Doras on
St. Thomas; Janet Brow and Rueben Roebuck on St.
Croix and Laurie Milliner and Fraser Drummond on
St. John.
"The co-chairs and the many members of the var-
ious subcommittees have been working around the
clock to pull together a memorable celebration and
we sincerely appreciate their efforts," deJongh said.
The three-day Inaugural is currently shaping up
as follows: On January 3, the day will begin with
a church service of Thanksgiving, followed by the
formal Inaugural Ceremony, a military parade and
an open house at Government House on St. Thom-
as.
The next day, January 4, on St. Croix, a church
service will precede an open house at Government
House in Christiansted.
On January 5, the celebration will shift to St. John
where an afternoon church service will be held fol-
lowed by an open house at The Battery in Cruz Bay.
More details about the activities that are planned for
January 3 through the 5, 2011 will be released later
this month.
DeJongh is the seventh elected governor of the
U.S. Virgin Islands and third Democrat to be over-
whelmingly re-elected to a second term in office.


Save the Date!


The 25th Annual


Gifft Hill School Auction

will be held Saturday March 12, 2011

at the Westin St. John Resort & Villas.

Please mark your calendars for this fun, elegant event

benefiting the students of GHS.
Please contact the Development Office for information:
340-776-1730 or ghsdevelopment@mac.com







20 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011


Rhythm & Views: Mid Term Exams

Continued from Page 12
anxiety. Some people disagree and think that test anxiety is simply
not being prepared for the test, but I have experienced it first hand.
You can study all you want and take your test and get points off
because you were nervous and made a mistake. I hear that yoga and
breathing exercises are always good ways to help ease test anxiety.
The holidays are a part of the year that everyone likes. I don't know
many people who don't enjoy the festivities. During the holidays, ev-
eryone goes to visit their family and go shopping. Personally I think
that everyone needs a break from the rock, even if they don't realize
it. It really makes you think more about the "Rock Life" when you
take a break from it.
Another great part about the end of the year is the coming New
Year! It's really great to reflect on the year and think about all the ad-
ventures, laughs, good times, bad times, sadness, and lessons learned.
Even more fun, is making resolutions and daring yourself to stick to
them!
I think the New Year it a great time for students to think about
things seriously. For upperclassmen, they think about their future and
the steps they need to take to get there. Many of them make changes
or strive to do better.
The younger classmen tend to roll they're eyes at the older ones
because they've yet to realize the importance of their upcoming fu-
ture.
In January, Gifft Hill School is beginning its annual "Mini Units."
Mini Units occur during the first two weeks back from break, when
teachers instruct the students in something other than everyday
school. This year the school has broadened its Mini Units and is of-
fering more and greater opportunities.
There is already much talk about Mini Units. Many students are
very excited for diving, theater, apprenticing, and the Italy Trip. Yes, I
did say Italy Trip. Gifft Hill School offers and organizes a trip to send
students away every school year to different places in the world.
This year amongst many great places we could have gone, we
chose Italy. It's a place that is so beautiful and holds so much history
(and good food), that we couldn't resist going.
Overall, even with all the stress, the end of the year and the begin-
ning of the new, lends a new perspective for everyone. We can think
about what we've accomplished and what we would still like to. Is-
landers don't let this seasonal stress overwhelm you, rather, embrace
it. Challenge yourself this New Year!
Happy Holiday and lots of love!


Crime Stoppers U.S. Virgin Islands
Seeking Information on Current Crimes


Crime Stoppers is asking the
community's help to solve the
following crimes. If anyone
knows something, they should
say something so law enforce-
ment can identify and arrest
these thugs. The minimum cash
reward for an arrest is $714
for a burglary, and $900 for an
armed robbery.
On November 27 at about
4:30 a.m., a resident at 17 B-l
Estate Enighed was awakened
by the sound of a burglar in her
bedroom. When she got up to
investigate, the burglar left via
the sliding glass door and then


jumped over the balcony to
escape. The burglar gained en-
trance by scaling the patio and
entering via the southwest slid-
ing glass door.
Crime Stoppers is pleased to
report that, since January 2009,
anonymous tips have assisted
law enforcement in making 102
arrests, which is more than one
per week. Please continue to
help law enforcement make the
territory a safer place to live,
work and raise a family by tell-
ing what you know about these
by calling 1-800-222-TIPS
(8477).


Guilderoy Sprauve, at far
left, and his brother Gerren,
at right, presented their gas
station development plans
at a DPNR public hearing
last week.




St. John Tradewinds News
Photo by Jaime Elliott

Adrian Gas Station Proposal Draws No Opposition


Continued from Page 7
the need for a second gas station on St. John and
thought the mid-island location of his property was
ideal, he explained.
"The idea is to build a full-service gas station and
convenience store," said Sprauve. "Right now St.
John is being serviced by one gas station. Our prop-
erty is centrally located and we had been looking at a
different parcel of our property."
"After talking to residents in the area, however, we
have decided that the 17 J-1 site is the ideal site for
the project," Sprauve said.
The project calls for a three tanks with two pumps
on each side, five of which will disperse gasoline
and one diesel fuel. The service station will be auto-
mated with customers able to use their debit or credit
cards right at the pump. A cashier will be available
for patrons using cash and together the businesses
would employ about two to three people, explained
Sprauve.
There will be two 25,000 gallon double wall gas
tanks and a roughly 6,000 diesel tank - all above
ground - on the property. A poured concrete con-
venience store with modem paneling and digital gas
price signs, will also be located on the site, Sprauve
explained.
The project will likely be enclosed in barbed wire
fencing and will include several security cameras,
Sprauve added.
"There will be an elaborate camera system with se-
curity cameras looking straight down on the pumps,"
said the developer. "There will be fencing around the
storage tanks and around the east side of the property
so the land will be totally fenced in. I've also spo-
ken to some security companies who will help with
having someone stationed at the site during closing
time."
The land is located on a partially blind corer, ac-
cording to Sprauve, who tweaked the project's layout
in order to make the entrance and exit as safe as pos-
sible.
"The issue of a blind comer came up and we went
up to the site to do some analysis," said the developer.
"It is a blind corer to some extent. Usually you allo-
cate 20 to 30 feet for a driveway, but we're extending
that to 60 feet to make it easier to drive in and out of
the station."
The parcel of land is about 80 feet wide and 200 feet
long, presenting project designer Clarence Browne


with the challenge of where to locate parking spaces
for the convenience store, oil and water separators,
sewage treatment facility and a generator and tank.
Responding to questions from DPNR's Division of
Environmental Protection terminal facility coordina-
tor Kent Bernier Jr., Sprauve agreed to take a closer
look at the exact logistics of the site as it pertains to
traffic flow, storm water drainage, water storage and
vapor recovery.
"DPNR is implementing new laws as far as vapor
recovery covering both from the truck to the storage
tank and from the pump to the vehicle," said Bernier.
"We're going to make sure that all stations recover
that vapor and have it pumped out. It's good to see
that you're already started to put these requirements
into your plan."
Sprauve planned to have the station and store open
from around 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thurs-
day. The businesses would close around 5 p.m. on
Friday and reopen in the evening on Saturday.
"We didn't feel that St. John was busy enough to
support a 24-hour operation," said Sprauve.
If the zoning variance is approved, Sprauve said he
could secure funding for the project within 60 days.
"We've already reached an agreement with a loan-
ing institution and they're just awaiting the variance,"
said Sprauve.
If the okay comes through, the tanks could be in-
stalled three weeks of having the equipment on island,
explained Paul Tollefson, president of Petroleum
Equipment Sales and Installation, who will oversee
that side of the project.
The overall project - including the convenience
store and gas station canopy - could be complete
within six months of approval, Sprauve explained.
The developer pledged to be transparent with the
project and to work in concert with all DPNR regula-
tions.
"We intend to work in tandem with all regulations
and to be as transparent as possible with the commu-
nity," said Sprauve. "We want to get the public in-
volved so they can feel a part of the project. We will
build a project that St. John can be proud of."
DPNR staff has 30 days to prepare a report sup-
porting or opposing the variance request. DPNR of-
ficials will then present their report to members of the
29th Legislature, who will host its own public hearing
on the measure and ultimately vote on amending the
official district map of St. John.











Frank Leaves Behind Lifetime of Love and Memories


Continued on Page 4

on 60 annual island performances and booked month-
long tours in Denmark, Germany, New York, France
and Switzerland.
"I have been looking around for years, and I
haven't met anyone who could think or operate or
function like Sis," Wells said. "Sis was the type of
person who you could go to with a small idea, and
she would make it happen - maybe she knew noth-
ing about it, but she would find a way to help you to
achieve it."
Wells said Frank possessed an unbelievable energy
- one that radiated when she listened to the youth
steel pan band.
"They don't make that model anymore," Wells
said. "I have never met a human being that can say
and do the things I have seen and heard Sis do in her
lifetime. She was an incredible human being."
Born out of the steel band's success, Sis co-found-
ed St. John School of the Arts with Wells and Elroy
Sprauve and served as its executive director for 30
years.
"I remember when we negotiated to buy the land
for the school - Sis was always so optimistic and she
really saw this as her way of giving back to the com-
munity and helping the young people of St. John,"
Elroy Sprauve said. "Even during the discouraging
times, she kept all of us motivated and focused, and
always managed to build our spirits."
Knowing Sis from the time she arrived in late 1959
and working by her side for more than 20 years with
Steel Unlimited and the art school, Sprauve recalled
the tremendous impact she had on the island and its
youth.
"Many young people who had the chance to par-
ticipate in the band and take these lessons at the art
school and get this whole experience would not have
had that opportunity if it weren't for Sis," he said.
"She led a life that all of us should try to follow and
exemplify."
Kinder, who met Sis in New York in 1984 when
she asked her to help develop programs and work-
shops for St. John's budding art school, called Sis a
visionary - someone who could recognize the po-
tential in others.
"She had an ability to connect with and attract ac-
complished and renowned teachers to join her while
encouraging and giving new teachers an opportunity
to grow," said Kinder, who Sis appointed as SJSA's
executive director in late 2006.
Kinder attributes the school's success to Sis'
straightforward approach and ability to keep things
simple and uncomplicated.
"She would never shy away from a challenge,"
Kinder said, recalling their daily morning phone
calls. "Every morning she would say she was off to
the school to see what problems needed solving for
the day."
Rafe Boulon remembers Sis as far back as a child
of 9- or 10-years-old. One of his first recollections
is when she and her late husband, Carl Frank, gave
him his first rod and reel to replace the hand lines and
bamboo poles he was accustomed to fishing with.
"To me, Sis never changed, she was always Sis,"


he said. "Sis just provided so much to the children of
this community and opened lots of doors and oppor-
tunities they wouldn't have otherwise had. She is very
much a part of this island, and I don't know if a single
person who has ever spoken a negative word of her."
Inga Hiilivirta met Sis in the early '60s; times she
refers to as the "kinder and gentler" days of St. John.
"She was a dear friend and has been a great bless-
ing in my life," Hiilivirta said. "In many ways, Sis has
helped St. John become Love City by being herself
and so caring. She was a legend already while she was
still with us."
Vashti Boynes first met Sis during her tenure at
Caneel Bay Resort when she honeymooned there
with Frank. The two remained close throughout the
years, and Boynes was among the handful of friends
who bid Sis farewell during her final days.
"Sis was an asset to St. John and I will miss her
dearly," said Boynes, recalling her constant friend-
ship and encouragement throughout the years. "She
was a good, good friend of mine; truly beautiful."
Pastor Carlyle Sampson of the Nazareth Lutheran
Church remembers Sis as someone who was always
involved in and supportive of the community.
"She has been very gracious and generous in sup-
porting the arts and younger children," Pastor Samp-
son said. "That is something she has always been very
passionate about."
Karen Samuel, who knew Sis from the time she
was a young girl, said Sis provided invaluable support
for the local children with artistic talents when oth-
ers would have told them to pursue something more
sensible.
"Sis was someone who always encouraged people
to continue pursing their skills and training," Samuel
said. "St. John is a small community and there were
not a lot of professional, local artists. Having some-
one from the outside encouraging you was extremely
valuable because it gave a different perspective."
Barbara Fernandez, Sis' childhood friend of 86
years, shared a lifetime of stories about Sis - from
growing up together in Norwich, New York, where
they spent summers riding horses, going to camp and
taking vacations to moving to St. John years later and
creating memories together there.
"I am two weeks older than she is, and we always
celebrated our birthdays every year - we knew each
other since the time we were born and we've remained
close all these years," said Fernandez, who lived on
St. John in the 60s and 70s. "When we were in the
islands, there were a couple of jazz bands mixed with
the steel drums, and we'd go every weekend just to
listen to them perform and have a couple of rum and
tonics."
Fernandez, the oldest of five sisters and brothers,
said Sis, who had no siblings of her own, was like
part of the family.
"She was so much fun and full of life and I enjoyed
her like a sister," she said.
It is this same sense of family Sis found on St.
John. As the island's matriarch, she was a mother, sis-
ter and friend to all who had the privilege of knowing
and inevitably loving her. She will be greatly missed,
but her spirit still radiates in the community she left
behind.


St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 21




Police Log






EMERGENCY LAND LINE: 911


POLICE DEPT: 340-693-8880
FIRE STATION: 340-776-6333


Friday, December 10
3:30 p.m. - A citizen p/r that
an unknown male is harassing
him by phone. Telephone ha-
rassment.
Saturday, December 11
8:00 p.m. - A citizen p/r a
fight in progress among a group
of boys at the Cruz Bay ferry
dock. Simple assault.
Sunday, December 12
1:11 a.m. - An employee of
Castaways r/ a fight at the busi-
ness. Simple assault.
6:52 a.m. - A citizen c/r that
she was assaulted by her ex-
boyfriend. Aggravated assault
and battery, D.V
8:20 a.m. - Badge #731 p/ at
Jurgen Command with one An-
tonio Powell of Estate Adrian
under arrest and charged with
Aggravated Assault and Bat-
tery, Domestic Violence. No
bail was set by order of the
court. Powell was released into
the custody of his mother.
1:08 p.m. - A citizen c/re-
questing police assistance with
her minor son. Police assis-
tance.
11:48 p.m. - A citizen c/r that
her neighbor is trying to com-
mit suicide. Police assistance.
Monday, December 13
7:41 a.m. - A citizen c/r a
D.O.A. DOA.
8:47 a.m. -A citizen c/r a dis-
turbance. Malicious mischief.
1:45 p.m. - An Estate Pastory
resident p/r her bag was stolen
in Cruz Bay. Grand larceny.
6:49 p.m. - A visitor from
Vermont p/r that he lost this
digital camera in Cruz Bay.
Lost camera.
8:27 p.m. - A Bellevue Vil-
lage resident p/r her son was
threatened by a male via the
internet. Disturbance of the
peace, threats.
Tuesday, December 14


8:15 a.m. - A citizen p/r that
she lost her wallet. Lost prop-
erty.
8:55 a.m. - A citizen p/r that
he lost his wallet. Lost prop-
erty.
10:40 a.m. -A citizen p/r that
he overheard someone threat-
ening him. Police assistance.
4:30 p.m. - A citizen c/r an
auto accident near E&C Gas
Station. Auto accident.
4:45 p.m. - A citizen p/r that
she and two friends are being
harassed by a group of individ-
uals. Disturbance of the peace,
threats.
Wednesday, December 15
3:35 p.m. - A citizen c/r an
auto accident at The Market-
place. Auto accident.
4:02 p.m. - A citizen c/r a
burglary. Burglary in the third.
Thursday, December 16
10:23 a.m. - A citizen p/r that
a male owes her money for a se-
curity deposit. Grand larceny.
10:50 a.m. - A citizen c/r
an auto accident on Centerline
Road. Auto accident.
11:24 a.m. - A Cruz Bay resi-
dent p/r that his laptop was sto-
len from his checked bag at the
airport. Grand larceny.
3:40 p.m. - An Estate Hard
Labor resident p/r that she is
being harassed by another fe-
male minor. Disturbance of the
peace.
4:25 p.m. - An Estate Grun-
wald resident p/r that she got
into an altercation with a male.
Disturbance of the peace.
10:45 p.m. - An Estate Beth-
any resident p/r that someone is
removing money from his bank
account without his permission.
Grand larceny.
Friday, December 17
6:42 a.m. - A citizen c/r an
auto accident in the area of Cen-
terline Road. Auto accident.








22 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011


CRUZ BAY TO RED HOOK
Every hour on the hour from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m.

RED HOOK TO CRUZ BAY
Every hour on the hour from 6 a.m. to 12 a.m.

CRUZ BAY TO DOWNTOWN CHARLOTTE AMALIE

Leaves Cruz Bay Leaves Charlotte Amalie
8:45 a.m. 10 a.m.
11:15 a.m. 1 p.m.
3:45 p.m. 5:30 p.m






St. John Tradewinds



Business Directory


Accommodations
Caribbean Villas & Resorts
tel. 1-800-338-0987
or locally 340-776-6152

Island Getaways
888-693-7676, islandgetaway-
sinc.com
kathy@islandgetawaysinc.com

Suite St. John Villas/Condos
tel. 1-800-348-8444
or locally at 340-779-4486

VIVA Vacations
tel. 779-4250
P.O. Box 1747, STJ, VI 00831


Jewelry
R&I PATTON goldsmithing
Located in Mongoose Junction
776-6548 or (800) 626-3445
Chat@pattongold.com


Landscaping
Alfredo's Landscaping
tel. 774-1655 cell 513-2971
P.O. Box 91, St. John, VI 00831

Coral Bay Garden Center
tel. 693-5579 fax 714-5628
P.O. Box 1228, STJ, VI 00831

PROPERTYKING


tel. 643-6348

Architecture Landscaping & Irrigation
Crane, Robert - Architect, AIA Proneri MI mt
tel. 776-6356 Cimmaron Property
P.O. Box 370, STJ, VI 00831 Management
tel. 340-715-2666


Barefoot Architect, Inc.
tel. 693-7665 fax 693-8411
P.O. Box 1772, STJ, VI 00831


Banking
Scotiabank
#1 Mortgage Lender in the VI
The Marketplace (340) 776-6552


Beautv/Sna
Beauty Lounge Salon & Spa
www.stjohnbeautylounge.com
Mongoose Junction 776-0774

Westin Resorts & Villas
Spa Services
tel. 693-8000, ext. 1903/1904


Construction
St. John Hardware
tel. 693-8780 fax 776-6685
Located at The Marketplace


Insurance
Theodore Tunick & Company
Phone 775-7001 / Fax 775-7002
www.theodoretunick.com


St. John s premier property
Manager

Seaview Vacation Homes, Inc.
tel. 340-776-6805; 1-888-625-
2963
www.seaviewhomes.com


Real Estate
American Paradise Real Estate
tel. 693-8352 fax 693-8818
P.O. Box 8313, STJ, VI 00831
info@americanparadise.com

Cruz Bay Realty
tel. 693-8808 fax 693-9812
P.O. Box 66, STJ, VI 00831
info@cruzbayrealty.com

Debbie Hayes, GRI
tel. 714-5808 or 340-642-5995
debbiehayes@debbiehayes.com
www.stjohnvirealestate.com

John Foster Real Estate
tel. 714-5808 or 340-642-5995
debbiehayes@debbiehayes.com
www.stjohnvirealestate.com


Holiday Homes of St. John
tel. 776-6776 fax 693-8665
P.O. Box 40, STJ, VI 00831
info@holidayhomesVI.com

Islandia Real Estate
tel. 776-6666 fax 693-8499
P.O. Box 56, STJ, VI 00831
info@islandiarealestate.com

John McCann & Associates
tel. 693-3399 fax 888-546-1115
Located at Wharfside Landing
www.RealEstateOnStJohn.com


Restaurants
Concordia Cafe, 693-5855
Happy Hour 4:30-6pm
Dinner 6-8:30pm Tues-Sat

Fish Trap Restaurant
and Seafood Market
tel. 693-9994, Closed Mondays

La Tapa Restaurant
tel. 693-7755
Open 7 Days a Week

Skinny Legs "A Pretty
OK Place"
tel. 340-779-4982
www.skinnylegs.com

Sun Dog Cafe
tel. 693-8340
Located at Mongoose Junction


Retail
Saltwater Gypsy Consignment
H
D

St. Johnimals, Island Pet
Outfitter
H
D


Services
C4th Custom Embroidery
tel. 779-4047
Located in Coral Bay


Classifieds






SCENIC PROPERTIES GLASS * MIRRORS * GLASS SHOWERS
340-693-7777 SCREENS * TABLE TOPS
Cruz Bay: An EDC Qualified Supplier
* One bedroom/one bath
w/d $1000.00 bath LICENSED GENERAL CONTRACTOR AND PAINTING
w bdr n 00 Across from Inspection Lane, Sub Base, STT, 777-9269
* One bedroom/one bath
w/d $1000.00 Co m m erical: _ _ _ _ _ _e_ - _ , _ _,-
* One bedroom/one bath
$1300.00
* One bedroom/one bath STORAGE:
w/d $1700.00 SECURED LOCKERS
* Large studio $1200.00 Sizes to 10' x 12'
avail Jan 1st Autos, Boats, Trailers. narketplace
Coral Bay: Call For Rates: 779-4445
SOne bedroom/one bath www.properyachts.com EVERYTHING
$1250.00 YOU NEED

ON EVERY LEVEL
CRUZ BAY OFFICES
2 bedroom, 2 baths Reasonable Rates, bright, GREAT PLACE
unfurnished, A/C, W/D. secure building, ample TO SHOP, DINE
First, Last and security, parking, First Month Free AND WORK
Call 775-7561 or 690-1138 693-7040
COME JOIN US
WE HAVE
FISH BAY LONG TERM SPACES AVAILABLE
AVAILABLE FEB 1: RETAIL or OFFICE
Furnished 3/2 native stone home w/covered decks,
View w/privacy on 1.22 ac. 3k/mo 970-382-6683 340-776-6455
Poweron@earthlink.net







Baha'i Community of St. John Missionary Baptist Church
For Devotions and Study Circles,call 714-1641 9:30 a.m. Sunday Services, 10:45 Worship,
7:30 p.m. Friday; Study Circles 9 a.m. Sunday Tuesday 7 p.m. Bible Study 693-8884
776-6316, 776-6254
Nazareth Lutheran Church
Bethany Moravian Church Sunday 9 a.m., Sunday School 8 a.m.
11 a.m., Sunday School 776-6291 776-6731

Calvary Baptist Church Our Lady of Mount Carmel
13 ABC Coral Bay, 776-6304 Sat. 6 p.m., Sun. 7:30 & 9:30 a.m., Spanish Mass
Sunday School 10 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Monday and Tuesday, 7 p.m.;
Sunday evening 6 p.m., Thursday 7 p.m. Wednesday and Friday, 8:30 a.m. 776-6339

Christian Ministry St. John Methodist Church
Cinnamon Bay Beach Sunday 10 a.m, 693-8830
Inter-Denominational, Sunday 8:30 a.m.
Seventh Day Adventist
Christian Science Society Saturdays, 779-4477
10:45 a.m. Sunday- Marketplace
Wednesday Testimonials St. John Pentecostal Church
7:45 p.m. on last Wed. of Month Sunday 11:05 a.m., 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer 7:30 p.m.,
The Church of Jesus Christ Thursdays Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
of Latter-day Saints 779-1230
Sun. 9 a.m., on St. Thomas . 776-2379
Sun., 5 p.m., STJ, Lumberyard St. Ursula's Episcopal Church
Sunday 9 a.m.; Bible Class, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m.
Cruz Bay Baptist Church 777-6306
Sunday 11 a.m., 6 p.m. 776-6315
Unitarian Universalist Fellowship
Emmaus Moravian Church 9:45 a.m. Sunday, 776-6332
Coral Bay, Sun. 9 a.m. 776-6713
Word of Faith Church
Jehovah's Witness Word of Faith International
7:30 p.m. Tuesday; 7 p.m. Christian Center, Sundays 7:30 a.m.
Saturday (Espaiol), 10 a.m. Sunday, 340-715-0530 Gifft Hill SchoolCall 774-8617







St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 23


_I Classifieds I


IS Smployml


Watersports Jobs!

Full time, part time, lots of benefits, free scuba,
snorkeling, sailing trips to the BVI, etc. Growing
watersports company has immediate openings:

* Beach Attendants at Westin Resort
* Retail Store Staff
* PADI Instructors

Cruz Bay Watersports 776-6857


Virgin Islands Waste Management Authority
Job Vacancy Announcement
Environmental Enforcement Officer III
St. Thomas

SALARY: Commensurate with experience

DEADLINE: December 21, 2010

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:
* Investigates resident's complaints relating to waste disposal
and handling, and performs "windshield" inspections of busi-
ness, public and private properties to ensure compliance with
Title 19, chapter 56 and Title 29, Chapter 8 of the VIC and
all related rules and regulations.
S Investigates incidents of illegal dumping of waste and seeks
to identify the responsible party(s): conducts follow-up and
subsequent closure of all assigned complaints and/or inves-
tigations.
* Issues warning notices and citations evidence to support all
issued citations.
* Serves violators Orders for Corrective Actions (OCA),
Notices of Non-Compliance (NONC) and other
Administrative Orders (AO).
* Indentifies and recommends penalties for environmental
damages caused by violators
* Initiates injunctive actions to halt and limit environmental
damages, and prescribes remedial actions as necessary to
restore appropriate environmental conditions
* Review all Environmental Enforcement Officers work orders,
investigates reports and complies and prepares monthly sum-
maries of activities.
* Prepares work schedules for approval by Division Director
and/or Senior Compliance Officer.
* Provides oversight, leadership, guidance and assistance to
Environmental Enforcement Officers and trainee while in
the field
* Perform other duties as assigned.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:
* AA degree in Environmental Science, Environmental
Planning, Criminal Justice or Political Science from an
accredited college or university.
* A minimum of six (6) years serving in the capacity of a law
enforcement officer.
* A minimum of five (5) years serving in the capacity of an
Environmental Enforcement Officer II.
* Must be a Virgin Islands Police Department Academy
Graduate.
* VI driver's license is required.

Submit the Environmental Enforcement applications and
a letter of interest along with a resume to:
Director of Human Resources
P.O. Box 1689
Kingshill, St. Croix 00851
OR
Email us at employment@dviwma.org
Virgin Islands Waste Management Authority is an Equal
Opportunity Employer


BUSY
REAL
ESTATE
OFFICE
NEEDS
P/T


RECEPTIONIST/
ASSISTANT. MUST BE
PLEASANT, DEPENDABLE,
AND HAVE GOOD
COMPUTER SKILLS.
ALSO, SALES AGENTS
LOOKING TO EARN HIGH
COMMISSIONS NEEDED
NOW. INQUIREIS ARE
CONFIDENTIAL.
CALL RE/MAX 775-0949


ASST MANAGER,
Gallows Point Resort

Position in St. John, USVI
Manage & direct resort
operations

Requirements:
St. John resident, property
management experience,
people skills, flexible hours,
weekend work required,VI
Driver's Lic., References
required, Salary will be
based on experience.

Interested person email
your resume to Akhil@gal-
lowspointresort.com or fax
resume to 340-776-6520


FRENCH TEACHER
Looking for a french teacher
to teach a 12 year old
beginning french.
Need to follow curriculum
from state side school.
Contact 786-877-7989





ST. JOHN BUSINESS
OWNERS Affordable
Reliable Internet. 1Mb
service $70/mo.
info @dishanddat.com
340 779 4001


RELIABLE MOBILE
AUTO REPAIR:
Professional and experi-
enced. Brakes, CV Joints,
Suspensions, Shocks,
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Foreign & Domestic.
All Work Guaranteed.
Call 227-9574


01.1afl,
`%�Akw
7-1 W


COMMERCIAL SPACE AVAILABLE


At The Lumberyard






UNUSUAL



OPPORTUNITY



first floor space available




Downtown Cruz Bay
Where St. John Does Business



For Space Call Nick


340-771-3737







VIRGIN ISLANDS WASTE MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
The Virgin Islands Waste Management Authority (VIWMA) is soliciting proposals for:
RFP-WMA-002-T-11 Preventative Maintenance and 24-Hour Emergency Repair Services of
Emergency Power Generator Systems and the VI Waste Management
Authority's Facilities - St. Thomas and St. John, Virgin Islands.
Documents pertaining to this Request for Proposal (RFP) may be obtained from the VIWMA's Division of
Procurement and Property, St. Thomas-St. John District Office at 9500 Wheatley Center II, Suite 2 or from
the St. Croix District Officer at #1 La Grande Princesse, Suite BL1, Christiansted between the hours of
8:00am and 4:30pm, Monday through Friday, or by contacting the Director, Mrs. Cecile Lynch, directly via
phone or email.
PROPOSAL DUE DATE and TIME: Wednesday, December 22, 2010 at 2:00pm Atlantic Standard Time
PROPOSAL DUE PLACE: Virgin Islands Waste Management Authority
9500 Wheatley Center II, Suite 2, St. Thomas, VI 00802
P. 0. Box 303669, St. Thomas, VI 00803
#1 La Grande Princesse, Suite BL 1, Christiansted, VI 00820
P. O. Box 1689, Kingshill, VI 00851-1689
(Six (6) Sealed Proposal Packages Marked Proposal for RFP
No. RFP-WMA-002-T-11, DO NOT OPEN)
NOTE: The proposal number must be placed on the outside of all
Bid Packages. Proposals may not be withdrawn for a period of
ninety (90) days from the date of the submission deadline.
DIRECT INQUIRIES: Mrs. Cecile Phillip-Lynch
Director, Procurement and Property Division
Virgin Islands Waste Management Authority
#1 La Grande Princesse, Suite BL1, Christiansted, VI 00820 OR
Email: clynch@viwma.org Phone: 340-718-4489
All questions pertaining to the submission of proposals, scope of services and the award process should
be directed in writing either in hard copy or by email to Mrs. Cecile Phillip-Lynch, Director of Procurement
and Property, at clynch@viwma.orq.
The Virgin Islands Waste Management Authority reserves the right to waive any non-substantive
informalities, technicalities, or irregularities; or reject any or all qualifications and proposals; or to
re-advertise for proposals, and to award or refrain from awarding the contract for the work. The Virgin
Islands Waste Management Authority also reserved the right to accept or reject any Proposal or any item
listed therein. VIWMA further reserves the right to waive any informality in Proposals received.
May Adams Cornwall
Executive Director
hrW MA







24 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011


Community Calendar



St. John Tradewinds welcomes notices of community-orient-
ed, not-for-profit events for inclusion in this weekly listing. Call
776-6496, e-mail editor@tradewinds.vi or fax 693-8885.


Wednesday, December 22
Karl Pytlik will be giving a presentation on the lionfish and
CORE's management plan at Maho Bay Camps at 7:30 p.m. in the
main dining pavilion.
Saturday, December 25
The Annual St. John Serenade in the Park set 5 a.m. at Frank
Powell Park in Cruz Bay. Come by and bring an instrument and
that Christmas cheer!
Saturday, December 26
Sigma Theta Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority,
Inc. will host its 16th Annual Community Kwanzaa Celebration at
6 p.m. at the Franklin Powell Park in Cruz Bay.
Friday, December 31
Sisterhood/Brotherhood Agenda is hosting a New Year's Eve
Youth Extravaganza at the Housing Parks and Recreation center
in Curz Bay from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Saturday, January 8
The annual fundraising gala to benefit the islands' only animal
shelter, the St. John Animal Care Center, will take place in the
evening at a breathtaking villa in Estate Chocolate Hole.
Wednesday, January 12
The public is invited to join Friends of the Elaine I. Sprauve
Library at 6 p.m. at the library for its annual meeting.
February 19, 2011
St. John Relay for Life - momentum continues to grow in
team sponsorships, volunteer recruitment, purchases of luminar-
ies and additional corporate sponsorships. For more information
call Mary at 642-1629 to learn how to get involved.
Saturday, March 12
The 25th Annual Gifft Hill School Auction will be at the Westin
Resort and Villas.
March 18-19, 2011
The 9th annual Johnnie Walker Blues Festival will feature two



ALCHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS
Alcoholics Anonymous meets as scheduled: Sundays, 9:45
a.m. at Hawksnest Bay Beach; Closed meetings for alcohol-
ics only at Nazareth Lutheran Church in Cruz Bay at 6 p.m
on Tuesday; Open meetings on Mondays, Wednesdays and
Friday at 6 p.m. at Nazareth Lutheran Church; Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays at 6 p.m. at Moravian Church, Coral
Bay.
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS
Narcotics Anonymous has open meetings from 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. every Saturday at St. Ursula's Church.

AL-ANON MEETINGS
Al-Anon meets on St. John every Tuesday at 1 p.m. at the
picnic table at the VINP ball field, and every Thursday at 5:30
p.m. at St. Ursula's Multi-purpose center.

ALATEEN MEETINGS
Alateen will meet on Mondays at St. Ursula's Church from
6 to 7 p.m. and is open to anyone interested in attending.


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CALL TODAY

340-774-3939


TWO INCREDIBLE THREE-ACRE HILLSIDE LOTS
-Adjacent to National Park lands (and short walk to the beach) with
spectacular views of Francis Bay and west (sunsets). Gentle grade, and
easy build. These lots are ideal/unique for one seeking a private estate/
compound within the National Park, desiring lots of land /gardens/privacy
with convenient beach access.

- Inquire about February 24th bid deadline and March 10th Auction (and
Rules) as this lot will be sold to highest qualified Bid!

*(Nearly 3 acre Beachfront access lot available separately for $3.8 million.)



(340)774 939axw wusi-re lest!IecImIl(340)


St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 25






John McCann &Assoc. ij.,


www.RealEstateOnStJohn.com
office 340.6933399 toll free 1.888StJohn8 (785.6468) fax 888.5461115


FEATURED


*(ATERI4G AiN
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ISLA VISTA
I Exceptional 5 bedrm,
4.5 bath Gated Villa
atop Caneel Hill. Seller is
Licensed Real Estate Broker.

VILLALLURE
Impressive 5 bedrm,
7 bath European Style
Villa in Coral Bay


OFFICE: 340 714 5808 w
CELL: 340 642 5995 Q
WWW.STJOHNVIREALESTATE.COM l
DEBBIEHAYES@DEBBIEHAYES.COM


St. John TRADEWINDS Newspaper

Send Check Payable to Tradewinds Publishing, P.O. Box 1500, St. John, VI 00831

1 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION $70.00 USD

Name

Address


LUXURY VILLAS WITH SPECTACULAR VIEWS
JUNGIJl STONI -CINNAMON IBRIllE -RHIIAPSODY ST.' JOIN .C(X:) DE MI-R
II.A(-: & Pl I.N I .IAS HIISAS ( ARIKi. .( CINNAMON BAY I.S IAl I. SOU(rt I'M .M
VISTA CARIBE - SEAVIEW - LAVENDER HILL - BATTERY HILL -GALLOWS POINT
SUITE ST. JOHN MANAGEMENT
www.suitestjohn.com * www.gallowspoint.com
1-800-348-8444
Call Us for a Tour of Our Exclusive Properties


S Cs m i *i



ST. JOHN TRADEWINDS SUBSCRIPTIONS
CALL 340-776-6496 WE ACCEPT VISA OR MASTERCARD

























urat cruz Iay - One acre ct
land with Dual water views ol
both Great Cruz Bay ard
Chocolate Hole from this over-
sized 1.03 acre parcel wilh a
very gentle grade allowing
easy access and building
Popular rental area with paved
roads & close to Cruz Bay town
location. =-stablsned HOAwlih
deeded beach access al
Chocolare Hole and Hart Bay
beaches II is nol often one of
these choice one acle in
Cricolaie lots is listed for sale
Jusl $695,000


"Lovango Love Shack" on
Lovango key is an inliriale
beachfronr hide-away eleganrly
furnished and oulitted wilh top
0o the line appliances including
a whirlpool spa This self con.
lained paradise features all
modern utilities ard amenities
in ar open style floor plan just
sleps from Ihe palm sludded
sand beach, with private dock
Euse & maintenance shared
*ith a few neighbors; Swim
snorkel and fisn from your
doorstep This is whale real
island ivinng 1S aboul' $2,250,


"Seashore Allure Condos" -
These new waterfront Condos
set a higher bar for quality in St.
John condos. These are a "must
see" with such features as
Iravertine & Brazilian hardwood
floors native stone work, grace-
ful arches framing water views,
solid mahogany doors, custom
cabinets rain head showers,
bidels spa jet tubs & high end
appliances The sounds of Ihe
surt trade wind breezes &
beachfronI location make these
condos a tropical dream come
Irue S1 97M to S3.39M.


S"Villa Tramanto" - an elegant contemporary slyled villa located high alop
a level sile within the gated community known as Virgin Grand Estates
Conslrucea in 2010. he stately fully air condiQoned tour bedroom nome
oilers sweeping waler and sunset views from Great Cruz Bay to St.
Thomas and beyond. Amenities include large pool and entertainment
deck, underground utilities and paved access roads. $3.45M
"Villa Lantano" - Magnificent North Shore views ove0 Peler Bay to Jost
Van Dyke from Ihis spacious home in Upper Peter Bay Features include
custom kilchen granite counlerlops. stainless appliances. Iavenine
marble floors lhroughoul including decks large pool deck wilh adjoining
spa water views romn every room aikd the pool and lush professional
landscaping A beautiful new arched native stone gazebo has been
F; 'added that makes a very comfortable shady outdoor seating area $7.9M.
Mango Terrace Villas - New & spacious condos on a hillside overlooking
the turquoise waters ol lhe Carioean All units nave spacious inlerors
ample decks from which 10 enjoy the cool breezes, expansive waler views
private decks. granite counters traverine tales & shared pool & deck Just
six units ira two buildings and close to Cruz Bay and Frank Bay beach
Ihese are the Desc cnoice in SI John condos $650,000 and up
"VOYAGES BUILDING'" Opportunity to own a combination commercial
& residential property in the hear of Coral Bay Located beside Ihe
Cocoloba Shopping Center, this is an ideal location for a reslaulant relall
shops or offices There are two beaulitul two-bedroom apartments on Ihe
2na floor & a swimming pool on site Just across tne road from Ihe
walerfhont wilh views of Ihe anc hoied boats & cool breezes $1.9M.
"El Clelo" - New masonry nome has an ideal location midway between
CrJz Bay & Coral Bay This four Dedroom home is perched on a rial ndge
aDbve Peler Bay ard has National Park land to Ihe north & east to insure
quLet & privacy Gracelul arenas frame ra sweeping views from Lovango
Cay to Jost van Dyke Fealures include custom markogany doors &
windows. large great room air condalhiorig. saloe accent walls large
pool deck and an office JusI Reduced by S200.000 to $2 39M
Developmen[ or escale size lot of 1 8 acres with fabulous views of Drake's
Passage ver Hurricane Hole to Tortola Virgin Gorda Fallen Jerusalem
Salt & Cooper Islands A very private location .llh greal breezes Large
10ol wtrn development polenlial Car be subdivided $1.1M


- ai "Squire's Cottage" - A delighlful & whimsical stone cotlage with separate
. U guesi quarters ir. Chocolate Hole West Fealures include fine local srone
& brick weor. Turiksh Ira-verl'le floors. dnck courtyard icstom hard wood
I Ic' doors S wirdowS stainless appliances cathedral ceil igs slate ioof pool
_1 - �g& deeded rights to two beaches. Priced to sell at just $1.299M
' "Estate Peter Bay" - 3 gorgeous home sites situated in prestigious
Eslate Peler Gay with great vnews over north shore 10 JosI van Dyke,
These parcels are nol part of Peler Bay subdivision Iherelore no dues,
asiessm ents . cGversants ,1 lasitricntons can be levied but owner retains
Limgh lo use the beach ioads for access Starting at $700,000.


EXCITING NEWS OF ST. JOHN ... BLUE TANG IS FOR SALE! - A delightful 2 bedroom, 2 bath pool villa nestled
high on the hillside in the prime neighborhood of Great Cruz Bay. Offering privacy, vibrant sunset views, gourmet
kitchen, 60-foot covered veranda & sunny pool. Catered To's top rental villa. $1,295,000.


CBR HOME LISTINGS
GREAT EXPECTATIONS is the ultimate St. John 7 bed-
room, 7.5 bath compound comprised of a main house,
guest house, 2 swimming pools, 2 hot tubs & a private
regulation doubles tennis court! This popular turn-key villa
has very impressive rental income! $2999,500.
WATERFRONT with DOCK - Masonry 3 bed/2bath
home on Ig. flat lot, with direct access to Fish Bay at your
doorstep. Now only $920,000.
AURORA - Luxurious 4 bd/4bath masonry villa on
Contant Pt. Enjoy 180� views from Great Cruz Bay to
St. Thomas, great privacy, pool, multiple outdoor areas,
excellent vacation rental history. $1,995,000.
VILLA ROMANCE - New, luxury villa built to highest
quality. This well-designed villa provides privacy, comfort
& exquisite detail. Gated entry leads to heart of villa,
overlooking the 30' pool, w/a tropical courtyard setting. Tile
roof, coral flooring, fountains, arches, columns, covered
galleries, & gazebo. This is a MUSTSEE! $2,150,000.
CHEZ SHELL - Charming 3 bd/3 bath, w/gorgeous sun-
setvi fully
deco -i A/C,
custom cabinetry, inviting spa & excellent floor plan.
CHOCOLATE HOLE - Unique ruins of 1700's Great House,
with a 1960's home on a beautiful 1.42 acre lot. $799,000.
CALYPSO del SOL - Very successful rental villa w/
excellent views of Chocolate Hole & St. James islands.
Newer masonry home w/3 equal bdrm suites, Ig. screened
porch, A/C, beautiful pool & hot tub. $1,950,000.
PERELANDRA - Excellent 2 bd/2 bath rental villa high
above Cruz Bay. Stunning water views, privacy, lovely pool
set in lush gardens. A good buy at. $1,050,000.
BORDEAUX MT. - REDUCED! - Well built home on
Bordeaux Mt. with 3bd/2baths, large covered porch &
south shore views. Bay rum trees abound on this lush,
gentle sloping site with ample room to expand. $525,000.
LIZARD HILL - Exclusive No. Shore property, overlook-
ing Cinnamon Bay, one of the only privately owned homes
bounded on all sides by Ntnl. Park. Extraordinary landscap-
ing enhances magical views from 2 bd/2 bath main house
w/separate luxurious master bdrm wing & private pool. The
charming cottage is ideal for a caretaker. $3,100,000.
SEASCAPE - Fabulous location on Bovocoap Point!
Spacious 2 bd main house w/lap pool & spa, plus a sepa-
rate caretaker's cottage. Panoramic sunset views, privacy
& successful vacation rental. $1,200,000.
CHRISTY ANN - New rental villa in upscale neighbor-
hood. Masonry construction w/low maintenance features.
3 bd/2 baths, large covered veranda, spa, 20' vaulted ceil-
ing in greatroom, ample room for expansion. $1,595,000.
REEF BAY VIEW - Absolutely stunning, unobstructed,
views of National Park land, w/secluded white sand
beach below. Attractive 4 bd/3 bath,w/pool, spa and
vacation rental history. $1,595,000.


COCO CRUZ- Fabulous 3 bd/2 bath turn-key rental villa
on Maria Bluff. Panoramic views, Ig. pool, multiple decks,
prime location. $1,800,000.
A BEST BUY! - Well built, poured concrete cottage w/
lovely covered wraparound porch in Est. Carolina. Tile
floors, louvered windows w/complete hurricane shutters,
flat lot for gardening & concrete slab in place for future
garage & expansion. Only $349,000.
PLUMB GUT - 1 bd/1 bath home with adjacent 1X1 cot-
tage. Lush setting on eastern side of Bordeaux. $499,000.
STONE HOUSE - Unique native stone 3 bd/3 bath villa
w/covered rotunda, freeform pool, and spectacular Coral
Bay views. $1,620,000. With adjacent parcel $1,890,000.
BOATMAN POINT - Masonry 4 bd. home on spectacular
1 ac. waterfront site with amazing views & outstanding
neighborhood. $2,795,000.
WINDSONG - Stately Boatman Pt. villa, w/separate
cottage, situated on a lac parcel w/panoramic views. 6
bdrms., 7 baths, huge pool, fully furnished. $3,495,000
GOLDEN DRAGON - Beautiful stone villa w/exceptional
craftsmanship. 4 bds./4 baths, infinity pool, multi patios &
decks, lush gardens, Pt. Rendezvous location. $2,195,000.
CBR BUSINESS LISTINGS
FABRIC MILL - Very successful clothing business, es-
tablished in 1982, in Mongoose Junction. Price includes
inventory & equipment, owner will train. $150,000.
SILVER IGUANA- Beachfront shop w/eclectic collection
of sterling silver jewelry & locally crafted gifts. $75,000.
CBR CONDO LISTINGS
WESTIN TIMESHARES - Call for a complete list of re-
sale units. All sizes & weeks available.
LAVENDER HILL - Tropical 2 bd/2bath penthouse unit
w/wrap-around deck, pool & sunset views. $849,000.
BET ~d/2
bath CI E *J00.
CRUZ VIEWS CONDO - Nice 2 bedroom unit w/full A/C,
sunset views, common pool, good rental history. $495,000.
SELENE'S- Ideal in town location, w/parking, for living/
rental or business. Terrific views. Reduced to $399K!
CBR LAND LISTINGS
AFFORDABLE PARCELS - in Estate Grunwald &
Adrian. Easy building sites, close to town. Starting at
$89,000. Call Today!
BANK OWNED PARCELS - Chocolate Hole, priced to
SELL! $261,500 & 235,000. GREAT BUYS!
DITLEFF POINT - Extraordinary sites on magnificent
peninsula w/sandy beach, gated entry, beautiful landscap-
ing, and incredible views. Prices start at $695,000.
KLEIN BAY - Small upscale neighborhood, gorgeous
views, commonly owned beach. $799K & $995K.
WATERFRONT ON MONTE BAY - Spectacular 13.44
ac. site, ideal for private estate or subdivision. $2,900,000.
CRUZBAYTOWN-Walkto FrankBay, R-4zoning.$249K.


Best Deals: Seagrape Hill - $95,000 & $99,000, Estate Bethany - building lot with views over the
Westin reduced to $99,000, Beautiful lot at Calabash Boom with an easy build & views up the
Sir FrajcilSDrAke ChanrInel JL4. S 0sr$d164.900 afr 4e ho- i3rt , ck--m SI s 280000.
Fractional Ownership - There are now many fracrional opportunities available on Sr John Irom
a summer week for $3,000 to a prime holiday month in a 3 bedroom spa villa at $950,000 and


m


DITLE]LIEF POIN
ST. JOHN, US VIRGIN ISLANDS INFOO~DITLEFF'~POIN-T.COM











Holiday Homes of St.
CTC nnitmnnT i that hrjiwc -b tn .4t !nhn"


ohn


%AlI ncnhinc1Dcnu a t.IINfAIVIUfl
RIDGE" 5 bedroom villa on 1+ private
by National
Park, features
stunning north
shore views,
pool w/waterfall,
spa,easyaccess
to Cinnamon
$4,900,000 Bay beach.
'SEA TURTLE VILLA" is a contempo-
rary Skytop home with amazing water
niews, 2 master suites, 3 baths, tropical
landscaping,
pool, & open
architecture
set amidst se-
cluded privacy.
Great vacation
villa or island
$1,500,000 home!


vvMicnrnuni un uLvrna DAT.
"CHOCOLATE BLISS" (5x5) Private, ex-
tremely quiet
masonry/
stone home
has all the
amenities one
would desire
on over an
acre of gently
$2,500,000 sloped land.
PELICAN'S PERCH" a charming, gat-
ed masonry & stone West Indian style
(3x2) villa features bi-level covered and
Open decks
overlooking
a pool, plus a
separate lxl
guest cot-
tage. Fabulous
south shore
$1,295,000 waterviews!.


-"rUVl. ruin I l A1.nl nIuuaI
for the active waterfront lifestyle.
Ridgetop,
waterfront,
open airsol-
id masonry
3 bedroom
home. Must
be seen to
be appreci-
$2,400,000 ated.
"SEAVIEW" vacation villa. Charming
4 Bedroom, masonry home in excellent
condition with large pool in convenient
Choco-
late Hole
with
deeded
rights
to two
nearby
$1,075,000 beaches.


"VILL.. IVI HCnl LL.A -uwn inls stun-
ning 3 bdrm and 3.5 bath custom Vir-
gin Grand Estates villa. View pool and
large veranda.
Great rentals &
sunsets over St.
Thomas & Pills-
Sbury Sound.
One level liv-
ing w/ fabulous
$2,450,000 Great room!
"SAGO COTTAGE" adorable Caribbean
style ma-
sonrycot-
tage with
wonder-
ful down
Sviews
and great
k id rental his-
$975,000 tory.


MwAinrniuNI LA uwLun VIIAm IS
an exceptionally
charming 3 bdrm
property on the
water's edge with
the possibility of
boat mooring. 376
ft. pristine shore-
line. Panoramic.
W-1 zoning allows
$1,995,000 commercial uses.
CORAL BAY INCOME PRODUCER
Beautiful water view from both decks
of well built home. Flexible floorplan
0 . can be 2
units or
combined
as 3 bed-
room home.
Convenient
to town!
$689,900 Great rental!


wInULnIIuvnlIc Is an very private 1.4
ac. estate set high atop Gifft Hill. Dra-
matic views to the east w/ spectacular
breezes &sun-
rises. This 3
bdrm villa has
room to ex-
pand with an
oversized pool
facing the ter-
$1,649,000 rific view.
"TREE HOUSE" offers spectacular
views from Upper Carolina's ridge top.
a M This gentle
parcel fea-
tures a 3
bedroom.


is border
by Natior
Park.


______________________________________________________________________Ir


"MILL VISTA - CAROLINA" Easy access & build on Centerline Rd.
"FISH BAY" Views, breezes and paved access
"LEAST EXPENSIVE WATERFRONT"! Gentle slope, 4 min. walk to beach
"SUGAR APPLE WEST" Harbor views gentle 2 ac. with Topo
"CONTANT" lot with Great Cruz Harbor View. Owner Realtor
"CALABASH BOOM" .4 ac. GREAT views, private. Topo map
"BOATMAN POINT WATERFRONT" Sunset Views and Gentle Site.


$ 125,000
$ 260,000
$ 285,000
$ 299,000
$ 375,000
$ 475,000
$1,095,000


EAST END LAND Parcels in Privateer Bay and on far East End. Coral Bay views and
underground utilities. From $265,000
"CHOCOLATE HOLE" Breezes and views to St. Thomas. From $285,000
"VIRGIN GRAND ESTATES" Gated sub-division, sunsetviews. Can build FRACTIONAL
HOME! Paved roads. 3 from $335,000
"LOVANGO CAY" Waterfront & hillside properties; upscale amenities including barge
docks, paved roads, undrgrd utilities beach & views. From $275,000


"ESTATE CONCORDIA" hillside sites with stunning views
ranging from the BVIs, down St. John's eastern coast to
Ram's Head , St. Croix. From $335,000
"UPPER MONTE BAY ESTATES" 7 Spectacular private
parcels above Rendezvous Bay; paved road, stone walls
& underground utilities. From $799,000
"NORTHSHORE PROPERTIES" Peter Bay & Hawksnest/
Denis Bay exquisite home sites with breathtaking views
over the North Shore, BVI & many cays in between. Call for
a tour today. Prices start at $895,000 for half acre
"PETER BAY ESTATES" Exquisite home sites with
breathtaking views over the North Shore, BVI & cays
between. Prices from $1,750,000
BEST BUY BEACH FRONT "GREAT CRUZ BAY" private
dock access, quiet upscale neighborhood, awesome
views. Owner/broker. Call for details. $1,300,000


SELLER FINANCING
WITH GREAT TERMS!
"HAULOVER" BEACHFRONT 3.71
acre sub-dividable borders National
Park! AMAZING VIEWS! $1,900,000
"SABA BAY" WATERFRONT &
HILLSIDE Incredible BVI views! 12
acre sub-divideable waterfront lot
for $9,999,000 plus 4 hillside lots
available from $699,000
"DREEKETS BAY ESTATES"
spectacular BVI views, excellent roads,
underground utilities, stone walls,
planters, common beach. Minutes from
Coral Bay. 12 lots from $399,000


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28 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011


We wish you Happy Holidays and a Prosperous New Year!


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Reservations * 693-8141
E-mail: morgansmango@islands.vi


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Full Text

PAGE 1

Westin Breeze Hits ReefSome of 23 Staff Members InjuredPage 2 60 DAYS TO GO December 20-January 2, 2011 Copyright 2010/2011The Perfect, Last-Minute Holiday Gift:St. John MagazineSt. John Magazine Sis Frank Leaves Lifetime of Love and MemoriesPage 4

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2 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011New 90-day Gross Receipts T ax Amnesty Period — Deadline Is January 25, 2011Director of the V.I. Bureau of Internal Revenue Claudette Watson-Anderson, CPA, announced last week that the new, 90-day gross receipts tax amnesty went into effect upon the implementa tion of Act 7233, which was signed into law by Governor John deJongh on October 26. gross receipts taxes before the deadline of January 25, 2011. All turns Branch on at 715-1040, extension 2232. EDITOR/PUBLISHER MaLinda Nelson malinda@tradewinds.vi NEWS EDITOR Jaime Elliott jaime@tradewinds.vi WRITERS Andrea Milam, Mauri Elbel ADVERTISING advertising@tradewinds.vi CIRCULATION Rohan Roberts COLUMNISTS & CONTRIBUTORS Sis Frank, Chuck Pishko, Malik Stevens, Adam Lynch, Tristan Ewald, Paul Devine, Andrew Rutnik SUBSCRIPTIONS U.S. & U.S.V.I. only $70.00 per year THIRD CLASS PERMIT U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 3 St. John, VI 00831 NEWSLINE Tel. (340) 776-6496 Fax (340) 693-8885 www.tradewinds.vi editor@tradewinds.vi MAILING ADDRE SS Tradewinds Publishing P.O. Box 1500 St. John, VI 00831 COPYRIGHT 2010/2011All rights reserved. No reproduction of news stories, letters, columns, photographs or advertisements allowed without written permission from the publisher. TRADEWINDS PUBLISHING LLCThe Community Newspaper Since 1972 By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds Less than two weeks after the General II ran aground on a rocky outcropping near the entrance to Enighed Pond Marine Facility, a Westin Resort and Villas ferry ran hard aground in the same area on Friday morning, December 16. The 71-foot Westin Breeze had 23 passengers, one crew member and the captain on board when it went hard aground right inside of the red buoy off Moorehead Point. “We had 23 associates on the boat,” said Westin Resort manager Mike Ryan. “It was our associate run from St. Thomas.” The passengers and the one crew member were evacuated from Westin Breeze by local boaters and brought to the resort where they were checked out by St. John “We had all of our associates checked out here at the hotel by St. John Rescue and Dr. James Clayton who were on the property,” said Ryan. “They were also all transported to Myrah Keating Smith Community Health Center for follow up examinations.” Myrah Keating Smith Commugers were being treated for back and neck strains. “We’re seeing people with back strain and neck sprains,” said the no life threatening injuries or severe bleeding or anything. We’re just doing X-Rays and looking at sprains and strains.” ceived a call around 9:15 a.m. on December 16 that a vessel was in distress in the area of Moorehead Point, according Roberto Castrodad, USCG spokesperson. “As the information came in, we found out we were dealing with a passenger vessel,” Castrodad said. “The vessel was heading to St. John and had entered the channel just off Moorehead Point when it went hard aground. There were several vessels on the scene assisting and taking passengers off the ferry.” 25-foot response boat from its Marine Safety Detachment in St. Thomas, Castrodad explained. “When our Coast Guard boat ar rived on scene all of the passengers and the one crew member were off of the boat and the only one on the vessel was the captain,” said the USCG spokesperson. “Our per sonnel went on board to see what was going on and they saw that the vessel was taking on water.” A vessel from the St. Thomas marine salvage company Sea Tow was en route to the scene of the accident, according to Castrodad. “Sea Tow was on its way to see if it was possible to salvage the boat,” said Castrodad. “There was no indication of the vessel leaking oil or fuel but that is one of the things that we’ll be monitoring. We’ll be investigating the cause of the incident as well.” As of press time, Sea Tow had removed Westin Breeze from the reef and was making its way to Tortola, according to Ryan. “It’s my understanding that at this time Sea Tow did temporary repairs and is on its way towing Westin Breeze to Tortola,” said the resort manager. Westin Breeze is owned and operated by Inter-Island Boat Ser vices, according to Ryan, who did not have any information on the identity of the captain of the vessel or what caused the accident. “I have no idea what happened,” said Ryan. “It’s under investigation.” Ryan thanked local boaters who helped rescue passengers from the ferry. “I want to thank the local boaters who actually rescued the associates from the boat and transported them back to the hotel,” said Ryan. The ferry grounding capped a tough several months for Wesmonths recovering from damage to ballrooms, property, tennis courts and the pool from October Sisterhood/Brotherhood Agenda is hosting a New Year’s Eve Youth Extravaganza at the Housing Parks and Recreation Building in Cruz Bay on Friday, December 31, from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Parents, please register children in person starting at 8 p.m. Businesses, please help Virgin Islands youth be safe and successful. Call Angela at 714-7076 for more information.New Y ear’s Eve Party Set for Kids Christmas Morning at Powell ParkThe public is invited to join Friends of the Elaine I. Sprauve Library on Jan. 12, at 6 p.m. at the library for its annual meeting. The featured speaker is Brad Baldridge, of Baldridge College more information call 776-6359. The Annual St. John Serenade in the Park set for Saturday, December 25, at 5 a.m. at Frank Powell Park in Cruz Bay. Come by and bring an instrument and that Christmas cheer! Anyone inter ested in donating local breakfast items should call 693-8102.Donations Needed for St. Thomas Family Devastated by ExplosionSt. John Properties is accepting donations for members of the David family, who lost everything they own last week after an explosion at their Bovoni apartment. located next to Mongoose Junction, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday to drop off toys, clothing, and more to the to 1, in addition to the mother in the family. For more information call St. John Properties at 244-7418.IEK Christmas Concert Set for Dec. 21The Ivanna Eudora Kean High School Music Department presents its annual Christmas Concert titled, “A Time to Celebrate” at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, December 21, in the cafeteria. Westin’s Breeze Runs Aground Friends of Library Meeting Jan. 12 Lionsh Presentation at Maho Dec. 22 CORE’s management plan at Maho Bay Camps on Wednesday, December 22, at 7:30 p.m. in the main dining pavilion. This will not be a diver training. Pytlik has also invited Ziggy Livnat to present his documentary, “Learning to Sea,” which details the similarities of sea life in the Red Sea and the Caribbean. Pytlik will be giving a second presentation at Estate Concordia Preserve on December 27 at 7:30 p.m.

PAGE 3

By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds Voices singing Christmas carols can mean only one thing in Coral Bay — the annual Community Carol Sing and Tree Lighting Cer emony. Residents of all ages from East End to Mandhal gathered outside of Sputnik’s in Coral Bay for the annual Community Christmas Program on Wednesday, December 15, at 6:30 p.m. Still spry and looking dapper in a bright red shirt, George January lit the tree to get the night underway. Emcee Joan Thomas introduced each neighborhood and kept the crowd entertained throughout the night with her witty jokes. The entire crowd joined to sing the Herald Angels Sing,” followed by St. John Montessori School students who sang impressive renditions of holiday favorites “Jingle Bells” and “Frosty the Snowman.” Emmaus Moravian Church members offered renditions of several Christmas hymns, followed by Upper Carolina residents decked out in antlers, who sang “Jingle Bells.” Many Upper Carolina residents came out for the carol sing-along because of one of their neighbors, explained Caroline Rogers. Carey Mercurio, who has been dealing with serious landslide issues on her property, never thought about missing the annual event, she explained. “I came out because it’s a great time to get together with our wonderful neighbors and share in the holiday joy,” said Mercurio. That was all the convincing it took Rogers, a 25-year St. John community Christmas Program. “I thought if Carey could make an effort to come out and do this, the least I could do was come down too,” Rogers said. The annual sing-along in Cor al Bay dates back more than 50 years, to a time when residents on bring some Holiday cheer to the neighborhood, explained Edmund Roberts, who gave a short history of the tradition. Esteemed educator Guy Benja min also discussed the history of the event and explained how close neighbors were back in the 1960s. “If I had sugar and you needed some, I would give it to you,” said Benjamin. John’s Folly Learning Institute founder Alvis Christian works hard to make sure that neighbors continue to join together in song each Christmas time. “This is a tradition that was started by the elders many years ago and is what starts the Christmas celebration on the island,” said Christian. “I want to do my part to make sure that this tradition continues.” For Pam Dolson, who read two passages about the Christmas mir acle, it just isn’t Christmas without the annual sing-along. “This is my Christmas,” said me. Now it’s Christmas.” Joining the celebration for the from the Adrian Senior Citizen’s Center, who sang “O Holy Night,” and “The Light of the Lord.” Neighbors from John’s Folly, Bordeaux and Calabash Boom also took their turns singing Christmas carols. A large group from Skinny Legs, which donated refreshments for the evening, sang “I Saw Three Ships,” “Santa Claus is Coming To Town,” and “Winter Wonder land.” The whole crowd joined in singlights from the Coral Bay Fire Station across the streets sent children in a frenzy. Perched on the back of the truck was Santa Claus himself, who handed out donated toys to all of the youngsters and took last St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 3 Thursday, Dec. 30th INDEX Annual Community Sing-Along Ushers in Christmas in Coral Bay

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By Mauri Elbel St. John Tradewinds When Ruth “Sis” Frank passed away on Thanksgiving Day, she left behind a collection of warm memories which still live on in the minds and hearts of those who loved her. From her unmistakable laugh and signature “Sis-isms” that could be heard echoing through the streets of Cruz Bay for more than 50 years to her genuine love of the arts, the island and its children, Sis was as much a part of St. John as it was of her. “Sis fell in love with the island people and their culture which she shared for almost 52 years,” said Jan Kinder, a close friend of 26 years. “My life has been forever touched by her presence. As our friendship grew closer over the years, we began caring for and loving each other more like family.” Phillip “Grasshopper” Picker ing, leader of St. John’s premier reggae band Inner Visions and new member of SJSA Board of Directors, knew Sis from the time he was a young boy and throughout his teenage years playing in Steel Unlimited, the steel pan band success Sis managed alongside band director Rudy Wells. “When we looked at Sis, we never saw color,” Pickering said. “When we looked at Sis, we saw ourselves. She was one of us and she embraced us.” From the moment he met Sis, Pickering recalls the overwhelming compassion in her eyes and the unwavering sense of reassurance and encouragement she provided to so many of the island’s youth over the years. “She came to St. John and really looked at the community and became a part of it and became a part of the people,” he said. “She and Rudy took a group of kids who would normally have been on the street corner and getting into trouble and gave them something to do. Sis is going to be missed dearly and we will all remember Sis just as Sis was — as an inspiration to everybody.” Rudy Wells fondly recalls the would come to Cruz Bay Park to listen to him teach steel pan music to local youth on weekends. “She was very impressed by what I was doing with the children,” he said. “She asked me if I was a musician and I told her, ‘No, I just do this because as a kid in Trinidad I got involved in steel bands and I’ve been with steel band all my life’.” After a few months of listening to Wells creating steel pan music with the children on the weekends, a friendship was forged. Soon Sis organized a scholarship for Wells which allowed him to study his passion at the Berklee College of Music. When he returned six years later, the two worked together to make Steel Unlimited and then Steel Unlimited II the pride and joy of the island. “Sis was the person I depended on — she became a part of this with me,” he said. “She had a love for children that was unbeatable.” Sis and Wells helped broaden the horizons for St. John youth — Steel Unlimited performed at the Rose Bowl parade, Disneyland, the Lincoln Center and Shea Stadium while Steel Unlimited II put 4 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 Local Legend Sis Frank Leaves Behind Lifetime of Island Love and Memories Continued on Page 21

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St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 5 St. John Community Says Goodbye to Sis Frank Tel: 340-715-FOOD (3663) Tel: 340-779-4949 Open Daily – Located on the 1st level of the Marketplace Seasons Greetings and a Prosperous New Year from all of us at Starsh Market and Starsh Gourmet & Wines

PAGE 6

By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds University of the Virgin Islands will have a presence on St. John in the new year. While the university continues to negotiate with management of The Marketplace, the school’s Cooperative Extension Services is moving ahead with in the Bureau of Motor Vehicles parking lot, accord ing to Carlos Robles, extension specialist and acting CES supervisor for St. John and St. Thomas. “The entire university has been in talks with The Marketplace for a space to meet with program par ticipants and distribute information,” said Robles. “CES is currently working on an area near inspection lane, in the trailer there run by solar power. We are in the process of getting ready to move into that facility while we await the facility at The Marketplace.” fer publications about its programs and as place to meet with its clients in the areas of agriculture, urban gardening, farming, natural resources and family and consumer sciences, Robles explained. “We’re also going to offer sewing classes, nutrition programs and other non-credit courses that everyone can take for a nominal fee or for free,” he said. ago because the space, located above Fashion Palace, was not handicapped accessible, according to Robles. BMV parking lot by the end of January 2011 and oflater, Robles added. “At The Marketplace, we’re looking at the old gym over there a few months down the road.”6 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 Experienced . Personalized . Professional . ProvenSeaview Vacation Homes, Inc. Short Term-Full Service Since 1985 VACATION VILLA MANAGEMENT24 years of on island rental servicee: info@seaviewhomes.com w: www.seaviewhomes.com t: 340-776-6805; toll-free 1-888-625-2963 of Motor Vehicles Parking Lot in January Open TuesdaySunday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tel: 693-5579Beautifying America’s Paradise St. John Tradewinds St. John arrested Antonio Powell, 28, around 8 a.m. Sunday, December 12, and charged him with Aggravated Assault and Battery, Domestic Violence. Powell repeatedly punched a female victim on her body and face causing cuts and scratches, according to the initial police report. The suspect and victim are romantically involved, police added. The incident occurred at an Estate Grunwald residence. The victim was transported by private vehicle to the Myrah Keating Smith Community Health Center for treatment. Powell is a St. Thomas native who was residing in Estate Adrian on St. John. Bail for Powell was denied due to the domestic violence charge and he was remanded to the Bureau of Corrections pending further court action.Antonio Powell Arrested for Domestic Violence

PAGE 7

By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds Unlike plans for a proposed gas station atop Jacob’s Ladder, Guilderoy Sprauve’s on Tuesday evening, December 14, in order to build an automated service station on his Estate Adrian property didn’t draw any opposition. While only two residents — out of the three who attended the hearing — spoke during the meeting, both were in favor of the project. “I live about 300 feet up the road and I think it’s a great project,” said Brian Smith said. “I usually feel so upset about where St. John is today with just one gas station. I want to hear about how we can assist this guy to pull this project off.” “We need more than one gas station,” said Smith. Julia Sommersall, who also lives nearby, gave her thumbs-up to the project as well. “They asked me my concerns about this project and they were very sensitive to my feelings,” said Sommersall. “Mr. Sprauve was very informative and told me about this meeting. He seems reasonable and I think the project is workable.” Sprauve presented his plans for a six pump automated service station and convenience store at Parcel No. 17 J-1 Estate Adrian during a Department of Planning and Natural Resources zoning variance repurpose Center. The parcel is currently zoned R-1 (residential low density) which does not allow variance in order to construct a six-pump automated gas station and convenience store Sprauve’s entire lot is six acres, but he is foot parcel of the land. The parcel is located on Centerline Road, adjacent to the Love City Home and Garden Center, on land previously used by the Seventh Day Adventist Church for evangelistic meetings. Other than a tent and temporary stage erected by the church, the property is empty. The other side of the property is abutted by an empty lot, which is also owned by the Sprauve family, according to the developer. Much of the area is already home to industry, explained Sprauve, who owns Jixter LLC with his brother Gerren. “Every other property in that area is an industrial operation,” Sprauve said. When creating the project, Sprauve saw St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 7 Estate Adrian Gas Station Proposal Draws No OppositionContinued on Page 20

PAGE 8

25th Annual GHS Auction Set for March 12By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds While a proposal to construct a 24-hour gas station in Estate Chocolate Hole was met with opposition from most residents, the land is zoned for such uses and the development looks likely to be okayed. Nedal Salem, principal of #481-1 Estate Chocolate Hole Realty Inc., plans to construct a four-pump 24hour gas station and a three-story building with a convenience store and two apartments on his .473-acre site adjacent to the Greenleaf Commons parking lot atop Jacob’s Ladder. At a November meeting with the developer and cials concerning the development, most residents opposed the location of the station and raised concerns over the steepness of the site. The area, however, is zoned B-3, business scattered, which allows gas stations among myriad other commercial uses. While the developer’s permit is cur rently pending, it seemed likely to be approved with a long list of special conditions, according to DPNR’s terminal facilities coordinator Kent Bernier Jr. “We took into consideration all of the comments mentioned by residents during the November meet ing,” said Bernier. “We put those into a list of special conditions that he must answer, explain, meet and turn in before he can move forward. We are trying to make sure that all of our ‘I’s’ are dotted and ‘T’s’ crossed.” For foes of the project, there is a possibility the development could be stopped. Despite having the necessary zoning, overwhelming community opposition could convince DPNR Commissioner Bob Mathes to deny the permit, explained DPNR’s Division of Comprehensive and Coastal Zone Planning director Mar jorie Emmanuel. “We had a similar situation on St. Croix where a property was rezoned for a particular use, not a gas station, and then that property was sold to someone else,” said Emmanuel. “The new owner applied for a gas station which residents in the area were against. Even though the zoning was correct for the station, there was overwhelming opposition to the develop ment and the developer ended up withdrawing his application.” “In this case, it would be a decision by the commis sioner,” said Emmanuel.8 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 Chocolate Hole Gas Station Permit Approval Likely with Long List of Special Conditions WR-FitnessClub TW 6.09.indd 1 6/10/09 12:42:29 PM St. John Tradewinds The 25th Annual Gifft Hill School Auction will be Saturday, March 12, at the Westin Resort and Villas. For more information call the GHS devel opment@mac.com. St. John T axi Medallion Goes For $50,100 at Public Auction, Veteran’s Goes for $20,100St. John Tradewinds Driving a taxi on St. John will put one back a cool $50,100. That was the winning of two bids received at a Thursday, December 16, public auction for St. John Taxi Medallions at the Oftaining that. All bidders were pre-approved and Kevin Williams posted the winning bid of $50,100. He had to post 10 percent on the spot with the remainder to be paid no later than the close of business that day. The V.I. Taxicab Commission was ordered by the V.I. Superior Court to host the public auction, after no one attended a Marshal’s Sale of the medallion, according to Judith Wheatley, the executive director of the V.I. Taxicab Commission. “The bank had a credit bid and they repossessed the medallion,” said Wheatley. “The bank can’t use the medallion so they hosted a Marshal’s Sale. But they advertised that sale online and no one showed up.” “So the court ordered the Taxicab Commission to proceed with the public auction,” Wheatley said. In addition to the public auction, the Taxicab Commission also hosted its annual Veteran’s Medallion auction earlier on Thursday, December 16. Edmund Roberts had the sole and winning bid of $20,100 to take home the medallion. The minimum bid for the Veteran’s Auction was $20,000 and while the Taxicab Commission had many

PAGE 9

By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds rose more than 40 feet into the sky last week. Doug White, who owns Solar Supply with his wife Leslie, over saw the project, while Chris Clark of Eclectic Electric did the wiring and Julio’s Construction built the concrete foundation. mill, a Skystream 2.4 kW wind generator, arose on Ellen and Edward Robert’s Bordeaux Mountain property. “It’s a Skystream 2.4 kW wind generator on a 45 foot tower,” said White. “It should produce, I would say, 500 kW hours a month depending on the wind speed. We’re estimating an average of 12 miles per hour.” “Sometimes it’s not blowing at all up there but 15 to 20 miles per hour is not unusual either for Bor deaux,” White said. After spending more than a year in the permitting process, watching the tower rise last week was a triumph, explained White. “It took us over a year to get the necessary permits,” he said. “We needed a Fish and Wildlife permit, an earth change permit and a buildthere in the forefront.” The 45-foot tower supports the windmill’s six-foot blades and is anchored by a concrete footing, “to keep it from turning over,” said White. The wind generator shouldn’t emit much noise, but is “very visible from the Bordeaux lookout,” said the owner of Solar Supply, the Skystream dealer in the Virgin Islands. In addition to the windmill, the Roberts have also installed a solar hot water heater and two kW of solar power, White added. “The Roberts are really committed to renewable energy and we kind of pushed the envelope with this project,” he said. mill on St. John, a second one is expected to be erected on the south shore, explained White, who did And more wind generators on St. John are sure to follow. “I think for the people who live in areas like Bordeaux, if you have the wind resources and you can it’s certainly a viable option for renewable energy,” said White. Wind generators must be set back from the property line one and half times the height of the tower, White explained. “You need a pretty good amount of property to put up that kind of wind generator,” he said. “There are other generators that can be put up in a smaller space.” For more details about the Skystream windmill or other Solar Supply products, call 775-7483.St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 9 First W indmill on St. John Rises on Bordeaux Mountain ATTENTION ST. JOHN HOMEOWNERSHIRING PROFESSIONALS TO MAINT AIN YOUR HOME ISNOT AN EXTRAVAGANCEI T ISSMART BUSINESS SENSE CONTACT THE PROFESSIONALS AT Cimmaron Property ManagementS t. John’s Premier Property M anagement Company Providing:COMPREHENSIVE MAINTENANCE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT GUEST SERVICES (340) 715-2666 / www.cimmaronstjohn.com / info@cimmaronstjohn.com P.O. Box 37, St. John, VI 00831 / Lumberyard Complex – Cruz Bay ABSOLUTE BEST DEAL ON ST. JOHN! Breathtaking panoramic views of BVI, Hurricane Hole and Coral Bay from this high elevation, downhill-build parcel, in quiet, upscale neighborhood of Upper Carolina. Paved road access, great terms! e-mail Carl at cjnpc@optonline.net or call 516.459.6480. NOW OPENHighest quality pet collars, leads, treats, sporting wear and MUCH, MUCH more. 340.777.9588 www.stjohnimals.com Festival Committee Celebrates with Gift Giving

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10 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 Rudy and Irene Patton wish to thank you ALL. We realize that without your support, sending in your friends, guests and clients, we would not still be making our jewelry at Mongoose Junction. Thirty-seven years and counting! Happy Holidays from all of us at R&I PATTON goldsmithing Brenda, Irene, Kim, George Sawyer (special guest artist,) Devin, Jo Anne, Linda, Ron and Rudy Love City Pan Dragons Perform Festive Holiday ConcertBy Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds More than 50 residents and visitors joined the Love City Pan Dragons in kicking off the holiday season on Sunday afternoon, December 12, with the group’s annual Christmas concert at the Westin Resort and Villas. Led by instructor and arranger Samuel Lawrence, the group played a variety of traditional and local holiday songs. From the Christmas standard, “O Holy Night” by Adolph Adams to the upbeat “Pan,” by Cool Session Brass, the crowd was tapping their toes and bopping their heads to the beat. The fun even continued between sets when dur ing the short intermission, one Love City Pan Dragon student gave a special show. Taking the baton from Samuel, the pan player gave a dead-on impersonation of the one-of-a-kind instructor, which had the whole crowd in stitches. set with the Pan Dragons showing off their considerable skill with such songs as “Can Can” by Cole Porter and “Pan in Mas” composed by Lawrence himself. The program wrapped up with the holiday favorite “Winter Wonderland” to thunderous applause. Stone Masonry Erecting Modern and Eco Bus Shelters Across St. JohnBy Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds Four new bus stops on St. John are sure to make taking VIT RAN much more enjoyable. The project was initiated by the Department of Public Works, which contracted the job to Stone Masonry to the tune of $147,085, according to St. John Administrator Leona Smith. The concrete bus shelters are located at Estate Susanaberg, George Simmons Terrace, the Emmaus Moravian Church and Estate Hard Labor and all include renewable energy sources, explained Smith. “All shelters will have solar panels on the top of the roof, which will allow the shelters to be lit at night,” said the administrator. “These bus shelters are very sturdy and attractive and I encourage the public to utilize them.” RAN buses, enabling riders to follow the bus route and know of any delays in the schedule, Smith added. “Going forward residents will be able to use GPS next year to track the movement and time of the bus arrival and departure at each shelter,” said Smith. “This is good news and technology is the way to go. We are moving in the right direction and other projects are in the making for this administration on the island of St. John.”

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By Jaime Elliott St. John Tradewinds With February 19 inching ever closer, organizers add exciting events to the night’s activities, but some Love City residents are still not clear on the day’s intention. While Relay for Life is the premier American Cancer Society fund raising event, the event is not a race, explained Mary Bartolucci, St. John Relay for Life event chair. “Relay for Life is not a race and is not even an athletic event, it is a family, community 18-hour event,” said Bartolucci. “The theme is that cancer never sleeps, which is why the event goes through the night. It started years ago when a physician did a continu ous jogging event in order to raise money for cancer research.” “This is not 8 Tuff Miles,” Bartolucci said. “Someone from the team just has to be on the track at all times.” The event, which starts at 4 p.m. on Saturday, teams of between 12 and 15 participants, who each raise a minimum of $100 for the American Cancer Society. During the event, one team member must be on the track at all times, whether walking, jogging or running. The event kicks off at 4 p.m. with an opening cer emony followed by survivors taking to the track for Bartolucci. “A survivor is anyone who has ever been told ‘You have cancer,’ whether they are in treatment or have lap and after that the teams take over with one person from each team on the track at all times.” Survivors are also in for a treat with the Relay for Life survivors dinner, which starts at 6 p.m. All sur vivors and one caretaker each, should sign up for the “It’s going to be a beautiful gourmet dinner,” said Bartolucci. “We have Ted Robinson, from Ted’s Supper Club, Alex Ewald from La Tapa, the guys from La Plancha del Mar and Zozo’s each doing courses.” At 9 p.m. the night turns emotional with the light ing of luminaries, which are lit in honor of those who have lost their battle with cancer, those who continue The luminaries are lit at 9 p.m. and will be arranged on the bleachers to share a special message with the Relay for Life crowd. The entire night will be full of games, events, chil dren’s activities and great music for all ages. Philip “Grasshopper” Pickering is helming the entertain ment committee, so participants can expect the very best of island entertainment. highlight of the evening, Bartolucci added. “The Mongoose Merchants Association is spontroop,” said the Relay for Life event chair. “We’ve never seen anything like this on St. John. It’s going to be an amazing show.” Music and activities will take participants through the night until the event wraps up at 10 a.m. with a closing ceremony. While many aspects of the event have already been covered, Relay for Life organizers are still looking for sponsors, explained Bartolucci. “The community can help out by forming teams, and providing donations and sponsorships,” said the United Airlines is providing transportation for the performers, Rocky Coast has offered discounted Tshirts which Skinny Legs is buying for all teams and volunteers. St. John Market, which is opening a new deli, is providing food for the volunteers, explained Bartolucci. Survivors should register for the survivors’ dinner by emailing Beverly Biziewski at bevjb@vipowernet. net or Elaine Estern at elaine@coconutcoaststudeios. com. For more information, or to donate or volunteer, check out the St. John Relay for Life website at www. stjohnrelay.org or call Bartolucci at 774-1484 or 6421629. The group is also Facebook, to sign up and become a fan.St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 11 Not 8 Tuff Miles —Relay for Life is A Community and Family Event, Not a Race

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12 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 Sun Power Loans for Solar Water HeatersNo money down Low Interest loan Up to $2,500 in rebateDon’t pay to heat Your Water; do it free, use the for a cleaner, greener Virgin Islands. St. John Tradewinds In this ever-changing world I feel you must give thanks for what you’ve got, especially during this time of year. Among many great things, I’d like to give thanks for the end of hurricane season, holiday break from school, and the beautiful “winter” weather. Although I am thankful for our holiday break at Gifft Hill School, midterm exams always create anxiety over studying. When talking to other students, we agree that about three weeks before midterms, the teachers kick it into over-drive and start loading up the homework. Students start freaking out because of the excess work and the building stress of midterm exams. We students do, however, learn many lessons during these three weeks. Procrastination is one of the many lessons we learn. Everyone procrastinates. It’s so easy to put things on the back burner. You realize the uselessness of procrastination when you are stuck at one o’clock reports. I sometimes feel that we need a class on procrastination, because we tend to forget how awful it is. A big problem that comes with midterms is test Patty Beach Wins 2010 Island Treasure Map Contest St. John Tradewinds The winner of the 2010 Island Treasure Maps contest is Patty Beach. Beach lives on her boat “The Seven Sisters” with her husband Billy Beach. The two spend their time between Coral Bay, St. John, St. Croix — where they own a home — and Rochester, New York where the two hail from. Beach plans on sharing her prizes with her friend Sally Pedrick earlier this year to solve the riddle and become eligible for the contest. Beach and Pedrick will share a whole pot luck of prizes includ ing a week long stay at one of Catered To’s villas. Congratulations to Beach and good luck to next year’s Treasure Map participants who will contend for best photo. Rhythm & ViewsAn outlook on young adult interests and concerns by Coral BreuningMid-Term Exams and the New Year Continued on Page 20

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St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 13 St. John Tradewinds The annual fundraising gala to shelter, the St. John Animal Care Center, will take place in the evening on Saturday, January 8, at a breathtaking villa in Estate Chocolate Hole. Tickets are on sale now for $100 each. Event attendees can submit ticket stubs at the door for a chance to win a Biras Creek getaway. Only 150 event tickets will be sold. Ticket holders will be shuttled from the Westin Resort and Villas’ time share entrance road to the fountained courtyard entry of the sprawling, elegant Hall residence. With a two-level pool, poolside bars and large decks, the residence is a perfect venue to watch the night rise and to celebrate the ACC’s continued efforts to help the community and the animals. As darkness approaches, so will the wild side. Guests are encouraged to support the evening’s “Walk on the Wild Side” theme be wearing animal inspired clothing. Dress is “island fancy” and party vided. Local chefs and restaurants are providing a menu of delicious appetizers, salads, entrees and desserts. including: Dine Around St. John packages; three-courses, plus wine for four people from St. John Catering; a one-week stay at the Rose Estate in Great Cruz Bay; a commission for a custom oil painting by Livy Hitchcock; a legal Will by Kathy Depree and more. Winners need not be present. One event attendee who purchases one or more Card prize, a full-day charter on Southern Hospitality. Event tickets are available for sale from the ACC, Catered To, Connections and St. John Hardchased in advance at www.stjacc. org. For more information contact the ACC at 774-1625 or online at www.stjacc.org. The ACC is a Go Wild With Christmas for the Animals on January 8Kwanzaa Celebration Set for Dec. 26 in Cruz BaySt. John Tradewinds Sigma Theta Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. will host its 16th Annual Community Kwanzaa Celebration on Saturday, December 26, at 6 p.m. at the Franklin Powell Park in Cruz Bay. The public is cordially invited to join the sorority members as they take time to celebrate Kwanzaa. The ebration held in 1995. This year promises to be festive and fun as in times past with local artists and students from the various schools, dancers, and other performers such as the Love City Leapers, Love City Pan Dragons Youth Steel Orchestra, St. Thomas Majorettes, to name a few. St. John students who participated in Alpha Kappa Alpha’s Earn Set Potential Kids Club will be recogciple Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics) meaning: to build and maintain stores, shops and other businesses Over the past four years the students have par ticipated in workshops and other activities geared towards helping them learn how to save and invest money towards their future. “Kwanzaa Celebration does not replace Christmas or other religious holidays, it is a time for us to come heritage and to focus on the goodness of life, culture, community and family,” said Laurel Hewitt-Sewer, president of Sigma Theta Omega Chapter. Additional participants for this program are welcome and can contact Elisa Hodge at eghodge@ya hoo.com or 774-8675 or 771-5332 22. Santa Dog Joins Reading Time at Elaine I. Sprauve LibrarySt. John Tradewinds Friends of Elaine I. Sprauve Library volunteers Miles Stair, Heather Ruhsam and Joy Stillman brought a special friend along with them to the library last week. While the trio regularly read to youngsters at the library, they brought along Santa Dog on Thursday morning, December 16. graders and Head Start students as the volunteers read Holidaythemed books.

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14 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 Does your business depend on tourists? now . comVirgin Islands Vacation Guide & CommunityVInow.com receives thousands of visitors each month researching the Virgin Islands; things like where to stay, where to go and what to do while on vacation. Will they nd your business? VInow.com covers St. John, St. Thomas, St. Croix and Water Island. Topics include accommodations, car rentals, tours, day charters, shing, wedding planners, restaurants and more! Well Established 10 + Years High Trac, Average 100,000 visits a month Targeted Audience of VI TravelersAdvertising options starting at just $1 a day Contact Us Today! (340) 774-1181 | info@VInow.com | http://www.VInow.com St. John St. Thomas St. Croix Water Island St. John Tradewinds As a component of its ongoing local tour ism awareness campaign, the Department spots designed to raise the level of customer service in the territory and promote the customer service pledge. The ads will air locally on the Government Access Channel and other local cable channels and began running last week. “Until now our tourism awareness message has been promoted locally in print, radio and online, so we are very excited to broaden our audience even further by adding television to our media mix,” said DOT Commissioner Beverly Nicholson-Doty. “Television also provides us a great opportunity to visually dramatize interactions with our visitors and illustrate how improving our customer service skills not only enhances the visitor’s experience but also fosters a greater sense of personal ownership in our tourism product.” Each spot features a mocko jumbie char acter who intervenes when poor service is being delivered and “inspires” the ser vice provider to take the customer service pledge. In the spots, taking the pledge results in the delivery of superior customer service, service provider with pride. The interactions depicted in the ads came directly from comments received by mystery shoppers who visited the territory in 2009 to rate the level of service in the USVI. The mystery shopper study, commis sioned by DOT, revealed that although the USVI scored 82 percent across 10 customer service standards, a score of 90 percent or above is what it will take to ensure that visitors return and recommend the destination to others. Mystery shoppers “shopped” 10 sectors throughout the territory including hotels, taxis, restaurants, retail and the general public, among others. “As members of a tourism-based commu nity, providing exceptional customer service is essential to the success of our destination and our future prosperity,” said Nicholsonvice we provide each other as residents of the Virgin Islands which is why we encour age the public at large to take the pledge and make the USVI a more hospitable place for all of us.” In addition to placing the ads on local television, the department planned to incor porate them into school presentations to encourage dialogue about exploring attitudes and cultural differences as it relates to tour ism. The spots may currently be viewed online at www.usvimarketing.com. The spots and digital production company based on St. John. For more information on the Department of Tourism’s customer service pledge and to take the pledge visit www.usviservicepledge.com.Tourism Launches Local TV Campaign to Promote Customer Service

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St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 15 St. John Tradewinds Steve Simon, the creator, producer and Blues Boss of the worldrenowned Johnnie Walker St. John Blues Festival proudly announced that the 9th annual Johnnie Walker Blues Festival will have two nights of celebrity concerts in the evening, March 18, and Saturday evening, March 19, both starting at 8 p.m. “With record breaking attendance year after year, we have decided to add another evening of world class Blues under the stars this coming March,” said Simon. nie Walker St. John Blues Festival will be held on two consecutive nights with two star studded shows.” The Friday night show will showcase Blues Challenge winner Grady Champion and his band, the Superhero herself Candye Kane and Blind Pig Records recording artist Albert Cummings. Taking the stage at 8 p.m. on Saturday evening will be Telarc recording artists Moreland & Ar buckle, the “Queen of Memphis” Reba Russell and her band and then the man who inspired John Belushi to create the Blues Brothers, Curtis Salgado and his Big Band. Tickets will go on sale right after January 1, 2011, and will be available on St. John at Connections in Cruz Bay, Connections in Coral Bay, Chelsea Drugs in the Marketplace and on St. Thomas at Chelsea Drugs in Red Hook. Advance tickets are $25 for each night or $45 for a two-night pass. Tickets purchased at the gate will be $30 each night. All children under 16 are admitted free. There will be $5 safari taxi rides the Cruz Bay passenger ferry dock to the Cruz Bay passenger ferry dock all night long both evenings. There will also be a late night ferry from Cruz Bay to Red Hook at 1 a.m. after both shows. Food and beverages will be available both nights so bring a blanket or bring a chair but please be cool — no coolers. The 9th Annual Johnnie Walker St. John Blues Festival is presented by Johnnie Walker, The Lumberyard Complex, Merchants Commercial Bank, the U.S.V.I Department of Tourism, Rotary of St. John, The Gifft Hill School, Shipwreck Landing Restaurant, Rhumblines, The Beach Bar, Sun Dog Cafe, Jeff and Bonnie Simon and Steve and Helen Simon. For additional information check out stjohnbluesfestival.com or contact Simon directly at stevesimonlive@yahoo.com.Ninth Annual St. John Blues Festival Adds Second Star Studded Show

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I am sure that all of us who knew Sis Frank feel a certain numbness at her passing, simply because her presence remains with us through all of her good deeds throughout her life on St. John. I’ll always remember coming back to St. John after an absence of 30 years and, realizing the contrast between back then and now, wondering if we could bring it back if only for a week, by searching out the “real” islanders and staging a cultural festival. After buying a small cottage, I mentioned my desire to Sang Khauv, who suggested I should talk to Sis Frank at the St. John School of the Arts. Sis invited me to meet with her one morning, and sitting at the small table as you entered the little theater, I presented my thoughts to Sis based on a festival I had started in New Zealand. She was all for it and arranged a meeting with Julien Harley, the St. John Administrator, and Corine Matthias, his secretary. They too liked the idea and chose February, Black History Month, as the preferred month. Thereafter, Sis provided contact after contact to help build a team of like-minded enthusiasts and volunteers. I didn’t know anyone and without Sis’ unrelenting encouragement and support, the festival would have remained just a good idea. After applying my analysis skills to marrying available artists and musicians to the limited venues on St. John (there was no town hall) a program was pulled together and published for February 17-23, 2001, with the theme “Something Different,” suggested by Harley. There were events everywhere and anywhere possible: The School of the Arts, Cruz Bay Park, restaurants, art galleries and stuThere were band concerts every day in the afternoon and evening and small groups at the restaurants and art galleries, and church choirs sang on Sunday. The Festival took root and was 11 years to become an established, “looked forward to” real St. John cultural event. Which is what I mean when I say, “Her presence is still with us.” This year’s St. John Art’s Festival will be February 19 to 25. Frank Langley16 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 Crossword Answers — Puzzle on Page 16 Keeping Track of Crime2009 2010 TO-DATE Letters To St. John TradewindsNo Arts Festival Save for SisVIVA! Villas sends a big thank you to the St. John community for the many donations to the company’s St. Lucia food drive last month. We collected 14 cases of food/linens and received $1,000 in cash donations. The items are all being sent down this week to St. Lucia in hopes the families will receive everything for the holidays Angie Smith VIVA! VillasCommunity Came Out Strong for St. Lucia Food DriveI do not have a boat and can therefore be objective in the case of our boating community. Last week, we were invited on a sailing ride by friends. When coming into the Coral Bay harbor, I was amazed how poor the place looked. This surprised me because sailing and other boating is a very important attraction of our islands; it is like a magnet for tourists from all over the world. This of course means an important source of business income and substantial landing and registration fees going to the treasury. The dock is in a very deplorable condition: pieces of concrete missing, part of the pier is made of wood. I did not realize that this Not knowing this, I lost balance when the pier moved and I fell into the water. Fortunately, I just lost one shoe in the deep mud but the fall was very unpleasant. I discussed the harbor and boating community with some bystanders and I was amazed to hear that the government is not only negligent, it even looks hostile against the boaters. Permits for any repair take a very long time and some of them are not even granted, like the one to of money. The government collects fees but gives nothing back to the boaters. Even repairs which would be made by the boaters for free including the materials, charters were not permitted for most applicants. gin Islands. There is no garbage bin in close vicinity of the harbor. The boaters do not usually have surface transportation and dispose of their garbage with difBoating is very important for the Virgin Islands. Please give them support. Z. HruzaBoating Community Needs Support

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St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 17 2011 EDITION ON NEWSSTANDS! Saltwater Gypsy Consignment Shop GENTLY USED HOUSEHOLD ITEMS & MORE... Furniture, Kitchen Items, Art, New Toys, Lamps, ETC. Find Us @ The Lumberyard Monday Friday 10-5 & Saturday 9-1Currently Accepting Your Items for Resale.. This week, we especially need: Dressers, TV’s & Microwaves For More Information Call Laurie 340-244-8888 crane ROBERT CRANEARCHITECT, A.I.A.P .O. BOX 370 CRUZ BAY, ST. JOHN U.S.V.I. 00831(340) 776-6356 SELLING? BUYING? RENTING SEEKING? GET RESULTS!St. John Tradewinds WHAT DO YOU THINK?NEXT DEADLINE: THURSDAY , DECEMBER 30The night before last as my sons and I prepared for bed, they were pushing me hard to be honest with them about Santa Claus. Otis is 10-years-old and Andrew is seven. I was doing my best to evade the bar think?” and “Do you think he is real?” Finally Otis we are asking you!” I smiled awkwardly. He continued, “We know that you know, so tell us the truth. Is he real?” guess it depends on what you mean by real.” To which Otis replies, “OK, for example, we know the tooth fairy comes into the house and takes the tooth from under the pillow and leaves a gift. Does Santa actually come into the house and leave gifts in the stockings?” At this point my mind twists and turns into various the conversation I am having with my sons. On one hand I am thinking that ten is kind of old for having this conversation. Why haven’t his friends told him the truth? Why do I have to be the one to break it to him? Maybe there is no right age to learn the truth about Santa. My mind continues to spin. I think I was seven (Andrew’s age) when my mother told me Santa wasn’t real. I can remember it like it was yesterday. She was ironing in the basement just outside the laundry room, tions my sons were now asking me. She was trying to Finally she said what I feared most. Santa was not ness yet I knew she was telling the (her) truth, but it didn’t seem fair. Or right. My mind spins back to my kids, I actually feel a tion of what do we mean by real. Not in the spirit of further evasion, but for real. ing in goodness and joy. Yet still I am not prepared to lie about who puts the gifts in the stockings. And the boys are no longer letting me dodge the issue. I can feel the tears welling up in my eyes and after Otis asks me one more time with much intensity and seriousness, “Who puts the gifts in our stockings?!?!?” I reply meekly, “I do.” Tears now running down my cheeks. The boys, bedroom is still. Time stops. Quiet all around. Finally one of them asks me why I am crying and I reply that I am not sure. Andrew puts his head in my lap and these words come out of my mouth, “Of course he can not get to all the houses, he relies on parents to help him out.” And Andrew chimes in with his sweet high pitched, little boy voice, “He probably goes to places like Haiti where the parents aren’t able to help out.” I let this the air around us. Now Otis has joined the cluster on my lap and under my arms. The boys are spilling out, all legs and arms across the bed. There is a small feeling of relief. The boys are now discussing their new awareness and dolph, well he certainly doesn’t have a glowing red nose. It’s likely that Santa focuses on the kids in need up north near his factory and maybe he ships toys to places like Africa and Haiti. Their voices blending in with the heaviness in my heart and the uncertainty I feel in letting them continue to believe. And still growing and welling stronger inside me and all around us is the vastness of possibility, so close to being lost, now restored. This morning as I write about it, I wonder if this is some odd version of what Christmas is really about. Believing in something magical, something that brings good things to people in need. Hope, something we all need. I now know why I was crying. I need to believe in the Greater Good, in the Holy Spirit, I need to believe in you and me. I need hope to stay alive. I need to see and feel the light, in myself, in my children, in my family, in my neighbors and the people I do not know. I need to believe. Especially during the darkest hour, the reminders are ever more important to me. I guess this is the story about someone raised Christian, raised to celebrate Christmas as the cel ebration of the birth of Christ. Someone who was told at a young age that Santa was not real. Then found meaning in things ancient as an adult. Seasons. Moon become a mother and saw again the ease with which children believe and carry hope in their hearts. This story is mine. It is my children’s. I suspect part of it may be yours too. I no longer will celebrate Solstice separate from Christmas. I no longer need to believe that Christ is more real than Santa. I hold all this as true. Jesus. Santa. The Great Mother Earth. You. Me. Love. Light. Hope. I offer my light up to the darkness that surrounds us. Blessed Be, Karn AndersonMom, Is Santa Real? Letters To St. John Tradewinds

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Holiday and Christmas Festival Leave 18 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 December 18thth.St. John Tradewinds The University of the Virgin Islands has received a $1.5 million grant to increase the number of students in the Virgin Islands who enter colleges and universities. A total of $1 million in scholar ships will be available to eligible students for the 2010-2011 aca demic year. UVI, in collaboration with the Virgin Islands Board of Governor, received the grant from the U.S. Department of Education College Access Challenge Grant (CACG) Program. This is a marked increase over the $330,000, twoyear grant that was previously awarded to the territory in 2008. This grant allows UVI and its community partners to provide information to students and families about postsecondary education and career preparation, and to offer need-based scholarships to students. Scholarships in the amount of $5,000 will be available for students who demonstrate a need and meet the grant’s criteria for appli cation. Scholarships can be used at any accredited college or univer sity. Grant awards will be distributed between the St. Thomas/St. John and St. Croix districts. Through the grant, targeted interventions will be implemented to address the disparity in the catego ries of students most underrepresented in accessing post-secondary training. It also allows UVI to collabo rate with the American Counseling Association of the Virgin Islands to implement professional development training and to provide support to guidance counselors at middle and secondary schools. Scholarships applications and awards will be administered through the V.I. Board of Educa tion. Denise Lake, the grant’s educa tional outreach coordinator from its inception, has vast experience in implementing federal grant-based programs. She works closely with educators to enhance students’ and their families’ awareness of the education. The CACG primarily seeks to focus on students who may be at risk of not enrolling in or complet college attendees. For more information contact Educational Outreach Coordinator Lake at 340-692-4101 or CACG Program Project Investigator and Associate St. Croix Campus Administrator for Student Affairs Miriam Osborne Elliott at 340692-4188.V.I. Receives $1.5 Million T o Help Students Attend CollegeSt. John Tradewinds Governor John deJongh signed a proclamation granting admin istrative leave to non-essential government employees during the Christmas holidays, St. Croix Christmas Festival and the 2011 Inaugural Celebration in January. Administrative leave has been granted territory-wide from 12 noon to 5 p.m. on both Friday, December 24, and on Friday, December 31, to celebrate the Christmas season and to ring in the New Year. To encourage greater participation in the annual St. Croix Festival celebration, deJongh’s proclamation granted territory-wide administrative leave from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, January 7, the day of the Children’s Parade. St. Croix only will also be granted administrative leave from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday, January 5, for both the St. Croix Christmas Festival J’ouvert and the Festival Food, Arts and Crafts Fair. To celebrate the 2011 Inaugural, deJongh has granted territorywide administrative leave on January 3 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. St. Croix only will be granted administrative leave on January 4 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for post-inaugural activities and on January 5, administrative leave will be granted only to employees on St. John to participate in post-inaugural activities. Holiday Administrative Leave December 24 and 31: Territory-wide administrative leave 12 noon – 5 p.m. January 3: Territory-wide administrative leave 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. January 4: St. Croix only administrative leave 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. January 5: St. Croix and St. John only administrative leave 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. January 7: Territory-wide administrative leave 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. The administrative leave as provided for in the proclamation does not apply to essential government employees, employees on a regular or rotating shift and employees on annual or sick leave.

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St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 19 Serving Breakfast & Dinner Outdoor Dining Overlooking Salt Pond BayCall Us for Seasonal Hours 340.693.5855 St. John, U.S. Virgin IslandsBreakfast Served: 8:00-10:00am Happy Hour: 5:00-6:00pm Dinner Served: 6:00-9:00pm St. John Tradewinds Governor John deJongh has announced that inaugural festivities scheduled for January 3-5, 2011 those of the past. After consulting with Lt. Governor Gregory Francis and the co-chairs of the Inaugural Commit tee, deJongh said that several activities have been eliminated altogether, including the Inaugural Luncheons and Inaugural Balls previously held on all three islands, as well as the post-Inaugural ceremo nies on the islands of St. Croix and St. John. “Although there is a $200,000 appropriation for these events, we believe it sends the wrong message to our community for us to stage an elaborate celebration at a time when we have had to borrow to sustain government services for the last two years,” said the governor. “We no longer have this option and yet may have to implement additional austerity Many of the territory’s residents are suffering to due to the continuing effect of the economic recession, explained deJongh. “It is simply not right for us to put on a celebra tion to the tune of $200,000,” he said. In making the announcement, the governor noted that the scaled back 2011 Inaugural in no way diminishes the hard work of the members of the Inaugural Committee. “Greg and I, and Cecile and Cheryl, appreciate all that has been done by everyone involved to plan out this event to celebrate the beginning of our second in which we live dictate that we continue to tighten our belts.” The governor expressed appreciation to the Inaugural co-chairmen for the three islands including Madeline Stevens-Webster and Philomina Doras on St. Thomas; Janet Brow and Rueben Roebuck on St. Croix and Laurie Milliner and Fraser Drummond on St. John. “The co-chairs and the many members of the var ious subcommittees have been working around the clock to pull together a memorable celebration and we sincerely appreciate their efforts,” deJongh said. The three-day Inaugural is currently shaping up as follows: On January 3, the day will begin with a church service of Thanksgiving, followed by the formal Inaugural Ceremony, a military parade and an open house at Government House on St. Thomas. The next day, January 4, on St. Croix, a church service will precede an open house at Government House in Christiansted. On January 5, the celebration will shift to St. John where an afternoon church service will be held followed by an open house at The Battery in Cruz Bay. More details about the activities that are planned for January 3 through the 5, 2011 will be released later this month. DeJongh is the seventh elected governor of the U.S. Virgin Islands and third Democrat to be over Governor deJongh Announces Scaled Back Inaugural FestivitiesSt. John Tradewinds The V.I. Water and Power Authority Governing Board last month and approved a major step in the utility’s long-term plan to increase electric transmission capacity and reliability to St. John. The Authority authorized management to negotiate and enter into an agreement in an amount not to exceed $3,308,000 with Kerite Cable Services of Connecticut to manufacture, install, test, and commission a 34.5 kV underwater cable from Red Hook Pond, St. Thomas to Frank Bay, St. John. Kerite has been in the power cabling business since 1854. Clinton Hedrington, Director of Transmission and Distribution, explained that the submarine cable will improve restoration time on the transmission system to St. John because it will be completely underground from St. Thomas’ east end substation. The cable will have a full load capacity of 22 to 27 megawatts of power. Presently, the peak St. John demand is about 10.5 megawatts. The new cable will increase the capac ity of an existing smaller cable by 172 percent and will allow growth on St. John for 30 years, Hedrington explained. The new cable will carry the entire load of the island in the event vice for maintenance. The project is expected to be in operation by June 2011 and will complete the 34.5 kV underground circuit from St. Thomas’ east end to St. John. Board members also approved a contract award to Asplundh Tree Expert Company for supervision, materials, labor, supplies, tools, trim or remove trees and brush, and to perform right-of-way clean ing and other utility forestry ser vices in the territory. The 18-month contract, to be funded by WAPA’s operating budget in the amount of $1,290,557, covers services for the 2011, and for FY 2012. During the Executive Director’s Report to the Board, Hugo Hodge, reported on the successful EDINUSVI Workshop, which was November 15 and 16. The two-day meeting took place on the St. Croix campus of the University of the Virgin Islands and provided a discussion forum for invited government, utility, education, and business leaders, environmental groups, clean energy advocates and developers; and others. In the third collaborative session since the territory was designated an Energy in Developing Islands partner earlier this year, experts from the U.S. Departments of Energy and the Interior, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the private sector, reported on progress and opportunities in energy newable energy generation and transmission, Hodge explained. Local working groups of public and private sector members teleconference weekly with their federal counterparts to discuss and take action on initiatives to meet the mandated goal of reducing fossil fuel usage in the territory by 60 percent by the year 2025. WAPA Approves St. John Cable

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the need for a second gas station on St. John and thought the mid-island location of his property was ideal, he explained. “The idea is to build a full-service gas station and convenience store,” said Sprauve. “Right now St. John is being serviced by one gas station. Our property is centrally located and we had been looking at a different parcel of our property.” “After talking to residents in the area, however, we have decided that the 17 J-1 site is the ideal site for the project,” Sprauve said. The project calls for a three tanks with two pumps and one diesel fuel. The service station will be automated with customers able to use their debit or credit cards right at the pump. A cashier will be available for patrons using cash and together the businesses would employ about two to three people, explained Sprauve. There will be two 25,000 gallon double wall gas tanks and a roughly 6,000 diesel tank — all above ground — on the property. A poured concrete convenience store with modern paneling and digital gas price signs, will also be located on the site, Sprauve explained. The project will likely be enclosed in barbed wire fencing and will include several security cameras, Sprauve added. “There will be an elaborate camera system with security cameras looking straight down on the pumps,” said the developer. “There will be fencing around the storage tanks and around the east side of the property so the land will be totally fenced in. I’ve also spoken to some security companies who will help with having someone stationed at the site during closing time.” The land is located on a partially blind corner, according to Sprauve, who tweaked the project’s layout in order to make the entrance and exit as safe as possible. “The issue of a blind corner came up and we went up to the site to do some analysis,” said the developer. “It is a blind corner to some extent. Usually you allo cate 20 to 30 feet for a driveway, but we’re extending that to 60 feet to make it easier to drive in and out of the station.” The parcel of land is about 80 feet wide and 200 feet long, presenting project designer Clarence Browne with the challenge of where to locate parking spaces for the convenience store, oil and water separators, sewage treatment facility and a generator and tank. Environmental Protection terminal facility coordina tor Kent Bernier Jr., Sprauve agreed to take a closer look at the exact logistics of the site as it pertains to vapor recovery. “DPNR is implementing new laws as far as vapor recovery covering both from the truck to the storage tank and from the pump to the vehicle,” said Bernier. “We’re going to make sure that all stations recover that vapor and have it pumped out. It’s good to see into your plan.” Sprauve planned to have the station and store open from around 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The businesses would close around 5 p.m. on Friday and reopen in the evening on Saturday. “We didn’t feel that St. John was busy enough to support a 24-hour operation,” said Sprauve. If the zoning variance is approved, Sprauve said he could secure funding for the project within 60 days. “We’ve already reached an agreement with a loaning institution and they’re just awaiting the variance,” said Sprauve. If the okay comes through, the tanks could be inexplained Paul Tollefson, president of Petroleum that side of the project. The overall project — including the convenience store and gas station canopy — could be complete within six months of approval, Sprauve explained. The developer pledged to be transparent with the project and to work in concert with all DPNR regula tions. “We intend to work in tandem with all regulations and to be as transparent as possible with the commu nity,” said Sprauve. “We want to get the public involved so they can feel a part of the project. We will build a project that St. John can be proud of.” DPNR staff has 30 days to prepare a report sup29th Legislature, who will host its own public hearing on the measure and ultimately vote on amending the anxiety. Some people disagree and think that test anxiety is simply You can study all you want and take your test and get points off because you were nervous and made a mistake. I hear that yoga and breathing exercises are always good ways to help ease test anxiety. The holidays are a part of the year that everyone likes. I don’t know many people who don’t enjoy the festivities. During the holidays, everyone goes to visit their family and go shopping. Personally I think that everyone needs a break from the rock, even if they don’t realize it. It really makes you think more about the “Rock Life” when you take a break from it. Another great part about the end of the year is the coming New ventures, laughs, good times, bad times, sadness, and lessons learned. Even more fun, is making resolutions and daring yourself to stick to them! I think the New Year it a great time for students to think about things seriously. For upperclassmen, they think about their future and the steps they need to take to get there. Many of them make changes or strive to do better. The younger classmen tend to roll they’re eyes at the older ones because they’ve yet to realize the importance of their upcoming future. In January, Gifft Hill School is beginning its annual “Mini Units.” teachers instruct the students in something other than everyday school. This year the school has broadened its Mini Units and is offering more and greater opportunities. There is already much talk about Mini Units. Many students are very excited for diving, theater, apprenticing, and the Italy Trip. Yes, I did say Italy Trip. Gifft Hill School offers and organizes a trip to send students away every school year to different places in the world. This year amongst many great places we could have gone, we chose Italy. It’s a place that is so beautiful and holds so much history (and good food), that we couldn’t resist going. Overall, even with all the stress, the end of the year and the beginning of the new, lends a new perspective for everyone. We can think about what we’ve accomplished and what we would still like to. Islanders don’t let this seasonal stress overwhelm you, rather, embrace it. Challenge yourself this New Year! Happy Holiday and lots of love! 20 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 Rhythm & Views: Mid T erm ExamsContinued from Page 12 Continued from Page 7Adrian Gas Station Proposal Draws No Opposition Crime Stoppers U.S. Virgin Islands Seeking Information on Current CrimesCrime Stoppers is asking the community’s help to solve the following crimes. If anyone knows something, they should say something so law enforce ment can identify and arrest these thugs. The minimum cash reward for an arrest is $714 for a burglary, and $900 for an armed robbery. On November 27 at about 4:30 a.m., a resident at 17 B-1 Estate Enighed was awakened by the sound of a burglar in her bedroom. When she got up to investigate, the burglar left via the sliding glass door and then jumped over the balcony to escape. The burglar gained entrance by scaling the patio and entering via the southwest sliding glass door. Crime Stoppers is pleased to report that, since January 2009, anonymous tips have assisted law enforcement in making 102 arrests, which is more than one per week. Please continue to help law enforcement make the territory a safer place to live, work and raise a family by tell ing what you know about these by calling 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

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St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 21 EM E RG E NCY NUMB E RS:EMERGENCY LAND LINE: 911 EMERGENCY CELLULAR: 340-776-9110 POLICE DEPT: 340-693-8880 FIRE STATION: 340-776-6333 Police LogFriday, December 10 3:30 p.m. A citizen p/r that an unknown male is harassing him by phone. Telephone harassment. Saturday, December 11 8:00 p.m. A citizen p/r a of boys at the Cruz Bay ferry dock. Simple assault. Sunday, December 12 1:11 a.m. An employee of ness. Simple assault. 6:52 a.m. A citizen c/r that she was assaulted by her exboyfriend. Aggravated assault and battery, D.V. 8:20 a.m. Badge #731 p/ at Jurgen Command with one Antonio Powell of Estate Adrian under arrest and charged with Aggravated Assault and Battery, Domestic Violence. No bail was set by order of the court. Powell was released into the custody of his mother. 1:08 p.m. A citizen c/re her minor son. Police assistance. 11:48 p.m. A citizen c/r that her neighbor is trying to commit suicide. Police assistance. Monday, December 13 7:41 a.m. A citizen c/r a D.O.A. DOA. 8:47 a.m. A citizen c/r a disturbance. Malicious mischief. 1:45 p.m. An Estate Pastory resident p/r her bag was stolen in Cruz Bay. Grand larceny. 6:49 p.m. A visitor from Vermont p/r that he lost this digital camera in Cruz Bay. Lost camera. 8:27 p.m. A Bellevue Village resident p/r her son was threatened by a male via the internet. Disturbance of the peace, threats. T uesday, December 14 8:15 a.m. A citizen p/r that she lost her wallet. Lost property. 8:55 a.m. A citizen p/r that he lost his wallet. Lost property. 10:40 a.m. A citizen p/r that he overheard someone threat ening him. Police assistance. 4:30 p.m. A citizen c/r an auto accident near E&C Gas Station. Auto accident. 4:45 p.m. A citizen p/r that she and two friends are being harassed by a group of individ uals. Disturbance of the peace, threats. W ednesday, December 15 3:35 p.m. A citizen c/r an auto accident at The Marketplace. Auto accident. 4:02 p.m. A citizen c/r a burglary. Burglary in the third. Thursday, December 16 10:23 a.m. A citizen p/r that a male owes her money for a security deposit. Grand larceny. 10:50 a.m. A citizen c/r an auto accident on Centerline Road. Auto accident. 11:24 a.m. A Cruz Bay resident p/r that his laptop was stolen from his checked bag at the airport. Grand larceny. 3:40 p.m. An Estate Hard Labor resident p/r that she is being harassed by another female minor. Disturbance of the peace. 4:25 p.m. An Estate Grunwald resident p/r that she got into an altercation with a male. Disturbance of the peace. 10:45 p.m. An Estate Bethany resident p/r that someone is removing money from his bank account without his permission. Grand larceny. Friday, December 17 6:42 a.m. A citizen c/r an auto accident in the area of Centerline Road. Auto accident.Frank Leaves Behind Lifetime of Love and Memorieson 60 annual island performances and booked monthlong tours in Denmark, Germany, New York, France and Switzerland. “I have been looking around for years, and I haven’t met anyone who could think or operate or function like Sis,” Wells said. “Sis was the type of person who you could go to with a small idea, and she would make it happen — maybe she knew nothachieve it.” Wells said Frank possessed an unbelievable energy — one that radiated when she listened to the youth steel pan band. “They don’t make that model anymore,” Wells said. “I have never met a human being that can say and do the things I have seen and heard Sis do in her lifetime. She was an incredible human being.” Born out of the steel band’s success, Sis co-founded St. John School of the Arts with Wells and Elroy Sprauve and served as its executive director for 30 years. “I remember when we negotiated to buy the land for the school — Sis was always so optimistic and she really saw this as her way of giving back to the community and helping the young people of St. John,” Elroy Sprauve said. “Even during the discouraging times, she kept all of us motivated and focused, and always managed to build our spirits.” Knowing Sis from the time she arrived in late 1959 and working by her side for more than 20 years with Steel Unlimited and the art school, Sprauve recalled the tremendous impact she had on the island and its youth. “Many young people who had the chance to par ticipate in the band and take these lessons at the art school and get this whole experience would not have had that opportunity if it weren’t for Sis,” he said. “She led a life that all of us should try to follow and exemplify.” Kinder, who met Sis in New York in 1984 when she asked her to help develop programs and workshops for St. John’s budding art school, called Sis a visionary — someone who could recognize the potential in others. “She had an ability to connect with and attract accomplished and renowned teachers to join her while encouraging and giving new teachers an opportunity to grow,” said Kinder, who Sis appointed as SJSA’s executive director in late 2006. Kinder attributes the school’s success to Sis’ straightforward approach and ability to keep things simple and uncomplicated. “She would never shy away from a challenge,” Kinder said, recalling their daily morning phone calls. “Every morning she would say she was off to the school to see what problems needed solving for the day.” Rafe Boulon remembers Sis as far back as a child is when she and her late husband, Carl Frank, gave “To me, Sis never changed, she was always Sis,” he said. “Sis just provided so much to the children of this community and opened lots of doors and oppor tunities they wouldn’t have otherwise had. She is very much a part of this island, and I don’t know if a single person who has ever spoken a negative word of her.” Inga Hiilivirta met Sis in the early s; times she refers to as the “kinder and gentler” days of St. John. “She was a dear friend and has been a great blessing in my life,” Hiilivirta said. “In many ways, Sis has helped St. John become Love City by being herself and so caring. She was a legend already while she was still with us.” Caneel Bay Resort when she honeymooned there with Frank. The two remained close throughout the years, and Boynes was among the handful of friends “Sis was an asset to St. John and I will miss her dearly,” said Boynes, recalling her constant friendship and encouragement throughout the years. “She was a good, good friend of mine; truly beautiful.” Pastor Carlyle Sampson of the Nazareth Lutheran Church remembers Sis as someone who was always involved in and supportive of the community. “She has been very gracious and generous in supporting the arts and younger children,” Pastor Sampson said. “That is something she has always been very passionate about.” Karen Samuel, who knew Sis from the time she was a young girl, said Sis provided invaluable support for the local children with artistic talents when others would have told them to pursue something more sensible. “Sis was someone who always encouraged people to continue pursing their skills and training,” Samuel said. “St. John is a small community and there were not a lot of professional, local artists. Having someone from the outside encouraging you was extremely valuable because it gave a different perspective.” Barbara Fernandez, Sis’ childhood friend of 86 years, shared a lifetime of stories about Sis – from growing up together in Norwich, New York, where they spent summers riding horses, going to camp and taking vacations to moving to St. John years later and creating memories together there. “I am two weeks older than she is, and we always celebrated our birthdays every year – we knew each other since the time we were born and we’ve remained close all these years,” said Fernandez, who lived on St. John in the 60s and 70s. “When we were in the islands, there were a couple of jazz bands mixed with the steel drums, and we’d go every weekend just to listen to them perform and have a couple of rum and tonics.” said Sis, who had no siblings of her own, was like part of the family. “She was so much fun and full of life and I enjoyed her like a sister,” she said. It is this same sense of family Sis found on St. John. As the island’s matriarch, she was a mother, sister and friend to all who had the privilege of knowing and inevitably loving her. She will be greatly missed, but her spirit still radiates in the community she left behind. Continued on Page 4

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22 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 SCENIC PROPERTIES 340-693-7777 Cruz Bay: One bedroom/one bath w/d $1000.00 One bedroom/one bath w/d $1000.00 One bedroom/one bath $1300.00 One bedroom/one bath w/d $ 1700.00 Large studio $1200.00 avail Jan 1st Coral Bay: One bedroom/one bath $1250.00 For Rent Glass/Screens GLASS MIRRORS GLASS SHOWERS SCREENS TABLE TOPSAcross from Inspection Lane, Sub Base, STT, 777-9269 An EDC Qualied SupplierLICENSED GENERAL CONTRACTOR AND P AINTING CRUZ BAY OFF ICES Reasonable Rates, bright, secure building, ample parking, First Month Free 693-7040 Commerical: Retail/Ofce/Storage STORAGE: SECURED LOCKERS Sizes to 10’ x 12’ Autos, Boats, Trailers. Call For Rates: 779-4445 www.properyachts.com EVERYTHING YOU NEED ON EVERY LEVEL GREAT PLACE TO SHOP, DINE AND WORK COME JOIN US WE HAVE SPACES AVAILABLE RETAIL or OFF ICE 340-776-6455 AccommodationsCaribbean Villas & Resorts tel. 1-800-338-0987 or locally 340-776-6152 Island Getaways 888-693-7676, islandgetaway sinc.com kathy@islandgetawaysinc.com Suite St. John Villas/Condos tel. 1-800-348-8444 or locally at 340-779-4486 VIVA Vacations tel. 779-4250 P.O. Box 1747, STJ, VI 00831ArchitectureCrane, Robert Architect, AIA tel. 776-6356 P.O. Box 370, STJ, VI 00831 Barefoot Architect, Inc. tel. 693-7665 fax 693-8411 P.O. Box 1772, STJ, VI 00831BankingScotiabank #1 Mortgage Lender in the VI The Marketplace (340) 776-6552 Beauty/SpaBeauty Lounge Salon & Spa www.stjohnbeautylounge.com Mongoose Junction 776-0774 W estin Resorts & Villas Spa Services tel. 693-8000, ext. 1903/1904ConstructionSt. John Hardware tel. 693-8780 fax 776-6685 Located at The MarketplaceInsuranceTheodore T unick & Company Phone 775-7001 / Fax 775-7002 www.theodoretunick.com JewelryR&I PATTON goldsmithing Located in Mongoose Junction 776-6548 or (800) 626-3445 Chat@pattongold.comLandscapingAlfredo’s Landscaping tel. 774-1655 cell 513-2971 P.O. Box 91, St. John, VI 00831 Coral Bay Garden Center tel. 693-5579 fax 714-5628 P.O. Box 1228, STJ, VI 00831 PROPERTYKING tel. 643-6348 Landscaping & IrrigationProperty MgmtCimmaron Property Management tel. 340-715-2666 St. John’s Premier Property Manager Seaview Vacation Homes, Inc. tel. 340-776-6805; 1-888-6252963 www.seaviewhomes.comReal EstateAmerican Paradise Real Estate tel. 693-8352 fax 693-8818 P.O. Box 8313, STJ, VI 00831 info@americanparadise.com Cruz Bay Realty tel. 693-8808 fax 693-9812 P.O. Box 66, STJ, VI 00831 info@cruzbayrealty.com Debbie Hayes, GRI tel. 714-5808 or 340-642-5995 debbiehayes@debbiehayes.com www.stjohnvirealestate.com John Foster Real Estate tel. 714-5808 or 340-642-5995 debbiehayes@debbiehayes.com www.stjohnvirealestate.com Holiday Homes of St. John tel. 776-6776 fax 693-8665 P.O. Box 40, STJ, VI 00831 info@holidayhomesVI.com Islandia Real Estate tel. 776-6666 fax 693-8499 P.O. Box 56, STJ, VI 00831 info@islandiarealestate.com John McCann & Associates tel. 693-3399 fax 888-546-1115 Located at Wharfside Landing www.RealEstateOnStJohn.comRestaurantsConcordia Cafe, 693-5855 Happy Hour 4:30-6pm Dinner 6-8:30pm Tues-Sat Fish Trap Restaurant and Seafood Market tel. 693-9994, Closed Mondays La Tapa Restaurant tel. 693-7755 Open 7 Days a Week Skinny Legs “A Pretty OK Place” tel. 340-779-4982 www.skinnylegs.com Sun Dog Cafe tel. 693-8340 Located at Mongoose JunctionRetailSaltwater Gypsy Consignment H D St. Johnimals, Island Pet H DServicesC4th Custom Embroidery tel. 779-4047 Located in Coral Bay St. John TradewindsBusiness Directory Ferry Schedules Cruz Bay and Charlotte Amalie CRUZ BAY TO RED HOOK RED HOOK TO CRUZ BAY CRUZ BAY TO DOWNTOWN CHARLOTTE AMALIE Leaves Cruz Bay Leaves Charlotte Amalie FISH BA Y LONG TERM AVAILABLE FEB 1: Furnished 3/2 native stone home w/covered decks, View w/privacy on 1.22 ac. 3k/mo 970-382-6683 Power_on@earthlink.net 2 bedroom, 2 baths unfurnished, A/C, W/D. First, Last and security. Call 775-7561 or 690-1138 Baha’i Community of St. John For Devotions and Study Circles,call 714-1641 7:30 p.m. Fridays; Study Circles 9 a.m. Sundays 776-6316, 776-6254 Bethany Moravian Church 11 a.m., Sunday School 776-6291 Calvary Baptist Church 13 ABC Coral Bay, 776-6304 Sunday School 10 a.m., Sunday evening 6 p.m., Thursday 7 p.m. Christian Ministry Cinnamon Bay Beach Inter-Denominational, Sunday 8:30 a.m. Christian Science Society 10:45 a.m. SundayMarketplace Wednesday Testimonials 7:45 p.m. on last Wed. of Month The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Sun. 9 a.m., on St. Thomas . 776-2379 Sun., 5 p.m., STJ, Lumberyard Cruz Bay Baptist Church Sunday 11 a.m., 6 p.m. 776-6315 Emmaus Moravian Church Coral Bay, Sun. 9 a.m. 776-6713 Jehovah’s Witness 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; 7 p.m. Saturdays (Espaol), 10 a.m. Sundays, 340-715-0530 Missionary Baptist Church 9:30 a.m. Sunday Services, 10:45 Worship, Tuesday 7 p.m. Bible Study 693-8884 Nazareth Lutheran Church Sunday 9 a.m., Sunday School 8 a.m. 776-6731 Our Lady of Mount Carmel Sat. 6 p.m., Sun. 7:30 & 9:30 a.m., Spanish Mass 5:30 p.m.; Monday and Tuesday, 7 p.m.; Wednesday and Friday, 8:30 a.m. 776-6339 St. John Methodist Church Sunday 10 a.m, 693-8830 Seventh Day Adventist Saturdays, 779-4477 St. John Pentecostal Church Sunday 11:05 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays Prayer 7:30 p.m., Thursdays Bible Study 7:30 p.m. 779-1230 St. Ursula’s Episcopal Church Sunday 9 a.m.; Bible Class, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. 777-6306 Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 9:45 a.m. Sunday, 776-6332 Word of Faith Church Word of Faith International Christian Center, Sundays 7:30 a.m. Gifft Hill SchoolCall 774-8617 Church Directory

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St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 23 Cruz Bay Watersports 776-6857Watersports Jobs! snorkeling, sailing trips to the BVI, etc. Growing watersports company has immediate openings: Employment ST . JOHN BUSINESS OWNERS Affordable Reliable Internet. 1Mb service $70/mo. info@dishanddat.com 340 779 4001 RELIABLE MOBILE AUTO REPAIR: Professional and experienced. Brakes, CV Joints, Suspensions, Shocks, Alternators, Timing Belts, General Engine, Repair, Foreign & Domestic. All Work Guaranteed. Call 227-9574 Services Commerical Space Available COMMERCIAL SPACE AVAILABLEAt The LumberyardUNUSUAL OPPORTUNITYfirst floor space availableDowntown Cruz Bay Where St. John Does BusinessFor Space Call Nick 340-771-3737 Requests for Proposals V I R G I N I SL A N D S W A ST E M A N A G EM EN T A U T H O R I T Y R EQ U EST F O R PR O PO SA LT h e V i r g i n I s l a n d s W a s t e M a n a g e m e n t A u t h o r i t y ( V I W M A ) i s s o l i c i t i n g p r o p o s a l s f o r : R F P W M A 0 0 2 T 1 1 P r e v e n t a t i v e M a i n t e n a n c e a n d 2 4 H o u r E m e r g e n c y R e p a i r S e r v i c e s o f E m e r g e n c y P o w e r G e n e r a t o r S y s t e m s a n d t h e V I W a s t e M a n a g e m e n t A u t h o r i t y ’ s F a c i l i t i e s – S t . T h o m a s a n d S t . J o h n , V i r g i n I s l a n d s . D o c u m e n t s p e r t a i n i n g t o t h i s R e q u e s t f o r P r o p o s a l ( R F P ) m a y b e o b t a i n e d f r o m t h e V I W M A ’ s D i v i s i o n o f P r o c u r e m e n t a n d P r o p e r t y , S t . T h o m a s S t . J o h n D i s t r i c t O f c e a t 9 5 0 0 W h e a t l e y C e n t e r I I , S u i t e 2 o r f r o m t h e S t . C r o i x D i s t r i c t O f c e r a t # 1 L a G r a n d e P r i n c e s s e , S u i t e B L 1 , C h r i s t i a n s t e d b e t w e e n t h e h o u r s o f 8 : 0 0 a m a n d 4 : 3 0 p m , M o n d a y t h r o u g h F r i d a y , o r b y c o n t a c t i n g t h e D i r e c t o r , M r s . C e c i l e L y n c h , d i r e c t l y v i a p h o n e o r e m a i l . P R O P O S A L D U E D A T E a n d T I M E : W e d n e s d a y , D e c e m b e r 2 2 , 2 0 1 0 a t 2 : 0 0 p m A t l a n t i c S t a n d a r d T i m e P R O P O S A L D U E P L A C E : V i r g i n I s l a n d s W a s t e M a n a g e m e n t A u t h o r i t y 9 5 0 0 W h e a t l e y C e n t e r I I , S u i t e 2 , S t . T h o m a s , V I 0 0 8 0 2 P . O . B o x 3 0 3 6 6 9 , S t . T h o m a s , V I 0 0 8 0 3 # 1 L a G r a n d e P r i n c e s s e , S u i t e B L 1 , C h r i s t i a n s t e d , V I 0 0 8 2 0 P . O . B o x 1 6 8 9 , K i n g s h i l l , V I 0 0 8 5 1 – 1 6 8 9 ( S i x ( 6 ) S e a l e d P r o p o s a l P a c k a g e s M a r k e d P r o p o s a l f o r R F P N o . R F P W M A 0 0 2 T 1 1 , D O N O T O P E N ) N O T E : T h e p r o p o s a l n u m b e r m u s t b e p l a c e d o n t h e o u t s i d e o f a l l B i d P a c k a g e s . P r o p o s a l s m a y n o t b e w i t h d r a w n f o r a p e r i o d o f n i n e t y ( 9 0 ) d a y s f r o m t h e d a t e o f t h e s u b m i s s i o n d e a d l i n e . D I R E C T I N Q U I R I E S : M r s . C e c i l e P h i l l i p L y n c h D i r e c t o r , P r o c u r e m e n t a n d P r o p e r t y D i v i s i o n V i r g i n I s l a n d s W a s t e M a n a g e m e n t A u t h o r i t y # 1 L a G r a n d e P r i n c e s s e , S u i t e B L 1 , C h r i s t i a n s t e d , V I 0 0 8 2 0 O R E m a i l : c l y n c h @ v i w m a . o r g P h o n e : 3 4 0 – 7 1 8 – 4 4 8 9 A l l q u e s t i o n s p e r t a i n i n g t o t h e s u b m i s s i o n o f p r o p o s a l s , s c o p e o f s e r v i c e s a n d t h e a w a r d p r o c e s s s h o u l d b e d i r e c t e d i n w r i t i n g e i t h e r i n h a r d c o p y o r b y e m a i l t o M r s . C e c i l e P h i l l i p L y n c h , D i r e c t o r o f P r o c u r e m e n t a n d P r o p e r t y , a t c l y n c h @ v i w m a . o r g . T h e V i r g i n I s l a n d s W a s t e M a n a g e m e n t A u t h o r i t y r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o w a i v e a n y n o n s u b s t a n t i v e i n f o r m a l i t i e s , t e c h n i c a l i t i e s , o r i r r e g u l a r i t i e s ; o r r e j e c t a n y o r a l l q u a l i c a t i o n s a n d p r o p o s a l s ; o r t o r e a d v e r t i s e f o r p r o p o s a l s , a n d t o a w a r d o r r e f r a i n f r o m a w a r d i n g t h e c o n t r a c t f o r t h e w o r k . T h e V i r g i n I s l a n d s W a s t e M a n a g e m e n t A u t h o r i t y a l s o r e s e r v e d t h e r i g h t t o a c c e p t o r r e j e c t a n y P r o p o s a l o r a n y i t e m l i s t e d t h e r e i n . V I W M A f u r t h e r r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o w a i v e a n y i n f o r m a l i t y i n P r o p o s a l s r e c e i v e d . M a y A d a m s C o r n w a l l E x e c u t i v e D i r e c t o r Virgin Islands Waste Management Authority Job Vacancy Announcement St. Thomas SALARY : Commensurate with experience DEADLINE : December 21, 2010 DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: Investigates resident’s complaints relating to waste disposal and handling, and performs “windshield” inspections of business, public and private properties to ensure compliance with Title 19, chapter 56 and Title 29, Chapter 8 of the VIC and all related rules and regulations. Investigates incidents of illegal dumping of waste and seeks to indentify the responsible party(s): conducts follow-up and tigations. Issues warning notices and citations evidence to support all issued citations. Serves violators Orders for Corrective Actions (OCA), Notices of Non-Compliance (NONC) and other Administrative Orders (AO). damages caused by violators Initiates injunctive actions to halt and limit environmental damages, and prescribes remedial actions as necessary to restore appropriate environmental conditions investigates reports and complies and prepares monthly summaries of activities. Prepares work schedules for approval by Division Director Provides oversight, leadership, guidance and assistance to Perform other duties as assigned. EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE: AA degree in Environmental Science, Environmental Planning, Criminal Justice or Political Science from an accredited college or university. A minimum of six (6) years serving in the capacity of a law Must be a Virgin Islands Police Department Academy Graduate. Submit the Environmental Enforcement applications and a letter of interest along with a resume to: Director of Human Resources P.O. Box 1689 Kingshill, St. Croix 00851 OR Email us at employment@viwma.org Virgin Islands Waste Management Authority is an Equal Opportunity Employer BUSY REAL ESTATE OFFICE NEEDS P/T RECEPTIONIST/ ASSISTANT. MUST BE PLEASANT, DEPENDABLE, AND HAVE GOOD COMPUTER SKILLS. ALSO, SALES AGENTS LOOKING TO EARN HIGH COMMISSIONS NEEDED NOW. INQUIREIS ARE CONFIDENTIAL. CALL RE/MAX 775-0949 ASST MANAGER, Gallows Point Resort Position in St. John, USVI Manage & direct resort operationsRequirements: St. John resident, property management experience, Driver’s Lic., References based on experience. Interested person email your resume to Akhil@gal lowspointresort.com or fax resume to 340-776-6520 FRENCH TEACHER Looking for a french teacher to teach a 12 year old beginning french. Need to follow curriculum from state side school. Contact 786-877-7989

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24 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 ALCHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS Alcoholics Anonymous meets as scheduled: Sundays, 9:45 a.m. at Hawksnest Bay Beach; Closed meetings for alcoholics only at Nazareth Lutheran Church in Cruz Bay at 6 p.m on Tuesdays; Open meetings on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 6 p.m. at Nazareth Lutheran Church; Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6 p.m. at Moravian Church, Coral Bay. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS Narcotics Anonymous has open meetings from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. every Saturday at St. Ursula’s Church. AL-ANON MEETINGS Al-Anon meets on St. John every Tuesday at 1 p.m. at the p.m. at St. Ursula’s Multi-purpose center. ALATEEN MEETINGS Alateen will meet on Mondays at St. Ursula’s Church from 6 to 7 p.m. and is open to anyone interested in attending. W ednesday, December 22 CORE’s management plan at Maho Bay Camps at 7:30 p.m. in the main dining pavilion. Saturday, December 25 The Annual St. John Serenade in the Park set 5 a.m. at Frank Powell Park in Cruz Bay. Come by and bring an instrument and that Christmas cheer! Saturday, December 26 Sigma Theta Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. will host its 16th Annual Community Kwanzaa Celebration at 6 p.m. at the Franklin Powell Park in Cruz Bay. Friday, December 31 Sisterhood/Brotherhood Agenda is hosting a New Year’s Eve Youth Extravaganza at the Housing Parks and Recreation center in Curz Bay from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday, January 8 shelter, the St. John Animal Care Center, will take place in the evening at a breathtaking villa in Estate Chocolate Hole. W ednesday, January 12 The public is invited to join Friends of the Elaine I. Sprauve Library at 6 p.m. at the library for its annual meeting. February 19, 2011 St. John Relay for Life — momentum continues to grow in team sponsorships, volunteer recruitment, purchases of luminar ies and additional corporate sponsorships. For more information call Mary at 642-1629 to learn how to get involved. Saturday, March 12 The 25th Annual Gifft Hill School Auction will be at the Westin Resort and Villas. March 18-19, 2011 The 9th annual Johnnie Walker Blues Festival will feature two St. John Tradewinds welcomes notices of community-orient 776-6496, e-mail editor@tradewinds.vi or fax 693-8885.CONDIMENT TRAYACROSS DOWN PREMIER Crossword

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St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 25 ST. JOHN TRADEWINDS SUBSCRIPTIONSCALL 340-776-6496 WE ACCEPT VISA OR MASTERCARD Providing professional rental management and marketing services for St. John’ s finest vacation villas and condominiums.For reservations For St. John or brochures business call1-800-338-0987 340-776-6152Vi e w o u r v i l la s a t w w w . c a r i b b e a n v i l l a . c o m Lumberyard Complex P .O. Box 458 St. John USVI 00831 C a r i b b e a nV i l l a s & R e s o r t sM A N A G E M E N T C O . EXCLUSIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICE IN THE VIRGIN ISLANDSOfce: 340 714 5808 Cell: 340 642 5995www.StJohnVIRealEstate.com DH@DH. ISLA VISTAExceptional 5 bedrm, 4.5 bath Gated Villa atop Caneel Hill. Seller is Licensed Real Estate Broker.VILLALLUREImpressive 5 bedrm, 7 bath European Style Villa in Coral Bay Contact DEBBIE HAYES, GRI, Your Licensed U.S. Virgin Islands Real Estate Broker DebbieHayes-TW 11.15.2010.indd 1 11/2/10 6:59:46 PM (340) 774-3939 fax www.usvi-realestate.com tel (340) 774-3939 Located at Caneel Hill Excellent business opportunity. Well established res taurant and minigolf course. Breath taking views of Pills bury sound and St Thomas from dining terrace, no better place to enjoy a good meal and view the sunset. Zoned B-2 which allows a multitude of commercial uses; ie retail, hotel,condos,apts., plenty of room for any of these uses on this 1.11 acre parcel.Adjacent 1 acre B-2 parcel avail able. Just Reduced to $3,900,000 Spectacular view location for variety of B-2 uses. Hotel, condo, retail, offices, or a combination of all suits this one of a kind lot. Owner has plans for condo/hotel development, with feasibility study and preliminary plans. Zoning allows for 80 persons per acre, for a multi-story de velopment. Panoramic views of Pillsbury Sound and West to St. Thomas, and south to St Croix. Minutes from Cruz Bay. Just Reduced to $2,800,000 Waterfront lot located on Chocolate Hole Pond. Easily accessible lot with gentle slope to waters edge, easy build.. Located a stones throw away from the planned prestigious high end Pond Bay Club Development. This quiet residential neighborhood has great breezes and deeded access to Chocolate Hole beach. $475,000 Mostly Flat 1/2 acre + lot, part of Guavaberry Farms Sub-division. Overlooks fresh water pond, off main road for easy access. Good breezes and quiet neighborhood with covenants and restrictions. Last lot in 7 parcel sub-division. $185,000 Spectacular view from this 1/2 acre + Fortsberg lot(s). Moderate grade, with sweeping views of East End,Tortola, and Coral Bay. Easy access off main sub-division road. Priced to sell at $350,000. Adjacent 1/2 acre lot also available for joining parcels together to make a very private 1 acre + lot for Just $700,000. PLEASE VISIT OUR NEW OFFICES LOCATED AT 6B CANEEL HILL ADJACENT TO ASOLARE RESTUARANT, THE GATEWAY TO THE VIRGIN ISLANDS NATIONAL PARK, OR CONTACT ANDY RUTNIK AT 340-774-3939 or EMAIL:ANDREWRUTNIK@GMAIL.COM TWO INCREDIBLE THREE-ACRE HILLSIDE LOTS– Adjacent to National Park lands (and short walk to the beach) with spectacular views of Francis Bay and west (sunsets). Gentle grade, and easy build. These lots are ideal/unique for one seeking a private estate/ compound within the National Park, desiring lots of land /gardens/privacy with convenient beach access. – Inquire about February 24th bid deadline and March 10th Auction (and *(Nearly 3 acre Beachfront access lot available separately for $3.8 million.)* CALL TODAY340-774-3939 St. John TRADEWINDS Newspaper Send Check Payable to Tradewinds Publishing, P.O. Box 1500, St. John, VI 00831 1 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION $70.00 USD Name ____________________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________

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We ’ re Sold on St. John! .cruzba yrealty .com Gretchen Labrenz Margie Labrenz Susanne Kir kT amm y P olloc kF ounded in 1985 CBR HOME LISTINGSGREAT EXPECTATIONS is the ultimate St. John 7 bed room, 7.5 bath compound comprised of a main house, guest house, 2 swimming pools, 2 hot tubs & a private regulation doubles tennis court! This popular turn-key villa has very impressive rental income! $2999,500. WATERFRONT with DOCK – Masonry 3 bed/2bath home on lg. at lot, with direct access to Fish Bay at your doorstep. Now only $920,000. AURORA – Luxurious 4 bd/4bath masonry villa on Contant Pt. Enjoy 180 views from Great Cruz Bay to St. Thomas, great privacy, pool, multiple outdoor areas, excellent vacation rental history. $1,995,000. VILLA ROMANCE – New, luxury villa built to highest quality. This well-designed villa provides privacy, comfort & exquisite detail. Gated entry leads to heart of villa, overlooking the 30’ pool, w/a tropical courtyard setting. Tile roof, coral ooring, fountains, arches, columns, covered galleries, & gazebo. This is a MUST SEE! $2,150,000 . CHEZ SHELL – Charming 3 bd/3 bath, w/ gorgeous sun set views & prime Great Cruz Bay location. This beautifully decorated & maintained rental villa has marble oors, A/C, custom cabinetry, inviting spa & excellent oor plan. CHOCOLATE HOLE – Unique ruins of 1700’s Great House, with a 1960’s home on a beautiful 1.42 acre lot. $799,000. CALYPSO del SOL – Very successful rental villa w/ excellent views of Chocolate Hole & St. James islands. Newer masonry home w/ 3 equal bdrm suites, lg. screened porch, A/C, beautiful pool & hot tub. $1,950,000. PERELANDRA – Excellent 2 bd/2 bath rental villa high above Cruz Bay. Stunning water views, privacy, lovely pool set in lush gardens. A good buy at. $1,050,000. BORDEAUX MT. – REDUCED! – Well built home on Bordeaux Mt. with 3bd/2baths, large covered porch & south shore views. Bay rum trees abound on this lush, gentle sloping site with ample room to expand. $525,000. LIZARD HILL – Exclusive No. Shore property, overlook ing Cinnamon Bay, one of the only privately owned homes bounded on all sides by Ntnl. Park. Extraordinary landscap ing enhances magical views from 2 bd/2 bath main house w/separate luxurious master bdrm wing & private pool. The charming cottage is ideal for a caretaker. $3,100,000. SEASCAPE – Fabulous location on Bovocoap Point! Spacious 2 bd main house w/lap pool & spa, plus a sepa rate caretaker’s cottage. Panoramic sunset views, privacy & successful vacation rental. $1,200,000. CHRISTY ANN – New rental villa in upscale neighbor hood. Masonry construction w/low maintenance features. 3 bd/2 baths, large covered veranda, spa, 20' vaulted ceil ing in greatroom, ample room for expansion. $1,595,000. REEF BAY VIEW – Absolutely stunning, unobstructed, views of National Park land, w/secluded white sand beach below. Attractive 4 bd/3 bath,w/pool, spa and vacation rental history. $1,595,000. COCO CRUZ – Fabulous 3 bd/2 bath turn-key rental villa on Maria Bluff. Panoramic views, lg. pool, multiple decks, prime location. $1,800,000. A BEST BUY! – Well built, poured concrete cottage w/ lovely covered wraparound porch in Est. Carolina. Tile oors, louvered windows w/complete hurricane shutters, at lot for gardening & concrete slab in place for future garage & expansion. Only $349,000. PLUMB GUT – 1 bd/1 bath home with adjacent 1X1 cot tage. Lush setting on eastern side of Bordeaux. $499,000. STONE HOUSE – Unique native stone 3 bd/3 bath villa w/covered rotunda, freeform pool, and spectacular Coral Bay views. $1,620,000. With adjacent parcel $1,890,000. BOATMAN POINT – Masonry 4 bd. home on spectacular 1 ac. waterfront site with amazing views & outstanding neighborhood. $2,795,000. WINDSONG – Stately Boatman Pt. villa, w/separate cottage, situated on a 1ac parcel w/panoramic views. 6 bdrms., 7 baths, huge pool, fully furnished. $3,495,000 GOLDEN DRAGON – Beautiful stone villa w/exceptional craftsmanship. 4 bds./4 baths, innity pool, multi patios & decks, lush gardens, Pt. Rendezvous location. $2,195,000.CBR BUSINESS LISTINGSFABRIC MILL – Very successful clothing business, es tablished in 1982, in Mongoose Junction. Price includes inventory & equipment, owner will train. $150,000. SILVER IGUANA – Beachfront shop w/eclectic collection of sterling silver jewelry & locally crafted gifts. $75,000.CBR CONDO LISTINGSWESTIN TIMESHARES – Call for a complete list of resale units. All sizes & weeks available. LAVENDER HILL – Tropical 2 bd/2bath penthouse unit w/wrap-around deck, pool & sunset views. $849,000. BETHANY CONDO – Spacious, free-standing 2 bd/2 bath unit w/ amazing views, new common pool. $449,000. CRUZ VIEWS CONDO – Nice 2 bedroom unit w/full A/C, sunset views, common pool, good rental history. $495,000. SELENE’S – Ideal in town location, w/parking, for living/ rental or business. Terric views. Reduced to $399K!CBR LAND LISTINGSAFFORDABLE PARCELS – in Estate Grunwald & Adrian. Easy building sites, close to town. Starting at $89,000. Call Today! BANK OWNED PARCELS – Chocolate Hole, priced to SELL! $261,500 & 235,000. GREAT BUYS ! DITLEFF POINT – Extraordinary sites on magnicent peninsula w/sandy beach, gated entry, beautiful landscap ing, and incredible views. Prices start at $695,000. KLEIN BAY – Small upscale neighborhood, gorgeous views, commonly owned beach. $799K & $995K . WATERFRONT ON MONTE BAY – Spectacular 13.44 ac. site, ideal for private estate or subdivision. $2,900,000. CRUZ BAY TOWN – Walk to Frank Bay, R-4 zoning. $249K. EXCITING NEWS OF ST. JOHN ... BLUE TANG IS FOR SALE! – A delightful 2 bedroom, 2 bath pool villa nestled high on the hillside in the prime neighborhood of Great Cruz Bay. Offering privacy, vibrant sunset views, gourmet kitchen, 60-foot covered veranda & sunny pool. Catered To’s top rental villa. $1,295,000. CONTRACTED CONTRACTED

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CONDOS . HOMES . LAND . FRACTIONALS . COMMERCIALView all St. John MLS properties at our website at www.americanparadise.com INFO@HolidayHomesVI.com TOLL FREE:WWW.HOLIDAYHOMESVI.COM FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF ALL ST. JOHN MLS PROPERTIES, DVD TOURS OF THE PROPERTIES, AND/OR A COPY OF OUR NEWSLETTER CALL OR E-MAIL US.“The Company that gives back to St. John” CATHERINEBERG’S “CINNAMON RIDGE” 5 bedroom villa on 1+ private acre, bordered by National Park, features stunning north shore views, pool w/waterfall, spa, easy access to Cinnamon Bay beach. WATERFRONT ON DEVERS BAY! “CHOCOLATE BLISS” (5x5) Private, extremely quiet masonry/ stone home has all the amenities one would desire on over an acre of gently sloped land. “ CORAL POINT BEACH HOUSE” for the active waterfront lifestyle. Ridgetop, waterfront, open air solid masonry 3 bedroom home. Must be seen to be appreciated. “VILLA M ARBELLA”-Own this stunning 3 bdrm and 3.5 bath custom Vir gin Grand Estates villa. View pool and large veranda. Great rentals & sunsets over St. Thomas & Pillsbury Sound. One level living w/ fabulous Great room! WATERFRONT ”LA DOLCE VITA” is an exceptionally charming 3 bdrm property on the water’s edge with the possibility of boat mooring. 376 ft. pristine shoreline. Panoramic. W-1 zoning allows commercial uses. “ WINDCHIME” is an very private 1.4 ac. estate set high atop Gifft Hill. Dramatic views to the east w/ spectacular breezes &sunrises. This 3 bdrm villa has room to expand with an oversized pool facing the ter ric view. DVD $2,450,000 $1,995,000 $2,500,000 DVD DVD $4,900,000 DVD “ SEA TURTLE VILLA” is a contemporary Skytop home with amazing water views, 2 master suites, 3 baths, tropical landscaping, pool, & open architecture set amidst secluded privacy. Great vacation villa or island home! PELICAN’S PERCH” a charming, gated masonry & stone West Indian style (3x2) villa features bi-level covered and open decks overlooking a pool, plus a separate 1x1 guest cottage. Fabulous south shore water views!. “SEAVIEW” vacation villa. Charming 4 Bedroom, masonry home in excellent condition with large pool in convenient Chocolate Hole with deeded rights to two nearby beaches. “SAGO COTTAGE” adorable Caribbean style masonry cottage with wonder ful down island views and great rental history. CORAL BAY INCOME PRODUCER Beautiful water view from both decks of well built home. Flexible oorplan can be 2 units or combined as 3 bedroom home. Convenient to town! Great rental! “ T REE H OUSE” offers spectacular views from Upper Carolina’s ridge top. This gentle parcel features a 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom home which is bordered by National Park. $1,500,000 $975,000 $1,075,000 DVD $1,295,000 $689,900$2,400,000 $1,649,000 $685,000 OWN A MONTH (OR MORE) in a 3 or 4 bedroom luxury home. Magnicent views and sunsets from 3 homes with all amenities, pools w/waterfalls and spas. Deeded 1 month ownerships from $59,000 WESTIN RESORT TIMESHARES: Own a week, a month, or more & enjoy all the resort amenities! Most unit sizes and weeks available. Priced from $4,000 “MILL VISTA – CAROLINA” Easy access & build on Centerline Rd. $ 125,000 “FISH BAY” Views, breezes and paved access $ 260,000 “LEAST EXPENSIVE WATERFRONT”! Gentle slope, 4 min. walk to beach $ 285,000 “SUGAR APPLE WEST” Harbor views gentle ac. with Topo $ 299,000 “CONTANT” lot with Great Cruz Harbor View. Owner Realtor $ 375,000 “CALABASH BOOM” .4 ac. GREAT views, private. Topo map $ 475,000 “BOATMAN POINT WATERFRONT” Sunset Views and Gentle Site. $ 1,095,000 “ ESTATE CONCORDIA” hillside sites with stunning views ranging from the BVIs, down St. John’s eastern coast to Ram’s Head , St. Croix. From $335,000 “ UPPER MONTE BAY ESTATES” 7 Spectacular private parcels above Rendezvous Bay; paved road, stone walls & underground utilities. From $799,000 “ NORTHSHORE PROPERTIES” Peter Bay & Hawksnest/ Denis Bay exquisite home sites with breathtaking views over the North Shore, BVI & many cays in between. Call for a tour today. Prices start at $895,000 for half acre “ PETER BAY ESTATES” Exquisite home sites with breathtaking views over the North Shore, BVI & cays between. Prices from $1,750,000 BEST BUY BEACH FRONT “GREAT CRUZ BAY” private dock access, quiet upscale neighborhood, awesome views. Owner/broker. Call for details. $1,300,000 EAST END LAND Parcels in Privateer Bay and on far East End. Coral Bay views and underground utilities. From $265,000 “ CHOCOLATE HOLE” Breezes and views to St. Thomas. From $285,000 “VIRGIN GRAND ESTATES” Gated sub-division, sunset views. Can build FRACTIONAL HOME! Paved roads. 3 from $335,000 “ LOVANGO CAY” Waterfront & hillside properties; upscale amenities including barge docks, paved roads, undrgrd utilities beach & views. From $275,000 SELLER FINANCING WITH GREAT TERMS! “HAULOVER” BEACHFRONT 3.71 acre sub-dividable borders National Park! AMAZING VIEWS! $1,900,000 “SABA BAY” WATERFRONT & HILLSIDE Incredible BVI views! 12 acre sub-divideable waterfront lot for $9,999,000 plus 4 hillside lots available from $699,000 “DREEKETS BAY ESTATES” spectacular BVI views, excellent roads, underground utilities, stone walls, planters, common beach. Minutes from Coral Bay. 12 lots from $399,000 Ask about “MUST SELL BEST BUY” SITUATIONS Call or email today for info!

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28 St. John Tradewinds, December 20-January 2, 2011 Free Champagne 11:00 pm to 12:30 a.m.Dancing with DJ Adonis from 11 pm untilNo Cover Charge Dinner Reservations RecommendedA TRUE ISLAND CELEBRATION! Cruz Bay, St. John Dining Nightly 5:30 10:00 p.m. E-mail: morgansmango@islands.vi Please join us for the Best New Year’s Eve Party on St. John!!We wish you Happy Holidays and a Prosperous New Year!