Citation
Osborne, W.H. to John B. Bailey, Sr. - Glade Springs, Va. - July 27, 1863 - Transcript

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Osborne, W.H. to John B. Bailey, Sr. - Glade Springs, Va. - July 27, 1863 - Transcript
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Cosmo O. Bailey Papers
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Subjects / Keywords:
Confederate States of America. Army. Florida Infantry Regiment, 7th.
Civil War
History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- United States
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North America -- United States of America

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Glade Springs [Virginia] July 27, 1863


[To] Maj. J.B. Bailey [John B. Bailey, Sr.]

Dear Sir
I have been unwell for several days, 2 days I suffered very much but I feel much better to
day & I am able to be up in my room. I was attacked with something like colick & when
I could get relief the first thing I would eat would throw me back in the same. Fine toast
bread & coffee, milk mush, the lightest diet I could eat, would renew the pain. I have
been living on gruel for the last 2 days. It don't set well with me but I take but little at a
time. I am in hopes it will wear off in a few days. My digestive organs are very much out
of fire some way.

Our surgeon is gone to Richmond and the assistant is a young half-witted fellow, thinks
he knows everything, but he undoubtedly has less common sense than any man I ever
saw to pretend to practice medicine. To give you and [sic] idea of the man's knowledge
he argued with me that a man's leg bone was solid and had no marrow in it & was not
hollow & he said a beef limb was solid also. I told him as to leg bones & beef bones I
could swear that they were hollow for I had cracked the odd one to get the marrow & he
nor no other man could convince me to the contrary. I was so disgusted at the fool I went
to our provision base. A part of a ham was in the base. I took it and broke the bone &
showed him that a hog bone did have a hollow in it & marrow also. He said to me, well,
I declare, I never noticed that before. He said he knew man & beast had a spinal marrow
but thought the other bones were solid.

I do my own practice. I took calomel night before last. It acted very well. I will take
more tonight if I think it necessary. I am hear [sic] alone & I will write you concerning
my business matters as I can think of different matters. I owe Matthew [Chusen?] $1000
and interest money that Maulden got me in as his security. I probably will get 500 bucks
some day but it is [????] whether I will ever get anything or not but I want you to pay it.
I owe Hope Colson. Old man McCall has it in his hands. I don't recollect the amt.
[amount]. Bernard has a claim in the Sheriff s office, I think for about $600. He
proposes to pay the cost & charge me 6 per cent intst. [interest] from the date he [sent?]
me. Pay it to him on those terms. I owe James McQueen 2000 & intst. [interest] on it for
I think 3 years. I sent him $100 by his brother which ought to be credited in the note. I
owe Edward ofMickanopy [Micanopy] 5 or 6 hundred dollars. I owe John E. Thompson
a small note, amt. [amount] not recollected. I recd. [received] 1000 from Boston &
Vilalonga by express. Pay the above and pay yourself what I owe you which is all I owe
in Fla. [Florida] that I can recollect at present. I owe old man McCall a small note; settle
it. Dr. McCaa [Thomas A. Mcaa] promised to go over & pay McQueen. See him. If he
will go give him the money to settle with him.

I sent a note to Swann [Samuel Swann] on Dr. McCaa for the rise of $300. I never heard
from you whether you recd. [received] it or not. One on old man Willey for $50 at the
same time. Dr. McCaa give me his note when he was up hear [sic] last. Write me
whether you recd. [received] them or not. I gave L.L. Long a note for $160 to collect. It









was on S.T. Bevel and his son and Law [son-in-law?] Vauchen[?]. Write Long & try and
get the note he gave me. No receipt for the note. Dawkins has some claim in his hands
of mine. I think you will find a receipt for them in my note book. He is Judge. Tell him
to turn these over to some responsible Lawyer. I have a good many acts that if I ever get
home I will fire up but if I never get home will be a dead loss to my family, but let them
go. Warner Lewis owes me about 200 which John Lewis promised to pay. My books
will show the amt. [amount] but those things will soon be out of date.

Cossermo [Cosmo O. Bailey, also known as Casermo] & Charley [Charles F. Bailey] is
quite well. The soldiers get 1/3 of a lb. [pound] of Bacon a day. When they can get Beef
they get a lb. [pound] a day. They spend all their wages for something to eat & more
than their wages if they had it. I will keep your boys in funds when they kneed [sic] it to
buy provisions if they get sick. I will provide for them the best I can & see that they are
cared for. I tell the boys if they want any thing to let me know.

I wish you would write to A. Young, R.R. [railroad] agent at Lake City & know of him if
he has sold my salt. I left 21 barrels with 6 bu. [bushels] in a Barrel. I don't want it sold
for less than $60 per Barrel, more if he can get it. Salt is worth hear [sic] at the salt
works $10 per bu. [bushel], 50 lbs. [pounds] to the bu. [bushel] & purchasers find sacks
to put it in. My salt is in first rate Barrels & better salt than the salt made at this place.
The salt that is made hear [sic] has a good deal of Plaster Paris in it. The Government has
control of the salt works hear [sic]. Those that make salt get 1/3 & the Government gets
2/3. Wood is worth $25 a cord. There is 5 or 6 thousand bushels of Salt made hear [sic]
every day & probably more. They have [?????] works. 2 trains go east and two south
loaded with salt, which is 28 car loads go so. [south] & 28 goes east every day. Still the
quantity increases at salt works. A great deal is halt [hauled] off by wagons.

The people here a[re?] true to their country. Old men & boys are organized for home
defence [sic]. When the raid was expected at this place the old men with their silvery
locks and stooped shoulders come in from all directions with these old flint & steel rifles,
[otter?] skin shot bags. Their arms looked like they might of been used in the War of 76.
Numbers] of those brave old veterans would take me by the hand seeing that I was an
officer & remark to me, I have come to help you all I can. Maj., I cannot find language to
describe [sic] the feeling those remarks put on me, is completely unnerved [?] me. I was
overjoyed to see the patriotism but felt sorry to see such old men turning out to defend
their homes & families. Some of them would have a son 14 or 15 years old along with
them. They would say, I have come myself & brought my little boy. The balance of my
sons & sons-in-law is in the army. Maj., is our people making similar moves for home
defence [sic]? Fla. [Florida] has acted nobly and I hope every man will be prepared &
ready [sic] to meet any raid. John & Frank is all that I have behind in Fla. [Florida] that
can use a gun.

[W.H. Osborne]


Item 49872. Transcribed by James Cusick, University of Florida, 2009.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Glade Springs [Virginia] July 27, 1863 [To] Maj. J.B. Bailey [John B. Bailey, Sr.] Dear Sir I have been unwell for several days, 2 days I suffered very much but I feel much better to day & I am able to be up in my room. I wa s attacked with something like colick & when I could get relief the first thing I would eat w ould throw me back in the same. Fine toast bread & coffee, milk mush, the lightest diet I could eat, would renew the pain. I have been living on gruel for the last 2 days. It dont set well with me but I take but little at a time. I am in hopes it will wear off in a few days. My digestive organs are very much out of fire some way. Our surgeon is gone to Richmond and the assi stant is a young half-witted fellow, thinks he knows everything, but he undoubtedly has le ss common sense than any man I ever saw to pretend to practice medicine. To give you and [sic] idea of the mans knowledge he argued with me that a mans leg bone was solid and had no marrow in it & was not hollow & he said a beef limb was solid also. I told him as to leg bones & beef bones I could swear that they were hollow for I ha d cracked the odd one to get the marrow & he nor no other man could convince me to the contra ry. I was so disguste d at the fool I went to our provision base. A part of a ham was in the base. I took it and broke the bone & showed him that a hog bone did have a hollow in it & marrow also. He said to me, well, I declare, I never noticed that before. He said he knew ma n & beast had a spinal marrow but thought the other bones were solid. I do my own practice. I took calomel night befo re last. It acted ve ry well. I will take more tonight if I think it necessary. I am h ear [sic] alone & I will write you concerning my business matters as I can think of different matters. I owe Matthew [Chusen?] $1000 and interest money that Maulde n got me in as his security. I probably will get 500 bucks some day but it is [????] whether I will ever ge t anything or not but I want you to pay it. I owe Hope Colson. Old man McCall has it in his hands. I dont recollect the amt. [amount]. Bernard has a claim in the Sh eriffs office, I think for about $600. He proposes to pay the cost & charge me 6 per cent intst. [interest] from the date he [sent?] me. Pay it to him on those terms. I owe Ja mes McQueen 2000 & intst. [interest] on it for I think 3 years. I sent him $100 by his brothe r which ought to be cred ited in the note. I owe Edward of Mickanopy [Micanopy] 5 or 6 hundred dollars. I owe John E. Thompson a small note, amt. [amount] not recollected. I recd. [received] 1000 from Boston & Vilalonga by express. Pay the above and pa y yourself what I owe you which is all I owe in Fla. [Florida] that I can recollect at pres ent. I owe old man Mc Call a small note; settle it. Dr. McCaa [Thomas A. Mcaa] promised to go over & pay McQueen. See him. If he will go give him the money to settle with him. I sent a note to Swann [Samuel Swann] on Dr McCaa for the rise of $300. I never heard from you whether you recd. [received] it or not. One on old man Willey for $50 at the same time. Dr. McCaa give me his note wh en he was up hear [sic] last. Write me whether you recd. [received] them or not. I ga ve L.L. Long a note for $160 to collect. It

PAGE 2

was on S.T. Bevel and his son and Law [son-in -law?] Vauchen[?]. Write Long & try and get the note he gave me. No receipt for th e note. Dawkins has some claim in his hands of mine. I think you will find a receipt for them in my note book. He is Judge. Tell him to turn these over to some responsible Lawyer I have a good many acts that if I ever get home I will fire up but if I never get home will be a dead loss to my family, but let them go. Warner Lewis owes me about 200 which John Lewis promised to pay. My books will show the amt. [amount] but those things will soon be out of date. Cossermo [Cosmo O. Bailey, also known as Ca sermo] & Charley [Charles F. Bailey] is quite well. The soldiers get 1/3 of a lb. [pound] of Bacon a day. When they can get Beef they get a lb. [pound] a day. They spend a ll their wages for something to eat & more than their wages if they had it. I will keep your boys in funds when they kneed [sic] it to buy provisions if they get sick. I will provide for them the best I can & see that they are cared for. I tell the boys if th ey want any thing to let me know. I wish you would write to A. Young, R.R. [railr oad] agent at Lake City & know of him if he has sold my salt. I left 21 barrels with 6 bu. [bushels] in a Barrel. I dont want it sold for less than $60 per Barrel, more if he can ge t it. Salt is worth hear [sic] at the salt works $10 per bu. [bushel], 50 lbs. [pounds] to the bu. [bushel] & purchasers find sacks to put it in. My salt is in first rate Barrels & better salt than the salt made at this place. The salt that is made hear [sic] has a good deal of Plaster Paris in it. The Government has control of the salt works hear [sic]. Those that make salt get 1/3 & the Government gets 2/3. Wood is worth $25 a cord. There is 5 or 6 thousand bushels of Salt made hear [sic] every day & probably more. They have [????? ] works. 2 trains go east and two south loaded with salt, which is 28 car loads go s o. [south] & 28 goes east every day. Still the quantity increases at salt works. A great deal is halt [hauled] off by wagons. The people here a[re?] true to their country. Old men & boys are organized for home defence [sic]. When the raid was expected at this place the old men with their silvery locks and stooped shoulders come in from all di rections with these old flint & steel rifles, [otter?] skin shot bags. Their arms looked like they might of been us ed in the War of 76. Number[s] of those brave old veterans woul d take me by the hand seeing that I was an officer & remark to me, I have come to help you all I can. Maj., I cannot find language to describe [sic] the feeling those remarks put on me, is completely unnerved [?] me. I was overjoyed to see the patriotism but felt sorry to see such old men turning out to defend their homes & families. Some of them w ould have a son 14 or 15 years old along with them. They would say, I have come myself & brought my little boy. The balance of my sons & sons-in-law is in the army. Maj ., is our people making similar moves for home defence [sic]? Fla. [Florida] has acted nobly and I hope every man will be prepared & ready [sic] to meet any raid. John & Frank is all that I have behind in Fla. [Florida] that can use a gun. [W.H. Osborne] Item 49872. Transcribed by James Cusick, University of Florida, 2009.