Citation
Featured Scholar: Josiah Raymer

Material Information

Title:
Featured Scholar: Josiah Raymer
Creator:
Watson, Sara
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publisher:
University of Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Journal of Undergraduate Research
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


UF,1ua of Undegraduae U iver$11 Flor"ida


L %'[VE Ri-II FL)RI' .I t
journal of
Undergraduate
Research

. cIuT l VuI.''.'U '











Future Contributions

Contact Et Staff

University Scholars Program

Undergraduate Research
Resources

Search:

JUR Archivesr
Enter Search Terms


Featured Scholar:
Josiah Raymer

2002 - 2003 University Scholar
Mentor: Mack Thetford











3"ele . , J.e Ia l, - 3, D I1e L I -e. , ,.,,Ir , ,,II _
horticultural sciences and work on his USP project in the nearby town of Milton, Florida.
"I already had a house here, and I'm married," says the 28-year-old. "I was able to take
night classes and work full-time while earning my degree."

As a USP scholar, Josiah teamed up with mentor Mack Thetford, a professor of
environmental horticulture, to study the genetic diversity of Red Baron cogongrass. Red
Baron cogongrass is an ornamental grass many Florldians set in their lawns for
decoration. Ironically, the wild form of cogongrass, which was imported from Asia in the
1950s as forage for cattle, is the seventh most invasive weed in the world. "It grows so
thick that it strangles out other vegetation and can take over a forest and even kill
trees," Josiah says. "We're determining if it has a potential to breed with the wild form
and whether it should be banned from sale."

Growers of Red Baron say that the plant is unable to flower and, therefore, cannot cross-
pollinate with the wild form. However, Josiah says he has seen the plant in flower form.
"If the Red Baron variety is planted somewhere, it may be able to breed with the wild
form and take over."

Josiah presented a shortened version of his USP paper at a research symposium of the
Southern Nurserymen's Association in Atlanta in August and won first place in the
undergraduate research competition. He was given a plaque and $500. After graduating
in May with highest honors and a perfect 4.0 GPA, Thetford hired Josiah as a full-time
senior laboratory technician. Josiah conducts research on a variety of different plants and
is responsible for the management of two greenhouses and several acres of vegetation.

Next fall, he plans to move to Gainesville and study plant breeding as a graduate
student.

--top--


UF UNIVERSITY of
U FLORIDA


Back to the Journal of Undergraduate Research
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences I University Scholars Program I University of Florida I


� University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611; (352) 846-2032.




Full Text

PAGE 1

While growing up in Pensacola, Josiah Raymer was always fond of plants. When it came time for him to go to college, he found a great place to study them just 20 minutes from home. At the West Florida Research and Education Center, a satellite center for the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Josiah was able to earn a degree in horticultural sciences and work on his USP project in the nearby town of Milton, Florida. "I already had a house here, and I'm married," says the 28-year-old. "I was able to take night classes and work full-time while earning my degree." As a USP scholar, Josiah teamed up with mentor Mack Thetford, a professor of environmental horticulture, to study the genetic diversity of Red Baron cogongrass. Red Baron cogongrass is an ornamental grass many Floridians set in their lawns for decoration. Ironically, the wild form of cogongrass, which was imported from Asia in the 1950s as forage for cattle, is the seventh most invasive weed in the world. "It grows so thick that it strangles out other vegetation and can take over a forest and even kill trees," Josiah says. "We're determining if it has a potential to breed with the wild form and whether it should be banned from sale." Growers of Red Baron say that the plant is unable to flower and, therefore, cannot crosspollinate with the wild form. However, Josiah says he has seen the plant in flower form. "If the Red Baron variety is planted somewhere, it may be able to breed with the wild form and take over." Josiah presented a shortened version of his USP paper at a research symposium of the Southern Nurserymen's Association in Atlanta in August and won first place in the undergraduate research competition. He was given a plaque and $500. After graduating in May with highest honors and a perfect 4.0 GPA, Thetford hired Josiah as a full-time senior laboratory technician. Josiah conducts research on a variety of different plants and is responsible for the management of two greenhouses and several acres of vegetation. Next fall, he plans to move to Gainesville and study plant breeding as a graduate student. Back to the Journal of Undergraduate Research Volume 4, Issue 3 November 2002Contents Submissions Archives Scholar Profiles Future Contributions Contact & Staff University Scholars Program Undergraduate Research Resources Search: College of Liberal Arts and Sciences | University Scholars Program | University of Florida | University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611; (352) 846-2032. Featured Scholar: Josiah Raymer 2002 2003 University Scholar Mentor: Mack Thetford College of Agriculture and Life Sciences --top--


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E7IQO0QX3_STS61P INGEST_TIME 2011-06-08T22:08:37Z PACKAGE UF00091523_00506
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES