Citation
Echoes from storyland

Material Information

Title:
Echoes from storyland
Uniform Title:
Cinderella
Little Red Riding Hood
Added title page title:
Echoes from story land
Added title page title:
Pauline and the matches and envious Minnie
Added title page title:
Favorite rhymes and jingles
Creator:
Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731 ( Author, Secondary )
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 21 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1899 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1899 ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1899 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1899
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Nursery rhymes ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Content Advice:
Cinderella -- Little Red Riding Hood -- Pauline and the matches and envious Minnie -- The story of Robinson Crusoe -- Favorite rhymes and jingles.
General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026676697 ( ALEPH )
ALG5937 ( NOTIS )
271656848 ( OCLC )

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CINDERELLA.

SE --) e

NCE upon a time there lived a rich man who had
a wife and one young daughter, a very sweet
and pretty girl. The wife fell sick and died, and after
fy ait a while the father
married again.
The lady he mar-
ried this time was
proud and cross,
and she had two.
grown-up daugh-
ters like herself.
The new wife
took a great dis-
like to her step-
child, because she
Was prettier, and
had better man-
ners than her own
daughters. So
‘both she and the |
daughters were
very unkind to
the poor girl,
whom they made |
do all the hard
work of the house. -





CINDERELLA.



While the two sisters spent their time in the drawing-
room, she had to stay in the kitchen, the only place she



CINDERELLA.

could sit being in the chimney-corner amongst the
cinders, and from this her proud, cruel sisters gave her
the name of Cinderella.

One day the two sisters received an invitation to a
ball at the King’s palace. They were in high glee,
and at once had the whole house in a stir to get them
ready to appear in grand style. They made Cinderella
help them to dress, for they knew her taste was better
than theirs, although they would not tell her so.

The night came, and the sisters rode off to the ball,
being mean enough to taunt: Cinderella at the last
moment because she was not going too.

The poor girl went to her chimney-corner, and could
not help weeping as she sat there, thinking about her
sisters’ cruelty. Suddenly her godmother, who was a
Fairy, appeared before her and asked her why she wept.

“ T wish—-I wish—” said Cinderella, with a sob, but
she could not say a word more.

“You wish to go to the ball—is not that it?” said.
the Fairy.

“Ah, yes,” said the poor child, and she began to
sob afresh.

“Well, be a good girl, and you shali go,” said the
Fairy.

She touched Cinderella’s dingy gown and it was
changed in an instant into a beautiful ball-dress. Then
she gave her a pair of slippers, the prettiest ever seen.
They were made of glass, but were soft as silk, and





CINDERELLA AT THE PALACE.



CINDERELLA .

fitted her exactly. The Fairy then took a pumpkin,
scooped it out, and touched it with her wand, and it
became a splendid coach. Next she went to the mouse-
trap, and finding six live mice in it, she touched them
too, with her wand, and turned them into six dashing
horses, Then she made a coachman out of a great
rat, and three footmen out of lizards from the garden.

She now made the happy girl get into the coach and
drive off to the ball, but she told her at starting that
she must not fail to leave the palace before twelve
o'clock, for at that hour her fine dress would turn again
to rags, and her coach and horses and servants to
what they had been in the first place.

There was a great stir at the palace when Cinderella’s
splendid coach drove up. The Lord High Chamberlain
helped her to alight, and escorted her himself into
‘the ball-room. There he presented her to the Prince,
the King’s only son, and he at once claimed her hand
for the next dance. Every one present was struck with .
her beauty, and with the richness of her dress, and
the elegance of her dancing. Even her proud sisters
could not help but admire her, little thinking who she
was, and they were much pleased that she took notice
of them.

As for the Prince, he. lost his heart to Cinderella
completely. He danced with her every time, and kept
by her side the whole evening.

Cinderella was so happy that it was no wonder that



CINDERELLA.

she took little heed of how the hours were passing, and
quite forgot her godmother's warning until she heard
the clock begin to strike twelve. She was sitting beside
the Prince, and she jumped up from her seat, rushed
across the room, and flew down stairs.

The Prince ran after her, but could not overtake her.
The orily trace of her was one of her glass slippers,
which had fallen off in her flight. The Prince picked
it up, and declared in the presence of the whole court,
that if he could find the owner he would marry her.

Cinderella had to reach home on foot, and had none
of her finery left except the other glass slipper.

The next day the Prince sent out a herald, with
orders to stop at every house, so that every lady might
try on the slipper he had picked up. When the herald
came to the home of Cinderella’s sisters, they tried
very hard to put on the slipper, but it was much too °
small for either of. them.

Then Cinderella’s turn came, and great was the dis-
may of her sisters when they saw that the slipper went
on easily, and fitted toa T. Cinderella at once drew
the other slipper from her pocket and put it on her
other foot, and then every one knew that she must be
indeed the beautiful lady of the ball-room. To put
an end to all doubt, the Fairy godmother at that mo-
ment appeared, and touching Cinderella’s clothes with
her-wand, changed them again into handsome robes of
satin and lace. .





CINDERELLA’S FLIGHT FROM THE BALL.



CINDERELLA.

r

The sisters were
sorry enough now that
they had treated Cin-
derella so harshly, and
fearing that she might
seize the chance to pay -
them back, they fell at |
her feet tobeg her par- ~
don. Cinderella was .
too kind-hearted to re-
fuse, and she bade them !
rise, assuring them that
she would forget what _.
was past if they would ,
only love her.

The herald set off to
bear to the Prince the ines So
happy news that the slipper’s owner had been found.
A royal escort was sent to bring Cinderella to the
palace, where the Prince received her with great joy.
She consented to become his wife, and the wedding
was soon celebrated with the greatest splendor.

Cinderella made hosts of friends, and’ she and the
Prince lived happily together for many years, and
among all the treasures of the royal palace there. was
nothing quite so precious as . :

CINDERELLA’S GLASS SLIPPER.





HE PRINCE.

I:

Q
Z



ERELLA|

THE MARRIAGE OF CIND













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Se OU GHLIN BROS. .

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ew DORK



RED RIDING HOOD.



NCE upon a time there lived in a
small cottage on the edge of a deep
wood, a forester and his wife, and
their dear little daughter. The
child was as lovely as a picture,
and a great pet with everybody.
Her mother liked to see her pret-
tily dressed, and made her a red
cloak with a hood to it, in which she looked so sweet
that the neighbors gave her the name of Little Red
Riding Hood..





LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.



One day her mother
said to her: ‘Go, my child,
to your. grandmother's
with this cake and pat of
butter, for we have heard
that she is not very. well,
and she may be in need
of something. Your father
will pass her cottage on
his way from work, and
will bring you home.”

‘Little Red Riding
« Hood set off with her
~ basket on her arm. Her
way lay through the wood, and she had not gone very
far before.she met a large wolf. He had a great
mind to eat her, but dared not for fear of some men
who were at work cutting down a-tree not far away.
So he only came up to her, and. asked her politely.
where she was going. The poor child, who did not
know that it is not wise to stop and speak to a wolf,
said; “I am on my way to see my grandmother, and
.to take her this cake and pat of butter, for we have
heard that she is not well.” |

“Does she live a great way off?” asked the wolf.

“Oh no,” said Little Red Riding Hood, ‘she lives
in the first house in the village on the other side of
the wood !”













“Well,” said the wolf, “I will go there also. to
inquire after the dear old lady’s health. I will go this
way, and you that, and we shall see which will be
there first.”

The wolf set out at full speed, and ran as fast as he
could, and the way he took was not much more than
half as longas the way Little Red Riding Hood took.



“TITTLE RED*RIDING HOOD.





As she went on, she stopped from time to time to pick
wild flowers, and when she had gathered a lot of them,
she sat down to arrange them in a nosegay for her
grandmother. So the wolf easily got first to the house
of the grandmother.

He knocked at the door, tap-tap, and the grand-
mother said: “ Who is there?”

“Itis little Red Riding Hood,” said the wolf, and
he tried to make his great gruff voice sound sweet,
like that of the little child. ‘1 have brought you a
cake and a pat of butter that mother has just made,
for she heard that you were not well.”

The good old lady, who was in bed, cried out: Cue
well, my dear, pull the string, and the latch will fly up.”

‘The wolf gave

a pull at the string, AZ Mi Ou sao wy
“at

and up went the Ae ii
latch. He ran in,

sprang on the bed, ly ‘ is vA os a a:



Mi
andateupthe poor “a me
old woman in a |, ha
trice, for it was
three days since he
had had a meal.

Then he shut the
door, and lay down
snugly in. bed to
wait for Little



LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.





“|

Sn Red Riding
Leal Hood. It was
a Se not long be-
ea fore she came,
oe and knocked, tap-
a ”%, tap, at the door.
"e3 sf ““Who is there ?”
" said the wolf. -
if “It is little Red
Riding Hood. Mother
has: sent you a cake
and a pat of butter.”
-The wolf then made
his: voice as. soft as
he could, as he said:
“Pull the string, ee
\ the latch will fly up.”
So Little Red Riding
Hood pulled the string, and the door-opened. She
went into the house, and after setting: her basket on a
chair, walked towards the bedside. She was greatly
surprised when she saw how strange her grandmother
looked, but she supposed it was the effects of illness.
The pretended grandmother appeared to be very ill
indeed, and said in a feeble voice, ‘“‘ My dear child, will
you not come into bed with your poor old granny; she
is too ill to get up and talk to you.” Little Red Rid-
ing Hood did as she was told. But now, taking a

a wn tig AW we
if Ce Ny




~



LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.



closer view, she was positively frightened at the change

which had come over her poor, sick grandmother.

What could ail her to make her took like this? The

child cd and stared, and her breath came quick
eee and short.

“Why, grandmother,”
she said, as soon as she
could speak, “what big
eyes you have got!”

“The better -to see
with, my child,” said the
wolf, imitating the grand-
mother’s voice as well as
he was able.

And “oh,” orand=

“mother,” said. .the child,
“what a long nose you
have got!”

“The: better: to.‘smell
with, my child.”

but, grandmother,
what great | big ears you
: have got!”

“t ‘The better to hear with, my child.”

Little Red Riding Hood began to be in greater fear
than she had ever been in her life before, and her voice —
trembled when she said; “Oh, grandmother, what
great — big — teeth — you’ ve— got !” ’ ‘











LITTLE REN RIDING HOOD.





“ The better to eat you up!” snarled the wolf, in his
natural voice; and he sprang up, and was about to set
his cruel teeth in her, when the door of the cottage
was thrown open, and before the wolf could turn, he
received’a stab in the back from a pitchfork in the hands
of Little Red Riding Hood’s father, who had arrived just
in time, witha fellow-workman. The wolf jumped out
of the bed, and tried to escape, but the men were too
quick for him, and they soon put an end to him with
their pitchforks.

As it was now late in the day the forester hastened
home with Little Red Riding Hood, in order that her
mother might not suffer from anxiety about her. When
the news of what had happened spread amongst the
neighbors, they all came to see Little Red Riding Hood





and to congratulate her and her parents, and she had
to tell, over and over again, just where she had met
the wolf, and all he had said and done.

Whenever the story was repeated to children, it was
with this word of warning: When you are sent on an
errand, go right along and do it as quickly as you can.
Do not stop to play on the road, or to make friends
with strangers, who may turn out to be wolves in
sheep’s clothing.









© JOUGHLUN DROS
. ae gees Sane :






~~ OOULINE
and the ATCHES.

MAMMA and Nurse went out one day,
And left Pauline alone at play;
Around the room she gaily sprung,
Clapped her hands, and danced, and sung.
Now, on the table close at hand,
A box of matches chanced to stand,
And kind Mamma and Nurse had told her,
That if she touched them they weuld scold her; ,



PAULINE AND THE MATCHES.

But Pauline said, ‘‘Oh, what a pity!
For when they burn, it is so pretty |
They crackle so, and spit, and flame,
To see them’s better than a game.
I will just light a match or two,
As oft I've seen my mother do.”
When Mintz and Mauntz, the cats, came by,
They raised their paws and began to cry;
““Me-ow!” they said, “me-ow, ‘me-oh!
You'll burn to death if you do so,
Your parents have forbid,
you know.”
But Pauline would not
take advice,
She lit a match, it was
so nice!
It crackled so, and
burned so clear—
Exactly like the picture
here:
She jumped for joy
and. ran about,
And was too pleased to
put it out.











When Mintz and Mauntz, the cats, saw this,
They said “Oh, naughty, naughty Miss!”
And stretched their claws,

And raised their paws;

“"Tis very, very wrong, you know;
Me-ow, me-oh, me-ow, me-oh!



PAULINE AND THE MATCHES.

You will be burnt if you do so,

Your mother has forbid you know.”

Now see! oh! see, a dreadful thing!

The fire has caught her apron-string!
Her apron burns, her arms, her hair;
She burns all over, everywhere.
Then how the pussy-cats did mew.

What else, poor pussies, could they do?
They screamed for help, ’twas all in vain,
‘So ‘then they said, We'll scream again;
‘Make haste, make haste ! me-ow, me-oh!
‘She'll burn to death—we told her so.”

So she was burnt with all her clothes
And arms, and hands, and eyes, and nose;
Till she had nothing more to lose,
Except her little scarlet shoes ;

And nothing else but these were found,
Among her ashes on the ground.

And when the good cats sat beside

The smoking ashes, how they cried!

“ Me-ow, me-oh, me-ow, me-oh!

What will Mamma and Nursy do?”
Their tears ran down their cheeks so fast,
They made a little pond at last.








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ENVIOUS MINNIE,

MINNIE had charming eyes of blue,

A figure trim and slender, too,
And gracefully her hair did curl,—
She was. in truth, a pretty girl.

And yet, with all these beauties rare,
These angel eyes, and curly hair,
Oh, many, many faults had she,

The worst of which was jealousy.










When on the shining
Christmas tree
Saint Nicholas hung
ue oe his gifts so free,
The envious Minnie could not bear
With any one these gifts to share.



And when her sisters’ birthdays came,
Minnie—it must be told with shame—
Would envy every pretty thing

Which dear Mamma to them would bring.



ENVIOUS MINNIE.

Sometimes great tears rolled from her eyes,
Sometimes she filled the air with cries,

For days together she would fret

Because their toys she could not: get.

Ah, then, how changed this pretty child,
No longer gentle, sweet, and mild,
That fairy form and winsome face

Lost all their sprightliness and grace.

Her tender mother often sighed,

And to’ reform her daughter tried, .
‘“Oh! Minnie, Minnie,” she would say,
‘*Quite yellow you will turn some day.”

Now came the merry Christmas feast;

Saint Nicholas brought to e’en the least
Such pretty presents, rich, and rare,

- But all the best for Minnie were.

But Minnie was not satisfied,

She pouted, fretted, sulked, and cried;
Sisters and brothers had no rest—

She vowed their presents were the best.

Now to her little sister, Bess,

Saint Nicholas brought a yellow dress;
This Minnie longed for, envious child,
And snatched it from her sister mild.





Then all in tears did Bessy run
To tell her mother what was done,
While Minnie went triumphantly
To try the dress on, as you see.

And springing quickly to the glass,
What saw she there? alas! alas!
Oh! what a sad, a deep disgrace!
She found she had a yellow face.

“Ah me!” she cried now, in despair,
“Where are my rosy cheeks—oh, where aid
“Ho!” screamed the parrot, “now you sce
The punis iment of jealousy!”







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CRUSOE ESCAPES FROM THE WAVES.



ROBINSON CRUSOE.



ROBINSON CRUSOE was an English lad, who,
when quite young, ran away to sea against his
father's wishes. He made several voyages without
_mishap, but at last, when he had become a man, and
had gone on a long voyage to Africa, the ship in which
he was sailing was wrecked ina storm. The wreck
took place near a strange coast, and the sailors, being
cast into the waves, tried to swim ashore, but all were
drowned except Robinson Crusoe. He was thrown
upon the beach nearly dead, and lay for a long time
Séniseless:. » moa,

When he came to, and found himself able to walk,
he went to the top of a hill which ‘he saw near by.
From there he could see that he was on a small island,
which seemed to be entirely without human inhabitants.
When he realized the awful situation in which he was
placed, all by himself on this lonely island, to which
ships probably never came, and from which there was
little hope that he could ever escape, he was filled with
despair, and he almost wished that he had died with
his shipmates. But other thoughts soon came to his
mind. He remembered how he had disobeyed. his
father, and felt that his fate was no* better than he
deserved, and he fell on his knees to ask God’s pardon, .
and to thank him for sparing his life.





BUILDING A CABIN.



ROBINSON CRUSOE.





The sea began to grow calm, and when the tide went
down, Crusoe was able to swim out to the wrecked
vessel, which had become imbedded in the sand. He
found that the stores of food aboard were unharmed,
and he set about getting them ashore. He made a
raft out of some planks, and with it was able to bring
small loads safe to land. Besides the food, he secured
a lot of tools, and some guns and other weapons, which
proved to be of great value to him.

Then he set to work to build himself a dwelling, out
of the planks of the ship. He knew but little about
the use of tools, so the hut he built was very rude, but
it served to shelter him from the sun and rain.

In the meantime, he frequently went about the island
with his gun, and often shot birds or wild goats, whose
flesh he used for food. On one of his rambles, he
caught a parrot alive, and he made-a pet of it, and
taught it to speak. He had also the company of a
dog that had been aboard the ship, and these two
creatures often served to while away his-lonely hours:

The clothes in which Robinson Crusoe had come
ashore were soon worn out, and he had to replace them
with garments which he made out of the skins of the
goats he shot. The heat of the sun was so fierce, that
he needed protection from it as he went about, so he
made himself an umbrella of goat-skin also.

After many years had passed, Crusoe was alarmed
one day to see some prints of naked feet in the sand.





COMPANIONS OF LONELY HOURS,







z : ee foe Re .
FINDING THE FOOT-PRINTS IN THE SAND,



ROBINSON CRUSOE.

Gladly as he would have welcomed the face of a civil-
ized being, he felt only fear at the sight of these tracks, ~
for he knew they must be those of savages. Not long
after, when he went out one morning, he saw smoke
at adistance, and stealing up under the shelter of some
trees, he saw that a lot of savages, who had come to
the island in canoes, were about to roast; over a fire,
some captives whom they had brought with them.
Presently, one of the captives broke away, and Crusoe
was in terror when he saw that he was coming straight
toward him. But he made up his mind to try to save
him, and when those who were after him came near
enough, he fired his gun at them.

One was killed, and the rest were so terrified by the
noise of the gun that they turned about and ran to
their canoes, in which they all paddled away.

The escaped captive then came and fell on his knees.
before his rescuer. Crusoe made signs to show that
he had nothing to fear, and took him home with him
to his hut. By degrees he taught the poor fellow to”
speak English, and he soon became a pleasant com-
panion and useful servant. Crusoe gave him the name
of Friday, because it was on that day he had rescued
him.

Although Robinson Crusoe was now less lonely, he
still longed to leave the island and go back to his old
home in England, but he had given up all hopes of
ever being able to do so. So you can imagine what







ROBINSON CRUSOE.



was his surprise and delight when Friday came run-
ning to him one morning to tell him that a ship was
in sight. He hastened to the shore, and he and Fri-
day made all possible signals to attract the attention of
those on board. They succeeded, and the captain of
the ship sent aboatashore. Then Crusoe learned that
the ship was an English Jne, bound for home, and
when he told his story, the captain agreed to carry
him and Friday along, and they set sail the same day.
Twenty-eight years, tvo months, and nineteen days
had passed since Crusoe was thrown upon the island.
Poor Friday never reached England. One day some
savages came paddling toward the ship in canoes, and
Friday was sent on the upper deck to speak to them
and find out what they wanted. At almost the first
word, the wretches let fly their arrows at him, and he
was killed. The ship’s guns were fired at the canoes
and the savages were all destroyed, but Robinson
Crusoe was not consoled by that for the loss of Friday,
of whom he had become very fond. When he arrived
in England, he found that his father and mother were
dead, and that few of his friends were living, and
for a time he felt almost as lonely as ever. But he
married a good wife before long, and settled down to
a quiet, industrious life. He was blest with children
who grew up to be his delight and comfort, and his
old age was spent in peace and happiness. |





VHE RESCUED CAPTIVE,









CJOUGHLIN BROS
i x te YORK:





JACK SPRAT AND HIS WIFE,



ACK SPRAT could eat no fat,
His wife could eat no lean;
And so between them both, you see,
They licked the platter clean. .

PUSSY-CAT, pussy-cat, where i



have you been? ©
I've been to London to visit | ae
the queen. aah | | x
Pussy-cat, pussy-cat, what | | | eae
did you there ? | Vl’
I frightened a.little mouse Wee
po COG



under. the chair. . f



IRLS and boys, come out to play,

The moon doth shine as bright as day,
Leave your supper, and leave your sleep,
And meet your play-fellows in the street ;

Come with a whoop, and come with a call,
And come with a good will, or not at all..
Up the ladder and down the wall,
A half-penny roll will serve us all ;
You find milk and I'll find flour,
And we'll have pudding in half an hour.

HERE was a fat man
of Bombay,

PP Qa w OL
Sea es? Who was: smoking one
ima” sunshiny. day,
When a bird called a snipe ©
Flew away with his pipe,

Sea Which vexed the fat man of Bombay.







ER

PUMPKIN EAT

» PETER,

PETER



PEFIER, Peter, pumpkin eater,

Had a wife and couldn’t keep her—
He put her in a pumpkin shell,
And there he kept her very well.

Peter, Peter, pumpkin eater,
Had another and didn’t love her;
Peter learned to read and spell,
And then he loved her very well.

HERE was an old man
of Tobago,
‘Who lived on rice, gruel,
and sago,
Till, much to his bliss,
His physician said this,
“To aleg, sir, of mutton you may go.”



Y little old man and I fell out,

I'll tell you what ’twas all
about ; °

& %) . I had money, and he had none, .

, ee And that’s the way the noise begun.





[Pair of Tongs. ]

eee LONG legs, crooked thighs,
Little head and no eyes.



“THERE was an old woman, and what do you think?
- She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink;

Victuals and drink were the chief of her diet ;

Yet this tiresome old woman could never be quiet.





le

THE OLD WOMAN WHO LIVED ON VICTUALS AND DRINK.







THE LITTLE MAN WHO HAD A LITTLE GUN.



HERE was a little man,
And he had a little gun,
And his bullets were made of lead, lead, lead.
He went to the brook,
And saw a little duck,
And he shot it through the head, head, head.

He carried it home,
To his old wife Joan,
And bid her a fire to make, make, make;
To roast the little duck,
He had shot in the brook,
And he’d go and fetch her the drake, drake, drake.

(a Tommy Tittlemouse,
Lived in a little house;
He caught fishes
In other men’s ditches.

OW-wow-wow,
Whose dog art thou ?
Little, Tom Tucker's dog,
ee Bow-wow-wow.



OT cross buns,
' Hot cross buns,
One a penny, two a penny, hot cross buns.
If your daughters don't like ’em,
Give them to your sons,
One a penny, two a penny, hot cross buns.

Neo and pins, needles and pins, _
When a man marries, his trouble begins.





HOT CROSS BUNS.



I HAD a little pony ;
They called him dapple gray,
I lent him to a lady,
To ride a mile away.
She whipped him, she slashed
him, ;
She rode him through the mire ;
I would not lend my pony now
For all the lady’s hire.



~ TET iE. Lome: Tucker
Sings for his supper.
What shall he eat?
White bread and butter.
How shall he cut it
Without any knife ?
How will he be married
Without any wife ?





(7 OO8EY, goosey, gander,
_ Whither dost thou wander ?
Up stairs, down stairs, © .
In my lady’s chamber.
There I met an old man,
Who would not say his prayers;
I took him by the left leg,
And threw him down stairs.



LD Mother Hubbard went to the cupboard,
To get her poor dog a bone ;
When she came there, the cupboard was bare,
And so the poor dog got none.





HER HUBBARD

-

OLD MO



AAS ZD\ RAT, bat,

Come under

my hat,
And I'll give youa
slice of bacon;

And when I bake
[ll give you a cake,
Iz I am not mistaken.



A LITTLE pig found a fifty-dollar note,
And purchased a hat and
a very fine coat,
With trousers, and stockings,
and shoes;
Cravat, and shirt-collar, and
gold-headed cane ;
Then proud as could be he
marched up the lane;
Said he, “I shall hear all
the news.”



SING: sing !—What shall I sing?
The cat's run away with the pudding-bag string!

HREE blind mice, see how




a
tS,

a they run!
ee They all ran after the farmer’s wife
. | | Who cut off their tails with a carv-
; ing-knife—

Did you ever see

such fools in

~ your life?
aa Three blind mice!










SEE, saw,
Margery Daw,
Johnny shall have
a new master ;
He shall have
but a penny
a day,
Because he can’t
work any faster.

A CAT came fiddling out of a barn,
With a pair of bag-pipes under
her arm:
She could sing nothing but fiddle-
cum-fee ;
The mouse has married the
humble-bee.
-Pipe cat, dance mouse,
We'll have a wedding at our
good house.





HOE the wild horse, and shoe the gray mare;
If the horse won't be shod, let him go bare.

"LP HERE was a Piper had a cow,
And he had naught to give her;
He pulled out his pipes and
played her a tune,
And bade the cow consider.






The cow considered very well,

And gave the Piper a penny

And bade him play the ©
other tune,

“Corn rigs are bonny.”





TOM, THE PIPER’S SON.



See he was a Piper’s son,

He learned to play when he was young;
But the only tune that he could play, :
Was “Over the hills and far away.”

Now, Tom with his pipe made such a noise,
That he pleased both the girls and boys,
And they all stopped to hear him play
“Over the hills and far away.”

Tom with his pipe did play with such skill,

That those who heard him could never stand still;

Whenever they heard him they began to dance—
Even pigs on their hind legs would after him prance.

He met old Dame Trot with a basket of eggs,—
‘He used his pipe and she used her legs ;

She danced about till the eggs were all broke; |
She began to fret, but he laughed at the joke.

He saw across fellow was beating an ass,
Heavy laden with pots, pans, dishes and glass;
He took out his pipe and played them a tune,
And the Jackass’s load was lightened full soon.



Do FOSTER went
to Gloster
In a shower of rain;
He stepped in a puddle up to
his middle,
And never went there
again.







THE FROG’S WOOING.



FROG he would a-wooing go,
Whether his mother would let him or no.

So off he set with his. opera-hat,

And on the road he:met with a Rat.
“Pray, Mr. Rat, will you go with me,
Kind Mrs. Mousey for to see 2”

They soon arrived at Mousey’s hall,
And gave a loud knock, and gave a loud call.

“Pray, Mrs. Mouse, are you within ?”

“Yes, kind sirs, and sitting to spin.”

‘“Pray, Mrs. Mouse, now give us some beer,
For Froggy and I are fond of good cheer.”
“Pray, Mr. Frog, will you give us.a song? ©
But let it be something that’s not very long.”

“Indeed, Mrs. Mouse, I shall have to say No;
A cold has made me:as hoarse as a crow.”

“Since you have caught cold, Mr. Frog,” she said,
“T’ll sing you a song that I have just made.”

But while they were making a merry din,
A Cat and her kittens came tumbling in.

the Cat she seized the Rat by the crown,
The kittens they pulled the little Mouse down.

This put Mr. Frog in a terrible fright,
So he took up his hat, and he wished them good-night.

As Froggy was crossing.a silvery. brook,
A lilywhite Duck came and gobbled him up,

So this was an end of one, two, three—
The Rat, the Mouse, and little Frog-ee,













() 2 woman, old woman, shall we go a-shearinz?

Speak a little louder, sir, I’m very thick o-hearing.
Old woman, old woman, shall I kiss you dearly? .
Thank you, kind sir, I hear you very clearly.

pes barber, shave a pig,

How many hairs will make a wig?
‘‘ Four-and-twenty—that’s enough ;”
Give the poor barber a pinch of snuff.

DILLAR, a dollar,

A ten-o’clock scholar ;
What makes you come so soon?
You used to come at ten o'clock,
But now you come at noon.

Go to bed Tom, go to bed Tom,
Merry or sober, go to org Tom.



Ow KING COLE was a merry old soul,
And a merry old soul was he;
He called for his pipe,
And he called for his bowl, ©
And he called for his fiddlers three.

eve fiddler, he haa a fine fiddle,
: ‘And a very fine fiddle had he;
‘““Twee tweedle dee, tweedle dee,” said the fiddlers.
Oh, there’s none so rare,
They can compare,
With King Cole and his fiddlers. three}





CLD KING COLE.



CARRION crow sat on an oak,
Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, de ri do.
Watching a tailor cutting a cloak;
Sing heigh ho! the carrion crow,
Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, de ri do.

“Wife, wife! bring me my bow,”
Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, de ri do.
“That I may shoot yon carrion crow ;”
Sing heigh ho! ‘the carrion crow,
Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, de rido.

The tailor shot and missed his mark,
Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, de ri do.

And shot his sow quite through the heart.
Sing heigh ho! the carrion crow, 5
Fol de rol. de rol, de rol, de ri do

‘“Oh! wife, some brandy in a spoon,”
Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, de ri do.

“ For our old sow is in a swoon;” -
Sing heigh ho! the carrion crow,
Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, de ri do.





A® I was going up Pippen Hill,

Pippen Hill was dirty,
There I met a pretty miss,

Who dropped me acurtsey.

Little miss, pretty miss
Blessings light upon you!

If I had half-a-crown a day
I'd spend it all upon you.



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MEW Soe
CINDERELLA.

SE --) e

NCE upon a time there lived a rich man who had
a wife and one young daughter, a very sweet
and pretty girl. The wife fell sick and died, and after
fy ait a while the father
married again.
The lady he mar-
ried this time was
proud and cross,
and she had two.
grown-up daugh-
ters like herself.
The new wife
took a great dis-
like to her step-
child, because she
Was prettier, and
had better man-
ners than her own
daughters. So
‘both she and the |
daughters were
very unkind to
the poor girl,
whom they made |
do all the hard
work of the house. -


CINDERELLA.



While the two sisters spent their time in the drawing-
room, she had to stay in the kitchen, the only place she
CINDERELLA.

could sit being in the chimney-corner amongst the
cinders, and from this her proud, cruel sisters gave her
the name of Cinderella.

One day the two sisters received an invitation to a
ball at the King’s palace. They were in high glee,
and at once had the whole house in a stir to get them
ready to appear in grand style. They made Cinderella
help them to dress, for they knew her taste was better
than theirs, although they would not tell her so.

The night came, and the sisters rode off to the ball,
being mean enough to taunt: Cinderella at the last
moment because she was not going too.

The poor girl went to her chimney-corner, and could
not help weeping as she sat there, thinking about her
sisters’ cruelty. Suddenly her godmother, who was a
Fairy, appeared before her and asked her why she wept.

“ T wish—-I wish—” said Cinderella, with a sob, but
she could not say a word more.

“You wish to go to the ball—is not that it?” said.
the Fairy.

“Ah, yes,” said the poor child, and she began to
sob afresh.

“Well, be a good girl, and you shali go,” said the
Fairy.

She touched Cinderella’s dingy gown and it was
changed in an instant into a beautiful ball-dress. Then
she gave her a pair of slippers, the prettiest ever seen.
They were made of glass, but were soft as silk, and


CINDERELLA AT THE PALACE.
CINDERELLA .

fitted her exactly. The Fairy then took a pumpkin,
scooped it out, and touched it with her wand, and it
became a splendid coach. Next she went to the mouse-
trap, and finding six live mice in it, she touched them
too, with her wand, and turned them into six dashing
horses, Then she made a coachman out of a great
rat, and three footmen out of lizards from the garden.

She now made the happy girl get into the coach and
drive off to the ball, but she told her at starting that
she must not fail to leave the palace before twelve
o'clock, for at that hour her fine dress would turn again
to rags, and her coach and horses and servants to
what they had been in the first place.

There was a great stir at the palace when Cinderella’s
splendid coach drove up. The Lord High Chamberlain
helped her to alight, and escorted her himself into
‘the ball-room. There he presented her to the Prince,
the King’s only son, and he at once claimed her hand
for the next dance. Every one present was struck with .
her beauty, and with the richness of her dress, and
the elegance of her dancing. Even her proud sisters
could not help but admire her, little thinking who she
was, and they were much pleased that she took notice
of them.

As for the Prince, he. lost his heart to Cinderella
completely. He danced with her every time, and kept
by her side the whole evening.

Cinderella was so happy that it was no wonder that
CINDERELLA.

she took little heed of how the hours were passing, and
quite forgot her godmother's warning until she heard
the clock begin to strike twelve. She was sitting beside
the Prince, and she jumped up from her seat, rushed
across the room, and flew down stairs.

The Prince ran after her, but could not overtake her.
The orily trace of her was one of her glass slippers,
which had fallen off in her flight. The Prince picked
it up, and declared in the presence of the whole court,
that if he could find the owner he would marry her.

Cinderella had to reach home on foot, and had none
of her finery left except the other glass slipper.

The next day the Prince sent out a herald, with
orders to stop at every house, so that every lady might
try on the slipper he had picked up. When the herald
came to the home of Cinderella’s sisters, they tried
very hard to put on the slipper, but it was much too °
small for either of. them.

Then Cinderella’s turn came, and great was the dis-
may of her sisters when they saw that the slipper went
on easily, and fitted toa T. Cinderella at once drew
the other slipper from her pocket and put it on her
other foot, and then every one knew that she must be
indeed the beautiful lady of the ball-room. To put
an end to all doubt, the Fairy godmother at that mo-
ment appeared, and touching Cinderella’s clothes with
her-wand, changed them again into handsome robes of
satin and lace. .


CINDERELLA’S FLIGHT FROM THE BALL.
CINDERELLA.

r

The sisters were
sorry enough now that
they had treated Cin-
derella so harshly, and
fearing that she might
seize the chance to pay -
them back, they fell at |
her feet tobeg her par- ~
don. Cinderella was .
too kind-hearted to re-
fuse, and she bade them !
rise, assuring them that
she would forget what _.
was past if they would ,
only love her.

The herald set off to
bear to the Prince the ines So
happy news that the slipper’s owner had been found.
A royal escort was sent to bring Cinderella to the
palace, where the Prince received her with great joy.
She consented to become his wife, and the wedding
was soon celebrated with the greatest splendor.

Cinderella made hosts of friends, and’ she and the
Prince lived happily together for many years, and
among all the treasures of the royal palace there. was
nothing quite so precious as . :

CINDERELLA’S GLASS SLIPPER.


HE PRINCE.

I:

Q
Z



ERELLA|

THE MARRIAGE OF CIND







q
HES

Se OU GHLIN BROS. .

hy ly \

ew DORK
RED RIDING HOOD.



NCE upon a time there lived in a
small cottage on the edge of a deep
wood, a forester and his wife, and
their dear little daughter. The
child was as lovely as a picture,
and a great pet with everybody.
Her mother liked to see her pret-
tily dressed, and made her a red
cloak with a hood to it, in which she looked so sweet
that the neighbors gave her the name of Little Red
Riding Hood..


LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.



One day her mother
said to her: ‘Go, my child,
to your. grandmother's
with this cake and pat of
butter, for we have heard
that she is not very. well,
and she may be in need
of something. Your father
will pass her cottage on
his way from work, and
will bring you home.”

‘Little Red Riding
« Hood set off with her
~ basket on her arm. Her
way lay through the wood, and she had not gone very
far before.she met a large wolf. He had a great
mind to eat her, but dared not for fear of some men
who were at work cutting down a-tree not far away.
So he only came up to her, and. asked her politely.
where she was going. The poor child, who did not
know that it is not wise to stop and speak to a wolf,
said; “I am on my way to see my grandmother, and
.to take her this cake and pat of butter, for we have
heard that she is not well.” |

“Does she live a great way off?” asked the wolf.

“Oh no,” said Little Red Riding Hood, ‘she lives
in the first house in the village on the other side of
the wood !”







“Well,” said the wolf, “I will go there also. to
inquire after the dear old lady’s health. I will go this
way, and you that, and we shall see which will be
there first.”

The wolf set out at full speed, and ran as fast as he
could, and the way he took was not much more than
half as longas the way Little Red Riding Hood took.
“TITTLE RED*RIDING HOOD.





As she went on, she stopped from time to time to pick
wild flowers, and when she had gathered a lot of them,
she sat down to arrange them in a nosegay for her
grandmother. So the wolf easily got first to the house
of the grandmother.

He knocked at the door, tap-tap, and the grand-
mother said: “ Who is there?”

“Itis little Red Riding Hood,” said the wolf, and
he tried to make his great gruff voice sound sweet,
like that of the little child. ‘1 have brought you a
cake and a pat of butter that mother has just made,
for she heard that you were not well.”

The good old lady, who was in bed, cried out: Cue
well, my dear, pull the string, and the latch will fly up.”

‘The wolf gave

a pull at the string, AZ Mi Ou sao wy
“at

and up went the Ae ii
latch. He ran in,

sprang on the bed, ly ‘ is vA os a a:



Mi
andateupthe poor “a me
old woman in a |, ha
trice, for it was
three days since he
had had a meal.

Then he shut the
door, and lay down
snugly in. bed to
wait for Little
LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.





“|

Sn Red Riding
Leal Hood. It was
a Se not long be-
ea fore she came,
oe and knocked, tap-
a ”%, tap, at the door.
"e3 sf ““Who is there ?”
" said the wolf. -
if “It is little Red
Riding Hood. Mother
has: sent you a cake
and a pat of butter.”
-The wolf then made
his: voice as. soft as
he could, as he said:
“Pull the string, ee
\ the latch will fly up.”
So Little Red Riding
Hood pulled the string, and the door-opened. She
went into the house, and after setting: her basket on a
chair, walked towards the bedside. She was greatly
surprised when she saw how strange her grandmother
looked, but she supposed it was the effects of illness.
The pretended grandmother appeared to be very ill
indeed, and said in a feeble voice, ‘“‘ My dear child, will
you not come into bed with your poor old granny; she
is too ill to get up and talk to you.” Little Red Rid-
ing Hood did as she was told. But now, taking a

a wn tig AW we
if Ce Ny




~
LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.



closer view, she was positively frightened at the change

which had come over her poor, sick grandmother.

What could ail her to make her took like this? The

child cd and stared, and her breath came quick
eee and short.

“Why, grandmother,”
she said, as soon as she
could speak, “what big
eyes you have got!”

“The better -to see
with, my child,” said the
wolf, imitating the grand-
mother’s voice as well as
he was able.

And “oh,” orand=

“mother,” said. .the child,
“what a long nose you
have got!”

“The: better: to.‘smell
with, my child.”

but, grandmother,
what great | big ears you
: have got!”

“t ‘The better to hear with, my child.”

Little Red Riding Hood began to be in greater fear
than she had ever been in her life before, and her voice —
trembled when she said; “Oh, grandmother, what
great — big — teeth — you’ ve— got !” ’ ‘





LITTLE REN RIDING HOOD.





“ The better to eat you up!” snarled the wolf, in his
natural voice; and he sprang up, and was about to set
his cruel teeth in her, when the door of the cottage
was thrown open, and before the wolf could turn, he
received’a stab in the back from a pitchfork in the hands
of Little Red Riding Hood’s father, who had arrived just
in time, witha fellow-workman. The wolf jumped out
of the bed, and tried to escape, but the men were too
quick for him, and they soon put an end to him with
their pitchforks.

As it was now late in the day the forester hastened
home with Little Red Riding Hood, in order that her
mother might not suffer from anxiety about her. When
the news of what had happened spread amongst the
neighbors, they all came to see Little Red Riding Hood


and to congratulate her and her parents, and she had
to tell, over and over again, just where she had met
the wolf, and all he had said and done.

Whenever the story was repeated to children, it was
with this word of warning: When you are sent on an
errand, go right along and do it as quickly as you can.
Do not stop to play on the road, or to make friends
with strangers, who may turn out to be wolves in
sheep’s clothing.



© JOUGHLUN DROS
. ae gees Sane :



~~ OOULINE
and the ATCHES.

MAMMA and Nurse went out one day,
And left Pauline alone at play;
Around the room she gaily sprung,
Clapped her hands, and danced, and sung.
Now, on the table close at hand,
A box of matches chanced to stand,
And kind Mamma and Nurse had told her,
That if she touched them they weuld scold her; ,
PAULINE AND THE MATCHES.

But Pauline said, ‘‘Oh, what a pity!
For when they burn, it is so pretty |
They crackle so, and spit, and flame,
To see them’s better than a game.
I will just light a match or two,
As oft I've seen my mother do.”
When Mintz and Mauntz, the cats, came by,
They raised their paws and began to cry;
““Me-ow!” they said, “me-ow, ‘me-oh!
You'll burn to death if you do so,
Your parents have forbid,
you know.”
But Pauline would not
take advice,
She lit a match, it was
so nice!
It crackled so, and
burned so clear—
Exactly like the picture
here:
She jumped for joy
and. ran about,
And was too pleased to
put it out.





When Mintz and Mauntz, the cats, saw this,
They said “Oh, naughty, naughty Miss!”
And stretched their claws,

And raised their paws;

“"Tis very, very wrong, you know;
Me-ow, me-oh, me-ow, me-oh!
PAULINE AND THE MATCHES.

You will be burnt if you do so,

Your mother has forbid you know.”

Now see! oh! see, a dreadful thing!

The fire has caught her apron-string!
Her apron burns, her arms, her hair;
She burns all over, everywhere.
Then how the pussy-cats did mew.

What else, poor pussies, could they do?
They screamed for help, ’twas all in vain,
‘So ‘then they said, We'll scream again;
‘Make haste, make haste ! me-ow, me-oh!
‘She'll burn to death—we told her so.”

So she was burnt with all her clothes
And arms, and hands, and eyes, and nose;
Till she had nothing more to lose,
Except her little scarlet shoes ;

And nothing else but these were found,
Among her ashes on the ground.

And when the good cats sat beside

The smoking ashes, how they cried!

“ Me-ow, me-oh, me-ow, me-oh!

What will Mamma and Nursy do?”
Their tears ran down their cheeks so fast,
They made a little pond at last.





Way |

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ENVIOUS MINNIE,

MINNIE had charming eyes of blue,

A figure trim and slender, too,
And gracefully her hair did curl,—
She was. in truth, a pretty girl.

And yet, with all these beauties rare,
These angel eyes, and curly hair,
Oh, many, many faults had she,

The worst of which was jealousy.




When on the shining
Christmas tree
Saint Nicholas hung
ue oe his gifts so free,
The envious Minnie could not bear
With any one these gifts to share.



And when her sisters’ birthdays came,
Minnie—it must be told with shame—
Would envy every pretty thing

Which dear Mamma to them would bring.
ENVIOUS MINNIE.

Sometimes great tears rolled from her eyes,
Sometimes she filled the air with cries,

For days together she would fret

Because their toys she could not: get.

Ah, then, how changed this pretty child,
No longer gentle, sweet, and mild,
That fairy form and winsome face

Lost all their sprightliness and grace.

Her tender mother often sighed,

And to’ reform her daughter tried, .
‘“Oh! Minnie, Minnie,” she would say,
‘*Quite yellow you will turn some day.”

Now came the merry Christmas feast;

Saint Nicholas brought to e’en the least
Such pretty presents, rich, and rare,

- But all the best for Minnie were.

But Minnie was not satisfied,

She pouted, fretted, sulked, and cried;
Sisters and brothers had no rest—

She vowed their presents were the best.

Now to her little sister, Bess,

Saint Nicholas brought a yellow dress;
This Minnie longed for, envious child,
And snatched it from her sister mild.


Then all in tears did Bessy run
To tell her mother what was done,
While Minnie went triumphantly
To try the dress on, as you see.

And springing quickly to the glass,
What saw she there? alas! alas!
Oh! what a sad, a deep disgrace!
She found she had a yellow face.

“Ah me!” she cried now, in despair,
“Where are my rosy cheeks—oh, where aid
“Ho!” screamed the parrot, “now you sce
The punis iment of jealousy!”

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CRUSOE ESCAPES FROM THE WAVES.
ROBINSON CRUSOE.



ROBINSON CRUSOE was an English lad, who,
when quite young, ran away to sea against his
father's wishes. He made several voyages without
_mishap, but at last, when he had become a man, and
had gone on a long voyage to Africa, the ship in which
he was sailing was wrecked ina storm. The wreck
took place near a strange coast, and the sailors, being
cast into the waves, tried to swim ashore, but all were
drowned except Robinson Crusoe. He was thrown
upon the beach nearly dead, and lay for a long time
Séniseless:. » moa,

When he came to, and found himself able to walk,
he went to the top of a hill which ‘he saw near by.
From there he could see that he was on a small island,
which seemed to be entirely without human inhabitants.
When he realized the awful situation in which he was
placed, all by himself on this lonely island, to which
ships probably never came, and from which there was
little hope that he could ever escape, he was filled with
despair, and he almost wished that he had died with
his shipmates. But other thoughts soon came to his
mind. He remembered how he had disobeyed. his
father, and felt that his fate was no* better than he
deserved, and he fell on his knees to ask God’s pardon, .
and to thank him for sparing his life.


BUILDING A CABIN.
ROBINSON CRUSOE.





The sea began to grow calm, and when the tide went
down, Crusoe was able to swim out to the wrecked
vessel, which had become imbedded in the sand. He
found that the stores of food aboard were unharmed,
and he set about getting them ashore. He made a
raft out of some planks, and with it was able to bring
small loads safe to land. Besides the food, he secured
a lot of tools, and some guns and other weapons, which
proved to be of great value to him.

Then he set to work to build himself a dwelling, out
of the planks of the ship. He knew but little about
the use of tools, so the hut he built was very rude, but
it served to shelter him from the sun and rain.

In the meantime, he frequently went about the island
with his gun, and often shot birds or wild goats, whose
flesh he used for food. On one of his rambles, he
caught a parrot alive, and he made-a pet of it, and
taught it to speak. He had also the company of a
dog that had been aboard the ship, and these two
creatures often served to while away his-lonely hours:

The clothes in which Robinson Crusoe had come
ashore were soon worn out, and he had to replace them
with garments which he made out of the skins of the
goats he shot. The heat of the sun was so fierce, that
he needed protection from it as he went about, so he
made himself an umbrella of goat-skin also.

After many years had passed, Crusoe was alarmed
one day to see some prints of naked feet in the sand.


COMPANIONS OF LONELY HOURS,




z : ee foe Re .
FINDING THE FOOT-PRINTS IN THE SAND,
ROBINSON CRUSOE.

Gladly as he would have welcomed the face of a civil-
ized being, he felt only fear at the sight of these tracks, ~
for he knew they must be those of savages. Not long
after, when he went out one morning, he saw smoke
at adistance, and stealing up under the shelter of some
trees, he saw that a lot of savages, who had come to
the island in canoes, were about to roast; over a fire,
some captives whom they had brought with them.
Presently, one of the captives broke away, and Crusoe
was in terror when he saw that he was coming straight
toward him. But he made up his mind to try to save
him, and when those who were after him came near
enough, he fired his gun at them.

One was killed, and the rest were so terrified by the
noise of the gun that they turned about and ran to
their canoes, in which they all paddled away.

The escaped captive then came and fell on his knees.
before his rescuer. Crusoe made signs to show that
he had nothing to fear, and took him home with him
to his hut. By degrees he taught the poor fellow to”
speak English, and he soon became a pleasant com-
panion and useful servant. Crusoe gave him the name
of Friday, because it was on that day he had rescued
him.

Although Robinson Crusoe was now less lonely, he
still longed to leave the island and go back to his old
home in England, but he had given up all hopes of
ever being able to do so. So you can imagine what

ROBINSON CRUSOE.



was his surprise and delight when Friday came run-
ning to him one morning to tell him that a ship was
in sight. He hastened to the shore, and he and Fri-
day made all possible signals to attract the attention of
those on board. They succeeded, and the captain of
the ship sent aboatashore. Then Crusoe learned that
the ship was an English Jne, bound for home, and
when he told his story, the captain agreed to carry
him and Friday along, and they set sail the same day.
Twenty-eight years, tvo months, and nineteen days
had passed since Crusoe was thrown upon the island.
Poor Friday never reached England. One day some
savages came paddling toward the ship in canoes, and
Friday was sent on the upper deck to speak to them
and find out what they wanted. At almost the first
word, the wretches let fly their arrows at him, and he
was killed. The ship’s guns were fired at the canoes
and the savages were all destroyed, but Robinson
Crusoe was not consoled by that for the loss of Friday,
of whom he had become very fond. When he arrived
in England, he found that his father and mother were
dead, and that few of his friends were living, and
for a time he felt almost as lonely as ever. But he
married a good wife before long, and settled down to
a quiet, industrious life. He was blest with children
who grew up to be his delight and comfort, and his
old age was spent in peace and happiness. |


VHE RESCUED CAPTIVE,



CJOUGHLIN BROS
i x te YORK:


JACK SPRAT AND HIS WIFE,
ACK SPRAT could eat no fat,
His wife could eat no lean;
And so between them both, you see,
They licked the platter clean. .

PUSSY-CAT, pussy-cat, where i



have you been? ©
I've been to London to visit | ae
the queen. aah | | x
Pussy-cat, pussy-cat, what | | | eae
did you there ? | Vl’
I frightened a.little mouse Wee
po COG



under. the chair. . f



IRLS and boys, come out to play,

The moon doth shine as bright as day,
Leave your supper, and leave your sleep,
And meet your play-fellows in the street ;

Come with a whoop, and come with a call,
And come with a good will, or not at all..
Up the ladder and down the wall,
A half-penny roll will serve us all ;
You find milk and I'll find flour,
And we'll have pudding in half an hour.

HERE was a fat man
of Bombay,

PP Qa w OL
Sea es? Who was: smoking one
ima” sunshiny. day,
When a bird called a snipe ©
Flew away with his pipe,

Sea Which vexed the fat man of Bombay.




ER

PUMPKIN EAT

» PETER,

PETER
PEFIER, Peter, pumpkin eater,

Had a wife and couldn’t keep her—
He put her in a pumpkin shell,
And there he kept her very well.

Peter, Peter, pumpkin eater,
Had another and didn’t love her;
Peter learned to read and spell,
And then he loved her very well.

HERE was an old man
of Tobago,
‘Who lived on rice, gruel,
and sago,
Till, much to his bliss,
His physician said this,
“To aleg, sir, of mutton you may go.”



Y little old man and I fell out,

I'll tell you what ’twas all
about ; °

& %) . I had money, and he had none, .

, ee And that’s the way the noise begun.





[Pair of Tongs. ]

eee LONG legs, crooked thighs,
Little head and no eyes.



“THERE was an old woman, and what do you think?
- She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink;

Victuals and drink were the chief of her diet ;

Yet this tiresome old woman could never be quiet.


le

THE OLD WOMAN WHO LIVED ON VICTUALS AND DRINK.




THE LITTLE MAN WHO HAD A LITTLE GUN.
HERE was a little man,
And he had a little gun,
And his bullets were made of lead, lead, lead.
He went to the brook,
And saw a little duck,
And he shot it through the head, head, head.

He carried it home,
To his old wife Joan,
And bid her a fire to make, make, make;
To roast the little duck,
He had shot in the brook,
And he’d go and fetch her the drake, drake, drake.

(a Tommy Tittlemouse,
Lived in a little house;
He caught fishes
In other men’s ditches.

OW-wow-wow,
Whose dog art thou ?
Little, Tom Tucker's dog,
ee Bow-wow-wow.



OT cross buns,
' Hot cross buns,
One a penny, two a penny, hot cross buns.
If your daughters don't like ’em,
Give them to your sons,
One a penny, two a penny, hot cross buns.

Neo and pins, needles and pins, _
When a man marries, his trouble begins.


HOT CROSS BUNS.
I HAD a little pony ;
They called him dapple gray,
I lent him to a lady,
To ride a mile away.
She whipped him, she slashed
him, ;
She rode him through the mire ;
I would not lend my pony now
For all the lady’s hire.



~ TET iE. Lome: Tucker
Sings for his supper.
What shall he eat?
White bread and butter.
How shall he cut it
Without any knife ?
How will he be married
Without any wife ?





(7 OO8EY, goosey, gander,
_ Whither dost thou wander ?
Up stairs, down stairs, © .
In my lady’s chamber.
There I met an old man,
Who would not say his prayers;
I took him by the left leg,
And threw him down stairs.



LD Mother Hubbard went to the cupboard,
To get her poor dog a bone ;
When she came there, the cupboard was bare,
And so the poor dog got none.


HER HUBBARD

-

OLD MO
AAS ZD\ RAT, bat,

Come under

my hat,
And I'll give youa
slice of bacon;

And when I bake
[ll give you a cake,
Iz I am not mistaken.



A LITTLE pig found a fifty-dollar note,
And purchased a hat and
a very fine coat,
With trousers, and stockings,
and shoes;
Cravat, and shirt-collar, and
gold-headed cane ;
Then proud as could be he
marched up the lane;
Said he, “I shall hear all
the news.”



SING: sing !—What shall I sing?
The cat's run away with the pudding-bag string!

HREE blind mice, see how




a
tS,

a they run!
ee They all ran after the farmer’s wife
. | | Who cut off their tails with a carv-
; ing-knife—

Did you ever see

such fools in

~ your life?
aa Three blind mice!







SEE, saw,
Margery Daw,
Johnny shall have
a new master ;
He shall have
but a penny
a day,
Because he can’t
work any faster.

A CAT came fiddling out of a barn,
With a pair of bag-pipes under
her arm:
She could sing nothing but fiddle-
cum-fee ;
The mouse has married the
humble-bee.
-Pipe cat, dance mouse,
We'll have a wedding at our
good house.





HOE the wild horse, and shoe the gray mare;
If the horse won't be shod, let him go bare.

"LP HERE was a Piper had a cow,
And he had naught to give her;
He pulled out his pipes and
played her a tune,
And bade the cow consider.






The cow considered very well,

And gave the Piper a penny

And bade him play the ©
other tune,

“Corn rigs are bonny.”


TOM, THE PIPER’S SON.
See he was a Piper’s son,

He learned to play when he was young;
But the only tune that he could play, :
Was “Over the hills and far away.”

Now, Tom with his pipe made such a noise,
That he pleased both the girls and boys,
And they all stopped to hear him play
“Over the hills and far away.”

Tom with his pipe did play with such skill,

That those who heard him could never stand still;

Whenever they heard him they began to dance—
Even pigs on their hind legs would after him prance.

He met old Dame Trot with a basket of eggs,—
‘He used his pipe and she used her legs ;

She danced about till the eggs were all broke; |
She began to fret, but he laughed at the joke.

He saw across fellow was beating an ass,
Heavy laden with pots, pans, dishes and glass;
He took out his pipe and played them a tune,
And the Jackass’s load was lightened full soon.



Do FOSTER went
to Gloster
In a shower of rain;
He stepped in a puddle up to
his middle,
And never went there
again.




THE FROG’S WOOING.
FROG he would a-wooing go,
Whether his mother would let him or no.

So off he set with his. opera-hat,

And on the road he:met with a Rat.
“Pray, Mr. Rat, will you go with me,
Kind Mrs. Mousey for to see 2”

They soon arrived at Mousey’s hall,
And gave a loud knock, and gave a loud call.

“Pray, Mrs. Mouse, are you within ?”

“Yes, kind sirs, and sitting to spin.”

‘“Pray, Mrs. Mouse, now give us some beer,
For Froggy and I are fond of good cheer.”
“Pray, Mr. Frog, will you give us.a song? ©
But let it be something that’s not very long.”

“Indeed, Mrs. Mouse, I shall have to say No;
A cold has made me:as hoarse as a crow.”

“Since you have caught cold, Mr. Frog,” she said,
“T’ll sing you a song that I have just made.”

But while they were making a merry din,
A Cat and her kittens came tumbling in.

the Cat she seized the Rat by the crown,
The kittens they pulled the little Mouse down.

This put Mr. Frog in a terrible fright,
So he took up his hat, and he wished them good-night.

As Froggy was crossing.a silvery. brook,
A lilywhite Duck came and gobbled him up,

So this was an end of one, two, three—
The Rat, the Mouse, and little Frog-ee,




() 2 woman, old woman, shall we go a-shearinz?

Speak a little louder, sir, I’m very thick o-hearing.
Old woman, old woman, shall I kiss you dearly? .
Thank you, kind sir, I hear you very clearly.

pes barber, shave a pig,

How many hairs will make a wig?
‘‘ Four-and-twenty—that’s enough ;”
Give the poor barber a pinch of snuff.

DILLAR, a dollar,

A ten-o’clock scholar ;
What makes you come so soon?
You used to come at ten o'clock,
But now you come at noon.

Go to bed Tom, go to bed Tom,
Merry or sober, go to org Tom.



Ow KING COLE was a merry old soul,
And a merry old soul was he;
He called for his pipe,
And he called for his bowl, ©
And he called for his fiddlers three.

eve fiddler, he haa a fine fiddle,
: ‘And a very fine fiddle had he;
‘““Twee tweedle dee, tweedle dee,” said the fiddlers.
Oh, there’s none so rare,
They can compare,
With King Cole and his fiddlers. three}


CLD KING COLE.
CARRION crow sat on an oak,
Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, de ri do.
Watching a tailor cutting a cloak;
Sing heigh ho! the carrion crow,
Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, de ri do.

“Wife, wife! bring me my bow,”
Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, de ri do.
“That I may shoot yon carrion crow ;”
Sing heigh ho! ‘the carrion crow,
Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, de rido.

The tailor shot and missed his mark,
Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, de ri do.

And shot his sow quite through the heart.
Sing heigh ho! the carrion crow, 5
Fol de rol. de rol, de rol, de ri do

‘“Oh! wife, some brandy in a spoon,”
Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, de ri do.

“ For our old sow is in a swoon;” -
Sing heigh ho! the carrion crow,
Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, de ri do.





A® I was going up Pippen Hill,

Pippen Hill was dirty,
There I met a pretty miss,

Who dropped me acurtsey.

Little miss, pretty miss
Blessings light upon you!

If I had half-a-crown a day
I'd spend it all upon you.
BY
DEK



28h 7222

?


a
t

iby
16? Whe,








xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008903600001datestamp 2008-12-11setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Echoes from storylandLittle Red Riding HoodEchoes from story landPauline and the matches and envious MinnieFavorite rhymes and jinglesdc:creator Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731dc:subject Children's stories ( lcsh )Children's poetry ( lcsh )Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )Children's stories -- 1899 ( lcsh )Children's poetry -- 1899 ( lcsh )Nursery rhymes -- 1899 ( rbgenr )Bldn -- 1899dc:description Date of publication from inscription.dc:publisher McLoughlin Bros.dc:date 1899?dc:type Bookdc:format 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 21 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00089036&v=00001002225662 (aleph)271656848 (oclc)ALG5937 (notis)dc:source University of Floridadc:language Englishdc:coverage United States -- New York -- New York