Citation
A hundred fables of Aesop

Material Information

Title:
A hundred fables of Aesop
Uniform Title:
Aesop's fables
Creator:
Aesop ( Aesop )
L'Estrange, Roger, 1616-1704
Grahame, Kenneth, 1859-1932
Billinghurst, Percy J
Lane, John, 1854-1925
Bodley Head (Firm)
Ballantyne, Hanson and Co
Ballantyne Press
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
John Lane
Bodley Head
Manufacturer:
Ballantyne, Hanson & Co. ; Ballantyne Press
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
xv, 201, 1 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Animals -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Fables ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1899 ( rbgenr )
Genre:
Fables ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Translations from the Greek.
Statement of Responsibility:
from the English version of Sir Roger L'Estrange ; with pictures by Percy J. Billinghurst and an introduction by Kenneth Grahame.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
07327227 ( OCLC )
002471059 ( Aleph )
ocm07327227
Classification:
PZ8.2 A254LES ( lcc )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
HUNDRED * FABLES: OF: I]

FESOP _

" WITH-PICTURES: —
PERCY: J BILLINGHURST _





pas ee











(4 A

sf,
1&4 i

Sys hat are



A HUNDRED FABLES OF

£450 P



7 AE
ayy
oe ros
PON ou Cox
W % yy ay 7 (
Mw

<=
————S
==

ZA

| NW) \h

DUAR
(

i aN

Se





AESOP

FROM:THE ‘ENGLISH: VERSION: OF
SIR*ROGER*LESTRANGE
WITH :PICTURES -BY

PERCY*J*BILLINGHURST

AND ‘AN: INTRODUCTION: BY

KENNETH*GRAHAME

we
A
ZZ

AC
i
A C
i

2
|

iy

i

Aas
Se

=.

JOHN-LA 7
THE-BODLEY-HEAD
LONDON-AND -‘NEW-YORK





Printed by Battanryne, Hanson, & Co.
At the Ballantyne Press



pr Oras os

10.
Il.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
1g.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
218
26.

CONTENTS

. The Cock and the Jewel.
. The Cat and the Cock
- The Wolf and the Lamb

The Kite, the Frog, and the
Mouse : , :

The Lion, the Bear, and the
Fox : : :

The Dog and the Shadow

The Wolf and the Crane

The Boar and the Ass .

The Country Mouse and the
City Mouse -

The Crow and the Mussel

The Fox and the Crow .

The Old Lion y

The Lion and the Mouse

The Sick Kite . ,

The Swallow and Other Birds

The Frogs Desiring a King

The Kite and the Pigeons

The Sow and the Wolf .

The Old Dog and his Master .

The Hares and Frogs

The Dog and the Sheep ..

The Fox and the Stork .

The Fox and the Mask .

The Jackdaw and the Peacocks

The Ox and the Frog

The Forse and the Lion.

Page
2

4
6

10
12
14
16

18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44

48
5°0
52



Fable
27.
28.

29.
30.
31.
aie
33:
34:
35+
36.
37:
38.
39-
40.
41.
42.
43-
44,
45.
46.
47:
48.
49-
50.
SI.
52.
53:
54+

The Horse and the Ass .

The Birds, the Beasts, and the
Bat . , ; ,

The Fox and the Wolf.

The Stag looking into the Water

The Snake and the File .

The Wolves and the Sheep

The Ape and the Fox ;

The Lark and her Young Ones

The Stag in the Ox-Stall

The Fox and the Sick Lion

The Stag and the Horse

The Horse and the Loaded Ass

The Dog and the Wolf .

The Fox and the Lion

The Eagle and the Fox .

The Hushandman and the Stork

The Shepherd’s Boy

The Eagle and the Crow

The Dog in the Manger .

Jupiter and the Camel

The Fox and the Hare to Jupiter

The Peacock’s Complaint

The Fox and the Goat

The Partridge and the Cocks

The Tunny and the Dolphin

The Fox without a Tail

The Fox and the Bramble

The Fox and the Crocodile

Page

54

56
58
60
62

66
68
70
72
74
76
78
80
82
84
86
88
go
g2
94

98
100
102
104
106
108





CONTENTS.



Fable

73:
74
75:
76.

. The Boasting Mule

. The Lion in Love

. The Lioness and the Fox

. The Fighting Cocks and the

Eagle. : ;

. The Stag and the Fawn

. Lhe Wasps and the Honey-Pot
. The Fox and the Grapes

. The Hare and the Tortoise

. Lhe Dog and the Cock upon a

Journey .

. The Vine and the Goat .

. The Ass, the Lion, and the Cock
. The Snake and the Crab.

. The Raven and the Swan

. The Ape and the Dolphin

. The Fox and the Crab .

. Lhe Shepherd and his Sheep

. The Peacock and the Magpie

. The Lion, the Ass, and the

fox. : ,
The Kid and the Wolf .
The Geese and the Cranes
The Angler and the Little Fish
The Bull and the Goat .

Page
IIo
112

114

116
118
120
122

124

126
128
130
132
134
136
138
140
142

144
146
148
150
152





Fable
77°
78.
79:

81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.

88.
89.
go.
gi.
92.
93:
94+
95:
96.

97-
98.
99+
100.

The Nurse and the Wolf
The Tortoise and the Eagle
The Fox and the Frog .

. The Mischievous Dog .

The Peacock and the Crane .
The Fox and the Tiger

The Lion and the Four Bulls .
The Crow and the Pitcher
The Man and his Goose

The Wanton Calf

. The Leopard and the Fox

The Hawk and the Farmer .

The Bear and the Bee-Hives.

The Fatal Marriage

The Cat and the Mice .

The Wild Boar and the Fox .

The Porcupine and the Snakes

The Hawk and the Nightingale

The Cat and the Fox .

The Wolf, the Lamb, and the
Goat f

The Cock and the Fox .

The Fox in the Well

The Ass Eating Thistles

The Wolf and the Lion

Page
154
156
158
160

164
166
168
170
172
1740
176
178
180
182
184
186
188
190

192
194
196
198
200



INTRODUCTION.

The fable had its origin, we are given to under-
stand, in a germ of politeness still lingering in
the breasts of the superior, or preaching, portion
of humanity, who wished to avoid giving more
pain than necessary when pursuing the inevitable
task laid upon them by their virtues, of instructing
the inferior and silent portion how to be—well,
just a little less inferior, if they would only listen
patiently to what they were told. It was also
Jrankly admitted by many, that there were diffi-
culties in getting a frivolous humanity to listen at
all, unless one took a leaf from the book of that
unprofitable rascal the story-teller, a spinner of
webs for the sheer irridescence and gossamer-film
and sparkle of the dainty thing itself; with no
designs whatever upon fat, black flies to be caught
and held in its meshes. And so, with half a sigh,
the preacher fell upon the element of Es and







i INTRODUCTION



the fable was born. It would have been pleasanter,
of course, to have told Smith to his face what a
rogue he was, and fones, what an idiot everybody
thought him ; but unfortunately there was no means
of putting compulsion on Smith and F ones to attend.
Again, it would have been quite easy to have got
the Smiths and Foneses to sit round in a circle,
while the theme was the folly of Robinson and the
roguery of Fenkins ; but Fenkins and Robinson
might stroll in, arm-in-arm, in the middle, and the
preacher who aimed at being a popular success knew
that he must not only avoid all little unpleasant-
nesses, but also spin a web whose meshes were fine
enough to catch and to hold, without undue obvious-
ness, fites of every bulk, from Smith down to the
recalcitrant F enkins,

It is more probable that the thing bad its roots
in the fixed and firm refusal of the community from
its very beginning, to allow any one of its members
to go about calling any other one a fool or a rogue,
“of his own mere notion,” If anybody has got to
be put away for folly, or trounced for roguery,
society has always told off some one to do it,and paid





INTRODUCTION il

him a more or less adequate salary. The amateur
has never been recognised nor countenanced, and
though occasionally he may score a success jor the
moment, and set a convicted people beating their
breasts in the streets, confessing their sins to each
other at the street-corners, and making piles of their
costly books and curios and precious ornaments in the
market-place, sooner or later the old rule asserts
itself, the paid policeman moves you on as before,
and the forsaken and discredited amateur comes to
hopeless grief.

What then was to be done? The inadequate
policeman had to be supplemented, the amateur
must somehow say his say. There was a certain
moral cowardice in the means he hit upon. The
friendly, tactful, unobstrusive beasts around bim—
could they not be seized upon and utilised to point
the requisite moral? True, it would be no good to
hold up their real characteristics for the public
admonishment, The moment they were really studied
they were seen to be so modest, so mutually helpful,
so entirely free from vanity, affectation, and fads ;
so tolerant, uncomplaining, and determined to







iv INTRODUCTION





make the best of everything ; and, finally, such
adepts in the art of minding their own business,
that it was evident a self-respecting humanity
would not stand the real truth for a moment, But
one could deal out the more prominent of human
failings among them ; one could agree, for argu-
ments sake, that the peacock was to be vain, the
wolf unregardful of his plighted word, the sackdaw
a snob with a weakness for upper circles ; and the
thing was done. The Smiths and foneses, instead
of disputing the premisses, fell into the trap ; while
the honest beasts, whose characters were thus meanly
filched from them, instead of holding indignation-
meetings, and passing resolutions of protest, as they
might have done had they been merely human, took
the nobler course of quietly continuing to mind their
own business,

But though they acquiesced and submitted, it
must not be thought that they did not feel and
resent, very keenly indeed, the ungentlemanly
manner in which they had been exploited, for moral
purposes, by people with whom they only wished to live

in mutual esteem and respect in a world in which





INTRODUCTION v



there was plenty of room for both. When you meet
a bird or a beast, and it promptly proceeds to move
off, in an obviously different direction, without abuse
indeed, or scurrility, or even reproach, but with a
distinct intention of seeing as little of you as possible
during the rest of the afternoon, you may be pretty
sure it 1s thinking of A&sop’s Fables. If only some-
body would withdraw and apologise, and arrange
that things should be on the same footing as before !
Some beasts have gone so far as to take a leaf
out of the book of the fabulist, and compile a volume
of their own. Though humanity had behaved in a
way to which they themselves would have scorned to
stoop, that was no reason (they argued) why they
should shun any moral lesson that was to be picked
up, even from Man. A beasts life is so short, so
eventful and precarious, that he is never above
learning, never too proud to take a hint; more than
all, he never thinks that what he dosn’t know isn’t
worth knowing. I was allowed a glimpse at the book
one afternoon, in a pine wood, when the world was
hot and sleepy, and the beasts had dined well. But
L could not get permission to take it away, and, as I





v1 INTRODUCTION



was sleepy too, I can only half recollect a scant fable
or two out of that rich treasure-house ; and somehow
I have never been able to happen upon that pine
wood again.

Naturally enough with creatures who live by
rule and order and inherited precept, the inconse-
quential and irregular habits of man afford much
food for beast-reflection. Here is a fable (by a
monkey apparently) which touches on this puzzling
aspect of humanity,

THE APE AND THE CHILD IN THE
LEGHORN HAT,

A frolicsome ape, who in much careless ease inhabited a lordly
mansion in Regent's Park, lounged up one afternoon to certain bars, on
the other side of which selected specimens of humanity were compelled
to promenade each day for the instruction and diversion of philosophic
apes. A little maid ina Leghorn hat having timidly approached the
bars, her large fat mother, shaking her imperiously by the shoulder,
ordered her to observe the pitty ickle monkey, so mild and so gentle, and
give it a piece of her bun at once, like a good, kind, charitable ickle girl.
The small maiden, though herself extremely loth, proffered ber bun to
the ape, who possessed himself of it with a squeal of delight, and bit
her finger to the bone as well; for he had bitten nothing more juicy





INTRODUCTION vil

and succulent than a neighbour's tail for a whole week past; and tails
are but gristly things at the best. But the large, fat mother, falling
upon the already shrieking little girl, shook and cuffed her unmercifully,
protesting that of all the naughty, tiresome, self-willed little trollops, and
that never, never, never would she take her a-pleasuring again.



MORAL.

Parents of the human species have an altogether singular and
unaccountable method of rearing their young. Yet they grow up some-
bow, nevertheless, and often become quite good and useful citizens: so
there may be something in it, and it's a lesson to us not to be proud
and think we know everything.

Flere is another (by a dog this time) based on
the same characteristic, but written from a slightly

different and more doggy point of view.

THE DOG, THE CHILD, AND THE MOON.

A child sat on the nursery floor and cried for the moon, which was
shining so temptingly through the window. A conscientious dog who
was strolling by, and had been wanting sorely to bay the moon all the
evening, because he had a bad pain in his inside that kept telling him to
do it, only he was mighty afeared of being kicked, sat down beside the
infant, and, with the sole remark that circumstances were too strong for
him, lifted his snout. Then the night was filled with music, till even the





Vill INTRODUCTION

face of the moon wore a pained expression ; and the dog felt the pain in
his inside trickling away through his ribs. Attracted by the outcry, the
mother hastened to the room, and smacked the child soundly for its folly and
unreasonableness. But she patted and praised the dog, who was sitting



severely on his tail, and called him a noble, sympathetic fellow, who
could not see others in trouble without being moved to share their
distress. Then the dog swaggered out of the room feeling good all over,
and resolving that next morning be would dig a hole in the geranium-
bed large enough to bury the moon itself.

MORAL.

You never can tell with exactness how human beings will act, under
any conditions. Therefore when you want to howl at the moon, or do
anything contraband, badly enough, better go and do it and get it over.
You can but be kicked, and you probably won't be, and you will get rid
of the bad pain in your inside.

Then there was that fable—and the one about—
and the other one where—and then that very
naughty one which—but it is time to pull up, as I
promised faithfully not to. How it all comes back
tome as I write! The cushion of moss and pine-
needles, the song of the streamlet hard by, the squirrel
perched half-way up a tree-trunk and chattering,
‘Do read him that one about— and the jay, who





INTRODUCTION =





was turning over the leaves, looking round and
saying, “O you shut up! This is my copy he's
looking at, and it opens at all the right places!”
The rabbits sat round in a ring, silent and large-
eyed, with gust a flicker passing over their ever-
unrestful noses. They will always come to listen to
a story, however old and hackneyed, and never open
their mouths except to say, “ Now another, please!”
The badger, who, as the biggest member present,
ought to have been doing the honours, and knew it,
sat and scratched himself, and looked crossly at the jay.
He wanted to say something cutting, but knew the
jay was his master at repartee. Then the wood-
land muttered its spell, and a drowsiness crept over
us. When I awoke the badger’s chair was vacant,
the rabbits were but a rustle in the bracken, the
squirrel and the jay but a quiver tm a tree-top and
a glint of blue against a distant copse.

Well! The story-teller, the gossamer-web-
spinner, has come to his own by this time, and the
fabulist, who started with such a flourish, has long
ceased to mount his tub, Even while these very
fables were in course of writing, the axe was being





x INTRODUCTION



laid to rhe root of the tree, and a whimsical fellow,
with his tongue in his cheek, was compiling the
“ Arabian Nights.” In this matter humanity,
though just as liable as the individual to its tem-
porary fits of affectation, knows what it wants and
sees that it gets it, and never troubles to Justify its
selection by argument. Did it care to do so, it
might contend that people, by diligent attention to
morals and rubbing in of applications, had become
quite too good for anything, and the fables had done
their work so thoroughly that now the time had
arrived for a little relaxation, honestly earned.
Or it might argue, on the other hand, that the job
had proved too tough a one, that the story which
posed as an obvious index to personal conduct had
got to be a bore and a nuisance, and that it was
much nicer to be frankly bad and shameless and
abandoned, and read fiction. But humanity, in
the mass, never argues—and rightly; and the
reader can please himself with whichever theory he
Likes, sure of this at least, that the story henceforth
will be tolerated only for itself, that the fable has
had its day and ceased to be.







INTRODUCTION X1



But a method may expire, and its output yet
remain that undefined thing, attained by neither
prayer nor fasting—a classic, (Indeed, so long as
you are a part of this earth's old crust, you must
generally wait till you are a stratum before people
will begin paying attention to you and calling you
nice names.) There are in literature men, women,
and beasts, who survive owing to fidelity in por-
traiture to the natural type. There are equally men,
women, and beasts, who live from their very devia-
tion from the real thing—tfresh and captivating
creations with rules of their own. These are the
folk who people the world of fairy-tale, heraldry,
and fable; and many such village communities
flourish in classic-land. Vitality—that is the test ;
and, whatever its components, mere truth 1s not
necessarily one of them. A dragon, for imstance, 1s
a more enduring animal than a pterodactyl, I
have never yet met any one who really believed in a
pterodactyl; but every honest person believes in
dragons—down in the back-kitchen of bis conscious-
ness, And every honest person believes that the
fable-people exist, or existed, somewhere—not on thts





xii INTRODUCTION



planet, perhaps, since personal experience must be
allowed its place when evidence has to be weighed,
but—well, the Census Department has never yet
overhauled the Dog-Star.

And this classic is here given forth in the brave
old seventeenth-century version of Sir Roger
L’Estrange, who wrote, by a happy Lift, im the very
language (we feel sure) that the Fable-beasts now
talk among themselves in Fable-land. Modern
renderings, with one eye on the anxious parent and
the other on the German governess, have often
achieved an impotence of English that increases our
admiration of a tongue that can survive such mis-
handling, and still remain the language of men,
“ Insipid Twittle-Twattles,” to use L’Estrange’s own
phrase. A Royalist politician and a Jluent and
copious pamphleteer, he had graduated in the right
school for work wherein one hard-hitting word must
needs supply the place of whole page or long-
drawn paragraph in the less restricted methods
by which the human conscience now insists on being
approached. In the sad case of the Lion, the

Bear, and the Fox, a modern version draws the





INTRODUCTION xiii



moral in these satisfactory if hardly stimulating
Lerms

“Those who fight with each other lose alt, and
give others the chance of enriching themselves.

Dear me, do they really? Lay this alongside
of our politician's, and with a snap and a bite be
has you by the leg.

“Tis the fate of all Gotham Quarrels, when
fools go together by the ears, to have knaves run
away with the stakes.”

Again,—‘ A certain Fackdaw was so proud
and ambitious that, &8c.,” bleats and trickles our
modern version. “A Daw that had a mind to be
sparkish,” says L’ Estrange, saving his breath for
his story. Yet be is not merely forcible, terse, and
arresting. With what a prettiness of phrase he puts
(in his preface) the case for the Fable! “What
cannot be done by the dint of Authority, or Persua-
sion, in the Chappel, or in the Closet, must be
brought about by the Side-Wind of a Lecture from
the Fields and the Forrests.” And there is a touch
both quiet and appealing in his account of the Tail-
less Fox, and his efforts to get level again with



XIV INTRODUCTION





cs

Society: “. . . But however, for the better coun-
tenance of the scandal, he got the Master and
Wardens of the Foxes Company to call a Court
of Assistants, where he himself appeared, and
made a Learned Discourse upon the Trouble,
the Uselessness, and the Indecency, of Foxes wearing
Laie

But, as I have said, it is in his Beast-talh that
our politician (naturally enough) excels :

“ But as they were entering upon the Dividend,
‘Hands off, says the Lion, ‘This part is mine by
the Privilege of my Quality; this, because I'l]
have it in spite of your Teeth ; this, again, because .
L took most pains fort; and if you dispute the
Fourth, we must en Pluck a Crow about it?” In
the “Wolf and the Lamb,” “* Nay, says t other,
‘you'll never leave your chopping of Logick, till
jour Skin’s turned over you Ears, as your Father's
was, a matter of Six Months ago, for prating at
this sawcy rate,”

L'Estrange may have had his faults of diction:
faults of excess, of violence, of recurrent effort for
the explosive phrase, wherein we get, indeed, the





INTRODUCTION XV



telling snapshot effect, but somehow hear the click
of the Kodak as well, Yet his version remains
the one version, and these are not the times in
which we may expect to get another, It is more
than doubtful whether Assop would have approved
of it; and yet, for good or for evil, it 1s the
ultimate version |

Those green back-garden doors that lead to the
trim classic plots—they are opened but rarely now-
a-days! For they are a trifle warped, and their
paint swollen, and they stick and jam, and one can
find neither time nor effort for the necessary tus.
But once inside this particular door—tif one takes the
pains—how one is possessed by the inhabitants, their
surroundings, their ways, and their points of view !
Emerging, one really expects to meet them at every
corner, to be hailed by them, to put the natural ques-
tion and get the appropriate answer, One forgets,
for the moment, that the real four-legged or feathered
fellows one encounters are sullen, rancorous, and
aggrieved—have a book of their own, in fine, a
version in which it is we who point the moral and

adorn the tale!
KENNETH GRAHAME.



A HUNDRED FABLES OF

£450 P





2 LE sop’s FABLES.

/2 aS Fase I,
The Cock and the Fewel. -

AS a Cock was turning up a Dunghill, he spy’d a Fewel. Well

(says he to himself) this sparkling Foolery now to a Lapi-
dary in my place, would have been the Making of him; but as
to any Use or Purpose of mine, a Barley-Corn had been worth
Forty on’t.

The Morat.

He that's Industrious in an Honest Calling, shall never fail of a
Blessing. Tis the part of a Wise Man to Prefer Things Necessary
before Matters of Curiosity, Ornament, or Pleasure.







Esop’s FABLES.



ite,
tatty,

Mie

ay NAN RUS











4 ZEsop’s FABLES.

? Fase II,

- The Cat and the Cock.

e was the hard Fortune once of a Cock, to fall into the Clutches

of a Cat. Puss had a Months Mind to be upon the Bones of
him, but was not willing to pick a Quarrel however, without some
plausible Colour for’t. Sirrah (says she) what do you keep such
a bawling, and screaming a Nights for, that no body can sleep near
you? Alas says the Cock, I never wake any body, but when ’tis
time for People to rise, and go about their Business. Come come,
says Puss, without any more ado, ’tis time for me to go to Break-
fast, and Cats don’t live upon Dialogues; at which word she gave
him a Pinch, and so made an end, both of the Cock, and of the
Story.

The Morat.

"Tis an Easie Matter to find a Staff to Beat a Dog. Innocence
is no Protection against the Arbitrary Cruelty of a Tyrannical Power :
But Reason and Conscience are yet so Sacred, that the Greatest Villanies
are still Countenanc’d under that Cloak and Color.



FABLES.

AEsop’s

= WN

=,

aa ee SEN Ae Sey
= Oh (ae OG,

SS
2 re
SSee

ZS =S

Sees Die
a Sa SS
SS

SS

: BZ

am
Eo
3
ess
-
>)

es

THE





6 4isop’s FABLES.

: Fasie IIT. S
The Wolf and the Lamb.

A a Wolf was lapping at the Head of a Fountain, he spy’d a

Lamb, paddling at the same time, a good way off down the
Stream. The Wolf had no sooner the Prey in his Eye, but away
he runs open-mouth to’t. Villain (says he) how dare you lye
muddling the Water that I’m a drinking? Indeed, says the poor
Lamb, 1 did not think that my drinking there Je/ow, could have
‘foul’d your Water so far above. Nay, says t’other, you’ll never
leave your chopping of Logick, till your Skin’s turn’d over your
Ears, as your Fathers was, a matter of six Months ago, for prating
at this sawcy rate; you remember it full well, Sirrah. If you'll
believe me, Sir, (quoth the innocent Lamé, with fear and trembling)
I was not come into the World then. Why thou Impudence, cries
the Wolf, hast thou neither Shame, nor Conscience? But it runs
in the Blood of your whole Race, Sirrah, to hate our Family; and
therefore since Fortune has brought us together so conveniently,
you shall e’en pay some of your Fore-Fathers Scores before you
and I part; and so without any more ado, he leapt at the Throat
of the miserable helpless Lamb, and tore him immediately to
pieces.

The Morat.

’Tis an Easie Matter to find a Staff to Beata Dog. Innocence
is no Proteétion against the Arbitrary Cruelty of a Tyrannical Power :
But Reason and Conscience are yet so Sacred, that the Greatest Villantes
are still Countenane'd under that Cloak and Color.





ZEsop’s FABLES.





7



8 4Esop’s FABLES.

al” FY Fase IV. Le.
The Bite, the frog, and the Mouse.

pee. fell out a Bloody Quarrel once betwixt the Frogs and

the Mice, about the Sovereignty of the Fenns; and whilst
Two of their Champions were Disputing it at Swords Point, Down
comes a Kite Powdering upon them in the /uéerim, and Gobbles up
both together, to Part the Fray.

The Morat.

Tis the Fate of All Gotham Quarrels, when Fools go together by
the Ears, to have Knaves run away with the Stakes.





Li sop’s FABLES.



it
ing
Ha she x
cae

nea
tI

iy

a i Ny m0 He

i
" AR vr a i a oS oe

THE KITE THEFROG ‘AND ‘THE MOUSE’







IO LES op’ s FABLES.



oe Fasie V. 3
The Lion, the Wear, and the For.

°T Here was a Lion and Bear had gotten a Fawn betwixt them,

and there were they at it Tooth and Nail, which of the Two
should carry’t off. They Fought it out, till they were e’en glad to
lie down, and take Breath. In which Instant, a Fox passing that
way, and finding how the case stood with the Two Combatants,
seized upon the Fawn for his Own Use, and so very fairly
scamper’d away with him. The Lion, and the Bear saw the
Whole A€tion, but not being in condition to Rise and Hinder it,
they pass’d this Reflexion upon the whole matter; Here have we
been Worrying one another, who should have the Booty, ’till this
Cursed Fox has Bobb’d us Both on’t.

The Moran.

*Tis the Fate of All Gotham Quarrels, when Fools £0 together by
the Ears, to have Knaves run away with the Stakes.





Ze sop’s FABLES. e



Soe





- F NE
eon iC x
.
“

gi
y=

a

\

BOLLE
LAL
Lt

THE-LION: THE BEAR, anv THE FOX.







12 “Esop’s FABLES.



7

Oke a Fase VI. ly
The Dog and the Shadow.

A a Dog was crossing a River, with a Morsel of Good Flesh in

his Mouth, he saw (as he thought) Another Dog under the
Water, upon the very same Adventure. He never consider’d that
the One was only the Jmage of the Other; but out of a Greediness
to get Both, he Chops at the Shadow, and Loses the Substance,

The Morat.

All Covet, All Lose ; which may serve for a Reproof to Those that
Govern their Lives by Fancy and Appetite, without Consulting the
Honor, and the Fustice of the Case.



LAL SO p's



FABLES.

Be)



Ss
SS

THE DOG ann THE SHADOW.





4 ZEsop’s FABLES.



mne/

: Fasre VII, / /
The Wolf and the Crane.

Ae had got a Bone in’s Throat, and could think of no better

Instrument to Ease him of it, than the Bill of a Crane; so
he went and Treated with a Crane to help him out with it, upon
Condition of a very considerable Reward for his pains. The Crane ~
did him the Good Office, and then claim’d his Promise. Why how
now Impudence! (says t’other) Do you put your Head into the
Mouth of a Wolf, and then, when y’ave brought it out again safe
and sound, do you talk of a Reward? Why Sirrah, you have your
Head again, and is not that a Sufficient Recompence.

The Morat.

One Good Turn they say requires another: But yet He that has to do
with Wild Beasts (as some Men are No Better) and comes off with a
Whole Skin, let him Expeé& No Other Reward.







fEsop’s FABLES. gs

@ P:

5 ZINN VEX AS
Zz ' F NS a.
Li Fp Mm MI i .

yy

we //

n
)}
——Z

aA

.
AWN

JUL

my

WN} .N
)
Sj a
Co ANN

ER
Nay ayy







16 LE sop’s FABLES.



r)
ie

Ven Fase VIII.
The Woar and the Ass.

AN Ass was so Hardy once, as to fall a Mopping and Braying

at a Boar. The Boar began at first to shew his Teeth,
and to Stomack the Affront; but upon Second Thoughts; Well!
(says he) Feer on, and be an AS still. Take notice only by the
way, that ’tis the Baseness of your Character that has sav’d your
Carcass.

The Morat.

It 1s below the Dignity of a Great Mind to Entertain Contests with
People that have neither Quality nor Courage: Beside the Folly of
Contending with a Miserable Wretch, where the very Competition is
a Scandal,







4Esop’s FABLES. 17



My / :
' ah }
wee J Yon, Wy! snl Ny ff



yp) Ni]

1
” 1H
ge

THE-BOAR ann THE:ASS.&



18 LEsop’s FABLES.

Cts Fase IX. Oo
Che Country Mouse and the City Mouse.

ales goes an Old Story of a Country Mouse that Invited a City-

Sister of hers to a Country Collation, where she spar’d for
Nothing that the Place afforded; as Mouldy Crusts, Cheese-Parings,
Musty Oatmeal, Rusty Bacon, and the like. Now the City-Dame was
so well bred, as Seemingly to take All in Good Part: But yet at last,
’ Sister (says she, after the Civilest Fashion) why will you be Miserable
when you may be Happy? Why will you lie Pining, and Pinching
yourself in such a Lonesome Starving Course of Life as This is; when
"tis but going to Town along with Me; to Enjoy all the Pleasures,
and Plenty that Your Heart can Wish? This was a Temptation the
Country Mouse was not able to Resist; so that away they Trudg’d
together, and about Midnight got to their Journeys End. The Cizy-
Mouse show’d her Friend the Larder, the Pantry, the Kitchin, and
Other Offices where she laid her Stores; and after This, carry’d her
into the Parlour, where they found, yet upon the Table, the Reliques
of a Mighty Entertainment of That very Night. The City-Mouse
Carv’d her Companion of what she lik’d Best, and so to’t they fell
upon a Velvet Couch together: The Poor Bumkin that had never
seen, nor heard of such Doings before, Bless’d herself at the Change
of her Condition, when (as ill luck would have it) all on a Sudden,
the Doors flew open, and in comes a Crew of Roaring Bullies, with
their Wenches, their Dogs and their Bottles, and put the Poor Mice
to their Wits End, how to save their Skins. The Stranger Especially,
that had never been at This Sport before; but she made a Shift how-
ever for the present, to slink into a Corner, where she lay Trembling
and Panting ’till the Company went their Way. So soon as ever the
House was Quiet again, Well: My Court Sister, says she, If This be
the Way of Your Town-Gamboles, Pll e’en back to my Cottage, and
my Mouldy Cheese again; for I had much rather lie Knabbing of
Crusts, without either Fear or Danger, in my Own Little Hole, than
be Mistress of the Whole World with Perpetual Cares and Alarums.

The Morat.
The Difference betwixt a Court and a Country Life. The Delights,

Innocence, and Security of the One, Compar’d with the Anxiety, the
Wickedness, and the Hazards of the Other.





ZEsop’s FABLES. 19







20 LES op’ s FABLES.

?\
Faste X, TO

The Crow and the Mussel.

aon was one of Your Royston-Crows, that lay Battering upon

a Mussel, and could not for his Blood break the Shell to
come at the Fish. A Carrion-Crow, in this Interim, comes up, and
tells him, that what he could not do by Force, he might do by Stra-
tagem. ‘ake this Musse/ up into the Air, says the Crow, as High
as you can carry it, and then let him fall upon that Rock there; His
Own Weight, You shall see, shall break him. The Roystoner took
his Advice, and it succeeded accordingly; but while the One was
upon Wing, the Other stood Lurching upon the Ground, and flew
away with the Fish.

The Morat.

Charity begins at Home, they say; and most People are kind to
their Neighbours for their Own sakes.





LES Op’s. FABLES. |



—— = ee ———————
= SS == = SSS SSS
Fag = —————— Le

(2 SS ————

NE

—?
SSS 5 €U—TEEQ{@

LE LZ EGA







ee) LE sop’ s FABLES.





Fasie XI, |
The For and the Crow.

Ae Fox spy’d out a Crow upon a Tree with a Morsel in

his mouth, that set his Chops a watering ; but how to come
at it was the Question. Oh thou Blessed Bird! (says he) the
Delight of Gods, and of Men! and so he lays himself forth upon
the Gracefulness of the Crows Person, and the Beauty of his
Plumes ; His Admirable Gift of Augury, &c., And now, says the
Fox, If thou hadst but a Voice answerable to the rest of thy Ex-
cellent Qualities, the Sun in the Firmament could not shew the
World such Another Creature. This Nauseous Flattery sets the
Crow immediately a Gaping as Wide as ever he could stretch, to
give the Fox a taste of his Pipe; but upon the Opening of his
Mouth he drops his Breakfast, which the Fox presently Chopt up,
and then bade him remember, that whatever he had said of his
Beauty, he had spoken Nothing yet of his Brains.

The Morat.

There's hardly any man Living that may not be wrought upon more
or less by Flattery: For we do all of us Naturally Overween in our
Own Favour: But when it comes to be Apply’d once to a Vain Fool, it
makes him forty times an Arranter Sot than he was before.





Lijsop’s FABLES. 2.3



atte















ANS <

AN RATA
SAR! Ve ‘) )
lr



——

Psi

SS










Rs



THE FOX anp THE ‘CROW.





Qe fEsop’s FABLES.



foe eiee XIE
‘Tbe Did Lion,

A Lion that in the Days of his Youth and Strength, had been

very Outragious and Cruel, came in the end to be Reduced
by Old Age, and Infirmity, to the last Degree of Misery, and Con-
tempt: Insomuch that All the Beasts of the Forest; some out of
Insolence, others in Revenge, some in fine, upon One Pretence,
some upon Another, fell upon him by Consent. He was a Miser-
able Creature to all Intents and Purposes; but Nothing went so
near the Heart of him in his Distress, as to find himself Batter’d
by the Heel of an Ass.

The Morat.

4 Prince that does not secure Friends to Himself while he is in
Power and Condition to oblige them, must never expel? to find Friends,
when he, is Old and Impotent, and no longer Able to do them any Good.
Lf he Governs Tyrannically in his Youth, he will be sure to be Treated
Contemptuously in his Age; and the Baser his Enemies are, the more
Insolent, and Intolerable will be the Affront.





Zisop’s FABLES. ae










Lite
yc



Ate (LLL

Ss











mh @ G&S on ~
. ah zxf WES i
a zy at ay
OA: — wih ®
js ada, 6 M
ANT ae
y NB =

z (
4 Ni






SS
==

P
Zz
e SSS





26 AS op’s FABLES.



Fase XIII.
The Lion and the Mouse.

bee the Roaring of a Beast in the Wood, a Mouse ran pre-

sently out to see what News: and what was it, but a Lion
Hamper’d in a Net! This Accident brought to her mind, how
that she herself, but some few Days before, had fall’n under the Paw
of a Certain Generous Lion, that let her go again. Upon a Strict
Enquiry into the Matter, she found This to be That very Lion ;
and so set her self presently to Work upon the Couplings of the
Net; Gnaw’d the Threds to pieces, and in Gratitude Deliver’d her
Preserver.

The Morat.

Without Good Nature, and Gratitude, Men had as good live in a
Wilderness as in a Society. There is no Subjeé so Inconsiderable, but
his Prince, at some time or Other, may have Occasion for him, and it
holds through the Whole Scale of the Creation, that the Great and the
Little have Need one of Another.







A sop’s FABLES. 27











ne
re
AY








: :
A i
} \!

RNS




LLC





le
SSE
zis



ESS




THE-LION ann THE MOUSE.





28 LES op’ s FABLES.



fe. Faste XIV, jib
~The Dick Bite.

py Mother (says a Sick Kite) Give over these Idle Lamenta-

tions, and let Me rather have your Prayers. Alas! my Child,
(says the Dam) which of the Gods shall I] go to, for a Wretch
that has Robb’d All their Altars?

The Morat.

Nothing but the Conscience of a Virtuous Life can make Death
Easie to us; Wherefore there’s No trusting to the DistraGion of an
Agonizing, and a Death-bed Repentance.



=)

Zisop’s FABLES.





30 Lh sop’s FABLES.

pal ABB XOV
The Swallow and other wirds.

Aire was a Country Fellow at work a Sowing his Grounds,

and a Swallow (being a Bird famous for Providence and Fore-
sight) call’d a company of Lisle Birds about her, and bad ’em take
Good Notice what that Fellow was a doing. You must know (says
the Swallow) that all the Fowlers Nets and Snares are made of Flemp,
or Flax ; and that’s the Seed that he is now a Sowing. Pick it up
in time for fear of what may come on’t. In short, they put it off,
till it took Root; and then again, till it was sprung up into the
Blade. Upon this, the Swallow told ’em once for All, that it was
not yet too Late to prevent the Mischief, if they would but bestir
themselves, and set Heartily about it; but finding that no Heed
was given to what she said; She e’en "bad adieu to her old Com-
panions in the Woods, and so betook her self to a City Life, and
to the Conversation of Men. This Flax and Hemp came in ‘time
to be gather’d, and Wrought, and it was this Swallows Fortune to
see Several of the very same Birds that she had forewarn’d, taken
in Nets, made of the very Stuff she told them off. They came at
last to be Sensible of the folly of slipping their Opportunity; but
they were Lost beyond All Redemption first.

The Morat.

Wise Men read Effects in their Causes, but Fools will not Believe
them till tis too late to prevent the Mischief. Delay in these Cases is
Mortal,





ZEsop’s FABLES. 31



a

SAR
e \ \
\ oh i MY PIS .

SF

cS INXS
NAc,

Ni

ZED
EE.
ZA

ai

a
S|
a EE

—
==
=<

eZ

eB

\ 2

ae NEN

: y
i

: -
i

















Bo LEsop’s FABLES.



} 7

eT Pasi XVI / lo

The Frogs Desiring a Bing.

ps the days of Old, when the Frogs were All at liberty in the

Lakes, and grown quite Weary of living without Government,
they Petition’d Yupiter for a King, to the End that there might be
some Distinétion of Good and Evil, by Certain Equitable Rules
and Methods of Reward and Punishment. ‘upiter, that knew the
Vanity of their Hearts, threw them down a Log for their Governour ;
which, upon the first Dash, frighted the whole Mobile of them into
the Mudd for the very fear on’t. This Panick Terror kept them
in Awe for a while, till in good time one Frog, Bolder than the
Rest, put up his Head, and look’d about him, to see how squares
went with their New King. Upon This, he calls his Fellow-
Subjects together; Opens the truth of the Case; and Nothing
would serve them then, but Riding a-top of him; Insomuch that
the Dread they were in before, is now turn’d into Insolence, and
Tumult. This King, they said, was too Tame for them, and upiter
must needs be Entreated to send ’em Another: He did so, but
Authors are Divided upon it, whether "twas a Stork, or a Serpent;
though whether of the Two soever it was, he left them neither
Liberty, nor Property, but made a Prey of his Subjects. Such was
their Condition in fine, that they sent Mercury to “fupiter yet once
again for Another King, whose Answer was This: They that will not
be Contented when they are Well, must be Patient when Things are
Amiss with them; and People had better Rest where they are, than
go farther, and fare Worse. .

The Morat.

The Mobile are Uneasie without a Ruler: They are as Restless with
one; and the oftner they shift, the Worse they Are; So that Govern-
ment, or No Government; a King of God’s Making, or of the Peoples,
or none at all; the Multitude are never to be satisfied.





Aisop’s FABLES 33









34 ZEsop’s FABLES



FasLte XVII.
The Bite and the pigeons.

epic Pigeons finding themselves Persecuted by the Hawk, made

Choice of the Kite for their Guardian. The Kite sets up
for their Protector, and is duly Crowned and Invested with Sovereign
Rights; but under Countenance of That Authority, makes more
Havock in the Dove-House in Two Days, than the Hawk could
have done in Twice as many Months.

The Mora...

Tis a Dangerous Thing for People to call in a Powerful and an
Ambitious man for their Protector ; and upon the Clamour of here
and there a Private person, to hazard the Whole Community.





LE sop’s FABLES Bc



















































ey aes ») Ws a Fae
Pt WN : hy
wi ET PS

\ Sita Fa MEN Ae 7 A

a MeO” 44 ph Waa Avs gow vg A
SY 5: y G ir Lm \ Mage.
~ Z KS iD Z
= \ S 5 SY ilftC Yor on =
= = = as ae - =
2 2% Ret
Bes Ks Ss



Uy




\
\





Y




q \3 y
/ 4 fie ii )
Me eA)
Ma y





Js



THE-KITE anvTHE PIGEONS.







36 fhsop’s FABLES



ee XVIII. 16
The Sow and the Wilf.

pes came to a Sow that was just preparing to lye down,

and very kindly offer’d to take care of her Litter. The
Sow as Civily thank’d her for her Love, and desir’d she would be
pleas’d to stand off a little, and do her the Good Office at a
Distance.

The Mora..

There are no Snares so Dangerous as those that are laid for us under

the Name of Good Offices.





a7

FABLES

LE SOp's



1] w
yy







38 ZEsop’s FABLES



Faste XIX. y
The Did Dog and his Master.

AN Old Dog, that in his Youth had led his Master many a

Merry Chase, and done him all the Offices of a Trusty
Servant, came at last, upon falling from his Speed and Vigor, to
be Loaden at every turn with Blows and Reproaches for it. Why
Sir, (says the Dog) My Will is as Good as ever it was; but my
Strength, and my Teeth are gone; and you might with as good a
Grace, and Every jot as much Justice, Hang me up because I’m
Old, as Beat me because I'm Jmpotent.

The Mora..

The Reward of Affection and Fidelity must be the Work of another
World ; Not but that the Conscience of Well Doing is a Comfort that
may pass for a Recompence even in This ; in Despite of Ingratitude and
Injustice.





“Ej sop’s FABLES 39

I Ss s

it

“,
My is !

pat

\ iH i
ni ce ww
S, \ Ky
Hi AN
‘,

X YZ
Kee
us = \







40 4 sop’s FABLES



Oo ee
The wares and the Frogs.

Ore upon a time the Hares found themselves mightily Un-

satisty'd with the Miserable Condition they Liv’d in, and
call’d a Council to Advise upon’t. Here we live, says one of ’em,
at the Mercy of Men, Dogs, Eagles, and I know not how many
Other Creatures and Vermin, that Prey upon us at Pleasure;
Perpetually in Frights, Perpetually in Danger; And therefore I
am absolutely of Opinion that we had Better Die once for All,
than live at This rate in a Continual Dread that’s Worse than
Death it self. The Motion was Seconded and Debated, and a
Resolution Immediately taken, One and All, to Drown Themselves.
The Vote was no sooner pass’d, but away they Scudded with
That Determination to the Next River. Upon this Hurry, there
leapt a Whole Shoal of Frogs from the Bank into the Water,
for fear of the Hares. Nay, then my Masters, says one of the
Gravest of the Company, pray let’s have a little Patience. Our
Condition I find is not altogether so bad as we fancy’d it; for
there are Those you see that are as much affraid of Us, as we
are of Others.

The Mora.

There's No Contending with the Orders and Decrees of Providence.
He that Made us knowes what's Fittest for us; and Every man’s Own
Lot (well Understood and Manag’d) is Undoubtedly the Best.



“A sop’s FABLES 41



0 an yt
Win aT
ais atta i, ul ni "al
RPL Vi PENN ae |

i KK Vespa SEZEEEE
Weta WN / LUN Z
dX Ot J, Uy
iS ZS Hf
—— ZA







42 Ops Kh eS



Faste XXI, |
The Mog and the Sbeeyp.

A Dog brought an Action, before the Wolf and the Kire as

Judges, of the Case against a Sheep, for some Certain Measures
of Wheat, that he had lent him. The Plaintiff prov’d the Debt.
The Defendent was cast in Costs and Damages, and forc’d to sell the
Wool off his Back to Satisfie the Creditor.

The Morat.

‘Tis not a Straw matter whether the Main Cause be Right or Wrong,
or the Charge True or False; Where the Bench, and fury are in a
Conspiracy against the Pris ner.



ZEsop’s FABLES





Ay \\

THEXDOG anp THE‘SHEEP

a3





44 LEsop’s FABLES



FasLte XXII.
The For and the Stork.

nes was a Great Friendship once betwixt a Fox and a Stork,

and the Former would needs Invite the Other to a Treat.
They had Several Soups serv’d up in Broad Dishes and Plates,
and so the Fox fell to Lapping Himself, and bad his Guest
Heartily Welcom to what was before him. The Stork found he
was Put upon, but set so good a Face however upon his Enter-
tainment; that his Friend by All means must take a Supper with
Him That night in Revenge. The Fox made Several Excuses
upon the Matter of Trouble and Expence, but the Svork in fine,
would not be said Nay; So that at last, he promis’d him to
come. The Collation was serv’d up in Glasses, with Long
Narrow Necks, and the Best of Every thing that was to be had.
Come (says the Stork to his Friend) Pray be as Free as if you
were at home, and so fell to’t very Savourly Himself. The Fox
quickly found This to be a Trick, though he could, not but
Allow of the Contrivance as well as the Justice of the Revenge.
For such a Glass of Sweet-Meats to the One, was just as much
to the Purpose, as a Plate of Porridge to the Other.

The Morat.

Tis allowable in all the Liberties of Conversation to give a Man a
Rowland for his Oliver, avd to pay him in his Own Coin, as we
say ; provided always that we keep within the Compass of Honour, and
Good Manners.





ZEsop’s FABLES 45









46 ZEsop’s FABLES



Faste XXIII.
The For and the Mask.

A a Fox was Rummidging among a Great many Masks, there

was One very Extraordinary one among the Rest. He
took it up, and when he had Considered it a while, Well, (says he)
What Pity "tis, that so Exquisite an Outside of a Head should not
have one Grain of Sense in’t.

The Morat,

‘Tis not the Barber or the Taylor that makes the Man; and’ tis No
New Thing to seea Fine Wrought Head without so much as One Grain
of Salt in’t.





“4 sop’s FABLES 47
























i\
i

\\ y “ye <
YF AN Hr flere N
Oar ‘ I
ida! ie
S| } c

NS







) USN oS ty
)\ MS ( ma f
MM. lly yr :

, ys
mt Heya
: i : NM X

a i p " yy Ny
AEN
i “ i ay " \












WW. |
ie

THE-FOX ann THE-MASK.







48 LE sop’s FABLES



FasLte XXIV.
The Yackdaw and the yeacocks.

A fackdaw that had a mind to be Sparkish, Trick’d himself up

with all the Gay-Feathers he could Muster together: And
upon the Credit of these Stoll’n, or Borrow’d Ornaments, he Valu’d
himself above All the Birds in the Air Beside. The Pride of this
Vanity got him the Envy of all his Companions, who, upon a
Discovery of the Truth of the Case, fell to Pluming of him by
Consent; and when Every Bird had taken his Own Feather; the
Silly Fackaaw had Nothing left him to Cover his Nakedness.

The Morat.

We steal from one Another all manner of Ways, and to all manner of
Purposes; Wit, as well as Feathers; but where Pride and Beggery
Meet, people are sure to be made Ridiculous in the Conclusion.







sop’s FABLES 49





50 ALS op’s FABLES



FasLe XXV.,
The Dr and the Frog.

AS a Huge Over-grown Ox was Grazing in a Meadow, an Old
Envious Frog that stood Gaping at him hard by, call’d out
to her Little Ones, to take Notice of the Bulk of That Monstrous
Beast ; and see, says she, if I don’t make my self now the Bigger of
the Two. So she Strain’d Once, and Twice, and went still swelling
on and on, till in the Conclusion she Forc’d her self, and Burst.

The MoraAt.

Betwixt Pride, Envy, and Ambition, men fancy Themselves to be
Bigger than they are, and Other People to be Less: And This Tumour
Swells itself at last till it makes All Fly,





LE sop’s FABLES st



(A
ie
yee i)
3) VAG i
War ay
WY]
IA\F M0



ey ‘ WY
Fr ay A Y aN
cS ‘V, ‘k NY fi hey
NAG NG
A TEA






(
f (Nes
Aye nl tt

VA Peet
a
NN f\

pe

Oy



6 ey EE SES

THE: OX ANp THE-FROG.









G2 LES Op’s FABLES



FasLteE XXVI.

The Horse and the ion.

pee. was an Old Hungry Lion would fain have been Dealing

with a piece of Good Horse-Flesh that he had in his Eye;
but the Nag he thought would be too Fleet for him, unless he
could Supply the want of Heels, by Artifice and Address. He
Imitates the Ways and Habits of a Professor of Physick, and
according to the Humor of the World, sets up for a Doctor of the
College. Under this Pretext, he lets fall a Word or two by way of
Discourse, upon the Subject of his Trade ; but the Horse Smelt him
out, and presently a Crotchet came in his Head how he might
Countermine him. I got a Thorn in my Foot T’other day, says
the Horse, as I was Crossing a Thicket, and I am e’en quite Lame
on’t. Oh, says the New Physician, Do but hold up your Leg a
little, and I'll Cure ye immediately. The Lion presently puts him-
self in posture for the Office; but the Patient was too Nimble for
his Doétor, and so soon as ever he had him Fair for his Purpose,
gave him so Terrible a Rebuke upon the Forehead with his Heel,
that he laid him at his Length, and so got off with a whole Skin,
before the Other could Execute his Design.

The Morat.,

Harm Watch, Harm Catch, is but according to the Common Rule
of Equity and Retaliation, and a very Warrantable Way of Deceiving
the Deceiver.





AS Op’ s FABLES Ce












=
SSS

LL CEN, i TY}
Milli y Hy BN fy hy i
ti q Hi ay ) } Hy HIN Zs
nN iN Di ay y G
; MN x DW t/ 1 Gi Meh ye
AE TE San app
LN A
} Hy) AN \ f












|
I ip ! WV E/
y ZN
io, S| 7 AN i Yi
>A eee Kien
W225 ZW INS oN N

THE HORSE anp THE'LION.



54 4 sop’s FABLES

Faste XXVII.,
The horse and the Ass.

a the Days of Old, when Horses spoke Greek and Latin, and

Asses made Syllogisms, there happen’d an Encounter upon the
Road, betwixt a Proud Pamper’d Fade in the Full Course of his
Carriere, and a Poor Creeping 4s, under a Heavy Burden, that
had Chopt into the same Track with him. Why, how now Sirrah,
says he, D’ye not see by these Arms, and Trappings, to what Master
I belong? And D’ye not Understand that when I have That
Master of mine upon my Back, the Whole Weight of the State
rests upon My Shoulders? Out of the way thou slavish Insolent
Animal, or ll Tread thee to Dirt. ‘The Wretched 455 immediately
Slunk aside, with this Envious Reflection between his Teeth.
[What would I give to Change Conditions with That Happy Creature
there.| This Fancy would not out of the Head of him, ’till it
was his Flap some Few Days after to see This very Horse doing
Drudgery in a Common Dung-Cart. Why how now Friend (says
the 4ss) How comes This about? Only the Chance of the War,
says the Other: I was a Soldiers Horse, you must know; and my
Master carry’d me into a Battle, where I was Shot, Hack’d, and
Maim’d ; and you have here before Your Eyes the Catastrophe of
My Fortune.

The Morat.

The Folly, and the Fate, of Pride and Arrogance. The Mistake of
Placing Happiness in any thing that may be taken away, and the Blessing
of Freedom in a Mean Estate.





4 sop’s FABLES 55

ZS

NG

re

we -







56 4sop’s FABLES



FasLte XXVIII.
The Wirds, the Weasts, and the Wat.

ee a Desperate and a Doubtful Battel betwixt the Birds

and the Beasts, the Bat stood Neuter, till she found that the
Beasts had the Better on’t, and then went over to the Stronger
Side. But it came to pass afterward (as the Chance of War is
Various) that the Birds Rally’d their Broken Troops, and carry’d
the Day; and away she went Then to T’other Party, where she was
Try’d by a Council of War as a Deserter; Stript, Banish’d, and
finally Condemn’d never to see Day-light again.

The Morat.

Trimming in some Cases, is Foul, and Dishonest; in others Laud-
able, and in some again, not only Honest, but Necessary. The Nicety
lies in the skill of Distinguishing upon Cases, Times, and Degrees.



Rat

TH





LES Op’ s FABLES c7

: Sse a

F-BIRDS-THE:BEASTS ano THE-BAT





58 4Esop’s FABLES



VASE eit ae NCONGL ONG:
The for and the Wolf.

A Wolf that had a mind to take his Ease, Stor’d himself

Privately with Provisions, and so kept Close awhile. Why,
how now Friend, says a Fox to him, we han’t seen You abroad at
the Chace this many a day! Why truly says the Wolf, I have
gotten an Indisposition that keeps me much at Home, and I hope
I shall have Your Prayers for my Recovery. The Fox had a Fetch
in’t, and when he saw it would not Fadge; Away goes he presently
to a Shepherd, and tells him where he might surprize a Wolf if
he had a mind to’t. The Shepherd follow’d his Directions, and
Destroy’d him. The Fox immediately, as his Next Heir, repairs
to his Cell, and takes possession of his Stores: but he had Little
Joy of the Purchase, for in a very short time, the same Shepherd
did as much for the Fox, as he had done before for the Wolf.

The Moral.

’Tis with Sharpers as tis with Pikes, they Prey upon their own
kind; And tis a Pleasant Scene enough, when Thieves fall out among
themselves, to see the Cutting of One Diamond with Another





LES op’s FABLES 59



WN







i =

Wa Tay Wi W'S



vine

‘sul ly,
Wily, ati: e
Ai,
Dasssy. hy lly.

ils, Sy
ie alt, wit Mt

THE-FOX AND THE WOLF.




;

I QA “il,







60 LES op’ s FABLES



Faste XXX,
The Stag Looking into the Water.

A a Stag was Drinking upon the Bank of a Clear Stream, he

saw his Image in the Water, and Enter’d into This Con-
templation upon’t. Well! says he, if These Pityful Shanks of
mine were but Answerable to this Branching Head, I can but
think how I should Defy all my Enemies. The Words were
hardly out of his Mouth, but he Discovered a Pack of Dogs
coming full-Cry towards him. Away he Scours cross the Fields,
Casts off the Dogs, and Gains a Wood; but Pressing through a
Thicket, the Bushes held him by the Horns, till the Hounds came
in, and Pluck’d him Down. The Last Thing he said was This.
What an Unhappy Fool was I, to Take my Friends for my Ene-
mies, and my Enemies for my Friends! I trusted to my Head,
that has Betray’d me, and I found fault with my Legs, that would
otherwise have brought me off.

The Morat.

He that does not thoroughly know himself, may be well allowed to
make a False fudgment upon other Matters that most Nearly concern
him.



Aisop’s FABLES 61

‘7 Se ot i ay y
PR SA
a Cr
SOY (FEES
>







62 LE sop’ s FABLES
Se

FABIE: XOXO:
The Snake and the File.

‘TT Bee was a Snake got into a Smith’s Shop, and fell to Licking

of a File. She Saw the File Bloody, and still the Bloodier
it was, the more Eagerly she Lick’d it; upon a Foolish Fancy, that
it was the File that Bled, and that She her self had the Better on’t.
In the Conclusion, when she could Lick no Longer, she fell to
Biting; but finding at last she could do no more Good upon’t
with her Teeth than with her Tongue, she Fairly left it.

The Morat.

"Tis a Madness to stand Biting and Snapping at any thing to no
manner of purpose, more than the Gratifying of an Impotent Rage, in
the fancy of Hurting Another, when in truth, we only Wound our
selves,



ZEsop’s FABLES 63

Tee yy

gape mM
a(n

y Pt |
a
WG

TINA isl 2 daa it

\ SA

i
)

ZZ
— a

ns
W. | \ J

pe
TTR A | \\| Re
ZS ZELLER, aN = exer
ope AAA. 4

SNAKE AND





64 LE sop’s FABLES

HABE OX GUL.
The THolbes and the Sheep.

opps was a Time when the Sheep were so Hardy as to Wage

War with the Wolves; and so long as they had the Dogs
for their Allies, they were upon all Encounters, at least a Match
for their Enemies. Upon This Consideration, the Wolves sent
their Embassadors to the Sheep, to Treat about a Peace, and in
the Mean Time there were Hostages given on Both Sides; the
Dogs on the part of the Sheep, and the Wolves Whelps on the
Other Part, ’till Matters might be brought to an Issue. While
they were upon Treaty, the Whelps fell a Howling; The Wolves
cryed out Treason; and pretending an Infraction in the Abuse of
their Hostages, fell upon the Sheep immediately without their Dogs,
and made them pay for the Improvidence of leaving themselves
without a Guard.

The Mora..

’Tis senseless to the Highest Degree to think of Establishing an
Alliance among those that Nature her self has Divided, by an In-
conciliable Disagreement. Beside, that a Foolish Peace is much more
Destruétive than a Bloody War.





4 sop’s FABLES, 65




























R vi Ss

AN Nemesia re Zoul
i SC Ew
HYG WV le
an RS x



THE: WOLVES ann THE’ SHEEP.







66 Aésop’s FABLES.



Faste XXXIII.
The Ape and the For.

AN Ape that found Many Inconveniences by going Tai/-less, went

to a Fox that had a Well-spread, Bushy Taz/, and begg’d
of him only a little piece on’t to Cover his Nakedness: For (says
he) you have enough for Both, and what needs more than you
have Occasion for? Well, Fohn (says the Fox) be it More, or
be it Less, you get not one single Hair on’t; for I would have
ye know, Sirrah, that the Tail of a Fox was never made for the
Buttocks of an pe.

The Morat.

Providence has Assign’d Every Creature its Station, Lot, Make and
Figure; and ’tis not for Us to stand Correcting the Works of an
Incomprehensible Wisdom, and an Almighty Power.





Lisop’s FABLES. re

os

8 ee

aD | iC

Nill MON Y ~~ 3

Alin Sten oe
| i » ims

Ql line
Witltiyss a ovals

i.

i anal,

NY
WENN UN
\







68 “Esop’s FABLES.



FasLle XXXIV.
The Wark and her Woung MDnes.

Here was a Brood of Young Larks in the Corn, and the Dam,
when she went abroad to Forrage for them, laid a Strict
Charge upon her Little Ones, to pick up what News they could get
against she came back again. ‘They told her at her Return, that
the Owner of the Field had been there, and Order’d his Neigh-
bours to come and Reap the Corn. Well, says the O/d One,
there’s no Danger yet then. They told her the next Day that
he had been there again, and Desir’d his Friends to Do’t. Well,
well, says she, there’s no Hurt in That neither, and so she went
out Progging for Provisions again as before. But upon the Third
Day, when they told their Mother, that the Master and his Son
appointed to come Next Morning and do’t Themselves : Nay then,
says she, ’tis time to look about us: As for the Neighbours and
the Friends, I fear em not; but the Master I’m sure will be as
good as his Word ; for ’tis his own Business.

The Mio ae

He that would be sure to have his Busness Well Done, must either
Do it Himself, or see the Doing of it; Beside that many a Good
Servant is Spoil’d by a Careless Master.





Alsop’s FABLES. 69



| . rrr aN







70 Zisop’s FABLES.



FasLte XXXV.,
The Stag in the Or-Stali.

A Stag that was hard set by the Huntsmen, betook himself to a

Stall for Sanctuary, and prevail’d with the Oxen to Conceal
him the Best they could, so they cover’d him with Straw, and by and
by in comes the Keeper to Dress the Cattel, and to Feed them; and
when he had done his Work he went his Way without any Dis-
covery. The Stag reckon’d himself by This Time to be out of
all Danger; but One of the Oxen that had more Brains than his
Fellows, advis’d him not to be too Confident neither; for the
Servant, says he, is a Puzzling Fool, that heeds Nothing ; but when
my Master comes, he’ll have an Eye Here and There and Every
where, and will most certainly find ye out. Upon the very Speak-
ing of the Word, in comes the Master, and He spies out Twenty
Faults, I warrant ye; This was not Well, and That was not
Well; till at last, as he was Prying and Groping up and down,
he felt the Horns of the Stag under the Straw, and so made Prize
of him.

The Morat.

He that would be sure to have his Bus’ness Well Done, must either
Do it Himself, or see the Doing of it; Beside that many a Good
Servant is Spoil’d by a Careless Master.





LE sop’s FABLES. =







Hee i q
ss rh MY Yq
Os SG
Ed 9
oe
REY












PNG








STs

Sas











SEOs





WE Caos



PEP
$

Nee
30















Wt ay ;
2 eS NS,
a Pe w aN X wa) f







so EAA
ere) a




SN

Ro CREE












5
oh, TS

ind | hy —Ss
aw)

}

,

IY Gea
ae



Ys= 25





THE'STAG:IN' THE: OX-



STALL,





Te LE sop’s FABLES.



Fasre XXXVI.
Che for and the Sich Dion.

A Certain Lion that had got a Politique Fit of Sickness, made it

his Observation, that of All the Beasts in the Forest, the
Fox never came at him: And so he wrote him Word how III he
was, and how Mighty Glad he should be of his Company, upon the
Score of Ancient Friendship and Acquaintance. The Fox return’d
the Complement with a Thousand Prayers for his Recovery; but
as for Waiting upon him, he desir’d to be Excus’d; For (says he)
I find the Traces of abundance of Feet Going In to Your Majesty’s
Palace, and not One that comes Back again.

The Morat.

The Kindnesses of Ill Natur'd and Designing People, should be
thoroughly Consider’d, and Examin’d, before we give Credit to them,





sop’s FABLES.

ARS



oy a SPA y }

YAO LA By

Zone SC
ZT fT RAO te

i ee
THE-FOX anv THE SICK:LION.

73









74 Lh sop’s FABLES.

Faste XXXVII.
The Stag and the horse.

zee Dispute betwixt a Stag and a Horse about a piece of

Pasture, the Stag got the Better on’t, and beat the Other out
of the Field. The Horse, upon This Affront, Advis’d with a Man
what Course to Take; who told him, that if he would Submit
to be Bridled, and Sadled, and take a Man upon his Back with a
Lance in his Hand, he would undertake to give him the Satis-
faction of a Revenge. The Horse came to his Terms, and for the
Gratifying of a Present Passion, made himself a Slave all the days
of his Life. Stesichorus made use of This Fable, to Divert the
Himerenses from Chusing Phalaris the Tyrant for their General.
This Horse’s Case, says he, will be Yours, if you go on with your
Proposals. ’Tis true, You’l have your Revenge, but you'l lose
your Liberties; Upon which Words the Motion fell.

The Morat..

Let every Man take a True Measure of Himself, what he is Able to
do, and what Not; before he comes to any Peremptory Resolution how
to Proceed. He is a Madman, that to Avoid a Present, and a Less
Evil, runs Blindfold into a Greater; and for the Gratifying of a
Froward Humour, makes himself a Slave All the Days of his Life.



EES Opis Bees, 75





THE'STAG anp THE ‘HORSE.





76 Zisop SE AD ES:





Fase SXXvVinl:
Che Horse and the Woaded Ass.

AD a Horse and an Ass were upon the Way together, the Ass

cryed out to his Companion, to Ease him of his Burden,
though never so little, he should fall down Dead else. The
Horse would not; and so his Fellow-Servant sunk under his
Load. The Master, upon This, had the ss Flay’d, and laid
his Whole Pack, Skin and All, upon the Horse. Well, (says he)
This Judgment is befall’n me for my Ill Nature, in refusing to
help my Brother in the Depth of his Distress.

The Mora.

It is a Christian, a Natural, a Reasonable, and a Political Duty, for
All Members of the same Body to Assist One Another.



Full Text


xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008900300001datestamp 2008-12-11setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title A hundred fables of Æsop Aesop's fablesdc:creator AesopL'Estrange, Roger, 1616-1704 ( Author )Grahame, Kenneth, 1859-1932 ( Author of introduction )Billinghurst, Percy J ( Illustrator )LaneBallantyne, Hanson and Co ( Printer )Ballantyne Press ( Printer )dc:subject Animals -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )Fables ( lcsh )Fables -- 1899 ( rbgenr )Bldn -- 1899dc:description b Statement of Responsibility from the English version of Sir Roger L'Estrange ; with pictures by Percy J. Billinghurst and an introduction by Kenneth Grahame.Translations from the Greek.dc:publisher John LaneBodley Headdc:date 1899dc:type Bookdc:format xv, 201, 1 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00089003&v=00001002471059 (aleph)07327227 (oclc)AMH6576 (notis)dc:source University of Floridadc:language Englishdc:coverage England -- LondonScotland -- Edinburgh


HUNDRED * FABLES: OF: I]

FESOP _

" WITH-PICTURES: —
PERCY: J BILLINGHURST _


pas ee








(4 A

sf,
1&4 i

Sys hat are
A HUNDRED FABLES OF

£450 P
7 AE
ayy
oe ros
PON ou Cox
W % yy ay 7 (
Mw

<=
————S
==

ZA

| NW) \h

DUAR
(

i aN

Se


AESOP

FROM:THE ‘ENGLISH: VERSION: OF
SIR*ROGER*LESTRANGE
WITH :PICTURES -BY

PERCY*J*BILLINGHURST

AND ‘AN: INTRODUCTION: BY

KENNETH*GRAHAME

we
A
ZZ

AC
i
A C
i

2
|

iy

i

Aas
Se

=.

JOHN-LA 7
THE-BODLEY-HEAD
LONDON-AND -‘NEW-YORK


Printed by Battanryne, Hanson, & Co.
At the Ballantyne Press
pr Oras os

10.
Il.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
1g.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
218
26.

CONTENTS

. The Cock and the Jewel.
. The Cat and the Cock
- The Wolf and the Lamb

The Kite, the Frog, and the
Mouse : , :

The Lion, the Bear, and the
Fox : : :

The Dog and the Shadow

The Wolf and the Crane

The Boar and the Ass .

The Country Mouse and the
City Mouse -

The Crow and the Mussel

The Fox and the Crow .

The Old Lion y

The Lion and the Mouse

The Sick Kite . ,

The Swallow and Other Birds

The Frogs Desiring a King

The Kite and the Pigeons

The Sow and the Wolf .

The Old Dog and his Master .

The Hares and Frogs

The Dog and the Sheep ..

The Fox and the Stork .

The Fox and the Mask .

The Jackdaw and the Peacocks

The Ox and the Frog

The Forse and the Lion.

Page
2

4
6

10
12
14
16

18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44

48
5°0
52



Fable
27.
28.

29.
30.
31.
aie
33:
34:
35+
36.
37:
38.
39-
40.
41.
42.
43-
44,
45.
46.
47:
48.
49-
50.
SI.
52.
53:
54+

The Horse and the Ass .

The Birds, the Beasts, and the
Bat . , ; ,

The Fox and the Wolf.

The Stag looking into the Water

The Snake and the File .

The Wolves and the Sheep

The Ape and the Fox ;

The Lark and her Young Ones

The Stag in the Ox-Stall

The Fox and the Sick Lion

The Stag and the Horse

The Horse and the Loaded Ass

The Dog and the Wolf .

The Fox and the Lion

The Eagle and the Fox .

The Hushandman and the Stork

The Shepherd’s Boy

The Eagle and the Crow

The Dog in the Manger .

Jupiter and the Camel

The Fox and the Hare to Jupiter

The Peacock’s Complaint

The Fox and the Goat

The Partridge and the Cocks

The Tunny and the Dolphin

The Fox without a Tail

The Fox and the Bramble

The Fox and the Crocodile

Page

54

56
58
60
62

66
68
70
72
74
76
78
80
82
84
86
88
go
g2
94

98
100
102
104
106
108


CONTENTS.



Fable

73:
74
75:
76.

. The Boasting Mule

. The Lion in Love

. The Lioness and the Fox

. The Fighting Cocks and the

Eagle. : ;

. The Stag and the Fawn

. Lhe Wasps and the Honey-Pot
. The Fox and the Grapes

. The Hare and the Tortoise

. Lhe Dog and the Cock upon a

Journey .

. The Vine and the Goat .

. The Ass, the Lion, and the Cock
. The Snake and the Crab.

. The Raven and the Swan

. The Ape and the Dolphin

. The Fox and the Crab .

. Lhe Shepherd and his Sheep

. The Peacock and the Magpie

. The Lion, the Ass, and the

fox. : ,
The Kid and the Wolf .
The Geese and the Cranes
The Angler and the Little Fish
The Bull and the Goat .

Page
IIo
112

114

116
118
120
122

124

126
128
130
132
134
136
138
140
142

144
146
148
150
152





Fable
77°
78.
79:

81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.

88.
89.
go.
gi.
92.
93:
94+
95:
96.

97-
98.
99+
100.

The Nurse and the Wolf
The Tortoise and the Eagle
The Fox and the Frog .

. The Mischievous Dog .

The Peacock and the Crane .
The Fox and the Tiger

The Lion and the Four Bulls .
The Crow and the Pitcher
The Man and his Goose

The Wanton Calf

. The Leopard and the Fox

The Hawk and the Farmer .

The Bear and the Bee-Hives.

The Fatal Marriage

The Cat and the Mice .

The Wild Boar and the Fox .

The Porcupine and the Snakes

The Hawk and the Nightingale

The Cat and the Fox .

The Wolf, the Lamb, and the
Goat f

The Cock and the Fox .

The Fox in the Well

The Ass Eating Thistles

The Wolf and the Lion

Page
154
156
158
160

164
166
168
170
172
1740
176
178
180
182
184
186
188
190

192
194
196
198
200
INTRODUCTION.

The fable had its origin, we are given to under-
stand, in a germ of politeness still lingering in
the breasts of the superior, or preaching, portion
of humanity, who wished to avoid giving more
pain than necessary when pursuing the inevitable
task laid upon them by their virtues, of instructing
the inferior and silent portion how to be—well,
just a little less inferior, if they would only listen
patiently to what they were told. It was also
Jrankly admitted by many, that there were diffi-
culties in getting a frivolous humanity to listen at
all, unless one took a leaf from the book of that
unprofitable rascal the story-teller, a spinner of
webs for the sheer irridescence and gossamer-film
and sparkle of the dainty thing itself; with no
designs whatever upon fat, black flies to be caught
and held in its meshes. And so, with half a sigh,
the preacher fell upon the element of Es and




i INTRODUCTION



the fable was born. It would have been pleasanter,
of course, to have told Smith to his face what a
rogue he was, and fones, what an idiot everybody
thought him ; but unfortunately there was no means
of putting compulsion on Smith and F ones to attend.
Again, it would have been quite easy to have got
the Smiths and Foneses to sit round in a circle,
while the theme was the folly of Robinson and the
roguery of Fenkins ; but Fenkins and Robinson
might stroll in, arm-in-arm, in the middle, and the
preacher who aimed at being a popular success knew
that he must not only avoid all little unpleasant-
nesses, but also spin a web whose meshes were fine
enough to catch and to hold, without undue obvious-
ness, fites of every bulk, from Smith down to the
recalcitrant F enkins,

It is more probable that the thing bad its roots
in the fixed and firm refusal of the community from
its very beginning, to allow any one of its members
to go about calling any other one a fool or a rogue,
“of his own mere notion,” If anybody has got to
be put away for folly, or trounced for roguery,
society has always told off some one to do it,and paid


INTRODUCTION il

him a more or less adequate salary. The amateur
has never been recognised nor countenanced, and
though occasionally he may score a success jor the
moment, and set a convicted people beating their
breasts in the streets, confessing their sins to each
other at the street-corners, and making piles of their
costly books and curios and precious ornaments in the
market-place, sooner or later the old rule asserts
itself, the paid policeman moves you on as before,
and the forsaken and discredited amateur comes to
hopeless grief.

What then was to be done? The inadequate
policeman had to be supplemented, the amateur
must somehow say his say. There was a certain
moral cowardice in the means he hit upon. The
friendly, tactful, unobstrusive beasts around bim—
could they not be seized upon and utilised to point
the requisite moral? True, it would be no good to
hold up their real characteristics for the public
admonishment, The moment they were really studied
they were seen to be so modest, so mutually helpful,
so entirely free from vanity, affectation, and fads ;
so tolerant, uncomplaining, and determined to




iv INTRODUCTION





make the best of everything ; and, finally, such
adepts in the art of minding their own business,
that it was evident a self-respecting humanity
would not stand the real truth for a moment, But
one could deal out the more prominent of human
failings among them ; one could agree, for argu-
ments sake, that the peacock was to be vain, the
wolf unregardful of his plighted word, the sackdaw
a snob with a weakness for upper circles ; and the
thing was done. The Smiths and foneses, instead
of disputing the premisses, fell into the trap ; while
the honest beasts, whose characters were thus meanly
filched from them, instead of holding indignation-
meetings, and passing resolutions of protest, as they
might have done had they been merely human, took
the nobler course of quietly continuing to mind their
own business,

But though they acquiesced and submitted, it
must not be thought that they did not feel and
resent, very keenly indeed, the ungentlemanly
manner in which they had been exploited, for moral
purposes, by people with whom they only wished to live

in mutual esteem and respect in a world in which


INTRODUCTION v



there was plenty of room for both. When you meet
a bird or a beast, and it promptly proceeds to move
off, in an obviously different direction, without abuse
indeed, or scurrility, or even reproach, but with a
distinct intention of seeing as little of you as possible
during the rest of the afternoon, you may be pretty
sure it 1s thinking of A&sop’s Fables. If only some-
body would withdraw and apologise, and arrange
that things should be on the same footing as before !
Some beasts have gone so far as to take a leaf
out of the book of the fabulist, and compile a volume
of their own. Though humanity had behaved in a
way to which they themselves would have scorned to
stoop, that was no reason (they argued) why they
should shun any moral lesson that was to be picked
up, even from Man. A beasts life is so short, so
eventful and precarious, that he is never above
learning, never too proud to take a hint; more than
all, he never thinks that what he dosn’t know isn’t
worth knowing. I was allowed a glimpse at the book
one afternoon, in a pine wood, when the world was
hot and sleepy, and the beasts had dined well. But
L could not get permission to take it away, and, as I


v1 INTRODUCTION



was sleepy too, I can only half recollect a scant fable
or two out of that rich treasure-house ; and somehow
I have never been able to happen upon that pine
wood again.

Naturally enough with creatures who live by
rule and order and inherited precept, the inconse-
quential and irregular habits of man afford much
food for beast-reflection. Here is a fable (by a
monkey apparently) which touches on this puzzling
aspect of humanity,

THE APE AND THE CHILD IN THE
LEGHORN HAT,

A frolicsome ape, who in much careless ease inhabited a lordly
mansion in Regent's Park, lounged up one afternoon to certain bars, on
the other side of which selected specimens of humanity were compelled
to promenade each day for the instruction and diversion of philosophic
apes. A little maid ina Leghorn hat having timidly approached the
bars, her large fat mother, shaking her imperiously by the shoulder,
ordered her to observe the pitty ickle monkey, so mild and so gentle, and
give it a piece of her bun at once, like a good, kind, charitable ickle girl.
The small maiden, though herself extremely loth, proffered ber bun to
the ape, who possessed himself of it with a squeal of delight, and bit
her finger to the bone as well; for he had bitten nothing more juicy


INTRODUCTION vil

and succulent than a neighbour's tail for a whole week past; and tails
are but gristly things at the best. But the large, fat mother, falling
upon the already shrieking little girl, shook and cuffed her unmercifully,
protesting that of all the naughty, tiresome, self-willed little trollops, and
that never, never, never would she take her a-pleasuring again.



MORAL.

Parents of the human species have an altogether singular and
unaccountable method of rearing their young. Yet they grow up some-
bow, nevertheless, and often become quite good and useful citizens: so
there may be something in it, and it's a lesson to us not to be proud
and think we know everything.

Flere is another (by a dog this time) based on
the same characteristic, but written from a slightly

different and more doggy point of view.

THE DOG, THE CHILD, AND THE MOON.

A child sat on the nursery floor and cried for the moon, which was
shining so temptingly through the window. A conscientious dog who
was strolling by, and had been wanting sorely to bay the moon all the
evening, because he had a bad pain in his inside that kept telling him to
do it, only he was mighty afeared of being kicked, sat down beside the
infant, and, with the sole remark that circumstances were too strong for
him, lifted his snout. Then the night was filled with music, till even the


Vill INTRODUCTION

face of the moon wore a pained expression ; and the dog felt the pain in
his inside trickling away through his ribs. Attracted by the outcry, the
mother hastened to the room, and smacked the child soundly for its folly and
unreasonableness. But she patted and praised the dog, who was sitting



severely on his tail, and called him a noble, sympathetic fellow, who
could not see others in trouble without being moved to share their
distress. Then the dog swaggered out of the room feeling good all over,
and resolving that next morning be would dig a hole in the geranium-
bed large enough to bury the moon itself.

MORAL.

You never can tell with exactness how human beings will act, under
any conditions. Therefore when you want to howl at the moon, or do
anything contraband, badly enough, better go and do it and get it over.
You can but be kicked, and you probably won't be, and you will get rid
of the bad pain in your inside.

Then there was that fable—and the one about—
and the other one where—and then that very
naughty one which—but it is time to pull up, as I
promised faithfully not to. How it all comes back
tome as I write! The cushion of moss and pine-
needles, the song of the streamlet hard by, the squirrel
perched half-way up a tree-trunk and chattering,
‘Do read him that one about— and the jay, who


INTRODUCTION =





was turning over the leaves, looking round and
saying, “O you shut up! This is my copy he's
looking at, and it opens at all the right places!”
The rabbits sat round in a ring, silent and large-
eyed, with gust a flicker passing over their ever-
unrestful noses. They will always come to listen to
a story, however old and hackneyed, and never open
their mouths except to say, “ Now another, please!”
The badger, who, as the biggest member present,
ought to have been doing the honours, and knew it,
sat and scratched himself, and looked crossly at the jay.
He wanted to say something cutting, but knew the
jay was his master at repartee. Then the wood-
land muttered its spell, and a drowsiness crept over
us. When I awoke the badger’s chair was vacant,
the rabbits were but a rustle in the bracken, the
squirrel and the jay but a quiver tm a tree-top and
a glint of blue against a distant copse.

Well! The story-teller, the gossamer-web-
spinner, has come to his own by this time, and the
fabulist, who started with such a flourish, has long
ceased to mount his tub, Even while these very
fables were in course of writing, the axe was being


x INTRODUCTION



laid to rhe root of the tree, and a whimsical fellow,
with his tongue in his cheek, was compiling the
“ Arabian Nights.” In this matter humanity,
though just as liable as the individual to its tem-
porary fits of affectation, knows what it wants and
sees that it gets it, and never troubles to Justify its
selection by argument. Did it care to do so, it
might contend that people, by diligent attention to
morals and rubbing in of applications, had become
quite too good for anything, and the fables had done
their work so thoroughly that now the time had
arrived for a little relaxation, honestly earned.
Or it might argue, on the other hand, that the job
had proved too tough a one, that the story which
posed as an obvious index to personal conduct had
got to be a bore and a nuisance, and that it was
much nicer to be frankly bad and shameless and
abandoned, and read fiction. But humanity, in
the mass, never argues—and rightly; and the
reader can please himself with whichever theory he
Likes, sure of this at least, that the story henceforth
will be tolerated only for itself, that the fable has
had its day and ceased to be.




INTRODUCTION X1



But a method may expire, and its output yet
remain that undefined thing, attained by neither
prayer nor fasting—a classic, (Indeed, so long as
you are a part of this earth's old crust, you must
generally wait till you are a stratum before people
will begin paying attention to you and calling you
nice names.) There are in literature men, women,
and beasts, who survive owing to fidelity in por-
traiture to the natural type. There are equally men,
women, and beasts, who live from their very devia-
tion from the real thing—tfresh and captivating
creations with rules of their own. These are the
folk who people the world of fairy-tale, heraldry,
and fable; and many such village communities
flourish in classic-land. Vitality—that is the test ;
and, whatever its components, mere truth 1s not
necessarily one of them. A dragon, for imstance, 1s
a more enduring animal than a pterodactyl, I
have never yet met any one who really believed in a
pterodactyl; but every honest person believes in
dragons—down in the back-kitchen of bis conscious-
ness, And every honest person believes that the
fable-people exist, or existed, somewhere—not on thts


xii INTRODUCTION



planet, perhaps, since personal experience must be
allowed its place when evidence has to be weighed,
but—well, the Census Department has never yet
overhauled the Dog-Star.

And this classic is here given forth in the brave
old seventeenth-century version of Sir Roger
L’Estrange, who wrote, by a happy Lift, im the very
language (we feel sure) that the Fable-beasts now
talk among themselves in Fable-land. Modern
renderings, with one eye on the anxious parent and
the other on the German governess, have often
achieved an impotence of English that increases our
admiration of a tongue that can survive such mis-
handling, and still remain the language of men,
“ Insipid Twittle-Twattles,” to use L’Estrange’s own
phrase. A Royalist politician and a Jluent and
copious pamphleteer, he had graduated in the right
school for work wherein one hard-hitting word must
needs supply the place of whole page or long-
drawn paragraph in the less restricted methods
by which the human conscience now insists on being
approached. In the sad case of the Lion, the

Bear, and the Fox, a modern version draws the


INTRODUCTION xiii



moral in these satisfactory if hardly stimulating
Lerms

“Those who fight with each other lose alt, and
give others the chance of enriching themselves.

Dear me, do they really? Lay this alongside
of our politician's, and with a snap and a bite be
has you by the leg.

“Tis the fate of all Gotham Quarrels, when
fools go together by the ears, to have knaves run
away with the stakes.”

Again,—‘ A certain Fackdaw was so proud
and ambitious that, &8c.,” bleats and trickles our
modern version. “A Daw that had a mind to be
sparkish,” says L’ Estrange, saving his breath for
his story. Yet be is not merely forcible, terse, and
arresting. With what a prettiness of phrase he puts
(in his preface) the case for the Fable! “What
cannot be done by the dint of Authority, or Persua-
sion, in the Chappel, or in the Closet, must be
brought about by the Side-Wind of a Lecture from
the Fields and the Forrests.” And there is a touch
both quiet and appealing in his account of the Tail-
less Fox, and his efforts to get level again with
XIV INTRODUCTION





cs

Society: “. . . But however, for the better coun-
tenance of the scandal, he got the Master and
Wardens of the Foxes Company to call a Court
of Assistants, where he himself appeared, and
made a Learned Discourse upon the Trouble,
the Uselessness, and the Indecency, of Foxes wearing
Laie

But, as I have said, it is in his Beast-talh that
our politician (naturally enough) excels :

“ But as they were entering upon the Dividend,
‘Hands off, says the Lion, ‘This part is mine by
the Privilege of my Quality; this, because I'l]
have it in spite of your Teeth ; this, again, because .
L took most pains fort; and if you dispute the
Fourth, we must en Pluck a Crow about it?” In
the “Wolf and the Lamb,” “* Nay, says t other,
‘you'll never leave your chopping of Logick, till
jour Skin’s turned over you Ears, as your Father's
was, a matter of Six Months ago, for prating at
this sawcy rate,”

L'Estrange may have had his faults of diction:
faults of excess, of violence, of recurrent effort for
the explosive phrase, wherein we get, indeed, the


INTRODUCTION XV



telling snapshot effect, but somehow hear the click
of the Kodak as well, Yet his version remains
the one version, and these are not the times in
which we may expect to get another, It is more
than doubtful whether Assop would have approved
of it; and yet, for good or for evil, it 1s the
ultimate version |

Those green back-garden doors that lead to the
trim classic plots—they are opened but rarely now-
a-days! For they are a trifle warped, and their
paint swollen, and they stick and jam, and one can
find neither time nor effort for the necessary tus.
But once inside this particular door—tif one takes the
pains—how one is possessed by the inhabitants, their
surroundings, their ways, and their points of view !
Emerging, one really expects to meet them at every
corner, to be hailed by them, to put the natural ques-
tion and get the appropriate answer, One forgets,
for the moment, that the real four-legged or feathered
fellows one encounters are sullen, rancorous, and
aggrieved—have a book of their own, in fine, a
version in which it is we who point the moral and

adorn the tale!
KENNETH GRAHAME.
A HUNDRED FABLES OF

£450 P


2 LE sop’s FABLES.

/2 aS Fase I,
The Cock and the Fewel. -

AS a Cock was turning up a Dunghill, he spy’d a Fewel. Well

(says he to himself) this sparkling Foolery now to a Lapi-
dary in my place, would have been the Making of him; but as
to any Use or Purpose of mine, a Barley-Corn had been worth
Forty on’t.

The Morat.

He that's Industrious in an Honest Calling, shall never fail of a
Blessing. Tis the part of a Wise Man to Prefer Things Necessary
before Matters of Curiosity, Ornament, or Pleasure.




Esop’s FABLES.



ite,
tatty,

Mie

ay NAN RUS








4 ZEsop’s FABLES.

? Fase II,

- The Cat and the Cock.

e was the hard Fortune once of a Cock, to fall into the Clutches

of a Cat. Puss had a Months Mind to be upon the Bones of
him, but was not willing to pick a Quarrel however, without some
plausible Colour for’t. Sirrah (says she) what do you keep such
a bawling, and screaming a Nights for, that no body can sleep near
you? Alas says the Cock, I never wake any body, but when ’tis
time for People to rise, and go about their Business. Come come,
says Puss, without any more ado, ’tis time for me to go to Break-
fast, and Cats don’t live upon Dialogues; at which word she gave
him a Pinch, and so made an end, both of the Cock, and of the
Story.

The Morat.

"Tis an Easie Matter to find a Staff to Beat a Dog. Innocence
is no Protection against the Arbitrary Cruelty of a Tyrannical Power :
But Reason and Conscience are yet so Sacred, that the Greatest Villanies
are still Countenanc’d under that Cloak and Color.
FABLES.

AEsop’s

= WN

=,

aa ee SEN Ae Sey
= Oh (ae OG,

SS
2 re
SSee

ZS =S

Sees Die
a Sa SS
SS

SS

: BZ

am
Eo
3
ess
-
>)

es

THE


6 4isop’s FABLES.

: Fasie IIT. S
The Wolf and the Lamb.

A a Wolf was lapping at the Head of a Fountain, he spy’d a

Lamb, paddling at the same time, a good way off down the
Stream. The Wolf had no sooner the Prey in his Eye, but away
he runs open-mouth to’t. Villain (says he) how dare you lye
muddling the Water that I’m a drinking? Indeed, says the poor
Lamb, 1 did not think that my drinking there Je/ow, could have
‘foul’d your Water so far above. Nay, says t’other, you’ll never
leave your chopping of Logick, till your Skin’s turn’d over your
Ears, as your Fathers was, a matter of six Months ago, for prating
at this sawcy rate; you remember it full well, Sirrah. If you'll
believe me, Sir, (quoth the innocent Lamé, with fear and trembling)
I was not come into the World then. Why thou Impudence, cries
the Wolf, hast thou neither Shame, nor Conscience? But it runs
in the Blood of your whole Race, Sirrah, to hate our Family; and
therefore since Fortune has brought us together so conveniently,
you shall e’en pay some of your Fore-Fathers Scores before you
and I part; and so without any more ado, he leapt at the Throat
of the miserable helpless Lamb, and tore him immediately to
pieces.

The Morat.

’Tis an Easie Matter to find a Staff to Beata Dog. Innocence
is no Proteétion against the Arbitrary Cruelty of a Tyrannical Power :
But Reason and Conscience are yet so Sacred, that the Greatest Villantes
are still Countenane'd under that Cloak and Color.


ZEsop’s FABLES.





7
8 4Esop’s FABLES.

al” FY Fase IV. Le.
The Bite, the frog, and the Mouse.

pee. fell out a Bloody Quarrel once betwixt the Frogs and

the Mice, about the Sovereignty of the Fenns; and whilst
Two of their Champions were Disputing it at Swords Point, Down
comes a Kite Powdering upon them in the /uéerim, and Gobbles up
both together, to Part the Fray.

The Morat.

Tis the Fate of All Gotham Quarrels, when Fools go together by
the Ears, to have Knaves run away with the Stakes.


Li sop’s FABLES.



it
ing
Ha she x
cae

nea
tI

iy

a i Ny m0 He

i
" AR vr a i a oS oe

THE KITE THEFROG ‘AND ‘THE MOUSE’




IO LES op’ s FABLES.



oe Fasie V. 3
The Lion, the Wear, and the For.

°T Here was a Lion and Bear had gotten a Fawn betwixt them,

and there were they at it Tooth and Nail, which of the Two
should carry’t off. They Fought it out, till they were e’en glad to
lie down, and take Breath. In which Instant, a Fox passing that
way, and finding how the case stood with the Two Combatants,
seized upon the Fawn for his Own Use, and so very fairly
scamper’d away with him. The Lion, and the Bear saw the
Whole A€tion, but not being in condition to Rise and Hinder it,
they pass’d this Reflexion upon the whole matter; Here have we
been Worrying one another, who should have the Booty, ’till this
Cursed Fox has Bobb’d us Both on’t.

The Moran.

*Tis the Fate of All Gotham Quarrels, when Fools £0 together by
the Ears, to have Knaves run away with the Stakes.


Ze sop’s FABLES. e



Soe





- F NE
eon iC x
.
“

gi
y=

a

\

BOLLE
LAL
Lt

THE-LION: THE BEAR, anv THE FOX.




12 “Esop’s FABLES.



7

Oke a Fase VI. ly
The Dog and the Shadow.

A a Dog was crossing a River, with a Morsel of Good Flesh in

his Mouth, he saw (as he thought) Another Dog under the
Water, upon the very same Adventure. He never consider’d that
the One was only the Jmage of the Other; but out of a Greediness
to get Both, he Chops at the Shadow, and Loses the Substance,

The Morat.

All Covet, All Lose ; which may serve for a Reproof to Those that
Govern their Lives by Fancy and Appetite, without Consulting the
Honor, and the Fustice of the Case.
LAL SO p's



FABLES.

Be)



Ss
SS

THE DOG ann THE SHADOW.


4 ZEsop’s FABLES.



mne/

: Fasre VII, / /
The Wolf and the Crane.

Ae had got a Bone in’s Throat, and could think of no better

Instrument to Ease him of it, than the Bill of a Crane; so
he went and Treated with a Crane to help him out with it, upon
Condition of a very considerable Reward for his pains. The Crane ~
did him the Good Office, and then claim’d his Promise. Why how
now Impudence! (says t’other) Do you put your Head into the
Mouth of a Wolf, and then, when y’ave brought it out again safe
and sound, do you talk of a Reward? Why Sirrah, you have your
Head again, and is not that a Sufficient Recompence.

The Morat.

One Good Turn they say requires another: But yet He that has to do
with Wild Beasts (as some Men are No Better) and comes off with a
Whole Skin, let him Expeé& No Other Reward.




fEsop’s FABLES. gs

@ P:

5 ZINN VEX AS
Zz ' F NS a.
Li Fp Mm MI i .

yy

we //

n
)}
——Z

aA

.
AWN

JUL

my

WN} .N
)
Sj a
Co ANN

ER
Nay ayy




16 LE sop’s FABLES.



r)
ie

Ven Fase VIII.
The Woar and the Ass.

AN Ass was so Hardy once, as to fall a Mopping and Braying

at a Boar. The Boar began at first to shew his Teeth,
and to Stomack the Affront; but upon Second Thoughts; Well!
(says he) Feer on, and be an AS still. Take notice only by the
way, that ’tis the Baseness of your Character that has sav’d your
Carcass.

The Morat.

It 1s below the Dignity of a Great Mind to Entertain Contests with
People that have neither Quality nor Courage: Beside the Folly of
Contending with a Miserable Wretch, where the very Competition is
a Scandal,




4Esop’s FABLES. 17



My / :
' ah }
wee J Yon, Wy! snl Ny ff



yp) Ni]

1
” 1H
ge

THE-BOAR ann THE:ASS.&
18 LEsop’s FABLES.

Cts Fase IX. Oo
Che Country Mouse and the City Mouse.

ales goes an Old Story of a Country Mouse that Invited a City-

Sister of hers to a Country Collation, where she spar’d for
Nothing that the Place afforded; as Mouldy Crusts, Cheese-Parings,
Musty Oatmeal, Rusty Bacon, and the like. Now the City-Dame was
so well bred, as Seemingly to take All in Good Part: But yet at last,
’ Sister (says she, after the Civilest Fashion) why will you be Miserable
when you may be Happy? Why will you lie Pining, and Pinching
yourself in such a Lonesome Starving Course of Life as This is; when
"tis but going to Town along with Me; to Enjoy all the Pleasures,
and Plenty that Your Heart can Wish? This was a Temptation the
Country Mouse was not able to Resist; so that away they Trudg’d
together, and about Midnight got to their Journeys End. The Cizy-
Mouse show’d her Friend the Larder, the Pantry, the Kitchin, and
Other Offices where she laid her Stores; and after This, carry’d her
into the Parlour, where they found, yet upon the Table, the Reliques
of a Mighty Entertainment of That very Night. The City-Mouse
Carv’d her Companion of what she lik’d Best, and so to’t they fell
upon a Velvet Couch together: The Poor Bumkin that had never
seen, nor heard of such Doings before, Bless’d herself at the Change
of her Condition, when (as ill luck would have it) all on a Sudden,
the Doors flew open, and in comes a Crew of Roaring Bullies, with
their Wenches, their Dogs and their Bottles, and put the Poor Mice
to their Wits End, how to save their Skins. The Stranger Especially,
that had never been at This Sport before; but she made a Shift how-
ever for the present, to slink into a Corner, where she lay Trembling
and Panting ’till the Company went their Way. So soon as ever the
House was Quiet again, Well: My Court Sister, says she, If This be
the Way of Your Town-Gamboles, Pll e’en back to my Cottage, and
my Mouldy Cheese again; for I had much rather lie Knabbing of
Crusts, without either Fear or Danger, in my Own Little Hole, than
be Mistress of the Whole World with Perpetual Cares and Alarums.

The Morat.
The Difference betwixt a Court and a Country Life. The Delights,

Innocence, and Security of the One, Compar’d with the Anxiety, the
Wickedness, and the Hazards of the Other.


ZEsop’s FABLES. 19




20 LES op’ s FABLES.

?\
Faste X, TO

The Crow and the Mussel.

aon was one of Your Royston-Crows, that lay Battering upon

a Mussel, and could not for his Blood break the Shell to
come at the Fish. A Carrion-Crow, in this Interim, comes up, and
tells him, that what he could not do by Force, he might do by Stra-
tagem. ‘ake this Musse/ up into the Air, says the Crow, as High
as you can carry it, and then let him fall upon that Rock there; His
Own Weight, You shall see, shall break him. The Roystoner took
his Advice, and it succeeded accordingly; but while the One was
upon Wing, the Other stood Lurching upon the Ground, and flew
away with the Fish.

The Morat.

Charity begins at Home, they say; and most People are kind to
their Neighbours for their Own sakes.


LES Op’s. FABLES. |



—— = ee ———————
= SS == = SSS SSS
Fag = —————— Le

(2 SS ————

NE

—?
SSS 5 €U—TEEQ{@

LE LZ EGA




ee) LE sop’ s FABLES.





Fasie XI, |
The For and the Crow.

Ae Fox spy’d out a Crow upon a Tree with a Morsel in

his mouth, that set his Chops a watering ; but how to come
at it was the Question. Oh thou Blessed Bird! (says he) the
Delight of Gods, and of Men! and so he lays himself forth upon
the Gracefulness of the Crows Person, and the Beauty of his
Plumes ; His Admirable Gift of Augury, &c., And now, says the
Fox, If thou hadst but a Voice answerable to the rest of thy Ex-
cellent Qualities, the Sun in the Firmament could not shew the
World such Another Creature. This Nauseous Flattery sets the
Crow immediately a Gaping as Wide as ever he could stretch, to
give the Fox a taste of his Pipe; but upon the Opening of his
Mouth he drops his Breakfast, which the Fox presently Chopt up,
and then bade him remember, that whatever he had said of his
Beauty, he had spoken Nothing yet of his Brains.

The Morat.

There's hardly any man Living that may not be wrought upon more
or less by Flattery: For we do all of us Naturally Overween in our
Own Favour: But when it comes to be Apply’d once to a Vain Fool, it
makes him forty times an Arranter Sot than he was before.


Lijsop’s FABLES. 2.3



atte















ANS <

AN RATA
SAR! Ve ‘) )
lr



——

Psi

SS










Rs



THE FOX anp THE ‘CROW.


Qe fEsop’s FABLES.



foe eiee XIE
‘Tbe Did Lion,

A Lion that in the Days of his Youth and Strength, had been

very Outragious and Cruel, came in the end to be Reduced
by Old Age, and Infirmity, to the last Degree of Misery, and Con-
tempt: Insomuch that All the Beasts of the Forest; some out of
Insolence, others in Revenge, some in fine, upon One Pretence,
some upon Another, fell upon him by Consent. He was a Miser-
able Creature to all Intents and Purposes; but Nothing went so
near the Heart of him in his Distress, as to find himself Batter’d
by the Heel of an Ass.

The Morat.

4 Prince that does not secure Friends to Himself while he is in
Power and Condition to oblige them, must never expel? to find Friends,
when he, is Old and Impotent, and no longer Able to do them any Good.
Lf he Governs Tyrannically in his Youth, he will be sure to be Treated
Contemptuously in his Age; and the Baser his Enemies are, the more
Insolent, and Intolerable will be the Affront.


Zisop’s FABLES. ae










Lite
yc



Ate (LLL

Ss











mh @ G&S on ~
. ah zxf WES i
a zy at ay
OA: — wih ®
js ada, 6 M
ANT ae
y NB =

z (
4 Ni






SS
==

P
Zz
e SSS


26 AS op’s FABLES.



Fase XIII.
The Lion and the Mouse.

bee the Roaring of a Beast in the Wood, a Mouse ran pre-

sently out to see what News: and what was it, but a Lion
Hamper’d in a Net! This Accident brought to her mind, how
that she herself, but some few Days before, had fall’n under the Paw
of a Certain Generous Lion, that let her go again. Upon a Strict
Enquiry into the Matter, she found This to be That very Lion ;
and so set her self presently to Work upon the Couplings of the
Net; Gnaw’d the Threds to pieces, and in Gratitude Deliver’d her
Preserver.

The Morat.

Without Good Nature, and Gratitude, Men had as good live in a
Wilderness as in a Society. There is no Subjeé so Inconsiderable, but
his Prince, at some time or Other, may have Occasion for him, and it
holds through the Whole Scale of the Creation, that the Great and the
Little have Need one of Another.




A sop’s FABLES. 27











ne
re
AY








: :
A i
} \!

RNS




LLC





le
SSE
zis



ESS




THE-LION ann THE MOUSE.


28 LES op’ s FABLES.



fe. Faste XIV, jib
~The Dick Bite.

py Mother (says a Sick Kite) Give over these Idle Lamenta-

tions, and let Me rather have your Prayers. Alas! my Child,
(says the Dam) which of the Gods shall I] go to, for a Wretch
that has Robb’d All their Altars?

The Morat.

Nothing but the Conscience of a Virtuous Life can make Death
Easie to us; Wherefore there’s No trusting to the DistraGion of an
Agonizing, and a Death-bed Repentance.
=)

Zisop’s FABLES.


30 Lh sop’s FABLES.

pal ABB XOV
The Swallow and other wirds.

Aire was a Country Fellow at work a Sowing his Grounds,

and a Swallow (being a Bird famous for Providence and Fore-
sight) call’d a company of Lisle Birds about her, and bad ’em take
Good Notice what that Fellow was a doing. You must know (says
the Swallow) that all the Fowlers Nets and Snares are made of Flemp,
or Flax ; and that’s the Seed that he is now a Sowing. Pick it up
in time for fear of what may come on’t. In short, they put it off,
till it took Root; and then again, till it was sprung up into the
Blade. Upon this, the Swallow told ’em once for All, that it was
not yet too Late to prevent the Mischief, if they would but bestir
themselves, and set Heartily about it; but finding that no Heed
was given to what she said; She e’en "bad adieu to her old Com-
panions in the Woods, and so betook her self to a City Life, and
to the Conversation of Men. This Flax and Hemp came in ‘time
to be gather’d, and Wrought, and it was this Swallows Fortune to
see Several of the very same Birds that she had forewarn’d, taken
in Nets, made of the very Stuff she told them off. They came at
last to be Sensible of the folly of slipping their Opportunity; but
they were Lost beyond All Redemption first.

The Morat.

Wise Men read Effects in their Causes, but Fools will not Believe
them till tis too late to prevent the Mischief. Delay in these Cases is
Mortal,


ZEsop’s FABLES. 31



a

SAR
e \ \
\ oh i MY PIS .

SF

cS INXS
NAc,

Ni

ZED
EE.
ZA

ai

a
S|
a EE

—
==
=<

eZ

eB

\ 2

ae NEN

: y
i

: -
i














Bo LEsop’s FABLES.



} 7

eT Pasi XVI / lo

The Frogs Desiring a Bing.

ps the days of Old, when the Frogs were All at liberty in the

Lakes, and grown quite Weary of living without Government,
they Petition’d Yupiter for a King, to the End that there might be
some Distinétion of Good and Evil, by Certain Equitable Rules
and Methods of Reward and Punishment. ‘upiter, that knew the
Vanity of their Hearts, threw them down a Log for their Governour ;
which, upon the first Dash, frighted the whole Mobile of them into
the Mudd for the very fear on’t. This Panick Terror kept them
in Awe for a while, till in good time one Frog, Bolder than the
Rest, put up his Head, and look’d about him, to see how squares
went with their New King. Upon This, he calls his Fellow-
Subjects together; Opens the truth of the Case; and Nothing
would serve them then, but Riding a-top of him; Insomuch that
the Dread they were in before, is now turn’d into Insolence, and
Tumult. This King, they said, was too Tame for them, and upiter
must needs be Entreated to send ’em Another: He did so, but
Authors are Divided upon it, whether "twas a Stork, or a Serpent;
though whether of the Two soever it was, he left them neither
Liberty, nor Property, but made a Prey of his Subjects. Such was
their Condition in fine, that they sent Mercury to “fupiter yet once
again for Another King, whose Answer was This: They that will not
be Contented when they are Well, must be Patient when Things are
Amiss with them; and People had better Rest where they are, than
go farther, and fare Worse. .

The Morat.

The Mobile are Uneasie without a Ruler: They are as Restless with
one; and the oftner they shift, the Worse they Are; So that Govern-
ment, or No Government; a King of God’s Making, or of the Peoples,
or none at all; the Multitude are never to be satisfied.


Aisop’s FABLES 33






34 ZEsop’s FABLES



FasLte XVII.
The Bite and the pigeons.

epic Pigeons finding themselves Persecuted by the Hawk, made

Choice of the Kite for their Guardian. The Kite sets up
for their Protector, and is duly Crowned and Invested with Sovereign
Rights; but under Countenance of That Authority, makes more
Havock in the Dove-House in Two Days, than the Hawk could
have done in Twice as many Months.

The Mora...

Tis a Dangerous Thing for People to call in a Powerful and an
Ambitious man for their Protector ; and upon the Clamour of here
and there a Private person, to hazard the Whole Community.


LE sop’s FABLES Bc



















































ey aes ») Ws a Fae
Pt WN : hy
wi ET PS

\ Sita Fa MEN Ae 7 A

a MeO” 44 ph Waa Avs gow vg A
SY 5: y G ir Lm \ Mage.
~ Z KS iD Z
= \ S 5 SY ilftC Yor on =
= = = as ae - =
2 2% Ret
Bes Ks Ss



Uy




\
\





Y




q \3 y
/ 4 fie ii )
Me eA)
Ma y





Js



THE-KITE anvTHE PIGEONS.




36 fhsop’s FABLES



ee XVIII. 16
The Sow and the Wilf.

pes came to a Sow that was just preparing to lye down,

and very kindly offer’d to take care of her Litter. The
Sow as Civily thank’d her for her Love, and desir’d she would be
pleas’d to stand off a little, and do her the Good Office at a
Distance.

The Mora..

There are no Snares so Dangerous as those that are laid for us under

the Name of Good Offices.


a7

FABLES

LE SOp's



1] w
yy




38 ZEsop’s FABLES



Faste XIX. y
The Did Dog and his Master.

AN Old Dog, that in his Youth had led his Master many a

Merry Chase, and done him all the Offices of a Trusty
Servant, came at last, upon falling from his Speed and Vigor, to
be Loaden at every turn with Blows and Reproaches for it. Why
Sir, (says the Dog) My Will is as Good as ever it was; but my
Strength, and my Teeth are gone; and you might with as good a
Grace, and Every jot as much Justice, Hang me up because I’m
Old, as Beat me because I'm Jmpotent.

The Mora..

The Reward of Affection and Fidelity must be the Work of another
World ; Not but that the Conscience of Well Doing is a Comfort that
may pass for a Recompence even in This ; in Despite of Ingratitude and
Injustice.


“Ej sop’s FABLES 39

I Ss s

it

“,
My is !

pat

\ iH i
ni ce ww
S, \ Ky
Hi AN
‘,

X YZ
Kee
us = \




40 4 sop’s FABLES



Oo ee
The wares and the Frogs.

Ore upon a time the Hares found themselves mightily Un-

satisty'd with the Miserable Condition they Liv’d in, and
call’d a Council to Advise upon’t. Here we live, says one of ’em,
at the Mercy of Men, Dogs, Eagles, and I know not how many
Other Creatures and Vermin, that Prey upon us at Pleasure;
Perpetually in Frights, Perpetually in Danger; And therefore I
am absolutely of Opinion that we had Better Die once for All,
than live at This rate in a Continual Dread that’s Worse than
Death it self. The Motion was Seconded and Debated, and a
Resolution Immediately taken, One and All, to Drown Themselves.
The Vote was no sooner pass’d, but away they Scudded with
That Determination to the Next River. Upon this Hurry, there
leapt a Whole Shoal of Frogs from the Bank into the Water,
for fear of the Hares. Nay, then my Masters, says one of the
Gravest of the Company, pray let’s have a little Patience. Our
Condition I find is not altogether so bad as we fancy’d it; for
there are Those you see that are as much affraid of Us, as we
are of Others.

The Mora.

There's No Contending with the Orders and Decrees of Providence.
He that Made us knowes what's Fittest for us; and Every man’s Own
Lot (well Understood and Manag’d) is Undoubtedly the Best.
“A sop’s FABLES 41



0 an yt
Win aT
ais atta i, ul ni "al
RPL Vi PENN ae |

i KK Vespa SEZEEEE
Weta WN / LUN Z
dX Ot J, Uy
iS ZS Hf
—— ZA




42 Ops Kh eS



Faste XXI, |
The Mog and the Sbeeyp.

A Dog brought an Action, before the Wolf and the Kire as

Judges, of the Case against a Sheep, for some Certain Measures
of Wheat, that he had lent him. The Plaintiff prov’d the Debt.
The Defendent was cast in Costs and Damages, and forc’d to sell the
Wool off his Back to Satisfie the Creditor.

The Morat.

‘Tis not a Straw matter whether the Main Cause be Right or Wrong,
or the Charge True or False; Where the Bench, and fury are in a
Conspiracy against the Pris ner.
ZEsop’s FABLES





Ay \\

THEXDOG anp THE‘SHEEP

a3


44 LEsop’s FABLES



FasLte XXII.
The For and the Stork.

nes was a Great Friendship once betwixt a Fox and a Stork,

and the Former would needs Invite the Other to a Treat.
They had Several Soups serv’d up in Broad Dishes and Plates,
and so the Fox fell to Lapping Himself, and bad his Guest
Heartily Welcom to what was before him. The Stork found he
was Put upon, but set so good a Face however upon his Enter-
tainment; that his Friend by All means must take a Supper with
Him That night in Revenge. The Fox made Several Excuses
upon the Matter of Trouble and Expence, but the Svork in fine,
would not be said Nay; So that at last, he promis’d him to
come. The Collation was serv’d up in Glasses, with Long
Narrow Necks, and the Best of Every thing that was to be had.
Come (says the Stork to his Friend) Pray be as Free as if you
were at home, and so fell to’t very Savourly Himself. The Fox
quickly found This to be a Trick, though he could, not but
Allow of the Contrivance as well as the Justice of the Revenge.
For such a Glass of Sweet-Meats to the One, was just as much
to the Purpose, as a Plate of Porridge to the Other.

The Morat.

Tis allowable in all the Liberties of Conversation to give a Man a
Rowland for his Oliver, avd to pay him in his Own Coin, as we
say ; provided always that we keep within the Compass of Honour, and
Good Manners.


ZEsop’s FABLES 45






46 ZEsop’s FABLES



Faste XXIII.
The For and the Mask.

A a Fox was Rummidging among a Great many Masks, there

was One very Extraordinary one among the Rest. He
took it up, and when he had Considered it a while, Well, (says he)
What Pity "tis, that so Exquisite an Outside of a Head should not
have one Grain of Sense in’t.

The Morat,

‘Tis not the Barber or the Taylor that makes the Man; and’ tis No
New Thing to seea Fine Wrought Head without so much as One Grain
of Salt in’t.


“4 sop’s FABLES 47
























i\
i

\\ y “ye <
YF AN Hr flere N
Oar ‘ I
ida! ie
S| } c

NS







) USN oS ty
)\ MS ( ma f
MM. lly yr :

, ys
mt Heya
: i : NM X

a i p " yy Ny
AEN
i “ i ay " \












WW. |
ie

THE-FOX ann THE-MASK.




48 LE sop’s FABLES



FasLte XXIV.
The Yackdaw and the yeacocks.

A fackdaw that had a mind to be Sparkish, Trick’d himself up

with all the Gay-Feathers he could Muster together: And
upon the Credit of these Stoll’n, or Borrow’d Ornaments, he Valu’d
himself above All the Birds in the Air Beside. The Pride of this
Vanity got him the Envy of all his Companions, who, upon a
Discovery of the Truth of the Case, fell to Pluming of him by
Consent; and when Every Bird had taken his Own Feather; the
Silly Fackaaw had Nothing left him to Cover his Nakedness.

The Morat.

We steal from one Another all manner of Ways, and to all manner of
Purposes; Wit, as well as Feathers; but where Pride and Beggery
Meet, people are sure to be made Ridiculous in the Conclusion.




sop’s FABLES 49


50 ALS op’s FABLES



FasLe XXV.,
The Dr and the Frog.

AS a Huge Over-grown Ox was Grazing in a Meadow, an Old
Envious Frog that stood Gaping at him hard by, call’d out
to her Little Ones, to take Notice of the Bulk of That Monstrous
Beast ; and see, says she, if I don’t make my self now the Bigger of
the Two. So she Strain’d Once, and Twice, and went still swelling
on and on, till in the Conclusion she Forc’d her self, and Burst.

The MoraAt.

Betwixt Pride, Envy, and Ambition, men fancy Themselves to be
Bigger than they are, and Other People to be Less: And This Tumour
Swells itself at last till it makes All Fly,


LE sop’s FABLES st



(A
ie
yee i)
3) VAG i
War ay
WY]
IA\F M0



ey ‘ WY
Fr ay A Y aN
cS ‘V, ‘k NY fi hey
NAG NG
A TEA






(
f (Nes
Aye nl tt

VA Peet
a
NN f\

pe

Oy



6 ey EE SES

THE: OX ANp THE-FROG.






G2 LES Op’s FABLES



FasLteE XXVI.

The Horse and the ion.

pee. was an Old Hungry Lion would fain have been Dealing

with a piece of Good Horse-Flesh that he had in his Eye;
but the Nag he thought would be too Fleet for him, unless he
could Supply the want of Heels, by Artifice and Address. He
Imitates the Ways and Habits of a Professor of Physick, and
according to the Humor of the World, sets up for a Doctor of the
College. Under this Pretext, he lets fall a Word or two by way of
Discourse, upon the Subject of his Trade ; but the Horse Smelt him
out, and presently a Crotchet came in his Head how he might
Countermine him. I got a Thorn in my Foot T’other day, says
the Horse, as I was Crossing a Thicket, and I am e’en quite Lame
on’t. Oh, says the New Physician, Do but hold up your Leg a
little, and I'll Cure ye immediately. The Lion presently puts him-
self in posture for the Office; but the Patient was too Nimble for
his Doétor, and so soon as ever he had him Fair for his Purpose,
gave him so Terrible a Rebuke upon the Forehead with his Heel,
that he laid him at his Length, and so got off with a whole Skin,
before the Other could Execute his Design.

The Morat.,

Harm Watch, Harm Catch, is but according to the Common Rule
of Equity and Retaliation, and a very Warrantable Way of Deceiving
the Deceiver.


AS Op’ s FABLES Ce












=
SSS

LL CEN, i TY}
Milli y Hy BN fy hy i
ti q Hi ay ) } Hy HIN Zs
nN iN Di ay y G
; MN x DW t/ 1 Gi Meh ye
AE TE San app
LN A
} Hy) AN \ f












|
I ip ! WV E/
y ZN
io, S| 7 AN i Yi
>A eee Kien
W225 ZW INS oN N

THE HORSE anp THE'LION.
54 4 sop’s FABLES

Faste XXVII.,
The horse and the Ass.

a the Days of Old, when Horses spoke Greek and Latin, and

Asses made Syllogisms, there happen’d an Encounter upon the
Road, betwixt a Proud Pamper’d Fade in the Full Course of his
Carriere, and a Poor Creeping 4s, under a Heavy Burden, that
had Chopt into the same Track with him. Why, how now Sirrah,
says he, D’ye not see by these Arms, and Trappings, to what Master
I belong? And D’ye not Understand that when I have That
Master of mine upon my Back, the Whole Weight of the State
rests upon My Shoulders? Out of the way thou slavish Insolent
Animal, or ll Tread thee to Dirt. ‘The Wretched 455 immediately
Slunk aside, with this Envious Reflection between his Teeth.
[What would I give to Change Conditions with That Happy Creature
there.| This Fancy would not out of the Head of him, ’till it
was his Flap some Few Days after to see This very Horse doing
Drudgery in a Common Dung-Cart. Why how now Friend (says
the 4ss) How comes This about? Only the Chance of the War,
says the Other: I was a Soldiers Horse, you must know; and my
Master carry’d me into a Battle, where I was Shot, Hack’d, and
Maim’d ; and you have here before Your Eyes the Catastrophe of
My Fortune.

The Morat.

The Folly, and the Fate, of Pride and Arrogance. The Mistake of
Placing Happiness in any thing that may be taken away, and the Blessing
of Freedom in a Mean Estate.


4 sop’s FABLES 55

ZS

NG

re

we -




56 4sop’s FABLES



FasLte XXVIII.
The Wirds, the Weasts, and the Wat.

ee a Desperate and a Doubtful Battel betwixt the Birds

and the Beasts, the Bat stood Neuter, till she found that the
Beasts had the Better on’t, and then went over to the Stronger
Side. But it came to pass afterward (as the Chance of War is
Various) that the Birds Rally’d their Broken Troops, and carry’d
the Day; and away she went Then to T’other Party, where she was
Try’d by a Council of War as a Deserter; Stript, Banish’d, and
finally Condemn’d never to see Day-light again.

The Morat.

Trimming in some Cases, is Foul, and Dishonest; in others Laud-
able, and in some again, not only Honest, but Necessary. The Nicety
lies in the skill of Distinguishing upon Cases, Times, and Degrees.
Rat

TH





LES Op’ s FABLES c7

: Sse a

F-BIRDS-THE:BEASTS ano THE-BAT


58 4Esop’s FABLES



VASE eit ae NCONGL ONG:
The for and the Wolf.

A Wolf that had a mind to take his Ease, Stor’d himself

Privately with Provisions, and so kept Close awhile. Why,
how now Friend, says a Fox to him, we han’t seen You abroad at
the Chace this many a day! Why truly says the Wolf, I have
gotten an Indisposition that keeps me much at Home, and I hope
I shall have Your Prayers for my Recovery. The Fox had a Fetch
in’t, and when he saw it would not Fadge; Away goes he presently
to a Shepherd, and tells him where he might surprize a Wolf if
he had a mind to’t. The Shepherd follow’d his Directions, and
Destroy’d him. The Fox immediately, as his Next Heir, repairs
to his Cell, and takes possession of his Stores: but he had Little
Joy of the Purchase, for in a very short time, the same Shepherd
did as much for the Fox, as he had done before for the Wolf.

The Moral.

’Tis with Sharpers as tis with Pikes, they Prey upon their own
kind; And tis a Pleasant Scene enough, when Thieves fall out among
themselves, to see the Cutting of One Diamond with Another


LES op’s FABLES 59



WN







i =

Wa Tay Wi W'S



vine

‘sul ly,
Wily, ati: e
Ai,
Dasssy. hy lly.

ils, Sy
ie alt, wit Mt

THE-FOX AND THE WOLF.




;

I QA “il,




60 LES op’ s FABLES



Faste XXX,
The Stag Looking into the Water.

A a Stag was Drinking upon the Bank of a Clear Stream, he

saw his Image in the Water, and Enter’d into This Con-
templation upon’t. Well! says he, if These Pityful Shanks of
mine were but Answerable to this Branching Head, I can but
think how I should Defy all my Enemies. The Words were
hardly out of his Mouth, but he Discovered a Pack of Dogs
coming full-Cry towards him. Away he Scours cross the Fields,
Casts off the Dogs, and Gains a Wood; but Pressing through a
Thicket, the Bushes held him by the Horns, till the Hounds came
in, and Pluck’d him Down. The Last Thing he said was This.
What an Unhappy Fool was I, to Take my Friends for my Ene-
mies, and my Enemies for my Friends! I trusted to my Head,
that has Betray’d me, and I found fault with my Legs, that would
otherwise have brought me off.

The Morat.

He that does not thoroughly know himself, may be well allowed to
make a False fudgment upon other Matters that most Nearly concern
him.
Aisop’s FABLES 61

‘7 Se ot i ay y
PR SA
a Cr
SOY (FEES
>




62 LE sop’ s FABLES
Se

FABIE: XOXO:
The Snake and the File.

‘TT Bee was a Snake got into a Smith’s Shop, and fell to Licking

of a File. She Saw the File Bloody, and still the Bloodier
it was, the more Eagerly she Lick’d it; upon a Foolish Fancy, that
it was the File that Bled, and that She her self had the Better on’t.
In the Conclusion, when she could Lick no Longer, she fell to
Biting; but finding at last she could do no more Good upon’t
with her Teeth than with her Tongue, she Fairly left it.

The Morat.

"Tis a Madness to stand Biting and Snapping at any thing to no
manner of purpose, more than the Gratifying of an Impotent Rage, in
the fancy of Hurting Another, when in truth, we only Wound our
selves,
ZEsop’s FABLES 63

Tee yy

gape mM
a(n

y Pt |
a
WG

TINA isl 2 daa it

\ SA

i
)

ZZ
— a

ns
W. | \ J

pe
TTR A | \\| Re
ZS ZELLER, aN = exer
ope AAA. 4

SNAKE AND


64 LE sop’s FABLES

HABE OX GUL.
The THolbes and the Sheep.

opps was a Time when the Sheep were so Hardy as to Wage

War with the Wolves; and so long as they had the Dogs
for their Allies, they were upon all Encounters, at least a Match
for their Enemies. Upon This Consideration, the Wolves sent
their Embassadors to the Sheep, to Treat about a Peace, and in
the Mean Time there were Hostages given on Both Sides; the
Dogs on the part of the Sheep, and the Wolves Whelps on the
Other Part, ’till Matters might be brought to an Issue. While
they were upon Treaty, the Whelps fell a Howling; The Wolves
cryed out Treason; and pretending an Infraction in the Abuse of
their Hostages, fell upon the Sheep immediately without their Dogs,
and made them pay for the Improvidence of leaving themselves
without a Guard.

The Mora..

’Tis senseless to the Highest Degree to think of Establishing an
Alliance among those that Nature her self has Divided, by an In-
conciliable Disagreement. Beside, that a Foolish Peace is much more
Destruétive than a Bloody War.


4 sop’s FABLES, 65




























R vi Ss

AN Nemesia re Zoul
i SC Ew
HYG WV le
an RS x



THE: WOLVES ann THE’ SHEEP.




66 Aésop’s FABLES.



Faste XXXIII.
The Ape and the For.

AN Ape that found Many Inconveniences by going Tai/-less, went

to a Fox that had a Well-spread, Bushy Taz/, and begg’d
of him only a little piece on’t to Cover his Nakedness: For (says
he) you have enough for Both, and what needs more than you
have Occasion for? Well, Fohn (says the Fox) be it More, or
be it Less, you get not one single Hair on’t; for I would have
ye know, Sirrah, that the Tail of a Fox was never made for the
Buttocks of an pe.

The Morat.

Providence has Assign’d Every Creature its Station, Lot, Make and
Figure; and ’tis not for Us to stand Correcting the Works of an
Incomprehensible Wisdom, and an Almighty Power.


Lisop’s FABLES. re

os

8 ee

aD | iC

Nill MON Y ~~ 3

Alin Sten oe
| i » ims

Ql line
Witltiyss a ovals

i.

i anal,

NY
WENN UN
\




68 “Esop’s FABLES.



FasLle XXXIV.
The Wark and her Woung MDnes.

Here was a Brood of Young Larks in the Corn, and the Dam,
when she went abroad to Forrage for them, laid a Strict
Charge upon her Little Ones, to pick up what News they could get
against she came back again. ‘They told her at her Return, that
the Owner of the Field had been there, and Order’d his Neigh-
bours to come and Reap the Corn. Well, says the O/d One,
there’s no Danger yet then. They told her the next Day that
he had been there again, and Desir’d his Friends to Do’t. Well,
well, says she, there’s no Hurt in That neither, and so she went
out Progging for Provisions again as before. But upon the Third
Day, when they told their Mother, that the Master and his Son
appointed to come Next Morning and do’t Themselves : Nay then,
says she, ’tis time to look about us: As for the Neighbours and
the Friends, I fear em not; but the Master I’m sure will be as
good as his Word ; for ’tis his own Business.

The Mio ae

He that would be sure to have his Busness Well Done, must either
Do it Himself, or see the Doing of it; Beside that many a Good
Servant is Spoil’d by a Careless Master.


Alsop’s FABLES. 69



| . rrr aN




70 Zisop’s FABLES.



FasLte XXXV.,
The Stag in the Or-Stali.

A Stag that was hard set by the Huntsmen, betook himself to a

Stall for Sanctuary, and prevail’d with the Oxen to Conceal
him the Best they could, so they cover’d him with Straw, and by and
by in comes the Keeper to Dress the Cattel, and to Feed them; and
when he had done his Work he went his Way without any Dis-
covery. The Stag reckon’d himself by This Time to be out of
all Danger; but One of the Oxen that had more Brains than his
Fellows, advis’d him not to be too Confident neither; for the
Servant, says he, is a Puzzling Fool, that heeds Nothing ; but when
my Master comes, he’ll have an Eye Here and There and Every
where, and will most certainly find ye out. Upon the very Speak-
ing of the Word, in comes the Master, and He spies out Twenty
Faults, I warrant ye; This was not Well, and That was not
Well; till at last, as he was Prying and Groping up and down,
he felt the Horns of the Stag under the Straw, and so made Prize
of him.

The Morat.

He that would be sure to have his Bus’ness Well Done, must either
Do it Himself, or see the Doing of it; Beside that many a Good
Servant is Spoil’d by a Careless Master.


LE sop’s FABLES. =







Hee i q
ss rh MY Yq
Os SG
Ed 9
oe
REY












PNG








STs

Sas











SEOs





WE Caos



PEP
$

Nee
30















Wt ay ;
2 eS NS,
a Pe w aN X wa) f







so EAA
ere) a




SN

Ro CREE












5
oh, TS

ind | hy —Ss
aw)

}

,

IY Gea
ae



Ys= 25





THE'STAG:IN' THE: OX-



STALL,


Te LE sop’s FABLES.



Fasre XXXVI.
Che for and the Sich Dion.

A Certain Lion that had got a Politique Fit of Sickness, made it

his Observation, that of All the Beasts in the Forest, the
Fox never came at him: And so he wrote him Word how III he
was, and how Mighty Glad he should be of his Company, upon the
Score of Ancient Friendship and Acquaintance. The Fox return’d
the Complement with a Thousand Prayers for his Recovery; but
as for Waiting upon him, he desir’d to be Excus’d; For (says he)
I find the Traces of abundance of Feet Going In to Your Majesty’s
Palace, and not One that comes Back again.

The Morat.

The Kindnesses of Ill Natur'd and Designing People, should be
thoroughly Consider’d, and Examin’d, before we give Credit to them,


sop’s FABLES.

ARS



oy a SPA y }

YAO LA By

Zone SC
ZT fT RAO te

i ee
THE-FOX anv THE SICK:LION.

73






74 Lh sop’s FABLES.

Faste XXXVII.
The Stag and the horse.

zee Dispute betwixt a Stag and a Horse about a piece of

Pasture, the Stag got the Better on’t, and beat the Other out
of the Field. The Horse, upon This Affront, Advis’d with a Man
what Course to Take; who told him, that if he would Submit
to be Bridled, and Sadled, and take a Man upon his Back with a
Lance in his Hand, he would undertake to give him the Satis-
faction of a Revenge. The Horse came to his Terms, and for the
Gratifying of a Present Passion, made himself a Slave all the days
of his Life. Stesichorus made use of This Fable, to Divert the
Himerenses from Chusing Phalaris the Tyrant for their General.
This Horse’s Case, says he, will be Yours, if you go on with your
Proposals. ’Tis true, You’l have your Revenge, but you'l lose
your Liberties; Upon which Words the Motion fell.

The Morat..

Let every Man take a True Measure of Himself, what he is Able to
do, and what Not; before he comes to any Peremptory Resolution how
to Proceed. He is a Madman, that to Avoid a Present, and a Less
Evil, runs Blindfold into a Greater; and for the Gratifying of a
Froward Humour, makes himself a Slave All the Days of his Life.
EES Opis Bees, 75





THE'STAG anp THE ‘HORSE.


76 Zisop SE AD ES:





Fase SXXvVinl:
Che Horse and the Woaded Ass.

AD a Horse and an Ass were upon the Way together, the Ass

cryed out to his Companion, to Ease him of his Burden,
though never so little, he should fall down Dead else. The
Horse would not; and so his Fellow-Servant sunk under his
Load. The Master, upon This, had the ss Flay’d, and laid
his Whole Pack, Skin and All, upon the Horse. Well, (says he)
This Judgment is befall’n me for my Ill Nature, in refusing to
help my Brother in the Depth of his Distress.

The Mora.

It is a Christian, a Natural, a Reasonable, and a Political Duty, for
All Members of the same Body to Assist One Another.


































































AA =a TANT ANUAUT)
ee a ae uu i
fi a ES

ca yy i
AA Maa ae os
























fare,

ee
4

\
\

WM.

Pp
: a }
(rs

AS it ey U BS eopyh
\ Phe i ph Wx NO
\ ih ean 5 bPAOE p

if 4 . 8 ; N ( ps cia Mal 4 ¥@ 135) 7 AG q
Â¥), ki AN Wise NV Bore redo
i \ Vy ~ YS Y Wee iJ DOGS HOEZO 9

{ \ Cx
Nt







THETORSE ann THE LOADED ASS










78 LEsop’s FABLES.



Faste XXXIX,
The Dog and the Woif.

‘T Bere was a Hagged Carrion of a Wolf, and a Jolly Sort of

a Gentile Dog, with Good Flesh upon’s Back, that fell into
Company together upon the King’s High-Way. The Wolf was
wonderfully pleas’d with his Companion, and as Inquisitive to
Learn how he brought himself to That Blessed State of Body.
Why, says the Dog, I keep my Master’s House from Thieves,
and I have very Good Meat, Drink, and Lodging for my pains.
Now if you'll go along with Me, and do as I do, you may fare
as I fare. The Wolf Struck up the Bargain, and so away they
Trotted together: But as they were Jogging on, the Wolf spy’d
a Bare Place about the Dog’s Neck, where the Hair was worn
off. Brother (says he) how comes this I prethee? Oh, That’s
Nothing, says the Dog, but the Fretting of my Collar a little.
Nay, says T’other, if there be a Collar in the Case, I know Better
Things than to sell my Liberty for a Crust.

The Morat.

We are so Dazzl'd with the Glare of a Splendid Appearance, that
we can hardly Discern the Inconveniencies that Attend it. ’Tis a
Comfort to have Good Meat and Drink at Command, and Warm
Lodging: But He that sells his Freedom for the Cramming of his
Belly, has but a Hard Bargain of it.


fii sop’s FABLES. 79



I

YAY

WS
\ Uh
hy yf

AS oS Wty

Leg

“<2THE ‘DOG ann THE: WOLF




80 ZEsop’s. FABLES.



Pasre Xe:
The for and the Lion.

A Fox had the hap to fall into the Walk of a Lion; (the First

of the Kind that ever he saw) and he was ready to Drop
down at the very sight of him. He came a While after, to see
Another, and was Frighted still; but Nothing to What he was
Before. It was his Chance, after This, to Meet a Third Lion ;
and he had the Courage, Then, to Accost him, and to make a
kind of Acquaintance with him.

The Morat.

Novelty Surprizes us, and we have Naturally a Horrour for Un-
couth Misshapen Monsters ; but’ tis our Ignorance that Staggers us, for
upon Custom and Experience, All These Bugs grow Familiar, and Easy
to us.
SI

ZEsop’s FABLES,

ae f
; —

ae
Ze.

~~
eee

Tes

yee.

SBS p pre = CEB
& (fz = 2

SSS

SRLS
= “GME a
2S a Ppl 7

“he 42 SS ——\. psf
: = £ f SN

F 2 YS LEZ!
2 & Wee Sy <2 ZS
= STZ
=< SS
> d
NAS Sai!

Zale

ZEA”

—_

To

zB
Zw .. NG
ss

>

mr eS es Oo

LION

FOX anp THE

THE

©®


82 AS op’s FABLES.

Faste XLI,
The Eagle and the for.

alta was a Bargain struck up betwixt an Eagle anda Fox, to

be Wonderful Good Neighbours and Friends. The One
Took Up ina Thicket of Brushwood, and the Other Timber’d upon
a Tree hard by. The Eagle, One Day when the Fox was abroad
a Forraging, fell into his Quarters and carry’d away a Whole Litter
of Cubs at a Swoop. The Fox came time enough back to see the
Eagle upon Wing, with her Prey in the Foot, and to send many a
Heavy Curse after her; but there was No overtaking her: It
happen’d in a very Short time after This, upon the Sacrificing of a
Goat, that the same Eagle made a Stoop at a piece of Flesh upon
the Altar, and she took it away to her Young: But some Live-
Coales it seems, that Stuck to’t, set the Nest a fire. The Birds
were not as yet Fledg’d enough to Shift for Themselves, but upon
Sprawling and Struggling to get Clear of the Flame, down they
Tumbled, half Roasted into the very Mouth of the Fox, that stood
Gaping under the Tree to see the End on’t: So that the Fox had
the Satisfaction at last, of Devouring the Children of her Enemy in
the very Sight of the Dam.

The Morat.

God Reserves to Himself the Punishment of Faithless, and Oppressing
Governours, and the Vindication of his Own Worship and Altars.


LE sop’ s FABLES. 83



S

——— ~—S
= 3 = sot
¥ : we —
ee ee
= a ie as
eS ~

= a
E 2 Ss
mont =,

a
w/

a RA oN SG ARR TSI
ey a Hes
{ yf a Ys u es i

i: aah i
p THE'FO



(
f




84 ZEsop’s FABLES.



Faste XLII.
The Pusbandman and the Stork.

A Poor Innocent Stork had the Il] Hap to be taken in a Net that

was layd for Geese and Cranes. ‘The Storks Plea for her self
was Simplicity, and Piety: The Love she bore to Mankind, and
the Service she did in Picking up of Venemous Creatures. This 1s
all True, says the Husbandman ; But They that Keep Ill Company,
if they be Catch’d with Ill Company, must Expect to suffer with
Ill] Company.

The Morat.

Tis as much as a man’s Life, Fortune, and Reputation, are Worth
to keep Good Company (over and above the Contagion of Lewd Examples)
for as Birds of a Feather will Flock together, so if the Good and the
Bad be taken together, they must Expeét to go the Way of All Flesh
together.


85

LE sop’ s FABLES.



SSS
ROT
ENS 8

SSS SS

THE STORK:

2
a
3
:

THE




86 AES op’ s FABLES.





Faste XLIII.
The Sbepherd’s Mop.

UN ees Boy had gotten a Roguy Trick of crying [a Wolf,

a Wolf| when there was no such Matter, and Fooling the
Country People with False Alarms. We had been at This Sport so
many times in Jest, that they would not Believe him at last when
he was in Earnest: And so the Wolves Brake in upon the Flock,
and Worry’d the Sheep at Pleasure.

The Mora..

He must be a very Wise Man that knows the True Bounds, and
Measures of Fooling, with a respect? to Time, Place, Matters, Persons,
&c. But Religion, Business and Cases of Consequence must be Excepted
out of That sort of Liberty.




“tjsop’s FABLES. | 87



Bs: GAREY TINT ARN 4 RR TIT
CUT Se et
ee NN

DARIN)

KUISSA I

Phiten aN
i my ray
Pag
NYSE

Ws Mt
hatttens\ : YY N
a ee "

os

wz
S
SS
SS

jPean

Nite
all VAN q
ALY aN TRTRRNAY’,(W/ WR eo ge §
La ES)
ws

a oy s
Nec
a

OR ANY

wa
bot

hy)
. aa !)

PUNE ‘A y i
DWAN hy OY 1 ‘a




88 AEsop’s FABLES.



PAsrEe el LV:
The Eagle and the Crow.

AY Eagle made a Stoop at a Lamb; Truss’d it, and took it

Cleverly away with her. A Mimical Crow, that saw This
Exploit, would needs try the same Experiment upon a Ram: But
his Claws were so Shackled in the Fleece with Lugging to get him
up, that the Shepherd came in, and Caught him, before he could
Clear Himself ; He Clipt his Wings, and carried him Home to his
Children to Play withal. They came Gaping about him, and ask’d
their Father what Strange Bird that Was? Why, says he, He’ll
tell you Himself that he’s an Eagle ; but if you'll take My Word
for’t ; I know him to be a Crow.

The Moratu.

"Tis a High Degree of Vanity and Folly, for Men to take More upon
them than they are able to go through withall; And the End of Those
Undertakings is only Mockery and Disappointment in the Conclusion.


ZEsop’s FABLES.



WN

thy yu iy,

vl

—

BAG
Sa




90 ZEsop’s FABLES.



FasLe XLV,
The Mog in the Mdanger.

Nea Envious Cur was gotten into a Manger, and there

lay Growling and Snarling to keep the Horses from their
Provender. The Dog Eat None himself, and yet rather Ventur’d
the Starving his Own Carcase than he would suffer any thing else
to be the Better for’t.

The MoraL..

Envy pretends to No Other Happiness than what it derives from the
Misery of Other People, and will rather Eat Nothing it self than not
Starve Those that Would,


Zi sop’s FABLES. a







I,
ai,
Wii:

Ny
ey | 2

al

> \ We \
i i vat: a \
h & ;
ya RN,
aoe : |
Ss A\
: = ey
i err eM
Lu SGSYLLELAA "
ve J —_
} SL
\
: ; |
y
\\
i
ht

GER.


Q2 fisop’s FABLES.



RASLE XLV I:
Puptter and the Camel,

i stuck filthily in the Camel’s Stomach, that Buils, Stags, Lions,

Bears, and the like, should be Armed with Horns, Teeth, and
Claws, and that a Creature of his Size should be left Naked and
Defenceless. Upon This Thought he fell down upon his Marrow-
bones, and begg’d of Fupiter to give him a pair of Horns, but
the Request was so Ridiculous, that Fupiter, instead of Horning him,
Order’d him to be Cropt, and so Punish’d him with the loss of his
Ears which Nature had Allow’d him, for being so Unreasonable
as to Ask for Horns, that Providence never intended him.

The Morat.

The Bounties of Heaven are in such manner Distributed, that Every
Living Creature has its Share; beside, that to Desire Things against
Nature is Effectually to Blame the very Author of Nature it self.
Zisop’s FABLES 93

iS

Ky

)

= SS !

SN

=!
~S

aN

ype
AN 28
a

SS s

==.
SS

Ni

.

SS

S\
oa

MG ly

<=

; : =
eS

A

NK \ ( ! i
iN ina , iY ve I

\ NY " ‘:

e, y

J d



p Cou

JUPITER i. THE-CAMEL


94 ZEsop’s FABLES.



EARLE XW [:
The For and the Hare to Yupitter.

A Fox and a Hare Presented a Petition to Fupiter. The Fox

pray’d for the Hare’s Swiftness of Foot, and the Hare for
the Fox’s Craft, and Wyliness of Address. Jupiter told them,
that since every Creature had some Advantage or Other Peculiar
to it self, it would, not stand with Divine Justice, that had pro-'
vided so well for Every One in Particular, to Confer All upon
any One.

The Morat.

The Bounties of Heaven are in such manner Distributed, that Every
Living Creature has its Share; beside, that to Desire Things against
Nature is Effeciually to Blame the very Author of Nature it self,


96 Atsop’s FABLES.



Faste XLVIIL
The peacock’s Complaint.

Abe Peacock, they say, laid it Extremely to Heart, that being

¥uno’s Darling-Bird, he had not the Nightingale’s Voice super-
added to the Beauty of his own Plumes. Upon This Subject he
Petition’d his Patroness, who gave him for Answer, that Providence
had Assigned Every Bird its Proportion, and so bad him Content
himself with his Lot.

The Mora..

The Bounties of Heaven are in such manner Distributed, that Every
Living Creature has its Share; beside, that to Desire Things against
Nature, is Effeftually to Blame the very Author of Nature it self.


LE sop’s FABLES.

oer oeey
putt






LAINT.




THE® PEACOCK S®COMP

oe


98 “hsop’s FABLES.



Faste XLIX.
The For and the Goat.

x Fox and a Goat went down by Consent into a Well to
Drink, and when they had Quench’d their Thirst, the Goat
fell to Hunting up and down which way to get back again. Oh!
says Reynard, Never Trouble your Head how to get back, but
leave That to Me. Do but You Raise your self upon your Hinder
Legs with your Fore-Feet Close to the Wall, and then stretch out
your Head: I can Easily Whip up to your Horns, and so out of
the Well, and Draw you after me. The Goat puts himself in a
Posture immediately as he was directed, gives the Fox a Lift, and
so Out he Springs; but Reyzard’s Bus’ness was now only to make
Sport with his Companion instead of Helping Him. Some Hard
Words the Goat gave him, but the Fox puts off all with a Jest. If
you had but half so much Brain as Beard, says he, you would have
bethought your self how to get up again before you went down.

The Morat.

A Wise Man will Debate Every Thing Pro and Con before he
comes to Fix upon any Resolution. He leaves Nothing to Chance more
than Needs must. There must be No Bantering out of Season.


ZEsop’s FABLES. 99



Ly)
ite |
NGS: Ms
ENS LN
aye iy
h nt
t May 4

vo ) Wears;
fv Nail Wy
aN

ye 3

Ae
, A y
oY ae i"

ct og es
BP 4 /
; o a y
EY £

4
he is

no oii aN hi

Co ap vg aa up;

= GW r
Ne

















THE FOX ann THE GOAT.




100 A sop’s FABLES.

BASE E la:
The partridge and the Cocks.

Cock-Master bought a Partridge, and turn’d it among his
Fighting Cocks, for them to feed together. The Cocks beat
the Partridge away from their Meat, which she lay’d the more to
Heart, because it look’d like an Aversion to her purely as a
Stranger. But the Partridge finding These very Cocks afterwards,
Cutting one Another to pieces, she comforted herself with This
Thought, that she had no Reason to expect they should be Kinder
to Her, than they were to One Another.

The Morat.

Tis No Wonder to find Those People Troublesome to Strangers, that
Cannot Agree among Themselves. They Quarrel for the Love of
Quarrelling ; and provided the Peace be broken, No matter upon What
Ground, or with Whom.
LEAs op’ s FABLES. IOI













Dry
Ne Z—= 45
WA
eer
as






Tx







()

Nites tanta /e ae Cae
Sx ATT ne Rae
Present: Vee
Re SST Aa

hh}

i



ATTN

ya
-\\







Wee "





THE PARTRIDGE anv THECOCKS.


102 LA sop’s FABLES.

BaAsLE luk
The Tunnp and the Dolphin.

A Tunny gave Chace to a Dolphin; and when he was just ready

to seize him, the Tuxny struck before he was aware, and the
Dolphin, in the Eagerness of his Pursuit, ran himself a ground with
him. They were both Lost; but the Tunmy kept his Eye still
upon the Dolphin, and Observing him when he was Just at Last
Gasp: Well, says he, the Thought of Death is now Easy to me, so
long as I see my Enemy go for Company.

The Morat.

‘Tis a Wretched Satisfattion, that a Revengeful Man takes, even
in the Losing of his own Life, provided that his Enemy may go for
Company.


Gk




1o4 LES op’ s FABLES.



FasrEae ht
The For without a Tati.

@ Recs was a Fox taken in a Trap, that was glad to Compound

for his Neck by leaving his Tail behind him. It was so
Uncouth a Sight, for a Fox to appear without a Tail, that the very
Thought on’t made him e’en Weary of his Life; for twas a Loss
never to be Repair’d: But however for the Better Countenance of
the Scandal, he got the Master and Wardens of the Foxes Company
to call a Court of Assistants, where he himself appeared, and made
a Learned Discourse upon the Trouble, the Uselessness, and the
Indecency of Foxes Wearing Tails. He had no sooner say'd out
his Say, but up rises a Cunning Snap, then at the Board, who
desir’d to be Inform’d, whether the Worthy Member that Mov’d
against the Wearing of Tails gave his Advice for the Advantage of
Those that Had Tails, or to Palliate the Deformity and Disgrace of
Those that had Noze,

The Morat.

When a Man has any Notable Defeé, or Lnfirmity about him, whether
by Nature, or by Chance, ’tis the Best of his Play, to try the humour, if
he can turn it into a Fashion,


ZEsop’s FABLES. Ios








FG
Za

a

pA Mees
Sa




eS

=







ZZ

ee SSS Lp
SS yp
LHe Stone

ss




‘3 THE-FOX- WITHOUT - A- TAIL &3




106 -Asop’s FABLES.



Fasrr Illi
The For and the MWrambdie.

Fox that was close Pursu’d, took a Hedge, The Bushes gave
way, and in Catching hold of a Bramble to break his Fall,
the Prickles ran into his Feet. Upon This, He layd himself down,
and fell to Licking his Paws, with Bitter Exclamations against
the Bramble. Good Words, Reynard, says the Bramble, One would
have thought you had known Better Things, than to Expect a
Kindness from a Common Enemy, and to lay hold on That for
Relief, that Catches at Every Thing else for Mischief.

The MoraAL..

There are some Malicious Natures that Place all their Delight in
doing Ill Turns, and That Man is hard put to’t that is first brought
into a Distress, and then fore'd to Fly to such People for Relief.


LE sop’s FABLES. 107



<0
ss

oN
SAS

Sess

I

»

y
a,
NY










\\

| NY
VWI TY
THE-FOX anp THE’ BRAMBLE:





108 TES Opes Bes:



Basie JIN,
Che for and the Crocodtle,

‘T Here happen’d a Contest betwixt a Fox and a Crocodile, upon

the Point of Blood and Extraction. The Crocodile Ampli-
fy’d Wonderfully upon his Family, for the Credit of his Ancestors.
Friend (says the Fox, smiling upon’t) there will need no Herald
to Prove your Gentility ; for you carry the Marks of Your Original
in Your very Skin.

The Morat.

Great Boasters and Lyars have the Fortune still some way or other to
Disprove themselves.


“sop s FABLES. 10g





Ls
























“¢ oe 4 y Ai
A oni Laan petits NOAM pS
0 qe PO Ua TTT img
fin ‘ : - fil
(
i i) Nee wat ER SS tM
|
1 /® “Y
i y " : 5




WN

he iy Wy “ Ae Vj
1




\ p Wi f



THE ‘FOX anp-THE CROCODILE.
ee ee
IIo LES op’ s FABLES.



BARE oh.
The Woasting Mule.

Ores was a Favourite-Mule, that was High Fed, and in the

Pride of Flesh and Mettle, would still be Bragging of his
Family, and his Ancestors. My Father (says he) was a Coarser,
and though I say it that should not say’t, I my self take after him.
He had no sooner spoke the Words, but he was put to the Tryal
of his Heels, and did not only shew himself a Jade; but in the
very Heat of his Ostentation, his Father fell a Braying, which
Minded him of his Original, and the Whole Field made Sport on’t,
when they found him to be the Son of an Ass,

The Morat.

A Bragging Fool that’s Rais'd out of a Dunghill, and sets up for a
Man of Quality, is Asham’d of Nothing in This World but of his Own
Father,


4Esop’s FABLES. III

NK

IS

\ A
y j I S X
4




2 LES op’s FABLES.



Papel Val.
The Lion tn Love.

A L10n fell in Love with a Country Lass, and desir’d her Father’s

Consent to have her in Marriage. The Answer he gave was
Churlish enough. He'd never Agree to’t he said, upon any Terms,
to Marry his Daughter to a Beast. The Lion gave him a Sour
Look upon’t, which brought the Bumkin, upon Second Thoughts,
to strike up a Bargain with him, upon these Conditions; that his
Teeth should be Drawn, and his Nails Par’d; for Those were
Things, he said, that the Foolish Girl was Terribly afraid of. The
Lion sends for a Surgeon immediately to do the Work; (as what
will not Love make a Body do?) And so soon as ever the Opera-
tion was Over, he goes and Challenges the Father upon his Promise.
The Countryman seeing the Lion Disarm’d, Pluck’d up a Good
Heart, and with a Swinging Cudgel so Order’d the Matter, that he
broke off the Match.

The Mora..

An Extravagant Love consults neither Life, Fortune, nor Reputation,
but Sacrifices All that can.be Dear to a Man of Sense and Honour, to
the Transports of an Inconsiderate Passion.




Li sop’s FABLES. 113



at TINY

2
IS

Y

WN yi i

UE 1; AY KN
Fi "Ny LAS
Pei aw i . \ Ni
SU.
7 N WW \ i ,
\\\

eS td
2 SS

aN
Ne
aS . \ ‘ i

HH

a :
BY AA UE
V7)

v \)
il i

A
ANA
Le
\ ) A
it | iil
gn

Mt ‘i \

Oa
\\

\ Hi

ote/
No ve
ED)
CSO)




114 LES op’ s FABLES.

Hage Vil:
The Wioness and the For.

A Numerous Issue passes in the World for a Blessing ; and_This

Consideration made a Fox cast it in the Teeth of a Lioness,
that she brought forth but One Whelp at a time. Very Right,
says the Other, but then That Ove is a Lion.

The Mora..

Tis a Common Thing to Value things more by the Number, than by
the Excellency of them,




“ti sop’s FABLES. 115



Wi
Wy i
vy
.
P




116 LE Sop’s FABLES.



Fase LVIII.
The Fighting Cocks and the CEagle.

WO Cocks fought a Duel for the Mastery of a Dunghil.
He that was Worsted, slunk away into a Corner, and Hid
himself; T’other takes his Flight up to the Top of the House, and
there with Crowing and Clapping of his Wings makes Proclamation
of his Victory. An Eagle made a Stoop at him in the Middle of
his Exultation, and carry’d him away. By This Accident, the Other
Cock had a Good Riddance of his Rival; took Possession of the
Province they Contended for, and had All his Mistresses to
Himself again.

The Morat.

A Wise, and a Generous Enemy will make a Modest Use of a
Viétory ; for Fortune is Variable.


L4'sop’s FABLES. 117



IS

ZZ

Zz

> ea
{ wa

QI HIN
aA

WY 4

\ ie

NY (

Ph rte

MO LLL

ita

ALIA UN a h




118 Asop’s FABLES.

Faste LIX.
The Stag and the fawn.

A Fawn was Reasoning the Matter with a Smug, why he should.

run away from the Dogs still; for, says he, you are Bigger
and Stronger than They. If you have a Mind to stand, y are better
Arm’d; And then y’are Fleeter if you’ll Run for’t. I can’t Imagine
what should make you so Fearful of a Company of Pityful Curs.
Nay, says the Stag, ’tis All True that you say, and ’tis no more
than I say to my self Many Times, and yet whatever the Matter is,
let me take up what Resolutions I please, when I hear the Hounds
once, I cannot but betake my self to my Heels.

The Morat.

"Tis One thing to Know what we ought to do, and Another thing to
Execute it; and to bring up our Praéfice to our Philosophy : He that is
naturally a Coward is not to be made Valiant by Councel,


LES op’s FABLES. 119

———

ZION
AN AA
Ady \ (NHAZ A

{ \ Y it
fy ; ee
a
Uj NY

y
“NWA
‘

ip

THE'STAG anp THE FAWN.




120 LES op’s FABLES.



BPAsLE Ex.
The Wasps and the Honep-ydot.

(ees was a Whole Swarm of Wasps discovered an Overturned

Honey-Pot, and there they Cloy’d and Clamm’d themselves,
till there was no getting Away again; which brought them to
Understand in the Conclusion, that they had pay’d too Dear for
their Sweet-Meats.

The Morat.

Loose Pleasures become Necessary to Us by the Frequent Use of them,
and when they come once to be Habitual, there’s no getting Clear again,


AE Sop’s FABLES. Pot














x, sr rir rh EEL
ea, @::

nts





THE’ WASPS anv THE HONEY POT






LoD LES op’ s FABLES.



PApiE cf Xt.
The For and the Grapes.

oO se was a Time, when a Fox would have Ventur’d as far for

a Bunch of Grapes, as for a Shoulder of Mutton, and it was
a Fox of Those days, and That Palate, that stood Gaping under a
Vine, and licking his Lips at a most Delicious Cluster of Grapes
that he had Spy’d out there; He fetch’d a Hundred and a Hundred
Leaps at it, till at last, when he was as Weary as a Dog, and found
that there was No Good to be done; Hang ’em (says He) they are
as Sour as Crabs ; and so away he went, turning off the Disappoint-
ment with a Jest.

The Morat.

‘Tis Matter of Skill and Address, when a man cannot Honestly
Compass what he would be at, to Appear Easy and Indifferent upon
All Repulses and Disappointments.


LES op’ s FABLES.







Ti
i
oT) t 4
ji vn) i ie
\ A lly ROH

NU vi “Win : alt
Tay tg

wi Tas





i
Hf (

ea

J 0 ier fy
INCH yi eet Acre IY) SSE
fae ee li He ul Duh SU
Ei lata A UM ASS

te iby it

THE-FOX anv THE ‘GRAPES.




124 4Esop’s FABLES.



FasLte LXII.
Che Hare and the Tortoise.

W Fat a Dull Heavy Creature (says a Hare) is This same

Tortoise! And yet (says the Tortoise) Pll run with you for
a Wager. "T'was Done and Done, and the Fox, by Consent, was to
be the Judg. They started together, and the Tortoise kept Jogging
on still, till he came to the End of the Course. The Hare lay’d
himself down about Mid-way, and took a Nap; for, says he, I can
fetch up the Tortoise when I please: But he Over-slept himself it
seems, for when he came to wake, though he scudded away as fast
as twas possible, the Tortoise got to the Post before him, and Won
the Wager.

The Morat.

Up and be Doing, is an Edifying Text; for Aétion is the Bus’ness
of Life, and there’s no Thought of ever coming to the End of our
Fourney in time, if we Sleep by the Way.


ALsop s FT ABIES. 12s



We
a Mi

a

yi



Qs HE HARE anp THE TORTOISE




126 A sopes GB ISS,



Faste LXIII.
The Mog and the Cock upon a Fourney.

Ave and a Cock took a Journey together. The Dog Kennell’d

in the Body of a Hollow Tree, and the Cock Roosted at night
upon the Boughs. The Cock crow’d about Midnight; (at his
Usual Hour) which brought a Fox that was abroad upon the Hunt,
immediately to the Tree; and there he stood Licking of his Lips,
at the Cock, and Wheedling him to get him Down. He Protested
he never heard so Angelical a Voice since he was Born, and what
would not He do now, to Hug the Creature that had given
him so Admirable a Serenade! Pray, says the Cock, speak to the
Porter below to open the Door, and I’ll come Down to ye: The
Fox did as he was Directed, and the Dog presently seiz’d and
Worry’d him.

The Morat.

The Main Bus’ness of the World is Nothing but Sharping, and
putting Tricks upon One Another by Turns.


:
\ um " es :
i
i ANY ml a a
Willi, y) ich A, wy ee

=e ane

‘iW,

.

THE DOG-AND-THE COCKS & &

UPON'’A - JOURNEY.




128 LE Sop’ s FABLES.



PaBLE XC.
The Uine and the Goat.

Roe that was hard Press’d by the Huntsmen, took San&uary

in a Vineyard, and there he lay Close, under the Covert
of a Vine. So soon as he thought the Danger was Over, he fell
presently to Browsing upon the Leaves; and whether it was the
Rustling, or the Motion of the Boughs, that gave the Huntsmen
an Occasion for a Stricter Search, is Uncertain: but a Search there ©
was, and in the End he was Discover’d, and shot. He dy’d in fine,
with this Conviction upon him, that his Punishment was Just, for
offering Violence to his Protector.

The Morat.

Ingratitude Perverts all the Measures of Religion and Society, by
naking it Dangerous to be Charitable and Good Natur’ d.


4isop’s FABLES. — 129








Sa RO SZ a ba












eeN at
wpe
\ aaa
S Sy i

S











U
FLRELIEAEEH Sey
' Ss

x)
uy
S





<7 iN : i f * ie
(i, ‘ WSS : Wye
Se <= = :
; 4 uh a COTS

Ss
CaF
SON



\ Ss
= 7, :
A i, yx
7 A y y
\\ INS
R [Dp hs
Ay Oy res



Wusll
ea



2 Re)

Hiv




130 LEsop’s FABLES.



PAapre bX v,
The Ass, the Lion, and the Cock.

AS a Cock and an Ass were Feeding together, up comes a Lion

Open-Mouth toward the ss: The Cock presently cries out ;
fAway Scoures the Lion, and the ss after him: Now ’twas the
Crowing of the Cock that Frighted the Lion, not the Braying of the
4ss, as That Stupid Animal Vainly Fanci’d to Himself, for so soon
as ever they were gotten out of the Hearing of the Cock, the Lion
turn’d short upon him, and tore him to pieces, with These Words
in his Mouth: Let never any Creature hereafter that has not the
Courage of a Hare, Provoke a Lion.

The Morat.

The Force of Unaccountable Aversions, is Insuparable. The Fool that
is Wise and Brave Only in his Own Conceit, runs on without Fear or
Wit, but Noise does no Bus’ness.


132 Alsop’s FABLES.



Faste LXVI,.
The Snake and the Crab.

‘T Bee was a Familiarity Contracted betwixt a Sake and a

Crab. The Crab was a Plain Dealing Creature, that
Advis’d his Companion to give over Shuffling and Doubling, and
to Practice Good Faith. The Snake went on in his Old Way: So
that the Crad finding that he would not Mend his Manners, set
upon him in his Sleep, and Strangled him; and then looking upon
him as he lay Dead at his Length: This had never befall’n ye, says
he, if You had but Liv’d as Straight as You Dy’d.

The Morat.

There’s Nothing more Agreeable in Conversation, then a Franke
Open way of Dealing, and a Simplicity of Manners.


oO

LES Op’ s FABLES.



CRAB.

=
fant
a
Zz
=
x
Zz.
A

THE


134 LES op’ s FABLES.



FasLte LXVII.
The Maven and the Swan.

A had a Great Mind to be as White as a Swan, and fancy’d

to Himself that the Swan’s Beauty proceeded in a High
Degree, from his often Washing and Dyet. The Raven upon this
Quitted his Former Course of Life and Food, and betook himself
to the Lakes and Rivers: But as the Water did him no Good at
all for his Complexion, so the Experiment Cost him his Life too
for want of Sustenance.

The Morat.

Natural Inclinations may be Moulded and Wrought upon by Good
Councell and Discipline ; but there are Certain specifick Properties and
Impressions, that are never to be Alter’d or Defacd.


Aisop’s FABLES. — 135



SSS 5d ppp ER
a =

—=
=

= = =
= L/P
SSS






136 4 sop’s FABLES.



Faste LXVIII.
The Ape and the Dolphin.

Prop were us'd in the Days of Old, to carry Gamesome Puppies

and pes with ’em to Sea, to pass away the Time withal.
Now there was One of these pes, it seems, aboard a Vessel that
Was cast away in a very great Storm. As the Men were Paddling
for their Lives, and the Ape for Company, a Certain Dolphin that
took him for a Man, got him upon his Back, and was making
towards Land with him. He had him into a Safe Road call’d the
Pyreus, and took occasion to Ask the Ape, whether he was an
Athenian or not? He told him Yes, and of a very Ancient Family
there. Why then (says the Dolphin) You know Pyreus: Oh!
exceedingly well, says T’other (taking it for the Name of a Man).
Why Pyrzus is my very Particular Good Frind. The Dolphin,
upon This, had such an Indignation for the Impudence of the
Buffoon-Ape, that he gave him the Slip from between his Legs, and
there was an End of my very-Good Friend, the Athenian.

The Mora..

Bragging, Lying, and Pretending, has Cost many a Man his Life
and Estate.




Wisop s VABIGES, 037.



mui

so

UT

= ; ——__ W\N
\\ \\ —— SS E Ke SON
AY 7% NWS S SS
mi EE, es XS) —=
=< . SS
BZ... — yf yt ’ ( — SSF
= ZF BSS!" Wh A Wee
a f 8 Xx \N Ry ee
N \) ANY ws
me FAN

i






138 AESOP Th A BIG Ss;



Faste LXIX,
The for and the Crab.

A Fox that was Sharp-set, Surpriz’d a Crad, as he lay out of the

Sea upon the Sands, and Carry’d him away. The Crab,
when he found that he was to be Eaten, Well (says he) This comes
of Meddling where we have Nothing to do; for My Bus’ness lay
at Sea, not upon the Land.

The Morat.

No Body Pities a Man for any Misfortune that Befalls him, in
Matters out of his Way, Bus’ness, or Calling.


ALSOP’ Ss TABLES. I 39



Zaye <—S =
= SS

mal

ZI DYz

ined



THE’ FOX anp THE’CRAB.
140 Asop’s FABLES.



Api eo Xe
The Shepherd and his Hbeep.

Je Old time when Sheep fed like Hogs upon Acorns, a Shepherd

drove his Flock into a Little Oak-Wood, spread his Coat
under a Tree, and up he went to shake ’em down some Mast.
The Sheep were so Keen upon the Acorns, that they Gobbled up
now and then a Piece of the Coat along with ’em. When the
Shepherd took Notice of it: What a Company of Ungrateful
Wretches are you, says he, that Cloath all Other People that have
No Relation to you, and yet Strip Your Master, that gives ye both
Food and Protection !

The MorRat..:

The Belly has no Ears; and a Ravenous Appetite Guttles up whar-
ever is Before it, without any regard either to Things or Persons.
LE sop’s FABLES. 141


















)

Aa

iy .
b



\
\
i
yy

Delt
i

+4




WERE ELT,
OS











B y,
Rp a B s
ink OR eo VE ry

/ an VAI)
\ e \ i ( WAN i Lae os WN my Hy
OANA tie NOLO

iN ‘i hin oP SN
CUA
THE? SHEPHERD ann nis SHEEP.

SS
—















142 .Afsop’s FABLES.



FasteE LXXI.
The peacock and the Magpie.

Ts the Days of Old, the Birds liv’d at Random in a Lawless State

of Anarchy ; but in time they began to be Weary on’t, and
Mov’d for the Setting up of a King. The Peacock Valu’d himself
upon his Gay Feathers, and put in for the Office: The Pretenders
were heard, the Question Debated; and the Choice fell upon the
Poll to King Peacock: The Vote was no sooner pass’d, but up
stands a Magpie with a Speech in his Mouth to This Effect : May
it please your Majesty, says he, We should be glad to Know, in Case the
Eagle should fall upon us in your Reign, as she has formerly done, how
will you be able to Defend us ? :

The Morat.

In the Bus’ness of either Ereéting, or Changing a Government, it
ought to be very well Consider’d before hand, what may be the Conse-
quences, in case of such a Form, or such a Person.


Be Wa

a ut! gh oe

ecu fe
WN

GP
We GIN lh a

afi) Yi
ry
Wf)

\
uf


144 LE sop’s FABLES.

FasLte LXXII.
The Lion, the Ass, and the for.

ees was a Hunting-Match agreed upon betwixt a Lion, an
Ass, and a Fox, and they were to go Equal Shares in the
Booty. They ran down a Brave Stag, and the ss was to Divide
the Prey; which he did very Honestly and Innocently into Three
Equal Parts, and left the Lion to.take his Choice: Who never
Minded the Dividend; but in a Rage Worry’d the 4s, and then
bad the Fox Divide; who had the Wit to make Only One Share
of the Whole, saving a Miserable Pittance that he Reserv’d for
Himself. The Lion highly approv’d of his Way of Distribution ;
but Prethee Reynard, says he, who taught thee to Carve? Why
truly says the Fox, I had an Ass to my Master; and it was His
Folly made me Wise.

The Morat.

There must be no Shares in Sovereignty. Court-Conscience is Policy.
The Folly of One Man makes Another Man Wise ; as one Man Grows
Rich upon the Ruines of Another.


AW
NAW
VAY

Ae



THE LION’ THE ASS ann THETOX
FITS ROM 3

GOING: OUT ‘HUNTINGAQ: SECS


146 AEsop’s FABLES.

Faste LXXIII.
The Hid and the Wolf.

AX a Wolf was passing by a Poor Country Cottage, a Kid spy’d

him from the Roof; and sent a Hundred Curses along with
him. Sirrah (says the Wolf) if I had ye out of your Castle, I’d
make ye give Better Language.

The Morat.

4 Coward in his Castle, makes a Great Deal more Bluster then a
Man of Honour,


sop’s FABLES. 147



is : ti

ik

Ay rw ‘

RNG NN ie
aid \\

Oy

iis

| | iy Wh Ni y
f q A SN iy
, : ih yi) pi

rp
f ee \
Z

i f 1 4 i
iy I aw ‘ aN ] es wy Ni fal i \
| eee eNOS Yl
7 c/s ~ oN
ses ie aay 4 cae | ae '
7 es } - i | ba Sa is
t)

THE’KID anp THE ‘WOLF,




148 TE So pigs he ea es



Ee ARinn 1 xX FV.
The Geese and the Cranes.

Sore Sports-men that were abroad upon Game, spy’d a Company

of Geese and Cranes a Feeding together, and so made in upon
’em as fast as their Horses could carry them. The Cranes that
were Light, took Wing immediately, and sav’d themselves, but
the Geese were Taken; for they were Fat, and Heavy, and could
not Shift so well as the Other.

The MorAL.

Light of Body and Light of Purse, comes much to a Case in Trouble-
some Times; Only the One saves himself by his Activity, and the Other
scapes because he is not worth the Taking.


ZE'sop’s FABLES. 149






150 LE Sop’ s FABLES.





Faste LXXYV.
The Angler and the Little Fish.

A an ngler was at his Sport, he had the Hap to Draw up a

very Little Fish from among the Fry. The Poor Wretch
bege’d heartily to be thrown in again ; for, says he, I’m not come
to my Growth yet, and if you’! let me alone till I am Bigger,
Your Purchase will turn to a Better Account. Well! says the
Man, but I’d rather have a Little Fish in Possession, then a Great
One in Reversion.

The Morat.

"Tis Wisdom to take what we May, while ’tis to be Had, even Up is
were but for Mortality sake


AA
RSs
NAAN
Wes

it

A AEE MC
EN
REAR

V3

J

THE:ANGLER ano THE'LITTLE FISH.




162 A'S op’ s FABLES.



Faste LXXVI,
The Wull and the Goat.

Bull that was Hard Press’d by a Lion, ran directly toward a
Goat-Siall, to Save Himself. The Goat made Good the
Door, and Head to Head Disputed the Passage with him. Well!
says the Bull, with Indignation, If I had not a more Dangerous
Enemy at my Heels, then I have Before me, I should soon Teach
you the Difference betwixt the Force of a Bull, and of a Goat.

The Morat.

"Tis no Time to Stand Quarrelling with Every Little Fellow, when
Men of Power are Pursuing us upon the Heel to the very Death.








Sop STORIES.



If
t
\
a ES
d PN WAY SSN Q
Wa Y aie a vA
iy! ‘ih 2’ y IN
ray Vp SY
\ y ‘, q Re
yf és |
A A

be SSO,

ay

Vy) \
Bz fl



RO

\\ \ f mE i, i

Lai Ale ‘i 4

Rh tt 4 (ef Dif Ns 8
3 Gustin

EE

FF
a

‘

RAO
Je


154 LE sop’s FABLES.



FAsie EexCxvil
The flurse and the Wolf.

AS a Wolf was Hunting up and down for his Supper, he pass’d
by a Door where a Little Child was Bawling, and an Old

Woman Chiding it. Leave your Vixen-Tricks, says the Woman, or
L’Ul throw ye to the Wolf. The Wolf Over-heard her, and Waited

a. pretty While, in hope the Woman would be as good as her

Word; but No Child coming, away goes the Wolf for That Bout.

He took his Walk the Same Way again toward the Evening, and

the Nurse he found had Chang’d her Note; for she was Then

Muzzling, and Cokesing of it. That’s a Good Dear, says she, Jf
the Wolf comes for My Child, We'll een Beat his Brains out. The

Wolf went Muttering away upon’t. There’s No Meddling with

People, says he, that say One Thing and Mean Another.

The Morat.

Tis Fear more then Love that makes Good Men, as well as Good
Children, and when Fair Words, and Good Councel will not Prevail
upon us, we must be Frighted into our Duty.


Aésop’s FABLES. — 1gs5


























\ ANS
NN
FN Re \ wat’

Suggs W8A(
y
Ny



|
(
i

THE‘NURSE ann THE’ WOLF-


156 ZiSOp SAB IGS.



Eapie fb xxv ITE
The Tortotse and the Eagle.

Aa was thinking with himself, how Irksome a sort of Life

it was, to spend All his Days in a Hole, with a House upon
his Head, when so many Other Creatures had the Liberty to
Divert Themselves in the Free, Fresh Air, and to Ramble about
at Pleasure. So that the Humor took him One Day, and he must
needs get an Eagle to teach him to Fly. The Eagle would fain
have put him off, and told him, twas a Thing against Nature, and
Common Sense; but (according to the Freak of the Wilful Part
of the World) the More the One was Against it, the More the
Other was For it: And when the Eagle saw that the Tortoise would
not be said Nay, she took him up a matter of Steeple-high into the
Air, and there turn’d him Loose to shift for Himself. That is to
say; she dropt him down, Squab upon a Rock, that Dash’d him to
Pieces.

The Morat.
Nothing can be either Safe, or Easy that's Unnatural,


“Ei sop’s FABLES. 157



THE: TORTOISE ano >THE ‘EAGLE.




158 Zisop s PA BIVIES,



Fasten Ex Xl xX
The For and the Frog.

Ave came forth out of a Pond, and made Proclamation of his
Skill in Physick. Pray, says the Fox, Begin with your Own
Infirmities before you Meddle with other Peoples.

The Morat.
Physician Cure thy Self.


ALSOP FABLES. 150






WME WIVES TTSsa Se
WHC 4!
(gh = ya é f
e i Z (dsp SS 4
= cf j “ASS ue } FW A

I
) } My Z w











N
\ iN
s ws NY
erent

ooh â„¢

Nas















“is wn ia “i

1 ull wee iy
atscalffh is Ra Hi acl )



oe
uty“ oi “i is
ty lly i Ap oe ws Ye
Ae AU trae

SOs THEFOX anv THE FROG.




160 ZESOp SA BIS,



BASLE 1X XX.
The Mischievous Dog.

oo was a very Good House-Dog, but so Dangerous a Cur

to Strangers, that his Master put a Log of Wood about his
Neck, to Prevent him Running at and Biting People. The Dog
took this Log of Wood for a Particular Mark of his Master’s
Favour, till One of his Companions shew’d him his Mistake. You
are Mightily Out (says he) to take this for an Ornament, or a
Token of Esteem, which is in truth, no Other then a Note of
Infamy set upon you for your II] Manners.

The Morat.

This may serve for an Admonition to Those that make a Glory of the
Marks of their Shame, and Value themselves upon the Reputation of an
Lil Chara€ter.
161

AEs op’s FABLES.





DOG

a
x
3S

= ret
67571
(BSsesst

ciii=——*

“" W
wt wd

ae

ef

Ress Les =o

eee
=

Ces 38

an
S
2
=
oO
2
=

THE




162 Asop’s FABLES.

Faste LXXXI.
The yweacockh and the Crane.

A a Peacock and a Crane were in Company together, the Peacock

spreads his Tail, and Challenges the Other, to shew him
such a Fan of Feathers. The Crane, upon This, Springs up into
the Air, and calls to the Peacock to Follow him if he could. You
brag of your Plumes, says he, that are fair indeed to the Eye, but
no way Useful or Fit for any manner of Service.

The Morat.

Heaven has provided not only for our Necessities, but for our
Delights and Pleasures too; but still the Blessings that are most Useful
to us, must be preferr'd before the Ornaments of Beauty.
LO

ZEsop’s FABLES.

ZS

ZING

iis




164 ZEsop’s FABLES.



Fase LXXXII.
The For and the Tiger.

BX a Huntsman was upon the Chace, and the Beasts flying before
him; Let Me alone, says a Tiger, and I'll put an end to
This War my self: At which Word, he Advanced towards the
Enemy in his Single Person, The Resolution was no sooner
Taken, but he found himself Struck through the Body with an
Arrow. He fasten’d upon it presently with his Teeth, and while
he was Trying to Draw it out, a Fox Ask’d him, from what Bold
Hand it was that he Receiv’d This Wound. I know Nothing of
That, says the Tiger, but by the Circumstances, it should be a Man.

The MorRaAt..

There’s No Opposing Brutal Force to the Stratagems of Humane
Reason.


ZEsop’s FABLES.















on) hi

THE: FOX ano THE-TIGER.




166 4 sop’s FABLES.



FasteE LXXXIII.
The Lton and the four Bulls.

Here was a Party of Four Bulls that Struck up a League to
Keep and Feed together, and to be One and All in case of a
Common Enemy. If the Lion could have Met with any of them
Single, he would have done His Work, but so long as they Stuck
to This Confederacy, there was No Dealing with them. They fell
to Variance at last among Themselves: The Lion made his Advan-
tage of it, and then with Great Ease he Gain’d his End.

The MorRat.

This is to tell us the Advantage, the Necessity, and the Force of
Union ; And that Division brings Ruine.




Lhsop’s FABLES. 167






SN i a

> Fi eT

that dea
> ZA












ah , V1 y y

sg Poe oN
7} ) t My aii Winn
i y : aA Hy (han ig

OR

NEMA i : ;
Hi ana i i i

et

———— (Daec
uukiky








ARN



\
)
et



: i) nae Ty
W

ANUANN
Wi









AN

‘FOUR BULLS.



THETLION ann THE


168 Aisop’s FABLES.

Faster ul xX XXKEV,
The Crow and the yttcher.

Crow that was Extream Thirsty, found a Pitcher with a Little

Water in’t, but it lay so Low he could not come at it. He

try’d first to Break the Pot, and then to Overturn it, but it was

both too Strong, and too Heavy for him. He Bethought Himself

However of a Device at last that did his Bus’ness; which was, by

Dropping a great many Little Pebbles into the Water, and Raising
it That Way, till he had it within Reach.

The Morat.

There is a Natural Logick in Animals, over and above the Instin@
of their Kinds,
169



ZEsop’s FABLES.



PITCHER

5 Oe

xt ¢ 1) Ey Ee = \ { f +) \
CS A a SSF eas .
Oy eS NINOS

——

Cake ey |
FEMA tS

V Zi
PAC
=) Co



THE: CROW anp THE

f Wag

5 ESS %

&




170 4 sop’s FABLES.

Fasue EXexX.X V.
The Man and his Goose.

VN aie Good Man had a Goose, that Laid him Golden Eggs,

which could not be, he thought, without a Mine in the
Belly of her. Upon This Presumption he Cut her up to Search for
Hidden Treasure: But upon the Dissection found her just like
Other Geese, and that the Hope of Getting more had betray’d him
to the Loss of what he had in Possession.

The Morat.

This is the Fate, Folly and Mischief of Vain Desires, and of an
Immoderate Love of Riches. Content wants Nothing, and Covetousness
brings Beggery.
171

“Eisop’s FABLES.

TCE
Ee

Dy

C

(¢

(

ON

xO



i

ee I

® &

aw
oS
©
Oo
=
S
<
3
:




172 Alsop’s FABLES.



PAsL EXO xX Vl,
The Wianton Calf.

Pores Calf that had little else to do than to Frisk up and

down in a Meadow, at Ease and Pleasure, came up to a
Working Ox with a Thousand Reproaches in her Mouth; Bless
me, says the Calf, what a Difference there is betwixt your Coat and
Condition, and Mine! Why, What a Gall’d Nasty Neck have we
here! Look ye, Mine’s as Clean as a Penny, and as smooth as Silk
I warrant ye. ’Tis a Slavish Life to be Yoak’d thus, and in Per-
petual Labour. What would you give to be as Free and as Easy
now as I am? The Ox kept These Things in his Thought, with-
out One Word in Answer at present; but seeing the Ca/f taken up
a While after for a Sacrifice : Well Sister, says he, and have not you
Frisk’d fair now, when the Ease and Liberty you Valu’d your self
upon, has brought you to This End?

The Morat.

‘Tis No New Thing for Men of Liberty and Pleasure, to make Sport
with the Plain, Honest Servants of their Prince and Country : But Mark
the End on’t, and while the One Labours in his Duty with a Good
Conscience, the Other, like a Beast, is but Fatting up for the Shambles.
173

ZEsop’s FABLES.



2S gS Zz

me a. Ss
SSS
=.

=

AZ od ¥

B ZS SS
aes AS

: SS SY SSS

F.

CAL

SS

SSS
SSS

SX =
NT Gx
i Ss—

S|

®

Zz.
aS

®

LEK EL
LS
SSS

THE




174 Lijsop’s FABLES.



Fant e aiex X XV
The Leopard and the For.

A a Leopard was Valuing himself upon the Lustre of his Party-

colour’d-Skin, a Fox gave him a Jog, and Whisper’d him,
that the Beauty of the Mind was an Excellence, Infinitely to be
Preferr’d above That of a Painted Out-side.

The Morat.

A Good Understanding is a Blessing Infinitely beyond All External
Beauties.
j Tas
WO NN ih

i
i

aN Yama
Y/N WE Ni
Wi (te Ud LUZ

Sy ate

me
ni
ryt

ty
ESN
A

ih RL
) “f Yn tL Zz
Og sats

Wy 16 Css i
aS

| £5)
‘HE “LEOPARD ann THE-FOX.




176 Alsop’s FABLES.



Baste (EX XXVIII
The Hawk and the Farmer.

Farmer had the Fortune to take a Hawk in the Hot Pursuit

of a Pigeon, The Hawk Pleaded for her self, that she

never did the Farmer any Harm, and therefore I hope, says she,

that You’l do Me None. Well! says the Parmer, and pray what

Wrong did the Pigeon ever do you? Now by the Reason of your

own Argument, you must e’en Expect to be Treated Your self, as
You your self would have Treated This Pigeon.

The MorRAL.

Tis good to Think before we Speak, for fear of Condemning our
selves out of our Own Mouths.
AEsop’s FABLES. =

I fi
AN Ve
AN AR ANN RH LL
Ze AION VOR |
FM ORSON
TREE TROL WOOO |

Af
































kQ

[(W
7,

WY)






O
V BO OO. i

THE HAWK anp THE FARMER.




178 LE sop’s FABLES.



Base xox De
The Wear and the Wee-Wives.

Ace was so Enrag’d once at the Stinging of a Bee, that he

ran like Mad into the Bee-Garden, and Over-turn’d All the
Hives, in Revenge. This Outrage brought them Out in Whole
Troops upon him; and he came afterwards to Bethink himself,
how much more Advisable it had been to Pass over One Injury,
then by an Unprofitable Passion to Provoke a Thousand.

The Mora..

Better pass over an Affront from One Scoundrel, then draw the Whole
Herd of the Mobile about a Man’s Ears.
ee es ee ee
LES Op’ s FABLES. 179



2 =
SEAT SP

x

Xt

Lige

Uy

iS
INS

= VP ts

eso




180 LES op’s FABLES.



BABE OCG,
The Fatal Marriage.

Nee that found himself Hamper’d in a Net, call’d to a

Mouse that was passing by, to help him out of the Snare,
and he’d never forget the Kindness, he said. The Mouse Gnaw’d
the Threads to pieces, and when he had set the Lion at Liberty,
desir’d him in Requital to give him his Daughter. The Lion
was too Generous to Deny him Any thing, but most Unluckily,
as the New Bride was just about to Step into the Marriage Bed,
she happen’d to set her Foot upon her Husband at Unawares,
and Crush’d him to Death.

The Morat.

The Folly of an Inconsiderate Love. The Force of Gratitude, and
Good Nature, and the Misery that Accompanies Unequal Matches.


4isop’s FABLES. 181






182 SOPs Webi S



Farin OG AIe
The Cat and the Mice.

A a Company of Mice were Peeping out of their Holes for

Discovery, they spy’d a Cat upon a Shelf; that lay and:
look’d so Demurely, as if there had been neither Life nor Soul
in her. Well (says one of the Mice) That’s a Good Natur’d
Creature, I'll Warrant her; One may read it in her very Looks;
and truly I have the Greatest Mind in the World to make an
Acquaintance with her. So said, and so done; but so soon as
ever Puss had her within Reach, she gave her to Understand, that
the Face is not always the Index of the Mind.

The Morat.

"Tis a Hard Matter for a Man to be Honest and Safe; for his very
Charity and Good Nature Exposes, if it does not Betray him.


LEsop’s FABLES. 183





THE°CAT ann THE’ MICE.
184 fEsop’s FABLES.

RARER OC ET.
The THild Woar and the For.

A a Boar was Whetting his Teeth against a Tree, up comes

a Fox to him. Pray what do you mean by That? (says
he) for I see no Occasion for’t. Well, says the Boar, but I do;
for when I come once to be Set upon, twill be too Late for me

to be Whetting, when I should be Fighting.

The MoraAt.

No Man, or State can be Safe in Peace, that is not always in
readiness to Encounter an Enemy in Case of a War.


YEsop s FABLES. 185



a)
fs j ;

ah Mian
1 iil! Wy,

NS
NY

THE-WILD-BOAR anv THE'FOX.


186 LES op’s FABLES.



PApiE x The porcupine and the Snakes.

Sos Snakes were prevail’d upon in a Cold Winter, to take a

Porcupine into their Cell; but when he was Once in, the
Place was so Narrow, that the Prickles of the Porcupine were very
Troublesome to his Companions: so that the Suakes told him,
he must needs Provide for Himself somewhere else, for the Hole
was not Big enough to Hold them All. Why then, says the
Porcupine, He that cannot Svay shall do Well to Go: But for my
Own Part, I am e’en Content where I am, and if You be not so
too, Y’are Free to Remove.

The Morar

Possession is Eleven Points of the Law.




187

4Esop’s FABLES.

| ‘
:





RW WWW l
iN ie Yip

|

=
=———_—

=

,

aetna
a

WY, Ze,


188 Asop’s FABLES.

Reais GL
The Hawk and the Mtghtingale.

Ng a Nightingale was Singing in a Bush, down comes a Rascally
Kite of a Sparrow-Hawk, and Whips her off the Bough:
The Poor Wretch Pleaded for her self, that alas! her Little
Carcass was not worth the While, and that there were Bigger
Birds enough to be found. Well, says the Hawk, but am I so
Mad d’ye think, as to Part with a Little Bird that I have, for
a Great One that I have Not? Why then, says she, I'll give ye
a Delicate Song for my Life: No, no, says the Hawk, I want for
my Belly, not for my Ears.

The Morat.
A Bird in the Hand is Worth Two in the Bush.


isop’s FABLES. 189



THE HAWK anp-tTHe NIGHTINGALE




Igo “Esop’s FABLES.



Faste XCV,
The Cat and the for.

‘T Bere was a Question started betwixt a Fox and a Cat; which

of the Two could make the best Shift in the World, if
they were put to a Pinch. For my Own part, (says Reynard,)
when the worst comes to the worst, I have a whole Budget of
Tricks to come off with at last. At that very instant, up comes
a Pack of Dogs full-Cry toward them. The Cat presently takes
a Tree, and sees the Poor Fox torn to Pieces upon the very
Spot. Well, (says Puss to her self,) One Sure Trick I find is
better than a Hundred Slippery ones.

The Morat.

Nature has provided better Sor us, than we could have done Jor our
Selves,


ZEsop’s FABLES.





U4, , |
Ny I, 1
Ase Luau yn Sx

. Sw nee ES

THE‘CAT anv THE FOX.


192 “sop’s FABLES.



Faste XCVI.
The Wilf, the Lamb, and the Goat.

Ae overheard a Lamb Bleating among the Goats. Dye hear

Little One, (says the Wolf,) if it be your Dam you want,
she’s yonder in the Field. Ay (says the Lamb,) but I am ,
not looking for her that was my Mother for her Owm sake,
but for her that Nurses me up, and Suckles me out of Pure
Charity, and Good Nature. Can any thing be Dearer to you,
says the Wolf, than she that brought you forth? Very Right,
says the Lamb; and without knowing or caring what she
did: And pray, what did she bring me forth for too; but to
Ease her self of a Burden? Iam more Beholden to her that
took Pity of me when I was in the World already, then to -her
that brought me into’t, I know not how. ’Tis Charity, not Nature,
or Necessity that does the Office of a Tender Mother.

The Morat.

There's a difference betwixt Reverence and Affection; the one goes
to the Charaéfer, and the other to the Person, and so distinguishes
Duty from Inclination. Our Mothers brought us into the World;
a Stranger takes us up, and Preserves us in’t. So that here’s both a
Friend and a Parent in the case, and the Obligation of the one, must
not destroy the Respect I owe to the other ; nor the Respect the Obliga-
tion: And none but an Enemy will advise us to quit either.


SERS) earn

Zoe

ih
A

CaO

ALS Op’ s

FABLES.



N




194 LES Op’ s FABLES.



PAprr XC LI.
The Cock and the For.

‘T Bere was a fox set up near a Hen-Roost, to hold forth

the Doéttrin of Terror and Example. A Cock spy’d it,
and scour’d away from’t, as fast as his Legs and his Wings could
carry him, and the Birds hooted at him for’t. Hark ye my
Masters, (says he,) there are Live-Foxes as well as Dead Ones, by
the Token one of ’em had me by the Back but t’other day, and
a Thousand Pound to a Nut-shell I had never got off again.
And pray tell me now, if any of you had but been in my con-
dition, whether the very Print of a Foxes Foot would not have
started ye; and much more the Image of him in his Skin.

The Morat.
The Burnt Child Dreads the Fire.


sop Ss TABLES, re







Y
ry
i ND G

i LAG,

a q
MEET) |!
RPA |

eB
shyt

AY fs
4 My

Gk
y WAG) Nip Wk
i

IN
NM

N He, Yy i
UB » y
. \ ( NY

{P




196 fisop’s FABLES,



Faste XCVIII.
The for in the Weil.

a Unlucky Fox dropt into a Well, and cry’d out for Help:

A Wolf overheard him, and looks down to see what the
Matter was. Ah, (says Reynard,) Pray lend me your Hand
Friend, or I'm lost else. Poor Creature! says the Wolf, Why
how comes this about? Prithee how long hast thou been here? Thou
canst not but be mighty Cold sure. Come, come, this is no Time
for Fooling, says the Fox; set me upon Terra Firma first, and
then I'll tell ye the History.

The Mora..

When a Man is in Misery, there must be no Trifling in the Case.
"Tis a Barbarous Humour to stand Bantering out of Season. °Tis no
Time or Place for Raillery, when a Life’s at Stake.


ro7

ZEsop’s FABLES.

A! Wy Gr
Ma

MW Ny
Ny, 7)
\ Moray

NS

sft

BSS S10

EN INA

Bat

Fy K
BASQk =
ESA N

GF

cB a 4 Cg
Gf WO i

\
\

Z :

2 ,
mi
IN

Peas
% i

\
EE : J
x ae
ey na

of

‘

B FY

> EE)
y 5

Peal

FOX IN-THEWELL!

THE




198 sop tN Bites:

FABEE CCL XG
The Ass Eating Thisties.

A Certain ss (yet none so. ssish as will presently appear)

trudging laden with Cakes and Wine, Capons, and every
jolly sort of Victual, for his Master and the Reapers to Wag their
Chops upon, spy’d a Stout and Sturdy Thisde, and fell to with all
the Stomach he was able. Ha (says he) How many of those Lick-
fingering Guzzling Trencher-scrapers, I warrant ye, would Skip
and Fall a Merry-making at sight of the Curious Meats and
Drinks that make up my Fardel! Now this Thistle, which tickles
my Leathery Palate so pleasantly, is to me worth a Score of those
your Decked-out Dishes and insipid Comfitries !

The Morau.

Whats Meat to one Man, is Nothing but a Tasteless Vanity to the
Other. But He who knows what he likes, and takes no Shame in Own-

ing it, even though an Ass’s Skin Clothe him, has more Wit than many
of his Neighbours.
fisops FABLES. 199

PETA ope ZEA I ES

SS

A

Uh Wii E SN
“ie A SMU

VY On

Oi ee
Uno

Tidy
aM
LD

ip

HOGS
4 i>
Sait








DOO AS op’s FABLES.



ECA Bian Cy
The Wolf and the Lion.

gees was a Wolf had Seiz’d upon a Sheep, and Makes Off

with it tohis Den. On his way he had the Hap to meet with
a Lion, come forth a-foraging, who without more Ado makes his
Booty of the Carcass, and leaves the Wolf a-gaping. Why, how
now (cries the Wolf in a rage) Ha’ ye no Conscience, that ye rob
Honest Folk on the King’s Highway? The Lion he fell a-laugh-
ing, and Sirrah (says he) Would ye have me to believe, then, that
your Proper Good Friend the Shepherd gave you the Sheep ?

The Morat.

A Rogue is Debarred from Appeal, when a Lustier Rogue than
himself out-rogues him. To claim the Protection of Lawes Humane,
we must first set ourselves to observe and maintain Them.


LES op’s FABLES. 201






y

wea yy A

ey ily

2 2 ‘A S

fee ae,
Tae




dbl aaa

a ee
he
poy rst yptonutfyn ao



a

ae



4, 4
plat
Le



_THE* WOLF anp THE LION.
Printed by Batranryne, Hanson €9° Co.
Edinburgh € London


3A) 97S