Citation
Little Jim

Material Information

Title:
Little Jim
Creator:
Smith, Henry Wood ( Author, Primary )
Knapp, James B ( Publisher )
Huxtable & Galway ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
James B. Knapp
Manufacturer:
Huxtable & Galway
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
48 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 15 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Orphans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Street children -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Boarding school students -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Teacher-student relationships -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cheating (Education) -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Malicious accusation -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Girls -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fathers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Winter -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Bullying -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Loyalty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Honesty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Gratitude -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Kindness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Rejection (Psychology) in children -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Poverty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1899 ( rbprov )
School stories -- 1899 ( local )
Juvenile literature -- 1899 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1899 ( local )
Genre:
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
School stories ( local )
Children's literature ( fast )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
England -- Huntingdon
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Pictorial front cover.
General Note:
Date of publication from prize inscription.
General Note:
Contains prose and verse.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Henry Wood Smith.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026962986 ( ALEPH )
ALH8160 ( NOTIS )
265034302 ( OCLC )

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Frontispiece. LITTLE JIM.



ees iis

BY

HENRY: WOOD SMITH.

LONDON:
JAMES B. KNAPP, Surron Street, E.,
AND

26, PaTERNOSTER Row, E.C.



PRINTED. BY

HUXTABLE & GALWAY, LONDON & HUNTINGDON.



CONTENTS.

See eens
CILAP. PAGE

I. OUT IN THE COLD. hs . , Z 7
II, JIM IS TAKEN FROM THE STREETS . 14
Il, THE MISSING WATCH . : ‘ «20

IV. " PREPARING FOR re EXAMINATION . 26
Vv. A DISCOVERY. i : is » 80

VI. TRUTH WILL OUT : : 5 oe 238.





ET IE: iM.

CHAPTER 1.

OUT IN THE COLD.

A house in flames in murky night,
Flooding the skies with lurid light.
OW the cold December wind blew
the sleet in your face, and how
dark and miserable everything
and everybody looked. It was
getting late and those that had homes and’
warm firesides were hastening homeward.
The shops were putting out their lights
before closing for the night—the streets:







8 LITTLE JIM.

were becoming more and more deserted—
goon none butthose whose duty made it
a necessity for them to be out, would be
‘seen ; there had not indeed been such a
dreadful night for a long time.

On this particular night, in spite of
both wind and rain you might have seen
a poor little ragged boy, wandering list-
lessly about one of our London squares
endeavouring to find some place into
. which he might enter for shelter. At
length he stopped and peered into a
doorway. The place seemed more
protected than some of the others, and so ©
the boy ventured within and seated
himself on the step. Hardly had he done
$0, however, when the door opened and a
. pompous-looking man attired in showy

livery made his appearance.

His eye at once fell upon the ragged
figure crouching in the corner.

‘What are you doing here, you young
scamp, eh ?’ growled the man.

‘Nothin,’ replied the boy, ‘only tryin’
to git out of the rain.’



LITTLE JIM. 9

‘That story won’t do—yow’re a young
thief, that’s what you are,’ said the man.

*No J ain't.’

‘Well if you don’t move on I'll give
you in charge.’

While he was standing hesitating where
to go for shelter, a gentleman carrying a
bag came hurrying by, and the boy seeing
the chance of earning a penny asked
whether he wanted his bag carried.

‘No, my boy thank you, get home out
the rain.’

‘I ain’t got no home, sir,’ replied the
boy, ‘ please let me carry your bag.’

‘I prefer to carry it myself,’ answered
the gentleman, ‘but here isa copper for:
you.’

Jim took the coin hastily and in a second
was running as fast as his legs would
carry him towards a baker’s shop, which
he saw still open in the distance.

The gentleman stood watching the boy
until he got out of sight, then turning with
a sigh he pursued his way.



10 LITTLE JIM.

A few moments later the boy came
again into the square, and looked about to:
findadry doorway. Aftera while he found
one, and with some hesitation he ventured
within. Then drawing a roll of bread
from beneath his ragged jacket, he set to
work eating as though he had not touched
a bit all day.

It was only a piece of dry bread, but
what a glorious meal it was to little Jim.
To him—even in that dark damp doorway,
with the wind and sleet howling and beat-
ing without—the world seemed brighter
for that morsel of bread.

Having disposed of his supper Jim made
preparations for the night. This, however,
did not occupy much time. Tightening
his ragged jacket close round him, he made
himself as comfortable as he could on the
hard, cold doorstep and was soon fast
asleep.

It was not the first time that Jim had
slept ina cold doorway. Indeed, since his
mother died, and their scant furniture had
been sold to pay the rent, he had scarcely



LITTLESJIM. 11

known what it was to have a night’s
shelter, let alone a bed. But even on the
hard stone he dreamt happy dreams of
days long passed and gone, when as a
little child he played around his parents
in the green fields and lanes of Devon-
shire. Butin the midst of this happiness he
awoke with a start only to find himself
still a poor outcast with nota person in
the wide world he could claim as a friend.
Rubbing his eyes he looked about him.
Suddenly he saw a bright light in one of
the second floor windows of a house on
the opposite side of the square. He saw
at once that it was not an’ ordinary light,
such as would come from gas or a lamp.
What could it be® Fire! Jim was sure
of it, and without wasting a second he was
in full speed to the nearest fire-brigade
station. In less than ten minutes an engine,
with Jim standing by the driver's side,
was tearing along the deserted streets.
Arriving at the house on fire, the firemen
saw at once that it was likely to be a
serious matter and another man was dis-



12 _ LITTLE JIM.

patched for assistance. In the meantime
the inmates were hurrying to and fro in
great excitement and a crowd of people
was rapidly gathering in the square.
The upper part of the house was now in
flames and it seemed almost impossible to
cope with the fire. Suddenly a little
white face appeared at one of the upper-
most windows and the first to perceive it
was Jim. Running up to one of the fire-
men he told him what he had seen. The
man was slow to believe the report, but the
boy’s manner was so agitated that he
hurried forward to the spot whence Jim
had first seen the child’s face. There was
then no mistake—the fireman too saw the
child and quickly consulted the others as
to what should be done.

There was not a second to lose—every-
one saw that only by little less than a
miracle could the poor little thing be saved
from the jaws of death. What was to be
done? The firemen stood hesitating and
perplexed. Suddenly and with eager
tones Jim said—



LITTLE JIM. 13

“Can’t you tie a rope round me and let
me down from the roof ?’

‘We could do that, my boy,’ replied the
’ fireman, ‘but we’re not going to risk your
life.’

Little Jim was, however, so persistent
that it was decided to make the attempt.
The father of the child as well as the
other relations were distracted at the peril
of their darling and yet they felt them-
selves utterly powerless to save her. Two
firemen and Jim now entered the next
house and in a few moments were on the
roof. The crowd anxiously watched the
men fasten a rope round the boy’s waist
and under his arms, and then amid the
greatest excitement watched them lower
him from the roof. The smoke from the
burning house made it impossible for them
to see every movement of the boy, arid it
” wastherefore not untilsome little time after-
wards that they knew the child was sived.

A few moments later as the child was
restored unhurt to her parents, a shout of
joy, such as is seldom heard in the streets
of London, went forth from the crowd.





CHAPTER II.

JIM IS TAKEN FROM THE STREETS.

A diamond buried in the mine,
Though now unknown;
May yet be found, and brightly shine,
In Monarch’s crown.
4 but not until considerable damage
\) had been done. The engines
as having returned to their stations,
‘the crowd quickly dispersed. In the
excitement and hubbub few, if any,
‘thought of the boy-hero,—in fact, after
the little girl had been safely restored to
‘her parents, Jim had disappeared, and no
_ sone knew where he had gone.





LITTLE JIM. 15

A day or two afterwards, Mr. Barnes, |
the father of the rescued child, made
enquiry at the fire-station after Jim, but
the men were unable to give any inform-
mution.as to his whereabouts. They had
not seen him since the night of the fire,
and lad no idea where he could be found.

This was grieving to Mr. Barnes, who
naturally felt that he owed a great debt of
gratitude to the boy who had risked his
own life to save that of his daughter.
Day after day went by and still Jim had
mot been seen or heard of. At length,
however, one of the fire-men noticed a
little ragged boy standing looking with
eager curiosity at one of the engines.
Thinking he resembled the lost hero, he
beckoned to him to come within. Then
putting one or two questions to the boy
the found that he was the very one for
whom search had hitherto been made in
-vain. Asking one of his mates to relieve
him of duty fora short time, he proceeded.
with little Jim to where Mr. Barnes was



16 “LITTLE JIM.

residing during the rebuilding of his old
house.

Fortunately Mr. Barnes was at home,
and, accordingly, Jim and his friend the
fireman were introduced at once to that
gentleman in his library. Mr. Barnes
recognised the boy immediately, and
rising, took him warmly by the hand and
told him how really grateful he was to
him for his bravery.

Whilst the two were thus standing to-
gether—the library door opened and a
little girl, prettily dressed in white, came
running into the room.

‘ Papa, papa, dinner is ready—come and
have your dinner like a good papa!’

‘Allright, Dolly,’ replied Mr. Barnes, and
then, drawing the child close to his side,
he continued : ‘Wouldn’t my “ Dolly” like
to thank this kind brave boy for taking
her away from the cruel fire ?’.

Dolly looked up into her father’s face,
and the recollection of that dreadful night
coming vividly before her—she threw her



LITTLE JIM. 17

arms around her father’s neck and burst
into tears.

Mr. Barnes kissed his daughter’s tiny
face and wiped the tears from her
cheeks.

‘Now Dolly, he said, ‘tell him how
thankful you are for saving your life.’

The child left her father’s side and,
going slowly up to Jim, said.

‘Me thank you for taking me away from
cruel fire.’

Then running back to her father’s side
she again threw her arms around his neck.

‘Now papa come and have your dinner
like a good papa’ .

Mr Barnes saw the poor boy’s eyes
glisten at the very word ‘dinner,’ and it
then occurred to him that Jim would also
like something to eat.

In answer to a ring from a bell which
Mr. Barnes had on his table, a servant
entered the library.

‘Take this boy,’ said the master of the
house ‘and give him a good dinner—then



18 LITTLE JIM.

-let. him put on some clean things of one
of our boys, and after dinner I want to
have a talk with him.’

In obedience to these orders, the servant
beckoned to Jim to follow her, which he
did, and in a moment found himself in a
well-lighted and comfortable kitchen.
“Having partaken of a hearty meal, he
washed himself and put on some clean
clothes belonging to one of the sons of
Mr. Barnes, then with a clean white collar,
he presented a quite respectable appearance.

‘Dear me,’ exclaimed the servant ‘ you
‘do look a swell, your friends won’t know
you.’ ,

Jim thought the same, but refrained
from saying so. It was such a long time
since he had been so well clad that he
could scarcely realise his present condition.

Presently a bell rang and the boy was
again shown into the library. Then in
compliance with a request from Mr.
Barnes le told the story of his life, and
how he came to be a wanderer in the



LITTLE JIM. 19

_ streets. The recital made a deep impres-
sion on Mr. Barnes, and at the conclusion
he asked Jim whether he would like to
live with him and be educated properly,
in order that he might earn a position for
himselfin the world. He was only too ready
to accept the generous offer, thankful for
the way of deliverance thus opened to him.

A few weeks later he was sent to a
school in the country, where the sons of
Mr. Barnes were receiving their education.
Here he was looked upon quite as a hero,
for the story of the part he had taken in
the fire had been passed on from one boy
to another until the whole school knew of
his bravery and admired him for it.
Indeed so great was this respect that even
the ‘bully’ of the school, remembering
that discretion is the better part of valour,
considered it more prudent not to interfere
with the ‘new boy,





CHAPTER IT.

THE MISSING WATCH.

God sees all I. do,
He hears all I say,
He knows my thoughts too,
And my every way.
He always is near,
By day and by night;
The darkness to Him
Is just as the light.
I never can go
Where He will not see ;
Awake or asleep,
He still is with me.

sc NE morning, a few weeks later, Mr.
Lee; the head master of the
School, came into the school-
5 room looking sad and depressed.





LITTLE JIM. ~ 21.

AS soon as prayers were over Mr Lee
announced that he had something
important to say.

‘Tt is my painful duty,’ he said, ‘to tell
you that asilver watch belonging to Frank
Johnson has been taken from his locker,
and it seems as though someone in the
school is dishonest. Who that someone
is I cannot say, but God, who sees all
things, saw the boy take the watch, and
mark my words, that boy, whoever he
may be, will be found out.’

This announcement fell like a thunder-
bolt upon the school. No one had
anticipated such news, for never in the
memory of the eldest boy had anything of
the kind occurred before. A theft in a
public school is always sure to create much
unpleasantness, for amongst so many boys
the chance of finding the thief is small,
and consequently suspicion frequently
falls upon innocent boys, and no one really
knows wheiher his neighbour is honest or
dishonest.



22 LITTLE JIM.

It appeared that Frank Johnson had left
his watch in his locker, on the previous
afternoon, whilst he went to football
practice, and that upon returning later
in the day he found that his locker had
been forced open, his things disarranged,
and his watch, which he valued. very
highly, stolen. Leaving the things just
as he found them, he went to the head
master’s study and related to Mr. Lee what -
had taken place.

The news startled Mr. Lee considerably.

‘Frank,’ said he, ‘I am very sorry for
you; I know how much you valued your
watch, but never mind, my boy, cheer up,
truth will out, sooner or later ; we may yet
discover who has taken your watch. Have
you cause to suspect anyone of doing such
a dishonest act ?’

‘No, sir, replied Frank, ‘ but ——

‘But what ?’ asked the head master. _

‘Such a thing has not occurred before,’
responded Frank, ‘I’m afraid that perhaps
the new boy, Jim Ellis, may have been
tempted ——’



LITTLE JIM. 23.

‘No, Frank,’ said Mr Lee, ‘TI don’t think
itis Jim. The lad is poor, I know, but.
that is no reason why we should suppose
him to be guilty of this theft.’ :

‘I do not believe he is,’ Frank said. ‘I
only thought that, being poor, he might:
have been tempted.’

‘Yes, Frank, I see what you mean, The:
temptation might indeed be great.’

The same evening Jim was called into
the study.

‘Jim,’ said Mr. Lee, ‘Frank Johnson
tells me that someone this afternoon
forced open his locker and took his silver
watch away.’

- Indeed, sir,’ replied Jim, ‘I am very
sorry for Frank. He was very fond of the:
watch.’

‘Such a thing,’ continued the head
master, ‘has never happened before in my
school, and I fear that some of the boys:
will suspect that z

Mr. Lee turned on one side. He found
it hard to say that suspicion would fall





24 _ LITTLE JIM.

upon Jim as the latest arrival in the school,
and yet he knew such would be the case.

‘I trust, sir,’ said Jim, ‘that you don’t
think I took Frank's watch ?’

‘No, Jim,’ replied Mr. Lee, ‘I do not
think so, and moreover, Frank does not
think you took it. At the same time,
most of the boys will, I fear, lay the charge
at your door, I hope, for your sake, that
we shall be able to discover the thief.’

Jim saw the seriousness of the situation,
and was determined to speak up.

‘On my honour, sir,’ he said, with
emphasis, ‘I did not take the watch. I
wasin the playground the wholeafternoon.’

The boy’s outspoken manner struck
the head master. He turned to Jim and.
said :—

‘Jim, I believe you.’

Before retiring to rest Mr. Lee made up
his mind to acquaint the school in the
morning, of the theft, in the hope that some
information might be forthcoming as to
the thief. The matter had, however,



LITTLE JIM. 25

caused him a great deal of anxiety, which
soon betrayed itself in his face, which was
usually so bright and cheerful. The effect
of the head master’s announcement was
to throw the whole school into a ferment
of excitement and curiosity. The matter
formed the principal theme of talk the
whole day, but no information could be
gleaned as to how or by whom the watch
had disappeared.





CHAPTER IV.

PREPARING FOR THE EXAMINATION.

Stick to thy studies, never give in ;

The prize set before thee, struggle to win,
-ONTHS had passed away since
the day Frank Johnson lost
his watch, and the little
aK episode had almost been for-
gotten, except by a few. Frank hardly
knew what to think about the matter. He
was an open-hearted boy, much liked by
every one with whom he came into contact.
He had told Jim that he, at any rate, did not
believe him guilty of the theft, but he





LITTLE JIM. 2b

knew that many of the boys ‘considered
Jim the culprit; some of them, indeed,
treated him as though it had actually been
proved against him. Frank, however,
much to his credit, cultivated a friendship
with Jim, in spite of many jeers and
unpleasant remarks from the other beys.
And so the two quickly became fast
friends, and during most of their spare
time were together, either reading or
studying. The usual examination was fast
drawing near, and both Frank and Jim
had made up their minds to do their very
best to come out with honours. They
were much about the same age, but Frank
had the advantage of a better education.
Jim, however, had studied very hard since
he entered the school, for he was anxious
to do credit to Mr. Barnes, and to show
that gentleman that his kindness was not
thrown away upon a worthless lad. He
told Frank candidly that he intended
to beat him if he could, and Frank had
accepted the challenge with his usual good
humour and fairness.



28 LITTLE JIM.

Itsoon became known that Jim intended
to enter forthe examination, and was study-
ing hard for that purpose. Some of the
young gentlemen had thought more of
cricket and fishing than study, but now the
time was rapidly drawing near when their
abilities would be tested, and here was a
boy, with only one friendin the world, who
had the audacity to compete with them
in the examination. No wonder that
some of them began to hunt up soine
of their lesson books that hadn’t seen the
light for weeks, and to read up the various
subjects with a degree of energy unknown
for many a day.

One of these boys, George Murdock,
found himself in a desperate condition.
He, like a good many others, had thought
that he would have had things all his own
way, and accordingly had neglected his
studies to such an extent that it was almost
impossible for him to pass the examination
in asatisfactory manner. If he was not

actually beaten by Jim, he felt pretty sure
of being placed second to Frank. And he



LITTLE JIM. 29

had been promised five pounds by his
uncle provided that he came out at the
top of the list. Five pounds! What a lot
he could buy with five pounds. And
besides, he owed two pounds to a man in
the town, who had advanced him that sum
on security, and he was anxious to clear
himself of it. Being naturally of a jealous
disposition George could scarcely bear the
thought of the disgrace attached tu his being
defeated in the examination, coupled with
the unpleasant knowledge that he would
also be the loser of five pounds, part of
which had already been disposed of in
anticipation.

It only wanted a week now to the
examination, and consequently the whole
school was in a more or less excited
condition. Many of the boys finding the
time so short were still studying with
energy in order if possible to make up for
the golden moments lost earlier in the
term. But some were still a very long
way behind, and among these was George
Murdock.







CHAPTER V.

A DISCOVERY.

From the glorious heaven,
Where the angels dwell,
God looks down on children ;
And smiles when they live well ;
He heareth all they ask for,
very night and day ;
He watches like a father,
While they work or play.

NE after another the days had
quickly passed until it only
wanted one day more before the
examination would take place.

Everything, so faras Mr. Lee was concerned,

was in readiness for the. important event,

but it must be admitted that many of the





LITTLE JIM. 31

boys, a8 upon all like occasions, looked
forward to the morrow with more anxiety
than pleasure. No matter how well up a
boy may be in his studies, examination
day is always a day of excitement and
anxiety and the coolest headed boy is apt
to experience a good deal of nervous
excitement which often proves very
detrimental to him. Frank Johnson felt
pretty confident of passing in most of the
subjects, whilst Jim hoped to come out
weli, and it was generally considered that
the contest would be a severe one between
a few of the boys.

On the morning before the examination
the school had assembled as usual, most of
the teachers and scholars appearing to be
in the best spirits, Mr. Lee, the head
master, alone bearing traces of anxiety as
he sat at his desk. After prayer he
called for silence and solemnly told the
assembled school that he had made a
very serious discovery, which might
probably render it necessary to postpone
the examination.



82 LITTLE JIM.

‘Upon going to my private desk early
this morning’ said Mr. Lee with agitation,
‘I found that some one who had no right
to do so, had been there and tampered with
the contents and extracted two or three
copies of the test papers intended for use
to-morrow. Such conduct I need not say is
disgraceful, but the theft shall not avail the
guilty one, for I have made up my mind
thatunless the dishonest boy or boys are
discovered or confess their guilt before
ten o’clock tomorrow morning, the ex-
amination shall be postponed and a fresh
set of test papers prepared which will be
entirely different to those taken from my
desk.’

The head master’s startling announce-
ment produced the most intense
excitement. The boys looked at one
another in amazement—no one seemed
capable of giving utterance to his thoughts,
and no wonder for as Mr. Lee had said
such conduct as one or more of them had
been guilty of was most disgraceful.





LITTLE JIM. 33

_ Before the school had in any way.
recovered from the effect of the head
master’s announcement, the door at the
further end opened and one of the masters.
hurried in, carrying in one hand several
sheets of printed paper.

Mr. Lee rose at once, and exclaimed,
‘The stolen papers, Mr. Grant!’

‘Yes, sir,’ replied Mr. Grant, ‘I believe
80.”

‘Where did you find them ?’

‘In one of the lockers.’

‘Mr. Grant,’ said Mr. Lee, ‘ this is a very
serious thing, but for the good of the
school generally, and for the sake of honest
boys, I must ask the name of the boy in
whose locker these papers were found.’

‘Acting upon your instructions, sir,’
replied the master, ‘I searched all the
lockers and every likely corner, and Iam...
extremely sorry to say that I discovered
the papers in a book in the locker belong-
ing to James Ellis.’

- Jim heard his name mentioned with
the utmost amazement and horror. What



84 LITTLE JIM.

cruel fate was this that seemed always
hovering about him? He had scarcely
‘outlived the suspicion that had attached
to him on account of Frank’s stolen
watch when here an equally serious
charge is brought against him, of having
taken these test papers from the head
‘master’s private desk.

In a state of indignation and. be aties
ment Jim rose from his seat and
exclaimed: ‘Mr. Lee, sir, I did not take
those papers from your desk.’

‘T shall be quite willing and only too
‘pleased to believe that,’ replied the head
master, rather sternly, ‘If you will explain
how it comes about that these papers are
found in your locker.’

« . Jim trembledall over and turned deathly
pale.

-‘T cannot explain that,’ he said, ‘I had
no knowledge that they were there, and
did not know any paper had been stolen
until this morning.’

, ‘I sincerely trust,’ replied Mr. Lee, ‘that
-what you say will turn out to be the truth,

f



LITTLE JIM. 35

hut at present with such evidence before
us we can only arrive at one conclusion.
You will not be permitted to take any
part whatever in the examination.’

After the morning lessons Mr. Lee sent
for Jim to come to his study.

‘IT did not expect you guilty of this
matter,’ said Mr. Lee sorrowfully, ‘and I
am bitterly disappointed.’

‘Mr. Lee, ay replied Jim, I did not
take the papers.’

‘Then how is it,’ demanded Mr. Lee,
“that they are found in your box ?’

‘I do not know, sir,’ answered Jim,
feeling the helplessness of his position. .

‘T fear it is a clear case against you,’
continued the head master, ‘and: -one
which calls for severe treatment.. You
will have to be expelled the school.’

“No, no, sir!’ cried Jim, ‘ Geptne but
that—what will Mr Barnes think ?’

‘That you are a worthless lad,’ replied
Mr.Lee. ‘I’m ashamed of you, and much
as I detest being harsh, I must sustain the
honour of my school.’



36 LITTLE JIM.

Jim left the study utterly downcast and
broken in spirit. How was he to prove
his innocence in time to be allowed to
take part in the examination for which he
had studied so hard? He could not in
any way account for the papers being
found in his box, but that they were found
there he could not doubt, for he looked
upon Mr. Grant as a highly honourable
man. '

Mr. Lee, considering that the boys were
too excited with the events of the morn-
ing to attend properly to their studies,
gave orders that there would be no school
in the afternoon, and that the boys were
at liberty to do what they liked until the
evening. Most of them availed themselves
of the holiday to pay a visit to the town,
or to ramble about in the fields and woods.
Jim, however, felt little inclined to take
any part in pleasure, being too much dis-
tressed with the events of the. morning
and wondering how he was to clear him-
self from the disgrace hanging over his



LITTLE JIM. 37

head. Thus wondering, and full of sadness
he went up to his room and sat down upon
the bed to think. He thought of his mother
.and hoped that she will at least know
that he is innocent of the charge made
against him. Then he remembers his
mother’s advice, often given to him, that
‘in time of trouble and perplexity he should
go humbly to God to ask His help, and
then in simple faith to leave the result
with Him.

Sinking upon his knees by his bedside,
Jim clasps his hands and utters the simple
prayer taught him years ago by his
mother,— ‘O God, help me in this time of
trouble, and teach me to do Thy will, and
to trust in Thee, for Jesus’ sake. Amen.’





CHAPTER VI.
TRUTH WILL OUT.

Be upright and faithful,
Be honest and true;

Then God will protect you,
And guide you safe through.

HE all-important day found Jim.
very sad at the thought that all
his careful studying had been in.’
vain, for he felt sure that Mr. Lee

would not permit him to take any part in

the examination unless he could prove his.
innocence in time, and this he felt was.
now out of the question. It was, therefore,
with a downcast face that he appeared in
the school-room and took his place as.





LITTLE JIM. 39

usual prior to the examination. Most of
the boys treated him with coolness, and”
some with contempt, but Frank took his -
seat beside him and whispered :—

‘T’m awfully sorry, Jim, about those
papers—I don’t believe you had anything
to do with them.’

‘Thank you, Frank,’ returned Jim, ‘I
had no more to do with the papers than.
{had with your watch. I believe some-
one has a grudge against me.’

‘Yes,’ said Frank, ‘ that’s it—and I think:
I know who he is.’

‘It’s a great shame,’ Jim said sorrowfully,, -
‘for I have studied hard for the exam.-
and now shall not be allowed to take part.
in it. I don’t know what Mr. Barnes will
think—he’s sure to hear all about it from:
his sons.’

‘But it doesn’t matter, answered Frank,
‘you know you didn’t take the papers.’

At this moment Mr. Lee entered the’
school, and perceiving Jim in his place,
said :—



40. LITTLE JIM.

‘Ellis go into my study and wait there
until I come.’

Jim left his place, and did as the head
master had ordered. Overcome with grief
at the thought of the cruel suspicion
attached to him, he sank into a chair and
burst into tears. Whilst in this condition
the study door opened, and a little head
peeped within the room as if in search of
someone. It was little Dora, the head
master’s youngest daughter. Seeing that
someone was inthe study she advanced
cautiously to see who it was, and then find-
ing it to be one of the boys crying she
stood hesitating what to do. She made
up her mind at last.

‘Don’t cry, please,’ she said going up to
Jim and touching his arm, ‘don’t cry or I
shall cry too, and you wouldn’t like Dora
to cry, would you ?’

The little appeal took effect at once,
Jim dried his eyes and turning to Dora
said that he should be sorry to see her cry
and hoped she wouldn’t do so.



LITTLE. JIM. | AL

‘] thought papa was in here,’ said Dora.

‘No, he is in the school-room’ answered
Jim, ‘but I expect he will be here directly.
He sent me here.’ ;

‘Then aren’t you going in for the
exam.?’ asked little Dora, with some
surprise.

“No, Dora’ replied Jim.

‘But why not?’ persisted the child,
“don’t you know your lessons ?’

‘It isn’t that Dora,’ said Jim turning on
one side, and trying to keep back the
great lump that would persist in rising in
his throat.

‘Is that what made you cry just now?”
Dora asks, as if she meant to get at the
bottom of the matter.

‘Yes,’ responded Jim.

‘Then,’ said Dora, ‘I shall go and tell
papa that you know your lessons.’

‘He knows that already,’ said Jim. ‘It
isn’t that—he thinks I have been to his
desk in this room and taken away some

‘papers.’



42° LITTLE JIM.

-*But you didn’t—did you?’ enquired
the child.

‘No, Dora,’ replied Jim, ‘I wouldn’t do
such a thing.’

'*Then,’ exclaimed Dora decidedly, ‘I
shall go and tell papa.’

With this remark Dora left the study
with the intention of finding her father.
Mr. Lee came hurriedly along one of the
corridors, and met his little daughter. .

“Why Dora,’ he exclaimed, ‘What are
you doing up here ?’

_ ‘I’m looking for you, papa,’ answered —

Dora. ;

' ‘What do you want, dear,’ enquired Mr.
Lee; ‘you know papa is very busy to-day.”

‘Yes papa, I know,’ rejoined Dora, ‘but
Jim’s crying because he cannot be at the
exam:, and it wasn’t him that took the
papers, I know it wasn’t.’

‘My dear Dora,’ said Mr. Lee patting
the child’s head, ‘you mustn’t worry your
dear little self about such matters.’

‘But it was another boy that I saw leave.
your study,’ persisted Dora, .



LITTLE JIM. 43;

Mr. Lee looked into the child’s glistening:
eyes.

‘And when dear, did you see a boy
leave my study ?’

‘The evening before last, papa, as I was.
looking for mamma.’ :

_ ‘And are you sure that it wasn’t Jim
you saw?’

‘Yes, papa dear, quite sure—he was a.
bigger boy.’

‘Why did you not tell me about this: -
before, Dora.’

‘Papa dear, don’t be angry.’

‘No, Dora, I’m not angry,’ said Mr. Lee,.
stooping and kissing the child’s upturned
face. ‘Would you know the boy if yow’
saw him ?’ he enquired.

‘Oh yes, papa—quite sure.’

‘Then come with me into the school--'
room and tell me whether you see him.
there.’ :

‘The two entered the school-room, and
the unexpected appearance of Dora put.
the boys into a flurry as to what it alk



A4 LITTLE JIM.

meant, Presenily the child after having
glanced around the room, turns to her
father and whispers to.him. Thereupon
Mr. Lee beckonsa boy to him, and says :—

‘George Murdock, my little daughter
tells me that she saw you leave my study -
‘on the evening before last. Is that true ?’

Murdock hangs his head and makes no
reply.

‘Murdock,’ exclaimed Mr. Lee, ‘Do
‘you hear me? Igit true or not?’

Still no reply.

‘Very well, you stand ashamed, and by
‘your own action condemn yourself.’ Then
turning to Dora, Mr. Lee, says: ‘Run
away Dora, and tell Jim to come here.’

The child ran out of the room and
bounds into the study, much to Jim’s
surprise.

‘Papa wants you,’ she exclaims; and
adds—‘ Oh I’m g0 glad.’

Jim doesn’t know quite what to make of |
thisstrangeand unexpected announcement.
Upon entering the school-room, however,
the sees at once that something is amiss.



LITTLE JIM. 45

‘Ellis,’ said Mr. Lee—‘ you are clear of
every suspicion connected with the papers.
taken from my desk. My little daughter
identifies George Murdock as the boy she
gaw leave my study on the evening before
last, and there he stands without a word to.
say for himself, thoroughly ashamed and
disgraced.” Then addressing the whole
school: ‘ Boys you are aware of the
circumstances under which ‘Ellis was
accused of having extracted the papers
from my desk. I wish to tell you all that
he is entirely innocent. Murdock does
not deny that he was in my study on the
evening before last. It must have been
on that occasion that the papers were
taken, and we can only suppose that he
placed them in Ellis’ box in order that
suspicion should fall upon him, and that
he should not be allowed to take part in
the examination. Fortunately the truth
has come out in time to defeat this end,
and Ellis will be permitted to take part in
the examination without the slightest.



A6 LITTLE JIM.

stain .on his character. And now
Murdock,’ continued the head master, ‘you
may goto your room and stay there until
you are sent for,’
Frank was among the first to express
his pleasure at the turn events had taken.
‘I had my suspicion ‘said he,’ ‘but of
course we couldn’t prove anything against
Murdock.’
‘He was badly in debt,’ said another
boy, ‘and was relying upon getting the
five pounds promised by an uncle on
condition he came out top of the. list.
That must have been his reason for trying
to discredit Jim—he was afraid of being
beaten.’ =i
Now that the truth had come out
Murdock knew well enough that he would
be expelled. To avoid that disgrace he
made up his mind to run away from the
school. Accordingly taking the few things
that were of use or value to him, he made
them up into a parcel, and then watching
his opportunity, he left the school by the
back way and made for the town,



LITTLE JIM. 47

Later in the day his disappearance. be-
came known, and the fact only established
his guilt more firmly in the minds of every
one. ; e :

The examination took place asappointed.
It proved a sharp contest between a few
of the boys. Frank Johnson and Jim
came out equal, and each received a good
deal of praise for the general excellence of
their work.

A few weeks later a letter was handed
to Frank. It was from George Murdock,
and in it he acknowledged having taken
Frank’s silver watch, upon which he had
borrowed some money from a man in the
town, intending, he gaid, to replace the
watch again as soon as he could discharge
his debt. He also confessed to having
taken the papers from Mr. Lee’s desk, and
expressed his sorrow and shame for having
done s0, and asked Jim to forgive him for
the injury he had done him. He had
learnt a lesson, he said, which he hoped
never to fcrget, and it was this, that no



48 LITTLE JIM.

matter how clever one may consider him-
self in evil doing, the truth will out sooner
or later, and then punishment is sure to
follow.

God had heard Jim’s prayer, and in His
own good way had answered it.

THE END.











Full Text
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The Baldwin Library

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Frontispiece. LITTLE JIM.
ees iis

BY

HENRY: WOOD SMITH.

LONDON:
JAMES B. KNAPP, Surron Street, E.,
AND

26, PaTERNOSTER Row, E.C.
PRINTED. BY

HUXTABLE & GALWAY, LONDON & HUNTINGDON.
CONTENTS.

See eens
CILAP. PAGE

I. OUT IN THE COLD. hs . , Z 7
II, JIM IS TAKEN FROM THE STREETS . 14
Il, THE MISSING WATCH . : ‘ «20

IV. " PREPARING FOR re EXAMINATION . 26
Vv. A DISCOVERY. i : is » 80

VI. TRUTH WILL OUT : : 5 oe 238.


ET IE: iM.

CHAPTER 1.

OUT IN THE COLD.

A house in flames in murky night,
Flooding the skies with lurid light.
OW the cold December wind blew
the sleet in your face, and how
dark and miserable everything
and everybody looked. It was
getting late and those that had homes and’
warm firesides were hastening homeward.
The shops were putting out their lights
before closing for the night—the streets:




8 LITTLE JIM.

were becoming more and more deserted—
goon none butthose whose duty made it
a necessity for them to be out, would be
‘seen ; there had not indeed been such a
dreadful night for a long time.

On this particular night, in spite of
both wind and rain you might have seen
a poor little ragged boy, wandering list-
lessly about one of our London squares
endeavouring to find some place into
. which he might enter for shelter. At
length he stopped and peered into a
doorway. The place seemed more
protected than some of the others, and so ©
the boy ventured within and seated
himself on the step. Hardly had he done
$0, however, when the door opened and a
. pompous-looking man attired in showy

livery made his appearance.

His eye at once fell upon the ragged
figure crouching in the corner.

‘What are you doing here, you young
scamp, eh ?’ growled the man.

‘Nothin,’ replied the boy, ‘only tryin’
to git out of the rain.’
LITTLE JIM. 9

‘That story won’t do—yow’re a young
thief, that’s what you are,’ said the man.

*No J ain't.’

‘Well if you don’t move on I'll give
you in charge.’

While he was standing hesitating where
to go for shelter, a gentleman carrying a
bag came hurrying by, and the boy seeing
the chance of earning a penny asked
whether he wanted his bag carried.

‘No, my boy thank you, get home out
the rain.’

‘I ain’t got no home, sir,’ replied the
boy, ‘ please let me carry your bag.’

‘I prefer to carry it myself,’ answered
the gentleman, ‘but here isa copper for:
you.’

Jim took the coin hastily and in a second
was running as fast as his legs would
carry him towards a baker’s shop, which
he saw still open in the distance.

The gentleman stood watching the boy
until he got out of sight, then turning with
a sigh he pursued his way.
10 LITTLE JIM.

A few moments later the boy came
again into the square, and looked about to:
findadry doorway. Aftera while he found
one, and with some hesitation he ventured
within. Then drawing a roll of bread
from beneath his ragged jacket, he set to
work eating as though he had not touched
a bit all day.

It was only a piece of dry bread, but
what a glorious meal it was to little Jim.
To him—even in that dark damp doorway,
with the wind and sleet howling and beat-
ing without—the world seemed brighter
for that morsel of bread.

Having disposed of his supper Jim made
preparations for the night. This, however,
did not occupy much time. Tightening
his ragged jacket close round him, he made
himself as comfortable as he could on the
hard, cold doorstep and was soon fast
asleep.

It was not the first time that Jim had
slept ina cold doorway. Indeed, since his
mother died, and their scant furniture had
been sold to pay the rent, he had scarcely
LITTLESJIM. 11

known what it was to have a night’s
shelter, let alone a bed. But even on the
hard stone he dreamt happy dreams of
days long passed and gone, when as a
little child he played around his parents
in the green fields and lanes of Devon-
shire. Butin the midst of this happiness he
awoke with a start only to find himself
still a poor outcast with nota person in
the wide world he could claim as a friend.
Rubbing his eyes he looked about him.
Suddenly he saw a bright light in one of
the second floor windows of a house on
the opposite side of the square. He saw
at once that it was not an’ ordinary light,
such as would come from gas or a lamp.
What could it be® Fire! Jim was sure
of it, and without wasting a second he was
in full speed to the nearest fire-brigade
station. In less than ten minutes an engine,
with Jim standing by the driver's side,
was tearing along the deserted streets.
Arriving at the house on fire, the firemen
saw at once that it was likely to be a
serious matter and another man was dis-
12 _ LITTLE JIM.

patched for assistance. In the meantime
the inmates were hurrying to and fro in
great excitement and a crowd of people
was rapidly gathering in the square.
The upper part of the house was now in
flames and it seemed almost impossible to
cope with the fire. Suddenly a little
white face appeared at one of the upper-
most windows and the first to perceive it
was Jim. Running up to one of the fire-
men he told him what he had seen. The
man was slow to believe the report, but the
boy’s manner was so agitated that he
hurried forward to the spot whence Jim
had first seen the child’s face. There was
then no mistake—the fireman too saw the
child and quickly consulted the others as
to what should be done.

There was not a second to lose—every-
one saw that only by little less than a
miracle could the poor little thing be saved
from the jaws of death. What was to be
done? The firemen stood hesitating and
perplexed. Suddenly and with eager
tones Jim said—
LITTLE JIM. 13

“Can’t you tie a rope round me and let
me down from the roof ?’

‘We could do that, my boy,’ replied the
’ fireman, ‘but we’re not going to risk your
life.’

Little Jim was, however, so persistent
that it was decided to make the attempt.
The father of the child as well as the
other relations were distracted at the peril
of their darling and yet they felt them-
selves utterly powerless to save her. Two
firemen and Jim now entered the next
house and in a few moments were on the
roof. The crowd anxiously watched the
men fasten a rope round the boy’s waist
and under his arms, and then amid the
greatest excitement watched them lower
him from the roof. The smoke from the
burning house made it impossible for them
to see every movement of the boy, arid it
” wastherefore not untilsome little time after-
wards that they knew the child was sived.

A few moments later as the child was
restored unhurt to her parents, a shout of
joy, such as is seldom heard in the streets
of London, went forth from the crowd.


CHAPTER II.

JIM IS TAKEN FROM THE STREETS.

A diamond buried in the mine,
Though now unknown;
May yet be found, and brightly shine,
In Monarch’s crown.
4 but not until considerable damage
\) had been done. The engines
as having returned to their stations,
‘the crowd quickly dispersed. In the
excitement and hubbub few, if any,
‘thought of the boy-hero,—in fact, after
the little girl had been safely restored to
‘her parents, Jim had disappeared, and no
_ sone knew where he had gone.


LITTLE JIM. 15

A day or two afterwards, Mr. Barnes, |
the father of the rescued child, made
enquiry at the fire-station after Jim, but
the men were unable to give any inform-
mution.as to his whereabouts. They had
not seen him since the night of the fire,
and lad no idea where he could be found.

This was grieving to Mr. Barnes, who
naturally felt that he owed a great debt of
gratitude to the boy who had risked his
own life to save that of his daughter.
Day after day went by and still Jim had
mot been seen or heard of. At length,
however, one of the fire-men noticed a
little ragged boy standing looking with
eager curiosity at one of the engines.
Thinking he resembled the lost hero, he
beckoned to him to come within. Then
putting one or two questions to the boy
the found that he was the very one for
whom search had hitherto been made in
-vain. Asking one of his mates to relieve
him of duty fora short time, he proceeded.
with little Jim to where Mr. Barnes was
16 “LITTLE JIM.

residing during the rebuilding of his old
house.

Fortunately Mr. Barnes was at home,
and, accordingly, Jim and his friend the
fireman were introduced at once to that
gentleman in his library. Mr. Barnes
recognised the boy immediately, and
rising, took him warmly by the hand and
told him how really grateful he was to
him for his bravery.

Whilst the two were thus standing to-
gether—the library door opened and a
little girl, prettily dressed in white, came
running into the room.

‘ Papa, papa, dinner is ready—come and
have your dinner like a good papa!’

‘Allright, Dolly,’ replied Mr. Barnes, and
then, drawing the child close to his side,
he continued : ‘Wouldn’t my “ Dolly” like
to thank this kind brave boy for taking
her away from the cruel fire ?’.

Dolly looked up into her father’s face,
and the recollection of that dreadful night
coming vividly before her—she threw her
LITTLE JIM. 17

arms around her father’s neck and burst
into tears.

Mr. Barnes kissed his daughter’s tiny
face and wiped the tears from her
cheeks.

‘Now Dolly, he said, ‘tell him how
thankful you are for saving your life.’

The child left her father’s side and,
going slowly up to Jim, said.

‘Me thank you for taking me away from
cruel fire.’

Then running back to her father’s side
she again threw her arms around his neck.

‘Now papa come and have your dinner
like a good papa’ .

Mr Barnes saw the poor boy’s eyes
glisten at the very word ‘dinner,’ and it
then occurred to him that Jim would also
like something to eat.

In answer to a ring from a bell which
Mr. Barnes had on his table, a servant
entered the library.

‘Take this boy,’ said the master of the
house ‘and give him a good dinner—then
18 LITTLE JIM.

-let. him put on some clean things of one
of our boys, and after dinner I want to
have a talk with him.’

In obedience to these orders, the servant
beckoned to Jim to follow her, which he
did, and in a moment found himself in a
well-lighted and comfortable kitchen.
“Having partaken of a hearty meal, he
washed himself and put on some clean
clothes belonging to one of the sons of
Mr. Barnes, then with a clean white collar,
he presented a quite respectable appearance.

‘Dear me,’ exclaimed the servant ‘ you
‘do look a swell, your friends won’t know
you.’ ,

Jim thought the same, but refrained
from saying so. It was such a long time
since he had been so well clad that he
could scarcely realise his present condition.

Presently a bell rang and the boy was
again shown into the library. Then in
compliance with a request from Mr.
Barnes le told the story of his life, and
how he came to be a wanderer in the
LITTLE JIM. 19

_ streets. The recital made a deep impres-
sion on Mr. Barnes, and at the conclusion
he asked Jim whether he would like to
live with him and be educated properly,
in order that he might earn a position for
himselfin the world. He was only too ready
to accept the generous offer, thankful for
the way of deliverance thus opened to him.

A few weeks later he was sent to a
school in the country, where the sons of
Mr. Barnes were receiving their education.
Here he was looked upon quite as a hero,
for the story of the part he had taken in
the fire had been passed on from one boy
to another until the whole school knew of
his bravery and admired him for it.
Indeed so great was this respect that even
the ‘bully’ of the school, remembering
that discretion is the better part of valour,
considered it more prudent not to interfere
with the ‘new boy,


CHAPTER IT.

THE MISSING WATCH.

God sees all I. do,
He hears all I say,
He knows my thoughts too,
And my every way.
He always is near,
By day and by night;
The darkness to Him
Is just as the light.
I never can go
Where He will not see ;
Awake or asleep,
He still is with me.

sc NE morning, a few weeks later, Mr.
Lee; the head master of the
School, came into the school-
5 room looking sad and depressed.


LITTLE JIM. ~ 21.

AS soon as prayers were over Mr Lee
announced that he had something
important to say.

‘Tt is my painful duty,’ he said, ‘to tell
you that asilver watch belonging to Frank
Johnson has been taken from his locker,
and it seems as though someone in the
school is dishonest. Who that someone
is I cannot say, but God, who sees all
things, saw the boy take the watch, and
mark my words, that boy, whoever he
may be, will be found out.’

This announcement fell like a thunder-
bolt upon the school. No one had
anticipated such news, for never in the
memory of the eldest boy had anything of
the kind occurred before. A theft in a
public school is always sure to create much
unpleasantness, for amongst so many boys
the chance of finding the thief is small,
and consequently suspicion frequently
falls upon innocent boys, and no one really
knows wheiher his neighbour is honest or
dishonest.
22 LITTLE JIM.

It appeared that Frank Johnson had left
his watch in his locker, on the previous
afternoon, whilst he went to football
practice, and that upon returning later
in the day he found that his locker had
been forced open, his things disarranged,
and his watch, which he valued. very
highly, stolen. Leaving the things just
as he found them, he went to the head
master’s study and related to Mr. Lee what -
had taken place.

The news startled Mr. Lee considerably.

‘Frank,’ said he, ‘I am very sorry for
you; I know how much you valued your
watch, but never mind, my boy, cheer up,
truth will out, sooner or later ; we may yet
discover who has taken your watch. Have
you cause to suspect anyone of doing such
a dishonest act ?’

‘No, sir, replied Frank, ‘ but ——

‘But what ?’ asked the head master. _

‘Such a thing has not occurred before,’
responded Frank, ‘I’m afraid that perhaps
the new boy, Jim Ellis, may have been
tempted ——’
LITTLE JIM. 23.

‘No, Frank,’ said Mr Lee, ‘TI don’t think
itis Jim. The lad is poor, I know, but.
that is no reason why we should suppose
him to be guilty of this theft.’ :

‘I do not believe he is,’ Frank said. ‘I
only thought that, being poor, he might:
have been tempted.’

‘Yes, Frank, I see what you mean, The:
temptation might indeed be great.’

The same evening Jim was called into
the study.

‘Jim,’ said Mr. Lee, ‘Frank Johnson
tells me that someone this afternoon
forced open his locker and took his silver
watch away.’

- Indeed, sir,’ replied Jim, ‘I am very
sorry for Frank. He was very fond of the:
watch.’

‘Such a thing,’ continued the head
master, ‘has never happened before in my
school, and I fear that some of the boys:
will suspect that z

Mr. Lee turned on one side. He found
it hard to say that suspicion would fall


24 _ LITTLE JIM.

upon Jim as the latest arrival in the school,
and yet he knew such would be the case.

‘I trust, sir,’ said Jim, ‘that you don’t
think I took Frank's watch ?’

‘No, Jim,’ replied Mr. Lee, ‘I do not
think so, and moreover, Frank does not
think you took it. At the same time,
most of the boys will, I fear, lay the charge
at your door, I hope, for your sake, that
we shall be able to discover the thief.’

Jim saw the seriousness of the situation,
and was determined to speak up.

‘On my honour, sir,’ he said, with
emphasis, ‘I did not take the watch. I
wasin the playground the wholeafternoon.’

The boy’s outspoken manner struck
the head master. He turned to Jim and.
said :—

‘Jim, I believe you.’

Before retiring to rest Mr. Lee made up
his mind to acquaint the school in the
morning, of the theft, in the hope that some
information might be forthcoming as to
the thief. The matter had, however,
LITTLE JIM. 25

caused him a great deal of anxiety, which
soon betrayed itself in his face, which was
usually so bright and cheerful. The effect
of the head master’s announcement was
to throw the whole school into a ferment
of excitement and curiosity. The matter
formed the principal theme of talk the
whole day, but no information could be
gleaned as to how or by whom the watch
had disappeared.


CHAPTER IV.

PREPARING FOR THE EXAMINATION.

Stick to thy studies, never give in ;

The prize set before thee, struggle to win,
-ONTHS had passed away since
the day Frank Johnson lost
his watch, and the little
aK episode had almost been for-
gotten, except by a few. Frank hardly
knew what to think about the matter. He
was an open-hearted boy, much liked by
every one with whom he came into contact.
He had told Jim that he, at any rate, did not
believe him guilty of the theft, but he


LITTLE JIM. 2b

knew that many of the boys ‘considered
Jim the culprit; some of them, indeed,
treated him as though it had actually been
proved against him. Frank, however,
much to his credit, cultivated a friendship
with Jim, in spite of many jeers and
unpleasant remarks from the other beys.
And so the two quickly became fast
friends, and during most of their spare
time were together, either reading or
studying. The usual examination was fast
drawing near, and both Frank and Jim
had made up their minds to do their very
best to come out with honours. They
were much about the same age, but Frank
had the advantage of a better education.
Jim, however, had studied very hard since
he entered the school, for he was anxious
to do credit to Mr. Barnes, and to show
that gentleman that his kindness was not
thrown away upon a worthless lad. He
told Frank candidly that he intended
to beat him if he could, and Frank had
accepted the challenge with his usual good
humour and fairness.
28 LITTLE JIM.

Itsoon became known that Jim intended
to enter forthe examination, and was study-
ing hard for that purpose. Some of the
young gentlemen had thought more of
cricket and fishing than study, but now the
time was rapidly drawing near when their
abilities would be tested, and here was a
boy, with only one friendin the world, who
had the audacity to compete with them
in the examination. No wonder that
some of them began to hunt up soine
of their lesson books that hadn’t seen the
light for weeks, and to read up the various
subjects with a degree of energy unknown
for many a day.

One of these boys, George Murdock,
found himself in a desperate condition.
He, like a good many others, had thought
that he would have had things all his own
way, and accordingly had neglected his
studies to such an extent that it was almost
impossible for him to pass the examination
in asatisfactory manner. If he was not

actually beaten by Jim, he felt pretty sure
of being placed second to Frank. And he
LITTLE JIM. 29

had been promised five pounds by his
uncle provided that he came out at the
top of the list. Five pounds! What a lot
he could buy with five pounds. And
besides, he owed two pounds to a man in
the town, who had advanced him that sum
on security, and he was anxious to clear
himself of it. Being naturally of a jealous
disposition George could scarcely bear the
thought of the disgrace attached tu his being
defeated in the examination, coupled with
the unpleasant knowledge that he would
also be the loser of five pounds, part of
which had already been disposed of in
anticipation.

It only wanted a week now to the
examination, and consequently the whole
school was in a more or less excited
condition. Many of the boys finding the
time so short were still studying with
energy in order if possible to make up for
the golden moments lost earlier in the
term. But some were still a very long
way behind, and among these was George
Murdock.




CHAPTER V.

A DISCOVERY.

From the glorious heaven,
Where the angels dwell,
God looks down on children ;
And smiles when they live well ;
He heareth all they ask for,
very night and day ;
He watches like a father,
While they work or play.

NE after another the days had
quickly passed until it only
wanted one day more before the
examination would take place.

Everything, so faras Mr. Lee was concerned,

was in readiness for the. important event,

but it must be admitted that many of the


LITTLE JIM. 31

boys, a8 upon all like occasions, looked
forward to the morrow with more anxiety
than pleasure. No matter how well up a
boy may be in his studies, examination
day is always a day of excitement and
anxiety and the coolest headed boy is apt
to experience a good deal of nervous
excitement which often proves very
detrimental to him. Frank Johnson felt
pretty confident of passing in most of the
subjects, whilst Jim hoped to come out
weli, and it was generally considered that
the contest would be a severe one between
a few of the boys.

On the morning before the examination
the school had assembled as usual, most of
the teachers and scholars appearing to be
in the best spirits, Mr. Lee, the head
master, alone bearing traces of anxiety as
he sat at his desk. After prayer he
called for silence and solemnly told the
assembled school that he had made a
very serious discovery, which might
probably render it necessary to postpone
the examination.
82 LITTLE JIM.

‘Upon going to my private desk early
this morning’ said Mr. Lee with agitation,
‘I found that some one who had no right
to do so, had been there and tampered with
the contents and extracted two or three
copies of the test papers intended for use
to-morrow. Such conduct I need not say is
disgraceful, but the theft shall not avail the
guilty one, for I have made up my mind
thatunless the dishonest boy or boys are
discovered or confess their guilt before
ten o’clock tomorrow morning, the ex-
amination shall be postponed and a fresh
set of test papers prepared which will be
entirely different to those taken from my
desk.’

The head master’s startling announce-
ment produced the most intense
excitement. The boys looked at one
another in amazement—no one seemed
capable of giving utterance to his thoughts,
and no wonder for as Mr. Lee had said
such conduct as one or more of them had
been guilty of was most disgraceful.


LITTLE JIM. 33

_ Before the school had in any way.
recovered from the effect of the head
master’s announcement, the door at the
further end opened and one of the masters.
hurried in, carrying in one hand several
sheets of printed paper.

Mr. Lee rose at once, and exclaimed,
‘The stolen papers, Mr. Grant!’

‘Yes, sir,’ replied Mr. Grant, ‘I believe
80.”

‘Where did you find them ?’

‘In one of the lockers.’

‘Mr. Grant,’ said Mr. Lee, ‘ this is a very
serious thing, but for the good of the
school generally, and for the sake of honest
boys, I must ask the name of the boy in
whose locker these papers were found.’

‘Acting upon your instructions, sir,’
replied the master, ‘I searched all the
lockers and every likely corner, and Iam...
extremely sorry to say that I discovered
the papers in a book in the locker belong-
ing to James Ellis.’

- Jim heard his name mentioned with
the utmost amazement and horror. What
84 LITTLE JIM.

cruel fate was this that seemed always
hovering about him? He had scarcely
‘outlived the suspicion that had attached
to him on account of Frank’s stolen
watch when here an equally serious
charge is brought against him, of having
taken these test papers from the head
‘master’s private desk.

In a state of indignation and. be aties
ment Jim rose from his seat and
exclaimed: ‘Mr. Lee, sir, I did not take
those papers from your desk.’

‘T shall be quite willing and only too
‘pleased to believe that,’ replied the head
master, rather sternly, ‘If you will explain
how it comes about that these papers are
found in your locker.’

« . Jim trembledall over and turned deathly
pale.

-‘T cannot explain that,’ he said, ‘I had
no knowledge that they were there, and
did not know any paper had been stolen
until this morning.’

, ‘I sincerely trust,’ replied Mr. Lee, ‘that
-what you say will turn out to be the truth,

f
LITTLE JIM. 35

hut at present with such evidence before
us we can only arrive at one conclusion.
You will not be permitted to take any
part whatever in the examination.’

After the morning lessons Mr. Lee sent
for Jim to come to his study.

‘IT did not expect you guilty of this
matter,’ said Mr. Lee sorrowfully, ‘and I
am bitterly disappointed.’

‘Mr. Lee, ay replied Jim, I did not
take the papers.’

‘Then how is it,’ demanded Mr. Lee,
“that they are found in your box ?’

‘I do not know, sir,’ answered Jim,
feeling the helplessness of his position. .

‘T fear it is a clear case against you,’
continued the head master, ‘and: -one
which calls for severe treatment.. You
will have to be expelled the school.’

“No, no, sir!’ cried Jim, ‘ Geptne but
that—what will Mr Barnes think ?’

‘That you are a worthless lad,’ replied
Mr.Lee. ‘I’m ashamed of you, and much
as I detest being harsh, I must sustain the
honour of my school.’
36 LITTLE JIM.

Jim left the study utterly downcast and
broken in spirit. How was he to prove
his innocence in time to be allowed to
take part in the examination for which he
had studied so hard? He could not in
any way account for the papers being
found in his box, but that they were found
there he could not doubt, for he looked
upon Mr. Grant as a highly honourable
man. '

Mr. Lee, considering that the boys were
too excited with the events of the morn-
ing to attend properly to their studies,
gave orders that there would be no school
in the afternoon, and that the boys were
at liberty to do what they liked until the
evening. Most of them availed themselves
of the holiday to pay a visit to the town,
or to ramble about in the fields and woods.
Jim, however, felt little inclined to take
any part in pleasure, being too much dis-
tressed with the events of the. morning
and wondering how he was to clear him-
self from the disgrace hanging over his
LITTLE JIM. 37

head. Thus wondering, and full of sadness
he went up to his room and sat down upon
the bed to think. He thought of his mother
.and hoped that she will at least know
that he is innocent of the charge made
against him. Then he remembers his
mother’s advice, often given to him, that
‘in time of trouble and perplexity he should
go humbly to God to ask His help, and
then in simple faith to leave the result
with Him.

Sinking upon his knees by his bedside,
Jim clasps his hands and utters the simple
prayer taught him years ago by his
mother,— ‘O God, help me in this time of
trouble, and teach me to do Thy will, and
to trust in Thee, for Jesus’ sake. Amen.’


CHAPTER VI.
TRUTH WILL OUT.

Be upright and faithful,
Be honest and true;

Then God will protect you,
And guide you safe through.

HE all-important day found Jim.
very sad at the thought that all
his careful studying had been in.’
vain, for he felt sure that Mr. Lee

would not permit him to take any part in

the examination unless he could prove his.
innocence in time, and this he felt was.
now out of the question. It was, therefore,
with a downcast face that he appeared in
the school-room and took his place as.


LITTLE JIM. 39

usual prior to the examination. Most of
the boys treated him with coolness, and”
some with contempt, but Frank took his -
seat beside him and whispered :—

‘T’m awfully sorry, Jim, about those
papers—I don’t believe you had anything
to do with them.’

‘Thank you, Frank,’ returned Jim, ‘I
had no more to do with the papers than.
{had with your watch. I believe some-
one has a grudge against me.’

‘Yes,’ said Frank, ‘ that’s it—and I think:
I know who he is.’

‘It’s a great shame,’ Jim said sorrowfully,, -
‘for I have studied hard for the exam.-
and now shall not be allowed to take part.
in it. I don’t know what Mr. Barnes will
think—he’s sure to hear all about it from:
his sons.’

‘But it doesn’t matter, answered Frank,
‘you know you didn’t take the papers.’

At this moment Mr. Lee entered the’
school, and perceiving Jim in his place,
said :—
40. LITTLE JIM.

‘Ellis go into my study and wait there
until I come.’

Jim left his place, and did as the head
master had ordered. Overcome with grief
at the thought of the cruel suspicion
attached to him, he sank into a chair and
burst into tears. Whilst in this condition
the study door opened, and a little head
peeped within the room as if in search of
someone. It was little Dora, the head
master’s youngest daughter. Seeing that
someone was inthe study she advanced
cautiously to see who it was, and then find-
ing it to be one of the boys crying she
stood hesitating what to do. She made
up her mind at last.

‘Don’t cry, please,’ she said going up to
Jim and touching his arm, ‘don’t cry or I
shall cry too, and you wouldn’t like Dora
to cry, would you ?’

The little appeal took effect at once,
Jim dried his eyes and turning to Dora
said that he should be sorry to see her cry
and hoped she wouldn’t do so.
LITTLE. JIM. | AL

‘] thought papa was in here,’ said Dora.

‘No, he is in the school-room’ answered
Jim, ‘but I expect he will be here directly.
He sent me here.’ ;

‘Then aren’t you going in for the
exam.?’ asked little Dora, with some
surprise.

“No, Dora’ replied Jim.

‘But why not?’ persisted the child,
“don’t you know your lessons ?’

‘It isn’t that Dora,’ said Jim turning on
one side, and trying to keep back the
great lump that would persist in rising in
his throat.

‘Is that what made you cry just now?”
Dora asks, as if she meant to get at the
bottom of the matter.

‘Yes,’ responded Jim.

‘Then,’ said Dora, ‘I shall go and tell
papa that you know your lessons.’

‘He knows that already,’ said Jim. ‘It
isn’t that—he thinks I have been to his
desk in this room and taken away some

‘papers.’
42° LITTLE JIM.

-*But you didn’t—did you?’ enquired
the child.

‘No, Dora,’ replied Jim, ‘I wouldn’t do
such a thing.’

'*Then,’ exclaimed Dora decidedly, ‘I
shall go and tell papa.’

With this remark Dora left the study
with the intention of finding her father.
Mr. Lee came hurriedly along one of the
corridors, and met his little daughter. .

“Why Dora,’ he exclaimed, ‘What are
you doing up here ?’

_ ‘I’m looking for you, papa,’ answered —

Dora. ;

' ‘What do you want, dear,’ enquired Mr.
Lee; ‘you know papa is very busy to-day.”

‘Yes papa, I know,’ rejoined Dora, ‘but
Jim’s crying because he cannot be at the
exam:, and it wasn’t him that took the
papers, I know it wasn’t.’

‘My dear Dora,’ said Mr. Lee patting
the child’s head, ‘you mustn’t worry your
dear little self about such matters.’

‘But it was another boy that I saw leave.
your study,’ persisted Dora, .
LITTLE JIM. 43;

Mr. Lee looked into the child’s glistening:
eyes.

‘And when dear, did you see a boy
leave my study ?’

‘The evening before last, papa, as I was.
looking for mamma.’ :

_ ‘And are you sure that it wasn’t Jim
you saw?’

‘Yes, papa dear, quite sure—he was a.
bigger boy.’

‘Why did you not tell me about this: -
before, Dora.’

‘Papa dear, don’t be angry.’

‘No, Dora, I’m not angry,’ said Mr. Lee,.
stooping and kissing the child’s upturned
face. ‘Would you know the boy if yow’
saw him ?’ he enquired.

‘Oh yes, papa—quite sure.’

‘Then come with me into the school--'
room and tell me whether you see him.
there.’ :

‘The two entered the school-room, and
the unexpected appearance of Dora put.
the boys into a flurry as to what it alk
A4 LITTLE JIM.

meant, Presenily the child after having
glanced around the room, turns to her
father and whispers to.him. Thereupon
Mr. Lee beckonsa boy to him, and says :—

‘George Murdock, my little daughter
tells me that she saw you leave my study -
‘on the evening before last. Is that true ?’

Murdock hangs his head and makes no
reply.

‘Murdock,’ exclaimed Mr. Lee, ‘Do
‘you hear me? Igit true or not?’

Still no reply.

‘Very well, you stand ashamed, and by
‘your own action condemn yourself.’ Then
turning to Dora, Mr. Lee, says: ‘Run
away Dora, and tell Jim to come here.’

The child ran out of the room and
bounds into the study, much to Jim’s
surprise.

‘Papa wants you,’ she exclaims; and
adds—‘ Oh I’m g0 glad.’

Jim doesn’t know quite what to make of |
thisstrangeand unexpected announcement.
Upon entering the school-room, however,
the sees at once that something is amiss.
LITTLE JIM. 45

‘Ellis,’ said Mr. Lee—‘ you are clear of
every suspicion connected with the papers.
taken from my desk. My little daughter
identifies George Murdock as the boy she
gaw leave my study on the evening before
last, and there he stands without a word to.
say for himself, thoroughly ashamed and
disgraced.” Then addressing the whole
school: ‘ Boys you are aware of the
circumstances under which ‘Ellis was
accused of having extracted the papers
from my desk. I wish to tell you all that
he is entirely innocent. Murdock does
not deny that he was in my study on the
evening before last. It must have been
on that occasion that the papers were
taken, and we can only suppose that he
placed them in Ellis’ box in order that
suspicion should fall upon him, and that
he should not be allowed to take part in
the examination. Fortunately the truth
has come out in time to defeat this end,
and Ellis will be permitted to take part in
the examination without the slightest.
A6 LITTLE JIM.

stain .on his character. And now
Murdock,’ continued the head master, ‘you
may goto your room and stay there until
you are sent for,’
Frank was among the first to express
his pleasure at the turn events had taken.
‘I had my suspicion ‘said he,’ ‘but of
course we couldn’t prove anything against
Murdock.’
‘He was badly in debt,’ said another
boy, ‘and was relying upon getting the
five pounds promised by an uncle on
condition he came out top of the. list.
That must have been his reason for trying
to discredit Jim—he was afraid of being
beaten.’ =i
Now that the truth had come out
Murdock knew well enough that he would
be expelled. To avoid that disgrace he
made up his mind to run away from the
school. Accordingly taking the few things
that were of use or value to him, he made
them up into a parcel, and then watching
his opportunity, he left the school by the
back way and made for the town,
LITTLE JIM. 47

Later in the day his disappearance. be-
came known, and the fact only established
his guilt more firmly in the minds of every
one. ; e :

The examination took place asappointed.
It proved a sharp contest between a few
of the boys. Frank Johnson and Jim
came out equal, and each received a good
deal of praise for the general excellence of
their work.

A few weeks later a letter was handed
to Frank. It was from George Murdock,
and in it he acknowledged having taken
Frank’s silver watch, upon which he had
borrowed some money from a man in the
town, intending, he gaid, to replace the
watch again as soon as he could discharge
his debt. He also confessed to having
taken the papers from Mr. Lee’s desk, and
expressed his sorrow and shame for having
done s0, and asked Jim to forgive him for
the injury he had done him. He had
learnt a lesson, he said, which he hoped
never to fcrget, and it was this, that no
48 LITTLE JIM.

matter how clever one may consider him-
self in evil doing, the truth will out sooner
or later, and then punishment is sure to
follow.

God had heard Jim’s prayer, and in His
own good way had answered it.

THE END.





xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008885300001datestamp 2008-11-13setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Little Jimdc:creator Smith, Henry WoodHuxtable & Galway ( Printer )dc:subject Orphans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Street children -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Boarding school students -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Teacher-student relationships -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Cheating (Education) -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Malicious accusation -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Girls -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Fathers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Winter -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Bullying -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Diligence -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Loyalty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Honesty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Gratitude -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Kindness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Rejection (Psychology) in children -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Poverty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Prize books (Provenance) -- 1899 ( rbprov )School stories -- 1899 ( local )Juvenile literature -- 1899 ( rbgenr )dc:description b Statement of Responsibility by Henry Wood Smith.Pictorial front cover.Date of publication from prize inscription.Contains prose and verse.dc:publisher James B. Knappdc:date 1899?dc:type Bookdc:format 48 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 15 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00088853&v=00001002237668 (ALEPH)265034302 (OCLC)ALH8160 (NOTIS)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English