Citation
Aunt Charlotte's stories of Bible history for young disciples

Material Information

Title:
Aunt Charlotte's stories of Bible history for young disciples designed for the 52 Sundays in the year containing over 100 stoires from the Holy Book embracing instructive historical events from the Old and New Testaments
Cover title:
Aunt Charlotte's stories of Bible history for the little ones
Creator:
Yonge, Charlotte Mary, 1823-1901
Scull, William Ellis, b. 1862 ( Copyright holder )
Place of Publication:
[S.l
Publisher:
s.n.]
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
252, [14] p., [2] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Bible stories, English -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Frontispiece and plates printed in colors.
General Note:
Date of publication on t.p. verso.
General Note:
Copyright held by W. E. Scull.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Charlotte M. Yonge ; embellished with nearly 100 fine engravings, color plates, half-tones, woodcuts and pen drawings made especially for this volume.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026667122 ( ALEPH )
ALG5552 ( NOTIS )
08852524 ( OCLC )
02026650 ( LCCN )

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Full Text










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Runt (janvorres Sroetes

BIBLE HISTORY
FOR YOUNG DISCIPLES

DESIGNED FOR THE 52 SUNDAYS IN THE YEAR

OVER 100 STORIES FROM THE HoLy BooK

HEMPRACING INSTRUCTIVE HISTORICAL EVENTS FROM THE
OLD AND NEW THSTAMENTS

By CHARLOTTE M. YONGE

(THE NOTED AUTHOR AND MISSIONARIES’ FRIEND]

EMBELLISHED witH NeEaRLY 100 FinE ENGRAVINGS

Color Plates, Half-Tones, Woodcuts and Pen Drawings
Made Especially for This Volume

perce





|

a



Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1898, by
W. E. SCULL,

in the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington {



All rights reserved.





ALL PERSONS ARE WARNED NOT TO INFRINGE UPON OUR COPYRIGHT BY USING KITHER Fk
MATTILR OR THE PICTURES IN THIS VOLUME, j







(NERO DE Crile

WCRI

: LS \



PANO Coan Calcio Auixalon@) singles
was a maiden lady who had
for many years been living
in the East, teaching school.
She had, also, been all her
life a great Sunday-school
worker, and had taught the
Infant, or Primary Depart-
ment in her home church
since she was a very young
lady. She almost ‘knew the
Bible by heart,” so everybody
said, and the older people
used to come to the Infant
Class room to hear her ex-
plain it.

As for Bible stories, there
was not one of them all that
sue did not know as well
as she did her A-B-C’s for
she had told them over hun-

dreds of times to her little scholars and friends.

In the year 1898 Aunt Charlotte concluded to visit her sister in a
far Western State, and it was this visit which caused this book to be
written. Her sister had three very pretty and interesting children—
two girls and one boy; Clara was ten years old, Willie was eight,



INTRODUCTION.

and ‘Little Anna,’ as everybody called her, was almost six when
Aunt Charlotte arrived.

They had heard their mother tell of wonderful Aunt Charlotte, and
so they longed to listen to some of her stories about everything, and
especially about the Bible.

They were not disappointed. Every day she told them about
heroes and fairies, and the beautiful countries and strange people
across the seas, and she also heard their lessons.

She said she would save all her Bible stories for Sunday, and to
make up for not telling them any during the week, she would tell
them three short stories every ere ne after breakfast, one after
dinner, and one after supper—if they would listen right well and try
to answer the questions she would ask them after each story. They
all promised they would do the very best they could. And she
planned her stories so she could take them all throgh the Bible in
the fifty-two Sundays in the year,—for she came to stay a whole year
with them,—and have them learn about the great people and great
things that happened in Bible times. _

So that is the very way they began; and if you, my little readers,
will do like Clara and Willie and little Anna did, and mother or
father or some auntie or big sister will do like Aunt Charlotte did,
when you get through this book you will know a great deal, and will
say, as these children did at the end of the year, that Sundays with
“Aunt Charlotte's Stories of Bible History’’ have been the very
happiest days you have had.

Of course, you may begin and read it straight through, as many
boys and girls do, in a week or two, if you prefer; but it is very
nice to read it every Sunday, just as Aunt Charlotte told the stories.







CONTANTS

PAGE
FIRST SUNDAY IN THE NEW VEAR.
The Making of the World. ....... 1g
Making the First Manand Woman. . . . 21
The Sea andthe Tides. ......... 23
SECOND SUNDAY.
EVO WES Ite bela Tiara menue e enn mn er 25
The Flood and Noah’sArk ....... 26
The Going Down of the Flood. .... . 29
THIRD SUNDAY.
ASE RIN 2 11119 OW ae ar ane og 31
Abraham, Who Trusted God. ...... 32
Abraham and Lot. ........... 34
FOURTH SUNDAY.
Lot’s Wonderful Escape... ...... 37
Abraham’s Son Isaac .......... 39
sae ces Wied din' cael mene meer 4
FIFTH SUNDAY.
How Hsau Lost His Birthright .... . 43
Jacob’s Journey and Dream ....... 47
Jacob and KHsau Meet Again ....... 48
SIXTH SUNDAY.
jJosephin Egypt ............ 50
JOSSOVESIENS 6 5 5 6 665 boo ud od 52
Joseph Tells the Meaning of Dreams. . . 54
SEVENTH SUNDAY.
Joseph’s Brothers... .....~, ers 0
Joseph’s Brothers Go Again to Egypt. . 58
Joseph Makes Himself Known. .). . . 59
EIGHT SUNDAY.
The Baby in the River. ........, 62
Moses and Aaron before the King... . 64
How God Punished the King ......, 67
NINTH SUNDAY.
The Plagues of Egypt. ........., 68
Death of the Sheep and Cows and Worse
erOub |e Weees tee cae ae ae ae ae im 69
Last and Most Sorrowful Punishment. . 70
TENTH SUNDAY.
PUDeyEassov.cta am ar an a aire: 71
The Passover and Easter Day ...... 72

Going Out of Egypt. ......, ob o o YR)





PAGE

ELEVENTH SUNDAY.
Wicked Men Swallowed Up... .... 76
Korah and His Friends Burnt toDeath. . 77
How They Made High Priests. ..... 79

TWELFTH SUNDAY. :
Moses Bringing Water Outofthe Rock. . 81
The Serpents that Bit the People... . . 82
Food Sent from Heaven. ........ 84

THIRTEENTH SUNDAY.

Balaam and the Wicked King ..... iP 86

Balak and Balaam Brought to Shame. . . 88

Balaam’s Tricks and Punishment. . . . 89
FOURTEENTH SUNDAY.

God Speaks to Moses... ......., QI

More About Moses on the Mountain. - . 92

Moses’ Long Stay on the Mountain . . . 94
FIFTEENTH SUNDAY, :

How MosesSaw God .......... 96

Two DangerousIdols .......... 97
The False Spies and Disobedient People . 99

SIXTEENTH SUNDAY.

God’s Anger at Moses... . oh osategete: IOI

Moses’ Death and Burial ........, 102

Joshua Made Captain ........., 103
SEVENTEENTH SUNDAY.

Crossing OverJordan.......... 105

The Wallsof Jericho Fall Down... . . 107

Joshua’s Victories and Death ..... , 108

EIGHTEENTH SUNDAY.

Worshiping Idols Again. .......~., tI
Two Very Brave Women ........, 112
Gideon’s Wonderful Battle. ....... S03

NINETEENTH SUNDAY.

Wittle; Sate] Ger ge ae eee aman nme TI5
God Speaks te the Child ........, 116
What Eli’s Wicked Sons Did ..... , 118

TWENTIETH SUNDAY.

Genel WeNslS Uae? 4s kb SB de p86 oO 6 120
Samuel Made Judge in Eli’s Place . . . . 120
Saul Hears Wonderful News, ...,., .1a!



CONTENTS.

TWENTY-FIRST SUNDAY.
Jonathan, Saul’s Good, Brave Son, sere
How the Philistines Oppressed the Jews, .
Jonathan’s Brave Act and Great Victory, .

TWENTY-SECOND SUNDAY.
Beautiful Ruth,
The Young Reaper in the Field of Boaz, .
How Ruth Gained a Friend and Husband,

TWENTY-THIRD SUNDAY.
King Saul Disobeys God, .....
Samuel Rebukes the King,. ......
The Old Prophet and Little David, ...

TWENTY-FOURTH SUNDAY.
Young David Kills the Giant,
The Shepherd Boy’s Visit to the Camp,
Little Anna’s Wish for David and Jonathan,

TWENTY-FIFTH SUNDAY.
Saul’s Death and David Made King, . .
The Robber’s Reward,. ... e+...
King David’s Baby Son, . .

ee ef @ ee 8

TWENTY-SIXTH SUNDAY.
Absalom and Solomon,
The King Fleeing before Absalom’s Army,
How David Honored Solomon, . .

eestor tse eh cay Le) viet e:

eo ee

TWENTY-SEVENTH SUNDAY.
King Solomon’s Wise Request,. . ...
The Two Women and the Dead Baby,. .
Lessons from the Story, Wheceaein can sae

TWENTY-EIGHTH SUNDAY.
Solomon’s Riches and Wisdom,
The Queen of Sheba’s Visit,
What Jesus said of Solomon and the Lily,

TWENTY-NINTH SUNDAY.
Solomon Turns Wicked, ........
The Worshiping of Idols, .......
Jeroboam and Rehoboam, ........

THIRTIETH SUNDAY.
Reading Lessons from the Bible, carr
Good Old Elijah and the Ravens,. . .
Elijah Calling Fire from Heaven,... .

THIRTY-FIRST SUNDAY. :
How a Little Girl Did Great Good,. . . .
iNaamany Cured museca costae: eeaenecaes
Promises to Worship God, .......

THIRTY-SECOND SUNDAY.
Good King Hezekiah, .........
Sennacherib Attacks Jerusalem,. ....
How the City Was Saved,. ......

THIRTY-THIRD SUNDAY.
The Good King Josiah,
Idols Broken Down,
The Book of the Law Found,. . . « » «

PAGE

122
122
123

124
125
126

127
128
129

130
132
133

134
134
135

136
138
139

140
141
142

143
144
145

145
145
146

147
148
148

150
I51
151

152
153
154

155
155
155

THIRTY-FOURTH SUNDAY.
Daniel and His Brave Companions,. . .
How They Obeyed the Law,
The Fiery Furnace,

THIRTY-FIFTH SUNDAY.
The Great Things that Daniel Did,
Interpreting Dreams,
Put in the Lions’ Den, .

2. 8 © © © © © ew ew

THIRTY-SIXTH SUNDAY.
Five Hundred Years of Jewish History, .
The Jews Repeatedly Punished,
Herod, King of the Jews,

THIRTY-SEVENTH SUNDAY.
The Coming of Christ,
Mary and Joseph,
Simeon and Infant Saviour,

oMceunelie. te icete el nelle:
Mm tht tao D 0 dat “O- 9

eyes ed ce) ole ey ce!

THIRTY-EIGHTH SUNDAY.
The Childhood of Jesus,
Visit of the Wise Men,
Jesus in Egypt,

ee 6 ee ee
2 8 8 © © we ee

THIRTY-NINTH SUNDAY.
The Baptism of Jesus, ......2--
The Temptation of Jesus,
Jesus’ Reply to Satan,

FORTIETH SUNDAY.
Jesus Calls His Disciples,. .......
Turning the Water into Wine,
Other Miracles,

foo erie; eseiecel om ales) let) 0) es nemo

FORTY-FIRST SUNDAY.
Wonderful Deeds of Goodness,
Feeding the Five Thousand,
Jesus and Peter Walking on the Water,

FORTY-SECOND SUNDAY.
Raising the Widow’s Son,
The Transfiguration,
Jesus Loves Little Children,. .....

ho oo OG & 6

FORTY-THIRD SUNDAY.
Jesus the King,
Casts out Devils,
Entering Jerusalem, .....

s 6 © © © © © © 0 8 © @
eo 8 6 eo ee ee

FORTY-FOURTH SUNDAY.
Cleansing the Temple,....
AUove Wee Giese; G 6 5 6 Oed 5 OO 6 6G
The Wicked Plot of Judas, .......

FORTY-FIFTH SUNDAY.
The Agony inthe Garden, .......
The Deceitful Kiss and Cruel Soldiers, . .
Peter Tries to Defend Jesus, ......

FORTY-SIXTH SUNDAY.

The Trial of Jesus by the Jews, .
Peter’s Denial, . ... swe
Jesus before the Great Council, .

PAGE

158

159
160

162
163
162

Jv

169
170
170

172
172
172

175
176
177

179
180
189

183
184
186

189
190
Igl

193
194
195

196
197
198

109)

200





CONTENTS.
: PAGE PAGE

FORTY-SEVENTH SUNDAY. FIFTIETH SUNDAY.

iiesusibetorepeilate mr mem mmm err ee 208 The Resurrection of Jesus. ....... 216

The Wicked Charge of Treason ..... 208 Wikia? Webi . 5 5 566 6 6 06 8 6 217

The Jews Preferred a Murderer ..... 209 On the Way to Emmaus,etc....... 218
‘FORTY-EIGHTH SUNDAY. FIFTY-FIRST SUNDAY.

The Crucifixionof Jesus. ........ 211 Doubting Thomas Convinced ........ 221

Numbered with Transgressors ..... . 212 Another Wonderful Draught of Fishes . . 222

Jesus’ Griefstricken Mother ....... 212 Jesus’ Parting Words and Ascension... . , 223
FORTY-NINTH SUNDAY. FIFTY-SECOND SUNDAY.

AVals bok ye ESS oo 6 o 6 6 6 6 8 0-6 214 Aes (CopaavionseSemltt 5 5 6 6 5 op 4 6 6 0-0 226

The Women atthe Tomb ....... . 215 The Apostles Go Outto Preach ..... 227

Precautions of theJews......... 215 JesusIsComing Again ......... 228



RSSSSS,

—

ANCIENT MODE OF GIVING DRINK IN THE EAST.



Basi OF LITHOGRAPH PLATES AND FULL-PAGE
HALF-TONE ILLUSTRATIONS.

JosepH Lep Away into Ecypr (Lethograph)
REBEKAH AT THE WELL (Lithograph)
THE ANGEL APPEARING TO ABRAHAM
HAGAR AND ISHMAEL Cast ForTH

' Davip TENDING His FaTHEr’s SHEEP
Davip PLayING BEFORE SAUL
Youne Kine JostaH READING THE Law
By THE RIVERS OF BABYLON
THE BIRTH OF CHRIST
CHRIST IN THE TEMPLE (Lithograph)
LITTLE JESUS IN JOSEPH'’S WoRKSHOP
Curist HEALING THE Sick
CHRIST BLessinc LirrLE CHILDREN
CHRIST IN THE GARDEN ©
CHRIST BEARING His Cross
CHRIST CRUCIFIED
THE BURIAL OF CHRIST
ON THE Way to Emmaus
THE ASCENSION





el i Oa FB a ar oe ee

LIST OF OTHER ILLUSTRATIONS.

Searching the Scriptures,
Animals Used for Sacrifice,
SVGLAMI ONES yamees wet eaten hare aks vecueercs
The Ram,
Death of Abel.
The Flood, .
Noah's Ark, .....
The Flood,
Mountain Goat of Palestine,. .... aoe
Native Plains of Abraham and Lot,
Patriarchal Caravan,
“‘God Will Provide Himself a Lamb for the
Burnt Offering,”
Where Lot Fed His Flocks, . .......
Offering Salutation in the East,
Valley of Salt in the Land of Edom, the
Country that Esau Afterward Obtained,
Isaac Blessing Jacob,
Jacob’s Dream, .
Jacob and the Angel,
Joseph and His Father, . .
Joseph Cast into the Pit,. .....
Ancient Egyptian Idols,. ......2..-.
Joseph Interpreting the Dreams, .
Joseph before Pharaoh,
Egyptian Women,
Joseph Making Himself Known to His Breth-
ren,
Moses in the Bulrushes,. .........
Moses Keeping Sheep in the Wilderness, . .
Israelites Making Bricks in Egypt,
Egyptian Taskmasters, 5
Israelites Making Bricks in Egypt, .....
Pharaoh,
Locust,
Egyptian King in His Chariot,
The High Priest Burning Incense within the
Holy of Holies,
The High Priest in His Beautiful Dress,. . .
Plague of Frogs,
The High Priest Offering Incense, .....
Gathering Manna in the Wilderness, .
Palm Tree,
Baal,
Egyptian Household Gods, . .
Mount Sinai,
The Erection of the Tabernacle, . .
High Priest in the Holy of Holies,
The Tabernacle Restored,. . . .

The First Murder, ee

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The Giving of the eo ees
Moloch, 5G
Ashtoreth, the Philistine Goddess, ae
Carrying the Grapes on a Pole, é
Altar of Offering,

Co ee se ee ey

The Emblems on the Standards of the bes: ‘

Blowing the Trumpets,
Bearing the Ark over Jordan, .......
The River Jordan,
Blowing of Trumpet Made of Ram’s Horn,
Fruit of Palestine,
Hebrew Idels,
Ancient War Engine, ee
ANGlenta War Engine ns es eee ee
“Speak, Lord; for Thy Servant Heareth,”
Samuel and His Mother,
Samuel Anointing Saul,
Armor Used in Time of Saul,
Boaz and Ruth,
Ruth Gleaning in the Field of Boaz,
Bethlehem-Judah, the Home of Naomi,
The Cattle Preserved by Saul,
Battle with the Philistines,
David Going Against the Giant,
David and Goliath,
Crowns of Kings in the Time of David, .
Musical Instruments at the Time of David,
Absalom’s Flight,
David's Tomb at Mount Zion,
Supposed Form of Sclomon’s Temple,
Interior View of Ancient Temple at Jerusalem,
Ship in Solomon’s Time,
King Solomon’s Ships,
Dagon, an Idol Worshiped in Solomon’s Time,
Elijah and the Widow,
Fire Sent Down upon the Altar of Elijah,
War Galley in Solomon’s Time,
Brazen Laver in the Temple,
Assyrian Army,
Jewish Books, Such as the One Found in the
Temple by Josiah,
Destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar,
Daniel in the Lions’ Den, .. .
NUAINE SINE 6 o 6g 6 Oo 6.0 Goo a
Daniel Interpreting the Handwriting on the
Wall,
Persian King in His Chariot,. .......
Supposed Site of Ancient Babylon, Seon eae
Form of Second Temple, .. . 2 oe 25.

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141
143

153

155
157

161

162
165
167
“169



LIST OF OTHER ILLUSTRATIONS.

An Hastern Vineyard . .

The Shepherds Listening to the Angels |

Simeon and Infant Saviour pa eee
An Offering of Doves . . .

Union of the Old and New Dispensations —

Beautiful Gate, Jerusalem ...... .
Jesus Baptized
On the EI OUSCLOD) Paemat is
Ancient Books in Their Cases

Eastern Wine Skins and Jars

SO KONG We oS 6 bn 66 be
SealomGalilecy span ee ae
The Prodigal’s Return eis
ican’ oatlvepp lin claw yam tenes
Christ and Peter on the Water .

The Lost Piece of Money

Eastern Head-dresses . .

Ptolemy Philadelphus . . Spee oe

Table of Shew-bread :
Lepers Outside the Gate. .

PAGE
ely al
pel
- 173
- 175
-177
- - 179
. 180
3 Me)
erg
. 184
eel 5
Bel Si

ss

. 189



Ancient Wiue-press . .
Gethsemane ..... ,
Fountain of Nazareth . .

Not as I Will, but as Thou Wilt
The Golden Candlestick ;
Roman Centurion

Christ is Scourged. . .

Pilate Washing His Hands |
Washing the Hands .

Forms of Crosses .°. es
Thorn-crowned Christ. . .
Roman Guards eae
Ancient Olive-press . . .

An Upper Room ina Jewish House

In Sackcloth ‘
Ancient Tombs in the Rock ;
The Last Supper :
The Wise Virgins .

Bethany

The Uuwise Virgins

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First Sunday in the Mew Wear.

The Making of the World.

‘Jn the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.’’— Genesés 1, 1.

THE first Sunday morning after Aunt
Charlotte came she and the children met
in the sitting-room by the open grate.
Aunt Charlotte had her Bible in her hand,
and was seated in the great arm-chair
before the pleasant fire. Little Anna, in
her curls, stood at Aunt Charlotte’s side;

Cn her brother Willie sat by her knee, and

sister Clara was near by. They were

ready to begin those Sunday Bible stories which Aunt Charlotte had
promised to tell them.

“Now, my darlings,” said Aunt Charlotte, “I hope you will listen
carefully to all I say. JI am going to tell you the story of how this
world was made, and at the close I will ask you some questions to see
how well you remember what I tell you. Did you know that Sunday
is earth’s birthday? That is so; for the Bible says on the first day of
the week the creation began, and you know Sunday is the first day
of the week.

“At first the world was all dark. It was soft matter, and had no
shape to it. Then God said: ‘Let there be light,’ and there was light.
Without light we could not live. The flowers and the trees and all
the plants, and all the animals, and the people would die if it were
not for the light. There were then upon the earth no trees or any —
living thing. But it would be almost as bad to have all day and ne
night. We must have the quiet, dark night for rest and stillness.

19





20 ’ THE MARKING OF THE WORLD.

“The next thing that God did after making the light was to put air
all around the earth. We look out through the air as far as our eye
can see, and when everything seems to come together in solid blue we
call it the sky, or firmament, though there is really nothing there except
the air. Sometimes we see clouds floating about in the sky. These
are made by the water rising up from the earth through the air. These
clouds take on strange shapes; sometimes they are dark and full of
rain; sometimes they are shining white or pink and golden hued.
This isGod’s means of drawing the water up from the sea and carry-
ing it about through the air to let it fall in rain and to water the earth.

“After God had made the light and the air, the earth, which was at
first a pulpy mass, grew hard on the outside. Some places were low,
| and into these the
water from the
clouds ran down
and made rivers
and lakes, while
the dry hills rose
up above them.
These rivers and
lakes carried their
water around
through all the
low places until it
ran down into the
sea. At the same
time when the rivers and the hills were formed God made fresh
green plants and grass and trees to grow upon the earth and caused
plants and weeds to grow even in the waters of the sea. The waters
and the air and the earth began to be full of live things, that swam or
crept or flew about. There were fishes and birds and insects at first,
and the land was full of beautiful trees and plants and flowers and
running streams, lakes, rivers, and waterfalls dashing down the
mountain sides. Then God began to make the larger animals,
four-footed beasts—sheep, cows, horses, dogs, cats, elephants, lions,































































ANIMALS USED FOR SACRIFICE,





MAKING THE FIRST MAN AND WOMAN. 21

all that we use or admire; and now that He had got the earth ready
for man to live in, He prepared to make the first man and woman.
He would make them out of dust like those of the beasts, but as
they were the last to be made, and all the others were to serve them,
He concluded to make them in His own image, for He intended that
they should think, speak, pray, and do many things that no other
creature could do, for God expected to use mankind to develop and
use this beautiful world which He had created for His glory and honor,
and He meant that they would be His own sons and daughters. So
He planted a beautiful garden, with fruit trees and flowers and every-
thing lovely for them to live in. He called it the garden of Eden.

‘Now I will stop with this story here. I know you are anxious to
hear about the making of this first man and woman, but I will save
that for our next talk this afternoon.

‘Now let me ask you some questions,” said Aunt Charlotte, ‘“ to
see how well you remember what I have told you. I will begin with
little Anna, because she is the smallest,’ and Aunt Charlotte patted

little Anna’s curls.
QUESTIONS.

Who made the world? Was there any light at first? Who made the light? Could we
live without the light? What did God make next? How do we get water on the earth?
What did he make to live in the water, and on theearth, and intheair? What did He make
next after the birds and fish and insects? After he made the four-footed beasts, what did
he conclude to make then? What did he prepare for man to livein? What did He call it?

Making the First Man and Woman. |

The children liked the morning reading so well that they teased
Aunt Charlotte to read them more, but she said, ‘‘Not now; after
noon I will;’’ and when the time came she opened to the second
chapter of Genesis, and this is the beginning of what she read:

‘‘And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils
the breath of life; and man became a living soul.’

Then she explained it to them by saying :
“In the Bible God tells us that he made the world and everything
in it—land and water, and grass, flowers, and trees, insects, bird, and



22 MAKING THE FIRST MAN AND WOMAN.

beasts, and last of all He made the first man and woman. The man
was made by God out of the dust of the ground, and then God
breathed into his nostrils the breath of life and gave him a living
soul. And the woman was made by God out of a rib from the man’s
side. They were called Adam and Eve, and they were to be the first
father and mother of everyone who was to be born into the world.

The good God gave them a beautiful home. It was a garden with
a clear river of water flowing through it and all kinds of delicious
fruit-trees and beautiful flowers growing in it. Nothing could hurt
or vex them there. They did not know what pain was, they were
never tired, and all they had to do was to dress the garden and to
keep it. They had no faults, and never
did wrong; and God Himself came
near to talk with them.

That was the way they lived, always
good and always happy, whilst they
obeyed what God had told them. In
the midst of the garden grew two trees:
one was the Tree of Life and the other
was the Tree of the Knowledge of
good and evil. God told them that it
they ate the fruit of this Tree of Know-
ledge they would die. We do not
know what those trees were like, but some time or other I hope we shall
see the Tree of Life, for it is growing in heaven, close by the river
that flows by the throne of God; and when we see it and taste of it,
we shall live forever, and be happier even than Adam and Eve were.
We shall never be as happy as they were while we are living in this
world; but if we will try to obey God, and trust in Christ and live
holy lives, He will take us to heaven, and that will be still better than
the Garden of Eden.”

The children liked this story of man’s creation, and asked Aunt
Charlotte to ask them questions to see if they could remember. Now
let my little readers see if they can answer them every one, as Willie
and Anna and Clara did.



SYRIAN SHEEP.







THE SEA AND THE TIDES. 23

QUESTIONS.

What did God make? Whom did He make? What was the man made of? What was the
woman made of? What did God breathe into them? What did He give them? Why were they
better than the beasts? What was the man’s name? What was the woman’s name? Of whom
were they the father and mother? Where did they live? What had they to do there? What grew
there? What were the two chief trees that grew there? Which were they not to touch? Where
is the Tree of Life now? When do we hope to see it? What is a still happier place than the
Garden of Eden?

The Sea and the Tides.

‘Hitherto shalt thou come, but no further: and here shall thy proud waves be stayed.’’—/ob
XXXVIII, II. %

“ Aunt Charlotte, now will you read us some more and tell us about
the wonderful things God did?” said Willie, as they gathered around
their aunt after supper. Aunt Charlotte promised. After reading
from the Bible here is what she said:

“What glorious and wonderful things God has made! Did you ever
see the sea?” “Yes,” said Willie, “one time—” but Aunt Charlotte
Putt Patch iteaniG ame 85, stnche mitmis=—=—a
great vast space, all water, looking green
near us, but blue further off, always heav-
ing up and down. The waves rise, and
then ripple along, and burst with a white
edge of bubbles of foam. And, if you
live near the sea, you know how, at
certain times in the day, one wave after
another begins to break a little higher
on the beach; eight waves seem to run
up the same distance, then the ninth
comes much further; then eight more
come like that, then another. A great space that had been left dry gets
covered up with water again, and where you were walking just now
is quite deep water. What is this called? The tide. Well, what
will the tide do in proper time? Will it come rolling in over the



THE RAM.





24 THE SEA AND THE TIDES.

beach, sand, pebbles, and rocks, and wash us all away and drown us
ail, and cover up the land? No; presently each will turn. Each
wave will be a little less high than the last, till it will have gone back
again and left the beach uncovered as before. Why does the tide do
this? It is because God so wonderfully contrived this earth and sea
that the waters should rise and go back. He made the sand the
bound of the sea, and said, ‘ Hitherto shalt thou come, but no further:
and here shall thy proud waves be stayed. So, you know, we read
in the Psalms sometimes— .

«< «The sea is His, and He made it:
And His hands prepared the dry land.’”*

“Now I willask you some—

QUESTIONS.

What curious thing does the sea do every day? What do you call the coming in and going back
of the sea? Why does the tide always stop in its proper place? What did God make the bound
of the sea? What did He say to it? What verse praises God for making the sea?

“T’ll tell you, I like this day,” said Willie. “Why, we have learned
about the making of the world, and the making of the first man and
woman, and about the tides of the sea.” “Won't you give us three
more lessons next Sunday?” said Clara. “Oh, do,’ said Anna.
Aunt Charlotte promised she would.









DEATH OF ABEL, THE First MURDER,





Second Sunday.

How Sin Began.

ae)

‘The serpent beguiled me ‘I did eat.’ ’’—Geneszs 111, 13.

THE children could hardly
wait for Aunt Charlotte to get
seated after breakfast the
second Sunday morning in
Sentient) ees leery tll tel eyo Uli
said she, opening her Bible,
“how sin began and the world
grew wicked.” ‘‘Good,” said
Willie, and they all settled
down around her.

“Last Sunday you heard
how God made the world, and
put a man and woman to live
in it. The man was named
Adam; the woman was named
Eve. God gave them a beau-~
tiful garden to live in, full of trees and flowers; and they had no pain,
no trouble, nothing to vex them. Only one thing God told them:
there was one tree whose’ fruit they must not eat. They might eat
the fruit of all the other trees, but not of that one. As long as they
obeyed, all was well and happy with them; but if they ate it they
would die. But a bad spirit came and took the shape of the serpent,

and talked to Eve. He told her a wicked lie—he told her that to eat
2 25 ,



THE FYooD.



26 THE FLOOD AND NOAF’S ARK,

the fruit would make her wise, and would not make her die. And
Eve listened, and did eat. And she gave Adam, and he also ate; and
so they took the bad spirit for their master instead of the good God.
Then God was angry with them, and put them out of the garden, and
let them be weak and sickly, and die at last. It is a sad thing for
them and for us. For if they had been good and obeyed God, and
not the bad spirit, it would have been easy to us to be good, and we
should not have had the devil tempting us to do wrong: we should
have never known pain or sorrow. But God pitied Adam and Eve,
and us too; and he promised them that the Seed—that is, the Son—of
the woman should bruise the serpent’s head, and set them and their
children free. Our Blessed Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, set us
free when He died on the cross and rose again; and now we belong
to Him, and not to the bad spirit. Only we must try and ask Him to
help us not to do what is wrong, as Eve did, or we shall not keep free
from the power of the enemy.”

The children were thoughtful, and Aunt Charlotte began with the—

QUESTIONS.

Who was the first man? Who was the first woman? Where did God put them? What was
the one thing they might not do? What was to happen if they ate of that fruit? Who came
and spoke to Eve? What shape did the bad spirit take? What did he tell Eve? What did
she do? Whom did she make her master? What was done to punish her? What sad things
did the bad spirit bring on her? Who came to set us free from the bad spirit ?

The Flood and Noah’s Ark.

“Well,” said Willie, as they settled down around Aunt Charlotte,
“Tm going to listen sharp this time. There were two questions I
could not answer before.” ‘So will I,’ said Anna; “but I only
missed one.”

‘‘ And, behold, I, even I, do bring a flood of waters upon the earth ’’—Geneszs v1, 17,

read Aunt Charlotte, and then, looking up, said:

“The lesson this morning told the sad history of how Adam and
Eve did the very thing that God forbade; so that He drove them
out of the Garden of Eden, and sin and death came into the world.





THE FLOOD AND NOAH’S ARK. 23

“After that they had children. Some were good, but not so good
as Adam and Eve had been at first; and some were bad. And as
time went on the bad ones grew worse, and the good ones were
tempted, and many of them grew wicked too. And so all the world
was getting wicked, and God saw nothing but evil when He looked
down on it. And He said that He would destroy these wicked
people, and wash away the evil from the earth by a great flood. But
there was one good man, whose name was Noah; and God said He
would save him. He bade Noah build an Ark. It was to bea great
ship, all made of wood, and it took a great many years to build; and
all that time people laughed at Noah, for
they would not believe that anything was
voing to happen. Noah made the Ark
and stored it with food. And God sent
him a pair of all sorts of animals that
were in the world, and he put them into
pens in the Ark. Then Noah and _ his
wife and his three sons, Shem, Ham, and
Japhet, and their Wives, went into the
Ark, and God shut them in.

“Then it began to rain. It rained for
forty days and forty nights without stop-
ping, and the rivers came out of their
banks, and the sea came up on the land,
and the ground was covered up. Even the tops of the highest hills
were Bees and everybody and every creature was drowned—all
but Noah and those that were with him. There was the Ark all the
time, floating quite safe on the water. The storm could not upset it
nor the sea get into it, for God took care of it and all that was in it.

“The reason Noah was saved was because, first, he tried to be
good, and not do like the bad people round him; and, next, because
he believed what God said to him, and went on making the Ark, even
when he saw no danger. If we wish God to save us, then we must
take care that we do just what we are told—not what seems pleasant
now, but what is really right.”



Noau’s ARK.



28 THE FLOOD AND NOAH’S ARK.

“That’s so; but it’s hard to do, though,” said Willie. “But
would n’t you have been afraid in that Ark?” said little Anna.







































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE FLOOD.

“No,” said Clara, “for Aunt Charlotte said God [GOK Care. Ole ate
“Right, Clara,” said Aunt Charlotte, “now for the—

‘QUESTIONS.

Do you know why Adam and Eve were driven out of the happy garden? How did people go
on after that? How had sin come into the world? What did God say He must do to the world ?
Why? Who was to be saved? What was Noah to make? What was the Ark like? What were
put into it? Why were two of all creatures put into the Ark? What men and women were in it?
What were the names of Noah’s sons? What happened when Noah was in the Ark? How long
did it rain? What was covered up? What became of all the people? Who were safe? Where
was the Ark? Who took care of the Ark? Why was Noah saved?

«But, Auntie,” said little Anna, “ what became of the Ark?” “Tl



THE GOING DOWN OF THE FLOOD. 29

tell you that after supper in our next lesson,” said good Auntie, with
a pat on Anna's curls.

The Going Down of the Flood.

‘“Sq Noah knew that the waters were abated from off the earth.’’—Genes¢s VIII, 2.

“Now,” said Aunt Charlotte, ‘‘for our third reading and talk,” as
they all gathered around the fire after supper. The children were all
eager to have her begin.

“Tt must have been a sad sight for Noah and his wife and their sons,

-as the rain went on and on, and the water grew deeper and deeper,
and everybody and everything was
drowned. Then came a time when noth-
ing was to be seen but water. Wherever
they looked all was sky and water; but
it had done raining, the sky was blue
again, the sun shone by day, the stars
by night, and they must have been very
glad. And still the water got lower,
till the Ark did not float about, but
stopped, resting on a peak of a mountain,
a very high mountain, and a few bare
tops of other hills began to peep out.
By and by Noah opened the window
of the Ark and let out a raven. He never saw the raven again, for
a raven eats dead things, and there were so many dead bodies floating
about that it got plenty of food, and never came back to the Ark
that had saved it. He waited a week, and then he let out a dove.
Now, doves like trees to sit and nestle in, and they eat grains and
seeds; so the poor dove found no place to rest in, and flew back to
the ee and Noah took her back and kept her a week, then let
her fly again. She flew away, but still she came back to the Ark, and
this time she brought in her beak a sprig of olive branch.

“Tt was the first green thing that Noah had seen for a year.



MouNTAIN GOAT OF PALESTINE.



50 THE GOING DOWN OF THE FLOOD.

Noah’s children have loved the olive leaf everywhere, and called it
the sign of peace and good news ever since.

“For now Noah knew that the waters had gone down, and that
trees must be able to put forth leaves again. Once more, after another
week, he let out the dove, and she did not come back, for she had
found a tree where she could make her home, and seeds to eat; and
then Noah knew the sad time of the flood—a whole year—was over.

“Was there any little boys in that Ark?” said Willie; “if so, they
must have got very tired waiting that long to go out and play. But
ask the questions quick, before I forget them.”

QUESTIONS.

What was the Flood? What was the Ark? Who was init? What had Noah with him in the
Ark? What became of every one else? Why? Why was Noah saved? How long did the Flood
last? What birds did Noah send out of the Ark? Which came back?’ Why did not the raven
come back? What did the dove bring? What was Noah sure of then?

After the questions were all asked the children asked Aunt Char-
lotte if she would not tell them a story or two every day instead of
waiting until Sunday. The good lady waited a minute, and then
said: “ You know, my darlings, I have come to spend a year with you,
and I have planned to take you through the Bible in a year, telling
you stories of the most important things that you will like, and the
three lessons every Sunday will do this. This is such a good way to
‘keep the Sabbath holy,’ as we are commanded to do. I will read
you from the Bible in the week and from other books, and then we
have our day lessons, you know.” The children all agreed to let Aunt
Charlotte tell them these pretty Bible stories on Sundays only.



Third Sunday.

The Rainbow.

“WHAT will you tell us about this morn-
ing, Aunt Charlotte?” said Clara. “The
Rainbow,” said the good lady with a smile,
and then she opened her Bible and read:

“*T do set my Bow in the Cloud,” etc.— Genesis 1x, 13.

“The sin that came into the world when
Eve listened to the tempter had grown as
men multiplied and made each other worse.
The wicked people had been drowned in
Eee the Flood, and Noah, his sons, and their

G7 WKN” x wives had alone been saved in the Ark.

a After a whole year of being shut up there

watching the earth, first drowned and then coming out of the water,

they had just come out on the fresh green earth, with all the animals
saved with them, when God spoke to them.

“Then God made a promise to Noah. It was that no flood of water
shall ever drown all the world again, but spring, summer, autumn,
and winter, day and night, will go on to the end of the world, when
it shall be burnt up by fire, not drowned by water. That Noah, and
all of us after him, might feel sure that God in His mercy will go on
preserving us, and giving us days and nights, seed-time and _ harvest,
He gave us something to look at as a sign of His promise. Do you
know what He gave us? It was the rainbow. And this is how He
made it. He so ordered the rays of light that when they shine upon
3r





32 ABRAHAM WHO TRUSTED GOD.

drops of water in the air they cause beautiful colors, making part of
a circle, so as to form a bow. So when the sun shines on a cloud, as
it rains, the fair bright rainbow is seen asa pledge to us of God's
merciful care and love to us. There is a rainbow round about the
throne of God in Heaven; and the lovely rainbows that we see when
the sun shines out and the showers drift away are to put us in mind
that we are safe under His care, in right of His promise to Noah and
his three sons, from whom the whole earth was to be repeopled.
We are the children of his son Japhet, and all that was then said to
him belongs to us also. We should recollect it, and put our trust in
Him, and be thankful when we see the beautiful rainbow that the
hands of the Almighty have bended looking out of the midst of the
dark watery cloud.”

“Well, I never knew how a rainbow was made before,” said Clara. |
“Isn't that lovely! Ill think of it every time I see one.” “I don't
understand yet,” said Anna. “I don’t either,’ said Willie. Then
Aunt Charlotte explained it over again, and they all were able to

answer the—
QUESTIONS.

What beautiful sight do we sometimes see after a shower? What is a rainbow like? Who put
the rainbow in the cloud? Who was the man to whom God showed the rainbow? What promise
did God make Noah? What had God just done to the wicked people? Whom had He saved ?
What did He say shouid always go on? What did God put in the sky to show that He will not
send another Flood? What are we to think.of when»we see a rainbow ? Who takes care of us?

Abraham Who Trusted God.

“Going to tell us more about Noah and the Ark and rainbows
and things?” said Willie. “No,” said Aunt Charlotte, “I’m going to
skip a long, long time. Now listen!” and she opened her Bible and.
read:

‘«In thee shall all families of the earth be blessed.’’—Genesis xm, 3.

“When Noah’s grandchildren and great-grandchildren came to be
more and more, and the world was being filled with people again,
they still were not all good, and the longer time went on, the worse
they grew.



ABRAHAM WHO TRUSTED GOD. © 33

“ At last God called to a very good man, whose name was Abraham,
and told him that if he would come away from his home to a land
God would show him, then God would bless him and lead him, and
by and by give the land to his children, and that their children after
them should be more in number than the grains of sand on the sea-
shore or than the stars in the sky; and that in his seed—that meant
by and by through a son of his—all the nations of the earth should
be blessed.





















































































































































































































































NATIVE PLAINS OF ABRAHAM AND LOT.

“It was strange to hear all this about Abraham’s children, for he was
growing an old man, and he and his wife Sarah had no child at all.
But he believed in God. He knew that God is Almighty, and can do
whatever He will; so he only did just as God told him, and went
away from his home, where God told him. He was obliged to
take all his cattle with him—quantities of cows and goats and sheep
and camels and asses; and he had servants to drive them. When
they came to a piece of grass and a fresh spring of water, there





34 | ABRAHAM AND LOT.

they would stop. They had no houses, only tents, which were great
curtains woven of goat’s hair and fastened up with poles, so that
they could be set up or taken down and carried about. All his life
Abraham lived in a tent, instead of staying at home in a city and
being at his ease.

“ By and by he came to a beautiful country. There were high, cool
hills rising up, and green valleys between, full of grass for the sheep
and cattle; and the wide sea spread out far away toward the sunset,
all blue and glorious. God told him to look at the land, for that was
the place which his children should have for their own; but in the
meantime Abraham had not one bit of it, and was a stranger there ;
and he had no child either.

“But still he was quite sure that God spoke truth; and that some-
how, though he did not know how, it would come about that his chil-
dren should have the land, and that in One all the nations of the
earth should be blessed. That was faith.”

“Why do you suppose God kept Abraham in the dark about what
_ was going to happen?” said Clara. “Because he wanted him to trust
His word and put faith in Him,” said Aunt Charlotte. “Yes,” said
Willie, “sometimes they send warships out to sea with sealed orders,
and the captain even don’t know where he’s going until he opens the
letter.” “That's it,” said Aunt Charlotte, “and we must obey God,
just as soldiers on the land and sea obey without asking the reason.”

QUESTIONS.

What good man do you hear of to-day? What did God tell Abraham to do? What did God
promise? Who were to have the land? Why was it strange to hear of his children? But did he
believe it would come true? Why did he believe it? How did he show that he believed ?. Where
did he go? What had he with him? What did he live in? What isa tent like? What sort of
place did he come to? Who were to have this land? How many were his children to be? Did
he believe this? What is believing called ?

Abraham and TL

“‘Let there be no strife, I pray thee, between thee and me.’”’— Genes?’s x11, 8.

“Two men were traveling together. They were an uncle and his
nephew. The uncle’s name was Abraham, about whom J told you this



ABRAHAM AND LOT, ~ 35

morning ; the nephew’s was Lot. They had come from home because
God had told Abraham to come away from his own home to the land
that God would give his children. Abraham believed, and did as God
bade him; and Lot, the son of his dead brother, went with him.
They did not go alone. Each of them had great flocks of cows, and
sheep, and camels, and asses, and goats, and numbers of servants
to take care of them. They would fix their black tents, made o:
camel's hair, in any place where they saw a spring of water and good





























































































































PATRIARCHAL CARAVAN,

green grass for their cattle; and there they would stay till all the
grass was eaten up, and then take up their tents and move to another
place.

“Just now they had got to a bare, stony place, where the sun shone
hotly and there was not much green; but Abraham had built up an
altar with the great stones and prayed there. Abraham and Lot loved
each other, and were at peace; but when their servants drove out



36 ABRAHAM AND LOT.

their flocks to get food and water there were apt to be quarrels. If
Abraham's men found a green grassy valley they would not let Lot’s
cattle into it; andif Lot’s came to a well they would not let Abraham’s
flocks drink; and so on. They were always quarreling and making
complaints to their masters. At last Abraham saw that they would
make Lot quarrel with him. So he said it would be wiser to part ;
Lot should go one way and he another—anyway there should be no
strife. And he even told Lot to choose which way he would go. So
Lot looked, and saw to the east a pleasant green valley, with fields
of corn and meadows, and a fine river running into a clear lake, and
five fine towns on the bank. He liked it better than the bare, stony
hills where Abraham was; and he never thought whether the people -
were good or not, but he took the first choice and went to live there.
So Abraham gave up. He had the right to choose first, but he would
not use it. He let his nephew choose. For he hated quarrels and
knew they were wicked; and he knew how to stop him, because he
would yeild up the best. That is the way to make peace and please
God.”

“Tf Pd been Abraham I would not have done that. Why did he not
take the best and let Lot scuffle for himself?” said Willie. pies.
and run off all of Lot’s old mean servants that fought his good men,”
said little Anna. ‘ No,” said Aunt Charlotte, “Abraham did right, as
we shall see. Jesus says, ‘blessed are the peace-markers,’ and Abra-
ham was a peace-maker. Now we will have the—

QUESTIONS
Who had called Abraham? Who went with him? What was lot to Abraham? Why
did they go? What had God promised? What had they with them? Who quarreled ?
About what did the servants quarrel? Did Abraham and Lot quarrel? How did Abraham
prevent a quarrel? Who was to choose first? Who might have chosen first? Why did
not Abraham choose first? Ought you to be in haste to take the first choice? What should
you try to hinder? And if you keep yourself back, and don’t say ‘‘I’ts mine,’’ and ‘‘I

must,’’ shall you not be likely to keep from quarrels ?







LSTA ERR ia

Fourth Sunday.

Lot’s Wonderful Escape.



“GOD WILL PROVIDE HIMSEeLr A LAMB FOR A
BURNT OFFERING.”’



OPENING her Bible at the
twenty-ninth chapter of Genesis,
seventeenth verse, Aunt Charlotte
Teseucle

‘Escape for thy life; look not behind thee,’’etc.

“As I told you last Sunday, Lot
chose the beautiful valley, with
steep hills shutting it in on all
sides and a clear, swift river run-
ning through the midst and
spreading into a lake. There
were fine fields and rich grass,
where sheep, cows, and goats could
feed, and the shepherds shelter
themselves under the palm trees;
and on the bank of the river were
five cities, with strong walls round

them, and full of rich people, who bought and sold and made merry
with the good things they possessed. Lot was the only man living
there who was good, and he was grieved by the wicked ways of the
men round him, who only laughed at him if Ke tried to tell them of
better things. One evening two strangers came into the city where
he lived, and he was the only person who would take them in and
shelter them from the wicked people in the street.

37



38 LOT’S WONDERFUL ESCAPE.

‘Those strangers told him the place was to be destroyed with all
that were in it, because it was so wicked! Though the fields looked
so quiet, the walls so strong, and the sun had gone down as usual, all
would be ruined in a few hours’ time! Then the strangers took hold
of him and his wife and daughters, and led them almost by force away
from their home in the dawn of morning, bidding them escape for
their lives to the mountain, and not look back. They were frightened,
and begged not to have to go so far as the wild mountain. Might





































































































































































































WHERE LOT FED HIS FLOCKS.

they not go to the little city near at hand? And their wish was
granted. Just as the sun had risen they entered the little city for
which they had begged; and as soon as they were safe the four towns,
that had seemed so strong and firm, were all burning with fire and
brimstone; and all the sinners who had mocked at warning were soon
lying dead under God’s awful anger! Four alone had been led out of
the city by the strangers, but even of these only three came into the
city of refuge. The wife did not heed the warning not to linger nor



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ABRAHAM'S SON ISAAC. 39

look back, the deadly storm overtook her, and she remained rooted to
the spot—turned into a pillar of salt!

“The names of those cities were Sodom and Gomorrah. And now
a strange gloomy lake called the Dead Sea covers that valley with its
salty waters, and the bare rocky hills, crusted with salt, show that the
curse of God is on the place.

“Let us try to remember one thought from this terrible history.
This world will one day be burnt up like those cities, and its looking
safe and prosperous now does not make it safe. But God sends mes-
sengers to lead us outofit. If we attend to them and follow their ad-
vice, we shall through all our lives be getting out of danger and going
on to a safe home in heaven; but if we care only for pleasant things
here, it is like looking back, and our souls will perish with what they
love. That is why our Saviour bade us ‘Remember Lot’s wife.’
We should remember her when we are tempted to think it hard to
give up anything pleasant, because we are told that it is wrong, and
may put us in danger of destruction.”

“Didn't Lot have any boys?” said Willie. “No,” said Aunt Char-
lotte. “But he had two girls, didn’t he?” said little Anna. “And—
but they were bigger than me, 'cause I couldn’t have runned away.”
“Yes, they were grown up girls,” said Aunt Charlotte. ‘Willie, you
may answer the first question.”

QUESTIONS.

What was the name of the place I told you of to-day? What was the name of the man? What
kind of place was Sodom? Who was the only good man there? Who came to Lot? What did
he do for the strangers? What did the strangers tell Lot? Why was Lot to come out of Sodom?
Why was Sodom to be destroyed? Where did Lot go? Who looked back? What became of
her? What did God do to Sodom? What sort of place is it now? What will be burnt up some
day? If we are not good, what will become of us? But what have we to teach us to be good?
And how must we try to come out, like Lot?

Abraham’s Son Isaac.

“Aunt Charlotte, didn’t Abraham have any boys either?” said
Willie. “You said Lot only had a pair of girls.” “ Yes,” said Aunt



40 ABRAHAM'S SON ISAAC.

Charlotte, “and I'll tell you about his son Isaac this afternoon.” Then
she read:

«¢ Now I know that thou fearest God, seeing thou hast not withheld thy son, thine only son fro
- Me.” —Genests XXII, 12.

“Tt was some time after this morning’s talk that Isaac was born.
Abraham was old, and he had begun to wonder if he should ever have
ason. All the promises God had made were to be for Isaac’s children
after him: and Abraham loved God, and hoped all the more, and
when little Isaac came Abraham was overjoyed and loved him dearly.

“ But then God called Abraham to do a strange and terrible thing,
He was to go and take his dear son Isaac to the top of a hill, and
there to offer him up to God, as if he had been a calf oralamb. Of
course, in general, to do such a thing would be shockingly wicked;
but Abraham knew that when God commanded a thing it must be
right to do as he was bidden, however dreadful it was to him.

“So they set out together. Abraham took the knife anda vessel
with fire in it, and Isaac carried the wood with which the sacrifice was
to be burnt. On the way Isaac said, ‘ My father, behold the fire and
the wood: but where is the lamb for a burnt offering?’ And Abra-
ham answered, ‘ My son, God will provide Himself a lamb for a burnt
offering.’

“Tsaac soon knew he was to be the lamb, for his father put the wood
in order and bound his limbs and took the knife. And Isaac did not
complain or struggle. He was ready, like his father, to do the will of
God. But just as Abraham had the knife ready to slay his son, an
angel called to him out of Heaven: ‘ Lay not thine hand upon the lad,
neither do thou anything unto him: for now I know that thou fearest
_ God, seeing thou hast not withheld thy son, thine only son from Me.’

“Then Abraham unbound his son, and was as glad as if Isaac had
really risen from the dead. And he saw aram caught in the thicket
by its horns; so he took that, and offered it up insteadof Isaac. Thus
God really provided a lamb for a burnt offering.

«And He blessed Abraham more and more, and promised again

that his children should have the land, and that in his Seed should all |







HAGAR AND ISHMAEL CAST FORTH.

‘And Abraham sent her away, and she departed, and randered in the wilderness
; of Beer-sheba.’’—Gen. XXI,







ISAAC’S WEDDING. 4t

the nations of the earth be blessed. That Seed was our blessed Lorn
‘Jesus Curist, who, you know, was really given by His Heavenly
Father to die, and then came back from the dead, that all people might
be saved by Him.”

“Was n't that mean of Abraham to do little Isaac that way?” said
little Anna. “No,” ‘said Willie, “he wasn’t scared; he knew his
father would n’t stick that knife in him.” “ Yes,” said ‘Aunt Charlotte,
“Abraham would have done so if God had not commanded him not
to. Much as he loved his son, he loved God more, and we must all
be willing to give up anything God wants us to; but yousee God only |
did this to test Abraham’s faith, and He would not let him do a wrong
thing. God will not make us give up anything we ought to have.”

“My first question!” said Willie; and this is what Aunt Charlotte
asked him: °

QUESTIONS.

What was the name of Abraham’s son? What had God promised Abraham? What had
Abraham done at God’s command? What was he now to do? Whom did he obey? Where was
he to go? Who went with him? What did Isaac ask? What did Abraham answer? Who seemed
likely to be the lamb? What was Abraham just going todo? Whocalled him? What did the
angel tell him? Why was God pleased with him? What blessing did God give him? Who was
to be his Seed, in whom all families should be blessed ?

Isaac’s Wedding.

‘And he brought her into his mother’s tent, and took Rebekah and she became his wife, and
he loved her.’’— Gen. xxv, 67.

“Auntie, what did little Isaac do when he became a man?” asked
little Anna.

“Well,” replied Aunt Charlotte, with a laugh, “one thing he did
was to get married, but he did not choose his own wife, as men do now.
Iwill tell you all about it. Abraham lived in the land of Canaan.
and the people were all heathen. He did not want his son Isaac to
marry one of the heathen girls, so he called his chief servant and gave
him ten camels and several men for companions, and many presents,
and told him to go to the city of Nahor and get a wife for his son

Isaac. After many days’ journey the servant came to the walls of the
‘ 3 :





42 ISAAC’S WEDDING.

city, and stopped on the outside by the well. At this well the girls
and women of the city came to draw water with their pitchers, and the
servant prayed to God that he would show him which one he might
choose to be the wife of Isaac. By and by a beautiful young woman
came up to draw water, and the servant asked her to let him drink
from her pitcher. She allowed him to drink, and then said she would
go and draw water for his camels. This she did, and the servant knew
she was the woman to be Isaac’s wife. After the camels had done
drinking the man took a golden ear-ring and two golden bracelets, and
gave them to the beautiful young woman, and in answer to questions
she told him of her parents, and told him there was plenty of straw
for the camels and room for the men to stay at her father’s house; and
the servant was immediately welcomed into the house, and after taking »
the loads off his camels and feeding them, they set before the men
many nice things to eat. But the servant said, ‘I will not eat until I
have told mine errand. Then he told them whose servant he was, how
rich his master was, and all about Isaac, Abraham’s child. Then he told
them how his master had sent him to their city to seek a wife for his
son Isaac, and how he had asked God to show him which woman he
should choose, and how he knew that Rebekah should be Isaac’s wife.
Then he asked them if they would let Rebekah go with him to be the
wife of Isaac ‘And they called Rebekah and said unto her, Wilt thou
go with this man? And she said, I will go. And they sent away
Rebekah, their sister, and her nurse, and Abraham’s servant, and his
men.’

“As they came near to where Abraham lived, Rebekah lifted up her
eyes and saw Isaac coming to meet her; and when the servant had
told Isaac all things that had been done, he took her into his mother’s
tent, and with his parents’ permission made her his wife.”

“That was a pretty story,” said Clara, “and I think it teaches us
that when God calls we should obey, like Rebekah did.”

QUESTIONS.

Why did not Isaac take a wife from the land of Canaan? To what city did Abraham send his
servant? How did the servant choose the woman for Isaac’s wife? Tell about his visit te
Rebekah’s parents. Tell about the meeting of Rebekah and Isaac.





LJ

REBEKAH AT TH



Fitth Sunday.

How Esau Lost His Birthright.

“ DID Isaac have any boys when he grew
up?” said Willie, as the children took their
seat the next Sunday morning, after break-
fast with Aunt Charlotte. “Yes, and didn’t
he have some little girls, too?” said little
Anna. “Willie's always thinking about the
boys, and you told us the Bible said his
children should be many as sand on the sea-
= shore.”

OFFERING ees IN THE a He had only two,” said Aunt Charlotte,

patting Anna’s cheek, “and they were both

boys ; but it was from them that the earth was to get its many people,
The name of one of the boys was Esau and the other was Jacob.

“Now let me read you from the Bible,” and she turned to the
twenty-seventh chapter of Genesis and read them down to the thirty-
fourth verse, where it said:



‘Bless me, even me also, O father.”’

Then, looking up, Aunt Charlotte said: “You see, as Esau was the
eldest he had the first right to the promises God had made Abra-
ham. But Esau did not care enough about them; he did not seem to
get anything by them, and he liked what he could get at once better
than what was a long way off. He had no faith, One day he came
home half dead with hunger, and saw his brother Jacob making soup
_ over the fire. Esau said he would give all these rights for a meal of
43



44 HOW ESAU LOST HIS BIRTHRIGHT.

tle soup; for if he died of hunger, what good would his birthright do
him? So for a mess of pottage he sold his right to the land of
Canaan and to be the forefather of our Saviour.

“A time was to come when he would be sorry for what he had
done. His father was old and blind, and thought he was going to
die; so he bade Esau, whom he loved the best, bring home some
meat and make a solemn feast—which was the way then of giving a
blessing. Esau went, and in time brought home the meat to his































































































































































































































































































































































































VALLEY OF SALT IN THE LAND OF EDOM, THE COUNTRY THAT ESAU AFTERWARD
OBTAINED.

father; but when he came in Isaac cried out and trembled. His
brother Jacob had come in his stead, and Isaac had taken him for
Esau and given to him the blessing that gave the right to the promised
land and to all God’s promises. |

“Then Esau cried out with an exceeding bitter cry, and asked if his
father had but one blessing. Isaac was grieved for him, and blest
him with all his heart; but there was no changing back, no taking
away what Jacob had won and Esau had lost.





HOW ESAU LOST HIS BIRTHRIGHT. 45

_ Esau did not know what he was doing when he took the pottage at
once, rather than wait patiently for the glorious inheritance that was to
come. This was the reason that he was allowed to be so cruelly dis-
ippointed. This is awarning to us. We have the inheritance of the
kingdom of heaven promised to us; but we are tempted not to care
about it when we want something here in this world, whether play or
dress or anything that seems a great deal to us now. Butif we trifle
away our right to those great
promises that God made us
at our baptism, there will
come a time of bitter grief,
when it is too late. And
when we are dead it will be
too late to change! There-
fore, now while we are alive,
We dlls Wave: falth and
show it by taking care that
the things we like here on
earth do not make us lose
the better things in heaven.”
“T’m sorry for Esau,” said
ition wana “Yess butehe
Was greedy,” said Willie. IsAAC BLESSING JAcoB.
“So are we when we had
rather have a little pleasure in this world than a great deal in heaven,”
said Aunt Charlotte.



QUESTIONS.

What were the names of Isaac’s two sons? Which son had the first right to the promise? But
which cared about it most?. What did Esau want? So what did he give up for the sake of the
soup? Could he get it back again? What are you an heir of? How could we lose the inheri-
tance of the kingdom of heaven? Shall we be able to change after we are dead? Then what must
we care about most? Why could not Esau get his father’s blessing ? What did he like better than
waiting for what he could not see? Can we see heaven? But when we get there, will it not be
better than anything we can see here ? :



46





























































































JACOB’S



DREAM.













JACOB'S JOURNEY AND DREAM, 47

Jacob’s Journey and Dream.

“Tell us more of Jacob and Esau,” said Clara. Aunt Charlotte
read :

‘«This is none other but the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven.’’— Genesis XXVIII, 17.

“T told you this morning that Isaac, Abraham's son, had two sons,
whose names were Esau and Jacob, and how Jacob had grieved Esau
by gaining God’s great promise, tor which Esau did not care till he had
lost it. Now, Esau was so angry with Jacob that Jacob had to go out
away from his father’s home, all alone. But Jacob knew he was not
alone, for God was with him. He went on till night came. Then he
was in a dismal stony place, with no house or shelter near—only big
stones, and here and there a thistle. He said his prayers, and then
he lay down with a stone for his pillow and the sky over him. Butin
the night he saw a wonder. There was a ladder reaching from earth
to heaven, and God’s angels were going up and down, and the Lord
himself stood at the top of the ladder. And He told Jacob that He
was going to give his children all the land he saw—north, south, east,
and west; and that He would take care of him, and be with him
wherever he went, and in time bring him safe home.

“Jacob woke and found it was a dream, but he knew it was true,
and that God had really spoken to him; and though he was glad he
was afraid, and he said: ‘ How dreadful is this place! this is none
other but the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven. And
that he might always know the place, he put one of the great stones
upright, and he took some of the sweet olive oil .he had brought tc
eat on his journey, and poured it on the stone, as the only thing he-
could do to show honor to God. Then he made a solemn holy vow,
that if God would take care of him on his way, and give him food to
eat and clothes to wear, he would make a gift to God all his life of the
tenth part of all he had. Good people like to do like Jacob, and give
God their tenth. And if-we only had our eyes opened to see, like
his, we should see God’s angels coming up and down with blessings



48 JACOB AND ESAU MEET AGAIN.

for us, for we go to the house of God and gate of heaven whenever
we go to church. Let us recollect how awful Jacob felt it to be so
near to God.”

“T have dreams, too, sometimes,” said little Anna, “and I see every-
thing. Do. you expect they are angels and ladders and things?”
Aunt Charlotte patted her cheek and began the—

. QUESTIONS.

Who was Isaac? Who was Jacob? Who was Esau? Why was Jacob obliged to go away?
What was the promise? What kind of place had he to sleep in? What was his pillow? But what
did he see? Who went up and down? Who stood at the top? What did God promise him?
What did Jacob say of the place? How did he mark it? What did he pour on the stone? What
vow did he make? What are our houses of God? Who come up and down to us? What do the
angels bring us? How much did Jacob promise to give to God? What does God do for us?

Jacob and Esau Meet Again. |

“ Aunt Chariotte, 1 know what became of Jacob,” said Clara. “But
don’t tell,” said Willie, shak-
ing his hand at her; “you
will spoil the story for me
and Anna—let Aunt Char-
Ne vemicelues

NV Cll sthenis “SalcmeeantlE
Charlotte, “it was a long
journey that Jacob had had to
take, but God took care of
him, and brought him safe
to the home where his mother
had come from. He lived
there and took care of his
uncle’s sheep and cattle till
he had earned a great many
for his own; and he had
married there and had a great
many sons. But after a time
God commanded him to go home to the land of Canaan. He was



JACOB AND THE ANGEL.







JACOB AND ESAU MEET AGAIN. . a5

afraid, because he thought his brother Esau might still be angry with
him; but, in spite of his fear, he did as God bade him. When he
came near the river Jordan, which flows on the east side of the land
of Canaan, he prayed to God to guard him, and once more God let
him see the angels who were going with him to protect him. He
was glad, but he was still very careful. He chose out a present of
cows and goats and camels and sheep and asses for Esau, and sent
it on to meet him; and then he sent on the other cattle he wanted to
keep for himself; then his children; and last of all, in the safest place,
his dear young son Joseph.

“Esau came to meet him, but not in anger. The two brothers met
and fell on each other’s neck and kissed each other and were friends.
So God had kept His promise to take care of Jacob; and Jacob kept
his promise, for he set up an altar at Bethel, where he had seen the
angels before, and praised and blessed God.”

“T knew Jacob would come out all right,” said Willie. “Ves, and.
Esau did, too; and Jacob had to make up for taking his birthright
too.”

QUESTIONS.

Who was Jacob? Why had he left home? With whom did he go to live? What did he earn
there? Why did he go back? Why was he afraid? But what comforted him? Of whom do
God’s angels take care? What did Jacob give Esau? How did Jacob put his family in order?
Who went last? How did Esau meet him? How did Jacob show he was thankful ?



Sith Sunday.

Joseph in Eeypt.
‘¢ His brethren envied him.’’—Genests xxxvu, re

“ NOW, Master Willie,” said Aunt Charlotte, “I will tell you about
a boy you will like.” “Good,” said Willie, clapping his hands. “ Well,
then, you know I told you
last Sunday how Jacob went
away from home, and how
God promised to take care of
lin wr ilenclicn tae. teAre sot.
him; He led him to his uncle,
and with him Jacob lived
many years, and then came
back with flocks of sheep and
goats, camels and cows.

Jacob had twelve sons.
The best of all his sons was
named Joseph. Jacob loved
him very much, and gave him
a striped dress of many colors,
such as the son who is to.
: be the heir wears in those

ae pee sae countries. But his brothers.

hated and envied him, and

could not speak peaceably to him. One day, when Joseph was seven-

teen years old, ten of the brothers were out with their sheep, and Jacob
as





JOSEPH IN EGYPT. ; 51

desired Joseph to go and see what they were about. He would not
tell his father how unkind they were to him, but he went; and as
they saw him coming some of them were so wicked as to say that
they would kill him, and never let him go home. Reuben, who was































JOSEPH CAST INTO THE PIT.

the eldest brother, tried to hinder them: but when he saw he could
not stop them, he said the best way would be not to kill him but ta
let him down into a dry well just by. There they meant to let him
starve to death; and they let him down without any pity for him
Reuben meant to come by and by and take Joseph out of the



52 JOSEPH A SLAVE.

pit and save him; but there was another brother, named Judah,
who did not want to have him killed, and who saw a great party of
men, with camels and asses laden with goods, going on a journey.
He knew they were merchants going to sell and buy in Egypt, and
he advised. the other brothers to persuade them to buy Joseph; for
in those days men and women used to be bought and sold, and were
called slaves. So Joseph was drawn up out of the pit; and when
the merchants saw what a fine young man he was, they paid the
price for him, and carried him off, away from his father and all he
had ever known or cared for before. The cruel brothers kept his
colored dress; and they killed a kid and stained it in the blood, and
then carried it to their father, telling him they had found it. Jacob
thought some wild beast had met Joseph and killed him and eaten
him, and he mourned and wept. His sons pretended to comfort him,
but not one of them would tell him that Joseph was not dead.”

“Was n't those boys mean to do poor Joseph that way ?” said little
Anna. “I knew that story all before,” said Willie; “my Sunday-
school teacher told us about it.” “Very well, then, we'll have the
questions now,” said Aunt Charlotte.

QUESTIONS.

Whose son was Jacob? How many sons had Jacob? What did he set them to do? Which
did he love best? What did he give Joseph? Where did-he send Joseph? What did the brothers
want todo? Who wished to save him? So what did Reuben persuade them to do? What did
Reuben mean to do? But who came by? What did the brothers do with Joseph? Who per-
suaded them to sell him? What are people called who are bought and sold? What was done with
his coat? What did Jacob think?

Joseph a Slave.
** The Lord made all he did to prosper in his hand.”’— Genesis xxx1x, 3.

“Aunt Charlotte, you did not finish about Joseph,” said Clara.
“No,” answered Aunt Charlotte, “I told you about his being sold; so
we see Joseph was made a slave. A slave is a servant who belongs to
his master, as his cows and horses do; he gets no wages and can not
go away, but is bought and sold like cattle.

“Think of poor Joseph. He was used to live as the son of a great





:
.
;

Ce eS ee a ee



JOSEPH A SLAVE 53

rich prince, wearing a dress of many bright colors, with many servants,
and no one to obey but his kind, fond father; and living in a beauti-
ful land, all hill and valley, where he used to feed his father’s flocks.
But now he was a slave in a strange land, with people speaking a lan-
guage he did not know, and no one to care for him or say a good word
to him, shut up in a house in a town, far away from his dear hills.

“Still he had one comfort, and the best of all—God was with him.
He could still pray to God and do his duty. And he did his work well,
for God helped him, and everything he did was made to prosper in
his hand. Then he was trusted. His master knew that he always
took care of everything as if it was
his own, and left all to him, quite
sure that it would be safe. But his
wicked mistress made up a story
that he had behaved ill, and he was
put in prison for what he had not
done. This sounds hard, but it was
God's own way of bringing good to
pass and making Joseph come at
last to honor. Very soon he was
loved and trusted in his prison, and
ale sdice ties lord anade at to
prosper.

“Think about this. mee when you nave anything to do,—a lesson
or a bit of work,—to ask God to make it prosper. Then if you try
your best He will help, and it will be sure to turn out well.

“Then try to deserve to be trusted. That is a great thing. If you
always recollect that God sees you, you will do the same when no one
is with you as if all the world were watching; and that is the way to -
be true and just in all your dealings. If you are only good when you
are looked at, you are not like Joseph, but are only doing service out-
wardly You must try to live that your parents may, when you are—





















































































Anouar EGvprian. IDOLS.

“Out of sight
Know all is right—
One law for darkness and for liyht,’’”’

-~



54 JOSEPH TELLS THE MEANING OF DREAMS.

“Didn't they let Joseph out of prison?” asked little Anna, with
tears in her blue eyes. “I know,” said Willie; “I know that, too. May
I tell her, Aunt Charlotte?” “TI will tell her in the next lesson,” said
Auntie. .

QUESTIONS.

Whose son was Joseph? Howmany brothers had Joseph? What had they done to him? Why
had Joseph’s brothers sold him? What is a slave? How did Joseph behave as a slave? Who
comforted him? How did he take care of his master’s things? Who made up a story. against
him? What was done to him? But who was with him still? And what did people think of him,
wherever he was? What is the way to be like Joseph? If you are trusted to carry a message, how
should you do it? Who always sees you? Then, even if no one is by, how should you behave?

Joseph Tells the Meaning of Dreams,
‘*Do not interpretations belong to God ?’’— Genesis x1, 8.

“Yous remember wee lett
Joseph jn prison,” began Aunt
Charlotte bilteswheteversne
was he tried to do his duty,
and so God blessed him; and
the keeper of the prison soon
found out how different he
was from the others, and let
ime shelp= I stpposeâ„¢ he
helped to carry the prisoners
their food and wait upon
them; and he often could say
a few kind good words to
them. One day two grand
people came in as prisoners.
One was the chief of all the
bakers, who made bread for
King Pharaoh; and the other
was the chief of all his cup-
bearers, who carried him his
wine. Some wrong thing had happened, and they were both sus-



JosEPH INTERPRETING THE DREAMS.



JOSEPH TELLS THE MEANING OF DREAMS. 55

pected of having had something to do with it, so they had been
sent to prison. One morning Joseph saw them both looking more
sad than usual; and when he asked what was the matter, they said
each had a dream, and they wanted to know what it meant; for
the Egyptians used to think a great deal of dreams, and there were
men among them who pretended to explain them. Most dreams have
no meaning, but these had, and God put it into Joseph’s heart to under-
stand them. The cup-bearer had dreamt that he saw a vine, and that
it had three bunches of grapes, and that he was squeezing the juice
into the king’s cup as he used to do. Joseph said this meant that

_ in three days the cup-bearer should really hand Pharaoh the cup again;

and Joseph begged that when-he was free he would tell the king about
himself, and get him set free. Then the baker told his dream—that
he had three baskets full of pastry and bread ready for Pharaoh, but
that the birds came down and ate them up. Joseph was obliged to
tell him that this meant that he would be hanged, and that the vul-
tures and ravens would eat his flesh. So it happened. Pharaoh
looked into the matter in three days’ time; he caused the baker to be
hung, and the cup-bearer to come back to his old place. But the cup-
bearer was ungrateful, and forgot all about Joseph in his prison, trust-
ing to him. And he stayed there a long time after. But, little Anna,
he did get out and became a very great man, and I will tell you about
it next Sunday.”

Little Anna was very sorryshe could not hear how it happened now,
but she said she would wait, and she hoped he would be sure to get
out. Aunt Charlotte patted her cheek and promised her he should do
so in the very next lesson.

QUESTIONS.

Who was Joseph? Where was he? How came he to be in Egypt? Where had he been put?
Had he done anything wrong? Who trusted him? What had he to do? Who came into the
prison? What was the cup-bearer’s dream? What was the baker’s dream? What did Joseph say
the cup-bearer’s dream meant ? What did the baker’s dream mean? What happened? What had
Joseph asked of the cup-bearer? Did he remember? ;



Seventh Sunday.

Joseph’s Brothers.
« We are verily guilty concerning our brother.’’— Genesis xXLIl, 21.

(ON OWE Sesaid = ttle = Amma,
clapping -her hands, “this is the
time for poor Joseph to get out of
that mean prison.” “Yes,” said
Aunt Charlotte, “Joseph did not
always stay in prison, for God gave
him wisdom to tell the king of
Egypt that his dreams had meant
that there were going to be first
seven years of very fine harvests,
and then seven years yon come of no harvests at all. So the king
took him out of prison and made hima great lord; and he set to
work to buy the corn that was over and above what people wanted to
eat in the years of plenty, that he might store it up against the
years when the corn would not grow.

“So when the bad harvest began Joseph had plenty of corn, and he
sold it for the king to all who wanted it. The famine was not only in
Egypt but in all the countries round; and by and by Joseph saw,
among the people that came to buy, ten of his own brothers—the
same who had sold him for a slave. He knew them, for they still
looked like shepherds, but they did not know him, for he had grown
from a youth to a man, and was dressed like an Egyptian lord; and

he did not let them know that he knew them, though he wanted much
|



JOSEPH BEFORE PHARAOH.









VOSELAOS WE RONGERS, a7,

to know what had become of his old father and his little brother Ben-
jamin. He made as if he thought they were enemies, come to see if
Egypt could be conquered.

“Then they told him who they were; that they were all one man’s
sons, and that one brother they had lost; the other was left with his
father, who could not bear to part with him. Joseph would not seem
to believe this, and said he must keep one of them in prison while he
sent the rest back to fetch their youngest brother, or else he could not
believe them. Then, when fear and trouble came on them, they began
to think how ill they had used their lost brother Joseph; and they said
one to another, ‘We are verily guilty concerning our brother.’ Joseph
heard them, and could hardly bear it; but still he kept to his plan. He
kept Simeon a prisoner, that he might be sure of the others coming
back, and sent them home to fetch Benjamin. But he would not have
any of the money they had brought for the corn, and made his steward
put it all back into the mouths of their sacks.

“When they found this out as they went home they were much
afraid, and when they came home their father was more afraid still.
After the way they had used Joseph he thought they had killed
Simeon, and wanted to kill Benjamin. They spoke truth now, but he
could not believe them; and he said he could not send Benjamin, for
if mischief should befall the lad, ‘then shall ye bring down my gray
hairs with sorrow to the grave.’”

“Yam so glad Joseph got out of prison,” said Anna. “Yes, but he
ought to have licked his old, mean brothers.” “Stop, Willie,” said
Aunt Charlotte. “The Bible says we must forgive those who injure us.”

QUESTIONS.

Where was Joseph? Why was he in prison? What did God make him able to tell the king? ©
How many years was there to be much corn? What was to be done with the corn? Who man-
aged the buying it? When was the corn wanted? Who came to buy corn? Who did not come?
Why did not Joseph’s brothers know him? What did he make believe to think? Whom did he
tell them to fetch? What did he give back to them? What did their father say about Benjamin's
going? Why was he afraid to trust them with Benjamin? What is the way to be believed ?

me





PS ere rae erate A NEN A EKA RAE TEE ENT SN Ae Sea

5S JOSEPH’S BROTHERS GO AGAIN LO-EGVET.

Joseph’s Brothers Go Again to Egypt.

“God Almighty give you mercy before the man.’’—Gezeszs XLII, 14.

“Juoseph’s brothers were soon obliged to go again and buy more
corn in Egypt. Joseph had said they must bring the. young brother
they had told him of, or he should not believe their story; and when
they said Benjamin must go, their father Jacob was greatly grieved,
and showed how little he could trust them now, after the way they
had behaved to Joseph. He would not have let Benjamin goat all if

Judah had
NOL. pret
ised to take
the greatest
care of him;
and Judah

could be
trusted.
fT nestory

is so beauti-
fubpeaiids 550
Gdsy StOe Un=
derstand in
the Bible,
that I hardly
like to tell it
in my own words. Only think of Joseph’s heart being so full when
he saw his own dear youngest brother that he could not stay with
him for his tears, and went away to weep in his chamber! And yet
he still tried the brothers. He wanted to see if they still were
envious of the one their father loved best; so he made his steward
hide his cup in Benjamin’s sack of corn, and then go after them and
pretend to think they had stolen it.

“The sons of Jacob were no thieves, and they said the steward



EGYPTIAN WOMEN.



JOSEPH MAKES HIMSELF KNOWN. 39

might search their sacks. They took them down and looked, and there.
was the cup in Benjamin's sack! 7
“They were all shocked; and the steward said that Benjamin must
go back and be punished.
“How pleased they would have been long ago if such a misfortune
had happened to Joseph! But now their hearts were changed, and
chey were shocked and grieved.”
“Tm glad they got into trouble,” said Willie; “ served ’em right.”
“Yes, but poor little Benjamin and old Jacob,” said little Anna.
“Joseph ought to have sent his papa a letter to tell him all about it.”

QUESTIONS.

What had Joseph’s brothers done to him? What trouble did you hear last Sunday he was in ?
But how did he behave? And what had he come to be? What had he stored up? Who came to
buy corn? How many brothers came? Which did not come ?- Why did not Benjamin come ?
Did the brothers know Joseph? What did he tell them to do? When he saw Benjamin, where
did he go? What did Joseph tell his steward todo? What did Joseph want tosee? How did the
brothers behave this time?

Joseph Makes Himself Known.

*¢ God did send me before you to preserve life.’’— Genesis XLV, §.

“Do hurry, Auntie, about Joseph. I’m mest crazy to know about
him and little Benjamin,” said Anna.

“Well, to begin where we left off,” said Aunt Charlotte. “All the
eleven sons of Jacob turned back in grief and fear and dismay with
Benjamin. How the cup came to be in his sack they could not guess,
but they knew that their father’s heart would break if they came home
ind left Benjamin to be a slave.

“So they all went back to the lord of the land, and Judah stood up
before the strange, stern, princely man, and told him how much their
old father loved this youngest son, and he would be sure to die if the
lad did not come home safe. And then Judah begged to stay and be
a slave in Egypt, instead of his brother Benjamin, for he said if mis-
chief befell the lad his father would die, and that he could not bear to
See,



Hei

ae ce
A ih ‘

a 5 ee



































































JOSEPH MAKING HIMSELF KNOWN TO HIS BRETHREN.



ee

| JOSEPH MAKES HIMSELF KNOWN, 6x

“ But when Judah so spake, the lord of the land sent all the lookers-
on away, and wept aloud, and said that he was their own brother,
Joseph, whom they had sold so long ago. He would not let them be
afraid; he embraced them all and wept for joy, and asked for his
father. Then he told them not to grieve for what had gone before;
for God had turned it all to good, and made him be the means of
saving all their lives, by storing up the corn in Egypt.

“And now they were to go home, and tell Jacob, their father, that
Joseph was still alive, and was a great and powerful man; and they
were to fetch old Jacob, their father, and their wives and their children,
and all they had, and come to live with Joseph in Egypt, where he
would take care of them.

“That was the way Joseph forgot all the ill his brothers had done to
him, and forgave them, and loved them with all his heart. When the
brothers came home, their father Jacob could scarcely believe such
good news; but at last he said, ‘Joseph my son is yet alive, I will go
to see him before I die.’

“And he came down to Egypt, and Joseph met him and fell on his
neck and kissed him; and then there was joy indeed, joy as if Joseph
had come back from the dead. |

“So Jacob lived all the rest of his life in Egypt, and was happy with
his son Joseph. God had given him another name, Israel, and his
sons, and their sons after them, were always called the children of
Ste le

“Now, brother,” said Clara, “don’t you see Joseph was right ?”
“Yes,” answered little Anna, “he was a good boy to his old, mean
brothers; and don’t you expect they all loved him after that ?”

“Right, my darling,” said Aunt Charlotte. “Jesus said we must do
good to those who treat us meanly, and that we must love our
enemies. That makes them our friends.”

QUESTIONS.

Who was Benjamin? What was found in Benjamin’s sack? Who put it there?- What was
going to be done to Benjamin? Who spoke for him? What did Judah ask? Who did the lord
of the land turn out to be? How came Joseph to be in Egypt? Why had his brothers not known
him sooner? How did he treat them? Whom did he send for? What did Jacob say? Where
did Jacob go to live? Why was it very kind in Joseph to help his brothers?



Eighth Sunday. —

The Baby in the River.

¢¢T have surely seen the affliction of My people.’’—Zxodus 11, 7.

“WILL you tell us more about
Joseph, Auntie?” “No, Willie; we
will skip a long time,—nearly three
hundred years,—and see how
Jacob’s people got on in the land of
Egypt, and I will start with the
baby in the river.

“You heard in our last lesson
how Joseph brought his father and
brothers and their children to live
in Egypt. Their children’s children
went on living there for many years,
till they had come to be a great
people, and were called the children
of istacl; “but then, the King of
Egypt grew cruel to them. He
made them work very hard to make

bricks and build towns for him; and, what was still worse, he ordered
that whenever a little boy was born to the children of Israel, he should
be thrown into the river and drowned. |

“One mother hid her little baby for three months, and when she
could not hide him any longer she put him into a little cradle of bul-
rushes, covered over with pitch to keep the water out, and let the

62 7





MosEs IN THE BULRUSHES.





THE BABY IN TRE RIVER. 63

cradle float on the river, leaving the little boy’s sister to watch him.
Presently a lady, no other than the daughter of the cruel king, came
down to bathe in the river. She saw the little cradle and had it
brought to her. The little baby was crying, and the lady pitied him
and took him home, to bring him up for her own child. She wanteda
nurse for him, and his sister brought the baby’s own mother, and she

became his nurse.

“His name was Moses, and he grew up in the king’s house as the

son of the king’s daughter; but when he grew up he went away from

the king’s house, because he
loved his people and pre-
ferred to live with them, and
the king grew angry with him
because he cared for his own
people, and he had to flee
away and keep sheep in the
wilderness. :

“And there he saw a great
wonder. He saw a flame of
fire in a bush, and yet the
bush was not burnt. And
God's voice spoke to him out
of the fire that did not burn,
and told him that the troubles
of His people, the children of



Mosrs Krrpinc SHEEP IN THE WILDERNESS.
Israel, were to come to an ;

end. God would save them from the cruel Egyptians; and Moses him-
self was to go and lead them out, and bring them to the good land
that God had promised that Abraham’s children should have for their
own. Moses was to go and tell the king of Egypt that it was God’s will
that they should go. Moses was afraid at first, but God promised to
help him; and in our next lesson you will hear what happened.”
“Tell us now,” said little Anna. “Was it bad?” “This afternoon,
my darling,” said Aunt Charlotte. “Now see how well you can —
answer the questions,”



64 MOSES AND AARON BEFORE THE KING.

QUESTIONS.

Who was Moses? Where was he put when he was a baby ?. Why was he put on the river? Who
had said the little boys were to be drowned? Whose babies were they that were to.be drowned?
What other cruel things did the King of Egypt do to the children of Israel? Who were called the
children of Israel? What became of Moses in his bulrush cradle? Who brought him up? Did
he stay with the king’s daughter? Whom did he care for? What wonder did Moses see? Who
spoke tohim? What was God going to do for His people? What land would He give them?
Who had the first promise that his children should have the good land?

Moses and Aaron before the King,

‘* And Pharaoh said, Who is the Lord ?’’—Exodus v, 2.

“Now, Moses had a brother Aaron, who was a priest and a good
talker, and he got him to go with him and they told Pharaoh God’s
message—that the people of Israel were to go away and worship
Him. But Pharaoh said, ‘Who is the Lord; that I should obey His
voice to let Israel go? I know not the Lord, neither will I let
Israel go. And he was more cruel to the children of Israel; he
made them work harder and harder,
and had them beaten if they did
not do all the work that was set
them. They had to make bricks of
clay mixed with straw; and,- to
punish them, Pharaoh said that they
should have no straw given to them
for their work, but that they must

: at find it for themselves; and yet he
Bee M a ea required of them just as many bricks
as they had had to make before. Then they cried out and were
angry, and fancied Moses had brought all this trouble on them by
asking for them to go. They were very miserable, and said they
wished they had never listened to Moses, for he had only made them
worse off instead of better.

“ Aaron was a better speaker than Moses, and God had said he
should help him, and that, when God told Moses anything, Aaron



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































EGYPTIAN TASK MASTERS.



65





a
| 66 MOSES AND AARON BEFORE THE KING.

should speak it to the people. So the two brothers stood telling the
‘Israelites to bear it a little longer, and then it would be all well and
over, and they would get away from making the bricks in Egypt.to
the beautiful country. They could not remember it themselves, but
some of their fathers’ grandfathers had been little boys when they
came, and could tell them that it was a country not all flat, with only
one river in it, like Egypt, but full of steep hills and green valleys,
with bright streams running along in them, and thick woods on some
of the slopes, and others laid out in gardens and vineyards. There
were So many cows in the pastures, and in the wild rocks and hollow.
trees so many bees’ nests, that
it was called a land flowing
with milk and honey.

“Should not the Israelites
have liked to hear of such a
place as this? But, no; they
were too dull to care. : They
thought more of whether they
should -get a leek or a melon
to eat at supper than of all the
‘lovely land far away. Do you
know, people are very like that
when they care for zow more than for dy and by. If we want just
what pleases us to-day, instead of caring for what will be good for us
as we grow older, we are just like the Israelites, who would not
attend to Moses or to God.”

“Tf Iwas Moses and Aaron I would have gone off to that pretty
country and left those good-for-nothing Israelites in Egypt,” said
Willie. “Not so,” said Aunt Charlotte. “We must do all the good
we can for others. That’s the way Jesus did.”







IsRAELITES MAKING Bricks IN Ecypt.

QUESTIONS.

Who was Pharaoh? Who were the children of Israel? Who had been sent to call them?
What did Pharaoh say to Moses? How did he use the Israelites? What would he not give them?
Who was Moses’ brother? What was Aaron to do for Moses? Who spoke to Moses? Who told
the people what God said to Moses? What kind of place did God promise? What did Moses

say it flowed with? Why? Did the Israelites carep Why not? When are we like them?









eS IAS

st tales cr

LF IM TRC IIE TD



Se



PSR LT EN Woe NA

HOW GOD PUNISHED THE KING. 67

How God Punished the King.

*¢T will redeem you with a stretched out arm.’’—Zxodus v1, 6.

“The Israelites grew very unhappy, for Pharaoh became even more
cruel to them, and they thought it all Moses’ fault. But Moses told
them that they must go away and that no matter what came on Egypt
they would be saved, and that God was going to show them His
power, so that they might always remember what He had done for
them, and how He punished Pharaoh, who would not obey Him.

“Then God made His power to be known; so that Pharaoh and the
children of Israel might both learn who is the great Lord of heaven
and earth, who must be obeyed. First, Moses stretched out his rod,
and all the water in the river turned into blood. For seven days it
was all one red dreadful stream of blood; and when Moses held out
his rod again it turned back into pure water. But Pharaoh did not
mind, and would not let the people go. Then God sent a multitude _
of frogs, that came into all the noes and bed-rooms, and on the
tables and everywhere. Pharaoh could not bear to have these crea-
tures everywhere, and said if the frogs would but go away he would
let the children of Israel go. Moses prayed to God, and all the frogs
died; but Pharaoh only hardened his heart again, and would not let
the people go. Next, God sent lice—disgusting unclean creatures,
most horrible to the Egyptians, who could not bear anything dirty; but
Pharaoh did not care. Then came swarms of flies, buzzing, stinging,
and tormenting; and Pharaoh said he would allow the Tstaehites to
go, so the flies were taken away; but no sooner were they gone than
he went back again to his obstinacy, and would not let the people go.
He was trying to fight against God, and so came these terrible miseries
onhim. If people will not do better after being punished, worse and
worse is sure to come on them.”

“But didn’t he let ’em go?” said little Anna. “Yes,” said Aunt
Charlotte; “at another time I'll tell you how it was,”

QUESTIONS.
How did God punish Pharaoh? What four plagues have I told you of to-day? Why did these
dreadful things happen? Did Pharaoh care for them? Why did he not mind them? What
happens to those who do not mind being punished?





inth Sunoday.

The Plagues of Egypt.

«* There is none like Me in all the earth.’’— Axodus 1x, 14.
“©The Lord hardened Pharaoh’s heart, so that he would not let the children of Israel go.””"—
| Exodus X, 20.

“NOW tell us some more about mean old
Pharaoh and how he had to let the children of
Israel go away from Egypt. You said you would,
Auntie,” pleaded little Anna, as they all took their
places after breakfast.

“T will, my dear,” answered Aunt Charlotte,
“and I will give you another surprise. You
notice the weather is getting warm and spring-like.
‘Suppose we have one long talk this morning. Then, after church,
_ we will use the afternoon for a pleasant walk, to see if there are any
tiny flowers coming.”

“Good!” shouted Willie, throwing up his hat, and the other children
were equally delighted. A

“Well, then, last Sunday we had learned about four plagues—.” “I
know,” said Willie; “the river turned to blood, the frogs, and the lice
and the flies.” “Right,” said Auntie. “I had forgot about the old
hop-frogs,” put in little Anna. “ Was there any more ‘d/egs,’ Auntie?”

“Yes; six times more God had to punish wicked Pharaoh, and these
six terrible plagues I will tell you about to-day,” said Aunt Charlotte,
and she straightened herself up in her chair and talked very earnestly

and looked away as if she could see all the terrible things she
68,



PHARAOH.



LEE PLAGUES. OF SEGYPT 69

described, and the children did not once take their eyes off her face,
so deeply were they interested.

“After God had sent the flies, next he made the sheep and cows,
that the Egyptians worshiped like gods, fall sick and die, but still
Pharaoh did not care; then the people all had sores and boils that
made them very ill, but still Pharaoh did not care; and then there
was a terrible storm, thunder and lightning, and rain and hail—such
big hailstones as killed the men and cattle that were out in the fields,
and lightning that struck them, and wind that broke every tree in the
field. No wonder that Pharaoh was frightened, and begged that the
storm might cease, and said that then he would let the Israelites go.
So Moses prayed to God, and the thunder
left off, there was no more hail, and it was
all still again. But when the thunder was
over Pharaoh grew wicked again, and left
off caring, and said the Israelites should
not go. And thus God went on being
angry with him and sending worse plagues
upon him.

“Worse troubles are sure to come
when people have not taken warning by
what was sent them before. Pharaoh had
not minded. seven dreadful plagues, so now God sent another. He
sent locusts. These were creatures like great grasshoppers. They
came in swarms and clouds, and ate up every green leaf and blade of
grass, and made all the earth brown and the trees dry sticks, so that
there was nothing left for man or beast to eat. Then Pharaoh gave
way a little, and ead he would let the men go, but that their wives
and children must stay; and he would not hear a word more, but
had Moses and Aaron driven out from before him.

“Then God bade Moses to hold up his hand to Heaven. And dark-
ness came all over the land. It was dark all day—and with ‘ dark-
ness that might be felt’; not like night, but such black darkness that
no fire or Pade could give light, and no one dared to move about,
but the Egyptians lay still in their places, full of horror and terror,



Locust.





70 THE PLAGUES OF EGYPT.

for three whole days. But all the time it was light among the Israelites
—the sun rose and set as usual; and thus God showed that they were
’ His people. Then Pharaoh said that he would let them go—men,
women, and children, only he must keep all their cattle; and when
Moses, speaking God's words, said that the cattle must go too, and
not a hoof be left behind, Pharaoh made his heart hard again, and
drove out Moses, saying the people should not go, and that Moses
should never see his face again. And Moses said, ‘Thou hast
_ spoken well, I will see thy face again no more.’

“So ended the last hope for Pharaoh. He was never to have
another chance of bending his will and doing as God told him. Oh,
let us take care not to be like him. —

« After the nine sad plagues that had come upon the Egyptians—
the blood for water, the frogs, the lice, the flies, the cattle plague, the
boils, the hail, the locusts, the darkness—there was to be still one
plague more, the last and worst. That would make the Egyptians
let the people of Israel go, so they must be ready.

“There should be a terrible night. God’s holy angel would pass
over the whole land of Egypt that night, and in each house of the

Egyptians he would slay the eldest son of the family. No one would
_ be spared: Pharaoh's eldest son, the young prince, and the very poorest
person’s son. They had killed the little Israelite babies, so God
would punish them by killing their children. None of the Israelites
should lose their children; only there was one thing for them to do.
_ They were that night to make their supper on a lamb, and, with some
of the blood of the lamb, they were to make a mark on the doors of
their houses. Where that mark was the angel would pass over and do
no one any hurt; but the people would be blest and set free, because
they believed God, and did as He bade them.”

«That was a good story, Auntie,” said Clara, “and it teaches us
that we must obey God or be punished. Pharaoh was like all sinners
who do not keep their promises to God. /They are punished for it.”
“Did Moses’ folks get away?” asked Anna. “T’ll tell you about it
next Sunday,” answered Auntie; “and this time, as we have had a
Jong talk, I will not ask any questions.”



Centh Sunday.—Easter Day.

The Passover.
‘* There was not a house in which there was not one dead.”’—Zxodus xu, 30.

“THIS is the day I promised
to tell you, Anna, about Moses’
people leaving Egypt; but in the
morning lesson I want to tell
you that this is the Sunday many
Christians celebrate as Easter,
which means deliverance.

“This is our own gladdest
Sunday in all the year, and we
read of the Israelites being glad
too—glad upon the very Sunday
that answered to this, thousands of years ago. On this Sunday, of all
those thousands of years, there has been joy and gladness and thank~
ing God. And why? It was because all the troubles in Egypt were
over, and God brought the Israelites out safe. There was one thing
they had to do first, though; Moses bade them do it, as God com-
manded. I told you they had to eat a lamb for supper Yes: every
family was to take a lamb, and it was to. be killed and roasted whole
in the evening, and some of its blood was to be marked upon the
door-post of the house, and then all the family were to stand round the
table, all ready dressed for a journey, and eat it as fast as they could,
late at night.

“ And while all the famiJies—fathers and mothers and children-—stood

ze



Ecyprian Kinc In His CHARIOT.



72 ‘THE PASSOVER AND EASTER DAY.

up eating the lamb in this strange way, there came a great shout and
cry. God had sent His angel to punish the cruel Egyptians; and
every house where there was no mark of blood on the door-post had
some one dead in it, and that dead person was the eldest or first-born
son. There was a great cry, for there was death everywhere, from the
son of Pharaoh who sat on his throne down to the child of the
poorest slave; and even the first-born of cattle died too, because the
Egyptians used to worship them; but wherever there was the blood
on the door-post the angel passed over, and the eldest son was safe.
The cruel King Pharaoh was sorry and afraid at last, and said that
the people who brought such trouble on him should go where they
liked. And, Anna, in the story this afternoon and to-night I will tell
you all about it.” |
QUESTIONS.

Why are we glad to-day? Where were the Israelites living ? Who said they should come out?
What did God tell the Israelites to eat? How were they to be dressed while they ate it? What
were they to do with the blood? Who was going to pass over the land that night? What did
the angel do where he did not see any blood on the door-post? Who were frightened then?

The Passover and Easter Day.
6¢It is the sacrifice of the Lord’s passover.’’—F#xodus Xu, 27.

“Now, children,” began Aunt Charlotte, “I want to teach youa little
lesson te show you why the Jews keep the Passover and many
Christians observe Easter day.

“When the king of Egypt said the Israelites might go they were all
up and dressed, quite ready and only waiting, and off they set. No
more making of bricks, no more slaving for the Egyptians, no more
drowning of babies! They were free! and God was going to lead
them to the beautiful country that long ago He had said He would
give them.

“ And so always after that, to put them in mind how they were saved
from the Egyptians, God bade them on the same day in each year to
kill a lamb and roast it, and put the blood on the door-post, and eat
the lamb all standing round the table, dressed as if they were going













GOING OUT OF EGYPT. 73

for a journey, that they might never forget how God had made them
free. This was called the Passover, because the angel passed over
the houses where the blood was marked over the door. And God
came in a pillar of cloud to show them the way they should go.

“ Now, you remember, hundreds of years after this our blessed Lord
was crucified when He had come to the Feast of the Passover at
Jerusalem. You know He was like a lamb, He was so pure and
gentle; and His blood saves us, as that lamb’s blood did the Israelites,
and sets us free from the power of the devil. So we still keep the
feast of being set free, on this happy Easter Sunday, when we recollect
that Christ was slain for our sins, but that He rose again from the dead,
and liveth for evermore.

QUESTIONS.

What did Pharaoh say that the Israelites might do? What made him let them go at last?
Who were set free? What were the Israelites to do every year? What was this eating the lamb
called? Why was it called the Passover? Why were the Israelites glad? Who set us free?
In what is He like a lamb ?

Going Out of Egypt.

‘* The children of Israel shall go on dry ground through the midst of the sea.— Exodus xiv, 16.

“This is the time the Israelites are to get away, Aunt Charlotte,”
said Willie. “Yes; and don’t let mean old Pharaoh keep them
any more,” said little Anna.

“All the Egyptians were weeping over their dead first-born sons,
and the Israelites were set free, and going gladly out and away from
their hard masters. .

“But Pharaoh's hard heart turned again, and he got all his chariots
and horsemen together, and went after the children of Israel to drive
them back to Egypt.” “Oh! now, but he did not catch them, did
he?” asked Anna, with great excitement. “No; when he came in
sight of them, there they were all upon the shore of the sea called the
Red Sea. They could not go on, for the sea was straight before them;
they could not go back, for the Egyptians were behind. They were
sore afraid. But God spoke to Moses, and told him not to fear. They

had only to stand still and see how God would save them.
5



74 GOING OUT OF EGYPT.

“And God himself showed that He was with them, for the pillar of
cloud went behind them, instead ‘of before, and made it dark to the
Egyptians, but gave light by night to the Israelites: so the Egyptians
could not get near them all night.” “How glad I am,” said little
Anna, clapping her hands. .

“Then God bade Moses stretch out his rod over the sea. And then
there was a great wonder. The waves of the sea parted, and stood
up on each side in a heap, and in between there was a wide open
space, where the children of Israel might walk safely dry-shod,
through the very midst of the sea. Through it they went, men,
women, and children, through the depths of the sea, with the waves
standing still on each side of them.

“Pharaoh saw that they were all gone over. He chose to follow after
them. But when his host was full in the midst, the sea returned to its
strength again and came down on the Egyptians, and every one of
them was drowned,—‘ they sank like lead in the mighty waters,—and
the Israelites were freed from their enemies, quite away from all their
trouble and all their slavery; and they all sang hymns of joy to God,
who had set them free. |

“ And now, as we hear about their being set free, let us remember
this is the great Easter day, when we ought to give special thanks to
our Blessed Lord Jesus for having set us free.”

“Pm so glad they got away safe,” said Anna. “Yes; and I’m
gladder because those wicked Egyptians got drowned,” put in Willie.
“No, brother, rather we should be sorry their wickedness made
them go in to their destruction,” said Clara. “Right,” said Aunt
Charlotte. “We should never rejoice in any wicked person's death.
Christ came to save the wicked, and but for his coming we would all
be lost.” .

QUESTIONS.

Who had set off to leave Egypt? But what did Pharaoh do? What was before the Israelites ?
What was behind? Where did the pillar of cloud go? How were the Egyptians cut off from
them? What wonder did God work? Where did the Israelites go over? Who came after them?
What became of the Egyptians? Who were free? Who had made them free? Who makes us
free?













OF THE EGYPTIANS.

DESTRUCTION



Kleventh Sunday.

Wicked Men Swallowed Up.

**The Lord will show who are His and who is holy.’’—Mumdbers XVI, 5.

“WHEN the Israelites came out of Egypt they hada long journey
to go, through a dreary, lonely wilderness. Moses and his brother
Aaron led them; and God took care of them, and fed them, and kept
them safe. But there were two wicked OMe Heine Gael) aencimmeeniiGl
Abiram, who were tired of the wilderness, and were angry at having
Moses for their leader and master, though God had made him lead
them, and had done so much for them. They said they were as good
as Moses, and that he should not be their prince. They did not care
for God having spoken by him.

“Their end was so very dreadful that I can hardly tell it to you.
God would not let them rise up against His servant Moses; and when
they would not listen nor repent He made the earth open under their
feet, and they went down alive, and were swallowed up in the pit
before the eyes of all the other Israelites; and so they died the most
terrible death any one ever died. It was because they set themselves
up against Moses, whom God had placed over them, that He was so
angry with them.

“Remember God has set people over us: there are our fathers and
mothers, and our clergymen and teachers ; and it is our duty to obey
them, as He tells us in the Fifth Commandment. If we are proud
and saucy, it is very wrong of us. It is not likely that we should be
so dreadfully punished in this life as Dathan and Abiram were; but
their horrible death should make us remember that God is very angry

76









KORAH AND HIS FRIENDS BURNT TO DEATH. 77

with those that will not try to obey those that have the rule over
them, and set themselves up to be bold and proud, and to say they do

not care.”
QUESTIONS.

Who was set over the Israelites by God? Where had he brought them from? Where was he
leading them to? How should they have behaved to him? What bad men were there among
them? Why was it very wicked of Dathan and Abiram not to obey Moses? What terrible end
did they cometo? Why was God angry with Dathan and Abiram? Whom did He set over you
Then how must you behave to your parents and clergyman and teachers?

























































































































































THE HIGH PRIEST BURNING INCENSE WITHIN THE HOLY OF HOLIES.





Korah and His Friends Burnt to Death, |

“And seek ye the priesthood also ?’’—Mumbers xvi, to.
“I will tell you to-day about a wicked meddler.” “Some people

are always meddling with other people’s business,” said Willie. “Yes
and we will see how this meddler suffered,” began Aunt Charlotte



78 KORAH AND HIS FRIENDS BURNT TO DEATH.

“When God had the children of Israel started on their journey He
chose that Aaron, Moses’ brother, and his sons should be His priests,
A priest had to offer up the sacrifices to God, and to burn incense to
Him. Incense is made of dried plants and gums that have a sweet
smell when they are burnt. The priests had brazen urns with holes
at the top, and chains to hold them by, and when the smoke of the
incense went up it was just as our prayers rise up to God in heaven
There were other people called Levites, who had to take care of the
holy things that were used in God’s service, but only the priests
might offer sacrifices or incense. .

“Now, one of these Levites, named Korah, wanted to do more.
He was angry, and said everybody was holy, and that Aaron took too
much on himself. Now, it was not Aaron who made himself priest,
but God had made him so. Therefore it was wrong in Korah; but
there were two hundred and fifty men whom he persuaded to come
and get censers, and offer incense to the Lord as if they had been
priests. But because they did it in pride and self-will God was angry
with them, and His fire burst out and scorched them all to death! It
was only the men themselves that died, not their wives or children ;
and Korah’s family after him were better than he was, and used to
sing God’s praises in the Psalms.

“But they always recollected that no one who was not a priest
might offer sacrifice or burn incense before God.”

“The lesson we learn from this,” said Clara, “I should think is
that we must do what God wants us to.” “Yes, and mind our own
business,” said Willie.

QUESTIONS.

What had a priest todo? Who was the right priest? How came Aaron to be priest? Who
wanted to offer incense? Whatdid Korah say? How many came with him? What did they try
to do? What happened to the two hundred and fifty? Why were they Pees What became
of Korah’s children ?





HOW THEY MADE HIGH PRIESTS. 79



_ How They Made High Priests,

~ «The rod of Aaron for the house of Levi was budded, and brought forth buds, and bloomed

blossoms, and yielded almonds.’’—Mumbers xvi, 8.
“Why did the priest offer a sacrifice, Aunt Charlotte?” asked
Clara, as they took their seats after tea. “An important question: |

am glad you asked it,”
said their aunt.

“ The high priest, whom
God chose, had to offer
sacrifices to Him. That
was, the priest slew a
lamb or a goat or a bul-
lock by the altar and gave
it to God. It was to
show that the son of God
would come and die to
take away sin. Now He
has come and died, we
have left off killing crea-
tures in sacrifice, and only
make remembrance over
again of His sacrifice in
thie, Sacraments O:e ete
Lord’s Supper.

“The high priest used
to wear a beautiful dress.
He had a. miter on his
head, with a gold plate on
it, and the words, -‘ Holi-
ness unto theLord’; and
he had a blue, red, and white robe, embroidered with gold, and round
the hem littie gold bells and pomegranates. He had a curious scarf
called an ephod, and a beautiful breast-plate made of twelve precious







Ture Hicnh Priest In His BEautiruL Dress.



80 HOW THEY MADE HIGH PRIESTS.

stones, each with the name of one of the twelve tribes of Is.ael
engraven on it.” “How did Aaron know he was to be the high
priest?” asked Willie. “Another good question,” answered Auntie.

“It was done this way. God said He would show who should be His’
priest. So he bade Moses desire the chief man in each tribe to bring him
a dry rod or staff, and lay them up all night in the Holy Place. The
one whose rod began to grow as if it was still on the tree should be
the high priest. When the twelve men went to look in the morning,
eleven rods were dry sticks still, but one had put out green leaves
and pink buds and white blushing flowers, like almond blossoms.
It was Aaron’s rod; and this was the way God let the children of
Israel know that Aaron and his sons, and grandsons after him, were
always to be priests.” “Now I understand it; don’t you, brother?”
Sale littlesAmirawe (Olmethatis, easy,” answered Willie.

QUESTIONS.

What was a priest? What creatures were killed? What was this to make the children of
Israel think of? Why don’t we kill sacrifices now? What did the high priest wear on his head ?
What color was his dress? How was it edged? What was on his breast? How did God say he
would show who was to be the high priest? What were the eleven rods like in the morning? But
how did one look? Whose was it? What, then, was Aaron to be?

a a
MN Te



st i

Pai



PLAGUE oF Frocs.





Cwelfth Sunday.

Wloses Bringing Water Out of the Rock.

‘¢Ye shall not tempt the Lord your God.’’—Dewt. v1, 16.

“T TOLD you what sort
of a place a desert is, and
how full it is of stones
and rocks and sand, and
with no water in it. Do
you remember how thirsty
Ishmael was in a desert,
and how God heard the
voice of the lad, and sent
an angel to lead his
mother to a well of
water?” “Yes, I learned
that at Sunday-school,”

said Willie. |

“Well, when the Is-
raelites had come out of

the land of Egypt they were in a terrible wilderness. Mount Sinai
stood up in the midst, and all round were great rocks of red and black
stone, all dry and parched with the hot sun shining on them. The
Israelites grew very hot and sadly thirsty, but they did not pray as
Ishmael had done. They grew angry, and said, ‘Is the Lord among
us orno?’ Do you not think they deserved that God should show
whether He was among them by punishing them for grumbling?”
81



















THE HicH Priest OFFERING INCENSE,



82 LHE SERPENTS THAT BIT THE PEOPLE.

“But they wanted some water to drink,” said Anna. “That was the
way they tempted God. Yes, and He was so good and merciful that
He pitied them; and He bade Moses to take his rod, and go to the
bare, dry rock and strike it. And when Moses struck the rock Goa
made a beautiful, fresh, clear spring of water come pouring out of it,
so that all the people, and all their cows and sheep and asses and

camels, could drink and be refreshed. Was not that a great wonder ?.

and was not God very kind to them, though they were not good?
But you see God was near to help them all the time, and it was very
sad that they grumbled instead of praying. Do not be like them. If
a thing is hard to bear, don’t murmur and grumble about it, but pray,
aad then you will get help. Either the vexing thing will go away,
or you will leave off minding it.”

QUESTIONS.

What was the mountain in the midst of the desert? What can not be found in the desert ?
Who was the lad that was thirsty there before? What did Ishmael do when he was thirsty? But
what did the Israelites do? What did they say? What would have served them right? But did
God punish them? What did He tell Moses to do? What came out of the rock? Who made
the water come out of the rock? Was it not very good of God to give them water? What oughi
they to have done? What should you do when a thing is hard? Is it not very naughty to
grumble?

The Serpents that Bit the People.

‘As Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up.’’
—John iu, 14.

“What will you tell us about this afternoon?” asked Willie.
“ Snakes,” answered Aunt Charlotte, with a laugh. “But I don’t like
snake stories,” said little Anna. “But you must be patient, my little
curlyhead,” said Aunt Charlotte, patting the chubby cheek, “this story
is in the Bible

“One great fault of the Israelites was that they had no patience.
The moment they saw anything troublesome or difficult they began
to cry out, and say they could not get on,and it was very hard on
them. Now, it is very wrong ever to say God is very hard upon us,
for we may be sure He is doing what is best for us. There was one











































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































MOSES SMITING THE ROCK.





84 FOOD SENT FROM HEAVEN.

stony, hot, steep part of the journey still to come, and when the
Israelites saw it they forgot how often God had helped them, and
cried out, and lamented, and complained of Him and of Moses.

“So again they were punished, for the little shining snakes that
live there came in numbers, darting at them and biting them, so that
the bite burnt like fire, and they died. Then they cried out to God
and were sorry, and He told Moses of a wonderful way to cure them.
Moses was to melt up some brass and make a great serpent, like the
little ones that bit them, and set it up on a pole. Then if any one
who was bitten would come at once and look up at the brazen serpent
his bite would get well, and he would not die of it.

“This was a miracle—a wonder. And it was to teach the Israelites
something, and us too. For you know our Blessed Lord hung on the
cross, as the serpent hung on the pole; and when our souls are in
danger of dying of sin, we must think of Him, and look to Him in
faith, and He will save us from being punished for our sin, and keep
our souls from dying if we believe in Him as our Saviour.”

QUESTIONS.

What sort of place had the Israelites to go over? How did they like it? What did they do?
Who had been taking care of them? How did God punish them? What happened when the ser-
pents bit them? What were they sorry for? So what was Moses to make? Where did he put the
brazen serpent? What were they to do if they were bit? What cured them? Who hung upon
the cross? What does He cure our souls of ?

Food Sent from Heaven.

‘*He humbled thee, and suffered thee to hunger, and fed thee with manna, which thou knewest
not.’’—Deut. Vu, 3. i

“This morning,” said Aunt Charlotte, drawing little Anna to her,
“you heard how God gave the children of Israel water to drink in the
wilderness. Then how he saved them from the fiery serpents. Now
you shall hear what He gave them to eat. The ground was all hard
and stony. There was grass which the cows and sheep could eat, and
there were a few trees with long sharp thorns, but no fruit on them,
and no corn to make bread; and soon the people were very hungry,









FOOD SENT FROM HEAVEN. 85

and began to cry ou that they did not know what would become of
them.

‘But God was not going to forget them. When they rose up in
the morning the fresh dew lay on the grass, and all about in the dew
were little white things that tasted like wafers made with honey. This
was called manna, and God had sent it from heaven for them to eat
Every morning on week days there it was, and they had all to come
out and pick it up. But they must get up early to gather it, for
when the sun was hot it
would melt away. And
they could not keep it—
it grew bad and was not
fit to use the next day ;
but there was always
just enough for every-
body to have all they
wanted. There was
only one day in each
week that more came
down, and that was the
day before the Sab-
bath day,—Saturday,—
which they kept instead
of our Sunday. Then GATHERING MANNA IN THE WILDERNESS.
each one could get
twice as much as could be eaten in one day, and it did not spoil so
fast. For on the Sabbath day God would have them rest, and so
no manna was to be found anywhere, so that they might learn to
keep the Fourth Commandment— remember the Sabbath day to keep
it holy.’”



QUESTIONS.

Where were the Israelites? Why could they not get bread? What did God give them instead ?
What was the manna like? Where did it lie? When was the manna on the grass? Who were to
eat it? What became of it in hot sunshine? Would it keep? What was the day when it could
be kept? How much came down the day before the Sabbath? What might not be done on the
Sabbath? When did no manna come?



Chitteenth Sunday.

Balaam and the Wicked King.

*« Thou shalt not curse the people: for they are blessed.”’—MWumbers XXII, 12.





















PALM TREE,



“CHILDREN,” began Aunt Charlotte,

“did you ever want to do something that
your mama said was not right, and did
Vou tease wien tovleh yousdout, Not
I,” said little Anna, “but brother Willie
does.” “Well,” said Auntie, “I'll tell you
a story about one of God's children who
did the same thing.

“There was a prophet called Balaam.
A prophet means a man to whom God
made His will known, and who was thus
much wiser than other men. This prophet
one day saw some rich great men come to
his house. They brought him a message,
that a king named Balak wanted him to

come with them, and would give him great rewards for coming.
Balaam said he must wait for one night, and God would make known

to him what he was to do.

And at night God told him he was not to

go; for what Balak wanted of him was to curse the children of
Israel, and God would not have them cursed. So Balaam said he
must not go, and the messengers went away.

“But Balak sent more princes, still grander men, with larger
presents, to fetch Balaam. He answered, ‘If Balak would give me

86



BALAAM AND THE WICKED KING. 87

his house full of silver and gold, I can not go beyond the word of
the Lord my God, to do less or more.’ But he had not left off wishing.
He begged the messengers to stay, and see if God would give him
leave to go. And this time God did say he might go, but that he
should not say anything about the Israelites but what God put in his
mouth. Balaam knew that God was not pleased with him; but he
wanted Balak’s rewards, and he set off in the morning, riding on his
ass. |
« Presently the ass was frightened, and turned out of the road into
the field. Balaam was angry at this, and beat the ass. But again the
ass turned aside in a narrow walled path, and squeezed Balaam’s foot
against the wall. He beat her again. Presently, in a very narrow
road, the poor ass fell quite down for fear; and Balaam was very
angry, and beat her harder. Then God worked a wonder. He made
the dumb ass to speak, and ask why he was so cruel to her. He
answered that he only wished for a sword to kill her. The ass asked
if she had ever been like this before. He said, No. And then, full
before him, he saw God's holy angel with a sword in his hand. And
he fell down on his face. The poor ass had seen the angel all the
time; but Balaam could not see him till God made him able. And
now he was afraid, and would have gone back; but the angel said he
must go on now, though he would only be able to speak the words
which God put in his mouth. Think if, sometimes when you have
been told you must not do something, you fret and tease to do it—is
not that like Balaam? And perhaps you tease till some one gives
you leave to do as you wish. Then you get quite cross with eagerness,
and are unkind to all that hinders you; and, after all, you do not find
that any good comes of getting your own way.” “That's right. I
guess I’ll quit teasing mother to let me do what she does n’t want me
to after this,” said Willie. “When you do it hereafter we will call you
Balaam,” said Clara, and they all hada hearty laugh.

QUESTIONS.

What is a prophet? Who sent for Balaam? What did God tell Balaam? But what did Balaam
wish todo? How did he get leave to go at last? But whostood in his way? Who saw the angel at





88 BALAK AND BALAAM BROUGHT TO SHAME.

first? What did Balaam do to the ass? What wonder did God work? What did the ass say?
Whom did Balaam see? What did the angel tell him? What had he been allowed to have? Does
good come of having our own way ?

Balak and Balaam Brought to Shame.

«* There shall come a Star out of Jacob, and a Sceptre shall rise out of Israel.’’—Wumbers XXIV, 17.

“What did old Balak want Balaam to curse the Israelites for, Aunt
Charlotte? Balaam would n't have got into that trouble if it hadn't
been for him,” said Willie. “Well,” answered Aunt Charlotte, “Balak
was a king whose land the Israelites were to pass through. They
promised not to do any harm to him or his people, if they might go
quietly through; but he was afraid and angry, and wanted to have
them cursed, hoping to bring God's anger on them. That was a very
wicked and foolish notion of King Baas and God would not let it
bring harm upon His people. They had not deserved to have His anger
called down on them, and so He would not be angry with them. And
when Balak’s friend Balaam tried to speak curses, God turned them all
to blessings; and, instead of saying they should come toa terrible end,
he could only say how happy and well off they should be, with God to
take care of them and be their King. He even went on to say that a
Star should come out of Jacob, and a Sceptre should rise out of Israel
—and that meant that our Saviour should be born among them. He
is called a Star because He came to give us light; and you know a
star showed the way to the place where He was born. And a sceptre
is the staff a king carries in his hand. So when He was called the
Sceptre, it meant that He should be a King.

“Only think how angry Balak was when Balaam could not curse, but
only blessed. I wish he had been afraid, and seen it was not God's
will that he should hurt the Israelites; but instead of that he went on
in his wickedness, and was miserably killed at last; for God took care
of His people, and would let no one do them any harm.

“ Now, recollect, bad words and bad wishes do harm to the person
that speaks them, not to those they are meant for. Ifa bad boy came
and abused a steady one for going to church or saying his prayers, it



BALAAM’S TRICKS AND PUNISHMENT, 89

would be very bad for himself ; but if the goed boy kept on quietly,
nothing that the other could say would hurt him one bit. God would
take care of him as surely as He took care of the Israelites.”

QUESTIONS. :

Why did Balak want the Israelites to be cursed? What did Balaam do instead? Why
could he not curse thém? Who was to be born among the Israelites? What did Balaam call eur
Saviour? Why was He like a star? Why was He like a sceptre? Why could not Balak hurt the
Israelites? Whom do bad words hurt? Ought we to mind them? If any one teases you when yeu
try to be geod, must you quit being good?

Balaam’s Tricks and Punishment.
«
x “Did Balaam get his money from old Balak?”
asked Willie. “And did he beat his poor little
donkey any more?” asked little Anna. “Did not -
; his experiences turn him into a good man?” asked
i Clara. “No,” said Aunt Charlotte; “not even this
made Balaam good. He wanted Balak to give him
a reward; and so he told him that though no harm
could happen to the people of Israel while they were
good and worshiped their God, yet if he could make
them do something wicked, and turn away from their God, then God
would be sure to punish them. .

“So these two wicked men sent a number of women to invite the
Israelites to hold a great feast with them, in honor of their idol Baal
Peor. Many were so foolish and wicked as to be led away; and they

hada great feasting and reveling, and all kinds of bad pleasures that
these heathen women said were to do praise to this horrible false god.
Then, though Balak might have cursed forever without hurting them,
they had done themselves the harm. God sent a deadly sickness, and
in one day twenty-four thousand people died.

“But Phinehas, Aaron’s grandson, did as Moses commanded him.
He first put to death the wickedest of the people who had joined them-

6 )



BAAL.





90 BALAAM’S TRICKS AND PUNISHMENT.

selves to Baal Peor; and then he prayed, and all the people prayed
and wept too. So God forgave them, and the plague ceased.
_ “Afterward Phinehas led the Israelite fighting men to punish the
wicked Balak and his people; and Balaam was killed in fighting with
them. All the wicked women who had tempted the Israelites away
from God were put to death too. So Balaam’s evil counsel ended in
all sorts of misery. Itis very sad to think of him, for he knew so well
what was good, and yet did what was so very bad. But remember
this : nobody could hurt God’s people till they did wrong, and then they
hurt themselves, and God punished them.” ;

“And wasn’t Balaam bad, though? Brother, you mustn't be like
him,” said little Anna, shaking her finger and looking sad.

QUESTIONS.

What did Balaam think would be the way to hurt the children of Israel? Whom did he send
to them? Whom did the women persuade them to worship? What did God send to punish them ?
_ How was the plague stopped? How was Balaam punished? Why was Balaam greatly to be blamed?
What became of Balaam? Who took care of the Israelites when they were good?



I ee ee ele ete ae ee





Fourteenth Sunday.

God Speaks to Moses.

“ Thou heardest His words out of the midst of the fire.’”’—Dewd. Iv, 36.

“WHAT would you think, Willie,
if you should hear some one speak-
ing to you from the clouds?” “It
would be fun,” said Willie. —“I
would be afraid,” said little Anna.
“So would Willie, if he should hear.
it as Moses heard it. I will tell you
about it.

“When the children of Israel had
come out of Egypt, God had told
Moses to lead them to the foot of
Mount Sinai. This was a high,
steep, rocky mountain in the wilder-
ness. And God told Moses to set
bounds round the mountain, so that nobody should come and touch it;
and the people were to pray, and wait round it for the holy and awful
thing that was to happen. Then there came on the hill-top a deep
dark cloud, ‘and the mountain was altogether on a smoke,’ and it
shook and quaked, and there were lightnings and thunders and voices,
and the sound of a trumpet loud and louder, so that all the people
trembled. Then out of that cloud there came a voice speaking to
them—a voice that they all could hear, and that made them afraid.
For it was the voice of God. And God spoke out of thecloud, and gave
qi



MounrT SINAI.



92 MORE ABOUT MOSES ON THE MOUNTAIN.

the Ten Commandments. They were the very same Ten Command-
ments you see in the Bible. God had come in this terrible and awful
manner to speak them, that all Israel might hear and fear, and take
care not to break them. Afterward God gave these Ten Command-
ments to Moses, written upon two tables, or pieces of stone—written
by God Himself. That was the way the Ten Commandments were
given—by God’s own voice speaking to men out of the cloud, amid
thunders and lightnings and the sound of the trumpet, dreadful to
hear. And God means us all to obey
the Commandments, just as much as
He meant the Israelites to obey them.
They are His words, and must be
kept; and if we ask Him in our
prayers He will give us help and
‘strength to obey them, so that we may
fulfil the promise that was made at our
baptism, that we should keep God’s
holy will and Commandments, and
walk in the same unto our lives’ ends.”
“T would have been frightened if I had been there with Moses,” said
Willie. “But Moses knew God was his friend and was not afraid,”
answered Clara. “ Right again, my girl,” rejoined Aunt Charlotte.









THE ERECTION OF THE TABERNACLE.

QUESTIONS.

Where had the children of Israel come from? Who was leading them? Where did God tell
Moses to take them? . What wonderful sight did they see on Mount Sinai? What did they hear ?
Who spoke out of the cloud? How many Commandments did God speak? On what did God
write them? ‘To whom did He give them? Why must they be kept?

More About Moses on the Mountain.

“The Lord talked with you face to face in the mount out of the midst of the fire.’—Deuz, v, 4. _

“Did Moses talk to God, Auntie?” asked Clara. “Yes,” answered
Aunt Charlotte; “the Bible tells us that when the lightning and
thunder and the loud voice of the trumpet came forth from the cloud
on Mount Sinai, and God had spoken the Ten Commandments, He



MORE ABOUT M@SES ON THE MOUNTAIN. 93

called to Moses to come up and speak with Him in the cloud. How
wonderful it must have been! Moses was the only man that ever
spoke so near to God.

« And, as I said before, God gave him two blocks of stone written
with the Ten Commandments—written with God’s own finger. Then
God told him to make a chest to keep them in. It was to be made of











































































































\ \\







































































































AN

XN

















nN

SY

\























HIGH PRIEST IN THE HOLY OF HOLIES.

wood, with gold all over it; and two figures of cherubims were to be
one on each side. This chest was to be called the Ark of the Cove-
nant. And it was to be put into a square room, inside a tent, that was

to be made with curtains, and carried about with the Israelites. It

was to be called the Tabernacle. And this was to be a very holy
place. The children of Israel would say their prayers in front of the

Tabernacle; but they were not to go into the place where the Ark



94. MOSES’ LONG STAY ON THE MOUNTAIN.

was, because they were sinful, and God is holy. That place was to be
called the Holy of Holies,and no one might go near it but the priests
whom God chose and set apart to lead His worship. The first high
priest, as I have told you, was to be Moses’ brother Aaron; and he
was to wear a beautiful dress when he ministered before God—a high
cap with “Holiness to the Lord” on it,a long embroidered robe,
edged with gold bells and pomegranates, and a blue scarf crossed.
over his breast; and in the middle a breast-plate, made of twelve
precious stones, each carved with the name of one of the twelve tribes
of Israel, so that he might have them on his heart as he prayed to
God. All this and much more God told Moses while he was on the
mount. =
QUESTIONS.

What was given on Mount Sinai? Who spoke the Commandments? What were they written
on? Where were they to be kept? What was the chest called? Where was Moses to put the
chest? What was the room called? Who might go near the Holy of Holies? Who was the first
high priest? Who was Aaron? What was Aaron to wear? Why might not the people come
near P fe i

Moses’ Long Stay on the Mountain.
«¢ Know therefore that the Lord thy God, He is God.’’—Deus. vu, 9.

“T expect Moses was very glad to get away quick from that place
when he got done talking with God,” said Willie. “ Not at all,”
answered Aunt Charlotte; “wher Moses went up into the awful cloud .
upon Mount Sinai, he stayed there forty days.

“But all the Israelites below were impatient. They could not think
what had become of Moses; and though they had so lately heard
God’s own voice speaking to them, they would not wait, as they had
been told to do. They cried out that they wanted something instead
of Moses, whom they had lost. So they took all their gold ear-rings
and melted them, and made an image of a golden calf. And then
these foolish, wicked people began to feast and dance, and worship this
golden idol.

“Moses was coming down Mount Sinai with the two Tables of the

Commandments in his hands. And first he heard a shouting and





4

MOSES’ LONG STAY ON THE MOUNTAIN. — 95

singing; then he saw the people leaping and dancing, and the great
golden idol standing in the midst. Then he was sure it was of no use
to bring them the Commandments if they minded them no better. So
he took the two tables of stone and threw them out of his hand, and
broke them to pieces. :

“Then he went down and severely punished the worst of the
Israelites for having disobeyed the Commandments. And he broke
the golden calf to pieces, and ground it to powder.” ;

“Who got the gold pieces of the calf?” said Willie. “And-then
‘they did not have any more ear-rings, and they did not have any more
tables of stone written by God, did they?” said little Anna. “Yes,”
dear; they had the Tables of the Law. I'll tell you next Sunday how
they got new tables of stone with the laws on them.”

QUESTIONS.

Where had Moses gone? What was God going to give him? Who were left below? What
did the Israelites want ? What did they take off? What did they make of theirear-rings? What
’ did Moses do to the Tables of the Law? Why did he throw them down? What did he do with
the golden calf? ee



THE TABERNACLE RESTORED.



Fifteenth Sunday,



Howe Nise ois. Gan

**T prayed therefore unto the Lord, an

inheritance.”’—Deut. 1x, 26.

THE GIVING oF THE COMMANDMENTS,



d said, O Lord God, destroy not Thy people and Thine

“LAST Sunday you heard how

_ Sadly the people of Israel sinned by

making the golden calf, while Moses
was up in the mountain, and how he
punished them and broke the tables of
stone.

“Then he said he would go and
pray to God to forgive them, and try
them again. So up he went, over the
rough rocks of Mount Sinai, and into
the cloud again, where he had spoken
with God before. And he prayed with
all his might that God would not cast
off His people, though they had been
so wicked, but would give them again
the Commandments on their tables of
stone. And God listened to Moses,
and promised to give them the Com-
mandments again. Then Moses made

‘a great request: he said to God, «I pray Thee, show me Thy glory.’
But God said, ‘Thou canst not see My face, for there shall no man see
Me and live’ But Moses was to come up the mountain the next day,

96 |



TWO DANGEROUS IDOLS. 97

and bring with him two blocks of stone, and then God would let him
see as much of His glory as he could bear.

“On the next day Moses went up the mountain again, and took with
him the two tables of stone. And the Lord came down in the cloud;
and Moses was in the cleft of the rock, where he could see a small
part of the glory, and hear the Lord’s voice proclaim before him, ‘ The
Lord, the Lord God, merciful and gracious, long-suffering, and abun-
dant in goodness and truth.” Then indeed Moses bowed his head
and worshiped. No man ever came so close to God as Moses, with
whom God spoke face to face, as a man speaketh to his friend.

“Moses stayed forty days and forty nights up in the mountain again
this time. And God again wrote the Commandments upon the two
tables of stone, and allowed the Israelites to try again to keep them.
When Moses came down from being in converse with God, the glory
was still about his face. It was all shining like the sun, and was so
bright that the Israelites could not fix their eyes on it; and he was
obliged to put a veil over his face, because they could not bear to
look at it. Was ever living man so favored, and brought into such
glory?”

QUESTIONS.

Where did Moses go to pray for the forgiveness of the Israelites? What did Moses venture to
ask God to show him? But what can no one do? Where was Moses placed? What passed by?
What voice did he hear? How was Moses more honored than any man? How long did he stay
in the mountain? What did God give him again? How did his face look when he came down?
What did he do to hide his face? How came his face to be so glorious?

Two Dangerous Idols.
*¢ Ve shall walk after the Lord your God, and fear Him.’ —Dew?. X11, 4.

( “Did the children of Israel worship any more golden calves, Auntie?”
asked Willie. “No; but they were in great danger of worshiping
other idols just as bad. I will tell you of them.

“God wanted the Israelites, when they should come into the good
land where they were going, to be very careful not to learn to worship
idols. For idols were no gods at all, only wood and stone, and
could not hear them pray, nor give them what they wanted. Besides,



Full Text
xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008758400001datestamp 2008-11-10setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Aunt Charlotte's stories of Bible history for young disciplesAunt Charlotte's stories of Bible history for the little onesdc:creator Yonge, Charlotte Mary, 1823-1901Scull, William Ellis, b. 1862 ( Copyright holder )dc:subject Bible stories, English -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )dc:description b Statement of Responsibility by Charlotte M. Yonge ; embellished with nearly 100 fine engravings, color plates, half-tones, woodcuts and pen drawings made especially for this volume.Frontispiece and plates printed in colors.Date of publication on t.p. verso.Copyright held by W. E. Scull.dc:publisher s.n.s.n.]dc:date 1898dc:type Bookdc:format 252, 14 p., 2 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00087584&v=00001002225280 (ALEPH)08852524 (OCLC)ALG5552 (NOTIS)02026650 (LCCN)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English














ES OF

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The Baldwin Library

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University |
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Runt (janvorres Sroetes

BIBLE HISTORY
FOR YOUNG DISCIPLES

DESIGNED FOR THE 52 SUNDAYS IN THE YEAR

OVER 100 STORIES FROM THE HoLy BooK

HEMPRACING INSTRUCTIVE HISTORICAL EVENTS FROM THE
OLD AND NEW THSTAMENTS

By CHARLOTTE M. YONGE

(THE NOTED AUTHOR AND MISSIONARIES’ FRIEND]

EMBELLISHED witH NeEaRLY 100 FinE ENGRAVINGS

Color Plates, Half-Tones, Woodcuts and Pen Drawings
Made Especially for This Volume

perce


|

a



Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1898, by
W. E. SCULL,

in the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington {



All rights reserved.





ALL PERSONS ARE WARNED NOT TO INFRINGE UPON OUR COPYRIGHT BY USING KITHER Fk
MATTILR OR THE PICTURES IN THIS VOLUME, j




(NERO DE Crile

WCRI

: LS \



PANO Coan Calcio Auixalon@) singles
was a maiden lady who had
for many years been living
in the East, teaching school.
She had, also, been all her
life a great Sunday-school
worker, and had taught the
Infant, or Primary Depart-
ment in her home church
since she was a very young
lady. She almost ‘knew the
Bible by heart,” so everybody
said, and the older people
used to come to the Infant
Class room to hear her ex-
plain it.

As for Bible stories, there
was not one of them all that
sue did not know as well
as she did her A-B-C’s for
she had told them over hun-

dreds of times to her little scholars and friends.

In the year 1898 Aunt Charlotte concluded to visit her sister in a
far Western State, and it was this visit which caused this book to be
written. Her sister had three very pretty and interesting children—
two girls and one boy; Clara was ten years old, Willie was eight,
INTRODUCTION.

and ‘Little Anna,’ as everybody called her, was almost six when
Aunt Charlotte arrived.

They had heard their mother tell of wonderful Aunt Charlotte, and
so they longed to listen to some of her stories about everything, and
especially about the Bible.

They were not disappointed. Every day she told them about
heroes and fairies, and the beautiful countries and strange people
across the seas, and she also heard their lessons.

She said she would save all her Bible stories for Sunday, and to
make up for not telling them any during the week, she would tell
them three short stories every ere ne after breakfast, one after
dinner, and one after supper—if they would listen right well and try
to answer the questions she would ask them after each story. They
all promised they would do the very best they could. And she
planned her stories so she could take them all throgh the Bible in
the fifty-two Sundays in the year,—for she came to stay a whole year
with them,—and have them learn about the great people and great
things that happened in Bible times. _

So that is the very way they began; and if you, my little readers,
will do like Clara and Willie and little Anna did, and mother or
father or some auntie or big sister will do like Aunt Charlotte did,
when you get through this book you will know a great deal, and will
say, as these children did at the end of the year, that Sundays with
“Aunt Charlotte's Stories of Bible History’’ have been the very
happiest days you have had.

Of course, you may begin and read it straight through, as many
boys and girls do, in a week or two, if you prefer; but it is very
nice to read it every Sunday, just as Aunt Charlotte told the stories.




CONTANTS

PAGE
FIRST SUNDAY IN THE NEW VEAR.
The Making of the World. ....... 1g
Making the First Manand Woman. . . . 21
The Sea andthe Tides. ......... 23
SECOND SUNDAY.
EVO WES Ite bela Tiara menue e enn mn er 25
The Flood and Noah’sArk ....... 26
The Going Down of the Flood. .... . 29
THIRD SUNDAY.
ASE RIN 2 11119 OW ae ar ane og 31
Abraham, Who Trusted God. ...... 32
Abraham and Lot. ........... 34
FOURTH SUNDAY.
Lot’s Wonderful Escape... ...... 37
Abraham’s Son Isaac .......... 39
sae ces Wied din' cael mene meer 4
FIFTH SUNDAY.
How Hsau Lost His Birthright .... . 43
Jacob’s Journey and Dream ....... 47
Jacob and KHsau Meet Again ....... 48
SIXTH SUNDAY.
jJosephin Egypt ............ 50
JOSSOVESIENS 6 5 5 6 665 boo ud od 52
Joseph Tells the Meaning of Dreams. . . 54
SEVENTH SUNDAY.
Joseph’s Brothers... .....~, ers 0
Joseph’s Brothers Go Again to Egypt. . 58
Joseph Makes Himself Known. .). . . 59
EIGHT SUNDAY.
The Baby in the River. ........, 62
Moses and Aaron before the King... . 64
How God Punished the King ......, 67
NINTH SUNDAY.
The Plagues of Egypt. ........., 68
Death of the Sheep and Cows and Worse
erOub |e Weees tee cae ae ae ae ae im 69
Last and Most Sorrowful Punishment. . 70
TENTH SUNDAY.
PUDeyEassov.cta am ar an a aire: 71
The Passover and Easter Day ...... 72

Going Out of Egypt. ......, ob o o YR)





PAGE

ELEVENTH SUNDAY.
Wicked Men Swallowed Up... .... 76
Korah and His Friends Burnt toDeath. . 77
How They Made High Priests. ..... 79

TWELFTH SUNDAY. :
Moses Bringing Water Outofthe Rock. . 81
The Serpents that Bit the People... . . 82
Food Sent from Heaven. ........ 84

THIRTEENTH SUNDAY.

Balaam and the Wicked King ..... iP 86

Balak and Balaam Brought to Shame. . . 88

Balaam’s Tricks and Punishment. . . . 89
FOURTEENTH SUNDAY.

God Speaks to Moses... ......., QI

More About Moses on the Mountain. - . 92

Moses’ Long Stay on the Mountain . . . 94
FIFTEENTH SUNDAY, :

How MosesSaw God .......... 96

Two DangerousIdols .......... 97
The False Spies and Disobedient People . 99

SIXTEENTH SUNDAY.

God’s Anger at Moses... . oh osategete: IOI

Moses’ Death and Burial ........, 102

Joshua Made Captain ........., 103
SEVENTEENTH SUNDAY.

Crossing OverJordan.......... 105

The Wallsof Jericho Fall Down... . . 107

Joshua’s Victories and Death ..... , 108

EIGHTEENTH SUNDAY.

Worshiping Idols Again. .......~., tI
Two Very Brave Women ........, 112
Gideon’s Wonderful Battle. ....... S03

NINETEENTH SUNDAY.

Wittle; Sate] Ger ge ae eee aman nme TI5
God Speaks te the Child ........, 116
What Eli’s Wicked Sons Did ..... , 118

TWENTIETH SUNDAY.

Genel WeNslS Uae? 4s kb SB de p86 oO 6 120
Samuel Made Judge in Eli’s Place . . . . 120
Saul Hears Wonderful News, ...,., .1a!
CONTENTS.

TWENTY-FIRST SUNDAY.
Jonathan, Saul’s Good, Brave Son, sere
How the Philistines Oppressed the Jews, .
Jonathan’s Brave Act and Great Victory, .

TWENTY-SECOND SUNDAY.
Beautiful Ruth,
The Young Reaper in the Field of Boaz, .
How Ruth Gained a Friend and Husband,

TWENTY-THIRD SUNDAY.
King Saul Disobeys God, .....
Samuel Rebukes the King,. ......
The Old Prophet and Little David, ...

TWENTY-FOURTH SUNDAY.
Young David Kills the Giant,
The Shepherd Boy’s Visit to the Camp,
Little Anna’s Wish for David and Jonathan,

TWENTY-FIFTH SUNDAY.
Saul’s Death and David Made King, . .
The Robber’s Reward,. ... e+...
King David’s Baby Son, . .

ee ef @ ee 8

TWENTY-SIXTH SUNDAY.
Absalom and Solomon,
The King Fleeing before Absalom’s Army,
How David Honored Solomon, . .

eestor tse eh cay Le) viet e:

eo ee

TWENTY-SEVENTH SUNDAY.
King Solomon’s Wise Request,. . ...
The Two Women and the Dead Baby,. .
Lessons from the Story, Wheceaein can sae

TWENTY-EIGHTH SUNDAY.
Solomon’s Riches and Wisdom,
The Queen of Sheba’s Visit,
What Jesus said of Solomon and the Lily,

TWENTY-NINTH SUNDAY.
Solomon Turns Wicked, ........
The Worshiping of Idols, .......
Jeroboam and Rehoboam, ........

THIRTIETH SUNDAY.
Reading Lessons from the Bible, carr
Good Old Elijah and the Ravens,. . .
Elijah Calling Fire from Heaven,... .

THIRTY-FIRST SUNDAY. :
How a Little Girl Did Great Good,. . . .
iNaamany Cured museca costae: eeaenecaes
Promises to Worship God, .......

THIRTY-SECOND SUNDAY.
Good King Hezekiah, .........
Sennacherib Attacks Jerusalem,. ....
How the City Was Saved,. ......

THIRTY-THIRD SUNDAY.
The Good King Josiah,
Idols Broken Down,
The Book of the Law Found,. . . « » «

PAGE

122
122
123

124
125
126

127
128
129

130
132
133

134
134
135

136
138
139

140
141
142

143
144
145

145
145
146

147
148
148

150
I51
151

152
153
154

155
155
155

THIRTY-FOURTH SUNDAY.
Daniel and His Brave Companions,. . .
How They Obeyed the Law,
The Fiery Furnace,

THIRTY-FIFTH SUNDAY.
The Great Things that Daniel Did,
Interpreting Dreams,
Put in the Lions’ Den, .

2. 8 © © © © © ew ew

THIRTY-SIXTH SUNDAY.
Five Hundred Years of Jewish History, .
The Jews Repeatedly Punished,
Herod, King of the Jews,

THIRTY-SEVENTH SUNDAY.
The Coming of Christ,
Mary and Joseph,
Simeon and Infant Saviour,

oMceunelie. te icete el nelle:
Mm tht tao D 0 dat “O- 9

eyes ed ce) ole ey ce!

THIRTY-EIGHTH SUNDAY.
The Childhood of Jesus,
Visit of the Wise Men,
Jesus in Egypt,

ee 6 ee ee
2 8 8 © © we ee

THIRTY-NINTH SUNDAY.
The Baptism of Jesus, ......2--
The Temptation of Jesus,
Jesus’ Reply to Satan,

FORTIETH SUNDAY.
Jesus Calls His Disciples,. .......
Turning the Water into Wine,
Other Miracles,

foo erie; eseiecel om ales) let) 0) es nemo

FORTY-FIRST SUNDAY.
Wonderful Deeds of Goodness,
Feeding the Five Thousand,
Jesus and Peter Walking on the Water,

FORTY-SECOND SUNDAY.
Raising the Widow’s Son,
The Transfiguration,
Jesus Loves Little Children,. .....

ho oo OG & 6

FORTY-THIRD SUNDAY.
Jesus the King,
Casts out Devils,
Entering Jerusalem, .....

s 6 © © © © © © 0 8 © @
eo 8 6 eo ee ee

FORTY-FOURTH SUNDAY.
Cleansing the Temple,....
AUove Wee Giese; G 6 5 6 Oed 5 OO 6 6G
The Wicked Plot of Judas, .......

FORTY-FIFTH SUNDAY.
The Agony inthe Garden, .......
The Deceitful Kiss and Cruel Soldiers, . .
Peter Tries to Defend Jesus, ......

FORTY-SIXTH SUNDAY.

The Trial of Jesus by the Jews, .
Peter’s Denial, . ... swe
Jesus before the Great Council, .

PAGE

158

159
160

162
163
162

Jv

169
170
170

172
172
172

175
176
177

179
180
189

183
184
186

189
190
Igl

193
194
195

196
197
198

109)

200


CONTENTS.
: PAGE PAGE

FORTY-SEVENTH SUNDAY. FIFTIETH SUNDAY.

iiesusibetorepeilate mr mem mmm err ee 208 The Resurrection of Jesus. ....... 216

The Wicked Charge of Treason ..... 208 Wikia? Webi . 5 5 566 6 6 06 8 6 217

The Jews Preferred a Murderer ..... 209 On the Way to Emmaus,etc....... 218
‘FORTY-EIGHTH SUNDAY. FIFTY-FIRST SUNDAY.

The Crucifixionof Jesus. ........ 211 Doubting Thomas Convinced ........ 221

Numbered with Transgressors ..... . 212 Another Wonderful Draught of Fishes . . 222

Jesus’ Griefstricken Mother ....... 212 Jesus’ Parting Words and Ascension... . , 223
FORTY-NINTH SUNDAY. FIFTY-SECOND SUNDAY.

AVals bok ye ESS oo 6 o 6 6 6 6 8 0-6 214 Aes (CopaavionseSemltt 5 5 6 6 5 op 4 6 6 0-0 226

The Women atthe Tomb ....... . 215 The Apostles Go Outto Preach ..... 227

Precautions of theJews......... 215 JesusIsComing Again ......... 228



RSSSSS,

—

ANCIENT MODE OF GIVING DRINK IN THE EAST.
Basi OF LITHOGRAPH PLATES AND FULL-PAGE
HALF-TONE ILLUSTRATIONS.

JosepH Lep Away into Ecypr (Lethograph)
REBEKAH AT THE WELL (Lithograph)
THE ANGEL APPEARING TO ABRAHAM
HAGAR AND ISHMAEL Cast ForTH

' Davip TENDING His FaTHEr’s SHEEP
Davip PLayING BEFORE SAUL
Youne Kine JostaH READING THE Law
By THE RIVERS OF BABYLON
THE BIRTH OF CHRIST
CHRIST IN THE TEMPLE (Lithograph)
LITTLE JESUS IN JOSEPH'’S WoRKSHOP
Curist HEALING THE Sick
CHRIST BLessinc LirrLE CHILDREN
CHRIST IN THE GARDEN ©
CHRIST BEARING His Cross
CHRIST CRUCIFIED
THE BURIAL OF CHRIST
ON THE Way to Emmaus
THE ASCENSION


el i Oa FB a ar oe ee

LIST OF OTHER ILLUSTRATIONS.

Searching the Scriptures,
Animals Used for Sacrifice,
SVGLAMI ONES yamees wet eaten hare aks vecueercs
The Ram,
Death of Abel.
The Flood, .
Noah's Ark, .....
The Flood,
Mountain Goat of Palestine,. .... aoe
Native Plains of Abraham and Lot,
Patriarchal Caravan,
“‘God Will Provide Himself a Lamb for the
Burnt Offering,”
Where Lot Fed His Flocks, . .......
Offering Salutation in the East,
Valley of Salt in the Land of Edom, the
Country that Esau Afterward Obtained,
Isaac Blessing Jacob,
Jacob’s Dream, .
Jacob and the Angel,
Joseph and His Father, . .
Joseph Cast into the Pit,. .....
Ancient Egyptian Idols,. ......2..-.
Joseph Interpreting the Dreams, .
Joseph before Pharaoh,
Egyptian Women,
Joseph Making Himself Known to His Breth-
ren,
Moses in the Bulrushes,. .........
Moses Keeping Sheep in the Wilderness, . .
Israelites Making Bricks in Egypt,
Egyptian Taskmasters, 5
Israelites Making Bricks in Egypt, .....
Pharaoh,
Locust,
Egyptian King in His Chariot,
The High Priest Burning Incense within the
Holy of Holies,
The High Priest in His Beautiful Dress,. . .
Plague of Frogs,
The High Priest Offering Incense, .....
Gathering Manna in the Wilderness, .
Palm Tree,
Baal,
Egyptian Household Gods, . .
Mount Sinai,
The Erection of the Tabernacle, . .
High Priest in the Holy of Holies,
The Tabernacle Restored,. . . .

The First Murder, ee

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The Giving of the eo ees
Moloch, 5G
Ashtoreth, the Philistine Goddess, ae
Carrying the Grapes on a Pole, é
Altar of Offering,

Co ee se ee ey

The Emblems on the Standards of the bes: ‘

Blowing the Trumpets,
Bearing the Ark over Jordan, .......
The River Jordan,
Blowing of Trumpet Made of Ram’s Horn,
Fruit of Palestine,
Hebrew Idels,
Ancient War Engine, ee
ANGlenta War Engine ns es eee ee
“Speak, Lord; for Thy Servant Heareth,”
Samuel and His Mother,
Samuel Anointing Saul,
Armor Used in Time of Saul,
Boaz and Ruth,
Ruth Gleaning in the Field of Boaz,
Bethlehem-Judah, the Home of Naomi,
The Cattle Preserved by Saul,
Battle with the Philistines,
David Going Against the Giant,
David and Goliath,
Crowns of Kings in the Time of David, .
Musical Instruments at the Time of David,
Absalom’s Flight,
David's Tomb at Mount Zion,
Supposed Form of Sclomon’s Temple,
Interior View of Ancient Temple at Jerusalem,
Ship in Solomon’s Time,
King Solomon’s Ships,
Dagon, an Idol Worshiped in Solomon’s Time,
Elijah and the Widow,
Fire Sent Down upon the Altar of Elijah,
War Galley in Solomon’s Time,
Brazen Laver in the Temple,
Assyrian Army,
Jewish Books, Such as the One Found in the
Temple by Josiah,
Destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar,
Daniel in the Lions’ Den, .. .
NUAINE SINE 6 o 6g 6 Oo 6.0 Goo a
Daniel Interpreting the Handwriting on the
Wall,
Persian King in His Chariot,. .......
Supposed Site of Ancient Babylon, Seon eae
Form of Second Temple, .. . 2 oe 25.

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orm nieMceU issues eee _eMcen eMCelemren (elie

x

141
143

153

155
157

161

162
165
167
“169
LIST OF OTHER ILLUSTRATIONS.

An Hastern Vineyard . .

The Shepherds Listening to the Angels |

Simeon and Infant Saviour pa eee
An Offering of Doves . . .

Union of the Old and New Dispensations —

Beautiful Gate, Jerusalem ...... .
Jesus Baptized
On the EI OUSCLOD) Paemat is
Ancient Books in Their Cases

Eastern Wine Skins and Jars

SO KONG We oS 6 bn 66 be
SealomGalilecy span ee ae
The Prodigal’s Return eis
ican’ oatlvepp lin claw yam tenes
Christ and Peter on the Water .

The Lost Piece of Money

Eastern Head-dresses . .

Ptolemy Philadelphus . . Spee oe

Table of Shew-bread :
Lepers Outside the Gate. .

PAGE
ely al
pel
- 173
- 175
-177
- - 179
. 180
3 Me)
erg
. 184
eel 5
Bel Si

ss

. 189



Ancient Wiue-press . .
Gethsemane ..... ,
Fountain of Nazareth . .

Not as I Will, but as Thou Wilt
The Golden Candlestick ;
Roman Centurion

Christ is Scourged. . .

Pilate Washing His Hands |
Washing the Hands .

Forms of Crosses .°. es
Thorn-crowned Christ. . .
Roman Guards eae
Ancient Olive-press . . .

An Upper Room ina Jewish House

In Sackcloth ‘
Ancient Tombs in the Rock ;
The Last Supper :
The Wise Virgins .

Bethany

The Uuwise Virgins

PAGE

eLOS)
- 199
. 201
0 0 202
- 204
205
. 206
. 208
210
reer
5 Didi
. 216
o Ait
. 219
A220
. 221
. 224
. 225
. 226
- 230


First Sunday in the Mew Wear.

The Making of the World.

‘Jn the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.’’— Genesés 1, 1.

THE first Sunday morning after Aunt
Charlotte came she and the children met
in the sitting-room by the open grate.
Aunt Charlotte had her Bible in her hand,
and was seated in the great arm-chair
before the pleasant fire. Little Anna, in
her curls, stood at Aunt Charlotte’s side;

Cn her brother Willie sat by her knee, and

sister Clara was near by. They were

ready to begin those Sunday Bible stories which Aunt Charlotte had
promised to tell them.

“Now, my darlings,” said Aunt Charlotte, “I hope you will listen
carefully to all I say. JI am going to tell you the story of how this
world was made, and at the close I will ask you some questions to see
how well you remember what I tell you. Did you know that Sunday
is earth’s birthday? That is so; for the Bible says on the first day of
the week the creation began, and you know Sunday is the first day
of the week.

“At first the world was all dark. It was soft matter, and had no
shape to it. Then God said: ‘Let there be light,’ and there was light.
Without light we could not live. The flowers and the trees and all
the plants, and all the animals, and the people would die if it were
not for the light. There were then upon the earth no trees or any —
living thing. But it would be almost as bad to have all day and ne
night. We must have the quiet, dark night for rest and stillness.

19


20 ’ THE MARKING OF THE WORLD.

“The next thing that God did after making the light was to put air
all around the earth. We look out through the air as far as our eye
can see, and when everything seems to come together in solid blue we
call it the sky, or firmament, though there is really nothing there except
the air. Sometimes we see clouds floating about in the sky. These
are made by the water rising up from the earth through the air. These
clouds take on strange shapes; sometimes they are dark and full of
rain; sometimes they are shining white or pink and golden hued.
This isGod’s means of drawing the water up from the sea and carry-
ing it about through the air to let it fall in rain and to water the earth.

“After God had made the light and the air, the earth, which was at
first a pulpy mass, grew hard on the outside. Some places were low,
| and into these the
water from the
clouds ran down
and made rivers
and lakes, while
the dry hills rose
up above them.
These rivers and
lakes carried their
water around
through all the
low places until it
ran down into the
sea. At the same
time when the rivers and the hills were formed God made fresh
green plants and grass and trees to grow upon the earth and caused
plants and weeds to grow even in the waters of the sea. The waters
and the air and the earth began to be full of live things, that swam or
crept or flew about. There were fishes and birds and insects at first,
and the land was full of beautiful trees and plants and flowers and
running streams, lakes, rivers, and waterfalls dashing down the
mountain sides. Then God began to make the larger animals,
four-footed beasts—sheep, cows, horses, dogs, cats, elephants, lions,































































ANIMALS USED FOR SACRIFICE,


MAKING THE FIRST MAN AND WOMAN. 21

all that we use or admire; and now that He had got the earth ready
for man to live in, He prepared to make the first man and woman.
He would make them out of dust like those of the beasts, but as
they were the last to be made, and all the others were to serve them,
He concluded to make them in His own image, for He intended that
they should think, speak, pray, and do many things that no other
creature could do, for God expected to use mankind to develop and
use this beautiful world which He had created for His glory and honor,
and He meant that they would be His own sons and daughters. So
He planted a beautiful garden, with fruit trees and flowers and every-
thing lovely for them to live in. He called it the garden of Eden.

‘Now I will stop with this story here. I know you are anxious to
hear about the making of this first man and woman, but I will save
that for our next talk this afternoon.

‘Now let me ask you some questions,” said Aunt Charlotte, ‘“ to
see how well you remember what I have told you. I will begin with
little Anna, because she is the smallest,’ and Aunt Charlotte patted

little Anna’s curls.
QUESTIONS.

Who made the world? Was there any light at first? Who made the light? Could we
live without the light? What did God make next? How do we get water on the earth?
What did he make to live in the water, and on theearth, and intheair? What did He make
next after the birds and fish and insects? After he made the four-footed beasts, what did
he conclude to make then? What did he prepare for man to livein? What did He call it?

Making the First Man and Woman. |

The children liked the morning reading so well that they teased
Aunt Charlotte to read them more, but she said, ‘‘Not now; after
noon I will;’’ and when the time came she opened to the second
chapter of Genesis, and this is the beginning of what she read:

‘‘And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils
the breath of life; and man became a living soul.’

Then she explained it to them by saying :
“In the Bible God tells us that he made the world and everything
in it—land and water, and grass, flowers, and trees, insects, bird, and
22 MAKING THE FIRST MAN AND WOMAN.

beasts, and last of all He made the first man and woman. The man
was made by God out of the dust of the ground, and then God
breathed into his nostrils the breath of life and gave him a living
soul. And the woman was made by God out of a rib from the man’s
side. They were called Adam and Eve, and they were to be the first
father and mother of everyone who was to be born into the world.

The good God gave them a beautiful home. It was a garden with
a clear river of water flowing through it and all kinds of delicious
fruit-trees and beautiful flowers growing in it. Nothing could hurt
or vex them there. They did not know what pain was, they were
never tired, and all they had to do was to dress the garden and to
keep it. They had no faults, and never
did wrong; and God Himself came
near to talk with them.

That was the way they lived, always
good and always happy, whilst they
obeyed what God had told them. In
the midst of the garden grew two trees:
one was the Tree of Life and the other
was the Tree of the Knowledge of
good and evil. God told them that it
they ate the fruit of this Tree of Know-
ledge they would die. We do not
know what those trees were like, but some time or other I hope we shall
see the Tree of Life, for it is growing in heaven, close by the river
that flows by the throne of God; and when we see it and taste of it,
we shall live forever, and be happier even than Adam and Eve were.
We shall never be as happy as they were while we are living in this
world; but if we will try to obey God, and trust in Christ and live
holy lives, He will take us to heaven, and that will be still better than
the Garden of Eden.”

The children liked this story of man’s creation, and asked Aunt
Charlotte to ask them questions to see if they could remember. Now
let my little readers see if they can answer them every one, as Willie
and Anna and Clara did.



SYRIAN SHEEP.




THE SEA AND THE TIDES. 23

QUESTIONS.

What did God make? Whom did He make? What was the man made of? What was the
woman made of? What did God breathe into them? What did He give them? Why were they
better than the beasts? What was the man’s name? What was the woman’s name? Of whom
were they the father and mother? Where did they live? What had they to do there? What grew
there? What were the two chief trees that grew there? Which were they not to touch? Where
is the Tree of Life now? When do we hope to see it? What is a still happier place than the
Garden of Eden?

The Sea and the Tides.

‘Hitherto shalt thou come, but no further: and here shall thy proud waves be stayed.’’—/ob
XXXVIII, II. %

“ Aunt Charlotte, now will you read us some more and tell us about
the wonderful things God did?” said Willie, as they gathered around
their aunt after supper. Aunt Charlotte promised. After reading
from the Bible here is what she said:

“What glorious and wonderful things God has made! Did you ever
see the sea?” “Yes,” said Willie, “one time—” but Aunt Charlotte
Putt Patch iteaniG ame 85, stnche mitmis=—=—a
great vast space, all water, looking green
near us, but blue further off, always heav-
ing up and down. The waves rise, and
then ripple along, and burst with a white
edge of bubbles of foam. And, if you
live near the sea, you know how, at
certain times in the day, one wave after
another begins to break a little higher
on the beach; eight waves seem to run
up the same distance, then the ninth
comes much further; then eight more
come like that, then another. A great space that had been left dry gets
covered up with water again, and where you were walking just now
is quite deep water. What is this called? The tide. Well, what
will the tide do in proper time? Will it come rolling in over the



THE RAM.


24 THE SEA AND THE TIDES.

beach, sand, pebbles, and rocks, and wash us all away and drown us
ail, and cover up the land? No; presently each will turn. Each
wave will be a little less high than the last, till it will have gone back
again and left the beach uncovered as before. Why does the tide do
this? It is because God so wonderfully contrived this earth and sea
that the waters should rise and go back. He made the sand the
bound of the sea, and said, ‘ Hitherto shalt thou come, but no further:
and here shall thy proud waves be stayed. So, you know, we read
in the Psalms sometimes— .

«< «The sea is His, and He made it:
And His hands prepared the dry land.’”*

“Now I willask you some—

QUESTIONS.

What curious thing does the sea do every day? What do you call the coming in and going back
of the sea? Why does the tide always stop in its proper place? What did God make the bound
of the sea? What did He say to it? What verse praises God for making the sea?

“T’ll tell you, I like this day,” said Willie. “Why, we have learned
about the making of the world, and the making of the first man and
woman, and about the tides of the sea.” “Won't you give us three
more lessons next Sunday?” said Clara. “Oh, do,’ said Anna.
Aunt Charlotte promised she would.









DEATH OF ABEL, THE First MURDER,


Second Sunday.

How Sin Began.

ae)

‘The serpent beguiled me ‘I did eat.’ ’’—Geneszs 111, 13.

THE children could hardly
wait for Aunt Charlotte to get
seated after breakfast the
second Sunday morning in
Sentient) ees leery tll tel eyo Uli
said she, opening her Bible,
“how sin began and the world
grew wicked.” ‘‘Good,” said
Willie, and they all settled
down around her.

“Last Sunday you heard
how God made the world, and
put a man and woman to live
in it. The man was named
Adam; the woman was named
Eve. God gave them a beau-~
tiful garden to live in, full of trees and flowers; and they had no pain,
no trouble, nothing to vex them. Only one thing God told them:
there was one tree whose’ fruit they must not eat. They might eat
the fruit of all the other trees, but not of that one. As long as they
obeyed, all was well and happy with them; but if they ate it they
would die. But a bad spirit came and took the shape of the serpent,

and talked to Eve. He told her a wicked lie—he told her that to eat
2 25 ,



THE FYooD.
26 THE FLOOD AND NOAF’S ARK,

the fruit would make her wise, and would not make her die. And
Eve listened, and did eat. And she gave Adam, and he also ate; and
so they took the bad spirit for their master instead of the good God.
Then God was angry with them, and put them out of the garden, and
let them be weak and sickly, and die at last. It is a sad thing for
them and for us. For if they had been good and obeyed God, and
not the bad spirit, it would have been easy to us to be good, and we
should not have had the devil tempting us to do wrong: we should
have never known pain or sorrow. But God pitied Adam and Eve,
and us too; and he promised them that the Seed—that is, the Son—of
the woman should bruise the serpent’s head, and set them and their
children free. Our Blessed Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, set us
free when He died on the cross and rose again; and now we belong
to Him, and not to the bad spirit. Only we must try and ask Him to
help us not to do what is wrong, as Eve did, or we shall not keep free
from the power of the enemy.”

The children were thoughtful, and Aunt Charlotte began with the—

QUESTIONS.

Who was the first man? Who was the first woman? Where did God put them? What was
the one thing they might not do? What was to happen if they ate of that fruit? Who came
and spoke to Eve? What shape did the bad spirit take? What did he tell Eve? What did
she do? Whom did she make her master? What was done to punish her? What sad things
did the bad spirit bring on her? Who came to set us free from the bad spirit ?

The Flood and Noah’s Ark.

“Well,” said Willie, as they settled down around Aunt Charlotte,
“Tm going to listen sharp this time. There were two questions I
could not answer before.” ‘So will I,’ said Anna; “but I only
missed one.”

‘‘ And, behold, I, even I, do bring a flood of waters upon the earth ’’—Geneszs v1, 17,

read Aunt Charlotte, and then, looking up, said:

“The lesson this morning told the sad history of how Adam and
Eve did the very thing that God forbade; so that He drove them
out of the Garden of Eden, and sin and death came into the world.


THE FLOOD AND NOAH’S ARK. 23

“After that they had children. Some were good, but not so good
as Adam and Eve had been at first; and some were bad. And as
time went on the bad ones grew worse, and the good ones were
tempted, and many of them grew wicked too. And so all the world
was getting wicked, and God saw nothing but evil when He looked
down on it. And He said that He would destroy these wicked
people, and wash away the evil from the earth by a great flood. But
there was one good man, whose name was Noah; and God said He
would save him. He bade Noah build an Ark. It was to bea great
ship, all made of wood, and it took a great many years to build; and
all that time people laughed at Noah, for
they would not believe that anything was
voing to happen. Noah made the Ark
and stored it with food. And God sent
him a pair of all sorts of animals that
were in the world, and he put them into
pens in the Ark. Then Noah and _ his
wife and his three sons, Shem, Ham, and
Japhet, and their Wives, went into the
Ark, and God shut them in.

“Then it began to rain. It rained for
forty days and forty nights without stop-
ping, and the rivers came out of their
banks, and the sea came up on the land,
and the ground was covered up. Even the tops of the highest hills
were Bees and everybody and every creature was drowned—all
but Noah and those that were with him. There was the Ark all the
time, floating quite safe on the water. The storm could not upset it
nor the sea get into it, for God took care of it and all that was in it.

“The reason Noah was saved was because, first, he tried to be
good, and not do like the bad people round him; and, next, because
he believed what God said to him, and went on making the Ark, even
when he saw no danger. If we wish God to save us, then we must
take care that we do just what we are told—not what seems pleasant
now, but what is really right.”



Noau’s ARK.
28 THE FLOOD AND NOAH’S ARK.

“That’s so; but it’s hard to do, though,” said Willie. “But
would n’t you have been afraid in that Ark?” said little Anna.







































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE FLOOD.

“No,” said Clara, “for Aunt Charlotte said God [GOK Care. Ole ate
“Right, Clara,” said Aunt Charlotte, “now for the—

‘QUESTIONS.

Do you know why Adam and Eve were driven out of the happy garden? How did people go
on after that? How had sin come into the world? What did God say He must do to the world ?
Why? Who was to be saved? What was Noah to make? What was the Ark like? What were
put into it? Why were two of all creatures put into the Ark? What men and women were in it?
What were the names of Noah’s sons? What happened when Noah was in the Ark? How long
did it rain? What was covered up? What became of all the people? Who were safe? Where
was the Ark? Who took care of the Ark? Why was Noah saved?

«But, Auntie,” said little Anna, “ what became of the Ark?” “Tl
THE GOING DOWN OF THE FLOOD. 29

tell you that after supper in our next lesson,” said good Auntie, with
a pat on Anna's curls.

The Going Down of the Flood.

‘“Sq Noah knew that the waters were abated from off the earth.’’—Genes¢s VIII, 2.

“Now,” said Aunt Charlotte, ‘‘for our third reading and talk,” as
they all gathered around the fire after supper. The children were all
eager to have her begin.

“Tt must have been a sad sight for Noah and his wife and their sons,

-as the rain went on and on, and the water grew deeper and deeper,
and everybody and everything was
drowned. Then came a time when noth-
ing was to be seen but water. Wherever
they looked all was sky and water; but
it had done raining, the sky was blue
again, the sun shone by day, the stars
by night, and they must have been very
glad. And still the water got lower,
till the Ark did not float about, but
stopped, resting on a peak of a mountain,
a very high mountain, and a few bare
tops of other hills began to peep out.
By and by Noah opened the window
of the Ark and let out a raven. He never saw the raven again, for
a raven eats dead things, and there were so many dead bodies floating
about that it got plenty of food, and never came back to the Ark
that had saved it. He waited a week, and then he let out a dove.
Now, doves like trees to sit and nestle in, and they eat grains and
seeds; so the poor dove found no place to rest in, and flew back to
the ee and Noah took her back and kept her a week, then let
her fly again. She flew away, but still she came back to the Ark, and
this time she brought in her beak a sprig of olive branch.

“Tt was the first green thing that Noah had seen for a year.



MouNTAIN GOAT OF PALESTINE.
50 THE GOING DOWN OF THE FLOOD.

Noah’s children have loved the olive leaf everywhere, and called it
the sign of peace and good news ever since.

“For now Noah knew that the waters had gone down, and that
trees must be able to put forth leaves again. Once more, after another
week, he let out the dove, and she did not come back, for she had
found a tree where she could make her home, and seeds to eat; and
then Noah knew the sad time of the flood—a whole year—was over.

“Was there any little boys in that Ark?” said Willie; “if so, they
must have got very tired waiting that long to go out and play. But
ask the questions quick, before I forget them.”

QUESTIONS.

What was the Flood? What was the Ark? Who was init? What had Noah with him in the
Ark? What became of every one else? Why? Why was Noah saved? How long did the Flood
last? What birds did Noah send out of the Ark? Which came back?’ Why did not the raven
come back? What did the dove bring? What was Noah sure of then?

After the questions were all asked the children asked Aunt Char-
lotte if she would not tell them a story or two every day instead of
waiting until Sunday. The good lady waited a minute, and then
said: “ You know, my darlings, I have come to spend a year with you,
and I have planned to take you through the Bible in a year, telling
you stories of the most important things that you will like, and the
three lessons every Sunday will do this. This is such a good way to
‘keep the Sabbath holy,’ as we are commanded to do. I will read
you from the Bible in the week and from other books, and then we
have our day lessons, you know.” The children all agreed to let Aunt
Charlotte tell them these pretty Bible stories on Sundays only.
Third Sunday.

The Rainbow.

“WHAT will you tell us about this morn-
ing, Aunt Charlotte?” said Clara. “The
Rainbow,” said the good lady with a smile,
and then she opened her Bible and read:

“*T do set my Bow in the Cloud,” etc.— Genesis 1x, 13.

“The sin that came into the world when
Eve listened to the tempter had grown as
men multiplied and made each other worse.
The wicked people had been drowned in
Eee the Flood, and Noah, his sons, and their

G7 WKN” x wives had alone been saved in the Ark.

a After a whole year of being shut up there

watching the earth, first drowned and then coming out of the water,

they had just come out on the fresh green earth, with all the animals
saved with them, when God spoke to them.

“Then God made a promise to Noah. It was that no flood of water
shall ever drown all the world again, but spring, summer, autumn,
and winter, day and night, will go on to the end of the world, when
it shall be burnt up by fire, not drowned by water. That Noah, and
all of us after him, might feel sure that God in His mercy will go on
preserving us, and giving us days and nights, seed-time and _ harvest,
He gave us something to look at as a sign of His promise. Do you
know what He gave us? It was the rainbow. And this is how He
made it. He so ordered the rays of light that when they shine upon
3r


32 ABRAHAM WHO TRUSTED GOD.

drops of water in the air they cause beautiful colors, making part of
a circle, so as to form a bow. So when the sun shines on a cloud, as
it rains, the fair bright rainbow is seen asa pledge to us of God's
merciful care and love to us. There is a rainbow round about the
throne of God in Heaven; and the lovely rainbows that we see when
the sun shines out and the showers drift away are to put us in mind
that we are safe under His care, in right of His promise to Noah and
his three sons, from whom the whole earth was to be repeopled.
We are the children of his son Japhet, and all that was then said to
him belongs to us also. We should recollect it, and put our trust in
Him, and be thankful when we see the beautiful rainbow that the
hands of the Almighty have bended looking out of the midst of the
dark watery cloud.”

“Well, I never knew how a rainbow was made before,” said Clara. |
“Isn't that lovely! Ill think of it every time I see one.” “I don't
understand yet,” said Anna. “I don’t either,’ said Willie. Then
Aunt Charlotte explained it over again, and they all were able to

answer the—
QUESTIONS.

What beautiful sight do we sometimes see after a shower? What is a rainbow like? Who put
the rainbow in the cloud? Who was the man to whom God showed the rainbow? What promise
did God make Noah? What had God just done to the wicked people? Whom had He saved ?
What did He say shouid always go on? What did God put in the sky to show that He will not
send another Flood? What are we to think.of when»we see a rainbow ? Who takes care of us?

Abraham Who Trusted God.

“Going to tell us more about Noah and the Ark and rainbows
and things?” said Willie. “No,” said Aunt Charlotte, “I’m going to
skip a long, long time. Now listen!” and she opened her Bible and.
read:

‘«In thee shall all families of the earth be blessed.’’—Genesis xm, 3.

“When Noah’s grandchildren and great-grandchildren came to be
more and more, and the world was being filled with people again,
they still were not all good, and the longer time went on, the worse
they grew.
ABRAHAM WHO TRUSTED GOD. © 33

“ At last God called to a very good man, whose name was Abraham,
and told him that if he would come away from his home to a land
God would show him, then God would bless him and lead him, and
by and by give the land to his children, and that their children after
them should be more in number than the grains of sand on the sea-
shore or than the stars in the sky; and that in his seed—that meant
by and by through a son of his—all the nations of the earth should
be blessed.





















































































































































































































































NATIVE PLAINS OF ABRAHAM AND LOT.

“It was strange to hear all this about Abraham’s children, for he was
growing an old man, and he and his wife Sarah had no child at all.
But he believed in God. He knew that God is Almighty, and can do
whatever He will; so he only did just as God told him, and went
away from his home, where God told him. He was obliged to
take all his cattle with him—quantities of cows and goats and sheep
and camels and asses; and he had servants to drive them. When
they came to a piece of grass and a fresh spring of water, there


34 | ABRAHAM AND LOT.

they would stop. They had no houses, only tents, which were great
curtains woven of goat’s hair and fastened up with poles, so that
they could be set up or taken down and carried about. All his life
Abraham lived in a tent, instead of staying at home in a city and
being at his ease.

“ By and by he came to a beautiful country. There were high, cool
hills rising up, and green valleys between, full of grass for the sheep
and cattle; and the wide sea spread out far away toward the sunset,
all blue and glorious. God told him to look at the land, for that was
the place which his children should have for their own; but in the
meantime Abraham had not one bit of it, and was a stranger there ;
and he had no child either.

“But still he was quite sure that God spoke truth; and that some-
how, though he did not know how, it would come about that his chil-
dren should have the land, and that in One all the nations of the
earth should be blessed. That was faith.”

“Why do you suppose God kept Abraham in the dark about what
_ was going to happen?” said Clara. “Because he wanted him to trust
His word and put faith in Him,” said Aunt Charlotte. “Yes,” said
Willie, “sometimes they send warships out to sea with sealed orders,
and the captain even don’t know where he’s going until he opens the
letter.” “That's it,” said Aunt Charlotte, “and we must obey God,
just as soldiers on the land and sea obey without asking the reason.”

QUESTIONS.

What good man do you hear of to-day? What did God tell Abraham to do? What did God
promise? Who were to have the land? Why was it strange to hear of his children? But did he
believe it would come true? Why did he believe it? How did he show that he believed ?. Where
did he go? What had he with him? What did he live in? What isa tent like? What sort of
place did he come to? Who were to have this land? How many were his children to be? Did
he believe this? What is believing called ?

Abraham and TL

“‘Let there be no strife, I pray thee, between thee and me.’”’— Genes?’s x11, 8.

“Two men were traveling together. They were an uncle and his
nephew. The uncle’s name was Abraham, about whom J told you this
ABRAHAM AND LOT, ~ 35

morning ; the nephew’s was Lot. They had come from home because
God had told Abraham to come away from his own home to the land
that God would give his children. Abraham believed, and did as God
bade him; and Lot, the son of his dead brother, went with him.
They did not go alone. Each of them had great flocks of cows, and
sheep, and camels, and asses, and goats, and numbers of servants
to take care of them. They would fix their black tents, made o:
camel's hair, in any place where they saw a spring of water and good





























































































































PATRIARCHAL CARAVAN,

green grass for their cattle; and there they would stay till all the
grass was eaten up, and then take up their tents and move to another
place.

“Just now they had got to a bare, stony place, where the sun shone
hotly and there was not much green; but Abraham had built up an
altar with the great stones and prayed there. Abraham and Lot loved
each other, and were at peace; but when their servants drove out
36 ABRAHAM AND LOT.

their flocks to get food and water there were apt to be quarrels. If
Abraham's men found a green grassy valley they would not let Lot’s
cattle into it; andif Lot’s came to a well they would not let Abraham’s
flocks drink; and so on. They were always quarreling and making
complaints to their masters. At last Abraham saw that they would
make Lot quarrel with him. So he said it would be wiser to part ;
Lot should go one way and he another—anyway there should be no
strife. And he even told Lot to choose which way he would go. So
Lot looked, and saw to the east a pleasant green valley, with fields
of corn and meadows, and a fine river running into a clear lake, and
five fine towns on the bank. He liked it better than the bare, stony
hills where Abraham was; and he never thought whether the people -
were good or not, but he took the first choice and went to live there.
So Abraham gave up. He had the right to choose first, but he would
not use it. He let his nephew choose. For he hated quarrels and
knew they were wicked; and he knew how to stop him, because he
would yeild up the best. That is the way to make peace and please
God.”

“Tf Pd been Abraham I would not have done that. Why did he not
take the best and let Lot scuffle for himself?” said Willie. pies.
and run off all of Lot’s old mean servants that fought his good men,”
said little Anna. ‘ No,” said Aunt Charlotte, “Abraham did right, as
we shall see. Jesus says, ‘blessed are the peace-markers,’ and Abra-
ham was a peace-maker. Now we will have the—

QUESTIONS
Who had called Abraham? Who went with him? What was lot to Abraham? Why
did they go? What had God promised? What had they with them? Who quarreled ?
About what did the servants quarrel? Did Abraham and Lot quarrel? How did Abraham
prevent a quarrel? Who was to choose first? Who might have chosen first? Why did
not Abraham choose first? Ought you to be in haste to take the first choice? What should
you try to hinder? And if you keep yourself back, and don’t say ‘‘I’ts mine,’’ and ‘‘I

must,’’ shall you not be likely to keep from quarrels ?




LSTA ERR ia

Fourth Sunday.

Lot’s Wonderful Escape.



“GOD WILL PROVIDE HIMSEeLr A LAMB FOR A
BURNT OFFERING.”’



OPENING her Bible at the
twenty-ninth chapter of Genesis,
seventeenth verse, Aunt Charlotte
Teseucle

‘Escape for thy life; look not behind thee,’’etc.

“As I told you last Sunday, Lot
chose the beautiful valley, with
steep hills shutting it in on all
sides and a clear, swift river run-
ning through the midst and
spreading into a lake. There
were fine fields and rich grass,
where sheep, cows, and goats could
feed, and the shepherds shelter
themselves under the palm trees;
and on the bank of the river were
five cities, with strong walls round

them, and full of rich people, who bought and sold and made merry
with the good things they possessed. Lot was the only man living
there who was good, and he was grieved by the wicked ways of the
men round him, who only laughed at him if Ke tried to tell them of
better things. One evening two strangers came into the city where
he lived, and he was the only person who would take them in and
shelter them from the wicked people in the street.

37
38 LOT’S WONDERFUL ESCAPE.

‘Those strangers told him the place was to be destroyed with all
that were in it, because it was so wicked! Though the fields looked
so quiet, the walls so strong, and the sun had gone down as usual, all
would be ruined in a few hours’ time! Then the strangers took hold
of him and his wife and daughters, and led them almost by force away
from their home in the dawn of morning, bidding them escape for
their lives to the mountain, and not look back. They were frightened,
and begged not to have to go so far as the wild mountain. Might





































































































































































































WHERE LOT FED HIS FLOCKS.

they not go to the little city near at hand? And their wish was
granted. Just as the sun had risen they entered the little city for
which they had begged; and as soon as they were safe the four towns,
that had seemed so strong and firm, were all burning with fire and
brimstone; and all the sinners who had mocked at warning were soon
lying dead under God’s awful anger! Four alone had been led out of
the city by the strangers, but even of these only three came into the
city of refuge. The wife did not heed the warning not to linger nor
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ABRAHAM'S SON ISAAC. 39

look back, the deadly storm overtook her, and she remained rooted to
the spot—turned into a pillar of salt!

“The names of those cities were Sodom and Gomorrah. And now
a strange gloomy lake called the Dead Sea covers that valley with its
salty waters, and the bare rocky hills, crusted with salt, show that the
curse of God is on the place.

“Let us try to remember one thought from this terrible history.
This world will one day be burnt up like those cities, and its looking
safe and prosperous now does not make it safe. But God sends mes-
sengers to lead us outofit. If we attend to them and follow their ad-
vice, we shall through all our lives be getting out of danger and going
on to a safe home in heaven; but if we care only for pleasant things
here, it is like looking back, and our souls will perish with what they
love. That is why our Saviour bade us ‘Remember Lot’s wife.’
We should remember her when we are tempted to think it hard to
give up anything pleasant, because we are told that it is wrong, and
may put us in danger of destruction.”

“Didn't Lot have any boys?” said Willie. “No,” said Aunt Char-
lotte. “But he had two girls, didn’t he?” said little Anna. “And—
but they were bigger than me, 'cause I couldn’t have runned away.”
“Yes, they were grown up girls,” said Aunt Charlotte. ‘Willie, you
may answer the first question.”

QUESTIONS.

What was the name of the place I told you of to-day? What was the name of the man? What
kind of place was Sodom? Who was the only good man there? Who came to Lot? What did
he do for the strangers? What did the strangers tell Lot? Why was Lot to come out of Sodom?
Why was Sodom to be destroyed? Where did Lot go? Who looked back? What became of
her? What did God do to Sodom? What sort of place is it now? What will be burnt up some
day? If we are not good, what will become of us? But what have we to teach us to be good?
And how must we try to come out, like Lot?

Abraham’s Son Isaac.

“Aunt Charlotte, didn’t Abraham have any boys either?” said
Willie. “You said Lot only had a pair of girls.” “ Yes,” said Aunt
40 ABRAHAM'S SON ISAAC.

Charlotte, “and I'll tell you about his son Isaac this afternoon.” Then
she read:

«¢ Now I know that thou fearest God, seeing thou hast not withheld thy son, thine only son fro
- Me.” —Genests XXII, 12.

“Tt was some time after this morning’s talk that Isaac was born.
Abraham was old, and he had begun to wonder if he should ever have
ason. All the promises God had made were to be for Isaac’s children
after him: and Abraham loved God, and hoped all the more, and
when little Isaac came Abraham was overjoyed and loved him dearly.

“ But then God called Abraham to do a strange and terrible thing,
He was to go and take his dear son Isaac to the top of a hill, and
there to offer him up to God, as if he had been a calf oralamb. Of
course, in general, to do such a thing would be shockingly wicked;
but Abraham knew that when God commanded a thing it must be
right to do as he was bidden, however dreadful it was to him.

“So they set out together. Abraham took the knife anda vessel
with fire in it, and Isaac carried the wood with which the sacrifice was
to be burnt. On the way Isaac said, ‘ My father, behold the fire and
the wood: but where is the lamb for a burnt offering?’ And Abra-
ham answered, ‘ My son, God will provide Himself a lamb for a burnt
offering.’

“Tsaac soon knew he was to be the lamb, for his father put the wood
in order and bound his limbs and took the knife. And Isaac did not
complain or struggle. He was ready, like his father, to do the will of
God. But just as Abraham had the knife ready to slay his son, an
angel called to him out of Heaven: ‘ Lay not thine hand upon the lad,
neither do thou anything unto him: for now I know that thou fearest
_ God, seeing thou hast not withheld thy son, thine only son from Me.’

“Then Abraham unbound his son, and was as glad as if Isaac had
really risen from the dead. And he saw aram caught in the thicket
by its horns; so he took that, and offered it up insteadof Isaac. Thus
God really provided a lamb for a burnt offering.

«And He blessed Abraham more and more, and promised again

that his children should have the land, and that in his Seed should all |

HAGAR AND ISHMAEL CAST FORTH.

‘And Abraham sent her away, and she departed, and randered in the wilderness
; of Beer-sheba.’’—Gen. XXI,




ISAAC’S WEDDING. 4t

the nations of the earth be blessed. That Seed was our blessed Lorn
‘Jesus Curist, who, you know, was really given by His Heavenly
Father to die, and then came back from the dead, that all people might
be saved by Him.”

“Was n't that mean of Abraham to do little Isaac that way?” said
little Anna. “No,” ‘said Willie, “he wasn’t scared; he knew his
father would n’t stick that knife in him.” “ Yes,” said ‘Aunt Charlotte,
“Abraham would have done so if God had not commanded him not
to. Much as he loved his son, he loved God more, and we must all
be willing to give up anything God wants us to; but yousee God only |
did this to test Abraham’s faith, and He would not let him do a wrong
thing. God will not make us give up anything we ought to have.”

“My first question!” said Willie; and this is what Aunt Charlotte
asked him: °

QUESTIONS.

What was the name of Abraham’s son? What had God promised Abraham? What had
Abraham done at God’s command? What was he now to do? Whom did he obey? Where was
he to go? Who went with him? What did Isaac ask? What did Abraham answer? Who seemed
likely to be the lamb? What was Abraham just going todo? Whocalled him? What did the
angel tell him? Why was God pleased with him? What blessing did God give him? Who was
to be his Seed, in whom all families should be blessed ?

Isaac’s Wedding.

‘And he brought her into his mother’s tent, and took Rebekah and she became his wife, and
he loved her.’’— Gen. xxv, 67.

“Auntie, what did little Isaac do when he became a man?” asked
little Anna.

“Well,” replied Aunt Charlotte, with a laugh, “one thing he did
was to get married, but he did not choose his own wife, as men do now.
Iwill tell you all about it. Abraham lived in the land of Canaan.
and the people were all heathen. He did not want his son Isaac to
marry one of the heathen girls, so he called his chief servant and gave
him ten camels and several men for companions, and many presents,
and told him to go to the city of Nahor and get a wife for his son

Isaac. After many days’ journey the servant came to the walls of the
‘ 3 :


42 ISAAC’S WEDDING.

city, and stopped on the outside by the well. At this well the girls
and women of the city came to draw water with their pitchers, and the
servant prayed to God that he would show him which one he might
choose to be the wife of Isaac. By and by a beautiful young woman
came up to draw water, and the servant asked her to let him drink
from her pitcher. She allowed him to drink, and then said she would
go and draw water for his camels. This she did, and the servant knew
she was the woman to be Isaac’s wife. After the camels had done
drinking the man took a golden ear-ring and two golden bracelets, and
gave them to the beautiful young woman, and in answer to questions
she told him of her parents, and told him there was plenty of straw
for the camels and room for the men to stay at her father’s house; and
the servant was immediately welcomed into the house, and after taking »
the loads off his camels and feeding them, they set before the men
many nice things to eat. But the servant said, ‘I will not eat until I
have told mine errand. Then he told them whose servant he was, how
rich his master was, and all about Isaac, Abraham’s child. Then he told
them how his master had sent him to their city to seek a wife for his
son Isaac, and how he had asked God to show him which woman he
should choose, and how he knew that Rebekah should be Isaac’s wife.
Then he asked them if they would let Rebekah go with him to be the
wife of Isaac ‘And they called Rebekah and said unto her, Wilt thou
go with this man? And she said, I will go. And they sent away
Rebekah, their sister, and her nurse, and Abraham’s servant, and his
men.’

“As they came near to where Abraham lived, Rebekah lifted up her
eyes and saw Isaac coming to meet her; and when the servant had
told Isaac all things that had been done, he took her into his mother’s
tent, and with his parents’ permission made her his wife.”

“That was a pretty story,” said Clara, “and I think it teaches us
that when God calls we should obey, like Rebekah did.”

QUESTIONS.

Why did not Isaac take a wife from the land of Canaan? To what city did Abraham send his
servant? How did the servant choose the woman for Isaac’s wife? Tell about his visit te
Rebekah’s parents. Tell about the meeting of Rebekah and Isaac.


LJ

REBEKAH AT TH
Fitth Sunday.

How Esau Lost His Birthright.

“ DID Isaac have any boys when he grew
up?” said Willie, as the children took their
seat the next Sunday morning, after break-
fast with Aunt Charlotte. “Yes, and didn’t
he have some little girls, too?” said little
Anna. “Willie's always thinking about the
boys, and you told us the Bible said his
children should be many as sand on the sea-
= shore.”

OFFERING ees IN THE a He had only two,” said Aunt Charlotte,

patting Anna’s cheek, “and they were both

boys ; but it was from them that the earth was to get its many people,
The name of one of the boys was Esau and the other was Jacob.

“Now let me read you from the Bible,” and she turned to the
twenty-seventh chapter of Genesis and read them down to the thirty-
fourth verse, where it said:



‘Bless me, even me also, O father.”’

Then, looking up, Aunt Charlotte said: “You see, as Esau was the
eldest he had the first right to the promises God had made Abra-
ham. But Esau did not care enough about them; he did not seem to
get anything by them, and he liked what he could get at once better
than what was a long way off. He had no faith, One day he came
home half dead with hunger, and saw his brother Jacob making soup
_ over the fire. Esau said he would give all these rights for a meal of
43
44 HOW ESAU LOST HIS BIRTHRIGHT.

tle soup; for if he died of hunger, what good would his birthright do
him? So for a mess of pottage he sold his right to the land of
Canaan and to be the forefather of our Saviour.

“A time was to come when he would be sorry for what he had
done. His father was old and blind, and thought he was going to
die; so he bade Esau, whom he loved the best, bring home some
meat and make a solemn feast—which was the way then of giving a
blessing. Esau went, and in time brought home the meat to his































































































































































































































































































































































































VALLEY OF SALT IN THE LAND OF EDOM, THE COUNTRY THAT ESAU AFTERWARD
OBTAINED.

father; but when he came in Isaac cried out and trembled. His
brother Jacob had come in his stead, and Isaac had taken him for
Esau and given to him the blessing that gave the right to the promised
land and to all God’s promises. |

“Then Esau cried out with an exceeding bitter cry, and asked if his
father had but one blessing. Isaac was grieved for him, and blest
him with all his heart; but there was no changing back, no taking
away what Jacob had won and Esau had lost.


HOW ESAU LOST HIS BIRTHRIGHT. 45

_ Esau did not know what he was doing when he took the pottage at
once, rather than wait patiently for the glorious inheritance that was to
come. This was the reason that he was allowed to be so cruelly dis-
ippointed. This is awarning to us. We have the inheritance of the
kingdom of heaven promised to us; but we are tempted not to care
about it when we want something here in this world, whether play or
dress or anything that seems a great deal to us now. Butif we trifle
away our right to those great
promises that God made us
at our baptism, there will
come a time of bitter grief,
when it is too late. And
when we are dead it will be
too late to change! There-
fore, now while we are alive,
We dlls Wave: falth and
show it by taking care that
the things we like here on
earth do not make us lose
the better things in heaven.”
“T’m sorry for Esau,” said
ition wana “Yess butehe
Was greedy,” said Willie. IsAAC BLESSING JAcoB.
“So are we when we had
rather have a little pleasure in this world than a great deal in heaven,”
said Aunt Charlotte.



QUESTIONS.

What were the names of Isaac’s two sons? Which son had the first right to the promise? But
which cared about it most?. What did Esau want? So what did he give up for the sake of the
soup? Could he get it back again? What are you an heir of? How could we lose the inheri-
tance of the kingdom of heaven? Shall we be able to change after we are dead? Then what must
we care about most? Why could not Esau get his father’s blessing ? What did he like better than
waiting for what he could not see? Can we see heaven? But when we get there, will it not be
better than anything we can see here ? :
46





























































































JACOB’S



DREAM.










JACOB'S JOURNEY AND DREAM, 47

Jacob’s Journey and Dream.

“Tell us more of Jacob and Esau,” said Clara. Aunt Charlotte
read :

‘«This is none other but the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven.’’— Genesis XXVIII, 17.

“T told you this morning that Isaac, Abraham's son, had two sons,
whose names were Esau and Jacob, and how Jacob had grieved Esau
by gaining God’s great promise, tor which Esau did not care till he had
lost it. Now, Esau was so angry with Jacob that Jacob had to go out
away from his father’s home, all alone. But Jacob knew he was not
alone, for God was with him. He went on till night came. Then he
was in a dismal stony place, with no house or shelter near—only big
stones, and here and there a thistle. He said his prayers, and then
he lay down with a stone for his pillow and the sky over him. Butin
the night he saw a wonder. There was a ladder reaching from earth
to heaven, and God’s angels were going up and down, and the Lord
himself stood at the top of the ladder. And He told Jacob that He
was going to give his children all the land he saw—north, south, east,
and west; and that He would take care of him, and be with him
wherever he went, and in time bring him safe home.

“Jacob woke and found it was a dream, but he knew it was true,
and that God had really spoken to him; and though he was glad he
was afraid, and he said: ‘ How dreadful is this place! this is none
other but the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven. And
that he might always know the place, he put one of the great stones
upright, and he took some of the sweet olive oil .he had brought tc
eat on his journey, and poured it on the stone, as the only thing he-
could do to show honor to God. Then he made a solemn holy vow,
that if God would take care of him on his way, and give him food to
eat and clothes to wear, he would make a gift to God all his life of the
tenth part of all he had. Good people like to do like Jacob, and give
God their tenth. And if-we only had our eyes opened to see, like
his, we should see God’s angels coming up and down with blessings
48 JACOB AND ESAU MEET AGAIN.

for us, for we go to the house of God and gate of heaven whenever
we go to church. Let us recollect how awful Jacob felt it to be so
near to God.”

“T have dreams, too, sometimes,” said little Anna, “and I see every-
thing. Do. you expect they are angels and ladders and things?”
Aunt Charlotte patted her cheek and began the—

. QUESTIONS.

Who was Isaac? Who was Jacob? Who was Esau? Why was Jacob obliged to go away?
What was the promise? What kind of place had he to sleep in? What was his pillow? But what
did he see? Who went up and down? Who stood at the top? What did God promise him?
What did Jacob say of the place? How did he mark it? What did he pour on the stone? What
vow did he make? What are our houses of God? Who come up and down to us? What do the
angels bring us? How much did Jacob promise to give to God? What does God do for us?

Jacob and Esau Meet Again. |

“ Aunt Chariotte, 1 know what became of Jacob,” said Clara. “But
don’t tell,” said Willie, shak-
ing his hand at her; “you
will spoil the story for me
and Anna—let Aunt Char-
Ne vemicelues

NV Cll sthenis “SalcmeeantlE
Charlotte, “it was a long
journey that Jacob had had to
take, but God took care of
him, and brought him safe
to the home where his mother
had come from. He lived
there and took care of his
uncle’s sheep and cattle till
he had earned a great many
for his own; and he had
married there and had a great
many sons. But after a time
God commanded him to go home to the land of Canaan. He was



JACOB AND THE ANGEL.




JACOB AND ESAU MEET AGAIN. . a5

afraid, because he thought his brother Esau might still be angry with
him; but, in spite of his fear, he did as God bade him. When he
came near the river Jordan, which flows on the east side of the land
of Canaan, he prayed to God to guard him, and once more God let
him see the angels who were going with him to protect him. He
was glad, but he was still very careful. He chose out a present of
cows and goats and camels and sheep and asses for Esau, and sent
it on to meet him; and then he sent on the other cattle he wanted to
keep for himself; then his children; and last of all, in the safest place,
his dear young son Joseph.

“Esau came to meet him, but not in anger. The two brothers met
and fell on each other’s neck and kissed each other and were friends.
So God had kept His promise to take care of Jacob; and Jacob kept
his promise, for he set up an altar at Bethel, where he had seen the
angels before, and praised and blessed God.”

“T knew Jacob would come out all right,” said Willie. “Ves, and.
Esau did, too; and Jacob had to make up for taking his birthright
too.”

QUESTIONS.

Who was Jacob? Why had he left home? With whom did he go to live? What did he earn
there? Why did he go back? Why was he afraid? But what comforted him? Of whom do
God’s angels take care? What did Jacob give Esau? How did Jacob put his family in order?
Who went last? How did Esau meet him? How did Jacob show he was thankful ?
Sith Sunday.

Joseph in Eeypt.
‘¢ His brethren envied him.’’—Genests xxxvu, re

“ NOW, Master Willie,” said Aunt Charlotte, “I will tell you about
a boy you will like.” “Good,” said Willie, clapping his hands. “ Well,
then, you know I told you
last Sunday how Jacob went
away from home, and how
God promised to take care of
lin wr ilenclicn tae. teAre sot.
him; He led him to his uncle,
and with him Jacob lived
many years, and then came
back with flocks of sheep and
goats, camels and cows.

Jacob had twelve sons.
The best of all his sons was
named Joseph. Jacob loved
him very much, and gave him
a striped dress of many colors,
such as the son who is to.
: be the heir wears in those

ae pee sae countries. But his brothers.

hated and envied him, and

could not speak peaceably to him. One day, when Joseph was seven-

teen years old, ten of the brothers were out with their sheep, and Jacob
as


JOSEPH IN EGYPT. ; 51

desired Joseph to go and see what they were about. He would not
tell his father how unkind they were to him, but he went; and as
they saw him coming some of them were so wicked as to say that
they would kill him, and never let him go home. Reuben, who was































JOSEPH CAST INTO THE PIT.

the eldest brother, tried to hinder them: but when he saw he could
not stop them, he said the best way would be not to kill him but ta
let him down into a dry well just by. There they meant to let him
starve to death; and they let him down without any pity for him
Reuben meant to come by and by and take Joseph out of the
52 JOSEPH A SLAVE.

pit and save him; but there was another brother, named Judah,
who did not want to have him killed, and who saw a great party of
men, with camels and asses laden with goods, going on a journey.
He knew they were merchants going to sell and buy in Egypt, and
he advised. the other brothers to persuade them to buy Joseph; for
in those days men and women used to be bought and sold, and were
called slaves. So Joseph was drawn up out of the pit; and when
the merchants saw what a fine young man he was, they paid the
price for him, and carried him off, away from his father and all he
had ever known or cared for before. The cruel brothers kept his
colored dress; and they killed a kid and stained it in the blood, and
then carried it to their father, telling him they had found it. Jacob
thought some wild beast had met Joseph and killed him and eaten
him, and he mourned and wept. His sons pretended to comfort him,
but not one of them would tell him that Joseph was not dead.”

“Was n't those boys mean to do poor Joseph that way ?” said little
Anna. “I knew that story all before,” said Willie; “my Sunday-
school teacher told us about it.” “Very well, then, we'll have the
questions now,” said Aunt Charlotte.

QUESTIONS.

Whose son was Jacob? How many sons had Jacob? What did he set them to do? Which
did he love best? What did he give Joseph? Where did-he send Joseph? What did the brothers
want todo? Who wished to save him? So what did Reuben persuade them to do? What did
Reuben mean to do? But who came by? What did the brothers do with Joseph? Who per-
suaded them to sell him? What are people called who are bought and sold? What was done with
his coat? What did Jacob think?

Joseph a Slave.
** The Lord made all he did to prosper in his hand.”’— Genesis xxx1x, 3.

“Aunt Charlotte, you did not finish about Joseph,” said Clara.
“No,” answered Aunt Charlotte, “I told you about his being sold; so
we see Joseph was made a slave. A slave is a servant who belongs to
his master, as his cows and horses do; he gets no wages and can not
go away, but is bought and sold like cattle.

“Think of poor Joseph. He was used to live as the son of a great


:
.
;

Ce eS ee a ee



JOSEPH A SLAVE 53

rich prince, wearing a dress of many bright colors, with many servants,
and no one to obey but his kind, fond father; and living in a beauti-
ful land, all hill and valley, where he used to feed his father’s flocks.
But now he was a slave in a strange land, with people speaking a lan-
guage he did not know, and no one to care for him or say a good word
to him, shut up in a house in a town, far away from his dear hills.

“Still he had one comfort, and the best of all—God was with him.
He could still pray to God and do his duty. And he did his work well,
for God helped him, and everything he did was made to prosper in
his hand. Then he was trusted. His master knew that he always
took care of everything as if it was
his own, and left all to him, quite
sure that it would be safe. But his
wicked mistress made up a story
that he had behaved ill, and he was
put in prison for what he had not
done. This sounds hard, but it was
God's own way of bringing good to
pass and making Joseph come at
last to honor. Very soon he was
loved and trusted in his prison, and
ale sdice ties lord anade at to
prosper.

“Think about this. mee when you nave anything to do,—a lesson
or a bit of work,—to ask God to make it prosper. Then if you try
your best He will help, and it will be sure to turn out well.

“Then try to deserve to be trusted. That is a great thing. If you
always recollect that God sees you, you will do the same when no one
is with you as if all the world were watching; and that is the way to -
be true and just in all your dealings. If you are only good when you
are looked at, you are not like Joseph, but are only doing service out-
wardly You must try to live that your parents may, when you are—





















































































Anouar EGvprian. IDOLS.

“Out of sight
Know all is right—
One law for darkness and for liyht,’’”’

-~
54 JOSEPH TELLS THE MEANING OF DREAMS.

“Didn't they let Joseph out of prison?” asked little Anna, with
tears in her blue eyes. “I know,” said Willie; “I know that, too. May
I tell her, Aunt Charlotte?” “TI will tell her in the next lesson,” said
Auntie. .

QUESTIONS.

Whose son was Joseph? Howmany brothers had Joseph? What had they done to him? Why
had Joseph’s brothers sold him? What is a slave? How did Joseph behave as a slave? Who
comforted him? How did he take care of his master’s things? Who made up a story. against
him? What was done to him? But who was with him still? And what did people think of him,
wherever he was? What is the way to be like Joseph? If you are trusted to carry a message, how
should you do it? Who always sees you? Then, even if no one is by, how should you behave?

Joseph Tells the Meaning of Dreams,
‘*Do not interpretations belong to God ?’’— Genesis x1, 8.

“Yous remember wee lett
Joseph jn prison,” began Aunt
Charlotte bilteswheteversne
was he tried to do his duty,
and so God blessed him; and
the keeper of the prison soon
found out how different he
was from the others, and let
ime shelp= I stpposeâ„¢ he
helped to carry the prisoners
their food and wait upon
them; and he often could say
a few kind good words to
them. One day two grand
people came in as prisoners.
One was the chief of all the
bakers, who made bread for
King Pharaoh; and the other
was the chief of all his cup-
bearers, who carried him his
wine. Some wrong thing had happened, and they were both sus-



JosEPH INTERPRETING THE DREAMS.
JOSEPH TELLS THE MEANING OF DREAMS. 55

pected of having had something to do with it, so they had been
sent to prison. One morning Joseph saw them both looking more
sad than usual; and when he asked what was the matter, they said
each had a dream, and they wanted to know what it meant; for
the Egyptians used to think a great deal of dreams, and there were
men among them who pretended to explain them. Most dreams have
no meaning, but these had, and God put it into Joseph’s heart to under-
stand them. The cup-bearer had dreamt that he saw a vine, and that
it had three bunches of grapes, and that he was squeezing the juice
into the king’s cup as he used to do. Joseph said this meant that

_ in three days the cup-bearer should really hand Pharaoh the cup again;

and Joseph begged that when-he was free he would tell the king about
himself, and get him set free. Then the baker told his dream—that
he had three baskets full of pastry and bread ready for Pharaoh, but
that the birds came down and ate them up. Joseph was obliged to
tell him that this meant that he would be hanged, and that the vul-
tures and ravens would eat his flesh. So it happened. Pharaoh
looked into the matter in three days’ time; he caused the baker to be
hung, and the cup-bearer to come back to his old place. But the cup-
bearer was ungrateful, and forgot all about Joseph in his prison, trust-
ing to him. And he stayed there a long time after. But, little Anna,
he did get out and became a very great man, and I will tell you about
it next Sunday.”

Little Anna was very sorryshe could not hear how it happened now,
but she said she would wait, and she hoped he would be sure to get
out. Aunt Charlotte patted her cheek and promised her he should do
so in the very next lesson.

QUESTIONS.

Who was Joseph? Where was he? How came he to be in Egypt? Where had he been put?
Had he done anything wrong? Who trusted him? What had he to do? Who came into the
prison? What was the cup-bearer’s dream? What was the baker’s dream? What did Joseph say
the cup-bearer’s dream meant ? What did the baker’s dream mean? What happened? What had
Joseph asked of the cup-bearer? Did he remember? ;
Seventh Sunday.

Joseph’s Brothers.
« We are verily guilty concerning our brother.’’— Genesis xXLIl, 21.

(ON OWE Sesaid = ttle = Amma,
clapping -her hands, “this is the
time for poor Joseph to get out of
that mean prison.” “Yes,” said
Aunt Charlotte, “Joseph did not
always stay in prison, for God gave
him wisdom to tell the king of
Egypt that his dreams had meant
that there were going to be first
seven years of very fine harvests,
and then seven years yon come of no harvests at all. So the king
took him out of prison and made hima great lord; and he set to
work to buy the corn that was over and above what people wanted to
eat in the years of plenty, that he might store it up against the
years when the corn would not grow.

“So when the bad harvest began Joseph had plenty of corn, and he
sold it for the king to all who wanted it. The famine was not only in
Egypt but in all the countries round; and by and by Joseph saw,
among the people that came to buy, ten of his own brothers—the
same who had sold him for a slave. He knew them, for they still
looked like shepherds, but they did not know him, for he had grown
from a youth to a man, and was dressed like an Egyptian lord; and

he did not let them know that he knew them, though he wanted much
|



JOSEPH BEFORE PHARAOH.






VOSELAOS WE RONGERS, a7,

to know what had become of his old father and his little brother Ben-
jamin. He made as if he thought they were enemies, come to see if
Egypt could be conquered.

“Then they told him who they were; that they were all one man’s
sons, and that one brother they had lost; the other was left with his
father, who could not bear to part with him. Joseph would not seem
to believe this, and said he must keep one of them in prison while he
sent the rest back to fetch their youngest brother, or else he could not
believe them. Then, when fear and trouble came on them, they began
to think how ill they had used their lost brother Joseph; and they said
one to another, ‘We are verily guilty concerning our brother.’ Joseph
heard them, and could hardly bear it; but still he kept to his plan. He
kept Simeon a prisoner, that he might be sure of the others coming
back, and sent them home to fetch Benjamin. But he would not have
any of the money they had brought for the corn, and made his steward
put it all back into the mouths of their sacks.

“When they found this out as they went home they were much
afraid, and when they came home their father was more afraid still.
After the way they had used Joseph he thought they had killed
Simeon, and wanted to kill Benjamin. They spoke truth now, but he
could not believe them; and he said he could not send Benjamin, for
if mischief should befall the lad, ‘then shall ye bring down my gray
hairs with sorrow to the grave.’”

“Yam so glad Joseph got out of prison,” said Anna. “Yes, but he
ought to have licked his old, mean brothers.” “Stop, Willie,” said
Aunt Charlotte. “The Bible says we must forgive those who injure us.”

QUESTIONS.

Where was Joseph? Why was he in prison? What did God make him able to tell the king? ©
How many years was there to be much corn? What was to be done with the corn? Who man-
aged the buying it? When was the corn wanted? Who came to buy corn? Who did not come?
Why did not Joseph’s brothers know him? What did he make believe to think? Whom did he
tell them to fetch? What did he give back to them? What did their father say about Benjamin's
going? Why was he afraid to trust them with Benjamin? What is the way to be believed ?

me


PS ere rae erate A NEN A EKA RAE TEE ENT SN Ae Sea

5S JOSEPH’S BROTHERS GO AGAIN LO-EGVET.

Joseph’s Brothers Go Again to Egypt.

“God Almighty give you mercy before the man.’’—Gezeszs XLII, 14.

“Juoseph’s brothers were soon obliged to go again and buy more
corn in Egypt. Joseph had said they must bring the. young brother
they had told him of, or he should not believe their story; and when
they said Benjamin must go, their father Jacob was greatly grieved,
and showed how little he could trust them now, after the way they
had behaved to Joseph. He would not have let Benjamin goat all if

Judah had
NOL. pret
ised to take
the greatest
care of him;
and Judah

could be
trusted.
fT nestory

is so beauti-
fubpeaiids 550
Gdsy StOe Un=
derstand in
the Bible,
that I hardly
like to tell it
in my own words. Only think of Joseph’s heart being so full when
he saw his own dear youngest brother that he could not stay with
him for his tears, and went away to weep in his chamber! And yet
he still tried the brothers. He wanted to see if they still were
envious of the one their father loved best; so he made his steward
hide his cup in Benjamin’s sack of corn, and then go after them and
pretend to think they had stolen it.

“The sons of Jacob were no thieves, and they said the steward



EGYPTIAN WOMEN.
JOSEPH MAKES HIMSELF KNOWN. 39

might search their sacks. They took them down and looked, and there.
was the cup in Benjamin's sack! 7
“They were all shocked; and the steward said that Benjamin must
go back and be punished.
“How pleased they would have been long ago if such a misfortune
had happened to Joseph! But now their hearts were changed, and
chey were shocked and grieved.”
“Tm glad they got into trouble,” said Willie; “ served ’em right.”
“Yes, but poor little Benjamin and old Jacob,” said little Anna.
“Joseph ought to have sent his papa a letter to tell him all about it.”

QUESTIONS.

What had Joseph’s brothers done to him? What trouble did you hear last Sunday he was in ?
But how did he behave? And what had he come to be? What had he stored up? Who came to
buy corn? How many brothers came? Which did not come ?- Why did not Benjamin come ?
Did the brothers know Joseph? What did he tell them to do? When he saw Benjamin, where
did he go? What did Joseph tell his steward todo? What did Joseph want tosee? How did the
brothers behave this time?

Joseph Makes Himself Known.

*¢ God did send me before you to preserve life.’’— Genesis XLV, §.

“Do hurry, Auntie, about Joseph. I’m mest crazy to know about
him and little Benjamin,” said Anna.

“Well, to begin where we left off,” said Aunt Charlotte. “All the
eleven sons of Jacob turned back in grief and fear and dismay with
Benjamin. How the cup came to be in his sack they could not guess,
but they knew that their father’s heart would break if they came home
ind left Benjamin to be a slave.

“So they all went back to the lord of the land, and Judah stood up
before the strange, stern, princely man, and told him how much their
old father loved this youngest son, and he would be sure to die if the
lad did not come home safe. And then Judah begged to stay and be
a slave in Egypt, instead of his brother Benjamin, for he said if mis-
chief befell the lad his father would die, and that he could not bear to
See,
Hei

ae ce
A ih ‘

a 5 ee



































































JOSEPH MAKING HIMSELF KNOWN TO HIS BRETHREN.
ee

| JOSEPH MAKES HIMSELF KNOWN, 6x

“ But when Judah so spake, the lord of the land sent all the lookers-
on away, and wept aloud, and said that he was their own brother,
Joseph, whom they had sold so long ago. He would not let them be
afraid; he embraced them all and wept for joy, and asked for his
father. Then he told them not to grieve for what had gone before;
for God had turned it all to good, and made him be the means of
saving all their lives, by storing up the corn in Egypt.

“And now they were to go home, and tell Jacob, their father, that
Joseph was still alive, and was a great and powerful man; and they
were to fetch old Jacob, their father, and their wives and their children,
and all they had, and come to live with Joseph in Egypt, where he
would take care of them.

“That was the way Joseph forgot all the ill his brothers had done to
him, and forgave them, and loved them with all his heart. When the
brothers came home, their father Jacob could scarcely believe such
good news; but at last he said, ‘Joseph my son is yet alive, I will go
to see him before I die.’

“And he came down to Egypt, and Joseph met him and fell on his
neck and kissed him; and then there was joy indeed, joy as if Joseph
had come back from the dead. |

“So Jacob lived all the rest of his life in Egypt, and was happy with
his son Joseph. God had given him another name, Israel, and his
sons, and their sons after them, were always called the children of
Ste le

“Now, brother,” said Clara, “don’t you see Joseph was right ?”
“Yes,” answered little Anna, “he was a good boy to his old, mean
brothers; and don’t you expect they all loved him after that ?”

“Right, my darling,” said Aunt Charlotte. “Jesus said we must do
good to those who treat us meanly, and that we must love our
enemies. That makes them our friends.”

QUESTIONS.

Who was Benjamin? What was found in Benjamin’s sack? Who put it there?- What was
going to be done to Benjamin? Who spoke for him? What did Judah ask? Who did the lord
of the land turn out to be? How came Joseph to be in Egypt? Why had his brothers not known
him sooner? How did he treat them? Whom did he send for? What did Jacob say? Where
did Jacob go to live? Why was it very kind in Joseph to help his brothers?
Eighth Sunday. —

The Baby in the River.

¢¢T have surely seen the affliction of My people.’’—Zxodus 11, 7.

“WILL you tell us more about
Joseph, Auntie?” “No, Willie; we
will skip a long time,—nearly three
hundred years,—and see how
Jacob’s people got on in the land of
Egypt, and I will start with the
baby in the river.

“You heard in our last lesson
how Joseph brought his father and
brothers and their children to live
in Egypt. Their children’s children
went on living there for many years,
till they had come to be a great
people, and were called the children
of istacl; “but then, the King of
Egypt grew cruel to them. He
made them work very hard to make

bricks and build towns for him; and, what was still worse, he ordered
that whenever a little boy was born to the children of Israel, he should
be thrown into the river and drowned. |

“One mother hid her little baby for three months, and when she
could not hide him any longer she put him into a little cradle of bul-
rushes, covered over with pitch to keep the water out, and let the

62 7





MosEs IN THE BULRUSHES.


THE BABY IN TRE RIVER. 63

cradle float on the river, leaving the little boy’s sister to watch him.
Presently a lady, no other than the daughter of the cruel king, came
down to bathe in the river. She saw the little cradle and had it
brought to her. The little baby was crying, and the lady pitied him
and took him home, to bring him up for her own child. She wanteda
nurse for him, and his sister brought the baby’s own mother, and she

became his nurse.

“His name was Moses, and he grew up in the king’s house as the

son of the king’s daughter; but when he grew up he went away from

the king’s house, because he
loved his people and pre-
ferred to live with them, and
the king grew angry with him
because he cared for his own
people, and he had to flee
away and keep sheep in the
wilderness. :

“And there he saw a great
wonder. He saw a flame of
fire in a bush, and yet the
bush was not burnt. And
God's voice spoke to him out
of the fire that did not burn,
and told him that the troubles
of His people, the children of



Mosrs Krrpinc SHEEP IN THE WILDERNESS.
Israel, were to come to an ;

end. God would save them from the cruel Egyptians; and Moses him-
self was to go and lead them out, and bring them to the good land
that God had promised that Abraham’s children should have for their
own. Moses was to go and tell the king of Egypt that it was God’s will
that they should go. Moses was afraid at first, but God promised to
help him; and in our next lesson you will hear what happened.”
“Tell us now,” said little Anna. “Was it bad?” “This afternoon,
my darling,” said Aunt Charlotte. “Now see how well you can —
answer the questions,”
64 MOSES AND AARON BEFORE THE KING.

QUESTIONS.

Who was Moses? Where was he put when he was a baby ?. Why was he put on the river? Who
had said the little boys were to be drowned? Whose babies were they that were to.be drowned?
What other cruel things did the King of Egypt do to the children of Israel? Who were called the
children of Israel? What became of Moses in his bulrush cradle? Who brought him up? Did
he stay with the king’s daughter? Whom did he care for? What wonder did Moses see? Who
spoke tohim? What was God going to do for His people? What land would He give them?
Who had the first promise that his children should have the good land?

Moses and Aaron before the King,

‘* And Pharaoh said, Who is the Lord ?’’—Exodus v, 2.

“Now, Moses had a brother Aaron, who was a priest and a good
talker, and he got him to go with him and they told Pharaoh God’s
message—that the people of Israel were to go away and worship
Him. But Pharaoh said, ‘Who is the Lord; that I should obey His
voice to let Israel go? I know not the Lord, neither will I let
Israel go. And he was more cruel to the children of Israel; he
made them work harder and harder,
and had them beaten if they did
not do all the work that was set
them. They had to make bricks of
clay mixed with straw; and,- to
punish them, Pharaoh said that they
should have no straw given to them
for their work, but that they must

: at find it for themselves; and yet he
Bee M a ea required of them just as many bricks
as they had had to make before. Then they cried out and were
angry, and fancied Moses had brought all this trouble on them by
asking for them to go. They were very miserable, and said they
wished they had never listened to Moses, for he had only made them
worse off instead of better.

“ Aaron was a better speaker than Moses, and God had said he
should help him, and that, when God told Moses anything, Aaron
























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































EGYPTIAN TASK MASTERS.



65


a
| 66 MOSES AND AARON BEFORE THE KING.

should speak it to the people. So the two brothers stood telling the
‘Israelites to bear it a little longer, and then it would be all well and
over, and they would get away from making the bricks in Egypt.to
the beautiful country. They could not remember it themselves, but
some of their fathers’ grandfathers had been little boys when they
came, and could tell them that it was a country not all flat, with only
one river in it, like Egypt, but full of steep hills and green valleys,
with bright streams running along in them, and thick woods on some
of the slopes, and others laid out in gardens and vineyards. There
were So many cows in the pastures, and in the wild rocks and hollow.
trees so many bees’ nests, that
it was called a land flowing
with milk and honey.

“Should not the Israelites
have liked to hear of such a
place as this? But, no; they
were too dull to care. : They
thought more of whether they
should -get a leek or a melon
to eat at supper than of all the
‘lovely land far away. Do you
know, people are very like that
when they care for zow more than for dy and by. If we want just
what pleases us to-day, instead of caring for what will be good for us
as we grow older, we are just like the Israelites, who would not
attend to Moses or to God.”

“Tf Iwas Moses and Aaron I would have gone off to that pretty
country and left those good-for-nothing Israelites in Egypt,” said
Willie. “Not so,” said Aunt Charlotte. “We must do all the good
we can for others. That’s the way Jesus did.”







IsRAELITES MAKING Bricks IN Ecypt.

QUESTIONS.

Who was Pharaoh? Who were the children of Israel? Who had been sent to call them?
What did Pharaoh say to Moses? How did he use the Israelites? What would he not give them?
Who was Moses’ brother? What was Aaron to do for Moses? Who spoke to Moses? Who told
the people what God said to Moses? What kind of place did God promise? What did Moses

say it flowed with? Why? Did the Israelites carep Why not? When are we like them?






eS IAS

st tales cr

LF IM TRC IIE TD



Se



PSR LT EN Woe NA

HOW GOD PUNISHED THE KING. 67

How God Punished the King.

*¢T will redeem you with a stretched out arm.’’—Zxodus v1, 6.

“The Israelites grew very unhappy, for Pharaoh became even more
cruel to them, and they thought it all Moses’ fault. But Moses told
them that they must go away and that no matter what came on Egypt
they would be saved, and that God was going to show them His
power, so that they might always remember what He had done for
them, and how He punished Pharaoh, who would not obey Him.

“Then God made His power to be known; so that Pharaoh and the
children of Israel might both learn who is the great Lord of heaven
and earth, who must be obeyed. First, Moses stretched out his rod,
and all the water in the river turned into blood. For seven days it
was all one red dreadful stream of blood; and when Moses held out
his rod again it turned back into pure water. But Pharaoh did not
mind, and would not let the people go. Then God sent a multitude _
of frogs, that came into all the noes and bed-rooms, and on the
tables and everywhere. Pharaoh could not bear to have these crea-
tures everywhere, and said if the frogs would but go away he would
let the children of Israel go. Moses prayed to God, and all the frogs
died; but Pharaoh only hardened his heart again, and would not let
the people go. Next, God sent lice—disgusting unclean creatures,
most horrible to the Egyptians, who could not bear anything dirty; but
Pharaoh did not care. Then came swarms of flies, buzzing, stinging,
and tormenting; and Pharaoh said he would allow the Tstaehites to
go, so the flies were taken away; but no sooner were they gone than
he went back again to his obstinacy, and would not let the people go.
He was trying to fight against God, and so came these terrible miseries
onhim. If people will not do better after being punished, worse and
worse is sure to come on them.”

“But didn’t he let ’em go?” said little Anna. “Yes,” said Aunt
Charlotte; “at another time I'll tell you how it was,”

QUESTIONS.
How did God punish Pharaoh? What four plagues have I told you of to-day? Why did these
dreadful things happen? Did Pharaoh care for them? Why did he not mind them? What
happens to those who do not mind being punished?


inth Sunoday.

The Plagues of Egypt.

«* There is none like Me in all the earth.’’— Axodus 1x, 14.
“©The Lord hardened Pharaoh’s heart, so that he would not let the children of Israel go.””"—
| Exodus X, 20.

“NOW tell us some more about mean old
Pharaoh and how he had to let the children of
Israel go away from Egypt. You said you would,
Auntie,” pleaded little Anna, as they all took their
places after breakfast.

“T will, my dear,” answered Aunt Charlotte,
“and I will give you another surprise. You
notice the weather is getting warm and spring-like.
‘Suppose we have one long talk this morning. Then, after church,
_ we will use the afternoon for a pleasant walk, to see if there are any
tiny flowers coming.”

“Good!” shouted Willie, throwing up his hat, and the other children
were equally delighted. A

“Well, then, last Sunday we had learned about four plagues—.” “I
know,” said Willie; “the river turned to blood, the frogs, and the lice
and the flies.” “Right,” said Auntie. “I had forgot about the old
hop-frogs,” put in little Anna. “ Was there any more ‘d/egs,’ Auntie?”

“Yes; six times more God had to punish wicked Pharaoh, and these
six terrible plagues I will tell you about to-day,” said Aunt Charlotte,
and she straightened herself up in her chair and talked very earnestly

and looked away as if she could see all the terrible things she
68,



PHARAOH.
LEE PLAGUES. OF SEGYPT 69

described, and the children did not once take their eyes off her face,
so deeply were they interested.

“After God had sent the flies, next he made the sheep and cows,
that the Egyptians worshiped like gods, fall sick and die, but still
Pharaoh did not care; then the people all had sores and boils that
made them very ill, but still Pharaoh did not care; and then there
was a terrible storm, thunder and lightning, and rain and hail—such
big hailstones as killed the men and cattle that were out in the fields,
and lightning that struck them, and wind that broke every tree in the
field. No wonder that Pharaoh was frightened, and begged that the
storm might cease, and said that then he would let the Israelites go.
So Moses prayed to God, and the thunder
left off, there was no more hail, and it was
all still again. But when the thunder was
over Pharaoh grew wicked again, and left
off caring, and said the Israelites should
not go. And thus God went on being
angry with him and sending worse plagues
upon him.

“Worse troubles are sure to come
when people have not taken warning by
what was sent them before. Pharaoh had
not minded. seven dreadful plagues, so now God sent another. He
sent locusts. These were creatures like great grasshoppers. They
came in swarms and clouds, and ate up every green leaf and blade of
grass, and made all the earth brown and the trees dry sticks, so that
there was nothing left for man or beast to eat. Then Pharaoh gave
way a little, and ead he would let the men go, but that their wives
and children must stay; and he would not hear a word more, but
had Moses and Aaron driven out from before him.

“Then God bade Moses to hold up his hand to Heaven. And dark-
ness came all over the land. It was dark all day—and with ‘ dark-
ness that might be felt’; not like night, but such black darkness that
no fire or Pade could give light, and no one dared to move about,
but the Egyptians lay still in their places, full of horror and terror,



Locust.


70 THE PLAGUES OF EGYPT.

for three whole days. But all the time it was light among the Israelites
—the sun rose and set as usual; and thus God showed that they were
’ His people. Then Pharaoh said that he would let them go—men,
women, and children, only he must keep all their cattle; and when
Moses, speaking God's words, said that the cattle must go too, and
not a hoof be left behind, Pharaoh made his heart hard again, and
drove out Moses, saying the people should not go, and that Moses
should never see his face again. And Moses said, ‘Thou hast
_ spoken well, I will see thy face again no more.’

“So ended the last hope for Pharaoh. He was never to have
another chance of bending his will and doing as God told him. Oh,
let us take care not to be like him. —

« After the nine sad plagues that had come upon the Egyptians—
the blood for water, the frogs, the lice, the flies, the cattle plague, the
boils, the hail, the locusts, the darkness—there was to be still one
plague more, the last and worst. That would make the Egyptians
let the people of Israel go, so they must be ready.

“There should be a terrible night. God’s holy angel would pass
over the whole land of Egypt that night, and in each house of the

Egyptians he would slay the eldest son of the family. No one would
_ be spared: Pharaoh's eldest son, the young prince, and the very poorest
person’s son. They had killed the little Israelite babies, so God
would punish them by killing their children. None of the Israelites
should lose their children; only there was one thing for them to do.
_ They were that night to make their supper on a lamb, and, with some
of the blood of the lamb, they were to make a mark on the doors of
their houses. Where that mark was the angel would pass over and do
no one any hurt; but the people would be blest and set free, because
they believed God, and did as He bade them.”

«That was a good story, Auntie,” said Clara, “and it teaches us
that we must obey God or be punished. Pharaoh was like all sinners
who do not keep their promises to God. /They are punished for it.”
“Did Moses’ folks get away?” asked Anna. “T’ll tell you about it
next Sunday,” answered Auntie; “and this time, as we have had a
Jong talk, I will not ask any questions.”
Centh Sunday.—Easter Day.

The Passover.
‘* There was not a house in which there was not one dead.”’—Zxodus xu, 30.

“THIS is the day I promised
to tell you, Anna, about Moses’
people leaving Egypt; but in the
morning lesson I want to tell
you that this is the Sunday many
Christians celebrate as Easter,
which means deliverance.

“This is our own gladdest
Sunday in all the year, and we
read of the Israelites being glad
too—glad upon the very Sunday
that answered to this, thousands of years ago. On this Sunday, of all
those thousands of years, there has been joy and gladness and thank~
ing God. And why? It was because all the troubles in Egypt were
over, and God brought the Israelites out safe. There was one thing
they had to do first, though; Moses bade them do it, as God com-
manded. I told you they had to eat a lamb for supper Yes: every
family was to take a lamb, and it was to. be killed and roasted whole
in the evening, and some of its blood was to be marked upon the
door-post of the house, and then all the family were to stand round the
table, all ready dressed for a journey, and eat it as fast as they could,
late at night.

“ And while all the famiJies—fathers and mothers and children-—stood

ze



Ecyprian Kinc In His CHARIOT.
72 ‘THE PASSOVER AND EASTER DAY.

up eating the lamb in this strange way, there came a great shout and
cry. God had sent His angel to punish the cruel Egyptians; and
every house where there was no mark of blood on the door-post had
some one dead in it, and that dead person was the eldest or first-born
son. There was a great cry, for there was death everywhere, from the
son of Pharaoh who sat on his throne down to the child of the
poorest slave; and even the first-born of cattle died too, because the
Egyptians used to worship them; but wherever there was the blood
on the door-post the angel passed over, and the eldest son was safe.
The cruel King Pharaoh was sorry and afraid at last, and said that
the people who brought such trouble on him should go where they
liked. And, Anna, in the story this afternoon and to-night I will tell
you all about it.” |
QUESTIONS.

Why are we glad to-day? Where were the Israelites living ? Who said they should come out?
What did God tell the Israelites to eat? How were they to be dressed while they ate it? What
were they to do with the blood? Who was going to pass over the land that night? What did
the angel do where he did not see any blood on the door-post? Who were frightened then?

The Passover and Easter Day.
6¢It is the sacrifice of the Lord’s passover.’’—F#xodus Xu, 27.

“Now, children,” began Aunt Charlotte, “I want to teach youa little
lesson te show you why the Jews keep the Passover and many
Christians observe Easter day.

“When the king of Egypt said the Israelites might go they were all
up and dressed, quite ready and only waiting, and off they set. No
more making of bricks, no more slaving for the Egyptians, no more
drowning of babies! They were free! and God was going to lead
them to the beautiful country that long ago He had said He would
give them.

“ And so always after that, to put them in mind how they were saved
from the Egyptians, God bade them on the same day in each year to
kill a lamb and roast it, and put the blood on the door-post, and eat
the lamb all standing round the table, dressed as if they were going










GOING OUT OF EGYPT. 73

for a journey, that they might never forget how God had made them
free. This was called the Passover, because the angel passed over
the houses where the blood was marked over the door. And God
came in a pillar of cloud to show them the way they should go.

“ Now, you remember, hundreds of years after this our blessed Lord
was crucified when He had come to the Feast of the Passover at
Jerusalem. You know He was like a lamb, He was so pure and
gentle; and His blood saves us, as that lamb’s blood did the Israelites,
and sets us free from the power of the devil. So we still keep the
feast of being set free, on this happy Easter Sunday, when we recollect
that Christ was slain for our sins, but that He rose again from the dead,
and liveth for evermore.

QUESTIONS.

What did Pharaoh say that the Israelites might do? What made him let them go at last?
Who were set free? What were the Israelites to do every year? What was this eating the lamb
called? Why was it called the Passover? Why were the Israelites glad? Who set us free?
In what is He like a lamb ?

Going Out of Egypt.

‘* The children of Israel shall go on dry ground through the midst of the sea.— Exodus xiv, 16.

“This is the time the Israelites are to get away, Aunt Charlotte,”
said Willie. “Yes; and don’t let mean old Pharaoh keep them
any more,” said little Anna.

“All the Egyptians were weeping over their dead first-born sons,
and the Israelites were set free, and going gladly out and away from
their hard masters. .

“But Pharaoh's hard heart turned again, and he got all his chariots
and horsemen together, and went after the children of Israel to drive
them back to Egypt.” “Oh! now, but he did not catch them, did
he?” asked Anna, with great excitement. “No; when he came in
sight of them, there they were all upon the shore of the sea called the
Red Sea. They could not go on, for the sea was straight before them;
they could not go back, for the Egyptians were behind. They were
sore afraid. But God spoke to Moses, and told him not to fear. They

had only to stand still and see how God would save them.
5
74 GOING OUT OF EGYPT.

“And God himself showed that He was with them, for the pillar of
cloud went behind them, instead ‘of before, and made it dark to the
Egyptians, but gave light by night to the Israelites: so the Egyptians
could not get near them all night.” “How glad I am,” said little
Anna, clapping her hands. .

“Then God bade Moses stretch out his rod over the sea. And then
there was a great wonder. The waves of the sea parted, and stood
up on each side in a heap, and in between there was a wide open
space, where the children of Israel might walk safely dry-shod,
through the very midst of the sea. Through it they went, men,
women, and children, through the depths of the sea, with the waves
standing still on each side of them.

“Pharaoh saw that they were all gone over. He chose to follow after
them. But when his host was full in the midst, the sea returned to its
strength again and came down on the Egyptians, and every one of
them was drowned,—‘ they sank like lead in the mighty waters,—and
the Israelites were freed from their enemies, quite away from all their
trouble and all their slavery; and they all sang hymns of joy to God,
who had set them free. |

“ And now, as we hear about their being set free, let us remember
this is the great Easter day, when we ought to give special thanks to
our Blessed Lord Jesus for having set us free.”

“Pm so glad they got away safe,” said Anna. “Yes; and I’m
gladder because those wicked Egyptians got drowned,” put in Willie.
“No, brother, rather we should be sorry their wickedness made
them go in to their destruction,” said Clara. “Right,” said Aunt
Charlotte. “We should never rejoice in any wicked person's death.
Christ came to save the wicked, and but for his coming we would all
be lost.” .

QUESTIONS.

Who had set off to leave Egypt? But what did Pharaoh do? What was before the Israelites ?
What was behind? Where did the pillar of cloud go? How were the Egyptians cut off from
them? What wonder did God work? Where did the Israelites go over? Who came after them?
What became of the Egyptians? Who were free? Who had made them free? Who makes us
free?










OF THE EGYPTIANS.

DESTRUCTION
Kleventh Sunday.

Wicked Men Swallowed Up.

**The Lord will show who are His and who is holy.’’—Mumdbers XVI, 5.

“WHEN the Israelites came out of Egypt they hada long journey
to go, through a dreary, lonely wilderness. Moses and his brother
Aaron led them; and God took care of them, and fed them, and kept
them safe. But there were two wicked OMe Heine Gael) aencimmeeniiGl
Abiram, who were tired of the wilderness, and were angry at having
Moses for their leader and master, though God had made him lead
them, and had done so much for them. They said they were as good
as Moses, and that he should not be their prince. They did not care
for God having spoken by him.

“Their end was so very dreadful that I can hardly tell it to you.
God would not let them rise up against His servant Moses; and when
they would not listen nor repent He made the earth open under their
feet, and they went down alive, and were swallowed up in the pit
before the eyes of all the other Israelites; and so they died the most
terrible death any one ever died. It was because they set themselves
up against Moses, whom God had placed over them, that He was so
angry with them.

“Remember God has set people over us: there are our fathers and
mothers, and our clergymen and teachers ; and it is our duty to obey
them, as He tells us in the Fifth Commandment. If we are proud
and saucy, it is very wrong of us. It is not likely that we should be
so dreadfully punished in this life as Dathan and Abiram were; but
their horrible death should make us remember that God is very angry

76






KORAH AND HIS FRIENDS BURNT TO DEATH. 77

with those that will not try to obey those that have the rule over
them, and set themselves up to be bold and proud, and to say they do

not care.”
QUESTIONS.

Who was set over the Israelites by God? Where had he brought them from? Where was he
leading them to? How should they have behaved to him? What bad men were there among
them? Why was it very wicked of Dathan and Abiram not to obey Moses? What terrible end
did they cometo? Why was God angry with Dathan and Abiram? Whom did He set over you
Then how must you behave to your parents and clergyman and teachers?

























































































































































THE HIGH PRIEST BURNING INCENSE WITHIN THE HOLY OF HOLIES.





Korah and His Friends Burnt to Death, |

“And seek ye the priesthood also ?’’—Mumbers xvi, to.
“I will tell you to-day about a wicked meddler.” “Some people

are always meddling with other people’s business,” said Willie. “Yes
and we will see how this meddler suffered,” began Aunt Charlotte
78 KORAH AND HIS FRIENDS BURNT TO DEATH.

“When God had the children of Israel started on their journey He
chose that Aaron, Moses’ brother, and his sons should be His priests,
A priest had to offer up the sacrifices to God, and to burn incense to
Him. Incense is made of dried plants and gums that have a sweet
smell when they are burnt. The priests had brazen urns with holes
at the top, and chains to hold them by, and when the smoke of the
incense went up it was just as our prayers rise up to God in heaven
There were other people called Levites, who had to take care of the
holy things that were used in God’s service, but only the priests
might offer sacrifices or incense. .

“Now, one of these Levites, named Korah, wanted to do more.
He was angry, and said everybody was holy, and that Aaron took too
much on himself. Now, it was not Aaron who made himself priest,
but God had made him so. Therefore it was wrong in Korah; but
there were two hundred and fifty men whom he persuaded to come
and get censers, and offer incense to the Lord as if they had been
priests. But because they did it in pride and self-will God was angry
with them, and His fire burst out and scorched them all to death! It
was only the men themselves that died, not their wives or children ;
and Korah’s family after him were better than he was, and used to
sing God’s praises in the Psalms.

“But they always recollected that no one who was not a priest
might offer sacrifice or burn incense before God.”

“The lesson we learn from this,” said Clara, “I should think is
that we must do what God wants us to.” “Yes, and mind our own
business,” said Willie.

QUESTIONS.

What had a priest todo? Who was the right priest? How came Aaron to be priest? Who
wanted to offer incense? Whatdid Korah say? How many came with him? What did they try
to do? What happened to the two hundred and fifty? Why were they Pees What became
of Korah’s children ?


HOW THEY MADE HIGH PRIESTS. 79



_ How They Made High Priests,

~ «The rod of Aaron for the house of Levi was budded, and brought forth buds, and bloomed

blossoms, and yielded almonds.’’—Mumbers xvi, 8.
“Why did the priest offer a sacrifice, Aunt Charlotte?” asked
Clara, as they took their seats after tea. “An important question: |

am glad you asked it,”
said their aunt.

“ The high priest, whom
God chose, had to offer
sacrifices to Him. That
was, the priest slew a
lamb or a goat or a bul-
lock by the altar and gave
it to God. It was to
show that the son of God
would come and die to
take away sin. Now He
has come and died, we
have left off killing crea-
tures in sacrifice, and only
make remembrance over
again of His sacrifice in
thie, Sacraments O:e ete
Lord’s Supper.

“The high priest used
to wear a beautiful dress.
He had a. miter on his
head, with a gold plate on
it, and the words, -‘ Holi-
ness unto theLord’; and
he had a blue, red, and white robe, embroidered with gold, and round
the hem littie gold bells and pomegranates. He had a curious scarf
called an ephod, and a beautiful breast-plate made of twelve precious







Ture Hicnh Priest In His BEautiruL Dress.
80 HOW THEY MADE HIGH PRIESTS.

stones, each with the name of one of the twelve tribes of Is.ael
engraven on it.” “How did Aaron know he was to be the high
priest?” asked Willie. “Another good question,” answered Auntie.

“It was done this way. God said He would show who should be His’
priest. So he bade Moses desire the chief man in each tribe to bring him
a dry rod or staff, and lay them up all night in the Holy Place. The
one whose rod began to grow as if it was still on the tree should be
the high priest. When the twelve men went to look in the morning,
eleven rods were dry sticks still, but one had put out green leaves
and pink buds and white blushing flowers, like almond blossoms.
It was Aaron’s rod; and this was the way God let the children of
Israel know that Aaron and his sons, and grandsons after him, were
always to be priests.” “Now I understand it; don’t you, brother?”
Sale littlesAmirawe (Olmethatis, easy,” answered Willie.

QUESTIONS.

What was a priest? What creatures were killed? What was this to make the children of
Israel think of? Why don’t we kill sacrifices now? What did the high priest wear on his head ?
What color was his dress? How was it edged? What was on his breast? How did God say he
would show who was to be the high priest? What were the eleven rods like in the morning? But
how did one look? Whose was it? What, then, was Aaron to be?

a a
MN Te



st i

Pai



PLAGUE oF Frocs.


Cwelfth Sunday.

Wloses Bringing Water Out of the Rock.

‘¢Ye shall not tempt the Lord your God.’’—Dewt. v1, 16.

“T TOLD you what sort
of a place a desert is, and
how full it is of stones
and rocks and sand, and
with no water in it. Do
you remember how thirsty
Ishmael was in a desert,
and how God heard the
voice of the lad, and sent
an angel to lead his
mother to a well of
water?” “Yes, I learned
that at Sunday-school,”

said Willie. |

“Well, when the Is-
raelites had come out of

the land of Egypt they were in a terrible wilderness. Mount Sinai
stood up in the midst, and all round were great rocks of red and black
stone, all dry and parched with the hot sun shining on them. The
Israelites grew very hot and sadly thirsty, but they did not pray as
Ishmael had done. They grew angry, and said, ‘Is the Lord among
us orno?’ Do you not think they deserved that God should show
whether He was among them by punishing them for grumbling?”
81



















THE HicH Priest OFFERING INCENSE,
82 LHE SERPENTS THAT BIT THE PEOPLE.

“But they wanted some water to drink,” said Anna. “That was the
way they tempted God. Yes, and He was so good and merciful that
He pitied them; and He bade Moses to take his rod, and go to the
bare, dry rock and strike it. And when Moses struck the rock Goa
made a beautiful, fresh, clear spring of water come pouring out of it,
so that all the people, and all their cows and sheep and asses and

camels, could drink and be refreshed. Was not that a great wonder ?.

and was not God very kind to them, though they were not good?
But you see God was near to help them all the time, and it was very
sad that they grumbled instead of praying. Do not be like them. If
a thing is hard to bear, don’t murmur and grumble about it, but pray,
aad then you will get help. Either the vexing thing will go away,
or you will leave off minding it.”

QUESTIONS.

What was the mountain in the midst of the desert? What can not be found in the desert ?
Who was the lad that was thirsty there before? What did Ishmael do when he was thirsty? But
what did the Israelites do? What did they say? What would have served them right? But did
God punish them? What did He tell Moses to do? What came out of the rock? Who made
the water come out of the rock? Was it not very good of God to give them water? What oughi
they to have done? What should you do when a thing is hard? Is it not very naughty to
grumble?

The Serpents that Bit the People.

‘As Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up.’’
—John iu, 14.

“What will you tell us about this afternoon?” asked Willie.
“ Snakes,” answered Aunt Charlotte, with a laugh. “But I don’t like
snake stories,” said little Anna. “But you must be patient, my little
curlyhead,” said Aunt Charlotte, patting the chubby cheek, “this story
is in the Bible

“One great fault of the Israelites was that they had no patience.
The moment they saw anything troublesome or difficult they began
to cry out, and say they could not get on,and it was very hard on
them. Now, it is very wrong ever to say God is very hard upon us,
for we may be sure He is doing what is best for us. There was one








































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































MOSES SMITING THE ROCK.


84 FOOD SENT FROM HEAVEN.

stony, hot, steep part of the journey still to come, and when the
Israelites saw it they forgot how often God had helped them, and
cried out, and lamented, and complained of Him and of Moses.

“So again they were punished, for the little shining snakes that
live there came in numbers, darting at them and biting them, so that
the bite burnt like fire, and they died. Then they cried out to God
and were sorry, and He told Moses of a wonderful way to cure them.
Moses was to melt up some brass and make a great serpent, like the
little ones that bit them, and set it up on a pole. Then if any one
who was bitten would come at once and look up at the brazen serpent
his bite would get well, and he would not die of it.

“This was a miracle—a wonder. And it was to teach the Israelites
something, and us too. For you know our Blessed Lord hung on the
cross, as the serpent hung on the pole; and when our souls are in
danger of dying of sin, we must think of Him, and look to Him in
faith, and He will save us from being punished for our sin, and keep
our souls from dying if we believe in Him as our Saviour.”

QUESTIONS.

What sort of place had the Israelites to go over? How did they like it? What did they do?
Who had been taking care of them? How did God punish them? What happened when the ser-
pents bit them? What were they sorry for? So what was Moses to make? Where did he put the
brazen serpent? What were they to do if they were bit? What cured them? Who hung upon
the cross? What does He cure our souls of ?

Food Sent from Heaven.

‘*He humbled thee, and suffered thee to hunger, and fed thee with manna, which thou knewest
not.’’—Deut. Vu, 3. i

“This morning,” said Aunt Charlotte, drawing little Anna to her,
“you heard how God gave the children of Israel water to drink in the
wilderness. Then how he saved them from the fiery serpents. Now
you shall hear what He gave them to eat. The ground was all hard
and stony. There was grass which the cows and sheep could eat, and
there were a few trees with long sharp thorns, but no fruit on them,
and no corn to make bread; and soon the people were very hungry,






FOOD SENT FROM HEAVEN. 85

and began to cry ou that they did not know what would become of
them.

‘But God was not going to forget them. When they rose up in
the morning the fresh dew lay on the grass, and all about in the dew
were little white things that tasted like wafers made with honey. This
was called manna, and God had sent it from heaven for them to eat
Every morning on week days there it was, and they had all to come
out and pick it up. But they must get up early to gather it, for
when the sun was hot it
would melt away. And
they could not keep it—
it grew bad and was not
fit to use the next day ;
but there was always
just enough for every-
body to have all they
wanted. There was
only one day in each
week that more came
down, and that was the
day before the Sab-
bath day,—Saturday,—
which they kept instead
of our Sunday. Then GATHERING MANNA IN THE WILDERNESS.
each one could get
twice as much as could be eaten in one day, and it did not spoil so
fast. For on the Sabbath day God would have them rest, and so
no manna was to be found anywhere, so that they might learn to
keep the Fourth Commandment— remember the Sabbath day to keep
it holy.’”



QUESTIONS.

Where were the Israelites? Why could they not get bread? What did God give them instead ?
What was the manna like? Where did it lie? When was the manna on the grass? Who were to
eat it? What became of it in hot sunshine? Would it keep? What was the day when it could
be kept? How much came down the day before the Sabbath? What might not be done on the
Sabbath? When did no manna come?
Chitteenth Sunday.

Balaam and the Wicked King.

*« Thou shalt not curse the people: for they are blessed.”’—MWumbers XXII, 12.





















PALM TREE,



“CHILDREN,” began Aunt Charlotte,

“did you ever want to do something that
your mama said was not right, and did
Vou tease wien tovleh yousdout, Not
I,” said little Anna, “but brother Willie
does.” “Well,” said Auntie, “I'll tell you
a story about one of God's children who
did the same thing.

“There was a prophet called Balaam.
A prophet means a man to whom God
made His will known, and who was thus
much wiser than other men. This prophet
one day saw some rich great men come to
his house. They brought him a message,
that a king named Balak wanted him to

come with them, and would give him great rewards for coming.
Balaam said he must wait for one night, and God would make known

to him what he was to do.

And at night God told him he was not to

go; for what Balak wanted of him was to curse the children of
Israel, and God would not have them cursed. So Balaam said he
must not go, and the messengers went away.

“But Balak sent more princes, still grander men, with larger
presents, to fetch Balaam. He answered, ‘If Balak would give me

86
BALAAM AND THE WICKED KING. 87

his house full of silver and gold, I can not go beyond the word of
the Lord my God, to do less or more.’ But he had not left off wishing.
He begged the messengers to stay, and see if God would give him
leave to go. And this time God did say he might go, but that he
should not say anything about the Israelites but what God put in his
mouth. Balaam knew that God was not pleased with him; but he
wanted Balak’s rewards, and he set off in the morning, riding on his
ass. |
« Presently the ass was frightened, and turned out of the road into
the field. Balaam was angry at this, and beat the ass. But again the
ass turned aside in a narrow walled path, and squeezed Balaam’s foot
against the wall. He beat her again. Presently, in a very narrow
road, the poor ass fell quite down for fear; and Balaam was very
angry, and beat her harder. Then God worked a wonder. He made
the dumb ass to speak, and ask why he was so cruel to her. He
answered that he only wished for a sword to kill her. The ass asked
if she had ever been like this before. He said, No. And then, full
before him, he saw God's holy angel with a sword in his hand. And
he fell down on his face. The poor ass had seen the angel all the
time; but Balaam could not see him till God made him able. And
now he was afraid, and would have gone back; but the angel said he
must go on now, though he would only be able to speak the words
which God put in his mouth. Think if, sometimes when you have
been told you must not do something, you fret and tease to do it—is
not that like Balaam? And perhaps you tease till some one gives
you leave to do as you wish. Then you get quite cross with eagerness,
and are unkind to all that hinders you; and, after all, you do not find
that any good comes of getting your own way.” “That's right. I
guess I’ll quit teasing mother to let me do what she does n’t want me
to after this,” said Willie. “When you do it hereafter we will call you
Balaam,” said Clara, and they all hada hearty laugh.

QUESTIONS.

What is a prophet? Who sent for Balaam? What did God tell Balaam? But what did Balaam
wish todo? How did he get leave to go at last? But whostood in his way? Who saw the angel at


88 BALAK AND BALAAM BROUGHT TO SHAME.

first? What did Balaam do to the ass? What wonder did God work? What did the ass say?
Whom did Balaam see? What did the angel tell him? What had he been allowed to have? Does
good come of having our own way ?

Balak and Balaam Brought to Shame.

«* There shall come a Star out of Jacob, and a Sceptre shall rise out of Israel.’’—Wumbers XXIV, 17.

“What did old Balak want Balaam to curse the Israelites for, Aunt
Charlotte? Balaam would n't have got into that trouble if it hadn't
been for him,” said Willie. “Well,” answered Aunt Charlotte, “Balak
was a king whose land the Israelites were to pass through. They
promised not to do any harm to him or his people, if they might go
quietly through; but he was afraid and angry, and wanted to have
them cursed, hoping to bring God's anger on them. That was a very
wicked and foolish notion of King Baas and God would not let it
bring harm upon His people. They had not deserved to have His anger
called down on them, and so He would not be angry with them. And
when Balak’s friend Balaam tried to speak curses, God turned them all
to blessings; and, instead of saying they should come toa terrible end,
he could only say how happy and well off they should be, with God to
take care of them and be their King. He even went on to say that a
Star should come out of Jacob, and a Sceptre should rise out of Israel
—and that meant that our Saviour should be born among them. He
is called a Star because He came to give us light; and you know a
star showed the way to the place where He was born. And a sceptre
is the staff a king carries in his hand. So when He was called the
Sceptre, it meant that He should be a King.

“Only think how angry Balak was when Balaam could not curse, but
only blessed. I wish he had been afraid, and seen it was not God's
will that he should hurt the Israelites; but instead of that he went on
in his wickedness, and was miserably killed at last; for God took care
of His people, and would let no one do them any harm.

“ Now, recollect, bad words and bad wishes do harm to the person
that speaks them, not to those they are meant for. Ifa bad boy came
and abused a steady one for going to church or saying his prayers, it
BALAAM’S TRICKS AND PUNISHMENT, 89

would be very bad for himself ; but if the goed boy kept on quietly,
nothing that the other could say would hurt him one bit. God would
take care of him as surely as He took care of the Israelites.”

QUESTIONS. :

Why did Balak want the Israelites to be cursed? What did Balaam do instead? Why
could he not curse thém? Who was to be born among the Israelites? What did Balaam call eur
Saviour? Why was He like a star? Why was He like a sceptre? Why could not Balak hurt the
Israelites? Whom do bad words hurt? Ought we to mind them? If any one teases you when yeu
try to be geod, must you quit being good?

Balaam’s Tricks and Punishment.
«
x “Did Balaam get his money from old Balak?”
asked Willie. “And did he beat his poor little
donkey any more?” asked little Anna. “Did not -
; his experiences turn him into a good man?” asked
i Clara. “No,” said Aunt Charlotte; “not even this
made Balaam good. He wanted Balak to give him
a reward; and so he told him that though no harm
could happen to the people of Israel while they were
good and worshiped their God, yet if he could make
them do something wicked, and turn away from their God, then God
would be sure to punish them. .

“So these two wicked men sent a number of women to invite the
Israelites to hold a great feast with them, in honor of their idol Baal
Peor. Many were so foolish and wicked as to be led away; and they

hada great feasting and reveling, and all kinds of bad pleasures that
these heathen women said were to do praise to this horrible false god.
Then, though Balak might have cursed forever without hurting them,
they had done themselves the harm. God sent a deadly sickness, and
in one day twenty-four thousand people died.

“But Phinehas, Aaron’s grandson, did as Moses commanded him.
He first put to death the wickedest of the people who had joined them-

6 )



BAAL.


90 BALAAM’S TRICKS AND PUNISHMENT.

selves to Baal Peor; and then he prayed, and all the people prayed
and wept too. So God forgave them, and the plague ceased.
_ “Afterward Phinehas led the Israelite fighting men to punish the
wicked Balak and his people; and Balaam was killed in fighting with
them. All the wicked women who had tempted the Israelites away
from God were put to death too. So Balaam’s evil counsel ended in
all sorts of misery. Itis very sad to think of him, for he knew so well
what was good, and yet did what was so very bad. But remember
this : nobody could hurt God’s people till they did wrong, and then they
hurt themselves, and God punished them.” ;

“And wasn’t Balaam bad, though? Brother, you mustn't be like
him,” said little Anna, shaking her finger and looking sad.

QUESTIONS.

What did Balaam think would be the way to hurt the children of Israel? Whom did he send
to them? Whom did the women persuade them to worship? What did God send to punish them ?
_ How was the plague stopped? How was Balaam punished? Why was Balaam greatly to be blamed?
What became of Balaam? Who took care of the Israelites when they were good?



I ee ee ele ete ae ee


Fourteenth Sunday.

God Speaks to Moses.

“ Thou heardest His words out of the midst of the fire.’”’—Dewd. Iv, 36.

“WHAT would you think, Willie,
if you should hear some one speak-
ing to you from the clouds?” “It
would be fun,” said Willie. —“I
would be afraid,” said little Anna.
“So would Willie, if he should hear.
it as Moses heard it. I will tell you
about it.

“When the children of Israel had
come out of Egypt, God had told
Moses to lead them to the foot of
Mount Sinai. This was a high,
steep, rocky mountain in the wilder-
ness. And God told Moses to set
bounds round the mountain, so that nobody should come and touch it;
and the people were to pray, and wait round it for the holy and awful
thing that was to happen. Then there came on the hill-top a deep
dark cloud, ‘and the mountain was altogether on a smoke,’ and it
shook and quaked, and there were lightnings and thunders and voices,
and the sound of a trumpet loud and louder, so that all the people
trembled. Then out of that cloud there came a voice speaking to
them—a voice that they all could hear, and that made them afraid.
For it was the voice of God. And God spoke out of thecloud, and gave
qi



MounrT SINAI.
92 MORE ABOUT MOSES ON THE MOUNTAIN.

the Ten Commandments. They were the very same Ten Command-
ments you see in the Bible. God had come in this terrible and awful
manner to speak them, that all Israel might hear and fear, and take
care not to break them. Afterward God gave these Ten Command-
ments to Moses, written upon two tables, or pieces of stone—written
by God Himself. That was the way the Ten Commandments were
given—by God’s own voice speaking to men out of the cloud, amid
thunders and lightnings and the sound of the trumpet, dreadful to
hear. And God means us all to obey
the Commandments, just as much as
He meant the Israelites to obey them.
They are His words, and must be
kept; and if we ask Him in our
prayers He will give us help and
‘strength to obey them, so that we may
fulfil the promise that was made at our
baptism, that we should keep God’s
holy will and Commandments, and
walk in the same unto our lives’ ends.”
“T would have been frightened if I had been there with Moses,” said
Willie. “But Moses knew God was his friend and was not afraid,”
answered Clara. “ Right again, my girl,” rejoined Aunt Charlotte.









THE ERECTION OF THE TABERNACLE.

QUESTIONS.

Where had the children of Israel come from? Who was leading them? Where did God tell
Moses to take them? . What wonderful sight did they see on Mount Sinai? What did they hear ?
Who spoke out of the cloud? How many Commandments did God speak? On what did God
write them? ‘To whom did He give them? Why must they be kept?

More About Moses on the Mountain.

“The Lord talked with you face to face in the mount out of the midst of the fire.’—Deuz, v, 4. _

“Did Moses talk to God, Auntie?” asked Clara. “Yes,” answered
Aunt Charlotte; “the Bible tells us that when the lightning and
thunder and the loud voice of the trumpet came forth from the cloud
on Mount Sinai, and God had spoken the Ten Commandments, He
MORE ABOUT M@SES ON THE MOUNTAIN. 93

called to Moses to come up and speak with Him in the cloud. How
wonderful it must have been! Moses was the only man that ever
spoke so near to God.

« And, as I said before, God gave him two blocks of stone written
with the Ten Commandments—written with God’s own finger. Then
God told him to make a chest to keep them in. It was to be made of











































































































\ \\







































































































AN

XN

















nN

SY

\























HIGH PRIEST IN THE HOLY OF HOLIES.

wood, with gold all over it; and two figures of cherubims were to be
one on each side. This chest was to be called the Ark of the Cove-
nant. And it was to be put into a square room, inside a tent, that was

to be made with curtains, and carried about with the Israelites. It

was to be called the Tabernacle. And this was to be a very holy
place. The children of Israel would say their prayers in front of the

Tabernacle; but they were not to go into the place where the Ark
94. MOSES’ LONG STAY ON THE MOUNTAIN.

was, because they were sinful, and God is holy. That place was to be
called the Holy of Holies,and no one might go near it but the priests
whom God chose and set apart to lead His worship. The first high
priest, as I have told you, was to be Moses’ brother Aaron; and he
was to wear a beautiful dress when he ministered before God—a high
cap with “Holiness to the Lord” on it,a long embroidered robe,
edged with gold bells and pomegranates, and a blue scarf crossed.
over his breast; and in the middle a breast-plate, made of twelve
precious stones, each carved with the name of one of the twelve tribes
of Israel, so that he might have them on his heart as he prayed to
God. All this and much more God told Moses while he was on the
mount. =
QUESTIONS.

What was given on Mount Sinai? Who spoke the Commandments? What were they written
on? Where were they to be kept? What was the chest called? Where was Moses to put the
chest? What was the room called? Who might go near the Holy of Holies? Who was the first
high priest? Who was Aaron? What was Aaron to wear? Why might not the people come
near P fe i

Moses’ Long Stay on the Mountain.
«¢ Know therefore that the Lord thy God, He is God.’’—Deus. vu, 9.

“T expect Moses was very glad to get away quick from that place
when he got done talking with God,” said Willie. “ Not at all,”
answered Aunt Charlotte; “wher Moses went up into the awful cloud .
upon Mount Sinai, he stayed there forty days.

“But all the Israelites below were impatient. They could not think
what had become of Moses; and though they had so lately heard
God’s own voice speaking to them, they would not wait, as they had
been told to do. They cried out that they wanted something instead
of Moses, whom they had lost. So they took all their gold ear-rings
and melted them, and made an image of a golden calf. And then
these foolish, wicked people began to feast and dance, and worship this
golden idol.

“Moses was coming down Mount Sinai with the two Tables of the

Commandments in his hands. And first he heard a shouting and


4

MOSES’ LONG STAY ON THE MOUNTAIN. — 95

singing; then he saw the people leaping and dancing, and the great
golden idol standing in the midst. Then he was sure it was of no use
to bring them the Commandments if they minded them no better. So
he took the two tables of stone and threw them out of his hand, and
broke them to pieces. :

“Then he went down and severely punished the worst of the
Israelites for having disobeyed the Commandments. And he broke
the golden calf to pieces, and ground it to powder.” ;

“Who got the gold pieces of the calf?” said Willie. “And-then
‘they did not have any more ear-rings, and they did not have any more
tables of stone written by God, did they?” said little Anna. “Yes,”
dear; they had the Tables of the Law. I'll tell you next Sunday how
they got new tables of stone with the laws on them.”

QUESTIONS.

Where had Moses gone? What was God going to give him? Who were left below? What
did the Israelites want ? What did they take off? What did they make of theirear-rings? What
’ did Moses do to the Tables of the Law? Why did he throw them down? What did he do with
the golden calf? ee



THE TABERNACLE RESTORED.
Fifteenth Sunday,



Howe Nise ois. Gan

**T prayed therefore unto the Lord, an

inheritance.”’—Deut. 1x, 26.

THE GIVING oF THE COMMANDMENTS,



d said, O Lord God, destroy not Thy people and Thine

“LAST Sunday you heard how

_ Sadly the people of Israel sinned by

making the golden calf, while Moses
was up in the mountain, and how he
punished them and broke the tables of
stone.

“Then he said he would go and
pray to God to forgive them, and try
them again. So up he went, over the
rough rocks of Mount Sinai, and into
the cloud again, where he had spoken
with God before. And he prayed with
all his might that God would not cast
off His people, though they had been
so wicked, but would give them again
the Commandments on their tables of
stone. And God listened to Moses,
and promised to give them the Com-
mandments again. Then Moses made

‘a great request: he said to God, «I pray Thee, show me Thy glory.’
But God said, ‘Thou canst not see My face, for there shall no man see
Me and live’ But Moses was to come up the mountain the next day,

96 |
TWO DANGEROUS IDOLS. 97

and bring with him two blocks of stone, and then God would let him
see as much of His glory as he could bear.

“On the next day Moses went up the mountain again, and took with
him the two tables of stone. And the Lord came down in the cloud;
and Moses was in the cleft of the rock, where he could see a small
part of the glory, and hear the Lord’s voice proclaim before him, ‘ The
Lord, the Lord God, merciful and gracious, long-suffering, and abun-
dant in goodness and truth.” Then indeed Moses bowed his head
and worshiped. No man ever came so close to God as Moses, with
whom God spoke face to face, as a man speaketh to his friend.

“Moses stayed forty days and forty nights up in the mountain again
this time. And God again wrote the Commandments upon the two
tables of stone, and allowed the Israelites to try again to keep them.
When Moses came down from being in converse with God, the glory
was still about his face. It was all shining like the sun, and was so
bright that the Israelites could not fix their eyes on it; and he was
obliged to put a veil over his face, because they could not bear to
look at it. Was ever living man so favored, and brought into such
glory?”

QUESTIONS.

Where did Moses go to pray for the forgiveness of the Israelites? What did Moses venture to
ask God to show him? But what can no one do? Where was Moses placed? What passed by?
What voice did he hear? How was Moses more honored than any man? How long did he stay
in the mountain? What did God give him again? How did his face look when he came down?
What did he do to hide his face? How came his face to be so glorious?

Two Dangerous Idols.
*¢ Ve shall walk after the Lord your God, and fear Him.’ —Dew?. X11, 4.

( “Did the children of Israel worship any more golden calves, Auntie?”
asked Willie. “No; but they were in great danger of worshiping
other idols just as bad. I will tell you of them.

“God wanted the Israelites, when they should come into the good
land where they were going, to be very careful not to learn to worship
idols. For idols were no gods at all, only wood and stone, and
could not hear them pray, nor give them what they wanted. Besides,
98

TWO DANGEROUS IDOLS.

the people round them had very frightful ways of trying to please

MoLocH.





their false gods. They had one
called Moloch, made of brass, and
they used to offer poor little children
up in sacrifice to him, and make a
noise with drums and trumpets, that
no one might hear their cries. There
was another god called Baal, to whom
they set up great images, and feasted
in his honor;-and a goddess, whom
they called the queen of heaven. or
Ashtoreth, Women used to offer
cakes to her, and dance in honor of
her, for they thought she sent the

“Now, the Israelites were not to
worship any of these false gods.
They were to remember how they
heard the only true God speaking to
them out of the cloud upon the
mountain, and telling them, ‘I am
the Lord thy God; thou shalt have
no other gods but Me.” And God
told them that if they would worship
Him and serve Him all should go
well with them, and they should be
happy and blessed. But if they
went after these false idols, all would
go ill with them, and there would be
only sorrow and misery. You see,
God was preparing the children of
Israel against the danger of bad com-
pany. We are almost sure to do
like those we associate with. That



moon to shine on them.



be mec Yh tS
By iy \ <2,
(Ris? =e CLE Gb)

ASHTORETH, THE PHILIsTINE GODDESS.

_ is the reason God gave them a commandment to worship Him only.”


THE FALSE SPIES AND DISOBEDIENT PEOPLE. 99

QUESTIONS.
What three idols did the people of the country worship? What did they do in honor of

Moloch? What did they do in honor of Baal? What did they call Ashtoreth? What did they -

think she sent them ? Who made the moon? What would happen if the children of Israel wor-
shiped God? What would happen if they worshiped idols? Say the First Commandment. Say
the Second. - 3

The False Spies and Disobedient People.

“It is a people that do err in their heart, and they have not known My ways.’’—Psalm XCV, 10.

“ Did they all soon get into the promised land and throw away old
Moloch and Baal and all the idols and worship God ?” asked little
Anna. “Not for a long, long time,” said Auntie.

«“ After the Commandments were given the Israelites went along .

very nicely on their journey. The Ark, or chest where the Command-
ments on their two tables of stone were kept, was carried before them ;
and God still showed that He was with them, for He madea pillar of
cloud by day and of fire by night go along with them, and rest on
it, After a few weeks, when they came near the land of Canaan,
twelve men were sent on to see it. They came back, bringing such a
great bunch of grapes that two had to carry it between them on a pole!
But ten of the men said that the land was full of strong cities and very
strong men, and they should never be able to win it, but would all be
killed. Only two good men, Joshua and Caleb, recollected that there
could be no fear, for God had promised to save them and bring them
in. But the people sided with the others, and all cried and said that
they would go back to Egypt, and threw stones at Moses and Aaron
when they wanted to quiet them.

“Then God showed His glory, and would have cut them all off ina
moment if Moses had not prayed for them. But He said none of those
who had said they would not go into the good land should go. They
were to stay forty years longer in the dismal wilderness, till all the
grown-up men, except Joshua and Caleb, should be dead, and their
children be grown up in their stead. Then their children, who had

so SS Saat Se ds SLES Fe eke Se fant




roo THE FALSE SPIES AND DISOBEDIENT EEORLE.

learned to trust God and do as He bade, should be the ones to go in
and live in the promised land.”

“That was a terrible punishment for disobedience,” said Clara.
“Yes,” answered Aunt Charlotte; “but it is much worse for us than
it was for them if we do not follow God’s commands. They lost an
earthly home, where they could live but a short time. We lose an
everlasting home in heaven.”

QUESTIONS.

How did the Israelites know which way to go in the wilderness? What was in the Ark? Whom
did Moses send to look at the land? What did these men bring back? But what did they say of the
country? Who were afraid? Why was it wrong to be afraid? Who only were not afraid? What
. were the people ready to do? How were they to be punished? How long were they to stay in the
wilderness? Who would die? Who would grow up to go in? Who were the two good brave
men? What was promised to Joshua and Caleb ?



FREES —
= FSS

CARRYING THE GRAPES ON A POLE.




Sixteenth Sunday.

God's Anger at Moses.

‘They angered Him also at the waters of strife.’’—Psalm Cvi, 32.

“BUT good Moses went into the happy
land, didn’t he, Auntie?” said Anna. “ No,’
said Aunt Charlotte, “and Ill tell you why
he could not...

“ After all the forty years in the wilderness
the children of Israel were quite close to

There was only the river Jordan between
them and the hills and valleys there. But
spueie ves oy s Moses was not to go with them. Once, you
remember, Anna, when the people were crying out for more water in
the wilderness, and God told Moses to command the stream to come
out of the rock, Moses was so hot with anger that he did not attend
carefully to what God commanded. He said, ‘Hear now, ye rebels;
must we fetch you water out of this rock?’ And he struck the rock
with his rod, instead of speaking to it. The water came out, as it
had done before; but Moses had been so hasty that he had not
thought how to obey God exactly, and so he was not to be allowed to
lead the people in as a great warrior, lest he should fail again. God
was not angry with him, but had forgiven him; only he had his
punishment because he had done wrong.
“Joshua, the good, true spy you heard about in the last lesson, was
to lead the people instead of Moses. So before Moses was taken away
Iol



their home in the promised land again. |
102 MOSES DEATH AND BURIAL.

he called Joshua and all the chief men of each tribe and put them in
mind ofall that God had done for them, and warned them very solemnly
that if they broke their promise and did not keep the Commandments,
God would punish them—first a little, and then more and more, and
would even cast them out of the good landatlast. F or, remember, God
always keeps his promises; and as surely as He gives the good all that
is best for them, so surely will He punish those who turn from Him.”

“ Poor Moses, I’m sosorry for him; he had been bad just only once,
ind the Lord ought to have let him off,” said Anna. “But,” answered
Aunt Charlotte, “one sin is enough to destroy us. It is terrible to
disobey God.” |

. QUESTIONS.
Where were the Israelites now? How long had their journey lasted ? What lay between them

and the land of Canaan? Who had led them? But what displeasing thing had Moses done ?
What could he not do now? Who was to lead them in ? What did Moses tell the Israelites they
must be careful todo? What had they promised to keep? What would happen if they broke the
promise? What would happen if they kept the promise? What promises have we made?

Moses’ Death and Burial.

**So Moses the servant of the Lord died.”’—Deut. XXXIV, 5,

“I’ve been thinking about Moses, Auntie, ever since this morning,
and trying to see why God did not forgive him, and let him lead the
children of Israel into the promised land,” said Clara.

“Did God kill him right off?” asked Willie. « No,” answered
Aunt Charlotte; “God did forgive him ; but He had to teach the children
of Israel that they must obey Him, and He took Moses for an example.
Besides, Moses was to have his rest above instead of in the land of
promise. But first God told him that he might see the land. So he
went up into a very high hill: and there God made him able to see all
the home of his people—the snowy hill of Hermon, and Mount
Lebanon where the cedar trees grow, and the hills and valleys where
Abraham had wandered and Isaac and Jacob had lived, and which he
had hoped for all his life; and green fields, and corn-fields, and -
vineyards, on to the great blue sea stretching out to the westward.


JOSHUA MADE CAPTAIN. 103
‘That was where his people were to live; but there was.a better home
for Moses. Nobody saw him any more after he went up into the
mountain. There he died,
and the Lord buried him,
and no one knows of his
grave. The children of
Israel wept and mourned
for him many days, expect-
ing him to return.”

« After all,” said Clara
“he was greatly honored
in God’s burying him.
Did God ever bury any
one else?” “No,” said
Aunt Charlotte.

















































QUESTIONS.

But what did God allow Moses te
see? Where was he to go? What
did God show him there?. What
kind of place was it? Where had he

THE EMBLEMS ON THE STANDARDS OF THE TRIBES. brought the people from? Who was

: to lead them in? What was to happen

to Moses? Did any one ever see him again? What does no one know? Why do we think

so much of Moses? Where did he speak with God? Was he not the greatest man we have yet
heard about ?



Joshua Made Captain,
‘* Be strong and of a good courage.’ ’— Joshua i, 6.

“Did fie children of Israel find out Moses was dead ?” asked Clara,
“Yes,” answered Aunt Charlotte; “after Moses had gone out of sight
on the mountain God Himself told Joshua that Moses was dead, and
that he must lead the children of Israel into the good land God had
promised them. Moses had laid his hands on Joshua’s head,and God’s
Holy Spirit had come to help him to see what was right and to lead
the people. He must be strong and brave, and do all that God com-
104 JOSHUA MADE CAPTAIN.

manded, and then he would be quite sure to be able to drive away all
the strange people out of the land, and make ahome for the people in
the land that Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob had loved so well. .

“All the people promised they would do as Joshua bade them. So
_he was their captain instead of Moses.”

“Did he take them right in to the promised land?” asked Willie, |
“JT hope they did not turn back again.” .

“TJ will tell you about that in our next lesson,” said Aunt Charlotte -
with a smile, and then she asked the following—

QUESTIONS.

Who was the old leader of the children of Israel? Where had Moses led them from? Where
were they going? What became of Moseson the mountain? Whomdid God make saptain instead
of Moses? What did God tell Joshua? What did God promise him? What is the way to be
helped by God? What were the Israelites to be helped to do? Who were to be driven away?
Why did the children of Israel wish to live in the land of Canaan? What did all the people
promise?




Seventeenth Sunday.

Crossing Over Jordan.
Ye go over Jordan, and dwell in the land which the Lord your God giveth you.” —Deu#. Xu, 10.

“NOW,” said Willie, as they
all gathered around Aunt Char-
lotte the seventeenth Sunday
morning in the year, “we are
going to hear about Joshua lead-
ing the Israelites into Canaan.”

“Ves,” said Clara, “but there
was a difficulty in the way,
brother. There was a river to
cross. How do you suppose
they got over that?”

“In a ferry-boat,” answered Willie promptly.

“Why, brother, there were more than a million of them,” laughed
Clara, “and they did not have a single ferry-boat.”

“TJ know,” said little Anna; “they went over on the bridge.”

Aunt Charlotte smiled and began. “I will explain it to you, my
dears. After the children of Israel had been forty years living in the
wilderness, God led them into the beautiful land He had promised
them. But before they could come in they had, as Clara said, to get
across a river—a deep river, with rocks on each side and a stony
bottom to it, and the water running very fast indeed. The name of
the river was Jordan. There was ne bridge to go over, and no boat to

7 10K



— —S=S=





BEARING THE ARK OVER JORDAN.




106 CROSSING OVER JORDAN.

row them across; and not only all the strong men, but all the women
and little children had to get over it]

“But nobody need be afraid when God is helping him. God told
them what to do. The priests, who were like clergymen to them,
were to take the ark—that is, the chest where the two tables of the
Ten Commandments were kept—and were to walk down into the
river, without being afraid. And they were brave men; they believed





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE RIVER JORDAN.

what God told them, and went down into the swift stream in no
fear of being drowned. And behold! as soon as their feet touched the
water it stopped flowing and stood still: No more water came down,
and all the hosts of the children of Israel went straight over the bottom
of the river with dry feet. The priests stood up in the middle all the
time the others were going over, and when every one was safe on the
other side they came after them; and by and by the river came rush-
THE WALLS OF JERICHO FALL DOWN. 107

ing down again in its own place, for it was God who had commanded
it to stop short and make a dry place for His people to pass over.
And so they came into the land of Canaan that He had promised them
so long.”

“Why, that was like the Red Sea did, wasn’t it?” said little Anna.
“Ves,” answered Auntie, with an approving nod of thehead. “Iam
glad you remember so well.”

“Did any more waters divide for them?” asked Willie. “Yes,”
answered Aunt Charlotte, ‘read the second chapter of the second
book of Kings, and you will find that the prophets Elyah and Elisha
both divided the waters of Jordan on the day Elijah ascended to
heaven.

“And now that we have the children of Israel out of the wilderness
into the promised land, I will ask you a few questions not in our
lesson to see how well you remember the principal things that hap-

pened.”
QUESTIONS.

How long did the children of Israel stay in the wilderness? Where were they going? What
had they to eat? What had they to drink? What had God given them on Mount Sinai? What
were the Ten Commandments written on? Where were the two stones put? Who carried this ark ?
What had the Israelites to go over? What was the name of the river? How do we cross rivers?
But had they a bridge or a boat? Who was taking care of them ? ' What did God tell the priests
to do? Were the priests afraid to go into the river? Why not? What happened when the
priests’ feet touched the water? Who made the water stop running? Who went over? Where
did they come to? Who had promised them the land?

The Walls of Jericho Fall Down.
“¢ By faith the walls of Jericho fell down.’’—HHebrews X1, 30.

“Well, that was very strange about that river dividing and letting
the people walk over,” said Willie.

“Ves, Wouldn’t it have been fun, brother, if we could have seen
all those little boys and girls walking in the deep place, and the big
wall of water standing back ’cause God wouldn’t let it run on them?”
said little Anna.

“T will tell you about something else just as strange to-day,” said
Aunt Charlotte.
108 THE WALLS OF JERICHO FALL DOWN.

“ After the Israelites had come into the land of Canaan there was a
strong walled city before them, and its name was Jericho. They could
not go any further till they had taken the city. But God was going
to show that He fought for them. So He told them not to fight, but
that every day for a whole week the priests should take the Ark of the
Covenant on their shoulders and walk round the outside of the walls
of the town. Seven priests were to go in front, blowing on trumpets
made of rams’ horns; but nobody else was to make any noise. So
they did one day, and nothing happened. Joshua bade them do it the
next day. Perhaps some of the
Israelites wondered and were impa-
tient, but they had to go on the next
day still; and after that the Ark was
carried round once every day for a
whole week.

“On the seventh day Joshua told
the priests that God would have them
go round not once but seven times.
And so they did; and then, at last,
on the seventh day, Joshua said,
Sioutlie sien alle orsiie speCpic
shouted, and the priests blew their
trumpets, and then—oh, great wonder!
—the walls of Jericho fell down flat,
and the people went in and took the
city. So the Lord fought for Israel.”

Willie whistled right out with astonishment, and said he would
rather have seen that than the crossing of the Jordan or the Red Sea.



BLOWING OF TRUMPET MADE OF RAm’s Fiorn.

QUESTIONS.

Where were the Israelites now? Whowastheir leader? What city were they come to? What
did they want todo? Were they to fight? But what was to be carried round? What was the
Ark? What wasin it? Who carried the Ark? Who went in front of them? How many days
did they go on? How many times did they carry the Ark round at first? How often on the
seventh day? What were the priests to do? What were the people to do? What happened then?
Who had conquered Jericho?


JOSHUA S VICTORIES AND DEATH. 109

Joshua’s Victories and Death.

«¢ As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.’’—/oshua xxiv, 15.

“ Aunt Charlotte,” began Willie, “did they go to other cities and
blow their rams’ horns and make the walls fall down?” “No,”
answered Aunt Charlotte, “God only helped them this way in their
first battle, to show them that He could make them conquer their
enemies with anything; even the blowing of horns would win them
victory if God told them to use them. They must always do just as
He said; then they would always be successful. And the lesson for
us is that in fighting
sin and temptation
we must do as God
tells us and we will
always be victori-
ous.

“After the victory
over Jericho God
gave the children
of Israel more vic-
tories. None of
the heathen people
could stand before them. They took their towns, and drove the
“heathen out, and had the fields and gardens and houses for their own.
Then Joshua was to divide the land among them, and fix what cities
each tribe should have for its own.

« All the chief men of each tribe came to him, and the Lord taught
him how to fix the places for them to dwell in. The children of the
good Joseph had the very best lot of all, as his father Jacob had wished.

It was just in the middle of the country, and was full of beautiful corn
land. Two tribes and a half lived on the other side of the river Jor-
dan, on the edge of the desert, but where there was fine grass for their
cattle. And the tribe of Judah had a very hilly, rocky part of the
country; but they loved it, because it was where Abraham had lived



FRUIT OF PALESTINE.
110 JOSHUA'S VICTORIES AND DEATH.

and now lay buried. And all up the hills they planted vines, where
fine large grapes grew, and in the valleys were plenty of corn-fields.
All over the country people had each man his own house, with his
vine and his fig-tree to shelter it, and olive trees in his garden, anda
field to grow corn in, and hillsides near, where he might keep his
cows, goats and sheep. And the rocks and the hollow trees were full
of wild bees’ nests; so that indeed they found it, as Moses had told
them, a land of corn and wine—a land that flowed with milk and
honey; and they were very glad to be there, and to rest after their
long wandering in the wilderness.

“After they had hada quiet rest their first sorrow came. It was that
their brave leader Joshua had grown old, and felt himself near his
death. So he called all the chief men together, and told them over
again how much God had done for them; and that if they would serve
Him and keep His Commandments all would go well with them.
‘As for me and my house,’ he said, ‘we will serve the Lord.’ And all
the people promised, too. They said they would serve the Lord, and
would not go after other gods, but would keep His Commandments.
And after that good old Joshua died.”

“Then what did they do without him?” asked little Anna. ‘Did
they be good, like Joshua told them?”

“No,” answered Auntie, ‘and I’ll tell you, in the next lesson,

what they did.”
QUESTIONS.

Where were the children of Israel now? Who had promised the land to them? Whom did
they drive out? How was it settled where they were to live? Who had the best part? What had
Joseph done that was good? Who went beyond the Jordan? What part did Judah have? What
grows there? What choice plants grew in the land? What sort of place had they been told it
would be? Who was grown old? What did Joshua tell the Israelites? What was the way for them
to be happy?
Eighteenth Sunday.

Worshiping Idols Again.
*¢ The journey that thou takest shall not be for thine honor.’’—/uages Iv, 9.

“NOW tell us what badness they
did,” began Anna. “I wish they had
been good.”

“T should have thought they
would have been good after all God
had done,” said Clara.

“Ves,” rejoined Aunt Charlotte,
“but do you know they were like
many Christians are now, who forget
their promises to God; and trouble
is sure to come whenever a Christian
does this. Certainly, when the
Israelites had come to live in the beautiful land that God had
promised them, they ought to have loved and served Him, and
thanked Him for all His goodness. But, no! They liked worshiping
false gods; and they made idols to pray to, cut out of wood and stone,
and they learnt wicked ways.

“Then God was angry with them; and He punished them by send-
ing cruel nations to conquer them, to burn their houses, to steal their
children, and drive away their cattle. Then they would be sorry, and
pray to God again; and He had pity, and sent some brave man to
defend them. To-day we hear how sadly they were used by a fierce

man named Sisera, who had nine hundred war chariots of iron to go
IIt



HEBREW IDOLS.












Teli? TWO VERY BRAVE WOMEN.

into battle with. His people used to shoot at the Israelites at the
wells when they came to draw water; and nobody dared to go along
the high-roads, but only through the paths, for fear of being killed.”
“Served ’em right for going back on their promises,” said Willie.
“Yes, brother,” answered Clara, “and we must remember if we dis-
obey God we are sure to be punished.”
“Right again, my child,” said Aunt Cina ott ; “all this Old Testa-
ment hee, has its lessons for us now.”

QUESTIONS.

How ought the Israelites to have behaved? What had God given them? Whom should they
have worshiped? But what did they worship? How did God punish them? What was the name
of the cruel man who ill-used them? How many chariots had Sisera ?

Two Very Brave Women.
** The Lord shall sell Sisera into the hand of a woman.’’—/uages IV, 9.

Did sold soiscnauncvich Cict
whipped ?” asked Willie.

“Ves.” answered Aunt Char-
lotte.

“What brave general whipped
y eS him ?” asked Clara.

iran Deere j “T will tell you how it came

about,” began Aunt Charlotte.

« At last God spake to a good brave woman named Deborah, and told

her to send for a man named Barak, who should lead the Israelites

to fight with Sisera. She sent for Barak, and told him what God had

said. But Barak was afraid to go alone. He said he must have

Deborah with him. He ought to have known that, if God sent him,
he was sure to be safe and to succeed.

“Deborah told him that since he wished it she would go with him,
but that the journey should not be to his honor, for the Lord would
sell Sisera into the hand of a woman. And it turned out as Deborah
said. Barak won a great battle and drove the enemies away, so that
























GIDEON’S WONDERFUL BATTLE. 113

they did not hurt the children of Israel again for forty years. But he
did not mect with Sisera in the battle, nor get the honor of killing
him. Sisera fled out of the battle, and was killed after all by a
woman, whose name was Jael. Barak lost all the honor, because he
would not do just as he was told, but was afraid without Deborah,
just as if God could not help him better than Deborah could.

“ Now let us turn to the fifth chapter of Judges and read the beauti-
ful song that Deborah made to thank God for having given her the ~
victory that saved His people.”

Aunt Charlotte turned and read the song, and the children listened
attentively.

QUESTIONS.

What was the name of the brave woman who went to Barak? What was Barak todo? Who
did Barak say must come with him? Why was this wrong of Barak? What happened in the fight?
Did Barak kill Sisera? Who did kill Sisera? Why was not Barak allowed to kill Sisera? Whom
ought he to have trusted to? Who will always help us if we are not afraid to do as we are told?

Gideon’s Wonderful Battle.

«They chose new gods; then was war in the gates.’’—/udges V, 8.
y gods ; § 8

“Now they had conquered their great enemy, the children of Israel
settled down to be good and happy, didn’t they, Aunt Charlotte ?”
asked Clara. _

“J wish I could say yes, my child,” said Aunt, “ for I know you wish
they had done so. But the truth is,as I have told you, Christians
often now do wrong and get punished for it, and then God helps them
out, and just so it was with the Jews. The Israelites never kept long
from sinning and setting up idols; and, by and by, God let a set of
robbers, called Midianites, come in and burn their crops and houses,
drive away their cattle, and steal their children for slaves.

“Then the Israelites were sorry, and prayed to God to save them.
And God had pity on them, and sent His angel to a man named
Gideon, to tell him that he was to fight for the Israelites.

“A great many men came to Gideon; but the Israelites were to be
shown that it was as easy for God to save them with few men as with


114 GIDEON’S WONDERFUL BATILE.

many. So'He bade Gideon send home all but three hundred men. And
Gideon believed, and sent them home, and kept only the three hundred.
“Then at night he took these men, and gave them each a trumpet,
and an earthern pitcher, with a lamp inside the pitcher, so that the
light could net be seen. He took a hundred with him, and sent the
other two hundreds another way, creeping quietly along till they came
to the place where the Midianites had set up their tents and were all
lying asleep among the cattle they had stolen. There they lay, and
never heard Gideon and his men coming till they were close to the
camp, the three parties on three sides. Then, all of a sudden, every
one of the Israelites broke his pitcher and let his lamp shine, and blew
his trumpet, and shouted, ‘The
sword of the Lord and of Gideon!’
“The Midianites were awakened
out of their sleep to see the lamps
on three sides of them in the dark,
and to hear the trumpets ana
the cries. They were very much
frightened, and quite wild with fear.
They all began to beat down one
another, for they did not know
friends from enemies. A great
many were killed, and the rest fled away, leaving all that they had
stolen behind them. And so God delivered the Israelites from the
Midianites by the hand of Gideon, and gave them peace again.”































































































































ANCIENT WAR-ENGINE.

QUESTIONS.

What made the Israelites meet with troubles? Whom ought they to have worshiped? But
whom did they worship? What happened then? Who were the next people that ill-used them ?
What did they do when they were punished? Whom did God send to save them? How many
men was Gideon to have with him? What did all the men carry? Where did they go? Into
how many parties were they divided? What did the Midianites hear? What did they see? What
did they begin to do? What became of those that were not killed?
fineteenth Sunoday.

Little Samuel.
¢¢ Samuel ministered before the Lord, being a child.’”"—1 Sam. u, 18.

« AUNTIE, was n't there any little
boys and girls then? Please tell us
about some children. I don’t like
so much about wars,” pleaded little
Anna, as they gathered. on Sunday
morning.

“All right, little curly locks,” said
Aunt Charlotte, with a pat on the
head. “I will tell you this morning
about a splendid little fellow.

“There was a very good woman,
named Hannah, and she grieved
because she had no children.
Whenever she came with her hus-
band to God’s holy place, she used
to kneel, and pray with all her heart
to God that He would let her have a
son; and she promised that if she had one she would lend him to-
the Lord all the days of his life. At last God granted her prayer and
gave her a little son, and she named him Samuel. She was very glad
when he was born, and she thanked God and sang a hymn of praise
for her dear little child. But she had promised to lend him to the
Lord all his life; and she kept her promise. As soon as little

115



¢ SPEAK, LoRD; FoR THY SERVANT HEARETH.”
AD

116 LITTLE SAMUEL.

Samuel was old enough to be without her, she took him to the holy
place, that was instead of a church, and gave him to wait upon the
Lord. He lived with the high priest, whose name was Eli, and was
taught by him.

“Eli was a very old man, and his sons used to behave very badly;
but Samuel was always good and obedient to him, and used to wait
upon him, and help him when he served God in the holy place.
Samuel wore a little white linen dress, like the priests; and when his
mother came to see him she used to bring him alittle coat. She had
five more children afterward, three sons and two daughters. J am
sure you like to think of the little child in his white dress, ministering
before God in His beautiful holy place. But only think! You can be
like Samuel. Though you live at home, you go to church, and can
serve God there, if you kneel and stand and sit quietly at the proper
times, and try to do good to others. And if you are obedient God
will love you as He loved Samuel.”

“JT like little Samuel the best of all,’ said Anna. “Is that all about
him ?”

“No,” said Auntie, “and I will tell you how God spoke to little
Samuel. Then I have a surprise for you. I have arranged for us to
go to the village to Sunday-school so long as the weather is fine.
This is May, and hereafter while we like it we will have only one talk
each Sunday, and that in the morning.”

“Oh!” said Anna, clapping her hands, “T'll be so glad. But now,
before we stop, we are going to hear about God talking to Samuel.”

“Yes,” began Aunt Charlotte. “Samuel was very good and holy,
and God blessed him and loved him. One night, when every one
was gone to bed, but the lamp in the holy place was not yet gone out,
Samuel heard a voice calling to him, ‘Samuel!’ He sprang up at once,
for he thought that Eli had called him, and he ran to Eli and said,
‘Here [ am, for thou didst call me. But Eli answered, ‘I called not,
my son; lie down again’; and Samuel went back to his bed.

“Then again came the voice calling to him, ‘Samuel!’ and againhe
thought it was Eli’s call. He was not lazy or fretful at being roused
out of his sleep, but he ran at once to Eli, and again said, ‘Here I am,


















































































































































































































































mn

|

:

i

|
i



i







ug

SAMUEL AND HIS MOTHER.
118 LITTLE SAMUEL.

for thou didst call me.’ But Eli sent him back to his bed again; and
there again he heard the call, ‘Samuel!’

“Patiently he once more rose and came to the old man, but this time
Eli knew that it must have been no other than God’s own voice speak-
ing to the child. So he bade Samuel go back, and next time he heard
the voice to say, ‘Speak, Lord; for Thy servant heareth.’

“And so Samuel did. Again his name was called, and he made ©
answer, ‘Speak; for Thy servant heareth.’

«And God spoke to him in the still night, and told him to give Eli

a fresh warning of the sad things that were coming on him and on his
sons. Samuel was forced to tell Eli all in the morning, sad and
mournful as it was. He was afraid and grieved to have such things
to say, but he told the truth, and Eli was too good a man to be angry
with him, and only said, ‘It is the Lord; let Him do what seemeth
_ Him good.’
« And, after that, God often made His will een to Samuel, and
- blessed him, and all Israel knew that Samuel was God’s own prophet.
Think of the great honor and blessing of having God so often speak-
ing to him! But we have that blessing too. God i is nearer to a little
Christian child than He was to Samuel; for the Holy Spirit speaks in
a Christian child’s heart, and tells him to be good and dutiful, and to
think of God, and pray with all his heart. And that is better than even
being a prophet like Samuel. Only we must take great care to attend
to that voice, or it will leave off, and then we shall get worse and
worse, like those bad sons of poor old Eli.”

“Was n't Samuel a ees good Doves ” said Anna, as Aunt Char-
lotte paused.

«What did Eli’s bad sons do?” asked Willie.

«J will tell you, and then we must stop for this time,” said Aunt
Charlotte. “They were very wicked and God punished them; and
old Eli had great trouble.

“God had helped the Israelites again and again, but they would not
leave off their wickedness, and at last He punished them still more.
There came up a nation to make war upon them, fiercer than any
before, called the Philistines. Then the Israclites fancied that if they
LITTLE SAMUEL. L1G

took the Ark of the Covenant out into the battle with them they would
get the victory, as they had done when Joshua conquered the land
But God had never bidden them take the Ark. He had commanded
that it should stay in its place at Shiloh. They did not heed this, but
took it out into the camp, and all the people shouted for joy when it
was brought, with the two priests, Hophni and Phinehas, Eli's sons,
to take care of it. When the Philistines heard the shout they said
that the gods of Israel were come, and that they must fight all the
more bravely. And they did. God would not help His people
because of their self-will, so He let them be beaten by the Philistines,
and Hophni and Phinehas were killed, and the holy Ark of God was
taken by these heathens. And when poor old Eli, the high priest,
heard the sad news, he was so much shocked that he fell down back-
ward and broke his neck and died.

“God still showed His power, for when the Philistines put the Ark
into the temple of one of their false gods the idol fell down and was
broken; and wherever it was taken the people fell sick, till at last
they sent it back to the Israelites. But it never came back to Shiloh;
it was hidden in a lonely house in the woods. And the Philistines
were strong and the Israelites were very weak and miserable, because
they had been so very disobedient.”

“So Eli and his sons lost their lives because they disobeyed God,
did they, Aunt?” asked Clara

“Ves,” said Aunt Charlotte. “Wesee what a terrible thing the sin
of disobedience is. We should ask God every day to show us our
duty and help us to do His will.”

QUESTIONS.

What was the name of the woman we hear of to-day? What did she wish for? What did she
do to obtain her wish? What was her son’s name? Where did Hannah bring her little son?
Who took care of Samuel? How did Samuel behave? What did he wear and what had he to do?
What did Samuel’s mother bring him every year? Who was the high priest? What did Samuel
hear? Who did he think was calling? What did he do? What did Elisay? How often did this
happen ? Was Samuel cross at being called so often? What did Eli know at last? What did he
tell Samuel to answer? What did the voice tell Samuel? Whose voice speaks to us? What peo-
ple came to fight with the IsraelitesP Why did God let any one hurt the Israelites? What did
the Israelites think would help them to fight? Why ought they not to have taken it? Who were
killed, and what happened to Eli when he heard the Ark was taken?
Twentieth Sunday.

Saul Made King.

«Behold, the Lord hath set a king over you.”"—1 Sam. x1, 13.

In ae “ANY more about Eli and his
oo arvinting Jul. | sons?” asked Willie.
“No, brother, they were dead.
Do n't you remember ?” said Clara.
“Yes, but Samuel was n’t,” said
Anna. “What did he do?”
“Well,” answered Aunt Char-.
lotte, “Samuel was made judge in
Biss place mpUigtic PeOpe ohew
tired of judges and said they
Weleda a sc iinem Mikey thee other
nations had. God did not want
them tor have a. kine, but they
begged for one, and God finally:
told Samuel to let them have a
- king, and this is how they got him.
“There was a young man named Saul, who was very tall and strong.
His father kept a number of asses; for, in the land of Israel, people
rode on asses instead of horses. One day all the asses were lost, and
Saul and one of the servants went out to look for them. They went
a long, long way, and never found the asses; and at night they came
to a city, and there they found Samuel. Samuel was an old man
now, and gray-headed; and he ruled over Israel, and every one
120




HH =
SAUL MADE KING. 12

honored and loved him, because he was so good and just. Saul was
very much surprised when the great and good Samuel met him, and
led him into the house, and put him in the chief place, and gave hima
choice piece of meat that had been set apart for him. Saul could not
think how Samuel knew anything about him. And he was still more
surprised the next morning, for then Samuel came out of the city with
him, and-sent the servant on before. Then Samuel took some oil,
and poured it on Saul’s head, which was what was called anointing,
and told him that God had chosen him to be king over all the people
of Israel. Was not this wonderful news for him? And, you see, God
had led him to Samuel to be made king, though he so little guessed
_ what was going to happen when he set out to look for the asses. And
God still makes everything happen, even the least thing; it is all for
our good, even though we do not quite see why.

“So Saul was the first king of Israel; but he was only to be pros-
perous as long as he would take care to obey God.”

“T don't think it was right in Saul to take old Samuel’s place,”
said Willie. .

“Yes, brother; but remember it was not Saul’s fault. The people

demanded a king, and God told Samuel to give them one,” said Clara.

“Did Saul be good, like Samuel ?” asked little Anna.
“THe was at first,” answered Aunt Charlotte, “and he had a very
good son. I will tell you more of them both in the next lessons.”

QUBSTIONS.

Who was the first king of Israel? Did Saul expect to bea king? What did he set out from
home todo? Where did he come? Whe was in the city? What did you hear about Samuel
last Sunday? Whatage was Samuel now? What didhe give Saul? Whatsurprised Saul? What
did Samuel do to him the next day? What is aneinting? What was he to be? But what must
he do if he would get on well?

8
Twenty-first Sunday.

Jonathan, Saul’s Coot Brave Son.

‘¢ There is no restraint to the Lord to save by many or by few.’’—1 Sam. xiv, 6.

ARMOR USED IN TIME OF SAUL.



“AUNT CHARLOTTE, what was Saul’s »
good son’s name?” asked Willie.

“Jonathan,” said Aunt Charlotte. “He
was not only good, but very brave and a
great soldier, and I will tell you what he
did.

“When Saul was first appointed king,
the people were in great distress, for their
enemies, the Philistines, had overrun the
whole land, and held all the strong places,
and were very hard to the Israelites. They
would not even let a smith live among the
Israelites, that they might not be able to
have swords or spears made to use in

fighting; and the Israelites had to go into the Philistines’ country to
get their axes and ploughshares made, and to sharpen the goads, or
long sticks tipped with iron that they drove the oxen with.

“ Nobody had a sword or spear but Saul and his good son Jonathan ;
all the rest of the people had nothing better to fight with than
axes and mattocks and goads, and they were very much frightened,
and came trembling after their new king.

“But Jonathan trusted in God, and he and one young man set out
creeping along a rugged, steep path to see what the enemy were

122
JONATHAN, SAUL’'S GOOD, BRAVE SON. 123

about, and by and by they came below the high rocky hill where the
Philistines were encamped.

“Oneof the Philistines looked out and said, ‘ Behold, the Hebrews
come forth out of the holes where they had hid themselves’; and he
called out to Jonathan,‘Come up to us, and we will show you a thing.’

“Now, Jonathan knew, as he said to his friend, that the Lord can
save as easily by few men as by many, so he was not afraid; and he
and the other young man climbed up on their hands and knees tili
they came out among all the Philistine soldiers. Then they began to
fight at once, and the Philistines were so surprised at these two men
beginning to fight with them that they most likely thought all the
others were behind, and-they began to run away.

“The people in Saul’s camp heard all the noise and went out to
look, and saw the Philistines running away, so they went after them,
and killed many, and drove them out of the land, and got free of them
once more. .

“So God blessed and helped the good Jonathan, because he trusted
in Him; and Saul became a great king.”

“T tell you, Jonathan was the bravest and the best fighter I ever
heard of,” said Willie.

“Ves; and that other man with him was brave, too, was n't he,
Auntie?” said little Anna.

“Saul was fortunate in having such a son,” said Aunt Charlotte.
“ All good, brave boys are helpful to their parents.”

QUESTIONS.

Who was Saul’s good son? Who were the enemies of the Israelites? Why would not, the
Philistines let the Israelites have any smiths? What isa smith? What tools does a smith make?
How did the Israelites get theiriron tools? Who were the only ones that had swords and spears?
Why were the people afraid? Who crept out to see the Philistines? What did Jonathan know
that God could do? Where did he climb up? What happened? What became of the Philis-
tines? What did God do for Jonathan and his father?
Twentypesecond Sunday.

Beautiful Ruth.

‘* Entreat me not to leave thee.’’—Auth 1, x6.

“WERE there any more young
men as noble and brave as eaten
Auntie?” asked Clara.

“Ves; Jonathan had a friend even
as brave and noble, and a greater
warrior; but before I tell you his
name, I want to go back and tell you
about his great-grandmother, Ruth.”

“Oh, do,” said little Anna.

“Well, I will begin when she was
a young woman. Once, upon a
fine summer day, a good man, named Boaz, went out into his
corn-fields where his reapers were cutting down the wheat. ‘The
Lord be with you, he said. ‘The Lord bless thee, they answered.
Then he saw a young woman gleaning whom he had never seen
before. He asked who she was. He heard that her name was Ruth,
and she was a stranger and a widow. Then why had she come there?
Because she could not bear to leave her husband’s mother, Naomi,
alone in her old age. She knew that if she kept with Naomi she must
be poor and forlorn, and away from all her friends; but she loved her
mother-in-law so much that she said: ‘Entreat me not to leave thee,
or to return from following after thee. . . . Where thou lodgest, I
will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God:
where oo diest, I will die, and there will I be buried.’

124,



Boaz AND RUTH.



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































126 BEAUTIFUL RUTH.

“When Boaz knew that Kuth was poor and a stranger, he told his
reapers to drop some handfuls of corn in her way; and he told Ruth
to keep among his young maidens, so that nobody might be rude to
her, and that she might rest and eat among them when they rested in
the heat of the day; for Boaz loved Ruth because she was very beau-
tiful. ;

“Ruth carried home plenty of corn to her mother-in-law. And
soon it was found out that Boaz was their nearest friend; and he mar-
ried Ruth, and Naomi lived with them; and Ruth was no longer poor
and a stranger, but was happy as a wife and mother in her beautiful
home.”

“That was a nice story about Ruth; but was that all about her?”
said little Anna.

“Well, she lived very happily with Boaz, and by and by she hada
great-grandson that was one of the greatest men in the world. Next
Sunday I will tell you about him.”

QUESTIONS.

What was the name of the mother of whom we hear to-day? Whose mother wasshe? But
who was good to her? What did Ruth do for Naomi Where did she go to glean? Who saw
her? What did Boaz bid his men do? How did Boaz speak to Ruth? How was he kind to Ruth?
What did she find out? Whom did Ruth marry? Why was Ruth so happy? Whom does God
bless ?









BETHLEHEM-JUDAH, THE HOME OF NAOMI.


Twentyetbird Sunday.

King Saul Disobeys Gul

«¢ Because thou hast rejected the word of the Lord, He hath also rejected thee from being king.”
—1 Sam. ¥V, 23.

“ARE you going to tell us
of Ruth’s brave and good
grandson to-day, Aunt Char-
lotte ?” said Willie.
ve , i “Ves; but first I want to tell
Nees Sk i) you of King Saul’s wicked dis-
p NE / obedience, for that is what
CUNY ; brought him to ruin, and gave

THE CATTLE PRESERVED BY SAUL. Ruth's grandson. a chance to
become so great.

“You have heard how God chose Saul to be king of Israel, and
promised to help him if he would obey in all that God commanded
him.

“Now, there were some cruel robbers that lived in the mountains,
and used to fall upon peaceful people and kill them, and take their
cows and sheep and camels and asses, and gold and silver, and all
they had. SoGod sent a message by Samuel to Saul and his brave
men to destroy these cruel people; but God said that none of all their
prey and riches that had been gained by such wicked ways was to be
kept by His people; it was all to be made away with; they were to
have none of it for themselves.

“They won the battle and killed the robbers, as they were sure to
do when God helped them; but then when they saw such fine cattle

hay


128 KING SAUL DISOBEYS GOD,

and choice things they would not obey God, but went and took it all
for themselves. They left only the poor and mean that they did not
care for, and helped themselves to all they liked. And then, when
Samuel came to meet them, Saul made as if he had done just what he
was told, and said, ‘ I have obeyed the voice of the Lord.” But Samuel
said, ‘What meaneth then this bleating of the sheep in mine ears, and
the lowing of the oxen which I hear ?’

“Saul wanted to make excuses; but it was not the first time
he had been dis--
obedient, and he
was only fright-

-ened, he was not
really sorry; so
Samuel was ob-
liged to tell him,
‘Because thou hast
rejected the word
of the Word, He
hath also rejected
thee from being
king.”

“Was the king-
dom taken away
from Saul at

























































































































































































































BATTLE WITH THE PHILISTINES. once?” askec
Clara.
“No, but the one to succeed him was chosen; and who do you
_ suppose it was, Anna?”

“I don't know. Was it his good son, Jonathan ?”

“No; it was Ruth’s grandson. I will tell you about it.

“The hills that lie above Bethlehem have green slopes, where the
sheep feed. There, one day, a flock was feeding, and a boy with blue
eyes and shining hair watched them, and perhaps sang as he watched.
He was the youngest of eight brothers, and all the rest had gone
down to a great feast, for Samuel, the great prophet, was come to
KING SAUL DISOBEYS GOD, 12g

visit their father. But the youngest must stay out with the sheep.
No one would want him. But see! a messenger is coming up the
hill. He calls—David, you are wanted! The prophet had called for
him. So the boy is obedient, and rises up to run down the hill.
Perhaps he stopped to wash his face in the clear well of Bethlehem
before he went up to the place of the feast—the same place where Boaz
had brought his bride, Ruth; for Jesse, David’s father, was Ruth’s
grandson.

“There stood the prophet, with his long white hair lowing down;
and as soon as young David came in he stepped forward with a horn
in his hand, and sweet-smelling oil of olives mixed with incense was
flowing upon David's golden hair. He was the anointed of the Lord.
In time to come he would be king, but he must wait long and patiently
first.

“Yes. Each of his seven brothers had passed before Samuel,—tall
goodly men,—but God had spoken to Samuel and forbidden him to
choose them; for Samuel could only see their fine handsome faces and
figures, but God looked at their hearts, and knew they were proud
men, who would soon have been as fierce and headstrong as Saul
himself. So he had sent Samuel to choose the youngest and least
thought-of of all Jesse’s sons, and anoint him to be king of Israel:
Yes; and, above all, to be the forefather of our blessed Lord Jesus
Citic a.

“Was David Christ’s father?” asked Anna.

“No, my pet; but many hundred years after David, Jesus became
one of his descendants; that is, he was a great, great, great, great,
great grandson of King David.”

QUESTIONS.

Whom did we hear of to-day who did not do as he was told? Who was Samuel? What was
Saul told not todo? How far did he obey? Why was it wrong of Saul to keep the robbers’ cattle
and sheep? What did he say when Samuel came? Was this true? What did Samuel hear that
showed that this was false? How was Saul to be punished? Who was sent to Bethlehem? Who
used to live at Bethlehem? ‘What was Samuel to do? Whose son was he to anoint ? _ How many
sons had Jesse? How many came to the feast? Where was David? Why were not his brothers
anointed? Why was David chosen ?
Cwentyefourth Sunday.

Young David Kills the Giant.

**T come to thee in the name of the Lord of hosts, the God of the armies of Israel.’*—-1 Saw,
KVII, 45.

“TELL us some more about
David,” said Willie.

“T will tell you to-day a very
heroic thing he did,” answered
Aunt Charlotte.

pol ino tier ein server
beaten the Philistines, still they
used to come back again and try
to conquer the Israelites.

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army, and Saul had an army too.
The Israelites were on one hill
and the Philistines on another

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the Philistines’ camp came a
Davip Goinc AcainsT THE GIANT. giant named Goliath ; for there

really were giants then, and
- Goliath had three brothers as tall as himself.

“Goliath was nearly twice as tall as any man we ever saw, and he
had a helmet on his head and armor on his breast, and an enormous
spear, and a man carried a shield before him. He stood out and
called to know if any Israelite would fight with him. Then, if Goliath

130 5
























































































































































Mille.



























































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DAVID AND GOLIATH.



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132 YGUNG DAVID KILLS THE GIANT.

conquered the Israelite, the Philistines should be lords over the
Israelites ; but if an Israelite conquered Goliath, then the Israelites
should be lords over the Philistines.

“But nobody felt bold or strong enough to go out to fight with this
great man; and day after day he came and walked up and down, and
laughed the Israelites to scorn for not daring to come out, they who
called themselves the servants of God.

“ Now, David, after he was anointed king, went back to minding
the sheep. But one day his father sent him with some bread and
other things for his brothers in the army; for he had three brothers
among King Saul’s soldiers, and David was to see how they were, and
bring his father word. When he came to the camp he saw the proud
Goliath walking up and down boasting against the Israelites; he asked
the soldiers about him, and. said he would go out and fight him, and
was so eager that at last they brought him to the king; and Saul
asked him how it was that he, who was only a youth, could dare to
think of fighting with a man of war like Goliath.

“David answered that when he was keeping his flocks alion and a
bear had come and tried to take away a lamb. And God had made
him strong to kill both the lion and the bear, and saved him from
danger; and he trusted that in-like manner God would help him if he
fought with the giant.

“So Saul wanted to dress David in his own armor, and David put
it on, but it was too large for him, and he would not use it. All he
dia was to choose five smooth stones out of the brook and put them
into his shepherd's bag. And he took his sling—a long strip of leather,
the ends of which he used to hold in his hand to throw stones farther
with when he wanted to drive beasts away from his flock. And with
only his sling and these stones he went out to meet the giant.

“Goliath was fierce and angry when he saw such a boy, and he
thought it was only laughing at him to send no better warrior to fight
withhim. But David said, ‘Thou comest to me with a sword and
with a spear and with a shield: but 1 come to thee in the name of the
Lord of hosts, . . . whom thou hast defied.’

“Then David took one of his stones and slung it out of his sling.


YOUNG DAVID KILLS THE GIANT. 133

It struck the very middle of the giant’s forehead, and went deep in,
and down fell Goliath. All his great strength was of no use to him,
and David ran and stood upon him, and drew eut his great sword
from his side and cut off his head.

“All the other Philistines fled away, and Daved gave thanks to ead
for his great victory.

“By and by Saul and roman were both dead. Jonathan was
David’s good friend, and he was killed in battle, and I will tell you
next Sunday how Saul’s life was ended and David became king.”

“JT wish David and Jonathan could both have been kings,” said little
Anna. “One was brave as the other, was n’t he, Auntie?”

“And they both were strong and brave because they trusted in
God,” said Clara. ;

“Right again, dearest,” said Aunt Charlotte, with a smile of
approbation.

QUESTIONS.

Who were the enemies of the Israelites? Who was the giant ? What did Goliath wear? What
did he call the Israelites to do? Who was the enly one that would come out to fight? What was
David, and why was he not afraid? What had David killed before? What did David take with
him? What did David say? Who helped David? How did David attack Goliath? What hap-
pened to Goliath? What did David do to him then? What became of the other Philistines?
What did David come tobe? What did God call David?



CROWNS OF KINGS IN THE TIME OF DAVID,
Cwenty-tifth Sunday.

Saul’s Death and David Made King.

** How are the mighty fallen.”’—2 Sam. 1, 19.
**T shall go to him, but he shall not return to me.’’—2 Sam. xu, 23.

“NOW David gets to be king, doesn’t he?” asked Willie.

“Yes,” began Aunt Charlotte. “The last thing that has to be told
about Saul is very sad. You know he would not do as God bade
him, but chose to go his own way. Then God forsook him, and left
him to grow worse and worse. Then his enemies, the Philistines,
came up against him, and his army came together on the hills to meet
them. But God was not with Saul,so his men could not fight, and he
was beaten back step by step up into his own hills, close to his home;
and there, when he found he could go- no further, and that the Philis-
tines would soon be upon him, he did the saddest thing of all—he
threw himself on his own sword, that they might not take him alive.
He did not quite kill himself; and when a young robber came by,
trying to get garments and weapons from the dead bodies, the unhappy
king begged for a death-blow as he lay. The robber gave him the
last stroke, and then took the crown from his helmet and _ his bracelets,
and brought them to David to show that he was dead. The robber
thought he should have a reward, but David put him to death for
having dared to strike the king; and David grieved and mourned for
Saul, who had been a great and noble king once. But he had come
to this miserable end because he would have his own way and will.

“Then, when Saul was killed, David was anointed to be king; and
he was a very good man, and served God with all his heart. So God
blessed him, and made him great and powerful.”

134












DAVID TENDING HIS SHEEP.
““There remaineth yet the youngest, and, behold, he keepeth the sheep.’’—-1 Sam. XVI, 11.




that David took a harp, and played with his hand.”



1 Sam. XVI, 23.

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And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was upon Saul




SAUL'S DEATH AND DAVID MADE KING, 135

“Did David have any little children?” asked Anna.

# Ves; King David had a little baby son, whom he loved very —
much; and this child fell sick. While it was sick King David grieved
for it, and prayed that it might be made well. But it was not God’s
will to make the little boy well, and he died. And then David was
patient, and knew it was God's will; and he said, ‘I shall go ts him,
but he shall not return to me.’

“For David meant that one day he should die, and then his soul
would go to be with his little son’s soul in the happy place of rest;
and by and by their bodies will rise again out of their graves, and be
joined to their souls again, and live for ever and ever. King David
used to sing the Psalms to praise God; indeed, he first made most of ;
them; and in one he says, ‘ My flesh also shall rest in hope.’ That was, |
the hope that he should rise again from the dead, and always live in. |
God’s holy home in heaven. Heaven is the happy place where we alf ~
hope to meet and live by and by, and that is the comfort that good
Christians have when death takes away friends whom they love.”

“Well, Auntie, I think this story about the dead baby teaches two
good lessons,” said Clara. “ First, that we should not grieve too much
when God takes our loved ones to heaven, because they are so much.
happier; ; and it also shows us Sa David believed the body should
rise from the dead.”

“Yes,” said Aunt Charlotte, “Christ’s body rose from the dead and
ascended, and Paul tells us we shall also rise as He rose.”

i
i
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§

QUESTIONS.

Who came out to fight against Saul? Where was Saul driven? Who came after Saul? What
dreadful thing did Saul do? What did the robber take? ‘To whom did he carry Saul’s crown ?
What did David do to the robber? Who wastobeking now? What did David do when his little
boy was ill? How did David bear his death ? Where did he hope to go to his little son? Wher
would his soul go to his child’s soul? When will their bodies rise? What do we hope to do?


Twenty-sirth Sunday,



Absalom and Solomon.

‘*O my son Absalom, O Absalom, my son, my son!’’—2 Sam. xIx, 4
* All things come of Thee, and of Thine own have we given Thee.” —: Chronicles xxix £4,

“T WAS so sorry David’s
little baby died, Auntie.
Did he have any more
children?” asked little
Anna, as they took their
seats the next Sunday,

“Yes, dear; good King
David had more sons be-
sides the little one wha
died. One was named
Absalom. He grew up ta
be a very fine, handsome

7 young man, and had most
beautiful hair; but he was fierce and proud, and wanted to be king.
Another was his wise son, Solomon.

“And when David was old this wicked Absalom gathered men
together and drove his father away, that he might be king instead.
Good King David had to go away, weeping and barefoot, down the
steep rocky pass, for fear of his wicked son; and cruel men called him
names, and threw stones at him as he went, while Absalom was made
to reign in his father’s palace, and did all he pleased there. But God
will not let wicked men prosper; and all David’s faithful old soldiers
came together to help him. They had a great battle with Absalom

and his men, and Absalom was beaten and fled away on a mule. -
°136



MusicaL INSTRUMENTS AT THE TIME OF DAVID.
~ ae

ZA SS
ADSALON’S FLIGHT,


138 . ABSALOM AND: SOLOMON.

“But when he came into a wood his thick hair was caught in an
oak tree, and he could not get it loose; and his mule went away and
left him,. still with his hair caught in the tree.

“ Now, though Absalom had been so wicked, his father loved him
‘still, and had berned all his men to take care not to hurt the young
man Absalom. eo when one of the men saw Absalom caught by the
hair in a tree he would not hurt him, and only went and told
Absalom’s cousin, Joab, who was the captain of David’s army.

“Joab had no pity; he thought Absalom richly deserved to die, and
he was afraid the
king would par-
don him; so he
went at. once
with three darts
in his hand, and
killed Absalom
as he hung in
the tree.

“King David
was grieved to
the heart. No
words can say
how sad he was
to think that his
son had died in
his sin, and never asked his pardon. He wept, and cried aloud,
‘O my son Absalom, my son, my son Absalom! would God I had
died for thee,O Absalom, my son, my son!’ It was not like his
grief for the innocent little baby he had lost before; for Absalom had
been a bad man, and for that there is no comfort.

“ And when all the people came joyfully to bring King David home
to his Pare to be king again, still his heart mourned for his son
Absalom.”

“That’s another bad boy who gave his father trouble,” said
Willie.







































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Davip’s Toms AT Mounr Zion.
ABSALOM AND SOLOMON. 139

“Yes, and brought destruction on himself, as they always do,”
answered Clara, and then she repeated the Fifth Commandment.

“What about Solomon?” asked Willie. “Was he good or was
he bad like Absalom ?”

“Tt is said he loved to sit at his father’s feet and learn wisdom,”
answered Aunt Charlotte. “He was a good boy and the delight of
is father, and I will show you how he was honored.

“When David had grown to be a very old man, near to his death,
he called all the princes of his people together at Jerusalem, and asked
them all to bring offerings to help to build a beautiful house, to be a
Temple to the Lord their God. So all the people brought what
precious things they could, to add to what the king had prepared; and.
a great quantity was ready—all willingly offered. They brought gold,
silver, brass, iron, and beautiful stones, or the wood of oaks and cedars,
according to what they had or could give; and when David saw it he
was very happy and glad, and offered it up to God, and prayed that
God would give unto his son Solomon a perfect heart, that he might
serve God and keep His laws. —

“The last thing King David did was to have his son, young
Solomon, anointed to reign, and then to show him to the people, and
charge them to help him build the Temple for the Lord God. For he
said Solomon was still very young, and the work was very great.
And the crown was set on Solomon’s head, and he was king. Then
there was a great feast all round Mount Sion, all the people eating
and drinking, and rejoicing and praising God, who had given them
rest from all their enemies. Soon after that good old David died.”

QUESTIONS.

Who was Absalom’s father? How had David to go away? What did cruel men do? Who
wame to help David? What did he charge them? What happened to Absalom? Why did Joab
kill Absalom and did Absalom deserve it? What did David cry out? What did David ask of his
people to do when he grew old? What did they bring him? What were all these things for?
Who was to build the Temple? Why was David happy? What great rejoicing was there ?
Cwentyeseventh Sunday,

King Solomon’s Wise Request and Wise Judgment,

** Give me now wisdom and knowledge.’’—2 Chronicles 1, 10.
** The wisdom of God was in him, to do judgment.’’—1 Kings i, 28.

“WHAT did Solomon do
after David died?” asked
Willie. “I’ve been wondering
all the week.”

“That is a very important
question, my child. Solomon
did not know what to do.
When King David died Solo-
mon was still almost a boy.
But God spake to him in a
dream by night, and said, ‘Ask
what I shall give thee. Then Solomon said he was but young, and
knew not how to rule over this great people that God had given him;
and therefore he prayed, above all, that God would give him a wise
and understanding heart. And God was pleased with Solomon’s
choice, and said that because he had cared for wisdom most, and had
not asked for riches, or long life, or to put down his enemies, that
therefore, besides wisdom, God would give him all the rest,—riches
and honor and length of life——and he should be wiser and greater and
richer than any king ever was before him or should be after him. All
this was because he had cared so much to have a wise and under-
standing heart to know good and evil. That was first with him, and

so God gave him all the rest. So it will be with all who seek fixst of
140



SUPPOSED FoRM oF SOLoMON’s TEMPLE.
|
|
|



KING SOLOMON'S WISE REQUEST AND WISE JUDGMENT. 14}

all to be good. God does not make us wise all at once like Solomon,
but if we care about it He will help us to get wise by little and little
if we really try, and then He will bless all we do.

« Now, little Anna,” began Aunt Charlotte, “I am going to tell you
a story which will show how wise Solomon was. It is about two
women and two babies.”

“Tam so glad,” said the little one, as she drew up closer to Auntie’s
elbow and took hold of her arm with both hands.

“One day,” continued Aunt Charlotte, “ when King Solomon was
sitting on his
throne two
women came
to him: one
with a live
baby, the other
with a dead
one, both boys
and just of the
Samie ae e
- They said they
had been liv-
ing alone to-
Serer din the
same house,
each with her
little baby, till one night one of the women rolled over her child in
her sleep and stifled it, so that she found it was dead. But each
woman said it was not her baby but the other’s that was dead,
and that the mother of the dead one had put the little corpse
down by the other sleeping woman and taken her living child out of
her bosom to herself. How was it to be known which was right ?—
for nobody out of the house knew the two little ones apart, and each
of the women declared that she was the mother of the live child,
not of the dead one. So they came to the king to judge between
them.























































































































































































































































































































































INTERIOR View or ANCIENT TEMPLE AT JERUSALEM.
142. KING SOLOMON’S WISE REQUEST AND WISE JUDGMENT.

“And what plan could Solomon take to find out the truth? He
sent for the executioner, with a sword, and said that,as the women
could not agree, the living child should be cut in two, and each
woman should have one of the halves. One woman was content to have
it so, but the other only cried out in grief and dread, ‘O my lord, give
her the living child, and in nowise slay it’ Then Solomon saw ina
moment which was full of mother’s love and which was full of hatred
and jealousy; so he said, ‘Give 4er the living child, and in nowise -
slay it: she is the mother thereof’ And so the true loving mother
had her child safe and well, and the other was disappointed in her
spite.” :

“ Hurrah for Solomon! Was n't he smart?” shouted Willie. “That
was a good start for a young king.”

“I’m so glad the mean woman didn’t get the good woman’s baby,”
put in Anna.

“It seems to me,” said Clara, “that Solomon was like God; he
judged these two women by their hearts.”

“Yes,” answered Aunt Charlotte; “no matter what we say or do
God judges us, and will reward or condemn us by the motives of our
acts. Therefore we should pray for clean, pure hearts. The lesson
also teaches us that wicked people are sure to come to disgrace.”

QUESTIONS.

How old was Solomon when he began to be king? What did God say to him at night? What
did Solomon wish for most? What did God give him besides? “Why did God give him all these
things when he did not ask for them? Who came before Solomon? What did both the women
say? What did Solomon command? Did he really mean to kill the child? What did the women
say? What did Solomon then tell them to do? Would not the loving mother rather give the
child away than have it killed?
Twentyecighth Sunday,

n

~Solomon’s Riches and Wisdom.

«AY the earth sought to Solomon, to hear his wisdom, which God had put in his heart.
1 Kings X, 24.

“SOLOMON was very rich
as well as wise, was he not,
Aunt?” asked Clara.

“Yes; King Solomon was
the greatest king in wisdom
and riches who ever lived,”
answered Aunt Charlotte
“He had an ivory throne with
golden lions standing on the
steps, and a beautiful house
lined with sweet cedar wood. He sent ships, which brought home
gold and silver, and apes and peacocks; and it was said that gold was
as common as silver generally is, and silver as common as stones! All
people honored him, and the Queen of Sheba came from her far-off
country to see him, because of the fame of his greatness. And when
she saw him she was quite overcome, and said that all she had heard
was not half so grand and glorious as what she saw. Very happy,
she said, were the people who stood around him and heard the words
of his wisdom.”

“T wish I could have heard him,” said little Anna.

“Yes, but we have the words of his wisdom in the Book of Proverbs
in the Bible, for his wisdom came from God. And though we shal}

143









SuHip In SoLomon’s TIME.
{44 SOLOMON’S RICHES AND WISDOM.

never see his purple robes or his gold and silver, do you know what
our blessed Saviour said 2—' Consider the lilies of the field, how they
grow, they toil not, neither do they spin: and yet I say unto you, that
even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.’

“The least little flower, if you look well into it, is more beautiful
than anything King Solomon ever wore, for God made it; and those
who made Solomon's clothes could only put things together that were
made already.”

QUESTIONS.

What sort of throne had Solomon? What were on the steps? Who came to see him?
What did she say of him? Where have we got Solomon’s wisdom? What did our blessed
Saviour say about him? What have we got which are more beautiful than Solomon’s robes?













oI

KING SOLOMON’S SHIPS.






:
:

LEXXIX. 32

Cwentyeninth Sunday.

Solomon Turns Wicked.

‘Then will I visit their transgression with the rod, and their iniquity with stripes.*—Fsadm

‘* 1 will take the kingdom out of his son’s hand.’’—1 Avngs XI, 356



acon, AN Ipot WorsHIPED IN SOLo-
MON’S TIME.

“SOLOMON was always a good
king, was n't he, Auntie?” asked little
Anna as they took their seats under the
trees in the cool shade.

“No, my dear,” answered Aunt Char-
lotte, with a sad shake of her head. “It
is very sad to say that as Solomon grew
old he left off being good. He married
a great many wives, and brought them
from the heathen nations round; and he
did not teach them to worship the true
God, but let them worship each in her
own way. So, out in his gardens, one
lady had her idol to the moon, and
another had hers to the dreadful idol
Dagon, and so on; and though Solo-

mon knew so much better, even he was persuaded to come and pay
honor to these idols, just to please these women—he, the son of
David, whom God had blessed so much.

“ And what the king did the people were sure to do. So God spake
to Solomon, and told him that since he had fallen away from the right
way he must be punished, and that ten out of the twelve tribes would

30

14
146 SOLOMON TURNS WICKED,

be taken away and not belong to his kingdom. It was not to happen
in his own time, but in his son’s time; but it must have been very
sad to him to know that his beautiful kingdom and great power were
to be so lessened, and that his son Rehoboam was a very foolish young
man, who would spoil everything. But he was not to lose all, only
part, for the sake of the holy King David, to whom God had promised
that his throne should last forever.”

“ How did they get part of the kingdom from Rehoboam ?” asked
Willie.

“Well, my boy,” answered Aunt Charlotte, laying her hand on
Willie’s head, “when God has a thing to do He always finds some
one to do it for Him.

“There was a strong, brave man of the tribe of Ephraim, named
Jeroboam, and God sent his prophet to speak to him: Jeroboam had
a new mantle on, and the prophet took it and tore it into twelve pieces,
and gave Jeroboam ten of them. Then the prophet said this was to
show how God was going to tear away ten tribes from Rehoboam, the:
grandson of David, and give them to Jeroboam, because Solomon
was bringing idols in to be worshiped. And he told Jeroboam that
all should go well with him, and he would be a great king, and his
sons after him, if he would go on serving the Lord, and the Lord |
only, and would keep from idols.”

“Tt was the sin of disobedience again,” said Clara, “and it brought
its punishment.”

“ Yes,” said her aunt, “ disobedience to the First and Second Com«
mandments.”

Willie repeated both of these commandments, and they seemed to
mean more than ever before to them. .

QUESTIONS.

What wrong did Solomon do? Where did his wives come from? What did they want to
worship? What did he do himself? Why was this wrong? What did God tell Solomon? How
was he to be punished? How many tribes were to be lost? How many were to be kept? Why
vere any to be left? What had God promised David? In whose time was the trouble to come?
What was the name of Solomon’s son? What sort of pe son was he? Who was to take away part
' of the kingdom? How did the prophet make it known to Jeroboam ?


Thirticth Sunday.

Reading Lessons from the Bible.

*¢ Search the Scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life; and they are they that
testify of Me.’”’—/ohx v, 39.

“NOW. children, = said
Aunt Charlotte, as they took
their seats around her, “there ’
are a number of beautiful
stories in Bible history that
I want you to read for your-
selves from the Bible. I will
skip them, because you have
learned about some of them |
in the Sunday-school; so I |
need only hint at them this
morning, and tell you where
Ope ttING eatin iin, een en lance
may read them to you dur-
ing the week, from the Bible
itself.”

ae ee Wee “T shall like that, Auntie,
said Clara.

“And I too,” said little Anna, “only I’m afraid I won't understand
them.”

“T will listen while Clara reads,” said Aunt Charlotte, “and explain
everything you don’t understand. Besides, you have heard most of
them in the Sunday-school recently. You remember we left off last

l4a7 :




148

READING LESSONS FROM THE BIBLE.

Sunday with God’s telling Solomon what should happen for his
wickedness in letting the people worship idols. Now, it came to pass,
just as God told him it would. His son Rehoboam was made king







































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































IRE SENT DOWN UPON THE ALTAR OF ELIJAH.



after Solomon died, and he was very
wicked. He would not listen to his
father’s old friends and advisers, se
ten tribes went away from him and
made Jeroboam their king. We are
told all about it in the rath and
13th chapters of 1st Kings, and the

13th chapter tells us also about the

wicked prophet who would not obey
God and the lion ate him up.”

Clara made a note in her rnemo-
randum book of the reference Aunt
Charlotte had given, so that she
might find the places and read.

“You ‘have learned,” continued
Aunt Charlotte, “in the Sunday-
school about the good prophet
Elijah, whom the raven fed, and how
he was afterward fed by a poor
widow, and how he made her meal
and oil hold out during the long
famine. You will find a full account
of this, Clara, in the 17th chapter of
Ist Kings. And then in the 18th
chapter we learn the very interesting
story of Elijah and the false prophets
of Baal, and how the fire came down
from heaven and consumed Elijah’s

offering; and about his taking the four hundred prophets of Baal
and slaying them. After that a spot of cloud appeared, and a great
rain came after the long drought, and the people again believed in
God and praised him. But in the next chapter, the 19th, you will


READING LESSONS FROM THE BIBLE, 149

learn how the wicked queen, Jezebel, the wife of Ahab the king, grew
very angry at Elijah for killing the prophets of Baal, and sought for
him everywhere to destroy him; but Elijah fled away into the wilder-
ness, and when he was about to starve to death an angel came to him
and fed him, as the ravens had done before.

“Then you have not forgotten how you learned in the Sunday-
school that this same wicked queen made Ahab take a poor man‘3
vineyard, and had the poor man, whose name was Naboth, killed, and
how the dogs licked up his blood. By reading more of the chapter,
and continuing to read on to the end of the 22d chapter of rst Kings,
you will find that God afterward punished Ahab by letting him be
killed in battle, and he fell on the very spot where Naboth was slain,
and, as Elijah had told Ahab, the dogs licked up his blood, as they
had done that of the poor man; but a more terrible fate was waiting
for Jezebel, for she was afterward thrown down from a window and
killed, and the dogs av her.

“Tam sure even little Anna has not forgotten the lesson of last
Sunday at the school about good old Elijah. Do you remember how
he died, little Anna >” :

“ No,” said Anna, “he didn’t die. He went to heaven in a chariot
of fire with horses of fire, and his mantle fell on his good young
friend Elisha, and he took it and made the waters of Jordan divide,
just as Elijah had done, and after that he was’ a great prophet, like
Elyah had been, and :

“T see you know it,” said Aunt Charlotte.

“Yes,” put in Willie, “and I know some more about him. He
made the Shunamite woman’s dead child come back to life, but
Gehazi, his servant, could not because he didn’t have faith enough,
our Sunday-school teacher said.”

“TI see you do not forget,” responded Aunt Charlotte, with a pleased
smile. “Now, Clara, make a note in your book where to read of all
these interesting things we have just been talking about. You will
find them in 2d Kings, 21st, 22d, 23d, 24th, 25th, and 26th chapters.
You can read some of them to-day, if you wish, and the balance of
the references we have given during the week.”




Thirty=first Sunday.

How a Little Girl Did Great Good.
‘Wash, and be clean.’’—2 Kings v, 13.

THE children said
they had enjoyed Clara's -
Bible readings very
much during the week.

““T wish I could do
great things, like men,’
said Willie.

S| dow too; spite in















































































































little Anna. “I would -

WAR-GALLEY IN SOLOMON’S TIME.

love to have birds and
angels feed me and to make folks well like Elijah and Elisha did.”

“Well,” said Aunt Charlotte, “I will tell you to-day of a little girl
‘who helped Elijah make a very great man well.”

“Oh, did she ?” asked Anna in glee. “Tell us all about her.”

“Well,” began Aunt Charlotte, “there was once a poor little girl
who was stolen away from her own home in Israel by Syrian soldiers,
and carried far from her mother and friends, to be a slave. It must
have been very sad and lonely; but God lets nothing happen but for
good, and so this poor little captive maid did great good. Her master
was named Naaman. He was the captain of the army—brave and
strong; but he fell ill of a disease called leprosy, that no doctor could
cure, and which would go on getting worse till he would die of it.
The little maid was sorry for him; and though she was all alone in a
age
HOW A LITTLE GIRL DID GREAT GOOD. 151

heathen land she had not forgotten about God and his prophets, and
she told her mistress that at home, in Israel, there was a prophet who
could cure her master by God's power.

“So Naaman set out in his chariot, and came to the prophet's door.
He thought the prophet would come out and strike his hand over the
place and cure him directly—all the more because he was such a
great man. But, instead of that, the prophet sent out word to him
that he was to wash seven times in the river Jordan, and he would
be well. This made Naaman very angry. He thought the bathing
in Jordan would do no good, and that the prophet made light of him;
and he turned and went away in arage. Then his servants persuaded
him. They said, ‘My father, if the prophet had bid thee do some
great thing, wouldest thou not have done it? how much rather then,
when he saith to thee, Wash, and be clean?’ Naaman was wise
enough to listen to them. He did go and wash in the river Jordan,
as the prophet bade him; and God gave the water the power to make
him quite well again. Then he came back and thanked the prophet,
and said he would never pray to any god again but to the one true
God, who had healed him.

“So, you see, the little maid did great good to her master, both to
his body and his soul, because she was good, and remembered her
God, even when she was far away from home.”

“Ves,” said Clara, “and we can all do good now by trying to get
people who are wicked to come to Jesus and be cured of their sins.”

“That is correct, my dear,” said her aunt, as she hugged Clara to
her breast. “Every one has the leprosy of sin, and Jesus can cure it,
and will do so if we will do as He tells us.”

-

QUESTIONS. |

Who is the great captain we hear of to-day? What was the matter with him? From whom did
he hear about the prophet? Howcame the little maid into Naaman’s house? Who made the
prophet able to cure people? Had Naaman been brought up to worship God? What did he
expect the prophet to do to him? What did the prophet tell him to do? Why did he not like
this? Don’t we sometimes wish to do something grand, rather than just what we are told? But
what have we got todo? What came of Naaman doing as he was told? To whom did Naaman
gay he would always pray ? A
Thittyesecond Sunday.

Good King Hezekiah.
** He did that which was right in the sight of the Lord.” —2 Kings xviu, 3.

‘AUNTIE, began Clara,
“was Hezekiah, about whom
we heard a little last Sunday
at Sabbath-school, a good man
or abad man? It seems to me
all those kings were wicked.”

“Indeed,” replied Aunt Char-
lotte, “you have been reading
in the Bible and learning at
Sunday-school of many bad
kings, and I am very glad to
tell you at last of good King
Hezekiah. He cared for noth-
ing so much as to please God.
He would not have any idols,
but he cleared them all away,
and had the holy Temple all set
to rights, and made beautiful as.
God had commanded; and he had all the services at the Temple
at the right times, and used to go and pray there himself constantly.
And he did all that he could to make his people gvod too.

“But there came a great danger. There was a king of Assyria

named Sennacherib, who had quantities of soldiers and horses and
152



































BRAZEN LAVER IN THE TEMPLE,


oo

GOOD KING HEZEKIAH. 153

chariots, and he used to conquer towns, and carry all the people in
them away, to live far from home. He thought he would seize
Hezekiah and his people in this way, and he did come and do much
harm all over the country. He did not come at once to Jerusalem ;
but he sent three boasting men, with an army, to stand outside the
walls and call out to the people inside that Sennacherib was coming
to conquer them and carry them away, and that they need not
believe their king oe OY SES en ee
Hezekiah when he << ees pee
said that God :
would help them,
for no god had
ever yet saved a
country from Sen-
nacherib.

“Hezekiah’s
people were ter-
ribly afraid. Some
wanted him to get
help from the king
of Egypt; but Hez-
ekiah knew that
God had forbidden
him to have any-
thine’ tO) sclonwithy 99 Ge ee a
the Egyp tians. He ASSYRIAN ARMY.
knew that God could help him, and that the way to be helped was to
do just what God told him. So, though Sennacherib had so many
men and he had so few, and the Egyptians had plenty of soldiers and
horses, he made sure that God could save him much better than any
Egyptian of them all.

“By and by Sennacherib had ruined all Hezekiah’s towns and
villages except Jerusalem, and shut up Hezekiah in his town, so that
his people did-not dare to come out. And Sennacherib wrote a

letter to tell Hezekiah that it was no use to hope to escape, as he was -
10





\G

“

i |) aoe



154 GOOD KING HEZEKIAH. -

coming to take away the Jews and ruin Jerusalem; for no nation had
ever yet been saved by its gods, so the God of Hezekiah could not
help him.

“In his great distress Hezekiah went up to the Temple and told
God all his trouble. And he said, ‘Thou art the God, even Thou
alone, of all the kingdoms of the earth: Thou hast made heaven and
earth.’ He said he knew. the gods of those nations could not save
them, for they were no gods, only wood and stone; but he trusted
that God would save him and his people, though they were far too
weak to defend themselves against this terrible king and his people.

“God heard -the good king’s prayer,.and sent him a Dreams that his
enemy should not even come before Jerusalem, nor shoot one arrow
at it. And God kept His word. The fierce soldiers of Sennacherib
all lay down to sleep one night, but they never woke up again. God
_ sent His angel with a deadly blast, and all the army that wanted to
- destroy. His people diéd in one single night. It was because they
and their king had fancied, God could not save His peopre that they
died.”

“Auntie,” said Clava, “wasn’t it because Hezekiah prayed to the

Lord and tried to be good and holy that no one could hurt him?”
Ves,” answered Aunt Charlotte, “and we should try to do like
. Hezekiah. If you are vexed, or if you are afraid, tell God all about |
it, and ask Him to help you. And He will be quite sure to hear and
help you, if you will only Speak to Him and tell Him what is in your
heart.”

_ QUESTIONS.

Who was Hezekiah? What kind of king was he? Who wanted to hurt him? What
did Sennacherib mean to do? Where did Hezekiah go in his distress? Why did Sen-
_ nacherib say the other cities had not been saved by their gods? What commandment tells
us not to have gods of wood and stone? What did Hezekiah ask God to do? What did God
promise? And what happened to the soldiers of Sennacherib ?
a

’_II Kings XXIII, 2.

YOUNG KING JOSIAH READING THE LAW

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s By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept when we remembered Zion.’’—Psalm CXXXVII, 1.




— Thirtysthirvd Sunday.

The Good King Josiah.

“* Like unto him was there no king before him, that turned to the Lord with all his heart, and
with all his soul, and with all his might.”—2 X7wgs xxi, 25.

“T LIKED Hezekiah ever so
much,” said little Anna. “Were
there any more good kings,
Aunties «)-

“Ves,” said Aunt Charlotte,
patting little Anna’s curls, “I
will tell you of one of them.
There is one more good king,.
whose name was. Josiah. He
was great-grandson to good
King Hezekiah. The two
kings who had come between Josiah’s grandfather and father had both
been very bad men. His grandfather repented when he fell into trouble,
and God forgave him; but his father never repented, and died in his
wickedness when Josiah was only eight years old. But Josiah was
very different. He made his people break down their idols, and clear
out the Temple of the unholy things they had-brought in, and wor-
ship God rightly once more. While they were cleaning out the
Temple they found a book that nobody knew—the Book of the Law
of Moses; that is, the first five books in the Bible. All the time of
these two bad kings nobody had minded it or read it; it had been
lost, and every one had forgotten all about it.

i55



JewIsu Books, sucCH AS THE ONE FOUND IN THE
TEMPLE BY JOSIAH.
156 THE GOOD KING JOSIAH.

“When Josiah knew what it was, and that it was the Law that God
had spoken to Moses, he made the priests read it to him and all his
people. They were very much frightened when they heard it; for
they found they were doing all the very things that God had said He
would punish them for, and turn them out of their good land.

‘So Josiah sent to a holy prophetess to ask her whether, if they left
off their sins and were very sorry, and prayed with all their might,
God would still forgive them. But God told her to answer that the
people had done so wrong and grown so wicked ‘that now their
punishment must come; but that, as Josiah’s heart was tender, and
he loved God, it should not happen in his time, and that he should be
quietly buried with his fathers. And, after years of goodness, Josiah
was killed in battle, and all his people mourned over him.

“But they had not been really good, they only pretended, just to
please him, and went back to their wicked ways in spite of all the
pains he had taken with them; and his own sons were as bad as the
rest. So the punishment was obliged to come.

“What I wish you to mind to-day is how these people lost their
Book of the Law for want of attending to it. Every one should have a
Bible of his own, and then not do like these people of Israel—let it lie
by, omitting even to look at it, and forget what is in it, and then forget
even where it is. If you do this, you will grow as bad as these people
were, and God will be forced to punish you, as He was forced to
punish them.”

“There were not any more wicked kings, were there, Aunt Char-
lotte, after Josiah showed them how much better it was to be good?”
asked Willie. }

“Yes, I am sorry to say there were,” replied Auntie; ‘and during
the week I want Clara to read you from the Bible the 23d, 24th,
and 25th chapters of 2d Kings, in which you will learn of good King
Josiah’s last acts, in reading the Law to the people and in destroying the
idols, and begging the people to be good. After that I will tell you
the sad story of Josiah’s wicked sons, who reigned after him, and how
much trouble they had because of their wickedness, and how God
finally let Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, come and kill many of
THE GOOD KING JOSIAH, 7 187

the people, and put out the king’s eyes, and burn the king’s house and
the holy Temple and the city, and carry the Done away to be his
slaves.”

“That is like God lets Satan lead us away to be worse than slaves
if we disobey and are wicked,” said Clara.

“Right,” answered her aunt, “and I am sure when you read these
chapters you will draw this and other good lessons from them. But
now let us havé the—

QUESTIONS.

Who was Josiah? What kind of person was Josiah? How old was he when he began to
reign? What did they find in the temple? How had it been lost? What did Josiah cause the
priests.ta do? Why was he frightened? What did he ask? What did God promise him? But
why did the people deserve to be punished? What did they do as soon as Josiah was dead? What
came of forgetting their Bibles?





















































































































DESTRUCTION OF JERUSALEM BY NEBUCHADNEZZAR.


Thirty=fourth Sunday.

Daniel and His Brave Companions.

** God gave them knowledge and skill.’’—Danie/ 1, 17.
*“Our God whom we serve is able to deliver us from the burning fiery furnace."’—Danéez 10, 17.



DANIEL IN THE Lions’ DEN.

“DID you read the chapters I gave you
last Sunday, Clara?” asked Aunt Charlotte.

“Yes, Aunt, and I also looked up the
references my Sunday-school teacher gave
me to help us understand better, and we
all liked them very much.”

“Yes, said Anna, ‘and Clara read us
about the good prophet Ezekiel, and his
making the dry bones come to life, and
about his drawing something on a stone
and telling the people they might some
time go back to Jerusalem. She can tell
us and read us very much since you
showed her how, Auntie.”

“Yes,” answered Willie, “but she told us she would get you to tell
us about the four brave boys that the king took and carried to his
palace, and many wonderful things happened to them. I’ve been
wondering all the week what it was that they did. One of the boys
was named Daniel; I have forgotten the others’ names.”

- “Daniel, Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego,” said Aunt Charlotte,
with a smile. “They were very interesting, brave, and noble boys. I
wish my little nephew, Willie, and all other Zoe might be as good

158
_ DANIEL AND HIS BRAVE COMPANIONS. 15G

2

and heroic. These little boys were young princes of the king’s -
family, who had been brought up in the palace of the house of David.
They could not have been more than twelve years old when they were
thus taken from their homes.

“The king of Babylon, Nebuchadnezzar, thought he should like to
have them to waiton him. So he desired the steward of his palace
to have them taken into his care, to be taught both to wait on the king
and to know all the learning of Babylon.

“Slaves instead of princes! That was sad enough; but what
grieved these boys most of all was that the dinners that were sent to

them all came from the king’s own table, and they knew that all the
_ meat there came from creatures that had been offered up to idols,
Now, there was one boy, whose name was Daniel, who knew that it
was very wrong for any Jew to eat meats that had been offered to
idols. Some of the boys said they did not care, and some said they
were very sorry, but they could not help. it. Yes, Daniel said, they
could help it if they would leave off eating meat and drinking wine,
and only have beans and water. Then three more of the boys said
they would stand by Daniel, and have only the beans and water rather
than break God’s holy Law. Their names were Hananiah, Azariah,
and Mishael, but the king had changed these boys’ names, and he
called Daniel’s companions Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego.

“So Daniel asked their master, Melzar, to give them none of the
rich wine and fine dainties, but only water and pulse—that is, beans.

“But Melzar said they would grow thin and weak on such poor
food, and then the king would be angry with him.

“«Only try us for just ten days, Daniel said.

.“And God so blessed the food that at the end of ten days Daniel.
Hananiah, Azariah, and Mishael were fairer and fatter than all their
cousins and friends, who had been eating the king's dainties.

“And Melzar had found that none were so true and honest and
obedient and painstaking, so he trusted them very much; and they
grew wise and learned, and still loved and feared their God, though
they were slaves, so far away from home.

“ Now, remember how they began. It was by giving up the things
160 DANIEL AND HIS BRAVE COMPANIONS.

they liked when they found it was wrong to have them. When you
are tempted to be greedy, would it not be a good thing to recollect
Daniel and the other boys eating beans and drinking water ?
“Well, by and by these boys grew up to be men. They were wise
and good and honest, and the king liked them very much; but the
king’s counsellors, who were not wise and good, hated them because
the king liked them better than themselves, and they concluded to try
to have them killed. Now, the king worshiped idols, and they
knew these young men would not do that. So the wicked men per-
suaded the king to make a great golden idol and to command that
everybody worship it.
_ “The king did not think of the trap these men were laying for his
favorites, and he set up a great golden idol, much higher than this
room, and commanded that as soon as his music played every one
should fall down and worship the image; or, if any one would not,
that person should be thrown into a burning fiery furnace. A furnace
is like a very large oven, or like a brick-kiln—a sort of house quite
full of fire—for burning and baking bricks, or melting iron, or any~
thing else that requires to be made very hot. Many people were afraid
of such a horrible punishment as being thrown into the furnace; and
when they heard the music they made haste to bow down before the
great golden image. But the Jews knew that they must not worship
idols; so what could they do? The three young men were
brought up before the king, because they would not bow down before
his great image. The king asked them how it was; and told them
fiercely that if they would not worship his golden image they must
be thrown into the fire. But they stood up boldly, and said, ‘Our
God whom we serve is able to deliver us from the burning fiery fur-
nace, and He will deliver us out of thine hand, O King! But if
not, be it known unto thee, O King, that we will not serve thy gods,
nor worship the golden image which thou hast set up.’
“The king was very angry at this brave answer. He had the furnace
made seven times hotter than usual; and Shadrach, Meshach, and
Abed-nego were thrown into it, tied hand and foot; and the flame
was so hot that it burnt the men that threw them in,
DANIEL AND HIS BRAVE COMPANIONS. 164

“Presently the king gave a loud cry. For in the midst of the fire
were the men, not tied, but free, and walking in the burning heat as
if they were in cool spring air! And there was another with them,
whose form was as the Son of God. Then he called them, and the three
came out. There was no smell of fire about them, and not a hair of
their heads was singed; they had not felt the heat at all; but that
Holy One had taken care of them, and kept them safe in the midst of
the fire. Then the king of Babylon knew how wrong he had been;
and he sent forth a command that no one should ever speak a word
against the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego, who had
saved them in the burning fiery furnace.”

“Was n’t that wonderful!” said Willie.

« And the three boys were so brave,” said little Anna. “ I do love
brave folks who are not afraid to do right.”

“This teaches us again,” said Clara, “that God always takes care
of those who obey him.”

QUESTIONS.

Who were the boys carried to Babylon? What did the king call them? What was the name
of the king of Babylon? How did he desire these boys to be brought up? What were they to
eat? Why did they not like to eat these meats? What did Daniel beg for? Who joined with
him? What did Melzar say? How long was it to be tried? How did Daniel and his friends
look? Why was this? Why did God bless them? What was the beginning of all their holiness?
What did the king of Babylon want every one to worship? Who would not worship the golden
image? Why would not Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego worship the image? What is the
Second Commandment? What was done to them for not worshiping the image? How hot was
it made? What did the king sce in the fire? Who was with them? Were they hurt? Why did
not the fire burn Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego? Who took care of them in the fire ?



ANCIENT SCEPTRES.

aac itiahenliaad leteediatmtelarls
— Thirtyefitth Sunoay.

The Great Things that Daniel Did.

** Those that walk in pride He is able to abase.”’—Daniel ww, 37.
- £€God hath numbered thy kingdom and finished it.”’—-Damiel v, 26.
** Thy God whom thou servest continually, He will deliver thee.””—Danzel v1, 16.

MIM bly Ay
VIVA
Ute







DANIEL INTERPRETING THE HANDWRITING ON THE WALL.

poe Ns eC bev
EQISEE, Daniel was snot
in the fiery furnace with
Shadrach, Meshach, and
Abed-nego, was he?”
asked little Anna...

““No,”» answered Aunt
Charlotte. 7

“He was put ina lions’
den instead of the furnace,
wasn't he, Aunt?” asked
Clara.

.“No, my dear; that is
one mistake my _ very
correct little assistant has
made. It was a very long
time after that before
Daniel was put in the
lions’ den. The best way
to straighten it all out
would be to read the 4th,
5th, and 6th chapters of
Daniel; but I'll tell the

story, and then you may read it in the Bible if you choose.

162


THE GREAT THINGS THAT DANIEL BID. 163

“Daniel became a great prophet and interpreter of dreams Some
time after his three companions were cast into the furnace, great Nebu-
chadnezzar, the king of Babylon, had a strange dream. He thought
he saw a great tree with spreading branches and fine leaves, making a
sweet shelter, where all the creatures came and stood, and the birds
nestled in the boughs; but while he was admiring it there came a holy
one down from heaven,and said the tree was to be cut down, and
only the stump left in the tender grass of the field, and that it should
be bound with iron, and wet with the dew of heaven till seven years
had passed over it.

“When Nebuchadnezzar woke he was troubled, and was sure the
dream had a meaning, and he sent for the prophet Daniel to tell him
what it was. Daniel was so sorry that at first he could hardly bear to
speak; but at last he told the king that it was himself, Nebuchad-
nezzar, that the tree meant. He was great and mighty, and countries
and people were shadowed over by his power; but soon he would
have a fall—he would lose his senses, and his man’s heart would be
like a beast’s heart, and he would be driven out of his palace, and he
would eat grass like an ox, and his body would be wet with the dew
of heaven, and his hair would be long like eagles’ feathers, and his
nails like eagles’ claws, till seven years had passed by; and then he
would recover his senses and know and understand again, and he
would come back to his kingdom again. Then he would know and
own that the Lord of Heaven is the true God.

“ Nebuchadnezzar was shocked at first; but soon he forgot all about
the dream, and felt himself so wise and strong and brave that
nothing could hurt him. He was walking one day in his palace, a
most beautiful one, and looking out on the grand city with the river
running through it, with all the bridges and the hundred brazen gates ;
and his heart was lifted up with pride, and he said, ‘Is not this great
Babylon that I have builded?’ That very moment there came a voice
from heaven that said the time was come!

“And a strange madness came on the king; his brave, clever spirit
became as senseless as a beast’s, and he only wanted to graze in the field
like the cattle. So they drove him out of the palace, and put a band

>
164 THE GREAT THINGS THAT DANIEL DID.

of iron round him,and let him eat grass like an ox; and his hair grew
long and shaggy,and his nails like an eagle’s claws, just as Daniel had
said.

«So seven years passed away; and at the end of them he came to
his senses again. God gave back his man’s heart and his reason, and
he went back to his palace and sat on his throne again. And one of
the first things he did was to have a letter written to his people, telling
them all this story, and bidding them do honor to the God of Daniel,
who putteth down and setteth up.”

“That was wonderful!” said Willie. “Then did he throw Daniel
in the lions’ den for making him eat grass like an ox?”

“No, brother,” said Clara. “It was God who made the king do
tate sees

“Yes,” replied Aunt Charlotte, “ Nebuchadnezzar seems to have
been kind to Daniel all his life. Years after the old king died his son
Belshazzar was on the throne, and he seemed to have forgotten Daniel,
but Daniel still lived in Babylon. Belshazzar was a foolish, self-
pleasing young man; and his enemies, the great nation of Medes and
Persians, came to make war on him, but still he did not care for any-
thing but his amusement.

“He thought Babylon so strong that they could never break in;
and he gave a great feast to all his lords, with fine meats and wines,
and he had all the gold and silver bowls, and the golden candlestick
that had been brought out of the Temple of God at Jerusalem, on the
tables while he and his friends were drinking and singing and shout-
ing. |

« All on a sudden a stillness came over them, and their eyes opened
wide with fright. For just over the candlestick there was seen a man’s
hand. ‘There was no body, only the hand; and the finger went along
writing on the wall, tracing out letters.

“There were four words, but no one could read them’ or tell what
they meant.

“The king was terribly frightened. His knees knocked together
and he shook all over, and he called for some one to tell him what
this writing could be. Nobody could guess; but at last the queen,
THE GREAT THINGS THAT DANIEL DID. 165

his mother, Nebuchadnezzar’s wife, who was still living, eame and put
him in mind how Daniel had been able to explain his father’s dreams.
So Daniel was sent for, and he at once read the writing. He told
them Belshazzar was found wanting. His kingdom was going to be
taken from him and given to the Medes and Persians.

« And even then, all the time the Babylonians were feasting and not
watching the enemy, Cyrus, the clever king of the Persians, was

making his
men dig
ditches,
into which
he turned
ari Patine
water of a
ereat river
that ran
through
the city;
and that
very night
all his
army came
in, walking
up the dry
bed of the
stream.
No one
saw them till they were in the city; and that very night Belshazzar
was slain.”

“I wish I could have seen that hand with. no arm to it writing on
the wall,” said Willie.

“But did they kill good Daniel, too, Auntie, when they killed the
king ?” asked little Anna.

“No, sister; he had not been put in the lions’ tee yet. That's what
they did with him, / veckou/” said Willie. “Was it, Auntie?”

Persian Kine 1n His CHARI0T.


166 THE GREAT THINGS THAT DANIEL DID.

“Not yet,” answered Aunt Charlotte. “Cyrus, the general who
conquered Babylon, was good to the Jews. He issued a proclamation
allowing them to return to Jerusalem and rebuild their holy Temple,
and tale back all the golden vessels. You can read all about it in the
_ first five chapters of the book of Ezra. Clara will find it and read it
to you this week. But Daniel was a very useful man to Cyrus, and he
kept him in Babylon. After the death of Cyrus his son-in-law, Darius,
was made king, and he, knowing how wise and good Daniel was, made
him the chief ruler next to himself.” | . /

“ That was good for Daniel! wasn’t it?” shouted Willie.

“Yes,” said his aunt, “but it made the other chief men jealous of
Daniel, and was the cause of his being put into the lions’ den.” |
“Oh, that was so mean!” said little Anna. “I wish the lions had
bit those old, bad men to death.”

“So they did, my dear,” answered Aunt Charlene: “and now let me
tell you the story. Darius himself worshiped idols. But Daniel
worshiped only the true God. And sometimés in those days men
were worshiped as if they were gods. It was the strange, foolish way
of the people to treat King Darius as if he was a sort of a god, and
one day his people came to him and begged him to make a law that
for thirty whole days nobody should say their prayers to any god, or
ask anything of any man, except of Darius the king; or if they did,
they should be thrown to the lions, to be eaten up. This was to
catch Daniel, for the wicked men knew that Daniel would not wor-
ship the king; but Darius thought it was all to do him honor, so he
_ made the law that thus it should be. Now, when a law had once been
made by the king of that people, it could not be changed. So nobody
was to say their prayers to any one but the king for all that time.

“But by and by the king’s people came and told him that there
was one old man who did not attend to his law, but that they had
watched him in his own room, and there he said his prayers three
times a day, just as if the king had made no law at all.

“The king was very sorry when he heard who it was, for this man
who would not leave off saying his prayers was the man he trusted
most in all the kingdom. It was Daniel, one of the captive Jews, son


THE GREAT THINGS THAT DANIEL DID. 167

or brother to one of the last kings of Jerusalem. He had been taken
to Babylon when he was a very little boy, and now he was quite an
old man, but he had never ceased praying to the great God of Heaven,
‘and he was not going to leave off now. He was a prophet of the.
Lord, and very wise, and he was one of the king’s very best advisers,
so Darius was greatly grieved when he was accused.
“But Darius could not help himself; the law that had once been
made could not be broken, and these spiteful people declared that
Daniel must be thrown to the lions. All day long the king tried to
get his wise, good counsellor saved from this dreadful fate, but
he could not.
Suececd
and at even-
ing Daniel’s
emesis
came to take
him and
throw him to
the lions in
their den.
Coe Coilkts
though Dar-
lus was a
h cat h en Supposrp Sirk or ANCIENT BanyLon
himself, he -
had one hope; and when he saw his friend led away he said, paiva
God whom thou servest continually, He will deliver thee.’
“So they took Daniel, and put him into a pit among the lions, an
they fastened up the door and left him there; and the king was so.
sorry that he could not sleep all night for grieving for the good,
wise, brave man who was thrown to the lions because he would not
leave off praying to God, and feared God more than man.
«And when daylight came the king and his attendants went to the
den. The enemies hoped to find that Daniel was eaten up, but the
king cried out in a lamentable voice, ‘OQ Daniel, servant of the living




































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































168 THE GREAT THINGS THAT DANIEL DID.

God, is thy God, whom thou servest Co eek able to deliver thee
from the lions?’

« And Daniel’s own voice came cheerfully back, and told the king
that his God had sent His angel, who had shut the lions’ mouths, so
that they could not hurt him, and had kept him safe all night.

«And the king was very glad, and commanded them to take Daniel
out of the pit, and to put the spiteful men in instead; and the lions
were so hungry that they broke all their bones in pieces before ever
they came to the bottom of the den.

“Only think what Daniel was willing to bear rather than not say
his prayers! And it was because he prayed that God saved him.
God’s power shut the lions’ mouths, because Daniel had been more
afraid to leave off praying than even to be torn to pieces. How glad
we should be that we can say our prayers safe and unhurt; and how
careful we should be never to miss them out of idleness, if Daniel
would not miss them out of fear.”

QUESTIONS.

What did the king Nebuchadnezzar see in his dream? What did the king want to know?
Whom did he send for? Whom did Daniel say the tree meant? What was to happen to the king?
What beautiful place had Nebuchadnezzar built? What did he say about it? What happened
that moment? What did this poor king want to be? What did he eat? What were his hair and
his nails like? What did he tell the people when God restored him? Had not he lost all his
pride? What should we not boast of? What wonderful thing did Daniel do in Belshazzar’s
reign? Tell about the terrible scene. What became of Daniel after Belshazzar was slain? What
law was Darius persuaded to make? Who was to be prayed to? What was to be done to any-
_ body who said prayers to any but Darius? Who refused to pray to the king? What was done
to Daniel? Did the lions hurt Daniel? Why was Daniel kept safe in the den? Whom did
Daniel fear most, God or man? When should we say our prayers? Can any one hurt us if God
takes care of us?
Thirty=sitth Sunday.

Five Hundred Years of Jewish History.

«¢ What doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justice, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly
with thy God.”’—Jdicah vi, 8.

a | See « AUNT CHARLOTTE, that
Ol os Wit i a

a ES ea was a beautiful story of Daniel



92a
in that you told us last Suncay,
but I am interested to know
something of the Jews that
Cyrus permitted to return te
Jerusalem. Were they good
and obedient after their long
captivity ?” asked Clara.
== “To answer your question,
Se ea ea Clara: after the Jews returned
to Jerusalem they were, as a rule, better than they had been before
they were carried away into capitivity. They had the good priest and
scribe Ezra, who rebuilt the temple, and Nehemiah, who rebuilt the
walls of Jerusalem, to help and advise them in the beginning, and
they had many good men and some very witked ones as rulers.
They rebuilt the Temple first, and a long time afterward built the
walls again around the city of Jerusalem. It is interesting to read in
Nehemiah how they worked on the walls with arms ready all the time
to fight the enemies who tried to hinder them. The high priests ruled
over the people in their own country, but they were all the time
ander some other power to whom they paid tribute. For the first
11 x69










i7G FIVE HUNDRED VEARS OF JEWiSit MiSTCRY.

hundred years after their return they were subject to the Persians,
Then the Greeks, under Alexander the Great, conquered Persia, and
he became their ruler. Alexander was very kind to them, let them
exercise their own laws almost entirely, and every seventh year he
did not require them to pay him any tribute, because every seventh

year, according to the Jewish law, was a year of rest. Alexander and
his successors ruled them for one hundred and sixty-four years. After
that the Syrians and the Egyptians and the Romans conquered the
country one after the other,and ruled them more than a hundred years.
Every time the Jews grew exceedingly wicked God let their enemies
punish them again, as He had done before. Then they had trouble
among themselves. Bad men several times murdered the high priests
in order that they might have themselves made high priests. The
_ Jews were often slain by thousands, and thousands of them were
time and again carried away into slavery; but all the while there were
many of them faithful and true to their religion. They were especially
careful in their observance of the Sabbath. Their enemies learned
that they would not even fight to defend themselves on the Sabbath
day, and on more than one occasion they were attacked, and one time
the city of Jerusalem itself was taken, and a hundred thousand Jews
permitted themselves to be carried away into slavery rather than
fight on the Sabbath day. Another time a brave Jewish leader
revolted against his oppressors and raised a great army, and won many
victories. A body of one thousand of his men took refuge in a cave
or deep defile in a mountain to worship one Sabbath day. The enemy
saw them and gave battle, but the Jews permitted themselves to be
slaughtered rather than violate God’s commandment to keep the day
holy, as they believed they would be doing if they fought to defend
themselves. After that it was made lawful for them to fight when they
were attacked on the Sabbath. Forty-eight years before Christ came
the Romans, and made Herod king of the Jews. He was the wicked
ruler in power when Jesus was born. By and by you will read the
writings of Josephus, the great Jewish historian, and will learn all
about what the Jews did during the five hundred years’ period between
their return from Babylon and the coming of Christ. There is very
FIVE HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH HISTORY. 171

little told of it in the Bible,and it is to be found in the books of Ezra
and Nehemiah, and in the Maccabees of the Apocrypha. And now,
as we have only sixteen more Sundays in the year, 1 propose that
next Sunday we shall take up the coming of our Lord, and have

some stories: from the New Testament even more interesting than

those we have had from the Old.”

The children all agreed to Aunt Charlotte’s suggestion, but said
they wished they might hear more of the Old Testament, and resolved
to read the books she had mentioned and find out for themselves.

QUESTIONS.

What good king permitted the Jews to go back to Jerusalem? What two good prophets helped
and advised them in the beginning? How long did the Persians rule over the Jews after their
return? What great warrior next conquered and ruled the country? How did he treat the Jews?
How strict were the Jews in observing the Sabbath? Tell what happened at a cave one Sabbath
day? Who was finally made king of the Jews by the Romans.



©

AN EASTERN VINEYARD.




Thirtyeseventh sunday,

The Coming of Jesus.
*¢ He shall be great, and shall be called the Son of the Highest.’’—Luke 1, 32.

**Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.”’—Lwuke i, 14.

“NOW, Auntie, you will tell
us about Jesus, will you not?”
asked Willie.

“Yes,” said Aunt Charlotte.
“All the Bible is intended to
point to and bring us to Jesus,
and now I will tell you the
story of His coming. You re-
member I told you last Sunday
that the Romans set up a
strange king over the Jews.
His name was Herod, and he
was an Edomite—that is, a
descendant of Jacob’s_ brother
Esau. He professed to believe

THE SHEPHERDS LISTENING TO THE SONG OF THE in the mule God : and began vo

ANGELS. make the Temple much more

beautiful than it had been

since it had been built up after the Jews came back from Babylon.

But he was a very wicked and cruel man, who killed his own wife,

and made everybody afraid of him; and the Jews were very unhappy
under him.



a ti
visto ee

172






THE BIRTH OF JESUS

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LITTLE JESUS IN JOSEPH’S CARPENTER SHOP.

““And he was subject unto them.’’—Luke TS.




THE COMING OF JESUS. 173

«They had one hope, and that was that it was just about the time
when God had promised to send a Holy One into the world to save
them and set them free; and they thought He would be a great,
mighty king, like David, who would conquer Herod, and drive away
the Romans, and have a crown and throne brighter than Solomon’s.

«And just then an angel was sent from God to the little town of
Nazareth, where there lived a young maiden, quite a poor woman, but
most good and holy, a descendant of the great King David. The
angel told her that
she was highly fav-
ored, for she was to
be the mother of
ties oro Meet atte
Hire hest, for athe
_Holy One who was
to be born of her
should be the Son
of God; and whén
He was born she
was to call His
name Jesus, which
means the Lord our
Saviour, because
He should save His
people from their
sins; and Mary said,
‘Behold the hand-
maid of the Lord; be
it unto me according to thy word.’ And the angel departed from her.

“Mary lived at Nazareth; but it was God’s will that the holy Son
of God should be born at Bethlehem, the little town where David
used to live and keep his sheep. The Romans sent out orders that
every one should go to their proper home to have their names set
down, and pay a piece of money. So Mary had to go, with her
husband, a good man named Joseph, who was a carpenter. Sucha

























































































































































SIMEON AND INFANT SAVIOUR.
u74 THE COMING OF JESUS.

number of people had come there that there was no room for them in
the inn, and they had to go to a stable—a cavern underground—
where the oxen and asses were.

“ And it was there that the Holy. Child of Mary, the Son of God,
was born—in the stable where the cattle were. The mother wrapped
Him in baby-clothes, and laid Him in the manger, among the hay and
straw.

“None of the people in the inn knew or cared; but there were
shepherds on the hill, keeping watch over their flocks by night The
angels came down to them, and told them that to them was born that
day, in the city of David, a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord, and
that He was a Babe lying in a manger. |

“As soon as the angel had said that, many other angels, who were
very glad that poor men below should be saved,all began to sing,
‘Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward
men. And when the angels had gone the shepherds went up to
Bethlehem and saw Jesus, and when they went away they told all they
saw and heard about Him.

“So the angels and the shepherds kept the Saviour’s birthday, as
we keep it on Christmas day.”

“ And is that how we get our Christmas day?” asked little Anna.

«Yes, darling,” said Aunt Charlotte; “we keep it in memory of
- Christ’s birth.”

QUESTIONS.

Whom did the Romans make king of the Jews? What nation did Herod belong to?
Who was the forefather of the Edomites? . Whose son was Esau? What sort of man was
Herod? What were the Jews hoping for? ‘To whom was the angel sent? Where did she
live? What did the angel tell her? Whoseson would He be? What was she to call Him?
What does Jesus mean? What did she answer? How came Mary to goto Bethlehem?
Why could she not go to the inn? Who was born in the stable? Where was He laid?) Who
were told of it? Who told the shepherds? What did the angels sing? Why were they
glad? What is the birthday of our Lord?
Thirty-eighth Sunday.



The Childhood of Jesus.

“We have seen His star in the East and have come to worship Him.’’—Me#. 11, 2.
‘ Arise, take the young Child and His mother.”’—J/ai. 11, 13.
- “Jesus increased in wisdom and stature and in favor with God and man,’’—Luke un, 52

“AUNTIE, did Jesus and
His parents live in Bethlehem
always after that?” asked little
Anna.

“No, darling; they remained
there avery little while. Would
you like me to tell you about
the childhood of Jesus ?”

“Yes, yes, yes,” answered all
the children at once.

herds were not the only people
who came to see the blessed
Lord Jesus when He was a

away in the East, God showed
a bright, beautiful star to some



hearts that it was the sign that
the great King was born.
“They set out on their journey to Judea, to see and honor Him;
and when they came they asked, ‘Where is He that is born king of
175

AN OFFERING OF DovEs.

“Well, to begin: the shep-.

little Infant at Bethlehem. Far.

wise men, and taught their
£76 THE CHILDHOOD OF JESUS.

the Jews, for we have seen His star in the East, and are come to wor-
ship Him.” This made Herod afraid, for he thought this must be a
king who would take his kingdom from him. He made the learned
men among the Jews look out in the prophecies where Christ should
be born. They found it was to be at Bethlehem, and he told the wise ~
men so, and desired them to let him know when they found the King,
that he might come and worship Him too; but he did not really mean
to worship Him, but to kill Him.

“However, God Himself showed these wise men where to find our
blessed Lord, for the same star that they had seen in the East came
out again, and went before them, and came and stood over where the
young Child was. And though they sawa little Baby, and-a poor
mother holding Him in her arms, they knew He was Lord and King;
and they worshiped Him, and offered Him the gifts they had brought.
There was gold, and there was frankincense, which means the sweet-
smelling, costly powder that was burnt in the Temple; and myrrh,
which is a precious gum which comes out of trees, and is used to
preserve and keep things good.”

“What did wicked Herod want to kill little Jesus for?” asked
Anna. “He was a very, very bad man.”

“Yes, Herod was very bad, and he was afraid that the new-born
King of the Jews would take away his kingdom. So he meant to kill
Him as soon as he could find out from the wise men where He was.
But the wise men never came back to tell him, for God spoke to them
in a dream, and warned them to go back to their own country
another way. And God also spoke to Joseph the carpenter,
Mary’s husband, and told him to take the young Child and His
mother and flee into the land of Egypt, and stay there till they should
be told to come back, for Herod was seeking the young Child to
destroy Him. Joseph obeyed, and the whole family fled into Egypt,
and lived there for some years.

“When Herod found the wise men did not come, he was very
angry; and, to make sure of killing Him who was to be king of the
Jews, he was so cruel and wicked as to cause all the babies in Beth-
lehem, of two years old and under, to be put to death. We call them


gn ee a)


THE CHILDHOOD OF JESUS. 177

the Holy Innocents, because they were the first who died for Jesus
Christ’s sake. It seemed very sad then, but they have been happy and
glorious ever since in heaven, and always will be. But God had taken
care of Jesus, and He was safe in Egypt; and there they staid till our
Lord was about three years oid, and then the wicked king Herod
died.” 7

“Tm glad of it!” said Willlie with excitement.









































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































SYMBOLIC UNION OF THE OLD AND NEW DISPENSATIONS.

“ Not so, dear,” said Aunt Charlotte. “We must not rejoice in the
destruction of the most wicked people. We should be sorry for
Herod, for wicked people always bring punishment on themselves,
and when they die sinful they suffer forever in the next world.”

“Joseph came home from Egypt after that, did he not, Auntie?”
asked Clara.

“Yes; when Herod died Joseph brought our blessed Lord and His


178 fHE CHILDHOOD OF JESUS.

mother back from Egypt, and went to live at Nazareth. We do not
know any more about Him till He was twelve years old, and then He
went up with Joseph and His mother to Jerusalem to keep the Feast
of the Passover. That great feast the Jews always kept in remem-
brance of the night when God delivered them out of their troubles
in Egypt. When the time came for going home, Mary and Joseph
could not find the Child Jesus. They thought at first that He
was among the other boys of the company who had come up from
Nazareth, and they went on a day’s journey; but when He did not
come back to them in the evening, they turned back to Jerusalem to
seek Him. They looked for Him during three days all round the
city, and found Him at last in the Temple, among the boys who came
to be taught by the learned men there, and He was so wise that even
the great scholars who listened were astonished at His undérstanding
and His answers; but when His mother came to call Him, He went
home with her directly; and He obeyed her and Joseph in everything,
and helped and worked for them, though He was really their God and
King. That was to teach us all how good children should behave at
home to their fathers and mothers, for Joseph was like a father to
Him, though His real Father is God. And as He grew older He
lived on with them, and worked.as a carpenter with them till He was
thirty years old. So, you see, He knows just what it is to be one of
us, and a poor, hard-working man. He was God from Heaven, who
came to be one of us, and just like us.”

QUESTIONS,

Who came to see our Lord? Where did they come from? What had they seen? What did
they ask? How did the wise men find the way? Whom did theysee? What did they offer Him?
What is frankincense? What is myrrh? Why did they worship Him? What did Herod want to
do? Why could he not find Jesus? Whom did Herod murder? What do we call those Babes of
Bethlehem? Where was Jesus? Who had taken Him there? How did Joseph know he was to_
go to Egypt? When did Jesus come back from Egypt? Where did He go and live? How old
was He when we hear about Him again? Where did He go then? What feast did He go to?
What happened when it was time to go home? Where was He found and what was He doing
there? What did He do when He was called? How did He always behave te His mother and
Joseph ?
Thittyeninth Sunday.

The Baptism and Temptation of Jesus.

“ Repent ye, for the kingdom of Heaven is at hand.’’—JA/aiz. 111, 2.
“This is my beloved Son in whom I am well pleased.’’—A/ai#. 111, 17.
‘¢ Thou shalt not tempt the Lord thy God.’’—J/azz. 1v, 7.

“ AUNTIE, what did Jesus do
after He left Joseph’s carpenter
shop? You said He worked there
until He was thirty years old,” said
Willie.

“Yes, so He did,” began Aunt
Charlotte. “It was now about time
for Him to begin to set up His
kingdom, for He had only three
years more to live. Jesus had a
cousin by the name of John. He
was about six months older than
Jesus, and God sent John to make ready for the coming of Jesus.
John was a very devout man, and also a very strange man in appear-
ance. He lived out in the rocky and bushy country on the bank of
the river Jordan, dressed in a coarse garment woven of camel's hair,
and living on the locusts and wild honey he found there. He stood
there telling every one who came that the kingdom of God was going
to begin, and that those who wished to belong to it must repent and
give up their sins. All who would feel and own their sins he took
dawn to the river and baptized, to show how some day they would
have their souls washed, just as their bodies were washed now. ‘This
179 :

Sell
ii a MTT
Erie eed AT TAA TA













BEAUTIFUL GATE, JERUSALEM.

cia aetna eae


180 THE BAPTISM AND TEMPTATION OF JESUS.

washing was called baptizing, and he is always called John the Bap-
tist; but he always told the people that there was One coming who
was greater than he was, and that this Holy One would baptize them
with the Holy Ghost and with fire.

“One day, as John was baptizing, Jesus came to him, aa desired to
be baptized. Now, John knew
Jesus had never done one wrong
thing in all His life, and had
nothing to repent of. So he
said, ‘I have need to be baptized
of Thee, and comest Thou to
me?’ Then Jesus answered,
‘Suffer it to be so now, for thus
it becometh us to fulfil all
righteousness.’

“Then John baptized Him;
and as they were coming up out
of the water the heaven above
was opened, and there came God
the Holy Ghost, taking a shape
like a dove, and rested upon the
Head of Jesus, and there was
God the Father’s voice speaking
out of heaven, and saying, ‘ This
is My Beloved Son, in whom I
am well pleased.’

“Then John the Baptist knew
that Jesus was the Son of God,
and the great King whose way
he had been sent to prepare.

“And this was the beginning of baptism. After that people were
baptized by the disciples of Jesus in the name of the Father, the
Son, and the Holy Ghost, to show to the world that they belonged
to Jesus Christ, and believed in Him as their Saviour. The ministers
of our Christian churches now administer baptism.”



Jesus BAPTIZED.
THE BAPTISM AND TEMPTATION OF JESUS. 181

“J did not understand before why people were baptized,” said Clara.

“What did Jesus do next?” asked Willie.

“Ah!” replied Aunt Charlotte, “this is the beginning of Christ’s
sorrows and sufferings for human beings. You remember how Satan
had gained power over man because Eve did not resist his tempta-
sions in the Garden of Eden, and thereby all mankind was lost in sin.
Now Satan was to be overcome by Jesus, and thereby all who
depended on and believed in Jesus should be free again from the
curse of sin.

«So Jesus went up into a lonely place in the wilderness, that He
might meet the Devil, and stand up against all the temptations that
had led Eve astray. He was there forty days, with nothing to eat;
and the Devil came and said, ‘If Thou be the Son of God, command
that these stones be made bread.’ But He would not do it at Satan's
word; and so as Eve fell by eating, He stood by resisting hunger.
Then the Devil showed Him all the kingdoms of the world, and the
glory of them, in one moment of time, and said, ‘All these things
will I give Thee, if Thou wilt fall down and worship me. But
though Eve had been tempted by seeing the beauty of the fruit, our
Lord was not led astray by all the glory and beauty of this world. —
So He conquered again. Then He stood with Satan on the top of
the Temple, with a precipice below; and Satan tempted Him to cast
Himself down, so that the angels should come round and bear Him
up, and all might see He was the Son of God. It was just as Satan
had told Eve, that she would be like a god if she ate the fruit; but
Jesus said, ‘It is written, Thou shalt not tempt the Lord thy God.’

“Satan left Him then for a time, and the angels came and waited on
Him. That was the beginning of His victory over Satan and sin.
And every one of us must fight our battle too. Whenever we are |
inclined to be naughty, Satan is tempting us, but we must try to be
strong and drive him away; a our Lord Jesus will help us if we
only try, and will drive him away.”

“Aunt Charlotte, does not Jesus teach us by resisting Satan that
we can resist his temptations, too ?”

* Yes,” said Aunt Charlotte. “We shall never be more tempted than
182 THE BAPTISM AND TEMPTATION OF JESUS.

Jesus was, and the Bible tells us ‘He will not permit us to be tempted
above that which we are able to bear,’ and when we are led into sin it
is because we do not call for and use God's power to help us resist.”

- QUESTIONS.

Who was sent to prepare Jesus’ way? Where did John live? What did he wear and what did
he eat? What did he tell the people? What did he do to those who repented? In what river
did he baptize them? Who did he say was coming? How would that One baptize them? Who
came to him to be baptized? What happened after the baptism? What came down from heaven ?
Who spoke from heaven? What did God the Father’s voice say? Tell of Jesus’ temptation.
What was Jesus’ reply to Satan?











































































































































ON THE HOUSETOP.
3 é


Fortieth Sunday.

How Jesus Called His Disciples and Apostles.
* Behold the Lamb of God.’’—/ohuz 1, 36.

*«T will make you fishers of men.’’—JZav. Iv, 19.

“AUNTIE, how did Jesus get His
disciples ?” asked Clara.

“Well,” answered Aunt Charlotte,
“the next day after Jesus was baptized
—of which I have told you—the good
John began to. point Him out, saying,
‘Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh
away the sin of the world.’ There were
two poor fishermen, who had come out
to listen to John, who heard, and who
went to Jesus and asked, ‘Master,
where dwellest Thou?’ He said, ‘Come and see.’ Their names
were Andrew and John. They stayed all one night with Him, and
saw and felt that He was so great and holy that no one else could
be the Christ who had been promised to come and save the world.
And John was always the nearest and best loved of all to Him.

“ Andrew went and told his own brother, Simon, whom our Lord
named Peter, which means a rock; and they brought two more of ©
their friends to see Him, whose names were Philip and Nathanael.
When Jesus saw Nathanael coming, He said, ‘Behold an Israelite
indeed, in whom is no guile!’ Nathanael asked how He could know
him, Our Lord answered, ‘Before that Philip called thee, when thou
aie 183



ANCIENT Booxs IN TuEir CASE,
184 HOW JESUS CALLED HIS DISCIPLES AND APOSTLES.

wast under the fig tree, I saw thee.’ Then Nathanael said, ‘Thou ar
the Son of God; Thou art the King of Israel.’ For he had beet,
alone under the fig tree, and nobody who was not God could have
seen or known he was there; and our Lord said that because he
believed, he should see greater things than these.

“Now, those persons who loved to learn of Jesus and followed after
Him were called His disciples, and Jesus showed them many wonder-
ful works to make their faith stronger. The first wonderful thing He
did was—

Turning the Water into Wine.

i . “Jesus and those first friends
\ iota, -—James, John, Andrew, Simon
Peter, Philip, and Nathanael—were

all invited to a wedding, and Mary
the mother of Jesus was there too.
But the bride and bridegroom
were poor people, and in the midst
of the feast it turned out that there
= was not wine enough. Then Mary
SS ssid in a low voice to her son,

aoa a ‘They have no wine.’
EASTERN WINE SKINS AND Jars.

HA





















“Now, there were six great jars
standing by, and Jesus told the servants to fill them with water. So
they filled them up to the brim; and then He told the servants to
draw out some of what they had poured in and carry it to the chief
person there. .

“As soon as this man had tasted it, he found it was such good wine
that he said to the bridegroom that most people began their feasts with
their best wine, but that here the best had been kept for the last. This
was the first wonderful thing our Lord did on earth, and it made His
disciples know that He was God, for no one else could have done such
a wonder. We call these wonders miracles.

“After that Jesus and His friends walked over into Samaria, and


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































“FOLLOW ME,”




186 fIOW JESUS CALLED HIS DIS CIPLES AND APOSTLES.

there He met a woman at the well and told her everything she had
ever done, and so greatly astonished her that she called Him a prophet;
and she told all the people of the town, and they begged Him to stay .
with them two days, and before He left they said He was the Christ
and Son of God, and many of them believed on Him and followed
Him. Then He went’back into Galilee, into the city of Cana, where
He had turned the water into wine, and there He did another very
wonderful work by—

Healing a _Nobleman’s Son

“The nobleman did not live at Cana, but at the city of Capernaum,
and he begged Jesus to come up there and heal his son, who was sick
unto death. But Jesus did not go; He simply said to the man, ‘Go
thy way; thy son liveth. The man believed Jesus and went away,
and sure enough, when he reached home he found his son cured.
He asked the people when the boy was made well, and they told him,
and it was the same hour that Jesus spake the word. You can read
all about this wonderful cure in the last nine verses of the fourth
chapter of John. The nobleman and all his house believed on Jesus,
_and this miracle brought Him many more disciples.

“The next wonderful miracle that Jesus performed was—

Causing the Miraculous Draft of Fishes.

“They were now back in the country where Andrew, Peter, and
John lived; and, as I told you, these men were fishermen. They
used to go fishing at night in boats on the blue lake of Galilee, shut
in between the high mountains. One night they had been out in two
boats, trying hard to catch fish, but none would come to their nets.
In the morning they saw Jesus standing on the bank, with a great
crowd of people round Him, come to see and hear His teaching. He
called to Simon Peter to come and take Him into his boat, so that He
could teach the people from thence without being crowded. When
HOW JESUS CALLED HIS DISCIPLES AND APOSTLES. 187

He had done speaking, He told Andrew and Peter to go out into the
deeper water and let down their nets. They said, ‘Master, we have
toiled all the night, and have taken nothing: nevertheless at Thy
word I will let down the net.’ And instantly the net was so full of
fishes that Andrew and Peter could not draw it up without the help
of John and his brother James, who was with him in his boat; and both
boats were quite full of fish, and ready to sink with the weight!
Jesus afterward caused another wonderful draft of fishes, of which I
will tell you at the proper time. When the boats came to land, our
Lord told the four dis-
ciples that they were,
from that time forward,
to leave their business
as fishermen and _ to
come with Him, for
He would make them
fishers of men, and they
were to draw disciples
to Him, instead of
catching fish. They
believed Him, and left
all they had to follow
Him, and they were
always with Him—as
His dear friends who
followed Him everywhere, and stored up His holy words in their
hearts.

“Jesus now chose nine other men to join these three, making twelve
in all who were to devote their whole time to His help and give up
their other business. These twelve men were called 4fostles.”

“Thank you, Aunt,” said Clara. “I now see how Jesus got His
disciples and apostles. I never understood before. . I see disciples are
all who follow Jesus; apostles were His preachers or teachers of the
people.”

“Right, my dear,” said Aunt Charlotte. “And now, Master Willie.











































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Sra or GALILEE, WHERE THE MiracuLous Drart oF FISHES
OccURRED.
188 | HOW JESUS CALLED HIS DISCIPLES AND APOSTLES.

and little Curlylocks,” she said, stroking little Anna’s curls, “do you
think you can answer the questions ?”

“JT think so,” responded Anna. “It was better than the stories
about David, I believe.”

“Yes; Christ could do more wonders than David, Moses, or Daniel,
could n't He, Aunt?” asked Willie.

“Yes, for Jesus was God Himself in the form of a man,” replied
Aunt Charlotte, “and He could do anything God could do.”

QUESTIONS.

Who were the first disciples that came to Jesus? Tell about Nathanael and Jesus? Where were
fesus and his friends invited? What wonderful thing did Christ do at the wedding? Where did
He then go? Whom did He meet at the well? What wonderful miracle did He next do? Did
He have to go to the nobleman’s son to heal him? What was the regular business of Peter and
Andrew and John? What wonderful thing happened to them? What did Christ now say He
would make them? How many others did He call to be always with Him and what did He call
them ?

2
Ste

2
La



ate

Wine Seat iri
cy




Ne

THE PRODIGAL’S RETURN.












CHRIST HEALING THE SICK
is hands on every one of them, and healed them.’’—Luke IV

, 40.

‘*And he laid h


CHRIST BLESSING LITTLE CHILDREN.

“‘Suffer little children, and forbid them not, to come unto me; for of such is the kingdom of
heaven.’’--Matt. XIX, 14. ;


fortyefirst Sunday.

Other Wonderful Ded: of Goodness.

‘¢He went about doing good.’’—Aers x, 38.

“AUNT,” said Willie, “did Jesus
do any more wonderful things after
He made the sick boy well and told the
woman all she had done and made
wine into water and caused the net to

get full of fish ?”

“IT am glad you remember last
Sunday’s talk so well,” said Aunt
Charlottes withecesmmlen moNvies- Out
Lord worked many more miracles
while He was on earth, and most of
them were cures to the blind, or the
lame, or the sick. He made them well
directly by His power and love. One
of His most remarkable miracles was——





Ve

a if
cm

Tt
my
{

at |
m An



Curing Peter’s Wife’s Mother
HEALING THE BLIND. otf a Fever.

“Simon Peter had a house at Capernaum, which is one of the towns
that stand upon the shore of the lake of Galilee. There our Lord
cured the mother-in-law of Peter of a bad fever by His mighty power
in one moment, and there He generally lived when He was in those

189
190 OTHER WONDERFUL DEEDS OF GOODNESS.

parts; but He never stayed long there, for He went about doing good.
In every town our Lord used to teach in the synagogues, and draw
out all the meaning of the Law; and when He came out, all the sick
people who were near, and all the blind and deaf and dumb people
were brought to Him, and He cured them all by only just touching
them, or even only by bidding the disease to go away. For He was
God as well as man, and could do all things.

“ Now, the Jews were in two parties, called Pharisees and Sadducees,
and they used to quarrel and have many bad ways. When they found
that Jesus blamed them, they were very angry; and when the people
called Jesus the Holy One whom God promised, they said that the
real Christ would be a great king, and that this Jesus was only pre-
tending. But all the poor heard Him gladly; and when He was
driven out of the towns, they came after Him into the hills and open
places, and went everywhere they could to hear Him, and it was on
one of these occasions that Jesus performed the wonderful miracle of—

Feeding the Five Thousand.

“Jesus had gone away from his persecutors into the wilderness, and
the multitude had followed Him. Evening was coming on, and all
these people had been with Him all day, and had NO UMN storcatyeble
said to Philip, ‘Whence shall we buy bread, that these may eat?’
Philip came from a village just below, but he did not know what to do.
Andrew said there was a little boy there who had brought five loaves
and two small fishes; but what would they be among so many?
Indeed, the loaves were not like ours—only thin barley cakes. But
our Lord said, ‘Make the men sit down. So they all sat on the
grass; and He gave thanks, and began to give out to the apostles the
bread and the fish, and they never came to. an end, but there was
enough for all the five thousand; and when they had all done, He
told the apostles to gather up the remains, that nothing might be lost.
And there was enough to fill twelve great baskets.

“At another time Jesus fed four thousand people in a marvelous


OTHER WONDERFUL DEEDS OF GOODNESS. Igl

manner. You can read about it in the last ten verses of the fifteenth

chapter of Matthew.”

“That was the most wonderful thing yet,” shouted Willie. “Think
of making one boy’s dinner feed five thousand people, and then leave
more than they began with.”

“What did the people do, Auntie?” asked little Anna.

“Why,” responded Aunt Charlotte, “the people whom Jesus had

fed wanted to make Him a king, but He would not be an earthly king;

so He told the apostles to row away across the lake, while He went

up alone into the hills to pray to His Father, where the people could not

find Him. They did as He told them, and then occurred another

wonder, greater than any of the others perhaps you would think.”
“What was it? What was it?” asked Willie and Anna together.
“Why,” answered Aunt Charlotte, “it was—

Jesus and Peter Walking on the Water.

“Walking—sure enough—on the

Willie.

“Tt was’ a rough night,” replied his
aunt. “The wind came down from the
hills, and tossed the lake up in great
waves; and the apostles rowed with all
their might, but they made little way.
But when the night was far on, they saw
a Figure coming to them, walking, yes,
walking on the waves. They were
frightened, and cried out: Then the Figure Satdweht. 1Se) +s beanor
afraid!’ and they knew it was their Master, and were glad. And
Peter said, ‘Lord, if it be Thou, bid me come unto Thee on the water.’
So he came out of the boat, and as long as he trusted in His Master
he could walk; but when he saw the wind boisterous, he was afraid,
and cried out, and then he began to sink. He called out, and Jesus



, CHRIST AND PETER ON THE WATER.
} :

water? Are you joking, Aunt?” asked —





i
Is
ik
is
i

th
192 OTHER WONDERFUL DEEDS OF GOODNESS.

put forth His hand and held him up, saying, ‘O thou of little faith,
wherefore didst thou doubt?’ Then they were both taken into the
boat, and the wind ceased, and the lake was calm and still.”

The children were too deeply thoughtful to make any more remarks,
and Aunt Charlotte explained to chem that God could do anything,
and Jesus was God.

QUESTIONS.

Whom did Jesus cure of a fever? Where did Peter live? Who hated Jesus? But who loved
and followed him? What wonderful miracle did Jesus perform in the wilderness? Where did He
send His disciples? What happened to them on the lake? What miracle was performed? Why
could Jesus do these wonderful things?



THE LOST PIECE OF MONEY.
~ Fortyesecond Sunoay.



Raising the Widow’s Son and Other Miracles.

«Young man, I say unto thee, Arise.’’—Zuke Vil, 14.
“« His face did shine as the sun.’’—JAZa/?/. XVII, 2.
‘Suffer the little children to come unto Me.’’—Jfark x, 14.

« AUNTIE, please tell us more of
Jesus’ wonders to-day,” requested little
Anna.

“Tam glad you like to hear of them,”
said Aunt Charlotte, “and I will tell
you something more wonderful than
walking on the water.”

«What ?” said Willie.

“Raising the dead,” said his aunt.
“Once, when He was going with His
disciples into a village called Nain,
He meta funeral coming out. People
are not carried to the grave in their coffins in the East; but they are
laid on a sort of bed called a bier, with all their best clothes on, and
a wreath of flowers round the head. The person who was now to be
buried was quite a young man, and he was the only son of his
mother, and she was a widow. And when the Lord saw it He had
pity on the poor woman, and He said to her, ‘Weep not. Then He
came and touched the bier, and the bearers stood still. dihen Ele
said, ‘Young man, I say unto thee, Arise” And he that was dead sat
up and began to speak; and our Lord gave him back alive to his

: 193



EASTERN HEAD-DRESS.
194 RAISING THE WIDOW’S SON AND OTHER MIRACLES.

mother. Jesus afterward raised other dead people. If Clara will
make a note she can read you in the ninth chapter of Matthew,
eighteenth to twenty-sixth verses, where he raised a girl, the daughter
of Jairus, to life, and the eleventh chapter of John tells about His
“calling His friend Lazarus from the grave after he had been dead
three days. These are both beautiful stories, which you can read for
yourselves.”

“That showed He was God sure enough,” said Willie.

“Yes,” said Aunt Charlotte, “but still the people doubted it. They
thought He did these things by some trick. But Jesus gave His
disciples another proof that He was really the Christ in—

The Wonderful Transfiguration.

“What does transfiguration mean?” asked Clara.

“This story will tell you,” said her avnt. “One night Jesus
took Peter and James and John out to a mountain with Him,
as He was wont to do when He was going apart to pray. They
went to sleep; but when they woke, they saw Him in bright light
and glory. His face was shining like the sun, and His clothes
were as white as the light; and there were two talking with Him,
Moses and Elias. And they were talking of how He was come to
die at Jerusalem. The three were afraid, but they were happy too;
and Peter said, ‘Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make
three tabernacles ; one for Thee, one for Moses, and one for Elias’;
for, indeed, he hardly knew what he was saying. .

“And even as He spoke, a bright cloud came and hid the wonderful
sight from them, and then they found that no one was with them but
their Master, Jesus, looking as usual; and He bade them tell no one
about what they had seen, until the Son of man should be risen again
from the dead.

“They knew then that their Lord was the Son of God: but they
could not think what He could mean by rising again from the dead.
And this wonderful showing forth of His glory, Clara, is called the
Transfiguration.”
RAISING THE WIDOW’S SON AND OTHER MIRACLES. 195

Jesus Loves Little Children.

«Were there not any children with Jesus, Auntie?” asked little
Anna.

“Yes,” responded Willie; “don’t you remember that boy whose
dinner Jesus made into enough to feed five thousand ?”

“Ves,” said Aunt Charlotte, “there were always children with the
parents who followed Jesus, and He loved them and used them often
as examples. Once when the disciples disputed among themselves
who would be first and greatest in His kingdom, our Lord called
a little child, and took him, and set him in the midst, and said
that the greatest in His kingdom would be the most like that little
child; for only those who are ready to be last here can be high up
there. At another time when the mothers were bringing their babies
for Jesus to touch, the disciples wanted to keep them away; but He
said, ‘Suffer the little children to come unto Me, and forbid them not,
for of such is the kingdom of heaven.’

“And then He took the little ones up in His arms, and put His
hands on them, and blessed them. And just so He blesses the little
children who come to Him now. Though they can not see Him now,
He is always glad to hear them pray.”

QUESTIONS.

What was the matter with the widow’s son? What did Jesus do to him? Whom else did Jesus
raise from the dead? What other wonderful proof did Jesus give His disciples that He was divine?
Who appeared with Him in the Transfiguration? What did the disciples know after that? What
did Jesus think of little children? Tell the two stories about them in this lesson,



-

PTOLEMY PHILADELPHUS.

By HIS ORDERS THE HEBREW SCRIPTURES WERE TRANSLATED INTO GREBR
Forty=third Sunday.

Jesus the King.
‘* Hosanna to the Son of David.’’—AMa#t. xx1, 9.

“DID Jesus just keep on doing
wonderful things to make the
people believe on Him, Auntie?”
asked Willie.

eNGES, JE Or Uniteey isan) Clute
blessed Lord went about doing
good and teaching, generatiy in
Galilee, in the towns or on the hills,
where the people camc out to hear
Him; and at the feasts, when people
went to worship at Jerusalem, He
used to go-up and speak to them
in the outer court of the Temple.
Ican not stop to tell you of all the wonderful things He did. In
the first chapter of Mark we read of His healing a leper. Leprosy
is a disease that no doctor could cure, and Luke, in the seventcenth
chapter, tells us where Jesus healed ten lepers all at once. Matthew,
in the twelfth chapter, tells how He made a withered hand well—
another thing the doctors could never do. And in the seventh
chapter Matthew also tells of how once when the disciples were
about to be lost in a great storm, Jesus just spoke to the winds.
‘Peace, be still,’ He said, and in a minute it was calm. Then, in the
ninth chapter of Matthew we read how He gave two blind men
196



TABLE OF SHEW-BREAD,




CHRIST IN THE GARDEN.
‘What, could ye not watch with me one hour?’’—Matt. XXVI, 40.




198 _ JESUS THE KING.

sitting upon an ass.’ People remembered this, and they spread thei1
mantles on the- ground before Him, and others cut down branches
from the trees and strewed them in the way; and the people before
and behind, especially the children, cried out with all their might,
‘Hosanna to the Son of David: Blessed is He that cometh in the
name of the Lord; Hosanna in the highest.’ Hosanna means, ‘Save
now.’ ;

“The Pharisees were very angry, and bade Him stop them; but He
answered with the verse of a Psalm, ‘Yea, have ye never read, Out
of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast Thou ordained strength ?’

“But upon the mountain side Jesus paused for a little while, and as
He looked at beautiful Jerusalem He wept over the city, for He knew
that sad and dreadful punishments were coming on it; and yet the
people would not listen to Him and be sorry, and so be saved.

“Then He rode on and entered the city. In our next lesson I will
tell you more of what happened.” :

QUESTIONS.

How long did Jesus go about doing good? Tell some of the wonderful things He did? What
did the people want to do? What made them sure Jesus was to be their King? What did they
shout? What did Jesus do before entering Jerusalem ?

























takes

ANCIENT WINE-PRESS.
Fortysfourth Sunday.

Cleansing ‘ihe Temple and the Last Supper.

«« My house shall be called the house of prayer.’”’—J/att. XX1, 13.
“¢ This do in remembrance of Me.’’—Lwke XXU, 14.

“AUNT, you said
you would tell us more
of what Jesus did after
entering Jerusalem,”
said Willie.

“Well,” began Aunt
Charlotte, “the first
thing our blessed Lord
did at Jerusalem was to
go into the Temple;
and there, in the courts.
He found people keep-
ing shop, selling the
lambs that were wanted

vr the Passover, and doves for other services, and changing the
vin that strangers brought for Jewish money.

“This was very disrespectful to God, and Jesus was angry. He had
driven them all out once before, and they had come back, and now
they were doing it again. So He drove them all out, and told
them His Father’s house was a house of prayer, but they had made it
a den of thieves.

“No one dared to answer Him, and all that day and the next He

2?



GETHSEMANE,
200 CLEANSING THE TEMPLE AND THE LAST SUPPER.

stood in the Temple, teaching the people, and showing the wicked-
ness of the chief priests and Pharisees. It seemed as if all the people
of Jerusalem were ready to follow Him, and as if He might begin His
reign directly ; but this was not what He came for, and, as He well
knew, the Pharisees were planning against Him.

“They wanted to get Him to say something that they could. say
was against the Law, so they asked Him many hard questions, but His
great wisdom put them all to silence, and made them ashamed; but
they were so hard and wicked that they only hated Him the more;
and the chief priests grew more fierce and bitter when they saw how
all men listened to the Lord Jesus. They could do nothing to Him
by day, because the people would have risen up to defend Him; so
they tried how to find Him alone and at night, to take Him secretly.
Then came—

The Wicked Plot of Judas.

“Judas, you know, was one of the twelve apostles. He was allowed
to be the treasurer for Christ and the other apostles. But he was too
fond of money, and he used to take for himself what was trusted to
him to take care of. So he went on from bad to worse, till at last he
did the dreadful thing of promising the chief priests that he would
show them to some lonely place, where they could take his Lord and
Master prisoner; and then they were to pay him for this wickedness
with thirty pieces of silver. Judas settled all this, and then he went
back to our Lord and the other eleven apostles just as usual, thinking
they did not know; but our Lord did know very well. But He bade
_ the apostles get ready the supper that was eaten the night before the
Passover, in a large upper room that was lent to them for it, and there
He sat down to eat with them.

“That night when our Lord and His apostles were eating the
Supper together, He was very sorrowful, and said, ‘One of you shall
betray me.’ The apostles were grieved, and each said, ‘ Lord, is it I?’
_ And He said, ‘ He that dippeth his hand with me in the dish, the same
shall betray me.’ And then, as the custom was, He dipped His piece
CLEANSING THE TEMPLE AND THE LAST SUPPER. 201

of bread in the dish in the middle of the table, and gave it to Judas.
Then the wicked man presently got up and went away.

“ And as they were still in the upper room, our Lord took bread
and broke it, and gave a piece to each of His apostles, and said, ‘ Take,
eat; this is My Body,which is broken for you: this do in remembrance
of Me.” And He took a cup of wine, and said, ‘ This Cup is the new
testament in My blood: this do, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance
of Me. For as often as ye do eat of this Bread, and drink this Cup,
ye do show the Lord’s death till He come. And that was the begin-
ning of what we call the Sacrament or the Lord’s Supper.”

« Auntie, I am very glad you told us of this. I did not know before
just how the Lord’s Supper was begun, nor did I understand so well
as now why we celebrate it.”

“Tt is substituted,” said Aunt Charlotte, “in the place of the old
Jewish Passover, and a little later we shall find why the Lord’s day
was substituted for the old Jewish Sabbath day.”

QUESTIONS.

What did Jesus do when He first entered Jerusalem? What did the people do? What did the
Pharisees try to get Him to do? What did the chief priests try to do? Which one of the disciples
turned traitor? What was the cause of Judas’ sin? Tell about the Lord’s Supper.

18



ae
FOUNTAIN AT NAZARETH,
‘“Forty-tifth Sunday.

The Betrayal and Arrest of Jesus.

© Not as I will, but as Thou wilt.””—A/ait. xxvi, 39.
ss Betrayest thou the Son of Man with a kiss >—Zwke xx, 48.

i . he
ADs

Za;

O\\

‘Ne
“AIn
‘Not as I wiLL, BUT AS THOU WILT.”





MOINS dia etic
wicked old priests
come into the supper-
room with Judas and
catch Jesus?” asked
little Anna.

“No, darling, when
the Supper was over,
and night was coming
on, our Lord went out
with His disciples to
a garden, full of olive
trees, called Gethsem-
ane, where He often
used to pray. He told
them again on the way
that they would soon
all be afraid, and leave
Him: but Peter could
not think so, and said |

boldly that if everybody fell from Him, he never would. But Jesus
answered, ‘ Verily, I say unto thee that this night, before the cock

crow, thou shalt deny Me thrice.’

202
THE BETRAYAL AND ARREST OF JESUS. 203

The Agony in the Garden.

“Then He went on to the garden, taking only Peter, James, and
John into it with Him, and telling them to watch while He went apart
to pray. They were heavy and sorrowful, and could not keep awake;
but while He was praying, He was in the greatest trouble and grief
that ever any one felt. He knelt and prayed in an agony, till His
sweat was as great drops of blood falling down to the ground. For
He was feeling the sorrow for all the sin of all the world—the sorrow
that belongs to youand me. The disciples heard Him say, ‘O my
_ Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me: nevertheless, not
as I will, but as Thou wilt’ He came to them more than once, and
called them, as if He longed for them to comfort Him; but still they
fell asleep again, though He said, ‘What, could ye not watch with me
one hour? The spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak.’

The Deceitful Kiss and the Cruel Soldiers.

“Just as our Lord had wakened His three apostles for the last time,
there came a tread of soldiers, and lanterns gleamed through the olive
trees. For Judas Iscariot, the traitor, knew that his Master was apt to
go to the olive garden to pray at night, and he was leading them, and
he said to them, ‘Whomsoever I shall kiss, that same is He: hold
Him fast. And he came up first to Jesus, and said, ‘ Hail, master ;
and kissed Him. All our Lord said was, ‘Judas, betrayest thou the
Son of man witha kiss ?’ .

“ Peter tried to defend Him, and drew a sword and cut off the eat
of one of the servants; but our Lord bade him put the sword back
into the sheath; and then, in His great love, our blessed Lord touched
the ear, and cured it inan instant, and begged that all the disciples
might be allowed to go their way. Indeed, they were so much afraid
that they all forsook Him and fled away, except John and Peter, who
both followed to see what would be done with Him.”
204, THE BETRAVAL AND ARREST OF JESUS.

“ That was very bad and mean to treat good Jesus that way,” said
little Anna.

“I’m glad Peter and John did not run away from Him like the
others,” said Willie. “I like Peter because he was so brave.”

“Yes, but Peter got into trouble a little later,” said Aunt Charlotte.
“T will tell you of it in our next lesson.”

QUESTIONS.

Where did Jesus go when the supper was over? Whom did He take with Him into the garden?
What did the disciples do? What were some of the words Jesus uttered? Who came with the
soldiers? How did Judas betray Jesus? Who tried to defend Jesus, and what did he do? What
did Jesus do? What did all the disciples except Peter and John do-



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THE BURIAL OF CHRIST

** And the women beheld the sepulchre,

» 55.

XIII

—Luke X

d.”

y was la

and how his bod
Fortyesirth Sunday.



The Trial of Jesus by the Jews. ee

¢¢J know not what thou sayest.””—Luwke Xx, 60.
‘« He is brought as a lamb to the slaughter.’’—/sazah LIIl, 7.

« AUNT, you said you would tell
us how Peter got into trouble by

‘ standing up for Jesus,” said Willie.

“Yes, and I want to know what
those wicked men did with him,”
said little Anna. “ Did they crucify
Him right off in the garden?”

“T will answer you both,” said .
Aunt Charlotte. “You will see,
Willie, that Peter got into trouble
not by standing up for Jesus, as you
suppose, but by denying Him. No,
Anna, they did not crucify Jesus

in the garden. The soldiers took Jesus, and bound Him, and led.
Him away to Annas first; for he was father-in-law to Caiaphas, which
was the high priest that same year. From Annas Jesus was taken
- to Caiaphas, where his enemies tried to make out some charge to bring
against Him; but as He was good and holy, and had no sin at all,
they could accuse Him of nothing. And when they asked Him ©
questions, He answered them not a word, for He knew that it was

only to accuse Him. Then, Willie, came the sad scene in which— .

_ 205



ROMAN CENTURION.


206 ZHE TRIAL OF JESUS BY THE JEWS.

Peter Denied His Lord.

_ “While Jesus stood at the upper end of the hall, John, who knew
one of the servants, had. come in to the lower end, and had brought
in Peter with him. The chill of the morning had come on, and the
servants lighted a fire on the pavement, where Peter stood and warmed
himself. One of the maids there looked at him, and asked if he did
not belong to
Jesus of Naza-
fete eter
was afraid,and
said, ‘I know
not what thou
sayest. But
then another
Aan e Cy
‘This fellow
was also with
Jesus of Naza-
retin eken
grew more
elieoehilalye aeckayital
went on- de-
claring he did
not know such
a person; but



CHRIST IS SCOURGED.
“Then Pilate therefore took Jesus, and scourged him.’’—John XIX, 1. presently an-

other servant
said, ‘Did I not see thee in the garden with Him?’ Again Peter's
fear of being punished for wounding the man in the garden led him
further astray, for he began to curse and swear, and say, ‘I know
not the man.’ Just then the cock crew, and the Lord turned round
and looked upon Peter.
“That look went to his heart. He went out and wept bitterly ; and
whenever he thought of his sin, he wept.” |
THE TRIAL OF JESUS BY THE JEWS. 207

“That is what Jesus had told Peter he would do,” said Clara.
“This is another proof that He knows things before they happen, and
is God.”

Aunt Charlotte nodded an approving smile to Clara,and then con-
tinued. ae

“But this was only the beginning of our Lord’s trials. From the
house of Caiaphas they carried—

Jesus Before the Great Council of the Jews,

where all of the chief men questioned Him. But no one could prove
that He had broken the law; and whenever a story was brought
against Him, it turned out not to be true- At last the high priest
stood up and commanded Him to say whether He were the Christ or
not. He answered, ‘Thou hast said: nevertheless, I say unto you,
hereafter shall ye see the Son of man sitting on the right hand of
power, and coming in the clouds of heaven. At this answer, Caiaphas
and all the other enemies made a great outcry, as if they were very
much shocked at His speaking of Himself as the great Judge of all—
namely, as God. They all cried, ‘ He is guilty of death’; and they
began to beat Him and strike Him ; and they blindfolded Him, and
struck Him on the face, and bade Him say whose blow it was. And
all the time He stood gentle and patient, and said not one word of
complaint or anger.

“Much as the chief priests hated Jesus, they dared not put Him to
death.”

“Did they have to turn him loose?” asked Anna.

“No,” said Auntie. “I will tell you in the next lesson what they
did with Him.”

QUESTIONS.

"Where did the soldiers take Jesus? Could they find any faultin Him? Where were Peter
- and John? What did the servant ask Peter? What did Peter answer? How many times did he
deny his Lord? What reminded him of his sin? Where did they carry Jesus from the house of
Caiaphas? Who questioned Him there? What did the high priest at last ask Him? What was His
answer? What did they cry? How did they mistreat Him? ;
Fortyeseventh Sunday.

Jesus Before Pilate’s Court.

**Ye denied the Holy One and Just and desired a murderer to be granted unto you.”’—Acés
Wi, 14. :

“AUNTIE,” began Clara, “you told
us the Jews dared not put Christ to
death ; why was that ?” .

“Since the reign of the great wicked
Herod,” replied Aunt Charlotte, “the
Romans had not allowed the Jews to
put anybody to death without their
leave; so the chief priests were obliged
to take Jesus before the Roman gover-
mer, Teioianniitss Jee, — Jeiime ith AWS ano
possible to find anything that a Roman
would think He deserved to be put to
death for. When the chief priests said
that ‘by our law He ought to die,
: because He made Himself the Son of
*f am INNOCENT OF THE BLoop = THIS JUST God,’ Pilate only feared to do anything

EERSONy against Him; for he saw that there
was no fault in Jesus, but that the chief priests were spiteful and
hated Him.























The Wicked Charge of Treason.

“Then the chief priests said that He called Himself King of the

Jews. This made Pilate more anxious, for to set up to be an earthly
208
JESUS BEFORE PILATE’S COURT. 209

king would have been rebelling against the Romans; but still he
wanted to let Jesus go, because he saw that He was innocent; yet he
did not like to offend the priests, who might have accused him to the
Emperor of Rome. Pilate saw what was just; but he was afraid, and
cared for himself more than for his duty.

- « Pilate’s wife warned him not to have anything to do with harming
Jesus. She told him she had suffered in a dream on account of Him,
and Pilate tried hard to release Him. At last he thought he had found
a way of saving the Lord Jesus without offending the Romans. It
was the custom that at the feast of the Passover he should set some
prisoner free, whomsoever the Jews asked for; and he thought that
they would ask for Jesus.

The Jews Preferred a Murderer to Christ.

« But there was a robber and murderer in prison named Barabbas,
and while Pilate was absent from the hall the enemies of our Lord
went about among the people, stirring them up to ask for him to be
set free ; so that the poor, foolish people all broke out with a great
shout to ask that this murderer Barabbas might be set free.

“ Pilate asked them what was he to do with Jesus, and then there
was a great roar from all the people, ‘Crucify Him! crucify Him!’

“Now, crucifying was a very horrible and painful punishment, that
had never been allowed among the Jews, but was chiefly used by
the Romans themselves for slaves and for robbers © 6@ Ghats Waele
savage cry was for Jesus to have the punishment that belonged to
Barabbas. s

« Pilate’s soldiers were very cruel, and they laughed at a poor man
being called a king; so when they had beaten the blessed Jesus till
He was bleeding all over, they took one of their old red soldiers’
cloaks and threw it over Him; and they platted a crown of sharp
thorns, and forced it upon His head ; and they puta reed in His right
hand, instead of a sceptre; and they bowed their knees, mocking Him
by pretending to do Him honor.

SER TE SR ND a I Sie niece alk




210 JE SOS TBAERORE a IE ATES 8OO CRIs

Pilate Tries to Clear Himself.

“Jesus never spoke one word of anger all this time; and when
Pilate saw His meek, brave, patient face, pale and faint with pain, and
streaming with blood, he thought the people would pity Him; so he
led Him once more to the top of the steps of the judgment hall, and
said, ‘Behold the man?’ But the people were too mad to have any
pity or feeling, and they only cried louder and louder still, ‘ Crucify
Him! crucify Him!’ Pilate was not brave enough to go against them
all, even to save an innocent man; so all he did was to take water
and wash his hands before them all, to show that he was clear of wish-
ing it, and He said, ‘I am innocent of the blood of this just person.’
But the chief priests made the dreadful answer, ‘ His blood be on us,
and on our children!’ meaning that they would take the guilt and
punishment.”

QUESTIONS.

Why could the Jews not put Christ todeath? What did they accuse Him of before the gov-
ernor? Why did not Pilate release Jesus? Who warned Pilate not to punish Jesus? What did
Pilate then try to do? Which of the two did the people choose? Who was Barabbas? What did
the Jews say should be done with Jesus? How did Pilate’s soldiers treat Jesus? What last effort

_ did Pilate make to save Jesus? How did he try to clear himself? What did the priests cry?



WASHING TIE HANDS.

Se


Fortyecighth Sunoay. —

The Crucifixion of Jesus.

«‘ They pierced my hands and my feet.’’—Psa/m xxi, 16.
«« Jesus of Nazareth, the king of the Jews.’’—/ohn XIX, 19.

«“ AUNTIE, what did they do next with
Jesus, after they treated Him so mean?”
asked little Anna.

“Pilate gave Him up to the Jews and
they crucified Him, did they not, Aunt?”
: rejoined Willie.

Serer “No,” said Aunt Charlotte. “The Jews

did not crucify Christ. The Romans did it, but the Jews were the

cause of it. When the judgment, about which I told you last Sunday,
was over, Pilate gave up our Lord to the four soldiers who were to
crucify Him. His cross,.a heavy beam of wood, with another fastened
across it, was laid on His shoulders, that He might carry it to the
place where He was to suffer—a place named Calvary, outside the
walls of Jerusalem. He was so weak and worn out after the long

. sad night, the being taken from one judge to another, and the beating —
and tormenting, that He could hardly walk under it; and the soldiers
met a man coming out of the country whom they forced to carry it
after Jesus.

“When they came to Calvary, the soldiers made the blessed Jesus
lie down on the beam of wood, and they stretched His arms out on
the cross-beam, and drove a large nail through each of the palms of
His hands into the wood, and another nail through His feet. Thus

211


212 _ LHE CRUCIFIXION OF JESUS,

they fulfilled the prophecy in the twenty-second Psalm and six-
teenth verse saying ‘They pierced my hands and my feet.’ Then
they lifted up the cross, with Him upon it, and planted it in the ground,
that He might hang there till He should die. And all He said while
they were thus nailing Him were the words, ‘Father, forgive them ;
for they know not what they do!’

“Over the head of the blessed Lord on the cross was a tablet, with
the words, ‘Jesus of Nazareth the king of the Jews.” The Jews tried
to persuade Pilate to change this inscription so it would read, ‘He
said He was king of the Jews’; but Pilate would not change it, and
the tablet told the truth, for Jesus is king of the Jews, and the Bible
tells us He will come again to reign over His kingdom on earth, but
it will not be until all the world shall become believers in Christ. On
each side of Jesus was another cross, with a robber upon it, and in
this was fulfilled the prophecy ‘He was numbered with transgressors,’
written hundreds of years before by the prophet, and we can read it
in the fifty-third chapter of Isaiah.

“There Jesus hung patiently, while the chief priests and Pharisees
passed by, mocking and laughing at His pain, and crying out, ‘He
saved others; Himself He can not save. If He be the King of
Israel, let Him now come down from the cross, and we will believe
Him.’ Even the robbers at first joined in the cry; but by and by one
of them began to feel that He who was so patient and so great in all
that agony must truly be the Son of God; and he rebuked his fellow,
and said to Jesus, ‘Lord, remember me when Thou comest into Thy
kingdom!’ And the Lord answered, ‘To-day shalt thou be with Me
in paradise !’ :

“Jesus’ grief-stricken mother had come to stand by the foot of His
cross, and with her, her sister and some other women, and His beloved
apostle John. The Lord looked down at her, and said, ‘Woman,
behold thy son!’ and He looked at John, and said, ‘ Behold thy
mother!’ And John took Mary the mother of Jesus home with him,
and was always like a son to her afterward.

“At noon-day a dreadful darkness came over all the earth, and it
lasted for three whole hours, as if the very sun mourned for Him who
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CHRIST ASCENDING INTO HEAVEN
““While he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried up into heaven."

Luke XXIV, 51.
IEEE EE ee ae aes) ee

THE CRUCIFIXION OF JESUS, 213

made it. The earth quaked, even the rocks were split asunder, and
the great thick veil of the temple was split in two from the top to the
hottom. These things convinced the Roman soldiers who watched
Jesus that He was no ordinary person, and their commander, the cen-
turion, went so far as to declare, ‘Truly, this was the Son of God.’
Just at three o’clock the blessed Lord said, ‘I thirst’; and as one of
the soldiers was touching His lips with a sponge full of vinegar, He
gave a great sad cry, ‘My God, my God, why hast Thou forsaken
Me!’ Then presently he added, ‘It is finished! Father, into Thy
hands I commend my spirit!’ And He cried with a loud cry; and
so He, who was God and man in one, died for us men, and for our
salvation.”

“Auntie,” said Clara, “should we blame the Jews for crucifying
Christ? We are taught that He died for all sinners, and as such
are we not all responsible for His death ?”

“Yes, my dear; that is a good point. We are too severe on the
Jews. Every sinner has a part in the crucifixion of Jesus. Jesus died
for those very Jews who crucified Him, and any other wicked people
would have done just as they did, and asked God to forgive them.
They did not know He was the Son of God, for Jesus said so; and per-
haps some of them who cried crucify Him afterward repented and
believed on Him, and were saved by Him.”

QUESTIONS. |

Where was our Lord to be crucified? What had He to carry? But who had to be called to
help Him? Why was He so worn out? What was the cross? How was He fastened to it?
What prayer did He make? For whom was He praying? For whom was He dying? What was
set up over our Lord’s head? Who were crucified on each side? How did the robbers behave at
first? How did one change? Who were standing by His cross? What did He say to his mother
and to John? What came over the earth? Howlong did the darkness last? What did our Lord
éry out? What was His sad cry? What did He ay at last? Why did He die?
Forty-ninth Sunday,

The Burial of Jesus.

‘* He wrapped it in a clean linen cloth and laid it in his own new tomb, which he had hewn
out in a rock.’’—Mart. xxv, 59, 60.

“AUNTIE, did they bury
Jesus in the ‘potter’s field’
that was bought with Judas’
thirty pieces of silver, and
where Judas was buried?”
asked Willie.

“No,” answered Aunt Char-
lotte. “TI will tell you about
His burial. There were some
good people even among the
chiefof the Jews; and two of
these, named Nicodemus and
Joseph of Arimathea, went to
Pontius Pilate and asked him
to let them bury the body of
Jesus. People generally were
much longer in dying on the
cross, so Pilate sent to see if
He was dead. To make sure, one of the soldiers pierced His side
with a spear, and out came blood and water together. The robbers
were still alive, so the soldiers broke their fegs, that they might die
sooner; and so the repenting one soon went to our Lord in paradise.

214,



THORN-CROWNED CHRIST.
THE BURIAL OF JESUS. 215

“Then Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea took the holy body
down from the cross, quite dead. Now, close by, Joseph had a garden,
and in it was acave in which he had hewn out a new tomb in the rock,
and in which he meant to be buried himself, but where no one had
yet been laid. They carried our Lord’s body there; and the good
women who followed Him, Mary Magdalene and the rest, wrapped it
up in linen cloths and sweet spices. They wanted to do more foie,
but it was getting late on Friday evening, and the Jewish Sabbath day,
or seventh day, was counted from sunset on our Friday,and then they
could do no manner of work. So they had to wait till the Sabbath
should be over; and Joseph rolled a great rock to close up the door,
and they went away in their grief.

«And then came a guard of soldiers, whom the chief priests had
sent to watch the stone, for fear, as they told Pilate, that the disciples
should steal the body away in the night. So they put seals over the
joinings of the rock and door. The seals were made of paper that
had the governor's stamp on them, and they would be torn if any one
rolled the stone away. It was a death penalty for any one to break
this seal. So they thought they had made sure that no one should
move the stone; and the soldiers were set to watch.

“Now, it is very fortunate for Christianity that all this was done, for
it made sure that no one would dare to roll the stone away, for there
was the seal they dared not break, and there were the soldiers to
guard the tomb, with instructions to arrest or kill any one who should
come to remove the stone or take away the body. All day long on
the Sabbath day, and all that night, these Roman soldiers stood guard
over the tomb of Jesus. Next Sunday I will tell you the most wonder-
ful thing that ever happened in the world.”

QUESTIONS.

Who asked for our Lord’s body? How was it made sure that our Lord was dead? What
was done to the robbers? Where did Nicodemus and Joseph take the body? To whom did the
cave belong? Who were there too? How did they wrap the body? What did they put with it?
Why did they not doany more? When did the Sabbath begin? How did Joseph close up the cave?
Who watched outside? Who sent the soldiers? Why was this fortunate for Christian history ?
‘Fiftieth Sunday.

The Resurrection of Jesus.

“* Now is Christ risen from the dead,’’—1 Cor. xv1, 20.
** Peace be unto you.’’—Lwke xxiv, 36.

“AUNTIE, you said you would teil
us the most wonderful thing that ever
happened in the world this Sunday,”
said Willie.

“T know what it was,” said little Anna;
“Clara told me.”

“What?” asked Aunt Charlotte.

“Jesus got up from the grave Himself,”
responded the child with a look of delight.
“The old mean men and all the soldiers
could not help it.”

“Right, my darling,” began Aunt
BOR ener Charlotte. “The good women of whom

I told you waited all the Sabbath day

in sorrow, for they wanted to put the spices on His body. All this
time our Lord Jesus lay in His grave. But in the night there was a
great earthquake, and an angel came from heaven, and rolled away
the stone from the door of the cave, and sat upon it; and for fear of
him the ‘keepers did shake, and were as dead men.’ And the Lord
Jesus rose up and cast aside the linen cloths, and came out of the
grave, and He is alive now and will be forever more. That was the

wonderful thing I had to tell you. He had raised others from the
216


THE RESURRECTION OF JESUS. — : 217

dead. Now He raised Himself from the dead, that all men might
believe in Him.

“Very early in the morning Mary Magdalene and the other women
who wanted to embalm the body of Jesus as soon as the Sabbath was
past, came with the sweet spices they had prepared. ‘They wondered
who would roll away the stone for them, and they thought perhaps
the soldiers would drive them away, but they determined to go to the
grave anyhow, and see what could be done. Their hearts leaped with
joy when they came nearer and saw that the stone was taken away ;
but when they went in, they saw that the body of the Lord was gone.
They feared at first

that some one had
taken it away; but
behold! two men
stood by them in
shining garments,
who said, ‘Why
seek ye the living
among the dead?
He is not here,
but is risen, as He
Seyiche KGoiakes Soe
the place where the
Lord lay.’

“And as the
women went in great wonder to tell the disciples they saw Jesus
Himself, the same whom they had seen and touched, quite dead,
the day before yesterday, standing before them, speaking kindly to
them. So they held Him by the feet, and worshiped Hams, Bor
never was there such wonderful joy and gladness in all the world.



ANCIENT OLIVE-PRESS.

The Entertaining Stranger.

“Tt was the first day of the week, or the Jewish Monday, that our

Lord rose from the dead, and we call that day the Lord’s day, or Sun-
14
218 - THE RESUKRECTION OF JESUS.

day, and have kept it holy ever since, instead of the seventh day or
Sabbath of the Jews. But on that first day it seemed too wonderful.
The apostles had never understood when their Lord spoke of dying
and rising again; and though the women said they had seen Him,
they were afraid to trust their word, and thought it a mistake.

“Later in the day, two of the disciples were walking to Emmaus, a
little village near Jerusalem, when a stranger came and joined them.

‘He asked why they were sad, and what they were talking of They
told Him it was of Jesus of Nazareth, who had been a great prophet,
and they had hoped would have redeemed Israel; but now He had
been put to death the day before yesterday, yet that some of the
women said that they had seen a vision of angels which said that He
was alive.

“Then the stranger began to show them, as they had never seen
before, that all the Old Testament meant that when the Christ came,
the Seed of the woman, He was to suffer and to save the world before
His kingdom and glory could begin; and their minds understood, for
they were opened to see and know the Scripture, so that they were
sure that Jesus was the Christ.

“So they came to Emmaus, and went into a house; and the stranger
made as if He would have gone farther, but they pressed Him to come
in. He sat down with them, and took bread and blessed and broke
it; and then their eyes were opened, and they knew it was Jesus
Himself! And as they knew Him, He vanished out of their sight.
And they said to one another,‘ Did not our heart burn within us,
while He talked with us by the way ?’

The Wonderful Appearance in the Upper Room.

“In the evening, the ten apostles were all together in the upper
room, with the doors close shut, for fear of the Jews. There were only
ten, for Thomas was not there; the wretched Judas had hung himself
in his grief and despair. The two disciples came back from Emmaus,
and told how they had seen Jesus; and while they were telling about
THE RESURRECTION OF JESUS. 219

it, though the door was not opened they found Jesus Himself stand-
ing in the midst, and they heard His voice say, ‘ Peace be unto you.

“They were afraid at first; butagain He said, ‘Why are ye troubled?
and why do thoughts arise in ‘your hearts? Behold My hands and
My feet, that it is I Myself; handle Me, and see; fora spirit hath not
flesh and bones, as ye see Me have.” Then He showed them that
there were the marks of the nails in His hands and feet, and the spear-
wound in His side; so that-it was His own real body that had’come
again from the dead.

“And while they could not believe for joy, and wondered, He
Said ddlavcrs yeu sliercseany.
meat?’ And they gave Him a
piece of broiled fi. and a
honeycomb; and He ate with
them, to make them quite sure
it was Himself.

“And He explained all to $2
them, and showed them how =

He really is the Christ the Son Uj,
of God; and told them that, as “il UV
His father had sent Him, so | i! if
He would send them to teach
all nations how He had died =
and risen again to save men /
from their sins.”

«That is, sure enough, the
most wonderful story of all, |
Auntie,” said little Anna, as Aunt Charlotte paused. “I do love good
Jesus; and I am so glad He came to life and got out of the grave.”

“By and by,” said Clara, with a sweet smile through eyes that
almost swam with tears, “Jesus will raise us all from the dead, as He
raised Himself. Will He not, Auntie?”

“Yes, my darling,” said Aunt Charlotte. “ Paul tells us that just as
Jesus Christ was raised from the dead, so shall those who trust in Him
rise up tomeet Him one day.”


































































































































































Ca



















Upper CHAMBERS IN ORIENTAL HOUSE.
220 : THE RESURRECTION OF JESUS.

“ Did Jesus die any more after He rose from the dead, Aunt?” asked
Willie.

“No; He went in His body to heaven. I will tell you of it next
Sunday.”

QUESTIONS.

What happened all the night after the Sabbath? Who came down from heaven? What hap.
pened to the soldiers? Who were the first at the grave in the morning? What did they bring?
Who stood by them? What did the angels say? Whom did they go to tell? Who met them?
How did they show their joy? What day did our Lord rise? What is it called? Which day do
we keep holy? Where were two disciples going? Who came and walked with them? What did
He explain to them? How did they know Him at last? How did they lose sight of Him? Where
were the ten met? Why were there only ten? Who stood in the midst? What did He say?
What did He show? What did He eat before them ? Why did He dothis? Whom were they to
tell about it ?



ZU
IN SACKCLOTH.

=




Flftyefirst Sunday.

Jesus Ascends to Heaven.

“This same Jesus, which is taken up from you into heaven, shall so come in like manner as
ye have seen Him go into heaven.’’—Ac/s 1, 11.

“YOU said you would tell
us about Jesus going to heaven,
Aunt?” said Willie.

ONES, PES V@mCleCh | ANE
Chanloteus-spiteibciorem facta
want to tell you of one or two
more appearances which Jesus
made to His apostles before He
went away. You must know.
that after His resurrection our
blessed Lord Jesus did not stay
with His apostles as He did
before His death and rising.
They did not see Him after Te first day fora whole week; and
they could not make Thomas, who had not been there when He
came, believe that it was true that any man could come again from
the grave.. Thomas said he should never believe that it was the
Lord Himself, unless he could put his fingers into the prints of the
nails, and his hand into the wound in the side.



ANCIENT ToMBS IN THE Rock.

Doubting Thomas Convinced.
“The next Sunday evening, Thomas and the other ten were all in
the upper room together, when Jesus came and stood in the midst,
8gh


222 JESUS ASCENDS TO HEAVEN.

and said to Thomas, ‘ Reach hither thy finger, and behold My hands;
and reach hither thy hand, and thrust it into My side: and be not
faithless, but believing.’

“Then Thomas knew Him indeed, and could only say, ‘My Lord
and my God.’

“And the Lord answered, ‘Thomas, because thou hast seen Me,
thou hast believed: blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have
believed. And that is the blessing for all of us, who have not lived
when our blessed Lord was on earth. We have not seen Him, but
we a believe in Him; and that faith is the beginning of all good-
ness.’

“Did Jesus do any more wonderful things?” asked Willie. “It
looks like there was no more reason for any one to doubt that He
was the Son of God.”

“Yes,” said Aunt Charlotte. “I told you before how He made the
disciples catch a great many fish on one occasion. Ncw I will tell
you of—

Another Wonderful Draught of Fishes.

“Our Lord told His apostles to go into Galilee; and there some
of them went out fishing on the lake, as they used to do; but they
fished all night, and caught nothing. In the dawn of morning they
saw a man standing on the bank, and He said, ‘ Children, have ye any
meat?’ They said,‘No. Then He said, ‘Cast the net on the right
side of the ship.” And directly the net was full of a hundred and
fifty-three fishes, all large and good, and it did not break! Then John
knew who it was, and said to Peter, ‘It is the Lord” And Peter was
so glad that he sprang out of the boat, and came hurrying through
the water to His Master’s feet.

“And Jesus said, ‘Come and dine’; and the disciples found a fire
ceady lighted on the bank, with the broiled fish and bread; and they
ate with Him again, and felt His care after their long, weary, hungry
night.

“ When they had eaten, the Lord said, ‘Simon, son of Jonas, lovest
thou Me more than these ?’
JESUS ASCENDS TO HEAVEN. 223

“«Vea, Lord, Thou knowest that I love Thee,’ Peter answered.

“ «Feed My sheep, our Lord said. Then again He asked, ‘ Simon,
son of Jonas, lovest thou Me?’ ‘Yea, Lord, Thou knowest that I
love Thee,’ said Peter. ‘Feed my lambs, He said. And again He
asked, ‘Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou Me?’ Then Peter was
grieved, and said, ‘Lord, Thou knowest all things; Thou knowest
that I love Thee.’

“And again Jesus said,‘ Feed my sheep.’ Peter knew that our
Lord is the Good Shepherd, and that His sheep and lambs are the
people, and the children of His flock, the Church; and that He was
to show his love for His Master by taking care of them.

“ Aunt Charlotte, why did Jesus make Peter say he loved Him three
times ? Was not once enough ?” asked Clara.

“Yes,” responded her aunt; “but don’t you remember Peter had
denied Jesus three times on the day of His trial, and now Jesus made
Peter confess his love three times. The best people, under fear or
impulse, sometimes deny or dishonor the Lord, and then they should
do as Peter did—make friends with Jesus by confessing their love, and
going to work for Him again. That is the way to be happy.”

Jesus’ Parting Words and His Ascension.

“You have n’t told us about Jesus going to heaven yet, Aunt,” said
Willie, who had been anxiously waiting.

“T am coming to that now,” said Aunt Charlotte. “For forty days
after He rose from the dead our Lord came in different ways, like
those I have told you, to see and to teach His disciples. Once five
hundred of them saw Him together; but He never came to the
wicked, unbelieving Jews again.

“ But when the feast of weeks was near, the disciples went back to
keep it at Jerusalem. There our Lord came to them again, anc He
led the eleven apostles out with Him to the Mount of Olives. He
taught them, and charged them much; and He gave them this great
command, ‘Go ye, therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in
= + =

224 JESUS ASCENDS TO HEAVEN.

the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost:
teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded
you: and, lo, lam with you alway, even unto the end of the world.’
And then He bade them stay at Jerusalem until they should be
endued with power from on high. And, Willie,” said Aunt Charlotte,
laying her hand on the boy’s head and looking earnestly into his eyes,
and speaking very slowly, “while Fesus talked with them, He was
paried from them, and went rising up into heaven, going higher
and higher, ill a cloud received Him out of their sight, and no one
| except
Faul ever
saw Fesus
SUNCE.

“While
they all
still look-
edup after
Him, two
angels ap-
peared
and stood
by them,
and_ said,
‘Ye men of Galilee, why stand ye gazing up into heaven ? this same
Jesus, which is taken up from you into heaven, shall so come in like
manner as ye have seen Him go into heaven,’

“And so it was that our blessed Lord Jesus ascended up to His
throne in heaven again, after He had been born, and lived, and died
to save us.”

“And Jesus is there in heaven now, watching over us, and laying
all our prayers before His Father in heaven, and getting ready our
home there for each of us,” said Clara.

“Right, my darling,” said Aunt Charlotte. “Jesus said, ‘I go to pre-
pare a place for you, that where I am there ye may be also,’ and He
promised to come again and receive all those who love Him to Hime
self, and make them His brothers and sisters in heaven.”




YESUS ASCENDS «1O- HEAVEN, 225

“\’m so sorry Jesus had to go away,” said little Anna. “Were
not the disciples very lonesome, Auntie ?”

“Yes, they weve very lonely; but Jesus will not leave His followers
lony unhappy, and next Sunday I will tell you what He sent them to
make them glad and joyous,” replied Aunt Charlotte.

QUESTIONS.

Who had not seen Jesus? What could not Thomas believe? What did he say? Where
were the apostles, and who appeared? What did our Lord say to Thomas? What did he
answer ? What did our Lord then say? Why had Thomas believed? Where did our Lord come
to His disciples again ? How did they know Him? Had He ever done anything like this before?
What did He give them to eat? What question did He ask Peter three times? What had Peter
once done three times? What did Peter answer now? What did our Lord three times bid him
do? How long did our Lord stay on earth after His resurrection? Where did the disciples go?
What was the great charge He gave them? In whose name were they to baptize? Who wonld
always be with them? What happened while He was speaking? Who came to tell them where
He was gone? When will He come again ?









THE WISE VIRGINS.


Fiftyesecond Sunday.

The Comforter Sent to Take Jesus’ Place.

‘*T will pray the Father, and He shall give you another ee that he may abide with you

for ever.’’—/ohn xiv, 16.

“YOU said, Aunt,
that you would tell us
how Jesus made the
apostles happy after
lem leit, sousecested
Willie, as they took
their seats the last
Sunday morning in
the year.

“Ves,” said Aunt
Charlotte. “As I told
you, Jesus does not
leave His followers
without comfort. Our
Lord had told the apostles that though He was going to heaven, He
would send them another comforter, who would be with them for-
ever, and in whom He Himself should be present with them—even
Ged the Holy Ghost, who is One with God the Father and God the
Son.

“Ten days after He had ascended up to heaven, on the great day
of the feast of weeks, as the disciples were together in one place at
Jerusalem, where Jesus had told them to go and wait, they heard a

sound like the noise of a rushing mighty wind, and it filled all the
248 *

* This includes full-page illustrations not previously numbered.













































































































BEE ais
THE COMFORTER SENT TO TAKE JESUS’ PLACE. 249

house; and there came flames like tongues divided ‘in the midst, and |

sat on the head of each disciple—not burning, but shining. And
wonderful knowledge came to all of them—they understood thing:
they could not understand before; and they could speak all sorts of
different languages, without ever having learnt them. These wonders
were to show them that God the Holy Ghost had come down from
heaven to be with them, and to dwell in them, and help them, and
make them strong for ever and ever. And that is why these apostles
were able to go out and suffer ill-treatment and work wonders, and
even die for Jesus’ sake.”

“Did anybody but the apostles have the comforter, Aunt?” asked
Willie, “and is he in the world now ?”

“Ves, dear; the Lord God the Holy Ghost goes on coming and»

being with us still. He does not show us when he comes now,
because it is more blessed to believe than to see; but we know he
does come to cach of us, when we are faithful in God’s service, to help
us and make us good.”

“Does he make people speak different languages now, ever, Aunt ?”
again asked Willie.

“No, my boy. The reason he made the apostles able to speak all
those languages was that they were to go and teach all the nations
the Gospel—that is to say, the good news that Christ was come, and
had died for the sins of every one, and risen again. They did go and
teach; and all who chose to believe and belong to Christ’s kingdom
were baptized. The apostles had to go at once, and this power to speak
different languages was a miracle to show them that every people of
every language must have the Gospel. Nowadays missionaries have
time to learn the languages of people to whom they mean to go, that
they may preach to them. What I want to teach you, my children, is
that every one who truly loves Jesus and serves Him feels the pres-
ence of the Holy Ghost in his heart to help him to be good, and to
keep God's holy law, the Ten Commandments, that He gave on Mount
Sinai. More and more of that good help of the Holy Spirit is given
to every one who comes, as our Lord bade, to do the work He gave
his followers to do, and to serve and love Him with the whole heart.
250 THE COMFORTER SENT TO TAKE JESUS’ PLACE.

We belong to those nations that the apostles were commanded te
teach and baptize,and bring into the fold; and we belong to Jesus
Christ just as much as His own first disciples did. We are called
Christians, after His name; and all the time we live here, He takes
care of us; and if we serve Him, He takes our souls to be with Him
in heaven, when death parts them from our bodies.

“This is the last Sunday in the year, and I want you to have one
more talk with me to-night, and that will close our year’s Sunday
conversations. What shall it be about ?”

Clara was thoughtful, and Aunt Charlotte said, « Come, my dear;
I think you have a subject to suggest. What is it?”

“ Auntie,” said Clara, with big tears in her beautiful eyes, to show
how deeply she felt, “I know after this Sunday you are going away,
and we are all so sorry; but I am sure you will come again. You
told us Jesus would come to earth again. Suppose you tell us some
more about that to-night?”

“Happy thought!” said Aunt Charlotte, hugging the dear girl to her
bosom. “So I will, my dear. And now, we will not have the ques~
tions this time.” The fact was, Clara’s words had made good, loving
Aunt Charlotte almost too near weeping to be able to ask the questions.

Jesus is Coming Again,
** We, according to His promise, look for new heavens and a new earth.’?—2 Peter i, 13.

It was a thoughtful little party that gathered around the glowing
fire after supper this last night in the year 1898. No one of the chil-
dren asked a question, for they all knew what the subject was to be,
but every one tried to get just as close as possible to dear, good, sweet
Aunt Charlotte. Little Anna climbed up on her lap and laid her
curly head close up against Aunt Charlotte’s bosom, and pressed it so
tight in her loving caress that she could hear the heart-beats of her
loving aunt, for, really, Aunt Charlotte felt so sad at the thought of
this last talk with her darlings about Jesus that her heart beat very
hard, though her face was so calm and sweet, .
THE COMFORTER SENT TO TAKE JESUS’ PLACE. | 251

The good woman took her Bible and read the third chapter of
second Peter, and then without comment she said, in a sad, mellow
voice, with one arm around little Anna and the other hand on Willie's
head:

“My children, the Lord Jesus Christ is coming again. We do not
know when it will be; but, some time or other, He will send His
angel to blow a trumpet; and all that are in their graves shall hear
His voice, and their souls will come back to their bodies; and we shall
all be alive again; and if we have been good and holy, we shall be
caught up to meet the Lord Jesus in the air. For then He will come,
with all His holy angels, and will sit on a great white throne; and all
that have ever lived will be called before Him, and judged for all the
things ‘they have done, and the words they have said. And then
these that have gone on doing wrong, and never being sorry, and
never caring for the Lord Jesus, but have made Satan their master,
will be given to Satan, to bein misery for ever,

“But those who have tried to do their best, and held fast to our
Lord Jesus, and prayed Him to wash them clean in His blood, will be
taken home for His sake. And they will have the happiest and most
blessed home that ever’can beinheaven. There will be all brightness,
and no more pain, nor grief, nor sorrow; and the Lord shall wipe off
all tears from all eyes; and there shall be gladness and joy forever
and ever.

“The old earth will be gone; but there will be new heavens, and a
new earth, all beautiful, with nothing that will hurt or spoil or fade,
but all lovely and peaceful.

« And then there will be the great joy of singing the praise of God,
who made us, and saved us, and helps us to be good, forever and ever.”

Aunt Charlotte’s last beautiful story was ended. Little Anna’s face
was buried in her loved aunt’s bosom, and she was sweetly weeping ;
she knew not why, for she was very, very happy. Clara stood, thought-
ful, with a bright countenance, looking her friend and teacher full in -
the face. Willie broke the silence:

“Well, dear Aunt Charlotte, you may have thought I didn't like
252 THE COMFORTER SENT TO TAKE JESUS’ PLACE,

these talks and stories like sister and little Anna, by my rough ways
sometimes, for I know I was not particular enough when I spoke; but
{ have loved them, and I love you for teaching us so much, and I
shall try hard to live a Christian life, and I mean to read every word
of the Bible through myself next year; and then, at the end of the
year, I'll write and tell you some other things I’ve learned.”

Aunt Charlotte pressed her lips to the boy’s forehead, too full of
tears to speak.

“Auntie,” said Clara, “I was just thinking it might be very hard to
part with you on New Year’s Day, when you start back home in the
East, for we might never see you again; but I feel like, if some of us
do die before we meet, we will all be sure to see each other again when
we rise up to meet Jesus when Hé comes. That’s the reason I do
not feel so sad at parting with you.”

“And then,” said little Anna, with a sunny laugh through her spark-
ling tears, as she threw her arms around Aunt Charlotte's neck, “we
will all just stay with Jesus forever, and I will not let you, precious
Auntie, go away from us; but you shall tell us pretty stories every day
and EVERY DAy. Shan’t she, brother?”

And so Aunt Charlotte was paid a thousand times over, on this last
night, for all the stories and lessons of the year,



THE UNWISE VIRGINS.
Ss
=e

al

2ZOT7