Citation
My book of adventures

Material Information

Title:
My book of adventures
Series Title:
Children's favourite series
Creator:
Arnold, Edward ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Edward Arnold
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
192 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Indians of North America -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1899 ( rbprov )
Baldwin -- 1899
Genre:
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from prize inscription.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026886218 ( ALEPH )
ALH5169 ( NOTIS )
263164073 ( OCLC )

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SO N & >a
yo Nem. tala ate









: ns Hi < ; ; ge:
The Children’s Favourite Series.
A charming Series of Juvenile.Books, each plentifully Illustrated, and written
in simple language to please young readers, Handsomely bound, and designed
to form an attractive and entertaining series of gift-books for presents and prizes.

‘The utmost care has been taken to maintain a thoroughly healthy tone
throughout the Series, combined with entertaining and interesting reading.

| ook MY BOOK OF HEROISM.

: Instances of daring and self-sacrifice.

& MY BOOK OF INVENTIONS.

Some of the most famous romances of industry,

Se MY BOOK OF PERILS.

Hairbreadth Escapes and Adventure Stories,

MY BOOK OF WONDERS.

: Ze Some of the most marvellous things in the world.

Fae MY BOOK OF THE SEA.

A budget of sea stories for the children of Britannia.

MY BOOK OF ADVENTURES.

A collection of exploits and adventures in all parts of the world.

MY BOOK OF TRAVEL STORIES.

Some of the most remarkable travels and explorations by great discoverers.

MY BOOK OF FAIRY TALES.

Old favourite stories which are never obsolete. Thirty original Illustrations

MY BOOK OF HISTORY TALES.

Well-known exploits from English history, attractive to children,

DEEDS OF GOLD.

A book of heroic and patriotic deeds, tending to inspire a love of courage,
bravery and devotion.

MY BOOK OF FABLES.

Chosen chiefly from the famous old Fables of sop and others dear to children
: of all generations.

MY STORY BOOKS OF ANIMALS.

About animals, the familiar pets of the house and the beasts of the forest.

RHYMES FOR YOU AND ME.

Short verses and rhymes, which everybody loves, and which are the first to be
learned and the last to be forgotten by children.
Each Volume contains nearly 200 pages Imperial 16mo., and about
= : 30 Illustrations,
: PRICE TWO SHILLINGS ; GILT EDGES, 2s. 6d.





EDWARD ARNOLD, Lonpon anp New York,



BUFFALO BILL’S RIDE

Ns.

4

Z
oy











THE CHILDREN’S FAVOURITE SERIES.

MY BOOK

OF

ADVENTURES



LONDON
EDWARD ARNOLD
87, BEDFORD STREET, STRAND, W.C.

[All rights reserved. ]







CONTENTS.

GE
BUFFALO BILL’S RIDE ON A BUFFALO... oe na 9
BUFFALO BILL ON THE PONY EXPRESS 5 An 14
RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA ... ee Pee ail
SHERIDAN’S RIDE ae a Ea ae 82
THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET : ee 38
A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE SOUDAN . ; 48
ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST... oon ee .. 58
THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND =e 66
THE BOY AND THE PANTHER... 5 Boe 85
UP IN A BALLOON cas ae Ae ae 90
IN THE RAPIDS ae ate ae — .. 98
A FIERY ORDEAL Ay ne Bee ne 105
PRESENCE OF MIND... Ba ar nme Pee ee
THE TAKING OF LINLITHGOW CASTLE an as 119
CHASED BY INDIANS ae ae we. L24
THE GOLDEN EAGLE’S NEST ae sis ae 138

VHE HERO OF THE FLOOD ... Ses Aan we «145



8 . CONTENTS.

WILD ELEPHANTS IN SOUTH AFRICA ee
A DASH FOR LIBERTY one vee eee
THROUGH THE GRAND CANON eee aoe
BUFFALO HUNTING... ose ee eee
THE FIRST ASCENT OF THE MATTERHORN ...

A FOREST ON FIRE... eee ose ees

PAGE

ree 154
... 162
Eee 167
... L76
Re 181
... 188



MY BOOK OF

ADVENTURES.

BUFFALO BILL’S RIDE ON A
BUFFALO.




Wy \ NE of the most extraordinary and novel
4) sights ever witnessed in London was
me —- eee een
)
Pe century civilisation, came a company of
hunters, trappers, cow-boys, scouts, and
Indians—men who had lived for the greater part
of their lives on the vast prairies and in the great
forests of North America. Having no settled
place of abode, these people are almost always
on the move from one part of the great continent
to another, traversing wide regions where the only
9






10 BUFFALO BILL’S RIDE ON A BUFFALO.

means of travelling was on horseback or on foot.
Under these circumstances it is not a matter of
surprise that among them we find some of the best
riders in the world.

The Wild West Show was a representation of
life in the Far West. The spectator was intro-
duced’ to the civilised life of the daring scout,
the hardy settler, and the adventurous pioneer.
Hunting scenes and Indian fights of the most
realistic character were engaged in, while the
marvellous horsemanship of the cow-boys called
forth the admiration and applause of all who
witnessed it.

The owner of the Wild West Show is one of
the most daring riders of modern times, and bears
the singular name of Buffalo Bill. His real name
is William Frederick Cody. On the prairies men
are not known by their baptismal names. The
wild adventurous life soon calls forth the good
or bad qualities of a man’s nature, and some
daring feat, act of bravery, or display of cowardice
causes his comrades to give him a name which he
ever afterwards bears, and thus a man’s frontier
name may often be taken as a key to his character.

Cody received the name by which he is known
ati a very. early period in his career. He was



BUFFALO BILL’S RIDE ON A BUFFALO. 11

born in 1843 in the Western State of Northern
America, called by the Indian name of Iowa. At
that time the region west of the Mississippi was
a vast wilderness through which roamed Indian
tribes, grizzly bears, and immense herds of buffa-
loes. Across the great prairies trains of waggons,
drawn by oxen, conveyed emigrants and goods to
distant regions, far beyond even the outskirts of -
civilisation.

When Cody made the famous ride from which
he received his name, he was engaged as an extra
driver of an ox team, his duty being to take the
place of any man who might be sick or disabled.
This did not often happen, and, therefore, the
youth whiled away the monotony of the journey
by hunting.

One day he had dismounted to cut up an ante-
lope which he had shot, when his horse suddenly
bounded away over the prairie. Springing to his
feet to discover the reason of the animal’s- flight,
he saw an enormous herd of buffaloes approaching
at a terrific speed. To remain where he was
meant certain death; escape by flight was im-
possible, for only the fleetest horse could outstrip
the infuriated animals.

Seeing a cottonwood tree a few hundred yards



12 BUFFALO BILL’S RIDE ON A BUFFALO.

from where he stood, it was but the work of a
moment to rush with headlong speed, and hastily
climb into its friendly branches. From this ele-
vated position he saw, to his horror and dismay,
a band of mounted Indians in full pursuit of the
flying herd. The young bull-whacker’s position
was now anything but an enviable one. The.
buffaloes were making straight for the tree, and it
was clear that the Indians would pass directly
under it.

Bill knew only too well what his fate would be
if he fell into the hands of the redskins. ‘To
escape a more terrible fate than even that of being
trampled to death by the wild animals, he con-
ceived the daring plan of dropping on to the back
of one of the buffaloes as the herd passed under
the tree. Onward they came, the earth vibrating
under the hoofs of the living mass as the buffaloes
rushed. along, their shaggy manes floating in the
wind, and their fierce bloodshot eyes rolling wildly
from side to side.

Strapping his rifle on his back Bill swung him-
self from a branch of the tree on to the back of a
huge bull, to the long shaggy mane of which he
clung for dear life, and at the same time stuck his
spurs into the sides of the terrified animal. Mad



BUFFALO BILL’S RIDE ON A BUFFALO. 138

with fear the enraged beast rushed forward at a
terrific pace, snorting wildly, and throwing the
whole herd into a state of confusion. Bill stuck
manfully on the back of his strange charger, and
with a triumphant smile, he glanced back from
time to time at the pursuing Indians. Straight
for the camp went the herd until discovered by
the train-men, who turned out in force to head
them off. But all to no purpose; the animals
dashed into the camp, causing the oxen and horses
to run hither and thither in their attempts to
escape.

The buffalo on which Bill was riding had by this
time become tired, and had dropped to the rear of
the herd. Before it could follow the rest of its
companions, a shot from a bull-whacker’s rifle
brought it to the ground and ended Cody’s famous
ride.

From that day the reckless youth was known as
Buffalo Bill, and he further justified his claim to
the title when he proved himself to be the cham-
pion buffalo-killer on the prairies. In one season
he killed the enormous number of four thousand
eight hundred and twenty buffaloes, a feat never
before or since equalled.



BUFFALO BILL ON THE PONY
EXPRESS.



GN the United States of North America,
before railways were made, letters were
» conveyed across that continent by what
was known as the Pony Express.
Two pony-couriers started on the same
day—one from San Francisco on the shores
of the Pacific to ride east, and the other from St.
Joseph on the Missouri, to ride west. When a
pony had completed its stage at twelve miles an
hour, another animal was provided to continue
the journey; and when a rider had accomplished
his part of the course the mail-bags were trans-
ferred to another who was waiting at a given point
to receive them. In this way the mails were kept
in motion at the rate of twelve miles an hour,
and were conveyed a distance of nineteen hundred

in about seven days and a half,
14





BUFFALO BILL ON THE PONY EXPRESS. 15

The riders suffered from fatigue, hunger, cold,
and heat, the work being so hard that strong
men were killed by it in a very short time.
The chief danger lay in the attacks of Indians
and robbers, who, knowing the country through
which the Express must pass, often lay in am-
bush, shot the riders, and carried off the mails.

Buffalo Bill, fond of an adventurous life, and
ever ready to be where the greatest danger was
to be encountered, engaged himself as a rider on
the Pony Express. The employés of the con-
tractors already counted among their number
some of the most famous riders in the world—
men who were so accustomed to the saddle that
they seemed to be almost a part of the gallant
animals they rode at breakneck speed; yet in this
band, where every man was a giant of strength
and daring, Buffalo Bill soon showed himself to
be head and shoulders above the rest. His daring
horsemanship earned him the title of the Boss
Pony-Rider.
While engaged in this work, Bill one day

arrived at the end of his stage and found that
there was no one ready to go on with the mails.
The rider who should have made the next trip
had been killed in a fight. The next station was



16 BUFFALO BILL ON THE PONY EXPRESS.

eighty-five miles away; but, nothing daunted,
Bill offered to take the dead man’s place for
this journey, and he accomplished the distance
in less than the time allowed. Without stopping
for rest, he turned back and made for his own
station, covering the extraordinary distance of
three hundred and twenty-two miles in one con-
tinuous ride, at an average speed of fifteen miles
an hour. This ride won for him a purse of gold
from the company, and a reputation for pluck
and endurance that placed him chief of the pony-
riders.

On another occasion, while riding along, Bill
was surprised by a party of Indians in ambush.
Being well mounted, he managed to escape cap-
ture, but the redskins at once gave chase. In a
short time he saw that two of them were rapidly
gaining on him, though he was urging his horse
to the utmost with lash and spur. As the savages
came nearer and nearer, Bill saw that it was
impossible for him to outride them, for the Indians
were mounted on large American horses. Glan-
cing over his shoulder, he noticed that one of the
Indians, whose features proclaimed him to be a
chief, was now considerably ahead of the rest,
and that this man was riding a splendid roan horse,











BUFFALO BILL ON THE PONY EXPRESS. 17

“JT want that horse and I want that Injun,”
muttered Bill, as he quietly grasped the revolver
he had always ready for an emergency.

The Express rider’s horse, already forced beyond
his powers of endurance, had begun to waver,
when Bill, suddenly pulling up and as quickly
wheeling in his saddle, sent a bullet crashing
through the brain of his pursuer. The Indian
fell from-his horse, which dashed on until Bill,
seizing the rein, brought the animal to a standstill.
It would have been an easy thing for the pony-
rider to spring upon the back of the roan, but he
was unwilling to lose his own saddle and the
inail-bags attached to it. Dismounting, he was in
the act of changing the saddle from his own to
the redskin’s horse, when the second Indian
dashed up. As soon as he came within range
he fired and knocked Bill’s cap off his head.
Having the two horses to look after, Bill had
quite enough to do, and his position for the time
being was by no means reassuring. A second shot
killed the pony, whereupon Bill immediately drew
his revolver and fired. Down fell the Indian,
but only wounded, and as he still grasped his
pistol, Bill fired again, this time with fatal effect.

Just then the whole band of Indians came in

2





is BUFFALO BILL ON THE PONY EXPRESS.

sight. The crisis had now come, when the mettle
both of horse and rider would be tested to the
utmost. But the presence of mind for which he
was famous did not desert the hardy pony-rider.
Quickly cutting loose his saddle from his dead
horse, and springing with it in his hand upon the
back of the roan, he dashed away just as the
bullets began to fly around him. The Indians
kept up the chase for several miles, but Bull,
urging forward the splendid horse he had captured,
left them far behind, and arrived safely at his
destination ahead of time, where he related
his adventures.

Six months passed away, during which Bill con-
tinued to carry the mails over his long and lonely
stage. During this time the Indians had become
very troublesome, attacking stations and killing
the riders, until there were very few who cared to
run the risks. Bill, however, did not seem to be
in the least alarmed by what was taking place, but
even appeared to delight in the wild, adventurous
life, which might at any moment end in death.

One day, as he rode along, he saw, some dis-
tance.in front, the stage-coach going at full speed.
He was surprised to see that the coach was without
a driver, and at once concluded that something



BUFFALO BILL ON THE PONY EXPRESS. 19

serious had happened. At that moment some
Indians suddenly dashed out of a ravine and gave
chase. The stage-coach was now in the open
prairie and proceeding as fast as the horses could
gallop, with three Indians in close pursuit. Bill,
putting spurs to his horse, soon came within range
of the redskins, and fired. Down dropped the
pony of the Indian nearest him, and its rider,
evidently stunned by the fall, lay motionless. A
second shot wounded one of the remaining Indians,
and. they took to flight, while Bill dashed up to
the side of the coach.

There a terrible sight met his gaze. On the
box the driver lay dead, still grasping the reins
in his nerveless hands. Bill knew that the coach
not only carried passengers, but also contained a
box of gold belonging to the company. He there-
fore rode alongside, seized the mail-bags, and by
a dexterous movement leaped from his saddle to
the coach. The next moment he held the reins
in his firm grip. His horse, trained to run on
the trail no matter what might happen to its
rider, galloped on in front, and Bill urged the
six coach-horses at the top of their speed.

Behind came the Indians gaining steadily, for
the road at this part was very bad; but just as



20 BUFFALO BILL ON THE PONY EXPRESS.

they were near enough to reach the coach with
their arrows, Bill again forced his team forward,
and at a breakneck pace they rushed down the
steep road, the vehicle swaying so wildly from
side to side that the five passengers within—two
of whom were women—were as much in danger
of getting their necks broken as of being scalped
by the Indians.

Notwithstanding the terrific speed at which he
was driving, Bill managed the horses well, and
after a desperate run of half an hour, the coach
dashed up to the door of the station in a style
that made the onlookers stare with astonishment.
Thus single-handed did Buffalo Bill, by his fearless
and prompt action, save the box of gold and the
lives of the passengers, and add fresh laurels to
his already illustrious name.



RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA,.

Si ZN the year 1877 a war broke out between
RV Russia and Turkey, and continued for
‘y. nearly a year. A Turkish Pasha in
Ay > Bulgaria had resorted to measures of
5 great severity, upon which Russia attacked

Turkey with the intention of seizing Constan-
tinople. Russia declared that her intention in
taking up arms was to free the Bulgarian
Christians of the Greek Church from the cruelty
of the Turks.

The chief event of the campaign was the siege
of Plevna, an entrenched camp in the north of
‘Bulgaria, defended by Osman Pasha. So deter-
mined were the attempts made to storm it,
that it is said Plevna cost the Russians 50,000
men.

The special correspondent of the Daily Tele-

21





22. RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA.

graph was in Plevna on the 12th of September,
and witnessed one of the most terrible battles
of that fearful war. He had seen some 8,000
Russians destroyed by the “pitiless bullet,
bayonet, sabre, and shell,” in their attempt to
break down the defence of Osman Pasha. He
graphically describes the ghastly scene when the
great fight was over, and the Russians had once
more retired to their camp. The ground was
thickly covered with great heaps of dead, many
of whom had not found room upon the bare earth
to die. They were lying in every possible posture,
and in every imaginable position, in holes, under
hedges, and in trees, killed by every description
of wound. Many were lying where they had
fallen, while some had apparently endeavoured to
creep into a sheltered spot to die.

The correspondent was anxious to leave the
beleaguered camp, and make his way to Constan-
tinople, but to do so he must run the blockade,
and effect a most daring ride through the Russian
hosts. He had once before attempted to leave
Plevna, and had been taken into custody by the
Turkish soldiers, who carried him and his guides
to one of the forts, the commandant of which
told him that he must not go any further, as the



RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA. 93

Russians were out in great numbers, and were
about to make an attack.

Three days after the great battle already men-
tioned, the correspondent determined to make
another attempt to leave Plevna. For this pur-
pose he engaged four Circassians, who offered to
guide him through the Russian lines for 2,000
piastres (about £400). It was arranged that the
correspondent should dress as nearly as possible
like a Russian, carry as little baggage as possible,
and be careful to have nothing about him that
would make the slightest noise, and so attract the
attention of the enemy. Proceeding to Osman
Pasha’s tent, the Marshal’s permission was asked.
He replied at once, ‘‘ You cannot go, you will never
get through,” and then said that out of thirty Cir-
cassians who had made the attempt singly, only
two had succeeded, the rest having been captured
or killed. For a party to attempt to pass through
the Russian camp was to invite certain death. The
correspondent said he must go, no matter how
great the risk, upon which the Marshal thought
for several minutes, and then replied: ‘‘ Well, if
you will go, do so. It is certain death ; you have
only a poor chance of escape.” When all was
ready he gave the correspondent some despatches



24 RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA.

to carry to Orhanie, as he was going that way,
and sent two of his own soldiers to render what
assistance they could.

At six o’clock on Saturday night, the 15th of
September, the little party, which now numbered
eleven persons, left the town of Plevna, in the
following order :—Four Circassians rode two
abreast, then a Turkish soldier, next the corre-
spondent and his servant, then a groom with a
baggage horse, after him came the other Turkish
soldier with a spare horse, and last of all a Turkish
_ officer and his servant, who led another spare horse
in case of need.

The party had some little distance to travel
before they reached the outposts of the Russian
army, and for the first hour all went well. The
Turkish sentinels allowed them to pass without
delay, recognising the uniforms of the guides and
_ the soldiers sent by the Marshal.

As they drew near the Russian lines the
members of the party in turn took upon them-
selves the office of scout, that they might not
suddenly come upon a body of the enemy. The
correspondent himself was the first to notice a
camp fire, round which a number of men were
lying. One of the Circassians having made



H] i
i
HA

aN



RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEYNA.



26 RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEYNA.

sufficient change in his appearance to look like
a Cossack, rode forward, and answered their
challenge in Russian. This satisfied the sentinels,
who allowed the travellers to proceed.

The party now advanced at a trot, making the
best progress they could, though they felt all the
time that their journey bristled with danger, as
they might at any moment have rushed into the
arms of the Russians. Again and again they had
to pull up suddenly, and to hide themselves from
some of the enemy’s troops, who happened to be
passing in that direction.

Keeping in the shadow of the hills, the party at
length found themselves in a broad plain on which
the moon was brightly shining. Not far away
were a hundred Cossacks encamped. How to
cross this plain without being observed and pur-
sued was a difficult matter to decide. A whis-
pered consultation was held, and they arranged
that each one should in turn ride across the plain,
a little time being allowed to elapse between each
attempt. In this way the travellers hoped to pass
themselves for members of the Russian army
engaged on some errand. The plan was success-
fully carried out, and all got safely across.

Starting again, they had just entered a valley



RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA. OF

when another body of troops appeared in sight.
Crouching down and holding their horses’ bridles
in one hand and their rifles in the other, they
waited to see the course events would take. Ina
whisper they arranged, if discovered, to fire simul-
taneously, and then in the confusion endeavour
to reach the woods which were quite near. For-
tunately the Cossacks who had alarmed them
mounted and rode away, the travellers following
their example, but proceeding in an opposite
direction. Being now in the very centre of the
Russian lines, it was more than ever necessary
to proceed with the greatest care and in the most
absolute silence, the clanking of the spur being
sufficient at one point to cause the whole com-
pany to come to a dead halt.

Having arrived near a Bulgarian village, three
of the Circassians went forward on foot and
cautiously looked for any traces of the enemy.
In about a quarter of an hour the guides returned,
saying that there did not appear to be any danger,
upon which the whole party rode forward, keeping
as clear of the village as possible, for fear of
alarming the dogs. Though they took every
precaution, the dogs scented them and imme-
diately began to bark. The village seemed to



28 RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA.

be aroused, as lights were seen moving about.
The whole party made for a ravine in which
they hid for about half an hour, until the barking
ceased, then mounting their horses, they rode off
as quickly as possible.

Similar experiences went on during the whole
night. Whenever they came in sight of a village
the dogs scented them and roused the neighbour-
hood with their barking, which was at once
followed by a wild galloping to escape being seen
and attacked by any troops that might be in the
neighbourhood.

In one part of their route the narrow path
was so thickly overgrown, that they had to cut
a way with their swords. Another time they
came suddenly on a great hole into which they
fell headlong. Then the path became so rough
that they had to dismount and lead their horses
over the broken ground.

As soon as the first light of morning appeared,
in response to their leader, who cried: ‘“ Get
along, quick!’ the party galloped madly over
hill and valley for about an hour. Their horses
stumbled repeatedly, but good progress was made,
and they reached the village of Lukowitz in safety,
where they made a halt, hoping to be able to



RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA. 29

obtain food and a short rest. A little bread and
honey and a drink of water was all the refresh-
ment they could obtain, and they had just flung
themselves on some straw on the ground, when
the whisper passed round that the Cossacks were
near, and delay was dangerous.

The most exciting part of the journey was now
to be done, as ib was broad daylight and there
were many Russians in the neighbourhood, and
the party could no longer proceed from point to
point under cover of darkness. For about an
hour they rode forward in single file, when they
suddenly saw that they were being pursued by
Cossacks who had sighted them in the distance.
Seeing that further concealment was impossible,
the party galloped away at a rapid pace, but
were obliged to leave behind the spare horses, one
of which was carrying the correspondent’s baggage,
which, of course, that gentleman lost in order to
save his life.

Jablanitza was reached in safety about five
- o’clock on the afternoon of Sunday. ‘There a
good-natured Bulgarian gave the party some
bread and meat. This man seemed to be almost
alone, for the villagers had deserted their houses
and formed an encampment some miles away,



30 RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA.

feeling that there they would be safe from attack.
Only a short stay was made, as time was precious.
Once more in the saddle, the party pressed on as
rapidly as possible, passing thousands upon thou-
sands of wretched people whom the war had
rendered homeless and helpless, without any means
of obtaining food or shelter.

At eleven o’clock at night, after twenty-nine
hours’ hard riding, Orhanie was reached. Here
the correspondent delivered the despatches he had
been carrying from Osman Pasha, and three
hours’ rest was obtained. When the journey was
resumed to Sophia, the same sights of misery inet
the travellers’ eyes on every side. Turkish troops
were pushing forward to the relief of Plevna, and
large quantities of ammunition and provisions
were being carried to the beleaguered army.

It was nearly the end of the week before Con-
stantinople was reached, and on Friday night the
correspondent was received by the Sultan, who
graciously asked him to dinner in order that he
might hear how matters were progressing at
Plevna. The Sultan heard the description of the
great battle, which had taken place just before
the correspondent left, with much interest, and
expressed: great satisfaction: that Plevna had



RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA. 31

hitherto successfully withstood the attacks of the
Russian army.

Here ends the story of this famous ride, and it
only remains to say that not until Plevna was
completely surrounded and all provisions failed,
that Osman Pasha and his gallant army were
made prisoners of war while attempting to cut
their way through the enemy.



SHERIDAN’S RIDE.




iG

7 3 troops in the valley of Virginia. For
gaye a long time Sheridan was very wary,

eee

:
GJ) being determined not to risk a battle against
Roa ne
an experienced commander like Harly with-
out a good chance of success.

At length Early’s force was reduced in numbers,
so Sheridan attacked him and won the battle of
Winchester. This battle was fought in 1864.
Three days later, Sheridan again attacked Harly
on two sides, routed his army, and drove the
Confederate force up the valley to the south. In
order to prevent their return, Sheridan burned all
the barns filled with grain, and he also carried off
all the stock in the valley.

Suddenly Early received large reinforcements,

and while Sheridan was absent from the camp,
32





SHERIDAN’S RIDE. 33

Early prepared to take it by surprise. Swords,
canteens, and everything that would make a noise
was left behind, and along a lonely path part of
the Confederate army crept stealthily on their
sleeping foes.

At the same time an attack was made in front,
and the Union soldiers were driven back four
miles. Meanwhile, Sheridan was at Winchester,
a place distant twenty miles from the scene of
action. Hearing the firing, he at once set, out.
Mounted on a black horse, he sped swiftly
onwards, almost hidden from view in a cloud of
dust. Faster and faster still the noble animal
flew along, as if it was impatient—like its master
—to plung into the fray. At length Sheridan
came upon his men in full retreat. Dashing
down the line, amid a storm of huzzahs, he cried,
““Come, boys, we’re going back!” And back
they went, to turn their defeat into a glorious
victory. -

The following poem graphically describes this
famous ride:— ~~

Up from the south at break of day,

Bringing to Winchester fresh dismay,

The affrighted air with a shudder bore,
3



24. SHERIDAN’S RIDE.

Like a herald in haste, to the chieftain’s door
The terrible grumble and rumble and roar,
Telling the battle was on once more—

And Sheridan twenty miles away !

The wilder still those billows of war
Thundered along the horizon’s bar ;

And louder yet into Winchester rolled

The roar of that red sea uncontrolled,
Making the blood of the listener cold

As he thought of the stake in that fiery fray,
With Sheridan twenty miles away.

But there is a road from Winchester town,

A good broad highway leading down ;

And there, through the flash of the morning light,
A steed as black as the steeds of night

Was seen to pass as with eagle flight—

As if he knew the terrible need,

He stretched away at his utmost speed ;

Hills rose and fell, but his heart was gay

With Sheridan fifteen miles away !

Still sprung from those swift hoofs, thundering
sound,

The dust, like the smoke from the cannon’s mouth,

Or the tail of a comet sweeping faster and faster ;



SHERIDAN’S RIDE. B5

Foreboding to traitors the doom of disaster ;

The heart of the steed and the heart of the master
Were beating like prisoners assaulting their walls,
Impatient to be where the battlefield calls ;



“COME BOYS, WE’RE GOING BACK.”

Every nerve of the charger was nerved to full play
With Sheridan only ten miles away |

Under his spurning feet the road
Like an arrowy Alpine river flowed;



36 SHERIDAN’S RIDE.

And the landscape sped away behind

Like an ocean flying before the wind;

And the steed, like a bark fed with furnace ire,
Swept on with his wild eyes full of fire ;

But, lo! he is nearing his heart’s desire ;

He is sniffing the smoke of the roaring fray,
With Sheridan only five miles away !

The first that the General saw were the groups

Of stragglers, and then the retreating troops ;

He dashed down the line midst a storm of huzzahs,

And the wave of retreat checked its course there,
because

The sight of the master compelled it to pause.

With foam and with dust the black charger was
grey ;

By the flash of his eye and his red nostril’s play,

He seemed to the whole great army to say,

‘“‘T have brought you Sheridan, all the way

From Winchester down to save the day!”

Hurrah, hurrah, for Sheridan !

Hurrah, hurrah, for horse and man!

And when their statues are placed on high,
Under the dome of the Union sky—

The American soldier’s temple of fame—



SHERTDAN’S RIDE. 37

There with the glorious General’s name,
Be it writ in letters both gold and bright :
‘“‘ Here is the steed that saved the day
By carrying Sheridan into the fight
From Winchester—twenty miles away!”
I’. B. Read.



THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET.

Qe a narrow strip of country bordering on
(akin the east coast of the Red Sea there are



world. They are annually visited by large
numbers of pilgrims from all parts of the

world, and are regarded as holy by one hun-
dred and thirty millions of the population of the
globe.

Mecca, one of these famous cities, contains the
Kaaba, an oblong stone building, over which has
been erected a great mosque. This building is
said to stand on the spot where Adam first
worshipped God, after he had been driven out of
the Garden of Hden. That first service, according
to the legend, was performed in a tent sent down
to him from Heaven.

After this, Seth built a structure of clay and
stone, which was destroyed by the Deluge, and
rebuilt by Abraham and Ishmael. The present

88



THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET. 89

building was erected in 1627. The silver-coated
door of this holy place is opened only three times
in a year—once for men, once for women, and
once for cleaning purposes.





































































































































































































































































MECCA.

In one corner of the Kaaba there is the famous
Black Stone, which is used to show the direction
towards which all Mabometans must turn in their



40 THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMEt

prayers. This stone, which is called “The Right
Hand of God on Earth,” is said to have dropped
from Paradise together with Adam. The original
colour of the stone was white, but the sins of
mankind have caused it to shed go many tears
that it has become black. Another explanation
given of the change of colour is that it has been
caused by the kisses and touches of the pilgrims,
who, when they visit the mosque, pass seven
times round the Kaaba, each time lissing the
stone, or touching it with their hands, which they
then kiss.

The outer building is a magnificent pile, sur-
mounted by cupolas, spires, and crescents, all of
which are gilded and adorned with lamps. Between
the Kaaba and the outer walls are seven paved
causeways intended to preserve the sacred building.
Every year the Sultan of Turkey sends a covering
of rich black silk, on which sentences from the
Koran have been embroidered in letters of gold, to
cover the walls of the Kaaba.

For a long time the guardianship of the Kaaba,
together with the supreme control of Mecca, was
in the hands of the Coreishites, or descendants of
Ishmael. Their chief kept the keys of the sacred
building, and assumed the chief offices connected



THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET. 4]

with the local worship. This position gave him
great influence, and his ordinances were obeyed
and venerated, as people obey and venerate the
observances of religion, both before and after his
death.

About 1,300 years ago there was a meeting of
the council of the Kaaba at Mecca. A peculiar
movement had been going on in the city during
the past two months. House after house had been
abandoned and whole families had suddenly dis-
appeared. One or two quarters of the city were
entirely deserted, and this council had been called
to decide upon some course of action. For some
time a new religion had been preached among the
people, and the guardians of the Kaaba had done
what they could to prevent it spreading, for fear
that it might injure the success of their own cause.

The sudden disappearance of so many people was
therefore a serious matter, and as the leader of
the new religion was still in the city, the question
arose what should be done with him. If they
imprisoned him, his followers might come to his
rescue. If they drove him out of the city, he
might bring against them some other tribes of |
Arabia, and obtain possession of Mecca. They
would have preferred to have put him to death



42 THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET.

but this they feared would bring down upon them
the hate and fury of his kinsman, who would feel
called upon to exact blood for blood. They would
have preferred to have had him murdered by an
unknown hand, if such an arrangement could have
been carried out. In the meantime, however, they
decided to wait upon this leader in his own house.
While that meeting was being held, the person
who was the cause of all this trouble had been
preparing for fight. Two swift camels were at
that moment in the yard of his house, in charge
of a guide who knew all the tracks and by-ways
between Mecca and Medina, a city distant about
two hundred and fifty miles.

Receiving notice of the intended visit of the
Coreish, this religious leader at once scented
danger. He had with him his nephew Ali, and
that the neighbours might not have their suspicions
aroused he put on the youth his own red mantle,
and told him to occupy his bed. Then he pro-
ceeded to the house of his follower Abu Bakr. A
few hasty preparations were made, and, creeping
through a back window, the two escaped from

the city. In the dark they climbed over bare and
rugged rocks, and at last reached a lofty mountain.
In a cave near its summit they took refuge.



THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET. 43

A recent traveller describes this mountain, and
the road to it from Mecca. He says the pathway
is excessively rugged and difficult, and the traveller
is obliged sometimes to crawl over the rocks on
his hands and knees. The entrance to the cave is
still preserved on one side, in what is believed to
be its original state.

When it is visited by pilgrims they are supposed
to acquire special merit by forcing themselves,
with difficulty, as the Prophet must have done,
through the hole, which is not more than one
and a half span in breadth. A wide passage has
-been opened out at the other end of the cave.
The hills are wild and bare; huge masses of rock
lie scattered about, and nothing green is in sight
but a few wild thorny bushes.

In this cave the Prophet and his companion
remained for a time, as they knew that they would
be looked for on the road between the two cities.
There is no doubt that the fugitives felt them-
selves to be in great peril, for looking out at the
crevice, through which the morning light entered
the cave, Abu Bakr whispered to his leader,
‘* What, if one of them were to look beneath him ;
he might see us under his very feet!”

“ Think not thus, Abu Bakr!” said the Prophet.



44 THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET.

‘Wo are two, but God is in the midst—a
third.”

It is said that the Coreish, while hotly scarching
after the Prophet, passed the entrance to this
cave, but seeing a spider’s web woven across it,
they turned back. It is claimed by the followers
of the Prophet, that the spider wove her web there
after the fugitives had entered the cave.

Another story in connection with this cave is,
that two of the pursuers, armed with swords, had
almost reached the hiding-place of the Prophet
and his companion, when they saw two wild
pigeons perched at the entrance to the cave.
Sccing them, one of the pursucrs said that he
was quite sure that nobody was in the cave. The
~ Prophet heard the men’s words and blessed the
wild pigeons, and made them sacred in the Holy
Territory.

During the time that they were in hiding, one
of Abu Bakr’s shepherds secretly stole to the cavo
every evening with a supply of milk, and his son
brought food at the same time. During the day
ho also kept watch in Mecca, that he might carry
a report to the cave at night.

On the evening of the third day it was reported
to them that the search had ceased, and that the



THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET. 45

roads were clear. They might now set out on
their journey without the fear of receiving an
arrow or a dagger from the hand of a hired
murderer. The following evening was decided
upon as the time for starting, and it was arranged
that the supply of food should be carried to the
cave, while the two camels should be held in
readiness near the summit of the mountain.

On the 20th of June, 622 a.v., the Prophet
mounted the swifter of the two camels, named
Al Caswa, while the guide and Abu Bakr mounted
the other. Having descended the mountain, they
left Mecca to the right, and struck off westward,
towards the sea shore. In the morning they came
upon an encampment of wandering Arabs. Here
a woman satin the door of her tent to give food
and drink to religious travellers. This being the
hottest season of the year, the Prophet and his
followers were tired and thirsty, and were glad to
receive from her a supply of milk.

In the evening they thought they might now
safely travel along the common road. They had
not proceeded far when they met one of their .
pursuers ; fortunately for them, he was returning
alone on horseback, and therefore unable to cope
with his opponents. He even promised that if



46 THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET,

they would let him depart in peace he would not
tell any one that he had met them. He kept his
word. It was not till several days afterwards
that the rulers of Mecca learned the story of the
Prophet’s flight. In safety he arrived at Medina,
and thus ended the first great stage of his life.

This famous ride, which was made by the
Prophet Mahomet from Mecca to Medina, and
known throughout the world as the Hegira (an
Arab word which means “‘ going away”) has since
been regarded as the Mahometan era. Thus, these
two cities of Arabia became for ever linked with
the history of the false Prophet Mahomet. Mecca
was his birthplace, and the cradle of the Mussul-
man creed. Medina is the spot where he died,
and therefore to both of these holy places pilgrims
are constantly wending their way.

For some years after his flight from Mecca,
Mahomet kept up a constant warfare with that
city. During this period he concluded an alliance
with many of the Arab tribes, and a great many
adventurers from all parts of the world flocked
to his standard. At length, with a force of ten
thousand men, he marched against the city, and
took it. He was then publicly proclaimed Chief
and Prophet. ‘This effectually established a new



THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET. AT

faith through Arabia. Thc idols of the Kaaba
were destroyed, and it was declared to be the
Holy Place of Islam, to which all true believers
should in future turn their faces when in prayer,
in whatever quarter of the world they might be.



A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE
: SOUDAN.

) cp HEN Gordon Pasha was Governor-
AV 2 General of the Soudan, he was famous
i Vole. throughout the length and breadth of
foe the land for the extraordinary speed
Se of his movements. In every part of his
“extensive territory, which was more than
1,600 miles long and 700 miles wide, the people
seemed to be always listening for the stirring
cry, ‘‘The Pasha is coming!” No one felt secure
from his presence. He seemed to be everywhere,
and to know what was going on in the most remote
corners of the country. When rebel chieftains
and other evil-doers fondly fancied that weary
miles of desert sand stretched between them
and the terrible Pasha, whose righteous anger
caused the boldest and most defiant to tremble,
he suddenly swooped down upon them, upsetting
48






A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE SOUDAN. 49

their plans, and dealing out the punishment they
richly deserved.

The ‘cushion-footed camel” bore him safely
through dangers and difficulties of the most
perilous character. Fearlessly he faced hordes
of wild and ruthless savages, while he endured
without a murmur the discomforts of desert life—_
the unhealthy climate, the horrible vermin, the
ghastly itch, and the nightly and daily alternations
of bitter cold and overpowering heat. More than
once, when riding under a burning sun, his camel
dropped dead beneath him and Gordon mounted
another and rode on.

He had been appointed to his high office to
put down the slave trade. No one knew better
than he how difficult was the task that he had
undertaken. ‘The slave trade,” he wrote, ‘is
ingrained in the bones of the people; slavery is
the A BC of life in the Soudan, to rich and
poor.”’

For twenty years or more the dealers in “ black
ivory” had been the real masters of the country
south of Khartoum. They had carried on their
horrible traffic on such an extensive scale, and
in so cruel a manner, that it had become the
scandal of the world.

4



50 A FIVE MONTHS’ BIDE IN THE SOUDAN.

The region bristled with zerebas, or fortified
camps, garrisoned with armed bands of ruffians
under Arab captains. Shaka, in the extreme south
of the province of Darfour, called by Gordon
“the Cave of Adullam,’ was the great centre,
the headquarters, of the wholesale slave trade.
Zebehr-Rahama, a native chieftain, and the lord
over thirty stations, had his stronghold at Shaka.
There the ‘“ Black Pasha,” as he was called, lived
in princely state, waited upon by richly-dressed
slaves, with armed sentries at his doors, and
chained lions in his halls of audience. Powerful,
daring, and ambitious, he had organised an army
of man-hunters whom he had armed, and whose
raiding expeditions he directed.

Villages were attacked by his ruthless followers,
peaceful tribes were plundered, and convoys of
slaves were brought in from all parts of the
surrounding country. Every road that led to
Shaka was marked by the whitened bones of the
poor worn-out and murdered negroes, who had
perished by the way. So strong did this “‘ Scourge
of Central Africa ’’ become, that he was able to
defeat the Egyptian troops sent to enforce his
obedience, and he was acknowledged as the King
of the Slave-Hunters.



































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































GORDON’S DESERT RIDE.



52 A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE SOUDAN.

Hoping by bribery to induce the Khedive of
Egypt to make him Governor-General of the
Soudan, Zebehr paid a visit to Cairo, taking with
him £100,000. Not only was his request refused,
but he was detained as prisoner at Cairo. He
had done too much mischief in the Soudan to
be allowed to return to his den of thieves. He
had, however, left behind him at Shaka his son
Suleiman, at the head of 6,000 robbers. To break
up the slave-hunter’s stronghold, and to destroy
this hideous traffic, Gordon Pasha set out on his
famous journey, which lasted five months.

Gordon left Khartoum in the middle of May,
1877. He rode an exceedingly fine camel, and
astonished his attendants by the tremendous pace
at which he journeyed. On the road he wrote a
letter home, in which he said, ‘“‘I am quite com-
fortable on the camel, and am happier when on
the march, than in towns with all the ceremonies.”
Finding that a camel travelled better when it was
not curbed, he allowed his to go as it would.
This freedom almost cost a native boy his life.
Gordon says: “I nearly acted as Juggernaut to -
a little black naked boy to-day. My camel had
shaken the nose-ring out of its nose, and ran off
with me, I could not stop it, and of course the



A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE SOUDAN. 53

little black ran right under the camel, who
however, did not tread on him, though it was a
miracle he escaped being killed. Nothing is so
perverse as a camel when it runs away; it will go
anywhere.”

One day the Governor of Fogia was dumb-
founded to see an officer in marshal’s uniform ride
into the palace, attended only by an Arab chief.
It was Gordon, who had pushed across the desert
at such a speed that his men were left far behind.
At another station he was so far in advance of
the two or three hundred ragamuffins he called
his army, that, to his great disgust, he had to
wait several days. .

At length the news reached Gordon that Sulei-
man, with his 6,000 robbers and murderers, was
about to attack Dara. The resolute Pasha lost not
a moment. At once he mounted his camel, and
set out for Dara.

Here is his own description of this tremendous
ride, one of the most famous achievements in his
career: “I got to Dara about 4 p.m., long before
my escort, having ridden eighty miles in a day
and a half. About seven miles from Dara I got
into a swarm of flies, and they annoyed me and
my camel so much that we jolted along as fast



54 A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE SOUDAN.

as we could. Upwards of three hundred were on
the camel’s head, and I was covered with them.
I suppose that the queen fly was among them.
If I had no escort of men I had a large escort
of these flies. I came on my people like a thunder-
bolt. As soon as they had recovered, the salute
was fired.. My poor escort! Whereis it? Imagine
to yourself a single, dirty, red-faced man on a

“camel, ornamented with flies, arriving in the divan

all of a sudden. The people were paralysed, and
could not believe their eyes.”

If Gordon’s own people in Dara were astonished
at his sudden, unexpected appearance, how great
must have been the surprise of the rebels who
threatened the town. When he rode into Sulei-
man’s camp unarmed and alone the whole body of
chiefs were dumbfounded. His sudden appearance
in their midst, his resolute manner and his
absolute indifference to danger so filled them with
amazement and awe that they were incapable of
action.

Entering the principal tent, Gordon sat down
among the leaders and fearlessly told them that
he meant to disarm them and break up their
band. Never dreaming that any man would be
so bold as to beard them in their own den



A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE SOUDAN. 55

unless backed by a powerful army which could
not be far away, the chiefs, headed by Suleiman,
yielded to Gordon, and swore to be faithful to
the Government. After receiving their submission,
the fearless Pasha returned to Khartoum. During
this year of office, he rode nearly 4,000 miles
over the desert, till he says, ‘‘ My heart and lungs
are shaken out of their places.”

The following year the slave-traders revolted
again. Gordon had broken their communications
in the north and blockaded them in the south.
In this way he had closed their market and cut
off their supplies. Suleiman proclaimed himself
lord of the province, seized a number of Govern-
ment stores, surprised and massacred an Hgyptian
garrison, and rallied the Bedouin tribes around his
standard.

Unable to leave Khartoum at once, Gordon
sent his lieutenant, an Italian named Romulus
Gessi, to put down the rising. A fearful struggle
ensued, and a great many battles were fought.
The rebels were mad with fury when they found
themselves opposed by a daring and successful
leader. Eventually Gessi fired the slavers’ camp
by means of rockets, drove out the robbers, and
freed some ten thousand negroes. ‘Then he set off



56 A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE SOUDAN.

in pursuit of Suleiman, following up his trail like
a blood-hound.

At length, Gordon was free to go to the scene
of action. This time he was fully determined to
dislodge the slavers and leave their stronghold in
Shaka in ruins. On he rode over vast tracts of
sand and withered vegetation, enduring intense
heat by day and intense cold by night. Crossing
the frontier of Kordofan he wrote, ‘‘ I have never
in China or elsewhere felt such heat.”

All the way he did good work, stopping caravans
of slave-dealers, punishing the traders and setting
free the slaves. ‘‘ At Edowa,” he wrote, “‘a party
of seven slave-dealers with twenty-three slaves
were captured and brought to me, together with
two camels. Nothing could exceed the misery of
these poor wretches. Some of them were children
not more than three years old, that had come
across that torrid zone from Shaka, a journey
from which I on my camel shrank.”

On his arrival at Shaka, Gordon learned that
Gessi had completely broken up the bands of
robbers, and driven them out of their strongholds.
Shortly afterwards Gessi captured Suleiman with
ten of his principal companions, and by Gordon’s
orders, the whole batch of rebel leaders were shot.



A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE SOUDAN. 57

Now that order was restored, General Gordon
resigned his post and returned to THngland,
completely worn out by his intense exertions.

During the four years of his absence, he had
ridden on camel-back over African deserts a dis-
tance of nearly 13,000 miles, in addition’ to the
untold labours of ruling a great province almost
unaided and alone, and in spite of the evil in-
fluence and open opposition of corrupt officials.
No wonder that the brave soldier, the able ruler,
and the negroes’ friend, was universally greeted as
an uncrowned king.



ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST.

OF JPAHE scene opens with a view of the great
a3 Natural Bridge in Virginia. There are
three or four lads standing in the channel
(: i * below, looking up with awe to that vast
pa arch of unhewn rocks which the Almighty
~ bridged over these everlasting buttresses,
“when the morning stars sang together.” The
little piece of sky spanning those measureless piers
is full of stars, although it is mid-day. It is
almost five hundred feet from where they stand,
up those perpendicular bulwarks of limestone to
the key of that vast arch, which appears to them
only of the size of a man’s hand.
The silence of death is rendered more impressive
by the little stream that falls from rock to rock
down the channel. The sun is darkened; and the

boys have uncovered their heads, as if standing in
68

e





ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST. 59

the presence-chamber of the Majesty of the whole
earth.
At last this feeling begins to wear away; they











































TUE NATURAL BRIDGE OF VIRGINIA,

look around them, and find that others have been
there before them. They see the names of
hundreds cut in the limestone buttresses. A new



60 ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST.

feeling comes over their young hearts, and their
knives are in their hands in an instant. ‘ What
man has done, man can do,” is their watchword,
while they draw themselves up, and carve their
names a foot above those of a hundred full-grown
men who have been there before them.

They are all satisfied with this feat of physical
exertion except one, whose example illustrates
perfectly the forgotten truth that there is “no
royal road to learning.’”” This ambitious youth
sees a name just above his reach—a name which
will be green in the memory of the world when
those of Alexander, Caesar, and Bonaparte will rot
in oblivion. It was the name of Washington.

It was a glorious thought to write his name side
by side with that great father of his country. He
grasps his knife with a firmer hand, and clinging to
a little jutting crag, he cuts again into the lime-
stone, about a foot above where he stands; he
then reaches up and cuts another for his hands.
Tis a dangerous adventure; but as he puts his
feet and hands into those gains, and draws himself
up carefully to his full length, he finds himself
a foot above every name chronicled in that mighty
wall.

While his companions are regarding him with





ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST. 61

concern and admiration, he cuts his name in wide
capitals large and deep into that flinty album.
His knife is still in his hand, and strength in his
sinews, and a new created aspiration in his heart.
Again he cuts another niche, and again he carves
his name in large capitals.

This is not enough. Heedless of the entreaties
of his companions, he cuts and climbs again. The
gradations of his ascending scale grow wider apart ;
he measures his length at every gain he cuts. The
voices of his friends wax weaker and weaker, till
their words are finally lost on his ear. He nowfor
the first time casts a look beneath him. Had that
glance lasted a moment, that moment would have
been his last. He clings with a convulsive shudder
to his little niche in the rock. An awful abyss
awaits his almost certain fall. He is faint with
severe exertion, and trembling from the sudden
view of the dreadful destruction to which he is
exposed.

His knife is worn half-way to the haft. He can
hear the voices, but not the words, of his terror-
stricken companions below. What a moment!
what a meagre chance to escape destruction!
There is no retracing his steps. It is impossible
to put his hands into the same niche with his feet,



62 ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST.

and retain his slender hold a moment. His com-
panions instantly perceive this new and fearful
dilemma, and await his fall with emotions that
“freeze their young blood.”

He is too high to ask for his father and mother,
his brothers and sisters, to come and witness or
avert his destruction. But one of his companions
anticipates his desire. Swift as the wind, he
bounds down the channel, and the situation of the
fated boy is told upon his father’s hearthstone.
Minutes of almost eternal length roll on, and
there are hundreds standing in that rocky channel,
and hundreds on the bridge above, all holding their
breath, and awaiting the fearful catastrophe.

The poor boy hears the hum of new and
numerous voices both above and below. He can
just distinguish the tones of his father, who is
shouting with all the energy of despair, ‘‘ William,
William! don’t look down! Your mother and
Henry and Harriet are all here praying for you!
Don’t look down! Keep your eye towards the
top!”

The boy did not look down. His eye is fixed
like a flint towards heaven, and his young heart on
Him who reigns there. He grasps again his knife.
He cuts another niche, and another foot is added



ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST. 63

to the hundreds that remove him from the reach
of human help from below. How every motion
is watched from below! There stands his father,
mother, brother, and sister, on the very spot
where, if he falls, he will not fall alone.

The sun is half-way down in the west. The lad
has made fifty additional niches in that mighty
wall, and now finds himself directly under the
middle of that vast arch of rock, earth, and trees.
He must cut his way in a new direction to get
from this overhanging mountain. The inspiration
of hope is in his bosom; its vital heat is fed by
the increasing shouts of hundreds perched upon
cliffs and trees, and of others who stand with ropes
in their hands upon the bridge above, or with
ladders below.

Fifty more gains must be cut before the longest
rope can reach him. His wasting blade strikes
again into the limestone. The boy is emerging
painfully foot by foot from under that lofty arch.
Spliced ropes are in the hands of those who are
leaning over the outer edge of the bridge. Two
minutes more and all will be over. That blade
is worn to the last half-inch. The boy’s head
reels; his eyes are starting from their sockets.
His last hope is dying in his heart, his life must



64 ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST.

hang upon the next gain he cuts. That niche is
his last.

At the last flint-gash he makes, his knife—his
faithful knife—talls from his nerveless hand, and,
ringing along the precipice, falls at his mother’s
feet. An involuntary groan of despair runs like
a death-knell through the channel below, and all
_is still as the grave. At the height of nearly 300
feet, the devoted boy lifts his hopeless heart and
closing eyes to commend his soul to God. Tis
but a moment—there! one foot swings off!—he
is reeling—trembling—toppling over into eternity.

Hark! a shout falls on his ears from above!
The man who is lying with half of his length over
the bridge has caught a glimpse of the boy’s head
and shoulders. Quick as thought the noosed rope
is within reach of the sinking youth. No one
breathes. With a faint, convulsive effort, the
swooning boy drops his arm into the noose.
Darkness comes over him, and with the words
“God!” and “mother!” whispered on his lips
just loud enough to be heard in heaven, the
tightening rope lifts him out of his last shallow
niche.

Not a lip moves while he is dangling over that
fearful abyss ; but when a sturdy Virginian reaches



ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST. 65

down and draws up the lad, and holds him up in
his arms before the tearful, breathless multitude—-
- such shouting and such leaping and weeping for
joy never greeted a human being so recovered from
the yawning gulf of eternity.

Elihu Burritt.



THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES
THE SECOND.

(AFTER THE BATTLE OF worcEsTER, 1651.)

‘XN the 30th of April, 1649, Charles the
x First was beheaded on a scaffold outside
one of the windows at Whitehall, London.
In the same year his son, Charles the
Second, was proclaimed King in Ireland.

The following year he landed in Scotland, and
in 1651 was crowned at Scone, near Perth, on New
Year's Day.

In August of the same year, Charles entered
England at the head of a Scottish army. After a
tedious march of nearly three hundred miles he
arrived before the town of Worcester on the 22nd
day of the month. Cromwell rapidly collected his
forces round the city, and on the 8rd of September
a great battle was fought, in which Charles was
utterly defeated. It is said that the young King

66





THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND. 67

vainly endeavoured to rally his forces, riding up
and down the streets of the town and calling upon
the officers and men by their names: “TI had
rather,” said he, ‘that you would shoot me than
keep me alive to see the sad consequences of this
fatal day.” Indeed, so complete and overwhelm-
ing was the victory of the Parliamentary forces
that Cromwell ever afterwards called it his
“crowning mercy.” Not until Cromwell was
dead did the Royalists again hold up their heads
in the land.

When Charles saw that all hope was gone, he
began to consider how he might best escape from
the fatal field, and so avoid the doom that had
befallen his father. His adventures during the
next few weeks have been described as “a history
of wonders that no former age can parallel and
succeeding times will scarce believe.” One writer
said that “much of his Majesty’s actions and
sufferings have run parallel with those of King
David,” and in his introduction bids his reader
to read on and wonder.

Leaving Worcester by St. Martin’s Gate, about
six o’clock in the evening, he rode off on the road
to Kidderminster, attended by a number of his
most trustworthy friends. When darkness came



68 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

on a consultation was held, and it was decided
that Charles should be taken to Boscobel House,
not far from the Severn, on the verge of the
county of Shropshire. This house was known to
be the dwelling of a loyal man who would do
his utmost to provide a place of safety for the
fugitive monarch.

With great care the party managed to pass
through Stourbridge at midnight, though that
place was held by a troop of the enemy’s horse.
Outside the town they managed to obtain a crust
of bread and a drink of water for his Majesty,
after which they rode on to White Ladies, a
house belonging to one of the same family as
Boscobel. The building, which is about twenty-
six miles from Worcester, received the name of
White Ladies because at one time it was a religious
house, and the nuns wore white garments.

White Ladies was reached at daybreak, and
the King’s horse was taken into the hall, in
order that suspicion might not be aroused. After
Charles and his followers had refreshed themselves
with wine and biscuits, it was decided to disguise
the King as much as possible, so that he might
not be recognised by any one whom he chanced to
meet.



THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND. 69

Living at Boscobel was one of the Penderels
(of whom there were five brothers), the rest
residing in the neighbourhood. Richard Penderel
was sent for a suit of his clothes, while the
King’s hair was cut and his face and hands
rubbed with soot from the back of the chimney.
Having taken off his buff coat and princely orna-
ments, such as the Order of the Garter, blue ribbon,
and George of Diamonds, and giving his watch and
the money he carried to his friends, the King put
on a leathern doublet and a woodman’s suit.

Scarcely had the disguise been completed, when
one of the Penderel brothers came in haste to say
that Cromwell’s soldiers were near at hand. The
King at once took leave of his followers, and
Richard led him out of the house by a back door
to the densest part of a small wood near.

September the third had been spent in battle
and the night in flight, therefore the morning of
the fourth day found Charles a lonely wanderer
seeking shelter like a hunted animal—the bad
weather and the fury of his pursuers combining to
make his situation very uncomfortable.

The rain fell so heavily that the thick foliage
was unable to protect the King, upon which
Richard obtained a blanket from a cottage near



70 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

and laid it on the ground under the tree for
Charles to sit on. The woman of the house also
brought him some food, consisting of milk, butter,
and eggs. When Charles said to her, ‘‘ Good
woman, can you be faithful to a distressed
Cavalier ?”’ she replied, ‘‘ Yes, sir; I will rather
die than discover you.” ‘The rest of the day was
passed by Charles crouched on his blanket in the
thicket.

When night came on Charles was taken to the
house of another of the Penderels, where his dis-
guise of a woodcutter was made more com
and it was arranged that he should fitsteeo"
Wales and from thence to France. I
with his assumed character, the Kin
wood-bill in his hand, and answered to.
of Will Jones. >,

Setting out in the dark, Charles, with ‘rclard
for his guide, was challenged by a miller who
took them for Cromwell’s spies, as he had at that
moment some of the King’s friends sheltering in
his house. Charles of course did not know this,
and fearing to fall into the hands of the enemy,
made good his escape. At midnight they reached
the house of a Mr. Woolff, who concealed the
King among a heap of straw in his barn. The













CHARLES THE SECOND IN THE Oak,



72 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

remainder of the night and the whole of the next
day were spent in this humble shelter. To make
the King’s disguise still more complete, his hands
and face were stained with a dye obtained from
the leaves of the walnut-tree.

At midnight Charles once more set out for
Boscobel: under the guidance of Richard, arriving
there about five in the morning. Here he found
Colonel Carlis, called the hero of Worcester, be-
cause it is said that he had seen the last man
killed before leaving the field of battle.

When the fugitives had partaken of a little food,
the Colonel pulled off the King’s wet shoes and
stockings, and while they were being dried on the
hot embers of the hearth his feet were bathed in
warm water.

When they had rested and refreshed themselves,
the King and the Colonel decided to leave the
house and climb into a large, thick oak-tree which
stood in the grounds. Here they concealed them-
selves during the day, the King managing to obtain
a little rest on a cushion which lay on the Colonel’s
knee. While here they saw Cromwell’s soldiers,
who passed beneath them every now and then,
eagerly searching the county for Charles.

The night was spent in Boscobel House, where



THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND. 73

the King enjoyed a good supper, and a bed was
made up for him in a small closet about five feet
square. In the early morning Carlis and one of
the Penderels went out to obtain food. The
Colonel killed a sheep with his dagger, and Pen-
derel brought the animal home on his back.

The King, who had risen very early in order
to examine the road from an upper window, was
so hungry that he helped to cook breakfast on the
arrival of the meat.

The flight of the King had been traced to
White Ladies, but so far the loneliness of Bos-
cobel and the poverty of those who lived there
caused no suspicion to rest upon it. Chazles
therefore spent the day in a very quiet manner,
and so obtained the rest which he so greatly
needed.

After nightfall the King set out once more,
guarded by the five Penderels and Yates, the
brother-in-law, armed with bills, pikestaves, and
pistols, determined to defend the King to the last.
Charles found the rough motion of the farm horse
that he rode very hard to bear, as he was so
fatigued with the exertion and exposure he had
undergone. When he complained, the owner of
the horse said, ‘‘Can you blame the horse, my



74 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

liege, to go heavily when he has the weight of
three kingdoms on his back.”

After proceeding by lonely paths for some dis-
tance, the party separated, three of his protectors
arranging to return home. They had gone a little
distance when the King remembered that he had
not bid them good-bye. Calling them back, he
gave them his hand to kiss, and said, ‘ My
troubles make me forget myself. I thank you
all!”

Three miles further brought the little party to
Moseley, where a Mr. Whitgreave was waiting to
receive them, having sent all his servants to bed
that they might be out of the way.

Lord Wilmot, who was concealed in the house,
had told Mr. Whitgreave that the fugitive was
his lordship’s friend. Now he said to his host,
‘Though I have concealed my friend’s name all
this while, I must tell you this is my master, your
master, and the master of us all,” upon which Mr.
Whitgreave kissed the King’s hand.

_ The King’s appearance is thus described :. “ Hig
Majesty’s attire was then a leathern doublet with
pewter buttons, a pair of old green breeches, and
a jump-coat of the same green, a pair of his own
stockings with the tops cut off because embroidered,



THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND. 75

and a pair of stirrup stockings which had been lent
to him, and a pair of old shoes cut and slashed to
go easy to his feet, an old grey greasy hat without
a lining, a noggin shirt of the coarsest linen; his
face and hands made of a reechy complexion by the
help of the walnut leaves.’ Sitting on the side
of the bed, the King pulled out a handkerchief as
coarse and dirty as the rest of his apparel, and
applied it to his nose, which had begun to bleed.

When the King’s blistered feet had been care-
fully bathed, and his coarse wet clothing changed
for a more comfortable dress, he began to be
somewhat cheerful, and said, “I am now ready
for another march; and if it shall please God
once more to place me at the head of about
eight or ten thousand good men of one mind
and resolve to fight, I shall not doubt to drive
these rogues out of my kingdoms.”’

That night before retiring to rest Lord Wilmot
told Mr. Whitgreave that if the enemy came
suddenly down on the house, they were first to
deliver him up and so endeavour to save the King.

Charles was placed in a secret chamber, where
he remained most of his time, while in the house
two parties of Cromwell’s soldiers searched the
building, but failed to discover the King’s hiding-



76 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

place. One party, however, carried off all the
movable articles of any value that they could find.
The King also received news that Carlis had
managed to reach France under an assumed
name.

Mrs. Jane Lane, who lived at Bentley House,
not far from Moseley, had obtained a pass which
allowed her and a man-servant to visit a Mr.
Naughton, who lived near Bristol. Colonel Lane,
Mrs. Lane’s brother, offered the King the use of
this pass, under the protection of which it was
hoped that he might reach the sea coast. messenger was sent to the Colonel to make the
necessary arrangements. Before he returned
another search party appeared at the house.
Whitgreave himself opened the door and appeared
to be so much at ease that the suspicions of the
soldiers were disarmed, and they left the house
quietly.

That night the King joined Colonel Lane, who
was waiting with horses in the orchard, and they
at once rode off to Bentley Hall. After a few
hours’ rest they were ready to start at daybreak.
A suit of grey clothing now converted Will Jones
the woodman into William Jackson, a tenant’s
son. Having been told how he was to act the



THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND. 77

part of a serving-man, Charles rode up to the front
door, hat in hand, on a horse intended to carry
himself and Mrs. Lane, whose attendant he was
supposed to be. =

Colonel Lane and Lord Wilmot rode with
hawks and spaniels at a little distance ready to
help their friends in case of need. On the way,
Mrs. Lane’s horse lost a shoe, and while it was
being replaced, the blacksmith said to the supposed
groom that he hoped that Cromwell’s soldiers
would soon capture that rogue, Charles Stuart.
The disguised monarch replied that he hoped so
too, as the said rogue deserved hanging more than.
all the rest.

Near Stratford the travellers suddenly came
across a troop of cavalry, through which the King
rode with his charge without being noticed. That
night the Royal party slept at a friend’s house at
Long Marston. Charles being, only regarded as
a servant had to be accommodated in the kitchen,
and was scolded by the cook because he could
not wind up the jack with which the meat was
roasted. He, however, said, “I am a poor tenant’s
son of Colonel Lane’s. In Staffordshire we
seldom have roast meat, and do not make use
of a jack.”



78 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

On the following day the party travelled from
Long Marston to Cirencester, during which no
suspicion was aroused, and at night he was
supposed to sleep in a truckle bed in his master’s
room, which, however, the master occupied when
the King and he were alone.

Another day’s journey brought them to Abbots- .
leigh, three miles from Bristol. Here the real
rank of the King was not made known, but in
order to obtain some little comfort for him, his
pretended mistress informed the butler that he
was a poor tenant’s son just recovering from an
illness, and certainly his wan appearance made
this appear to be true. The butler therefore gave
him a private room, where he could take supper
and enjoy the rest he so much needed.

The following morning Charles made a good
breakfast in the buttery, where he heard the
Battle of Worcester described by a visitor who
was present, who declared that he would recognise
the King if he saw him, and said that the man
Jackson was not so tall as the fugitive monarch.
- The butler, however, who it seems had been the
King’s servant when he was Prince of Wales,
recognised him, and Charles privately admitted
to the man that he was the King. Charles never



YHE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND. 79

had occasion to regret the confidence which he
reposed in the trusty butler.

Charles remained in the house from Saturday to
Tuesday, where he was allowed to be very much
alone in order that he might recover from his
supposed illness. Here word was brought to him
that it would not be safe for him to try to get on
- board a vessel at Bristol, and therefore he decided
to go yet further south. The party started on
September 16th, Lord Wilmot riding on to tell
Colonel Wyndham that they were coming. The
night they spent on the road was at Castle Cary,
while Wyndham prepared to receive and hide the
King. Having got all questionable persons out of
the way, the Colonel and his lady walked in the
fields to watch for their guest. Soon they saw a
lady riding behind a pale, meanly-dressed young
man, whom Wyndham joyfully recognised as the
King. The night was passed in safety, and next
day Wyndham endeavoured to find means for con-
veying the King to the coast. For several days
Charles spent his time either in Lady Wyndham’s
chamber, which had been set apart for his use, or
in a secret room with which it was connected.
While here the news arrived, brought by Crom-
well’s soldiers, that the King had been killed. at



80 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

the Battle of Worcester, and one of the soldiers
not only declared that he had killed the King with
his own hand, but even showed a coat which he
said he had taken from the dead body. Many of
the people were on Cromwell’s side, and therefore
they showed great joy, making large bonfires and
ringing the church bells.

Unable to find a means of escape, Colonel
Wyndham went to Lyme, and there found a
captain who had made arrangements for three or
four Royalist gentlemen to be carried by night
across the Channel from England to France. The
party was described as that of a broken merchant
flying. from his creditors, while rooms at the inn
were engaged for a runaway bridal party from
Devonshire.

On September 22nd the Royal party left Trent
for the coast, the King again riding before a lady
on horseback. Arriving at the place agreed upon
the party waited for the ship’s boat, which, how-
ever, did not come, and it was afterwards dis-
covered that the captain of the vessel had. been
locked up in his own bedroom by his | wife,
who feared that he would get into trouble a
Cromwell’s party.

The King was now in great danger, for Lyme



.THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND. 81

was very busy on account of the fair which was
being held. at that place, and there were also a
great many of Cromwell’s soldiers in the town.
Charles decided on acting promptly, and rode
boldly into the yard of the principal inn. Pushing
his way through the troopers into the stable,
like a determined groom he insisted on finding ac-
commodation for his horse. Some rough language
was exchanged with the soldiers, and the King
was alarmed when he heard the ostler say that
surely he had seen his face before. Charles,
however, managed to keep his countenance, and
found that the man had lived at Exeter, where
the King had once stayed. Then Charles told
the man that he would no doubt know him, as
he had lived there as a servant for about a year.
After a chat with the servants and the soldiers
Charles joined his friends, and it was agreed that
they should leave the town as soon as possible.
They had not gone far when the talk of the ostler
aroused the suspicions of the soldiers, and a black-
smith, who shod one of the horses, said that the
shoes on its feet had been put on in different
counties—and one in Worcestershire. The
captain of the troops set out on the London
road in pursuit, but fortunately the Royal party
6



82 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

had journeyed in a different direction. They
spent that night at the village of Broad Windsor,
and were lodged in the upper part of a house.
They had not been long there before forty soldiers
arrived and quartered themselves in the house
for the night, which was spent in a very un-
comfortable manner. After the soldiers had left
in the morning, the King and Colonel Wyndham
returned to Trent, and Charles was once more
placed in his old hiding-place in Wyndham’s
house.

Charles had by this time been traced to the
neighbourhood, and the country was searched
for him, many of the inhabitants being roughly
treated. Meanwhile Lord Wilmot travelled to
and fro endeavouring to arrange for some means
of embarkation. On Sunday, the 28th September,
the village tailor told Wyndham that people had
begun to suspect that Royalists were hiding in
his house. Lord Wilmot therefore openly accom-
panied Wyndham to church, that people seeing
him might not think that any one else was in
hiding.

On October 6th, Charles, once more mounted
in front of a lady, set out for Hele House, where
the owner, Mrs. Hyde, showed him a good deal of



THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE sEcoND. 83

attention, as she had been informed of his rank.
The next day the King spent most of his time
counting the stones at Stonehenge, in order to
get rid of the weariness of doing nothing. The
King remained concealed in Hele House for five
days, when Lord Wilmot brought news that he
had hired a small coasting vessel to convey them
to France. On the 13th October the King set
out, attended by several faithful friends, who had
provided themselves with greyhounds as if on a
hunting expedition. At one house where they
spent the night, the host, who did not know the
rank of his guest, observing the King’s dress and
the cut of his hair, said “that he was some
Roundheaded rogue’s son.”

The next day’s journey took them thirty-five
miles, where at Brighthelmstone (Brighton, in
Sussex) they met the captain of the vessel who
had promised to take them to France. This man
recognised the King, as did also the landlord of
the inn at which they were staying, for he had at
one time held an office at Court. Not wishing
to lose sight of the captain for fear that some-
thing might prevent him from going as had been
the case before, Charles kept him drinking and-
smoking all the night, until the time for setting out.



84 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

On October 15th, at four o’clock in the morn-
ing, the party left Brighthelmstone for Shoreham,
where they embarked on board the vessel; and so
that no suspicion might rest on the captain, it
was arranged that the passengers should say they
were merchants flying from their creditors. The
sailors only knew so much, and in their presence
the captain reluctantly consented to the arrange-
ment. It was one o’clock in the afternoon when
Charles lost sight of the English shore, and at the
same hour one of his most devoted followers iaid
his head on the block at Bolton, in Lancashire,
for there Lord Derby was executed, October 15th.
Thus ended the wanderings of Charles, for forty-
three days, from the Battle of Worcester until his
escape from England. Arriving in France he was
received by the King, and subsequently educated
in Paris in a style befitting his rank.



THE BOY AND THE PANTHER.

2EN the early days of the settlement of
North America, a lad of ten was one
a Zz. morning sent on an errand to the nearest
by village. While he was passing through
«the forest a panther sprang from the boughs

of a large tree and landed on the ground
beside him.

The animal had not uttered a single growl to
warn the boy of its presence, and its manner was
so gentle that he did not feel any alarm. The
panther played around him, purring like a cat, and
rubbing its huge body against his legs.

As the two strange companions proceeded along
the path, the panther sometimes rolled over and
over on the leaves, and then made leaps and
bounds that caused the little fellow to clap his
hands in admiration. When they came to a level

piece of ground the boy ran a race with the
85





86 THE BOY AND THE PANTHER.

panther, and when the animal got in front of
him he seized hold of its tail and hung on
laughing till the woods re-echoed with his mirth.
Then, as if tired of this sport, the animal again
played round him and made several leaps right
over his head.

The boy had never seen a panther, but he had
often heard his father speak about this fierce
animal, and as they drew near the village, he
began to suspect that his playful companion was
one of these savage creatures, for it suddenly ~
- seemed to become excited and angry. All its
playfulness disappeared as it snarled and growled
and tore up the earth with its claws in the most
terrible manner.

The boy patted the beast on the back and
stroked its fur. In this way he restored it to its
former good humour, and it began purring and
playing again. After trotting along for some
distance, the panther suddenly bounded off and
disappeared among the trees. Glad to get rid of
his strange companion, of whom he had begun to
feel afraid, the boy hurried away as fast as he
could.

He had not proceeded far alone when a
threatening growl fell upon his ears. He started



THE BOY AND THE PANTHER, 87

to run towards an old unoccupied barn on the
outskirts of the village. When he was within a
few paces of the building he heard a fierce scream,
and turning round, he beheld the panther with



PREPARING TO SPRING,

bristling back and tail erect bounding towards
him. Terror stricken the poor lad rushed into
the barn and shut the door behind him. Scarcely
had he done this when the panther sprang against



88 THE BOY AND THE PANTHER.

the door with all its force, and in its wild attempts
to gain an entrance it splintered the wood with its
sharp claws.

When the animal found that it could not enter
by the door it sprang upon the roof. Hearing this
the boy looked eagerly round to see if there was
any opening by which the animal could reach him,
and saw to his great alarm a square hole in the
roof which had once served as a chimney. It was
quite evident that the panther meant to effect an
entrance by this means, nor was there anything to
prevent it from doing so.

The boy watched the hole until he saw the
shadow of the panther as the animal peered over
the edge of the opening, and the moment that itg
lithe body passed through the hole he drew the
bolt, bounded outside, and pulled the door after
him. The disappointed animal returned by the
way it had come, and as soon ag the boy heard
the clatter of its claws on the roof he again took
refuge inside the building. Wild with fury the
panther made another fierce attack on the door,
but without success. Then it again tried the roof
and the chimney-hole, but the boy was not to be
caught. The animal leaped down and he ran out
Then it leaped up and he ran in,



TIE BOY AND THE PANTHER. 89

While the furious beast was at the door
growling and snarling in a way that made the
boy’s blood run cold, the report of a rifle was
heard. Directly afterwards two men came run-
ning up to the barn and found that the shot which
one of them had fired had proved fatal. They
happened to be passing at the time, and were
able to approach quite near to the panther, as the
animal was so intent on securing its prey that it
did not notice them.



UP IN A BALLOON.

EFORE taking a seat in the car of a
balloon for the first time, imagination is
busy picturing the scenes and sensations

ee which belong to an aerial voyage. How-



? ever great one’s courage may be, there are

always little fears as to personal safety, and

it is owing to this feeling before starting that the

first great impression is made on the mind, when

the traveller finds, on rising, that there are none

of those disagreeable emotions which it is usual to
connect with that mode of travelling.

‘““As a balloon leaves the ground, twofold as-
tonishment seizes the mind—first, as to the vast-
ness and splendour of the view; secondly, that the
effect produced in looking down is not what would
be supposed, judging from lofty surveys on the tops
of high buildings.”’

90



- UP IN A BALLOON. 91

_ A balloon voyage is not without danger, and the
aeronaut requires to be a man of great presence of
mind and quick resolve. One of the most remark-
able of balloon voyages which ever took place was
recently commemorated in France.

Towards the end of 1784 it was the desire of
French balloonists to achieve the first passage
from England to France. A celebrated French
aeronaut named Blanchard at length decided to
make the venture. He took passage to England,
and on his arrival here his plans were warmly
entertained.

While in this country he met an American
named Dr. Jeffries, who was very desirous of
accompanying the daring Frenchman. When all
arrangements had been completed they went to
Dover and awaited a favourable breeze to carry
the balloon across the English Channel.

At last a start was made from Dover Castle
amid the firing of cannon and the cheers of the
inhabitants. Blanchard did his utmost to get
away alone, but Jeffries held firmly to the agree-
ment which had been signed and sealed. By this
agreement Jeffries-provided all the funds necessary
for the ascent, and thus secured a seat in the car.
He further bound himself on his word of honour



92 UP IN A BALLOON,

to jump out of the car the moment his weight
should imperil Blanchard’s life.

The balloon rose and soon drifted over the sea.
When in mid-channel the travellers were alarmed
to find that they were slowly descending. The
sandbags were quickly emptied, and though every-
thing available was cast out of the car, the advan-
tage gained was but momentary. The question,
‘What should be dispensed with next?” must
have caused Dr. Jeffries to shudder.

The anchor was thrown out and the provisions
followed it, but the balloon continued to descend.
Asa last resource, before the Doctor must follow
the provisions, the two aeronauts threw overboard
all their spare garments. This last sacrifice saved
the Doctor. The balloon quickly ascended, and
with a favouring breeze was swiftly wafted across
the Channel.

As they had lost their anchor the two men were
anxious to descend on the first opportunity. While
passing over a forest in the neighbourhood of
Guines they caught hold of the topmost branches
of some lofty trees, lowered themselves into the
dense wood, and reached solid ground a little over
two hours after the start.

hey were conveyed to Guines, and afterwards



UP IN A BALLOON. 93

to Calais, in great triumph, where the freedom of
the city was conferred on the Frenchman; and the













































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A BALLOON IN MID AIR,

two travelleis were regarded as heroes, for they
were the first to cross from England to France.



94 — UP IN A BALLOON.

One of the most perilous descents on record, took
place in London in 1847. A night ascent with
fireworks displayed under the balloon was in those
days an uncommon sight, and great crowds as-
sembled to witness it. :

During the day the weather had been calm and
bright, but when the time came for the balloon to
start there was a sudden change. A thick mist
yose in the east, and the rumbling of distant
thunder announced a coming storm. Notwith-
standing these warnings the aeronauts prepared to
ascend. As they left the earth they set off the
fireworks, and up they went into the clouds, leaving
behind them a train of fire.

Suddenly a vivid flash of lightning seemed to
envelope the balloon, the thunder crashed and
pealed overhead, and the occupants felt themselves
dropping rapidly through space. Then to their no
small alarm they saw that the balloon had a rent
in it of fully sixteen feet, and that they were falling
headlong right over the west end of London.
Beneath them were thousands of gas lamps, and
the houses were so close together that there seemed
to be no chance of escape.

“A more frightful descent to the earth could
not possibly be imagined. The sparks from the



UP IN A BALLOON. 95 -

paper cases shot up among the gas through the
hole in the silk, and once more the thunder roared
and the lightning flashed.” The balloonists were
meanwhile busy making preparations to land the
moment they should touch the ground. Fortu-
nately they came down in a quiet street in perfect
safety, and returned to their homes unhurt after
their exciting adventure.



Professor Higgins, the well-known parachutist,
had recently a most remarkable adventure. He
ascended from Croydon, and for a time everything
appeared to go well. Upon reaching a height of
something like four thousand feet, the parachute
broke loose from the balloon which was rising at a
great rate. It was evident that something had
gone wrong, but what it was those below had no
means of telling.

The balloon rapidly disappeared in the clouds.
Darkness set in, but no news had been received of
the aeronaut, and much anxiety was felt as to his
fate. Shortly after eight o’clock, however, all fears
were set at rest by the receipt of a telegram saying
that Higgins had landed safely about thirty miles
away.



96 UP IN.A BALLOON.

On his return to Croydon he said that he had
experienced the most wonderful of all his aerial
voyages. When he reached a height of four thou-
sand feet he got into a strong current, and the
balloon twisted right round. The current then
caught his parachute, and the test cord which held
it broke. —

Directly that happened he saw that the para-
chute was hanging below him fully inflated, and
the pressure was so great that it was impossible
for him to descend in safety. He therefore opened
his penknife with his teeth and cut the parachute
away. ‘This caused the balloon to shoot up at a
great rate, and he saw nothing until he passed
through some sleet and snow. He could hear,
however, the sound of trains. He was in this
snowstorm for at least ten minutes, and when
he had passed through it the sun was shining
beautifully.

Away in the distance he could see the sun

- shining on the water at Brighton. He found the
air getting very sharp and keen ; icicles were hang-
ing from his moustache, and for a few minutes he
was quite deaf. He now seemed to be descending,
and he thought he was getting near Hastings or
Brighton, as he could smell the sea.



UP IN A BALLOON. 97

On nearing the earth he prepared to descend by
hanging by one arm on to his trapeze rope, as if he
were using his parachute. When his feet touched
the ground the balloon, which was in front of him,
dragged him for ten yards, and then rebounded
some sixty feet into the air, between two trees. _
He came down a second time, and by the help of
two labourers succeeded in securing the balloon.
The Professor considered that at one time he must
have been five miles above the earth—the greatest
height he had ever been. .



IN THE RAPIDS.

GIAGARA FALLS are formed by the
sudden descent of the Niagara River
down a mighty cliff half a mile wide,
and more than 160 feet in height, into a
huge foaming basin over 400 feet in depth.
The river flows out of this basin in smooth
circling eddies for a mile or so, and then rushes
through a mighty gorge only 300 feet wide at the
rate of 30 miles an hour, piling its roaring and
foaming waves 30 feet higher in the centre than at
the margin, sweeping at its outlet into a vast
circular basin surrounded by high cliffs, forming a
huge whirlpool, in which the river circles before its
final rush into Lake Ontario.
About a mile above the Falls, the Rapids—the
downhill course of the stream—begin, and there is
a fall of nearly 60 feet in the bed of the river

before the edge of the cliff is reached, and the final
98



















































































































































































































































































































































































































NIAGARA FALLS,



100 a IN THE RAPIDS.

plunge taken. The river is part of the boundary
between Canada and the United States, and as an
island on the edge of the cliffs divides the Falls
into two separate cataracts, one is called the
Canadian Fall and the other the American
Fall.

Many exciting events take place at Niagara,
and sometimes terrible accidents happen. A great
many persons have lost their lives in one way and
another. Here is a story of a recent incident,
which shows what a brave cool-headed man can
do in a moment of peril.

Just as a grain barge, containing a crew of four
men, and towed by two horses, swung out of the
Chippewa Cut into the Niagara River, she met a
raft of timber rather too near the shore for the
barge to pass between it and the land. The barge
was forced to take the outside. The driver of the
horses did his best to keep the line clear by urging
the animals, but it finally caught in the logs and
snapped. As the rope parted, the barge trembled
on the surface of the water for an instant, as if in
dread of the terrible fate that awaited it, and then
swung round and started for Niagara Falls at a ~
terrific pace.

The barge, being for canal use only, had no



Full Text


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SO N & >a
yo Nem. tala ate



: ns Hi < ; ; ge:
The Children’s Favourite Series.
A charming Series of Juvenile.Books, each plentifully Illustrated, and written
in simple language to please young readers, Handsomely bound, and designed
to form an attractive and entertaining series of gift-books for presents and prizes.

‘The utmost care has been taken to maintain a thoroughly healthy tone
throughout the Series, combined with entertaining and interesting reading.

| ook MY BOOK OF HEROISM.

: Instances of daring and self-sacrifice.

& MY BOOK OF INVENTIONS.

Some of the most famous romances of industry,

Se MY BOOK OF PERILS.

Hairbreadth Escapes and Adventure Stories,

MY BOOK OF WONDERS.

: Ze Some of the most marvellous things in the world.

Fae MY BOOK OF THE SEA.

A budget of sea stories for the children of Britannia.

MY BOOK OF ADVENTURES.

A collection of exploits and adventures in all parts of the world.

MY BOOK OF TRAVEL STORIES.

Some of the most remarkable travels and explorations by great discoverers.

MY BOOK OF FAIRY TALES.

Old favourite stories which are never obsolete. Thirty original Illustrations

MY BOOK OF HISTORY TALES.

Well-known exploits from English history, attractive to children,

DEEDS OF GOLD.

A book of heroic and patriotic deeds, tending to inspire a love of courage,
bravery and devotion.

MY BOOK OF FABLES.

Chosen chiefly from the famous old Fables of sop and others dear to children
: of all generations.

MY STORY BOOKS OF ANIMALS.

About animals, the familiar pets of the house and the beasts of the forest.

RHYMES FOR YOU AND ME.

Short verses and rhymes, which everybody loves, and which are the first to be
learned and the last to be forgotten by children.
Each Volume contains nearly 200 pages Imperial 16mo., and about
= : 30 Illustrations,
: PRICE TWO SHILLINGS ; GILT EDGES, 2s. 6d.





EDWARD ARNOLD, Lonpon anp New York,
BUFFALO BILL’S RIDE

Ns.

4

Z
oy








THE CHILDREN’S FAVOURITE SERIES.

MY BOOK

OF

ADVENTURES



LONDON
EDWARD ARNOLD
87, BEDFORD STREET, STRAND, W.C.

[All rights reserved. ]




CONTENTS.

GE
BUFFALO BILL’S RIDE ON A BUFFALO... oe na 9
BUFFALO BILL ON THE PONY EXPRESS 5 An 14
RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA ... ee Pee ail
SHERIDAN’S RIDE ae a Ea ae 82
THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET : ee 38
A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE SOUDAN . ; 48
ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST... oon ee .. 58
THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND =e 66
THE BOY AND THE PANTHER... 5 Boe 85
UP IN A BALLOON cas ae Ae ae 90
IN THE RAPIDS ae ate ae — .. 98
A FIERY ORDEAL Ay ne Bee ne 105
PRESENCE OF MIND... Ba ar nme Pee ee
THE TAKING OF LINLITHGOW CASTLE an as 119
CHASED BY INDIANS ae ae we. L24
THE GOLDEN EAGLE’S NEST ae sis ae 138

VHE HERO OF THE FLOOD ... Ses Aan we «145
8 . CONTENTS.

WILD ELEPHANTS IN SOUTH AFRICA ee
A DASH FOR LIBERTY one vee eee
THROUGH THE GRAND CANON eee aoe
BUFFALO HUNTING... ose ee eee
THE FIRST ASCENT OF THE MATTERHORN ...

A FOREST ON FIRE... eee ose ees

PAGE

ree 154
... 162
Eee 167
... L76
Re 181
... 188
MY BOOK OF

ADVENTURES.

BUFFALO BILL’S RIDE ON A
BUFFALO.




Wy \ NE of the most extraordinary and novel
4) sights ever witnessed in London was
me —- eee een
)
Pe century civilisation, came a company of
hunters, trappers, cow-boys, scouts, and
Indians—men who had lived for the greater part
of their lives on the vast prairies and in the great
forests of North America. Having no settled
place of abode, these people are almost always
on the move from one part of the great continent
to another, traversing wide regions where the only
9



10 BUFFALO BILL’S RIDE ON A BUFFALO.

means of travelling was on horseback or on foot.
Under these circumstances it is not a matter of
surprise that among them we find some of the best
riders in the world.

The Wild West Show was a representation of
life in the Far West. The spectator was intro-
duced’ to the civilised life of the daring scout,
the hardy settler, and the adventurous pioneer.
Hunting scenes and Indian fights of the most
realistic character were engaged in, while the
marvellous horsemanship of the cow-boys called
forth the admiration and applause of all who
witnessed it.

The owner of the Wild West Show is one of
the most daring riders of modern times, and bears
the singular name of Buffalo Bill. His real name
is William Frederick Cody. On the prairies men
are not known by their baptismal names. The
wild adventurous life soon calls forth the good
or bad qualities of a man’s nature, and some
daring feat, act of bravery, or display of cowardice
causes his comrades to give him a name which he
ever afterwards bears, and thus a man’s frontier
name may often be taken as a key to his character.

Cody received the name by which he is known
ati a very. early period in his career. He was
BUFFALO BILL’S RIDE ON A BUFFALO. 11

born in 1843 in the Western State of Northern
America, called by the Indian name of Iowa. At
that time the region west of the Mississippi was
a vast wilderness through which roamed Indian
tribes, grizzly bears, and immense herds of buffa-
loes. Across the great prairies trains of waggons,
drawn by oxen, conveyed emigrants and goods to
distant regions, far beyond even the outskirts of -
civilisation.

When Cody made the famous ride from which
he received his name, he was engaged as an extra
driver of an ox team, his duty being to take the
place of any man who might be sick or disabled.
This did not often happen, and, therefore, the
youth whiled away the monotony of the journey
by hunting.

One day he had dismounted to cut up an ante-
lope which he had shot, when his horse suddenly
bounded away over the prairie. Springing to his
feet to discover the reason of the animal’s- flight,
he saw an enormous herd of buffaloes approaching
at a terrific speed. To remain where he was
meant certain death; escape by flight was im-
possible, for only the fleetest horse could outstrip
the infuriated animals.

Seeing a cottonwood tree a few hundred yards
12 BUFFALO BILL’S RIDE ON A BUFFALO.

from where he stood, it was but the work of a
moment to rush with headlong speed, and hastily
climb into its friendly branches. From this ele-
vated position he saw, to his horror and dismay,
a band of mounted Indians in full pursuit of the
flying herd. The young bull-whacker’s position
was now anything but an enviable one. The.
buffaloes were making straight for the tree, and it
was clear that the Indians would pass directly
under it.

Bill knew only too well what his fate would be
if he fell into the hands of the redskins. ‘To
escape a more terrible fate than even that of being
trampled to death by the wild animals, he con-
ceived the daring plan of dropping on to the back
of one of the buffaloes as the herd passed under
the tree. Onward they came, the earth vibrating
under the hoofs of the living mass as the buffaloes
rushed. along, their shaggy manes floating in the
wind, and their fierce bloodshot eyes rolling wildly
from side to side.

Strapping his rifle on his back Bill swung him-
self from a branch of the tree on to the back of a
huge bull, to the long shaggy mane of which he
clung for dear life, and at the same time stuck his
spurs into the sides of the terrified animal. Mad
BUFFALO BILL’S RIDE ON A BUFFALO. 138

with fear the enraged beast rushed forward at a
terrific pace, snorting wildly, and throwing the
whole herd into a state of confusion. Bill stuck
manfully on the back of his strange charger, and
with a triumphant smile, he glanced back from
time to time at the pursuing Indians. Straight
for the camp went the herd until discovered by
the train-men, who turned out in force to head
them off. But all to no purpose; the animals
dashed into the camp, causing the oxen and horses
to run hither and thither in their attempts to
escape.

The buffalo on which Bill was riding had by this
time become tired, and had dropped to the rear of
the herd. Before it could follow the rest of its
companions, a shot from a bull-whacker’s rifle
brought it to the ground and ended Cody’s famous
ride.

From that day the reckless youth was known as
Buffalo Bill, and he further justified his claim to
the title when he proved himself to be the cham-
pion buffalo-killer on the prairies. In one season
he killed the enormous number of four thousand
eight hundred and twenty buffaloes, a feat never
before or since equalled.
BUFFALO BILL ON THE PONY
EXPRESS.



GN the United States of North America,
before railways were made, letters were
» conveyed across that continent by what
was known as the Pony Express.
Two pony-couriers started on the same
day—one from San Francisco on the shores
of the Pacific to ride east, and the other from St.
Joseph on the Missouri, to ride west. When a
pony had completed its stage at twelve miles an
hour, another animal was provided to continue
the journey; and when a rider had accomplished
his part of the course the mail-bags were trans-
ferred to another who was waiting at a given point
to receive them. In this way the mails were kept
in motion at the rate of twelve miles an hour,
and were conveyed a distance of nineteen hundred

in about seven days and a half,
14


BUFFALO BILL ON THE PONY EXPRESS. 15

The riders suffered from fatigue, hunger, cold,
and heat, the work being so hard that strong
men were killed by it in a very short time.
The chief danger lay in the attacks of Indians
and robbers, who, knowing the country through
which the Express must pass, often lay in am-
bush, shot the riders, and carried off the mails.

Buffalo Bill, fond of an adventurous life, and
ever ready to be where the greatest danger was
to be encountered, engaged himself as a rider on
the Pony Express. The employés of the con-
tractors already counted among their number
some of the most famous riders in the world—
men who were so accustomed to the saddle that
they seemed to be almost a part of the gallant
animals they rode at breakneck speed; yet in this
band, where every man was a giant of strength
and daring, Buffalo Bill soon showed himself to
be head and shoulders above the rest. His daring
horsemanship earned him the title of the Boss
Pony-Rider.
While engaged in this work, Bill one day

arrived at the end of his stage and found that
there was no one ready to go on with the mails.
The rider who should have made the next trip
had been killed in a fight. The next station was
16 BUFFALO BILL ON THE PONY EXPRESS.

eighty-five miles away; but, nothing daunted,
Bill offered to take the dead man’s place for
this journey, and he accomplished the distance
in less than the time allowed. Without stopping
for rest, he turned back and made for his own
station, covering the extraordinary distance of
three hundred and twenty-two miles in one con-
tinuous ride, at an average speed of fifteen miles
an hour. This ride won for him a purse of gold
from the company, and a reputation for pluck
and endurance that placed him chief of the pony-
riders.

On another occasion, while riding along, Bill
was surprised by a party of Indians in ambush.
Being well mounted, he managed to escape cap-
ture, but the redskins at once gave chase. In a
short time he saw that two of them were rapidly
gaining on him, though he was urging his horse
to the utmost with lash and spur. As the savages
came nearer and nearer, Bill saw that it was
impossible for him to outride them, for the Indians
were mounted on large American horses. Glan-
cing over his shoulder, he noticed that one of the
Indians, whose features proclaimed him to be a
chief, was now considerably ahead of the rest,
and that this man was riding a splendid roan horse,








BUFFALO BILL ON THE PONY EXPRESS. 17

“JT want that horse and I want that Injun,”
muttered Bill, as he quietly grasped the revolver
he had always ready for an emergency.

The Express rider’s horse, already forced beyond
his powers of endurance, had begun to waver,
when Bill, suddenly pulling up and as quickly
wheeling in his saddle, sent a bullet crashing
through the brain of his pursuer. The Indian
fell from-his horse, which dashed on until Bill,
seizing the rein, brought the animal to a standstill.
It would have been an easy thing for the pony-
rider to spring upon the back of the roan, but he
was unwilling to lose his own saddle and the
inail-bags attached to it. Dismounting, he was in
the act of changing the saddle from his own to
the redskin’s horse, when the second Indian
dashed up. As soon as he came within range
he fired and knocked Bill’s cap off his head.
Having the two horses to look after, Bill had
quite enough to do, and his position for the time
being was by no means reassuring. A second shot
killed the pony, whereupon Bill immediately drew
his revolver and fired. Down fell the Indian,
but only wounded, and as he still grasped his
pistol, Bill fired again, this time with fatal effect.

Just then the whole band of Indians came in

2


is BUFFALO BILL ON THE PONY EXPRESS.

sight. The crisis had now come, when the mettle
both of horse and rider would be tested to the
utmost. But the presence of mind for which he
was famous did not desert the hardy pony-rider.
Quickly cutting loose his saddle from his dead
horse, and springing with it in his hand upon the
back of the roan, he dashed away just as the
bullets began to fly around him. The Indians
kept up the chase for several miles, but Bull,
urging forward the splendid horse he had captured,
left them far behind, and arrived safely at his
destination ahead of time, where he related
his adventures.

Six months passed away, during which Bill con-
tinued to carry the mails over his long and lonely
stage. During this time the Indians had become
very troublesome, attacking stations and killing
the riders, until there were very few who cared to
run the risks. Bill, however, did not seem to be
in the least alarmed by what was taking place, but
even appeared to delight in the wild, adventurous
life, which might at any moment end in death.

One day, as he rode along, he saw, some dis-
tance.in front, the stage-coach going at full speed.
He was surprised to see that the coach was without
a driver, and at once concluded that something
BUFFALO BILL ON THE PONY EXPRESS. 19

serious had happened. At that moment some
Indians suddenly dashed out of a ravine and gave
chase. The stage-coach was now in the open
prairie and proceeding as fast as the horses could
gallop, with three Indians in close pursuit. Bill,
putting spurs to his horse, soon came within range
of the redskins, and fired. Down dropped the
pony of the Indian nearest him, and its rider,
evidently stunned by the fall, lay motionless. A
second shot wounded one of the remaining Indians,
and. they took to flight, while Bill dashed up to
the side of the coach.

There a terrible sight met his gaze. On the
box the driver lay dead, still grasping the reins
in his nerveless hands. Bill knew that the coach
not only carried passengers, but also contained a
box of gold belonging to the company. He there-
fore rode alongside, seized the mail-bags, and by
a dexterous movement leaped from his saddle to
the coach. The next moment he held the reins
in his firm grip. His horse, trained to run on
the trail no matter what might happen to its
rider, galloped on in front, and Bill urged the
six coach-horses at the top of their speed.

Behind came the Indians gaining steadily, for
the road at this part was very bad; but just as
20 BUFFALO BILL ON THE PONY EXPRESS.

they were near enough to reach the coach with
their arrows, Bill again forced his team forward,
and at a breakneck pace they rushed down the
steep road, the vehicle swaying so wildly from
side to side that the five passengers within—two
of whom were women—were as much in danger
of getting their necks broken as of being scalped
by the Indians.

Notwithstanding the terrific speed at which he
was driving, Bill managed the horses well, and
after a desperate run of half an hour, the coach
dashed up to the door of the station in a style
that made the onlookers stare with astonishment.
Thus single-handed did Buffalo Bill, by his fearless
and prompt action, save the box of gold and the
lives of the passengers, and add fresh laurels to
his already illustrious name.
RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA,.

Si ZN the year 1877 a war broke out between
RV Russia and Turkey, and continued for
‘y. nearly a year. A Turkish Pasha in
Ay > Bulgaria had resorted to measures of
5 great severity, upon which Russia attacked

Turkey with the intention of seizing Constan-
tinople. Russia declared that her intention in
taking up arms was to free the Bulgarian
Christians of the Greek Church from the cruelty
of the Turks.

The chief event of the campaign was the siege
of Plevna, an entrenched camp in the north of
‘Bulgaria, defended by Osman Pasha. So deter-
mined were the attempts made to storm it,
that it is said Plevna cost the Russians 50,000
men.

The special correspondent of the Daily Tele-

21


22. RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA.

graph was in Plevna on the 12th of September,
and witnessed one of the most terrible battles
of that fearful war. He had seen some 8,000
Russians destroyed by the “pitiless bullet,
bayonet, sabre, and shell,” in their attempt to
break down the defence of Osman Pasha. He
graphically describes the ghastly scene when the
great fight was over, and the Russians had once
more retired to their camp. The ground was
thickly covered with great heaps of dead, many
of whom had not found room upon the bare earth
to die. They were lying in every possible posture,
and in every imaginable position, in holes, under
hedges, and in trees, killed by every description
of wound. Many were lying where they had
fallen, while some had apparently endeavoured to
creep into a sheltered spot to die.

The correspondent was anxious to leave the
beleaguered camp, and make his way to Constan-
tinople, but to do so he must run the blockade,
and effect a most daring ride through the Russian
hosts. He had once before attempted to leave
Plevna, and had been taken into custody by the
Turkish soldiers, who carried him and his guides
to one of the forts, the commandant of which
told him that he must not go any further, as the
RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA. 93

Russians were out in great numbers, and were
about to make an attack.

Three days after the great battle already men-
tioned, the correspondent determined to make
another attempt to leave Plevna. For this pur-
pose he engaged four Circassians, who offered to
guide him through the Russian lines for 2,000
piastres (about £400). It was arranged that the
correspondent should dress as nearly as possible
like a Russian, carry as little baggage as possible,
and be careful to have nothing about him that
would make the slightest noise, and so attract the
attention of the enemy. Proceeding to Osman
Pasha’s tent, the Marshal’s permission was asked.
He replied at once, ‘‘ You cannot go, you will never
get through,” and then said that out of thirty Cir-
cassians who had made the attempt singly, only
two had succeeded, the rest having been captured
or killed. For a party to attempt to pass through
the Russian camp was to invite certain death. The
correspondent said he must go, no matter how
great the risk, upon which the Marshal thought
for several minutes, and then replied: ‘‘ Well, if
you will go, do so. It is certain death ; you have
only a poor chance of escape.” When all was
ready he gave the correspondent some despatches
24 RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA.

to carry to Orhanie, as he was going that way,
and sent two of his own soldiers to render what
assistance they could.

At six o’clock on Saturday night, the 15th of
September, the little party, which now numbered
eleven persons, left the town of Plevna, in the
following order :—Four Circassians rode two
abreast, then a Turkish soldier, next the corre-
spondent and his servant, then a groom with a
baggage horse, after him came the other Turkish
soldier with a spare horse, and last of all a Turkish
_ officer and his servant, who led another spare horse
in case of need.

The party had some little distance to travel
before they reached the outposts of the Russian
army, and for the first hour all went well. The
Turkish sentinels allowed them to pass without
delay, recognising the uniforms of the guides and
_ the soldiers sent by the Marshal.

As they drew near the Russian lines the
members of the party in turn took upon them-
selves the office of scout, that they might not
suddenly come upon a body of the enemy. The
correspondent himself was the first to notice a
camp fire, round which a number of men were
lying. One of the Circassians having made
H] i
i
HA

aN



RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEYNA.
26 RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEYNA.

sufficient change in his appearance to look like
a Cossack, rode forward, and answered their
challenge in Russian. This satisfied the sentinels,
who allowed the travellers to proceed.

The party now advanced at a trot, making the
best progress they could, though they felt all the
time that their journey bristled with danger, as
they might at any moment have rushed into the
arms of the Russians. Again and again they had
to pull up suddenly, and to hide themselves from
some of the enemy’s troops, who happened to be
passing in that direction.

Keeping in the shadow of the hills, the party at
length found themselves in a broad plain on which
the moon was brightly shining. Not far away
were a hundred Cossacks encamped. How to
cross this plain without being observed and pur-
sued was a difficult matter to decide. A whis-
pered consultation was held, and they arranged
that each one should in turn ride across the plain,
a little time being allowed to elapse between each
attempt. In this way the travellers hoped to pass
themselves for members of the Russian army
engaged on some errand. The plan was success-
fully carried out, and all got safely across.

Starting again, they had just entered a valley
RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA. OF

when another body of troops appeared in sight.
Crouching down and holding their horses’ bridles
in one hand and their rifles in the other, they
waited to see the course events would take. Ina
whisper they arranged, if discovered, to fire simul-
taneously, and then in the confusion endeavour
to reach the woods which were quite near. For-
tunately the Cossacks who had alarmed them
mounted and rode away, the travellers following
their example, but proceeding in an opposite
direction. Being now in the very centre of the
Russian lines, it was more than ever necessary
to proceed with the greatest care and in the most
absolute silence, the clanking of the spur being
sufficient at one point to cause the whole com-
pany to come to a dead halt.

Having arrived near a Bulgarian village, three
of the Circassians went forward on foot and
cautiously looked for any traces of the enemy.
In about a quarter of an hour the guides returned,
saying that there did not appear to be any danger,
upon which the whole party rode forward, keeping
as clear of the village as possible, for fear of
alarming the dogs. Though they took every
precaution, the dogs scented them and imme-
diately began to bark. The village seemed to
28 RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA.

be aroused, as lights were seen moving about.
The whole party made for a ravine in which
they hid for about half an hour, until the barking
ceased, then mounting their horses, they rode off
as quickly as possible.

Similar experiences went on during the whole
night. Whenever they came in sight of a village
the dogs scented them and roused the neighbour-
hood with their barking, which was at once
followed by a wild galloping to escape being seen
and attacked by any troops that might be in the
neighbourhood.

In one part of their route the narrow path
was so thickly overgrown, that they had to cut
a way with their swords. Another time they
came suddenly on a great hole into which they
fell headlong. Then the path became so rough
that they had to dismount and lead their horses
over the broken ground.

As soon as the first light of morning appeared,
in response to their leader, who cried: ‘“ Get
along, quick!’ the party galloped madly over
hill and valley for about an hour. Their horses
stumbled repeatedly, but good progress was made,
and they reached the village of Lukowitz in safety,
where they made a halt, hoping to be able to
RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA. 29

obtain food and a short rest. A little bread and
honey and a drink of water was all the refresh-
ment they could obtain, and they had just flung
themselves on some straw on the ground, when
the whisper passed round that the Cossacks were
near, and delay was dangerous.

The most exciting part of the journey was now
to be done, as ib was broad daylight and there
were many Russians in the neighbourhood, and
the party could no longer proceed from point to
point under cover of darkness. For about an
hour they rode forward in single file, when they
suddenly saw that they were being pursued by
Cossacks who had sighted them in the distance.
Seeing that further concealment was impossible,
the party galloped away at a rapid pace, but
were obliged to leave behind the spare horses, one
of which was carrying the correspondent’s baggage,
which, of course, that gentleman lost in order to
save his life.

Jablanitza was reached in safety about five
- o’clock on the afternoon of Sunday. ‘There a
good-natured Bulgarian gave the party some
bread and meat. This man seemed to be almost
alone, for the villagers had deserted their houses
and formed an encampment some miles away,
30 RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA.

feeling that there they would be safe from attack.
Only a short stay was made, as time was precious.
Once more in the saddle, the party pressed on as
rapidly as possible, passing thousands upon thou-
sands of wretched people whom the war had
rendered homeless and helpless, without any means
of obtaining food or shelter.

At eleven o’clock at night, after twenty-nine
hours’ hard riding, Orhanie was reached. Here
the correspondent delivered the despatches he had
been carrying from Osman Pasha, and three
hours’ rest was obtained. When the journey was
resumed to Sophia, the same sights of misery inet
the travellers’ eyes on every side. Turkish troops
were pushing forward to the relief of Plevna, and
large quantities of ammunition and provisions
were being carried to the beleaguered army.

It was nearly the end of the week before Con-
stantinople was reached, and on Friday night the
correspondent was received by the Sultan, who
graciously asked him to dinner in order that he
might hear how matters were progressing at
Plevna. The Sultan heard the description of the
great battle, which had taken place just before
the correspondent left, with much interest, and
expressed: great satisfaction: that Plevna had
RIDING THE BLOCKADE AT PLEVNA. 31

hitherto successfully withstood the attacks of the
Russian army.

Here ends the story of this famous ride, and it
only remains to say that not until Plevna was
completely surrounded and all provisions failed,
that Osman Pasha and his gallant army were
made prisoners of war while attempting to cut
their way through the enemy.
SHERIDAN’S RIDE.




iG

7 3 troops in the valley of Virginia. For
gaye a long time Sheridan was very wary,

eee

:
GJ) being determined not to risk a battle against
Roa ne
an experienced commander like Harly with-
out a good chance of success.

At length Early’s force was reduced in numbers,
so Sheridan attacked him and won the battle of
Winchester. This battle was fought in 1864.
Three days later, Sheridan again attacked Harly
on two sides, routed his army, and drove the
Confederate force up the valley to the south. In
order to prevent their return, Sheridan burned all
the barns filled with grain, and he also carried off
all the stock in the valley.

Suddenly Early received large reinforcements,

and while Sheridan was absent from the camp,
32


SHERIDAN’S RIDE. 33

Early prepared to take it by surprise. Swords,
canteens, and everything that would make a noise
was left behind, and along a lonely path part of
the Confederate army crept stealthily on their
sleeping foes.

At the same time an attack was made in front,
and the Union soldiers were driven back four
miles. Meanwhile, Sheridan was at Winchester,
a place distant twenty miles from the scene of
action. Hearing the firing, he at once set, out.
Mounted on a black horse, he sped swiftly
onwards, almost hidden from view in a cloud of
dust. Faster and faster still the noble animal
flew along, as if it was impatient—like its master
—to plung into the fray. At length Sheridan
came upon his men in full retreat. Dashing
down the line, amid a storm of huzzahs, he cried,
““Come, boys, we’re going back!” And back
they went, to turn their defeat into a glorious
victory. -

The following poem graphically describes this
famous ride:— ~~

Up from the south at break of day,

Bringing to Winchester fresh dismay,

The affrighted air with a shudder bore,
3
24. SHERIDAN’S RIDE.

Like a herald in haste, to the chieftain’s door
The terrible grumble and rumble and roar,
Telling the battle was on once more—

And Sheridan twenty miles away !

The wilder still those billows of war
Thundered along the horizon’s bar ;

And louder yet into Winchester rolled

The roar of that red sea uncontrolled,
Making the blood of the listener cold

As he thought of the stake in that fiery fray,
With Sheridan twenty miles away.

But there is a road from Winchester town,

A good broad highway leading down ;

And there, through the flash of the morning light,
A steed as black as the steeds of night

Was seen to pass as with eagle flight—

As if he knew the terrible need,

He stretched away at his utmost speed ;

Hills rose and fell, but his heart was gay

With Sheridan fifteen miles away !

Still sprung from those swift hoofs, thundering
sound,

The dust, like the smoke from the cannon’s mouth,

Or the tail of a comet sweeping faster and faster ;
SHERIDAN’S RIDE. B5

Foreboding to traitors the doom of disaster ;

The heart of the steed and the heart of the master
Were beating like prisoners assaulting their walls,
Impatient to be where the battlefield calls ;



“COME BOYS, WE’RE GOING BACK.”

Every nerve of the charger was nerved to full play
With Sheridan only ten miles away |

Under his spurning feet the road
Like an arrowy Alpine river flowed;
36 SHERIDAN’S RIDE.

And the landscape sped away behind

Like an ocean flying before the wind;

And the steed, like a bark fed with furnace ire,
Swept on with his wild eyes full of fire ;

But, lo! he is nearing his heart’s desire ;

He is sniffing the smoke of the roaring fray,
With Sheridan only five miles away !

The first that the General saw were the groups

Of stragglers, and then the retreating troops ;

He dashed down the line midst a storm of huzzahs,

And the wave of retreat checked its course there,
because

The sight of the master compelled it to pause.

With foam and with dust the black charger was
grey ;

By the flash of his eye and his red nostril’s play,

He seemed to the whole great army to say,

‘“‘T have brought you Sheridan, all the way

From Winchester down to save the day!”

Hurrah, hurrah, for Sheridan !

Hurrah, hurrah, for horse and man!

And when their statues are placed on high,
Under the dome of the Union sky—

The American soldier’s temple of fame—
SHERTDAN’S RIDE. 37

There with the glorious General’s name,
Be it writ in letters both gold and bright :
‘“‘ Here is the steed that saved the day
By carrying Sheridan into the fight
From Winchester—twenty miles away!”
I’. B. Read.
THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET.

Qe a narrow strip of country bordering on
(akin the east coast of the Red Sea there are



world. They are annually visited by large
numbers of pilgrims from all parts of the

world, and are regarded as holy by one hun-
dred and thirty millions of the population of the
globe.

Mecca, one of these famous cities, contains the
Kaaba, an oblong stone building, over which has
been erected a great mosque. This building is
said to stand on the spot where Adam first
worshipped God, after he had been driven out of
the Garden of Hden. That first service, according
to the legend, was performed in a tent sent down
to him from Heaven.

After this, Seth built a structure of clay and
stone, which was destroyed by the Deluge, and
rebuilt by Abraham and Ishmael. The present

88
THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET. 89

building was erected in 1627. The silver-coated
door of this holy place is opened only three times
in a year—once for men, once for women, and
once for cleaning purposes.





































































































































































































































































MECCA.

In one corner of the Kaaba there is the famous
Black Stone, which is used to show the direction
towards which all Mabometans must turn in their
40 THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMEt

prayers. This stone, which is called “The Right
Hand of God on Earth,” is said to have dropped
from Paradise together with Adam. The original
colour of the stone was white, but the sins of
mankind have caused it to shed go many tears
that it has become black. Another explanation
given of the change of colour is that it has been
caused by the kisses and touches of the pilgrims,
who, when they visit the mosque, pass seven
times round the Kaaba, each time lissing the
stone, or touching it with their hands, which they
then kiss.

The outer building is a magnificent pile, sur-
mounted by cupolas, spires, and crescents, all of
which are gilded and adorned with lamps. Between
the Kaaba and the outer walls are seven paved
causeways intended to preserve the sacred building.
Every year the Sultan of Turkey sends a covering
of rich black silk, on which sentences from the
Koran have been embroidered in letters of gold, to
cover the walls of the Kaaba.

For a long time the guardianship of the Kaaba,
together with the supreme control of Mecca, was
in the hands of the Coreishites, or descendants of
Ishmael. Their chief kept the keys of the sacred
building, and assumed the chief offices connected
THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET. 4]

with the local worship. This position gave him
great influence, and his ordinances were obeyed
and venerated, as people obey and venerate the
observances of religion, both before and after his
death.

About 1,300 years ago there was a meeting of
the council of the Kaaba at Mecca. A peculiar
movement had been going on in the city during
the past two months. House after house had been
abandoned and whole families had suddenly dis-
appeared. One or two quarters of the city were
entirely deserted, and this council had been called
to decide upon some course of action. For some
time a new religion had been preached among the
people, and the guardians of the Kaaba had done
what they could to prevent it spreading, for fear
that it might injure the success of their own cause.

The sudden disappearance of so many people was
therefore a serious matter, and as the leader of
the new religion was still in the city, the question
arose what should be done with him. If they
imprisoned him, his followers might come to his
rescue. If they drove him out of the city, he
might bring against them some other tribes of |
Arabia, and obtain possession of Mecca. They
would have preferred to have put him to death
42 THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET.

but this they feared would bring down upon them
the hate and fury of his kinsman, who would feel
called upon to exact blood for blood. They would
have preferred to have had him murdered by an
unknown hand, if such an arrangement could have
been carried out. In the meantime, however, they
decided to wait upon this leader in his own house.
While that meeting was being held, the person
who was the cause of all this trouble had been
preparing for fight. Two swift camels were at
that moment in the yard of his house, in charge
of a guide who knew all the tracks and by-ways
between Mecca and Medina, a city distant about
two hundred and fifty miles.

Receiving notice of the intended visit of the
Coreish, this religious leader at once scented
danger. He had with him his nephew Ali, and
that the neighbours might not have their suspicions
aroused he put on the youth his own red mantle,
and told him to occupy his bed. Then he pro-
ceeded to the house of his follower Abu Bakr. A
few hasty preparations were made, and, creeping
through a back window, the two escaped from

the city. In the dark they climbed over bare and
rugged rocks, and at last reached a lofty mountain.
In a cave near its summit they took refuge.
THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET. 43

A recent traveller describes this mountain, and
the road to it from Mecca. He says the pathway
is excessively rugged and difficult, and the traveller
is obliged sometimes to crawl over the rocks on
his hands and knees. The entrance to the cave is
still preserved on one side, in what is believed to
be its original state.

When it is visited by pilgrims they are supposed
to acquire special merit by forcing themselves,
with difficulty, as the Prophet must have done,
through the hole, which is not more than one
and a half span in breadth. A wide passage has
-been opened out at the other end of the cave.
The hills are wild and bare; huge masses of rock
lie scattered about, and nothing green is in sight
but a few wild thorny bushes.

In this cave the Prophet and his companion
remained for a time, as they knew that they would
be looked for on the road between the two cities.
There is no doubt that the fugitives felt them-
selves to be in great peril, for looking out at the
crevice, through which the morning light entered
the cave, Abu Bakr whispered to his leader,
‘* What, if one of them were to look beneath him ;
he might see us under his very feet!”

“ Think not thus, Abu Bakr!” said the Prophet.
44 THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET.

‘Wo are two, but God is in the midst—a
third.”

It is said that the Coreish, while hotly scarching
after the Prophet, passed the entrance to this
cave, but seeing a spider’s web woven across it,
they turned back. It is claimed by the followers
of the Prophet, that the spider wove her web there
after the fugitives had entered the cave.

Another story in connection with this cave is,
that two of the pursuers, armed with swords, had
almost reached the hiding-place of the Prophet
and his companion, when they saw two wild
pigeons perched at the entrance to the cave.
Sccing them, one of the pursucrs said that he
was quite sure that nobody was in the cave. The
~ Prophet heard the men’s words and blessed the
wild pigeons, and made them sacred in the Holy
Territory.

During the time that they were in hiding, one
of Abu Bakr’s shepherds secretly stole to the cavo
every evening with a supply of milk, and his son
brought food at the same time. During the day
ho also kept watch in Mecca, that he might carry
a report to the cave at night.

On the evening of the third day it was reported
to them that the search had ceased, and that the
THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET. 45

roads were clear. They might now set out on
their journey without the fear of receiving an
arrow or a dagger from the hand of a hired
murderer. The following evening was decided
upon as the time for starting, and it was arranged
that the supply of food should be carried to the
cave, while the two camels should be held in
readiness near the summit of the mountain.

On the 20th of June, 622 a.v., the Prophet
mounted the swifter of the two camels, named
Al Caswa, while the guide and Abu Bakr mounted
the other. Having descended the mountain, they
left Mecca to the right, and struck off westward,
towards the sea shore. In the morning they came
upon an encampment of wandering Arabs. Here
a woman satin the door of her tent to give food
and drink to religious travellers. This being the
hottest season of the year, the Prophet and his
followers were tired and thirsty, and were glad to
receive from her a supply of milk.

In the evening they thought they might now
safely travel along the common road. They had
not proceeded far when they met one of their .
pursuers ; fortunately for them, he was returning
alone on horseback, and therefore unable to cope
with his opponents. He even promised that if
46 THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET,

they would let him depart in peace he would not
tell any one that he had met them. He kept his
word. It was not till several days afterwards
that the rulers of Mecca learned the story of the
Prophet’s flight. In safety he arrived at Medina,
and thus ended the first great stage of his life.

This famous ride, which was made by the
Prophet Mahomet from Mecca to Medina, and
known throughout the world as the Hegira (an
Arab word which means “‘ going away”) has since
been regarded as the Mahometan era. Thus, these
two cities of Arabia became for ever linked with
the history of the false Prophet Mahomet. Mecca
was his birthplace, and the cradle of the Mussul-
man creed. Medina is the spot where he died,
and therefore to both of these holy places pilgrims
are constantly wending their way.

For some years after his flight from Mecca,
Mahomet kept up a constant warfare with that
city. During this period he concluded an alliance
with many of the Arab tribes, and a great many
adventurers from all parts of the world flocked
to his standard. At length, with a force of ten
thousand men, he marched against the city, and
took it. He was then publicly proclaimed Chief
and Prophet. ‘This effectually established a new
THE FLIGHT OF MAHOMET. AT

faith through Arabia. Thc idols of the Kaaba
were destroyed, and it was declared to be the
Holy Place of Islam, to which all true believers
should in future turn their faces when in prayer,
in whatever quarter of the world they might be.
A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE
: SOUDAN.

) cp HEN Gordon Pasha was Governor-
AV 2 General of the Soudan, he was famous
i Vole. throughout the length and breadth of
foe the land for the extraordinary speed
Se of his movements. In every part of his
“extensive territory, which was more than
1,600 miles long and 700 miles wide, the people
seemed to be always listening for the stirring
cry, ‘‘The Pasha is coming!” No one felt secure
from his presence. He seemed to be everywhere,
and to know what was going on in the most remote
corners of the country. When rebel chieftains
and other evil-doers fondly fancied that weary
miles of desert sand stretched between them
and the terrible Pasha, whose righteous anger
caused the boldest and most defiant to tremble,
he suddenly swooped down upon them, upsetting
48



A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE SOUDAN. 49

their plans, and dealing out the punishment they
richly deserved.

The ‘cushion-footed camel” bore him safely
through dangers and difficulties of the most
perilous character. Fearlessly he faced hordes
of wild and ruthless savages, while he endured
without a murmur the discomforts of desert life—_
the unhealthy climate, the horrible vermin, the
ghastly itch, and the nightly and daily alternations
of bitter cold and overpowering heat. More than
once, when riding under a burning sun, his camel
dropped dead beneath him and Gordon mounted
another and rode on.

He had been appointed to his high office to
put down the slave trade. No one knew better
than he how difficult was the task that he had
undertaken. ‘The slave trade,” he wrote, ‘is
ingrained in the bones of the people; slavery is
the A BC of life in the Soudan, to rich and
poor.”’

For twenty years or more the dealers in “ black
ivory” had been the real masters of the country
south of Khartoum. They had carried on their
horrible traffic on such an extensive scale, and
in so cruel a manner, that it had become the
scandal of the world.

4
50 A FIVE MONTHS’ BIDE IN THE SOUDAN.

The region bristled with zerebas, or fortified
camps, garrisoned with armed bands of ruffians
under Arab captains. Shaka, in the extreme south
of the province of Darfour, called by Gordon
“the Cave of Adullam,’ was the great centre,
the headquarters, of the wholesale slave trade.
Zebehr-Rahama, a native chieftain, and the lord
over thirty stations, had his stronghold at Shaka.
There the ‘“ Black Pasha,” as he was called, lived
in princely state, waited upon by richly-dressed
slaves, with armed sentries at his doors, and
chained lions in his halls of audience. Powerful,
daring, and ambitious, he had organised an army
of man-hunters whom he had armed, and whose
raiding expeditions he directed.

Villages were attacked by his ruthless followers,
peaceful tribes were plundered, and convoys of
slaves were brought in from all parts of the
surrounding country. Every road that led to
Shaka was marked by the whitened bones of the
poor worn-out and murdered negroes, who had
perished by the way. So strong did this “‘ Scourge
of Central Africa ’’ become, that he was able to
defeat the Egyptian troops sent to enforce his
obedience, and he was acknowledged as the King
of the Slave-Hunters.
































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































GORDON’S DESERT RIDE.
52 A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE SOUDAN.

Hoping by bribery to induce the Khedive of
Egypt to make him Governor-General of the
Soudan, Zebehr paid a visit to Cairo, taking with
him £100,000. Not only was his request refused,
but he was detained as prisoner at Cairo. He
had done too much mischief in the Soudan to
be allowed to return to his den of thieves. He
had, however, left behind him at Shaka his son
Suleiman, at the head of 6,000 robbers. To break
up the slave-hunter’s stronghold, and to destroy
this hideous traffic, Gordon Pasha set out on his
famous journey, which lasted five months.

Gordon left Khartoum in the middle of May,
1877. He rode an exceedingly fine camel, and
astonished his attendants by the tremendous pace
at which he journeyed. On the road he wrote a
letter home, in which he said, ‘“‘I am quite com-
fortable on the camel, and am happier when on
the march, than in towns with all the ceremonies.”
Finding that a camel travelled better when it was
not curbed, he allowed his to go as it would.
This freedom almost cost a native boy his life.
Gordon says: “I nearly acted as Juggernaut to -
a little black naked boy to-day. My camel had
shaken the nose-ring out of its nose, and ran off
with me, I could not stop it, and of course the
A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE SOUDAN. 53

little black ran right under the camel, who
however, did not tread on him, though it was a
miracle he escaped being killed. Nothing is so
perverse as a camel when it runs away; it will go
anywhere.”

One day the Governor of Fogia was dumb-
founded to see an officer in marshal’s uniform ride
into the palace, attended only by an Arab chief.
It was Gordon, who had pushed across the desert
at such a speed that his men were left far behind.
At another station he was so far in advance of
the two or three hundred ragamuffins he called
his army, that, to his great disgust, he had to
wait several days. .

At length the news reached Gordon that Sulei-
man, with his 6,000 robbers and murderers, was
about to attack Dara. The resolute Pasha lost not
a moment. At once he mounted his camel, and
set out for Dara.

Here is his own description of this tremendous
ride, one of the most famous achievements in his
career: “I got to Dara about 4 p.m., long before
my escort, having ridden eighty miles in a day
and a half. About seven miles from Dara I got
into a swarm of flies, and they annoyed me and
my camel so much that we jolted along as fast
54 A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE SOUDAN.

as we could. Upwards of three hundred were on
the camel’s head, and I was covered with them.
I suppose that the queen fly was among them.
If I had no escort of men I had a large escort
of these flies. I came on my people like a thunder-
bolt. As soon as they had recovered, the salute
was fired.. My poor escort! Whereis it? Imagine
to yourself a single, dirty, red-faced man on a

“camel, ornamented with flies, arriving in the divan

all of a sudden. The people were paralysed, and
could not believe their eyes.”

If Gordon’s own people in Dara were astonished
at his sudden, unexpected appearance, how great
must have been the surprise of the rebels who
threatened the town. When he rode into Sulei-
man’s camp unarmed and alone the whole body of
chiefs were dumbfounded. His sudden appearance
in their midst, his resolute manner and his
absolute indifference to danger so filled them with
amazement and awe that they were incapable of
action.

Entering the principal tent, Gordon sat down
among the leaders and fearlessly told them that
he meant to disarm them and break up their
band. Never dreaming that any man would be
so bold as to beard them in their own den
A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE SOUDAN. 55

unless backed by a powerful army which could
not be far away, the chiefs, headed by Suleiman,
yielded to Gordon, and swore to be faithful to
the Government. After receiving their submission,
the fearless Pasha returned to Khartoum. During
this year of office, he rode nearly 4,000 miles
over the desert, till he says, ‘‘ My heart and lungs
are shaken out of their places.”

The following year the slave-traders revolted
again. Gordon had broken their communications
in the north and blockaded them in the south.
In this way he had closed their market and cut
off their supplies. Suleiman proclaimed himself
lord of the province, seized a number of Govern-
ment stores, surprised and massacred an Hgyptian
garrison, and rallied the Bedouin tribes around his
standard.

Unable to leave Khartoum at once, Gordon
sent his lieutenant, an Italian named Romulus
Gessi, to put down the rising. A fearful struggle
ensued, and a great many battles were fought.
The rebels were mad with fury when they found
themselves opposed by a daring and successful
leader. Eventually Gessi fired the slavers’ camp
by means of rockets, drove out the robbers, and
freed some ten thousand negroes. ‘Then he set off
56 A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE SOUDAN.

in pursuit of Suleiman, following up his trail like
a blood-hound.

At length, Gordon was free to go to the scene
of action. This time he was fully determined to
dislodge the slavers and leave their stronghold in
Shaka in ruins. On he rode over vast tracts of
sand and withered vegetation, enduring intense
heat by day and intense cold by night. Crossing
the frontier of Kordofan he wrote, ‘‘ I have never
in China or elsewhere felt such heat.”

All the way he did good work, stopping caravans
of slave-dealers, punishing the traders and setting
free the slaves. ‘‘ At Edowa,” he wrote, “‘a party
of seven slave-dealers with twenty-three slaves
were captured and brought to me, together with
two camels. Nothing could exceed the misery of
these poor wretches. Some of them were children
not more than three years old, that had come
across that torrid zone from Shaka, a journey
from which I on my camel shrank.”

On his arrival at Shaka, Gordon learned that
Gessi had completely broken up the bands of
robbers, and driven them out of their strongholds.
Shortly afterwards Gessi captured Suleiman with
ten of his principal companions, and by Gordon’s
orders, the whole batch of rebel leaders were shot.
A FIVE MONTHS’ RIDE IN THE SOUDAN. 57

Now that order was restored, General Gordon
resigned his post and returned to THngland,
completely worn out by his intense exertions.

During the four years of his absence, he had
ridden on camel-back over African deserts a dis-
tance of nearly 13,000 miles, in addition’ to the
untold labours of ruling a great province almost
unaided and alone, and in spite of the evil in-
fluence and open opposition of corrupt officials.
No wonder that the brave soldier, the able ruler,
and the negroes’ friend, was universally greeted as
an uncrowned king.
ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST.

OF JPAHE scene opens with a view of the great
a3 Natural Bridge in Virginia. There are
three or four lads standing in the channel
(: i * below, looking up with awe to that vast
pa arch of unhewn rocks which the Almighty
~ bridged over these everlasting buttresses,
“when the morning stars sang together.” The
little piece of sky spanning those measureless piers
is full of stars, although it is mid-day. It is
almost five hundred feet from where they stand,
up those perpendicular bulwarks of limestone to
the key of that vast arch, which appears to them
only of the size of a man’s hand.
The silence of death is rendered more impressive
by the little stream that falls from rock to rock
down the channel. The sun is darkened; and the

boys have uncovered their heads, as if standing in
68

e


ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST. 59

the presence-chamber of the Majesty of the whole
earth.
At last this feeling begins to wear away; they











































TUE NATURAL BRIDGE OF VIRGINIA,

look around them, and find that others have been
there before them. They see the names of
hundreds cut in the limestone buttresses. A new
60 ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST.

feeling comes over their young hearts, and their
knives are in their hands in an instant. ‘ What
man has done, man can do,” is their watchword,
while they draw themselves up, and carve their
names a foot above those of a hundred full-grown
men who have been there before them.

They are all satisfied with this feat of physical
exertion except one, whose example illustrates
perfectly the forgotten truth that there is “no
royal road to learning.’”” This ambitious youth
sees a name just above his reach—a name which
will be green in the memory of the world when
those of Alexander, Caesar, and Bonaparte will rot
in oblivion. It was the name of Washington.

It was a glorious thought to write his name side
by side with that great father of his country. He
grasps his knife with a firmer hand, and clinging to
a little jutting crag, he cuts again into the lime-
stone, about a foot above where he stands; he
then reaches up and cuts another for his hands.
Tis a dangerous adventure; but as he puts his
feet and hands into those gains, and draws himself
up carefully to his full length, he finds himself
a foot above every name chronicled in that mighty
wall.

While his companions are regarding him with


ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST. 61

concern and admiration, he cuts his name in wide
capitals large and deep into that flinty album.
His knife is still in his hand, and strength in his
sinews, and a new created aspiration in his heart.
Again he cuts another niche, and again he carves
his name in large capitals.

This is not enough. Heedless of the entreaties
of his companions, he cuts and climbs again. The
gradations of his ascending scale grow wider apart ;
he measures his length at every gain he cuts. The
voices of his friends wax weaker and weaker, till
their words are finally lost on his ear. He nowfor
the first time casts a look beneath him. Had that
glance lasted a moment, that moment would have
been his last. He clings with a convulsive shudder
to his little niche in the rock. An awful abyss
awaits his almost certain fall. He is faint with
severe exertion, and trembling from the sudden
view of the dreadful destruction to which he is
exposed.

His knife is worn half-way to the haft. He can
hear the voices, but not the words, of his terror-
stricken companions below. What a moment!
what a meagre chance to escape destruction!
There is no retracing his steps. It is impossible
to put his hands into the same niche with his feet,
62 ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST.

and retain his slender hold a moment. His com-
panions instantly perceive this new and fearful
dilemma, and await his fall with emotions that
“freeze their young blood.”

He is too high to ask for his father and mother,
his brothers and sisters, to come and witness or
avert his destruction. But one of his companions
anticipates his desire. Swift as the wind, he
bounds down the channel, and the situation of the
fated boy is told upon his father’s hearthstone.
Minutes of almost eternal length roll on, and
there are hundreds standing in that rocky channel,
and hundreds on the bridge above, all holding their
breath, and awaiting the fearful catastrophe.

The poor boy hears the hum of new and
numerous voices both above and below. He can
just distinguish the tones of his father, who is
shouting with all the energy of despair, ‘‘ William,
William! don’t look down! Your mother and
Henry and Harriet are all here praying for you!
Don’t look down! Keep your eye towards the
top!”

The boy did not look down. His eye is fixed
like a flint towards heaven, and his young heart on
Him who reigns there. He grasps again his knife.
He cuts another niche, and another foot is added
ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST. 63

to the hundreds that remove him from the reach
of human help from below. How every motion
is watched from below! There stands his father,
mother, brother, and sister, on the very spot
where, if he falls, he will not fall alone.

The sun is half-way down in the west. The lad
has made fifty additional niches in that mighty
wall, and now finds himself directly under the
middle of that vast arch of rock, earth, and trees.
He must cut his way in a new direction to get
from this overhanging mountain. The inspiration
of hope is in his bosom; its vital heat is fed by
the increasing shouts of hundreds perched upon
cliffs and trees, and of others who stand with ropes
in their hands upon the bridge above, or with
ladders below.

Fifty more gains must be cut before the longest
rope can reach him. His wasting blade strikes
again into the limestone. The boy is emerging
painfully foot by foot from under that lofty arch.
Spliced ropes are in the hands of those who are
leaning over the outer edge of the bridge. Two
minutes more and all will be over. That blade
is worn to the last half-inch. The boy’s head
reels; his eyes are starting from their sockets.
His last hope is dying in his heart, his life must
64 ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST.

hang upon the next gain he cuts. That niche is
his last.

At the last flint-gash he makes, his knife—his
faithful knife—talls from his nerveless hand, and,
ringing along the precipice, falls at his mother’s
feet. An involuntary groan of despair runs like
a death-knell through the channel below, and all
_is still as the grave. At the height of nearly 300
feet, the devoted boy lifts his hopeless heart and
closing eyes to commend his soul to God. Tis
but a moment—there! one foot swings off!—he
is reeling—trembling—toppling over into eternity.

Hark! a shout falls on his ears from above!
The man who is lying with half of his length over
the bridge has caught a glimpse of the boy’s head
and shoulders. Quick as thought the noosed rope
is within reach of the sinking youth. No one
breathes. With a faint, convulsive effort, the
swooning boy drops his arm into the noose.
Darkness comes over him, and with the words
“God!” and “mother!” whispered on his lips
just loud enough to be heard in heaven, the
tightening rope lifts him out of his last shallow
niche.

Not a lip moves while he is dangling over that
fearful abyss ; but when a sturdy Virginian reaches
ONE NICHE THE HIGHEST. 65

down and draws up the lad, and holds him up in
his arms before the tearful, breathless multitude—-
- such shouting and such leaping and weeping for
joy never greeted a human being so recovered from
the yawning gulf of eternity.

Elihu Burritt.
THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES
THE SECOND.

(AFTER THE BATTLE OF worcEsTER, 1651.)

‘XN the 30th of April, 1649, Charles the
x First was beheaded on a scaffold outside
one of the windows at Whitehall, London.
In the same year his son, Charles the
Second, was proclaimed King in Ireland.

The following year he landed in Scotland, and
in 1651 was crowned at Scone, near Perth, on New
Year's Day.

In August of the same year, Charles entered
England at the head of a Scottish army. After a
tedious march of nearly three hundred miles he
arrived before the town of Worcester on the 22nd
day of the month. Cromwell rapidly collected his
forces round the city, and on the 8rd of September
a great battle was fought, in which Charles was
utterly defeated. It is said that the young King

66


THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND. 67

vainly endeavoured to rally his forces, riding up
and down the streets of the town and calling upon
the officers and men by their names: “TI had
rather,” said he, ‘that you would shoot me than
keep me alive to see the sad consequences of this
fatal day.” Indeed, so complete and overwhelm-
ing was the victory of the Parliamentary forces
that Cromwell ever afterwards called it his
“crowning mercy.” Not until Cromwell was
dead did the Royalists again hold up their heads
in the land.

When Charles saw that all hope was gone, he
began to consider how he might best escape from
the fatal field, and so avoid the doom that had
befallen his father. His adventures during the
next few weeks have been described as “a history
of wonders that no former age can parallel and
succeeding times will scarce believe.” One writer
said that “much of his Majesty’s actions and
sufferings have run parallel with those of King
David,” and in his introduction bids his reader
to read on and wonder.

Leaving Worcester by St. Martin’s Gate, about
six o’clock in the evening, he rode off on the road
to Kidderminster, attended by a number of his
most trustworthy friends. When darkness came
68 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

on a consultation was held, and it was decided
that Charles should be taken to Boscobel House,
not far from the Severn, on the verge of the
county of Shropshire. This house was known to
be the dwelling of a loyal man who would do
his utmost to provide a place of safety for the
fugitive monarch.

With great care the party managed to pass
through Stourbridge at midnight, though that
place was held by a troop of the enemy’s horse.
Outside the town they managed to obtain a crust
of bread and a drink of water for his Majesty,
after which they rode on to White Ladies, a
house belonging to one of the same family as
Boscobel. The building, which is about twenty-
six miles from Worcester, received the name of
White Ladies because at one time it was a religious
house, and the nuns wore white garments.

White Ladies was reached at daybreak, and
the King’s horse was taken into the hall, in
order that suspicion might not be aroused. After
Charles and his followers had refreshed themselves
with wine and biscuits, it was decided to disguise
the King as much as possible, so that he might
not be recognised by any one whom he chanced to
meet.
THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND. 69

Living at Boscobel was one of the Penderels
(of whom there were five brothers), the rest
residing in the neighbourhood. Richard Penderel
was sent for a suit of his clothes, while the
King’s hair was cut and his face and hands
rubbed with soot from the back of the chimney.
Having taken off his buff coat and princely orna-
ments, such as the Order of the Garter, blue ribbon,
and George of Diamonds, and giving his watch and
the money he carried to his friends, the King put
on a leathern doublet and a woodman’s suit.

Scarcely had the disguise been completed, when
one of the Penderel brothers came in haste to say
that Cromwell’s soldiers were near at hand. The
King at once took leave of his followers, and
Richard led him out of the house by a back door
to the densest part of a small wood near.

September the third had been spent in battle
and the night in flight, therefore the morning of
the fourth day found Charles a lonely wanderer
seeking shelter like a hunted animal—the bad
weather and the fury of his pursuers combining to
make his situation very uncomfortable.

The rain fell so heavily that the thick foliage
was unable to protect the King, upon which
Richard obtained a blanket from a cottage near
70 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

and laid it on the ground under the tree for
Charles to sit on. The woman of the house also
brought him some food, consisting of milk, butter,
and eggs. When Charles said to her, ‘‘ Good
woman, can you be faithful to a distressed
Cavalier ?”’ she replied, ‘‘ Yes, sir; I will rather
die than discover you.” ‘The rest of the day was
passed by Charles crouched on his blanket in the
thicket.

When night came on Charles was taken to the
house of another of the Penderels, where his dis-
guise of a woodcutter was made more com
and it was arranged that he should fitsteeo"
Wales and from thence to France. I
with his assumed character, the Kin
wood-bill in his hand, and answered to.
of Will Jones. >,

Setting out in the dark, Charles, with ‘rclard
for his guide, was challenged by a miller who
took them for Cromwell’s spies, as he had at that
moment some of the King’s friends sheltering in
his house. Charles of course did not know this,
and fearing to fall into the hands of the enemy,
made good his escape. At midnight they reached
the house of a Mr. Woolff, who concealed the
King among a heap of straw in his barn. The










CHARLES THE SECOND IN THE Oak,
72 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

remainder of the night and the whole of the next
day were spent in this humble shelter. To make
the King’s disguise still more complete, his hands
and face were stained with a dye obtained from
the leaves of the walnut-tree.

At midnight Charles once more set out for
Boscobel: under the guidance of Richard, arriving
there about five in the morning. Here he found
Colonel Carlis, called the hero of Worcester, be-
cause it is said that he had seen the last man
killed before leaving the field of battle.

When the fugitives had partaken of a little food,
the Colonel pulled off the King’s wet shoes and
stockings, and while they were being dried on the
hot embers of the hearth his feet were bathed in
warm water.

When they had rested and refreshed themselves,
the King and the Colonel decided to leave the
house and climb into a large, thick oak-tree which
stood in the grounds. Here they concealed them-
selves during the day, the King managing to obtain
a little rest on a cushion which lay on the Colonel’s
knee. While here they saw Cromwell’s soldiers,
who passed beneath them every now and then,
eagerly searching the county for Charles.

The night was spent in Boscobel House, where
THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND. 73

the King enjoyed a good supper, and a bed was
made up for him in a small closet about five feet
square. In the early morning Carlis and one of
the Penderels went out to obtain food. The
Colonel killed a sheep with his dagger, and Pen-
derel brought the animal home on his back.

The King, who had risen very early in order
to examine the road from an upper window, was
so hungry that he helped to cook breakfast on the
arrival of the meat.

The flight of the King had been traced to
White Ladies, but so far the loneliness of Bos-
cobel and the poverty of those who lived there
caused no suspicion to rest upon it. Chazles
therefore spent the day in a very quiet manner,
and so obtained the rest which he so greatly
needed.

After nightfall the King set out once more,
guarded by the five Penderels and Yates, the
brother-in-law, armed with bills, pikestaves, and
pistols, determined to defend the King to the last.
Charles found the rough motion of the farm horse
that he rode very hard to bear, as he was so
fatigued with the exertion and exposure he had
undergone. When he complained, the owner of
the horse said, ‘‘Can you blame the horse, my
74 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

liege, to go heavily when he has the weight of
three kingdoms on his back.”

After proceeding by lonely paths for some dis-
tance, the party separated, three of his protectors
arranging to return home. They had gone a little
distance when the King remembered that he had
not bid them good-bye. Calling them back, he
gave them his hand to kiss, and said, ‘ My
troubles make me forget myself. I thank you
all!”

Three miles further brought the little party to
Moseley, where a Mr. Whitgreave was waiting to
receive them, having sent all his servants to bed
that they might be out of the way.

Lord Wilmot, who was concealed in the house,
had told Mr. Whitgreave that the fugitive was
his lordship’s friend. Now he said to his host,
‘Though I have concealed my friend’s name all
this while, I must tell you this is my master, your
master, and the master of us all,” upon which Mr.
Whitgreave kissed the King’s hand.

_ The King’s appearance is thus described :. “ Hig
Majesty’s attire was then a leathern doublet with
pewter buttons, a pair of old green breeches, and
a jump-coat of the same green, a pair of his own
stockings with the tops cut off because embroidered,
THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND. 75

and a pair of stirrup stockings which had been lent
to him, and a pair of old shoes cut and slashed to
go easy to his feet, an old grey greasy hat without
a lining, a noggin shirt of the coarsest linen; his
face and hands made of a reechy complexion by the
help of the walnut leaves.’ Sitting on the side
of the bed, the King pulled out a handkerchief as
coarse and dirty as the rest of his apparel, and
applied it to his nose, which had begun to bleed.

When the King’s blistered feet had been care-
fully bathed, and his coarse wet clothing changed
for a more comfortable dress, he began to be
somewhat cheerful, and said, “I am now ready
for another march; and if it shall please God
once more to place me at the head of about
eight or ten thousand good men of one mind
and resolve to fight, I shall not doubt to drive
these rogues out of my kingdoms.”’

That night before retiring to rest Lord Wilmot
told Mr. Whitgreave that if the enemy came
suddenly down on the house, they were first to
deliver him up and so endeavour to save the King.

Charles was placed in a secret chamber, where
he remained most of his time, while in the house
two parties of Cromwell’s soldiers searched the
building, but failed to discover the King’s hiding-
76 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

place. One party, however, carried off all the
movable articles of any value that they could find.
The King also received news that Carlis had
managed to reach France under an assumed
name.

Mrs. Jane Lane, who lived at Bentley House,
not far from Moseley, had obtained a pass which
allowed her and a man-servant to visit a Mr.
Naughton, who lived near Bristol. Colonel Lane,
Mrs. Lane’s brother, offered the King the use of
this pass, under the protection of which it was
hoped that he might reach the sea coast. messenger was sent to the Colonel to make the
necessary arrangements. Before he returned
another search party appeared at the house.
Whitgreave himself opened the door and appeared
to be so much at ease that the suspicions of the
soldiers were disarmed, and they left the house
quietly.

That night the King joined Colonel Lane, who
was waiting with horses in the orchard, and they
at once rode off to Bentley Hall. After a few
hours’ rest they were ready to start at daybreak.
A suit of grey clothing now converted Will Jones
the woodman into William Jackson, a tenant’s
son. Having been told how he was to act the
THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND. 77

part of a serving-man, Charles rode up to the front
door, hat in hand, on a horse intended to carry
himself and Mrs. Lane, whose attendant he was
supposed to be. =

Colonel Lane and Lord Wilmot rode with
hawks and spaniels at a little distance ready to
help their friends in case of need. On the way,
Mrs. Lane’s horse lost a shoe, and while it was
being replaced, the blacksmith said to the supposed
groom that he hoped that Cromwell’s soldiers
would soon capture that rogue, Charles Stuart.
The disguised monarch replied that he hoped so
too, as the said rogue deserved hanging more than.
all the rest.

Near Stratford the travellers suddenly came
across a troop of cavalry, through which the King
rode with his charge without being noticed. That
night the Royal party slept at a friend’s house at
Long Marston. Charles being, only regarded as
a servant had to be accommodated in the kitchen,
and was scolded by the cook because he could
not wind up the jack with which the meat was
roasted. He, however, said, “I am a poor tenant’s
son of Colonel Lane’s. In Staffordshire we
seldom have roast meat, and do not make use
of a jack.”
78 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

On the following day the party travelled from
Long Marston to Cirencester, during which no
suspicion was aroused, and at night he was
supposed to sleep in a truckle bed in his master’s
room, which, however, the master occupied when
the King and he were alone.

Another day’s journey brought them to Abbots- .
leigh, three miles from Bristol. Here the real
rank of the King was not made known, but in
order to obtain some little comfort for him, his
pretended mistress informed the butler that he
was a poor tenant’s son just recovering from an
illness, and certainly his wan appearance made
this appear to be true. The butler therefore gave
him a private room, where he could take supper
and enjoy the rest he so much needed.

The following morning Charles made a good
breakfast in the buttery, where he heard the
Battle of Worcester described by a visitor who
was present, who declared that he would recognise
the King if he saw him, and said that the man
Jackson was not so tall as the fugitive monarch.
- The butler, however, who it seems had been the
King’s servant when he was Prince of Wales,
recognised him, and Charles privately admitted
to the man that he was the King. Charles never
YHE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND. 79

had occasion to regret the confidence which he
reposed in the trusty butler.

Charles remained in the house from Saturday to
Tuesday, where he was allowed to be very much
alone in order that he might recover from his
supposed illness. Here word was brought to him
that it would not be safe for him to try to get on
- board a vessel at Bristol, and therefore he decided
to go yet further south. The party started on
September 16th, Lord Wilmot riding on to tell
Colonel Wyndham that they were coming. The
night they spent on the road was at Castle Cary,
while Wyndham prepared to receive and hide the
King. Having got all questionable persons out of
the way, the Colonel and his lady walked in the
fields to watch for their guest. Soon they saw a
lady riding behind a pale, meanly-dressed young
man, whom Wyndham joyfully recognised as the
King. The night was passed in safety, and next
day Wyndham endeavoured to find means for con-
veying the King to the coast. For several days
Charles spent his time either in Lady Wyndham’s
chamber, which had been set apart for his use, or
in a secret room with which it was connected.
While here the news arrived, brought by Crom-
well’s soldiers, that the King had been killed. at
80 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

the Battle of Worcester, and one of the soldiers
not only declared that he had killed the King with
his own hand, but even showed a coat which he
said he had taken from the dead body. Many of
the people were on Cromwell’s side, and therefore
they showed great joy, making large bonfires and
ringing the church bells.

Unable to find a means of escape, Colonel
Wyndham went to Lyme, and there found a
captain who had made arrangements for three or
four Royalist gentlemen to be carried by night
across the Channel from England to France. The
party was described as that of a broken merchant
flying. from his creditors, while rooms at the inn
were engaged for a runaway bridal party from
Devonshire.

On September 22nd the Royal party left Trent
for the coast, the King again riding before a lady
on horseback. Arriving at the place agreed upon
the party waited for the ship’s boat, which, how-
ever, did not come, and it was afterwards dis-
covered that the captain of the vessel had. been
locked up in his own bedroom by his | wife,
who feared that he would get into trouble a
Cromwell’s party.

The King was now in great danger, for Lyme
.THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND. 81

was very busy on account of the fair which was
being held. at that place, and there were also a
great many of Cromwell’s soldiers in the town.
Charles decided on acting promptly, and rode
boldly into the yard of the principal inn. Pushing
his way through the troopers into the stable,
like a determined groom he insisted on finding ac-
commodation for his horse. Some rough language
was exchanged with the soldiers, and the King
was alarmed when he heard the ostler say that
surely he had seen his face before. Charles,
however, managed to keep his countenance, and
found that the man had lived at Exeter, where
the King had once stayed. Then Charles told
the man that he would no doubt know him, as
he had lived there as a servant for about a year.
After a chat with the servants and the soldiers
Charles joined his friends, and it was agreed that
they should leave the town as soon as possible.
They had not gone far when the talk of the ostler
aroused the suspicions of the soldiers, and a black-
smith, who shod one of the horses, said that the
shoes on its feet had been put on in different
counties—and one in Worcestershire. The
captain of the troops set out on the London
road in pursuit, but fortunately the Royal party
6
82 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

had journeyed in a different direction. They
spent that night at the village of Broad Windsor,
and were lodged in the upper part of a house.
They had not been long there before forty soldiers
arrived and quartered themselves in the house
for the night, which was spent in a very un-
comfortable manner. After the soldiers had left
in the morning, the King and Colonel Wyndham
returned to Trent, and Charles was once more
placed in his old hiding-place in Wyndham’s
house.

Charles had by this time been traced to the
neighbourhood, and the country was searched
for him, many of the inhabitants being roughly
treated. Meanwhile Lord Wilmot travelled to
and fro endeavouring to arrange for some means
of embarkation. On Sunday, the 28th September,
the village tailor told Wyndham that people had
begun to suspect that Royalists were hiding in
his house. Lord Wilmot therefore openly accom-
panied Wyndham to church, that people seeing
him might not think that any one else was in
hiding.

On October 6th, Charles, once more mounted
in front of a lady, set out for Hele House, where
the owner, Mrs. Hyde, showed him a good deal of
THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE sEcoND. 83

attention, as she had been informed of his rank.
The next day the King spent most of his time
counting the stones at Stonehenge, in order to
get rid of the weariness of doing nothing. The
King remained concealed in Hele House for five
days, when Lord Wilmot brought news that he
had hired a small coasting vessel to convey them
to France. On the 13th October the King set
out, attended by several faithful friends, who had
provided themselves with greyhounds as if on a
hunting expedition. At one house where they
spent the night, the host, who did not know the
rank of his guest, observing the King’s dress and
the cut of his hair, said “that he was some
Roundheaded rogue’s son.”

The next day’s journey took them thirty-five
miles, where at Brighthelmstone (Brighton, in
Sussex) they met the captain of the vessel who
had promised to take them to France. This man
recognised the King, as did also the landlord of
the inn at which they were staying, for he had at
one time held an office at Court. Not wishing
to lose sight of the captain for fear that some-
thing might prevent him from going as had been
the case before, Charles kept him drinking and-
smoking all the night, until the time for setting out.
84 THE ADVENTURES OF CHARLES THE SECOND.

On October 15th, at four o’clock in the morn-
ing, the party left Brighthelmstone for Shoreham,
where they embarked on board the vessel; and so
that no suspicion might rest on the captain, it
was arranged that the passengers should say they
were merchants flying from their creditors. The
sailors only knew so much, and in their presence
the captain reluctantly consented to the arrange-
ment. It was one o’clock in the afternoon when
Charles lost sight of the English shore, and at the
same hour one of his most devoted followers iaid
his head on the block at Bolton, in Lancashire,
for there Lord Derby was executed, October 15th.
Thus ended the wanderings of Charles, for forty-
three days, from the Battle of Worcester until his
escape from England. Arriving in France he was
received by the King, and subsequently educated
in Paris in a style befitting his rank.
THE BOY AND THE PANTHER.

2EN the early days of the settlement of
North America, a lad of ten was one
a Zz. morning sent on an errand to the nearest
by village. While he was passing through
«the forest a panther sprang from the boughs

of a large tree and landed on the ground
beside him.

The animal had not uttered a single growl to
warn the boy of its presence, and its manner was
so gentle that he did not feel any alarm. The
panther played around him, purring like a cat, and
rubbing its huge body against his legs.

As the two strange companions proceeded along
the path, the panther sometimes rolled over and
over on the leaves, and then made leaps and
bounds that caused the little fellow to clap his
hands in admiration. When they came to a level

piece of ground the boy ran a race with the
85


86 THE BOY AND THE PANTHER.

panther, and when the animal got in front of
him he seized hold of its tail and hung on
laughing till the woods re-echoed with his mirth.
Then, as if tired of this sport, the animal again
played round him and made several leaps right
over his head.

The boy had never seen a panther, but he had
often heard his father speak about this fierce
animal, and as they drew near the village, he
began to suspect that his playful companion was
one of these savage creatures, for it suddenly ~
- seemed to become excited and angry. All its
playfulness disappeared as it snarled and growled
and tore up the earth with its claws in the most
terrible manner.

The boy patted the beast on the back and
stroked its fur. In this way he restored it to its
former good humour, and it began purring and
playing again. After trotting along for some
distance, the panther suddenly bounded off and
disappeared among the trees. Glad to get rid of
his strange companion, of whom he had begun to
feel afraid, the boy hurried away as fast as he
could.

He had not proceeded far alone when a
threatening growl fell upon his ears. He started
THE BOY AND THE PANTHER, 87

to run towards an old unoccupied barn on the
outskirts of the village. When he was within a
few paces of the building he heard a fierce scream,
and turning round, he beheld the panther with



PREPARING TO SPRING,

bristling back and tail erect bounding towards
him. Terror stricken the poor lad rushed into
the barn and shut the door behind him. Scarcely
had he done this when the panther sprang against
88 THE BOY AND THE PANTHER.

the door with all its force, and in its wild attempts
to gain an entrance it splintered the wood with its
sharp claws.

When the animal found that it could not enter
by the door it sprang upon the roof. Hearing this
the boy looked eagerly round to see if there was
any opening by which the animal could reach him,
and saw to his great alarm a square hole in the
roof which had once served as a chimney. It was
quite evident that the panther meant to effect an
entrance by this means, nor was there anything to
prevent it from doing so.

The boy watched the hole until he saw the
shadow of the panther as the animal peered over
the edge of the opening, and the moment that itg
lithe body passed through the hole he drew the
bolt, bounded outside, and pulled the door after
him. The disappointed animal returned by the
way it had come, and as soon ag the boy heard
the clatter of its claws on the roof he again took
refuge inside the building. Wild with fury the
panther made another fierce attack on the door,
but without success. Then it again tried the roof
and the chimney-hole, but the boy was not to be
caught. The animal leaped down and he ran out
Then it leaped up and he ran in,
TIE BOY AND THE PANTHER. 89

While the furious beast was at the door
growling and snarling in a way that made the
boy’s blood run cold, the report of a rifle was
heard. Directly afterwards two men came run-
ning up to the barn and found that the shot which
one of them had fired had proved fatal. They
happened to be passing at the time, and were
able to approach quite near to the panther, as the
animal was so intent on securing its prey that it
did not notice them.
UP IN A BALLOON.

EFORE taking a seat in the car of a
balloon for the first time, imagination is
busy picturing the scenes and sensations

ee which belong to an aerial voyage. How-



? ever great one’s courage may be, there are

always little fears as to personal safety, and

it is owing to this feeling before starting that the

first great impression is made on the mind, when

the traveller finds, on rising, that there are none

of those disagreeable emotions which it is usual to
connect with that mode of travelling.

‘““As a balloon leaves the ground, twofold as-
tonishment seizes the mind—first, as to the vast-
ness and splendour of the view; secondly, that the
effect produced in looking down is not what would
be supposed, judging from lofty surveys on the tops
of high buildings.”’

90
- UP IN A BALLOON. 91

_ A balloon voyage is not without danger, and the
aeronaut requires to be a man of great presence of
mind and quick resolve. One of the most remark-
able of balloon voyages which ever took place was
recently commemorated in France.

Towards the end of 1784 it was the desire of
French balloonists to achieve the first passage
from England to France. A celebrated French
aeronaut named Blanchard at length decided to
make the venture. He took passage to England,
and on his arrival here his plans were warmly
entertained.

While in this country he met an American
named Dr. Jeffries, who was very desirous of
accompanying the daring Frenchman. When all
arrangements had been completed they went to
Dover and awaited a favourable breeze to carry
the balloon across the English Channel.

At last a start was made from Dover Castle
amid the firing of cannon and the cheers of the
inhabitants. Blanchard did his utmost to get
away alone, but Jeffries held firmly to the agree-
ment which had been signed and sealed. By this
agreement Jeffries-provided all the funds necessary
for the ascent, and thus secured a seat in the car.
He further bound himself on his word of honour
92 UP IN A BALLOON,

to jump out of the car the moment his weight
should imperil Blanchard’s life.

The balloon rose and soon drifted over the sea.
When in mid-channel the travellers were alarmed
to find that they were slowly descending. The
sandbags were quickly emptied, and though every-
thing available was cast out of the car, the advan-
tage gained was but momentary. The question,
‘What should be dispensed with next?” must
have caused Dr. Jeffries to shudder.

The anchor was thrown out and the provisions
followed it, but the balloon continued to descend.
Asa last resource, before the Doctor must follow
the provisions, the two aeronauts threw overboard
all their spare garments. This last sacrifice saved
the Doctor. The balloon quickly ascended, and
with a favouring breeze was swiftly wafted across
the Channel.

As they had lost their anchor the two men were
anxious to descend on the first opportunity. While
passing over a forest in the neighbourhood of
Guines they caught hold of the topmost branches
of some lofty trees, lowered themselves into the
dense wood, and reached solid ground a little over
two hours after the start.

hey were conveyed to Guines, and afterwards
UP IN A BALLOON. 93

to Calais, in great triumph, where the freedom of
the city was conferred on the Frenchman; and the













































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A BALLOON IN MID AIR,

two travelleis were regarded as heroes, for they
were the first to cross from England to France.
94 — UP IN A BALLOON.

One of the most perilous descents on record, took
place in London in 1847. A night ascent with
fireworks displayed under the balloon was in those
days an uncommon sight, and great crowds as-
sembled to witness it. :

During the day the weather had been calm and
bright, but when the time came for the balloon to
start there was a sudden change. A thick mist
yose in the east, and the rumbling of distant
thunder announced a coming storm. Notwith-
standing these warnings the aeronauts prepared to
ascend. As they left the earth they set off the
fireworks, and up they went into the clouds, leaving
behind them a train of fire.

Suddenly a vivid flash of lightning seemed to
envelope the balloon, the thunder crashed and
pealed overhead, and the occupants felt themselves
dropping rapidly through space. Then to their no
small alarm they saw that the balloon had a rent
in it of fully sixteen feet, and that they were falling
headlong right over the west end of London.
Beneath them were thousands of gas lamps, and
the houses were so close together that there seemed
to be no chance of escape.

“A more frightful descent to the earth could
not possibly be imagined. The sparks from the
UP IN A BALLOON. 95 -

paper cases shot up among the gas through the
hole in the silk, and once more the thunder roared
and the lightning flashed.” The balloonists were
meanwhile busy making preparations to land the
moment they should touch the ground. Fortu-
nately they came down in a quiet street in perfect
safety, and returned to their homes unhurt after
their exciting adventure.



Professor Higgins, the well-known parachutist,
had recently a most remarkable adventure. He
ascended from Croydon, and for a time everything
appeared to go well. Upon reaching a height of
something like four thousand feet, the parachute
broke loose from the balloon which was rising at a
great rate. It was evident that something had
gone wrong, but what it was those below had no
means of telling.

The balloon rapidly disappeared in the clouds.
Darkness set in, but no news had been received of
the aeronaut, and much anxiety was felt as to his
fate. Shortly after eight o’clock, however, all fears
were set at rest by the receipt of a telegram saying
that Higgins had landed safely about thirty miles
away.
96 UP IN.A BALLOON.

On his return to Croydon he said that he had
experienced the most wonderful of all his aerial
voyages. When he reached a height of four thou-
sand feet he got into a strong current, and the
balloon twisted right round. The current then
caught his parachute, and the test cord which held
it broke. —

Directly that happened he saw that the para-
chute was hanging below him fully inflated, and
the pressure was so great that it was impossible
for him to descend in safety. He therefore opened
his penknife with his teeth and cut the parachute
away. ‘This caused the balloon to shoot up at a
great rate, and he saw nothing until he passed
through some sleet and snow. He could hear,
however, the sound of trains. He was in this
snowstorm for at least ten minutes, and when
he had passed through it the sun was shining
beautifully.

Away in the distance he could see the sun

- shining on the water at Brighton. He found the
air getting very sharp and keen ; icicles were hang-
ing from his moustache, and for a few minutes he
was quite deaf. He now seemed to be descending,
and he thought he was getting near Hastings or
Brighton, as he could smell the sea.
UP IN A BALLOON. 97

On nearing the earth he prepared to descend by
hanging by one arm on to his trapeze rope, as if he
were using his parachute. When his feet touched
the ground the balloon, which was in front of him,
dragged him for ten yards, and then rebounded
some sixty feet into the air, between two trees. _
He came down a second time, and by the help of
two labourers succeeded in securing the balloon.
The Professor considered that at one time he must
have been five miles above the earth—the greatest
height he had ever been. .
IN THE RAPIDS.

GIAGARA FALLS are formed by the
sudden descent of the Niagara River
down a mighty cliff half a mile wide,
and more than 160 feet in height, into a
huge foaming basin over 400 feet in depth.
The river flows out of this basin in smooth
circling eddies for a mile or so, and then rushes
through a mighty gorge only 300 feet wide at the
rate of 30 miles an hour, piling its roaring and
foaming waves 30 feet higher in the centre than at
the margin, sweeping at its outlet into a vast
circular basin surrounded by high cliffs, forming a
huge whirlpool, in which the river circles before its
final rush into Lake Ontario.
About a mile above the Falls, the Rapids—the
downhill course of the stream—begin, and there is
a fall of nearly 60 feet in the bed of the river

before the edge of the cliff is reached, and the final
98
















































































































































































































































































































































































































NIAGARA FALLS,
100 a IN THE RAPIDS.

plunge taken. The river is part of the boundary
between Canada and the United States, and as an
island on the edge of the cliffs divides the Falls
into two separate cataracts, one is called the
Canadian Fall and the other the American
Fall.

Many exciting events take place at Niagara,
and sometimes terrible accidents happen. A great
many persons have lost their lives in one way and
another. Here is a story of a recent incident,
which shows what a brave cool-headed man can
do in a moment of peril.

Just as a grain barge, containing a crew of four
men, and towed by two horses, swung out of the
Chippewa Cut into the Niagara River, she met a
raft of timber rather too near the shore for the
barge to pass between it and the land. The barge
was forced to take the outside. The driver of the
horses did his best to keep the line clear by urging
the animals, but it finally caught in the logs and
snapped. As the rope parted, the barge trembled
on the surface of the water for an instant, as if in
dread of the terrible fate that awaited it, and then
swung round and started for Niagara Falls at a ~
terrific pace.

The barge, being for canal use only, had no
IN THE RAPIDS, 101

small boat or anchor. Alive in an instant to their
awful danger, the men on the barge yelled to the
men on the raft to get a boat, quick. One of their
number sprang ashore and ran for Chippewa,
shouting as he went: “Help! a boat, quick! men
going over the Falls!” The people poured out of
their houses and shops, each inquiring of the
other what could be done. Some scattered to
hunt for a boat, while others, who felt that they
could be of no use if one were found, ran down the
creek bank to see what was the situation on the
river.

On reaching it, they were horrified to see that
the barge was already considerably below the
mouth of the creek, and was speeding down-stream
with its precious human freight to what seemed
certain destruction. Some of the men on the
vessel were on their knees, with clasped hands
and upturned faces, commending their souls to
God.

Very soon the Canadian bank of the river was
lined with hundreds of people, while quite a crowd
could also be seen on Goat Island side. They
were all agonised witnesses of four fellow beings
in horrible danger. Just as all hope had been
given up by the people on land and the men on
102 IN THE RAPIDS.

the barge, a voice cried from the upper end of the
crowd: ‘‘ Here comes a boat!”

In an instant every eye was turned in the direc-
tion of Chippewa Creek, and here most of them
recognised the tall and manly form of a bargeman
named Smith in a boat, boldly pulling into the
river. As he forged into the stream he made a
hasty survey of the situation, and then plied the
oars with redoubled energy.

As he sped along, the boat almost leaping from
the water at each stroke, a cheer rose from the
people on the shore that fairly rent the air. On
and on he shot, each stroke narrowing the distance
between him and the barge; but the latter was
getting alarmingly close to the Rapids, to enter
which was certain destruction to all on board.

Those on shore could not help admiring and
applauding the heroism of young Smith, but they
could only fear that the result of his daring would
be to add another to the list of the lost. As he
neared the barge, he turned his head and shouted
to the men: ‘“ Scatter along the side of the barge,
and drop in as I pass by.”’

The command was promptly obeyed, and in an
instant the little craft was alongside. One after
another the men sprang in until the four were
SUSPENSION.
BRIDGE,



BIRD’S EYE VIEW OF NIAGARA FALLS.
104 IN THE RAPIDS.

safely in the boat. Now came a moment of
painful anxiety. ‘‘ What will he do?” was the
query that came to every mind.

Smith had his plan of action, and never hesi-
tated a moment. At a point some distance from
the Canada shore the current divided at the head
of the Rapids, part of the stream flowing around
an island. In reaching the current leading around
the island lay the only hope of escape. Taking a
course across and down the stream, Smith bent
every effort to reach the Canadian “ divide.”

It was a desperate struggle, for the lives of five
men, between the seething, boiling waters and the
muscle and endurance of young Smith, with the
odds seemingly against him. But the “ divide”
was finally gained, with not a boat’s length to
spare, and the frail craft shot down between the
island and the mainland like a rocket. At the foot
of the island the channel widened, the current
slackened, and the water became more shallow :
and here young Smith landed his boat, having
performed one of the most heroic and daring feats
ever performed by mortal man.
A FIERY ORDEAL.



rays upon two English lads, Alec and
g@ George Law, accompanied by Murri, a

native guide. The party was well mounted,
but men and animals fairly gasped for breath, and
the air, tremulous with the heat of the burning
earth, was quivering to a height of twenty feet
above their heads. In the west a copper-coloured
cloud rose slowly in the sky, and thin films of
cloud changed the face of the sun to a dull blood-
red hue.

All of the little party well knew what this
meant. Some tribe of natives had carelessly
left their camp fire not quite extinguished, and
it had set fire to the bush. Every blade of grass,

every bit of scrub, and every leaf was as dry as
105
106 A FIERY ORDEAL.

tinder, and leaped into flame in an instant. In a
short time the whole district was blazing, and,
fanned by the strong, hot wind, the fire spread
rapidly in all directions.

“With this strong wind the fire will travel
much quicker than we can,” said Alec, the
younger of the brothers, with a tone of anxiety
in his voice; ‘or we could turn and ride back to
our last camp, for there is water there, and no
fire could reach us on that open, sandy space.”

“The horses could not travel so far under eight
_ hours; they are almost done up as it is,” said
George.

“No, I don’t think they could; it has been a
trying day for them, and they are pretty well tired
out.”

“Don’t you think that by pushing on to the
north or south, as fast as ever we can make the
horses go, we might reach the end of the line of
fire and head round it? ‘Let us ask Murri.”

But the native, who had been scanning the
advancing line of smoke, said that the fire was
already too extended for them to think of riding
around it, and that the only way that offered any
chance of safety was to push on with the greatest
speed and try to reach the rocks at Nooergup






















































































































































































































































a
i eae

fi Wn aot
RAY

fh y

AT



A BUSH FIRE,
108 A TIERY ORDEAL.

before the flames could meet them. It almost
seemed like courting death to ride straight in the
teeth of the advancing fire, but they knew that
they might rely on Murri’s word, so they acted as
he advised. After an hour’s rapid riding along a
stretch of scrub-covered country, the line of leap-
ing flame could be seen stretching as far as the
eye could see to the north and south. The quiver-
ing limbs of the beasts, their dilated nostrils, and
wildly starting eyes, showed how greatly they
feared the dreaded element.

Now it was that they began to pass numbers of
animals all hurrying and rushing along in abject
terror in the opposite direction.

livery moment the heat became greater and the
speed of the horses grew less, just when there was
the greatest need for swiftness. They could only
be kept on the gallop by constant application of
the spur; the boys knew that the horses’ lives as
well as their own depended upon their being able
to keep up their present pace for a mile or two
more. |

They could now plainly hear the wild roar and
crackling of the awful fire as it consumed every-
thing before it in its devastating march, and the
burning air that came in puffs and beat upon them
A FIERY ORDEAL. 109

scorched and withered them. Their very eyeballs
seemed to dry within their sockets, and the smart-
ing lids when they closed them hardly kept out
the awful glare. The natural light was gone, the
sky was a cloud of smoke.

Still Nooergup, their haven of refuge, lay a mile
ahead of them. Murri pointed it out to them, and
seemingly close behind it rose the moving wall of
flame. Could they but reach those barren rocks
before the line of fire encircled it they were safe ;
but, with failing, worn-out horses and exhausted
as the riders were with the heat and want of air, it
seemed impossible.

Alec’s noble and high-spirited horse, Amber, was
much less jaded than the horses that George and
Murri rode. George, seeing this, goaded on his
over-strained steed and caught up to Alec, who
was some few paces ahead. George tried to speak,
and, forcing his voice, made himself heard above
the roaring of the advancing flames.

‘“‘ Alec, old boy, push on. ‘There igs something
in Amber yet, but Firebrace is about done up.
You can get through and on to the rocks. Don’t
wait for me.”

“Georgie,” cried Alec, in a tone of reproach,
looking round at him with stiff, bloodshot eyes.

?
110 A FIERY ORDEAL.

‘Leave you! Never! We will both get through
or we die together on this side.”’

They were now within a hundred yards of
Nooergup, which was just a little mass of barren,
tumbled rocks on a slight elevation, rising like an
island from the sea of stunted trees, scrubs, and
tall grasses that surrounded it on all sides. The
rushing line of fire had already reached it, and the
huge flames, ten feet in height at their lowest
part, were already licking the rocks at the sides
with flickering, blazing tongues, as though they
would consume even the rocks that impeded their
progress. But the fire had not passed all along it
yet, and just where the rocks stood there was a
break in the livid, roaring line.

Towards this the riders were madly goading on
their panting horses. One minute later, and it
will be too late! The very air seems fire; they
can only get their breath with the utmost difficulty.
Murri has wrapped his poor naked body in the blue
blanket that was fastened to his saddle. There is
a roaring in their ears as of a mighty sea, and a
flame and glare before their eyes as though heaven
and earth are fire.

There is still a narrow opening in the vivid line
of fire. Only a few seconds more, and they will be
& FIERY ORDEAL. 111

safe. Fifty yards! forty yards! ! thirty yards!!!
And then—! George’s horse staggers, and with
a sob like a human being in distress its legs almost
give way.

Alec leans across, half out of his saddle, and
gives poor trembling Firebrace a blow across the
quarters with his whip. George is almost ingen-
sible from the heat, but he sticks in his saddle,
and his horse, making one last awful effort, bears
him between the narrow gates of flame, and places
him in safety—but alone.

When Alec stooped to strike Firebrace, Amber,
terrified beyond control, swerved to one side, and
by the time Alec had again turned his head towards
the rocks the disconnected line of fire had rejoined
itself, and presented an unbroken front. At this
moment, when every hope seemed extinguished,
mad courage came to his aid, and suggested one last
chance—a chance in a thousand, but still a chance.

He saw that Murri had been as unsuccessful
as himself, and that he was still in front of the
leaping line of fire ; he shouted to him +o dismount,
and, for all his huskinegss, his voice rang out like a
clarion, and the man heard him, and blindly obeyed,
like a child, in his fear and confusion, doing exactly
as he was bidden.
112 A FIERY ORDEAL.

“* And now stand still,” roared Alec.

Backing his horse for some little distance to
gain the necessary speed, Alec, straining every
muscle, seized the native round his slim, naked
body, and by an almost superhuman effort lifted
him from the ground; then, goading Amber with
voice and spur alike, rushed like lightning at the
wall of fire.

Like a greyhound the superb horse cleared the
glowing heart of the fire, and darting with incon-
ceivable speed through the flickering flame, which
for one second surged and beat about him, landed
with his double burden in safety on the glowing
ashes of the ground the fire had just passed over.
A few strides more and they were side by side
with George.

Alfred St. Johnson.
PRESENCE OF MIND,

Pe ) UFF! puff! puff! It was hard work,

» for the grade was steep, and the train
was long and heavy. The engine panted
as if its strength was failing. It had
ge been tugging at its heavy load for miles up

the slopes of the Alleghany Mountains, and
it had many more miles to ascend before reaching
the top.

Much of the way was little more than a ghelf
cut into the mountain sides, with rising walls on
the one hand and a deep ravine on the other.
Far up among the mountains, often on the Oppo-
site sides of gloomy chasms, the traveller would
catch glimpses of what seemed to be the curves
and embankments of another road. Later he
would himself be borne over these very chasms,
and whirled round these very curves,

The passengers were kept, by the changing
scenes, in a state of constant excitement.

8 113


114 PRESENCE OF MIND.

‘Shall we ever get to the top of the moun-
tain?” ‘See this silvery cascade!” ‘Ah, here
we go through a tunnel!” ‘“‘ How dark it is!”
“We are now on the bridge, crossing a ravine.”
“What a dizzy height!’ Such exclamations
were falling from the lips of the passengers, when
suddenly a quick, sharp whistle was heard.

To those who understood it, it said, ‘Down
brakes! and be quick about it!”’ Instantly the
brakesmen were at their posts applying the brakes.
Indeed, it was their duty on these steep ascents to
stand by the brakes and use them at a moment’s
warning.

And now people thrust their heads out of the
car-windows. Some hurried to the platforms.
What was the matter? Had an accident hap-
pened? Was there any danger ?

Nobody seemed to know, not even the brakes-
men. But the engineer had caught a glimpse of
an awful peril.

Far up the road was a train of runaway luggage
trucks. It was coming down the track. One
moment it was in plain sight dashing round a
curve; then it was lost in the woods. There was
no engine with it; no brakesman was visible.

Nowhere on the grade at that time was a down
Hera
AAA
\J

AS
oe

aN
CAL
hs





A MOUNTAIN RAILWAY
116 PRESENCE OF MIND.

train due. Already the cars were running furiously,
and every second their speed was increasing. A
collision seemed inevitable. The destruction of
life would be frightful.

What should the engineer do? Plan after plan
rose before him; plan after plan was dropped.
To stop the train would do no good. ‘To reverse
the engine and go the other way would only post-
pone the sure result, and make it more dreadful
because of the increased headway of the runaways.

These thoughts ran through the mind of the
engineer with wonderful speed. In a few brief
seconds he seemed to live hours. Suddenly there
appeared to him a ray of hope—a possible plan of
safety.

“Down brakes!’ he whistled. This was the
signal that had startled the passengers.

‘Free the engine from the train!’’ he shouted
to the fireman. The engine was uncoupled, and
the train left lagging behind.

“Now jump for your life!” The fireman
leaped, fell, and scrambled to his feet again.

Then the engineer put on full steam. Freed
from its burden the engine dashed onward.

“Now fight the battle for us!’ exclaimed the
engineer, as he leaped from the steps. His quick
PRESENCE OF MIND. 117

eye had chosen a favourable spot for alighting.
Though thrown headlong he was on his feet
promptly enough to see his train roll by with
lessening speed under the control of the faithful
brakesmen.

That something serious had happened, or was
about to happen, began to be clear to the passen-
gers. One or two had seen the fireman jump; two
or three, the engineer; and larger numbers had
caught sight of the two men, soiled and bruised,
as they rose to their feet by the side of the line.
All was excitement and tumult. Some began to
leap from the cars. Fortunately there was little
danger now, for the motion of the train had nearly
. ceased.

Up the track, meanwhile, went the iron monster
to meet the foe alone. Down the track into full
sight came the wild luggage trucks with a speed
so great that they almost rose from the rail as
they rounded the curves. Nearer and nearer they
and the engine approached each other, the speed
of each increasing. Then they flew at each other
in a tiger-like rage.

The crash shook the hills. A cloud of steam
burst into the air. The shattered cars shot out
from the smoke, and rolled crashing down the
118 PRESENCE OF MIND.

mountain side. When the steam cleared away,
there were to be seen deep furrows in the road
bed, and splintered ties, and bent and broken rails,
to mark the scene of the encounter.

The gallant engine was a hopeless wreck; but it
had done a noble service. Not a life was lost.
Before the awful peril had fairly dawned upon the
passengers they were rescued from it. With tears
of joy and gratitude they blessed the engineer
whose quick wit and daring plan and instant
execution had saved them from a fate which it
seemed impossible to escape.

And to the poor engine, that lay wrecked and
useless on the rocks below, there went out a kind
and tender feeling, as if, in giving its life to save
others, it had shown something akin to the brave
and loving self-sacrifice of a noble human soul.
THE TAKING OF LINLITHGOW
CASTLE,

=ae\ HERE was a strong castle near Linlith-
x gow, or Lithgow, as the word is more
} generally pronounced, where an English
governor, with a powerful garrison, lay in
readiness to support the English cause, and —

used to exercise much severity upon the
Scots in the neighbourhood.

There lived at no great distance from this
stronghold a farmer, a bold and stout man, whose
name was Binnock, or as it is now pronounced
Binning. This man saw with great joy the pro-
gress which the Scots were making in recovering
their country from the English, and resolved to
do something to help his countrymen by getting
possession, if it were possible, of the Castle of
Lithgow.

But the place was very strong, situated by. ta

119


120 THE TAKING OF LINLITHGOW CASTLE.

side of a lake, defended not only by gates, which
were usually kept shut against strangers, but also
by a portcullis. A portcullis is a sort of door
formed of cross bars of iron, like a grate. It has
not hinges like a door, but is drawn up by pulleys,
and let down when any danger approaches. It
may be let go in a moment, and then falls down
into the doorway, and as it has great iron spikes at
the bottom, it crushes all that it lights upon; thus
in case of a sudden alarm a portcullis may be let
suddenly fall to defend the entrance, when it is
not possible to shut the gates. Binnock knew
this very well, but he resolved to be provided
against this risk also when he attempted to sur-
prise the castle.

So he spoke with some bold, courageous country-
men, and engaged them in his enterprise, which
he accomplished thus :—Binnock had been accus-
tomed to supply the garrison of Linlithgow with
hay, and he had been ordered by the Finglish
governor to furnish some cartloads, of which they
were in want. He promised to bring it accord-
ingly, but the night before he drove the hay to the
castle, he stationed a party of his friends, as well
armed as possible, near the entrance, where they
could not be seen by the garrison, and gave them
THE TAKING OF LINLITHGOW CASTLE. 121

directions that they should come to his assistance



‘as soon as they should hear him cry a signal,
which was to be ‘ Call all, call all.”’
122 THE TAKING OF LINLITHGOW CASTLE.

Then he loaded a great waggon with hay. But
in the waggon he placed eight strong men, well
armed, lying flat on their breasts, and covered over
with hay, so that they could not be seen. He
himself walked carelessly beside the waggon, and
he chose the stoutest and the bravest of his ser-
vants to be the driver, who carried at his belt a
strong axe or hatchet. In this way Binnock
approached the castle early in the morning, and
the watchman, who only saw two men, Binnock
being one of them, with a cart of hay, which they
expected, opened the gates, and raised up the
portcullis to permit them to enter the castle.

As soon as the cart had got under the gateway
Binnock made a sign to his servant, who with his
axe suddenly cut asunder the soam, that is, the
yoke which fastens the horses to the cart, and the
horses finding themselves free, naturally started
forward, the cart remaining behind under the arch
of the gate. At the same moment Binnock cried
as loud as he could, ‘ Call all, call all,” and draw-
ing the sword which he had under his country
habit, he killed the porter. The armed men then
jumped up from under the hay where they lay
concealed, and rushed on the English guard.

The Englishmen tried to shut the gates, but
THE TAKING OF LINLITHGOW CASTLE. 123

they could not because the cart of hay remained
in the gateway, and prevented the folding doors
from being closed. The portcullis was also let
fall, but the grating was caught on the cart, and
so could not drop to the ground. The men who
were in ambush near the gate, hearing the cry,
‘Call all, call all,” ran to assist those who had
leaped out from amongst the hay, the castle was
taken, and all the Englishmen killed or made
prisoners. King Robert rewarded Binnock by
bestowing on him an estate, which his posterity
long afterwards enjoyed.
CHASED BY INDIANS.

af‘ one time the American Fur Company
and the Hudson Bay traders were rivals

in the wild region of the Oregon. In
er the interior they had each erected little



forts or stations, to which the Indians
came to exchange their peltries for other
goods.

Spokan Fort was in charge of a Scotsman,
named McPherson. As a lad he had left his
native country to seek his fortune, and now by
hard work and economy he had become a well-to-
do merchant. Of an enterprising disposition, he
had so far been able to carry on a thriving trade
_ with the Indians, though the shrewd Scotsman
often required all his wits to enable him to out-
general his opponents.

Success required a knowledge of Indian tastes,
of the haunts of the beaver and buffalo, of the

124
CHASED BY INDIANS. 125

time to move and the time to go into Indian
quarters. McPherson, however, had such a know-
ledge of these things, that so far he had been able
to keep the best part of the trade in his own
hands,

One of the clerks employed at the fort was
named Hdward Ray, who a short time before
the story opens had brought a cargo of merchan-
dise from New Orleans for the use of the
Company. Advantage had been taken of this
expedition to send Miss McPherson to her father.
During the long journey up the Mississippi and
across the vast plains of the interior, Ray and
the young lady had become very intimate, and
both seemed sorry when they arrived at their
destination.

Once at the fort, their stations in life were not
quite the same as they had been while lingering
on the deck of the river steamer admiring the
scenery, or riding over the prairies. Now he was
simply a clerk in her father’s office, while she
presided over the establishment. The young lady
seemed so far out of his reach, that Ray became
reserved and desponding, for he saw no means by
which he could become the young lady’s equal,
and he did not feel justified in presuming upon the
126 CHASED BY INDIANS.

good feeling which she had shown him during the
journey.

At length the time came round for the annual
meeting with the Indians of that region. This
was an event of great importance, for it decided
the fortunes of the year. The natives gathered at
an appointed place, bringing with them all the
skins they had been able to procure in their
various hunting expeditions. To this place the
traders went, and that one generally secured the
best bargains who was able not only to supply the
articles most in demand by the Indians, but also
obtained their goodwill.

One day McPherson, his daughter, Ray, and
“some other clerks were taking their evening meal
of buffalo, venison, trout, salmon, and wild fowl,
all of which abounded in the district, when a noise
was heard outside the fort, and a moment later
a half-breed appeared at the door of the room.
McPherson looking up, saw that the newcomer
was a scout whom he had sent to inquire into the
state of the market.

‘What news?” cried the trader.

“Bad,” said Nick, the scout; ‘“‘Master Sublette”
(a rival trader) “got ahead of Spokan. The
Indians all at camp with plenty beaver. Master
CHASED BY INDIANS. 127

Sublette buy up all, but him got no tobacco, so he
sent away to Brown for some, then smoke and buy
all the beaver.”

“Why, that is good news,” said McPherson,
laughing; ‘if Sublette has no tobacco, all is
right. We have plenty, and not an Indian will
sell a skin until he has a good puff at the pipe of
peace. So up, my men,” he continued, address-
ing the clerks, ‘you must away and out-general
Sublette by taking Johnson a good supply of the
weed.”

‘All very fine,” said Nick; ‘“ that is not so easy
as it appears to be. Sublette knows a trick worth
two of that. A hundred Blackfeet are lying in the
woods, and not a soul will reach the market until
they are gone.”

“The Blackfeet !’’ cried McPherson, “then we
are surely defeated. What is to be done ?”

‘““How many bales are needed?” asked Ray,
quietly.

“Tf Johnson, our agent, had but one,” was the
reply, ‘all would be well, and if not we have lost
the year.”

‘It is not lost,” said the clerk, with a flashing
eye. “Johnson shall have the bale, or my scalp
shall hang in an Indian’s lodge before morning.”
128 CHASED BY INDIANS.

“ Hdward!’’ exclaimed the daughter, with an
alarmed glance, which betrayed to her father a
secret which he had not before suspected. That
momentary exclamation and anxiety for the clerk’s
safety, explained to the old man many things which
before he had not understood.

*“‘ Are you in earnest, Mr. Ray?” asked McPher-
son gravely, and even sternly.

“JT am, sir; give me Wild Polly” (a favourite
mare), ‘and I will do your message.”

“You will go alone, then? ”

Vey?

The valuable mare was quickly saddled; and in
half an hour Edward Ray, armed to the teeth, rode
off from Spokan on his perilous ride. He carried
two bales of tobacco. Miss McPherson had hastily
retired to her room, where alone she gave vent to
her feelings and fears for his safety. The gates of
the fort were fastened, sentries appointed, and the
trader himself lit his pipe, and sat down by the fire
to think over the situation.

Edward Ray had before him a ride of seventy
miles. The distance in itself was nothing, but the
country was alive with Indians, eager for the scalp
of a pale-face. Then to this must be added the
special inducement of securing a horse, and what
CHASED BY INDIANS. 129

was of still greater value in their eyes, the two
bales of tobacco. Ray knew only too well the
dangers and difficulties of his journey. No ordi-







A PERILOUS RIDE.

nary circumstances would have induced him to
attempt it. He was a brave young fellow, and
though they had showed the opinion they had of

the dangers to be faced, yet he thought with pride
9
130 CHASED BY INDIANS.

that no one at the fort had offered to ride with
him.

In about half an hour he had passed through the
valley in which the fort lay, and reached the edge
of the plain. Looking out on the prairie, he saw
no signs of the Blackfeet. There was a bright
moon which lit up the scene, but around him all
was still. Spurring his mare, Ray passed swiftly
along the path in the direction of the Indian mavrt.
Suddenly the animal began to show signs of hesi-
tation. She had been quick to scent the smoke
which Ray now saw in the distance. He felt that
the Indians were near, and hoping that he had not
been discovered, he made a bold dash along the
skirt of the forest. He had half cleared the most
dangerous part of his journey when the silence of
the night was broken by the Indians’ war whoop
and the crack of rifles. Then came the sound of
horses in pursuit, and Ray knew that enemies were
in full chase.

Now the time had come when the mettle both of
horse and rider would be tried to the utmost. The
gallant steed required no urging to perform her
part, and Ray felt himself nerved for the desperate
contest. Behind him rode the wild Indian warriors
as fast as their wiry horses could carry them.
CHASED BY INDIANS. 13]

Glancing backward from time to time he saw that
while they kept their ground they did not gain

























































































































































































































































































































































































INDIANS ON THE WARPATH.

upon him. He knew that if he cut away the
precious bales of tobacco, he could at once outstrip
132 CHASED BY INDIANS.

them, but then the object of his journey would be
lost. For an hour the race for life was kept up.
Half -a hundred howling, whooping Indians, their
black hair streaming in the wind, galloped madly
behind the brave clerk, who urged Wild Polly to
her utmost. Seeing before him a thicket of cane
trees, he made up his mind as soon as he reached
the welcome shelter to turn on his pursuers, when
to his surprise, he saw before him what appeared
to be another foe, mounted on a tall horse, riding
madly forward, pistol in hand. Ray was about to
fire when he heard the words, ‘‘ All right—Saucy
Nick.” It was the scout who had brought the
news.

Into the cane brake the two dashed together.
They had not proceeded far before Nick stopped
for a moment to fire the reeds; then they rode
onward. A moment later there was a wall of fire
between them and their pursuers. Birds and
beasts were rushing wildly in all directions to
escape from the devouring element.

“ Away!” cried Nick, urging his steed to the
utmost. ‘The fire spirit is awake; the wind is
coming towards us! Away, or our bones will be
mingled with those of the red man of the
plain!”
CHASED BY INDIANS. 133

‘But, Nick,” said Ray as they dashed side by
side across the prairie, ‘how came you here? I
left you at the fort.”

“No; Nick start half an hour before. Wouldn't
let brave warrior go by himself find him chased by
Indians—Blackfeet, but Indian no take Master
Ray. Nick know trick worth two of that; but,
hush,” he added, as they entered a valley, ‘‘ we are
not yet free. Blackfeet here.”

Hearing this and seeing that they were about
to meet a party of their enemies, Ray prepared
his pistols once more, and then galloped forward
at a rattling pace. A flash and a crack of guns
showed that Nick was not mistaken. Firing in
reply, the pair emerged from the valley and
struck out on the plain. Gradually they left
their pursuers behind, and before daylight they
had reached the great camp where the Indians
had pitched their tents to traffic with the white
men.

Here Ray found Johnson, McPherson’s agent, in
bad spirits, since he had exhausted his supply of
tobacco, while his rivals would have theirs in the
course of the afternoon. When the agent heard
Ray’s story, he cried, ‘“‘ Brava! I should like to be
in your shoes. If you haven’t made old Mac’s
184 CHASED BY INDIANS.

fortune, my name is not Johnson. Such prime
beavers you never saw.”

Ray was delighted, and after a hasty meal the
traders began their work. Then, to the consterna-
tion of Sublette, he saw Johnson pass round a most
liberal supply of tobacco—not a single Indian was
forgotten.. Then the bartering began, and the
natives showed their gratitude by selling every
skin they had at a very reasonable price to the
Spokan merchant. When Sublette’s supply of
tobacco came, there wasn’t a skin left.

Getting a fresh horse, Ray now prepared to
return to the fort. He had already received word
that the Blackfeet had been so demoralised by
the fire, that they had left the neighbourhood.
Nick and he rode together back to the fort, and
when they arrived they were received with open
arms. McPherson was delighted, and could not
find words to sufficiently praise the brave action of
his clerk.

‘You have brought me the best year’s trade I
ever had,” said McPherson, ‘and I count it no
small thing to have beaten Sublette, the cunning
trader on-the frontier.”

‘“T am pleased,” said. Ray, ‘‘that I have been
able to serve you.”
CHASED BY INDIANS; 135

“That is all very well,’’ said McPherson, push-
ing his spectacles over his forehead, “‘ but what I
want to know is this, Mr. Ray—why you, who
have been so reserved and cold, should all at once
take so much trouble in my service ? ”

“Tt was the first time,” replied Ray, “ that I
had a chance of doing what others would not
do.”

“Oh,” said the trader, ‘‘I see; and don’t you
expect a share in the great advantage of last
night’s adventure ?”’

‘“‘ That I leave to you, sir.”

‘Now, Mr. Ray,” said the trader, with a smile,.
‘“‘T wish you to speak plainly. There must have
been a reason for your quiet manner, and there is
an equal reason for suddenly, when you could really
serve me, risking your life to do so. I say again,
speak out! Have I not treated you properly? Is
your salary too small? Do you see no chance for
promotion ? You have doubled my fortune, let me
do you some service in return.”

Then Ray told the merchant that he wished to
share the good fortune. ‘‘ Nay, more,” said the
clerk, ‘‘I should like some day to posters all you
now hold dear.”

This reply puzzled the merchant, who said:
136 CHASED BY INDIANS.

“What would you be—a partner, young man?
The idea is a bold one, but after what you have
done it is not impossible.”

“Sir,” said Ray, hurriedly, “I am content to be
your clerk, if you will, all my life, but I want at
the same time to be your son-in-law—I want your
daughter.’’.

“Ah,” cried the astonished merchant, “sits the
wind in that quarter! And does my daughter
know of this?”

“She does. You will recollect our long journey
together, when we were inseparable companions.”

“Oh, I recollect all! And does my daughter
encourage you?”

‘She will answer for herself, dear father,” said
the young girl, who at that moment entered the
room. “I did encourage him, because I thought
he deserved to be your son. Of late Mr. Ray had
almost made me regret my resolution, but his
recent act convinces me that he is still the Edward
Ray with whom I travelled.”

‘“And so you have arranged it all without
consulting me,’ said the old man a. little
testily.

‘““We have arranged nothing, dear father, but
leave it all with you,” was the reply.
CHASED BY INDIANS. 137

A few weeks afterwards Ray was not only son-
in-law, but partner at Spokan, and he at any rate
never had cause to regret his midnight ride over
the prairies,
THE GOLDEN EAGLE’S NEST.




ESL ST all th le in th ish
qe 0} all the people in the parish were
AN loading in their meadow hay on the same

ANA day of midsummer, so drying was the sun-
on shine and the wind; and huge heaped-
g¢7 up carts that almost hid from view the
horses that drew then: were moving in all
directions towards the snug farmyard. Never
before had the parish seemed so populous. Jocund
was the balmy air with laughter, whistle, and
song. But soon the trees threw the shadow of
‘“‘one o’clock ” on the green dial face of the earth;
the horses were unyoked and turned loose to graze;
groups of men, women, lads, lasses, and children
collected under grove and bush and hedgerow for
their mid-day meal.
The great golden eagle, the pride and the pest
of the parish, swooped down and flew away with

something in its talons. One single, sudden,
138
THE GOLDEN EAGLE’S NEST. 139

female shriek arose, and then shouts and outcries.
‘“ Hannah Lamond’s bairn! Hannah Lamond’s
bairn. The eagle has ta’en off Hannah Lamond’s
bairn!’? was the loud, fast-spreading cry, and
many hundred feet were in another instant hurry-
ing towards the mountain.

Two miles of hill and dale, and copse and
shingle, and many brooks lay between; but in an
incredibly short time the foot of the mountain was
alive with people. The eyry was well known, and
both old birds were. visible on the rock ledge.
But who shall scale that dizzy cliff, which Mark
Stewart, the sailor, who had been at the storming
of many a fort, attempted in vain? All kept
gazing, weeping, wringing their hands, rooted to
the ground, or running back and forward.

Hannah Lamond had all this while been sitting
on a rock, with a face perfectly white, and eyes
like those of a mad person, fixed on the eyry.
Nobody had noticed her; for, strong as all
sympathies with her had been at the swoop of
the eagle, they were now swallowed up in the
agony of eyesight. Suddenly she flew off through
the brakes and over the huge stones, up—up—up
—faster than ever huntsman ran in to the death,
fearless as a goat playing among the precipices.
140 THE GOLDEN EAGLE’S NEST.

No one doubted, no one could doubt, that she
would soon be dashed to pieces.

No stop, no stay; she knew not that she drew
her breath. Beneath her feet Providence fastened
every loose stone, and to her hands strengthened .
every root. Down came the fierce rushing eagle’s
wings—each savage bird dashing close to her head,
so that she saw the yellow of their wrathful eyes.
All at once they appeared to be terrified, and with
hoarse screams flew off to the stump of an ash,
jutting out of a cliff, a thousand feet above the
cataract; and the mother, falling across the eyry,
clasped her child—dead—dead—dead, no doubt,
but unmangled and untorn, just as it was when
she laid it down asleep among the fresh hay in the
nook of the harvest field. Oh, what a pang of
perfect blessedness transfixed her heart from that
faint, feeble cry. “It lives! it lives! it lives!”
she exclaimed, ag she pressed the child closer to
her bosom.

But how to descend? Below were cliffs, chasms,
blocks of stone, and the skeletons of old trees, far,
far down and dwindled into specks ; and a thousand
creatures of her own kind, stationary or running to
and fro. No hope! no hope! Here she must die ;
and these horrid beaks and eyes and talons and
THE GOLDEN EAGLE’S NEST. 141

wings will return, and her child will be devoured











ei at last, even

{within the dead
i bosom that can pro-
tect it no more.

But suddenly a
rotten branch breaks
off from the crum-
bling rock. Her eye
watches its fall; it
seemed to stop not far
down on a small plat-
W form. She determined to
c= follow that branch. Her
child was bound to her
bosom—she remembered not

how or when, but it was safe.
Then, scarcely daring to open her
eyes, she slid down the rocks, and found herself
142 THE GOLDEN EAGLE’S NEST,

on a small piece of firm, root-bound soil, with
the tops of bushes appearing below.

With fingers suddenly strengthened into the
power of iron, she swung herself down by brier
and broom, and heather and dwarf birch. Here
a loosened stone leaped over a ledge, and no sound
was heard, so far down was its fall. There the
shingle rattled down the rocks, and she hesitated
not to follow. Her feet bounded against the huge
stone that stopped them, but she felt no pain.
Her body was callous as the cliff.

Steep as the upright wall of a house was now
the side of the precipice; but it was matted with
ivy, centuries old, long ago dead, and without a
single green leaf, but with thousands of arm-thick
stems petrified into the rock, and covering it as
with a trellis. She bound her baby to her neck, °
and with hands and feet clung to the fearful
ladder.

Turning her head and looking down, lo! the
whole population of the parish—so great was the
multitude—on their knees! and, hush! the voice
of psalms! a hymn breathing the spirit of one
united prayer. An unseen hand seemed fastening
her fingers to the ribs of ivy, and, in sudden faith
that her life was to be saved, she became almost
THE GOLDEN EAGLE’S NEST. 143

as fearless as if she had been changed into a
winged creature. Again her feet touched stones
and earth. The psalm was hushed; but a tremu-
lous sobbing voice sounded close beside her, and
lo! a she-goat with two little kids at her feet !

** Wild heights,” thought she, ‘do these creatures
climb, but the dam will lead down her kids by the
easiest paths.” Then turning her head she kissed
the sleeping baby, and for the first time she wept.
Overhead frowned the front of the precipice, never
before touched by human hand or foot. No one
had ever dreamed of climbing it; but all the rest
of this part of the mountain side, though scared
and seamed, yet gave some footing, and more than
one person in the parish had reached the bottom
of the cliff.

Many were now attempting it; and before the
cautious mother had followed her dumb guide a
hundred yards the head of one man appeared, and
then the head of another; and she knew that she
and her child were in safety in the care of their
fellow-creatures. Not a word was spoken—eyes
said enough.

There had been trouble and agitation, much
sobbing and many tears, among the multitude
while the mother was scaling the cliffs; sublime
144 THE GOLDEN EAGLE’S NEST.

was the shout that echoed afar the moment she
reached the eyry ; and now that her preservation
was sure, the great crowd rustled like a wind-swept
wood.

She lay as in death. ‘ Fall back, and give her
fresh air!” said the old minister of the parish ;
and the close circle of faces widened around her.
Hannah started up from her swoon, and looking
wildly around cried, ‘‘O the bird, the bird! the
eagle! the eagle! the eagle has carried off my
child! Is there none to pursue?” A neighbour
laid the baby in her arms, and, shutting her eyes
and smiting her forehead, the sorely bewildered
creature said, in a low voice:

“Am I awake? O tell me if I am awake, or
if all this is but the work of a fever, and the
delirium of a dream.”
THE HERO OF THE FLOOD.




l—

WS








N a broad and well-cultivated farm on the
western bank of the Missouri there lived
45, a family named Wilson. One day the
WS father and mother left home, leaving be-
= hind Henry, a lad of fifteen, and two little
girls, Lucy and Jennie, aged ten and six years
old, and a farm labourer named Rudolph.

When his day’s work was done Rudolph started
off to see some friends who lived a few miles away,
promising to be back by ten o’clock.

~Ié was not the first time that the children had
been left alone at night, so they were not afraid.
They played games and told stories till nine o’clock,
when they went to bed and slept soundly. Henry
was awakened next morning by the sun shining
brightly into the room. Leaping out of bed he

called to Rudolph to get up. He received no
10 M45
146 THE HERO OF THE FLOOD.

answer, and therefore he thought that the man
must have got up earlier and gone out to his work.

As he was putting on his clothes he noticed for
the first time that the river was making an un-
usually loud noise. He ran to the window, and
saw a sight that would have caused the stoutest
heart to quail. Water, water everywhere—an
angry surging mass. Trees, logs, and cattle were
floating past, while here and there were huge
lumps of ice. Looking down he saw that the
water was undermining the foundations of the
house, and that its destruction was only a matter
of a few hours.

By this time he was almost paralysed with fear.
Leaving the window, he went to the door of his
room and again called loudly for Rudolph, but the
rush and roar of the river mocked his feeble cries.
His shouting had, however, wakened the two girls,
who clung to him sobbing and crying.

Leaving them to dress, the boy went to see if
the water had risen. To his alarm he found the
kitchen floor already covered, and he saw that the
water was increasing in depth every minute. He
stood for some minutes as in a dream. Then the
crash of a huge block of ice, which shook the
building to its very foundations, aroused him.
THE HERO OF THE FLOOD. 147

Boy as he was, he knew only too well that a few
more such shocks and the house would tumble
about their ears. Something must be done, and
that speedily.

Just then he remembered that outside of the
kitchen window stood an old elm-tree, a perfect
monarch of the forest, which would surely with-
stand the violence of the flood. The elm had
great outspreading branches, the largest of which
extended across the corner of the kitchen roof.
He could climb into the tree all right, in fact he
had done it many a time, but how about the two
girls? Here was a difficulty. Atlength he decided
on a plan.

Wading knee deep through the water on the
kitchen floor, he went into the woodshed, and in
a few minutes came out with a coil of strong rope,
a door, and some loose boards. Carrying these
upstairs, he put them on the kitchen roof. Mean-
while the girls were crying bitterly and calling for
their father and mother. Henry tried to cheer
them up by telling them of the plan he had
formed, and he bade them come and help him
to get some food on to the kitchen roof. |

His cheery voice seemed to give the girls
courage, and they helped him to carry up some
148 | THE HERO OF THE FLOOD.

bread and meat and several blankets. Then Henry
bound the clothes line round his waist and climbed
to the branches on which he had determined to
‘‘ build a house,” as he said to his sisters. Before
climbing up he had told them what to do and how
to doit. With wonderful quickness they followed
out his instructions, and in a very short time the
boards, the door, and the rope were hoisted up and
placed on two branches, about twenty feet above
the raging flood, and securely tied together. In
this way he made a rough platform about eight
feet square, and quite large enough for them all
to lie down on. It was an easy matter to hoist
the food and blankets, but the hardest and most
important task still remained to be done—that was
getting his sisters on to this airy platform.

He had kept the longest and strongest rope for
that purpose. Looping it in the middle over a
branch he let the two ends fall to the roof, where
they were caught and held by the girls. Then he
went down and tied an end firmly under the arms
of Lucy and Jennie. To climb back to his posi-
tion on the platform was but the work of a moment.
Then came the trial of strength before which all
else that he had done that morning seemed child’s
play. Grasping the rope tightly in both hands
THE HERO OF THE FLOOD. 149

he set his teeth and pulled with might and main.
Lucy was no light weight, but after a few strong
pulls he got her up beside him.

It was now Jennie’s turn, and though not so old
she was still heavier than her sister. But there
were now two pulling at the rope, and in another
minute the youngest child was safe on the plat-
form. —

All this time the wild, rushing waters were
steadily rising, and had almost reached the kitchen
window sills. Large blocks of ice were driven
along by the flood, and occasionally one came with
a mighty rush against the old elm, causing it to
shake violently. Now that the excitement was
over the little girls trembled with fear, and Henry
could hardly keep back his own tears. He felt
that if he had something to do it would relieve his
mind, so he busied himself in arranging and re-
arranging their small stock of provisions. Then,
when that was done to their satisfaction, he tied
his sisters with ropes to the tree for fear they
might tumble off the platform. |

His next thought was to try and save some
of the furniture. The house was still standing,
though the crashing of the blocks of ice against
it had more than once made the timbers crack and
150 THE HERO OF THE FLOOD.

the whole building shake. But what would become
of his sisters if the house should be suddenly swept
away while he was inside? It was not worth the
risk, so he gave up the idea.

As the dreary hours wore on, the three children
strained their eyes in every direction in the hope
of seeing'a boat coming to their rescue. Once
they thought they heard the sound of shouting in
the distance, but they could not tell from whence
the sound came.

The afternoon darkened into evening, and the
evening into night. The old house still stood, but
the flood was creeping higher and higher, and the
greater part of it was now covered by the water.
The two girls cried themselves to sleep with their
heads pillowed on their brother’s lap. There they
lay throughout that long night while he kept a
faithful watch over them, never once closing his
eyes in sleep.

Suddenly from out of the darkness came a

. terrific crash, and the brave boy, as he looked
down, could dimly see the house swept away by
the mad waters. It seemed to melt as if made of
snow. At length the weary night was past, and
the cold, gray dawn broke. Not a single familiar
landmark met the weary watcher’s gaze, every-
THE HERO OF THE FLOOD. 151

thing, except a few trees, had been completely
swept away.



Tt was a sad awakening for the girls, and it was
a long time before Henry could pacify them with
152 THE HERO OF THE FLOOD.

the hope that their father and mother would soon
come with a boat to their rescue. Almost as he
finished speaking, a loud shout was heard higher
up the river, and a boat was seen at a great
distance pulling towards them.

The neighbours had seen them the day before,
and had made desperate exertions to rescue them,
but the speed of the current and the dangerous
masses of ice had rendered the task impossible.
Even now it required the utmost skill of those in
the boat to prevent an accident. Slowly, very
slowly, they reached the tree. What a sight it
must have been—the three young, white, anxious
faces watching the boat with eager eyes from their
lofty platform; the men in the boat pulling
cautiously among the blocks of ice and the
wreckage of many a happy home—a sight never
to be forgotten.

At length the boat drew near, and the children
were delighted to see that the faithful Rudolph
was one of the crew. Cold and hungry, but safe
and happy, the heroic boy and his sisters were
taken into the boat, and their troubles were
over.

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson had been delayed longer
than they expected, and did not return till that
THE HERO OF THE FLOOD. 153

evening. They did not know about the flood or
the terrible position in which their children had
been placed till after they had seen them safe at
the house of a kind neighbour.
WILD ELEPHANTS IN SOUTH
AFRICA.

a OON after I had joined the recently
WZ formed settlement beyond the Great
(ea = Fish River, I had an adventure with
oy wild elephants. Our party, consisting
2 chiefly of the disbanded officers and soldiers

of the Royal African Corps, had already shot
many elephants, with which the country at that
time abounded. The day previous to my adventure
I had witnessed an elephant-hunt for the first time.
On that occasion a large female was killed, after
some hundred shots had been fired at her. The
balls seemed at first to produce little effect, but at
length she received several shots in the trunk and
eyes, which entirely disabled her from making
resistance or escaping, and then she fell an easy
prey to her assailants.

On the following day one of our servants came
154 :






WILD ELEPHANTS IN SOUTH AFRICA, 155

to inform us that a large troop of elephants were
in the neighbourhood of the settlement, and that
several of our people were already on their way
to attack them. I instantly set out to join the
hunters, but losing my way in the jungle through
which I had to proceed, I did not overtake them
until after they had driven ulate elephants from
their first station.

On getting out of the jungle I was proceeding
through an open meadow on the banks of the
Gualana to the spot where I heard the firing,
when I was suddenly warned of approaching
danger by loud cries of, ‘‘ Pas-op! Take care!”
in Dutch and English, coupled with my name;
and at the same moment I heard the crackling of
broken branches produced by the elephants burst-
ing through the wood, and the tremendous screams
of their wrathful voices resounding among the
precipitous banks.

Immediately a large female, accompanied by
three others of a smaller size, issued from the
edge of the jungle which skirted the river margin.
As they were not more than two hundred yards off,
and were coming directly towards me, I had not
much time to decide on my motions. Being alone,
and in the middle of a little open plain, I saw
156 WILD ELEPHANTS IN SOUTH AFRICA.

that I must inevitably be caught should I fire in
this position and my shot not take effect. I
therefore retreated hastily out of their direct path,
thinking they would not see me until I should
find a better opportunity to attack them. But
in this I was mistaken, for, on looking back I
perceived to my dismay that they had left their
former course and were rapidly pursuing and gain-
ing ground on me. Under these circumstances I
determined to reserve my fire as a last resource ;
and turning off at right angles in the opposite
direction, I made for the banks of the small river,
intending to take refuge among rocks on the other
side, where I should have been safe.

But before I got within fifty paces of the river
the elephants were within twenty paces of me—
the large female in the middle and the other three
on either side of her—apparently with the inten-
tion of making sure of me; all of them screaming
so tremendously that I was almost stunned with
the noise. I immediately turned round, cocked
my gun, and aimed at the head of the largest—the
female. But the gun, unfortunately, from the
powder being damp, hung fire till I was in the
act of taking it from my shoulder, when it went
off, and the ball merely grazed the side of her head.
WILD ELEPHANTS IN SOUTH AFRICA. 157

Halting only for an instant, the animal again
rushed furiously forward. I fell—I cannot say
whether struck down by her trunk or not. She
then made a thrust at me with her tusk. Luckily
for me she had only one, which, still more luckily,
missed its mark; but it ploughed up the earth
within an inch or two of my body. She then
caught me with her trunk by the middle, threw
me within her forefeet, and knocked me about
with them for a brief space—I was scarcely in
a condition to compute the number of minutes
or seconds very accurately. Once she pressed her
foot on my chest with such a force that I actually
felt the bones, as it were, bending under the
weight; and once she trod on the middle of my
arm, which, fortunately, lay flat on the ground at:
the time. During this rough handling, however, I
never entirely lost my recollection, else I have
little doubt she would have settled my accounts
with this world. But owing to the roundness of
her foot, I generally managed, by twisting my
body and limbs, to escape her direct tread.

While I was still undergoing this buffeting,
Lieutenant Chisholm, of the Royal African Corps,
and Diederik, a Hottentot, had come up, and
fired several shots at her, one of which hit her
158 WILD ELEPHANTS IN SOUTH AFRICA.

in the shoulder; and at the same time her com-
panions, or young ones, retiring and screaming to
her from the edge of the forest, she reluctantly left
me, giving me a cuff or two with her hind feet in
passing.

I got up, picked up my gun, and staggered away
as fast as my aching bones would allow; but
observing that she turned round and looked back
towards me before entering the bush, I lay down
in the long grass, by which means I escaped her
observation.

On reaching the top of the high bank of the
river I met my brother, who had not been at this
day’s hunt, but had run out on being told by one
of the men that he had seen me killed. He was
not a little surprised at meeting me alone and in
a whole skin, though plastered with mud from
head to foot.

While he, Mr. Knight, of the Cape Regiment,
and I were yet talking of my adventure, an
unlucky soldier of the Royal African Corps, of
the name of M’Clane, attracted the attention of
a large male elephant. which had been driven
towards the village. The ferocious animal gave
chase, and caught him immediately under the
height where we were standing, carried him some





































































160 WILD ELEPHANTS IN SOUTH AFRICA.

distance in his trunk, then threw him down, and,
bringing his four feet together, trod and stamped
upon him for a considerable time, till he was quite
dead. Leaving the body for a little, he again
returned, as if to make quite sure of his destruc-
tion, and, kneeling down, crushed and kneaded the
body with his fore-legs; then seizing it again with
his trunk he carried it to the edge of the jungle,
and threw it among the bushes. While this
tragedy was going on, my brother and I scrambled
down the bank as far as we could, and fired at the
furious animal; but we were at too great a distance
to be of any service to the unfortunate man, who
was crushed almost to a jelly.

Shortly after this catastrophe a shot from one of
the people broke this male elephant’s left fore-leg,
which completely disabled him from running. On
this occasion we witnessed a touching instance of
affection and sagacity in the elephant which I
cannot forbear to relate, as it so well illustrates
the character of this noble animal. Seeing the
danger and distress of her mate, the female before
mentioned (my personal antagonist), regardless of
her own danger, quitted her shelter in the bush,
rushed out to his assistance, walked round and
round him, chasing away the assailants, and still
WILD ELEPHANTS IN SOUTH AFRICA; 161

returning to his side and caressing him; and
when he attempted to walk she placed her flank
under his wounded side and supported him.

This scene continued nearly half an hour, until
the female received a severe wound from Mr. C.
Mackenzie, of the Royal African Corps, which
drove her again to the bush, where she speedily
sank exhausted from the loss of blood ; and the
male soon after received a mortal wound also from
the same officer.

Thus ended our elephant-hunt, and I need hardly
say that what we witnessed on this occasion of
intrepidity and ferocity of these powerful animals
rendered us more cautious in our dealings with
them for the future. Pringle.

11
A DASH FOR LIBERTY.

: a, fortress in itself. The walls are of great
thickness, and there is so little woodwork
that shells would not fire the buildings. The
farmhouses are built like small castles, with
walls on all four sides, some of which are loopholed.
Such a village is Le Bourget, on the north-east of
the city. This place was the scene of a series of
terrible struggles during the siege of the French
capital by the Germans in 1870.

Le Bourget stands out in the plain detached,
and in front, and was of so much importance either
as a defensive or offensive position, that both
parties were anxious to occupy it. The village
was held by the Germans, retaken by the French
on the 30th of October, and recaptured by the

Germans on the following day. During this time
162


A DASH FOR LIBERTY. 163

the German field artillery threw about 2,000
grenades into the place—sufficient to destroy an
ordinary village over and over again, but Le
Bourget did not even catch fire.

On the 31st the Germans cut off the French
retreat, and then fought their way into the village.
Hand-to-hand fighting from house to house then
took place, and in four hours the village was cleared
of Frenchmen. In this engagement the Germans
had 39 officers and 449 men killed and wounded,
while the French loss was about 600 and 1,300
prisoners.

A small villa at the entrance to the village was
the scene of a deadly combat. The house itself
was riddled through and through with shot. On
the walls there were marks of blood and bayonet
thrusts, while there was scarcely a square inch of
the gable and front that was not pitted all over
with bullet marks.

_ As the invading column pushed forward a deadly
hail poured down upon them from every house, and
when these were entered the French fought on the
landings and stairs, and the balustrades had to be
carried at the point of the bayonet. Obstinate
Frenchmen were pitchforked out of windows on
the bayonets, and others were driven into the
164 A DASH FOR LIBERTY.

cellars, where they were made prisoners, though
even then some would not yield until they were
smoked out.

Every part of the village had its share in the
general conflict. Not only did fights take place in
the streets and houses, but also in the gardens and
outhouses, while the church was the scene of a
desperate stand made by the French. When all
was over, this building was filled with wounded
men from both parties. The walls were splashed
with blood, which also lay in little pools on the.
pavement. Shells had passed through portions of
the roof, the image of the Virgin had a bullet hole
through the region of the heart, and the figure of
Our Lord had been shot through the head.

This terrible encounter took place as we have
seen at the end of October, when the village was
held by a strong German force. On the 21st of
December the French once more made a sortie,
and partially occupied Le Bourget. The German
battalion which had headed the attack in October
was the one to suffer the chief loss of the day. Of
its remaining officers five more went down on the
21st of December, 117 men were killed and wounded,
and some sixty were taken prisoners.

The German commander seemed to bear a
A DASH FOR LIBERTY. 165

charmed life. He had fourteen bullet holes in
his coat, and not a single wound. General von
Moltke’s nephew, a young lieutenant, was shot
through the chest, and believed to be fatally
wounded. The youth had already shown great
bravery. He had not only won his commission,
but had been decorated with the Iron Cross, and,
therefore, his condition was regarded with some
concern by those interested in the promising young
officer. Youth, and a good constitution, however,
pulled him through.

Among the prisoners taken by the French at
Le Bourget was a German cavalry soldier, who
was carried off under an escort. Three days after
the fight a halt was made at a village, where the
party put up for the night. The French, having
removed the saddle and bridle, placed the soldier’s
horse in a shed, and took the captive into their
own room; and that he might not escape he was
ordered to take off his boots. .

While his captors were seated round the fire,
enjoying themselves, the German sat near the
window thinking how he might best escape, when
suddenly he was startled by the neighing of a
horse in the street. Feeling sure that it was his
own steed, which, not having been securely
166 A DASH FOR LIBERTY.

fastened, had broken loose and come in search
of her master, he determined to find some means
of communicating with the intelligent animal.
One of the broken panes of the window had been
mended with paper. Looking towards the fireplace
he saw that his captors were too busy drinking to
pay any attention to his movements. He therefore
bored a hole in the paper with his finger, and,
putting his mouth to the opening, called cautiously
and coaxingly, “Lizzie, Lizzie.” With a joyous
neigh, Lizzie came close to the window. Now,
if ever, was the time to escape, so with a quick
blow the soldier broke open the rickety frame,
and before the tipplers knew what had happened,
their captive had mounted his steed, and was fast
disappearing in the darkness. Shots were fired,
but the bullets fell harmlessly around, and away
dashed the gallant Lizzie though urged neither by
spur nor bridle. At length, after a hard gallop of
thirty-five hours, the outposts of Le Bourget were
reached, where the faithful animal deposited her
master among his comrades, who listened with
wonder and admiration to the story of his escape.
THROUGH THE GRAND CANON.

A cA HE following extract describes a boat
Po e voyage through the Grand Caton. This
‘ees ») vast chasm is about three hundred miles
eo long, and from half a mile to over a mile
ge deep, forming the channel through which the

Colorado, a large river, descends from the
higher lands by a long series of wild rapids. The
caiion is so narrow at the bottom that the river
fills its entire width, and its sides are so steep that
they could only be scaled at three or four places
throughout its length.

“ About eleven o’clock we came to a place in
the river where it seems much worse than any we
have yet met in all its course. The streams have
washed boulders into the river, forming a dam,
over which the water makes a broken fall eighteen
or twenty feet; then there is a rapid, beset with

rocks, for two or three hundred yards, while on
167




168 THROUGH THE GRAND CANON.

the other side points of the cafion wall project into
the river.

‘Then there is a second fall below, how great
we cannot tell. Then there is a rapid, filled with
huge rocks, for one or two hundred yards. At the
bottom of it, from the right wall, a great rock
projects quite half-way across the river. I decide
that it is possible to let the boats down over the
first fall, then run near the right cliff to a point
just above the second, where we can pull out into
a little incline, and, having run over that in safety,
we must pull with all our power across the stream
to avoid the great rock below.

“Returning to the boats, I announce to the
men that we are to make the attempt in the
morning, and we go into camp for the night on
some rocks in the mouth of a little side caiion.
All night long I pace up and down a few yards of
sand-beach by the river. Is it wise to go on? I
go to the boats to look at our rations. I feel
satisfied that we can get over the danger imme-
diately before us; but what there may be below,
I know not.

“From our outlook, yesterday, on the cliffs, the
canon seemed to make another great bend to the
south, and this, from our experience heretofore,
























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE GRAND CANON, COLORADO.
170 THROUGH THE GRAND CANON.

means more and higher granite walls. I am not
sure we can climb out of the cafion here; and,
when at the top of the wall, I know enough of the
country to be certain that it is a desert between
this and the nearest Mormon town, which must be
seventy-five miles away.

‘““At one time I almost conclude to leave the
river. But to leave the exploration unfinished,
to say that there is a part of the cation which I
cannot explore, having already almost accom-
plished it, is more than I am willing to acknow-
ledge, and I determine to go on. I wake my
brother, and tell him of the determination of
Howland and two others to leave us, and he
promises to stay with me; then I call up Haw-
kins, and he makes a like promise; then Sumner,
and Bradley, and Hall, and they all agree to go on.

“ At last daylight comes and we have breakfast,
without a word being said about the future. The
meal is as solemn as a funeral. The last thing
before leaving I write a letter to my wife, and give
it to Howland. Sumner gives him his watch,
directing that it be sent to his sister should he not
be heard from again. The records of the expedi-
tion have been kept in duplicate; one set of these
is given to Howland, and now we are ready. For ©
THROUGH THE GRAND CANON. 171

the last time they entreat us not to go on. It is
rather a solemn parting; each party thinks the
other is taking the dangerous course.

“ The Maid of the Cafion pushes out. We glide
rapidly along the foot of the wall, just grazing one
great rock, then pull out again into. the incline of
the second fall, and plunge over it. The open
compartment of the boat is filled when we strike
the first water below; but we cut through it, and
then the men pull with all their might towards the
left wall, and swing clear of the dangerous rock
below. We are scarcely a minute in running these
rapids, and find that, though they looked bad from
above, we have passed many places that were
worse. The other boat follows without more
difficulty. ;

‘‘And now we have a succession of rapids and
falls until noon, all of which we run in safety.
Just after dinner we come to another bad place.
A little stream comes in from the left, and below
there is a fall, and, still below, another fall.
Above, the river tumbles down over and among
the rocks, in whirlpools and great waves, and the
waters are washed into mad white foam. Werun
along the left, and soon see we cannot get down
on this side; but it seems possible to get down on
172 THROUGH THE GRAND CANON.

the other. We pull up-stream again for two or
three hundred yards, and cross.

“Now there is a bed of basalt on this northern
side of the cation, with a bold escarpment that
seems to be one hundred feet high. We can climb
it and walk along its summit to a point where we
are just at the head of the fall. Here the basalt
is broken down again, so it seems to us, and I
direct the men to take a line to the top of the
cliff and let the boats down along the wall. One
man remains in the boat to keep her clear of the
rocks, and prevent her line from being caught on
the projecting angles.

“I climb the cliff, and pass along to a point just
over the fall, and descend by broken rocks, and
find that the break of the fall is above the break of
the wall, so that we cannot land; and that still
below the river is very bad, and that there is no
possibility of a portage. Without waiting further
to examine and determine what shall be done, I
hasten back to the top of the cliff, to stop the
boats from coming down.

‘When I arrive I find the men have let one of
them down to the head of the fall. She is in swift
water, and they are not able to pull her back; nor
are they able to go on with the line, as it is not
THROUGH THE GRAND CANON. 173

long enough to reach the higher part of the cliff,
which is just before them; so they take a bight
around the crag. I send two men back for the
other line. The boat is in very swift water, and
Bradley is standing in the open compartment,
holding out his oar to prevent her from striking
against the foot of the cliff. Now she shoots out
into the stream, and up as far as the line will
permit, and then, wheeling, drives headlong
against the rock, then out and back again, now
straining on the line, now striking against the
rock.

‘“‘ As soon as the second line is brought, we pass
it down to him; but his attention is all taken up
with his own situation, and he does not see that
we are passing the line to him. I stand on a
projecting rock, waving my hat to gain his at-
tention, for my voice is drowned by the roaring
of the falls. Just at this moment I see him take
his knife from its sheath, and step forward to cut
the line. He has evidently decided that it is
better to go over with the boat as it is than to
wait for her to be broken to pieces. As he leans
over, the boat sheers again into the stream, the
stern-post breaks away, and she is loose.

“With perfect composure Bradley seizes the
174 THROUGH THE GRAND CANON.

great scull, places it in the stern rowlock, and
pulls with all his power (and he is an athlete) to
turn the bow of the boat down-stream, for he
wishes to go bow down, rather than to drift broad-
side on. One, two strokes he makes, and a third
just as she goes ovér, and the boat is fairly turned,
and she goes down almost beyond our sight, though
we are more than one hundred feet above the river.
Then she comes up again, on a great wave, and
down and up, then around behind some great
rocks, and is lost in the mad white foam below.

‘We stand frozen with fear, for we see no boat.
Bradley is gone, so it seems. But now away
below, we see something coming out of the waves.
It is evidently a boat. A moment more and we
see Bradley standing on deck, swinging his hat to
show that he is all right. But he is in a whirl-
pool. We have the stern-post of his boat attached
to the line.

“I direct Sumner and Powell to pass along the
cliff, and see if they can reach him from below.
Rhodes, Hall, and myself run to the other boat,
jump aboard, push out, and away we go over the
falls. A wave rolls over us, and our boat is un-
manageable. Another great wave strikes us, the
boat rolls over, and tumbles and tosses, I know
THROUGH THE GRAND CANON. 175

not how. All I know is that Bradley is picking us
up. We soon have all right again, and row to the
cliff, and wait until Sumner and Powell can come.
After a difficult climb they reach us.

“We start very early the next morning. The
river still continues swift, but we have no serious
difficulty, and at twelve o’clock emerge from the
Grand Cation of the Colorado.”
BUFFALO HUNTING.

dangerous sport, for the buffalo is not

ey easily killed unless shot through the,

© heart or in some other vital spot. When

be wounded it becomes very savage, and will

turn and attack its hunters with such fury

that even a good horseman finds it difficult to keep
out of its way.

Once in Ceylon, Sir Samuel Baker had an
awkward twenty minutes while engaged in a
buffalo hunt. One afternoon he had gone out on
a shooting excursion accompanied by his brother,
and about eight miles from Kandy they came
across a herd of about a hundred buffaloes.
Though only carrying light guns the brothers
determined to attack the herd.

When the animals saw the hunters coming

towards them they looked up with evident surprise.
176

& UFFALO hunting is an exciting but very
| I

LAAN

»)
BUFFALO HUNTING. 177

As the plain was perfectly bare the hunters
advanced at a run, and when they got within
thirty paces of the buffaloes the main body of the
herd suddenly took to flight. One of the bulls,
however, at the same instant charged, but was
met by a volley from the hunters, and severely
wounded he retreated to the lake.

Suddenly there was a great bellowing, and one
of the companions of the wounded bull came
charging down with wild fury, and struck him
swith such force as to send him reeling into the
water. There he lay as if dead.

Leaving his brother to put an end to the
wounded animal, Sir Samuel went off after the
slowly retreating conqueror. He followed the
animal for about a mile along the edge of the
lake without being able to get a shot. Suddenly
he made a plunge into the water and struck out
for the opposite shore. Running round the lake
at full speed, Sir Samuel arrived at the other
side in time to oppose the bull as he made for
the bank.

With a quick but steady aim-he fired at the
animal’s chest, but to his great surprise his
Opponent stood there as motionless as a statue.

A small stream of blood flowing from a wound in
12:°
178 BUFFALO HUNTING.

his chest was the only sign that the shot had
taken effect.

Sir Samuel fired again, but with no better result.
His gun was now unloaded, and he was completely
in the power of the huge beast. There they stood
fifteen paces apart trying to stare each other out
of countenance. With a surly grunt the bull
advanced a few paces, but as the hunter boldly
stood his ground he halted.

As his brother could not know of the predica-
ment in which he was placed, Sir Samuel gave
a long, loud whistle, which he thought would be
answered if heard. The buffalo still continued to
advance slowly step by step, and had now reduced
the distance between them to seven paces. Sir
Samuel gave himself up for lost, and could only
stare vacantly at his fierce adversary.

Suddenly a brilliant idea struck him. Still
keeping his eyes riveted on those of the animal
in front of him, he put a charge of powder into his
rifle. This was followed by all the money he had
in his pouch, consisting of three shillings in six-
pences. These he rammed down just as the bull
made another spring forward. The hunter im-
mediately brought his gun to his shoulder, and
the buffalo paused.
BUFFALO HUNTING. 179

He had been for more than a quarter of an hour
facing the animal, when he heard a splashing in
the water and the laboured breathing of some one
who had been running hard. It was his brother,
who, gasping from the effects of his long run, told
him that he had only one shot left. Not daring to
take his eyes off the buffalo, Sir Samuel warned
his brother to reserve his fire till the bull was quite
close on them, and then to give him the contents
of his rifle in the head.

He had barely finished speaking when the
buffalo charged, and his brother fired, but with-
out effect. Waiting until the animal had lowered
its head and was just on him Sir Samuel fired,
‘and three shillings worth of small change rattled
into his hard head.” He fell, and the two hunters
ran off at their utmost speed, knowing that the
bull was only stunned and would probably be after
them again in a few minutes.

The buffalo regained his feet and came on very
slowly. He had not yet recovered from “the
collision with Her Majesty’s features upon the
coin which he had dared to oppose.” Slow as
his pace was he could not keep it up and he fell.
The hunters algo slackened their speed, and before
long had the satisfaction of seeing their enemy
180 BUFFALO HUNTING.

lying on the ground unable to move. They-then
retired to the village.

On the following morning, accompanied by
several natives, they returned to the scene of
the battle fully expecting to see their foe lying
dead on the spot where they had left him. But to
their disappointment he had gone and was never
more seen.
THE FIRST ASCENT OF THE
MATTERHORN.

T half-past five o’clock on the morning of
the 13th of July, 1865, eight persons
set out from the village of Zermatt to
" ascend the Matterhorn, one of the most
precipitous mountain masses of the Alps,
which rises to a height of over fourteen
thousand feet. The party consisted of Mr.
Whymper, the Rev. Charles Hudson, Lord
Francis Douglas, Mr. Hadow, and four guides
carrying a supply of provisions for three days.
On the first day they ascended very slowly, and
at about twelve o’clock they pitched their tent at
a height of eleven thousand feet. Here they spent
the remainder of the day, ‘‘some basking in the
sunshine, some sketching or collecting.” When
the sun went down they made preparations for
sleep, but it was not until long after dusk that the

181


182 THE FIRST ASCENT OF THE MATTERHORN.

songs and laughter of the mountaineers ceased to
echo among the cliffs.

On the following morning they were up before
the break of day, and as soon as possible continued
the ascent. For some distance no great difficulty
was encountered, but when nearing the summit
the nature of the ground changed, and great
caution had to be exercised. In some places
there was little foothold, and it was necessary
for the most sure-footed of the guides to go first
The cracks and crevices of the rock had been so
filled up with snow that it presented an almost
smooth surface, with here and there an occasional
rocky fragment jutting out. Even these did not
afford a secure footing, as they were covered with
a thin coating of ice, caused by the melting and
freezing of the snow.

At length, after about an hour and a half of
laborious climbing, this difficulty was overcome,
and the party made directly for the summit. No
further obstacle now confronted them. Only two
hundred feet of snow remained to be traversed,
and then the Matterhorn would be won.

Meanwhile a party of Italians had started from
another village to attempt the ascent, and all the
way up the Englishmen were afraid that their
THE FIRST ASCENT OF THE MATTERHORN. 183

rivals might reach the summit before them. Many
a time during their ascent had they lifted their eyes
to the summit, expecting to see it already occu-
pied ; but no human forms appeared, and they were
comforted. Then came the thought “ what if they
have already been there, and gone away again.”
Such a circumstance was perfectly possible, for the
Italians had started two days before.

On reaching the easy portion of the ascent,
Whymper and one of the guides rushed off at full
speed, eager not to be beaten at the last moment.
It was a neck and neck race, and the two men
reached the summit together. Not a footstep was
to be seen. The Matterhorn was won. When the
first excitement of triumph was over, Whymper
looked in every direction for traces of the Italians.
Yes! Fully twelve hundred and fifty feet below,
looking like dots in the distance, could be seen
the rival party. Whymper and his companions
shouted to attract their attention, and waved
their hats and sticks. The Italians seemed to
look up, but to make sure, the successful party
began to hurl down rocks and stones over the
cliffs. The Italians heard, and were so dismayed
that they turned and fled.

Then one of the guides tied his blouse to the tent
184 THE FIRST ASCENT OF THE MATTERHORN.

pole and stuck it up as a flag. After remaining
on the summit for an hour they prepared for the
descent. Then, tied together by stout ropes, they
began to retrace their steps. All went well until
the difficult portion of the mountain was reached.
Great care was now exercised, and only one man
moved at a time, and not until he had obtained a
sure foothold did his companion advance.

In order to give Mr. Hadow greater security,
Michel Croz, the chief guide, took hold of his legs
and put his feet one by one into their proper
positions. While he was so engaged a terrible
accident occurred. Hadow slipped and fell on his
back, and his feet struck Croz and knocked him
over. The guide uttered a loud cry as with the
speed of lightning he went flying downward,
followed by Hadow. Another moment, Hudson
and Lord Douglas were dragged from their footing,
and owing to the sudden jerk the rope broke. It
was all over in a moment. As the unfortunate
men slid downwards on their backs they stretched
out their arms in a vain attempt to save them-
selves. But they passed swiftly out of sight one
after the other over the precipice.

For fully half an hour Whymper and the two
remaining guides stood as if rooted to the spot.










































































































































































































THH ROPE BROKE
186 THE FIRST ASCENT OF THE MATTERHORN.

At length Whymper persuaded them to continue
the descent, but they were so shaken by the
dreadful sight which they had just witnessed, that
more than once these hardy fellows declared they
could not proceed a step further owing to the diffi-
culty of the ground. For two hours Whymper
toiled on, expecting every moment to share the
fate of his companions. Darkness came on when
the worst of the danger was past, but they had to
halt for the night. It seemed as if daylight would
. never come, and the hours dragged wearily on.
As soon as the first streaks of dawn lit up the
sky, they started off again, and arrived safely in
Zermatt, where they told the mournful news.

A party was at once organised to recover the
bodies, but they returned without being able to
effect their object. Next day another party
started off with Whymper. After six hours’
climbing they got to a spot from which they
expected to gain a sight of the lost moun-
taineers. As one weather - beaten man after
another raised the telescope to his eye, turned
as pale as death, and passed it on to his neigh-
bour, it was evident that there was no hope of
saving life. They went to the spot and found the
bodies lying as they had fallen from above: Croz
THE FIRST ASCENT OF THE MATTERHORN. 187

a little in advance, Hadow near him, and Hudson
some distance behind; of Lord Douglas, however,
no trace could be discovered. Whymper says,
‘We left them where they fell; buried in snow at
the base of the grandest cliff of the most majestic
~ mountain of the Alps.”

A few days afterwards, however, another party
of twenty-one men “accomplished the sad and
dangerous task” of recovering the bodies of three
of the unfortunate mountaineers. They were
buried in the graveyard of Zermatt Church in
the presence of a reverent crowd of mourners.
But of Lord Francis Douglas, except portions of
his clothing, nothing has ever been recovered.
A FOREST ON FIRE,




i were sound asleep one night, when,
< about two hours before day, the snorting
of our horses and lowing of our catile,
which were ranging in the woods, sud-
* denly awoke us. I took my rifle and went

to the door to see what beast had caused
the hubbub, when I was struck by the glare of
light reflected on all the trees before me, as far
as I could see through the woods. My horses
were leaping about, snorting loudly, and the
cattle ran among them in great confusion.

On going to the back of the house I plainly
heard the crackling made by the burning brush-
wood, and saw the flames coming towards us in
a far-extended line. I ran to the house, told
my wife to dress herself and the child ag quickly
as possible, and take the little money we had,
while I managed to catch and saddle two of the
best horses.

All this was done in a very short time, for I

felt that every moment was precious to us. We
188


A FOREST ON FIRE. 189

then mounted our horses, and rode off from the
fire. My wife, who is an excellent rider, kept
close to me, and my daughter, who was then a
small child, I took on one arm.

When making off I looked back and saw that
the frightful blaze was close upon us, and had
already laid hold of the house. By good luck
there was a horn attached to my hunting-clothes,
and I blew it, to bring after us, if possible, the
remainder of my live stock as well as the dogs.

The cattle followed for a while, but before an
hour had passed they all ran, as if mad, through.
the woods, and that was the last we saw of them.
My dogs, too, although at all other times easily
managed, ran after the deer that in great numbers

sprang before us, as if fully aware of the death
that was so rapidly approaching.

We heard blasts from the horns of our neigh-
bours as we proceeded, and knew that they were
in the same unfortunate condition that we were
in ourselves. Intent on striving to the utmost
to preserve our lives, I thought of a large lake
some miles off, where the flames might possibly
be checked, and we might find a place of safety.

Urging my wife to whip up her horse, we set
off at full speed, making the best way we could
190 A FOREST ON FIRE.

over the fallen trees and the brush heaps, which
lay like so many articles placed on purpose to-
keep up the terrific fires that advanced with a
broad front upon us.

Ten miles are soon gone over on swift horses,
but yet, when we reached the borders of the lake,
we were quite exhausted, and our hearts failed us.
The heat of the smoke was insufferable, and sheets
of blazing fire flew over us in a manner beyond
belief.

We reached the shore, however, rode by the
lake for a while, and got round to the sheltered
side. There we gave up our horses, which we
never saw again. We plunged down among the
rushes by the edge of the water, and laid ourselves
down: flat, to await the chance of escaping from
being burned or devoured. The water greatly
refreshed us, and we enjoyed the coolness.

On went the fire, rushing and crashing through
the woods. Such a morning we never again hope
to see! The heavens themselves, I thought, were
frightened. All above us was a bright red glare,
mingled with dark, threatening clouds, and smoke
rolling and sweeping away in the distance. Our
bodies were cool enough, but our heads were
scorching ; and the child, who now seemed to
A FOREST ON FIRE. 191

understand the matter, cried so as nearly to break
our hearts.

The day passed on, and we became hungry.
Many wild beasts came plunging into the water
beside us, and others swam across to our side and





































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































DS
XN Vitara

ad 4

AFTER THE FIRE,

‘stood still. Although faint and weary, I managed
to shoot a porcupine, and we all tasted its flesh.
The night passed I cannot tell you how.
Smouldering fires covered the ground, and the
trees stood like pillars of fire, or fell across each
other. The stifling smoke still rushed over us,
192 A FOREST ON FIRE.

and the burnt cinders and ashes fell thick
around.

When morning came everything around us

was calm, but a dismal smoke still filled the air,
and the smell seemed worse than ever. What

was to become of us I did not know. My wife —

hugged the child to her breast and wept bitterly ;
but God had preserved us through the worst of
the danger, and the flames had gone past, so I

thought it would be both ungrateful to Him and

unmanly to despair now.

_ Hunger once more pressed upon us, but this
was soon remedied. Several deer were standing
in the water up to the head, and I shot one of
them. Some of its flesh was soon roasted, and
after eating it we felt wonderfully strengthened.
By this time the blaze of the burning forest was
beyond our sight, although the remains of the
trees were still burning in many places.

After resting for some time we prepared to /

commence our march. Taking up the child in
my arms, I led the way over the hot ground and
rocks, and after two weary days and nights of
suffering, we at last succeeded in reaching the
hard woods, which had been free from the fire.

Soon afterwards we came to a house, where we

were kindly treated.

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