Citation
Eileen's journey

Material Information

Title:
Eileen's journey history in fairyland
Creator:
Jelf, Ernest Arthur, b. 1868
Troubridge, Laura, 1858-1929 ( Illustrator )
John Murray (Firm) ( Publisher )
Watson & Hazell ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
John Murray
Manufacturer:
Hazell, Watson, & Viney Ld.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
Popular ed.
Physical Description:
xiv, 390 p., [17] leaves of plates : ill., ports. ; 22 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Imaginary places -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages, Imaginary -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Girls -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Queens -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Honesty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Beauty, Personal -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christmas -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Castles -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Farmers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Leisure -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1899 ( rbgenr )
Imaginary voyages -- 1899 ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1899 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1899
Genre:
Fantasy literature ( rbgenr )
Imaginary voyages ( rbgenr )
Children's literature ( fast )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
England -- Aylesburry
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Title page printed in black and red.
General Note:
Pictorial front cover and spine; illustrated endpapers.
General Note:
Contains prose and verse.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Ernest Arthur Jelf ; with a frontispiece by Mrs. Adrian Hope and numerous other illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026825490 ( ALEPH )
ALH2542 ( NOTIS )
31232391 ( OCLC )

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Full Text








The Baldwin Library

University
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Florida







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1b4



ETLEEN’S -JQURNEY

_ HISTORY IN FAIRYLAND





MRS. ADRIAN HOPE deé.] (Frontispiece.
TITANIA, THE FAIRY QUEEN.



EILEEN’S JOURNEY

HISTORY IN FAIRYLAND

By ERNEST ARTHUR JELF, M.A.

WITH A FRONTISPIECE BY MRS. ADRIAN HOPE AND NUMEROUS
OTHER ILLUSTRATIONS

POPULAR EDITION

LONDON ,
JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET
: 1899



NOTE.

Tue Author wishes to express his gratitude to his sister, Miss Evelyn
Jelf, for the invaluable help which she has given him in this book by
undertaking the arduous labours of an amanuensis. He is also greatly
indebted to different other friends—too numerous for particular mention—
who have afforded him assistance of many kinds in the preparation of

the work.



Printed by Hazell, Watson, & Viney, Ld., London and Aylesbury,



PREFACE.

TO PARENTS AND ELDERS.

HE preface ts the only part of this book that ts
NOT zntended for children. Everything else which
zs contained within tts two covers is addressed To
Cuitpren in the first place of all: so that the Author
well there be satisfied. if he meet the wants of children.
There tt is children’s approval that he has tried to win,
but here he wishes to explain the principle of his book
to those parents and elders, who can place the book in
children's hands, or read it aloud while children listen.
The story of “Exleen’s Journey” is a fairy-tale in
form: but in substance it ts an attempt to gather together
Jrom past history and legend in various ages of the world
a number of the best stories, which children ought to know.
The Author therefore feels that he may fairly be asked upon
what principle the selection ts based. For the stories may
seem at first sight to have been chosen entirely at hap-

hazard. The selection has not been based upon historical

Vv



vi Preface.

zmportance: some of the scenes introduced are of great
and some of ttle historical importance. Nor has the
Author tried to represent every age and people at equal
length and with equal emphasis: on the contrary he has
dwelt far more strongly upon some of them than upon
others. Chronological proportion has not been an object
with him: nor yet the deep. political significance of these
past experiences of mankind.

What then has been the principle underlying the
. selection? While the story of “ Ezleen’s Journey” deals, as
has been said, with past history in various ages of the
world, yet the thread of a single fairy tale—with a single
governing tdea—is woven through the whole. LEzleen’s
magic journey, in which she travels through the centuries
as mortals travel through space, is a journey made in search
of beauty and goodness: and, although the scenes are
varied as much as possible—war alternating with peace,
and art with science—the supreme object ts never left out
of sight. All sorts and conditions of men and women pass
before Etleen’s eyes as she journeys back. Warriors from
fLavelock and the Duke of Wellington to Jeanne Dare and
Richard Coeur-de-Lion and Brian Borotmhe: adventurers
and explorers from Sir John Franklin to Columbus:
champions of freedom from the Bastille mob and the
Concord farmers to Wilhelm Tell and the daughter of
O Melachlin, King of Meath: monarchs from the ill-fated



Preface. vii

Louis XVI. to Elizabeth and her rival, Mary Queen of
Scots, and back to the many-storied Haroun Alraschid,

Khaliph of Bagdad: artists of all descriptions from Shelley

and Byron and Beethoven to Shakespeare and Michel Angelo

and Dante: heroines of romance from Flora McDonald

to Berengaria of Navarre and the golden-haired Queen

Guenever : reformers of the world from the Pilgrim Fathers

to Mohammed, the Prophet of Arabia: preachers of the

true Gospel from David Livingstone to Saint Patrick. And

—besides all these—Eileen has a fleeting vision of the

Christ Himself: though the story of that Life—without

parallel, because Divine—ts told only in the pictures which

recall its chiéf moments to mind. In each and all of these,

Jrom the lowest to the Highest, the object sought. for has

been always one and the same—the Idea of whatever is:
most beautiful and best.

By the scheme of his story, the Author has had a world
of beauty, from which to borrow as he writes. In lke
manner he has endeavoured to select from the world of art
such subjects as seem best suited to illustrate his story, and
best calculated to convey to the mind of the reader some
beautiful idea.

In a word, then, the task which the Author here attempts
zs the adaptation of old-world stories to the purpose of this
new “fairy-tale.” The Idea of the good is to be all in all.

If any story—or any picture—or any notion, from what-



vill Preface.

ever source derived, has been in any measure suttable from
this point of view (however unimportant from all other
points of view), the Author has not hesitated to make use
of wt. Every country, every age, every faith has probably
something of the beautiful and good: and we should seek
to find zt everywhere—even in the most unlikely places.

And now, tf tt be lawful to compare small things with
great, the beautiful words, with which an old Hebrew
writer approached the conclusion of his magnificent work,
may not tnaptly be adopted here as the Author's parting
words :—

“And, tf I have done well and as ts fitting the story,
zt ts that which I desived: but, tf slenderly and meanly,

it ts ‘that which I could attain unto.”



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.
CHAINED TO TIME

Telling how Eileen wished that she could travel back into the
centuries of the past.

CHAPTER II.
THE CHARIOT OF THE FAIRY QUEEN

Telling how the beautiful Titania came to grant her wish.

CHAPTER III.
TO THE DARK, TO THE PAST, TO THE DEAD

Telling how Eileen started upon her journey and how her dog
Teazer came with her.
CHAPTER IV.
PITY AND PEACE AND LOVE . .

Telling of the nature and objects of the journey.

CHAPTER V.
OUR BANNER OF ENGLAND

Telling how, when Eileen was come to the years of the Indian
Mutiny, she visited Lucknow and stayed throughout the siege.

CHAPTER VI.
TTHICK-RIBBED ICE

Telling how Eileen saw the death of Sir John Franklin on the
Arctic seas.

ix

PAGE

19

28

35

57



x ~ Contents.

CHAPTER VII.
FIERY FLOODS. : : .

Telling how Eileen witnessed the work of David Livingstone in
Africa.

CHAPTER VIII.
THE SIGNAL SOUND OF STRIFE . : .

Telling how Eileen was present at the Duchess of Richmond’s
ball in Brussels on. the eve of the Battle of Quatre Bras.

CHAPTER IX.
THE DEATH OF KINGS . . . . ; 7

Telling how Eileen followed the unhappy fortunes of the Royal
Family of France in the time of the Revolution.

CHAPTER X.
THE EMBATTLED FARMERS .

Telling of what Eileen saw and heard in America when the War
of Independence first broke out.

CHAPTER XI.
OVER THE SEA TO SKYE

Telling how Eileen watched the adventures of Prince Charles
Edward and Flora McDonald.

.

CHAPTER XII.
THE UNDAUNTED FEW .

Telling how Eileen became acquainted with the reasons which
caused the Pilgrim Fathers to sail for America.

CHAPTER XIII.
THE PLAY .

Telling of Eileen’s play-going in the days of Queen Elizabeth and
of what she learned about that sovereign.

PAGE

77

go

II7

130

166



Contents.

CHAPTER XIV.
THE FORCING OF WRATH .

Telling how Eileen came to Ireland in the reign of King Henry

VIII, and of the persecution which its people suffered under
his rule.

CHAPTER XV.
THAT SHADOWY SHORE.

Telling of Eileen’s voyage with Columbus, when that great dis-
coverer sailed to the New World.

CHAPTER XVI.
YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND

Telling how Eileen saw the difficulties which Michel Angelo had
to meet before he could become a painter.

CHAPTER XVII.
AS THOUGH IT WERE A JOY TO DIE

Telling how Eileen witnessed the triumph and the martyrdom
of the Maid of Orleans.

CHAPTER XVIII.
THE SECOND ARROW

Telling how Eileen was a spectator of the feats of Wilhelm Tell.

CHAPTER XIX.

THE REASON OF THE NAME OF BEATRICE

Telling how Eileen was present at the first meeting of Dante and
Beatrice. -

CHAPTER XX.
LADY BERENGARE

Telling how Eileen watched the fortunes of Berengaria of Navarre,
the Consort of King Richard I.

PAGE

193

224

237

273



XU Contents.

CHAPTER XXI.
THE GLORIES OF BRIAN THE BRAVE

Telling how Eileen had the sight of the Battle of Clontarf and of
the death of King Brian Boroimhe.

CHAPTER XXII.
A POWER OF LIFE AND DEATH

Telling how Eileen beheld the Khaliph Haroun Alraschid face
to face.

CHAPTER XXIII.
REVENGE ON A TYRANT

Telling how Eileen sailed to Ireland and saw the revenge which
O’Melachlin, King of Meath, took upon Turgés, the wicked
Dane.

CHAPTER XXIV.
OBEDIENT TO THE LIGHT

Telling how Eileen travelled in Arabia and of the Flight of the
Prophet Mohammed.

CHAPTER XXvV.
ONE GOOD CUSTOM

Telling how Eileen accompanied King Arthur and the Knights
of the Round Table upon different adventures.

CHAPTER XXVI.
TARA’S HALLS .

Telling how Eileen was present in the Halls of King Leogaire
at Tara on the coming of Saint Patrick.

CHAPTER XXVII.
CHRISTMAS .

In which the pictures tell the story that is too great for words.

PAGE

300

310

326

332

352

372

385



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

TITANIA, THE FAIRY QUEEN Frontispiece
(From a drawing by Mrs. Adrian Hope.)

TEAZER . 7 7 : : Facing page 24
(From a are by E Hillis & Cee

THE RELIEF OF LUCKNOW ‘i : ” » 53
(From the picture by T. J. Barker.)

SHIPS IN THE ARCTIC REGIONS . . . yy ” 60
(From the original by W. Westall, A.R.A., made for

“ Franklin’s Travels.”)

BRUSSELS . : : . ” » 77

(From a drawing by Percival Skelton, mae ‘for “ Childe
Harold.”)
LOUIS XVI. AND HIS FAMILY IN THE PRISON OF THE
TEMPLE . . oo LIE

(From the picture E. M. Ward, R. R.A)

PRINCE CHARLES EDWARD ; . ‘ 1 yi A3T
(From the portrait by Nicolas Largiltiore in the National

Portrait Gallery.)

THE DEPARTURE OF THE PILGRIM FATHERS a ” 163
(From the picture by C. W. Coke, R.A.)

THE DAWN OF AMERICA . . . : ” ” “219
(From the picture by J. W. M. Turner, R.A.)

THE TOMB OF LORENZO II. . - oy » 233
(By Michel Angelo.)

JEANNE DARC . 2 : i » 248

(From the statue by Fremiet in the Rue de - Rivoli Parts.)

xiii



Xiv List of Illustrations.

RICHARD CCUR-DE-LION . . e a . : Facing page 295
(From the statue by Marochetti at Westminster.)

BRIAN BOROIMHE . : : ; : : : ie 302
(After J. F. O’Hea.)

HAROUN ALRASCHID, GIAFAR AND MESRUR 3 » 316
(From.an engraving by T. Dalziel.)

THE INFANT CHRIST : : : : : . Following page 388
(From the picture by Giampietrino.)

THE CRUCIFIXION . : mes PEEP cp See aed : " » 388

(From the picture by Schongauer.)

““NOLI ME TANGERE.” CHRIST APPEARING TO THE
MAGDALEN . : ; i oe ; : : 388

(From the picture by Titian.)



EILEEN’S JOURNEY.



CHAPTER I.

CHAINED TO TIME.

“But I am chained to time and cannot thence depart.” —SHELLEy.

N the far west of Ireland there is an old ruin, which
is all that remains of the great mansion once called
Clonderalaw Castle. It stands on the top of a hill,

overhanging the river Shannon, which is probably the
lovelicst piece of water in the whole wide world. It is
a most picturesque old place—and, among the scattered
stones of it, on the day that this story begins, there lay
a little girl just twelve years old, with large beautiful blue
eyes and golden hair, that fell in pretty ringlets about
her neck. She was lying flat upon the ground. beneath
the shadow of a big holly-tree—intently interested in
the book that she was reading: and close by her side
her favourite dog—a little rough-coated terrier—was out-
stretched. The name of the fair child was Eileen O’Ryan:
and she was the youngest daughter of a popular land-
I

“8



2 Chained to Time. [Cu.

owner, who lived in the neighbourhood. Her brother, a
few years older than herself, was for a great part of the
year away at school in England, and, even in the holidays,
was often, as to-day, engaged in some sport, which she
could not share: while the rest of her family were busily
occupied with various important duties at home or abroad.
She was therefore very often left quite alone: save for the
company of her little dog on the one hand and her story-
books on the other. j

Eileen was very fond of reading. She would read in
her bed before she was called in the early morning. Often
she came down to breakfast with her book in her hand:
and could hardly be induced to say so much as “good
morning” to anyone, when the book was really interesting.
At such times she was most strangely blind and deaf
to everything that was going on in the room: and her
tea would get cold, while she was “just finishing the
chapter.” She read an enormous number of books: and
was always ready for more. She read them very quickly,
and could devour a dozen of them in a single week :—
not (as in some cases happens) because she read care-
lessly or incompletely, but because her quick under-
standing and long-continued practice enabled her to read
and grasp the meaning much more rapidly than another
would. Never was any child more devoted to reading
than was Eileen O’Ryan: and her father and mother were
very glad that it was so. They said it “kept her quiet”:
and indeed it did. In fact it kept her so quiet that



L] Chained to Time. 3

she never stirred for hours while she read: but she would
lie as now, still turning page after page, as happy as the
day is long,—only stopping occasionally to speak her
thoughts to her little dog, as she pondered over the stories
that she read, or to gaze awhile into the deep blue river
below her and watch the ships that passed along it,
fondly imagining them full of heroes such as her story-
books described—bold pirates, brave sailors, and great
adventurers of every kind.

It was now four o'clock on a hot summer afternoon :
her lessons were over for the day: and, after a brisk
canter on her pony over one of her father’s fields—
(Eileen was a very good rider)—she became rather tired,
and consequéntly felt that she was now free to roam
lazily whithersoever she pleased: and this old ruin was.
her favourite resort. So it came about that she lay down
there: and became closely fastened to what she was
reading, as already described. She read on thus for an
hour or so, till she had finished her book. To-day it
was a volume of old Irish legends, which were her especial
favourites: telling, as they did, stories of the bravery and
magnificence of her own people in days gone by, of the
feats of Brian Boroimhe and of the fierce and bloody
quarrels of the wild clans who once inhabited what was
now her home:—or of the beauty and gentleness of the
once celebrated Irish women for whom the warriors
fought :—or again of the holy life and strange miracles
of the great Saint Patrick.



4 Chained to Time. (Cu.

Eileen held her breath with deepening interest, as she
followed the story out to its conclusion. And, while
she read, she seemed to see and hear the originals
themselves: she rejoiced over their joys, wept over
their sorrows and was wildly excited over their
various adventures: it all seemed marvellously real
to her.

But, when she had done reading, when she had closed
the book and risen to her feet, when she recollected the
sad reality that it was getting late and that she must
go home to bed, then she was somehow discontented.
Reading, she thought, was a very useless thing after all:
the people and places of her story-books had looked to
her, for a moment, bright and beautiful, as she read and
dreamed: but now they vanished away as quickly as
a cluster of soap-bubbles in the wind. Reading was still
indeed the best thing possible in the world in which she
lived: better than eating, or drinking, or sleeping, or
walking, or playing croquet: but it was not enough to
satisfy her. She wanted really to live with those warriors
and heroes of old days: to be actually present at their
battles and their feasts: with her own ears to hear them
speak: with her own eyes to see the stories played out
before her, as they had been played out so many years
before in fact. Was such a thing, she wondered, quite |
impossible? Was there no way of going back to the
days departed? While there are a thousand ways of

moving about from place to place—trains and carriages



L] Chained to Time. 5

and ships and so forth—are there no vehicles to carry
us back into another time? is there no railway, cut
through the centuries, to carry passengers to the stations,
where it would interest them to stop?—to the time of
the Duke of Wellington, of seventy years ago—to the
time of the Crusaders, of seven hundred years ago—and—
who knows ?—to the time of the strange creatures who
inhabited the world before the Flood, perhaps seven
thousand years ago?

No, she said to herself, it can never be. We are
indeed free to move about from place to place, whether
by walking on our own feet or by travelling in trains
and carriages. But with Time it is quite otherwise. We
are fast chazned to the present ¢zme: it is impossible
to go back anyhow into the past. All the money in
the world would not buy a train that could make that
journey. The thing was quite impossible: it was foolish
even to have thought of it.

But then she sat down and reflected about it once
again: and bethought her of all the most wonderful
things that she had ever read or heard about :—of witches
and demons, hobgoblins and fairies. The fact is that
Eileen partly believed in fairies within her secret heart :
although, if she had been asked the question, she would
have scornfully denied that she had any such _ belief.
Irish people are apt to believe such things: and the
peasants who lived in those parts, had told her wonderful

tales, with such positive insistence on their absolute truth-



6 Chained to Time. [Cu. I.

fulness, that she could not altogether refuse to put some
faith in them.

It might be, surely it might be, after all, a possibility :—
if only she could find the fairies, she felt certain that they
would find the Magic Train: the great railway-journey
through the fields of past history might yet be hers.
“Oh! how I wish” she cried aloud (although she felt
the wish was vain) “Oh! how I wish the fairies would

1»

come at once: and bring the Magic Train



CHAPTER ILI.

THE CHARIOT OF THE FAIRY QUEEN,

“Behold the chariot of the Fairy Queen !”—SuHELtry.

S Eileen uttered these words, she caught hold of a

bough of the holly-tree by which she was sitting,

intending to raise herself from the ground in readi-
ness for her homeward walk: and it chanced that, at
the same moment, a stone, on which her feet had been
resting, was dislodged from its position by her movement
and fell bounding down the hill.

And now, in an instant, Eileen became aware of the
most wonderful sights and sounds all round about her.
The whole sky grew suddenly dark, and yet a glorious
light began to shine upon the old castle ruin: while, at
the same time, the most exquisite music was heard, at first
rising faintly in the distance, and then seeming to come
gradually nearer—music as of children’s voices accom-
panied on silver-stringed lutes. And the air withal was
suddenly sweet with the breath of summer roses. Then
Eileen leaned against part of the castle wall, staring wildly
in front of her and wondering what in the world could

7



8 The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. [cu

have happened. As she gazed with the greatest astonish-
ment in the direction from which the music came, she
saw approaching her an army of beautiful little creatures,
who appeared at first sight to be of a form like that of
very small children: but, as they drew nearer, she saw
that they had crystal wings, more lovely than the wings
of any bird she knew. These wings were not as yet
outstretched for flight: but the edges of them glistened,
as the army marched along in perfect time to the gay
music that accompanied them. Some of the troop, she
saw, had golden wands: others had bows and arrows:
others long lances made of sturdy steel and brilliant with
diamonds: .others carried the most lovely musical instru-
ments of every kind: and it was of course from them
that the sweet sounds, which she had heard, proceeded.

Eileen could no longer doubt that these were indeed
the fairies. But she was so utterly overwhelmed with
wonder and surprise, that she could not speak a word—
not even when the fairies advanced to the spot where
she was standing and surrounded her on all sides.

They now sang a song, which, to Eileen’s great surprise,
was in the old Celtic Irish language—a language which
she had often heard from her Connemara nurse, and
sometimes also from the peasant people in the neighbour-
-hood—but of which she understood very little herself.
The last words of it however she clearly heard and did
understand :—“ Bownreigh na Sheefaree.” It meant that

the singers were calling the “Queen of the Fairies” to



1] The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. 9g

come to them! Then there was one moment’s silence:
followed by a delicious whirr in the air, as still more
fairies came and joined the large band which had already
assembled in the place. They seemed to-come from every
direction—from the road—from the valley—from the river
—from the sky! Now they seemed to be bringing all their
marvellous powers into use. They spfead their crystal
wings in flight. They danced gay jigs and rhythmic sets
with one-another, after the fashion of Irish peasant-folk,
but with a graceful perfection, whose likeness was never
seen before. They sang yet more delightful choruses:
and the air seemed to ring with the harmonies of their
well-tuned instruments. Lastly they lifted up their wands:
and whatever met their touch turned immediately to some-
thing bright and beautiful:—to gold, or precious stones,
or fresh sweet-smelling flowers. Eileen now discovered
that her own dress was blazing with jewels: and that her
hair was wreathed with the most exquisite rosebuds. And
everything round about her seemed to have undergone a
similar transformation :—the walls of the old castle had
risen high from their ruins, and seemed to be made from
the rarest marbles, delicately chiselled with the finest
tracery: the holly-tree was bent double with the weight
of divers rich fruits, such as she had never seen before—
plums and apricots and rosy apples, beside which even
the best in her father’s orchard would have looked poor
_ and pale indeed: and, in the meanwhile, snowdrops, and

primroses, and violets, and daffodils, and dog-roses were



10 The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. [Cx

springing up all at once—as it were in a few minutes—
from the earth. This was all doubtless, Eileen mused,
the work of the fairies: all the powers of the earth obey
them: Spring and Summer and Autumn and Winter are
all alike the servants of the fairies, and bring them all
they ever wish for—at all times and seasons—without
any of the evils that usually attend their several blessings
when they come to ordinary persons.

And, in the middle of all this, a most magnificent
rainbow appeared in the sky. It was not like an ordinary
rainbow. It seemed to have ten thousand colours in it
instead of only seven: and it seemed to fill a quarter of
the great black sky. And from this rainless rainbow
showers of shooting stars, and vast new constellations, and
far-reaching comets seemed to fall in rich profusion: until
at last there fell from the rainbow a bright something,
which was even more delightful to look at than what Eileen
had already seen. It was a rich car drawn by golden
eagles through the sky—lit with a fair shining light of its
own like the light of the silver moon, and casting its
reflection into the Shannon river as the moon casts hers.
The eagles bore their burden toward the place where
Eileen stood.-=It was the chariot of the Fairy Queen !

Eileen thought that she must be dreaming. She rubbed .
her eyes and stared: but it made no difference. The
chariot remained where she had first seen it, as distinct as
ever. She was still surrounded by the host of dancing

and singing fairies: ten of whom now sprang forward to



u.] The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. 11

the sides of the car, as it alighted upon the earth, and drew
back the curtains of it. Eileen stretched forward eager to
see the face of the Fairy Queen.

There she lay, the royal beautiful Titania,—whom poets
have sung,—whom artists have painted,—of whom children
have fondly dreamed. It was an image of unimaginable
loveliness :—and not quite what Eileen had expected.

Titania looked like a young girl: merry and full of life:
bright with “all those endearing young charms,” which
mortal maidens lose so soon, but which fairies never lose,
however many ages may pass away. And, although she
looked a giantess beside her tiny followers (for they were
only of a doll-like stature), she was by no means tall. She
was in fact but a few inches taller than Eileen herself:
but she held herself majestically, and looked worthy every
whit to be the ruler of a mighty kingdom. A star of
light seemed to glitter above her forehead : but, although
her chariot was builded of pure gold and decked with
every kind of precious stone, yet she wore none of these
upon her own person.—And still she far outshone them
all! She was quite simply arrayed: but could not have
looked more like a goddess, had she been clad in the
most gorgeous robes. Her neck and arms were bare:
save that she had a little bracelet of thin-wrought silver
upon either wrist. But, although she wore no jewels, it
was because she needed none. It was enough that she had
those wonderful deep blue eyes—that flowing dark brown

hair, whose:waves and curls were lit up from moment to



12 The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. [ce

moment with a glint of golden glory, as the rays of the
bright light caught them—that fair rosy colour, which
all the flowers of the field could never surpass—that
sweet mouth of smooth-curved lips, now. gently opening
like a crimson shell which does not quite hide the snowy
pearls within it—those lovelily-shaped hands :—beauty in
short such as was never seen except in her.

When Eileen saw her, she yielded to the’ irresistible
impulse which moved her to kneel and kiss Titania’s
fingers. The Queen immediately stood up: and, stretching
forth her hands, raised the child to her feet again. Then
she said :—“ Eileen O’Ryan, thou art very fortunate: thou
hast thy wish: the fairies HAVE come,—to bear thee to
the Magic Train, of which thou didst speak. Thou shalt
visit the centuries of the past with us. Give thanks to
the great Saint Patrick and his holy well.”

Although the words were English, there was something
in the Queen’s beautiful voice, which made Eileen sure
that she might claim her as a countrywoman of her own.
Her words had certainly, she thought, an unmistakably
Irish ring about them. Titania beyond doubt loved
Ireland well: and was proud of the name of “ Bownreigh
na Sheefaree.” However Eileen thought more, at present,
about what the Queen had said, than she did about her
Irish nature, or the music of her voice. She thanked
the Queen most heartily: asking at the same time the
meaning of what she had said about Saint Patrick and
his holy well.



1.] The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. 13

The Fairy Queen, for a reply, pointed to the place,
where Eileen had a short while since been lying, reading
her story-book. And now for the first time she saw there
a large deep well. There was no water in the well: but
on one side of it, at some little depth from the surface of
the earth, she could see a tablet of bronze. She stooped
down to read the inscription which was on it. The well
was dark : but five fairies came and stood on either side
of her with bright-flaming tapers in their hands: and by
the light of them she read these words :—

THIS IS THE CLONDERALAW WISHING-WELL :

IF HERE YOUR WISHES YOU TRULY TELL,

AND TUG AT THE HOLLY, AND RAISE THE STONE,
WHATEVER YOU ASK SHALL BE YOUR OWN.

Eileen had—unconsciously and accidentally—tugged at
the holly with her hands, and dislodged the stone with
her feet, at the very moment when she was uttering her
extraordinary wish! The Queen now explained the
secret of the well to her. Once upon a time, Saint
Patrick was searching for a drop of water to give to a
poor sick woman. He expected to have to walk, perhaps
half a mile or so, before he found what he wanted. But
he found the water here in this well, close to the invalid’s
cottage. He then blessed the well: and placed the tablet
there. The Castle of Clonderalaw was afterwards builded
over the place: and the stones of it had hidden the well,
until Eileen had happened to dislodge the last stone which



14 The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. [C.

covered it by the movement of her feet:—and for this
reason she had her wish.

In spite of the clearness of this explanation, Eileen still
looked dazed and bewildered. “What puzzles thee yet,
child?” asked the Queen. “Is not everything now in-
telligible to thee?” “Not quite,—if you please,—Your
Majesty ” she replied, after a pause, “I cannot understand
what you fairies are, or where you live, or why you are so
seldom seen, or how you have come here so suddenly.—
And indeed” she added doubtfully “I don’t quite under-
stand there being such things as fairies at all!”

At this the chorus of fairies standing round laughed
right merrily. “Eileen didn’t believe in fairies” they said .
“till she saw us.”

“And no wonder either!” said Her Majesty reproach-
fully. Then, turning to Eileen, she graciously vouchsafed

‘to explain her difficulties. “You must know” she began
“that the people of strange beings of whom I am the
Queen, the people whom you call ‘fairies, have lived for
long ages on this earth:—indeed there have been fairies
as long as there have been men and women and children.
They can do almost everything they like: all the powers
of nature are their servants: they are irresistibly strong
and immensely wise. They can be of whatever size, or
shape, or figure that delights them most. In ancient times
it pleased them to be great and tall: and the men of old
time who dwelled in Hellas or in Italy, called them ‘gods
and goddesses.’ In later days it pleased them to be small



11] The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. 15

—sometimes so small that flowers were their houses and
‘swinging cobwebs the cradles in which they rocked—and
the peasants of Shropshire and elsewhere called us ‘ pixies’
and ‘brownies’ and ‘elves’ and ‘the small people” Every
country in the world knows us by some name or other.
Is not all this so?” she said, appealing to the company
of her subjects.

“Indeed it is”: they said: “and it has pleased Your
Majesty to be neither very great nor very small :—we are
each and all of us exactly what we please to be.”

Eileen felt that the Queen had chosen well. It did not
seem possible for there to be a more perfect beauty than
was hers: the greatness of the old goddesses and the small-
ness of the little fairies were both, she saw, mistakes :—
perfect beauty has nothing in excess.

The Queen went on speaking: and Eileen listened with
the deepest attention. “Asin different times and places”
she said “our form and figure have been different, so our
names have been different as well. But it is all one
people: or rather it was all one people once—for, even
as the angels fought in Heaven itself, so that there are
now bad angels as well as good, likewise it was with us.
There are evil fairies too” she said—“ witches and’ demons
and hobgoblins:—oh! may the good fairies be stronger
and mightier than they all some-day, and drive all their
enemies from the earth.” The Queen sighed: and the
thought of the bad fairies evidently made all the company
so very unhappy, that Eileen made haste to change the



16 The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. [cz.

subject. “Are there as many fairies as there used to be?”
she asked—* they are so seldom seen now-a-days!”

“Once” said Titania “we were a race more numerous
than all the nations of mankind. But now alas! our
numbers are small: and, year after year, they are still
becoming less. Soon there will be no fairies, at this rate,
in the world at all. We are indeed an unfortunate people:
thousands of us perish daily by the most cruel deaths:
many fall by the workings of poison, but most of us die
miserably by lingering starvation.”

“Poison!” cried Eileen, naturally much astonished,
“and starvation!” Her ideas of fairies had been so very
different from this: she had imagined that fairies were
always happy, and she had envied them for always having
plenty of good things to eat and drink at their desire.
“How can fairies be obliged to starve” she inquired,
as she pointed to the rich magic fruits that hung above
her, “when they can always have delicious things like
these as often as they want them?”

The Fairy Queen smiled sadly. “You do not under-
stand the nature of a fairy” she said. “Fruits and all
manner of victuals and sweet refreshing drinks they caz
have at their desire : but we are so made that something
else is needful to our life—far more needful than these
wretched dainties are. To the diseases and plagues and
fevers, that attack mankind, we are uot liable. We could
live for centuries without a crumb of food or drop of drink.

Our bodies are made stronger and more healthful than



.] The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. 17

yours are. But, as if to make up for it, the spirit in each
of us has been made a thing more delicate and easy to
destroy. We breathe pure joy and love, as you breathe
air: and thoughts of what is beautiful and of what is good
are our necessary sustenance, as meat and drink are
yours. We look for our food—as you do for yours—from
the earth. When the earth is full of Faith and Hope
and Charity: when children love one-another and beauty
is perfected everywhere :—then do the fairies thrive and
multiply and live a happy life. But when malice and
hatred and envy are stalking upon the earth: when
children quarrel with one-another and unloveliness works
its way :—then the fairies sicken and die, as though
they had been mortals from the first. Every unkind
or ugly word or thought upon your earth sends decay
and destruction into our fairy-world: this is the poison
of which I spoke just now. Every good deed, that is left
undone, or beauty unperfected, denies to some of us poor
fairies that which is our daily bread: and so we starve.
I sometimes think that the world is more wicked than
it was: and fairies are fewer. Buthere in Ireland :—where
many hearts are large and generous: where purposes are
often noble and love abounding :—it is still possible for
some of us to live and to be happy. Yet there is much
of the cruel poison even here. Beware! for what is our
poison is the food of our enemies, the evil powers: while
what is their poison is our food.”

These thoughts were all new to Eileen. She was

2



18 The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. [c#.11

inquisitive by nature: and, encouraged by Titania’s kind-
ness, she was going to ask more questions, when Her
Majesty stopped her, saying that by and by there would
be time enough for explanations—now it was time to
start for Fairyland. She invited Eileen to enter the royal
chariot: and, when they had both taken their seats in
it, the Queen and the fairies all called out :—“ Ho! and
away for Fairyland”: and bade Eileen utter the same
words. She did so: though thinking at the time that she
had no wish to go to Fairyland just then—she would
sooner go straight to the Magic Train.

Titania answered her thoughts: “Fairyland is not far
away”: she said: “it lies close above the ordinary world.
But it is wrapped about with a silver cloud, that makes
it always invisible, save when the fairies are willing to
show it to their favourites.”

While she yet spake, they were there. Fairyland looked
to Eileen like a lovely garden: watered by snowy streams
and gurgling fountains: and nestling, as the Queen had
said, in a “silver cloud” :—the earth being close below.
But of this Eileen had only a momentary glimpse: for the
Queen called immediately to the golden eagles, who bore
the chariot along, and bade them fly straight toward the
railway-station. .

So to the railway-station they went.



2

is

CHAPTER III.

TO THE DARK, TO THE PAST, TO THE DEAD.

“They have passed:

they outspeeded the blast:

while, ’tis said, they are fled.”

—“ Whither, oh! whither ?”—

“To the dark, to the past, to the dead.”

—SHELLEY.

HEN Eileen reached the railway-station a few

\ \ moments after this, she accompanied the Queen

down a flight of steps toward the platform: and
thereby she lost sight at once of the garden of Fairyland,
where she would now have liked to linger, forgetting her
previous impatience for the arrival of the Magic Train.

But it must not be supposed that the railway-station
itself was as dull and dirty as those to which we are
accustomed on this earth: nor indeed was it particularly
like them in any way. It is true that there were two
“platforms”: and there was a “booking-office” :—and a
“waiting-room”:—and a “book-stall”: but these were
all very different from any which Eileen had ever. seen
before.

The station-buildings seemed to her like a magnificent

19



20 To the Dark, to the Past, = [c«.

cathedral—only more beautiful than any cathedral ever
builded on this earth. The different places to which
allusion has been made—the waiting-rooms and so forth—
were like lovely little chapels: and the whole lay in a
smiling valley, on either side of which were sloping fields
of waving corn. The platforms were mossy banks: and
between them, for a rail-road, lay a sort of smooth crystal
sea. The station itself was bathed in brilliant light : but
immediately outside, in either direction, it was very dark.
For a moment Eileen was at a loss to know why this
was so: but soon she saw a finger-post, one half of which
pointed TO THE FUTURE and the other TO THE PAST.
The railway-station was evidently that of THE PRESENT—
one of the points of time, at which the Magic Train would
stop according to her wish, on its journey from the future
to the past. The future was even darker than the past :
and at first Eileen could have wished that the train was
going that way: but she consoled herself by thinking
that we are all making that journey, surely though slowly,
every day: whereas no-one had ever made the other
journey before. She could hardly even yet believe that
she was really going to the past. The thought of it
bewildered her: but it would be immensely interesting,
and she determined not to give it up. Then she fell
a-thinking of many strange questions. What would be-
come of herself? Would she feel herself becoming younger
and younger, as the journey went on? and smaller and

smaller? And then what would happen, when. she passed



IIL] to the Dead. 21

on to the years before she was born? As she pondered
thus, she remembered a beautiful poem, which she had
lately read, and how her mother had explained it to her.
The poet who wrote the lines thought that the fresh joy
of children was fraught with recollections of a world
before the present one, and that little ones remembered:
something of years earlier than their birth. It seemed
to harmonise with her present surroundings: and she
repeated some of the words of the poem to herself :—

“Here, in a season of calm weather,
our souls have sight of that immortal sea,
which brought us hither:
can in a moment travel thither,
and see the children sport upon the shore,
and hear the mighty waters rolling evermore.”

Was this water, Eileen wondered, that she saw before
her, the “immortal sea” of which the poet dreamed ?
and was she to make the journey to the place whence we
came hither—not in fancy but in very fact? Would
she know what her soul was before her birth ?

Titania knew what she was thinking: and answered
the questions, which rose up in her mind, before she had
spoken them in words. “You are not to make that
journey”: she said: “the child that is of mortal birth
never will. You wished to be taken back into past time :
and to see the Fields of History. You shall. But it
must be your present self that is to travel with us in the
Magic Train: your past body must remain on the earth



22 To the Dark, to the Past, [cx

for that is where it was in the past. You who come with
us, will remain as you are now: but you shall be privileged
to see the times when you were not. This is indeed a
mystery: and all the doings of the fairies are full of
mysteries. The train will pass along the magic rail-road :
and from the windows of it, which look down upon the
earth, you shall see what is happening there.”

“And will there be cars?” was Eileen’s next question:
“and carriages to take us to what places we want to see,
close outside the railway-stations, as there are at ours on
earth?”

“There will”: said the Queen :—‘ carriages and fairy-
chariots borne by eaglets, who will take us, as it were in
a moment of time, whithersoever we would go.”

And now Titania went to get the tickets and refresh-
ments for the journey: and bade Eileen amuse herself
at the book-stall. She did so: and found the fairy-book-
stall most entertaining. Eileen had never seen such
a collection of books: they were of every sort: poems
and tales and histories: of men, women and children:
of birds, beasts and fishes: of trees, fruits and flowers :—
she would like to have had them all. There were
hundreds of them, each perfectly different from its fellows :
and they must have been full, as Eileen could see at a
glance, of the most beautiful stories and of yet more
beautiful pictures. Just a few of the best story-books,
written on this earth, were there as well: “Alice in
Wonderland,” “The Arabian Nights”—and a very small



IIL] to the Dead. 23

number of the other exquisite books of our world—are
read and enjoyed even by the fairies in their happy
homes.

Meanwhile, as the Queen came back to the platform,
the signal went down for the expected train: and the
porters came forward ready to open the doors. The
porters were not dressed in dark and dingy clothes: nor
had they bent backs and sallow faces, as ours too often
have. They were more like a small company of picked
soldiers: and were arrayed in a uniform that was pic-
turesque beyond description. The grandest regimental
colours which we know would be pale and shabby beside —
those which the fairy-porters wore.

And now one of them sang out in a deep musical
voice, which was distinctly heard all along the platform,
the words that were needed to tell intending passengers
what was the destination of the train :—“ To the dark, to the
past, to the dead.” And these words he kept calling out
continually. The train came in: the engine ploughing
through the waters of the strange sea before mentioned,
by means of some unseen force: there was no smoke nor
dirt with it. The porters threw open the doors of a
luxurious saloon. The Queen and Eileen entered it
alone: and the doors were shut.

Then there came a sound of exquisite beauty :—“ The
whistle of the engine” Titania said: but Eileen, who had
been used to very different engine-whistles, could hardly
believe this: she had imagined that it was the note of the



24 To the Dark, to the Past, = [C«.

nightingale. Have you ever heard a woodland nightingale
singing on a summer evening, when all else was still
and quiet? If so, you may have a faint conception of
the beauty of the fairy-engine’s whistle: never did bird
sing more sweetly. And everything connected with the
fairies was similarly beautiful.

The fairies on the platform were now shouting that
the train was off: and it seemed indeed as though it
were beginning to move. But suddenly—with a jerk—it
stopped again: and Eileen heard another and a different
sound. This time, however, it was not a sound which
was in any way mysterious to her: she knew well what
was the cause of it: it was her own dear dog “ Teazer”
clamouring outside the carriage, that he might be let in,
and scratching the door with his feet.

Eileen sprang up, delighted : and opened the door for
him. “How did you get here, old boy?” she said. Of
course the dumb animal could not answer her question
in words: but he jumped up at her, and licked her hands.
The fairies however, who had come to the carriage along
with the dog, told Eileen what she wanted to know :—
“He came here the same way that you did: and by the
same means. He came by virtue of Saint Patrick’s
wishing-well.” Still she did not understand :—surely a
dog could not make the charm work? surely the fairies
could not have come for the wish of a mere dog?

“And why not?” said Titania, as her eyes rested

lovingly on the affectionate creature. “Dumb animals,





HILLS & SAUNDERS.] [To face p. 24.
TEAZER.



M.] to the Dead. 25

such as horses and dogs, with other noble brutes, can wish
as well as you: although they cannot speak and say so.
Have you never seen a dog left at home, without his
master? have you not marked how miserably he mopes
about? have you not seen him gazing through the closed
window after his master, as that master walks away?
have you not heard his piteous whining? I tell you that
dog wishes to be with his master more eagerly than ever
you wished for anything in all your life? Human beings,
with all their brains and philosophy, have not often half
the strength of will, nor half the passion of affection,
which belongs to a faithful dog. When you were gone
with us, your trusty brute wished but for one thing :—to
be with you! That one thing he wished with all his
soul :—not as human beings wish, balancing one advantage
against another, and forgetting their desire, the moment
after it is formed, in the attraction of some new delight.
His whole soul, I tell you, went out in that simple longing
for your company. He ‘pulled at the holly’: and ‘raised
the stone, which the fairies had replaced. And the
charm, which is giving you all your wonderful wish, gave
him his simple prayer as well.”

Eileen had learned much that day, of which she had
never thought before: but this seemed to her most strange
of all. She had been so long accustomed to think of the
wishes of men, women and children as being all-important
in the world—and to think of dogs and horses as their
toys and instruments—that this new notion of the “ whole

ex
ait



26 To the Dark, to the Past, [cx

soul” of her dog going out in one heartfelt desire was
quite beyond her understanding. Why, she had even
imagined—as many others do—that a dog can have no
soul at all: and that only men and women have hearts
to feel and wills to pray. But now she no longer doubted
that what the beautiful Queen told her was true :—there
is no reason, because a dog cannot speak, to suppose he
has no soul: he has a soul, a faithful and a loving one:
and the powers that can work on the spirit of a man can
work also on the spirit of a brute.

Eileen fondled him more lovingly than she had ever

done before :—and this is saying much, for she had always
loved him exceedingly. Poor old fellow, with that fine
noble head, and those speaking eyes!—she would no
longer treat him as a toy intended for her amusement:
henceforward he should be as much a “person” to her
as anyone else in the world.
. These explanations and these meditations were all the
work of a minute or two: and the carriage door was quickly
closed again. The train had only stopped for the dog’s
sake :—(fancy that! those who direct the driving of our
earthly trains would scorn to stop for a dog’s sake: but
the fairies are not so proud) :—and, now that Teazer was
safely sleeping upon Eileen’s lap, the journey might really
begin.

Titania, accordingly, bade Eileen sit close up against
the window of the carriage: and showed her where she
must look for the best view. Straight beneath the window,



UIl.] to the Dead. 27

there was a crevice in the silver cloud which sunders
Fairyland from Earth: and through the crevice Eileen
could see the world below, at no considerable distance
from her. And immediately before her eyes lay Clonderalaw
Castle, many fairies still at present surrounding it, and the
whole place still gay with their magic handiwork.

The beautiful whistle sounded forth once more. The
fairies on the platform shouted a last good-bye. And the
train moved out of the station, as the porter called out
again—for the last time—his solemn oft-repeated words :—
“To the dark, to the past, to the dead.”



CHAPTER IV.
PITY AND PEACE AND LOVE.

“A thousand nations swore that there should be
pity and peace and love among the good and free.”
—SHELLEY.

ILEEN had been prepared for what she was to see
on this journey: but, for all that, she was startled
at the immediate change in the view which she beheld

from the window directly the train had left the station.
She still saw Clonderalaw Castle : but the fairies’ work was
gone: and she only saw herself lying there, with her book
and her dog,—looking very much as she had looked every
day of her life. The sun seemed to be slowly rising from
the west and travelling to the east: the evening turned to
afternoon and the afternoon to morning.

While this was going on, Eileen turned away from the
window. Even on this journey, she could not look at the
view all the time :—especially when there was the lovely
Titania in the carriage with her, whose blue eyes and merry
smile were so irresistibly attractive. So she fell into con-
versation once more with the Fairy Queen. “Where shall
we stop first?” she asked. “ That is as you like”: replied

28



Cu.Iv.]° Pity and Peace and Love. 29

the other: “this journey is undertaken for your pleasure
and instruction. You may stop as often as you please:
and see any part of the history of the world at your
desire.” Eileen gave a little scream of delight : her fondest
wishes were indeed coming to pass. “But Your Majesty
will help me to choose” she said. “I know so little
history: I would be guided by you: what is most worth
seeing P”

“Whatever is most beautiful and good” the Queen
replied. “We will visit the thousand nations that have
sworn ‘that there shall be pzty and peace and love among
the good and free. And what I mean is this :—Although
the world is full of much wickedness, and although
cruelty and war and hatred have been common from the
beginning of time: there have nevertheless always been
men, and there have always been nations, who have set
themselves to fight on the side of goodness: the struggles
then of these men and these nations to defend the right,
to free the oppressed and to spread the influences of pity
and peace and love—these and these alone are the things
worth seeing in the history of the earth.”

Eileen was rather disappointed. “Shall I see none of
the bad people in history?” she said: “for cruel tyrants,
bloody warriors and even the most wicked villains are
interesting to me, as well as good people. I would like
to see history in its true colours. I would not see only
half the picture.”

“ Alas! my dear Eileen” replied Her Majesty “you



30 Pity and Peace and Love. [Cu.

will see many of these. The struggle of the good cannot
be seen without the struggle of the bad as well. Good
is seen in the resistance of evil. \Wherever we stop to
see pity and peace and love, there we shall see also cruelty
and war and hate. Indeed, as far as this purpose goes,
it does not very much matter where we stop: love is ever
and again manifested in the same places as hatred, in so
much that the highest love is to love them that hate you.
See therefore that you learn from them to distinguish the
good and loveable from the bad and abominable : for we
shall find both everywhere.”

Eileen, after thanking the beautiful Queen, looked out
of the window once more: and laughed to see the changes
that the years had brought about. For the train had
travelled back several years, while they had been speak-
ing: the years being marked by stones at the side of
the line like our milestones, though the train often shot
past them so quickly that Eileen had hardly time to read
the date. There were stations at frequent intervals along
the line: and, as she afterwards discovered, there was
always a big station at the beginning of a century. At
these the trains always stopped: these were the junctions
where the passengers “changed”: and they were suitable
places to pause and look back over the last hundred years.

Already, as has been said, the train had passed back
several years. Eileen still saw Clonderalaw Castle and
the surrounding country in the foreground, though the

whole view was a very wide one :—embracing the whole



v.} Pity and Peace and Love. 31

world, she thought. Now she saw her brother and herself
as they had been years ago: her brother with short socks
and bare legs, and herself in almost baby attire. This
made her laugh immensely: but her laughter did not
last long. For, standing close beside them, she soon
saw a friend, whom she well remembered, though she had
not seen him for many a long day. This was their dear
old pony, Jocko, who had died a great while ago. Eileen
had had a very happy life: and, in the whole course of it,
she had had no experience of death, save only this one.
Tears came into her eyes, as she looked at her well-
remembered favourite. She recollected that the voice
at the station, which they had lately left, had called out
“to the dead” with its last words: and it now struck her
with awe to think that all the myriad men and women,
whom she was to see after the next few stations, were
none other than the company of the departed dead. She
looked very lovingly, for a few moments, at the pony on
which she had learned to ride, and which once had seemed
to know the meaning of everything she said. Poor old
creature! she was very glad to have seen him once again :
although, when she returned home, of course she knew
he would be dead again as heretofore. It was the first
Eileen had learned of the “bitterness of Death!—One
thought consoled her: Titania had told her that brute
animals may have souls: and, where there is a soul, we
have a hope that looks into the future of that soul.

She now turned again from the window, stroked her



32 Pity and Peace and Love. [c.

dear dog’s head and looked endless questions into his keen
dark eyes. And, when she again looked out, she saw no
pony there: but she knew, by the number of the next
milestone which they passed, that the train had come
to a date, when neither her pony nor herself had yet been
born. She looked upon the earth: and her eyes wandered
over the face of it: but she no longer saw herself there:
and she struggled to realise the extraordinary fact, that
they had arrived at the time, wherein she was not. “We
will stop at the next station ” said the Queen.

* * * * cg

The train came to a stand-still: and immediately one
of the fairy-porters opened the door of the carriage in
which Titania and Eileen were seated. They then got out
of the train together and stepped on to the platform.
There was a large painted board at one end of it, on which
was written the name of the station:—‘THE YEAR OF
‘OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND FIFTY-
SEVEN.” Eileen was very much excited, as she took
her seat by the side of Titania in the car, which was
waiting for them outside the station, with four golden
eaglets already harnessed to it. “When we leave the
station” said Titania in a soft voice “Time will go on
as usual,—from the point where we alight. As in the case
of journeys made upon your earth from place to place,
you may walk, when the train stops, a little way back

along the line in the direction from which you have come,



IVv.] Pity and Peace and Love. a8

so will it be in the case of this journey. But, wherever
we may be upon the earth, we shall go wrapped in an
invisible cloud: and the men, women and children on the
earth will never guess that we are near them, though we
shall pass close to them and mingle in their multitudes.
The fairies always move in clouds that render them thus
invisible: save only when they discover their presence to
some especial favourites, and allow those favourites to
see them through the cloud. So long as this journey
lasts, you shall be in no danger from any of the perils,
which mortals have to fear: so long as this journey lasts
you shall have all the protections from such things, which
fairies have. And, beside these protections, you shall have
all the powers of mind which fairies have—enlarged
powers of seeing and hearing, and chiefest of all that
gift of tongues, which will enable you to understand all
languages.”

The car was now beginning to move: and Teazer was
on the point of leaping in after them. But Her Majesty
said that he must wait: for that they would be back
in an instant. “We cannot take your pretty beast with
us”: said the Queen as the car sped off: “though I am
sorry to refuse him. For he is a dog of mettle, well
I know: and he would want to worry the cats and other
animals upon the earth. If he were to go with us, he
would go, like us, invisible: and it would not be playing
the part of a good fairy to the past inhabitants of the
earth, were I to suffer their pets to be taken unawares and

3



34 Pity and Peace and Love, [c1Vv.

killed by an invisible enemy.” Eileen quite saw that
to suffer this would be unfair: and consented to a short
separation from her favourite: just as she did when she
went in the course of her ordinary life to Church or other
places, where “dogs are not admitted ” :—remembering
that there is a time for everything, and that, while con-
sidering Teazer’s wants, she must not forget what was
reasonable in the interests of others.

This had just been amicably arranged: when the car,
having executed its journey with lightning speed, set down
the travellers upon the earth : and Eileen gazed about her,

wondering where she could be.



CHAPTER V.

OUR BANNER OF ENGLAND.

“ And ever upon the topmost roof our banner of England blew.”
—TENNYSON.

HE was in India: at Lucknow: and they were

standing beside the English church. It was Sunday

morning: and the church was full of British soldiers
and their wives and children. The Fairy Queen and
Eileen entered the building: where all things were being
done much as they are done at home. With the Queen’s
leave, Eileen took her place between two beautiful children,
who sat with their mother, in a pew which was otherwise
unoccupied: and there, unseen of all, she could look about
her entirely at her ease. There was nothing very extra-
ordinary to see: and except for the tremendous power
of the blazing sun, whose rays streamed in through the
chinks of the shutters, she would never have guessed that
she was so far away from home. The gay British uni-
forms indeed, to which we are accustomed, of scarlet and
gold were changed for uniforms of white, as being better
suited to the burning heat which prevailed. Otherwise
the whole surroundings seemed familiar: the straight-
backed regimental lines filling the pews set apart for the

35 :



36 Our Banner of England. [Cu

military, the peculiar clattering and clanking which ac-
companies their movements whenever the congregation
kneels or rises, the surplice and hood of the English
clergyman, the well-known language of the Book of
Common Prayer,—together with the usual Sunday-morning
attire of the women and children—were all reproduced
here exactly as you may observe them in the mother-
country any summer’s day.

Eileen was very curious to know more about her com-
panions in the pew. And so, after a while, she took
advantage of the cloud of invisibility, which hid herself and
all her actions from mortal eyes, to'look into the children’s
prayer-books : hoping to read their names upon the fly- _
leaves. She was not disappointed: the names were written
there as she had expected—“ Herbert ” and “ Muriel.”

Just as. Eileen had made this discovery, the prayers
being nearly finished, Herbert whispered into Muriel’s
ear :—“Do you see? Father is going out of church:
and several other officers too!” Muriel turned her head
to the place where the soldiers sat: and Eileen, who had
overheard the whisper, did the same. It was as the boy
had said. A man had come in with a message for those
officers: and they were evidently going out in consequence.

' The service went on. For a time all was quiet again.
But soon other men entered with messages for other
officers: and they too left the church. Then the women
who were present began to look very uncomfortable.

Something was wrong. And it was not without a touch



v.J Our Banner of England. 37

of impatience that they—and Eileen—waited until service
and sermon were over to learn what was amiss.

When at last they did come out of church, Eileen
followed the children, with whom she had been sitting.
Their mother left them for a short while on a seat in the
churchyard: and bade them stay there, while she made
inquiries among her friends as to the reason of her
husband’s disappearance.

This mother was still young: hers was a gentle, refined
face, whose outline was singularly lovely: proud in its
beauty too: rich dark eyes, which sparkled from beneath
thick eyelashes: a slender form: not strong, but very
active. She was not a woman inclined to sofas and
scents and languishing luxury, albeit rich enough for such
indulgence had she wanted it :—no, she was very practical :
thought much: did much: not for herself only, but for
everyone about her: all in all to her husband and her
children: one of the most precious and helpful women
in Lucknow during the hours of trouble.

Muriel was very like her mother,—only more delicate.
The climate of North India had harmed her grievously !
She was small, fragile, weakly: but with not a little of
her mother’s proud spirit flashing from her eyes and
colouring her pale-white cheeks. She had her mother’s
voice and step and attitudes. Indeed the shape of their
face and form was ridiculously the same. And so was
the colour of their hair:—only that of course the dark

brown clusters of mother and daughter were treated



38 Our Banner of England. [Cu.

very differently. Muriel’s hair was allowed to fall
unrestrainedly whithersoever it pleased (for that is
childhood’s privilege): whilst her mother’s was severely
imprisoned, according to the fashion of the day, within
anet. Herbert was of a rougher build and full of robust
health : but had withal an undeniable beauty of his own.
He was fourteen years old: and his sister was about two
years younger.

The children waited somewhat impatiently for their
mother, who was soon standing in the middle of a little
knot of friends, engaged in anxious conversation. At
last she turned from them, and Herbert, leaving his sister’s
side, sprang-toward his mother, asking excitedly :—* What
is it, mother? Has anybody told you why father left
the church?” “He has gone” she said “to the camp of
the Sepoys—the Indian native troops. They are rising in
arms against their officers. It is a grave matter. If others
were to follow their example, there would be a terrible
_war. It may come to serious fighting here and’ every-
where in India.” “I hope it will” said Herbert : evidently
meaning in earnest what he said. He had been: brought
up among soldiers and guns and fortifications all his life.
He wanted now to see something of real war. He was
tired of seeing people “only playing at it always,” as he
said. “Yes” he repeated “I hope there will be war.”
“Do not say so!” his mother said. “You little know -
what such a thing would mean to all of us. But we will
not speak about it more at present: for Muriel must not



Vv.) Our Banner of England. 39

be alarmed.” Muriel however had already overheard what
her mother had been saying. “I am not in the least
afraid”: said she: “I am too English for that. But for
the sake of everybody here, I hope there will be no
fighting.” And the three set out together for their
own quarters.

The Fairy Queen and Eileen went with them, and they
soon reached the house. It was one of those which is
called a bungalow: a building with only one story. They
entered the children’s old nursery. It was very like our
nurseries at home: and was hung moreover with the
very same prints and pictures that may be seen in ten
thousand children’s haunts in England and in Ireland.
But the view from the window was very different from
any that the British Isles can show. It was a curious
mixture of East. and West. There were gilded domes:
tall slender pillars: lofty colonnades: iron railings and
balustrades: cages, some filled with wild beasts, others
with strange bright birds: gardens, fountains, cypress-
trees: elephants, camels and horses. But there were
also London-like houses, which Englishmen had builded
there: and English barouches took their turns with the
gilt litters of the Indians in passing along the streets.
And in the distance was the view of the Sepoys’ Indian
camp. Herbert, arming himself with a small telescope,
tried to see what was happening there. In vain: for the
distance was too great. But now that his mother was

‘no longer present, he confessed to Muriel that still he



40 Our Banner of England. (Cu.

could not help hoping there would be a fight. He thought
a battle must be the most magnificent spectacle on earth.
But she would not agree with him. Peace would be far
better, she thought, if an honourable peace were possible.

In due time the father of the family came home. He
was a handsome man, of a soldierly appearance: tall and
powerful. Herbert ran eagerly to him: asking whether
there had been or would be any fighting against the
Sepoys. “Thank Heaven” was the answer “it has not
come to fighting yet. But it may do so before long.
Nothing would make me sorrier than if there were to be
a great Indian mutiny. The English women and children
would suffer dreadfully: and many of our brave fellows
would be shot before we won the victory. No, let our
prayer be for ‘ peace in our time’ still.” Herbert was silent
for a while: not liking to confess to his father that he yet
wished for war. But Eileen could see that he was not
really convinced. He had certainly set his heart on seeing
a fight.

Muriel had now a question to put to her father. “ What
is it all about?” she said. “Why are the Indian soldiers
dissatisfied? Surely the English are very kind to them?”
“J will try and explain” he said “as clearly as I can.”
And then he told her a thing about which Eileen had often
read before now in her history-book, but whose importance
she had always found it hard to understand. “When the
natives in our service load their rifles” he said “it is usual

to order them to bite their cartridges,—so as to let out the



Vv.) Our Banner of England. 41

gunpowder and pour it down the muzzle of their rifles.
Some mischief-maker has told them that the paper of those
cartridges is made of the fat of pigs and cows. Now these
people are chiefly of two religions. Some are Brahmins:
some Mohammedans. Brahmins think that cows are
sacred animals: that it is wicked to touch any part of a
cow with their lips: and that a man is degraded if he does
so. Mohammedans think that pigs are impure animals:
and that even to taste their flesh is to defile themselves.
This is why both are so angry at the notion of biting the
cartridges: and this is the reason of their dissatisfaction !”
“Flow absurd” said Herbert. “It is very absurd in a
sense of course”: his father said: “but then these men
believe their religion, as we believe ours. And they think
that we purposely intend to hurt their religious feelings.
I told the men with whom I had to deal that it was a
mistake : that we did not mean’to offend them: and that
some other way of making the cartridges ready would be
found. AndsolI persuaded them to become obedient again.
Sir Henry Lawrence, our governor here, will hold a grand
military levée to-morrow : and then he is going to explain
to the assembled native officers what I have been trying to
explain to my own men. If you would like to come, I will
take you to the place.” Both children were eager to go.
And accordingly on the next day they were duly taken to
the Residency, where the levée was. The lawn was strewn
with carpets: and the chief officers sat thereon in chairs.

Titania and Eileen reclined, invisible, in the midst of them.



42 Our Banner of England. [Cu.

Then Sir Henry stood on a verandah and addressed the
Indian chiefs. “Those who tell you that we Englishmen
intend to hurt your religious feelings” he said “are liars.
Other rulers of India have forced people to accept their
own religion. But we allow you absolute freedom in all
matters of faith. You may build your own temples every-
where: and have what ceremonies you please therein.”
Then he pointed to the Union Jack, which was waving in
the wind above. “It is our boast” he said “that under
our banner of England men may have what religion they
choose : for Christians do not compel others to become
Christians too by force of arms: and who will dare to
interfere with those beneath our protection? Be faithful
to us: and that banner will assure to you your perfect
liberty !”

The Fairy Queen said to Eileen:—“ The governor is
right. Men must believe the faith their consciences
approve. There is no good in using force of arms in
such matters. These strange religions, however imperfect,
are all that the unconverted natives have to lead them to
what is good and beautiful. And every man’s religious
beliefs have something sacred about them, which it is
wrong in others to offend. May the banner of England
always protect the rights of Liberty!”

When Sir Henry Lawrence had made an end of speak-
ing, he rewarded the natives who had done faithful service :
and the meeting then dispersed. Herbert and Muriel

returned home again: and Eileen went with them.



Vi] Our Banner of England. 43

For some time nothing more was said about the mutiny :
and people began to think that all was right again.
Herbert and Muriel noticed however that their father
was very busy: and his absence from home became more
and more frequent as time went on. At last he told
Herbert one day that the mutiny was not by any means
at an end: the mischief-makers had found other reasons
besides religious ones for persuading the men to be dis-
obedient : they were being disobedient still, not only here,
but throughout the length and breadth of India. It was
becoming a serious war. Then Herbert thought he would
see some fighting after all! But his father said :—“ We
do not expect that the enemy will come here. Sir Henry
Lawrence is anxious about other places: but this place
Lucknow he considers safe. Pray Heaven he may be
right : for this is the place where your mother and Muriel
and yourself are. And therefore I must care for its safety.
first of all!”

But one morning not long after this, the whole town
was alarmed. “The enemy are coming” it was said: and
it was true. Titania and Eileen sped to the place where
Lawrence was. Every preparation was being made for
a real siege. Stores of food were being carried into the
place. New fortifications were being made. Each soldier
was being given his special post. Lawrence looked very
anxious. “I am not afraid for us, who are men and
soldiers”: he said: “it is for the women and children

that I fear.”



A4 Our Banner of England. [Cu

Before Eileen had half realised what was happening,
the fierce regiments of the Indian enemy were close to
them: black-faced wretches uttering fearful war-cries and
bellowing for admission: calling to Lawrence to give the
city up to them, as he valued his own life: firing musket-
shots at whomsoever they could see exposed: threatening
to destroy the whole place and torture everyone within
it, if their will were not obeyed immediately: an army
of wild and merciless murderers. The whole country was
black with the enormous numbers of them: marching
in formed line, arrayed in British uniforms, and armed
with all the artillery and implements of war, which the
English themselves had given them.

Lawrence said:—“I must write to General Havelock,
who is at Allahabad, to bring more men to Lucknow to
save us from destruction. We must keep the city at all
costs till he comes. We must never give in.” And he
wrote to Havelock, saying in what danger Lucknow was.

“Relieve us with all speed” he wrote. “I think we
might hold out for ten or fifteen days!”

Eileen returned to her little friends again. Herbert was
pale: but appeared as though endeavouring to enjoy the
scene. Muriel was very quiet: but showed no signs of
fear. Soon their mother came in: and told them that
their father was going away from them upon a dangerous
piece of business. They must come and bid him good-
bye. They went to the door of the bungalow: and found
him already on horseback and about that instant to



Vv.) Our Banner of England. 45

depart. “Lawrence has decided to leave the city, with
some picked soldiers, to attack the enemy at a place called
Chinhut. And I am to go with him. Heaven bless and
keep you while Iam away!” So saying, he bent from his
horse to kiss his wife and children. He hid his face for
a few moments in Muriel’s soft dark hair: and struggled
to be calm. Then he rose again to his full height in the
saddle: and crossing the Goomtee river by the bridge,
quickly galloped out of sight. None of his dear ones
ever saw him alive again.

Lawrence’s sally to Chinhut did not go prosperously.
Other enemies, whom he had not seen, were hidden in
ambush where he had to pass: and fell upon his soldiers
unawares. Many were killed: and the father of Herbert
and Muriel was among their number! Lawrence and
those with him barely escaped with their lives back to
the city walls.

Herbert heard of his father’s death, before his widowed
mother knew about it. He told her bravely, quietly: as
befitted a soldier’s son. But he no longer looked as he
had done hitherto. The terrors of war had come home
to him at last: for at the very beginning of it his dear
father was lost to him!

More trouble was yet in store for them all. The next
day Muriel fell very sick: and the good victuals, which
it was so important that she should have, had already risen
to a terribly high price. For the siege had now really
begun: and it would soon be impossible to buy them at



46 Our Banner of England. [Cx.

all. A doctor was wanted. Herbert went to fetch him:
for none of the servants durst leave the house. It was
very dangerous—almost unto death—to go into the streets
of Lucknow during those terrible days. In the meantime
Muriel lay in bed: and her mother had to watch con-
stantly by the side of her. A sick-room should be above
all things quiet and undisturbed: and such Muriel’s had
always been when she was ill before. But now the bullets
of the besieging savages rained on the walls of her bed-
chamber as thick as hail: the shutters had to be con-
tinually closed, for the sake of such slight protection as
they might afford: and, despite all precautions, Muriel’s
mother was actually wounded in the shoulder by one of
the merciless bullets, which found its way into the room.

Eileen, who of course had nothing to fear by the side
of the Fairy Queen, followed Herbert on his perilous
errand. Great were the horrors which were to be seen,
as they passed along the streets. But Herbert pluckily
persevered in the accomplishment of that which he had
come to do: and at last, by Heaven’s mercy, arrived
unhurt at the good doctor’s house.

He was admitted. But the doctor was not at home:
he had gone to the Residency, which was just opposite,—
the place where Lawrence lived, and where the levée had
been held. The servant thought. that Lawrence himself
must have been wounded. The boy went into the house:
he would wait there, he said, until the doctor came. The
Fairy Queen and Eileen waited too. Shot and shell were



Vi] Our Banner of England. 47

striking the house opposite, from which the doctor was
expected to come. After half an hour the door opened:
and a small party of men came across the road, amid
a shower of bullets, carrying a wounded man! When
Eileen saw him, she recognised him at once. It was
Sir Henry Lawrence himself: and he was wounded unto
death. When the party came to the doctor’s house,
Herbert was told that medical aid should be sent to Muriel
as soon as possible. So, with that hope, he left the house:
and, turning his face homewards, faced again the dangers
of the streets.

‘Eileen stayed for a while at the doctor’s house.
Lawrence had been carried safely to the northern verandah
of it, which at that moment was somewhat sheltered from
the heavy fire of the enemy. But he had hardly been
placed upon a bed there, when a terrific storm of bullets
came in that direction also: and it was only by the
greatest care and by keeping within the shelter of the
pillars and end walls, that any of the party who stood
round his bed were saved alive.

That was the second of July: and on the fourth the
wounded warrior died, bidding those around him fight on
to the last. “You must never give in”: he said: “the
barbarous Indians must never be allowed to touch our
women and children. You ought rather to die of starvation,
before you let that come to pass.” Lawrence spoke well.
It was better to starve and fall into the hands of Heaven,

than by surrendering to fall into the hands of merciless



48 Our Banner of England. [Cu

men. Besides the honour of our banner of England was
at stake: it was still blowing proudly on the topmost roof,
and, please Heaven, still should blow!

Eileen went that night to the leader’s lonely funeral:
lonely,—for none of his friends were there, save the priest
who read a hurried prayer above the grave. The words
of that prayer could hardly be heard by earthly ears, amid
the booming of the cannon without the walls.

Then Titania brought her back to Muriel’s bed-chamber.
The little girl was very ill. A young doctor had come to
see her. He said that she must have great care, and as
much quiet as possible. Alas! quiet was not to be had
in Lucknow at this time for all the money in the world.
The terrible siege went on amid unceasing shot and shell:
and would go on, until the expected soldiers should come
with Havelock to set them free. Time passed away: and
at last a shell burst in the very room where Muriel lay
abed. Happily she was herself unhurt: but the outside
wall of the chamber was utterly destroyed. And bullets
were still flying fast. Some soldiers passing in the street
called to the dwellers in the house :—“ You must come to
the Brigade Mess in the Residency. That is where all
the women and children are taking refuge now. Come!
there is no time to lose.” Hearing that the child was
sick, one of the soldiers, who.had served under Muriel’s
father, rushed into the room. Taking the pale child from
the bed, he wrapped her tender limbs in his rough military

great-coat (this was no time for ceremony): and ran from



Vv.) Our Banner of England. 49

the house to the place of safety, which had been mentioned.
They were followed by Herbert and his mother, who came
unprotected through the perilous streets. Other women
and children, and wounded and sick men, were hurrying
also to the Brigade Mess. All ranks were huddled together
there: and delicate little Muriel had to share a sofa in
the place with a butcher’s wounded urchin, a dirty creature
and shabbily attired.

In the third week of the siege this new place of refuge,
the Brigade Mess, was itself attacked: and from that time
forward not a few of the women and children were
numbered among the wounded in the city. When would
their troubles come to an end? Lawrence had said :—
“JT think we can hold the place for ten or fifteen days,
till Havelock comes.” Lawrence was dead: and Inglis,
‘who had taken his place, was continuing to hold the fortress
still—for a space of time far longer than for fifteen days.

Weeks passed away: the horrors increased, instead of
lessening. Food was very scarce. There was an infinite
torment of flies—like the Egyptian plague—which settled
upon everything. The air was foul. Disease and decay
were raging everywhere. The doctors said that Muriel
was dying: and must die certainly within a very short
time, unless good victuals could be had for her.

Herbert was miserable. His mother was very weary:
and her wound was not yet whole. And every morning
they arose and asked:—‘“Is not Havelock coming? We
shall die if he does not come soon.” But still no-one

4



50 Our Banner of England. — [cs

talked of surrendering the city to the mutineers. Our
banner of England was riddled with bullets again and
again: but a new Union Jack was always put in the
place of the old one.

Eileen watched unseen over Muriel’s couch. Herbert
would stay by the window: and tell his sister what was
passing in the street. His heart was sick with vainly
looking for relief.

A terrible explosion was heard. “The house opposite ”
said the boy “is blown to pieces.” And this was literally
the truth. The enemy had made mines right underneath
the Residency: and were now exploding them. Part
of the women’s quarters even was blown away in this
ghastly fashion. But still Inglis did not think of yield-
ing : for he remembered Lawrence’s dying words, and he
knew that they were true.

The butcher’s child died on Muriel’s sofa: and she had
it all to herself. But ah! for how long? Relief must
come soon: or Muriel would die.

And now at last news came from the friends of the
English. Havelock was on the road! A clever spy had
managed to bring a note into Lucknow, written by the
hand of Havelock. It said that Outram and he were
on their way: and hoped to reach Lucknow within three
or four days. Muriel seemed a little better on this day:
and Eileen fancied that she yet would live.

Three days more passed away with no sign of the

deliverers: and the morning of another came. Herbert



V.] Our Banner of England. 51

still looked through the window: which commanded a
view of the country beyond the fortifications. He could
see nothing but the armies of the enemy: and heard
only the thundering sounds of their artillery.—Suddenly
the air was rent by a wild shriek of joy: an infinitely
intense “hooray.” All looked at the place whence the
sound came. And there stood a poor Scotch corporal’s
wife: Jessie Brown by name: who had had her troubles
like the rest, and had borne them patiently. Was she
mad? or why her extraordinary joy? She could hardly
speak for excitement: but she said:—“I ken weel our
rescuers are here. I have just caught the faint sound
of bagpipe notes. Whist! I hear them still.” Eileen
heard nothing but the cannon’s roar: and it seemed that
nobody else heard anything of what the woman described.
“Vou must be mistaken” said someone. “I canna be
mistaken”: said Jessie Brown: “I should know the pibroch-
sound amid all other music in the world. A Scotch lass
couldna be mistaken aboot that. And oh! it is growing
louder. It is the slogan, as we ca’ it, of the advancing
Hielanders: I hear the piping o’ the Macgregors, the

ry”

grandest of them a And she wept for the very ecstasy
of her joy.

Jessie Brown was right. At midday the sounds of
battle were distinctly heard: and, as the afternoon
advanced, the sounds came nearer and nearer. Soon all
acknowledged that they heard the bagpipes. Muriel’s

mother clasped her darling’s hand: and listened to the



52 Our Banner of England. [Cu

noise with a beating heart. For the soldiers who were
coming were bringing with them that state of things,
which was the last hope for Muriel’s life. Indeed the
lives of all the women and children hung on the same
event. For starvation stared them in the face on the
one side: and on the other, what mercy was to be looked
for, if the enemy could win their way into the city ?

And now the sharp ring of rifles was heard: all knew
that their saviours were very nigh. The flash of the
musketry was gradually seen: and then the well-known
uniforms of the faithful Highlanders. After that there
was a great battle. Havelock and Outram fought their
way through the enemy’s lines. The enemy were beaten
back. And at last, as the sun was going down, Inglis and
his trusty officers clasped their deliverers’ hands.

Lawrence had wondered whether Lucknow could be
held for fifteen days—They had “held it for eighty-
seven”!

The joy was not a thing which pen and ink can
possibly describe. Eileen had a confused vision of men
and women and little children shaking each others’ hands:
cheering : weeping : talking endlessly : shouting: singing :
dancing—in a frenzy of wild delight! For the thing
which was too horrible for words had zo¢ come to pass:
English women and children had zo fallen into the horrid
clutches of the Indian savages. When the siege was
over, and food was no longer scarce, Muriel in happier

and more peaceful days grew well again. But this was







T. J. BARKER 77x. (To face ~. 53.
THE RELIEF OF LUCKNOW.

From a print published by Messrs. Thomas Agnew & Sons.



Vv] Our Banner of England. 53

not until Sir Colin Campbell with more men had come
to their relief. When Eileen last saw Lucknow, behold !
Sir Colin, Havelock and Outram stood together: and
our banner of England still was blowing on the topmost
roof. Happy will it be for India, if she may rest for
ever beneath the shadow of the Union Jack!

*& * * a *

Eileen looked up. The chariot of the golden eaglets
was waiting there for her. Titania bade her take her
place again upon its cushioned seat. Attendant fairies
covered our two travellers with fair shawls: and they
returned to the station. The train was waiting for them.
Teazer looked up lazily as they opened the door of the
carriage: but he did not jump in wild excitement toward
her, as he usually did aftera long absence. “What! boy”:
she said: “don’t you know I’ve been away far more than
eighty-seven days?” “You have forgotten”: said the
Fairy Queen : “it has all been one moment at this station,
where your dog has been. You have come back to the
same point of time, as that wherein you started from the
station.” “I forgot” said Eileen: and she shut her eyes
for very bewilderment, as she fell back in her seat. Then

the Magic Train went on again.

As they travelled, Eileen looked again from the window
—through the crevice in the silver cloud to the countries
of the earth beneath. And it happened that sometimes



54 Eileen’s Journey. [Cx

one country would be in the foreground and easiest to see,
sometimes another : so that she had a never-ending variety
of spectacles. They flew along, past station after station,
without stopping at all: but, whenever there was anything,
which those looking from the window wished to see more
particularly, the Fairy Queen was always able—by a
movement of her sceptre—either entirely to stop the train
for a bit, or to make it travel at a slower pace. And,
during the next few years of their backward journey, there
were many scenes, which Eileen beheld in this way: and
watched with the liveliest delight. Some were scenes of
war. At one time they watched the great doings of
English soldiers in the cold Crimea: and the famous battles
there, of which the history-books are full. At another
Italy was nearest to the cloud-chink, and Eileen looked on
Venice :—at any time it would have given her great
delight to see that fair city, whose streets are beautiful
waters and whose sky is almost always blue: but now the
city was busied with a great revolt and full of armed men
eager to be fighting: the citizens were fighting for their
liberty, and resolved to be no more a subject city.—It was
warfare of this kind, which the Fairy Queen loved best to
watch. There was other warfare in those years, which she
liked less.

Some again were scenes of peace: and Eileen saw many
of the hunts and horse-races and cricket-matches of the
days before she was born. And she beheld with the

greatest interest a hundred famous sportsmen and famous



vo Eileen’s Journey. 55

beasts: of whom she had heard her father speak, but
whom she never expected to look on in the flesh. Nor
was it sport alone that she watched: she saw something
of business too. She saw the myriad money-makers, who
then as now were scattered all over the face of the earth.
Most of these were dull enough: but there was some
excitement in watching the swarms of fortune-seekers, who
flocked to Australia about this time to dig for the gold
which had just been discovered there, and in observing
how they quarrelled for its possession, when it was found.
And, beside all these, she saw those men as well who
made it their business to help their fellows, and who
loved—more than wealth or pleasure—that which is
really beautiful and good.

All the while Eileen was eagerly looking out for Ireland,
her dear native land: whose past she longed to know and
understand, more than the past of all the rest beside. But,
for some while after they left Lucknow, she never caught
a glimpse of it: until at last, when they had traversed a
distance of nine years, she turned to Titania and said :—
“I would like to see Ireland again.” “You shall”: the
Queen at once replied: “but Ireland at this time is a sad
spectacle for you. Look from the window!” Eileen did
so: and beheld the Connemara wilderness in all its glory
of wild lakes and misty mountains. But she quickly
started back from the window: and clutched Titania’s arm.
She had seen a horrible and ghastly sight! The ground
was strewn about with the dying and the dead: andin a



56 Eileen’s Journey. [Cu. V.

moment Eileen knew what the year must be to which they
were now come. It was the year of the great famine !

Eileen knew well that Connaught country in the days in
which she lived: and, when sojourning there a week or
two, she had often gazed upon the scene which she was
gazing upon now, and marked with pleasure the red bog-
lands, dotted here and there with native folk,—men in
their quaint knee-breeches and women in their scarlet
petticoats scattered about the ground and cutting the turf,
from which they make their fires,—while others within
doors were preparing their frugal meals of boiled potatoes.

Potatoes! they lived on potatoes: and in this famine-
year the potatoes had failed. The absence of that simple
root made all the difference. It meant starvation: and
the Irish were indeed starving in great multitudes. The
hunger was terrible: all were in the immediate presence of
the most cruel death, because they wanted that daily
bread, for which day by day without ceasing they so
piteously prayed. Whole families were perishing: and
many a mother would have given her very life for a few
crusts, on which to feed her child. The people knew not
what to do: they began to fight against their rulers, for no
good reason, but because in their despair they could not
tell whom to blame. Eileen had never before seen real
despair: and the vision of it appalled her.

She did not look out of the window again:—and the
Magic Train passed on.



CHAPTER VI.

THICK-RIBBED ICE.

“To reside
in thrilling regions of thick-ribbed ice.”
—SHAKESPEARE,

NCE more the train began to slacken its speed: and

() Eileen, looking from the windows, observed that
they were coming into another station. The fairy-
porters rang their bells: and shouted the station’s name :—
“THE YEAR OF OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND EIGHT
HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIVE.” Our travellers again
found the faithful eaglets waiting for them. “Bear us,
sweet creatures” said Titania “to the Arctic Seas.” Away
they flew forthwith: and stayed not until they had set
down their passengers, on a white bleak promontory in the
heart of the Land of Ice. Attendant fairies clothed them
with soft warm furs: and a blazing fire burst forth, by
Magic, at the side of them. Thus Eileen herself was warm:
and yet she wondered how any creature could live in such
a clime, if no fairy-porters were at hand. Nowhere, save at
the very spot where the car had halted, did there seem to
be any possibility of warmth whatever. All around were

57



58 Thick= Ribbed: lee: ce

spread the waters of an endless ocean, more than three-
quarters whereof were wholly frozen up: and, where there
was unfrozen sea, mountainous icebergs were drifting about
therein, not without frequent collisions terrible to see. But
in very truth nature had taken care of the birds and beasts,
who lived in these chill climes, almost as well as the Fairy
Queen had taken care of her own favourite. And this
Eileen soon perceived, when she began to look about her.
The fowls of the air were clothed with the most luxurious
furs: their necks were wrapped about with wool: their
whole bodies were protected by warm raiment: and their
legs and feet were covered with natural stockings of thick
hair. The four-footed beasts were arrayed just as were the
birds: and the intense cold seemed to give them positive
enjoyment. Have you ever seen the poor Polar Bear at
the Zoological Gardens, pacing up and down the whole
day long in his narrow prison, and seeming even in winter
to find our England intolerably hot? Well, Eileen saw
him in his Arctic home: roaming whithersoever he pleased.
He was happy there, and shambled gaily along, delighting
in the hoar-frost and the ice. So it was with all the beasts
that inhabited that land, in the middle of what the
geography-books call the “ Frigid Zone.” It is one of the
laws of nature that all living animals are dressed in the
fashion which is best suited to the clime in which they live.
“Can then human beings live here at all?” asked Eileen.
“The men” said Titania “who were born here and whose
fathers’ fathers lived in the Arctic regions are fitted by



V1] Thick-Ribbed Ice. 59

nature, as the birds and beasts are fitted, to endure the
cold. Look at their skins, their hair and their whole
bodies” :—and Eileen followed the direction in which the
Fairy Queen's finger pointed, and saw the strange native
people of the place. “Are those the Esquimaux?” she
asked. “They are” Titania said. And indeed they had
the same look about them that all other living things had
in this corner of the world: a look of comfortable warmth
in the midst of the penetrating cold. “Oh!” said Eileen
“what would the men of Europe do, if they were here?
They were never born to endure this fearful cold. If they
came hither, they would surely die.” “Alas!” said the
Queen “my mind tells me that your foreboding is all too
true. There are Europeans here to-day: brave strong-
hearted men, once strong-bodied too. But the terrors of
this country are beyond their strength. We will go and
see how they fare in this cruel land.” Eileen was over-
whelmed with astonishment at the news which the Queen
had told her. “Europeans here?” she said. “What men
of Europe could be so bold or foolish as to come to this
place, when they might stay safe and warm at home?
They must be mad. From what land do they come?”
“They come from England”: said the Fairy Queen:
“and they are NOT mad. If they had come from mere
idle curiosity, they would be so. But they came with
their brave hearts, because they hoped to help mankind
thereby. They came to discover that which would be

a boon to mariners the whole world over—the north-



60 Thick-Ribbed Ice. [Cu

west passage to the other hemisphere. They used all
possible precautions: and hoped to surmount all obstacles.
Though nature had not given them thick woolly skins
and hair, science and art could clothe them in such fashion
as to imitate the advantages which nature has given to
the Esquimaux. The birds and beasts of Arctic regions
have to pay dearly for their coats of fur. For man kills
the poor creatures, that he may clothe himself in. the
raiment of which he has despoiled them. So, for that
matter, these men are well provided. Is it not moreover
worth while to undergo much personal trouble and pain—
is it not even worth while to meet a death bravely
suffered—to help the whole world to new advantages?
It is fortunate that all men are not content to sit ‘safe and
warm’ at home. Come with me, and I will show you a
hero: who is willing to suffer death to satisfy the object
of his life.”

In a moment Eileen found herself standing on the
deck of Her Majesty’s ship Eredus. And it was with
great joy that she hailed the sight of this vessel: whose
appearance reminded her at once of Europe and of the
comforts enjoyed in our own Temperate Zone. She was
a glorious ship, fitted with all the gear and machinery
of modern times—a ship which had done good service
in the Queen’s Navy, and which had weathered a thousand
dangers successfully. But now she was useless for the
purpose with which she had been’ builded:. she would
never sail again: for she was fast bound in the ¢hzck-



(70 face p. 60.

SHIPS IN THE ARCTIC REGIONS,





VL] Thick-Ribbed Ice, 61

ribbed ice, and gripped with a deadly embrace. It was
a grievous disappointment to the sailors who were on
board of her: for although they knew that they were
close to the north-west passage, which they had come
to seek, they also knew that their vessel could never
now go through that passage. It was a hard fortune
to come so near success and yet to fail. “Come” said
Titania “let us go below: and you shall see a man
whom you will never forget. It is the dying Franklin.”
Eileen went below: and they entered the cabin, where
the hero’s death-bed was. There lay the commander of
the expedition at the last moment of his life. “Alas!”
he said feebly: “I am too old: I am not strong enough
to fight any longer against the chilling climate of this
Arctic land. I am worn out: and I must die. But that
is not the worst. What most troubles me is that I have
failed in the purpose of my life. The north-west passage
is not yet discovered.” At this moment the cabin-door
softly opened: and one of his officers came in, who had
just returned to the ship from a long expedition made
to explore the neighbouring country. “Be of a good
cheer” said the new-comer. “You have not failed. I
come to you at this moment to tell you that the north-
west passage IS discovered. I and my men have
searched it out and found it. And the glory of the dis-
covery is yours: for it was you who brought us to the
place.” Franklin’s face at this intelligence was right
glorious to behold. “Thank God!” he said: “I die



62 Thick-Ribbed Ice. [Cu

happy.” And, saying this, he yielded up his spirit and
fell asleep.

His was a happy death:—such a death as one would
wish for a hero. He died at the very moment, when the
object of his life had been fulfilled: and he did not have
to face the horrors which fell upon his comrades after-
wards. For it came to pass, that, although the north-
west passage was discovered, yet none of those who were
with Franklin on this voyage lived to tell the tale. They
had written their short story on a scrap of paper: and
put this scrap of paper in a bottle. This bottle remained
whole, when they were turned to dust: and was found
by friendly Englishmen. The scrap of paper in the bottle
was the last trusty news of Franklin and his brave followers,
which his mourners in England ever had. (Now Franklin
had a loving wife to mourn him : besides friends innumer-
able at home.)

Of the last days of Franklin’s followers no news ever
came to Europe. Some of their skeletons were found,
and their sledge: and some of their other tools and
possessions. No man in Europe ever saw the men them-
selves alive again. But Eileen saw them:—saw them as
they stood mourning their great chief:—saw them sadly
bury him:—saw them, after vainly waiting for the ice
to melt and set their vessels free, at last abandon their
ships and march with their sledge across the fields of ice,
in search of a friendly continent :—saw them fall sick:—saw

them drop and faint by the way :—saw them starve :—and



VL] Thick-Ribbed Ice. 63

saw them die—even to the last man of their company.
And the Fairy Queen said :—‘“It is well. The death of
these men is a blessed death. For they died bravely
striving to do a great thing, which would help all
mankind.” And Eileen recognised the truth of her saying :
and understood that it is better to die in pursuit of a noble
object as Franklin died, than to sit “safe and warm” at
home in selfishness.

Eileen took a last look at the never-to-be-forgotten
Land of Ice, with its strange natives and its curious beasts
and birds: and she felt its chill blasts sweep for the last
time over them, as she bade farewell to the old Polar Bear
upon a snowy peak.

* * * * *

Then, reascending the car of the golden eaglets, she

was wafted back again to the Magic Railway.



CHAPTER VII.

FIERY FLOODS.

“To bathe in fiery floods.’—SHAKESPEARE.

RITERS of all ages—those at least who dwell in
\ \ the “Temperate Zone”—seem to have agreed
with Shakespeare in thinking that the worst
tortures imaginable are first the hottest of heat and then
the coldest of cold :—
“to bathe in fiery floods, or to reside
in thrilling regions of thick-ribbed ice.”
Milton describing the tortures of the inhabitants of Hell
tells us that they

“starve in ice their soft ethereal warmth.”

And Dante, who wanted, when describing the place he
called “Inferno,” to picture the most awful torments which
could be conceived, wrote what he thought most horrible :
and it was this :—
“Woe to you wicked spirits. Hope not
ever to see the sky again. I come
to take you to the other shore across

into eternal darkness, there to dwell
in fierce heat and in ice!”

64



Cu. VIL] Fiery Floods. 65

Eileen had been to the land whose natives “reside
in thrilling regions of thick-ribbed ice”: and now at the
next station “THE YEAR OF OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND
EIGHT HUNDRED AND FORTY-ONE” she was taken in the
car of the golden eaglets to a land where all nature seemed
to “bathe in fiery floods”! She herself was protected
by the fairies as before from the horrors of the fearful
climate, to which she was come. For she found herself
clothed mysteriously in airy fabrics and fanned with the
coolest breezes—all by that same magic which in the land
of ice had made her warm. Here again too she noticed
that the men and animals who were born in the place had
been fitted by nature to endure the climate. And the
same creatures, which she had seen, in the Zoological
Gardens, covered with blankets and warmed by stoves and
hot-water pipes, even in our most scorching summers, were
here at home: and basked in contented nakedness beneath
the blazing sun, which shines in the “ Torrid Zone.”

But for the men of Europe, unaccustomed to such a
clime, the heat was fully as terrible as the cold had been
in the Arctic lands:—a thing whereof Eileen was soon
made aware. The poets are right in this. There are
no more fearful tortures to the human body than these
tortures of ice and fiery floods. “Where are we?” said
Eileen as she looked about her. We are standing on
the earth’s equator” answered the Fairy Queen. Eileen
looked at her feet: half expecting to see the equator

drawn there, as it is drawn in the map. But she soon

5



66 Fiery Floods, - [Cu

remembered that it is an altogether imaginary line: and
asked another question. “What country then is this?”
she said. “It is Darkest Africa” the Queen answered.
“Come, let us explore it.”

“ Why do you call it ‘Darkest’ Africa?” asked Eileen :
for the fiery floods that poured down from the sun blazed
oftentimes with brilliant light. “Because it is the land
of the heathen”: said the Fairy Queen: “in whose minds
there is no light.” And Eileen, wandering about the
country, soon understood that these were indeed “the
people that walked in darkness”! Among them were
those who filled her oftentimes with horror unspeakable :
those who deliberately killed men and women of a like flesh
and blood with themselves, as a sacrifice upon the altars of
their heathen gods: those who slew the old and weakly
because they said there was not food in plenty sufficient
for everyone: and those who led the life of cannibals—
most terrible of all to see—whose hideous doings were
beheld in open day, shameless and remorseless. Yet even
among these wretches the Fairy Queen at times found
things to show her favourite, which were beautiful and
good. There was much that gave hope of better things
to come, when the days of darkness should be passed.

Africa interested Eileen very’ much. She would have
thought it worth while to go there, if only to see its birds
and beasts and fishes. Hundreds of creatures which before
she had seen only in menageries or read of in natural-

history books were now shown to her in their own homes:



VIL] Fiery Floods. 67

and moreover they never started away at her presence, nor
showed any sign of alarm, for they knew that Titania and
her friends would never do them aharm. Bright-coloured
birds were there: green yellow-shouldered parrots and
guinea-fowl: ostriches and black vultures. Sharks swam
in the seas: and scorpions crept upon the earth. The long-
necked giraffe, the striped zebra, and the fierce rhinoceros
each in his turn walked up most trustfully to be admired,
when the Fairy Queen and Eileen came near. They saw
the mother hippopotamus, carrying her young ones on
her neck: they saw mighty buffaloes and lions fighting
in desperate conflict one with another. Eileen liked the
lion best of all the animals. “He really is the king of
beasts” said she. “The books are right which told me so.”

One night, while they were in South Africa, they went to
the side of a water-pond: and sat there together in the
foliage of a thick-leaved tree. It was a moonlit evening:
and for a short space all was still. Then there was the
roar of lions: and soon a troop of them came to the water’s
edge to drink. When their thirst was satisfied they lay
there still awhile: and seemed as though about to sleep.
But in a few minutes Eileen heard the lowing of cattl—
not very far off. “The sound comes from the village of
Mabotza” said the Queen. And hardly had she spoken
when the lions made it manifest that they too had heard
it: for they started up, and rushed away, roaring, to seek
their meat !

Our travellers followed: and found the lions doing great



68 Fiery Floods. TC.

havoc in the pens. It was a fearful slaughter. When
they had had enough, they withdrew again: and came toa
small hill, covered with trees. There Eileen and Titania
tarried: watching their majestic slumber, until the sun was
risen high in the heavens.

And now the owners of the cattle were seen coming to
avenge themselves upon the midnight robbers : a troop of
negro savages armed with spears. The men made them-
selves into a circle round the hill. Eileen watched the
lions with deepening interest. They looked a formidable
enemy to attack with spears: and at first she could not
see that they had any other weapons. All of a sudden
however she heard the crack of a rifle! and quickly
perceived that one lion, who had been sitting on a little
tock behind a bush, was wounded. “He is shot”: cried
the savages: “he is shot.” Eileen saw his tail erected
in anger for one moment: then with a fearful rush he
bounded forward and sprang upon the man, who had fired
the shot. Growling horribly, he shook him, as Eileen had
seen Teazer shake a rat. At this instant another shot
was fired. The lion turned to attack his new enemy: and
bit him in the thigh. But just then the bullets, which
the lion had received, took effect : and the great monster
fell down dead.

Eileen looked to the place where the man was, whom
she had first seen beneath the lion’s dreadful paw: and
to her astonishment she saw that it was a white man.
“That is he” Titania said “who is to bring Light to the



VIL] Fiery Floods. 69

Dark Continent. He has come from England, on purpose
to preach the Christian Gospel to men who had never even
heard of it before. If the lion had slain him, Africa
had lost her truest friend. But Heaven in its mercy
spared him.” “Who is it?” asked Eileen. The Queen
answered :—“ It is David Livingstone!”

And from that moment Titania and Eileen followed the
fortunes of this great missionary for many a long day.
He underwent great perils in his work of love: not only
perils from beasts of prey: but other perils too: perils
from hostile savages, who did not know that he was
their friend: perils of every sort by land and water: and,
worst of all, the perils of the fiery floods which poured
down ever more fiercely from the sky as he pierced his
way farther and farther through unhealthy swamps and
swollen rivers into the “Torrid Zone.” “The climate of
Africa” said Titania “is killing Livingstone, as surely
as the Arctic climate killed Sir John Franklin.” But it
was a slower matter in this case. Eileen never saw the
death of Livingstone: which happened some years later,
when the rising waters overtook him: and, after making
a long vain journey to escape them, carried on the backs
of his native followers, he fell a victim to the weakness
which the climate of the land of fiery floods had wrought
in him.

Titania did not choose that they should wait in Africa
so long as that: but they waited long enough to under-

stand the dangers which Livingstone was facing, and



70 Fiery Floods. [Cu.

long enough to understand also the reason why he faced
them. On a day, while they were following him, he
met a woman called Manenko,—who was a chieftainess
in Africa. Manenko was the sort of woman, whom, if
you once saw, you would not easily forget.

She was young, tall, and, for one of her people, hand-
some: her black skin was painted with red ochre: iron
ornaments were hung about her, which in Africa were
considered as precious as diamonds are in London: and
charms innumerable adorned her person too, amulets
which she thought would keep the evil spirits off and
bring her good luck of every kind. For she was very
superstitious. When this Manenko met Livingstone she
liked him well: and offered to take him to her uncle the
Shinté, who was a sort of king in those parts. Two men
accompanied her, one on each side: the man on her right
hand was her husband: and the other was her drummer,
who made strange music as.they passed along! She had
numerous servants withal.

This strange company, with Livingstone under their
protection, came to the kingdom of the Shinté. The
wretched people in this place worshipped an ugly idol,
made of grass and clay, with cowry-shells for eyes: some-
thing like a lion and something like a crocodile. Think!
It is a sober fact. Eileen saw them, with her own eyes,
bowing down and worshipping this thing. It was their
religion :—they had never heard of any other. Eileen

could not understand what they could see in this frightful



VIL] Fiery Floods. 71

object, that they worshipped it. But Titania said :—
“They worship it, because they think it beautiful and
good. You may say that it is absurd to call it beautiful
and meaningless to call it good. Yet there may be some-
thing beautiful and good in their rude faith, which you
cannot understand. They want to worship something and
to pray to something to give them what is good for them :
but they know not what to worship. It is Livingstone’s
high privilege to preach to them the true religion!”

Manenko fell ill: and was unable herself to present
the missionary to her uncle. Sambaza her husband under-
took to do so in her stead. “Come with me” he said:
and he led the way to the place where the Shinté was
waiting with his assembled court. He himself sat beneath
a tree on a throne of leopard’s skin: he had on a checked
jacket and a kilt of scarlet and green: he wore heavy
ornaments of iron on his arms and chest, and anklets of
copper on his ankles—things of priceless value in that
land: on his head he wore a helmet made of beads and
crowned with a great bunch of goose-feathers. Close to
him sat three lads with large sheaves of arrows on their
shoulders.

Sambaza and his followers clapped their hands when
they came into the Shinté’s presence :—this was to show
their respect for him. They rubbed their chests and arms
with . ashes :—that was to show that the meeting was
a friendly one. The soldiers, fully armed, made fierce

grimaces at Livingstone to frighten him: and pretended



72 Fiery Floods, [Cu

that they were going to attack him: but he sat still and
showed them that he was not afraid. Then they ceased
from doing these things.

Then Sambaza, who was gaily dressed, stalked back-
wards and forwards in front of the Shinté and told them
everything, which Manenko and he had been able to learn,
of Livingstone: how the Bible, which he had come to
teach them, was a word from Heaven: and how the white
man wanted the tribes to live in peace. It was very doubt-
ful, he said, whether the white man was telling the truth or
not: probably he was not. But the Shinté was usually
kind to strangers: and he hoped that he would be kind
to the white man. Thus spake Sambaza: but he did not
at all understand that Livingstone was doing a far greater
kindness to the negroes than they could repay to him.

Behind the Shinté sat about a hundred women: dressed
in red baize. The chief wife of the Shinté sat in front:
with a curious red cap upon her head. During the
intervals between the speeches, these women burst forth
into a kind of plaintive ditty : but Eileen could not make
out whether it was in praise of the speaker, or of the
Shinté, or of themselves. They often clapped their hands
and shouted with delight, when anything was said which
pleased them.

Curious drums and wooden instruments of music were
played by the Shinté’s band from time to time. Nine
speeches were made: and the tenth was the speech of the

Shinté himself, who was very dignified and condescending.



VIL] Fiery Floods. 73

Then Livingstone stood up and preached the Christian
faith: and the negroes thought that they were being very
kind in listening to what he said. They did not at first
appear much interested: but the magic-lantern, which he
showed them afterwards, with little pictures on a sheet,
excited them immensely. It seemed to them a miracle:
for they could not conceive what caused the bright
pictures to come and go at the white man’s desire.

In this way the Gospel first came to the land of the
Shinté, as to so many other regions of the Dark Continent.
Eileen left Livingstone sitting under a graceful tree called
a banian, so to obtain such shelter as he could from the
fiery floods which came in torrents from the African sun:
she knew that the climate of Africa was to cause his
death at the last, as it had already caused him cruel pain
in life. But she could not wish it otherwise. The pain and
the death were not for nothing, nor for a little purpose.
For he had caused the great Light to be seen of the
people that walked in darkness. And for that, Africa,
through countless centuries, will do honour to his name.

And Titania and Eileen went back to the station.
In their after-wanderings they experienced many fierce
extremes of heat and cold: but never so startling a change
as when they came from the Arctic regions to the land of
Africa.



74 Eileen’s Journey. (Cu.

And as the train passed on, they saw the usual shifting
scenes of war and peace. But they also saw some persons
and things, whose likeness was not to be seen in every
age, but which Eileen always remembers as peculiar to
this little bit of the line. |

Such, for one, was the setting-free of all the negro-slaves
throughout the British Empire. Eileen was astounded at:
the frantic joy of the men and women, who had been
whipped and driven and used merely as living tools for
untold centuries: when they heard that they were their
own masters and would never have to work again without
a wage, and that the mothers could never have their
children sold away from them any more, nor the men
have their wives stolen from their side. It was a thing
never to be forgotten.

The next great event along this line was the glimpse,
which they had in passing, of Beethoven, the best of
composers and the chief pride of Germany. Simply to
have seen the face and forehead of Beethoven, when he
was at work, was a recollection for Eileen in her after-
years, which many would have envied her. But she almost
forgot the sight of him, in listening to his music.- And,
when she found that he was deaf, and that, while all the
world was ravished with his music, he could not hear a
note of it himself, she thought it was one of the saddest
things which she had ever known.

Then again, through the silver cloud, she had a vision

of Lord Byron’s death. Byron had loved the country of



VIL] Eileen’s Journey. 75

Greece: and had written noble poems for its sake. And
now he gave his life for the liberty of Greece. Why?
Because, he said, Greece was a country of past glories:
and it was a shame that its glories should not rise again.
The Greeks were at war for their liberty: wherefore he
joined their cause, and there he met his death.

Eileen asked. Titania to tell her all about the past
glories of which Lord Byron had spoken. “Ah! my dear
Eileen” she said—“you shall see these things later on,
along our backward journey, for yourself. The country
of Greece has another and a lovelier name, the name of
Hellas. This was its name in the days of old: and its
people. were known as Hellenes. In those days we fairies
were called gods and goddesses: and all the ideas of
men were somewhat different. Byron says rightly that
they were days of glory: you will say so when you see
them and Hellas for yourself.”

And, before the next station at which they were to get
out, the train stopped once again: and Eileen, through the
crevice in the cloud, saw two other poets, not one whit
less great than Byron: and heard them speak together.

The first was the wild-eyed Shelley: very young and
beautiful. At first Eileen thought he must be mad: he
said such strange unusual things, and was altogether unlike
other men. But soon the music of words, that seemed
to flow from his brain, compelled her to listen with the
deepest admiration: as the whole world is listening even

now that he is dead.



76 Eileen’s Journey. [Cu. VIL

The other was his friend John Keats: who made the
loveliness of nature more lovely by his poetry.

Eileen heard these men also speak of Hellas and agree
with Lord Byron, that there was glorious beauty in the
past days of its liberty and ought to be again. And from
this day Eileen longed impatiently for the time, when
they should go to ancient Hellas, and she might see
that glory for herself. She was right to look forward to
it: for no other country had ever such rich thoughts of
beauty or such enchanting fairy-tales, as ancient Hellas
had.







PERCIVAL SKELTON de?,] (To face p. 77.
BRUSSELS,



CHAPTER VIII.

THE SIGNAL SOUND OF STRIFE.

“Last noon beheld them full of lusty life :
last eve in Beauty’s circle proudly gay:
the midnight brought the signal sound of strife,
the morn the marshalling in arms, the day
battle’s magnificently stern array.”

—Byron.

T was some while before they stopped again: and
Eileen, looking from the window, saw that they had
traversed a distance of several years since their last

halting-place. It was now THE YEAR OF OUR LORD
ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND FIFTEEN. Our
travellers went to Brussels: and arrived there on the
evening of the fifteenth of June, when it was already dark.
Eileen followed Titania through several streets, until
they came to a small and unpretentious-looking house in a
quiet corner of the city. “This house” said the Fairy
Queen “is at present tenanted by the widow of an English
officer, who was killed at the battle of Corunna. And she
is at present in Brussels on a business-matter :—connected
with some papers belonging to his regiment, which were
found upon him after his death. Her daughter Lilian is
77



78 The Signal Sound of Strife. [c«

here with her: and she is going to her first ball to-night—
the Duchess of Richmond’s ball. It is now six years since
the death of her father: and a great lady has insisted on
taking Lilian in her own carriage to this festivity. Say,
shall we two go with them” asked Titania “ wrapped
about as usual by’ a cloud of invisibility?” Of course
Eileen assented: and so they went together to Lilian’s
chamber, where she was dressing for the ball. The last
touches were being put, as our travellers entered the room.
Lilian was a very pretty girl: just seventeen years old:
English every inch of her: light as the air: delicately
made: her cheeks just tinged with a faint pink colour:
with soft wavy hair: a sort of brittle-looking beauty, like
a rare piece of old china. She was dressed in light blue:
a simple gown, but one which was very appropriate to her
form. The soft wavy hair already referred to was having
the best attention of her maid, a damsel cunning in such
things: who was doing all that she knew how to do to
complete the work of art, which nature had so well begun.
Eileen was not enthusiastic about the beauty of this
Lilian: for Lilian stood beside Titania, and who would
be enthusiastic about the pale hue of the blue-bell, if it
bloomed beside the glory of a summer rose? But none of
Lilian’s partners would see the Fairy Queen: and Eileen
felt sure that the Duchess of Richmond’s ball would boast
no fairer flower than the soldier's orphan daughter, with
whom she was to go. And now the great lady’s carriage

was at the door. In the twinkling of an eye Lilian was



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ETLEEN’S -JQURNEY

_ HISTORY IN FAIRYLAND


MRS. ADRIAN HOPE deé.] (Frontispiece.
TITANIA, THE FAIRY QUEEN.
EILEEN’S JOURNEY

HISTORY IN FAIRYLAND

By ERNEST ARTHUR JELF, M.A.

WITH A FRONTISPIECE BY MRS. ADRIAN HOPE AND NUMEROUS
OTHER ILLUSTRATIONS

POPULAR EDITION

LONDON ,
JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET
: 1899
NOTE.

Tue Author wishes to express his gratitude to his sister, Miss Evelyn
Jelf, for the invaluable help which she has given him in this book by
undertaking the arduous labours of an amanuensis. He is also greatly
indebted to different other friends—too numerous for particular mention—
who have afforded him assistance of many kinds in the preparation of

the work.



Printed by Hazell, Watson, & Viney, Ld., London and Aylesbury,
PREFACE.

TO PARENTS AND ELDERS.

HE preface ts the only part of this book that ts
NOT zntended for children. Everything else which
zs contained within tts two covers is addressed To
Cuitpren in the first place of all: so that the Author
well there be satisfied. if he meet the wants of children.
There tt is children’s approval that he has tried to win,
but here he wishes to explain the principle of his book
to those parents and elders, who can place the book in
children's hands, or read it aloud while children listen.
The story of “Exleen’s Journey” is a fairy-tale in
form: but in substance it ts an attempt to gather together
Jrom past history and legend in various ages of the world
a number of the best stories, which children ought to know.
The Author therefore feels that he may fairly be asked upon
what principle the selection ts based. For the stories may
seem at first sight to have been chosen entirely at hap-

hazard. The selection has not been based upon historical

Vv
vi Preface.

zmportance: some of the scenes introduced are of great
and some of ttle historical importance. Nor has the
Author tried to represent every age and people at equal
length and with equal emphasis: on the contrary he has
dwelt far more strongly upon some of them than upon
others. Chronological proportion has not been an object
with him: nor yet the deep. political significance of these
past experiences of mankind.

What then has been the principle underlying the
. selection? While the story of “ Ezleen’s Journey” deals, as
has been said, with past history in various ages of the
world, yet the thread of a single fairy tale—with a single
governing tdea—is woven through the whole. LEzleen’s
magic journey, in which she travels through the centuries
as mortals travel through space, is a journey made in search
of beauty and goodness: and, although the scenes are
varied as much as possible—war alternating with peace,
and art with science—the supreme object ts never left out
of sight. All sorts and conditions of men and women pass
before Etleen’s eyes as she journeys back. Warriors from
fLavelock and the Duke of Wellington to Jeanne Dare and
Richard Coeur-de-Lion and Brian Borotmhe: adventurers
and explorers from Sir John Franklin to Columbus:
champions of freedom from the Bastille mob and the
Concord farmers to Wilhelm Tell and the daughter of
O Melachlin, King of Meath: monarchs from the ill-fated
Preface. vii

Louis XVI. to Elizabeth and her rival, Mary Queen of
Scots, and back to the many-storied Haroun Alraschid,

Khaliph of Bagdad: artists of all descriptions from Shelley

and Byron and Beethoven to Shakespeare and Michel Angelo

and Dante: heroines of romance from Flora McDonald

to Berengaria of Navarre and the golden-haired Queen

Guenever : reformers of the world from the Pilgrim Fathers

to Mohammed, the Prophet of Arabia: preachers of the

true Gospel from David Livingstone to Saint Patrick. And

—besides all these—Eileen has a fleeting vision of the

Christ Himself: though the story of that Life—without

parallel, because Divine—ts told only in the pictures which

recall its chiéf moments to mind. In each and all of these,

Jrom the lowest to the Highest, the object sought. for has

been always one and the same—the Idea of whatever is:
most beautiful and best.

By the scheme of his story, the Author has had a world
of beauty, from which to borrow as he writes. In lke
manner he has endeavoured to select from the world of art
such subjects as seem best suited to illustrate his story, and
best calculated to convey to the mind of the reader some
beautiful idea.

In a word, then, the task which the Author here attempts
zs the adaptation of old-world stories to the purpose of this
new “fairy-tale.” The Idea of the good is to be all in all.

If any story—or any picture—or any notion, from what-
vill Preface.

ever source derived, has been in any measure suttable from
this point of view (however unimportant from all other
points of view), the Author has not hesitated to make use
of wt. Every country, every age, every faith has probably
something of the beautiful and good: and we should seek
to find zt everywhere—even in the most unlikely places.

And now, tf tt be lawful to compare small things with
great, the beautiful words, with which an old Hebrew
writer approached the conclusion of his magnificent work,
may not tnaptly be adopted here as the Author's parting
words :—

“And, tf I have done well and as ts fitting the story,
zt ts that which I desived: but, tf slenderly and meanly,

it ts ‘that which I could attain unto.”
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.
CHAINED TO TIME

Telling how Eileen wished that she could travel back into the
centuries of the past.

CHAPTER II.
THE CHARIOT OF THE FAIRY QUEEN

Telling how the beautiful Titania came to grant her wish.

CHAPTER III.
TO THE DARK, TO THE PAST, TO THE DEAD

Telling how Eileen started upon her journey and how her dog
Teazer came with her.
CHAPTER IV.
PITY AND PEACE AND LOVE . .

Telling of the nature and objects of the journey.

CHAPTER V.
OUR BANNER OF ENGLAND

Telling how, when Eileen was come to the years of the Indian
Mutiny, she visited Lucknow and stayed throughout the siege.

CHAPTER VI.
TTHICK-RIBBED ICE

Telling how Eileen saw the death of Sir John Franklin on the
Arctic seas.

ix

PAGE

19

28

35

57
x ~ Contents.

CHAPTER VII.
FIERY FLOODS. : : .

Telling how Eileen witnessed the work of David Livingstone in
Africa.

CHAPTER VIII.
THE SIGNAL SOUND OF STRIFE . : .

Telling how Eileen was present at the Duchess of Richmond’s
ball in Brussels on. the eve of the Battle of Quatre Bras.

CHAPTER IX.
THE DEATH OF KINGS . . . . ; 7

Telling how Eileen followed the unhappy fortunes of the Royal
Family of France in the time of the Revolution.

CHAPTER X.
THE EMBATTLED FARMERS .

Telling of what Eileen saw and heard in America when the War
of Independence first broke out.

CHAPTER XI.
OVER THE SEA TO SKYE

Telling how Eileen watched the adventures of Prince Charles
Edward and Flora McDonald.

.

CHAPTER XII.
THE UNDAUNTED FEW .

Telling how Eileen became acquainted with the reasons which
caused the Pilgrim Fathers to sail for America.

CHAPTER XIII.
THE PLAY .

Telling of Eileen’s play-going in the days of Queen Elizabeth and
of what she learned about that sovereign.

PAGE

77

go

II7

130

166
Contents.

CHAPTER XIV.
THE FORCING OF WRATH .

Telling how Eileen came to Ireland in the reign of King Henry

VIII, and of the persecution which its people suffered under
his rule.

CHAPTER XV.
THAT SHADOWY SHORE.

Telling of Eileen’s voyage with Columbus, when that great dis-
coverer sailed to the New World.

CHAPTER XVI.
YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND

Telling how Eileen saw the difficulties which Michel Angelo had
to meet before he could become a painter.

CHAPTER XVII.
AS THOUGH IT WERE A JOY TO DIE

Telling how Eileen witnessed the triumph and the martyrdom
of the Maid of Orleans.

CHAPTER XVIII.
THE SECOND ARROW

Telling how Eileen was a spectator of the feats of Wilhelm Tell.

CHAPTER XIX.

THE REASON OF THE NAME OF BEATRICE

Telling how Eileen was present at the first meeting of Dante and
Beatrice. -

CHAPTER XX.
LADY BERENGARE

Telling how Eileen watched the fortunes of Berengaria of Navarre,
the Consort of King Richard I.

PAGE

193

224

237

273
XU Contents.

CHAPTER XXI.
THE GLORIES OF BRIAN THE BRAVE

Telling how Eileen had the sight of the Battle of Clontarf and of
the death of King Brian Boroimhe.

CHAPTER XXII.
A POWER OF LIFE AND DEATH

Telling how Eileen beheld the Khaliph Haroun Alraschid face
to face.

CHAPTER XXIII.
REVENGE ON A TYRANT

Telling how Eileen sailed to Ireland and saw the revenge which
O’Melachlin, King of Meath, took upon Turgés, the wicked
Dane.

CHAPTER XXIV.
OBEDIENT TO THE LIGHT

Telling how Eileen travelled in Arabia and of the Flight of the
Prophet Mohammed.

CHAPTER XXvV.
ONE GOOD CUSTOM

Telling how Eileen accompanied King Arthur and the Knights
of the Round Table upon different adventures.

CHAPTER XXVI.
TARA’S HALLS .

Telling how Eileen was present in the Halls of King Leogaire
at Tara on the coming of Saint Patrick.

CHAPTER XXVII.
CHRISTMAS .

In which the pictures tell the story that is too great for words.

PAGE

300

310

326

332

352

372

385
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

TITANIA, THE FAIRY QUEEN Frontispiece
(From a drawing by Mrs. Adrian Hope.)

TEAZER . 7 7 : : Facing page 24
(From a are by E Hillis & Cee

THE RELIEF OF LUCKNOW ‘i : ” » 53
(From the picture by T. J. Barker.)

SHIPS IN THE ARCTIC REGIONS . . . yy ” 60
(From the original by W. Westall, A.R.A., made for

“ Franklin’s Travels.”)

BRUSSELS . : : . ” » 77

(From a drawing by Percival Skelton, mae ‘for “ Childe
Harold.”)
LOUIS XVI. AND HIS FAMILY IN THE PRISON OF THE
TEMPLE . . oo LIE

(From the picture E. M. Ward, R. R.A)

PRINCE CHARLES EDWARD ; . ‘ 1 yi A3T
(From the portrait by Nicolas Largiltiore in the National

Portrait Gallery.)

THE DEPARTURE OF THE PILGRIM FATHERS a ” 163
(From the picture by C. W. Coke, R.A.)

THE DAWN OF AMERICA . . . : ” ” “219
(From the picture by J. W. M. Turner, R.A.)

THE TOMB OF LORENZO II. . - oy » 233
(By Michel Angelo.)

JEANNE DARC . 2 : i » 248

(From the statue by Fremiet in the Rue de - Rivoli Parts.)

xiii
Xiv List of Illustrations.

RICHARD CCUR-DE-LION . . e a . : Facing page 295
(From the statue by Marochetti at Westminster.)

BRIAN BOROIMHE . : : ; : : : ie 302
(After J. F. O’Hea.)

HAROUN ALRASCHID, GIAFAR AND MESRUR 3 » 316
(From.an engraving by T. Dalziel.)

THE INFANT CHRIST : : : : : . Following page 388
(From the picture by Giampietrino.)

THE CRUCIFIXION . : mes PEEP cp See aed : " » 388

(From the picture by Schongauer.)

““NOLI ME TANGERE.” CHRIST APPEARING TO THE
MAGDALEN . : ; i oe ; : : 388

(From the picture by Titian.)
EILEEN’S JOURNEY.



CHAPTER I.

CHAINED TO TIME.

“But I am chained to time and cannot thence depart.” —SHELLEy.

N the far west of Ireland there is an old ruin, which
is all that remains of the great mansion once called
Clonderalaw Castle. It stands on the top of a hill,

overhanging the river Shannon, which is probably the
lovelicst piece of water in the whole wide world. It is
a most picturesque old place—and, among the scattered
stones of it, on the day that this story begins, there lay
a little girl just twelve years old, with large beautiful blue
eyes and golden hair, that fell in pretty ringlets about
her neck. She was lying flat upon the ground. beneath
the shadow of a big holly-tree—intently interested in
the book that she was reading: and close by her side
her favourite dog—a little rough-coated terrier—was out-
stretched. The name of the fair child was Eileen O’Ryan:
and she was the youngest daughter of a popular land-
I

“8
2 Chained to Time. [Cu.

owner, who lived in the neighbourhood. Her brother, a
few years older than herself, was for a great part of the
year away at school in England, and, even in the holidays,
was often, as to-day, engaged in some sport, which she
could not share: while the rest of her family were busily
occupied with various important duties at home or abroad.
She was therefore very often left quite alone: save for the
company of her little dog on the one hand and her story-
books on the other. j

Eileen was very fond of reading. She would read in
her bed before she was called in the early morning. Often
she came down to breakfast with her book in her hand:
and could hardly be induced to say so much as “good
morning” to anyone, when the book was really interesting.
At such times she was most strangely blind and deaf
to everything that was going on in the room: and her
tea would get cold, while she was “just finishing the
chapter.” She read an enormous number of books: and
was always ready for more. She read them very quickly,
and could devour a dozen of them in a single week :—
not (as in some cases happens) because she read care-
lessly or incompletely, but because her quick under-
standing and long-continued practice enabled her to read
and grasp the meaning much more rapidly than another
would. Never was any child more devoted to reading
than was Eileen O’Ryan: and her father and mother were
very glad that it was so. They said it “kept her quiet”:
and indeed it did. In fact it kept her so quiet that
L] Chained to Time. 3

she never stirred for hours while she read: but she would
lie as now, still turning page after page, as happy as the
day is long,—only stopping occasionally to speak her
thoughts to her little dog, as she pondered over the stories
that she read, or to gaze awhile into the deep blue river
below her and watch the ships that passed along it,
fondly imagining them full of heroes such as her story-
books described—bold pirates, brave sailors, and great
adventurers of every kind.

It was now four o'clock on a hot summer afternoon :
her lessons were over for the day: and, after a brisk
canter on her pony over one of her father’s fields—
(Eileen was a very good rider)—she became rather tired,
and consequéntly felt that she was now free to roam
lazily whithersoever she pleased: and this old ruin was.
her favourite resort. So it came about that she lay down
there: and became closely fastened to what she was
reading, as already described. She read on thus for an
hour or so, till she had finished her book. To-day it
was a volume of old Irish legends, which were her especial
favourites: telling, as they did, stories of the bravery and
magnificence of her own people in days gone by, of the
feats of Brian Boroimhe and of the fierce and bloody
quarrels of the wild clans who once inhabited what was
now her home:—or of the beauty and gentleness of the
once celebrated Irish women for whom the warriors
fought :—or again of the holy life and strange miracles
of the great Saint Patrick.
4 Chained to Time. (Cu.

Eileen held her breath with deepening interest, as she
followed the story out to its conclusion. And, while
she read, she seemed to see and hear the originals
themselves: she rejoiced over their joys, wept over
their sorrows and was wildly excited over their
various adventures: it all seemed marvellously real
to her.

But, when she had done reading, when she had closed
the book and risen to her feet, when she recollected the
sad reality that it was getting late and that she must
go home to bed, then she was somehow discontented.
Reading, she thought, was a very useless thing after all:
the people and places of her story-books had looked to
her, for a moment, bright and beautiful, as she read and
dreamed: but now they vanished away as quickly as
a cluster of soap-bubbles in the wind. Reading was still
indeed the best thing possible in the world in which she
lived: better than eating, or drinking, or sleeping, or
walking, or playing croquet: but it was not enough to
satisfy her. She wanted really to live with those warriors
and heroes of old days: to be actually present at their
battles and their feasts: with her own ears to hear them
speak: with her own eyes to see the stories played out
before her, as they had been played out so many years
before in fact. Was such a thing, she wondered, quite |
impossible? Was there no way of going back to the
days departed? While there are a thousand ways of

moving about from place to place—trains and carriages
L] Chained to Time. 5

and ships and so forth—are there no vehicles to carry
us back into another time? is there no railway, cut
through the centuries, to carry passengers to the stations,
where it would interest them to stop?—to the time of
the Duke of Wellington, of seventy years ago—to the
time of the Crusaders, of seven hundred years ago—and—
who knows ?—to the time of the strange creatures who
inhabited the world before the Flood, perhaps seven
thousand years ago?

No, she said to herself, it can never be. We are
indeed free to move about from place to place, whether
by walking on our own feet or by travelling in trains
and carriages. But with Time it is quite otherwise. We
are fast chazned to the present ¢zme: it is impossible
to go back anyhow into the past. All the money in
the world would not buy a train that could make that
journey. The thing was quite impossible: it was foolish
even to have thought of it.

But then she sat down and reflected about it once
again: and bethought her of all the most wonderful
things that she had ever read or heard about :—of witches
and demons, hobgoblins and fairies. The fact is that
Eileen partly believed in fairies within her secret heart :
although, if she had been asked the question, she would
have scornfully denied that she had any such _ belief.
Irish people are apt to believe such things: and the
peasants who lived in those parts, had told her wonderful

tales, with such positive insistence on their absolute truth-
6 Chained to Time. [Cu. I.

fulness, that she could not altogether refuse to put some
faith in them.

It might be, surely it might be, after all, a possibility :—
if only she could find the fairies, she felt certain that they
would find the Magic Train: the great railway-journey
through the fields of past history might yet be hers.
“Oh! how I wish” she cried aloud (although she felt
the wish was vain) “Oh! how I wish the fairies would

1»

come at once: and bring the Magic Train
CHAPTER ILI.

THE CHARIOT OF THE FAIRY QUEEN,

“Behold the chariot of the Fairy Queen !”—SuHELtry.

S Eileen uttered these words, she caught hold of a

bough of the holly-tree by which she was sitting,

intending to raise herself from the ground in readi-
ness for her homeward walk: and it chanced that, at
the same moment, a stone, on which her feet had been
resting, was dislodged from its position by her movement
and fell bounding down the hill.

And now, in an instant, Eileen became aware of the
most wonderful sights and sounds all round about her.
The whole sky grew suddenly dark, and yet a glorious
light began to shine upon the old castle ruin: while, at
the same time, the most exquisite music was heard, at first
rising faintly in the distance, and then seeming to come
gradually nearer—music as of children’s voices accom-
panied on silver-stringed lutes. And the air withal was
suddenly sweet with the breath of summer roses. Then
Eileen leaned against part of the castle wall, staring wildly
in front of her and wondering what in the world could

7
8 The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. [cu

have happened. As she gazed with the greatest astonish-
ment in the direction from which the music came, she
saw approaching her an army of beautiful little creatures,
who appeared at first sight to be of a form like that of
very small children: but, as they drew nearer, she saw
that they had crystal wings, more lovely than the wings
of any bird she knew. These wings were not as yet
outstretched for flight: but the edges of them glistened,
as the army marched along in perfect time to the gay
music that accompanied them. Some of the troop, she
saw, had golden wands: others had bows and arrows:
others long lances made of sturdy steel and brilliant with
diamonds: .others carried the most lovely musical instru-
ments of every kind: and it was of course from them
that the sweet sounds, which she had heard, proceeded.

Eileen could no longer doubt that these were indeed
the fairies. But she was so utterly overwhelmed with
wonder and surprise, that she could not speak a word—
not even when the fairies advanced to the spot where
she was standing and surrounded her on all sides.

They now sang a song, which, to Eileen’s great surprise,
was in the old Celtic Irish language—a language which
she had often heard from her Connemara nurse, and
sometimes also from the peasant people in the neighbour-
-hood—but of which she understood very little herself.
The last words of it however she clearly heard and did
understand :—“ Bownreigh na Sheefaree.” It meant that

the singers were calling the “Queen of the Fairies” to
1] The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. 9g

come to them! Then there was one moment’s silence:
followed by a delicious whirr in the air, as still more
fairies came and joined the large band which had already
assembled in the place. They seemed to-come from every
direction—from the road—from the valley—from the river
—from the sky! Now they seemed to be bringing all their
marvellous powers into use. They spfead their crystal
wings in flight. They danced gay jigs and rhythmic sets
with one-another, after the fashion of Irish peasant-folk,
but with a graceful perfection, whose likeness was never
seen before. They sang yet more delightful choruses:
and the air seemed to ring with the harmonies of their
well-tuned instruments. Lastly they lifted up their wands:
and whatever met their touch turned immediately to some-
thing bright and beautiful:—to gold, or precious stones,
or fresh sweet-smelling flowers. Eileen now discovered
that her own dress was blazing with jewels: and that her
hair was wreathed with the most exquisite rosebuds. And
everything round about her seemed to have undergone a
similar transformation :—the walls of the old castle had
risen high from their ruins, and seemed to be made from
the rarest marbles, delicately chiselled with the finest
tracery: the holly-tree was bent double with the weight
of divers rich fruits, such as she had never seen before—
plums and apricots and rosy apples, beside which even
the best in her father’s orchard would have looked poor
_ and pale indeed: and, in the meanwhile, snowdrops, and

primroses, and violets, and daffodils, and dog-roses were
10 The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. [Cx

springing up all at once—as it were in a few minutes—
from the earth. This was all doubtless, Eileen mused,
the work of the fairies: all the powers of the earth obey
them: Spring and Summer and Autumn and Winter are
all alike the servants of the fairies, and bring them all
they ever wish for—at all times and seasons—without
any of the evils that usually attend their several blessings
when they come to ordinary persons.

And, in the middle of all this, a most magnificent
rainbow appeared in the sky. It was not like an ordinary
rainbow. It seemed to have ten thousand colours in it
instead of only seven: and it seemed to fill a quarter of
the great black sky. And from this rainless rainbow
showers of shooting stars, and vast new constellations, and
far-reaching comets seemed to fall in rich profusion: until
at last there fell from the rainbow a bright something,
which was even more delightful to look at than what Eileen
had already seen. It was a rich car drawn by golden
eagles through the sky—lit with a fair shining light of its
own like the light of the silver moon, and casting its
reflection into the Shannon river as the moon casts hers.
The eagles bore their burden toward the place where
Eileen stood.-=It was the chariot of the Fairy Queen !

Eileen thought that she must be dreaming. She rubbed .
her eyes and stared: but it made no difference. The
chariot remained where she had first seen it, as distinct as
ever. She was still surrounded by the host of dancing

and singing fairies: ten of whom now sprang forward to
u.] The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. 11

the sides of the car, as it alighted upon the earth, and drew
back the curtains of it. Eileen stretched forward eager to
see the face of the Fairy Queen.

There she lay, the royal beautiful Titania,—whom poets
have sung,—whom artists have painted,—of whom children
have fondly dreamed. It was an image of unimaginable
loveliness :—and not quite what Eileen had expected.

Titania looked like a young girl: merry and full of life:
bright with “all those endearing young charms,” which
mortal maidens lose so soon, but which fairies never lose,
however many ages may pass away. And, although she
looked a giantess beside her tiny followers (for they were
only of a doll-like stature), she was by no means tall. She
was in fact but a few inches taller than Eileen herself:
but she held herself majestically, and looked worthy every
whit to be the ruler of a mighty kingdom. A star of
light seemed to glitter above her forehead : but, although
her chariot was builded of pure gold and decked with
every kind of precious stone, yet she wore none of these
upon her own person.—And still she far outshone them
all! She was quite simply arrayed: but could not have
looked more like a goddess, had she been clad in the
most gorgeous robes. Her neck and arms were bare:
save that she had a little bracelet of thin-wrought silver
upon either wrist. But, although she wore no jewels, it
was because she needed none. It was enough that she had
those wonderful deep blue eyes—that flowing dark brown

hair, whose:waves and curls were lit up from moment to
12 The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. [ce

moment with a glint of golden glory, as the rays of the
bright light caught them—that fair rosy colour, which
all the flowers of the field could never surpass—that
sweet mouth of smooth-curved lips, now. gently opening
like a crimson shell which does not quite hide the snowy
pearls within it—those lovelily-shaped hands :—beauty in
short such as was never seen except in her.

When Eileen saw her, she yielded to the’ irresistible
impulse which moved her to kneel and kiss Titania’s
fingers. The Queen immediately stood up: and, stretching
forth her hands, raised the child to her feet again. Then
she said :—“ Eileen O’Ryan, thou art very fortunate: thou
hast thy wish: the fairies HAVE come,—to bear thee to
the Magic Train, of which thou didst speak. Thou shalt
visit the centuries of the past with us. Give thanks to
the great Saint Patrick and his holy well.”

Although the words were English, there was something
in the Queen’s beautiful voice, which made Eileen sure
that she might claim her as a countrywoman of her own.
Her words had certainly, she thought, an unmistakably
Irish ring about them. Titania beyond doubt loved
Ireland well: and was proud of the name of “ Bownreigh
na Sheefaree.” However Eileen thought more, at present,
about what the Queen had said, than she did about her
Irish nature, or the music of her voice. She thanked
the Queen most heartily: asking at the same time the
meaning of what she had said about Saint Patrick and
his holy well.
1.] The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. 13

The Fairy Queen, for a reply, pointed to the place,
where Eileen had a short while since been lying, reading
her story-book. And now for the first time she saw there
a large deep well. There was no water in the well: but
on one side of it, at some little depth from the surface of
the earth, she could see a tablet of bronze. She stooped
down to read the inscription which was on it. The well
was dark : but five fairies came and stood on either side
of her with bright-flaming tapers in their hands: and by
the light of them she read these words :—

THIS IS THE CLONDERALAW WISHING-WELL :

IF HERE YOUR WISHES YOU TRULY TELL,

AND TUG AT THE HOLLY, AND RAISE THE STONE,
WHATEVER YOU ASK SHALL BE YOUR OWN.

Eileen had—unconsciously and accidentally—tugged at
the holly with her hands, and dislodged the stone with
her feet, at the very moment when she was uttering her
extraordinary wish! The Queen now explained the
secret of the well to her. Once upon a time, Saint
Patrick was searching for a drop of water to give to a
poor sick woman. He expected to have to walk, perhaps
half a mile or so, before he found what he wanted. But
he found the water here in this well, close to the invalid’s
cottage. He then blessed the well: and placed the tablet
there. The Castle of Clonderalaw was afterwards builded
over the place: and the stones of it had hidden the well,
until Eileen had happened to dislodge the last stone which
14 The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. [C.

covered it by the movement of her feet:—and for this
reason she had her wish.

In spite of the clearness of this explanation, Eileen still
looked dazed and bewildered. “What puzzles thee yet,
child?” asked the Queen. “Is not everything now in-
telligible to thee?” “Not quite,—if you please,—Your
Majesty ” she replied, after a pause, “I cannot understand
what you fairies are, or where you live, or why you are so
seldom seen, or how you have come here so suddenly.—
And indeed” she added doubtfully “I don’t quite under-
stand there being such things as fairies at all!”

At this the chorus of fairies standing round laughed
right merrily. “Eileen didn’t believe in fairies” they said .
“till she saw us.”

“And no wonder either!” said Her Majesty reproach-
fully. Then, turning to Eileen, she graciously vouchsafed

‘to explain her difficulties. “You must know” she began
“that the people of strange beings of whom I am the
Queen, the people whom you call ‘fairies, have lived for
long ages on this earth:—indeed there have been fairies
as long as there have been men and women and children.
They can do almost everything they like: all the powers
of nature are their servants: they are irresistibly strong
and immensely wise. They can be of whatever size, or
shape, or figure that delights them most. In ancient times
it pleased them to be great and tall: and the men of old
time who dwelled in Hellas or in Italy, called them ‘gods
and goddesses.’ In later days it pleased them to be small
11] The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. 15

—sometimes so small that flowers were their houses and
‘swinging cobwebs the cradles in which they rocked—and
the peasants of Shropshire and elsewhere called us ‘ pixies’
and ‘brownies’ and ‘elves’ and ‘the small people” Every
country in the world knows us by some name or other.
Is not all this so?” she said, appealing to the company
of her subjects.

“Indeed it is”: they said: “and it has pleased Your
Majesty to be neither very great nor very small :—we are
each and all of us exactly what we please to be.”

Eileen felt that the Queen had chosen well. It did not
seem possible for there to be a more perfect beauty than
was hers: the greatness of the old goddesses and the small-
ness of the little fairies were both, she saw, mistakes :—
perfect beauty has nothing in excess.

The Queen went on speaking: and Eileen listened with
the deepest attention. “Asin different times and places”
she said “our form and figure have been different, so our
names have been different as well. But it is all one
people: or rather it was all one people once—for, even
as the angels fought in Heaven itself, so that there are
now bad angels as well as good, likewise it was with us.
There are evil fairies too” she said—“ witches and’ demons
and hobgoblins:—oh! may the good fairies be stronger
and mightier than they all some-day, and drive all their
enemies from the earth.” The Queen sighed: and the
thought of the bad fairies evidently made all the company
so very unhappy, that Eileen made haste to change the
16 The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. [cz.

subject. “Are there as many fairies as there used to be?”
she asked—* they are so seldom seen now-a-days!”

“Once” said Titania “we were a race more numerous
than all the nations of mankind. But now alas! our
numbers are small: and, year after year, they are still
becoming less. Soon there will be no fairies, at this rate,
in the world at all. We are indeed an unfortunate people:
thousands of us perish daily by the most cruel deaths:
many fall by the workings of poison, but most of us die
miserably by lingering starvation.”

“Poison!” cried Eileen, naturally much astonished,
“and starvation!” Her ideas of fairies had been so very
different from this: she had imagined that fairies were
always happy, and she had envied them for always having
plenty of good things to eat and drink at their desire.
“How can fairies be obliged to starve” she inquired,
as she pointed to the rich magic fruits that hung above
her, “when they can always have delicious things like
these as often as they want them?”

The Fairy Queen smiled sadly. “You do not under-
stand the nature of a fairy” she said. “Fruits and all
manner of victuals and sweet refreshing drinks they caz
have at their desire : but we are so made that something
else is needful to our life—far more needful than these
wretched dainties are. To the diseases and plagues and
fevers, that attack mankind, we are uot liable. We could
live for centuries without a crumb of food or drop of drink.

Our bodies are made stronger and more healthful than
.] The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. 17

yours are. But, as if to make up for it, the spirit in each
of us has been made a thing more delicate and easy to
destroy. We breathe pure joy and love, as you breathe
air: and thoughts of what is beautiful and of what is good
are our necessary sustenance, as meat and drink are
yours. We look for our food—as you do for yours—from
the earth. When the earth is full of Faith and Hope
and Charity: when children love one-another and beauty
is perfected everywhere :—then do the fairies thrive and
multiply and live a happy life. But when malice and
hatred and envy are stalking upon the earth: when
children quarrel with one-another and unloveliness works
its way :—then the fairies sicken and die, as though
they had been mortals from the first. Every unkind
or ugly word or thought upon your earth sends decay
and destruction into our fairy-world: this is the poison
of which I spoke just now. Every good deed, that is left
undone, or beauty unperfected, denies to some of us poor
fairies that which is our daily bread: and so we starve.
I sometimes think that the world is more wicked than
it was: and fairies are fewer. Buthere in Ireland :—where
many hearts are large and generous: where purposes are
often noble and love abounding :—it is still possible for
some of us to live and to be happy. Yet there is much
of the cruel poison even here. Beware! for what is our
poison is the food of our enemies, the evil powers: while
what is their poison is our food.”

These thoughts were all new to Eileen. She was

2
18 The Chariot of the Fairy Queen. [c#.11

inquisitive by nature: and, encouraged by Titania’s kind-
ness, she was going to ask more questions, when Her
Majesty stopped her, saying that by and by there would
be time enough for explanations—now it was time to
start for Fairyland. She invited Eileen to enter the royal
chariot: and, when they had both taken their seats in
it, the Queen and the fairies all called out :—“ Ho! and
away for Fairyland”: and bade Eileen utter the same
words. She did so: though thinking at the time that she
had no wish to go to Fairyland just then—she would
sooner go straight to the Magic Train.

Titania answered her thoughts: “Fairyland is not far
away”: she said: “it lies close above the ordinary world.
But it is wrapped about with a silver cloud, that makes
it always invisible, save when the fairies are willing to
show it to their favourites.”

While she yet spake, they were there. Fairyland looked
to Eileen like a lovely garden: watered by snowy streams
and gurgling fountains: and nestling, as the Queen had
said, in a “silver cloud” :—the earth being close below.
But of this Eileen had only a momentary glimpse: for the
Queen called immediately to the golden eagles, who bore
the chariot along, and bade them fly straight toward the
railway-station. .

So to the railway-station they went.
2

is

CHAPTER III.

TO THE DARK, TO THE PAST, TO THE DEAD.

“They have passed:

they outspeeded the blast:

while, ’tis said, they are fled.”

—“ Whither, oh! whither ?”—

“To the dark, to the past, to the dead.”

—SHELLEY.

HEN Eileen reached the railway-station a few

\ \ moments after this, she accompanied the Queen

down a flight of steps toward the platform: and
thereby she lost sight at once of the garden of Fairyland,
where she would now have liked to linger, forgetting her
previous impatience for the arrival of the Magic Train.

But it must not be supposed that the railway-station
itself was as dull and dirty as those to which we are
accustomed on this earth: nor indeed was it particularly
like them in any way. It is true that there were two
“platforms”: and there was a “booking-office” :—and a
“waiting-room”:—and a “book-stall”: but these were
all very different from any which Eileen had ever. seen
before.

The station-buildings seemed to her like a magnificent

19
20 To the Dark, to the Past, = [c«.

cathedral—only more beautiful than any cathedral ever
builded on this earth. The different places to which
allusion has been made—the waiting-rooms and so forth—
were like lovely little chapels: and the whole lay in a
smiling valley, on either side of which were sloping fields
of waving corn. The platforms were mossy banks: and
between them, for a rail-road, lay a sort of smooth crystal
sea. The station itself was bathed in brilliant light : but
immediately outside, in either direction, it was very dark.
For a moment Eileen was at a loss to know why this
was so: but soon she saw a finger-post, one half of which
pointed TO THE FUTURE and the other TO THE PAST.
The railway-station was evidently that of THE PRESENT—
one of the points of time, at which the Magic Train would
stop according to her wish, on its journey from the future
to the past. The future was even darker than the past :
and at first Eileen could have wished that the train was
going that way: but she consoled herself by thinking
that we are all making that journey, surely though slowly,
every day: whereas no-one had ever made the other
journey before. She could hardly even yet believe that
she was really going to the past. The thought of it
bewildered her: but it would be immensely interesting,
and she determined not to give it up. Then she fell
a-thinking of many strange questions. What would be-
come of herself? Would she feel herself becoming younger
and younger, as the journey went on? and smaller and

smaller? And then what would happen, when. she passed
IIL] to the Dead. 21

on to the years before she was born? As she pondered
thus, she remembered a beautiful poem, which she had
lately read, and how her mother had explained it to her.
The poet who wrote the lines thought that the fresh joy
of children was fraught with recollections of a world
before the present one, and that little ones remembered:
something of years earlier than their birth. It seemed
to harmonise with her present surroundings: and she
repeated some of the words of the poem to herself :—

“Here, in a season of calm weather,
our souls have sight of that immortal sea,
which brought us hither:
can in a moment travel thither,
and see the children sport upon the shore,
and hear the mighty waters rolling evermore.”

Was this water, Eileen wondered, that she saw before
her, the “immortal sea” of which the poet dreamed ?
and was she to make the journey to the place whence we
came hither—not in fancy but in very fact? Would
she know what her soul was before her birth ?

Titania knew what she was thinking: and answered
the questions, which rose up in her mind, before she had
spoken them in words. “You are not to make that
journey”: she said: “the child that is of mortal birth
never will. You wished to be taken back into past time :
and to see the Fields of History. You shall. But it
must be your present self that is to travel with us in the
Magic Train: your past body must remain on the earth
22 To the Dark, to the Past, [cx

for that is where it was in the past. You who come with
us, will remain as you are now: but you shall be privileged
to see the times when you were not. This is indeed a
mystery: and all the doings of the fairies are full of
mysteries. The train will pass along the magic rail-road :
and from the windows of it, which look down upon the
earth, you shall see what is happening there.”

“And will there be cars?” was Eileen’s next question:
“and carriages to take us to what places we want to see,
close outside the railway-stations, as there are at ours on
earth?”

“There will”: said the Queen :—‘ carriages and fairy-
chariots borne by eaglets, who will take us, as it were in
a moment of time, whithersoever we would go.”

And now Titania went to get the tickets and refresh-
ments for the journey: and bade Eileen amuse herself
at the book-stall. She did so: and found the fairy-book-
stall most entertaining. Eileen had never seen such
a collection of books: they were of every sort: poems
and tales and histories: of men, women and children:
of birds, beasts and fishes: of trees, fruits and flowers :—
she would like to have had them all. There were
hundreds of them, each perfectly different from its fellows :
and they must have been full, as Eileen could see at a
glance, of the most beautiful stories and of yet more
beautiful pictures. Just a few of the best story-books,
written on this earth, were there as well: “Alice in
Wonderland,” “The Arabian Nights”—and a very small
IIL] to the Dead. 23

number of the other exquisite books of our world—are
read and enjoyed even by the fairies in their happy
homes.

Meanwhile, as the Queen came back to the platform,
the signal went down for the expected train: and the
porters came forward ready to open the doors. The
porters were not dressed in dark and dingy clothes: nor
had they bent backs and sallow faces, as ours too often
have. They were more like a small company of picked
soldiers: and were arrayed in a uniform that was pic-
turesque beyond description. The grandest regimental
colours which we know would be pale and shabby beside —
those which the fairy-porters wore.

And now one of them sang out in a deep musical
voice, which was distinctly heard all along the platform,
the words that were needed to tell intending passengers
what was the destination of the train :—“ To the dark, to the
past, to the dead.” And these words he kept calling out
continually. The train came in: the engine ploughing
through the waters of the strange sea before mentioned,
by means of some unseen force: there was no smoke nor
dirt with it. The porters threw open the doors of a
luxurious saloon. The Queen and Eileen entered it
alone: and the doors were shut.

Then there came a sound of exquisite beauty :—“ The
whistle of the engine” Titania said: but Eileen, who had
been used to very different engine-whistles, could hardly
believe this: she had imagined that it was the note of the
24 To the Dark, to the Past, = [C«.

nightingale. Have you ever heard a woodland nightingale
singing on a summer evening, when all else was still
and quiet? If so, you may have a faint conception of
the beauty of the fairy-engine’s whistle: never did bird
sing more sweetly. And everything connected with the
fairies was similarly beautiful.

The fairies on the platform were now shouting that
the train was off: and it seemed indeed as though it
were beginning to move. But suddenly—with a jerk—it
stopped again: and Eileen heard another and a different
sound. This time, however, it was not a sound which
was in any way mysterious to her: she knew well what
was the cause of it: it was her own dear dog “ Teazer”
clamouring outside the carriage, that he might be let in,
and scratching the door with his feet.

Eileen sprang up, delighted : and opened the door for
him. “How did you get here, old boy?” she said. Of
course the dumb animal could not answer her question
in words: but he jumped up at her, and licked her hands.
The fairies however, who had come to the carriage along
with the dog, told Eileen what she wanted to know :—
“He came here the same way that you did: and by the
same means. He came by virtue of Saint Patrick’s
wishing-well.” Still she did not understand :—surely a
dog could not make the charm work? surely the fairies
could not have come for the wish of a mere dog?

“And why not?” said Titania, as her eyes rested

lovingly on the affectionate creature. “Dumb animals,


HILLS & SAUNDERS.] [To face p. 24.
TEAZER.
M.] to the Dead. 25

such as horses and dogs, with other noble brutes, can wish
as well as you: although they cannot speak and say so.
Have you never seen a dog left at home, without his
master? have you not marked how miserably he mopes
about? have you not seen him gazing through the closed
window after his master, as that master walks away?
have you not heard his piteous whining? I tell you that
dog wishes to be with his master more eagerly than ever
you wished for anything in all your life? Human beings,
with all their brains and philosophy, have not often half
the strength of will, nor half the passion of affection,
which belongs to a faithful dog. When you were gone
with us, your trusty brute wished but for one thing :—to
be with you! That one thing he wished with all his
soul :—not as human beings wish, balancing one advantage
against another, and forgetting their desire, the moment
after it is formed, in the attraction of some new delight.
His whole soul, I tell you, went out in that simple longing
for your company. He ‘pulled at the holly’: and ‘raised
the stone, which the fairies had replaced. And the
charm, which is giving you all your wonderful wish, gave
him his simple prayer as well.”

Eileen had learned much that day, of which she had
never thought before: but this seemed to her most strange
of all. She had been so long accustomed to think of the
wishes of men, women and children as being all-important
in the world—and to think of dogs and horses as their
toys and instruments—that this new notion of the “ whole

ex
ait
26 To the Dark, to the Past, [cx

soul” of her dog going out in one heartfelt desire was
quite beyond her understanding. Why, she had even
imagined—as many others do—that a dog can have no
soul at all: and that only men and women have hearts
to feel and wills to pray. But now she no longer doubted
that what the beautiful Queen told her was true :—there
is no reason, because a dog cannot speak, to suppose he
has no soul: he has a soul, a faithful and a loving one:
and the powers that can work on the spirit of a man can
work also on the spirit of a brute.

Eileen fondled him more lovingly than she had ever

done before :—and this is saying much, for she had always
loved him exceedingly. Poor old fellow, with that fine
noble head, and those speaking eyes!—she would no
longer treat him as a toy intended for her amusement:
henceforward he should be as much a “person” to her
as anyone else in the world.
. These explanations and these meditations were all the
work of a minute or two: and the carriage door was quickly
closed again. The train had only stopped for the dog’s
sake :—(fancy that! those who direct the driving of our
earthly trains would scorn to stop for a dog’s sake: but
the fairies are not so proud) :—and, now that Teazer was
safely sleeping upon Eileen’s lap, the journey might really
begin.

Titania, accordingly, bade Eileen sit close up against
the window of the carriage: and showed her where she
must look for the best view. Straight beneath the window,
UIl.] to the Dead. 27

there was a crevice in the silver cloud which sunders
Fairyland from Earth: and through the crevice Eileen
could see the world below, at no considerable distance
from her. And immediately before her eyes lay Clonderalaw
Castle, many fairies still at present surrounding it, and the
whole place still gay with their magic handiwork.

The beautiful whistle sounded forth once more. The
fairies on the platform shouted a last good-bye. And the
train moved out of the station, as the porter called out
again—for the last time—his solemn oft-repeated words :—
“To the dark, to the past, to the dead.”
CHAPTER IV.
PITY AND PEACE AND LOVE.

“A thousand nations swore that there should be
pity and peace and love among the good and free.”
—SHELLEY.

ILEEN had been prepared for what she was to see
on this journey: but, for all that, she was startled
at the immediate change in the view which she beheld

from the window directly the train had left the station.
She still saw Clonderalaw Castle : but the fairies’ work was
gone: and she only saw herself lying there, with her book
and her dog,—looking very much as she had looked every
day of her life. The sun seemed to be slowly rising from
the west and travelling to the east: the evening turned to
afternoon and the afternoon to morning.

While this was going on, Eileen turned away from the
window. Even on this journey, she could not look at the
view all the time :—especially when there was the lovely
Titania in the carriage with her, whose blue eyes and merry
smile were so irresistibly attractive. So she fell into con-
versation once more with the Fairy Queen. “Where shall
we stop first?” she asked. “ That is as you like”: replied

28
Cu.Iv.]° Pity and Peace and Love. 29

the other: “this journey is undertaken for your pleasure
and instruction. You may stop as often as you please:
and see any part of the history of the world at your
desire.” Eileen gave a little scream of delight : her fondest
wishes were indeed coming to pass. “But Your Majesty
will help me to choose” she said. “I know so little
history: I would be guided by you: what is most worth
seeing P”

“Whatever is most beautiful and good” the Queen
replied. “We will visit the thousand nations that have
sworn ‘that there shall be pzty and peace and love among
the good and free. And what I mean is this :—Although
the world is full of much wickedness, and although
cruelty and war and hatred have been common from the
beginning of time: there have nevertheless always been
men, and there have always been nations, who have set
themselves to fight on the side of goodness: the struggles
then of these men and these nations to defend the right,
to free the oppressed and to spread the influences of pity
and peace and love—these and these alone are the things
worth seeing in the history of the earth.”

Eileen was rather disappointed. “Shall I see none of
the bad people in history?” she said: “for cruel tyrants,
bloody warriors and even the most wicked villains are
interesting to me, as well as good people. I would like
to see history in its true colours. I would not see only
half the picture.”

“ Alas! my dear Eileen” replied Her Majesty “you
30 Pity and Peace and Love. [Cu.

will see many of these. The struggle of the good cannot
be seen without the struggle of the bad as well. Good
is seen in the resistance of evil. \Wherever we stop to
see pity and peace and love, there we shall see also cruelty
and war and hate. Indeed, as far as this purpose goes,
it does not very much matter where we stop: love is ever
and again manifested in the same places as hatred, in so
much that the highest love is to love them that hate you.
See therefore that you learn from them to distinguish the
good and loveable from the bad and abominable : for we
shall find both everywhere.”

Eileen, after thanking the beautiful Queen, looked out
of the window once more: and laughed to see the changes
that the years had brought about. For the train had
travelled back several years, while they had been speak-
ing: the years being marked by stones at the side of
the line like our milestones, though the train often shot
past them so quickly that Eileen had hardly time to read
the date. There were stations at frequent intervals along
the line: and, as she afterwards discovered, there was
always a big station at the beginning of a century. At
these the trains always stopped: these were the junctions
where the passengers “changed”: and they were suitable
places to pause and look back over the last hundred years.

Already, as has been said, the train had passed back
several years. Eileen still saw Clonderalaw Castle and
the surrounding country in the foreground, though the

whole view was a very wide one :—embracing the whole
v.} Pity and Peace and Love. 31

world, she thought. Now she saw her brother and herself
as they had been years ago: her brother with short socks
and bare legs, and herself in almost baby attire. This
made her laugh immensely: but her laughter did not
last long. For, standing close beside them, she soon
saw a friend, whom she well remembered, though she had
not seen him for many a long day. This was their dear
old pony, Jocko, who had died a great while ago. Eileen
had had a very happy life: and, in the whole course of it,
she had had no experience of death, save only this one.
Tears came into her eyes, as she looked at her well-
remembered favourite. She recollected that the voice
at the station, which they had lately left, had called out
“to the dead” with its last words: and it now struck her
with awe to think that all the myriad men and women,
whom she was to see after the next few stations, were
none other than the company of the departed dead. She
looked very lovingly, for a few moments, at the pony on
which she had learned to ride, and which once had seemed
to know the meaning of everything she said. Poor old
creature! she was very glad to have seen him once again :
although, when she returned home, of course she knew
he would be dead again as heretofore. It was the first
Eileen had learned of the “bitterness of Death!—One
thought consoled her: Titania had told her that brute
animals may have souls: and, where there is a soul, we
have a hope that looks into the future of that soul.

She now turned again from the window, stroked her
32 Pity and Peace and Love. [c.

dear dog’s head and looked endless questions into his keen
dark eyes. And, when she again looked out, she saw no
pony there: but she knew, by the number of the next
milestone which they passed, that the train had come
to a date, when neither her pony nor herself had yet been
born. She looked upon the earth: and her eyes wandered
over the face of it: but she no longer saw herself there:
and she struggled to realise the extraordinary fact, that
they had arrived at the time, wherein she was not. “We
will stop at the next station ” said the Queen.

* * * * cg

The train came to a stand-still: and immediately one
of the fairy-porters opened the door of the carriage in
which Titania and Eileen were seated. They then got out
of the train together and stepped on to the platform.
There was a large painted board at one end of it, on which
was written the name of the station:—‘THE YEAR OF
‘OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND FIFTY-
SEVEN.” Eileen was very much excited, as she took
her seat by the side of Titania in the car, which was
waiting for them outside the station, with four golden
eaglets already harnessed to it. “When we leave the
station” said Titania in a soft voice “Time will go on
as usual,—from the point where we alight. As in the case
of journeys made upon your earth from place to place,
you may walk, when the train stops, a little way back

along the line in the direction from which you have come,
IVv.] Pity and Peace and Love. a8

so will it be in the case of this journey. But, wherever
we may be upon the earth, we shall go wrapped in an
invisible cloud: and the men, women and children on the
earth will never guess that we are near them, though we
shall pass close to them and mingle in their multitudes.
The fairies always move in clouds that render them thus
invisible: save only when they discover their presence to
some especial favourites, and allow those favourites to
see them through the cloud. So long as this journey
lasts, you shall be in no danger from any of the perils,
which mortals have to fear: so long as this journey lasts
you shall have all the protections from such things, which
fairies have. And, beside these protections, you shall have
all the powers of mind which fairies have—enlarged
powers of seeing and hearing, and chiefest of all that
gift of tongues, which will enable you to understand all
languages.”

The car was now beginning to move: and Teazer was
on the point of leaping in after them. But Her Majesty
said that he must wait: for that they would be back
in an instant. “We cannot take your pretty beast with
us”: said the Queen as the car sped off: “though I am
sorry to refuse him. For he is a dog of mettle, well
I know: and he would want to worry the cats and other
animals upon the earth. If he were to go with us, he
would go, like us, invisible: and it would not be playing
the part of a good fairy to the past inhabitants of the
earth, were I to suffer their pets to be taken unawares and

3
34 Pity and Peace and Love, [c1Vv.

killed by an invisible enemy.” Eileen quite saw that
to suffer this would be unfair: and consented to a short
separation from her favourite: just as she did when she
went in the course of her ordinary life to Church or other
places, where “dogs are not admitted ” :—remembering
that there is a time for everything, and that, while con-
sidering Teazer’s wants, she must not forget what was
reasonable in the interests of others.

This had just been amicably arranged: when the car,
having executed its journey with lightning speed, set down
the travellers upon the earth : and Eileen gazed about her,

wondering where she could be.
CHAPTER V.

OUR BANNER OF ENGLAND.

“ And ever upon the topmost roof our banner of England blew.”
—TENNYSON.

HE was in India: at Lucknow: and they were

standing beside the English church. It was Sunday

morning: and the church was full of British soldiers
and their wives and children. The Fairy Queen and
Eileen entered the building: where all things were being
done much as they are done at home. With the Queen’s
leave, Eileen took her place between two beautiful children,
who sat with their mother, in a pew which was otherwise
unoccupied: and there, unseen of all, she could look about
her entirely at her ease. There was nothing very extra-
ordinary to see: and except for the tremendous power
of the blazing sun, whose rays streamed in through the
chinks of the shutters, she would never have guessed that
she was so far away from home. The gay British uni-
forms indeed, to which we are accustomed, of scarlet and
gold were changed for uniforms of white, as being better
suited to the burning heat which prevailed. Otherwise
the whole surroundings seemed familiar: the straight-
backed regimental lines filling the pews set apart for the

35 :
36 Our Banner of England. [Cu

military, the peculiar clattering and clanking which ac-
companies their movements whenever the congregation
kneels or rises, the surplice and hood of the English
clergyman, the well-known language of the Book of
Common Prayer,—together with the usual Sunday-morning
attire of the women and children—were all reproduced
here exactly as you may observe them in the mother-
country any summer’s day.

Eileen was very curious to know more about her com-
panions in the pew. And so, after a while, she took
advantage of the cloud of invisibility, which hid herself and
all her actions from mortal eyes, to'look into the children’s
prayer-books : hoping to read their names upon the fly- _
leaves. She was not disappointed: the names were written
there as she had expected—“ Herbert ” and “ Muriel.”

Just as. Eileen had made this discovery, the prayers
being nearly finished, Herbert whispered into Muriel’s
ear :—“Do you see? Father is going out of church:
and several other officers too!” Muriel turned her head
to the place where the soldiers sat: and Eileen, who had
overheard the whisper, did the same. It was as the boy
had said. A man had come in with a message for those
officers: and they were evidently going out in consequence.

' The service went on. For a time all was quiet again.
But soon other men entered with messages for other
officers: and they too left the church. Then the women
who were present began to look very uncomfortable.

Something was wrong. And it was not without a touch
v.J Our Banner of England. 37

of impatience that they—and Eileen—waited until service
and sermon were over to learn what was amiss.

When at last they did come out of church, Eileen
followed the children, with whom she had been sitting.
Their mother left them for a short while on a seat in the
churchyard: and bade them stay there, while she made
inquiries among her friends as to the reason of her
husband’s disappearance.

This mother was still young: hers was a gentle, refined
face, whose outline was singularly lovely: proud in its
beauty too: rich dark eyes, which sparkled from beneath
thick eyelashes: a slender form: not strong, but very
active. She was not a woman inclined to sofas and
scents and languishing luxury, albeit rich enough for such
indulgence had she wanted it :—no, she was very practical :
thought much: did much: not for herself only, but for
everyone about her: all in all to her husband and her
children: one of the most precious and helpful women
in Lucknow during the hours of trouble.

Muriel was very like her mother,—only more delicate.
The climate of North India had harmed her grievously !
She was small, fragile, weakly: but with not a little of
her mother’s proud spirit flashing from her eyes and
colouring her pale-white cheeks. She had her mother’s
voice and step and attitudes. Indeed the shape of their
face and form was ridiculously the same. And so was
the colour of their hair:—only that of course the dark

brown clusters of mother and daughter were treated
38 Our Banner of England. [Cu.

very differently. Muriel’s hair was allowed to fall
unrestrainedly whithersoever it pleased (for that is
childhood’s privilege): whilst her mother’s was severely
imprisoned, according to the fashion of the day, within
anet. Herbert was of a rougher build and full of robust
health : but had withal an undeniable beauty of his own.
He was fourteen years old: and his sister was about two
years younger.

The children waited somewhat impatiently for their
mother, who was soon standing in the middle of a little
knot of friends, engaged in anxious conversation. At
last she turned from them, and Herbert, leaving his sister’s
side, sprang-toward his mother, asking excitedly :—* What
is it, mother? Has anybody told you why father left
the church?” “He has gone” she said “to the camp of
the Sepoys—the Indian native troops. They are rising in
arms against their officers. It is a grave matter. If others
were to follow their example, there would be a terrible
_war. It may come to serious fighting here and’ every-
where in India.” “I hope it will” said Herbert : evidently
meaning in earnest what he said. He had been: brought
up among soldiers and guns and fortifications all his life.
He wanted now to see something of real war. He was
tired of seeing people “only playing at it always,” as he
said. “Yes” he repeated “I hope there will be war.”
“Do not say so!” his mother said. “You little know -
what such a thing would mean to all of us. But we will
not speak about it more at present: for Muriel must not
Vv.) Our Banner of England. 39

be alarmed.” Muriel however had already overheard what
her mother had been saying. “I am not in the least
afraid”: said she: “I am too English for that. But for
the sake of everybody here, I hope there will be no
fighting.” And the three set out together for their
own quarters.

The Fairy Queen and Eileen went with them, and they
soon reached the house. It was one of those which is
called a bungalow: a building with only one story. They
entered the children’s old nursery. It was very like our
nurseries at home: and was hung moreover with the
very same prints and pictures that may be seen in ten
thousand children’s haunts in England and in Ireland.
But the view from the window was very different from
any that the British Isles can show. It was a curious
mixture of East. and West. There were gilded domes:
tall slender pillars: lofty colonnades: iron railings and
balustrades: cages, some filled with wild beasts, others
with strange bright birds: gardens, fountains, cypress-
trees: elephants, camels and horses. But there were
also London-like houses, which Englishmen had builded
there: and English barouches took their turns with the
gilt litters of the Indians in passing along the streets.
And in the distance was the view of the Sepoys’ Indian
camp. Herbert, arming himself with a small telescope,
tried to see what was happening there. In vain: for the
distance was too great. But now that his mother was

‘no longer present, he confessed to Muriel that still he
40 Our Banner of England. (Cu.

could not help hoping there would be a fight. He thought
a battle must be the most magnificent spectacle on earth.
But she would not agree with him. Peace would be far
better, she thought, if an honourable peace were possible.

In due time the father of the family came home. He
was a handsome man, of a soldierly appearance: tall and
powerful. Herbert ran eagerly to him: asking whether
there had been or would be any fighting against the
Sepoys. “Thank Heaven” was the answer “it has not
come to fighting yet. But it may do so before long.
Nothing would make me sorrier than if there were to be
a great Indian mutiny. The English women and children
would suffer dreadfully: and many of our brave fellows
would be shot before we won the victory. No, let our
prayer be for ‘ peace in our time’ still.” Herbert was silent
for a while: not liking to confess to his father that he yet
wished for war. But Eileen could see that he was not
really convinced. He had certainly set his heart on seeing
a fight.

Muriel had now a question to put to her father. “ What
is it all about?” she said. “Why are the Indian soldiers
dissatisfied? Surely the English are very kind to them?”
“J will try and explain” he said “as clearly as I can.”
And then he told her a thing about which Eileen had often
read before now in her history-book, but whose importance
she had always found it hard to understand. “When the
natives in our service load their rifles” he said “it is usual

to order them to bite their cartridges,—so as to let out the
Vv.) Our Banner of England. 41

gunpowder and pour it down the muzzle of their rifles.
Some mischief-maker has told them that the paper of those
cartridges is made of the fat of pigs and cows. Now these
people are chiefly of two religions. Some are Brahmins:
some Mohammedans. Brahmins think that cows are
sacred animals: that it is wicked to touch any part of a
cow with their lips: and that a man is degraded if he does
so. Mohammedans think that pigs are impure animals:
and that even to taste their flesh is to defile themselves.
This is why both are so angry at the notion of biting the
cartridges: and this is the reason of their dissatisfaction !”
“Flow absurd” said Herbert. “It is very absurd in a
sense of course”: his father said: “but then these men
believe their religion, as we believe ours. And they think
that we purposely intend to hurt their religious feelings.
I told the men with whom I had to deal that it was a
mistake : that we did not mean’to offend them: and that
some other way of making the cartridges ready would be
found. AndsolI persuaded them to become obedient again.
Sir Henry Lawrence, our governor here, will hold a grand
military levée to-morrow : and then he is going to explain
to the assembled native officers what I have been trying to
explain to my own men. If you would like to come, I will
take you to the place.” Both children were eager to go.
And accordingly on the next day they were duly taken to
the Residency, where the levée was. The lawn was strewn
with carpets: and the chief officers sat thereon in chairs.

Titania and Eileen reclined, invisible, in the midst of them.
42 Our Banner of England. [Cu.

Then Sir Henry stood on a verandah and addressed the
Indian chiefs. “Those who tell you that we Englishmen
intend to hurt your religious feelings” he said “are liars.
Other rulers of India have forced people to accept their
own religion. But we allow you absolute freedom in all
matters of faith. You may build your own temples every-
where: and have what ceremonies you please therein.”
Then he pointed to the Union Jack, which was waving in
the wind above. “It is our boast” he said “that under
our banner of England men may have what religion they
choose : for Christians do not compel others to become
Christians too by force of arms: and who will dare to
interfere with those beneath our protection? Be faithful
to us: and that banner will assure to you your perfect
liberty !”

The Fairy Queen said to Eileen:—“ The governor is
right. Men must believe the faith their consciences
approve. There is no good in using force of arms in
such matters. These strange religions, however imperfect,
are all that the unconverted natives have to lead them to
what is good and beautiful. And every man’s religious
beliefs have something sacred about them, which it is
wrong in others to offend. May the banner of England
always protect the rights of Liberty!”

When Sir Henry Lawrence had made an end of speak-
ing, he rewarded the natives who had done faithful service :
and the meeting then dispersed. Herbert and Muriel

returned home again: and Eileen went with them.
Vi] Our Banner of England. 43

For some time nothing more was said about the mutiny :
and people began to think that all was right again.
Herbert and Muriel noticed however that their father
was very busy: and his absence from home became more
and more frequent as time went on. At last he told
Herbert one day that the mutiny was not by any means
at an end: the mischief-makers had found other reasons
besides religious ones for persuading the men to be dis-
obedient : they were being disobedient still, not only here,
but throughout the length and breadth of India. It was
becoming a serious war. Then Herbert thought he would
see some fighting after all! But his father said :—“ We
do not expect that the enemy will come here. Sir Henry
Lawrence is anxious about other places: but this place
Lucknow he considers safe. Pray Heaven he may be
right : for this is the place where your mother and Muriel
and yourself are. And therefore I must care for its safety.
first of all!”

But one morning not long after this, the whole town
was alarmed. “The enemy are coming” it was said: and
it was true. Titania and Eileen sped to the place where
Lawrence was. Every preparation was being made for
a real siege. Stores of food were being carried into the
place. New fortifications were being made. Each soldier
was being given his special post. Lawrence looked very
anxious. “I am not afraid for us, who are men and
soldiers”: he said: “it is for the women and children

that I fear.”
A4 Our Banner of England. [Cu

Before Eileen had half realised what was happening,
the fierce regiments of the Indian enemy were close to
them: black-faced wretches uttering fearful war-cries and
bellowing for admission: calling to Lawrence to give the
city up to them, as he valued his own life: firing musket-
shots at whomsoever they could see exposed: threatening
to destroy the whole place and torture everyone within
it, if their will were not obeyed immediately: an army
of wild and merciless murderers. The whole country was
black with the enormous numbers of them: marching
in formed line, arrayed in British uniforms, and armed
with all the artillery and implements of war, which the
English themselves had given them.

Lawrence said:—“I must write to General Havelock,
who is at Allahabad, to bring more men to Lucknow to
save us from destruction. We must keep the city at all
costs till he comes. We must never give in.” And he
wrote to Havelock, saying in what danger Lucknow was.

“Relieve us with all speed” he wrote. “I think we
might hold out for ten or fifteen days!”

Eileen returned to her little friends again. Herbert was
pale: but appeared as though endeavouring to enjoy the
scene. Muriel was very quiet: but showed no signs of
fear. Soon their mother came in: and told them that
their father was going away from them upon a dangerous
piece of business. They must come and bid him good-
bye. They went to the door of the bungalow: and found
him already on horseback and about that instant to
Vv.) Our Banner of England. 45

depart. “Lawrence has decided to leave the city, with
some picked soldiers, to attack the enemy at a place called
Chinhut. And I am to go with him. Heaven bless and
keep you while Iam away!” So saying, he bent from his
horse to kiss his wife and children. He hid his face for
a few moments in Muriel’s soft dark hair: and struggled
to be calm. Then he rose again to his full height in the
saddle: and crossing the Goomtee river by the bridge,
quickly galloped out of sight. None of his dear ones
ever saw him alive again.

Lawrence’s sally to Chinhut did not go prosperously.
Other enemies, whom he had not seen, were hidden in
ambush where he had to pass: and fell upon his soldiers
unawares. Many were killed: and the father of Herbert
and Muriel was among their number! Lawrence and
those with him barely escaped with their lives back to
the city walls.

Herbert heard of his father’s death, before his widowed
mother knew about it. He told her bravely, quietly: as
befitted a soldier’s son. But he no longer looked as he
had done hitherto. The terrors of war had come home
to him at last: for at the very beginning of it his dear
father was lost to him!

More trouble was yet in store for them all. The next
day Muriel fell very sick: and the good victuals, which
it was so important that she should have, had already risen
to a terribly high price. For the siege had now really
begun: and it would soon be impossible to buy them at
46 Our Banner of England. [Cx.

all. A doctor was wanted. Herbert went to fetch him:
for none of the servants durst leave the house. It was
very dangerous—almost unto death—to go into the streets
of Lucknow during those terrible days. In the meantime
Muriel lay in bed: and her mother had to watch con-
stantly by the side of her. A sick-room should be above
all things quiet and undisturbed: and such Muriel’s had
always been when she was ill before. But now the bullets
of the besieging savages rained on the walls of her bed-
chamber as thick as hail: the shutters had to be con-
tinually closed, for the sake of such slight protection as
they might afford: and, despite all precautions, Muriel’s
mother was actually wounded in the shoulder by one of
the merciless bullets, which found its way into the room.

Eileen, who of course had nothing to fear by the side
of the Fairy Queen, followed Herbert on his perilous
errand. Great were the horrors which were to be seen,
as they passed along the streets. But Herbert pluckily
persevered in the accomplishment of that which he had
come to do: and at last, by Heaven’s mercy, arrived
unhurt at the good doctor’s house.

He was admitted. But the doctor was not at home:
he had gone to the Residency, which was just opposite,—
the place where Lawrence lived, and where the levée had
been held. The servant thought. that Lawrence himself
must have been wounded. The boy went into the house:
he would wait there, he said, until the doctor came. The
Fairy Queen and Eileen waited too. Shot and shell were
Vi] Our Banner of England. 47

striking the house opposite, from which the doctor was
expected to come. After half an hour the door opened:
and a small party of men came across the road, amid
a shower of bullets, carrying a wounded man! When
Eileen saw him, she recognised him at once. It was
Sir Henry Lawrence himself: and he was wounded unto
death. When the party came to the doctor’s house,
Herbert was told that medical aid should be sent to Muriel
as soon as possible. So, with that hope, he left the house:
and, turning his face homewards, faced again the dangers
of the streets.

‘Eileen stayed for a while at the doctor’s house.
Lawrence had been carried safely to the northern verandah
of it, which at that moment was somewhat sheltered from
the heavy fire of the enemy. But he had hardly been
placed upon a bed there, when a terrific storm of bullets
came in that direction also: and it was only by the
greatest care and by keeping within the shelter of the
pillars and end walls, that any of the party who stood
round his bed were saved alive.

That was the second of July: and on the fourth the
wounded warrior died, bidding those around him fight on
to the last. “You must never give in”: he said: “the
barbarous Indians must never be allowed to touch our
women and children. You ought rather to die of starvation,
before you let that come to pass.” Lawrence spoke well.
It was better to starve and fall into the hands of Heaven,

than by surrendering to fall into the hands of merciless
48 Our Banner of England. [Cu

men. Besides the honour of our banner of England was
at stake: it was still blowing proudly on the topmost roof,
and, please Heaven, still should blow!

Eileen went that night to the leader’s lonely funeral:
lonely,—for none of his friends were there, save the priest
who read a hurried prayer above the grave. The words
of that prayer could hardly be heard by earthly ears, amid
the booming of the cannon without the walls.

Then Titania brought her back to Muriel’s bed-chamber.
The little girl was very ill. A young doctor had come to
see her. He said that she must have great care, and as
much quiet as possible. Alas! quiet was not to be had
in Lucknow at this time for all the money in the world.
The terrible siege went on amid unceasing shot and shell:
and would go on, until the expected soldiers should come
with Havelock to set them free. Time passed away: and
at last a shell burst in the very room where Muriel lay
abed. Happily she was herself unhurt: but the outside
wall of the chamber was utterly destroyed. And bullets
were still flying fast. Some soldiers passing in the street
called to the dwellers in the house :—“ You must come to
the Brigade Mess in the Residency. That is where all
the women and children are taking refuge now. Come!
there is no time to lose.” Hearing that the child was
sick, one of the soldiers, who.had served under Muriel’s
father, rushed into the room. Taking the pale child from
the bed, he wrapped her tender limbs in his rough military

great-coat (this was no time for ceremony): and ran from
Vv.) Our Banner of England. 49

the house to the place of safety, which had been mentioned.
They were followed by Herbert and his mother, who came
unprotected through the perilous streets. Other women
and children, and wounded and sick men, were hurrying
also to the Brigade Mess. All ranks were huddled together
there: and delicate little Muriel had to share a sofa in
the place with a butcher’s wounded urchin, a dirty creature
and shabbily attired.

In the third week of the siege this new place of refuge,
the Brigade Mess, was itself attacked: and from that time
forward not a few of the women and children were
numbered among the wounded in the city. When would
their troubles come to an end? Lawrence had said :—
“JT think we can hold the place for ten or fifteen days,
till Havelock comes.” Lawrence was dead: and Inglis,
‘who had taken his place, was continuing to hold the fortress
still—for a space of time far longer than for fifteen days.

Weeks passed away: the horrors increased, instead of
lessening. Food was very scarce. There was an infinite
torment of flies—like the Egyptian plague—which settled
upon everything. The air was foul. Disease and decay
were raging everywhere. The doctors said that Muriel
was dying: and must die certainly within a very short
time, unless good victuals could be had for her.

Herbert was miserable. His mother was very weary:
and her wound was not yet whole. And every morning
they arose and asked:—‘“Is not Havelock coming? We
shall die if he does not come soon.” But still no-one

4
50 Our Banner of England. — [cs

talked of surrendering the city to the mutineers. Our
banner of England was riddled with bullets again and
again: but a new Union Jack was always put in the
place of the old one.

Eileen watched unseen over Muriel’s couch. Herbert
would stay by the window: and tell his sister what was
passing in the street. His heart was sick with vainly
looking for relief.

A terrible explosion was heard. “The house opposite ”
said the boy “is blown to pieces.” And this was literally
the truth. The enemy had made mines right underneath
the Residency: and were now exploding them. Part
of the women’s quarters even was blown away in this
ghastly fashion. But still Inglis did not think of yield-
ing : for he remembered Lawrence’s dying words, and he
knew that they were true.

The butcher’s child died on Muriel’s sofa: and she had
it all to herself. But ah! for how long? Relief must
come soon: or Muriel would die.

And now at last news came from the friends of the
English. Havelock was on the road! A clever spy had
managed to bring a note into Lucknow, written by the
hand of Havelock. It said that Outram and he were
on their way: and hoped to reach Lucknow within three
or four days. Muriel seemed a little better on this day:
and Eileen fancied that she yet would live.

Three days more passed away with no sign of the

deliverers: and the morning of another came. Herbert
V.] Our Banner of England. 51

still looked through the window: which commanded a
view of the country beyond the fortifications. He could
see nothing but the armies of the enemy: and heard
only the thundering sounds of their artillery.—Suddenly
the air was rent by a wild shriek of joy: an infinitely
intense “hooray.” All looked at the place whence the
sound came. And there stood a poor Scotch corporal’s
wife: Jessie Brown by name: who had had her troubles
like the rest, and had borne them patiently. Was she
mad? or why her extraordinary joy? She could hardly
speak for excitement: but she said:—“I ken weel our
rescuers are here. I have just caught the faint sound
of bagpipe notes. Whist! I hear them still.” Eileen
heard nothing but the cannon’s roar: and it seemed that
nobody else heard anything of what the woman described.
“Vou must be mistaken” said someone. “I canna be
mistaken”: said Jessie Brown: “I should know the pibroch-
sound amid all other music in the world. A Scotch lass
couldna be mistaken aboot that. And oh! it is growing
louder. It is the slogan, as we ca’ it, of the advancing
Hielanders: I hear the piping o’ the Macgregors, the

ry”

grandest of them a And she wept for the very ecstasy
of her joy.

Jessie Brown was right. At midday the sounds of
battle were distinctly heard: and, as the afternoon
advanced, the sounds came nearer and nearer. Soon all
acknowledged that they heard the bagpipes. Muriel’s

mother clasped her darling’s hand: and listened to the
52 Our Banner of England. [Cu

noise with a beating heart. For the soldiers who were
coming were bringing with them that state of things,
which was the last hope for Muriel’s life. Indeed the
lives of all the women and children hung on the same
event. For starvation stared them in the face on the
one side: and on the other, what mercy was to be looked
for, if the enemy could win their way into the city ?

And now the sharp ring of rifles was heard: all knew
that their saviours were very nigh. The flash of the
musketry was gradually seen: and then the well-known
uniforms of the faithful Highlanders. After that there
was a great battle. Havelock and Outram fought their
way through the enemy’s lines. The enemy were beaten
back. And at last, as the sun was going down, Inglis and
his trusty officers clasped their deliverers’ hands.

Lawrence had wondered whether Lucknow could be
held for fifteen days—They had “held it for eighty-
seven”!

The joy was not a thing which pen and ink can
possibly describe. Eileen had a confused vision of men
and women and little children shaking each others’ hands:
cheering : weeping : talking endlessly : shouting: singing :
dancing—in a frenzy of wild delight! For the thing
which was too horrible for words had zo¢ come to pass:
English women and children had zo fallen into the horrid
clutches of the Indian savages. When the siege was
over, and food was no longer scarce, Muriel in happier

and more peaceful days grew well again. But this was




T. J. BARKER 77x. (To face ~. 53.
THE RELIEF OF LUCKNOW.

From a print published by Messrs. Thomas Agnew & Sons.
Vv] Our Banner of England. 53

not until Sir Colin Campbell with more men had come
to their relief. When Eileen last saw Lucknow, behold !
Sir Colin, Havelock and Outram stood together: and
our banner of England still was blowing on the topmost
roof. Happy will it be for India, if she may rest for
ever beneath the shadow of the Union Jack!

*& * * a *

Eileen looked up. The chariot of the golden eaglets
was waiting there for her. Titania bade her take her
place again upon its cushioned seat. Attendant fairies
covered our two travellers with fair shawls: and they
returned to the station. The train was waiting for them.
Teazer looked up lazily as they opened the door of the
carriage: but he did not jump in wild excitement toward
her, as he usually did aftera long absence. “What! boy”:
she said: “don’t you know I’ve been away far more than
eighty-seven days?” “You have forgotten”: said the
Fairy Queen : “it has all been one moment at this station,
where your dog has been. You have come back to the
same point of time, as that wherein you started from the
station.” “I forgot” said Eileen: and she shut her eyes
for very bewilderment, as she fell back in her seat. Then

the Magic Train went on again.

As they travelled, Eileen looked again from the window
—through the crevice in the silver cloud to the countries
of the earth beneath. And it happened that sometimes
54 Eileen’s Journey. [Cx

one country would be in the foreground and easiest to see,
sometimes another : so that she had a never-ending variety
of spectacles. They flew along, past station after station,
without stopping at all: but, whenever there was anything,
which those looking from the window wished to see more
particularly, the Fairy Queen was always able—by a
movement of her sceptre—either entirely to stop the train
for a bit, or to make it travel at a slower pace. And,
during the next few years of their backward journey, there
were many scenes, which Eileen beheld in this way: and
watched with the liveliest delight. Some were scenes of
war. At one time they watched the great doings of
English soldiers in the cold Crimea: and the famous battles
there, of which the history-books are full. At another
Italy was nearest to the cloud-chink, and Eileen looked on
Venice :—at any time it would have given her great
delight to see that fair city, whose streets are beautiful
waters and whose sky is almost always blue: but now the
city was busied with a great revolt and full of armed men
eager to be fighting: the citizens were fighting for their
liberty, and resolved to be no more a subject city.—It was
warfare of this kind, which the Fairy Queen loved best to
watch. There was other warfare in those years, which she
liked less.

Some again were scenes of peace: and Eileen saw many
of the hunts and horse-races and cricket-matches of the
days before she was born. And she beheld with the

greatest interest a hundred famous sportsmen and famous
vo Eileen’s Journey. 55

beasts: of whom she had heard her father speak, but
whom she never expected to look on in the flesh. Nor
was it sport alone that she watched: she saw something
of business too. She saw the myriad money-makers, who
then as now were scattered all over the face of the earth.
Most of these were dull enough: but there was some
excitement in watching the swarms of fortune-seekers, who
flocked to Australia about this time to dig for the gold
which had just been discovered there, and in observing
how they quarrelled for its possession, when it was found.
And, beside all these, she saw those men as well who
made it their business to help their fellows, and who
loved—more than wealth or pleasure—that which is
really beautiful and good.

All the while Eileen was eagerly looking out for Ireland,
her dear native land: whose past she longed to know and
understand, more than the past of all the rest beside. But,
for some while after they left Lucknow, she never caught
a glimpse of it: until at last, when they had traversed a
distance of nine years, she turned to Titania and said :—
“I would like to see Ireland again.” “You shall”: the
Queen at once replied: “but Ireland at this time is a sad
spectacle for you. Look from the window!” Eileen did
so: and beheld the Connemara wilderness in all its glory
of wild lakes and misty mountains. But she quickly
started back from the window: and clutched Titania’s arm.
She had seen a horrible and ghastly sight! The ground
was strewn about with the dying and the dead: andin a
56 Eileen’s Journey. [Cu. V.

moment Eileen knew what the year must be to which they
were now come. It was the year of the great famine !

Eileen knew well that Connaught country in the days in
which she lived: and, when sojourning there a week or
two, she had often gazed upon the scene which she was
gazing upon now, and marked with pleasure the red bog-
lands, dotted here and there with native folk,—men in
their quaint knee-breeches and women in their scarlet
petticoats scattered about the ground and cutting the turf,
from which they make their fires,—while others within
doors were preparing their frugal meals of boiled potatoes.

Potatoes! they lived on potatoes: and in this famine-
year the potatoes had failed. The absence of that simple
root made all the difference. It meant starvation: and
the Irish were indeed starving in great multitudes. The
hunger was terrible: all were in the immediate presence of
the most cruel death, because they wanted that daily
bread, for which day by day without ceasing they so
piteously prayed. Whole families were perishing: and
many a mother would have given her very life for a few
crusts, on which to feed her child. The people knew not
what to do: they began to fight against their rulers, for no
good reason, but because in their despair they could not
tell whom to blame. Eileen had never before seen real
despair: and the vision of it appalled her.

She did not look out of the window again:—and the
Magic Train passed on.
CHAPTER VI.

THICK-RIBBED ICE.

“To reside
in thrilling regions of thick-ribbed ice.”
—SHAKESPEARE,

NCE more the train began to slacken its speed: and

() Eileen, looking from the windows, observed that
they were coming into another station. The fairy-
porters rang their bells: and shouted the station’s name :—
“THE YEAR OF OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND EIGHT
HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIVE.” Our travellers again
found the faithful eaglets waiting for them. “Bear us,
sweet creatures” said Titania “to the Arctic Seas.” Away
they flew forthwith: and stayed not until they had set
down their passengers, on a white bleak promontory in the
heart of the Land of Ice. Attendant fairies clothed them
with soft warm furs: and a blazing fire burst forth, by
Magic, at the side of them. Thus Eileen herself was warm:
and yet she wondered how any creature could live in such
a clime, if no fairy-porters were at hand. Nowhere, save at
the very spot where the car had halted, did there seem to
be any possibility of warmth whatever. All around were

57
58 Thick= Ribbed: lee: ce

spread the waters of an endless ocean, more than three-
quarters whereof were wholly frozen up: and, where there
was unfrozen sea, mountainous icebergs were drifting about
therein, not without frequent collisions terrible to see. But
in very truth nature had taken care of the birds and beasts,
who lived in these chill climes, almost as well as the Fairy
Queen had taken care of her own favourite. And this
Eileen soon perceived, when she began to look about her.
The fowls of the air were clothed with the most luxurious
furs: their necks were wrapped about with wool: their
whole bodies were protected by warm raiment: and their
legs and feet were covered with natural stockings of thick
hair. The four-footed beasts were arrayed just as were the
birds: and the intense cold seemed to give them positive
enjoyment. Have you ever seen the poor Polar Bear at
the Zoological Gardens, pacing up and down the whole
day long in his narrow prison, and seeming even in winter
to find our England intolerably hot? Well, Eileen saw
him in his Arctic home: roaming whithersoever he pleased.
He was happy there, and shambled gaily along, delighting
in the hoar-frost and the ice. So it was with all the beasts
that inhabited that land, in the middle of what the
geography-books call the “ Frigid Zone.” It is one of the
laws of nature that all living animals are dressed in the
fashion which is best suited to the clime in which they live.
“Can then human beings live here at all?” asked Eileen.
“The men” said Titania “who were born here and whose
fathers’ fathers lived in the Arctic regions are fitted by
V1] Thick-Ribbed Ice. 59

nature, as the birds and beasts are fitted, to endure the
cold. Look at their skins, their hair and their whole
bodies” :—and Eileen followed the direction in which the
Fairy Queen's finger pointed, and saw the strange native
people of the place. “Are those the Esquimaux?” she
asked. “They are” Titania said. And indeed they had
the same look about them that all other living things had
in this corner of the world: a look of comfortable warmth
in the midst of the penetrating cold. “Oh!” said Eileen
“what would the men of Europe do, if they were here?
They were never born to endure this fearful cold. If they
came hither, they would surely die.” “Alas!” said the
Queen “my mind tells me that your foreboding is all too
true. There are Europeans here to-day: brave strong-
hearted men, once strong-bodied too. But the terrors of
this country are beyond their strength. We will go and
see how they fare in this cruel land.” Eileen was over-
whelmed with astonishment at the news which the Queen
had told her. “Europeans here?” she said. “What men
of Europe could be so bold or foolish as to come to this
place, when they might stay safe and warm at home?
They must be mad. From what land do they come?”
“They come from England”: said the Fairy Queen:
“and they are NOT mad. If they had come from mere
idle curiosity, they would be so. But they came with
their brave hearts, because they hoped to help mankind
thereby. They came to discover that which would be

a boon to mariners the whole world over—the north-
60 Thick-Ribbed Ice. [Cu

west passage to the other hemisphere. They used all
possible precautions: and hoped to surmount all obstacles.
Though nature had not given them thick woolly skins
and hair, science and art could clothe them in such fashion
as to imitate the advantages which nature has given to
the Esquimaux. The birds and beasts of Arctic regions
have to pay dearly for their coats of fur. For man kills
the poor creatures, that he may clothe himself in. the
raiment of which he has despoiled them. So, for that
matter, these men are well provided. Is it not moreover
worth while to undergo much personal trouble and pain—
is it not even worth while to meet a death bravely
suffered—to help the whole world to new advantages?
It is fortunate that all men are not content to sit ‘safe and
warm’ at home. Come with me, and I will show you a
hero: who is willing to suffer death to satisfy the object
of his life.”

In a moment Eileen found herself standing on the
deck of Her Majesty’s ship Eredus. And it was with
great joy that she hailed the sight of this vessel: whose
appearance reminded her at once of Europe and of the
comforts enjoyed in our own Temperate Zone. She was
a glorious ship, fitted with all the gear and machinery
of modern times—a ship which had done good service
in the Queen’s Navy, and which had weathered a thousand
dangers successfully. But now she was useless for the
purpose with which she had been’ builded:. she would
never sail again: for she was fast bound in the ¢hzck-
(70 face p. 60.

SHIPS IN THE ARCTIC REGIONS,


VL] Thick-Ribbed Ice, 61

ribbed ice, and gripped with a deadly embrace. It was
a grievous disappointment to the sailors who were on
board of her: for although they knew that they were
close to the north-west passage, which they had come
to seek, they also knew that their vessel could never
now go through that passage. It was a hard fortune
to come so near success and yet to fail. “Come” said
Titania “let us go below: and you shall see a man
whom you will never forget. It is the dying Franklin.”
Eileen went below: and they entered the cabin, where
the hero’s death-bed was. There lay the commander of
the expedition at the last moment of his life. “Alas!”
he said feebly: “I am too old: I am not strong enough
to fight any longer against the chilling climate of this
Arctic land. I am worn out: and I must die. But that
is not the worst. What most troubles me is that I have
failed in the purpose of my life. The north-west passage
is not yet discovered.” At this moment the cabin-door
softly opened: and one of his officers came in, who had
just returned to the ship from a long expedition made
to explore the neighbouring country. “Be of a good
cheer” said the new-comer. “You have not failed. I
come to you at this moment to tell you that the north-
west passage IS discovered. I and my men have
searched it out and found it. And the glory of the dis-
covery is yours: for it was you who brought us to the
place.” Franklin’s face at this intelligence was right
glorious to behold. “Thank God!” he said: “I die
62 Thick-Ribbed Ice. [Cu

happy.” And, saying this, he yielded up his spirit and
fell asleep.

His was a happy death:—such a death as one would
wish for a hero. He died at the very moment, when the
object of his life had been fulfilled: and he did not have
to face the horrors which fell upon his comrades after-
wards. For it came to pass, that, although the north-
west passage was discovered, yet none of those who were
with Franklin on this voyage lived to tell the tale. They
had written their short story on a scrap of paper: and
put this scrap of paper in a bottle. This bottle remained
whole, when they were turned to dust: and was found
by friendly Englishmen. The scrap of paper in the bottle
was the last trusty news of Franklin and his brave followers,
which his mourners in England ever had. (Now Franklin
had a loving wife to mourn him : besides friends innumer-
able at home.)

Of the last days of Franklin’s followers no news ever
came to Europe. Some of their skeletons were found,
and their sledge: and some of their other tools and
possessions. No man in Europe ever saw the men them-
selves alive again. But Eileen saw them:—saw them as
they stood mourning their great chief:—saw them sadly
bury him:—saw them, after vainly waiting for the ice
to melt and set their vessels free, at last abandon their
ships and march with their sledge across the fields of ice,
in search of a friendly continent :—saw them fall sick:—saw

them drop and faint by the way :—saw them starve :—and
VL] Thick-Ribbed Ice. 63

saw them die—even to the last man of their company.
And the Fairy Queen said :—‘“It is well. The death of
these men is a blessed death. For they died bravely
striving to do a great thing, which would help all
mankind.” And Eileen recognised the truth of her saying :
and understood that it is better to die in pursuit of a noble
object as Franklin died, than to sit “safe and warm” at
home in selfishness.

Eileen took a last look at the never-to-be-forgotten
Land of Ice, with its strange natives and its curious beasts
and birds: and she felt its chill blasts sweep for the last
time over them, as she bade farewell to the old Polar Bear
upon a snowy peak.

* * * * *

Then, reascending the car of the golden eaglets, she

was wafted back again to the Magic Railway.
CHAPTER VII.

FIERY FLOODS.

“To bathe in fiery floods.’—SHAKESPEARE.

RITERS of all ages—those at least who dwell in
\ \ the “Temperate Zone”—seem to have agreed
with Shakespeare in thinking that the worst
tortures imaginable are first the hottest of heat and then
the coldest of cold :—
“to bathe in fiery floods, or to reside
in thrilling regions of thick-ribbed ice.”
Milton describing the tortures of the inhabitants of Hell
tells us that they

“starve in ice their soft ethereal warmth.”

And Dante, who wanted, when describing the place he
called “Inferno,” to picture the most awful torments which
could be conceived, wrote what he thought most horrible :
and it was this :—
“Woe to you wicked spirits. Hope not
ever to see the sky again. I come
to take you to the other shore across

into eternal darkness, there to dwell
in fierce heat and in ice!”

64
Cu. VIL] Fiery Floods. 65

Eileen had been to the land whose natives “reside
in thrilling regions of thick-ribbed ice”: and now at the
next station “THE YEAR OF OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND
EIGHT HUNDRED AND FORTY-ONE” she was taken in the
car of the golden eaglets to a land where all nature seemed
to “bathe in fiery floods”! She herself was protected
by the fairies as before from the horrors of the fearful
climate, to which she was come. For she found herself
clothed mysteriously in airy fabrics and fanned with the
coolest breezes—all by that same magic which in the land
of ice had made her warm. Here again too she noticed
that the men and animals who were born in the place had
been fitted by nature to endure the climate. And the
same creatures, which she had seen, in the Zoological
Gardens, covered with blankets and warmed by stoves and
hot-water pipes, even in our most scorching summers, were
here at home: and basked in contented nakedness beneath
the blazing sun, which shines in the “ Torrid Zone.”

But for the men of Europe, unaccustomed to such a
clime, the heat was fully as terrible as the cold had been
in the Arctic lands:—a thing whereof Eileen was soon
made aware. The poets are right in this. There are
no more fearful tortures to the human body than these
tortures of ice and fiery floods. “Where are we?” said
Eileen as she looked about her. We are standing on
the earth’s equator” answered the Fairy Queen. Eileen
looked at her feet: half expecting to see the equator

drawn there, as it is drawn in the map. But she soon

5
66 Fiery Floods, - [Cu

remembered that it is an altogether imaginary line: and
asked another question. “What country then is this?”
she said. “It is Darkest Africa” the Queen answered.
“Come, let us explore it.”

“ Why do you call it ‘Darkest’ Africa?” asked Eileen :
for the fiery floods that poured down from the sun blazed
oftentimes with brilliant light. “Because it is the land
of the heathen”: said the Fairy Queen: “in whose minds
there is no light.” And Eileen, wandering about the
country, soon understood that these were indeed “the
people that walked in darkness”! Among them were
those who filled her oftentimes with horror unspeakable :
those who deliberately killed men and women of a like flesh
and blood with themselves, as a sacrifice upon the altars of
their heathen gods: those who slew the old and weakly
because they said there was not food in plenty sufficient
for everyone: and those who led the life of cannibals—
most terrible of all to see—whose hideous doings were
beheld in open day, shameless and remorseless. Yet even
among these wretches the Fairy Queen at times found
things to show her favourite, which were beautiful and
good. There was much that gave hope of better things
to come, when the days of darkness should be passed.

Africa interested Eileen very’ much. She would have
thought it worth while to go there, if only to see its birds
and beasts and fishes. Hundreds of creatures which before
she had seen only in menageries or read of in natural-

history books were now shown to her in their own homes:
VIL] Fiery Floods. 67

and moreover they never started away at her presence, nor
showed any sign of alarm, for they knew that Titania and
her friends would never do them aharm. Bright-coloured
birds were there: green yellow-shouldered parrots and
guinea-fowl: ostriches and black vultures. Sharks swam
in the seas: and scorpions crept upon the earth. The long-
necked giraffe, the striped zebra, and the fierce rhinoceros
each in his turn walked up most trustfully to be admired,
when the Fairy Queen and Eileen came near. They saw
the mother hippopotamus, carrying her young ones on
her neck: they saw mighty buffaloes and lions fighting
in desperate conflict one with another. Eileen liked the
lion best of all the animals. “He really is the king of
beasts” said she. “The books are right which told me so.”

One night, while they were in South Africa, they went to
the side of a water-pond: and sat there together in the
foliage of a thick-leaved tree. It was a moonlit evening:
and for a short space all was still. Then there was the
roar of lions: and soon a troop of them came to the water’s
edge to drink. When their thirst was satisfied they lay
there still awhile: and seemed as though about to sleep.
But in a few minutes Eileen heard the lowing of cattl—
not very far off. “The sound comes from the village of
Mabotza” said the Queen. And hardly had she spoken
when the lions made it manifest that they too had heard
it: for they started up, and rushed away, roaring, to seek
their meat !

Our travellers followed: and found the lions doing great
68 Fiery Floods. TC.

havoc in the pens. It was a fearful slaughter. When
they had had enough, they withdrew again: and came toa
small hill, covered with trees. There Eileen and Titania
tarried: watching their majestic slumber, until the sun was
risen high in the heavens.

And now the owners of the cattle were seen coming to
avenge themselves upon the midnight robbers : a troop of
negro savages armed with spears. The men made them-
selves into a circle round the hill. Eileen watched the
lions with deepening interest. They looked a formidable
enemy to attack with spears: and at first she could not
see that they had any other weapons. All of a sudden
however she heard the crack of a rifle! and quickly
perceived that one lion, who had been sitting on a little
tock behind a bush, was wounded. “He is shot”: cried
the savages: “he is shot.” Eileen saw his tail erected
in anger for one moment: then with a fearful rush he
bounded forward and sprang upon the man, who had fired
the shot. Growling horribly, he shook him, as Eileen had
seen Teazer shake a rat. At this instant another shot
was fired. The lion turned to attack his new enemy: and
bit him in the thigh. But just then the bullets, which
the lion had received, took effect : and the great monster
fell down dead.

Eileen looked to the place where the man was, whom
she had first seen beneath the lion’s dreadful paw: and
to her astonishment she saw that it was a white man.
“That is he” Titania said “who is to bring Light to the
VIL] Fiery Floods. 69

Dark Continent. He has come from England, on purpose
to preach the Christian Gospel to men who had never even
heard of it before. If the lion had slain him, Africa
had lost her truest friend. But Heaven in its mercy
spared him.” “Who is it?” asked Eileen. The Queen
answered :—“ It is David Livingstone!”

And from that moment Titania and Eileen followed the
fortunes of this great missionary for many a long day.
He underwent great perils in his work of love: not only
perils from beasts of prey: but other perils too: perils
from hostile savages, who did not know that he was
their friend: perils of every sort by land and water: and,
worst of all, the perils of the fiery floods which poured
down ever more fiercely from the sky as he pierced his
way farther and farther through unhealthy swamps and
swollen rivers into the “Torrid Zone.” “The climate of
Africa” said Titania “is killing Livingstone, as surely
as the Arctic climate killed Sir John Franklin.” But it
was a slower matter in this case. Eileen never saw the
death of Livingstone: which happened some years later,
when the rising waters overtook him: and, after making
a long vain journey to escape them, carried on the backs
of his native followers, he fell a victim to the weakness
which the climate of the land of fiery floods had wrought
in him.

Titania did not choose that they should wait in Africa
so long as that: but they waited long enough to under-

stand the dangers which Livingstone was facing, and
70 Fiery Floods. [Cu.

long enough to understand also the reason why he faced
them. On a day, while they were following him, he
met a woman called Manenko,—who was a chieftainess
in Africa. Manenko was the sort of woman, whom, if
you once saw, you would not easily forget.

She was young, tall, and, for one of her people, hand-
some: her black skin was painted with red ochre: iron
ornaments were hung about her, which in Africa were
considered as precious as diamonds are in London: and
charms innumerable adorned her person too, amulets
which she thought would keep the evil spirits off and
bring her good luck of every kind. For she was very
superstitious. When this Manenko met Livingstone she
liked him well: and offered to take him to her uncle the
Shinté, who was a sort of king in those parts. Two men
accompanied her, one on each side: the man on her right
hand was her husband: and the other was her drummer,
who made strange music as.they passed along! She had
numerous servants withal.

This strange company, with Livingstone under their
protection, came to the kingdom of the Shinté. The
wretched people in this place worshipped an ugly idol,
made of grass and clay, with cowry-shells for eyes: some-
thing like a lion and something like a crocodile. Think!
It is a sober fact. Eileen saw them, with her own eyes,
bowing down and worshipping this thing. It was their
religion :—they had never heard of any other. Eileen

could not understand what they could see in this frightful
VIL] Fiery Floods. 71

object, that they worshipped it. But Titania said :—
“They worship it, because they think it beautiful and
good. You may say that it is absurd to call it beautiful
and meaningless to call it good. Yet there may be some-
thing beautiful and good in their rude faith, which you
cannot understand. They want to worship something and
to pray to something to give them what is good for them :
but they know not what to worship. It is Livingstone’s
high privilege to preach to them the true religion!”

Manenko fell ill: and was unable herself to present
the missionary to her uncle. Sambaza her husband under-
took to do so in her stead. “Come with me” he said:
and he led the way to the place where the Shinté was
waiting with his assembled court. He himself sat beneath
a tree on a throne of leopard’s skin: he had on a checked
jacket and a kilt of scarlet and green: he wore heavy
ornaments of iron on his arms and chest, and anklets of
copper on his ankles—things of priceless value in that
land: on his head he wore a helmet made of beads and
crowned with a great bunch of goose-feathers. Close to
him sat three lads with large sheaves of arrows on their
shoulders.

Sambaza and his followers clapped their hands when
they came into the Shinté’s presence :—this was to show
their respect for him. They rubbed their chests and arms
with . ashes :—that was to show that the meeting was
a friendly one. The soldiers, fully armed, made fierce

grimaces at Livingstone to frighten him: and pretended
72 Fiery Floods, [Cu

that they were going to attack him: but he sat still and
showed them that he was not afraid. Then they ceased
from doing these things.

Then Sambaza, who was gaily dressed, stalked back-
wards and forwards in front of the Shinté and told them
everything, which Manenko and he had been able to learn,
of Livingstone: how the Bible, which he had come to
teach them, was a word from Heaven: and how the white
man wanted the tribes to live in peace. It was very doubt-
ful, he said, whether the white man was telling the truth or
not: probably he was not. But the Shinté was usually
kind to strangers: and he hoped that he would be kind
to the white man. Thus spake Sambaza: but he did not
at all understand that Livingstone was doing a far greater
kindness to the negroes than they could repay to him.

Behind the Shinté sat about a hundred women: dressed
in red baize. The chief wife of the Shinté sat in front:
with a curious red cap upon her head. During the
intervals between the speeches, these women burst forth
into a kind of plaintive ditty : but Eileen could not make
out whether it was in praise of the speaker, or of the
Shinté, or of themselves. They often clapped their hands
and shouted with delight, when anything was said which
pleased them.

Curious drums and wooden instruments of music were
played by the Shinté’s band from time to time. Nine
speeches were made: and the tenth was the speech of the

Shinté himself, who was very dignified and condescending.
VIL] Fiery Floods. 73

Then Livingstone stood up and preached the Christian
faith: and the negroes thought that they were being very
kind in listening to what he said. They did not at first
appear much interested: but the magic-lantern, which he
showed them afterwards, with little pictures on a sheet,
excited them immensely. It seemed to them a miracle:
for they could not conceive what caused the bright
pictures to come and go at the white man’s desire.

In this way the Gospel first came to the land of the
Shinté, as to so many other regions of the Dark Continent.
Eileen left Livingstone sitting under a graceful tree called
a banian, so to obtain such shelter as he could from the
fiery floods which came in torrents from the African sun:
she knew that the climate of Africa was to cause his
death at the last, as it had already caused him cruel pain
in life. But she could not wish it otherwise. The pain and
the death were not for nothing, nor for a little purpose.
For he had caused the great Light to be seen of the
people that walked in darkness. And for that, Africa,
through countless centuries, will do honour to his name.

And Titania and Eileen went back to the station.
In their after-wanderings they experienced many fierce
extremes of heat and cold: but never so startling a change
as when they came from the Arctic regions to the land of
Africa.
74 Eileen’s Journey. (Cu.

And as the train passed on, they saw the usual shifting
scenes of war and peace. But they also saw some persons
and things, whose likeness was not to be seen in every
age, but which Eileen always remembers as peculiar to
this little bit of the line. |

Such, for one, was the setting-free of all the negro-slaves
throughout the British Empire. Eileen was astounded at:
the frantic joy of the men and women, who had been
whipped and driven and used merely as living tools for
untold centuries: when they heard that they were their
own masters and would never have to work again without
a wage, and that the mothers could never have their
children sold away from them any more, nor the men
have their wives stolen from their side. It was a thing
never to be forgotten.

The next great event along this line was the glimpse,
which they had in passing, of Beethoven, the best of
composers and the chief pride of Germany. Simply to
have seen the face and forehead of Beethoven, when he
was at work, was a recollection for Eileen in her after-
years, which many would have envied her. But she almost
forgot the sight of him, in listening to his music.- And,
when she found that he was deaf, and that, while all the
world was ravished with his music, he could not hear a
note of it himself, she thought it was one of the saddest
things which she had ever known.

Then again, through the silver cloud, she had a vision

of Lord Byron’s death. Byron had loved the country of
VIL] Eileen’s Journey. 75

Greece: and had written noble poems for its sake. And
now he gave his life for the liberty of Greece. Why?
Because, he said, Greece was a country of past glories:
and it was a shame that its glories should not rise again.
The Greeks were at war for their liberty: wherefore he
joined their cause, and there he met his death.

Eileen asked. Titania to tell her all about the past
glories of which Lord Byron had spoken. “Ah! my dear
Eileen” she said—“you shall see these things later on,
along our backward journey, for yourself. The country
of Greece has another and a lovelier name, the name of
Hellas. This was its name in the days of old: and its
people. were known as Hellenes. In those days we fairies
were called gods and goddesses: and all the ideas of
men were somewhat different. Byron says rightly that
they were days of glory: you will say so when you see
them and Hellas for yourself.”

And, before the next station at which they were to get
out, the train stopped once again: and Eileen, through the
crevice in the cloud, saw two other poets, not one whit
less great than Byron: and heard them speak together.

The first was the wild-eyed Shelley: very young and
beautiful. At first Eileen thought he must be mad: he
said such strange unusual things, and was altogether unlike
other men. But soon the music of words, that seemed
to flow from his brain, compelled her to listen with the
deepest admiration: as the whole world is listening even

now that he is dead.
76 Eileen’s Journey. [Cu. VIL

The other was his friend John Keats: who made the
loveliness of nature more lovely by his poetry.

Eileen heard these men also speak of Hellas and agree
with Lord Byron, that there was glorious beauty in the
past days of its liberty and ought to be again. And from
this day Eileen longed impatiently for the time, when
they should go to ancient Hellas, and she might see
that glory for herself. She was right to look forward to
it: for no other country had ever such rich thoughts of
beauty or such enchanting fairy-tales, as ancient Hellas
had.




PERCIVAL SKELTON de?,] (To face p. 77.
BRUSSELS,
CHAPTER VIII.

THE SIGNAL SOUND OF STRIFE.

“Last noon beheld them full of lusty life :
last eve in Beauty’s circle proudly gay:
the midnight brought the signal sound of strife,
the morn the marshalling in arms, the day
battle’s magnificently stern array.”

—Byron.

T was some while before they stopped again: and
Eileen, looking from the window, saw that they had
traversed a distance of several years since their last

halting-place. It was now THE YEAR OF OUR LORD
ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND FIFTEEN. Our
travellers went to Brussels: and arrived there on the
evening of the fifteenth of June, when it was already dark.
Eileen followed Titania through several streets, until
they came to a small and unpretentious-looking house in a
quiet corner of the city. “This house” said the Fairy
Queen “is at present tenanted by the widow of an English
officer, who was killed at the battle of Corunna. And she
is at present in Brussels on a business-matter :—connected
with some papers belonging to his regiment, which were
found upon him after his death. Her daughter Lilian is
77
78 The Signal Sound of Strife. [c«

here with her: and she is going to her first ball to-night—
the Duchess of Richmond’s ball. It is now six years since
the death of her father: and a great lady has insisted on
taking Lilian in her own carriage to this festivity. Say,
shall we two go with them” asked Titania “ wrapped
about as usual by’ a cloud of invisibility?” Of course
Eileen assented: and so they went together to Lilian’s
chamber, where she was dressing for the ball. The last
touches were being put, as our travellers entered the room.
Lilian was a very pretty girl: just seventeen years old:
English every inch of her: light as the air: delicately
made: her cheeks just tinged with a faint pink colour:
with soft wavy hair: a sort of brittle-looking beauty, like
a rare piece of old china. She was dressed in light blue:
a simple gown, but one which was very appropriate to her
form. The soft wavy hair already referred to was having
the best attention of her maid, a damsel cunning in such
things: who was doing all that she knew how to do to
complete the work of art, which nature had so well begun.
Eileen was not enthusiastic about the beauty of this
Lilian: for Lilian stood beside Titania, and who would
be enthusiastic about the pale hue of the blue-bell, if it
bloomed beside the glory of a summer rose? But none of
Lilian’s partners would see the Fairy Queen: and Eileen
felt sure that the Duchess of Richmond’s ball would boast
no fairer flower than the soldier's orphan daughter, with
whom she was to go. And now the great lady’s carriage

was at the door. In the twinkling of an eye Lilian was
vill] The Signal Sound of Strife. 79

down the stairs: and had darted up the carriage-step—
blowing kisses to her mother, who watched her from the
door. The footman took the order to drive at once to the
Rue des Cendres, where the front entrance to the ball-
room was. And Eileen and Titania were with them as
they drove away, although they knew it not.

As they entered the ball-room, the dancers were just
taking their places for the first quadrille. While it was
being danced, Lilian and her protectress had time to
take their seats and look about them, before they were
surrounded by a throng of friends and the fair girl was
besieged by officers demanding her hand in the dance.

Who shall venture to tell again the story of that many-
storied ball? Men and women have been dancing the
whole world over for forty centuries at least :—yet never
has there been dancing so famous as that dancing. Amid
the throng of “fair women and brave men,” the Fairy
Queen and Eileen steered their unseen way. And a
glorious company of fairies was also there invisible :—
dancing among the mortals, and shedding among them
rays of the beautiful and good. Even Titania could not
resist the sound of the dance-music: and joined her troop
of the many-twinkling feet. Their brightness was reflected
in the ranks of the Duchess of Richmond’s guests : while
Eileen, disporting herself among the fairies, was happiness
itself. And “all went merry as a marriage-bell.”

As for Lilian, think what delight it must have been for
her! She had never been to any ball before: but had lived
80 The Signal Sound of Strife. — [cx

a very quiet life in her mother’s house for the six long
years which had passed since her father’s death—amid a
multitude of lesson-books and needlework. And now she
was the admired of all admirers in that brilliant assembly.
The great lady, who had brought her to the ball, had
before this made her known to her young cousin, a captain
in the Guards, who was there to-night. Lilian and this
youth held sweet converse together: they liked each other
well, and were partners, you may believe me, more than
once. Eileen followed them as they flitted about amid a
maze of gay uniforms and gowns of every colour in the
rainbow. And then she sat on a sofa with them, while
they rested between two dances: and listened to their
talk—a silent invisible listener, all unbeknown to them.
The young soldier was eager for the daily-expected
marching-orders. But Lilian confessed that her hope was.
the army would tarry in Brussels a little longer :—“ Surely
there was no hurry for the dreadful day to come? It
must come of course—but surely there was no need for
haste?” The young soldier, impatient for action, thought
otherwise. And then they fell a-talking about the great
officers of the army, not a few of whom were in the room.
Lilian’s partner pointed out to her the Duke of Brunswick,
the Prince of Orange, and last, but not least, the Duke of
Wellington.

When Lilian saw the Iron Duke, she was delighted at
his handsome presence and soldierly bearing. “How I
should like to know him!” she said. “If only he had
vit] The Signal Sound of Strife. 81

spoken one word to me, I should be proud-of the remem-
brance all my life.” Her partner answered :—“ My uncle,
who is acolonel on his staff, could introduce you: come
with me, and I will ask him to do it.” He was as good
as his word: he found his uncle: and the three approached
the Duke together. And in a few moments Lilian had
her wish: and was standing face to face with the great
general. He spoke very kindly to her: for he was always
courteous. And, when he heard her father’s name, he
looked at her with true affection. “Oh! he was a
trusty friend of mine”: he said: “and a gallant officer
withal. War is a terrible and painful thing. Some
persons think a successful general’s life is an enviable
one. I tell you that even in the moment of my greatest
victories, I have had more pain than pleasure :—for I have
always had to mourn the death of some, often of many,
whom I had loved and honoured. Such an one your
father was: though it was as subordinate officers that we
knew each other.” And he asked her for the honour of
her hand at the next quadrille. Lilian, with a blush of
real pleasure, accepted the honour: and, when the dance
was over, he led her to a sofa, and said :—“ Farewell, my
child: it is quite possible that we shall never meet again.”
And there was that in his face which was full of meaning:
and about which Eileen often ponders to this day. Then,
bending close to her ear, and whispering, he said :—“ Can
I trust you to seize a fitting occasion and give this note
to the colonel who presented you to me, and to say never
6
82 The Signal Sound of Strife. — [cs.

a word about it to anyone? Be careful: for tidings of
grave importance lie within the folds of it.” Lilian was
much pleased at the trust reposed in her: and, curtseying
low to the Duke, for aforetime ladies always made their
curtsey on such occasions, sat down beside the lady who
had brought her to the ball :—while they had been talking
the Duke had led her to the place. She then waited for
an opportunity to deliver her note: and had not long to
wait. For the colonel himself, who had been fascinated
by the blue butterfly whom, as he said, the wind had
blown towards him, soon came and desired to dance with
her himself. She willingly agreed: and, when he had
led her to a quiet corner, she gave him the little piece
of paper. “Read it” she said. “It is from the Duke of
Wellington.” He read it,—looked very grave, and then
said :—“Forgive me for my want of courtesy: but this
is a serious matter. I must leave you without delay.”
And, having led her back to her protectress, he was gone
in a few seconds out of the ball-room altogether. Lilian
was in much amazement. But she kept her thoughts to
herself: and the ball went on. Other partners came to
claim her hand: and she danced many a dance, inso-
much that she had never a moment for sitting still. At
last the captain in the Guards, of whom I have already
spoken, advanced again to her place in the ball-room.
“Come for a last dance with me”: he said: “for I must
go away almost immediately.” And now Eileen perceived
that, whereas he had been talkative before, he now scarcely
vul] The Signal Sound of Strife. 83

spoke a word to his partner. And, when she would have
returned to the subject of the army’s departure, he began
to speak confusedly of other things. When the dance
was over, he said that it was time for their “ good-byes”
to be said. And, as he led her back to her place, she
observed that other officers too were bidding farewell to
their partners and trying to slip away unseen.

It was the hour of midnight: Lilian had just left her
hold upon the captain’s arm: and was turning to another
gentleman, who was asking for a dance—when the whole
room was startled by a thrilling sound. Eileen knew what
it was—the “ cannon’s opening roar.” Another such sound
came: and yet another still. Then at last Lilian under-
stood what Eileen had already guessed: and therewith she
understood what was the meaning of the look upon the
Duke’s face when he had said “ Farewell”: what was the
content of the little note that she had given to the colonel :
what was the meaning of the hurried departure of the
officers: and why the captain had been so reserved and
silent, when he had last spoken to her.

All were now alarmed : for all knew the meaning of that
which could no longer be misunderstood. It was the
signal sound of strife—that is to say the cannon, which
announced that the enemy were near. The Duke had
given his orders secretly to his several officers : and they
had given their orders secretly to their subordinates. It
had been hoped that the ladies might not be alarmed:
but it. was too late now to keep the secret. The signal
84 The Signal Sound of Strife, [c#.

sound of strife was indeed an unmistakable sound.
Lilian’s partner kissed her hand: and she shook his
warmly. They parted—never to meet again: for in a few
hours the battle of Quatre Bras had been fought: and the
captain was lying dead in the forefront of the battle, still
dressed (for there had been no time to change them) in
the very silk stockings, shoes and buckles in which he
had danced with Lilian !

Eileen tarried near Lilian a few more days in Brussels :
and.on the eighteenth of June she heard the noise of the
battle, though she did not see the fray. She saw the Duke
of Wellington return—the conqueror of Waterloo—and she
understood why it was that he found the day of victory
more full of pain than it was pleasurable. A sad number
of his brave soldiers, who had been “ full of lusty life” a
few days ago, were now as cold and lifeless, as if they had
never breathed.

Lilian, who had waited at Brussels in an agony of
suspense, while the two battles were being fought, wept
sorely when all was over. For she had already learned
to love the young captain who died at Quatre Bras: and
would have given much to have him safe at home again,
that she might hear the story of the battle from his own
lips and rejoice init with him. She did not forget however
that she was an Englishwoman and the daughter of an
English soldier. And she bare her sorrow patiently, like
the brave little girl she was: remembering that the soldier
who had fallen had fallen in her country’s service, and that
vu] The Signal Sound of Strife. 85

in that service the lives of Englishmen must never be
grudged. And the bravery of the women at home on such
occasions is as precious to the country as the bravery of
the soldiers at the wars. And, when Lilian heard that the
tyrant Napoleon was a prisoner, and that England had
won a glory, which would redound throughout all ages, she
said to herself :—* It is well. He, whom I loved, has fallen
in a great cause: and I will not be the one to repent it.”

* * a * *
And Eileen and Titania returned to the station once

again.

In the years that they passed between this station and
the next one at which they stopped, they saw principally
scenes of war. All Europe was in arms: and the things
which Eileen saw through the silver cloud were, for the
most part, far too horrible to please her. But there were
some scenes of glory too. There were the sea-battles of
Nelson: and for some while the Magic Train stopped still
above Trafalgar Bay, that Eileen might watch that great
hero’s honourable death—when in the moment of his most
magnificent victory he was shot by the fateful bullet from
the rigging of one of the enemy’s ships!

Some years earlier than this, they stopped again: and
Teazer gave a little sniff of recognition, which made his
mistress guess that her home was near. She guessed
right: Ireland was visible from the windows of the
86 Eileen’s Journey. (Cx.

Magic Train: and the part of it which was nearest to
them was the north-eastern corner of the island—the
savage-looking stretch of country from Ballina to Killala
Bay. This district was thickly peopled: and Eileen saw
many meetings of men there—angry meetings called
together to give voice to discontent. The people, it was
said, were miserable and poor: all their good things were
taken from them and given to rich Englishmen : the Irish
race was trodden down: and everything was done to
prevent them if possible from. being Irish at all! On
Saint Patrick’s day the Irish loved to wear the green
shamrock, which was Saint Patrick’s favourite plant : and
the English people tried to stop them wearing it, as they
tried to stop all their customs, which were different from
their own. The Irish hated them: and they were
resolving to begin a great rebellion.

Eileen saw many of these groups of angry men, and
even angrier women. They were at once beautiful and
terrible to see. But of all the meetings which she saw
in Ireland at this time, she remembers one more distinctly
than the rest. Hundreds of peasants were met together
in the streets of Ballina: and they had music and sing-
ing besides debate of words. There she heard a song,
which is to be heard in all parts of Ireland to-day—but
a song which then was new.

Kathleen O’Leary sang the verses of it: and the whole
crowd joined in the chorus. It was the sweetest piece

of mortal melody that Eileen ever heard. Kathleen was
VIL] Eileen’s Journey. 7 87

a young maiden, with sad-looking blue-grey eyes. She
was dressed only in the merest rags: but these became
her more than the costliest gown could have done. Her
hair was supposed to be covered by a bright-coloured
shawl: but many of the rough curls refused to stay
beneath it, and were blown in wild confusion hither and
thither, as she sang her song. Kathleen sat on a rough
piece of rock, with her naked feet dangling toward the
clear trout-stream, which runs through Ballina. A harper
stood behind her, with a small Irish harp in his hand:

and this is what, to his accompaniment, she sang :—

“Oh! Paddy dear, and did you hear
the news that’s going round ?
The shamrock is by law forbid
to grow on Irish ground.
No more Saint Patrick’s day we'll keep:
his colour shan’t be seen:
for there’s a cruel law agin
the Wearin’ of the Green.

Oh! I met with Napper Tandy:
and he took me by the hand,

and said:—‘How’s poor old Ireland ?
and how does she stand?’

‘She’s the most distressful country,
that ever yet was seen:

for they’re hanging men and women there
for Wearin’ of the Green.’

Oh! if the colour you must wear
be England’s cruel red,

let it remind you of the blood
poor Ireland has shed!
88 Eileen’s Journey. [Cx

Then take the shamrock from your hat
and fling it on the sod:

and never fear—'twill take root there,
though underfoot ’tis trod.

Oh! when laws can stop ‘the blades of grass
from growing as they grow,
and when the leaves in summer-time
their colour dare not show :—
then I will change the colour,
that I wear in my caubeen:
but till that day—please God !—I'll stick
to the Wearin’ of the Green!”

The words were -not new to Eileen: but they were
new to Kathleen’s audience. They were greatly excited
by the singing of them :—for Kathleen sang well
and with much feeling. Eileen could see as_ she
looked on the multitude. that the rebellion was all but
begun.

“T thought” said the Fairy Queen “that you should
see this meeting: and hear their songs. The music is
very beautiful: and the spirit which it raises is a spirit
of courage and liberty—that is a right good thing. But
' alas! the events which followed were neither beautiful nor
good. Ireland is anything but proud of them. I did
not choose for you to see those things: to see French
ships riding in the fair bay yonder: to see the horrid
murders and insults, which harmless travellers had to
suffer: to see the unsoldierly deeds wrought by Napper

Tandy and his rebel crew: and to see the actual rebellion,
VIIL.] Eileen’s Journey. 89

which did no good to anyone in Ireland, while it brought
cruel wrongs upon the heads of thousands. Remember
the music and the beauty of the scene, which I
showed you. Seek no more to see that which I showed
you not.”

And the Magic Train passed on.
CHAPTER Ix.

THE DEATH OF KINGS.

“For Heaven’s sake, let us sit upon the ground:
and tell sad stories of the death of kings.”
—SHAKESPEARE.

HE next station was “THE YEAR OF OUR LORD ONE

THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-NINE”:

and, with the utmost delight, Eileen heard the Queen

give word to her eaglets that they should bear the car

forthwith to Paris. To Eileen’s mind the name of Paris

suggested everything that was most supremely pleasurable

and full of joy. Who is there that has anything of the

woman in her, especially be she young and fresh and

eager and fond of the bright gay things of life, that would

not go right willingly to the lovely city of the French:

the market where all things most fair and most desirable

in woman's eyes are bought and sold: the treasure-house

where a thousand far-renowned works of beauty are

stored: the city of glad theatres and gorgeous operas :

the heart’s desire of multitudinous damsels throughout the
universe ?

So at least thought Eileen when the Fairy Queen began

go
CxIXj] The Death of Kings. QI

to speak : but Titania added yet two other words, which
marvellously changed the course of the child’s thoughts.
“La Bastille” said the Fairy Queen: and at that name—
Eileen knew that it was the name of a horrid prison—she
remembered that her present journey was not one of mere
idle pleasure-seeking : the beautiful things which she had
come to see were not the bonnets and bonbons and trinkets
of the shop-windows, which form one of the chief delights
of those who spend a few weeks’ holiday in the French
capital: but the ideas of the beautiful and good, which
are ever helping to make the world better and brighter
than before. So again, she was not come to gaze at
pictures and statues: but at women and men of real flesh
and blood like herself, that she might watch how they
behaved themselves in the hour of trial. She was going
to see adrama more exciting than any that the theatres
of Paris could afford: and to hear much music scarcely
less thrilling than that of the opera. But these were not
to be mimic scenes by clever actors and concerted strains
‘of skilful composers: real enthusiasms and loves and
sorrows, real cries, real tears, real blood, would pass before
her: and the music to be heard in France this year was
fierce music wrung from the bursting hearts of men who
were intensely moved !
% * * a

And now they were come to the Bastille: and entered

into one of the dungeons there—deep—dismal—dark :—

so dark that Eileen was at first unable to make out
92 The Death of Kings. [Cu.

whether there was any prisoner there or not. But the
Fairy Queen’s presence seemed to bring a holy light of
its own whithersoever she went: and—either for this
reason or because Ejleen’s eyes grew soon accustomed
to the dark place, and then, as sometimes will happen,
she could see more than at first she thought she could—
she at last discovered there was a prisoner in the cell:
his hair and beard were long, and he was of most wretched
appearance: and she afterwards learned that he had lain
in that miserable place for many a long year, seeing none
of his fellow-men but the jailers and turnkeys and prison
attendants, who brought him his daily pittance of food
and water. And yet this man had committed no serious
offence: but was suffering this long punishment, because
he had happened to offend some nobleman, who had the
power to cast him into prison.

“Listen!” said Titania: “the prisoner speaks.’ He
did speak: and spoke in a weak and quavering voice:
but the purport of his words was clear. He was praying
to Heaven that he might see the sun and sky again before
he died: and be assured whether his wife and those whom
he had left as little children were alive and well. Surely
Heaven would grant an answer to such a prayer :—if
never before, surely to-day there would be an answer.

Hark now! From without the walls there does come
an answer. Sent by Heaven? It seemed hard to believe
that. For the answer was heard in the madly-fierce cries

of angry men outside the prison, cursing and blaspheming :
IX] The Death of Kings. 93

—a voice of merciless fury and unrestrained hate. And
then withal there was the firing of muskets: and the
various sounds of war. To Eileen all this was hideous
enough—terrible,—palsying her with fear: but to the poor
prisoner it was the beautiful call of Liberty: the music
kept ringing in his heart, “To-day perhaps I may be
free!” Free!—only think of it. For years he had not
seen the colours of the flowers: nor heard the note of any
bird. And now what cared he for anything in this world,
so only the prison walls be burst asunder and he might
stand a free man once more among the free. The glad-
ness in his face,—the joy bursting from his heart and
expressing itself in his every gesture—the light of hope
relit that made him a new man again:—ah! there was
a beauty in all of these that more than outweighed the
horrors of the surrounding scene:—when the Bastille was
presently forced open and the frenzied multitude rushed
in. Eileen saw many horrors that day, and many days
afterwards—wounding—killing—blood running everywhere.
Yet she fainted not: forasmuch as she knew that it was
all in the cause of Liberty: and to-day for the first time
she realised what “ Liberty” means to the captives who
suffer under tyranny.

In a very short space of time, the struggle was over :
and a thousand men were excitedly shaking hands one
with the other—brothers falling upon each other’s necks,
weeping and kissing as only Frenchmen can:—while a
thousand voices made the sky ring with their trium-
O4 The Death of Kings. [Cu

phant shouting “The Bastille is taken—La Bastille est
prise!”

It was the beginning of the “French Revolution ”—a
confusing and difficult study for those who have to read
of it in books: but for Eileen, who stayed during the
next eventful years in Paris, it was as exciting a story as
could well be wished. There was a constant struggle of
life and death going on every day and hour in every street
of the city. Eileen, who had been used to peace and
plenty from her babyhood, found the frequent bloodshed
and the all-pervading misery most terrible: but there
were many thousand children in Paris at this time as
young or younger than she, who were more to be pitied
than herself: for they had no fairy-protectors: it was not
as visitors and spectators that they were there: and,
although Eileen was heartsick enough, the loss of life and
limb affected these other children more nearly than it
could affect her:—for the lives and limbs were their
parents’, or their brothers’, or their own. Woe to the
mothers who had little babies at Paris in those years!
Life was so difficult: death so easy: food was so very
dear: starvation so very nigh.

From the day when the Bastille was taken all Paris was
in an uproar: everyone seemed well-nigh mad. Eileen
heard it said on all hands that the king and all his
nobles would be killed:—no-one should have any title
beyond that of citizen.

Eileen could not understand the meaning of the people’s

«
1X.] The Death of Kings. 95

fury. In the time and country where her own lot was
cast there had always seemed to her to be no particular
difference between noblemen and other persons. But in
France before the Revolution it was otherwise: the king
and his nobility had all the power: and truly they had
now to suffer for having grievously abused it.

Whenever. Eileen saw any man, however young and
harmless he might be,—if only the people said he was an
“ aristocrat,’—she always expected very soon to see his head
cut off by the terrible new engine of beheadal which had
been just invented. “ Aristocrats” is the name properly
given to those who have most power, because they are the
best men: but the Frenchmen of this time swore they
would have no man to rule over them. The people were
the best men now, they said: and only the people should
bear rule. Multitudes of unoffending persons were put to
death for no crime but this—that they were aristocrats :
thus the sons of noble families were pitilessly sfaughtered :
and, far and wide, not for the first or second time in
history, there was a voice heard, lamentation and great
mourning, mothers weeping for their children and would
not be comforted because they were not. Those who for
so long had asked for justice, themselves forgat to practise
justice now: while, as for mercy and love, they seemed
altogether to have vanished from the face of the earth.

Eileen would have entreated the Fairy Queen to take
her away from a city full of so many horrors: had it not

been that there was one family among those she saw there,
96 The Death of Kings. [Cu.

which interested her so much, that she determined to wait
in Paris until she had seen whatsoever things were destined
to befall it.

_ This was the royal family of France: and it interested
her not because of its mighty rank and high position, but
because its great distress and peril moved her tender pity.
Children in fairy-tales often have wished to be kings and
queens: but the result of Eileen’s fairy-journey was that
she resolved for her part at least never to wish for that.
Louis the Sixteenth of France and his fair consort Marie
Antoinette were the first king and queen—saving of course
Titania—whom Eileen had ever seen: and this is how she
saw them first.

She was standing one rainy day in a great crowd, near
the city gates: it was a crowd of excited citizens and
their not less excited wives. Now it must be remembered
that, although Eileen was in France and heard the French
language all about her, she understood every word of what
was said. For had not the fairies given her the wonderful
gift of tongues? Not only did that gift enable her
perfectly to understand the language spoken in Paris in
the days to which she was now come—a language of which
she already knew a very little from her lesson-books : but
the power lasted with her as long as the wonderful
journey went on, and she could thus follow with ease the
extraordinary jargons and dialects of all the peoples of far
remoter countries which she visited, as they were spoken

in the more ancient days to which the Magic Train after-
IX.] The Death of Kings. 97

wards brought her. From what talk she heard among
the people in Paris that day, Eileen learned that the king
and queen were expected. The people in the streets were
hungered with long want: for bread was very dear. Now
they thought that it was in the power of the king and
queen to make it cheap, if they could but be persuaded
to come to Paris. If they would not listen to persuasion,
then the péople had said they should be forced to come—
willy-nilly—to the place where their subjects wanted them.
The excitement in the mob grew greater every moment :
and at last Eileen heard it said that the royal carriage
was approaching. Then she herself became as excited as
the rest. She expected to see a royal progress through the
streets, with heralds and trumpeters in attendance. The
reality was very different: the king and queen were come
to their chief city that day without glory :—nay more, they
were come in dishonour and attended with insult. Would
you know what was the procession, which actually advanced
through the streets between the shouting multitudes on
either side? It was on this wise. First came an executioner
—a man named Nicholas, who of his own choice had under-
taken the hateful trade of butchering his fellow-country-
men. The ruffian was hideous to look upon: he wore a
long beard, and there was a high-crowned hat upon his
head : there was blood upon him—upon his hair and face
and upon the axe which he carried in his hand. It was
the blood of the king’s servants. An unsightly vision was

this Nicholas : but the mad starving people shouted joyfully
7
98 The Death of Kings. [Cu.

at the sight of him. Next came a rabble: all sorts and
conditions of men: some riding, some on foot. Women
too were there: wild wan women with little children
shrieking by the side of them. There were cannons and
cheap carriages and carts of corn. There were loaves of
bread, lifted high upon the points of bayonets. And some-
one, looking toward his neighbours, said :—“ We shall be in
no more want of bread. We will bring the baker and the
bakeress and the baker’s boy.” The speaker meant the
king and queen, their so-called majesties of France, and
the Dauphin, their son: who now only interested the
French people in so far as they hoped to obtain bread
from them.

And now Eileen caught a glimpse of the royal carriage,
wherein they rode, helpless and forlorn, among the yelling
crowd. In this carriage sat the king and queen, with their
children (a little girl of eleven and the young Dauphin
of nine years of age) by their side: and the king’s good
sister the princess Elizabeth was there. But Eileen would
never have guessed that she was looking at a royal family
at all: for there were no outward signs of royalty about
them, no diadems nor princely robes. Dignity however
there was: and firmly, though graciously, did the king
address those of his subjects who were near enough to
hear him through the hubbub. But it was not the king
that interested Eileen most: it was his beautiful lady-wife,
and his two fair children.

The queen Marie Antoinette was hated by all the people
IX] The Death of Kings. 99

in that howling multitude: they fancied her guilty of all
sorts of wickedness, of which she had never so much as
dreamed. Fifteen years ago she had come from Austria
to France, a smiling little princess then not yet sixteen
years old:—oh! so beautiful with gay golden hair and a
face whose shape was loveliness itself. And the people of
Paris had shouted their admiration and had prayed that
she might live long and happily. Frivolous perhaps she
was, and fond of power: but very loving withal, and
loveable: a foreigner by birth, but meaning to be a good
queen to her French subjects, besides a devoted wife to her
French lord. She hada kind heart: and never intended
harm to anyone. But the people had heard that she had
turned the heart of the king against them: and that she
was to blame for their poverty and hunger. It was not
true: and it was very hard on her that she must needs sit
there that day among her subjects, who had once so gladly
welcomed her, but who now were cursing her on every
side, calling her a Jezebel, a tyrant, a daughter of the devil.
And all the time she would right gladly have made them
happy, had she known the way to do so. She still was
beautiful: her face and form were still full of youthful
brightness: and her calm dignity excited Eileen’s admira-
tion in such a large degree, that she resolved more than
ever to abide in Paris and watch the destinies which there
awaited the royal family. That royal family now retired
to their “ Palace of the Tuileries” : and Eileen went with

them into their retreat. The palace was by no means .
100 The Death of Kings. [Cu

ready for the reception of a king and queen: it was in
complete disorder, for their majesties had not intended to
come to Paris at that time. They had come against their
will: and were really prisoners there in their own palace.
But they determined to make the best of the position in
which they found themselves. The king had important
business to attend to: the queen read, or plied her needle:
the little princess read, or sat at the queen’s feet and
learned her lessons. Both the children carried on their
daily round of work and play, as though nothing unusual
had happened. The young Dauphin had his own private
tutor: and he was being taught all things which it would
be most useful for him to know, when he should’ have
grown up to be a king. Alas! he never did grow up to
be a king: he never even grew up to bea man. The day
after the arrival of the Court at Paris, he was frightened at
hearing some noise in the gardens: and he threw himself
into the queen’s arms, and said :—“ Grand Dieu, maman !
will it be yesterday over again?” A few days afterwards,
he went up to the king his father: and looked at him with
a thoughtful face. The king asked him what he wanted:
he answered that he had something very serious to say to
him. His father then asked him to explain himself: and
the boy then inquired why the people, who had once
loved him so well, were suddenly angered against him:
and what he had done to vex them so grievously. His
father took him upon his knees, and tried to explain the
matter to him, saying as follows :—“I wished, child, to
IX] The Death of Kings. IOI

make the people still happier than they were. I wanted
money to pay for wars, which were meant for the good of
France. I asked my people for money, as those who have
been kings before me always did. Some of their leaders
tried to prevent me from having the money. I called
together the chief men among the people from every town
in France: that is what is called ‘the States-General.
When they were met together, they asked me to agree to
certain things, which would have been disgraceful to my
kingly dignity, and which would have been unjust to you
my son, who will be king when Iam dead. Wicked men
then excited the people to rise up against me: and this
caused the unhappy doings of the last few days. The
ignorant people must not be blamed for them.”

The queen made the young prince clearly understand
that he ought to treat the soldiers and officers of the
National Guard, and all the men of Paris, who were round
about him, with gentle courtesy. The child therefore took
great pains to please all these people: and one day, when
he had had a chance of making a gracious answer to a
question asked of him, he came and whispered in his
mother’s ear :—“ Was that right, maman ?”

Eileen wandered with Titania through the gardens of
the Tuileries. Oftentimes the king walked there alone:
and among the people who saw him there were not a few
who cheered. The little princess and her brother fed the
ducks with crumbs of bread: and they had their own little
garden, where the little boy would dig and plant, or gather
102 The Death of Kings. [Cu.

posies for his sister’s hair. Queen Marie Antoinette would
sometimes forget to be unhappy, when she saw them
playing there, content with these simple amusements.
Yet, all the while, there was no disguising the fact that the
royal family were prisoners: for the people would not
suffer them to depart and be free. The only possible
chance for them was to escape secretly and in disguise.
This they intended to attempt to do, when they should
have an opportunity. They talked of it half-whisperingly,
when they ‘thought they were alone :—but Eileen. and
Titania were always there invisible) One day our
- travellers entered the queen’s private chamber : and found
her alone with Madame Campan, one of the ladies of her
court. They appeared to be in solemn consultation about
something :—it was about dresses for the journey. The
queen said she was determined to have a complete ward-
robe with her, as well for her children as for herself.
Madame Campan in vain objected that the queen of
France would surely find linen and gowns everywhere.
Then, seeing that the queen was resolved, she went out,
alone and in disguise, to purchase what her majesty
required: pretending that the things were for herself.
The,queen also determined to take her dressing-case: and
it was thought best to have it sent before her to a place
where she would be able to find it Madame Campan
thought that this was an unwise step: for she was afraid
that the affair might get wind, and so the queen’s enemies

would be led to suspect that she intended to escape from
IX.] The Death of Kings. 103

Paris. However, as the queen persisted, she bade the
wardrobe-woman to make ready the dressing-case: saying
that it was going to be sent away.

Now it happened that this wardrobe-woman was a
traitress: and unfriendly to the queen. She did as she
was bidden punctually: but on the evening of that very
day, she went to the mayor of Paris, the leader of the
queen’s enemies, and told him that preparations for flight
were being made at the royal palace.

A gallant nobleman named “the Compte de Fersen”
procured a carriage for the royal family: and it was to be
pretended that the party consisted of a Russian lady and
her household,—the lady’s name was to be “the Baroness
de Korf.” The long-expected day came at last, upon which
the attempt was to be made: and Eileen tarried with the
Fairy Queen outside the palace gates: and after she had
waited some time in eager expectation, she saw those for
whom she was looking issue forth by a door, where there
was no sentry, and pass, one by one, into the street. The
children had their hoods drawn down over their faces: so
that they were quite unrecognisable. Eileen wondered
what they thought of it all. Did they half enjoy the
adventure : and the excitement of escaping from the palace
in disguise ? or were they only frightened and distressed
at the position in which they found themselves? But
there was no way of answering such questions: for they
hurried along the street to the place where the count and
his carriage were waiting for them. The queen was at
104 The Death of Kings. [Cu

first unable to find her way thither: and thus much
precious time was lost. But at last they all came safely
into the carriage: and the horses swiftly bore them out
of the city,—no-one suspecting who the so-called Russian
baroness really was.

When they were well out of Paris, Eileen clapped her
hands for joy. Surely no-one would overtake them now?
She and Titania sped along by the side of the carriage :
and for some time all went well.

But when they were about twelve leagues’ distance from
Paris, something went wrong with one of the carriage-
wheels: and the putting right of this caused a serious
delay. The king chose to walk up one of the hills: and
he walked up so slowly, that more time had to be wasted
in waiting for him at the top. And in the meantime it
was discovered that the horsemen, who were expected to
meet them at this place and escort the carriage into the
town of Varennes, had never appeared: and this occasioned
grave anxiety.

Louis looked out of the window at one of the villages
through which they passed: and asked several questions
of the by-standers about the road. Now it chanced that
the postmaster of the place was near: and he knew the
king at once from his likeness to the portrait of him
on the stamps! This was a fatal misfortune. The post-
master would tell everybody who it was that was in the
carriage. The queen was full of fear: and soon became

more so. For some person unknown came riding towards
IX] The Death of Kings. 105

them on horseback : and, passing close to the carriage in
full gallop, bent towards the window and exclaimed :—
“You are recognised.” And then he rode away again,
without ever having slackened speed.

The carriage was now close to the gates of Varennes:
and Eileen saw that the bridge was already blocked up
with old carts and lumber. The people evidently did not
intend to let them pass. At this moment they saw the
expected horsemen approaching: but the king did not
choose to enter the place by force, fearing lest harm might
befall his family in the struggle. They therefore took
refuge in a grocer’s shop—king, queen, princess Elizabeth,
children and all. The king tried to persuade the grocer
and the other citizens to let them pass: saying that it
would do no harm to France. Meanwhile the beautiful
queen Marie Antoinette, seated at the farther end of the
shop amid parcels of soap and candles, tried to win the
mayor’s wife to their interests, that she might prevail upon
her husband to suffer them to escape. This woman was
much moved: she wept, as she listened to the queen’s
entreaties. But she said :—“ Madame, it would ruin my
husband. I love my king: but I love my husband too,
you must know. And he would be answerable, you see.”

There was not much time for arguing the question.
Three envoys now arrived from the king’s enemies at
Paris: they had pursued the fugitives, as soon as they
discovered that the story of the treacherous. wardrobe-
woman was true. A troop of National Guards, with wild
106 The Death of Kings. [Cu.

furious faces, surrounded the carriage of the royal family:
and they were compelled to return therein, with the three
envoys, back to Paris. One of the envoys, a rude bully,
held the little Dauphin upon his knees: and amused
himself with curling the child’s fair hair round his fingers :
and, as he spoke with much gesticulation, he pulled his
locks, so that the Dauphin began to cry out thereat.
“Give me my son” said the queen indignantly. “He is
accustomed to tenderness and delicacy, which make him
little fit for such familiarity.”

When the royal family returned to their palace, of
course they were made closer prisoners than before.
Sentries guarded the queen’s chamber: and she was not
allowed to have her door shut even at night. Dangers of
all sorts were about them: attempts were made to poison
them: and only the greatest precautions saved their lives.
And one day that summer a furious mob attacked the
palace: who nearly killed both king and queen. One
woman among the crowd cursed the queen to her face,
and said :—“It is you who have caused the misery of the
nation.” “You have been told so”: answered the queen:
“but you are deceived. As the wife of the king of France
and mother of the Dauphin, I am myself a Frenchwoman :
I shall never see my own country again. I can be happy
or unhappy only in France: I was happy when you loved
me.” The woman began to weep, asked the queen’s
forgiveness, and said :—“It was because I did not know

you: I see that you are good.”

,
IX.] The Death of Kings. 107

At length came the terrible night of the tenth of
August: a night famous in history: the night when the
palace was attacked by the men of Marseilles. You will
find the story of it told in a hundred books. Eileen was
there in the thick of the fight. Queen Marie Antoinette
was the bravest spirit among all the defenders of the
Tuileries: and urged a vigorous resistance. But the
men of Marseilles were too strong for any resistance:
and their murderous regiments burst into the palace,
wielding destruction everywhere, and even singing in

terrible sort this their wild and peculiar song :—

“Children of France, arise, arise!

now is the day of glory nigh:

behold upraised against you flies
the blood-stained flag of tyranny.

Hark to the brutal soldiers’ roar,
that fills the country with alarms :
they come to butcher in your arms

the friends you love, the sons you bore.

Arm, Citizens, arm!—Your ranks in order set!
March on! march on!—With their foul blood our furrows shall be wet !

Why is this horde of slaves arrayed
and vainly sworn to do us wrong?
For whom were these base fetters made?
these chains that have been forged so long,
Frenchmen, for us?—O deed accurst!
deed that shall justly raise our ire!
it is on us they dare aspire
to fix the bonds that we have burst.
Arm, Citizens, arm!—Your ranks in order set!
March on! march on! —With their foul blood our furrows shall be wet !
108 The Death of Kings. [Cu.

Quake, tyrants, and, you traitors, quake:
all factions point their scorn at you.

Now your unnatural plots shall take
at last the meed that is their due.

All France will arm for such a, fight :
if her heroic youth should fall,
she still has others at her call,

eager to put your hosts to flight.

Arm, Citizens, arm!—Your ranks in order set!
March on! march on !—With their foul blood our furrows shall be wet!

O sacred love of Country, guide
and strengthen our avenging arm!

Freedom, stand ever at our side:
for we would succour thee from harm.

Lift up thy voice: and Victory
shall crown our standards at thy call:
so shall our foemen as they fall

thy triumph and our glory see!

Arm, Citizens, arm !—Your ranks in order set!
March on! march on !—With their foul blood our furrows shall be wet!”

Singing this song, they swept along through the corridors of
the palace : hewing down all whom they met with ungovern-
able fury. Women were murdered: and white muslin
dresses splashed with blood. And before long their work was
done. The monarchy was a thing of the past. The king
and queen, with all their family, were locked fast within
the monastery walls, which formed their temporary prison.

In a few days they were moved to another place of con-
finement: where they were very badly treated. The beautiful
queen had frequently to take upon herself the humble

duties of servant. And every insult was offered to them all.
IX] The Death of Kings. 109

Some time after this Eileen was one day watching the
king in his cell, giving the Dauphin a reading-lesson :
when they were interrupted by some officers, who said that
they had come to take the young prince to his mother.
When asked the reason of this action, they gave no
explanation: but only said that such were their orders.
The Dauphin came to the queen and told her what had
happened. She wanted to go to the king: but she was
not allowed to do so. The king was in fact being tried for
his life: and his own wife did not even know where he
was. And no-one would tell her: until at last she heard
that the king had been condemned to death, and was to
return only to bid his family farewell.

Their last meeting was in a room with a glass door:
through which their enemies watched them all the time.
The queen, holding her little son by the hand, rushed
sobbing into the king’s arms: followed by her young
daughter and the princess Elizabeth. During the first
moments all was confusion and despair. Cries and lamen-
tations prevented those who were on the watch from
distinguishing anything. Then the king grew more calm:
told the queen the story of his trial and condemnation : and
said that he would not make any endeavour to escape.
He bade ‘his little son forgive those who caused his death.
And then, after giving his blessing to them all, he went
his way :—never to be seen of them again. For the next
morning he was to be put to death.

Eileen and Titania stayed with the stricken queen. She
IIo The Death of Kings. [Cu

had hardly strength enough to put the young prince to
bed. Then she threw herself, dressed as she was, upon her
own bed: and there they heard her shivering with cold
and grief the whole night long. At a quarter past six in
the morning the door opened. The royal family believed
this meant that they were summoned to the presence of
the king : but it was only the officers looking for a prayer-
book for him. They did not however give up all hope of
seeing him: until they heard the shouts of the people,
proclaiming that the king was dead !

The princesses were searched : and every little keepsake,
which might have reminded them of the king, was taken
from them. The young prince became very ill: and no-
one pitied the poor prisoners. The princesses themselves
made their beds, swept the room and waited on the queen.

But the worst was yet to come. Some officers arrived
one day to tell the queen that her little son was to be
parted from her: and separately confined. As soon as the
boy heard this, he threw himself into his mother’s arms:
and with violent cries entreated to be allowed to stay with
her. ~The queen would not let her son go: but tried to
defend the bed, in which he lay, against the officers. At
last they threatened the lives of the children: and the
poor mother was thus forced to bear the sacrifice. The
princesses dressed the child: for the strength of the queen
was gone from her. Yet when he was dressed, she took
him up in her arms: and delivered him herself to the
officers, bathing him with her tears. The poor little fellow


E, M. WARD, R.A., pz] [To face p. 111.
LOUIS XVI. AND HIS FAMILY IN THE PRISON OF THE TEMPLE.
IX.] The Death of Kings. III

was carried from their presence, sobbing bitterly: and his
mother never saw him again—save through a crevice in
the door, when he passed up and down the stairs.

Not long afterwards it came to pass that the queen
Marie Antoinette herself was tried for her own life: and
condemned to death. She was not over-much moved,
when she heard that she must die. “I was a queen”: she
said: “and ye took from me my crown. I was a wife:
and ye took from me my husband. I was a mother: and
ye took from me my son. It little matters now, if ye take —
my life as well.” And then, arrayed in a poor white dress
—not at all like queen’s attire—she stepped into the cart
which was to take her to the place of execution. “ Adieu,
mes enfants”: she said: “I go to rejoin your father.”
And so she went to death.

Eileen returned to the prison: wishing to look once
more upon the young Dauphin and see how he fared,
before she left Paris with Titania. Some persons would
now have called him “King Louis XVII. of France.”
But he looked very little like a king just then. She found
him in a dismal airless cell, with one Simon a shoe-maker
for his jailer. The little prince had once been fair and
healthy to behold: but now he was neither the one nor
the other. The cruel Simon and his wife had cut off his
beautiful light hair, of which his mother used to be so
proud. And they had stripped him of the mourning,
which he wore for his father :—they called this “ playing at
the game of the spoiled king.” Some days they forced him
L112 The Death of Kings. [Cu

to eat too much: and other days they starved him. They
beat him without mercy all the day long: nor was their
treatment of him by night less brutal. As soon as the
tired boy had sunk into his first deep slumber, they would
loudly call him by his name and bid him come to them.
Startled, nervous, and shaking with the cold, the boy
would spring up: and, rushing through the dark, would
appear at Simon’s bedside. That bully would buffet him
on the head: or kick him away from him, and say :—“ Get
to bed again, wolf’s cub: I only wanted to know that you
were safe.” Once, when the boy had got a blow like this
and was lying upon his wretched bed, faint with the pain
of it, Simon roared out with a brutal laugh, and asked :—
“Tf you were king, what would you do tome?” The boy
remembered his father’s dying words, and said :—“I would
forgive you!”

At last Simon was removed from the prison. And then
the prince was left all alone. The solitude was worse than
his former suffering. He passed his days without any
kind of occupation :—nor was he even allowed lights in
the evening. His keepers never came near him: except
to bring him food. Before long the little prince—he was,
you must remember, only ten years old—became very ill
indeed. And when at last one came to the prison with
power, whose name was Gomin and who felt pity for the
sufferer, it was too late to save his life. Doctors came:
but the prince was past their help.

Gomin asked the child one evening the reason of his
1X] The Death of Kings. 113

tears. “I am always alone”: he said: “my mother is
in the other tower.” For he did not know that she was
dead. And in the morning Gomin came again to the

child’s room: and, seeing that the boy was quiet and

motionless, he said :—“I hope you are not in pain now?”
He answered :—“Oh yes! I am still in pain: but not
nearly so much—the music is so beautiful!” This must

have been the music of the angels, which only the dying
hear on earth. For Gomin heard no music: and even
Eileen could perceive no voice at all, whether of fairy or
mortal, either in the tower or elsewhere. The little prince
spoke again:—“Do you not hear it?” he asked: “it
comes from above.” Then Gomin, to quiet him, made
as though he heard: but in fact he heard nothing.

After a few moments’ silence, the boy started again:
and cried, in a voice of intense joyfulness:—“ Among the
rest, I plainly heard my mother’s voice” And, soon
after saying this, he died.

* * * * *

“What of the young princess, the Dauphin’s sister?”
asked Eileen, as the car bore them away again towards
the station. “Her life was spared”: was the answer:
“and hers alone of all the royal family, whose adventures
you have watched. She was kept a prisoner for some
while: and only heard at a later day that her mother and
her brother were dead, together with her good aunt the
princess Elizabeth: for she was executed too. News of
life and death was slow to travel to her lonely prison:

8
114 The Death of Kings. [Cu.

and it was only when those dark days were passed that
she was suffered to hear the truth. She learned to forgive
the French people for the murder of her kindred: and
she supposed that some strange madness had swept over
France, and caused the unhappy history of those terrible
years.”

And, having gained the station, our travellers continued
their journey.

But to this day, whenever Eileen has felt in the humour,
as children sometimes do—(and some grown-up people
also for the matter of that)—

“to sit upon the ground:
and tell sad stories of the death of kings,”
she has looked into the fire and imagined herself once
more in Paris in the years of the Revolution, following
the fortunes of Louis and his little son and his beautiful
miserable queen.

And she has thought to herself that sadder stories than

these it would be impossible to tell or hear.

There was one thing between this station and their
next stopping-place, which I must not forget to mention:
that is the glimpse which Eileen caught in passing of
Sir William Herschel and his sister Caroline.

The brother was sitting at his telescope, patiently
watching the stars and making those grand discoveries
for which the whole world of men has thanked him ever
IX.] Eileen’s Journey. I15

since: while the unwearying sister sat by his side the
livelong night, and wrote down notes of 'what he saw—
giving him, from time to time, such food as was needed to
keep life in him.

Often the clouds obscured the sky, and made discoveries
impossible: often he saw nothing which had not been seen
by thousands before him: often a smaller man would have
given the matter up in despair. But Herschel was full
of hope: and Eileen will not be in a hurry to forget the
greatest example which she ever saw of patient industry.

Herschel and his sister Caroline were a strange contrast
to the busy fighting world about them. On these same
nights a thousand horrors were enacted, a thousand deeds
of cruelty and vice: the crimes were being committed and
the hatred being created, for which Eileen had seen Marie
Antoinette and her kindred pay the penalty.

But these things did not interest Herschel: the un-
changing and ever-beautiful stars filled all his thoughts—
the stars and music, which had been the profession of his
early life, and which he had never ceased to love. Marie
Antoinette—now so young and gay, so proud of her high
position as the consort of a mighty king and leader among
the women of his lively court—dreaming nothing of the
terrible things that were to come to her, and seeing no ©
importance in signs, which should have shown the danger
that threatened—would fall from her dazzling glory to
the dust. The Bastille prisoners would rise from their

miserable condition: and become rulers of men, ready
116 Eileen’s Journey. [Cu. IX.

to be cruel to those who had been cruel to them and to
obtain a large revenge. But was not Herschel right?
Were. not. these things but a small matter in a single
corner of a single planet, which rolls about amid un-
numbered myriads of far greater worlds?

Titania bade Eileen think upon these things, as the
Magic Train passed upon its way.
CHAPTER X.
THE EMBATTLED FARMERS.

“By the rude bridge that arched the flood,
their flag to April’s breeze unfurled,
here once the embattled farmers stood
and fired the shot heard round the world.”
—Emerson.

\ j [HEN they came to the station which was called
“THE YEAR OF OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND
SEVEN HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-FIVE,” the
eaglets had their orders to bear the car to the coasts
of America.
“You have seen” said Titania to Eileen “how men
fought in France for liberty: now I will show you some-
thing of the struggle which was fought in the New World
upon the same account. Let us go therefore to Boston.”
The April sun was setting, when Eileen found herself
again upon the earth: and, looking about her, she per-
ceived that she was in a barrack-yard, at the gate of
which she observed a sentry standing upon guard. He
appeared to be barring the passage to a noisy mob,
which had gathered in the streets. This mob showed
itself in many ways to be very unfriendly to the soldiers :
117
118 The Embattled Farmers. [Cu.

who were moving about upon their different ‘businesses
within the gate. Eileen could see at a glance that the
uniforms which the men were wearing—despite their
quaint old-world fashion—must be English uniforms.

For Boston, now one of the chiefest cities of the United
States, was garrisoned in those days by the troops of
his Britannic Majesty King George the Third: and a
vast territory—-some millions of square miles in area—
upon the same continent, now governed by its own free
rulers, was then a mere colony under the control of
London.

“Where are we going?” asked Eileen. “And what
are we to see?”

“Let us enter by this door”: the Fairy Queen re-
plied: “it is the mess-room of the 1oth Foot.”

So they went into the room: where they found a
number of officers taking their wine together and talking
about military affairs.

Eileen felt herself very important, you may imagine,
at being allowed the privilege of listening to what they
said : although she understood not the half of it. Some-
thing serious evidently occupied them: and some sort
of immediate action seemed about to take place.

The Fairy Queen soon took note of Ejileen’s perplexity :
and hastened to explain exactly what the trouble was.
“You must remember” said she “that the reason why
these officers and their men are in America at all is

that they may take care of these American colonies for
x] The Embattled Farmers. 119

the king at home: they have to see to it that his
majest’ys subjects here obey the laws, which have been
made in England, and pay the taxes, which the Parlia-
ment at Westminster has decreed—And this although
Boston is thousands of miles away from Westminster.”

“And what” asked Eileen “has happened now?”

“Very much has happened” said Titania. “It was
in this way.—When the laws were just, the Americans
were loyal and ready to obey them. But the day came
when the laws were just no longer: for the Americans
were ordered not only to pay taxes for their own govern-
ment (which was but right and fair), but also to send
tribute to be spent by Englishmen in England upon
themselves. That they refused to do: which made the
king and his parliament so angry, that they have lately
resolved, by way of a punishment, to make it unlawful
for any ship to enter Boston Harbour. If this punishment
were really carried out, it would be the ruin of the city.
Therefore it is that the people of Boston are enraged :
and the streets of their town disturbed. Blood has been
shed before to-day in the quarrel between the soldiers and
the citizens: what is already a riot threatens to become
a war. That was the meaning of those angry faces,
which you saw at the barrack-yard gates just now: and
that is the reason for the anxious mien of the officers
who are gathered together here. For—it being their
duty to keep the town quiet and obedient to the king—
they are finding it no easy task.”
120 The Embattled Farmers. [Cu

After this explanation Eileen was able to follow the
conversation more easily than before. Letters had come,
it seemed, from England : which said that the king was
resolved not to give way. His majesty expected the
Governor and his soldiers in Boston to keep the colonists
in subjection : four regiments, it was thought in England,
should be enough to do this. But how, asked the officers
one of another, were four regiments to subdue a whole
continent of enemies : numbering thousands upon thousands,
and Englishmen withal? Yet there were not a few, who
thought that there would be no serious trouble with these
colonists. For was it not likely that they would be dis-
united: and that the greater part of them would refuse to
fight against the old country, come what would? About
one thing however they all agreed: their own duty at
least was plain: they were the king’s soldiers: and they
must prevent at all costs the schemes and plottings of
his enemies. .

Now it appeared that at Concord—within a day’s march
from Boston—the colonists had been discovered to have
guns and ammunition and stores: doubtless intended to
be used in case of war against the king. The Governor
of Boston had heard of these rebel preparations: and by
his orders a force was to set out that very night to destroy
all the warlike properties of the enemy. They were to
start as soon as it should be dark. They must needs cross
the River Charles, which flows through Boston City : and
thence begin their march across the swamps. The Colonel
X.] The Embattled Farmers. 121

said that measures had been taken to prevent the people
of Concord from learning the movements of the British
troops: and to stop the passage of all messengers. Eileen
waited in great excitement to see the upshot.

When the darkness of night was come, the men were
marched as secretly as possible to the river-banks: and
there embarked for the opposite shore. But the secret was
not as well observed as had been supposed: the rebel
leaders already had wind of it: and there were riders
wildly galloping to alarm the countryside and to prepare
resistance, or ever the boats of the English crossed to the
other side of the river.

Now, when they had seen the soldiers take their places
silently in the boats, Titania put her hand-upon Eileen’s
shoulder and said :-—“ Come, let us make our way ahead

2

of them. Ho! and away to Concord Town.” The fairies,
who were never far away from the Queen whom they
adored, instantly performed her bidding : and in the twink-
ling of an eye they both found themselves at Concord,
although that place was a distance of more than twenty
miles away from Boston.

They presently came to a farm-house upon the outskirts.
of the town: and here they went inside. The scene within
was just such an one as is most familiar to the country-
man at home: the fire blazing merrily upon the hearth:
the dresser reflecting back its light from brightly-shining
pewter: the ceiling hung with hams and bacon: the old

woman sewing in the chimney-corner, with the inevitable
122 The Embattled Farmers. [Cu

cat seated at her feet: the old man opposite to her
smoking his well-earned pipe, after the day’s work was
done: and the great family disposed about the room,
talking from time to time as they plied their various.
businesses, mending their tools or sharpening their pruning-
hooks. At first sight everything seemed to speak of
general comfort and happiness: but signs of uneasiness
would not have been wanting to a closer observer, which
foreshadowed coming trouble.

It soon appeared that there was one stranger present in
this homely company :—an English traveller, but recently
arrived from his native land. How he came to be there
Eileen did not know: but she soon became accustomed,
wherever she went for many centuries, to see Englishmen
upon their travels in all sorts of most unlikely places.
And if it so happened that at any time some particular
place was fraught with especial danger to Englishmen, she
observed that they were always only the more certain to
be there!

This Englishman was a tall fellow and well made:
evidently of gentle birth: and with a proud demeanour.
“Listen!” he was saying “my good friends. You are
Englishmen yourselves. You surely would not fight
against the English king.”

“Ay, but that would we!” answered the old man.
“Do you blame us? Just think. If you were a colonist
in a distant land, would you allow yourself to be oppressed
and ruined by the king at home?”
X.] The Embattled Farmers. 123

“T and my fathers” the other made reply “have paid
the king willing homage, generation after generation. I
may travel all over the world: but wherever I go, I still
seem to see the pictures of my ancestors, which hang upon
the walls at home. Those ancestors have served their king
—in his Army and his Navy—in his Parliament and his
Council Chamber—in his Courts of Law—and in his
Church—ever since that grand old gentleman over the
mantelpiece, with the lace ruffles and the long-flowing hair,
fell in his royal master’s cause on Naseby field!”

“T too had my ancestors” said Jedediah (for such was
his uncouth name). “ But my ancestors paid no homage
to any human king. Little cause had they for doing so.
They were men who sought to serve Heaven as their
consciences approved : but the king and those same noble
gentlemen, of whose lineage you are so proud, persecuted
the faithful flock. Some of them they drave to seek refuge
and free worship in America—from their line I spring—:
while others they compelled to take up arms in their own
defence—you know with what result! With one consent
my ancestors and their following refused to bow down to
an earthly king rather than toa Heavenly: and I will not
be a traitor to my ancestors.”

“You shall see those ancestors of his”: here softly
observed Titania to Eileen: “ when you have gone back
farther along the rails of Time” And Eileen thanked
her for the promise.

Meanwhile the stranger smiled at the other’s vehemence.
124 The Embattled Farmers. [Ca.

“But” said he “you farmers are men of peace: and you
do not know what war means. Else you would not speak
so lightly of it.”

“T speak xof lightly of it” said the other. “Think you
I feel no charm in this grey homestead of mine? in the
trees, which my father planted? in the farms and fields,
which I have known from a boy? and in the household
faces, which wait at the door for me every evening upon
my home-coming? You say that I do not know what
war means. Not know! Can I forget that it means to
risk the loss of all these things: which are dear to every
man that lives? But for all that” he added “we intend
to fight and to jeopardise everything we have and love,
rather than by yielding to show ourselves wanting in
manhood—slaves without spirit: and all America will say
the same.”

“Well!” said the Englishman “it seems to me that
the king has a good army over here: and is ready for
you and all- your ancestors to boot. I for one am not
afraid of you.” And he snapped his fingers carelessly.

“You yourself” was the reply “have nothing to fear
from us: for you are our guest. Puritans and Royalists
alike ever agreed in this :—that it is a sacred duty never
to offer violence to any guest. As to the king and his
men, we shall do them no harm, until necessity drives us
to it. _But Boston Harbour MUST be thrown open to all
ships again. We are sending to pray his majesty to give
us justice of his own accord: but, if so be that he denies
X.] The Embattled Farmers. 12 5

our prayer, the Lord shall show, whether our quarrel be
a righteous one !”

The Puritan paused: but soon he resumed his speech.
“Meanwhile” said he “we are preparing the munitions
of War—to be ready for the time of need. -Minutemen
are being enlisted everywhere—I care not who knows it
—so called because they are sworn to come forward at
a minute’s notice to their country’s help. There stand
three minutemen” :—and he pointed proudly to his three
stalwart sons.—“ Here stands another, if he be wanted !—
And there stand those, who are prepared to play the
hardest parts, which War has to give :—those of the wife
and daughters of a soldier!”

“This is rank treason”: the stranger said: “I will
stay no longer in a rebel house.” And presently, late
as the hour was, he packed his baggage: and went to
seek a bed at some hostelry hard by. And Eileen never
saw him more.

When he had shut the door, the youngest of the old
man’s sons started to his feet. He had been sitting silent
in the family circle: but one could see that he had hardly
been able to ‘suppress the excitement, which had hold
of him. He was now free to speak as he thought fit.
“Father” he said “the hour has come. The redcoats
are marching’ here to. destroy our guns and stores. I
had the news in the village half an hour ago: but I
thought it not wise to utter it before yonder fellow. But
now listen, father! listen, all of you!—The enemy have
126 The Embattled Farmers. [Cu.

started this very night. They will be upon us, before
to-morrow’s morning is well broken.”

All were silent for a few minutes: and then the father
of the family spake, and said :—‘ They must be resisted.
All Concord will say that. I little thought that the first
of the fighting would be in this little town of ours.
Well, and if it be so, ye are ready to do the Lord’s work,
when He biddeth you. Get ye to bed meanwhile: there
is little fear that ye will sleep too heavily to hear the
call to arms, if indeed such call be given.”

The group accordingly broke up: and they all went
to their several sleeping-places. The Fairy Queen took
Eileen to pass the night under a leafy bower, amid the
gambols of the small people, who were her subjects. And
then—somehow or other—Eileen fell asleep: although
she had never thought to have slept that night.

In the morning she awoke with a start!

Well might Farmer Jedediah have said:—“No fear
the call to arms will not be loud enough.” There was
every kind of sound :—enough, one would have thought,
to awaken Rip Van Winkle from his wondrous sleep— :
guns were being fired: bells were ringing: and the air
was alive with shouts and cries. By the time that Eileen
had reached the little town—for all the speed of the
fairies in bearing her along—the “minutemen” were
already assembled on the hill: and were preparing to
hold the rude bridge, which spanned the Concord River
and across which the enemy were making ready to
X.] The Embattled Farmers. 127

advance. The voices of the American leaders were heard
encouraging their men :—“ They are coming here to make
slaves of you all! They have set fire to the village
of Lexington on their way! Come, men of Concord!
men of Acton! men of Lincoln!—We must show them
that we are men indéed: and able to fight in our own
defence !”

“Ts it even so?” cried the old Puritan, whom Eileen
now saw hurrying to the fray (his sons were already
in their line). “Then it is indeed too late to pray for
peace. The quarrel has gone too far for that.. May the
Lord show the right!”

The next moment the shot had been fired :—fired by
the embatiled farmers against the king’s English regulars.
What was a riot yesterday had become a war to-day.

The smoke of the volley still confused the air: when
the car of the golden eaglets was seen making its way
toward the place. “We will stay no longer” said Titania.
“War is ever a fearful thing to see: but never more
so than when it is waged between those of the same
blood and who speak the same language. But I wanted
to show you how this great war began: how peace-loving
countrymen became soldiers: and how ‘these same
embattled farmers-have fired a shot, which all the world
shall hear of presently. Englishmen are not accustomed
to be unsuccessful in their wars: but they have forgotten
that in this case the enemy are English too and there-
fore not likely to submit to slavery. See! Though the
128 The Embattled Farmers. [Cu.

soldiers of the roth Foot have destroyed some stores
and have not therefore altogether failed in the purpose of
their raid”—(these things were still just visible upon the
earth in the distance below)—“ they have roused the whole
country against them: and they shall soon know that
the war which awaits them is no slight matter. The
shot, which has been fired this day, will have much result.
I tell you that from this time forth America shall be free.
Before many years are past, English sovereigns shall send
ambassadors to the ‘ United States’ as to a free foreign
power: and in the days to come—the days in which you,
my dear Eileen, live your natural life—and from those days
forward, two nations of one tongue and lineage shall be
friends again—each under its own separate government.”

“Friends?” asked Eileen. “In spite of the quarrels
of their ancestors?”

“T hope they can be friends” said Titania “even in
spite of that—And as to ancestors, do you think that
the people of America are not really proud of their
ancient English ancestors? and of the history, which goes
back to ages long before the quarrels of the Royalists
and Puritans began, when English knights and warriors
won Crecy, Poictiers and Agincourt? I tell you that
they are very proud of these old-world memories: and
of others more ancient still. In Boston a man rejoices,
when he can associate such thoughts with the picture
of his grandmother’s grandmother and say:—(is it not

writ in famous American verse ?)—
XJ The Embattled Farmers. 129

‘Ay! since the galloping Normans came,
England’s annals have known her name:
and still to the three-hilled rebel town
dear is that ancient name’s renown.’

Else what is it that the people of America go forth
to England in their hundreds for to see? Do not the
ancient English monuments—the fortresses and palaces:
the cathedrals and the churches and the half-ruined
abbeys: the colleges and halls—of which the old country
is so justly proud—one and all get their full meed of
worship from those who visit them from across the seas?”
* * * % *
As Eileen thought upon these things, the fairy-station

came in sight once more.
CHAPTER XI.

OVER THE SEA TO SKYE.

“Speed, bonnie boat, like a bird on the wing!
Onward the sailors cry!
Carry the lad that’s born to be king
over the sea to Skye.”
—Jacobite Song.
HEN they came to the next station, Eileen looked
out as usual to read the name of it. It was
simply “AFTER THE FORTY-FIVE”: but Eileen
did not need to ask “what forty-five?” Of course the
year of the great Scottish Rebellion under Prince Charles
Edward must be meant. The Queen of the fairies told
her that it was as she supposed: only what they were
now to see was not the Rebellion itself, but the events
which followed on the suppression of the rising in the
following year. .

Directly they left the station, the air was full of the
melancholy music of the bagpipes: and the eaglets were
not long in making their way to Scotland. It was two
o'clock in the afternoon of an April day: and the spot
where Titania and Eileen left the car was in the middle
of Culloden Muir. Snow and hail were falling thick:

130


[To face p. 131.

N. LARGILLIERE firx.]

PRINCE CHARLES EDWARD.
Cx. XI] Over the Sea to Skye. 131

and the scene upon which they looked was a very
wretched one. It was the end of the great battle, wherein
Charles Edward was conquered once and for all. His
troops were entirely beaten: the wounded and the dead
were lying all around him: and the brave Highlanders
who were still left to him were not enough to do any
serious damage to the enemy. Yet the Prince, knowing
that, if this battle were indeed lost, all his hopes were
gone, was eager to lead his forces once more to the
fray: and the courageous clansmen would have followed
him. Very mighty and terrible they looked, these tall
bare-legged Highlanders, shining in all the glory of their
tartans and their kilts: but against so numerous an enemy
they could have done nothing. Yet they would certainly
have made a last desperate charge, with Charles Edward
at their head: had not one of the generals, finding that
words were lost upon the Prince, taken his horse by the
bridle and forcibly led his royal master off the field.
But whither? Where was a place to be found where
Bonnie Charlie could lay his head in safety? The sentries
of the enemy were posted everywhere. The only hope
of saving the Prince’s life was to enable him to fly the
country and take refuge in some foreign land. He who
just seven months ago had entered Edinburgh in royal
triumph was now an outlaw: and had no choice between
exile and death.

The conquerors were very cruel to the defeated Scotch-

men everywhere: they took pleasure in the most bar-
132 Over the Sea to Skye. [Cx

barous treatment of the prisoners, in watching their
sufferings and in the execution of hundreds of them. And
this dreadful news came to the poor Prince’s knowledge,
wanderer as he was. The tears gathered in his eyes at
times: and he would sit silently brooding over the dismal
events of the last few weeks,

The best chance for his escape seemed to his advisers
to be that he should make as rapidly as possible for the
islands on the western coast of Scotland. So he wandered
for weeks in the wildest parts of the Highlands: and his
sufferings and his miseries were terrible. In hills, in
caves, in forests he hid himself: continually pursued by
the soldiers of the enemy: often without food or shelter:
and yet afraid to ask for it, lest he should meet with
those unfriendly to his cause.

Meanwhile search was being made everywhere for the
Prince: and parties of redcoats might be seen any day
exploring the inns and the cottages and even the
smithies in the hope of finding him. But those who
stood at the anvil gave them no better help than did
the rest. A reward of thirty thousand pounds was offered
to anyone, who should take the fugitive, dead or alive.
The bribe was high, and these Highlanders were very poor:
but they scorned the thought of enriching themselves at
the price of their honour and the Prince’s life. For six
months from the time of the battle of Culloden, Charles
Edward was a houseless wanderer : trusting to the loyalty
of the Highlanders. And his confidence was not mis-
XI] Over the Sea to Skye. 133

placed. Fifty people, most of them poor, were in the
secret: and not one betrayed him. On one occasion he
trusted to the fidelity of a very poor man: who had but
to convey the secret to the soldiers in the next town,
and he would have received the enormous reward that
has been mentioned. The Highlander despised gold,
obtained at the price of his honour: kept the secret:
and assisted the Prince to escape. “Yet” said Titania
to Eileen, who much admired his faithful conduct “that
very man was soon afterwards transported for stealing
a cow of the value of thirty shillings. This illustrates
the Celtic notion of what is and what is not dishonourable
everywhere.” °

At last the Prince made his way to a group of three
islands on the extreme west of Scotland. These three
islands are called North Uist, Benbecula and South Uist :
but they are known together as the “Long Island.”
There he stayed in apparent security for about a month:
he was very nearly betrayed however by a wretched little
boy, who passed by when the Prince and a companion
named Burke were cooking their humble supper, and tried
to snatch away some of the provision, for which Burke gave
him a good cuff. “Nay, man!” said the Prince. “You
forget that Scripture commands us to feed the hungry:
you had better give the lad meat than blows.” So saying
he not only fed him, but even out of his scanty store found
him some clothing. This boy, with monstrous ingratitude,
yielded to the temptation which so many had withstood.
134 Over the Sea to Skye. [Ce

He actually found out a party of the enemy: told them
where the Prince was hidden: and offered to lead them to
his hiding-place. But, fortunately, they refused to follow
him, not believing his story: and so the Prince escaped the
danger. However this occurrence showed the necessity
for quitting their present retreat. Days passed away:
bringing greater perils to the unhappy wanderer. For the
enemy hada notion where he was: and the “ Long Island”
was surrounded on every side—by vessels of war, frigates
and cutters, and upwards of fifteen hundred militia troops
—with guards at every ferry, to entrap him should he
attempt to escape. A messenger was sent by some friends
of the cause to warn him of the danger: and the Prince
received him in his hut. His face was sooty, his hands
blackened with dust and smoke, and his eyes aching from
want of sleep: yet he would not dismiss the messenger
without giving him the best of what his straitened means
permitted. An old chest was the table: a board placed
across a barrel the seat: and a glass of brandy the dram
to commence the feast,—which consisted of a piece of beef
and a lump of butter on a wooden platter, with two more
clumsy broken dishes on which to serve it.

Matters were now at their worst: the Prince and his
followers held an anxious consultation as to what was next
to be done. Amongst those who advised him on this
occasion one must be particularly mentioned :—an Irish-
man, Captain O’Neil by name. And this was the plan
which he proposed.—He had a dear friend, he said, named
XL] Over the Sea to Skye. 135

Angus, of the great McDonald clan: and this Angus had
a sister called Flora, who happened at this moment to be
staying with her brother in the “Long Island,” but was
intending shortly to return to the island of Skye. If
Charles could be conveyed to that island, which was less
closely guarded, and where he had more powerful friends,
he might yet be saved. O’Neil therefore proposed that
he should cross the strait, which separates the two islands,
with Flora. McDonald and in her boat. The Prince
objected that every boat was searched by the soldiers:
and that none were allowed to pass without a written
paper, signed by some man in authority among his
enemies. How could he therefore pass? O’Neil then
went on to explain that the young lady whom he
had named was the step-daughter of a certain Captain
Hugh McDonald, who had much authority, and that she
could easily obtain from him the signed paper required :
he would be sure to give it to her for the asking, and
would suspect nothing. The Prince, it was proposed,
should dress in woman’s clothes: and pass himself off
as Betty Burke, Flora McDonald’s Irish maid. In this
disguise he might yet escape: and come safely out of
all his troubles.

The next evening the faithful O’Neil came in: and
announced that Flora McDonald herself (attended by
Lady Clanranald, her kinswoman) stood without and was
ready to wait on him. At the Prince’s desire she entered.
Eileen thought her very pleasant to look upon. She
136 Over the Sea to Skye. (Cx.

was tall and slender, with a graceful active-looking figure.
Her face was ruddy and of a healthy appearance: but
nevertheless refined and gentle. Her features were of
a firm and resolute character: her eyes were bright and
her bearing noble.

The Prince received her graciously: and an eager dis-
‘cussion began, which was adjourned at last till the next
day. In the morning she came again to the hut: any
objections she raised were now overruled: and she
determined to risk her life, if need were so to do, for
the sake of Bonnie Prince Charlie. She agreed to make
the necessary preparations with all possible speed: and
to do her best to ensure the success of the scheme. But
she insisted that only the Prince himself and her servant
Niel McEachan were to come with her. O’Neil would
have given worlds to come with them! He was miserable
at having to lose sight of the Prince: and besides this
he was very much in love with Flora herself! However
it was impossible for many reasons that he should come:
and Flora would not hear of it. But the Prince himself,
she said, was most welcome to a place in her boat. These
and other matters being arranged, Flora withdrew : pro-
mising to come again as soon as possible, bringing with
her the necessary disguise and also the signed papers
that would enable them to pass the sentries. |

She was as good as her word. Her step-father readily
granted the requisite papers for Flora and her Irish
maid at her request. There was a look however upon
XL] Over the Sea to Skye. 137

his face, as he signed the paper, which made Eileen think
that he had an inkling of the secret, but was too kind-
hearted to interfere with the plan. Flora now returned
to her friend Lady Clanranald, who was overjoyed at
her success. “Weel” she said “dear Flora, you’re a
bonnie, clever lassie! Our greatest difficulty is over:
and what there is now to see to is the getting up the
claise for Betty and taking it to the poor laddie at the
shieling. He mauna come here, where so many folks are
ganging to and frae: so we'll just walk out this fine
evening.”

The two women quickly set to work: and very soon
the disguise was completed. It consisted of a light-
coloured quilted petticoat and a large apron, with a
mantle of dun-coloured camlet, to which they attached
a hood, sufficiently large to draw over Miss Betty’s face,
if necessary for concealment :—also there was a cap with
a broad flapping border. The petticoat was of common
material: but the pattern was very pretty,—a little purple
flower on a light ground.

It now only remained to see to the hiring of a six-oared
boat with men:—they were told it was for Miss Flora,
who, with her maid and an attendant, was about to cross
to Skye. So, all being prepared, they had only to convey
the clothes and tell the Prince to be ready to embark that
night. O’Neil came to meet them: and returned with
them to the shieling, followed by Niel McEachan, Flora’s
servant, with the important bundle under his arm.
138 Over the Sea to Skye. [Cu.

The sight which they saw on entering the miserable hut
brought tears into their eyes. There stood the unhappy
young man, the unfortunate descendant of a race of kings,
before a wretched fire of furze and dry leaves, attempting
to roast his dinner—the heart, liver, and kidneys of a sheep
—upon a wooden spit! They could not refrain from re-
marking on his destitute condition. But he replied :—“ The
wretched to-day may be happy to-morrow: and perhaps
many a great man would be the better for suffering as I
am doing now.” Eileen never forgot the Prince’s appearance
on that memorable night. Tall he was and slight: and,
even beneath the threadbare faded jacket and plaid thrown
over his wasted figure, there was the grace and dignity of
his noble race, too striking for concealment. His manner
and voice were most attractive: and he did not seem so
much depressed by surrounding danger as might have been
expected. But, though he was not afraid to die when his
hour should come, he was naturally most anxious to do
all that could be done to save his life for happier days:
and he promised himself that, if he now escaped, he
would come again some day at the head of a new army
and have the kingdom after all.

The Prince now playfully invited his companions to
partake of his fare: and Flora McDonald blushed with
pleasure, when he asked her to sit at his right hand. After
dinner the Prince allowed them to try on his disguise: at
which he laughed so heartily, that Flora feared that folks
might be about and overhear. The noble-looking Prince
XL] Over the Sea to Skye. 139

was now turned into a tall awkward-looking Irish girl:
and strode along in a most ungainly fashion. However
there was no time to talk of this. Flora, dreading the
_ enemy’s approach, hastily threw some warm clothing over
her shoulders: and proceeded with her ¢wo servants and
Captain O’Neil towards the boat, which lay hidden behind
some rocks.

It was now eight o’clock on Saturday night, the twenty-
eighth of June, when—after the Prince had bidden farewell
to the warm-hearted O’Neil, who had so faithfully followed
him in his distressed condition for so long—they sat them
in the boat and put safely out to sea. The Prince had a
strong oaken stick under his arm: but Flora gave it in
charge to McEachan, saying it was not suitable for a

female servant: nor would she let him hide a loaded pistol

~under his gown, for fear of discovery. It was fine when
they started: but they had not gone far, when the heavy
dark clouds portended a fall of rain: and the waves of
the sea raged horribly.

By this time the boatmen had been informed by
McEachan who the pretended Betty really was. He
judged it best to tell them, as they were talking together
in Gaelic and looking suspiciously at the queer servant
Miss Flora was taking home. However they soon had
enough to do in managing the boat: for the rain came
pelting down, the wind blowing a hurricane. It was a
terrible position for Flora! and Eileen could not for

anything have helped admiring her bravery. Fancy a
140 Over the Sea to Skye. [Cu

young girl undertaking a night voyage of thirty or forty
miles in an open boat: in rough weather : and, above all,
with the constant dread’ before her of being seized by one
of the numerous vessels plying about! The Prince was
the most composed of the party: for even. the boatmen
were alarmed by the storm. So, to amuse them, he told
many curious anecdotes and sang several songs in a
charming tenor voice: one of which was a lively air, which
had been composed on the restoration of his great-uncle
Charles the Second of England.

The singing lulled Flora to sleep in spite of the roaring
wind. On awaking she found herself comfortably placed
in the bottom of the boat: and the Prince was guarding
her carefully, with his hands cautiously spread above her
head, to prevent any accident from the falling of a sail
’ which one of the men was setting. Lady Clanranald had
given him a small quantity of very: good wine: but so
thoughtful was he of Flora, that nothing would induce
him to touch it:—“Every drop” he said “was for his
amiable preserver.”

When the day dawned, they found themselves out of
sight of land, without any means of determining where
they were: for they had no compass. They had sailed
however but a little way farther, when the wind turned
favourably: and they distinctly saw the headlands of
Skye. Making with all speed towards that coast they
soon approached Waternish, one of the westernmost points

of the island. They had no sooner however drawn near to
XL] Over the Sea to Skye. IAI

the shore, than they perceived a body of the enemy’s
militia stationed at the place. These men had a boat,
but no oars. The men in Flora’s boat no sooner saw
them, than they began to pull heartily in the contrary
direction. The soldiers called upon them to land, upon
peril of being shot at. But it was resolved to escape at
all risks : and they exerted their utmost energies in pulling
off their little vessel. The soldiers then put their threat
into execution : and began to fire at the boat. The Prince
called to the boatmen “to pull lustily and not to fear the
villains.’ The honest fellows said they did not care for
themselves : it was only “for his ain sel.” “Oh, no fear
for me!” he replied in a cheerful tone. But he was
tenderly anxious to shield Flora from the bullets, which
were pelting the boat: so he entreated her to avoid the
danger by lying at the bottom of it. She earnestly
implored him to do so himself: for in the thick of danger
of what consequence was her insignificant life, when his
was in jeopardy? “What!” she said indignantly “was
she to think of her danger, when her ain Prince was
standing by? Such an act of selfishness would have
eternally disgraced the name of McDonald!” She there-
fore resolutely refused to lie down, unless he would do the
same: so by stooping very low, almost at the bottom of
the boat, they both managed to avoid the unfriendly
bullets: and at last the lusty boatmen pulled them beyond
reach of danger. The poor men were hard worked : and
longed for rest. After going a few miles farther, they
142 Over the Sea to Skye. [Cu.

tried to put into a small creek: but were obliged to set off
again on account of the hostility of the villagers.

At length the weary voyage came to an end: for the
oarsmen landed them near Mugstat, the seat of Lady
Margaret McDonald. This lady was one of the beautiful
daughters of the Countess of Eglintonne, another clans-
woman of Flora: and a faithful friend to the cause, who
would be certain to shelter the royal fugitive. With the
utmost relief and delight, they heard the bottom of the
boat grind at last upon the shingle: and they stepped out
upon dry land.

Flora thought that it would be best for her to go first
to her friend’s house and see that the place was clear of
enemies, before the Prince ventured thither himself. So
she started off with Niel McEachan: and left the Prince
in the boat. And fortunate it was that he stayed behind :
for, on entering the parlour at Mugstat, Flora found that
a certain Lieutenant McLeod, an officer of the enemy,
was there. He arose and greeted Flora: and asked her
a number of tiresome questions about her journey. She
however put on the most innocent face and natural manner
possible, which completely baffled the young man’s sus-
picions: and Lady Margaret, to whom she whispered a
word in the hall, had nerve enough to hide her anxiety
from the stranger. As soon as she had an opportunity,
‘she told Flora that another faithful clansman, named
Kingsburgh, was. there in. the house: and the ladies
accordingly determined to seek his advice. When he
XL] Over the Sea to Skye. 143

heard their extraordinary news, he offered to go and meet
the Prince and conduct him to his own house some miles
distant : and, this being agreed upon as the best course,
he set forth toward the shore. Flora stayed, sitting in
the company of Lady Margaret and the young officer
until she thought the two travellers would be well
advanced: and then rose to take her leave. Lady Mar-
garet pretended to press her to remain: but Flora said
she must go home at once to her mother, who was not
well. Of course these speeches were only pretences, made
to hoodwink the shallow-pated officer. Much relieved to
be free from the restraint of his presence, Flora and Niel
McEachan started off from the house on horseback :
accompanied by another lady, who was in the secret, and
two servants, who were not. And now Eileen thought
that, if Flora ever looked beautiful, it was in the saddle:
she had a perfect seat on her pony, and was altogether a
capital rider: and, in spite of all she had undergone, she
seemed still to be fresh and untired as ever. They soon
overtook Kingsburgh and the pretended Betty Burke:
who had walked thus far on the country high-road, but
were soon afterwards to turn off upon a lonely country
path. Flora, anxious that her fellow-traveller’s servants,
who were ignorant of the secret, should not see where
these two were going, called upon the party to ride faster,
and so passed them at a trot. Her fears were not without
good cause. The maid was telling McEachan that she
“couldna think who that bold brazen-faced hussy was,”
144 Over the Sea to Skye. [Cu.

who was walking with Kingsburgh. “Irish indeed! I'd
say she’s a man in woman’s claise! Lawk! what strides
the jade tak’s, and drags up her petticoats in an unco’
strange way!” Flora told her she was talking nonsense
about a man being dressed up: and that the person of
whom she spake was an Irish girl, that she was taking
home with her to spin flax for the family. Soon after
this, she parted from her fellow-travellers: and rejoined
Kingsburgh and the Prince. Then they all went along
together.

Many country people were returning from their kirk:
all of whom seemed struck by the Prince’s uncouth stride.
He made a kind of bow to those who accosted Kingsburgh
instead of a curtsey: and to this day, Eileen still laughs
when she thinks of the appearance of Betty Burke, at the
first ford they had to pass. But to Flora it was no matter
for laughter! and yet even she seemed to be amused in
spite of herself. For he was so afraid of dabbling his
gown and petticoat in the water, that he raised and twisted
them round his legs in such a queer fashion, that Kings-
burgh was obliged to take him to task. Poor Betty
promised to behave herself better. Accordingly at the
next brook the unfortunate gown was draggling through
the water! “They do call your Highness a Pretender”
said Kingsburgh. “If you are one, all I can say is
that you are the worst of your trade that ever was
seen.”

In the end it was striking ten, when, tired and hungry,
XL] Over the Sea to Skye. 145

they rode into the back yard of Kingsburgh’s house. Lady
Kingsburgh lost no time in setting supper before them: and
they all ate heartily of it. Charles, still wearing the female
disguise, placed Flora on his right hand, and his hostess
on his left. After a time, the two ladies left the gentle-
men over a bowl of punch: and went to have a little,
conversation by themselves. When Flora had related her
adventures, Lady Kingsburgh asked what had been done
with the boatmen who brought them across to Skye. The
other said that they had been sent back to the “ Long
Island.” Lady Kingsburgh observed that they ought not
to have been permitted to return immediately, lest, falling
into the hands of the enemy, they might tell the tale of
the Prince’s whereabouts. Flora was much troubled at
this oversight: and determined to change the Prince’s
clothes on the next day.

The pretended Betty. was that night hid in the best
bed that the house contained : and next morning all the
ladies assisted at her toilet. A lock was cut from the
head of the yellow-haired laddie: and divided between
Lady Kingsburgh and Flora. Late in the day the Prince,
attended by Flora and McEachan, set out for Portree,
whence he could be conveyed to a safe place: Kingsburgh
accompanying him with a suit of male Highland attire
under his arm. At a convenient place in a wood, Charles
exchanged his female dress for this suit: and then the
party separated. Kingsburgh returned home: the Prince
and McEachan set out for Portree, a walk of fourteen

Io
146 Over the Sea to Skye. (Cu.

miles: and Flora also proceeded thither by a different
road.

They all arrived safely at the appointed place: and, in
the evening, some trusty friends received the adventurer
at a mean public-house in the village. Here he partook
of a coarse meal: and slaked his thirst from a broken
brown potsherd, which was usually employed in baling
water out of a boat. Flora soon afterwards joined the
party: but this time it was only to take a final farewell
of the Prince.

The brave girl found this parting harder to bear than
all her previous troubles. She was taking leave of him
perhaps for ever: and was terribly anxious about his
safety. The tears started to her eyes: but with an effort
she drove them back, as the Prince came forward to her,
and taking both her hands in his, clasped them warmly
as he thanked her in the most grateful manner for the
service she had so opportunely rendered. And said he :—
“Although at present my affairs are but gloomy and
_ unfavourable, yet the time may come, my dear Miss
McDonald, when I shall feel proud to welcome my
patroness at my royal palace. Farewell now: and may
Heaven reward you as you deserve.” “Fareweel” said
she, with a tremor in her voice. The Prince turned aside
for a moment to hide the tears which were gathering in
his clear blue eyes: and then, pressing a kiss upon her
pretty red cheek, he tore himself away from her. That
kiss made her blush with pride and pleasure: and more
XL] Over the Sea to Skye. 147

than rewarded her for all that she had done. So the

Prince escaped in safety from his enemies:

* * * * *

and Titania and Eileen reascended the car and prepared
to continue their journey.

_As they went the fairies sang one of the lovely songs,
in which the Scotch people loved to commemorate the
escape of their bonnie Prince from the “Long Island”

over the Sea to Skye :—

‘Speed, bonnie boat, like a bird on the wing!
Onward the sailors cry!
Carry the lad that’s born to be king
over the sea to Skye!

Loud the winds howl: loud the waves roar:
thunder-clouds rend the air.

Baffled, our foes stand by the shore:
follow, they will not dare.

Speed, bonnie boat, like a bird on the wing!
Onward the sailors cry!

Carry the lad that’s born to be king
over the sea to Skye!

Though the waves leap, soft shall ye sleep:
Ocean’s a royal bed:

rocked in the deep, Flora will keep
watch by your weary head.

Speed, bonnie boat, like a bird on the wing!
Onward the sailors cry!

Carry the lad that’s born to be king
over the sea to Skye!
148 Over the Sea to Skye. [Cu.

Many’s the lad fought on that day
well the claymore could wield,
when the night came silently lay
dead on Culloden’s field.

Speed, bonnie boat, like a bird on the wing!
Onward the sailors cry!

Carry the lad that’s born to be king
over the sea to Skye!

Burned are our homes: exile and death
scatter the loyal men.

Yet, ere the sword cool in the sheath,
Charlie will come again !

Speed, bonnie boat, like a bird on the wing!
Onward the sailors cry!

Carry the lad that’s born to be king
over the sea to Skye!”

“But” said Eileen “Charlie never did come again,
did he?”

“Ah no” said Titania “Charlie Stuart and Flora
McDonald never met again. Often when an exile upon a
foreign shore he thought with affection of the sweet girl
who had saved his life: and she for her part never forgot
him.. She prayed morning and evening for him all the
days of her life: and when she died, her corpse was
shrouded at her request in the sheets. in which he had
lain on the last night before they parted. The young
Scottish Prince had no power at his back strong enough
to resist the English arms: but for all that he fought
a good fight. His valiant struggle and that of his trusty
friends, though they did not end in victory, have yet
XL] Over the Sea to Skye. 149

cast an imperishable glory on Scotland: and the brave
men and women, who assisted his cause, will never be
forgotten while history lasts.” As she said this, they
found themselves once more in the railway-station: and
made quickly for the train.

When they were in the train, Titania spoke to Eileen
and said:—“If we stop so often, you will be weary
of this journey, before you have seen a tenth part of
the interesting sights 1 want to show you.” So for a
long time the Magic Train sped on without a pause.

Yet, in the meantime, the journey was anything but
dull. Eileen might have found the history of Russia
and of Peter the Great a tiresome thing enough to read
of in a book. But it was a very different matter to lie
on a comfortable soft cushion with her dog’s head in
her lap beside the Fairy Queen: and thus, looking lazily
out of the window, to see Russia for herself, and watch
the successes of that lusty warrior, who was its Czar.
Seen in this way, she found Peter the Great most in-
teresting—and Catherine as well, the fair lady, who was
first the captive of his spear and afterwards his Czarina
and companion on the throne.

And Eileen became still more excited when, after some
while, Ireland came in sight again. Alas! she found it
still a distressful country: and the sight of Oliver Crom-

well, fresh from the execution of his king, slaughtering her
150 Kileen’s Journey. [Cu XL

countrymen like sheep, was a thing which naturally made
her even more angry when she verily beheld it than when
she had only learned it in her reading. There was fighting
all over Ireland in those years: and you may imagine
how much interested Eileen was to see her favourite
Clonderalaw Castle bearing its own part in the wars. It
was no dismembered ruin then: but the proud fortress
of Sir Teige McMahon. Its fortunes were varied and
exciting : at one time the Irish party held it: at another
the Cromwellians were possessed of it. Ever and again it
was besieged and attacked anew : and stubbornly defended
one day by those who had been storming it the day
before. Warships sailed on the Shannon : and every part
of the surrounding country, which Eileen knew so well
in peace, became, month after month, the battlefield of
some new bloody struggle. Then, as they passed farther
back, the scene shifted to England: and Eileen saw the
battles of Naseby and Marston Moor,—events which are
thrilling even in a history book, but which were a thousand-
fold more so when actually visible from the window where
she sat. And so too Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden, of
whom, before, she had vague ideas, if any, now acted his
part of a hero before her very eyes. But it would take a
. volume by itself even to mention the numberless tales,
which Eileen saw played out in. those eventful years.
The expectations, which she had formed when first she
heard that her wonderful wish was to be realised, were
far more than fulfilled.
CHAPTER XII.

THE UNDAUNTED FEW.

“They who first off-cast
their moorings from the habitable past :
and ventured chartless on the sea
of self-engendering liberty:

the undaunted few,
who changed the old world for the new.”
—LoweELL.

URING the years which they passed between their

[ last and their next stopping-place, the Fairy Queen
—besides the things described in the last chapter
—gave Eileen many views of the American shores: and
bade her notice the various settlements, which were being
made there by the Europeans of this time. At a further
- stage in her backward journey, she was to see the first
discovery of the western world: but what the present
view from the windows of the Magic Train showed her
was the use which was being made of that discovery by
persons of divers descriptions and characters. Many and
various were the motives, which urged voyagers from
Europe to seek the coasts of America. Men of several
nations crossed the seas: numbers of Dutchmen and

151
152 The Undaunted Few... [Cu

Swedes and Spaniards wended their way westward : but
English adventurers were always to the fore. Some fled
because their affairs at home were desperate: some went
in the mere expectation of adding to their wealth. The
men who founded the colony of Maryland journeyed
thither in the hope of a good trade in furs. That of
Virginia—originally founded by the Royalists—became
the refuge-land of many of the defeated followers of king
Charles the First, after his unhappy death had put an end
to all their thoughts of greatness in their own country.
Of course Eileen saw that ill-fated king, as the Magic
Train flew past the ages to which his sad history belongs:
and she felt sure, from the time when first she saw his
face, that if she had lived in his reign she never could
have helped wishing him well—for all his faults and follies.
But it was not only in England that those, who were
fallen from their high estate at home, bethought them-
selves of bettering their fortunes in the other hemisphere.
In Paris beautiful women, who one after another became
the favourites of king Louis the Fourteenth, had the
ruling of everything: these women made men great one
day and debased them on the next: and ever and again
those upon whom the favourite of the moment frowned
were compelled to fly from France. There was war all
over Europe in this century: and many of those who.
had the worst of the fighting started upon like voyages
in the quest of a safe resting-place. Many such did
Eileen see taking ship for America: full of a good hope
XIL] - The Undaunted Few. (153

for happier days in that land of promise. At another
time Titania desired her to mark the settlement of the
Jesuit priests in Canada: which had entirely other aims.
These holy men went thither not for their own sakes:
but for the sake of the heathen, who lived there in dark
ignorance. They went to preach the Gospel to grim
savages: and to suffer agonies of every kind in that
sacred cause. With them went also not less holy women.
_ Some of these had had their share of this world’s great-
ness: and, finding it unsatisfying, had resolved to give
their lives to better things. Others of them hardly knew
what “this world’s greatness” meant. These last went
straight from the still cloisters of a nunnery to do the
work, which the priests, whom they obeyed in everything,
had bidden them do: nor would they have hesitated, if
so called, to travel unto the world’s end at their behest.
Eileen beheld a strange company of this sort, sailing one
day from the gay French port of Dieppe on a vessel bound
for Canada. It was an extraordinary sight to see their
startled aspect, when they came on board. Everything
in the world was new to them. Their whole idea of life
had hitherto been narrowed to the small cells of their
convents: where they had heard of little else than reli-
gious devotion or the arts of the needle and the paint-
brush. Fancy what matter for astonishment there was to
them in this outside world of life and action :—the ship :—
the sailors :—the shouts of command:—the flapping of
sails:—the salt wind:—and the boisterous sea! Terrible
154 The Undaunted Few. - [Cu.

was the trial of a sea voyage, in one of the uncomfortable
vessels of those days, to women nurtured as these women
were. But they endeavoured to behave as though they
were in their convent still. Oftentimes they sang in
choir on deck: and they heard their usual number of
masses in the cabin. And in this spirit they went zhezr
way to the same America: little dreaming what fear-
ful creatures, and how unlike the people of Europe,
would be the savages, to whom their mission had been
sent !

At last, as the train flew on, Titania said :—“ We are
coming very soon to the station which I thought it would
be best for us to make our next stopping-place. I will
show you now the ancestors of Farmer Jedediah: whom
you may remember that I promised you should see.”
“Indeed I do remember”: said Eileen: “I wonder to
which of the different kinds of settlers that I have been
seeing Farmer Jedediah’s ancestors belong?”

“Not exactly to any of them” Titania made reply.
“They went not to regain any greatness, which they
had lost in their own country: nor to find great wealth
or escape great poverty :—nor yet upon an enthusiastic
mission to convert the heathen. They went merely to
be able to worship and pray, unhindered, in the fashion
which seemed best to them—But here we are at the
station, ‘THE VEAR OF OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND SIX
HUNDRED AND SEVEN’: and you shall see them for
yourself.”
xIL] . The Undaunted Few. 155

Almost immediately they were there: and quickly took
their places in the car. “Ho and away to Boston!” said
the Queen.

It was the same command which had been given at
another station: but Titania did not mean the same
Boston as that which they had visited before. They were
going this.time to the little old seaport and manufacturing
town in England, from which the other has its name.

They soon came to the place: and passed along the
principal streets of the town,—where however for some
time they saw little which was worthy of notice, save
the mighty tower of Saint Botolph’s Church, which could
be seen for forty miles around. But what most struck
Eileen in this Boston was the gay attire of the citizens:
they might have come out of the canvas of old pictures :
she had seen nothing like them in real life before. The
Fairy Queen now brought her, by way of the ancient .
grammar school, to a solid-looking building of a consider-
able size,—which, as Eileen was soon made aware, was
Boston Jail. A large crowd was gathered together outside
the doors of it: and in their midst six or seven peculiar-
looking men were the objects of general attention. Their
clothing and mien were very different from that of the rest
Their faces were pale and stern. Their raiment was of
a gloomy description: they wore black cloaks and high
black hats with steeple crowns: and the white bands
stiff with starch about their necks were all that afforded

any relief to this severe attire. Eileen knew this fashion
156 The Undaunted Few. [Cw

from pictures, as that.adopted by the Puritans. They
had but just stepped from the prison doors: and a few
friends, adorned (or rather unadorned) like themselves,
were coming forward to greet them upon their relcase.
The people jeered at them awhile: but soon suffered
them to depart in peace. A passing questioner stopped,
and asked one of the Puritans what was the prisoners’
crime,—the very question which Eileen had it on her lips
to put.

The answer sounded like a bit of a sermon, as, with
a nasal utterance, the Puritan replied and said :—“ Why,
art thou a stranger in Israel, that thou knowest not what
has come to pass? Ask the Bishops of this honourable
nation what sin these poor men have committed. Their
crime is that, like a faithful flock, they have followed their
Shepherd : that they have spoken the word of the Lord:
and that they have been instant in prayer.”

It sounded a curious crime! and Eileen was anxious to
hear more. “Come” said the Fairy Queen “to yonder
house, which belongs to a Ruling Elder of these people.
There shall the prisoners give their own account.”

Eileen followed her accordingly: and there—in a bare
gloomy room, without any adornment of any kind—the
flock of one of the released Pastors was assembled, to hear
his voice once more. When they were all come together,
he lifted up his voice to speak to them: but the first
part of his discourse was hard to understand. It sounded

like a long lamentation over the wickedness of some of
XIL} The Undaunted Few. 157

the ancient tribes, who used to -dwell near the Holy
Land, with whose mere names (but nothing more) Eileen
was acquainted from the Psalms. But presently she
found that by the “ Moabites ” and “ Hagarenes ” and such-
like names the Puritans understood the Lords of the
Council and the Bishops of the Church of England to
be meant. A bishop according to the present speaker
always seemed to be everything which was bad: one
bishop in particular was called “Ahab,” “Aceldama,”
“ Abomination,” “Leviathan” and “Beelzebub,” by all
of which words of scorn the Puritan meant to say that
he was the enemy of what was beautiful and good. The
only bishop, whom Eileen had ever known in Ireland,
was a kind-hearted and fatherly old gentleman: who
had the love of all men:—devoted to the welfare of his
people and spending his life in their behalf. She had
always imagined that bishops in general were somewhat
of this pattern: but she was soon to learn why the
word had so very different a meaning for the present
gathering. ,

The Puritan Pastor and his congregation were certainly
not attractive-looking men to outward sight: nor were
their voices pleasing to hear. But the Queen of the
Good Fairies had brought Eileen among them: because
they were men of a high courage,—ready to dare
everything in defence of what to them seemed beautiful
and good.

One or two of the company, who did not know what
158 The Undaunted Few. [Cu.

had happened, besought the speaker “to testify to the
things which have been done and suffered by the faithful
in the present case.” And—for an answer—he began to
tell his story in these words :—

“ There was a large company of us, who were purposed
to get a ship wholly to ourselves: in which we might
fly from this country to another, where we might praise
the Lord in peace. And we made agreement with the
master of a ship to come for us upon a certain day:
and to take us and our goods in, at a convenient place,
where we should all attend in readiness. So, after long
waiting and large expenses, though he kept not day
with us, yet he came at length: and he took us in during
the night. But when he had us and our goods aboard,
he betrayed us: having made a plot with the searchers
and other officers so to do. For those who are in power
in this land hold it a crime for us to fly from our
persecutors. They took us and put us into open boats:
and there rifled and ransacked us,—searching our clothes
for money, yea searching even the women with all
rudeness. Then they carried us back into the town:
and made us a spectacle and wonder to the multitude,
which came flocking on all sides to behold us. Being
thus first rifled and stripped by the officers of our money,
our books and much other property, we were presented
to the magistrates. Messengers were sent to inform the
Bishops and Lords of the Council about us: and so we

were committed to ward. Indeed the magistrates used
XIL] The Undaunted Few. 159

us courteously : and showed us what favour they could.
But they could not deliver us, until orders came from
the Council-table, where sit the Bishops and _ their
fellowship. But the issue was that, after a month’s
imprisonment, most of our company were dismissed :
and sent to the places whence they came. But seven
of us, whom they thought to be the principal, were
kept in prison until to-day.”

After hearing this and much like discourse, the Puritans
began to consider what they should do in the future:
and they agreed that—at a convenient season—they would
make another attempt to get over to foreign shores from
another place upon the coast. Some of the Elders were
to find a ship for the intending fugitives. After that
Eileen saw many of their hopeless attempts to find a ship:
and no English vessel would receive them. For all men
dreaded to be punished by the Bishops and the Lords of
the Council for the crime of taking such men on board.

At last however it fell out that they lighted upon a
Dutchman, who had a ship of his own. They made
agreement with him: and acquainted him with their
condition,—hoping to find more faithfulness in him than
in the former ship-master of their own nation. He said :—
“Do not fear: I will do well enough.” He was by ap-
pointment to take them in between Grimsby and Hull.
For there was a large common there: a good way distant
from any town.

Now at the time, which had been fixed upon, the women
160 The Undaunted Few. [Cu

and children were sent with the goods to the place in a
large boat, which had been hired for that end: and the
men were to meet them by land. Eileen went with the
boat. By this time she was full of good wishes for these
queer stern-looking people :—who seemed to be so hardly
used : and to be yet so resolute to find a place, where
they might worship as their consciences approved.

And after all, when they came to the place, there was
no ship waiting for them. The sea was rough: the women
were sorely weather-tried: and so they prevailed upon
the seamen to put into a creek hard by. There they lay
aground at low water: and next morning, when the
promised ship did come, they were fast and could not
stir till about noon.

In the meantime the ship-master, perceiving how the
matter was, sent his boats to be getting the men aboard :
for he saw that they were ready and walking about the
shore. Eileen watched the first boatful on board: and
was just thinking that the boat was ready to go for more,
when she espied a great company, both horse and foot,—
with guns and bills and other weapons—, bearing quickly
down upon the fugitives. The whole country seemed to
have been raised to take them.

The Dutchman, seeing this, began to curse and to swear.
And forthwith—having the wind fair—he weighed anchor
and hoisted his sails: and away went the ship. And with
it went the poor men, who were already on board :—in

great distress, as you may imagine, for their wives and
XIL] The Undaunted Few. 161

children, who would be taken prisoners before their eyes,
being left destitute of those who might have helped them— :
and all their goods moreover. were with the women in
the boat. They had neither money, nor any clothes,
except those which they wore upon their;backs. Eileen
could see them attempting to make the Dutchman put
about again: they would have given all they had to be
back ashore. But all in vain: there was no remedy: it
was necessary that they and their dear ones should thus
sadly part.

For a few minutes the women watched the sails of the
vessel, as she sank with all they loved below the verge.
Pitiful it was to see their distress.) What weeping and
crying there was on every side! Some called out for their
husbands, who were carried away in the ship: others
wondered what would become of themselves and their
children: others again were melted in tears, seeing their
poor little ones hanging about them, crying for fear and
quaking with cold! And although the men upon the
shore attempted to come to their aid, many of the women
were taken captives: and Eileen saw them led off to the
jail. It was not long however before they were released.
For it seemed impossible even to their enemies to imprison
wives for refusing to leave their husbands: and daughters
for following their fathers in their flight.

Before Eileen left Boston, she went again to hear the
Pastor speak, whom she had heard before: for he had
been among those, who never went aboard the ship.

II
162 | The Undaunted Few. [Cu

There was a great company of “the faithful” gathered
together for worship in his house. And, when they
had prayed and sung, he spake to them and said :—
“The women, who are parted from their loved ones,
shall go to them: that must be our first care: and they
shall all meet together in Holland with no small re-
joicing.” (For the Dutchman had taken them to his
own country.) “Yet methinks that none of our people
will stay long among the Hollanders. For they know
naught of trades or traffic, which are the only means
of living in that land: but are simple countryfolk—
fishers and choppers and ploughmen and the like. That
is not our destiny. Nay rather we should set our
thoughts upon some of those vast unpeopled countries of
America, which are fruitful and fit for habitation. There
shall we worship the Lord our God in the manner which
seems meet to us. I feel assured that those who depart
to-day shall return again: and they—and we—and our
wives and little ones shall sail together to those western
shores. There shall be no lords and bishops to
oppress us: but simple countryfolk—yea even fishers
and choppers and ploughmen—shall constitute a state.
Our numbers may be small for such a purpose: but if
our hearts are undaunted and we fear not to make this
venture, then of a surety the undaunted few can accom-
plish these things by the help of the Lord.”

The Fairy Queen said :—“It shall be as the Pastor
says. These men shall indeed seek America: and the






W. COKE, R.A, pix.) [To face p. 163.
THE DEPARTURE OF THE PILGRIM FATHERS,

From the print published by Messrs. Henry Graves & Co.
XIL] The Undaunted Few. 163

ship in which they shall sail—the d/ayflower—shall be
for ever famous for their sakes. But there is no need
for us to stay in England till the day of her sailing.
After what you have seen, you can imagine their em-
barkation for yourself: the Puritan Elders leaving their
country with pious words upon their lips: their friends
gathered together upon the sea-shore and bidding them
God-speed: all praying the same prayers—men, women
and children—for a happy freedom and prosperity in
the new country. Verily those prayers shall not remain
unanswered : a great destiny awaits the undaunted few /
These and none other are the ancestors of Farmer
Jedediah and. his countrymen !—But now let us away!”
And she. summoned her fairy-car.

On their way to the station the car hovered for a few
minutes over America: and the shores of what in the
latter days came to be called “ Boston Bay.” The three
hills and the swamps and the River Charles were there
as in the days, when she saw the soldiers of the Ioth
Foot preparing to make their raid upon the Concord
stores: but there were no buildings then—no wealth—
no industries—no nation—no inhabitants save heathen
savages. And then of a truth Eileen realised how great
indeed was the work which the undaunted few, who
changed the scene, achieved.

* * * * *

When they were speeding on again, the Fairy Queen

said :—“ Can you be surprised, now that you have seen
164 The Undaunted Few. [Cu

the Puritan Fathers, that these men’s children’s children
had no hesitation in fighting against their mother-land,
when she ill used them in after-days? For England
had never been a kind parent to them and theirs. It
is a very different case from that of the poor emigrant,
who goes out merely to make his fortune: he loves his
country still, though it is far away: absence endears it
to him: distance lends enchantment. You know what
the Irishman says in the song”: and, to the music of

the silver-stringed lutes of her fairies, Titania sang :—

“¢But Ill ne’er forget you, darling,
in the land I’m going to.
They say there’s bread and work for all
and the sun shines always there:
but I'll ne’er forget old Ireland
were it fifty times as fair.’”

And again :—

“¢There’s a country that they tell of—

far away across the sea:

where they say there’s luck and fortune
in store for you and me.

But the richest country, darlin’,
and the luckiest spot on earth

can ne’er be like ould Ireland,
the place that gave us birth.’

“An emigrant who goes out in this spirit longs to
return home: and would: fain at least be buried, when
he dies, in the churchyard of his native parish. Often
such an one, if he makes his fortune, will come back to
XIL] The Undaunted Few. 1605

his mother-country in very truth: and, if it be not so
ordained, he will fight at least for her in any part of
the world, whensoever there be need. The idea of his
home is a sacred idea to him: and one which he can
never forget. England has many sons in foreign lands,
who think of her on this wise: I believe they will never
leave her, nor forsake her. But these Puritans found
that what was most sacred to ¢hem was impossible in
their old home: and therefore the undaunted few, who
left it, gave their whole soul’s affection to the country
of their choice. And their posterity have but followed
in the paths they trod.” ,
CHAPTER XIII.
THE PLAY.

“The play’s the thing,
wherein I'll catch the conscience of the king.”

“Madam, how like you this play?”
—SHAKESPEARE,

HEN they came to the station “THE YEAR OF

OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED

AND NINETY-EIGHT,” the Fairy Queen said :—

“Eileen, I am going to blindfold you, before the car starts

this time. For I want to make you guess where you

are, when the car draws nigh the earth.” “Allright!” said

Eileen, laughing: “I will guess if I can.” So Titania took

a scarf, and therewith for a short season Eileen’s beautiful
blue eyes were hidden from the light of day.

“You shall have the bandage off very soon” said the
Fairy Queen. The golden eaglets flew more swiftly than
ever: and slackened not their speed, until the Queen bade
them stay their flight. Then they obeyed: and the car
was at rest for a while,—poised in mid-air a few hundred
feet above the earth. “ Now take off the scarf”: Titania

said: “and tell me where you are.”
166
Cu. XUL] The Play. 167

Eileen threw it off impatiently : and soon her eyes were
free to gaze unhindered on the scene below. She saw
an ancient-looking city: girded about with picturesque
grey walls and full of richly-timbered houses, such as
may seldom now-a-days be seen: a city of gardens
and parks and trees and flowers: a city of towers and
spires and palace-battlements: a sunlit city, radiant with
the joy of summertide and merry with the music of
singing birds: fresh with the breezes of the not far distant
sea: and vaulted over by a bright blue sky, which neither
mists nor clouds obscured. Through the midst of the city
ran a fair-flowing river, almost as clear and blue as her
own dear Irish Shannon: yet not deserted in its loveliness,
but ploughed by manifold trim vessels with white sails
a-spread, and curiously-painted barges floating upon the
tide. The river was spanned by a quaint old bridge, on
which tall houses were builded, a row of them on. either
side, as though it were an ordinary street. Land and
water were alike moving with busy life: but there was
nothing ugly or unpleasing in the sight of all these many
businesses.

“Tt is just splendid!” cried Eileen enthusiastically. “I
like it ever so much: but I can’t guess the least bit where
we are.” The Queen smiled, and said to the eaglets :-—
“Ho and away! to the earth we go.” And then the car
began slowly to descend.

“Cannot you guess yet?” Titania asked again, when they

were getting near the ground. “I can’t” she answered.
168 | The Play. [Cu.

“Do you see that building ?” said the Fairy Queen, point-
ing to the left side of the car. “I do” said Eileen.
She looked at it intently: she was certain that she had
seen it before some time in her ordinary life: when?
where ?—Suddenly the truth flashed across her mind.
It was Westminster Abbey!

“Vou are right at last” Titania said. “Then does Your
Majesty mean to tell me” said the bewildered Eileen
“that we are in London?” “That is just what I do mean
to tell you” answered the Queen.

Now you must know that, less than a year before the
opening of this story, Eileen had paid a visit to London
in the winter. She had been to the Pantomime: and the
Zoological Gardens: and “ Madame Tussaud’s.” She had
also been on Sunday to service at the Abbey, which she
now recognised.

She had much enjoyed all of these things: but London
as a whole she had thought detestable. Foul fogs :—
huge unlovely mansions:—a muddy river :—everything
that was unclean and ugly :—these were Aer chief ideas
of London as a whole. How different to the sunny city,
upon which she was now looking—the London of the
closing sixteenth century! The beautiful Abbey and a
few other precious relics of the old times remain: all

the rest is gone.

. Not far from the Abbey the car touched the ground.
“This” said the Queen “is the Palace of Whitehall.”
And so the two of them, wandering about there that
XIII] The Play. 169

day, saw all the wonders of the place: the parliament-
house: the palace-gates: the clock-tower: the fountain:
and, what Eileen thought most curious of all, the cock-
pit. A visit to the cock-pit was one of the favourite
amusements of the courtiers in this age. Eileen thought
it a poor amusement to see two wretched birds tearing
each other to pieces: and fighting to the death for the
sport of men and women in the gallery. After all London
was not altogether better in these days than in her own
time :—and in that the Fairy Queen agreed with her.
Even now there was a cock-fight being fought: amid
great shouting from the onlookers. But of course our
travellers did not stop to watch it. “We must find some
better entertainment” said the Queen “than that!” It
chanced that just at this moment two young courtiers
left the cock-pit. “I am weary of that”: said one: “the
little bird is nearly dead. What entertainment shall we
seek now?” “Let us to dinner first”: said the other:
“and my counsel is that after that we take a barge down
the river: so we shall be sure to find some manner of
merriment.” Titania said:—“ We will follow their example.”
So they kept behind the two young men, as they started
off to the tavern where they meant to dine. Eileen
certainly thought them very odd figures. They were
richly dressed according to the fashion of the time: but
it was a fashion which gave them in her eyes a most
grotesque appearance. They had gay scarlet caps: and
enormous ruffs of puckered linen about their necks. Their
170 The Play. [Cu

cloaks and leggings were equally brilliant. And they
swaggered in their walk: like peacocks conscious of their
gorgeous tails. They came to the tavern: where cringing
servants at once set dainty food before them, and a
huge bowl of punch. Titania and Eileen refreshed
themselves at the same time.

Of course during her whole journey Eileen had always.
had whatever she wanted in this way: and continued
so to have during the whole of her magic journey.
I have not in this book attempted a description of the
feasts she had. IJ am afraid that it would only cause
the watering of many mouths: and you may be sure '
that Eileen’s mother would have been most seriously
alarmed for her health, had she been there. Certainly
strawberries and cream were nothing to it!

Meanwhile they listened to the conversation of the
courtiers: who were revelling, for their part, on the best
of earthly fare. Their talk was chiefly of Elizabeth, their
queen, at whose palace they were living: of her magni-
ficent progresses from place to place about the country:
and of the great entertainments which her subjects gave
in her honour everywhere. Other things too they dis-
cussed, which would interest the persons who make
history-books, were Eileen able to remember them. But
the truth is that she thought these things very dull: and
paid no heed to them.

After dinner the courtiers strolled toward the river-

side: and, going down the steps belonging! to the Palace,
XUL] The Play. 171

embarked on board a private barge. When they had
sat them down, Titania and Eileen took their places also
on two empty seats. While the men were unmooring
the barge from the shore, Eileen looked about her with
much interest. Close above her was “Y* STARRE
CHAMBER” :—the horrible place where people were con-
demned for wrong-doings, which oftentimes they had never
done at all: and tortured with the thumb-screw and the
rack to make them remember things, which they had
never seen nor heard. Eileen shuddered when she saw
the place: and so did Titania herself. On the other side
of the river there was Lambeth Marsh, then a boggy
country all undrained and empty of houses: whereas the
same place is now covered by busy streets: and thickly
built over with houses and churches and hospitals.

Soon the oars were plashing lazily in the water: and
the voyage down the river had begun. It was growing
towards evening: and the Thames was crowded with
barges and boats of all sorts, carrying people of every
rank to divers places of amusement. Here and there, at
intervals along the shore, were stairs from the land to
the river: and under those stairs the watermen, standing
‘in their boats, were shouting to all the passers-by to
persuade them to hire their various craft. No-one seemed
to dream of driving anywhither by land. The part played
by cabmen now was then played by the watermen: for
it was not until a much later date that sedan-chairs came

into fashion. Eileen remembered that, when she had
172 The Play. [Cu

visited the Pantomime, she had driven along the Strand,
one of the most crowded of the London streets. That
street was almost empty now. It was regarded merely
as the shore of the river. The beautiful houses, built
upon that shore, were washed at high tide by the waters
of the Thames. Everything was different, except some
of the names. Eileen saw the names of Savoye and
Somerset and Arundel: and many others, which are
names along that shore to-day,—but names of things
quite different.

The barge did not stop upon her course, until they
were come to the place where the monks lived, who
were called the White Friars. (There are no friars there
now: but the names of Whitefriars and Blackfriars
remain.) At this point the courtiers bade the men stay
the vessel, while they considered where it would be best
to land. So they rested upon their oars beneath the
shadow of Bridewell Prison: and the sun set red and
lowering above its murky walls.

A little way farther down the Thames there was a
great stream of boats crossing the river. And one of
the young men said :—“See yonder crowd. I trow there
must be great doings afoot over there, on the south side
of the river. I fancy there will be good bear-baiting
to-night!” Eileen did not know exactly what “bear-
baiting” was: but she felt rightly sure that it must be
some cruel sport, nearly as bad as cock-fighting. She
hoped that it was not this, which Titania was bringing
XIL] The Play. «193

her to see. The Fairy Queen reassured her. “It will
be something better than ‘bear-baiting,’ I promise you”
she said.

Their barge now took the same direction as the crowd.
Eileen looked with amused interest at the strange folk,
who were crossing from the Blackfriars Stairs. One barge
in particular attracted her attention. Some rough noisy
men were the passengers on board of her. They seemed
to be in a great hurry. One of them was urging the
watermen to make haste. “ Bring us to the Paris Gardens
Stairs as quickly as you can”: he exclaimed: “we have
no time to spare.” Their vessel nearly ran foul of the
courtiers’ barge: and one of the bargemen called out to
the first speaker :—‘Do not be in such hot haste, Mad
Will: or you will get into trouble” And so the other
vessel waited for the proud young courtiers to pass by.

The helmsman of the private barge turned to his
masters: and pointed towards the man, who had been
called “Mad Will.” “That, sirs” he said “is William
Shakespeare, a favourite stage-player. The fellow has
written some plays himself, I am told, which have great
wit in them. He is going at this moment, with his
company, to the Globe Theatre, which you may see
yonder.” Eileen looked again at the players’ barge,
which was still following them, though at a respectful
distance: and she bent her eyes on the man whom she
now learned to be Shakespeare. If Shakespeare were

alive in the nineteenth century, he would be recognised
174 The Play. [Cu.

as the greatest man in England: Eileen could hardly
believe that this rudely-dressed actor, whom she had
just seen so unceremoniously treated, was indeed that
most illustrious poet, of whom every child has heard at
least the name. It sounded so very funny to hear this
great man called “ Mad Will” and spoken of as a “ fellow,
who is said to have written plays with wit in them.”

“TI would fain talk to the fellow” said one of the
courtiers. “Let him overtake us.” And in a few
moments the players’ barge was beside the grand vessel.

“When one is invisible” thought Eileen “it cannot be
rude for one to stare”: and so stare she did. Who is
there in our day that would not be tempted to stare,
if Shakespeare stood before him? She would remember
that broad forehead and majestic intellectual counte-
nance all her life. Talk of the privilege of beholding
kings and. queens !—here was a privilege far greater than
that. There are many persons now living who would
give great sums to see what Eileen saw that day.

The company of Shakespeare’s fellows was also remark-
able : they were called “The Chamberlain’s Servants” : and
they wore scarlet cloaks with velvet capes, given them by
order of Elizabeth herself. And when Eileen had stared
at Shakespeare to her heart’s content, Titania pointed
out to her the other celebrated actors who were of the
company. “That is Burbadge” she said, pointing to
one: “and that” levelling her finger at another “is

Fletcher. They are both to play important parts in
XIL.] The Play. 195

the tragedy to-night.” Then she turned to a slim pale
youth, and said :—“ That is Robert Goughe. He plays
the women’s parts. To-night he is to be the mother of
a murdered prince. Yesternight he was—who do you
think?” “I can’t guess” said Eileen. “He was
Titania!” said the Queen. “Do you think that he can
have looked much like the real Titania?” Eileen could
not help roaring with laughter at the idea of that pale
youth pretending to be the Fairy Queen: and contrasting
his lank face with the glorious beauty of the real Titania.
“However” said the Queen “the audience found
nothing funny in it. They had never seen a woman
act. In the sixteenth century, when plays are acted,
men alone appear upon the stage: and Robert Goughe,
dressed as a woman, played Titania quite well enough
for them. Besides the words, which the stage Titania
and her comrades had to say in that same play, were
words so strangely beautiful, that the figure and form
of the actor were small matters in comparison.”

And now the young gallants were asking the players
what was to be acted at the theatre that night. The
answer was:—-“The Life and Death of King John—a
tragedy, written by our comrade here, Will Shakespeare.
We hope that your worships will come and hear it.”
“No, I think not”: said one of the courtiers: “I shall
pass this evening in the Paris Gardens under the open
sky. Perchance to-morrow I will come and see your
theatre. What will you play to-morrow?” Shakespeare
176 The Play. [Cx

answered that the morrow would be Thursday: and that
it was against the law to act plays in London on a
Thursday. “Why” they asked “against the law?”
Eileen was astounded at the answer to this question.
Because Thursday was the day set apart for the chief
exhibition of bear-baiting: and plays were forbidden on
Thursdays lest they should interfere with that royal
sport! “Well, what say you?” asked one friend of the
other: “shall we see this play of Kzxg /ohkn to-night,
or shall we not?” “Let us wait” he answered “till we
are ashore: and see what choice of amusements we have
there.” And so both the barges came to the Paris
Gardens Stairs.

Shakespeare and his comrades hurried away to their
theatre: and the young men, whom Eileen and the
Fairy Queen were following, strolled about in search of
entertainment. The crowd, whom the watermen set
down, were likewise employed in looking for something
with which they might amuse themselves. The two
greatest attractions were certainly “The House of Bear-
baiting” and “The House of Bull-baiting”: and most
of the crowd had no doubt or hesitation about anything,
save whether it were more amusing to see bears teased
and tormented, or to see bulls teased and tormented.
Eileen could not see aught particularly tempting in either
of these sports: nor did the dancing and music, which
the Paris Gardens afforded, seem to her to have much

about them which was beautiful. or good. She was
XL] The Play. 179

therefore very glad, when the young men decided after
all to go and see the play. “I have heard before now”
said one “that this Will Shakespeare is verily a witty
fellow. Let us go and hear his tragedy.” And they
started off in the direction of the playhouse.

They came to a square place surrounded by four walls:
the top of which was partly thatched over with reeds, but
for the greater part entirely open to the sky. There was a
great crowd here: anda number of benches. The courtiers
stopped in this place: and so did the Fairy Queen.
“Is this the way to the theatre?” asked Eileen. “This
Is the theatre” was the answer. Eileen was greatly
astonished : it had looked to her more like the yard of
some country inn. Now however she observed that
there was a gallery, which ran round three sides of the
square: and which was filled with spectators. There
were also private rooms for the richer folk: and it was
in one of these that the courtiers took their places. The
whole house was lighted by large and _ brightly-blazing
iron lamps, making huge fire-crosses here and there.

“T suppose that is the stage”: said Eileen, pointing
to a woollen curtain in front of her: “but why is it hung
with black crape?” “That is to show” replied Titania
“that a dreadful tragedy is to be played. Hush now!
the play is going to begin.” The curtain was drawn
aside: and the stage was visible. The scene was sup-
posed to be a room of state in king John’s Palace
at Northampton. It looked more like a parlour in a

2
178 The Play. [Cu

public-house: the floor was strewn with rushes: and the
_ walls were bare: Eileen could not believe that king
John ever had a palace quite like that.

But when king John came upon the stage—and his
mother and the English nobles—and the French am-
bassador,—all dressed according to their proper quality :—
then Eileen forgot all about the scenery and the iron
lamps and the half-thatched roof: as she listened with
ever-deepening interest to the words of the play itself.
There was much in it which she could not understand :
but the main story of it was simple enough: the story
of the life and death of king John! That French
ambassador had to say that the young Prince Arthur,
John’s nephew, was the real king of England: and that
John was not king at all. If John did not immediately
give up the throne and allow his nephew Arthur to be
king, there would be fierce and bloody war: for Arthur
should be protected by the armies of France. After a
while the woollen curtain was drawn together again: and
when the stage was next seen, it was supposed to be
France, before the walls of Angers. It was not in the
least like what Eileen would have herself imagined France
or the walls of Angers to be. But what did that matter?
It was all pretence: and she could easily pretend to
herself that the stage was France. And when the young
prince Arthur and his mother came upon the stage, with
king Philip of France, she became more excited than
ever. In fact the whole play interested her immensely.
XIIL] The Play. 179

It was so well acted that it seemed extraordinarily real.
Eileen gave a gasp of horror, when she saw Arthur taken

prisoner in the battle and heard his cry :—

“O, this will make my mother die with grief!”

And in the next Act she was still more deeply touched,
when she heard the little prince greeting Hubert his jailer
with “ Good-morrow” and saying to him words that were
full of love: while all the time she knew that this same
Hubert had promised king John that he would burn out
both the boy’s eyes with hot irons! There was a spell-
bound silence all over the theatre, while Arthur pleaded
‘with his jailer to spare him: and not to put out his
eyes. At last, overcome with compassion, Hubert gave

way. And when he said :—

“Well, see to live: I will not touch thine eyes
for all the treasure that thine uncle owes!”

Eileen clapped her hands for joy: and all the audience
seemed to breathe more freely.

The next time that the tyrant king John came upon
the stage, he pretended that he himself had never wished
any harm to Arthur, but that it was Hubert, who had the
greater sin. Of course this was a wicked lie: and Eileen
thought John the most contemptible coward who ever
lived. The death of Arthur happened next: when the
boy leaped down from the walls,—hoping to escape from
his prison,—and died in that fearful fall.
180 The Play. [Cu

And Eileen forgot that it was all mimicry: and felt as
though the beautiful unhappy child were really slain. It
was not until the miserable king was dead himself,
and the curtains were drawn over the last scene, that
Eileen realised that it was all imaginary: that the cruel
John, whom she had hated so much, was really the same
man as the good-natured Burbadge, whom she had seen
upon the barge: and that the poor distracted mother, for
whom she had had such deep compassion, was only that
Robert Goughe, the pale lank youth, at whom she was
laughing so heartily only a few hours since. The actors
at the end of the tragedy prayed in Latin for the queen
and her court: and the audience, after applauding them
loudly, prepared to leave the theatre. “See!” said one
of the courtiers to his friend, pointing to the open sky
above their heads, “the moon is risen high—we must
go back with all speed to Whitehall.”

As they left the theatre, they could hear the growling
of bears and the bellowing of bulls: for these “sports”
were not yet ended for the night. Soon they were all
in their barge again: and the oars were once more
plashing merrily in the moonlit waters of the Thames.
“The queen ought to hear that play”: they said: “it
was a right excellent one.”

That night the courtiers slept at Whitehall, the palace
of Elizabeth: and Titania and Eileen abode there too.
A few days afterwards, they heard that the queen had
expressed her pleasure, that William Shakespeare should
XIIL.] The Play. 181

be summoned to the palace to read the play to her, of
which her courtiers had given such a good account.

Eileen waited at the Palace Stairs to see the barge
arrive: and in due time, Shakespeare appeared there,
with the large book in his hand, which contained the
play. We was escorted to the royal chamber, and took
his seat at a table therein.

There was a flourish of trumpets. The doors were
thrown open: and the next moment the company found
themselves in the presence of Elizabeth. The queen was
no longer young: nor did she look so. She had never
been really beautiful: and such beauty as she might have
had was departed from her long ago. Yet she believed
that she appeared both young and beautiful: for she was
a sovereign, and had many flatterers who told her so. She
was the cleverest monarch, who ever sat upon an English
throne: knew all the arts and sciences: spoke Latin and
Greek and French with ease: and ruled England like
a veritable statesman. Yet, in the matter of knowing
her own shortcomings, both of body and soul, she was
the silliest woman in the land: listening readily to the
compliments of those about her: and taking them for
sober truth.

Eileen soon learned that Shakespeare himself was one
of the queen’s flatterers: and many a pretty thing he said
that day, before he sat him down to read King John.
For, great man as he was, he could not afford to despise

the favour of Elizabeth. His theatre wanted the money,
182 The Play. [Ce

which was Elizabeth’s to give: and the queen’s praises
would be most precious to him in helping on the work
of his life.

At last the reading began: and, in a rich musical voice,
the poet uttered forth the play. No man now-a-days
could read the rolling verses of the work, as the author
read them then. Eileen, remembering her evening at
the Globe Theatre, thought the present occasion still more
interesting. Her eyes were so intently bent upon the
reader, that she did not notice the features of Elizabeth
until Titania whispered :—“ Mark you the queen? She
does not like this play.”

The poet was reading the conversation that passed
between king John and Hubert, the prince’s jailer: where
the king was trying to prove that the fault was with
Hubert, and that he, for his part, would have saved
Arthur if he could. It was indeed a cowardly pretence.
For the king was master and could do what he pleased,
while Hubert was only his servant: yet he argued that
he had never meant that Arthur should be hurt, and
that Hubert had understood a law, which he the king
had never made.

During the whole of the earlier part of the play, Eliza-
beth had been leaning back in her seat and smiling a
lazy approval of what was being read: occasionally even
clapping her royal hands when something witty—and
there was much that was witty in that play—occurred.
But now, while the king was making these cowardly
XIIL] The Play. 183

excuses for himself, Elizabeth became flushed and excited :
and seemed to listen with a feverish eagerness. And
when Hubert’s dreadful answer came :-—

“Here is your hand and seal for what I did,”

the queen turned pale. The actor at the Globe Theatre,
who played the part of king John, though he had
acted well, had not given such signs of great feeling as
Elizabeth gave now. Her feeling was surely real: while
his was all pretence. And when Shakespeare read on,
and John declared his remorse, saying that the hand
and seal set by him to Arthur’s death-warrant would
witness against him on the judgment-day, the queen was
so much agitated that Eileen thought she would have
fallen back in a dead faint. But with an effort she calmed
herself: and listened to the last act of the tragedy. Then,
without a word to the reader, she signified to her attend-
ants that she was fatigued: and hastily retired—almost
it might be said rushed—only that queens never rush—
from the chamber.

“Come” said Titania “it is time for us also to with-
draw.” “Let us wait a little while” said Eileen. “I
want to learn the reason of the queen’s strange behaviour :
and why she was so much excited at the reading of
those words.” “You shall know the reason”: said
Titania: “but you can only know it by going back
into the past. No man or woman in the future shall

discover it from the queen. For Elizabeth keeps her
184 The Play. [Cu

secrets to herself: and none will dare to question her
about this. A journey of a few years further back, in
the Magic Train, will show you what you want to
know.” So the car bore them to the station forthwith.

* * * * *

As the Magic Train left the platform, Titania said :—
“Well, Eileen, how did you like that play?” “It was ever
so interesting”: said she: “but it seems rather funny for
us to go and see a sham king John and a sham prince
Arthur, when a few stations further back we might see
the real ones.” Titania answered :—‘Oh! but the real
ones would not be half so well worth seeing. Great
poets can make up stories and persons that are far more
interesting than those stories and persons in history, from
whom: their ideas were gotten. We will not see the real
John and Arthur: for you would think them very dull
creatures, after those whom you have seen upon the stage.”
“The play is not all true then?” asked Eileen. “No”
was the answer. “ Many things were altered by the poet.
His object was not to give his audience a history-lesson :
but to touch their hearts: to make them feel the fears,
which the stage Arthur felt, and sympathise with the pity,
which Hubert was supposed to feel for him. This is good
for the hearts of men. Our journey is being made to see
whatever is beautiful and good :—and there is more that
is beautiful and good in Shakespeare’s play than ever
could have been found in the real history of that feeble
XIL] The Play. 185

wretch John Lackland and his inglorious wars with
France.”

As the Fairy Queen spoke, they came to the next station,
which bore the name of a date eleven years earlier than
the last. “Now you shall understand” Titania said “what
made Elizabeth turn pale when Shakespeare read The
Life and Death of King John—To Whitehall Palace”
she said to the eaglets “once again.”

When they were come there, they found Elizabeth alone
with her secretary. The latter however did not stay long.
He was the bearer of a letter. “It is from the Scottish
queen” he said: and he withdrew. Elizabeth was alone,
save that the Fairy Queen and Eileen were looking over
either of her shoulders, as she read that letter. The
letter was in French: a pathetic appeal from Mary queen
of Scots to her cousin the English queen. That letter
wrought tears. Seldom if ever did mortal eye see
Elizabeth weep: but Eileen saw her weep that day. :

Yet not for long. Soon she heard footsteps coming
toward her chamber. “I have promised to receive the Earl
of Leicester this morning”: she said: “he shall not see
me weeping.” And, when he presently entered the royal
chamber, she flattered herself that all the signs of her
weakness were destroyed. But she was wrong: it is not
so easy to remove the marks of tears. Leicester knew
she had been weeping: and guessed that it was for pity
of Mary queen of Scots. He did not like this: it suited
his purposes that Mary should die at once: delay was
186 The Play. [Cx.

dangerous. What if Elizabeth, out of sheer pity, should
relent and spare her cousin? But she would not relent.
He knew quite well that she would not. For she hated
her cousin. She might weep, for a few moments, out of
pity. But her hatred was deeper than her pity. She
hated her for many reasons: because she was more
popular with many of Elizabeth’s own subjects than was
Elizabeth herself: because she rivalled her in many ways:
because she was more loveable and far more beautiful.

Elizabeth however, although she meant that Mary
should die, pretended that she had no such purpose: in
order that other people might seem to persuade her to
have her cousin put to death. It was very easy to
persuade her that this thing was right: for it was what
she herself desired. Yet she knew all the time that it
was a cruel and a wicked thing which she was doing.
Eileen, who had learned all this from Titania, listened
to Elizabeth’s counsellors: and watched her pretending
to be convinced !

Leicester withdrew. And Elizabeth sat her down to
write. “Can you read her letters” said Titania “from
your invisible place behind her chair?” “I can”: said
Eileen: “but they are very badly spelled.”

Indeed no writing of those days seemed to her to have
any spelling at all: spelling must have been invented
in later days—probably by governesses—she supposed.
When she had spelled the queen’s letters, she did not
like them. They were false, every line of them! Elizabeth
XUL] The Play. 187

assured those to whom she was writing that Mary’s life
was safe :—well knowing that she was to be put to death
before another week was passed. And the things which
the queen said during those days were as false as the
things she wrote.

A few days afterwards Titania and Eileen visited the
queen’s chamber once again. Some of her counsellors
were there: waiting for her to sign a parchment, which
was in her hand. It was the death-warrant of Mary
queen of Scots. She pretended to hesitate: but she
meant to sign it all the time. The moment that “ Eliza-
beth R.” was written on that scroll beside the royal seal,
Mary queen of Scots would be irrevocably doomed to
death.

At last Elizabeth did sign the parchment!—and her
counsellors withdrew.

“ Now you understand” Titania said “of what Elizabeth
was thinking when she listened to the reading of the play.
Shakespeare knew how to catch the conscience of his
listener, even if his listener were a queen. She will never
forget that play. The answer which Hubert gave to John
is the answer which History gives to Elizabeth, if any
try to make excuses for her, in the matter of the execution

of Mary queen of Scots :—
“*Fere is your hand and seal for what I did’”

After that Titania and Eileen left Whitehall.
On their way back to the station the car hovered close
188 The Play. (Cx.

over Fotheringay, the castle where the queen of Scots
was imprisoned. She was taking her exercise upon a
balcony, dressed in a black robe, as befitted one in grief.
Eileen was near enough to see her face. The queen
had for a few moments raised the white veil of crape she
wore, that she might breathe the air of heaven: and
Eileen scanned eagerly the features, which were so much
admired. And when she saw them, she did not wonder
that so many of the people preferred the queen of Scots
to her rival at Whitehall. Mary, like all the other beauties
whom Eileen saw, was far the inferior of Titania. But
there was something about the quality of Mary’s loveliness
so utterly different from anything which Eileen had ever
seen, that for the moment she forgot even the Fairy
Queen in looking at her. There was a wonderful con-
trast between the English sovereign and the Scottish.
Such charms as Elizabeth had were artificial to a degree:
Mary’s were sweetly natural, while her expression was
as soft and gentle as her cousin queen’s was hard and
obstinate. Love was as natural to the one as selfishness
was to the other. Elizabeth it is true was a great and
clever queen. Mary was something better still: she was
a loveable and lovely woman,—whose spirit, despite many
sins and weaknesses, was full of that highest gift of
charity, which made her not altogether unworthy of her
holy and honourable name. Even now that delicate fair
neck, whose bones Elizabeth had already determined to

have severed by the sharp-steeled axe, was bent in prayer,

|
‘XIIL] _ The Play. 189

as she walked, for the very woman, who was to be her
murderess.

To this very day the soft pathetic beauty of the queen
of Scots, even in her pictures, is unutterably sweet and
loveable—all men confess its charm. Eileen, who saw her
close before the hour of death, indeed no longer wondered
that Elizabeth turned pale, when she listened to the poet’s
stirring words about the death-warrant in the reading of
the play.

* * * * *%

And, when they had looked upon her for a few minutes,
the car bore them away from earth again: while the
attendant fairies raised a funeral dirge upon their silver-
stringed instruments. That was not the only lament,
which was sung for the Scottish queen that day. The
length and breadth of Scotland were wild with grief for
her: all over Europe there were those that mourned :
nor has the whole wide world ever forgiven Elizabeth
for doing to death one, who, with all her faults, was
perhaps the most beloved being that ever sat upon an
earthly throne.

When they left this station, the islands of Japan came
nearest to their view: and the train stopped still for a
few moments just above the Mikado’s palace. Hidéyoshi
was the Mikado: he had just come to the throne and was

the ruler of all Japan. It was a day of rejoicing: you could
Igo Eileen’s Journey. [Cu.

tell that from the ringing of bells and clashing of gongs:
kites were flying in the air, and grown men and women
held the strings: fireworks were blazing here and there,
though it was daylight: and gay decorations were hanging
out from every window. “It is the day of the great
Mikado’s wedding” explained the Fairy Queen. “He is
marrying for the sixth time! When he was a poor peasant,
he married a poor peasant-girl: and each time he rose
in rank, he took a wife of higher rank: now that he is
Mikado he is wedding a princess!” “That is something
like Henry the Eighth, isn’t it?” asked Eileen. “Ah!”
said Titania “but Henry the Eighth had only one wife
at a time. Hidéyoshi enjoys the society of all the six
at once!”

And now the Mikado’s present bride became visible.
She was considered a great beauty in Japan. Eileen
would not have said quite that of her. But she was
undeniably pretty in a way, as she stood beside her lord.
The dress of both was very similar: and indeed all the
people wore dresses of much the same shape, only made
of richer or poorer stuffs according to their rank.

The robe of the princess was made of the finest silk,
flowered and interwoven with figures of gold: it was
rounded off about the neck, and was open in front, leaving
the bosom bare: she had a huge belt about her waist,
which before her marriage was tied in a square bow
behind her back, but after her marriage in front of her:
the sleeves were wide and badly shaped: her petticoat
XIL] Eileen’s Journey. 191

was most extraordinary—breeches of golden material,
left open at the sides for two-thirds of their length: her
slippers were shaped like a horse’s hoof, and not like a
human maiden’s foot at all.

An English lady would not have worn such a dress
for all the world: but somehow it suited this quaint
princess. She did well to show her neck: it was the
prettiest thing about her, beautifully modelled, exquisitely
white, moving gracefully :—otherwise she seemed by no
means well-shaped. She was of a dwarfish figure: her
features were almost crooked: her hair was straight and
black—where her head was not entirely bald. Yet Eileen
liked the look of her: she was what she called “soft and
coaxy”: and she was evidently full of fun, thoroughly
enjoying the fireworks and the kites.

But the strangest thing of all was this—-The Japanese
princess had the most lovely delicately-pencilled eyebrows
and ivory-white teeth: and yet, on this her wedding-day,
she smilingly suffered her attendants to shave off the
eyebrows and blacken the teeth with enamel! Eileen
stared astounded. “What a horrid thing!” she said.
“It ig”: answered Titania: “but in this country it is
thought correct: it is always done at weddings, And
there are things done in other countries quite as wrong
and stupid: the painting of faces, the dyeing of hair and
the spoiling in a hundred ways of what nature has made
most beautiful. Such things are hateful everywhere!”

But Eileen was glad that she had seen these extra-
1Q2 Eileen’s Journey. [Cu. XIU.

ordinary people: there was something about their merri-
ment and playfulness, which it would not be easy to forget.
And though she had glimpses of events in which more
important persons were concerned in other countries before
the train stopped again,—such as the cruel tyrants of the
Inquisition in Spain and the martyrs whom it tortured, and
Alva the not less cruel tyrant of the Dutch in Amster-
dam— : and though she saw other weddings, such as that
of Eric the Swedish prince, who married a maiden of the
common people—yet she thought the things, which she
saw in Japan, the most interesting of them all.
CHAPTER XIV.

THE FORCING OF WRATH.

“Surely from the churning of milk cometh forth butter:
and from the wringing of the nose cometh forth blood :—
so from the forcing of wrath cometh forth strife.”
—The Proverbs of Solomon.

T the next station—“ THE YEAR OF OUR LORD ONE
A THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SEVEN ”
—KEileen found herself being carried once more to
her native land. As the car approached the earth, she
looked down upon the scene beneath her. “See!” said
Titania: “it is an Irish village on the borders of what
is called the English Pale, and is supposed to be subject
to English law.”

An Irish village? Well, Eileen had seen some queer
villages in Ireland during the course of her ordinary life:
but never one like this. It was merely a cluster of rude
huts: hardly fit for human habitation. But they lay
beneath the shadow of an ancient Abbey, which looked
the lovelier for the squalor which surrounded it—a fitting
emblem of the religion of Love in the midst of a world
where bitterness and hate were working their evil way.

193 13
194 The Forcing of Wrath. [Cu.

It was Saint Patrick’s day: late in the afternoon:
and all the assembled folk were keeping holiday—from
the lowest to the highest. It was a motley gathering:
the Irish “kerns” (the rough peasants who lived in the
neighbourhood for the sake of the good pasturage
abounding there) formed the chief part of the crowd.
But the day of the great Saint had brought not a few
more important persons to the place: which was famous
for the dancing which had been had there upon the
festival in former years. There were “gallowglasses” or
warrior-followers of divers chieftains-of-clans, who had
come from miles around: having foreknowledge that
some of the loveliest damsels in the world were to be
there. For indeed, though the Irish country-girls of those
days were very rustic, almost even to savagery, there was
an exquisite wild beauty with them, most undeniable.
A considerable number of Englishmen were also to be
seen: many being there upon military duty (and these
were. well armed): while others were present merely out
of curiosity.

Even now the dance was going forward under the
Abbey walls: the music which is peculiar to Irish voices
filled the air: and the sound of stringed instruments kept
them company. But where, wondered Eileen, was the
Irish harp? where was the distinctive Irish dress? where
the “coolins” or long locks of flowing hair? where the
fierce “cronmeals” or moustachios on their upper lips,

which Eileen had always seen in pictures of her country-
XIV] The Forcing of Wrath. 195

men of early times? where was the shamrock? where was
the shirt of saffron silk, so famous in their histories?
She asked Titania for an answer to these questions: and,
for the first time in all her travellings, she saw the Fairy
Queen shed tears before she answered her. “Ah!” she
said: “it is a bad day for Ireland that we have chanced
upon. King Henry the Eighth of England has deter-
mined to destroy the Irish nationality. Poor fool! he
little knew the way to set about it. He has resolved
to do away with everything that distinguishes the two
peoples, English and Irish, one from the other: and now,
in this year, he has made a law that Irishmen are to attire
themselves as Saxons do, and to wear their hair as Saxons
wear it: to cut off their ‘coolins’ and shave away their
‘cronmeals’—and once and for ever to abandon every-
thing about them which is peculiar to their nation. The
harps are hidden away, because the king has included
the national minstrels in his heartless persecution: and
to sing an Irish song is to be accounted a crime. Every-
thing, in short, which is Irish, is forbidden by the king.
But all his efforts will be in vain. That is not the
way to.destroy national spirit: but rather the way to
strengthen it. Look closer: and you will see that even
here—under the very eyes of the English soldiers, who

'. are drawn up yonder and who have come hither to enforce

the law—even here, I say, there are those, who dare defy
them. Many of these merry-makers are not Irishmen at
all, but visitors from England: and many more are those
196 ‘The Forcing of Wrath. [Cu.

who are compelled by the power of their enemies to obey
the cruel law for a time, while they wait for a fit moment
to rebel. But even here, as I have said, there are a few
bold Irishmen, who still show the shamrocks in their hats
and wear their long ‘coolins’ in true Irish fashion.”

“It is an earlier chapter” she continued “of the same
sad story that we heard before nearer the commencement
of our journey—the story of ‘the Wearin’ of the Green,’
You remember the pathetic song. Indeed who is there
in Ireland that knows it not? Does it not rightly show
forth the thoughts, which the spirit of the nation often-
times calls forth?” “It does” said Eileen: and then,
remembering how beautifully the Queen could sing an
Irish song, she added :—“ There are yet a few minutes ere
the car can touch the earth. Will not Your Majesty sing
the song to me? I would like to hear it again.” “I
will” Titania said: and Eileen listened once more to the
‘lovely old melody, of which she had always been very
fond, but which she had never fully appreciated, until
now, when she heard it sung by the Fairy Queen. May

the last verses of it be repeated here again ?—

“Oh! if the colour you must wear

be England’s cruel red,

let it remind you of the blood
poor Ireland has shed!

Then take the shamrock from your hat
and fling it on the sod:

and never fear—’twill take root there,
though underfoot ’tis trod.
XIV.] The Forcing of Wrath. 1097

Oh! when laws can stop the blades of grass
from growing as they grow,
and when the leaves in summer-time
their colours dare not show :—
then I will change the colour,
that I wear in my caubeen:
but till that day—please God !—I’ll stick
to the Wearin’ of the Green,”

The song ended: the eaglets were upon the earth: and
Eileen, leaving the car, sat down upon the stump of an
old tree close under the Abbey walls. This was just the
spot, she thought, from which to watch what was
happening in the place. The Irishmen had of course
not heard the song, which Titania had been singing and
which belonged to a later age: but Eileen thought they
seemed to feel that its spirit was already in the air. The
Englishmen who were of the company appeared most
anxious to be friendly with the native folk: for although
it was their duty, as servants of the English king, to see
that his law was obeyed, they bore no malice against the
victims of it. On the contrary, they loved the genial
comradeship of the Irish boys: and loved still more the
beautiful cheeks and brightly-beaming eyes of the damsels
of Erin. They themselves too could dance a merry
measure after their own fashion: for they had often taken
part in country dances upon an English village-green :
and although they knew not the national steps of Erin,
they thought that the differing measures might easily be
combined by a little meed of compromise. And so they
198 The Forcing of Wrath. [Cu

eagerly sought them partners, who would help to this end.
But the Irish girls avoided them: and fled to the boys
of their own blood. One there was in particular: Shela
O’Boyle by name: tall of limb and straight as an arrow:
rosy-cheeked as an apple, and merry as a sunbeam: the
best dancer of them all: and everybody’s favourite. To
her the Captain of the English troop drew near: and
asked her whether she would trip a measure with him.
She shrieked her answer in unintelligible Irish: and fled
to the place where her young Coolin stood. This was
a bold youth,—who wore the long yellow locks that were
the meaning of his name, and had to this moment refused
to cut them off in obedience to any English laws: he
wore the shamrock also and the national dress. The
English soldiers had not, until now, appeared to notice
him. But when they saw the pretty girl rush toward him,
and shelter herself behind him from the gaze of her Saxon
admirers, they delayed no longer to perform their duty :
but instantly advanced upon the offender and arrested
him, for disobedience to king Henry’s law. Some were
' for imprisoning, some for whipping him. The Irish folk
murmured: but their enemies were too strong for them.
If Coolin had been sentenced to immediate death, none
of his friends would have been able to protect him. But
“the English Captain was not so lost to all humanity as
to sanction that. “Leave Ireland” he said “with all
the speed you may. Obey this order: and you shall not
be harmed. But linger here: and you will certainly be
XIV.] The Forcing of Wrath. 199

hanged!” “Ah! I will go”: he said: “having no other
choice.” “And I'll go with you, Coolin Asthore” said
Shela: to the discomfiture of his persecutors. “ Reach
me an Irish harp”: she said: “I will tell you what is
the whole matter with me.”

Someone fetched her a harp from a neighbouring hut.
The soldiers were too much astonished to protest:
although this too was against king Henry’s law. She
struck the strings of it with lightsome touch: and sang
an Irish melody, the words of which, being interpreted,
run thus :—

“Though the last glimpse of Erin with sorrow I see,
yet wherever thou art shall seem Erin to me:

in exile thy bosom shall still be my home,

and thine eyes make my climate wherever we roam.

To the gloom of some desert or cold rocky shore,
where the eye of the stranger can haunt us no more,
I will fly with my Coolin: and think the rough wind
less rude than the foes we leave frowning behind.

And I'll gaze on thy gold hair as graceful it wreathes,
and hang o’er thy soft harp as wildly it breathes:

nor dread that the cold-hearted Saxon will tear

one chord from that harp, or one lock from that hair.”

She flung her arms about her lover: and they went
away together—bound for France. It was well known
that the French king would gladly welcome Irishmen
like Coolin: and place them among his mercenary troops.
Coolin would be a magnificent soldier: and, though a
hireling, would fight the battles of his master to the
200 The Forcing of Wrath, = [c».

bitter death. He might have fought as well for England:
but king Henry had not encouraged Irishmen to enlist
in his service. So they went away to join his enemies.

The merry holiday meanwhile was spoiled: for the.
village had lost its brightest ornaments, and all were
deeply sorry for the loss. The murmuring crowd
dispersed to seek the shelter of their little huts: and
the English soldiers also went away to hold carousals in
their own quarters.

And now, ere long, the Vesper bell began to toll: and
the peasant folk were flocking toward the Abbey gates—
there to forget their miseries or find consolation for them
in the chapel of the nuns. This Abbey was beloved by
all the neighbourhood. The Abbess and her sisterhood
were the people’s friends in all their troubles. Their
Society was not indeed a rich one: but the deserving poor
might always count on what assistance they could minister
in the hour of need. While the Abbess had a loaf
remaining, they knew that she would be ready to share
it with the community she loved. And for such troubles
as food or money could not touch, she had other comforts
to. bestow—kind words and loving sympathy, together
with the Holy Sacraments of the Church, which were
administered every day within the Nunnery chapel walls.
So now the sorrow-stricken people wended thither: and
worshipped, “because” as the Psalmist would have said
“it was so comfortable.” Eileen and Titania entered with

them: and heard the service in the chapel.
XIV] The Forcing of Wrath. 201

‘When it was over, they came forth again: sought their
homes once more and made ready to enjoy their simple
suppers :—of which there was none too much to spare.
(For the season had been bad: and what little wealth
the peasants had went to satisfy those landlords, to whom,
by the laws of the English Pale, the land belonged.)
“Come” said the Fairy Queen “let us enter one of their
rude dwellings: and abide awhile therein: the events of
this day are not yet over.” Accordingly they went into
one of the poor hovels, in which a labourer lived with
his wife and a large family: and sat them down before
a bright turf fire. They had hardly done so: when martial
music greeted their ears and the roll of mighty drums.
And then they heard the tramp of horses and the shouts
of men. “More Saxons!” quoth the father of the family.
“What devil’s work do they want now?” They had not
long to wait: soon the newly-arrived regiment was in the
road where their own hut stood: and someone was
knocking rudely without. A red-coated soldier entered:
and demanded “coyne and livery in the name of the king.”
Eileen did not know what they meant: but the people
of the house knew but too well. In speaking those
words, they were demanding food for themselves and
fodder for their horses. Both must at once be yielded to
them : willy-nilly and free of charge. The hospitable
Irish folk were always ready to give their best to every
passing traveller. But these demands for “coyne” and
“livery ” had been very often made of late: and were past
202 The Forcing of Wrath. [Cu.

all reason insolent. Nevertheless the soldiers had their
will: took the best viands for themselves: fed their horses
sumptuously on other men’s provender: and stretched
themselves in the most comfortable quarters, which the
village could afford—in the name of his “most gracious ”
majesty the king.

The hovel, into which Eileen had been taken by the
Fairy Queen, was so small and ill provided, that none
of the soldiers were desirous of spending the night in
it. So when they had taken all the food which they
could find and left the rightful owners well-nigh supper-
less, they retired. The family left in the hut were hungry:
and had the good fairies brought them a mighty feast,
they would have done full justice to the fare. If Titania
(for many good reasons) did not give them this, she
did the next best thing and gave them a refreshing
sleep: so that though hungry they did not feel their
hunger, and though troubled they forgat their troubles.
But this sleep was rudely broken in the middle of the
night. Then there was heard a great noise :—the falling
of stones: the crashing of glass: the roaring of fire:
the cries of women: and the shouts of men. In utter
astonishment all rushed outside: where, to their horror,
they beheld that their well-loved Abbey was in flames.
Its walls were tumbling: and all the beautiful tracery
of arches and doorways and windows was going to
destruction. But the most fearful part of it all was this.

The English soldiers were there:—not trying to stay
XIV.] The Forcing of Wrath. 203

the progress of the flames and save the holy building,
but actually assisting them to accomplish their deadly
work: while others stove in the well-carved doors
with deliberate blows, shattered the dark-stained glass
or destroyed the sacred images of martyrs and saints,
which had been the pride of all the neighbourhood.
Some meanwhile rushed to the Refectory and seized
such stores as they could find: while others tore away
the gold and silver vessels from the very altars and rent
from the walls their tapestries. The gentle nuns had
been aroused from their slumbers only just in time to
don such scanty garments as might hide their nakedness :
and, without the veils in which their faces were usually
hidden, had fled in terror from the flaming building to
the huts of the Irish kerns. Up to this time they had
spent their whole lives in the sanctuary of the Nunnery
walls: now they were cast forth upon the world to work
with their own hands for their livelihood. Up to this
time they had been the succour of the poor around them :
now they themselves were thrown upon their neighbours’
charity. Some were old and wrinkled: others young and
beautiful. But now all alike cold and miserable, with
pale faces and dishevelled hair, were fleeing hither and
thither: among the jeers and laughter of the brutal
soldiery. The venerable Abbess advanced with great
dignity toward the Captain of the troops: and asked by
what warrant his men did these things. “ By the warrant”

was the answer “of his most gracious majesty the king
204. The Forcing of Wrath. [Cu

of England: whose pleasure it is that the monasteries
and abbeys throughout the country shall be destroyed:
that the revenues thereof may accrue to the king: that
there may be no more Popery: and that no-one may
have power to maintain an Irish nationality distinct from
ours! There is my warrant, writ by the King’s own
hand.”

“T shall go to Dublin and make protest to his
majesty’s Council against this outrage” answered the
Abbess. -She had some few pieces of gold in her private
purse, which the rude soldiers had not dared to touch:
nor had they as yet approached the stables of the
Nunnery. So, rallying her scattered fellowship, the
Abbess bade them endeavour to be of good cheer, as
far as might be in their unhappy circumstances. Then
she selected three of the sisterhood to follow her to
Dublin. Irish hands were not wanting to fetch their
palfreys from the stables: and the four women set out
upon their journey. The soldiers retired to count their
spoil: and celebrate the event with night-long revelry.
The Irish peasants brought water: and tried to rescue
the ruins of their unfortunate old Abbey from the flames
and to collect what was remaining of the sacred images.
The women took home the outcast sisters into their own
dwellings: and comforted them, as others had oftentimes
been comforted by them.

Meanwhile Eileen and Titania followed the Abbess
and her little company: who talked sadly, as they rode
XIV] The Forcing of Wrath. 206

along, of the happy years that they had lived in the
beautiful old Abbey, which was now no more, lamenting
that it should have been thus wantonly destroyed, to
please the whim of the self-willed king and his Saxon
court. She feared that all the monasteries of Ireland
would be overthrown with a like fate, unless she could
influence the Dublin Council to avert their doom. As
long as the night lasted, they saw the lurid red flames
of the burning building whenever they looked behind
them. But when the morning star arose and the sun
shone forth, the flames disappeared : though whether this
were because the efforts to extinguish them had at last
prevailed, or because the distance and the greater light
of day prevented them from being seen any longer,
Eileen could not tell. They overtook Coolin and Shela
on the road—they had been married by a friendly priest:
and were now travelling toward the sea. They were most
indignant when they heard the news: and declared that
England would suffer some day for thus provoking the
Irish people.

The good Abbess and her nuns were two nights upon
the road: and the small store of money, which they had
brought with them, would have certainly been exhausted,
had not the hospitable peasants on the road insisted on
entertaining them free of charge. On the third day—
about noon—they arrived at Dublin: and found a large
crowd assembled there in the courts outside the great

Cathedral of St. Patrick. Dismounting at a little hostelry,
206 The Forcing of Wrath. [cu.

they saw their beasts well cared for: and partook them-
selves also of some slight refreshment. Some priests were
lingering by the doors: and offered their protection to
the nuns. Under this escort they went forward to the
crowd: and soon learned its meaning. The ground was
strewn with the ruins of sacred images, destroyed as their
own had been. A fire was burning in the middle of the
court: and, at the very moment when the Abbess and
her friends came near, the soldiers cast into this fire no
less a treasure than the staff of Saint Patrick, deemed by
all men the most holy relic in all Ireland, and reputed —
to have once been handled by Christ himself. The
helpless priests deplored the desolation all around them:
but they could do nothing to avert it. They were in the
hands of enemies mightier than themselves.

The people murmured. But they knew that the
soldiers were too strong for them: and though their
hearts were rebelling already, they wanted a leader before
they dared give forcible expression to their anger.
“Would but that Thomas the young Lord of Kildare
were here”: said one: “he who refused the commission
of king Henry and defied the power of England. All
the Irishrie of Ireland are with him now: and were he
here these impious soldiers should be slain even to the
last man. Where’s the boy in all Erin who ‘would not
follow the young Lord, if he were here to lead us?”
“Ah!” said another: “but he is a chained prisoner in

the Tower of London. If he were in Ireland he would
XIV,] The Forcing of Wrath. 207

be clad in silk attire such as he loved to wear: and his
face would be yet gayer than his robes. But now he is
in jail in dismal garb: and, if I mistake not, in dismal
spirits too.”

Just then the news arrived from London: and spread
like wildfire through the mob:—that Lord Thomas of
Kildare had been put to death, for encouraging the men
of Ireland to be Irish, The anger manifested by the mob
at this intelligence is more easily imagined than described.
Their impotent fury blazed in their flashing eyes. The
English soldiers saw that it would be wise to infuriate
them no further for the present: and so withdrew. The
crowd also withdrew to hatch treason against the Tyrant
on the English Throne.

Well as she loved England, Eileen could not find it in
her heart to blame them. Often when in her own home
and in her own century, she had wondered how it was
that some among the people seemed to hate the name of
England :—England who helped them in their hour of
need, relieving the poor of Ireland with her own rich
stores and striving continually for their happiness in
divers ways. Now she saw that the seeds of bitterness
had been sown centuries before by English oppression :
and she did not wonder any longer that the ills of past
time were not entirely forgotten. :

“Jt is the law of nature” said Titania as they departed
“that ‘from the forcing of wrath cometh forth strife” The
Irish did not rebel against king Henry at this moment,
208 The Forcing of Wrath. (Cu.

because they had not power: but they taught their
children to be ready to rebel when the time should come
in which it should be possible. The iron entered into
their souls : and all the troubles of later years, the frequent
risings and constant discontent, had their origin in that
cruelty of long ago. The Spirit of Revenge dies hardly
even now: although the larger Island is no longer
oppressive to her small sister.”

Eileen thought that she had never quite understood
before, what was meant by che forcing of wrath: but

she understood now, and could never again forget.

The age into which the Magic Train now passed was
an age of great discoveries: and the first discoverer, whom
Eileen saw in it, was one who found out, for the first
time, a thing which caused the deepest surprise among
the people of his day. The man was Copernicus: and
his discovery was the fact that the earth goes round the
sun. Eileen could hardly understand the astonishment
of the gaping multitudes, whom she saw listening to the
proof of this and for the most part refusing to believe it.
She had been taught this thing herself—years ago—among
her earliest lessons. To her the wonderful truth had
become a commonplace :—the wonderful truth that our
whole earth, with its oceans and continents, cities and
waste places, men and brutes and all, is for ever moving

at an infinitely vast speed around the sun which seems to
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J. W. M. TURNER, R.A., Zizx.] [To face Z. 219.

THE DAWN OF AMERICA.
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surpliced choristers and priests in many-coloured vest-
_ ments. A carriage or two drove up in front of the
building, bearing richly-robed signoras—ladies of exalted
rank—with a crowd of attendants following. Moreover
the simpler folk were there as well :—those dark-eyed men
and maidens, with their gentle demeanour and their soft
melodious voices, whom Italy has ever loved to bring
forth. Eileen was still gazing at these people and
wondering at their attire so different from anything
which she had ever seen before: when Titania touched
her shoulder in order to point out two young boys to
her, who were leaning against a buttress without the
cathedral walls. And the Fairy Queen said :—* These
are they, whom I have brought you here to see.” And
immediately Eileen turned her gaze away from the
interesting crowd, whom she had been watching hitherto :
for she was well aware that Titania always of a surety
knew what was most worthy of study in each place or
city and in every generation of the world.

“Oh, Francesco mio” the first boy was saying to the
other “what a beautiful drawing! it is just what I wanted
for a copy! It was very kind of you to get it for me.”
The two boys were bending their heads over a paper,
which the speaker held in his hand: and examining
it with care. The other answered:—“It is indeed a
marvellously fine piece of work: and my master, who
did it, is a great artist. But you yourself, my friend,
would be able to do work even still more beautiful :—

15
226 You don’t Understand. [Cu

if your father would only allow you to spend your
whole time in studying art. Is there no chance that he
will consent to it?” “None whatever” said the boy
who had spoken first. “My father gave me a beating
yesterday for spending a morning in drawing, which he
said I should have spent in learning something of the
business by which he means me to make my livelihood.
There is no chance of his giving his approval if I choose
an artist’s life. He does not understand, nor care to
understand, about my art. Why! if I spend a few
moments by myself, thinking out a picture or design,
he tells me not to stand dreaming there, but to go
about my business. And, if actually he finds me using
a pencil or a brush, he beats me as he beat me yesterday.
And all the while I know that I have a great and
glorious gift. Surely it is right to exercise it: and I
mean to do so, if I can. It is possible that my father
may yield to what he calls my obstinacy in this matter :
and send me some day to a drawing-school. But I
am very much afraid that he will always think it waste
of time.”

The large deep eyes of the speaker filled with tears :
and he sighed, as young people seldom sigh. And it
was no wonder either: for the boy who stood there, _
lamenting that he was not allowed to draw nor paint, was
none other than the famous Michel Angelo Buonarrotti,
whose genius as a painter and a sculptor has for centuries
been the admiration and the glory of mankind.
XV] You don’t Understand. 227

“It’s a cruel shame” said Francesco. This boy was
himself a clever artist too: but he recognised that his
friend had a genius far greater than his own. He was
_ justly indignant with those who were doing all they
could to turn him from his art: and thus trying to make
one of God’s greatest gifts a thing of none avail. Eileen
sympathised with the two boys: and so did the Fairy
Queen, who was always hurt at any attempt to destroy
anything which was beautiful and good. Francesco
thought silently for a few minutes. Then he spake
again and said:—“‘ You must prevail upon your father
to let you come to the drawing-school with me. He
may not like it at this moment: but in the end your
art will win you fame and wealth. And then he will
be glad.” “Indeed” said Michel Angelo “you are a
comforter, Francesco mio:—I will do as you say: and
let us pray that all may be for the best.” And with
that, the two boys went together into the cathedral.

When they came forth again, Francesco said :—“I
must be going to the drawing-school now myself. Addio,
Michel. Come and tell me what your father says” :—and
he went his way.

Michel Angelo looked wistfully at his departing friend,
longing to go with him to the drawing-school. But he
was obliged to go to a very different place of learning,
namely the school of one Messer Francesco d’ Urbino—
~a man whose.Christian name indeed was the same as that
of his own artist. friend, who had just left him, but
228 You don’t Understand. [Cu

whose nature was widely different. Michel Angelo had
been sent by his father to this school, that he might be
taught things which would be useful to him—when he
followed his father’s business and became, as his father
intended that he should become, a weaver of silks and
wool. The schoolmaster had no sympathy with his
pupil’s love of art: and had often given him the birch-
rod for “wasting his time” with pencil or paint-brush,
whenever he. was discovered employed in such pursuits.
And to-day Eileen saw that Michel Angelo spent an un-
happy day at school: and then in the late afternoon set
out on his homeward walk. His father’s house was
three miles outside the gates of Florence: but the sun
being no longer hot, the boy was not long in accomplish-
ing this distance. When he entered the parlour, his
father said to him:—“Come here, my son, and listen
to what I have to say.” Michel Angelo did as he was
bidden. “I have made up my mind” his father said
“to send you to the drawing-school where your friend
Francesco is and to which you are always saying that
you want to go.” The boy, who was of course delighted,
was going to thank his father profusely for his unex-
pected consent, when he was rudely stopped from doing
so. “You are.a wretched young idiot” his father said.
“T have agreed to do what you ask, because I am tired
of thrashing you and of trying to drive you to do what
you ought to do of your own free will, You are a

disgrace to your family. Our fathers have always been
XVI] You don’t Understand. 229

respectable merchants: whereas you are going to be a
common painter. I am not rich and I am getting old:
and I had hoped to have you to help me hereafter in
my business. As it is, you are worse than useless to
me: and I wish you had never been born. Still, if you
persist in your desire to go to this drawing-school, then,
as I have already said, you may go.”

Michel Angelo said quietly but firmly :—“ Father, I do
persist”: and so it came to pass that an agreement
for sending him to the drawing-school was signed that
very day. But when he was alone, Michel Angelo wept
not a little at the remembrance of his father’s words:
yet he kept saying to himself:—‘I am sure—yes I am
quite sure—that I did right when I persisted in my
wish to go.”

The master of the drawing-school was astonished at
the excellence manifested by his new pupil: and indeed,
after a short time of study, he confessed that Michel
Angelo was an artist who far surpassed himself, master
though he was. And every day the boy seemed to
grow more perfect in his art. Still he was not entirely
happy: for at his own home no-one thought it any
merit to be able to draw well: and he was scorned as
much as ever and called the family’s disgrace.

One day as he was leaving the drawing-school and
starting (which he always did reluctantly) for home,
the drawing-master sent for him to his own chamber,

saying that he had something important to say to
230 You don’t Understand. [Cu

him. Of course he went at once to the place men-
tioned: where he found his friend Francesco, who had
also been summoned, waiting for him. Soon the master
came in and said :—“ Lorenzo the Magnificent, the chief
man of Florence, has bidden me invite some young
artists into his gardens at San Marco, to study art
there. I have chosen you two to go, if you would like
it. There you will have masters far abler than myself
to imitate: and you will have many advantages, which
only wealth can give you, for studying your art.”

The two pupils thanked their master cordially and
kissed his hand. And the next day he brought them
into the gardens of Lorenzo the Magnificent. Eileen
and Titania followed them: and, as they went upon
their way, the Fairy Queen said:—This Lorenzo is
a powerful man, who deserves his power, because he
uses it all in the service of the beautiful and good.
This man wants the city of Florence to be full of
everything which is beautiful and good. And he knows
that artists, especially poor artists, have a thousand
difficulties to face in exercising their profession. He
is trying to make things easier for them. And in these
gardens he has put many beautiful works, wrought by
great artists in the days of old—hoping that some may
be found in Florence who will be able to follow their
good example. Behold! we are at the gates of the
gardens now :—watch Francesco and Michel Angelo.”

The two young artists were delighted with every-
XVI] You don’t Understand. 231

thing they saw in the gardens. “See, Francesco mio”
said Michel Angelo to his friend as they looked together
at some ancient sculptures “this is the best work I
have ever seen. It was done by the men of Hellas
nineteen centuries ago: but none in Italy can equal
it. Let it be our life’s work to try and produce some
work like this.” “Amen to. that” cried the other
enthusiastically. (And of course Eileen longed more
than ever to see that ancient Hellas, which poets and
artists agreed in thinking the home of what is beautiful
and good.) As the boys walked about the gardens
admiring all they saw, they came to a place where
there were two men—one a master and the other his
pupil—working at figures of clay. Michel Angelo tried
to. copy, what he saw them doing: and although he
had never done work like this before, he soon excelled
those whom he was copying. And Lorenzo the
Magnificent, walking in his garden one day, came to
the place where Michel Angelo was: and found him
eagerly pursuing his work. And Lorenzo was equally
astonished and delighted at what he saw: and having
inquired about the young painter’s history, he said :—
“Michel Angelo, are you willing to come and live ‘with
me at my palace? I will bring you up as one of my
own people. And you shall have all that money can
buy to help you in the study of your art.”

Michel Angelo of course accepted the great man’s offer
with much joy and thankfulness. Then he told his
232 You don’t Understand. [Cu.

kind protector about his father’s displeasure: and said
that this was now his only cause of grief.

Lorenzo listened sympathetically: and then he sent
for the father of Michel Angelo and said :—“ Your son is
a great artist. You don’t understand nor care to under-
stand about his art. But I have taken him into my
own palace: and will treat him as my own son: so
greatly do I reverence the great gift that God has
given him. And I will not forget you either, for that
you are his father and have brought him up: I will
pay you enough money to enable you to live happily
for the rest of your life—and this for your son’s
sake.”

The old man fell at Lorenzo’s feet: and thanked him
with all his heart. Then turning to his son he said :—
“Forgive me, Michel Angelo. I did you wrong. In
my foolishness I undervalued the great gift which
I did not understand.” Then Michel Angelo said :—
“Father, forgive me for my obstinacy and because I
disobeyed your wishes when I refused to enter into
your business and lead the life which you had planned
for me.” And so they were reconciled together. Lorenzo
was delighted at this result: and took father and son
away together to feast them that day at his palace.
Surely this prince well deserved the name of Magni-
ficent, for that he used his wealth and power to make
others happy and to render the world more beautiful.

The boy, whom he was now befriending, would never


MICHEL: ANGELO seuifs.] [To face p. 233.
THE TOMB OF LORENZO II.
XVI] You don’t Understand. 233

forget what he owed to him: and the world is never
likely to forget it either. The name of Lorenzo will
be named as often as the great master’s history is
told: the family of Lorenzo has won an imperishable
glory from its association with that master’s art, whose
paintings keep many a memory of it alive: and the
grandson of Lorenzo lives for ever by virtue of the
sculpture chiselled upon his tomb in later days by
the hands which had frst learned their cunning in
the gardens of San Marco. For Michel Angelo, who had
been scorned and called the family’s disgrace, lived to
be one of the most famous men in Europe and to be
courted by dukes and princes and kings and emperors
and popes—all of. whom wanted to have him at their
courts and vied with each other in doing him honour.

Francesco and his other friends were delighted to see
him thus honoured: and one day, in Eileen’s presence,
told him so. “I am to-day receiving an honour” replied
the artist “which I think even greater than those of
which you speak.” “What honour mean you?” asked
Francesco. “Come to the Hospital of the Dyers”
he answered “and you shall see.”

The Fairy Queen and Eileen went, with the others,
to that place. There they all stood together in front
of a beautiful picture—the great Cartoon painted by
Michel Angelo himself. It was a picture of a number
of men bathing in the River Arno—and_ surprised,

whilst so bathing, by the enemy. The work was
234 You don’t Understand. [Cu.

perfect beyond all description. And what was the
honour of which Michel Angelo had spoken? It was
this. The picture was being studied and copied by a
group of artists, who were agreeing together that they
could have no better drawing-lesson than this. “And
see, Francesco mio” said Michel Angelo himself “among
that group are two pre-eminent. Those two men are
the greatest painters that the world’ has ever seen, or
probably will ever see. And if they think they can
learn anything by studying a work of mine, surely that
is an honour greater than any, which can be given me
by popes and emperors!”

“Which are the two he means?” asked Eileen. And _
the Fairy Queen pointed them out to her: and told
her their names. The first was a man advanced in
years, handsome, of distinguished appearance and having
a venerable beard. “That is Leonardo da Vinci” said
Titania,—“ a man whose powers of mind are wonderful.
Whatever he had chosen to do, he would have been at
the top of his profession. Literature and science and
art were all equally within his reach. But he knew
well the limits of his power. He could not do all
these things well. In the short space of time which you
mortals have to live on earth, there is not time for mere
man to do a things well. With fairies it is otherwise:
we are undying, and we can bring to perfection all the
gifts which nature has given us. We can study all the
beautiful things of all .times and places: we can go
XVL] You don’t Understand. 2:3°5

hither and thither on the railroad of time at our
pleasure: and we can visit all the world in our winged
chariots. Hence endless also are the beauties stored
within our souls. Leonardo knew that, for all his
greatness, he was only man. So he made his choice
of one thing, which he could do well. He chose to
paint: and he is numbered among the greatest painters
of the world. This is a lesson for all mankind.”

And the other?—he was a youth, with beautiful soul-
ful eyes: and his face shone with a glorious expression
such as is seldom seen on earth. “That is Raphaello
Sanzio”: said the Fairy Queen: “and his story is a sad
one. He is fated, as the favourites of the fairies too
often are fated, to die young. His pictures are truly
thought to be the most precious of all pictures. . But
he himself is not satisfied with them. He feels he could
do something better. ‘Those pictures are the studies
of my youth’: he says: ‘if Heaven will, I hope in the
days of my full manhood to paint pictures really worthy
of the spirit that is in me.’ But he never will: for
he will die before that day arrives.”

Eileen took a long look at the two artists who were
still studying the work of Michel Angelo: and then,
when her soul was satisfied with gazing, she and Titania
went upon their way.

Truly in Florence Eileen had seen some rare glimpses
of the beautiful and good, such as it would be a joy for

ever to remember in her after-life. “But there are many
236 You don’t Understand. — [cx. xvi.

persons in the world” Titania said “who are altogether
blind to the beauties of the world of art. Oh the pity
of it! What Lorenzo said to the father of Michel Angelo,
who would have made a weaver of his son, might well
be said to thousands upon thousands, who follow after
wealth and close their eyes to the loveliness of life :—

“Vou dow t understand.”

* * * * *

The eaglets were waiting for them.
CHAPTER XVII.

AS THOUGH IT WERE A JOY TO DIE.

“Like saints, who at the stake expire
and lift their raptured looks on high,
as though it were a joy to die.”
—Byron.

ND now, as the journey continued, the train still
flew along past much that was interesting. Stories
of human life were still enacted, as ever, under the

eyes of the passengers. Wars and rebellions and tragic
histories were seen on this side: love-stories and revelries
and gay entertainments on that :—all sorts and conditions
—as from the beginning of the world. But they passed
along so quickly, that Eileen had little time to take
special note of any of these things, before the train
stopped again at a station, whose name was “THE YEAR
OF OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND
TWENTY-NINE.” Here they alighted: and the Queen
called again for her chariot: and it came forthwith.
Then she bade the eaglets that bore it fly straightway
to Domremy, a little hamlet in the East of France.
Eileen could not imagine what she was to see here.
237
238 As though it were [Cu.

She had a sort of idea that she had read something
about this place in her history-book: but she could
not remember what. The eaglets, flying as usual with
astounding speed, almost immediately alighted in a pic-
turesque place, where there was a group of little cottages
clustered together on the outskirts of a forest. To one
of these cottages went Titania and Eileen: and, entering,
they gazed upon the scene within.

A very beautiful young girl, between sixteen and seven-
teen years of age, sat there alone, busy at her spinning-
wheel: and, as soon as she saw her, Eileen knew who
she must be. It was Jeanne Darc, the greatest heroine
that France ever had, and one of the most wonderful
women that the world has known. She was at this
time however a humble person: and of no repute. She
was dressed in the plainest white gown, made of some
simple stuff: and she wore no ornaments. It has been
said that she was very beautiful: and so in truth she
was. But it was utterly unlike any beauty which Eileen
had ever seen before: and was in strange contrast
particularly with the beauty of Titania. For while the
Queen shone with every grace of youth and was full of
boundless life, radiant with pleasure and satisfied with
the perfect knowledge of all things past, present and to
come, the Peasant Maid was very pale and wan: her
dreamy eyes shone with no exquisitely-varying light of
lustrous blue, and took their beauty from no colour and

no expression of their own, but seemed like reflections
XVII] a Joy to Die. 239

of a distant light, wandering with a strange unearthly
eagerness—with a restless and hungry longing for some
far-off aim. Her breath came fitfully: and she often
sighed. And yet her face seemed to wear a smile of
joy. In this smile nevertheless there was something,
which made Eileen inclined to pity her: but there was
something too, which filled her with a nameless awe.
The next thing which happened surprised Eileen very
much. The persons, whom she had hitherto met in her
rambles with the Queen through the bygone ages of the
world, had always seemed entirely unaware that Titania
and herself were watching them. But in the case of
' Jeanne Darc it was altogether otherwise! When Titania
and Eileen entered the cottage-door, she looked eagerly
in their direction. At first it appeared that she did not
see them, though she seemed aware of their presence.
But soon she did see them: and then, uttering an
exclamation of delight, rushed up to them and kissed
them both very passionately upon their cheeks. Jeanne
evidently knew the Queen: she must have been accus-
tomed to see fairies. “Give me some hope, Bright Spirits ”
she said. (She had mistaken Eileen for a spirit too:
and this was hardly surprising, for the child was lovely,
and her appearance was as miraculous to Jeanne as was
the Queen’s.) “Give me some hope. I have seen the
misery of my people in. this wretched war. I have
nursed the wounded: and laid out the corpses of the

dead. I have pity on the fair realm of France. But
240 As though it were [Cu.

what can I do? I am but a poor maiden: I know not
how to ride to the wars and lead men-at-arms.” “Be
of a good courage” said Titania, with a beautiful smile
which Jeanne never afterwards forgot and which sustained
her in all her after-troubles:—“ You have pity? Fear
not. There is pity in Heaven for the fair realm of
France!”

So speaking, Titania wrapped herself and Eileen about
once more with the cloud, which had hidden them at
all the previous stations from everybody upon the earth:
and henceforth both of them became for a long while—
even to Jeanne—invisible.

The sad wistful eyes filled again with blinding tears:
when Jeanne found that her mysterious friends were
gone. “QOh! that they would spirit me too away”
she cried “to Heaven! I am den misérable.” But after
a while she stood up, magnificent in her fresh strength:
and her dreamy eyes seemed to be lit with a new fire. “I
am the favourite of Heaven” she said. “My mission is
clear to me. Titania has but repeated the encouragement,
which all the angels have been singing to me: and which
the Archangel Michael himself sounded to me erewhile.
I must go to the Dauphin: and, with God’s help, I will
be his saviour from his enemies, and will set the crown
of France upon his head.” So saying, she bethought
her of a suit of armour and a valiant sword, which had
belonged to a soldier, who had died not long since from

grievous wounds upon that very floor—the floor of her
XVIL] a Joy to Die. 241

father’s cottage. These arms were kept and treasured
in the maiden’s own private chamber: she arose now
and went thither, passing through a door opposite to that
of which Titania and Eileen had entered: and, as she
went, Eileen heard once more the voices of the Fairy
Chorus, which she had first heard in Ireland,—singing
this time, in the delicate language of the French, a song
of heavenly love, of victory and of triumph. Jeanne soon
returned, girt about with the armour and wielding the
mighty sword. She seemed to hear the fairy voices. She
fell to the ground as one in a swoon : and, with a look of
rapt ecstasy upon her face, gazed up to the place from
which the voices seemed to come.

Suddenly the music ceased: and, at the same moment,
the cottage-door was thrown open: and a man entered,
whom Eileen readily guessed to be Jeanne’s father. He
found her still prostrate upon the ground with upturned
face, as when the fairies had begun to sing. He was a
well-built man. His face showed that he was honest, but
of low intelligence. “What doest thou here, mad girl?”
he said, somewhat roughly. Jeanne poured forth eagerly
the story of what she had seen and heard. “And now”
she said, when she had finished, holding up the cross of
the sword-hilt:—“] devote myself to Heaven: I am
going to the Dauphin. I must perform mine errand.”
Her father had heard stories like these from her before:
and thought them very absurd and foolish. He laughed
harshly: but she still persisted. At last she brandished

16
242 As though it were [Cx.

her sword: and would have left the room by force. But
the strong man easily wrenched it from her grasp: and,
becoming now furiously angry, he caught hold of her
wrists and, looking wrathfully into her face, he said :—
“Cease from this absurd fancy. Thou shalt not go on
this mad errand. I would drown thee first.”

Jeanne said nothing. But the expression upon her
face showed her unchanged determination. At this
point the door again opened: and the Parish Priest
came in. Jeanne’s father told the Priest what had
happened. The good man was sorrowful. “It must
be the devil’s work” said he. At this Jeanne started
up and her eyes flashed fire. “Blaspheme not so,
Father”: said she: “that is the blasphemy, which can
never be forgiven. I must go to the Dauphin—yes,
even if I wear my limbs to the very knees. For myself,
I had far rather rest and spin by my good mother’s side.
This work is none of my choosing. But I must go and
do it: for my Lord wills it so!” “Whois your Lord?”
asked her father scornfully. She answered :—“He is
Gov.”—Such a holy light illumined her pale face, as
she said these words, that the Priest was silenced. “I
believe this maiden”: he said: “Heaven grant it may
be well for her and France!”

“Amen” said a voice, which had not been heard
before. It came from the Captain of the Dauphin’s
forces in that neighbourhood. He had come round to

the village in search of recruits: and had entered the
XVII] a Joy to Die. 243

cottage during the dispute. His “Amen” was said
half in earnest and half in jest. He was very much
in earnest as to the prayer for France: he had devoted
his life to the cause. But he could not at first regard
the help offered by the Peasant Maiden as a serious
matter.

“Despise me not ”: said Jeanne, turning toward him:
“T have a good hope that I can do this thing.” The
dispute between father and daughter lasted long. The
father was still obstinate: the daughter still resolute.
The Priest was perplexed: and the Captain too now
began to doubt whether there might not be more in
the matter than had at first appeared. Jeanne was
indeed a saint to look upon: and the soldier was touched
in spite of himself. The door opened yet once more
and Jeanne’s mother entered: the Maiden approached
and kissed her. “J must go. Indeed I must” she said.
“And I will die, if need be, for my country’s sake.”
And she smiled: as though it were a joy to die in that
sacred cause. “Captain, I pray thee lead me to the
Dauphin.” “JI will lead her to the Dauphin” he said.
“Heaven’s will be done”:—and he took her hand.
This time nobody opposed her passage: and they left
the room together.
~“Come, Eileen”: said Titania: “we must follow them.”

When they were free of the cottage, Jeanne Darc -
“and her companion walked along the road together,

bound for Chinon, where the Dauphin now held his
244 As though it were [Cx

court. The Fairy Ouden and Eileen still followed
them. The path led through the forest. The sun was
now setting: and the nightingale began to sing. Jeanne
looked eagerly in the direction, whence came the beauti-
ful notes of the bird. “Hold!” she said. “Give me a
few minutes to take leave of my friends. Then I will
follow you, if need be, to the ends of the world: and
never will grow tired.” The soldier complied, though
he knew not what she meant: and he sat him down
to rest upon the stump of a tree hard by. “Come
now” said Jeanne in a voice, which was very sweet
and clear. Then all the creatures of the forest began
to congregate around her. The birds ate crumbs from
her fingers. The deer came fearlessly to lick her
hand. The wolves bounded from their lairs. The snakes
glided from the underwood. The soldier started up:
and was inclined to fly. “Fear not”: said Jeanne:
“see, they will do no harm. I have known these
fellows from my cradle.’ And indeed they all seemed
to love her: the snakes caressed her: the wild wolves
fawned upon her, like dogs: and for a few minutes
she stroked and fondled them. Then, when she had
bestowed some token of her notice on all the creatures
which encircled her,—* Adieu!” she said: “I leave you
for ever.” There was one great moan from all the
multitude of animals: and the sound of it brought
tears into the Maiden’s eyes for a moment. But she

soon restrained her sorrow. “It is my heavenly
XVIL] a Joy to Die. 24.5

mission” she said. “I go my way: and you must all
go yours.” It was evident that the beasts all under-
stood her. They left her and went their several ways:
and the birds flew off at the same time to their: nests,
where they raised a plaintive song.

The Captain was astonished. “I believe thee now,
Jeanne” said he. “Thou art verily a messenger to us
from Heaven. I had often heard this of thee before—
that thou couldest tame all living things by the fascina-
tion of thine eyes; but now IJ have seen it for myself:
and I am thy servant from henceforth.” “Lead me
to the Dauphin” said Jeanne, giving him her hand:
and they walked along again together.

But not for long :—two Knights, riding with a servant
a short distance behind, had seen the whole of what
had passed. They had heard rumours of Jeanne’s
visions ere now: and they too from this moment put
faith in her power. Presently they came up with her :
and, bidding their servant dismount, dismissed him,
for that they had no further need of him. And now
they offered his horse to Jeanne, saying that they were
themselves on their way to the Court at Chinon, and
praying that they might escort her thither. “I will go”
she said simply: and, taking leave of the Captain, she
mounted: and the three rode on together,—still followed
by Eileen and the Fairy Queen, who were invisible
to them.

Many days and nights they rode on thus: until at
24.6 As though it were [cu

last they came to Chinon, where the Knights prevailed
upon the Dauphin to receive the Holy Maid. The
ladies and gentlemen of the French Court were at
this time in great distress. The armies of the English
were destroying all that there was in the country, where
they had their houses and their grounds: and, unless
these enemies could be driven away, they would all
be ruined.

When Jeanne entered the Royal Council-chamber,
the Dauphin and his generals were sitting together,
busied in anxious conversation. Several richly-attired
ladies were sitting near them listening: and sometimes
putting in a word. Jeanne had of course never seen
the Dauphin, having lived all her life in her own native
village. But she knew which was he at once: and,
kneeling before him, offered him homage. The Dauphin
raised her: and kissed her. “Gentle Dauphin”: said
she: “my name is Jeanne Darc, the Maid. The King
of Heaven sends me to tell you, that you shall be
anointed .and crowned at the city of Rheims :—and
you shall be lieutenant of the Heavenly King, who is
the king of France.”

The generals at first smiled at the idea of a peasant
girl leading the great army of the French. But, seeing
that the Dauphin wished them to humour her desire,
they offered to lead her to the camp at once. “The
sooner the better” said the Maid. So to the camp
they went.
XVII] a Joy to Die. 247

As soon as she appeared on the camp-grounds, where
a great review was being held, five thousand soldiers
raised a mighty cheer. They had heard who Jeanne
Darc was: they were ready to believe that she was
-indeed a saint from Heaven: and they swore to follow
her to death or victory. “Vive Jeanne Darc!” they
cried. “Vive La France!” She went boldly forward :
and held out her hands towards them, saying in a
strong, clear voice, which every man upon the field
could hear distinctly :—‘ Brave soldiers! I will be
your general. I know that we must win.” The men
all vowed that she was a goddess or a saint: and
wished her to work miracles upon their ailing ones.
“No” said she “I am no goddess and no saint. I
am but a poor peasant maiden: but I am strong in
the strength of Heaven’s favour.” The officers then,
each in his turn, advanced and kissed her hand: and
vowed that they would all follow her most faithfully.

Day after day, she accompanied the generals to the
field. And, if it was by their experience that she
learned how to dispose an army on the field, it was
owing to her strong will and powerful influence that
the troops obeyed the orders given them so diligently
and well.

At last the day for the march arrived: and the
army went forward. Jeanne brought forth a banner,
embroidered by her own hand, with lilies and sacred
emblems, The Dauphin rode beside her. The Maiden
248 As though it were [Cu.

herself gave all the orders: and the troops followed
with a most glorious enthusiasm.

The enemy fell back at their approach: and the
French were full of hope. For a long while the enemy
refused to give them battle. But at last the day of
battle came. The armies met at a village called Patay.
The English charged forward against the French army:
crying out curses and insults against Jeanne. But she
was only the more determined to win. Herself she
slew with the sword the soldiers who were immediately
opposed to her: and flinched not,—though her own
white arms were wounded and gashed by the cruel
weapons of the enemy, and stained with her own dark
blood. She seemed to bear a charmed life. Charge
after charge was made: and Jeanne was to the front
in all of them. At last the English fled: and the Maid
had won the battle.

Jeanne in great joy gave thanks to Heaven: but she
wept as the prayers went up for the souls of the dead
on either side. Yet she was more sure than ever of
the righteousness of her cause. “The Dauphin mus¢
be triumphant at the last” she said.

The English still held a large part of the country.
Months passed on. The soldiers were’ sorely wearied:
and would have lain down their arms—had it not been
for Jeanne. The generals would have despaired—had
it not been for Jeanne. The Dauphin himself would

have retired from the fight and consented to live quietly,
1 mM

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a



48.

[To face p

JEANNE DARC,

tJ

FREMIET fecii
XVIL] a Joy to Die. 249

as a private person, in the far east of France—had it
not been for Jeanne. She was still untired: she still
bade them fight on: she was aglow with a heavenly
hope. And, led by her, the army still persevered. Many
skirmishes were fought: and the French suffered great
loss. Strong men fell to the dust in death on either
side of her: but she was not afraid: she was still the
same brave woman, that she had been from the first.

Slowly but surely she pushed forward: and the
English gave way before her conquering arms: until
at last, on a glorious April day, she entered Orleans
at the head of an army—a triumphant general. And
the cause was won. The English seemed now to have
well-nigh given up the struggle: and a few months
_ afterwards the Dauphin had sufficiently dispersed his
enemies to be crowned king of France, as Jeanne had
promised him that he should be, in the great Cathedral
at Rheims. Jeanne had made him a king: she stood
behind him at his coronation: and her eyes welled up
‘with tears of joy, as she saw that so great a portion of
her work was done.

“Let us go back to the station now” said Eileen to
Titania. “The story is finished.”

“Not yet” said the Queen. “The victories of Jeanne -
- are glorious: but what is to follow will show her still
more glorious.”

Now the English had allies in France. The Duke
of Burgundy and his great army were still opposed to
250 As though it were [Car.

the newly-crowned king. And the Maid of Orleans, as
she was now called, resolved if possible to conquer them
as well, ere she returned home to Domremy.

More battles and more blood were the necessary
consequences of this determination. The French forces
were no longer as strong as they had been: and the
Duke’s army pressed them sorely. At last at Compiégne
a terrible battle was fought:—terrible in itself and still
more terrible in its consequences.

Jeanne was riding forward in this battle, fearlessly as
ever, when—in the hottest of the fight—her closest
followers were driven back, while she still charged on.
The Maiden was surrounded. “Thou witch!” cried her
enemies, coming round her. “Yield thee: thou art a
prisoner.” In vain she struggled to escape them: in
vain her soldiers tried to rescue her. A troop of cavalry
was sent against them: and they were forced to retire.

“Follow, follow still” cried Titania: and Eileen
excitedly did so. .

A strong guard went with Jeanne and bore her to
the camp: where she was kept as a captive in a
fortified place, surrounded by soldiers. Here she
lingered many months: till at last she was sold to
her old foes, the generals of the English army at
Rouen. Thither she was rudely hurried. When she
came there her armour and sword were taken from her:
and she was given a common prison dress. Her hands

were bound with fetters: and a rope was tied round her
XVIL.] a Joy to Die. 251

body—so tightly that it tore her soft flesh cruelly. In
this plight, she was roughly thrown into a prison cell:
where she was left—in the damp and darkness—for the
night. Here Titania and Eileen, who had been close by
her all this time, became once again visible to her eyes:
and comforted her. She kissed them: and told them
that she was not afraid to die.

A few mornings after this, she was summoned to be
tried as a witch before the High Court of the Inquisition.
Many witnesses came forward and swore wicked lies
about her. They said that she was Satan’s servant:
and did the works of Satan. The Judges condemned
her to be burnt alive at the stake. And she was again
bound and led back to the prison.

When the long night ended and the day broke, she
was startled by the entrance of a jailer. She looked
at him with wan thoughtful eyes: but her face shone
with a joy, that was strange in one who was condemned
to die so cruel a death.

“Thou art pardoned” said the jailer. Jeanne believed
that he was mocking her. “It is true” he said. He
left the cell: but came back shortly with her military
robes and her sword: and bade her take them to herself
again. He left her: Jeanne seemed as one in a dream:
and did not appear to realise what he had meant.
However she donned the armour: and clenched her
sword again.

Soon the door opened once more: and one of the
252 As though it were [Cx

cruel officers of the Inquisition entered the Maiden’s
cell: when he saw her eyes flashing with their old
light, as she brandished the great sword, he was
astonished and said:—“A little while ago, thou wert
pardoned. But I swear thou art a witch after all.”
And he called two servants to him:—‘“Is not she a
witch?” he said. The servants answered that she much
resembled one. They then left her alone: and yet once
more she spent the night in this gloomy place. She
was faint and ill: and gazed all round her with a
dreamy smile. Occasionally she murmured prayers or
muttered verses from the Psalms, such as:—‘I am so
fast in prison that I cannot get forth,” or again :—
“ Nevertheless, though I am sometime afraid, yet put I
my trust in Thee!”

In the morning the jailer appeared again. “The
Judges” he said “have altered their minds. Thou
must needs die” “I am content to do it” said the
Maid of Orleans. “Lead me forth to die!”

She was told this time to robe herself in white light-
flowing robes, for that she was to be offered as a
sacrifice to Heaven: and the day was to be counted as
a festival in Rouen. But she was to walk through the
streets with naked feet and ankles: and with uncovered
head. The Maiden did as she was bidden. Outside
the door of her cell she was met by priests and monks,
bearing tapers and singing chants. For her enemies

pretended that it was a service that they rendered to
XVIL] a Joy to Die. 253

God, when they burned alive this noble girl, who had
opposed their armies. This mockery of religion made
it all the harder for her to bear. She glanced round :—
still hoping that perchance the French forces, whom
she had so often led to victory, might come to her
rescue in her hour of need :—still hoping that he, whom
she had made a king, would somehow or other force
his way into the city and save her even then. But it
was not so to be. Shame on the coward king, shame
on the coward Frenchmen, her old followers, who
deserted their brave leader in the day of trouble: and
who did not even lift a hand in the attempt to save
her! But shame also on the coward Englishmen and
their allies, who did not think scorn to torture a
defenceless woman, now that they had her in their
power, though they had fled from her in the day of
battle! Shame on the coward people, who stared
stupidly at the cruel stake, as though they were looking
on at a play in a theatre, and came with their wives
and little children to see the devilish deed! Above
all, shame on the coward Priests—most abominable of
men—who called themselves God’s ministers, and yet
did not scruple to commit a crime almost too black for
Hell itself!

The Maiden walked—barefoot and bareheaded as
has been said—through the streets of Rouen: in the
procession of the Priests. The pitiless bystanders cursed

and insulted her as she passed them. No friendly face
254 As though it were | [Cu.

was near:—save those of a few prisoners as helpless
as herself. She came to the place of execution: she
‘climbed upon the pile of faggots: and was fast bound
to the stake, hand and foot, with ropes. There she
stood: firmly looking at the multitudes. Another hymn
was raised: and the servants of the Inquisition lit their
torches. The hymn ended: and, as the great “Amen”
sounded through the crowd, those whose business it was
set light to the faggots underneath the stake. In a
few moments the fire blazed fiercely forth: and the
beams, upon which Jeanne’s unshod feet had been
fastened, were red-hot. And now the maiden’s dress
caught the flame. Eileen could look no longer: but
turned shudderingly away and hid her face in Titania’s
bosom.

Only think what it was that was being done :—
there in a public place of the city, inthe light of open
day. Burning by fire is one of the most fearful pains,
which our bodies can know. Burn even his little finger
with fire for a few moments, and it is not too much to
say that a strong man will cry aloud. And.here was a
tender girl, who had done no wrong, suffering from its
utmost agonies, in every part of her young beautiful
. body. The flames were fanned by the wind. And
more than a thousand men and women actually looked
on and idly watched!—while the fire wreathed itself
in its fury all over her light-flowing robes, and slowly
burned to death the fair white body that was within
XVIL] a Joy to Die. 255

them. More intolerable agony than hers must have
been could not be conceived. A Hercules would have
roared aloud with the pain of it. But she just raised
to Heaven those great melancholy eyes, which had
been the pride of France, but shining now with a new
light in them, as though it were a joy to die: and lifted
up that sweet, clear, all-pervading .voice, which armies
had unquestioningly obeyed, ringing now in spite of
everything with a celestial triumph, as she said, in her
own native tongue, the old words first uttered by a
holy man, who suffered a great sorrow long ago :—
“Cest L’Eternel: Qu’Il fasse ce qui Lui semblera
bon !”—and saying this, she died.

* * * * *

Eileen was miserable. But the Fairy Queen spake
softly and kindly to her, as she bore her away. “It
was good for you to be there” she said. “It was
indeed unspeakably horrible: but very glorious withal.
Nothing is more sweet and honourable than to die for
the country of your birth—as though it were a joy to
adie! Jeanne Darc is now a member of a host, com-
pared to which all the hosts which you have seen are
as nothing. For she is one of the foremost among
THE NOBLE ARMY OF MARTYRS.”
CHAPTER XVIII.

THE SECOND ARROW.

“Whate’er it be, your life I promise you.
Wherefore the second arrow ?”

From Schiller’s “Wilhelm Tell.”

& HE YEAR OF OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND THREE
HUNDRED AND SEVEN” was the next station:
and therefrom they went to Switzerland.

I do not suppose that any man, woman or child could
ever forget his or her first visit to Switzerland :—the
pleasure-ground of our planet :—Earth’s nearest approach
to Fairyland. And Eileen’s was a visit very different
from any which can have befallen other children—and
that in many ways. To begin with, there was no long
wearying journey: but the fairy-car set the travellers
down, immediately at their desire, upon the top of
Mont Blanc itself. Not a cloud was in the sky: and,
as they stood there in a field of snow, the whole panorama
of the Alps was at that very moment spread out before
their eyes in all its vast immeasurable beauty. And
then Eileen wandered with Titania along the summits of

the mountain range: flitting, as fairies and their favourites
256
Ch, XVIII] The Second Arrow. 257

may, from peak to peak: over the'same ground where
the best of mortal mountaineers can hardly climb with
_guides and ice-axes and ropes. On they sped: and
Eileen found endless pleasure in watching the varying
mists, which at one time covered everything with a
dismal pall of cloud, at another moment allowed streaks
of the glory beyond them to be seen at intervals, and
at another rolled away entirely. In the evening of the
same day in which our travellers came to Switzerland,
they watched from the Grand Saint Bernard the sunset
and the gradual darkening of the roseate-tinted snows.
And the daybreak found them on the Matterhorn !

So, passing from summit to summit, they came to the
Saint Gothard Pass: and, after looking down for a few
minutes upon the lakes of Italy, they descended into
the valley on the Swiss side of the pass. The part of
the country to which they were now come is called the
Canton of Uri: and “it is here” said the Fairy Queen
“that the people live amongst whom the deeds are to
be done which I would have you see.”

Our travellers sojourned for some while in the Canton
of Uri. The people in this country were a feeble folk.
It has been said that mountainous countries never form
the nurseries of tall and well-grown men: and certainly
the Swiss of this period appeared to Eileen a stunted
and misshapen race. They were ill-fed: and scantily
clothed. Poverty was about them on every side. Weak
women, young children and very old men did hard

17
258 The Second Arrow. (Cu.

work such as is only done by the strong and able-
bodied in our land: and they were urged on thereto by
cruel taskmasters. There seemed to be misery and.
injustice everywhere. Poor men were scourged and
imprisoned, and executed too, for very slight offences,
such as hardly deserved any punishment at all: while
the rich and powerful oppressed their humble neighbours
unrestrainedly. In one village, through which Eileen
and Titania passed, a very cruel thing was done, of
which they were witnesses. A rich man’s servants came
to a pretty little chalet—the humble home where a
young peasant lived: and he was very poor. They
carried off some oxen belonging to him before his very
eyes: whereat he was furious and smote one of them.
And then, seeing they were too many for him, he
fled. They did not pursue him: but took their revenge
instead on the young man’s aged father, by putting out
both his eyes! And this was only one of many horrors
not less abominable.

“Who rules this country” asked Eileen “that he
allows this tyranny?” The answer was :—%“The sway
of the country belongs to the Kaiser of the House of
Hapsburg. But he lives far away from here: and
allows a district governor—or, as they call him in the
German tongue, a ‘Landvogt’—to rule over this region
in his behalf’ The present Landvogt, is a cruel tyrant:
and Gessler is his name.” As the Fairy Queen said

this, they came to a beautiful meadow near the town
XVIIL] The Second Arrow. 259°

of Altdorf, not very far from the shores of the Lake of
Lucerne. At one end of the meadow there was a
thick plantation of trees: lindens and walnut trees and
apples, growing side by side with plums and cherries,
laden with abundance of fruit. Eileen and the Fairy
Queen sat beneath the shade of them, enjoying the
view therefrom. A peaceful valley lay at their feet,
fringed by the edges of the lake: and the strange wild
glaciers, with their great chasms of ice, glistened beyond
them. These were surmounted in their turn by a
distant range of soft blue mountains: capped with never-
melting snow, at whose whiteness the eye marvelled.
But in the foreground, close to the place where Eileen
and Titania were reclining, a curious object forced itself
upon their sight: standing as it did between them and
the beautiful scene beyond. It was a long pole, fixed
in the ground: with a hat upon the top of it!

The Fairy Queen never seemed to grow tired of
answering whatever questions Eileen liked to put: and
so now, when the child asked her, she readily explained
the meaning of the pole and hat. The Landvogt
had ordered the people of Uri to bow down and salute
this hat, which he had ‘had placed upon the pole: as
a token of respect to him. Behind it stood two sentinels
ready to arrest the man who passed it without salute.
“ And methinks” she said “they will not have long to
wait for a victim.”

A few moments later a man and a boy were seen
260 The Second Arrow. (CH.

_ approaching the place. They were Wilhelm Tell and
Walther, his little son. Wilhelm Tell was the favourite
of all the country-side: he was the best archer at every
shooting-meeting : and he was the best steersman of all
the boatmen on the whole of the Lucerne Lake. He was
a peaceable law-abiding man: respectful to those above
him and courteous to all. Now Eileen observed that
he did not see the hat: but passed it unnoticed, and
sat down on the stump of a broken tree with his little
son by his side. The father and son talked together
for a few minutes uninterrupted. Wilhelm Tell told his
son stories about countries where there are no mountains
nor glaciers nor avalanches of snow, but flat plains
only and slowly-creeping streams. To little Walther
these places sounded quite as strange and wonderful as
his own Switzerland did to Eileen and her countrymen.

But they were not long suffered to remain at peace.
For when the sentinels perceived that Wilhelm Tell
still took no notice of the hat, they came forward. One
of them laid his hand on the offender’s shoulder,
and said:—“JI arrest you in the name of the Kaiser.”
“What mean you?” he asked. “You have disobeyed the
commands of Gessler the Landvogt: and you must
come away with us. You have not saluted the hat!
You must away to prison!” Then the little boy
opened his mouth: and cried aloud :—“ Help! help!
They are taking my father away to prison!”

Now it happened that there were divers of the country-
XVIIL] The Second Arrow. 261

people at no great distance: and when they heard
Walther’s cries they soon ran together to the place. On
hearing what was amiss, they were very indignant: and
bade the sentinels let their prisoner go, threatening else
to rescue him with violence. Then the sentinels called
aloud for their fellows:—“Help! help! ye servants of
the law!” and they strove withal to prevent the rescue
of their prisoner.. At this moment there was a stir in the
crowd. Eileen heard voices calling :—% Place, place for
the Landvogt!” And looking up, she beheld Gessler
himself coming toward them on horseback: holding a
falcon upon his wrist and attended by the lords and ladies
of his suite and a numerous train of servants-at-arms.
And the people lamented at the sight of him: saying —
“There is the Landvogt. Alas! what will become of us?”
The haughty Gessler scowled upon the multitude: and
exclaimed :—“ Part them asunder! Why are the folk
crowding here? Who calls‘ Help’?” But all were silent.
“What was it?” again demanded the tyrant. “I will
know it.” Then, addressing the sentinel, he said:—
“Step forward, you. Who are you? And why do you
hold’ this man?” So saying, he gave his falcon to one
of his attendants: while the sentinel made answer, and
said :—“ Dreaded sire, I am your servant-at-arms: and
was sent here to keep guard beside the hat. This man
I caught in the very act of refusing to give his salute
of honour to the hat. Wherefore I was for seizing him

as you commanded: whereon the people tried with
262 The Second Arrow. [Ce.

violence to rescue him.” Gessler paused for a second
or two: and then said:—“ And do you, Tell, so utterly
despise your Kaiser and myself, who bear rule here
in his behalf, that you refuse to give your salute of
honour to the hat, which I hung here on purpose to
see whether you were of a loyal spirit? By this
thing you have betrayed to me your evil feeling.” Tell
besought the Landvogt for pardon, saying :—‘“ Forgive
me, gracious sire: it was from thoughtlessness and
not from disrespect that I did this thing. I was ever -
- thoughtless: were I otherwise I should not be Tell. I
ask for mercy.” Gessler thought silently for a moment:
then, with an evil smile upon his countenance, he said :—
“You are a master with your crossbow, Teil: so people
say! You take the prize, wherever there is shooting.”
Young Walther Tell said:—‘ And that must be true,
sire: seeing that my father can shoot an apple from the
tree from the distance of a hundred yards.” Gessler
asked Tell whether the child who had spoken was his
boy. “Yes, gracious sire” he answered. “ Have you any
more of them?” “TI have two boys, sire” he said. “ And
which is it that you love the best?” Tell answered that
both of the children were equally dear to him. “Now,
Tell!” said Gessler: “as you can shoot an apple from
the tree from the distance of a hundred yards, you shall
prove your cunning in my sight. Take the crossbow :—
you have it. there at hand:—and make you réady to
shoot an apple from off the head of your boy. Now I
XVIIL] The Second Arrow. 263

will give you a piece of advice! See well that you hit
the apple at the first shot. For, if you miss it, you shall
lose your head.” At this hideous threat, all those who
were present gave signs of horror. Wilhelm Tell himself
could hardly believe that the Landvogt’s words were
seriously meant. “My lord”: he said: “what is this
unnatural thing you hold out to me? That I from
the head of my dear child

cannot have meant that! Heaven forbid it! You cannot



No, no, gracious sire—you

' be in earnest in expecting such a thing from a father!”
But Gessler still insisted :—“You will shoot the apple
from off the boy’s head. I desire it:—and I will have
it so.”

Still Tell could not believe that this cruelty was really
to be. “I shoot” said he “ with my crossbow at the dear
head of my own child? Rather would I die.” “You
shoot” was the answer—“ or else you shall die: and your
child with you.” Tell entreated him once more, saying :—
“Sire, you have no children—and you know not what
moves in a father’s heart!” The Landvogt laughed and
mocked him, saying :—‘ How now, Tell? I had been
told you were thoughtless and a dreamer: you are
thoughtful enough now. You like wonderful adventures :
and so I have chosen you a hazardous task. Others
might be afraid: but they tell me that, when you come
near danger, you always shut your eyes and spring to
meet it.”

At this point Bertha von Bruneck, one of the ladies
264 The Second Arrow. (Cu.

beside the Landvogt, interfered, saying :—“ The joke has
lasted long enough, sire: pardon the man now, I beseech
you.” But Gessler answered that he was not joking : he
meant the thing quite seriously. Then he stretched his
hand to a branch above his head, and picked an apple
from it: saying that it was full time the archery began.
“Open a way forthwith! Why this delay? Tell, your
life is forfeited: and lo! I graciously rest your fate upon
the cunning of your practised hand. The man that is
made the master of his own destiny cannot complain
that his treatment is harsh. You boast that your eye
is steady. Well! now is a fit occasion to show your
cunning. The mark is a worthy one: and the prize is
great. As for hitting the middle of a target, there are
others who can do that. The man I call a master of |
his craft is one whose cunning reaches over all things,
and whose heart does not disturb the steadiness of his
hand and eye.”

Then the father of Tell’s wife, an old white-headed
man, threw himself upon his knees, and said :—“ Sire
Landvogt: be merciful. Take all my property, if you
will: but spare a father from this unnatural venture!”
But the sweet treble voice of Walther—Tell’s young son
—rebuked him, saying :—“ Grandfather, kneel not thou
before that false man. Say, where shall I stand? I am
not afraid. My father hits even the bird upon the wing:
and he will not miss now, when the life of his own child

is at stake!” Gessler was deaf to all entreaties: neither
XVIIL] The Second Arrow. 265

was he touched by the simple faith of the child, nor awed
by the fear of Heaven. He simply pointed to the boy,
and said:—“Bind him straightway to the linden over
there.” Walther was indignant:—“Bind me? No, I
will-not be bound. I will stand still, like a_lamb, and
will not even breathe. But if you bind me:—so I could
not be still: for I should struggle against my bonds.”
“But let just your eyes be blindfolded, boy.” “ Where-
fore my eyes?” he said. “Do you think I am afraid of
an arrow from my father’s hand? I will await it firmly:
and not flinch even with my eyelashes. Quick, father:
show that you are an archer. That man does not believe
in your skill: he thinks to destroy us. Shoot then and
hit, if only to disappoint this wicked man!” And
therewith he went to the linden: and the apple was put
upon his head.

Eileen looked all round, wondering whether the people
would stand still and see this horrid deed done before
their eyes without making any resistance. They could
not help themselves. Resistance would have been
useless. For the people were all unarmed: while Gessler
was surrounded by a wood of lances. The Landvogt was
angry with Wilhelm Tell for carrying a crossbow at all:
and this was one of the principal reasons why he was
so cruel to him. “Men do not carry arms for nothing”
he said. “It is a dangerous custom. It pleases you
to carry crossbow and shaft? Well, be it so: and I
will provide the mark!” And now Tell bent the bow:
266 The Second Arrow. CH.

and fixed the arrow. “ Open a passage there” he said.
He was obeyed: but still he did not shoot. He let the
crossbow sink down: and murmured thickly, saying :—
“Something is swimming before my eyes.” The women
who were present shrieked:—“Great Heaven!” Tell
tore open the coverings of his breast: and turning
to the Landvogt, exclaimed:—‘Spare me this shot.
Here is my heart. Call your soldiers and shoot me.”
Gessler said:—“I do not want your life: but the shot.
You can do everything, Tell. Nothing frightens you.
You can steer a boat, as surely as you can aim a cross-
bow. Storms do not terrify you, when there is some
precious thing to save. Now, saviour, help yourself—
you save all.”

The unfortunate man stood wringing his hands: torn
by conflicting feelings, and looking now toward the
Landvogt, now toward Heaven. Suddenly Eileen saw
him take a second arrow from his quiver, and stick it
in his belt. And Walther, beneath the linden, called
and said :—“ Come, father, shoot. I am not afraid for
myself.” Tell pulled himself together: and, saying “It
must be done,” levelled his crossbow toward his son.

What followed Eileen saw but indistinctly: for all
was confusion. .A young Swiss-born knight, who was
present, Ulrich von Rudenz by name, had for some time
been showing signs of great displeasure. And now he
could. no longer restrain his fury: but leaped to his feet,
and threatened the Landvogt with his vengeance if he
XVIII] The Second Arrow. 267

allowed this cruelty to go any further. The lady who
had already spoken, observing that this interference only
rendered Gessler more exasperated than ever, threw her-
self between them: and tried to keep the peace. But
the young knight could not be silenced. He drew his
sword, and was springing with it toward the Landvogt,
fearless of the body-guard :—when a cry from the crowd
arrested him in the act. “The apple is fallen!” exclaimed
the multitude, with a joyful cheer. “The boy lives!”
cried others: “and the apple has been hit!”

It was true. While Eileen’s attention had been turned
toward the place where the brave young knight was
speaking, Wilhelm Tell had shot. And now, on hearing
the good news, the knight returned to his place: and
Gessler, staring round him in astonishment, asked:
“How? Has he shot? The madman!” All doubt
was soon destroyed. Walther himself ran toward them
with the apple in his hand. “Here is the apple, father” :
said he:—“] knew that you would not hurt your boy.”

Wilhelm Tell stood with his body still bent forward,
as though he would follow the arrow: and his crossbow
fell from his hand. But when he saw his boy coming
toward him, he made haste to meet him with open arms:
and embraced him passionately. He sank, together with
the child, upon the ground: for his strength was gone
from him. The people crowded round him: and told
him that he had performed a feat, which would be famous

for all time. Moreover one of Gessler’s officers took
268 The Second Arrow. [Cu

the apple from the hand of the child: and, looking
at it, said:—“This story will be told as long as yon
mountains stand upon their foundations.” Therewith
he gave the apple into the Landvogt’s hands. And,
when Gessler saw it, he said:—‘By Heaven! the
apple is divided into two parts, right through the very
core! It was a master-shot. I am bound to praise it.”

Now Wilhelm Tell was about to go upon his way:
when the Landvogt called him back, and said :—* Tell,
listen to me.” And he said :—‘ What wouldst thou,
sire?” Gessler said:—“ You stuck a second arrow in
your belt. Yes—yes—I saw it well. What did you mean
to do with it?” Tell was confused. “It is usual for
archers to do so, sire” he said. Gessler however would
not let this answer pass: he promised Tell his life, but
insisted on his telling him the reason of the second arrow.
Then Tell at last opened his mouth and said :—“ Well,
sire, since you have assured my life to me, I will tell
you the whole truth: from the very bottom.” (And, as
he spake, he drew the arrow from his belt: and fixed his
eyes sternly upon the Landvogt.) “With this, che second
arrow, if I had hit my dear child, I should have shot
at—you !-And be assured that I should not have missed
that time.” “Well” said Gessler “ Tell, I have promised
you your life. I gave my knightly word: which I will
keep. Yet, since I know about your evil feeling toward
me, I will have you taken hence and kept a prisoner,

in a place where neither moon nor sun shall shine
XVIIL] ‘The Second Arrow. 269

upon you. So shall I be safe from your arrows. Arrest
him, ye knaves: and bind him.” And they did as he
commanded, Gessler then departed, bidding his servants
remove Tell to the ship, in which he was about himself to
sail across the Lake of Lucerne. “ Alas!” said the country-
people as Tell was carried off: “our last hope goes with
you.” “Farewell” said Tell. Hereupon little Walther

threw himself upon his father, crying in great agony :—

“Father, father, my dear father!” Tell pointed to
Heaven as he answered and said:—‘Thy Father is
above: appeal to Him!” Then, clasping his son

passionately to his breast, he bade the people tell his
wife that the boy was still safe, and, as for himself,
Heaven would help him to escape.

And so it came to pass. Heaven did help him to
escape. And Eileen, following his fortunes, saw how
this fell about. When the ship started across the lovely
lake, all was fair and smooth on the dark blue waters.
Gessler enjoyed himself on deck: Tell suffered in chains
below. But all in a moment—a thing not unfrequent
on the lakes of Switzerland—a fearful squall arose: the
squall became a tempest: and the Landvogt’s vessel
was soon flying helpless before the hurricane. None of
the ship’s crew understood how to steer her on those
troubled waters: only a Swiss-born sailor could have
understood. There was one man on board, and one
man alone, that could save the vessel now: and that man
was Wilhelm Tell!
276 The Second Arrow. [Ca

Gessler sent for him, and said:—*Tell, if you will
undertake the venture, and so save us from the storm, I
might consent to release you from your bonds.” Tell,
having agreed to make the attempt to steer the vessel,
was unbound: and took the helm in his hands. But
when the ship came near the shore of the lake, he drove
her toward a shelf of rock, which ran out into the
water, and the top of it was smooth. (The Swiss people
loved in after-times to show the place: and built a
chapel there to the memory of Wilhelm Tell. And it
is there even unto this day.) At this place, Tell himself
with a great leap—so great that no-one would have
believed it to be possible—escaped ashore: and left the
Landvogt’s vessel to the mercy of the waves.

The fishermen on shore had seen the ship start from
the little quay of Fluélen: had seen her sail prosperously
for a time over the smooth blue waves: and had seen
her tossing awhile in the arms of the terrible storm. But
they had not seen Tell’s leap: and they were still gazing
with anxious eyes to the place where they had last
caught sight of the ship. They were praying for her
too :—not for the sake of the Landvogt, her owner, but
for the sake of Tell, his prisoner.

Imagine then their joy, when they beheld him safe
ashore, and heard the tale of his wonderful escape.
But, while they wished him joy, they yet feared what
might befall him in the future, should the Landvogt

happen also to escape alive from the perils of the storm,
XVII] The Second Arrow. 271

They therefore showed him the way to a place of hiding,
where he would be secure. But, before he departéd
thither, he charged them with this message for his wife
and kindred:—“Bid them be brave and of a good
courage: for that Tell is free and has full use of his
arm. And soon they shall have further news of me.”
The fishermen asked him what he meant :—what was he
going to do? “When once it is done” he said “it will
be in every mouth.” And Eileen looking at him saw,
by his countenance, that whatever it was he had resolved
to do, he would surely do it without fail.

As Tell departed to his hiding-place, the Fairy Queen
wafted her companion back to the Landvogt’s ship. The
waters were become calmer: and the crew managed to
bring the vessel safe to shore. And afterwards the cruel
tyrant returned to his former evil courses: and oppressed
his poorer neighbours as before. But Wilhelm Tell he
could not find, although he made search for him: for
he was securely hidden.

And on a day it came to pass that the Landvogt
made a progress, with his retinue and on horseback,
through a deep ravine: meaning to go to Kiissnacht,
where he had business to perform. Eileen and Titania
followed him. And a woman stopped him in the road,
having a petition to ask of him. But he would not even
hear her petition: and he bade his servants thrust her
from his path. And he was minded to continue his

journey forthwith. But his servants told him, saying :—
272 The Second Arrow. (Ca. XVIIL

“Thy servants cannot force a passage, my lord. The
whole way is barred by a marriage party.” Then
Gessler was very angry, and said:—“I have been even
too mild a ruler over this folk. Their tongues are too
free. They are not wholly under my constraint, as they
shall be in the future. I will break their . stubborn
disposition. I will crush the bold spirit of freedom. I



will publish a new law in this land. I will But
Gessler never finished what he was going to say: for
at that moment an arrow struck him and pierced him
to the heart: and he fell on the ground—dead. It was
THE SECOND ARROW, which Wilhelm Tell had
stuck into his belt, in the hour when he shot at the .
apple on the head of his child, and which now at last
had found its destined mark.

Then did the people of Switzerland rise in rebellion
against their oppressors: and overthrow them all. They
razed to the ground the castles of the cruel lords, who
had so long tyrannised over them: and the bold spirit
of Freedom, which Gessler with his latest breath had
threatened to crush, was mightier now than ever it was
before. The last thing which Eileen saw, before she left
the country for the railway-station, was a group of
laughing Swiss maidens, carrying the Landvogt’s hat in
sportive triumph on a pole, and thereto making mock
salutations, as they danced about it, full of thankful joy.

_ % % * # *
CHAPTER XIX.
THE REASON OF THE NAME OF BEATRICE.

“She was called Beatrice by many who did not know the reason of
the name of Beatrice. . . .”

“And her beauty has such perfection, ©
that envy never arises from the sight of it:
but it causes a veil to be drawn around her,—
a veil of gentleness, of love and faith:
the mere vision of her makes all things humble,
and it is not she alone who seems a holy being,
but, through her, all others take a share of loveliness.
Such beauty flows from all her acts,
that there is no-one who can even recall her to mind,
but he sighs and owns the sweetness of love.”

—From Dante's “ Vita Nuova.”

HE next station was “THE YEAR OF OUR LORD
ONE THOUSAND TWO HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-
FOUR”: and on May day .of that year our

travellers came again to Florence, and alighted in
a place where a multitude of beautiful children were
at play.

“Look!” said Titania: “for amongst these children
is a maiden, whose loveliness is celebrated among all
mankind for all centuries to come, and has won a
glory, such as the loveliness of woman never won

273 18
274 The Reason of (Cx.

before nor since. Her praises will never die: her name
is among the immortals.” Eileen asked the Fairy
Queen whom she meant. She answered :—“ The
maiden’s name is Beatrice! She is so called by many
who do not know the reason of the name of Beatrice.
Do you know, Eileen, what Beatrice means?” “I do
not” said she. “I thought. not” said Titania. “The
name means SHE WHO BLESSES: and it was to teach
you the reason why the maiden so appropriately bears
that name, that I brought you to Florence on_ this
first of May. Look at the maid herself: and soon
you shall understand the whole matter. See! there
she stands.”

Eileen turned her eyes to the spot, where, in the
course of the children’s play, Beatrice was curtseying
with surpassing grace. She was then only just eight
years old. Her dress on that day was of a most noble
colour: a subdued and goodly crimson: girdled and
adorned in such sort as best suited with her very
tender age. Her face was very sweet, like the face of
some saint descended from Heaven. Her form was
something spiritual and holy, such as Eileen had
imagined that an angel’s form might be.

“There is no great adventure” said Titania, “no
exciting story for you to watch here. And yet I
think it was worth while to bring you hither——” “It
was” interrupted Eileen, “indeed it was, if only to see

Beatrice.” “You will only stay here a few moments”:
XIX] the Name of Beatrice. 275

said Titania: “this is to be the shortest of all our excur-
sions.” [For the same reason this is going to be one
of the shortest chapters in my book.] “But before we
go you must see Beatrice’s lover. Fair as she is, she
would soon have been forgotten after her death, but
that the monument which Dante Alighieri raised to her
has made it impossible that she should ever be forgotten.”

Now Eileen had rather a vague idea who this Dante
Alighieri was: she fancied that she had heard of him:
and she thought that probably, as he had raised a
monument, he must be a sculptor.

The Fairy Queen answered her thoughts by pointing
to a small boy among the crowd of children. “That
is Dante” she said. “Observe him.” He was a child of
only nine years: but unlike other children altogether :—
he appeared to have deeper thoughts than children
think. He had himself, for the nonce, stopped playing
in the game: and was fixing his eyes intently on the
spot where the curtseying maiden stood. Oh! what
wonderfully expressive eyes: eyes with a whole soul
in them: eyes such as were never seen in childish face
before! You could read in them that the boy was all
but worshipping the fair being who stood before him.
It was a memorable moment that: the moment when—
jor the first time—Dante beheld that glorious lady to
whose honour all his after-life was given. “You will not
easily forget this scene, I think, Eileen”: said Titania :
“it were a pity that you should.”
276 The Reason of [Cu

Eileen was still looking at those two children playing
amid their mates: who shone as shine two peculiarly
bright stars in the midst of a sky spangled with other
stars, which all are beautiful. In the course of their
game Dante was called upon to place a wreath upon
the head of Beatrice: but, as Eileen watched her bend
with lowly grace to receive the honour, she felt that
Titania was touching her ear. And, looking round, she
saw that the car was already waiting for them: and the
golden ‘eaglets were fluttering their wings, as though
impatient to depart. The Queen directed Eileen to
take her place in the car: and the child immediately
obeyed.

* * * * *

“Yet I should have liked to have seen the end of
Dante’s love-story” said Eileen, as they drove away.
“We could not well see that story” said Titania “to
the end. The story of Dante’s love is as long as the
story of Dante’s life. It was not until nine years after
this time, that Beatrice saluted Dante, when, robed
in the purest white, she passed him in the street, and
he stood aside abashed. She knew almost nothing of
him: and little dreamed that his thoughts of her were
to give her an eternal glory!”

“What is the monument of which you spoke?”
asked Eileen. “I should like to see it.” “That was
no monument of stone or brass” Titania said. “No!

the monument, which Dante raised for her, is something
XIX] the Name of Beatrice. 20%

far more lasting than that. It is a memorial of golden
poetry, the loveliest that was ever heard in Italy. And
all the world thanks Beatrice for it: she was the
cause of all Dante’s poetry.” “What had she to do with
his being a great poet?” asked the other. The Fairy
Queen said:—‘* Why! she was the soul and spirit of
it all. The poems were nothing else than visions of
Beatrice: visions of great beauty, of divers forms and
colours, but always visions of the same pure being
whom he called ‘the glorious lady of my mind’”

And this was true. Dante could no more have written
his great books, without Beatrice’s part in them, than
my little story of “Eileen’s Journey” could have been
written without Titania.

Eileen was too young, and not learned enough, to
read those great poems to herself just yet. But she
asked Titania numberless questions about them. And
thus she discovered, ere they reached the next station,
what sort of thing they were: and tried to understand
what the visions had been which Dante told in such
exquisite verse :—how firstly there was a vision of a
fiery-coloured mist, wherein the spirit of Love appeared
to the poet as a lord joyful, but of terrible aspect, in
whose arms was a form as of one asleep and uncovered,
save that it was lightly shrouded in a crimson scarf:—
how Dante, looking, knew that it was the form of her
whom he loved: and how in that vision she ate that
burning heart, which heart was Dante’s own :—how
278 The Name of Beatrice. [cu xix.

again another was a vision of the day when Beatrice
died, a vision of ladies loosely robed fleeting along,
some weeping and some uttering loud lamentations,
while a veil obscured the sun—and the star of love
appeared—and birds dropped dead—and the earth
trembled—and there appeared the figure of a man
feeble and pale, crying in mournful tones these words
of plaintive sadness: “Morta é la donna tua, ch’era
si bella” (“Dead is thy lady, she who was so fair”) :—
and lastly how, after that, Dante resolved not to speak
any more of Beatrice until what time he could sing
her praises in a worthier way: and it was only after
many years of labour, when Beatrice had been a long
while dead, that he gave to the world the most wonderful
vision of all—in which the poet dreamed that he
journeyed through deepest Hell, passed thence along
the terraces of Purgatory, and was afterward uplifted,
by the help of holy Beatrice herself—smiling divinely
fair—, to the place, where her appointed home was, in
the Paradise of Heaven !

And then, although Eileen found that these strange
visions were hard to understand (in which you will
doubtless sympathise with her), she felt that there was
something weirdly beautiful in them. And there was
one thing, which now she did most fully understand :—

that was ¢he reason of the name of Beatrice!
CHAPTER XxX.

LADY BERENGARE.

“Till King Richard be forward
he may have no rest,
Acres then is his tryste:
upon Saracen fiends
to venge Jesu Christ,
hitherward he wends.
The king’s sister Joanna
and Lady Berengare
foremost sailed of ilk one:
next them his chancellor,
Roger Mancel.
The chancellor so hight,
his tide fell not well:
a tempest on him light.
His ship was down-borne,
himself there to die:
the king’s seal was lost,
with other gallies tway.
Lady Joanna she
the Lord Jesu besought
in Cyprus she might be
to haven quickly brought.
The maiden Berengare
she was sore affright,
that neither far or near
her king rode in sight.”
—Pirrs or Lanertort.

st HE YEAR OF OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND ONE
HUNDRED AND NINETY-ONE!” That was the
name of the station, where the train now
stopped: and the spot chosen by Titania, as the

best to visit from this station, was the isle of Sicily.
279
280 Lady Berengare. [Cu

Thither accordingly went the travellers, who soon found
themselves in the reception-chamber of the Sicilian
queen—Joanna by name, and sister of Richard the
First of England. She was looking eagerly out of the
window toward the sea. She seemed restless and
unable to compose herself to any occupation: nor was
Eileen long in discovering the cause. It was that she
was looking for a visitor—no less a person, as it
turned out, than her own mother, Eleanora, the queen-
dowager of England, who was even then expected
momentarily, with her royal retinue. Joanna held in
her hand a letter from this same Eleanora:—“ We are
coming to you” it said “upon important business :
but the disquiet of England demands our immediate
return. So we shall leave you almost the same day
that we arrive: only be: prepared for us and ready to
execute our wishes.” What could it mean? Joanna
was much perplexed: but she was not to wait long
for an answer to the riddle. For soon the vessel, in
which queen Eleanora and her company were sailing,
hove in sight: and Joanna proceeded to the palace
gate, where a troop of Sicilian horse was drawn up,
to receive her guests.

When at last the ship made the shore, the magnificent
retinue disembarked, and began to come towards her.
Splendid they were to behold: heralds and trumpeters
and armour-bearers: squires and royal body-guards :
‘with standards unfurled and music playing. Eileen was
x] Lady Berengare. 281

delighted—as what child would not have been ?—with
all of them. At length there came a break in the pro-
cession: and then there were seen two litters, side by
side, borne by attendants in gay livery. Of course, thought
Joanna, her mother was in one of them: but who, she
wondered, could be in the other? Who was there, of such
rank and pretensions, as to be suffered to be borne side
by side with her majesty queen Eleanora, widow of
the much-lamented Henry the Second of England?
When they came to the gate, queen Eleanora stepped
out of the first litter: and advanced to greet her daughter.
And, while she did so, the other litter was set down by
its bearers: and another lady appeared, who was richly
dressed, but whose person was largely hidden by a great
veil, which fell in ample folds around her. Joanna was.
more astonished than ever: and her curiosity was so
intense, that she would have questioned her mother
eagerly, had she not been induced by her gestures to:
refrain. “Come into the inner palace”: said Eleanora
in a low voice: “where I will advise you of the business.
that brought me hither: and where I will make known
to you this lady, whom our business most concerns.”
Joanna obeyed: so Titania and Eileen went,. with
the three ladies, into the interior of the palace: while
their followers withdrew to feast elsewhere. “ How fares
it with your brother Richard?” asked Eleanora, when
they were seated there. “How is my _ well-beloved
son? That is my first care! Answer me that first.”
282 Lady Berengare. (Cu.

“He is well” said Joanna. “But he is at present
absent at a little distance with Tancred, the usurper
king of Sicily. For, in the absence of my own dear
lord, king Henry of Sicily, Tancred has taken the
power into his own hands. And now Richard has
gone, with this same Tancred, to perform a pilgrimage
at the shrine of Saint Agatha of Catania. However
both of them will soon be back: indeed they should
be here: to-day or at least to-morrow they will come.
You can wait till then?” “Nay, I cannot wait my-
self’: said the other: “I am urgently required at
home: but you shall do my errand to your royal
brother.” Joanna said she would do her majesty’s
pleasure in this and everything. “Do you then, fair
daughter” was the reply “take this damsel for me
to the king, your brother: and tell him I command
him .to espouse her speedily. It is the lady princess
Berengaria of Navarre!”

As queen Eleanora spake these words, the princess
threw back her veil, and stood before them in all her
native beauty, blushing much at the straightforward
words that had been said of her. Then she came to
Joanna: and said that the queen had rightly spoken
her wish. It was no secret that she loved the brave
king of England: and, from what he had said ere
now, she was of a good hope that she might be his
queen. “You are his sister”: she said: “oh! will

you be my friend?” And she came forward: took
XX] Lady Berengare. 283

Joanna’s hands in hers: and looked entreatingly into
her face.

Berengaria of Navarre—or, as the English ballad-
mongers called her, “ Lady Berengare”—was not yet nine-
teen years of age: and her features appeared so very
childlike, that Eileen could have fancied her still younger
than she actually was. “She is reckoned” said Titania
“one of the most beautiful women of her age.” “ And
rightly so” thought Eileen, as she looked at her now.
Her form was slight, though exquisitely moulded: an
abundance of fair hair fell down her shoulders: her little
upturned face was more than pretty: her cheeks were
soft and delicate: and her small cherry-lipped mouth was
of a shape that seemed to have been made for kissing.
Yet was she both modest and queenly in her bearing :
only her dignity was of such very juvenile sort, that it
seemed rather suggestive of a child playing at sovereignty,
than fitted for one, who was in very truth to be the
consort of the greatest monarch in the world.

It was the winsome sweetness of her smile, that
especially endeared the lovely Berengaria- to those of
all degrees, who were brought upon her path. And
Joanna now came irresistibly to feel the fascination of
her. “Yes” she said simply in answer to the question
of the princess “we will be friends: you shall be
Richard’s queen.”

Eleanora was very glad to see that her favourite had

made so good an impression. The queen-dowager was
284 Lady Berengare. [Cx

an old woman now. Her life had been for a long space
a wicked and unprofitable one: but she loved Richard
truly, and would fain see him happy in this matter ere
she died. She thought that, were she once the instru-
ment in joining her son’s hand to that of Berengaria,
and so preventing his marriage to the French princess
Alice, who was no fit mate for such a king, she would
not have lived in vain: and that history, when record-
ing her iniquities, would remember that in one thing at
least she had been on the side of England’s truest
interests and those of England’s king. She had now
done her part: she therefore made no long stay in
Sicily, but soon set sail again for England.

Her daughter and the beautiful Berengaria went
down to the quay, to speed them on their way: and
it was only when the figures upon the ship could
no longer be distinguished that they returned to the
palace.

Eileen, as the favourite of the fairies, was privileged
to listen to the conversation, which the two women held
together there, in the privacy of their closet. Beren-
garia spoke long and lovingly of king Richard. She
knew that he loved her: he had told her so a hundred
times. In those days the deeds of each doughty knight
were openly dedicated to the glory of some fair. lady :
and the more splendid the achievements of the knight,
the greater the honour in which the lady’s name was
held. And Richard was the doughtiest knight of all:
XX] Lady Berengare. 285

his strength and bravery were mote famous than those
of any other hero in all Christendom: .and all the bright-
ness of them had entered into the life and happiness of
the princess Berengaria. All the women in Europe
were envious of her. But when they came to speak
of marriage—there was a serious hindrance that stood
in the way of Richard and his love. Kings may not
always marry as they please: and the hand of Richard
had been promised by his father to the princess Alice,
sister of Philippe Auguste, the king of France. And,
although this match was none of Richard’s seeking, he
might well find it difficult to overrule the compact that
had been made for him.

Now queen Joanna knew all this as well as Beren-
garia: and she confessed to a fear that it might prove
an insurmountable difficulty in the way of the hopes of
her pretty guest. “Of course” said she “my brother
Richard would fain take you for his wife and leave the
princess Alice to another. For she interests him not :—
while he loves you passionately. But his father’s pro-
mise, concerning her, will trouble him much and cause
him to think many times before he disappoints her.
Moreover she has strong friends at her back: her
brother France is not to be lightly defied: he is the
most powerful king on all the Continent!”

Berengaria’s small proud face flushed fiery, as she
made answer :—“ Richard of England fears no man. If

he would marry me, a score of Frances would never
286 Lady Berengare. [Cu

daunt so brave a knight: nor would he be turned from
his purpose to consider their desire. But his father’s
promise” she added more quietly “is another thing:
and if he thinks that his honour binds him to this
French princess, he would never wed Berengaria in
despite of it. Full well I know that everything which
Richard has is at my service, except his honour: and,
by my troth, for my part, I would sooner die un-
wedded, than he should tarnish his bright escutcheon
ever so little for my sake.”

The young princess said this bravely enough: but
for all that there were tears in her beautiful eyes as
she finished speaking. Joanna cheered her friend with
many merry hopes: and prophesied that she should be
Richard’s wife despite all hindrances: and that France
indeed should be the first to do her homage.

Thus for more than an hour the queen of Sicily and
the princess of Navarre sat talking one to the other :—
till at last the door was thrown open, and a servant
entered. “Madam” he said “your majesty bade the
watchman send you word when the first glimpse was
had of the returning pilgrims. They have come into
sight a moment since: and are even now approaching
the castle.”

At this news the ladies ran together to the casement:
and saw with their own eyes the figures of the royal
pilgrims, wending their way towards them, and now not

far distant from the palace. They then withdrew, for a
XX] Lady Berengare. 287

short space, to attire themselves suitably to the occa-
sion: which done, they hastened to the great hall of the
palace,—Eileen and Titania following as usual in their
wake. There they were received by the whole company
of the Sicilian court: and the bands played gay music
at their approach.

Meanwhile Richard and Tancred had arrived: and,
doffing the humble robes of pilgrims, had put on the
gorgeous apparel of kings. They advanced to meet
Joanna: and greeted her. She first received king
Tancred: then, turning to Richard, she whispered to
him the message which his mother had left: and told
him that Berengaria was near at hand. It was indeed
needless to tell him this: for, despite her veil, which
she had again thrown over her pretty face, Richard had
already seen that his beloved princess was among the
maids of honour, who waited on the queen. He
advanced to the place where she stood: and, bowing
low before her, kissed the small white hand that she
held out toward him.

After this he took his own place on the right hand
of the king of Sicily: and then he lifted up his voice
before all the assembled court, and said :—‘Gallant
king Tancred, fair queen Joanna, ladies and knights
of Sicily, we have a matter of much moment to
announce to you. The late king of England, our dear
father of blessed memory, promised the royal house of

France, that we, his son, should wed the princess Alice,
288 Lady Berengare. [Cu

sister of the French king, and make her queen of
England. We did not in truth desire this marriage,
having bestowed our affections elsewhere”—(and he
looked at Berengaria)—“ But had the lady Alice been
beyond reproach, we would have wedded her: and kept
our royal father’s promise. But we are excused from its
performance. For the French princess has been proved
to be no honest woman: and therefore she is no fit
mate for England. We are not to be forced into a
marriage that likes us not: and we therefore, here and
now, repudiate our engagement to the French princess.”

At this point in his speech, one of the English nobles
among his followers tried to check the king, speaking
in a low voice and bidding him “not to go too far”:
for the king much needed the support of France, he
said, in the war of the Crusade: and, in any case, if
France were insulted, his vengeance would be formid-
able. These words were intended for the king’s ear
only: but he flung them openly back at the speaker.
“One of our counsellors” he said “bids us beware of
France. We fear him not. And that you may all
know that we are speaking in earnest when we repudiate
this marriage, we will make good our words. Now
therefore, even here before all the court of Sicily, we
ask the lady princess Berengaria of Navarre for wife.
There she stands: and, if she will listen to our suit, we
will wed her forthwith.”

At these words queen Joanna could hardly forbear
XK} Lady Berengare. 289

clapping her hands, for very joy at this immediate fulfil-
ment of their fondest hopes: and king Tancred, turning
to the princess, said:—‘ What sayest thou then, lady
Berengaria? Thou hast heard the offer which England
makes to thee. Prithee unveil thyself: and make reply.”

Berengaria did as she was requested: and a great
cry of admiration burst from the whole assembly at
the sight of her extraordinary beauty. “I am greatly
honoured”: said she: “and right willingly will I give
my hand to England!” “Then thou shalt be my
queen at once, sweet Berengaria” the king replied
“France will be vexed: but he will not dare gainsay
our pleasure in this matter... And the whole company
gave a lusty cheer.

Richard was to sail for Palestine on the morrow:
and he was eager to have his marriage celebrated in
Sicily before his departure. Tancred called upon the
lord bishop of Bayonne, who was present at the
assembly, to know whether he was ready to marry
the king and princess then and there. “Nay” said the
bishop “it is now the holy fast of Lent. Wait but
till Easter: and I will be proud to do as ye desire.
I will sail with the fleet: and the wedding shall he
solemnised in the Holy Land.” To this Richard re-
luctantly consented: but Tancred insisted on entertain-
ing them that night at a splendid banquet, in honour
of the betrothal.

The feast lasted late that night: and on the morrow

19
290 Lady Berengare. [Cu.

Richard prepared to take ship for Palestine. He gave
Tancred, as a parting gift, a magnificent sword, sazd to
be the famous “Excalibur” itself, which had belonged
to good king Arthur. But Eileen was to see the real
“Excalibur” at a station further along the line: and she
would then come to know that no mortal hand ever
held that treasure again after the passing of Arthur.
However this sword was so goodly a weapon, and its
jewelled hilt was of such cunning workmanship, that
Eileen thought it small wonder that the story was
believed. “Take it” said the king “in remembrance of
our pilgrimage together to the shrine of Saint Agatha:
and in remembrance of the betrothal of England to
Berengaria of Navarre!” One other thing Richard did,
before he went, in honour of this great occasion: he
instituted the “Order of the Knights of the Blue Thong.”
This was an order of twenty-four knights, who pledged
themselves, in a holy brotherhood with the king himself, to
scale the walls of Acre, the first stronghold of the infidels
in the Holy Land: and, that they might be known in
the storming of that city, he bade them each to wear a
band of blue leather on the left leg. The enthusiasm
for the king and his beautiful bride-elect was intense :
and the cheers of the Sicilians were loud and long, as
the king and his troops departed.

The flower of the English nobility accompanied them.
In one vessel went Roger Mancel, the Lord High
Chancellor of England, with the Great Seal: and in
Dora Lady Berengare. 291

another the bishop of Bayonne and Knights of the
Temple. Richard himself. embarked in his favourite
galley, named by him Tvenc-the-mere: but custom
did not permit the as yet unwedded maiden Berengaria
to embark on the same vessel as himself. So she sailed,
in company with queen Joanna, in one of the strongest
ships, under the care of a brave knight named Sir
Stephen de Turnham. After this had been arranged,
Richard led the van of the fleet in TZvenc-the-mere,
which bore a huge lantern at her poop, to rally the fleet
together in the darkness of the night. Thus—with a
hundred and fifty ships and fifty galleys, and accom-
panied by his betrothed bride and his sister—Richard
of England hoisted sail for Palestine: hoping, with the
aid of the French king, to storm the city of Acre and
win the Holy Land.

Eileen and Titania went, unseen of all, on board the
vessel in which Berengaria was sailing.

For some time all went well: but one dark night a
horrible storm arose. The Lord Chancellor's ship went

down: he himself was drowned: and the Great Seal

- lost in the waters. The ladies were much alarmed at

this terrible event: and fear grew into agony, when
the lantern of Tvenc-the-mere was lost to sight, and
their vessel was left alone in her distress. Queen
_ Joanna wrung her hands, and said :—* What will become
of us?” But Berengaria only thought of Richard’s safety.

While the ship was still labouring heavily, Sir
292 Lady Berengare. (CH.

Stephen de Turnham, who commanded her, gave a cry
of joy :—“I see the harbour-light of Limoussa” he said
“the port of the island of Cyprus. We can put into
that haven: and wait till this storm be over-passed.”
So, at last and with great difficulty, the vessel was
brought into the harbour: and seemed to be in safety
once again. But soon two boats appeared with
messengers in them from Isaac, the Greek king of
Cyprus, who wished to know, they said, whether the
queen would land. Joanna declined the offer, saying
all that she wanted was to learn whether the king of
England had passed? The men in the boat answered
that they did not know. At this moment Isaac himself
appeared with a great force: and seemed to threaten
hostilities. Sir Stephen was not in a position to offer
fight, having only one ship’s company at his command,
and being discomfited withal at the fury of the storm.
So he was compelled to get the galley in order for
rowing out of the harbour: and she was soon tossing
to and fro in the open sea again. In the meantime,
Isaac, who saw Berengaria on board, demanded to know
“what damsel that was with them.’ They answered
that she was the princess of Navarre, whom the king
of England’s mother had brought for him to espouse.
Isaac appeared full of wrath at this reply: and Sir
Stephen, fearing violence, hastened still more the
departure of his ship. “ Dire will be the vengeance of

my king!” he shouted, as he went.
XX] Lady Berengare. 208

After a night of the intensest misery, the wind abated
with the dawn of day. All on board looked eargerly
for Richard and his TZvenc-the-mere. - They were
certain that he would return for them, when he found
that they were missing. Meanwhile the Cypriots, under
Isaac, were pillaging the wreck of the Lord Chancellor’s
ship, which had been cast upon the shore. All at once
the galley of the king of England made its appearance
in front of them, followed by his whole fleet. Joanna
and Berengaria looked on anxiously from their galley,
to know what would happen next: and, though without
the harbour, they were at so short a distance from the
shore that they could plainly see and hear all that was
being done. Richard, when he reached the offending
islanders, demanded angrily why they were plundering
an English ship. To this Isaac returned an impertinent
reply, saying that whatever goods the sea threw upon
his island he should take, without asking leave of any-
one. “Then, by Heaven” answered Richard “ye shall
buy your prizes dearly!” With this saying, he himself,
battle-axe in hand, led his crusaders so boldly to the
rescue, that the Cypriot king and his men fled to their
citadel with all possible speed.

Great was the delight on board Sir Stephen’s ship :
which was increased yet further, when the king made
signals from the shore that it was now safe for them
to enter the harbour. They did so at once: and

Berengaria, half dead with fright and weariness, was
294 Lady Berengare. [Cu

welcomed on shore by the conquering king: when, in
the joy and love which followed, they forgot all the
perils of the night. But, when Berengaria related the
insults to which she had been exposed, Richard was
more wroth than ever with the king of Cyprus. “He
shall be king no more”: said he: “he shall yield his
kingdom to a worthier: and thou, sweet lady, shalt be
queen of Cyprus.”

Isaac had meanwhile retreated to a stronghold in a
neighbouring mountain: but the king of England was
determined to follow him and humble his pride.
“Come, men of London!” he said to his brave soldiers :
“come and help your king to an easy victory!” The
Cypriots could not abide his onslaught : and their citadel
was soon taken. Isaac himself was bound a prisoner.

Then Richard turned him to the lord bishop’ of
Bayonne. “Lent is now over”: he said: “what further
reason is there why we should not be married here in
Cyprus even to-day? yes, even to-day—or at least
so soon as due preparation can be made—the princess
Berengaria shall be my queen: and she shall be crowned
with a double crown,—the crown of England and the
crown of this fair isle besides. Say, my lord, wilt thou
marry us?” “Right willingly will I” replied the bishop.
Then the island became gay with preparation for the
wedding and the coronation of the queen. All appeared
on the appointed day in their most magnificent robes:
and Richard rode with his bride to the chapel, where
NR) eensemeussgsc



[70 face p. 295.

MAROCHETTI jécit.]

RICHARD CCZUR-DE-LION,
XX.] Lady Berengare. 295

the ceremony .was to be performed: their horses were
richly caparisoned: the Spanish steed of Richard was
saddled and bitted with gold: and the saddle was inlaid
with precious stones: two little golden lions were fixed
on it in the place of a crupper: and they were figured
with their paws raised in act to strike each other.

Richard himself wore a scarlet bonnet upon his head,
brocaded in gold, with figures of animals embossed
thereon: a satin tunic of rose colour was belted round
his waist: his mantle was of striped silver tissue, bro-
caded with silver half-moons: his sword, which was of
fine Damascus steel, had a hilt of gold and a scabbard
with silver scales: and in his hand he bore a golden
sceptre.

And the appearance of Berengaria was not less

splendid: her hair was parted, according to the wont
of brides, upon the brow: a muslin veil, open at each
side, hung behind and covered her rich tresses at their
length: and the veil was fastened by a royal diadem of
peculiar splendour, studded with several bands of gems
and surmounted by fleurs-de-lis, to which so much foliage
was added as to give it the appearance of a double crown,
as was meet for the coronation of one who was to be the
queen of England and of Cyprus too.
- So there in the joyous month of May, in the fair isle
of Cyprus, supposed in ancient times to be the very
abode of the goddess of Love, did king Richard solemnly
take to wife his beloved Lady Berengare.
296 Lady Berengare. [CH

The prisoner Isaac had asked the king not to bind
him with chains of iron. Richard said he should be
bound with chains of silver richly gilt: and that he
would present him to his queen, who might do with
him as she pleased. So it came to pass that he, who
had insulted Berengaria in her hour of need and laughed
at her distress, was now her bond-slave and held even
his very life only on her sufferance. A word from
Berengaria, and Isaac would have assuredly been hanged
upon the nearest tree. But the gentle Berengaria had
no such thoughts: hers was a generous nature: it
grieved her to see a strong man bound with chains,
when he might be fighting in the holy cause of the
Crusade. “Thou are a free man”: she said: “and
my favour shall find a place for thee among the Knights
of the Temple. Though thou hast been found unworthy
to wield the power of a king, thou shalt have thine arms
unfettered and be free to use thy strength. But see
that in future thou usest it better, than in offering
violence to weak women, protected only by a guard of
men a hundredth fraction of thine own. See that, in
thy brave deeds that are to be, this shameful reproach
against thee may be forgotten.” Making a low reverence,
Isaac withdrew: and soon afterwards he joined the
ranks of the Templar Knights.

The assembly was about to break up, when a young
Greek girl,—dark and handsome, and richly dressed,—
with her tender hands bound in chains, came and threw
Mogi =< Lady Berengare. 297 |

herself ‘at the feet of Richard, and said:—‘‘ Lord king
have mercy upon me. I am the daughter of king Isaac:
and had fancied myself the heiress of his crown. But
thy soldiers have destroyed our citadel: and made the
king my father a prisoner. Me too they have bound in
chains. Let them not use me despitefully: but give me
for a handmaiden to thy lovely queen. I will serve her
faithfully: and thank thee for thy courtesy.”

Richard listened to the maiden’s prayer: and gave her
—as he had given her father—to his queen, that she might
work her will with her. Berengaria received her as her
handmaiden: and the girl served her faithfully.

All was now ready for the departure of the fleet to
Palestine, where they were to join the French in waging
the war of the Crusade. Queen Berengaria and Joanna
were now closer friends than ever: they were consigned
once more to the protection of Sir Stephen de Turnham :
while the king again went on board of J venc-the-mere.
So they sailed away in beautiful summer weather, over
calm seas, to Palestine.

Berengaria’s vessel arrived at the port of Acre before
that of the king: and Philippe Auguste was there to
welcome them. He was of course sorely vexed at the
.affront which had been put upon his own sister: but he
was not prepared to quarrel with the English monarch,
and face the terrible wrath that might have been expected
from him, had. his bride been slighted by a foreign king.

He therefore received the fair Berengaria with great
298 Lady Berengare. [Cu.

courtesy. He was the first to approach her vessel when
it reached the shore: and with his own hands he helped
her to alight upon the beach, to the great delight of
Joanna and all the ship’s company.

Preparations were then made to receive the king of
England, who arrived not long afterwards with his 7venc-
the-mere. It was the long bright day of St. Barnabas
when Richard landed: and the whole allied army marched
to the beach to meet their champion. The earth shook
with the footsteps of the Christians, and the sound of their
shouts. “Come then, ye Knights of the Blue Thong!”
shouted the king of England—“come to the storm of
Acre.” Right valiantly the Christians fought that day:
and the king with his gallant knights was always in the
van. Acre was taken from the infidels: and the palace-
chambers of the Saracen nobility were made ready for
the enjoyment of Joanna, queen of Sicily, and Berengaria
of England.

*& * co % *

“We will go back to the train now” said the Fairy
Queen. “What do you think of what you have seen?
Did you like it?”

“J did” said Eileen. “Thank you for showing me such
interesting things. Of all the women I have seen in the
journey through the Fields of History I envy Berengaria
most of all. To be the queen of Richard of England
must be perfect happiness.”

“Ah!” said Titania “remember you not that a great
RX] Lady Berengare. 299

man once said :—‘ Call no man happy till he is dead’? It
is only then that the joys and sorrows of a lifetime can
be measured. Berengaria was happy, when we left her:
but evil days were at hand for her. The Crusade did not
prosper afterwards, though it began well. A little later
her king was taken captive by an Austrian duke: and,
as she wandered with Joanna through the streets of Rome,
she saw his favourite belt of jewels exposed for sale, and
knew from this that her lord was somewhere a prisoner.
Long years she lamented in vain for his loss: and, when
at last he was rescued, and she was for a short season
happy in his lové again, he was killed all too soon, and
Lady Berengare was weeping a widow at his bedside.
She was proud indeed to have been the queen of Richard :
but at times she could almost envy the women of the
court, who were still happy in the affections of their
less noble lords.”

And the Fairy Queen and Eileen went back to the
station after their usual fashion.
CHAPTER XXI.

THE GLORIES OF BRIAN THE BRAVE.

“ Remember the glories of Brian the Brave,
though the days of the hero are o’er:
though, lost to Mononia and cold in the grave,
he returns to Kinkora no more.
That star of the field, which so often has poured
its beam on the battle, is set:
but enough of its glory remains on each sword,
to light us to victory yet.”
—Tuomas Moore.
ERY early in the morning of Good Friday, in THE
YEAR OF OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND AND FOUR-
TEEN (for that was where the Magic Train next
stopped), the fairy-car sped over St. George’s Channel once
again to fair Dublin Bay: and landed on the northern
side of it. There Eileen was surprised to see a beautiful
maiden, adorned with gold and with gems which were
very rich and rare, wandering all alone and unprotected in
the wild wastes of that bleak shore, in the dusk of the
dawning day. In her hand she bore a white wand, with
a costly ring on its top. Such treasures would be a sore
temptation to the passers-by: and Eileen would have
imagined, that, in any country and in any age, it was

300
Cu. XXL] Brian the Brave. 301

a dangerous thing for one so lone and lovely to stray
about unguarded, and expose herself and her riches to
the rude violence of lawless men. But so fearless was
her mien, that Eileen longed to question her: and
accordingly she asked Titania whether she might show
herself openly before the eyes of the maiden, freed for
a moment from the invisible cloud which usually en-
wrapped her in her travellings. The Fairy Queen con-
~ sented: and at once it was as Eileen had desired. Then
she approached the object of her curiosity: and asked
her whether she had no fear as to the probable con-
sequences of thus wandering unguarded and alone. “I
have no fear”: was the reply, when the maiden had
recovered herself from the astonishment which this sudden
apparition caused her: “I have come thus all the way
from Mononia in the west. I have walked in the light
of day and in the darkness of night: and have made my
journey, without fear, from the mouth of the Shannon
on the further coast of Ireland to the mouth of the Liffey
here. No-one of all the sons of Erin has been rude to
me: or offered me any violence. I put on all my richest
jewels, ere I started on my travels: and I still have them
safe without exception.” Eileen thanked her for her
answer: and turned away. But she was more astonished
than ever: and told Titania of her perplexity. She had
always heard, she said, that Ireland in. early times was
infested by pitiless brigands, who plundered right and
left without respect of persons. “Ah! they did”:
302 The Glories of [Cx

replied the Fairy Queen: “but not in the reign of Brian
Boroimhe. His work has done great good for Ireland:
he has spread the Christian religion far and wide, and
established law and order everywhere. Yon maiden knew
well enough: that, thanks to his virtuous influence, she
was safe in her reliance upon the honour and pride of
Erin. But this happy state of things in Ireland is not
assured. There is grave danger at this moment. For
the cruel and wicked Danes have mustered a great army :
and threaten to overthrow the Irish king. If they were
to be successful, it would go hard with Ireland! Yonder
is the field of Clontarf, where Brian’s camp is pitched.
Let us go forward and see what is happening there.”
In a moment they were there: and Eileen’s heart
swelled within her, when she beheld the Irish army. For
the men were tall and soldierly: and worthy of their
great leader. The enemy were close at hand: and it
was time for battle. The white-haired Brian himself, at
this time eighty-seven years of age, commanded them
in person: supported by his son Murrough,—and also by
his grandson Turlough, who was then a boy of fifteen.
These three passed along the lines: and Brian encouraged
his army with his brave words. He reminded them of
the cruelty of the Danes, who, when they triumphed,
spared not women nor little children nor them that stooped
for age, in their ruthless massacres: who laid waste all
Ireland with fire and sword: who pillaged the churches
and sought to restore the days of the heathen gods.






After J. F, O'HEA,] [To face p. 302
BRIAN BOROIMHE,

From a photograph by Lafayette.
XX1] Brian the Brave. 303

“ Brave-hearted Irishmen!” he said: “ye who have
helped me to win more than a score of battles against
these bloody pirates, follow me once more to victory—to
extirpate for ever the tyranny of the Danes over our
country and to punish them for their innumerable crimes
by the avenging power of the sword!” On saying these
words he exhibited in his left hand a bloody crucifix,
while in his right he waved triumphantly his sword: and
exclaiming—“ To-day is Good Friday. Was it not to-day
that Christ Himself suffered for you? Be ye ready to
suffer to-day, if need be, for Christianity !”—he led them
forth to battle.

Eileen watched the great king with his sons and
chosen chiefs, as they charged forward to the battle,
at the head of their troops: but she herself withdrew
to some high ground near a big wood—at some little
distance from the battle-field, where Brian’s tent was
pitched: her gentle heart made her shrink from stand-
ing too near the bloodshed of the battle, although she
knew that, with Titania, she herself in any case was
safe.

Yet she could see the battle as it raged afar: and
could hear the fierce war-cries, with which either side
encouraged their men.

Brian had led his troops in person to the battle, that
the leadership of so great a conqueror might the more
inspirit them. But, at his great age, he could not long
endure the fatigues of battle: and therefore, before
304 ‘The? Glories of [Cu

things had gone very far, he was compelled for very
weariness to return to his tent. Eileen watched him
as he came slowly back, attended by his body-guard.
When he reached his tent, he lay still a little while, to
recover his strength: then he raised himself: and looked
toward the battle. Long the armies fought: and
messengers arrived at the royal tent from time to time,
bearing news of the battle and asking for further
orders from the veteran general.

Both armies fought very hard and stubbornly: and
at one time it seemed as though it were going hardly
for the Irish: Murrough and Turlough were both slain,
fighting bravely against the Norsemen. When the old
king heard this, he turned pale: he was deeply dis-
tressed at the loss of his son and grandson happening
thus in one day:—but he did not give way to grief.
“They have fallen in a just quarrel”: said he: “fighting
for Ireland and for Christendom. The world will
honour their brave names.”

Brian would have given his kingdom for half an hour
of his ancient strength, that would have enabled him to
fight once. more himself—even if it were for the last
time. But this was impossible:—he could not fight,
but he could watch the progress of the battle from
afar, and pray for his brave troops. Eileen thought of
Moses: and of how he watched and prayed from the
top of a hill, when Israel fought with Amalek. And

the two occasions were not unlike: now as then the

1
XXL] Brian the Brave. 305

two armies fought until the going down of the sun.
But at the last the army of the Irish prevailed.

Never was the Irish sunset more glorious than upon
that Good Friday evening: and its rays seemed to
throw a bright halo around the head of the aged king,
as he kneeled on the ground and prayed. The Danes
were now entirely routed: and they were running in
the direction of Brian’s tent. Utterly discomfited,
they fled hither and thither, with no thought but of
how they might escape from the victorious Irish.

Most of the king’s body-guard joined in the pursuit.
Brian had told them, that if they could harm the enemy
they need not trouble for his safety. “See that ye rid
the country of the heathen pirates. Let that be your
_ first care,’ he had said. “Ye are not my soldiers, but
those of Christendom.” But, while the event of the
battle had seemed uncertain, they had remained at the
king’s side. Now the battle was won: and they thought
no longer of his danger. So they left him :—all but a
very few of his trusty men—and one young boy, who
loved the king devotedly and was determined to remain
at his side.

And now, in the midst of the confusion of pursuing
and pursued, the Danish admiral Bruadair, with a
large body of his followers, fled for refuge to the small
wood that lay near Brian’s tent. This Bruadair was
the wickedest of all the Danes: and the most deter-
mined enemy of the Irish king. When therefore, soon

20
306 The Glories of [Cu

afterwards, upon looking from his hiding-place, he
suddenly perceived that the monarch was almost alone
and unprotected, and was kneeling with his hands upraised
and his mind intent on prayer, he resolved to take advan-
tage of the opportunity to destroy him. And so, giving
the word to his followers, he rushed with them into the
royal tent: and made an onslaught on the king. And,
although the few soldiers he had with him resisted the
ruffians with all their strength: and, although the boy,
who loved him so well, threw his body between Brian
and his murderers: they only gained a few minutes by
their heroism. The murderers were too many for them.
They died in their endeavours to save the king: and
then Bruadair put the old man to the sword (for he was
now too feeble to defend himself aright). He gloried
in the dastardly deed. .“ Let it be proclaimed from man
to man” he said as he held up his bloody weapon “ that
Brian Boroimhe has fallen by the hand of Bruadair.”
And his troops cheered him as though he had done a
noble thing.

The noise of this soon reached the ears of the absent
body-guard: who returned too late alas! to save the
king, but not too late to wreak a fearful vengeance
on his murderers,

Meanwhile the Danes had fled with great loss to their
ships: and those who were alive, were putting out to sea
with the utmost haste. That day a great battle had

been won indeed: and the invaders were driven from
XX1] Brian the Brave. 307

Irish shores once and for ever. This—the last of she
glories of Brian the Brave—was a triumphant victory for
Erin and for the Christian Church.

But, at Kinkora where Brian’s palace was, there was
great mourning for the death of the king: and for the
deaths of his son and grandson. Never did a whole
nation sorrow more deeply: and never with more just
a cause.

All the flower of the Irish assembled at the funeral :
and among the rest came the Dalgais. These were the
best of all Brian’s doughty warriors: but they had been
unable to reach the king in time to give him their
services at the battle of Clontarf. Eileen had often read
in her story-books of this brave regiment: and loved
their memory more than that ofall the rest. They came
from Mononia—from Eileen’s own home in County Clare:
and they were now to return thither, when the funeral
was over. Donchad, a brave chieftain of the house of
Brian Boroimhe, was at their head. When they arrived,
their brother-soldiers who had won the victory of Clontarf
welcomed them with great heartiness: and they mingled
their tears together for King Brian’s death. “Take com-
fort, brothers” said the noble Donchad. “ The glorious
Brian is dead: but enough of his glory remains with
Irishmen, to light us to victory yet.” When the last
solemn rites had been performed, Donchad and the Dalgais
set out on their march to Mononia.

Their troubles were not over: for, though the Danes
308 The Glories of [Cu

were gone, they met on their way home with a new enemy,
—this time no foreign invader, but an ambitious Irishman,
Mac-Gilla-Patrick by name, the Prince of Ossory, who
wished to take the kingdom away from the house of
Brian and to hold it for himself: He prepared to pre-
vent the Dalgais from passing through his territories,
unless they consented to acknowledge their submission
to his authority. “Ye must either yield” said the prince
“or give battle to my troops.” “Let it then be battle!”
Donchad replied. “Was it yet heard, within the memory
of man, that a chieftain of the race of Brian had yielded
to a Mac-Gilla-Patrick ?”

Having thus declared his purpose, the heroic chieftain
then made him ready for battle: first taking care to
appoint some of the bravest men of his troop to guard
the sick and wounded. But the sick and wounded men
entreated that they might be allowed to fight with the
rest. “Let stakes” they said “be stuck in the ground:
and suffer each of us to. be tied to one of these stakes
and to be placed in his rank by the side of a sound
man.’ This extraordinary suggestion was put into
practice: and eight hundred wounded men, pale, ema-
ciated, and supported in this manner, appeared on the
battle-field mixed with the foremost of the troop.
The battle was fought: the brave men never flinched:
but most of them were too far spent for fighting:
and Eileen-saw them fall from their wounds and weak-

ness upon the plains of Ossory. Yet the battle was
XXL] Brian the Brave. 309.

won: and their comrades returned home safe to Clare,
where they were welcomed with great joy, as you may
imagine, by their wives and little children. Truly,
though his body was slain at Clontarf, the spirit of
Brian Boroimhe remained among the Irish.

* * * * *

“And, please Heaven, it shall remain among them
still!” exclaimed Titania, as they reascended the car
and returned to the station. And Eileen had her mind
so full of the glories of Brian the Brave, that she paid
no heed to anything which they passed upon their
journey: and was only startled out of her dreamings
by the voice of the fairy-porters, calling out the name
of the station at their next stopping-place.

°
CHAPTER XXII.

A POWER OF LIFE AND DEATH.

“Lord of the Land, who wields—and none demurs—
a power of life and death.”

—Rosert BRownine.

T was THE YEAR OF OUR LORD EIGHT HUNDRED
| AND THREE—two whole centuries earlier than

the days of Brian: and Eileen went from the
station to the city of Bagdad, which was then the
principal city of the Arabian Empire. When they
were arrived there, the Fairy Queen led the way to a
small house on the outskirts of the place: and they
went within, and stood invisible inside the parlour. A
charming little damsel was preparing a late supper for
two men of rather unpleasing aspect, who seemed to
be (and were in fact) her brothers. There was a knock
heard at the door: and three travellers, entering, asked
the owners of the house to give them food and drink,
as they were but just arrived in Bagdad, after a long
and wearying journey. “You may have it, if you pay
for it” said one of the brothers in a surly tone. This

was an unusual condition in Arabia, where every man

310
Cu. XxIL] A Power of Life and Death. 311

was always hospitable in his own house and ready to
supply the wants of strangers. But it chanced that
the young men were in a bad temper on this particular
evening: and not disposed to be very friendly to their
guests. The travellers however pretended not to notice
that anything was wrong: and said they were ready
to pay for what they had. The little damsel made
further preparations for the new partakers of the meal:
and soon all was ready. Presently the first brother
opened his mouth and said :—“ The Khaliph who rules
this country is a tyrant. I wish I had him in my
power. I would have him beheaded at once.” Both
the young men had a grievance against the Khaliph.
For they were two of the men in the Khaliph’s bakery:
and the Khaliph had ordered all the young men in
the bakery to be whipped, because his bread was badly
baked that day. Of course the Khaliph’s commands
had been obeyed: and the whipping had been a severe
one. But the second brother answered :—“That is too
hard a saying, brother. The Khaliph is a generous and
kind-hearted prince, He is indeed a hasty and hot-
tempered man: and we have to-day been very badly
treated by his commands. I would like some revenge:
and if I had him in my power, he should have forty
stripes on the soles of his bare feet. That he deserves :
but I would not altogether kill him: for there are many
rulers worse than he.” “And what would you do?”
said one of the travellers, turning to the little damsel,
312 A Power of [Cu.

“if you had the Khaliph in your power?” “I love the
good Khaliph well” said she. “He is always kind to
children: and he has often thrown me silver pieces,
as he passed along the street. And if I had him in
my power—well, I think I- would kiss him, and tell him
never to be naughty again.”

Now it came to pass that, not long after this,
the young men, who were still smarting from their
whipping, and who did not like their sister’s saying,
became very rude, not only to her, but also to the three
travellers: wherefore they—in high dudgeon—withdrew,
having paid the price of the refreshment which they
had had. Then Titania whispered to Eileen :-—-“ Have
you guessed who the three travellers really are? The
first was the Khaliph himself, the famous Haroun
Alraschid, who loves to wander about at night and in |
disguise. The second was Giafar, his vizier. The last
was Mesrar, his chief executioner.”

Eileen was astonished and delighted beyond all
measure. She had often read of the doings of these
three great persons in that child-worshipped volume
the “Arabian Nights”: but she had never under-
stood and realised that they were real men with
an actual place in history, who in very truth had
walked the earth a thousand years before she _her-
self was born. Yet it is certain, beyond all dispute,
that these three persons really lived: and the night-
rambles of Haroun Alraschid in the Bagdad streets are
XXIL] Life and Death. 313

as true as any of our own experiences in this present
century.

The next morning Eileen went to the council at
the Khaliph’s palace: and saw the great monarch there
in all his glory. After the business of the day had
been finished, he bade the rest of his council withdraw,
save only Giafar the vizier and Mesrtr the chief exe-
cutioner. Then, turning to the vizier, “Giafar” said
he “seek out the house where we supped last night:
and bring before us the two surly brothers and the
little damsel, their sister.” Before long they made their
appearance: and tremblingly approached the royal
throne. “What was it that the elder of these brothers
said about me last night?” the Khaliph asked of.
Giafar. “Commander of the Faithful!” replied the
vizier: “he said that if he had your Majesty in his
power, he would have your Majesty beheaded.” The
Khaliph then turned to the chief executioner, and
said :—“ Lead him away and behead zm.” The exe-
cutioner then left with his victim: and after a few
minutes -he returned alone. Haroun Alraschid then
turned to the other brother, and asked :—“ What was it
this fellow said?” “Sire” replied the vizier “the rascal
declared that if he had your Majesty in his power, he
would order your Majesty forty stripes on the bare feet.”
“Let him then have forty stripes on his own bare
feet” the Khaliph answered. The executioner again

retired with his second victim: and after an absence
314 A Power of [Cu.

of a quarter of an hour, during which loud yells were
heard, they both returned. Then looking toward the
little damsel, Haroun asked :—‘ What was it that she
said?” “She said” answered the vizier, laughing, “ that
if she had your Majesty in her power, she would kiss
your Majesty and tell your Majesty never to be naughty
again!” “I will undertake er punishment my-
self!” said the monarch, with a twinkle in his merry
eye.

The Fairy Queen and Eileen tarried in Bagdad for
many days: watching the doings of the famous Khaliph
and his courtiers. Pleasant he was beyond all doubt:
and generous withal and kindly-hearted. Many a poor
man was made rich by his liberality: and many a
sufferer in distress relieved. He meant to be just
toward all men: and generally he rewarded those who
did well, as thoroughly as he punished evil-doers. But
he did not seem quite to realise what a serious matter
it is to put men and women to death: and often he
repented of his cruel commands when it was just too late.
If any man displeased him even in a trifle, he immediately
sent for his executioner: and in a few minutes a deed
would be done, which could never be recalled. There
was oftentimes something most fearfully grim and horrid
about his jests. One day he caused a baker to be
baked alive in his own oven, because his bread was not
pure: and another day a pie-man, who had made bad

pies, was ordered to be nailed by the ears to his own
XXIL] Life and Death. 315

shop-door, while his pies were thrown without the city
gates. “JI admit” said the Khaliph afterwards (when
his vizier reproved him for what he had done) “that I
was a little too hasty”! Such things are all very well
to read about—as past events in history more than a
thousand years ago: but you must remember that Eileen
actually saw the horrid sights with her own eyes. She
could not understand the Khaliph at all. Sometimes
she loved him for his goodness—indeed on the whole
he was an excellent man, despite his faults: zealous in
his religion and charitable towards his fellow-men :—an
amiable prince, beloved by thousands of his subjects.
But there were also times when Eileen veritably hated
him as an inhuman monster. And to this day, whenever
Eileen reads the pages of the “Arabian Nights,’ she
shudders when the name of Mesrir the executioner meets
her eye in quite a different way from that in which other
children shudder, who have never seen an executioner
nor heard the cry of prisoners in the agony of death.
For them it is “only a story”: but for the people of
Bagdad, whom Eileen saw in those ages long ago, it was
only too real and true. “How comes it” Eileen asked
the Fairy Queen “that the Khaliph ever does such
horrid deeds?” Titania answered :—“ Haroun Alraschid
as a private man would have been all that is generous and
humane. But the lord of the land in Eastern cities and
in these ancient times wields a power of life and death—

and none demurs—over every one of his subjects. Such
316 A Power of [Cu

is a serious trust: and requires a serious mind. Hastiness,
hot temper, thoughtlessness are bad enough wherever they
be found: but when it is a Khaliph who has. these faults,
they become the most terrible scourges on earth. The
worst is yet to come. Watch what the Khaliph will do
to his own familiar friend.” Eileen knew to whom the
Queen alluded: she meant the vizier Giafar. And what
of him? He was the most loveable man in all Bagdad.
He was ever urging the Khaliph to be merciful: and
trying to restrain him from doing those cruel things,
which had so much shocked Eileen’s gentle heart. Giafar
had frequently so much offended the Khaliph by speak-
ing to him on this wise, when he was angry, that he
had nearly lost his life in trying to save his master from
his own evil temper. In the end however the Khaliph
always confessed that the vizier was right. He loved
him well: and always took him by his side, when he
wandered disguised at night-time through his capital.
It is true that Mesrdr the executioner was always there
as well: but the vizier contrived somehow that he
should be given. as little work as possible. “Watch
what the Khaliph will do” the Queen had said “to his

own familiar friend!”

And Eileen remembered this,
with a foreboding of evil in her heart, as she listened
to a conversation, which not long afterwards took place
between the Khaliph Haroun Alraschid and Zobeideh,
his favourite wife.

The Khaliph was telling the lady that he had given


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XXIL] Life and Death. 317

Giafar an important command in the army: but that he
had heard rumours to the effect that this same Giafar
was a traitor and intended to use the command against
the Khaliph himself. “Advise me” said he “O dear
Zobeideh, what I ought to do.” Now it happened that
Zobeideh hated the good Giafar: and was only waiting
for an opportunity of doing him an injury. Her eyes
sparkled with malice: she was a beautiful woman, this
dark-skinned favourite: there could be found none more
enchanting throughout all Araby: but there was some-
thing about her mien which Eileen did not exactly like,
and which reminded her of the feeling which a lovely
snake excites. And Zobeideh made answer and said :—
“Commander of the Faithful, you have been until now
so insanely fond of Giafar that all men feared to say a
word against him, lest they might lose their heads. If
you are no longer possessed by this mad affection for an
unworthy man, I will tell you something much harder
for you to bear than even the rumours which you have
heard. But if you are as infatuated with him as ever, I
will let you alone.” “What do you mean?” asked the
Khaliph. Zobeideh stamped upon the floor: and imme-
diately a slave appeared. “Argu” said she, addressing
the slave :—“tell the Commander of the Faithful what
you told me about the vizier Giafar.” The slave trembled
from head to foot. “I dare not tell the tale”: said he:
“for I should surely die, if I were to let this secret pass
my lips.” “You will surely die, if you do zo¢ tell the
318 A Power of | [Cu

secret forthwith!” the Khaliph said:—‘I am impatient
to hear what this mystery may be.” But the slave still
feared to speak. The Khaliph sent for Mesrdr the
executioner, as he usually did when his patience was
tried. The slave then asked the Khaliph whether he
would spare his life, if he told the tale. “Yes”: said
the Khaliph: “speak at once: and I promise that all
shall be well with you. But if you do not speak, you
die this very hour.”

Then the slave said:—*“ Sire, the vizier Giafar is
married to your Majesty’s sister the princess Abbasah.”
The Khaliph at this news was absolutely furious: he
turned red and white by turns: and in his anger was
terrible to behold. ' A wounded lion could not have
looked more savage than Haroun Alraschid did at this
moment. “Why is he so angry?” asked Eileen of
Titania. “Child” said the Fairy Queen “it were diffi-
cult entirely to explain the cause. But this much you
may understand. The Khaliph and his family are all
pure Arabs by birth. They are descended from the
Prophet Mohammed, whom hereafter you may see, when
we: have gone further back on the railroad of Time.
None of this family ever married a foreigner, The
Arabs think all foreigners inferior to themselves: and
that it is a deep disgrace to marry a foreigner. Haroun
Alraschid once said in fun that Giafar ought to marry
his sister, because he was so fond of both of them.
But he never meant it. This Giafar knew well: and
XXII] Life and Death. 319

he would never of his own will have dreamed of marry-
ing Abbasah. But Abbasah had fallen in love with
Giafar: and was determined that he should really marry
her. So she went to the mother of Giafar and told her
what she wanted. To cut a long story short, Giafar was
deceived by a trick, which was put upon him by his
mother and by Abbasah herself: and was persuaded to
marry her, being told that his bride was a little slave-
girl, and without ever discovering until too late who
she really was. Giafar is not to blame: he was de-
ceived. But yet the Khaliph will never forgive him :
since he fancies that his family is disgraced for ever,
by his sister having been married to a foreigner. For

Giafar is not an Arab, but a Persian by birth!”

Mesrtir, the chief executioner, now arrived. “ Kill
that slave!” exclaimed the Khaliph, forgetting his
promise: “for he knows a secret, that I wish no man

but myself to know.” Mesrir with one blow of his
scimitar beheaded the poor slave: and then he and his
royal master left Zobeideh’s chamber together. When
he was gone out from Zobeideh’s presence, the Khaliph
said to Mesrir, in a hard pitiless tone:—“Mesrtr, to-
night, when it is dark, bring me ten masons and two
servants.” Mesrir obeyed: and brought the unlucky
workmen at the appointed time, when it was dark.
Then Alraschid rose up and preceded them to the
private apartments of his sister, where he found her

sitting by herself. Without speaking one word to her,
320 A Power of (Cx.

he ordered the men whom he had brought with him
to kill her, shut her up in a large box and bury her,
just as she was, under the floor of her own room.
When she was dead, and the body placed in the chest,
he locked it, took the key and made the workmen dig
down under the floor till they came to water. Then he
said :—“ That will do. Let the box down, and put
the earth over it.” They did so, smoothed the soil
and left the floor as it was before: and the Khaliph sat
there all the while and looked at what they did. When
they had finished, he turned them all out: locked up
the door: and came away, taking the key with him.
Then he turned to Mesrfir and said :—“ Take these
people and give them their wages.” Mesrtir, knowing
what was meant, put them all into sacks: sewed them
up with heavy weights inside: and threw them into the
river. The Khaliph then gave him the key of the house.
‘He told him to keep it until he asked for it, and to go
and set up a Turkish tent in the middle of the palace:
this he did, and the Khaliph entered it before dawn, no
one knowing what his intentions were. It was on a
Thursday morning: and he sat there holding his
council. Now Thursday was the day when he next
expected Giafar. Presently he said :—“Mesrfir, do not
go far away from me.” Then the people came in and
saluted him: and sat in their respective places. And
Giafar came too: and Haroun received him with the

greatest cordiality,—and welcomed him,—and_ smiled
XXIL] Life and Death. 321

upon him,—and laughed and joked with him—
and he sat next the Khaliphand he and _ the
Khaliph did much business one with the other. Then
the vizier went home: people of all ranks making
much of him as he went. At last he reached his
palace, surrounded by troops: transacted his business :
and sent the crowds away. But he had hardly retired
to his apartments when Alraschid sent Mesrfr, saying :—
“Go to him at once, and bring him here, and say to
him, ‘A letter has just come from Khorassan’ When
he comes through the first door, post the soldiers there :
and at the second, post the slaves. Do not let any of
his people come in with him: but bring him in alone:
and turn him aside to the Turkish tent I bade you
set up yesterday. And when he is inside it, behead
him: and bring his head to me: and do not acquaint
anyone with what I have ordered :—and do not trouble
me again about the matter. If you disobey my
commands, I will have your head cut off and brought
to me with his. Enough! Begone! MHasten, before
he gets word of it from anyone else.” Mesrir went off
and asked for an interview with Giafar, who had just
taken off his things and laid himself down to rest. On
entering he said :—“ Sir, the Commander of the Faithful
has sent me to summon you—he was very instant, and I
dare not but obey him.” “But, Mesrir” said Giafar “I
have only just come from his presence. What is the
matter?” “Letters from Khorassan have just arrived:

2I
a2 A Power of [Cu

and you must read them” was the reply. At this
Giafar felt more comfortable: dressed himself: put on his
sword: and went with him. So he passed through the
first gate, where he saw the soldiers: and then he
passed through the second, where he saw the slaves.
Then he turned: and, finding none of his own attendants
and seeing that he was alone in the court, he blamed
himself for coming out as he did. But it was too late
to go back. Then Mesrfr led him to the tent: and
made him go inside it and sit down as usual. But
seeing no one there, he perceived that some mischief
‘was in store for him, and said:—*Mesrér, my brother,
what is the matter?” “I am your brother” answered
Mesrér, “and in your house: and you ask me what the
matter is? You know well enough :—your time has
‘come. The Commander of the Faithful has bidden me
‘cut off your head: and take it to him at once.” Giafar
wept a little: and then began to kiss Mesriir’s hands
and feet, and to say:—‘O my brother! O Mesrar!
you know how good I have been to you, more than to
any of the pages or members of the household, and
that I always did what you asked me day and night.
You know what position I hold and what influence I
have with the Commander of the Faithful, and how he
entrusts me with all his secrets. Perhaps someone may
have slandered me to him. I have here two hundred
thousand pieces of gold. I will give them to you
immediately, if you will only let me depart from hence.”
XXIL] Life and Death. 228

“YT cannot do it” said Mesrir. “Then” continued the
wretched victim “take me to the Khaliph—set me
before him. Perchance when his glance falls upon me,
he will have some pity and pardon me.” “I cannot
do it” was the reply. “I dare not go back to him. I
know there is no chance for your life—no, not the least.”
But Giafar persisted. “Oh! wait a little. Go back to
him and say,—‘I have done what you ordered’: then
listen to what he says: and come back and do as you
like. But if you do that and I am saved, I take the
angels of Heaven to witness that I will give you half
of what I possess, and make you commander-in-chief
in my army. I will give you everything.” And he
kept on weeping and imploring him—for he was very
eager still to live: so that at last Mesrir said, “ Well,
it may be managed.” So he took off the sword and
sword-belt: and set forty black slaves to guard the tent:
and went to the Khaliph. The latter was sitting down,
livid with rage: he held a cane in his hand: and was
digging it into the ground. When he saw Mesrir, he
spoke angrily to him, and said:—‘What hast thou

done in the matter of Giafar?” “I have done what
you ordered.” “Where is his head?’ “In the tent.”
“Fetch it me at once” So Mesrair went back: and

found Giafar on his knees praying. He did not give
him time to finish his prayer: but drew his sword and
cut off his head. And he took it by the beard: and
threw it before Haroun Alraschid. The Khaliph heaved
324 A Power of (Cx.

a deep sigh: and wept terribly: and dug his stick in
the earth after each word that he spoke: and gnashed
his teeth on the walking-stick: and addressed the head,
saying :—“O Giafar, did I not put you on an equality
with myself? Oh, how have you requited me? You
have neither observed my rights: nor kept your pact
with me. You have forgotten my bounty: you have
not looked to the results of actions. You have not
counted on the changes time will bring. O Giafar,
you have deceived me in my family: and disgraced
me before all men. O Giafar, you have done evil to
me and to yourself.”

After that, the Khaliph bade his servants slay those
that were of the kindred of the fallen vizier,—them,
and their children, and their wives. He wept at the
sight of Giafar’s two young sons: for they were very
beautiful. “Your beauty and innocence touch me” he
said. “May Heaven be good to you!” But he slew
them for all that. His stubborn pride was stronger
than his love.

Haroun Alraschid was never happy afterwards. He
had slain the one man in the world whom he really
loved : the man who had shared all his gay adventures
and striven to make them innocent: who had spent
his life in serving his master and his country. He had
slain his own familiar friend, with whom he had eaten
and drunken, made merry and wept, fasted and prayed.
He had ‘slain his own dearly-beloved sister and a
XXIL] Life and Death. a25

host of persons entirely innocent beside :—and all this
because he fancied that this marriage was a disgrace
to him. The Khaliph’s life was henceforward miserable :
for, although his worldly prosperity was as great as
ever, his pleasure in it was gone.

Eileen often recalled the words of the Fairy Queen :—
“ As a private man Haroun Alraschid would have been all
that is generous and humane.” ‘Think of this, ye who in
your nurseries have wished to be kings and queens.
Eileen had resolved never to wish for such a thing herself
from the day when she saw the miserable overthrow of
the royal family in France. She was now more certain
than ever that her resolve was right. The king who
died at the hands of his own rebel subjects in France
was happier far than this monarch, who had absolute
power and sovereignty, and whose word none had ever
ventured to dispute. A tyrant is himself the slave of
his own tyranny.

And now the Fairy Queen and Eileen looked their
last upon the city of Bagdad: and reascended the

fairy-chariot again.
CHAPTER XXIII.

REVENGE ON A TYRANT.

“Yes, monarch! though sweet are our home recollections,
though sweet are the tears that from tenderness fall,
though sweet are our friendships, our hopes, our affections—
revenge on a tyrant is sweetest of all!”
—-TuHomas Moore.

UT, although they had said “good-bye” for the
) present to the East, the Fairy Queen and Eileen
did not return straight to the railway-station ac-
cording to their ordinary wont. For, as they ascended
the car of the golden eaglets once more, Titania said :—
“There are many things about this time which I would
like you to see. Come let us cruise about the shores of
Europe for a while: and see what is in motion there.”
In a moment of time the chariot was transformed into
the loveliest little fairy-yacht: and our travellers were
soon gliding gently over the waters of the sea. It was
always calm, you may believe me, whithersoever Titania
went. Eileen thinks that they must really have been
many years thus wandering over the surface of the sea:

though, in Titania’s company, the time went fast enough.
326
Cu. XXL] Revenge on a Tyrant. 2007

(Besides it appeared that time could never be wasted
on this journey: for they could always go back by train
to whatever date they liked.) First they made a voyage
in the Mediterranean Sea. They landed upon the coast
of Italy: and went to Rome. There they saw a great
pope and a yet greater emperor, talking to one another
on subjects of deep import: and Eileen learned from
Titania that the pope was Leo the Third and the emperor
was Charlemagne!

But these things interested her less than what she saw
when the fairy-yacht sailed into the northern seas. Those
northern seas were alive with pirates: and it was a
spectacle after Eileen’s own heart to watch their wild
adventures. Now they were battling with the storm :
and now with human enemies. Now they were repelled
by angry citizens when they landed on the coast: and
suffered great loss and were many of them killed. At
another time they would sail away triumphant :—bearing
off prizes of great worth—vessels of gold and silver and
suchlike precious merchandise—or white-skinned delicately-
nurtured maidens to be their slaves.

Eileen knew who these pirates were. Of course they
were the Danes: for who else could they be? And she
went to England and saw the unhappy people there
battling with the invading pirates: Egbert their king
building navies and arming troops to oppose them: and
all the cities in the land fortifying their walls to with-
stand all possible attacks.!
328 Revenge on a Tyrant. [cx

“But what I want you most of all to see” the Fairy
Queen exclaimed “is the reception that these cruel
pirates are to meet with in your own dear Ireland.” So
the fairy-yacht spread sail for Ireland: and soon reached
its coast. Our travellers landed: and found the Danes,
there as everywhere, ravaging the land with fire and
sword.

Now in the course of their rambles in Ireland, the
Fairy Queen and Eileen came to the banqueting hall
of O’Melachlin, the good king of Meath: where he was
entertaining a Danish chieftain, named Turgés, with
lavish hospitality. This man, the king’s guest, was a
cruel tyrant: and a large part of Ireland was oppressed
by him. But the king of Meath was at present on
terms of peace with him: and made him welcome in his
halls. For it was king O’Melachlin’s boast that every
traveller, who passed by, should be received at the palace,
according to his rank and degree, with cordial liberality.
The beggar in zs place, the merchant in 47s, each found
a part in the royal bounty. But Turgés was a man of
such high rank, that the king deemed him worthy of a
place at his own table.

On the right hand of the king sat the princess his
daughter : admired throughout the country for her loveli-
ness. And Turges was pleased at the sight of her. For
“Jrish eyes” were already beautiful even in those days:
and this maiden in particular was without a peer among

all the fair women of that century. Turgés was insolent
xxi] Revenge on a Tyrant. 329

and shameless: and he said to the king his host :—
“Thy daughter is comely. Give her to me for my slave :
and I will promise that, when I conquer Ireland, thy
kingdom shall be safe.” At these words Eileen saw the
king’s face wax black with fury. But the armed soldiers
of Turgés were in the hall: and O’Melachlin knew that,
if he defied their leader to his face, they would easily
conquer his own smaller retinue and carry off his daughter,
whether he would or no.

- So, for that time, he pretended to consent to what
the Danish chieftain had demanded. “My daughter
shall be thy slave” he said: though he could hardly
bring his lips to utter the words. “I will send her to
thee anon. Where wilt thou meet her?” Turgés was
delighted to have gained the king’s assent so easily.
And he made answer:—“Send her to me to-morrow:
let her come to the island, which lies in the middle of
Lough Var:—that is a lake at no great distance from
thy palace. 1 will be there to receive her.” “She shall
attend thee”: answered O’Melachlin: “and fifteen other
Irish maidens shall go with her to be slaves for so many
of thy followers.” “It is well spoken” said the Dane.
“See that thou keep thy word!—and in the day when
I shall have conquered all Ireland, it shall go well with
thee. But play me false: and I will burn thy palace
to the ground!” Having thrown these insolent words
in the teeth of his kindly host, Turges retired with his
followers from the hall.
330 Revenge on a Tyrant. 7 [Cu.

When he was gone, the king of Meath spake to one
of his followers and said :—“ Choose me out fifteen youths,.
strong of heart and brave of purpose: but let them be
beardless men,—for they must go to the island on Lough
Var disguised as maidens. So shall they slay the
insolent Dane: and his fifteen followers withal.” “I will
see that it is done, sire” replied the captain: and all
then withdrew for the night.

On the next day, at the appointed hour, Eileen was
waiting on the shores of the island, which had been
chosen for the trysting-place: eager to see the end of
the story. The Danish chief was there: and with him
were fifteen picked men from among his retinue, each
desirous of possessing an Irish damsel for his slave. The
boat, in which the princess and her supposed maidens
were coming, was now seen approaching: and the Danes.
went down to the shore to meet them.

The Irish princess was soon standing upon the beach =
looking, however, more like a goddess than a slave.
Turgés approached her. “Come, my pretty one” he said.
“Ours will not be a hard service.” And the monster was
bending over her, heedless alike of the look of loathing
on her countenance and of the fire that flashed from her
blue-grey eyes. But, at this moment, he was stabbed in
the neck by one of the supposed maidens, who bore the
princess company: and fell, a corpse, upon the strand.
Each of the fifteen Irishmen had a dagger, or (as in their

language it was called) a “skian,’ hidden beneath his
XXL] Revenge on a T'yrant. 331

womanish robe: and the Danish soldiers, who had been
with the chieftain, met with the same fate as their master.
Their resistance was not for long: and then the princess,
with her fair foot upon the fallen tyrant’s throat, praised
the young men for their valour, and told them that
Turgés had well deserved to die. “Of all the sweet
things in this wide world” she said “vevenge on a tyrant
is the sweetest far!”

The death of Turgés was soon known throughout the
length and breadth of the country. And, for that time,
Ireland was saved from foreign oppression: though the
final overthrow of the Danes in that country was left
for Brian Boroimhe to accomplish, as Eileen had seen at
an earlier station.

They returned to the sea-shore again. There the
fairy-sails vanished at the Queen’s command: and: the
yacht became a chariot again, with golden eaglets ready
in the shafts. And they returned to the railway-station :
and got into the train. The engine whistled: and soon
they were flying off again to yet earlier centuries.

“When we next stop” Titania said “you shall come
with me to the East once more. For though you have
seen the city of Bagdad, you have not yet crossed the
great grim desert which forms so large a part of Arabia.
You shall cross it at the next station. And, more than
that, you shall see the greatest created being that Arabia

ever produced.”
CHAPTER XXIV.

OBEDIENT TO THE LIGHT.

“Obedient to the light
"that shone within his soul, he went.”
—SHELLEY.

‘HE board at the next station was inscribed simply
1 “HEGIRA”: and Eileen was puzzled as to its mean-
ing. “It is the year” said Queen Titania “when
Mohammed, the prophet of Arabia, fled from Mecca to
Medina or (as it was then called) Yathreb, and published his
new religion to the world. Myriads of people date all the
events of history from this year:—(the six hundred and
twenty-second after Christ) :—and so the fairies thought no
other name was needed for this station. Come” she
added “step quickly into the car. Let us make haste to
see this strange event : which millions of men count of such
vast importance. And let us try to find the reason why
they count it so—Ho and away to Arabia!” she called,
addressing her eaglets—“to the city of Mecca!” And the
car made thither with amazing speed. (Yet it was a much
longer journey than the journey to Bagdad: for this time

they had to cross the desert of Arabia.)

332
cu. xxIv.] Obedient to the Light. 222

Eileen had read stories and seen pictures of deserts
and wildernesses: but when she actually saw the desert
of Arabia and its measureless wastes of sand, she found
that the reality was something beyond all her imaginations.
Close above the surface of the land the car sped along
invisibly. Vultures were flying by their side: fanning
them with their enormous wings: and thereby lessening
for them the almost intolerable heat of the blazing sun,
whose rays beat down upon the great grim desert with
extraordinary fury. The journey for some while seemed
wearisome enough. For miles and miles of it there was
nothing but arid sand, as far as the eye could see. Eileen
vowed never to think an Irish bog monotonous again: for,
when compared with the changeless wilds of this thirsty
land, an Irish bog would be a country of infinite variety.
Eileen was beginning to fear that the journey over these
dismal sands would never end, when at last they came
to that which is one of the loveliest things in nature :—
what is called an “ oasis,” where “in the wilderness waters
break out, and streams in the desert” :—a fruitful place
of sweet-smelling shrubs and dates and incense-bearing
trees: and where the greenness of everything is the more
delicious for the contrast afforded by the dry places
round about.

Such was the pleasant resting-place, where the city of
Mecca lay. “Here Titania told Eileen to alight from the
car and set her face toward a certain spot, whither her

finger pointed. There beneath the cool shade of some -
334 Obedient to the Light. [Cu

mighty trees she saw two figures—those of a man and a
little girl: and both of them were worthy of remark. The
man was beautiful: there could be no doubt of that. It
was a pleasure to behold that fine honest-looking face,
which appeared besides so wonderfully wise. His eyes
were jetty black: and so was his hair, which waved without
a curl upon his shoulders. His beard was long and very
full. He was not tall: but his body seemed to be as
strong as iron and as supple as steel. Eileen thought that
there was a strange fascination in his noble countenance:
and yet its aspect. was rather stern than otherwise. He
wore a simple woollen robe: and a turban on his head.
There was no need to ask who this man was. It must
be Mohammed, the Prophet of the Desert! The little
girl beside him seemed a strange companion for such a
man. She was only eight years old, though to judge from
her appearance she might have been several years older.
Indeed she seemed already more than half a woman.
This is not an uncommon thing in Eastern lands. Those
who are children in years, as we count children, blossom
out into full womanhood, both in body and in mind: as
Eileen was soon to learn from the case of this extra-
ordinary “child” She too was marvellously beautiful
after her own fashion—a dark beauty, if ever there was
one :—her smooth hair was dark: her flashing eyes were
dark: so were her dimpled cheeks, her tender neck, her
-small-cut hands and feet,—her whole body. She was a
thorough Arab child in every way: she had not only the
xxiv] Obedient to the Light. 335

dusky hue and glowing warmth of Araby, but all the
nature of her countrymen was in her blood :—full of fire
and life and vigour: passionate alike in love or hatred.
She was more richly attired than was Mohammed. Her
raiment was broidered with rare needlework : and she had
a girdle of pure silver round her waist.

It was noonday: and, even under the thick-shadowed
trees, the rays of the sun were insufferably hot: insomuch
that the child was compelled to bare her shoulders to
the light, unloosening the thin robe which was their only
covering, that she might lave them with the cool waters of
the fountain. And as she stooped to do so, Mohammed
bent and kissed her. Until this moment Eileen had
fancied she was the Prophet’s daughter. But now she
discovered that the truth was very different. A great
blush seemed to overspread her, as she received his kiss:
and, throwing her gentle arms about his shoulders, she
addressed him with these words :—“ When one year shall
have passed away, O Mohammed, I shall be your wife:
and I am yearning for that time to come!”

Was the child mad? His wife! in one year’s time.
When she would be but nine years old! It must surely
be a game of play.

Mohammed’s answer made an end of all doubts as
to the reality of it. “By Heaven’s help, dear Ayesha ”
he replied “it shall be so.” And Ayesha was happy
in his answer. Then they sat down together: and
were silent for a little while, both absorbed in thought.
336 Obedient to the Light. [cu

Ayesha was the first to speak :—“ How pleasant and
fair art thou, O my love” she said “for my delight!”
Then after a pause she added :—“I will ask thee a ques-
tion, O my love, and thou shalt answer it.” Mohammed
assured her that he would. Ayesha held his strong
hand in her little palm: and asked her question. “I
know” she said “that thou art beautiful and good
and strong :—and kind withal to me. But my father
tells me that thou art something more—a_ prophet
among the people. What is this great thing?”

Mohammed answered her, telling her that he was
indeed a prophet: and had a mission from Heaven to
men. “The people of Araby” he said “are worshippers
of idols: they are heathens, who believe a vain thing:
they are wise in their own eyes, but the. truth is
hidden from them: they drink strong wine and are
given up to sin. I am a prophet: and I will go into
the world and teach men the right faith. I will teach
them to pray :—to live holy lives :—and love their fellow-
men :—to give up strong wine and all other tempta-
tions :—and to enter into the knowledge of Heaven’s
truth.”

Ayesha fixed her large eyes upon him: and seemed
to be considering what he had told her. Presently
she asked him another question. “How does Mohammed
know the truth himself?” she said. “I know it, O
my well-beloved” he answered “because the Angel

Gabriel has revealed it to me: and because into my
xxIv.} Obedient to the Light. 337

hands has been given the Book of Truth itself, divinely
"writ in the seventh Heaven!”

Then Ayesha wanted to know when the Prost had
seen the Angel and whence he had received the Book.
She entreated him to tell her everything. He must
tell her: for she was going to be his wife, and help
him in all his work.

Mohammed answered :—‘My well-beloved Ayesha,
surely I will tell thee the whole of my wonderful story :
and thou shalt help me, when I preach it to the world.
Ayesha listened eagerly (and Eileen in her invisible
cloud was not less interested): while Mohammed, in
a voice of strange beauty, told his story to his young
betrothed.

He began by telling how the men of his family were
the guardians in Mecca of the Temple of the Idols, and
were held in great honour by reason of that guardian- ©
ship: how he himself had wealth and high estate in
the city, and was married to Kadijah (the wife whom
he had dearly loved, and who was now but lately
dead): and how for many years he had lived happy
-with her alone, in peace and quietness, occupied only
with the ordinary cares of busy men and with the affec-
tions of home. “It was not” he said “until my fortieth
year that anything occurred to interrupt this tranquil
life. I had often, before that time, wondered what the
true religion was. It seemed to me absurd to think, as
my fathers had taught me, that idols, who cannot even

22
338 Obedient to the Light. [cu

handle with their hands nor walk with their feet, can
really be the gods that rule the world. Then I had
asked the Jews and the Christians what was the true
faith They gave me different answers: but none of
them was satisfactory to me. J could not understand
the religions, which they taught. I was used to ponder -
much about these things: and at last one evening I
withdrew to the cavern in Mount Hara to think and
fast and pray. And as, in the silent watches of the night,
I lay there, wrapped about with my mantle, I heard a
voice calling me. Whereupon, uncovering my head,.!
looked : and lo! a flood of light broke upon me of such
fearful splendour that I swooned away. When | recovered
my senses, I beheld an angel in the likeness of a man,
who displayed before my eyes a silken cloth, covered
with written characters. ‘Read’ said the Angel. But
I had never learned to read. And so I answered that I
could not. ‘Read’ said the Angel yet again :—‘ Read
in the name of the Creator, who taught man the use of
the pen, who sheds on his soul the rays of knowledge
and teaches him what before he knew not. Upon this
I instantly felt my understanding illumined with heavenly
light: and read what was written on the cloth—even the
divine decrees of Heaven. When I had finished reading,
the messenger said to me:—‘O Mohammed, of a verity
thou art the Prophet of Truth: and I am the Herald-
Angel Gabriel” So he departed: and I went my way.
In the morning I came trembling to Kadijah, not know-
xxiv] Obedient to the Light. 339

ing whether what I had heard and seen was indeed true:
or whether it might not be a mere vision, a delusion of
the senses, or worse than all, the apparition of an evil
spirit. But Kadijah had no such doubts: she believed
that every word of it was true. ‘Thou bringest joyful
tidings, husband!’ she exclaimed. ‘Nay I am sure that
thou art verily the prophet of our people. Surely heaven
will not suffer thee to fall into shame. Hast thou not
been loving to thy kinsfolk: kind to thy neighbours:
charitable to the poor: hospitable to the stranger: faith-
ful to thy word: and ever a defender of the truth?’
So I was comforted and assured: and began the work
that I had to do. First I spake only to my own house-
hold. Zeid my servant believed: and some forty others
with him. Then, when I tried to preach throughout the
city, many enemies were raised up against me: and
I was compelled for a while to fly from Mecca. But I
returned and pursued my mission: many believed, and
the work prospered with me. And now, if I had ever
doubted that I was indeed a prophet, the next event that
happened to me—more wonderful than even the visit of
the Angel at the cavern—would have taken every doubt
away. Listen while I tell you the whole truth. It was
the darkest and most awfully silent night that ever had
been known. There was no crowing of cocks, nor bark-
ing of dogs—no howling of wild beasts, nor hooting of
owls. The very waters ceased to murmur and the winds

to whistle: all nature seemed motionless and dead. In
340 Obedient to the Light. [Cu.

the mid-watches of the night I was roused by a voice
crying, ‘Awake, thou sleeper!’ and Gabriel, the Herald-
Angel, stood before me once again. He was white as
snow: his forehead was clear and serene: his hair floated
on his shoulders: he had wings of many dazzling hues:
and his robes were sewn with pearls and embroidered
with gold. He had brought for me a white-winged steed
of wondrous form, whose eyes were as jacinths and
radiant as stars. I prepared to mount upon the back
thereof: but, as I stretched forth my hand, the animal
drew back and reared. ‘Be still, O Borak’: said the
Angel : ‘and show respect unto the Prophet: never wert
thou mounted by a worthier rider.’ Immediately the
animal approached and submitted to be mounted: then,
rising with me, he soared aloft far above the city of
Mecca. This lofty flight continued, till we arrived at the
Gate of the Holy Temple at Jerusalem. There, entering
the Temple, I found within it many of the Great Prophets
of old time. After I had prayed in company with these
for a time, a ladder of light was let down from Heaven:
and the lower end of it rested on the stone of Jacob.
Aided by the Angel Gabriel, I ascended the ladder in
_the twinkling of an eye: and knocked at the Gate of
Heaven. Gabriel said that it was Mohammed who stood
without. Then the Gate opened: and we entered the.
abodes of the Blessed. And there it was that I received
into my own hands the Koran or the Book of Truth—
the Book which I will publish to the world. And now,
xxIv.] Obedient to the Light. 341

dear Ayesha, thou’ hast an answer to the question
which thou didst ask me, saying :—‘ How knowest thou
that thou art a prophet?’”

Ayesha’s large eyes grew larger as he told the tale.
It was interesting certainly: but was it true or false?
Was it a dream, a vision, or a waking reality? She
half believed—half doubted. Howbeit she was pledged
to be Mohammed’s wife: and she was therefore ready
to support him in whatever he chose to do. Yet she
feared this mission of his would lead him into danger:
the men of Mecca were jealous of the honour of the
idols: and threatened to slay the Prophet for insulting
them. She told Mohammed of her fears: and implored
him to think again before he provoked them ‘too far.
Could he not be silent about it all? Could he not
believe it for himself and trouble no-one else in the
matter? To talk of it, she urged, was only to anger
the chief men of Mecca and to endanger himself together
with his friends.

The Prophet was very angry with her for saying this :
and the dark vein upon his frowning forehead swelled
to blackness, making his countenance look terrible. He
spoke sternly when he made reply. “Thinkest thou,
Ayesha” he said “to dissuade me from my work by fear
of men? It was an evil thought. I will answer thee as
I answered Abu Thalet, my. father’s brother, when he
said what thou hast said. I solemnly declare that,.if the
sun stood on my right hand and the moon on my left,
34.2 Obedient to the Light. [Cu.

ordering me to hold my peace, I could not obey. There
is a light within my soul that has the first claim on
my obedience.”

Ayesha was penitent immediately. She embraced
Mohammed : and bade him forget her thoughtless words.
She loved him so much, she said, that she could not
help fearing for his safety: but, if it was his pleasure to
do this great work in defiance of all enemies, Ayesha
would follow him, for better or for worse, unto the
world’s end. It was not for her own sake, she added
proudly, that she feared.

But Mohammed could not so easily forget her words.
“Kadijah would not have tried thus to tempt me from
my duty” he said. “She was indeed the best of women
—a treasure above all price. Would that she were still
alive! My life had all its happiness from her.”

Ayesha pouted. What! Were not her own fresh and
budding charms more than a full recompense for all that
he had lost? “Was not Kadijah stricken in years?”
she said: “and is not Heaven now about to give thee
a better wife in her stead?” a

“Never!” exclaimed the other, with an honest. burst
of feeling: “never could I have a better than Kadijah
was. When I was poor, she enriched me: when I
was pronounced a liar, she believed in me: and when
I was opposed by all the world, she remained true
to me.”

At these words the child burst into a passionate flood
xxiv] Obedient to the Light. 34.3

of tears: and reproached Mohammed with his unkindness
to herself.

“Weep not, my opening blossom”: he replied: “I love
thee well. Blame me not that I loved yet better one who
is now dead. Be faithful to me: and I will fully requite

” he con-

thy love with mine—See now, my Ayesha
tinued after a pause. “To show my trust in thee I will
tell thee all my plans. I cannot longer abide in Mecca:
for the people would slay me. But I will not, to please
them, give up my great work. Rather will I abandon all
home delights and flee unto Yathreb—a city nearly three
hundred miles away from here, where there are those
who will befriend my cause. Thy father and I purpose
to go thither before many days be passed: and thou
wilt follow us within a few days more.” Then the
two rose up side by side: and walked together to
the city. There Ayesha found her father: and went
home with him. But Eileen and Titania followed in
the Prophet’s steps.

It was growing towards eventide, when Mohammed
arrived at his own house. He went in: but Eileen and
the Fairy Queen stayed without, watching the crowds in
the streets of Mecca, as they thronged home from their
work. Soon they saw a gang of some twenty men near
the dwelling of the Prophet. These persons discoursed
with one another in whispers:—but loud enough to be
overheard by their invisible watchers. It soon became
clear what the business was, for which they were met
344 Obedient to the Light. [Cu

together. They had sworn an oath each to plunge his
sword into the body of Mohammed. His house was
unprotected: they would quickly force open the door,
they said, and despatch their bloody task. Eileen wanted
to burst from the cloud which hid her, and reveal the
danger: but Titania forbade her. She said that it was
needless: Heaven would not allow him to be hurt before
his hour. The conspirators advanced: they paused at the
door, but hesitated to enter. Looking through a crevice,
they beheld Mohammed, as they thought, wrapped in his
green mantle and lying asleep upon his couch. They
waited for a while: taking thought as to whether they
should fall on him while sleeping, or wait until he should
go forth. At length, growing impatient, they burst open
the door: and rushed towards the couch. The sleeper
started up: but, instead of Mohammed, another person
stood before them. This was a much younger man than
the Prophet, Ali by name, one of his faithful followers,
who had wrapped himself up in his mantle and taken
his place upon the couch. Amazed and confounded, the
murderers demanded :—‘ Where is Mohammed?” “I
know not” replied Ali sternly, and walked forth: nor did
any one venture to molest him. The murderers searched
the house, but in vain: the Prophet was gone: but how
he escaped remains a mystery to this day.

“Come with me” cried Titania. “Let us go to the
house of Abu Beker, the father of Ayesha. It is thither
that he has fled.” Thither they went: and there they
xxiv] Obedient to the Light. 345

found Mohammed—and Abu Beker—and Ayesha—and
some other children of the same family. -The Prophet
was speaking. “We must flee to Yathreb sooner than I
had thought” he said. “But the murderers are searching
for us everywhere. Where shall we hide our heads?”

After some consultation, it was agreed that they should
take refuge in a cave upon Mount Thor, about an hour’s
distance from Mecca, and there abide until they could
proceed safely to Yathreb: and in the meantime the
children of Abu Beker should bring them food. So,
tearing himself away once more from the tender caresses
of the beautiful Ayesha, Mohammed left Mecca with her
father at his side. It was yet dark when they started:
and they had_no other lanterns but the stars to light them
on their way. The day was dawning, when they found
themselves at the entrance of the cave.

There for three long days the fugitives remained in
hiding from their enemies: and the children of Abu Beker
‘brought them food in the dusk of the evenings. On the
third night a servant brought them camels: and next
morning they ventured forth, and began their world-
famous journey over the desert to Yathreb.

They avoided the main road usually taken by the
caravans: and bent their course nearer to the coast of
the Red Sea. They had not proceeded far, however, be-
fore they were overtaken by a troop of horse, headed by
Soraka, one of the most savage of the Prophet’s enemies.

Soraka was a grim warrior: with shaggy iron-grey locks
346 Obedient to the Light. [Cu

and naked sinewy arms rough with hair. As he over-
took Mohammed, his horse reared and fell with him. He
was a superstitious man: and he was so frightened by
this evil omen that he turned back with his troops, and
suffered the fugitives to pass on their way unharmed.
So they continued their journey: until at last they came
to the Hill of Koba, about two miles from Yathreb. It
was a favourite resort of the people of the city: and a
place to which they sent their sick and ailing, for the
air was health-giving and pure. Hence too the city
was supplied with fruit. The hill and the country
round about were covered with vineyards, with groves of
the date and lotus, and with gardens producing citrons,
oranges, pomegranates, figs and oranges.. When she
came here the Prophet’s camel crouched on her knees
and would go no farther. It was a favourable sign:
so they determined to stay awhile at Koba and make
ready for entering the city.

Thither the friends of his religion flocked. They gave
the tired travellers refreshment: and white mantles to
put on in place of their travel-stained attire. And
Mohammed preached to them. On the fourth day from
his arrival thither, he assembled all his followers together.
After prayer, he mounted again upon his camel: and _ set
forth for the city, with numerous attendants and a guard
of seventy horsemen.

From that day the Religion of Mohammed began to
spread. He preached everywhere against idolatry: and
xxIv] Obedient to the Light. 34.7

taught a purer religion. He bade his followers give alms
to the poor: pray five times a day: deny themselves and
fast: he taught them to submit themselves contentedly to
Heaven’s will: to make pilgrimages: to be fair in all their
dealings: and to give up drinking strong wine with all.
other things which tempted men astray. These things
were written in the Koran or Book of Truth, which had
been given to him in Heaven itself. “Verily I swear to
you” he said “by the stars which move swiftly and are
lost in the brightness of the sun, and by the darkness of
the night, these are not the words of an evil spirit: but
of an Angel of light and power, who knows the secrets
of all Truth. Neither is Mohammed, your comrade, a mad
dreamer. He beheld the Herald-Angel in the light of
the clear horizon: and the words revealed to him are for
a warning to all the creatures of the earth.”

Those. who followed his teaching began to lead a
new life. They were very much in earnest. Homes
which had been unhappy were now no longer so. Men
who had been entirely given up to the gratification of
selfish passions learned now the lessons of charity and
love. The religion of Mohammed was not a perfect one:
it was not even entirely free from grave sins of its own:
but it was something far better than Araby had known
before. It was not for nothing that he had given up
his high estate in Mecca, and all the happy comforts of
his home.

Soon a great army was at the service of Mohammed :
34.8 Obedient to the Light. [Cu

and the Prophet determined to lead it against his former
enemies. If the men of Mecca could not be persuaded
to the faith, then he said they must be won to it by the
power of the sword.

Titania said that it was time to leave Arabia. Eileen
was ready to do so. She saw Mohammed’s army ride
forth to battle, and she had no wish to see the rest: she
hated scenes of bloodshed. And yet she could not but
wish him victory. He seemed more fit to rule than were
the worshippers of idols. “Heaven” said Titania “ever
prospers those who fight in the cause of Righteousness.
Therefore will Mohammed and his work be prospered.”

“T am very glad” said Eileen, as she ascended the car
once more. And if anything could have made her wish
the Prophet good speed more heartily than she already
did, it would have been the look which she saw upon
the face of Ayesha:—who had now come to Mohammed
at Yathreb, and was buckling his sword upon his thigh
as he rode forth to battle: raising her face the while to
Heaven and lifting up from her full soul the prayers
which he had taught her.

* rm # * "2 fae

Eileen had frequently discovered in the course of her
journey that the men and women of history were very
different, when she saw them face to face, from what
she had in fancy pictured them. Often she had found
them better in all respects than she had expected,—

their purposes more noble, their work more beneficial to
xxIv.} Obedient to the Light. 349

the world. History, as told in her books, had frequently
put most stress upon their faults and follies: and for-
gotten the brighter side of their lives. But with History
as seen in the magic journey it was altogether otherwise.
Whatever was best in all men seemed to shine forth
most brilliantly, as the Fairy Queen approached them.

So had it been on this occasion: and Eileen confessed
to Titania that hitherto she had thought of Mohammed
only as a false prophet and “Antichrist”: pretending
impossible things to deceive mankind, and setting up an
unreal religion for his own glorification. Now however
she saw her mistake : and recognised him.as being indeed
one of the greatest of men.

The lovely Queen was not surprised at this: for she
had known many men and women, who from the same
prejudices had formed the same false impression of
Mohammed. “But I would have you give up all such
prejudices” she said. “In all men and in all their
works there is surely something good. And in the case
of those that have played a great part in history, there
is generally much that is very good and very beautiful,
though sometimes hidden away under other things that
are unlovely. Wherefore in everyone and in everything,
whether in persons or in books or works of art, see
that you seek first for what is good and beautiful in
them, and take delight in that. And, above all things
in a religion, whose purpose is to give comfort to the

souls of men, there is certain to be something good.
250 Obedient to the Light. [Cu

Find that out first”: said the Queen imploringly: “realise -
to yourself what there is that is good in every form of
faith. There will be time enough afterwards to look for
the evil in them. The important matter is to find the
good. I have brought you through the Fields of History :
and I do but ask you to look upon what you see there as
you would look upon the things that you see about you
every day.

“When you take your delight in wandering through
a flower-garden, surely it is natural first to look at the
beautiful flowers and sniff their sweet-smelling odours.
And, though perchance afterwards you may not be able
to prevent yourself from seeing that there are rank and
noxious weeds—(for in the best of gardens there must
needs at times be some of them)—which cluster round
their roots: yet you will think more.of the flowers
than the weeds, as being more worthy of your regard.
The garden was made for the flowers: whereas the weeds
are only there by accident, and diligence will lessen their
luxuriance day by day. Or, when you walk along a
smooth sea-shore the day after a storm, when the sand
is strewn with all the strange things that are at such
times cast up by the ocean, ugly as well as beautiful,
surely it not is for the ugly things that you make your
search—for dead star-fish and for such sea-weeds as are
rotten and decayed: but rather for the lovelier kinds of
growth in which the sea abounds, and for the little

shells, whose prettiest and most delicate varieties are so
xxiv] Obedient to the Light. 261

_often hidden in the middle of the rankest sort of
weeds.

“Look at the Fields of History in the same spirit as
that in which you would look at the treasures of the
garden or sea-shore. Nature—and the best part of Nature
too—calls upon you to search first everywhere for what
is most beautiful.

“Surely in religion least of all things should we make
exception to this rule. Why seek to have explained the
miracles and marvels of Mohammed’s story? What do
they matter? Perhaps he dreamed them. Perhaps he
fancied them: and was partly mad. However that may
be, Mohammed has spent his own life in seeking to help
mankind,—obedient to the Light, that shone within his
soul. He has done much to purify the lives of thousands
upon thousands of men, and in many ways has raised
them ever and again to higher things. Let this work
of Mohammed be remembered alway: and then if his
faults and follies be forgotten the loss will be of little
moment.”
CHAPTER XXV.

ONE GOOD CUSTOM.

‘The old order changeth, yielding place to new:
and God fulfils Himself in many ways,
lest one good custom should corrupt the world.”
—TENNYSON,

T often happened that, when Eileen walked with Titania
on the earth, choruses of fairies appeared in sundry
places to their eyes, disporting themselves there : and

of course they did obeisance at all times to their Queen,
whenever she passed their way. This was never more so
than at the next station, “THE YEAR OF OUR LORD FIVE
HUNDRED AND FORTY,” from which our travellers went
to the country now called the Principality of Wales but
formerly part of the Kingdom of Britain. The haunts of
the fairies in this country were then more than usually
populous :—the reason doubtless being that there was
more of the beautiful and good among mortals to attract
them thither. “Come and see a new part of my domain ”
Titania’ said “which you have never seen before.”
Eileen obeyed: and their path led them to the edge of a
352
XXV.] One Good Custom. 953

silvery lake. And ‘now a marvellous thing came ‘to
pass !—For, as they stood upon the margin of the water,
fairy-sprites innumerable rose up from the bosom of the
lake. ° Eileen rubbed her eyes to assure herself once more,
that she was not dreaming: and she almost wondered
whether she were not at the pantomime. The place was
alive with spirit-beings of all sorts and conditions :—
from the Lady of the Lake, a magic princess of the
rarest beauty, tall and. fair, attended by lovely nymphs
and mermaidens of like perfection with herself, to the
wee little elves who sat- upon the water-lilies or swung
themselves from leaf'to leaf among the bulrushes :—and
all, with one consent, awakened. the sweetest music
that could be imagined to-hail the Sovereign of the
Fairy-world.

But soon Eileen heard a noise behind her which caused
her to turn her head: it was the sound of clashing
spears. And, looking toward the place, she beheld two
goodly horsemen, clad in armour, doing battle one
against. the other. And they fought for a long space
like two wild boars: until they both fell to the earth.
Immediately however they sprang to their feet again :
and renewed the combat with their swords. At last
the sword of one smote the other sword in pieces! And
the knight whose sword was whole shouted to the other
knight, and said:—“Thou. art mine to kill or save.
Yield thee as conquered, or die.” But the other would
not yield: but sprang, all unarmed as he was, at the

23
354 One Good Custom. [Ca

throat of his’ enemy. Then the knight whose sword
was whole brought the other under him, and was for
smiting off his head: when a third person appeared
upon the hill and called on him with a loud voice to
stop. “Knight, hold thy hand”: he said: “for if thou
slay ¢hat knight, thou puttest this kingdom in an evil
way: because that knight is a man of more worship
than thou knowest.”. “Why, who is he?” asked. the
knight. And the other answered:—“It is king
Arthur.” ,

It was indeed king Arthur. And, when Eileen looked
upon his honest face, she loved it greatly: nor could
she bear the thought that he should be slain at the
hands of the other knight. And things so happened,
that Arthur was not slain. For he who had. interrupted
the fight was named Merlin: he was a man of great
wisdom: and somehow or other he knew that there
were fairies near. Now therefore when he perceived
that Arthur’s enemy was still eager to kill him, he
besought the fairies to help him. And Titania heard,
and threw an enchantment over that knight: so that
he fell on a deep sleep, and harmed the prince no
more.

Half-way between the place of battle and the lake,
there was a little hermitage: and Merlin led Arthur
thither to be healed of the wounds which he had taken
in the fight. Eileen and the Fairy Queen went to

the same place: and saw the good hermit ministering
XXV.] One Good Custom. 355

to the wounded man. ‘So the hermit searched all his
wounds: and. gave good salves and ointments to -heal
them. The king was there three days : and after that
he was whole again.- Then Merlin and he departed:
and as they rode king Arthur. said:—‘1- have no
sword.” “You shall find a sword. ere long” said
Merlin.. “And as he spake, ae “came, to. the lake
already described.

The fairies in the meantime had withdrawn to the
depths beneath: but in the midst of the lake king. Arthur
saw an arm clothed in white samite, which held a fair
sword in its hand. “Lo!” said Merlin “yonder is the
sword, of which I spake.” And at this moment a fairy
of the Lake drew near to Merlin and the king, who
asked who she was.- “That damsel is the Lady of the
Lake” said Merlin. “Speak her, for she is a fairy”
(Merlin was himself one of the favourites of the fairies,
and had long known as much about these things as Eileen
now did herself): “and” he added “if. thou speak her
fair, she will give thee the sword.” King Arthur then
addressed the Lady of the Lake. “Damsel” said he
“what sword is that, which the arm holdeth yonder above
the water? I would that it were mine, for I have no
sword.” Now Arthur was beautiful, and Arthur was good
and brave: such men all the fairies love. So the Lady
of the Lake was only too glad to do him this pleasure.
“Well” said she “go ye into yonder barge: and row

yourself as far as the sword. And take it and the scab-
356 One. Good Custom. [cH

bard with you.’ The faities make: you a willing present
of it.’ See that you use’it ever in the cause of ‘right.” -
~~ And the king’ did-as she told him: ‘and received ‘the
sword.. Then, having thanked the fair Lady : ‘of? the
Lake, lie rode away’ with Merlin. - .

‘Eileen and the Fairy Queen’ followed eee “And
they came’ to: Carlion. . There was one of the. king’s
palaces: there too was Guenever, his -beautiful golden-
haired queen: and thefe were ‘the king’s’ honoured
followers, who were called the Knights of the Round
Table. The king -had collected these men about him
not for his own glory-nor for- theirs, but for the advan-
tage of the world. Whenever a new Knight of the
‘Rotnd Table was. made (and Eileen several times saw
this happen), the king took his hand, and made him
swear to fight only for what was right and’ beautiful
and good:—not to use his sword for selfish purposes,
but ever to do battle’ for conscience’ sake, with’ all the
might that was in him. And’ for a long while the
most part of them kept their oaths: and Eileen, riding
about the country with them; saw their deeds of bravery:
She saw them ‘attack wicked heathen knights: and
destroy the’ castles of robbers. She saw them defend
maidens’ and widows and children from those who
would have harmed them. And she never tired of
seeing these things: for deeds of bravery, done for the
right, are’ never wearisome to watch. Moreover there

was endless variety in these adventures. Whenever
XXV.] One Good Custom, 357

anybody, however poor.and humble, came to one of
Arthur's palaces to complain that he or she was
wronged, some knight was always ‘ready to offer help.
Eileen would sit in the king’s banqueting-hall: and
wait for sich events to happen.

Now at the feast of Pentecost, king ‘Arthur had a
great. banquet in his hall at Camelot: a hundred
and fifty knights were present: and-Eileen and Titania
sat at the board invisible. ‘Then Sir Gawaine, one of
the Knights of the Round Table, spake to the king and
said: “Behold, sir king, heré at hand there cometh
strange adventures.” Even as he spake there came into
the hall two men richly apparelled: and upon their
shoulders leaned a young man fair and goodly. He was
large, long, and broad in the shoulders: his hands were
the largest that ever man saw: but he seemed too weak
to walk by himself, and must needs lean upon the
shoulders of those who attended him. Arthur saw him:
and bade all keep: silence, that he might hear what the
meaning of this thing might be. So the three came right
up to the high dais, without saying any word. And then
the big young man stood up straight and spake, saying
to king Arthur :—‘Heaven bless you and all your fair
fellowship! I have come to ask a boon of you, sir king.
Let me be one of the servants in your kitchen: and give
me meat and drink for my service.” Eileen was very
. much astonished,—and so was everybody,—at the humble

request made by the young man. They had expected
358 One Good Custom. [Cu.

him to ask to be made a knight. The king answered :—
“Thou shalt have what thou askest. I have’ never.
grudged meat and drink even to my: enemies. What
is thy name?” But the youth would not tell his name.
He went away to the kitchen, happy ‘that his simple
request was granted. Some of the company laughed
at him, especially one sallow-faced knight, whose name
was Sir Kay. But Sir Launcelot, who was the most
honoured of all the knights, liked the youth exceed-
ingly: and prophesied that he would some day turn out
a-man of worth. And since the young man would not
tell his real name, he was called Beaumains (“ Fair-
hands”), because his hands were so fair to see. “What
is his real name?” whispered Eileen to the Fairy
Queen. “His name is Gareth”: she said: “and he is a
king’s son. He is the son of a great king. The
queen, his mother, did not desire him to go to king
Arthur's court. But, as he was most eager to go, she
said that he might do so, if he went as a kitchen-knave.
For she thought he would never go under such a condi-
tion. But he at once said that he would go and be
a kitchen-knave, and therefore he, came as you have
seen: hoping that he might some day become a knight
after all.”

And so, in fact, it happened. Sir Launcelot and Sir
Gawaine were both angry with Sir Kay because he laughed
so much at Beaumains. Sir Launcelot said :—*He is a

brave youth: and he shall prove it before long.” A few
XXV.] One Good Custom. 359.

days afterwards a damsel named Linet came to Arthur’s
palace: complaining that her lady-sister was besieged
by a tyrant, and praying that some knight would come
and help her. “Three other villains” ‘she said “take
the part of this wicked tyrant : who will certainly attempt
to prevent her rescue.” And she implored. the king to
send his best knight, to help her. Then Sir Launcelot
bethought him that this would be a chance for Beau-
mains to prove his bravery: and asked king Arthur
that Beaumains might be chosen to go with the damsel
upon this errand. Arthur consented: and Beaumains
was summoned from the kitchen. He was straightway
made .a knight: and, while people were -wondering
whence he would get a horse and armour, a dwarf
appeared: and gave him a goodly horse and trappings
of cloth of gold. But he had neither shield nor spear.
Then before all the court Sir Beaumains camé to the
damsel Linet: and said that he was ready to ride with her
and to do battle against the tyrant, who besieged her
lady-sister. But when she saw him and recognised him
for. the kitchen-knave, the damsel was mad with fury.
She stamped her dainty little foot upon the floor: her
dark eyes shot. fre: her pretty cheeks flushed to an
angry scarlet: the whole of her body trembled with
rage: and at last, in a voice of passion she screamed
forth and said :—“It is the kitchen-knave:—a man who
ought to be sticking pigs, and not riding about with a

damsel of high parentage!” Imagine a modern _ ball-
360 | One Good Custom. [Cx

room. beauty in the presence of a fashionable assembly
introduced: to the under-footman for her partner: and
you. will have some notion of how Dame Linet looked
at this moment! But the king and Sir Launcelot would
not. change their purpose ‘for all her passion: and so
perforce she had to ride away with Sir Beaumains by
her side. Very sullen she looked, and very disagreeable
was the pout upon ‘her lips, as she departed with her
despised: companion: yet more disagreeable were the
taunting words she spoke, whenever she deigned to open
to him her cherry-coloured mouth. Sc

Yet Sir Beaumains was quite patient with her: all
this time: and made no answer to: her gibes. . But
he was not patient when Sir Kay insulted him as he
rode forth. He rushed at Sir Kay: and fought with
him. Sir Kay was ‘conquered: ‘and Sir Beaumains
took his spear and shield. Then. he put spurs to his
horse : and came up with the damsel again.

And they rode upon their way, until they came to
a. great forest: and here there was a broad river and
only one way by which it was possible to pass. And
two knights stood there to prevent them from passing.
“What. sayest thou?” asked the damsel: “wilt thou
do battle with yonder two knights, or wilt thou go
back again?” Sir Beaumains made answer :—“I will
fight.” And he did fight most manfully : and conquered
both of them. But still proud Linet’ scorned the brave
Sir Beaumains: untruly saying that the two knights
xxv] One Good Custom. 361

had met with accidents, and that the kitchen-knave
had slain them :like a coward from behind. Sir Beau-
mains still bore with her unkind sayings most gently
and patiently: and rode after her, as he had done
hitherto.

And, as they went, they met many enemies.. Had
Linet been alone or had her companion been indeed
a coward, she would have been at the mercy of ruffians
innumerable. ' As it was Sir Beaumains conquered all
these enemies: and suffered them not to touch so much
as the hem of the damsel’s robe. Still she called him
hard names as before: and insulted him in every way.
Whenever they stopped by the road. to eat and’ drink,
she would not allow him to sit at the same table with
herself: ‘but always sent him to the kitchen. Yet
he followed patiently: and did all her battles as
before.

At last they came to the Castle, where the : Lady
Liones was. besieged, the sister of Linet. “Thou canst
_fight in some fashion, thou wretched kitchen-knave”:
said Linet: “but thou wilt meet with one here that
is too strong for thee. It is the Knight of the Red
Lands.” But Sir Beaumains only smiled and said :—
“TI think that I shall conquer him too.” Sir Beaumains
was right. The Knight of the Red Lands was indeed
a more powerful foe than any whom he had met before.
‘They. fought for a long. while: but at length Sir
Beaumains had the better of him. . And he. made the
362 One Good Custom. [cu

knight yield him to Dame Linet: and confess that
he was her prisoner, saying that else he would kill
him outright. , ,

Then at last Linet begged Sir Beaumains’ pardon for
all her insolence: owning that he was a brave knight
indeed. He was greatly delighted at her words: and,
when they had. made friends, he told her how that his réal
name was.Sir Gareth and that he was the son of a king.

The Lady Liones was speedily rescued: and became
the wife of Sir Gareth, who no longer hid his name
but returned to king Arthur’s court and was honoured
greatly among the Knights of the Round Table.

This is only one of the adventures which Eileen
witnessed in those glorious days. Many a fight she saw
and many a good deed done by king Arthur and his
followers. The enemy whom they all found hardest
to conquer was of course the natural wickedness of
their own hearts. In conquering all other enemies, Sir
Launcelot was the bravest and mightiest of the knights:
but, in the matter of conquering his own sin, he was
the worst!

“You must not leave king Arthur’s court” Titania
said “before you have seen the most interesting thing
‘in all its histories. I mean the QUEST OF THE
SANCGREALL.” “What ever is that?” asked Eileen.
“The Sancgreall” she answered “is the Holy Cup,
which was used at the Last Supper. Saint Joseph of
Arimathea brought it to Britain centuries ago. All
XXV]] One Good Custom. 363

the Knights of the Round Table are most eager’ to
discover. it: for there .is a legend that it will bring
great blessings with it, whithersoever it comes. The
search which they made for it is :called the QUEST
OF THE SANCGREALL: and no story of their adventures
is more wonderful.” omer

Soon after this conversation, the Fairy Queen and
Eileen were out riding with the king. The king had
been to punish some robbers, who had plundered his
subjects. As he was coming home again and was
getting very near his palace, a vivid flash of lightning
was seen above the banqueting-hall, wherein the Knights
of the Round Table were assembled. The roofs of the
hall seemed to be rolled.in smoke. The king gave a
cry of alarm. “My beautiful palace is destroyed”
he said: and he rode the faster, as did also his unseen
companions. So they soon came to the hall.

The palace was unhurt. But all the knights were
in a state of the greatest excitement: and all were
steadfastly gazing towards one of the windows of the
hall, where however the king could see nothing to
account for their behaviour. “Speak, Sir Percivale”
said Arthur to the nearest knight. “What has hap-
pened?” Then Sir Percivale told the king how that
the Holy Cup, the Sancgreall, had come to the hall in
the lightning-flash, had passed along through their
midst, and had vanished through the window, whereto
the steadfast gaze of all was turned. All the knights
364 One Good Custom. [Cx

had seen the glorious light of it: but one alone, Sir
Galahad by name, had seen the Sancgreall itself. Then
many knights vowed each a. vow that he would. search
for the Sancgreall: and undergo every danger in the
quest of it. ~ es!

The king inclined to think that these knights. must
be mad: but he ‘did not try to persuade them to give
up the quest, because he’ said :—%“ They. have vowed
vows: and they must keep these vows.” Sir Gawaine,
Sir Bors, Sir Launcelot and many other knights had
sworn this vow: and among the fest was a beautiful
young knight, clothed in white armour. This was Sir
Galahad !—he who chad seen the Cup. “Alas!” said
king Arthur to Sir Gawaine. “I have: lost, through
this vow of -yours, the fairest fellowship. and truest of
knighthood that ever were seen together in any realm
in this world. For, when they shall depart hence, I
am sure that they all shall never meet together again
in this world, For many shall die in this quest.’ Few,
if any, shall return. The custom, which has been the
glory of my kingdom, shall be done away :—the custom
of many knights banding. themselves together in the
defence of what is right, and helping the weak against
their oppressors. The custom shall be done away.” “I
am sotry for that”: said. Eileen softly: “for it was a
good custom.” “It was” Titania said.

_There was great sorrow in the court when the knights

were about to set forth: especially among the ladies,
ERY] One Good. Custom. 365

For no. ladies .were ‘to. Baccounpany: ge Knights meen this
holy quest. ve Gate pele Ps

And the king said:—“I am sure’ that by reason of
this quest all ye of thé Round Table will.depart from
me eternally: and never shall.I see. you agairi all to-
gether. ‘Therefore ‘before ye start, let me see you’ all
together once more in the meadow of Camelot! For
there shall be.a great. tournament to-morrow «in. that
meadow: a tournament which men shall ‘spéak of in
after days when you.ate dead. Then shall .they rejoice
to remember that such a gathering ‘of brave knights
ever met together in this land.of Britain.” And they
all consented that it should be as the king desired.

Accordingly on the: morrow Titania and Eileen were
in their places, with the rest of the on-lookers; in ‘the
meadow: of ‘Camelot. And they saw a noble tourna-
ment :—brave knights fighting in mock combat, for
honour and glory, and making ‘the country re-echo with
their war-cries.. And the golden-haired queen Guenever
was in a tower, with all her ladies: to .behold that
tournament, and to see the last of the departing
knights.

‘The knight who ‘won most glory in these sports
was Sir Galahad—he. who had seen the Sancgreall.
“That is the knight” Titania said “whom Heaven
loves. There is no selfishness in him. The -order
of the Round Table has: many other knights, who
do brave and’ good things.. But there is much selfish-
366 One Good Custom. “fx.

ness'in them ‘along with their. goodness. They | think
of their own reputation: Sir Galahad thinks little of
fame and much of virtue. They value the praises of
king Arthur above all things: Sir Galahad values most
the praise of his own conscience. See you that curious
chair?” Eileen was much startled by this odd question,
which. the Queen had put so suddenly, in the midst of
her graver remarks. “I see it” said she.. “That chair
is called the SIEGE PERILOUS. And Merlin, the
wise man who made “it, said :—! Whoever’ sits in that
chair will be lost’ When the other knights heard this,
they avoided the chair: but Sir Galahad immediately
sat him down in the SIEGE PERILOUS. For said
he :—‘If I lose myself, I save myself. Hard as that
saying is, it contains all the truth. Sir Galahad will
achieve more than they all: for he does not seek his
own glory, and the truest greatness is humility!”

Then the knights rode forth, The Fairy Queen and
Eileen followed them: sometimes one and sometimes
' another. As Eileen now expected, it was Sir’ Galahad
alone, who: enjoyed the full blessings of the vision: of
the Sancgreall.

Sir Percivale saw it also: but the holy vision. made
him afraid of this wicked world. And he went into a
monastery: not understanding that the truest goodness

is not to fly from the world, but to try.and make all
- people in the world happier than before. Sir Gawaine
turned aside from the quest.in pursuit of some chance
XXV.] One Good Custom. 367

amusement: and forgat his vow. Sir Launcelot;—what
of Sir Launcelot, the mightiest of all Arthur’s knights?
He got as far as the chamber, wherein the Sancgreall
was. But he had many wicked ideas. in his heart. .He
could not seé the vision, .unless he abandoned those
wicked ideas. ‘And he was afraid. Sir Bors saw the
vision: and would have had Sir Launcelot see it too.
But he could not persuade him to repent. :

A long time was spent in the QUEST OF THE
SANCGREALL. If you were to meet. Eileen, she
could entertain you for many a long hour in telling you
the adventures that she saw in those days. She liked
Sir Galahad the best. Many wicked customs: did he
destroy: and much kindness did he do to all about him,
as he passed along. She was. very glad that the bless-
ings of the vision came to him. ;

Eileen never saw the SANCGREALL herself. She
never quite knew, whether to believe in its actual exist-
ence. or whether it might not be a mere vision in the
minds of men. But certainly the story of its quest is
real enough. The adventures of the knights and the
self-sacrifices that they endured in order to make them-
selves holy enough to see the Holy Cup:—these Eileen
saw with her own eyes. These self-sacrifices were them-
selves a holy thing: well-nigh as holy, Titania said, as
the Cup itself would be if indeed it was on earth.

The king had rightly prophesied. Many of his knights
were killed in the QUEST OF THE SANCGREALL:. few
368 One Good Custom. * [em

saw the vision: and the whole assembly of the Knights
of ‘the Round Table was never:seen again in its ancient
glory at king Arthur’s court. :
Evil days came. Sir Launcelot, still unrepenting of
his ‘sins, still unblessed with ,the holy ‘vision; rebelled
against the good king, who had made him great. The
golden-haired queen Guenever, whom Arthur had sup-
posed to be as. good as she was beautiful, became a very
wicked woman: and was even numbered’ among her
lord’s enemies. The order of the Round Table ‘began to
be full of quarrelsomeness: and the knights thought no
longer of their vows. The purpose of the king’s life was
spoiled: and he was broken-hearted.
‘The war between Arthur and Sir Launcelot raged long
and fiercely: and the whole country was very miserable,
as always happens in the ‘time of civil: war. . At last
the, king received a grievous wound. Eileen stood with
Titania in the little ruined chapter to which the monarch
had been carried. . One’ knight only was there—Sir
Bedivere: and he was in great grief at seeing his master
so ill. But Arthur said :—‘ Weep no more, Sir Bedivere:
My time is nearly run. Therefore take you Excalibur,
my good sword: and go.with it unto yonder water-side.
And, when thou comest thither, I charge thee throw my
sword into that water. Then come again: and tell. me
what thou shalt see there.”. “My lord” said Sir Bedivere
“your command shall be done.” So the knight took the
sword and departed for a while : and then camie back again.
XXV] One Good Custom. 369

Arthur knew the truth the moment he saw his face.

Sir Bedivere had not been able to make up his mind
to part with the jewelled sword: but had hidden it.
“Thou hast not done my bidding” said the wounded
king. “Go again.”

Sir Bedivere started forth a second time. But when he
came back again, Arthur said as before: “False knight,
thou still hast not obeyed me. Dost thou forget thy
king, because he is dying?” Then Sir Bedivere rushed
forth again: and, when he came back this time, the king
knew by his face that he had now done as he was bidden.
“What happened” he asked “when thou threwest in the
sword?” “Sir king” said the other “the thing which
happened is passing strange. I threw the sword into the
water as far as I might: and there came an arm above
the water, clothed in white samite, and met the sword,
and caught it in the hand. The hand shook it thrice and
brandished it: and then vanished away into the water.
What that hand can have been I know not. Yet I swear
that I speak the truth, though perchance thou wilt not
believe me.” Titania smiled meaningly at Eileen. She
believed him. She knew that the arm was the arm of
the fairy, the servant of the Lady of the Lake, who
had first given the king the sword Excalibur.

Moreover Arthur also did believe the knight. He
knew it was a fairy sword: and was not surprised at
the marvellous tale the knight had told.

“Alas!” said the king. “Help me from hence. I fear

24
B90 One Good Custom. (Cu.

I may have already tarried too long.” Then Sir Bedivere
carried the king to the lake, where Eileen had first
seen the water-fairies and the sword Excalibur. And
when they were at the water’s side a little barge came
toward them with many beautiful fairies in it. And
there were three fairy-princesses in the barge, dressed
in the garb of mourning, and with black hoods upon
their heads. And when they saw king Arthur, wounded
and weak, and too helpless even to walk without the
aid of Sir Bedivere, they wept and shrieked for the
piteous plight of so good and brave a king.

“Now put me into the barge” said the king. And Sir
Bedivere softly laid him in the barge. The three
fairy-princesses received him with great mourning.
And in the lap of one of them king Arthur laid his
head. And that princess said:—‘ Ah! dear brother,
why have ye tarried so long from me? Alas! this
wound on your head has taken over much cold.”
And the fairies made ready to row the barge away.

Titania and Eileen stood with Sir Bedivere upon
the bank. The knight was in sore distress. “Alas!
my lord Arthur” he cried “what shall become of me,
now that thou leavest me here alone among mine
enemies? The glorious days are gone indeed. The
Round Table is no more. Oh! the pity of it that
the good custom, which thou gavest us, should be
destroyed! The earth is no longer fit to live in. I
desire to die.” “Comfort thyself” said the king. “The
XXV.] One Good Custom. a7

Round Table and the custom that I gave you are
things of the past indeed: but the good and beautiful
can never be a thing of the past. This form and
fashion of them is indeed gone. And the reason
thereof is that one good custom cannot last for ever.
It is the duty of men each to help to make the
fashions of his own day beautiful and good. The days
shall come when this rude and rough Britain of to-day,
which even in the most glorious hours of my Round
Table was full of horrible sights and sounds, shall
become a land of peace. The battles of good knights
in defence of the right are glorious and lovely. But
peace and widespread plenty among all the folk are
more glorious and lovely still. I pray for thee and
Britain that these things may some day be. Pray thou
for me in turn. Yet shalt thou never see me again:
for I go with the fairies to the Isle of the Blest.”

And so they that were in the barge rowed from
the land. As soon as Sir Bedivere had lost sight of
the barge, he wept and wailed long:—for the loss of
his noble lord. Then he departed to the forest: to
think alone and silently about his master’s words.

* *% % * *

The water-fairies thronged about Titania: and yoked
her eaglets again to the golden car. And they soon
bore their burden back to the station whence they had
come: and when they had taken their places in the

Magic Train, the journey was continued as before.
CHAPTER XXVI.

TARA’S HALLS.

“The harp that once through Tara’s halls
the soul of music shed.”

—Tuomas Moore.
T was at “THE YEAR OF OUR LORD FOUR HUNDRED
AND TWENTY-TWO ” that the Magic Train next halted :
and Eileen heard with great delight the command
given by the Fairy Queen to the golden eaglets to
take them once again to Ireland: and set them down

in the famous halls of Tara in the kingdom of Meath.
Titania had chosen exactly the right moment for
their approach: king Leéogaire and his court were
assembled in the royal palace to keep high-festival : and
the great and glorious hall was filled to overflowing
with “chiefs and ladies bright.” It was the feast of
Bealtinne: once in every year, on the evening of the
birthday of the king of Tara, his court assembled to
do him honour: no other festival might lawfully be
held that night, nor might any other fire be lighted in
that country till the king’s palace-fire had first been
seen on Tara hill. This fire was not lit till most of

372
Cu. XXVIJ Tara’s Halls. a78 |

the expected guests were come: and the Druid priests
were there to bless the ceremony. It was then intended,
after having thus done their duty to the heathen gods,—
who were supposed to be delighted with this ceremony,
—to call upon the minstrels for their melodies and the
bards for their songs: then too gay dances would begin
and merry feasting therewithal.

The moment was now at hand for setting fire to the
huge pile upon the hill, that would be for a sign to the
whole country-side that all men might light their fires,
for that the time was come: and the Druids were
wending their way toward the place with torches in
their hands: when a great cry burst from the assembly
“Look toward Slane”: they exclaimed: “there is another
fire yonder which has been lit before the king’s, and
already it is burning high and bright.”

The king was very wroth: Eileen had never seen a
man so angry. He was a tall magnificent man, with
large blue eyes and a jolly rubicund face, that was accus-
tomed to wear a genial smile and look good-temperedly
at everything. But, at this intelligence, the smile gave
place to an angry frown: and the appearance of good
temper to an ungovernable fury. The chiefs rose to
their feet and drew their swords :—the Druids tore their
garments and seemed beside themselves :—all professed
themselves to be insulted at the insult to their king,
and eagerly offered to work his majesty’s pleasure on

the offenders. “Go then and kill these men for me”
a74 Tara’s Halls. eae

said the king. “Let-them die forthwith: I will have no
mercy on them.—Those who are strangers to us and
our gods are enemies: and it is no sin to slay them.
Bring me music”: he said: “and set the wine upon
the table.”

Well has it been said that music has charms to soothe
the savage breast: and never had the saying been
proved more true than now. King Leogaire was indeed
a savage: and in his present temper not a pleasant
one to look upon. The evil passions of hate and anger
showed themselves undisguisedly in his face: and he
still muttered reviling words. But when the minstrel
stood before him and touched his instrument, when the
harp that Eileen had so often longed to hear shed the
soul of music through the halls of Tara, when its cadences,
which at first were stern (for the minstrel thought to
adapt his strains to his master’s mood), changed from
stern to plaintive and from plaintive again to merry,
the mood of the monarch altered with the altering
harmonies: and he broke into a laugh, when the music
ceased. “It may have been some accident” he said.
“There is no reason, at least, why we should not be
merry now: the offenders are surely dead.”

Even as he spake, one of the chieftains who had left
the hall returned. “The man who lit the fire” he said
“was one who is named Patrick: he intended it for a
sacred ceremony: perchance he wist not of thy decree.

Anyway he is as good as dead. A message was sent
XXVL] Tara’s Halls. 375

him, saying thou badst him come hither: but twelve
men have been hidden on the way that he must pass,
who have sworn by the sun that they will slay the
fellow—and they are not likely to forswear themselves.”

“Tt is well” the king replied, and his good humour was
now entirely recovered. “Let us think no more about
it: but turn us to the feast instead.”

They were preparing accordingly to sit. them down
and enjoy the banquet, and the bards were to beguile
the time with pleasant minstrelsy while the nobles feasted :
when suddenly the king started up again saying :—“I see
through the open window, a strange man habited in white
' garments: he is making this way accompanied by others
arrayed as himself: who is he?” The chief who had
spoken before looked in the direction indicated by king
Leogaire. “It is the man” he cried in the utmost
astonishment—“ the man who lit the fire—the man whom
I supposed to have been murdered before now. He must
be a favourite of Heaven: or he would not have escaped
the ken of those who were set to watch and murder him.”
By this time, the mysterious visitor had come very near
to the palace door: and the king had only time to
‘mutter sullenly—“ He comes! beware! Let none salute
him, or rise at his approach”—when the door opened:
and Saint Patrick entered. He had a mitre upon his
head, and that sacred staff which had once belonged, it
was said, to Christ Himself was in his hand: he was robed

entirely in pure white: he was of venerable appearance
376 Tara’s Halls. [Cu.

and stood calm as a statue before the angry king. He
was followed by priests and choir, all robed as himself
in the purest white: and a fair boy, with bright eyes
and a face that shone with holy love, the favourite of the
Saint, was of the company. The king was about to
address them: when, to the astonishment of all, the
white-robed choir raised a chant: of which both the
music and the words-were utterly unlike anything that
the men of Tara had ever heard before.

The music to which the Irish of those days were
accustomed was of the kind that the Irish of all times
have always loved :—music, which, though varying much
in its moods—sometimes stern and sometimes plaintive—
was ever of a fiery and excited nature, trembling with
passion and bursting with feeling. The music to which
they now listened was the solemn chant of a Roman
canticle: grand, magnificent, stately: but unchanging
and passionless.

Nor were the words which met their ears less astonishing
than the music. The only songs that had hitherto been
known in Ireland were songs of love and war, of the
pride of fair women and the glories of brave men. The
song to which they now listened was entirely unknown
‘to them: it was the song which was first sung by the’
Virgin Mary before the birth of Christ and which was
afterwards adopted by Christians everywhere as part of
their evening service. The ideas of it—which Saint

Patrick presently expounded to them in their native
XXVL] Tara’s Halls. a7.

tongue—sounded strange indeed to the heathen chiefs.
“He hath put down the mighty from their seat: and
hath exalted the humble and meek.” Why! this was
the very opposite of their religion: which honoured
the mighty and despised the lowly. What could the
meaning be?

The Irish king was moved in spite of himself: for
the second time that day he forgot his wrath under the
influence of music: and, instead of offering violence to
his visitors, or threatening them, he bade them explain to
him the strange things, of which they had been singing.

Then Patrick told the assembly in simple words the
beautiful story of the life of Christ: the warriors sat in
silent awe, while he preached to them: and when he
had made an end of speaking, the king was heard to
whisper to a chieftain at his side:—“It were better for
me to believe than die!” Then he looked at the Druid
priests of his own religion: and hesitated. At last he
spake to Saint Patrick and said :—*‘It is a hard matter of
which you speak to me. I am an old warrior: and I
do not believe there is anything good in mercy. The
more men we kill in this world, the happier will be
our life hereafter. That is my creed. But” he added
thoughtfully “ye may be right: I will not gainsay that.
So preach wherever ye choose: I shall not forbid the
men of Tara to be Christians if they please.”

Then Dubtach, the chief of the bards, came to
Patrick and said that he would join the band that had
378 Tara’s Halls. [Cu

brought these good tidings to Ireland: and would help
them to publish the gospel everywhere. - And, after him,
many more wild-visaged Irishmen said the same: and
Saint Patrick received them one and all. “Behold!”
said the Saint “this little three-leaved shamrock that I
have picked on its native Irish soil. It is a symbol of
the beauty of the Three Persons in One God.” And, in
that Name, he baptised them in Zara’s halls.

Titania then signed to Eileen that it was time for them
to go: and they left the palace together. Close by,
the golden eaglets were waiting with the car: Titania
bade her ‘enter it, but Eileen was slow to do so. The
Queen asked the reason of this hesitation. “I can hardly
bear to leave Ireland” she said “until 1 have seen more
of the Holy Saint. From my earliest days I have read
stories of his good works, He is the best friend Ireland
ever had: and I too owe him much: for he is the cause
of my having this delightful journey with you. His face
is so beautiful and his thoughts are so noble that I would
fain linger a little longer where he is.” The Fairy Queen
acceded to the request. “The night is now far spent”:
she said: “the warriors will soon seek their rest :—and
the priests too. So we will sleep also. I will bear you
to the grove at the foot of Mount Cruachan, which is
not far distant: and in the morning you shall see more

of Saint Patrick and his holy work.” Eileen was soon.
wafted thither on the wings of fairies: and ere long

sank into a gentle sleep.
XXVL] Tara’s Halls. 379

She awoke with the sunrise: and found herself by
the side of a well of sparkling water, pure as crystal:
shaded on one side by darkling foliage. Titania was
standing near her, bright and beautiful as ever. “Look”
she said “ here come the two princesses Fedelm and Ethna,
daughters of king Leogaire.” Eileen raised her eyes
accordingly: and beheld two of the prettiest young
maidens that could be seen, coming quickly, hand in
hand, toward the well. Titania and Eileen withdrew
to some little distance: and watched, from within their
invisible cloud, to see what would happen next.

The sisters were evidently intending to enjoy an
early bathe in the cool tempting fountain. First they
unlooped their hair, which fell about them in luscious
profusion and was soon thrown to and fro by the fresh
breezes against each others cheeks. Next they took
off their shoes: and dipped their fair naked feet into
the water, as if to try whether it were very cold. Then
they unclasped their girdles: and were proceeding to
divest themselves of the rich robes in which they were
loosely clad:—when they were arrested by the sound
of voices: and after hastily donning again what they
had taken off, looked blushingly to see what was the
cause of this unwelcome interruption.

The sound which they had heard was the chant of
Saint Patrick’s choir: and now he stood before them
with his holy following. The two princesses gazed in

silent awe at the solemn company: and were uncertain
380 Tara’s Halls. [cu

whether or no to address them. At last Fedelm raised
her voice and said:—“ This land, holy men, is the
kingdom of Eire: and our father Leogaire rules over it.
Whence do you come?” “We come from a kingdom —
that is far off, yet near” was the reply. “The wise
love it: the wicked fear it. We come with good
tidings for some: and bad for others.” Then Fedelm
and Ethna beset the Holy Man with questions. Who
was the ruler of their kingdom? Were the men brave
in it? the women fair? Was it like the kingdom of the
king of Tara? :

The chiefs of that kingdom, was the reply, were brave
in fighting against evil: the maidens of it were fair
indeed, and of spotless purity. The King was the King
of Kings and Lord of Lords.

Were there no poor and hungry in their kingdom?
was there no suffering and sin and sorrow?

In their kingdom, was the answer, the poor and those
that mourn are blessed above all others: there the
wicked cease from troubling and the weary are at
rest. :

So, answering the maidens’ questions, Saint Patrick
and his followers taught them the Christian faith. Very
strange it was to them, as it had been to their father
yesternight. Those who have known it from their baby-
-hood can never realise how strange it was to those who
had been brought up in a ‘land, where bloodshed and

violence were things held in honour and where to be
XXVL] Tara’s Halls. 381

at peace was accounted cowardice. Yet the princesses
knew now that they had found a better way: and they
were so delighted with the discourse of Saint Patrick,
that they declared their willingness to conform to any
course of life which would render them acceptable to
such a King as he announced.

So, at the fountain,—where not an hour since they
had been unrobing for their bath, and where they had
been laughing as they went heedless of all thoughts but
of the joy it was to live and move at all on such a
morning,—happy in each other’s love and careless of
all the world besides,—at that fountain it came to pass
that they now kneeled down together, and the Saint
signed their. foreheads with the sign of the Cross: and
they became consecrated virgins of the Church, bound
to the service which the Holy Patrick had preached to
them and to the love of all the world.

The following of Saint Patrick waxed greater day by
day: and rough churches were built over all the land.
And when one Christmas morning men were coming
together from every quarter to welcome the good news,
and Eileen, standing near the open door of one of those
rude early churches, was listening to the solemn sound
of the mass-bell, she suddenly marked a fair graceful
girl, who seemed to come rushing straight from the tall
green reeds which surrounded a wild lake hard by, as
if to. join the congregation which was flocking past
her into the sacred building. Saint Patrick himself
382 Tara’s Halls. [Cu.

was standing at the entrance: and when she saw
him the maiden fell down at his feet. “I am
Fionnuala”: she said: “the lonely daughter of Lir.
The Evil Powers turned me, centuries since, into the
image of a swan: but the sound of your mass-bell has
broken the charm: and I am a woman once again.
The swan has uttered its last sweet’ song and died:
and my spirit has come forth again into its natural
body.” The folk said that the girl was mad: and, to
look at her, it seemed likely enough. But Saint Patrick
laid his hands upon her head: and comforted her.
Eileen, after all that she had seen, was half inclined to
think there was some truth in the tale which the
maiden told: and Titania.did not say- her nay.

So, far and near, through all the country-side, Saint
Patrick pursued his mission: and Eileen still followed
in his footsteps, drawn, like her fellow-countrywomen,
Fedelm and Ethna, of so many centuries since, by the
fascination of his presence and discourse. “Indeed”
said Titania “you are right: Erin owes more to Patrick
than to any other man. And yet Erin had not been
kind to him: for years he had been a miserable slave
to Milcho, an Irish chieftain, and, until he escaped from
Ireland, he had no earthly happiness. But, like a true
Christian, he loved his enemies. He heard in dreams
‘the voice of the Irish’ calling to him for help: and
so he came to preach to them. To Milcho himself, his
old cruel master, he did not grudge the gospel which
XXV1.] Tara’s Halls. 383

he preached to others: but that Milcho was stubborn
and would not listen.”

Many wonderful works did Patrick do: and Eileen
was always there, watching him still with the deepest
interest. But the time was drawing nigh when she
was to part from him: and one day, as the holy men
were journeying on their way, it came to pass that they
were attacked by ferocious brigands, of whom the Irish
woods were full. With the help of his disciples, the
Saint defended himself: and MacKyle the brigand-chief
was made their prisoner. He expected to be hanged:
for that was the usual fate of such men, when worsted
by those whom they attacked: but the Christians had
pity on him. Not only did.they spare his life: but
they taught him their own faith, He was christened:
and professed himself willing to undergo any penance
which Patrick might ordain. Saint Patrick thought that a
severe trial would be good for him: so he bade him find
a boat made of one hide and put to sea therein, taking
with him nothing but a coarse garment: to trust him-
self oarless and rudderless to the mercy of the wind
and tide: to let the boat be wafted whither Heaven
should please: and to preach the gospel wherever he
first should land. The man declared that he would
do it.

That. day Titania again suggested to Eileen that they
should return to the Magic Train: urging that she still
had a long journey before her and that it would not
384 Tara’s Halls. [Cu. XXVI

be well to dally too. long at one station, lest she should
weary before her travelling was over. Eileen, with some
reluctance, consented :—“ Only, before we go” she said
“let us see how this brigand-chief will keep his promise.”
So it was determined that they should follow him: and
they saw him perform his perilous journey in safety.
He landed on the Isle of Man: preached diligently
there: and became the Bishop of the Island. So Saint
Patrick knew how to find the good and beautiful in
everything: and turned to good use the most unlikely
instruments.. And Ireland became a Christian country.
* * * : * *
Then at last Eileen and Titania did return to the

station, and resumed their journey.
CHAPTER XXVII.

CHRISTMAS.

“And the Christmas bells are ringing:
and the Christmas waits are singing.”
—Old Christmas Carol,

ROM the time of Saint Patrick the train sped on
K over a great distance of time, before Eileen and
the Fairy Queen again alighted at any station.
They saw meanwhile a number of interesting sights
from the windows of their railway-carriage. A crowd
of kings and emperors and popes passed before her
eyes. And there too were the saints of the Christian
Church undergoing every torture rather than renounce
their faith—fighting with lions, being burned with fire,
and suffering a hundred other hideous deaths. But
these things, despite the glory of them, were so horrible
to the sight, that the short quick glances, which they
had thereof as the train flew swiftly past, were quite
enough: there was no need to stay. Moreover there
were other martyrs there beside the martyrs of religion
—martyrs who suffered and died for the sake of freedom
and their country’s weal. Such among. others was
385 25
386 Christmas. [Cu

Boadicea, the heroic British queen of famous memory :
who was publicly scourged, before the eyes of the
soldiery, because she would not submit to the rule of
the cruel Romans, who had stolen her daughters from
her and tried to make the Britons into slaves. Eileen
saw her plainly for a little space struggling against her
foes: and the train had stayed on its course for a
moment when Boadicea took poison rather than fall
into the hands. of those same enemies, whom her armies
grievously discomfited but could not destroy. And
Eileen saw Hermann too, the German patriot: who fought
to the bitter death against these same Romans: and
she saw a number of other noble barbarians, who fell
with him. But it would take a whole book by itself -
to describe all the many things which Eileen beheld,
between the stations, from the windows of the train:
for it was four hundred and fifty years from the time of
Saint Patrick before they stopped again.

This time the name of the station was very easy to
read. It consisted of one word only: and that word
was “CHRISTMAS.” As soon as she saw this, Eileen
was very glad. No children need to be reminded of
the memories which cluster round the-name of Christmas :
—when the snow is on the ground and the robins on
the window-sill: when the mistletoe sprouts on the oak
and the bell-ringers play beneath: when waits and
mummers ply their various tasks: when the rooms are
decked’ with holly and the chestnuts crackle in the
XXVIL] Christmas. 387

grate: when the cricket chirrups on the hearth for
very joy that it is holiday-time and that all the fond
members of each family have put aside their many
businesses and are met together to keep the happy
festival : and when peace and plenty are outpoured and
men delight freely to bestow such good things as they
can afford upon those who are poorer than themselves.

Eileen even in the course of her short life could
remember many a merry Christmas much like this: for
in some of these things, though not in all (since the
works of nature and of custom must needs bring about
some varieties), Christmas is very much the same as here
not only in Ireland but over half the world.

But the Queen told her that the Christmas which
she was now to see was such an one as she had never
seen before. “For you are to see the Christmas” she
said “from which all other Christmases have their
meaning. And more than this:—you are to see the
birth and life and death from which all other births
and lives and deaths should have their meaning too.
And when you are at the place, to which the car will
take you at this season, the voice of the fairies will be
hushed : for powers mightier than fairies are abroad upon
the earth. I shall but bear you to the place: and then
say nothing. This is a story which needs no words.”

So saying, Titania showed Eileen that they were
being wafted to the “country near to Bethlehem”: and
the story of what Eileen now saw is a story which
388 Christmas. [Cu

every child knows well. What Titania said was true
indeed :—no other words are needed to tell that story,
which has been divinely well told long since. But great
men of many ages have loved to paint it all—each
after the image of his own imagination. The scenes

‘as they so imagined them were often vastly different
—as regards outward things the clothing of the men
and women, the buildings and the landscapes and all
the. worldly . surroundings—from the actual scenes
which Eileen saw. But you will remember how Titania
said that the poet’s part is not literally to follow
history: but to catch the spirit and set forth the inner
meaning of it all. Now it is just the same with painters.
Many of these great men knew nothing of the Holy
Land, of the character of Hebrew faces,—nor of the very
appearance of the places where these things happened :
but the spirit of the beautiful and good in them they
did so truly understand that men of all after times have
been fain to fancy the pictures as they fancied them.
These works of art form a world of beauty in themselves:

. and some few glimpses. of their glory are given you
here, eriough to. recall—more fitly than aught else could
do---the chief moments of the oft-repeated tale.


GIAMPIETRINO Ain] [7o follow p. 388 (1).












SCHONGAUER 477x.] [To follow p. 388 (2).
THE CRUCIFIXION.


TITIAN fixv.] [To follow p. 388 (3).
CHRIST APPEARING TO THE MAGDALEN.
XXVIL] Eileen’s Journey. 389

* % cg * *

So Eileen was added to the number of “the witnesses
of these things”: and, when they were in their places
‘again and the train was going on, Eileen said quietly :—
’ “No more: after our seeing this, no other sight can
be worth seeing: and no other words worth hearing.”

But the Queen rebuked her: and said —“ You have
indeed seen and heard that which is greatest and best
in all the world. But, though there is nothing else in
what you shall yet see that is absolutely pure or un-
spotted with evil, there is much in the world that is
bright and beautiful still. Remember what you have
seen as being most beautiful of all: but do not close
your eyes to whatever is in any sort beautiful beside.
Rather is it your part to look out for what is most
bright and beautiful in all things—at all times—every-
where: and hail it with delight as akiz to the most
beautiful of all. ‘There is one glory of the sun and
another glory of the moon and another glory of the
stars: for one star differeth from another star in glory.’
So though He whom you have seen has lived the
holiest of all lives and has shown men how to live
best, yet there were others before His birth, who lived
noble lives and taught good lessons to their followers.

Some of these you now shall see.”
390 Eileen’s Journey, (Cx. xXvil.

While Eileen was still pondering on these strange
words, the journey was beginning for her through the
centuries which are called “THE CENTURIES BEFORE
CHRIST.”

* * * * *%

What she saw and heard in those centuries shall be

set forth hereafter.



Printed by Hazell, Watson, & Viney, Ld., London and Aylesbury.

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xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008755100001datestamp 2008-11-04setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Eileen's journeydc:creator Jelf, Ernest Arthur, b. 1868Troubridge, Laura, 1858-1929 ( Illustrator )Watson & Hazell ( Printer )dc:subject Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fictionConduct of life -- Juvenile fictionChristian life -- Juvenile fictionImaginary places -- Juvenile fictionVoyages, Imaginary -- Juvenile fictionFairy tales -- Juvenile fictionAdventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fictionGirls -- Juvenile fictionQueens -- Juvenile fictionHonesty -- Juvenile fictionBeauty, Personal -- Juvenile fictionChristmas -- Juvenile fictionCastles -- Juvenile fictionFarmers -- Juvenile fictionLeisure -- Juvenile fictionFantasy literature -- 1899Imaginary voyages -- 1899Juvenile literature -- 1899dc:description by Ernest Arthur Jelf ; with a frontispiece by Mrs. Adrian Hope and numerous other illustrations.Title page printed in black and red.Pictorial front cover and spine; illustrated endpapers.Contains prose and verse.dc:publisher John Murraydc:date 1899dc:type Bookdc:format xiv, 390 p., 17 leaves of plates : ill., ports. ; 22 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00087551&v=00001002232150 (ALEPH)31232391 (OCLC)ALH2542 (NOTIS)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English