Citation
Little bright eyes

Material Information

Title:
Little bright eyes
Series Title:
Father Tuck's "Golden gift" series
Creator:
Burnside, Helen Marion ( Author, Primary )
Guest, Antony ( Author, Secondary )
Bennett, S. E ( Author, Secondary )
Brundage, Frances, 1854-1937 ( Illustrator )
Bowley, May ( Illustrator )
Taylor, Edith ( Illustrator )
Taylor, Mabel ( Illustrator )
Vredenburg, Edric, b. 1860 ( Editor )
Raphael Tuck & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Paris
New York
Publisher:
Raphael Tuck & Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
63, [1] p. : ill. ; 26 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1898 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1898 ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1898 ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
France -- Paris
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from prize inscription.
Statement of Responsibility:
Helen Marion Burnside, Antony Guest, S.E. Bennett &c &c ; illustrated by Frances Brundage, M. Bowley, Edith and Mabel Taylor &c., &c. ; edited by Edric Vredenburg.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026638217 ( ALEPH )
ALG4372 ( NOTIS )
262617002 ( OCLC )

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Full Text



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a Little Bright Eyes.

OR eyes of blue and eyes of brown
K These pretty tales are written down,
To drive away each naughty frown
From little bright eyes.

_And all the pretty pictures, too, |
Are drawn to please brown eyes and blue.
What pains we take to gladden you,

Dear little bright eyes!

And when the sun does early set,

Or when the day is very wet,

From out your nursery cupboard get
Your ‘“ Little Bright Eyes.”



LITTLE BRIGHT EYES.

Or if your brother is not well,

Just sit beside his bed and tell

The grand adventures that befell .
These “ Little Bright Eyes.”

And, so the time will swiftly run,

Yow’ll hardly know the day is done,

And quiet night-time has begun,
Sweet little bright eyes.

And out your nursery candle goes

When, like good children, I suppose

You’ve said your prayers. Then gently close
Your little bright eyes.

Mae Pa 595 beer |







The Man in the Moon.

NCE upon a time there was a little baby who stretched
() out her arms and cried for the moon—the beautiful
round moon, looking in at her nursery window. As you will
guess, she could not have it. |

“The baby orew, and became Marguerite—sweet as a
flower, from the top of her curly head to the tips of her
dancing toes. ; ;

Still she loved the moon. At night she looked out of her

ittle casement window at the beautiful moon shining in the





8 THE MAN IN THE MOON.

dark sky. As she lay in her little white bed she could see
the moon, and she fancied the kind face of the Man in
‘the Moon smiled her good-night, and watched her sleeping
where she lay alone. Beautiful moon! She told it all her
little joys and sorrows, and fell asleep to dream that the kind.
Man in the Moon came down to play with her.

Marguerite’s father, mother, and a little brother she had
never seen, were far away in India. They would come home ?
Meanwhile, Mar-
guerite lived with kind grand-

some day.



mamma, and
made _ friends
and playmates
of the flowers

in the beauti-

ful garden,
and the birds,
and all the

inhabitants of
the field, and
wood, and
farm-yard.
Last, but not
least, she had
the Man in the
Moon.

One morn-



THE MAN IN THE MOON. 0

ing Marguerite tripped down the garden path, full of
importance, with a big book under her arm. She did not
loiter to look at anything. Not even her favourite moon
daisies waving in the wind, not even at the black hen, who
had just been put on her nest with fifteen eggs by the
gardener, nor at the twin lambs in the meadow, or Mollie or
Susan, the cows. She went straight on, out of the gate into
the road. 3

“Good-bye, all of you,” she said. “I am going to school.
I am four years old to-day, and grandmamma says I must
learn all about everything.” -

‘Goodness me!” said the sparrow. ‘‘ Upon my hop that is
surprising.”

‘““T don’t believe in over-education myself,” said the silly-
faced mamma of the twin lambs. ‘I like fresh air and
exercise for children,’ and she smiled at her long-legged
pets.

“The only school I have met is a school of porpoises,”
said the elegant and travelled swallow. ‘I should not like
our Marguerite to get like a porpoise.”

“Marguerite will always be beautiful,” said the faithful
robin, who was her friend all the year round. ‘ Nothing can
spoil her.”

The moon daisies sighed sentimentally in the soft breeze,
and the sunflowers tried to peep over the wall to see Mar-
guerite in the road.

‘‘T am very unhappy,” said Susan, the black cow. ‘ My



10 THE MAN IN THE MOON.

calf has been taken away. I thought Marguerite would be
sorry for me; but now she is gore, I must go and look for my
child.” And she broke through the hedge of the kitchen
garden. Mollie, the red-and-white cow, followed, out of
sympathy, of course.

Marguerite soon got to the school, a square red house,

with a green door, and a bright brass knocker and plate— |

‘“Srrzot ACADEMY FoR Young Lapres AND GENTLEMEN.
Principal: Miss Wappen.”

The eldest young lady of the school. happened to arrive
with Marguerite. She was very kind and grown up, quite
seven.

‘‘Come with me, little dear,” she said; ‘‘and Pll give
your little handies a nice washy-pash.”

‘My hands are quite clean, thank you,” said Marguerite,
with dignity. 3 ;

Such a lot of children were arriving—little girls with
curly hair, little girls with straight hair, and one with a long
red pig-tail.

Little boys, too, curly and straight, dark and fair, and one
little Tommy, still in petticoats, who sucked his thumb.

Then the bell rang, and all the children took their places.
Marguerite, of course, as a new pupil, lowest of all, even
below Tommy, who looked sleepy. At the top of the class
stood the girl with the red pig-tail. How clever she must
be! Marguerite wondered if all clever girls had red pig-tails.



THE MAN IN THE MOON. Il










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Lessons went on, the clever girl seemed to know everything:
She could answer the questions almost before they were
asked. It must be the pig-tail, and Marguerite, wondering
how she would look with one down her back, and thinking it
was rather like Mollie, the red cow’s tail, found she was
getting sleepy. Tommy had sunk to by-bye on his desk
long ago.
Suddenly she woke up, for Miss Wappem was saying—

‘“‘ Sit down, children, and we’ll learn about the Moon!”



12 THE MAN IN THE MOON.

So, with a
blackboard, and
pictures, and
diagrams, Miss
Wappem gaye
a lecture on the
moon. .

She had no
more interested
listener than.
little Marguerite.
The clever girl
smiled faintly,



as who should
say: “I know
all that, and a oreat deal more too.”

Tommy, happily, and with no disguise, slept and snored.

Other curly pates wagged with inattentive mischief, and
smooth heads were demure, but vacant. Marguerite was all
eyes and ears, and longing to learn.

Miss Wappem went back to earliest days, millions of
years ago, when the red-hot moon flew away from. its sister
earth into space by itself.

There it spun, like a humming top, till, exhausted by its
own vitality and spurned away by the earth, it retreated
farther into space and died. Now, there it hung, worn out

and dead—its sole mission to regulate the earth’s tides.



THE MAN IN THE MOON. 13

Then there were lunar pictures—wastes of blue-green
scenery, dreary and lonely.

Whata sad, lifeless moon! And no man at all! His nose
was a blue mountain, his eyes were extinét volcanoes, and his
mouth was a yawning chasm.

Why, it might almost as well, as wicked J ano, the house-
maid, had said, be made of green cheese.

Poor Marguerite went home crying—the friend of a
lifetime had gone. There was no Man in the Moon! School
was a dreadful place. To-morrow, no doubt, she would learn
that there were no fairies, and the day after that her dollies
were not real babies.

‘Oh, my Man in the Moon! My beautiful moon!” she
sobbed, as she ran through the field home.

‘““Why, Marguerite is crying,” said the flowers. ‘There
are dew-drops in her eyes.”

‘That nasty school! I told you so,” said the sheep.

_ “T cried a good deal to-day myself,” said the black cow.
‘But those peas I got in the kitchen garden were delicious,
and made.me feel better.’’

The red-and-white cow had eaten some also, for sympathy,
of course.

‘‘Pve had worries too,” said the black hen. ‘By day-
light I see these eggs gardener gave me are green, and we —
all know what that means.”

‘At any rate, she’s not growing like a porpoise yet,” said

the graceful swallow.



14 THE MAN IN THE MOON.

Night came, and Marguerite cried herself to sleep ; while
the beautiful moon looked down, little disturbed by - Miss
Wappem’s lecture, and, surely, the kind eyes seemed to
twinkle; yet no, there was no Man in the Moon, only
craters and volcanoes and—but here Marguerite slept.

* * *& pS : *

Morning light, and sunshine, and sweet roses dancing
against the window pane. |

And what was this? Beside the bed, the dearest little
boy in the world, with round blue eyes, and a very round
yellow head, as round, as round as the Moon.

‘Oh, dearest of little moonboy playfellows, where did you
come from?”

As you will guess, the little boy was Marguerite’s brother,
sent home from India to be her playfellow.

Of course, Marguerite was quite happy now. But of all
the games they had together and all the adventures that
happened I must tell you another time. Only you may be
quite sure that Marguerite soon loved him quite as much as

her old friend Tue Man in toe Moon.





A Birthday Queen.

BLITHE Birthday Queen,
A Is.she not ?—little Rosie
Is four years of age,
And as sweet as a posy—
She wears a new frock—
With wild rose-buds they’ve crowned her,
And her cheeks are as pink

As the roses around her.



16 A BIRTHDAY QUEEN.

To take her down stairs

Comes her big, merry brother,
For she must be kissed

By the father and mother ;
And loaded with gifts,

And kind greetings by dozens,
From uncles and aunts,

And affectionate cousins.



There’s a tea-party grand
In the wide breezy meadow,
Where tables are spread
In the sycamore’s shadow ;
With good things galore
The table is laden,
With a grand Birthday cake,
For the dear little maiden.



A BIRTHDAY QUEEN. 17

Then a haycock is piled
At the table to throne her, —
Where Queen of the day
All the company crowned her ;
And while they’re at tea
Comes a nightingale singing,
And all round their heads

There are butterflies winging.

And at last it is o’er—

All the feasting so splendid,
And then the fair Queen,

By her subjects attended,





18 _ A BIRTHDAY QUEEN.

Has all the broad field

Full of haycocks to play in,
A world of delight —

For small folk to be gay in!

Queen Rose, you must know,
Has a special attendant—
A smart little page,
In blue velvet resplendent,
Who trots by her side,
And each moment assures her,
She’s Queen of his heart,
And he deeply adores her!

How sweet is the hay,
With dry clover and grasses,
How joyous the shouts
Of the lads and the lasses,
As round the wide field
They go racing each other,
Or try with the hay

A companion to smother.

Then father comes out
With his violoncello,

And calls the smart page,
Who’s a musical fellow,



A BIRTHDAY QUEEN. 19



And plays the guitar—

‘Then the two play together,
And lead a blithe dance,

In the warm summer weather.

Jigs, hornpipes, and reels,
Foot the light-hearted dancers
(They even insist

On performing the Lancers) ;



20 A BIRTHDAY QUEEN.

Till down falls the dew
Of the soft fragrant gloaming,
And mother calls out

That the nurses are coming!

Then round the wee Queen
Swarm the lads and the lasses,
And kiss her ‘“ Good-night,”
Midst the clovers and grasses ;
And soon—very soon—
With her crown of pink roses
Hung over her bed,

Our Queen Rosie reposes !









. From the Sunny South.

HEN Melina came to live at Briardene, she felt so
W very lonely, for Briardene was a great big house
that seemed full of nothing save furniture and servants.
Certainly there was uncle Michael, but uncle Michael was
never visible ; he lived chiefly in his bedroom. The doctor
said that gout kept him there; but the butler said it was
temper, and Melina believed the butler. Only Melina did
not dare to say so, except to Dim and Tim.

Nobody came to visit at Briardene, for uncle Michael
had. quarrelled with everybody ; yes, even with her dear
mamma. But that was because her mamma (who had died
only a year ago) had married an Italian, and a painter.
Melina thought that Italy was a beautiful country—far



22 FROM THE SUNNY SOUTH.

nicer and warmer than England—and that the pictures
her father painted were glorious; but uncle Michael had
different views.

‘‘ Shall I never see uncle Michael?” Melina asked of
Mrs. Mopes, the housekeeper, after she had lived at
Briardene about six weeks. _

“T doubt it,. Missie,”’ answered. Mrs. Mopes. ‘ When
you were expected here, the Squire gave orders that you
were never to enter the west garden, and he uses only
. ' the west rooms and
the west garden.
And I think it just
as well you don’t
see him,’ added
that worthy dame,
with a sniff. ‘“ Wait

until your papa

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autumn, my dear,

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to be done.”
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will be ever so many







months,” cried Me-
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Oe eos eee re ws moist at the thought



FROM THE SUNNY SOUTH. 23

of the endless, lonely days that must transpire ere she dare
laugh, or romp, or sing, as in the old, old days at Florence.

But to a maiden of seven, life cannot always be spent
in cloud. The summer must come, and with it the sunshine.
So on one of the very brightest summer days, when the birds
were singing, and the bees were humming, and the dear
little lambkins were skipping in the fields, Melina, without
saying a word to anyone, took Dim and Tim for a walk.
Neither Melina nor the puppies had ever been so far from
Briardene before, and, of course, every fresh object that
met their view was wonderful, and took a lot of considering.
Dim tried hard to worry the wild roses, and then wished
she had left them alone. For roses have thorns, and thorns
hurt tongues. So Dim howled. Melina, who was standing
a little way from the puppies, thought that Tim was hurt.
So she took him up in her arms to comfort him, which
was rather rough on Dim, with the thorn prickles in her
tongue.

But oh! what a glorious day it was! How those pups
waddled on, and how their little mistress trotted on—lI
cannot tell you how far. Presently, Melina felt tired and
hungry, and so did the puppies. And when the clouds began
to come together.and get friendly, and when the sun was not
at all what it had been, poor Melina started crying.

Not so the puppies. Dim ran after her tail, and Tim
sniffed as if he did not care a jot for anything. Then he
chose a tuft of grass, and walked round it, and scratched it



24 FROM THE SUNNY SOUTH.

soft, and then plumped down, and went fast asleep on it.
Melina took Dim in her arms for company, and then began
to ery a little louder.

Just then a rough-looking man came up.

‘What are you crying for, my little girl ?” he said.

‘‘ Because—I don’t know why,” wailed Melina.

‘“‘ And what are you doing with my dog?” asked the man,
harshly, wrenching Dim from Melina’s arms, and walking
away with her.

Melina was too much afraid to follow, or even to speak at
first. But she saw a nice old gentleman coming along, and
when he got near she told him all about it.

And the old gentleman went after the man, and brought
him back.

“ Give the little girl her dog,” he commanded.

But the man would not, no. Dim was a valuable puppy.

‘Tt is my dog, sir,” said the man, and said it so decidedly
that the old gentleman looked very severely at Melina.

“ Are you sure it. is your dog, little girl?” he
questioned.

“Yes, oh yes, sir; I’m postif it’s my dog, and so is Tim,”
pulling the other puppy from under the tuft of grass.

Tim looked round, opened his mouth, and yawned. Ina
moment the old gentleman saw the strong puppy likeness
between Dim and Tim.

‘You said nothing about a second dog, and you'd better
be off about your business,” he commanded. “Give the little



FROM THE SUNNY SOUTH. 5)

girl her dog,”
and the old
gentleman said
it so sternly
that the tramp
obeyed.

‘“ Now, where
do you live?”
asked the old
gentleman of
Melina, when
her tears were
brushed away,
and Dim and
Tim consented
to stop chasing
their tails.

“At Briar-

dene, sir.”



“Oh! You are Squire Manghan’s little niece?”

“Yes, sir.”
— “Well, ’m going your way. You may come through
these woods. It is shorter, and more direct. He’s a very
cross old man, that Squire,” began the stranger, after a
pause, taking Melina’s hand, and leading the way through

the wood. |
“Oh, drefful,” said Melina, shaking her head. ‘ When



26 FROM THE SUNNY SOUTH.

my papa comes in the autumn I’m going to ask him to take
me away from here. My papa belongs to Italy, you know,
and he’s a grand painter.” :

‘“‘Indeed,” said the old gentleman. ‘So you don’t like
this cross uncle Michael ?” :

‘Now, how can I, when I’ve never seen him? ‘That’s the
silliness of it,” Melina went on. ‘Uncle Michael’s got
nobody here to love him, and I’ve got nobody here to love
me. Now, wouldn’t it have been nice if we could have only
lived together and loved each other? Ive thought of it
ever so often. Now, if uncle Michael had been a nice old
gentleman like you.”

“‘ How do you know I’m nice?” asked the stranger.

‘“‘ Because you speak kindly to me, and you saved my
doggie. But we’re getting near home, and I shall have to
say good-bye. You had better go out of that gate, please,
and be sure uncle Michael does not catch you.”

The old gentleman laughed.

“Well, little girl, if I’m to say good-bye, won’t you give
me a kiss ?—remember, I saved your doggie.” |

“Oh, yes, Pl kiss you,” said Melina. “Thanks; good-
bye!”

* * * * *

“Well, good gracious! Bless me!” cried the butler, rub-
bing his spectacles, and looking out of the still-room window.
‘‘Mrs. Mopes, Mrs. Mopes, look here! Quick—quick! There’s
the Squire with little Miss Melina, and he’s kissing her.”



FROM THE SUNNY SOUTH. 27



And that was how Melina became acquainted with her
uncle Michael.

And it was a very good thing they became known to
one another, for uncle Michael has been dreadfully mangled,
Melina avers. Of course, she means maligned. And when

her father did come to Briardene in the autumn, he consented

ev

to the Squire adopting his little girl.








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Dobbin, the Donkey.

ISS VIOLET, please come away!” entreated nurse ;
M ‘those rough boys might throw stones at you—and
you, Miss Amy and Miss Joan, both of you!”

We were crossing the common; we always. chose it for
our morning walk, because Violet (she is the youngest)
brought an apple, or a biscuit, and sometimes a carrot for the
poor old donkey which browsed there. We did not know his

name, but we called him “ Dobbin” among ourselves.



DOBBIN, THE DONKEY. 29

It was a poor, thin, old little donkey, too old to work any
more, but the wicked village boys did not think he was too
old for sport, for they would jump on his back and beat him
cruelly. No one seemed to care whether Dobbin suffered or
not, except ourselves.

‘“‘ But he hasn’t had the apple!” pleaded Violet, beginning
to cry, because she loved him so.

‘‘ Flow can he have it so far off, and all those horrid boys
pelting him with stones and sticks? You couldn’t go any
nearer, it?s even dangerous standing where we are—so do

please come away!”

said nurse.

“Don’t cry, Violet!” I said, «“ Amy and I will go to papa
about Boer old Dobbin ; the cruel boys shall not hurt him any
more.’

“It’s my donkey,” sobbed Violet.

“Yes, darling, we know it’s your donkey,” said Amy,
kissing her.

Violet always called the donkey hers, but, of course, it
wasn’t really ; we don’t know whose it was. Mamma thinks
a gipsy must have left it to starve on the common. It looked
as if it had been tied to a heavy cart, and its poor body had
been beaten and thumped with a heavy stick, for it had so
little of its coat left.

Tom, our big brother, is coming home from school to-
morrow, sO we are going to try and see if we cannot get him
to befriend Dobbin. |

All. the tittle boys at school are nervous of Tom, so



30 DOBBIN, THE DONKEY.

perhaps he can make the village boys afraid to hurt
Dobbin.

_ Directly we reached home, Amy and I ran to the library
to find papa. He is a doctor; he had been up all night with
a patient, so we found him looking very tired and worried.

‘Papa, we've decided on Violet’s birthday present,” I said.

“‘ And we want your help,” added Amy.

“Tt’s something big this time,” gaid I.

‘“Tt’s tremendous!” said Amy.

‘“‘Violet’s birthday is a month off yet,’ papa answered,
yawning. He wasn’t at all interested, perhaps he was still
too sleepy.

It was so
difficult to make
papa under-
stand without
exactly tell
ing him. We |
wanted him to
make guesses—
such as—‘‘is it
the size of an
orange?” but
he wouldn’t help
us a bit; so at.
last I had to

say,—





DOBBIN, THE DONKEY. ol

‘Tt’s an animal, papa, that we want to give her.”

‘What does Violet want to add to the menagerie, now?”
he asked, quite crossly.

I looked at Amy, and Amy looked at me; we were afraid
to tell him. .

“Tt’s no use, I cannot have any more pets in the house.”

‘“‘But, papa, it couldn’t be in the house, like the dogs and
cats—it’s a—a donkey!” I answered.

“A what?” said papa, sitting very upright.

‘A donkey—old Dobbin on the common, papa. He is
being beaten to death by those cruel boys, and it makes
Violet cry; you said she oughtn’t to cry after her last illness
—didn’t you?” I added slily.

Papa was silent a minute, then he frowned.

‘‘There’s no room for him in the stables ; besides, he must
belong to someone; if we took him it would be highway-
robbery,” said papa; ‘it’s not to be dreamed of—run away,
children, don’t plague me any more about it, at any rate
not to-day.”

So, you see, we had to give it up.

But directly Tom came home we told him about Dobbin,
and how we wished to give him to Violet.

“But Vi mustn’t ride a kicking animal,” said Tom.

“He is too old to kick. Oh, Tom! if you would punish
those boys!” |

Tom laughed.

‘“‘ V’ll have a shot, Joan, shall 1?”



382 DOBBIN, THE DONKEY.




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When he
said that Amy
and I rejoiced ;
and when we
told him that

there was no

“Ye room in the

stables, Tom

said—

“Oh, I will
soon rig him up
a stable in my
own tool-shed,

and groom

him myself until the governor comes round.”

Tom always had been a slave to Violet since she was

a baby, so now we felt sure we should get Dobbin in

the end.

That very afternoon Tom strode across the common to

look at him.

As usual, the boys were pelting Dobbin with stones, but

he nibbled on, twitching his long ears.
Batts, was hitting him on the head.

A horrid boy, named

‘“‘ Now, you little wretch,” said Tom, ‘“ what do you mean

by ill-treating a poor beast like this?”

“Tt ain’t yours,”

replied the dirty urchin.

“T’ve a jolly good mind to thrash you,” said Tom.



DOBBIN, THE DONKEY. 33

‘No you don’t—hit one of your own size,” said the boy,
erimacing. |

The village bully here squared up to Tom.

‘You keep your hands off him, will yer?”

Tom suddenly gripped him. The bully looked terrified—
Tom was so very strong. |

“Let go!” he shouted, striking wildly at Tom.

‘‘ What’s up now, Musgrove?” said a strange voice behind
us. It was the squire.

“These young imps have injured the old donkey, hurt its
eye with a stick—and I believe P’ve the culprit here,” said
Tom, shaking the bully and throwing him down.

‘Poor brute! it would be a kindness to give him to the

knacker,” said the squire; ‘but old Binns would rather
sell him.”
“Old Binns!

does it belong
to him?” cried
Tom. s
“Yes, he told
me the other
day he’d part
with him ‘for a
shiner, — but
he’s not worth
five shillings,”



said the squire.



34 DOBBIN, THE DONKEY.

By this time quite a little crowd had gathered. A lot of
little boys said, ‘‘ There’s a row on, let’s go and see!”
_ What they saw was dear old Dobbin being led home by
Tom—some of the older people cheered Tom, and one said—
“Tt ain’t everyone as would take pity on the poor beast—
but he’s got a good home now for the rest of his days, for the
doctor is the kindest-hearted gentleman in the county.”
So Dobbin was Violet’s birthday present after all! He
looks so sleek and beautiful that you would think he was
quite young—but it is with happiness, we love him 50 dearly.







Dolly’s Skates.

S OU know, mother, I do really think I deserve them.”

3 And Dolly’s big brown eyes looked up very gravely
into her mother’s.

“Oh, and why?” said mother, trying to hide the smile that
would turn the corners of her mouth.

‘“‘ Because I have saved and saved, you can’t think how
hard, and so long, too—I should say it was years. And I
haven’t bought anything, no sweets, and no tea-sets, and
—nothing.”

“Oh yes, you have!” said mother, looking down very
tenderly at the little face up-turned to hers, and giving
Dolly’s hand a little squeeze as they walked briskly along the
frozen street. “‘ You gave Daddy that nice pocket-book on

his birthday, and me that beautiful fuchsia, on mine.”



36 DOLLY’S SKATES.

“Why, of course ;
what's the good of
mothers and daddies
if you can’t give them
things?”

‘What, indeed?” said
her mother. “ And now
you are going to have
your reward for saving.”

“Yes,” cried Dolly,
nodding her ' little head
till the bright brown
locks shook themselves
loose beneath her pretty
red hood. “Now I am
going to buy my skates



—four shillings and
threepence.”

She said “four shillings and threepence,” because it
sounded so much more important than ‘‘ four and three.” At
the thought of the purchase she was going to make, she
began tripping merrily along by her mother’s side in little
polka steps, and then suddenly dropped into a very quiet and
well-behaved style of walking. )

“Oh, I forgot,” she said. ‘‘ Nurse says ladies don’t dance
in the street. But I am so happy, because I’m going to

learn skating, aren’t I, mother?”

-



DOLLY’S SKATES. 37

She held her little head up very proudly, for it really is a
great and wonderful thing to learn skating when you are.
only six. Why, there was her cousin Nellie only just
beginning to learn, and she, as Dolly said, was almost quite
growed up—sixteen, or some enormous age like that.

“Let us go down here,” said mother, and they turned
into a bye street full of poor shabby cottages. “It’s a short
cut, and the road is sure to be clean in this hard frost.’”

They were not quite so merry now, for mother’s eyes
were grave and sad as she looked from time to time at the
unwholesome dwellings and the poor shivering people who
came in and out of them; and Dolly, seeing the children
playing in the streets, and noticing what poor shabby clothes
they had, and how few even of them, felt somehow—she
could not understand why—a little ashamed of herself. But
the poor children seemed happy enough, and laughed and
shouted and scampered about. Presently, to her great sur-
prise, Dolly noticed a little girl, rather younger than herself,
running down the street, holding in her arms a lovely wax
doll, dressed in the height of doll’s fashion. Just then the
most terrible accident happened. The little girl was step-
ping on to the path, and was so wrapped up in her beautiful
doll that she did not notice she was crossing over a slide
the boys had made. At that moment a boy came flying
down like the wind, and he accidentally knocked the doll
out of her hand. The boy behind him, not having time to

stop himself, stumbled against it, and in recovering himself.



36 DOLLY'S SKATES.

trod right on the doll’s face and smashed it to pieces. Just
as he jumped off it, a mischievous fox terrier jumped on,
and seizing the doll in its mouth tore its beautiful clothes
to tatters. The poor little owner of the doll set up a dismal
and dreadful howl, and Dolly felt inclined to cry with her.
She dropped her mother’s hand, and ran over to the little
girl.

‘¢O, little girl,” she cried, “I am so very sorry for you.”

The little girl stopped howling and looked up surprised that
any one who looked like a fairy out of a story book should
stop to speak to her, and to speak so kindly too.

‘“¢ Who gave it you?” Dolly went on.

“JT dot her at a treat yast
night,” said the little girl, sobbing











again quite bitterly. ‘The kind
lady dave it me. O, my booful
dolly—my booful ickle dolly!” 7

Then Dolly ran up to her
mother with tears in her pretty
brown eyes. 4

‘‘Mother,” she said, ‘I don’t
want to buy any nasty skates. I
want to buy that poor
little girl a new doll.”

“So you shall, my
darling,” said her

ee mother. ‘Is this your



DOLLY’S SKATES. 39

little girl?”
she went on,
turning to a
respectable
woman who,
at the sound -
Ol Crying,
came hurrying
down the
street, dryin o

her arms on



her apron.



“Yes, ma’am ;
and whatever the poor mite 7ill do without her doll I can’t
say. It’s cruel hard.”

“My little girl,” Dolly’s mother went on, “ has been
saving up her money to buy herself something ; but she tells
me it will make her much happier if she may buy your child
another doll. May she?”

‘‘ It’s a true lady you are, ma’am, to ask me like that. And
I say God bless your pretty darling for thinking of such
athing. It will make my Rosie as happy as a bird in spring ;
and she don’t have more happiness than she can do with.”

So Rosie and Dolly and Dolly’s mother went off hand in
hand to the toy shop, and there Dolly bought the prettiest,
daintiest doll, with flaxen hair, and clothes that you could
take off and put on again. And. when Rosie kissed Dolly



40 DOLLY’S SKATES.



and ran away, with her little heart full of joy and pride,
Dolly felt consoled for the loss of the pleasure she had been
looking forward to.

‘‘T am the wee-est little bit sorry,” she whispered to her
mother, as they trudged back ; ‘because I did want the skates
very badly, but ’m much more happier.”

When Daddy heard the story, he looked very proud of his
little girl as he bent and asked her whether she would like
him to give her a pair of skates.



4

DOLLY’S SKATES. 41

“Oh no, no, Daddy, dear,” said Dolly. ‘“ ‘That would
spoil everything.”

So Dolly’s skates have still to be bought; but she has
begun to save up again for them, and I think she will have

enough to buy them before the next frost comes.










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an, ees aban
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aaa rae 4 TEN Ua

Pa: aa BURN oa



Little Miss Mischief.

HE was always called “Little Miss Mischief,” although
S her real name was ‘“ Victoria Dorothea”; but how
could any one ever think of calling anything so roguish and
dimpled by such a grand name. When she was quite a
tiny mite she was so full of pranks and fun, and merry
tricks, that nurse began to speak of her as little Miss
Mischief, and gradually mother, father, and all the big boy
brothers called her so too. Mother used to declare that it was
the boys who led her little darling into mischief, and that if
she had no brothers she would be quiet like other people’s
little girls. But the boys said, “No, if Victoria Dorothea was —
the only person on a desert island she would still always be



LITTLE MISS MISCHIEF. 43

up to mischief, trying to paint the trees red, or something
just as funny and impossible.” _ Nursie would brush out Miss
Mischief’s curls, put on a clean pinafore, a tidy frock, and
hat, and send her down to the Lodge gate to meet her father
as he came from the station ; but somehow, before the Lodge
gate was reached, the pinafore would have become dirty, the
frock torn, and even the straw hat would look as if it had
been worn for a year instead of a day or two. Father always
tried to look shocked, but when the dirty little face was
raised to his, and the chubby arms squeezed round his neck,
although his collar suffered, he could only return the hug,
smiling. | 7
At the Lodge lived Miss Mischief’s great friend, Janie, the
lodgekeeper’s little girl, just the same age, but very different
in everything else. Janie was just as quiet as a little mouse,
and as timid as a little mouse that knows the cat is not far
off ; whereas Miss Mischief did not know what fear was.
One day a very sad thing happened. The lodgekeeper’s
wife was hanging out clothes to dry in the back garden,
when she heard a carriage coming down the drive; “ Run,
Janie dear, and open the gate,” she said; ‘‘if I don’t peg
these things securely the wind will blow them down.”
Janie picked up her doll, and walked round to the front
of the cottage.
The sound of wheels came nearer and nearer, and faster
and faster, and, just as the little girl got to the gate, she saw

a horse, harnessed to a trap, come tearing madly down the

e



44 : LITTLE MISS MISCHIEF.

drive. It was the butcher’s cart, but there was no driver ;
while the man was talking to a servant, something had fright-
ened the horse, and it had bolted.

Janie’s mother came rushing out when she heard at what a_
rate the trap was coming, but she reached the gate too late ;
Janie had opened it, but, as the horse tore through, he swerved
aside and knocked the little girl down, so that one wheel went
over her. A leg was broken, and for weeks poor little Janie
had to lie in bed.

Little Miss Mischief was almost heart-broken when she
heard of the accident, and her lips quivered, and tears came
into her eyes whenever anyone spoke of her little friend.
For a long time she was not allowed to go and see her;
but at last, when Janie was getting on nicely, she went to
pay her a visit. The very best doll, and a bunch of hothouse
grapes, were taken as a present, and little Miss Mischief
went herself into the village, and with her very own money
bought a nice ‘“‘ Jack-in-the-Box,” and a stick of barley sugar
for Janie. —

One day, not long after this, little Miss Mischief was lost.
It was the boys’ half-holiday, a day which she always loved,
and which never came often enough. All the morning she
had been wandering about the house and garden, helping
cook, the housemaid, and gardener. She called it helping, and
they loved her too much to tell her that it hindered their work
when she put currants into the Irish Stew instead of the cake ;

let the pig into the back garden to eat the cabbages, so as to



LITTLE MISS MISCHIEF. 45

save Tom the trouble of feeding her; unfastened Rover, the
yard dog, who then went for a walk on his own account with-
out his muzzle, and many other suchlike little jobs. But when
the boys came home nurse gave a sigh of relief.

‘Take care of your sister, Master Jack,” she said.

‘All right, nurse,” he shouted back, as he caught hold of |
the little girl’s hand, and raced over the lawn after Rex
and Phil.

They had a game of
“hide-and-seek”; the boys
always hid in such erand
places, and little Miss
Mischief hid and sought
with them, until at last she
exclaimed :

“Now I shall hide
quite alone; no, Jack, not
even with you;” and off
she marched, after making
them promise to wait
where they were until she
cried “ Cuckoo.”

The boys waited and
waited, but there was no





‘call. The minutes went on,

and still no “‘ Cuckoo.”



“T say, you fellows,”



46 LITTLE MISS MISCHIEF.

said Jack at last, “I’m not going to wait any longer; per-
haps she has called and we haven’t heard.” |
So the boys began to search, they hunted high and low,
in the garden, orchard, stables, and house; but no little Miss
Mischief. After that they began to get anxious. Could she
have fallen into the pond in the meadow? Or had she
wandered into the road and been stolen by gipsies? Or
what had become of her? Mother was frightened too, when
j she saw their white, scared

faces; and she, nurse, and



the gardener, joined in the
search.

“« We can’t fancy
Miss Mischief keep-
ing quiet so long
anywhere,” they
said; and began to
hunt still farther
afield.

“ Run down to
the Lodge, and ask
if she has been seen
by anyone there,”
said mother; and off
the boys ran.

They knocked at
the Lodge door. No



LITTLE MISS MISCHIEF. 47



answer. ‘They knocked again, and tried the door, but it was
fastened. Janie’s mother at that moment came hurrying up.

‘*No,” she exclaimed, when she heard what was the
matter, ‘I’ve not seen the dear child. I went out an hour
ago, meaning to be back in a few minutes, but a neigh-
bour’s baby was taken ill, and I could not leave her. Poor
little Janie, I don’t know what she’ll think, me leaving her
locked up all this time ! Why who’s she talking to?”

‘Oh, here she is—Master Phil, Master Jack,” she called
out to the boys, who were already running back up the
drive. :

Yes, there she was, little Miss Mischief, sitting by her
little friend’s side undressing her doll.

“Janie was crying,” she explained, ‘“‘so I came in.”

‘‘ But how,” said Janie’s mother, ‘‘ when I had locked the

door ?”



48 LITTLE MISS MISCHIEF.

“Qh, I climbed up, and got through the window,” said
Victoria Dorothea calmly.

‘Oh, little Miss Mischief, when will you leave off being a
Tom-boy and a pickle,” said her mother when she had her

little, daughter safely in her arms once more.

fone n ss



Lah Carey ok -





Pussy’s Tale.

HAT a lovely Persian!” Those are the first words

that I can remember my aunt saying. She took

me in her arms and kissed me, admiring my beautiful ruff and

tail, and my dainty ways, and I felt a kindly feeling towards
her from that moment. |

There was great excitement in my uncle’s studio on the
day of the wedding.

He was dressed all in his best, and was bustling about
with boxes and portmanteaux, and my aunt was so agitated
that her hand trembled when she stroked me. They are
not really my uncle and aunt, though they always say they
are; but, of course, no one believes them. They are well
enough, but they have not the ae) and style that belong
to Persian blood. |

The fact was that they were going to be married secretly.



50 PUSSY’S TALE,

I was in the secret, for I had often listened to their conversa-
tion in the studio when I was curled up on a cushion, or on
my aunt’s lap, and they thought I was asleep; and Elsie—she
was my uncle’s little sister—was in the secret too. They
were just about to start for the church, when there was a
loud double-knock at the door. My aunt peeped out of the
window.

‘“Tt’s father,” she exclaimed, ‘what shall we do?”

They looked at each other for a moment in consternation.

‘Tl tell the girl
not to open the door,”
said my uncle.

But it was too late.
A handsome old gen-
tleman, with white
whiskers, and. a white

waistcoat—not nearly |



so becoming as mine—

and a very red face,



~ bounced into the room.




I immediately

;.- jumped on my uncle’s



shoulder, for safety.
‘What are you



doing here?” shouted



the old gentleman,



> eo lari mes: cane eles



PUSSY’S ' TALE. dL

daughter, but taking
no notice of my
uncle and me.

She burst into
tears. My uncle
said—

| “Tt is useless to
conceal our inten-
tions any longer,
Major; your daugh-
ter and I are going
to be married this
morning.” :

“You will do
nothing of the sort,”
said the Major;
“fortunately, I am



just in time to stop
you.”
You cannot carry her away by force,” said my uncle;
“our arrangements are complete, and nothing can alter our
determination.”

“T will go to the church and forbid the banns. I will have
the law on you!” spluttered the enraged Major.

At this moment, just when the conversation was growing
interesting, Elsie took me from my uncle’s shoulder, and

carried me into another room.



52 - PUSSY’S TALE.

‘‘He wants her to marry Mr. Jenkins, because he is so
rich,” said Elsie; ‘‘ but you won’t let them separate your uncle
and aunt, will you, Pussy, dear ?”

Of course not! Jenkins was a clumsy creature who
sometimes stumbled over me, and would not stroke me for
fear I should scratch him, as, indeed, I often felt inclined to.

‘Now listen to me, Pussy,” continued Elsie; “the Major

is a very vain old
gentleman, a regu-
lar old dandy; he -
thinks more of his
clothes and _ his
appearance than
anything else in
the world.”
; I knew this
| very well. I had
| often thought his
vanity ridiculous.

“Well,” said

Elsie—she is a





































































’ mischievous little











person, ‘is Elsie,



and as sharp as a

needle, though she



knows how to look



innocent almost as



PUSSY’S TALE. 53

well asI do. ‘ Well,” she said, “do you know how we can
prevent him from going to the church and interfering with
the marriage?” Hlsie laughed aloud.

‘Oh! it will be such fun, Pussy,” she said.

_ I purred in sympathetic approval while Elsie told me her
scheme in a whisper, which was every now and then inter-
rupted by a burst of laughter. Then we went back into the
studio, where the angry party were still disputing.

‘‘T am determined never to marry Mr. Jenkins,” my aunt
was tearfully declaring.

The Major sat down with an air of decision, having first
_carefully dusted the chair with his handkerchief, for the studio
had a general aspect of untidiness that morning.

“Then you shall not marry anyone,” he said; ‘I will
take care to prevent it.”

“You may make a scene, but you cannot prevent the
ceremony,” said my uncle.

“Oh! I could not bear a scene,” exclaimed my aunt.

Meanwhile, Elsie had quietly taken down my uncle’s
palette from a nail on the wall. In the ordinary way I
cannot endure paint, it is so sticky, it smells so nasty, and it
is so troublesome to get off if you accidentally get a little on
your tail. That is one of the disadvantages of living with an
artist. But I had made up my mind to the sacrifice, so I let
Elsie dab one of my paws in the Prussian blue, another in the
burnt sienna, a third in the vermillion, and a fourth in the

light red.



54 PUSSY’S TALE.

“Tl get it all off for you, Pussy,” she said, encouragingly.

Then I leapt straight from the palette to the Major’s knee,
and purred in my most engaging fashion.

To make a pretence of coolness, he began to pet me in a
mechanical sort of way, while my uncle was consoling my
aunt. I climbed up the Major’s white waistcoat and got on
his shoulder, continuing to purr loudly, and all the time
playfully tapping his white whiskers and his cheeks with my
paws, of course, taking care to keep my gloves on. This is —
one of my little tricks for creating a good impression on
people. The Major took to it very quietly, and, when I had
thoroughly done both sides, I jumped down and returned to
Elsie, who hugged me with delight, while she vainly strove
to suppress her laughter.

‘We must go now, dear,” said my uncle to my aunt.

“¢ And I shall go with you,” cried the Major.

My uncle and aunt turned towards him to make a last |
appeal. At first their faces wore a look of apprehension. No
doubt they thought he was suffering from some terrible and
unknown disease. ‘Then they smiled.

‘What are you laughing at?” asked the Major, in
a fury.

‘“‘ Look at yourself in the glass,” said my uncle, who could
contain his mirth no longer.

The Major stepped to the mirror, and on seeing his appear-
ance, indulged in such a terrible outburst that I thought it

discreet to hide behind a distant canvas. -



-PUSSY’S TALE. 55

“Tt’s that con-
founded cat,” he
roared. . “I can’t
go out like this! ”

“If you do,
youll be taken
straight off to a
lunatic asylum,”
said my uncle.
‘You'll find plenty
of turpentine in
the studio. The
paint will all come
off in time. Good-

bye, I hope you



will manage to
get clean by the time we are back.”

_ My uncle and aunt hurried away to the church, and Elsie
and I left the Major, who was furiously wiping his face and
clothes with a cloth, and improving on my workmanship
generally by spreading the mess over a wider area. How we
purred and chuckled when we were alone!

It took Elsie quite a long time to get me clean, and I felt |
miserable while she was doing it, for I loathe soap and water,
even when it is warm. But she packed me up comfortably
in front of the kitchen fire, and I soon got dry; and when I
had had some fish, as a reward, I felt all right.



56 PUSSY’S TALE.

It was a long time before the Major forgave my uncle and
aunt, who, I am glad to say, are properly grateful to me, and
tell all their friends that I arranged their marriage for them.
This induces people to pet me, and give me delicacies. Still,
I have no doubt I could coax them just as well, even if they

did not know the story of my heroic self sacrifice.










test"
Wh 1 fA—
ie

Ss WG



A Day’s Holiday!

OU may have heard of St. Luke’s summer—those lovely
iv summer-like days which we appreciate, perhaps, all
the more for having had just a taste of the coming winter
cold. Well, it was on one of these sunny autumn days that
Herbert Fanshawe was lucky enough to have a whole holiday
before him, and he had begged a holiday for his sister, Gwen-
doline—not, as he said, that she much wanted it, for was she
not taught at home by Aunt Meg, which was like having a
sort of holiday all the year round! Gwendoline herself by:
no means shared his opinion, and considered that Aunt Meg
kept her very closely at it. Anyway, she was glad of the
holiday, and so was Aunt Meg, who declared it was the very
day for taking her sketch book and catching the autumn



58 A DAY’S HOLIDAY.

tints: So they were all three going for a day’s excursion,
and Aunt Meg was busily tying up packages of daintily cut.
sandwiches, which, together with sundry small cakes, she
handed to the children. © |

“¢ So, each man is to carry his own rations?” said Herbert,
with a smile of approval, for boys—polite boys—do come in for
so much carrying on these excursions, and he already had
his fishing-rod and basket to manage. So off they started,
merrily enjoying their three-mile walk on that sunny morning,
with the golden leaves dancing above their heads, and the
dead ones crisply crunching beneath their feet. They soon
reached the river, and Herbert was not long in selecting a
“ripping” place for catching fish. Gwendoline settled
herself with a book near him, and ventured the timidly
expressed hope that presently she “might have a try.”

“Why, you'd never care to put the worm on, or take the |
fish off the hook—even if you caught one!” was the angler’s
disdainful reply.

‘Well, you could do that, you know,” was the suggestion
hesitatingly made.

“Oh, I dare say!” was all the answer, perhaps, which
could be expected. But Gwendoline knew her brother’s
moods, and wisely determined to tackle him later on, play
him, ‘like he does the fish,” she thought; so she took up her
book and began to read with much diligence; it was not
that she exactly cared for what she was reading, but really she
was so snubbed and sat upon over this matter of fishing, that



A DAY’S HOLIDAY. 7 - 59

she determined she would remain in ignorance no longer, but
would study the subject. So she repeated over and over
again (for it was dry reading), ‘‘The perch is a very good and |
bold biting fish, he is one of the fishes of prey, and carries his
teeth in his mouth.” Why, good gracious! Where else could
he carry them? and she shut up the book with an impatient
snap. But she was not going to let slip the knowledge she
had so diligently gleaned; so before it all vanished out-of her
head, she called out, in rather an unnecessarily loud voice— _

‘Had any sport ?” |

“No!” rather snappishly answered her brother; for what
is more irritating to an angler who has caught nothing than
to be asked what he has caught.

“Ah!” she replied, decidedly, “ that’s because yow ve not
got the right sort of bait; youshould
have” (and here she began to
speak with great rapidity, so afraid
“was she that
her know-
ledge would
vanish )—
pt you should
have the flesh
of a rabbit
or cat, cut
small ” (she

af
6aith (.Caylor
shuddered as







60 A DAY’S HOLIDAY.

she quoted)—‘‘and mixed with bean-flour, or, if that may not
easily be got, other flour; and put to these sugar and honey,
and beat together in a mortar ””—she had to stop a moment
to gasp for breath, just time enough for her brother to say,
contemptuously, ‘* What rot!”

‘“‘ Indeed ! then,” she said, with great dignity, “it’s Isaac
Walton who says it. Oh! but I forgot, that was not for
roach, that was for some other fish, but——”

‘‘Oh! it?s near enough, what’s sauce for the goose is sauce
for the gander with you,” said Herbert, not at all impressed
as she thought he would be; really, it seemed little use her
pursuing the study any longer—it was so baffling; and she
felt quite relieved when Herbert suggested, that they should
get in the boat that was moored by the bank, and cross over
to the wood just opposite. .

‘But won’t auntie be frightened?” said Gwendoline,
glancing towards Aunt Meg, who was sketching some little
distance off.

‘Oh! we shall be back before her sketch is finished.”

‘ And is it safe?” was her next question, as she stepped
into the boat.

‘Herbert assured her that it was, and, indeed, one stroke of
_ the oars brought them to the other side.

“Tdo hope we sha’n’t see ‘Silly Peter,’” said Gwendoline,
as she stepped out of the boat.

‘Bah! who’d care for a crazy dwarf?” replied Herbert, 7

as he fastened the boat to a willow tree, and looked about



for a nice place
to put in his line.
Now, the fish, too,
evidently liked this
side of the river
best, and Herbert
could have answer-
ed cheerfully the

question ‘ What:

sport?” It was
quite difficult to
get him away from
his rod, though it

A DAY’S HOLIDAY. ; 61









a iS ! ly ¢ i eZ Shee a\s
pen Wh Loy \ ae ZS 4
th Caylor YN
LAs NbN Me

was long, long past dinner time, and Gwendoline was impa-

tiently waiting, with their dinner temptingly spread out on the

low bough of the tree on which she was sitting. But he came

‘at last; and most thoroughly were they enjoying their repast,

feeling like two birds in the tree, when they were startled by

a harsh gurgling laugh just above them, and, looking up, they

saw a large-headed, ugly dwarf, whom they at once knew

must be “Silly Peter.” He jumped on a branch close to

‘them, and began to sing, in a squeaky voice—

‘Yah! Yah! piccaninnies !
Yah! Yah! chickabiddies !
Am I not a funny little man?
But I hope you like the sight of me,
And are not in any fright of me,
For V’ll try to look as pretty as I can.”



62 A DAY’S HOLIDAY.

Hereupon he jumped down and pulled some hideous
grimaces.’ Now, Gwendoline, frightened as she was, felt
offended with him for pulling such faces ; besides, it was so
rude to interrupt their picnic, so she answered as coolly as
she could—

“No! I’m not frightened, and if you want to look pretty
I shouldn’t pull such faces if I were you,” and then she went
on eating her cake. !

Herbert looked up, amazed at his sister’s courage; and
for once in his life did not feel her superior.

Perhaps her courage disconcerted and routed the dwarf,
who was said to ape at being more foolish than he really was. 3
Anyhow, he soon vanished as quickly as he came; but he had
alarmed the children, and they both felt that they had had
enough of picnicking in the wood, so, quickly gathering
up the fishing tackle, they prepared to jump into the boat,
when—oh! horror of horrors !—it was floating down the
stream. nae

‘¢ ¢Silly Peter’ must have unfastened it,” hoarsely whispered
Herbert.

‘¢ Or perhaps you tied it badly,” answered his sister, with
more calmness than she really felt, for the shades of evening
were beginning to come on, and Aunt Meg must have finished
her sketch by this time.

‘Oh! there 7s aunt Meg rushing along the path.” She
pointed and shouted loudly.

‘Oh, hush!” entreated Herbert, “it’s no use shouting,



A DAY’S HOLIDAY. 7 68

she’s so deaf she’ll
never hear, and it
will only bring
Peter.”

“Well,” said
his sister, trying to
comfort him, ‘“ after
all, we sha’n’t be so
badly off as Robin-
~ gon Crusoe, even if
we are here all
night, because there
are two of us, you
see.”

But, to their in-
finite relief, they






‘ay
te

were not to be left Edith m.Caylor

there all night.
They hear the
splashing of oars.
Aunt Meg brings with her a boatman whose sharp eyes
had seen the children cross over. Aunt Meg is so glad ton
get them safe and sound that she forgets to scold; indeed,
she kisses them again and again, which is what they certainly

do not deserve.

And for some reason or another Herbert never snubbed

his sister any more












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a Little Bright Eyes.

OR eyes of blue and eyes of brown
K These pretty tales are written down,
To drive away each naughty frown
From little bright eyes.

_And all the pretty pictures, too, |
Are drawn to please brown eyes and blue.
What pains we take to gladden you,

Dear little bright eyes!

And when the sun does early set,

Or when the day is very wet,

From out your nursery cupboard get
Your ‘“ Little Bright Eyes.”
LITTLE BRIGHT EYES.

Or if your brother is not well,

Just sit beside his bed and tell

The grand adventures that befell .
These “ Little Bright Eyes.”

And, so the time will swiftly run,

Yow’ll hardly know the day is done,

And quiet night-time has begun,
Sweet little bright eyes.

And out your nursery candle goes

When, like good children, I suppose

You’ve said your prayers. Then gently close
Your little bright eyes.

Mae Pa 595 beer |




The Man in the Moon.

NCE upon a time there was a little baby who stretched
() out her arms and cried for the moon—the beautiful
round moon, looking in at her nursery window. As you will
guess, she could not have it. |

“The baby orew, and became Marguerite—sweet as a
flower, from the top of her curly head to the tips of her
dancing toes. ; ;

Still she loved the moon. At night she looked out of her

ittle casement window at the beautiful moon shining in the


8 THE MAN IN THE MOON.

dark sky. As she lay in her little white bed she could see
the moon, and she fancied the kind face of the Man in
‘the Moon smiled her good-night, and watched her sleeping
where she lay alone. Beautiful moon! She told it all her
little joys and sorrows, and fell asleep to dream that the kind.
Man in the Moon came down to play with her.

Marguerite’s father, mother, and a little brother she had
never seen, were far away in India. They would come home ?
Meanwhile, Mar-
guerite lived with kind grand-

some day.



mamma, and
made _ friends
and playmates
of the flowers

in the beauti-

ful garden,
and the birds,
and all the

inhabitants of
the field, and
wood, and
farm-yard.
Last, but not
least, she had
the Man in the
Moon.

One morn-
THE MAN IN THE MOON. 0

ing Marguerite tripped down the garden path, full of
importance, with a big book under her arm. She did not
loiter to look at anything. Not even her favourite moon
daisies waving in the wind, not even at the black hen, who
had just been put on her nest with fifteen eggs by the
gardener, nor at the twin lambs in the meadow, or Mollie or
Susan, the cows. She went straight on, out of the gate into
the road. 3

“Good-bye, all of you,” she said. “I am going to school.
I am four years old to-day, and grandmamma says I must
learn all about everything.” -

‘Goodness me!” said the sparrow. ‘‘ Upon my hop that is
surprising.”

‘““T don’t believe in over-education myself,” said the silly-
faced mamma of the twin lambs. ‘I like fresh air and
exercise for children,’ and she smiled at her long-legged
pets.

“The only school I have met is a school of porpoises,”
said the elegant and travelled swallow. ‘I should not like
our Marguerite to get like a porpoise.”

“Marguerite will always be beautiful,” said the faithful
robin, who was her friend all the year round. ‘ Nothing can
spoil her.”

The moon daisies sighed sentimentally in the soft breeze,
and the sunflowers tried to peep over the wall to see Mar-
guerite in the road.

‘‘T am very unhappy,” said Susan, the black cow. ‘ My
10 THE MAN IN THE MOON.

calf has been taken away. I thought Marguerite would be
sorry for me; but now she is gore, I must go and look for my
child.” And she broke through the hedge of the kitchen
garden. Mollie, the red-and-white cow, followed, out of
sympathy, of course.

Marguerite soon got to the school, a square red house,

with a green door, and a bright brass knocker and plate— |

‘“Srrzot ACADEMY FoR Young Lapres AND GENTLEMEN.
Principal: Miss Wappen.”

The eldest young lady of the school. happened to arrive
with Marguerite. She was very kind and grown up, quite
seven.

‘‘Come with me, little dear,” she said; ‘‘and Pll give
your little handies a nice washy-pash.”

‘My hands are quite clean, thank you,” said Marguerite,
with dignity. 3 ;

Such a lot of children were arriving—little girls with
curly hair, little girls with straight hair, and one with a long
red pig-tail.

Little boys, too, curly and straight, dark and fair, and one
little Tommy, still in petticoats, who sucked his thumb.

Then the bell rang, and all the children took their places.
Marguerite, of course, as a new pupil, lowest of all, even
below Tommy, who looked sleepy. At the top of the class
stood the girl with the red pig-tail. How clever she must
be! Marguerite wondered if all clever girls had red pig-tails.
THE MAN IN THE MOON. Il










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Lessons went on, the clever girl seemed to know everything:
She could answer the questions almost before they were
asked. It must be the pig-tail, and Marguerite, wondering
how she would look with one down her back, and thinking it
was rather like Mollie, the red cow’s tail, found she was
getting sleepy. Tommy had sunk to by-bye on his desk
long ago.
Suddenly she woke up, for Miss Wappem was saying—

‘“‘ Sit down, children, and we’ll learn about the Moon!”
12 THE MAN IN THE MOON.

So, with a
blackboard, and
pictures, and
diagrams, Miss
Wappem gaye
a lecture on the
moon. .

She had no
more interested
listener than.
little Marguerite.
The clever girl
smiled faintly,



as who should
say: “I know
all that, and a oreat deal more too.”

Tommy, happily, and with no disguise, slept and snored.

Other curly pates wagged with inattentive mischief, and
smooth heads were demure, but vacant. Marguerite was all
eyes and ears, and longing to learn.

Miss Wappem went back to earliest days, millions of
years ago, when the red-hot moon flew away from. its sister
earth into space by itself.

There it spun, like a humming top, till, exhausted by its
own vitality and spurned away by the earth, it retreated
farther into space and died. Now, there it hung, worn out

and dead—its sole mission to regulate the earth’s tides.
THE MAN IN THE MOON. 13

Then there were lunar pictures—wastes of blue-green
scenery, dreary and lonely.

Whata sad, lifeless moon! And no man at all! His nose
was a blue mountain, his eyes were extinét volcanoes, and his
mouth was a yawning chasm.

Why, it might almost as well, as wicked J ano, the house-
maid, had said, be made of green cheese.

Poor Marguerite went home crying—the friend of a
lifetime had gone. There was no Man in the Moon! School
was a dreadful place. To-morrow, no doubt, she would learn
that there were no fairies, and the day after that her dollies
were not real babies.

‘Oh, my Man in the Moon! My beautiful moon!” she
sobbed, as she ran through the field home.

‘““Why, Marguerite is crying,” said the flowers. ‘There
are dew-drops in her eyes.”

‘That nasty school! I told you so,” said the sheep.

_ “T cried a good deal to-day myself,” said the black cow.
‘But those peas I got in the kitchen garden were delicious,
and made.me feel better.’’

The red-and-white cow had eaten some also, for sympathy,
of course.

‘‘Pve had worries too,” said the black hen. ‘By day-
light I see these eggs gardener gave me are green, and we —
all know what that means.”

‘At any rate, she’s not growing like a porpoise yet,” said

the graceful swallow.
14 THE MAN IN THE MOON.

Night came, and Marguerite cried herself to sleep ; while
the beautiful moon looked down, little disturbed by - Miss
Wappem’s lecture, and, surely, the kind eyes seemed to
twinkle; yet no, there was no Man in the Moon, only
craters and volcanoes and—but here Marguerite slept.

* * *& pS : *

Morning light, and sunshine, and sweet roses dancing
against the window pane. |

And what was this? Beside the bed, the dearest little
boy in the world, with round blue eyes, and a very round
yellow head, as round, as round as the Moon.

‘Oh, dearest of little moonboy playfellows, where did you
come from?”

As you will guess, the little boy was Marguerite’s brother,
sent home from India to be her playfellow.

Of course, Marguerite was quite happy now. But of all
the games they had together and all the adventures that
happened I must tell you another time. Only you may be
quite sure that Marguerite soon loved him quite as much as

her old friend Tue Man in toe Moon.


A Birthday Queen.

BLITHE Birthday Queen,
A Is.she not ?—little Rosie
Is four years of age,
And as sweet as a posy—
She wears a new frock—
With wild rose-buds they’ve crowned her,
And her cheeks are as pink

As the roses around her.
16 A BIRTHDAY QUEEN.

To take her down stairs

Comes her big, merry brother,
For she must be kissed

By the father and mother ;
And loaded with gifts,

And kind greetings by dozens,
From uncles and aunts,

And affectionate cousins.



There’s a tea-party grand
In the wide breezy meadow,
Where tables are spread
In the sycamore’s shadow ;
With good things galore
The table is laden,
With a grand Birthday cake,
For the dear little maiden.
A BIRTHDAY QUEEN. 17

Then a haycock is piled
At the table to throne her, —
Where Queen of the day
All the company crowned her ;
And while they’re at tea
Comes a nightingale singing,
And all round their heads

There are butterflies winging.

And at last it is o’er—

All the feasting so splendid,
And then the fair Queen,

By her subjects attended,


18 _ A BIRTHDAY QUEEN.

Has all the broad field

Full of haycocks to play in,
A world of delight —

For small folk to be gay in!

Queen Rose, you must know,
Has a special attendant—
A smart little page,
In blue velvet resplendent,
Who trots by her side,
And each moment assures her,
She’s Queen of his heart,
And he deeply adores her!

How sweet is the hay,
With dry clover and grasses,
How joyous the shouts
Of the lads and the lasses,
As round the wide field
They go racing each other,
Or try with the hay

A companion to smother.

Then father comes out
With his violoncello,

And calls the smart page,
Who’s a musical fellow,
A BIRTHDAY QUEEN. 19



And plays the guitar—

‘Then the two play together,
And lead a blithe dance,

In the warm summer weather.

Jigs, hornpipes, and reels,
Foot the light-hearted dancers
(They even insist

On performing the Lancers) ;
20 A BIRTHDAY QUEEN.

Till down falls the dew
Of the soft fragrant gloaming,
And mother calls out

That the nurses are coming!

Then round the wee Queen
Swarm the lads and the lasses,
And kiss her ‘“ Good-night,”
Midst the clovers and grasses ;
And soon—very soon—
With her crown of pink roses
Hung over her bed,

Our Queen Rosie reposes !






. From the Sunny South.

HEN Melina came to live at Briardene, she felt so
W very lonely, for Briardene was a great big house
that seemed full of nothing save furniture and servants.
Certainly there was uncle Michael, but uncle Michael was
never visible ; he lived chiefly in his bedroom. The doctor
said that gout kept him there; but the butler said it was
temper, and Melina believed the butler. Only Melina did
not dare to say so, except to Dim and Tim.

Nobody came to visit at Briardene, for uncle Michael
had. quarrelled with everybody ; yes, even with her dear
mamma. But that was because her mamma (who had died
only a year ago) had married an Italian, and a painter.
Melina thought that Italy was a beautiful country—far
22 FROM THE SUNNY SOUTH.

nicer and warmer than England—and that the pictures
her father painted were glorious; but uncle Michael had
different views.

‘‘ Shall I never see uncle Michael?” Melina asked of
Mrs. Mopes, the housekeeper, after she had lived at
Briardene about six weeks. _

“T doubt it,. Missie,”’ answered. Mrs. Mopes. ‘ When
you were expected here, the Squire gave orders that you
were never to enter the west garden, and he uses only
. ' the west rooms and
the west garden.
And I think it just
as well you don’t
see him,’ added
that worthy dame,
with a sniff. ‘“ Wait

until your papa

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comes for you in the

autumn, my dear,

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then we’ll see what’s
to be done.”
“Oh! but that

will be ever so many







months,” cried Me-
lina, and the beauti-

ful dark eyes grew



Oe eos eee re ws moist at the thought
FROM THE SUNNY SOUTH. 23

of the endless, lonely days that must transpire ere she dare
laugh, or romp, or sing, as in the old, old days at Florence.

But to a maiden of seven, life cannot always be spent
in cloud. The summer must come, and with it the sunshine.
So on one of the very brightest summer days, when the birds
were singing, and the bees were humming, and the dear
little lambkins were skipping in the fields, Melina, without
saying a word to anyone, took Dim and Tim for a walk.
Neither Melina nor the puppies had ever been so far from
Briardene before, and, of course, every fresh object that
met their view was wonderful, and took a lot of considering.
Dim tried hard to worry the wild roses, and then wished
she had left them alone. For roses have thorns, and thorns
hurt tongues. So Dim howled. Melina, who was standing
a little way from the puppies, thought that Tim was hurt.
So she took him up in her arms to comfort him, which
was rather rough on Dim, with the thorn prickles in her
tongue.

But oh! what a glorious day it was! How those pups
waddled on, and how their little mistress trotted on—lI
cannot tell you how far. Presently, Melina felt tired and
hungry, and so did the puppies. And when the clouds began
to come together.and get friendly, and when the sun was not
at all what it had been, poor Melina started crying.

Not so the puppies. Dim ran after her tail, and Tim
sniffed as if he did not care a jot for anything. Then he
chose a tuft of grass, and walked round it, and scratched it
24 FROM THE SUNNY SOUTH.

soft, and then plumped down, and went fast asleep on it.
Melina took Dim in her arms for company, and then began
to ery a little louder.

Just then a rough-looking man came up.

‘What are you crying for, my little girl ?” he said.

‘‘ Because—I don’t know why,” wailed Melina.

‘“‘ And what are you doing with my dog?” asked the man,
harshly, wrenching Dim from Melina’s arms, and walking
away with her.

Melina was too much afraid to follow, or even to speak at
first. But she saw a nice old gentleman coming along, and
when he got near she told him all about it.

And the old gentleman went after the man, and brought
him back.

“ Give the little girl her dog,” he commanded.

But the man would not, no. Dim was a valuable puppy.

‘Tt is my dog, sir,” said the man, and said it so decidedly
that the old gentleman looked very severely at Melina.

“ Are you sure it. is your dog, little girl?” he
questioned.

“Yes, oh yes, sir; I’m postif it’s my dog, and so is Tim,”
pulling the other puppy from under the tuft of grass.

Tim looked round, opened his mouth, and yawned. Ina
moment the old gentleman saw the strong puppy likeness
between Dim and Tim.

‘You said nothing about a second dog, and you'd better
be off about your business,” he commanded. “Give the little
FROM THE SUNNY SOUTH. 5)

girl her dog,”
and the old
gentleman said
it so sternly
that the tramp
obeyed.

‘“ Now, where
do you live?”
asked the old
gentleman of
Melina, when
her tears were
brushed away,
and Dim and
Tim consented
to stop chasing
their tails.

“At Briar-

dene, sir.”



“Oh! You are Squire Manghan’s little niece?”

“Yes, sir.”
— “Well, ’m going your way. You may come through
these woods. It is shorter, and more direct. He’s a very
cross old man, that Squire,” began the stranger, after a
pause, taking Melina’s hand, and leading the way through

the wood. |
“Oh, drefful,” said Melina, shaking her head. ‘ When
26 FROM THE SUNNY SOUTH.

my papa comes in the autumn I’m going to ask him to take
me away from here. My papa belongs to Italy, you know,
and he’s a grand painter.” :

‘“‘Indeed,” said the old gentleman. ‘So you don’t like
this cross uncle Michael ?” :

‘Now, how can I, when I’ve never seen him? ‘That’s the
silliness of it,” Melina went on. ‘Uncle Michael’s got
nobody here to love him, and I’ve got nobody here to love
me. Now, wouldn’t it have been nice if we could have only
lived together and loved each other? Ive thought of it
ever so often. Now, if uncle Michael had been a nice old
gentleman like you.”

“‘ How do you know I’m nice?” asked the stranger.

‘“‘ Because you speak kindly to me, and you saved my
doggie. But we’re getting near home, and I shall have to
say good-bye. You had better go out of that gate, please,
and be sure uncle Michael does not catch you.”

The old gentleman laughed.

“Well, little girl, if I’m to say good-bye, won’t you give
me a kiss ?—remember, I saved your doggie.” |

“Oh, yes, Pl kiss you,” said Melina. “Thanks; good-
bye!”

* * * * *

“Well, good gracious! Bless me!” cried the butler, rub-
bing his spectacles, and looking out of the still-room window.
‘‘Mrs. Mopes, Mrs. Mopes, look here! Quick—quick! There’s
the Squire with little Miss Melina, and he’s kissing her.”
FROM THE SUNNY SOUTH. 27



And that was how Melina became acquainted with her
uncle Michael.

And it was a very good thing they became known to
one another, for uncle Michael has been dreadfully mangled,
Melina avers. Of course, she means maligned. And when

her father did come to Briardene in the autumn, he consented

ev

to the Squire adopting his little girl.





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Dobbin, the Donkey.

ISS VIOLET, please come away!” entreated nurse ;
M ‘those rough boys might throw stones at you—and
you, Miss Amy and Miss Joan, both of you!”

We were crossing the common; we always. chose it for
our morning walk, because Violet (she is the youngest)
brought an apple, or a biscuit, and sometimes a carrot for the
poor old donkey which browsed there. We did not know his

name, but we called him “ Dobbin” among ourselves.
DOBBIN, THE DONKEY. 29

It was a poor, thin, old little donkey, too old to work any
more, but the wicked village boys did not think he was too
old for sport, for they would jump on his back and beat him
cruelly. No one seemed to care whether Dobbin suffered or
not, except ourselves.

‘“‘ But he hasn’t had the apple!” pleaded Violet, beginning
to cry, because she loved him so.

‘‘ Flow can he have it so far off, and all those horrid boys
pelting him with stones and sticks? You couldn’t go any
nearer, it?s even dangerous standing where we are—so do

please come away!”

said nurse.

“Don’t cry, Violet!” I said, «“ Amy and I will go to papa
about Boer old Dobbin ; the cruel boys shall not hurt him any
more.’

“It’s my donkey,” sobbed Violet.

“Yes, darling, we know it’s your donkey,” said Amy,
kissing her.

Violet always called the donkey hers, but, of course, it
wasn’t really ; we don’t know whose it was. Mamma thinks
a gipsy must have left it to starve on the common. It looked
as if it had been tied to a heavy cart, and its poor body had
been beaten and thumped with a heavy stick, for it had so
little of its coat left.

Tom, our big brother, is coming home from school to-
morrow, sO we are going to try and see if we cannot get him
to befriend Dobbin. |

All. the tittle boys at school are nervous of Tom, so
30 DOBBIN, THE DONKEY.

perhaps he can make the village boys afraid to hurt
Dobbin.

_ Directly we reached home, Amy and I ran to the library
to find papa. He is a doctor; he had been up all night with
a patient, so we found him looking very tired and worried.

‘Papa, we've decided on Violet’s birthday present,” I said.

“‘ And we want your help,” added Amy.

“Tt’s something big this time,” gaid I.

‘“Tt’s tremendous!” said Amy.

‘“‘Violet’s birthday is a month off yet,’ papa answered,
yawning. He wasn’t at all interested, perhaps he was still
too sleepy.

It was so
difficult to make
papa under-
stand without
exactly tell
ing him. We |
wanted him to
make guesses—
such as—‘‘is it
the size of an
orange?” but
he wouldn’t help
us a bit; so at.
last I had to

say,—


DOBBIN, THE DONKEY. ol

‘Tt’s an animal, papa, that we want to give her.”

‘What does Violet want to add to the menagerie, now?”
he asked, quite crossly.

I looked at Amy, and Amy looked at me; we were afraid
to tell him. .

“Tt’s no use, I cannot have any more pets in the house.”

‘“‘But, papa, it couldn’t be in the house, like the dogs and
cats—it’s a—a donkey!” I answered.

“A what?” said papa, sitting very upright.

‘A donkey—old Dobbin on the common, papa. He is
being beaten to death by those cruel boys, and it makes
Violet cry; you said she oughtn’t to cry after her last illness
—didn’t you?” I added slily.

Papa was silent a minute, then he frowned.

‘‘There’s no room for him in the stables ; besides, he must
belong to someone; if we took him it would be highway-
robbery,” said papa; ‘it’s not to be dreamed of—run away,
children, don’t plague me any more about it, at any rate
not to-day.”

So, you see, we had to give it up.

But directly Tom came home we told him about Dobbin,
and how we wished to give him to Violet.

“But Vi mustn’t ride a kicking animal,” said Tom.

“He is too old to kick. Oh, Tom! if you would punish
those boys!” |

Tom laughed.

‘“‘ V’ll have a shot, Joan, shall 1?”
382 DOBBIN, THE DONKEY.




AR
fy

Y %
yi Ye VV

yp Ih, SAS
al i CAM BA,

eM, \
Laud y A fi ie, . ba
wi rt ORs : Huta:





‘





When he
said that Amy
and I rejoiced ;
and when we
told him that

there was no

“Ye room in the

stables, Tom

said—

“Oh, I will
soon rig him up
a stable in my
own tool-shed,

and groom

him myself until the governor comes round.”

Tom always had been a slave to Violet since she was

a baby, so now we felt sure we should get Dobbin in

the end.

That very afternoon Tom strode across the common to

look at him.

As usual, the boys were pelting Dobbin with stones, but

he nibbled on, twitching his long ears.
Batts, was hitting him on the head.

A horrid boy, named

‘“‘ Now, you little wretch,” said Tom, ‘“ what do you mean

by ill-treating a poor beast like this?”

“Tt ain’t yours,”

replied the dirty urchin.

“T’ve a jolly good mind to thrash you,” said Tom.
DOBBIN, THE DONKEY. 33

‘No you don’t—hit one of your own size,” said the boy,
erimacing. |

The village bully here squared up to Tom.

‘You keep your hands off him, will yer?”

Tom suddenly gripped him. The bully looked terrified—
Tom was so very strong. |

“Let go!” he shouted, striking wildly at Tom.

‘‘ What’s up now, Musgrove?” said a strange voice behind
us. It was the squire.

“These young imps have injured the old donkey, hurt its
eye with a stick—and I believe P’ve the culprit here,” said
Tom, shaking the bully and throwing him down.

‘Poor brute! it would be a kindness to give him to the

knacker,” said the squire; ‘but old Binns would rather
sell him.”
“Old Binns!

does it belong
to him?” cried
Tom. s
“Yes, he told
me the other
day he’d part
with him ‘for a
shiner, — but
he’s not worth
five shillings,”



said the squire.
34 DOBBIN, THE DONKEY.

By this time quite a little crowd had gathered. A lot of
little boys said, ‘‘ There’s a row on, let’s go and see!”
_ What they saw was dear old Dobbin being led home by
Tom—some of the older people cheered Tom, and one said—
“Tt ain’t everyone as would take pity on the poor beast—
but he’s got a good home now for the rest of his days, for the
doctor is the kindest-hearted gentleman in the county.”
So Dobbin was Violet’s birthday present after all! He
looks so sleek and beautiful that you would think he was
quite young—but it is with happiness, we love him 50 dearly.




Dolly’s Skates.

S OU know, mother, I do really think I deserve them.”

3 And Dolly’s big brown eyes looked up very gravely
into her mother’s.

“Oh, and why?” said mother, trying to hide the smile that
would turn the corners of her mouth.

‘“‘ Because I have saved and saved, you can’t think how
hard, and so long, too—I should say it was years. And I
haven’t bought anything, no sweets, and no tea-sets, and
—nothing.”

“Oh yes, you have!” said mother, looking down very
tenderly at the little face up-turned to hers, and giving
Dolly’s hand a little squeeze as they walked briskly along the
frozen street. “‘ You gave Daddy that nice pocket-book on

his birthday, and me that beautiful fuchsia, on mine.”
36 DOLLY’S SKATES.

“Why, of course ;
what's the good of
mothers and daddies
if you can’t give them
things?”

‘What, indeed?” said
her mother. “ And now
you are going to have
your reward for saving.”

“Yes,” cried Dolly,
nodding her ' little head
till the bright brown
locks shook themselves
loose beneath her pretty
red hood. “Now I am
going to buy my skates



—four shillings and
threepence.”

She said “four shillings and threepence,” because it
sounded so much more important than ‘‘ four and three.” At
the thought of the purchase she was going to make, she
began tripping merrily along by her mother’s side in little
polka steps, and then suddenly dropped into a very quiet and
well-behaved style of walking. )

“Oh, I forgot,” she said. ‘‘ Nurse says ladies don’t dance
in the street. But I am so happy, because I’m going to

learn skating, aren’t I, mother?”

-
DOLLY’S SKATES. 37

She held her little head up very proudly, for it really is a
great and wonderful thing to learn skating when you are.
only six. Why, there was her cousin Nellie only just
beginning to learn, and she, as Dolly said, was almost quite
growed up—sixteen, or some enormous age like that.

“Let us go down here,” said mother, and they turned
into a bye street full of poor shabby cottages. “It’s a short
cut, and the road is sure to be clean in this hard frost.’”

They were not quite so merry now, for mother’s eyes
were grave and sad as she looked from time to time at the
unwholesome dwellings and the poor shivering people who
came in and out of them; and Dolly, seeing the children
playing in the streets, and noticing what poor shabby clothes
they had, and how few even of them, felt somehow—she
could not understand why—a little ashamed of herself. But
the poor children seemed happy enough, and laughed and
shouted and scampered about. Presently, to her great sur-
prise, Dolly noticed a little girl, rather younger than herself,
running down the street, holding in her arms a lovely wax
doll, dressed in the height of doll’s fashion. Just then the
most terrible accident happened. The little girl was step-
ping on to the path, and was so wrapped up in her beautiful
doll that she did not notice she was crossing over a slide
the boys had made. At that moment a boy came flying
down like the wind, and he accidentally knocked the doll
out of her hand. The boy behind him, not having time to

stop himself, stumbled against it, and in recovering himself.
36 DOLLY'S SKATES.

trod right on the doll’s face and smashed it to pieces. Just
as he jumped off it, a mischievous fox terrier jumped on,
and seizing the doll in its mouth tore its beautiful clothes
to tatters. The poor little owner of the doll set up a dismal
and dreadful howl, and Dolly felt inclined to cry with her.
She dropped her mother’s hand, and ran over to the little
girl.

‘¢O, little girl,” she cried, “I am so very sorry for you.”

The little girl stopped howling and looked up surprised that
any one who looked like a fairy out of a story book should
stop to speak to her, and to speak so kindly too.

‘“¢ Who gave it you?” Dolly went on.

“JT dot her at a treat yast
night,” said the little girl, sobbing











again quite bitterly. ‘The kind
lady dave it me. O, my booful
dolly—my booful ickle dolly!” 7

Then Dolly ran up to her
mother with tears in her pretty
brown eyes. 4

‘‘Mother,” she said, ‘I don’t
want to buy any nasty skates. I
want to buy that poor
little girl a new doll.”

“So you shall, my
darling,” said her

ee mother. ‘Is this your
DOLLY’S SKATES. 39

little girl?”
she went on,
turning to a
respectable
woman who,
at the sound -
Ol Crying,
came hurrying
down the
street, dryin o

her arms on



her apron.



“Yes, ma’am ;
and whatever the poor mite 7ill do without her doll I can’t
say. It’s cruel hard.”

“My little girl,” Dolly’s mother went on, “ has been
saving up her money to buy herself something ; but she tells
me it will make her much happier if she may buy your child
another doll. May she?”

‘‘ It’s a true lady you are, ma’am, to ask me like that. And
I say God bless your pretty darling for thinking of such
athing. It will make my Rosie as happy as a bird in spring ;
and she don’t have more happiness than she can do with.”

So Rosie and Dolly and Dolly’s mother went off hand in
hand to the toy shop, and there Dolly bought the prettiest,
daintiest doll, with flaxen hair, and clothes that you could
take off and put on again. And. when Rosie kissed Dolly
40 DOLLY’S SKATES.



and ran away, with her little heart full of joy and pride,
Dolly felt consoled for the loss of the pleasure she had been
looking forward to.

‘‘T am the wee-est little bit sorry,” she whispered to her
mother, as they trudged back ; ‘because I did want the skates
very badly, but ’m much more happier.”

When Daddy heard the story, he looked very proud of his
little girl as he bent and asked her whether she would like
him to give her a pair of skates.
4

DOLLY’S SKATES. 41

“Oh no, no, Daddy, dear,” said Dolly. ‘“ ‘That would
spoil everything.”

So Dolly’s skates have still to be bought; but she has
begun to save up again for them, and I think she will have

enough to buy them before the next frost comes.







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Little Miss Mischief.

HE was always called “Little Miss Mischief,” although
S her real name was ‘“ Victoria Dorothea”; but how
could any one ever think of calling anything so roguish and
dimpled by such a grand name. When she was quite a
tiny mite she was so full of pranks and fun, and merry
tricks, that nurse began to speak of her as little Miss
Mischief, and gradually mother, father, and all the big boy
brothers called her so too. Mother used to declare that it was
the boys who led her little darling into mischief, and that if
she had no brothers she would be quiet like other people’s
little girls. But the boys said, “No, if Victoria Dorothea was —
the only person on a desert island she would still always be
LITTLE MISS MISCHIEF. 43

up to mischief, trying to paint the trees red, or something
just as funny and impossible.” _ Nursie would brush out Miss
Mischief’s curls, put on a clean pinafore, a tidy frock, and
hat, and send her down to the Lodge gate to meet her father
as he came from the station ; but somehow, before the Lodge
gate was reached, the pinafore would have become dirty, the
frock torn, and even the straw hat would look as if it had
been worn for a year instead of a day or two. Father always
tried to look shocked, but when the dirty little face was
raised to his, and the chubby arms squeezed round his neck,
although his collar suffered, he could only return the hug,
smiling. | 7
At the Lodge lived Miss Mischief’s great friend, Janie, the
lodgekeeper’s little girl, just the same age, but very different
in everything else. Janie was just as quiet as a little mouse,
and as timid as a little mouse that knows the cat is not far
off ; whereas Miss Mischief did not know what fear was.
One day a very sad thing happened. The lodgekeeper’s
wife was hanging out clothes to dry in the back garden,
when she heard a carriage coming down the drive; “ Run,
Janie dear, and open the gate,” she said; ‘‘if I don’t peg
these things securely the wind will blow them down.”
Janie picked up her doll, and walked round to the front
of the cottage.
The sound of wheels came nearer and nearer, and faster
and faster, and, just as the little girl got to the gate, she saw

a horse, harnessed to a trap, come tearing madly down the

e
44 : LITTLE MISS MISCHIEF.

drive. It was the butcher’s cart, but there was no driver ;
while the man was talking to a servant, something had fright-
ened the horse, and it had bolted.

Janie’s mother came rushing out when she heard at what a_
rate the trap was coming, but she reached the gate too late ;
Janie had opened it, but, as the horse tore through, he swerved
aside and knocked the little girl down, so that one wheel went
over her. A leg was broken, and for weeks poor little Janie
had to lie in bed.

Little Miss Mischief was almost heart-broken when she
heard of the accident, and her lips quivered, and tears came
into her eyes whenever anyone spoke of her little friend.
For a long time she was not allowed to go and see her;
but at last, when Janie was getting on nicely, she went to
pay her a visit. The very best doll, and a bunch of hothouse
grapes, were taken as a present, and little Miss Mischief
went herself into the village, and with her very own money
bought a nice ‘“‘ Jack-in-the-Box,” and a stick of barley sugar
for Janie. —

One day, not long after this, little Miss Mischief was lost.
It was the boys’ half-holiday, a day which she always loved,
and which never came often enough. All the morning she
had been wandering about the house and garden, helping
cook, the housemaid, and gardener. She called it helping, and
they loved her too much to tell her that it hindered their work
when she put currants into the Irish Stew instead of the cake ;

let the pig into the back garden to eat the cabbages, so as to
LITTLE MISS MISCHIEF. 45

save Tom the trouble of feeding her; unfastened Rover, the
yard dog, who then went for a walk on his own account with-
out his muzzle, and many other suchlike little jobs. But when
the boys came home nurse gave a sigh of relief.

‘Take care of your sister, Master Jack,” she said.

‘All right, nurse,” he shouted back, as he caught hold of |
the little girl’s hand, and raced over the lawn after Rex
and Phil.

They had a game of
“hide-and-seek”; the boys
always hid in such erand
places, and little Miss
Mischief hid and sought
with them, until at last she
exclaimed :

“Now I shall hide
quite alone; no, Jack, not
even with you;” and off
she marched, after making
them promise to wait
where they were until she
cried “ Cuckoo.”

The boys waited and
waited, but there was no





‘call. The minutes went on,

and still no “‘ Cuckoo.”



“T say, you fellows,”
46 LITTLE MISS MISCHIEF.

said Jack at last, “I’m not going to wait any longer; per-
haps she has called and we haven’t heard.” |
So the boys began to search, they hunted high and low,
in the garden, orchard, stables, and house; but no little Miss
Mischief. After that they began to get anxious. Could she
have fallen into the pond in the meadow? Or had she
wandered into the road and been stolen by gipsies? Or
what had become of her? Mother was frightened too, when
j she saw their white, scared

faces; and she, nurse, and



the gardener, joined in the
search.

“« We can’t fancy
Miss Mischief keep-
ing quiet so long
anywhere,” they
said; and began to
hunt still farther
afield.

“ Run down to
the Lodge, and ask
if she has been seen
by anyone there,”
said mother; and off
the boys ran.

They knocked at
the Lodge door. No
LITTLE MISS MISCHIEF. 47



answer. ‘They knocked again, and tried the door, but it was
fastened. Janie’s mother at that moment came hurrying up.

‘*No,” she exclaimed, when she heard what was the
matter, ‘I’ve not seen the dear child. I went out an hour
ago, meaning to be back in a few minutes, but a neigh-
bour’s baby was taken ill, and I could not leave her. Poor
little Janie, I don’t know what she’ll think, me leaving her
locked up all this time ! Why who’s she talking to?”

‘Oh, here she is—Master Phil, Master Jack,” she called
out to the boys, who were already running back up the
drive. :

Yes, there she was, little Miss Mischief, sitting by her
little friend’s side undressing her doll.

“Janie was crying,” she explained, ‘“‘so I came in.”

‘‘ But how,” said Janie’s mother, ‘‘ when I had locked the

door ?”
48 LITTLE MISS MISCHIEF.

“Qh, I climbed up, and got through the window,” said
Victoria Dorothea calmly.

‘Oh, little Miss Mischief, when will you leave off being a
Tom-boy and a pickle,” said her mother when she had her

little, daughter safely in her arms once more.

fone n ss



Lah Carey ok -


Pussy’s Tale.

HAT a lovely Persian!” Those are the first words

that I can remember my aunt saying. She took

me in her arms and kissed me, admiring my beautiful ruff and

tail, and my dainty ways, and I felt a kindly feeling towards
her from that moment. |

There was great excitement in my uncle’s studio on the
day of the wedding.

He was dressed all in his best, and was bustling about
with boxes and portmanteaux, and my aunt was so agitated
that her hand trembled when she stroked me. They are
not really my uncle and aunt, though they always say they
are; but, of course, no one believes them. They are well
enough, but they have not the ae) and style that belong
to Persian blood. |

The fact was that they were going to be married secretly.
50 PUSSY’S TALE,

I was in the secret, for I had often listened to their conversa-
tion in the studio when I was curled up on a cushion, or on
my aunt’s lap, and they thought I was asleep; and Elsie—she
was my uncle’s little sister—was in the secret too. They
were just about to start for the church, when there was a
loud double-knock at the door. My aunt peeped out of the
window.

‘“Tt’s father,” she exclaimed, ‘what shall we do?”

They looked at each other for a moment in consternation.

‘Tl tell the girl
not to open the door,”
said my uncle.

But it was too late.
A handsome old gen-
tleman, with white
whiskers, and. a white

waistcoat—not nearly |



so becoming as mine—

and a very red face,



~ bounced into the room.




I immediately

;.- jumped on my uncle’s



shoulder, for safety.
‘What are you



doing here?” shouted



the old gentleman,



> eo lari mes: cane eles
PUSSY’S ' TALE. dL

daughter, but taking
no notice of my
uncle and me.

She burst into
tears. My uncle
said—

| “Tt is useless to
conceal our inten-
tions any longer,
Major; your daugh-
ter and I are going
to be married this
morning.” :

“You will do
nothing of the sort,”
said the Major;
“fortunately, I am



just in time to stop
you.”
You cannot carry her away by force,” said my uncle;
“our arrangements are complete, and nothing can alter our
determination.”

“T will go to the church and forbid the banns. I will have
the law on you!” spluttered the enraged Major.

At this moment, just when the conversation was growing
interesting, Elsie took me from my uncle’s shoulder, and

carried me into another room.
52 - PUSSY’S TALE.

‘‘He wants her to marry Mr. Jenkins, because he is so
rich,” said Elsie; ‘‘ but you won’t let them separate your uncle
and aunt, will you, Pussy, dear ?”

Of course not! Jenkins was a clumsy creature who
sometimes stumbled over me, and would not stroke me for
fear I should scratch him, as, indeed, I often felt inclined to.

‘Now listen to me, Pussy,” continued Elsie; “the Major

is a very vain old
gentleman, a regu-
lar old dandy; he -
thinks more of his
clothes and _ his
appearance than
anything else in
the world.”
; I knew this
| very well. I had
| often thought his
vanity ridiculous.

“Well,” said

Elsie—she is a





































































’ mischievous little











person, ‘is Elsie,



and as sharp as a

needle, though she



knows how to look



innocent almost as
PUSSY’S TALE. 53

well asI do. ‘ Well,” she said, “do you know how we can
prevent him from going to the church and interfering with
the marriage?” Hlsie laughed aloud.

‘Oh! it will be such fun, Pussy,” she said.

_ I purred in sympathetic approval while Elsie told me her
scheme in a whisper, which was every now and then inter-
rupted by a burst of laughter. Then we went back into the
studio, where the angry party were still disputing.

‘‘T am determined never to marry Mr. Jenkins,” my aunt
was tearfully declaring.

The Major sat down with an air of decision, having first
_carefully dusted the chair with his handkerchief, for the studio
had a general aspect of untidiness that morning.

“Then you shall not marry anyone,” he said; ‘I will
take care to prevent it.”

“You may make a scene, but you cannot prevent the
ceremony,” said my uncle.

“Oh! I could not bear a scene,” exclaimed my aunt.

Meanwhile, Elsie had quietly taken down my uncle’s
palette from a nail on the wall. In the ordinary way I
cannot endure paint, it is so sticky, it smells so nasty, and it
is so troublesome to get off if you accidentally get a little on
your tail. That is one of the disadvantages of living with an
artist. But I had made up my mind to the sacrifice, so I let
Elsie dab one of my paws in the Prussian blue, another in the
burnt sienna, a third in the vermillion, and a fourth in the

light red.
54 PUSSY’S TALE.

“Tl get it all off for you, Pussy,” she said, encouragingly.

Then I leapt straight from the palette to the Major’s knee,
and purred in my most engaging fashion.

To make a pretence of coolness, he began to pet me in a
mechanical sort of way, while my uncle was consoling my
aunt. I climbed up the Major’s white waistcoat and got on
his shoulder, continuing to purr loudly, and all the time
playfully tapping his white whiskers and his cheeks with my
paws, of course, taking care to keep my gloves on. This is —
one of my little tricks for creating a good impression on
people. The Major took to it very quietly, and, when I had
thoroughly done both sides, I jumped down and returned to
Elsie, who hugged me with delight, while she vainly strove
to suppress her laughter.

‘We must go now, dear,” said my uncle to my aunt.

“¢ And I shall go with you,” cried the Major.

My uncle and aunt turned towards him to make a last |
appeal. At first their faces wore a look of apprehension. No
doubt they thought he was suffering from some terrible and
unknown disease. ‘Then they smiled.

‘What are you laughing at?” asked the Major, in
a fury.

‘“‘ Look at yourself in the glass,” said my uncle, who could
contain his mirth no longer.

The Major stepped to the mirror, and on seeing his appear-
ance, indulged in such a terrible outburst that I thought it

discreet to hide behind a distant canvas. -
-PUSSY’S TALE. 55

“Tt’s that con-
founded cat,” he
roared. . “I can’t
go out like this! ”

“If you do,
youll be taken
straight off to a
lunatic asylum,”
said my uncle.
‘You'll find plenty
of turpentine in
the studio. The
paint will all come
off in time. Good-

bye, I hope you



will manage to
get clean by the time we are back.”

_ My uncle and aunt hurried away to the church, and Elsie
and I left the Major, who was furiously wiping his face and
clothes with a cloth, and improving on my workmanship
generally by spreading the mess over a wider area. How we
purred and chuckled when we were alone!

It took Elsie quite a long time to get me clean, and I felt |
miserable while she was doing it, for I loathe soap and water,
even when it is warm. But she packed me up comfortably
in front of the kitchen fire, and I soon got dry; and when I
had had some fish, as a reward, I felt all right.
56 PUSSY’S TALE.

It was a long time before the Major forgave my uncle and
aunt, who, I am glad to say, are properly grateful to me, and
tell all their friends that I arranged their marriage for them.
This induces people to pet me, and give me delicacies. Still,
I have no doubt I could coax them just as well, even if they

did not know the story of my heroic self sacrifice.







test"
Wh 1 fA—
ie

Ss WG



A Day’s Holiday!

OU may have heard of St. Luke’s summer—those lovely
iv summer-like days which we appreciate, perhaps, all
the more for having had just a taste of the coming winter
cold. Well, it was on one of these sunny autumn days that
Herbert Fanshawe was lucky enough to have a whole holiday
before him, and he had begged a holiday for his sister, Gwen-
doline—not, as he said, that she much wanted it, for was she
not taught at home by Aunt Meg, which was like having a
sort of holiday all the year round! Gwendoline herself by:
no means shared his opinion, and considered that Aunt Meg
kept her very closely at it. Anyway, she was glad of the
holiday, and so was Aunt Meg, who declared it was the very
day for taking her sketch book and catching the autumn
58 A DAY’S HOLIDAY.

tints: So they were all three going for a day’s excursion,
and Aunt Meg was busily tying up packages of daintily cut.
sandwiches, which, together with sundry small cakes, she
handed to the children. © |

“¢ So, each man is to carry his own rations?” said Herbert,
with a smile of approval, for boys—polite boys—do come in for
so much carrying on these excursions, and he already had
his fishing-rod and basket to manage. So off they started,
merrily enjoying their three-mile walk on that sunny morning,
with the golden leaves dancing above their heads, and the
dead ones crisply crunching beneath their feet. They soon
reached the river, and Herbert was not long in selecting a
“ripping” place for catching fish. Gwendoline settled
herself with a book near him, and ventured the timidly
expressed hope that presently she “might have a try.”

“Why, you'd never care to put the worm on, or take the |
fish off the hook—even if you caught one!” was the angler’s
disdainful reply.

‘Well, you could do that, you know,” was the suggestion
hesitatingly made.

“Oh, I dare say!” was all the answer, perhaps, which
could be expected. But Gwendoline knew her brother’s
moods, and wisely determined to tackle him later on, play
him, ‘like he does the fish,” she thought; so she took up her
book and began to read with much diligence; it was not
that she exactly cared for what she was reading, but really she
was so snubbed and sat upon over this matter of fishing, that
A DAY’S HOLIDAY. 7 - 59

she determined she would remain in ignorance no longer, but
would study the subject. So she repeated over and over
again (for it was dry reading), ‘‘The perch is a very good and |
bold biting fish, he is one of the fishes of prey, and carries his
teeth in his mouth.” Why, good gracious! Where else could
he carry them? and she shut up the book with an impatient
snap. But she was not going to let slip the knowledge she
had so diligently gleaned; so before it all vanished out-of her
head, she called out, in rather an unnecessarily loud voice— _

‘Had any sport ?” |

“No!” rather snappishly answered her brother; for what
is more irritating to an angler who has caught nothing than
to be asked what he has caught.

“Ah!” she replied, decidedly, “ that’s because yow ve not
got the right sort of bait; youshould
have” (and here she began to
speak with great rapidity, so afraid
“was she that
her know-
ledge would
vanish )—
pt you should
have the flesh
of a rabbit
or cat, cut
small ” (she

af
6aith (.Caylor
shuddered as




60 A DAY’S HOLIDAY.

she quoted)—‘‘and mixed with bean-flour, or, if that may not
easily be got, other flour; and put to these sugar and honey,
and beat together in a mortar ””—she had to stop a moment
to gasp for breath, just time enough for her brother to say,
contemptuously, ‘* What rot!”

‘“‘ Indeed ! then,” she said, with great dignity, “it’s Isaac
Walton who says it. Oh! but I forgot, that was not for
roach, that was for some other fish, but——”

‘‘Oh! it?s near enough, what’s sauce for the goose is sauce
for the gander with you,” said Herbert, not at all impressed
as she thought he would be; really, it seemed little use her
pursuing the study any longer—it was so baffling; and she
felt quite relieved when Herbert suggested, that they should
get in the boat that was moored by the bank, and cross over
to the wood just opposite. .

‘But won’t auntie be frightened?” said Gwendoline,
glancing towards Aunt Meg, who was sketching some little
distance off.

‘Oh! we shall be back before her sketch is finished.”

‘ And is it safe?” was her next question, as she stepped
into the boat.

‘Herbert assured her that it was, and, indeed, one stroke of
_ the oars brought them to the other side.

“Tdo hope we sha’n’t see ‘Silly Peter,’” said Gwendoline,
as she stepped out of the boat.

‘Bah! who’d care for a crazy dwarf?” replied Herbert, 7

as he fastened the boat to a willow tree, and looked about
for a nice place
to put in his line.
Now, the fish, too,
evidently liked this
side of the river
best, and Herbert
could have answer-
ed cheerfully the

question ‘ What:

sport?” It was
quite difficult to
get him away from
his rod, though it

A DAY’S HOLIDAY. ; 61









a iS ! ly ¢ i eZ Shee a\s
pen Wh Loy \ ae ZS 4
th Caylor YN
LAs NbN Me

was long, long past dinner time, and Gwendoline was impa-

tiently waiting, with their dinner temptingly spread out on the

low bough of the tree on which she was sitting. But he came

‘at last; and most thoroughly were they enjoying their repast,

feeling like two birds in the tree, when they were startled by

a harsh gurgling laugh just above them, and, looking up, they

saw a large-headed, ugly dwarf, whom they at once knew

must be “Silly Peter.” He jumped on a branch close to

‘them, and began to sing, in a squeaky voice—

‘Yah! Yah! piccaninnies !
Yah! Yah! chickabiddies !
Am I not a funny little man?
But I hope you like the sight of me,
And are not in any fright of me,
For V’ll try to look as pretty as I can.”
62 A DAY’S HOLIDAY.

Hereupon he jumped down and pulled some hideous
grimaces.’ Now, Gwendoline, frightened as she was, felt
offended with him for pulling such faces ; besides, it was so
rude to interrupt their picnic, so she answered as coolly as
she could—

“No! I’m not frightened, and if you want to look pretty
I shouldn’t pull such faces if I were you,” and then she went
on eating her cake. !

Herbert looked up, amazed at his sister’s courage; and
for once in his life did not feel her superior.

Perhaps her courage disconcerted and routed the dwarf,
who was said to ape at being more foolish than he really was. 3
Anyhow, he soon vanished as quickly as he came; but he had
alarmed the children, and they both felt that they had had
enough of picnicking in the wood, so, quickly gathering
up the fishing tackle, they prepared to jump into the boat,
when—oh! horror of horrors !—it was floating down the
stream. nae

‘¢ ¢Silly Peter’ must have unfastened it,” hoarsely whispered
Herbert.

‘¢ Or perhaps you tied it badly,” answered his sister, with
more calmness than she really felt, for the shades of evening
were beginning to come on, and Aunt Meg must have finished
her sketch by this time.

‘Oh! there 7s aunt Meg rushing along the path.” She
pointed and shouted loudly.

‘Oh, hush!” entreated Herbert, “it’s no use shouting,
A DAY’S HOLIDAY. 7 68

she’s so deaf she’ll
never hear, and it
will only bring
Peter.”

“Well,” said
his sister, trying to
comfort him, ‘“ after
all, we sha’n’t be so
badly off as Robin-
~ gon Crusoe, even if
we are here all
night, because there
are two of us, you
see.”

But, to their in-
finite relief, they






‘ay
te

were not to be left Edith m.Caylor

there all night.
They hear the
splashing of oars.
Aunt Meg brings with her a boatman whose sharp eyes
had seen the children cross over. Aunt Meg is so glad ton
get them safe and sound that she forgets to scold; indeed,
she kisses them again and again, which is what they certainly

do not deserve.

And for some reason or another Herbert never snubbed

his sister any more









isp.

y)
SELLE LLLP so is

a








































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xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008737600001datestamp 2008-10-30setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Little bright eyesArtistic seriesdc:creator Burnside, Helen Marion ( Author )Guest, Antony ( Author )Bennett, S. E ( Author )Brundage, Frances, 1854-1937 ( Illustrator )Bowley, May ( Illustrator )Taylor, Edith ( Illustrator )Taylor, Mabel ( Illustrator )Vredenburg, Edric, b. 1860 ( Editor )dc:subject Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literatureConduct of life -- Juvenile literatureChildren's storiesChildren's poetryChildren's stories -- 1898Children's poetry -- 1898Prize books (Provenance) -- 1898dc:description Helen Marion Burnside, Antony Guest, S.E. Bennett &c &c ; illustrated by Frances Brundage, M. Bowley, Edith and Mabel Taylor &c., &c. ; edited by Edric Vredenburg.Date of publication from prize inscription.dc:publisher Raphael Tuck & Sonsdc:date 1898?dc:type Bookdc:format 63, 1 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00087376&v=00001002224111 (ALEPH)262617002 (OCLC)ALG4372 (NOTIS)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English


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Invalid character
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describe
'695414' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFOP' 'sip-files00010a.jp2'
671c9e6f0cb145e7f4ca07bce6e74ac1
fdcd8e89766ac02cbdb4f8e0030dfad7dc900b47
describe
'66004' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFOQ' 'sip-files00010a.jpg'
6aa165406c24f515ae9d21b17f901770
2a7b94dbd42d13b8e9e069ef0d360349417df788
'2012-01-14T23:06:42-05:00'
describe
'11742' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFOR' 'sip-files00010a.pro'
c364b8f4284a85c590bc0d282c7da957
8f4b238a752f6647d1bafc4846ee91406e4c5022
'2012-01-14T23:06:23-05:00'
describe
'17348' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFOS' 'sip-files00010a.QC.jpg'
bd9661d414ea535724b8b868797dd23b
4f1ca2a2685cc7636137aeae428c37be435dd123
'2012-01-14T23:08:10-05:00'
describe
'5580232' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFOT' 'sip-files00010a.tif'
7a7712313cea9284ae4c682b98e22152
159ec2c50fcfcaabd85270b27e481f770b1f4962
'2012-01-14T23:07:34-05:00'
describe
'533' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFOU' 'sip-files00010a.txt'
9bf84cbd7405bf26efb6b4296bc2c130
b4d04d5f5b4c0ba7d4401982cdb2bc94dd0335bb
'2012-01-14T23:07:13-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'4549' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFOV' 'sip-files00010athm.jpg'
c6a76bc2e77bada927d7f059a9ac8efd
2304ea56b1f734b5b44401e067592090657eb57b
'2012-01-14T23:06:17-05:00'
describe
'695784' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFOW' 'sip-files00011a.jp2'
c46e13c2abfa5286b22634f670e0ba75
01b10271fcc8580b2ffd2f4f7ede4ccac0bb365c
describe
'81141' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFOX' 'sip-files00011a.jpg'
c8994576ef6642d01d715d22377e7328
480eae9e0d78d51c2e261c92f57f50fabb7f7874
'2012-01-14T23:07:07-05:00'
describe
'12182' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFOY' 'sip-files00011a.pro'
9403a75b397e5406c53aed49cfcd4c5d
1587db7e59a5c1a03725e751782d28c9d27be1bd
describe
'22928' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFOZ' 'sip-files00011a.QC.jpg'
335d25767911eecda5a5de3acbde4c60
f117e53cbc53cdcb8a8f7bd39e8c50b9e6ce251b
'2012-01-14T23:07:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPA' 'sip-files00011a.tif'
d3f75d8393e0f39e1ad7bee682e9ba78
736253c3f62881261b3edcb15b54325a655746fe
'2012-01-14T23:07:52-05:00'
describe
'541' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPB' 'sip-files00011a.txt'
08e7679c65ee37b67b835ec86796ce79
0178df43c63474919808cd768702260b9af36f43
'2012-01-14T23:07:08-05:00'
describe
'6124' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPC' 'sip-files00011athm.jpg'
6c944f06d0377fba7bc75a0a4c8ab679
fbc59d60d39f0a7373edc380e670071de64d4338
describe
'677929' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPD' 'sip-files00012a.jp2'
43b5df72b2eb4bfcd4113e9cff4ef869
52e57313f51f83902080559531d6434a89b0a4c9
describe
'125889' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPE' 'sip-files00012a.jpg'
a54cfe6ebd88e7df5da78eb8019e47ca
1ecda45b0fd26003757fb9e5dc148c76243c6f57
'2012-01-14T23:07:17-05:00'
describe
'20725' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPF' 'sip-files00012a.pro'
f29f0ed0293fe6dad4a992850fe1bd81
074c73ab807187826de582cb551c2cc008deb8da
'2012-01-14T23:07:56-05:00'
describe
'34516' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPG' 'sip-files00012a.QC.jpg'
e0153ccf68914d0c6ef7e4ea6af19071
a860eeaba1ed95885f80bdf9c92da27af75afb27
'2012-01-14T23:06:30-05:00'
describe
'5441992' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPH' 'sip-files00012a.tif'
d4913bcb02d6839551eac55572b66ca8
3a9a22b55a61f8958f90da5f7cc69c2c0d8c73b0
'2012-01-14T23:06:20-05:00'
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPI' 'sip-files00012a.txt'
e2d8d6eaf1783f39625538de63cc163a
7797aaaa166bcf31c2cdaa19d293c8e02b9105af
describe
'8365' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPJ' 'sip-files00012athm.jpg'
0d0f808f48012df7f322704a9aff0fea
5b8be0ac872c81b1c3dd9f0c4ea7f7f1ffa090b1
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPK' 'sip-files00013a.jp2'
793674467331de31c1513731e262cd0e
c3f0f79d0feaa5b627b2ef8f5ac6d0a6aaf09d47
describe
'105406' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPL' 'sip-files00013a.jpg'
a0c334e783478b57d59f87c0b6366fa8
377bb9d57259851a2cf984f472b12c41e6562a4e
describe
'34438' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPM' 'sip-files00013a.pro'
83bf1abc92bdf07d2c239580592ffbbd
2b19ae88f86c3a891fb3405b363a8fcace49a82f
describe
'32856' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPN' 'sip-files00013a.QC.jpg'
6b5f774f06889f60ced1f179b41b77e9
d967fd746be532ae6176b7132492c2ff1a08e958
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPO' 'sip-files00013a.tif'
ea706a59d2f96ab85bf1d653ba941fb0
d348b7147b800c180f11f9341ce7c6b6837acebf
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPP' 'sip-files00013a.txt'
2ebbfd57b6b05215e95e938b8ee97561
b136b5ecf1bfc9d9043b84ecb25140e965a5f43b
describe
'8770' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPQ' 'sip-files00013athm.jpg'
fef41d6aed65da37ea6f7d1dcc7e8f8a
ab3c59e9c5dc1fad0e28197f31994f97cbb4d9ac
'2012-01-14T23:07:31-05:00'
describe
'684100' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPR' 'sip-files00014a.jp2'
c98c1ee98d93ee53830062e4ea8316cb
6731348a3a6a9a69963bf7d27e828c3842784dc0
describe
'105243' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPS' 'sip-files00014a.jpg'
d9365cc965259a7e622e87c43fa24786
294790387c131e3043cec2d49bdd179d59947d12
describe
'34202' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPT' 'sip-files00014a.pro'
0cf190825d21e9b26ed5de561c68e608
a43d52872fe0b1254d543fa7df7111a9e871dbfd
'2012-01-14T23:07:35-05:00'
describe
'32202' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPU' 'sip-files00014a.QC.jpg'
d54d10da2c75ad730f5ff600726c7c26
d250bc8c2814bc176341d74848b06308e64c91b1
describe
'5494988' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPV' 'sip-files00014a.tif'
2b1d5a0e508d6e1b6f4be01da43491f5
58fc3ad73b802682920c933c49b035f0052f1313
'2012-01-14T23:06:25-05:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPW' 'sip-files00014a.txt'
60218d886bfffbdf6ec8d17c014250f7
a36d37c9917d3762bb4dbadebd0f8aa5fa8c3b92
describe
'8194' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPX' 'sip-files00014athm.jpg'
32b7bbec7f6b7c5887194fd9fbc7a9a6
b224dcb96e03988a813e74fde85c0155e703bd5a
'2012-01-14T23:07:44-05:00'
describe
'695773' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPY' 'sip-files00015a.jp2'
85310617b9eb48ef2dcdc0988196cfb8
67dba2b63e57a97e3dad7f8d684f65167a05a1fa
'2012-01-14T23:08:11-05:00'
describe
'100858' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFPZ' 'sip-files00015a.jpg'
7fac24aa0dc3987e92ca0f8d8ca74e9b
7dbc9c211db6a530f0e32620b22cb41ff472f38e
describe
'13058' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQA' 'sip-files00015a.pro'
be2f4a55737a6cc3916b6fc31794cbd7
89a27ed5bbac2ea3ca565111b9a804a6866e856b
describe
'28303' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQB' 'sip-files00015a.QC.jpg'
2adc128780a3c7c5e1001d9113a916e6
ca34ea1a6b8ff86ec56f7be7b4658200581ad3ef
'2012-01-14T23:07:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQC' 'sip-files00015a.tif'
b6ce8e19ce55b3b47124d1486e44c9e5
54d14a79ae15941ba257c1740bc2b08bafbb08db
'2012-01-14T23:06:49-05:00'
describe
'512' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQD' 'sip-files00015a.txt'
a0eba8a3d2fc2b7719f70044a196bed9
3c2c8effa59a1412c1179d795cff6fac6521a3aa
'2012-01-14T23:07:05-05:00'
describe
'7351' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQE' 'sip-files00015athm.jpg'
100e3b1c2e2519732e8069d73e875ad7
6ebffc90370cbb94a47d2c2bcba22914a32919a9
'2012-01-14T23:06:12-05:00'
describe
'686536' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQF' 'sip-files00016a.jp2'
d62961187db8010924ccd8d706f85125
467602c94b13ca2508b4e4cdd1f354f6f6ac7332
'2012-01-14T23:06:09-05:00'
describe
'109954' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQG' 'sip-files00016a.jpg'
aca6de308242b174eb9c604e8ce4efba
1b18d3db0f2742074492c2785a60e7e365569fb5
'2012-01-14T23:07:21-05:00'
describe
'25039' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQH' 'sip-files00016a.pro'
140f3cff59c142cfccf38aa218bb972c
6108ac076f51b173a7288755162ada195fceddf7
describe
'31728' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQI' 'sip-files00016a.QC.jpg'
d219edc444e3736ffdaf5c286bfc04a5
858d1ee35b3fa1a7b9832ece4e1117d0bf9e5d21
describe
'5509064' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQJ' 'sip-files00016a.tif'
b1dd3822b26e45b10c40f6a30dffa5f7
696aa76d239017b332fad9918d5cf28fafe17e98
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQK' 'sip-files00016a.txt'
67982ae19fad5ceb2cb718ddbd926df0
a7c92a200844f4333d0f98cdc689dfad610b2aec
'2012-01-14T23:08:01-05:00'
describe
'8125' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQL' 'sip-files00016athm.jpg'
75c77b0cf0a48a1ef1978ffbae70b51d
9a1bed20335d8eba495a4352216f7ccb68a61dfd
'2012-01-14T23:06:27-05:00'
describe
'695191' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQM' 'sip-files00017a.jp2'
2391b3cd2089971478a70d3065d53bb9
3292ebbae0acd01550a66d03d618296106cf6f25
describe
'101042' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQN' 'sip-files00017a.jpg'
16fa970b63fdbb765d42928c6966b110
e9a5d873e736b712576dd35dc6eee76714044b07
'2012-01-14T23:06:21-05:00'
describe
'33328' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQO' 'sip-files00017a.pro'
9c44acca29187ea68392084caa1a8f27
93a81279e7e6eb024ea697689fb7e62256ac5a42
describe
'30599' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQP' 'sip-files00017a.QC.jpg'
cef4a4bd5e62da82b4f3b348ec213a15
427aa87c59f23292dacc45d04446cfbea46b0c22
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQQ' 'sip-files00017a.tif'
b9bfd39ece0a84358db02a57f9aea781
3758b212400189bd138ecbfb597d972fae6ace21
'2012-01-14T23:07:16-05:00'
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQR' 'sip-files00017a.txt'
eb99e309ec40c79af8fb97bf7c79a20c
9cb8e4e52d3cd9377537a855acd74293cab227b5
'2012-01-14T23:07:19-05:00'
describe
'7958' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQS' 'sip-files00017athm.jpg'
4b9bdc586f7181864ca34c23b87cae78
c90af3181d4b6be5adee73b1b40c08a47bc489af
'2012-01-14T23:07:09-05:00'
describe
'686535' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQT' 'sip-files00018a.jp2'
332042954ca366d7f40a23cff5c814a8
8f3da38e7128cba2685829a3a04e8c9cf9e17623
'2012-01-14T23:07:26-05:00'
describe
'86604' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQU' 'sip-files00018a.jpg'
5f75577b525aa00d0948878dce971b35
26d10ad813cc475de06029b69591557608c25719
'2012-01-14T23:06:41-05:00'
describe
'25639' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQV' 'sip-files00018a.pro'
774e829c13382c683f3d3971945b28f4
3a08f28c6285722f7bd0dfdf86a91dcd2ea2a282
'2012-01-14T23:06:56-05:00'
describe
'25867' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQW' 'sip-files00018a.QC.jpg'
787985290e3c286a58952cb0f2466e29
ed6ba6bf7483ea117a62828dd8a187d33bdf2dbf
'2012-01-14T23:06:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQX' 'sip-files00018a.tif'
e0f34a853facf1a6fb1d023c360fa89b
7a472b3d4f969cb92aa6a514219e63e1bfc118b0
'2012-01-14T23:07:02-05:00'
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQY' 'sip-files00018a.txt'
b9d54b1fc1c3bdb71241e7fae60335f2
be36c20401a9ec4b20abf87385f6c4a4422a18bf
'2012-01-14T23:07:36-05:00'
describe
'6663' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFQZ' 'sip-files00018athm.jpg'
b9caed9931fb96c0bdf40bf2b2538232
910644575d84c78b278c1265efe86aef8cfa9a5a
describe
'673614' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRA' 'sip-files00019a.jp2'
3593c281c52161063c3aa8e3fc9c2c6d
8dc7eb7f6986fd501752a54ae611baf7ace278be
describe
'65455' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRB' 'sip-files00019a.jpg'
6d65e9a7a86140230a47b4cb2eb5f3aa
df21080c805213d3ed0a03d15b7642a7489de84b
describe
'6491' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRC' 'sip-files00019a.pro'
e9e324e9e6cb063a02d5d80110b254c9
8aef2cf5bca00b58849cd6768b398f437062560c
describe
'16836' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRD' 'sip-files00019a.QC.jpg'
f68d8e32222331b03f767464933150a0
bea451368d3aebf8ee8124a506cddb765b8165cb
describe
'5405820' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRE' 'sip-files00019a.tif'
3671e9824e0a5c742aa00183d2f1c5be
d3fc3edd6360da2d74f07d8e1d08b678b1957739
'2012-01-14T23:06:38-05:00'
describe
'328' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRF' 'sip-files00019a.txt'
f4b4c4800b84eabde26ace666c1da61a
2a97869ecebb92a8e7eadda1d4a1622071fecf36
'2012-01-14T23:06:22-05:00'
describe
'4456' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRG' 'sip-files00019athm.jpg'
8bec6538e63e49c386e8ded0f40f7225
8acf6c77d935543d5e4cc0e227572bbb97dbdaa4
describe
'679959' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRH' 'sip-files00020a.jp2'
7961d28eb907a8e7425c104243481bc8
001807503caab54e0f72de08dd3544107e423535
'2012-01-14T23:06:37-05:00'
describe
'74912' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRI' 'sip-files00020a.jpg'
24dac6af3bab4060d6d1d3bcf677eb0e
e9cdd10b46f003286aa37d945e07a60d7c778a6a
describe
'12519' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRJ' 'sip-files00020a.pro'
712124f27a5d8a99a8478080de677669
1c76518127d240e25ebab8735e7821878470cbc1
describe
'20324' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRK' 'sip-files00020a.QC.jpg'
66d6c8b09e6ff7aaae80d92661c6e02f
6019affe4c01b33f9271304dbf4a0d7edaa18e71
describe
'5456468' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRL' 'sip-files00020a.tif'
96253f03785e25d23d137e918eea299a
d5e66c063d600a57fd910fd9e3136c97eefaff89
describe
'694' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRM' 'sip-files00020a.txt'
87e0ced6782cc8d7d5ce3260fc6d860e
8eb7889b9be47953055dbddf41073a97b55ad175
'2012-01-14T23:06:48-05:00'
describe
'5161' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRN' 'sip-files00020athm.jpg'
31f5641244ec32e8c0e6d5523c8568b8
0014558de2d660376a75f441b544ff3ac4e5cfa0
describe
'688862' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRO' 'sip-files00021a.jp2'
681fa91dcfa848ee569a3838bffa9e17
6411af184ce87610d40bde118550b59579c32e4a
'2012-01-14T23:07:28-05:00'
describe
'88133' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRP' 'sip-files00021a.jpg'
4294741dc634a42b28fe613ba57b41a0
909af1abeea2e99fbd75f67c278dd141fe84b401
describe
'9262' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRQ' 'sip-files00021a.pro'
2eef7686a73a831859fea662454641c9
11ce1333ab8e79574daec319204fc479a5f87d7c
describe
'22957' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRR' 'sip-files00021a.QC.jpg'
99d935aca77b75b1e8b180838da171fc
eca9417586d9cc87cb006b60009db95cec5023a8
describe
'5527660' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRS' 'sip-files00021a.tif'
7c74b4d8660e3e095affb05df9a1c976
01a5103b5a6e708d219c94801497ff5bfc690e55
describe
'480' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRT' 'sip-files00021a.txt'
065ae7497115c1481495b0ffebcc75e6
b98449bf8a5dee43daab35ee60873d8f7289d42e
describe
'5680' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRU' 'sip-files00021athm.jpg'
0072123aa74213379b5660f9a2a1c6d3
b108af6765c16669b9addc3685d4a446cb60ffa8
'2012-01-14T23:07:53-05:00'
describe
'688805' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRV' 'sip-files00022a.jp2'
302f15234403e8768e0800b591ae0082
1786526e9c736672c2fbdf11f7e92880c6d3971a
describe
'62847' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRW' 'sip-files00022a.jpg'
82404941320fea145dc747c0029acb77
2cfcab42fb9c872658e3929f649f4c3898a64af5
describe
'16683' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRX' 'sip-files00022a.pro'
e5283761e72ab8304c2586a5dd76dc97
bcf3c0d8d96ab44c69fad32870a4ffaf5129f957
describe
'17570' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRY' 'sip-files00022a.QC.jpg'
c0abfcbf5f6e664c4f4b441a4a8ef912
245e78ccbd2f8724a74d165ed2ed9a53d9c02bd0
'2012-01-14T23:08:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFRZ' 'sip-files00022a.tif'
0a355fd7d13cb043db600778a02526df
16ce3e6f0e2633da11ebe18126b004b3c89bf7a2
'2012-01-14T23:06:52-05:00'
describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSA' 'sip-files00022a.txt'
af72de453ccf9566c0daa3ed5d1b6ca7
ea9d3863007bf1a51136d7e523e627123ffecc43
'2012-01-14T23:08:07-05:00'
describe
'4743' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSB' 'sip-files00022athm.jpg'
42f8632da676c265525b0aeeeb51a00c
dfad3081277a6211d58112c1df7a021b9c836df3
'2012-01-14T23:06:15-05:00'
describe
'687932' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSC' 'sip-files00023a.jp2'
106d058b2d894aa77e37c1542cea66ae
46cb26fcf3ee9008f99db182eb0df8e722a32ddc
'2012-01-14T23:07:11-05:00'
describe
'77057' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSD' 'sip-files00023a.jpg'
d88b384450d97f2c0f0d3a6390117898
81174526c8f1a87f7a39b39d29ae2db6f3a00973
describe
'6594' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSE' 'sip-files00023a.pro'
377febcdde315623279c1992698dfda6
61d069727e5f5114171f5d479118836bf1fc84a5
describe
'20249' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSF' 'sip-files00023a.QC.jpg'
de837380ca0a75d3b02ee5fb19a95faf
fbe3d8caf93848d4bf3d0cf53413afeafb65b637
describe
'5520752' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSG' 'sip-files00023a.tif'
c09cf8f1137b5d33151b410ba8082b59
332af06e659551f3e1d8479578d2d89f55ea575b
describe
'277' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSH' 'sip-files00023a.txt'
6594c08b3c402a0bb7b2146d2dea2ccb
9dacd952985ecf179d8e716faa8e23803bc31ebd
describe
Invalid character
'5263' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSI' 'sip-files00023athm.jpg'
b9b5b849a9c75cf524bba5c60c1c60b3
239f7c58320eb5596404de9aa92af53327958af9
describe
'687661' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSJ' 'sip-files00024a.jp2'
d8d65fe9a22d9398dfa4d01fd86d33b5
7714126c7d58b0e34c3423e21290360882ff18c2
'2012-01-14T23:06:10-05:00'
describe
'62107' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSK' 'sip-files00024a.jpg'
1b1f754e05065f19d9851ad42273042a
de3b0a8e5462038cf6dafef9965257d27e9b4f0f
describe
'10217' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSL' 'sip-files00024a.pro'
9515da1f3673133d72261ba8fa364d01
4b43dade1f6cbfe0a21a121e32146e8adaec1448
describe
'16485' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSM' 'sip-files00024a.QC.jpg'
b9e2b36d3626924d6ebc9fba0e1f5f31
78acc8ef2685b5620b1e1c3b20ddda6f6b63fdb4
describe
'5518804' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSN' 'sip-files00024a.tif'
99dce3b45efe37563e813b68f66a2eff
0464cb5f144790ba22d1d127d392e898f2ebbd19
'2012-01-14T23:06:24-05:00'
describe
'515' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSO' 'sip-files00024a.txt'
e73d2c8bbd49917864b157bad82953eb
fd86001984e3c23fb2639c6c0ec008174d35aa63
'2012-01-14T23:06:46-05:00'
describe
'4386' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSP' 'sip-files00024athm.jpg'
17c8b756159b748cd60d26034718c86e
8c0a7cf3ee214825f0d738bbe311c585776a75e4
describe
'695400' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSQ' 'sip-files00025a.jp2'
322aa0fa0eaec22ddafadba203063510
a49bb64c698c3b7311ff3f8a29de81daa36368df
describe
'114906' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSR' 'sip-files00025a.jpg'
252e356f909118b870e890c001130e6e
531d271fd7fa1dc1722fea21d6787e8c9a2ca235
describe
'21291' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSS' 'sip-files00025a.pro'
378a096fd94f7227d9ce9bba5e219dca
cda23b3cad8869fe32fa9147fd275eedfaf19238
'2012-01-14T23:06:58-05:00'
describe
'31915' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFST' 'sip-files00025a.QC.jpg'
080ddc8269f3849b48c343f39679897e
abd24aef13937298d12a7ea8913af88920107972
'2012-01-14T23:07:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSU' 'sip-files00025a.tif'
3647c13c78a668d9217e916e639dec37
326800b3712a5d814d59ef62af1e7ae66e2246f6
describe
'915' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSV' 'sip-files00025a.txt'
ed44a429406b4e5bb7674c30b94ec271
4c028c9675bd3f7fada5283db93e9676a971feb0
'2012-01-14T23:06:50-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7718' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSW' 'sip-files00025athm.jpg'
9c971546cbd69412e289e4671e5e2a52
a8320a68b30bc6cf757ed4884895168cf073223c
describe
'695781' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSX' 'sip-files00026a.jp2'
7ca48af5ad92459d4bbd4e47f3672cd6
a856d23c53f56cd64d629f6a458ad84150fa43de
describe
'129612' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSY' 'sip-files00026a.jpg'
1542780b4135b879e2436da5fad126d3
7cebe3c63998fd2ca31d671039bcbed4b3514f9b
describe
'21974' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFSZ' 'sip-files00026a.pro'
ce36ee767fa2460c94756fc374c816a8
7ca55cdf33cef928263b8625d4b8e50ecffa884e
describe
'35316' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTA' 'sip-files00026a.QC.jpg'
8c590ef35f623524c3fb3dce8d436dd9
e2139c689e9fd0140ed8c603653a76e3100905fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTB' 'sip-files00026a.tif'
9a243d641add959f7ee17af7dddb95fe
a1e003fb76b24a3224198d31326ad7b2bb849477
'2012-01-14T23:06:39-05:00'
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTC' 'sip-files00026a.txt'
e56ac8f4860602a272999415b8889c58
2903a5c88c1a7fba327d579dc87ab09408a6459e
'2012-01-14T23:07:51-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8940' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTD' 'sip-files00026athm.jpg'
b5a52a1ac6837fe26ceebc53997d25b7
31ec303b4a96544ad8ae51fddbd64b789a2f6c82
describe
'695788' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTE' 'sip-files00027a.jp2'
cececf7c34e8878660f03230bce4294b
d6141a86d67a97b6faa38f1b13bc1f630dcdf9ac
describe
'120677' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTF' 'sip-files00027a.jpg'
7329bc009614cfb13cd79219c4c88eee
047c42874de9cb55cc2378cd4cf9642c1b863ccb
'2012-01-14T23:07:37-05:00'
describe
'40174' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTG' 'sip-files00027a.pro'
913110c6a4096f9d5746c7f65d0061b9
12cbaa3819e3d677ea64ac6109021c147135174f
describe
'38021' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTH' 'sip-files00027a.QC.jpg'
b0abaa7bc1759309d242688d9eeb17d4
f624a857ea58c49b3852a1f1f0d35e9d7d155474
'2012-01-14T23:07:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTI' 'sip-files00027a.tif'
8c61872ae1bff0da86035cab9f8f943f
a98c4a1cd6823c2102f859c010f4f1229ae1bdd9
describe
'1569' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTJ' 'sip-files00027a.txt'
da8783108940c3bfe37947a3e6e58744
6895af38f51bcc89641e02bb436e6b46115f53cf
describe
'9198' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTK' 'sip-files00027athm.jpg'
dbc5fde6b5a2ede620419eb6ec30016e
626c8e9b140445f1525142ac63a2c3ab8b0ebeeb
describe
'683819' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTL' 'sip-files00028a.jp2'
fc7cf77b56e8c29f93919a361e41ec99
640456e11db700aefe4541883026ac68b00c1e1a
describe
'106360' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTM' 'sip-files00028a.jpg'
76c030d98f6d1794ba5f73266579c645
d7455e6a329582ad0adc94762fff2ce687ccda5b
describe
'34088' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTN' 'sip-files00028a.pro'
bd02f2ce317175ae2e4b86392802a167
6ce5be93d22d2163e50a54b70e51584fbd585c60
describe
'33061' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTO' 'sip-files00028a.QC.jpg'
f6a609409a06bc8b02368ed80d65d900
e713be4c6c1cbe5bfd2ddb0506338c032c0bf8d2
describe
'5487636' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTP' 'sip-files00028a.tif'
9c24a85ef6f76e91ac3e5d9ea6b3f595
efa9f0e044ab69c93adcfe8c63cc9e0ef322bb13
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTQ' 'sip-files00028a.txt'
591054a61f3ced1ff570c6aa59544666
0f281722cbc9719d832dd8c7d1d5f3f2565ede85
describe
'8417' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTR' 'sip-files00028athm.jpg'
2f0d562cd822bb9e96c39d1283ee12a2
2d32a7f5cfe1f8e18ba6f74357edc1ab1da63302
describe
'690634' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTS' 'sip-files00029a.jp2'
edc00ba5bdf54bd38b99332261c0d8d3
dbd6ccf64bcfc7d6ffc919188ba0f912bad38826
describe
'113159' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTT' 'sip-files00029a.jpg'
6a7d285eacd1b3d8bff7ee624fb3f416
7479051afff152301552a9fb2995fc3613d7e20e
describe
'18088' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTU' 'sip-files00029a.pro'
e20d9bd64d49d6af110b03388f1a6aaa
141dde3368581fc870e785fb04b50797bb1711f1
describe
'30170' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTV' 'sip-files00029a.QC.jpg'
b6473c16f993320cc19868d49ae41c26
cf9f0c256c57104689239408e866b6a0289e24da
'2012-01-14T23:06:18-05:00'
describe
'5542180' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTW' 'sip-files00029a.tif'
1e0bb4cfa192a52be17a9f71a69765d1
044388b61f0ae13869cb14ad0a5536eb270e9cad
'2012-01-14T23:06:54-05:00'
describe
'751' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTX' 'sip-files00029a.txt'
cd730d4a1dd76a307a0bebb320102546
b6bb04c56bca66cffc7b4a6087d68e06c2dfbe36
describe
'7672' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTY' 'sip-files00029athm.jpg'
6979270e4b056c09c332987ff9484075
97acd90fab2e183674b1b875a39603c8c761b11a
describe
'695766' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFTZ' 'sip-files00030a.jp2'
5ed23c1ccb42c25c1580c71d9588ccf7
09e89b1e5b6d1c10b77e75654a689125700b289a
describe
'109076' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUA' 'sip-files00030a.jpg'
96744c14cb00d3436edc5eca9d8e7c45
a8ca3fbf67e7051f12b86f63a0ae68344f6e1230
describe
'34538' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUB' 'sip-files00030a.pro'
800f4abc0c463e66fc97cc788f86f191
5c7e679c0b27c9abb4a6ebbcc37a73d313553d22
describe
'33858' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUC' 'sip-files00030a.QC.jpg'
5e6c635d0c417b27082aef264717f089
525882954a525e2f1d13e38f8afd83da8fa24db5
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUD' 'sip-files00030a.tif'
0f5240b4fd9f09b9b66f22b46968dec0
69622d2a9fa65ded12adb70a68d6ae76bc669500
'2012-01-14T23:06:31-05:00'
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUE' 'sip-files00030a.txt'
ca432bce082b4b62c07daba6925c6f6a
122da237526a8d916d557b97afa57b66e69d62c7
describe
'8276' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUF' 'sip-files00030athm.jpg'
59182ff279fb6b9bf7688b3e42576f5c
bd366b372c7e08992cc3f85b416a7a34df9bfabe
describe
'695408' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUG' 'sip-files00031a.jp2'
a4a7bb642b90bf3abf1c635ed237b28e
f1217ea9fe43acc029cbad8b0eb6f5e099ba74c1
'2012-01-14T23:06:51-05:00'
describe
'80004' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUH' 'sip-files00031a.jpg'
1840767db30b4a7dc6a5bf28257a6ee9
c8d520aacf9098e2a7a346c9e3852587553fc33b
describe
'10906' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUI' 'sip-files00031a.pro'
44e3b010de9e159d27e0a4173aa80c98
77bb417655d20a3e5dbc548d0895bca49672ea0e
describe
'20964' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUJ' 'sip-files00031a.QC.jpg'
425d6d5499f876695cc772072f1bfa26
49fe5bb8dc825d0e891d9918aa7926bb87f38fdb
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUK' 'sip-files00031a.tif'
a02e220f8a6ba77aec67fc25e0f27c09
5e3fc104cda79a103ec191f8d862e3d8c522b0bb
describe
'496' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUL' 'sip-files00031a.txt'
45b44985190cd9c949a18ee9258a1e51
25747a43577ff8d3e6f408beefe8ee6d629dd0bc
describe
'5218' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUM' 'sip-files00031athm.jpg'
5fb4bdcdb63cbd37ef424566ccf04b42
1f48967808b9dd317b27de2d00e52fce4f747b16
describe
'686178' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUN' 'sip-files00032a.jp2'
dd0761d90bc1d09b84017c29a9743496
acb4cc813835a548d4dbfcc8bbbb1d4b1238abad
describe
'90246' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUO' 'sip-files00032a.jpg'
8b1dd24992b9a6aaf7f4b69bba6a75bd
16e3c7de35feedafec95a33b34c845e8d447a66c
'2012-01-14T23:07:01-05:00'
describe
'12194' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUP' 'sip-files00032a.pro'
0fc47f54dd73faea7d95db120977d2e0
f6ffede3b0ebf63ace953bf7e2e27f3c5a7e3f26
describe
'24082' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUQ' 'sip-files00032a.QC.jpg'
05ffe54039a1f6c740f6acac69537591
7fd623554a11e6f3429a9359aafbda8e300e543b
describe
'5506244' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUR' 'sip-files00032a.tif'
f810011b6ce856d1c65f521010671dc6
84ed489a958b1f43dff1b5f5658c332a3ed27dae
describe
'540' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUS' 'sip-files00032a.txt'
1ac70d722b65db1e2b338adc7f5751c8
c9e456002a5a6d3ccafedcb1a1b3a1c3339859d8
describe
'6078' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUT' 'sip-files00032athm.jpg'
dc0ced2ae59bbb7205b5ecc6beea1721
9816efa6028bf28e9ee63ac0e8314e57ab8dc2ef
describe
'695321' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUU' 'sip-files00033a.jp2'
b16e1c7bf2781b4f5659cd8923016bb2
899ba83aa374a2131fc734df1ec81b6d9a7412d3
describe
'104886' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUV' 'sip-files00033a.jpg'
6d0cfbee3a9b5b23d7b15c807ab21391
2c1a347b44b2b5be401cc47a000ebd20fcfd39ec
describe
'34687' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUW' 'sip-files00033a.pro'
8b1a8fe699917a8ee6a4bfbee2c91b3e
0c9f74dfbb14f6871440e35c4e84acc2d89a6f16
describe
'33963' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUX' 'sip-files00033a.QC.jpg'
4b919e39f86a675e13e74df8e45d6ea7
27f79315c41f95a24628ac5ca86b5d735c22dffb
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUY' 'sip-files00033a.tif'
b0848edf7a9a63960223c29f30fd7337
6505b8ceb9be4382089b1351d204444dbc6f4eea
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFUZ' 'sip-files00033a.txt'
65ba55571480ce2250838ef5d3ff63fb
355cc8e5735b6bcdb639dc38e794760f168033b8
describe
'8572' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVA' 'sip-files00033athm.jpg'
3323cbb376bce38ff6347f5ba6c49847
41ccaa01d413ef09d7b7065e8cf5a81b00b0900e
describe
'695786' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVB' 'sip-files00034a.jp2'
0185bf4ebeb1ce328e53729dbd9d61f6
06e535951ddc69ec604d9be47f515822c0c63c44
describe
'115180' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVC' 'sip-files00034a.jpg'
5a9b5825cddd2c3aa5305d9745ef0ad3
71121b35ff9f9cd45187ff34aca911b786991fdd
describe
'20691' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVD' 'sip-files00034a.pro'
5524ce9d302e7ae8b09445d88be8c5a9
56116df8ad270b5f7916cb8b6fff337e6e9fd89e
'2012-01-14T23:08:04-05:00'
describe
'31764' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVE' 'sip-files00034a.QC.jpg'
37601fcf01dbf70b990f70938d8093f9
e477a21494eaa6d97a06a2bb28656134824a6427
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVF' 'sip-files00034a.tif'
329ef2bbef560f6f0cc555dc5876f5ca
9531fe8df54dc91ed4024a5e0e2b4005961d7c07
'2012-01-14T23:07:47-05:00'
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVG' 'sip-files00034a.txt'
a7c96eb3d3ed577fe0f3619fa834550a
39449d0f89cf305be833f2671c234f50bfff2312
'2012-01-14T23:07:04-05:00'
describe
'7866' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVH' 'sip-files00034athm.jpg'
34850a2bc29040efa17ec808beb8f30a
a63e8551919703ca5d23f384ebca9c810c02044f
'2012-01-14T23:07:18-05:00'
describe
'678191' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVI' 'sip-files00035a.jp2'
1ce68b6e9b9686edd2199e32bd45a7ed
3ef4a421c98bee05f2b79b61974b8cff7afe6114
describe
'100420' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVJ' 'sip-files00035a.jpg'
67646e573a790c244958143f388680d9
e52e5d65497fc9c2222133b1fd303a35e5bccc16
describe
'31800' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVK' 'sip-files00035a.pro'
e8dbbfe8d593c4bcb52e110ddaee535a
3d6397c6598f0e947fd22111a4bc34970f87f4a6
describe
'31588' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVL' 'sip-files00035a.QC.jpg'
7d4c5b4a632ebfc6b335c56ce8a427e9
fad29ea4b24459ae2e007b46695efcdf0d350cb2
describe
'5443940' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVM' 'sip-files00035a.tif'
2750771510eeaf9b8ae794ff3183ed4e
25bec79ebc98516c98d5d78b558cfeddf738ec9e
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVN' 'sip-files00035a.txt'
646b58c9166acf4d9ed07fa826454cee
f123e30ffaad7bc67349fe925250886bebd2fe18
describe
'7420' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVO' 'sip-files00035athm.jpg'
a1b44ff638cd0b50370ae17b2e70ee09
c3947e8aeae4380fee99e1174ab426928e8e651e
describe
'679837' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVP' 'sip-files00036a.jp2'
c6d1a67d47747125e620580c37a50580
106c62764ee1e0ca2ed3d8486dee41e1baed1cb7
'2012-01-14T23:07:30-05:00'
describe
'116052' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVQ' 'sip-files00036a.jpg'
2c53bd458f1ada4b88e14fdc4a4bd236
d95f19a7551e94b7422061b7e74c21bef4abd528
describe
'22598' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVR' 'sip-files00036a.pro'
d728836439d8288b1e032bb6d8b1dae6
5bb3ec9ee193df537e4bb26dae97d3406291a7ff
describe
'32582' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVS' 'sip-files00036a.QC.jpg'
ce43803bb93de7dde6c7dcb008f477cf
82fe558ed840331f56a20bd31c0a7fe2008d7246
describe
'5455624' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVT' 'sip-files00036a.tif'
cf92b6375d94115db1a8816c22b70dd3
680ac495962eb672024a9231af5d8928c47363ae
'2012-01-14T23:07:43-05:00'
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVU' 'sip-files00036a.txt'
491ac96373b5ac2d39ff6f48dc5b2baa
6349e86c43d1541ff350444ddf7b5746c722d340
describe
'8135' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVV' 'sip-files00036athm.jpg'
71a9114380e07d87ca5e607512b95aff
3ffb1e662f8d452d24a04255440e13b226b0550f
describe
'687848' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVW' 'sip-files00037a.jp2'
c38cc5270c6fb486207e655db6cf2e16
dd9e479bba7ad995203aa821564d60dbf9dad996
describe
'106866' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVX' 'sip-files00037a.jpg'
63183563e509646f5e41752a895530d8
d2d2df55bd4a364a44518639a6f4128c6454407b
describe
'23719' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVY' 'sip-files00037a.pro'
74a0a5fa7b72870c52eb710ee31735f2
68438656f83b56c6ff260e325d3d1a462deef72b
describe
'29895' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFVZ' 'sip-files00037a.QC.jpg'
792ed40459b61e3335cdc3e7da6e89b7
ff5df965e06acff2f2e84b75735373f1842f72cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWA' 'sip-files00037a.tif'
311cbd42296e0a3522a0af69c011ab27
323d4f2384b767705891c6c848220519279bb01a
'2012-01-14T23:06:40-05:00'
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWB' 'sip-files00037a.txt'
253e111038d74d0edb0ef95b6f850dab
ac5aed38a8ea643173cc4d926cbaa614a93aa81b
describe
'7890' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWC' 'sip-files00037athm.jpg'
15f77640eeae6b1f7a9a531250c821fb
2426245d02ba5a9be86026b29757db5aab5b3e21
describe
'683846' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWD' 'sip-files00038a.jp2'
cfefad7d45fac92502c9b0640a88f26c
7a6f0c838366218b68109abc825901aa64e93c82
describe
'99635' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWE' 'sip-files00038a.jpg'
9745e19c3356b7e12b5555b55cd30731
69b0264bd71d4a2b01498f1f66c6427b8973b892
describe
'18295' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWF' 'sip-files00038a.pro'
e7eae03ff7c4f935899a7ecc7b36cce1
d1f65ca93ecdec567efba85d46bb43010e3ef70b
describe
'27537' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWG' 'sip-files00038a.QC.jpg'
d694c00086d35f52f1d32c32fccd3e55
a56875ce8e9c12a21be09c01cc9c4a1ba7b92f6b
describe
'5487628' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWH' 'sip-files00038a.tif'
8ff0d02f89303711796fec587272c192
8ecba547b728cee66e355b540ac018db0b519309
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWI' 'sip-files00038a.txt'
4f2e8b9283afce62686d529d4f18245c
82aafd2867182278993094e8faf042435446b497
'2012-01-14T23:07:20-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6847' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWJ' 'sip-files00038athm.jpg'
ab9f753fa951354495dabb04d61db75b
40896ebc66614feb4adf9285a5ad98e755bdb3cd
describe
'682853' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWK' 'sip-files00039a.jp2'
47e25d0cd269999b3651869ce9a98f5c
147bcd51cd8e810fd7b4c9d26686102291086629
describe
'77472' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWL' 'sip-files00039a.jpg'
1a2a723f764958ff3478368f06980e38
eaae6c117d0e526fb7c3eff493e0a6aeac5072d7
describe
'19089' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWM' 'sip-files00039a.pro'
702753905c233ef3eb10458608729c89
a80b43d707b4f323be6eb7305e7e819234870a03
'2012-01-14T23:07:55-05:00'
describe
'23782' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWN' 'sip-files00039a.QC.jpg'
9eb2e92e2c9cf8599cad708c32326b2e
7a288f78847e194ff82d9c52b2f70089901e36d7
describe
'5479844' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWO' 'sip-files00039a.tif'
17f2969325f770ce7c1f497129987887
1de9c26be0451ba74c1764e0d713f56fc4a2a8de
describe
'815' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWP' 'sip-files00039a.txt'
dcd23afac1369adb69c460bb7b32ac89
e5e650e3c7c9b617ce717162dc0100fb874a01e6
describe
Invalid character
'6179' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWQ' 'sip-files00039athm.jpg'
0f8b545153b8a98bbc99bb4df21e24ce
f0b26b2cf1af8f72bd7dfcd323851487206a0767
describe
'679870' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWR' 'sip-files00040a.jp2'
5575558925822a371c2f0be52a05fd1e
eafa217995568671e503b9f8f584ec532477b62a
describe
'121231' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWS' 'sip-files00040a.jpg'
af4511f01d6c46d175c9f814cb6223a2
6e2e6dbc8715e7a5bfd71c468e81461239d03720
describe
'23104' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWT' 'sip-files00040a.pro'
6d37f5839a3c5714a73f1ea077dcb19b
0f5c884ba3bf2287916be194df2ef8942b50060d
describe
'33725' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWU' 'sip-files00040a.QC.jpg'
f50eebc4e942e689e93d9c2fcfb8f20e
8556e5f67050aed55c1698cc5b3d311b271b2ba2
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWV' 'sip-files00040a.tif'
12883c402012a055ffdbcd0529100402
439871ab83aa00e252d855d09a36d983257b6dce
'2012-01-14T23:07:33-05:00'
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWW' 'sip-files00040a.txt'
9f69a67ac898321a620c0ff3d143633d
b75a8807e4c2819803e25bdc53a97139f42bdc5d
describe
'8471' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWX' 'sip-files00040athm.jpg'
cbe70cda7f6cbbe9850aa463e087908a
3e26a0ed784221d40aa122cc605837c5f8efbce1
describe
'689032' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWY' 'sip-files00041a.jp2'
4fb17e3cd71f01cf180eaeac07c47ab2
5bc8dc8bb91635b8cb5911569615836d8a3f582b
describe
'122952' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFWZ' 'sip-files00041a.jpg'
e9ffcbdba6e5adf5b958223a8a2889a7
a4a27b108a73bd433f764f2966515eda6fd9680c
describe
'41551' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXA' 'sip-files00041a.pro'
d8b614eb26dc775f60be2f080c1d55bc
8bfad23290655ae387a13f4910be86e66d73368c
describe
'38858' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXB' 'sip-files00041a.QC.jpg'
668242b769686bba932cc12048605c49
bff63b217b2e413958ef9481b280ac6c7d00fb46
describe
'5529608' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXC' 'sip-files00041a.tif'
8e3e0e7fe0998fc9db24ea47767182a0
46bc431d78a7c86ac2e636d609f189db9fbe5e34
describe
'1624' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXD' 'sip-files00041a.txt'
43d0af3151df147db5c66d1c6be4ae55
fbad89f9937b741b08482dda5940447055aad0a0
describe
'9227' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXE' 'sip-files00041athm.jpg'
994342c18b688a475014a7050f639530
c294c5c1615b4794896c70668888a0f6870262cf
describe
'686439' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXF' 'sip-files00042a.jp2'
963a6de8286e77744b903033b35b9f84
874b510492dc3bf4a8d9e70ac8dd1eba1b13b907
describe
'112594' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXG' 'sip-files00042a.jpg'
6fb2936bcf6551a769e16256c74adf45
7034b1d9aa5bc9cc1ad2eefa87c059d169d7394e
describe
'28339' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXH' 'sip-files00042a.pro'
1e7adaecf9844813ae2c28b0f82dbe08
55abf72f7b90287589b67a27da53594d57da4b0e
describe
'33428' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXI' 'sip-files00042a.QC.jpg'
8f389ea79bd07c393930d62fa88e755e
ded79e551d9de447fc0211a476672ff2b31968c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXJ' 'sip-files00042a.tif'
b0f5da2c2dbed18e8346330e62c4052c
acf543ecfd6b2ebe9c11964cf056179aa9c1d589
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXK' 'sip-files00042a.txt'
18f1a83fbea740e63733bce04245d8dd
4137fde8e49a4e6a47e555054d751f207378f96a
describe
'8543' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXL' 'sip-files00042athm.jpg'
5df054644bf4aa9ae1adfc289a196316
155dfd3c8ef3154e1b1ffa65341607ee20e11fb1
describe
'695790' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXM' 'sip-files00043a.jp2'
7e5cf8fa39c8780edd451425b29905fc
707a204592f95bca9f9ccae61167b1e85b108ff9
describe
'111404' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXN' 'sip-files00043a.jpg'
27365eade14dbde25f52147900f5d7fa
7398a3bfd4773f55c92c23646c5f12440fd0f310
'2012-01-14T23:06:19-05:00'
describe
'26708' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXO' 'sip-files00043a.pro'
5d800129d9284d3912fefc58d1708858
0ce477910053f8680c7902d15e80f6b7c902f860
describe
'33100' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXP' 'sip-files00043a.QC.jpg'
a164c378f41fc449cce5a218b8b91f90
7e358d922cbf3ccb8e4bf7d56604794afe355bb0
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXQ' 'sip-files00043a.tif'
7f08b0d4186c5e20601d5734758fbcd4
8fcb1c51b3dfd953c16396dd148bdf912d209a98
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXR' 'sip-files00043a.txt'
c0e5e516112f152e0a21dbfb95b793d6
c40081935133e38790b9ea21aa2632865a5c5a87
describe
'8323' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXS' 'sip-files00043athm.jpg'
6f9700a05f0099e62e2bc0b8c2d00f4e
19cac69056e19b1b1b06157fb26ecaf4d388d8f7
describe
'690419' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXT' 'sip-files00044a.jp2'
902db4708b5b0b80536e109c59f6ba62
0113b80692c8a718526180b8c5f7906c25962b0f
describe
'89812' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXU' 'sip-files00044a.jpg'
e39745173f14b65601ae132e54785ce3
00bf9f183284feb77479bfe9d0e84153999ce530
describe
'12625' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXV' 'sip-files00044a.pro'
8dd04a2c773d45a18bcbcb4d9f57f378
71202f19dba824e7d264c1612cd048cbf03e075e
describe
'23561' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXW' 'sip-files00044a.QC.jpg'
7c9a2ad03b0bfc5c900967cf1a5aa7a5
e7290e82677f4b00c8ed511a485bb94c31ccb9c2
describe
'5540232' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXX' 'sip-files00044a.tif'
9164f650d1c0c2c032d6b36c6c5a311e
3268d4d3606e1055b0cf510aa333f13229a14706
describe
'499' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXY' 'sip-files00044a.txt'
62e919eca74fef0b9785b3afc539c955
b00be4e53faf7020fbcda9692c01ececda739ad3
describe
'6242' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFXZ' 'sip-files00044athm.jpg'
6dd467856209f39b91aec9874b1a0fe3
399593434b53e1b2d78aafc132eb5fcaa5f983fc
describe
'685975' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYA' 'sip-files00045a.jp2'
9cf21f84b4e6ac327081863643fcf02c
25d0aeacad7a551755600fd7cf2a393ceeef3872
'2012-01-14T23:06:33-05:00'
describe
'71954' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYB' 'sip-files00045a.jpg'
5bed54201bf7b8018d3d0bd59f0b56f8
50a3a3065eef0d8a3842b1209ec3a4bc58b5d023
describe
'7552' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYC' 'sip-files00045a.pro'
53be2d19e56790051979c6fe7b4eb2c7
e4a391b7c943cdf123e3c0ed49df75f2163252ce
describe
'18827' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYD' 'sip-files00045a.QC.jpg'
ec22ce66f85689f8d6e6c81add53fbed
3d879cc7a5a37183fc7555ac95e46c45ba4f562b
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYE' 'sip-files00045a.tif'
02eada339325e67d7b28e5afc3aa2582
594b7fe8e2024a3c671815d3aec1ad4483ed32ef
describe
'394' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYF' 'sip-files00045a.txt'
1d9b60ef6598bf3688b8fb6a6e2f3b26
fc0954061d16e8080857c9f607d60e377f7fa4c9
describe
Invalid character
'4880' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYG' 'sip-files00045athm.jpg'
93c381b53118093ce6c589cfa4606690
ffffc2d0bc6227a3d6d47d394cb7d1b9fa4457fe
'2012-01-14T23:06:32-05:00'
describe
'681987' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYH' 'sip-files00046a.jp2'
8f84be8bc4c952777373bd496d9ba7d6
6a8311ecda07aebf7cac6f4241c6cd84068b113c
describe
'107766' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYI' 'sip-files00046a.jpg'
42b38881bcb3e552ec0a1af08d0d4a3f
343b721c742ec2e79a9886f2a8bbcfa9102ef45b
describe
'19117' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYJ' 'sip-files00046a.pro'
d50d12b0a360a8de330fcc743b95ef2d
6fa619a682cbcf9b09a11f2fb4c20b231d7fd7a5
describe
'30017' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYK' 'sip-files00046a.QC.jpg'
b42240da6cda52f055409887383cdfee
dd01c11600f65297c20e0a43d965e5861b572b04
describe
'5473144' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYL' 'sip-files00046a.tif'
3c9619de8bb7b4cf93bc1162d058233b
b2e72c41abc81a082dfc43f90c905cc3c0cb71cf
describe
'801' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYM' 'sip-files00046a.txt'
766b121c18565f8fa46b2153aee57300
8557d2a2efbd8160525c9e9a1632afc23ee43570
describe
'7131' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYN' 'sip-files00046athm.jpg'
9a21374be3b87e89bc7785494dc913fa
fc7fa67abb3d1c19bdab5ee7021906558131882f
describe
'690665' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYO' 'sip-files00047a.jp2'
ad421936116ed8ada20ac85eba0649ad
fbd80780e533a2c539504d8d5faf1e4650289265
describe
'120947' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYP' 'sip-files00047a.jpg'
71ddff7a6c61b27fd63eec79c04a68d9
c1d9dad6fc1cee9e9bba6fe8371f0785d3b8376a
describe
'40209' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYQ' 'sip-files00047a.pro'
317e18c310da0a2c1bef5f7c014db686
0c4ee46e4ae3a2035797a9f5a6f687e0fa215ea7
describe
'38298' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYR' 'sip-files00047a.QC.jpg'
7dfb00f89061d126ce06d26a3c79cc42
6918fd3032085d613403c4d0efd4d20621922891
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYS' 'sip-files00047a.tif'
e20902affa02dd366dc2d8183e12c670
674d147d85c04413104f794e81305dfa05d92be4
describe
'1576' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYT' 'sip-files00047a.txt'
f8bab5dc1d1face35a13cd4bed4df80f
236349e989fe922471fa1b862f0e60cab54f0fce
describe
'9212' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYU' 'sip-files00047athm.jpg'
b5e0ef2f15c9b9bc21abe9fcfc700a20
341e9a6c142cd5f7f28a940fc342ec68ea89cbbb
describe
'678726' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYV' 'sip-files00048a.jp2'
17e7be60750af3daf97e167676eadf70
cb5517b78c9934129f1b550323ef4cd813098fc6
describe
'121855' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYW' 'sip-files00048a.jpg'
e199bc1601644b6ba74b00169ecb27fa
d9b35646ce88a8ade60e2d19d965e8a54eae3ba9
describe
'40264' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYX' 'sip-files00048a.pro'
a650a82ef4e0268dec666e0d313bdfda
19328744558060f54eb462d6905d32d6390f5c6c
describe
'37958' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYY' 'sip-files00048a.QC.jpg'
54ac3c425cdb558fa79b5a38fc896ef2
e358cf4b48c4d4dce8ce0d9e94de2397cdc6361a
describe
'5446728' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFYZ' 'sip-files00048a.tif'
410c614750fd03cc122e0def6df33bf5
b98684a232bcf1d4e7024df33d6e8910fd2af9cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZA' 'sip-files00048a.txt'
a1f2e82a54714ad7a9eb9e4f30d3daa6
cccaaf66fec39cf9434c49305a63a269dd89a237
describe
'9364' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZB' 'sip-files00048athm.jpg'
1343af523816a1e4a94cb22674075030
f0c0a50ce89af8b18ea5282f287eab804e103c45
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZC' 'sip-files00049a.jp2'
449a3346ee042f4e97ed46c758589ead
341182a699a7dd10db3ed67e7e5c82c8504a8bbc
describe
'115971' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZD' 'sip-files00049a.jpg'
f76ff1fe460b941fcd76bdeb56e0e9ab
111213c29d7bea035e4f2a1ccf9ef18463785448
describe
'24040' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZE' 'sip-files00049a.pro'
1e82439e70d7dd48d6485290f3fa2b62
c2452c4591b3d238297ed003d9bb1157e7450e73
describe
'34378' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZF' 'sip-files00049a.QC.jpg'
e6bb58e679b4be0c3338b446be5b15c8
f025be479e7191df91d137d6027f9e44ec16c6e5
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZG' 'sip-files00049a.tif'
95091ebe5cb288c18deb8705bf9d9ed1
08fb387cb0b1a3d6f4e8efa92d0091ec79ef4972
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZH' 'sip-files00049a.txt'
b6984f48303e9d1bd0611ebae87d38fe
a9926c530c2c7c30adcde051b984f8f203b2f667
describe
'8647' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZI' 'sip-files00049athm.jpg'
ba6388999587b9b40a6fd3b46a1d951b
c9634e2641d230b56dbc92efcad0fb146a1ea7c0
describe
'667503' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZJ' 'sip-files00050a.jp2'
b12b05570b05a9a6fbb4feca6ab8c779
1fe5c6454137562693be638add8f51ccc301bd74
describe
'120572' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZK' 'sip-files00050a.jpg'
64060d98a2241a1843f5a9c83b559ac1
187cd23ab0f5131f8e08f6e54297fa3e6d1bb489
describe
'24086' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZL' 'sip-files00050a.pro'
bcffa66ff7947eb2dcb9b017126eb2f7
0ad235326527a7bb612ee91a142d2626d4e0f66c
describe
'32973' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZM' 'sip-files00050a.QC.jpg'
dfa094e6b4baaebc63c23418bdeb6d28
7a3f9290aef30ee787289ba8569c033fdac124e1
describe
'5358272' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZN' 'sip-files00050a.tif'
dcf1df51f7465512f885a9e52b4aee2b
4cf7d0619b49e67f60a8b34dcb270d9ab97ae75a
'2012-01-14T23:07:54-05:00'
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZO' 'sip-files00050a.txt'
b559b42201dffe8fd46746b2cb16ae31
5c1faec32eb38e29e112fa51012297c3766aa7c5
describe
Invalid character
'7914' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZP' 'sip-files00050athm.jpg'
edd7aa4ccd91866233bc95a5dfdb2270
1c97199ef7e29ecacb56e9c405a8d0b140bed462
describe
'687643' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZQ' 'sip-files00051a.jp2'
156220ebb1e12187f62ea1c3b9d212eb
f21d7aaf1f729c55d2b102d194e91e7d0c869952
describe
'107747' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZR' 'sip-files00051a.jpg'
a7443225839cee90e274050af114b2e0
4d6206bdd90dde200d5eb5cf0a813b824b7376a8
describe
'21557' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZS' 'sip-files00051a.pro'
33a2c007be4509fa812228d04376c6a6
bd4689df32abbdcd62335813e235b577acc93a75
describe
'30280' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZT' 'sip-files00051a.QC.jpg'
1bbe1c7873095329e5cdb9018492cbfd
496d39cbed666b6397fb0649e5e28af67852af3f
describe
'5517928' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZU' 'sip-files00051a.tif'
712dac0361bfb374f3a5b690dc11b27c
ecf33060a161a6c66a669be732af232d5206767a
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZV' 'sip-files00051a.txt'
9532c4ae4e3e677e36f74480ae8c2178
9bd9663a5ca6ed5b470c8336e4acc807a52bec2f
describe
'7326' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZW' 'sip-files00051athm.jpg'
14f15ebf8cb63decc6a90a5b3bfa3359
5f7302fd4a815ab05c42d559ce65a746d7fb58a0
describe
'688970' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZX' 'sip-files00052a.jp2'
4d7f96467674c1652062db24c6f57e17
49235351c2c996fd17a8e10250c8508948eef2cf
describe
'82892' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZY' 'sip-files00052a.jpg'
67fa6e660c58d9ca093b9e7a40b4e54d
590371931603910c3be609719d63eba15a4f730f
describe
'8507' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEFZZ' 'sip-files00052a.pro'
7b9a9e33da0c2355a0a4ac3c6a160442
b5aa98153a461f0fc194d3a69db409801897b9c8
describe
'21733' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAA' 'sip-files00052a.QC.jpg'
4b3a4b84cba2436d6c7a48c85302c99b
72334ca1748e9e049f9debfc35b29bf9621ee5ee
describe
'5528544' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAB' 'sip-files00052a.tif'
8077d8041508d079b6963b7eedef8495
da0f08364bc9935bc90a350a1e74d7c69fb610e2
describe
'381' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAC' 'sip-files00052a.txt'
cca2b052a8805978dadd26b2bc79e6d6
c27a2c440d7587e5e2fc53fac3072782664985d6
describe
Invalid character
'5582' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAD' 'sip-files00052athm.jpg'
82af843ae2a408ba29299cbb7e2f2c73
fac9309018d815c6fb473feceb37202617d425ff
describe
'678744' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAE' 'sip-files00053a.jp2'
a538096640f386f34f5a384aabd96dbf
44fb5793604b7fdbdc2e810d7fee462b65980ac0
describe
'92951' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAF' 'sip-files00053a.jpg'
bdc933fc858d6dc2ae9f7b90df662891
942d911ff3791e76d65bc613b255a23d9396f437
describe
'19970' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAG' 'sip-files00053a.pro'
d3952c7dede418cbe78562a158c88b20
aeb7f323d871e3f75986866e0c92003623103f03
describe
'26458' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAH' 'sip-files00053a.QC.jpg'
1864d70453d80efcb463c48023a3e599
fc6884ab2a12b5270f91eaffcd74035d221b6196
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAI' 'sip-files00053a.tif'
5a68458877592a6fc51d086f181164f5
a98887905d0c969f6b7ec194ac180db7a7418a5e
describe
'846' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAJ' 'sip-files00053a.txt'
23b2bf566b37c4f4751a14fde5895695
46c31ff61eedceef485d89b9171a83cb37e9a2d9
describe
'6619' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAK' 'sip-files00053athm.jpg'
7f38c28e4d35588d694afa46da98a815
18c35585a6aaa08360f802526e83f4bf83b5830c
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAL' 'sip-files00054a.jp2'
33cb425932f3f767ca4327875ecf9f13
6eaa70560753e7952640030a89b9c207b5ab412b
describe
'112952' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAM' 'sip-files00054a.jpg'
68aa327c8a5dbb852cf592ffc7011086
126b524004823553f439819ead71697d4f75c95e
describe
'23224' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAN' 'sip-files00054a.pro'
5586c737bb2e1ec89c2c8221b3635301
6acd793a8500be918fb8482b0068fba4c66dbfb8
describe
'32384' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAO' 'sip-files00054a.QC.jpg'
9e74e0d0d8147c2a921e828740bb7673
a79fca633a618de683410fcb327fd11b4be619e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAP' 'sip-files00054a.tif'
9a7de83a5e8d6a464a1edf32025cbbf9
e7ba5139e9a194f8a1ece56652955b7a79856a77
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAQ' 'sip-files00054a.txt'
abec6d2eec1cd8f4b6cf0b7245fd76ba
eeb52307d65a89a800abd4626671d7599106cbcb
describe
'8067' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAR' 'sip-files00054athm.jpg'
ca520fbf8273f7f61a381e6dcadae86a
ed45e35d2383c7744a665f4846d3bb3057e8a74e
describe
'684966' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAS' 'sip-files00055a.jp2'
9559fca334b1cedde7adbf28224f1b26
50c2478a1b4cb246d1baddea2057f04049388cb0
describe
'109247' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAT' 'sip-files00055a.jpg'
d1b595a4caf1f55d3e5cc16b3819b0c5
4d80b39b6233f3e84a05578875e6dcf7be737e28
describe
'19072' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAU' 'sip-files00055a.pro'
ea98a5517bb1ad9e31e00cccc24b7a54
02778e89e915483791abbfcd4907a731e699b2eb
describe
'30151' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAV' 'sip-files00055a.QC.jpg'
aaaa35e411728896255cf530a5d9de33
03cfb11bcc6e5a2a0abb65e89b1e7f87a6ef5e3b
describe
'5496508' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAW' 'sip-files00055a.tif'
4f978382ac9fc0b3df30b2f09af73478
68aea6b29a563214b96246c67667d6a027f14540
describe
'775' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAX' 'sip-files00055a.txt'
98511ca12ee3c9f2688417d895cb2bc8
77ddc2750df3475ee8965610f47e2e9502774b33
describe
'7586' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAY' 'sip-files00055athm.jpg'
339bfdca279223f7954c9aad3a763c19
ee854bdc8f0b9490ee2012b82cd29a8882d7bddc
describe
'683703' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGAZ' 'sip-files00056a.jp2'
1ddcbf545db2fb64d5c554e37c1933e1
62ab86c345e6e95eaa78e63308e0d4cf6c1caaa8
describe
'124269' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBA' 'sip-files00056a.jpg'
0a521ec8a05413c5fa818db4b681a917
0798d769b13114cc5bf240f9aa2213a126ead7b9
describe
'19694' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBB' 'sip-files00056a.pro'
fc099b3cb9e5304dd76000d53e5f8764
7756d3f6cef8a8e3e2d57c9582313501d089cee7
describe
'34493' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBC' 'sip-files00056a.QC.jpg'
754ba099c5ea81969c8a8b90e1390c22
a3f57bca18a51adc50a28cd8bb49d839bd44da0f
describe
'5486776' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBD' 'sip-files00056a.tif'
df55f2f8d92a4298b71e601e91f234b4
a4470d8d714cf0d6165bcd3e987473ba3c31b5f0
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBE' 'sip-files00056a.txt'
9c7953a9ce6220961928fe5fe10e642c
a3617ae090afcc11538c4295ae1434a10e7d491f
describe
'8430' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBF' 'sip-files00056athm.jpg'
da864ee636174b75df7c174595ab6f76
6906fd2741a49cddb22ca45532c118540fc72d1d
describe
'690658' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBG' 'sip-files00057a.jp2'
14fefd5f77495455cef332fee02692bc
487b384d72c51ecefdaa7624fcee3dce935a5af7
describe
'107765' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBH' 'sip-files00057a.jpg'
0be1b3df9898b0a377d27426de00f423
fe8a9d371009f6a4f4c2204c902a1a6cc5403e52
'2012-01-14T23:06:29-05:00'
describe
'36688' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBI' 'sip-files00057a.pro'
1e5e50a9d3edc34a39e894ebdbac7646
25bfa8106a19d2d51090a88ea6e636c3548a43f3
describe
'33937' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBJ' 'sip-files00057a.QC.jpg'
957b27dc4ac796a677f4619e1f87d8f3
0d3ad62da03a913541d9af49366a3301f8c54ed4
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBK' 'sip-files00057a.tif'
c74a481324e9be69e786eb639d68cc22
d8f065b05cba6f29a009abb232f5b00efcc7b0c8
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBL' 'sip-files00057a.txt'
ab216cb3fe14425f77df72e38ef6f304
0b621110b4194dc5376085b82ee9bcd772544774
describe
'8336' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBM' 'sip-files00057athm.jpg'
6e434d647cafde13b2fcbe3ddb1104c0
959e8dee353814dc76ea46ca5fa438040408caa2
describe
'684695' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBN' 'sip-files00058a.jp2'
49a03dbf5ab46352c2e7bb0ffbb592ae
70a8f4413a81903bfd7f18b9da64acbe5a289b4b
describe
'114934' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBO' 'sip-files00058a.jpg'
f469dff85e9712feb7f56e28782dcf11
ba5b1dc9e31f4be04489b8f90fdd8ae082ef3f21
describe
'36907' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBP' 'sip-files00058a.pro'
8f5b19309d61a5e86ed1a9bb8d2d28ac
de9f364a47c1c7e929b52e5bb68d220c14d0423d
describe
'34860' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBQ' 'sip-files00058a.QC.jpg'
db9aabef806d8187661e9929185d8622
683d4fe8a7ed303379a9b0df454a889cebd70278
describe
'5494564' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBR' 'sip-files00058a.tif'
0fd08fbdaf48e780e482db67943cc6f8
7b56cf00ca7be8a6eb70f67c42e9320fc1722e32
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBS' 'sip-files00058a.txt'
07abec92531dce07d7db88f75d7edbb2
d4e2682fd7796ba52a2bb28d75ae4cda1ad3d694
describe
'8019' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBT' 'sip-files00058athm.jpg'
cefebe474a14fed17a964823825af04c
abc362afdd35ef8204703b774b3ca87e220c23dd
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBU' 'sip-files00059a.jp2'
f9b980f607c50bff9f25a6dda9478848
f754d5df66b756a57cec3bd89d1e12495804fcda
describe
'115995' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBV' 'sip-files00059a.jpg'
492b70ea7fa56a531c65abdfd08e3636
11a8504b5abdd8c058f3cc9c14a1da8d71b2c15e
describe
'24395' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBW' 'sip-files00059a.pro'
03b6ca7a1262aa287a7e4482d9c23e25
25dbcdba3391316e4a7a9e4305335ec9ab1e6e99
describe
'33226' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBX' 'sip-files00059a.QC.jpg'
d12770607023f37bc604eddefca757c0
970fba7db05d995aa01e1dfc3913a3bf98459591
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBY' 'sip-files00059a.tif'
ccbeb97e31e7a7bbc0c82cdfe0677367
fd14c8ececebf3321810e3211587fe0e396b76a0
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGBZ' 'sip-files00059a.txt'
b82016065464038461ac9492a8f70f03
93ab50f7c67ce41ac18fa4a0cd63abf1e4713135
describe
'8560' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCA' 'sip-files00059athm.jpg'
30cfd7023860a9bb3c3482ea458c0b2e
207dc13754c215a2422e775b53d3d211fc21a81b
describe
'687746' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCB' 'sip-files00060a.jp2'
ef8775b27a200d18990e4032b2af3e6f
807d170601d16fd7d042fb21b319062b1b67f335
describe
'96991' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCC' 'sip-files00060a.jpg'
858b3a3ea2c9ff3a47f22509b072d3fb
fc5b9b506a2ecd1f75e0559c649a7f4417ed4e54
describe
'10359' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCD' 'sip-files00060a.pro'
426e37bccdac1bbddbb5bfeabd113b39
b0bdbfa9cf6b9273060fee906abb399fc582f2b7
describe
'24828' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCE' 'sip-files00060a.QC.jpg'
0d4e03c2da17356d39af59f23204a96b
21b1e6bf91ed1229a8415b17c9a0d5b78116b4f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCF' 'sip-files00060a.tif'
89b183f7dd5d19072b2b7cba97ec0c07
7669a51907123ec2fe95d9ea36687c2e0b1d4531
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCG' 'sip-files00060a.txt'
7d4a3bb8cedb7e61401e15d8ee1240ed
deeed5b865e521ab65d80f0ab55f9ab6f6e336af
describe
'6138' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCH' 'sip-files00060athm.jpg'
cb69891d30f3497dbeeb8c85a6d8e62f
6dc68f1059cce867afdf3606c0dde11ec15f8a22
describe
'686386' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCI' 'sip-files00061a.jp2'
608df7d93fee56b92ace7290e804df0f
f651c8c1607f84dd1a16561523facf79418755d1
describe
'107542' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCJ' 'sip-files00061a.jpg'
6a9951d9d546ef7bb03ac19b0621030a
9f161e5e7340e9caa5f9afce0f60448ed2ee77d7
describe
'20370' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCK' 'sip-files00061a.pro'
1c0183f1be1b40caa91538a2fb34a4cd
3c82f5498d35f8fb38ff77e1af8f50ee3d830d81
describe
'29469' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCL' 'sip-files00061a.QC.jpg'
35f2bef6929f773c1697aec0ff8ffece
56b9322e10fa0e5aab08590abdfbd78f8b720814
describe
'5508192' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCM' 'sip-files00061a.tif'
2698da3a3343ab1f6f2b2b411b2c1e8e
dee72d474000430579af27f12e405c6bf8cc3e2d
describe
'848' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCN' 'sip-files00061a.txt'
58cc7dffe8b45a8d5a066f2b6c6bad7e
73ff6d6fe4ee6e169b275cd0611a89b10d13cae7
describe
'7410' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCO' 'sip-files00061athm.jpg'
995b5888f2bd87cf51903063c2564c6c
2d2a7863f777c771f9185d82af8fa728bf3baa3c
describe
'687644' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCP' 'sip-files00062a.jp2'
bb788af9bd7403bad55cc53306ae2500
ba658a3c570c2ce246dfc9d5504a49390cb219d8
describe
'123552' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCQ' 'sip-files00062a.jpg'
2cfccefb4af5ae3e59a0b5c0603b4938
f4c7a24d88f303f3309dd2486307212a656cf90b
describe
'38965' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCR' 'sip-files00062a.pro'
c2382d64a52227c0b5b1bf9c4e83403d
3e7af2727892a69c9c1e5e61be46373aaa905836
describe
'37518' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCS' 'sip-files00062a.QC.jpg'
de8001372361cc7fbf32ae8d0c4ed949
8c99201725fb8a0378dc7071a2a3234a5aa5ccb6
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCT' 'sip-files00062a.tif'
863c634afd74a73954b4cccb5f7043ed
80d678edf06bfad911b58f787e475ee0612250e6
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCU' 'sip-files00062a.txt'
81db7aad926c4c9c94fd70c4477f8820
831869d8411ddb97419bf6b7c61db1e47a63ad9b
describe
'9067' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCV' 'sip-files00062athm.jpg'
9dee3ceb947f7561bd8bd23079293e84
101506638e97d7445ce6a68bc301e7765d71c3fc
describe
'685555' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCW' 'sip-files00063a.jp2'
e75b02772da48ddf6f3d4bad23182bfa
f5f636da505c57876b06ea3f0bc7599c58f04dde
describe
'119570' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCX' 'sip-files00063a.jpg'
bd2598069a9f98297a8cdf3bad6f0e4a
e5716eb2aa98724396bbf24db906fecd98deeb41
describe
'28449' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCY' 'sip-files00063a.pro'
98f4aa09e737dd7bc8d7117c65817ea6
e89f468205e8b51ddefdd593c7d7b3a44eb4ce0c
describe
'34956' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGCZ' 'sip-files00063a.QC.jpg'
9a19dc7b972c26f68a7a832a07e04d04
905f65ba11ff689a754dc1fb3b88941e61035874
describe
'5501272' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDA' 'sip-files00063a.tif'
e5df55bcd7bb67921715b35ceadf4626
e5ac39f56e8969092647baa32ae2de1573f3eb85
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDB' 'sip-files00063a.txt'
9d14fd7b0f5a9a3d1961eff295c4e88a
0bb869b04dda0646ac375cf48a4d25025fcbaeff
describe
'8295' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDC' 'sip-files00063athm.jpg'
29ef5f98a3de31512befe99a396643db
0c43c0065db380d46ff34e482ec4bbc722f29111
describe
'679946' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDD' 'sip-files00064a.jp2'
b6579a5824ef58f8a24c06faca0082ff
66918704bfb733235381c127ad9ca450b0be9818
describe
'108623' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDE' 'sip-files00064a.jpg'
5ddbe8a77dd5122c1beab15d5c393b3e
7df113757ccf8d93aaeb20c962a8da7a3c16da34
describe
'37044' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDF' 'sip-files00064a.pro'
c9f81a950984ed47402377359a801f41
5e748381e5277fd56cb63cbd4d29ea872ace6850
describe
'33489' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDG' 'sip-files00064a.QC.jpg'
24049376bd23bcb32f5149fe280bad1e
d98837a01a61ce489f12b62c831c877910a56b96
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDH' 'sip-files00064a.tif'
8ac6d464d92063c0306c4bf5185a2236
87e16aac218002759b1f78c20068c88ac7d76700
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDI' 'sip-files00064a.txt'
ef6cd61c4c6abdc1edc463cc1dddef12
bdd50772c6e1b35fcc0d1b9e7e2c498f97047bb8
describe
'8021' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDJ' 'sip-files00064athm.jpg'
03590f5b3d8b1418bee1f010618dc3cd
9b6d41b39b0a39edf3e61324ec7b3061fbc96e0a
describe
'687645' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDK' 'sip-files00065a.jp2'
1c3c8ed4d4184a8ed9859a3c833583db
6647da1ccc6db421ff0f0a37820d347832d5aea6
describe
'114182' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDL' 'sip-files00065a.jpg'
bdd6ba6077fee45727dd1a1578e3333d
37c745937eb37dfcc415b9234be30e7d0d293db5
describe
'27115' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDM' 'sip-files00065a.pro'
dad0b6191a356e7885c7d5e7e0e88627
ab7940afdfd45d50d42300c704f3fa885c1ce7d7
describe
'32948' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDN' 'sip-files00065a.QC.jpg'
6acf7fe9f51e27ccc4b1753cb095df68
6d5ca376d08961b2c8cddd303da7a1aa9f0727b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDO' 'sip-files00065a.tif'
64bbe6252191f584bc0c03d6195eb75b
48b12d66454e683998eb27beb4d8d109f745d1fb
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDP' 'sip-files00065a.txt'
52803cbf77f023de9eb95e69a35673c6
44a3471a1b5d8e1374fca46fd48ea3bd35df2113
describe
'8398' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDQ' 'sip-files00065athm.jpg'
1a5c3fe020e52a91a6f4cd9754ec431e
2194436b00ce467489cacfdf80237d9ed02f7bdc
describe
'684954' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDR' 'sip-files00066a.jp2'
66a4d52bd3abfc1a858a50da006fd4be
f77d0e0e63492bffc0dc48365213c77ffccd132b
describe
'113925' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDS' 'sip-files00066a.jpg'
07590c188db63b768e773e0718d37d81
b0abe92e4a91861ca795163257d9bf25481b5cda
describe
'35001' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDT' 'sip-files00066a.pro'
6dbc53888fd2d2d5c2aa4a3449adc4c3
f1c7684e6988c43a3badd1245114617abf9bf2ef
describe
'33845' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDU' 'sip-files00066a.QC.jpg'
cd7b16d9927a1a11c7a91468d1c937a7
53f89e6bae2b491050d02499e7b929a1e767dce9
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDV' 'sip-files00066a.tif'
da14a4779a04dfa794786dd98c221430
16975d558f198aa03ca2fa63db54dfc0fcf5f0e9
describe
'1384' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDW' 'sip-files00066a.txt'
becd509a9f251adb90343ec5cf88386a
a962ae72cfc5b598dcba27d4e16da009d6a5b340
describe
'8258' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDX' 'sip-files00066athm.jpg'
1b85e21dd45a71f548cce6ea389b632f
a3a39f5d6fd7051c2bafa7f2611e8af09df05e3d
describe
'682601' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDY' 'sip-files00067a.jp2'
1e84c785829716b714f7468f7d185c35
ae141a43fa7b6f263a11244a46f259b4148485c7
describe
'112662' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGDZ' 'sip-files00067a.jpg'
468edb575b97724bda22ba91cb197475
4f3b8551b005ef79cbd5b73df95f6a45d2555072
describe
'20637' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEA' 'sip-files00067a.pro'
b4a3dde009eb15d4fbc81f5bad27ea90
30c04b7c7c8b896fa70645489fc621f2827927bf
describe
'31630' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEB' 'sip-files00067a.QC.jpg'
21e7ff3023c13f4fa02660d88d46bd08
288f01cc0fcf189dd89e5434bc9aa67820f3acc7
describe
'5477896' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEC' 'sip-files00067a.tif'
e19544fe674a0c73beb68a1cd58b569a
445bd5348846671ab5295bd7784c79fd5ee37fc1
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGED' 'sip-files00067a.txt'
91cc8a6350dd7859b89f10743201667b
26c1eb075752ae208c75f9dd9dd248eca3c166ec
describe
Invalid character
'8061' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEE' 'sip-files00067athm.jpg'
3d2f7ff7c5714dc6855fb4ea1900ead5
0234a6b0d79ede6315a5ddb65a890abe2b8c54ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEF' 'sip-files00068a.jp2'
0cfd2810eab54a1a89428f572495df20
066f364dcfab23e32f7e4451a9af5b965f532cc8
describe
'63721' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEG' 'sip-files00068a.jpg'
1ca594e357637b86a6c052ccd5040693
fb926c8188ece34dab0f752611bf41bdc8fae716
describe
'15166' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEH' 'sip-files00068a.QC.jpg'
67dbbaf2f8bd6ce9a8ad9897995a7a1f
a15f7a6a0254a802862448805446a08db7d8dbf4
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEI' 'sip-files00068a.tif'
a278360d2d4d506dcfa941a68d45ab78
ca032690b2455ad27a814f0bf36fbeaff9753bfa
describe
'3662' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEJ' 'sip-files00068athm.jpg'
247eb657d0bf3ca3f4c6a4e66ecda71d
ec21ce5df75d8670854f522d0fb1c781b6d33e4a
describe
'807786' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEK' 'sip-files00071a.jp2'
abf005bfc53e9af3e90ad4f8eb849ea1
c0f172793df6be2edf0d69bc4b5b4fd69665cb07
describe
'207401' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEL' 'sip-files00071a.jpg'
de2dc4c2f300bf473e87e7e89dd04305
06917cb9f8144099276b3dbb08679e5a82214778
describe
'45561' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEM' 'sip-files00071a.QC.jpg'
d8f62250a10704e974760e9a728566bd
cb62f63ac2dd7388d9a47eb6c71a260b1eca0b1f
describe
'19407572' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEN' 'sip-files00071a.tif'
539e65b8f59a36a4135a079a6346d58c
10d84cc2150f9b8f52735d344086de5293417c0f
describe
'9256' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEO' 'sip-files00071athm.jpg'
5ba7afb738042b19635f2212848fcaa2
96b6edbe9f3054d134273b405af75f0d6b572962
describe
'825765' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEP' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
9c47cc086297b9e2bcea0d8929ca7d19
2b866c6c7ccfcb8c32163497e8327ef540df66d2
describe
'111769' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEQ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
60ddff0f0982b1fff141a0f061aca054
a21b28899f676ba691f8f879e5035ebabafeca76
describe
'24024' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGER' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
f4b2105c28cd9e9a4db60d65f1119bfa
d687764710fca78d03951353c69993b32a2ae683
describe
'19839088' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGES' 'sip-files00072.tif'
eed9c87dd2a96f3edfbe6c32d0d197a4
ad5d722e21486619d42f71260a842e626f5f314b
describe
'5570' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGET' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
63fd76e01555807c63437c0c1ecf94e6
e4e8527b5fe87504a8fc1c1c64c8921cc548ba88
describe
'62' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEU' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
61f70e239e4f87bf59d69768892cf36a
1d727dafc8f712753e178dce8d068cd53e8771d0
describe
'107760' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEV' 'sip-filesUF00087376_00001.mets'
822647ebe46e079b46e640c3ce5de904
cbae66a61f2acd28004b6a8e8f46e753a57eace0
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T08:09:39-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'136894' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAALFfileF20090314_AAEGEY' 'sip-filesUF00087376_00001.xml'
5272d05d0bea20e72389fdbfd30bedb0
ce00567d838cc912c20ba6c43f339592444aa2e5
describe
'2013-12-13T08:09:40-05:00'
xml resolution