Citation
Gerald and Geraldine

Material Information

Title:
Gerald and Geraldine and other stories
Creator:
Plympton, A. G ( Almira George ), b. 1852
DeWolfe, Fiske & Co. (Boston, Mass.) ( Publisher )
Niagara Lithograph Co ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
De Wolfe, Fiske & Co.
Manufacturer:
Niagara Lithograph Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
128 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1898 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Children's stories
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
United States -- New York -- Buffalo
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Subject:
Gerald and Geraldine -- Lucille and Lucilla -- Daisy Dalrymple's dog -- David Hickey's Christmas -- Queen Isabella.
Statement of Responsibility:
by A.G. Plympton.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026649795 ( ALEPH )
ALG4848 ( NOTIS )
49457683 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


BY Vis

Lop YAPTOS yy.

DE WOLFE: FISKE ~&sea.
BOSTON.





















GERALD AND GERALDINE.

AND OTHER STORIES.

BY
A. G. PLYMPTON,
AUTHOR OF

“DEAR DAUGHTER DorROTHY,” WANOLASSET,”’ Etc., ETC.

BOSTON :
DE WOLFE, FISKE & CO.,
361 & 365 WASHINGTON STREET.



COPYRIGHTED 1898.
BY DE WOLFE, FISKE & CO.
BOSTON, MASS.

PRESS OF
NIAGARA LITHOGRAPH CO.
BUFFALO, N. Y.



TABLE OF CONTENTS.

GERALD AND GERALDINE,
LUCILLE AND LUCILLA,
Daisy DALRYMPLE’S Doe,
Davin HIcKEY’s CHRISTMAS,
QUEEN ISABELLA,

PAGE.
15
43
61

99
IE









LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE.

GERALDINE SINGING THE EASTER ARIA (Colored) Frontispiece.
J) Pp
“SHE Hap DoLits WitHoutT NuMBER” (Colored), . : 25
“GERALD OPENED HIS MOUTH AND GERALDINE PEERED
IONARO) ION : : : ‘ : . : : 29
“TUCILLE WITH THE DOVES CIRCLING ABOUT HER HEAD”
(Colored), : : : : : : é AS
“HE KEPT POINTING TOWARD THE FIELDS,” . : 53
Daisy DALRYMPLE AND Bruno (Colored), . : : : 63
HowarD KIMBALL TORMENTING THE DOG WITH HIS
FATHER’S CANE (Colored), : : : Mae 78
“BRUNO SOLEMNLY SEATED HIMSELF ON THE WITNESS
STAND,” : : : : : ; : é : 87
“IN A SHAME-FACED WAY HE OPENED THE BOX” (Colored), 99:
“THE MOST POPULAR BOY IN THE DEAF SCHOOL,” : 105,
“SHE HAD THE LATEST IMPROVEMENT IN WHEELS,” . : 113

“SHE WAS HUSTLED INTO THE WAGON, HER WHEEL
WITH HER,” : . : : : : ; : Tees









seeegh











GERALD AND GERALDINE.











GERALD AND GERALDINE.

ERALD and Geraldine, or Gerry and Dino as they were called,

had been standing by the window of Mrs. Blaney’s little
parlor for more than an hour eagerly watching the passers by. Each
time they saw a man’s figure approaching they would cry:

“Here he is! Here he is! Surely this is our uncle at last.”

And then as the gentleman passed on, they would look after him
and say with derision: |

‘Pooh, our uncle is a far nicer and handsomer gentleman.”’

They were twins, and if they kept their eye-lids down, and if
Dino smoothed her red-gold locks, and Gerry ran his hands through
his, one face answered to the other like its image in the glass. But
let the eyes be seen, and all likeness seemed to vanish in an instant,
for Gerald looked at you with appealing, gentle, almost seraphic, blue
ones, with an expression that made you hope the world would not use
the little lad ill, while Geraldine gave you a mocking glance out of
her fearless black eyes, and you could not help laughing and think-
ing that she would be fully able to take care of herself.

The poor little things, it must be confessed, at ten years of age had

19)



GERALD AND GERALDINE.



seen a good deal of the world. When two years old, as newly made
orphans, they had been brought from London to their mother’s father,
who was a clergyman with a large parish in Chicago. When he died,
which happened three years later, they were passed on to an aunt, a
fashionable lady of New York, who perhaps was none too well pleased
at the course of events that left two young children to her care. But
she did the best she could for them according to her light, until she
married a rich but ill-tempered man, who made her give up the very
obvious duty of caring for them.

And then ? well then, the little creatures were put in the care of a
person who, for so much a week, undertook to stand in the place of a
mother to them. She was a widow and childless, and there was a
chance that at last the twins might find themselves in justsuch a niche
as they were made for, but they had occupied it hardly a twelve month,
when “circumstances arose” which compelled the widow “to give up
the dear children,” the circumstances being a legacy that made life
possible to her without any effort on her own part to increase her
income.

And now they were waiting for the appearance of their uncle,
their father’s brother, who having been - notified of the forlorn situa-
tion of his brother’s children, was coming to carry them away to his
own home. They had never seen him or any of their father’s
relatives, and were anxious to know what he would be like.

“T think he will be big and fat, with a real red, jolly face, and a
loud laugh, and just plum full of stories,” said Gerry. “ He will like you
best, but he’ll like me too, I dare say.”

“You are thinking of the man we saw in the park,” said

16



GERALD AND GERALDINE.

Geraldine. “Ohno! he won’t be that kind of a man. I dare say
he’ll be thin and have dispepsia, like Uncle Harold, but I hope he
won't, for that is the worst kind; and I think you are wrong, Gerald,
about one thing. I think he will like you best. Its your turn you
know.

In truth the children had noticed in their divers guardians, that
one of them was sure to be preferred to the other, and for that reason
they had been constantly in danger of being separated. Gerald had
been his grandfather’s favorite, and he had sometimes talked of send-
ing Gerldine to theaunt. When, after his death, they both went toher,
she had fancied the little girl the more, and had thought of sending

“the boy to boarding school, and once when the widow Mrs. Blaney,
had been angry with Dino, she had declared that she would never
part with her brother, but that their aunt would be forced to find some
one else to take care of her. Yet these threats had never resulted
in anything, and the twins had never been separated a whole day in
their lives. :

In spite of their vicissitudes, they were happy, healthy, and
courageous children, being, as it seemed, not in the least discouraged
by the way the world had usedthem. Nothing had seemed to shake
their childish trust in others, and they met.every one as a new friend.

The uncle had written to Mrs. Blaney that he would come for the
twins at eleven o’clock on a certain a The day and hour had
come, but the uncle tarried.

“Tor,” said the widow, “I doubt if he turns up at all. What on
earth should he want of two young ones? Mark my words, he'll
wriggle out of it. Its twelve o’clock already.”

te



GERALD AND GERALDINE.



“ He’s wriggling in it now,” said Geraldine, ‘“‘at least I’spose so.”

There was certainly some one coming up the outside steps. Some |
one with a great shock of iron-gray hair that bushed out under a soft
hat. Some one with piercing dark eyes, and a strange, foreign face,
which at the present moment wore an unmistakable frown.

“Oh Gerry!” whispered Dino, “do you think that is our uncle?”

There was a sharp ring at the bell, and through the open door
the children heard a voice ask :

“Does Mrs. Blaney lif here?”

The twins looked at each other, “well to be sure,’ they said.
“Yes, that’s our uncle.”

For suddenly they remembered something that they had once
heard—that their father was German, and that their mother’s family
had objected to him on that account. They had never half believed
it, but now they saw that it was true.

Geraldine took the card that the little maid servant brought in
and read: .

“Mr. Otto Kaufmann.”

The new comer entered the room in a hurried manner. He said
he had been delayed, and that there was now but twenty minutes to
get to the depot, where he was to take the train.

There was no time to make acquaintance, and in an incredibly
few moments the children were ready, (Mrs. Blaney would not have
had them left any longer on her hands for anything under the sun,) .
and were seated opposite the uncle in the carriage.

But the danger of being too late made any conversation impos-
sible, for Uncle Otto sat with his watch in one hand and the other on

18



GERALD AND GERALDINE.

the knob of the door, ready to spring out the moment that they
reached the station. The children sat close together delighting in
the hurry and excitement. They felt that there was plenty of time in
the future for making acquaintance. The little party reached the
train at just the last moment. Gerald climbing in like the agile
monkey that he was, and the uncle steadying Miss Geraldine.

The cars were crowded, Gerry sat with a fat woman with a baby,
Dino with an old Jew who slept peacefully behind a newspaper, and
Uncle Otto went into the smoking car. At last the two children had
a seat together, but although there was now room enough, Uncle
Otto did not come back into their car, and at the end of the journey
they felt that they knew him no better than at the start.
street just beyond a church, there



Somewhere in the vicinity of
is—or at least there was a few years ago—an iron gate with a brass
plate upon it bearing the inscription,

“Otto Kaufmann, Choir-master of the Church of St John ‘the
Evangelist and Teacher of the Organ and Piano-forto.”

Behind the gate was a small house, remodelled from a stable,
having below, one great apartment, used as a music room, parlor, and
sometimes even dining room and kitchen, while the second story was
divided into four sleeping rooms. ‘This was the twins’ new home.

It was a strange life, sure enough, for these mites, for Mr. Otto
Kaufmann’s little house was frequented by all sorts and conditions of
people. He was fashionable, and ladies in their carriages came to
beg him to come to their entertainments, for he had composed an
opera which had been a success, and he was looked npon as a celeb-
rity. And young women tra-la-la’d in the room down stairs, where

19



GERALD AND GERALDINE.

he gave his lessons ; in the evening musicians and artists of all sorts
were always running in, and it was music, music, music all day and
pretty nearly all night. There was an old woman who came in every
day to put the house in order, but their meals were sent in from a
caterer’s, except when, as sometimes happened, Uncle Otto took a
turn himself at cooking in which he always scored a great success, as
he did in everything else.

Geraldine thought that on account of her sex, she ought to have
a hand in these operations, but her uncle used to wave her away, with
a smile and a flowery speech that she did not know what to make. of,
for though it sounded polite, she seemed to feel that there was some-
thing that was not so behind it.

“De ladies, my dear, like leedle dolls must do noding,” he would
say, and Dino would shrink away abashed.

It had been plain from the first that Uncle Otto was not quite
pleased with Geraldine, not that he was not always kind and generous
to her—oh! dear, no—but his manner was so different from his man-
ner to Gerald. He was a quiet man, but he would draw the little
fellow on his knee and talk with him for hours. He would tell him
about his father, and how as boys they had loved each other, and
many a story he told him too of Germany, his fatherland. But it

‘seemed to Geraldine that if she drew near and dared take a place by
his side, his tongue lagged and after a while he would remind himself
of some appointment and go away.

What pride and joy he had when he first heard Gerald sing. It
was an old Christmas anthem that he had learned long ago, achildish
thing that they used to sing at school:

20



GERALD AND GERALDINE.

‘We three kings of Orient are,

Bearing gifts, we come from afar,

By field and fountain, moor and mountain,
Following yonder star ;”

But Gerald’s voice was lovely, as sweet and true as aun angel’s.
His uncle made him sing it over and over again, and the other pieces
also, and every one who came in that evening had to hear him sing.

Once Gerald said— But Uncle Otto, Geraldine can sing t00.
Don’t you wan’t to hear Geraldine sing?”

Uncle Otto shook his head.

“Ach Gott, no, de leedle girls are like de doll. Dey must do
noding but look pretty, and Geraldine she do that very well.”

In truth his little nephew appealed to the really warm heart of
the old organist, as no one had ever done, but his brother, the little
lad’s father, and sometimes as he talked and played with him he
almost fancied he had his Heinrich back again. His brother had
been much younger than himself, and he had had for him that same
tender sense of protectorship, and the desire to save him from all
hardship and pain that he now had for Gerry. Only in Heinrich’s|
case he had been poor and struggling and not able to do what he
wished for him, but now he was rich, and could give Gerald all that he
needed and more. He began to be very happy. ‘There was one
thing that troubled him—and that was Geraldine. There was no
place for her in his life and plans. Her little fgure hovering about
Gerald, disturbed that pleasant fancy in which he relieved his old life
with his brother. Besides—he knew nothing of girls, all his troubles
had come through thatsex. It was a girl, and Geraldine’s mother,

ai



GERALD AND GERALDINE.



that had stolen Heinrich from him, no! no! He would find some »
good woman to bring up the girl, and he himself would take care of
Gerald.

One day he called the children to him. They were at play in
the little enclosure in front of the house, but when they heard his
voice, they came in, hand in hand, with their eyes full of happiness
and little suspecting what they were going to hear. Gerald went up
to his uncle and pressed against his knees, and Geraldine stood by,
shuffling on her feet, unable from mere happiness to keep quiet.

“Now children, be goot and quiet vilst I talk to you,” Oncle
Otto began, patting Gerald’s hand. “I haf been considering what is
the best for you, and I haf made up my mind dat my house ish no
goot place for a leedle girl.”

“Oh!” said Geraldine, and she stood quite still now.

“T know noding about leedle girls, and I tink I must find some
goot vomans dat vill take petter care of Geraldine as I can.”

“Where will Gerald be?” asked Geraldine faintly, “will he go
too?”

‘“Gerald? oh no, he vill shtay wit me. Dat vill be de petter vay,
eh? Ican pring up a poy very goot. Ach Gott. I know vell de
poys. Vy, Gerald. Vot’s de matter?”

For Gerald had gone to Geraldine and thrown his arms around
her, and his face was very red in his efforts not to cry.

‘“T think it will be horrid,’ he said. “Geraldine is my twin,
and we have always been together, and girls aren’t so very different
from boys either. Oh! Ob! I wish we were back again at Mrs.
Blaney’s. I do indeed.”

22



GERALD AND GERALDINE.



Poor Gerald did not dream how he cut his uncle’s heart when he
uttered these words, but he could not have said anything that would
_ have made him put from him this plan so quickly.

“Vell, vell, I vill do noding at present. I haf only thought that
Geraldine would pe petter off mit some goot and kind vomans. Vot
does leedle Geraldine tink of eet? Eh?” ;

“Oh,” said Dino, who was crying with her face on Gerry’s neck.
“T think it would be cruel.”

“Vell den, you shall not go,” said Uncle Otto.

And that ended the matter for that time, but the knowledge that
he had thought of sending Geraldine away and that he might event-
ually think best to part them, was a sharp thorn in the twins’ flesh.
They could never forget it and the fear made them cling to each other
more closely than ever.

And Uncle Otto would look at them, and shake his head, and say
to himself: ,

‘Tis always so, ’tis always so. Some pretty leedle girl does
always make de vorld go wrong mit Otto Kaufmann.”

It has been mentioned that Uncle Otto was the choir master of St.
John the Evangelist’s. The church was very near the little house
behind the iron gate, and sometimes of a week-day, when he went in
to rehearse the music for the following Sunday, the children would
go too and listen. ‘The choir was of boys’ voices, and the most beau-
tifulin the city. The twins were of a deeply musical nature, and
they would sit there spell bound, until’ Uncle Otto would come from
the organ and take them home.

One day as the children walked before him, he heard Geraldine say:

23



GERALD AND GERALDINE. |

‘Oh brother, if I could only sing in the choir, I would be happy.”

‘“‘Leedle girls do‘not sing in dot choir,” said Uncle Otto.

“Yes, yes, I know,” said Geraldine drearily. “Leedle girls
must do noding, but look pretty.”

Uncle Otto laughed, but he turned to Gerald.

‘“Vot do you say, mein poy?”

“T think as Dino does, that it would be beautiful. Oh, Uncle |
Otto! could 1?” he cried.

“Vell, yes, I vas long tinking of dat.”

Gerald began to caper up and down on the pavement, and
Geraldine was capering too, in her generous sympathy, but her eyes
were wistful and she murmured once more:

“‘Leedle girls can do noding.”

Then Gerald’s training began. Each day he had long tiresome
exercises to go through, for Uncle Otto would spare no pains. In-
deed, because he was ambitious for the boy, he was all the harder
master, and sometimes poor Gerald would say privately to Geraldine,
that he would rather never sing at all than toil so, and Geraldine
would always answer: :

“Pooh, I would work as hard and harder too for music. I love
it, I love it, I love it! Oh, Gerald dear, if I could only change places
with you!”

But however tired Gerald was, he never complained to Uncle
Otto. He could not, for he knew if he should not become a musician
it would break his uncle’s heart.

So, because of his love and gratitude to his uncle ; and constantly
encouraged by Geraldine, he kept on, and he made good progress,

24













GERALD AND GERALDINE.



and at last (it was Sunday) Gerald’s voice rang out in the church,
bearing its part sweetly above the lower voices of the others, and
Geraldine in her place below in the pew sat with rapture in her heart
and her eyes full of tears.

As for Uncle Otto, it was easy to see that he was daily growing
more fond of, more proud of, and more ambitious for Gerald, and that
Geraldine was nothing to him.

Yet it must not be thought that he was unkind tothe child. He
saw that she had every thing she needed. Geraldine wore the
prettiest clothes, went to the best school and had everything that
money could buy. Her room was furnished for her according to her
own taste. She had dolls without number.

‘One day, when her uncle and brother were away, the fancy took
her to place them all in a row, and they reached clear across the floor
of the big music room. ‘Then she sat down at the end of the row
with her legs and arms hanging stiff, and a simper on her face.

“‘ Ach Gott,” said Uncle Otto, coming suddenly in the room and
seeing her. “ Vot ails you mein schild?”

“We are all dolls,” answered Geraldine gravely, “we can do
noding,” and then she burst into tears.

“Certainly ‘his Geraldine is a very odd little girl,” thought
Uncle Otto.

Sometimes when left alone Geraldine would go to the organ (a
great instrument which Uncle Otto had built into the room) and try
to bring forth music from it, and sometimes she would dress the dolls
in little white surplices and herself in another, and then she would
stand very straight, with her head thrown back, and _ sing.

27

#2



GERALD AND GERALDINE.

How she would sing! Scales and exercises and anthems and
chants, and at last the ariathat Gerald was learning and which he
was to sing on Haster Sunday.

If the truth be told, she had learned it sooner than Gerald had
learned it, being quicker and more persevering than her brother. When
Gerald took his lessons poor Dino always sat in a corner of the sofa
and drank in every word her uncle said, and then when she was alone
she would practice the piece just as he had told her brother to prac”
tice it. No it was not only because she was more persevering and
quicker than her brother, it was also because of the deep love of
music in her heart.

‘Well, when she finished singing she would turn to the dolls
and say:

‘““Tsn’t it glorious ? Isn’t it heavenly, and pray why, why, why
must leedle girls do noding ?”

Though he was not so quick as his sister, Gerald learned his
aria in good time.

Sweet and pure as the notes of a flute his voice fell on the ear.
In the still church, with the scent of the flowers, and the sunshine
pouring through the stained glass windows, it would be beautiful
Geraldine thought, she hoped it would not make her cry.

It was a week before Easter. Spring was coming, but the air
was damp and the weather dull.

Geraldine noticed that Gerald swallowed his breakfast with wry
faces that morning, and after their uncle had gone out he began to cry.
He seldom demeaned himself in this fashion and Geraldine was
alarmed.

28





‘Gerald opened his mouth and Geraldine peered into it.”









GERALD AND GERALDINE.

“Tt hurts so,” he said at last in reply to her entreaties to tell her
the cause of his tears. “Its my throat, and its ached and ached this
ever so long, and I can’t stand it any longer. Oh Geraldine! I don’t
see how I can go and sing tonight, but I will.” jen

“Of course you can’t,” said Geraldine. “You must have some-
thing to take, but I don’t know what, and Uncle Otto has gone. Oh
dear! Oh dear! Why couldn’t it have been my throat? How does it
reel ye?

“Tt feels as if there were lumps in it. See here Dino, look down
and see.”

Gerald opened his mouth and Geraldine peered into it, and after
much squinting on her part and various maneuvers of Gerald’s
tongue, she cried out excitedly:

“Tumps? Ohmy! there is an awful big one wagging right
in the middle! You poor poor boy, I should think it would hurt you.
You must go to bed and have the doctor.”

Of course, Geraldine had seen the soft palate, but her advice
was good, nevertheless, and Gerald, much frightened, made no
objection.

The doctor’s diagnosis was different from Geraldine’s but he kept
the patient in bed and watched him closely.

He told Uncle Otto that the boy had not a bad throat, but if he
was to sing on Easter Sunday, he had best take every precaution
against catching more cold. He said that Gerald would probably be
well by Friday.

The doctor’s directions were carefully followed, and Thursday
morning, Gerry felt as well as everand it was thought safe for him to get

31



GERALD AND GERALDINE.



up,and even to go out of doors for a half an hour in the middle of the day.

It was a beautiful morning, the air was soft and warm. ‘The
grass in the parks was quite green and a blue sky hung overhead.
But there were little clouds blowing up from the horizon, and before
Gerald and Geraldine had emerged from the iron gate, the air hada
sharpness in it, and Gerry was soon shivering. So they went home
again, and that night he confessed to Dino that his throat was worse.
He used his gargles faithfully, and made her promise to say nothing
to her uncle.

‘“He has worked so hard over me and he is so good to us Dino,”
he said, “ I should feel awfully to disappoint him. You know there is
no one else that has learned the aria.” |

‘“Er—no, of course not,” said Dino, adding to herself, “ Leedle
girls don’t count. Oh dear! Oh dear! what a pity it is that its not
my throat that’s sore instead of yours.”

Well it would be good if it could be yours just for Easter morn-
ing,” Gerald admitted. ‘‘ But no matter, don’t let’s worry for I shall
probably be well tomorrow for that was the day the doctor set. Friday,
you know he said, and this is only Thursday.

This thought comforted Gerry, but Geraldine felt anxious.

Their uncle being out that evening, Mrs. Riley their good
natured housekeeper sat with Gerald, who soon fell asleep. But
though Geraldine went to bed, for a long time she could only toss
from side to side with wide open eyes and her brain filled with the
strangest thoughts, and her heart beating like a trip-hammer.

“T can’t doit. I can’t, I can’t,” she would say to herself, and
then in a moment, “Yes, Ican do it and I will” It was like two

32



GERALD: AND GERALDINE.

voices each trying to drown the other; and in the end “I can’t”
yielded and “I will” won the day.

Friday morning found Gerald worse. His throat ached badly,
his head was hot and he was hoarse as a crow.

‘“Itis no use,” be said in answer to Geraldine’s anxious enquiries.
I shan’t be well enough to sing, and I am going to tell Uncle Otto so,
as soon as he comes in.”

“Hush,” cried Dino in a warning whisper. ‘Don’t you do
anything of the kind. You come and get into my bed, and I will
manage everything.”

Her cheeks were red, and her eyes sparkled. Geraldine usually
gave up to Gerald, but sometimes a peculiar look would come into
her eyes and her chin would lengthen, and when she looked like this,
she would have her own way. She looked so now.

Gerald got up and sat on the edge of the bed and watched her, as
she hastily dressed herself in his clothes. She made her hair smooth
and dropped her eyelids over her eyes and said:

‘Come Geraldine, you'll catch cold, you must go right back to
your room and go to bed—I’m all right this morning and now you
see its your turn.”

“Oh!” said Gerald, “I begin to catch on. We are going to
change places, but what good will it do?’’

’ she said, now Gerry,

“Tm going to sing on Easter Sunday,’
quick, put on this night dress in place of yours, and then go back to
bedey. i

‘What a girl you are!” said Gerald laughing. ‘“ But you know

you can’t do it.”

30



GERALD AND GERALDINE.



Nevertheless he let her put him into her own bed, laughing all
the time, to see how much at ease she seemed to feel in knicker-
bockers, and watched her as she flew about making the necessary
changes.

They were just made, when Uncle Otto tapped at the door.

“Where’s Gerald,” he was saying; but as he opened the door his
eyes fell upon Dino and he wenton. “Oh! here you are. Ach Gott
you are petter, ist it not so?”

“Ym all right,” answered Geraldine, ‘‘ the patient is in here now.
It’s no more than fair, is it?”

“Vell,” said Uncle Otto, “if eet must be von, the leedle girl—”’
he ended with a shrug and outspread hands, and gave a little laugh.

‘Kom here, mein poy. I vant to lookat you. I vant to see eef
de throat is vell.” He held out his hand to Geraldine, and Gerry
smothered his chuckles in the pillows.

‘She never will have the face to do it,” he said to himself, but
the audacious Geraldine, after a moment’s hesitation, had tilted back
her head and opened her.mouth, in which position, luckily for the
success of her bold scheme, her black eyes were not visible.

‘“ Vere goot, vere goot. Itink you are vell sure enough,” said
Uncle Otto. “ And de doctor vill haf anoder patient, eh, Geraldine?
I vill go now to get him, and you, mein poy, go tell Mrs. Riley she
moost get some preakfast ready soon.”

So off he went, and with a look at Gerry, Dino followed him.

After breakfast Geraldine came back for a moment to whisper :

“Uncle Otto is going to have me sing the aria. Shall I leave
the door open so that you can hear, Gerry ?”’

34



GERALD AND GERALDINE.

And Gerry said yes. In vain he strained his ears for sounds of
music. ‘The house was very quiet, and presently Geraldine came
back to say that a gentleman had come and taken their uncle away
with him. Some friend of his was in trouble, and he had been called
upon to help him, aud there was no knowing when he would be back.

‘Ah well,” said Gerry, who had been thinking the situation over
during her absence, “it’s a great deal better that you didn’t have the
chance to sing to him. He would discover the trick in a moment
and very likely it would make him angry. I say Dino, you can’t
sing that aria, you know.”

But Dino would not be discouraged. She was sure she could
take her brother’s place and to prove it began to sing the aria, and
Gerry soon found that she had not overrated her ability.

‘But then, you know,” he said finally, “it wouldn’t be the thing
_ at all for you, a girl, to go there in my place in the choir, you can’t do
that. .

“Nobody will know it isn’t you,” persisted Geraldine. ‘‘ How
can they? I have only to keep my eyes closed.”

“How silly yowll look,” Gerry went on. “I won’t havea silly
looking lackadaisical thing like that palmed off for me.”

‘And Uncle Otto will not be disappointed, “she continued in her
turn. “TI shall enjoy it and I think I might have the chance for
once. Come, don’t be so selfish.”

“Gerry gave up then. He felt tired and if every one else was
satisfied there was no reason why he should object. His responsi-
bilities slipped off. He made himself comfortable and went to sleep.

His own part was easy.

35



GERALD AND GERALDINE.



The path of deception was never smoother than Geraldine found
it. ‘To begin with, Uncle Otto was constantly away from home and
there was no chance for a rehearsal. "The doctor reported his patient
as not at all seriously ill only needing rest and quiet. He left orders
for her to be kept warm in bed until the hoarseness disappeared, and
said that he should not call again unless sent for.

Saturday he was better again, but still hoarse. There was no_
possible chance that he would be able to sing on Sunday.

At last Sunday morning came. Geraldine had breakfast a
Gerald in his, or rather her, room. Both children werea little ex-
cited, but Geraldine would not admit that she was afraid. ‘She did
not believe that anyone would discover that it was herself and not
Gerald that sang the aria.

“ But I think your voice is different from mine,” croaked Gerry.

“‘ Aren’t twins’ voices always the same? Certainly they are,”
she insisted. “I don’t think there is any difference, but if there is,
it will be set down to the sore throat.”

“What a girl you are!” said Gerald, for the hundredth time.
“Well I would give anything’ to be there to see and hear you. But
you will be sure to give yourself away. The boys will find you out.”

When the bells began to ting, Uncle Otto came,in for Gerald,
and the two set out for the church, Uncle Otto kept his hand on the
child’s shoulder. He looked down upon the little ip poston with a
fond and proud smile.

“Ve are two goot cronies, is eet not so?” he said pleasantly.
“ Vot makes you so quiet, lately, mein schild? es it the throat vot

aches?”
36



GERALD AND GERALDINE.

Geraldine could only shake her head. . She could not trust her-
self to answer, and she dared not raise her black eyes to him, who
looked so expectantly to meet a pair of sweet, soft, blue ones. She
began to wonder if ke would be angry if he knew all. This seemed
hard, for it was for his sake a:ter all that she was going to sing.

But when they got into the church, she became excited and bold
again. Her cheeks grew red, her eyes glowed.

- She found the vestry, and put on Gerald’s surplice with a little
chuckle of delight, all the time chaffing and playing with the boys
in Gerald’s manner, but she did not look one of them in the face, and
none suspected her.

‘Then the procession of boys passed into the church Geraldine in

- Gerald’s place no one noticing the change.
The service began and Dino’s voice chimed with the others in
anthem and hymn. The church was fragrant with Easter flowers
and the organ notes pealed grandly along the vault of the great
cathedral dome. : . :

“Tt is glorious, it is. heavenly,” thought the child. Presently
she realized that the moment had come. It was time for the aria.
For an instant the candle lights flickered and the church whirled
around. Shé seemed to hear a voice she knew say:

‘“Leedle girls can do noding.”

Then she began. The first notes were faint and tremulous, then
Dino forgot everything but the music. She raised her head and the
music just poured out of her mouth. She was no longer little’
Geraldine, who by stealth stood in another’s place. She was trans-
ported. Her eyes shone like stars, the lids raised, and her cheeks pale.

37



GERALD AND GERALDINE.

The boys nuged each other and smiled, many of them had seen
Geraldine and they now recognized her.

As for Uncle Otto, he was saying to himself: ‘‘ Ach Gott dish
voice is not Gerald’s. He vill nefer sing like dat in all dish vorld.
His voice ish ein goot voice—but dis. Ach Gott! Vot a voice!”

But the last note now died away upon the stillness of the church,
and a sudden darkness blotted the whole scene from Dino’s eyes.
Then an arm stole around her and she felt herself borne gently away.

When Geraldine opened her eyes, they looked full into a pair
that were shining upon her with the tenderest anxiety.

“Ach Gott!” said a voice, “she is mooch petter now. I tink
she vill soon pe vell. Mein leedle Dino. Vy, vy haf you not told
me vot a voice you haf? Ach Gott. Vot a heavenly voice.”

“Yes, Gerry,” said Dino having tried to give her brother an
account of the whole wonderful morning. You were right in think-
ing that I would be found out, but after all it was lovely and Uncle
Otto was not vexed, and I think—yes I think now he is going to
teach me music as well as you.”

From this time, Geraldine shared equally with Gerald in the
singing lessons and in the affection of their uncle, and never after-
wards was he heard to say:

‘““Leedle girls can do noding.”











LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.









LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

UCILLE was a picture as she ‘stood in the dusky shadows of the
barn with the doves circling about her head, and Lucilla perched
upon her shoulder.

She was an unusually pretty child with soft hazel eyes, anda
dazzle of golden ‘hair, and when as now, she was pleased and excited
and her cheeks were pink, she was bewitching. |

The only remarkable thing about her was an unusual fondness for
animals and the power she had overthem. Itreally seemed as if there
was some special relationship between this little girl and the various |
orders of the animal kingdom, different from that between them, and
other human beings. Even the shy inhabitants of the green woods
seemed to feel that she was nearer akin to themselves than to the
ugly object with a gun that was their traditional enemy. They
taught her their calls, and when with soft oe De she came into the
wood, they seemed to say joyfully :

“Tt’s Lucille, dear Lucille. She will do us no harm.”

To be sure, she had her favorites among them. Though she loved
them all. .She loved the birds better than the toads and the beetles,

43

*3



LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.



and she liked what she called the woolly worms better than the
slippery ones; but that was only as you might say you liked choco-
late candy better than peppermint, meaning no disrespect to the
latter.

Even the crickets and grasshoppers seemed to feel the bond, for
she could keep one by her all day, and perhaps, when evening came
and her mother would say:

“What became of the cricket you had this morning?”

Lucille would find it for her in a fold of her dress.

But of course the domestic animals were her chief playmates,
and of these there was no lack on the fine old farm where Lucille
lived. The dogs had a warm corner of her heart. One was a big,
lean, awkward, foolish, greyhound pup, and the other a wise old fat
little spaniel. [here was also a dear and faithful collie that slept in
the barn, who was different from either. But however the dogs may
have differed in other respects they were alike in their affection for
Lucille. As for the cats, there were enough of them to make a very
respectable cat show, black, yellow, tiger, whiteandgray. And there
were horses and cows, and pigs and hens, each being a personal friend
to Lucille.

The little girl never gave herself any airs of superiority to her
playmates, however humble they might be. Indeed she often amused
herself by imagining that she was one of themselves. With the dogs
she would leap about with her tongue hanging out of her mouth, and
just as easily she could fancy herself one of the cats, when she would
hunch up her back and hiss, or else curl herself up for a nap, with
her head cuddled into the rest of her; and it was the drollest thing to

44











LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

see her stand stock still in the pasture, like some old placid cow. Just
stand there and swallow an imaginary cud.

The cows would look at her out of the corner of their great mild
eyes and seem to say:

“The idea of that little snipe fancying herself one of us!”

I wonder if she ever thought it a little hard that in their turn
the animals would not sometimes pretend to be a little girl.

But the doves were Lucille’s true brothers and sisters. What a
whirring of feathery wings there was when the soft whistle of
Lucille was heard in the dovecote, and the dainty things,
purple, and white, and clouded grey, as softly as the flitting shad-
ows gathered about her. Of all the doves, however, the little :
maidenly Lucilla was the gentlest and the sweetest.

She was of a light-soft grey, with an arching neck of beautiful
iridescent colors. Lucilla was of a timid nature even for a dove, and
always flew away from her perch on Lucilles’ shoulder at the first ap-
proach of any other person, even the familiar figure of Adolphus who

took care of the dove-cote, and a certain way she had at such times of
seeking another perch over Lucille’s head, and sending down to her
cooing assurances of her love, was wonderfully pretty.

Having filled a measure with corn, Lucille went out into the
open, to scatter it on the ground for the doves. But Lucilla ate only
out of Lucille’s hand—the gentle little hand that had never yet hurt
living creatures.

So rare and perfect a companion as Lucille, certainly deserved a
playmate of her own race; and that very morning, before she had
come out to feed the doves, she had been introduced to a little brother.

47



LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.



It must be said that Baby boy, as he was called, did not seem upon
that first inspection a very promising companion. First he made a
horrible face at her, and turned purple; then he doubled up his fists
as if he were a born prize fighter, and finally opened his mouth and
screamed. But Lucille was no cold critic. She watched these feats
with sympathetic interest, and aimably declared that he was as sweet
as he could be; and when he fell asleep, and was laid in his dainty
bassinet, all made of lace and blue ribbons, she stood by his side ad-
miring his small round head, his tiny features, and little pink
hands.

And so, she was so happy, when she went out to feed the doves,
that she did not notice that Lucilla wore a drooping air, that she ate
but afew kernels of corn, and her voice was more plaintive than
usual.

“Tucilla you will love the little brother as well as you love
me” she prattled. “ You will never be afraid of him but cuddle in |
his arms as you do in mine.”

“Coo, coo,” answered Lucilla very soft and sad and low.

It was a beautiful May morning, and to Lucille the world was
made of blue sky, of apple blossoms, of cooing doves, and sweet little
baby brothers; but all at once, Lucilla spread her wings and flew

away.
: She had seen Donald and Dexter, the boys of a neighbor, com-
ing down the lane, and Lucilla knew that their appearance was the
signal for trouble. They scorned poor little Lucille as a playmate,
but sometimes they amused themselves by teasing her. |

Usually she was none too well pleased to see them; but to-day it

48



“LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

was different. She was glad of the opportunity to tell the good news.
“Coo, coo, coo,” warned Lucilla, but Lucille would not heed her.
With her little face shining with happiness she ran forward to meet
them.
‘“Oh Donald, she cried, oh Dexter what do you think? I havea
dear little baby brother. What do you think of that?”
“Think of it? Why, you needn’t be so pleased” said Donald.
‘No, you needn’t be so pleased” added Dexter.
“He will grow up to be just like me,” said Donald with a grim-
ace.
‘Oh he will grow up to be just like me,” said Dexter.
Lucille looked first at one, and then at the other, and shook her
head.
“Oh, no, no. He is very pretty and good.”
‘“We were pretty and good when we were only a day old’”’—they
laughed, and Donald said :
“He'll tease you dreadfully. He’ll put burs in your curls, hide
your doll babies, and fling stones at the doves.”
“Never! never!” cried Lucille looking up to Lucilla on the ap-
ple bough. “ He will love them as I do.”
“Coo,” answered Lucilla, gently.
Just then a little green snake slipped out of the stone wall be
hind the apple tree.
“There’s a snake, let us kill him,” cried Dexter, picking up a
stick. |
‘Oh, no, no, he is so pretty and happy,” pleaded Lucille catch-
ing hold of his arm—“Don’t kill it.”

49



LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

“Well, then, I will let you kill him,” said Donald, winking at
Dexter. And then he got on one side of her and Dexter on the other,
and they assured her that to kill a little snake in. the spring always
brought good luck. Donald said he had killed one, and Dexter had
killed one and this one she ought to kill herself.

Of course, it seemed strange to her, but she was told a great
many things that seemed strange, It might be just as true as that
“crusts will make the hair curl,” for all she knew, but all the same
she shook her head till her curls danced.

‘““Oh no,” she would never kill the snake.

“Then you will have bad luck—Your baby brother will grow
ugly and deformed and sick and wicked,” Donald said, and Dexter ad-
ded :

“Or very likely he will never grow up at all.”

Then they put the stick into poor Lucille’s little hand, and in the
great horror she felt at the picture they drew, and hardly knowing
what she did Lucille ran after the snake that was now gracefully glid-
ing through the grass, and struck it.

“Lucille has killed a snake. Lucille has killed a snake,” shout-
ed Donald and Dexter, and being satisfied with the mischief they had
done, ran away laughing up the lane, and all the world seemed to
echo “ Lucille has killed a snake.”

Only Lucilla was perfectly quiet up in the apple tree.

- And Lucille tried in vain to wake up the little snake and to make
him glide again through the fragrant grass, and to enjoy the beautiful
morning, as she thought it had done before she struck that cruel blow.

“ Oh why had it been so very easy to kill it. So very easy. And

50





LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

why could she not give it back its life? But no, its happy harmless
life was over. It was quite dead, and the collie came and sniffed at it.

“Don’t” sighed Lucille, and burst into tears.

At last needing comfort, and conscious that Lucilla had ceased to
utter her tender love note, she called her; but for the first time the
dove refused to obey her voice. Then Lucille stretched out her hand,
thinking that as usual Lucilla would come rushing down and alight
on it. But instead of that, she fluttered uneasily on her perch and
then flew away.

At night fall when Lucille called the doves for their supper, and
with swift wings they came whirring down, myriads of them, white,
and purple, and twilight grey, one was missing.

Greatly grieving, Lucille sent Adolphus up to the nests, but Lu-
cilla was not there, and she looked and looked for her, and all the
evening she wandered sadly about the place calling:

“Tucilla, Lucilla.”

But there was no answering note. Bitter tears she wept for her’
dear grey dove, and whatever one might say in well-meant consolation
she could only believe that when she struck the poor green snake
she also killed her tender Lucilla. ‘‘ The dove,” she said, “had hid-
den itself and died of a broken heart.”

Lucille buried the little snake under the apple tree, but the dead
body of the dove could not be found. For as much as a week she
could not go near the dovecote ; for she said that she was ashamed to
look the doves in the face, for they knew that she had killed Lucilla.
Indeed, her old delight in her dumb friends was gone. They seemed
to look at her with reproach. The dogs came less willingly when she

51



LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

called, the cats hid under the furniture. If she went into the woods,
the squirrels scolded her from the tree tops. The birds flew away at
her approach. ;

But if this were really so and not the child’s foolish fancy, there
was consolation in the society of Boy baby. He, at least, looked at
her with no reproach in his glance. Lucille was the first person he
ever noticed, holding out his little wavering arms to her the moment
he caught sight of her yellow curls. He grew in beauty like the rose.
His complexion changed from red to white, his little head was covered
with rings of gold, and his eyes became big and blue. Having noth-
ing else to do he grew, and grew, and grew—handsome, healthy and
good. 3

So a year passed. It was the baby’s first birthday, and Lucille
was sitting on the porch to enjoy the morning which was as lovely as
that one on which she had killed the snake. To make amends for
this cruel act she meant to teach Baby boy to be kind to all living’
creatures, and it seemed to her that already he had a natural
love for them in his little heart. She knew he would always love the
dogs, the horses, and the birds; but she feared that when he was as
big as Donald and Dexter, he might fling stones at the frogs, and kill
harmless snakes.

Presently, nurse brought Baby boy onto the porch for Lucille to
amuse for a while. He had on a big hat with rosettes over the ears,
and he kept pointing with his little fat fore finger toward the fields.

Lucille took his hand and walked with him up and down in front
of the porch; but that was not what Baby boy meant at all. He had
investigated everything on the gravel walk many times, and he want-

52









“ He kept pointing toward the fields.”’











LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.



ed to go off to the great Faraway. So Lucille started with him fora
little journey in the world. They did not go very fast for every few
steps Baby boy, who was walking independently by himself, sat down
_unexpectedly in the grass. Then he would look up with great sur-
prised and indignant eyes at Lucille, and just as she would think he
was going to cry he would begin to gurgle and laugh. And then he
must pick every flower that he saw and look at every bird or bee or
insect that crossed his path, so that it was a long time before they
reached the orchard; and before going on they sat down upon the edge
of it to rest.

And now who should come upon the scene but those mischievous
urchins who a year ago had caused so much trouble.

They had found a poor little woodcock that had been shot. One
wing was gone so that though, when they put it on the ground, it
could hop about it could not fly away.

Donald said that they were going to have some fun with it, and
knowing very well what that would mean to the woodcock, Lucille
begged them to give it to her, and in her pity, followed them a long
way offering first one and then another among her treasures in ex-
change for the bird. And when having at Jast got possession of it
and set it free in the woods, she returned to the spot where she had
left Baby boy, he was no where to be seen.

Frantic with fear, she ran hither and thither, seeking him in im-
possible places, and calling his name as loud as she could. She was
answered only by the soft coo of a dove in the old apple tree by the

stone wall.
It was Lucilla.

Jo



LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

Rushing forward, she beheld beneath the tree, the little figure of
Baby boy creeping through the grass and laughing with delight over
a new and strange play fellow.

Lucille stooping down beside him saw that it was a tiny green |

snake.

56













DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.











DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

LMOST everybody in Bay View knew Daisy Dalrymple and
Bruno. In fact it was impossible to’ know one without knowing

the other; for they were always together.
Daisy was a lily of a girl with white skin and fair hair, but her
eyes were a soft brown. ‘Though she looked so gentle, she was a

lively sprite, and if any mischief were going on she liked to have a
hand in it.

Bruno was of the opinion that without himself for a protector,
Daisy would speedily come to some bad end and therefore he never
dared leave her very long at a time. ,

Bruno of course was a dog, a huge, handsome mastiff with a
fine head and real doggy eyes, soft, faithful, and pathetic with the
thoughts that he longed in vain to share with his human friends. His
silky coat can best be described as a tawny grey, a lovely color, and
he stood nine hands high. But Bruno was even more remarkable
for his intelligence than for his beauty. There was noend to the
tales his friends told of his wonderful doings by which it appeared
that he was a dog of far more than ordinary sagacity. Although his

61

*4



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.



disposition was winning and sweet, and he had hosts of friends, he
was not a dog to be trampled on, and above all he was not a dog to
allow any one to trample upon Daisy Dalrymple.

One morning Daisy was walking up and down the garden path
with Bruno at her heels. It was in the spring and the daffodils were
in blossom and the shrubs were covered with masses of white or red
or yellow flowers. As Daisy walked she sang snatches of songs,
sentimental love lorn, old fashioned songs mostly that Miss Evange-
line Miller had taught her and which were droll enough as coming
from her childish lips.

At one moment it would be:

“The weary day to me
Goes sad and mournfully
And when the night comes darkly deep
No joy, no joy it brings,
But sadness on its wings,
No balmy sleep, Alone I weep.”
Then again the red lips would trail out yet more dismally :
“While hollow burst the rushing winds,
And heavy beats the shower,
This anxious aching bosom finds
No comfort in its power.
For ah my love it little knows
What thy hard fate may be,
What bitter storm of fortune blows,
What tempests trouble thee.
62

















_ DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

But whatsoe’er may be our doom,
The lot is cast for me bee

For in the world, or in the tomb
My heart is fix’d on thee.”

Or, sometimes the words would be:

‘Be hushed, be hushed, ye bitter winds!
Ye pelting rains, a little rest;

Lie still, lie still, ye busy thoughts
That wring with grief my aching breast.

Oh! cruel was my faithless love,
To triumph o’er an artless maid ;

Oh! cruel was my faithles love,
To leave the girl by him betrayed.”

On the outside of the fence the people were tripping along the
pavement to the ferry, and hearing the love-sick songs would look
over and smile at little Daisy Dalrymple, who was the merriest of
mortal children and perhaps some one would say:

“Well now Daisy. Is it so bad with you as that then? If I
were a pretty girl like you, I would’nt wear the willow for any man.”

Then Daisy would explain that she hadn’t any lover at all, and
didn’t want any she was sure, since they seemed to make one so very
uncomfortable, so the listener on the other side of the fence would
pretend to look relieved and pass on.

Sometimes some intimate friend would ask her for a flower or a

65



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

kiss, and sometimes a little girl or boy would stop to tell her some im-
portant bit of news such as that there were two girls and a boy in the
family that was going to move into the new house on Sycamore street ;
or that Jerry Watterson had stopped going to the kindergarten and was
coming to school; or that Jack Barker’s father had bought him a new
bicycle.

While the conversation was going on, Bruno always stood by
Daisy’s side with his watchful eyes on her companion. He had of
course his own preferences among Daisy’s friends-and thought it no
more than honest to let a _person know just how much regard he had
for him—for alas! he was no diplomat.

Among Daisy’s friends there were none Bruno approved of so
highly as a certain young gentleman who was an old and ardent ad-
mirer of hers.

He was a tall and handsome youth with a wonderfully pleasant
voice and a twinkle in his blue eyes. On his way to the ferry he
stopped every pleasant morning for a word with Daisy Dalrymple, and
Daisy would always enquire with a great deal of interest if business
was getting better, or if he had had any luck.

For he had started in his profession that year, and was a young
lawyer without any clients.

_ Daisy had heard her father say that he didn’t believe John Lor-
ton had made ten dollars the whole year; but as an absolute fact he
hadn’t made ten cents. In truth the young fellow made no secret of
his bad luck, but joked continually over his want of success, and no
one but Daisy and Bruno suspected his real discouragement.

A law suit had been brought against a neighbor of the Dal-

66



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

rymples that winter, and Daisy had hoped that Mr. Whitlaw would
put his case into Lorton’s hands. She had teased her father into pro-
posing it to him, but Mr. Whitlaw had replied, that John Lorton was
young and inexperienced and nobody knew how he would manage a
case, and so he gave it toanother lawyer who had already made some
reputation, and as John said, “ could earn enough to pay his car fares
to and from his office.”

Then there had been a neighbor’s quarrel that year between the
Porters and the Andersons, the Andersons complaining that the
Porter children were always playing on their lawn and Mr. Anderson
had threatened to take the matter into court. Daisy had pricked up.
her ears at this report thinking that this might be an opportunity for
John, but Mr. Anderson was after all a peacable sort of man, “ born
to be trampled and spit upon,” as Daisy Dalrymple said and would
not take legal proceedings.

As young Lawton came down the street that pleasant May morn-
ing, he could not go by without a word with Daisy and also a word
- with Bruno, who performed his great feat of shaking hands between
the pickets of the fence with a great wagging and waving of his tail.
His method of accosting such as displeased his fancy being one gruff
growl of disapproval and glance of hostility through the apertures of
the fence.

It was in this way he greeted Master Howard Kimball and to tell
the truth Daisy never welcomed him much more warmly, for he was
the sort of boy that found pleasure in the misery of others, and a lit-
tle girl and a dumb dog often served him for victims. In truth there
had been a long-standing grudge between these parties which Bruno

67



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.



often longed to square off.

On the day of Daisy’s lawn party the boy had squeezed him into
his little sister Nell’s old gown tying her little white sun-bonnet over
his head. Bruno had too much good sense to show himself in this
ignominious costume and hid himself behind the barn, but Howard
had no notion of seeing his mean trick so defeated, and armed witha
stick went to look for him, and Bruno’s first appearance on the scene
was in chasing his tormentor screaming wildly over the lawn, where
the gay party was assembled so the ignominy was shared equally be-
tween them.

This is a mere sample of the way hostilities were conducted, and
the minds of all three were hot for revenge.

John Lorton came down the street humming a pleasant air, the
sky was not more serene than his own blue eyes and he seemed as
blithe as the beautiful May morning.

‘““How is the distressed fair one this ORME? ” he asked on
seeing Daisy whose fair head was thrown back while she sang:

‘For cold and dead he lies,
And far in yonder skies
The joys that once were mine now dwell,
My grief, my grief is vain.
Tl see him nee’r again,
I may not quell my bosom’s swell,

I may not quell my bosom’s swell.”

‘Oh, I am as merry as a grigg this lovely day,” said Daisy.
“How is business ?”

68



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG. |



“Why,” said John,” “Iam as busy as I can be from morning till
night, busy trying to think of something to do. If this rush goes on
I shall give up the law and perhaps drive the baker’s cart. I had an
opportunity to do that the other day.”

John’s face wore still its humorous expression, but Daisy’s was
clouded with gloom. She was thinking how she had scorned the pre-
dictions of the ill-disposed that John Lorton would never succeed
in the law.

“And to think you have never had one case yet,” she said dis-
mally, ‘to show them what a good lawyer you would be.”

‘Never mind, never mind,” replied John, “ advantages bring ter-
rible responsibilities. If I only had the longed-for opportunity, I should
be under the necessity of proving what a clever fellow I am, and that’s
often uncommonly inconvenient, and just think too how free from
carking care is the baker’s boy. I say, Daisy dear, would you be too
proud to ride in the baker’s cart with me?” |

“Why no,” answered Daisy, her brown eyes looking dreamily
into the distance. “I am very fond of chocolate cake and I could
have plenty of it then.” And so the bad news was treated as a joke.

Just as John was starting off he drew two tickets from his pocket,

and asked her if she would like to go to the dog show.
; Daisy did not understand how it was that John never had any
business. He had always tickets or some trifle to give away. ‘The
truth was that John was very popular and people were always glad to
give him anything but cases, which was what he most wanted.

“Of course I should be delighted to go,” answered Daisy, shield-
ing her lips from Bruno’s searching eyes.

69



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

‘Oh dear, how stupid of me to speak before him,” said John, un-
derstanding the movement at once. ‘‘ Of course Bruno will be wild
to go too.”

“Yes, he knows every thing, every thing,” said Daisy, “and I
do so hate to deceive him, but Mamma would never go if Bruno is
with us and he must be left behind.”

She uttered these last words in John’s ear and hoped that for
once Bruno’s suspicions had not been aroused.

John returned home having left it at that time to give the tickets
to Daisy. Shortly after he left her, her mother came into the garden
and after much coaxing, Bruno was decoyed into the shed.

Any dog would enjoy a promenade with so charming a lady and
so pretty a child. Bruno honestly believed that Mrs. Dalrymple was
the belle of the town, and as for Daisy there could not be two opinions
about her. They walked on hard-heartedly while Bruno watched
them with his mournful brown eyes from the window of the shed.

They walked down Centre street from which point they would
turn either to the right or to the left—to the right if they wanted to
take the train to the city, to the left if they were to cross the ferry.
As a matter ef fact they went by the train.

In five minutes after their departure Bruno succeeded in making
his escape from the shed. The clever ‘dog waited until there were no
longer footsteps near his prison house, then he calmly raised the
latch of the door with his nose and stepped boldly out. He cast a
look of supreme pity at Susan who was hanging out the clothes, and
_ who had said in answer to Daisy’s inquiries:

‘“Law no, Miss, no need of tying him for no dog could ever get

70



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.



out of that place.’

Then he, too, went down Centre street. At the turning point
he hesitated justfor an instant, then tore down the street that led
to the station. He was just a moment too late, and experienced that
sense of exasperation induced in man or dog by the spectacle of his
train just puffing off in the distance.

In a moment he had turned around and was running at full
speed in the direction of the ferry remembering there was stilla
chance left. Unlucky Bruno! The boat was just moving off. He
sprang to catch it and by a splendid feat clung for a moment with
his fore paws onto the deck and his hind ones on the side of the boat.

A shout went up from the passengers, most of whom knew the
dog.

‘Oh, ho! Little Mistress Daisy must be on the boat,” said one
of them, “and I’ll trust the dog not to be left behind.”

“He is a splendid brute,” said another. ‘Did you ever hear
how, when the Dalrymples came here from St. Paul, this same dog,
then a little pup, and had been given toa neighbor before starting,
followed them, how no one knows, but no doubt stealing many a ride
on the trains, for he reached here in time to partake of the first fam-
ily breakfast?”

‘“‘T never heard that,” said a short stout red faced man, “‘ but I re-
member how it was by his sagacity that those sly burglars who gave
the police so much trouble last autumn were eventually captured. I
also remember,” and here the little red faced man’s voice began to get
husky, “how he succeeded in rescuing two little kids that contrived
to fall off the landing at places some two hundred feet distant from

71



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

each other. And gentlemen, one of those little kids was my kid,”
added the red faced man with an air of importance as if the rescue of
his kid was a much more heroic achievement than the rescue of any
other child.

“He is a brave dog,” exclaimed another man who had seemed to
be reading a newspaper. ‘‘OnceI saw him successfully defending
his little mestress against five young scamps; who were determined to
have Miss Daisy’s hat for a foot-ball.”

“Poh! poh! What a fuss over a cur!” said an individual who

‘happened to be the father of that malicious little imp, Howard Kim-
ball; and he got up in disgust and walked to the other end of the
boat. :

Bruno meanwhile had scrambled to a place of safety, but only to
» be met by his old enemy Howard, with hate in his heart and his
father’s cane in his hand, a combination fatal to Bruno.

In a lively skirmish Howard succeeded in pushing the dog off
the deck of the boat. He fell plump into the water, and disappeared
from view but immediately reappeared and pursued the boat.

It must be remembered that owing to Howard’s attack upon him
Bruno had not had an opportunity to look for Daisy, for which reason
he continued to follow the boat instead of going back to the landing.

He was a big dog, and being powerful, made rapid progress
through the water.

The sailors who had watched the adventure being his friends—
for he often went in the boat with his mistress—threw him a rope, and
helped him on board.

Howard having disappeared during the loud hurrahs sent up by

74













DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

the passengers, Bruno now took the opportunity to make a search for
Daisy.

But neither fore or aft, on deck or in the cabin was she to be
found. His plan, although no one knew it, was to stay on board un-
til Daisy, or at least Mr. Dalrymple who always went home by the
ferry, should return.

Bruno roamed disconsolately around the boat, consenting to allow
his head to be patted by many a condescending hand, and at last flung
himself down with a sigh at the feet of John Lorton who had watched
the proceedings with an interested eye.

Bruno was asleep and dreaming that he was chasing Daisy
through the streets of the city. Now and then his paws would twitch
and he would pant in the excitement of the chase.

At length on a crowded street he caught sight of the object of his
search. He ran this way and that in his frantic fear of losing her
again. :

With straining sinews he sped on until stopped by a boy who
obstructed the way with a.cane. Let him leap as high as he would
he could not jump over that barrier.

Suddenly he was conscious of numbers of voices around him, and
the sound of a child screaming and some one seizing him by the col-
lar and saying: ‘He is a vicious brute and not a safe dog to be at
large.” ‘Then slowly he realized that he had jumped up and bitten
Howard who had been tormenting him in his sleep with his father’s
cane. ;

“He is a noble animal,” said John Lorton in whose voice was
more anger than usual, “and I doubt if your son is much hurt.”

75



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

‘“T leave it to these gentlemen who are fathers,” said Mr. Kim-
ball, “whether they wish their children left tothe mercy of such a
dog.”

Alas! public opinion is always fickle. ‘These gentlemen ” eyed
poor Bruno somewhat dubiously, standing with his tail between his
legs and conscious that he was under a ban. He slunk away and
hid himself knowing the boat was nearing the landing.

Mr. Kimball examined his son’s wound while the other passen-
gers buttoned up their overcoats in readiness to go on shore.

Bruno spent the rest of the day monotonously crossing from
shore to shore in the ferry-boat, finally going home with his master.

Having passed the day pleasantly in town, Daisy and her mother
returned as they had gone, by train.

Being fond of dogs, Daisy was enthusiastic over the dog show,
but she declarad there was not an animal there that for wisdom and
beauty could compare with their Bruno.

During the subsequent shopping expedition she followed a cus-
tom which her mother often practiced when Daisy herself was left at
home and bought a little present for him, a gorgeous yellow satin
bow to be tied on his collar, for which she knew in her secret heart he
would not care a whit, but she knew also that it would show finely on
his silky coat.

In the evening John Lorton dropped in at the Dalrymples and
reported what had taken place on the boat. He said Mr. Kim-
ball had behaved like an idiot, that he talked rank heresy about the
dog and made a muff of his son.

“ He has spoiled his boy until he has not a virtue left save his

76



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.



pretty Fauntleroy suits. They are very pretty but they do not make
one forget the expression of his face which is that of a spoiled and
spiteful child.”

John further said that Mr. Kimball had nursed his indignation
until it was very lively and hot. There were rumors about the town
that he meant to take the matter into court. Herepresented Howard’s
injuries that were on his leg as of a very serious character, but
the boy had been seen playing hop-scotch that day without any dif-
ficulty, although when he found himself observed he stopped at once
and went limping home.

Mr. Kimball had been heard to say many times that the dog
ought tobe killed, but he. had had no medical advice except Dr.
Saunders, the boy’s grandfather.

“Well,” said Mr. Dalrymple turning red, “let him take it to
court. I can fight it as long as he can.” :

“Poh!” exclaimed Daisy, ‘‘ every body knows it would be a sin‘
to shoot Bruno. It was not his fault but Howard’s, and besides

_Bruno’s life is valuable and Howard’s is not, and I guess if all his
good deeds were put against Howard’s he would be let off quick
enough,” and she went on, “I hope and pray he will carry it into
court and we will have Mr. John for our lawyer, and then everybody
will see what a good lawyer Mr. John is and what a good dog Bruno
is. He shall wear his new yellow satin bow and make a great sensa-
tion.”
‘Bless my soul, child, bless my soul,” said Mr. Dalrymple when .
John had gone. “If that idiot of a Kimball does carry the matter into
court I’ll take your advice, Daisy, and put the case into John’s hands.”

77

5



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DQG.

“Much to his surprise, however, Mr. Kimball did carry the mat-
ter into court. He was an irascible little man and had argued him-
self into the belief that he had justice on his side. He refused to see
that Howard had been at all in fault, and loudly and angrily de-
clared that poor Bruno was a ferocious beast whose savage humor was
a constant menace to the children of the neighborhood.

Alas, poor Bruno! the faithful guardian of little children and be-
loved by all-the babies. Somehow he seemed to know that danger of
some sort threatened him. He would go from one to another and
nestle his nose in their lap, and seemed to say:

“You know what a worthy creature I am, and have not deserved
such obloquy. But I have plenty of friends, haven’t I? And there is
no need of worrying.”

The thought would sometimes steal into Daisy’s mind, that per-
haps there was something to worry about. It had been explained to
her just how Bruno’s trial would be carried on, for so strong was his
personality that it was always called Bruno’s case rather than Mr.
Dalrymple’s.

But Bruno’s lawyer assured her of success. “‘ You just wait now,”
he said in consolation to Daisy, ‘and you will see what a good charac-
ter people will give him. Besides to despair shows little confidence
in me in whose ability you have always professed to have so much
faith.”

But then it was always John Lorton’s nature to look hopefully at
things, and it was true that Bruno had bitten his adversary.

But the suspense of long waiting was not added to their troubles,

The case was called for trial during the last of May, about two

78



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.



weeks after Bruno had turned on his persecutor. The weather was
warm as summer and brought the leaves on the trees well forward. The
apple trees were like large bouquets of blossoms, and the earth was
at its loveliest.

The thought of Bruno’s possible sentence was especially sad to
soft-hearted Daisy. ‘The forfeit of a life could be more easily paid
on some dull churlish day,” she thought. She would throw her arms
around his neck and tell him there were not half a.dozen men in the
town whose lives would in beauty equal his own; and she was not far
wrong, for faithful love and unconquerable loyalty, for dauntless
courage and unpretending self-sacrifice Bruno would bear comparison
with many human heroes.

As has been said, the trial took place in the last week of May—
‘to be accurate, it was on the last day of the month. Bruno’s party set |
forth with all the’courage given by a righteous cause.

Mr. Kimball was very much in earnest in this matter and had
secured the services of one of the most prominent lawyers of the
_ neighboring city. As an actual fact he was of such repute that, as an
antagonist, it brought poor unknown John Lorton into what he him-
self designated a ridiculous prominence. Nevertheless John did not
think he should lose his nerve. \

He had secured a large number of witnesses. First on the list
were Mr. Dalrymple and Daisy. Then there were the gentlemen who
had spoken in Bruno’s favor on the boat, a tall maiden lady with a
bird of paradise on her hat, and many others.

Mr. Kimball on his part had but a few witnesses and these with
the exception of Howard and Dr. Saunders looked as if they had come

79



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

more for love of fifty cents than from love of acause. Howard was
of course present in his prettiest Fauntleroy suit, the appearance of
which was much marred by the conspicuous bandages on his leg.

The trouble had excited.a great deal of interest in the neighbor-
hood and the court room was unusually crowded.

After the case had been called by the clerk, the witnesses were

seated and Mr. Kimball’s attorney began his opening speech, when
an unsummoned witness suddenly appeared and after calmly looking
around the court room took a seat beside Daisy Dalrymple. He was
a magnificent brute, with affectionate eyes, that is when looking at
certain persons, the little maiden at his side for instance, and with a
stupendous yellow satin bow rakishly arranged under one ear.
‘There was a broad smile on most faces and a soft clapping of
hands. ‘Then Mr. Kimball leaned over and whispered something to
his lawyer who immediately objected to the appearance of the dog in
the court room. But John Lorton instantly arose declaring that the
dog, being the cause of the litigation his presence was necessary, for
he saw at once that Bruno was not a dog to injure his own case.

The judge it so happened was a great lover of dogs—and who
that loves dogs would not love Bruno?—and Bruno, having listened
politely to the speech of the other side, now rolled his eyes over to
the bench as if to say: “ Now for a sensible decision from the judge,”
which no doubt had its effect on that dignitary, for he immediately
said with a slight bow:

“The objection of the plaintiff is overruled.” So John Lorton
had scored his first triumph.

The trial went on after the usual manner, the chief interest be-

80



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

ing the absurdly appropriate conduct of the dog. Mr. Kimball was
the first to take the witness stand, and he labored long to prove how
great were the injuries the dog had inflicted on his son, after which
Dr. Saunders corroborated all that he had said.

John Lorton here interposed that the witness was the child’s
grandfather and suggested that, the boy being in court, they should
have ocular proof of these terrible injuries they had heard so much of.

At this point Bruno’s tail was heard to thump the floor. He un-
doubtedly approved of John’s suggestion. The spectators who had
been watching the dog with admiration laughed audibly.

Mr. Bryant, Mr. Kimball’s lawyer, then, called Howard to the
stand. It must be confessed he looked rather picturesque and made
a favorable impression. On his cross-examination, notwithstanding
the constant interruption of Mr. Bryant, John Lorton drew from him
the admission that he had been tormenting the dog at the time he was
bitten, and also that on leaving the boat he had been able to walk
from the ferry boat up to the place where ‘the circus tents were
pitched.

“IT suppose your pleasure was entirely spoiled by your physical
sufferings—by the bite on your leg, you know,” suggested John.

“Oh yes, you’d better believe it,” answered Howard emphatically.

Here the opposing lawyer interposed, objecting that these re-
-marks were beside the question, but after some sparring between the
attorneys the cross-examination was allowed to go on.

“Was the clown a good one?” asked John innocently.

“Oh! just ripping,” replied Howard enthusiastically.

“You did not feel the acute pain in your leg perhaps at that

8I



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.



time,” said John with a significant smile. And Bruno gave two de-
lighted yaps, or at Jeast they sounded so.

“Did you come out before the performance was over ?”’ continued
John.

“No,” answered Howard with a hang-dog air.

‘“T think, Your Honor,” said John addressing the Judge, “I must
ask that this witness be required to show to the jury the injuries he
claims the dog has inflicted on him.”

“Oh!” cried Howard, who was certainly a chip of the old block,
“Tt will hurt me to have the bandages taken off. I won’t! I can’t!”

At the request of Mr. Bryant, Howard was temporarily dismissed
_ from the witness box, and Dr. Saunders recalled. Whereupon Bruno
cocked up one ear, Mr. Kimball rubbed his hands and smiled blandly,
while Dr. Saunders in rather a hesitating way, took the stand.

Me was an old gentleman, and he looked at his son-in-law, How-
ard’s papa, in an appealing sort of way, as if he were afraid more was
going to be demanded of him than he felt disposed to admit. How-
ever, he testified that his grand-son’s injuries were of a serious char-
acter and that the dog was dangerous to the community and ought to
be shot.

The attention of all was now again drawn to the accused, who
feeling himself the centre of attraction turned his head, and put on
that air of sublime indifference which dogs sometimes assume.

“Ts it your opinion, Doctor, that it would injure the boy to have
the bandages herewith removed ?” asked John.

“Decidedly,” the doctor promptly responded, and this witness
was then dismissed.

82



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.



The witnesses that were to prove the good character of the dog
were next called. The testimony of such of them as had been on the
boat proved that the boy had badgered Bruno into biting him, and
that the punishment was no more than the boy deserved. Each was
eager to give the dog a good character.

The first witness was Mr. Greene, who related the incident of
Bruno’s saving the children who had fallen from the landing into the
bay. But Mr. Greene’s sympathies had been so excited by the grief
of Daisy, as well as by the critical situation of Bruno, that although
the main facts did not differ it seemed like another tale.

He was very dramatic, first he described the two little children
sporting on the banks, then how each one came to fall simultaneously
into the water though at a distance of fifteen feet from each other.

His movements were quite infantile and you could almost see the
oddling steps of the little innocents and hear their shouts of baby glee.

He waved his great pudgy red hands with childish grace as he
showed how they tripped over the grass, and you almost held your
breath as they came down to the edge of the water.

Just as vividly could you see their mammas as with pretty ma-
ternal cries they ran after their offspring and wrung their hands as
the little figures dropped into the water. Then like a true hero comes
Bruno to the rescue.

The construction of the human frame forbade Mr. Greene quite
reproducing the exact appearance of Bruno, as with his tongue pro-
truding and ears pricking up, he dashed into the water and succeeded
in dragging both children to the shore. The story created a great
sensation and Bruno was more popular than before.

83



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

The next witness was a tall, lank maiden lady, with a bird of
paradise on her hat.

‘““What is your name?” asked John.

“Evangeline Miller,” answered the lady, with a graceful dip of her
head, which made every feather quiver.

‘Occupation ?”

“ Milliner,” was the reply.

“Did you see Mr. Dalrymple’s dog bite Master Howard Kim-
ball?”

Miss Evangeline turned around for a moment for a glance at
Daisy and answered hesitatingly : |

“Well I don’t know that I can say he bit him.”

“What do I understand you to mean!”

“Well, it looked as if he did,” answered the witness.

“Did you see him tormenting the dog?”

“Certainly I did,” replied Miss Evangeline, without any hesita-
tion at all.

“Or else it looked as if he did,” sneered Mr. Bryant.

Did you try to protect the dog from the boy’s persecutions?”
asked Lorton, resuming his examination.

“Yes, Idid,” replied Miss Evangeline, “and I hid him behind
my dress. But after a while Master Howard came poking along with
his stick and routed him out. Heis always at him. I never saw
any thing like it inmy life. This warn’t any new thing, the little
rascal has had a grudge against hima long time. I can tell you
about that. You see it began by Miss Daisy’s planting my garden with
pansies and violets and some other flowers, and she tended them her-

84



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

self a good deal, knowing I hadn’t much time for it. She worked real
hard on them and I did lot on having them plants blossom.”

Here Mr. Bryant interrupted, strongly objecting to the witness
being allowed to go on with her rigmarole, as he called it, which he
declared was entirely foreign to the case.

But by this time it was clearly evident on which side were the
judge’s sympathies, for again the objection was overruled, and with
another wave of the bird of paradise Miss Evangeline continued.

‘““Well, though some of the plants were already budded, there
were never any blossoms on them, and Daisy and me, we wondered
and wondered what could be the reason of it. At. last one night
when one of the pansies was just ready to burst into flower Miss
Daisy had Bruno tied to the apple tree on the edge of the garden.
‘ There now,’ says she, ‘we'll be likely to find out.’ And we did.

“Tt was in the morning very early that Bruno began to bark,
and instantly I was at the window in time to behold that little
scamp,” motioning to Master Howard, “bending down over my
pansies. Well I couldn’t get out in time to catch him,” said Miss
Evangeline blushing. “ But when I went out tomy plants I found
every bud was stripped off of them. ca

‘“‘ After that Master Howard began to torment Daisy Dalrymple
and when he couldn’t torment her he tormented Bruno, and that’s
the Gospel truth.”

On the whole Miss Evangeline’s testimony had made a favorable
impression for Bruno upon the jury.

Just at this moment the strains of a band of music broke upon
the air, which apparently heralded the approach of a procession of

85



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

some sort, and which caught the ear of Master Howard. Immedi-
ately he climbed over the benches onto the window-sill from which
point he had a view of the street.

The spectators though they had no view of the procession, had
a very distinct one of Master Howard, and a smile went around the
court room, as the fact became evident that in his eager scramble he
had displaced the bandages, the removal of which was supposed to

give him so much pain.
| Miss Evangeline’s testimony having been concluded Lorton
pointed out to the court the obvious fact that a convenient time had
arrived to examine Master Howard’s injuries.

This time Howard’s protestations were of no avail, though he
screamed and kicked and proved himself to have anything but the
temper of an angel.

As he was put upon the stand Daisy Dalrymple broke out into
an audible giggle and Bruno left his place by her side and took
up his position in front of the witness box, held his head on one side
and assumed a most judicial and critical air.

“Well; I declare, I never saw the beat of that dog!” whispered
one of the jurymen slyly to another, he was a kindly old countryman
who was fond of animals. “I like a dog of that breed.”

‘Howard was standing sulkily in the witness box, his leg, from
which the bandages had now been entirely removed, displayed a scar
which bore very insignificant proportion to the bandage. It was evi-
dent that the boy had been bitten but not: seriously. The ae of
testimony was closed.

When Howard had resumed his seat by his father’s side, Bruno

86









‘ Bruno solemnly seated himself on the witness stand.”’











DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.



feeling perhaps that it might be some high place of honor which
he alone had not been invited to occupy solemnly seated himself on the
witness stand. A king of dogs on trial for his life! His aspect was
that of a trusting and loyal friend; it had no meanness in it. There
he sat while the two attorneys made their pleas and when at last the
judge having charged the jury, they filed out to decide his fate.

Then there arose a hum of voices in the good dog’s praise.

‘He’s a blooming friendly dog,” said an old rowdy by the door.
“Tl be blest if he didn’t want to go right along with them jurymen
when they went out. I bet they aren’t going to bring any verdict
against him. Iseen ’em look at him and laugh a hundred times.”

Another man said, and this wasa gentleman, “I’d stake my life
the splendid creature would be the safest playmate any child could
have. If he isn’t killed I’m going totry to buy him.”

The verdict was a foregone conclusion, and was that which the
friends of Bruno desired.

The case brought John Lorton into notice and his luck took a
sudden turn, finally placing him on a high peak of prosperity; but he
always said that his success was entirely due to Bruno.

Bruno took no airs unto himself, he did not presume upon the
good turn he had done his friend, nor expect favors in return. Yet
he appreciated the honors that were paid him, and perhaps vaguely
wondered why his path in life was strewn with so many more roses
than that of any other dog he knew. ;

It has been said that John Lorton always gave Bruno the credit
of all that was fortunate in his career; but the time came when he
basely maintained that what he had always meant was that he owed it

89



DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

to Daisy, who had given him his first case. If Bruno’s feelings were
hurt by this transfer of gratitude from himself to his mistress he never
let it so appear. In fact it would be so uncharacteristic of this high-mind-
ed and unselfish animal that the idea is herewith dismissed with con-
tempt. At all events among Daisy’s suitors he gave preference in the
most decided and unmistakable dog language to John Lorton, and
finally became a happy and honored inmate of his home.

gO















DAVID HICKEY’S CHRISTMAS.









DAVID HICKEY’S CHRISTMAS.

VERY body at the Deaf School called David Hickey a clod.

Miss Brown—the pretty Miss Brown, for there were two of that
name among the corps of teachers—said that he was like all the peo-
ple from that section of Maine, where the Hickey’s lived (She had
spent three weeks there, one summer, camping out in the lumber dis-
trict) and that he was stolid and quite devoid of sensative feeling.

With his rather vacant grey eyes, and his half opened mouth,
and his slow apathetic manner, poor David did not give one the im-
pression of being keenly alive to his own misfortune, or to the sadness
of the necessary separation it caused from his home, which was usual-
ly the case with such children and made it pathetic.

There was one sweet young girl in the school with soft, pleading
brown eyes and sad curved lips, who would look in your face, and say
in the metallic, jerky way of a deaf mute.

“T am deaf, Iam deaf, I cannot hear. Are you sad that I am
deaf?”

- And the tears would gather in her sweet eyes, and in yours also

unless you had a heart of stone.

OD



DAVID HICKEY’S CHRISTMAS.

Then there was a manly boy of David’s age, who in the friendli-
est way would draw up to you, and tell you, by his painfully acquired
speech, and many signs, about his home, and those that he had left
there and all his sorrow at being forced to leave themas he must, if
he were ever to learn to speak and understand the speech of others.

But David did not appeal to one’s sympathy any more than some
stunted plant.

It is not to be supposed that the pretty Miss Brown, or any of
the teachers were unkind to David, but kindness froma sense of duty
is a cold thing, and David must indeed have been a clod if he did not
feel the difference between the teachers’ manner toward himself, and
toward Louis Alden—and the pretty pathetic brown-eyed girl.

It was in the autumn that David had been brought to the deaf
school, and it was already in the early winter. It was within a few
weeks of Christmas.

There was an unusually large number of children at the school
that year, and of course of all sorts and temperaments. Some of
them, because of their misfortune, had been indulged and spoiled by
their friends until they were disagreeable to everyone, and others too,
who had learned that they were to be mere bystanders in the busy
world, some of these were gentle, patient creatures, but by far the
greater part of them had not the temper of the angels, which, taking
everything into consideration is not to be wondered at. One little
girl did nothing but cry, and one of the boys could express his home-
sickness only by kicking and screaming, and another would fly into
a passion at the least hint of opposition. ‘This was the boy, who

96



DAVID HICKEY’S CHRISTMAS,



angry with the pretty Miss Brown, dropped this letter (a love letter
she laughingly called it) into her desk.

‘“Miss Brown—Hate !

Toad, pig, bug, snake.

Hatchet—kill,

Miss Brown very sad,

Glad, glad, glad.”

And since you may not be able to translate this singular com-
position I will put it in plain English for you.

Miss Brown was hateful. She wasa toad, pig, bug, snake, every-
thing he loathed most. He would like to kill her with a hatchet.
Then she would be punished and he would be glad.

But of all the children there was not one so unpopular as David.

Deaf children are not so unlike others that they do not take a joy-
ous interest in Christmas. There was to be a vacation of a week, and
they were going home. All of them except the very little ones were
collecting their gifts. The girl with the brown eyes, had made hers,
dainty little things such as a deft-fingered girl can make. Louis
Alden had bought his with money that he had earned. Beautiful gifts
for his parents and brothers and sisters of whom he talked so much.

There were many opportunities for the boys at the deaf ‘school to
make money. Some of the older ones had regular employment out-
side. One worked for a photographer, one did odd jobs in carpenter-
ing, and they could chop wood, or shovel snow, and sometimes they
were sent on errands by the teachers. But David was not often chosen.
The brighter boys out bid him, and then it was thought that he was

too stupid to know what to do with money.

OF

6*



DAVID HICKEY’S CHRISTMAS.

None of the boys made so much money as Louis, and none
showed such enthusiasm over his preparations for Christmas. One of
his sisters was to be married that year, and Miss Brown had helped
him choose a present for her. It was a silver berry spoon, and very
pretty. He showed all his presents to the other pupils. He showed
them to David who looked a long time at them.

Louis explained that the spoon was real silver, and not like those
that were bought at the ten cent store, and he said that it would be a
an heirloom in his sister’s family.

Some one had told him that, and it pleased him immensely.

He talked continually and with all his happy animation of
manner about those for whom his gifts were bought. The teachers
felt that they almost knew Louis’ friends, and they sympathized with
his fondness for them. :

David alone, seemed to make no preparations. He had never
tried to tell any one of his home, or those that he had left there. Ap-
parently he had felt no sorrow at leaving them, and now had no joy
at the thought of seeing them again.

Yes, he must. be a mere clod—A soulless clod.

The children were to be away a week, but they were not allowed
to carry home their trunks. Most of them came from poor and igno-
rant families that did not appreciate the advantage of the school train-
ing, and if the children did not wish to return would not oblige them
todo so. So the trunks were held back.

When the pupils were ready for their trains, David came into the
room of the principal where the teachers were assembled to carry lit-
tle squads of children to the stations. He carried the big valise that

98



Sead

so












Full Text




BY Vis

Lop YAPTOS yy.

DE WOLFE: FISKE ~&sea.
BOSTON.









GERALD AND GERALDINE.

AND OTHER STORIES.

BY
A. G. PLYMPTON,
AUTHOR OF

“DEAR DAUGHTER DorROTHY,” WANOLASSET,”’ Etc., ETC.

BOSTON :
DE WOLFE, FISKE & CO.,
361 & 365 WASHINGTON STREET.
COPYRIGHTED 1898.
BY DE WOLFE, FISKE & CO.
BOSTON, MASS.

PRESS OF
NIAGARA LITHOGRAPH CO.
BUFFALO, N. Y.
TABLE OF CONTENTS.

GERALD AND GERALDINE,
LUCILLE AND LUCILLA,
Daisy DALRYMPLE’S Doe,
Davin HIcKEY’s CHRISTMAS,
QUEEN ISABELLA,

PAGE.
15
43
61

99
IE



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE.

GERALDINE SINGING THE EASTER ARIA (Colored) Frontispiece.
J) Pp
“SHE Hap DoLits WitHoutT NuMBER” (Colored), . : 25
“GERALD OPENED HIS MOUTH AND GERALDINE PEERED
IONARO) ION : : : ‘ : . : : 29
“TUCILLE WITH THE DOVES CIRCLING ABOUT HER HEAD”
(Colored), : : : : : : é AS
“HE KEPT POINTING TOWARD THE FIELDS,” . : 53
Daisy DALRYMPLE AND Bruno (Colored), . : : : 63
HowarD KIMBALL TORMENTING THE DOG WITH HIS
FATHER’S CANE (Colored), : : : Mae 78
“BRUNO SOLEMNLY SEATED HIMSELF ON THE WITNESS
STAND,” : : : : : ; : é : 87
“IN A SHAME-FACED WAY HE OPENED THE BOX” (Colored), 99:
“THE MOST POPULAR BOY IN THE DEAF SCHOOL,” : 105,
“SHE HAD THE LATEST IMPROVEMENT IN WHEELS,” . : 113

“SHE WAS HUSTLED INTO THE WAGON, HER WHEEL
WITH HER,” : . : : : : ; : Tees



seeegh





GERALD AND GERALDINE.





GERALD AND GERALDINE.

ERALD and Geraldine, or Gerry and Dino as they were called,

had been standing by the window of Mrs. Blaney’s little
parlor for more than an hour eagerly watching the passers by. Each
time they saw a man’s figure approaching they would cry:

“Here he is! Here he is! Surely this is our uncle at last.”

And then as the gentleman passed on, they would look after him
and say with derision: |

‘Pooh, our uncle is a far nicer and handsomer gentleman.”’

They were twins, and if they kept their eye-lids down, and if
Dino smoothed her red-gold locks, and Gerry ran his hands through
his, one face answered to the other like its image in the glass. But
let the eyes be seen, and all likeness seemed to vanish in an instant,
for Gerald looked at you with appealing, gentle, almost seraphic, blue
ones, with an expression that made you hope the world would not use
the little lad ill, while Geraldine gave you a mocking glance out of
her fearless black eyes, and you could not help laughing and think-
ing that she would be fully able to take care of herself.

The poor little things, it must be confessed, at ten years of age had

19)
GERALD AND GERALDINE.



seen a good deal of the world. When two years old, as newly made
orphans, they had been brought from London to their mother’s father,
who was a clergyman with a large parish in Chicago. When he died,
which happened three years later, they were passed on to an aunt, a
fashionable lady of New York, who perhaps was none too well pleased
at the course of events that left two young children to her care. But
she did the best she could for them according to her light, until she
married a rich but ill-tempered man, who made her give up the very
obvious duty of caring for them.

And then ? well then, the little creatures were put in the care of a
person who, for so much a week, undertook to stand in the place of a
mother to them. She was a widow and childless, and there was a
chance that at last the twins might find themselves in justsuch a niche
as they were made for, but they had occupied it hardly a twelve month,
when “circumstances arose” which compelled the widow “to give up
the dear children,” the circumstances being a legacy that made life
possible to her without any effort on her own part to increase her
income.

And now they were waiting for the appearance of their uncle,
their father’s brother, who having been - notified of the forlorn situa-
tion of his brother’s children, was coming to carry them away to his
own home. They had never seen him or any of their father’s
relatives, and were anxious to know what he would be like.

“T think he will be big and fat, with a real red, jolly face, and a
loud laugh, and just plum full of stories,” said Gerry. “ He will like you
best, but he’ll like me too, I dare say.”

“You are thinking of the man we saw in the park,” said

16
GERALD AND GERALDINE.

Geraldine. “Ohno! he won’t be that kind of a man. I dare say
he’ll be thin and have dispepsia, like Uncle Harold, but I hope he
won't, for that is the worst kind; and I think you are wrong, Gerald,
about one thing. I think he will like you best. Its your turn you
know.

In truth the children had noticed in their divers guardians, that
one of them was sure to be preferred to the other, and for that reason
they had been constantly in danger of being separated. Gerald had
been his grandfather’s favorite, and he had sometimes talked of send-
ing Gerldine to theaunt. When, after his death, they both went toher,
she had fancied the little girl the more, and had thought of sending

“the boy to boarding school, and once when the widow Mrs. Blaney,
had been angry with Dino, she had declared that she would never
part with her brother, but that their aunt would be forced to find some
one else to take care of her. Yet these threats had never resulted
in anything, and the twins had never been separated a whole day in
their lives. :

In spite of their vicissitudes, they were happy, healthy, and
courageous children, being, as it seemed, not in the least discouraged
by the way the world had usedthem. Nothing had seemed to shake
their childish trust in others, and they met.every one as a new friend.

The uncle had written to Mrs. Blaney that he would come for the
twins at eleven o’clock on a certain a The day and hour had
come, but the uncle tarried.

“Tor,” said the widow, “I doubt if he turns up at all. What on
earth should he want of two young ones? Mark my words, he'll
wriggle out of it. Its twelve o’clock already.”

te
GERALD AND GERALDINE.



“ He’s wriggling in it now,” said Geraldine, ‘“‘at least I’spose so.”

There was certainly some one coming up the outside steps. Some |
one with a great shock of iron-gray hair that bushed out under a soft
hat. Some one with piercing dark eyes, and a strange, foreign face,
which at the present moment wore an unmistakable frown.

“Oh Gerry!” whispered Dino, “do you think that is our uncle?”

There was a sharp ring at the bell, and through the open door
the children heard a voice ask :

“Does Mrs. Blaney lif here?”

The twins looked at each other, “well to be sure,’ they said.
“Yes, that’s our uncle.”

For suddenly they remembered something that they had once
heard—that their father was German, and that their mother’s family
had objected to him on that account. They had never half believed
it, but now they saw that it was true.

Geraldine took the card that the little maid servant brought in
and read: .

“Mr. Otto Kaufmann.”

The new comer entered the room in a hurried manner. He said
he had been delayed, and that there was now but twenty minutes to
get to the depot, where he was to take the train.

There was no time to make acquaintance, and in an incredibly
few moments the children were ready, (Mrs. Blaney would not have
had them left any longer on her hands for anything under the sun,) .
and were seated opposite the uncle in the carriage.

But the danger of being too late made any conversation impos-
sible, for Uncle Otto sat with his watch in one hand and the other on

18
GERALD AND GERALDINE.

the knob of the door, ready to spring out the moment that they
reached the station. The children sat close together delighting in
the hurry and excitement. They felt that there was plenty of time in
the future for making acquaintance. The little party reached the
train at just the last moment. Gerald climbing in like the agile
monkey that he was, and the uncle steadying Miss Geraldine.

The cars were crowded, Gerry sat with a fat woman with a baby,
Dino with an old Jew who slept peacefully behind a newspaper, and
Uncle Otto went into the smoking car. At last the two children had
a seat together, but although there was now room enough, Uncle
Otto did not come back into their car, and at the end of the journey
they felt that they knew him no better than at the start.
street just beyond a church, there



Somewhere in the vicinity of
is—or at least there was a few years ago—an iron gate with a brass
plate upon it bearing the inscription,

“Otto Kaufmann, Choir-master of the Church of St John ‘the
Evangelist and Teacher of the Organ and Piano-forto.”

Behind the gate was a small house, remodelled from a stable,
having below, one great apartment, used as a music room, parlor, and
sometimes even dining room and kitchen, while the second story was
divided into four sleeping rooms. ‘This was the twins’ new home.

It was a strange life, sure enough, for these mites, for Mr. Otto
Kaufmann’s little house was frequented by all sorts and conditions of
people. He was fashionable, and ladies in their carriages came to
beg him to come to their entertainments, for he had composed an
opera which had been a success, and he was looked npon as a celeb-
rity. And young women tra-la-la’d in the room down stairs, where

19
GERALD AND GERALDINE.

he gave his lessons ; in the evening musicians and artists of all sorts
were always running in, and it was music, music, music all day and
pretty nearly all night. There was an old woman who came in every
day to put the house in order, but their meals were sent in from a
caterer’s, except when, as sometimes happened, Uncle Otto took a
turn himself at cooking in which he always scored a great success, as
he did in everything else.

Geraldine thought that on account of her sex, she ought to have
a hand in these operations, but her uncle used to wave her away, with
a smile and a flowery speech that she did not know what to make. of,
for though it sounded polite, she seemed to feel that there was some-
thing that was not so behind it.

“De ladies, my dear, like leedle dolls must do noding,” he would
say, and Dino would shrink away abashed.

It had been plain from the first that Uncle Otto was not quite
pleased with Geraldine, not that he was not always kind and generous
to her—oh! dear, no—but his manner was so different from his man-
ner to Gerald. He was a quiet man, but he would draw the little
fellow on his knee and talk with him for hours. He would tell him
about his father, and how as boys they had loved each other, and
many a story he told him too of Germany, his fatherland. But it

‘seemed to Geraldine that if she drew near and dared take a place by
his side, his tongue lagged and after a while he would remind himself
of some appointment and go away.

What pride and joy he had when he first heard Gerald sing. It
was an old Christmas anthem that he had learned long ago, achildish
thing that they used to sing at school:

20
GERALD AND GERALDINE.

‘We three kings of Orient are,

Bearing gifts, we come from afar,

By field and fountain, moor and mountain,
Following yonder star ;”

But Gerald’s voice was lovely, as sweet and true as aun angel’s.
His uncle made him sing it over and over again, and the other pieces
also, and every one who came in that evening had to hear him sing.

Once Gerald said— But Uncle Otto, Geraldine can sing t00.
Don’t you wan’t to hear Geraldine sing?”

Uncle Otto shook his head.

“Ach Gott, no, de leedle girls are like de doll. Dey must do
noding but look pretty, and Geraldine she do that very well.”

In truth his little nephew appealed to the really warm heart of
the old organist, as no one had ever done, but his brother, the little
lad’s father, and sometimes as he talked and played with him he
almost fancied he had his Heinrich back again. His brother had
been much younger than himself, and he had had for him that same
tender sense of protectorship, and the desire to save him from all
hardship and pain that he now had for Gerry. Only in Heinrich’s|
case he had been poor and struggling and not able to do what he
wished for him, but now he was rich, and could give Gerald all that he
needed and more. He began to be very happy. ‘There was one
thing that troubled him—and that was Geraldine. There was no
place for her in his life and plans. Her little fgure hovering about
Gerald, disturbed that pleasant fancy in which he relieved his old life
with his brother. Besides—he knew nothing of girls, all his troubles
had come through thatsex. It was a girl, and Geraldine’s mother,

ai
GERALD AND GERALDINE.



that had stolen Heinrich from him, no! no! He would find some »
good woman to bring up the girl, and he himself would take care of
Gerald.

One day he called the children to him. They were at play in
the little enclosure in front of the house, but when they heard his
voice, they came in, hand in hand, with their eyes full of happiness
and little suspecting what they were going to hear. Gerald went up
to his uncle and pressed against his knees, and Geraldine stood by,
shuffling on her feet, unable from mere happiness to keep quiet.

“Now children, be goot and quiet vilst I talk to you,” Oncle
Otto began, patting Gerald’s hand. “I haf been considering what is
the best for you, and I haf made up my mind dat my house ish no
goot place for a leedle girl.”

“Oh!” said Geraldine, and she stood quite still now.

“T know noding about leedle girls, and I tink I must find some
goot vomans dat vill take petter care of Geraldine as I can.”

“Where will Gerald be?” asked Geraldine faintly, “will he go
too?”

‘“Gerald? oh no, he vill shtay wit me. Dat vill be de petter vay,
eh? Ican pring up a poy very goot. Ach Gott. I know vell de
poys. Vy, Gerald. Vot’s de matter?”

For Gerald had gone to Geraldine and thrown his arms around
her, and his face was very red in his efforts not to cry.

‘“T think it will be horrid,’ he said. “Geraldine is my twin,
and we have always been together, and girls aren’t so very different
from boys either. Oh! Ob! I wish we were back again at Mrs.
Blaney’s. I do indeed.”

22
GERALD AND GERALDINE.



Poor Gerald did not dream how he cut his uncle’s heart when he
uttered these words, but he could not have said anything that would
_ have made him put from him this plan so quickly.

“Vell, vell, I vill do noding at present. I haf only thought that
Geraldine would pe petter off mit some goot and kind vomans. Vot
does leedle Geraldine tink of eet? Eh?” ;

“Oh,” said Dino, who was crying with her face on Gerry’s neck.
“T think it would be cruel.”

“Vell den, you shall not go,” said Uncle Otto.

And that ended the matter for that time, but the knowledge that
he had thought of sending Geraldine away and that he might event-
ually think best to part them, was a sharp thorn in the twins’ flesh.
They could never forget it and the fear made them cling to each other
more closely than ever.

And Uncle Otto would look at them, and shake his head, and say
to himself: ,

‘Tis always so, ’tis always so. Some pretty leedle girl does
always make de vorld go wrong mit Otto Kaufmann.”

It has been mentioned that Uncle Otto was the choir master of St.
John the Evangelist’s. The church was very near the little house
behind the iron gate, and sometimes of a week-day, when he went in
to rehearse the music for the following Sunday, the children would
go too and listen. ‘The choir was of boys’ voices, and the most beau-
tifulin the city. The twins were of a deeply musical nature, and
they would sit there spell bound, until’ Uncle Otto would come from
the organ and take them home.

One day as the children walked before him, he heard Geraldine say:

23
GERALD AND GERALDINE. |

‘Oh brother, if I could only sing in the choir, I would be happy.”

‘“‘Leedle girls do‘not sing in dot choir,” said Uncle Otto.

“Yes, yes, I know,” said Geraldine drearily. “Leedle girls
must do noding, but look pretty.”

Uncle Otto laughed, but he turned to Gerald.

‘“Vot do you say, mein poy?”

“T think as Dino does, that it would be beautiful. Oh, Uncle |
Otto! could 1?” he cried.

“Vell, yes, I vas long tinking of dat.”

Gerald began to caper up and down on the pavement, and
Geraldine was capering too, in her generous sympathy, but her eyes
were wistful and she murmured once more:

“‘Leedle girls can do noding.”

Then Gerald’s training began. Each day he had long tiresome
exercises to go through, for Uncle Otto would spare no pains. In-
deed, because he was ambitious for the boy, he was all the harder
master, and sometimes poor Gerald would say privately to Geraldine,
that he would rather never sing at all than toil so, and Geraldine
would always answer: :

“Pooh, I would work as hard and harder too for music. I love
it, I love it, I love it! Oh, Gerald dear, if I could only change places
with you!”

But however tired Gerald was, he never complained to Uncle
Otto. He could not, for he knew if he should not become a musician
it would break his uncle’s heart.

So, because of his love and gratitude to his uncle ; and constantly
encouraged by Geraldine, he kept on, and he made good progress,

24




GERALD AND GERALDINE.



and at last (it was Sunday) Gerald’s voice rang out in the church,
bearing its part sweetly above the lower voices of the others, and
Geraldine in her place below in the pew sat with rapture in her heart
and her eyes full of tears.

As for Uncle Otto, it was easy to see that he was daily growing
more fond of, more proud of, and more ambitious for Gerald, and that
Geraldine was nothing to him.

Yet it must not be thought that he was unkind tothe child. He
saw that she had every thing she needed. Geraldine wore the
prettiest clothes, went to the best school and had everything that
money could buy. Her room was furnished for her according to her
own taste. She had dolls without number.

‘One day, when her uncle and brother were away, the fancy took
her to place them all in a row, and they reached clear across the floor
of the big music room. ‘Then she sat down at the end of the row
with her legs and arms hanging stiff, and a simper on her face.

“‘ Ach Gott,” said Uncle Otto, coming suddenly in the room and
seeing her. “ Vot ails you mein schild?”

“We are all dolls,” answered Geraldine gravely, “we can do
noding,” and then she burst into tears.

“Certainly ‘his Geraldine is a very odd little girl,” thought
Uncle Otto.

Sometimes when left alone Geraldine would go to the organ (a
great instrument which Uncle Otto had built into the room) and try
to bring forth music from it, and sometimes she would dress the dolls
in little white surplices and herself in another, and then she would
stand very straight, with her head thrown back, and _ sing.

27

#2
GERALD AND GERALDINE.

How she would sing! Scales and exercises and anthems and
chants, and at last the ariathat Gerald was learning and which he
was to sing on Haster Sunday.

If the truth be told, she had learned it sooner than Gerald had
learned it, being quicker and more persevering than her brother. When
Gerald took his lessons poor Dino always sat in a corner of the sofa
and drank in every word her uncle said, and then when she was alone
she would practice the piece just as he had told her brother to prac”
tice it. No it was not only because she was more persevering and
quicker than her brother, it was also because of the deep love of
music in her heart.

‘Well, when she finished singing she would turn to the dolls
and say:

‘““Tsn’t it glorious ? Isn’t it heavenly, and pray why, why, why
must leedle girls do noding ?”

Though he was not so quick as his sister, Gerald learned his
aria in good time.

Sweet and pure as the notes of a flute his voice fell on the ear.
In the still church, with the scent of the flowers, and the sunshine
pouring through the stained glass windows, it would be beautiful
Geraldine thought, she hoped it would not make her cry.

It was a week before Easter. Spring was coming, but the air
was damp and the weather dull.

Geraldine noticed that Gerald swallowed his breakfast with wry
faces that morning, and after their uncle had gone out he began to cry.
He seldom demeaned himself in this fashion and Geraldine was
alarmed.

28


‘Gerald opened his mouth and Geraldine peered into it.”



GERALD AND GERALDINE.

“Tt hurts so,” he said at last in reply to her entreaties to tell her
the cause of his tears. “Its my throat, and its ached and ached this
ever so long, and I can’t stand it any longer. Oh Geraldine! I don’t
see how I can go and sing tonight, but I will.” jen

“Of course you can’t,” said Geraldine. “You must have some-
thing to take, but I don’t know what, and Uncle Otto has gone. Oh
dear! Oh dear! Why couldn’t it have been my throat? How does it
reel ye?

“Tt feels as if there were lumps in it. See here Dino, look down
and see.”

Gerald opened his mouth and Geraldine peered into it, and after
much squinting on her part and various maneuvers of Gerald’s
tongue, she cried out excitedly:

“Tumps? Ohmy! there is an awful big one wagging right
in the middle! You poor poor boy, I should think it would hurt you.
You must go to bed and have the doctor.”

Of course, Geraldine had seen the soft palate, but her advice
was good, nevertheless, and Gerald, much frightened, made no
objection.

The doctor’s diagnosis was different from Geraldine’s but he kept
the patient in bed and watched him closely.

He told Uncle Otto that the boy had not a bad throat, but if he
was to sing on Easter Sunday, he had best take every precaution
against catching more cold. He said that Gerald would probably be
well by Friday.

The doctor’s directions were carefully followed, and Thursday
morning, Gerry felt as well as everand it was thought safe for him to get

31
GERALD AND GERALDINE.



up,and even to go out of doors for a half an hour in the middle of the day.

It was a beautiful morning, the air was soft and warm. ‘The
grass in the parks was quite green and a blue sky hung overhead.
But there were little clouds blowing up from the horizon, and before
Gerald and Geraldine had emerged from the iron gate, the air hada
sharpness in it, and Gerry was soon shivering. So they went home
again, and that night he confessed to Dino that his throat was worse.
He used his gargles faithfully, and made her promise to say nothing
to her uncle.

‘“He has worked so hard over me and he is so good to us Dino,”
he said, “ I should feel awfully to disappoint him. You know there is
no one else that has learned the aria.” |

‘“Er—no, of course not,” said Dino, adding to herself, “ Leedle
girls don’t count. Oh dear! Oh dear! what a pity it is that its not
my throat that’s sore instead of yours.”

Well it would be good if it could be yours just for Easter morn-
ing,” Gerald admitted. ‘‘ But no matter, don’t let’s worry for I shall
probably be well tomorrow for that was the day the doctor set. Friday,
you know he said, and this is only Thursday.

This thought comforted Gerry, but Geraldine felt anxious.

Their uncle being out that evening, Mrs. Riley their good
natured housekeeper sat with Gerald, who soon fell asleep. But
though Geraldine went to bed, for a long time she could only toss
from side to side with wide open eyes and her brain filled with the
strangest thoughts, and her heart beating like a trip-hammer.

“T can’t doit. I can’t, I can’t,” she would say to herself, and
then in a moment, “Yes, Ican do it and I will” It was like two

32
GERALD: AND GERALDINE.

voices each trying to drown the other; and in the end “I can’t”
yielded and “I will” won the day.

Friday morning found Gerald worse. His throat ached badly,
his head was hot and he was hoarse as a crow.

‘“Itis no use,” be said in answer to Geraldine’s anxious enquiries.
I shan’t be well enough to sing, and I am going to tell Uncle Otto so,
as soon as he comes in.”

“Hush,” cried Dino in a warning whisper. ‘Don’t you do
anything of the kind. You come and get into my bed, and I will
manage everything.”

Her cheeks were red, and her eyes sparkled. Geraldine usually
gave up to Gerald, but sometimes a peculiar look would come into
her eyes and her chin would lengthen, and when she looked like this,
she would have her own way. She looked so now.

Gerald got up and sat on the edge of the bed and watched her, as
she hastily dressed herself in his clothes. She made her hair smooth
and dropped her eyelids over her eyes and said:

‘Come Geraldine, you'll catch cold, you must go right back to
your room and go to bed—I’m all right this morning and now you
see its your turn.”

“Oh!” said Gerald, “I begin to catch on. We are going to
change places, but what good will it do?’’

’ she said, now Gerry,

“Tm going to sing on Easter Sunday,’
quick, put on this night dress in place of yours, and then go back to
bedey. i

‘What a girl you are!” said Gerald laughing. ‘“ But you know

you can’t do it.”

30
GERALD AND GERALDINE.



Nevertheless he let her put him into her own bed, laughing all
the time, to see how much at ease she seemed to feel in knicker-
bockers, and watched her as she flew about making the necessary
changes.

They were just made, when Uncle Otto tapped at the door.

“Where’s Gerald,” he was saying; but as he opened the door his
eyes fell upon Dino and he wenton. “Oh! here you are. Ach Gott
you are petter, ist it not so?”

“Ym all right,” answered Geraldine, ‘‘ the patient is in here now.
It’s no more than fair, is it?”

“Vell,” said Uncle Otto, “if eet must be von, the leedle girl—”’
he ended with a shrug and outspread hands, and gave a little laugh.

‘Kom here, mein poy. I vant to lookat you. I vant to see eef
de throat is vell.” He held out his hand to Geraldine, and Gerry
smothered his chuckles in the pillows.

‘She never will have the face to do it,” he said to himself, but
the audacious Geraldine, after a moment’s hesitation, had tilted back
her head and opened her.mouth, in which position, luckily for the
success of her bold scheme, her black eyes were not visible.

‘“ Vere goot, vere goot. Itink you are vell sure enough,” said
Uncle Otto. “ And de doctor vill haf anoder patient, eh, Geraldine?
I vill go now to get him, and you, mein poy, go tell Mrs. Riley she
moost get some preakfast ready soon.”

So off he went, and with a look at Gerry, Dino followed him.

After breakfast Geraldine came back for a moment to whisper :

“Uncle Otto is going to have me sing the aria. Shall I leave
the door open so that you can hear, Gerry ?”’

34
GERALD AND GERALDINE.

And Gerry said yes. In vain he strained his ears for sounds of
music. ‘The house was very quiet, and presently Geraldine came
back to say that a gentleman had come and taken their uncle away
with him. Some friend of his was in trouble, and he had been called
upon to help him, aud there was no knowing when he would be back.

‘Ah well,” said Gerry, who had been thinking the situation over
during her absence, “it’s a great deal better that you didn’t have the
chance to sing to him. He would discover the trick in a moment
and very likely it would make him angry. I say Dino, you can’t
sing that aria, you know.”

But Dino would not be discouraged. She was sure she could
take her brother’s place and to prove it began to sing the aria, and
Gerry soon found that she had not overrated her ability.

‘But then, you know,” he said finally, “it wouldn’t be the thing
_ at all for you, a girl, to go there in my place in the choir, you can’t do
that. .

“Nobody will know it isn’t you,” persisted Geraldine. ‘‘ How
can they? I have only to keep my eyes closed.”

“How silly yowll look,” Gerry went on. “I won’t havea silly
looking lackadaisical thing like that palmed off for me.”

‘And Uncle Otto will not be disappointed, “she continued in her
turn. “TI shall enjoy it and I think I might have the chance for
once. Come, don’t be so selfish.”

“Gerry gave up then. He felt tired and if every one else was
satisfied there was no reason why he should object. His responsi-
bilities slipped off. He made himself comfortable and went to sleep.

His own part was easy.

35
GERALD AND GERALDINE.



The path of deception was never smoother than Geraldine found
it. ‘To begin with, Uncle Otto was constantly away from home and
there was no chance for a rehearsal. "The doctor reported his patient
as not at all seriously ill only needing rest and quiet. He left orders
for her to be kept warm in bed until the hoarseness disappeared, and
said that he should not call again unless sent for.

Saturday he was better again, but still hoarse. There was no_
possible chance that he would be able to sing on Sunday.

At last Sunday morning came. Geraldine had breakfast a
Gerald in his, or rather her, room. Both children werea little ex-
cited, but Geraldine would not admit that she was afraid. ‘She did
not believe that anyone would discover that it was herself and not
Gerald that sang the aria.

“ But I think your voice is different from mine,” croaked Gerry.

“‘ Aren’t twins’ voices always the same? Certainly they are,”
she insisted. “I don’t think there is any difference, but if there is,
it will be set down to the sore throat.”

“What a girl you are!” said Gerald, for the hundredth time.
“Well I would give anything’ to be there to see and hear you. But
you will be sure to give yourself away. The boys will find you out.”

When the bells began to ting, Uncle Otto came,in for Gerald,
and the two set out for the church, Uncle Otto kept his hand on the
child’s shoulder. He looked down upon the little ip poston with a
fond and proud smile.

“Ve are two goot cronies, is eet not so?” he said pleasantly.
“ Vot makes you so quiet, lately, mein schild? es it the throat vot

aches?”
36
GERALD AND GERALDINE.

Geraldine could only shake her head. . She could not trust her-
self to answer, and she dared not raise her black eyes to him, who
looked so expectantly to meet a pair of sweet, soft, blue ones. She
began to wonder if ke would be angry if he knew all. This seemed
hard, for it was for his sake a:ter all that she was going to sing.

But when they got into the church, she became excited and bold
again. Her cheeks grew red, her eyes glowed.

- She found the vestry, and put on Gerald’s surplice with a little
chuckle of delight, all the time chaffing and playing with the boys
in Gerald’s manner, but she did not look one of them in the face, and
none suspected her.

‘Then the procession of boys passed into the church Geraldine in

- Gerald’s place no one noticing the change.
The service began and Dino’s voice chimed with the others in
anthem and hymn. The church was fragrant with Easter flowers
and the organ notes pealed grandly along the vault of the great
cathedral dome. : . :

“Tt is glorious, it is. heavenly,” thought the child. Presently
she realized that the moment had come. It was time for the aria.
For an instant the candle lights flickered and the church whirled
around. Shé seemed to hear a voice she knew say:

‘“Leedle girls can do noding.”

Then she began. The first notes were faint and tremulous, then
Dino forgot everything but the music. She raised her head and the
music just poured out of her mouth. She was no longer little’
Geraldine, who by stealth stood in another’s place. She was trans-
ported. Her eyes shone like stars, the lids raised, and her cheeks pale.

37
GERALD AND GERALDINE.

The boys nuged each other and smiled, many of them had seen
Geraldine and they now recognized her.

As for Uncle Otto, he was saying to himself: ‘‘ Ach Gott dish
voice is not Gerald’s. He vill nefer sing like dat in all dish vorld.
His voice ish ein goot voice—but dis. Ach Gott! Vot a voice!”

But the last note now died away upon the stillness of the church,
and a sudden darkness blotted the whole scene from Dino’s eyes.
Then an arm stole around her and she felt herself borne gently away.

When Geraldine opened her eyes, they looked full into a pair
that were shining upon her with the tenderest anxiety.

“Ach Gott!” said a voice, “she is mooch petter now. I tink
she vill soon pe vell. Mein leedle Dino. Vy, vy haf you not told
me vot a voice you haf? Ach Gott. Vot a heavenly voice.”

“Yes, Gerry,” said Dino having tried to give her brother an
account of the whole wonderful morning. You were right in think-
ing that I would be found out, but after all it was lovely and Uncle
Otto was not vexed, and I think—yes I think now he is going to
teach me music as well as you.”

From this time, Geraldine shared equally with Gerald in the
singing lessons and in the affection of their uncle, and never after-
wards was he heard to say:

‘““Leedle girls can do noding.”


LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.



LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

UCILLE was a picture as she ‘stood in the dusky shadows of the
barn with the doves circling about her head, and Lucilla perched
upon her shoulder.

She was an unusually pretty child with soft hazel eyes, anda
dazzle of golden ‘hair, and when as now, she was pleased and excited
and her cheeks were pink, she was bewitching. |

The only remarkable thing about her was an unusual fondness for
animals and the power she had overthem. Itreally seemed as if there
was some special relationship between this little girl and the various |
orders of the animal kingdom, different from that between them, and
other human beings. Even the shy inhabitants of the green woods
seemed to feel that she was nearer akin to themselves than to the
ugly object with a gun that was their traditional enemy. They
taught her their calls, and when with soft oe De she came into the
wood, they seemed to say joyfully :

“Tt’s Lucille, dear Lucille. She will do us no harm.”

To be sure, she had her favorites among them. Though she loved
them all. .She loved the birds better than the toads and the beetles,

43

*3
LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.



and she liked what she called the woolly worms better than the
slippery ones; but that was only as you might say you liked choco-
late candy better than peppermint, meaning no disrespect to the
latter.

Even the crickets and grasshoppers seemed to feel the bond, for
she could keep one by her all day, and perhaps, when evening came
and her mother would say:

“What became of the cricket you had this morning?”

Lucille would find it for her in a fold of her dress.

But of course the domestic animals were her chief playmates,
and of these there was no lack on the fine old farm where Lucille
lived. The dogs had a warm corner of her heart. One was a big,
lean, awkward, foolish, greyhound pup, and the other a wise old fat
little spaniel. [here was also a dear and faithful collie that slept in
the barn, who was different from either. But however the dogs may
have differed in other respects they were alike in their affection for
Lucille. As for the cats, there were enough of them to make a very
respectable cat show, black, yellow, tiger, whiteandgray. And there
were horses and cows, and pigs and hens, each being a personal friend
to Lucille.

The little girl never gave herself any airs of superiority to her
playmates, however humble they might be. Indeed she often amused
herself by imagining that she was one of themselves. With the dogs
she would leap about with her tongue hanging out of her mouth, and
just as easily she could fancy herself one of the cats, when she would
hunch up her back and hiss, or else curl herself up for a nap, with
her head cuddled into the rest of her; and it was the drollest thing to

44


LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

see her stand stock still in the pasture, like some old placid cow. Just
stand there and swallow an imaginary cud.

The cows would look at her out of the corner of their great mild
eyes and seem to say:

“The idea of that little snipe fancying herself one of us!”

I wonder if she ever thought it a little hard that in their turn
the animals would not sometimes pretend to be a little girl.

But the doves were Lucille’s true brothers and sisters. What a
whirring of feathery wings there was when the soft whistle of
Lucille was heard in the dovecote, and the dainty things,
purple, and white, and clouded grey, as softly as the flitting shad-
ows gathered about her. Of all the doves, however, the little :
maidenly Lucilla was the gentlest and the sweetest.

She was of a light-soft grey, with an arching neck of beautiful
iridescent colors. Lucilla was of a timid nature even for a dove, and
always flew away from her perch on Lucilles’ shoulder at the first ap-
proach of any other person, even the familiar figure of Adolphus who

took care of the dove-cote, and a certain way she had at such times of
seeking another perch over Lucille’s head, and sending down to her
cooing assurances of her love, was wonderfully pretty.

Having filled a measure with corn, Lucille went out into the
open, to scatter it on the ground for the doves. But Lucilla ate only
out of Lucille’s hand—the gentle little hand that had never yet hurt
living creatures.

So rare and perfect a companion as Lucille, certainly deserved a
playmate of her own race; and that very morning, before she had
come out to feed the doves, she had been introduced to a little brother.

47
LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.



It must be said that Baby boy, as he was called, did not seem upon
that first inspection a very promising companion. First he made a
horrible face at her, and turned purple; then he doubled up his fists
as if he were a born prize fighter, and finally opened his mouth and
screamed. But Lucille was no cold critic. She watched these feats
with sympathetic interest, and aimably declared that he was as sweet
as he could be; and when he fell asleep, and was laid in his dainty
bassinet, all made of lace and blue ribbons, she stood by his side ad-
miring his small round head, his tiny features, and little pink
hands.

And so, she was so happy, when she went out to feed the doves,
that she did not notice that Lucilla wore a drooping air, that she ate
but afew kernels of corn, and her voice was more plaintive than
usual.

“Tucilla you will love the little brother as well as you love
me” she prattled. “ You will never be afraid of him but cuddle in |
his arms as you do in mine.”

“Coo, coo,” answered Lucilla very soft and sad and low.

It was a beautiful May morning, and to Lucille the world was
made of blue sky, of apple blossoms, of cooing doves, and sweet little
baby brothers; but all at once, Lucilla spread her wings and flew

away.
: She had seen Donald and Dexter, the boys of a neighbor, com-
ing down the lane, and Lucilla knew that their appearance was the
signal for trouble. They scorned poor little Lucille as a playmate,
but sometimes they amused themselves by teasing her. |

Usually she was none too well pleased to see them; but to-day it

48
“LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

was different. She was glad of the opportunity to tell the good news.
“Coo, coo, coo,” warned Lucilla, but Lucille would not heed her.
With her little face shining with happiness she ran forward to meet
them.
‘“Oh Donald, she cried, oh Dexter what do you think? I havea
dear little baby brother. What do you think of that?”
“Think of it? Why, you needn’t be so pleased” said Donald.
‘No, you needn’t be so pleased” added Dexter.
“He will grow up to be just like me,” said Donald with a grim-
ace.
‘Oh he will grow up to be just like me,” said Dexter.
Lucille looked first at one, and then at the other, and shook her
head.
“Oh, no, no. He is very pretty and good.”
‘“We were pretty and good when we were only a day old’”’—they
laughed, and Donald said :
“He'll tease you dreadfully. He’ll put burs in your curls, hide
your doll babies, and fling stones at the doves.”
“Never! never!” cried Lucille looking up to Lucilla on the ap-
ple bough. “ He will love them as I do.”
“Coo,” answered Lucilla, gently.
Just then a little green snake slipped out of the stone wall be
hind the apple tree.
“There’s a snake, let us kill him,” cried Dexter, picking up a
stick. |
‘Oh, no, no, he is so pretty and happy,” pleaded Lucille catch-
ing hold of his arm—“Don’t kill it.”

49
LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

“Well, then, I will let you kill him,” said Donald, winking at
Dexter. And then he got on one side of her and Dexter on the other,
and they assured her that to kill a little snake in. the spring always
brought good luck. Donald said he had killed one, and Dexter had
killed one and this one she ought to kill herself.

Of course, it seemed strange to her, but she was told a great
many things that seemed strange, It might be just as true as that
“crusts will make the hair curl,” for all she knew, but all the same
she shook her head till her curls danced.

‘““Oh no,” she would never kill the snake.

“Then you will have bad luck—Your baby brother will grow
ugly and deformed and sick and wicked,” Donald said, and Dexter ad-
ded :

“Or very likely he will never grow up at all.”

Then they put the stick into poor Lucille’s little hand, and in the
great horror she felt at the picture they drew, and hardly knowing
what she did Lucille ran after the snake that was now gracefully glid-
ing through the grass, and struck it.

“Lucille has killed a snake. Lucille has killed a snake,” shout-
ed Donald and Dexter, and being satisfied with the mischief they had
done, ran away laughing up the lane, and all the world seemed to
echo “ Lucille has killed a snake.”

Only Lucilla was perfectly quiet up in the apple tree.

- And Lucille tried in vain to wake up the little snake and to make
him glide again through the fragrant grass, and to enjoy the beautiful
morning, as she thought it had done before she struck that cruel blow.

“ Oh why had it been so very easy to kill it. So very easy. And

50


LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

why could she not give it back its life? But no, its happy harmless
life was over. It was quite dead, and the collie came and sniffed at it.

“Don’t” sighed Lucille, and burst into tears.

At last needing comfort, and conscious that Lucilla had ceased to
utter her tender love note, she called her; but for the first time the
dove refused to obey her voice. Then Lucille stretched out her hand,
thinking that as usual Lucilla would come rushing down and alight
on it. But instead of that, she fluttered uneasily on her perch and
then flew away.

At night fall when Lucille called the doves for their supper, and
with swift wings they came whirring down, myriads of them, white,
and purple, and twilight grey, one was missing.

Greatly grieving, Lucille sent Adolphus up to the nests, but Lu-
cilla was not there, and she looked and looked for her, and all the
evening she wandered sadly about the place calling:

“Tucilla, Lucilla.”

But there was no answering note. Bitter tears she wept for her’
dear grey dove, and whatever one might say in well-meant consolation
she could only believe that when she struck the poor green snake
she also killed her tender Lucilla. ‘‘ The dove,” she said, “had hid-
den itself and died of a broken heart.”

Lucille buried the little snake under the apple tree, but the dead
body of the dove could not be found. For as much as a week she
could not go near the dovecote ; for she said that she was ashamed to
look the doves in the face, for they knew that she had killed Lucilla.
Indeed, her old delight in her dumb friends was gone. They seemed
to look at her with reproach. The dogs came less willingly when she

51
LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

called, the cats hid under the furniture. If she went into the woods,
the squirrels scolded her from the tree tops. The birds flew away at
her approach. ;

But if this were really so and not the child’s foolish fancy, there
was consolation in the society of Boy baby. He, at least, looked at
her with no reproach in his glance. Lucille was the first person he
ever noticed, holding out his little wavering arms to her the moment
he caught sight of her yellow curls. He grew in beauty like the rose.
His complexion changed from red to white, his little head was covered
with rings of gold, and his eyes became big and blue. Having noth-
ing else to do he grew, and grew, and grew—handsome, healthy and
good. 3

So a year passed. It was the baby’s first birthday, and Lucille
was sitting on the porch to enjoy the morning which was as lovely as
that one on which she had killed the snake. To make amends for
this cruel act she meant to teach Baby boy to be kind to all living’
creatures, and it seemed to her that already he had a natural
love for them in his little heart. She knew he would always love the
dogs, the horses, and the birds; but she feared that when he was as
big as Donald and Dexter, he might fling stones at the frogs, and kill
harmless snakes.

Presently, nurse brought Baby boy onto the porch for Lucille to
amuse for a while. He had on a big hat with rosettes over the ears,
and he kept pointing with his little fat fore finger toward the fields.

Lucille took his hand and walked with him up and down in front
of the porch; but that was not what Baby boy meant at all. He had
investigated everything on the gravel walk many times, and he want-

52






“ He kept pointing toward the fields.”’





LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.



ed to go off to the great Faraway. So Lucille started with him fora
little journey in the world. They did not go very fast for every few
steps Baby boy, who was walking independently by himself, sat down
_unexpectedly in the grass. Then he would look up with great sur-
prised and indignant eyes at Lucille, and just as she would think he
was going to cry he would begin to gurgle and laugh. And then he
must pick every flower that he saw and look at every bird or bee or
insect that crossed his path, so that it was a long time before they
reached the orchard; and before going on they sat down upon the edge
of it to rest.

And now who should come upon the scene but those mischievous
urchins who a year ago had caused so much trouble.

They had found a poor little woodcock that had been shot. One
wing was gone so that though, when they put it on the ground, it
could hop about it could not fly away.

Donald said that they were going to have some fun with it, and
knowing very well what that would mean to the woodcock, Lucille
begged them to give it to her, and in her pity, followed them a long
way offering first one and then another among her treasures in ex-
change for the bird. And when having at Jast got possession of it
and set it free in the woods, she returned to the spot where she had
left Baby boy, he was no where to be seen.

Frantic with fear, she ran hither and thither, seeking him in im-
possible places, and calling his name as loud as she could. She was
answered only by the soft coo of a dove in the old apple tree by the

stone wall.
It was Lucilla.

Jo
LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

Rushing forward, she beheld beneath the tree, the little figure of
Baby boy creeping through the grass and laughing with delight over
a new and strange play fellow.

Lucille stooping down beside him saw that it was a tiny green |

snake.

56




DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.





DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

LMOST everybody in Bay View knew Daisy Dalrymple and
Bruno. In fact it was impossible to’ know one without knowing

the other; for they were always together.
Daisy was a lily of a girl with white skin and fair hair, but her
eyes were a soft brown. ‘Though she looked so gentle, she was a

lively sprite, and if any mischief were going on she liked to have a
hand in it.

Bruno was of the opinion that without himself for a protector,
Daisy would speedily come to some bad end and therefore he never
dared leave her very long at a time. ,

Bruno of course was a dog, a huge, handsome mastiff with a
fine head and real doggy eyes, soft, faithful, and pathetic with the
thoughts that he longed in vain to share with his human friends. His
silky coat can best be described as a tawny grey, a lovely color, and
he stood nine hands high. But Bruno was even more remarkable
for his intelligence than for his beauty. There was noend to the
tales his friends told of his wonderful doings by which it appeared
that he was a dog of far more than ordinary sagacity. Although his

61

*4
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.



disposition was winning and sweet, and he had hosts of friends, he
was not a dog to be trampled on, and above all he was not a dog to
allow any one to trample upon Daisy Dalrymple.

One morning Daisy was walking up and down the garden path
with Bruno at her heels. It was in the spring and the daffodils were
in blossom and the shrubs were covered with masses of white or red
or yellow flowers. As Daisy walked she sang snatches of songs,
sentimental love lorn, old fashioned songs mostly that Miss Evange-
line Miller had taught her and which were droll enough as coming
from her childish lips.

At one moment it would be:

“The weary day to me
Goes sad and mournfully
And when the night comes darkly deep
No joy, no joy it brings,
But sadness on its wings,
No balmy sleep, Alone I weep.”
Then again the red lips would trail out yet more dismally :
“While hollow burst the rushing winds,
And heavy beats the shower,
This anxious aching bosom finds
No comfort in its power.
For ah my love it little knows
What thy hard fate may be,
What bitter storm of fortune blows,
What tempests trouble thee.
62








_ DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

But whatsoe’er may be our doom,
The lot is cast for me bee

For in the world, or in the tomb
My heart is fix’d on thee.”

Or, sometimes the words would be:

‘Be hushed, be hushed, ye bitter winds!
Ye pelting rains, a little rest;

Lie still, lie still, ye busy thoughts
That wring with grief my aching breast.

Oh! cruel was my faithless love,
To triumph o’er an artless maid ;

Oh! cruel was my faithles love,
To leave the girl by him betrayed.”

On the outside of the fence the people were tripping along the
pavement to the ferry, and hearing the love-sick songs would look
over and smile at little Daisy Dalrymple, who was the merriest of
mortal children and perhaps some one would say:

“Well now Daisy. Is it so bad with you as that then? If I
were a pretty girl like you, I would’nt wear the willow for any man.”

Then Daisy would explain that she hadn’t any lover at all, and
didn’t want any she was sure, since they seemed to make one so very
uncomfortable, so the listener on the other side of the fence would
pretend to look relieved and pass on.

Sometimes some intimate friend would ask her for a flower or a

65
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

kiss, and sometimes a little girl or boy would stop to tell her some im-
portant bit of news such as that there were two girls and a boy in the
family that was going to move into the new house on Sycamore street ;
or that Jerry Watterson had stopped going to the kindergarten and was
coming to school; or that Jack Barker’s father had bought him a new
bicycle.

While the conversation was going on, Bruno always stood by
Daisy’s side with his watchful eyes on her companion. He had of
course his own preferences among Daisy’s friends-and thought it no
more than honest to let a _person know just how much regard he had
for him—for alas! he was no diplomat.

Among Daisy’s friends there were none Bruno approved of so
highly as a certain young gentleman who was an old and ardent ad-
mirer of hers.

He was a tall and handsome youth with a wonderfully pleasant
voice and a twinkle in his blue eyes. On his way to the ferry he
stopped every pleasant morning for a word with Daisy Dalrymple, and
Daisy would always enquire with a great deal of interest if business
was getting better, or if he had had any luck.

For he had started in his profession that year, and was a young
lawyer without any clients.

_ Daisy had heard her father say that he didn’t believe John Lor-
ton had made ten dollars the whole year; but as an absolute fact he
hadn’t made ten cents. In truth the young fellow made no secret of
his bad luck, but joked continually over his want of success, and no
one but Daisy and Bruno suspected his real discouragement.

A law suit had been brought against a neighbor of the Dal-

66
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

rymples that winter, and Daisy had hoped that Mr. Whitlaw would
put his case into Lorton’s hands. She had teased her father into pro-
posing it to him, but Mr. Whitlaw had replied, that John Lorton was
young and inexperienced and nobody knew how he would manage a
case, and so he gave it toanother lawyer who had already made some
reputation, and as John said, “ could earn enough to pay his car fares
to and from his office.”

Then there had been a neighbor’s quarrel that year between the
Porters and the Andersons, the Andersons complaining that the
Porter children were always playing on their lawn and Mr. Anderson
had threatened to take the matter into court. Daisy had pricked up.
her ears at this report thinking that this might be an opportunity for
John, but Mr. Anderson was after all a peacable sort of man, “ born
to be trampled and spit upon,” as Daisy Dalrymple said and would
not take legal proceedings.

As young Lawton came down the street that pleasant May morn-
ing, he could not go by without a word with Daisy and also a word
- with Bruno, who performed his great feat of shaking hands between
the pickets of the fence with a great wagging and waving of his tail.
His method of accosting such as displeased his fancy being one gruff
growl of disapproval and glance of hostility through the apertures of
the fence.

It was in this way he greeted Master Howard Kimball and to tell
the truth Daisy never welcomed him much more warmly, for he was
the sort of boy that found pleasure in the misery of others, and a lit-
tle girl and a dumb dog often served him for victims. In truth there
had been a long-standing grudge between these parties which Bruno

67
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.



often longed to square off.

On the day of Daisy’s lawn party the boy had squeezed him into
his little sister Nell’s old gown tying her little white sun-bonnet over
his head. Bruno had too much good sense to show himself in this
ignominious costume and hid himself behind the barn, but Howard
had no notion of seeing his mean trick so defeated, and armed witha
stick went to look for him, and Bruno’s first appearance on the scene
was in chasing his tormentor screaming wildly over the lawn, where
the gay party was assembled so the ignominy was shared equally be-
tween them.

This is a mere sample of the way hostilities were conducted, and
the minds of all three were hot for revenge.

John Lorton came down the street humming a pleasant air, the
sky was not more serene than his own blue eyes and he seemed as
blithe as the beautiful May morning.

‘““How is the distressed fair one this ORME? ” he asked on
seeing Daisy whose fair head was thrown back while she sang:

‘For cold and dead he lies,
And far in yonder skies
The joys that once were mine now dwell,
My grief, my grief is vain.
Tl see him nee’r again,
I may not quell my bosom’s swell,

I may not quell my bosom’s swell.”

‘Oh, I am as merry as a grigg this lovely day,” said Daisy.
“How is business ?”

68
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG. |



“Why,” said John,” “Iam as busy as I can be from morning till
night, busy trying to think of something to do. If this rush goes on
I shall give up the law and perhaps drive the baker’s cart. I had an
opportunity to do that the other day.”

John’s face wore still its humorous expression, but Daisy’s was
clouded with gloom. She was thinking how she had scorned the pre-
dictions of the ill-disposed that John Lorton would never succeed
in the law.

“And to think you have never had one case yet,” she said dis-
mally, ‘to show them what a good lawyer you would be.”

‘Never mind, never mind,” replied John, “ advantages bring ter-
rible responsibilities. If I only had the longed-for opportunity, I should
be under the necessity of proving what a clever fellow I am, and that’s
often uncommonly inconvenient, and just think too how free from
carking care is the baker’s boy. I say, Daisy dear, would you be too
proud to ride in the baker’s cart with me?” |

“Why no,” answered Daisy, her brown eyes looking dreamily
into the distance. “I am very fond of chocolate cake and I could
have plenty of it then.” And so the bad news was treated as a joke.

Just as John was starting off he drew two tickets from his pocket,

and asked her if she would like to go to the dog show.
; Daisy did not understand how it was that John never had any
business. He had always tickets or some trifle to give away. ‘The
truth was that John was very popular and people were always glad to
give him anything but cases, which was what he most wanted.

“Of course I should be delighted to go,” answered Daisy, shield-
ing her lips from Bruno’s searching eyes.

69
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

‘Oh dear, how stupid of me to speak before him,” said John, un-
derstanding the movement at once. ‘‘ Of course Bruno will be wild
to go too.”

“Yes, he knows every thing, every thing,” said Daisy, “and I
do so hate to deceive him, but Mamma would never go if Bruno is
with us and he must be left behind.”

She uttered these last words in John’s ear and hoped that for
once Bruno’s suspicions had not been aroused.

John returned home having left it at that time to give the tickets
to Daisy. Shortly after he left her, her mother came into the garden
and after much coaxing, Bruno was decoyed into the shed.

Any dog would enjoy a promenade with so charming a lady and
so pretty a child. Bruno honestly believed that Mrs. Dalrymple was
the belle of the town, and as for Daisy there could not be two opinions
about her. They walked on hard-heartedly while Bruno watched
them with his mournful brown eyes from the window of the shed.

They walked down Centre street from which point they would
turn either to the right or to the left—to the right if they wanted to
take the train to the city, to the left if they were to cross the ferry.
As a matter ef fact they went by the train.

In five minutes after their departure Bruno succeeded in making
his escape from the shed. The clever ‘dog waited until there were no
longer footsteps near his prison house, then he calmly raised the
latch of the door with his nose and stepped boldly out. He cast a
look of supreme pity at Susan who was hanging out the clothes, and
_ who had said in answer to Daisy’s inquiries:

‘“Law no, Miss, no need of tying him for no dog could ever get

70
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.



out of that place.’

Then he, too, went down Centre street. At the turning point
he hesitated justfor an instant, then tore down the street that led
to the station. He was just a moment too late, and experienced that
sense of exasperation induced in man or dog by the spectacle of his
train just puffing off in the distance.

In a moment he had turned around and was running at full
speed in the direction of the ferry remembering there was stilla
chance left. Unlucky Bruno! The boat was just moving off. He
sprang to catch it and by a splendid feat clung for a moment with
his fore paws onto the deck and his hind ones on the side of the boat.

A shout went up from the passengers, most of whom knew the
dog.

‘Oh, ho! Little Mistress Daisy must be on the boat,” said one
of them, “and I’ll trust the dog not to be left behind.”

“He is a splendid brute,” said another. ‘Did you ever hear
how, when the Dalrymples came here from St. Paul, this same dog,
then a little pup, and had been given toa neighbor before starting,
followed them, how no one knows, but no doubt stealing many a ride
on the trains, for he reached here in time to partake of the first fam-
ily breakfast?”

‘“‘T never heard that,” said a short stout red faced man, “‘ but I re-
member how it was by his sagacity that those sly burglars who gave
the police so much trouble last autumn were eventually captured. I
also remember,” and here the little red faced man’s voice began to get
husky, “how he succeeded in rescuing two little kids that contrived
to fall off the landing at places some two hundred feet distant from

71
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

each other. And gentlemen, one of those little kids was my kid,”
added the red faced man with an air of importance as if the rescue of
his kid was a much more heroic achievement than the rescue of any
other child.

“He is a brave dog,” exclaimed another man who had seemed to
be reading a newspaper. ‘‘OnceI saw him successfully defending
his little mestress against five young scamps; who were determined to
have Miss Daisy’s hat for a foot-ball.”

“Poh! poh! What a fuss over a cur!” said an individual who

‘happened to be the father of that malicious little imp, Howard Kim-
ball; and he got up in disgust and walked to the other end of the
boat. :

Bruno meanwhile had scrambled to a place of safety, but only to
» be met by his old enemy Howard, with hate in his heart and his
father’s cane in his hand, a combination fatal to Bruno.

In a lively skirmish Howard succeeded in pushing the dog off
the deck of the boat. He fell plump into the water, and disappeared
from view but immediately reappeared and pursued the boat.

It must be remembered that owing to Howard’s attack upon him
Bruno had not had an opportunity to look for Daisy, for which reason
he continued to follow the boat instead of going back to the landing.

He was a big dog, and being powerful, made rapid progress
through the water.

The sailors who had watched the adventure being his friends—
for he often went in the boat with his mistress—threw him a rope, and
helped him on board.

Howard having disappeared during the loud hurrahs sent up by

74




DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

the passengers, Bruno now took the opportunity to make a search for
Daisy.

But neither fore or aft, on deck or in the cabin was she to be
found. His plan, although no one knew it, was to stay on board un-
til Daisy, or at least Mr. Dalrymple who always went home by the
ferry, should return.

Bruno roamed disconsolately around the boat, consenting to allow
his head to be patted by many a condescending hand, and at last flung
himself down with a sigh at the feet of John Lorton who had watched
the proceedings with an interested eye.

Bruno was asleep and dreaming that he was chasing Daisy
through the streets of the city. Now and then his paws would twitch
and he would pant in the excitement of the chase.

At length on a crowded street he caught sight of the object of his
search. He ran this way and that in his frantic fear of losing her
again. :

With straining sinews he sped on until stopped by a boy who
obstructed the way with a.cane. Let him leap as high as he would
he could not jump over that barrier.

Suddenly he was conscious of numbers of voices around him, and
the sound of a child screaming and some one seizing him by the col-
lar and saying: ‘He is a vicious brute and not a safe dog to be at
large.” ‘Then slowly he realized that he had jumped up and bitten
Howard who had been tormenting him in his sleep with his father’s
cane. ;

“He is a noble animal,” said John Lorton in whose voice was
more anger than usual, “and I doubt if your son is much hurt.”

75
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

‘“T leave it to these gentlemen who are fathers,” said Mr. Kim-
ball, “whether they wish their children left tothe mercy of such a
dog.”

Alas! public opinion is always fickle. ‘These gentlemen ” eyed
poor Bruno somewhat dubiously, standing with his tail between his
legs and conscious that he was under a ban. He slunk away and
hid himself knowing the boat was nearing the landing.

Mr. Kimball examined his son’s wound while the other passen-
gers buttoned up their overcoats in readiness to go on shore.

Bruno spent the rest of the day monotonously crossing from
shore to shore in the ferry-boat, finally going home with his master.

Having passed the day pleasantly in town, Daisy and her mother
returned as they had gone, by train.

Being fond of dogs, Daisy was enthusiastic over the dog show,
but she declarad there was not an animal there that for wisdom and
beauty could compare with their Bruno.

During the subsequent shopping expedition she followed a cus-
tom which her mother often practiced when Daisy herself was left at
home and bought a little present for him, a gorgeous yellow satin
bow to be tied on his collar, for which she knew in her secret heart he
would not care a whit, but she knew also that it would show finely on
his silky coat.

In the evening John Lorton dropped in at the Dalrymples and
reported what had taken place on the boat. He said Mr. Kim-
ball had behaved like an idiot, that he talked rank heresy about the
dog and made a muff of his son.

“ He has spoiled his boy until he has not a virtue left save his

76
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.



pretty Fauntleroy suits. They are very pretty but they do not make
one forget the expression of his face which is that of a spoiled and
spiteful child.”

John further said that Mr. Kimball had nursed his indignation
until it was very lively and hot. There were rumors about the town
that he meant to take the matter into court. Herepresented Howard’s
injuries that were on his leg as of a very serious character, but
the boy had been seen playing hop-scotch that day without any dif-
ficulty, although when he found himself observed he stopped at once
and went limping home.

Mr. Kimball had been heard to say many times that the dog
ought tobe killed, but he. had had no medical advice except Dr.
Saunders, the boy’s grandfather.

“Well,” said Mr. Dalrymple turning red, “let him take it to
court. I can fight it as long as he can.” :

“Poh!” exclaimed Daisy, ‘‘ every body knows it would be a sin‘
to shoot Bruno. It was not his fault but Howard’s, and besides

_Bruno’s life is valuable and Howard’s is not, and I guess if all his
good deeds were put against Howard’s he would be let off quick
enough,” and she went on, “I hope and pray he will carry it into
court and we will have Mr. John for our lawyer, and then everybody
will see what a good lawyer Mr. John is and what a good dog Bruno
is. He shall wear his new yellow satin bow and make a great sensa-
tion.”
‘Bless my soul, child, bless my soul,” said Mr. Dalrymple when .
John had gone. “If that idiot of a Kimball does carry the matter into
court I’ll take your advice, Daisy, and put the case into John’s hands.”

77

5
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DQG.

“Much to his surprise, however, Mr. Kimball did carry the mat-
ter into court. He was an irascible little man and had argued him-
self into the belief that he had justice on his side. He refused to see
that Howard had been at all in fault, and loudly and angrily de-
clared that poor Bruno was a ferocious beast whose savage humor was
a constant menace to the children of the neighborhood.

Alas, poor Bruno! the faithful guardian of little children and be-
loved by all-the babies. Somehow he seemed to know that danger of
some sort threatened him. He would go from one to another and
nestle his nose in their lap, and seemed to say:

“You know what a worthy creature I am, and have not deserved
such obloquy. But I have plenty of friends, haven’t I? And there is
no need of worrying.”

The thought would sometimes steal into Daisy’s mind, that per-
haps there was something to worry about. It had been explained to
her just how Bruno’s trial would be carried on, for so strong was his
personality that it was always called Bruno’s case rather than Mr.
Dalrymple’s.

But Bruno’s lawyer assured her of success. “‘ You just wait now,”
he said in consolation to Daisy, ‘and you will see what a good charac-
ter people will give him. Besides to despair shows little confidence
in me in whose ability you have always professed to have so much
faith.”

But then it was always John Lorton’s nature to look hopefully at
things, and it was true that Bruno had bitten his adversary.

But the suspense of long waiting was not added to their troubles,

The case was called for trial during the last of May, about two

78
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.



weeks after Bruno had turned on his persecutor. The weather was
warm as summer and brought the leaves on the trees well forward. The
apple trees were like large bouquets of blossoms, and the earth was
at its loveliest.

The thought of Bruno’s possible sentence was especially sad to
soft-hearted Daisy. ‘The forfeit of a life could be more easily paid
on some dull churlish day,” she thought. She would throw her arms
around his neck and tell him there were not half a.dozen men in the
town whose lives would in beauty equal his own; and she was not far
wrong, for faithful love and unconquerable loyalty, for dauntless
courage and unpretending self-sacrifice Bruno would bear comparison
with many human heroes.

As has been said, the trial took place in the last week of May—
‘to be accurate, it was on the last day of the month. Bruno’s party set |
forth with all the’courage given by a righteous cause.

Mr. Kimball was very much in earnest in this matter and had
secured the services of one of the most prominent lawyers of the
_ neighboring city. As an actual fact he was of such repute that, as an
antagonist, it brought poor unknown John Lorton into what he him-
self designated a ridiculous prominence. Nevertheless John did not
think he should lose his nerve. \

He had secured a large number of witnesses. First on the list
were Mr. Dalrymple and Daisy. Then there were the gentlemen who
had spoken in Bruno’s favor on the boat, a tall maiden lady with a
bird of paradise on her hat, and many others.

Mr. Kimball on his part had but a few witnesses and these with
the exception of Howard and Dr. Saunders looked as if they had come

79
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

more for love of fifty cents than from love of acause. Howard was
of course present in his prettiest Fauntleroy suit, the appearance of
which was much marred by the conspicuous bandages on his leg.

The trouble had excited.a great deal of interest in the neighbor-
hood and the court room was unusually crowded.

After the case had been called by the clerk, the witnesses were

seated and Mr. Kimball’s attorney began his opening speech, when
an unsummoned witness suddenly appeared and after calmly looking
around the court room took a seat beside Daisy Dalrymple. He was
a magnificent brute, with affectionate eyes, that is when looking at
certain persons, the little maiden at his side for instance, and with a
stupendous yellow satin bow rakishly arranged under one ear.
‘There was a broad smile on most faces and a soft clapping of
hands. ‘Then Mr. Kimball leaned over and whispered something to
his lawyer who immediately objected to the appearance of the dog in
the court room. But John Lorton instantly arose declaring that the
dog, being the cause of the litigation his presence was necessary, for
he saw at once that Bruno was not a dog to injure his own case.

The judge it so happened was a great lover of dogs—and who
that loves dogs would not love Bruno?—and Bruno, having listened
politely to the speech of the other side, now rolled his eyes over to
the bench as if to say: “ Now for a sensible decision from the judge,”
which no doubt had its effect on that dignitary, for he immediately
said with a slight bow:

“The objection of the plaintiff is overruled.” So John Lorton
had scored his first triumph.

The trial went on after the usual manner, the chief interest be-

80
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

ing the absurdly appropriate conduct of the dog. Mr. Kimball was
the first to take the witness stand, and he labored long to prove how
great were the injuries the dog had inflicted on his son, after which
Dr. Saunders corroborated all that he had said.

John Lorton here interposed that the witness was the child’s
grandfather and suggested that, the boy being in court, they should
have ocular proof of these terrible injuries they had heard so much of.

At this point Bruno’s tail was heard to thump the floor. He un-
doubtedly approved of John’s suggestion. The spectators who had
been watching the dog with admiration laughed audibly.

Mr. Bryant, Mr. Kimball’s lawyer, then, called Howard to the
stand. It must be confessed he looked rather picturesque and made
a favorable impression. On his cross-examination, notwithstanding
the constant interruption of Mr. Bryant, John Lorton drew from him
the admission that he had been tormenting the dog at the time he was
bitten, and also that on leaving the boat he had been able to walk
from the ferry boat up to the place where ‘the circus tents were
pitched.

“IT suppose your pleasure was entirely spoiled by your physical
sufferings—by the bite on your leg, you know,” suggested John.

“Oh yes, you’d better believe it,” answered Howard emphatically.

Here the opposing lawyer interposed, objecting that these re-
-marks were beside the question, but after some sparring between the
attorneys the cross-examination was allowed to go on.

“Was the clown a good one?” asked John innocently.

“Oh! just ripping,” replied Howard enthusiastically.

“You did not feel the acute pain in your leg perhaps at that

8I
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.



time,” said John with a significant smile. And Bruno gave two de-
lighted yaps, or at Jeast they sounded so.

“Did you come out before the performance was over ?”’ continued
John.

“No,” answered Howard with a hang-dog air.

‘“T think, Your Honor,” said John addressing the Judge, “I must
ask that this witness be required to show to the jury the injuries he
claims the dog has inflicted on him.”

“Oh!” cried Howard, who was certainly a chip of the old block,
“Tt will hurt me to have the bandages taken off. I won’t! I can’t!”

At the request of Mr. Bryant, Howard was temporarily dismissed
_ from the witness box, and Dr. Saunders recalled. Whereupon Bruno
cocked up one ear, Mr. Kimball rubbed his hands and smiled blandly,
while Dr. Saunders in rather a hesitating way, took the stand.

Me was an old gentleman, and he looked at his son-in-law, How-
ard’s papa, in an appealing sort of way, as if he were afraid more was
going to be demanded of him than he felt disposed to admit. How-
ever, he testified that his grand-son’s injuries were of a serious char-
acter and that the dog was dangerous to the community and ought to
be shot.

The attention of all was now again drawn to the accused, who
feeling himself the centre of attraction turned his head, and put on
that air of sublime indifference which dogs sometimes assume.

“Ts it your opinion, Doctor, that it would injure the boy to have
the bandages herewith removed ?” asked John.

“Decidedly,” the doctor promptly responded, and this witness
was then dismissed.

82
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.



The witnesses that were to prove the good character of the dog
were next called. The testimony of such of them as had been on the
boat proved that the boy had badgered Bruno into biting him, and
that the punishment was no more than the boy deserved. Each was
eager to give the dog a good character.

The first witness was Mr. Greene, who related the incident of
Bruno’s saving the children who had fallen from the landing into the
bay. But Mr. Greene’s sympathies had been so excited by the grief
of Daisy, as well as by the critical situation of Bruno, that although
the main facts did not differ it seemed like another tale.

He was very dramatic, first he described the two little children
sporting on the banks, then how each one came to fall simultaneously
into the water though at a distance of fifteen feet from each other.

His movements were quite infantile and you could almost see the
oddling steps of the little innocents and hear their shouts of baby glee.

He waved his great pudgy red hands with childish grace as he
showed how they tripped over the grass, and you almost held your
breath as they came down to the edge of the water.

Just as vividly could you see their mammas as with pretty ma-
ternal cries they ran after their offspring and wrung their hands as
the little figures dropped into the water. Then like a true hero comes
Bruno to the rescue.

The construction of the human frame forbade Mr. Greene quite
reproducing the exact appearance of Bruno, as with his tongue pro-
truding and ears pricking up, he dashed into the water and succeeded
in dragging both children to the shore. The story created a great
sensation and Bruno was more popular than before.

83
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

The next witness was a tall, lank maiden lady, with a bird of
paradise on her hat.

‘““What is your name?” asked John.

“Evangeline Miller,” answered the lady, with a graceful dip of her
head, which made every feather quiver.

‘Occupation ?”

“ Milliner,” was the reply.

“Did you see Mr. Dalrymple’s dog bite Master Howard Kim-
ball?”

Miss Evangeline turned around for a moment for a glance at
Daisy and answered hesitatingly : |

“Well I don’t know that I can say he bit him.”

“What do I understand you to mean!”

“Well, it looked as if he did,” answered the witness.

“Did you see him tormenting the dog?”

“Certainly I did,” replied Miss Evangeline, without any hesita-
tion at all.

“Or else it looked as if he did,” sneered Mr. Bryant.

Did you try to protect the dog from the boy’s persecutions?”
asked Lorton, resuming his examination.

“Yes, Idid,” replied Miss Evangeline, “and I hid him behind
my dress. But after a while Master Howard came poking along with
his stick and routed him out. Heis always at him. I never saw
any thing like it inmy life. This warn’t any new thing, the little
rascal has had a grudge against hima long time. I can tell you
about that. You see it began by Miss Daisy’s planting my garden with
pansies and violets and some other flowers, and she tended them her-

84
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

self a good deal, knowing I hadn’t much time for it. She worked real
hard on them and I did lot on having them plants blossom.”

Here Mr. Bryant interrupted, strongly objecting to the witness
being allowed to go on with her rigmarole, as he called it, which he
declared was entirely foreign to the case.

But by this time it was clearly evident on which side were the
judge’s sympathies, for again the objection was overruled, and with
another wave of the bird of paradise Miss Evangeline continued.

‘““Well, though some of the plants were already budded, there
were never any blossoms on them, and Daisy and me, we wondered
and wondered what could be the reason of it. At. last one night
when one of the pansies was just ready to burst into flower Miss
Daisy had Bruno tied to the apple tree on the edge of the garden.
‘ There now,’ says she, ‘we'll be likely to find out.’ And we did.

“Tt was in the morning very early that Bruno began to bark,
and instantly I was at the window in time to behold that little
scamp,” motioning to Master Howard, “bending down over my
pansies. Well I couldn’t get out in time to catch him,” said Miss
Evangeline blushing. “ But when I went out tomy plants I found
every bud was stripped off of them. ca

‘“‘ After that Master Howard began to torment Daisy Dalrymple
and when he couldn’t torment her he tormented Bruno, and that’s
the Gospel truth.”

On the whole Miss Evangeline’s testimony had made a favorable
impression for Bruno upon the jury.

Just at this moment the strains of a band of music broke upon
the air, which apparently heralded the approach of a procession of

85
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

some sort, and which caught the ear of Master Howard. Immedi-
ately he climbed over the benches onto the window-sill from which
point he had a view of the street.

The spectators though they had no view of the procession, had
a very distinct one of Master Howard, and a smile went around the
court room, as the fact became evident that in his eager scramble he
had displaced the bandages, the removal of which was supposed to

give him so much pain.
| Miss Evangeline’s testimony having been concluded Lorton
pointed out to the court the obvious fact that a convenient time had
arrived to examine Master Howard’s injuries.

This time Howard’s protestations were of no avail, though he
screamed and kicked and proved himself to have anything but the
temper of an angel.

As he was put upon the stand Daisy Dalrymple broke out into
an audible giggle and Bruno left his place by her side and took
up his position in front of the witness box, held his head on one side
and assumed a most judicial and critical air.

“Well; I declare, I never saw the beat of that dog!” whispered
one of the jurymen slyly to another, he was a kindly old countryman
who was fond of animals. “I like a dog of that breed.”

‘Howard was standing sulkily in the witness box, his leg, from
which the bandages had now been entirely removed, displayed a scar
which bore very insignificant proportion to the bandage. It was evi-
dent that the boy had been bitten but not: seriously. The ae of
testimony was closed.

When Howard had resumed his seat by his father’s side, Bruno

86






‘ Bruno solemnly seated himself on the witness stand.”’





DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.



feeling perhaps that it might be some high place of honor which
he alone had not been invited to occupy solemnly seated himself on the
witness stand. A king of dogs on trial for his life! His aspect was
that of a trusting and loyal friend; it had no meanness in it. There
he sat while the two attorneys made their pleas and when at last the
judge having charged the jury, they filed out to decide his fate.

Then there arose a hum of voices in the good dog’s praise.

‘He’s a blooming friendly dog,” said an old rowdy by the door.
“Tl be blest if he didn’t want to go right along with them jurymen
when they went out. I bet they aren’t going to bring any verdict
against him. Iseen ’em look at him and laugh a hundred times.”

Another man said, and this wasa gentleman, “I’d stake my life
the splendid creature would be the safest playmate any child could
have. If he isn’t killed I’m going totry to buy him.”

The verdict was a foregone conclusion, and was that which the
friends of Bruno desired.

The case brought John Lorton into notice and his luck took a
sudden turn, finally placing him on a high peak of prosperity; but he
always said that his success was entirely due to Bruno.

Bruno took no airs unto himself, he did not presume upon the
good turn he had done his friend, nor expect favors in return. Yet
he appreciated the honors that were paid him, and perhaps vaguely
wondered why his path in life was strewn with so many more roses
than that of any other dog he knew. ;

It has been said that John Lorton always gave Bruno the credit
of all that was fortunate in his career; but the time came when he
basely maintained that what he had always meant was that he owed it

89
DAISY DALRYMPLE’S DOG.

to Daisy, who had given him his first case. If Bruno’s feelings were
hurt by this transfer of gratitude from himself to his mistress he never
let it so appear. In fact it would be so uncharacteristic of this high-mind-
ed and unselfish animal that the idea is herewith dismissed with con-
tempt. At all events among Daisy’s suitors he gave preference in the
most decided and unmistakable dog language to John Lorton, and
finally became a happy and honored inmate of his home.

gO






DAVID HICKEY’S CHRISTMAS.



DAVID HICKEY’S CHRISTMAS.

VERY body at the Deaf School called David Hickey a clod.

Miss Brown—the pretty Miss Brown, for there were two of that
name among the corps of teachers—said that he was like all the peo-
ple from that section of Maine, where the Hickey’s lived (She had
spent three weeks there, one summer, camping out in the lumber dis-
trict) and that he was stolid and quite devoid of sensative feeling.

With his rather vacant grey eyes, and his half opened mouth,
and his slow apathetic manner, poor David did not give one the im-
pression of being keenly alive to his own misfortune, or to the sadness
of the necessary separation it caused from his home, which was usual-
ly the case with such children and made it pathetic.

There was one sweet young girl in the school with soft, pleading
brown eyes and sad curved lips, who would look in your face, and say
in the metallic, jerky way of a deaf mute.

“T am deaf, Iam deaf, I cannot hear. Are you sad that I am
deaf?”

- And the tears would gather in her sweet eyes, and in yours also

unless you had a heart of stone.

OD
DAVID HICKEY’S CHRISTMAS.

Then there was a manly boy of David’s age, who in the friendli-
est way would draw up to you, and tell you, by his painfully acquired
speech, and many signs, about his home, and those that he had left
there and all his sorrow at being forced to leave themas he must, if
he were ever to learn to speak and understand the speech of others.

But David did not appeal to one’s sympathy any more than some
stunted plant.

It is not to be supposed that the pretty Miss Brown, or any of
the teachers were unkind to David, but kindness froma sense of duty
is a cold thing, and David must indeed have been a clod if he did not
feel the difference between the teachers’ manner toward himself, and
toward Louis Alden—and the pretty pathetic brown-eyed girl.

It was in the autumn that David had been brought to the deaf
school, and it was already in the early winter. It was within a few
weeks of Christmas.

There was an unusually large number of children at the school
that year, and of course of all sorts and temperaments. Some of
them, because of their misfortune, had been indulged and spoiled by
their friends until they were disagreeable to everyone, and others too,
who had learned that they were to be mere bystanders in the busy
world, some of these were gentle, patient creatures, but by far the
greater part of them had not the temper of the angels, which, taking
everything into consideration is not to be wondered at. One little
girl did nothing but cry, and one of the boys could express his home-
sickness only by kicking and screaming, and another would fly into
a passion at the least hint of opposition. ‘This was the boy, who

96
DAVID HICKEY’S CHRISTMAS,



angry with the pretty Miss Brown, dropped this letter (a love letter
she laughingly called it) into her desk.

‘“Miss Brown—Hate !

Toad, pig, bug, snake.

Hatchet—kill,

Miss Brown very sad,

Glad, glad, glad.”

And since you may not be able to translate this singular com-
position I will put it in plain English for you.

Miss Brown was hateful. She wasa toad, pig, bug, snake, every-
thing he loathed most. He would like to kill her with a hatchet.
Then she would be punished and he would be glad.

But of all the children there was not one so unpopular as David.

Deaf children are not so unlike others that they do not take a joy-
ous interest in Christmas. There was to be a vacation of a week, and
they were going home. All of them except the very little ones were
collecting their gifts. The girl with the brown eyes, had made hers,
dainty little things such as a deft-fingered girl can make. Louis
Alden had bought his with money that he had earned. Beautiful gifts
for his parents and brothers and sisters of whom he talked so much.

There were many opportunities for the boys at the deaf ‘school to
make money. Some of the older ones had regular employment out-
side. One worked for a photographer, one did odd jobs in carpenter-
ing, and they could chop wood, or shovel snow, and sometimes they
were sent on errands by the teachers. But David was not often chosen.
The brighter boys out bid him, and then it was thought that he was

too stupid to know what to do with money.

OF

6*
DAVID HICKEY’S CHRISTMAS.

None of the boys made so much money as Louis, and none
showed such enthusiasm over his preparations for Christmas. One of
his sisters was to be married that year, and Miss Brown had helped
him choose a present for her. It was a silver berry spoon, and very
pretty. He showed all his presents to the other pupils. He showed
them to David who looked a long time at them.

Louis explained that the spoon was real silver, and not like those
that were bought at the ten cent store, and he said that it would be a
an heirloom in his sister’s family.

Some one had told him that, and it pleased him immensely.

He talked continually and with all his happy animation of
manner about those for whom his gifts were bought. The teachers
felt that they almost knew Louis’ friends, and they sympathized with
his fondness for them. :

David alone, seemed to make no preparations. He had never
tried to tell any one of his home, or those that he had left there. Ap-
parently he had felt no sorrow at leaving them, and now had no joy
at the thought of seeing them again.

Yes, he must. be a mere clod—A soulless clod.

The children were to be away a week, but they were not allowed
to carry home their trunks. Most of them came from poor and igno-
rant families that did not appreciate the advantage of the school train-
ing, and if the children did not wish to return would not oblige them
todo so. So the trunks were held back.

When the pupils were ready for their trains, David came into the
room of the principal where the teachers were assembled to carry lit-
tle squads of children to the stations. He carried the big valise that

98
Sead

so






DAVID HICKEY’S CHRISTMAS.



he had brought with him from home. It was a great leather,
countrified affair with a bag at the top and a box-like compartment
beneath, and it would easily hold all David’s worldly possessions.

“What have you in there?” questioned Miss Libby, the prin-
cipal, pointing to the bag.

He knew what she meant. His eyes dropped, and he colored to
the roots of his close-cropped flaxen hair. His loose lips quivered a
little.

“Open it,” said Miss Libby.

He looked into her face with those gray eyes of his—not expres-
sionless now, but filled with a piteous pleading.

He did not want to open the bag.

The teachers gathered around him and Miss Brown said that he
had no doubt packed all his clothes in the bag and they had better
examine it.

“Open it, David,” said Miss Libby again; and not daring to re-
fuse hetook the key from his pocket and unfastened it.

Nothing was there but his nightshirt, and brush and comb which
was the extent of luggage allowed to each pupil. So Miss Libby
motioned to him to unlock the lower part.

David was still kneeling on the floor. He cast an appealing
glance at the pretty Miss Brown. But she would not, as she some-
times did, intercede for him. No one sympathized with his embar-
rassment. No onehelped him. In a shame-faced way he opened the
box.

The teachers looked at each other and the tears filled their eyes.
They saw at last the Christmas gifts that unsuspected by every one,

IOI
DAVID HICKEY’S CHRISTMAS.

David had gathered together. ‘They were so poor. So utterly val-
ueless, and they had been collected with such self denial that it was
pathetic. ‘There was a handkerchief so coarse that it might be used
as a veil, and a knife with a broken blade. There was a box of nuts
and candy, which was evidently David’s share of that which during
the term had been given from time to time to the children, and there
was a little tumbler full of beads. ‘Through her tears the pretty Miss
Brown could see that some of them had dropped from one of her own
gowns.

All that long, lonely term, understood by none, believed by all
to be unfeeling and unloving, he had been gathering them together ;
and now the poor mean gifts had tongues. They told of David’s loyal
love for his own people, and how, in this cold place where none cared
for him his thoughts had turned constantly to those dear ones whom
he had been supposed to be too dull of feeling to grieve for. Yes,
they spoke eloquently, and the teachers’ hearts were moved.

There was little time to spare, but after a moment’s talk each
pulled out her purse and gave a sum of money to the pretty Miss
Brown who was dressed in her out-door wraps, and with a smile and
nod to David went bustling away. ,

Then the others encouraged him to tell them at last of his home
up there in the lumber district of Maine.

In his own way he described the poor little unpainted house with
its background of tallold pines, “so high in the sky,” and the old
fashioned cinnamon roses, tiger lillies and other flowers, that even
poor folks who love such things can have. David was a touching pic-
ture as he spoke of the loved home. The tears ran down his face

I02
DAVID HICKEY’S CHRISTMAS.



so eager and earnest, and the little hands moved constantly to better
make known his meaning, for the deaf children use many signs to
make clear what they wish tosay. He told them also of his father
who worked with his axe day after day—of how big he was, and how
the great trees would fall under his strong arm, and he showed how
his mother’s hands were moving, moving, moving allday long. He
told them how different his brothers were from himself; of all the
wonderful things that they could do that he could not. And when
at last, won by their sympathy he spoke of his little lame sister, with
her pale face and dazzling golden hair, “like the sun,’ a look came
into his face that made them wonder that they ever could have called
him a clod.

He took up the little tumbler of beads and explained how it was
for her, and how she would sit hour after hour and string them when
he should come back again to the deaf school. He was holding it up
with a half proud, half depreciating look when Miss Brown returned
with her arms full of bundles and her jacket pockets stuffed out till
she had, as she said, a truly gothic outline. She was prettier than
ever with her cheeks glowing and her eyes shining, and the others
crowding round, she began to pack David’s bag with the presents she
had brought.

‘There were a whole dozen of fine handkerchiefs, and a pair of fur
mittens, and a hood for the mother and a gay scarf, a little silver ban-
gle, a pair of skates, a knife with four blades and a cork screw, and
books, and toys galore, which means just heaps and heaps of them.
And there was candy enough to make the whole family ill.

It being quite time that the party should start, these things were

103
DAVID HICKEY’S CHRISTMAS.



now hurried into David’s bag, it was locked with a click, and the pro-
cession of children and teachers set forth.

At the end of the line, limping fearfully to show how heavy was
his bag, came David Hickey—the most popular boy at the deaf

school.

104


i
i
|
‘
!
i





‘The most popular boy in the deaf school.”





QUEEN ISABELLA.



QUEEN ISABELLA.

HE was not that Isabella whose bigotry caused the suffering of so

many faithful Protestants long ago in Spain, but a far wiser

little person who was born in a prosaic old New England town not so
very many years ago. .

Her father was a man of great wealth and influence, and her
mother had high family connections and she was the only descendant
of the paternal and maternal stock. The fairy God-mothers had been
unusually generous to her. She was a remarkably beautiful child,
with the air of having been born to the purple, and she had a quick
wit with a kind heart, but the fortunate little lady had her faults
like the rest of us, and it must be confessed that, her friends and
playmates had some grounds for declaring that Isabella Waterbury
had her full share of pride.

From all these causes you can see how she came to be given a
royal title.

As a very little child she was rather delicate and lived much out
of doors. She was encouraged in all manner of sports, was a skillful
tennis player, was fond of boating, rode a horse (there were plenty to

Nees
QUEEN ISABELLA.

choose from in her father’s stables) like a jocky with or without a
saddle, but her chief pleasure was in bicycling.

Each year she had the latest improvement in wheels—You would
not catch her on a last year’s bicycle, and various and bewitching were
the costumes Susan, the little sempstress, devised under her direc-
tions.

Susan was.a patient, mild-eyed creature, as hunible as Isabella
was proud. If a fairy were to appear to her with the offer to change
her into whomsoever she chose, Susan would instantly have asked to
be Isabella Waterbury. She admired Isabella’s glossy black hair
and dark eyes and high spirits. She thought no little princess could
be more grand, and what could a princess have that Isabella had not?
Nevertheless, she sometimes thought that were she Isabella she would
be just a little less exacting.

Perhaps she thought this when she was occupied changing the
last bicycle suit for the fourth time, but she immediately forgot it
when, the suit being completed, Isabella said kindly:

“Oh, Susan, you do look dreadfully tired. You must go out
and take a walk.”

‘“That’s not what sempstresses are for” laughed Susan. ‘‘ Don’t
you know that your mother wishes all this pile of sheets
hemmed? I should like nothing better than to go, Miss Isabella, but
Wcarts

“Ves, you can, and you must,” persisted Queen Isabella. “ You
know very well that if I wish it that will be enough for mamma.”

This was a truth not to be gainsaid by anyone belonging to the
household, and Susan offered no further objection. As an actual fact

II2








wt

‘She had the latest improvement in wheels.”’



QUEEN ISABELLA.



before she could speak plainly, Isabella had discovered that her wish
was the family law, and it was said so many times in her hearing,
~ “do it to please her” that the child used to say it herself, urging a
request with serious persistence.

“Do it, doit. It will please me.”

Isabella had first thought of taking Susan to the park, but as
she put on her dowdy little grey cape, and shabby black hat she
seemed hardly a fit figure to be seen in the royal suite. Then smiling,
she brought from her own well-stocked closet a fur collar and a_pret-
ty Tam-’O-Shanter cap. These she insisted that Susan should wear,
and when they were on immediately broke out:

‘Why Susan you are a pretty girl. A real pretty girl, and have
quite an air too.”

“Tt is your collar and cap that have an air” said Susan, and then
for the first time realizing that Isabella intended that they should go
together, went on ina sad voice: ‘Oh Miss Isabella, don’t make me go
out with you. I ought not.”

“Why not?” demanded Isabella, “why shouldn’t you go with
AIST

Susan stood silent with red cheeks and a look of pain on her
pretty young face.

“T can’t tell you, Miss Isabella. If I could tell anybody, it
would be you, because you are so kind, but I can’t tell any one.”

Isabella’s heart smote her, as the saying is.

“T haven’t been kind,” she broke out in self reproach, for the
patient sadness of Susan’s face touched her, “but I mean to be kind
now, I won’t be so fussy about my bicycle suits. Even mamma says

II5
QUEEN ISABELLA.

I am fussy, and if mamma says fussy, I am probably a perfect tyrant.
No, I will be good and unselfish. Tell me Susan what’s the trouble ?”

It was difficult to refuse Isabella when she was in this, her gent-
lest and most lovable mood, but Susan still stood silent and the tears
were beginning to roll over her cheeks.

“ Oh Miss Isabella,” she cried at last, “please don’t make me
celle : |

“Oh, you are so mysterious. You have roused my curiosity, but
that’s not the real reason I want you to tell me, but because I mean
to help you. You must tell me.”

The word was brought out with all the energy of Isa-
bella’s nature, but it was kindness and not determination that
conquered Susan.

She took a step nearer, her face growing still redder, and her
eyes having a world of pain in them that awakened all the good im-
pulses of Isabella’s heart.

“ Oh,” she said and her voice was scarcely more than a whisper,
“Tl try to tell you because you are so generous and believe the best
of people. I’ve often noticed that about you, Miss Isabella, and I
think perhaps you will believe me.”

“Yes I will. I promise that, only tell me,” urged Isabella.

“Well then, I must confess that before I came here I was not a
sempstréss in New York as I pretended to be. I was a shop girl at
Greenberger’s, and was accused of dishonesty, and though it was im-
mediately proved that I was innocent was sent away. They treated
me very harshly, and at first everything went against me; but you
cannot judge always by appearances. However, though I was cleared

I16
QUEEN ISABELLA.

they would not take me back again, and so I got a bad name.”

“Why did you not tell your true story to mamma?” asked Isa-
bella.

‘““T had told my true story so many times, and no one would be-
lieveit. I ama poor girl and have my living to get. No, no, no,
nobody ever believes the true story,” said Susan, beginning to cry.

“Qh, yes, for I believe it, I believe every word of it,” burst out
Isabella, all her generous feeling was stirred, and she went on ex-
citedly. ‘‘ And I will make mamma believe it, she will do it to please
me I know, and so will papa. And he shall be all worked up about
it just as I am; for I really think it was a cruel shame, and he shall
go to Greenberger’s and tell them just how he despises them and how
all other decent people despise them, or would if they knew about
the way they have treated you. Then my uncle Horatio who owns a
newspaper shall have the true story printed init. And Uncle Amos
who is governor of this state, he shalldo something for you too, and
grandmamma—”

But here Isabella stopped herself, for her Grandmother Loomis,
alas, was a proud and despotic old lady, and it was whispered that she
was rather hard and uncharitable in her judgments, and not inclined
to be merciful to the wrong doer. So Isabella wisely thought that she
had better make no promises for her. “So you see, Susan, you will
have reason to be glad that you told me” she ended.

Susan was already glad that she had unburdened her mind,
though not from any belief that Isabella could perform these promises.
But she did think that she could persuade her mother to befriend her,
and Susan found that living under false pretences was unbearable.

Tey,
QUEEN ISABELLA. _

She was a simple-minded girl, of sixteen years or thereabouts,
and as much of a child as Isabella herself. Now, having thrown off
her cares, she went out into the fresh air with her small protector,
conscious only of the pleasing fact that she was going to have an out-
ing in the middle of the day. ;

It was a bright October afternoon and the air was crisp and cold,
making the blood flow gladly in ones veins. Isabella had intended to
walk with Susan but she reflected that it was a perfect afternoon for
wheeling, and beside she had on her new suit. Her bicycle, too, was
conspicuously placed by the porch, and as she and Susan came out she
cast a longing look toward it. ;

“Well” said Susan laughingly, “why not?”

“Tt’s not very polite to invite a person to walk and then go off on
a bicycle,” was the answer ; but this inconvenient politeness was soon
overcome by a very little persuasion, and Isabella consented to start
onward on her wheel, leaving Susan to her own devices. The two
girls, however, walked together down the plank walk that led from
the house to the street.

The house was a fine one with rooms on either side of the door,
built after the generous fashion of half a century ago. It had belonged
to Isabella’s paternal grandfather, who was an aristocratic old gentle-
man and had always lived in what was then the most fashionable por-
tion of the town ; and the old mansions there, spoke of its prosperity
at that period of its growth. Like itself, the neighboring houses wore
an air of comfortable grandeur, with their wide colonial porches and
green front lawns adorned with shrubbery and fine old trees.

But the neighborhoed was fast running down. Boarding houses

118
QUEEN ISABELLA.

were creeping in, and the very next house to the Waterbury mansion
which had been owned by a rich old nabob and had been famous for
its fine hospitality, had recently been bought -by a Jew for purposes
as yet unknown, but suspected to be of a character detrimental to
Chestnut Street. Old residents said with a shudder, that they ex-
pected a pawn shop would be opened in the basement, and whenever
they saw the young Cohens, the Chestnut Street boys would instant-
ly cry through the nose:

“Old clothes, old clothes,” to the evident chagrin of their adver-
saries, and a pleasant sense of their own wit.

When Susan and Isabella came out onto the pavement they
found a number of the young Cohens at play there, and a girl of Isa-
bella’s age spun past her on a bicycle as Isabella started on hers. As
she rounded the corner of Chestnut Street, Miss Rebecca could not
forego a shriek of derisive laughter.

“The impudent thing,” cried the insulted Isabella.

Eager for revenge, she redoubled her speed and followed Re-
becca. ‘The latter was evidently going to the park. Well, she too,
would go to the park, and it would go hard with her if she could not
overtake a wretched Jew on a last year’s wheel, and teach her better than
to insult her superiors. ‘To be sure, she had forgotten her bell, and
riding in the park without one was against the law, but dear me, what
was the use of being Queen Isabella if she were subject to the same
laws as other mortals. And after all, whatever she did could not be
far wrong. ‘The park was but a short space distant, and Isabella not
far behind Rebecca, had soon reached the entrance gate from which
point began the main promenade. This was usually filled with car-

119g
QUEEN ISABELLA.

riages and riders on horseback, but along its entire length, and sepa-
rated only by a strip of grass, was another and somewhat narrower
road, which with the numerous pretty paths that curved around the
hills, were thronged with wheelmen.

The sky that day was as blue as a sapphire, and matched the color
of the harbor, glimpses of which were to be seen through the open-
ings that the autumn winds had made in the foliage. The trees were
dressed in their richest tints, and in them sang swarms of birds,
stopping in this lovely park on their journey southward.

But none of these things saw the bicyclists as they sped on their
way. Isabella still behind the triumphant Rebecca, who having led
her far over hill and dale in the little quiet by-ways, now brought her
out again upon the main path.

On seeing Queen Isabella follow their sister, the whole tribe of
young Cohens also had started for the park. There were Esther and
Moses, Isaac and Abraham—and Abraham was the youngest of them all.
In truth, he was too young to go to the park at all, unless with a nurse,
and that office was performed indiscriminately by Esther, Moses or
Isaac. Sometimes the nurse left off being nurse, and the nursling
suddenly found himself his own master. Upon one such occasion
the young Abraham strayed away from the precincts allotted to the
babies. He had probably been attracted by his sister Rebecca who
had just flown past, and having become convinced of the hopelessness
of two fat wabbly baby legs ever rivalling a bicycle, he suddenly gave
up the attempt and found a comfortable seat for himself without tak-
ing trouble to ‘go back to the security of the babies’ corner.

Unhappily, it was just at this moment that, intent upon her re-

I20
QUEEN ISABELLA.



venge Isabella came flying around a curve. Her eyes were straining
into the distance where the little blue-clad figure of Rebecca showed
a mere speck, for which reason she quite overlooked the small
person of Abraham.

There was a shriek, the instantaneous approach of several per-
sons, and a heavy hand laid upon her spender tac last was the
hand of the law.

“You have been riding without any bell,” said the policeman,
who had laid hold of her, “I shall have to arrest you.”

“Me! arrest me!” cried Queen Isaballa.

Her blood ran hot. She looked at the bystanders, for a crowd
had instantly collected as if she expected they would fly to her relief.

A stout colored woman who had snatched the Cohen child from
its place of danger, was the central figure of the group.

“Good Gawd, Miss,” she had cried out angrily to Isabella as she
held the boy to her bosom, ‘‘ havn’t you got no feelin’s that you ride
over harmless little chillens as if dey was of no more ’count dan de
stones ?”’

She was now beaming with satisfaction at the probable punish-
ment of the unfeeling bicycle rider.

Just behind the colored woman were two feeble old gentlemen
who had been pointed out to Isabella as rabid anti-bicyclists, and
whom she now remembered having seen almost run down near this
very spot. Of course, it would not ; be of much use to look for sym-
pathy from them.

‘Two messenger boys also were interested in nee fate but they
seemed not ill pleased at her humiliation. A number of idle prome-

IG2436
QUEEN ISABELLA.



naders were on the outskirts of the crowd, and here, there and every-
where, gesticulating like little imps, and frantic with glee, were Esther,
Moses and Isaac Cohen. As the patrol wagon rattled up the last
drop was added to Isabella’s cup of bitterness, by the sudden appear-
ance of Rececca.

“This girl has been riding without her bell,” said the policeman,
indicating Isabella to the driver of the patrol wagon. ‘“ Take her
to the City Hall.”

“Ting-a-ling. Ting-a-ling,” tinkled Rebecca’s bell merrily.

“T’ll pay my fine here,” cried Isabella pulling out her purse.

But this was not allowed.

She was hustled into the wagon her bicycle with her, and away
she went, Miss Isabella Waterbury, in company with a boy who had
stolen a tart, a little girl who was lost, and an Irishman who had been
found asleep, drunk on the grass.

Meanwhile Susan had greatly enjoyed her walk. Instead of fol-
lowing Isabella to the park she had strayed into a street where there
were shops. She liked to look into shop windows, having a taste for
finery and gewgaws. It pleased her to imagine herself Isabella and
choose what she would have, or what was still more in Isabella’s style,
make disparaging remarks upon every article, as if nothing was good
enough for her. ‘And that’s the reason I shall buy nothing” she
said to herself laughing.

Once she saw sucha pretty girl coming toward her and a second
glance revealed the fact that she had seen only her own figure in the
glass and been deceived by Isabella’s hat and collar. The poor girl
really had a talent for making fun out of nothing, and went on and

122






TRL ae le eS Se RC coat eto —— Es Se

«She was hustled into the wagon, her wheel with her.”’

QUEEN ISABELLA.



on forgetful of the fact that she was only a poor little sempstress and
that her time belonged to another.

But she was destined soon to be rudely brought back to the re-
alities of life. She was standing before a jeweler’s window, still play-
ing the part of the fastidious Isabella, to decide if a certain beautiful
sapphire ring was worthy to be worn by a person of her elegance,
when she heard a voice calling her by name.

"The voice came from a carriage drawn up to the pavement, and
leaning from the window she saw the head of old Mrs. Loomis, Isa-
bella’s grandmother. ‘The old lady had eyes that bored into one like
gimlets and were as hard as black shoe buttons. She had a hooked
nose, a projecting jaw and a voice that made one hop. As she had a
habit of informing people of their failings, she was not a popular per-
son, and many confessed to being afraid of her. As for Susan she
considered her as some human dragon and would walk a mile out of her
way any time to avoid meeting her. But now there was no escape.

“Susan, Susan Giles. Come here,” the old lady was calling,
and she beckoned peremptorily with a hand that, in its loose black
glove, looked like a great claw.

So, like a poor scared mouse Susan went cautiously down to the
mouth of the cave, if we may so disrespectfully speak of Mrs. Loomis’
fine carriage.

“Does Mrs. Waterbuty know that you are out?” asked the
dragon. ;

Poor Susan was obliged to answer in the negative.

“Well, that’s just what I supposed. Get into the carriage and
T'll take you home.”

125
QUEEN ISABELLA.

There was no help for it, and Susan stepped in. She seated her-
self opposite the dreadful old lady, and the carriage drove on. Pres-
ently she felt the gimlets boring into her and Mrs. Loomis suddenly

said :

“Where did you get that hat and collar?”

“Miss Isabella-said I must wear them,” answered Susan in a
wee voice.

“Susan Giles, I have just heard that you have the reputation of 7
not being an honest girl, and I believeit. You have been imposing

on Mrs. Waterbury, but I shall tell her what I’ve heard. I am going
to take you to her at once.”

‘“Oh, Mrs. Loomis do not be hard on me,” implored Susan. “I
never deserved a bad reputation. Let me tell you how it was.”

“You can tell Mrs. Waterbury,” said the old lady laughing. “I
don’t care for what people are now calling chestnuts.”

‘“Oh, don’t be hard on me” pleaded Susan again; but she felt
that she might as well plead with a stone. “ Have pity on me as you
would wish one to have pity for Miss Isabella.”

‘You are an impertinent girl. My grandchild needs no pity,”
said the proud old lady.

By a strange chance just as she spoke, Mrs. Loomis’ eyes fell
upon a patrol wagon rattling along to the City Hall, and in it with
other offenders, humiliated and disgraced, was that very grandchild,
She had turned down her hat over her eyes and covered her face with
a handkerchief, but the figure of Queen Isabella was quite unmistak-
able.

‘Look, look,” she cried to Susan, thinking her old eyes must

126
QUEEN ISABELLA.



have deceived her. “ Whois that child in the patrol wagon ?”’

“Tts, why its Miss Isabella,” cried Susan.

“Tsabella Waterbury in a patrol wagon! How dared they? Good
Heavens! what can it mean?” exclamed the old lady wildly.

‘Perhaps she had forgotten her bicycle bell. They are taking
her to the City Hall. “Oh, Mrs. Loomis, don’t you think you had
better follow her, and take her home?”

Susan feared the presumption of advising Mrs. Loomis would
bring vials of wrath upon her head, but the poor old lady was quite
upset. She was glad of the support of Susan Giles, and meekly fol-
lowed all her suggestions.

So having descended from her place of ignominy, and paid her
fine, Isabella was put into her grandmother’s carriage, while Susan
trundled the wheel home—an arrangement as satisfactory to her as
to Isabella. |

In the public eye Isabella played a brave part. She held up her
head, and walked away with a nonchalant air, but when she was in
the carriage she burst into a flood of tears. ;

The little scene which Mrs. Loomis had planned for the humilia-
tion of Susan had an entirely different ending than that she had ex-
pected, for no one of the house of Waterbury would oppose Isabella’s
wishes on that day, and she really carried out a great part of that pro-
gram she arranged when she first heard Susan’s story. The whole
family warmly espoused the cause of the little sempstress, which as
they learned to know her better became more and more easy.

Isabella did not easily forget the disgrace that had befallen her,
for she could not go out of her own door but, as it seemed, some men-

Te
QUEEN ISABELLA.

ber of the Cohen family would ery out: “ Dare goes de leedle girl dat
rides in de patrol wagon.”

But when, a few months afterwards, the Cohens moved away,
there was no one in Chestnut Street who rejoiced more deeply than
Queen Isabella. :

128





xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008736600001datestamp 2008-11-03setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Gerald and Geraldinedc:creator Plympton, A. G ( Almira George ), b. 1852Niagara Lithograph Co ( Printer )dc:subject Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fictionConduct of life -- Juvenile fictionChildren's storiesChildren's stories -- 1898dc:description by A.G. Plympton.dc:publisher De Wolfe, Fiske & Co.dc:date c1898dc:type Bookdc:format 128 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00087366&v=00001002224582 (ALEPH)49457683 (OCLC)ALG4848 (NOTIS)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English


xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20090327_AAAAAR' PACKAGE 'UF00087366_00001' INGEST_TIME '2009-03-27T00:05:40-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:49:58-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 299690; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-13T00:29:47-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '782505' DFID 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWH' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 701a3c0e6a35e2fc19637f3327567c3e
'SHA-1' b857e2d14397648b931a52c896f2ff488c16b96c
EVENT '2012-01-20T11:30:56-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'138950' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWI' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
449156aa61d2ff6142d33c335ffb292d
3df35383aa11c2a5e17bd20974b73ace5466f48c
'2012-01-20T11:33:17-05:00'
describe
'6198' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWJ' 'sip-files00001.pro'
7608353ddbd6b50a776446ed62c4b2fb
4de5b86da1de1cb3c33ee787e65a32cd65958bd1
'2012-01-20T11:31:42-05:00'
describe
'33614' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWK' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
a1138bb910ed39a7990357974105eee7
3b1fe5f0e0cffe7c457cbb52f9b37808ac34aa80
'2012-01-20T11:31:32-05:00'
describe
'18790224' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWL' 'sip-files00001.tif'
9c708b7d03c82266ef0666e0837c66de
ace2f83f13282414fa60106cc38a6fd39b6ad85c
'2012-01-20T11:32:30-05:00'
describe
'434' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWM' 'sip-files00001.txt'
adc81c07d67867aeb0a58c26a8ec76b3
3dd8e283ad02b266255ae4b6245ed0481293ab3b
'2012-01-20T11:31:23-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'796850' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWN' 'sip-files00001a.jp2'
c22c705356be5752d1ef5645ea20a78b
504e49985605e80c81479b5a6bc76091c8688c6f
'2012-01-20T11:33:01-05:00'
describe
'63047' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWO' 'sip-files00001a.jpg'
bab6d60b35ab8ebf8c2b73208405bda4
79f5ebe8e0ef4eb008936cfea8c14f23293515b6
'2012-01-20T11:30:55-05:00'
describe
'13459' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWP' 'sip-files00001a.QC.jpg'
a00ac0ac35f2e6928b98763b0d138e8b
90aa99409442aaeb825fc4c44d751c3f0ed8e364
'2012-01-20T11:34:13-05:00'
describe
'19129924' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWQ' 'sip-files00001a.tif'
67bd907feb135130999c33d72e93fc04
45723d9646196007ec47f007faed1bbdfbda88d1
'2012-01-20T11:36:20-05:00'
describe
'3394' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWR' 'sip-files00001athm.jpg'
955685b88b6e06a769a25923f05786b9
23dac1b8936bf38d98f61cd9dcac9fdbabc911e2
describe
'9015' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWS' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
805611e6ccdda92c04bef5c3a6d6c2ee
e0f6cfbb0f9787a0c63205a8d7f6601b32886fa1
'2012-01-20T11:32:18-05:00'
describe
'665411' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWT' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
aa084b11e43d0faca3e4d104c062341a
43b1d14b858b868be6c73320d1556a2db209e0b6
'2012-01-20T11:33:37-05:00'
describe
'153102' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWU' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
a8dc96e89f205fd2ab37a078d97c9590
91c29f7bab49d19cdd38f0052f6a252eb973c617
'2012-01-20T11:35:39-05:00'
describe
'39484' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWV' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
329e184f1e73acf15b696ef8060ad273
184bd9303f0e8407d30b53f3f8c84479f3fa6e42
'2012-01-20T11:31:30-05:00'
describe
'15977996' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWW' 'sip-files00002.tif'
b8fa996f6c97422ef13c589be2b2367a
94c70d9bef52663ae707e0e388e10c760af5ef51
'2012-01-20T11:32:35-05:00'
describe
'17715' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWX' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
92f46eb435af612382d857ed9d090bb2
aab30daa0e90f4b3fd16a0077476be8166030a1f
'2012-01-20T11:32:23-05:00'
describe
'665162' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWY' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
8607220253640bbb30d6a5dcca18ad0a
11b9625c99600f5fc8798b0ac1939dfc294f5515
'2012-01-20T11:31:06-05:00'
describe
'79538' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANWZ' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
6eb5ee0ee36b1238874bb71f2118999e
6bf55cb1d2ef1584fe314ac790ae53c486c5f5d5
'2012-01-20T11:32:07-05:00'
describe
'28770' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXA' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
8927da785c3f893d9e80f13b45307ea4
548f5cc141df6365f614befcd59044ccdb330afa
'2012-01-20T11:32:53-05:00'
describe
'5341252' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXB' 'sip-files00005.tif'
b18fd6e14f5fbf12e4916a04518d30d9
523ae3be5bfc6401e99f82c46f9b2e7d18be5e3f
'2012-01-20T11:32:55-05:00'
describe
'20236' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXC' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
8828a162e080057976ff8c7481092420
96b642492e8230d5d00d34c1a33c92b2cbebb312
'2012-01-20T11:32:54-05:00'
describe
'665430' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXD' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
d50954c2952b6f64905e01a6504336f2
5792a8c3a96fb99d71c654902721fa6961408fbc
'2012-01-20T11:33:39-05:00'
describe
'31034' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXE' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
6db1aca531d8ca805d8c5b88f732f094
6d15c244503e00d24114d84ac66f9ff8f442e97b
'2012-01-20T11:33:30-05:00'
describe
'4947' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXF' 'sip-files00006.pro'
9e5636b1021696946da4a2e28954bfb0
dbefd545d62807da7d26ecf73dc5ccb7416dbc0e
'2012-01-20T11:35:08-05:00'
describe
'7891' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXG' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
ccb2ea042e00073bf92b1645171d3eab
419cc8e12fd28afbba233433bed5833333d665b7
'2012-01-20T11:35:12-05:00'
describe
'5340276' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXH' 'sip-files00006.tif'
87c6c57821c1a1f59938917eb1898bc9
0f21c7bf387dc27da3dd640760b793dc9f194afb
'2012-01-20T11:32:13-05:00'
describe
'359' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXI' 'sip-files00006.txt'
1e78f152b948f12c2fe08d052fc597dd
989f4ea07974df5c1667298777a14ddade0ef206
'2012-01-20T11:33:57-05:00'
describe
'2253' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXJ' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
abe83e4741d9c99e15cdfad265c67d1c
49a3c128ae53ab07d5d6aedf59e12672db81dba7
'2012-01-20T11:32:14-05:00'
describe
'665389' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXK' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
9e157fe6d5a272ef2bed9557ee51523c
ca1351e97bbbacc6db9855acebcb5b09333bab06
'2012-01-20T11:31:57-05:00'
describe
'20320' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXL' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
7b9deee2d5c2c2337cee8a7df2322d79
c8eafcd0e83843f16712fa8148dadad3fa74f30a
'2012-01-20T11:32:33-05:00'
describe
'2995' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXM' 'sip-files00007.pro'
fe9334b0388a0b4073f0c642b4eab056
7e19f2354d7168de4148cde9cd090382cb62c75d
'2012-01-20T11:34:32-05:00'
describe
'4195' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXN' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
e4df13a0d85421765ae2505158db7db2
c9e0acf2e09896cad02b27e49696d0d324dbfd48
'2012-01-20T11:32:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXO' 'sip-files00007.tif'
62706fc968d38bf96475c62eb62894dc
1ca02ac92c520523759eba320d2166e8d8db6be4
'2012-01-20T11:33:10-05:00'
describe
'247' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXP' 'sip-files00007.txt'
89304e357286796556f86d028a7c7800
459258cc5b39b378a8a3241217fe77e190821096
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXQ' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
7cbbbaea6799caa39c7deb9345ed4716
e5b58f086efe6951bfe9f51e51b887fe585c8858
'2012-01-20T11:31:49-05:00'
describe
'665401' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXR' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
9c6d2a0c4788c366b1e2d647cf57d1e6
eeb360db26f60f4f85e75ea53e2f936a9ee91ba4
'2012-01-20T11:33:11-05:00'
describe
'26900' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXS' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
9b52c702439a762486a2faa5bc3bfa65
73337b465c8f16d711d015c2c65c446c5f5bfbc2
'2012-01-20T11:32:15-05:00'
describe
'5881' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXT' 'sip-files00008.pro'
0ed69c11ad4d979d005af0f47d5360d2
ab026e0538befa6e49ed3a08a3a73e2a9f2a1c46
'2012-01-20T11:33:14-05:00'
describe
'6988' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXU' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
8a13b85cf878dddda6419b77e9ce97d2
bd5df07c8f355ddd94696ec6fee4ed19effa42e5
'2012-01-20T11:33:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXV' 'sip-files00008.tif'
4e6530d2ca285511470b8be807de99b8
4009121c3acc68489e6e586a7490e2adc9c7231a
'2012-01-20T11:33:35-05:00'
describe
'395' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXW' 'sip-files00008.txt'
3f22c20ec493660af77aeb064d013836
0c6b83fcc787e701d7e36fb723ee85391687a012
describe
'1980' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXX' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
099691f206886d4f85fd2b626837d46c
e830720d0383e17db88c0c1a931a2c6e38015e7e
'2012-01-20T11:32:42-05:00'
describe
'665039' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXY' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
77d29fc17071ecec754d321e0502ffab
a30b9e23102e8fd9a87d2eb6a9a5996f5e683be0
describe
'16495' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANXZ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
005ed9ca2890ef1797766361f81e0514
6d974693da8e54f4fa2c4a04232083d321bafc94
'2012-01-20T11:32:59-05:00'
describe
'3446' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYA' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
526c93b6697845bb9b8bac81ae085fbb
5f29b01088e4495b62408a298998ed12f5912683
'2012-01-20T11:32:22-05:00'
describe
'5337624' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYB' 'sip-files00009.tif'
43f59aa75635df282651ab442b0a663a
82e2256609f00db50b18414135327ffdacbb5eb0
'2012-01-20T11:31:41-05:00'
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYC' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
beec93fc8a6bdc8db449fc006f9ed950
45484ea458ed53801f85ee0e235d239428fd21aa
'2012-01-20T11:34:18-05:00'
describe
'665426' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYD' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
3bcdbb660a0de588618a390e85acfa02
ddf474eeebcbefb9339efd6928783a13fb510e26
'2012-01-20T11:31:44-05:00'
describe
'57747' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYE' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
b46126bf7bad330c79da5430fbda2cbc
6684d9c4f9d659e507a5f2fef35ff2343b597a85
'2012-01-20T11:32:24-05:00'
describe
'17928' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYF' 'sip-files00010.pro'
71d93457f25e7b8ad4d9648c660dde6e
e8fa7065886863e7dc958d5e909a6733b528325f
'2012-01-20T11:32:41-05:00'
describe
'17176' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYG' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
11634d21895bc771b720de402abf1899
d8e18d56108a0995046f81ce5c3bad0d8e1cbe2a
'2012-01-20T11:35:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYH' 'sip-files00010.tif'
6782365b1e5f1e4d4ec41273684444fc
3c3b1585c1d9e9d3f874f78cbd273afee87169a5
'2012-01-20T11:33:43-05:00'
describe
'792' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYI' 'sip-files00010.txt'
24509d42eb73d68f36b3d0bee53764c6
b616ff167bdf61dbbb770334b4bd846edf70e202
describe
'4281' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYJ' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
aae2830f8a5224d73c06788c42f4ab10
c03dd5a78f68323be6594f0f536cac5f1d0d0108
describe
'664843' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYK' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
6a1370d625544d3e978f6fa1760d1ea5
737d1d34010963a4707011fd5f2371f75085fb94
'2012-01-20T11:31:48-05:00'
describe
'17699' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYL' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
98fb3e737af97bea8b3f56553eedd97c
32b52d473b44786f72e636f5ea2c22e949a858fb
'2012-01-20T11:31:28-05:00'
describe
'3641' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYM' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
d427741bf9aa6c0b173ba2ca0f1da67a
6ad724338154f77353b7ce14a28610a39ebafdc8
'2012-01-20T11:31:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYN' 'sip-files00011.tif'
bd9a65f59b822e5d2c91ca2aa328d88a
4ed6ab2e8b01d4b8d80dfcfa0aa5a9a04587d50f
'2012-01-20T11:33:06-05:00'
describe
'998' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYO' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
1b546a5941cdac65a48ab1e21667a1f7
60462d2c317306596f1fe6b7efbe94406ba2addc
'2012-01-20T11:31:08-05:00'
describe
'665364' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYP' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
91cc28136009db0a1a549a4b75635341
85f0e2487998cc69c8e28c51f6f58de86107f0e3
'2012-01-20T11:31:46-05:00'
describe
'19954' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYQ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
83c3334feb0ec25db29a4279509656b2
696138b46276d8edb46f8e4ece5368bc90987ba2
'2012-01-20T11:36:02-05:00'
describe
'4083' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYR' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
2cab32d4bcb2baba5e8fab61210c9b25
b5822136a27b7ac67497566cff0b38921d649d40
'2012-01-20T11:33:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYS' 'sip-files00012.tif'
22d92429348d91dd00efe49e367f63ec
1d1a5a05879a606b3d1ad456b710449762d8488a
'2012-01-20T11:32:40-05:00'
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYT' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
85db6e977bc89bbb2ae5fb6d043f3e08
147404077aa791bff1f89cf7312c4880a80aab33
'2012-01-20T11:34:20-05:00'
describe
'664877' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYU' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
47d9d0c941fb0d0abf4da724bd169883
dcf2f2140b3cf1a5f0968b3e0c606747afc9a6e6
'2012-01-20T11:35:26-05:00'
describe
'16503' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYV' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
94eed25c079aecfea10d8823ebdc83ca
922fe2777f6c3e081da42352c4819c400a31816c
'2012-01-20T11:32:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYW' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
418b6920309cd0db00d5cc2c1cdca9bd
a124219506ab9977d0591614d23b085fd701cd20
'2012-01-20T11:31:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYX' 'sip-files00013.tif'
7e7674323de36b4053bc53119577a6d6
eeeec729b0a6344ac5db8e812154abcc838f6603
'2012-01-20T11:31:52-05:00'
describe
'665329' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYY' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
807343b24e67fdb192b0607a8bdec3c9
07536a5ec60380f6736e560288bb7e6e34310c3d
'2012-01-20T11:32:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANYZ' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
27147f087e4265a46835d05512bc82ad
8af4b21265293c2acf9286fd48fda98cc4814ea9
'2012-01-20T11:31:29-05:00'
describe
'19914' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZA' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
86d22f067b5fff223f27be6588c821da
bfafc022862ae6c222d5929cdcd618e212913ef5
'2012-01-20T11:31:22-05:00'
describe
'829' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZB' 'sip-files00014.pro'
1992216bbec7a91e989ee6950ceb080d
2a6fdf85bc9030b26cd327d4e5263b51b44bd29e
'2012-01-20T11:33:13-05:00'
describe
'4679' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZC' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
089c1b115d6cfa09a728a41d12f3f892
92856869d832d26352062a5a8e3fe2fbc9ad253f
'2012-01-20T11:33:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZD' 'sip-files00014.tif'
6121c05709a059a85efa251f9fe3e274
2c5833dbfa747cce7400c04329d7a4ebe4ae61b2
'2012-01-20T11:35:25-05:00'
describe
'58' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZE' 'sip-files00014.txt'
81b8435c91e0c9262cc7a28db0404d49
45838c0439b1f14eb5640caaebe61a01d1b1cc4d
'2012-01-20T11:36:09-05:00'
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZF' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
e3fdea6325aee8a934780644cc255d45
4ab4a80d4397a9cd215c2aaec0b59aff22789d9a
describe
'665245' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZG' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
0bf1539ff4b4d19f2a77f12c1beb62c0
2c191a78ece80a242ea3087c9a28d673303c465a
'2012-01-20T11:31:58-05:00'
describe
'19599' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZH' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
53b534bd436fc316a0c451a501ba90d3
3728bb27a7c5f23e5dce5132c48b9e7993909010
'2012-01-20T11:33:38-05:00'
describe
'3963' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZI' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
e18b02048ae8854afc34b014c2323e1e
5b1278ef7d5b568f8db75847d06f00e5627bec9c
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZJ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
5dc3bd1db11a0dea66e9580fc30ba6ba
881bbe19b88f082f8db7a3d074e70516e0a1042a
'2012-01-20T11:31:07-05:00'
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZK' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
2a00a2b2bc481d5b96ab5479fbe7b05f
8a08ff264fd5f4c2b2a5698eff62e96033733c40
'2012-01-20T11:35:40-05:00'
describe
'665412' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZL' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
45e4588977fa095807eed47252e3aa41
b6f2f1573109f610a7979146152858399ba38d40
'2012-01-20T11:33:28-05:00'
describe
'83061' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZM' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
18823c34fa7f672d0f3869bfaa36e710
9112f2377279c7430cbfb7e87826a69c29b6fbec
describe
'30157' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZN' 'sip-files00016.pro'
37fce6af92e75384b2dbf8ca86e79f5b
55e7ba7850dd0abd2cb06292148824bf6b9ec517
describe
'23892' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZO' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
3c12bf832556e193b7c463a3c73b85b4
1baa89901c2cc7e5a037cde9820cfe3a93c5915e
'2012-01-20T11:31:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZP' 'sip-files00016.tif'
f5f3cf0a9afad6546582620d09609e46
094d74e75e3edbb877fc664f8b1296bc7d92535b
'2012-01-20T11:31:53-05:00'
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZQ' 'sip-files00016.txt'
b4d9a84a1c53bd88355ef52feb1b6733
a766f5a69cf80d455276acc9633225d2c2995abe
describe
'5590' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZR' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
a97cd4e49d7c1556799e52200dc25ca6
64badc151c810a06a1e4ac55f534523d81ab1929
'2012-01-20T11:34:09-05:00'
describe
'665424' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZS' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
5dd470ae165a4a7ac751ebd6a5bd93f4
da5896074403ec6e7bf51378ca5b9181d94197e1
'2012-01-20T11:36:13-05:00'
describe
'108234' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZT' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
ab6c7316b1a7a9cc4e723adf46952a3d
77689beca71b3562d7bce4aea3f2ef1427fa736d
describe
'45452' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZU' 'sip-files00017.pro'
26e9eaefb3e18beef84afcc08e7d612f
0262a65ae1d11195a69cd433a23fcadb73b8bc4f
'2012-01-20T11:33:15-05:00'
describe
'30731' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZV' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
f0f633b01457c404ef0cfe3f1c56c5bc
000abb02c2ac0d0f097455c34b3aedd53aa35b9d
'2012-01-20T11:31:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZW' 'sip-files00017.tif'
21697b0f74a5a7a818ca8bbebf86ee60
a4cb3dd7bccf4844368f78f00146af2aa6ae1005
'2012-01-20T11:31:18-05:00'
describe
'1845' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZX' 'sip-files00017.txt'
fcb324403fb4b6c5a7fcd07b8f95b1ee
27e05ef1eb7895869cfda28c586251ef9e42ad8a
'2012-01-20T11:31:00-05:00'
describe
'6993' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZY' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
c98722ff793006cb7431de84568bf0e2
757428d71ab0b7f738938d9a0fd56af90bf9858a
'2012-01-20T11:32:20-05:00'
describe
'665421' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAANZZ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
8399c1ed93bfa0e96887c77b0cc18549
89d958572f6fcff430d027adfe3859ab428d1162
'2012-01-20T11:32:31-05:00'
describe
'105543' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAA' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
4ec566da32bddf45884c4cc8db062353
0ffa1a82ac9a5fc81fa626215b157b432684dcb8
describe
'43849' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAB' 'sip-files00018.pro'
7e2010d9187209be5a20b769b226d34a
4cefad79a194663eedb6b30dda7f62ef1050c347
describe
'29536' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAC' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
d2b877a983c48f0d99a36902fcafce36
bf42c3a28c1115a8b1e2b31c9651c4ee98f324b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAD' 'sip-files00018.tif'
aa79aa1fca769841f424acb12ca61726
c4c29d3b70fee085cc7f02608f2071449b784ccf
'2012-01-20T11:36:14-05:00'
describe
'1761' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAE' 'sip-files00018.txt'
4cf937e6718562b927c1798e4bb247bc
05077124743b06992f3327861f65830d57e23ce5
describe
'7058' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAF' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
e1f540d7f41ad12ec0b8d0f388ea2508
cb36c15119476a31b782fb342f0963d6e6a3bfa9
'2012-01-20T11:32:48-05:00'
describe
'665427' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAG' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
ab65c9d99a0631699495a957d35c2f7c
306b8bf74201a286200043833e927dddaddaecb7
'2012-01-20T11:34:35-05:00'
describe
'103129' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAH' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
90b6a918806aadfc5208c39dd23bb053
88700159b3cc3114c20ca8becb9092014a29a9e6
'2012-01-20T11:32:06-05:00'
describe
'39898' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAI' 'sip-files00019.pro'
678de6344b72e87f869691d69974577e
650689615fb45b4a7fd755aaba740896c01503fd
'2012-01-20T11:33:00-05:00'
describe
'29291' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAJ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
948d62a522b4cf28b81a07064c977ca3
15ed021359dde232b48404aa1bc2ed0dca1e3a91
'2012-01-20T11:31:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAK' 'sip-files00019.tif'
fdae26cc5a3d409908b75187d7a96d66
d8b90002bbeeec4f28504f82189498a7dfcf4cfb
'2012-01-20T11:34:52-05:00'
describe
'1670' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAL' 'sip-files00019.txt'
8941e62c16d0d6434909d4c2ebe19222
0311ee5df8a8b02c95776d43fcded7222525c908
'2012-01-20T11:33:56-05:00'
describe
'6742' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAM' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
f48ddf50396f9566c9e538cd0366fa8d
eef849b1b48b883b4b80930b27e7b8d69aabe151
'2012-01-20T11:33:21-05:00'
describe
'665428' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAN' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
f2ecd525b3df370a992f5377dcca641a
9fd78245839edbd429ebede0a500263c000aae50
'2012-01-20T11:33:25-05:00'
describe
'116881' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAO' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
bb9734e835af135a629421032392af0e
ba195488fd49154bc994eecbcf822ff495bb08ab
'2012-01-20T11:32:43-05:00'
describe
'45762' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAP' 'sip-files00020.pro'
12c9d67ab3fe99ec9c9264c9b278f4b1
46acf045710f54a8cf711e44f842c005e5751d61
'2012-01-20T11:31:01-05:00'
describe
'32614' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAQ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
002ac864715472737e20b1f8039d46cb
9ceb4f9edd870722282505c8da2f2b17f4de8e43
'2012-01-20T11:33:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAR' 'sip-files00020.tif'
8d55919654010550b0ab583455208d03
bb75ea9fc816a3cc870107681ea790f2594296f0
'2012-01-20T11:36:15-05:00'
describe
'1856' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAS' 'sip-files00020.txt'
dd84fdf231008363c6adc793187baa87
a3d7f590fab82bfbff131983664378d2a95025dd
'2012-01-20T11:33:52-05:00'
describe
'7273' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAT' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
b1f969e1c3f0968d37ea82d9d5f4d32f
77b49d03cb568f0c9c1198314c9238adb4590fe1
describe
'665279' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAU' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
e04a1037e2130c9317f32e062c0cb089
5ac7764728856cb4c152b507b5f34a44e91b2fc0
describe
'102219' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAV' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
4204ef6b661a08852946eee7f96d6aed
37a38a2371d74c8d92f72184be63013d37f6853d
'2012-01-20T11:33:04-05:00'
describe
'44010' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAW' 'sip-files00021.pro'
faa360f1224987bd099a9dac6d454654
699f8527bfdf25ac01e8dbf11c07d47d12b60f1b
'2012-01-20T11:31:55-05:00'
describe
'29856' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAX' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
7701f51c494c0fe6a0bd1d13217b0f82
9bd57af6ba7f79d242c7d083d0cc278f53d711eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAY' 'sip-files00021.tif'
1d87ccb8ffde3bf552d16dd92e8ea055
cefdf21ce0965642db95c02cd5a8a08b7d545af0
'2012-01-20T11:32:44-05:00'
describe
'1751' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOAZ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
4dbdfbde28ebcba5240544bd9aeeb1e4
0394cd55855f4553c352653e1f8a92acb937d138
'2012-01-20T11:33:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBA' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
e203af4f84a51eb87084c8d68d1ddf8e
79243123db380bc5e874268e95ac0d1576f0548f
'2012-01-20T11:31:15-05:00'
describe
'665334' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBB' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
f55decb7086ef672984d251f8340acd9
afdf6d130f4db5a194f9502ea5aadef81fb34398
'2012-01-20T11:32:56-05:00'
describe
'100450' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBC' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
365600a856d6d22e14fa0de8bf1ae0d0
90d9db24fec2189f734ba8af1d3e21f3447b05e7
'2012-01-20T11:36:23-05:00'
describe
'42228' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBD' 'sip-files00022.pro'
492fe9671cf88276867ea5c1a9f9fc26
6a30dd61566e36d024a20273eb061f5b2551683f
'2012-01-20T11:33:48-05:00'
describe
'29088' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBE' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
7dbc98ea67fcceb5ce7f8b61bb5e86d7
10af8a568ff15aeeae7f9ef9f376c49ed1dd11da
'2012-01-20T11:36:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBF' 'sip-files00022.tif'
db49ac0ddbeeed776707aa75d9fdc475
3e861163d16a28a43ef692c1c38f4452f8e41e7f
'2012-01-20T11:35:34-05:00'
describe
'1797' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBG' 'sip-files00022.txt'
dbc36fcd3d285c792c8246ec1decf89f
c328e35cf37c1298abdc68c30a647654c4e3edac
'2012-01-20T11:36:08-05:00'
describe
'6519' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBH' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
070141f6ba2d5077a9852c6cacbcd575
61bcfea5f40831a079b40421f1454eab12fe92b1
'2012-01-20T11:32:27-05:00'
describe
'665189' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBI' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
12ccd28e28ec78743d525a9537a7375a
fa51aa66850256a294f54768ae7f0d5470a35bf0
'2012-01-20T11:33:09-05:00'
describe
'95354' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBJ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
115b585268041d8bb23e443a167d7835
4d50afdd63a6c7dfdf57c51eb3e3822a376124e5
describe
'40473' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBK' 'sip-files00023.pro'
f3df1128f1383445ee48e2a99f27967b
f31e968f808777b3a20832ce311958d5dafef1bc
describe
'27539' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBL' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
e58dbb5a45eea0723cd632d27a083570
26242c82aceffcc8e024a6afd17921df3aa1d7de
'2012-01-20T11:31:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBM' 'sip-files00023.tif'
a712493f21e7ed3eb469c5fc77b442a7
bf1cf5a08cef7b0be788bb4cbff5efd7d5b6f81f
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBN' 'sip-files00023.txt'
0092d378ada6c6bab130fd215cf2a25f
bf15d8482439ddc15c007c4be8d5543a98476313
'2012-01-20T11:35:02-05:00'
describe
'6642' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBO' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
134126d263eedad5c9930673bd562f99
166d4b8ea84dc9b278994be04d568f1426b02cad
'2012-01-20T11:33:12-05:00'
describe
'665405' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBP' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
72492c347912e0d7225a9aacbc15c8b2
6117e4994ab46d59aac917098d029daf465fbbdc
describe
'98632' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBQ' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
06a0bc752c62974da3facce6c741aa24
87f6003dd29cb20f0356d0c705a054a847523807
describe
'41190' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBR' 'sip-files00024.pro'
1a756be389d389bfbd1625d4de6eac84
f350c2042c337f96cd91a72f33ec75495584407f
'2012-01-20T11:33:34-05:00'
describe
'28321' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBS' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
4a44f3d056abc0acf7511768eac5fd16
5cbce8701a60ca4728e62079061a80f52048d53c
'2012-01-20T11:33:40-05:00'
describe
'5340268' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBT' 'sip-files00024.tif'
26a5e740e433f0227dfea8ac09fc5be8
0cd1f9df03588b7b8b9ec11c999afeb28ef179ac
'2012-01-20T11:30:57-05:00'
describe
'1666' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBU' 'sip-files00024.txt'
f2faa53be94d2da5fcde6c1a2fa17fea
3cca5c990f42c58f1a47f0b8e1b52dc55c679786
'2012-01-20T11:32:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBV' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
6064006e966a6533c080f68988b67dab
0f1d6f766175d83f9fa4856e4614cab82b357046
describe
'665420' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBW' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
efba9a80e81fff910190620411aadf99
bdcc8fc8f2af8535acacc0de5976a0c585d3f3a0
'2012-01-20T11:31:10-05:00'
describe
'89335' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBX' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
a84fd5b100893088695bd9b8d8d015f5
9c8e086456fdcc2151aaf575cc91910d27400a86
'2012-01-20T11:32:08-05:00'
describe
'37873' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBY' 'sip-files00025.pro'
c1c8bb0357e327d10651cc4b88cf0401
72b4f9ef9422cd0a6b4f13804f481238b7a88fec
describe
'24441' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOBZ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
7289d0c6232bafb01c9a226dc006ab20
ffa36c06c40062e57d84c3e2a3d1de10d68f7dee
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCA' 'sip-files00025.tif'
a028348306e45dbc0deb5f2cb1debf10
801c94dc86c7c904ca445a4be8f827a7aed23204
'2012-01-20T11:31:50-05:00'
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCB' 'sip-files00025.txt'
a8caa8f82a6467998c90a8afec5dbcdd
a87247be966e567c056b4021e2379b38342cc8e5
describe
'6330' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCC' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
82fce716607ee32aabead616ba48701e
19cb0e453236f41b9e4cdd264a2f559818053f03
'2012-01-20T11:31:43-05:00'
describe
'665321' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCD' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
047ee379a1854162d50f498d0ea4859b
cb3e067f1ea75ad103faf0d97c020aabd18a29c6
describe
'127004' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCE' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
ccd6c693959b0688e0ded3efe5880c0e
3fff1b3cae71c59bbb873320a392689a0385d67d
describe
'27231' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCF' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
893d9791db897ad77f25d6beffb3c224
8dd937ba8939265bbc2a2b740e32f779362881f1
'2012-01-20T11:33:36-05:00'
describe
'15978036' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCG' 'sip-files00026.tif'
fd63ea3d0ff4f4f98e7b98c9d498ec88
eb70677a4d27105840fcead279d44ac6245d5059
describe
'6998' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCH' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
a9d29c0eddc52cf47a23f7ea4e71c310
e096a71b366565e81e3c1f655664f01df95e748e
describe
'665297' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCI' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
90eca9c9e525e46cc866c1ce5a443d16
ad71b2211350a25e3ebe795176b53c6dbdab4519
describe
'41008' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCJ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
ed556f47177b81660ddda839c23839a9
ffcec1105cb0e38e52f174873da580e0573af758
'2012-01-20T11:34:51-05:00'
describe
'7872' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCK' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
b9f27e2f83742c1e3107ace8bd0d5410
eccd9758e0a3caaf8154e5468e1e048d53105b6e
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCL' 'sip-files00027.tif'
28a5f7f8fc5936d68d8d84ef7009ddd5
8fd50974d235a674bd2b03b8637d7f25ace5334c
'2012-01-20T11:32:36-05:00'
describe
'1702' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCM' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
f602007a5dd002890193970fa2ff5108
ce596c8b9ffc793d2bb29eddbb6cd11ed65454f2
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCN' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
b55d0cacc7540a43c5335fc8088838d3
d9d32ca008996598484592d759be98cc556adb08
'2012-01-20T11:33:29-05:00'
describe
'99931' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCO' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
3326de461e4eeab353d284135d003c95
a3fb219434c5933beac188fface26d2f1c711d07
'2012-01-20T11:32:51-05:00'
describe
'41816' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCP' 'sip-files00028.pro'
bee61010cd5f249ceca0e2892ff82b43
b275d61e345c0beb5074eb7b444ad2d5d305c983
describe
'29281' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCQ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
b086b2eea3b66b478bce9ce77a4b05a1
9cda275d6477ca014b1a58e0c61f7ecd1677993e
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCR' 'sip-files00028.tif'
f2c32ece367e22fd413e53fb78c797e6
74cd5365ece2ae8202fee46de3273219041c7abf
'2012-01-20T11:33:18-05:00'
describe
'1717' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCS' 'sip-files00028.txt'
de0c74e3375dd08ff45484619d3fcb17
423601d77340c1148408012106e7293f083d505c
'2012-01-20T11:32:26-05:00'
describe
'7107' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCT' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
2dbe897e0e36c5253a535427a24816b9
aa82ff0421df6849696a0e65c8f7b41ecfd5653a
describe
'665417' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCU' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
f2d6386471ce13b2469ea485058236d9
806d32b3524360b978f4586bc2fb64df9843e85c
describe
'92086' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCV' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
8f51e07cfe12c678700c1f910abeb4fa
14a1c256907f23b2040552bd7bc371f08e04f4da
'2012-01-20T11:34:53-05:00'
describe
'38882' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCW' 'sip-files00029.pro'
fc7c0ee53d119fbb8eafa083f9cd91dc
c639b47bd967a92e9da2e9b784f71402e923b2f0
'2012-01-20T11:33:41-05:00'
describe
'27046' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCX' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
2c28d203d51d870f7bbd5a9e57aae381
fa93f8578bfa7e344dde90af9d9fdf846f53009c
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCY' 'sip-files00029.tif'
741c7bd85586887f296f3e4da9219842
0d0f37f9c7b58cd9becbdb3ccdbf66488efd7f11
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOCZ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
df3eaa5d51e6e47c5ab0ee9c9dfab3ad
e4da906c8a89575a63c6c5b48c712691d90d3caa
describe
'6327' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODA' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
abdbfd8aee5276d304b6c45d12b46adf
61558bcf0d9c2903529c852c86fd97c6e4af2f14
describe
'665378' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODB' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
463349f381fa775bc8fdb882e2ff8fbc
fd5dc7b3e7634d10db1e850807c84ece2ff7f9b0
describe
'96432' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODC' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
24e78309c4085578f8c47b6e1293762e
afc6c2857cc3d97ec51eb2b2a1ec7327195d9a1b
'2012-01-20T11:31:39-05:00'
describe
'4378' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODD' 'sip-files00030.pro'
b8361296200c55faebcb2a03732ef446
ff961773e2cc1eafee2dfb92693ee19c15afe70e
'2012-01-20T11:31:40-05:00'
describe
'21448' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODE' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
908a8c0599b42ff2e196ba51096571a9
48bc080c0bb6557f413f275a20eec2e218a560c1
'2012-01-20T11:34:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODF' 'sip-files00030.tif'
26b294fa933c2fa315e8735d7c758829
28965c3cf64a5843cba6932df0bb50923ebf7968
'2012-01-20T11:33:23-05:00'
describe
'452' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODG' 'sip-files00030.txt'
b59b1e29fea28b708e616c41f0418502
1fdb0d042e39f47b51fc2157af58825ec22fb414
describe
Invalid character
'5250' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODH' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
a4444abe0872e88682a56a9eda26b017
daebd5297d766fa07a1a885c7b45180b1dc8af48
'2012-01-20T11:32:01-05:00'
describe
'665255' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODI' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
43f19295edf4d53a79debea97a0be7bf
386fece110481c9b553e358d383498ee02ed0c2b
'2012-01-20T11:31:51-05:00'
describe
'16739' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODJ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
6408cb4864ed93c9830eb066823eb3c6
41f154b39898906a68df0db97b99db870fd8c7c5
describe
'3205' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODK' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
496235368d32f892300fb99c450f5b79
25fda94958575b28369e11a9fffa65b5840b607d
'2012-01-20T11:34:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODL' 'sip-files00031.tif'
6e9324a337d18d27333273dfaebccdd6
26720e23a11469c7b2b03455de8dcf829866d1de
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODM' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
36b2a697dc7ba8a9248793a5f8185542
3b65f35b562f6373a3389e04628fe5f12701794d
describe
'665296' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODN' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
9c4cdc7dbd22e612923f83a0e366288f
32f4315e8bbd9b7a017f0bc355862a699d6cf85d
describe
'94475' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODO' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
ef12a3558f30cc1e6e6c18b3aa1f1430
71ff9868e6ffb84c51242b1e2e761eb6139620eb
'2012-01-20T11:35:57-05:00'
describe
'38940' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODP' 'sip-files00032.pro'
09397f8d86a3422bf2196c2fb222061a
651be86feb3d2e6f0393d9acfda88fa879190eaa
'2012-01-20T11:31:35-05:00'
describe
'27471' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODQ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
a5b3ffcb5337841127965546d40dea12
4336a274deb27147a1b858590593b3d1b9a2ffaa
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODR' 'sip-files00032.tif'
718b9b33b1ad5493aa98f35043204802
e5e037745567a6c71e004b3dedd2375c3fca42db
'2012-01-20T11:32:50-05:00'
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODS' 'sip-files00032.txt'
1501f23d790905579f623286847afce3
b21e9a3c1525ed4bc92e8c17a43da72529349550
describe
'6883' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODT' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
ca73e56db88f7946cf5f27617620d1b2
cfc4df1575b06e7766777ce5ee13213937930ff8
'2012-01-20T11:36:25-05:00'
describe
'665425' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODU' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
ecc75a02a2c644e087672554ac61be9b
0ab0f0f8cfae5ac404ad1b0f97d852eb05cf65fe
describe
'102305' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODV' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
fdbf48113073b79f5d514958d960ae9f
bc07ae12c6d255b733e4762be12d5542f83e6bdc
'2012-01-20T11:33:58-05:00'
describe
'44454' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODW' 'sip-files00033.pro'
bada3a7d973d5329771f91a5c9474c95
bd9e436b1003bb2eb451eb098770d510b213b44a
describe
'29089' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODX' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
88754e3a9f8ec2c597009a099c16640e
47cdc4f82a1bc95200130ee03f6c0fddd439bcb9
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODY' 'sip-files00033.tif'
f1fecd11dc1560fbfbf05682a4823c38
9db94b315260c0cd89fe1b8d37a9a3f87d4d8cc8
'2012-01-20T11:35:09-05:00'
describe
'1794' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAODZ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
12c38b035cb4c0f41256ce16879be9f0
253be6d4f497e64d5ee49c83ef6158974b2996a0
describe
'6938' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEA' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
afaa9aa98c827e9f167610aaf69324e2
89976449302e59d8dbdb0e8792575ccccd16867b
'2012-01-20T11:32:16-05:00'
describe
'665413' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEB' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
2866047b1885d121bcacfadc8990a687
0351e1d5da1977e172fdc9f91b391287be2894d8
describe
'91949' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEC' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
f45d579c391a07de34b4f9ddfc27ea8b
e30084b3c8eba5c41cabd77ac7275231bc32c2ad
'2012-01-20T11:31:27-05:00'
describe
'37639' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOED' 'sip-files00034.pro'
c3fc3794f694ecfec98385640f1baeb0
bbfdc8b549d04c68ddcca4cdc14742dd1005cc68
'2012-01-20T11:32:29-05:00'
describe
'25923' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEE' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a0eca71f0c634f837c3018906a4723c6
55d7f2613b2acd18bc5c14bddf231592acd4d048
'2012-01-20T11:35:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEF' 'sip-files00034.tif'
45006a8166577e73e47dd39bb4a3971e
f761a2aaeb0f44ce967041729356edc890faedcb
'2012-01-20T11:32:25-05:00'
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEG' 'sip-files00034.txt'
e8604e78a76bf083c42f2845397137a5
773ede795650161241b40e79056bc2b0b4135dee
'2012-01-20T11:31:47-05:00'
describe
'6311' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEH' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
56deb90189c5bd608f890043e5bf8940
e5247e61f91ea2682e5d70137b666c7bc14eeeec
describe
'665182' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEI' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
01474c6fe282800013ebe3fe5fd537bf
3dfe85b7319654d710c4f7547a3bdedfec44784c
describe
'97142' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEJ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
13d80dd3cfef072577fcdb57075e85ad
21f65f58dd46d4a43742de636e22ceb8654aa382
describe
'41482' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEK' 'sip-files00035.pro'
1951acf36b9bafd0e4b3443fbe54135c
6dc6d989198c0523f8e02e1a0f076a53d1d6fa05
'2012-01-20T11:34:45-05:00'
describe
'27284' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEL' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
c721c26d9d4eb3ea39f81ba75af3597b
47ea4744281779658fb800ed47d7fe5303ee0dba
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEM' 'sip-files00035.tif'
b3da03e5e236c592ed108fad4aecb97d
87245b55e671acfca0f449ae2187f6f9c336b3d1
'2012-01-20T11:32:09-05:00'
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEN' 'sip-files00035.txt'
54dad37cd491168890f7c70bb0465213
750d384d743ec279a97b0453b98ebd6bf70d7e85
describe
'6542' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEO' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
c05fb92f60bac9d2573e1b47c1143d02
6d0fab08ca6bc508b434e8adba239d73669e3396
'2012-01-20T11:33:26-05:00'
describe
'665431' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEP' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
e950333bfa47e82ccf7355053084e9d4
d3420cf29b53b680efd9d977c385d9bff58e80c2
'2012-01-20T11:32:19-05:00'
describe
'97018' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEQ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
62c6152b6f4284568030c0e8d3024f5d
22dd1d3086ca4fdc805840a98dd9f7915bdfd868
'2012-01-20T11:35:48-05:00'
describe
'41774' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOER' 'sip-files00036.pro'
bf317c380d119bc882105edb32dd8518
4b9759dff5d6393d2e4457a28f07c4408d102275
describe
'27553' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOES' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
a36721c86a403566aed3e04f319ce385
56f50c34c0d85ead92a3c1232d249f76f6699fe6
'2012-01-20T11:34:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOET' 'sip-files00036.tif'
e6438c1afdbc04ab629af5856f032326
a30353f67b6781a5b2faef484fcd0984624ed8ae
'2012-01-20T11:36:27-05:00'
describe
'1695' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEU' 'sip-files00036.txt'
2140d0b78289139bec948231072e3a31
47bd482e73bbefd0305faa2d6b12d160b306ae8c
'2012-01-20T11:30:59-05:00'
describe
'6448' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEV' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
46840b3c12f3ba85faa5748c21261ff2
8019a030ac28921bb0d0434f2db90c3df1cfb714
describe
'665391' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEW' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
a2982d1df13a73db3d63590353c60680
1a71ab00c6374d46316f562ba12221df0b867b88
describe
'102508' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEX' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
9a4a1c0aac432a2d17b85906b871b45d
74d8dc96aa9ac3826f9b4671c4071e4c17a2ccc0
'2012-01-20T11:32:12-05:00'
describe
'42387' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEY' 'sip-files00037.pro'
f21ae0e2950ef8808accdd3f7455eab0
8ed6fc66caa030ba7c2c93512daa04aa966c367c
'2012-01-20T11:34:00-05:00'
describe
'29673' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOEZ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
5fe07df795862d5c48cd7ee93b1620c3
5a1d5fdc25fcd7706c21b29431c8e9fcd6c5d9d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFA' 'sip-files00037.tif'
c884aea03ace9191c7655db63a763a6c
c0e94b4e962cb3ca49d64e79518a7cc1b5baa5ec
'2012-01-20T11:32:28-05:00'
describe
'1723' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFB' 'sip-files00037.txt'
1dafdfca911591506cfbe4e14eeb7dfb
81a524b23fcf793575d96b32c23b51b8b22d2cf4
describe
'6971' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFC' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
2c8f0157ed0ba8b5b61502c58bd583e7
4a85933795481c29d7802750918b1d0e400e1386
'2012-01-20T11:36:12-05:00'
describe
'665226' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFD' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
d647a346db8a1cc66dc7c37831359c3b
ae1a79f194e8b5a586214146b767dceefc5c671d
'2012-01-20T11:32:17-05:00'
describe
'101963' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFE' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
36d74b1ed657b0ead32fe4ecc7329748
62d7bd341e997d9125858bbc0d2ac88b59537575
describe
'42203' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFF' 'sip-files00038.pro'
e922aca68dfffe09bdc1555f51076fad
c9c6aead9b551e2d28865eba3f313a246fee20e0
describe
'28598' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFG' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
be0852145c7f44edeea4885c7e6291bd
c7378d430a80f2f750278ba0e55a95a5b1e9cebc
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFH' 'sip-files00038.tif'
3e54d52e4226ae24ceb5dd2cd82ebac3
a9250171380268bd6452892d86d8b5e2213efce3
'2012-01-20T11:35:32-05:00'
describe
'1700' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFI' 'sip-files00038.txt'
a1ac32d53a89365770fc903fa7d50f3a
fbcfeeac6f81032a4c80455d3afc828386cc16a8
describe
'6647' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFJ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
4188d4b89cecc02c3de2643918d94e7d
1c31de6fd17c6b2bfb15848909166b349f81f177
'2012-01-20T11:35:44-05:00'
describe
'665363' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFK' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
3cd325480cc8127c017789828c5bddb0
c4535e7026f2f2e7072468449a9c72fa54052da7
describe
'82626' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFL' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
14b139e3c37f4845f6543e966ea7ac7c
cdc6cc40fe19a9183caaae3bd1b8417179d1a227
'2012-01-20T11:34:21-05:00'
describe
'34132' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFM' 'sip-files00039.pro'
c40692f0e0534d3b310f1b7e28153ef9
af46e8cf212d788af93cff22af1ad8a01fd92052
'2012-01-20T11:33:42-05:00'
describe
'23214' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFN' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
a3254b5f248a3867b40fee3a082e984c
1737e157efc092074f4a836b6ac4208a0f0bdede
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFO' 'sip-files00039.tif'
eb7ee82e277fffafbecf39690e2d5874
d3a6549a8445b8006d7d83f3d958353b29a81981
'2012-01-20T11:35:53-05:00'
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFP' 'sip-files00039.txt'
840bb9c6a7d0d98d9dfb217427d493dc
539f2a9f355178d9046b7c13bf316f95400cfdf4
describe
'5563' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFQ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
f3cb528427a6ad82c5fe4db148b1103c
11903a618e853121aab2833dd470f9cac09db465
describe
'665167' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFR' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
3459a4161cc8acd71e8678a7b7d8b9f1
7c9dbd581558be144cfc42bd23fdc1221c71581b
describe
'15232' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFS' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
c8275688738ab214b08354f44f45122a
2573a71808d16c66515743d1dc0401e591dbac6d
'2012-01-20T11:36:01-05:00'
describe
'3038' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFT' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
0dd33743a67f5819561d2043ae259566
ed90797cf0b424a74ffe6646da75da87fb8f10ab
'2012-01-20T11:35:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFU' 'sip-files00040.tif'
2ab3bd1bab8cb6ac19e75c11252e3097
2e10e04ceea5ba5e091203d23c04cfe616a7aa4a
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFV' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
c13d498212d26ac508dc9189f9260cb7
0bb5b23be95733313406c0f32c5803fa2bfe752e
describe
'665253' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFW' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
00ff5d7e939a0dfd7e235f41352bc136
9e62d4746ef69eb5a5ca860d28b72b1657a35690
describe
'14375' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFX' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
6c642d0f850aa41e12bd3f7bfff9546a
22996aacdb159a92af65d4a9b080eb56305abfa5
describe
'2999' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFY' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
3354e4e637d4490faf78a55b775732f6
c6e44379ba20e41854063af8ec6c0f470d230460
'2012-01-20T11:31:59-05:00'
describe
'5340508' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOFZ' 'sip-files00041.tif'
9875ecf344e421c623aa61483a956819
8cfc3f5d0b028681863c82edfc9041c5ddbeca28
'2012-01-20T11:32:00-05:00'
describe
'936' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGA' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
2581137cec3ef4d3cf3647d70cfc5a6c
ccedb3545826e0d6ede76daf4fdff25a46085168
'2012-01-20T11:36:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGB' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
bb81f378e344e5094e6db434b4d0b26c
55bf8fcc31c81c6bb683407ff81956e15dab16e4
'2012-01-20T11:31:16-05:00'
describe
'17647' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGC' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
971308e7a11b889ea03bb007f243dddd
294a440ed9115df318d33c9e3d0093bff80d1f56
describe
'803' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGD' 'sip-files00042.pro'
5fcc01edd2e4d80a332e1627dc922c0f
028621f9d988741993613a8590766d4e8fa48083
'2012-01-20T11:33:27-05:00'
describe
'4276' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGE' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
4c0504a86462d0977ab9036b941342df
dc095b63b3f76707e70f5f8c4d9039d00b48086d
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGF' 'sip-files00042.tif'
1b9b99e7410dc3af902140687f86f816
e1395bd2840416bec2197812d385f480a6daaaa1
describe
'57' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGG' 'sip-files00042.txt'
f4452c3271a297e9bc60145629f54cb5
a8efb497f2f83315622f24afd8e23bb15d887c14
'2012-01-20T11:30:53-05:00'
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGH' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
fa823b03bb3d1ee047e582f46409f9be
7ab3cc082b192a0525ca73eaabb44196dc7439cb
'2012-01-20T11:36:16-05:00'
describe
'665337' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGI' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
dea7dc10c470a4668b14b120650b545e
07c90d1741e2dcd57b9cbb356199a525c3e72404
describe
'16071' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGJ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
2e9229d1c2786228abfc869ca48ae173
0760c7fa9aad578404b4d0537c2222fc045ef49c
'2012-01-20T11:31:09-05:00'
describe
'3161' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGK' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
e16a74ee705803b6e6b4267ad2e23ef4
addeb064bbad1eaecf5c7ad8c8afba35baac0e37
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGL' 'sip-files00043.tif'
ff7429f1aab07a72cb42189e6817dafc
d4aba9d3a22b32a5d2bb6e535831d73be18f16ae
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGM' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
b6c976d2caeb629d83a79637a7cdc88e
2b145184201ff0bd0e33461114e44f955eb61326
'2012-01-20T11:31:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGN' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
b77d8d535792ce3418e5a395d8cd28bf
92fdc3f268e0ece0c9b0526e4166240460e6da76
'2012-01-20T11:33:24-05:00'
describe
'78423' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGO' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
a345bc4e2e591fdcb8881d2ca259282e
4a17a0356d622f5150fa3cbf3dd14eae5bdebad4
'2012-01-20T11:33:33-05:00'
describe
'29206' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGP' 'sip-files00044.pro'
c6fdcb1fe2fadb0ea5cc77c0008f67db
f891f8bf44731995fe5432fed1c35dcd8b98cd52
describe
'22142' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGQ' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
bc41ec3c4ac96dee3a569e567f45e092
52ba3229741286eee8f014485ad7757d7ad8a0f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGR' 'sip-files00044.tif'
eda97e2bdedf9c0e569cf53b96524fde
6d2c3815521870ad75e8311171e709181314d3e1
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGS' 'sip-files00044.txt'
5cd9d5676b22d7d6edae84d023634759
7977a51843424b7b94d502594febfb09abbcde9d
describe
'5366' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGT' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
533a8eac16b55dbe7682ba168ee01c3c
b9aec9d5cb90a16bedc1c6796b20ab1fd2eedbeb
'2012-01-20T11:33:31-05:00'
describe
'665429' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGU' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
45404cd427d92fbaaba45f47a9069357
41f87124a7d92abb97f76c77666d238269b64748
describe
'103589' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGV' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
b12c0461eb8ea7ea3ae2128870e91553
3267c5e0f3cfddbbfaa25163ce2125c655c1df1b
describe
'43598' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGW' 'sip-files00045.pro'
6ba2569664c3bfd9f6364dcd677cfb2d
5460bac604387812457db12ecdac1d1486c74230
'2012-01-20T11:31:26-05:00'
describe
'29646' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGX' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
044304a0ae2c81eb217d605b980c998f
7914c1785913a69934479b89dba09c36e831760c
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGY' 'sip-files00045.tif'
c3a2d7f614ddf25c84c547786ad34c2e
3f4ed975e66775ef7b05f592afce7bc01eea9e40
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOGZ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
52f03964a6e6258dda9ea33a0e40b2b6
34708c65ebd7948f17b97a97c91d5a9dd5cbf275
'2012-01-20T11:36:22-05:00'
describe
'6877' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHA' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
e2740bf280841332c24b74a0a9fcb716
9753792a160db6d21062b8add272383e99b433b8
'2012-01-20T11:33:47-05:00'
describe
'767237' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHB' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
dc7aa57ab9d65847b3d34756b0a7d630
18c07455f8b4b16c5dbaf15bb08c2335523f44f5
describe
'137682' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHC' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
842173ddfc9ba279888b077d62f78a36
e963a236c22555a0167db5591d1307279ed2c24f
describe
'31018' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHD' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
6620b43f5386801ca7898ae0502658a9
da0fa1a954aea4e6583f5816ef0c225d3d7bb00a
'2012-01-20T11:36:18-05:00'
describe
'18423072' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHE' 'sip-files00046.tif'
2a6361cd57bc33192b5e51d10e021955
76c72e860d1bf91dbb5ba5401218a2b192a5da85
'2012-01-20T11:32:46-05:00'
describe
'8064' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHF' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
847292f08437e7e20647bb8da76ca232
2d4d9d2c03d1be39be76ba7e960505d5285bac5c
describe
'665398' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHG' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
b52e0404f623f77e363ac0686ad462e7
ffd27a8643f25a9477d9c6c8fce82422e7f938ed
describe
'34475' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHH' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
c699a0fc01ecaefda0e8ceecc61a51fc
96506933fe0afd1623c222a874fa43afe7b9a23b
describe
'6754' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHI' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
5e8b378b30b0f39c5d257f761cfd0ca5
e4307a2b5920adce95f7ac7eb398978ce38d4a43
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHJ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
7e36499852fe8630ff55a472d3b3740e
86a2d2cba1805809889ebf17bca6eaf7ae7ba875
'2012-01-20T11:35:33-05:00'
describe
'1661' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHK' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
9665be2794ece3aa4f98caa0c18ea5ee
fda17c53fff4011d84dae3d9f30fc08482697d90
'2012-01-20T11:32:21-05:00'
describe
'665423' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHL' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
2ea0afa6b9f3a32b4f3c41a9e3a6baf2
38b96e7d769eaddc0d4ab56d911b77c856671e80
'2012-01-20T11:35:28-05:00'
describe
'101982' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHM' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
37d731e2bff5309450faeb9eaf28f592
df51e4b0f3535e7218bd9b295664e023eebb6875
describe
'44156' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHN' 'sip-files00048.pro'
c78796dc5dfaf67c2a09b8047206a809
e7ab3e7aaa43986c17c8a4551f52dc02fed899df
describe
'28704' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHO' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
5c243441b2d298205d0cc46ce28def77
499eceae0cdf01bc90516988d70d42dd19c14ea9
'2012-01-20T11:31:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHP' 'sip-files00048.tif'
fb19b596bbeec177a800ce4611f595ed
f391030ec355d9c53822d72e455c22e5d2b0ccf2
'2012-01-20T11:31:14-05:00'
describe
'1781' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHQ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
199087cb05cb7baa0d63f72fa8a307e7
eb661dde29662402e5f7e54be36115c2c4e51cd0
describe
'6583' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHR' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
3c41be32bda8564caa079f241cae9999
f9150a3b4f128f78c237b1e79c08f93571723e57
describe
'665331' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHS' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
16b936fa973cedca0f96e4ecdc482ca1
2fba31be23527243c2f9c10cb1ecbd991c781c2e
describe
'97417' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHT' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
c6d69b6aac5a869fb9d8defd1fb5ee47
b2b8928c6557892a32b0b4ad45c980216cdb2c44
describe
'41707' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHU' 'sip-files00049.pro'
51de783222f842609cee902b2bd9a19f
f5812bb1545c6e2c7ef3c799acabee1d09ea4e23
describe
'28246' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHV' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
157c341665a58f90666e19caf86e2e9e
415bb7859a16822fad4101cccce43faf5f83d6ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHW' 'sip-files00049.tif'
d3a0aacf49a55387311214649f390c87
f2dd08bc8e1ffd4a78dba632071b2e109c8809b0
'2012-01-20T11:35:10-05:00'
describe
'1653' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHX' 'sip-files00049.txt'
4533a1d66b5c269bc631fdd7eb9fe0d8
35f30e6c7f158beb965ba93e85813a860411c0e6
describe
'6333' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHY' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
62954816d3632624b266bc874e755c22
048fd30ea6002e42cbbf034f021d256e87ecfa5e
'2012-01-20T11:31:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOHZ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
f923b9de60ffbeca7638d69599cfcc9d
b414616dc79c60d3ed736571c65fe49ae185111a
describe
'83449' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIA' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
233f3fc4e1068e7519ca935b827e0ada
324c9745951c45a08d514118c5b289fb8630b561
'2012-01-20T11:33:02-05:00'
describe
'34505' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIB' 'sip-files00050.pro'
064207570a41a9cf4162ee239dfb69e5
1874a297e9110635087d61837aafe6df8e905fec
'2012-01-20T11:33:53-05:00'
describe
'22718' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIC' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
3046bd8a3e8f4c119777eecb26439141
9b06ea8ad2ecbc465a79a30076a098e81588301e
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOID' 'sip-files00050.tif'
4ea70280cd7a8a257fc8fa15baaff064
fdbc779f0a46530fb33a47b09623bcabe8c15139
'2012-01-20T11:31:33-05:00'
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIE' 'sip-files00050.txt'
efd8c75addc9b407853e8e51732872f2
3e8c7759db5a9813250cb585d2128f24edc2b82a
'2012-01-20T11:35:18-05:00'
describe
'5972' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIF' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
fed45703a629065fa14092ffd5397e54
02b56310033ef47d95b57af85d8bb7b0790d0a5b
'2012-01-20T11:36:28-05:00'
describe
'665416' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIG' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
5410812b3bb79b4b980ac5dd906ddfcf
5a3b0811a959a3c7ff0a66f296b63261cc67c138
'2012-01-20T11:35:31-05:00'
describe
'101727' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIH' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
f29b97928a6e6be6d5398e1d3f0e7c56
2a4a1b29dc2a5b4399f1d27bede887596c287d56
describe
'42414' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOII' 'sip-files00051.pro'
70c5ed0a6d87151a64d9548ecabdcae0
31759289eeb2f84867ba80443c0985e6d87381b7
'2012-01-20T11:31:25-05:00'
describe
'27988' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIJ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
0e7446871f241a612a3f4adf982cba5a
e056d705d54ccf8e08e1a2cda52e855c9c75818c
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIK' 'sip-files00051.tif'
fd3655845e9e906a60409d87684ab1cd
49567549dc39a9e51fc6e9be2b81c3aacccb454f
'2012-01-20T11:31:38-05:00'
describe
'1721' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIL' 'sip-files00051.txt'
8fc5262a4f6132fe505f78e5e90deb4f
4ed4f9388cea066b12730ea405cfa9d05fd84722
describe
'6563' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIM' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
9e199b4b5060896e28d62f8fba14d531
278d09b12b72f0d78401a7cf165d96062a4941d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIN' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
2cf735adf669a90485bcae5d89864241
395f951e1f7000f47a9a8fe260caae293ff31d90
'2012-01-20T11:31:34-05:00'
describe
'105587' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIO' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
d897855cebe72af8027413895544fc92
101d46c31e23939fd9a85b5d9b4fbeeb29439a1c
describe
'43881' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIP' 'sip-files00052.pro'
51c532f3aa451dc5761a7d4a2bcec865
ad107dbcf83bf68da6b01dccf757afd0092d4764
describe
'30644' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIQ' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
0349b8efd371992e0887dec798812355
4411976c79c1dc38eae2dff0f367fab5e132886c
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIR' 'sip-files00052.tif'
8443944c380b5d8bcbf0677372a217f7
369d6ef9785a50caf2c925f1dfcc316858405044
'2012-01-20T11:32:47-05:00'
describe
'1776' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIS' 'sip-files00052.txt'
904a48be545081869dba3cff5a626b98
047caf0b6568a6e4464c56da1afd126d2a53f48b
describe
'6839' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIT' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
ec024a166c33e14d0270049ac1240a47
b18ef843f19fc70adfb10824f5ef60b0369a2e21
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIU' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
02035bb8f1f1f8db0331a618dec0292b
ec444c9c65bb34b40fcd166d336423e40aac1cbe
'2012-01-20T11:35:46-05:00'
describe
'103361' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIV' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
3dbd63ef1d944136a69706f51fffb98b
be882e350a70d0597a20860c940e8830dbcc4c6e
describe
'44135' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIW' 'sip-files00053.pro'
bf5097e6cf2aca5eeea68d186d1a626d
7b1370b5bf19d71c1dd55cbf8f2bf28efcc59894
describe
'29549' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIX' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
85b15199d83af9f4aeeb74a63245f4a4
e8febb822e0d400baf75b59eb2d07d012bd9457c
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIY' 'sip-files00053.tif'
dd50fbb3079b5448c6910466696b1e07
623195fd1a0f8afcd19f4a9c6af4c02d96419abf
describe
'1764' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOIZ' 'sip-files00053.txt'
1eadee46a09799d5ab17dff45e203530
3e092af4bf75367aaaab7c3060262ff356e38a16
describe
'7014' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJA' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
c25343ef801805404931cf1b3ceb73ce
bc7cc049b84832243a987a0079b5682d1f38330b
'2012-01-20T11:33:46-05:00'
describe
'665231' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJB' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
f29e63aa7b69d3858760193126256abc
f78a70bb70d28070db5891420e3d39c053169934
'2012-01-20T11:32:39-05:00'
describe
'89848' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJC' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
9467934df3bf8c369c9baa04fddacf61
0401e38fafcff516937351a237eff3949bf4e5fe
describe
'3521' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJD' 'sip-files00054.pro'
afd58fa68f4deeff7690bb028265a41e
4b2bdcb2c540ec8c7eddc9cbe2b2be680f28583b
describe
'20309' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJE' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
d2a413164705f5e54b7e09079c0ae0d3
7ea99016a95c6551a5940d5b8a748be778b3ca4a
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJF' 'sip-files00054.tif'
dc960238dabf933c7494f46d5bec488a
d0c9f2b8fdaea71d054f1abbf0eb94953d68eb8f
'2012-01-20T11:33:19-05:00'
describe
'195' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJG' 'sip-files00054.txt'
571995460e355a6dafaf0b44943a9dfc
854421b664750119a7a2e4e40e467fefd407dd34
describe
Invalid character
'4941' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJH' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
92b24df50e4522cc273d0445a0840ce1
488bc47c461463e90223998210e851041b12be61
'2012-01-20T11:35:24-05:00'
describe
'665382' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJI' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
24d2c5e128ec63f4e14f8c41baa67eb7
698490a7eab18a7cc2a34f8db0d7f1e6dcf2d85d
'2012-01-20T11:34:14-05:00'
describe
'15249' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJJ' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
26344ae54d8ed329ad6dfcf95f58ee68
af6e3aaae3ac93683290f603f6ad2af85b160e2b
describe
'3079' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJK' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
d58942e834603ae6d064e9cfbff9d92f
63a34b81ec4acaabe19c84e29ed052e22b82f410
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJL' 'sip-files00055.tif'
012977705218b3885ced0700f2446196
2b3d87720548a2b9f284ed312d10dbddbd587bd0
'2012-01-20T11:31:37-05:00'
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJM' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
fc9fc4218dde73c2e93048d14be3828c
da7cef0c1534b7f223c1f8b834e61582befad781
'2012-01-20T11:33:08-05:00'
describe
'665353' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJN' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
4cc40584dc4542b7dd9945270ecc516e
350610395e8ec1193b2e9e5dafffe9a479ec4f0b
describe
'96429' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJO' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
5b3652a6af6d9628f9ea71e2477ecf5d
d968030cbfb3ce801548161c8603b4d3b9aa4cc7
describe
'42026' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJP' 'sip-files00056.pro'
a508285bb83e25c1c39d035b638ca778
4f04d2afb0ea504b28564af63721cfe8c8029340
describe
'27711' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJQ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
3f6678e5a09b6904a7ecc25d7755a336
6535a94ec47f7663fd221a6df17660b0f6ae81cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJR' 'sip-files00056.tif'
e3f8d1906535770cb6eba8d6dc926976
c1615bcd97a8b17dc4ca394ba172106f67e55071
'2012-01-20T11:36:24-05:00'
describe
'1698' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJS' 'sip-files00056.txt'
d15e5fe6ef99b2efd4ed1b9e3ee1fca2
3a71d37da0555d70111556d61571a367f227c09b
describe
'6349' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJT' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
f0f9ccca3f373a20d935f44874b62c5f
dc2d8ce6344dc5d25ed5efc9a8bb3764fd2cc75b
describe
'665107' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJU' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
7b5a7adbaf891cfbb8a22ff22bdfc909
b694c466368635b0d57ddd09a97958e16524951d
'2012-01-20T11:30:58-05:00'
describe
'28811' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJV' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
138cb916c3b23415e584cf81ff288473
b9cdfd7697d820976ed92376abcf3aa4788d3952
describe
'6941' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJW' 'sip-files00057.pro'
3950dd921324dafbbcdd2c3ab8d3e20e
8651727b77b427aaced1c39bdfebee045f6ca7c7
describe
'7013' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJX' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
475bbe3bf4f41d2454c23a970864a582
2b55de602fdaacc0a3e25202f98cf57b77b60cdd
'2012-01-20T11:33:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJY' 'sip-files00057.tif'
017401c646aa595c3159ced5a614a4fa
f18b47800638e9449d3f251a91da56237631c422
describe
'310' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOJZ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
7e9ab4db227b3e1cb1080cdc6294b27b
179f0a5ddbadebe2f2d37ac8af8daaba756f0e26
describe
'1996' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKA' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
3c773001c31005a7bd71f278802f84ed
56f9104650ae5bbe856a58cfc211612d090bd636
describe
'665168' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKB' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
c456b89c6544203daf9b03423aaf56c1
8933645a336de936892232bab6714a2a18b8f0bd
'2012-01-20T11:35:00-05:00'
describe
'14036' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKC' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
4c07ed77aff81aa5902c8152f3356b16
19e5eb42440a2d5dd7207c995a5aa5c14b3bbc3d
'2012-01-20T11:30:54-05:00'
describe
'2915' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKD' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
10ccc270a0cd67819fae003cd3ec45c5
b66c1eb04136f1fedf27366f41216b3ab64365fe
'2012-01-20T11:34:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKE' 'sip-files00058.tif'
6d33b0b74caa6cd60c4e59bd52ecf85b
525d7a764d8965b73cda50dfb12742c5d4961804
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKF' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
39284ab5518d1075b8bb150f6e10b26e
03677e95072c588cba4daa4e53dd8104d1327d9d
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKG' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
d7e26c22b683d2ae929042373b9ab112
adbf36d443b69a9e7802bb7ae648ddea64a693fb
describe
'15158' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKH' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
dd87827f0fa96bfac9ac61225ca01978
3f7b6f051581375d0b00362770dbacef485b2661
describe
'3077' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKI' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
edd4fa66f7b06deb6b5a6448430aa4e2
96ad5abcb747adfde118e7837eb0b53e80ed3f4b
'2012-01-20T11:32:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKJ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
18b67d9298a38b5128d1a75a1659ea6d
3d749a6a398d7c6b2ee5f12b0a34ff59d981f219
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKK' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
6c5d7f5a5baacdaddfb4176be20ed7b6
44b33d552d2f8d723d72e6fdb8d4a59864b34f9a
describe
'665216' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKL' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
e15ebe9e0ebcd77823bb43af80d3aa18
e35decafaef3747cefb4b782f25edbc72bde80b2
'2012-01-20T11:32:32-05:00'
describe
'18739' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKM' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
76dd0655baaed9a0b38ae34890aa8c21
db3dcc90685e81aa323e15577169cd94e1a82808
describe
'855' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKN' 'sip-files00060.pro'
572a48b80c5697eb834fc956b0795a19
5653de930bc0042cd948e2a0df3400f57800aaae
describe
'4451' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKO' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
9a8d61fd50eb43f4c2936ed4f309a8f0
7572599690946d8d46e05a63e923c4039e4ab5a1
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKP' 'sip-files00060.tif'
18be9b182ee049d5ced4cd74a710cf35
34b4062f17a25d895b7fff17d043b3199f41e18c
describe
'59' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKQ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
50fd8e6e663449678eee804773b642a5
119afe9a31c4b7b1ff65a9390c20ebbefda7c194
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKR' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
28aa818d2331f4b37027dbdeefdaedc8
8693285f7912c7d789e0af3457fc2d71fd34e952
'2012-01-20T11:32:38-05:00'
describe
'665342' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKS' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
ceef93152c1d38bec22853ab71e8f837
fcf2591ddf749da55e644da89d1d0307ef58b47d
describe
'14016' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKT' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
4d071d61bdf0030242adf8fabe2cde42
c08b34770b37f3535e9906cc1e25d83418d393cf
describe
'2828' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKU' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
975902792aeef591518191f389d03aed
7edb8b65fe7002dd515c185b22bbcefd2bc3e233
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKV' 'sip-files00061.tif'
663c0b6db31b34b1e3091718537a3a4a
a831ed7bf3f5d198356f72bc3d03960f6938f98d
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKW' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
b9be68218bd527d4467e8191a944c570
aa76dfdf36842b220712f05dabd881c38cd8b071
describe
'665406' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKX' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
836994a56c3efc52acf724ef335a36f1
22b98018cbd5afc99076583df1d01b8feaa40551
describe
'82133' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKY' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
fe4cd02055c606f71fc4e767a48e396a
a019ff34cf6232f5fc8cd82042db9b33cf274420
describe
'28896' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOKZ' 'sip-files00062.pro'
3082888b8aad9b02110e126fce3c4e0b
898fe0c2de4dec9c5e541dd1a958643286b68cfc
'2012-01-20T11:35:21-05:00'
describe
'23186' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLA' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
e2fd4c71141930e27a62fb89f14488ea
dd2644f95b0db9da1f14ca35d5690e6eb0aff74e
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLB' 'sip-files00062.tif'
e7d6cb3d5dc143372ef9acdcc03336ce
ff6ae99e2f719ae8a3ed0d8cce125d935ee342d8
'2012-01-20T11:31:12-05:00'
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLC' 'sip-files00062.txt'
5aea5c6bd2ac9d850a0d1cfac26a9f07
19ac522705d0063890ca99aff17d8b1c70ed0ab9
'2012-01-20T11:35:41-05:00'
describe
'5546' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLD' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
a4d80f1947a4bafee9e75e5fde34c569
588200898936d3a1112aa0de7aae75de5b5c289c
'2012-01-20T11:33:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLE' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
55bc4f9e668d01de482ba7ac811a866e
d121f33ddcb00f96407ec7b777c0174167fc9cce
describe
'78555' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLF' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
cf899e32ca919193222401b93214a922
a0dd27f33b9b14fb0c0241f45ce0531ed876665f
describe
'29642' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLG' 'sip-files00063.pro'
45d5656c0925c32677f517cd3c853bf5
a8ffe5abc61bdec9d67f0e9b27f0879c78f5f630
'2012-01-20T11:32:04-05:00'
describe
'22620' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLH' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
f0d9f09c397c49b08a0721ea953a5c26
b98c999aa4eb3fbc2590d018132554df2952c4eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLI' 'sip-files00063.tif'
fbd5fd42a76b80b857a70b71b28a3186
491692729db6a642c5351e8e10337d8eee37159b
'2012-01-20T11:36:26-05:00'
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLJ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
2c280fdff06cee9ff54c9d08e07f9ab0
c3059d1df10f81740c0a1789186d0df6dcabd7ca
describe
'5388' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLK' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
e9811357daf180b2374d7151be3f407a
3bd3a22474a0f189ef481c8b433adaf46b2a139a
describe
'767541' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLL' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
2e63dd5ac0c981036fe66d27b24c3bc8
608145f38375609689c607a2d2771dfa20c4f233
describe
'125988' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLM' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
c09234b6673f2410b1b4b03a1fcd2ec7
7895a36129d30d4c42879e07333d6ba2e265f412
describe
'28528' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLN' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
7f1dd448f4b7e9156d550ba897184666
a1c17e07d8a83ef9c1d84ec679b0fbda7fb60189
describe
'18429524' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLO' 'sip-files00064.tif'
c2335664c5458cd0f7065d7f0d727666
10155c41bdcb6d66ae9a0c0333532dcb553c8c44
'2012-01-20T11:33:03-05:00'
describe
'7433' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLP' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
b06f2b594679a830d3c3cccb14768226
39aed381dca1f605111581479aeebc67809dc2e1
describe
'665315' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLQ' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
2e34105057430713330bab3e8714f1fb
ee69bd62d95212adb6c68cd70e254a9013c8b507
'2012-01-20T11:32:45-05:00'
describe
'34887' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLR' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
389e7b116a5648b5184b1130fd61153d
1a8023e27961f9233033dfd7a2e275aba7bd7f9e
'2012-01-20T11:34:59-05:00'
describe
'6694' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLS' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
268e3f80ef64b7c81cbb5ef160d7dd99
04e2af29598f968927101f823595481b08aa04c5
'2012-01-20T11:35:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLT' 'sip-files00065.tif'
64498f4d79eb943f257600f14708ba8a
644c33769102cee676ed3603c18dedb6a1c289b7
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLU' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
3d59cc11261a1d9abc9324f4adf5c26b
229cd26f30377eec6dba629580617e7739c3ebe3
describe
'665414' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLV' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
fadb79d7e9f2c6300febd26552eb202c
56ec4f7ad24eb5eddd833057010b4ebb7b2354d5
describe
'73502' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLW' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
dd8ac0664969b445ee3d3544699abfba
cb9c14fda11eb61c440471ece29ad90885282457
describe
'30081' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLX' 'sip-files00066.pro'
643e7ff97ccc25c1a1e9b7ae06ca75ee
511f87249fbb049587a21e026a29252f9cf8a504
describe
'20478' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLY' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
a0c9f281cb2c74c03e4c6a3ef779e03c
407311cb471aef35273e13e39e3bb57a423c8a4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOLZ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
3a3bb6914f62c4657b2374aaf34dc415
ed608a1092004d105ef8b80c1d9a693b937661ad
'2012-01-20T11:31:20-05:00'
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMA' 'sip-files00066.txt'
e1562f11c1f8987c1ea24fdd149029a5
f0aaa2e94ced0555635756e165b943552b25aa13
describe
'5053' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMB' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
692235e8d65ae115810b94ec96df15b3
5234fa18b311c1bdee598f3c32e843b796db929d
'2012-01-20T11:34:08-05:00'
describe
'665380' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMC' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
d5974f29b9d67ec19daf99e56822ab83
31fbcffdc8c1a8d743f18a221ad64e2504e21d03
describe
'102582' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMD' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
b7c37b1c64c48912483d438319964dd0
56cda446d90242c52b2edc572b139987921afbfa
describe
'42489' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOME' 'sip-files00067.pro'
c841e240ca552e3da7994f60148bd678
f6ac11f692215ff3527122463a21a88dad238730
describe
'29356' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMF' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
c32ae2fe096d56fdf3a903a81b93a043
8a143274d34f1f830d8de131ffa667ac32938156
'2012-01-20T11:33:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMG' 'sip-files00067.tif'
9dc48273ef2033b4d85a408f31631b55
5addeec2fbdd64892ba0e878099cdde5d248bdc2
describe
'1731' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMH' 'sip-files00067.txt'
381430e06ef36b226044184820bd9cb1
a1ae87201f78c3e303f04542f8057672f80ce8d2
'2012-01-20T11:31:05-05:00'
describe
'7211' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMI' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
cdc63858412feacb4d53d3a38af75172
83105880a578598d6950c52f2f42c829bc0d6184
'2012-01-20T11:31:13-05:00'
describe
'665121' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMJ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
dc275000caf24dc5606ab9eef78c8355
ce4c450052c8323a34e00a40942e74170fff06a0
describe
'105771' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMK' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
37c8222bac0d13d895c712bf73c24898
c0f8dd3d136b20bfce31f445e9d248d0a0b7edd1
describe
'44639' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOML' 'sip-files00068.pro'
bcf3440af7af93a1066d95a94b8a271d
84b1f8ec1b773574cd894bbae443245ddccf05ad
describe
'31285' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMM' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
2186dd661efd534c2f9e37941870ef48
1a63941aca03bf2c8314f0dc9e64bed7a96fd6f2
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMN' 'sip-files00068.tif'
d91c4b86323cacd14136a0a74dd8bf4e
d80fc050d5086363f5b42cbb30c41bd210989fa6
describe
'1809' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMO' 'sip-files00068.txt'
8bd049b3821defff61084536b5a914e4
84025008721ba372c7b7e9075b5354251f2660e9
describe
'6991' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMP' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
5c7b6bce1e35860e2d3ab7c66c5ee50b
59add987666cda1ebb7a321b6551be557e6e8f5c
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMQ' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
4c197601bae82a1e0873f7f90ba4aec8
1efef78ae82b4760bfd12c4b0a50f7adc4e2366e
'2012-01-20T11:35:07-05:00'
describe
'82627' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMR' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
aeaff435a89b86d0a90e92f189a078af
2fddef370a56cf5efb0b71379d3dfe3f2c9c0808
'2012-01-20T11:31:24-05:00'
describe
'34166' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMS' 'sip-files00069.pro'
3dd8af1f9d2503c6a31f4b7a9775c93e
59815cc06256aa4a8d334ba98427b4faed62ebee
describe
'24786' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMT' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
f84ba88e0bd3e9ffc3fc3b77290c6696
28eb03a4acae2f4acd89f4d91b3167c904ba7157
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMU' 'sip-files00069.tif'
6056a6a56ee250bef88997e5a9613364
b4f3678759d104efb29e0a6404d25bab65ceb303
describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMV' 'sip-files00069.txt'
5430d4332b20008c7b2e4e2106d3777f
b75946500a05b6924b1c878fcd553ffe513ed3d5
'2012-01-20T11:34:25-05:00'
describe
'5669' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMW' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
8bf1e277f22b32e3eb9e0e131b6faa6d
99d8aac2d340b19ec406ab8f2c40ffb8c0604868
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMX' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
8012b19e875b2a1ed98143182be75e22
9c66dfdc62d9433655aa4fdd0b22c01a5870ef95
'2012-01-20T11:35:37-05:00'
describe
'107376' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMY' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
47f0fab2cf3ba5d6a84624304e94b3e3
0725841e45916d34c09821d971e7adcf03cf0766
describe
'43814' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOMZ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
fd4e9bc00db409288440f3bfafc69305
1873f436793838e58a77ba838eadf1659dac961c
describe
'29538' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONA' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
c2f452193b68abb8c2d231b49ffec102
271bc1fbd5603f99b6a4443d11b0de58668a977b
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONB' 'sip-files00070.tif'
a37fd6ff5c9d6b84e784d0b3d6abe557
f96e424bf26b85f088e81adc11ace709a3b3f1d6
'2012-01-20T11:36:07-05:00'
describe
'1804' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONC' 'sip-files00070.txt'
a94df760a93def379f4161df144e968b
15280546d2d5c0a4d47c38972339cff0b90998c5
describe
'6920' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOND' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
16e1a7a9d4807f548dd3215bd79f3f00
e62127c94ee818a92cb432ada4e571e1dda36763
'2012-01-20T11:35:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONE' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
af87661a9bc1ee4362059daf06fd7c1d
4b0d6e1b4b15843e3c6320f9bf5e04c3a63b97d6
'2012-01-20T11:35:36-05:00'
describe
'104901' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONF' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
d17a0ea9eb0a21086415bf393b87bacd
c799fcdcb4bb63ea9e300bfda0ba422a330d0aa3
describe
'43270' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONG' 'sip-files00071.pro'
3512836ca1c1f60e2a4169c730caa954
f89686ba1d9d8726f3bb1f0a28c0dc62848f8d42
describe
'29930' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONH' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
650ac671900c888bd7440b568f87105b
eeef4559358b2b576082adbc00771afc024227e4
'2012-01-20T11:31:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONI' 'sip-files00071.tif'
8bdfa79f645533f65a512fd52b3ce6a6
94c0d893b442f0d635f7bdb3bd0abb8e8e2719c0
describe
'1748' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONJ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
290de9634c673d9c2724243b83cdd495
2fbc4cdb24a1c121546ddf1701d002da8ac8524a
'2012-01-20T11:36:04-05:00'
describe
'6894' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONK' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
796482760d7fb6447de561819aeb3996
e442ccdec12018465088bb20389bc29c6e76891c
describe
'665229' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONL' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
e596319d249b7fc81911f9abffcd1959
5cd5c0bf84f65ea46c34cb68cedbe268aa91a4e9
describe
'98153' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONM' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
2c0f6cc86d795031253643c35fd20ac2
9f9765235980f4ab0f304bea637eb9d8968912b9
describe
'42749' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONN' 'sip-files00072.pro'
d6c54774e0b879c42f74d89b02c24cb0
3a5be29447f9d742f5b7251c82713297f17af5a0
describe
'29022' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONO' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
9e47a28739ee7a0d9b611c3db2104f92
1790b68bd88555ab61dc65f97bd5244da33d881f
'2012-01-20T11:34:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONP' 'sip-files00072.tif'
a7b6d4fa107ea22d6b6376104966d9be
373ee7f212286c4c824908cc3ea1a0d20a238a0f
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONQ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
9300c22b396e69e52f986802dc9bb706
d0d996656172c71e85948d5582545b8daffbbc99
'2012-01-20T11:35:11-05:00'
describe
'6815' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONR' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
642510dc042433f359366127ac52f6ae
d6d0e342c230949e109c15855f0a08171b58cff3
describe
'665407' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONS' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
c25387adc82fdbadfed72f5ef499e156
496f60be788aad690ed6b1e8a3214a1e13ffa85b
describe
'96291' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONT' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
4e00884ec43ee0866b0135767970187c
32dc28d24deeb1b4464807355670f7334a63bcb8
describe
'40645' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONU' 'sip-files00073.pro'
f64b9459b63ac04450324ed6b829ef58
1a199207eb26c830ac9a47d5ef15bf36b0f61e80
describe
'28101' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONV' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
355f9b4b276fb0ea0373c7319365c47a
b23f85ad1865101e511608acaf0900175c357451
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONW' 'sip-files00073.tif'
a30dad160203bb6ea1f12b029372bd36
7d536df914fb02b7eecf59070f69820151c5fa6e
describe
'1654' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONX' 'sip-files00073.txt'
a8b8599a3529d5ef76b05381e60e2625
ce5420e97ca755950ef0be164f9cd3c0c84f949e
describe
'6873' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONY' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
2f004f1e24c250b557eb663e6b030c51
8a17715308992749baf6d6459f1e826ee1a64ad5
'2012-01-20T11:32:57-05:00'
describe
'726712' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAONZ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
c3ed449074a2f7ec52b4f0b80c5d3fcc
3a8b35133d839997eb031bad38282f81b9053d95
describe
'130743' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOA' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
649fa7d48c63c92ff8f8155056c82595
4b99ada614393f19918226b25da9be05c79c5d31
describe
'29551' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOB' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
ee4c8e2e5c6c42be4c52762ebf52cfd8
9819637b370747e80b6bcb94d7be7f9e99a19f1a
describe
'17449580' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOC' 'sip-files00074.tif'
53f0769b32ae9e4b1ad7f9230d09cd44
b31f1f946eb18c256462a5f133339d9214a704d9
describe
'7868' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOD' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
3a13353e97a70a13081d09ad1eed6b70
992b9115684ddb7e22d42ba28a79a63a105a05d3
describe
'665260' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOE' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
cf736cf0955422ee6604d34f2fbcb62d
37d60f2c44a911ae47a6a4e0a5a9bf61cf6efd68
describe
'40091' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOF' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
dd4ca9a1a53326a85615ddc200b8acfd
13f9cc4b0dacdb6c70d620a1b1d8d3fe67e0fe2f
describe
'7716' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOG' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
fb2bf3a73d947fc39040c247edd45695
6a555c7eaa541d71b2766ab93f295f000df4499c
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOH' 'sip-files00075.tif'
03c1a81926d9b6012145f519888e4fbe
bfb1f8014f6d69a2597a8c364609e044e80e3d49
describe
'1696' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOI' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
c870698497cd1711566b863297938582
245ac9c93d5cb353ddef568dc6078092988d40e4
describe
'665366' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOJ' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
9e569976eb1a8fea8db96e480ee5654d
93092218b74276d35ffd9f947edbb4d960ab2df5
describe
'96508' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOK' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
53e7a79688ee55efa9ed826d8be27d36
6059296dc80a0109b8bcfcbab5cd2d7ca1deea62
describe
'39618' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOL' 'sip-files00076.pro'
961fc5c5b663de02acdfb134e2140581
4a9b42ecc95b39f53d22bf1765012253ab8514af
'2012-01-20T11:33:05-05:00'
describe
'27856' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOM' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
0cdeb0c833ae7c86c943af2606b6a384
71744354f2ccf57f2f92d6af2a0a09a2e66f9276
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOON' 'sip-files00076.tif'
a097779bc567880d83ace30611431988
dd492a6d381cd3840b965c56bfe40b3495d95166
'2012-01-20T11:36:19-05:00'
describe
'1650' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOO' 'sip-files00076.txt'
e0286c646394605c62b55a3222647193
cdcdf2c622fb436cda821b98d82ad5b1713b3752
describe
'6843' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOP' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
ad1449c58e308576693bdbffba2fc988
980cbe29ddc010b92757da0928c4aeefec176749
describe
'665383' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOQ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
fce7e2c701a1c964b3077ffdb468b2f3
33786877ffb2c9f8c275e4eb11f590d746cc3fb7
'2012-01-20T11:32:05-05:00'
describe
'98099' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOR' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
2259a0d388dfc37d524886c3318c19bc
d37c1a9cddcd2ccf85ccc7765a1e103eca0f8b5d
describe
'41502' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOS' 'sip-files00077.pro'
6d04a29f587f0978331bf6783aace769
4f05e63c8a0d03ae491b605b64245e5949c141e4
describe
'28402' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOT' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
43d389b3086956cad7aa958c80f0b01b
58a4bc13a911d872567b6286e2e8729cc97c5da4
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOU' 'sip-files00077.tif'
84b04dcd5ec3d5bc10f23df0f17b5abf
97e63d9bf9d66b96c1eb0d2ae92e90a3351d13e8
describe
'1716' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOV' 'sip-files00077.txt'
22e5ce4021371fc5d7bb018b663dc8f8
2469d53535c3a8dbcf36c3583248c32c32b6ff69
describe
'6950' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOW' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
3358d9da384300f0295d779e9310d55c
9142d0ee6bf6be4c96a832290081325da405c603
describe
'665422' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOX' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
208f1bef692ddeca1799a22e90897972
be46cfb3d4ffd35dfda32cd24b76174f4aadc0cc
'2012-01-20T11:35:45-05:00'
describe
'100136' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOY' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
2686a97bcce13add5cd26340c4556d7e
56c032952d2efc7f39c9362003b2bef16436437c
'2012-01-20T11:32:02-05:00'
describe
'42200' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOOZ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
aaa9cfa9768d4adbc3e00640fb3a0ec9
c74e7ddcd97ed0fbe0e8f753ad1135cc02f461dd
describe
'29130' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPA' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
d08c56b3358db590bddf3bc62379f213
a68813fcbc309ee0d8b80e680d2ae5b6e7c046f2
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPB' 'sip-files00078.tif'
8dc9d49ede08df026b4df649f9f32ddf
0dc5508b783e2c8d13a8a9b9d33b752f810bbe80
describe
'1703' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPC' 'sip-files00078.txt'
b3cfcde9d8faceb0ac6eeaa206d1adaa
449c7f12cbdd2a9da5d9fed54ec7a5ce9ae628cc
describe
'6961' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPD' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
06c31b0a68dee5391a6fa73ba2d2aafb
f84122078381dbc6ca7c609a008adce355d80335
describe
'665241' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPE' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
32c17d2ba4d903e240322dcd74f38926
b9bbc97e5a911f62be53988c9a07174322f8d2a3
describe
'100634' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPF' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
c18dca0b0ce93803b93c95d0772e56c7
2a9ff274fcaef6609cb908945b568229a645c77e
describe
'42891' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPG' 'sip-files00079.pro'
17e2fac1ba1128b6947acfe855bcbb38
f5f1ee3e5bc1859a77619e852b8601932c520fba
describe
'28494' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPH' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
6c92ab638e9a6811c3c40eda38bb2689
7257b81b125c62ff18ae1389571946ea95a4d0a1
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPI' 'sip-files00079.tif'
4fd4bdb19ca4951af2499eb80cd46fc9
e0266effc5ac2adf3634f48a1127ed9658878b08
describe
'1740' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPJ' 'sip-files00079.txt'
38677e7b69a027833cff04ede4044202
0fbb0cfcef288ef1f7fa3838500a86c2075638d6
describe
'6696' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPK' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
108cd54ce965b571bfbe9a4288cd1f9d
b2c906bac5af493e8618ebeb555679d8abe58aab
'2012-01-20T11:35:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPL' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
cf027167ed553f143ffcdd94110d31bd
eb9f3432e627256ad707ae7cefab6f46fc37c86a
describe
'104254' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPM' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
1d732fbf97acf523b8d3f8e8e3af44f9
93563af3092d15a9d5803ea616ea9001e0d6fe08
'2012-01-20T11:33:44-05:00'
describe
'43626' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPN' 'sip-files00080.pro'
389a717bb37ab18e2653167330a7dbf2
1ebe75d8bedd076588b236dbbc06a92d1f44f796
'2012-01-20T11:36:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPO' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
bb4ebf1214b26ce8407bb5bf0adf4b26
5950c11782867ba559122b5ed9012e7d7e7b4f81
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPP' 'sip-files00080.tif'
6bbadc41c3e81e7137a79092a7188633
8a1c165aa85aa78dd91e3921f640fdad490dfad8
describe
'1742' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPQ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
69ba2251473530ccd242e8b8b40ae320
7544112b8b916f0e37752b44e423f64ae1081eba
describe
'6945' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPR' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
791243a6b0485b9f256f9a8613ea35d5
35d059ece1b098a2f6221814831601e3ac013a09
describe
'665397' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPS' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
3efd58d10a5e3741f1cb3aef9da05296
745f25a48bb00ca4e06b9268381b72086f95f278
describe
'107058' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPT' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
aa0efa1dee2ea7d9abfd3b1c4e1757dd
0541e0812d88687f51a8ecfcd7200a9d3b1de8aa
describe
'45073' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPU' 'sip-files00081.pro'
6b3bf7c370f308fa4188d8af42eec12e
769e9c087d6f6294c11ac16532caba180d5dacf4
describe
'30628' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPV' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
fc436a72a65ba8e0cdcbd2e9d461ada0
2251a70d2104fb3091cc24d8446e25f5251560ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPW' 'sip-files00081.tif'
f81d2f87bca7b15360d893d5522f0abd
58256f2d841867e99594f1f9555fd356efc7073b
describe
'1846' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPX' 'sip-files00081.txt'
562d8f0ebb3f5ac8d0203f5eb95abd06
339b3c256741c0f941d24a747ace12bc32c7dd51
describe
'6845' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPY' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
39ea7fd0431f16d0803b75f165277146
88d2cba215f02f25096e7068943bfb28d2bf7e20
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOPZ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
1b64b800122765a60734870fd7ca7a38
d65b1362d45563f2a6d182fc2a93eec0475a5fff
describe
'108072' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQA' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
1b061ffd1af284483c0718dbdae505f9
f2cfb2f5dc3e4bdafe93882557c8e11be5d33c29
describe
'44303' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQB' 'sip-files00082.pro'
d1f14806fc2dbb5c4356219a745b60b6
607dbd9c1123b3cbd3c709657ea6b10a080d1b65
describe
'30629' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQC' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
833b9e65417a733cf3051d36dbfcf829
c5a8c5dbf9fc4fc69c7bc51acdcfa2525f5c7a67
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQD' 'sip-files00082.tif'
9b405039faa2db5ee3633ef42b94d4dc
0afa40b3d34d651f212404ba7c742469ea34deaa
describe
'1831' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQE' 'sip-files00082.txt'
85106c05e6bc18deb697cdbaa5642ad9
6f7e4f63869194b854d8805b55f86b32bb0c93f9
describe
'6833' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQF' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
27a7f73dae02afbbc62b53680c24efd0
d2b0f8e92fb2f1384156d96aebedb1ba31c6e7b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQG' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
271ca8264420a1ba70c93f6429ac7fbe
1f69a64a151bf70ff358da9f7836da6d387e96c6
describe
'101381' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQH' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
4edb0904a7fa3e53952be271a996f667
be6e1b13663a9ec1b9df4f24ffcb7f1dd2b888ed
describe
'40836' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQI' 'sip-files00083.pro'
6cc9d463df018ab713661f2a69ee9b2a
cb8d9733ea0ec6a803653bd9d1db560c601d5499
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQJ' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
fd285105d86c6be11bcfa4789cd0f0ed
c1948356122d9380cd38905d019c8a1c5962727d
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQK' 'sip-files00083.tif'
783fd1854795eb387fe32bf3d15c3c93
9c3304fd3a1668d0c6ee25d80b7f42b919caa21c
'2012-01-20T11:33:45-05:00'
describe
'1651' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQL' 'sip-files00083.txt'
76690b6dd7f2696f7ca983ee661255d7
77b1d5cc69393d4c670ec847665edce29a3c4e9a
describe
'6537' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQM' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
e5b66467c1caf33a25c040b84a9df2b2
c8894064f1759c2f3ee847cb41e8bdc00e23f264
describe
'665419' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQN' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
33f5b8e36afd8987990d26c942b6101d
dfe87565b78008f3bda28aaf7b622f7825a68923
describe
'106266' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQO' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
f6182971a422613d23ba34c628cabec4
c8d7c4cdbfcadb143f0b96c9b7bfa91990c5fab2
describe
'44961' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQP' 'sip-files00084.pro'
b8f1d8fdc06154d8c932690d691243da
99564d0fae982f75037a92c48395fe57156464bd
describe
'30409' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQQ' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
72a11b20f5341f436f0414aafe4acfd3
daba8f4eeb97c205a23ac85ca3f39aaaaa28d680
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQR' 'sip-files00084.tif'
262a130ad159f10d9d3db88fc53d5ce5
2acf63410f7cb915357a6b115ba1bd421522c163
describe
'1837' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQS' 'sip-files00084.txt'
836ccde2798765aa7fc8a305b9ddf7a0
46de42514a9cff02917d2768fe70a03745646918
describe
'6994' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQT' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
835699772d400ddd0d53cc863b0ca00f
8d2807b0c6d27efe1047843ff3d553117d04a814
'2012-01-20T11:34:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQU' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
f6ebc31fb1e3ac2b157976acf64ad697
181ffe8a2c3b8ad34915330754351486afe7170a
describe
'88803' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQV' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
5db1141e38b08f419bffcce5d924b1df
1248c77fb422d56b8c9b09f391652262e6b65649
describe
'35172' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQW' 'sip-files00085.pro'
1bc09225dd7f42a2824a093d55e2cc0f
2009e9e4373f449e9acdbf88349f05c91104c2e3
describe
'26025' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQX' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
e1fb494f07f92720984a0bca1b4d72b9
887cdc3146db60e479ed20c1506541c1edc4d0d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQY' 'sip-files00085.tif'
11f0c6e264d223c017bc98bda64de100
c084a0d30f00da694b2da9cbfe37760653de8198
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOQZ' 'sip-files00085.txt'
215cb7b9493c254eb5f922551fbc4345
25097e82b3e23d3e8e86a4b77aabe04e68da4844
describe
'6358' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORA' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
a42d60083e2e6cf609873238a49b0e02
2a8d36f81e5852cf924dff20d83df23fb19912dd
describe
'665327' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORB' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
1d6977a88349858cd29260713fd49ab6
b3089da9a5717a1c5779cbbdbd2b492afa8215ca
'2012-01-20T11:35:58-05:00'
describe
'103587' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORC' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
3edb1c7617d628ea7fd22c33ec0a44c8
b877021c656f55983f945641361b630d1b5eb572
describe
'42984' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORD' 'sip-files00086.pro'
9f67421c7d249438feba3aa9366fbe74
e7fdfe148d4f1f46c31cf8ea05183c41bc9afeae
describe
'29276' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORE' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
0fd927629f79f26ed2d1ecccc7039121
f33a33fa7e2dee61f055e40f7b88ba37891ef3f0
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORF' 'sip-files00086.tif'
a9bf55ce021ec780fc9cb24b46acd05d
8eb037b3f4edc1d636fd6dc4ce0e4e3165e83b0b
describe
'1754' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORG' 'sip-files00086.txt'
5452572e1dc8b7b227ddcfbc6b7f6779
d75dc1a3a0360c1f45f5da633416b41ad3042282
describe
'6791' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORH' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
b6ec3970bab396db84dd38f97541d79e
c5986c4a46eaa6e116468008a543d9a124e89a53
describe
'665204' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORI' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
fd6d78001ba9a2c24254260ca7b69ef4
dd21942477ad04e56caf28388feb2d75bbd042c8
describe
'99722' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORJ' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
44716eb814f4931b97350dab5c94f369
3742dd5b752a4801acefcc1c8fac6ffe970d4429
describe
'41446' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORK' 'sip-files00087.pro'
2ab696eca42257454a974f2eae5f00bc
202cfd9ed6088a6cb3296d84ed7f31f8f94d3ada
describe
'28650' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORL' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
84688a6ffdc7aeabd9f71e78f93b58c8
b6e6c986f85c8db78e92af327660d27538df38c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORM' 'sip-files00087.tif'
95ba2506495496828461c0e5a37c1dd9
424332edb026a63ea61bed196468ff9ed238a75b
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORN' 'sip-files00087.txt'
b8eb4eb77453f6eeb48f3a6e4fec50e3
77241bb48e2ad110cc5448654084e09b9776b0e8
describe
'6712' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORO' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
d7baa2b6d9eb23d59898c254a333cac0
bca97102e2a8ec86768b49a36e05798db6521c25
describe
'665234' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORP' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
76d343cebf5a98e3e73e69f824cf836c
d8045a13f1fbd4335c8e706b5cbde9fbfc0c62e8
'2012-01-20T11:34:04-05:00'
describe
'107585' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORQ' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
32f179aeef8b488e2f4399c9a9103bb2
b4bcc79b01136e51454d6f73413883a6b79ad7a2
describe
'2183' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORR' 'sip-files00088.pro'
c560f25b6e93f3ed3f5f70865c0b547e
fea3d5ebaba22d5531cdde8a5f9861273fdb6254
describe
'23770' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORS' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
1ba782b682140910c09c2ec85df41424
d5bdfea1171f11bf074740ffc850936a976e30b1
'2012-01-20T11:34:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORT' 'sip-files00088.tif'
cb49a0e24acd86b6b3769d0bbb813feb
c8159d0fa876dca4bc7b15d776047fef2d724089
'2012-01-20T11:32:34-05:00'
describe
'134' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORU' 'sip-files00088.txt'
8b854ef558eeffaffbacc87dbf1ecbc8
57a1ab1404871b0f63635b472c97fe14c408850e
describe
Invalid character
'5621' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORV' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
21ec604c1086afa8842215290d9a7a56
db2079d7fdf6c64b309fb7c27b2269f521b2df89
describe
'665302' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORW' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
43f6b93c9c3552e4cdc51211f73cbc44
df54793cd181d4f7ea692ac0df7983b8a0b4d9c8
describe
'18781' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORX' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
197c9dcb383243a50650d7f82932dfde
8e2a092c05199b13d94b7fecdab9cbe2e797084f
describe
'3691' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORY' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
2fe9b601c7279b38975b791eeb5da74d
914dc827662684c6a4b0d8c61b1d02278e40361e
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAORZ' 'sip-files00089.tif'
1d79507306cad529d9b5538fd0345047
106f03176f22819a2dab9d626644b42a20508776
'2012-01-20T11:34:56-05:00'
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSA' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
d614499052d5bbe588b1ee1a00d837cc
0aee4bd5ea590acfb543e55f458ec32484fcb5e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSB' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
5837cf0dc004dbb1d308ea85ffd15ded
037c4bd94ec05389446831aec75b21f66f1fc2c3
describe
'105884' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSC' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
8a294352e476d215b1e09a258235a4b4
9f5e970c7618d84fdaf34e38b581baebd2fe441a
describe
'45004' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSD' 'sip-files00090.pro'
3a81e11e11c9cf9f696614fe6cb26105
734aa842ca828f3a9fe70e3a78de2965bc31fd3e
describe
'28581' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSE' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
32aaf71276b54e31ed8f1c6ac5ba3fec
854cdd0d09d7a2a20d0e5add19cc24be3e0bb6d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSF' 'sip-files00090.tif'
536f4ba4f88df5ab7c635f0351f9c837
7aa9895e7a417a658ad07c6cb4c681919ccf66a2
describe
'1805' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSG' 'sip-files00090.txt'
b22ff61cd0ab5de8ca9a4a1d705c7201
7c8d8ecb0e21cfdf496182a8374662f17e6ce58e
describe
'6725' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSH' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
d692ad8cb5169e4682955d00e488a30f
906e0e0e727aaa69c1ee85131ff32959714b0337
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSI' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
f1ddb48653334ece8cf3ec4bf0c0d2c3
25d111a2c86b7d412ce8080a31f183d37acc8666
describe
'42871' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSJ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
8124c15f89311496e525647c63316935
cd480f60ed22a039c28e44ab8764127a36a95f1d
describe
'13285' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSK' 'sip-files00091.pro'
492f15e0b18a3216e577f694c832eb68
39a0624c04cdffaa73cadc426d443bc9d0af6e8b
describe
'11403' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSL' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
6e77b5c9545776cb209c26c1c87eef38
f2c7f068e024bc0f9099fcf3e4ed48be8e29c104
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSM' 'sip-files00091.tif'
efa13e582b356a25a038c03e92f3cc4e
b3726676135eb38732e2efed958b00c40637985e
'2012-01-20T11:32:03-05:00'
describe
'546' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSN' 'sip-files00091.txt'
d757b9336d85822ecce336aad70ccaac
61688d4e53289e6e4277851e531b86670a31a01c
'2012-01-20T11:35:51-05:00'
describe
'2765' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSO' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
f69828a29b0033051598e6096fd44273
26863e93b8e3890c3955818625c4febcec19f002
describe
'665187' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSP' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
26cc61fcddf7391796daac2c7424098c
3fcd38d8410f5d73bf4be4f9ff72ffdca184436f
describe
'13983' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSQ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
0079b689b0bc918446330e012599f9df
8042f48ae699ff416e47ec1d4a2c2b1b8c4da3db
describe
'2890' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSR' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
a9ec317570e69431de61c5710fbfacad
ca67b0f5927fd6de12b289e21d222e688475b72e
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSS' 'sip-files00092.tif'
98d38688ee853f9bd8db610dea55d568
c3eb26f06387bf11bc7cc9babbc25e57de9d7f8e
describe
'902' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOST' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
a53e8197b59c782d8de0e109b6cde06e
4ad3f512f043ac96f9bf2c86b76a1f3793d2b8d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSU' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
8be45803b0d2a3420b056b8d593b16fc
fc920c098a69fbe6712cb77b354b7bd6cc0362b9
describe
'15146' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSV' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
d1b7761440901e4427d604e02b1106dd
e00aa6508e27a95792a34ee2af2478703dd9babd
describe
'3031' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSW' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
d2bdbecb33e5d013723dc46576133a61
725bd4d569347ccb0510f3b28f77e0092f5918f0
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSX' 'sip-files00093.tif'
0ea7220da30b685cc32ea347f162aa12
7c2ec331b916e4881561ba63fc84ba89824e14f3
describe
'943' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSY' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
972d6d15550733d43017e6ff571c54e9
7d098671eac344f343c9a98261a61e89c7d61b89
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOSZ' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
211713de1dbf5e0cbc391c3e2c2feefc
39a03422abafe33ace8c004a7bcb1089b30aea65
describe
'18751' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTA' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
dc06a7402a33835eb5ab981943ab9b1a
50213194c237d54f9d073bef501cce1a1da10470
describe
'933' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTB' 'sip-files00094.pro'
7d56b5bba2446eb8b74e47a7fb04faea
c9a34fdb2dc752bc4c59105d862246fe23d48984
'2012-01-20T11:34:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTC' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
e0255d18e1613e805ee0c1831f2e3c93
0f18789f1eb71d960f81f4f3dc03f00f8016e252
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTD' 'sip-files00094.tif'
ffa505972f9253a22a8c09245b2a0dbe
302bcb5c68d660104e8fff3e332c0fd143d19d8f
'2012-01-20T11:35:52-05:00'
describe
'60' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTE' 'sip-files00094.txt'
b5616695b6d89c61d7552bf778147c8a
c16e9a0353f30c6e5b44e5d081b93cfcb40579cd
describe
'1667' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTF' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
e7b9b8ccf6fa5b4578b82c41ab234078
7bd2ab391459f37900ca8d34585dbd142bd1bb02
'2012-01-20T11:34:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTG' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
fc0c962ec0c6767fe7ee3881857169b7
40b148fd943401c82a577980d11e7e10b75347d6
describe
'17300' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTH' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
d99a470f44c457e429a687d3bd329321
3b07efa1c6f9fd0523b000436d8505c1f9db51c9
describe
'3393' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTI' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
f754aed4cba771bde1333878ee5f3ae7
538cf66218c8681d0e7b9c03729eb4124647c626
'2012-01-20T11:34:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTJ' 'sip-files00095.tif'
ae4b1dd522d7af0fb1bbf2968113263a
8b889f03f1c3b009467b4ebfc256832e834b3bbf
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTK' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
aceb6c0153cd12d4dde22c744e9d0c8d
a5f584e7e199de88e33e4ccb5877fe9d971d7830
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTL' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
20c27bf7c32946f7f344a86e283585fd
530edddae41907b40a2c05b4d9db440a8857fe09
describe
'76522' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTM' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
d99caf9989022e7f045d5d7ab94b0f01
6ac3b0547c87673af7995a8b218eff1c737d306c
describe
'28692' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTN' 'sip-files00096.pro'
6c97903f8748f7ffbe186b31ee4552ce
ac1d4bfda8a1c7a99ddc187a613f72615eec55ad
'2012-01-20T11:34:48-05:00'
describe
'21936' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTO' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
0ca929563f356969db574ab19c955e88
afbb20433b0cbfc08308957781239a971a43c87f
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTP' 'sip-files00096.tif'
79644e390f637e2066c5dd3efddf7c1c
2d38d29ab082529600f06660a7bd5843c5cd3c33
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTQ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
ca4ec2931d8ee9e651485cf0e6597b2f
c3e36bbf5fcac961deacb42f1d9baf91bc086a10
describe
'5423' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTR' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
f1ebeba31507e336ad8087a3ca820ebd
0ddaff4d7cce400e490cef82a4fb552165e7867d
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTS' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
f9276d473d3193c2548829dd1abcc958
9151ca79d4b0990ff3761f397ec7af0f440a9c00
describe
'106097' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTT' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
7aa0b8ef6042e8257e1ee10444b465eb
2bd0147c066da84cc406e8d0be1db465d2b74464
describe
'43783' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTU' 'sip-files00097.pro'
89c34498913cb91f5260dd973d08b1ca
cacbef341f8690259ebcffd5c36912c66379e6c7
describe
'29989' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTV' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
ce53ffe32aab0490b06357b8bfea79f8
919ae18e68da7418e7533fa45be858042afa81e2
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTW' 'sip-files00097.tif'
7adaeb3c95518974ea873997ae452da5
4d651c96775f6adf271041efc17c646bdd9bd494
describe
'1745' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTX' 'sip-files00097.txt'
28069d102cdf2edb4dceb6743a0201c8
0809673f58d00a151ee14a75a3bd96830cdaaa53
'2012-01-20T11:35:49-05:00'
describe
'6940' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTY' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
128c4e6388e96e6cabe03364866b9ccb
2ed4d76b6515e82ad26578ac32367c171b061aab
describe
'665409' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOTZ' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
0eef5fee4e9576aa683c3c9b5e7049ca
39179c66c833d228aaac60c416f54832a281b804
describe
'94373' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUA' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
91e3a55446dae68df7429afe4a15ff1a
34409ca8f859e69c72259a2810752d816821428a
describe
'39808' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUB' 'sip-files00098.pro'
5a87524c4c582c2d289f0529756c84ca
5a1ac3c769092b669c8d3e7c4ce2e1e100a4f13c
describe
'26916' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUC' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
4d5cabd31b04b01220eb07b084b679db
e1c27e049db65959c42ec239eddbb5159c71028d
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUD' 'sip-files00098.tif'
2412a001afd711239d5c7ab2edf0aa19
a80ee04e49bc29c23d3d414337cdda8d1b3ec57a
describe
'1729' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUE' 'sip-files00098.txt'
d2c9fa72bb583ba51f1aec0bd094e837
b9cfcbe01309afbe05a98f64bb2d0eb0963198e9
describe
'6209' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUF' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
4e41ed99517570094750534126b90872
63a46a8218ee46b26a94e21f419bfa0933009749
describe
'665348' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUG' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
4e5bfe16a0d563d76965df3ce92da92d
6a688c671279cc495f5c554b13c86b7d1919f13a
describe
'100726' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUH' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
600018291e3c31cd06e8dfb33b41dbc5
ef9e1c7ecd67ee5af78cef0c948dea2cc2c12c1f
describe
'43318' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUI' 'sip-files00099.pro'
4b9366835337a8fdd0cd30ad2bd3301c
4329a102c022ee97b8c6009afa1776fdcff92176
describe
'28626' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUJ' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
332108f5d591f4db1d01cdc8fde487ba
7f30fc2cf6638dda4a18583aac2c8ff333eb5de9
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUK' 'sip-files00099.tif'
8cad699af062cd8a83eb2e7f5d949a63
cfa00c51aa4dfc77890b270395d494eab5ca47d3
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUL' 'sip-files00099.txt'
2bbcb725c59d3e666ccd274093dedef4
a0aa86c11995208ad69ce89796319b203d602e40
describe
'6747' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUM' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
dc0d69927139c142805f948b29361ec5
080b52337331edd77765e0f73d633b9ab87e9e0f
describe
'766576' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUN' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
d148bb3da04e384a286b3a26bf404f87
63b5d8247e1ffbaef5fb30071c763029c16f9796
describe
'127658' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUO' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
97f3441c11c535d8fe3d39b839eb4fe5
78fa5eb9f9204994ec1f0d010bd4c41ac9d922d2
describe
'28293' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUP' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
229d04045ce4bb25d5aadc7f632477dd
4127052b131c1522cf669c378efa09ea1533247f
describe
'18406624' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUQ' 'sip-files00100.tif'
5883ad5d0c75511940544fbd3af35688
71e422404d11516f155353134238dd9d5612b7c3
describe
'7324' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUR' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
ede518777b7728f8f68194358b4b2958
42f236f7501d04649779672996cf28ab3aaa9c50
describe
'665372' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUS' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
fb566ec0dc5e687cc5bdf2c26b38bedc
63b03bc80f7c23c57ba2a69aaa220ad5a77030d3
describe
'24698' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUT' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
2ce45a7feafebd45efce45c8e6293c6a
f8c7bc71807c8d85fcf346fc34fa1ab0530f0160
describe
'4671' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUU' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
aaad26f60095eada4e41b423390998e8
970e710c6aafa84c269b59f4ffa27b6a33586546
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUV' 'sip-files00101.tif'
e483161c62d3ab1d19271cb2dc456ea8
0c74db40f298ac931e4e10a15dc5178cd1b2ce4c
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUW' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
24e70fe02e9a12448d465d705cfb848a
621ea57327d0a5f2ebf7004eb9a664939188fc30
describe
'665246' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUX' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
117a4931c865b5d6b19e0007b018357e
cc414959fc75ec82f19ec29927e716653ef6001b
describe
'92519' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUY' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
14e4a5632fa8e06862f14db96ded21d2
43d4d4fdcaec4f894b4195d473812b16586bcfb3
describe
'38287' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOUZ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
6633c31c8c0a452452d4174357a932ab
8e93a34b07c9267edd73ed25a8ca3eca4e371d2a
describe
'26557' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVA' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
5fbb1ac87f907665a74c5b0cf1cc1264
ed327b968a31e6a7dac845511b54a9a7362227ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVB' 'sip-files00102.tif'
b3fe125220e97eccd50c78eb7fff1ad1
c0839ec14186dd2aa33983e9de9a2ca8588e5fb6
'2012-01-20T11:35:56-05:00'
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVC' 'sip-files00102.txt'
fc704ae5e63652ec83a3dfd0a0e0f2bf
d9306334b61bf3ab531fdb64e58441fdddb48103
describe
'6375' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVD' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
6794747fe98c3eb4c43d8babc862efd9
360a3daa1f2140d35da779e50b59c91e4af7fadd
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVE' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
6eaa569110dfeede2ddf326703b54b54
485e3c439c9e2c4d5c4c41c1fe4730d01a643bb8
describe
'105407' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVF' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
e7c7d3aba07b0b6b836143771b792e61
451c897757d7458e2f279ad9eb4428499b2d08f7
describe
'44910' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVG' 'sip-files00103.pro'
1418fe090184d0e6de16ea03a1f90585
e6b550eb7961061b871d3375df5ce07487f297b6
describe
'30246' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVH' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
50b593f7db0513dd3986d94e3fd3e5d7
e34962e05522cb2d820a20a8d0d6a892ea28fc55
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVI' 'sip-files00103.tif'
fe2ae0dcbbeecfecd96487655776565d
89a5293b1876de86b9e8a8d57779e676ed0bafb8
describe
'1770' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVJ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
161979f7e6069d31267c3e9717ae1a69
32d35b2afbcf992df6886ec46ad5f798c2674616
describe
'6827' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVK' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
36223ce9ae302e7f2c8f12a624f31c7e
ab69e5bd18ab1d5bdb9614aa4a96f70583487468
describe
'665394' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVL' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
7bcc996b7a63cecc0db57642d98bff6a
2c09e0eae5f21cef23a2a9a73f25484620490287
describe
'105256' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVM' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
e351715b2d570366411e714878f7a05d
5db6b2a28eeb0b6e727ef80e8c3579bd11916548
describe
'45606' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVN' 'sip-files00104.pro'
564fe8d9a61b08b8d5b6c80d62995e99
237b62650b617656fabc471d1f1a91a7eb9c2c19
describe
'30424' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVO' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
bae76a87447e9514caf550d9e68192b1
e0d9a65d2243a9a19e20f2025d164e0a7887a9b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVP' 'sip-files00104.tif'
7bbff8a8f15f70cd87126c2569666906
cd4580dbdf6fe5e638abcaf03d97400cb66680f6
describe
'1840' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVQ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
5c5bf926b354ab88028b0a4f4bb12c26
fb680844ae83d778a4fe22686f471aef97851278
describe
'6913' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVR' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
7f2295104216df0e2c4581fe24baf613
2b64e2210e61a4317d5d4b4ba23557da829b9985
describe
'665176' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVS' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
6baff9dfa69791d665bdb11717e0e6f9
1870f4f881fee0fd5e0e59c5c65cee52eabc444c
describe
'33566' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVT' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
97e1ed0f802795a088357ae4b4ed4912
c51b1f86069a2fa096fe0d20e1f101f048621784
describe
'7587' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVU' 'sip-files00105.pro'
175d72f0c5fc801e0dd4d16f44ec5702
faea4e29f37754ea232f154e2ae3718dc1dda1f8
describe
'7831' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVV' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
dbd6669de6917d40840883163cd9ac72
409ac86cbecaaa9286e5814044dd61fe6b11c319
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVW' 'sip-files00105.tif'
2d24b8e200fbd3ab0e028d6e7cdafd55
3eb8bcae50a3f724c831cb37e5104fd95bc74373
describe
'330' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVX' 'sip-files00105.txt'
b46f1485ba50b1a3ec322c482c3621c9
735fec440682e7524d5b8e061f5cb5de7853fd2b
describe
'2077' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVY' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
1406750456407275af25981dae130b2e
6ca3f70a6f7686392ebbbb876e9763edea6b5a67
describe
'665292' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOVZ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
3c7fbbd5d1afda5b8e0f5b3299d68e74
5a3fa634984ccc3c8a54a51b0fa9d7e5618a6506
describe
'76003' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWA' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
a6ee8ccee067349cc15a5ae992fd8694
ccab812b0de0b30653d7abac8a6ccb8ee369274a
describe
'2303' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWB' 'sip-files00106.pro'
46c450605a2a5197096b491940629de1
a9025638ab1796ae853df40f223e6a4ddafbac34
'2012-01-20T11:35:43-05:00'
describe
'17425' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWC' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
2534284ce52daa0094e609385e5ab9d8
d6de5998f2a51b424092988f3d896f693bf4ed8a
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWD' 'sip-files00106.tif'
29af23a6837ed115a6388492f305a67b
bdb3d3aff74c941dab1b252e7776a69aa2b89423
describe
'161' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWE' 'sip-files00106.txt'
32614fb7a8c65382157f3994e07e7d74
d87e6468f24f99662ae722592ca65c0adf113a72
describe
Invalid character
'4362' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWF' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
34b6dce45dbc5a502980c3d75261f0fc
73058947f26186f9729a624520e9d02c8ca369e7
describe
'665368' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWG' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
dce6049eaa2a40b4a545daa0de2e479a
2fb64bfb640ecc92ad59060fd7d13de454a384fb
describe
'17918' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWH' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
b0e76a44c667432ca408a9af8d2bc863
e979da88e0b6bc8afdb7ff9d0a7fb287a4dce573
describe
'3270' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWI' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
8034f338479218acdf0847c453807095
b21e0b88a5914f7aad7b2c895c61c9f4e23cbd3e
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWJ' 'sip-files00107.tif'
a3aa0ad2ac3893f95c1901d6f166149e
f5a94274873f26db8a7ae0cc67b7f5567a1b7e9a
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWK' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
2f18fee64a381a37cc428dc5a4ca0b6e
99fb80f76ad05c8a1393a68525c41c02e2b070db
describe
'665265' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWL' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
c9bf92048b3a59927e95747bb8cf5ece
9fb1ce38c820ee6a2eea26158b0b7836e9b0be14
describe
'18320' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWM' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
65035499d7bdb2f21527320a533244d3
7c837517c0f6e5f421f398d118cce0982bc3f252
describe
'3223' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWN' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
fbcea08cd3cef758476cb2014f914871
b2f3d41ee03e262f4deab97688c5542b7b941a96
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWO' 'sip-files00108.tif'
012833ad2988f82c8317f586b850e743
ea44d2b0daa29419a401e5eef8922d8fa2b2863f
'2012-01-20T11:32:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWP' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
bea8f3eb6fa33f34c4b10e258cda21c2
cf3383db6a61e91881b3bbd74980008212aabb77
'2012-01-20T11:36:10-05:00'
describe
'665358' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWQ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
b87ee79fac8b5bacd3fa32d882959152
ab9c95dec7ba33adb4a3f9e6a6d1b8c0623982fb
describe
'15578' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWR' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
0f276bdc088986b4fc4f628a93bd0317
9a5341b6b190d08faeb96915692f9924e9ec161a
describe
'3078' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWS' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
61ed8df953ce424f2d9ccbe02ddd5b9c
fc59f8b9a4a1b66b8cd9f68af0ef6c1fa4d993e9
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWT' 'sip-files00109.tif'
3f122e0aa8371d6b226fb41de6cc571c
e3995edd4091d7edda842413fd8bd23677313247
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWU' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
3a9a04ec6af63a0afce44280291160c9
5b3644e1723efeddc190cb7bd14defc10fa80351
describe
'665192' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWV' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
a932e6ffecf430552925dc667cd7e47c
8736596e58e36a0f830de5a9e457cc6ee67245eb
describe
'20279' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWW' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
bf7ca5d27ae1443dae1b915d334e08d5
a663085443641539d2cc7d615ee4b6036ecb2d2b
describe
'673' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWX' 'sip-files00110.pro'
78425f81a64ecf9fd9aa5e248135a648
1ff246e456460e6e39977583d88bc50ba014f314
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWY' 'sip-files00110.tif'
2e124e0862b94ef7e8a9c81b7e5b7b71
d54af880590baa3b6d97eebd2d9b387fd4f5fb74
describe
'4442' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOWZ' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
2d4ba0045784d6306392261c11bff730
a7251c352acfd8e705e6a3fb2940b2ed5240f9e6
describe
'50' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXA' 'sip-files00110.txt'
bf07374db75f8304da38f399e5a90245
85328ac7d020d61b2be9e2584f3fd92880dd251b
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXB' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
e91577b207e2211d1a9cd9cd06f7aca2
8ab73431d05022865cf0056cf533f8445f2b3ce0
describe
'665214' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXC' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
6f5c169264862da6bd63d4900f75bf48
e75df937e879bb8280da6c4497a6750548afa4f2
describe
'15757' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXD' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
fef78d2aa18e092efc0a8473cc498095
3182d32f9de9244b7b2a99b84d126f109d6eb5a5
describe
'3273' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXE' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
c6dc807297a2027f842ebba8b9049918
4b4a7581445db9c20dc12d39e2ae2bf13df79b75
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXF' 'sip-files00111.tif'
71ecebe01f0642f01f34d11bf39f86ed
ec7bd987d31fa45a1cd2428674c4defc788894e2
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXG' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
e198284d824bc4d6836884622601a4f2
08a5dc51504a53294cd76b2158c2582ab6992d6f
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXH' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
281929246df1f9bf9960d8367afba887
f73477055b94099a7d0a89fc7882102bfb85fcbb
describe
'75768' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXI' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
8ac1f0a17b3d69e0370d7d62ac98a832
8d4d160e3cec867e93fb1045e1a269e0ff0039f0
describe
'28322' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXJ' 'sip-files00112.pro'
a82c7795b148d1756a3ff2f59fff2063
9ada5de21186e5e14b7663dea58ccfc0fee4c5f1
'2012-01-20T11:35:20-05:00'
describe
'21199' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXK' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
37922fcce9ed52a855a6a31b0485313a
1c8bd31e2db4646bf3da7153af064d6ac7ed1e71
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXL' 'sip-files00112.tif'
e8c04d26f59bb3b4bbf352a6ce269ffa
e75a3cf9b54500e10ce4f92728a57062630b7653
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXM' 'sip-files00112.txt'
c15736e9ead97f21fb28044cc7fc68d7
14ac8c11b8834773575b7e4b8210254cd3297d3d
describe
'5259' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXN' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
e6caa3076ecd183f7754c4ddbf375072
85f49f53b15088c2b48d24465f00d4afed7d12ad
describe
'665359' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXO' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
a883de18d81fe471acf49a9a65e90f6d
dc854d4379d26af6a4843253ea9130829583b9f4
describe
'101511' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXP' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
d1b35de4d644c2d310550b902735fb10
f0c6d7070e96ad5b082912709309e864bed0db35
describe
'41410' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXQ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
e82164591ea1f9e346e44df72bc54b29
cac85541269ed61e93f647f1523d736df3c48512
describe
'28837' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXR' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
eb799ec8f0e7a590c7c1d02ca2428a45
5bfa82737fc7484a06db24f305af53b1d2c8fd31
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXS' 'sip-files00113.tif'
cbfed01faa7eef867f66c356bc7cbf95
8d2901208c358f26b9c04ab6f606a18b8a799b45
describe
'1679' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXT' 'sip-files00113.txt'
0baeb852aff74c46991feb92feeae3bf
14c331e25eb8682a95bbc7eb8ab58f5535d49399
describe
'6803' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXU' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
156d6eeafb0c3030b9ffca13432c45e6
267cfed003d18f1b3a365d1b02721d252e0feffb
describe
'665349' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXV' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
7eea5b22ccbdc45ef21e74a2c1e6c97b
fbc82eb639c8d184f2b141bad684102e9cce5b8f
describe
'85578' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXW' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
9f42aae7ab1cd5d4c8f077f5b31b538a
b940c22af4bbbffc927d04a76ef0af103a61e1d4
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXX' 'sip-files00114.pro'
74e820324c86cb426a44590a09558fd3
7c30be246884e3be03861e2449c28212df23a40c
describe
'19351' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXY' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
82629221823953f9257912df619b1821
f5382ae600f56f54c2ee2050a9e09bb96aa50de0
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOXZ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
01d17026627350a49cec93c4e85a1c73
593b9ab4805b8c828cff5012e5cd20fe4ffc349e
describe
'189' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYA' 'sip-files00114.txt'
b1787a7aee6abf98231f3694cb8c2ca0
253ec1cf7e876fb48506989b3ed80ba90472220d
describe
'4684' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYB' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
a2d1defd10eb338bfa1d1ddcbf98ebdb
abd5ea51cd3967c45699bd81a161614f3394c50c
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYC' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
2a0ea5eb0e244b28643b1d65d9c36a1c
991d890aba7a01f9bcaf5c4fcb6860deb3808926
describe
'19316' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYD' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
3d8a1dbd229485bb4058a7044e72be4e
cd651063375946f567af1f8c784f0626955d66f5
describe
'3735' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYE' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
1cf947f5a8dcd9c145ceb6dfeeb41c1c
6bd16219ca5aca09dfa5a72ae6d17f1e2533f8c1
describe
'5340272' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYF' 'sip-files00115.tif'
a72d9c26912ede686a4d2872c0cf987f
987acc97fb7a46aec02918cf7a858599f5cb8e86
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYG' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
cd7f20e2ace854fcb94471e120dcdc7a
205092f8e2725752053e39dac95adc9385a3ce1c
describe
'665152' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYH' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
641d629151f739ec330d617bd5a35063
f60443dada248a356828bf603138efa71d5febea
describe
'95045' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYI' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
16295aa99cfe9ef5342097f31f4f87a7
2ca3556be763ab3442c76244e51b289e8e116ceb
describe
'39954' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYJ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
39df800393cf97379deada3fc1697cab
9719b1f41d994e3665a339889fda1e40e2390a33
describe
'27822' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYK' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
28592e414e179b56e092e8b22a7bc4da
91265e2134eb89604cb7ceeb71a8461de75eec88
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYL' 'sip-files00116.tif'
eb525f320c65f26a9530f2ac1502c9ff
e42ce07c05814622d805c1d51cee6594cf1a9f17
describe
'1655' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYM' 'sip-files00116.txt'
6072d87d1282c6eae800cf85905e66b0
7c9ecdc761ea5787c1232a051ee5b4c134f2ca87
describe
'6653' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYN' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
480c1974d36ad43879fe02a4153d20f8
758817211eb89ed2e6f3a2c4ac6714fbcf877e8b
describe
'665324' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYO' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
afa3b3ea5c31fa1cbb66429a49472977
031b7935deaa75af1a29b818dcd739545231aac3
describe
'97558' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYP' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
bfff915e34ec677175548627ca5036c4
edb665aac4ecbfe0519d45e726d7da0f45ae37e2
describe
'41243' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYQ' 'sip-files00117.pro'
5e0f518292c98bf25de25d4a16ddb8a0
0712b8a50764485770c507f3c3a6b0f487e0d4a6
describe
'27272' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYR' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
434eb87f3b3859a2fbacebefc10188c5
dad8f7ec0057aea861e075f85ded3d08b4a97fe9
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYS' 'sip-files00117.tif'
8d6c5674acfec5408f0d63885e64230f
a74c8c06856a33465fb71a9f06965a2984a8279a
describe
'1704' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYT' 'sip-files00117.txt'
e8d4243374e084be42074440a3fa871e
471af2116501d8ea9308db805e8e348286a8ac22
describe
'6482' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYU' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
fef764ce624b1a24e2566012a9ab281b
8e8e9c366c6e61ed3777b9d8bbf4c62f72dfa5cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYV' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
ae33903fd29e370de5353105ea2ea6bd
b3e1596a6feb6cb7b01a904c09ca7632c289ab5e
describe
'106826' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYW' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
bbfb2f8ab6504e3d5b13d5f90ecc325b
c584deb98ab8bf17fcaddff8c3c4c2034760467d
describe
'44673' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYX' 'sip-files00118.pro'
063b4ce8b48875255ea7fab60e1f9cfd
6bb41d6886c38926898d732cb92bff993bf5ce3d
describe
'30532' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYY' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
fd781358fb144585e212334eaff7f6f8
21f78eea7ad3d096cd0f3e68871666d1c1b53346
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOYZ' 'sip-files00118.tif'
836d53413ac2dc92f928c14df2795407
15059265eb555365741acaef708baf53413b8afb
describe
'1795' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZA' 'sip-files00118.txt'
0ea82f2f59eb0eb1618109a80b5437a5
fc3be0a0e31ccca2111d082d984560cfe2662a2c
describe
'6885' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZB' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
57ea73bf13a5c6e4126e230be54a2d66
0c4f85b5f4e7e8233514cd033731d38db92f1146
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZC' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
516bcfe1eb6217c1cac5c45ac0fc8585
41be0ed7bd5c9a1190eb96a44c019ecd344e7586
describe
'105517' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZD' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
76c174d55c45793b3b86e17da44814b6
a0660ee26d4e39923e352155f7271787371e089d
describe
'45152' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZE' 'sip-files00119.pro'
7cd369efd09a7b3e2010a9dcb0effa34
25c11bfbc3cb36c282aedc35cd63d2ae9c1d63b5
describe
'29075' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZF' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
535cbd1a25d839b72c6481bf8d03a952
5ab905ac4dcfe82a0b59e573e07968a5d40bd566
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZG' 'sip-files00119.tif'
cbb56bd94cf8e65e2d0bf4fa5a22cc28
1a2d8b4543fb5a702c17a77b8b77ef1f7269a336
describe
'1876' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZH' 'sip-files00119.txt'
6325ee8c787dd3ab097313026e0f10e5
85d98bef2575842494b284dfcb7712585e7fa6fc
describe
'6711' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZI' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
1f6bc6ab851e076cd27b4d9d27e79936
494dadacbd01ffb40cbe0fa09f4cffb9aa050acd
describe
'665396' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZJ' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
4c0aa2e453f689a41b43023b55319785
1abdb9afeb1ad3f96fa1405a4a22d5ea2315a594
describe
'108334' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZK' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
f9879c0f92bdcf426c46563dffb6cf20
bfbe52f55d80d30a9e6c0b4bae22be515aae693c
describe
'45480' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZL' 'sip-files00120.pro'
0aab8a5757f87195d2fea20ce57efb17
352c6c1c5771c8f9a60b1f9a951b07bf3bd753cb
describe
'30618' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZM' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
21ecffbf532d9edac7fa3f979f52ea51
d0b7a95ac57de9418ad9a1a60b245369f959b887
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZN' 'sip-files00120.tif'
09d1e45e30805d1e340f054fa8188673
42534af9ffd7bdd2311a957a40b96bbf734b6948
describe
'1814' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZO' 'sip-files00120.txt'
a8ba3bd80a58b1426a9c499447da8c67
1e6a528d437ce12282c37e6ab37a93482bd4aa42
describe
'7246' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZP' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
2a09b96472f38a298f39013f4a6518eb
8a43e99855f6e4993a2e7fb9064bd0f6a1c3a6c2
describe
'665390' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZQ' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
5f3975367d3f15dc09d9a7c79c0d1ab7
986416095e942da7ac5d4fd324f58db701688faf
describe
'109150' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZR' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
a73a3791a0d771ef88ad15033de63b29
e5b46b53eb3915d41a167983372a3e04fe4b9c3e
describe
'46149' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZS' 'sip-files00121.pro'
1cee01b8686b09e25d8d127bfb0dd054
1d8048ca985869df88421bad9aedd5258c74b7f7
describe
'31287' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZT' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
6aeaf0b289f28bafc829da22cd1e4049
c46d21fd9432fe8a90ea111dfdcd8e891167b814
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZU' 'sip-files00121.tif'
d8e0f2c43028f812620d30c632d72135
33872ee1b983f4b03635208fd4895c0cc2814580
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZV' 'sip-files00121.txt'
a35e35f4830213311d8182bfb5f6943e
e87e9aa5955d7d339d7e5f213254185adeae5c3c
describe
'7265' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZW' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
707e069f48b593ff5a9f9a5cbc4d3d0b
b4a416e604864e53a1383aa0342b59c5968ecbff
describe
'665228' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZX' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
828aea62ccb0dc6b05879d5d95d56b95
5ffad00b47d3e022f6a31cbedebf79ce84bf2c61
describe
'97126' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZY' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
6fa6284b46611f421f0805b2965a5c85
98bc419fbb454ad552f85fdce285d377f7ae2f05
describe
'39866' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAOZZ' 'sip-files00122.pro'
6d5f78d9139a0ac8cce15b382e7502e9
e89433fbf47b21049e80ce911de4943af87464d7
describe
'27809' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAA' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
6c42b5f0194d22c952716cea57b63d08
5001e52f1986b699ee8074a1e8c6b3c2847fbe57
'2012-01-20T11:35:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAB' 'sip-files00122.tif'
9cc2700322ba7607e780c7bfb2da9159
502de8f31152187b55091c6c54c145fd3eddff90
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAC' 'sip-files00122.txt'
e17f285780bfa315f4e12e51baee6f3d
297c47ee03ac7e17b55aa1ce588611d27b43323f
describe
'6446' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAD' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
1dcfd4c89290f5f81e7e3d9a5d8db0fe
68a2c8b9c8e7b7e950716685490e640fc564b068
describe
'665336' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAE' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
0407d85c6b7a822b6237d5bd1bec7c25
cfcf8e8886d9d9e473ac3d671a330d9dbb83e28f
describe
'100983' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAF' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
19874bcbb11ea93b01ded8f6c3c5e357
d45ea245ef59f75b46310ee3440dce1bd9149623
describe
'42631' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAG' 'sip-files00123.pro'
f827cc1bde74b2928101ee1791f95b29
d9b3776d1d1503e09856bb865ef93f9e67c9a19e
describe
'30173' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAH' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
b77b518182c833b70f2f62931829883e
d0b20373a03e7cefae161997e10108a14aaa5549
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAI' 'sip-files00123.tif'
5c12574a59ad204f37a0d405d091d0bf
6cabd497957051485d92c6b42ba6f2be2102e2d5
describe
'1755' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAJ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
b6878045e8186e6aef730fc83ba28ccc
48e320d94f761afe1b5a38a64ea143a2f62290f8
describe
'7160' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAK' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
49dc4fee26ce4d58f9e020887cc4385b
4e632de1dfd2f26c9b5429c2f641804a2acd74f3
describe
'665259' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAL' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
92f5e99f251f1bdaead2b8c7b09ffb16
fb0629722fe065056f86e8be30c41c7549aa6e67
'2012-01-20T11:34:07-05:00'
describe
'94545' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAM' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
b1dc032b438d670f3d8ba632a86de27a
8060cbf98586a668246ee5ad2831027624fd2c54
describe
'2005' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAN' 'sip-files00124.pro'
6c244ccfd28154f425e63c94d6f28c1c
a24ef512dc35977569665f11a970626368367f9f
describe
'22652' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAO' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
98eed2c946095b44cd9a4e62c5da53aa
875d3dd32a9e73a5aa2038ce5238da5681653a91
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAP' 'sip-files00124.tif'
e536b0d6d63018d75e990c03dcb1b6fa
1de1331b84fc482543ddf126a717456f63885ed7
describe
'150' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAQ' 'sip-files00124.txt'
d4c3ae8ee8058305e0cd6c3ef1788d80
68e63c8804e29b04f4f25b3afe05e98c50b1492c
describe
'5767' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAR' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
2a3880ba56dda3c9a126da09ea5f19ff
f4caa211a2109ccb6cad1927eb388af42b0af47a
describe
'665400' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAS' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
8b118c8c7210811dd34a4bc5b9974c0a
853057b5be3d437c2c690a1faad700a52695cba1
'2012-01-20T11:35:23-05:00'
describe
'18033' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAT' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
e4e18af1350d2bfbcb2e76066217515a
77ee030f6c7b8fee9ea676a38227e7592db7a103
describe
'3416' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAU' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
bf3b67f6211c24d82d5403f688216d5a
4e7913a472a1095a4b6972f1db7f9d1082c8d9f0
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAV' 'sip-files00125.tif'
a4b88e2180f0279476a08ef7d1f8e266
1e42d899b7260f04777d340dc44eba39066fc259
describe
'963' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAW' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
2605b775eaf9da4ba4378b12351a529d
e1c0acd0ce40f2e14f276691f30ceac3a8a1475f
describe
'665399' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAX' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
b4d597d5c8e3cab7a619afaded64c981
1c95799c155a1915d5f454af0f58d9a046e5ae29
describe
'96389' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAY' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
ed1c54eeb04dd29112c280d388a01acd
cf39465b31d38ac848a954a41dad2c4cb8a36c13
describe
'40803' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPAZ' 'sip-files00126.pro'
0d7f04e3ed0aa47e8f8f7cbd015939f4
dae1812734765cf74793749f1a8785c6c26e6838
'2012-01-20T11:35:05-05:00'
describe
'28221' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBA' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
ba86a871650076bcdadf58bedf18d5f5
867f8292480f2a9a9e4b22995cadd48413f23ccc
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBB' 'sip-files00126.tif'
c431f47813839599e1ebcbfc648a9be0
41fbebfbcb75576dee6a8f1ec606c07f804cb7f5
describe
'1649' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBC' 'sip-files00126.txt'
d8b5c503493a2831632454186127a402
055b5b867608b8252e618a64718bed4d884a15ab
describe
'6728' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBD' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
eb7be805c1d45f4eee1244568148e47b
ce239ef541699a32d5168c560e5603dafe4540bc
'2012-01-20T11:34:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBE' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
8b65215f0b138c8eb8609d27c2b78012
f9bdb2b1254fa9d1ecc012774da6597e2f09a2bd
describe
'96612' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBF' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
e87143cad3883b7930cd7f0601537965
975c3216ae5e483eb3af6e5bae3d5515655a7107
describe
'39134' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBG' 'sip-files00127.pro'
e6b1dcd7b8a9fc0949b112cbca25eb8c
d3f13a421a5419a845ae5ccf74a5245fa5651537
describe
'27588' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBH' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
97a43b5ea74f2e6d34f10453725c14b8
bfbcf77285b64264061344a372af224f53126b26
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBI' 'sip-files00127.tif'
8455a6660e87ca5ede964515117f967c
106fc87cb77c0f4772498af88586535527c5eb1d
describe
'1627' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBJ' 'sip-files00127.txt'
cfc8bcee4cec827fe908b81b59d3e9ef
d235b7503d689f2009cad8685ed523f71f26bd49
describe
'6681' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBK' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
783e30ddb90210c0cac5181856bee8fa
3e3cdc15f29a8167d02363ac87bd0501c1909a78
describe
'665250' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBL' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
cf55d31f8465655085c9eda9209a841d
fe30bc76e44ee0aa441ca3540876798b29d60f8d
describe
'103507' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBM' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
0303a603b7545e04d84d1eadb52dc70c
581ca065a82fb1e0b1e7878fb369ed0339e5c14b
describe
'42793' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBN' 'sip-files00128.pro'
851b14a361fdf362748269a10a93214a
91bb083409440de205a05329d3da022721d50bde
describe
'28850' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBO' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
b1d880e7079d88b106b475eee7f73d24
98cdcdac203a7726ab36e3d3a2ec4b7086d25531
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBP' 'sip-files00128.tif'
4b2a8e7473827ff85c1f2157433bd1d3
1d4296e188fd2dc0b8d68a67271820c2b877da91
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBQ' 'sip-files00128.txt'
9632e4ec5c3f995bce28cb026954273f
d3ac706405fcedc750b3db622d7830c80c5d795e
describe
'6609' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBR' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
53701701f39335b2e765f7718dc2fa98
dc6e167fe9c22d74ab59a63db4c74aa5fb2ff39e
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBS' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
7c46fbdccba5df2b7966a4e77d5c364d
32c836bdae6c8743e8f3823035a8affe8d136c7e
describe
'33246' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBT' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
dbbe314f187a4441a6d9387e10b08da0
4a62397d57c627f09c984286538061545fe2cb5e
describe
'6895' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBU' 'sip-files00129.pro'
61fd632fb3b2c50b9507e9604590a251
6373f99932f7227082f2e16f796342bb8059b56e
describe
'7515' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBV' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
799bff8a12ae5cecc562c329f127f066
1de0eb66a9125e05e696a72071b5faec066aae6f
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBW' 'sip-files00129.tif'
c44cc290703caae7d40c736f4fdb0c20
7c8bea26a70b01c1106044600c9ea97edd5a5ee6
describe
'307' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBX' 'sip-files00129.txt'
764f98c55980a677f9a1c5f0ebb52fc0
d856ebe882af9a8aecb0deeb34b474d218a3d81d
describe
'2084' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBY' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
17f0c3f47e0b6d168ca63b51ead11d9f
111ea6a16ba9ecc9bb24ddf602179a18918ceba7
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPBZ' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
f085c9f343e81959af74cd74e3c5aa6f
014cb000cfa2fa33145a9fb07037955bae01e19f
'2012-01-20T11:34:05-05:00'
describe
'22386' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCA' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
83fc1c9a6416805814b5307dff42a350
8c410ffe932ad71cb047ccfeab08dc75e9a583fd
describe
'4556' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCB' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
33d96b789b02eeefecf02d30fdea6652
b702d88b223b5ba9485bd826822ef1c8ca2d7f15
describe
'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCC' 'sip-files00132.tif'
b1d07bc37839e31b8c5d677295eb756b
992bd1ab8f5edf075804a08ff33c58660935c5b7
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCD' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
1b22db489c67a899bffd7a193b1010f9
40679450b625d28307c75ae3082eb168e1dc6beb
describe
'800110' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCE' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
4defc89cb735b181faf2fd5f1216bcfa
b7c92d3f319fe048ea925dfa02f517fad626acee
describe
'67520' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCF' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
54422b0f364dafe1789ccfd0503c383b
7c6f386500ecf00c6ed9b20030ce23ce6026de71
describe
'14992' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCG' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
2e277f15a9623846d5642f623981d1f0
2977748feb27c44c3450e33cd15c8036c6fcf01d
describe
'19209112' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCH' 'sip-files00134.tif'
0277c2a645e363ae322653367ffb6630
496b760c31bc339c8ec2fd4bda78c2c171dd66e5
'2012-01-20T11:31:03-05:00'
describe
'3903' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCI' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
0c8b382fcac9aa596e13afad14e80b64
b5ae93625bc8ede53175d00b427adcb295c0879b
describe
'778634' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCJ' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
5d01f25ae3c981444f6f15ab8005ca57
3e51bbb925c1f4fe1fb8f38512f5d601c87bd344
describe
'139538' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCK' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
73545fd7b043568a8cb20d98f07edc49
374f26b4fe4028295de0446071f5cb38e2b99d9d
describe
'32174' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCL' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
14903423b34fd7cac5ed7389b1e42c63
c0dd1694c5e84ca1ee5c8c71200d101c47b8e920
describe
'18697008' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCM' 'sip-files00136.tif'
1870d96ada9fb52c31b0112866359f65
c38df6f08c8caf167d9a23ec71adb9c74cf471ed
'2012-01-20T11:34:47-05:00'
describe
'8399' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCN' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
52a0a7b8250d7b699032f89c2d48747d
733464e5eee2b6aab9a34d3696bf910e2fc09ea3
describe
'313' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCO' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
849fe8544d1d3e5a8506c823477fbc9c
0f228122fd45b5f9bf2c2a10ae4a0ceb25c33c0d
describe
'176114' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCP' 'sip-filesUF00087366_00001.mets'
7486180ff8c1de6c24c4c31f9b585535
a66d0e1dcb068b960a39593bd8eed7ce3a411619
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T00:23:11-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'233098' 'info:fdaE20090327_AAAAARfileF20090327_AAAPCS' 'sip-filesUF00087366_00001.xml'
5bceef7556f9a47be8fd80128c9b0fac
84d8a22a8818e3fac59c572bf74858dd541f3d7e
describe
'2013-12-13T00:23:09-05:00'
xml resolution