Citation
The Arabian nights

Material Information

Title:
The Arabian nights
Series Title:
Artistic series
Uniform Title:
Arabian nights
Creator:
Burnside, Helen Marion ( Editor )
Brundage, Will ( Illustrator )
Brundage, Frances, 1854-1937 ( Illustrator )
Grey, J. Willis ( Illustrator )
Raphael Tuck & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Paris ;
New York
Publisher:
Raphael Tuck & Sons Ltd.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
48 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Social life and customs -- Juvenile fiction -- Arab countries ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1898 ( lcsh )
Folk tales -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Fantasy literature -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Onlays -- 1898 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Children's stories
Folk tales ( rbgenr )
Fantasy literature ( rbgenr )
onlays (applied decoration) ( aat )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
France -- Paris
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
"Book 2"- -Cover.
General Note:
Some illustrations hand-colored.
General Note:
Two full-color onlays, pasted verso of fly leaf and on p. [41].
Statement of Responsibility:
arranged by Helen Marion Burnside ; illustrated by W. & F. Brundage and J. Willis Grey.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
002222540 ( ALEPH )
ALG2785 ( NOTIS )
122412938 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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THE BARBER’S FIFTH BROTHER.



Grranged by
PeveN

‘Marion
Burnside,

Jihus trated. by

W & F. BRUNDAGE,
and

oJ. WiLus GREY.



RAPHAKL TUCK § SONS, L.

London, Paris, and New York.

PUBLISHERS TO
THE QUEEN.









Jhe Barber's Fifth Brother,

Told by Scheherazade.

sre il HAVE the honour to inform you,” said the Barber, “‘ that the name

of my fifth brother was Alnaschar.. He spent an idle and impro-
vident youth. Our father died at an advanced age, leaving each of us
seven brothers a hundred drachms of silver, and, after much considera-
tion, my brother Alnaschar expended his in setting up a small shop,
which he furnished with a basket full of bottles, glasses, and other objects
of a similar nature. He then seated himself in his shop, and waited for
customers to buy. Whilst he sat he began to meditate, speaking to him-
self sufficiently loud for a neighbouring tailor to overhear. ‘This basket
of glass,’ said he, ‘cost one hundred drachms, which was all I had; by
selline its contents I shall make two hundred, which, reinvested, will
bring in four hundred, so that by continuing this traffic I shall in time
possess four thousand drachms. As soon as I have amassed ten thou-
sand, I can leave off selling glass ware and turn jeweller, and when, by
this means, I possess as much wealth as I require, I will buy a beautiful
house, slaves, and horses: nor will I be satisfied till I have realised one
hundred thousand drachms ; then I shall consider myself equal to a prince,
and demand the daughter of the grand vizier im marriage, and if he
refuse I will go and bring her home in spite of him. When we are
married, I shall dress like a prince, and ride a magnificent horse, capari-
soned with gold stuffs, and I will treat my wife with the utmost disdain }
she shall not leave the apartment without my permission ; I will sit in the
seat of honour, and will not speak to her, and, however splendidly she
may array her emute in the hope of rene me, I will take no notice,
and shall pretend not to see her. She will throw herself at my feet, pal
conjure me to accept a glass of wine from her hand; I shall persist in my
conduct, then she will press the wine close to my mouth, and assure me
she will not cease from entreating till she obtains the favour of my drink-



6 THE BARBER’S FIFTH BROTHER.

ing it. At-last I will give her a good blow on her cheek, and push her
Aaya me so violently with my foot that she shall fall to A eround.’

‘ Absorbed in these visions, my brother unfortunately at ike moment
kicked his basket of earthenware, so that it flew across the shop into the
street and was broken to pieces. His neighbour, the tailor, burst into a
fit of laughter, but Alnaschar beat his breast and sobbed so violently at
the destruction of all his hopes, that a lady of consequence, who was
passing by, mounted on a richly-caparisoned mule, paused to enquire the
reason of his distress, and when she heard it, she put a purse, containing
five hundred pieces of gold, into his hand. Alnaschar was overjoyed at
the sight of it, and, bestowing a thousand blessings on the lady, shut up
his shop and went home.

“While he sat reflecting on: his good
fortune, an old woman eee at the door.
‘My son,’ she said, when
he raed it, Gruen me,
I entreat you, to enter,
and give me a basin of
water.’

“¢Willinely,’ replied
Alnaschar; and whilst
the old woman washed
and said her prayers,
he placed his money in
a long purse attached
to his girdle. When
she had finished, see-
ing she was poorly
| dressed, he offered her
gi two gold pieces, but
f|she refused it, saying
_ she peleueed to
a rich and beau-
* tiful young lady
who let her want
for nothing.






















‘Greek slave, and the old woman ushered

THE BARBER’S FIFTH BROTHER. i

‘“‘ Alnaschar asked her if she could procure him the
honour of seeing this lady. ‘Certainly,’ replied the old
woman; ‘you might even marry her,
and possess her fortune. Will you follow
me ??

‘He followed her through the city
to the door of a great house, where she
knocked. It was opened by a female













him into a large and handsomely-furnished
hall, whilst she went to inform her
mistress of his arrival. In a few, te
minutes a beautiful and richly-dressed | Tl f
young lady appeared. He arose, but NR
she requested him to resume his place, d
and seated herself at his side, and ex- a
pressed much pleasure at his visit. “~=<

“Give me your hand,’ sai
she, ‘and I will lead you to my
own apartments.’

‘¢¢ Soon after they had gained the lady’s rooms she left him, saying
she would return in a few moments; but she was no sooner gone than
a tall black slave entered with a scimitar in his hand.

‘¢¢ What business have you here ?’ he cried, and immediately stripped
him, took away his gold, and wounded him in several places. He fell.
down for dead, and a young Greek slave and the black proceeded to
rub salt into his wounds; but in spite of the pain, he still pretended to be
dead. The old woman then dragged him by the legs to a trap door,
which she opened, and threw him into a subterraneous place. Believing
him to be dead, she did not bolt the trap-door, and Alnaschar managed to
open it, and get out as soon as it was night. He then hid himself till the
old woman opened the street door in the morning and went out, when
he followed her into the street and fled to my house.

‘At the end of a month he was cured of his wounds, and resolved to
avenge himself on the old woman. He accordingly disguised himself as
a woman, and tied a large purse to his girdle, filled with bits of glass.





Oma THE BARBER’S FIFTH BROTHER.

Be 4g Before long he met the old hag, and in a feigned
Ae ‘ oy _ voice addressed her.
NY if by ‘““*Can you do me the favour to introduce
4 7, me to-a money changer, my good woman? I.
eS MA am a Persian but just arrived in this city,



» and wish to have five hundred pieces of gold
4 (" ee weighed.’
a bins ' ir : ~ “£V¥ou could not have addressed a fitter
ah ys erson for your purpose,’ answered the old
: iT y / \e oF yp ys PUR eee.

Ti) 2 7 1 Y@gay woman, ‘my son is a money changer; follow
| . iy] me, and I will take you to him.’ She led: him
‘eZ / Y to the hall as before, and begged him to wait,

Sic J =z and she would send her son to him. The black

% fl Be slave then appearing, said, ‘My good woman,
/ if you will follow me, I will do what you desire.’

Alnaschar got up, and as he walked behind the Co
black, gave him such a blow with the scimitar 34
which he had concealed in his robe, that he cut
his head off. The Greek slave then appeared,
and was served in the same manner, and the old
woman, who ran in to see what was the matter,
was also beheaded. The lady alone remained, . << y
and my brother went in search of her. When “”“~“{
she saw him she nearly fainted, and begged of
him to spare her life. When he reproached
her for leading such an infamous life, she
informed him that she had been stolen away
from her husband, a rich merchant, ae the
old woman, and had been forcibly ___
detained in this house by the
black for three years.

“<«He must have ee ereat ,
riches in this wicked manner,’ 4
said Alnaschar.

““« He has,’ replied the lady. fo
‘I will show it you.’ She then



















THE BARBER’S FIFTH BROTHER. 9

took him to a room in which were many coffers full of gold, and begged
him to go and bring people to carry it away. ;

‘My brother went, and when he returned with ten men, behold! the
lady and the coffers had all vanished. That he might not return with
empty hands, he took with him, when he left the house, enough furniture
to repay him the value of his five hundred pieces of gold; but the neigh-
bours, it seemed, observed him do this, and went and informed the judge,
who sent and had Alnaschar brought before him.

‘This was, it turned out, an unjust and merciless magistrate, who
would not listen to or believe my brother’s story, but sent to his house
and took away all that he had, and commanded him instantly to leave
the city, on forfeiture of his life. My brother obeyed, and on the road
met some robbers, who stripped him bare, in which unhappy condition
I found him, and brought him home with me, and took every care of
him, as I do of my other brothers.”

Scheherazade, always contriving to interest the Sultan by the relation
of her different stories, immediately commenced a new one, and addressed
‘Schahrian as follows.





Filo of BEDER

Pines of TIS

K 2) EDER, Prince of Persia, was the son of one of ©
“\ the most mighty of the kings of that kingdom,
and of a most beautiful lady who had been sold
to the king asa slave by some merchants who
visited his court. The king fell in love with
this slave and married her, and she then told
him that she was the Princess Gulnaré of the
ocean. Her father, now dead, had been one
\&"Fs of the most powerful of the kings of the sea,
ES and her brother, Selah, now reigned in his
stead. This brother, she continued, had desired -to marry her to a
powerful prince, whom she detested. She therefore ran away to the
Island of the Moon, where she was discovered, and taken away by the
merchants, who had brought her to the Persian court.
The King of Persia was overjoyed when he heard this,
and promised that he would present his wife to his
subjects next day as the Queen of Persia. She then
told him that she was desirous of seeing her mother and
brother and other relatives again, and begged to be
allowed to summon them. ‘To this he agreed instantly,
and the queen begged him to retire to a closet, the
window of which, like her own, looked on the sea.
Being alone, she took some aloe wood from a box and
put it in the perfuming pot. As soon as the smoke
arose she pronounced some words, and immediately the
sea opened, and a majestic lady, a young man, and
three beautiful young ladies arose from it, and bounded
through the window into the room.
After having tenderly embraced this party, Queen







HISTORY OF BEDER, PRINCE OF PERSIA. 11

Gulnaré introduced them to her husband as her mother, her brother,
King Selah, and her sisters. The king expressed great pleasure at seeing
them; and shortly afterwards, during their visit to his court, a lovely
little son was born to Queen Gulnaré, whom they called Beder (the full
moon), who grew up to be the most beautiful, amiable, and accomplished
prince ever seen. His parents adored him; and when he was about
fifteen years old, the king, feeling himself becoming aged and infirm,
desired to resign the kingdom to his son. His council and subjects
agreeing to his wishes, a day was fixed for the cere-
mony. The old king descended from his throne,
and taking the crownffrom his own head placed it on
that of the prince, whom he assisted to mount the
throne, and then kissed his hand. The chief
officers followed his example,
and took the oath of ~
allegiance towards the
new king, after which
he proceeded to the
apartment of his
mother, who wished
him every happi-
ness.

In about two
years the old king
died, and Queen
Gulnaré, wishing
again to see her
brother, King
Selah, and intro-
duce her son to
him, summoned
him to pay her a
visit. The king
expressed himself
highly satisfied
with his nephew,












12 HISTORY OF BEDER, PRINCE: OF PERSIA.

and was never tired of praising his beauty and amiability to his
mother.

“Sister,” he one day exclaimed, ‘I am only astonished that so perfect
a prince should be unmarried. Permit me to mention to you Princess
Giauhar’, daughter of the King of Samandal, as worthy of him.”

He then proceeded to draw such a picture of the charms of this
princess, that King Beder, who had overheard the conversation, became
violently in love with her, and eagerly besought his uncle to lose no time
in introducing him to her.

King Selah yielded to the King of Persia’s vehemence, and placing a
ring on his nephew’s finger, proceeded to the sea, into which they imme-
diately plunged. They soon arrived at the palace of King Selah, who only
stayed long enough to choose a rich casket, full of pearls, emeralds, and
rubies, and then proceeded to the kingdom of the King of Samandal.
King Selah hastened to prostrate himself before his brother king, and pre-

KH, - “ie. eG senting the casket, laid before him his

a BN G. oil WW” proposals; and entreated of him to
| ae bestow the hand of the Princess
Sy Giauharé on his nephew, Beder, King
Dp - of Persia. At this proposal the

»_? King of Samandal burst into

f=’ a violent fit of laughter, and
rejected the idea with the ut-
most contempt.

King Selah was highly offended
a=. 2t this insolence, and
SC «C°o—quickly§ returned to
ae own palace; and
~ KF WW 2s at ey oun, King Beder was

OM, We é excessively afflicted
when the ill success of his uncle’s
mission was made known to him.

He determined to return
Z----home, and darted to the
surface of the sea, but not
knowing the way, ascended -
















HISTORY OF BEDER, PRINCE OF PERSIA. 13

to an island, where, in a dejected
frame of mind, he seated himself
at the foot of a tree. Whilst he thus sat he
suddenly beheld, looking through the foliage, a
lady of most exquisite beauty, and, arising, made
her a profound
bow.









‘“* Madam, ”. SA
said he, “I be- Cute
seech you to a
accept my ser-

vices, if you are Wie a I

in need of as-





sistance.”
eee aa, Seis
answered she, ‘the





Princess Giauhart, daughter of =
the King of Samandal; this morning
I heard that King Selah had arrived,
and demanded my hand of my father,
for his nephew, the King of Persia, and I fled hither to h

‘< Adorable Princess,” answered Beder, ‘I am myself that unworthy
Prince. I have long loved you, and I entreat you to make me happy,
and accept my love.”

The Princess extended her hand to him in token of friend-
ship, but when he bent forward in order to kiss it respectfully,
she snatched it away. “Wretch!” she exclaimed, spitting in his
face, “quit the human form, and take the shape of a white bird
with red beak and feet.”

When the transformation was effected, she took the bird and con-
veyed it to a distant island. A day or two afterwards it was caught by
a peasant, who, pleased at possessing so beautiful a bird, decided to take
it as a present to the King of the island. The King expressed great
admiration for the bird, and ordered his officers to give it any kind of food
it liked best. Dinner was at this moment served, and the Queen, entering,
instantly drew her veil over her face. ‘“‘ Sire,” she exclaimed, ‘this is



14 HISTORY OF BEDER, PRINCE OF PERSIA.

not, as you suppose, a bird, but a man; it is, in fact, Beder, King of
Persia, whom you see in this form, which he was compelled to take by
the daughter of the King of Samandal; but as I am myself skilled in
magic, I will, with your permission, restore him to his royal self.” She
then took some water in her hand, and throwing it upon the bird, pro-
nounced some mysterious words, and King Beder instantly stood before
them in all his manly beauty.

Having expressed his gratitude to the Queen, King Beder hastened

to request ie the King the use of a ship to take tea back to Persia.
This was readily ened but, to add to ¢
the misfortunes of the young King, the
vessel was wrecked in a tempest, and he
and a remnant of the crew were cast
ashore on an island, called the City of
Enchantment, where, shortly afterwards,
the Queen of the island saw and fell in
love’ with him. Being already in love
with the Princess Giauhart, King Beder
could not return the affection of the
Queen, who was a noted sorceress, and,
enraged at his repulse, she changed him
into an owl.

Meanwhile King Selah had, with
his army, conquered Samandal, and taken
the Kine prisoner, and hearing, by some
means, of the misfortunes of his nephew,
begged his sister to join him, that they might
set out together to deliver him. Accordingly
they set out with such a powerful army for
the City of Enchantment, that all its im-
habitants were destroyed in the twinkling
of an eye. The Queen herself rushed to
the cage in which the owl was confined,
and, tenderly caressing it, once again trans-
Foraneal her beloved son into his natural
figure.

















HISTORY OF BEDER, PRINCE OF PERSIA. 15

LZ King Beder professed himself still so deepl
LO K in love wath the Biineast Giauhare that he ad
Bee We not exist without her. Officers were, therefore,
sent in search of her, and she was found on
the island where the young king had first met
her.








Overcome by his constancy, and re-
penting of her ill-treatment
of him; she now consented
to be his wite; and the
4 marriage having been cele-
veh I~ brated an great splendour,
the King and Queen of
Persia departed for their own capital, whilst King Selah returned to his
dominions under the sea. :
The Sultana Scheherazadé would here have commenced another
story, but the Sultan, perceiving that day was breaking, deferred hearing
it till the next morning, when she began the following history.












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had a wife and one son.

1

et

= [’ the capital of one of the
kingdoms of China lived a
| poor tailor, named Mustafa, who

This son, whose name was
Aladdin, had been so neglected

== that he became idle, mis-



~ chievous, and disobedient. He
os was always from home, and
Ss re ska ae would not mind a word his

father and mother said to him. When he was old enough his father

wished to teach him his own trade, but Aladdin refused to learn, and in
spite of all the chastisement Mustafa bestowed upon him, persisted in
living the life of an idle vagabond, which conduct so afflicted his father as
to bring on a fatal illness, and thereby quickly put an end to his existence.
Seeing that her son would be of no use to her, Aladdin’s mother sold her
shop, and all it contained, and upon the proceeds of these, and the little she
earned by spinning, she and her son subsisted. Aladdin pursued his idle



ALADDIN AND HIS WONDERFUL LAMP. 17

course of life, and was one day playing with his companions in the
street, when a stranger stopped to look at him.

This stranger was a learned African magician, Toe believing from
the countenance of Aladdin that he would suit a purpose he had in view,
made himself acquainted with his family, and introducing himself to
Aladdin as his uncle, hinted a desire to put him in the way of a’ better
mode of life, promising to give him a handsome suit, and introduce him
to some merchants, if his nephew would accompany him. Aladdin gladly
agreed, and his mother joyfully consented to his departure with his
uncle, who behaved most affectionately to him. |

As they journeyed along, they came to a beautiful garden unknown
to Aladdin, and his uncle proposed that they should sit down and rest
and refresh themselves with the food he had brought with him. When
they had finished their repast, they pursued their way till they came to
a valley.

‘We shall now,” said the magician, “ go no further. I am about to
unfold to you the most extraordinary wonders.” He then spoke some
mysterious words, and a dense smoke arose, the ground shook, and dis-
closed a square stone with a brass ring fixed into it. The magician
ordered Aladdin to lift up the stone, which easily yielded to his strength,
and revealed a hole, at the bottom of which appeared a door.

“You must now,” said his uncle, ‘do exactly as I tell you. Go
into this cavern, through an open door which vou will find at the bottom,
then through other doors (taking the greatest care to touch nothing as you
go), till, in a niche in the wall, you see a lighted lamp. Extinguish this ©
lamp and bring it to me. On your way back you may, if you please,
gather some Pee from the garden you will pass through.” As he spoke he
placed a ring on Aladdin’s finger, si immediately des-
cended and pend all as his ane hadsaid. He then put

Ree the lamp into his robe, and piled as much
==: fruit as he could carry over it. As soon
ae as he arrived at the entrance to the cave,
the magician commanded Aladdin to give
him the lamp, but as it was covered over
with fruit the boy steadily refused to do
so, till his pretended uncle, in a violent

: b




ge Te wilh











18 ALADDIN AND HIS WONDERFUL LAMP.



rage, spoke some magic words over the |
stone, which instantly returned to its
place, and enclosed Aladdin in the .
cavern.

When the magician found his hopes _ |
of possessing the lamp foiled in this
manner (for, in truth, the quest for this
same lamp had been the object of his
journey), he set out on his return to
Africa, leaving his supposed nephew in
the cavern, from which, he knew, all his __{
arts were powerless to release him. ‘The oo
garden and halls, which had been raised
by enchantment, now disappeared, and for
two days Aladdin regarded himself as buried
alive, without hope of relief; but on the third day, throwing
up his hands in despair, he accidentally rubbed the ring which was
still on his finger. Instantly a gigantic genie appeared. _ before
him, and said, ;

‘What do you wish? Iam ready to obey him who is the wearer
of that ring.” -

But for the peril of his situation Aladdin would have been alarmed ;
as it was, he answered,

‘Whoever you are, take me out of this place,” and he had scarcely
spoken the words before he found himself alone, and. outside the cavern,
on the spot to which his uncle had brought him; and in fear of the
magician, set out, without loss of time, on his journey home. His
mother, who had given him up for dead, was overjoyed to see him,
though her disappointment was great when she found he had come back
as poor as he went away. When he had recounted to her all that had-
taken place, she assured him that she was quite satisfied the wicked
magician was no uncle of his, but that he had deceived them for his own
purposes. She then bewailed herself that she had no food in the house,
and Aladdin bethought him of the lamp, which, he said, if rubbed up
they might be able to sell. His mother took it from him, and began
to rub it. Instantly a hideous genie appeared before her.





ALADDIN AND HIS WONDERFUL LAMP. 19

‘What do you wish?” he said. ‘I am
ready to oney. you, who have the lamp in
your hands.” :
The poor woman, greatly alarmed, fell down fainting,
but Aladdin, seizing the lamp, cried,

“Tam hungry, bring me food.”

g A silver basin, filled with the choicest food, immedi-

| ately appeared on the table, and the youth insisted on his
mother seating herself, and eating with him. She was ex-
tremely | astonished, and her son explained to her that this was not
the same genie who had appeared to him in the cavern, but one
evidently belonging to the lamp. She wished him to get rid of so’
dangerous a possession, but Aladdin refused to do so, and made use of
it in order to obtain not only their daily food, but all kinds of riches—
gold, and silver, and precious stones. He had ale to ask, and the slave
of the lamp procured him his desire.

Thus things went on till Aladdin happened to see the Princess
Badroulboudour, the daughter of the Sultan, with whom he fell desperately
in love, and resolved to make his wife. This was, however, a matter in
which the genius of the lamp was powerless to help him ; but by means of
it, the youth became the possessor of so much wealth, that he was enabled
_ to offer magnificent presents to the Sultan. He built the most splendid
palace ever seen, and wore dresses more costly than those of the Sultan
himself; so that, seeing how rich and powerful he became, the Sultan was
in course of time induced to listen, and give his consent to the marriage.
Some years passed away, and nothing could exceed the happiness and
prosperity of Aladdin, and his beautiful wife. Aladdin became as irre-
proachable in his life and conduct as he had, in his youthful days, been the
reverse, and was so just, liberal, and courteous, that he won the affection
of every one who knew him.

It then happened that the African magician returned again, and had
no sooner set foot in China than the fame of Aladdin, whom he believed
to be dead, reached him. ‘‘ Miserable son of a tailor,” he exclaimed in a
furious rage, ‘‘ he has then escaped and discovered the secret of the lamp
which I failed to obtain for myself. But I will destroy him, or perish in

the attempt.” Summoning his diabolical arts to his aid, he soon formed
Dea








ALADDIN’S MOTHER AND THE SULTAN.



ALADDIN AND HIS WONDERFUL LAMP. ; e211



his plans. The first thing
was to discover the place in
which the lamp was kept, or
- whether Aladdin, who was at
that time absent from home,
carried it about with ‘him.
Accordingly, he disguised
7 himself as a lamp-seller, and,
carrying a basket of beautiful
new lamps on his arm, walked
ye, round and round the palace,
=~ ealling out, ‘‘ Who will change
old lamps for new?” The
Princess and her slaves, hearing
him, could not help laughing at
his folly.
I “There is an old lamp lying
xray upon the cornice,” said one of the
_ slaves. ‘If the Princess will permit,
I will sce if this fellow is as great
a fool as he pretends.” Now this was the
i very lamp which had caused Aladdin’s
success and happiness. He had himself placed it there before he went
hunting ; when not engaged in the chase he always kept it about him.
The magician at once recognised it, and eagerly exchanged the old
lamp fora new one, heedless of the laughter of the slaves, and instantly
disappeared with it down an unfrequented street. The first use he made
of it was to command that Aladdin’s palace, with everything in it, should
be transported to the wilds of Africa, which was at once effected.
Meanwhile the Sultan, looking from his window, missed the palace
cof Aladdin. In his rage he conceived the idea that his son-in-law was an
impostor, who had stolen away the Princess, and sent out his officers to
arrest him, and on his arrival, knowing nothing of what had happened,
ordered his immediate execution. The populace, however, being much
attached to Aladdin, made such a commotion that the Sultan was obliged
to reconsider his determination; but he declared that if Aladdin - did














22 ALADDIN AND HIS WONDERFUL LAMP.

not discover and restore his daughter, his life would eventually be the
forfeit. The unhappy Aladdin did not know in what direction to com-
mence his search. He therefore wandered towards the country, and heed-
less with despair, slipped, and would have fallen. In recovering himself
he accidentally rubbed the ring on his finger, and the genie he had seen
once before stood before him, enquiring his wishes.

‘Place me,” he cried, ‘‘ under the windows of the Princess Badroul-
boudour.” He had barely il this before he found himself on the spot, and
was recognised by the Princess on her coming to the window at sunrise.

They embraced with tears of joy, but Aladdin’s first words were to
entreat his wife to tell him what had become of the lamp which he had
placed on the cornice. She then related to him
all that had happened, and informed -him that
the country they were now in was Africa.

“ Ah! you have unmasked to me the ,@
traitor,” exclaimed Aladdin. “The African ? 2
magician !—he is the most infamous of men. But tell me, I beseech you, what he has done ts
with the lamp.”

“ He carries it, carefully wrapped up, in his
bosom,” rejoined the Princess. ‘‘ He comes here
frequently, and persecutes me with his attentions.”

“With your help, my dear wife,” said

Aladdin, “I. will endeavour to rid us both
of this vile wretch.”

And hearing that the magician had signified his intention of visiting
the Princess that very day, he hastened to a chemist’s in the town, ane
purchased a certain powder, which he instructed his wife to mix in the wine
she was to present to. their enemy on his arrival. She did as Aladdin
bade her, and the next moment the African magician fell lifeless on the
sofa. Aladdin quickly repossessed himself of the lamp, and commanded
the genie to transport the palace and all in it back to the same spot in
China whence it was brought.

This was done in a minute’s time, and the Sultan could scarcely
believe his eyes when, on looking from his window at sunrise; he beheld
the palace in its accustomed place, and all about it as usual. In his joy





ALADDIN AND HIS WONDERFUL LAMP. ; 28

at the recovery of his daughter, the Sultan forgot all about his anger
against Aladdin ; and when she had recounted to him all that had taken
place, freely reinstated him in the favour he had formerly enjoyed, and
when some years afterwards the old king died, at an advanced age,*

as he had no son, the Princess succeeded to — the throne,
and transferred the supreme power to her husband.
Be They reigned together for many years, and left _ @ numerous

t

and illustrious family to succeed
them. -



The Sultan, having expressed his satisfaction with this story, was
informed by Scheherazadé that she had another quite as surprising to
relate to him, and commenced as follows : —

:





<= © he nen nted Hore 4

Ne your majesty is aware, the festival of Nevrour, which is the first
day of the year, is one of special solemnity Ahmenein Persia, not
a village, however small, neglecting to celebrate it with great rejoicing ;
and the Kine of Persia bene eto curious in scientific construction,
it was the custom for all ingenious persons, who had anything to display,
to exhibit its merits at fe festival held at Schiraz,
where the court was assembled. At one of ee oe
festivals an Indian appeared, and presented ee
himself at the foot of the throne, leading a
mechanical horse, richly capariconed) endl
so skilfully ene that every one
supposed it to be real.

“Sire,” said he, prostrating himself
before the King, “Iam assured that you
have not seen anything so astonishing
as this horse, which I entreat you to.
look at.”

“T see nothing in the horse,”
replied the King; “another work.
man might have aoe it with a still
greater resemblance to Nature.”

“It is to the interior construc- |
tion of the horse, and the use I 3
can make of it, that I desire to call &.
your majesty’s attention,” resumed












THE ENCHANTED HORSE. 25

the Indian. “When I mount him, I can transport myself to any
particular spot in a short space of time. I am ready to give your
majesty proof of this.”

The King told the Indian that- nothing but the proof he had
proposed could convince him of the truth of such an assertion. The
Indian therefore mounted his horse, and inquired of the King where
he desired him to go.

“To yonder mountain,” answered the King, “and, as proof of
having been there, bring me a branch of a palm which grows at
its foot.”

He had scarcely spoken, when the Indian touched a little peg
in the horse’s neck, which rose from the ground and flew through
the air at an immense height. In a quarter of an hour, the Indian
alighted again at the same spot, and laid a palm branch at the
King’s feet.

Filled with admiration and astonishment, the King conceived
a strong desire to possess this horse, and resolved to give the Indian
whatever sum he asked for it. The Indian, however, refused to
sell it. :

“T obtained it from its inventor,” he said, “in exchange for the
hand of my daughter, and promised him that I would only part with
it in exchange for anything I myself desired.” ~

is “I am ready,” said the King, “to grant you

/s7e /__._ anything you may ask of me.”
i 4 “Give me, then, the hand of your daughter

as my wite,” answered the Indian. “TI will part
with the horse on no other terms.”

~The King seemed inclined to grant this
y extravagant request, but the Prince Firoux Schah,













Wh his eldest son, expressed great indignation.

a “Sire,” said he, “I entreat you to consider
4 what is due to yourself, my sister, and the blood
Bid : of our ancestors.”
Seo Se But the King was deaf to his argu-

—— ments.
** Before we conclude the bargain,” he



26 THE ENCHANTED HORSE.

said to his son, ‘‘I.wish you to make trial of the

horse yourself. I daresay the Indian will peut
this.”

















Seeing that the King of Persia did not alto-
_ gether refuse his proposal, the Indian gladly
assented, hoping to win the Prince’s
favour alse: and hastened to assist him
in mounting. But the latter sprang into —
the eae and, without waiting for |
any instructions from the Indian,
instantly turned the peg, and the
horse carried him off with such
velocity that, in a minute, he was
out of sight. Neither steed nor
‘rider appeared again, and the
’ Indian threw himself at the King’s
feet—

“Your majesty must have
observed,” cried he, ‘that the
Prince did not wait for my
directions as to the manage-
ment of the horse, therefore
I am_ not peapeueilile should
aught befall him, and should he not discover how to return.”

‘Be that as it may,” answered the King, “‘your life shall be the
forfeit if my son do not return in safety.” fe then caused the paebae
to be cast into prison, there to await the return of the Prince.

Prince Firoux Schah meanwhile, having travelled as far as he desired,
would have returned, and, finding that he did not know how to control
his wonderful steed, regretted his impetuosity in not waiting for instruc-
tions; he tried by various means to stop, but it was not for a iene time that
he saw a second and smaller peg in the horse’s neck. This he turned,
and at length, long past midnight, the horse descended and stopped.

The Prince dismounted, and found himself on the roof of a magnificent
palace, examining which, he descried a staircase, leading to an open door.
Quickly pee this, ie found himself in a lighted phamiber containing



THE ENCHANTED HORSE. 27

several beds, in the most elevated of which lay a Princess offextraordinary
beauty, whilst the others were occupied by her ladies. All were asleep,
but, kneeling by the couch, the Prince gently touched the lady to attract
her attention ; she opened her eyes or him with the utmost astonishment.

“Great Princess,” cried he, still kneeling, ‘in consequence of a most
wonderful adventure, you see before you the Prince of Persia, who finds
himself in danger of perishing, unless you will protect him.”

The Princess listened to him very graciously, and saying she would
restrain her curiosity to hear his adventures till the morning, roused. her
ladies, and. ordered them to conduct him to a safe apartment, and provide.
forall his wants. The ladies, albeit much surprised, obeyed the commands

of the Princess, who, in the morning, ordered herself to be magnificently





“98 THE ENCHANTED - HORSE.

arrayed, and was not satisfied till her mirror told her there
was nothing more to be desired. She then sent a lady to
inform the Prince of Persia that she was ready
F to receive him. Prince Firoux Schah obeyed her
(2% summons, and seating himself on a sofa by her
RS) side, related to her ne circumstances of his arrival.
: When he had finished, the Princess |
informed him that she was the daughter
‘of the King of Bengal, who was at present absent
' from his palace. She begged that Prince Firoux
| Schah would remain as Hee guest till her father’s
| return, in order to pay his SesDOee to him. The
\ Prince readily assented to this, for he had fallen
= in loye with the beautiful and amiable Princess ;
== indeed, it was not long before he declared his
- passion, and finding that she was not unwilling
to accept him, he “imtesisel her to return with bin
to the court e his father, who, he assured. her, would
delight to welcome her as his wife.

Ser long persuasion, she consented to do so. They mounted the’
enchanted steed together, and in about two hours and a half arrived in
the capital of Persia. Prince Firoux, on alighting, conducted ‘the
Princess of Bengal to a magnificent ee eee He requested her to
wait, whilst he went to infor m his father of her arrival.

"The King was overjoyed at the return of his son, and -when he heard
of the presence of the Princess, and of the Prince’s eee for her, exclaimed
that he would himself hasten to receive her, and that the marriage should
take place that very day. He then gave orders for the release of the
Indian, whose horse was to be restored to him. Whilst the King prepared
to accompany his son into the presence of the Princess, the Indian hastened
to possess himself of his steed, and hearing from the grooms all that had
occurred, resolved to avenge himself for the wrongs he had suffered; he
therefore presented himself in the apartment where the Prince had left his
intended bride, and informed her that he had been sent by the King to ¢on-
duct her on the enchanted horse to the square before the palace, where he
and his court awaited her. She easily consented to do this, and mounting

4

















THE ENCHANTED HORSE, 29

with her he turned the peg, and ascended into the air so swiftly that they
-were instantly out of sight. Nothing could exceed the anger of the King,
but the grief of Prince Firoux cannot be described. After indulging it for
a time, he resolved to set out in search of the Princess, and not to return
till he had found her. The Indian meanwhile directed his course towards
Cashmere, and descending with the Princess in a wood, proceeded to
ill-treat her; but her cries attracted the attention of the Sultan of Cash-
mere, who was hunting close by, and who came to her assistance, and
destroyed the Indian by cutting off his head. fm

The Princess was not, however, much the gainer by this, for the
Sultan fell in love with, and determined to marry her ; and notwithstand-
ing her refusal, on their arrival at his palace, he ordered his intention to
be announced in his capital with rejoicings. The Sultan provided the
Princess with magnificent apartments, a retinue of ladies, and did every-
thing he could think of to please and amuse her, but she was so afflicted
by the situation in which she found herself that she became ill. Day by
day her malady grew worse, and the marriage could not take place. The
Princess showed every,symptom of insanity, and none of the physicians
who were brought to her were able to effect a cure.

‘In the interval Prince Firoux, disguised as a dervise, had
reached & Cashmere in search of her, and hearing the cireum-
stances, was assured that he was at last near the object
of his affections. He hastened to present
himself to the Sultan as a physician,
and in this character was
introduced into the Prin-
cess’s apartments in the
hope that he could cure
her. Having whispered to
: her who he was, he
—=<=- yapidly matured — his
plans for her escape.

He then informed the
Sultan that she had con-
tracted something of en-
chantment from the horse,











30 THE ENCHANTED HORSE.

and that if allowed to perform the cure in his own manner, she would
be perfectly well in a few minutes.

The Prince then requested that the enchanted horse should
be brought to him in the middle of the great
square. This being done, he conducted the Prin-
cess thither, and mounted her care-
fully; he then placed round the
horse some little vessels full of
fire, so that it was enveloped
in smoke, and pretending to
pronounce some magic words,
leapt on to the horse under
cover of the smoke. Touching
the peg, the steed instantly
ascended into the air,
and bore them in a few
minutes out of sight. Hay-
ing by this stratagem
delivered the Princess
of Bengal, the Prince
of Persia soon after-
wards alighted with
her before the King’s
palace, and the mavr-
riage between them
was immediately cele-
brated with great
pomp and magnifi-
cence.



















Dinarzad& aid not fail to remind her sister, on the conclusion of this
story, that she had promised one of still greater attraction for the
following morning—and the Sultan rel himself anxious to ne
the history of ‘“ The Paling Bird.”







hey HERE was once a Prince of Persia, named .
by GY ye Khosroushah, who used to amuse himself by
Wi going out into the city in the night in disguise,
with an attendant, also disguised. Iam going
to tell you of an adventure that happened to
him the very first night on which he did go, -
_ after he ascended to the throne of the Sultan,
his father.
Accompanied by his grand vizier, disguised
like himself, he started one evening two hours
after dark, and strolled
Sa - into a quarter of the
city where only common people lived.
Passing a house in one of the streets,
he heard voices talking very loud, and
peeping in at a half open door, beheld three sisters seated on a
sofa. He soon discovered that they were talking of their wishes for
themselves.

“Talking of wishes,” said the eldest, “mine is to marry the Sultan’s
baker. I should then have as much of that delicious white bread, called
‘The Sultan’s bread,’ as I could eat.”

‘“And mine,” said the second sister, “is to marry the Sultan’s cook.
I could then eat of such excellent dishes, and, of course, the bread would
be included. So, you see, my taste is as good as yours.”














32 THE TALKING BIRD.

The youngest, who was extremely beautiful, and much more
sprightly than the others, spoke laughingly. ‘For my part I take
a higher flight, and should like to marry the Sultan himself, and
have a son whose hair should be gold on one side, and silver on
the other.”

The wishes of the three sisters appeared to the Sultan so singular
that he resolved to gratify them, and desired his vizier to take particular
note of the house, that he might come the next day and bring the three
sisters before him.

When they. arrived. the Sultan asked them if they remembered
their wishes of the evening before, and whether they really meant
what they said. The three sisters were frightened and abashed, and as
the youngest cast down her eyes and blushed in confusion, she looked
so beautiful that the Sultan was more than ever determined to marry her.
He told them not to be alarmed. He had only ee
asked because he intended to grant all their ==

wishes, and sending for his baker and ay iN
cook, he had all three marriages cele. “Se /
brated at once. The two elder sisters yf;

were filled with envy and_ jealousy
at the better fortune of the youngest,
and concerted together by what ©
means they could destroy her
happiness. ‘This was not easy, NEY
but at last they hit upon \
a plan, and pretending great
affection for her, they
got her to promise,
with the Sultan’s
permission, that
should she have
any children they ane
should be chosen =
as nurses. By and
by a beautiful little son was born, but the sisters took him
away, and “showed a dead dog to the Sultan instead, telling him








Z

HMO OHNE

N
3
e























THE TALKING BIRD, 38

it was his child; whilst the little Prince they put into a basket and
dropped into a canal which ran past the window. Here it was speedily
found by the Superintendent of the Royal Gardens, who, seeing what

a lovely child it was, guessed at the truth, and resolving to adopt and

bring it up as his own, took it home to nis wife, who joyfully fell in
with his wishes.

By and by another son was born to the Sultana, and the wicked
sisters acted in the same way as before—this time showing the Sultan
a dead cat. The second Prince was also found and adopted by the
Superintendent of the Gardens, who, when a little Princess followed,
became quite certain of the identity of the three beautiful children who
lived in his house, and were brought up by him as his own. When the
wicked sisters showed a piece of wood to the Sultan after the birth of the
third child, he was so angry and disappointed that he no longer loved
the Sultana, and resolved on her death, but his grand vizier and officers,
who adored the gentle and beautiful Queen, persuaded him to grant her
life ; so he had her shut up for life in a large cage, which was placed by
the gate of the church. One window of this cage was to remain always
- open, and every Mussulman who went into the church

was ordered to spit in her face on pain of sharing
her punishment. This cruel decree was executed to
the great satisfaction of the jealous sisters, who
congratulated themselves on the success

Uk of their plans. Meanwhile the young
Princes and the Princess, to whom the









Mi
“ig



names of Bahman, Perviz, and
EF | ’Parazadt, after some of the
ancient Kings and Queens of
© Persia, grew up handsome, ami-
able, and accomplished. They
“had the best masters that could
_ be procured, and the good Super-
intendent, after the death of
his wife, built for them a
most beautiful residence in the

Superintendent had given the-

'





34 THE TALKING BIRD.

midst of an extensive park, which he furnished most
elegantly, and supplied with everything he could
think of to give them pleasure.

Bie —— Soon after they had moved. there,
j however, he died so suddenly, that

| he had no opportunity of telling

i Us them, as he had intended, the true
| circumstances of their pr -The
,, Princes and Princess mourned for
“him as a father, and perfectly
satisfied with their beautiful home
af ond the companion-
( i _ ship of each
7 ~— other, continued
cto reside there,
as retired as sey, had
always done. :
One day, when the
Princes were out hunting, leaving their .
sister at home alone, an old Mussulman devotee came to the gate, and
begged to be allowed to enter and repeat her prayers in the oratory, as
there was not time to reach the church. Princess Parazadé admitted
her, and when she had finished her prayers showed her over the house
and gardens, which, on taking leave, she assured the Princess only
wanted three things to be perfect. After much persuasion she consented —
to tell what these things were (which were all in one place on the con-
fines of the kingdom). ‘ They are,” she said, ‘the talking bird, the
singing tree, and the golden water. You have but to follow the road
which passes here, for twenty days, and then the first person you meet

will point them out to you.”

The Princess was plunged into such affliction at the impossibility of
procuring these things on which she immediately-set her heart, that her
brothers were anxious to know what ailed her. After much pressing,
she told them. They loved her very dearly, and they had never
thought anything they could do to please her a trouble, so Prince
Bahman instantly resolved on setting out to procure these things.










THE TALKING BIRD, 35 -

“Only tell me the road I am to go,” said he, ‘and I will start to-
morrow.” |
Very early next morning Bahman was ready to set out, and while
embracing his sister, gave her a knife. “As long as you see the blade -
bright and clear, as it is now,” he said, ‘I shall be alive and well, but
if you see blood drop from it you will know that I am dead.” He
then mounted his horse and rode away. On the twentieth day of his
journey he found a hideous old dervise by the wayside, whom he
accosted, but so long were the moustache and beard of the old man
that he could not understand the mumbled words spoken in answer,
until he had removed some of the hair with his scissors. He then
explained again what he wanted. At first the old man was unwilling
to reply, but yielding to persuasion, informed the Prince he would
encounter great danger in obtaining what he desired. ‘‘ But take this
bowl,” he said, ‘throw it before your horse, and follow it till you come
to the foot of the mountain. You will hear voices calling to and
abusing you, but if you look back you will be changed into a black
stone. If you overcome the dangers and reach the top of the mountain,
you will find what you seek. Take the cage of the talking bird first,
‘and it will inform you as to the rest.”
Prince Bahman proceeded on his way, but unfortunately forgot the
injunction of the old man not to look behind, for he did so, and he and
his horse instantly became black stones. At the same minute Princess
Parazadt, looking at the knife given her by her brother, saw blood ”
dropping from it, and knew that he had failed, and lost his life in the
enterprise. Prince Perviz then became obstinately determined to go
also, in spite of the entreaties of his sister to remain with her; and’
started next morning in the same direction, first placing in hig sister’s
hand a chaplet of pearls. ‘Tell this over every day,” said he, “and
’ if ever you happen to find the pearls set fast, so that you cannot
h move them, you will know I also am dead.”
| All happened to Prince “Perviz exactly the same as to his
brother. On the twentieth day the Princess, telling over
her chaplet, found the pearls set fast, and knew that
this brother also was no more. In her affliction she
conceived the idea of going herself, and next morn-




Cu,



36 THE TALKING BIRD.



ing, disguising herself as a youth, she mounted her horse, and taking the
same road that her brothers had done,reached the spot where the dervise sat
on the twentieth day. After speaking with him, she cunningly placed
cotton in her ears, so that she might not hear the voices, and by this means
reached the talking birdin safety. ‘Then taking the cotton from her ears,
she enquired of the bird how to find the singing tree, and afterwards the
golden water. Whenshe had procured both, the bird informed her that if
she sprinkled the black stones she passed as she went down the mountain-
side with a few drops of golden water, she would discover and disenchant
her brothers. This she did, and instantly Prince Bahman and Prince Perviz,
and their horses, appeared before her. They joyfully: embraced each other,
and the Princess showed them that she had obtained the objects of her de-
sires. They then set out on their return home, Prince Bahman carrying the
branch of the singing tree, and Prince Perviz the pitcher of golden water,
whilst the Princess herself carried the cage containing the talking bird.
When they arrived at home the latter was placed in the garden,
where it attracted crowds of other birds ; the branch was planted close to the
house, and quickly grew into a tree, the leaves of which sang in the sweetest
harmony; and the golden water, on being poured into a marble basin,



THE TALKING BIRD. ; 37

rose into.a fountain twenty feet high, and fell back without overflowing
the rim of the basin.

A few days after their return, the Princes went out hunting, and met
the Sultan before they had time to get out of his way. Struck by
their faces and manner, he enquired who they were, and on being
told, invited them to join him in hunting. This they did, and were not

only very successful in sport, but the Sultan became
- so much interested in their intelligent conversation
that he wished them to return with him. They ex-
cused themselves, saying they had an only,
and very dear sister at home, and could
do nothing without consulting her.

“Do so,” said the Sultan, “and
come and hunt with me again soe; and
tell me what she says.”

The brothers, however, forgot to tell their
sister, both on this day sul rl succeeding
ones, in spite of the reminders and increasing











Z | persistence of the Sultan. At last they remem-
yee ~ bered, and did as he desired.
4 ae «“ Let us consult the bird,” said the
Princess.

= —— Fey When it was brought, she explained
to it the Sultan’s wishes.
‘- Let them go,” said the Dine ‘‘and not only this, but invite the
Sultan to your home in return.”

After having visited the Sultan at the palace, Prince Bahman
proffered to him a respectful request that he would do them the honour
to visit them and be introduced to their sister. The Sultan not only
accepted the invitation, but expressed much pleasure at the idea, and
the brothers retired to prepare for his visit.

The Princess determined on consulting the talking bird as to what
dishes the Sultan preferred. ;

“You have good cooks,” replied the bird. ‘“ Let them do their
best, but, above all things, place before the Sultan a dish of cucumbers,
with pearl sauce.” .



38 THE TALKING BIRD. |

e

The Princess exclaimed in astonishment at the idea of such a dish,
and objected that she had not the pearls to furnish the sauce.

“For that matter,” answered the bird, “you have but to turn up
the earth at the foot of the first tree you come to in your park, and you
will find more than you will want.”

The Princess did as she was told, and obtained a ‘small gold be full
of pearls, which she exhibited to her brothers, and they decided it would
be wise to act exactly as the bird had told them.

When the Sultan arrived, to occupy the time before dinner, the
Princess took him into the paeden and called his attention to the talking
bird, the singing tree, and the golden water. He was so amazed at these
wonders that he could scarcely tear his attention away from them.

The talking bird was placed in the window of the dining saloon
that he might further observe it. As the repast proceeded, the Sultan
drew the dish of cucumbers towards him,
intending to partake of it, and was
astonished to find it dressed with pearls.

elt yous Majesty thinks it so very
surprising,” suddenly remarked the bird,
“how could you so readily credit
your children being born in the form
of a dog, a cat, and a piece of
wood ?”

‘Because the attendant
women told me so,” said the
Sultan. G

‘¢ Those women
were the Sultana’s
sisters,” replied
the bird, ‘who
were jealous of
the honours she
enjoyed, and who
imposed upon
you. They will
confess it if you















ee





THE TALKING BIRD. 39 _

question thant and in these three young people you behold your real
children, who were found and rescued by the Superintendent of the :
Gardens.” . :

This speech enlightened the Sultan as to the whole scheme.

‘Ag for these children,” he said, ‘‘ the strong affection and at-
traction : have felt towards them convinces me of the truth of what
you say.”

Tenderly embracing all three, he mounted his Hane. i
and rode away to put the question to the sisters of the j
Sultana, who, on the torture being applied, £ &
confessed the truth, and were executed. s

He then let the Sultana out of her
prison with his own hand, and em-
bracing her, begged for her forgiveness 5
with tears in his eyes, and when she
had been bathed and dressed
with her former magnificence, .
he introduced the Princes and
Princess to her, telling her :
they were her own children,
and the manner in which
he, and she also, had been
imposed upon by her wicked
sisters.

Prince Bahman,
Prince Perviz, and Prin-
cess Parazadé were then
conducted to the palace,
followed by the re-
joicings of the people. |

And in this mag- |
nificent and joyful man-
ner ends their history
and that of the talking bird.
















i



40 THE TALKING BIRD.

’

The Sultan expressed so much pleasure at the recital of ‘‘ The
Talking Bird” that Scheherazadé informed him that she had another
for the following morning, which was even more wonderful. 5







Res

or

=



THE STORY OF BEDER, PRINCE OF PERSIA.



STK oF Havre

or THE Al RAB LAN Kuiexy :

pee was the only son of Emir Ben-Hilac-Salamis, of Arabia, and :
of Amirala his wife. He wasa child of extraordinary beauty and -
abilities, of whom it was foretold that he would be glorious and successful
in life, but that he must first pass through great dangers. His-father -
and inother therefore determined that his education should be such as
best to strengthen him, in body and mind, to endure any hardships
which might befall him; thus, before he was seven years of age, he
could ride the most unmanageable horses, and excelled all his companions
in strength and activity. Ifakis, the wisest philosopher of the time, —
was engaged as tutor to the young Prince, and when he died, in a few
years’ time, Habib knew everything that even a man of such attainments
as Ilfakis could teach him. is
While Habib was still grieving over the loss of his tutor, a stranger--
knight, of great strength and military accomplishments, arrived at the
camp, and after numerous satisfactory trials of his prowess and dexterity
in knightly and soldierly science, Emir Salamis determined to place his
son in his care. I] Haboul, as the stranger-knight was called, joyfully
accepted the charge, and with the happiest results. The young Sultan



STORY OF HABIB, OR THE ARABIAN KNIGHT, 43

soon distinguished himself by prodigies of valour, and astonished. his
father’s peaeilen by his wisdom and clear-sightedness.

When I] Haboul had finished the education of Habib, he was alled
away into another country; but before his departure he confided to his
pupil the secret of the existence of a beautiful and unfortunate Princess,
named Dorothil-goase, whose destiny was linked with his own, for the
stars had foretold that it was only by an Arabian Prince that she could
be rescued from the persecutions of the genii of the race of Ebhis, i in
whose power she was.

“This Princess is the daughter of a powerful king, named Schal-
goase, and of Camarilzaman, his wife, and you yourself, my dear
Habib,” continued I] Haboul, ‘‘are the Prince whom fate has destined,
after an alarming series of dangers, to rescue this Princess, and unite her
fortunes with your own. You must, however, have patience till some
‘event shall direct you how to act. ” Pentenly embracing his- pupil,
Il Haboul rode away.

One day, as Habib was.musing in a rustic abode which he had built

for himself in a charming vale outside his father’s camp, he heard a
sudden noise in the air, and perceived:a large grey bird approaching,
bearing upon its back a pavilion, of gauze, the doors and windows of
which were wreathed about with flowers. The bird alighted, and a
golden staircase was let down from the door of the pavilion, at which
a most lovely young lady, surrounded with attendants of remarkable
beauty, appeared. Leaning on the arm of one of them, she descended
the stairs, and came ‘punk the Sultan’s retreat. Hai arose and’
cast himself at her feet, when, gazing upon a picture which she wore,
and then on him, she said :—

“Tt is indeed my hero, the young Habib, whom I, Dorothil-goase,
am thus happy enough to find.” :

While they were embracing each other, a genie in human form
appeared, and saluting the young queen, informed her that the rebel
Abarakaff had een advantage of her absence to attack the only
island which remained to her of her kingdom, and that the rebel genii
had joined him,

‘“* Return immediately, ” he cried, ‘‘ and oppose them, lest the way be
blocked by dangers, and the enemy feat ” With another embrace the



44 STORY OF HABIB, OR THE ARABIAN KNIGHT.

lovers parted, the Princess returning to her pavilion, borne by the roc,
and Habib to his father’s tent, to inform him of his resolve immediately _
to proceed to Mount Caucasus to the assistance of Dorothil-goase.

With twenty men of tried prudence and courage, Habib hastened to
set forth on his journey, the dangers of which were rendered light to
him by the love that inspired his enterprise; but as they proceeded -
difficulties and deprivations grew day by day, and his attendants became
weary and disheartened. They therefore conspired to leave Habib whilst.
he slept, and return home. This they did, and told the Emir Salamis
that his son had been killed in the desert by the bite-of a serpent.

Salamis believed them, and while he and the whole kingdom were
mourning for the loss of the Prince, Habib, having discovered the
treachery of his soldiers, proceeded alone on his journey, which he still
determined to accomplish. Having encountered successfully unheard-of
difficulties and dangers, his strength, though not his courage, was one day
beginning to fail, when a monstrous bird, which he perceived to be a roe,

alighted close to him, and
bowed its head. Habib saw.
that a damask cushion was
suspended to its feet by
cords, catching hold of which
he seated himself on the
cushion, when the bird in-
stantly arose and carried him
through the air to MountCau- ~
casus, where he was, to his
extreme joy, received by no
less a person than I] Haboul
himself, who conducted -his
pupil to a place where he
might refresh himself and re-
gain his exhausted strength,
andinthemeantimeinformed
him what further was to be
done in order to accomplish
the object of his journey. ~









































STORY OF HABIB, OR THE ARABIAN KNIGHT. 45

“You are
theavenger of
_ is through the






















called by destiny, my dear Habib,” said he, “to be
(Queen Dorothil-goase. The only way to her dominions
| gi. centre of the earth and through forty
brazen gates, guarded by malevolent genii
of great strength and courage, and
through the rooms in which Solomon’s
treasure is deposited. Five hundred
knights have already tried to penetrate
these, but have all failed through
having neglected the precautions which
Twill tell you of.

‘ Before the first gate you will see
a golden key on the ground. Pick.
it up, and open the gate, taking
care to close it behind you so
gently that it will not make any
noise. In the first hall you will
see a gigantic black, who will
raise over your head an enormous
scimitar. You must repeat
aloud the talismanic charac-
ters written on the blade, and

then take it from the slave.

It is the scimitar of Solo-
mon, and you must take
_the keys also. When. you
have opened the fortieth
door, you will see before you the first of the seas you must pass in order
to reach Dorothil-goase, and you will also find means of proceeding; but
I warn you not to forget a single point of you instructions ; especialy
remember to close each door softly behind you.’

Habib did so, and proceeded in safety until he came to the fortieth
door. Here, in fe delight at seeing the sea in front of him, he let the
door clang to with a great noise, and instantly a violent storm arose ;
evil spirits assailed him, and he must have been destroyed had he not
remembered to draw his mysterious scimitar, and in the mighty name

ea



46 STORY OF HABIB, OR THE ARABIAN KNIGHT.

inscribed on the blade, commanded the powers of

the air and water to return to their wonted order.

Instantly there was a calm, and,

wearied with his exertions,

_ Habib fell asleep, and -
on awakening found
that three fair daugh-

ters of the sea had

been guarding his slumbers, who gave him news of Dorothil-

1 goase. Peek

“She is still persecuted by the monster Racachick,” they

told him, ‘‘and by the tyrant Abarakaff. The former, when on

land, can assume a purely human form, but he has a shark’s
head, and his body is covered with scales; he rides a sea
horse, and carries the rib of a whale by way of a scimitar.

My sisters and I have provided a raft on which to carry
you to the White Isle where he dwells.” ee

Eight dolphins were yoked to the raft on which

Habib embarked, and the three sisters swam by its side,

till, having reached the White Isle, and despatched this -

monster with his magic scimitar, he arrived near the

Green Isle, the residence of the enchanter, Nizabic, whom he

intended to attack next, where he found the raft entangled

inanet. His first thought was to place the three daughters
of the sea upon the raft in safety, whilst he destroyed
this net. Nizabic then approached to attack him when
he should land, but Habib smote him such a blow with
his scimitar, that the magician retired half dead into his
castle, which, by his arts, he caused to fall down, thus
hoping to crush the Sultan as well as himself in its ruins.

Habib, however, fell into a sort of pit of rocks, and was
unhurt, and Ilzaide, one of the three sisters, let down
her long hair into the pit, and begged him to climb
up by it. This he easily did, and they proceeded on
their voyage until they came to the Island of Mendinaz
Ill-ballor, the residence of Dorothil-goase herself, where —













STORY OF HABIB, OR THE SAS tN aeaT iG 47

Habib entreated Ilzaide to precede him and announce his arrival to
the queen. —

This was soon done, and Dorothil-goase was yet indulging in
transports of joy at the presence of her Arabian knight, when news was
brought that Abarakaff, the last remaining of her persecutors, was
approaching to attack them, and Habib was forced to arm himself for
battle once more, and slay this monster also; then at last he was able
to enjoy the reward of his valour, and to. restore to the beautiful
queen her dominions free from the presence of the tyrant usurpers who
had so long poisoned her peace.





48 STORY OF HABIB, OR THE ARABIAN KNIGHT.

After afew days of happiness passed together, Habib set out on a
visit to the tents of his father, accompanied by Dorothil-goase, and pre-
sented her to Salamis and Amirala as his bride. They were transported
with joy at his return. After welcoming the queen as their daughter-

in-law, they became eager to celebrate her marriage with their son,

which was performed with great magnificence. The happy pair then
returned to the kingdom of Dorothil-goase, over which Habib was
henceforth to reign with her as joint sovereign.

CONCLUSION.

Delighted with the wonderful memory and charming accomplish-
ment of the Sultana, her husband, at the conclusion of this history,
embraced her with affection, and assured her that he had by this time
forgotten his anger, and had no longer any desire for her death.

“You have entirely appeased my anger,” he said, “and I freely
revoke in your favour the cruel law I had Peed ear receive you
into my favour.”

The Sultana, for answer, threw herself at ie feet, and gave every
sign of heart-felt and lively gratitude. She then obtained permission to
be the bearer of the delightful intelligence to her father, the grand
"vizier, and it was immediately reported through the city and kingdom,
bringing down on the heads of Sultan Schahrian and the amiable Sultana
Scheherazadé, the praises and congratulations of all the people of the
empire of the Indies.













Father

og

ys OLDEN Gurr” sno
— Larti, hesson”





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describe
'14089' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFXX' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
3b37e38777e20814d7ae437a71358d60
f8aecd476195d5e69a4ff3f931a381fb7ad56483
'2012-01-14T14:00:03-05:00'
describe
'5918028' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFXY' 'sip-files00008.tif'
3aece89d8e19bc9cdef3f5c2301f034f
cef0386ecda0c5828279d28fcfc731cf176ec150
'2012-01-14T14:00:42-05:00'
describe
'3544' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFXZ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
688552a0ade65c151ea16a9f47f7d9c7
c090bde1a586fffcc1f457067685d5174391c844
'2012-01-14T14:01:00-05:00'
describe
'737639' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYA' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
ae5e5693b596017f60d8a1a6afd63bb7
19e2c48e2d756318d6f3d4cbdc2cb1a0f4c875b8
'2012-01-14T14:00:32-05:00'
describe
'130313' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYB' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
e9a4aebd7a9d76836d7f9bcd2776a474
cb610bc8c25731c40df25b09b2d5a73010ab7f30
describe
'54375' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYC' 'sip-files00009.pro'
fd4d1c5b557490889a1a18dd1bf33ef5
283e33a1cc90f64258d53c278357b73e951e57a9
'2012-01-14T14:00:23-05:00'
describe
'32949' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYD' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
0194831094e53153389db6ab03b45423
49f49493a09975028214d5305eb381e9ae32cf61
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYE' 'sip-files00009.tif'
e88d1e26c1268f2cd870ef458fb20025
5f33c133a7a1c9e5300faa9daa649e3e24742188
describe
'2229' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYF' 'sip-files00009.txt'
3eb20808af7e49f2b55761c1b80dba7f
75fca4d88bda9ee0f90b5eb84c3bb0f5034426dc
'2012-01-14T14:01:36-05:00'
describe
'7319' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYG' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
ec01ffb6fe7291f8e623fdebb4dd489e
8130e4aaa2db0f842ab95c4d3bf638b6e0902e19
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYH' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
53f0184f6119d699d21b38f397ae4acc
e7c39483c6c3506faaec81a6a515169ecd35f2e9
describe
'129060' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYI' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
d95d7fae2eef8c8a56ffab1212963a84
6abca6228eb6884b827f5a0b4cc692f2b6e661cc
'2012-01-14T14:00:25-05:00'
describe
'39104' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYJ' 'sip-files00010.pro'
8e8df8205bb2826485385b4abd7e147d
9925a005ee75c8357a7a02b11b7fc42c6659d10a
'2012-01-14T13:59:24-05:00'
describe
'32879' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYK' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
bb5c9bcd3ee0e06663c8f63321a64fd4
6b603d8237c18f5ca98b40f00e18a01d81e99176
'2012-01-14T13:59:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYL' 'sip-files00010.tif'
1419a25d60c10410404b5912abfad789
b6735be012d60fb3f7e01fd0ca9ea6bae388547e
'2012-01-14T14:01:11-05:00'
describe
'2569' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYM' 'sip-files00010.txt'
bc629a73c4915ebcfbfdd109a6967aae
b74bb94d8a8c634a78e8bbaa30467ab6fe7ce888
'2012-01-14T14:00:04-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7589' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYN' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
6c3ebafc252224646016e5855366c4b8
7174c637be0fa3005a674d5ef413de1beb0fc2e6
'2012-01-14T14:01:09-05:00'
describe
'737588' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYO' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
b62b1fc2b8ccabf67cbd24f159cc88f4
acbcf1455702f01d4d6788a78d74fe48b25d5c56
describe
'133756' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYP' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
db991677da7f762b5fc6ee07c55eeaad
1100593aaf50fda1a9d60c4300b4d8a4e8432714
'2012-01-14T13:59:31-05:00'
describe
'49981' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYQ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
31034ea2da4ce76af5ce81d8b9334f5b
f74dcc82e4f54b6dba124daa81372a40687eae3e
'2012-01-14T13:59:28-05:00'
describe
'34641' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYR' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
5dee698b1b7d169a8d8253613ab0949e
bc4db0e89ab84c479f8eb2e937b2d26229821d70
'2012-01-14T14:00:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYS' 'sip-files00011.tif'
56f6155bec4bfc9a4e566e754028f989
d144fe5922c2a50bd60ee2c9a742bfcff57a7598
'2012-01-14T14:01:14-05:00'
describe
'2034' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYT' 'sip-files00011.txt'
428f70aaff473dbe980166afcb61f194
30656826dd595cd86c40e64cd4a32ed02068e80e
'2012-01-14T14:01:15-05:00'
describe
'7606' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYU' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
de07590c2edbae375ca2e51dadec9fcd
b7db5f0584d9e74fc6914b705a6e73a0cf45aab3
describe
'737623' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYV' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
05f84aa9ae8d129cbdf9b3595c2479d8
125674a2e0449da36476b7a6f3ab2439b8ab3120
'2012-01-14T14:00:01-05:00'
describe
'135742' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYW' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
2e8ced3dd3761390aaebc8ea8dc697ea
13d9d179c0145af884cf5eceb3a86b612ffc0390
describe
'39297' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYX' 'sip-files00012.pro'
c7f2390c1b29c1538170fd21dc38624f
eaf3e68b6629cccfa8d0a5934cd3090044f8eabf
'2012-01-14T14:01:30-05:00'
describe
'35073' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYY' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
a13c046eb100370af1c119f035c5fdf4
cfba93fa940ce78cc7c08c05944dbdb49de95cac
'2012-01-14T14:00:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFYZ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
bf87713ba238d91a5703498d7a22a64f
65436d4b0301692f8ce61d714d0778cda08d531a
'2012-01-14T14:00:57-05:00'
describe
'1874' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZA' 'sip-files00012.txt'
a901a390259881a1cb40f03ba4fe7825
c6d25027c5adfc5f6d1c59ac0c8c452c96900fa3
describe
'8211' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZB' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
55262adab9d1e11aee3ef281febf6946
ae3ffe9205554da4f3897a6fc1d345266629e087
'2012-01-14T14:00:21-05:00'
describe
'737648' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZC' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
02ff7f62fc07e568b97ea5046956914d
1dae28ce6e8cda7da29b1df7d879fc2f7808cb49
'2012-01-14T14:01:05-05:00'
describe
'102881' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZD' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
97859d83723af7470706841f82fe5376
8a58807c0ec9344a457b02d414d42a2a544ad00f
'2012-01-14T14:01:27-05:00'
describe
'31398' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZE' 'sip-files00013.pro'
af3e0c49c9b1b8588d42d0027d9e4f94
ad9ffa8f261ccfb4f7b27dbea49677129e53d731
'2012-01-14T14:01:34-05:00'
describe
'25817' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZF' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
d892388dc6a3a629a958b452ddbdfc10
6735b6d2625ecf904b3f2044d60ac50c6ab33223
'2012-01-14T14:00:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZG' 'sip-files00013.tif'
a708680e133a098e86c06a7e9966d69d
71700aff63edab62c6516bdb86ff744d458bd260
'2012-01-14T14:00:14-05:00'
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZH' 'sip-files00013.txt'
59c76d08a7cb90cdd2528d9bc45a1f46
64e842dac614d8069c979a6189db37b745dec498
'2012-01-14T14:01:07-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'5857' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZI' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
f198dd8fc9453466e760f5e4a7a0914e
ac215f7ad8c5ff28507c7ff684acd6c4f2aa5803
'2012-01-14T13:59:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZJ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
01ff859b83303aa57ef5d61d78e4a233
747bf478009f9f6d1d5e1fcfffd48a6c36023bf1
describe
'114262' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZK' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
5556a466e1db453ec8542509935a10d4
6e130b434c07de95ed77f979c07ce5470c8f148f
describe
'40068' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZL' 'sip-files00014.pro'
0930eab198d064a6655b4ee41507c5db
b15683e7eda2070b7f54ebe16379c9e2aa5ecaa1
describe
'29628' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZM' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
aa6fe8ba9dcf32198f4e46e0a3fae142
2492769381f5074b8bebad92ee667d4cff6459ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZN' 'sip-files00014.tif'
c911399dac350448cdbcc7a1bafac46c
1fd52d2fef171d21fb5d2e75993e897a49c2ac40
'2012-01-14T13:59:39-05:00'
describe
'1793' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZO' 'sip-files00014.txt'
f1e125907f63d5422d6cc3a099c1a157
5ed8e53486ba508469046e25d3d68c6f720f6d02
'2012-01-14T13:59:54-05:00'
describe
'6787' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZP' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
b42662462308e373e60e91f2d1b2d605
1be9d5f55e0f660c61c2dca27a617174fcc39ed3
'2012-01-14T14:00:20-05:00'
describe
'737582' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZQ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
4378b106d47610a08f6a4d937fb9cd37
485ecf730fe2d1e5dea0acf2b7556ade90753011
'2012-01-14T14:01:03-05:00'
describe
'138750' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZR' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
2f9983ca44e3856ff3ea2fb4ab141d37
929c777c39a98501042f250be59595eace055673
'2012-01-14T14:00:13-05:00'
describe
'35563' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZS' 'sip-files00015.pro'
18c030491812cd1a128ca72b76bf2c49
49018edfbbe366adcd28f4e06bb72f921953fe86
'2012-01-14T14:01:32-05:00'
describe
'35070' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZT' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
6df9c064a2ef0cec9fc936e0a683c059
67ceacb29d9c1ee5ce70ecb8f816ded4cb93a179
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZU' 'sip-files00015.tif'
744b842d811cad5ecf0acf389900d99c
40378d7ce225daa4266b1a9aa0502265d646f3d1
'2012-01-14T14:01:28-05:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZV' 'sip-files00015.txt'
38a99244c4d1a984904a9794b9a681da
757050160c7353170d614f85f24c120475626d10
describe
'8040' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZW' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
5eb08d3bb2f204b34d7537b5c11ccd2b
3a44edca1be34e6d9bf35a4a4c010f34955c08f9
'2012-01-14T14:00:10-05:00'
describe
'737575' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZX' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
b42854965e6c4ca7c7c23380a36f1b49
4c0aa0c3a45010a1c90a9a2f1a80cc5556293f08
'2012-01-14T13:59:47-05:00'
describe
'130105' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZY' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
8a48f31843f8c04b902f1290643283c1
b20b96065f5972e48b805e62a2b62408b4ac9973
'2012-01-14T13:59:44-05:00'
describe
'43731' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAFZZ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
2faea588df6ded957679260cb7a47692
bdaf32ff110d62e9fe92e61585a7274fbe7647f4
describe
'33938' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAA' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
c4ad24a1cc7f7218ef932458f71ad640
faed51100dd05d252e36f23887b7f08aff8947ed
'2012-01-14T14:01:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAB' 'sip-files00016.tif'
0397420a0d7c67479e9d332033d3fee4
2c4f197e8de1f07fcda46b3a9faf01cc0e5276c1
describe
'2440' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAC' 'sip-files00016.txt'
3510381bdcf68b34c44640c3a1b8bf03
a71574f841319e71b94f032bd35b0e21e5eeddd9
'2012-01-14T14:00:15-05:00'
describe
'7993' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAD' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
6f50778bbd9d0348ce8567d6da398a4a
b160f06251317acb72cc82e31eadc50273725d49
describe
'737606' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAE' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
aa93ecac169c8bed9eda6a33fd33bb0f
e66dee3af113587d4dac6518adb8e3b9ef310e1f
describe
'136437' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAF' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
d420a6ad720946e7d8725a53b8aaaffd
44c669892c6d39aa4f4061ab9cf235fec6b5834d
describe
'43418' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAG' 'sip-files00017.pro'
a440de4fc848c96b9cb4abe2d9ff2f8b
5783c48143f4b7d5abe6adb07cdffcf4cfab6232
describe
'35592' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAH' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
17eb61c9c14218f8b8f653ed10750477
31d440436c2992ee38ea4494aeedb7100cfe2d10
'2012-01-14T14:01:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAI' 'sip-files00017.tif'
1d26af9b3cac3191513a2c15deb5fc15
2c713777c86e9042a7f818cace5f7e62fbfd0e6b
'2012-01-14T14:00:43-05:00'
describe
'1821' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAJ' 'sip-files00017.txt'
3e09f273e2558dc49ac4f3e96b56a4ec
5755fb1f71d7616ea738a278dfbe201406902acd
'2012-01-14T13:59:56-05:00'
describe
'8037' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAK' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
025e0c3150648e3ab2509a27cea5d320
ba51070b69d93896d7be5675b5bfd86455c06f78
describe
'737625' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAL' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
9c4baa8e1c32fcb1e50654c1b9229496
22c7a7bdb5dfba98ecd3ddc5199119758290ca08
describe
'123610' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAM' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
538c72662fbf1c312a32d1d4b58a2aeb
8951cc7a4a35a6f78f9eff5ce3dfae38c936fc2a
describe
'45257' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAN' 'sip-files00018.pro'
f48ecd3291d6d03dab2f131baf1f546b
bac28edfc79d0e131b21ba3f8ccce46ae08d538c
describe
'32751' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAO' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
675ab718783be146e5a05109c1f6f192
a7ba863d93c3cd2a88364aa45edcb2b62b947205
'2012-01-14T14:00:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAP' 'sip-files00018.tif'
a65bf3d933c17c9519b781454524f4e2
d2d6c83b9ba009777fb0a126702c58212ba70a12
describe
'1806' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAQ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
b127a47f8f3779930fef775e0e006118
56dc35306735b0a689cc000fc50d07da8fb10724
describe
Invalid character
'7355' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAR' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
aaa596c960a7acab20c01481aa798528
05194c3df8a6fa893166122f21b00bd276957887
'2012-01-14T14:01:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAS' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
b22cbd2e5fe221108d2893eace5009c7
036ccb3db50058a6240ae5ab9c3031c8afae2ec4
describe
'90422' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAT' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
f7d1406f49665dd8e226b76052d12a9d
24dd76a78a0ef05ef66e8c1c041560daaec2ae1a
describe
'21197' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAU' 'sip-files00019.pro'
d2750d37066190db32485536d97493d3
dd4201e7119d12859f6254b4eabdd3d316d5faf8
describe
'22987' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAV' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
fad590c72c506454109f962cd4ef18e2
10b6bdd594b8de5eaf2cc9dfc2a19a99f4ce4039
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAW' 'sip-files00019.tif'
7d76364cf048025b3b07fadecbc7d4b2
bbfa6f184b57fb95fb4d96174832b9e2c31f970d
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAX' 'sip-files00019.txt'
770ddc822e357b02a6bdd654b8f0774d
07f81299ce8a7dd617c385c09a78a82612f9ba25
describe
Invalid character
'5518' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAY' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
e49c5d6433b50b8a9d64908febda1e81
c578360b6c7f07cc7a8090de291e617a77c68653
'2012-01-14T14:00:48-05:00'
describe
'737613' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGAZ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
17c051d2eeb817b01f2f37c652e0d44f
6c41427d231dfed13276ae9a2c801747d9f0590b
describe
'116815' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBA' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
4ec658731bf0f3f8c93cee8efead949a
0c8ac3ebe167372fed3488128be90b2016f85050
describe
'23115' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBB' 'sip-files00020.pro'
d81ecdef7fdde964d87d7fe9a28a0538
beb476ae5afa2d9dd5392196ac1b680ed02995b7
describe
'29427' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBC' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
0d49a3beec99e76020b34713d6c9849e
511b873f50db3b6a8fa9a33404e0c7d7942efb77
'2012-01-14T14:00:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBD' 'sip-files00020.tif'
f38fe37b463bd35109e805f6e2dc00ef
4640065bc119174f775c0666ef468a64b1b5ac34
describe
'1331' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBE' 'sip-files00020.txt'
5bec5c74cb4c0dbeea116f6f31364550
cb9382aaac13c9b19dd92f386b9f572469d32c51
'2012-01-14T14:00:55-05:00'
describe
'7070' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBF' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
4b1ff02bb49354f0f6c2d122441b8ec2
d30dc495004e4511fbc4dfa1ceb561a1570237aa
describe
'737618' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBG' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
e8f10658471dc13c21626273b608ed0a
c632c91f1df49a0fb2ad3d876fbbef29690b3857
describe
'137387' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBH' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
7714a0fca3a7838b137172c21fa3c375
155aada20cbce9d7d8bbcb89c44505d711634ecd
'2012-01-14T13:59:45-05:00'
describe
'58486' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBI' 'sip-files00021.pro'
de280ada095fb565abe9bf852b4846f8
ad547d4444611688f89ba44c00c41600dd280318
describe
'35253' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBJ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
d01af2c56ee4a79e998bc43d5df4bdc6
3fc661ac45171f536609d9e1de7fe06f7bb03e85
'2012-01-14T13:59:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBK' 'sip-files00021.tif'
34ac1373f4cf880b4f88268cc36c5f17
13c7fefe8ce530fb0260e52805f6348a8183834d
describe
'2573' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBL' 'sip-files00021.txt'
410340d9f4de3c7f5e8ba45f0b181a8a
aef4895bfdf1a79a0924e2226bd9ad25d1010a7f
'2012-01-14T14:00:53-05:00'
describe
'8015' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBM' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
12ef1c334cf88ca02f97ecbbc737c0c7
1ea0e1538c94d9388f0a2304a9605baf6043b1d2
describe
'737622' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBN' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
245c0311d04d7b11d962ef16f99dbcb8
c6ece11748252c71e884f44274f367c40a0059c5
describe
'131326' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBO' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
eff555725a325509156116acb915ce36
39de87383e66e6b37e607df10cda0b71e41a4765
describe
'50094' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBP' 'sip-files00022.pro'
190cc75a51df01c9df11beaead4eebdb
919b97a067bd4f9ad8370960499c2e97d54e21c4
describe
'35197' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBQ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
f3e881a9e2dda3c6e0639149fa2e3c30
cd9cb1bf3438da188b504c13ec963254ce875444
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBR' 'sip-files00022.tif'
607210ec3ddc0ab5266257b8290609a4
49b13579115ad57db7e703705f0b1f614081785a
'2012-01-14T14:00:44-05:00'
describe
'2017' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBS' 'sip-files00022.txt'
65cf309c24d1ab1efabc7858963e359b
d96a259af4e71e3890a24598ab7b590d62ccd475
describe
'7961' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBT' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
364e101fa0eacfbaff2a4636379e38d2
1aa6e3824322e872e72ae9316943d56fc62e5d64
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBU' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
f6e71042cc0e6ced566b3cc0432d83fe
dfabb793e2534510b98472e45591cdb41143c53b
describe
'144694' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBV' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
39a9ccbaac45c93e0d2669853d0411d8
f4571b8b1c4cb29a1aa3f7691fb2c9bd86940571
'2012-01-14T14:00:34-05:00'
describe
'59859' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBW' 'sip-files00023.pro'
8d0fe26b6d4bf51311218e9f27663685
9b81bd045d30527538d49ddb9d5fed7379fe8fb3
describe
'36681' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBX' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
09da21fe8b53e16f05a61c344ec34a23
3094cec1c85f2d10fff528ecfee299e902dc04f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBY' 'sip-files00023.tif'
0d8905b4dba737ccc528777e818ff273
9107846ade30df397a96d16c079b6be3f2744395
'2012-01-14T14:00:52-05:00'
describe
'2561' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGBZ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
6d9c9b43579bd30c4fca83de71fcc4a9
9f6274809dfa4fbd823eca0a80936ec18af86286
'2012-01-14T14:00:18-05:00'
describe
'8308' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCA' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
c001662e2e006ea4f03487ee267b8f09
f26e016bd3d2a87833be1b92293d0035a2aca162
describe
'737491' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCB' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
5ece78b194d6d1b63b1820da06643c60
ee96fc5ac255db64398dba2dab7a4f7f4e09cb15
'2012-01-14T14:01:18-05:00'
describe
'129147' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCC' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
1151bce8a21362161696dab331f4393c
a503b051839eb952ac5ccf7502171040e88457bd
'2012-01-14T14:01:12-05:00'
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCD' 'sip-files00024.pro'
66c39ffd682180fa1bfdb37e12fa3752
37d25a52cba3b3ec66c1c3b0a1c5fddb5581026f
describe
'31019' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCE' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
18d5045297182b3d2b2ce148daf066ef
ba21563d16a528ef3b9abdb244a70a1498407f1f
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCF' 'sip-files00024.tif'
31bdec984a521fd32bab4f3be345241c
497719c5a1e7f251a6a7b9b1e5a27a78187c5b8e
describe
'148' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCG' 'sip-files00024.txt'
e45e5d95576c3f0203e53e01ddb1a318
bfc528a6ac0c37219d6f03f8be05955aa7fc1dc7
describe
'7521' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCH' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
89b033d28e0666ab65d5819767a00ddf
73dbe6c41cb258d9d72649d1cdbb3cb9d3268761
describe
'737650' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCI' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
e3b3abb2cfaf1293a63088e4affc08c9
8e15c8e589d3ada4347a5e1fa0a304185ecac25c
describe
'141338' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCJ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
cf4e029272644bf3594ac70fbd8a958d
1f70b46fbbfe059b8355435e652e1f0c4a5b338f
describe
'44575' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCK' 'sip-files00025.pro'
fb78da0ca480c382efcd2a53a2c32ffc
c3d73a0d49ff7cc49974920338cacf3b05bd1fd9
'2012-01-14T13:59:49-05:00'
describe
'34980' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCL' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
dd3b9d87f1cee315fbf036348c356d4e
536ede31972746ac98d6a8c01cb439aa0e36f94f
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCM' 'sip-files00025.tif'
151dab365f22aa50cdd90ebe0633dacb
50781d94c13ef594d31942e40472f81a80f93edb
describe
'2494' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCN' 'sip-files00025.txt'
8357969a44d57c617110948ed97d9209
a13ca7353a931bd3a5637f9d3d53b40e45bf7062
describe
'7847' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCO' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
35f086feb67a9e0d35f18343e69d6b95
f681046acac8df4e8206bb3548695339789c6160
describe
'737626' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCP' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
71ad5658677c58c3cddfb8068dda6469
52839c6cff28ed3fa27345037d2013100dfda083
describe
'141955' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCQ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
b94ea7c832e7b71ebcc3936d29a06641
ebec499eda70493e463e22a15c66bec25a9d5590
'2012-01-14T14:01:19-05:00'
describe
'55793' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCR' 'sip-files00026.pro'
9b5e260c82c12d68d724dda3ccea2caa
be184e48dd16c0407b88be95c95f736722de9b40
describe
'36107' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCS' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
4261e8216c3cffb6a62e1f364aeab22c
f923abba17217b15d11c2cc3527fa6c4a62a7526
'2012-01-14T14:00:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCT' 'sip-files00026.tif'
e3e19b1b234b5a9d34b9dab3de73c7d0
94355e8ccfda5f694cc6ac54c450d75e25a95b86
'2012-01-14T13:59:25-05:00'
describe
'2238' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCU' 'sip-files00026.txt'
92996d3a87fd08f11929794d096b1ddd
a6fadf0da183a0b261c45e9f80bbab902baf0a16
describe
'7967' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCV' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
c765600073ade1c25de2f3eac450a4d3
9510c9378b05b6e87d4f4489444a1b576a68e3cc
describe
'760415' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCW' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
73dbe987ac9f0b20eca7fbe6016ac4de
592592103ca436b03bc1745d8816ac25a7a82100
'2012-01-14T14:00:29-05:00'
describe
'145215' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCX' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
cb855a9cfb3e4779fd4bec0c7f68f4fd
cf1b3746414110cdc136c29dd08d8aa85cc6625f
describe
'20947' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCY' 'sip-files00027.pro'
d59d8b60f870a270db151960793bfa54
0b8b6d0b2ca0b2752cfb2ddb5ced2d79fdec2627
describe
'35903' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGCZ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
f028772048e6da4e627adbf22c54b214
ff0315fd50c0354b3074fe8c7c7717b77c29cb88
describe
'6100272' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDA' 'sip-files00027.tif'
cf259d845f952209289c78205f82e08d
2125b525be1f12cbc0e1f606dc2d8fbd6d4888c9
describe
'905' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDB' 'sip-files00027.txt'
d7088d9efc66d20f525ac6d1181dbc41
c6e4674fcf7775425d45cd5a6d56ca31e05f751f
describe
Invalid character
'8344' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDC' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
3f3ce20a70d7ba7fb9660745f4a97131
1674b10d72e8ee7caf086861a063004e2d484923
describe
'723626' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDD' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
e3b508b3744949f78a5e1dc00168e1d7
d0c968967194cef4dfd4d212b9f7e39c216861df
describe
'78673' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDE' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
6794b08eabc3c7b149927823b3c02e89
8b5df8369a63f85bc69bf95a0e27208a284abb87
describe
'30963' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDF' 'sip-files00028.pro'
6c9a49339c46703b6034b1c0073e5fdc
f14a2ff530ad9dac029d231b80f67d9be481babc
describe
'21291' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDG' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
9c677160a8e03a919310593128e041cd
42886b56bfa6c7349b42f36aa07c06c1efe39aa6
describe
'5805836' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDH' 'sip-files00028.tif'
b113072e4276af967f16d264c9432d44
afa5c3b8daeee46eb89d624780b37a452ddde813
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDI' 'sip-files00028.txt'
bdd4b480c3f0d45760f5756d6deee7b8
008dadcbd33432c6948bf76e6231e3489a43fb60
describe
'5133' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDJ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
2820fb66dd1dc9229abb3df840dafb3b
b113e2023062af672f5147900929a5248d2aeb69
describe
'730220' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDK' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
9fbe7ea565d51af2baa8bed63f6272ad
e281be0b5daa3d673f2a87e64d13a46d26cf4130
describe
'90580' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDL' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
8122d0c5f436ef1880efd467f23725be
112262520e1500fa0ef4f24501af901fb0d9c1a2
'2012-01-14T14:00:38-05:00'
describe
'44979' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDM' 'sip-files00029.pro'
b5dd3b451bbab9ca1ffc9a0878c6b658
ded799f31b0b3eb614ed64150585b0dead776bc6
describe
'25633' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDN' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
a0d6483b04ddb28049b3b67119529adb
29df9c4d633284638b37571976bfc39837fb9bb3
describe
'5858468' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDO' 'sip-files00029.tif'
dfc31dbd030f1613743e3504f4a4375b
5f3edeb22b4814b3c5d4d231a0fa798d03bafd9b
describe
'2094' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDP' 'sip-files00029.txt'
57bbdaec22b8ebba83e040fbad19bd9f
ee150891f9d1819c817555eb2d26d1c935d4cb8f
describe
'6243' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDQ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
1e08d95561a72ea18b43ad36a3d72a73
a8036ffb0011ac1b533e3aaca0b4916676aadacc
describe
'737600' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDR' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
6dbe22729908f91ad1008acf7aa8562b
78a3bc9741d00872bf7a836cc388b4159aa7ed39
describe
'136314' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDS' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
ca1b745534f3fb8a3fa3f2c340413433
3a0d4ab3c99cec0ddab442c63185e9b73b9fdf77
'2012-01-14T14:01:20-05:00'
describe
'46677' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDT' 'sip-files00030.pro'
6ca75862fc325f3b68aab5967d4ff759
ca010bf8e8d6b5c3e23b0bef72dc8da69370486f
describe
'34258' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDU' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
4136fd571fad36a90fe1445f241766bd
d9e791f03ea5947a2c411f2663be6710911f3dc7
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDV' 'sip-files00030.tif'
a995bd505ea36bfab775f7b429bea4fe
ccffe6e096ffa47d3218c352bd2af67e2b74ff1c
describe
'2497' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDW' 'sip-files00030.txt'
d0c7deba4cb843229b02d3e17e20a465
bcb2ff87ebc97a2832010048a9d55b811cb635d9
describe
'7834' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDX' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
7a6452f6d4882a88f4997c95f30e0f10
258094605c98e35863c010941e291eafd9e7958a
describe
'737640' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDY' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
dc89243d231183ce6e0cff2d0740ffc5
b314e19633b92ccdf81a787ea1b0c2f4da776966
describe
'148586' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGDZ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
d5bb8c7f4fb04ff0b2815de4cc7b4f94
a6bcf3f8a3d101f5cb95fb510b2dee7869a49e05
'2012-01-14T13:59:43-05:00'
describe
'23803' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEA' 'sip-files00031.pro'
502c17b15e3446fd6162f2c832728142
48a8352e0547930aa42c30aaf01caad20be4c7f7
describe
'36811' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEB' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
18628af550262d5b11fe14dd88cf823d
aff998a138c6fb92ef057b6d710e073bec24fe8b
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEC' 'sip-files00031.tif'
6caa091c79fd1bc978fa19c7ec165b7c
16839ce08caff180e888053b7e2e3fa7767bb339
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGED' 'sip-files00031.txt'
6d37a8fc49bdda03636772243f25e4ef
38f6422d5ed545a8e8300905085f3f1cf75d3037
describe
'8703' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEE' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
d42cd3e6de34d32b9253bc62d9e2b6fa
3a2e5ad4aa2ab587106ba9fb9d45d5a331e270ad
'2012-01-14T14:00:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEF' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
a6c5f923d418dc733de2660ac22af69b
fa14abb4b78ddc6af2e9969c253f111927c3bc24
'2012-01-14T14:00:26-05:00'
describe
'134986' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEG' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
06ab714702a12a4f105312e6e470d8b5
b28b63a6099a689b2ec8c2d8372fdb91b2a1c384
describe
'59103' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEH' 'sip-files00032.pro'
b2f6fa35cb81e364e180714cd2911b1f
0e9653af80fb6619793e3f78bb1c1b2fa2f86094
describe
'33948' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEI' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
65874819d820b0736676c5db734ae0fa
41febcf43bcf42b2d8de74bb7842ca3dc459cd70
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEJ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
c8e319188db8e763c6de7a3c2bc04535
d651ae25b7e89c022fe53d012a94903b6a0ba810
'2012-01-14T13:59:27-05:00'
describe
'2541' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEK' 'sip-files00032.txt'
f47e001a1365930fa5a0c4d76f8d7369
8d2f78ff0270c6c608750f836c799aca92bc8268
'2012-01-14T14:01:24-05:00'
describe
'7504' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEL' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
c215ab5f228effde0e6b642268025e3a
445df1ed62230ed9ef4352e99c69f67c61d1dd1c
describe
'737631' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEM' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
2382ed1c01dad9d3f876dd4480de785a
a8414781562dab462811ba23c9d633cf7bd8a332
describe
'138011' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEN' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
5f87f2ff8b907065f47b8f5cbcb2a870
57ae3d6394c1b1aec458381e05185c69eaa25644
describe
'51485' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEO' 'sip-files00033.pro'
eb8329b29cf8633987c5890985e24e8f
491ebccf017128ce7ab7a10df4f45f4fb522b1b5
describe
'34853' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEP' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
47223031ddc88e48247c74b2fd1928d2
29417c1083adaa9aaf51473c7da409063ad8466a
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEQ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
bc2d8564c945bb0f020f8930cbf5c998
4f80322dce6578abe2ce3cc39ae18bf76913b29d
describe
'2581' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGER' 'sip-files00033.txt'
c0819c8f87ca472b8df64cbc2eac0eef
3f4b2076399334a1c61d65a9f18eb4e5e67deba0
'2012-01-14T14:01:25-05:00'
describe
'7821' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGES' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
1547bb6eaf5e51d00cefa14b6fcdde4d
db6c8186bd672e493e40803f435537d3ff40ec3e
'2012-01-14T14:00:31-05:00'
describe
'737597' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGET' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
8c8a8a2f0d7aa116f2e29029afb8ace8
06a76d034ca6085b38f38c7ed04d30b9045ff3dc
describe
'127057' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEU' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
2884e3d5dd56cfe49d43c70d5381ba6a
2cfc37164d8aec3580f74af5b68d38970a51e92c
describe
'32378' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEV' 'sip-files00034.pro'
75c2c8c6482fa08426260a42c103b3ee
3fa338387c0da43e16a92965518b25813bcce0ed
describe
'32169' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEW' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a4b0b32c8342672b7fd221e1e140b89e
8976e4e11720ad8a68bba333b7b6aa065581f55f
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEX' 'sip-files00034.tif'
7690c0430334a97ef7216d1cdef061ce
c197ed95692eb17a9acce5f9fd10c54de0f70d51
'2012-01-14T13:59:29-05:00'
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEY' 'sip-files00034.txt'
e780b276f2ab85efb73bc0eef44a5d3c
e6bdc3cab235d70b6a2cb0055a488fd3f050d674
describe
Invalid character
'7343' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGEZ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
6a34b2ff9e08f8cca975b0051b21567d
30d6b08af3cb0fcbcaa9460915eeea1822f30efd
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFA' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
dd564d3818760e037022eeae1c4cfd58
5599d7e09eed2f28ff8f10b30095b557d0b8a2aa
describe
'108354' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFB' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
957cd0264f10c86973e80becbc37d003
53f884df6a05ecd76c58d5a214f29bc196681855
describe
'30189' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFC' 'sip-files00035.pro'
da09b8d2df8ca698f77b7601b966f3ac
68a137dc5343950d16abca779a778b5b15d73d7c
describe
'27053' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFD' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
d762b730cd2e96c574c5eb2c142f603d
3c08c378765fc503fc0faec8a9e101cf7079af2e
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFE' 'sip-files00035.tif'
a54e0a951856389517c1108ce4cd5b6e
6c21f74e57aa44e97f6b001ad872227f7d871699
describe
'1592' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFF' 'sip-files00035.txt'
af0774af00c8e18db8198ba7a2c39986
66a0bdb429fe8fa972831534b6297269fa977c5b
'2012-01-14T14:01:21-05:00'
describe
'6421' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFG' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
4bb91b24aaa42f58c405a639634e8863
448c6a2682d0848042a340b314acf4fd07119443
describe
'737646' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFH' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
d7191580d0249e94228ca1776cdbe28e
29970d749f7a41d8407b5040631390c382047e61
'2012-01-14T14:01:16-05:00'
describe
'124987' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFI' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
e6772c03965d12467809e75e4e937bc1
86ef5695d21bfdf0ca0866108106d83832ae7199
describe
'42356' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFJ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
ef33ecc039ecbaccaa7b1495a327f9cb
6e24fce0ae6b245d3faa18a13e7e4207c22150dc
describe
'32896' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFK' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
23f871703db6ecd33c2f0a1da6b8ab02
37d0c0369bec67f6b6290c8ae1187a92d8a63914
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFL' 'sip-files00036.tif'
727e9ef78b50fa6e07928307cd98a53c
0c9cf31520053d7d5eb1b47028f8c18b8dac1e19
describe
'1705' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFM' 'sip-files00036.txt'
96f12c328bc09c283165540afa8a9949
e6be1d74bca52ac0db7a7c5b383c6a7960e8453b
describe
'7704' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFN' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
090d6c0c6a94e8263f2aa0e9ad285b7c
ce0642b2c14ff766ea0c7665b20956087b413851
describe
'737576' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFO' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
af6287468ef0bc885b1345f041bfffe5
2b1b9fa3098304c74275a3591c53a453e301d95e
describe
'145859' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFP' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
d8eaf7a6ad62cc88a65ddaa06ba63f10
b8f307ed4361fb00a7ecfaba695e8df0c6508494
describe
'52349' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFQ' 'sip-files00037.pro'
41a4fe0c24d95cf393a7eaa4fa063f06
28614f78180a541308aa217a414001e2b7e06ee1
describe
'36466' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFR' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
4eacbdd02ef069e36ffa3173a9b65b23
b5ecda6f3d7fe74d605777cde19807792f719339
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFS' 'sip-files00037.tif'
4a3de445e399eaa99e143a830c5ecc5b
f9bf6b422c58e8c80d3d0741ab571d282003a3d9
describe
'2502' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFT' 'sip-files00037.txt'
cc7022fc5d7466e7c8b2d359f33538a2
7494005b063f31cbdd6993f8ec818c59e3b873e7
describe
Invalid character
'8292' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFU' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
e1cab79d6d13586eaacaa357069faeb9
8fadf8b15addbbf01fefd4ed24e6f539be5bc11f
'2012-01-14T13:59:38-05:00'
describe
'737632' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFV' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
dc41f0fe0d8424d1c1ee95da24e20c96
51a5ae5f9d08a242c95f311d57dacfcf5291c700
describe
'140367' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFW' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
4b5073cbabfdb5196315c1290a8892c1
86534715d1f6a3422028626ad9606eca2be835fa
describe
'47253' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFX' 'sip-files00038.pro'
1088a3ddcdeb0e76fbf4f639a07a1e8c
bf1b147d77bc7edb00ad6d6bffe6b04505cb8dea
describe
'36278' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFY' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
32afb5a50b3fdafcb45815c2399e042b
67cd83c8e8c7b56777a8ec7c4d75513b15eb1a36
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGFZ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
c8672f7ee332603210a0113174e493a9
73bf55f8739cdc40c53449d0dcc1821038c82203
describe
'2444' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGA' 'sip-files00038.txt'
893aa3221dc0230fb498188203e0ce85
0c450db31da0e298d886c8af5955c01959c907c7
describe
'8159' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGB' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
1afa6753c40500a965d5c4765486cf65
ba81123d7202f4e259b771b2ee81fbb18397dede
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGC' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
05b1db47750cf1c337a12b5ebe3ac2e8
40bf668275dcdfac1e36fb777c77277a344bfb42
'2012-01-14T14:01:02-05:00'
describe
'150758' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGD' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
78c57ffdb19a3d0a868f74be86896411
cfcec3e5fc0762918c4d6c4844d86856fc4d6e48
describe
'60416' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGE' 'sip-files00039.pro'
0f315fbb73375646001d205e9130fce3
de566d41952620a67165d9b10fdf7e56027c02e0
'2012-01-14T14:00:59-05:00'
describe
'38688' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGF' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
fd2532e3ec6831677770aca7b69ff263
c2ac7dd80d13a9f867bba189604a76a0da1b3614
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGG' 'sip-files00039.tif'
c3db370b3135f676b530bc9fc5228ade
c072ba21ecd86458624f8e0552abbacbb4b9f860
'2012-01-14T13:59:35-05:00'
describe
'2488' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGH' 'sip-files00039.txt'
c1b8295073db88a0cb6730c1fafbf989
340681ee27dc83565aaa7f3e83116b973c506621
describe
'8063' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGI' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
efe0bd825b639aacccf0aab7a1c37ff8
1868c310337f38cf83576dc6f00c47bff934a698
describe
'737629' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGJ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
315ffaa28d00d2b1efc4022a5838413a
4249203dc056d372794016e9e6830b6709be474d
describe
'142449' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGK' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
42fa91bafad2cb8e2a944737458fef45
ce083488673e8529c443f6489dc1b515532cac37
describe
'37716' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGL' 'sip-files00040.pro'
5e565b321847e8b46b734020566582b9
5d6b6a96eec3810f57de446470dee9229d39d992
describe
'34309' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGM' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
90988d5f1fc280b5580b578278c02e02
e1b25c05b0e29cc270c5100b66fd0d4e92c60705
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGN' 'sip-files00040.tif'
42f20630b290822fd37251dab4724962
26cfb919aba7c80000122264a7d8e1a900edeacd
describe
'1544' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGO' 'sip-files00040.txt'
a18fca2d5f696146885c3667bd1e5e45
29455f2e9868176f8c05770ccb7e473f8671d4f9
describe
'7935' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGP' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
9e054b4f3768e60501c2bab7cb160cdb
e87d7037f7a7e801e119be3a01cbf3cf4b3c4f28
describe
'737633' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGQ' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
d2363a6f408d550152a980fe45a62a0b
4ff92cc4a31cf12206a601d1e75dbca9104328ae
describe
'136788' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGR' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
4276a593e4f93651f4198870e9197ee3
23967768199ea6c3be224ea4f6ad5b217ab9a790
describe
'46770' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGS' 'sip-files00041.pro'
654d0c3bd2504bbb72550436244c89a9
287df35b65bd4af1e90ab5b5dc9eee4c44f5bc28
describe
'34813' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGT' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
36fa959dbb63a791443ea2d6f891125c
0c8243eeb4b1cef3a9fc099216980e7437c6cabb
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGU' 'sip-files00041.tif'
58a393cce5fef893e151ecfabe98a863
b7e7a890e62c23ee8666066eb493eec6605b2a6c
describe
'2293' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGV' 'sip-files00041.txt'
20ccf112efd7ad7ea40648075299fa37
068ceb4d21147042aa68a99d582c7dedc3c2b942
describe
'8030' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGW' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
3b3b5f3b7f978db21822b698963b4efe
774245c7096023ddf9d8c88d505004986a2c1422
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGX' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
069f2ee6022cb3bcaf2ad087220ff131
11880d8397b1da97febb69815ac3052782f53546
describe
'137001' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGY' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
7f7f4d499fdb9d8d086513a448bbd810
8efe081eddd70efd5d7d405f4d56f79ccc6ba381
'2012-01-14T14:00:35-05:00'
describe
'40289' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGGZ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
8fd320afdb4ec90ad71f7a7625a1a0eb
6df24e354b67b26d4d3c97c38123891109157a02
describe
'34330' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHA' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
112267f90d7214932c0e789509bfbeeb
3bb691e2066db1e02738d99d6edb3785f9206a10
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHB' 'sip-files00042.tif'
b4842447c06fabfe72390cffabb562e9
3305e682aa9669160287e32d9b90a5b9dd67b4c2
'2012-01-14T13:59:58-05:00'
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHC' 'sip-files00042.txt'
d63bf4418b9195567eb9066f998c47de
8b67f6c6e0b49f81ec83f994cdb9d04a57ccf92c
describe
'8055' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHD' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
e5d2b4d0b205e5cea0f63945bb39b364
9f2143babd05269fc9cf9eb08931bbe959ad5df6
describe
'737635' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHE' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
ce0cd2833df56169b19b9075f000dc3c
fcda214309eb99e2f2f0ddace8b95dea4f74a99d
describe
'129944' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHF' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
9e9906fa543b562a327efd1b46011aeb
8a442bf122fdeaf54eda5de4da31a5f64fe9f82a
describe
'34399' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHG' 'sip-files00043.pro'
147cd0978adc45b2692ecc9fe7ae9638
c15f87b29b2ff993d65b9f6e80565e57bb53fb28
describe
'32448' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHH' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
bfe253a8f4034d28cfe0323c218847cd
d8defe1f976ed291f83bb4618f78cfc360223445
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHI' 'sip-files00043.tif'
b28eddf10b35baf8ab7380b5eba069d9
b3d82e20d444bae5111e113bd53c07398ac951fd
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHJ' 'sip-files00043.txt'
c75e416c7b17c8ab37ed039205615071
d845955e2f76fad520e112aabfa7720371ddfff5
describe
'7380' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHK' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
a1f513c7b131930bf7cdedf2130c0a6a
42743197b308472413d4a5f82137150afcaa5b5f
describe
'737468' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHL' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
f122a35a84d281b45a0788e6e2dec6e8
4a965a663e5405d4df4ac97b670afc9962905b11
describe
'153171' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHM' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
d05a827f366524d001de7b40bda1cbf1
743a562e42c3457e18cb19e175d0fdaab1d493d9
describe
'6950' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHN' 'sip-files00044.pro'
f36abecc49d71f5ed8abd2053ceed0a2
4c48bd8bd86cd390f8bff539c3bea6d5605aa358
describe
'34278' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHO' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
80fdcd7ee6ce62b842179a9c3bdaab96
a39b42b84ee54126796fee2d9ff09efb3feaaa57
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHP' 'sip-files00044.tif'
fc60f867f3fddcd7290fb66e0d438e47
73c05cd6257172ce970f5ebdc506d6cfa8319ea0
'2012-01-14T13:59:37-05:00'
describe
'334' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHQ' 'sip-files00044.txt'
21bafd99bbdddd2939fe5fbfc96f097f
6b9c2ea57805c5b2bfa1ded501f9fbb070f635a4
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHR' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
c12b7cf41940095d78e15723ea3c2e34
03d22f7b5448b69b6bee3fe1b86ce2209787e678
describe
'737644' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHS' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
de684f6ed2e1b8753f33fad78199caef
58e283dcb159312f04d7bdafc9fd5a56b7688a95
'2012-01-14T14:00:50-05:00'
describe
'135348' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHT' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
8efbb6175495f939ddf4af05dcd3efaf
0e8f8d1c76913c5e8d5db0cb925661a5a1bf1947
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHU' 'sip-files00045.pro'
097ccad9c4cc330ef17f129de3d57f2e
66d4af5328e509259888586a7fe5f60da72f9162
describe
'33500' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHV' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
8bc28058999bac1524eebaf8285ade10
0fd0a8079ec141c5fba5cfa3b4956703b8a7f13b
describe
'17725804' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHW' 'sip-files00045.tif'
781eb660dd6552ec2a47d8023e94c1a2
6acaf32d8c16e881d74f054952d0d21b077f567c
describe
'81' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHX' 'sip-files00045.txt'
065d8500a17ebda9f68ede7b33e35b45
9ad4648f8ae5deec8bd89dc6b080852a948d6834
'2012-01-14T14:00:33-05:00'
describe
'8836' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHY' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
788b0dd6f7eff8a2fba43e1aee5c8e0f
863136e7dfb8bf3e43157a43384f0702a8b48389
'2012-01-14T14:01:04-05:00'
describe
'737609' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGHZ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
10620354734a43670a2503e11f886a60
b41556482fa2dc92dfde09c800e1edc34531607f
describe
'105080' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIA' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
32d3e8214f581b5757ced7d9708b3041
479b36bf09092b64525670c39c9625b38b411dac
describe
'33177' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIB' 'sip-files00046.pro'
ac4327b14964c6eefc27693a3b6aaebe
d274d0cd99014b929d9edd4b7d204b6f41740415
describe
'25714' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIC' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
480ae703ee1340757a909ba470784461
8445bc11d58a6304be13efcbefa9c0168c52ddae
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGID' 'sip-files00046.tif'
a918e5a82edb6e8b6cb6fac65791875b
d56fd97f1a5a975a20d2ba43f9d194c00711535d
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIE' 'sip-files00046.txt'
0e4bace55bea104ef88456ad6ac93001
88a6c5647bf950213f39f2b444f09c491971fa49
describe
'5501' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIF' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
e906012f4c30c2c20ac2e94e6383f088
eba3cb33d8b905310ba9e534ea0340d0aca77525
describe
'737637' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIG' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
d453a7393e6c9cbea7255c9c323dc8d3
d972a5e15304ea792586195cfe311832faf0f10d
describe
'150679' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIH' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
0a0ccd66b3ae7e7e9fabdfae3f3e4e30
889129f3031044b6bb83477126d87900cb7bcf5b
describe
'59640' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGII' 'sip-files00047.pro'
b24ff86cbcfcca224d456fc3c32abe1d
fc6babfe8dae026fa8419de3c31ec463b4d8b140
describe
'37703' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIJ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
9700d0681518e47eb81d4eb07fb06c73
e3c680efadbf1bc038dd0b335e2e68d4eccfb8c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIK' 'sip-files00047.tif'
efc6a4ab878be76ac9cbf72e4b0d0444
26031eb079ffe80205719abc27f5ac0530e78097
describe
'2371' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIL' 'sip-files00047.txt'
f9aa42e4a32591637ee99783983e061e
98b6de9b070379e5e09b74e12a9a9b6fe3404119
describe
'8484' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIM' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
5c3469d20e19b141e513bca37ab1b15b
7a032d92b7809696f85be25c4ffd20c4bc62a26e
describe
'737596' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIN' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
3585921039c2c73e9fba206018b29a80
0ab33a70c38f281baf0ead623d4920b9c3eb4f43
describe
'136374' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIO' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
9dbdc34dd6c5337f7be8d3817babf964
576b274240bcff7b6e9385ca87842ebbe41804fa
describe
'45643' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIP' 'sip-files00048.pro'
8e88470c552a520f4ccdb6090165dae0
5f83adbbaccca7e306e3db83634d90f8dda88bdc
describe
'34383' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIQ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
f952f7de826ceeda3c74ac3a0cee36c9
20b5e93f9946d3e9ad1198139814f6fe2e87a357
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIR' 'sip-files00048.tif'
70a7cbc8a6919216038c2ad670648a4d
70422a4e23ecaf64d5a87628479e96d345d16bfe
describe
'2607' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIS' 'sip-files00048.txt'
bbce305194fa5bb06fdb0a3d7142c663
269190aad620281d3c37f4189f03ca04f28bd26b
describe
'7543' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIT' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
1f9ebb2e6b4829d6fb62ca40e38a4b1c
0774125c1d212cdea8a4a6ff715fd281f41ea25d
describe
'737630' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIU' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
dc735eecdf52e309043ff1616462fa8b
a6a921f0389cfc674d0dd13835243cc876addccd
describe
'152546' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIV' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
2769ef73b1ac205809c6e36882c850ee
06459c4c3aa7526521f8ceff881a74e903f5fe45
describe
'45712' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIW' 'sip-files00049.pro'
c333085bce5884f084e193b96583abec
77e4ca1ab996e7eefa88defe0bad18883e0ca5ef
describe
'38103' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIX' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
2f755426646ec3e2b99ef54deb055e72
2f617cf63be0f510ce0f365b98479ff66992d057
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIY' 'sip-files00049.tif'
9fabe0e16de4d6dd0dc2034050a431dc
f89745dfbdccd057729fee1cdb311c33ef592468
describe
'2517' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGIZ' 'sip-files00049.txt'
dd37186a74f4131963af5d3529a03393
a9cdc3ee910c4716d963ab071806e2f6c2722b8e
describe
'8565' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJA' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
7ac567b8362c5246875a9ce031adf6b0
9226e3108361573fabfca94533ea06b46503e967
describe
'737527' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJB' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
0c519157dd16025d623e87f5c5d0d555
3a829f51f60f0c149b1c5052541fc56cfba2bf13
'2012-01-14T14:00:45-05:00'
describe
'150735' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJC' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
d628c46f0e53187c5f5bf9b18c81abbc
0fb1f0be0513d2cc824cef0212a859ca2879ab8e
describe
'49127' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJD' 'sip-files00050.pro'
833499af1a55a9e271e14b6082e12423
4f157c5d1b85d1250ba21e579eea5f5dea6326ae
describe
'38456' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJE' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
a3b4ef137a9ac39fef47d3a2b4ed0be7
544ace59b65fd9080e93e1c0e19ba700a6f4a25a
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJF' 'sip-files00050.tif'
19de781da13c8ecbbb97d8ab702422bd
7d7a7154682f56654997ffc831c929d778bf0981
describe
'2474' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJG' 'sip-files00050.txt'
96b7fc867a5838830a645cf5454bf88d
8534c0c686b58c36cde9c036d91245fa08f7c5b9
describe
'8584' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJH' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
1551b99c193030f7467cdece0791f974
c3523012a828cef18c0e04d4f4b5d9a92920170a
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJI' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
78d493d5709bb57344fdcdbe46c24167
bb2c36c0bfedeec2eb5f17953c80fbbf985ca826
describe
'130655' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJJ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
3cc8e6c4e86655e4d8a4d769044f4266
c43564ebdcf9dcc16d74a477d9ca411b679b24f5
describe
'16981' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJK' 'sip-files00051.pro'
d37e91366904abfeb7ac006598bfad09
00ff9180bf2921453ba6b0e40773c26ea72debb1
describe
'30701' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJL' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
ad57b33786ac2e1e03b03e153fb3a46c
47a46672405daeb27e40f479b2eb0d0cb85181cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJM' 'sip-files00051.tif'
0a70831dcd73a3e6b9835f6409df4cfa
d97cc1f12219b8c027bfeb562f95518999c616e2
describe
'710' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJN' 'sip-files00051.txt'
39530fa460f7afebf25921ed85b18265
8104597afdf84797cdbdfa5fc9c638f420d35d83
describe
Invalid character
'6915' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJO' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
f2e44d7abc58f296dc848e011676d8f0
91911bed0731255d74590b3148c925e5df674802
describe
'691305' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJP' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
2aa6a32608da39cd61897fe06aafa964
6a171dbadec1c6f0fff919ef699c0456dd98b970
describe
'123550' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJQ' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
3e83b606016c5ea7dc43072e6e9b86c9
a098f294a951450e3c99cfa28558f2e6baa088f3
'2012-01-14T14:01:01-05:00'
describe
'38122' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJR' 'sip-files00052.pro'
0b97b34b7eb761a2ac4bcb678f6d5bd4
86cd9f7eb45cd9ff10896762000271bb9ae19f2b
describe
'31783' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJS' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
f59651e7ebb9090282ad2e7f16cc0d3d
07ad519e1a4b1265662977ad1af04657823be64f
describe
'5548032' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJT' 'sip-files00052.tif'
1de010c7258c04effa8cf86ba7a1cf1d
3542b6e2cebb116057bc84a3e8a65078dcf134cc
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJU' 'sip-files00052.txt'
e8392ba0cb8ce0f222305f8122cc9248
b1095440d343f5bca119c9327230cfcfafbcfb35
describe
'7084' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJV' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
84441d6e10299548dab01b2a5e20d756
79f15688fbe555da664a1fded70a2ab1f7945cfd
describe
'737425' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJW' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
065f53347028d40be3002f4414eb5457
88778170900d4dbf07beafc2e8143f62c699c604
describe
'115865' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJX' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
ad323810c9f78a1af3130bda00288c1d
0d1615fb39fa3881714f5c1f25f5ee19e1f6ba3c
describe
'25252' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJY' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
7e2db7302569b00d1847d2d358cf1df1
e73d79852695fce76c69d463a63185e36a8e8b51
describe
'17710012' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGJZ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
152b5d6600d8c2e0b4ec78756a3b94fd
cb709bcc73b5e3042eb6fe3e7c6711fbc4f1fef4
'2012-01-14T14:00:22-05:00'
describe
'5591' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGKA' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
5183b690ab26fd29bd9742dea37684ea
282504e380c337af1981914fc728fca161492be8
describe
'810858' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGKB' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
7aeeaadedfd93c9e8aa4beae889cca54
734f69970e423ea143e241a20d00bda09526aed7
describe
'153392' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGKC' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
bd6297eafcc81314fdab469ca9d386f4
95d66f4a3fb1a8c44757493df18d05d7824ab0f9
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGKD' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
b78081a4e9558f2895d4e9b40c815b4f
8ea841a270776e1ce1aa1e95b39575145ec284fa
describe
'19468760' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGKE' 'sip-files00055.tif'
718eadd6b6fadb6d8e1628a13d2d8786
afaa373eacd3a45810df78a77aaf0458a3d2b3b7
describe
'7429' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGKF' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
aefe63126e9e6a465477d487bd908230
d360bc7e4d91fc0fa45cf98c336089e51faf0142
describe
'815305' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGKG' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
8656de338030e6c1cb53d86d9b435001
191692625f33e77e4e6d11c7b132dd821adc8658
describe
'150587' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGKH' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
722f15c71129a3c66c43f96f6002bd52
fee55bab5716b33fe681f286ba77aeb56e218409
describe
'4788' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGKI' 'sip-files00056.pro'
e0a6b95df3fd0b853958e369abf194a3
de8967d4a773999a2d6ec4c661e24c5ada33d88e
describe
'35714' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGKJ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
9df225c983902633619df952585f6e46
0f33b911192bc82692e207d4608997120d23ff4c
describe
'19575808' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGKK' 'sip-files00056.tif'
45082c803c1267526acc0543b626810e
badfa75d228e14aafb12e9d6e89dafad21f5e03d
describe
'229' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGKL' 'sip-files00056.txt'
a1a73cff22c9577c1a8b9d7b2f3073a5
b2d1f5cbf21c09f5796b20e0874f21b6d833ff20
describe
Invalid character
'8560' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGKM' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
ecbe17dd45267a008b67c585ca269003
c2a2043e5f7dcb95c98978b74bef2255a5426e0f
describe
'56' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGKN' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
d9d242e5b712e3e1a9801ce3ecc02844
a708504bc796de2ce6cfb99ee3e9d703e2a4170d
describe
'86142' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGKO' 'sip-filesUF00087349_00001.mets'
68d5df3ccb2b50ec4d1b5a506cfa9336
f70b54eacc0a886b022a2a960cc621ec2d686ed3
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T08:33:01-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'108799' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAAMfileF20090314_AAAGKR' 'sip-filesUF00087349_00001.xml'
8d38dea68f0991a5cc1ee7a3d9ad99a6
2ebd7df6ed82d6acf7566064ea96e71f6ff4c2f3
describe
'2013-12-13T08:33:00-05:00'
xml resolution




xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008734900001datestamp 2008-10-30setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title The Arabian nightsArabian nightsFather Tuck's "golden gift" seriesdc:creator Burnside, Helen Marion ( Editor )Brundage, Will ( Illustrator )Brundage, Frances, 1854-1937 ( Illustrator )Grey, J. Willis ( Illustrator )dc:subject Children's storiesSocial life and customs -- Juvenile fiction -- Arab countriesChildren's stories -- 1898Folk tales -- 1898Fantasy literature -- 1898Onlays -- 1898dc:description arranged by Helen Marion Burnside ; illustrated by W. & F. Brundage and J. Willis Grey.Date of publication from inscription."Book 2"- -Cover.Some illustrations hand-colored.Two full-color onlays, pasted verso of fly leaf and on p. 41.dc:publisher Raphael Tuck & Sons Ltd.dc:date 1898?dc:type Bookdc:format 48 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00087349&v=00001002222540 (ALEPH)122412938 (OCLC)ALG2785 (NOTIS)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English


F ather sick
ty
“ GOLDEN Girt ”

Series. ¢

}


Sr AE
er der Op SND é

Lis CRY

: &

PONTE Te PRON
: ee: Se me. iM
uae





Ee UT ei ee |
d : 3 o ‘
eit ic a
AA rs at 5) ;
“as Opis, Oke Aafia
= th oe ‘ a

SIA eo”
a A aes , ; Ss
vy A 2 ry mt
A | Tbe tees |
SAG ae
mB of Ae
: Florida | [2







THE BARBER’S FIFTH BROTHER.
Grranged by
PeveN

‘Marion
Burnside,

Jihus trated. by

W & F. BRUNDAGE,
and

oJ. WiLus GREY.



RAPHAKL TUCK § SONS, L.

London, Paris, and New York.

PUBLISHERS TO
THE QUEEN.



Jhe Barber's Fifth Brother,

Told by Scheherazade.

sre il HAVE the honour to inform you,” said the Barber, “‘ that the name

of my fifth brother was Alnaschar.. He spent an idle and impro-
vident youth. Our father died at an advanced age, leaving each of us
seven brothers a hundred drachms of silver, and, after much considera-
tion, my brother Alnaschar expended his in setting up a small shop,
which he furnished with a basket full of bottles, glasses, and other objects
of a similar nature. He then seated himself in his shop, and waited for
customers to buy. Whilst he sat he began to meditate, speaking to him-
self sufficiently loud for a neighbouring tailor to overhear. ‘This basket
of glass,’ said he, ‘cost one hundred drachms, which was all I had; by
selline its contents I shall make two hundred, which, reinvested, will
bring in four hundred, so that by continuing this traffic I shall in time
possess four thousand drachms. As soon as I have amassed ten thou-
sand, I can leave off selling glass ware and turn jeweller, and when, by
this means, I possess as much wealth as I require, I will buy a beautiful
house, slaves, and horses: nor will I be satisfied till I have realised one
hundred thousand drachms ; then I shall consider myself equal to a prince,
and demand the daughter of the grand vizier im marriage, and if he
refuse I will go and bring her home in spite of him. When we are
married, I shall dress like a prince, and ride a magnificent horse, capari-
soned with gold stuffs, and I will treat my wife with the utmost disdain }
she shall not leave the apartment without my permission ; I will sit in the
seat of honour, and will not speak to her, and, however splendidly she
may array her emute in the hope of rene me, I will take no notice,
and shall pretend not to see her. She will throw herself at my feet, pal
conjure me to accept a glass of wine from her hand; I shall persist in my
conduct, then she will press the wine close to my mouth, and assure me
she will not cease from entreating till she obtains the favour of my drink-
6 THE BARBER’S FIFTH BROTHER.

ing it. At-last I will give her a good blow on her cheek, and push her
Aaya me so violently with my foot that she shall fall to A eround.’

‘ Absorbed in these visions, my brother unfortunately at ike moment
kicked his basket of earthenware, so that it flew across the shop into the
street and was broken to pieces. His neighbour, the tailor, burst into a
fit of laughter, but Alnaschar beat his breast and sobbed so violently at
the destruction of all his hopes, that a lady of consequence, who was
passing by, mounted on a richly-caparisoned mule, paused to enquire the
reason of his distress, and when she heard it, she put a purse, containing
five hundred pieces of gold, into his hand. Alnaschar was overjoyed at
the sight of it, and, bestowing a thousand blessings on the lady, shut up
his shop and went home.

“While he sat reflecting on: his good
fortune, an old woman eee at the door.
‘My son,’ she said, when
he raed it, Gruen me,
I entreat you, to enter,
and give me a basin of
water.’

“¢Willinely,’ replied
Alnaschar; and whilst
the old woman washed
and said her prayers,
he placed his money in
a long purse attached
to his girdle. When
she had finished, see-
ing she was poorly
| dressed, he offered her
gi two gold pieces, but
f|she refused it, saying
_ she peleueed to
a rich and beau-
* tiful young lady
who let her want
for nothing.



















‘Greek slave, and the old woman ushered

THE BARBER’S FIFTH BROTHER. i

‘“‘ Alnaschar asked her if she could procure him the
honour of seeing this lady. ‘Certainly,’ replied the old
woman; ‘you might even marry her,
and possess her fortune. Will you follow
me ??

‘He followed her through the city
to the door of a great house, where she
knocked. It was opened by a female













him into a large and handsomely-furnished
hall, whilst she went to inform her
mistress of his arrival. In a few, te
minutes a beautiful and richly-dressed | Tl f
young lady appeared. He arose, but NR
she requested him to resume his place, d
and seated herself at his side, and ex- a
pressed much pleasure at his visit. “~=<

“Give me your hand,’ sai
she, ‘and I will lead you to my
own apartments.’

‘¢¢ Soon after they had gained the lady’s rooms she left him, saying
she would return in a few moments; but she was no sooner gone than
a tall black slave entered with a scimitar in his hand.

‘¢¢ What business have you here ?’ he cried, and immediately stripped
him, took away his gold, and wounded him in several places. He fell.
down for dead, and a young Greek slave and the black proceeded to
rub salt into his wounds; but in spite of the pain, he still pretended to be
dead. The old woman then dragged him by the legs to a trap door,
which she opened, and threw him into a subterraneous place. Believing
him to be dead, she did not bolt the trap-door, and Alnaschar managed to
open it, and get out as soon as it was night. He then hid himself till the
old woman opened the street door in the morning and went out, when
he followed her into the street and fled to my house.

‘At the end of a month he was cured of his wounds, and resolved to
avenge himself on the old woman. He accordingly disguised himself as
a woman, and tied a large purse to his girdle, filled with bits of glass.


Oma THE BARBER’S FIFTH BROTHER.

Be 4g Before long he met the old hag, and in a feigned
Ae ‘ oy _ voice addressed her.
NY if by ‘““*Can you do me the favour to introduce
4 7, me to-a money changer, my good woman? I.
eS MA am a Persian but just arrived in this city,



» and wish to have five hundred pieces of gold
4 (" ee weighed.’
a bins ' ir : ~ “£V¥ou could not have addressed a fitter
ah ys erson for your purpose,’ answered the old
: iT y / \e oF yp ys PUR eee.

Ti) 2 7 1 Y@gay woman, ‘my son is a money changer; follow
| . iy] me, and I will take you to him.’ She led: him
‘eZ / Y to the hall as before, and begged him to wait,

Sic J =z and she would send her son to him. The black

% fl Be slave then appearing, said, ‘My good woman,
/ if you will follow me, I will do what you desire.’

Alnaschar got up, and as he walked behind the Co
black, gave him such a blow with the scimitar 34
which he had concealed in his robe, that he cut
his head off. The Greek slave then appeared,
and was served in the same manner, and the old
woman, who ran in to see what was the matter,
was also beheaded. The lady alone remained, . << y
and my brother went in search of her. When “”“~“{
she saw him she nearly fainted, and begged of
him to spare her life. When he reproached
her for leading such an infamous life, she
informed him that she had been stolen away
from her husband, a rich merchant, ae the
old woman, and had been forcibly ___
detained in this house by the
black for three years.

“<«He must have ee ereat ,
riches in this wicked manner,’ 4
said Alnaschar.

““« He has,’ replied the lady. fo
‘I will show it you.’ She then
















THE BARBER’S FIFTH BROTHER. 9

took him to a room in which were many coffers full of gold, and begged
him to go and bring people to carry it away. ;

‘My brother went, and when he returned with ten men, behold! the
lady and the coffers had all vanished. That he might not return with
empty hands, he took with him, when he left the house, enough furniture
to repay him the value of his five hundred pieces of gold; but the neigh-
bours, it seemed, observed him do this, and went and informed the judge,
who sent and had Alnaschar brought before him.

‘This was, it turned out, an unjust and merciless magistrate, who
would not listen to or believe my brother’s story, but sent to his house
and took away all that he had, and commanded him instantly to leave
the city, on forfeiture of his life. My brother obeyed, and on the road
met some robbers, who stripped him bare, in which unhappy condition
I found him, and brought him home with me, and took every care of
him, as I do of my other brothers.”

Scheherazade, always contriving to interest the Sultan by the relation
of her different stories, immediately commenced a new one, and addressed
‘Schahrian as follows.


Filo of BEDER

Pines of TIS

K 2) EDER, Prince of Persia, was the son of one of ©
“\ the most mighty of the kings of that kingdom,
and of a most beautiful lady who had been sold
to the king asa slave by some merchants who
visited his court. The king fell in love with
this slave and married her, and she then told
him that she was the Princess Gulnaré of the
ocean. Her father, now dead, had been one
\&"Fs of the most powerful of the kings of the sea,
ES and her brother, Selah, now reigned in his
stead. This brother, she continued, had desired -to marry her to a
powerful prince, whom she detested. She therefore ran away to the
Island of the Moon, where she was discovered, and taken away by the
merchants, who had brought her to the Persian court.
The King of Persia was overjoyed when he heard this,
and promised that he would present his wife to his
subjects next day as the Queen of Persia. She then
told him that she was desirous of seeing her mother and
brother and other relatives again, and begged to be
allowed to summon them. ‘To this he agreed instantly,
and the queen begged him to retire to a closet, the
window of which, like her own, looked on the sea.
Being alone, she took some aloe wood from a box and
put it in the perfuming pot. As soon as the smoke
arose she pronounced some words, and immediately the
sea opened, and a majestic lady, a young man, and
three beautiful young ladies arose from it, and bounded
through the window into the room.
After having tenderly embraced this party, Queen




HISTORY OF BEDER, PRINCE OF PERSIA. 11

Gulnaré introduced them to her husband as her mother, her brother,
King Selah, and her sisters. The king expressed great pleasure at seeing
them; and shortly afterwards, during their visit to his court, a lovely
little son was born to Queen Gulnaré, whom they called Beder (the full
moon), who grew up to be the most beautiful, amiable, and accomplished
prince ever seen. His parents adored him; and when he was about
fifteen years old, the king, feeling himself becoming aged and infirm,
desired to resign the kingdom to his son. His council and subjects
agreeing to his wishes, a day was fixed for the cere-
mony. The old king descended from his throne,
and taking the crownffrom his own head placed it on
that of the prince, whom he assisted to mount the
throne, and then kissed his hand. The chief
officers followed his example,
and took the oath of ~
allegiance towards the
new king, after which
he proceeded to the
apartment of his
mother, who wished
him every happi-
ness.

In about two
years the old king
died, and Queen
Gulnaré, wishing
again to see her
brother, King
Selah, and intro-
duce her son to
him, summoned
him to pay her a
visit. The king
expressed himself
highly satisfied
with his nephew,









12 HISTORY OF BEDER, PRINCE: OF PERSIA.

and was never tired of praising his beauty and amiability to his
mother.

“Sister,” he one day exclaimed, ‘I am only astonished that so perfect
a prince should be unmarried. Permit me to mention to you Princess
Giauhar’, daughter of the King of Samandal, as worthy of him.”

He then proceeded to draw such a picture of the charms of this
princess, that King Beder, who had overheard the conversation, became
violently in love with her, and eagerly besought his uncle to lose no time
in introducing him to her.

King Selah yielded to the King of Persia’s vehemence, and placing a
ring on his nephew’s finger, proceeded to the sea, into which they imme-
diately plunged. They soon arrived at the palace of King Selah, who only
stayed long enough to choose a rich casket, full of pearls, emeralds, and
rubies, and then proceeded to the kingdom of the King of Samandal.
King Selah hastened to prostrate himself before his brother king, and pre-

KH, - “ie. eG senting the casket, laid before him his

a BN G. oil WW” proposals; and entreated of him to
| ae bestow the hand of the Princess
Sy Giauharé on his nephew, Beder, King
Dp - of Persia. At this proposal the

»_? King of Samandal burst into

f=’ a violent fit of laughter, and
rejected the idea with the ut-
most contempt.

King Selah was highly offended
a=. 2t this insolence, and
SC «C°o—quickly§ returned to
ae own palace; and
~ KF WW 2s at ey oun, King Beder was

OM, We é excessively afflicted
when the ill success of his uncle’s
mission was made known to him.

He determined to return
Z----home, and darted to the
surface of the sea, but not
knowing the way, ascended -













HISTORY OF BEDER, PRINCE OF PERSIA. 13

to an island, where, in a dejected
frame of mind, he seated himself
at the foot of a tree. Whilst he thus sat he
suddenly beheld, looking through the foliage, a
lady of most exquisite beauty, and, arising, made
her a profound
bow.









‘“* Madam, ”. SA
said he, “I be- Cute
seech you to a
accept my ser-

vices, if you are Wie a I

in need of as-





sistance.”
eee aa, Seis
answered she, ‘the





Princess Giauhart, daughter of =
the King of Samandal; this morning
I heard that King Selah had arrived,
and demanded my hand of my father,
for his nephew, the King of Persia, and I fled hither to h

‘< Adorable Princess,” answered Beder, ‘I am myself that unworthy
Prince. I have long loved you, and I entreat you to make me happy,
and accept my love.”

The Princess extended her hand to him in token of friend-
ship, but when he bent forward in order to kiss it respectfully,
she snatched it away. “Wretch!” she exclaimed, spitting in his
face, “quit the human form, and take the shape of a white bird
with red beak and feet.”

When the transformation was effected, she took the bird and con-
veyed it to a distant island. A day or two afterwards it was caught by
a peasant, who, pleased at possessing so beautiful a bird, decided to take
it as a present to the King of the island. The King expressed great
admiration for the bird, and ordered his officers to give it any kind of food
it liked best. Dinner was at this moment served, and the Queen, entering,
instantly drew her veil over her face. ‘“‘ Sire,” she exclaimed, ‘this is
14 HISTORY OF BEDER, PRINCE OF PERSIA.

not, as you suppose, a bird, but a man; it is, in fact, Beder, King of
Persia, whom you see in this form, which he was compelled to take by
the daughter of the King of Samandal; but as I am myself skilled in
magic, I will, with your permission, restore him to his royal self.” She
then took some water in her hand, and throwing it upon the bird, pro-
nounced some mysterious words, and King Beder instantly stood before
them in all his manly beauty.

Having expressed his gratitude to the Queen, King Beder hastened

to request ie the King the use of a ship to take tea back to Persia.
This was readily ened but, to add to ¢
the misfortunes of the young King, the
vessel was wrecked in a tempest, and he
and a remnant of the crew were cast
ashore on an island, called the City of
Enchantment, where, shortly afterwards,
the Queen of the island saw and fell in
love’ with him. Being already in love
with the Princess Giauhart, King Beder
could not return the affection of the
Queen, who was a noted sorceress, and,
enraged at his repulse, she changed him
into an owl.

Meanwhile King Selah had, with
his army, conquered Samandal, and taken
the Kine prisoner, and hearing, by some
means, of the misfortunes of his nephew,
begged his sister to join him, that they might
set out together to deliver him. Accordingly
they set out with such a powerful army for
the City of Enchantment, that all its im-
habitants were destroyed in the twinkling
of an eye. The Queen herself rushed to
the cage in which the owl was confined,
and, tenderly caressing it, once again trans-
Foraneal her beloved son into his natural
figure.














HISTORY OF BEDER, PRINCE OF PERSIA. 15

LZ King Beder professed himself still so deepl
LO K in love wath the Biineast Giauhare that he ad
Bee We not exist without her. Officers were, therefore,
sent in search of her, and she was found on
the island where the young king had first met
her.








Overcome by his constancy, and re-
penting of her ill-treatment
of him; she now consented
to be his wite; and the
4 marriage having been cele-
veh I~ brated an great splendour,
the King and Queen of
Persia departed for their own capital, whilst King Selah returned to his
dominions under the sea. :
The Sultana Scheherazadé would here have commenced another
story, but the Sultan, perceiving that day was breaking, deferred hearing
it till the next morning, when she began the following history.









iS

i

| S

\

&

AN,
\

Zz ee a ‘
L454 2 ed



iS
2D)
-

MUN,
CN
Qa

: i

wi"
¢ ah
AN
ean








ELL)
it
i
id

y
F
i

<

Bsa ‘

-
(2
gee

"
Ny



(

had a wife and one son.

1

et

= [’ the capital of one of the
kingdoms of China lived a
| poor tailor, named Mustafa, who

This son, whose name was
Aladdin, had been so neglected

== that he became idle, mis-



~ chievous, and disobedient. He
os was always from home, and
Ss re ska ae would not mind a word his

father and mother said to him. When he was old enough his father

wished to teach him his own trade, but Aladdin refused to learn, and in
spite of all the chastisement Mustafa bestowed upon him, persisted in
living the life of an idle vagabond, which conduct so afflicted his father as
to bring on a fatal illness, and thereby quickly put an end to his existence.
Seeing that her son would be of no use to her, Aladdin’s mother sold her
shop, and all it contained, and upon the proceeds of these, and the little she
earned by spinning, she and her son subsisted. Aladdin pursued his idle
ALADDIN AND HIS WONDERFUL LAMP. 17

course of life, and was one day playing with his companions in the
street, when a stranger stopped to look at him.

This stranger was a learned African magician, Toe believing from
the countenance of Aladdin that he would suit a purpose he had in view,
made himself acquainted with his family, and introducing himself to
Aladdin as his uncle, hinted a desire to put him in the way of a’ better
mode of life, promising to give him a handsome suit, and introduce him
to some merchants, if his nephew would accompany him. Aladdin gladly
agreed, and his mother joyfully consented to his departure with his
uncle, who behaved most affectionately to him. |

As they journeyed along, they came to a beautiful garden unknown
to Aladdin, and his uncle proposed that they should sit down and rest
and refresh themselves with the food he had brought with him. When
they had finished their repast, they pursued their way till they came to
a valley.

‘We shall now,” said the magician, “ go no further. I am about to
unfold to you the most extraordinary wonders.” He then spoke some
mysterious words, and a dense smoke arose, the ground shook, and dis-
closed a square stone with a brass ring fixed into it. The magician
ordered Aladdin to lift up the stone, which easily yielded to his strength,
and revealed a hole, at the bottom of which appeared a door.

“You must now,” said his uncle, ‘do exactly as I tell you. Go
into this cavern, through an open door which vou will find at the bottom,
then through other doors (taking the greatest care to touch nothing as you
go), till, in a niche in the wall, you see a lighted lamp. Extinguish this ©
lamp and bring it to me. On your way back you may, if you please,
gather some Pee from the garden you will pass through.” As he spoke he
placed a ring on Aladdin’s finger, si immediately des-
cended and pend all as his ane hadsaid. He then put

Ree the lamp into his robe, and piled as much
==: fruit as he could carry over it. As soon
ae as he arrived at the entrance to the cave,
the magician commanded Aladdin to give
him the lamp, but as it was covered over
with fruit the boy steadily refused to do
so, till his pretended uncle, in a violent

: b




ge Te wilh








18 ALADDIN AND HIS WONDERFUL LAMP.



rage, spoke some magic words over the |
stone, which instantly returned to its
place, and enclosed Aladdin in the .
cavern.

When the magician found his hopes _ |
of possessing the lamp foiled in this
manner (for, in truth, the quest for this
same lamp had been the object of his
journey), he set out on his return to
Africa, leaving his supposed nephew in
the cavern, from which, he knew, all his __{
arts were powerless to release him. ‘The oo
garden and halls, which had been raised
by enchantment, now disappeared, and for
two days Aladdin regarded himself as buried
alive, without hope of relief; but on the third day, throwing
up his hands in despair, he accidentally rubbed the ring which was
still on his finger. Instantly a gigantic genie appeared. _ before
him, and said, ;

‘What do you wish? Iam ready to obey him who is the wearer
of that ring.” -

But for the peril of his situation Aladdin would have been alarmed ;
as it was, he answered,

‘Whoever you are, take me out of this place,” and he had scarcely
spoken the words before he found himself alone, and. outside the cavern,
on the spot to which his uncle had brought him; and in fear of the
magician, set out, without loss of time, on his journey home. His
mother, who had given him up for dead, was overjoyed to see him,
though her disappointment was great when she found he had come back
as poor as he went away. When he had recounted to her all that had-
taken place, she assured him that she was quite satisfied the wicked
magician was no uncle of his, but that he had deceived them for his own
purposes. She then bewailed herself that she had no food in the house,
and Aladdin bethought him of the lamp, which, he said, if rubbed up
they might be able to sell. His mother took it from him, and began
to rub it. Instantly a hideous genie appeared before her.


ALADDIN AND HIS WONDERFUL LAMP. 19

‘What do you wish?” he said. ‘I am
ready to oney. you, who have the lamp in
your hands.” :
The poor woman, greatly alarmed, fell down fainting,
but Aladdin, seizing the lamp, cried,

“Tam hungry, bring me food.”

g A silver basin, filled with the choicest food, immedi-

| ately appeared on the table, and the youth insisted on his
mother seating herself, and eating with him. She was ex-
tremely | astonished, and her son explained to her that this was not
the same genie who had appeared to him in the cavern, but one
evidently belonging to the lamp. She wished him to get rid of so’
dangerous a possession, but Aladdin refused to do so, and made use of
it in order to obtain not only their daily food, but all kinds of riches—
gold, and silver, and precious stones. He had ale to ask, and the slave
of the lamp procured him his desire.

Thus things went on till Aladdin happened to see the Princess
Badroulboudour, the daughter of the Sultan, with whom he fell desperately
in love, and resolved to make his wife. This was, however, a matter in
which the genius of the lamp was powerless to help him ; but by means of
it, the youth became the possessor of so much wealth, that he was enabled
_ to offer magnificent presents to the Sultan. He built the most splendid
palace ever seen, and wore dresses more costly than those of the Sultan
himself; so that, seeing how rich and powerful he became, the Sultan was
in course of time induced to listen, and give his consent to the marriage.
Some years passed away, and nothing could exceed the happiness and
prosperity of Aladdin, and his beautiful wife. Aladdin became as irre-
proachable in his life and conduct as he had, in his youthful days, been the
reverse, and was so just, liberal, and courteous, that he won the affection
of every one who knew him.

It then happened that the African magician returned again, and had
no sooner set foot in China than the fame of Aladdin, whom he believed
to be dead, reached him. ‘‘ Miserable son of a tailor,” he exclaimed in a
furious rage, ‘‘ he has then escaped and discovered the secret of the lamp
which I failed to obtain for myself. But I will destroy him, or perish in

the attempt.” Summoning his diabolical arts to his aid, he soon formed
Dea





ALADDIN’S MOTHER AND THE SULTAN.
ALADDIN AND HIS WONDERFUL LAMP. ; e211



his plans. The first thing
was to discover the place in
which the lamp was kept, or
- whether Aladdin, who was at
that time absent from home,
carried it about with ‘him.
Accordingly, he disguised
7 himself as a lamp-seller, and,
carrying a basket of beautiful
new lamps on his arm, walked
ye, round and round the palace,
=~ ealling out, ‘‘ Who will change
old lamps for new?” The
Princess and her slaves, hearing
him, could not help laughing at
his folly.
I “There is an old lamp lying
xray upon the cornice,” said one of the
_ slaves. ‘If the Princess will permit,
I will sce if this fellow is as great
a fool as he pretends.” Now this was the
i very lamp which had caused Aladdin’s
success and happiness. He had himself placed it there before he went
hunting ; when not engaged in the chase he always kept it about him.
The magician at once recognised it, and eagerly exchanged the old
lamp fora new one, heedless of the laughter of the slaves, and instantly
disappeared with it down an unfrequented street. The first use he made
of it was to command that Aladdin’s palace, with everything in it, should
be transported to the wilds of Africa, which was at once effected.
Meanwhile the Sultan, looking from his window, missed the palace
cof Aladdin. In his rage he conceived the idea that his son-in-law was an
impostor, who had stolen away the Princess, and sent out his officers to
arrest him, and on his arrival, knowing nothing of what had happened,
ordered his immediate execution. The populace, however, being much
attached to Aladdin, made such a commotion that the Sultan was obliged
to reconsider his determination; but he declared that if Aladdin - did











22 ALADDIN AND HIS WONDERFUL LAMP.

not discover and restore his daughter, his life would eventually be the
forfeit. The unhappy Aladdin did not know in what direction to com-
mence his search. He therefore wandered towards the country, and heed-
less with despair, slipped, and would have fallen. In recovering himself
he accidentally rubbed the ring on his finger, and the genie he had seen
once before stood before him, enquiring his wishes.

‘Place me,” he cried, ‘‘ under the windows of the Princess Badroul-
boudour.” He had barely il this before he found himself on the spot, and
was recognised by the Princess on her coming to the window at sunrise.

They embraced with tears of joy, but Aladdin’s first words were to
entreat his wife to tell him what had become of the lamp which he had
placed on the cornice. She then related to him
all that had happened, and informed -him that
the country they were now in was Africa.

“ Ah! you have unmasked to me the ,@
traitor,” exclaimed Aladdin. “The African ? 2
magician !—he is the most infamous of men. But tell me, I beseech you, what he has done ts
with the lamp.”

“ He carries it, carefully wrapped up, in his
bosom,” rejoined the Princess. ‘‘ He comes here
frequently, and persecutes me with his attentions.”

“With your help, my dear wife,” said

Aladdin, “I. will endeavour to rid us both
of this vile wretch.”

And hearing that the magician had signified his intention of visiting
the Princess that very day, he hastened to a chemist’s in the town, ane
purchased a certain powder, which he instructed his wife to mix in the wine
she was to present to. their enemy on his arrival. She did as Aladdin
bade her, and the next moment the African magician fell lifeless on the
sofa. Aladdin quickly repossessed himself of the lamp, and commanded
the genie to transport the palace and all in it back to the same spot in
China whence it was brought.

This was done in a minute’s time, and the Sultan could scarcely
believe his eyes when, on looking from his window at sunrise; he beheld
the palace in its accustomed place, and all about it as usual. In his joy


ALADDIN AND HIS WONDERFUL LAMP. ; 28

at the recovery of his daughter, the Sultan forgot all about his anger
against Aladdin ; and when she had recounted to him all that had taken
place, freely reinstated him in the favour he had formerly enjoyed, and
when some years afterwards the old king died, at an advanced age,*

as he had no son, the Princess succeeded to — the throne,
and transferred the supreme power to her husband.
Be They reigned together for many years, and left _ @ numerous

t

and illustrious family to succeed
them. -



The Sultan, having expressed his satisfaction with this story, was
informed by Scheherazadé that she had another quite as surprising to
relate to him, and commenced as follows : —

:


<= © he nen nted Hore 4

Ne your majesty is aware, the festival of Nevrour, which is the first
day of the year, is one of special solemnity Ahmenein Persia, not
a village, however small, neglecting to celebrate it with great rejoicing ;
and the Kine of Persia bene eto curious in scientific construction,
it was the custom for all ingenious persons, who had anything to display,
to exhibit its merits at fe festival held at Schiraz,
where the court was assembled. At one of ee oe
festivals an Indian appeared, and presented ee
himself at the foot of the throne, leading a
mechanical horse, richly capariconed) endl
so skilfully ene that every one
supposed it to be real.

“Sire,” said he, prostrating himself
before the King, “Iam assured that you
have not seen anything so astonishing
as this horse, which I entreat you to.
look at.”

“T see nothing in the horse,”
replied the King; “another work.
man might have aoe it with a still
greater resemblance to Nature.”

“It is to the interior construc- |
tion of the horse, and the use I 3
can make of it, that I desire to call &.
your majesty’s attention,” resumed









THE ENCHANTED HORSE. 25

the Indian. “When I mount him, I can transport myself to any
particular spot in a short space of time. I am ready to give your
majesty proof of this.”

The King told the Indian that- nothing but the proof he had
proposed could convince him of the truth of such an assertion. The
Indian therefore mounted his horse, and inquired of the King where
he desired him to go.

“To yonder mountain,” answered the King, “and, as proof of
having been there, bring me a branch of a palm which grows at
its foot.”

He had scarcely spoken, when the Indian touched a little peg
in the horse’s neck, which rose from the ground and flew through
the air at an immense height. In a quarter of an hour, the Indian
alighted again at the same spot, and laid a palm branch at the
King’s feet.

Filled with admiration and astonishment, the King conceived
a strong desire to possess this horse, and resolved to give the Indian
whatever sum he asked for it. The Indian, however, refused to
sell it. :

“T obtained it from its inventor,” he said, “in exchange for the
hand of my daughter, and promised him that I would only part with
it in exchange for anything I myself desired.” ~

is “I am ready,” said the King, “to grant you

/s7e /__._ anything you may ask of me.”
i 4 “Give me, then, the hand of your daughter

as my wite,” answered the Indian. “TI will part
with the horse on no other terms.”

~The King seemed inclined to grant this
y extravagant request, but the Prince Firoux Schah,













Wh his eldest son, expressed great indignation.

a “Sire,” said he, “I entreat you to consider
4 what is due to yourself, my sister, and the blood
Bid : of our ancestors.”
Seo Se But the King was deaf to his argu-

—— ments.
** Before we conclude the bargain,” he
26 THE ENCHANTED HORSE.

said to his son, ‘‘I.wish you to make trial of the

horse yourself. I daresay the Indian will peut
this.”

















Seeing that the King of Persia did not alto-
_ gether refuse his proposal, the Indian gladly
assented, hoping to win the Prince’s
favour alse: and hastened to assist him
in mounting. But the latter sprang into —
the eae and, without waiting for |
any instructions from the Indian,
instantly turned the peg, and the
horse carried him off with such
velocity that, in a minute, he was
out of sight. Neither steed nor
‘rider appeared again, and the
’ Indian threw himself at the King’s
feet—

“Your majesty must have
observed,” cried he, ‘that the
Prince did not wait for my
directions as to the manage-
ment of the horse, therefore
I am_ not peapeueilile should
aught befall him, and should he not discover how to return.”

‘Be that as it may,” answered the King, “‘your life shall be the
forfeit if my son do not return in safety.” fe then caused the paebae
to be cast into prison, there to await the return of the Prince.

Prince Firoux Schah meanwhile, having travelled as far as he desired,
would have returned, and, finding that he did not know how to control
his wonderful steed, regretted his impetuosity in not waiting for instruc-
tions; he tried by various means to stop, but it was not for a iene time that
he saw a second and smaller peg in the horse’s neck. This he turned,
and at length, long past midnight, the horse descended and stopped.

The Prince dismounted, and found himself on the roof of a magnificent
palace, examining which, he descried a staircase, leading to an open door.
Quickly pee this, ie found himself in a lighted phamiber containing
THE ENCHANTED HORSE. 27

several beds, in the most elevated of which lay a Princess offextraordinary
beauty, whilst the others were occupied by her ladies. All were asleep,
but, kneeling by the couch, the Prince gently touched the lady to attract
her attention ; she opened her eyes or him with the utmost astonishment.

“Great Princess,” cried he, still kneeling, ‘in consequence of a most
wonderful adventure, you see before you the Prince of Persia, who finds
himself in danger of perishing, unless you will protect him.”

The Princess listened to him very graciously, and saying she would
restrain her curiosity to hear his adventures till the morning, roused. her
ladies, and. ordered them to conduct him to a safe apartment, and provide.
forall his wants. The ladies, albeit much surprised, obeyed the commands

of the Princess, who, in the morning, ordered herself to be magnificently


“98 THE ENCHANTED - HORSE.

arrayed, and was not satisfied till her mirror told her there
was nothing more to be desired. She then sent a lady to
inform the Prince of Persia that she was ready
F to receive him. Prince Firoux Schah obeyed her
(2% summons, and seating himself on a sofa by her
RS) side, related to her ne circumstances of his arrival.
: When he had finished, the Princess |
informed him that she was the daughter
‘of the King of Bengal, who was at present absent
' from his palace. She begged that Prince Firoux
| Schah would remain as Hee guest till her father’s
| return, in order to pay his SesDOee to him. The
\ Prince readily assented to this, for he had fallen
= in loye with the beautiful and amiable Princess ;
== indeed, it was not long before he declared his
- passion, and finding that she was not unwilling
to accept him, he “imtesisel her to return with bin
to the court e his father, who, he assured. her, would
delight to welcome her as his wife.

Ser long persuasion, she consented to do so. They mounted the’
enchanted steed together, and in about two hours and a half arrived in
the capital of Persia. Prince Firoux, on alighting, conducted ‘the
Princess of Bengal to a magnificent ee eee He requested her to
wait, whilst he went to infor m his father of her arrival.

"The King was overjoyed at the return of his son, and -when he heard
of the presence of the Princess, and of the Prince’s eee for her, exclaimed
that he would himself hasten to receive her, and that the marriage should
take place that very day. He then gave orders for the release of the
Indian, whose horse was to be restored to him. Whilst the King prepared
to accompany his son into the presence of the Princess, the Indian hastened
to possess himself of his steed, and hearing from the grooms all that had
occurred, resolved to avenge himself for the wrongs he had suffered; he
therefore presented himself in the apartment where the Prince had left his
intended bride, and informed her that he had been sent by the King to ¢on-
duct her on the enchanted horse to the square before the palace, where he
and his court awaited her. She easily consented to do this, and mounting

4














THE ENCHANTED HORSE, 29

with her he turned the peg, and ascended into the air so swiftly that they
-were instantly out of sight. Nothing could exceed the anger of the King,
but the grief of Prince Firoux cannot be described. After indulging it for
a time, he resolved to set out in search of the Princess, and not to return
till he had found her. The Indian meanwhile directed his course towards
Cashmere, and descending with the Princess in a wood, proceeded to
ill-treat her; but her cries attracted the attention of the Sultan of Cash-
mere, who was hunting close by, and who came to her assistance, and
destroyed the Indian by cutting off his head. fm

The Princess was not, however, much the gainer by this, for the
Sultan fell in love with, and determined to marry her ; and notwithstand-
ing her refusal, on their arrival at his palace, he ordered his intention to
be announced in his capital with rejoicings. The Sultan provided the
Princess with magnificent apartments, a retinue of ladies, and did every-
thing he could think of to please and amuse her, but she was so afflicted
by the situation in which she found herself that she became ill. Day by
day her malady grew worse, and the marriage could not take place. The
Princess showed every,symptom of insanity, and none of the physicians
who were brought to her were able to effect a cure.

‘In the interval Prince Firoux, disguised as a dervise, had
reached & Cashmere in search of her, and hearing the cireum-
stances, was assured that he was at last near the object
of his affections. He hastened to present
himself to the Sultan as a physician,
and in this character was
introduced into the Prin-
cess’s apartments in the
hope that he could cure
her. Having whispered to
: her who he was, he
—=<=- yapidly matured — his
plans for her escape.

He then informed the
Sultan that she had con-
tracted something of en-
chantment from the horse,








30 THE ENCHANTED HORSE.

and that if allowed to perform the cure in his own manner, she would
be perfectly well in a few minutes.

The Prince then requested that the enchanted horse should
be brought to him in the middle of the great
square. This being done, he conducted the Prin-
cess thither, and mounted her care-
fully; he then placed round the
horse some little vessels full of
fire, so that it was enveloped
in smoke, and pretending to
pronounce some magic words,
leapt on to the horse under
cover of the smoke. Touching
the peg, the steed instantly
ascended into the air,
and bore them in a few
minutes out of sight. Hay-
ing by this stratagem
delivered the Princess
of Bengal, the Prince
of Persia soon after-
wards alighted with
her before the King’s
palace, and the mavr-
riage between them
was immediately cele-
brated with great
pomp and magnifi-
cence.



















Dinarzad& aid not fail to remind her sister, on the conclusion of this
story, that she had promised one of still greater attraction for the
following morning—and the Sultan rel himself anxious to ne
the history of ‘“ The Paling Bird.”




hey HERE was once a Prince of Persia, named .
by GY ye Khosroushah, who used to amuse himself by
Wi going out into the city in the night in disguise,
with an attendant, also disguised. Iam going
to tell you of an adventure that happened to
him the very first night on which he did go, -
_ after he ascended to the throne of the Sultan,
his father.
Accompanied by his grand vizier, disguised
like himself, he started one evening two hours
after dark, and strolled
Sa - into a quarter of the
city where only common people lived.
Passing a house in one of the streets,
he heard voices talking very loud, and
peeping in at a half open door, beheld three sisters seated on a
sofa. He soon discovered that they were talking of their wishes for
themselves.

“Talking of wishes,” said the eldest, “mine is to marry the Sultan’s
baker. I should then have as much of that delicious white bread, called
‘The Sultan’s bread,’ as I could eat.”

‘“And mine,” said the second sister, “is to marry the Sultan’s cook.
I could then eat of such excellent dishes, and, of course, the bread would
be included. So, you see, my taste is as good as yours.”











32 THE TALKING BIRD.

The youngest, who was extremely beautiful, and much more
sprightly than the others, spoke laughingly. ‘For my part I take
a higher flight, and should like to marry the Sultan himself, and
have a son whose hair should be gold on one side, and silver on
the other.”

The wishes of the three sisters appeared to the Sultan so singular
that he resolved to gratify them, and desired his vizier to take particular
note of the house, that he might come the next day and bring the three
sisters before him.

When they. arrived. the Sultan asked them if they remembered
their wishes of the evening before, and whether they really meant
what they said. The three sisters were frightened and abashed, and as
the youngest cast down her eyes and blushed in confusion, she looked
so beautiful that the Sultan was more than ever determined to marry her.
He told them not to be alarmed. He had only ee
asked because he intended to grant all their ==

wishes, and sending for his baker and ay iN
cook, he had all three marriages cele. “Se /
brated at once. The two elder sisters yf;

were filled with envy and_ jealousy
at the better fortune of the youngest,
and concerted together by what ©
means they could destroy her
happiness. ‘This was not easy, NEY
but at last they hit upon \
a plan, and pretending great
affection for her, they
got her to promise,
with the Sultan’s
permission, that
should she have
any children they ane
should be chosen =
as nurses. By and
by a beautiful little son was born, but the sisters took him
away, and “showed a dead dog to the Sultan instead, telling him








Z

HMO OHNE

N
3
e




















THE TALKING BIRD, 38

it was his child; whilst the little Prince they put into a basket and
dropped into a canal which ran past the window. Here it was speedily
found by the Superintendent of the Royal Gardens, who, seeing what

a lovely child it was, guessed at the truth, and resolving to adopt and

bring it up as his own, took it home to nis wife, who joyfully fell in
with his wishes.

By and by another son was born to the Sultana, and the wicked
sisters acted in the same way as before—this time showing the Sultan
a dead cat. The second Prince was also found and adopted by the
Superintendent of the Gardens, who, when a little Princess followed,
became quite certain of the identity of the three beautiful children who
lived in his house, and were brought up by him as his own. When the
wicked sisters showed a piece of wood to the Sultan after the birth of the
third child, he was so angry and disappointed that he no longer loved
the Sultana, and resolved on her death, but his grand vizier and officers,
who adored the gentle and beautiful Queen, persuaded him to grant her
life ; so he had her shut up for life in a large cage, which was placed by
the gate of the church. One window of this cage was to remain always
- open, and every Mussulman who went into the church

was ordered to spit in her face on pain of sharing
her punishment. This cruel decree was executed to
the great satisfaction of the jealous sisters, who
congratulated themselves on the success

Uk of their plans. Meanwhile the young
Princes and the Princess, to whom the









Mi
“ig



names of Bahman, Perviz, and
EF | ’Parazadt, after some of the
ancient Kings and Queens of
© Persia, grew up handsome, ami-
able, and accomplished. They
“had the best masters that could
_ be procured, and the good Super-
intendent, after the death of
his wife, built for them a
most beautiful residence in the

Superintendent had given the-

'


34 THE TALKING BIRD.

midst of an extensive park, which he furnished most
elegantly, and supplied with everything he could
think of to give them pleasure.

Bie —— Soon after they had moved. there,
j however, he died so suddenly, that

| he had no opportunity of telling

i Us them, as he had intended, the true
| circumstances of their pr -The
,, Princes and Princess mourned for
“him as a father, and perfectly
satisfied with their beautiful home
af ond the companion-
( i _ ship of each
7 ~— other, continued
cto reside there,
as retired as sey, had
always done. :
One day, when the
Princes were out hunting, leaving their .
sister at home alone, an old Mussulman devotee came to the gate, and
begged to be allowed to enter and repeat her prayers in the oratory, as
there was not time to reach the church. Princess Parazadé admitted
her, and when she had finished her prayers showed her over the house
and gardens, which, on taking leave, she assured the Princess only
wanted three things to be perfect. After much persuasion she consented —
to tell what these things were (which were all in one place on the con-
fines of the kingdom). ‘ They are,” she said, ‘the talking bird, the
singing tree, and the golden water. You have but to follow the road
which passes here, for twenty days, and then the first person you meet

will point them out to you.”

The Princess was plunged into such affliction at the impossibility of
procuring these things on which she immediately-set her heart, that her
brothers were anxious to know what ailed her. After much pressing,
she told them. They loved her very dearly, and they had never
thought anything they could do to please her a trouble, so Prince
Bahman instantly resolved on setting out to procure these things.







THE TALKING BIRD, 35 -

“Only tell me the road I am to go,” said he, ‘and I will start to-
morrow.” |
Very early next morning Bahman was ready to set out, and while
embracing his sister, gave her a knife. “As long as you see the blade -
bright and clear, as it is now,” he said, ‘I shall be alive and well, but
if you see blood drop from it you will know that I am dead.” He
then mounted his horse and rode away. On the twentieth day of his
journey he found a hideous old dervise by the wayside, whom he
accosted, but so long were the moustache and beard of the old man
that he could not understand the mumbled words spoken in answer,
until he had removed some of the hair with his scissors. He then
explained again what he wanted. At first the old man was unwilling
to reply, but yielding to persuasion, informed the Prince he would
encounter great danger in obtaining what he desired. ‘‘ But take this
bowl,” he said, ‘throw it before your horse, and follow it till you come
to the foot of the mountain. You will hear voices calling to and
abusing you, but if you look back you will be changed into a black
stone. If you overcome the dangers and reach the top of the mountain,
you will find what you seek. Take the cage of the talking bird first,
‘and it will inform you as to the rest.”
Prince Bahman proceeded on his way, but unfortunately forgot the
injunction of the old man not to look behind, for he did so, and he and
his horse instantly became black stones. At the same minute Princess
Parazadt, looking at the knife given her by her brother, saw blood ”
dropping from it, and knew that he had failed, and lost his life in the
enterprise. Prince Perviz then became obstinately determined to go
also, in spite of the entreaties of his sister to remain with her; and’
started next morning in the same direction, first placing in hig sister’s
hand a chaplet of pearls. ‘Tell this over every day,” said he, “and
’ if ever you happen to find the pearls set fast, so that you cannot
h move them, you will know I also am dead.”
| All happened to Prince “Perviz exactly the same as to his
brother. On the twentieth day the Princess, telling over
her chaplet, found the pearls set fast, and knew that
this brother also was no more. In her affliction she
conceived the idea of going herself, and next morn-




Cu,
36 THE TALKING BIRD.



ing, disguising herself as a youth, she mounted her horse, and taking the
same road that her brothers had done,reached the spot where the dervise sat
on the twentieth day. After speaking with him, she cunningly placed
cotton in her ears, so that she might not hear the voices, and by this means
reached the talking birdin safety. ‘Then taking the cotton from her ears,
she enquired of the bird how to find the singing tree, and afterwards the
golden water. Whenshe had procured both, the bird informed her that if
she sprinkled the black stones she passed as she went down the mountain-
side with a few drops of golden water, she would discover and disenchant
her brothers. This she did, and instantly Prince Bahman and Prince Perviz,
and their horses, appeared before her. They joyfully: embraced each other,
and the Princess showed them that she had obtained the objects of her de-
sires. They then set out on their return home, Prince Bahman carrying the
branch of the singing tree, and Prince Perviz the pitcher of golden water,
whilst the Princess herself carried the cage containing the talking bird.
When they arrived at home the latter was placed in the garden,
where it attracted crowds of other birds ; the branch was planted close to the
house, and quickly grew into a tree, the leaves of which sang in the sweetest
harmony; and the golden water, on being poured into a marble basin,
THE TALKING BIRD. ; 37

rose into.a fountain twenty feet high, and fell back without overflowing
the rim of the basin.

A few days after their return, the Princes went out hunting, and met
the Sultan before they had time to get out of his way. Struck by
their faces and manner, he enquired who they were, and on being
told, invited them to join him in hunting. This they did, and were not

only very successful in sport, but the Sultan became
- so much interested in their intelligent conversation
that he wished them to return with him. They ex-
cused themselves, saying they had an only,
and very dear sister at home, and could
do nothing without consulting her.

“Do so,” said the Sultan, “and
come and hunt with me again soe; and
tell me what she says.”

The brothers, however, forgot to tell their
sister, both on this day sul rl succeeding
ones, in spite of the reminders and increasing











Z | persistence of the Sultan. At last they remem-
yee ~ bered, and did as he desired.
4 ae «“ Let us consult the bird,” said the
Princess.

= —— Fey When it was brought, she explained
to it the Sultan’s wishes.
‘- Let them go,” said the Dine ‘‘and not only this, but invite the
Sultan to your home in return.”

After having visited the Sultan at the palace, Prince Bahman
proffered to him a respectful request that he would do them the honour
to visit them and be introduced to their sister. The Sultan not only
accepted the invitation, but expressed much pleasure at the idea, and
the brothers retired to prepare for his visit.

The Princess determined on consulting the talking bird as to what
dishes the Sultan preferred. ;

“You have good cooks,” replied the bird. ‘“ Let them do their
best, but, above all things, place before the Sultan a dish of cucumbers,
with pearl sauce.” .
38 THE TALKING BIRD. |

e

The Princess exclaimed in astonishment at the idea of such a dish,
and objected that she had not the pearls to furnish the sauce.

“For that matter,” answered the bird, “you have but to turn up
the earth at the foot of the first tree you come to in your park, and you
will find more than you will want.”

The Princess did as she was told, and obtained a ‘small gold be full
of pearls, which she exhibited to her brothers, and they decided it would
be wise to act exactly as the bird had told them.

When the Sultan arrived, to occupy the time before dinner, the
Princess took him into the paeden and called his attention to the talking
bird, the singing tree, and the golden water. He was so amazed at these
wonders that he could scarcely tear his attention away from them.

The talking bird was placed in the window of the dining saloon
that he might further observe it. As the repast proceeded, the Sultan
drew the dish of cucumbers towards him,
intending to partake of it, and was
astonished to find it dressed with pearls.

elt yous Majesty thinks it so very
surprising,” suddenly remarked the bird,
“how could you so readily credit
your children being born in the form
of a dog, a cat, and a piece of
wood ?”

‘Because the attendant
women told me so,” said the
Sultan. G

‘¢ Those women
were the Sultana’s
sisters,” replied
the bird, ‘who
were jealous of
the honours she
enjoyed, and who
imposed upon
you. They will
confess it if you















ee


THE TALKING BIRD. 39 _

question thant and in these three young people you behold your real
children, who were found and rescued by the Superintendent of the :
Gardens.” . :

This speech enlightened the Sultan as to the whole scheme.

‘Ag for these children,” he said, ‘‘ the strong affection and at-
traction : have felt towards them convinces me of the truth of what
you say.”

Tenderly embracing all three, he mounted his Hane. i
and rode away to put the question to the sisters of the j
Sultana, who, on the torture being applied, £ &
confessed the truth, and were executed. s

He then let the Sultana out of her
prison with his own hand, and em-
bracing her, begged for her forgiveness 5
with tears in his eyes, and when she
had been bathed and dressed
with her former magnificence, .
he introduced the Princes and
Princess to her, telling her :
they were her own children,
and the manner in which
he, and she also, had been
imposed upon by her wicked
sisters.

Prince Bahman,
Prince Perviz, and Prin-
cess Parazadé were then
conducted to the palace,
followed by the re-
joicings of the people. |

And in this mag- |
nificent and joyful man-
ner ends their history
and that of the talking bird.
















i
40 THE TALKING BIRD.

’

The Sultan expressed so much pleasure at the recital of ‘‘ The
Talking Bird” that Scheherazadé informed him that she had another
for the following morning, which was even more wonderful. 5




Res

or

=



THE STORY OF BEDER, PRINCE OF PERSIA.
STK oF Havre

or THE Al RAB LAN Kuiexy :

pee was the only son of Emir Ben-Hilac-Salamis, of Arabia, and :
of Amirala his wife. He wasa child of extraordinary beauty and -
abilities, of whom it was foretold that he would be glorious and successful
in life, but that he must first pass through great dangers. His-father -
and inother therefore determined that his education should be such as
best to strengthen him, in body and mind, to endure any hardships
which might befall him; thus, before he was seven years of age, he
could ride the most unmanageable horses, and excelled all his companions
in strength and activity. Ifakis, the wisest philosopher of the time, —
was engaged as tutor to the young Prince, and when he died, in a few
years’ time, Habib knew everything that even a man of such attainments
as Ilfakis could teach him. is
While Habib was still grieving over the loss of his tutor, a stranger--
knight, of great strength and military accomplishments, arrived at the
camp, and after numerous satisfactory trials of his prowess and dexterity
in knightly and soldierly science, Emir Salamis determined to place his
son in his care. I] Haboul, as the stranger-knight was called, joyfully
accepted the charge, and with the happiest results. The young Sultan
STORY OF HABIB, OR THE ARABIAN KNIGHT, 43

soon distinguished himself by prodigies of valour, and astonished. his
father’s peaeilen by his wisdom and clear-sightedness.

When I] Haboul had finished the education of Habib, he was alled
away into another country; but before his departure he confided to his
pupil the secret of the existence of a beautiful and unfortunate Princess,
named Dorothil-goase, whose destiny was linked with his own, for the
stars had foretold that it was only by an Arabian Prince that she could
be rescued from the persecutions of the genii of the race of Ebhis, i in
whose power she was.

“This Princess is the daughter of a powerful king, named Schal-
goase, and of Camarilzaman, his wife, and you yourself, my dear
Habib,” continued I] Haboul, ‘‘are the Prince whom fate has destined,
after an alarming series of dangers, to rescue this Princess, and unite her
fortunes with your own. You must, however, have patience till some
‘event shall direct you how to act. ” Pentenly embracing his- pupil,
Il Haboul rode away.

One day, as Habib was.musing in a rustic abode which he had built

for himself in a charming vale outside his father’s camp, he heard a
sudden noise in the air, and perceived:a large grey bird approaching,
bearing upon its back a pavilion, of gauze, the doors and windows of
which were wreathed about with flowers. The bird alighted, and a
golden staircase was let down from the door of the pavilion, at which
a most lovely young lady, surrounded with attendants of remarkable
beauty, appeared. Leaning on the arm of one of them, she descended
the stairs, and came ‘punk the Sultan’s retreat. Hai arose and’
cast himself at her feet, when, gazing upon a picture which she wore,
and then on him, she said :—

“Tt is indeed my hero, the young Habib, whom I, Dorothil-goase,
am thus happy enough to find.” :

While they were embracing each other, a genie in human form
appeared, and saluting the young queen, informed her that the rebel
Abarakaff had een advantage of her absence to attack the only
island which remained to her of her kingdom, and that the rebel genii
had joined him,

‘“* Return immediately, ” he cried, ‘‘ and oppose them, lest the way be
blocked by dangers, and the enemy feat ” With another embrace the
44 STORY OF HABIB, OR THE ARABIAN KNIGHT.

lovers parted, the Princess returning to her pavilion, borne by the roc,
and Habib to his father’s tent, to inform him of his resolve immediately _
to proceed to Mount Caucasus to the assistance of Dorothil-goase.

With twenty men of tried prudence and courage, Habib hastened to
set forth on his journey, the dangers of which were rendered light to
him by the love that inspired his enterprise; but as they proceeded -
difficulties and deprivations grew day by day, and his attendants became
weary and disheartened. They therefore conspired to leave Habib whilst.
he slept, and return home. This they did, and told the Emir Salamis
that his son had been killed in the desert by the bite-of a serpent.

Salamis believed them, and while he and the whole kingdom were
mourning for the loss of the Prince, Habib, having discovered the
treachery of his soldiers, proceeded alone on his journey, which he still
determined to accomplish. Having encountered successfully unheard-of
difficulties and dangers, his strength, though not his courage, was one day
beginning to fail, when a monstrous bird, which he perceived to be a roe,

alighted close to him, and
bowed its head. Habib saw.
that a damask cushion was
suspended to its feet by
cords, catching hold of which
he seated himself on the
cushion, when the bird in-
stantly arose and carried him
through the air to MountCau- ~
casus, where he was, to his
extreme joy, received by no
less a person than I] Haboul
himself, who conducted -his
pupil to a place where he
might refresh himself and re-
gain his exhausted strength,
andinthemeantimeinformed
him what further was to be
done in order to accomplish
the object of his journey. ~






































STORY OF HABIB, OR THE ARABIAN KNIGHT. 45

“You are
theavenger of
_ is through the






















called by destiny, my dear Habib,” said he, “to be
(Queen Dorothil-goase. The only way to her dominions
| gi. centre of the earth and through forty
brazen gates, guarded by malevolent genii
of great strength and courage, and
through the rooms in which Solomon’s
treasure is deposited. Five hundred
knights have already tried to penetrate
these, but have all failed through
having neglected the precautions which
Twill tell you of.

‘ Before the first gate you will see
a golden key on the ground. Pick.
it up, and open the gate, taking
care to close it behind you so
gently that it will not make any
noise. In the first hall you will
see a gigantic black, who will
raise over your head an enormous
scimitar. You must repeat
aloud the talismanic charac-
ters written on the blade, and

then take it from the slave.

It is the scimitar of Solo-
mon, and you must take
_the keys also. When. you
have opened the fortieth
door, you will see before you the first of the seas you must pass in order
to reach Dorothil-goase, and you will also find means of proceeding; but
I warn you not to forget a single point of you instructions ; especialy
remember to close each door softly behind you.’

Habib did so, and proceeded in safety until he came to the fortieth
door. Here, in fe delight at seeing the sea in front of him, he let the
door clang to with a great noise, and instantly a violent storm arose ;
evil spirits assailed him, and he must have been destroyed had he not
remembered to draw his mysterious scimitar, and in the mighty name

ea
46 STORY OF HABIB, OR THE ARABIAN KNIGHT.

inscribed on the blade, commanded the powers of

the air and water to return to their wonted order.

Instantly there was a calm, and,

wearied with his exertions,

_ Habib fell asleep, and -
on awakening found
that three fair daugh-

ters of the sea had

been guarding his slumbers, who gave him news of Dorothil-

1 goase. Peek

“She is still persecuted by the monster Racachick,” they

told him, ‘‘and by the tyrant Abarakaff. The former, when on

land, can assume a purely human form, but he has a shark’s
head, and his body is covered with scales; he rides a sea
horse, and carries the rib of a whale by way of a scimitar.

My sisters and I have provided a raft on which to carry
you to the White Isle where he dwells.” ee

Eight dolphins were yoked to the raft on which

Habib embarked, and the three sisters swam by its side,

till, having reached the White Isle, and despatched this -

monster with his magic scimitar, he arrived near the

Green Isle, the residence of the enchanter, Nizabic, whom he

intended to attack next, where he found the raft entangled

inanet. His first thought was to place the three daughters
of the sea upon the raft in safety, whilst he destroyed
this net. Nizabic then approached to attack him when
he should land, but Habib smote him such a blow with
his scimitar, that the magician retired half dead into his
castle, which, by his arts, he caused to fall down, thus
hoping to crush the Sultan as well as himself in its ruins.

Habib, however, fell into a sort of pit of rocks, and was
unhurt, and Ilzaide, one of the three sisters, let down
her long hair into the pit, and begged him to climb
up by it. This he easily did, and they proceeded on
their voyage until they came to the Island of Mendinaz
Ill-ballor, the residence of Dorothil-goase herself, where —










STORY OF HABIB, OR THE SAS tN aeaT iG 47

Habib entreated Ilzaide to precede him and announce his arrival to
the queen. —

This was soon done, and Dorothil-goase was yet indulging in
transports of joy at the presence of her Arabian knight, when news was
brought that Abarakaff, the last remaining of her persecutors, was
approaching to attack them, and Habib was forced to arm himself for
battle once more, and slay this monster also; then at last he was able
to enjoy the reward of his valour, and to. restore to the beautiful
queen her dominions free from the presence of the tyrant usurpers who
had so long poisoned her peace.


48 STORY OF HABIB, OR THE ARABIAN KNIGHT.

After afew days of happiness passed together, Habib set out on a
visit to the tents of his father, accompanied by Dorothil-goase, and pre-
sented her to Salamis and Amirala as his bride. They were transported
with joy at his return. After welcoming the queen as their daughter-

in-law, they became eager to celebrate her marriage with their son,

which was performed with great magnificence. The happy pair then
returned to the kingdom of Dorothil-goase, over which Habib was
henceforth to reign with her as joint sovereign.

CONCLUSION.

Delighted with the wonderful memory and charming accomplish-
ment of the Sultana, her husband, at the conclusion of this history,
embraced her with affection, and assured her that he had by this time
forgotten his anger, and had no longer any desire for her death.

“You have entirely appeased my anger,” he said, “and I freely
revoke in your favour the cruel law I had Peed ear receive you
into my favour.”

The Sultana, for answer, threw herself at ie feet, and gave every
sign of heart-felt and lively gratitude. She then obtained permission to
be the bearer of the delightful intelligence to her father, the grand
"vizier, and it was immediately reported through the city and kingdom,
bringing down on the heads of Sultan Schahrian and the amiable Sultana
Scheherazadé, the praises and congratulations of all the people of the
empire of the Indies.




Father

og

ys OLDEN Gurr” sno
— Larti, hesson”