Citation
Ideal fairy tales

Material Information

Title:
Ideal fairy tales
Uniform Title:
Sleeping Beauty
Cinderella
Puss in Boots
Beauty and the beast
Added title page title:
Diamonds and toads
Creator:
Perrault, Charles, 1628-1703
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[56] p. : ill. (some col.) ; 32 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Love -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Magic -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Fairy tales ( lcshac )
Fairy tales -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1897 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
Children's stories
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026623152 ( ALEPH )
ALG3717 ( NOTIS )
07622184 ( OCLC )

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NCE upon a time there lived a King
and a Queen who loved each other

yery dearly, and who would have been

‘Wery happy, if it had not been for one
very happy |
“thing. This was that they had no children.

¥» When, at last, after long waiting, a little

fr
fyey

If

x —

daughter was born, their joy knew no
bounds. The King, to show his delight,
gave a christening feast-so grand that
nothing like it had ever been seen before.
He invited all the fairies
that could be found in the
land to stand as godmoth-
ers to the little Princess, in

order that each might






bestow upon her some

vty, gift, as was the
a ft i 1 1 y

| mi ashion with good

fairies. in those

\\
days. When they

\
\

ND) sat down to
Nw the table
é FAS there was
ZS set before

THE BABY PRINCESS.

each fairy





a magnificent cover, with a knife, fork,
and spoon, all of pure gold, studded with
diamonds and rubies.

But just as they had taken seats, there
came into the hall an old fairy who had
not been invited, because more than fifty
years before she had left the kingdom on
a journey, and had not since been heard
of until this day. The King, much troub-
led, ordered a cover to be placed for her,
but it was of common ware, because only
seven of the gold dishes had been made.
The old fairy thought she had been
slighted, and muttered some angry threats
between her teeth. ne of the young
fairies who sat by her overheard how she
grumbled, and fearing that she might give
the little Princess some evil gift, went and
hid herself behind the hangings, so that
she might speak last, and repair, as much
as she could, the harm which the old fairy
might do.

The six other good fairies now began
Tie

youngest gave for her gift that she

to offer their gifts to the Princess.










i

"yl



a

ARRIVAL OF, THE OLD FAIRY,

should be the most beautiful person in
the world; the text, that she should be
as sweet-tempered as an angel; the third,
that she should be wonderfully graceful ;
the fourth, that she should sing like a
nightingale; the fifth, that she should
dance like a flower in the wind; the sixth,
that she should be clever at learning and
very witty. ‘

Then the old fairy’s turn came. Shak-
ing her head spitefully, she walked to the
middle of the room, and stretching out
her hand, cried: “My gift to the Princess

is—that when she is fifteen years old, she

ij 2 t A yp AHN é;
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bie

MM
Cee iene

a

| shall pierce her. hand with a spindle,

and die of the wound.” ‘Then, turning,

she left the hall, and was seen no more.
Her terrible gift made every one

shudder, and the King and Queen and

all present began to cry and weep.

- Then the young fairy came out from

| behind the hangings, and said: “Do not

grieve, O King and Queen; your daugh-
ter shall not die of this disaster. It is true
J am not able to undo altogether what
my elder has done. |
Your daughter shall
indeed pierce her
hand with a spin-
dle; ‘but instead of
dying, sheshall only |
fall intoadeep sleep,
which shall
hundred years. At

last a







the end of that time,





the son of a king



Diced

eR NCLNET RIVET





SLEEPING BEAUTY =—



will find her, and awake her. ‘They will fall in love \j
NI

\ ith ie
Ne, A iy







with each other, and he will marry her.

To save the Princess, if possible, from the misfor-
tune invoked by the old fairy, the King gave a com-
mand forbidding his subjects, under pain of death, to
spin with a spindle, or even so much as to have one
in any of their houses.

As the Princess grew up, all the wishes of the good
fairies were fulfilled; she was beautiful, wise, and





good, and every one loved her dearly. |
One day, when she was just fifteen years of age,

a desire seized her to explore the palace, and she \

wandered about from room to room, until finally she

reached the top of the tallest tower. There, in a little

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chamber, she found a very old woman—so old and Ly ;
deaf that she had never even heard of the King’s i) y
command— A |





Ue al dW

spinning

\

busily
with a oe
spindle. BEHIND THE HANGINGS.

The Princess; never having seen
anything of the sort before, was very

much interested, and asked the old






Ai woman what she was doing.
|

Tai
| / ,
il \




“eT am spinning, my pretty child,”



“How amusing!” said the Prin-
cess. “Let me try if I can spin too.”
Scarcely had she touched the spin-
dle, when the wicked wish was fulfilled
—the point pierced her finger, and

‘© ALL PRESENT BEGAN TO WEEP AND CRY,” she fell as if dead. The poor fright-



—#SLEEPING BEAUTY se—





THE DWARF WITH THE SEVEN-LEAGUE BOUTS.

ened old woman called for help, and
people came and tried every means to
restore the Princess, but they could not
bring her to. When the King and
Queen beheld her thus, they knew that
regret was vain. They caused her to
be carried into the finest apartment in
the palace, and placed upon a magnifi-
cent bed. There she lay looking like a
sleeping angel.

The good fairy who had saved her life
was in the kingdom of Matakin, twelve
thousand leagues away, when this accident
befell the Princess, but she was instantly
informed of it by a little dwarf, who had
seven-league boots, that is, boots with

which he could step over seven leagues



of ground at one stride. The fairy started
at once, in a chariot drawn by dragons,
and in less than an hour she had arrived
at the palace.

She approved of every thing the King
and Queen haddone. As she had great
foresight, she thought that it would be
sad for the Princess, when she awoke, to
find herself alone among strangers, so she
touched with her wand everybody in the
palace except the King and Queen—
ladies-of-honor, waiting-maids, gentle-
men, officers, guards, footmen, cooks, and
scullions. She likewise touched all the
animals about the place, the horses, the
watch-dog, and even the cat and her
kittens. They all fell asleep, that they
might awake with their mistress, and be
ready to wait upon her.



THE DRAGON CHARIOT.













THE FAIRY USES HER WAND.

And now the King and Queen, having
kissed their dear child tenderly, went
sadly forth from the palace, and gave a
command that no one should go near it.
This, however, was not needed; for in
less than an hour there grew up around
it, a wood so thick and thorny that
neither man nor beast could pass through.
Above this, nothing could be seen but





the very tops of the towers, and that only
at a good way off #

When a hundred years were past, the
son of a king then reigning, who was
of a different family from the Princess,
being out hunting in that part of the
country, asked what tower it was which
he saw in’ the middle of a great thick
wood. No one could. give him a sat-
isfactory answer, for the story of the
Princess had been almost completely for-
gotten. At last an old peasant was found
who remembered hearing his grandfather
say to his father that in this palace was
a Princess, the. most beautiful that was
ever seen, who was doomed to sleep for a
hundred years, when she would be awak-

RN







ened by a king’s son.
The young Prince
was all on fire at these
. words, believing that
he could put an end
to this mystery, and
he made up ins
mind to push his



way through the
mut tlie

~~. _ first advance the

wood.







trees and bram-
ap—— bles gave way of
their own accord
and let him pass.

A SLEEPING COOK.

He went up to.







;
‘
Y

THE PRINCE AND THE OLD’ PEASANT.

the palace, which he saw at the end of a
laroe avenue, and entered it; “Tle was
surprised to find that none of his atten-
dants could follow him, for the branches
closed together again as soon as he passed
through.

However, he went on boldly. He came
first Into an outer court, and what he saw
there was enough to daunt the stoutest

heart. Bodies of men, horses, dogs, cats,



XY ‘ there, standing, sitting,
f°. and lying in the atti-
YS

Wy, asmotionlessas if they

were dead, while over

i tudes of life, and yet |
| |

almost more than human, lay sleeping



and otheranimalswere | furnished chamber,

all reigned a most death-like silence. But
on looking closely, the Prince saw that
the men had not the pale faces of the



dead, but looked, indeed, quite rosy, while
beside them were goblets half filled with



wine, showing that they had gone to
sleep suddenly while drinking. _

The Prince then crossed the court, and
going up a short flight of stairs, came into
the guard-room, where the guards were
standing on duty, but. fast asleep and
Atter that,
several rooms full: of

snoring. he went through
ladies and gentlemen

whowere asleep, some
standing and some

Finally, the
astonished Prince

sitting.

came into a richly



~ where was the fairest

A SLEEPING GUARD.

sight he had ever beheld.
A young girl, whose beauty scemed

gently, as if she had only just closed her









‘DIASMONDS#é|OADSa



eyes. Trembling, the Prince approached.

And now, the enchantment being ended, —

“the Princess opened her eyes, and look-
ing at him kindly, said: “Is it you, my
Prince? I have waited for you a long
Ele

Hand in hand the Prince and Princess
walked out of the chamber. They found
the ladies and gentlemen of the court

awake, and staring one at another with
startied eyes, while throughout the palace

all the inmates had begun to busy them-

| wedding in the palace.

selves about what they had been doing
when they fell asleep. i
Not long afterwards, there was a grand
The young
Prince and Princess were married, and
lived happily to the end of their days.





NCE upon atime there was a widow,
who hada daughter that was just

like herself in looks, and also in temper,
which is the same as saying that she was
so proud and disagreeable that no one
could like her. Another young girl lived
with them, a daughter of the widow's dead
husband by a previous marriage. She
was a good, sweet girl, and very pretty;
but was disliked and abused by both her
step-mother and step-sister. The mother
never spoke a kind word to the poor

child, and made her do all the hard work |

of the house, and take her meals by her-
self in the kitchen. But Rose (this was
the step-daughter’s name) remained gentle
and sweet-tempered, and bore her hard
fate with patience.

Among other things, she had to go

‘DIAMONDSé[OADS@







twice a day to draw water from a well

which was fully half a










mile from the house,
and bring home a
great pitcher full of it.
One day, while
she was at the
well, a, very,
poorly-dressed ff
old woman &
came along
and begged of
her to let her have a
drink from her pitcher.

“Why, yes, with all | { i / ,

——







my heart, good moth-/ |
er,” this kind
girl, and she rinsed
her pitcher, and then

said

ROSE.



4DIAMONDS4[OADS&








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drew some fresh water from the well, and
held the pitcher up for the old woman,
that she might drink with ease.

When she had finished drinking, the
old woman said to Rose: “ You are so
good and kind, my dear, and your face
pleases me so well, that I will bestowa
gift upon you.” In reality, the old woman
was a fairy, who had taken this form to
test Rose's kindness. “ My gift,” she now



went on, “1s that at every word you speak,
adiamond or a pearl shall drop from your
lips.” She then disappeared from view.

When Rose reached home, her step-
mother scolded her crossly for having been
so long away. The poor girl replied
meekly, “I am very sorry, mother.” As
she spoke these words, there fell from her
lips, for each of them, either a diamond
or a pearl.

“Why, what does this mean?” cried
the mother, bewildered. “Diamonds and
pearls! where did they come from?”

“From my lips!” said Rose, and she
then told her mother what had happened,
a perfect shower of sparkling stones
falling from her lips as she did so. The
mother gathered them up greedily, and
spoke to Rose more kindly than she had
ever done in her life before. But pres-
ently she grew jealous that the poor step-
child should be gifted more highly than
her own daughter, and she said: “ Fanny
must go to the well too. No doubt the
old woman will give her something finer
still.” |

She called her daughter, and said:
“Look, Panny, what has come from
Roses mouth. Would you not like to
You

have only to go and draw some water

have the same gift given to you.

from the well, and if a poor woman asks

you for a drink, to give it to her civilly.”





ROSE AND THE OLD WOMAN AT THE WELL.










“WHY! WHAT DOKS THIS MEAN?’ SAID THE MOTHER, BEWILDERED.”

yourself if you want any!” '

“It would be a fine sight, really, to see
me go and draw water,” said the ill-bred
“Indeed, I shall do noth-

ing of the sort!”

girl, rudely.

“You shall go,” said her mother, “and
that instantly.” :

Fanny finally went, but wore a sulky
face, and grumbled to herself all the way.
Instead of the pitcher, she took the best
silver tankard.

She had no sooner reached the well,
than she saw coming from the wood
near by, a lady most splendidly dressed,
who drew near and asked her for a drink.

It was the same fairy that had spoken to



MIAMONDS€/OADS&

her sister, but she had now taken the ap-
pearance and dress of a Princess, to see

just how far this girl's rudeness and
ill-nature would go.

Fanny stupidly supposed
that as this was not the poor
woman whom her sister had
seen, she: had: nothing, to
gain by being polite, so, in

a proud, saucy manner, she
replied: “Dees your lady-
ship think I came here only
— to draw water ton you?
Perhaps you suppose the
silver tankard was brought
purely for your benefit.
Quite likely, isnt it You
will have to draw water for

“Those are your manners, are they 2”
“Well, I will be-
For

every word you speak, a'toad or a viper

said the fairy, cooly.

stow an appropriate gift upon you.

shall come out of your mouth.”

Vive fairy, then vanished, and Fanny,

angrier than ever, set out for home, with-

out filling her tankard.,

Fanny's: mother was waiting impa-
tiently for her return, and as soon as she
was within hearing, she called to her,
inquringly: ‘“ Well, daughter ?”

“Well, mother, answered the saucy
girl in her usual pert manner; and, lo!







as she spoke there fell from her mouth a
vipen and a toad.

“Oh, mercy!” cried her mother, “what
is this I see ?. Oh, this ts all that wretched
Rose's doing, she. shall pay for it!”

She seized a heavy stick and was just
about to give Rose a terrible beating,
when, suddenly, the fairy appeared be-
fore them in her own proper form, with
a brilliant star upon her forehead, and a
wand in her hand. “ Do not strike Rose,”
she said, in a manner so commanding
that the mother could not help obeying.
“Tt is your daughter's ill-temper, and not
Rose, that is to blame for what has _hap-
pened to her. I shall*take Rose away,
and place her with people who will treat
her kindly, and who will deserve better





DIAMONDS4[OADSxe

than you to be rewarded with the treas-
ures that fall from her lips. As for your
daughter, when she mends her temper
and her manners, so that only kind and
proper words come from her mouth, she
shall cease to let fall the toads and vipers.
For it is a truth which you should know
that cross, unkind, and spiteful words,
dropped from the lips, are really as bad
as toads and vipers, while gentle and
loving words are as precious as pearls |
or diamonds.”























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CINDERELLA,
i

NCE upon a time, a poor nobleman
married avery rich, but proud, and
bad-tempered lady. She was his second
wife, and had two grown-up daughters,
The
nobleman, too, had a daughter— the love-
She had been
brought up by her godmother, who, as
sometimes happened in those days, was

a Fairy.

of exactly her own disposition.

liest girl ever known.





_ The marriage was no sooner over, than
the stepmother began to be very harsh
and unkind towards this young girl, whose
gentle and loving disposition caused the
behavior of her own daughters to appear
even more detestable than before. They,
on their part, were so jealous of the poor
child that they did all they could to make
her life miserable and unhappy. They
teased and tormented her from morning
till night, and when she bore patiently
with them—for she was anxious to win
their love—they made fun of her, and
were more disagreeable than ever.

The poor child made no complaint to
her father, for she knew that it would only
add to his unhappiness and discomfort,
and that if he interfered 1t would only
make matters worse. It was not long
before he fell violently ill; medicines
would not save him; and he died so sud-
denly that the shock almost killed his
poor little daughter, who knew not how
she could live without him.

After her dear father’s death, the
haughty sisters were more unkind than

ever to the poor little oirl. They never



(CGINDERELLA.



invited her to share in their games or
their sports, or to join them in their walks
Their mother

One ames: encouraged

them im this sort of conduct, for she
seemed to bear the poor child a grudge
for being so much prettier than her own
daughters.

them that more than half of their ill- looks

It did not occur to. her or to

was owing to their ugly tempers.
no disgrace to be homely’; and pretty

manners will hide all. defects’ “of: face’ or
form, and enable us to win hosts of friends: |
The young girl, who should-have beeit,

treated: as)-a daughter and sister,

made to-do all the hard work

house.

the rooms, cooked the meals, and was as.

busy as a bee from morning till night.

When her work was done, she would
sit for warmth in a corner of thé chimney,
among the cinders
and to show how much they despised her,
the unkind sisters gave her the name of |
Cinderella..

She had to ‘sleep on a,hard, straw
bed ina garret, which was most meanly
furnished ; wh

a beautiful room, with feather beds and -

while her sisters had each

pillows, the softest and most luxurious
that money could buy ; and with look-
ing-glasses in which they could see

themselves from head to foot.

®

It iS a
















of the’
She made-the fires, carried the |

water, made the beds, swept and dusted |



- and, for this reason,.,

ale:

One day the sisters received an invita-
tion to a series of grand balls that were
to be given in honor of a Prince, who,
being the eldest son: of the King, would

soon have a right to the throne It was
a great honor to.be invited to the palace,

andthe note was eagerly read, and the
invitation pt omptly accepted by the proud
ee gave deeds es much







THE TWO HAUGHTY SISTERS.





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fe
re
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aa





CINDERELLA.



loftier airs than before; and it seemed as
if they would never cease discussing how
they should be dressed.

“shall wear my red velvet, with

co Well!”

said the other, “I shall put on my plain

Honiton lace,” said one sister.

silk; but then I -shall have my gold-
embroidered cloak, and _ pearl-and-dia-
mond coronet; and don't you think that
will look rather nice?”

‘This meant a great deal more work for
Cinderella. She had to do all the sew-
ing and ironing, to starch and plait the
ruffles, to run upon errands three or four
fimtesa day ; and she even offered to
dress their hair. This, in truth, was what
they were longing for, as she had such
excellent taste! but they were too proud
to own it openly.

In the midst of this preparation, one |

of thesisters said, “ How would you like
fo go: fo ance, pall, Cinderella
ing this was only said to annoy her, Cin-
derella merely answered, “Oh! they don't
want me. “No, 1) should thinks not
indeed,” said the other sister, tossing her

Know-

head, “I never heard of a Cinder-sifter
being at a ball.”
herspoil her hair ; but with all this unkind-
ness, she still seemed ready and willing
to please them.

So anxious were they to improve their
figures, at least twenty stay-laces were



It was enough to make



broken. They scarcely ate anything for

two whole days, and were admiring them-

selves continually in the looking-glass.
TA:

At last the great day came. When
the two sisters started, Cinderella kept
her eyes fixed on the carriage until it dis-
appeared, and then she went back to her
usual seat in the chimney-corner, and
began to weep.

Suddenly, her Fairy godmother stood











CINDERELLA BRINGING A PUMPKIN FROM THE GARDEN,



-2CINDERELLA-



by her side, and asked what was the

matter.

“=| shouldso muchthave——

And how they did squeal! Cinderella
took care that not one of them should

have liked”—sobbed the broken-hearted | escape, as she bore the trap in triumph to

girl, but she could
say no more.

“ Do you mean,



you would like to
go with your sisters?”

“Oh! yes, I should,” cried Cinderella.

“Well, well!” said her godmother,
“be a good girl, and you shall go.”

Cinderella soon dried her tears; and
when her godmother said, “ Fetch me a
pumpkin from the garden,” she ran and
got the largest she could find; but not
knowing that her godmother wasa Fairy,
she did not think this had much to do
with going to the ball.

The Fairy scooped it hollow, touched
it with her wand, and immediately
changed it into a magnificent carriage,
lined with satin and plush, fit for a Royal
Highness to ride in.

“That is good as far as it goes,” said
the Fairy; “ but it won't go far without
horses. Look in the mouse-trap, my
child, and see if there is anything in it.”

Ve

Cinderella ran quicklyto do her bid-
ding, and was delighted to find six
plump mice caught in the trap. There
they were, poking their little noses
through the bars and trying to get out.





her godmother. |

The Fairy told her to raise
the wire door that the
might Come out, onc by one.
As they did so, a
touch of the wand
transformed them

mice

into six handsome
horses, with arching necks, shining manes,
and long tails, and splendid harness all
plated with gold. It was enough to make
one’s eyes water just to look at them.

“Well, my child,” said the Fairy, “this

eof Hg i
vl ety Fs
eid

D















A RAT FOR A COACHMAN !







-=2CGINDERELLA=-







MH!
Hh
l}

en

CINDERELLA § COACH.

is a fine turn-out, truly. But there are
the finishing touches yet to be put on.
Go and see if there is a rat in the rat-
trap, |

Cinderella ran with all haste, and soon

returned bearing the trap, which had in
it a rat of the very best quality. As he |

sprang out of the trap, he was changed
into a coachman, and took his place on
the box as orderly as you please.

But, this: was not all. “Brine me six
lizards, said*the Bairy godmother. “ You
will find them behind the watering-pot
in the garden.” The lizards were brought,
and at once transformed into pages, whose
duty it was to run alongside or ahead of

the carriage, and announce its arrival.

These immediately sprang to their places, |

and stood as if awaiting further orders.

“There, Cinderella!”
godmother, gazing with pride upon the
equipage. “Could anything be finer
than that ? Jump in, and be off.”

exclaimed her

| led “heréand: there—— on her hands



Cinderella looked at hershabby clothes,
contrasting them with the splendor of the
eaite
godmother understood at once, and said,
“Oh, I see! You think that dress is hardly

fit to wear to a ball.

carriage, and shook her head sadly.

Well, we can easily
remedy that. My dressmaker is wonder-
fully skillful, and will fit you out in short
orders

Saying this, she touched Cinderella
with her wand, and immediately the old
clothes fell off the young girl, and she
stood arrayed in a beautiful dress that
shone like cloth of gold. Jewels spark-

aul



her throat—and on her waist: and to
crown ‘all, the Fairy brought a pair of
lovely glass slippers—that shone like
diamonds— for Cinderella to put on.



CINDERELLA CATCHING THE LIZARDS.



8G INDERBLLA=

WW

The godmother paused awhile to ad-
mire Cinderella in her new attire, and
then “she said, “1
to give you, mychild.
Be certain to leave
the ball-room before
twelve o'clock, for if
vou remain a mo-
that

time, your carriage

ment beyond

will become a pump-
kin, your coachman,
iia rat, your horses,
i\\| mice, and your pages,
M4 lizards. Your beau-
tiful dress, too, will

vanish away, leaving



| you inv the shabby,
—. clothes of a kitchen
drudge.”

in

Cinderella, a

THE COACHMAN,

flutter of excitement
and eager to be off, promised all her god-
mother wished, and away dashed the
ile
courtyard of the palace, the Prince was

Calniage, ; \Vben site "drove into
informed that a beautiful Princess, whom
nobody knew, had arrived; and, in order

to show her the greatest respect, he went

himself and handed her out of the car- |
riage, and led her into the ball-room. The |

_have but one charge

band stopped playing at once, and the
dancers stood still and gazed at her.

safe er

There was a long, still husl
Then a confused whisper all over the
| room:

bo. ere she comes 2) t

“Oh! how lovely!!!"

|
|
|



As soon as the band struck up again,
the Prince courteously asked if he might

have the pleasure of. dancing, with her.




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THE “SIX PAGES:

So. exquisitely’ graceful were Cinder-
ella’s movements, that after a few bars,

she and the Prince were the only couple



dancing, everybody else looking on.

»







-2CINDERELLA-



The King himself, old as he was, could
not turn away his eyes, and, over and
over again, he whispered to the Queen
that 1t was many a long day since they
had seen so beautiful and charming a
visitor at their court.

The ladies took every opportunity to
They

all intended to follow her example, if they

notice how her dress was made.

could but get artists skillful enough, and
Ab the

supper, which was most sumptuously

buy the same kind of material.

served, the young Prince had no appetite ;
but kept his eyes fixed tenderly on this
unknown visitor, who had taken a seat
by the side of her sisters, and was giving
them a share of all the delicacies which he

passed to her.

Ps . iM
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THE PRINCE FINDS THE SLIPPER.



When their merriment was at its
highest —

Vee
The clock struck a quarter of twelve.
Then Cinderella remembered the Fairy’s
warning and, making a courtesy to all the
company, immediately returned home.

After kissing her godmother, she asked
if she might go the next night, as the
Prince had decided to have another ball,
and particularly wished her to come.

Before she had finished telling the
Fairy all the events of the evening, the
two sisters knocked at the door, and Cin-
derella, whose beautiful clothes disap-
peared at that instant, let them in.

“Oh! how late you are!” she yawned,
rubbing her eyes, and stretching herself,
as though she had just woke up.

“xl! caid one oi the sisters, = you
would not have been so sleepy, if you

We have been talk-

ing, nearly the whole evening, to a most

had been with us.

lovely Princess.”

Cinderella could not help feeling
very much pleased secretly at hear-
ing this. She asked the name of

the Princess, but they could not say.
They only knew that the Prince was
greatly distressed at her leaving so

suddenly, and would give all the

-2

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Cinderella’s eyes a with joy.
“ How beautiful she must have been!”
she said, “and how very fortunate you
both were in being invited! If you were
to lend me one of your old, every-day
dresses, don't you think I could go and
See her?

Ont the dea:
“A kitchen wench like you!

the sisters screamed.
What
next will you think of ?”

The following night the two sisters
went again to the ball, and Cinderella's
godmother let her also go; but in a much
handsomer dress than before.

The Prince waited for her at the door,
at least three-quarters of an hour, and
when she arrived, he again led her into
the ball-room. He danced with her every
time, and kept by her side the whole
evening.

Cinderella was so happy, she entirely

SGINDERELLAS



and the
did not
think it was more than eleven, when the

| She
jumped up from her seat by the side of

ese her Panes warning,
time had passed so quickly, she

first stroke of midnight sounded.

the Prince, rushed across the room, and
flew down stairs. The Prince ran after

her; but was too late. The only trace

of her was a glass slipper, which had
fallen off inher flight. ‘The Prince picked
it up, and would not part with it.
Poor Cinderella got home frightened
and out of breath, with no carriage—no
horses—no coachman—no footmen—and

She had

none of her finery now, except the other



all her old clothes back again.

glass slipper.
VATE

The Prince made the strictest inqui-
ries, but could get no information from
the servants of the palace, or the soldiers
on guard. The only person that had
passed them, they said, was a poorly clad



‘“*HERALDS WERE SENT ALL THROUGH THE KINGDOM.”



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sINDERBELUAF

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girl, who certainly could
not have been at the ball.

When the sisters came
home, Cinderella asked
them if they had enjoyed
themselves as much as on
the first night, and if they
had again seen the Prin-

EAVES

“but just as the clock was

cess. they said ;
striking twelve, she left in
a great hurry, and one of _
her beautiful glass slippers:

fell off. The Prince picked: i ;

it up, and has been, looking
abit ane kissing it” ever:
since. Everybody says he
is madly in love with. her”
And so. he. was. . For
the next-day heralds were
sent all through the king-
dom, proclaiming that the

Prince would marry the lady who could

wear this slipper.

The rivalry among the ladies" “was very

“LADIES OF THE. COURT.

Be ofall’ the:

Princessesattied; then the

great.



Duchess’ and then the

“other ladies of the Gore ;

. ”..:.but. their féet. were much




aA too large.
a brought: ti

vebut. could not.’

‘The'slipper was



re two sisters,

and thoug oh they knew very
well that neither of them
was’ the ° beautiful ” Prin-
cess, they. tried h ard to get
their : clumsy feet into it,
“When they

‘were quite tired out with

trying, Gand lérella’ said, qui-
etly, “May: i see if it will
filme:

The: sistérsy: hart into

and

began. ‘to make snecring

shouts | of Jaughter,

aa but they* could

SS Hot prevertt her, since the
command was that « every young girl in

>the kingdom -‘sh ould” try on the slipper.

‘“THEIR FEET WERE MUCH TOO

LARGE.”

| Cinderella smilingly seated herself'in the





-8CINDERELLA®-



re they nearly fainted, when Cinderella put
her hand into her pocket, and brought
out the other slipper.
NTA
The moment both slippers were on,
the good Fairy appeared, and touching
Cinderella’s clothes with her wand, made



them more costly and dazzling than ever.
Then the two sisters recognized that the
despised Cinderella was the beautiful
Princess whom they had seen at the ball;
and throwing themselves on their knees,
asked her to forgive them the very many,
unkind things they had said and done
to her. She lifted them up, kissed them
affectionately, and said she only wanted











them to love her now. ‘The carriage, the

coachman, and the pages were all ready,

wy and Cinderella was at once taken to the
k y a ry]? .
a palace. The Prince thought her more

charming than ever, and insisted on



AT THE WEDDING,

_marrying her in a few days. Cinderella
chair; and the slipper, at the very first showed the goodness of her heart by
trial, went on her pretty little foot, and | bringing her sisters to the palace, and
fitted it like a glove. The two sisters shortly after they became the wives of

bit their lips in envy and vexation; and _ two rich gentlemen of the court











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TMHERE was once an old miller who
had three sons, and after his death

his property was divided among them.
The eldest son had the mill, and he soon
set the sails going round and round, and
the farmers and neighbors brought their —
corn and wheat to be ground, and money



came in very fast. So he was all right,
and had no cause to complain.

The second son did not fare so well,










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however, for he had nothing left him but
a donkey, and he was quite down-hearted

‘about it for a while, Ihen the thought

struck him that ®
he might join in
his elder
brother, and by

with

taking the grain
to and from the



mill might earn
enough to live on.
iis: tuned “out
to be a good plan, and he thought him-
self lucky in having such a faithful serv-
ant as the little donkey. So he was all
right, and had no cause to complain.

But the third son fared the worst of

all, for all that fell to his share was a cat,





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BEMOANING HIS FATE,

and that was about as good, he thought,
as nothing at all.

He sat down to think in what way he
could earn a living, and bemoaned his
fate with bitter sighs and tears.

“What shall I do?” he cried aloud.
“Tf I tall the cat and sell her skin, that
won't go far toward keeping me out of
the poor-house! Oh, how much worse
I am off than my brothers!”

The cat sat near his master and heard
every word he said; and when he paused
for a moment, Puss came forward, and
in a clear voice said: “Dear master, do

not be so cast down. If youll give me



a pair of boots and a game-bag you shall
have no cause for complaint.” The young
man did not understand how the cat
could be of any service to him, but as he
had always been a clever puss he thought
it best to humor him. |

So Puss was measured for a pair of
well-fitting boots, and as soon as they
came home he put them on, hung the
game-bag round his neck, and set off on
his adventures.

Through the woods and over the fields
he ran till he came near a rabbit warren,

when he crept more cautiously for fear

some of the bunnies might hear him, for

they have very sharp ears. He opened

the game-bag, into which. he had put

some bits of cabbage and fresh parsley,

and arranging the strings of the bag in
aclever way, waited patiently for a visit
from the rabbits. ,-

Presently two-or three young ones
came hopping up and twitching their long.
ears. They sniffed around for a while at
the entrance of the bag, and then hopped

/in and began munching and nibbling at

the parsley and cabbage, little thinking
All at

once the cat, gave the string a jerk, and

of the fate that awaited them.

the bunnies were caught in a trap, and
though they kicked ever so hard they
couldn't get out. Puss lost no time in

killing them, and slinging the game-bag











-


over his shoulder, he set out for the king’s
palace. lle went up to the guard at the
gate, as grand as you please, and said he
desired to speak with the king. His
manner was so determined that the sen-
tinels dared not refuse him, and Puss

made his way straight to the king’s pri-
vate room.









obliged to him.” And he could not help
wendering who the Marquis of Carabas
was, and why he had never heard of him
before. But Puss was so aristocratic in
his appearance there could be no doubt
that he belonged to a master of high rank.

Satisfied with the success of his inter-

view with the king, the cat bowed himself



‘“yete! HELP! FOR THE LORD MARQUIS OF CARABAS !”*

Here he took off his cap, threw down
his bag, and with a flourish of his tail pre-
sented the gifts he had brought with the
compliments of his master, the Lord
Marquis of Carabas. Puss made quite
a grand speech, to which the king replied,
“Tell my lord marquis that I accept his
present with great pleasure, and am much



out with all the grace of a well-bred
courtier.

A day or two afterwards he went out
with his boots and bag in search of more
game, and succeeded in trapping a couple
of young partridges, which he speedily
killed and presented to the king, with a
suitable speech.



x

=U 89 piss

For three or four weeks he managed
to send a present to the king every day
or two; and hearing one day that the
king was to take his lovely daughter for
a drive by the river side, Puss devised a
cunning scheme which he proceeded to
carry out in the following manner :

“(Go and bathe in the river, dear
master,’ said Puss, “and leave the rest
to me.’. The master consented to do as
Puss told him, although he failed to see
the necessity of bathing in that place at
that hour.



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Presently the king’s carriage drove in
sight, and Puss began to run to and fro,
and wring his paws, and toss them over
his head as if almost distracted. Then
he cried out at the top of his voice:
“Help! help! help! my master is being
drowned! Help for the Lord Marquis
ot) Carabas |”

The king looked out of the carriage-
window, and recognizing the cat who
brought the presents of game and fruit,
he ordered several of his guard to go to
the assistance of the lord marquis.

But the rogue of a cat
was not satisfied with this,
he knew that his master’s

shabby

7 Mever do for a marquis,

clothes would








~~ so he ran to the carriage
and told the king that a
wicked thief had stolen

his masters fine clothes

!

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while he was in bathing.
Puss said that as soom as
he knew of the loss he
gave chase to the thief,
but, though he ran miles
and miles could tind no
trace of him.
The king at once or-
dered asuit from his own
wardrobe to be brought

fer the Marquis of Cara-





LESS





—


bas; and the young man who was a
handsome fellow, looked very fine indeed
in his new garments, as he came up to
the carriage to thank the king for his
kindness. His majesty. was so pleased
with him that he insisted that my lord

marquis should enter the carriage and

take a drive with him; and the daughter

lookedas if she were not “at. all: dis:
pleased at the proposal. In fact, she was
rather struck with the appearance of the

Marquis of Carabas.

saw his master safely in the carriage he

ran on until he came to a field where a
party of reapers were gathering in the
harvest.
and said: “If you don't say, when the
king asks you, that this field belongs to
the Marquis of Carabas, you shall all be
chopped as fine as mince meat.”

The reapers were startled at. first, and
then amused at the little creature in boots,
but they promised to do as they were told,
and Puss took his departure. :

When the royal carriage passed the

field soon afterward, the king
stopped, and calling one of
the reapers to him, asked to
whom all that fine wheat
belonged. “To the Marquis
of Carabas, your majesty,”
answered all the reapers.
“You have a very fine

As soon as Puss:

The cat went up to the men







““HE STOOD BEFORE THE CAT IN THE

crop of wheat, my lord marquis,” said the
king.

“Yes, your majesty,. replied the mar.
quis: and the king thought he had never
met such a nice and modest young man.

As the king passed through the different
fields he did not fail to ask to whom they

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SHAPE OF AN ELEPHANT.”





‘“CWHEN THE LION GAVE A GREAT ROAR, PUSS FLEW DOWN THE STAIRS. ie

belonged, and was surprised at being told
they were the property of the Marquis
oi Caralnas.

“W
king, “your possessions are very exten-
sive ,

“Yes, your majesty:” and the princess
thought he was the handsomest young
man she had ever laid eyes on.

Now there was in these. parts a very
fine castle in which dwelt.an ogre, who
was a great giant and a magician. The
cat had a slight acquaintance with him, so
he posted off to the castle, rang the bell
loudly, and told the ogre he had come to
make him a visit and inquire after his
health. The ogre was much obliged to

the cat, and invited him in, which was | «=

just wit Puss, wanted. Ele at once
accepted the invitation, and sitting down
at a table, with his paws tucked cosily to-

gether, entered at once into conversation.





“Sir, said Puss << am told that you
are a mighty magician.” |

“That is true,” said the ogre.

« And I have heard,” said Puss, “that
you can transform yourself into the shape
On vanious amimals. = 8

«That is very true, said the ogre. .

“But I mean large animals; an ele-
phant for instance.”

«That is Quite” true 1. sade the soane,
“as you can see for yourself,” and saying



PUSS PUTS AN END TO THE OGRE,









—*PUSSl@BOOTS=—



a few magical

words, he stood




| belone the cat im
yz __the shape of an
{immense elephant,
i with a long trunk,
I Steal tapping
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sree swatiownss tHe 06%. all complete.

Puss was rather startled at the change,
but he soon mustered courage and went
on: “ Well, that is really marvelous, in-
deed! But can you change your shape
to any animal you choose ?”

“ Certainly,’ said the ogre, and he waved
his trunk in the air, flapped his ears, and
presently stood before the astonished cat
in the shape of a huge African lion, with
bristling mane, glaring eyes, and a most
ferocious display of white teeth.

The cat gazed at him for a while in
astonishment and fear, but when the lion
opened his mouth and gave a great roar,
Puss flew down the stairs and escaped
through an open window.

The ogre was delighted with the success

of his performance, and laughed heartily |
at the way in which he had frightened his —

guest.

Puss kept up his growling and spitting
for some time, but after he had recovered
from his fright he entered the room again,



excusing himself to the ogre for leaving
in such haste.
table he began:

Resuming his seat at the

_ “Sir, I should never have believed
these wonders possible if 1 had not seen
them with my own eyes. Youare, indeed,
a great magician, but I have heard of a
conjuror who could assume the shape
of small animals as well as large ones.
That must be exceedingly difficult, and
require long practice.”

“ One is as easy as the other,” said the
ogre, who was vain of his powers, and
did not like to think there was any one
greater than he.



PUSS APPEARS IN A FINE SUIT OF CLOTHES.



os >

SS5P8@ BOOTS=—



“But 1 mean,» said’ Puss“small ani-
mal’s like a cat or a mouse.”

“ Judge for yourself,” said the ogre, and
in a moment he was capering about the
room in the shape of a mouse. In less
than a second, the cunning cat had sprung
upon him, and with his sharp teeth he
soon put an end to him.

Puss sat for a moment after swallowing
the ogre, licking his lips, and congratula-
ting himself upon the excellent condition
into which he had brought his young
masters affairs; for had he not now
a fine castle, into which he need not
be ashamed to ask the king to enter

But the

sound of the king's coach coming near

to rest after his long ride.

reminded him that he had still much mM

to do, so he ran up stairs, and dressed
himself hastily in a fine suit of clothes
which he found in a closet, and which, “
being intended for a little dwarf, just —
fitted him. Then he went to the
castle entrance to receive the royal
party.

Great, indeed, was the surprise of
the Marquis of Carabas, when he
beheld his cat so finely dressed, and
heard him deliver the following speech,
with great dignity: “ Welcome your
majesty, and your royal highness, to
the castle of my master, the Marquis
of Carabas! As the honor is an

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unexpected one, pray pardon the hasty
arrangements made for your reception.
To tell the truth, my master has not long
been in possession of this castle, but if
you will be pleased to alight and take
some refreshments, this will be the proud-
est day of my life, and of my master’s, the
Lord Marquis of Carabas.”

“Upon my word, my lord marquis, ”
said the king, “you have a splendid
castle here, and I should greatly enjoy
giving it a closer inspection. I am tired

































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THE PRINCESS ADMIRES THE CONTENTS OF THE WARDROBES.






—#PUS Sie

BOOTS=—









PUSS ORDERS A BANQUET.

of being cramped up so in this coach, and
the long drive has given me quite an ap-
petite. Will you join us, my daughter ?”

The princess was only too: glad. to
gratify her curiosity, and the king gra-
ciously commanded the marquis to take
her by the hand and lead her into the
dwelling.

While they were walking through
the upper rooms, which were splendidly
furnished, and in the closets and ward-

robes of which. there was a great store

of beautiful clothes which the princess
especially admired; the cat slipped away
to the kitchen to order a banquet to be
prepared, and when the party returned to
the great hall, they sat down to a feast
that was, indeed, fit for a king.

With each glass of wine he drank, the



|

|

lovely court suit.

king became more and more
jovial, and seemed to grow very
fond of the marquis, to whom
he said: “It will be your own
fault, my Lord Marquis of Car-
abas, if you do not become our
sson-in-law, provided our daugh-
ter has no objection. ”
At this: plain speech the prin-
cess blushed and hung her head,
but did not. look at all displeased,
while: the’. ‘marquis rose at once
“from his seat, thanked the king
for the honor he desired to be-
stow upon him, and accepted the honor
very gracefully.

The cat's joy was so great that he had

to go out of doors and stand on his head

for a while, and kick up his hind legs in
the aur.

‘There is little more to tell. The mar-
quis returned with the king and princess
to their palace, where the wedding took
place with much pomp and ceremony.
The. king, his
daughter, and the cat was present in a
The two brothers of
the Marquis, came to attend the wedding,

but Puss thought that-as they had taken

of course, gave away

no notice of his master when he was poor,
they had no right ‘to expect. any honors

now that he was rich; so he..gave them

_ apiece of his mind, which made them ¢lad



—


to slip away home to the mill as quietly
as possible. Their brother, however, after-
wards returned good for evil by giving
each Ol them a fine tarm, and as they
were industrious fellows, and cultivated
their land diligently, they became quite
But it
was always a cause of regret to them

well-to-do in the course of time.

that they had treated ther «younger
brother so shabbily in the days when he
had sat forlorn, not knowing what he
should do to earn a living,

The Marquis of Carabas made a good
husband, and he and the princess lived
most happily together. As for the cat,
he became a great lord and never had to
hunt rats and mice except for his own
amusement. He was fond of fine clothes,
and used to go about the court dressed
in velvets and satins of the best quality,

He had

very pleasing manners, which made him

made up in the latest fashion.

a great favorite, particularly with the
ladies. He lived to a
and when he died, his

good old age,

grateful master

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THE TWO BROTHERS RETURN CRESI-FALLEN FROM THE WEDDING.
put up a monument in his honor. His
memory was venerated in the highest
degree by his fellow-cats, who held him
But

while many of them may have tried to

up as an example to their kittens.

imitate him, none has ever been able to
rival the famous Puss in Boots.

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lived a very rich merchant who had three daughters
whom he loved most dearly.
All three had grown up with a fair share of good
looks, but the youngest so far surpassed her sisters, and
in fact all the other young girls of that time and
country, in loveliness, that she was known
by the name of Beauty.
And Beauty was as superior to her
sisters in disposition as in person: for
while they were vain and haughty, she




ly was of a most sweet and kindly nature,
eyit//// free from all selfishness, and in the
YS habit of finding her chief

delight in trying to make

ill-fortune fell to es
the share of the
merchant, and other people happy.

that in no small After many years of

measure either. prosperity, it came to

His ships were lost at sea, and
in a very short time he saw nearly
the whole of his riches swept away,
barely enough being left to support
himself and his daughters in the
most humble way of living. They

had to go to live in a little cottage which, with the small farm



about it, was nearly all that the father had been able to save, out ,
. . Cc ° i Hh y ee / '
of the immense possessions of which he was once the owner. (@ AN
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It was with loud lamentations that the two elder sisters sub- Ge a






SQ

Ye.

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1) Sh YY ‘

BEAUTY S SISTERS LAMENTING THE LOSS OF THEIR RICHES.
mitted to this hard fate, and their father's
sorrow was made more bitter by their

constant complaints. Beauty alone’ of

4 BEAUT Yet BEAST



storms and unfavorable winds.

father did mot tail to seta sieht value
upon the fine qualities she displayed, and
her sweet ways were his comfort in the
dark days that had fallen upon him.
Pitter about a year aid a halt had
passed, news came one day that one oF

the merchant's ships which had been

|, thought to be lost, had come safe to port,
| having been delayed all this time by

The two

|-elder sisters ‘were greatly excited, and
indulged in the wildest hopes of being
_ restored to their former splendor. When

their father sect out ior the city to take

steps to recover his property, they loaded
him with commissions to bring them

fine dresses and: jewels upon his return.

his children, tried to. make the best of

their altered circumstances.
She bravely put’oh

a cheerful air, and set

to work to be as useful

as possible to her father

She did

not shrink from: any:

and_ sisters.

tasks, however disa-
erecable, doing all the
drudgery that in her

former home had been

the work of servants. Qa” ae
She got but little help,
or even sympathy from
her

ner sisters, but













BEAUTY DOING THE WORK OF THE HOUSE.







=>

a BEAUTY Ye" BEAST =



Observing that Beauty asked for nothing,
her father said to her:
“Well, Beauty, do you desire no gifts?

Is there nothing that you would have |

me bring you from the city?”

Beauty replied that his safe return was
all that she wished for, but upon her
father’s urging her, for his pleasure, to
name something that would be acceptable
to her, she said:

“Well, dear father, bring me arose. I
have seen none since we have been
here, and I love them so dearly.”

The merchant then started upon
his journey. When he reached the
city, he found that while it was indeed
true that one of his ships had come 1n,
the people who had been his partners
in business had taken advantage of
his absence to sell the ship and its
cargo, and had divided the money
amongst themselves. He went to
law to obtain his share, but succeeded
in getting very little, and he started
for home nearly as poor as when he
left it.

He lost his way one night upon
the journey, and after wandering till

morning came to a stately palace sur- ff
rounded by beautiful gardens. Think- #3

ing to inquire his way, he rode up to
the entrance and knocked, but re-
ceived no answer. He turned to go,





but as he was leaving he noticed some
lovely roses, and remembering Beauty's
request, thought it would be no harm to
pluck one for her. He had no sooner
done so, than he heard a deep roar, and

looking round, saw a frightful Beast,

and heard him say:

“Do you dare to steal my roses? You
shall die for the crime!”

The merchant fell at the creature's feet,
to beg for pardon, and explained that it

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THE MERCHANT PRESENTING THE ROSE TO BEAUTY,



a BEAUTY BEAST 2



zi



og

ON THE WAY TO THE BEAST’S PALACE.

was his desire to comply with his dear
child’s request that had led him to com-
mit the act.

‘W ell,” said the Beast, “J will spare
your life on one condition. You say that
you have three daughters. I will let you
go home, if you will promise to return
at the end of a week with one of them to
But bear in mind that
she must come willingly; and understand,
also, that if you break your word I will
come and fetch you.”

take your place.





Although the merchant would not
think for a moment of asking one of his
children to take his place, he reflected
that if he took the beast’s offer he should
at least have a chance to bid them good-
by. So he accepted iS amd the Beast
allowed him to depart.

When he arrived at his home, he could
hardly bring himself, at first, to relate
what had happened; merely saying to
Beauty as he handed her the rose, “ Here
is your gift, Beauty: you little know what
it has cost.” But these words distressed
Beauty so much, and so excited the
curiosity of the other daughters, that he
was soon forced to tell them all.

Beauty at once announced her willing-



BEAUTY IS OVERCOME WITH SADNESS AFTER HER FATHER’S DEPARTURE,









ness to take his place. Her father, at

first would not consent, but she insisted |

so sweetly, and yetso firmly, that he was
forced to yield.

It was night when they reached the
palace, which was brightly lighted in all.

parts.



Beauty and her father entered,

man bade his child good by, for he knew

The Beast

it was the Beast he heara:

came in, and when Beauty first saw his

huge form, she shook with fright, but

she tried to hide her fear as much as she

could. The Beast asked her if she had

~ come of her own free will, and when she

BEAUTY S DREAM.

but saw no living being. They came to
a large hall, where they saw a table set
Wit food, anda plate and. chair for
each of them. They sat down and ate
a little) though, as might be expected,
neither of them had much appetite.
When they were through their meal,

they heard a great noise, and the good old

answered, “Yes,” he said,



= ounces a
good girl and I thank you.”

He then turned to the father, and told
him he must leave the palace early next
morning, and never think of returning.

“But you shall not go empty handed,”

he added.

gold, and when you reach home, you will

“T have had a chest filled with



a BEAUTYM BEAST



find it there mclore you,
The Beast then bade them
both good-by, and went
away.

Beauty and: her father -
went to bed thinking they *
should not be able to close
thei, eves all nioht, but as





soon as they had lain down, ~ =







they went to sleep. Beauty “e
had a dream. in which a
beautiful lady came to her
amd said | aim pleaccd,
Beauty, to see what a kind,
brave teat youmbave. It
was right that you should
wish to give your life to save
your father’s, and you shall not go without

a reward.”

In the morning, Beauty told her father :

this dream, but though it gave him.some
hope, he shed bitter tears as he took leave
of his dear child. As soon as he was
gone, Beauty sat down, and gave herself
up for a time to tears and sad thoughts;
yet she had so strong and brave a heart
that she soon made up her mind not to
make her sad case worse by grieving. »
As no one came to her, she wandered
about, taking a full view of the beautiful
palace. She was surprised when she
came to a door over which was written

(ReAuUrmas INoom, © “Sire went in and











THE MAGIC MIRROR...

- found it splendidly furnished, and supplied
| with books, fine musical instruments, and

everything that would help her to pass
the time pleasantly. She thought then
that the Beast would not have put all
these things here if he meant her to live
but one day; so, taking heart, she opened

the library and there saw written in letters

of gold: “ WusH or Commanp, YOU ARE

WIISTRESS HERE.







Ww






a BEAUTY" BEAST



When it came to be noon, she found
rich food set out for her, and heard music
while she ate it, yet she saw no one. But
at night, after she had eaten her supper,
she heard the noise of the Beast approach-
ing as on the previous evening, and she
could not help trembling as she wondered
whether he meant to eat her up now.
However, as he did not seem at all fero-
cious when he entered, and only said,
“Good evening, Beauty,” she answered
cheerfully, and managed to conceal her
fright. He began to converse pleasantly,
and at the end of an hours talk, Beauty
began to think he was not at all terrible,
when suddenly he nearly made her faint
by saying, “ Beauty, will you be my wife?”

“Oh what shall I say?” cried Beauty,
for she feared to enrage him by refusing.

moay | Yeo Ohr NoO without aicar,
replied the Beast.’

“Oh! No, Beast,” said Beauty, hastily.

“Then good-night, Beauty,’ said the
Beast, sighing.

“Good-night, good
Beast, said Beauty
and the Beast left the
room.

A numberof weeks

passed, and during
them Beauty lived



in the same way.
HUSBAND OF BEAUTY’S YOUNGER SISTER. The Beast came to





see her every evening,
and repeated his re-
quest that she should
marry him, but on
her refusal, merely

sighed deeply, and:



went sadly away.

a

Beauty had become “,

accustomed to her

x
way of life, and would \
HUSBAND OF BEAUTY S ELDER

SISTER.

have been contented
enough if it were not for the separation
from her father, and her anxiety to know

She spoke of this to the

Beast one evening, and he said that she

how he was.

would find in her room the next morning,
a magic mirror in which she could see all
that was passing at home. :
When Beauty awoke the next morning,
she looked in every mirror in her room,
but saw nothing uncommon, until she
picked up a small hand-glass which she
In‘ this she

saw a picture which shocked and grieved

had never noticed before.
her terribly. It showed a room in the
cottage in which her father was sitting in
a chair, propped up with pillows, having
pined himself ill over her absence.
Beauty did little but weep until she
saw the Beast again. When he came in
the evening, she told him what she had
seen, and how much she wished to go

home fora while to nurse and comfort her



a BEAUTY BEAST E-



father. The Beast asked her if she would
promise to return at the end of a week if
he let her go. Beauty promised, and the
Beast gave her aring, saying: “ Put this
under your pillow to-night, and you will
find yourself at home when you awake.
When you wish to return, you have
only to place the ring under your pillow
again. And now farewell, dear Beauty:
do not break your promise, for I shall die
if you desert me.”

When Beauty awoke the next morning,
she found herself in her father’s cottage,
and on ringing a little bell that was at
the side of the bed, the maid entered,
and gave a loud shriek on seeing her.
When Beauty’s father heard the shriek,
he ran into the room, and when he saw
his dear daughter, he thought he should
faint with joy. He ran to the side of
the bed, and embraced her with a glad
heart. Itseemedas if his illness began
to depart almost right away. When
Beauty thought of getting up, she
remembered that she had no clothes
with her to put on, but the maid told
her that she had just found in the
next room a chest full of fine dresses.
Beauty thanked the good Beast in her
mind, and choosing the simplest of
the gowns, she told the maid to put
the others aside, as she would give
them to her sisters.



Beauty's sisters had been enabled to
get husbands, by means of the wealth
the Beast had sent home with their father,
and no longer lived in the cottage; but
they were sent for, and came with a great

display of joy. But when they heard

| that Beauty was living in a splendid

palace, where her every wish was grati-
‘They

made unhappy marriages.

fied, they became very envious.

had both



BEAUTY'S SISTERS PLOTTING.



pests

a











a BEAUTY" BEAST Be

young man, but he was so

much in love with his own
face that he never took any
notice of the beauty of his wife.
The second had married a man
of great wit, but he used it
chiefly to say cutting things
to his wife. |

So envious were the two
sisters of Beauty, that they
planned together to keep her
beyond the time she had prom-
ised, in hopes that the Beast
would fly into such a rage
that he would eat her up on
her return. In order to suc-
ceed, they treated Beauty most 4
lovingly; and when the week
had past, pretended.to feel so
deep a grief that Béauty was
persuaded to stay a few “days
Beauty fretted,

ever, over the sorrow she-knew she must

longer. how-

be causing the poor Beast, towards whom
she had begun to entertain a really very
friendly feeling. The ‘tenth night, she
dreamed that she was in the Palace gar-
den, and that she saw the Beast lying



on the grass, at the point of death, and |
that with his last breath he reminded |

her of his parting words to her. Beauty

Ah saidshe “am

awoke, weeping.

aie
THE FAIRY CONGRATULATES BEAUTY ON HER CHOICE... \

with their husbands.





been so kind to me 2 Why should I not

bevhis wite: 1 am sure) should be
happier with him than my. sisters are
I wil go back to-

night, for if he were to die I should

feel all my life that I was to blame.”

So Beauty placed her ring under her
pillow, and fell at once into a sound sleep,
from which she awoke to find herself in

the Palace. She ran with haste to the

I not ungrateful to grieve one who has | place where she had seen him in_ her



a BEAUT Ya"BEAST ET



dream; and there he was, lying almost
dead. She hurried to a fountain near by,
and from it brought some water, which
ise mevived, 2
little, and opening his eyes, said: “ Alas,

she dashed in his face.

Beauty, you forgot your promise, and
therefore I must die!”

“No, dear Beast,” said Beauty, “you
shall not die. You will live to be my
I thought, indeed, that I had

merely a friendly feeling toward you, but

husband.

the grief which now oppresses me, tells

me that I love you

with all my heart
No had
these words passed
iy , her lips); than “the
| % ; Beast disappeared,

4),
e 7 and she beheld at

Sooner




her for having done
for him the greatest
possible favor. He
told her thata wicked
fairy had made him
take the form of a
Beast, which he must
wear until some fair





young girl should
| promise to become
his wife.

i
| Sh De y .? Ly

The Prince then



took Beauty by the hand, and led her
to the great hall of the palace, which was
now thronged with courtiers and servants,
who had been made invisible at the same
time that the Prince had been changed into
a Beast. But Beauty's greatest joy was
to find there her father, who had been
brought there along with her sisters by the
beautiful fairy that had appeared to her in
her sleep, the first night she stayed in the
palace. This stately lady now advanced,
and addressing Beauty, said: “ Beauty,
you will be glad, as
long as you live, of
the choice you have

You

goodness, and you

made. chose
will have beauty and
wisdom in addition.”
Then she punished
Beauty's two sisters,
by changing them
into statues, to stand
at the palace gates,
until they repented
of their faults.

The Prince soon
married Beauty, and
they were happy, for
they «did siight (im
thought, word, and
act, as they had done



4)\

. G VD \y ~ b
before all their lives. © ARP!





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‘Milly








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Full Text
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describe
Invalid character
'4240' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGG' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
a5c901bcd53ef28cab350cd99cb5edf4
abd802adbccbf3ab969a3e6f9248f5be4beeb03c
'2011-12-28T21:25:49-05:00'
describe
'1246598' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGH' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
a405bc0466e7dae207f72c022da94733
cc9dd94825ce6d38bb6316ed04cb82a74e79e0d0
'2011-12-28T21:24:28-05:00'
describe
'88615' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGI' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
4ef7b990711b85bb367731a804a14427
088f91f883e5eaf7c6791be66bdecaf33a2c6acf
'2011-12-28T21:24:57-05:00'
describe
'383' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGJ' 'sip-files00007.pro'
3757c5eb93d1e9b281a76c7961535da5
fb6b487d3bcbd8505d6959d38ce1de513edf7ae1
'2011-12-28T21:27:15-05:00'
describe
'21965' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGK' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
63782780bb34764ac6252c5cf28496e3
838838ca86fbd1268e39acf8d3d408909a727d1e
'2011-12-28T21:27:11-05:00'
describe
'29935680' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGL' 'sip-files00007.tif'
bdfa325d65d4923d5ab9bd8451b1b10d
4a7391e3c4ac2996f3f3f9ec39a632e9f9bf75dd
'2011-12-28T21:28:28-05:00'
describe
'129' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGM' 'sip-files00007.txt'
29c71a7536f6432000076bcd9bf457f6
837bce6ad7157dded10096cfc18036d17c9e466e
'2011-12-28T21:25:46-05:00'
describe
'5901' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGN' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
a941bc56a29381ede207217b3cfb8239
e0b8a4fb69c0f46e64285dafbf41c55c23049f7d
'2011-12-28T21:27:51-05:00'
describe
'1246228' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGO' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
b403ddb20a81285f8e85258b4bc8c279
f99497544b6b31d0c94cd3f6c3c7a9c1094be933
describe
'130204' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGP' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
1d8d33f919bf744e53ad3e555ca63cb2
10d32a56744c2fe18cf45cfa0b9807f0d18ac30b
describe
'47381' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGQ' 'sip-files00008.pro'
ba4538dbfafafcfd1f84188371a45a96
e026425d3afb6a216b78b97d8999cdebe6920823
'2011-12-28T21:27:02-05:00'
describe
'34388' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGR' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
5813ac302ee9504caebbeb4ace31a2e9
40713eb28be9c0332cc129ce4e3ead6a8270c1fd
describe
'29924976' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGS' 'sip-files00008.tif'
48731e544a2e42a4c79a3e0b98b11e7e
c4fef8720ec12408e96434807959d15a9e106e5e
describe
'2108' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGT' 'sip-files00008.txt'
ea6808642df4adbda41a9c168b5ff540
5eda6beb370a7defa192ec9a28719f10ff56ee23
'2011-12-28T21:28:06-05:00'
describe
'7890' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGU' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
0f2a79d98e7fa8c0691e955e08850eb9
9ba96cb2c14ba347fc34ad7edc38e61f775d72e7
'2011-12-28T21:25:56-05:00'
describe
'1246658' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGV' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
35707884dda25ef26643fe1ef036c233
8ec4dab0b12e836507ffb332e9543c84bde1a5f5
describe
'134790' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGW' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
3882a7871bc9e7890ea254e692ff47b6
f3b81d91d013dcfee79801cbc7e3c818907e1a84
'2011-12-28T21:27:52-05:00'
describe
'36950' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGX' 'sip-files00009.pro'
fa651f0071dcf286347e16468446c07a
b6fd4f69a5cb0a261e93b18ae9f637f647e8b93b
'2011-12-28T21:25:42-05:00'
describe
'34722' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGY' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
a195f3b76b48663b1d26dda644f7bfa7
8a2a363c77adcd1c4006e28d415303f616d9d584
'2011-12-28T21:25:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASGZ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
63cd6cbeae301a4908d8b5871a9af35a
3da3ba8b4e6c3047b6b55e53fb92ad929690c4b0
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHA' 'sip-files00009.txt'
a9011c5b3190947f3bd9cebdf49ab77c
b9899fa14a10dc2dfa8f4dd1126b96195b9ed2d6
'2011-12-28T21:28:42-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8065' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHB' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
e90c0b43128102e4fa74158b2e83f71b
b153f6dd615d5cf7e4b082d65d58d390a6cabfec
'2011-12-28T21:27:47-05:00'
describe
'1246919' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHC' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
c198babd8bdaadff906e13f642edece9
292869eb107055e7a1a12acbe8e0ac29a9b1b5db
describe
'140678' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHD' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
f53b97b0c4b458d7517bd8d0106c8a2b
29707ef7ee447731eb1a0f46d81afad4c5d2bd94
'2011-12-28T21:25:24-05:00'
describe
'5793' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHE' 'sip-files00010.pro'
0bace86598208a3493b6adaddb7fd834
c63be01ca034054dca0657a9df9a205dda878f22
'2011-12-28T21:24:36-05:00'
describe
'32553' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHF' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
a7cf02d85d7725ab2b7e477ab1a73fbc
51b38317535df0016ad315fe9ef95b791140d0f8
'2011-12-28T21:27:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHG' 'sip-files00010.tif'
5e87e3acab28649897ef3eaa5f787283
93b01349267f1ee7bf712e595cf3585136167014
'2011-12-28T21:25:09-05:00'
describe
'310' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHH' 'sip-files00010.txt'
c0496e8c2a0decd3c1a1c2866f317268
ffd009f1305359a3ef2af70a4c5e643a03c31766
'2011-12-28T21:27:31-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8219' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHI' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
fa4201f5fbbc298988a69c1f4fedc308
c5a688f2bb8f76c5dff81d86bd551fb0dedc600d
describe
'1246670' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHJ' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
b72241a7c49b68ba4be1f3db0b1a6b56
7a431b50c32115b99060b1efc2b3d25c40b4384d
'2011-12-28T21:25:53-05:00'
describe
'136390' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHK' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
4434c1d6123daefae28e17a4109618b3
c47a9386ffdd8c0f783c1b1c78d972f5e884548c
'2011-12-28T21:26:16-05:00'
describe
'37636' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHL' 'sip-files00011.pro'
ac93b36489d665e958cef17cd74b0f92
607c81ee2a034c19f8cc0ea0e732b1b51e45fd8a
'2011-12-28T21:24:35-05:00'
describe
'34821' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHM' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
af3fd6b4d8552ad8c049e745cdfedad5
50fb420590516bad6a07c2bb04affc477eb7844c
'2011-12-28T21:26:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHN' 'sip-files00011.tif'
b07ca8921c0b6ff167eab8fb2b46c940
22350463f24cd8b7ff719b6fb87a8fc3198ae822
'2011-12-28T21:27:30-05:00'
describe
'2135' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHO' 'sip-files00011.txt'
ac8c409c631130973d889e68679c756e
55a38444cac7f9f58c9187dc019b563022e6073e
'2011-12-28T21:25:50-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8214' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHP' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
83eb0dcaf14486a50fa2903500565a4b
42b41f7484ca10e233a9ce99bdc346ea97fa821d
'2011-12-28T21:27:10-05:00'
describe
'1246188' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHQ' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
dc43651022987c85a1e5a7e1aa9622ec
446a1bd3131cba099ac8803a67b42c6ed09c352d
'2011-12-28T21:25:17-05:00'
describe
'127041' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHR' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
829af8496c51c0e51857a810f1238290
3a55ccbd8e989fef47c0f0f686c570b012028560
'2011-12-28T21:27:25-05:00'
describe
'39526' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHS' 'sip-files00012.pro'
9969b262c20d625271bb7f943d4fdb58
217336066286c6f46f7d4c4290fad07a0737cba5
'2011-12-28T21:28:05-05:00'
describe
'33231' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHT' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
c7ea729c150ac63dbaf9e05fe1aca694
0f6d885696a4cb9d86839f2664c41ea428789d03
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHU' 'sip-files00012.tif'
123935b611ce3e44e66efa5e61a48537
470a3cfc8393c1b00c0125149d77e856278cad57
'2011-12-28T21:28:04-05:00'
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHV' 'sip-files00012.txt'
beea84dc9837a4c7378fd2794a2f3614
1171e0cf3e1fd587e8522a1ae1bcc7722ec4548b
describe
'7705' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHW' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
7b8b0425376a298e0144702c275499fd
2cf7eb7fff4f8fcf045d59c88d95d1afc858d1b7
'2011-12-28T21:28:07-05:00'
describe
'1246949' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHX' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
bdc13d29d3ff2324e5f0a72cee8c3b4d
d1920d6f831e685de6e7d08c738bedbd28fe90d7
describe
'140654' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHY' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
1de00ea312e09c294370ed661feb83fb
23c64cf7e9ac0cb34fa0ba5874925ce2560718ba
'2011-12-28T21:25:03-05:00'
describe
'1876' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASHZ' 'sip-files00013.pro'
adfec62b9156180abd383f34b80c2b6f
ebd11bbc457e56f5dec1875d6f43416cf5070b98
'2011-12-28T21:28:11-05:00'
describe
'31200' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIA' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
4cd76472b86eda9cde5eb9fc0fd89d91
6ad5ebfef8b4c687795d11a8eb15370bc67ed51b
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIB' 'sip-files00013.tif'
17b7072d6cd3fe3ec156cd78ff0cc8c3
51414b1f7b8972c4753f32c57607ff0b8076443e
'2011-12-28T21:26:56-05:00'
describe
'424' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIC' 'sip-files00013.txt'
3bd9cfc07e32b8326604954c72669fdc
6e981d8c2b0560da521e6f4590d5dcfafd429bc8
'2011-12-28T21:26:57-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7580' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASID' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
9cbde1d36c64ff314a9ab7fb9b26a60d
5b701b5a8a63a7e54499a19599073d97482740a1
'2011-12-28T21:28:33-05:00'
describe
'1246235' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIE' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
93ae871dc7cb033429de02101aa7b271
3d87cc9917a51aeb450f11f4cfd8050bfa7eef17
'2011-12-28T21:24:51-05:00'
describe
'120478' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIF' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
f702f537f2ac2083066bbe392987bb9b
6581335f6faa41df6475ae75fcd08742388dcb9b
'2011-12-28T21:24:33-05:00'
describe
'39967' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIG' 'sip-files00014.pro'
1f601a06f82babcb3beae9c5144b599a
765869cbcffa3b4f0552ce7974975f064e163c24
'2011-12-28T21:26:49-05:00'
describe
'31513' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIH' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
d9e70d72140f1fd2aaef42c53dbe37aa
af647a52492b4f04a71add67f6ebca8c40522b54
'2011-12-28T21:25:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASII' 'sip-files00014.tif'
2059b6455fe6358fcda53bd74487cd91
94e6b98cc4490789114b4b306372a5a0a07cd34e
'2011-12-28T21:28:32-05:00'
describe
'1758' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIJ' 'sip-files00014.txt'
907675e63fd3c400e4a245ab6cc3325f
7c650d60102aeab7b2ad4171943d442f78fce9a2
describe
Invalid character
'7470' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIK' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
e0147bd87d6fd6ef03a0fbffad9f3110
004c8be3b4342515ac14ec2b72a4fff5cfa8afdb
'2011-12-28T21:25:04-05:00'
describe
'1246673' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIL' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
8ede381dea35b83041fbb33530ed0a5a
18bb4795ac4324155dea75e4f31357cf3251a81c
describe
'128714' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIM' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
33426c1b72c38584f8c3aae1e0d97b8b
3c5169afd878ad8fb6d5737111cdbcd03f9ca740
'2011-12-28T21:27:14-05:00'
describe
'38370' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIN' 'sip-files00015.pro'
b8bbbae6bcc75cd4e89473c6101e2d39
5dedc95314b4a2b57b21b5099ab9f741f19b5c0f
'2011-12-28T21:26:00-05:00'
describe
'33687' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIO' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
b46013ee742e0c0075d063288ffba25c
8ceb6908164b5b3ae76a9d260ebe4206dcbdf90b
'2011-12-28T21:28:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIP' 'sip-files00015.tif'
7898c066ca6960d9b811aba275fdf740
55419dbd51c1a45f728fbe072a4f098e14c501eb
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIQ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
4ad490aab58718c1773594282d5b25cf
0d94cd0b82618fec62fa8984c6920de759009875
'2011-12-28T21:24:32-05:00'
describe
'8119' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIR' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
26e85db7155c6b4ff7d36d134f6d9c94
b0722fe0a7de897047d1aa0f66a8afe3062c8e00
describe
'1247005' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIS' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
51b961728cd41cdce82f589a8f689bb2
c94a1b83f780f310d367ee2594c73858ffe1ea15
describe
'145598' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIT' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
871277d8d633097c4e10f3f32166e277
6ec3f76a4a51a5f5e376078e0ed492c7dba5a841
'2011-12-28T21:27:48-05:00'
describe
'1893' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIU' 'sip-files00016.pro'
222e73f894ade9f024316f5d2fa295bf
d02973b6a7fee875e8b862001233e5af6f74fe9d
describe
'33147' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIV' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
e9f1becbe328d1fdea63c6adf209a818
649f8a0de16f8e1e34dd40be623e6de26d706357
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIW' 'sip-files00016.tif'
c946724f714be8e3c2ca329ed07f5ecb
0a32b7ec44f05f9f6d68390b505000c3ec79af52
describe
'154' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIX' 'sip-files00016.txt'
254a2d13ce907b94fd11ab3d66d16780
5c684698d2a0cfc253e50a4335157418765c4b96
'2011-12-28T21:27:04-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8258' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIY' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
3a7422d7c842f2f52c690c4523877c2f
62552f75f3958312c02df63a5434b954c8dcbfdf
'2011-12-28T21:28:41-05:00'
describe
'1246603' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASIZ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
a344ec1f4b33df456fc1bad94403cb24
9f9b8613c37f4ef034d37a4d8e42c8bb6052b4cf
describe
'129865' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJA' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
69f22a5a5ebee675f92359a336b450bf
56ce214adf712f40c3068a282caa2cd17254ee4b
'2011-12-28T21:24:30-05:00'
describe
'49826' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJB' 'sip-files00017.pro'
46d738fdf29ef36b9a1569e1822c05ed
a1bf302569ec6fdcd712af5bbd43818b66cf3dd7
describe
'34527' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJC' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
f059289c007e4e24c38d5a100e39fecb
9aa4e5b1ab07546cc3ae9c32da5d22c721993c7a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJD' 'sip-files00017.tif'
b01cdfb3b82d088d439826082c621f52
75e071a9f2e4c9a8d5d4377bcd2957d7474c4dc5
describe
'1938' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJE' 'sip-files00017.txt'
cb8c68b17c750e8bbbeea0f2403a501e
1cc93e3fbf9c39b7e743280200a5f5ddeb212f1f
describe
'8238' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJF' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
7b975358049d275a98d265807a571c90
49b6da81a7c2ac99f35e27937bd1e3593d40d262
'2011-12-28T21:28:39-05:00'
describe
'1246234' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJG' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
588205a503577a199b286148bce62302
bc18f4486ad61004b94d5cc23e8315443cadb7f5
describe
'121158' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJH' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
41003761d7b1d5fcab546741c6705e88
5475a2eceaa7f867be3a51902c67d33987da42e9
describe
'45234' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJI' 'sip-files00018.pro'
7a3d27be025fb8cb6272d2a8fe7a6ea7
652b974fdaaf81c03aad94b54d275f7ff79a72ef
'2011-12-28T21:27:12-05:00'
describe
'31630' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJJ' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
ececaf306dab97ea43c119d5eb2bc951
92a967242c8b1f1d12e1f057bc99c4fe2b8ff0e5
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJK' 'sip-files00018.tif'
5494084c547dbe6f55958efe8987f07c
457426e4afed84b41dfb77f5b8b84febbd71f95e
'2011-12-28T21:28:14-05:00'
describe
'1713' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJL' 'sip-files00018.txt'
6b1780cf06b9154e29dc736f8554dc60
80c36d06b066f21b1da37b21679b9ae36d034022
describe
Invalid character
'7706' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJM' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
7eb0bb00e08f755d0bdf895ee3b5d768
7e399f65ca3385f6556f7c35cb43ee5d224dc6c1
describe
'1246951' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJN' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
f4558ce6b81ca0f5f7e378311b0b3e8d
9c22cfd74fa2a0c222b3f33738ed8c0f8e71616f
'2011-12-28T21:27:53-05:00'
describe
'127162' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJO' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
4de17e3d283f817c6f03d9ed2520edca
83e90de3e58e5829446dafbe7299d7d8464bf9f4
'2011-12-28T21:27:20-05:00'
describe
'5753' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJP' 'sip-files00019.pro'
5c908735c5a134522021b95e76e06bb3
e5c64c6ef7df0af53e047c45cf538c4bc7e7a7a4
describe
'28367' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJQ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
a895d4b353d964cd61d0ce190d3b2d10
c1b6db5d19bba67a8fc996a241445099fef49e85
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJR' 'sip-files00019.tif'
fa23037636cd9896c44e470bc163f897
f8f1b15abdc69369442dbbe2acad8c203d714dfa
'2011-12-28T21:27:17-05:00'
describe
'341' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJS' 'sip-files00019.txt'
f7a42fbd0a265c82c81dc4137487cdd6
701618e7502287d1c4b2736266c9e1f8be2f1d0a
describe
Invalid character
'7068' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJT' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
96dae249dadad533d154c42bc90e8c77
ae370b4cb9a5d3490bf959a823ed422bb60197db
'2011-12-28T21:27:23-05:00'
describe
'1246226' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJU' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
58252f4be471cafea5815be2a2c27c82
fe9a3b18f12a6bbd7ec80970aeafd04b85d5a415
describe
'128278' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJV' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
d59ace56a0267f63f7d70919e9457954
b8220e4992fd6e0322ad6a10c7bafe806d8e492f
'2011-12-28T21:28:00-05:00'
describe
'52633' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJW' 'sip-files00020.pro'
58437840ed18b4e6342629f65033d6da
397b5bce0505f38ead354fc7aef487e3bc25d193
describe
'33616' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJX' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
865d771d8e59910499ad1824124b7343
0532dc4989feaa33de7872583d87246dda06b22f
'2011-12-28T21:26:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJY' 'sip-files00020.tif'
ea14a1ccbab24330b49ad10423402267
5fa1ebccbaa77fc0ca79dfa52bdd0331fb2d0fa1
'2011-12-28T21:28:19-05:00'
describe
'2671' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASJZ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
c6d5f933404db596a3f1a596bd69c841
9a27f0c9bc321b001eaf155d8305f58a829fc74d
'2011-12-28T21:24:24-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7961' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKA' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
7fa2e1b66d1db7af6b66ac33b29f8bfd
37c1e34c1d5f114c0321c5c3a1c2af9c8af84595
'2011-12-28T21:25:44-05:00'
describe
'1246671' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKB' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
e7c852a98fb56072de1b5d1f90ba79b7
8c5b62c705cd725a4bbcd025954373110d7d0c62
describe
'117917' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKC' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
14c05911e9dd1fa59fdd0e5e7289c04a
3601814ef5c1c41263c0b28007a9ed2c5f33c728
describe
'32319' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKD' 'sip-files00021.pro'
f52940e2726fe0b134939109a7f3fde2
10b73fac4b9eda46656fce76df47921bd98d33c7
describe
'29862' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKE' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
79626705a811245fd2f9d808746af49a
c931a828074a4966f83e0ac9a1f183911543a66d
'2011-12-28T21:28:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKF' 'sip-files00021.tif'
7e0826e59be2bc60affc7f754ce93c4a
006bbd921797d9d2ffc3dd510dc351f12ec047a4
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKG' 'sip-files00021.txt'
149a5112b75b719ee0471bf46efc83bd
611cd12c1db7203c5319ca327a284cb5d751a139
describe
Invalid character
'6887' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKH' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
7b87388446ad761adc71b9f3fbb5bb05
eafa2aed7d98d1ecb4e9cdc4a491fd9fa2ce2bfe
describe
'1247013' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKI' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
fcff42c5af4eb8b4b437dc35ed64ac96
eb81eca1766d4860b74d558a40e2f36dcb9f6b72
describe
'49273' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKJ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
5c678ab99440a2044c54623ed5f211c9
a7c97d5665e993eca6f163ecd0ba8a0d810bb8cd
describe
'464' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKK' 'sip-files00022.pro'
db7e2aeefe5dc88f9c5fa30422af850b
2bf79bf7e31e3888326500ace298f1ebb93f3e57
describe
'11059' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKL' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
523c419f82ea594d16ab217b128970d7
a1967bd7fbc5d4819f8044ee171c1139bdef61ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKM' 'sip-files00022.tif'
32aae248f6cbfedd6780920f5bf7b5a4
ff11356f050760992fd940acafd7a459aba43250
'2011-12-28T21:28:30-05:00'
describe
'84' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKN' 'sip-files00022.txt'
83c39d3a070e17ebced76cd66c4e49d6
3f642886cbc5da4883fc3f0d190f88d11b6f0098
'2011-12-28T21:28:38-05:00'
describe
'3026' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKO' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
da3b13f8bd19ce22ac1f723d08df3812
24627ff069f415862180187022b1609d02b7782a
'2011-12-28T21:25:45-05:00'
describe
'1247002' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKP' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
dcfd680390309807259bb3341c8498b8
404ce0b0fd9a21a8d18ae9bdf7ba82010c3dbb05
describe
'97275' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKQ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
c4161c3d6c3a4168d6320017a71767e2
5498aa9812fb66340680c0bf39b3b11ac28462ae
describe
'597' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKR' 'sip-files00023.pro'
f371161339fc3b5b2277502cd23d90e1
99c62068dd0352b0d577f2d9578d11c9d87782d4
describe
'24013' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKS' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
5afdf547787859780afb4301580598ea
10f062fbe12619ef048840f2ef84699387b9c92e
'2011-12-28T21:24:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKT' 'sip-files00023.tif'
7b02c8af51fc37d1803aacfedfcae5e1
0bfb6f2b215aaffcaa14be0e5aac1dcccd2a296c
'2011-12-28T21:25:39-05:00'
describe
'43' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKU' 'sip-files00023.txt'
17b1962e90a1e6f118bbc750d57d139c
b6b95c1f4f4d50e091ca229d1394b8efec6d28d7
describe
'6238' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKV' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
c3bc351bcb3f92552e0b56f0831350ed
c458b865177e6dc558a84e4c4ea1eb1e8aaf9977
describe
'1246017' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKW' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
fa828fad81f5d25a2ce868f06f1c3a23
bbfd152d631c180c4e80dad197ad0043a27c6a40
'2011-12-28T21:26:07-05:00'
describe
'127650' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKX' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
7d3ad558247ce211b0d1a8463775c6d7
d537c4b2353cc78981854eadad9c7fecf92f4191
'2011-12-28T21:25:23-05:00'
describe
'39260' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKY' 'sip-files00024.pro'
e4a140baaff52bcb62375c36874903fd
eb0c2c80b755be8f60c5451695b8b8b1b2a6fff5
describe
'33508' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASKZ' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
d25f6caaed2ac823c3a430f5ce0d5f9c
09570f306f405b3dfbb279bccbfc60a15316f167
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLA' 'sip-files00024.tif'
28cf8fd4e7b8963eadc3ea4c986457e1
b60745da7ee0e0c474e8221e648f996394dc02c3
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLB' 'sip-files00024.txt'
3a99bdc685515c86b7658362c25825fb
ecbb2bd3ed0e2ebf5624900ef9b7a96da05137f3
'2011-12-28T21:27:45-05:00'
describe
'7757' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLC' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
3f190a05d823eeeac32ffbd2b668d504
caab5f275f34c87d7cbcb3785141595b8da2fe9b
'2011-12-28T21:26:52-05:00'
describe
'1246616' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLD' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
1843e555a31a2133ed898f27c004c9ad
2ba7901d4de200bb76ae6836b97e0f2260042c27
'2011-12-28T21:25:57-05:00'
describe
'134160' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLE' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
17dab56eeebcfb699d95133644c26cf1
49aa7bdcc66addc9fda528e8e526d6941f4ce168
describe
'47893' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLF' 'sip-files00025.pro'
51e2f31c51258c31f5cf0f2ee790130f
b9eb4398faac41cc6cae0e8faa39575070503d72
'2011-12-28T21:24:56-05:00'
describe
'33938' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLG' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
99cf686a5c3cfa2be59c9d0832884525
a4ac413eb4942b764d04cb7008ba355ffdc3f052
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLH' 'sip-files00025.tif'
35f7c525390cea404bd416a455d32de0
b5458c10ee5f729a46a4223a285a7cc058c34f37
describe
'1928' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLI' 'sip-files00025.txt'
eb75a80fd7db4cef0b7c710ed9b417c5
664f24dd1be721863a519d397d0ba7696f3007b5
'2011-12-28T21:28:01-05:00'
describe
'7692' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLJ' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
c9ea4882969f7390aeb3148aab010d63
ebb513d9f30de8795fb372e57830c11982e9c867
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLK' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
ae326bcfe5e56840751ca412b25b7b01
88b34a45e59e514b51875d85bc99e8d91bdd207a
describe
'121502' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLL' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
c44fdd05d4b4dc509e1721c8ae0d32e2
626ebe13837be0c29bd7a379ef704e4b39c9542b
'2011-12-28T21:27:49-05:00'
describe
'6108' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLM' 'sip-files00026.pro'
98f11f4382fc39db3b3a66761d1dd4cf
13e9aaece5c3300951bc0612d3691f0081d70c85
'2011-12-28T21:28:10-05:00'
describe
'27630' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLN' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
feeb4b4411590d7370cf505f41f1872b
2057c8591c3474bebd338b79059ccbdf613818ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLO' 'sip-files00026.tif'
bacdd80e8513bd61dbf8f991458c0394
12430e93343843e4b6d80bfe931535879502cd21
'2011-12-28T21:27:42-05:00'
describe
'336' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLP' 'sip-files00026.txt'
e77933824cc5965f8c197b66d73c7e77
1e924a907917fb8a1f64aa34038f778de62c91ab
describe
Invalid character
'7000' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLQ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
2d81bbb71d4f76d63122de7865f03fcf
7c8208c75ecfb8488fa2287b80270366e3fb1dfb
describe
'1246613' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLR' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
f30a601b73438d1eff874605bd210ada
820c94a945fe57cc8638209f95d3e7d164140cd8
'2011-12-28T21:25:01-05:00'
describe
'126778' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLS' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
580f7deb37a0edd224cdb728c71deca1
d47fdc20082185ca7ac57f16bd1e264a4ccc68ac
describe
'45397' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLT' 'sip-files00027.pro'
c3f7fdc50e2a3ebf3f5f4be34c5bf9ad
f1ce73ff03ab1c49067fa320160fd9870fe6a955
describe
'33305' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLU' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
d4d42ab8caa13b541d4c6fb2b15e4302
a5284df40851923290107afbb5c12400aaf8da85
'2011-12-28T21:27:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLV' 'sip-files00027.tif'
cb15ffbe469ffe3f80f85bbfb24c9d37
aef00e63f0280f484341d4e6f0b30cddc36b89b9
'2011-12-28T21:26:12-05:00'
describe
'1777' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLW' 'sip-files00027.txt'
6dc077907d20cc779555d231b6742b8b
56ccaea7f47b6f4ea338ea30b72f19107fad5d45
'2011-12-28T21:27:26-05:00'
describe
'7536' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLX' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
4a97dc82df91a8f07688549580cde9bf
b4ad2b6daeba3ce3c4935310610d5fa1a6a78104
'2011-12-28T21:25:13-05:00'
describe
'1246211' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLY' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
d1301242c1c4e56daa46285da37a9a0d
36a9107f8dabfb784fae74d8e64b145919d0c80c
describe
'131240' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASLZ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
1a86b9962acc2b4b6ace83ff17fa5ded
c2de1dbcf104a45cdaa53565f03f9c4704a7dea8
'2011-12-28T21:28:35-05:00'
describe
'44313' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMA' 'sip-files00028.pro'
0c675fc16a2f1205294d5c0790ff79f6
8e763e8cc394e89f9050c4e4264d02c286182bdf
describe
'35256' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMB' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
69b1bb32ebd71d45084ede1784a51338
13fb7b7094806dc62b5abc7cac68cd02b83bee75
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMC' 'sip-files00028.tif'
b11c55ca998df7ddccd11d47c96f73b7
988ce9b6210a545d7cdbb14d95985649dbabb102
'2011-12-28T21:25:48-05:00'
describe
'1851' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMD' 'sip-files00028.txt'
88e9ed9f64e35889ffe2fff744cc28db
2e7d7d24d7e424e04b9090394276944805592d71
describe
'8209' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASME' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
3e7fbe43c6511c7459a80765ebe16c5c
8292a9dfa2071674cb05c464505260aa94ea9e7d
'2011-12-28T21:25:07-05:00'
describe
'1246668' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMF' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
58180faad6481ee1b4b23c4e962c30f4
208565f11beb5d57859060a72cb936e498f6fff8
describe
'163653' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMG' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
252850890f4e2dcbe2c8777a221b9739
6f5f0dece23e01c1fc0a857a556d3d98b7c3fe38
describe
'4445' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMH' 'sip-files00029.pro'
9f8ba1d429b05cd4aec7fdf6d441e7fe
f86303ef17aa602b5a175c7a83075f133d775928
'2011-12-28T21:24:29-05:00'
describe
'37931' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMI' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
9b2fa59c1307b61bb5ba4dccfabaeb85
8ce2a22312bb2c93d149e56fe1b9ff4177fe9609
'2011-12-28T21:27:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMJ' 'sip-files00029.tif'
34deebb3580993d06293c390ae04105b
4f6bf90ef563d816e1f1bb6bd64e45f1c4b74fed
'2011-12-28T21:25:19-05:00'
describe
'400' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMK' 'sip-files00029.txt'
32c4d487af277ae06b9420a032040bfc
2e68f71e5b03dfcf671f6795a3a75ba4d4cd505d
describe
Invalid character
'9176' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASML' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
f601d88b98f494360111003d3b6d75bf
bbe705eb84b2cd530dcafb81e36130c2c8de79c6
describe
'1246606' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMM' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
7a5dbf5ea45367e2dc0f0961c6e153c0
3623b4f0094cfe73d5d76a439ea8f87762865f5c
'2011-12-28T21:26:59-05:00'
describe
'129274' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMN' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
de3d9f5f00c83d651663ba47644669c8
e2cf46d923fc0adfb575d667ff4fda6e5aab73cd
describe
'45783' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMO' 'sip-files00030.pro'
b10a734d0c5b140bb45fb6c12364dceb
62c8e21fb4b661586fa7af7e1a1dbe0d66c99408
'2011-12-28T21:25:36-05:00'
describe
'33834' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMP' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
d7f983248624ffc443e7cb4bafae992a
6dc1eed19f4f132d13822a7a56d7845ff4fb84c8
describe
'29935672' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMQ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
59b8b4a4a3a58872a82579318969ca6c
68bc6a942a261f00fc1d621671ba4d1a0d136f2b
describe
'1840' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMR' 'sip-files00030.txt'
8a06fea13ad8b6ce8961955c7e57971a
c9062da750e2062c30659ef7eb9a1af4afe8353e
'2011-12-28T21:27:27-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7717' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMS' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
1be6e60fce7b02d9d113199ed1056292
85dd17857fc76875db525eb5aa3aeea24e612666
describe
'1246607' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMT' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
ccf0b3519f3d262f967a87f07f781b13
a1d85e774a5fa26e79251abb486d7fb3e38070e0
describe
'120139' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMU' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
db0a758431c07ec9db41ed23f0e32dc5
52cf0c1c49d4cd735456c9b5863922ded54337e3
describe
'38500' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMV' 'sip-files00031.pro'
d2637f7c780894b9300d2f2d3644d9b7
b33867fc256fec3fe4d4674ad030dd708bbe5625
describe
'30480' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMW' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
23d3181555e9a7cc41e1b8f69569dbe9
b89c3006fa4710363220a516c9006c6513d106dd
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMX' 'sip-files00031.tif'
8aeb67bbadb46f1a1db08a35d7a5fcd7
e186b68b8889419c3f28571297c88bb226def7f2
'2011-12-28T21:26:03-05:00'
describe
'1882' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMY' 'sip-files00031.txt'
7c8dd2b55a2e796496ad180e7eeb24fb
313487592c654c483c2ff896535aa258b801dff6
describe
Invalid character
'7314' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASMZ' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
91737c2873065759b203ae989687bc18
f93ac9aa4948830f89986d536e4ec64547766ead
describe
'1246148' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNA' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
2c04e617237588239462e93bb0b5cab6
289ddae9d9077e3a65fb49214cb383c38fbf483f
describe
'139557' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNB' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
9687116aef9bf08046dbd00d742657b1
7516d01131a63ec128f8f1f6d7a724e8896dfae9
describe
'9733' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNC' 'sip-files00032.pro'
fa96fc4f66150cba451201c1e08e6323
3acc6113a003f19485e299a6a1aeb60b3009ce89
describe
'32058' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASND' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
62ed7a83084b64323da7463ab79a01da
6d782aa007a786a6b6466f64cc22f2d4df3526f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNE' 'sip-files00032.tif'
644695ad39d68a02db705869bd1284d9
4d243d25a84f7c347725f7406394d1c029f067a6
'2011-12-28T21:27:01-05:00'
describe
'651' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNF' 'sip-files00032.txt'
3204263f28521b40f0c383638981c79e
60bb05c3cb24071aeb0adf235ce04e90798ecc55
describe
Invalid character
'8131' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNG' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
e4140b9bb001d113ea6f76c2a65a6ec0
66752a0f345dfe5cf7bb2aa1ccc2208d0665502c
describe
'1246233' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNH' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
a878d2b4d2a6dfb8f1b6755431d7fa3f
c2c664ec84780d70a86679656f157d938b90e741
'2011-12-28T21:26:04-05:00'
describe
'130880' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNI' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
4316a1fd3cbc38f9b3a92ac254e248a4
fbb8aaad9d991e249f741fd5c0f6146b8e473002
'2011-12-28T21:24:47-05:00'
describe
'49358' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNJ' 'sip-files00033.pro'
66e42d34e9a1a453ff3939d4c3a22338
c6422762730ccb56b62ef7813185d53ea306947b
'2011-12-28T21:25:11-05:00'
describe
'34949' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNK' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
fa0f8f94518a6abfc47efcf58d3bafaa
7577c37ed15d5761c293e43649ab2261313abdba
'2011-12-28T21:26:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNL' 'sip-files00033.tif'
b981091a9799db7693ed2f495a46a25a
cf837fd4a560ff0ef0dddb8eb722679fade1c45b
'2011-12-28T21:27:50-05:00'
describe
'1973' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNM' 'sip-files00033.txt'
ceac38d0540a58d90fe085400d1eb96e
9255d181d95545f61e47d566e820ecbec62463f6
describe
'7840' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNN' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
fca8ca97502ae92b05584ef8662521d9
faab999259f4475f4e6e455f3e59452c1155f233
'2011-12-28T21:24:21-05:00'
describe
'1246677' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNO' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
e3af1b98c00558a2ef3a461302f33f89
1111933818ee88b2fd634e5abf3adcf82bf53cc3
'2011-12-28T21:25:33-05:00'
describe
'129236' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNP' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
2bf57c25109a69cf946078fc2d334adb
edbe1c822ffbf9a34c685db64d09f23c4277a29a
describe
'45094' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNQ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
fc08e195426933ee0c33854777f939c4
73c460b514d968b1f732659bfae5bc0c08bd8eec
describe
'34010' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNR' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
5b78b0cbfd6399eb66b3f335cb1ce2ae
436586fb6a37ec07fce040ba0ea9ec23e86379bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNS' 'sip-files00034.tif'
11ee9bec2318ccd0657861070b01b1fd
715781599d2e563b6a39ae5475f83f16ccb68087
'2011-12-28T21:27:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNT' 'sip-files00034.txt'
6156169d02aa4ed1cdbac5ed683d0fa0
e4ab541c374c97709006bb7115f0bf5da83deb5a
describe
'7908' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNU' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
5e478b307d16d75914c806d8886773b0
210ee25ffd9097b9ca2d128ca604d5cd42f89aa6
describe
'1246187' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNV' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
6eadfb738c9a010a29153837ff44cb47
2f8b8709ebb054193608df5b32a9f1d20b456d83
describe
'139194' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNW' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
51bce9dfb16925b1c6fff103f1008a8d
bdf3625c1d8b6de8e79e4091ed25dc3d5a85df72
describe
'2817' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNX' 'sip-files00035.pro'
6f0344490618ff31d1e8b5f08a21c1d2
1398017136d62a9c4b1f080afb650da491c311a1
describe
'32639' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNY' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
b2a80fdbfa7108401e3db128499626f8
67f6e33c23d607df3eea1ddecd96e9f6a1ebeffc
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASNZ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
1d65f0c41126700f3c1769b35ca268fd
a8f6be8cbd030984f52835a565d5dc98779a32ff
'2011-12-28T21:24:34-05:00'
describe
'171' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOA' 'sip-files00035.txt'
0827b0435d416d34ed50e1414b0931fd
dbe0818252ce30b54842928c5c021bd2e7da5deb
describe
Invalid character
'8362' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOB' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
e071a3b252954dee94098ec81bb62ad6
f400622d36bf0d10504fcac590f7700c675e1ac3
describe
'1246116' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOC' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
1af9e2c35bcd3e59ab0388e1e59a7595
efe722c3906c739561da203e341b64311ee9447c
describe
'128652' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOD' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
62a3d74e54202c0396f4bb30c6a74ea9
08f85483b9f23469f8b59426513bf584c49d3484
describe
'42507' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOE' 'sip-files00036.pro'
d995d02490f6c11ea684184bcbb94325
6bc4a08305f4696e2f277a5ac6e66735bbdc278d
'2011-12-28T21:28:23-05:00'
describe
'32011' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOF' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
b55a80f1b15a945348899699654d5d5c
8a3203646fe5728934bcbb732e92ab8d69e2d288
'2011-12-28T21:24:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOG' 'sip-files00036.tif'
f8f838525e087683267ffe46ce840944
a36bfea2099c376c5abfd59c795c5a89ec3df9bc
'2011-12-28T21:27:36-05:00'
describe
'1951' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOH' 'sip-files00036.txt'
8c02dd7fa9f2a725a9809d30953203f1
4ff24740948bea95c9bade183a33692ebf688b2f
describe
Invalid character
'7521' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOI' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
3b39eb67ffc989facceab4ad46d626d4
61b6434ea34127a19980e77cb511fa0405dc7e0a
'2011-12-28T21:25:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOJ' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
ed66a93776a01750de94b5f19d95f522
808a1afb29bb67c5c6c7358cfd65413e93db4005
describe
'113419' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOK' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
2f107845edd99b1a872a30a6b64ac353
f26d7bddf40a70088873404006914da28ce4c149
describe
'31787' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOL' 'sip-files00037.pro'
014ab2dd6bde042005a15e239a284a21
01bfa8dd9c64145dc4a4a3f5bb5ef27bb004d0e4
describe
'28629' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOM' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
fde4985b3608aecec6a24f495a57ef43
e55d9fb7fcb0624ae709a296f88835fe4d9a0f26
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASON' 'sip-files00037.tif'
0f5314cef15fc417ef8392474850e2cd
7de432a49c34543f4a1c1943d7754ddcf3c73393
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOO' 'sip-files00037.txt'
b3811226b1e204d17a18744eacec9e07
9f960f6c43ac9097dd4200afd7ef4167d7654673
describe
'6708' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOP' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
7286003167e40f82ec3241082f83f7ff
87644c9306cae6d9bb1e59f43efaae2c56289589
describe
'1247012' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOQ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
003c9452b3018219d643780710b915e8
f9f79f0164d8c1f4b2efcab43328c8039cebc07e
describe
'49583' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOR' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
a8d77bb61a0b939f0b0d7b15fb3ca9d8
596557013b0b9db10c0d8879445de0d712edd7ed
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOS' 'sip-files00038.pro'
70dcbaffbbeed6d222501862cfd7f6d8
e17ce3bcc79728d1417d3678ba303c92444491c3
'2011-12-28T21:26:09-05:00'
describe
'11210' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOT' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
62d0c3276d3e1260e97e1f424e2b5e55
26c64ec19bd49786257c7fd89941bdff5886facf
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOU' 'sip-files00038.tif'
cd93979c207ca29d23563d48670cf07f
a4c26b17906566b0fbb42d3c71ca8bba8d9f9f76
describe
'155' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOV' 'sip-files00038.txt'
47386fe2409499d5b89a1481a97462da
e1313f17108eb133a63500a2a9730c94f8e0d5af
describe
'2972' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOW' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
7082e95b78eb5b9e9429793c42bedc0c
83903b8b0ecef83b9e77dbbaa54ec8ba73dd5d2f
describe
'1246912' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOX' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
2c4becf0e9540dd4ae0aff7e5008bc30
2376ac4d76cdc774cd1f739c04e4da27a48e33bd
describe
'93335' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOY' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
5739d6475a126b762d86c5e2a28af0ae
3e2271b283b38e5225f26c925fc439b78def0bea
'2011-12-28T21:28:43-05:00'
describe
'640' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASOZ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
de40058c103f3edc3759fd73e2406186
c2d93d441dc9bffb093faf80f4f29376f20209e2
describe
'22603' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPA' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
438063f2bd1bf7c422ddfa5e08506f71
41fc559fd196501666f4367c509df0130dc34104
'2011-12-28T21:24:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPB' 'sip-files00039.tif'
4bdf42449093d16fdfd84f72394da4bf
4acf2a3f35170ce7bc9b5db8cdd781d869373f34
describe
'133' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPC' 'sip-files00039.txt'
e9017b8e7e0620ba39b0e5fb5e27822f
071206938400b38db7eaeed5e3a3314e466c4dda
'2011-12-28T21:24:41-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'5902' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPD' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
3d9d7ffb319ec5f01172e4c7f20ae6a2
7b8d8f4deb72544035c623c4647817d692e0d8b0
describe
'1246230' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPE' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
72e386e31080379c8e4e4976683b3da6
8c191481769d13d2b446d89a6ab913fa213bc500
describe
'119905' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPF' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
9de00e1f092dc716125760a4a26467ca
24afef232249ee3eb5065a8fce1c02ef231bd54e
'2011-12-28T21:25:12-05:00'
describe
'24507' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPG' 'sip-files00040.pro'
51cdd0a4edd64b823082a403ab56995b
1aa2e411e6ac39acfc8ae47def0682e5bf5dcf7c
describe
'31338' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPH' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
9fa4cd73d416765331ec5cbc944b64a1
e49a0184f76f12499272bd01c58585d9d797692e
'2011-12-28T21:27:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPI' 'sip-files00040.tif'
786ae277ef49c9406fa113b0cf48877d
7033e857c2c278601beb7cbfb1b88345abacc4d5
'2011-12-28T21:25:29-05:00'
describe
'998' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPJ' 'sip-files00040.txt'
26bda0a28e94d3103e1639033390523f
b8e2f4dd56c9436ea7a16b31b712966b1dd7a6af
'2011-12-28T21:26:54-05:00'
describe
'7772' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPK' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
890b8e33c4bba8df77ef31114c2595e5
639262defe79c6769efde1aabe2335e43f5d4654
describe
'1246477' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPL' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
33d01714ba4e912aa129a1dc9f5ba25e
76c3bfebdb216a13eca13d4fa4d47ce763a4649a
describe
'131601' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPM' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
47554344e344cbfb4f08de895005daf1
9862f8ad737d0e21dba13e33c147f85499f252ee
describe
'49031' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPN' 'sip-files00041.pro'
6072f626c185a952c19d0eee3941dda2
dd441f2bd1f6e98f71e4bee83699252430f23f29
'2011-12-28T21:27:28-05:00'
describe
'34894' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPO' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
5ea6c4d5af15de90a519007fbd9d2576
9e2af881ae20ecc00cf27cb25322dcc7337a2f8d
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPP' 'sip-files00041.tif'
1184d5493844914166e5f919219377c2
9d9544dba903dada15eab2668f7d92f275d5ebf2
'2011-12-28T21:24:23-05:00'
describe
'1899' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPQ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
cae7e606ae5f6d59fbc97717e61896ee
179e885ab2d800eff2a894629d79becd10c63ed1
describe
'7867' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPR' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
6620c2cfc8f6f55ee74361e56f84eb12
9ed6b36a5de971d27e88435dad1d048a1dea25d1
'2011-12-28T21:28:08-05:00'
describe
'1246222' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPS' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
9df7d4ab08f630bba31b178e12f20955
ff7c376357964736b5e5a73034071f1985214503
describe
'125168' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPT' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
df03799857e63f3533490eca5b51e827
a96f70ecb9eb3abcffc1619435d057e1c90e5325
describe
'8270' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPU' 'sip-files00042.pro'
362f6c9d407d8ed575642eecf753758c
025f0ebc03b43c8261de3eacae71a0f314276a25
describe
'27480' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPV' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
8964aa97ebb57f4fd4f205e3f940a938
cd1dd9d4e279a42588a52fd8178b4ed2195fc8ff
'2011-12-28T21:24:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPW' 'sip-files00042.tif'
0e2aaf770a676a05fecff10d63174124
c267f8e2b2a02a7d4dc79eeea1dc8e8075f42865
'2011-12-28T21:27:55-05:00'
describe
'461' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPX' 'sip-files00042.txt'
01f79a51741eae0341d628cff7ddd8e1
4e3ac182242b35ecd58c6f6d57f64fb046791422
describe
Invalid character
'6976' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPY' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
b742f8b70ac8373e9493f6c3d5ff4997
5bab9ed29b73f9a2121642f5537529f4129fbd74
'2011-12-28T21:24:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASPZ' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
4ef60b294893451335b166cb515faeab
4d17f84bd8ca64d98194403e47ce4cae2f07e44c
describe
'119232' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQA' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
f8024f33c7b28af3626eeaf641cc8b37
d2b2340855c15c4a12558cdfec6cfdb427099214
describe
'36876' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQB' 'sip-files00043.pro'
e2c69cc0cc645eb73213f7b74c68d36b
b5c23e895b7468d98147306b6a0c847973b38ee3
describe
'29831' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQC' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
dab912cd93f427d514a3cbda8567c607
9138702becceae7071272e8a05576df788658cde
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQD' 'sip-files00043.tif'
ddfcd6352ab2f3e95e8c1f40c2d2a32b
bbcf99aa8df2f6303f8fd43e3d34e388cd99d7e0
'2011-12-28T21:26:50-05:00'
describe
'1569' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQE' 'sip-files00043.txt'
b985eed0e6b4eccb98de101d6ded6325
0780a062a083f3069222fb76d8c11f49ebb50757
'2011-12-28T21:27:24-05:00'
describe
'6993' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQF' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
f6aebd225a7e0efcee83347f15fd1b71
59574a14f0bbbc2cb354bb07df6e81b109bfab9f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQG' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
2697c2632faa21044391cce1f7931ffb
ae78154dd1d248416c2e9c9715ef5135872d2606
describe
'136396' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQH' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
f0fbddb3024b991e1aaa9dbb3283d447
ca256865f3a906c2495266fe037672613519d9fc
describe
'40939' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQI' 'sip-files00044.pro'
4b9c81eae134f604b6db8c817df27104
90848cddb6a201805b27b95382ff6696c3908d48
describe
'35717' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQJ' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
b4ac9ef01742d0b02a6d64fde2d6bf45
277fe763422b1cc57ab6c5a0aa00426411c57945
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQK' 'sip-files00044.tif'
85a1eec84b4238a7138521b518eb36ad
ebf6840148c901a62d32b026d99246cca253b994
'2011-12-28T21:27:33-05:00'
describe
'1866' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQL' 'sip-files00044.txt'
0a25a6a7d0373be6c27d8054ffe2042c
2676cf1968631679e175b6b1166d86a3309080cb
describe
'8210' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQM' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
cb5074f41b9c655ea4560a90ddfa73b0
ffad53d30b0ffed0cf91b19919d33d0f5708fc0b
describe
'1246590' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQN' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
f710e73e717c9e48aafd47171bef45c9
f1f493bd224da1bab49bc94234f981b0992e96a5
describe
'133130' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQO' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
271ef7c8bce2ffb1fa09f24259097db8
9e6d8d30db605721ec8e93801cf0becd94550444
'2011-12-28T21:25:58-05:00'
describe
'6599' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQP' 'sip-files00045.pro'
ebedd671907ce931870439047e47daf0
b3ac96a66bb6b9aaa5f7d6bd3a8dfbefde4b88cc
describe
'30111' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQQ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
5fa83c5be3264fa6491a89c59bd45faa
0a84714e0c462292e6fe8db39c1408dfddda254b
'2011-12-28T21:24:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQR' 'sip-files00045.tif'
402f9694eec50e158f40ec5455340374
88c9099f47031e11cfb4ee3dd6626b86688f11f6
describe
'386' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQS' 'sip-files00045.txt'
63eea332ec76351860e68032ecceb0b3
641d76333feae2b8feb651064e721eb84dcffab8
describe
Invalid character
'7672' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQT' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
c30f08240a4ee8a8e90039ae1e69f2fc
972303c0ba47d671fa03922daefdc40a244b4875
describe
'1246231' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQU' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
0dd88b3fba11cba87516a9ce94b1af73
9e95f9b63774bf4c9f5b0a26b782eb12fc3396e9
describe
'124324' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQV' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
6f7b18cff5ee6036dc8bc01e794503b3
d7b2e3106c26175406e16127d2eb39cadbb5e9fe
describe
'39164' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQW' 'sip-files00046.pro'
f2d36b57e01374384ec6930ec952edd9
4c07cc0dce0350a085b7702302c83af393dfd4c1
describe
'32302' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQX' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
1bd1a0e47fa5868206d889de8634ac78
fb061b5682999628f6f710eb085e759be371b3bc
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQY' 'sip-files00046.tif'
ab4ca3910c4287a9d627f49e63c72e68
a8ccb86f6d881c22e04b77e0c278e1d441729a35
'2011-12-28T21:28:34-05:00'
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASQZ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
88950fc8a112e1c0f24e05aff25703c0
cd197b40fd33cbd94cf82b97198be4bdd93f39f1
describe
'7480' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRA' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
3fba8ab45bea201c6a570510cf29bf4a
e7d02c5881db6956806ef9228f00a57d8a8c180d
describe
'1246220' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRB' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
0dddbb52242890612a1be471dc44951c
2d5dc5d1af3cc06cc0907b73fd375d86dcefa240
describe
'109600' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRC' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
68b3d239e4bf86ddf5c543a047c7b85e
785820f8de9b91e4cc968e13720d36eff1b4340f
describe
'35504' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRD' 'sip-files00047.pro'
4ea019ad1aee094d7e0fdb7d37e9be37
5dfa170b0bff4b3fe27d23a944c1a6081deee08d
describe
'28821' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRE' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
5a235c95325346b6f28ec886aced092b
2aff47306591e3b568418b47928c7daab388ac1e
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRF' 'sip-files00047.tif'
162dd2f94104df06e5bb1f81dfb4cb9e
9b26a741401f5ff07bf9f511d2f3a45b0fbdcaaf
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRG' 'sip-files00047.txt'
f87ec1f72219da906998fb4b064d4b7a
ee8b257430e7122f9baa2dd7d4caf9bc0a3876ce
describe
'7088' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRH' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
954ffb8882d8dc8fa618b494de8b31f0
33794762bc77937dc33f57cb90731ed70fbd27f0
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRI' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
dcacd245401bf644dbbc800fa101769c
d02116df509bdc6a61e0f6e7b6f5cd94798ffd1d
describe
'130414' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRJ' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
0d89d25150821d546cb861fc68fe170e
ba0e38ba56eb9f5fc8510d44a01ff0d75586eb06
describe
'3634' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRK' 'sip-files00048.pro'
e7d8d73192b8974f6d716b9903764594
84fadc54889fa0343012c62401cee6599b767bea
describe
'29842' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRL' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
cb05e604ac9ea1c6d2ca2894e5d45e3d
c035f4a4f3b65ea7bb2c3fd06f84cd3bb1514789
'2011-12-28T21:25:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRM' 'sip-files00048.tif'
c9257981852783bdbb0a4859aa970c78
7712b194db07c293dccbb77b452ff6a031de1ba3
'2011-12-28T21:25:16-05:00'
describe
'182' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRN' 'sip-files00048.txt'
effa8d3081602faf0bd0f698b2349723
35e6f5801ec1ddfe20e0bd53f9311f945b597586
describe
'7592' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRO' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
3128332caa90774cfe29af8cf72624e9
c29d78be2726e94887dea9c71fbf51f81304c7e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRP' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
7a753b24c09188e35a3e712f8318f255
5d9ec8b0a8312ec84e96fe4baeb5603876d8fb8f
describe
'125371' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRQ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
0b730051c5e281153f0bfeb647c80379
7d3f8b142052a7fdf52b510a42d561e32e3bd07b
describe
'45346' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRR' 'sip-files00049.pro'
f9ecce41ef547c515ba3bbadb7afc5f4
dac95797fc615ead6ad6f4b8d9dbf960d7bc96f6
describe
'33385' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRS' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
47c16f8c9a250d639f475880f89cf8b4
8e6de7d3a6ae8ae0e49d5030eae1311378e7e82c
'2011-12-28T21:24:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRT' 'sip-files00049.tif'
09abba6ba7fd9b6aa96cd25294b34866
04ae2bd2b5e87379cd247d252e2680342ef086b8
describe
'1954' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRU' 'sip-files00049.txt'
caba5ae88716735e6b9ea75ce0c379cf
55c1fc9328c61a2718d05b34f7bc6b1a4770eee4
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRV' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
28363cc00ff15ddaaa2ee097590bab1c
e3741e13e775fccf9b84357f357ea6d4d1652ca0
describe
'1246666' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRW' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
3786ebaaed7af7059d7f0347250f189b
bc0cc74c5b5c90747e5750ed04ca82944b34e71d
'2011-12-28T21:24:55-05:00'
describe
'141243' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRX' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
3c33a08cca1468eaf78997da4cd8a8e1
872ec4e17791f5ad332b9b4e495b8877a9295f35
describe
'46530' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRY' 'sip-files00050.pro'
57f6eab1c880192e329bc734673abc3f
23f2090d557342c097c4e8678081e3dc797f0aaa
describe
'36811' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASRZ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
d490cac4cb41f6843eb7eca4b37af6f4
faa6954f8efe5243be09f2e15529d84bdec6e339
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSA' 'sip-files00050.tif'
4423b2b28cff83a4e818deb5073a9ffe
ac757ca98471057428719448e5942656b1e2ddef
describe
'1807' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSB' 'sip-files00050.txt'
89638463a5c08b9afa81a0b34b310b60
5bf94697b6b7625f3277529de385b06529d66614
describe
'8423' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSC' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
3d15dd7004334c40f8cf7c8cb0d97d7c
f312a8a85c90af89dbcb444f5cdc6daa40b8aedc
describe
'1246639' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSD' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
12b7db830618185e40b96d7ec071a05b
7cd2f1eb0698024a63280b76489a15d5d6b8f85e
describe
'134945' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSE' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
749a1d68e1c5615e6dfaf1525398ad76
6377acad99cbf0946c6f23394f8b801ab7450685
describe
'4752' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSF' 'sip-files00051.pro'
2f16eff7de622df3e1d603b0f0bd52fe
9f9551fd3c75c03552600729ab4c42c8c81f62b1
'2011-12-28T21:28:22-05:00'
describe
'30572' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSG' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
da84041053358d33a7fe228110efcbcc
6a4c5e6ee7d465ab94b4198831a4b718737bac17
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSH' 'sip-files00051.tif'
556d4b6c22ae2be8143b75098eda82b3
6e1fe30fb54a8504dd23962828623d0438a8680c
'2011-12-28T21:25:20-05:00'
describe
'287' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSI' 'sip-files00051.txt'
9c9a07af08fed1c6b024e772b5a56381
5a6f3d8645fdd6b3ff6964e8cb43dd2268d32b6b
describe
Invalid character
'7821' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSJ' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
532612e3d83545e22b63ce9f3a82ae81
5c2eaf3be5be805256abffe6f5b3a6b8c512c7f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSK' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
f5eea001cf4d7eff6d74d3ce3b6ba50b
2f9afda227f0bbeadb488997c8bf454b1e3f9d17
describe
'131459' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSL' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
76a181935a9231ef37cb1a7b321db676
7e745d99e00bc4c9ef1c83f4961c5cea214cc399
describe
'52288' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSM' 'sip-files00052.pro'
41a15e15f3d4d771bf41551d127e522b
aa6f4c17bc5fda0644bad0bb3d2f197c3e556f61
describe
'35037' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSN' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
417f06c5d7cd68ac0d41fece0c364a87
a0f286175d7530e5babf6ba3e5aa7ff80a13c9af
'2011-12-28T21:25:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSO' 'sip-files00052.tif'
3cf39392138fae5bbc0b7a5be94d982c
9544cc0b64faa2226e761694c1edec6933061483
'2011-12-28T21:24:53-05:00'
describe
'2120' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSP' 'sip-files00052.txt'
e171ed001c3a9c116e33c22a6dbf3abf
7ece1b4c0c163f7f0fc4cd3b26f232fb74687eb0
describe
'7956' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSQ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
b1eece3b34b3657c662a4a261e45e03d
0b87aee11d9528e6f70ee4a69141e7e0e28e656e
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSR' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
a8fdf77eec4aaf3f1fd31bdf2029d2f2
f0d929655d39461c3cd79c537394305400fe8382
describe
'128317' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSS' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
714961b201315b2d5bc015289cdd6a8e
b120b89a9639ee6cd957ea51a781c38c7370e5d4
describe
'35811' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASST' 'sip-files00053.pro'
f1509264f210a58f192561e3f36a4682
33ea98422245bd7c61a3b71a58a0885ee6a2922f
describe
'33915' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSU' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
e9c8c9de0456871aa9685d0d4fc98d67
9149745fa9d4a910917943472c65172792a468d1
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSV' 'sip-files00053.tif'
5c963f65004f6165fa517cbbf3b5a302
86fc5583f8925841b226ec9e6cdb5de4b9c7a551
'2011-12-28T21:27:18-05:00'
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSW' 'sip-files00053.txt'
0d82a620d041b89878bf61858031e7d5
3050fd7948e28e301e84f263403ddba091f086c7
describe
'8005' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSX' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
d072a848b3d7278fa394c53e3b4dc9f3
44dcf2f94d5b6aff42c043a020c5f19aef075dd4
describe
'1247006' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSY' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
bd2ad8c0a18d21540317d1d2548f11f9
3a2f83772fe1ece2c3feb68f0b382fd83fe41535
describe
'48971' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASSZ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
801f45608db7939545357f7dec03f68f
7ee2d85ec0de31cc187e714c6a90fdb4ff2d4c9f
describe
'488' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTA' 'sip-files00054.pro'
89a08e4cd137a0b6e5db62e25264ded0
baa5270cd127b30aff6d5ed4ebb882cea04a99cd
describe
'11000' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTB' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
d8c37de871fc85d701d10074cd1ccd46
9fd76fae0ffb14d9d5b5cdb95fb97a8f24519dd0
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTC' 'sip-files00054.tif'
460a9914aff296d19fd630d3f30a6768
92aef188d784676d6bf2c95dfce9aa142eb3a8f7
'2011-12-28T21:28:17-05:00'
describe
'41' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTD' 'sip-files00054.txt'
675272a9654a96d572100bbfbe041d6b
08e95cb4b87d08d02b3db60cf9db956beaffa16b
describe
'3077' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTE' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
fe94134947fa09af62d7fcd25adef359
941f7b39bd169ec071ea5e6d0dddb5054d55524e
describe
'1247024' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTF' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
2473727e5099a984780b4b981bf25f2f
36be1d929676c5d970fb46ff3aef53e22f64c323
describe
'97074' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTG' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
8108c468d5020312f62b25f4a2f1fdea
ed43122487bb03d235d06fdc5d782d547e8af99d
'2011-12-28T21:24:48-05:00'
describe
'451' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTH' 'sip-files00055.pro'
f7b771bb28738503baedc540d81ddb00
f01403447db18a30b46d1fb12f0d32df5800e5bb
describe
'23689' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTI' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
8212b5d5daae7d04aec2460289dec8a2
d32850f6fee6415083a4c5e31733849bfcd96b37
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTJ' 'sip-files00055.tif'
a24ae4b9d21c0e36e2a6d3044a5d2469
bc0f609ad0bfdf8a557992faa487af08362ffebc
describe
'47' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTK' 'sip-files00055.txt'
30cefc356169eb49351f3c79d1b40ab6
a9424d2cabbc296e26ed244ec8a30f5310417e82
'2011-12-28T21:25:05-05:00'
describe
'6085' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTL' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
fc6dcaf0a2891095b5af703050c23639
c50f194688964dfb7ad44899d84fb473bdcededb
describe
'1246674' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTM' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
683116213b5f15dca33bcff9f48e26ed
dac5fb22d7447ec1a9943d8e9fe76f43db57d109
describe
'132502' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTN' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
369f90a36973f462746303ce415f71bd
541dc6e8959b86bdb62734ba2803d22e47167d24
describe
'38630' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTO' 'sip-files00056.pro'
5379a612542302f80b0d287c082b878f
b8c5d081b784bac2f49b110353615e618c1ae233
describe
'34528' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTP' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
91907ba449ee96b61ed9225194762dff
34269bf6db4c30b3fc6d9457584a71b8a30037ff
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTQ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
76adeede560f7e50751b08a462e49044
f294e7f61f6e0d3f7a384dc4a91e6593014518f7
'2011-12-28T21:26:18-05:00'
describe
'1901' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTR' 'sip-files00056.txt'
2b7122f7df7aa8ca0ad459ce619ace52
acbe41952465e67b409615da01aabc23bf366643
describe
'8018' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTS' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
e5722edac6ef0b759a303ba9f59dbf42
f9418c704948accef0b0038f5f320eec049ef744
describe
'1246634' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTT' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
105f9a83a2c24a16c792c8b44f49fa97
4b87bb33f39087cead897f1a807097e184beb4a2
'2011-12-28T21:27:37-05:00'
describe
'116711' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTU' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
99d4530ebaef91bd594b9d29fa6017ac
de97a4c5994679fc6895265ce5607727cc105293
describe
'37125' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTV' 'sip-files00057.pro'
ddca680d99ce3a63755568439f49bd12
60925203c0dd329800ac98da8e1baf79818177be
describe
'29548' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTW' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
83bd23a321bdb95a041a8f630839ab67
d779a094272552bfb54b382672e9e72b421a20fd
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTX' 'sip-files00057.tif'
7184eea6f838112cf96bc813ead79483
094a877c4559609731c46138bdf9abd92e9edbe9
describe
'1536' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTY' 'sip-files00057.txt'
20891032fa498da94247e209ac8301cb
b42ae5d96937da95095c3d2f20a19daa5095239b
'2011-12-28T21:26:48-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6891' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASTZ' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
f193be953dd457746d8eeb6dd8aa2366
eab3c59bcee0b067a7a84a0816f4cacf232e7c43
describe
'1246672' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUA' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
21172f9d953ff124e95cefa95bf9f837
8386c827fb51181faf13b1941054b8ec82fe2e52
describe
'130740' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUB' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
be830b958617066ddf8eb55bd986da87
9865edd51d2701e97baf8397047212a11ddbe2f2
describe
'3421' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUC' 'sip-files00058.pro'
bf5792870d2dab98220cf3c793e2a373
c5aa6b7354b65a353d0e85586a32d7bf2e2f29a0
describe
'30081' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUD' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
91866eef49d56fb111be8abaa3aae9fc
082cbb6d6207730e01c0669052276e936080ff91
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUE' 'sip-files00058.tif'
3c2b34e08288987f289e51758e73260b
14166f2ec48891bdf6638332028ea5146f131a23
'2011-12-28T21:25:59-05:00'
describe
'196' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUF' 'sip-files00058.txt'
fbbede765bc4b92ef98eb0740456cf78
c8a8da81a13b47c1890b53a3f87fdea7d6bd4fba
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUG' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
f59608edd28d1a58985a13e1b217dbc6
76e3fd2200637824fcaf269fd2a24210a5d854df
describe
'1246554' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUH' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
fd1d22732ed6d5e5a5a1da20cc765cd4
d158ca79aa97a0ad5147428f65e96606b0f2caa9
'2011-12-28T21:24:54-05:00'
describe
'135393' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUI' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
aa7eecae3cbabad471c1bfb32905ccb4
080b64912cda17eb6ab14daa2b1aeea3452e009d
describe
'44301' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUJ' 'sip-files00059.pro'
6609ca6a8d64776abf7687c018bf160a
1636f525fd242e51fd977867e1de2084082d6e21
describe
'35064' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUK' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
2a273c5cc32d70f52e10880494aaf664
f5326eaff348887bec93c2cad6f31a3e81d37f07
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUL' 'sip-files00059.tif'
3fecfff11111905777648c2c2726afc7
9a250c68d771c4383a2fc66dadf5f10b3a4db0e8
describe
'1793' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUM' 'sip-files00059.txt'
2b83e9c466fcdf9651bee17bdcd5747f
1b6b2d574e9328ffdd65aa5b3dfe435a57ff9b8e
describe
'8297' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUN' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
917f0fc0524ce2494aca6278850162bb
429faba040b700368c29c797e3c73f7940d0a06d
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUO' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
20018dfa3089dce096c06d574e74aa7e
7af1be1b81fa42615e8992d950663c527956222c
describe
'128083' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUP' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
5fe56a4c4f1d99e54dbccebaf209cd11
c4e1f6f96db41a2e3d93063f3c249418e2fe7069
describe
'33545' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUQ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
3bd9d9e367cf3940aef7627c6ca6e822
76a79f3bdacc43e07bad2a2650c4d70beb7b461d
describe
'34103' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUR' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
ec44f4560e1b7e4d17cfd4b01d29585d
c8c05fcda4b8bb8ab18300b1ed81d2aeca0ce391
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUS' 'sip-files00060.tif'
909102c1562df7ce0b66b1d222edcb35
0171a15abb0d0f51099b7933256ec4a75ab6c325
describe
'2026' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUT' 'sip-files00060.txt'
60d7d4a9f52afbd8b66330d27856363b
b236a83368b66fbfddcffbfc4582d8c627aa58d2
describe
'8138' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUU' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
6bd998db458100d13e310c22a6702656
c134e16d99eb4ae949540a6706bfecbdf5cb36b7
describe
'1246506' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUV' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
30a48bde3a067abf697932d035d16920
52df10b96449e51640c63efd6131e7729189fceb
describe
'143224' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUW' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
0baeddfae6961098108b6703079b53c5
5c5397b3283a52fbe20add755f0b3d5c8de4095d
describe
'4180' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUX' 'sip-files00061.pro'
fadd8b629c7ddf9856f86f8f6da68830
1a87af2397222811176e18b9f7b053ad51b3fef5
describe
'31855' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUY' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
ffd5191c0ab3f0f234f6cf82bf2191d5
87b060f93bbdbb365a9b75f2c8ba02fe060bfc60
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASUZ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
9e692aedda2afdef02c01c6d4891ce6f
5be00ed879d72bddb20b84e38b6d5f536b5f6db8
describe
'272' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVA' 'sip-files00061.txt'
37cf109c9311b45142889a54dbb1e27a
814e03ca71f46ea6692f7a732cdcc62a15111b2b
describe
Invalid character
'7790' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVB' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
3ac1657c2934049adc377f9570e9b8fa
313bfe94e29f4b06c1154f44f1827331630768d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVC' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
299eeda41d1e2d87eb1e8189c569a26c
470c0f8cbc624372e8f26a2faf1d053009670cae
describe
'120890' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVD' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
2ee960fc1680b56252c2628f88ab475c
118c2bdf4ea57a537047e9b5310e625e9e91353f
describe
'35595' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVE' 'sip-files00062.pro'
35a267f3f108f8db3086348913b4c3f3
5c3ca3577fe08f4b24daf95bd82f70792df0cc8a
describe
'30129' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVF' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
2d0a15c6fc841fb00cc669d3ad66ba13
d5bc54739a9b4a7202b21a4f0653ace7bf7868f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVG' 'sip-files00062.tif'
1cbc94936bbae82cfda0380eff05f21f
052dd3f2053b441c1e53f84007d1dbd0ccf34214
describe
'1583' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVH' 'sip-files00062.txt'
1e481ff86033036ffa3d8b8cad5b1b3f
e3ff2120d7f8ae0e5e8883e6ef4f5609cca5fbaa
describe
'7115' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVI' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
41b2584d02e29addb1f7f50c3ead47d7
181011dbc21d542f768593707b35f8e17a62acd4
describe
'1246175' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVJ' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
1fe4d3880eafc19746e9196d558aeef6
462dc0588cbaf7f76bad43c908cbc41170c06e25
describe
'122124' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVK' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
48fdf938fd814ab80ee3f98f5b20d649
3a97defdd25fc8d57ae058a6865f1a4c188178a6
describe
'41087' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVL' 'sip-files00063.pro'
dbae12391a82ab62b7f742892e71e097
a02a5e024a0d0d28c374c35e0c009bbe25c9fb4e
'2011-12-28T21:25:00-05:00'
describe
'31671' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVM' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
d9165d0f80b42ea670de731167bc4aa4
3c10bb696a97f40de5e00dc8b20c325f6f98d971
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVN' 'sip-files00063.tif'
fc5f0987bc4d7eff0a3d397251b46e58
68641c24e0a9e543ad1dafa9fab1ea6517d46c1f
describe
'1590' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVO' 'sip-files00063.txt'
4963efe219c7e58a26a9182a5e1e92d4
0230321fee162af2b5527d636702c520f8d31273
describe
Invalid character
'7288' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVP' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
368a1633bb8bc32851de6a93048885ce
8bfa989cadcbbb6c79fa6ec9a34cbd8365ca9864
describe
'1247030' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVQ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
3e0c61be959b150407be5e98a704a6a3
e278510682bf2c3e88e8e6d330bea483bbe92da9
describe
'141376' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVR' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
315ffd35088235e5360cd3530b54c7d3
70f07f243be8c87553c1730793865acecc3e03fe
describe
'9675' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVS' 'sip-files00064.pro'
b7067f3ef405db6f08377a1cc87addc3
39e5dfd9b9702fbb5287cc8517cc43446a53665b
'2011-12-28T21:26:13-05:00'
describe
'31115' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVT' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
6902471ca5aa008e96963f8cf442c637
6321247a1851b3aca7696ed9466db22a9eface23
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVU' 'sip-files00064.tif'
157451ea8302b1d81870a03e1539a127
46013f97b5f44021258525bc682d46e1926c18b1
'2011-12-28T21:28:25-05:00'
describe
'571' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVV' 'sip-files00064.txt'
31b7920c459c61cb4da9650f3893cdc8
0ef49994d2e3eb4f7a73564f2a4384be0e63c2af
describe
Invalid character
'7619' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVW' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
2a6441591a500db3c07a509ffcc22671
ab34107be312a1332fa40e25f6ce727e6fa7b33d
describe
'1246675' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVX' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
44a31239746289a6f978d993c037598d
8abfeb300d20d65d4fd117174967ddf912079c73
describe
'138312' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVY' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
e6725427000f22444a660d0e10c98903
911c34eb3e8951836f64bd761047b94c14c388d9
describe
'60731' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASVZ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
7b356a3d32d6070e255512ae6267919b
dffcdc7450e6673df02a9546d6fc6fbb583e921a
describe
'36561' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASWA' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
3cc9a39c8fe0fc68a79c7cf471f80c3a
ecfebb9f6a37b84501aa457d4b3a6258d37c5c3a
'2011-12-28T21:27:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASWB' 'sip-files00065.tif'
31a8dfc9657762e7f5aa945bb8e474f2
3d59d9b750fb3b499d5847c9503914c6c350e2d8
describe
'2544' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASWC' 'sip-files00065.txt'
e86b46fe16c94f339867a9cba63b6a96
7ba2a6f103ef88fa1fb46918dcbffd6216f404a6
describe
'8125' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASWD' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
e16f747d4141672ecc4675ea65a68f49
e27b7084cbf5f198be125ca1e1881ea954016963
describe
'1246619' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASWE' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
27970dd273f89b2487fbb8e88644e184
bed6df5c7f70b903a1ba27a2260da5fe039b0311
describe
'131734' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASWF' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
19d94a61a4efa455c9114181b94c7e0b
9de272ff16ef631f298d85f7738bc35b6f000541
describe
'45932' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASWG' 'sip-files00066.pro'
5a67c3ef5cf460072dff5aed89220e1d
bc70de55e89d3ec092091c5198ce25da869ede3f
describe
'35404' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASWH' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
e446aebf7ef8608e1743c2f1360edd2a
8e01cae69a9f04d5fbec967c2f93c6bc1efdad1e
'2011-12-28T21:26:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASWI' 'sip-files00066.tif'
cd913d3dffd315278850deb874583156
3c493c46d6d30141f0f71e751d4bd297fa61bfea
describe
'1770' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASWJ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
46988c3023c6ac4ce1842aa23c85b517
62a70454e97e55d1d83cbbc6b47941096f456fea
describe
'8174' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASWK' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
d24c054cefe4383ce78509c4fea98162
b71ed78f9e67c1a0735dfd772953021e69429e6c
describe
'1247028' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUFfileF20090113_AAASWL' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
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RN aie


|
|



The Baldwin Library

RnB






: [
ay,
7 HS
Ws. 7
YA
Ws LQ?

SS SSS WY

x




SMPs


NCE upon a time there lived a King
and a Queen who loved each other

yery dearly, and who would have been

‘Wery happy, if it had not been for one
very happy |
“thing. This was that they had no children.

¥» When, at last, after long waiting, a little

fr
fyey

If

x —

daughter was born, their joy knew no
bounds. The King, to show his delight,
gave a christening feast-so grand that
nothing like it had ever been seen before.
He invited all the fairies
that could be found in the
land to stand as godmoth-
ers to the little Princess, in

order that each might






bestow upon her some

vty, gift, as was the
a ft i 1 1 y

| mi ashion with good

fairies. in those

\\
days. When they

\
\

ND) sat down to
Nw the table
é FAS there was
ZS set before

THE BABY PRINCESS.

each fairy





a magnificent cover, with a knife, fork,
and spoon, all of pure gold, studded with
diamonds and rubies.

But just as they had taken seats, there
came into the hall an old fairy who had
not been invited, because more than fifty
years before she had left the kingdom on
a journey, and had not since been heard
of until this day. The King, much troub-
led, ordered a cover to be placed for her,
but it was of common ware, because only
seven of the gold dishes had been made.
The old fairy thought she had been
slighted, and muttered some angry threats
between her teeth. ne of the young
fairies who sat by her overheard how she
grumbled, and fearing that she might give
the little Princess some evil gift, went and
hid herself behind the hangings, so that
she might speak last, and repair, as much
as she could, the harm which the old fairy
might do.

The six other good fairies now began
Tie

youngest gave for her gift that she

to offer their gifts to the Princess.







i

"yl



a

ARRIVAL OF, THE OLD FAIRY,

should be the most beautiful person in
the world; the text, that she should be
as sweet-tempered as an angel; the third,
that she should be wonderfully graceful ;
the fourth, that she should sing like a
nightingale; the fifth, that she should
dance like a flower in the wind; the sixth,
that she should be clever at learning and
very witty. ‘

Then the old fairy’s turn came. Shak-
ing her head spitefully, she walked to the
middle of the room, and stretching out
her hand, cried: “My gift to the Princess

is—that when she is fifteen years old, she

ij 2 t A yp AHN é;
eS oe CO A




bie

MM
Cee iene

a

| shall pierce her. hand with a spindle,

and die of the wound.” ‘Then, turning,

she left the hall, and was seen no more.
Her terrible gift made every one

shudder, and the King and Queen and

all present began to cry and weep.

- Then the young fairy came out from

| behind the hangings, and said: “Do not

grieve, O King and Queen; your daugh-
ter shall not die of this disaster. It is true
J am not able to undo altogether what
my elder has done. |
Your daughter shall
indeed pierce her
hand with a spin-
dle; ‘but instead of
dying, sheshall only |
fall intoadeep sleep,
which shall
hundred years. At

last a







the end of that time,





the son of a king
Diced

eR NCLNET RIVET


SLEEPING BEAUTY =—



will find her, and awake her. ‘They will fall in love \j
NI

\ ith ie
Ne, A iy







with each other, and he will marry her.

To save the Princess, if possible, from the misfor-
tune invoked by the old fairy, the King gave a com-
mand forbidding his subjects, under pain of death, to
spin with a spindle, or even so much as to have one
in any of their houses.

As the Princess grew up, all the wishes of the good
fairies were fulfilled; she was beautiful, wise, and





good, and every one loved her dearly. |
One day, when she was just fifteen years of age,

a desire seized her to explore the palace, and she \

wandered about from room to room, until finally she

reached the top of the tallest tower. There, in a little

N

\ yy yy

K«
\\\

~





\ \
Q}

Qn \
SS
SSS



chamber, she found a very old woman—so old and Ly ;
deaf that she had never even heard of the King’s i) y
command— A |





Ue al dW

spinning

\

busily
with a oe
spindle. BEHIND THE HANGINGS.

The Princess; never having seen
anything of the sort before, was very

much interested, and asked the old






Ai woman what she was doing.
|

Tai
| / ,
il \




“eT am spinning, my pretty child,”



“How amusing!” said the Prin-
cess. “Let me try if I can spin too.”
Scarcely had she touched the spin-
dle, when the wicked wish was fulfilled
—the point pierced her finger, and

‘© ALL PRESENT BEGAN TO WEEP AND CRY,” she fell as if dead. The poor fright-
—#SLEEPING BEAUTY se—





THE DWARF WITH THE SEVEN-LEAGUE BOUTS.

ened old woman called for help, and
people came and tried every means to
restore the Princess, but they could not
bring her to. When the King and
Queen beheld her thus, they knew that
regret was vain. They caused her to
be carried into the finest apartment in
the palace, and placed upon a magnifi-
cent bed. There she lay looking like a
sleeping angel.

The good fairy who had saved her life
was in the kingdom of Matakin, twelve
thousand leagues away, when this accident
befell the Princess, but she was instantly
informed of it by a little dwarf, who had
seven-league boots, that is, boots with

which he could step over seven leagues



of ground at one stride. The fairy started
at once, in a chariot drawn by dragons,
and in less than an hour she had arrived
at the palace.

She approved of every thing the King
and Queen haddone. As she had great
foresight, she thought that it would be
sad for the Princess, when she awoke, to
find herself alone among strangers, so she
touched with her wand everybody in the
palace except the King and Queen—
ladies-of-honor, waiting-maids, gentle-
men, officers, guards, footmen, cooks, and
scullions. She likewise touched all the
animals about the place, the horses, the
watch-dog, and even the cat and her
kittens. They all fell asleep, that they
might awake with their mistress, and be
ready to wait upon her.



THE DRAGON CHARIOT.







THE FAIRY USES HER WAND.

And now the King and Queen, having
kissed their dear child tenderly, went
sadly forth from the palace, and gave a
command that no one should go near it.
This, however, was not needed; for in
less than an hour there grew up around
it, a wood so thick and thorny that
neither man nor beast could pass through.
Above this, nothing could be seen but





the very tops of the towers, and that only
at a good way off #

When a hundred years were past, the
son of a king then reigning, who was
of a different family from the Princess,
being out hunting in that part of the
country, asked what tower it was which
he saw in’ the middle of a great thick
wood. No one could. give him a sat-
isfactory answer, for the story of the
Princess had been almost completely for-
gotten. At last an old peasant was found
who remembered hearing his grandfather
say to his father that in this palace was
a Princess, the. most beautiful that was
ever seen, who was doomed to sleep for a
hundred years, when she would be awak-

RN







ened by a king’s son.
The young Prince
was all on fire at these
. words, believing that
he could put an end
to this mystery, and
he made up ins
mind to push his



way through the
mut tlie

~~. _ first advance the

wood.







trees and bram-
ap—— bles gave way of
their own accord
and let him pass.

A SLEEPING COOK.

He went up to.




;
‘
Y

THE PRINCE AND THE OLD’ PEASANT.

the palace, which he saw at the end of a
laroe avenue, and entered it; “Tle was
surprised to find that none of his atten-
dants could follow him, for the branches
closed together again as soon as he passed
through.

However, he went on boldly. He came
first Into an outer court, and what he saw
there was enough to daunt the stoutest

heart. Bodies of men, horses, dogs, cats,



XY ‘ there, standing, sitting,
f°. and lying in the atti-
YS

Wy, asmotionlessas if they

were dead, while over

i tudes of life, and yet |
| |

almost more than human, lay sleeping



and otheranimalswere | furnished chamber,

all reigned a most death-like silence. But
on looking closely, the Prince saw that
the men had not the pale faces of the



dead, but looked, indeed, quite rosy, while
beside them were goblets half filled with



wine, showing that they had gone to
sleep suddenly while drinking. _

The Prince then crossed the court, and
going up a short flight of stairs, came into
the guard-room, where the guards were
standing on duty, but. fast asleep and
Atter that,
several rooms full: of

snoring. he went through
ladies and gentlemen

whowere asleep, some
standing and some

Finally, the
astonished Prince

sitting.

came into a richly



~ where was the fairest

A SLEEPING GUARD.

sight he had ever beheld.
A young girl, whose beauty scemed

gently, as if she had only just closed her



‘DIASMONDS#é|OADSa



eyes. Trembling, the Prince approached.

And now, the enchantment being ended, —

“the Princess opened her eyes, and look-
ing at him kindly, said: “Is it you, my
Prince? I have waited for you a long
Ele

Hand in hand the Prince and Princess
walked out of the chamber. They found
the ladies and gentlemen of the court

awake, and staring one at another with
startied eyes, while throughout the palace

all the inmates had begun to busy them-

| wedding in the palace.

selves about what they had been doing
when they fell asleep. i
Not long afterwards, there was a grand
The young
Prince and Princess were married, and
lived happily to the end of their days.





NCE upon atime there was a widow,
who hada daughter that was just

like herself in looks, and also in temper,
which is the same as saying that she was
so proud and disagreeable that no one
could like her. Another young girl lived
with them, a daughter of the widow's dead
husband by a previous marriage. She
was a good, sweet girl, and very pretty;
but was disliked and abused by both her
step-mother and step-sister. The mother
never spoke a kind word to the poor

child, and made her do all the hard work |

of the house, and take her meals by her-
self in the kitchen. But Rose (this was
the step-daughter’s name) remained gentle
and sweet-tempered, and bore her hard
fate with patience.

Among other things, she had to go

‘DIAMONDSé[OADS@







twice a day to draw water from a well

which was fully half a










mile from the house,
and bring home a
great pitcher full of it.
One day, while
she was at the
well, a, very,
poorly-dressed ff
old woman &
came along
and begged of
her to let her have a
drink from her pitcher.

“Why, yes, with all | { i / ,

——







my heart, good moth-/ |
er,” this kind
girl, and she rinsed
her pitcher, and then

said

ROSE.
4DIAMONDS4[OADS&








5

SSS f ge lio a ) ts
ones ST, = Z Ne, 4
a SS SSS - te = 2 4 4

—__>=-





drew some fresh water from the well, and
held the pitcher up for the old woman,
that she might drink with ease.

When she had finished drinking, the
old woman said to Rose: “ You are so
good and kind, my dear, and your face
pleases me so well, that I will bestowa
gift upon you.” In reality, the old woman
was a fairy, who had taken this form to
test Rose's kindness. “ My gift,” she now



went on, “1s that at every word you speak,
adiamond or a pearl shall drop from your
lips.” She then disappeared from view.

When Rose reached home, her step-
mother scolded her crossly for having been
so long away. The poor girl replied
meekly, “I am very sorry, mother.” As
she spoke these words, there fell from her
lips, for each of them, either a diamond
or a pearl.

“Why, what does this mean?” cried
the mother, bewildered. “Diamonds and
pearls! where did they come from?”

“From my lips!” said Rose, and she
then told her mother what had happened,
a perfect shower of sparkling stones
falling from her lips as she did so. The
mother gathered them up greedily, and
spoke to Rose more kindly than she had
ever done in her life before. But pres-
ently she grew jealous that the poor step-
child should be gifted more highly than
her own daughter, and she said: “ Fanny
must go to the well too. No doubt the
old woman will give her something finer
still.” |

She called her daughter, and said:
“Look, Panny, what has come from
Roses mouth. Would you not like to
You

have only to go and draw some water

have the same gift given to you.

from the well, and if a poor woman asks

you for a drink, to give it to her civilly.”


ROSE AND THE OLD WOMAN AT THE WELL.







“WHY! WHAT DOKS THIS MEAN?’ SAID THE MOTHER, BEWILDERED.”

yourself if you want any!” '

“It would be a fine sight, really, to see
me go and draw water,” said the ill-bred
“Indeed, I shall do noth-

ing of the sort!”

girl, rudely.

“You shall go,” said her mother, “and
that instantly.” :

Fanny finally went, but wore a sulky
face, and grumbled to herself all the way.
Instead of the pitcher, she took the best
silver tankard.

She had no sooner reached the well,
than she saw coming from the wood
near by, a lady most splendidly dressed,
who drew near and asked her for a drink.

It was the same fairy that had spoken to



MIAMONDS€/OADS&

her sister, but she had now taken the ap-
pearance and dress of a Princess, to see

just how far this girl's rudeness and
ill-nature would go.

Fanny stupidly supposed
that as this was not the poor
woman whom her sister had
seen, she: had: nothing, to
gain by being polite, so, in

a proud, saucy manner, she
replied: “Dees your lady-
ship think I came here only
— to draw water ton you?
Perhaps you suppose the
silver tankard was brought
purely for your benefit.
Quite likely, isnt it You
will have to draw water for

“Those are your manners, are they 2”
“Well, I will be-
For

every word you speak, a'toad or a viper

said the fairy, cooly.

stow an appropriate gift upon you.

shall come out of your mouth.”

Vive fairy, then vanished, and Fanny,

angrier than ever, set out for home, with-

out filling her tankard.,

Fanny's: mother was waiting impa-
tiently for her return, and as soon as she
was within hearing, she called to her,
inquringly: ‘“ Well, daughter ?”

“Well, mother, answered the saucy
girl in her usual pert manner; and, lo!




as she spoke there fell from her mouth a
vipen and a toad.

“Oh, mercy!” cried her mother, “what
is this I see ?. Oh, this ts all that wretched
Rose's doing, she. shall pay for it!”

She seized a heavy stick and was just
about to give Rose a terrible beating,
when, suddenly, the fairy appeared be-
fore them in her own proper form, with
a brilliant star upon her forehead, and a
wand in her hand. “ Do not strike Rose,”
she said, in a manner so commanding
that the mother could not help obeying.
“Tt is your daughter's ill-temper, and not
Rose, that is to blame for what has _hap-
pened to her. I shall*take Rose away,
and place her with people who will treat
her kindly, and who will deserve better





DIAMONDS4[OADSxe

than you to be rewarded with the treas-
ures that fall from her lips. As for your
daughter, when she mends her temper
and her manners, so that only kind and
proper words come from her mouth, she
shall cease to let fall the toads and vipers.
For it is a truth which you should know
that cross, unkind, and spiteful words,
dropped from the lips, are really as bad
as toads and vipers, while gentle and
loving words are as precious as pearls |
or diamonds.”














\\ ( li; I,
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ill the
eal
CINDERELLA,
i

NCE upon a time, a poor nobleman
married avery rich, but proud, and
bad-tempered lady. She was his second
wife, and had two grown-up daughters,
The
nobleman, too, had a daughter— the love-
She had been
brought up by her godmother, who, as
sometimes happened in those days, was

a Fairy.

of exactly her own disposition.

liest girl ever known.





_ The marriage was no sooner over, than
the stepmother began to be very harsh
and unkind towards this young girl, whose
gentle and loving disposition caused the
behavior of her own daughters to appear
even more detestable than before. They,
on their part, were so jealous of the poor
child that they did all they could to make
her life miserable and unhappy. They
teased and tormented her from morning
till night, and when she bore patiently
with them—for she was anxious to win
their love—they made fun of her, and
were more disagreeable than ever.

The poor child made no complaint to
her father, for she knew that it would only
add to his unhappiness and discomfort,
and that if he interfered 1t would only
make matters worse. It was not long
before he fell violently ill; medicines
would not save him; and he died so sud-
denly that the shock almost killed his
poor little daughter, who knew not how
she could live without him.

After her dear father’s death, the
haughty sisters were more unkind than

ever to the poor little oirl. They never
(CGINDERELLA.



invited her to share in their games or
their sports, or to join them in their walks
Their mother

One ames: encouraged

them im this sort of conduct, for she
seemed to bear the poor child a grudge
for being so much prettier than her own
daughters.

them that more than half of their ill- looks

It did not occur to. her or to

was owing to their ugly tempers.
no disgrace to be homely’; and pretty

manners will hide all. defects’ “of: face’ or
form, and enable us to win hosts of friends: |
The young girl, who should-have beeit,

treated: as)-a daughter and sister,

made to-do all the hard work

house.

the rooms, cooked the meals, and was as.

busy as a bee from morning till night.

When her work was done, she would
sit for warmth in a corner of thé chimney,
among the cinders
and to show how much they despised her,
the unkind sisters gave her the name of |
Cinderella..

She had to ‘sleep on a,hard, straw
bed ina garret, which was most meanly
furnished ; wh

a beautiful room, with feather beds and -

while her sisters had each

pillows, the softest and most luxurious
that money could buy ; and with look-
ing-glasses in which they could see

themselves from head to foot.

®

It iS a
















of the’
She made-the fires, carried the |

water, made the beds, swept and dusted |



- and, for this reason,.,

ale:

One day the sisters received an invita-
tion to a series of grand balls that were
to be given in honor of a Prince, who,
being the eldest son: of the King, would

soon have a right to the throne It was
a great honor to.be invited to the palace,

andthe note was eagerly read, and the
invitation pt omptly accepted by the proud
ee gave deeds es much







THE TWO HAUGHTY SISTERS.


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CINDERELLA.



loftier airs than before; and it seemed as
if they would never cease discussing how
they should be dressed.

“shall wear my red velvet, with

co Well!”

said the other, “I shall put on my plain

Honiton lace,” said one sister.

silk; but then I -shall have my gold-
embroidered cloak, and _ pearl-and-dia-
mond coronet; and don't you think that
will look rather nice?”

‘This meant a great deal more work for
Cinderella. She had to do all the sew-
ing and ironing, to starch and plait the
ruffles, to run upon errands three or four
fimtesa day ; and she even offered to
dress their hair. This, in truth, was what
they were longing for, as she had such
excellent taste! but they were too proud
to own it openly.

In the midst of this preparation, one |

of thesisters said, “ How would you like
fo go: fo ance, pall, Cinderella
ing this was only said to annoy her, Cin-
derella merely answered, “Oh! they don't
want me. “No, 1) should thinks not
indeed,” said the other sister, tossing her

Know-

head, “I never heard of a Cinder-sifter
being at a ball.”
herspoil her hair ; but with all this unkind-
ness, she still seemed ready and willing
to please them.

So anxious were they to improve their
figures, at least twenty stay-laces were



It was enough to make



broken. They scarcely ate anything for

two whole days, and were admiring them-

selves continually in the looking-glass.
TA:

At last the great day came. When
the two sisters started, Cinderella kept
her eyes fixed on the carriage until it dis-
appeared, and then she went back to her
usual seat in the chimney-corner, and
began to weep.

Suddenly, her Fairy godmother stood











CINDERELLA BRINGING A PUMPKIN FROM THE GARDEN,
-2CINDERELLA-



by her side, and asked what was the

matter.

“=| shouldso muchthave——

And how they did squeal! Cinderella
took care that not one of them should

have liked”—sobbed the broken-hearted | escape, as she bore the trap in triumph to

girl, but she could
say no more.

“ Do you mean,



you would like to
go with your sisters?”

“Oh! yes, I should,” cried Cinderella.

“Well, well!” said her godmother,
“be a good girl, and you shall go.”

Cinderella soon dried her tears; and
when her godmother said, “ Fetch me a
pumpkin from the garden,” she ran and
got the largest she could find; but not
knowing that her godmother wasa Fairy,
she did not think this had much to do
with going to the ball.

The Fairy scooped it hollow, touched
it with her wand, and immediately
changed it into a magnificent carriage,
lined with satin and plush, fit for a Royal
Highness to ride in.

“That is good as far as it goes,” said
the Fairy; “ but it won't go far without
horses. Look in the mouse-trap, my
child, and see if there is anything in it.”

Ve

Cinderella ran quicklyto do her bid-
ding, and was delighted to find six
plump mice caught in the trap. There
they were, poking their little noses
through the bars and trying to get out.





her godmother. |

The Fairy told her to raise
the wire door that the
might Come out, onc by one.
As they did so, a
touch of the wand
transformed them

mice

into six handsome
horses, with arching necks, shining manes,
and long tails, and splendid harness all
plated with gold. It was enough to make
one’s eyes water just to look at them.

“Well, my child,” said the Fairy, “this

eof Hg i
vl ety Fs
eid

D















A RAT FOR A COACHMAN !

-=2CGINDERELLA=-







MH!
Hh
l}

en

CINDERELLA § COACH.

is a fine turn-out, truly. But there are
the finishing touches yet to be put on.
Go and see if there is a rat in the rat-
trap, |

Cinderella ran with all haste, and soon

returned bearing the trap, which had in
it a rat of the very best quality. As he |

sprang out of the trap, he was changed
into a coachman, and took his place on
the box as orderly as you please.

But, this: was not all. “Brine me six
lizards, said*the Bairy godmother. “ You
will find them behind the watering-pot
in the garden.” The lizards were brought,
and at once transformed into pages, whose
duty it was to run alongside or ahead of

the carriage, and announce its arrival.

These immediately sprang to their places, |

and stood as if awaiting further orders.

“There, Cinderella!”
godmother, gazing with pride upon the
equipage. “Could anything be finer
than that ? Jump in, and be off.”

exclaimed her

| led “heréand: there—— on her hands



Cinderella looked at hershabby clothes,
contrasting them with the splendor of the
eaite
godmother understood at once, and said,
“Oh, I see! You think that dress is hardly

fit to wear to a ball.

carriage, and shook her head sadly.

Well, we can easily
remedy that. My dressmaker is wonder-
fully skillful, and will fit you out in short
orders

Saying this, she touched Cinderella
with her wand, and immediately the old
clothes fell off the young girl, and she
stood arrayed in a beautiful dress that
shone like cloth of gold. Jewels spark-

aul



her throat—and on her waist: and to
crown ‘all, the Fairy brought a pair of
lovely glass slippers—that shone like
diamonds— for Cinderella to put on.



CINDERELLA CATCHING THE LIZARDS.
8G INDERBLLA=

WW

The godmother paused awhile to ad-
mire Cinderella in her new attire, and
then “she said, “1
to give you, mychild.
Be certain to leave
the ball-room before
twelve o'clock, for if
vou remain a mo-
that

time, your carriage

ment beyond

will become a pump-
kin, your coachman,
iia rat, your horses,
i\\| mice, and your pages,
M4 lizards. Your beau-
tiful dress, too, will

vanish away, leaving



| you inv the shabby,
—. clothes of a kitchen
drudge.”

in

Cinderella, a

THE COACHMAN,

flutter of excitement
and eager to be off, promised all her god-
mother wished, and away dashed the
ile
courtyard of the palace, the Prince was

Calniage, ; \Vben site "drove into
informed that a beautiful Princess, whom
nobody knew, had arrived; and, in order

to show her the greatest respect, he went

himself and handed her out of the car- |
riage, and led her into the ball-room. The |

_have but one charge

band stopped playing at once, and the
dancers stood still and gazed at her.

safe er

There was a long, still husl
Then a confused whisper all over the
| room:

bo. ere she comes 2) t

“Oh! how lovely!!!"

|
|
|



As soon as the band struck up again,
the Prince courteously asked if he might

have the pleasure of. dancing, with her.




SS
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THE “SIX PAGES:

So. exquisitely’ graceful were Cinder-
ella’s movements, that after a few bars,

she and the Prince were the only couple



dancing, everybody else looking on.

»

-2CINDERELLA-



The King himself, old as he was, could
not turn away his eyes, and, over and
over again, he whispered to the Queen
that 1t was many a long day since they
had seen so beautiful and charming a
visitor at their court.

The ladies took every opportunity to
They

all intended to follow her example, if they

notice how her dress was made.

could but get artists skillful enough, and
Ab the

supper, which was most sumptuously

buy the same kind of material.

served, the young Prince had no appetite ;
but kept his eyes fixed tenderly on this
unknown visitor, who had taken a seat
by the side of her sisters, and was giving
them a share of all the delicacies which he

passed to her.

Ps . iM
-S ey ie. SUTIN
. ? Ki ZEN Hi ‘he EL mu f ) \) f
ee Tl Wee
> i Gf.























THE PRINCE FINDS THE SLIPPER.



When their merriment was at its
highest —

Vee
The clock struck a quarter of twelve.
Then Cinderella remembered the Fairy’s
warning and, making a courtesy to all the
company, immediately returned home.

After kissing her godmother, she asked
if she might go the next night, as the
Prince had decided to have another ball,
and particularly wished her to come.

Before she had finished telling the
Fairy all the events of the evening, the
two sisters knocked at the door, and Cin-
derella, whose beautiful clothes disap-
peared at that instant, let them in.

“Oh! how late you are!” she yawned,
rubbing her eyes, and stretching herself,
as though she had just woke up.

“xl! caid one oi the sisters, = you
would not have been so sleepy, if you

We have been talk-

ing, nearly the whole evening, to a most

had been with us.

lovely Princess.”

Cinderella could not help feeling
very much pleased secretly at hear-
ing this. She asked the name of

the Princess, but they could not say.
They only knew that the Prince was
greatly distressed at her leaving so

suddenly, and would give all the

-2

eae Bax, werld to find out where she came
<> e

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Cinderella’s eyes a with joy.
“ How beautiful she must have been!”
she said, “and how very fortunate you
both were in being invited! If you were
to lend me one of your old, every-day
dresses, don't you think I could go and
See her?

Ont the dea:
“A kitchen wench like you!

the sisters screamed.
What
next will you think of ?”

The following night the two sisters
went again to the ball, and Cinderella's
godmother let her also go; but in a much
handsomer dress than before.

The Prince waited for her at the door,
at least three-quarters of an hour, and
when she arrived, he again led her into
the ball-room. He danced with her every
time, and kept by her side the whole
evening.

Cinderella was so happy, she entirely

SGINDERELLAS



and the
did not
think it was more than eleven, when the

| She
jumped up from her seat by the side of

ese her Panes warning,
time had passed so quickly, she

first stroke of midnight sounded.

the Prince, rushed across the room, and
flew down stairs. The Prince ran after

her; but was too late. The only trace

of her was a glass slipper, which had
fallen off inher flight. ‘The Prince picked
it up, and would not part with it.
Poor Cinderella got home frightened
and out of breath, with no carriage—no
horses—no coachman—no footmen—and

She had

none of her finery now, except the other



all her old clothes back again.

glass slipper.
VATE

The Prince made the strictest inqui-
ries, but could get no information from
the servants of the palace, or the soldiers
on guard. The only person that had
passed them, they said, was a poorly clad



‘“*HERALDS WERE SENT ALL THROUGH THE KINGDOM.”
SVAN TEI CANES EE ROE ie

i

ORE 5.




—Or7

er)

.






\

sINDERBELUAF

=



girl, who certainly could
not have been at the ball.

When the sisters came
home, Cinderella asked
them if they had enjoyed
themselves as much as on
the first night, and if they
had again seen the Prin-

EAVES

“but just as the clock was

cess. they said ;
striking twelve, she left in
a great hurry, and one of _
her beautiful glass slippers:

fell off. The Prince picked: i ;

it up, and has been, looking
abit ane kissing it” ever:
since. Everybody says he
is madly in love with. her”
And so. he. was. . For
the next-day heralds were
sent all through the king-
dom, proclaiming that the

Prince would marry the lady who could

wear this slipper.

The rivalry among the ladies" “was very

“LADIES OF THE. COURT.

Be ofall’ the:

Princessesattied; then the

great.



Duchess’ and then the

“other ladies of the Gore ;

. ”..:.but. their féet. were much




aA too large.
a brought: ti

vebut. could not.’

‘The'slipper was



re two sisters,

and thoug oh they knew very
well that neither of them
was’ the ° beautiful ” Prin-
cess, they. tried h ard to get
their : clumsy feet into it,
“When they

‘were quite tired out with

trying, Gand lérella’ said, qui-
etly, “May: i see if it will
filme:

The: sistérsy: hart into

and

began. ‘to make snecring

shouts | of Jaughter,

aa but they* could

SS Hot prevertt her, since the
command was that « every young girl in

>the kingdom -‘sh ould” try on the slipper.

‘“THEIR FEET WERE MUCH TOO

LARGE.”

| Cinderella smilingly seated herself'in the


-8CINDERELLA®-



re they nearly fainted, when Cinderella put
her hand into her pocket, and brought
out the other slipper.
NTA
The moment both slippers were on,
the good Fairy appeared, and touching
Cinderella’s clothes with her wand, made



them more costly and dazzling than ever.
Then the two sisters recognized that the
despised Cinderella was the beautiful
Princess whom they had seen at the ball;
and throwing themselves on their knees,
asked her to forgive them the very many,
unkind things they had said and done
to her. She lifted them up, kissed them
affectionately, and said she only wanted











them to love her now. ‘The carriage, the

coachman, and the pages were all ready,

wy and Cinderella was at once taken to the
k y a ry]? .
a palace. The Prince thought her more

charming than ever, and insisted on



AT THE WEDDING,

_marrying her in a few days. Cinderella
chair; and the slipper, at the very first showed the goodness of her heart by
trial, went on her pretty little foot, and | bringing her sisters to the palace, and
fitted it like a glove. The two sisters shortly after they became the wives of

bit their lips in envy and vexation; and _ two rich gentlemen of the court





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TMHERE was once an old miller who
had three sons, and after his death

his property was divided among them.
The eldest son had the mill, and he soon
set the sails going round and round, and
the farmers and neighbors brought their —
corn and wheat to be ground, and money



came in very fast. So he was all right,
and had no cause to complain.

The second son did not fare so well,










~ Reena ee
SAPO SQL =
RWW ee —



however, for he had nothing left him but
a donkey, and he was quite down-hearted

‘about it for a while, Ihen the thought

struck him that ®
he might join in
his elder
brother, and by

with

taking the grain
to and from the



mill might earn
enough to live on.
iis: tuned “out
to be a good plan, and he thought him-
self lucky in having such a faithful serv-
ant as the little donkey. So he was all
right, and had no cause to complain.

But the third son fared the worst of

all, for all that fell to his share was a cat,


|
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BEMOANING HIS FATE,

and that was about as good, he thought,
as nothing at all.

He sat down to think in what way he
could earn a living, and bemoaned his
fate with bitter sighs and tears.

“What shall I do?” he cried aloud.
“Tf I tall the cat and sell her skin, that
won't go far toward keeping me out of
the poor-house! Oh, how much worse
I am off than my brothers!”

The cat sat near his master and heard
every word he said; and when he paused
for a moment, Puss came forward, and
in a clear voice said: “Dear master, do

not be so cast down. If youll give me



a pair of boots and a game-bag you shall
have no cause for complaint.” The young
man did not understand how the cat
could be of any service to him, but as he
had always been a clever puss he thought
it best to humor him. |

So Puss was measured for a pair of
well-fitting boots, and as soon as they
came home he put them on, hung the
game-bag round his neck, and set off on
his adventures.

Through the woods and over the fields
he ran till he came near a rabbit warren,

when he crept more cautiously for fear

some of the bunnies might hear him, for

they have very sharp ears. He opened

the game-bag, into which. he had put

some bits of cabbage and fresh parsley,

and arranging the strings of the bag in
aclever way, waited patiently for a visit
from the rabbits. ,-

Presently two-or three young ones
came hopping up and twitching their long.
ears. They sniffed around for a while at
the entrance of the bag, and then hopped

/in and began munching and nibbling at

the parsley and cabbage, little thinking
All at

once the cat, gave the string a jerk, and

of the fate that awaited them.

the bunnies were caught in a trap, and
though they kicked ever so hard they
couldn't get out. Puss lost no time in

killing them, and slinging the game-bag





-


over his shoulder, he set out for the king’s
palace. lle went up to the guard at the
gate, as grand as you please, and said he
desired to speak with the king. His
manner was so determined that the sen-
tinels dared not refuse him, and Puss

made his way straight to the king’s pri-
vate room.









obliged to him.” And he could not help
wendering who the Marquis of Carabas
was, and why he had never heard of him
before. But Puss was so aristocratic in
his appearance there could be no doubt
that he belonged to a master of high rank.

Satisfied with the success of his inter-

view with the king, the cat bowed himself



‘“yete! HELP! FOR THE LORD MARQUIS OF CARABAS !”*

Here he took off his cap, threw down
his bag, and with a flourish of his tail pre-
sented the gifts he had brought with the
compliments of his master, the Lord
Marquis of Carabas. Puss made quite
a grand speech, to which the king replied,
“Tell my lord marquis that I accept his
present with great pleasure, and am much



out with all the grace of a well-bred
courtier.

A day or two afterwards he went out
with his boots and bag in search of more
game, and succeeded in trapping a couple
of young partridges, which he speedily
killed and presented to the king, with a
suitable speech.
x

=U 89 piss

For three or four weeks he managed
to send a present to the king every day
or two; and hearing one day that the
king was to take his lovely daughter for
a drive by the river side, Puss devised a
cunning scheme which he proceeded to
carry out in the following manner :

“(Go and bathe in the river, dear
master,’ said Puss, “and leave the rest
to me.’. The master consented to do as
Puss told him, although he failed to see
the necessity of bathing in that place at
that hour.



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PUSS INSTRUCTING THE REAPERS.

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Presently the king’s carriage drove in
sight, and Puss began to run to and fro,
and wring his paws, and toss them over
his head as if almost distracted. Then
he cried out at the top of his voice:
“Help! help! help! my master is being
drowned! Help for the Lord Marquis
ot) Carabas |”

The king looked out of the carriage-
window, and recognizing the cat who
brought the presents of game and fruit,
he ordered several of his guard to go to
the assistance of the lord marquis.

But the rogue of a cat
was not satisfied with this,
he knew that his master’s

shabby

7 Mever do for a marquis,

clothes would








~~ so he ran to the carriage
and told the king that a
wicked thief had stolen

his masters fine clothes

!

Ny ee :

while he was in bathing.
Puss said that as soom as
he knew of the loss he
gave chase to the thief,
but, though he ran miles
and miles could tind no
trace of him.
The king at once or-
dered asuit from his own
wardrobe to be brought

fer the Marquis of Cara-


LESS


—


bas; and the young man who was a
handsome fellow, looked very fine indeed
in his new garments, as he came up to
the carriage to thank the king for his
kindness. His majesty. was so pleased
with him that he insisted that my lord

marquis should enter the carriage and

take a drive with him; and the daughter

lookedas if she were not “at. all: dis:
pleased at the proposal. In fact, she was
rather struck with the appearance of the

Marquis of Carabas.

saw his master safely in the carriage he

ran on until he came to a field where a
party of reapers were gathering in the
harvest.
and said: “If you don't say, when the
king asks you, that this field belongs to
the Marquis of Carabas, you shall all be
chopped as fine as mince meat.”

The reapers were startled at. first, and
then amused at the little creature in boots,
but they promised to do as they were told,
and Puss took his departure. :

When the royal carriage passed the

field soon afterward, the king
stopped, and calling one of
the reapers to him, asked to
whom all that fine wheat
belonged. “To the Marquis
of Carabas, your majesty,”
answered all the reapers.
“You have a very fine

As soon as Puss:

The cat went up to the men







““HE STOOD BEFORE THE CAT IN THE

crop of wheat, my lord marquis,” said the
king.

“Yes, your majesty,. replied the mar.
quis: and the king thought he had never
met such a nice and modest young man.

As the king passed through the different
fields he did not fail to ask to whom they

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SHAPE OF AN ELEPHANT.”


‘“CWHEN THE LION GAVE A GREAT ROAR, PUSS FLEW DOWN THE STAIRS. ie

belonged, and was surprised at being told
they were the property of the Marquis
oi Caralnas.

“W
king, “your possessions are very exten-
sive ,

“Yes, your majesty:” and the princess
thought he was the handsomest young
man she had ever laid eyes on.

Now there was in these. parts a very
fine castle in which dwelt.an ogre, who
was a great giant and a magician. The
cat had a slight acquaintance with him, so
he posted off to the castle, rang the bell
loudly, and told the ogre he had come to
make him a visit and inquire after his
health. The ogre was much obliged to

the cat, and invited him in, which was | «=

just wit Puss, wanted. Ele at once
accepted the invitation, and sitting down
at a table, with his paws tucked cosily to-

gether, entered at once into conversation.





“Sir, said Puss << am told that you
are a mighty magician.” |

“That is true,” said the ogre.

« And I have heard,” said Puss, “that
you can transform yourself into the shape
On vanious amimals. = 8

«That is very true, said the ogre. .

“But I mean large animals; an ele-
phant for instance.”

«That is Quite” true 1. sade the soane,
“as you can see for yourself,” and saying



PUSS PUTS AN END TO THE OGRE,



—*PUSSl@BOOTS=—



a few magical

words, he stood




| belone the cat im
yz __the shape of an
{immense elephant,
i with a long trunk,
I Steal tapping
wears, and a pair

{ of sharp tusks—
sree swatiownss tHe 06%. all complete.

Puss was rather startled at the change,
but he soon mustered courage and went
on: “ Well, that is really marvelous, in-
deed! But can you change your shape
to any animal you choose ?”

“ Certainly,’ said the ogre, and he waved
his trunk in the air, flapped his ears, and
presently stood before the astonished cat
in the shape of a huge African lion, with
bristling mane, glaring eyes, and a most
ferocious display of white teeth.

The cat gazed at him for a while in
astonishment and fear, but when the lion
opened his mouth and gave a great roar,
Puss flew down the stairs and escaped
through an open window.

The ogre was delighted with the success

of his performance, and laughed heartily |
at the way in which he had frightened his —

guest.

Puss kept up his growling and spitting
for some time, but after he had recovered
from his fright he entered the room again,



excusing himself to the ogre for leaving
in such haste.
table he began:

Resuming his seat at the

_ “Sir, I should never have believed
these wonders possible if 1 had not seen
them with my own eyes. Youare, indeed,
a great magician, but I have heard of a
conjuror who could assume the shape
of small animals as well as large ones.
That must be exceedingly difficult, and
require long practice.”

“ One is as easy as the other,” said the
ogre, who was vain of his powers, and
did not like to think there was any one
greater than he.



PUSS APPEARS IN A FINE SUIT OF CLOTHES.
os >

SS5P8@ BOOTS=—



“But 1 mean,» said’ Puss“small ani-
mal’s like a cat or a mouse.”

“ Judge for yourself,” said the ogre, and
in a moment he was capering about the
room in the shape of a mouse. In less
than a second, the cunning cat had sprung
upon him, and with his sharp teeth he
soon put an end to him.

Puss sat for a moment after swallowing
the ogre, licking his lips, and congratula-
ting himself upon the excellent condition
into which he had brought his young
masters affairs; for had he not now
a fine castle, into which he need not
be ashamed to ask the king to enter

But the

sound of the king's coach coming near

to rest after his long ride.

reminded him that he had still much mM

to do, so he ran up stairs, and dressed
himself hastily in a fine suit of clothes
which he found in a closet, and which, “
being intended for a little dwarf, just —
fitted him. Then he went to the
castle entrance to receive the royal
party.

Great, indeed, was the surprise of
the Marquis of Carabas, when he
beheld his cat so finely dressed, and
heard him deliver the following speech,
with great dignity: “ Welcome your
majesty, and your royal highness, to
the castle of my master, the Marquis
of Carabas! As the honor is an

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unexpected one, pray pardon the hasty
arrangements made for your reception.
To tell the truth, my master has not long
been in possession of this castle, but if
you will be pleased to alight and take
some refreshments, this will be the proud-
est day of my life, and of my master’s, the
Lord Marquis of Carabas.”

“Upon my word, my lord marquis, ”
said the king, “you have a splendid
castle here, and I should greatly enjoy
giving it a closer inspection. I am tired

































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THE PRINCESS ADMIRES THE CONTENTS OF THE WARDROBES.
—#PUS Sie

BOOTS=—









PUSS ORDERS A BANQUET.

of being cramped up so in this coach, and
the long drive has given me quite an ap-
petite. Will you join us, my daughter ?”

The princess was only too: glad. to
gratify her curiosity, and the king gra-
ciously commanded the marquis to take
her by the hand and lead her into the
dwelling.

While they were walking through
the upper rooms, which were splendidly
furnished, and in the closets and ward-

robes of which. there was a great store

of beautiful clothes which the princess
especially admired; the cat slipped away
to the kitchen to order a banquet to be
prepared, and when the party returned to
the great hall, they sat down to a feast
that was, indeed, fit for a king.

With each glass of wine he drank, the



|

|

lovely court suit.

king became more and more
jovial, and seemed to grow very
fond of the marquis, to whom
he said: “It will be your own
fault, my Lord Marquis of Car-
abas, if you do not become our
sson-in-law, provided our daugh-
ter has no objection. ”
At this: plain speech the prin-
cess blushed and hung her head,
but did not. look at all displeased,
while: the’. ‘marquis rose at once
“from his seat, thanked the king
for the honor he desired to be-
stow upon him, and accepted the honor
very gracefully.

The cat's joy was so great that he had

to go out of doors and stand on his head

for a while, and kick up his hind legs in
the aur.

‘There is little more to tell. The mar-
quis returned with the king and princess
to their palace, where the wedding took
place with much pomp and ceremony.
The. king, his
daughter, and the cat was present in a
The two brothers of
the Marquis, came to attend the wedding,

but Puss thought that-as they had taken

of course, gave away

no notice of his master when he was poor,
they had no right ‘to expect. any honors

now that he was rich; so he..gave them

_ apiece of his mind, which made them ¢lad
—


to slip away home to the mill as quietly
as possible. Their brother, however, after-
wards returned good for evil by giving
each Ol them a fine tarm, and as they
were industrious fellows, and cultivated
their land diligently, they became quite
But it
was always a cause of regret to them

well-to-do in the course of time.

that they had treated ther «younger
brother so shabbily in the days when he
had sat forlorn, not knowing what he
should do to earn a living,

The Marquis of Carabas made a good
husband, and he and the princess lived
most happily together. As for the cat,
he became a great lord and never had to
hunt rats and mice except for his own
amusement. He was fond of fine clothes,
and used to go about the court dressed
in velvets and satins of the best quality,

He had

very pleasing manners, which made him

made up in the latest fashion.

a great favorite, particularly with the
ladies. He lived to a
and when he died, his

good old age,

grateful master

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THE TWO BROTHERS RETURN CRESI-FALLEN FROM THE WEDDING.
put up a monument in his honor. His
memory was venerated in the highest
degree by his fellow-cats, who held him
But

while many of them may have tried to

up as an example to their kittens.

imitate him, none has ever been able to
rival the famous Puss in Boots.

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lived a very rich merchant who had three daughters
whom he loved most dearly.
All three had grown up with a fair share of good
looks, but the youngest so far surpassed her sisters, and
in fact all the other young girls of that time and
country, in loveliness, that she was known
by the name of Beauty.
And Beauty was as superior to her
sisters in disposition as in person: for
while they were vain and haughty, she




ly was of a most sweet and kindly nature,
eyit//// free from all selfishness, and in the
YS habit of finding her chief

delight in trying to make

ill-fortune fell to es
the share of the
merchant, and other people happy.

that in no small After many years of

measure either. prosperity, it came to

His ships were lost at sea, and
in a very short time he saw nearly
the whole of his riches swept away,
barely enough being left to support
himself and his daughters in the
most humble way of living. They

had to go to live in a little cottage which, with the small farm



about it, was nearly all that the father had been able to save, out ,
. . Cc ° i Hh y ee / '
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It was with loud lamentations that the two elder sisters sub- Ge a



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BEAUTY S SISTERS LAMENTING THE LOSS OF THEIR RICHES.
mitted to this hard fate, and their father's
sorrow was made more bitter by their

constant complaints. Beauty alone’ of

4 BEAUT Yet BEAST



storms and unfavorable winds.

father did mot tail to seta sieht value
upon the fine qualities she displayed, and
her sweet ways were his comfort in the
dark days that had fallen upon him.
Pitter about a year aid a halt had
passed, news came one day that one oF

the merchant's ships which had been

|, thought to be lost, had come safe to port,
| having been delayed all this time by

The two

|-elder sisters ‘were greatly excited, and
indulged in the wildest hopes of being
_ restored to their former splendor. When

their father sect out ior the city to take

steps to recover his property, they loaded
him with commissions to bring them

fine dresses and: jewels upon his return.

his children, tried to. make the best of

their altered circumstances.
She bravely put’oh

a cheerful air, and set

to work to be as useful

as possible to her father

She did

not shrink from: any:

and_ sisters.

tasks, however disa-
erecable, doing all the
drudgery that in her

former home had been

the work of servants. Qa” ae
She got but little help,
or even sympathy from
her

ner sisters, but













BEAUTY DOING THE WORK OF THE HOUSE.

=>

a BEAUTY Ye" BEAST =



Observing that Beauty asked for nothing,
her father said to her:
“Well, Beauty, do you desire no gifts?

Is there nothing that you would have |

me bring you from the city?”

Beauty replied that his safe return was
all that she wished for, but upon her
father’s urging her, for his pleasure, to
name something that would be acceptable
to her, she said:

“Well, dear father, bring me arose. I
have seen none since we have been
here, and I love them so dearly.”

The merchant then started upon
his journey. When he reached the
city, he found that while it was indeed
true that one of his ships had come 1n,
the people who had been his partners
in business had taken advantage of
his absence to sell the ship and its
cargo, and had divided the money
amongst themselves. He went to
law to obtain his share, but succeeded
in getting very little, and he started
for home nearly as poor as when he
left it.

He lost his way one night upon
the journey, and after wandering till

morning came to a stately palace sur- ff
rounded by beautiful gardens. Think- #3

ing to inquire his way, he rode up to
the entrance and knocked, but re-
ceived no answer. He turned to go,





but as he was leaving he noticed some
lovely roses, and remembering Beauty's
request, thought it would be no harm to
pluck one for her. He had no sooner
done so, than he heard a deep roar, and

looking round, saw a frightful Beast,

and heard him say:

“Do you dare to steal my roses? You
shall die for the crime!”

The merchant fell at the creature's feet,
to beg for pardon, and explained that it

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THE MERCHANT PRESENTING THE ROSE TO BEAUTY,
a BEAUTY BEAST 2



zi



og

ON THE WAY TO THE BEAST’S PALACE.

was his desire to comply with his dear
child’s request that had led him to com-
mit the act.

‘W ell,” said the Beast, “J will spare
your life on one condition. You say that
you have three daughters. I will let you
go home, if you will promise to return
at the end of a week with one of them to
But bear in mind that
she must come willingly; and understand,
also, that if you break your word I will
come and fetch you.”

take your place.





Although the merchant would not
think for a moment of asking one of his
children to take his place, he reflected
that if he took the beast’s offer he should
at least have a chance to bid them good-
by. So he accepted iS amd the Beast
allowed him to depart.

When he arrived at his home, he could
hardly bring himself, at first, to relate
what had happened; merely saying to
Beauty as he handed her the rose, “ Here
is your gift, Beauty: you little know what
it has cost.” But these words distressed
Beauty so much, and so excited the
curiosity of the other daughters, that he
was soon forced to tell them all.

Beauty at once announced her willing-



BEAUTY IS OVERCOME WITH SADNESS AFTER HER FATHER’S DEPARTURE,



ness to take his place. Her father, at

first would not consent, but she insisted |

so sweetly, and yetso firmly, that he was
forced to yield.

It was night when they reached the
palace, which was brightly lighted in all.

parts.



Beauty and her father entered,

man bade his child good by, for he knew

The Beast

it was the Beast he heara:

came in, and when Beauty first saw his

huge form, she shook with fright, but

she tried to hide her fear as much as she

could. The Beast asked her if she had

~ come of her own free will, and when she

BEAUTY S DREAM.

but saw no living being. They came to
a large hall, where they saw a table set
Wit food, anda plate and. chair for
each of them. They sat down and ate
a little) though, as might be expected,
neither of them had much appetite.
When they were through their meal,

they heard a great noise, and the good old

answered, “Yes,” he said,



= ounces a
good girl and I thank you.”

He then turned to the father, and told
him he must leave the palace early next
morning, and never think of returning.

“But you shall not go empty handed,”

he added.

gold, and when you reach home, you will

“T have had a chest filled with
a BEAUTYM BEAST



find it there mclore you,
The Beast then bade them
both good-by, and went
away.

Beauty and: her father -
went to bed thinking they *
should not be able to close
thei, eves all nioht, but as





soon as they had lain down, ~ =







they went to sleep. Beauty “e
had a dream. in which a
beautiful lady came to her
amd said | aim pleaccd,
Beauty, to see what a kind,
brave teat youmbave. It
was right that you should
wish to give your life to save
your father’s, and you shall not go without

a reward.”

In the morning, Beauty told her father :

this dream, but though it gave him.some
hope, he shed bitter tears as he took leave
of his dear child. As soon as he was
gone, Beauty sat down, and gave herself
up for a time to tears and sad thoughts;
yet she had so strong and brave a heart
that she soon made up her mind not to
make her sad case worse by grieving. »
As no one came to her, she wandered
about, taking a full view of the beautiful
palace. She was surprised when she
came to a door over which was written

(ReAuUrmas INoom, © “Sire went in and











THE MAGIC MIRROR...

- found it splendidly furnished, and supplied
| with books, fine musical instruments, and

everything that would help her to pass
the time pleasantly. She thought then
that the Beast would not have put all
these things here if he meant her to live
but one day; so, taking heart, she opened

the library and there saw written in letters

of gold: “ WusH or Commanp, YOU ARE

WIISTRESS HERE.




Ww



a BEAUTY" BEAST



When it came to be noon, she found
rich food set out for her, and heard music
while she ate it, yet she saw no one. But
at night, after she had eaten her supper,
she heard the noise of the Beast approach-
ing as on the previous evening, and she
could not help trembling as she wondered
whether he meant to eat her up now.
However, as he did not seem at all fero-
cious when he entered, and only said,
“Good evening, Beauty,” she answered
cheerfully, and managed to conceal her
fright. He began to converse pleasantly,
and at the end of an hours talk, Beauty
began to think he was not at all terrible,
when suddenly he nearly made her faint
by saying, “ Beauty, will you be my wife?”

“Oh what shall I say?” cried Beauty,
for she feared to enrage him by refusing.

moay | Yeo Ohr NoO without aicar,
replied the Beast.’

“Oh! No, Beast,” said Beauty, hastily.

“Then good-night, Beauty,’ said the
Beast, sighing.

“Good-night, good
Beast, said Beauty
and the Beast left the
room.

A numberof weeks

passed, and during
them Beauty lived



in the same way.
HUSBAND OF BEAUTY’S YOUNGER SISTER. The Beast came to





see her every evening,
and repeated his re-
quest that she should
marry him, but on
her refusal, merely

sighed deeply, and:



went sadly away.

a

Beauty had become “,

accustomed to her

x
way of life, and would \
HUSBAND OF BEAUTY S ELDER

SISTER.

have been contented
enough if it were not for the separation
from her father, and her anxiety to know

She spoke of this to the

Beast one evening, and he said that she

how he was.

would find in her room the next morning,
a magic mirror in which she could see all
that was passing at home. :
When Beauty awoke the next morning,
she looked in every mirror in her room,
but saw nothing uncommon, until she
picked up a small hand-glass which she
In‘ this she

saw a picture which shocked and grieved

had never noticed before.
her terribly. It showed a room in the
cottage in which her father was sitting in
a chair, propped up with pillows, having
pined himself ill over her absence.
Beauty did little but weep until she
saw the Beast again. When he came in
the evening, she told him what she had
seen, and how much she wished to go

home fora while to nurse and comfort her
a BEAUTY BEAST E-



father. The Beast asked her if she would
promise to return at the end of a week if
he let her go. Beauty promised, and the
Beast gave her aring, saying: “ Put this
under your pillow to-night, and you will
find yourself at home when you awake.
When you wish to return, you have
only to place the ring under your pillow
again. And now farewell, dear Beauty:
do not break your promise, for I shall die
if you desert me.”

When Beauty awoke the next morning,
she found herself in her father’s cottage,
and on ringing a little bell that was at
the side of the bed, the maid entered,
and gave a loud shriek on seeing her.
When Beauty’s father heard the shriek,
he ran into the room, and when he saw
his dear daughter, he thought he should
faint with joy. He ran to the side of
the bed, and embraced her with a glad
heart. Itseemedas if his illness began
to depart almost right away. When
Beauty thought of getting up, she
remembered that she had no clothes
with her to put on, but the maid told
her that she had just found in the
next room a chest full of fine dresses.
Beauty thanked the good Beast in her
mind, and choosing the simplest of
the gowns, she told the maid to put
the others aside, as she would give
them to her sisters.



Beauty's sisters had been enabled to
get husbands, by means of the wealth
the Beast had sent home with their father,
and no longer lived in the cottage; but
they were sent for, and came with a great

display of joy. But when they heard

| that Beauty was living in a splendid

palace, where her every wish was grati-
‘They

made unhappy marriages.

fied, they became very envious.

had both



BEAUTY'S SISTERS PLOTTING.
pests

a








a BEAUTY" BEAST Be

young man, but he was so

much in love with his own
face that he never took any
notice of the beauty of his wife.
The second had married a man
of great wit, but he used it
chiefly to say cutting things
to his wife. |

So envious were the two
sisters of Beauty, that they
planned together to keep her
beyond the time she had prom-
ised, in hopes that the Beast
would fly into such a rage
that he would eat her up on
her return. In order to suc-
ceed, they treated Beauty most 4
lovingly; and when the week
had past, pretended.to feel so
deep a grief that Béauty was
persuaded to stay a few “days
Beauty fretted,

ever, over the sorrow she-knew she must

longer. how-

be causing the poor Beast, towards whom
she had begun to entertain a really very
friendly feeling. The ‘tenth night, she
dreamed that she was in the Palace gar-
den, and that she saw the Beast lying



on the grass, at the point of death, and |
that with his last breath he reminded |

her of his parting words to her. Beauty

Ah saidshe “am

awoke, weeping.

aie
THE FAIRY CONGRATULATES BEAUTY ON HER CHOICE... \

with their husbands.





been so kind to me 2 Why should I not

bevhis wite: 1 am sure) should be
happier with him than my. sisters are
I wil go back to-

night, for if he were to die I should

feel all my life that I was to blame.”

So Beauty placed her ring under her
pillow, and fell at once into a sound sleep,
from which she awoke to find herself in

the Palace. She ran with haste to the

I not ungrateful to grieve one who has | place where she had seen him in_ her
a BEAUT Ya"BEAST ET



dream; and there he was, lying almost
dead. She hurried to a fountain near by,
and from it brought some water, which
ise mevived, 2
little, and opening his eyes, said: “ Alas,

she dashed in his face.

Beauty, you forgot your promise, and
therefore I must die!”

“No, dear Beast,” said Beauty, “you
shall not die. You will live to be my
I thought, indeed, that I had

merely a friendly feeling toward you, but

husband.

the grief which now oppresses me, tells

me that I love you

with all my heart
No had
these words passed
iy , her lips); than “the
| % ; Beast disappeared,

4),
e 7 and she beheld at

Sooner




her for having done
for him the greatest
possible favor. He
told her thata wicked
fairy had made him
take the form of a
Beast, which he must
wear until some fair





young girl should
| promise to become
his wife.

i
| Sh De y .? Ly

The Prince then



took Beauty by the hand, and led her
to the great hall of the palace, which was
now thronged with courtiers and servants,
who had been made invisible at the same
time that the Prince had been changed into
a Beast. But Beauty's greatest joy was
to find there her father, who had been
brought there along with her sisters by the
beautiful fairy that had appeared to her in
her sleep, the first night she stayed in the
palace. This stately lady now advanced,
and addressing Beauty, said: “ Beauty,
you will be glad, as
long as you live, of
the choice you have

You

goodness, and you

made. chose
will have beauty and
wisdom in addition.”
Then she punished
Beauty's two sisters,
by changing them
into statues, to stand
at the palace gates,
until they repented
of their faults.

The Prince soon
married Beauty, and
they were happy, for
they «did siight (im
thought, word, and
act, as they had done



4)\

. G VD \y ~ b
before all their lives. © ARP!


ig ZZ

‘Milly








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