Citation
A traitor's escape

Material Information

Title:
A traitor's escape a story of the attempt to seize Benedict Arnold after he had fled to New York
Series Title:
Young patriot series
Creator:
Otis, James, 1848-1912
White, George G ( George Gorgas ), d. 1898 ( Illustrator )
A.L. Burt Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
A.L. Burt, Publisher
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
234, 27 p., [9] leaves of plates : ill. ports. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
American loyalists -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Generals -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
War -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Social classes -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Treason -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Traitors -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prisoners -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Escapes -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
History -- United States -- Revolution, 1775-1783 ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Biographical fiction -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
Biographical fiction ( rbgenr )
Children's literature ( fast )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Title page engraved.
General Note:
Pictorial front cover and spine.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by James Otis ; with eight page illustrations by George G. White.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
002394840 ( ALEPH )
ALZ9747 ( NOTIS )
44747317 ( OCLC )

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Full Text




The Baldwin Library

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——— —=
—————— SS



GALLEY NEAREST Mz,—Page 26.



A TRAITORS ESCAPE.

A Story of the Attempt to Seize Benedict
Arnold After He Had Fled to
New York.

‘By JAMES OTIS.



WITH HIGHT PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS BY GEORGE G. WHITE.

NEW YORK:
A. L. BURT, PUBLISHER.



Copyright, 1898, by A. L. Burt.

A TRAITORS ESCAPE.
By James OTis,



EXPLANATION.

Suon credit as may attach to this story of
the unsuccessful attempt to capture Benedict
Arnold should be given to the lad concerned
in the plot, rather than to him whose name
appears on the title-page.

In a general way Oliver Littlefield is the
author of the tale, since his account, written
early in the year 1778, is given with but little
change of text, and only a slight rearrangement
of details,

JAMES OTIS.



CONTENTS.

: CHAPTER I. PAGE
A Dangerous Plat........ 0... cece eee seen eeen eens aaiereisisiencmnnd)

CHAPTER II.

Thor Plotssirecis ss csistcciaiioeisl close cieversiemieretereisiie Riesiioriits aie -. 82.
= CHAPTER IIT.
The American Legion .........cceeeeee Maiclele sie Nass ese CERO
Se CHAPTER IV.
An Inquisitive Stpanger ............0.2e cee eee scent ees Banas)
Stig CHAPTER V.
THe PrisOMl ss .cccses cesses ceoeececnseee's Snpousesocaodo t 0s

CHAPTER VI.
Suspenseiee saiaire celeste cioisinsiee sleisivers sereistewlersiers's nee Roce ad

; CHAPTER VII.
Unwelcome TidingS..........cceecccceecececes wear esesivee sLOO

CHAPTER VIII.

- CHAPTER IX.
Captured stercevs sce cisrotsie ciosticsiewiecsicieieveisevelere siete Eiielate veeeis sek OG

CHAPTER X. :
Turning the Tables ...........0eeeeee wees PANE siauenee gore natetice 217



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS,

: PAGE

As I waded into the Water I signalled to those on the Galley
nearest ME......... cece cece eer eees Seleraynsiein Bu toielanyers 26
Benedict Arnold—Portrait. ...........005 ear arent iets ec iecets 30

I then saw Ben Stork standing behind some bales of Hemp.. 87

David now had his Prisoner so nearly Choked, he was in
Subjection........ ae oo Batei eevee ass Tele ators alone Samet 101



a

aa :
Bea a* was a Prisoner in a Building that served the pur-
perane of 8. Guardhouses: +. co cccimeres veces tees sens Sear 122

A Gentleman with a long Beard came toward the Ruins and
spoke the word ‘‘ Newark.”........... ccc ceececeesees 148

From our Hiding Place we could see through the Windows
where the Traitor slept ...........ceeeceueeeccceeeces 175

I seized a Billet of Firewood, with which to defend Myself.. 186

‘* Step over your Man, so you may catch him by the Throat,”
I whispered to David........... estecetslereierleuinr® tole eee s.e Re



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. »

- CHAPTER. I.
A DANGEROUS PLAN.

Aursouen I have passed through the trou-
blous time ‘when we braved King George, ay,
and bested him too, I never heard of, or took
part in any more perilous venture than that
when I enlisted in the plot to capture the
traitor Arnold while he was in this city of New
York holding the king’s commission, and mak-
ing ready his expedition to the south from
which so much was expected and so little
realized. :

The story is worth the telling, even though _

the attempt was a failure, for in it was con-



8 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

cerned as brave a man and gallant a.soldier as
it was ever my good fortune to meet.

There is no reason, however, why I should
jump into the tale in such hap-hazard fashion ;
itshould be told in an orderly manner for its
better understanding.

In the fall of 17 80 I was a stripling of seven-
teen years, believing myselfalready a man, and
chafing much because my good mother had her
heart so set against my joining the “rebel” army.

We, my mother and I, lived on George Street
hard by the highroad to Boston, and in Duke *
Street, just off Frankford, David Rhinelander,
my particular comrade, who was about my own
age, made his home.

He, as well as I, was the only child of a
widowed mother, and our fathers had fallen
gloriously, fighting for the colonies at Trenton
in the province of New Jersey, in January
of 777. |

’ Because our lives so nearly resembled each



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 9

other, and because David was a lad who could
be trusted through evil as well as fair days, we
became such firm friends that the neighbors
spoke of us as comrades, and the Tories never
mentioned our names without adding that we
should be hanged for what we had been able —
to do toward aiding the cause.

More than once had we carried valuable in-
formation to those who were fighting against —
the king, and no less an officer than General
Sullivan himself was pleased to say to our

“faces that we were of more service to him in
New York City than we could have been in the
ranks, which I considered a great compliment,
although envious lads, to whom we repeated
the words, insisted it was but another way of
telling us the army was better off for not hav-
ing us in it. |

All this I set down that it may be under-
stood how we, who were of no importance as

Citizens, save ip our own estimation, should -



10 A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE. _

have been the ones selected to aid a brave man
in a plot which, had it succeeded, would have
brought great renown to all concerned.

As a matter of course we, meaning David
and I, had heard the news when Major John
André, adjutant-general of the king’s forces in
New York, was made a prisoner; of Benedict
Arnold’s penn, and later of André’s execu-
tion.
On the 24th of September in the year 1780,
we had the first information, less than eighteen
hours after the major was captured, and twas
days later we saw the arch traitor, Benedict
Arnold, walking through the streets of the
city, he having fled on the 25th.

It can well be fancied that we did little alee
than converse on this subject, which was in the
mouths of all the citizens whether they favored
the Continentals or the king, and David de-
clared more than once that we would be justi-

fied in shooting Arnold as we would a pole-cat..



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE, pee lal

And we were in the temper to do such a rash

_ thing, had it not been for the fact that his

death would hardly serve to right the wrong,
and also that of a certainty we should have
been hanged offhand, for the traitor was under
the protection of Sir Henry Clinton in fact,
he had taken up his quarters in the house adjoin-
ing the building occupied by that nobleman.

It would appear as if I had set down many

_. words that might well have been left out; yet

it seems to me, and also to David, who is even
now overlooking the task, as if each one is nec-
essary for the proper telling of the story.

It was just five weeks from the day Arnold,

the traitor, entered the city, that David and I,

returning home from a stroll to Bowling Green,
met that good patriot, Jacob Schuster, who was
my comrade’s uncle on his mother’s side, she
having been one of the Schusters from Bergen
before marrying Frederick Rhinelander.

The night was just coming on, and we were



12 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

quickening our steps lest we be overhauled by
the patrol, and were not minded to linger any
longer than was necessary to greet Master
Schuster in respectful fashion, when he said in
a cautious tone, so unusual with him, that our
curiosity was quickened at once: —

“JT would have speech with you, lads, and in -
private, on a weighty matter. If it so be you
can come to the sign of the Black Horse in half ©
an hour, I will have ordered a lunch spread for
the three of us.”

The tavern he spoke of was where the post-
stage from Boston put up, and we should have
been well pleased to go there under any pre-
text, for much was always doing at the inn, and
gossip was plenty as fleas on a cur. :

“We will be there, Master Schuster,” I said
boldly ; “but first it is right our mothers should
be made acquainted with the favor you propose
doing us.”

“Tt is well to remember the mother, Oliver



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 13

Littlefield, and a credit that you think of her
first. Step quickly, so that I am not ee
waiting.” 1

We needed no urging to make all possible
haste; for to partake of food at the sign of the
Black Horse was much more of an entertain-
ment than it is now, when the tavern has fallen
into bad repute. ;

We two were excited by the invitation and
the mysterious air which Master Schuster wore
while giving it, and speculated as to its mean-
ing while we hurried homeward, but without
solving the riddle; for it surely was a riddle
when David’s uncle was willing to spend good
money without seeing an immediate return,
with ample profit from the investment,

Of course we understood it had to do with
the cause, and I declared my belief that we
were about to be allowed to enlist; but this
hope David soon dashed, when he said:

“Tf such had been the business Uncle Jacob



14 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

would have called at our homes, instead of buy:
ing refreshments at the Black Horse, where I am
told everything is of the most expensive kind.”

“Then why should he have thus summoned
us 2?”

“ We shall know once we have arrived, and I
am minded to eat fast before the business be un-
- folded in order that I may have all the enter.
tainment possible while we remain there.”

No check was put upon us when we an-
nounced our purpose, for our mothers had every
confidence in Master Schuster, and we had
taken the precaution to accompany each other
when we told, the news; therefore, in several —
minutes less than the time set we were at the
Black Horse Inn looking around eagerly for
David’s uncle, and with many fears lest he
had repented of his generosity.

The good man was there, however, true to his
- word, and the amount of food before him was

ao great as to surprise both my comrade and



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE, 15

myself, for instead of a lunch he had purchased
a veritable feast.

No second invitation was needed, and with
only such delay as was necessary in order to
greet Master Schuster in becoming fashion, we
fell-to, I following David’s advice to eat rapidly
lest we be interrupted before my hunger was ~
appeased.

There was no need of such unseemly haste,
however; for Master Schuster waited patiently
until we were filled so full that another mouth-
ful would have been impossible, and then said
ina dow tone, after looking stealthily around to
make certain no one was within earshot:

“Are you lads minded for an adventure in be-
half of. the cause—one which has in it danger
enough to please the most gluttonous swash-
buckler, and much honor if it be successful 2”

_ “Tndeed we are, and it cannot come our way
too quickly,” I replied, without waiting to hear



16 A TRAITORS ESCAPE.

David’s opinion, for I knew full well what he
would have said had I given him the time.

“And think you it would be possible to re-
main away from home a goodly portion of the
time during the next week, or perhaps longer?” -

“Ay, sir; if it so be you represent to our
mothers that it is your desire we should be
absent.”

“T would not have you decide an important
matter too quickly. Remember that the danger
is great; if you should be taken, I believe your
lives would pay the penalty, and even in case
of success, we have nothing save the Wor | of
others—neitheg bond nor written undertaking.”

“So that the adventure is for the cause, we -
need not waste our time speaking of rewards.”

« And the danger ?”

“We have been in no little peril when we
carried news out of the city to our friends, and
yet no one can say that David or I was ever like
to show the white feather.” .



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 17

“T am not questioning your courage, lad;
but wish you should understand that this is a
serious matter—more important than anything
you have ever even dreamed of adventuring on.”

“There is no reason why you should search
for bugbears, Uncle Jacob,” David said quickly.
“We are all the more eager to embark in it
_ when you tell us of the danger.”

“A man is never so courageous as when his

stomach is full, therefore it was I fed you well

. before broaching the subject, and now I must

beliove you will carry out your parts in goodly
fagiiiion.” BS

“What are they to be?” _
"Instead of replying Master Schuster called
for his account; paid it like a man who is not
given to pinching his shillings, and walked out
of the tavern after motioning us to follow.

By this time it can well be understood that
we were on fire with curiosity; but, question as we
might; Master Schuster would speak no further



18 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

word until we were come to the common near
the powder-house, when he halted and said:

“Tt was here I agreed to meet a gentleman
at this hour, and from him, if he keeps the
engagement, you will learn all that may be
necessary.”

Surely the plot was looking black enough to
satisfy even David and me, who had ever hoped
we might be concerned in some. gigantic con-
spiracy against the king, and I am free to -
confess that for the moment I began to feel —
weak-kneed. . :

If the ee business was of such a nafure
that Master Jacéb Schuster oe be willing
to skulk in this fashion, then it must be indeed —
a serious matter.

David slyly took my hand in his as we
waited there in the darkness, and I believed it
was not only because of the cold, piercing wind
that his teeth chattered so merrily.

Anything was better than waiting here



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 19

within the shadow of the powder-house at such
a time, and great was my relief of mind when a
stranger suddenly appeared from around the
corner.

The newcomer greeted Master Schuster in a
friendly fashion, and asked quickly, before
David’s uncle had time to introduce us:

“ Are these the two of whom you spoke ?”
Yes, and although they be young, I can
vouch both for their courage and their deny
to the cause.” >

“How much do they know?”

& Nothing more than that they are needed. for
an ‘adventyre of great peril. Oa |

“Ts it asking too much that you pace to and —

- . fro near to the road, where you may see if any

one approaches this place, while I make known
to the lads what we'would have them do? I |
am not minded they shall embark without
knowing all, and through your recommendation
I am about to put my life in their hands.”



20 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“They would not betray you, however sore
might be their suffering. I will keep an eye
out, so that you be not surprised, and you may
summon me when the interview is ended.”

Then Master Schuster walked out toward the
road, and I stepped forward a few paces in
order to get a better view of this man who pro-
posed to tell us—two strangers to him—that
which would prove his undoing were we minded
to act the part of traitors. ;

I do not believe he was more than five years
our senior; an inch or two above six feet in
- height, and with a face so gloomy that it was as
if he suspected some portion of his,own body
had designs against the remainder of his
anatomy.

Taking him all in all, so far as I could judge
at that moment, he was not one I would choose
as a comrade, yet at the same time I would
have taken his word if my life was in the

balance.



A TRAITOR’S. ESCAPE, ai

While I gazed at him he was scrutinizing us,
and when this portion of the interview was con-
cluded to the satisfaction of all, he asked our
names, where we lived and who were our par-
ents, until I cut short such catechism by giving
the history of each, even down to such details
as when David had the fever, and I was laid up

with a broken arm.

He listened attentively, as if each particular
was deeply interesting, and when I had come
to an end because I could think of nothing
more to say, he took his turn at talking, and
from that instant there was not a moment
wasted on useless matters.

“T am John Champe, of Virginia, sergeant-
major in Lee’s Legion,” he began, and I was so
ill-mannered as to interrupt him by asking :

“Have you left the service ?”

“No; although my comrades, as well as the
_ British in this city, believe I have deserted.”
“Believe it?” Icried. “ How can they be-



22 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

lieve such a thing unless there be some truth in
the matter ?”

“ And so there is, as will be seen if you hold
your peace while I tell my story, after which
you must believe I can be depended upon, for
_ I put it in your power to have me arrested as a
spy. lam informed that General Washington
himself sent for my commander—Major Henry
Lee—and told him he believed there might be
found in the Legion a soldier capable and will-
ing to undertake a delicate and hazardous
_ project. The major was so kind as to mention -
my name as one who might be trusted, and it
"was arranged that I be approached with a plan
whereby I was apparently to desert, make my
way into this city, and here attempt to capture

_ the traitor Arnold.”

It was David who interrupted the stranger
at. this point by an exclamation of amaze-
ment that so daring a scheme should even so

much as. be spoken of, and my knees grew



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. : 23

weaker, for this promised to be more of an
adventure than I had ever desired.

“ At first Iwas unwilling my comrades should
- believe, even for a few weeks, that I had basely

deserted; but the major used weighty argu-
ments, chiefest among which was the fact that
I should be obliging the Commander-in-chief —
himself, and might-make such a name as years
~ of service could not win for me.”

« When did you appear to desert?” I asked
jn a tremulous tone, more to gain courage from
‘hearing my own voice than because I was
curious on the matter.

“T will come to that later. I agreed to the
plan, and was given letters to two gentlemen
on whom it was said I could fully rely. One
was Master Jacob Schuster, and the other need -
_ not be named now. At eleven o’clock. on the
night of the 20th I took my cloak, valise and
orderly-book, crept out of quarters to the
stable, and there saddled my horse without



24 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

being detected. It was necessary to lead the
animal half a mile or more lest his footsteps
on the frozen ground should give the alarm,
and I be taken before having really started.”

“If your major was in the plot, why was all —
that necessary ?” David asked. “T fail to see
why you could not have walked out in the
open day.”

“That would have been to tell every man
in the command of my purpose, and, thanks to
the spies which are around every encampment,
General Clinton must have been warned of my
intention before I arrived. I was to be a de!.
serter in every sense of the word, save that I
so acted under command of my superior officer.
It had been arranged that I ride to Paulus -
_ Hook where is a British post; but just asI left
the tavern near Bergen, known as the Three
Pigeons, I saw a detachment from the Legion,
led by Lieutenant Middleton, in hot pursue of

me. ”



A TRAITORS ESCAPE. 25

“How far away?” I asked, forgetting in
the interest the story had for me, that it
was not seemly to interrupt the sergeant.

“Less than half a mile. There no longer
appeared to be any chance that I could gain
Paulus Hook; therefore I drew rein for Com-
munipaw, knowing that off the settlement
would be found two of his majesty’s galleys.
_ Now I believed myself safe from pursuit, for
it was reasonable to suppose the lieutenant
would continue on into Bergen, and I slackened
. pace, for my horse was nearly winded. This act
of humanity was near being the undoing of
my mission; for no sooner had J arrived on
the shore of Communipaw Bay. than the
cavalry appeared, now so near at hand it
seemed. certain I must be taken.”

“Of course you would have come to no
harm, for Major Lee could bear witness as to

why you were thus apparently deserting,”



26 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

David said, quite as interested in the story as
was I.
Oe True; but the plan would thus have mis.
carried, which was what I had to guard against.
Fortunately those aboard the galleys were on
’ the lookout, and that which had threatened to
be a disaster but worked for my benefit. Dis-
mounting, and with the few belongings in my a
hands, I sent the beast shoreward with a blow
from the flat of my sword as I waded into the
water, signaling furiously to those on the galley
nearest me.” a
“What were the pursuers doing meanwhile?”
I asked. /
“ Riding at full speed in the hope ,of cutting
me off before I could be taken up by a boat
_ which instantly put out from one of the craft.
No less than half a dozen musket-balls were
sent after me by my late comrades; but I had
the best of them by three or four minutes, and

soon found myself on board the boat in safety,



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. a7

_ grieved to the heart because my companions in-
arms would return to camp with the word that
I had gone over to the enemy.”

The sergeant paused an instant, and David
and I literally held our breath in suspense to
hear the conclusion.

“I was now with the enemy, having arriyed_

in such fashion there could be no question but
‘that I was all I claimed to be, and the captain
of thd galley gave me conveyance to this city,
forwarding to Sir Henry Clinton, at the same
time, a full account of my daring escape. With
that general I soon had an interview, and he has
proposed that I enlist in what is to be called
the American Legion, which the traitor is now
raising from such loyalists and deserters as are
of the mind to aid the king.”

“Do you count on 80 doing?” I asked,
full of admiration for the young man who
was thus gloriously serving the cause, and at

the same moment saying to myself that I



~38 A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE.

would it were my good fortune to have a like .
opportunity.

“That is what must be done, I expect, in
order that I may follow the movements of the
traitor whom I hope soon to carry back to the ©
American camp as a prisoner. You can well
understand that I have not told this story with
the idea of entertaining you lads. The time has
come when I must have some assistance from the
outside—assistance by those on whom I can rely
with my life, and when I made such want known
to Master Schuster he mentioned your names,
pledging his own honor for your loyalty to the’
cause.”

“He could not well have said other than that
we are bound to it as closely as can be those
whose hearts are set on the one matter. We,
David and I, do not lay claim to being won-
drous brave; but we would sooner suffer death
a dozen times over than give any man the chance

to say we were false to the colonists in this



‘A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 29

, struggle, and only wait for the day when we
may prove that such is no empty boast.”

“The chance is now come, lad. Aid me, but
at the same time with a full understanding of
all that may be meant by defeat, and you shall
have an opportunity of doing what falls to the

“lot of but few men in these provinces.”

“What will you have us do?” David asked
eagerly.

“Assist me in making Benedict Arnold a pris-
oner, and carrying him back to the American

“camp.”
«That we will, right readily,” I answered,
before David had time to speak, “and in so
doing we shall be pleasing ourselves.”

“Tt will be necessary you follow my direc-
tions blindly, if need be; for in a matter like
this there must be but one head.” -

“That we are agreed to,” David cried, deter-

~-mined to speak for himself, that it might be

seen he was of the same mind as I.



30. A TRAITORS ESCAPE.

“Tf we fail it is possible you may share my —
fate, for on being taken I shall be hung as a

Spy.
“While we have no hankering after such a

”

doom, yet the possibility does not frighten us,”
~ and I took David by the hand that he might
have full credit for joining in what I believed
to be a brave speech. «

“You are lads after my own heart, and should
have been raised in Virginia instead of here,
where ee is measured ay its value in
money.”

“T have no complaint to make against this —
province,” David said thoughtfully; “but I
should like to say I was from the same colony as
that brave gentleman, General Washington.”

“J believe you are almost: Virginians even
now,” Sergeant Champe cried, as he seized us by
the hands, wringing them with such force that
we had a very good idea of the quality 0 of his

~ muscles,



NN XY
\

ANY
WN
NN

ee
Ze

SESS
FS



BENEDICT ARNOLD.
(Â¥rom a Painting by Du Similier, 1783.



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. - 31

“Yet you will find that we hold to this col-
ony,” I said, not minded that Virginia should be
set up so highly as against our own province,
“and it will please me to prove that we of New
York are no more lacking in courage than the
youths from your home.”

“ Now Iam beginning to believe we may be
comrades,” Sergeant Champe cried, as if pleased
with us, “and we will set about thiswork, each .
feeling’ every confidence in the other. Come, we
will speak with Master Schuster.”



32 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

CHAPTER II.
THE PLOT.

Durrve our converse David’s uncle had been
pacing to and fro near the road where the wind
had full sweep, and he must have felt relief at
. seeing us approaching, for his share in this in-
terview had been most. disagreeable.

“It is arranged that the lads will aid me,”

Sergeant Champe said as he laid his hand on.

Master Schuster’s shoulder. “I believe they
can do as good service as men, and we shall suc-
ceed in the work unless fortune serves us an
ugly turn.”

“What part have you set down for them?”

“None as yet; I have but just made them -

acquainted with the facts, for it was not to my

Gee

eer





A TRAITORS ESCAPE. 33

mind that they embark in this adventure with
their eyes closed.”

- “Then finish your converse, for there is noth-
ing to prevent, and it had better be brought to
an end as soon as may be.”

_ “First of all we must gain accurate informa-
tion as to the surroundings of the building in
which the traitor is lodged.”

“That I can give you now, sergeant.. Under-
standing that it would be of importance, I
strolled that way this afternoon, picking up
such facts as are apparent to strangers.”

“ What did you learn ?”

“Very little more than the boys are most
likely already familiar with. In the rear of his
quarters is a garden extending to the water's
edge, and adjoining this a dark alley leads to

- the street, By asking a few careless questions

I learned that the renegade usually returns to

his lodgings about midnight; but, whatever

the hour, makes it a custom to spend more



34 A TRATTOR’S ESCAPE.

or less time in this same garden before
retiring.” a‘

“You have done well, Master Schuster.
There is little left for me, save to decide upon

the plan, which I will do this night. To-morrow



I shall enlist in the American Legion——”

“To what end? Once having signed the
rolls you would be held as a deserter should
you be taken prisoner after returning to your |
rightful command, and the Britishers need have
no further excuse for hanging you.”

“T have considered all that, my worthy sir,
and know full well the dangers which attend
such a course; but it must be done in order
that I may have opportunity for free speech
with the traitor.” |

“He has ever held himself ey, and I ¢ ques-
tion whether you could have an interview at
will when you are no more than a private under
his command,” Master Schuster objected.

“Tam promised a commission if I enlist, in

/



\

A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 85

which case there will be certain intercourse
with the traitor, and to my mind there is no
more positive way of gaining an opportunity to
spy upon him. It must be enlistment for me,
whatever may befall at.a later date.”

I could understand that the sergeant would
not be diverted from such plan as he had

already formed, and Master Schuster must have

realized the same, for he made no further

attempt to dissuade him from what seemed like
useless danger.

Then the two, meaning David’s uncle and

_ Sergeant Champe, conversed as they walked

down the Boston road toward the fort, the talk

_ being wholly upon the traitorous plot which

would have delivered one of our strongholds

‘into the hands of the British ; and my comrade

and I, keeping close at their heels, learned much

_ that was new to us. _

First we heard what price Benedict Arnold
had received for thus selling himself body and



36 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

soul, which was, as nearly as I now remember
it, six thousand pounds sterling in hand, and a
commission as colonel in the British army, with
the brevet rank of brigadier.

Save for the money, he had not bettered his
fortunes, if that was the sole purpose in mind -
when he would have sacrificed the colonies
to his greed; and money gained in such
manner does not long remain in the hands of
him who receives it, so I have often heard said.

Sergeant Champe claimed that, on Saturday
before the Monday when Major André was exe-
cuted, Captain Ogden was sent to Paulus Hook
with an escort of twenty-five men for the pro-
fessed purpose of carrying letters to General
Clinton, and that he privately suggested to the
British commander there, having instructions so
to do from headquarters, that if Arnold’s cap-
ture could be brought about immediately, Major
André would be set free. :

That plan had failed, however, as we knew,



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 37

and now it was to be seen if this one, bold and
dangerous as it was, would succeed.

It was decided between Master Schuster and
the sergeant that we lads were to return to our
homes that night, letting it appear as if we had
done no more than enjoy a feast at the sign of
the Black Horse.

Early on the following morning, however,
David’s uncle was to say he had work for us to
perform which would often keep us away from
home at night, and otherwise so arrange mat-
ters with our mothers that there would be
no difficulty in going whithersoever we would
until the plot was worked out to a triumphant
ending, or disaster had come, bringing with it,
for us at least,-death.

I should have been better pleased if we were
required to set about the business without de-

‘lay; for Iwas burning with impatience to begin
the adventure, which was far greater, and ac-

companied by more danger, than I had ever

~



38 . A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

thought it-would be my good fortune to embark
in, to further the cause. }

Sergeant Champe, however, made no bones
of dismissing us, once it had been decided we
should present ourselves at Master Schuster’s
- office next morning, within a reasonable time
after the breakfast hour; but he did so with an
air of exceeding friendliness, such as robbéd.the
words of their severity. |

“Remember, lads, having once set your faces
toward this work there can be no turning back.
- Punctuality is as necessary as fidelity, and after
we meet to-morrow morning you must conform
your goings and comings to my commands.”

I-was not minded he should believe us to be
lads who had had no experience in serious
tasks, and therefore made reply :

“ Although we are not soldiers, both of us
understand all that may be implied in the
word ‘duty,’ for we have been under the orders

of no less a personage than General Sullivan



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 39

in some pérformaices almost as dangerous as
this.” ae
“J have already heard from Master Schuster

how you lads have proved your devotion to the
cause; and if I repeat certain instructions again
and again, more often than seems necessary or
kindly, you must set it down that I have grown
timorous, as a man can well be pardoned for
becoming when he is classed by his old com.
rades as a deserter, and may be apprehended
by his new acquaintances as a spy. Even the
knowledge of what we would do fails to take
-away either the shame for the one or the fear
of the other.” .

_ The young Virginian spoke us so friendly,
and withal so sadly, that I was shamed because
of having made a pert answer to what was
indeed a timely caution, and would have atoned
for my over-hasty speech but that he cut me
short ere I was well begun, by saying :

. eT ean understand, lad, what was in “your



40 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

heart; and that we may work together to the
greatest good, with the least friction among
ourselves, I was disposed you should know all
that bore heavily upon me.”

Then he stretched out both hands as if in
token of friendship, and when David and I had
clasped them heartily he turned abruptly away,
Master Schuster following, and we two watch-
ing until they disappeared in the distance down
Nassau Street.

It was little less than a vain boast when I
pertly told Sergeant Champe we had been
under the orders of General Sullivan in some
certain performances almost as dangerous as
this promised to be; and if he could have
turned back five minutes after saying good-
night, he would have seen for a surety that we
were unaccustomed to such perilous adventures,
by our lingering in the street, starting in alarm
at every sound, however slight.

It is true we had performed duties under the



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 41

commands of General Sullivan, to which was
attached a certain degree of danger in case the
enemy should discover what we were about;
and I may say, without boasting, that we had
done our part well, or at least so it would
seem from the words of praise and encourage-
ment which were bestowed upon us.

But this adventure of Sergeant Champe’s
was something far different from anything we
had ever done, and looking back upon it now I
question whether even men grown old in the
service would not have been in a certain
degree timorous upon considering the matter in
all its bearings.

Although Benedict Arnold was a traitor to
his country, and one to be despised by all who
love the cause, he was now among those who
had ‘sworn to protect him, and would do so, as
could be seen from the fact that Sir Henry
Clinton had housed him in the building next

adjoining his own residence.



42 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

The city was overrun with redcoats, as can
well be fancied; one could hardly walk half a
mile through the streets after the hours of dark-
ness without meeting two or three detachments,
out on patrol, and be forced to explain his
reasons for being abroad.

David Rhinelander and I well knew how
difficult it was to depart from the city without
a military pass: and yet here was a young ser-
geant from Virginia who not only proposed to
leave New York when it should be his pleasure,
but to take with him a prisoner, and that
prisoner a man who must have been well-
known by this time to every redcoat on the
island; for traitors were not so plentiful in those
days but that each man and boy would have a
look at one.

IT do not believe you could have found a
Britisher who had either regard or respect for
this renegade ; but yet we knew full well they

would not suffer him to be carried away, and



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 43

even that private soldier who detested him
most heartily would have done valiant battle
against us should our purpose be known.

All this I set down that it may be the better
understood why David’s mind and mine were
in such a whirl that to go quietly home and
lie down in bed with the idea of sleeping’ was
out of the question.

As for myself, it was much as thous I were
burning with a fever. My mouth was parched,
and my throat dry; the barking of a dog in the
distance sounded loud as the roaring of a lion,
and the sighing of the night wind like unto the
howl of the tempest, all of which is much the
same as though I had confessed to being
exceedingly timorous.

We two, David and J, stood on the street
corner in silence, starting apprehensively at the
lightest sound after Master Schuster and Ser-
geant Champe had left us, and mayhap five



44 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

minutes passed in such manner before my
comrade asked in a whisper:

“ What are we to do now, Oliver ?”

“(Go home and shiver till the morning comes,
for certain it is that my eyes will not be closed
in slumber this night.”

“T would he had waited until the moment
for action had come, before explaining. his pur-
pose; for then we should. not be forced to
remain inactive, the sport of our own fears, and
I am grown timorous, Oliver Littlefield—that
much I may confess to you alone.”

“Yet you have no thought of turning back ?”

“Not even though I knew to a certainty the
adventure would end in our undoing.”.-

“It is yet early in the night,” I said, seized |
by a sudden thought. “Our mothers know we
are with Master Schuster, and therefore will not
be alarmed if we remain abroad many hours.
Now I am minded to have a look at the house

where this traitor lives, and that done we



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 45

shall be the better prepared when work is
begun.”

This plan pleased Oliver greatly, not so much
because of the preparations that would be mak-
ing, as that it gave usa semblance of something
to do at the time when we most needed em-
ployment.

We turned back and struck across the com-
mon at a rapid pace until we were come to
Broad Way, down which we walked leisurely,
as if abroad merely for pleasure, deciding
between, ourselves that in event of being halted
by the patrol we should make such explanation
of our being abroad.

There wa8'no reason why we should not have
continued straight on, until arriving at the
house which sheltered the traitor; but it
seemed to us as if our purpose was suspected
by every one whom we passed, and on coming
near to the ruins of Trinity Church we made

our way across the yard to Lumber Street,



46 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

going thence to the water’s edge as if fleeing
from pursuit.

Here we surveyed the premises as best we
might in the darkness, walking up and down
the alley from Greenwich Street to Broad
Way no less than four times, but neither seeing
nor hearing any one in the garden.

It was much too early for the traitor to take
his nightly airing; and this, perhaps, saved us
from bringing suspicion upon ourselves, for had
we been observed loitering there I doubt not
but that it would have become’ necessary to
make some explanation of our purpose.

During more than two hours we walked to
and fro, not daring to converse even in whispers
on the subject nearest our hearts, lest the words
should be overheard, and then, having fatigued
our bodies, we were in better condition to follow
the advice given by Sergeant Champe, although
I was far from wishing to be alone in my cham-
ber.



A.TRAITOR’S ESOAPE. 44

Had we been two of the king’s most devoted
subjectswe could not have made our way through
the city with less impediment, for when we were
arrived at the door of my mother’s dwelling
there had been no interference with our move-
ments.

“T shall come here at an early hour to-morrow
morning, Oliver Littlefield,” David whispered as
we clasped hands in parting, and I could well
understand that he would keep his promise
faithfully ; for, judging from what was in my
own mind, I knew his eyes would be opened
with the first light of the coming day.

Master Jacob Schuster gave proof that his
anxiety regarding the outcome of the plot was
nearly as great as was David’s and mine, for my
mother was not yet arisen next morning when a
knock was heard at the door, and by her com-
mand I hastened to learn who might be this
early visitor, although knowing full well that I

could have spoken his name before seeing him.



48 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

It must have been that he feared I would
speak some incautious word, for instantly we
stood face to face he made a warning gesture
with his hand as he said stiffly :

- “Present my excuses to Mistress Littlefield,
lad, for such an untimely visit; but the time is
precious to me when [ have so much of business
on hand, and I could not well afford to wait
until a more seemly hour.”

Then I, to carry out the acting which he had
begun, asked innocently :

“Would you have speech with my mother, sir?”

“Ay, that I would, lad, and as soon as may
be, again craving her pardon for coming at such
an hour.”

I knew that my mother must have overheard
the conversation, yet going to the foot of the
stairs | repeated that which Master Schuster
had said; and she, good soul, flustered by this
early visit, came down ere yet it seemed to ‘me

possible she could have arisen from the bed.



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. " 49

If he had been face to face with the noblest
lady in the province, Master Schuster could not
have been more humble in his apologies, or
used so many high-flown words while asking
pardon for his coming.

In fact, he beat about the bush so long that I
began to grow anxious, fearing lest he would
never come to an end of words.

The business was quickly arranged, however,
when he broached the subject by explaining,
without too much of detail, that he was desir-
ous of hiring David and me to perform certain
duties which it was not necessary should be
explained.

My mother readily gave her consent to the
proposition, although making some show of a
demur when Master Schuster stated that it
might even be necessary that we remain away
from home at night on some occasions,

When this business had been brought to an

end I was told to await there David’s coming,



50 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

and my mother set about getting breakfast,
while Master Schuster went, as he declared, to
arrange for the hire of my comrade.

Before David came I was in mortal terror
lest I betray the secret to my mother, who was
full of speculations as to why the worthy mer-
chant should have come himself on an errand
which might equally well have been done by
one of his clerks, and over and over again did
she ask whether he had made any mention of
this business while we were with him at the
sign of the Black Horse.

Not being willing to tell my mother an un-
truth, I was finally forced to say that he had
spoken somewhat of his purpose, but pledged
both David and I to secrecy; therefore, unless
she would have me break my word, I must
remain silent.

It is not likely this satisfied my mother; but
it certainly gave me great relief, for instantly

she ceased her questioning, and refrained from



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 51

speculating aloud in my presence, contenting
herself by saying:

“T hope it has nothing to do with the war,
Oliver boy, for since your father fell at Trenton
I have none but you left me; and surely the
colonists are not in such sore need that they
would take a widow’s only child from her.”

“Tf it had to do with the war, mother, it
would be a question of our enlisting; and that,
you know, I might not do without your consent.
However, this much you should remember, that
Master Schuster desires to keep his business a
profound secret; and were you to speak of it to
others, even so much.as to wonder what it was,
a wrong might be done the gentleman who
gives me employment.”

I knew this would in a certain degree arouse
my mother’s suspicions; but better that than
for her to speak unguardedly to some of the
neighbors, and thus be the means of having a

watch set upon us.



52 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

My breakfast was but just concluded when
David entered with much the appearance of a
lad who has been soundly flogged.

At other times, when we were engaged in
what might be of benefit to the cause, he had
been joyous to the verge of triumph; but now
he was subdued, and I could well understand
that the possible perils of the adventure were
already weighing heavily upon him.

~“Will you return for dinner?’ my mother
asked as I arose from the table and prepared to
accompany my comrade,

“That is as Master Schuster may say; but it
will be as well if you de not expect me, for
surely we shall find enough with which to
satisfy our hunger, and supper will be all the
more enjoyable because of short rations at
noon.”

Then my mother kissed me much as if I were
going forth to battle, and the thought of her
anguish if it should so chance that through this



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE, 53

plot David and I were brought to the gallows,
so unnerved and dispirited me that when we
were on the street I had hard work to keep
back the tears from my eyelids. :

Almost anything would have been better
than cowardice at such a time, and I took good
care not to so much as look toward David,
until he said in a voice that trembled :

“We shall feel better, Oliver, once the work
has been begun.”

Then I understood that I was not alone in

my timorousness.



BA A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE,

CHAPTER III.
THE AMERICAN LEGION.

Now that the sun was shining, David and
I were far more valiant than we had been the
evening previous, having also gotten rid of the
home influences that naturally serve to weaken
a fellow when he sets out upon a dangerous
undertaking.

What in the darkness had seemed venture-
some to the last degree, was not so desperate
by the light of day, and we soon began to feel
as if we could do our share of the work with-
out so much as ever coming within the shadow
of the gallows, although that Sergeant Champe’s
days might be ended thereon seemed very rea-
sonable.



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 55

He, a soldier in the Continental Army, was
within the enemy’s lines under false pretenses;
and should the true story of his escape be dis-
covered, or his hand be seen in the effort to
capture the traitor Arnold, then the doom of a
spy would necessarily be his.

With us the situation was far different, since
we were at home, had no absolute connection
with the American Army, and even were we
discovered in the attempt, it hardly seemed
possible that death would be the penalty for
our portion of the work.

Thus it was I argued with myself, and re-
peated aloud for David’s benefit the result as
we went toward Master Schuste1’s office.

How much good such words did my comrade
it is not for me to say ; but I found in the idea
a great sense of relief—so much, in fact, that I
was as light-hearted by the time we were
arrived at our destination as I had previously

been downcast.



56 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

David’s uncle was more distraught when we
presented ourselves than I ever remember to
have seen him; it was almost as if he feared
our visit might bring evil, and instead of speak-
ing with us in the office as had been his wont,
he took us to the rear of the wareroom,
although nothing was said that might not
have been heard by any person.

“T have no means of guessing what it is
proposed you lads shall do; but as was
arranged last night, you are to remain here
until some word be received from the sergeant,
after which, and I say this for your safeguard
as well as my own, it will be best that you do
not present yourselves here, save when it may
be absolutely necessary. You are like to have
more intercourse with the Britishers than with
our friends, and it is not wise to show your-
selves on good terms in both camps.”

_ Jf Master Schuster had told us that he

regretted having appointed his office as a,



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 57

rendezvous, I should not have been more
certain of it, and therefore when he ceased
speaking I proposed that we wait at some con-
venient place out of doors rather than in the
building, and for the moment it seemed as if
he was minded to take advantage of the prop-
osition; but then, much as though ashamed
of his fears, he added hurriedly:

“No, no, lads! Stay where you are, since
this was the place selected for the meeting. I
only warned you against certain movements in
the future, thinking mayhap you would come
here so often as to excite suspicion. It is best,
perhaps, that you remain at this end of the
wareroom, where my patrons will not be so
likely to see you.”

Then, motioning toward two boxes which
were behind a pile of barrels, as if these might
be used in the stead of stools, Master Schuster
hastened away, looking thoroughly ill at ease,

and I so stated to David, adding in conclusion :



58 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“Tf it so be a citizen like Master Schuster is
alarmed, for no other cause than we two are in
his wareroom, how great must be the danger
which threatens us!”

“T cannot see how it is possible any peril
threatens just now, for thus far we have not so
much as lifted our hands against the king; but
Uncle Jacob is feeling as I was last night, and
it is not for me, who was even more timorous,
to laugh at his fears.”

Had we been received by Master Schuster as
we usually were—that is to say, if“he “had
given little or no heed to our presence—I
should have felt that much of the danger
existed only in my own mind; but now, as
David and I sat there alone with ample time to
think over the matter, it came to me that the
peril was even greater than I had anticipated,
and that Master Schuster knew more of the
plot than had been intrusted to us.

During more than half an hour we thus re-



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 59

mained as if in hiding, and then David’s uncle

came hurriedly to say that the sergeant was in
the street, and would have us join him.

Without waiting for further words we has-
tened away, and I am certain did not move any
too quickly to please Master Schuster, who, I
fancy, gave vent to a deep sigh of relief when
we were well over the threshold.

On the opposite side of the way, a short
distance above the warehouse, we saw the ser-
geant, who, having made certain we observed
him, moved leisurely on, which to our minds
was an invitation to join him,

I was ‘more pleased with the appearance of
this raw-boned, sedate-looking Virginian in the
daytime than I had been at night.

He had the air of one who would not be.
quick to understand when he was beaten; and
as I saw him there in advance of us, the
thought came to my mind that however much

of danger might threaten, or however many



60 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

difficulties be in the path, he would neither
draw back nor swerve from his course until
absolutely forced so to do.

He greeted us cheerily, and with nothing in
his manner to show that he was either over-
weighted or alarmed by the responsibility.

Beginning the conversation as if it had been
but lately interrupted, he said, speaking in such
manner that were his words overheard even by
Sir Henry Clinton himself there could be no
suspicions attached to their meaning :

“ When I arrived in New York I was recom-
mended to call upon General Arnold;who, as
you may know, is engaged in raising what is
to be called the American Legion, a force com-
posed almost entirely of Loyalists and deserters
from the Continental Army.”

David looked up in surprise, not understand-
ing whither such conversation might tend, and

as the sergeant paused asked :



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 61

“Did you have a long interview with General
Arnold 2”

“Tt might be considered so when you under-
stand that a brevet brigadier in his majesty’s
service was talking with a sergeant-major lately
from the rebel army. The gentlemen was very
kind, and personally asked if I would join his
Legion; but when I humbly ventured to sug-
gest that if I should do so, and was then cap-
tured by my former comrades I would
assuredly be hanged, he kindly changed the
subject, stating, however, that he would assign
me quarters among his recruiting sergeants.”

There was in my mind an idea that the
Virginian made these statements in what might
be called a continuation of his story told on the
previous night; but David, who had been
expecting to hear immediately what part we
were to play, looked thoroughly puzzled at
this roundabout way of setting to work, and
again interrupted by asking:



62 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“Then you decided not to enlist, sir?”

“Such had been my decision; but after
thinking the matter over seriously I came to
the conclusion, as I stated to the general late
last evening when I was so fortunate as to meet
him on the street, and he so kind as to grant
me a brief interview, that it might be as well
if I joined the legion, since death would be the
punishment for desertion, whether I was cap-
tured while wearing a red coat or in civilian’s
garments. He quite agreed with :me, and
further promised that I should be made ser-
geant-major. Therefore it was I enlisted this
morning.” ;

Now I was surprised, for although the Vir-
ginian had declared his intention of so doing,
several hours previous, I then questioned whether
at the last moment he would not decide against
it. For him the die was cast in good truth.

“Then you have signed the rolls?” I asked,

not attempting to hide my surprise.



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 63

“Hardly more than an hour since, but am
given liberty until such time as we shall have
duties to perform. At present there is nothing
to be done at the barracks, and I would see
what I may of New York, for perhaps a second
opportunity will not present itself.”

“Are you bent on sight-seeing this morning ?”
T asked after a short pause, during which I was
trying to decide in my own mind the reason for
such conversation.

“T may answer yes and no to that question.
Since you are the only acquaintances I have in
the city,” he continued in a meaning tone, “and
because it may not be possible for me to induce
you to join this portion of the king’s forces
which will be sent southward under General
Arnold, I have thought that before you enter-
tained me with the sights of the town I would
show you what perchance you have never seen
—a military barracks.”

Of course we understood that this long-



64 A TRAITOR’'S ESCAPE.

winded way of coming to it was a proposal for
us to see where the sergeant would be quar-
tered, lest peradventure it might become neces-
sary to call on him suddenly, although I could
not fully understand why he was so careful in
his manner of giving the invitation.

However that may be, we at once, and as a
matter of course, agreed that it would please us
to do as he suggested.

To our great surprise we were led directly to
the fort beyond Bowling Green, instead: of to
some building, for I had supposed this newly-
formed legion would be kept to a certain
degree by themselves; but it must have been
that General Clinton was doubtful as to: how

“the men might be treated by others in the serv.
ice, for a Britisher hates a deserter and a turn-
coat, however much benefit he may gain from -
him. :

Therefore it was that we, who had several

times feared we might enter the fort as prison-



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 65

ers, followed the sergeant without being ques-
tioned, and were soon in the midst of that
worthy band of renegades, spies and informers,
who, having done all the harm to the cause
that was possible, were now leaguing them-
selves together under the command of the arch
traitor himself.

As we soon learned, this visit had been pro-
posed in order that we might, should occasion
require, be able to communicate with Sergeant
Champe without delay.

He spoke to several of the legion, saying it
was his intention to persuade us to enlist, and
declaring that we were the only persons in
New York with whom he was acquainted.

Without having absolutely told a falsehood,
he made it appear much as if we were old
friends, if not relatives; and thus it was that
we took our first step in the plot—not a pleas-
ant one, since we were forced to receive those

villainous curs on a friendly footing.



66 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

During the entire forenoon we remained
within the limits of the fort, and in that time
had good opportunity of seeing the precious
band who were ready to work injury to their
own country.

Among these was Jethro Stork—he who
lived on Duke Street, and had held himself
devoted to the cause of liberty until that cer-
tain time when he found an opportunity to lay
hold of ten pieces of the king’s gold, whereat
he suddenly became a Royalist.

David and I had seen Jethro, but perchance
he did not remember us; his brother Benjamin,
a lad of about our age, had ever been a loud-
mouthed Tory, and he it was with whom we
were acquainted, but not friendly.

“Tf it was Ben who had enlisted in this so-
called American Legion, I would say the city
was well rid of him,” David whispered to me.

“And New York will lose nothing when
Jethro leaves it.”



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 6%

“True; but we know for a certainty Jethro
will get himself hanged in due time wherever
he may be, while Ben is far too cautious to put
his precious body into jeopardy.”

Then, not caring to see more of the Stork
family, for we could get a sight of such rene-
gades any day, we turned away, and at noon
ate the king’s rations, which would surely have
disagreed with our stomachs but for the fact
that we were doing so with a purpose which
it was hoped would result in good to the
cause. .

Half an hour or more after noon Sergeant
Champe said to David and me, speaking in a
tone that might have been heard by any of the
recruits who chose to listen:

“Now if you lads are minded to show me
around New York, I will thank you for the
service. Above all things I would see that
portion of the city which was burned during
the great fire of ’76,”



68 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“That we can readily show you, and without
much walking to and fro,” I replied, whereat
the three of us left the barracks, departing
from the fort without any more difficulty than
if we had been on the staff of General Clinton
himself.

As we were passing one of the sentinels, the
sergeant said :

“JT first have a desire to see the ruins of
Trinity Church. Of course I know where they
are; but it would please me much to have an
extended view of them, that I may thereby
form some idea of what the building was
like.”

As may be supposed, we acted upon his sug-
gestion without delay, and, going up Broad
Way, stopped at the ruins, as if our only pur-
pose in coming had been to see them.

The sergeant led the way across the church-
yard until we were a short distance in the rear

of where the building had formerly stood, and



A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE. 69

here, in the very heart of New York, where
the king was master, and Sir Henry Clinton,
his dutiful servant, did we arrange further
details of that plot against his majesty and his
majesty’s prime traitor.

Standing where we were no one could ap-
proach within earshot save we were aware of
the fact, and we conversed—perhaps it would
be more correct to say Sergeant Champe de-
tailed his plans without fear of eavesdropping.

He had already decided upon the course of
action, and J soon understood that we were to
be but assistants, not principals or advisers, in
the plot.

“T have decided that on the night of the 5th
day of November we shall be able to make a
prisoner of General Arnold,” he said abruptly,
and David and I were so surprised by the
startling announcement that we stood silent
and motionless like simples; for it did not

seem to us possible the sergeant, however able



70 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

aman he was, could have perfected his arrange-
ments so quickly.

“Tf the work is to be done at all, the sooner
we move in it the better, and nothing will be
gained by much preparation. Now listen, for
it is my purpose that you repeat this to
another: As is well known, Arnold returns to
his quarters about midnight, and thus far,
previous to going to bed, has always taken a
stroll in the garden. Now I propose that on
the night mentioned David shall procure a
boat, and lay in waiting for us near the foot of
the garden. You and I, Oliver, will secrete
ourselves amid the shrubbery, while another,
whose name I have not yet mentioned, stands
watch outside. When Arnold appears it should
be a simple matter to deprive him of his liberty
and the power of speech.”

“ And even then it will be necessary to get
him to the boat,” I suggested, yet bewildered.
‘We may not be able to carry him without



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. V1

attracting attention, unless you are depending
upon the fact that the streets shall be empty
just at that time.”

“T have no such foolish expectation as that.
We shall undoubtedly meet some of the patrol
or watch as we make our way from the garden;
but it will be a simple matter to represent him
as one drunken whom we are carrying to his
home or the guardhouse, as the case may be.
That portion of the plot depends wholly upon
chance. Regarding the capture we may be
more positive. Nothing can defeat us save the
fact that he departs from his usual custom, in
which case the next night will suffice for our
purpose. All that now remains to be done is
to acquaint Major Lee with our intentions, and
have him see to it that horses are ready for us
on the Jersey shore not later than half an hour
after midnight.”

“Acquaint Major Lee!” David repeated.



72 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“ Why, he is in the American camp; either at
Pompton or West Point !”

“Nay, lad, most likely at Dobb’s Ferry, and
you may have speech with him to-morrow
morning, if you be diligent on the way.”

“We may ?” David cried in surprise. “Is it
your purpose that we go into the American
camp ?”

“You have done so more than once, I am told.”

“ Ay, and can again,” I replied.

“Then set out at once. Here are six
shillings in case you should need money during
the journey; and even though I had more it
would not be well to increase the amount, since
should you be overhauled, suspicions might be
aroused at your being so well supplied with
funds.” ad

“Do you mean that we are to leave immedi-
ately—this afternoon?” David asked, as if it
were not yet possible for him to understand
what had been said.



- A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 43

“ Ay, lad; so soon as you can get away.
There yet remains four days before the time I
have set. You should be at the American
camp to-morrow morning, and can return to
New York the night after, which will give us
time to change our arrangements, if it so be
Major Lee sees any reason for delay.”

I knew full well that in addition to the
difficulty of leaving New York would come
the question of entering the American lines,
and therefore asked the sergeant what creden-
tials we might take with us, which would
admit of our passing the sentinels, once we
were arrived at the outposts.

“There is nothing I can do for you in that
way, Oliver Littlefield,” he said sadly. “Re-
member, I am considered by all, save the
Commander-in-chief and Major Lee, as a
deserter. You must make your way there and

back as best you can, unless it should chance



m4. A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE.

Master Schuster could give you what would
serve as credentials.”

“That he cannot do,”David replied quickly.
“The last time we set out from the city it was
near four-and-twenty hours before he suc-
ceeded in so much as getting us a pass to leave
town, and then he greatly desired we should
visit some New Hampshire troops, among whom
he had acquaintances; but claimed he could
not get the necessary permit.”

“Then you must depend upon your own
resources, remembering that by the day after
to-morrow it is necessary to have returned.
Let me repeat, as forcibly as may be possible,
that my name is to be mentioned to no person
save Major Lee, and then only when you are
certain none other will hear the words.”

“ What shall we tell him in addition to the
plan you propose to carry out ?”

“That will suffice. Should he ask any ques-

tions concerning me, answer them as truthfully



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. "5

as you can, and forget not the night I have set,
for unless we have horses on the Jersey side
awaiting us, we shall never be able to get our

prisoner within the American lines.”

It was a blind sort of a journey we were
called upon to undertake, and without any
preparation whatsoever; therefore it was that
I stood looking mutely at David instead of set-
ting about the work at once, and Sergeant
Champe asked with much sharpness in his
tones :

“Are you expecting time will hang heavily
on your hands, unless you make a delay here ?”

“T was thinking how we might best set about
it, for it is not assimple as you appear to think,
this journey to and from the American lines.’’

“So, at the first show of difficulty, your
courage deserts you?” he asked in a sneering
tone. “You who were ready to aid me even
in the face of death, stand questioning as to how

you may perform what should be a familiar



"6 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

task. Thrice Iam told you have been inside
the lines, and why shall you waste the moments
by debating how it may be done the fourth
time ?”

The tone of his voice, quite as much as the
words, nettled me, and turning stiffly after
motioning David to follow, I gave him what
might have passed for a military salute, as I said:

“We will meet you in this place on the day
after to-morrow.”

“You had best present yourselves boldly at
the fort and ask for me there,” he replied
with a smile, and then it was that I understood
his harsh words had simply been intended to
spur Us On. wv

Nevertheless I did not linger, but with my
hand on David’s shoulder, walked through the
inclosure to Lumber Street, cudgeling my brains
to decide how we might make the journey to
Dobb’s Ferry within twenty-four hours.

Not until we had arrived nearly at the



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 0”

water’s edge did my comrade venture any
remark, and then it was to say grimly:

“JT am free to admit that the sergeant takes
many chances in thus joining the American
Deserters’ Legion—for that isthe name by which
it should be known. Yet at the same time he
would have it appear as if our part in this
matter was as nothing. Since he can arrange
our plan so glibly, it would have been well had
he told us how we might set about the journey.”

“ But since he didn’t, David Rhinelander, and
because we have no mind to fail in the first
work set us, we must go ahead, blindly trusting
to chance.”

“And it will be a chance if you get through
on time. Were we given two or three days, so
that we might watch our opportunity for leaving
the city, then would the case be different; but
it is proposed that we start immediately, and I
ask you how that may be done?”

“We must use the skiff we borrowed the last



"8 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

time of Master Taylor, and embark as if bent
on pleasure.”

“ And think you we shall be permitted to
do so in the light of day ?”

“That we must venture on. It may be the
very boldness of the attempt will prove friend-
ly, for the guard could not suppose we would
set about to visit the American lines without
trying to disguise our purpose.”

“Then do you take the lead, and I will fol-
low wherever you may say. I make no claims
at being a prophet, but yet venture to predict
that we shall find ourselves in the gaol, or as
prisoners within the fort, before the sun sets
rather than on our way up the river.”

I was much of David’s opinion, but would
not admit it just then; for if both of us were
weak-kneed at the start, then had the venture
failed before we began, and while I had little
faith of its success I determined to make it ap-

pear as if I was valiant and confident.



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. "9

CHAPTER IV.
AN INQUISITIVE STRANGER.

Davin ventured no further remark.

One who did not know him as well as I,
would have said he was disgruntled, if not ab-
solutely angry, at being sent forth on sucha
mission; but I understood that his silence came
from anxiety lest we should fail, and paid no
attention to what in another lad would have
been ill humor.

It was useless for me to try to form any plan
of action in the limited space of time at our dis-
posal, and after gazing about me in vain for
ten minutes or more I said, speaking to myself,
and not aware that I had raised my voice:

“We will buy hooks and lines and appear to

be fishing along the bank, working up-stream



80 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

until, if fortune favors us, we are so far out of
the city that it may be possible to pull across
without attracting the attention of the senti-
nels.”

It was when David made reply to this that
I realized I had given words to my thoughts.

“ Mayhap it is as well to start in that way as
another, and while it seems impossible we
should be allowed to leave, there is a chance
the very boldness of the plan will carry it
through.”

“Tt gives me heart to hear you speak like
that, lad, for it is your old self, and but for the
fact of what lays behind all this, neither of us
would be so timorous. If your Uncle Jacob
had proposed that we make our way to West
Point to learn what news might be about the
camp, we, understanding that no one was in
peril if we failed, should have set about the
task without thought of danger.”

“ Very true, and if the redcoats stopped us



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 81

it would bea trifling matter ; whereas now if
we are delayed it means, perhaps, the undoing
of all the plot in behalf of which the sergeant
has ventured his liberty and his life.”

“Let us forget all that for the time, and have
only in mind the desire to leave New York.
I know of a shop hard by where we can buy
lines, and while I am there you shall go ahead to
acquaint Master Taylor with the fact that we
desire his skiff. Get some bait, also; for we
must play the part of fishermen whether we
expect to catch anything or not.”

There was a cheery expression on David’s
face as he left me, and it had not disappeared.
when I met him again at the water’s edge half
an hour later.

Thad bought the lines and hooks; he had
seen Master Taylor and gotten a dozen clams,
wherefore we were equipped for the under-
taking, and it only remained to embark.

We were at the foot of Stone Street.



82 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

A short distance away were two redcoats
coming toward the water in a leisurely fashion,
and as if bent on pleasure rather than business.

Anchored in the river less than half a musket-
shot off was one of the king’s ships, and in mid-
stream, as if having come from the direction of
the fort, was an eight-oared barge, in the stern-
sheets of which sat an officer wearing a cocked
hat, and so profusely decorated with gold braid
that there came into my mind thoughts of the
golden calf which had been set up to be wor-
shiped.

Without seeming to look at thesé things we
saw them all, David and I; but did our best
to appear indifferent, as if they could in no
possible way concern us.

At the time it seemed to me as if I played
my part well; but I now remember how my
knees trembled when I stepped on board the
skiff, and it did not increase my courage to see

David fumbling nervously in the attempt to



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 83

break open one of the clams, that we might bait
our hooks.

If the truth need be told we were both
frightened, although there was nothing near
about to cause alarm.

We gained in courage, however, or at least
I can say as much for myself, when, entering
the skiff, we pushed off without seemingly at-
tracting the attention of any one.

Had there never been any uprising against
the king, we could not have had less difficulty
in setting out on this voyage; but I well knew
it was one thing to push out into the stream a
short distance as if to fish, and another to con-
tinue straight on up the river.

However, our faces were set in that direc-
tion, and we should go on until forcibly
stopped ; but not at a pace which would show
we were bent on getting to any particular point
within a certain time.

We moved leisurely, I working the oars with



84 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

a trifle more than sufficient force to stem the
current, and David pretending to fish, but mak-
ing a very poor fist of it, as any one might say
who was close at hand, for he trembled so vio-
lently that his line danced up and down in the
water as if he was churning.

Inch by inch we crept up the stream, keep-
ing close watch, as can well be imagined, upon
all within sight ; but yet no one gave heed to
our movements.

My timorousness vanished gradually; David
ceased to tremble, and when we were abreast
of Partition Street, I could not refrain from
saying to the lad:

“We feared pain before being hurt. It
seemed certain we should not be allowed to
embark, and yet here we are started on the
voyage without hindrance.”

“Yes, we have started,” David replied doubt-
fully ; “but yet it is almost a stretch of the

imagination to say so much as that. We are



A TRAITOR’S. ESCAPE. 85

loitering about here in the boat, and it remains
to be seen how far we may row up-stream be-
fore some one hails us.”

“We may as well make the venture thor-
oughly,” I said, giving more strength to my
stroke, and the skiff glided over the water with
reasonable rapidity; but yet no one hailed us. —

“The next time it is necessary for us to visit
the American camp, instead of hanging around
the water-front after midnight for a chance to
slip off in the darkness, I shall set forth in the
same bold fashion we have done this day.”

David made no reply.

He was ever one who insisted on strong
proof before being confident of anything, and I
understood that he was waiting until we should
have pushed on past the city before giving way
to joy.

When we were abreast of Barkly Street, I
suddenly bethought myself that we would

stand in sore need of food if it became neces-



86 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

sary to row the skiff all the way to Dobb’s
Ferry, and made the suggestion to David that
he go ashore to buy, at a shop which I knew
was hard by the water-front, such as would
serve us for at least one meal.

He objected to making any halt lest by lay-
ing in stores we should bring suspicions upon
ourselves; but I laughed at his fears, declaring
that the redeoats were not grown so alarmed
as to fall into a panic when two lads purchased
enough of provisions to supply themselves with
a supper, and by ridicule persuaded him to do
as I wished.

Once ashore he bought such food as would
have made three substantial meals for us, prob-
ably arguing that he might as well be hanged
for a sheep as a lamb, and when we pushed off
the second time without opposition, both of
us were confident we would accomplish our
purpose without difficulty or danger,

Ten minutes later we were at the outskirts











Sani
Hi AEA ICI
\ Hy My) Oh Uo»

eg

Z

—S==
——
I



I TuEn Saw Ben Srork Sranptnc BEHIND SOME BALES OF
Hemp.—Page 87.



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 87

of the town, being opposite the rope-walk, and
at that moment, when all danger seemed to
have been passed, we were both startled by
hearing our names called loudly from the
shore:

For a full minute I gazed around me in sur-
prise and fear, and then saw, standing half
hidden behind some bales of hemp, Ben Stork,
a brother to that Jethro whom we had met
in the barracks of the A‘merican Deserters’
Legion.

“We must get rid of him in short order,”
David said in a half whisper.

“Ay; but how may that be done? The
young Tory has hailed us for a purpose; and
should we not reply might raise an alarm that
we were fleeing from the city.”

Then Ben Stork cried out once more, coming
a few paces nearer the water’s edge, and I, as
if having seen him for the first time, replied by
asking what he desired.



88 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“Where are you lads bound ?”

“ Fishing, as you can see.”

“Take me aboard.”

“The skiff is not large enough for three, and
besides, we are not inclined for company,”
David replied quickly.

Ben Stork knew that we did not look upon
him as a friend, and never courted his company,
therefore my comrade’s remark could have been
no surprise; yet he treated the matter as though
he was wholly at a loss to understand why we
should not desire his companionship.

I had ceased rowing, and was allowing the
boat to drift with the current, thinking that we
might thus get rid of him even though we were
going backward on the journey, when he cried:

“Tf you are really fishing there is no reason
why I could not come aboard. If you’re bound
on some rebel business, as, it is said, you have
engaged in more than once, then I understand

why you are not inclined. for my company.”



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 89

This was little less than a threat, and I so
understood it.

That we should find ourselves stopped, after
having passed the most dangerous points, by a
worthless Tory like Ben Stork was enough of
vexation to make a fellow gnash his teeth with
rage, and David came nigh to doing so.

“The skiff cannot be increased in size what-
ever business we may be bent on,” I cried,
thinking to parley with the fellow, for I knew
full well that it was in his heart to do us a
wrong turn when an opportunity came.

“Let me see how many fish you have
caught?” he demanded rather than asked, and
it was in my mind to go on shore and flog the
Tory villain.

“Since when has it been that we must ac-
count to you for our doings?” I cried angrily,
and David said in a whisper :

“Be careful, Oliver, he has it in his power

now to undo us both.”



90 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“And he will work the harm whether we
give him soft words or harsh.”

“Ay; but molasses is better for flies than
vinegar, and by using it you may entangle
them meanwhile.”

I was at a loss to understand the meaning of
David’s remark, and had no time to ponder
over it, for at the same instant Ben Stork cried
threateningly :

“JT shall warn the patrol that you are leaving
the city to visit the American lines, and per-
haps by the time they make prisoners of both
you will understand how long since it had been
that you must account to me for your doings.
I have had my eye on you two rebels, and
don’t intend you shall remain free to carry
matters with such high hands.”

“T will go ashore and flog him,” I said, haul-
ing the boat around, and David whispered, a
smile coming over his face which told me he

had some plan in mind.



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 91

“Let me try the molasses first, Oliver, and
mayhap then you will have a better oppor-
tunity for doing the flogging. Hold your
peace while I make talk with the Tory.”

I nodded my head without understanding
his purpose, and straightway was astonished to
hear him cry to the villainous cur on shore:

“There is no reason why you should set
yourself to watch us, Ben Stork, for we are not
now doing any more than we ever have done
against the king; but if it so please you, come
aboard.”

“Now you are knuckling down to that
Tory,” I whispered angrily.

“It won’t be for long, Oliver, so don’t get
your teeth on edge until the proper time
comes ; but pull in toward the shore.”

“Where are your fish ?”? Ben demanded, now
mystified by David’s willingness to take him on
as passenger.

“We haven’t got any yet. It is less than



92 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

half an hour since we set out, and the fish are
not biting hereabouts; but we will have better
luck further up the river. Are you comiag
aboard 2”

“You think to blind my eyes by appearing
willing to have me for a companion after you
had once refused.”

“Tt is better we do so than that you should
bring our fishing voyage to a close by calling
on the Britishers,” David said with a laugh.
“Tt is seldom I have three or four hours to my-
self for such a purpose, and I am not minded
to cut it short because of your suspicions. To
be frank, Ben Stork, we are not inclined to-
ward you as a companion; but are willing to
pay the price for a spell, and what is more,
you shall share in the food which we have
brought with us.”

I was inwardly raging at what seemed worse
than stupidity in David.

Should we take this Tory aboard the voyage



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 93

must come to an end beyond a peradventure,
for how could we get rid of him, more partic.
ularly if matters were made pleasant as my
comrade suggested ?

However, it was too late for me to interfere,
since by this time the boat was at the shore
and Ben Stork had laid hold of the gun-
wale.

He peered around suspiciously, looking here
and there as if expecting to see that which
would prove we were about to aid the “rebels,”
and David said impatiently :

“We are not minded to come ashore that
you may overhaul us for your own curiosity.
If it so be you think we are on other than a
fishing voyage, come with us; else let go your
hold there.”

“TI will do that when I please,” the Tory
cried defiantly, and I, unable to control my

anger any longer, rose tomy feet suddenly,
shouting;



94 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“You will do it now, you villain, or I'll
break at least one of the bones in your worth-
less body !”

David had hold of me in an instant, literally
forcing me back on the thwart as he said to
Ben Stork:

“My comrade is right in being angry when
you would thus play the part of customs officer
without authority. If it so be you choose to
come on board, as was first proposed, do so at
once; but attempt to detain us here, and Oliver
shall work his will.”

Why David should be eager to take this
fellow as a passenger I could not understand,
and the bewilderment, together with anger,
kept me silent; my mind was in such a state
of confusion as prevented me from noting the
Tory’s movements.

He hesitated an instant as if to let go his
hold on the boat, and then, most likely enjoy-

ing his fancied advantage, when it seemed as if



A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 95

he had the whip-hand of us, he shoved the skiff
off, at the same time leaping aboard.

“Tl go to make certain whether you are tell-
ing the truth or not.”

“'That’s the proper way,” David replied in a
tone of perfect satisfaction, and added to me,
“ Pull heartily, Oliver, for the day is fast wear-
ing away, and we shall have no sport if you
loiter here.”

There was more in his tone than his words
to attract my attention, and straightway I under-
stood that the lad had in his head some cun-
ningly devised plan which would result in the
confusion of the Tory; but what it was I could
not so much as conjecture, for it seemed to me
we thus lost our last opportunity of leaving the
city on that day.

“You said that there was something on
board to eat,” Ben Stork began with the
same friendly manner, and Dayid replied

laughingly :



Full Text


xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008728400001datestamp 2008-10-30setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title A traitor's escape : a story of the attempt to seize Benedict Arnold after he fled to New Yorkdc:creator Otis, James,Otis, JamesWhite, George G.dc:publisher A.L. Burtdc:date 1898dc:type Bookdc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00087284&v=00001002394840 (ALEPH)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English



The Baldwin Library

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——— —=
—————— SS



GALLEY NEAREST Mz,—Page 26.
A TRAITORS ESCAPE.

A Story of the Attempt to Seize Benedict
Arnold After He Had Fled to
New York.

‘By JAMES OTIS.



WITH HIGHT PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS BY GEORGE G. WHITE.

NEW YORK:
A. L. BURT, PUBLISHER.
Copyright, 1898, by A. L. Burt.

A TRAITORS ESCAPE.
By James OTis,
EXPLANATION.

Suon credit as may attach to this story of
the unsuccessful attempt to capture Benedict
Arnold should be given to the lad concerned
in the plot, rather than to him whose name
appears on the title-page.

In a general way Oliver Littlefield is the
author of the tale, since his account, written
early in the year 1778, is given with but little
change of text, and only a slight rearrangement
of details,

JAMES OTIS.
CONTENTS.

: CHAPTER I. PAGE
A Dangerous Plat........ 0... cece eee seen eeen eens aaiereisisiencmnnd)

CHAPTER II.

Thor Plotssirecis ss csistcciaiioeisl close cieversiemieretereisiie Riesiioriits aie -. 82.
= CHAPTER IIT.
The American Legion .........cceeeeee Maiclele sie Nass ese CERO
Se CHAPTER IV.
An Inquisitive Stpanger ............0.2e cee eee scent ees Banas)
Stig CHAPTER V.
THe PrisOMl ss .cccses cesses ceoeececnseee's Snpousesocaodo t 0s

CHAPTER VI.
Suspenseiee saiaire celeste cioisinsiee sleisivers sereistewlersiers's nee Roce ad

; CHAPTER VII.
Unwelcome TidingS..........cceecccceecececes wear esesivee sLOO

CHAPTER VIII.

- CHAPTER IX.
Captured stercevs sce cisrotsie ciosticsiewiecsicieieveisevelere siete Eiielate veeeis sek OG

CHAPTER X. :
Turning the Tables ...........0eeeeee wees PANE siauenee gore natetice 217
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS,

: PAGE

As I waded into the Water I signalled to those on the Galley
nearest ME......... cece cece eer eees Seleraynsiein Bu toielanyers 26
Benedict Arnold—Portrait. ...........005 ear arent iets ec iecets 30

I then saw Ben Stork standing behind some bales of Hemp.. 87

David now had his Prisoner so nearly Choked, he was in
Subjection........ ae oo Batei eevee ass Tele ators alone Samet 101



a

aa :
Bea a* was a Prisoner in a Building that served the pur-
perane of 8. Guardhouses: +. co cccimeres veces tees sens Sear 122

A Gentleman with a long Beard came toward the Ruins and
spoke the word ‘‘ Newark.”........... ccc ceececeesees 148

From our Hiding Place we could see through the Windows
where the Traitor slept ...........ceeeceueeeccceeeces 175

I seized a Billet of Firewood, with which to defend Myself.. 186

‘* Step over your Man, so you may catch him by the Throat,”
I whispered to David........... estecetslereierleuinr® tole eee s.e Re
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. »

- CHAPTER. I.
A DANGEROUS PLAN.

Aursouen I have passed through the trou-
blous time ‘when we braved King George, ay,
and bested him too, I never heard of, or took
part in any more perilous venture than that
when I enlisted in the plot to capture the
traitor Arnold while he was in this city of New
York holding the king’s commission, and mak-
ing ready his expedition to the south from
which so much was expected and so little
realized. :

The story is worth the telling, even though _

the attempt was a failure, for in it was con-
8 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

cerned as brave a man and gallant a.soldier as
it was ever my good fortune to meet.

There is no reason, however, why I should
jump into the tale in such hap-hazard fashion ;
itshould be told in an orderly manner for its
better understanding.

In the fall of 17 80 I was a stripling of seven-
teen years, believing myselfalready a man, and
chafing much because my good mother had her
heart so set against my joining the “rebel” army.

We, my mother and I, lived on George Street
hard by the highroad to Boston, and in Duke *
Street, just off Frankford, David Rhinelander,
my particular comrade, who was about my own
age, made his home.

He, as well as I, was the only child of a
widowed mother, and our fathers had fallen
gloriously, fighting for the colonies at Trenton
in the province of New Jersey, in January
of 777. |

’ Because our lives so nearly resembled each
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 9

other, and because David was a lad who could
be trusted through evil as well as fair days, we
became such firm friends that the neighbors
spoke of us as comrades, and the Tories never
mentioned our names without adding that we
should be hanged for what we had been able —
to do toward aiding the cause.

More than once had we carried valuable in-
formation to those who were fighting against —
the king, and no less an officer than General
Sullivan himself was pleased to say to our

“faces that we were of more service to him in
New York City than we could have been in the
ranks, which I considered a great compliment,
although envious lads, to whom we repeated
the words, insisted it was but another way of
telling us the army was better off for not hav-
ing us in it. |

All this I set down that it may be under-
stood how we, who were of no importance as

Citizens, save ip our own estimation, should -
10 A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE. _

have been the ones selected to aid a brave man
in a plot which, had it succeeded, would have
brought great renown to all concerned.

As a matter of course we, meaning David
and I, had heard the news when Major John
André, adjutant-general of the king’s forces in
New York, was made a prisoner; of Benedict
Arnold’s penn, and later of André’s execu-
tion.
On the 24th of September in the year 1780,
we had the first information, less than eighteen
hours after the major was captured, and twas
days later we saw the arch traitor, Benedict
Arnold, walking through the streets of the
city, he having fled on the 25th.

It can well be fancied that we did little alee
than converse on this subject, which was in the
mouths of all the citizens whether they favored
the Continentals or the king, and David de-
clared more than once that we would be justi-

fied in shooting Arnold as we would a pole-cat..
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE, pee lal

And we were in the temper to do such a rash

_ thing, had it not been for the fact that his

death would hardly serve to right the wrong,
and also that of a certainty we should have
been hanged offhand, for the traitor was under
the protection of Sir Henry Clinton in fact,
he had taken up his quarters in the house adjoin-
ing the building occupied by that nobleman.

It would appear as if I had set down many

_. words that might well have been left out; yet

it seems to me, and also to David, who is even
now overlooking the task, as if each one is nec-
essary for the proper telling of the story.

It was just five weeks from the day Arnold,

the traitor, entered the city, that David and I,

returning home from a stroll to Bowling Green,
met that good patriot, Jacob Schuster, who was
my comrade’s uncle on his mother’s side, she
having been one of the Schusters from Bergen
before marrying Frederick Rhinelander.

The night was just coming on, and we were
12 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

quickening our steps lest we be overhauled by
the patrol, and were not minded to linger any
longer than was necessary to greet Master
Schuster in respectful fashion, when he said in
a cautious tone, so unusual with him, that our
curiosity was quickened at once: —

“JT would have speech with you, lads, and in -
private, on a weighty matter. If it so be you
can come to the sign of the Black Horse in half ©
an hour, I will have ordered a lunch spread for
the three of us.”

The tavern he spoke of was where the post-
stage from Boston put up, and we should have
been well pleased to go there under any pre-
text, for much was always doing at the inn, and
gossip was plenty as fleas on a cur. :

“We will be there, Master Schuster,” I said
boldly ; “but first it is right our mothers should
be made acquainted with the favor you propose
doing us.”

“Tt is well to remember the mother, Oliver
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 13

Littlefield, and a credit that you think of her
first. Step quickly, so that I am not ee
waiting.” 1

We needed no urging to make all possible
haste; for to partake of food at the sign of the
Black Horse was much more of an entertain-
ment than it is now, when the tavern has fallen
into bad repute. ;

We two were excited by the invitation and
the mysterious air which Master Schuster wore
while giving it, and speculated as to its mean-
ing while we hurried homeward, but without
solving the riddle; for it surely was a riddle
when David’s uncle was willing to spend good
money without seeing an immediate return,
with ample profit from the investment,

Of course we understood it had to do with
the cause, and I declared my belief that we
were about to be allowed to enlist; but this
hope David soon dashed, when he said:

“Tf such had been the business Uncle Jacob
14 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

would have called at our homes, instead of buy:
ing refreshments at the Black Horse, where I am
told everything is of the most expensive kind.”

“Then why should he have thus summoned
us 2?”

“ We shall know once we have arrived, and I
am minded to eat fast before the business be un-
- folded in order that I may have all the enter.
tainment possible while we remain there.”

No check was put upon us when we an-
nounced our purpose, for our mothers had every
confidence in Master Schuster, and we had
taken the precaution to accompany each other
when we told, the news; therefore, in several —
minutes less than the time set we were at the
Black Horse Inn looking around eagerly for
David’s uncle, and with many fears lest he
had repented of his generosity.

The good man was there, however, true to his
- word, and the amount of food before him was

ao great as to surprise both my comrade and
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE, 15

myself, for instead of a lunch he had purchased
a veritable feast.

No second invitation was needed, and with
only such delay as was necessary in order to
greet Master Schuster in becoming fashion, we
fell-to, I following David’s advice to eat rapidly
lest we be interrupted before my hunger was ~
appeased.

There was no need of such unseemly haste,
however; for Master Schuster waited patiently
until we were filled so full that another mouth-
ful would have been impossible, and then said
ina dow tone, after looking stealthily around to
make certain no one was within earshot:

“Are you lads minded for an adventure in be-
half of. the cause—one which has in it danger
enough to please the most gluttonous swash-
buckler, and much honor if it be successful 2”

_ “Tndeed we are, and it cannot come our way
too quickly,” I replied, without waiting to hear
16 A TRAITORS ESCAPE.

David’s opinion, for I knew full well what he
would have said had I given him the time.

“And think you it would be possible to re-
main away from home a goodly portion of the
time during the next week, or perhaps longer?” -

“Ay, sir; if it so be you represent to our
mothers that it is your desire we should be
absent.”

“T would not have you decide an important
matter too quickly. Remember that the danger
is great; if you should be taken, I believe your
lives would pay the penalty, and even in case
of success, we have nothing save the Wor | of
others—neitheg bond nor written undertaking.”

“So that the adventure is for the cause, we -
need not waste our time speaking of rewards.”

« And the danger ?”

“We have been in no little peril when we
carried news out of the city to our friends, and
yet no one can say that David or I was ever like
to show the white feather.” .
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 17

“T am not questioning your courage, lad;
but wish you should understand that this is a
serious matter—more important than anything
you have ever even dreamed of adventuring on.”

“There is no reason why you should search
for bugbears, Uncle Jacob,” David said quickly.
“We are all the more eager to embark in it
_ when you tell us of the danger.”

“A man is never so courageous as when his

stomach is full, therefore it was I fed you well

. before broaching the subject, and now I must

beliove you will carry out your parts in goodly
fagiiiion.” BS

“What are they to be?” _
"Instead of replying Master Schuster called
for his account; paid it like a man who is not
given to pinching his shillings, and walked out
of the tavern after motioning us to follow.

By this time it can well be understood that
we were on fire with curiosity; but, question as we
might; Master Schuster would speak no further
18 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

word until we were come to the common near
the powder-house, when he halted and said:

“Tt was here I agreed to meet a gentleman
at this hour, and from him, if he keeps the
engagement, you will learn all that may be
necessary.”

Surely the plot was looking black enough to
satisfy even David and me, who had ever hoped
we might be concerned in some. gigantic con-
spiracy against the king, and I am free to -
confess that for the moment I began to feel —
weak-kneed. . :

If the ee business was of such a nafure
that Master Jacéb Schuster oe be willing
to skulk in this fashion, then it must be indeed —
a serious matter.

David slyly took my hand in his as we
waited there in the darkness, and I believed it
was not only because of the cold, piercing wind
that his teeth chattered so merrily.

Anything was better than waiting here
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 19

within the shadow of the powder-house at such
a time, and great was my relief of mind when a
stranger suddenly appeared from around the
corner.

The newcomer greeted Master Schuster in a
friendly fashion, and asked quickly, before
David’s uncle had time to introduce us:

“ Are these the two of whom you spoke ?”
Yes, and although they be young, I can
vouch both for their courage and their deny
to the cause.” >

“How much do they know?”

& Nothing more than that they are needed. for
an ‘adventyre of great peril. Oa |

“Ts it asking too much that you pace to and —

- . fro near to the road, where you may see if any

one approaches this place, while I make known
to the lads what we'would have them do? I |
am not minded they shall embark without
knowing all, and through your recommendation
I am about to put my life in their hands.”
20 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“They would not betray you, however sore
might be their suffering. I will keep an eye
out, so that you be not surprised, and you may
summon me when the interview is ended.”

Then Master Schuster walked out toward the
road, and I stepped forward a few paces in
order to get a better view of this man who pro-
posed to tell us—two strangers to him—that
which would prove his undoing were we minded
to act the part of traitors. ;

I do not believe he was more than five years
our senior; an inch or two above six feet in
- height, and with a face so gloomy that it was as
if he suspected some portion of his,own body
had designs against the remainder of his
anatomy.

Taking him all in all, so far as I could judge
at that moment, he was not one I would choose
as a comrade, yet at the same time I would
have taken his word if my life was in the

balance.
A TRAITOR’S. ESCAPE, ai

While I gazed at him he was scrutinizing us,
and when this portion of the interview was con-
cluded to the satisfaction of all, he asked our
names, where we lived and who were our par-
ents, until I cut short such catechism by giving
the history of each, even down to such details
as when David had the fever, and I was laid up

with a broken arm.

He listened attentively, as if each particular
was deeply interesting, and when I had come
to an end because I could think of nothing
more to say, he took his turn at talking, and
from that instant there was not a moment
wasted on useless matters.

“T am John Champe, of Virginia, sergeant-
major in Lee’s Legion,” he began, and I was so
ill-mannered as to interrupt him by asking :

“Have you left the service ?”

“No; although my comrades, as well as the
_ British in this city, believe I have deserted.”
“Believe it?” Icried. “ How can they be-
22 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

lieve such a thing unless there be some truth in
the matter ?”

“ And so there is, as will be seen if you hold
your peace while I tell my story, after which
you must believe I can be depended upon, for
_ I put it in your power to have me arrested as a
spy. lam informed that General Washington
himself sent for my commander—Major Henry
Lee—and told him he believed there might be
found in the Legion a soldier capable and will-
ing to undertake a delicate and hazardous
_ project. The major was so kind as to mention -
my name as one who might be trusted, and it
"was arranged that I be approached with a plan
whereby I was apparently to desert, make my
way into this city, and here attempt to capture

_ the traitor Arnold.”

It was David who interrupted the stranger
at. this point by an exclamation of amaze-
ment that so daring a scheme should even so

much as. be spoken of, and my knees grew
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. : 23

weaker, for this promised to be more of an
adventure than I had ever desired.

“ At first Iwas unwilling my comrades should
- believe, even for a few weeks, that I had basely

deserted; but the major used weighty argu-
ments, chiefest among which was the fact that
I should be obliging the Commander-in-chief —
himself, and might-make such a name as years
~ of service could not win for me.”

« When did you appear to desert?” I asked
jn a tremulous tone, more to gain courage from
‘hearing my own voice than because I was
curious on the matter.

“T will come to that later. I agreed to the
plan, and was given letters to two gentlemen
on whom it was said I could fully rely. One
was Master Jacob Schuster, and the other need -
_ not be named now. At eleven o’clock. on the
night of the 20th I took my cloak, valise and
orderly-book, crept out of quarters to the
stable, and there saddled my horse without
24 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

being detected. It was necessary to lead the
animal half a mile or more lest his footsteps
on the frozen ground should give the alarm,
and I be taken before having really started.”

“If your major was in the plot, why was all —
that necessary ?” David asked. “T fail to see
why you could not have walked out in the
open day.”

“That would have been to tell every man
in the command of my purpose, and, thanks to
the spies which are around every encampment,
General Clinton must have been warned of my
intention before I arrived. I was to be a de!.
serter in every sense of the word, save that I
so acted under command of my superior officer.
It had been arranged that I ride to Paulus -
_ Hook where is a British post; but just asI left
the tavern near Bergen, known as the Three
Pigeons, I saw a detachment from the Legion,
led by Lieutenant Middleton, in hot pursue of

me. ”
A TRAITORS ESCAPE. 25

“How far away?” I asked, forgetting in
the interest the story had for me, that it
was not seemly to interrupt the sergeant.

“Less than half a mile. There no longer
appeared to be any chance that I could gain
Paulus Hook; therefore I drew rein for Com-
munipaw, knowing that off the settlement
would be found two of his majesty’s galleys.
_ Now I believed myself safe from pursuit, for
it was reasonable to suppose the lieutenant
would continue on into Bergen, and I slackened
. pace, for my horse was nearly winded. This act
of humanity was near being the undoing of
my mission; for no sooner had J arrived on
the shore of Communipaw Bay. than the
cavalry appeared, now so near at hand it
seemed. certain I must be taken.”

“Of course you would have come to no
harm, for Major Lee could bear witness as to

why you were thus apparently deserting,”
26 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

David said, quite as interested in the story as
was I.
Oe True; but the plan would thus have mis.
carried, which was what I had to guard against.
Fortunately those aboard the galleys were on
’ the lookout, and that which had threatened to
be a disaster but worked for my benefit. Dis-
mounting, and with the few belongings in my a
hands, I sent the beast shoreward with a blow
from the flat of my sword as I waded into the
water, signaling furiously to those on the galley
nearest me.” a
“What were the pursuers doing meanwhile?”
I asked. /
“ Riding at full speed in the hope ,of cutting
me off before I could be taken up by a boat
_ which instantly put out from one of the craft.
No less than half a dozen musket-balls were
sent after me by my late comrades; but I had
the best of them by three or four minutes, and

soon found myself on board the boat in safety,
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. a7

_ grieved to the heart because my companions in-
arms would return to camp with the word that
I had gone over to the enemy.”

The sergeant paused an instant, and David
and I literally held our breath in suspense to
hear the conclusion.

“I was now with the enemy, having arriyed_

in such fashion there could be no question but
‘that I was all I claimed to be, and the captain
of thd galley gave me conveyance to this city,
forwarding to Sir Henry Clinton, at the same
time, a full account of my daring escape. With
that general I soon had an interview, and he has
proposed that I enlist in what is to be called
the American Legion, which the traitor is now
raising from such loyalists and deserters as are
of the mind to aid the king.”

“Do you count on 80 doing?” I asked,
full of admiration for the young man who
was thus gloriously serving the cause, and at

the same moment saying to myself that I
~38 A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE.

would it were my good fortune to have a like .
opportunity.

“That is what must be done, I expect, in
order that I may follow the movements of the
traitor whom I hope soon to carry back to the ©
American camp as a prisoner. You can well
understand that I have not told this story with
the idea of entertaining you lads. The time has
come when I must have some assistance from the
outside—assistance by those on whom I can rely
with my life, and when I made such want known
to Master Schuster he mentioned your names,
pledging his own honor for your loyalty to the’
cause.”

“He could not well have said other than that
we are bound to it as closely as can be those
whose hearts are set on the one matter. We,
David and I, do not lay claim to being won-
drous brave; but we would sooner suffer death
a dozen times over than give any man the chance

to say we were false to the colonists in this
‘A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 29

, struggle, and only wait for the day when we
may prove that such is no empty boast.”

“The chance is now come, lad. Aid me, but
at the same time with a full understanding of
all that may be meant by defeat, and you shall
have an opportunity of doing what falls to the

“lot of but few men in these provinces.”

“What will you have us do?” David asked
eagerly.

“Assist me in making Benedict Arnold a pris-
oner, and carrying him back to the American

“camp.”
«That we will, right readily,” I answered,
before David had time to speak, “and in so
doing we shall be pleasing ourselves.”

“Tt will be necessary you follow my direc-
tions blindly, if need be; for in a matter like
this there must be but one head.” -

“That we are agreed to,” David cried, deter-

~-mined to speak for himself, that it might be

seen he was of the same mind as I.
30. A TRAITORS ESCAPE.

“Tf we fail it is possible you may share my —
fate, for on being taken I shall be hung as a

Spy.
“While we have no hankering after such a

”

doom, yet the possibility does not frighten us,”
~ and I took David by the hand that he might
have full credit for joining in what I believed
to be a brave speech. «

“You are lads after my own heart, and should
have been raised in Virginia instead of here,
where ee is measured ay its value in
money.”

“T have no complaint to make against this —
province,” David said thoughtfully; “but I
should like to say I was from the same colony as
that brave gentleman, General Washington.”

“J believe you are almost: Virginians even
now,” Sergeant Champe cried, as he seized us by
the hands, wringing them with such force that
we had a very good idea of the quality 0 of his

~ muscles,
NN XY
\

ANY
WN
NN

ee
Ze

SESS
FS



BENEDICT ARNOLD.
(Â¥rom a Painting by Du Similier, 1783.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. - 31

“Yet you will find that we hold to this col-
ony,” I said, not minded that Virginia should be
set up so highly as against our own province,
“and it will please me to prove that we of New
York are no more lacking in courage than the
youths from your home.”

“ Now Iam beginning to believe we may be
comrades,” Sergeant Champe cried, as if pleased
with us, “and we will set about thiswork, each .
feeling’ every confidence in the other. Come, we
will speak with Master Schuster.”
32 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

CHAPTER II.
THE PLOT.

Durrve our converse David’s uncle had been
pacing to and fro near the road where the wind
had full sweep, and he must have felt relief at
. seeing us approaching, for his share in this in-
terview had been most. disagreeable.

“It is arranged that the lads will aid me,”

Sergeant Champe said as he laid his hand on.

Master Schuster’s shoulder. “I believe they
can do as good service as men, and we shall suc-
ceed in the work unless fortune serves us an
ugly turn.”

“What part have you set down for them?”

“None as yet; I have but just made them -

acquainted with the facts, for it was not to my

Gee

eer


A TRAITORS ESCAPE. 33

mind that they embark in this adventure with
their eyes closed.”

- “Then finish your converse, for there is noth-
ing to prevent, and it had better be brought to
an end as soon as may be.”

_ “First of all we must gain accurate informa-
tion as to the surroundings of the building in
which the traitor is lodged.”

“That I can give you now, sergeant.. Under-
standing that it would be of importance, I
strolled that way this afternoon, picking up
such facts as are apparent to strangers.”

“ What did you learn ?”

“Very little more than the boys are most
likely already familiar with. In the rear of his
quarters is a garden extending to the water's
edge, and adjoining this a dark alley leads to

- the street, By asking a few careless questions

I learned that the renegade usually returns to

his lodgings about midnight; but, whatever

the hour, makes it a custom to spend more
34 A TRATTOR’S ESCAPE.

or less time in this same garden before
retiring.” a‘

“You have done well, Master Schuster.
There is little left for me, save to decide upon

the plan, which I will do this night. To-morrow



I shall enlist in the American Legion——”

“To what end? Once having signed the
rolls you would be held as a deserter should
you be taken prisoner after returning to your |
rightful command, and the Britishers need have
no further excuse for hanging you.”

“T have considered all that, my worthy sir,
and know full well the dangers which attend
such a course; but it must be done in order
that I may have opportunity for free speech
with the traitor.” |

“He has ever held himself ey, and I ¢ ques-
tion whether you could have an interview at
will when you are no more than a private under
his command,” Master Schuster objected.

“Tam promised a commission if I enlist, in

/
\

A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 85

which case there will be certain intercourse
with the traitor, and to my mind there is no
more positive way of gaining an opportunity to
spy upon him. It must be enlistment for me,
whatever may befall at.a later date.”

I could understand that the sergeant would
not be diverted from such plan as he had

already formed, and Master Schuster must have

realized the same, for he made no further

attempt to dissuade him from what seemed like
useless danger.

Then the two, meaning David’s uncle and

_ Sergeant Champe, conversed as they walked

down the Boston road toward the fort, the talk

_ being wholly upon the traitorous plot which

would have delivered one of our strongholds

‘into the hands of the British ; and my comrade

and I, keeping close at their heels, learned much

_ that was new to us. _

First we heard what price Benedict Arnold
had received for thus selling himself body and
36 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

soul, which was, as nearly as I now remember
it, six thousand pounds sterling in hand, and a
commission as colonel in the British army, with
the brevet rank of brigadier.

Save for the money, he had not bettered his
fortunes, if that was the sole purpose in mind -
when he would have sacrificed the colonies
to his greed; and money gained in such
manner does not long remain in the hands of
him who receives it, so I have often heard said.

Sergeant Champe claimed that, on Saturday
before the Monday when Major André was exe-
cuted, Captain Ogden was sent to Paulus Hook
with an escort of twenty-five men for the pro-
fessed purpose of carrying letters to General
Clinton, and that he privately suggested to the
British commander there, having instructions so
to do from headquarters, that if Arnold’s cap-
ture could be brought about immediately, Major
André would be set free. :

That plan had failed, however, as we knew,
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 37

and now it was to be seen if this one, bold and
dangerous as it was, would succeed.

It was decided between Master Schuster and
the sergeant that we lads were to return to our
homes that night, letting it appear as if we had
done no more than enjoy a feast at the sign of
the Black Horse.

Early on the following morning, however,
David’s uncle was to say he had work for us to
perform which would often keep us away from
home at night, and otherwise so arrange mat-
ters with our mothers that there would be
no difficulty in going whithersoever we would
until the plot was worked out to a triumphant
ending, or disaster had come, bringing with it,
for us at least,-death.

I should have been better pleased if we were
required to set about the business without de-

‘lay; for Iwas burning with impatience to begin
the adventure, which was far greater, and ac-

companied by more danger, than I had ever

~
38 . A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

thought it-would be my good fortune to embark
in, to further the cause. }

Sergeant Champe, however, made no bones
of dismissing us, once it had been decided we
should present ourselves at Master Schuster’s
- office next morning, within a reasonable time
after the breakfast hour; but he did so with an
air of exceeding friendliness, such as robbéd.the
words of their severity. |

“Remember, lads, having once set your faces
toward this work there can be no turning back.
- Punctuality is as necessary as fidelity, and after
we meet to-morrow morning you must conform
your goings and comings to my commands.”

I-was not minded he should believe us to be
lads who had had no experience in serious
tasks, and therefore made reply :

“ Although we are not soldiers, both of us
understand all that may be implied in the
word ‘duty,’ for we have been under the orders

of no less a personage than General Sullivan
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 39

in some pérformaices almost as dangerous as
this.” ae
“J have already heard from Master Schuster

how you lads have proved your devotion to the
cause; and if I repeat certain instructions again
and again, more often than seems necessary or
kindly, you must set it down that I have grown
timorous, as a man can well be pardoned for
becoming when he is classed by his old com.
rades as a deserter, and may be apprehended
by his new acquaintances as a spy. Even the
knowledge of what we would do fails to take
-away either the shame for the one or the fear
of the other.” .

_ The young Virginian spoke us so friendly,
and withal so sadly, that I was shamed because
of having made a pert answer to what was
indeed a timely caution, and would have atoned
for my over-hasty speech but that he cut me
short ere I was well begun, by saying :

. eT ean understand, lad, what was in “your
40 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

heart; and that we may work together to the
greatest good, with the least friction among
ourselves, I was disposed you should know all
that bore heavily upon me.”

Then he stretched out both hands as if in
token of friendship, and when David and I had
clasped them heartily he turned abruptly away,
Master Schuster following, and we two watch-
ing until they disappeared in the distance down
Nassau Street.

It was little less than a vain boast when I
pertly told Sergeant Champe we had been
under the orders of General Sullivan in some
certain performances almost as dangerous as
this promised to be; and if he could have
turned back five minutes after saying good-
night, he would have seen for a surety that we
were unaccustomed to such perilous adventures,
by our lingering in the street, starting in alarm
at every sound, however slight.

It is true we had performed duties under the
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 41

commands of General Sullivan, to which was
attached a certain degree of danger in case the
enemy should discover what we were about;
and I may say, without boasting, that we had
done our part well, or at least so it would
seem from the words of praise and encourage-
ment which were bestowed upon us.

But this adventure of Sergeant Champe’s
was something far different from anything we
had ever done, and looking back upon it now I
question whether even men grown old in the
service would not have been in a certain
degree timorous upon considering the matter in
all its bearings.

Although Benedict Arnold was a traitor to
his country, and one to be despised by all who
love the cause, he was now among those who
had ‘sworn to protect him, and would do so, as
could be seen from the fact that Sir Henry
Clinton had housed him in the building next

adjoining his own residence.
42 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

The city was overrun with redcoats, as can
well be fancied; one could hardly walk half a
mile through the streets after the hours of dark-
ness without meeting two or three detachments,
out on patrol, and be forced to explain his
reasons for being abroad.

David Rhinelander and I well knew how
difficult it was to depart from the city without
a military pass: and yet here was a young ser-
geant from Virginia who not only proposed to
leave New York when it should be his pleasure,
but to take with him a prisoner, and that
prisoner a man who must have been well-
known by this time to every redcoat on the
island; for traitors were not so plentiful in those
days but that each man and boy would have a
look at one.

IT do not believe you could have found a
Britisher who had either regard or respect for
this renegade ; but yet we knew full well they

would not suffer him to be carried away, and
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 43

even that private soldier who detested him
most heartily would have done valiant battle
against us should our purpose be known.

All this I set down that it may be the better
understood why David’s mind and mine were
in such a whirl that to go quietly home and
lie down in bed with the idea of sleeping’ was
out of the question.

As for myself, it was much as thous I were
burning with a fever. My mouth was parched,
and my throat dry; the barking of a dog in the
distance sounded loud as the roaring of a lion,
and the sighing of the night wind like unto the
howl of the tempest, all of which is much the
same as though I had confessed to being
exceedingly timorous.

We two, David and J, stood on the street
corner in silence, starting apprehensively at the
lightest sound after Master Schuster and Ser-
geant Champe had left us, and mayhap five
44 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

minutes passed in such manner before my
comrade asked in a whisper:

“ What are we to do now, Oliver ?”

“(Go home and shiver till the morning comes,
for certain it is that my eyes will not be closed
in slumber this night.”

“T would he had waited until the moment
for action had come, before explaining. his pur-
pose; for then we should. not be forced to
remain inactive, the sport of our own fears, and
I am grown timorous, Oliver Littlefield—that
much I may confess to you alone.”

“Yet you have no thought of turning back ?”

“Not even though I knew to a certainty the
adventure would end in our undoing.”.-

“It is yet early in the night,” I said, seized |
by a sudden thought. “Our mothers know we
are with Master Schuster, and therefore will not
be alarmed if we remain abroad many hours.
Now I am minded to have a look at the house

where this traitor lives, and that done we
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 45

shall be the better prepared when work is
begun.”

This plan pleased Oliver greatly, not so much
because of the preparations that would be mak-
ing, as that it gave usa semblance of something
to do at the time when we most needed em-
ployment.

We turned back and struck across the com-
mon at a rapid pace until we were come to
Broad Way, down which we walked leisurely,
as if abroad merely for pleasure, deciding
between, ourselves that in event of being halted
by the patrol we should make such explanation
of our being abroad.

There wa8'no reason why we should not have
continued straight on, until arriving at the
house which sheltered the traitor; but it
seemed to us as if our purpose was suspected
by every one whom we passed, and on coming
near to the ruins of Trinity Church we made

our way across the yard to Lumber Street,
46 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

going thence to the water’s edge as if fleeing
from pursuit.

Here we surveyed the premises as best we
might in the darkness, walking up and down
the alley from Greenwich Street to Broad
Way no less than four times, but neither seeing
nor hearing any one in the garden.

It was much too early for the traitor to take
his nightly airing; and this, perhaps, saved us
from bringing suspicion upon ourselves, for had
we been observed loitering there I doubt not
but that it would have become’ necessary to
make some explanation of our purpose.

During more than two hours we walked to
and fro, not daring to converse even in whispers
on the subject nearest our hearts, lest the words
should be overheard, and then, having fatigued
our bodies, we were in better condition to follow
the advice given by Sergeant Champe, although
I was far from wishing to be alone in my cham-
ber.
A.TRAITOR’S ESOAPE. 44

Had we been two of the king’s most devoted
subjectswe could not have made our way through
the city with less impediment, for when we were
arrived at the door of my mother’s dwelling
there had been no interference with our move-
ments.

“T shall come here at an early hour to-morrow
morning, Oliver Littlefield,” David whispered as
we clasped hands in parting, and I could well
understand that he would keep his promise
faithfully ; for, judging from what was in my
own mind, I knew his eyes would be opened
with the first light of the coming day.

Master Jacob Schuster gave proof that his
anxiety regarding the outcome of the plot was
nearly as great as was David’s and mine, for my
mother was not yet arisen next morning when a
knock was heard at the door, and by her com-
mand I hastened to learn who might be this
early visitor, although knowing full well that I

could have spoken his name before seeing him.
48 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

It must have been that he feared I would
speak some incautious word, for instantly we
stood face to face he made a warning gesture
with his hand as he said stiffly :

- “Present my excuses to Mistress Littlefield,
lad, for such an untimely visit; but the time is
precious to me when [ have so much of business
on hand, and I could not well afford to wait
until a more seemly hour.”

Then I, to carry out the acting which he had
begun, asked innocently :

“Would you have speech with my mother, sir?”

“Ay, that I would, lad, and as soon as may
be, again craving her pardon for coming at such
an hour.”

I knew that my mother must have overheard
the conversation, yet going to the foot of the
stairs | repeated that which Master Schuster
had said; and she, good soul, flustered by this
early visit, came down ere yet it seemed to ‘me

possible she could have arisen from the bed.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. " 49

If he had been face to face with the noblest
lady in the province, Master Schuster could not
have been more humble in his apologies, or
used so many high-flown words while asking
pardon for his coming.

In fact, he beat about the bush so long that I
began to grow anxious, fearing lest he would
never come to an end of words.

The business was quickly arranged, however,
when he broached the subject by explaining,
without too much of detail, that he was desir-
ous of hiring David and me to perform certain
duties which it was not necessary should be
explained.

My mother readily gave her consent to the
proposition, although making some show of a
demur when Master Schuster stated that it
might even be necessary that we remain away
from home at night on some occasions,

When this business had been brought to an

end I was told to await there David’s coming,
50 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

and my mother set about getting breakfast,
while Master Schuster went, as he declared, to
arrange for the hire of my comrade.

Before David came I was in mortal terror
lest I betray the secret to my mother, who was
full of speculations as to why the worthy mer-
chant should have come himself on an errand
which might equally well have been done by
one of his clerks, and over and over again did
she ask whether he had made any mention of
this business while we were with him at the
sign of the Black Horse.

Not being willing to tell my mother an un-
truth, I was finally forced to say that he had
spoken somewhat of his purpose, but pledged
both David and I to secrecy; therefore, unless
she would have me break my word, I must
remain silent.

It is not likely this satisfied my mother; but
it certainly gave me great relief, for instantly

she ceased her questioning, and refrained from
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 51

speculating aloud in my presence, contenting
herself by saying:

“T hope it has nothing to do with the war,
Oliver boy, for since your father fell at Trenton
I have none but you left me; and surely the
colonists are not in such sore need that they
would take a widow’s only child from her.”

“Tf it had to do with the war, mother, it
would be a question of our enlisting; and that,
you know, I might not do without your consent.
However, this much you should remember, that
Master Schuster desires to keep his business a
profound secret; and were you to speak of it to
others, even so much.as to wonder what it was,
a wrong might be done the gentleman who
gives me employment.”

I knew this would in a certain degree arouse
my mother’s suspicions; but better that than
for her to speak unguardedly to some of the
neighbors, and thus be the means of having a

watch set upon us.
52 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

My breakfast was but just concluded when
David entered with much the appearance of a
lad who has been soundly flogged.

At other times, when we were engaged in
what might be of benefit to the cause, he had
been joyous to the verge of triumph; but now
he was subdued, and I could well understand
that the possible perils of the adventure were
already weighing heavily upon him.

~“Will you return for dinner?’ my mother
asked as I arose from the table and prepared to
accompany my comrade,

“That is as Master Schuster may say; but it
will be as well if you de not expect me, for
surely we shall find enough with which to
satisfy our hunger, and supper will be all the
more enjoyable because of short rations at
noon.”

Then my mother kissed me much as if I were
going forth to battle, and the thought of her
anguish if it should so chance that through this
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE, 53

plot David and I were brought to the gallows,
so unnerved and dispirited me that when we
were on the street I had hard work to keep
back the tears from my eyelids. :

Almost anything would have been better
than cowardice at such a time, and I took good
care not to so much as look toward David,
until he said in a voice that trembled :

“We shall feel better, Oliver, once the work
has been begun.”

Then I understood that I was not alone in

my timorousness.
BA A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE,

CHAPTER III.
THE AMERICAN LEGION.

Now that the sun was shining, David and
I were far more valiant than we had been the
evening previous, having also gotten rid of the
home influences that naturally serve to weaken
a fellow when he sets out upon a dangerous
undertaking.

What in the darkness had seemed venture-
some to the last degree, was not so desperate
by the light of day, and we soon began to feel
as if we could do our share of the work with-
out so much as ever coming within the shadow
of the gallows, although that Sergeant Champe’s
days might be ended thereon seemed very rea-
sonable.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 55

He, a soldier in the Continental Army, was
within the enemy’s lines under false pretenses;
and should the true story of his escape be dis-
covered, or his hand be seen in the effort to
capture the traitor Arnold, then the doom of a
spy would necessarily be his.

With us the situation was far different, since
we were at home, had no absolute connection
with the American Army, and even were we
discovered in the attempt, it hardly seemed
possible that death would be the penalty for
our portion of the work.

Thus it was I argued with myself, and re-
peated aloud for David’s benefit the result as
we went toward Master Schuste1’s office.

How much good such words did my comrade
it is not for me to say ; but I found in the idea
a great sense of relief—so much, in fact, that I
was as light-hearted by the time we were
arrived at our destination as I had previously

been downcast.
56 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

David’s uncle was more distraught when we
presented ourselves than I ever remember to
have seen him; it was almost as if he feared
our visit might bring evil, and instead of speak-
ing with us in the office as had been his wont,
he took us to the rear of the wareroom,
although nothing was said that might not
have been heard by any person.

“T have no means of guessing what it is
proposed you lads shall do; but as was
arranged last night, you are to remain here
until some word be received from the sergeant,
after which, and I say this for your safeguard
as well as my own, it will be best that you do
not present yourselves here, save when it may
be absolutely necessary. You are like to have
more intercourse with the Britishers than with
our friends, and it is not wise to show your-
selves on good terms in both camps.”

_ Jf Master Schuster had told us that he

regretted having appointed his office as a,
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 57

rendezvous, I should not have been more
certain of it, and therefore when he ceased
speaking I proposed that we wait at some con-
venient place out of doors rather than in the
building, and for the moment it seemed as if
he was minded to take advantage of the prop-
osition; but then, much as though ashamed
of his fears, he added hurriedly:

“No, no, lads! Stay where you are, since
this was the place selected for the meeting. I
only warned you against certain movements in
the future, thinking mayhap you would come
here so often as to excite suspicion. It is best,
perhaps, that you remain at this end of the
wareroom, where my patrons will not be so
likely to see you.”

Then, motioning toward two boxes which
were behind a pile of barrels, as if these might
be used in the stead of stools, Master Schuster
hastened away, looking thoroughly ill at ease,

and I so stated to David, adding in conclusion :
58 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“Tf it so be a citizen like Master Schuster is
alarmed, for no other cause than we two are in
his wareroom, how great must be the danger
which threatens us!”

“T cannot see how it is possible any peril
threatens just now, for thus far we have not so
much as lifted our hands against the king; but
Uncle Jacob is feeling as I was last night, and
it is not for me, who was even more timorous,
to laugh at his fears.”

Had we been received by Master Schuster as
we usually were—that is to say, if“he “had
given little or no heed to our presence—I
should have felt that much of the danger
existed only in my own mind; but now, as
David and I sat there alone with ample time to
think over the matter, it came to me that the
peril was even greater than I had anticipated,
and that Master Schuster knew more of the
plot than had been intrusted to us.

During more than half an hour we thus re-
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 59

mained as if in hiding, and then David’s uncle

came hurriedly to say that the sergeant was in
the street, and would have us join him.

Without waiting for further words we has-
tened away, and I am certain did not move any
too quickly to please Master Schuster, who, I
fancy, gave vent to a deep sigh of relief when
we were well over the threshold.

On the opposite side of the way, a short
distance above the warehouse, we saw the ser-
geant, who, having made certain we observed
him, moved leisurely on, which to our minds
was an invitation to join him,

I was ‘more pleased with the appearance of
this raw-boned, sedate-looking Virginian in the
daytime than I had been at night.

He had the air of one who would not be.
quick to understand when he was beaten; and
as I saw him there in advance of us, the
thought came to my mind that however much

of danger might threaten, or however many
60 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

difficulties be in the path, he would neither
draw back nor swerve from his course until
absolutely forced so to do.

He greeted us cheerily, and with nothing in
his manner to show that he was either over-
weighted or alarmed by the responsibility.

Beginning the conversation as if it had been
but lately interrupted, he said, speaking in such
manner that were his words overheard even by
Sir Henry Clinton himself there could be no
suspicions attached to their meaning :

“ When I arrived in New York I was recom-
mended to call upon General Arnold;who, as
you may know, is engaged in raising what is
to be called the American Legion, a force com-
posed almost entirely of Loyalists and deserters
from the Continental Army.”

David looked up in surprise, not understand-
ing whither such conversation might tend, and

as the sergeant paused asked :
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 61

“Did you have a long interview with General
Arnold 2”

“Tt might be considered so when you under-
stand that a brevet brigadier in his majesty’s
service was talking with a sergeant-major lately
from the rebel army. The gentlemen was very
kind, and personally asked if I would join his
Legion; but when I humbly ventured to sug-
gest that if I should do so, and was then cap-
tured by my former comrades I would
assuredly be hanged, he kindly changed the
subject, stating, however, that he would assign
me quarters among his recruiting sergeants.”

There was in my mind an idea that the
Virginian made these statements in what might
be called a continuation of his story told on the
previous night; but David, who had been
expecting to hear immediately what part we
were to play, looked thoroughly puzzled at
this roundabout way of setting to work, and
again interrupted by asking:
62 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“Then you decided not to enlist, sir?”

“Such had been my decision; but after
thinking the matter over seriously I came to
the conclusion, as I stated to the general late
last evening when I was so fortunate as to meet
him on the street, and he so kind as to grant
me a brief interview, that it might be as well
if I joined the legion, since death would be the
punishment for desertion, whether I was cap-
tured while wearing a red coat or in civilian’s
garments. He quite agreed with :me, and
further promised that I should be made ser-
geant-major. Therefore it was I enlisted this
morning.” ;

Now I was surprised, for although the Vir-
ginian had declared his intention of so doing,
several hours previous, I then questioned whether
at the last moment he would not decide against
it. For him the die was cast in good truth.

“Then you have signed the rolls?” I asked,

not attempting to hide my surprise.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 63

“Hardly more than an hour since, but am
given liberty until such time as we shall have
duties to perform. At present there is nothing
to be done at the barracks, and I would see
what I may of New York, for perhaps a second
opportunity will not present itself.”

“Are you bent on sight-seeing this morning ?”
T asked after a short pause, during which I was
trying to decide in my own mind the reason for
such conversation.

“T may answer yes and no to that question.
Since you are the only acquaintances I have in
the city,” he continued in a meaning tone, “and
because it may not be possible for me to induce
you to join this portion of the king’s forces
which will be sent southward under General
Arnold, I have thought that before you enter-
tained me with the sights of the town I would
show you what perchance you have never seen
—a military barracks.”

Of course we understood that this long-
64 A TRAITOR’'S ESCAPE.

winded way of coming to it was a proposal for
us to see where the sergeant would be quar-
tered, lest peradventure it might become neces-
sary to call on him suddenly, although I could
not fully understand why he was so careful in
his manner of giving the invitation.

However that may be, we at once, and as a
matter of course, agreed that it would please us
to do as he suggested.

To our great surprise we were led directly to
the fort beyond Bowling Green, instead: of to
some building, for I had supposed this newly-
formed legion would be kept to a certain
degree by themselves; but it must have been
that General Clinton was doubtful as to: how

“the men might be treated by others in the serv.
ice, for a Britisher hates a deserter and a turn-
coat, however much benefit he may gain from -
him. :

Therefore it was that we, who had several

times feared we might enter the fort as prison-
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 65

ers, followed the sergeant without being ques-
tioned, and were soon in the midst of that
worthy band of renegades, spies and informers,
who, having done all the harm to the cause
that was possible, were now leaguing them-
selves together under the command of the arch
traitor himself.

As we soon learned, this visit had been pro-
posed in order that we might, should occasion
require, be able to communicate with Sergeant
Champe without delay.

He spoke to several of the legion, saying it
was his intention to persuade us to enlist, and
declaring that we were the only persons in
New York with whom he was acquainted.

Without having absolutely told a falsehood,
he made it appear much as if we were old
friends, if not relatives; and thus it was that
we took our first step in the plot—not a pleas-
ant one, since we were forced to receive those

villainous curs on a friendly footing.
66 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

During the entire forenoon we remained
within the limits of the fort, and in that time
had good opportunity of seeing the precious
band who were ready to work injury to their
own country.

Among these was Jethro Stork—he who
lived on Duke Street, and had held himself
devoted to the cause of liberty until that cer-
tain time when he found an opportunity to lay
hold of ten pieces of the king’s gold, whereat
he suddenly became a Royalist.

David and I had seen Jethro, but perchance
he did not remember us; his brother Benjamin,
a lad of about our age, had ever been a loud-
mouthed Tory, and he it was with whom we
were acquainted, but not friendly.

“Tf it was Ben who had enlisted in this so-
called American Legion, I would say the city
was well rid of him,” David whispered to me.

“And New York will lose nothing when
Jethro leaves it.”
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 6%

“True; but we know for a certainty Jethro
will get himself hanged in due time wherever
he may be, while Ben is far too cautious to put
his precious body into jeopardy.”

Then, not caring to see more of the Stork
family, for we could get a sight of such rene-
gades any day, we turned away, and at noon
ate the king’s rations, which would surely have
disagreed with our stomachs but for the fact
that we were doing so with a purpose which
it was hoped would result in good to the
cause. .

Half an hour or more after noon Sergeant
Champe said to David and me, speaking in a
tone that might have been heard by any of the
recruits who chose to listen:

“Now if you lads are minded to show me
around New York, I will thank you for the
service. Above all things I would see that
portion of the city which was burned during
the great fire of ’76,”
68 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“That we can readily show you, and without
much walking to and fro,” I replied, whereat
the three of us left the barracks, departing
from the fort without any more difficulty than
if we had been on the staff of General Clinton
himself.

As we were passing one of the sentinels, the
sergeant said :

“JT first have a desire to see the ruins of
Trinity Church. Of course I know where they
are; but it would please me much to have an
extended view of them, that I may thereby
form some idea of what the building was
like.”

As may be supposed, we acted upon his sug-
gestion without delay, and, going up Broad
Way, stopped at the ruins, as if our only pur-
pose in coming had been to see them.

The sergeant led the way across the church-
yard until we were a short distance in the rear

of where the building had formerly stood, and
A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE. 69

here, in the very heart of New York, where
the king was master, and Sir Henry Clinton,
his dutiful servant, did we arrange further
details of that plot against his majesty and his
majesty’s prime traitor.

Standing where we were no one could ap-
proach within earshot save we were aware of
the fact, and we conversed—perhaps it would
be more correct to say Sergeant Champe de-
tailed his plans without fear of eavesdropping.

He had already decided upon the course of
action, and J soon understood that we were to
be but assistants, not principals or advisers, in
the plot.

“T have decided that on the night of the 5th
day of November we shall be able to make a
prisoner of General Arnold,” he said abruptly,
and David and I were so surprised by the
startling announcement that we stood silent
and motionless like simples; for it did not

seem to us possible the sergeant, however able
70 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

aman he was, could have perfected his arrange-
ments so quickly.

“Tf the work is to be done at all, the sooner
we move in it the better, and nothing will be
gained by much preparation. Now listen, for
it is my purpose that you repeat this to
another: As is well known, Arnold returns to
his quarters about midnight, and thus far,
previous to going to bed, has always taken a
stroll in the garden. Now I propose that on
the night mentioned David shall procure a
boat, and lay in waiting for us near the foot of
the garden. You and I, Oliver, will secrete
ourselves amid the shrubbery, while another,
whose name I have not yet mentioned, stands
watch outside. When Arnold appears it should
be a simple matter to deprive him of his liberty
and the power of speech.”

“ And even then it will be necessary to get
him to the boat,” I suggested, yet bewildered.
‘We may not be able to carry him without
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. V1

attracting attention, unless you are depending
upon the fact that the streets shall be empty
just at that time.”

“T have no such foolish expectation as that.
We shall undoubtedly meet some of the patrol
or watch as we make our way from the garden;
but it will be a simple matter to represent him
as one drunken whom we are carrying to his
home or the guardhouse, as the case may be.
That portion of the plot depends wholly upon
chance. Regarding the capture we may be
more positive. Nothing can defeat us save the
fact that he departs from his usual custom, in
which case the next night will suffice for our
purpose. All that now remains to be done is
to acquaint Major Lee with our intentions, and
have him see to it that horses are ready for us
on the Jersey shore not later than half an hour
after midnight.”

“Acquaint Major Lee!” David repeated.
72 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“ Why, he is in the American camp; either at
Pompton or West Point !”

“Nay, lad, most likely at Dobb’s Ferry, and
you may have speech with him to-morrow
morning, if you be diligent on the way.”

“We may ?” David cried in surprise. “Is it
your purpose that we go into the American
camp ?”

“You have done so more than once, I am told.”

“ Ay, and can again,” I replied.

“Then set out at once. Here are six
shillings in case you should need money during
the journey; and even though I had more it
would not be well to increase the amount, since
should you be overhauled, suspicions might be
aroused at your being so well supplied with
funds.” ad

“Do you mean that we are to leave immedi-
ately—this afternoon?” David asked, as if it
were not yet possible for him to understand
what had been said.
- A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 43

“ Ay, lad; so soon as you can get away.
There yet remains four days before the time I
have set. You should be at the American
camp to-morrow morning, and can return to
New York the night after, which will give us
time to change our arrangements, if it so be
Major Lee sees any reason for delay.”

I knew full well that in addition to the
difficulty of leaving New York would come
the question of entering the American lines,
and therefore asked the sergeant what creden-
tials we might take with us, which would
admit of our passing the sentinels, once we
were arrived at the outposts.

“There is nothing I can do for you in that
way, Oliver Littlefield,” he said sadly. “Re-
member, I am considered by all, save the
Commander-in-chief and Major Lee, as a
deserter. You must make your way there and

back as best you can, unless it should chance
m4. A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE.

Master Schuster could give you what would
serve as credentials.”

“That he cannot do,”David replied quickly.
“The last time we set out from the city it was
near four-and-twenty hours before he suc-
ceeded in so much as getting us a pass to leave
town, and then he greatly desired we should
visit some New Hampshire troops, among whom
he had acquaintances; but claimed he could
not get the necessary permit.”

“Then you must depend upon your own
resources, remembering that by the day after
to-morrow it is necessary to have returned.
Let me repeat, as forcibly as may be possible,
that my name is to be mentioned to no person
save Major Lee, and then only when you are
certain none other will hear the words.”

“ What shall we tell him in addition to the
plan you propose to carry out ?”

“That will suffice. Should he ask any ques-

tions concerning me, answer them as truthfully
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. "5

as you can, and forget not the night I have set,
for unless we have horses on the Jersey side
awaiting us, we shall never be able to get our

prisoner within the American lines.”

It was a blind sort of a journey we were
called upon to undertake, and without any
preparation whatsoever; therefore it was that
I stood looking mutely at David instead of set-
ting about the work at once, and Sergeant
Champe asked with much sharpness in his
tones :

“Are you expecting time will hang heavily
on your hands, unless you make a delay here ?”

“T was thinking how we might best set about
it, for it is not assimple as you appear to think,
this journey to and from the American lines.’’

“So, at the first show of difficulty, your
courage deserts you?” he asked in a sneering
tone. “You who were ready to aid me even
in the face of death, stand questioning as to how

you may perform what should be a familiar
"6 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

task. Thrice Iam told you have been inside
the lines, and why shall you waste the moments
by debating how it may be done the fourth
time ?”

The tone of his voice, quite as much as the
words, nettled me, and turning stiffly after
motioning David to follow, I gave him what
might have passed for a military salute, as I said:

“We will meet you in this place on the day
after to-morrow.”

“You had best present yourselves boldly at
the fort and ask for me there,” he replied
with a smile, and then it was that I understood
his harsh words had simply been intended to
spur Us On. wv

Nevertheless I did not linger, but with my
hand on David’s shoulder, walked through the
inclosure to Lumber Street, cudgeling my brains
to decide how we might make the journey to
Dobb’s Ferry within twenty-four hours.

Not until we had arrived nearly at the
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 0”

water’s edge did my comrade venture any
remark, and then it was to say grimly:

“JT am free to admit that the sergeant takes
many chances in thus joining the American
Deserters’ Legion—for that isthe name by which
it should be known. Yet at the same time he
would have it appear as if our part in this
matter was as nothing. Since he can arrange
our plan so glibly, it would have been well had
he told us how we might set about the journey.”

“ But since he didn’t, David Rhinelander, and
because we have no mind to fail in the first
work set us, we must go ahead, blindly trusting
to chance.”

“And it will be a chance if you get through
on time. Were we given two or three days, so
that we might watch our opportunity for leaving
the city, then would the case be different; but
it is proposed that we start immediately, and I
ask you how that may be done?”

“We must use the skiff we borrowed the last
"8 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

time of Master Taylor, and embark as if bent
on pleasure.”

“ And think you we shall be permitted to
do so in the light of day ?”

“That we must venture on. It may be the
very boldness of the attempt will prove friend-
ly, for the guard could not suppose we would
set about to visit the American lines without
trying to disguise our purpose.”

“Then do you take the lead, and I will fol-
low wherever you may say. I make no claims
at being a prophet, but yet venture to predict
that we shall find ourselves in the gaol, or as
prisoners within the fort, before the sun sets
rather than on our way up the river.”

I was much of David’s opinion, but would
not admit it just then; for if both of us were
weak-kneed at the start, then had the venture
failed before we began, and while I had little
faith of its success I determined to make it ap-

pear as if I was valiant and confident.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. "9

CHAPTER IV.
AN INQUISITIVE STRANGER.

Davin ventured no further remark.

One who did not know him as well as I,
would have said he was disgruntled, if not ab-
solutely angry, at being sent forth on sucha
mission; but I understood that his silence came
from anxiety lest we should fail, and paid no
attention to what in another lad would have
been ill humor.

It was useless for me to try to form any plan
of action in the limited space of time at our dis-
posal, and after gazing about me in vain for
ten minutes or more I said, speaking to myself,
and not aware that I had raised my voice:

“We will buy hooks and lines and appear to

be fishing along the bank, working up-stream
80 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

until, if fortune favors us, we are so far out of
the city that it may be possible to pull across
without attracting the attention of the senti-
nels.”

It was when David made reply to this that
I realized I had given words to my thoughts.

“ Mayhap it is as well to start in that way as
another, and while it seems impossible we
should be allowed to leave, there is a chance
the very boldness of the plan will carry it
through.”

“Tt gives me heart to hear you speak like
that, lad, for it is your old self, and but for the
fact of what lays behind all this, neither of us
would be so timorous. If your Uncle Jacob
had proposed that we make our way to West
Point to learn what news might be about the
camp, we, understanding that no one was in
peril if we failed, should have set about the
task without thought of danger.”

“ Very true, and if the redcoats stopped us
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 81

it would bea trifling matter ; whereas now if
we are delayed it means, perhaps, the undoing
of all the plot in behalf of which the sergeant
has ventured his liberty and his life.”

“Let us forget all that for the time, and have
only in mind the desire to leave New York.
I know of a shop hard by where we can buy
lines, and while I am there you shall go ahead to
acquaint Master Taylor with the fact that we
desire his skiff. Get some bait, also; for we
must play the part of fishermen whether we
expect to catch anything or not.”

There was a cheery expression on David’s
face as he left me, and it had not disappeared.
when I met him again at the water’s edge half
an hour later.

Thad bought the lines and hooks; he had
seen Master Taylor and gotten a dozen clams,
wherefore we were equipped for the under-
taking, and it only remained to embark.

We were at the foot of Stone Street.
82 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

A short distance away were two redcoats
coming toward the water in a leisurely fashion,
and as if bent on pleasure rather than business.

Anchored in the river less than half a musket-
shot off was one of the king’s ships, and in mid-
stream, as if having come from the direction of
the fort, was an eight-oared barge, in the stern-
sheets of which sat an officer wearing a cocked
hat, and so profusely decorated with gold braid
that there came into my mind thoughts of the
golden calf which had been set up to be wor-
shiped.

Without seeming to look at thesé things we
saw them all, David and I; but did our best
to appear indifferent, as if they could in no
possible way concern us.

At the time it seemed to me as if I played
my part well; but I now remember how my
knees trembled when I stepped on board the
skiff, and it did not increase my courage to see

David fumbling nervously in the attempt to
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 83

break open one of the clams, that we might bait
our hooks.

If the truth need be told we were both
frightened, although there was nothing near
about to cause alarm.

We gained in courage, however, or at least
I can say as much for myself, when, entering
the skiff, we pushed off without seemingly at-
tracting the attention of any one.

Had there never been any uprising against
the king, we could not have had less difficulty
in setting out on this voyage; but I well knew
it was one thing to push out into the stream a
short distance as if to fish, and another to con-
tinue straight on up the river.

However, our faces were set in that direc-
tion, and we should go on until forcibly
stopped ; but not at a pace which would show
we were bent on getting to any particular point
within a certain time.

We moved leisurely, I working the oars with
84 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

a trifle more than sufficient force to stem the
current, and David pretending to fish, but mak-
ing a very poor fist of it, as any one might say
who was close at hand, for he trembled so vio-
lently that his line danced up and down in the
water as if he was churning.

Inch by inch we crept up the stream, keep-
ing close watch, as can well be imagined, upon
all within sight ; but yet no one gave heed to
our movements.

My timorousness vanished gradually; David
ceased to tremble, and when we were abreast
of Partition Street, I could not refrain from
saying to the lad:

“We feared pain before being hurt. It
seemed certain we should not be allowed to
embark, and yet here we are started on the
voyage without hindrance.”

“Yes, we have started,” David replied doubt-
fully ; “but yet it is almost a stretch of the

imagination to say so much as that. We are
A TRAITOR’S. ESCAPE. 85

loitering about here in the boat, and it remains
to be seen how far we may row up-stream be-
fore some one hails us.”

“We may as well make the venture thor-
oughly,” I said, giving more strength to my
stroke, and the skiff glided over the water with
reasonable rapidity; but yet no one hailed us. —

“The next time it is necessary for us to visit
the American camp, instead of hanging around
the water-front after midnight for a chance to
slip off in the darkness, I shall set forth in the
same bold fashion we have done this day.”

David made no reply.

He was ever one who insisted on strong
proof before being confident of anything, and I
understood that he was waiting until we should
have pushed on past the city before giving way
to joy.

When we were abreast of Barkly Street, I
suddenly bethought myself that we would

stand in sore need of food if it became neces-
86 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

sary to row the skiff all the way to Dobb’s
Ferry, and made the suggestion to David that
he go ashore to buy, at a shop which I knew
was hard by the water-front, such as would
serve us for at least one meal.

He objected to making any halt lest by lay-
ing in stores we should bring suspicions upon
ourselves; but I laughed at his fears, declaring
that the redeoats were not grown so alarmed
as to fall into a panic when two lads purchased
enough of provisions to supply themselves with
a supper, and by ridicule persuaded him to do
as I wished.

Once ashore he bought such food as would
have made three substantial meals for us, prob-
ably arguing that he might as well be hanged
for a sheep as a lamb, and when we pushed off
the second time without opposition, both of
us were confident we would accomplish our
purpose without difficulty or danger,

Ten minutes later we were at the outskirts








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I TuEn Saw Ben Srork Sranptnc BEHIND SOME BALES OF
Hemp.—Page 87.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 87

of the town, being opposite the rope-walk, and
at that moment, when all danger seemed to
have been passed, we were both startled by
hearing our names called loudly from the
shore:

For a full minute I gazed around me in sur-
prise and fear, and then saw, standing half
hidden behind some bales of hemp, Ben Stork,
a brother to that Jethro whom we had met
in the barracks of the A‘merican Deserters’
Legion.

“We must get rid of him in short order,”
David said in a half whisper.

“Ay; but how may that be done? The
young Tory has hailed us for a purpose; and
should we not reply might raise an alarm that
we were fleeing from the city.”

Then Ben Stork cried out once more, coming
a few paces nearer the water’s edge, and I, as
if having seen him for the first time, replied by
asking what he desired.
88 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“Where are you lads bound ?”

“ Fishing, as you can see.”

“Take me aboard.”

“The skiff is not large enough for three, and
besides, we are not inclined for company,”
David replied quickly.

Ben Stork knew that we did not look upon
him as a friend, and never courted his company,
therefore my comrade’s remark could have been
no surprise; yet he treated the matter as though
he was wholly at a loss to understand why we
should not desire his companionship.

I had ceased rowing, and was allowing the
boat to drift with the current, thinking that we
might thus get rid of him even though we were
going backward on the journey, when he cried:

“Tf you are really fishing there is no reason
why I could not come aboard. If you’re bound
on some rebel business, as, it is said, you have
engaged in more than once, then I understand

why you are not inclined. for my company.”
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 89

This was little less than a threat, and I so
understood it.

That we should find ourselves stopped, after
having passed the most dangerous points, by a
worthless Tory like Ben Stork was enough of
vexation to make a fellow gnash his teeth with
rage, and David came nigh to doing so.

“The skiff cannot be increased in size what-
ever business we may be bent on,” I cried,
thinking to parley with the fellow, for I knew
full well that it was in his heart to do us a
wrong turn when an opportunity came.

“Let me see how many fish you have
caught?” he demanded rather than asked, and
it was in my mind to go on shore and flog the
Tory villain.

“Since when has it been that we must ac-
count to you for our doings?” I cried angrily,
and David said in a whisper :

“Be careful, Oliver, he has it in his power

now to undo us both.”
90 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“And he will work the harm whether we
give him soft words or harsh.”

“Ay; but molasses is better for flies than
vinegar, and by using it you may entangle
them meanwhile.”

I was at a loss to understand the meaning of
David’s remark, and had no time to ponder
over it, for at the same instant Ben Stork cried
threateningly :

“JT shall warn the patrol that you are leaving
the city to visit the American lines, and per-
haps by the time they make prisoners of both
you will understand how long since it had been
that you must account to me for your doings.
I have had my eye on you two rebels, and
don’t intend you shall remain free to carry
matters with such high hands.”

“T will go ashore and flog him,” I said, haul-
ing the boat around, and David whispered, a
smile coming over his face which told me he

had some plan in mind.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 91

“Let me try the molasses first, Oliver, and
mayhap then you will have a better oppor-
tunity for doing the flogging. Hold your
peace while I make talk with the Tory.”

I nodded my head without understanding
his purpose, and straightway was astonished to
hear him cry to the villainous cur on shore:

“There is no reason why you should set
yourself to watch us, Ben Stork, for we are not
now doing any more than we ever have done
against the king; but if it so please you, come
aboard.”

“Now you are knuckling down to that
Tory,” I whispered angrily.

“It won’t be for long, Oliver, so don’t get
your teeth on edge until the proper time
comes ; but pull in toward the shore.”

“Where are your fish ?”? Ben demanded, now
mystified by David’s willingness to take him on
as passenger.

“We haven’t got any yet. It is less than
92 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

half an hour since we set out, and the fish are
not biting hereabouts; but we will have better
luck further up the river. Are you comiag
aboard 2”

“You think to blind my eyes by appearing
willing to have me for a companion after you
had once refused.”

“Tt is better we do so than that you should
bring our fishing voyage to a close by calling
on the Britishers,” David said with a laugh.
“Tt is seldom I have three or four hours to my-
self for such a purpose, and I am not minded
to cut it short because of your suspicions. To
be frank, Ben Stork, we are not inclined to-
ward you as a companion; but are willing to
pay the price for a spell, and what is more,
you shall share in the food which we have
brought with us.”

I was inwardly raging at what seemed worse
than stupidity in David.

Should we take this Tory aboard the voyage
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 93

must come to an end beyond a peradventure,
for how could we get rid of him, more partic.
ularly if matters were made pleasant as my
comrade suggested ?

However, it was too late for me to interfere,
since by this time the boat was at the shore
and Ben Stork had laid hold of the gun-
wale.

He peered around suspiciously, looking here
and there as if expecting to see that which
would prove we were about to aid the “rebels,”
and David said impatiently :

“We are not minded to come ashore that
you may overhaul us for your own curiosity.
If it so be you think we are on other than a
fishing voyage, come with us; else let go your
hold there.”

“TI will do that when I please,” the Tory
cried defiantly, and I, unable to control my

anger any longer, rose tomy feet suddenly,
shouting;
94 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“You will do it now, you villain, or I'll
break at least one of the bones in your worth-
less body !”

David had hold of me in an instant, literally
forcing me back on the thwart as he said to
Ben Stork:

“My comrade is right in being angry when
you would thus play the part of customs officer
without authority. If it so be you choose to
come on board, as was first proposed, do so at
once; but attempt to detain us here, and Oliver
shall work his will.”

Why David should be eager to take this
fellow as a passenger I could not understand,
and the bewilderment, together with anger,
kept me silent; my mind was in such a state
of confusion as prevented me from noting the
Tory’s movements.

He hesitated an instant as if to let go his
hold on the boat, and then, most likely enjoy-

ing his fancied advantage, when it seemed as if
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 95

he had the whip-hand of us, he shoved the skiff
off, at the same time leaping aboard.

“Tl go to make certain whether you are tell-
ing the truth or not.”

“'That’s the proper way,” David replied in a
tone of perfect satisfaction, and added to me,
“ Pull heartily, Oliver, for the day is fast wear-
ing away, and we shall have no sport if you
loiter here.”

There was more in his tone than his words
to attract my attention, and straightway I under-
stood that the lad had in his head some cun-
ningly devised plan which would result in the
confusion of the Tory; but what it was I could
not so much as conjecture, for it seemed to me
we thus lost our last opportunity of leaving the
city on that day.

“You said that there was something on
board to eat,” Ben Stork began with the
same friendly manner, and Dayid replied

laughingly :
96 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

« Ay, so there is; but it isn’t to be touched
until we are where we can get some fish.”

“How far up the river are you counting on
going ?”

“Half a mile or more over cn the other
shore the fishing is good, and now since we
have such an ardent Royalist on board there
can be no reason why we should not venture
that far from the city,” David replied in a voice
so mild that one would have thought he was
speaking to his dearest friend, and so thick-
- headed was Ben Stork that he did not suspect
any mischief was intended.

I began to have an inkling of what my com-
rade would do, and the thought of it was so
satisfactory and amusing that I had great diffi-
culty in keeping my face straight as I furthered
his plans by pulling the best I knew how up-
stream, but constantly working, apparently with-
out purposing to do so, toward the Jersey

shore.
A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE. 97

Ben’s mind was on the food rather than his
own position, and after he had asked several
questions concerning it, David apparently re-
lented, saying as he brought out the parcel:

“We will divide this into fair portions so
there may be enough left for supper, because
after fishing two or three hours one will need
a hearty meal.”

Ben fell-to innocently as any lamb, and I
pulled on the oars as vigorously as was in my
power until we were well over toward the
Jersey shore, so far above the town that we no
longer had any fear of being interrupted.

Then it was that for the first time Ben Stork
began to realize perhaps it was not exactly safe
for him to venture so far from home in a skiff
manned by two “rebels,” who had more than
once plainly showed they felt no love for
him.

“See here,” he began blusteringly, when he

suddenly. discovered how far we were from
98 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

New York, “I shan’t stand anything like this,
you know.”

“Anything like what?’ David asked inno-
cently.

“This; going so far away. How doI know
what you fellers are up to?” ,

“That is exactly what you came on board
for, as I understand it. You intended to learn
what we were about, and are in a fair way to
gain the information.”

“But I don’t intend to go so far. There is
as good fishing ground on the other side as
here.”

“But we preferred to try our luck on this
shore. Now let us gather up the food lest
some of it be wasted, and then we'll get the
lines over.”

David, who had been sitting aft, stepped on
the thwart occupied by me and went toward
Ben, as if expecting the Tory cur would give

him such of the provisions as remained uneaten.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 99

“T'll keep what I’ve got, and you may attend
to turning back. Do you hear me? Put the
boat-around, for I'll not go any further !”

David stepped past me, and fearing lest he
might overset the boat I moved further aft;
but holding myself in readiness for that which ;
I knew was about to take place.

“Now what are you fellows up to?” Ben
Stork cried in a rage, and probably at that in-
stant the first suspicion crept into his mind that
_he had shown himself to be an idiot.

“ You had better keep your seat or the boat
will be overturned,” David said quietly. “It is
our purpose to land on the Jersey shore, and
since you were so eager to come we shall be
forced to ask that you remain with us for a cer-
tain length of time.”

Never did I see a lad’s face change so sud-
denly as the Tory’s at that moment.

Although slow of wit, he could not fail to

understand that we had him within our power,
100 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

and must have known we should not handle
him too gently; but yet he tried one more
game at bullying.

“Turn this skiff back or TP] lodge informa-
tion against you at once,” he cried. “ You will
repent having acted the part of spies.”

“Try not to lodge information against us
until you get on shore, Ben Stork,” David said
laughingly, and the Tory showed that he had
about as much courage in him as has a cornered
rat, for he sprang up suddenly, aiming a blow
full at my comrade’s face.

If he had known David Rhinelander better
there would have been no idea in his mind of
taking the lad by surprise, and hardly had _ he
struck out before my comrade clutched him by
the throat.

There was no reason for me to take part in
the affray. ;

In fact it was quite necessary I should pay

all my attention to preventing the skiff from










































SEE
. NOE
See
Ss

Sac
Ry

Se



DAVID NOW HAD HIS PRISONER SO NEARLY CHOKED HE was
UnpDER SuBsection.—Page 101.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 101

being overset, and I jumped here and there to
counterbalance the movements of the two who
were struggling in the bow, until David had his
prisoner so nearly choked that he was under
subjection.

“Give me something for a gag, Oliver,” he
said, “and pass forward that piece of rope
from the stern. We must truss this fellow
up in such fashion that he can neither
move nor give the alarm, else we are not
safe.” .

The rope I handed him as he desired; but
could see nothing out of which a gag might be
fashioned until I bethought myself of Ben’s
own coat, and this we stripped from him in a
twinkling, stuffing a goodly portion of one
sleeve into his mouth, and fastening it there in
proper fashion.

Then I took up the oars, leaving to David
the task of getting the prisoner into the bottom

of the boat where he would not be so readily
102 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

seen by those on board passing craft, and asked
as I rowed:

“Now that you have caught your fish,
David, what do you‘count on doing with him 2”

“There is but one course for us, so far as J
can see, which is to carry him into the Amer-
ican camp. Had he been allowed his way we
should yet be in New York, and if Major Lee
can’t care for this fellow a few weeks, why
then the time has come when we must of a
surety enter the American army so soon as we
have captured the traitor who is lying under

Sir Henry Clinton’s wing.”
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 103

CHAPTER V.
THE PRISONER.

Tue adventure on which we had embarked
promised all the danger and difficulty that the
most venturesome could have desired, when it
was first unfolded to us by Sergeant Champe ;
but at this moment, while we had a prisoner in
the skiff and were yet many miles from the
American lines, it appeared much as if it was
increasing rapidly in magnitude.

Should we be overhauled by the Britishers
while Ben Stork was on board, our position
would be even more perilous than Master
Schuster or the sergeant had counted on, and
even at the moment of our triumph over the

Tory I grew timorous again.
104 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

When his plan was fully carried out, and the
Royalist cur lay helpless in the bottom of the
skiff, David looked at me with a certain
expression of pride on his face, which he had
a good right to wear considering how neatly he
trapped the scoundrel; but as the moments
~ passed the same thoughts came into his mind
which had already found lodgment in mine, and
he began to appear disturbed.

It was to me as if he had spoken, and I
answered the question I read in his eyes:

“We can only trust to chances, David Rhine-
lander, for now are we so far upon the road
which may lead to the gallows that there is no
possibility of turning back.”

“J understand that full well,” he said impa-
tiently, “and am not so simple as to think we
may retreat even though we were so disposed;
but that which troubles me most just now
is as to what we are to do with this Tory
bundle 2?”
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 105

“He must be taken with us, else we may
make up our minds to taste of life on board
the prison-ships if we venture into New York
again.”

“Once the journey on foot is begun he will
hinder our movements to such an extent that
we cannot hope to return according to promise.”

“Yet must we hold him, unless you are of
the mind to drop the cur overboard.”

David’s face grew pale at the idea of taking
a human life in cold blood, and he answered
quickly :

“That would be murder, Oliver Littlefield,
and neither you nor I would do it, however
great the stake for which we are playing.”

“I did not suggest it; but said it is the only
way by which we can rid ourselves of him. I
have no question but that Major Lee will see
to it he is not allowed to enter New York for
some time; but he cannot always be held a

prisoner, and we have shut ourselves out from
106 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

our homes so long as the Britishers remain in
possession of New York.”

David was silent while one might have
counted ten, and then cried angrily :

“T could almost wish we had allowed him to
prevent our coming up the river !”

“You do not mean all that. We had our
duty to perform, and at such a time have no
right to think of ourselves. It is not well that
we speak further on the matter while his ears
are open, lest we make him acquainted with
our secret. What is done may not be recalled,
and the only course now is to push forward
with all speed to carry out the orders given.”

Then, as the plainest way of putting an end
to what was a needless conversation, I bent to
the oars once more, rowing as I had never done
before, and keeping the skiff well within the
shadows of the Jersey shore.

David again took up his station in the stern
that the little boat might be in better trim, and
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. x 107

steered with the paddle that our course might
be the most direct.

Ben Stork lay on his back unheeded by us,
and the oars were plied until I was so spent
with toil that it seemed as if I could not pull
another stroke. :

Then David spoke for the first time in half
an hour,

“ Let me take your place, Oliver. By spell-
ing each other we can continue to push ahead,
and it should not be long now before the
danger is passed.”

“T allow that time has already: come, at least
until we set our faces homeward once more.”

Then I changed seats with my comrade, and
he worked the oars with even more vigor than
IT had done.

Neither of us gave thought to the provisions
with which we had proposed to refresh our-
selves,

It was as if the presence of our unwilling
108 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

passenger had taken from us all desire or
thought, save to gain the American lines at the
earliest possible moment.

When another quarter of an hour had passed
I noticed that the prisoner was writhing as if
in agony, and instantly came the fear that he
might be stifling to death because of the gag,
which may not have been properly fixed in his
mouth.

“We must give him some attention,” I said
to David, after explaining what was in my
mind; but he was not disposed to spend time
in aiding Ben Stork.

“Tf he should stifle his death would be at
our door as surely as if we had thrown him
overboard,” I said sharply, and then made my
way forward regardless of the possibility that
by so doing I might overset the light skiff.

_ It was but the work of a few seconds to take
the coat-sleeve from the cur’s mouth, and then I

knew he had been very near death.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 109

He gasped for breath, his face was of a dark
hue, and the eyeballs protruded from their
sockets.

My exclamation of fear brought David to his
senses, and hastily drawing in the oars he joined
me in the effort to give the Tory relief, although
while thus trying to aid an enemy he cried
nervously : |

“Tt is destined the Tory villain shall bring
trouble upon us, for even while saving his
worthless life the redcoats may come !”

“Tt cannot be helped,” I replied recklessly as
I dashed water into the fellow’s face. “ Almost
anything is better than that a murder be done
by us.”

Not until five minutes had passed did Ben
Stork show signs of returning consciousness,
and then David insisted that he should be
dragged further aft, for while two of us were
in the bow it was next to impossible to propel
the boat.
110 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“Lay the cur where we can have an eye on
him without changing positions,” he said, as he
suited the action to his words. “ We must not
loiter here for such as he.”

After this had been done David began
rowing again, and I watched the Tory until he
was recovered sufficiently to speak.

“You are bent on killing me!” he cried, and
there was terror in his tones. :

“ We would do so rather than allow you to
interfere with our plans,” I answered, minded
to have him believe we were really blood-
thirsty. “You have taken it upon yourself to
do the king’s work and must not grumble if at
times it causes pain or discomfort.”

“Tt would be better to set me ashore, than
do murder.”

“Of that I am not so certain. However,
there will be no murder done so long as you
obey such orders as we may give.”

“Why should I do anything of the kind?”
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 111

he cried angrily, grown bolder now it appeared
that he was not to be killed off-hand.

“ Because we are the masters now, and don’t
count on your spoiling our plans.”

“Set me ashore or J will bring you to the
gallows before this year has come to an end !”
he screamed, and David cried sternly :

“Put the gag back in his mouth. We can’t
have him yelling at this rate, and must take
the chances of his stifling.”

This reduced Ben to submission instantly,
and he cried for mercy, promising he would
obey us strictly and to any length, if the torture
was spared him.

“So long as you hold your peace, and do
not attempt to so much as whisper, your mouth
shall be left free,” I said, not minded to run
the chance of killing the cur. “If you make
ever so little noise the coat-sleeve will be put

in place again, not to be removed however near

you may be to death.”
112 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

I could see that this decision of mine did not
please David.

He believed our safety demanded that Ben
Stork be rendered powerless for harm of any
kind, and mayhap he was in the right, yet I
had not the heart to inflict needless torture
on a prisoner.

After nearly half an hour more had passed,
during which time not a word was spoken by
either of us, David yielded up the oars to me,
taking my place in the stern-sheets.

The night was now rapidly approaching, and
with the coming of darkness the danger less-
ened.

In fact, I believed we no longer had any
reason to fear meeting the Britishers, and counted
that it was now only a question of endurance.
until we should gain that portion of the
American lines where it was believed Lee’s
Legion was encamped.

The Tory had not so much as yipped from .
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 113

the moment I threatened to replace the gag if
he made the slightest outcry, and I felt certain
we would have no trouble with him unless we
suddenly came upon a party of redcoats, when
I doubted not but that he would use his lungs
to the best possible advantage.

There is no reason why I should set down
here all we speculated upon in our minds, or
spoke of during the hours which followed, for
nothing of moment occurred until we were come
to a point where we could see on the New York
side of the river what both David and I believed
were the camp-fires of our army.

Then we pulled quickly across; but before
arriving within an hundred yards of the shore
the sentries hailed us.

“We are but just come from New York, and
would have speech with Major Henry Lee!” I
cried, thinking to lose as little time as possible
if it so chanced we were not yet come to the

place where the Legion was encamped.
114 A TRAITORS ESCAPE.

“What have you to do with him?” a voice
from out the darkness asked, and it angered me
that there should be in the Continental Army a
man so stupid as to think a message of any
nature whatsoever might be bawled from one
to another at such a distance.

“We have business of the utmost importance
with him, and I beseech you to give us speedy
information of his whereabouts.”

“ Come ashore and let me have a look at you !”

I was about to make a hasty answer to this
unsoldierly demand, when David raised his hand
to command silence.

His ears, quicker than mine, had heard a
voice reproving the sentry in sharpest tones, and
an instant later some one whom I fancied was
an officer cried :

“Major Lee is at this point !”

Fortune was most certainly beginning to
smile upon us at last, and in such hearty fashion

that I began to doubt if it could be possible we
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 115

had blundered upon the very place we most
wished to find.

“You may come ashore and state your busi-
ness,” the same voice cried, impatient because
of my delay in answering.

“Very well, sir,” David replied, and then he
pulled toward the shore, for it was his trick
at the oars.

We were met at the water’s edge by an
officer and two men, and, motioning for David
to keep his place in the boat, I leaped ashore,
asking to speak privately with him who wore a
sword.

When we had stepped a few paces away

from the privates, I whispered that we had but

just come from New York with a message of
the utmost importance for Major Lee, and while
getting away from the city had been forced to
take a Tory prisoner.

The officer would have asked for more in-

formation ; but I implored him to lose no time
116 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

in speaking with the major, and urged that that
gentleman be requested to come to the shore, at
least until I might make him acquainted with
certain matters which should receive attention
before we left the boat.

The officer was not disposed to grant what
was an unusual request, if not downright impu-
dence; but I pleaded earnestly, representing
that David and I had more than once before
risked our lives to bring information within
the lines, until he finally consented, ordering
the sentry to keep every one away from our
eraft until his return.

The major, who as a matter of course was
momentarily expecting word from Sergeant
Champe, answered the summons hastily on
being informed that certain lads wished to
speak with him, and from the moment of his
arrival all our danger was passed for the time
being.

I had but to whisper in his ear the name of
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 11%

the man who had sent us, in order to insure his
attention, and before opening the matter with
which we had been charged, I. begged that Ben
Stork be carried into camp and kept securely
until we could tell our story.

All was done as I desired, and then David
and I, freed from the companionship of the
hated Tory, followed Major Lee to his quar-
ters, where in a very few moments we had
repeated the message from the sergeant.

As was but natural, the major insisted on
our telling him who we were, and I introduced
David and myself by explaining what we had
already done to aid the cause, referring him to
General Sullivan as to the truth of the story.

This appeared to satisfy the gentleman as
to our trustworthiness, and he questioned us
closely regarding the sergeant’s doings.

After giving him down to the minutest
detail all we had heard or what we ourselves

saw, he was pleased to say :
118 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“You lads have taken upon yourselves a
dangerous task; but I can promise you rich
reward if it be successful.”

“We have not entered into the business for
the sake of what profit may come out of it,
but to serve the Continental Army; and now
that Ben Stork knows somewhat of our work I
venture to say our necks are in nearly as much
danger as the sergeant’s.”

“You need have no present fear of him. I
will undertake to keep the Tory where he can
do no mischief until this work be completed
and your safety is assured.”

Then the major would have us repeat again
the plan which the sergeant had proposed to
carry out, and when I had told for the second
time how it was proposed to capture the traitor,
he said:

“You may tell him that I myself will be on
the Jersey side of the river with such an escort

as will insure the traitor’s being brought into
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 119

our camp. I shall wait there for him until
daylight, and if it so chance his plan miscarries,
he must send word as to when the next attempt
is to be made.”

“That would cause a delay of at least three
more days, sir,” I ventured to suggest. “Would
it not be well to say you would come to the
rendezvous on the next night also, unless word
should be brought to the contrary meanwhile.”

“Ay, lad, that is a happy thought, and we
will so arrange it. You say the sergeant has
been forced to enlist ?”

“He believed the plot would be more certain
of success if he did so, and signed the rolls
yesterday morning.”

“Well, what is done cannot be undone,” the
major said after a brief pause. “I do not think
there need be more said between us. You are
to remain in camp until morning, and then
make your way to the city. I will remind you
of the fact, although there is little need lads of
120 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

your experience should be warned, that the
sergeant’s name is not to be spoken here.”

I made bold to ask if none of his comrades
suspected the true state of affairs, and was told
that among all the men none had the slightest
idea but that the sergeant had gone over to the
enemy in good truth.

“Tt is of course to be regretted that so gal-
lant a soldier should be dishonored in the eyes
of his comrades even for a brief period,” the
major said regretfully ; “but if all goes well in
the city the truth can be made known in a few
hours, and he will have no reason to complain
of his reception when he takes his place in the
Legion once more.”

I fancied Major Lee would be pleased if the
interview was brought to a speedy close now
the business was concluded, and that he talked
thus kindly with us through courtesy rather
than from desire, therefore suggested that we

had best take our leave.
A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE. 121

To this he assented by calling a soldier to
provide us with quarters during the night, and
soon we were lying on the straw in a sort of
shed which had been put up as a shelter for
the troops at this point.

However sleepy we might be, there was no
opportunity for rest until we had satisfied the
curiosity of the men who were awakened by
our entrance, after they learned from him. who
conducted us that we had lately arrived from
New York, and it seemed to me before the
questioning was brought to an end that the
day must have fully come.

However, we found time for a nap ’twixt
then and morning, and at sunrise were making
ready to set our faces homeward.

Generous rations were served us, and we
were yet at breakfast when summoned to Major
Lee’s quarters.

As was shown, this had been done simply

through courtesy, and as he bade us farewell,
122 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

promising that both David and I should be
given a place in his troop whenever we de-
cided to enter the army, I asked to see our
prisoner, explaining that I simply wanted
to be certain he could not readily make his
escape.

“With so much at stake you may rest easy
that he will not be given a chance to leave us,”
he said with a smile, and at the same time
gave orders that we be taken to where the
Tory was confined.

Ben Stork was in a small building which
served the purpose of guardhouse, having been
once used, I should guess, as a woodshed, and
although there were no less than two soldiers
on guard, it did not appear to me that he was
any too secure.

We made no attempt to speak with the cur;
but after looking in on him went at once to our
boat, and when we were rowing down the

river David said questioningly :
H
i
i
i

Se







Bren Stork WAS IN A SMALL BUILDING WHICH SERVED THE
PURPOSE OF A GUARDHOUSE.—Page 122.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 123

“Jt is in your mind that the Tory may get
away ?”

“Tf I was in his place I should not stay in
that shanty four-and-twenty hours.”

“So that strict guard be kept I fail to see
how he might give them the slip.”

“One who bent all his energies to the task
could accomplish it, of that I feel confident,”
was my reply, and then I fell to speculating
as to what might come to David and me,
if Ben Stork should suddenly appear in
New York while we were yet engaged in the
plot.

My comrade had greater faith in the security
of the makeshift for a jail than I and there
was no good reason why I should try to shake
his faith, for under such belief he was content
in mind, and it was better he had no additional
cause for worriment.

As we pulled leisurely down stream, reserv-

ing our strength in case it should suddenly
124 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

become necessary to out-row the enemy, we
decided that it would be safest to leave the
skiff a mile or more above the ropewalk, and
make our way across the country until arriving
at the Boston Road.

Approaching the city from that direction
there would be less reason for suspicion on the
part of those we might meet than if we had
been within the American lines.

We were right secure in mind, for since
having been halted by Ben Stork fortune had
favored us so grandly that it seemed certain
we should complete this portion of our task
without mishap, and pulled toward the city as
if bringing a pleasure-trip to a close.

When, at about noon, we were arrived near,
by where it had been proposed to land, and I
was looking around for a favoring place in
which to conceal the skiff, we saw a boat put
out from the shore as if to meet us.

I was at the oars, and, therefore, could not
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 125

see what was ahead without turning; but
David warned me of all he saw.

“Ts it a redcoat ?” I asked nervously.

“T cannot say—he wears no coat.”

“We surely have no need to fear one man
)

”



anc
David’s face paled so suddenly that I ceased
speaking and rowing at the same time, while I
stared at him in alarm.
“What has come over you, lad?” I asked
as he remained silent, much as if having lost

all power over his tongue.
“He who is putting out from the shore

can be none other than Jethro Stork !”

Instantly I pulled the boat around three or
four points, in the vain hope we might pass
him, and asked in a whisper:

“Has he taken note of us, do you
think 2?”

“Ay, and is rowing this way. Ben’s par-

ents have become alarmed because he did not
126 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

return home last night, and Jethro is out
searching for him, most likely.”

“ He can have no idea we know aught con-
cerning the cur.”

“T would we were certain of that! Who
shall say we were not observed when he came
on board ?”

This suggestion was enough to send the cold
chills of fear down my spine, and I turned my
head ever so slightly to look at one who
might prove a more dangerous enemy than

ever Ben could be.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 127

CHAPTER VI.
SUSPENSE.

Iv needed but one glance at this represen-
tative of the Stork family to convince me he
had put out from the shore for the sole pur-
pose of intercepting us, and my courage sud-
denly oozed away at my fingers’ ends as I
realized he must have learned something of our
meeting with Ben the day previous, else he
would not be approaching with such a con-
fident manner.

“We are undone,” David said hopelessly,
and I could have echoed the words, but did not,
lest by so doing I should discourage myself.

To continue on down the stream in the hope
of avoiding Jethro Stork would be folly, since

he could easily cut us off, and it would have
128 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

been a confession of guilt to have deliberately
run away, therefore it only remained for us to
meet him with as good grace as possible, which
was much the same as none at all.

“Which of you lads is called Oliver Little-
field ?? young Stork asked while he was yet
a dozen yards or more away, and I determined
to put a brave face on the matter, however
cowardly I might be at heart, as I replied:

“Tam he.”

“ Where did you leave Benjamin ?”

For an instant I was tempted to deny having
seen his brother, and then, luckily, came the
thought that since he knew my name so well
it must be he had gotten definite information
concerning our movements of yesterday, and I
made answer without apparent delay:

“Up the river a short distance.”

“Why did he not remain with you 2”

“Because we wouldn’t sail the boat to please

him, I suppose.”
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 129

“Do you know he hasn’t returned at his
home 2”

By this time Jethro was alongside, and I
forced myself to look surprised as I repeated :

“ Not returned home !”

- “Know you aught of him since yesterday ?”
and young Stork looked me sharply in the
face.

“T know he wished to join us in a fishing
excursion; but shortly after we started from
the ropewalk he insisted on being put ashore.”

Thus far I had answered his questions
without telling that which was false, although
I must confess to have acted the lie; but it
was necessary if we would save our own lives,
or so it seemed to meat the moment, and I was
prepared to go even to greater length than I had
done,

Fortunately, however, Jethro Stork took it
into his head to bully us, not as I now think

because he had any idea we were keeping
130 A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE.

certain matters secret, but it was his disposition
ever to override those weaker than himself.

“Be careful what kind of a story you tell
me, because I am in a position to make matters
very uncomfortable if you attempt to deceive,”
he began with a swagger, and I looked him full
in the eye without replying.

Silence was the best course at this time. _

“Why did you tempt my brother to embark
on this craft?” he cried furiously, and I replied,
speaking earnestly now because it was the
absolute truth:

“Tt was not in my mind that he should do
so. David and I both were opposed to having
a passenger on board so small a craft; but he
insisted, declaring he would give notice that we
had left the city to enter the American lines,
unless we did as he desired. Therefore, rather
than lose an opportunity for fishing, we took
him on, and it was with positive relief I saw

him go ashore.”
A. TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 131

“But where is he now?” Jethro persisted,
losing, however, some of his swagger.

“That he can best tell. We had no further
concern regarding him after he left us.”

“How far up the river have you been 2”

“Perhaps two miles.”

“Where did you sleep last night ?”

“Tn a hut by the riverside.”

“ And you have neither seen nor heard any-
thing of Benjamin since you started down the
river ?”

“No,” I replied, decidedly, not thinking it
necessary to state that just before setting out
we had seen the villainous Tory.

Young Stork had his hand on the gunwale
of our boat, and after this last reply of mine
remained silent two or three minutes as_ if
revolving some plan in his mind, thus causing
us much mental anxiety.

I doubted not but that he was deliberating

whether it would be well to carry us before a
182 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

magistrate on the charge of being concerned in
his brother’s disappearance, which would have
been almost as bad as to have accused us of
being spies.

I dared not attempt to leave him lest he
should understand how eager we were to part
company ; but sat there inwardly quaking as I
looked him full in the face, until he finally said
threateningly :

“T shall know where to find you, Oliver
Littlefield, in case Benjamin does not return
home this day.”

“And in case he does not, how are we
to be held responsible? He was never a
friend of ours, and since it must have been
that some one saw him take passage with
us, the same person can tell you how un-
willing we were to make him one of the
party.”

It was evident from the expression on Stork’s

face that he was already aware of such fact, and
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 133

instead of continuing his threats he asked
sharply, looking toward David:

“ What is the name of your comrade ?”

Before I could reply my companion answered
readily as an innocent lad should:

“ David Rhinelander.”

Then the bully loosened his hold on our
skiff, and it could plainly be seen that he
was perplexed,

I rowed leisurely away from young Stork,
not daring to bend all my strength to the oars
lest he should grow suspicious, and it was with
a sense of deepest relief that I saw him head
his boat up the river.

Not until we were separated by a great
stretch of water did either of us two speak, and
then David said grimly :

“We are like to come to grief through these
promising members of the Stork family, since
if one does not appear to charge us with carry-

ing him into the Continental camp a prisoner,
134 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

the other will accuse us of having done some
bodily injury.”

“The day is rapidly approaching when our
mothers will urge that we enlist, instead of
objecting to our doing so,” I said with a laugh
in which there was no mirth, for it seemed that
we were being so compassed around by enemies
as to render it impossible we could aid the
sergeant in his plot.

This same thought was in David’s mind
also, for he said half to himself:

“To-morrow night is the time fixed for the
sergeant’s work, and it is well the hour be so
near at hand.”

“Whether the attempt is a success or a fail-
ure, we had best not be found in the city on
the morning of the 6th of November, and in
that case it is necessary we make our arrange-
ments for departure at once, since there is like
to be little time to-morrow for our own

matters.”
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 135

In reading over what I have just set down it
appears much as if I had utterly failed in thus
trying to describe our position, although per-
haps it is of little consequence, since in the
plot conceived by the commander.in-chief our
parts were so small that they could have been
readily performed by almost any one.

However, the situation seemed to us of
greatest moment, and we gave little heed to
the more important work as we strove to
devise some way out of the tangle into which
we had been plunged.

Because of the coming of Jethro Stork we
landed further down on the shore than was at
first intended, pulling our skiff amid the bushes
hardly a quarter of a mile above the ropewalk,
and then set out at full speed across the coun-
try, hoping to gain Master Schuster’s office
before he should have gone home for the night.

In this last we were happily successful,

although it taxed our powers of endurance to
136 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. -

the utmost, for not a halt was made as we sped
across the island.

The sun was yet half an hour high in the
heavens when we presented ourselves to
David’s uncle, and learned from the expres-
sion on his face that he was by no means
pleased because of our coming.

“You have returned from up the river?” he
asked in a whisper, motioning that we should
go from the office into the wareroom toward
that corner, where once before we had been
secreted from view of any who might enter.

“We are just come back,” David made reply,
and then he would have told of what had be-
fallen us but that Master Schuster interrupted
impatiently :

“ And did you perform your mission 2”

“Ay, sir,” I replied, quivering with impa-
tience because he delayed us in the telling of
our story. “Listen to David, Master Schuster,

for it is important you should hear at once that
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 137

which he has to tell, and then we will depart,
leaving you to decide on our future course.”

I fancy at that moment the worthy merchant
regretted most deeply he had ever concerned
himself in this plot to make a prisoner of the
traitor, for he betrayed fear in every movement
and gesture.

David gave no heed to this, however, but
straightway plunged into the story, telling it
with the fewest words, yet at the same time
making plain all the dangers which menaced
us.

If Master Schuster had been troubled before
he was certainly in great distress of mind when
the tale had been concluded, and such evidence
of uneasiness on his part did not tend to render
David and I more courageous.

When the position of affairs was such that
he, who was in little danger as compared with
us, was seriously alarmed, we might well be

excused for displaying the greatest terror.
138 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

It pleases me, however, to be able to say that
timorous although we both were, Master
Schuster could .never have guessed it from
our faces as we stood before him waiting for
his advice.

“Tt is a most perplexing business,” he finally
said. “At present I can see in it but one
course, which is for you to return to the Ameri-
can lines as soon as may be, and there enlist.”

“Of course you mean, sir, after we have done
what we may toward aiding the sergeant in his
work ?” I ventured to say, and to my great sur-
prise Master Schuster replied impatiently:

“T mean that it is necessary to leave the city
without delay. I can repeat to the sergeant
what you have told me, which will suffice for
him. You must take measures for your own
safety.”

“That we cannot do, sir, until after complet-
ing the task in which we engaged,” I said with

more of courage in my voice than was in my
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 139

heart, yet at the same time was I determined
to carry out the work regardless of the hazard
to ourselves.

“You can be of little assistance if Jethro
Stork lodges information against you, as doubt-
less he will.”

“But the time is set for to-morrow night,
and he can hardly accomplish very much

toward our undoing ’twixt now and_ then,”

David added.
_ Master Schuster suddenly looked around him
as if fearing some enemy was about to appear
and work harm; but seeing none he turned
again to us as if we had offended seriously.
“You shall go your own way, and get out of
the difficulty as best you can, if my advice be
not heeded.”
“No, sir,” I ventured to remonstrate. “ You
are bounden to aid us so far as you may, since
we embarked in the adventure through your

counsel.”
140 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“ And how can I render aid when you are
determined to go your own way ?”

“That may be done, sir, by acquainting our
mothers with the full reasons why we must
enlist, for I question whether we would be safe
in visiting our homes this night. If you are
pleased to do that, sir, we will take care of the
rest so far as we may.”

I believe the worthy merchant was greatly
relieved at learning that we demanded no more
of him, for he readily promised to do as I had
requested, agreeing to visit our mothers within
the hour.

But he offered neither money nor advice
when we took our leave of him to go in search
of Sergeant Champe.

“Uncle Jacob is credited with having much
love for the cause,” David said grimly when we
were out of the merchant’s office, walking
toward Broad Way; “but I question if

his love for self be not far greater. He is
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 141

ready to serve the American people when he
may do so without fear of injuring Jacob
Schuster either in a private or a_ business
way.”

It was not seemly for me to say anything in
disparagement of my comrade’s uncle, although
his was the right to do so, if he pleased, and I
held my peace, turning over in mind meanwhile
such plans as could be devised on the moment
for our own safety while we carried out our
portion of the plot.

When we were come near the ruins of Trinity
Church I saw the sergeant, who I had no
doubt was abroad with the hope of meeting us,
and instantly he turned into the churchyard
where we had once before conversed in safety,
I knew we were observed.

“Now we shall speedily settle this portion
of our work, and mayhap have time for attend-
ing to our own matters,” I said to David in as

cheery a tone as I could muster, and he, not to
142 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

be outdone by my pretense of carelessness,
replied with a laugh:

“We shall be cared for in some fashion or
other before many hours have passed.”

Then we were near to the sergeant, who
gazed at us with earnest inquiry in his eyes.

“We have carried your message, and bring
the reply that all will be done as you request.
At the same time we took it upon ourselves to
say that if the adventure failed to-morrow night,
your friends should be at the rendezvous the
next evening, unless in the meantime other
word had been sent them.”

“Tt was well thought of, although I fear
much that if it miscarries this time we shall
have little opportunity of making a second
attempt, for the American Legion is under
orders to begin the southern campaign without
loss of time.”

“Do you mean that Arnold is like to leave

the city soon?’ I cried incautiously loud, and
A TRAITORS ESCAPE. 143

the sergeant silenced me with a gesture as he
replied :

“ Ay, lad, as soon as may be, so it is said in
the barracks; but we will not look further
ahead than tomorrow night. Have you other
news to tell me? If not, we had best separate
to meet again in this place two hours after sut-
set to-morrow.”

“ All that we have of information concerns
ourselves, and because we repeat it now do not
think that either of us is of the mind to turn
back from the work agreed upon. It is well
you should know how we are threatened, since
it may cause some change in your own
plans.”

Then I told him the story of the journey up
the river, and of the meeting with Jethro Stork,
whereat he was instantly plunged into deep
thought, not after the same fashion as Master
Schuster, but with the air of one who racks his

brain to devise how he may be of assistance.
144 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“You must enter the army at once,” he finally
said, and David replied with a laugh:

“ Ay, sir, that much we know, and are of the
mind to set forth before sunrise on the sixth day
of November. It is on what we shall do in the
meanwhile that we should have advice.”

“Master Schuster should be able to counsel
you in that matter.”

“Uncle Jacob should be able to; but he is not
willing. We have just come from him, and even
though he be my relative, I have no hesitation in

saying that he would wash his hands of the
whole business if it were possible, so cowardly

has he grown with this new danger threatening.”

“T am not surprised,” Sergeant Champe said
half to himself. “The worthy merchant has
never seemed to me like one ready to venture
much if it so be his property or person might
be injured thereby, yet the keeping of two lads
for four-and-twenty hours should not have caused

him great annoyance or distress.”
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 145

Then he would have us repeat to him the
conversation we held with the merchant, and
when we had done so, said with a confident
air, which heartened me wonderfully :

“Tt is fortunate that we have one other here
of stronger stuff, upon whom we may call. I
told you in explaining the situation of affairs
that I was recommended to two persons, one of
whom I did not name. It is Master Baldwin
of Newark with whom I am to have speech
this night, unless it so chance fortune goes
against us. It appears to me you lads can do
no better than remain in hiding near about this
ruin until one shall approach who speaks the
word ‘Newark. Such a man you may be
certain is our friend, and he will take it upon
himself to look after your safety until the time
agreed upon to rendezvous here. If, however, I
should fail in meeting him, then may you expect
to see me again this night.”

The sergeant did not spend further time in
146 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

explanations, but hurried away like one bent
on carrying out his own purposes, and much of
the anxiety was instantly gone from David’s
mind and mine because of the heartiness with
which the Virginian had espoused our cause.

“T would that to-night had been set for the
attempt to capture the traitor,’ David said
when we were alone. “Imperiled as we are,
and about to incur yet greater danger, the
suspense is worse than action.” :

“Yet it must be borne, and instead of allow-
ing ourselves to dwell upon that which can only
tend to make cowardly, let us picture what we
will do after becoming members of the Con-
tinental Army.”

“The picture had best be drawn when we
are concealed from view,” David said with a
laugh. “Tam not minded to stay here in the
open lest the patrol take us in hand.”

There was no lack of opportunities for con-

cealment, and once we were where it was
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 147

possible to have a view of any one who might
approach from either street we comforted and
encouraged ourselves by speaking of the future
when we had enlisted, and never allowing the
conversation to venture on any nearer time
than that.

When we left the skiff in the woods just
above the ropewalk, I stuffed in my pocket that
which was left of the food David purchased
the day previous, and now it formed our supper.

After the meal had been eaten, and when we
had speculated upon our possible military
careers until the subject was grown stale, we
relapsed into silence, and it seemed to me the
morning must be come before any one ap-
proached our hiding-place.

Then it was that, as nearly as could be dis-
tinguished in the faint light of the moon, a
gentleman of middle age, with a long beard,
came toward the ruins, looked about cautiously,

and as if satisfying himself there was no one in
148 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

the vicinity, spoke the single word “ Newark,”
sufficiently loud for us to hear him.

Whereat David and I uprose, thankful that
the time of waiting had come to an end, what-
ever of evil might be in store, and the manner
in which this stranger greeted us seemed all the
more warm as compared with the reception we
had received from Master Schuster.

He did not display petulance because we were
run into danger, nor counsel that we flee the
city without attempting to do what had become
our duty, but asked if we were cold or hungry.

“We might be warmer, sir,” I replied, feel-
ing instinctively that this was one who could be
depended upon as a friend; “but our hunger
has been more than half-appeased by that
which we brought with us.”

“Tam told you lads have always lived in the
city 2”

“ Ay, sir; we were born here,” I replied.

“Then it may be you can lead the way to
SSS
SSS
SS



A GENTLEMAN WITH A LONG BEARD CAME TOWARD THE RUINS
AND SPOKE THE WORD ‘‘ NEWARK.”—Page 148.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 149

Orange Street nearabout the tanyards on the
Boston Road ?”

“That we can, sir, if it so be your pleasure
to go there.”

“ Say rather if it be your pleasure, lad, for I
would secure shelter for you with one who may
be relied upon, and who lives on thatstreet. Iam
told it is not well for you to venture home.”

“So it seems to us, sir; but peradventure
you think we are over-timid regarding what
Jethro Stork may do, we are willing to make
the venture, for, as you may suppose, we had
rather be under our mothers’ roof than any
other.”

“T think more than like the brother of your
prisoner would seek you out ’twixt this and

. morning, therefore, that you may be spared for
to-morrow night’s work, it will be well to
follow me, at as smart a pace as you can-set, for
the night is grown late, and the gentlemen of

the patrol are given to much curiosity.”
150 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

CHAPTER VII.
UNWELCOME TIDINGS.

Master Batpwin gave us to understand we
were to lead the way to Orange Street, from
which I guessed he was a stranger in the city,
although it seemed odd that one who lived so
near at hand should not be thoroughly well ac-
quainted with all the streets in New York.

However, that was of no moment, and David
and J, on either side of the gentleman, walked
up Broad Way to the Common, where we took
a short cut across, not so much to save dis-
tance as to avoid meeting unwelcome travelers.

It was as if the Britishers had no patrols out
this night, for although on the alert constantly

from the time of leaving the ruins of Trinity
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 151

Church until arrived at this house where he
said his friend lived, we saw nothing more dis-
agreeable in the form of a redcoat than a few
soldiers who were lounging about the streets,
evidently without purpose, and had one of us
been Sir Henry Clinton himself we could not
have made our way with less impediment.
Master Baldwin was not so reckless as to
engage us in conversation while we were in the
open air, and we continued the walk in silence.
Once arrived at the house of which he spoke
we entered without ceremony, and it seemed
much as if our coming had been anticipated.
David and I were introduced to the master
of the premises, whose name was Ledyard, a
brother, so I have since been told, to that
Ledyard who owned the pottery nearabout the
Common, and he immediately bade us welcome
as if we had been old friends.
Master Baldwin made no hesitation about

asking for supper, and whiie the meal was
152 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

being prepared we three were given a room
to ourselves, Master Ledyard explaining that
it might be well we did not remain with the
family lest peradventure some of the neighbors,
of whom many were Tories, should enter un-
expectedly.

Therefore it was that while thus waiting for
the meal we had an opportunity of conversing
upon the matter in hand, and it seemed to me
only natural Master Baldwin should ask for an
account of the doings which had brought us
into such peril.

There was no reason why we should not
explain everything down to the minutest detail,
knowing as we did that the gentleman was
such a friend to the cause that he had been
trusted with the secret of Sergeant Champe’s
coming, and surely we might confide in him our
poor secret.

“Save for the fact that it will cause your

mothers distress of mind, I see no good reason
A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE. 152

why you lads should be downcast,” the kindly
gentleman said in an encouraging tone after
our story had been told. “It is almost certain ~
the brother of that lad whom you made prisoner
will lay charges against you, since Benjamin
was probably last seen in your company; but
the time for the grand plot is so near at hand
that you may safely take part in it, and yet
have ample opportunity to make your escape.
More than that, in case the plot be successful,
then is the way plain for you to join the
American forces. If it fails, row up the river
as you did before, and I cannot see why you
should give yourselves any uneasiness concern:
ing the matter, save on behalf of your mothers.
Is Master Jacob Schuster one who will speak
the right word at the right time when he goes
to your homes ?”

“Under different circumstances I would say
he might, sir,” was my reply; “but now he is

grown so timorous, fearing lest the slight share
154 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

he has had in the plot may prove his undoing,
that I fear he will set the matter in such light
as to make it appear more serious than really is
the case.”

“That much at least may be remedied, and
at once. If it be your pleasure I will go to
your homes this night and do what I may
toward comforting those who are sorrowing
without great cause.”

There was nothing the gentleman could heve
said to give me greater pleasure than this, for
he had so heartened David and me that I knew
his visit would bring cheer to the widows who
were most likely by this time mourning the
loss of their only sons.

I would have been glad could he have set
out at once in order to arrive there before the
night should be well advanced; but we could.
not well ask him to sacrifice his supper in our
behalf, therefore were forced to content our-

selves until the proper time should come,
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 155

although it seemed as if the women folks in
Master Ledyard’s home were wonderfully slow
about their work.

Then it was that Master Baldwin told us
how it chanced he had been concerned in this
plot which was being carried out by Sergeant
Champe. |

He had made the acquaintance of Major
Henry Lee at a time when it was possible for
him to render signal service to the cause,
and thus proved himself a friend of the colo-
nies, therefore the major had first applied to
him, and afterward to David’s uncle.

“Tam surprised that Master Schuster should
grow so faint-hearted before there is any great
danger, considering the fact that he eagerly
snatched at the bait which was offered, and
while I accepted the same terms, it was not
wholly because of the money and property to
be received that I agreed to do what might be

within my power.”
156 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“Was Uncle Jacob to be paid for aiding
Sergeant Champe?” David asked in surprise,
and I was dumfounded to think that the man
who had claimed to be such a friend to the
cause should have agreed to take payment for
his services, however arduous they might
be.

“Ay, that he was, lad, for I repeated at
Major Lee’s request the same proposition which
was made me, and it is no secret. If the plot
succeeds each of us is to receive one hundred
guineas in lawful coin, five hundred acres of
land, and three negroes—not a small amount
for what service you say should be rendered
without thought of payment.”

“Tt is large, indeed !” David exclaimed, as if
bewildered by the magnitude of the amount.
“One hundred guineas, five hundred acres of
land, and three negroes! Why, Uncle Jacob
need not have begrudged us the shelter of his

wareroom a few hours.”
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 157

“True, lad, true; but Master Jacob Schuster
is a careful man, and when learning you had
run your noses into difficulty, or that it so
seemed, he immediately feared harm would
come to him through you. I venture to say at
‘the moment it was as if his house or his lands
were already being taken away from him in the
name of the king because of disloyalty. How-
ever, there is no reason why we should discuss
that now. Doubtless you are well satisfied with
the reward promised you?”

“There was no mention of such a thing, sir,”
I said sharply. “I question whether we had
been so hot to do the work if anything had
been promised.”

“But your portion was to be what I fancy
lads like you are most eager to have—rapid
promotion in the army so soon as you shall
have learned the trade of a soldier.”

“Who promised such a thing?” David asked
sharply.
158 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“Major Lee. I repeated his words to your
Uncle Jacob.”

“ But yet he made no mention of it to us.”

“Perhaps he wanted the better to prove your
loyalty.”

“ Perhaps he did,” David replied with a curl-
ing lip, and I knew there was in his mind
thoughts concerning Master Schuster like unto
those which I entertained; but we had no
opportunity just then for comparing notes,
because at that moment Master Ledyard
entered the room to say that our supper was
prepared.

Despite the fact that we were in danger of
losing our liberty, perhaps our lives—despite
the sorrow into which we knew our mothers
were plunged because of us, we thoroughly
enjoyed the meal in Master Ledyard’s home.

It was generous in quantity, cooked nearly as
well as if my mother had superintended it, and

of such variety that to David and me it seemed
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 159

even more of a feast than that which we had
enjoyed at the sign of the Black Horse.

While we were busy at the table, and the
master of the house kept us in countenance by
seeming to eat also, I am ashamed to confess
that there was little in my mind save the satis-
faction of the present moments, and even at this
date, after having sat at more bountifully spread
but not more hospitable boards, I look back on
that meal given in charity as one of the most
pleasant half-hours of my life.

When the supper was ended Master Baldwin
set forth on his errand of mercy, and David and
I went at once to the chamber which had been
prepared for us, since it was not safe, as we had
before been assured, to remain where the neigh-
bors might by chance have come upon us.

As has already been set down, our sleep on
the previous night was not prolonged, and
during six-and-thirty hours we had had such

exercise and passed through such experiences as
160 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

had fatigued us, consequently we fell asleep
even while saying to ourselves that we would
remain awake until Master Baldwin should
return.

Therefore, not until the sun had risen next
morning did we learn of the gentleman’s doings
in our behalf.

As we had supposed, he found our mothers
in great grief, both of them in my home, where
Mrs. Rhinelander had come for sympathy in her
trouble, and it was his opinion that Master
Schuster acted the part of one who bears evil
tidings, rather than a friend who would search
in his mind for words of consolation. ,

I can well fancy how cheered these two grief-
stricken widows were after Master Baldwin had
set forth the facts in the case, belittling the
danger and enlarging upon the advantages
which would be ours from enlisting at such a
time.

Certain it is he did not fail to set great stress
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 161

upon the probability that we ourselves might, a
few months later, if checked now, insist upon
entering the army, when the opportunities for
advancement would be far less than if we went
hot-foot from this plot which had been con-
ceived by the commander-in-chief.

In short, Master Baldwin assured us, and I
had no question as to the truth of the statement,
that he had left our mothers in a reasonably
cheerful frame of mind, and he repeated to us
their parting words, for it was decided we should
not return home before leaving the city.

It can well be imagined how much more
comfortable in mind David and I were after
hearing this news, and the future now looked as
bright as it had dark.

It was decided that we should remain in this
place of refuge until after sunset, Master Bald-
win taking it upon himself to have speech with
Sergeant Champe before the day was come to

an end, when we would know if any change
162 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

was to be made in the proposed order of
events.

Then we were left alone, since even in the
hours of daylight it was not considered safe for
us to take the chances of being seen by any of
the neighbors, and until late in the afternoon
we saw no person, save when dinner was ~
brought in to us.

Then Master Baldwin appeared, and before
he so much as opened his mouth I knew he
brought unwelcome tidings.

I feared they were concerning my mother,
and never so much as thought of Jethro or Ben
Stork, for during the past twelve hours it had
been to me as if they never had an existence.

“You bring us bad news, Master Baldwin,”
I said as if unable to wait until it should be his
pleasure to speak.

“You have a keen eye, lad, if you can read it
in my face, for there is yet a doubt whether it

be bad, although it cannot be good. Ben
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 163

Stork has escaped from the camp near Dobb’s
Ferry.”

“ iscaped !” I exclaimed in dismay.

“Ay, lad. Last night at about eleven
o’clock it was learned that he had in some
way, whether by assistance from such of our
people as are traitorously inclined, or some one
on the outside, it is impossible to say, broken
jail, and so cleverly was it done that no trace
could be found of him.”

“Then we are undone indeed !” I exclaimed,
overwhelmed by the information, for once that
Tory cur reached New York he would lay be-
fore Sir Henry Clinton all he knew of our
being in communication with the American
Army, and the hue and cry must be raised
immediately afterward.

“T debated some time as to whether it would
be well to tell you this thing, lads,” Master
Baldwin said thoughtfully ; “but after giving
the matter due reflection I said to myself that
164 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

these boys are brave, and a brave man is best
armed when he knows all that awaits him. I
fail to see how the escape may affect you, since
it has already been agreed upon that you were
to join the army this night.”

“But we may be taken in custody even as
we leave the house,” I interrupted.

“T question if there be any danger of that,
since no one can know where you are, and the
only risk to be run is while crossing the city.
Surely to lads who are well acquainted here-
abouts that should be a reasonably simple
matter.”

“But one of us must go above the ropewalk
to get the boat, and Jethro Stork may, by
watching, have learned that we landed at that
point.”

“The same idea has come into my mind, and
been provided for. Because of the prisoner's
escape the plans for this night are changed
somewhat. I have brought a boat to the foot
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE 165

of Crown Street, where she is now made fast.
David has simply to get on board and keep her
afloat until our coming. It was proposed for
you to stand guard in the alley, where several
palings of the fence have been so far detached
that a slight blow will throw them off, while I
was to lay in wait with the sergeant to seize
the traitor. Now, however, the parts are to be
reversed ; you taking mine and I yours.”

“ Am I to aid in seizing General Arnold ?” I
cried in astonishment.

“ Are you afraid 2?” :

“ Not of what can come to me; but that I
may not be equal to the task.”

“T venture to say you will perform it as well
as I. If all goes as we hope, he must be taken
by surprise, and the sergeant should be able to
manage the matter alone, were it necessary.
Now, as has just been arranged, you two lads
will remain here until ten o'clock, when you

are to go to the foot of Crown Street, where
166 A TRAITORS ESCAPE.

David is to remain in the boat, and you,
Oliver, make your way to the garden in the
rear of the traitor’s lodgings. At that point
Sergeant Champe may be found. Do you
understand the plan fully ?”

I repeated the brief instructions to make
certain there was no mistake, and Master Bald-
win buttoned his coat around him as if to take
his departure.

“ Do you go so soon, sir?” David asked.

“There are many possibilities to be guarded
against, and it is well I be stirring.”

“Before going will you kindly tell us how
you learned that Ben Stork had made his
escape 2” |

“Tt was a simple matter. I have been in
communication with Major Lee for some time,
and instantly he learned that the prisoner was
missing a messenger started for my home that
I might bring you the news.”

“But you were not there, sir.”
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 167

“True; my wife, who is known to be a good
patriot, received the messenger in my stead,
and immediately visited New York as if to sell
chickens and eggs. Fortunately I met her on
Bowling Green, where she was staring about as
if struck with admiration of all she saw, and a
few words sufficed to put me in possession of
the facts. Now, lads, nothing remains for the
success of the plot but to guard against a possi-
ble failure. Remain here until the time set;
do not allow yourselves to dwell upon the
disagreeables which may happen, for such
thoughts only serve to dispirit you. Say that
we shall succeed; keep your courage up, and
when the hour arrives set forth full in the
belief that we shall ferry the arch traitor across
to the Jersey side this night.”

Then the good man took us each by the
hand, after which he went his way; but. despite
the advice he had given we could not prevent

ourselves from indulging in gloomy thoughts.
168 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

How we passed the hours from the time he
left us until Master Ledyard announced that
the clock was on the point of striking ten, I do
not know.

My mind was in such a whirl that I could
hardly have said whether a full day had not
been spent, so wearisomely did the moments
drag.

It was a blessed relief to know the time was
at last come when we should be at work, and
we sprang to our feet joyously.

During the tedious waiting we had decided
how we might best reach our posts of duty,
and this simple plan we hit upon:

We were to make our way from the corner
of Orange Street to the Boston Road. Then
through the negroes’ burying-ground, and from
there down the upper part of Broad Way until
we were come to Veseys Street, after which the
course would be along the water-front.

Leaving David in the boat, I was to make
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 169

my way as best I might to the rendezvous, and
here we were both convinced the greatest peril
threatened ; but it could not be avoided, and
must be met bravely.

It was a grewsome tramp through the bury-
ing-eround, and mayhap but for the many other
disagreeable matters in our minds, we might
have feared to venture among the graves, for it
was said more than one ghost had been seen in
that place.

Terrifying though the spectacle might be, I
felt then that we would be safer in the pres-
ence of a disembodied spirit than standing face
to face with Jethro Stork, and in that I believe
David was agreed.

However, we saw neither one nor the other,
and, thanks to the lateness of the hour and the
unfrequented streets through which we passed,
we. met no person until we were on Veseys
Street, when two drunken sailors lurched this

way or that on a course such as I was convinced
170 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

would speedily bring them into the arms of the
patrol.

On the water-front we were nearly as fortu-
nate. At all events, no person challenged our
right to be abroad, and we gained the boat
without mishap.

It was well she should be kept afloat in case
we were pursued after our work was done, or
had miscarried, and I aided David in pushing
off from the shore, after which, without. one
single word of farewell, for I could not trust
my voice to speak, I left him.

Now there was no longer opportunity for me
to skull around.

I was forced to take my chances, knowing full
well that the Storks, and most likely half a
dozen soldiers, were searching the city for
me.

As I figured it there was little to be gained,
and much risk run, in dodging from one corner

to another in the attempt to avoid passers-by
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 171

since he who saw me co-maneuvering might be
certain I was bent on mischief, and thus I
should find myself in difficulties when none
would have existed had I gone in a straight-
forward. fashion.

Hence it was, after leaving David I walked
boldly through the streets as if I wasone of the
king’s most loyal subjects’; but it may be set
down for a fact, however, that I did not court
companionship, and when I saw two or three
approaching, crossed to the other side of the
street, whenever it could be done secretly.

Many times I was forced to pass some citizen,
or a soldier clad in a red coat, and then my
heart literally stood still until [found it difficult
to breathe; but no mishap befell me, and I
gained the alley without having been recog-
nized, however many may have been searching
for me.

At that end of the passage nearest the water

I saw standing in the shadow a dark form, and
172 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

approaching it boldly was arrested by Sergeant
Champe’s hand on my shoulder.

“You are come in good time, lad. Where is
your comrade 2?”

“Tn the boat.”

“Then we may as well take our stations,”
and the sergeant spoke quietly, as if he had
been engaged in some simple duty rather than
that of attempting to steal from beneath the
very eyes of Sir Henry Clinton the traitor who
would have sold his country.

“ Where is Master Baldwin?” I ventured to
ask,

“ Somewhere abroad in the city; never fear
but that he will be here on time. Follow me,
and from this moment do not so much as
speak.”

The sergeant led the way up the alley until
we were come to that portion of the fence where
the palings had been partially removed, and

after taking one off we crawled through, he
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 173

replacing the board once we were on the other
side.

As proof that he had made good use of his
time, my companion went through the garden
with the air of one who knows exactly the
point he wishes to gain, and forced his way into
the midst of a clump of shrubs which grew
midway from the house to the lower end of the
inclosure.

Here he crouched upon the ground, motion.
ing for me to do the same, and then there
was nothing for us but to wait until the rene-
gade should appear, as he had done every night

since arriving in New York.
174 A TRAITOR’'S ESCAPE.

CHAPTER VIII.
FLIGHT.

Never, either before nor since, have I spent
two such long, fearsome hours as on that night
of the 5th of November when we crouched
amid the shrubbery straining our ears to catch
the lightest sound as we awaited the coming of
the arch traitor, and thinking of what would be
our fate if he should succeed in alarming the
guard while we were trying to make him pris-
oner.

‘Once when I would have whispered to Ser-
geant Champe, he pressed his hand over my
mouth in token that I must remain silent, and
as the moments wore on, bringing no change in
the situation, it seemed as if I must ery aloud,

So grievous was the tension upon my nerves.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 175

Finally we heard footsteps in the alley just
outside the garden, and when, from the sound,
we knew they had passed and re-passed. several
times that portion of the fence where the palings
~ had been loosened, we understood that Master
Baldwin had begun his portion of the task
which, at that moment, seemed to me could lead
nowhere else than the gallows.

From our hiding-place I could see indistinctly
the windows in the rear of the house, and those
I watched, believing we should see the reflection
of a light when the traitor returned from hob-
nobbing with the Britishers, as it was said he
did nightly, although it was common gossip in
the city that there were many wearing the
king’s uniform who refused to sit at the same
table with one who had sold his honor for gold
and a commission.

IT noted the fact that Sergeant Champe also
looked from time to time at the windows, and I

believed he too was watching for the light as
176 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

a token that the time for action was nigh at
hand.

Now and then in the distance we heard the
measured tread of men which told that the
patrol was passing; but save for that a most
distressing silence reigned, and I would have
sacrificed much of safety could I have broken
that fearsome stillness.

My legs became cramped with remaining in
one position, but only when I could endure the
pain no more did I venture to move ever so
slightly, while as for the sergeant, I question if
he so much as lifted a finger during two of the
longest hours that can well be imagined.

Although the seconds passed so slowly, I was
surprised almost into an exclamation, when by
the ery of the watch we knew the hour of mid-
night was at hand.

It had been believed that by this time the
work would be finished, and yet there was














































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A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 177

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nothing to betoken that the traitor had returned
to his lodgings.

From the rustling of the dry leaves I believed
my companion was trembling violently, and I
stretched out my hand to touch him.

He was crying!

Inever would have believed so determined
and soldierly a man could give way to tears
had I not felt them on my hand, and now I un-
derstand it was vexation and disappointment,
rather than grief, which caused such a display
of weakness.

When the first flush of surprise had passed
away I began to realize that he believed some
unlucky chance was to prevent the accomplish-
ment of the design, and regardless of possible
noise I moved four or five paces toward the
house to make certain there were no signs of life
to be seen from the windows.

All was gloom and silence as if I stood

before an uninhabited dwelling.
178 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

Returning to the sergeant’s side I motioned
toward the building,and he shook his head sadly.

It was much as if he said he no longer even
hoped we might be successful.

He yet remained motionless, save when now
and then a stifled sob shook his body, and I
mentally counted each sixty seconds that I
might have some idea of the passage of time,
but soon lost my reckoning when I got well
into the thousands.

The watch had not yet called the hour of
one when we heard the scuffling of feet on the
alley just outside the garden fence, and Ser-
geant Champe understood that Master Baldwin
was trying to attract his attention.

I made no effort toward leaving the hiding-
place when my companion rose cautiously to
his feet, believing I was to remain there while
he spoke with Master Baldwin, but the pres-
sure of his hand on my arm told that I was

expected to follow.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 179

At this hour of the night there was little
danger of our attracting the attention of
enemies, save from the building, and we went
toward the fence at a reasonably rapid pace.

Master Baldwin was near the palings, his
face turned toward Broad Way that he might
not be taken by surprise from that direction,
and Sergeant Champe presented himself boldly
at the opening in the fence through which we
had entered.

“Tt is useless to remain here longer to-night,”
he said in a whisper, and Master Baldwin
replied :

“Something has prevented him from returning
home, else he would have been here before this.”

“We will hope for better fortune to-morrow
night. The boys must not remain in the city,
‘and it is for you to see that they have a safe
hiding-place.”

“I know of one which will serve their pur-

pose, but it is on the opposite shore.”
180 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“ee that they are taken to it, and manage
to speak with me during the forenoon, even
though you are forced to come to the barracks.
We cannot afford to lose another opportunity,
for the legion is to be sent away very soon.”

Master Baldwin nodded; the sergeant clasped
- my hand ‘warmly after he came through the
fence, and then we separated, he going toward
Broad Way, while Master Baldwin and I went
where David was in waiting,

I could well fancy how nervous the lad was
by this time, for the hours must have seemed
as long to him as they had to me, and I urged
my companion to his best pace in order that
David’s suspense might be the sooner ended.

We saw no person on the streets. It was as
if we walked through a deserted city; but yet
we dared not speak regarding that matter
which was nearest our hearts lest an enemy be
in hiding among the shadows.

David was on the alert, as I knew he would
A TRAITORS ESCAPE. 181

be even though we had been away four-and-
twenty hours instead of three, and I could
guess much of what was in his mind when a
dry sob choked his voice as he would have
asked why we came alone.

“There is nothing to be done this night,”
Master Baldwin said, as he stepped into the
boat and took the oars from the lad’s hands,
and until he had rowed a long distance from
the shore neither of us three so much as
whispered.

Then I explained to my comrade that the
traitor had failed to come into the garden for
the first time since his arrival in the city, and
added in conclusion, to give him heart :

“He will surely be there to-morrow night,
and so that our purpose is finally accomplished,
we can well afford to give him a little more of
our time.”

“But what of ourselves? Close watch will

doubtless have been set for us by that time.”
182 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“You shall go to an old hiding-place of
mine, and remain till I come for you after dark
to-morrow,” Master Baldwin said. “I can an-
swer for your safety there, and when you ven-
ture into the city again it will be so late in the:
night there is little chance of your being recog-
nized, for the Storks cannot remain upon the
streets constantly. We shall surely succeed in
our work on the second attempt.”

“T had prayed it might be finished this
night,” David said tremulously, and I under-
stood how great had been the strain upon him
as he sat in the boat all that while, starting at
every sound, even as I had done in the garden.

From that moment we held no converse until.
after having gained the opposite shore and
hauled the boat up amid the bushes.

“Now keep close at my heels, lads, and I’ll
lead you to a hut which might contain more to
make men comfortable; but could not afford a

safer hiding-place.”
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 183

Perhaps we walked straight back from the
river, as it seemed to me in the darkness, dur-
ing nearly half an hour, and then the journey
was come to an end.

We were arrived at a log hut in the thicket,
built as stoutly as a fort, and into this Master
Baldwin led the way.

As soon as might be a blaze was kindled in
a fireplace formed of clay, and grateful indeed
was the warmth, for the night was biting cold,
although until now we had given such fact but
little thought because of our anxiety of mind.

Two benches and a rough table made of
hewn boards comprised all the furnishings ;
but we were not distressed because of this.

The knowledge that we were safe from those
whom Jethro or Ben Stork might send in pur.
suit of us was more gratifying than the great-
est luxuries could possibly have been.

From a cunningly-contrived cupboard behind

the fireplace Master Baldwin drew forth some
184 A TRAITOR'’S ESCAPE.

dried beef and salt fish, and from such thirst
inspiring food we made a hearty meal as we
talked freely concerning the disappointments
of the night.

Tn less than half an hour from the time we
arrived all three of us were stretched at full
length on the floor with our feet toward the
fire, and I was hardly more than in this posi-
tion before my eyes were closed in slumber,
only to be opened next morning when Master
Baldwin shook me by the shoulder.

“The moment has come when I must set
forth for the city,” he said, speaking hurriedly
like one in great haste. “You two are to
remain here without so much as venturing out
of doors until I return, no matter how long I
may be absent. The keg is filled with water;
you know where is stored the supply of food,
and it only remains to be patient, otherwise the
hours will seem doubly long.”

Then he was gone, and I said to myself that
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 185

if we were to stay there in hiding it would be
wise to spend all the time we could in sleep,
therefore I rolled over with the hope of finding
a softer spot as I closed my eyes again.

Additional repose was denied me, however,
for having once been aroused my mind went
‘instantly to the work which remained to be
done, and slumber fled very far from my eye-
lids.

“Tf you can sleep any more you have a
stouter heart than I,” David said grimly, as he
arose to his feet and began pacing to and fro.
“The wonder in my mind is how I could
have lost consciousness when we lay down
here.” s

Then we fell to talking of what had hap-
pened during the past four-and-twenty hours,
he telling me of his fears as he sat in the boat
awaiting our coming and expecting each instant
to hear those sounds which would tell that we

had been discovered and were pursued, and I
186 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

depicting my sensations as we crouched amid
the shrubbery in the garden waiting for the
coming of the traitor.

During this long day we ate whenever our
stomachs craved the oversalt food; talked
much of thé past, and speculated long regard-
ing the future when we should be members of
the Continental Army, for of course we under- ;
stood full well that we eould not return to our —
homes again until after the redcoats had been
driven out of New York.

It was not yet dark when we were-startled
by the sound of footsteps approaching the hut,
and I seized a billet of firewood with which to
defend myself, for I fully expected the enemy
had tracked us to this place, but the poor
weapon was suddenly dropped when, the door
opening, Master Baldwin appeared.

One glance at his face and I understood that
evil fortune had befallen us.

For the instant I believed Sergeant Champe’s


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SELF.

My
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 187

purpose had been discovered, and he put under
arrest, which caused me to cry:

“How could they have suspected him ?”

“Suspected whom, my lad ?” Master Baldwin
asked in a tone of exceeding sadness.

“The sergeant. Is he in prison ”

“No; but there is no longer any hope we
can make a prisoner of the traitor.”

“What?” David and I cried in concert,

“The time for the legion of deserters to
embark was nearer at hand than we supposed.
It is possible something has occurred in the
south to render it necessary that exceedingly
honorable body of men be sent forward at once,
or that Arnold fears they may desert again if
he allows them to remain too long in the city.”

“ Are they to leave soon ?” I cried, impatient
because Master Baldwin was so long in telling

what should have been a short story.
“ Arnold did not return to his quarters last

night because he slept on board the transport
188 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE:

which is to carry the legion southward, and he
will not lodge there again for many months, if
ever.”

“But Sergeant Champe?”’ I cried yet more
impatiently.

“T went to seek him this morning after learn-
ing what was being done. His orders were that
I present myself at the barracks, if I failed to
see him on the street, and there I went.. The
sergeant was among those sent aboard the
transport shortly before sunrise this morning.”

“Why, there is danger he may be obliged to
sail with them!” I cried in horror, as I pictured
to myself one who loved the cause forced to
take his place in the ranks of the Britishers.

“ May be obliged! Lads, he has already
gone! The transport sailed at one o'clock. this
afternoon, and. the Virginian must now serve
the king, or acknowledge that which cannot fail
of taking him directly to the gallows.”

There was so much of evil fortune in Master
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 189

Baldwin’s disconnected story that some mo.
ments elapsed before I could fully understand
all which had come upon us, and then I saw the
picture.

The traitor escaped from us, who could have
trapped him so readily, by the merest chance,
and the brave youth from Virginia, wearing the
uniform he hated, receiving orders from that
man above all others in these united colonies to
be most despised !

It was indeed a sorry ending to the adventure,
and for the moment I believed fate would have
been more kindly to the gallant sergeant had
it brought him speedy death.

Master Baldwin was not disposed to give
us overmuch time in which to dwell upon the
matter, however.

“You lads are, of all those connected with the
plot, in the greatest danger, although I can
understand full well how desperate is the ser-

geant’s position. The boy you took prisoner
190 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

- has returned to the city; his story, added to and
embellished until you would hardly recognize it,
is in the mouths of all the gossips, and a reward
of five pounds is offered for the capture of each.
I doubt not but that this side of the river will
speedily be searched, for the promise of ten
pounds will make of many a man who has pro.
fessed to love the cause, a loyal subject to his
majesty, and you must be on your way toward
our lines within an hour.”

“Did you see Master Schuster?” I asked,
failing for the moment to realize fully the
danger which menaced us.

“Ay; but he was too much alarmed to
venture on speech with me. Never before have
I seen a man so thoroughly frightened, and I
dare wager he would deny ever having seen
either of us three, if the question was put to him
by one wearing a red coat.”

“T suppose his cowardice is so great that he

will not so much as think of going to my mother,”
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 191

David said bitterly, and his eyes grew moist as he
understood that there was no longer the slightest
chance he could see his best friend until after
many months—perhaps years—had passed.

“The same thought was in my mind, and I
went to your homes that there might be no
more anxiety in that quarter than is absolutely
necessary. Both the good women believe your
escape is the same as accomplished, and I will an-
swer for it their hearts are not so heavy as yours.”

“The sadness in my heart is not wholly be-
cause I must flee,” I replied quickly. “It
grieves me that the plot has failed signally;
but most of all because Sergeant Champe is in
such sore straits.”

“Jt is best to think of nothing save what
lays before you,” Master Baldwin said kindly,
and then he began explaining how we had best
proceed in order to gain Major Lee’s camp.

I do not think he gave this advice because he

thought it necessary, but rather to hearten us
192 A TRAITORS ESCAPE.

by leading our thoughts to the future, and in
this last he succeeded.

When the moment had come he conducted
us to the water’s edge, where was concealed his
boat, and promising to visit the camp before a
month passed, actually pushed us into the cratt.

Hugging the Jersey shore closely, that we
might have an opportunity of taking to our
heels in case of pursuit, we rowed as when that
villainous cur, Ben Stork, had been an unwilling
prisoner aboard, watching closely meanwhile, as
may well be imagined, for any sign which might
give token that we were being pursued.

To my mind there was little cause for fear.

I could not believe that Jethro Stork or his
precious brother Ben would have any suspicion
we had passed nearly twenty hours on the
New Jersey shore; but fancied they were at
that very moment watching intently every craft
which put out from New York, in the hope of

intercepting us.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 193

Because of this unfounded, and perhaps un-
reasonable, belief, I was not as cautious as
should have been a lad whose life was in the
greatest peril.

To me, at the time, it was as if we had
escaped all danger, and that there remained for
us no more than to row so far as the encamp-
ment of Major Lee’s Legion, when we could
snap our fingers at the Stork family.

Davi'ds mind was concerned with little else
save our future, and as he pulled vigorously at
the oar the dear lad talked regarding that time
when we, wearing the Continental uniform,
would do for our country something more than
spy around New York to gather such poor in-
formation as might come our way.

Thus it was that instead of keeping sharpest
watch, at the very hour when we should have
been most keenly on the alert our minds
wandered from what should have been the one
important duty.
194 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

Perhaps five minutes had passed without my
having searched with my eyes the river as well
as was possible in the gloom of the fast-coming
night, when suddenly the sound of oars brought
me to a realization of what should ever have
been present in my thoughts.

David heard it almost at the same instant,
and whispered :

“Whoever may be in that on-coming craft
must already have heard the sound of oars, for
we have been exceedingly careless.”

“Pull for the shore. We will take our
chances on land rather than the water.”

The skiff was headed for the Jersey side of
the river as soon as might be thereafter, and,
rowing cautiously now, since all the mischief
had been done, we pulled at our best speed,
which was far inferior to that of the other craft,
while we knew beyond a peradventure that
these newcomers were in pursuit.

It needed not the fragments of conversation
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 195

which we overheard just before reaching the
shore, to tell us who was so close at hand.

“They can be none other than the traitorous
rebels, and if we are so minded neither of them
shall escape.”

It was Ben Stork who said this, as I well
knew from the tone of his voice, and his brother
Jethro replied :

“ Have no fear, lad, that they can give us the
slip. Stand ready to shoot instantly you have
a fair target, for it matters little whether we
take them dead or alive—the reward of ten
pounds holds good in either case.”

Now I realized fully to what extremities our
carelessness had led us, for it seemed more
than likely they could so far gain in the chase
as to be able to bring one or both of us down
with a bullet, and for the moment my heart
was as lead, heavy in my breast, for I believed

that indeed was the end near at hand.
196 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

CHAPTER IX.
CAPTURED.

From the time I became convinced our cap-
ture was certain, until David and I leaped
ashore, no more than forty seconds had elapsed.

The two Storks, thinking rather of the ten
pounds which had been offered as reward for
our capture than that they might be benefiting
the king, or wreaking a private vengeance, were
so near the landing when I sprang from the
boat as to appear no more than fifty yards
away, and it needed not the sight of Benjamin
rising to his feet suddenly with a musket in his
hands, to tell me that I could not too soon get
under cover.

“Have a care to yourself, David,” I said

sharply, as we two ran with all speed toward
A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE. 197

the thicket which bordered this side of the ~

river. “Have a care to yourself, for the Tory
cur is about to fire !”

‘The words had no sooner been spoken than
the report of a musket rang out, and I heard
the hissing of the bullet as it cut its way
through the foliage nearer my head than was
agreeable.

The night was so nearly come that the dark-
ness sheltered us once we were within the
thicket, and had it been possible for us to
have run at full speed without making any
noise whatsoever, then might we readily have
given our pursuers the slip.

Unfortunately, however, as we floundered on
in the darkness, making twice as much of a dis-
turbance as if we had been thoroughly ac-
quainted with the way, the enemy could follow
us readily, and our only hope lay in outstrip-
ping the Tories in the flight.

There was no longer any reason to fear they
198 A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE.

might attempt to shoot us down, because we
were completely screened from view, and thus
was the fear of a sudden death taken from us
for the time being.

“Come to a standstill, or I'll fire!” Jethro
cried, after having followed us perhaps a couple
of hundred yards.

There was no reason why I should waste
breath in replying to this demand, unless it
might be to let him know I was not a fool who
could be thus frightened; but he who is
pursued plays a simple part when he spends
his wind in vain, and I held my peace.

How long we two ran in silence, one at the
other’s heels, I cannot say of a surety; but it
seemed to me it was hardly more than five min-
utes since we left the boat when David began
to slacken pace somewhat, and I urged him for-
ward in whispers :

“T cannot do it, Oliver,” he replied, speaking
with difficulty because of his labored breathing.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 199

“T am nearly blown already. Do you keep on,
and let them make a prisoner of me. Thus
your escape will be insured. My capture is
certain.”

“Do you believe I would leave a comrade
behind in the enemy’s hands ?” I asked sharply,
hurt because David had judged me so
meanly.

“But if it is possible for you to escape, and I
am out of the race, why give them two prisoners
when one will suffice?”

“ Because I do not choose to have it laid at
my door that I deserted a friend. Run as far
as you can, and then we will measure strength
with them.”

I spoke hopefully at this time to cheer my
friend; but knew only too well that it was a
foolish speech.

These two Storks were armed, and would
perhaps be better pleased at carrying us back
to New York dead than alive, therefore when
200 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

the instant. came that David must halt we were
the same as prisoners.

There was time, perhaps, for me to have
counted twenty before the dear lad, almost at
the verge of exhaustion, tripped over a haif-
decayed log and fell heavily, remaining motion-
less as if death had come to spare him further
suffering. |

It was only by catching at the nearest tree
that I prevented myself from falling headlong
across his body, and then as soon as possible I
leaned over him, fearing the poor lad had re-
ceived dangerous injury.

“ How is it with you?” I asked anxiously, and
he replied as well as he might because of his
thick, rapid breathing:

“Tam at the end of my rope. Leave me—
save yourself.” .

Here in the thicket it was so dark one could
not see an object at the distance of half a dozen

paces away, and I crept around blindly for
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 201

something which would serve as a weapon, but
not finding so much as a stout stick.

From the rear, that is to say in that direc-
tion where ran the river, could be heard the
two Storks as they floundered on through the
underbrush, and instantly there came into my
mind the hope that now we were still they
might perchance pass us in the gloom, and thus
we have an opportunity of doubling back on
them.

There was no such good fortune in store for
us as that these traitorous curs should miss
their prey, and the two were not more than
half a dozen yards from me when I heard
Jethro say as he came to a standstill :

“Look out for yourself, Benjamin. The
rebels have halted hereabout, and we must not
miss them in the darkness. Be ready to shoot,
and take care of your aim, for there is no reason

why we should run any risks.”
I believe my conscience never would have
202 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

troubled me in-the future if, it being possible,
I had killed that Tory where he stood.

He was speaking of David and I much as he
might a couple of foxes who, being run down,
had best be shot dead than that the hunter
take the chances of receiving a scratch.

I literally held my breath, hoping even now
they might pass us by, and having decided in
my own mind that it would be worse than
folly, unarmed as we were, to attempt any
resistance when they demanded our surrender.

There was no need to warn David of what I
hoped to do, for he still remained where he
had fallen, his face pressed among the de-
caying leaves until the noise of his heavy
breathing was stifled.

The Tories came, of course by chance,
directly toward us, and had my comrade been
on his feet I believe of a verity we might have
stepped aside and so let them pass.

As it was, however, such a plan could not
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 203

have been carried into effect save at the expense
of too much noise, and I was forced to stand
still until Jethro Stork had advanced within
three or four paces, the muzzle of his musket
hardly more than that many inches distant from
my chest.

Then suddenly he saw me, and cried in a
loud voice: ;

“Surrender, you rebel, or Pll shoot you as I
would a cur !”

“When an unarmed man is directly in front
of a loaded weapon without means of defense,
it would seem as if there was no need
of demanding his surrender,” I replied with
a laugh which had in it very little of
mirth.

“Do you yield 2” he cried.

“T see no other course. If there was half a
show of succeeding in case of making a resist-
ance, you may be sure I would not be thus
humble.”
204 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“Have done with so much talk! Where is
the other rebel ?”

“Find him if you count on gaining the
reward; but do not think I am to search at
your bidding.”

By this time Ben had stumbled across

David’s body and come nigh to falling, where-
upon he clubbed his musket viciously. For a
moment I felt certain it was his purpose to
brain my comrade, as indeed he might have
done without fearing to be punished therefor,
because we were the same as outlaws.
- “His death will be on your head if you
strike, Ben Stork!” I cried. “There has been
no resistance made by either of us, and should
you take our lives it will be none other than
a cold-blooded murder !”

“You choose rather to go back and be
hanged, do you?” the villainous cur asked, with
a laugh that strongly tempted me to try conclu-

sions with him, even though the odds were so
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 205

absolutely against me. “I have no desire to do
the king’s butchering, but a few days later can
sit at my leisure and see the executioner stretch
his neck.”

Then Ben lowered his musket and kicked
David viciously, ordering him to stand up.

While my comrade obeyed, Jethro Stork,
lowering his weapon, stepped forward, com-
manding me to hold up my hands, after which
he proceeded to search my garments as if
believing I had weapons concealed.

Having satisfied himself on this score he
took from his pocket a piece of stout hempen
cord, and with it tied my wrists together,
drawing the bonds so tightly as to cause me no
slight amount of pain.

While this was being done Ben followed his
brother’s example in the treatment of David,
and the two of us were soon tied together in
such a fashion that we could not have made

much progress toward escape even had our
206 A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE.

Tory captors given us free permission ta
run.

At the moment we were thus helpless all
hope deserted me, and I could see in my mind’s
eye, at not such a very long distance in the
future, the outlines of the gallows on which
David and I would be hanged, or a squad of
soldiers who were to put us to death in a more
humane fashion.

That there were many days of life yet
remaining to us I did not believe.

The Storks would, so I argued, deliver us up
to the Britishers in New York before midnight.
We should be tried within forty-eight hours,
most likely, for aiding and abetting the so-
called rebels, and both of us well knew the
penalty. :

All this was in my mind on the supposition
that we would be taken directly to the city, in
order that the Tories might handle the promised

reward as soon as possible.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 207

Therefore it was that I felt a certain amount
of surprise, which came near to verging into
hope, when Ben said:

“T have no stomach for pulling across the
river to-night with these rebels. They must
have friends on the shore below here, where
they remained hidden yesterday ; and who shall
say that our movements were not observed
when we landed for the chase?

“These two have not so many friends here-
about that we can be bested, armed as we
are,” Jethro said, with a certain display of care-
lessness, yet I knew that in his cowardly heart

he was giving no slight weight to his brother's
suggestion.

“We might not be bested,” Ber hastened. to
add; “but there is a chance our prisoners could
be taken from us, and it would make me sore
to lose the ten pounds which are now so near
our pockets.”

“By all of which you mean—to do what?”
208 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

“Stay where we are until daybreak. After
the sun has risen I venture to say there are no
rebels hereabout who would dare make an
attack upon us once we were in our boat.”

Jethro threw himself upon the ground as if
to consider the matter more at his leisure, and
David pressed my hands, which were nigh to
his because of the cord, much as if he would
say that there was yet good reason for hope.

How it might be that we, fettered and un-
armed, should get the best of these two Tories
I had not so much as the ghost of an idea, but
it was in my mind that if they delayed return-
ing to New York it was not impossible we
could free ourselves.

Jethro, who ordinarily would not have
stopped to argue with his younger brother,
now invited Ben to state in more detail why
he considered it imprudent to venture on the
river after nightfall, and thus the two showed

their cowardice.
‘A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 209

For my part I did not believe there were
any friends of ours who could aid us at this
time in case the Tories went directly back to
the city.

I fancied it would be safer for them to do
so, if indeed there was anything like danger
attached to their side of the enterprise, in the
night rather than the day, and as the matter
turned, it was proven to me of how little value
my own judgment might be.

When Ben had come to an end of explaining
that we must have friends nearabout, because
of the fact that we had remained hidden cer-
tainly during the day just passed, Jethro pro-
fessed to be satisfied with the reasoning and
consented, as if in thus acting he was confer-
ring a favor upon his brother, to remain in the
thicket until sunrise.

Even this precaution was not all the coward
Ben desired.

He feared some one might have followed on
210 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

his trail, after having seen us land, and was
even now coming through the thicket.

In order to throw a possible pursuer off the
scent, he suggested that we be taken a quarter
of a mile or more further up-stream, where
perchance a better camping-place might be
found.

To this Jethro also agreed, and we were
ordered to march forward as best we might
while standing face to face, our four wrists
pinioned together, while the valiant Tories,
their weapons ready for instant use, followed
close in our wake.

As may be supposed, we could not walk
rapidly, David and I, and after ten minutes of
awkward movement, during which time I be-
lieved we had not gained two hundred yards in
distance, Ben called a halt, saying to his brother
that the spot where we then were afforded a
fairly comfortable place for a camp.

We were in a depression of the land sheltered
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 211

from the wind, and amid a thicket of spruce
trees which would provide material for a bed,
were one at liberty to make use of it.

David and I were ordered to sit down, one
either side a small sapling, to which our fettered
hands were tied securely.

The only comfort to be found in the situation
for us was that we might hold converse together
in whispers, and could stretch our legs now and
then, although there was good reason to believe
our arms would be cramped before the morning
sun gave these cowards sufficient heart to ven- -
ture on the journey across the river.

I have said that hope came to me when the
curs who had so nearly earned the ten pounds
reward proposed to remain on that side all
night; but after thus learning how they in-
tended to guard against our escape I gave way
once more to despair.

The two Storks threw themselves down

on the ground half a dozen feet in front of
212 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

us, and Ben took from his coat pocket a
supply of food, which showed that they had set
out in pursuit of us believing the chase would
be a long one.

Now they could regale themselves at their
leisure, and I venture to say both had all the
more pleasure in this meal because of the belief
that they were tantalizing us by eating when
it might well be supposed we were hungry.

David pressed his hands against mine now
and then as if to hearten me, and I clasped his
fingers as best I might to let him think I had
not yielded to despair, although the shadow of
the scaffold was hanging heavily upon me.

We made no attempt to speak one with the
other, lest the Tories should check us, and I
was not minded to give them even that pitiful
satisfaction.

After perhaps no more than half an hour,
although it seemed to me fully a third of the
right must have been spent, Ben Stork gave
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 213

himself up to slumber while his brother acted
the part of sentinel.

Then, in time, lulled by the silence, which
was profound save for the soughing of the
gentle wind through the trees, Jethro’s heavy
breathing told that he had also had so far for-
gotten his duty as to yield to the influences of
the night.

“Ts there no way we may best them even
now?” David whispered cautiously, bending
forward that he might speak directly in my
ear, and I replied, striving to prevent the sorrow
in my heart from being apparent in the words :

“JT know not what we can do, fettered as we
are, A dozen times have I tried to work my
fingers so far as to undo the knots of this cord;
but all in vain. Unless you have greater
freedom we must remain prisoners until it shall
please these curs to give up to the Britishers.”

“The rope is drawn so tightly that my

fingers are numb, and even if a


214 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

He ceased speaking very suddenly, for at that
instant we both heard.what sounded like the
breaking of dry twigs under a heavy weight, and
I believed there were wild beasts prowling
around, even though it did not seem probable
any such had their lairs near by.

We listened intently while one might have
counted ten, the blood bounding in our veins
until it seemed as if the pulsations of our hearts
must waken the Tories, and then there was no
question but that a man or an animal was
stealthily approaching.

David showed himself to be quicker-witted
than I, for he instantly suspected the truth of
the situation, and leaning forward whispered
eagerly in my ear:

“Tt is Master Baldwin! He saw the pursuit
on the water, and has followed that he may do
us a good turn.”

“Tt could not have been that he watched our

boat so long,” I replied, refusing to believe such
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 215

good news because at the time it seemed improb-
able.

Yet even as I denied the correctness of my
comrade’s statement all fear’ of wild beasts
was gone from me, and I listened intently
to trace in the sounds of what was now a
regular approach something which should
betoken that they were caused by a human
being.

“Tt must be him,” David repeated, as if to
stimulate his own courage. “It must be him,
and we are saved !”

Even though my comrade was in the right,
we were not safe unless perchance Master
Baldwin was armed ; but the fact that he might
be near gave me such cheer as I never expect to
experience again.

Then came an instant when I was startled,
although almost expecting it, by the pressure of
a hand on my shoulder, and turning as nearly

as I might while held in position by the rope, I
216 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

saw a dark mass against the foliage which told
me a friend was near at hand.

“Tt is I—Baldwin,” came a whisper as gentle
as the breathing of the night wind. “Where
are the Tories ?”

“Directly in front of us, asleep,” David re-
plied cautiously.

“ How are they armed ?”

“Both have muskets, and had as soon kill us
as to take us into the city alive, the reward
being the same.”

“How are you fettered 2”

I explained in a few words, when he, first
passing his hand over the rope to make certain
of its position, drew across the strands the keen
edge of a knife, and we were free so far as

concerned our limbs.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 217

CHAPTER X.
TURNING THE TABLES.

Wirnovut being told, I knew that Master
Baldwin was unarmed save for the knife with
which he had severed our bonds, otherwise, so I
judged, he would have approached with more
boldness, for from what he had already shown
of himself I knew he was by no means a tim-
_ orous man.

After cutting the rope he stepped back into
the thicket as if of the mind that we should
follow him, and I understood that it was his
purpose we slip away from our captors rather
than make any attempt at disarming them.

Neither David nor I were minded to go

away thus, leaving those scoundrelly Tories be-
218 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

hind to follow on our trail so soon as they
were awakened, and by our hesitation it was
much as though each gave words to the same
thought.

Now that we were free to move as we
pleased it did not seem either a dangerous or a
difficult task to creep upon our late captors,
and should this be done successfully the work
of disarming them would be comparatively
light.

On the contrary, if they awakened while we
were making the attempt, I argued with my-
self that we were but little worse off, since
coming from out the heavy slumber suddenly
they would be confused, and we might take
leave of them at our will.

It was not with the idea of risking this
last chance that I halted to learn what scheme
David might propose.

There was no question in my mind as to the

possibility of doing as I desired, and it seemed
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 219

as if my comrade was of much the same opinion.

Because we hesitated to follow him Master
Baldwin advanced once more until he could lay
his hand upon my shoulder, and as he thus
clutched me it was much the same as though
he had asked why we delayed.

I pointed toward the sleepers, trusting he
would understand the gesture by the sense of
hearing, since the night was now come so dark
that his eyes were of but little avail, and I was
not mistaken.

He increased the pressure upon my shoulder,
thus giving me to understand he disapproved of
the plan; but there was in my mind the thought
that it were better to take a few chances here
while the Tories were asleep than run the dan-
ger of being pursued before we had well gotten
away, for however timorous these two Storks
might be, that reward of ten pounds would go
far toward screwing up their courage.

There was no need David Rhinelander and I
220 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

should exchange a single word so far as under:
standing each other was concerned.

He knew exactly what I proposed to do, for
there could be but one reason for thus turning
back when we might have made good our
escape, and he stood close by my side, awaiting
the signal.

I gave it by pressing his hand, and together
we stole forward, without heed to what Master
Baldwin might do.

If either Jethro or Ben Stork had been versed
in woodcraft we could not have crept up on
them as we did, for he who has spent much
time in the forest learns to sleep lightly, and
instinctively wakens at the slightest unusual
noise.

As we advanced more than once did a twig
break under our feet, for we were, as you might
say, moving at random since it was impossible
to see anything before us, and yet the heavy
breathing of the Tories continued undisturbed.
A TRAITORS ESCAPE. 221

Once we were come near to where I believed
they were, it was necessary to stoop and grope
around with our hands, lest we should actually
step upon them, and while thus engaged I came
upon the butt of a musket.

The weapon was most likely lying by the
side of its owner; yet I took the chances of
withdrawing it without changing my position,
determined to treat them, should they awaken,
even as they would have treated us, providing I
first succeeded in getting control of the musket.

It was like playing at a game of jack-straws
in the darkness, and although the odds were
desperately against the attempt, it went through
so admirably that the current of the sleeper’s
breathing was not changed.

Then I would have handed the weapon to
David, and tried the same method with the
second Tory, but that I soon understood the
dear lad was following my example.

To shorten an -over-long story, I had best
222 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

content myself by saying that in less than five
minutes from the time Master Baldwin severed
our bonds we were standing over the Stork
brothers, prepared for anything they might
attempt to do.

The tables had been turned most beauti-
fully, and instead of our being carried back to
New York that the villainous Tories might
finger ten pounds of the king’s gold, we would
give them a most urgent invitation to accom-
pany us to the encampment of Lee’s Legion.

However, there was possible danger to be
apprehended before our task was fully com-
pleted, for when we had aroused them in the
darkness it was not unlikely one or the other
might strike a cowardly blow with a knife, and
our joy be turned to mourning.

“Step over your man so you may clutch him
by the throat, and do not be afraid of putting
too heavy a pressure upon it,” I whispered

softly to David, and in another instant those


‘(STEP OVER YOUR MAN, 80 YOU MAY CLUTCH HIM BY THE
Trost,” I WHISPERED TO DAVID.—Page 222.
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 223

who had triumphed a few hours previous were
suddenly awakened to find themselves gasping
for breath.

“ At the first show of resistance I shall act as
you threatened us!” I cried in Jethro’s ear, for
he it was over whom I kneeled. “We have
taken possession of the muskets, and propose
to go in another direction than New York.” ~

As I spoke the sound of rapid footsteps from
the rear told that Master Baldwin, apprised of
our success, was coming forward to lend what-
ever aid might be in his power, and David
cried :

“ Have we nothing with which to truss them
up so that it may not be necessary to keep so
strong a hold upon the curs ?”

“You are choking me to death,” Ben gasped,
speaking only after the greatest difficulty, and
David replied, with a note of satisfaction in his
tones:

“Tt would give me solid pleasure to do so,
224 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

but that I might afterward be ashamed of
having killed such a wretch.”

“Here is what will serve to tie them,”
Master Baldwin said, as he crept around in the
darkness to learn how we were situated, and I
cried warningly :

“Be careful lest they strike with a knife,
although should such an attempt be made it
would be their last on this earth, for I am not
minded to treat these villains with any ap-
proach at kindness after our late experience
with them.”

So thoroughly frightened was the cowardly
Jethro that he made no effort even to speak, and
dexterously did Master Baldwin tie his hands,
using, as I afterward learned, the fragments of
cord which had been severed from our wrists.

I have taken longer in the telling than was
really required to render these Tories helpless,
and when it had been done David and I rose

to our feet with a sense of deepest relief.
A TRAITOR'S ESCAPE. 225

Now we were free, indeed, and what was
more, would carry to Major Lee two prisoners
who might possibly be made to serve as barter
for some of our unfortunate friends who were
confined in the prison ships.

“Will you go back to the hut?’ Master
Baldwin asked, and I replied promptly, having
decided in my own mind what we should do
unless it so chanced my comrade was opposed
to the plan:

“We'll push on to the river. I am not afraid
to venture forth in the night, and would be at
at the American camp as soon as may be
possible.”

David was of the same opinion, and gave
token of it by ordering Ben to rise.

“Are you going to carry me, who have never
done you any wrong, to that wretched place
again?” young Stork asked in a quavering
voice, and David replied with a laugh:

“Your memory is treacherous when you
226 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

speak of never having done us a wrong, for not
more than an hour ago you proposed to shoot
us down in cold blood. The best we could
have hoped from you was to have been con-
ducted to the scaffold. I shall not hold out
any such promises as that, but this I vouch for
right heartily: There won’t be a second turn-
ing of the tables this night, and you may not
find escape as easy when you make a second
attempt.”

Now that his brother had spoken Jethro
found his tongue, and he cried pleadingly—I
believe the cowardly cur would have gotten on
his knees before me had he dared to make the
slightest movement:

“The threats we made were more in jest than.
earnest, and surely you will not take us prison-
ers to the American camp ?”

“The threats were so much a jest that already
in your mind had you fingered the ten pounds

reward,” I said, angered that he should prove
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 227

so arrant a coward, and then the fellow begged
and whimpered like a child, until I could have
struck him, prisoner though he was.

“ There is no reason why we should delay for
such converse as this,” Master Baldwin said im-
patiently. “These two were searching for you,
and unquestionably there are others of the same
kidney who would earn the reward by carrying
you to the gallows. Nothing is gained by loi-
tering, and much may be lost thereby. I can
lead the way to the river even though it be
dark, and the sooner you have set out on your
journey the better.”

I was of the same mind; and, after threaten-
ing Jethro with a blow if he did not cease his
whining, I was ready to follow the guide.

Master Baldwin went as straight through the
thicket as if it had been broad day, bringing us
out within fifty yards of where the two boats
had been beached.

Once clear of the foliage, the night was not
228 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

so dark but that we could make our way up the
river without difficulty ; and David took it upon
himself to embark the prisoners, while I held a
short conversation with the gentleman who had
proven himself such a devoted friend, beginning
it by asking how he chanced to come upon us
so opportunely.

“You had hardly gotten out of earshot when
I saw those Tories coming up the river,” he
said. “It did not require much thought to
decide that they were in search of you, and
it was then too late to give a warning. I could
only hope to be of assistance by following at a
distance. But for the fact that I was unarmed,
you two would not have been prisoners even
for a moment. As it was, however, I only
hoped to render aid later, as really happened.
It must be your care, since you have decided to
carry them to the American camp, that they do
not escape, for I doubt not that I have been

recognized; and once they were to return to
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 229

New York, I could no longer be of service to
the cause.”

“JT will answer for their safe-keeping, even
though I stand guard over them myself. Shall
you go into the city soon again 2”

“You ask hoping to send your mother some
word 2”

“That is my desire, if it can be done without
danger to yourself, sir.”

“Tt shall be done, lad. I will see her to-
morrow.”

“And tell her by that time we shall have

enlisted in Lee’s Legion, If David’s uncle re-

. covers from his alarm there should be an

opportunity for her to send us a message
through him in due course of events.”

“J will explain everything you would say,
my boy: Have no fear as to that, and now get
you gone, for it is better you were not on the
river after daylight.”

David had placed his prisoners in the stern-
230 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

sheets of the boat, and was standing ready to
push her off.

There was nothing to delay our departure.

After a hearty hand-clasp with this true
friend to the cause, we embarked, and until he
was lost to view in the darkness I saw Master
Baldwin standing on the shore watching: to
make certain no further mishap befell us.

Once we were well on our way up the river
Jethro Stork began to plead for liberty; but
David put an end to his whining by threaten-
ing him with a gag unless his mouth was
speedily closed, and during the next hour I
question if he so much as opened his lips to
breathe.

“Tt was not so much of a misadventure after
all, this being overhauled by our Tory friends,”
my comrade said when we had been rowing
steadily for an hour or more, and I, thinking
what might befall Master Baldwin in case these

two Tories should be exchanged for American
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 231

prisoners, or otherwise find their way into New
York again, said doubtfully :

“That remains to be seen, David. We will
not call the day fair until the sun be set, and
while these cowards are alive there is always
a possibility of treachery.”

We talked but little, David and I, during
this pull up the river, for strength was needed
at the oars, and we were not minded to waste
our breath on such conversation as could safely
be indulged in while we had as prisoners the
two Storks.

It was after daybreak when we were hailed
by the sentinels at Major Lee’s camp ; but this
time there was no delay in making known to
the commander our arrival, and as soon as
might be after the boat’s bow grated on the
sand we were detailing to the major the un-
happy ending of the plot to capture a traitor.

His sorrow at Sergeant Champe’s disagreeable

if not dangerous, position can well be fancied.
232 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

I could see that he was more disturbed in
mind than he would have us believe, but after
some time he made as if to dismiss the subject
by saying:

“Tt is the fortune of war, lad, and those who
have embarked in this struggle against the king
know that their lives are staked on the hazard.
Champe would suffer less amid all the horrors
of the prison ships than he will while obeying
the commands, as he must perforce do, of that
arch traitor, Benedict Arnold. However, our
regrets and speculations can avail him but little.
We had best think only of ourselves.”

“ And in so doing I venture to add, with all
due respect, that it is necessary closer guard
be kept over these prisoners than was exer-
cised when Ben alone was in camp, for should
they succeed in returning to New York Master
Baldwin’s life would speedily be sacrificed be-
cause of the part he has played in this affair.”

“T will see that they are forwarded to head-
A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE. 233

quarters at once with a detailed report of the
capture, and now you lads will consider your-
selves as having the liberty of the camp. Do
whatsoever pleases you, and if I can contribute
in the slightest degree to your comfort or happi-
ness, it is only necessary for you to say the
word.”

At this point the story of our attempt to
capture the traitor has been told, and there
can be no question but that he who reads it is,
as were we two, sad at heart because that which
promised to be a brave adventure came to
naught.

As a matter of course Major Lee readily
gave us an opportunity to enlist in his troop;
and we were yet with the legion on that day
in North Carolina when Sergeant Champe,
having after many a long, weary day, escaped
from his commander the traitor, came into camp,
to the intense surprise of all save Major Lee,

David Rhinelander, and myself.
234 A TRAITOR’S ESCAPE.

I would there was time for me to set down
the details of his reception when all the story
had been told the men, while they were drawn
up in line, with the sergeant, David, and I facing
the ranks.

- However, it may be that at sometime in the
future, when we shall have given the redcoats
a few doses such as we administered to Lord
Rawdon’s troops the day after the sergeant
came into camp, the opportunity will come for
me to set down in better fashion than I have
been able to do in this tale all that was said
and done when the men of Lee’s Legion under-
stood that their sergeant-major had never been
in truth a deserter, but one who risked every-

thing for the cause.

THE END.
A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS
For Young People

BY POPULAR WRITERS,
97-99-101 Reade Street, New York.

Bonnie Prince Charlie: A Tale of Fontenoy and Culloden. By
G. A. Henry. With 12 full-page Illustrations by GoRDON
Browne. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

The adventures of the son of a Scotch officer in French service.

The boy, brought up by a Glasgow bailie, is arrested for aiding a
Jacobite agent, escapes, is wrecked on the French coast, reaches
Paris, and serves with the French army at Dettingen. He kills
his father’s foe in 2 duel, and escaping to the coast, shares the
adventures of Prince Charlie, but finally settles happily in Scot-
land,
_ ‘Ronald, the hero, is very like the hero of ‘Quentin Durward.’ The lad’s
journey across France, and his hairbreadth escapes, make up as good a nar-
rative of the kind as we have ever read. For freshness of treatment and
variety of incident Mr. Henty has surpassed himself.’—Spectator.

With Clive in India; or, the Beginnings of an Empire. By
G@. A. Henry. With 12 full-page Illustrations by GorRDON
BRowNE. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

The period between the landing of Clive as a young writer in
India and the close of his career was critical and eventful in the
extreme, At its commencement the English were traders existing
on sufferance of the native princes. At its close they were masters
of Bengal and of the greater part of Southern India. The author
has given a full and accurate account of the events of that stirring
time, and battles and sieges follow each other in rapid succession,
while he combines with his narrative a tale of daring and adven-
ture, which gives a lifelike interest to the volume.

“He has taken a period of Indian history of the most vital importance,
and he has embroidered on the historical facts a story which of itself is deeply
inte esune Young people assuredly will be delighted with the volume.

cotsman.

The Lion of the North: A Tale of Gustavus Adolphus and the
Wars of Religion. By G. A. Henry. With full-page Illuse
trations by JOHN ScHéNBERG. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

In this story Mr. Henty gives the history of the first part of the
Thirty Years’ War. The issue had its importance, which has ex-
tended to the present day, as it established religious freedom
in Germany. The army of the chivalrous king of Sweden was
largely composed of Scotchmen, and among these was the hero of
the story.

“The tale is a clever and instructive piece of history, and as boys may be
trusted to read it conscientiously. they can hardly fail to be profited “’—Times.
2 "A, L, BURT’S PUBLICATIONS.



The Dragon and the Raven; or, The Days of King Alfred. By
G. A. Henry. With full-page Illustrations by C. J. STANI-
LAND, R.I. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

In this story the author gives an account of the fierce struggle
between Saxon and Dane for supremacy in England, and presents
a vivid picture of the misery and ruin to which the country was
reduced by the ravages of the sea-wolves. The hero, a young
Saxon thane, takes part in all the battles fought by King Alfred.
He is driven from his home, takes to the sea and resists the Danes
on their own element, and being pursued by them up the Seine,
is present at the long and desperate siege of Paris.

‘*Treated in a manner most attractive to the boyish reader.”—Athenceum.

The Young Carthaginian: A Story of the Times of Hannibal.
By G. A. Henry. With full-page Illustrations by C. J. STANI-
LAND, R.I. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

Boys reading the history of the Punic Wars have seldoma keen
appreciation of the merits of the contest. That it was at first a
struggle for empire, and afterward for existence on the part of
Carthage, that Hannibal was a great and skillful general, that he
defeated the Romans at Trebia, Lake Trasimenus, and Canne,
and all but took Rome, represents pretty nearly the sum total of
their knowledge. To let them know more about this momentous
struggle for the empire of the world Mr. Henty has written this
story, which not only gives in graphic style a brilliant descrip-
tion of a most interesting period of history, but is a tale of ex-
citing adventure sure to secure the interest of the reader.

‘* Well constructed and vividly told. From first to last nothing stays the
interest of the narrative. It bears us along as on a {stream whose current
varies in direction, but never loses its force.”—Saturday Review.

In Freedom’s Cause: A Story of Wallace and Bruce. ByG. A.
Henty. With full-page Illustrations by GORDON BROWNE.
12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

In this story the author relates the stirring tale of the Scottish
War of Independence. The extraordinary valor and personal
prowess of Wallace and Bruce rival the deeds of the mythical
heroes of chivalry, and indeed at one time Wallace was ranked
with these legendary personages. The researches of modern
historians have shown, however, that he was a living, breathing
man—and a valiant champion. The hero of the tale fought under
both Wallace and Bruce, and while the strictest historical accuracy
has been maintained with respect to public events, the work is
full of ‘‘hairbreadth ’scapes ” and wild adventure.

“Tt is written in the author’s best style. Full of the wildest and most re-
markable achievements, it is a tale of great interest, which a boy, once he has
begun it, will not willingly put on one side.”"—The Schoolmaster.
A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS. 4







With Lee in Virginia: A Story of the American Civil War. By
@. A. Henty. With full-page Illustrations by GorpDoN
Browne. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

The story of a young Virginian planter, who, after bravely
proving his sympathy with the slaves of brutal masters, serves
with no less courage and enthusiasm under Lee and Jackson
through the most exciting events of the struggle. He has many
hairbreadth escapes, is seve'al times wounded and twice taken
prisoner; but his courage and readiness and, in two cases, the
devotion of a black servant and of a runaway slave whom he had
assisted, bring him safely through all difficulties.

‘One of the best stories for lads which Mr. Henty has yet written. The
picture is full of life and color, and the stirring and romantic incidents are
Beal pleaded with the personal interest and charm o7 the story.”—

tandard.

By England’s Aid; or, The Freeing of the Netherlands (1585~
1604). By G. A. Henry. With full-page Illustrations by
ALFRED PEARSE, and Maps. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

The story of two English lads who go to Holland as pages in
the service of one of ‘‘the fighting Veres.” After many adven.
tures by sea and land, one of the lads finds himself on board a
Spanish ship at the time of the defeat of the Armada, and escapes
only to fall into the hands of the Corsairs. He is successful in
getting back to Spain under the protection of a wealthy merchant,
and regains his native country after the capture of Cadiz.

“Tt is an admirable book for youngsters. It overflows with stirring inci-
dent and exciting adventure, and the color of the era and of the scene are
Piel ee proaueedy The illustrations add to its attractiveness.’’—Boston

‘azette,

By Right of Conquest ; or, With Cortez in Mexico. By G. A.
Henty. With full-page Illustrations by W. 8S. Stacny, and
Two Maps. 12mo, cloth, price $1.50.

The conquest of Mexico by a small band of resolute men under
the magnificent leadership of Cortez is always rightly ranked
among the most romantic and daring exploits in history. With
this as the groundwork of his story Mr. Henty has interwoven the
adventures of an English youth, Roger Hawkshaw, the sole sur.
vivor of the good ship Swan, which had sailed from a Devon port
to challenge the mercantile supremacy o! the Spaniards in the
New World. He is beset by many perils among the natives, but
is saved by his own judgment and strength, and by the devotion
of an Aztec princess. At last by a ruse he obtains the protection
of the Spaniards, and after the fall of Mexico he succeeds in re-
gaining his native shore, with a fortune and a charming Aztec

ride,

“* By Right of Conquest’ is the nearest approach to a perfectly successful
historical tale that Mr. Henty has yet publiahediAcadenig:
4 A, L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS.



In the Reign of Terror: The Adventures of a Westminster Boy.
By G. A. Henty. With full-page Illustrations by J. Scuén-
BERG. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

Harry Sandwith, a Westminster boy, becomes a resident at the
chateau of a French marquis, and after various adventures accom-
panies the family to Paris at the crisis of the Revolution. Im-
prisonment and death reduce their number, and the hero finds
himself beset by perils with the three young daughters of the
house in his charge. After hairbreadth escapes they reach Nan-
tes. There the girls are condemned to death in the coffin-ships,
but are saved by the unfailing courage of their boy protector.

“Harry Sandwith, the Westminster boy, may fairly be said to beat Mr.
Henty’s reeord. His adventures will delight boys by the audacity and peril

they depict. . . . The story is one of Mr. Henty’s best.”—Saturday
Review.

With Wolfe in Canada; or, The Winning of a Continent. By
G. A. Henty. With full-page Illustrations by GorDON
BRowNE. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

In the present volume Mr. Henty gives an account of the strug-
gle between Britain and France for supremacy in the North
American continent. On the issue of this war depended not only
the destinies of North America, but to a large extent those of the
mother countries themselves. The fall of Quebec decided that
the Anglo-Saxon race should predominate in the New World;
that Britain, and not France, should take the lead among the
nations of Europe; and that English and American commerce, the
English language, and English literature, should spread right
round the globe.

“It is not only a lesson in history as instructively as it is graphically told,

but also a deeply interesting and often thrilling tale of adventure and peril by
flood and field.”’—Illustrated London News.

True to the Old Flag: A Tale of the American War of Inde-
pendence. By G. A. HentTy. With full-page Illustrations by
GoRDON BRownE. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

In this story the author has gone to the accounts of officers who
took part in the conflict, and lads will find that in no war in which
American and British soldiers have been engaged did they behaves
with greater courage and good conduct. The historical portion of :
the book being accompanied with numerous thrilling adventures
with the redskins on the shores of La!'e Huron, a story of exciting
interest is interwoven with the general narrative and carried
through the book.

‘‘ Does justice to the pluck and determination of the British soldiers during
the unfortunate struggle against American emancipation. The son of an
American loyalist, who remains true to our flag, falls among the hostile red-

skins in that very Huron country which has been endeared to us by the ex:
ploits of Hawkeye and Chingachgook.’—The Times.
A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS. 5



The Lion of St. Mark: A Tale of Venice in the Fourteenth
Century. By G. A. Henry. With full-page Illustrations by
GorpoN Browne. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

A story of Venice at a period when her strength and splendor
were put to the severest tests. The hero displays a fine sense and
manliness which carry him safely through an atmosphere of in-
trigue, crime, and bloodshed. He contributes largely to the vice
tories of the Venetians at Porto d’Anzo and Chioggia, and finally
wins the hand of the daughter of one of the chief men of Venice.

‘* Every boy should read ‘The Lion of St. Mark.’ Mr. Henty has never pro

duced a story more delightful, more wholesome, or more vivacious.” —Satur
day Review.

A Final Reckoning: A Tale of Bush Life in Australia. By G. A
Henry. With full-page Illustrations by W. B. WoLLEN.
12mo, cloth, price $1.00,

The hero, a young English lad. after rather a stormy boyhood,
emigrates to Australia, and gets employment as an officer in the
mounted police. A few years of active work on the frontier,
where he has many a brush with both natives and bushrangers,
gain him promotion to a captaincy, and he eventually settles
down to the peaceful life of a squatter.

‘“Mr. Henty has never published a more readable, a more carefully con.
structed, or a better written story than this ’—Spectator.

Under Drake’s Flag: A Tale of the Spanish Main. By @. A.
Henty. With’ full-page Illustrations by GorDON BROWNE.
12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

A story of the days when England and Spain struggled for the
supremacy of the sea. The heroes sail as lads with Drake in the
Pacific expedition, and in his great voyage of circumnavigation.
The historical portion of the story is absolutely to be relied upon,
but this will perhaps be less attractive than the great variety of
exciting adventure through which the young heroes pass in the
course of their voyages.

“ A book of adventure, where the hero meets with experience enough, one
would think, to turn his hair gray.”—Harper’s Monthly Magazine.

By Sheer Pluck: A Tale of the Ashanti War. By G, A, HENTY.
With full-page Illustrations by GoRDON BROWNE. 12mo,
cloth price $1 00. ‘

The author has woven, in a tale of thrilling interest, all the de:
tails of the Ashanti campaign, of which he was himself a witness,
His hero, after many exciting adventures in the interior, is de-
tained a prisoner by the king just before the outbreak of the war,
but escapes, and accompanies the English expedit on on their
march to Coomassie.

““Mr, Henty keeps up his reputation as a writer of boys’ stories. ‘ By Sheer
Pluck ’ will be eagerly read.”’—Athenwunr.
6 A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS.



By Pike and Dyke: A Tale of the Rise of the Dutch Republic.
By G. A. Henry. With full-page Illustrations by MAYNARD
Brown, and 4 Maps. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

In this story Mr. Henty traces the adventures and brave deeds
of an English boy in the household of the ablest man of his age—
William the Silent. Edward Martin, the son of an English sea-
captain, enters the service of the Prince as a volunteer, and is em-
ployed by him in many dangerous and responsible missions, in the
discharge of which he passes through the great sieges of the time,
He ultimately setties down as Sir Edward Martin.

“ Boys with a turn for historical research will be enchanted with the book,
while the rest who only care for adventure will be students in spite of them-
selves.”"—St. James’ Gazette.

St. George for England: A Tale of Cressy and Poitiers. By
@. A. Henry. With full-page Illustrations by GoRDON
Browne. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

No portion of English history is more crowded with great events
than that of the reign of Edward III. Cressy and Poitiers; the
destruction of the Spanish fleet; the plague of the Black Death;
the Jacquerie rising; these are treated by the author in ‘' St.
George for England.”” The hero of the story, although of good
family, begins life as a London apprentice, but after countless ad,
ventures and perils becomes by valor and good conduct the squire,
and at last the trusted friend of the Black Prince.

“Mr. Henty has developed for himself a type of historical novel for boys
which bids fair to supplement, on their behalf, the historical labors of Sir
Walter Scott in the land of fiction.”—The Standard.

Captain’s Kidd’s Gold: The True Story of an Adventurous Sailor
Boy. By JAMES FRANKLIN Fitts. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

There is something fascinating to the average youth in the very
idea of buried treasure. A vision arises before his eyes of swarthy
Portuguese and Spanish rascals, with black beards and gleaming
eyes—sinister-looking fellows who once on a time haunted the
Spanish Main, sneaking cut from some hidden creek in their long,
low schooner, of picaroonish rake and sheer, to attack an unsus-
pecting trading craft. There were many famous sea rovers in
their day, but none more celebrated than Capt. Kidd. Perhaps
the most fascinating tale of all is Mr. Fitts’ true story of an adven.
turous American boy, who receives from his dying father an
ancient bit of vellum, which the latter obtained in a curious way.
The document bears obscure directions purporting to locate a cer-
tain island in the Bahama group, and a considerable treasure
buried there by two of Kidd’s crew. The hero of this book,
Paul Jones Garry, is an ambitious, persevering lad, of salt-water
New England ancestry, and his efforts to reach the island and
secure the money form one of the most absorbing tales for our
youth that has come from the press,
A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS, a



Captain Bayley’s Heir: A Tale of the Gold Fields of California.
By G. A. Henty. With full-page Illustrations by H. M.
PacEeT. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

A frank, manly lad and his cousin are rivals in the heirship of a
considerable property. The former falls into a trap laid by the
latter, and while under a false accusation of theft foolishly leaves
England for America. He works his passage before the mast,
joins a small band of hunters, crosses a tract of country infested
with Indians to the Californian gold diggings, and is successful
both as digger and trader.

‘‘Mr. Henty is careful to mingle iustruction with entertainment; and the

humorous touches, especially in the sketch of John Holl, the Westminster
dustman, Dickens himself could hardly have excelled.”—Christian Leader.

For Name and Fame; or, Through Afghan Passes. By G. A.
Henry. With full-page Illustrations by GoRDON BROWNE.
12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

An interesting story of the last war in Afghanistan. The hero,
after being wrecked and going through many stirring adventures
among the Malays, finds his way to Calcutta and enlists in a regi-
ment proceeding to join the army at the Afghan passes. He ac-
companies the force under General Roberts to the Peiwar Kotal,
is wounded, taken prisoner, carried to Cabul, whence he is trans-
ferred to Cundahar, and takes part in the final defeat of the army
of Ayoub Khan.

‘““The best feature of the book—apart from the interest of its scenes of ad-

venture: -is its honest effort to do justice to the patriotism of the Afghan
people.”— Daily News,

Captured by Apes: The Wonderful Adventures of a~Young
Animal Trainer. By Harry PRENTICE. 12mo, cloth, $1.00.

The scene of this tale is laid on an island in the Malay Archi-
pelago. Philip Garland, a young animal collector and trainer, of
New York, sets sail for Eastern seas in quest of a new stock of
living curiosities. The vessel is wrecked off the coast of Borneo
and young Garland, the sole survivor of the disaster, is cast ashore
on a small island, and captured by the apes that overrun the
place. The lad discovers that the ruling spirit of the monkey
tribe is a gigantic and vicious baboon, whom he identifies as
Goliah, an animal at one time in his possession and with whose
instruction he had been especially diligent. ‘The brute recognizes
him, and with a kind of malignant satisfaction puts his former
master through the same course of training he had himself ex-
perienced with a faithfulness of detail which shows how astonish-
ing is monkey recollection. Very novel indeed is the way by
which the young man escapes death. Mr. Prentice has certainly
worked a new vein on juvenile fiction, and the ability with which
pone a difficult subject stamps him as a writer of undoubted
skill,
8 A, L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS.



The Bravest of the Brave; or, With Peterborough in Spain.
By G@. A. Henty. With full-page Illustrations by HE. M.
PaGET, 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

There are few great leaders whose lives and actions have so
completely fallen into oblivion as those of the Earl of Peter.
borough. This is largely due to the fact that they were over-
shadowed by the glory and successes of Marlborough. His career
as general extended over little more than a year, and yet, in that
time, he showed a genius for warfare which has never been sur-
passed.

“Mr. Henty never loses sight of the moral purpose of his work—to enforce

the doctrine of courage and truth. Lads will read ‘ The Bravest of the Brave'
with pleasure and profit; of that we are quite sure.”—Daily Telegraph.

The Cat of Bubastes: A Story of Ancient Egypt. By G. A.
HeEnty. With full-page Illustrations. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

A story which will give young readers an unsurpassed insight
into the customs of the Egyptian people. Amuba, a prince of the
Rebu nation, is carried with his charioteer Jethro into slavery.
They become inmates of the house of Ameres, the Egyptian high-
priest, and are happy in his service until the priest’s son acci-
dentally kills the sacred cat of Bubastes. In an outburst of popular
fury Ameres is killed, and it rests with Jethro and Amuba to
secure the escape of the high-priest’s son and daughter.

‘““The story, from the critical moment of the killing of the sacred cat to the
perilous exodus into Asia with which it closes, is very skillfully constructed

and full of exciting adventures. It is admirably illustrated.’’°—Saturday
Review.

With Washington at Monmouth: A Story of Three Phila-
delphia Boys. By JAMES Or1s. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

Three Philadelphia boys, Seth Graydon ‘‘ whose mother con-
ducted a boarding-house which was patronized by the British
officers;” Enoch Ball, ‘“‘son of that Mrs. Ball whose dancing
school was situated on Letitia Street,” and little Jacob, son of
‘Chris, the Baker,” serve as the principal characters. The
story is laid during the winter when Lord Howe held possession
of the city, and the lads aid the cause by assisting the American
spies who make regular and frequent visits from Valley Forge.
One reads here of home-life in the captive city when bread was
scarce among the people of the lowerclasses, and a reckless prodi-
gality shown by the British officers, who passed the winter in
feasting and merry-making while the members of the patriot army
but a few miles away were suffering from both cold and hunger.
The story abounds with pictures of Colonial life skillfully
drawn, and the glimpses of Washington’s soldiers which are given
show that the work has not been hastily done. or without con-
siderable study.
A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS, 9
—

For the Temple: A Tale of the Fall of Jerusalem. By G. A.
HeEntTy. With full-page Illustrations by S. J. Souomon. 12mo,
cloth, price $1.00.

Mr. Henty here weaves into the record of Josephus an admirable
and attractive story. The troubles in the district of Tiberias, the
march of the legicns, the sieges of Jotapata, of Gamala, and of
Jerusalem, form the impressive and carefully studied historic
setting to the figure of the lad who passes from the vineyard to
the service of Josephus, becomes the leader of a guerrilla band of
patriots, fights bravely for the Temple, and after a brief term of
slavery at Alexandria, returns to his Galilean home with the favor
of Titus.

“Mr. Henty’s graphic prose pictures of the hopeless Jewish resistance to

Roman sway add another leaf to his record of the famous wars of the world.”
—Graphic.

Facing Death; or, The Hero of the Vaughan Pit. A Tale of
the Coal Mines. By G. A. Henry. With full-page Tllustra-
tions by GorDON Browne. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

“Facing Death” is a story with a purpose. It is intended to
show that a lad who makes up his mind firmly and resolutely that
he will rise in life, and who is prepared to face toil and ridicule
and hardship to carry out his determination, is sure to succeed.
The hero of the story is a typical British boy, dogged, earnest,
generous, and though ‘‘ shamefaced” to a degree, is ready to face
death in the discharge of duty.

“The tale is well written and well illustrated, and there is much reality in
the characters. If any father, clergyman, or schoolmaster is on the lookout
for a good book to give as a present to a boy who is worth his salt, this is the
book we would recommend.” —Standard.

Tom Temple’s Career. By Horatio AtcEer. 12mo, cloth,
price $1.00.

Tom Temple, a bright, self-reliant lad, by the death of his
father becomes a boarder at the home of Nathan Middleton, a
penurious insurance agent. Though well paid for keeping the
boy, Nathan and his wife endeavor to bring Master Tom in line
with their parsimonious habits. The lad ingeniously evades their
efforts and revolutionizes the household. As Tom is heir to
$40,000, he is regarded as a person of some importance until by
an unfortunate combination of circumstances his fortune shrinks
to a few hundreds. He leaves Plympton village to seek work in
New York, whence he undertakes an important mission to Cali-
fornia, around which center the most exciting incidents of his
young career. Some of his adventures in the far west are so
startling that the reader will scarcely close the book until the last
page Shall have been reached. The tale is written in Mr. Alger’s
most fascinating style, and is bound to please the “ery large class
of boys who regard this popular author as a prime favorite.
10 A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS.





Maori and Settler: A Story of the New Zealand War. By
G. A. Henry. With full-page Illustrations by ALFRED PEARSE
12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

The Renshaws emigrate to New Zealand during the period of
the war with the natives. Wilfrid, a strong, self-reliant, coura-
geous lad, isthe mainstay of the household. He has for his friend
Mr. Atherton, a botanist and naturalist of herculean strength and
unfailing nerve and humor. Intheadventures among the Maoris,
there are many breathless moments in which the odds seem hope-
lessly against the party, but they succeed in establishing them-
selves happily in one of the pleasant New Zealand valleys.

‘“Brimful of adventure, of humorous and interesting conversation, and
vivid pictures of colonial life.’”-—Schoolmaster.

Julian Mortimer: A Brave Boy’s Struggle for Home and Fortune.
By Harry CAsTLEMON. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

Here is a story that will warm every boy’s heart. There is
mystery enough to keep any lad’s imagination wound up to the
highest pitch. The scene of the story lies west of the Mississippi
River, in the days when emigrants made their perilous way across
the great plains to the land of gold. One of the startling features
of the book is the attack upon the wagon train by a large party of
Indians. Our hero is a lad of uncommon nerve and pluck, a brave
young American in every sense of the word. He enlists and holds
the reader’s sympathy from the outset. Surrounded by an un-
known and constant peril, and assisted by the unswerving fidelity
of a stalwart trapper, a real rough diamond, our hero achicves the
most happy results. Harry Castlemon has written many enter-
taining stories for boys, and it would seem almost superfluous to
say anything in his praise, for the youth of America regard him
as a favorite author.

“Carrots: Just a Little Boy. By Mrs. MoteswortH. With
Illustrations by WALTER CRANE. 12mo, cloth, price 75 cents,

““One of the cleverest and most, pleasing stories it has been our good for-
tune to meet with for some time. Carrots and his sister are delightful little
beings, whom to read about is at once to become very fond of.”—Hxaminer.

“A genuine children’s book; we’ve seen *em seize it, and read it sreedily.
Children are first-rate critics, and thoroughly appreciate Walter Crane’s
illustrations.”— Punch.

Mopsa the Fairy. By Jean InceLow. With Eight page
Illustrations. 12mo, cloth, price 75 cents.

“Mrs. Ingelow is, to our mind, the most charming of all living writers for
ehildren, and ‘ Mopsa’ alone ought to give her a kind of pre-emptive right to
the love and gratitude of our young folks. It requires genius to conceive &
purely imaginary work which must of necessity deal with the supernatural,
without running into a meve riot of fantastic absurdity; but genius Miss In-
gelow has and the story of ‘Jack’ is as careless and joyous, but as delicate,
as a picture of childhood.’’—Eclectic.
A. 1. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS. 1





A Jaunt Through Java: The Story of a Journey to the Sacred
Mountain. By Epwarp §. Exxis. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

The central interest of this story is found in the thrilling ad-
ventures of two cousins, Hermon and Eustace Hadley, on their
trip across the island of Java, from Samarang to the Sacred Moun-
tain. In a land where the Royal Bengal tiger runs at large;
where the rhinoceros and other fierce beasts are to be met with
at unexpected moments; it is but natural that the heroes of this
book should have a lively experience. Hermon not only dis-
tinguishes himself by killing a full-grown tiger at short range,
but meets with the most startling adventure of the journey.
There is much in this narrative to instruct as well as entertain the
reader, and so deftly has Mr. Ellis used his material that there is
not a dull page in the book. The two heroes are brave, manly
young fellows, bubbling over with boyish independence. They
cope with the many difficulties that arise during the trip in a fear-
less way that is bound to win the admiration of every lad who is
so fortunate as to read their adventures.

Wrecked on Spider Island; or, How Ned Rogers Found the
Treasure. By JAmMEs Oris. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

A *‘down-east” plucky lad who ships as cabin boy, not from
love of adventure, but because it is the only course remaining by
which he can gain a livelihood. While in his bunk, seasick,
Ned Rogers hears the captain and mate discussing their plans for
the willful wreck of the brig in order to gain the insurance. Once
it is known he is in possession of the secret the captain maroons
him on Spider Island, explaining to the crew that the boy is
afflicted with leprosy. While thus involuntarily playing the part
of a Crusoe, Ned discovers a wreck submerged in the sand, and
overhauling the timbers for the purpose of gathering material
with which to build a hut finds. considerable amount of treasure.
Raising the wreck; a voyage to Havana under sail; shipping there
a crew and running for Savannah; the attempt of the crew to
seize the little craft after learning of the treasure on board, and,
as a matter of course, the successful ending of the journey, all
serve to make as entertaining a story of sea-life as the most
captious boy could desire.

Geoff and Jim: A Story of School Life. By Ismay THorN. II-
lustrated by A. @. WALKER. 12mo, cloth, price 75 cents.

“This is a prettily told story of the life spent by two motherless bairns at
& small preparatory school. Both Geoff and Jim are very lovable characters,
only Jim .s the more so; and the scrapes he gets into and the trials he en-
au wi. no doubt, interest a large circle of young readers.’’—Church

mes.

“This is a capital children’s story, the characters well portrayed, and the
book tastefully bound and well illustrated.”\—Schvolmaster.

“The story can be heartily recommended as a present for boys.”’~-
Standard.
12 A, L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS.



The Castaways; or, On the Florida Reefs. By Jams OTIS.
12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

This tale smacks of the salt sea. It is just the kind of story
that the majority of boys yearn for. From the moment that the
Sea Queen dispenses with the services of the tug in lower New

“ York bay till the breeze leaves her becalmed off the coast of
Florida, one can almost hear the whistle of the wind through her
rigging, the creak of her straining cordage as she heels to the
lveward, and feel her rise to the snow-capped waves which her
sharp bow cuts into twin streaks of foam. Off Marquesas Keys
sh? floats in a dead calm. Ben Clark, the hero of the story, and
Jalke, the cook, spy a turtle asleep upon the glassy surface of the
water. They determine to capture him, and take a boat for that
purpose, and just as they succeed in catching him a thick fog
cut; them off from the vessel, and then their troubles becin.
They take refuge on board a drifting hulk, a storm arises and they
are cast ashore upon a low sandy key. Their adventures from
this point cannot fail to charm the reader. As a writer for young
people Mr. Otis is a prime favorite. His style is captivating, and
never for a moment does he allow the interest to flag. In ‘‘ The
Castaways ” he is at his best.

Tom Thatcher’s Fortune. By Horatio ALGER, JR. 12mo,
cloth, price $1.00.

Like all of Mr. Alger’s heroes, Tom Thatcher is a brave, am-
bitious, unselfish boy. He supports his mother and sister on
meager wages earned as a shoe-pegger in John Simpson’s factory.
The story begins with Tom’s discharge from the factory, because
Mr. Simpson felt annoyed with the lad for interrogating him too
closely about his missing father. A few days afterward Tom
learns that which induces him tostart overland for California with
the view of probing the family mystery. He meets with many ad-
ventures. Ultimately he returns to his native village, bringing con-
sternation to the soul of John Simpson, who only escapes the con-
sequences of his villainy by making full restitution to the man
whose friendship he had betrayed. The story is told in that en-
tertaining way which has made Mr, Alger’s name a household
word in so many homes.

Birdie: A Tale of Child life. By H. L. CoH1LDE-PEMBERTON.

Illustrated by H. W. Ratnry. 12mo, cloth, price 75 cents.
“‘The story is quaint and simple, but there is a freshness about it that
makes one hear again the ringing laugh and the cheery shout of children at
play which sharmed his earlier years."-—New York Express.
Popular Fairy Tales. By the BrorHers Grimm Profusely
Illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

“From first tolast, almost without exception, these stories are delightful.”
—Atheneum.
A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS. 13

With Lafayette at Yorktown: A Story of How Two Boys
Joined the Continental Army. By JAMES OTIS. 12mo, cloth,
price $1.00.

The two boys are from Portsmouth, N. H., and are introduced
in August, 1781, when on the point of leaving home to enlist in
Col. Scammell’s regiment, then stationed near New York City.
Their method of traveling is on horseback, and the author has
given an interesting account of what was expected from boys in
the Colonial days. The lads, after no slight amount of adventure,
are sent as messengers—not soldiers—into the south to find the
troops under Lafayette. Once with that youthful general they
are given employment as spies, and enter the British camp,
bringing away valuable information. The pictures of camp-life
are carefully drawn, and the portrayal of Lafayette’s character is
thoroughly well done. The story is wholesome in tone, as are all
of Mr. Otis’ works. There is no lack of exciting incident which
the youthful reader craves, but it is healthful excitement brim-
ming with facts which every boy should be familiar with, and
while the reader is following the adventures of Ben Jaffreys and
Ned Allen he is acquiring a fund of historical lore which will
remain in his memory long after that which he has memorized
from text-books has been forgotten.

Lost in the Canon: Sam Willett’s Adventures on the Great
Colorado. By ALFRED R. CALHOUN. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

This story hinges on a fortune left to Sam Willett, the hero,
and the fact that it will pass to a disreputable relative if the lad
dies before he shall have reached his majority. The Vigilance
Committee of Hurley’s Gulch arrest Sain’s father and an associate
for the crime of murder. Their lives depend on the production
of the receipt given for money paid. This is in Sam’s possession
at the camp on the other side of the cafion. A messenger is dis-
patched to get it. He reaches the lad in the midst of a fearful
storm which floods the cafion. His father’s peril urges Sam to
action. A raft is built on which the boy and his friends essay to
cross the torrent. They fail to do so, and a desperate trip down
the stream ensues. How the party finally escape from the hor-
tors of their situation and Sam reaches Hurley’s Gulch in the very
nick of time, is described in a graphic style that stamps Mr. Cal-
houn as a master of his art.

Jack: A Topsy Turvy Story. By C. M. CraAwLEy-BoEVEY.
With upward of Thirty Illustrations by H. J. A. MILEs.

12mo, cloth, price 75 cents.

“The illustrations deserve particular mention, as they add largely to the
interest of this amusing volume forchildren. Jack falls asleep with his mind
full of the subject of the Ben pon and is very much surprised presently to
find himself an inhabitant of Waterworld, where he goes though wonderful
and edifying adventures. A handsomeand pleasant book.”—Literary World.
14 A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS.



Search for the Silver City: A Tale of Adventure in Yucatan.
By James Oris. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

Two American lads, Teddy Wright and Neal Emery, embark
on the steam yacht Day Dream for a short summer cruise to the
tropics. Homeward bound the yacht is destroyed by fire. All
hands take to the boats, but during the night the boat is cast upon
the coast of Yucatan. They come across a young American
named Cummings, who entertains them with the story of the
wonderful Silver City, of the Chan Santa Cruz Indians. Cum-
mings proposes with the aid of a faithful Indian ally to brave
the perils of the swamp and carry off a number of the golden
images from the temples. Pursued with relentless vigor for days
their situation is desperate. At last their escape is effected in an
astonishing manner. Mr. Otis has built his story on an historical
foundation. It is so full of exciting incidents that the reader is
quite carried away with the novelty and realism of the narrative.

Frank Fowler, the Cash Boy. By Horatio ALGER, JR. 12mo,
cloth, price $1.00. %

Thrown upon his own resources Frank Fowler, a poor boy,
bravely determines to make a living for himself and his foster-
sister Grace. Going to New York he obtains a situation as cash
boy in a dry goods store. He renders a service to a wealthy old
gentleman named Wharton, who takes a fancy to the lad. Frank,
after losing his place as cash boy, is enticed by an enemy toa
lonesome part of New Jersey and held a prisoner. This move re-
coils upon the plotter, for it leads to a clue that enables the lad to
establish his real identity. Mr. Alger’s stories are not only un-
usually interesting, but they convey a useful lesson of pluck and
manly independence.

Budd Boyd’s Triumph; or, the Boy Firm of Fox Island. By
WILiIAM P, CHIPMAN. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

The scene of this story is laid on the upper part of Narragansett
Bay, and the leading incidents have a strong salt-water flavor.
Owing to the conviction of his father for forgery and theft, Budd
Boyd is compelled to leave his home and strike out for himself.
Chance brings Budd in contact with Judd Floyd. The two boys,
being ambitious and clear sighted, form a partnership to catch
and sell fish. The scheme is successfully launched, but the un-
expected appearance on the scene of Thomas Bagsley, the man
whom Budd believes guilty of the crimes attributed to bis father,
leads to several disagreeable complications that nearly caused the
lad’s ruin. His pluck and good sense, however, carry him through
his troubles. . In following the career of the boy firm of Boyd &
Floyd, the youthful reader will find a useful lesson—that industry
and perseverance are bound to lead to ultimate success.
A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS, 15

The Errand Boy; or, How Phil Brent Won Success. By
HoRATIO ALGER, JR. 12mo, cloth, price’ $1.00.

The career of ‘“‘ The Errand Boy” embraces the city adventures
of a smart country lad who at an early age was abandoned by his
father. Philip was brought up by a kind-hearted innkeeper
named Brent. The death of Mrs. Brent paved the way for the
hero’s subsequent troubles. Accident introduces him to the
notice of a retired merchant in New York, who not only secures
him the situation of errand boy but thereafter stands as his
friend. An unexpected turn of fortune’s wheel, however, brings
Philip and his father together. In ‘‘The Errand Boy” Philip
Brent is possessed of the same sterling qualities so conspicuous in
all of the previous creations of this delightful writer for our youth.

The Slate Picker: The Story of a Boy’s Life in the Coal Mines
By Harry PRENTICE. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

This is a story of a boy’s life in the coal mines of Pennsylvania.
There are many thrilling situations, notably that of Ben Burton’s
leap into the ‘ lion’s mouth ”—the yawning shute in the breakers
—to escape a beating at the hands of the savage Spilkins, the
overseer. Gracie Gordon isa little angel in rags, Terence O'Dowd
is a manly, sympathetic lad, and Enoch Evans, the miner-poet, is
a big-hearted, honest fellow, a true friend to all whose bur-
dens seem too heavy for them to bear. Ben Burton, the hero, had
a hard road to travel, but by grit and energy he advanced step by
step until he found himself called upon to fill the position of
chief engineer of the Kohinoor Coal Company.

A Runaway Brig; or, An Accidental Cruise. By JAmMEs OTIS.
12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

«A Runaway Brig” is a sea tale, pure and simple, and that’s
where it strikes a boy’s fancy. The reader can look out upon
the wide shimmering sea as it flashes back the sunlight, and
imagine himself afloat with Harry Vandyne, Walter Morse, Jim
Libby and that old shell-back, Bob Brace, on the brig Bonita,
which lands on one of the Bahama keys. Finally three strangers
steal the craft, leaving the rightful owners to shift for themselves
aboard a broken-down tug. ‘The boys discover a mysterious
document which enables them to find a buried treasure, then a
storm. comes on and the tug is stranded. At last a yacht comesin
sight and the party with the treasure is taken off the lonely key.
The most exacting youth is sure to be fascinated with this enter.
taining story.

Fairy Tales and Stories. By Hans CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN.
Profusely Illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

“Tf I were asked to select.a chiid’s library Ishould name these three volumes
‘English,’ * Celtic,’ and ‘Indian Fairy Tales,’ with Grimm and Hans Ander-
sen’s Fairy Tales.”—Independent.
16 A, L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS.



The Island Treasure; or, Harry Darrel’s Fortune. By Frank
H. ConvERSE. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

Harry Darrel, an orphan, having received a nautical training on
a school-ship, is bent on going to sea with a boyish acquaintance
named Dan Plunket. A runaway horse changes his prospects.
Harry saves Dr. Gregg from drowning and the doctor presents his
preserver with a bit of property known as Gregg’s Island, and
makes the lad sailing-master of his sloop yacht. A piratical hoard
is supposed to be hidden somewhere on the island. After much
search and many thwarted plans, at last Dan discovers the
treasure and is the means of finding Harry’s father. Mr. Con-
verse’s stories possess a charm of their own which is appreciated
by lads who delight in good healthy tales that smack of salt
water.

The Boy Explorers: The Adventures of Two Boys in Alaska.
By HARRY PRENTICE. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

Two boys, Raymond and Spencer Manning, travel from San
Francisco to Alaska to join their father in search of their uncle,
who, it is believed, was captured and detained by the inhabitants
of a place called the ‘‘ Heart of Alaska.” On their arrival at
Sitka the boys with an Indian guide set off across the mountains.
The trip is fraught with perils that test the lads’ courage to the
utmost. Reaching the Yukon River they build a raft and float
down the stream, entering the Mysterious River, from which they
barely escape with their lives, only to be captured by natives of
the Heart of Alaska. All through their exciting adventures the
lads demonstrate what can be accomplished by pluck and resolu-
tion, and their experience makes one of the most interesting tales
ever written.

The Treasure Finders: A Boy’s Adventures in Nicaragua. By
JAMES OTIS. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

Roy and Dean Coloney, with their guide Tongla, leave their
father’s indigo plantation to visit the wonderful ruins of an ancient
city. The boys eagerly explore the dismantled temples of an ex-
tinct race and discover three golden images cunningly hidden
away. They escape with the greatest difficulty; by taking advan-
tage of a festive gathering they seize a canoe and fly down the
river. Eventually they reach safety with their golden prizes.
Mr. Otis is the prince of story tellers, for he handles his material
with consummate skill. We doubt if he has ever written a more
entertaining story than ‘‘ The Treasure Finders,”

Household Fairy Tales. By the BRoruers Grimm. Profusely
Illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

* As a collection of fairy tales to delight children of all ages this work
ranks second to none.”—Daily Graphic.
A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS. 17



Dan the Newsboy. By Horatio AuGER, JR. 12mo, cloth,
price $1.00.

The reader is introduced to Dan Mordaunt and his mother living
in a poor tenement, and the lad is pluckily trying to make ends
meet by selling papers in the streets of New York. A little
heiress of six years is confided to the care of the Mordaunts. At
the same time the Jad obtains a position in a wholesale house.
He soon demonstrates how valuable he is to the firm by detecting
the bookkeeper in a bold attempt to rob his employers. The
child is kidnaped and Dan tracks the child to the house where
she is hidden, and rescues her. The wealthy aunt of the little
heiress is so delighted with Dan’s courage and many good qualities
that she adopts him as her heir, and the conclusion of the book
leaves the hero on the high road to every earthly desire.

Tony the Hero: A Brave Boy’s Adventure with a Tramp. By
Horatio ALGER, JR. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

Tony, a sturdy bright-eyed boy of fourteen, is under the control
of Rudolph Rugg, a thorough rascal, shiftless and lazy, spending
his time tramping about the country. After much abuse Tony
runs away and gets a jobas stable boy ina country hotel. Tony is
heir to a large estate in England, and certain persons find it nec-
essary to produce proof of the lad‘s death. Rudolph for a con-
sideration hunts up Tony and throws him down a deep well. Of
course Tony escapes from the fate provided for him, and by a
brave act makes a rich lriend, with whom he goes to England,
where he secures his rights and is prosperous. ‘The fact that Mr.
Alger is the author of this entertaining book will at once recom-
mend it to all juvenile readers.

A Young Hero; or, Fighting to Win. By Epwarp §. Exits.
12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

This story tells how a valuable solid silver service was stolen
from the Misses Perkinpine, two very old and simple minded
ladies. Fred Sheldon, the hero of this story and a friend of the
old ladies, undertakes to discover the thieves and have them ar-
rested. After much time spent in detective work, he succeeds in
discovering the silver plate and winning the reward for its re-
storation. During the narrative a circus comes to town anda
thrilling account of the escape of the lion from its cage, with its
_Tecapture, is told in Mr. Ellis’ most fascinating style. Every
boy will be glad to read this delightful book.

The Days of Bruce: A Story from Scottish History. By GRAcE

AGUILAR. Illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

“There is a delightful freshness, sincerity and vivacity about all of Grace
Aguilar’s stories which cannot fail to win the interest and admiration of
every lover of good reading.’’—Boston Beacon.
18 A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS.



Tom the Bootblack; or, The Road to Success. By Horatio

ALGER, JR. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

A bright, enterprising lad was Tom the bootblack. He was
not at all ashamed of his humble calling, though always on the
lookout to better himself. His guardian, old Jacob Morton, died,
leaving him a small sum of money and a written confession that
Tom, instead of being of humble origin, was the son and heir of
a deceased Western merchant, and had been defrauded out of his
just rights by an unscrupulous uncle. The lad started for Cin-
cinnati to look up his heritage. But three years passed away
before he obtained his first clue. Mr. Grey, the uncle, did not
hesitate to employ a ruffian to kill the lad. The plan failed, and
Gilbert Grey, once Tom the bootblack, came into a comfortable
fortune. This is one of Mr. Alger’s best stories,

Captured by Zulus: A story of Trapping in Africa. By Harry
PRENTICE. 12mo, cloth, price $1.60.

This story details the adventures of two lads, Dick Elsworth
and Bob Harvey, in the wilds of South Africa, for the purpose of
obtaining a supply of zoological curiosities. By stratagem the
Zulus capture Dick and Bob and take them to their principal
kraal or village. ‘The lads escape death by digging their way
out of the prison hut by night. They are pursued, and after a
rough experience the boys eventually rejoin the expedition and
take part in several wild animal hunts. The Zulus finally give
up pursuit and the expedition arrives at the coast without further
trouble, Mr. Prentice has a delightful method of blending fact
with fiction, He tells exactly how wild-beast collectors secure
specimens on their native stamping grounds, and these descrip-
tions make very entertaining reading.

Tom the Ready; or, Up from the Lowest. By RANDOLPH
Hii. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

This is a dramatic narrative of the unaided rise of a fearless,
ambitious boy from the lowest round of fo:tune’s ladder—the
gate of the poorhouse—to wealth and the governorship of his
native State. ‘Thomas Seacomb begins life with a purpose. While
yet a schoolboy he conceives and presents to the world the germ
of the Overland Express Co, At the very outset of his career
jealousy and craft seek to blast his promising future. Later he
sets out to obtain a charter for a railroad line in connection with
the express business. Now he realizes what it is to match him-
self against capital. Yet he wins and the railroad is built. Only
an uncommon nature like Tom’s could successfully oppose such a
combine. How he manages to win the battle is told by Mr. Hill
in a masterful way that thrills the reader and holds his attention
and sympathy to the end.
A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS. 19



Roy Gilbert’s Search: A Tale of the Great Lakes. By Wm. P.
CHIPMAN. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

A deep mystery hangs over the parentage of Roy Gilbert.
He arranges with two schoolmates to make a tour of the
Great Lakes on a steam launch. The three boys leave Erie on
the launch and visit many points of interest on the lakes. Soon
afterward the lad is conspicuous in the rescue of an elderly gentle-
man and a lady from a sinking yacht. Later on the cruise of the
launch is brought to a disastrous termination and the boys nar-
rowly escape with their lives. The hero is a manly, self-reliant
boy, whose adventures will be followed with interest.

The Young Scout; The Story of a West Point Lieutenant. By
Epwarp 8. Exuis. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

The crafty Apache chief Geronimo but a few years ago was the,
most terrible scourge of the southwest border. The author has
woven,ina tale of thrilling interest, all the incidents of Geronimo’s
last raid. The hero is Lieutenant James Decker, a recent graduate
of West Point. Ambitious to distinguish himself so as to win
well-deserved promotion, the young man takes many a desperate,
chance against the enemy and on more than one occasion nar-
rowly escapes with his life. The story naturally abounds in
thrilling situations, and being historically correct, it is reasonable
to believe it will find great favor with the boys. In our opinion
Mr. Ellis is the best writer of Indian stories now before the
public.

Adrift in the Wilds: The Adventures of Two Shipwrecked
Boys. By Epwarp §. Exuis. 12mo, cloth, price, $1.00.

Elwood Brandon and Howard Lawrence, cousins and school-
mates, accompanied by a lively Irishman called O’Rooney, are en.
route for San Francisco. Off the coast of California the steamer
takes fire.. The two boys and their companion reach the shoré
with several of the passengers. While O’Rooney and the-lads
are absent inspecting the neighborhood O’Rooney has an excit-
ing experience and young Brandon. becomes separated from. his
party. Heis captured by hostile Indians, but is rescued by an
Indian whom the lads had assisted. This is a very entertaining
narrative of Southern California in the days immediately preced-
ing the construction of the Pacific railroads. Mr. Ellis seems to
be particularly happy in this line of fiction, and the present story
is fully as entertaining as anything he has ever written.

The Red Fairy Book. Edited by ANDREW LANG. Profusely

Illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

‘*A gift-book that will charm any child, and all older folk who have been
porta te enough to retain their taste for the old nursery stories.”’—Literary
orld,

—
20 A, L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS.



The Boy Cruisers; or, Paddling in Florida. By Sr, Groren
RATHBORNE. 12mo, cloth, price, $1.00.

Boys who like an admixture of sport and adventure will find
this book just to their taste. We promise them that they will
not go to sleep over the rattling experiences of Andrew George
and Roland Carter, who start on a canoe trip along the Gulf
coast, from Key West to Tampa, Florida. Their first adventure
is with a pair of rascals who steal their boats. Next they run
into a gale in the Gulf and have a lively experience while it lasts.
After that they have a lively time with alligators and divers
varieties of the finny tribe. Andrew gets into trouble with a
band of Seminole Indians and gets away without having his
scalp raised. After this there is no lack of fun till they
reach their destination. That Mr. Rathborne knows just how to
interest the boys is apparent at a glance, and lads who are in
search of a rare treat will do well to read this entertaining story.

Guy Harris: The Runaway. By Harry CasTLemMon. 12mo,
cloth, price $1.00.

Guy Harris lived in asmall city on the shore of one of the
Great Lakes. His head became filled with quixotic notions of
going West to hunt grizzlies, in fact, Indians. He is per-
suaded to go to sea, and gets a glimpse of the rough side of life
in a sailor’s boarding house. He ships on a vessel and for five
months leads a hard lite. He deserts his ship at San Francisco
and starts out to become a backwoodsman, but rough experiences
soon cure him of all desire to be a hunter. At St. Louis he be-
comes a clerk and for a time he yields to the temptations of a
great city. The book will not only interest boys generally on
account of its graphic style, but will put many facts before their
eyes in anew light. This is one of Castlemon’s most attractive
stories.

The Train Boy. By Horatio ALGER, JR. 12mo, cloth, price.
$1.00.

Paul Palmer was a wide-awake boy of sixteen who supported
his mother and sister by selling books and papers on one of the
trains running between Chicago and Milwaukee. He detects a
young man named Luke Denton in the act of picking the pocket
of a young lady, and also incurs the enmity of his brother Ste-
phen, a worthless follow. Luke and Stephen plot to ruin Paul,
but their plans are frustrated. Ina railway accident many pas-
sengers are killed, but Paul is fortunate enough to assist a Chicago
merchant, who out of gratitude takes him into hisemploy. Paul
is sent to manage a mine in Custer City and executes his com-
mission with tact and judgment and is well started on the road
to business prominence. This is one of Mr. Alger’s most attrac-
tive stories and is sure to please all readers.
A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS. 21



Joe’s Luck: A Boy’s Adventures in California. By Horatio.
ALGER, JR. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

Without a doubt Joe Mason was a lucky boy, but he deserved
the golden chances that fell to his lot, for he had the pluck and
ambition to push himself to the front. Joe had but one dollar in
the world when he stood despondently on the California Mail
Steamship Co.’s dock in New York watching the preparations in-
cident to the departure of the steamer. ‘lhe same dollar was
still Joe’s entire capital when he landed in the bustling town of
tents and one-story cabins—the San Francisco of ’51, and inside
of the week the boy was proprietor of a small restaurant earning a
comfortable profit. The story is chock full of stirring incidents,
while the amusing situations are furnished by Joshua Bickford,
from Pumpkin Hollow, and the fellow who modestly styles him-
self the ‘‘ Rip-tail Roarer, from Pike Co., Missouri.” Mr. Alger
never writes a poor book, and ‘‘Joe’s Luck” is certainly one of

is best.

Three Bright Girls: A Story of Chance and Mischance. By
ANNIE BE. ARMSTRONG. With full page Illustrations by W.
PARKINSON. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

By a sudden turn of fortune’s wheel the three heroines of this
story are brought down from a household of lavish comfort to
meet the incessant cares and worries of those who have to eke out
a very limited income. And the charm of the story lies in the
cheery helpfulness of spirit develuped inthe girls by their changed
circumstances; while the author finds a pleasant ending to all
their happy makeshifts.

“The story is charmingly told, and the book can be warmly recommended
as a present for girls.”—Standard.

Giannetta: A Girl’s Story of Herself. By RosA MULHOLLAND.
With full-page Illustrations by LockHART Bo@LE. 12mo,
cloth, price $1.00.

The daughter of a gentleman, who had married a poor Swiss
girl, was stolen as an infant by some of her mother’s relatives.
The child having died, they afterward for the sake of gain sub-
stitute another child for it, and the changeling, after becoming
aclever modeler of clay images, is suddenly transferred to the
position of a rich heiress. She develops into a good and accom-
plished woman, and though the imposture of her early friends is
finally discovered, she has gained too much love and devotion to
be really a sufferer by the surrender of her estates.

“ Extremely well told and full of interest. Giannetta is a true heroine—
warm-hearted, self-sacrificing, and, as all good women nowadays are, largely
touched with enthusiasm of humanity. The illustrations are unusually good.
One of the most attractive gift books of the season.”—The Academy.
22 A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS.



Margery Merton’s Girlhood. By AticE CorKRAN. With full-
page Illustrations by GORDON BROWNE. 12mo, cloth, price
$1.00.

The experiences of an orphan girl who in infancy is left by her
father—an officer in India—to the care of an elderly aunt residing
near Paris. The accounts of the various persons who have an
after influence on the story, the school companions of Margery,
the sisters of the Conventual College of Art, the professor, and
the peasantry of Fontainebleau, are singularly vivid. There isa
subtle attraction about the book which will make it a great favorite
with thoughtful girls.

“* Another book for girls we can warmly commend. There is a delightful

piquancy in the experiences and trials of a young English girl who studies
painting in Paris.’"—Saturday Review.

Under False Colors: A Story from Two Girls’ Lives. By
Saraw DoupNEY. With full-page Illustrations by G. G. Kin-
BURNE. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

A story which has in it so strong a dramatic element that it
will attract readers of all ages and of either sex. The incidents
of the plot, arising from the thoughtless indulgence of a decep-
tive freak, are exceedingly natural, and the keen interest of the
narrative is sustained from beginning to end.

‘Sarah Doudney has no superior as a writer of high-toned stories—pure
in style, original in conception, and with skillfully wrought-out plots; but

re have seen nothing equal in dramatic energy to this book.”—Christian
Leader.

Down the Snow Stairs; or, From Good-night to Good-morning.
By ALICE CoRKRAN. With Illustrations by GoRDON BROWNE.
12mo, cloth, price 75 cents.

This is a remarkable story: full of vivid fancy and quaint
originality. In its most fantastic imaginings it carries with it a
sense of reality, and derives a singular attraction from that com-
bination of simplicity, originality, and subtle humor, which is so
much appreciated by lively and thoughtful children. Children
of a larger growth will also be deeply interested in Kitty’s strange
journey, and her wonderful experiences.

‘Among all the Christmas volumes which the year has brought to our
table this one stands out facile nrinceps—a gem of the first water, bearing
upon every one of its pages the signet mark of genius. . . . All is told

with such Bap, and perfect naturalness that the dream appears to be a
solid reality. It is indeed a Little Pilgrim’s Progress.” —Christian Leader.

The Tapestry Room: A Child’s Romance. By Mrs. MoueEs-
WORTH. Illustrated by WALTER CRANE. 12mo, cloth, price
75 cents.

‘Mrs. Molesworth is a charming painter of the nature and ways of children;
and she has done good service in giving us this charming juvenile which will
delight the young people.” —Athenceum, London,
A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS. 23



Little Miss Peggy: Only a Nursery Story. By Mrs. Mouzs-
wort. With Illustrations by WALTER CRANE. 12mo, cloth,
price 75 cents.

Mrs. Molesworth’s children are finished studies. She is never
sentimental, but writes common sense in a straightforward man-
ner. A joyous earnest spirit pervades her work, and her sym-
pathy is unbounded. She loves them with her whole heart,
while she lays bare their little minds, and expresses their foibles,
their faults, their virtues, their inward struggles, their concep-
tion of duty, and their instinctive knowledge of the right and
wrong of things. She knows their characters, she understands
their wants, and she desires to help them.

Polly: A New Fashioned Girl. By L. T. MEADE. Illustrated
12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

Few authors have achieved a popularity equal to Mrs. Meade
as a writer of stories for young girls. Her characters are living
beings of flesh and blood, not lay figures of conventional type.
Into the trials and crosses, and everyday experiences, the reader
enters at once with zest and hearty sympathy. While Mrs.
Meade always writes with a high moral purpose, her lessons of
life, purity and nobility of character are rather inculcated by
example than intruded as sermons.

Rosy. By Mrs. Mo.esworra. Illustrated by WALTER CRANE.
12mo, cloth, price 75 cents,

Mrs, Molesworth, considering the quality and quantity of her
labors, is the best story-teller for children England has yet
known. This is a bold statement and requires substantiation.
Mrs. Molesworth, during the last six years, has never failed to
occupy a prominent place among the juvenile writers of the
season.

“A very pretty story. . . . The writer knows children and their ways
well. . . . The illustrations are exceedingly well drawn.”’—Spectator.
Little Sunshine’s Holiday: A Picture from Life. By Muss

Mutocx. Illustrated by WALTER CRANE. 12mo, cloth, price

75 cents.

“ This is a pretty narrative of baby life, describing the simple doings and
Sayings of a very charming and rather precocious child nearly three years
old.” —Pall Mall Gazette.

‘‘ Will be delightful to those who have nurseries peopled by ‘ Little Sun-
shines’ of their own.”—Athenceum.

Esther: A Book for Girls. By Rosa N. Carey. Illustrated,

12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

“She inspires her readers simply by bringing them in contact with the
‘characters, who are in themselves inspiring, Her simple stories are woven
in order to give her an op ortunity to describe her characters by their own
conduct in seasons of trial.”"—Chicago Times.
24 A, L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS.

Sweet Content. By Mrs. MoLeswortu. Illustrated by W.
RaInEy. 12mo, cloth, price 75 cents.

“Tt seems to me not at all easier to draw a lifelike child than to draw a
lifelike man or woman: Shakespeare and Webster were the only two menof
their age who could do it with perfect delicacy and success. Ourown age is
more fortunate, on this single score at least, having a larger and far nobler
proportion of female writers; among whom, since the death of George Eliot,
there is none left whose touch is so exquisite and masterly, whose love is so
thoroughly according to knowledge, whose bright and sweet invention is so
fruitful, so truthful, or so delightful as Mrs. Molesworth.”°—A. C. SWINBURNE.

One of a Covey. By the Author of ‘‘Honor Bright,” ‘ Miss
Toosey’s Mission.” With Numerous Illustrations by H. J. A.
Mies. 12mo, cloth, price 75 cents.

“Full of spirit and life, so well sustained throughout that grown-up readers
may enjoy it as much as children. This ‘Covey’ consists of the twelve
children of a hard-pressed Dr. Partridge. out of which is chosen a little girl
to be adopted by a spoilt, finelady. . . . Itis one of the best books of the
season.” —Guardian.

‘We have rarely read a story for boys and girls with greater pleasure.
One of the chief characters would not have disgraced Dickens’ pen.”—
Literary World.

The Little Princess of Tower Hill. By L. T. MEADE. Illus-
trated, 12mo, cloth, price 75 cents.

“This is one of the prettiest books for children published, as pretty as a
pond-lily, and quite as fragrant. Nothing could be imagined more attractive
to yours people than such a combination of fresh pages and fair pictures;
and while children will rejoice over it—which is much better than crying for
it—it is a book that can be read with pleasure even by older boys and girls.”
—Boston Advertiser,

Honor Bright ; or, The Four-Leaved Shamrock. By the Author
of ‘“‘One of a Covey,” ‘‘ Miss Tovosey’s Mission,” etc., etc.

With full-page Illustrations, 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

“Tt requires a special talent to describe the sayings and doings of children,
and the author of ‘Honor Bright,’ ‘One of a Covey,’ possesses that talent
in no small degree.”—Literary Churchmdn.

‘*A cheery, sensible, and healthy tale.’—The Times.

The Cuckoo Clock. By Mrs. MoteswortH. With Illustra-

tions by WALTER CRANE. 12mo, cloth, price 75 cents.

‘‘A beautiful little story. It will be read with delight by every child into
whose hands it is placed. . . . The author deserves all the praise that has
been, is, and will be bestowed on ‘The Cuckoo Clock.’ Children’s stories are

plentiful, but one like this is not to be met with every day.”—Pall Mall
Gazette.

Girl Neighbors; or, The Old Fashion and the New. By Saran
TyYLER. With full-page Illustrations by C. T. GARLAND.
12mo, cloth, price 75 cents.

‘‘ One of the most effective and quietly humorous of Miss Tytler’s stories,
‘Girl Neighbors’ is a pleasant comedy, not so much of errors as of preju

dices got rid of, very healthy, very agreeable, and very well written.”—
Spectator.
A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS. 25



The Little Lame Prince. By Miss Muuock. Illustrated,
cloth, price 75 cents.

‘*No sweeter—that is the proper word—Christmas story for the little folks
could easily be found, and it is as delightful for older readers as well. There
is a moral to it which the reader can find out for himself, if he chooses to
think.”—Herald, Cleveland.

The Adventures{of a Brownie. As Told to my Child. By
Miss Munock. Illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price 75 cents.

‘The author of this delightful little book leaves it in doubt all through
whether there actually is such a creature in existence as a Brownie, but ake
makes us hope that there might be.’—Standard, Chicago.

Only a Girl: A Story of a Quiet-Life. A Tale of Brittany.

Adapted from the the French by C. A. JonEs. Illustrated,

12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

.. “We can thoroughly recommend this brightly written and homely narra-
rative.’’—Saturday Review.

Little Rosebud ; or, Things Will Take a Turn, By BEATRICE

HARRADEN. Illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price 75 cents.

“A most delightful little book. . . . Miss Harraden is so bright, so
healthy, and so natural withal that the book ought, as a matter of duty, to
be added to every girl’s library in the land.”—Boston Transcript.

Little Miss Joy. By Emma Marsuauu. Illustrated, 12mo,

cloth, price 75 cents.

“A very pleasant and instructive story, told by a very charming writer in
such an attractive way as to win favor among its young readers. The illus-
trations add to the beauty of the book.”—Utica Herald.

Little Lucy’s Wonderful Globe: By CuartoTre M. YonaE.

Illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price 75 cents. 5

“This story is unique among tales intended for children, alike for pleasan'
instruction, quaintness of humor, gentle pathos, and the subtlety with which
lessons ORAL and otherwise are conveyed to children, and perhaps to their
seniors as well.”—The Spectator.

Joan’s Adventures at the North Pole and Elsewhere. By

ALIcE CoRKRAN. Illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price 75 cents.

“ Wonderful as the adventures of Joan are, it must be admitted that they
are very naturally worked out'and very plausibly presented. Altogether
this is an excellent story for girls.’—Saturday Review,

Count Up the Sunny Days: A Story for Boys and Girls. By
C. A. Jones. With full-page Illustrations, 12mo, cloth, price
%5 cents.

“ An unusually good children’s story.”—Glasgow Herald.
‘Sue andI, By Mrs. O’ReILLy. Illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price

75 cents.

“A thoroughly delightful book, full of sound wisdom as well as fun;"—
Atheneum. : -
26 A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS.

Soa es a ee eee

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. By Lewis Carrow.
With 42 Ilustrations by Joun TENNIEL. 12mo, cloth, price
75 cents.

“From first to last, almost without exception, this story is delightfully
arall humorous and illustrated in harmony with the story."—New York
apress,

Celtic Fairy Tales. Edited by Josmru Jacozs. Illustrated by
J.D. Barren. 12mo, cloth, preic $1.00.

“CA stock of delightful little narratives gathered chiefly from the Celtic-
speaking peasants of Ireland.”—Daily Telegraph.

‘A perfectly lovely book. And oh! the wonderful pictures inside. Get
this book if you can; it is capital, all through.”—Pall Mall Budget.

English Fairy Tales. Edited by JoszpH Jacozs. Illustrated
by J. D. Batten. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

“The tales are simply delightful. No amount of description can do them
supine: The only way is to read the book through from cover to cover.”—
‘Magazine and Book Review.

‘The book is intended to correspond to ‘ Grimm’s Fairy Tales,’ and it must
be allowed that its pages fairly rival in interest those of the well-known re-
Pository of folk-lore.”—Sydney Morning Herald.

Indian Fairy Tales. Edited by JosrrH Jacozs. Illustrated by

J.D. Barren. 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

“Mr. Jacobs brings home to us in a clear and intelligible manner the enor-
mous influence which ‘ Indian Fairy Tales’ have had upon European litera-

‘ture of the kind.”—Gloucester Journal.

‘‘ The present combination will be welcomed not alone by the little ones for
whom it is specially combined, but also by children of larger growth and
added years.”—Daily Telegraph.

The Blue Fairy Book. Edited by ANDREW Lana. Profusely

Illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

., “The tales are simply delightful. No amount of description can do them
queue The only way is to read the book through from cover to cover.”—
agazine and Book Review.

The Green Fairy Book. Edited by ANDREW Lana. Profusely
Illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.
‘‘The most delightful book of fairy tales, taking form and contents to-
gether, ever presented to children.”"—E. S. HarTLANp, in Folk-Lore.
“The Yellow Fairy Book. Edited by ANDREW Lana. Profusely
illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.
“ As a collection of fairy tales to delight children of all ages ranks second
to none.” —Daily Graphic (with illustrations).
‘Through the Looking Glass, and What Alice Found There.
By Lewis CaRROLL. With 50 Illustrations by Joun TENNIEL.

=» “A delight alike to the young people and their elders, extremely funny
bcth in text and illustrations.”—Boston Express,
A. L. BURT’S PUBLICATIONS, 27



The Heir of Redclyffe. By CHarLorTeM. Yonge. Illustrated,
12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

‘‘ A narrative full of interest from first to last. It is told clearly and in a
straightforward manner and arrests the attention of the reader at once,-so
that one feels afresh the unspeakable pathos of the story to the end.”—
London Graphic.

The Dove in the Eagle’s Nest. By CHARLOTTE M. YonGE.
Illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

“Among all the modern writers we believe Miss Yonge first, not in genius,
but in this, that she employs her great abilities fora high and noble purpose.
‘We know of few modern writers whose works may be so safely commended
as hers.”.—Cleveland Times.

A Sweet Girl Graduate. By L. T. Mmapz. Illustrated, 12mo,

cloth, price $1.00.

“ One of this popular author's best. The characters are well imagined and
drawn. The story moves with plenty of spirit and the interest does not flag
until the end too quickly comes.”.—Providence Journal.

The Palace Beautiful: A Story for Girls, By L. T, MmApDE,

Illustrated, cloth, 12mo, price $1.00.

“A bright and interesting story. The many admirers of Mrs. L. T. Meade
in this country will be delighted with the ‘Palace Beautiful ’ for more reasons
than one.”—New York Recorder.

A World of Girls: The Story of a School. By L. T. MEADE,

Illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

‘One of those wholesome stories which it does one good to read. It will
afford pure delight to her numerous readers."—Boston Home Journal.

The Lady of the Forest; A Story for Girls. By L. T. Mmapn,
Illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

“This Seory is written in the author’s well-known, fresh and easy style.
All girls fond of reading will be charmed by this well-written story. It is
told with the author’s customary grace and spirit.”—Boston Times.

At the Back of the North Wind. By Gror@z MACDONALD.

Illustrated by GEORGE GROVES, 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

‘‘A very pretty story, with much of the freshness and vigor of Mr. Mac-
donald’s earlier work. . . .~ It is a sweet, earnest, and wholesome fairy
story, and the quaint native humor is delightful. A most delightful volume
for young readers.”—Philadelphia Times.

The Water Babies: A Fairy Tale fora Land Baby. By CHARLES

Krne@siEy. Illustrated, 12mo, cloth, price $1.00.

“The strength of his work, as well as its peculiar charms, consist in his
description of the experiences of a youth with life under water in the luxu-
riant wealth of which he revels with all the ardor of a poetical nature.”—
New York Tribune.






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0675af23ead9f0f721a20ca3e53c77c6
0c0048bb914f72549a4b77034b77ed7f81d50b12
'2011-12-30T12:17:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUMT' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-12-30T12:15:36-05:00'
describe
'9931' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUMU' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
f720ad4bfe2bacd4110e798a7f7fc05e
6424f145b0d1541902e6fc97eec14b9242172328
'2011-12-30T12:18:26-05:00'
describe
'405947' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUMV' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
5cd9e1f2c781ed1f790f592d777c011e
74f460a02a414ed2b12835e59d7a53a82ddd10e3
'2011-12-30T12:17:42-05:00'
describe
'52998' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUMW' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
2e23ee3ae0258d0204dd5c7a14ffeadf
de4b1bebfcbc6649f75851922539fc0ea9f4456a
'2011-12-30T12:17:54-05:00'
describe
'11912' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUMX' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
0313eb0fc1d9a13e21e15638c3382fe8
401268aeb92a11570cdc45aeae45f4d783d4072e
'2011-12-30T12:13:58-05:00'
describe
'9751300' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUMY' 'sip-files00003.tif'
23410b4125e37d0b6f7589d82d73cb62
036fa156a7f046c86578f1afaf88c19dcab611f5
'2011-12-30T12:18:49-05:00'
describe
'3310' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUMZ' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
d2eee5f908d31ae98343ee325d351535
b88e9666d78c342a9baeb619f538233ef55c28a8
'2011-12-30T12:19:37-05:00'
describe
'324104' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNA' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
f381e6ecdb5380f248ed0decf16a0c43
a35e9f5d22044aa3bc1a3fde569fbaccd24392e4
'2011-12-30T12:20:15-05:00'
describe
'50423' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNB' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
e96b8994db654f8d870c5fb2679c38e7
609db03132d8b2d8e309bb9a67e5ee2d52aca7e4
'2011-12-30T12:17:40-05:00'
describe
'11187' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNC' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
90fb7c2b2c2e711261d2741a6b219cef
266073feda487bedd8670fe33ca6a2ed6ed6ec5e
'2011-12-30T12:14:36-05:00'
describe
'7786904' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUND' 'sip-files00004.tif'
131f54c095bcb50b30094acf5d0db038
d639da3927db4315115b3a970a21153e55e1511b
'2011-12-30T12:20:45-05:00'
describe
'3222' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNE' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
fc2d6ecd1d8bb01fb9340de13eeaece9
f0bb7fda5ae47cca9f1cac37f4c44bc29188e14c
'2011-12-30T12:16:46-05:00'
describe
'313165' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNF' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
eedc861a025fe1b18decbf804e1bbf4c
dbc5c790e89e981a636383d03caf1206dd9e21b0
'2011-12-30T12:19:07-05:00'
describe
'183745' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNG' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
44664887c0fb7ce69320b9aaf6b098e7
26510c985cc3a2081b8f8eea98f11e97fb85be31
'2011-12-30T12:16:25-05:00'
describe
'3042' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNH' 'sip-files00009.pro'
4adc34b2552af5f2326c2807e6a629e4
69d3483603d327f5de34d779d003c939ee2ea37c
'2011-12-30T12:17:46-05:00'
describe
'48573' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNI' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
fabb64d7a156a0726efe4c0d3babea84
e432ee63d964c01524cd0bf638cc3a8cdb6a7f3d
'2011-12-30T12:14:29-05:00'
describe
'2519756' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNJ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
950798a6c925280aec6557f2b28b3fd0
55fdffc42cf5319bf9b7113d4943d80cd8a99baf
'2011-12-30T12:17:14-05:00'
describe
'259' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNK' 'sip-files00009.txt'
ab889c5f338db1e35ddcf8b1e3cd14a3
6a7c8a7fceb00872253c37d35e1e276b6e8aa1ed
'2011-12-30T12:16:07-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'11758' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNL' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
0cbaa122fb494da63026830c5e5882cb
bcedbd64f5fd9b73cb35363f03925a0df7319bfb
'2011-12-30T12:17:15-05:00'
describe
'313179' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNM' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
571b034746bec0baeca97637a8eb6034
9dedda378285cc49e38f51191307a7609f8290b0
'2011-12-30T12:16:22-05:00'
describe
'98091' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNN' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
c6f5afc04a662882c39749c41c61e41d
7b6ed28ad94993247e3359cf22cdf13fabec4eae
'2011-12-30T12:15:30-05:00'
describe
'5630' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNO' 'sip-files00010.pro'
a97b24a8c64341bf6322b740658b92cf
cc21ae0bb14ac232a39050b79a47984a11cc7167
'2011-12-30T12:18:07-05:00'
describe
'25411' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNP' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
7520e983f164c1beb074a38c5d623e8b
ffb48922bd138904319d395f01b811fb45625c3f
'2011-12-30T12:18:42-05:00'
describe
'2517468' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNQ' 'sip-files00010.tif'
7fa68e8e622d09e8fa06e3e2ae3500ef
950c26abd65ff3a2a33e934fb82a9b3712738356
'2011-12-30T12:15:15-05:00'
describe
'294' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNR' 'sip-files00010.txt'
6819e740f24d0e6e46ca918fd1648eed
da0016a70f233d5b6a08869d8474b73e0bd8b916
'2011-12-30T12:14:48-05:00'
describe
'7012' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNS' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
a316300f67a0a022d3cfdf19da8d8a94
cdda146d6c6cfd13b1c4ba2a5313fd11ce267b4c
'2011-12-30T12:13:53-05:00'
describe
'313110' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNT' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
e31e6987c0d6aad91e9448cdd61bc1f7
a3938599f52c235957df7474ef8a11a1a10211b8
'2011-12-30T12:18:19-05:00'
describe
'33353' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNU' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
5fec778f9a68afb59238fb9631582fb8
b240f0c2e8be77626b2d40d400d7bfa2c64ca6b8
'2011-12-30T12:13:06-05:00'
describe
'1961' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNV' 'sip-files00011.pro'
ed34a49638c83f45f63b1d147ccf5817
dd05979e9f28cd8a2d2d4dd34d160510e27b3095
'2011-12-30T12:13:29-05:00'
describe
'6677' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNW' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
574855faa1ebd5ab872164bd6a440712
12a18b8c2cb31bd39d1c207f554cfde2e80c6e03
'2011-12-30T12:19:10-05:00'
describe
'2513972' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNX' 'sip-files00011.tif'
6278e57472b511ae4ece00eaed835349
2b85936ef67abd70a6f0a7cf6f8f4ccda1979400
'2011-12-30T12:14:59-05:00'
describe
'141' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNY' 'sip-files00011.txt'
22eea34e64c401f018c77c31421a523f
2d3a250a3ee9e8d3c49a4d25e6a641c2b1dd7675
'2011-12-30T12:18:46-05:00'
describe
'1855' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUNZ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
ba0384dbef3dee29bf8a3f7f21bb8e55
97ce4b24afc05a1ebe9595e21061a962d8348bb9
'2011-12-30T12:15:45-05:00'
describe
'313124' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOA' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
4aba0e203418f7c88836b7f58654b255
9c33a5a0ef8b62c0d330e3a16f5657bfe07552ee
'2011-12-30T12:16:56-05:00'
describe
'72659' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOB' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
f9d873fe51390942d7188945c6eb48cc
2882ad1bea4d6f2ed33af9f3e59680d2320ca66d
describe
'11489' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOC' 'sip-files00012.pro'
634999fb259ecdaf553986969e7e42f2
4daa99203533bab04acfc6d42aab20454fbc1b6d
'2011-12-30T12:14:24-05:00'
describe
'22272' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOD' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
baeb22831c5a65b83252c88fee085e96
ed5794e0f331950c22e30ab4254ba43b407f8b5b
'2011-12-30T12:20:31-05:00'
describe
'2516560' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOE' 'sip-files00012.tif'
a0c6f89d95affc1334f30f5a6bc8a614
bfcab1e2f6b42b17f0d29b1d476aa69de575a15e
'2011-12-30T12:14:50-05:00'
describe
'469' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOF' 'sip-files00012.txt'
01941ccc972c2873bf492f2d7adce51c
2d4cee36c231bf4b5289d7984ee6fbad165ddd71
'2011-12-30T12:19:17-05:00'
describe
'6549' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOG' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
1ed2c9cc8a77ea4c939e27dd9282daa2
485b0a20243db9929113df8b8c0889e17987e07c
'2011-12-30T12:16:42-05:00'
describe
'313232' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOH' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
0dca1da1a7199b6bce98db0d0d2ca57b
8af80777c044429c9db2a652c50a84777f449a5f
'2011-12-30T12:13:52-05:00'
describe
'73870' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOI' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
98f2293726f57503ef641f17528d02a8
070351d9925a24aef8cf8d511331820607332bb0
describe
'19676' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOJ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
736b9c7f3c6f087d69005de10e5d1639
b29ae71b00b47adab32879a260e6cdb03c1305b5
'2011-12-30T12:20:27-05:00'
describe
'21938' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOK' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
32d1c90d7c7246e5bace7c89ce4b7f21
d3dafc33ba7b56a18e7f07ebf92340415ef02619
'2011-12-30T12:18:54-05:00'
describe
'2516880' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOL' 'sip-files00014.tif'
e0d958486084c652fa3e97bcc34ba9a5
07d529c30453b3e29d28b4c6508a7982f070ab46
'2011-12-30T12:17:09-05:00'
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOM' 'sip-files00014.txt'
4654dd20c575e5194b1a25dc1c85630f
da84abaaa5aeaa75013956b5c848e0629c7419f8
'2011-12-30T12:16:39-05:00'
describe
'6604' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUON' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
a2060ddcd1ee9cccd9f471436a9126b2
156e0204c492d09c479a03f424524b1c3fe99443
'2011-12-30T12:17:06-05:00'
describe
'313008' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOO' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
2a25207b91a4189937101721cad3ed24
b42e96ac472b8e07e8af0f2aed3a5673e65fb21b
'2011-12-30T12:16:04-05:00'
describe
'84049' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOP' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
03f2da510977b8686ac5e36b9d2e34c5
2207bc42273ff5487fce6e8a80793d4a69df9761
'2011-12-30T12:16:20-05:00'
describe
'23038' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOQ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
ba353e694c2ef012f308d0ac4f99a4ae
65ae50db05a72129ef814040a1f452c4c37cf8bb
'2011-12-30T12:15:50-05:00'
describe
'26022' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOR' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
0b08043ce9dbdc462f28bb76041a2de1
bb125014f3fbf4e893c515ea424b8f9b4b7e9298
'2011-12-30T12:16:21-05:00'
describe
'2517376' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOS' 'sip-files00016.tif'
846cf3ee4d2d52d6ddb9ca440f543bab
283c183222e1033a41d4c5315936105022d0406f
'2011-12-30T12:17:50-05:00'
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOT' 'sip-files00016.txt'
d60c174c113103b84cdabd8167a6ab6d
60256284acdf9493f3b00ca53beb94f3eb94cd24
'2011-12-30T12:19:38-05:00'
describe
'7296' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOU' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
3d2a05994935670fa7d73a69fe412894
07ad932d2fe0ac387a6b65d5a3dcdfa5aa3e8ecb
'2011-12-30T12:19:02-05:00'
describe
'313224' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOV' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
6ba3590d9bb666d259b2eb1b1532d850
0572e968dccf191b36c3d056e91cf57ca2827b00
'2011-12-30T12:13:14-05:00'
describe
'92781' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOW' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
ecd9be6069633deb207c057d855dd872
5e533dae78fa303774e3b861890fdebb4eb99eb0
describe
'14515' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOX' 'sip-files00018.pro'
9cf274a2440ca0a531dce9802b262628
66bb40ed52aa9f07a86a24793f268f977e52bca5
'2011-12-30T12:15:48-05:00'
describe
'28717' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOY' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
5e3a6db71b4a9e5f30cae9d85ea114b0
68c1ef02d80cab9e90ef4c4b539891559834315d
'2011-12-30T12:19:47-05:00'
describe
'2517792' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUOZ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
0d346db95a913f3aec767b0300273f71
b3b663707a587cbd1e65cf2ec638872592afcf5c
'2011-12-30T12:20:40-05:00'
describe
'616' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPA' 'sip-files00018.txt'
07834438999483b142d406559efde4b7
7cf26408622b264dc033e96225e303ecf778e43c
'2011-12-30T12:15:59-05:00'
describe
'8038' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPB' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
8f7d0e3a60762ac453d6f090db8d99f6
addec9057bca3f68ac4a58442b415dd52df22c93
'2011-12-30T12:16:27-05:00'
describe
'313213' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPC' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
bddfa851b8dc2b31bbe8895d20c7be90
be9a386f0da99c41ff0ec84846e507479d0caa71
'2011-12-30T12:18:37-05:00'
describe
'118548' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPD' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
fe74e9dca9e46dc3d54c1b9dd419d2c5
17c273e061ca5aca7467311cbc707681d72fb5f1
'2011-12-30T12:17:05-05:00'
describe
'23166' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPE' 'sip-files00019.pro'
bb81f5b5e28cb18a96e9c91194f25a17
94b3c6fc1393ab9eb4138428766dd20fcaae3894
describe
'38327' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPF' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
f090b5db3593e5c98f4e709c7553d586
2f36f46d9fdb4695a4cf2afed9199bc1e3230465
describe
'2518976' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPG' 'sip-files00019.tif'
0e5bde4e091c2dac70b06a802bbbbd40
dfc57ec287ebbcacdf6ed949cf53e2d68270014b
'2011-12-30T12:14:12-05:00'
describe
'924' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPH' 'sip-files00019.txt'
190bb58a2e93168772c6d0f50576f604
c37f6ae9f9c28989b7a9400cbd9c1ddb71cd93f4
'2011-12-30T12:20:38-05:00'
describe
'10462' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPI' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
b2885c68923593092a85f8f21c283743
abfb7912b61a6e8c4bb006ca46790191251fad64
'2011-12-30T12:16:47-05:00'
describe
'313198' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPJ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
6155051a6ebeed6d349ccb50cce737ab
d2060ece8ac14bd46007641a7801fd7ccdfed808
describe
'120808' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPK' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
4257ff7c91e150791b99d0e1e6df3670
a4aa5139600fd39c7b135c33563515bedd4551f7
'2011-12-30T12:14:01-05:00'
describe
'24122' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPL' 'sip-files00020.pro'
2c6312807e9403a027affa75f90d3b19
8277e09fe7b0cb71e6f718da33cc8362e3310939
'2011-12-30T12:19:09-05:00'
describe
'39567' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPM' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
60f139f4f2a1ad9a5d257dad73b6b5d7
565d7032450e5c0cbd06a300261f9fca7b63d45b
'2011-12-30T12:15:22-05:00'
describe
'2519380' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPN' 'sip-files00020.tif'
b35fd4b0efcd107703b57794924e1ad1
f0ce43507548606d9f7a306184bd8e791f60cad5
'2011-12-30T12:14:32-05:00'
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPO' 'sip-files00020.txt'
c397d55fe800bc54488bfbc29f29e3f9
fdc18db9c67cecfd0c81fe5eff7e4110c4b87862
'2011-12-30T12:18:06-05:00'
describe
'11165' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPP' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
b748d5e54c7cbd12f148d6d882b9385e
77594409158329b5faf5c86b1191d24fa7b7e6dd
'2011-12-30T12:16:13-05:00'
describe
'313201' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPQ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
2a0a844d01b8c67e331a3022a6fef6a6
85bfd6f122211ae4ef04d54dd6f5bd2022a702a0
describe
'124663' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPR' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
59ebb31be39f0c6489981ce84c742117
8479fd48f42a34db17570615436fbd8c8e176e4f
'2011-12-30T12:19:24-05:00'
describe
'24301' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPS' 'sip-files00021.pro'
95d0b87d853bf36824d5f0acfb56e245
839b29cfcf68465f7ab4af34a6d5ec4ab1f80e53
'2011-12-30T12:19:54-05:00'
describe
'40004' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPT' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
8b7442491f1c4f89e0943007126d38e2
f4fa26d87e8fa32001baf0ad4153e0912f471e9c
'2011-12-30T12:14:56-05:00'
describe
'2519408' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPU' 'sip-files00021.tif'
6b8078c7d3688ef33de6695bbe181ede
111d2c71748094e94e4752da4c639cbf775a2b4f
'2011-12-30T12:17:30-05:00'
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPV' 'sip-files00021.txt'
e781415c3b2db6d07df74079fb954cf7
fdc2beb7008e1b7a5d4e2e6732d77c84eb8326d7
'2011-12-30T12:16:28-05:00'
describe
'11111' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPW' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
a337daf6cdee2026d55a45b1e6ce582b
5b1c73d2ce5dc5e6ebd700b2de66a9518bfc8921
'2011-12-30T12:19:19-05:00'
describe
'313226' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPX' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
45f5f548b248373cd05d9db9d41007c5
6c32d07800a95bc0a034e865b1156b0ef0e065ea
'2011-12-30T12:15:10-05:00'
describe
'128000' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPY' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
c18b92666e66f996242ea5dafcbfbbd6
7c1c18611b6c471911168e710972b8ce6fea900f
describe
'25562' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUPZ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
36027ecef38080fde4eb52a24ddedad8
594e8a861d6d7ca170bb502cb49e373210e2ae7b
'2011-12-30T12:18:28-05:00'
describe
'41613' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQA' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
bd93ddebf36f704119e0a812ca169a64
3740d46ba9888a18f7899dd977bf29c11a7fe486
'2011-12-30T12:13:50-05:00'
describe
'2519480' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQB' 'sip-files00022.tif'
15b4b00037a732ae55bb0c36fcca3462
182f59f9655ba04a52af60f66f6948484dc2f9e1
'2011-12-30T12:19:28-05:00'
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQC' 'sip-files00022.txt'
e13d23303dcbf9ab2a30466f111d843d
e91176470fcb73e1551dea9c4eddd79375a42f63
describe
'11833' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQD' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
2997df66364a799284e3aa9fb1c54443
d3ca250eca02f3c9d7fe994149f79c3caa31041d
describe
'313189' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQE' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
34380220a11aa37fbcad4577a9f416b5
45d92105c231fe02becd3f35e5523659ba8166ae
'2011-12-30T12:19:51-05:00'
describe
'117746' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQF' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
4ad529345ac985ada478aac668ec0807
ede54d5762e3010b911cd1b8d929965fee463a6d
'2011-12-30T12:14:57-05:00'
describe
'23732' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQG' 'sip-files00023.pro'
83dec79c75cad7fafe74fbe82fa65f92
b44e6503a84e43fc402838051d1c2e6c11fd4884
'2011-12-30T12:17:04-05:00'
describe
'38335' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQH' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
85c3b65a175dca1985a84c368d7cf5f2
23a2f544596dedf052cd04face6638c471c4bb2d
'2011-12-30T12:19:16-05:00'
describe
'2518964' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQI' 'sip-files00023.tif'
e8f6c9e39569002fa2700028fcd056b5
0fe880ac00e46453e7f401beb1d09813511e5781
describe
'943' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQJ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
1890dbc5e68086a7c6dcbf9fa0f7f615
6d8365d1fc0e0940bba207fd6d9cee39176c8e1a
'2011-12-30T12:18:38-05:00'
describe
'10681' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQK' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
06b7b3cac3f2418b05556bfd126170bd
27c3dabc21e76e16ef9a5a9a1dbc03e9a6792942
'2011-12-30T12:17:25-05:00'
describe
'313244' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQL' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
c6b5cb4fa0a3c9bfcb1addd53f9aeb6a
6b5ac9f4733ba0ab0ba7db00195540ba432628e1
'2011-12-30T12:14:14-05:00'
describe
'119897' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQM' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
75fff761c3c9394fb95e2bf02cd8e0e8
7c52f4e274eff3602e086e6fc4a0cd6d9bae6a84
describe
'23237' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQN' 'sip-files00024.pro'
e8ff869acd535030fa76d025433588fd
328fff15a0503c418cf088cc1b48164eff6f9e9f
'2011-12-30T12:16:58-05:00'
describe
'39602' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQO' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
a6853a38f18d5821dd33e9a41bab5889
be17d91b631257f82804b48ffa453cb6c5d32b63
describe
'2519352' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQP' 'sip-files00024.tif'
d841347574d665b478b822d5461302b1
fa799d67f076956bbbb0823769e113e53eb4dfb4
'2011-12-30T12:14:28-05:00'
describe
'926' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQQ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
261dad62f9fdc436869f945b1d5e8091
8bde7c1e410f47d1ec9589e8f25e1e55a3c1a076
'2011-12-30T12:18:59-05:00'
describe
'11030' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQR' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
e3986bad762670791d1394f50c07277f
ed617b8873c3da109ec6f66bc7150e2495dc0ecf
'2011-12-30T12:13:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQS' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
61c8344bfbc771491600b26d41a05bf4
d558bd75f774679f1e91da7d4dfd470a9976f58d
describe
'121749' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQT' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
ac747ec9890ee0c670ddae6f30ee5ffd
a2c5590a65784194d00501d6a983025555cbc2e8
'2011-12-30T12:18:33-05:00'
describe
'23811' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQU' 'sip-files00025.pro'
d554a563179663ceab97a0496a0d07b7
37d5c864eec34051da1f13de090c013abfaad8dd
describe
'38890' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQV' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
7920af73fb59126987ee49ca6a51d5a8
ca465d06dde2ec6cc338c6e94eb9b8bebd81f260
'2011-12-30T12:20:44-05:00'
describe
'2518936' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQW' 'sip-files00025.tif'
586afac63ac6fc51b766e6cf54fe6623
818f827a006691099363b5f37bbe0122423d15bb
'2011-12-30T12:17:22-05:00'
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQX' 'sip-files00025.txt'
7bf01703b309203237031e477421c02c
edd454b9bedc817683741106c84929d408ec002e
'2011-12-30T12:19:36-05:00'
describe
'10998' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQY' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
a8aea63b3742ac43e2b2867df73d680e
a7ef5de9c3b637b94afcf2f1909414773a6fdca2
describe
'313217' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUQZ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
6c4b0b969c0402ec0f33feec478bcc52
835a1c9da8ca6c73019c5436bc0a5b57b17627ca
'2011-12-30T12:18:48-05:00'
describe
'119106' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURA' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
4f19e6df92c42769569e17bf33e8fa38
7a45375f75c071e2d8ea52294567f9b9fa5e4fa5
'2011-12-30T12:15:18-05:00'
describe
'22921' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURB' 'sip-files00026.pro'
7cbe3dcce06ac9303efd7e4828c9f5b3
e7387a3de6c91b90e444cbe229f678fd1d6d0b83
'2011-12-30T12:17:41-05:00'
describe
'37847' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURC' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
dad0793ba80532f9803fd6fc4deec41a
b4a38f7ce565154ef18055f401c73688b087bd90
'2011-12-30T12:20:28-05:00'
describe
'2518852' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURD' 'sip-files00026.tif'
9a3818b8f49eda31aa2c51bd36dff7ca
c1507702126b97d6b7a7f6fd834afc34326ff6b3
'2011-12-30T12:20:49-05:00'
describe
'923' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURE' 'sip-files00026.txt'
26eb0d8f0adb15c94d7bb44b143fdb60
fd6c145fe538086697e75c1e7244e3db378c2f29
'2011-12-30T12:14:40-05:00'
describe
'10470' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURF' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
6322fa122535ad6a81b3eb5df3c83cbf
63fc9603b82e09f80106ebf14232e4bf156dc819
describe
'313216' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURG' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
5b99db04edc48567386497accb0a5701
34873cfb086a150fd60195804045a6b51032d9ea
'2011-12-30T12:14:30-05:00'
describe
'119192' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURH' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
3399e009d9e81712063af45f226ad7a8
62daff864b225919ecae538255151163f8c2cff1
'2011-12-30T12:13:33-05:00'
describe
'23388' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURI' 'sip-files00027.pro'
7e23a17b12b8a0216b4b247d0a9475ee
e7d4906e26dcd7838d11a3c505a9cf632dfe4970
describe
'38149' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURJ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
cfaf9d9a997ce6e45b2fa2a98948f867
00a589a0f2411f47b417e50aaf6518d8dd7ee17d
'2011-12-30T12:17:20-05:00'
describe
'2519092' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURK' 'sip-files00027.tif'
934d3feb30bbf1b32e5e31b135081ff0
70c015318b720ec3a4d4f43b6ea0c40da46d5387
'2011-12-30T12:16:35-05:00'
describe
'933' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURL' 'sip-files00027.txt'
9d678c2a7a36318c3cda2ec7a4549123
948a5f53987fa5656a4042e6f0ac3da23b08efc8
'2011-12-30T12:14:41-05:00'
describe
'10433' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURM' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
14133e7fce59d8aa993fe913625cfbb5
3f199d15beaaaeef1af763d45860bb61c7ea8ecf
'2011-12-30T12:18:44-05:00'
describe
'313237' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURN' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
dd43a8cb508e6137e10a0c93c6341628
6ab3ddaa8cb51e9193025b9b95bb19564ac6c5a9
'2011-12-30T12:19:44-05:00'
describe
'123007' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURO' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
ea9782935d66c49d031a92cf641d6fa7
6641ac60127c52ba6f7d7191468c90b7392bb946
'2011-12-30T12:19:50-05:00'
describe
'23935' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURP' 'sip-files00028.pro'
75e6d6eca39bfecffe65072798e5bb26
9beb67a00cd6c6bf556734cf000c23668788c1e1
'2011-12-30T12:16:01-05:00'
describe
'39329' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURQ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
a5ab9fb1931be23776efb030da424fab
cef39639f87d5d324363fffe3080abfa339ecb3f
'2011-12-30T12:17:27-05:00'
describe
'2519076' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURR' 'sip-files00028.tif'
208a9d849c629785bbe31c08dc752194
371e625aeb5f276caa651c33bad9540c949dffa4
'2011-12-30T12:19:25-05:00'
describe
'969' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURS' 'sip-files00028.txt'
982709c9737ad315de18c626c3e24e0c
72b7e9a28b1986d6629a1aad984d6f16609d5442
describe
'11053' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURT' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
f68345fcac9eeb3a2f08053cc4b53bb8
b4c12db40e43ae4f1dfae751c0a90d63e7b831e3
describe
'313238' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURU' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
6fd365aa86c26212008fceb1b392b016
8176596614f256bf27d379dd80fd333379d6936e
describe
'118442' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURV' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
64a66276bcd7f89582b9ea7550bc5802
7262a97e0250456b56a1173993086f256cf53b81
'2011-12-30T12:17:43-05:00'
describe
'22566' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURW' 'sip-files00029.pro'
e322a95f858f51e446cccf84378b96d0
171b9ddc573fc38ae4771e236cc380485e481ca0
'2011-12-30T12:14:51-05:00'
describe
'37910' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURX' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
82263685d8f279dcc36473e81d9619af
f848d7289d1ac8cf6d10fd22eb537875fe3d9da8
'2011-12-30T12:15:53-05:00'
describe
'2518844' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURY' 'sip-files00029.tif'
326f225f6159dccf6b63a02d7be6cfce
81c2de5677170d14cf50a6b49c0f6b757626f87c
'2011-12-30T12:17:26-05:00'
describe
'903' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAURZ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
341f7a51b90ab86ce428ba3260d1e988
31e381e8cd8c4b568d11fcd9a6c0fde91fa51965
describe
'10474' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSA' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
ffe0e38fa3bd68cfdb9bb540eaece293
24e3ff7af18d5d25f6821c2d98b1ab69674ae916
'2011-12-30T12:14:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSB' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
7a0c75fd8515bc2b7f3f4f5f5161e6f2
50079c9901252a1178e3a9a62b94fc26076ed3e5
describe
'119395' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSC' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
74c42dd2e0ba6d4ddfca69fd073aa4df
a8ff68d7c24fd21fd538f8409c8042ff7547e19e
describe
'22251' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSD' 'sip-files00030.pro'
ba8e5f5fa38d748c66868fc34bfb5025
d97ae3449cd1eddf74824ae846274cba402178ca
'2011-12-30T12:16:16-05:00'
describe
'38490' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSE' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
10c8f2e336f5a80333a785fa245a4cc2
6f9883eac37953f6086de11e95622e44f67f3219
'2011-12-30T12:18:17-05:00'
describe
'2519172' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSF' 'sip-files00030.tif'
9949f57ccf85da3ee700907b7717b506
71b0abba6cfcdd3f91d635883b39823868cc8e53
'2011-12-30T12:19:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSG' 'sip-files00030.txt'
17fda98aa01269b657ccb174a5c13f5b
09527afbbf4a9fc66fd844e4c4e131c301428c3f
'2011-12-30T12:14:55-05:00'
describe
'10951' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSH' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
337d24bf7ebabc69f1d28219b8f91ecd
2b7e3004b39d813b07905f10a1db00a2dc6cc35b
'2011-12-30T12:20:39-05:00'
describe
'313190' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSI' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
c1e08e894ef6376dc81b64e8fddce742
e389786431bb887e9b3dc785806de04e5397638a
'2011-12-30T12:18:29-05:00'
describe
'118158' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSJ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
d3dab9800923fedab6ac794d41e2eee5
6f333ad2e291fe03f956049e6a132b0bba449873
describe
'22817' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSK' 'sip-files00031.pro'
f2b4ae4083024b5b024e54f732df5d36
fc2620ebc5f38a675c9a5c1e2ee8833474529c48
'2011-12-30T12:16:17-05:00'
describe
'38779' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSL' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
7ff819ce885de9ee547bee067ea839cb
5ab49ae3401d650f491ae596d069c6d30f24b9cd
'2011-12-30T12:17:28-05:00'
describe
'2519140' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSM' 'sip-files00031.tif'
10c88ef323eb6a3b6ba6269669768559
e5ee52a74e3d75dda7f98d663620879c6b570e61
'2011-12-30T12:14:43-05:00'
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSN' 'sip-files00031.txt'
12853209125cbeb4631ab03a8ceb5522
4f3c4f68f40b4827c3cddb3715cac76c90ba309e
'2011-12-30T12:16:40-05:00'
describe
'10823' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSO' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
e7e53b9ec17e8cd1c0cb8c46fcb33fac
e92601df00171e8ae6690be8de953b7763ad0974
'2011-12-30T12:15:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSP' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
ce704edde2a23601070ca6eb4f93e68b
9cd8be9681eb962a6707b8eaf6e6cc807eed78a2
'2011-12-30T12:15:07-05:00'
describe
'120206' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSQ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
84667157d8bfd28c5996edc07318283c
8e7c903f309365b8f7a2df47b8dddde354526a2d
'2011-12-30T12:14:46-05:00'
describe
'24006' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSR' 'sip-files00032.pro'
9392f39d70fbe2522834b0388505fe72
8ca668f5f0bb243f3f5a5dfb99f06973593c5c99
'2011-12-30T12:16:23-05:00'
describe
'39159' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSS' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
60fbf03a401faa5614483c64d18e857e
8556736be4f166b0c4ab2594159e722d51096a21
'2011-12-30T12:14:06-05:00'
describe
'2519312' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUST' 'sip-files00032.tif'
69ced3bb9397ab9ba3ef77559ef89fbf
9140c2ea937d3f4a41c9d0f0677efd526d1d7635
'2011-12-30T12:14:37-05:00'
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSU' 'sip-files00032.txt'
d17b0f142cf66503e5021fb1ca80f1a4
3143fb714c47417ef4618350e53608221902d9a0
describe
'11163' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSV' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
f28724957675ffe66f117bec49078ca5
7701e659b575cbf556163118b9f7ee9d2c1d38fd
'2011-12-30T12:13:20-05:00'
describe
'313235' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSW' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
ed55ddc5109ad48cd9a1e8c6142f03da
eba4bc1c29a7a0a22162e88791bf6e43aaafc1e1
'2011-12-30T12:20:55-05:00'
describe
'123813' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSX' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
7cc9d357c5723a2583e5a7c164f63e35
85b53568e494eadbd5896f02d215c211bd14c5c4
'2011-12-30T12:16:53-05:00'
describe
'23856' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSY' 'sip-files00033.pro'
d19a89867a86d1d30eb18dec86be51da
90908e7a98056d46c22831b1f4648ae2fb17722b
'2011-12-30T12:15:31-05:00'
describe
'39636' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUSZ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
457874626162ca62780ae4e9b3a179fc
28223bcc99ccfc7f569a393db8e24abf0a8ba5ae
'2011-12-30T12:16:03-05:00'
describe
'2519348' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTA' 'sip-files00033.tif'
9e4ba56f5c6a8ac9da7cb5b244553a04
eea77af50b610c8a457085b652a4f0a65f59377f
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTB' 'sip-files00033.txt'
6a22ffae8e9d1594c626dfb767599967
b1227e91a880b91ff2d0fa987effd234f92caae9
describe
'11368' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTC' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
8b10f70c9f0ecfd59ad9d8942bae4465
fb22f17523c28d09dba4192bfe5373cee6a8a173
'2011-12-30T12:20:53-05:00'
describe
'313210' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTD' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
f0eec81e0943855bcc2e7f7e8c54c66d
e516c53282d2ff507c2c6c14618a10ed09512f4a
describe
'122359' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTE' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
2c70f57d045eb93a2bc15693111254e5
187239fd3ba9e6da6c11a0ce783a7e0007a596fd
'2011-12-30T12:15:14-05:00'
describe
'24090' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTF' 'sip-files00034.pro'
e319fbc7a523364f3a70a5902dd5b39a
30bfdf8cc49a796aaa43f35e3ecef5a7d7f2c25e
'2011-12-30T12:15:16-05:00'
describe
'39088' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTG' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
02701ead9cb8e9387e645088146693f2
d2aea38df17ea7fcd587d2765e09451a06db6aba
'2011-12-30T12:18:12-05:00'
describe
'2519152' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTH' 'sip-files00034.tif'
e2c3a549f4b809e8025ddc876f3b9667
ec2a40e046d5063181772a7285cc039fab38cd76
'2011-12-30T12:15:08-05:00'
describe
'965' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTI' 'sip-files00034.txt'
b6cef2eec960517ef1dab58fedfdadac
2cec193bb48bfa58e9536a3a79c0ac124952b944
'2011-12-30T12:18:36-05:00'
describe
'11504' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTJ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
a735ca150e92fbb7b9ccf40927c20c86
8cf336099e279a575906884b3c47f7f61bf8d887
'2011-12-30T12:15:44-05:00'
describe
'313206' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTK' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
0e698513d242a0baa34af8b898059e11
f46edb9f74c0087278a1b37a94f5fd0b0456e850
describe
'117253' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTL' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
db985694f56d6557f6e48baebc41d239
3432e5a1c8444ffa22372072a85aedb09a711dd8
'2011-12-30T12:19:52-05:00'
describe
'23452' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTM' 'sip-files00035.pro'
b1a426134bb537f130af444ae7a36d76
8a74b90317241d6dfa424814bba8e6101f606f61
'2011-12-30T12:20:24-05:00'
describe
'38176' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTN' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
5e8368fe62ae71265592c2b9647f4683
cf0cc166a51c697ff76bd38bac098797d4183403
describe
'2519064' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTO' 'sip-files00035.tif'
3393fc19318dfc4df63b79baac837a8d
8e6516f98901ef4dc5f32f4b32d138fa16de490c
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTP' 'sip-files00035.txt'
561c4e13fb5a1a0b0b448a231d98c421
5a43e5aebb449ae978c85e5892215008366cd8d5
'2011-12-30T12:14:22-05:00'
describe
'10488' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTQ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
63a3a4a253eb3dfee58fd3a245210a27
a40f34359adeba0ee9dbb18f782943468c2eb6ce
'2011-12-30T12:17:08-05:00'
describe
'313177' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTR' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
f3c826322861b57a8d9292cd90393ad9
1c9f94c4e17769cd5a4a2aeadeef4bf6bb5a1cba
'2011-12-30T12:18:56-05:00'
describe
'114719' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTS' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
38e5a5072745bbbd9d383e9f3b71dacc
fed0dd21aec2b7be1e42039014d7902d9e613b87
'2011-12-30T12:16:18-05:00'
describe
'22866' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTT' 'sip-files00036.pro'
ab9782dedbd33d6d30d8ff8be2eefec7
de15fd7f3e442a7c23ad0e5f5951956fe9b37de5
describe
'37511' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTU' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
453d60231e1b7dec6a18f58f6a00fb8b
e2e9355edff2467b14bdf70df42f70248f61ae35
'2011-12-30T12:18:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTV' 'sip-files00036.tif'
7ab3c9fbc2b0bb2fbb91523aa871946d
0dd7613a9f6290c3c4731232a0948e324c0bce8f
'2011-12-30T12:17:19-05:00'
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTW' 'sip-files00036.txt'
ee8de15ce3ebbb4a95413376e4530b9e
399999b5c83ad581bc2bcbb79bf2fb0dd00b7cc7
'2011-12-30T12:20:48-05:00'
describe
'10801' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTX' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
46bdbe73d755e95e7abd5ce2cb87d504
090d932e0ad367dc1aa08ed530f80301384eeb71
'2011-12-30T12:15:46-05:00'
describe
'313242' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTY' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
aaf921529c236e599c0e73af11802d21
eb097a0952aa279fddb01eddce9ecc6050691ad6
'2011-12-30T12:13:28-05:00'
describe
'118402' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUTZ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
a2e37087e78de983acaaa0c107813ca1
46ed6674b3b443182d8da1e5ba0eba86e0ab0a29
'2011-12-30T12:20:18-05:00'
describe
'23094' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUA' 'sip-files00037.pro'
eca0586600b7677fe30fea847cf05450
ab899e1ca1843d2cd3036890ae59b6b101eb70a4
describe
'37735' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUB' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
cca66500c17b0f8cc1e59cc8f00ba2e9
4a4f402833b5bdd30efec21f34e565dbe5585ec5
'2011-12-30T12:14:47-05:00'
describe
'2519004' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUC' 'sip-files00037.tif'
e4cd5ec23a023562f1dedc463c3a798e
342b62d5356a01715176da7e1a240cd45364374e
'2011-12-30T12:18:31-05:00'
describe
'920' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUD' 'sip-files00037.txt'
62f274e3ca05f718bd8af9969cf6fbb5
e9e2d211d16abda248b978c88b2b98a6429ef396
describe
'10379' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUE' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
8558c39679c485799b01ed9372a686d2
c75f7618058d26c89b1169904eb405e27a4b194f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUF' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
ebe8ec5c02df4340acdd15ae79d9ae32
8fefc1cb86a77b905aad55d16e486db05a1193a1
'2011-12-30T12:18:18-05:00'
describe
'124094' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUG' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
e9ff4076a01d8286ff76ba0c74e42c6d
a5a6c7a74a692a53f9cfab483b1efbfe8ee92f08
'2011-12-30T12:15:55-05:00'
describe
'24083' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUH' 'sip-files00038.pro'
1536d3113e51475a8f06a58a798e5e54
0b0553994dd35c599ac2c9059c4e09b52146b80f
'2011-12-30T12:17:45-05:00'
describe
'39475' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUI' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
6d0e5083e9913e65a219862c972ee580
1722d4c7f73139850c43402925f651195cbe4c29
'2011-12-30T12:14:31-05:00'
describe
'2519188' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUJ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
10f1895a67b0dad38a9994647e550b4f
3dd6083c429a288567534c8f4d488ddb23e034c5
'2011-12-30T12:18:55-05:00'
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUK' 'sip-files00038.txt'
1d941db0e185b8009ba5cf4e58c416d9
941ebc301131b84dc1e13cbd23a4f35ed289fe5b
describe
'11045' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUL' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
490056b08d8d38b2f3083f974a11856a
699b423fc0257720b614b944ae8ecd4fa94f1244
'2011-12-30T12:18:43-05:00'
describe
'313239' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUM' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
e686015d170f1bbc77fb3f34676e37f5
ca9222f9cdf4eae0f12cfc2f36af0cdd3efd56d7
'2011-12-30T12:14:16-05:00'
describe
'117696' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUN' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
360f1e8c1104dad28d02346ce2633248
eab1a95bc2a01286d0d579d5678c290b41e8775a
describe
'23976' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUO' 'sip-files00039.pro'
5679335cf27cd0d5a711ad4519091a86
1bec46be2c5936099bc90d31c60207088fac39b3
describe
'38891' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUP' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
aa3f6fe8b98eb08088512d9838476a65
18b136a59191731ff62bb10236e30cf4968b3f4a
describe
'2519136' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUQ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
0b06670974c143a7aff8045dadff23e0
e94bdd8c502576c3d728b480d1133ddaa6879d3e
'2011-12-30T12:17:03-05:00'
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUR' 'sip-files00039.txt'
49b88f8a40435ed77047e7d64e0c2197
565be2788b5dcb9cf77ea26f7a916184c0dc5f38
'2011-12-30T12:20:01-05:00'
describe
'10899' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUS' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
fbed94bb5c5c6f958ef4588de3ce2303
1b6c76310236b19276ecf4b89b2ce19cffb1a0b5
'2011-12-30T12:15:34-05:00'
describe
'313182' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUT' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
df5bdb5debee6fa8c1c6140c8d2f5ac5
02488299841b9192671c660e2e766cfb582bbcad
describe
'113088' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUU' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
cd86cab5c5ee00f20b6c4fa02ecbc61e
909c53f32b56c7d0b18c29ffd4b3dd293d5658a4
describe
'22337' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUV' 'sip-files00040.pro'
3410e78550cb9ff2539c7578b5716bcf
e7d3ad4e37b67b39f44bc2a7e1e1c98a9595ea75
describe
'36593' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUW' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
45db83083da035fb865bf948540bc3e2
3fa4d2af237a913b5c86c205d829c60b71326569
'2011-12-30T12:16:11-05:00'
describe
'2518884' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUX' 'sip-files00040.tif'
d95d3fe36504c84c0eaf870666d3aecc
2c6a4dd38a12fcb410c7a2f4a8667019ff562ce6
describe
'905' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUY' 'sip-files00040.txt'
9c46a0a80a42c0dde84a7b3f33ac7b8f
cb6d89d6b8132069b8c9096c8ed4037c22ce73a4
'2011-12-30T12:18:34-05:00'
describe
'10497' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUUZ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
2c8f4d68982ecc5d6450303ae3f4cb80
9431921f2f99dc485c98f47a99fd753337affe59
'2011-12-30T12:17:01-05:00'
describe
'313233' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVA' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
c51aebd621c2d628200bd38c7c175558
98b35715a1dc359cb9e5b49ead941c7a0b0d8bb4
describe
'116099' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVB' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
025fc34818f6e0b6145131d10cdbb9c7
025eac2cfe7aed8a628f6d3f2a2711b50cc5d50e
describe
'22063' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVC' 'sip-files00041.pro'
9cd312fa65dc37e251c8ac9beaceb7d8
14f5deddc43cee8f8137bc2f0130a7172b8e1027
'2011-12-30T12:20:22-05:00'
describe
'36571' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVD' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
a0207dedb8e185e56983cc795859d88f
9c2b6c275801447e0e314fb6b6a15338469d946f
'2011-12-30T12:17:07-05:00'
describe
'2518980' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVE' 'sip-files00041.tif'
2a732b9ffffa6b0acb38211d3ae3d986
34103d6139fa2d67dc44cecaad827979425556d6
'2011-12-30T12:18:41-05:00'
describe
'880' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVF' 'sip-files00041.txt'
184bbb8bb3b37b6fc0686daed5d57e54
bb5e977279f875d7b9d3e354415e7037753a7988
'2011-12-30T12:15:52-05:00'
describe
'10120' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVG' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
cf8045ca88ac5fd491ef3b26d610fcd2
d8d46f44100ae70002c6ab737b572d3a46e6be7d
'2011-12-30T12:16:06-05:00'
describe
'257742' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVH' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
b6ad967468fb6770e8f30236f8e1d512
a9153992b8de65f6125b639239178c16a54748f7
'2011-12-30T12:13:40-05:00'
describe
'210321' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVI' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
8e489b69bd4b1e54e5c74f1d88fbf85c
c71b72ec14b9632c191feda67e516ab1117b0cd6
describe
'1671' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVJ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
b9d0279400feb2e5a47912ecac2bcbed
a341dfd2df9a83ed3707ea715b07953849f4e323
'2011-12-30T12:13:22-05:00'
describe
'49416' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVK' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
e2766cb9a02d04440dc3c8aa0bf76ee6
ef41fd2a80e22a7e00251c40255437687868a531
'2011-12-30T12:18:03-05:00'
describe
'2076492' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVL' 'sip-files00042.tif'
2cd0e73f9dec53fae9eb69ba4e5ce394
c7911c2b62d5148f9e423785fc45cfff27a889d7
'2011-12-30T12:20:14-05:00'
describe
'160' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVM' 'sip-files00042.txt'
3b5511b0c7f05bab5271fce148158811
eb1f78bc543962f1b68b0f938ba1a387106414b3
describe
'10087' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVN' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
a16d1ba193d5ad0c645e9ff98c11f447
52bd2c4d0a3e7ca8db51fa8e90668f6ac262f5f0
describe
'313176' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVO' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
03eacbba06eb8878a5d01a9ed3d07665
8c346955a26d876f28f31c68e06e80d3e070ced3
'2011-12-30T12:13:12-05:00'
describe
'80658' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVP' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
be0a8ac9ff869963fd1066b012eb714e
689a82197541251fcc324c7ed3ac597996c8e3f3
'2011-12-30T12:16:44-05:00'
describe
'13304' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVQ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
a5c0155cc5ea82fe09869939a9c9a468
c206b86cfe6f1142ad72adf680a92fc122b2bed0
'2011-12-30T12:16:02-05:00'
describe
'24146' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVR' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
1062b1e0e38d03cd415840a02df89f88
9a406a9e910fec0ef1388a45691825e08916a908
describe
'2516680' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVS' 'sip-files00044.tif'
a40c4342bc52a3fd04f93554d46f9608
b15845783276ce17f718b3deee6834f68b8aa9bd
'2011-12-30T12:16:45-05:00'
describe
'547' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVT' 'sip-files00044.txt'
d2d979b0afa65def9945da12cc974731
6bdc2d73144599abd023746646aed9e839810fda
'2011-12-30T12:16:08-05:00'
describe
'6680' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVU' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
87da5a830c08ecde50b18619ee0091a7
b93b8a37480388ba501054a43700196aacc920e8
'2011-12-30T12:19:15-05:00'
describe
'313195' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVV' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
f0ff7fdae15319ef62edd99d99fa1f31
c6bc53e038fc55925825f7ae35e0bc2504240ccc
'2011-12-30T12:19:31-05:00'
describe
'93859' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVW' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
d31b2fa8cbdbab533eed9ab0fa8dae4b
cbbb2153bda09f69f4f61a0f340c7d9001328051
describe
'16935' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVX' 'sip-files00045.pro'
ff06c9245c0c616ff6a024fd72b63dcc
5134dce1c697491a2449a476288c9dc8b2d0bbab
describe
'29266' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVY' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
48094de3e9f52b545f3df24ef52cd541
53eaab93bffcd8971919cfc057172fdc9f77ad0b
'2011-12-30T12:14:05-05:00'
describe
'2517756' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUVZ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
9912ac2877a15277a0ceff38eef1c8c8
01f6c2d0eb6a3caf9ad6024c10ae211fc9bfe7e6
'2011-12-30T12:19:06-05:00'
describe
'729' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWA' 'sip-files00045.txt'
7012e17d5eb95212364f4fb81163d03d
69b571919edfb1c104a85dbeef039548508c076a
'2011-12-30T12:13:41-05:00'
describe
'8193' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWB' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
98c2f69731ce2c752b3be2deb67c09b0
ff1c21a0cf27374222955a46d4bc686089a3b33f
'2011-12-30T12:14:34-05:00'
describe
'313223' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWC' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
977945619208003bbc61585fc2bc1117
ccdfe107323e296bc3e330a74e1441f6d365c698
describe
'118489' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWD' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
6c6a16b406a1977c05cd67e04292ea2d
b33172caa9dd5652b5e0336940be201fff64b308
'2011-12-30T12:20:25-05:00'
describe
'23395' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWE' 'sip-files00046.pro'
3e122d592f6b36d655507ec92651814e
99c6b73f37df11640dc3ed2a5bfe71c25fb1c878
describe
'38584' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWF' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
864fd4dcab399393ea5ccfaff3a920e3
7aa4329cff00fda602a890f91d9e60ae4709b2fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWG' 'sip-files00046.tif'
0ac4adb16650193879504c90e6b9ff71
356e634fc257f1a8de7a156d09357051ab5636e2
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWH' 'sip-files00046.txt'
ba7ebafa59b465d2be6b8ad1ad51db60
d4596e8477e1f2a517a13c8e20d0465f2b1a24a0
describe
'10477' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWI' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
5f756568a6ce774c01447c0bf1b3704e
d3370e0e54359bd3255fa0221f7122e153d906c4
'2011-12-30T12:15:21-05:00'
describe
'313218' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWJ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
310555b62f623a781775bb750cce3399
5c8a67185ee57056008b3d69a6a6b8922eec7827
describe
'116337' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWK' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
d51e35137fa9c33f776de024d4e50b9a
0fc1d83a4b08ceb0eac4fec085ad9bf5e485d12f
describe
'23020' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWL' 'sip-files00047.pro'
e59942b2d39c85eb1e6d1b8496166819
e511c0baa465ca6f45daaf18564e6495ca744535
describe
'37622' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWM' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
76e7566e9bbac9c25ff67f6a5bce007f
c3d505c157679244585d00146d094d73e5030419
'2011-12-30T12:14:33-05:00'
describe
'2518932' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWN' 'sip-files00047.tif'
014a780ccd35126c4e9c7aee91b1bad7
7233669af7a831ad6d55e7fba9605e10517550f4
describe
'929' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWO' 'sip-files00047.txt'
77c64c127da40cacb9727f2684361fcd
221a8e415f256e8cccec29ec93d91e2d47e7bc81
'2011-12-30T12:14:27-05:00'
describe
'10463' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWP' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
313c60fd7ea6cc86653a63dcf4fd369f
1ee4f7e8d6ebde3238cc98d506d8159047625025
'2011-12-30T12:16:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWQ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
867e63906b1f6f822eb6d124faf3ebb9
6bb670e2acbb3679ca7993dc1a035e78c8506253
describe
'120727' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWR' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
81f36d2a95f5fcbb83497b0f5b440f93
c5f8be41c856534c2938172fde3b3f196c6242b4
describe
'23639' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWS' 'sip-files00048.pro'
468c7dc00c85cb9a5b0a25ff9708b64f
20de066d646d602258258dcd0b28e1df35058505
describe
'39318' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWT' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
27e0372cd693747e189739b480ec3e5f
ef89fef429e560c3ddc3c0a47a88790f115b69b5
describe
'2519156' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWU' 'sip-files00048.tif'
c1df13902f07b240e68a90b224f75095
2c78e8e34679e4584029d1c44cdfa01ae3dfbfc4
'2011-12-30T12:18:14-05:00'
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWV' 'sip-files00048.txt'
7ae35cf9851fc8aedd93daaf1eaf98ac
63a65796327a7b32e9e3bbd940a0a5b9d35c5cb8
describe
'11002' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWW' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
9b8fd3e38d743c86e84e8c293adf0a15
bf33f136925b3475c837610963712a85528ccfdc
'2011-12-30T12:15:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWX' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
a4cd3ac92de08ed745a44924cb726849
3b5e9764fd74d2fb1b88ca9cf7f4a43e9dfe8f83
'2011-12-30T12:17:44-05:00'
describe
'126400' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWY' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
97ca78e9a859bca07bb0258b072cc7de
28f3631c23090d24612fe5d652bf5fcbe2cb2de8
'2011-12-30T12:19:53-05:00'
describe
'24815' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUWZ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
c20ff15e7dfd562b8fce9bd2031fa019
e1ae83cac9fee224746ca53cad965695b707201e
'2011-12-30T12:19:58-05:00'
describe
'40784' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXA' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
e92cd835ee24fdc55318496eaf34e118
133be21d5c39032a482e49acf4c490baa3aeda46
describe
'2519372' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXB' 'sip-files00049.tif'
5dba54f89b41892ec33c95314a129554
ab959a1017c182c5be2f5194230f381a0228cf86
'2011-12-30T12:13:42-05:00'
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXC' 'sip-files00049.txt'
2f3669b4f79343da037c6c523a545019
24da9e207e47b69874a40977c68366f3c7ef40ae
describe
'11401' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXD' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
3e7969ab3c25a029415f2ec6e2a1f0b0
2f55f8d3c27e0892aef8cb5df02e6a33cd18e9de
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXE' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
998405617909f822e5dabf74d626120c
a5bb83a4678706fcc29a190b9494fcdd43d469ce
describe
'122783' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXF' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
40b12fb92a3a03ffdddd7b1b04452bab
d027a9b910f74bf247457f4bd2a5d7d6aefb1da0
'2011-12-30T12:14:26-05:00'
describe
'24189' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXG' 'sip-files00050.pro'
433a3f6b5cfb6be0f972bb19a618d1e1
d0ea729cfb28b60404819c1cfc1ccf9d4d6bc6fe
'2011-12-30T12:19:01-05:00'
describe
'39612' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXH' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
aa11e31240efab99f6fa1124dd7f4224
2fc60bd2c3a349c4b97f4239c3b04aeb1d7052fb
'2011-12-30T12:16:38-05:00'
describe
'2519112' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXI' 'sip-files00050.tif'
78d96aba6f090086887986cfa17faf02
bfcd12e8a63df2b324d18d59330d45c24aa15962
describe
'962' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXJ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
a96f0ccb5e37d2909005a428852680f6
6b693cec99529b95e946fea05c6bbb111b7c7969
describe
'11538' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXK' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
6705a2227604d6f4eacfdacca4bea82b
9233f804c1a24a0adcda1330c773a9fc68b5b674
'2011-12-30T12:14:53-05:00'
describe
'313231' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXL' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
098dfdd877a916c45846d559674cb9d2
9929d917f2a71d81656d2af9f67ba2d0bf7ff1de
'2011-12-30T12:14:52-05:00'
describe
'119166' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXM' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
9357934726022da1c3c68b4b93f73254
88981cfdb344ed9641b34c94e0a2bd19faf18548
describe
'24127' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXN' 'sip-files00051.pro'
ada94887a0cff4553c84c48dc86774be
de4e4d3f9f47d9830ecbddfd57a1e6e795bab837
describe
'38767' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXO' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
ee8f5e83050935da9bec6ea34808f7fe
1f5322642ab684a876a2feaa02335b9bf0b1e9f8
'2011-12-30T12:16:00-05:00'
describe
'2519100' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXP' 'sip-files00051.tif'
f2274e9caef60a24fb9ab9e54efd3cb6
28126c979abb07eaf61b021ea1fd0c726b3924da
'2011-12-30T12:15:39-05:00'
describe
'960' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXQ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
b9f46295880aea54ce733bc5b9d70dd9
73585bd7feedaa7a3e9743425eacc8b18a5eda0c
describe
'11021' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXR' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
c71cd463f5ebd0fa161513cb839fb6fb
39bc7ceffa9b8ca8b9df7ee8826af8176bbdebcd
'2011-12-30T12:15:24-05:00'
describe
'313434' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXS' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
da8aeadffb39b94f9f4cbdd71b5ab6c2
f38c5f43b83c681b0e2d02a0d31f8812ea5a23f5
describe
'119078' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXT' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
19b93e6114af0db29558114a6d15b9b2
4e541ae75133c0234a48d8f3ad00724c65f15a92
'2011-12-30T12:16:31-05:00'
describe
'23349' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXU' 'sip-files00052.pro'
22f8c17beb89566baaac3d1f99429ca5
c0dbda8f5a4022dbc5262149bb2b35852f745bf8
describe
'39568' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXV' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
0fade7dc45434e18064a4a454cb2499a
1e9052e6d75d85b2767e26a81167bc4cec067b27
'2011-12-30T12:19:46-05:00'
describe
'2521104' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXW' 'sip-files00052.tif'
e5ec7dee4135ec1f04d8ede33c3790da
b5a388b1f2d74ea7311a4884de0c492a3f3d0ca4
'2011-12-30T12:19:23-05:00'
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXX' 'sip-files00052.txt'
7ce25a8cbf0b027f74843a507d9a8150
0074423096d4d09396abc5a676974d52d3c232b9
'2011-12-30T12:15:03-05:00'
describe
'10861' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXY' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
63c28c9d0cc1c762f6e82a1fd9a4e040
91cb528c580b51ad4a213625c5697addbd29641b
'2011-12-30T12:17:12-05:00'
describe
'312045' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUXZ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
91d20fd8328a91157755ad108832cdb1
cb49a97fbda3cfb620b1da6c6a310a2c532b3e96
describe
'113556' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYA' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
e925d7eb96b8bfb95f7600b970f57ad3
1bfbcff2fe9fb7945597ccda30ba74debf6a84ad
describe
'23896' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYB' 'sip-files00053.pro'
20260b8bbdd81220bd00ff75b26dd7aa
5badff390ba7a74bdbdae2154aa0c4506ec18149
describe
'37125' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYC' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
3667b25c0141414072c18145ab59909e
99146fe6c14ec267f13a77a9d1846bcaf9e98518
'2011-12-30T12:19:00-05:00'
describe
'2509516' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYD' 'sip-files00053.tif'
611631ffa8e1512370a5d68b57217ef2
e87100af3d4ce966c2965cf8d0dba68e603ba817
'2011-12-30T12:20:41-05:00'
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYE' 'sip-files00053.txt'
a4330256064b6841404932f93120c62e
ba2ea360cc34575dadee24f7cb3808c51928938d
describe
'11263' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYF' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
83be0f0c5f699a5a086832d9bb0dda90
1fcb7ef2d8e83dbd3246e34899e0a99c2eb2c35b
'2011-12-30T12:18:10-05:00'
describe
'312099' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYG' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
8aa26ee45bf6d016155f08f1f48c3913
bfcab1bb64ff66bd9466c476fe5aa109757f5564
'2011-12-30T12:19:56-05:00'
describe
'111584' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYH' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
ef1e380b0d130bf42c55cd33ced581be
0c0d0504d9e42a88d2c0ce2466c6bba867f4e717
'2011-12-30T12:18:58-05:00'
describe
'23540' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYI' 'sip-files00054.pro'
04fdbee4de9ac9cea0266c84592f2d62
7fb54cf871d668add2b6a6affd26bd70cd0cc765
'2011-12-30T12:13:48-05:00'
describe
'36174' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYJ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
3d4d0d30c15adf4798858e3265898f48
16ebc8f471f708740afd0cc5afa711abb5429b93
'2011-12-30T12:20:02-05:00'
describe
'2509112' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYK' 'sip-files00054.tif'
af2aacc600115119e6409deb00736e03
2b8162acc07aac6bf5c90627ec1afce1325dbd54
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYL' 'sip-files00054.txt'
2703497e13b5ec5a463b6016bac49301
195d43ca00cfb2fb7e7a36736781a2c5acef396d
'2011-12-30T12:19:21-05:00'
describe
'11167' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYM' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
64826da6dc4a18a3737151fcd373b636
ee64e5369e5fc4513690d9dab6c9c0bf1ae80fcf
'2011-12-30T12:14:10-05:00'
describe
'312066' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYN' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
f3a4af5cd1f6475992565b0df3795e25
5a57d16106b92e1257a3c345b5c1a9cc018541d4
describe
'104369' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYO' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
1f04f3482431a7974b4d5223bed7a005
38cc33793640d2a074b3006d88ff1f6f3e3a9c5d
describe
'24070' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYP' 'sip-files00055.pro'
000ccebad849a59af768ab6bf68fca02
2dcc33c9f06913efcdc2004f14e6dec6f3fb1a25
'2011-12-30T12:20:16-05:00'
describe
'36520' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYQ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
c33d7f1f260f0b1f1f27ca187d4cee2b
72fe57f90de904049ecb232f5b4dee89c30d9a3b
'2011-12-30T12:15:41-05:00'
describe
'2509204' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYR' 'sip-files00055.tif'
557d526f09ff3145c3b06775721fd056
d0524d52478cd7517406941a9eb78c52c9433a95
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYS' 'sip-files00055.txt'
0a7865057ec56e9a936ea274722010bd
ea970812c347be59668bbd7562536efe6d9d415d
describe
'11039' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYT' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
15c5ef55982c77c294922aabc9b5a8f9
06fd280c45d3ae5e0caad0b6f05f01e8374d036c
'2011-12-30T12:18:21-05:00'
describe
'312081' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYU' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
f7a78a5d74c269d841992053a47233a4
5fbc4589d3c924fd2bab8123032db809c68451e6
'2011-12-30T12:13:47-05:00'
describe
'103046' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYV' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
f463e3106db0a43cfbbacaef7b03419a
997b403a096b56b4a8badddc47171e970ba68ab8
describe
'22755' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYW' 'sip-files00056.pro'
40ccd4d7315fe2a583124c7b1c6c3ec0
29456146dacbf42dbc622a10d7c7515af7ea2de9
'2011-12-30T12:20:17-05:00'
describe
'35150' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYX' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
fe08c76865b26ed4974b0fc66fe52490
13817dbc68fb8e1b7dde1e827564d3e8c258c660
'2011-12-30T12:14:08-05:00'
describe
'2509216' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYY' 'sip-files00056.tif'
aa8711805aca84b010595bf8a99d3169
c277f0ba4e7cb1b333473edad95da84fa185f90b
'2011-12-30T12:15:42-05:00'
describe
'906' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUYZ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
803ed547f7f85395c5741c5e3f2a7164
cd606b7b427faa1a97f36ead5ad5508d6c7b62b9
'2011-12-30T12:13:35-05:00'
describe
'10527' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZA' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
2841681675427792ca9d612aa3598889
2bdc36943c06e27d5489a79c88636e75954e2e47
'2011-12-30T12:16:41-05:00'
describe
'312072' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZB' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
699de90803ea98023d25b959185ff9c1
3aa31a79a9da183c1904f76c6c1286765697601d
'2011-12-30T12:20:37-05:00'
describe
'104812' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZC' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
c45059c1848aa1e3a14f3ade2c9dee68
5314c0610cb50657d3e97209a69dafcc0082438d
'2011-12-30T12:17:11-05:00'
describe
'23662' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZD' 'sip-files00057.pro'
a69ca998d8096b54d88b031da8271de7
6b731d331af86c228a0104d00927305492d25f17
'2011-12-30T12:16:55-05:00'
describe
'35410' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZE' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
9267618b3424ceed032228941cf809f0
455416c02bd2f6263add8c59fe5021b994555114
'2011-12-30T12:13:18-05:00'
describe
'2509272' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZF' 'sip-files00057.tif'
3e4d9ddd437c8a452be4f89d47c6ce52
4d04688429fbe6030889b232af3a94b941b5d622
'2011-12-30T12:14:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZG' 'sip-files00057.txt'
329ba9ecac7c6f1469e7ff264510e59f
9eaa250343a292fdb7e4e23c738206061a827774
'2011-12-30T12:13:26-05:00'
describe
'10825' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZH' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
c6a8746aff2507d412e3e0bc69762e93
82cdc801732095324b958f720e0b4b39a1ff7a6b
'2011-12-30T12:13:39-05:00'
describe
'312100' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZI' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
c6940dd6e9eea8c3c7e12f6545e6f354
509600f85ab9be42dbdd5f58f572eb95c7098e1a
'2011-12-30T12:20:30-05:00'
describe
'100637' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZJ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
bb9219333a3fdc17811f8d8a7ec99f7c
f24e6c1984d05e6bb6fdb5d581962f34b64c0dfd
describe
'22491' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZK' 'sip-files00058.pro'
7ca937e0a8173ac38a7522993036bdd3
00a2819ceffba869dba41249d3065d368c4f36eb
describe
'34808' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZL' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
e57426089507af9c95324e886eda080f
2e275fdc1f57d899259053713f1bc20f2f354fe1
describe
'2508892' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZM' 'sip-files00058.tif'
7fb5f62660c9cc360447253980199fef
2e5acc3a3d70bf7a54e3efad4e2e1c6b69175b84
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZN' 'sip-files00058.txt'
8ce73a409b9571e9011db4667048ae33
b0f8c9ac615e00f2b72a3b49f8b6532e5e75551a
'2011-12-30T12:20:23-05:00'
describe
'10456' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZO' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
c250b015d26a93100ae21bd4189f7b80
84d1ea4e969b112b2d109c40a2a1915e038877ed
describe
'312071' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZP' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
c7efe9c6f4dfe058987b898b7c792168
250beb6d295773037df8b4bb09c5f964f551c22d
describe
'113534' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZQ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
bea9a6a5677d34e39820608dfb66d644
d79ddc04a5bcdb5910150f1a4fbe97f2efe115ab
'2011-12-30T12:15:00-05:00'
describe
'23516' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZR' 'sip-files00059.pro'
e99990a560b320af4f61db1f44868570
e06fded2df021758e39e350c3725d1e69d583a03
'2011-12-30T12:13:01-05:00'
describe
'37314' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZS' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
2e0861d27e92b354cd8403b8e485b701
e478e744496352d6dfe49acf7303cd77fea3e6eb
'2011-12-30T12:16:50-05:00'
describe
'2509384' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZT' 'sip-files00059.tif'
5a888144ca1fa177d0b605c7b01bf66f
7722ab73416a4c896b08ecc1fb765a8b3f8f8531
'2011-12-30T12:13:23-05:00'
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZU' 'sip-files00059.txt'
b74094f166979c6713226bb4d3c4d91a
2394644174a935b0b4b5750eec272cb069607904
describe
'11103' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZV' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
d6a2118930e1f6186b36e34910532f4c
29ac05b5021e33809f16aa6e58e4b249777b3eec
'2011-12-30T12:15:04-05:00'
describe
'312109' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZW' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
39b5a4367ff888e7016794f1d5d54b7f
d59ad301204b6eace32565cc6453bd6eb40d5fad
'2011-12-30T12:14:20-05:00'
describe
'116922' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZX' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
ace49640dd953ab81a6cdb896d12c5b3
92c07db802443a0cdbacf96be8e5b03a69144272
'2011-12-30T12:20:00-05:00'
describe
'24491' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZY' 'sip-files00060.pro'
69d64ad828c02978603ac3a1b8be7219
71581048d86a6fda95cca898ef2682658ba6b83f
describe
'38287' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAUZZ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
9dc2e17db26c24397178cc996a9cf6f5
a302aabfc4d96af66c586439c9b2bee902445705
'2011-12-30T12:17:36-05:00'
describe
'2509508' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAA' 'sip-files00060.tif'
35674e15e7b6bc97cecbf2d174f265a6
12e57f05a8b1b4ecea4cc52c23be1c13bbd56216
'2011-12-30T12:15:02-05:00'
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAB' 'sip-files00060.txt'
9c944931af3375b4ad37652eac6ddbe4
4e7ed2efc17bf807d710d8a326c032e75e875385
describe
'11312' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAC' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
990ae0618a9e521312763bf6a8631de9
2c8510a1345ac89dad772120ffe501df6618ea8d
describe
'311994' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAD' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
43e2a5ebafe792046b525572d722993e
e760e0a2c86776c75dbddbbc55792ba86477a35f
'2011-12-30T12:19:33-05:00'
describe
'106821' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAE' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
7ff24307b24f7413e21744951546bf0a
1c311bf8fba7611d65300948d9cb0c75ac58b7f1
'2011-12-30T12:15:49-05:00'
describe
'23447' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAF' 'sip-files00061.pro'
48a46d52970f04e0c89b84100d1acb59
9fe7b5132f1064c7e02996b98d1b0067299b96c9
describe
'35234' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAG' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
e274a5bd36ca3e1f1b7053ae832f469e
19a6ea84bd115958f339e97bfecb791a5a63db1c
'2011-12-30T12:15:23-05:00'
describe
'2509312' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAH' 'sip-files00061.tif'
7d4f2c9ae2ee7dd50dd3cffa1ca3e79e
981d5c6f75e38e4e1cc1af51f722e20b142cea34
describe
'936' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAI' 'sip-files00061.txt'
3a83b87319f2e639b8b155a9b60b3748
1103867a5d371de654cd1a797d1147412e8aba9e
'2011-12-30T12:18:50-05:00'
describe
'10773' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAJ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
8f726bcee1e3b0123ca63f8a4ad376b4
ebcf789a25339c068e74f38308ac6ad293481910
'2011-12-30T12:20:51-05:00'
describe
'312095' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAK' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
ae89dc74edc7ce532c6012262380d16e
d66b32ae3279934a936c8e1e35a1e10424b8a991
'2011-12-30T12:20:10-05:00'
describe
'105508' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAL' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
733903a0a18f8d18c161cd2faa4f8bd4
2c44b4943938aedd5bbbc9a022371a1114d1bc96
describe
'23168' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAM' 'sip-files00062.pro'
22b4b112c9ef0b0f0f9c5e8cc8534ca8
6f3fe5f143cf4aa970e5cbed955a4c6b4c6ce6bb
'2011-12-30T12:17:17-05:00'
describe
'35405' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAN' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
36fb77bfd92c749cedc264f342a27c5a
030f04fb698a952ba9b367a56db478e23740ba29
describe
'2508972' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAO' 'sip-files00062.tif'
b70094a4c53a07b9cffdf28f4dacee9d
fc8fdb07924fd489eecc9ff69d262e34d7a46d7e
'2011-12-30T12:16:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAP' 'sip-files00062.txt'
4507b0f719237c4c5dad7517461adc0e
7c11cefe56eb2025a81d0867cdb99b1ab8908a72
describe
'10732' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAQ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
bb44e7f70cd2ddc302f7c32f819b16c4
5fecb4512010cab5ecb03cab0e665feb4a309417
'2011-12-30T12:16:10-05:00'
describe
'312088' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAR' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
7f6e55f7fd6b429d41c2a52d3b94408c
77bee806310d2dab2ec17e894ea27f21de47ead7
'2011-12-30T12:15:06-05:00'
describe
'110014' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAS' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
227e411dbcfa9f0ce36673c3c7db78e7
efda2c02a6fd0ffdec4bcc854c79c2437b35fe9d
describe
'23826' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAT' 'sip-files00063.pro'
3b028bac1a5867628a964caeb13c23cc
15daca86da9adc3b201489443b705d213f507b98
describe
'37686' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAU' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
55dddabb1618dda536a6c745cd83619e
5e220ab525c09fdb3fa270f0ac992de72e7297ea
describe
'2509472' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAV' 'sip-files00063.tif'
c0727798e182ec9c8021fea4f8724837
fa883ab1e5ce69ce164cbbc819bd9a30da8bc4a5
'2011-12-30T12:17:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAW' 'sip-files00063.txt'
8a26f5fcaa6e1a5b32be9c4cfd55d8cf
c7e938ce69ff9213b2e477bfc50d0c1aaacc16f9
describe
'11162' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAX' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
0f28ed43db3c3e31c1d1055d90de4dc8
5e26b36b340f451859a067c57c3c611e24dea806
'2011-12-30T12:16:54-05:00'
describe
'312062' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAY' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
f5b6c619a82afb4c27ad21e9b208569c
a1291d5ec1ed05b5cdea6780b625968afad25d7d
'2011-12-30T12:14:13-05:00'
describe
'109711' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVAZ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
ec61f1c379f6433a6cb3a4e544ad5314
b6f4ea123a741bf127b2f9e6c5d858a59aa74aec
describe
'23568' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBA' 'sip-files00064.pro'
b58b55f9ce16ae0f0053b1c2b1556aca
52faf6928b6e33001807aeb0429cbbbad3885432
'2011-12-30T12:16:36-05:00'
describe
'37043' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBB' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
f812318304da526c3db667a82451d1a4
7274c5d56f3633443ecf923f86994be5d4933f43
describe
'2509372' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBC' 'sip-files00064.tif'
6381931c7f15e024fc0b1f43a0b79be9
4b7a7b19f69d97d8dd6543968863343a6e1ad95d
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBD' 'sip-files00064.txt'
a3fd00030859215afb48f32747872bbb
e0cd3875acdbb72bb1e59ac51c7deaa9cd44fcc4
'2011-12-30T12:17:18-05:00'
describe
'10775' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBE' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
9cd53c79f3ade131d966672a180556ed
53f10eb8f0ada9fc741ba8ff5a30dd5f3f7f3a13
describe
'312080' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBF' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
bc6877177b4fa01103a10c686e11b932
d4cd4d038b7909414a603ea4de683de4a0074225
describe
'107734' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBG' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
2bde1b1d4443f7559e6731d0c205bd84
fc8ce89ed9779779ca187223a8390692481311a0
'2011-12-30T12:15:54-05:00'
describe
'23034' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBH' 'sip-files00065.pro'
9f199a6129f9fde93f074d32561586b7
4cd99d434e18c08da7a2a056fa4bcdc2c3ebac1d
'2011-12-30T12:17:52-05:00'
describe
'36212' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBI' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
9ac3572d9b12a8b304907d0645d0d962
5f5ca551d1fc70151921c556e8efbb6e375a4af0
'2011-12-30T12:13:03-05:00'
describe
'2509324' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBJ' 'sip-files00065.tif'
6cb9febc937e91f21ac7d2282eb22a30
ab754a4e7e747419aef3ab89425dd63d9064cf9d
'2011-12-30T12:13:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBK' 'sip-files00065.txt'
bb2f002eb1f121e2b04df392c8cf1eda
a1b81d1b2c2f44456b4b356d28fa7989cd194d55
describe
'10610' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBL' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
e1b97b21a399a703088aba6722cc1a6e
21fb54062a64dfe06f3830b1add8393243cf34e7
describe
'312009' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBM' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
ead4be3dec1fbbaead98a0ee0f843b33
799b2c4575d8e759ec75f4e4d2791c2a5401862b
describe
'68413' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBN' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
1a91f92a9987c45e1007bd222be8f7a9
51878da30c708b8b43f3438038671b7448aada77
describe
'12721' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBO' 'sip-files00066.pro'
37f63f4c7a47d778b57b3527ff2787d0
d7beaabc400ab10af1d25f97e76f3277db4bd7dc
describe
'21695' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBP' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
a25f9cf9c89aa7fa6dec5aa2d5d0af9c
42bcea639ed92bad8948af366d1e171032682467
'2011-12-30T12:14:09-05:00'
describe
'2507124' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBQ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
ccaf18d8252c1d0b50226639a62192c8
a29939d8796e5a99798820a934fcce1e3e80fdf6
describe
'528' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBR' 'sip-files00066.txt'
2a180e6768fcdde3988502b59650342c
308f3ecd9cefc2aeb00a885404ecfcd89ede3190
describe
'6582' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBS' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
6b11d99e5f1803bc996426b385ab14a0
09c57acf504758ad69be6e87bfe5dff4aa47400e
describe
'312112' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBT' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
bae6d59cf00f49ef1a3919c522bbd7b5
44226abb68c616e90f287c86df6b1977a946bab4
'2011-12-30T12:14:21-05:00'
describe
'70733' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBU' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
f0c886285ceaa18a30d48fde78001de0
c23fcc6c8cf25fcbc7607b7c89fe20ade5933c30
describe
'16356' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBV' 'sip-files00067.pro'
32c35ec73bb5a1885c3078940d3341f5
2811890fdac448f5daaca4d081e82a10504efbbe
'2011-12-30T12:19:11-05:00'
describe
'24937' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBW' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
e1f72dc72a3c76811dfff727bb19ebec
0e3e9ac067540e236925a5187cefaf6bc2632b94
describe
'2507836' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBX' 'sip-files00067.tif'
540b8ab1b3f03480f008017ef4e95ccf
74c4a7a2deb216f6cced557ae4656bea5b4d6a04
'2011-12-30T12:13:04-05:00'
describe
'680' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBY' 'sip-files00067.txt'
53b3be371ce2315f454c8b838f093ab9
f9927cb24caf4cbf63de2af8f5bf541e371be158
describe
'7661' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVBZ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
ebd3902869c3b6d256feb886cb315e94
05f33d4745dfed7f24c3394d81f6e17fcb2aae70
'2011-12-30T12:20:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCA' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
483248a8a558a9ad9cc19b52b8a64a52
bfcfd8edee39a2cccfc8c430c2202bebcc3e0c68
describe
'97555' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCB' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
41253999afd2ef50bed917f9d48f4890
ff29c1d291b4a3c0c49e11d9af4eea55014251fa
describe
'23674' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCC' 'sip-files00068.pro'
c0770665874bdc1536271cca182ec8e8
0ed518c8ece3145863305afbbbfde67cb91cdb90
describe
'34098' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCD' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
dfc444d057904f508763337f3e7cd052
be0af2c05710ed973a21b5fe1ebdb9c4602193bc
describe
'2508924' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCE' 'sip-files00068.tif'
29ddcb828f9e08f683b203c83c7085a9
563000ca4352786d0f697d1e6ddd95b8113abd58
'2011-12-30T12:13:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCF' 'sip-files00068.txt'
c9b44bc0de09a31ed3cc3af5e85eca01
7d443b8a1def1d5e7e7ce26e0e2bbdb389a4529f
'2011-12-30T12:15:17-05:00'
describe
'10706' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCG' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
fe3499bf4bca4d85f61986475951dd36
a5d2d54585c353e1697a7a5a138ac5c2d073418b
describe
'312028' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCH' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
e04fc39fdac7101c7fdaee1388fdff45
1da5a0b8f2934ba3ab648dbb5193e15f3f383b5e
'2011-12-30T12:18:02-05:00'
describe
'116340' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCI' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
ef416fb45fafc6fbe3af7be59cec0bce
77789472d4b91563dcc29d5f6f8d88b8a67d733c
describe
'24609' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCJ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
2dad3f9ea66f7f9f551bdf1a1fac6adf
f93d6d2165eef66a61779164bb3e0c5a32665a41
describe
'38150' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCK' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
f3c2c8d1abe9718208b57a983ea21a7a
456058210e8e828b53fa10d20ad4a22d4706387f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCL' 'sip-files00069.tif'
a2e0f3baa92de4a9b42a768b134ce7bd
4d7dbe5de7e4f8786e5c8fdeee7a328fc0bbcece
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCM' 'sip-files00069.txt'
c1284c8845d5194ea660f5d0582ffea4
9403c88a4b133cb5eade0648c9574cc28fedc05f
describe
'11170' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCN' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
f37e48be1c25211b9d33f4dab9c2ae67
2ddd6822ff93de3f17ab5f55e62bc6f23278d0b8
'2011-12-30T12:20:21-05:00'
describe
'312018' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCO' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
62120a6436c755fe07daae27c8e772a1
438ae64298b2301ab42e93ac2d98e0b1301cbb6a
describe
'117921' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCP' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
57d2b7c171d34879cb69f72485083f89
96d8e34cb596cbcea591bc0317d102061055064b
'2011-12-30T12:13:54-05:00'
describe
'24334' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCQ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
5ee55f399d34c0ba6822592849afba49
58d8ee5aa06198591b89177a1ef376d516f32266
'2011-12-30T12:14:49-05:00'
describe
'37968' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCR' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
fd7c546f7908a59647ba296c6ffa50da
1681517f98b12bb4d91f1628037f537759ff03f3
'2011-12-30T12:19:12-05:00'
describe
'2509296' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCS' 'sip-files00070.tif'
8106adbda3d2e60351acb20022f06d32
61f5d5c9398026d31be88bd626377928794c882c
'2011-12-30T12:14:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCT' 'sip-files00070.txt'
ab2152e80f476cf9d6f01ab8186b7ce4
8a2ca93c95294d811cbc45aebecef45088a4e1ba
'2011-12-30T12:16:49-05:00'
describe
'11247' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCU' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
4eef6107371ac153f36691f9a4bcdd5f
122bc3caa0453895924a219cd22d26d145a86c1e
describe
'312082' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCV' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
24c1d41187231aa7ba0e28615aa9abf2
762690906b0c663d3fa90a7aa6bddc1dd3bdcd8c
describe
'120564' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCW' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
5ac74e7a3c0ee4c2bb5f6035d6b28475
ea480018df79111154a697dffc67ed44b8f855f3
'2011-12-30T12:20:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCX' 'sip-files00071.pro'
fbe042a79b33aa53e0e8709cea85be91
303bab4d5f860a9d4add52afe01ea5a195cef76d
describe
'37841' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCY' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
39b2298ea6f1f4912e88fe712e14f506
5ca9e276d3a32e4bbd2d00c5b41d05f931ea172a
'2011-12-30T12:13:36-05:00'
describe
'2509560' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVCZ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
e0ae809af6a022d2b549d5053dfed298
85230058ca4bdfd428f6204fd517c1dad19534b3
'2011-12-30T12:18:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDA' 'sip-files00071.txt'
6a640ae315ca47bfc61fc3c64e97b5ba
d38befe3b49dad341a2e02fe651c9f75de90a8ce
'2011-12-30T12:18:11-05:00'
describe
'11175' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDB' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
0190202a63585559b9a93e476def2a3b
0363c91d7c6ac899a002113447bbc58ceda85806
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDC' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
62b8415ad888d4b6017c6b2a7c1eba0d
134136dcaa61326ece24960b8ffa82af4808b0d5
describe
'119554' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDD' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
7c62c4b904137622c80a921b3724cd30
ea77fcb36db362bb5f810ba0817e22ff0789c8fb
'2011-12-30T12:14:44-05:00'
describe
'23841' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDE' 'sip-files00072.pro'
fa4caf673925c7019c4edd4ec27f91a7
a4f0bb5f2d3e3a1d6a28947ad3328f58c64bf491
describe
'37393' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDF' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
4ccce74cda63cd66f10e73f1ab9b9b53
2237f3efde47f5b7819aa36d25c24c5d7cac5033
describe
'2509096' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDG' 'sip-files00072.tif'
d2d99295d2804e6aff557904ad78e293
abbaf7ed57dbc1ecad9dbd096a9b871720ff6f81
'2011-12-30T12:15:58-05:00'
describe
'950' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDH' 'sip-files00072.txt'
cec05d5ca4177b0572bc2b50e00ecf9c
f1fbc8a9a0d4ae7ab7d724fe926b3b513db88988
describe
'11106' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDI' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
bd74bd562cdc5db805f0a11bfe162fc0
c70f311cbb47c097ae86dc44abdcf4cdafb34ef2
'2011-12-30T12:15:01-05:00'
describe
'312049' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDJ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
09d875324fe4d78af9ae2246d3ba4e9b
4398533e4759e7c5b2b3223f83ebffbc7de046ab
'2011-12-30T12:15:29-05:00'
describe
'110592' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDK' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
5d33e54d26ecba2c2dd95d2d544a729d
ab8ef60fd6b5cc34ba92ef3500e48be0206867f7
'2011-12-30T12:15:38-05:00'
describe
'22813' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDL' 'sip-files00073.pro'
0d11a7d6391e37839437a4934bef6b48
a28fd9d3bf05a3eac2ade058071575dd65053756
describe
'34299' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDM' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
8e9d048c71b7189158f72c38649cbe1d
f52fd67d27a959c7ddaaf7ee148f369c850a85e7
'2011-12-30T12:14:02-05:00'
describe
'2509072' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDN' 'sip-files00073.tif'
2b32f812a2b3fab9dea24e0284a175a8
efa3ad566f1121dbdc5dd0a7d661650b292af9b2
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDO' 'sip-files00073.txt'
caf57cc794b83cb182c718e6f58ca578
5531787c17931284ee7b30eed4c13d993059d9fe
'2011-12-30T12:14:07-05:00'
describe
'10340' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDP' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
d93d8bd615a0d8557673862a9520276e
55d0a1b28a6b0c272eef820444c499e90acb08ee
'2011-12-30T12:13:21-05:00'
describe
'312097' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDQ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
2d24d49fd720bb446eddc9476af87bdd
47553828a06defe7a15654f202082a8cc2d9acb9
describe
'114453' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDR' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
0c4ca71b6882031b1a6194084cbcafc0
bcde0067ec84a78e93ecafaa5abf61ffece70683
describe
'23849' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDS' 'sip-files00074.pro'
e4d860d75ea8f1dbdbf5bc2efea9b748
f0812d0377962ff376048533fa1aaff52e2409d2
describe
'37999' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDT' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
3ec5c5f6decdbcbcc6847a8cb5f8216d
3365ccc7046b58f5fc396c14d9d29e41f19bf6ee
describe
'2509524' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDU' 'sip-files00074.tif'
fedc1cb05f147c2db8c3117a0df00e25
82ce0466ef4736cb570305e467dc554b33cb685a
'2011-12-30T12:18:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDV' 'sip-files00074.txt'
f810224ac61c1f2de6113eaa3221abe0
9cd782ecca42e5905e3d84c6fa3bb5310afa742e
describe
'10921' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDW' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
f861bb624317e64a9320934e7d3ddd01
a77fbda0ff9a8dde11b2c2b0f23dd42d8e8e262d
describe
'312086' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDX' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
ff38a302d3704a19b4c2126d90bc56c3
9f9b16fad0f95485723b211c8f68b16777330e30
describe
'120428' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDY' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
75d205c7d551a37cdf8b21a08bbae421
e0cf7090d5b41620e99baace2db97248c2e80685
describe
'24399' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVDZ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
c1cbe9e612a7c0a2edc700f4f79ccfbe
6f817223c66b07f98e867dae9455fa992d797a16
'2011-12-30T12:19:27-05:00'
describe
'38693' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEA' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
c5565eefb41792b103ee0c6336f77e1a
045d225c1d51a992dc95bed3f1061237bc11ae5a
'2011-12-30T12:13:08-05:00'
describe
'2509064' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEB' 'sip-files00075.tif'
17502f4d137728f40ef3eefe0ec529cd
9e780c5a4844cfa06ab7eab85d52f5adc413358c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEC' 'sip-files00075.txt'
545ba443f6272a514b636c7611926e8b
b99d74f9493a3316e8f0c06ebe5715afae6aa61b
describe
'11237' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVED' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
c4cf37db3fd19dfe7000f7df2383648d
8022d19911138e4a1b5d320e62ab1ec5d86e0804
describe
'311867' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEE' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
792e22e2a9b8cac2c3f3d95424cfecec
950c361553e3a70ad421bb2ce6710d37f644e2f4
describe
'116538' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEF' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
4e8e9b572271e7bf5b3c350d6a69cce1
38af66e24c674989d8b4f62549ec80aa9b83947e
'2011-12-30T12:13:51-05:00'
describe
'24119' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEG' 'sip-files00076.pro'
e6c0cc2ebd655f06cb6a599a307fe10f
6a1768d5202d744e200d3c16a827c434218b7933
'2011-12-30T12:16:14-05:00'
describe
'37342' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEH' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
4a0888e330b927d3d7ad90cd4db21a54
2fc6416a9efc4e354f6987c8547a42f958d5f6d0
describe
'2509148' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEI' 'sip-files00076.tif'
5e60f1c94b113c1bd28bfe4ac190e575
625740a7105bdf32111fca6a5cfa70b7b45c5df2
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEJ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
2daf7d2d0fd08e66c107a5b50e833174
ebef94e380b3206e3aaaa1b84220dae1c42f87d4
describe
'10748' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEK' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
919e7ac894e8bea458cd9c4945bc560d
316d4bac71abc991ea1bbb184bdfb15f89492361
describe
'312113' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEL' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
0427a5ca3534521a74c0b45bbbdec9bc
0e1f5eda436b4f8050eb436828c7f0a777a1a81c
'2011-12-30T12:16:33-05:00'
describe
'113726' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEM' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
d1b43f60ff2e50f3a9b7a87a49880904
3db0e6edf55e0ed5714c11a457e486569d207d2a
'2011-12-30T12:18:40-05:00'
describe
'23815' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEN' 'sip-files00077.pro'
c7c698f3c03871792c4514a1ec19f328
9aed3252018f5915bb6c7ff6f7d0ade12dde0acf
describe
'36944' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEO' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
6b8b44a2c058b3bf7fae802651fc909e
0c1a7b77252b92bc2c937b735fb78bcf13b4035f
'2011-12-30T12:19:22-05:00'
describe
'2509120' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEP' 'sip-files00077.tif'
3b17757d967e47cb1770ae72170b3175
9e45a0c38076ccbffe063843aeb0d036142b9a5c
'2011-12-30T12:18:24-05:00'
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEQ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
1126f295d607fa1dabdd34c4edf24b80
a0aa764fa1c752fc5c5213c27cc9abdf1bc648aa
'2011-12-30T12:17:48-05:00'
describe
'10855' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVER' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
a7d53ce2462bfcaeb7c1764011913cba
148eeee56504960b29f96473b330730153c12750
'2011-12-30T12:13:37-05:00'
describe
'312102' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVES' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
90dfc2132933d34008061603aa390b28
55375a5e428cdb533abf711cfa7f197c9ca7a74f
'2011-12-30T12:17:02-05:00'
describe
'110230' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVET' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
61373529ef73c08bce4d624df34991d4
92a83b1b270f0cd5f4d3945fc4b615a34c5eda2d
'2011-12-30T12:18:22-05:00'
describe
'23852' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEU' 'sip-files00078.pro'
14e59fb6f2e76cad4ef7a3ac918c5394
7186d89dee843e2e5766a14370bbfc57b36d0538
'2011-12-30T12:20:43-05:00'
describe
'36586' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEV' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
426b0bbd065cb8ad4a76f269a95fcb51
7cf43b59a13c6020602f0dc16fb9bb0e44607d5f
describe
'2509180' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEW' 'sip-files00078.tif'
19ac3b7b58a1c606e53e3f48f003561e
69ecb974baa7b6b97e2aa14e0efb0acda46a2cb0
describe
'954' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEX' 'sip-files00078.txt'
cdabb85f4de2d4e4fafab28355f8d84d
377ab7531cc02851c6c4b83fa972dab9dbacb13b
describe
'10694' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEY' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
f81b7323b7384a2506ebbe2c91c75855
43324335e29a2c070fd3b6d83901d70f47021c7e
describe
'311879' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVEZ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
5a9957ddad5fac1f5da664ca480b60e2
8e1fdd20550ecbf2894619bb677c05e86895f39f
describe
'114002' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFA' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
8fd624bf5fa9b538d6c2c8d5e16fd47d
39a82ba0046628a665b5c1f7eee6025da2c61430
'2011-12-30T12:15:51-05:00'
describe
'22713' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFB' 'sip-files00079.pro'
b2ba35f7ff1ae7c2a1ba271db48aa0fa
7661b84348c95b98576e82b1c9249bf61d6e34ba
describe
'36817' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFC' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
cc85140b00eace0ffbecd2e4aa4fc835
c71189286f313909e117e80f62367b960f9b8b0a
describe
'2509184' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFD' 'sip-files00079.tif'
c3e3a69bfc6de8c751aeb8e179a73f6a
9d40ee9a1ace70999d75679584bd3ebef13c2acb
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFE' 'sip-files00079.txt'
4642f6baf0ccc488804d47d9ba6e97c4
fc5a8a9932f07b8d125a26a9c1d8133046a0c42c
describe
'10743' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFF' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
002865e74cd8f2df861c51591aeb305d
1db017febe23a49b9223014a6fc94f5ef566426c
describe
'312044' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFG' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
ab4a24287111755cf3c85294b485da22
6f1954c34f8407c9e46d33258d2885abbabfa5bf
describe
'109929' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFH' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
b0a5550652d22ff8394fb360f4654593
b2b4596d4e03d5071fa5d908e532899089e8fcbb
describe
'22607' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFI' 'sip-files00080.pro'
b61ad923555a90874ad40952bcd274b9
3b715cd410fefa04edb26eb9da88845e7ebf0a58
describe
'35216' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFJ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
229e1206bafb5b3c1544c37939fceb8a
9dd833a57ea21c331c7b722e459cb4c91367ed20
describe
'2509264' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFK' 'sip-files00080.tif'
9aa0ec077cf4bcf5e4e1ead8b63b2321
8d7c9766561bc317c4ea6fe8034386f6b383e7fd
describe
'909' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFL' 'sip-files00080.txt'
40aa91e8c7bbea0f4750f020b254cb73
aeb5b2385632bfd80d73f6fd594ee4c0aa4d7592
describe
'10464' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFM' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
8b9752c725d24a93c8cac3e23176b46e
0b126f8310f4a6724f0826a6e9914a86786ca566
describe
'312077' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFN' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
d2cbfe3ae70dbc2dfa86b23335a4615a
4376451af5aeeb65f0e2d815e2721bc1b5999e08
describe
'109045' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFO' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
004335c9b30aa2f173ee17cf6e50683d
a6b4a4cefefa0f3e68dbc33239de6935f3aa64db
'2011-12-30T12:13:11-05:00'
describe
'22275' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFP' 'sip-files00081.pro'
f3cb28235e6eb7ebbb7c084718e75121
7a79fdf6039d0bb3dfc21d975d933ce5fb189edb
describe
'35042' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFQ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
49b76cea33bc4e26ca81ad0af08cfe12
00e2c63c0c802f165aa2e067ff9c4ee92092ffe0
'2011-12-30T12:15:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFR' 'sip-files00081.tif'
b2d9c1bb2f1fb36803b8d3985e11389b
096c646843972d6077f4761c77f46af204720290
'2011-12-30T12:16:34-05:00'
describe
'896' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFS' 'sip-files00081.txt'
4bea0e6e7eb21079505bd6dd2aa3dfae
0e6098af129333bb0af9ce6528b15d3aee9cdc21
'2011-12-30T12:17:39-05:00'
describe
'10312' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFT' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
c631519354be0cd1357e7f9884d13a21
9cb86b7f0aefa44f871bcad4701d767eb21e0544
describe
'312114' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFU' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
42c724fd728c4e7e16415a77ff763ff6
cf7cbb58f441b287f8b1b55112fe01bb8077753c
'2011-12-30T12:17:33-05:00'
describe
'100975' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFV' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
dbf3676ed07ead1060712e71aa4e5cb0
8bb291096c65a207215d8f6ab8046168b6434446
describe
'23764' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFW' 'sip-files00082.pro'
786f6f7d1c92a937ef42176b8c40a38c
7c2c3eac1d3561cfa1a30abf072b4c2698c55a9b
'2011-12-30T12:19:57-05:00'
describe
'35328' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFX' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
3eeb821c149e058eb78f634b7f6d1197
af190c4a7dce2b5f18de88ec5ce89fd5a04faf58
'2011-12-30T12:15:47-05:00'
describe
'2509020' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFY' 'sip-files00082.tif'
2da866afd0a9bef0facf006af073271d
f79bc062a9e7fa039ca2b4cbd56ed922e1c3c67e
'2011-12-30T12:20:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVFZ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
2afcefb1edbf2371d07c3298c72ea194
105ec2b6b6be015d2698f17844fd1273c864e997
describe
'10973' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGA' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
14c4de78246c786f850fc52936603103
aa5ca1c616dc6cbe5eb09a87c1ab8b1f5574b1ec
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGB' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
ee3813452a6ab5d4591a0f7045547601
d0c907056bfe17ab107987841c276a0efab3ad54
'2011-12-30T12:18:52-05:00'
describe
'116819' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGC' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
bf6f85e41df96029b038fdb49f343984
a8c1a3cc8ae682157d41e54ac67b62a5df6a6c23
describe
'24132' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGD' 'sip-files00083.pro'
1202cbe6822602fe3e801ef31720438b
3e8092a750f17b964fc4a6e0f9c74e9490b5bd87
describe
'37704' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGE' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
03511d2c242716b49b2ddd7bdbd96d08
ddf0e9e59fea112bcfddb0a3c5ef8494432e770a
describe
'2509344' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGF' 'sip-files00083.tif'
7c01d3a0c90f8dfea19c43176acb6be8
2ba0b643d2a517800173c89c6418ead5a0425565
'2011-12-30T12:15:57-05:00'
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGG' 'sip-files00083.txt'
240663f128615636c6e354ba653562f1
32ae2058e0fce34d0c559cbc940b2ba43a008a16
'2011-12-30T12:16:15-05:00'
describe
'11095' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGH' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
66ff871f7d8b321aefcef87eecaec8ce
49a65580e0035bf31ab8091fe8e08a9945baae4b
describe
'312022' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGI' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
44e96945a074241044d83edf0eb09f56
0c22098c146bc013ea8f13cd88f92453c505dc57
describe
'113863' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGJ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
6f837a95790849a3acd7b7d2effdf732
57ba1c0a8205165f8e4c1b8b92f56ce89f6cfb8e
'2011-12-30T12:15:11-05:00'
describe
'23019' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGK' 'sip-files00084.pro'
9fef7ac4f47e67a095f827362f5eded1
6f39e7c76d28f6f7db7ff5634a5273f7b8b286e1
'2011-12-30T12:18:15-05:00'
describe
'36781' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGL' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
9706fd2787bfedd0585bfa4b24641486
cbc8cc41ea1988f72595fa2180658498b87bc8d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGM' 'sip-files00084.tif'
54870adc125d4d4e0261591cb892ba52
bce7ac4873943902038f3dd9c465b263f22eeeac
'2011-12-30T12:13:34-05:00'
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGN' 'sip-files00084.txt'
de6e0143b901911cc1fb7af9dadc673f
7910234b91e5ec14991a4f4d30feb1f14d8935dc
describe
'10528' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGO' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
ff60fdfd978b7ece989d89b3063ac203
070eb59e0a3bd91c8c4c0590fa5113d9bcaf7276
'2011-12-30T12:15:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGP' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
4bfc36862c9b01aa17509ae464e500fe
7176de86ea4f4dba167a5ca7f4219df5fcc21064
'2011-12-30T12:20:09-05:00'
describe
'109879' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGQ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
162934c2761905368771c5d6f548fc19
cd8f4d3f268d883041db7b4455a047d0f11bfee2
describe
'21713' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGR' 'sip-files00085.pro'
f68b3ec6a44ba045c7b46c947043acd7
a4acb2c2564682a2c9db4f43566d4f229ee71446
describe
'34815' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGS' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
f9bb9580ecea7cff7b99f9a6554cb83e
c84513427b20fd44cd0fb423e710c19acad94c03
'2011-12-30T12:17:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGT' 'sip-files00085.tif'
e4f0093abeefbf8e4f72afbdf44e7e09
f84a4ab857f29fdac688347ae2b6455724787795
describe
'879' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGU' 'sip-files00085.txt'
7d89f69812ccfc787dd6038201088b1b
0bcdf540ae5e1f0d61808994077fe082ed36ce0f
describe
'10569' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGV' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
68eb91c17cb9edcb5a20575c520f680e
df3d4c5aa98eed387c76df4afe48f64ba53811ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGW' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
ba2f6aef0f996a02025aa297c43976be
7079025d78d239a18963adf812adb2b087bf1af7
'2011-12-30T12:18:35-05:00'
describe
'111466' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGX' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
fe2f32f50154bfdb5e7d46eba3c4f92e
3de81d9b44e11a0d521e39622192b1da0871c612
describe
'22916' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGY' 'sip-files00086.pro'
65c9d3e1fd81702e01a979e06bb6ee37
84e093f4293b17e0a3524acef275631ca5a282fe
'2011-12-30T12:17:13-05:00'
describe
'36584' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVGZ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
a0a1d9b060e7cf98ed57c980c874730f
eec3a0f234a346011485a6ab38590ccd0f619ce6
describe
'2509248' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHA' 'sip-files00086.tif'
7b073efd6b6edca1d036728cab1c5d96
e34f859095fee4338adf24bae43d3c68f656d355
describe
'915' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHB' 'sip-files00086.txt'
a08588f0838c4d94b09cb10796145c1c
6cf120ce9066bcb2b3947f135b380e20a5bca3ad
'2011-12-30T12:19:34-05:00'
describe
'10776' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHC' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
9dd1cde832695d60b0aeea4ced7fbdc0
83fe04dfbff62c45c68343d01f8903ad26ff427b
'2011-12-30T12:18:53-05:00'
describe
'312063' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHD' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
f61806d5af8aed974c24f62b0d882705
7ef4fca0d2784c8b93fa9a447b81783071f681a3
describe
'118420' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHE' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
3c14d791c24dfeb97a086118da969ba9
d24ad4c80a06ca2177a93063cbeb4e8838bf6e24
'2011-12-30T12:17:47-05:00'
describe
'23760' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHF' 'sip-files00087.pro'
cdb89bf746d10e404d6fb5769fa55421
963219fa9a4141a57e375d2ab59f147d651a0c64
describe
'37919' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHG' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
0120d4c874d54f3a43265cbd48df7852
bca3a81fe5316b1b5a7d3dcf0fcf9af9956b7c29
describe
'2509240' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHH' 'sip-files00087.tif'
153cdcf482ca2cb732f3578b1ac43fad
800f395a5d4416afe8b8bb84d0e90abc2889e667
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHI' 'sip-files00087.txt'
fbb04d7d803e5519c25c0d72dd92c256
0d320b5a4e31bbd4ce397df9a209d56b8f4fa8a6
'2011-12-30T12:20:47-05:00'
describe
'11068' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHJ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
3d1545fea49155a8e2e8ccef508df33b
1d00ccd959a84617a9eabea791f83a28cc6a2db3
'2011-12-30T12:20:13-05:00'
describe
'312020' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHK' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
4c941d16e1c9c2fc6e1b8af111f271fe
fdded902a097138d82bc8a5a630a2f1545c1f4c4
'2011-12-30T12:17:23-05:00'
describe
'115043' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHL' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
00b1d16a8921da49db9c82a067c3bc00
d525adefee46499491276d529b4abfd893414d2a
describe
'24290' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHM' 'sip-files00088.pro'
1ff2a981c568fc2357d38088fbb78e50
4bd04f2bd089103d01f5548ce3ca47fcf783049f
'2011-12-30T12:13:56-05:00'
describe
'36578' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHN' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
174c70b1447690f412f6b335d4157bf1
9b920e2c2360e9568738430ff84313b91abcff84
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHO' 'sip-files00088.tif'
4a85489b1e5d20b5a2e5ee273d079709
c72eec1b833b6fa567948488b1506739729e02f6
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHP' 'sip-files00088.txt'
55fc76bcee436a1d3e484fb5ee2e1de9
9af79bda9b8af4e3df56feb140e1b2cd96a413ae
describe
'10820' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHQ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
cf8c6431f66fc0baabcdf441043e6494
1eee8c7b872c69d9f30a3e363b02d4ca7d2e85df
'2011-12-30T12:13:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHR' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
2c7b3d14bb78cbcf36fd96c44bb1b272
f6fd174b2b9bf5405ae17be645875ba36f9e0a7d
describe
'92761' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHS' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
611abfed5bade0caeafa639576ee48d8
2b5c2cdba184114c51b1f7396dae8f57fd556a1c
describe
'22621' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHT' 'sip-files00089.pro'
578a145ba16d7b90ca17522479b9efff
c30e18c4150aa2ab720bd2b80806997a2934e8b8
describe
'32874' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHU' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
e2bd06edf45b5ddb71adfaf9d92ab7b5
83cae3fbc35e26bc6ec5e3df55cc295dbc264dab
'2011-12-30T12:14:15-05:00'
describe
'2508772' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHV' 'sip-files00089.tif'
6e92b7fe21bcc2d9da741903d33d3256
93227566f9e4b576cc536e076dd60de9e4e06258
'2011-12-30T12:18:09-05:00'
describe
'904' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHW' 'sip-files00089.txt'
c4275b691c14c25e30c070e84df00edd
06b37df9163fa95b7e23f4409556b274514aee65
describe
'9948' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHX' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
b2743d3d771443f9ae8c6a9453309804
537beca67b4d256883fdac7cb4cdfb209c9ed240
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHY' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
c7f5273dc0b88daf5ced6cc22eb093c7
8237ea15bd64815959b3172c34b4870903ccb5b0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVHZ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
3903f5543efdd4647c0522c44fcbdbdd
3b6bc0a963e7bd91960df9ae93be9d3f4f12b1f9
describe
'24241' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIA' 'sip-files00090.pro'
5236e7165c65e653ca220def695dca57
e506af70180f201ffb23cde28a97ec413a56ceee
describe
'35437' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIB' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
a7861d8e494848a5a624eb608360dbc6
ca6c672ca9385f3fb6d5297b393c4c912f287ef6
'2011-12-30T12:18:01-05:00'
describe
'2508996' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIC' 'sip-files00090.tif'
9a85e9dad01eac4fb3678b89bc64d86f
b5579eaa5b66eaa4b63ff314fe6f6337d826ed07
describe
'963' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVID' 'sip-files00090.txt'
eb583dc717d4823372c63b2941a24e4e
b0c72cf1831fe1e41cb3a91985968a955441186a
describe
'10516' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIE' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
f7396b7333d999f1be1a6c452d108d5b
ff8df5edc56b4079bc1b2d666bbecea14c489cac
describe
'312068' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIF' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
d2c6295083ae28b18e67b3bc84d6a4a4
73b1e139985f92f5497f210393ca63a024e86322
describe
'92823' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIG' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
176555b31c3acffbed93fbd69f6ad381
9c5100b16658eb0ce3f93f569e0846cfb087b6ad
describe
'23664' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIH' 'sip-files00091.pro'
7bfd67eb35545fe2ab3ab68e0c30bb32
7650ab9adb85898ef92dbed200e53d9bf998bbf6
'2011-12-30T12:17:34-05:00'
describe
'33797' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVII' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
0275444d4a9213cab2da52cce853b8a0
ca5e939943dfee6f8428ace937fbac22b0259f7c
'2011-12-30T12:16:30-05:00'
describe
'2508796' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIJ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
6b900cc1b653996d9053f50d9eb3cc78
fe95fc906f5383daab83fa25d5c7d451c43f768a
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIK' 'sip-files00091.txt'
810edde1979d8b46e17208878111f40a
975f64b19d31c493b35e22b0388f4abacba8e067
describe
'10223' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIL' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
0d7244dace3017aace785fd9b338f077
f32a129bdfa73b3994c41f11b19084d5208e12a6
describe
'312076' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIM' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
86b6cecf36d2dde1e3bbae86ae2f8892
d6b9c80f2455e0e1294f3a790525a6f0da959fa9
'2011-12-30T12:17:21-05:00'
describe
'75213' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIN' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
66cce47775ab3f4fbd296d0498fada4b
4180d4131e4e536e0f8540b8cb8b2b88f2241887
describe
'18441' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIO' 'sip-files00092.pro'
209cc264781c81bf33d5fdb802fab3d9
95480c08e25b815ffe8a2dce8e53d7646969b9b4
describe
'26781' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIP' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
fb18d56fbfc69e3cd744b36b09b28646
b3482813700d9c687ac51f2ddb9c457249585653
'2011-12-30T12:19:49-05:00'
describe
'2508096' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIQ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
b086137c43bff3cc82678e4669870cb6
9a43257cb7de7f5417769c2824e3f131642a035c
describe
'764' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIR' 'sip-files00092.txt'
a017abc090f0b10dbd22b5f4f3161ab1
3c7bdae83525b0a3051eaace831e4e5e1954f19b
'2011-12-30T12:18:27-05:00'
describe
'8273' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIS' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
40bf7618aa664e377df1f7509e835aa3
e579d39d56b6caf74636b111ce0fdd852e0b3d39
describe
'312105' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIT' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
0e386d0feef0f9873a1f5f62175c3e52
a2f3b27a23c4653fe6d1f53ad749a8dc238d1e81
'2011-12-30T12:20:36-05:00'
describe
'94647' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIU' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
57dc3f064f1cd4af1b3f2a845567dda7
6330b492daad5e3eafb033ac31662bfcdb52e518
'2011-12-30T12:18:47-05:00'
describe
'23266' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIV' 'sip-files00093.pro'
2f858de59d7c4a234afd848081cf738c
73536e3d9983b9d8280dc9d7a714e193f2e91c71
describe
'34554' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIW' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
b403672a87cd64aaf41e779c78f56a75
3a3ba39a44a2276d85aa8785be5e331d7a195c94
'2011-12-30T12:14:03-05:00'
describe
'2509128' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIX' 'sip-files00093.tif'
9b256d87e143c44abcde47fad7ca4ff7
2300c073e2c064268682a31e5a46ca0c26fd51f9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIY' 'sip-files00093.txt'
e9d0f4c3093c06cfb5f8fd2050436c98
a40d3894c550c9ac931649e4c0b9e8b9ef431793
describe
'10584' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVIZ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
fdc62f5305a01940300b07df741fd5cf
503500d5c25c91652a10519ecd0d3dcfd6216ffa
describe
'312098' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJA' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
ca6fb7a9410fdca48003d607725c1f1f
92401862915f991eb9b83a5d9b25478be50494cd
'2011-12-30T12:19:41-05:00'
describe
'96169' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJB' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
c12163bce20ffb1951fb7abbeb3a10bb
6fb0b7111b5e5bcbcc9b21e2f16fc2165a257bfe
describe
'23833' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJC' 'sip-files00094.pro'
6365ff5c9743da0fb9ad7d72681f218e
2caedead1bd462199c374d5fbbc4aafd9637ff76
'2011-12-30T12:17:49-05:00'
describe
'33813' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJD' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
428388cda867fe41662c10e8f1f20023
c5c6897eb396e8cc2a1ebe23737990a6f109b1b8
'2011-12-30T12:15:19-05:00'
describe
'2509160' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJE' 'sip-files00094.tif'
161e3c3584277687a320ac32477e511c
b05bc6c58d3cd86080d290bb0e4b53627f252cd8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJF' 'sip-files00094.txt'
bfee7790934c6dba5982f44a2fc2ae21
807b5429ac92b6bb5f54fb5a7e22efd8882b6244
describe
'10416' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJG' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
34e8c58c601fe1ebe27583194dbaf926
a5683e7982a2f709c57c6dc3bbc91784191ed5df
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJH' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
e36af0a8206dbff030517deb7415567b
486bab8f9602ffa4d343bb66aad02cf2bb5aa344
describe
'98932' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJI' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
a62a6d3a668257c62eb22b1685b8c212
487d5d5ba09242099c44490ebb32b158e0cf54e5
describe
'24382' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJJ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
847cbd6814825d833f3da7b5db96409c
420d0a28f86049c98b17b55f02f1a633ec6ce1c5
describe
'35163' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJK' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
8eafc217ead66d584c231f9eb34a3fe2
e579954c19dd4e28aa20a687cfa61f5b7f272fb4
'2011-12-30T12:13:45-05:00'
describe
'2509200' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJL' 'sip-files00095.tif'
c8236b725591edf5d20b4968cf8e49c0
fd99e10d1ef4390c8f41887751d34ef9e7bda24e
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJM' 'sip-files00095.txt'
22a85cfb0aa5f02932c29ba28d901ba2
bb622531b82f60e57a38c84366308534cb9abd8c
describe
'10529' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJN' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
9fb027d2a845374a27b58e01c7d36a9b
99ffe607ddba2cc3976fc2bf13f28d515d4a4a44
describe
'312067' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJO' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
31e0b73f490e0a1d5253012e23f013df
bae34cc7f7b00d95a624f37b98caf28a2eaa70c7
describe
'91450' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJP' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
224d35f0e802407861d5a1d81a1b8f82
2cceb863767a57b5e3746de7991fca22e2a679fa
'2011-12-30T12:17:58-05:00'
describe
'22750' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJQ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
e58fcc6c8a220fb3496fabfd6a6c9464
b95ec082d22e0e9be1655358fc86bc3a274431b6
describe
'32731' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJR' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
1e18848041774b4bf66d52917d567b85
b99b0b446d4ade1f771881fdd27c9a175022aa7a
'2011-12-30T12:20:06-05:00'
describe
'2508864' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJS' 'sip-files00096.tif'
275d6ad7cf3cdf3f4d339ac48fc69c9d
9246a9eeda521e417bfe41b3e5d675bca5ddc908
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJT' 'sip-files00096.txt'
4521911462e4a99c0f0f3913d1ff73ac
76bb129fd3123fa6c3563740cf85f2a546f40160
describe
'10043' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJU' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
159e0e7647ceed2ab31ab35e3df6e831
d6e06c342cd1499c1a12c00f3ec7d0acabd11d21
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJV' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
4b48a742b2334a0ba8a4143065ed0cab
a7924935f1a9e73e3f926cd35fd13e3cd835f0c2
describe
'95215' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJW' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
3db50e6220780e94218cc5c61dae9170
48890cd4951418370dac069288da68367587bfb3
describe
'23082' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJX' 'sip-files00097.pro'
510c4fcc778ff1234015606867ca9288
49ae42e724c9442e8b26a667afd021cc31f73243
describe
'33731' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJY' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
5bc19a108fa558f454cea3f77d265fc9
2320a6f5b652a39e588a201d6d7dcdc65410829b
'2011-12-30T12:15:32-05:00'
describe
'2509172' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVJZ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
00e9e7c928fdf2dec6bbfbc57d4ac329
68bd2c526a5202bdf7466e7796a290818d675145
describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKA' 'sip-files00097.txt'
97b6a78650dad0dcf7969b5cc2f4547c
e5545eeabc8731979ed52bfdd46552c005491695
describe
'10518' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKB' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
ebe23d1fcbc57606bf5bfe20f3437be5
2178742dda2750288c70901014735fafbad3556b
describe
'312078' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKC' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
70eaf3b729316e26ddd3fd23a79cada3
78ad6e26c6c5c628ea1023ba789b2b506bd89a84
describe
'96596' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKD' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
a35e89dcdc017950b7bebd95942ed1c6
755d7246c69f620dea2be2db2820f80ca9bc7c5b
describe
'23389' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKE' 'sip-files00098.pro'
87b4bd0f66c792e81d2249f986a7ae02
5fdc68c11c833cd15597d51209725d722da3a759
describe
'34779' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKF' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
f4ccc6164634b34fb1ab341f3ae81123
c7240e3a4d3b9ecaff33190eb915b39d5f02941a
describe
'2509176' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKG' 'sip-files00098.tif'
a3316c0281366d296f007b11e65904f4
c692ff6a65511dc82f6a1c576152de450f974e1b
'2011-12-30T12:17:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKH' 'sip-files00098.txt'
4ab1ec6665622f28981dce89f42263bf
d1ba05ce5d7adf5bb7e8ab20cbfcf493bb38bc29
'2011-12-30T12:13:00-05:00'
describe
'10525' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKI' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
6c4967a610c8bc4c808937695df9c92d
8f2d01d2a0a8039a00402a0bdda346d0f0d5df91
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKJ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
7895908d808de4d3a417498e9cc4023d
02e6471b546c9d796e4c0a5896f72a2dd6bbdecc
'2011-12-30T12:20:32-05:00'
describe
'100692' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKK' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
6c6e0c1918ef043b361696ab8cdc5a36
2fce934512f0e30ee25918666f65ff5c3bd6157a
describe
'24042' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKL' 'sip-files00099.pro'
bd58731a9c18accfb8532d93aaebef95
1b50b7f30163780a8ef0ef17df30201597dfd2f5
'2011-12-30T12:15:28-05:00'
describe
'35494' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKM' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
680a5f72c8a48646705e7b3331b4081c
98a67d97b8596c8cbc72b4ce6b5d9efcd366fe52
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKN' 'sip-files00099.tif'
f61441155286223bf7d6547a871f77f4
196b551c0459e86fe0607e31d841e26de692dd62
'2011-12-30T12:13:38-05:00'
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKO' 'sip-files00099.txt'
112d8436e72958ed43a8273f7ccf8615
ed41b77515797b163e7c14e399d04436d53c07cf
describe
'10508' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKP' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
86fda8d8089a20a5b9a6b44e3072d845
2f3bc393b89acfbb8aa0673e5252258c4640cd15
describe
'312092' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKQ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
72d850b14b97c1f7fc7418aa8de38a16
ae601f93fab6191368fc64004a8ee9eefb21a218
'2011-12-30T12:17:38-05:00'
describe
'181881' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKR' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
39f8fdb7cca5979dd556b502293f92b0
d2b3266037c6453eb3f0ec284648bf753320c110
'2011-12-30T12:19:20-05:00'
describe
'1906' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKS' 'sip-files00100.pro'
a44494ff7d2d5b99791b1925377f74f0
06cadb6aa84f0ed80e6a0b52dba2dc0dcc0a43ee
describe
'49023' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKT' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
7ff9a542515441eda35a96edafc3527d
93a1bb0ace6fc291900951d041be8fa6d762b9a9
'2011-12-30T12:13:17-05:00'
describe
'2510564' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKU' 'sip-files00100.tif'
4b850d639debc749570197bf739aa2cf
8b7f733914e827be13395e0818f2601a529479a3
describe
'186' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKV' 'sip-files00100.txt'
3235024833dc34347053210fd5b16905
4f334efb27d88000dc7e3ef0002eb3e7f63798cc
'2011-12-30T12:13:05-05:00'
describe
'12825' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKW' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
6677eec2877a4db39c821fc471dc92d9
47fd829d6c9b23732ae135cd4f9836e2f18ec264
'2011-12-30T12:13:57-05:00'
describe
'312101' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKX' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
a66ebf1bd054eb5e6759edf28a0e98f3
42e7cb05a03b79783708fd9fb4fc1ca5c9729e39
'2011-12-30T12:17:31-05:00'
describe
'87991' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKY' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
0195bcf0cea4c8b729f460e5cfbc03a4
fc72ed9d970fd0aff9ef94cf791eea8a19739ce4
describe
'21604' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVKZ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
ed06e91dc79db70f17a48308a0de059f
cc92c4b07e3450dd1244858854207362a7f381a5
describe
'31301' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLA' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
3cee440a54c0adf43442431e590c74d3
88d7259d3e1cb13a1e723c03ec776fd4d0eb55e3
describe
'2509068' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLB' 'sip-files00102.tif'
92f30ac53ce4ea0d466d4cfae854994e
97bb45fdaf558909e3ebe87f2bb3f66d61ef3bf9
describe
'861' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLC' 'sip-files00102.txt'
c051450f01f07c2c0f5a1f529b2c6bdd
de734bc0443351d2dff7cac4bd4a28ef8dbbd0cc
describe
'9925' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLD' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
a726d6b3ef7f35b2eda698056163d2fb
3d826ae91f9292b36ce72ffcc52a16e50e349acd
describe
'312111' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLE' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
691272ed424c34c5dab0df42e42c06d2
84077de4efb062e6a968e2f6363b21e18a1a5f4e
describe
'94984' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLF' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
c8aa2b57719e8e20824eacd8e61e151c
6d1a3ba82fbaf30882721dae47d85718f9ff05e6
describe
'23350' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLG' 'sip-files00103.pro'
377c7b93e4e79b8b07c3757bf2991077
e6870d793bf5adfbcfb9499757774c81f684e63c
describe
'34204' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLH' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
6b7b2681ad1c1481fba563b7671a13db
791f9a08c6a229b42dfc95ad733d9f1ed20eaa5d
'2011-12-30T12:14:54-05:00'
describe
'2508872' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLI' 'sip-files00103.tif'
58e7654b34e7665f0fbd25a3b32e1fb4
f42f44649a8a3a06fc5748251d6d0197ca26b50a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLJ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
01643984c7d525f20db3112bc5cf828e
ba0a7005a878ca2182fe6482d74f02f11c8bee01
describe
'10102' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLK' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
9cf7b1e12de010705783601ffa1b3fa2
e90b5683cc98fe806b64659f07d9da3716f45336
'2011-12-30T12:17:51-05:00'
describe
'312094' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLL' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
72586b0e2af8ad6e6448cef755d4112b
c6b2d0a5ba5fe2604eb1f1314027125ba4525ecc
describe
'88419' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLM' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
90ec10684e7a695fc58fa92cace99bd7
dd45bb544280d4ec9893391c4d524db67e6b7ba3
'2011-12-30T12:19:04-05:00'
describe
'22342' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLN' 'sip-files00104.pro'
b5ccfb93fad8005e9103d48bb60f85d9
2c23ea2064faa1ab7a7bb8b9b932f15c8e9fbdca
'2011-12-30T12:19:14-05:00'
describe
'32302' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLO' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
6db807e45687a0c7778d231dfc211401
5ada0497b8eabb498ccbf551d6dec9cbabf9c4d6
describe
'2508840' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLP' 'sip-files00104.tif'
a8d9e878176f651441e1cf4b49c762ba
e4ac8c7746f917f3c2a2c40b6f45941de07427cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLQ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
237f8c42c765f2d01d3238bd62876eef
b28322673cf2b80cebacd740da19d25b7c2c7158
'2011-12-30T12:16:09-05:00'
describe
'9756' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLR' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
2a5f0170b25f382bdf387bceb18a89da
1dc6d46b80021014e5b49e1110e3f291a2ce3849
'2011-12-30T12:19:39-05:00'
describe
'312089' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLS' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
ecb0c1cbe9efa77de4bdae901b2e6928
265580137072f00b87a03a791e8117d115e3af07
describe
'93388' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLT' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
2cb705961ace715a8d68eee60e47f472
59fc7526d1b06d4203e4f94860936b385deb1d9c
describe
'22353' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLU' 'sip-files00105.pro'
eb0a9ce1d383c7cab8c4678817f6333d
0d6642be7c34c8b3865d846a4e5221ded7961a6a
describe
'33532' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLV' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
c1df2dfe11e7f02d2754299837a420f6
074d8187079b752d60b894cc7c87ebda3df8949b
describe
'2509088' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLW' 'sip-files00105.tif'
ee976d80d3ae8afcac6f3a8b4b5065d1
f5f45028dababb3c56dd98d7d3894ba7faa20353
describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLX' 'sip-files00105.txt'
d70893b450ca2602b4f7b793e8d9aa77
77a36076a8624ea38b2db285297354e36e8eecd0
describe
'10242' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLY' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
818b7f03884296764bb1b94499cb5d8c
5e4131d3f0a3f4436e2247bcb857b72a429f681c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVLZ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
a62cd86664e686c65e8f8c936fe52dc3
9a7b1f45516b2fba3d7294775e578d6b7a3534fb
describe
'91744' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMA' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
3930a9bf4e9e2dfd6459fed48010748b
edd985304307d5cb70b66026ba8d0f2719765551
describe
'22101' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMB' 'sip-files00106.pro'
059a440f7188fe5f39b2da8f802a08fb
0bc9b6ffbb8efcb4252685b7b6f18918a58cabae
describe
'32116' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMC' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
c48b7d56cbc48128a161d5f8a403082b
2d41767c44bac5c2f906cc558896d0dfd91a31dd
describe
'2509188' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMD' 'sip-files00106.tif'
7bf9a6243ece1f75247f2b2c70992378
2579d433558a5836742e9e1c29e83241f1f443be
'2011-12-30T12:15:40-05:00'
describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVME' 'sip-files00106.txt'
9f8447547bb2ab73038a072ac1bc4f45
825f35ef4e3f686a102534fcaed826457d445626
describe
'10256' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMF' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
8166899f360ffa3bf8026191face0dbf
3cedba998de5afbd452bbb472b2990ba63ebd8a4
describe
'312107' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMG' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
33c941de7c45ceec439b7d09a002c63e
5ff11eab016ffbb0ec5332c1c3511a53e0a8952a
'2011-12-30T12:19:55-05:00'
describe
'92166' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMH' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
df709117902c485c4cb95f575fbc19f5
47a6a002490eda3ef5352ab1623edd4d9b3ab572
describe
'22506' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMI' 'sip-files00107.pro'
74265dd4050b5ecd299ac42e215835a0
f84125a30751ba4ec66bbd32b14946180080f2c9
describe
'32860' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMJ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
9d505804d1189efa7cde02043cd4dd54
48751735577185a424c3b0c4679c0dde6255cc24
'2011-12-30T12:18:45-05:00'
describe
'2508784' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMK' 'sip-files00107.tif'
e75ffd3f1ed22f96fb0be0f844ee05b8
a3dc020b06667ee90986c8b863199c7c0ea0d86f
describe
'899' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVML' 'sip-files00107.txt'
dcd7223cb26440de8688a40b3b42c128
eb5038986957bec2db10fc6057e49867e73f6fb0
describe
'10201' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMM' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
cec5604b113448adf60dbd0db00d7ec2
ccef8b3896e65d7d7ec81f648d990c605c886842
'2011-12-30T12:14:35-05:00'
describe
'312058' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMN' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
1156478d74f0c0df105ed3c98c72ec7e
694e01707ed143f8a0396314906afc47cc32dc19
describe
'85774' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMO' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
12491039c89b04c1af0dfb4862295f77
c0a624dca452dbcda244d84d975745afafc0b717
describe
'21094' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMP' 'sip-files00108.pro'
92a27909d38c744b27f9324b76a1559a
a50c5f986f4f7188649226d5ad057ee4d43b0beb
describe
'30715' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMQ' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
6de250e83b182893a3cecbade0c59879
32451477e6a401a8bd366f739f4e277e82a85d66
describe
'2508768' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMR' 'sip-files00108.tif'
9e3109f02b0d9682b30179cd57c5267c
a195ea2cca8cde04082ecd11721da90be6deb964
describe
'842' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMS' 'sip-files00108.txt'
e7a55d55dfd00e5bad46622618ddc5dd
5e4e5fa5b071be9a675a7b6098911558fbe28827
describe
'9788' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMT' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
573210783f4daa22290e74d87a4eac88
b3407d676a650e9a21d6c376fd42791360a29fc6
describe
'312106' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMU' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
313e2e5903b6de77b91b8fa3745c201a
8867f268d87a22ffd575ceebf46f4a3a2c02d145
describe
'124492' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMV' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
fc437cc3c06996c7c3a4afb33121019a
d23d5b3c9c490b8828879fa0989bcc3616a2263d
describe
'22383' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMW' 'sip-files00109.pro'
859bff59ac4e6be9c8e10899939a4054
6202a6d3d0ba6530b838c633c4d418a7244c6d2c
describe
'37571' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMX' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
9fbd75e4c9ab32592d841c30a733678e
09a8afdcbd23812c3c63ab707e07ace20da137ed
'2011-12-30T12:14:25-05:00'
describe
'2509236' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMY' 'sip-files00109.tif'
6711cf7334cf9e9ecdfb5b0ffdf80c2f
5c56dfadfc2a7fe3b1e31154526e1f3a93d12dab
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVMZ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
483be8ce9b3e6cf789747f1fed7cca4a
a7913b1ddce01a19ff0edc87b7efd2e734c2b076
describe
'10580' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNA' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
0c9e1b4dc45f82413656f511b4682051
d7ffa22c5f0c1caddd49d0ea0837bff94761f723
'2011-12-30T12:20:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNB' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
cf04c5a154065bff76ee09897743eeff
40733c066d0cf27002bdbddd7cf653dcef19f43e
describe
'123756' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNC' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
141dd97c754e9f92eac1cf72a69f79d4
77e6aabc78d771cb0c639791e6549d332c42eb91
describe
'22570' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVND' 'sip-files00110.pro'
0d2be25768220e548b0823014890e4d8
9e1b35d188e4fd2213fc8e390d51f7da719bf371
'2011-12-30T12:16:52-05:00'
describe
'36455' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNE' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
d1a474c0cee9083410ad28640fcbb182
8bcbcec894a02aa6af8be0af0362e04c910bcb71
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNF' 'sip-files00110.tif'
dd606e9ad66ec17a0c7692f52a883cd7
bf9ec207244a2a42fca441f371610d9ac68e37c5
'2011-12-30T12:15:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNG' 'sip-files00110.txt'
3f372c85fe537f3729cc6f3c2ba76ee3
cc04ed6300fa25e490bcfbca97814686f3faab11
'2011-12-30T12:17:56-05:00'
describe
'10313' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNH' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
3f8d8845a0dbfcd77c85c1c298af8e77
b47bd66522a2fff99781e09a1dc73a0e36e8af52
describe
'312083' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNI' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
26c4c5c6b415a2c1c6b48846a2059018
3e827a68d40531e2fd65b673b547a0541d5b4df4
describe
'123424' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNJ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
b5843645a3ed205be7bceb85ce52c303
8faece85914cc8cf9d25f6eaf94694fa6da1e9f3
'2011-12-30T12:16:32-05:00'
describe
'22912' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNK' 'sip-files00111.pro'
34f84cae57a41b8c101b6471372df739
a0a9f9246b67cd085bbb42ca4b31056275f31ed3
describe
'37320' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNL' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
87576e335bdc875d1e5d059064373d70
0fdb4e29f940990df1d261409470ee2290de2234
'2011-12-30T12:19:26-05:00'
describe
'2509328' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNM' 'sip-files00111.tif'
2680b74e8c2766fef42ab68632202342
dbc8dd0212124ee82564a458e88e17dd53e861ba
describe
'919' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNN' 'sip-files00111.txt'
c38ed15056f8c289adf428575eca4608
60c56bc955d9431c973c7b759559e65dd07641ab
'2011-12-30T12:15:26-05:00'
describe
'10707' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNO' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
def9fdee2a4fe63baf8d769fe10a7a1e
c69348294a82cdc457123cd137d02807dc215e63
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNP' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
6a0243b2b72cc7ec41ac514bbc5a65d6
c320e4bbe0588e76af375c2ea6ff2b09c101f8bf
'2011-12-30T12:14:11-05:00'
describe
'122700' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNQ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
19bb0d43f8443d9a82347832999a5172
6b8f6cb484155afa80a9c1c796aa48a8f18fa3c3
'2011-12-30T12:13:32-05:00'
describe
'23458' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNR' 'sip-files00112.pro'
929c30c5ccfd2709245d1f13df8fa5ac
0f3fe8093d5a75d1d5ba67e2bbc630aacf9814a5
describe
'37777' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNS' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
5e253e884d6d00ddd6f0a704ef282d1b
f39d2575e846e9be85d428a78407cf9002336dee
describe
'2509348' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNT' 'sip-files00112.tif'
3819cf3fcc1b202c9cfebc1faf16f247
cd129c5326c6f4743dc8c6daec84480328b172ff
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNU' 'sip-files00112.txt'
3fb26c7fa554900f026e016d8e987b88
442e77cc5e55624817171223f20c6d8f3abce7a9
'2011-12-30T12:16:37-05:00'
describe
'10641' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNV' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
2118e0d156262322ddc34020bc1fcf79
feb56620c6f511075fe6679e1c6f43ee4cabad82
describe
'312091' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNW' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
5b77a84e9670cbceee6b72234823f6d4
d6853d607df58909b8dbb22a1fe13568f87464d5
describe
'120108' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNX' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
4ace42ff215dad2edfbdfcb4dcdab9ce
92306d816e25180a390733227ea43d9addeb0e3a
describe
'20189' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNY' 'sip-files00113.pro'
ff0af1ca66e7ddd7a9bec066d37e57f5
7d9e8c7369b74aad5357bb57f42b3387c6453da4
describe
'35858' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVNZ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
03df11ce92526b90ea96acce5184cd25
88f9bf40e1c92d3ea2af93d8c29e7f4ea0d21d19
'2011-12-30T12:13:30-05:00'
describe
'2508900' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOA' 'sip-files00113.tif'
16a7709676cda4e820e48129030e6eb1
5ef03c50341d3921f1f98104c13600e55356f914
'2011-12-30T12:19:18-05:00'
describe
'818' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOB' 'sip-files00113.txt'
30efc39404d3945b1145fbbb6cc37996
19aeb3c766e8613c57120a7c7393af3f57929b4c
'2011-12-30T12:15:27-05:00'
describe
'10363' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOC' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
0a0ee19272342f68d38459fef6096fad
63599065186ec2a6c86b928db6d903380de95762
'2011-12-30T12:19:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOD' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
96cbc3255c01af2c8d1890deec730d7e
462f84378f807ee9600409be0c9b8958bfe60100
'2011-12-30T12:20:20-05:00'
describe
'130498' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOE' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
c61c0d5ecc53179deb7e55dd204a1b5f
d3e102b958dbd73e8e64d06fff4b8f0664e4db60
describe
'24158' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOF' 'sip-files00114.pro'
f2fbc5356b1eddd4f417b12368c86c8f
95e9395c652afedf2a867bc7645039196f1c89c8
describe
'40257' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOG' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
f2dd4af66237b6d37503cc9685948420
48cabb3db63cefcdcd8ac9b1330b73a2a6c15024
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOH' 'sip-files00114.tif'
88c9ba8d81babd991f7577a58673b621
cb5ed28aac99d88de0d20c4f5b73821ee64cf393
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOI' 'sip-files00114.txt'
3bbfa1846714e3e3aecc125d7ee96228
d5f72fe9d4a89b40f571babaecfa7650c97a481f
describe
'11046' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOJ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
9d82a7c53de531fce4f4007619808e88
09ec0b56581f9952ad962b99814ed9a08ed7d0fc
describe
'312055' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOK' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
d723d5ad08fe9efd89d3e342868cb08b
cfc4080b6146feb7737c3c1f19f4ad365ef49ea7
describe
'97209' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOL' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
315072cd89a391c471c4e3b2f0faca7d
0c371b49a61e298179e5b354d15321cb606b3806
describe
'22172' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOM' 'sip-files00115.pro'
1bd60920104a792a5191597032ce97f3
7178286ead0a75d6fb7a5eb3e1ed3938cba6c815
'2011-12-30T12:14:42-05:00'
describe
'34251' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVON' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
c0af3558a961e35a657c6c89796ee5a1
a37d1ec8b0a108b5fa8d2ece05d52144b3d22add
describe
'2509024' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOO' 'sip-files00115.tif'
33e96ebadfe40d622cabc360357dcf42
19b86e2d1716cdca50f2e8214d0e18a774782683
describe
'885' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOP' 'sip-files00115.txt'
32395362b587f39db9fb2dba7422cc9e
682b89d7532a8c0d570b298a3612691a931362fc
'2011-12-30T12:19:42-05:00'
describe
'10019' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOQ' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
8a33324d4468359fd4663123eb591d03
e9ceeae9c22ab992de80214b0eeb2951e1a2c399
describe
'312021' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOR' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
6bb20596403d0ed6be18031fffc3104a
f4b6c23ae7314dee568e66fad3c7b1e0ef945832
describe
'170268' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOS' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
990aeb641cdcbbd54fbfc8f4334dfbad
5a506e6812b8c26aa576ddbc065257f1a1fe01b8
describe
'4115' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOT' 'sip-files00116.pro'
57b49d298d299894bc77a7bfbc7b8573
8cda49b3f72ba4f8655cc6baa9bc6b2f6f1fcab5
describe
'46870' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOU' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
87cd53539015889f0180f8db8e41be22
435ef1749a8546a2044a483b50f6c44efb525c4d
describe
'2510112' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOV' 'sip-files00116.tif'
2dcec57f9278761a230a1513a27ceab7
bb4d0bdbf9a066bcbb05d84ce1de65924633ef20
describe
'385' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOW' 'sip-files00116.txt'
ed416eb7f0ec14130bc05e91d6345e45
f5dd97e7d88724b0993aa0f58ac19b24543c84a6
describe
Invalid character
'12538' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOX' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
771c2e2b7eff4aad35144fbd3f043b40
3966c7a205f1e7ed75994eeda95e06fef2476142
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOY' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
38542c9760f45eec3e871149b4464e7a
c6965ab3410b4a1b22666c1008520d430cccd716
describe
'98367' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVOZ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
fd5122087648ea4a63671d0797365227
a38f995c607bc1bcbe2a94c7a5754653c7ae415c
describe
'22483' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPA' 'sip-files00118.pro'
15007f9bcccc1881e57e522c986d0e7c
b854453756774bfa429acea3397120ff4f469080
describe
'32655' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPB' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
06a7458f8378b5293346e1286dfe2036
8d9a31cd984b455453e8da3bcd09bae1bcacd56f
'2011-12-30T12:18:32-05:00'
describe
'2508860' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPC' 'sip-files00118.tif'
b7719fdb4c7256a2c97a515594d47cfe
8ba21a461cdb8c7c26524682ab9ac7558e417cd7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPD' 'sip-files00118.txt'
7d18a9a19bd9b2b29e1e0d008d88c9ca
6003562ad95a4f6be8da243158ab42beba7da28a
describe
'10427' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPE' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
17f3165949b98dd2bbb1a731321f39cc
38bc55a14745ea070e13da9668909601bfae2ef6
describe
'311962' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPF' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
e3077e309fcbd39b7e872289efacdd64
a8e6b29a3f21e6f76ee7bfa016fe416e497d2d41
'2011-12-30T12:19:13-05:00'
describe
'66313' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPG' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
0c1a56cf7041fdc56d45a76d87c98051
5bc345c5851422be9d891d5ba25c846c6bc53c96
'2011-12-30T12:18:08-05:00'
describe
'14453' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPH' 'sip-files00119.pro'
c769652722a9fa773901bfc1f407bd47
1c489f378cc20171bed62212f05edd358d50e478
describe
'21991' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPI' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
c26772e1887acf5c72fc4d1d24a3548d
939d338a54f7a1a5035761db45906bb24613157b
'2011-12-30T12:17:57-05:00'
describe
'2507440' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPJ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
6686447c3d2cb72132299ba90ed50ec3
faefa64caa9c2fe7fe4700cff404dc6004693d28
describe
'577' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPK' 'sip-files00119.txt'
a76cc4e4e7d43873cee2b80f20c5c1e8
754981a003d7aae950c59c17893ea86d26f9c62b
describe
'7128' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPL' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
c1e5afb2ea585c0459b29591c72df5e7
51938295d35ace0c65953878a97713918a370dd7
describe
'311965' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPM' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
05fe99477a0cddbb28647305f713a33d
95595579bb2051361297f0e2ceca1d6e6da8ac5a
describe
'76840' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPN' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
08c96c7df8a755664f2e9cbad0a71b6f
3fe1b85fcd995169f5254c14832512d60d7daf10
describe
'16734' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPO' 'sip-files00120.pro'
a650f3e023e3841812fdaeb67c879792
7f2a1704f96b8d383f6437bf54cc586ee39f27d9
describe
'25808' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPP' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
948f9f3adf82345357679d21a0d87ace
81ddd1f7f2fbb8e247a97ca61d4e1ddcc52dbb1c
describe
'2507788' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPQ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
1be705afcf7ae57c87f448b0d75a263b
13418daf61184240ea5b7c11744116b9b0621da0
describe
'698' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPR' 'sip-files00120.txt'
24f38aa5224f70ffdc09f428b680f834
ff1d8808ac0dbc28ae9c6cf13f1db9cf14a3b1d6
describe
'7947' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPS' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
bce82fee0f9ae179007a2ff4f4c2a27f
99718812d48dbdf2e2f89de6b8e2b631cbc520fe
describe
'312085' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPT' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
09bd6bc6835c2b94e56cdbe30a53425c
bc52a7d18109f2db81ae70d4f07ea6088d252c32
describe
'108377' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPU' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
85610465bc4faacb91841c6583724362
f6dc0d3366e18e3b15df89edd01c1b13f5f7abd9
describe
'23381' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPV' 'sip-files00121.pro'
11076d225832ef55f9990ff7951ef4a6
9ad9afd1b7289f1fede021229514f20aa2e39099
describe
'36011' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPW' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
4867c30b978c9d12c1230767a5f805d1
8a6d86533cd9e7c8ad112ac78a36248247ff580e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPX' 'sip-files00121.tif'
b4263a997c01492082ba6689deb82da7
aabada6f1ac0ece9adc7edfb88f8f2cd790c755a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPY' 'sip-files00121.txt'
ac0c8c3bdf5bcd233d73264d3071b25d
66e2168099a6f95f18ae7b4dc75c0adea39948f5
describe
'10628' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVPZ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
cd84ab28c2709577c585842a5e40017a
0f6b72442280c362adb2abe33c28fbef6987ed84
describe
'312075' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQA' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
46ad03154b6a99822e2126110203934f
6ee2520e7f4f5cacb49e99ed8532e38bdf406823
describe
'101278' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQB' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
d408a9888bacc95db75743806f964e93
febec8c26fc16106bcf06e12daae2f4a4dfd7590
describe
'22863' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQC' 'sip-files00122.pro'
b6d3eb71a27f18f226ada8b9198cfa91
abfd0e1987b0097aa79e22b424ba0c5cd27c79c3
describe
'34782' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQD' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
ed6132acb6bac7fc08e3886171537674
74cff23e092d8a056c7e534c33fa7f286eb86010
'2011-12-30T12:16:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQE' 'sip-files00122.tif'
be6b192ec855c11dd7db7a7ca7410916
5d94752949f3e0fc68094d2e78d2e4d04adc37d9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQF' 'sip-files00122.txt'
70542e982d8e63d02f5065b155236f10
57ac8f286127f7a33794d00d5f8fdffe43e66b70
'2011-12-30T12:12:59-05:00'
describe
'10459' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQG' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
787f766f986adb3ae2770ac2ce45a1f1
bbf37009f0a897728b27840d7b6a45af334f91e2
'2011-12-30T12:20:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQH' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
2c86fecc82a41be76bd33c0e246b3447
26aaf08fa6fa4a14408cfe49a35893c4662641b9
'2011-12-30T12:13:55-05:00'
describe
'129544' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQI' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
5eb0f39744599655484ddf45e395f7ab
29d474d56893c9448bc0fc164adf3b11f1c8420c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQJ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
d9b18bab732a9d0b5ca097eece7c5f7e
84ce1044474ee25fa3ca197c320555acfae308d6
describe
'39627' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQK' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
bb2538af628eef4f84e4f6dea074b614
c9c34aed9198b5b8ad6e82b1a19ba24aab543b22
describe
'2509504' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQL' 'sip-files00123.tif'
cd5b9d1216b8da7922624b384f0488c4
4a457e7f423148eb69b9ed671ba009f0114f7a2b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQM' 'sip-files00123.txt'
a3d50be321ed34b15ab7adb8d2969d5a
1cc80b788fcd3177589f8649bdbe066032c98911
describe
'11210' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQN' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
7ac71814b47c2986b2ec14f2d6ad3675
dd97a0886a27497863c9c1b5815e5bf6231b0405
describe
'312110' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQO' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
7f567a3dd4d3441692cdfdcb4a236f16
f692c51d47ecc075b308f7525bb7e0d6ea5bf807
'2011-12-30T12:19:59-05:00'
describe
'113970' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQP' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
50112c3c9c63f76de089e08c9efd7358
07cc912d270886182c2080fdaafa088fc8bbcc65
'2011-12-30T12:17:10-05:00'
describe
'20609' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQQ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
edf2eb84d0f9247a5f9a3938169b8b49
4d0e0f83aaf3f973c3bfca27d252384fecada569
describe
'34532' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQR' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
8e4e40397bc27d1ef297aa8451b4bf92
497b1a580731e13dbb1ac2aa8437ade35ec70853
'2011-12-30T12:20:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQS' 'sip-files00124.tif'
a92463d4cfca18efd3a0193f86e83e56
405061ccd833f1e6520bdbc4e0047c16032ba6e4
'2011-12-30T12:18:25-05:00'
describe
'833' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQT' 'sip-files00124.txt'
11de1515c739d9d496f0698b4b06bb26
78e52c8009f86516f1d8c9452dd89e30f511a589
describe
'9992' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQU' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
a0c99b52ee5b82334244e99089c941df
c03eb5f09ad3260e1e79d35f7bb0b5dcc755c21e
'2011-12-30T12:13:19-05:00'
describe
'312070' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQV' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
5c7f9bf7573e1f037e91444a780677b7
c57451c1b439288fc71698d0a981a52ae803dd9c
describe
'100922' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQW' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
2f856fb271bfa5993e287daa4382605c
83659c77e848e114a273857264a02be38a98334e
describe
'23003' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQX' 'sip-files00125.pro'
24b5e78b135c2252860384c74a88b628
95e2fb1fbc2624a40f4d4bd1f6c707ef5907130f
describe
'35092' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQY' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
201bce08011c4c51164c457ca17d12bb
821b2eceaed72955bc7bf749a1f14ea6abe203bb
describe
'2508788' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVQZ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
4400a5b3c5c648af02d801d6d36b3597
a9d0405fe67a072ff310765d8c7f77500fe9a776
'2011-12-30T12:18:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRA' 'sip-files00125.txt'
295a8eef2bd8ccb21a8d9d24b86d40e2
271b68b8bd952296b3e2a1f2a77883b5a81dc8a0
describe
'10573' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRB' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
638d266c1f81e97b17b92c1666364b1c
b3b4570336cac982169a0d9ef6ab0a3e94277c26
describe
'312108' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRC' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
36fc4f8c6ed7cc8e9eafd7caf91ae3c0
6b32a4d4ae3963ebd0b07beed94b6e7b792e3409
describe
'93993' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRD' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
adbe40c59d74beb0956babeb3cae69cb
9b500275d011435a9b9b13b0494ab7b7ef39c3c5
describe
'21848' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRE' 'sip-files00126.pro'
a3919b5bec1d350a4084c70820bc65a6
55d8b1505ae4ba69cc6ff90cea2102542fcdccb3
describe
'33112' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRF' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
d03d8e565a6d6b3322f69cc36d238d79
a79eb524e04648c6a7c01c57a858cb29acc7af86
describe
'2509124' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRG' 'sip-files00126.tif'
d5e9a377da33e4aec8e9293456c0903f
e5ecb23c027c738a5619c0d7c98d1b0e6658e1c5
'2011-12-30T12:17:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRH' 'sip-files00126.txt'
634182b4b467c7db75e23da8afa29bd5
ba15766f66910bfdb626314d6226961fe8d2a8bc
describe
'10029' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRI' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
cd6573fd37f2a823a0d4d65e039c12c3
9d6664dcc65fa291b84dca222276fc3c18165278
describe
'312073' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRJ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
8bebb7c6adba39897094fab9d42d85b6
955f71442c77489aa50105d9b55afb0f0cb21ce6
describe
'103541' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRK' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
a6bdf42de894c0eaff31616e90fe6dd9
6468eaf9e46cb3ab6435b5e91b617bd39789f166
describe
'22470' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRL' 'sip-files00127.pro'
4977fd1d6ed9029a7bd586bcca4256f5
b8884656d5e2d223084bc46d5420a82b16d3fe92
describe
'34671' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRM' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
3d3b99787c57be0bb615f3fb6b0ff203
4a468af55d6c66c6cc4b3114cbb1a1b040e92f4b
describe
'2509156' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRN' 'sip-files00127.tif'
22ae53c5711efc5791afcdc17beb0eed
a2e721496c3e38d8b4a46dc95a97218b1a7d599d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRO' 'sip-files00127.txt'
bcfa7ae3bbf15ded9600d5a76db83f90
0cd5d17928f569a1c0275d405a8209d7f8c04d89
describe
'10402' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRP' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
c91e9db1c22001dd35d97e1607553cbc
109e02942ff8cbab51fd291077c80847efdca19d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRQ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
a5bf14e79d3c50d5d0a01f4e7c37bab7
9888ab45cf4f3d6b848a751b09efe0fcbbbdb106
describe
'102390' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRR' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
4e5c186be6a4143790950b5fbee74196
34468d00e7a6df51b4a9916586d5497da883b465
'2011-12-30T12:20:46-05:00'
describe
'23101' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRS' 'sip-files00128.pro'
9760813529c76a6d16c0f23cacb8ab68
966b570692d5b51ee374a5d67c7ae7a1e9de0d4b
describe
'35118' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRT' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
28119bebce95227e6ebab11da4fe465c
c3ce899a024c39e5c57510301784f583cfcf3215
describe
'2508960' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRU' 'sip-files00128.tif'
2fb40666b3daa68d20fc1cd376c0f102
509b2f380923a3938175cebe7744430ddf80ad07
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRV' 'sip-files00128.txt'
09ca8dda0e3029a2aff4753e3acd241b
4eb4dfa7e06398e06789cea7c204ed74703f3403
describe
'10593' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRW' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
4731dc10ac87966581c8ec09bd8499f2
ca88749bde9b7b7739c3b6305d16b98145e3f441
describe
'312104' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRX' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
fced5ac2faa6a724efbfc94f589a28ca
03de5c040374242a8ed5b5552ee4194d774dadc6
describe
'100063' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRY' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
cd94ce3615a2f5e3298b0a2361cbcfc8
42ab233c7b35facc52e5e1ab1734291001079f89
'2011-12-30T12:14:04-05:00'
describe
'21549' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVRZ' 'sip-files00129.pro'
2cb5529e321586920913d86d7f37e0ee
5adf0f6a0e00de9d202a73fca117db81a39e3328
describe
'33759' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSA' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
559be8bc54a2d27e5b36fa362a3a74f4
23662da43fc9c584bee31c8163918478bbf3fa96
describe
'2509140' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSB' 'sip-files00129.tif'
c8209f452112bf65bab6c1496f158119
b79c9af5db501b054129caf7d592cd266918e6e5
describe
'866' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSC' 'sip-files00129.txt'
d82d6846ddb458154907e4d1aefac522
6f58d0e4f65cad02aff53b8700ba088995b69817
describe
'10265' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSD' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
023b17985e27c7798be177fc0e50750d
21fcd3813b3a7d5a09241feecec154ec277da626
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSE' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
02d9f495934ae38fe252aaa848198951
fa7990052166b86e45056db828ad2ea53403bd49
describe
'104777' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSF' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
7aca2e95d95b3fcaa4e4ee95b47408eb
e296873a333144e9219fcf12d2e94d2d9f2430b4
describe
'24221' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSG' 'sip-files00130.pro'
cbee435d3e7fe109d478f867fa898455
021669e74b2183e5e3a03873c3c6a59d9d63f6f7
describe
'36115' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSH' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
bba7afb5cc997bed13f535570de692fc
9627c1b853279060648955addcbdef1090b2da9f
describe
'2509252' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSI' 'sip-files00130.tif'
1530f5d7e54571ca97eb9cef97c3a9fb
6b4f56df27174d4db0c3a4ceb8291d25a7f812af
'2011-12-30T12:14:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSJ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
905a19320a46267e81d5478fe950b73d
bd3f71bc4a603214e2fde8d6f78e18d85c2321f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSK' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
d85a8879fa2a0553e3b3eb30d19e5613
51f48bd71141e6f0ad6669fac334bbc78c7011a1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSL' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
0f7411c913eb6f58952c70c14ee7c957
367028e82a6fd45bf8b3ce001580ecf6577b9f7d
'2011-12-30T12:18:51-05:00'
describe
'116668' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSM' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
68dba50da610cfd17eef852ea93976d2
c767bdf5698d137b1b890f4aae7566ad4a985a03
describe
'23052' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSN' 'sip-files00131.pro'
d38ac8202801d140eade68572d22e3ec
bb426964a32553b95a90e89d55e72c7705c0330d
describe
'35640' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSO' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
4b40d8d7be14eba85c582d4dc7e25199
d00fd0449152cfa4ab071d12387191ccc178972a
describe
'2508720' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSP' 'sip-files00131.tif'
88cd835310be64581b8491ca124e018f
633e8031e5666c1dfc61b1f92b60046cb3b62a04
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSQ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
42b88437f33368dd98f90e9fe7455aa0
7daf2a765b608e9532ce09e8655a6cddcac7c595
describe
'10713' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSR' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
53ceb32399448eb9af36083cd576dd10
bcc0a7e9f2afad815f78c4b455a280c500eb38dd
describe
'311950' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSS' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
68a440e39825b6b65a87c8f03544c12c
e84c0e96645a2b2591b28e4a3760455488e1c350
'2011-12-30T12:17:32-05:00'
describe
'107641' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVST' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
7f7b4e94f19e1820baf3a0160df6bf67
ff8339c55aed9a7ded8b5ec4bf72b36b7bf2e531
describe
'21460' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSU' 'sip-files00132.pro'
feb54ee909eaed3d521fa3a646cdd907
1f204ed2dd93e240146f9b63312ad810dccafb24
describe
'32877' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSV' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
7fe00d224cadd6bccb9d09e5a802f9fd
9a8a85bc8ef35ef72564b163d1d88218d4f7c6d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSW' 'sip-files00132.tif'
43a91784df68e7cdb59a60b69932d61f
54894f53f6c9afb81880eab472236e3ca57d0122
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSX' 'sip-files00132.txt'
4ce4a1154af04d00af5711700c7c4f52
fdc312b72889fae48a5bd3b1d624267b6f71d969
describe
'10289' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSY' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
2bb0eac731dd1865c968c4b164872f0f
2e96ac590c22ac31a2e5a2acec87ef76e0a67be3
describe
'312004' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVSZ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
f1d8463ce1a6e45a858f35c29f861ea1
b4ace28c4f9be29649cd3a47b3fc5289e4b30114
'2011-12-30T12:14:23-05:00'
describe
'99123' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTA' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
cca7a29759545f156c1ce17b37a1025f
f73e795e511ab8c92f50aec44dbafef65df17064
describe
'23097' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTB' 'sip-files00133.pro'
46ee29e40ee3f7b22bd5b4a38e4e8062
aaf596f71258dc0e6cefea55179b2ea4a23bd4b2
describe
'34318' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTC' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
1874c1a6b19c6bcd75ee97a6182d1736
c4a840db8373e332818ab6b4f7cde9a511e401e5
describe
'2509008' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTD' 'sip-files00133.tif'
4893aa32797b1d4795cb322081834ebc
a54c5e31637007bc38fe0f297027e0d91d948a78
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTE' 'sip-files00133.txt'
936b1078b3529b3b1d0ce52d1368ad84
7a7090664f7d348a5374c4969e178b4c4dd28382
describe
'10872' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTF' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
e3e1a21c0adebf1b20bec21d499b4eb6
86c0bb8c87f7df0bbf5dcdef44f6dc9480b5a778
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTG' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
83f432830355d6a5de8b1b59c6c68892
3ba41284147a9be69d9dae98c31305758d55ac08
describe
'100376' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTH' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
02d2d6c01a2e3dcc1859ecde3e4271ca
f78ebbc3469b97c31b52ddce7f25b1f2e0af4c05
describe
'23981' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTI' 'sip-files00134.pro'
50d2f3237055c402cf13ae95a2d82a39
7f15f5b15c3a57dbc0bc0a1ef48c4716ffe37b19
describe
'35766' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTJ' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
06ccfeb3a9aa71decb4355765ab9c88e
8e22fab80647e9768aec0eac0aa1c3e5b29590bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTK' 'sip-files00134.tif'
6ed5257ef17a4ce6385e35900389bd77
0543ae8500170e5481ff9588a05670847f28ce42
describe
'953' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTL' 'sip-files00134.txt'
0106451f0c941effeedbaaa573dddee2
46b57435f08060e68e649eb6744b5a45711d0990
describe
'10651' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTM' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
881f29a6eeb231a2a9398ef76eef3a64
dd055ef26c72dcb61127ff46e868310cd586e0a4
describe
'311705' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTN' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
b99cbd7708e8df59e3cc67685420cc0d
e635260a337392c04e46adccbe8401fd1eb1d22b
describe
'112984' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTO' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
5c0663df80e27713831ec2305e55e0bc
1542ea863a32ecb557516c73c21a815e6154beff
'2011-12-30T12:16:19-05:00'
describe
'22975' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTP' 'sip-files00135.pro'
8b1fa9d33ab13c1a08cc909b52041a36
c3d7782e54e38690e9f72a1987c43747b6298de7
describe
'35688' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTQ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
b633e9f6e44e7595fe08acfbb7d6c6a6
d9f2720411fb2615f3358dd721faa7bc8b3637ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTR' 'sip-files00135.tif'
e24bacce9c9c0946ccbc2fbef107740a
3efd3d77ec0455173ad29e32b8b54c22a8abdddf
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTS' 'sip-files00135.txt'
8933b245612f108e4422da2e69be03d1
af67fbe62ad3c34ece4b54bee33afc0a730697a2
describe
'10489' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTT' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
a43d5fda0dab79d13c4e3ba97346371e
dececaf90a0ba0276d60965463fc824981d231ec
'2011-12-30T12:17:00-05:00'
describe
'312040' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTU' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
997cee88d075c742718e845198d51871
5d8b6488c51c196ab8da914bf7056068fd2aa9ec
describe
'106589' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTV' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
f53a6b505fff9b5aea7165c7b981f81c
5d002c955b49b68278fe75a43b0d2d6ac80d9d36
describe
'23723' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTW' 'sip-files00136.pro'
1f9f113b28de80ee3df7a99f4a62ff22
f2a5f864d92e2f39cbc59b1903bf8067d62fa74d
describe
'35205' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTX' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
679d03d17612777123242401b06b49f3
fe0f11a2ab8d146004da991b83ad9208bfd06c03
describe
'2509084' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTY' 'sip-files00136.tif'
5cf97c274fc92670cde46ca99e30844a
644f51580f6587fca885bedf5191b880a7cf4924
'2011-12-30T12:16:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVTZ' 'sip-files00136.txt'
8fcc7dd0a2632d1bc1f83baf10a6d50d
74f477e21f8a167a0a4771e328266ba14ecf5e6e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUA' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
4fd1582294864507919592239bda64b3
05f0902939475b8d8f3d06a08c8c070518cc3bc6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUB' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
b555830d26b90ebe4d60b6da7baa2c14
776ceac066aa515fd64fd75a08536a1038f7746e
describe
'117443' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUC' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
eeabcee0c101999b6bd0a599d54f3d7b
9b21939e85204cd18a500964d6160c1b148f4911
'2011-12-30T12:19:03-05:00'
describe
'24039' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUD' 'sip-files00137.pro'
cf28bca54cf6c31d78f0e46d96a7f8b6
e1224d21fc7bdd93392e1c1a1073696edf9a5a6d
describe
'37469' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUE' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
3d5ecd95f5ed1c0df164afdb9a61781c
4d4235e0460f30f0fb09e67863e90c87049fb380
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUF' 'sip-files00137.tif'
7b4519d6b8a6c63b9bbf9556a442a9f9
b45e13751153a1c5fafbe6aceacf8cac26241a15
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUG' 'sip-files00137.txt'
dffee29f3c8c079401e6419cf89849ce
96ec4e3299ed2097e0db8d2c888f99876181d0fc
'2011-12-30T12:20:34-05:00'
describe
'10737' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUH' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
4bf3afbcaf8174b9f9f76eddced3a9a4
8b80ed95fa6f81ad6b2de9c65600415eabb5e2f0
describe
'312024' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUI' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
5a82e8b30e977723303a034bae5522ca
1c03816e9ad9ed649c9e27d4de4de6a9ee5423e9
describe
'109620' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUJ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
5b1cd463ee7f8e2f61c0598e001c7999
e94a5699f346025f32db057d29f1b84918027101
describe
'22771' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUK' 'sip-files00138.pro'
1e373e4fbde226064e861d144a51a137
39c3671f4bd3db8c4991dfcba32c3bf59a71bbce
describe
'36056' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUL' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
0f3594f82bc347683f04a1c59f31039c
3140b8ad3056177217c25c6c1f33e8e83bb36553
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUM' 'sip-files00138.tif'
5783b12e0b7e9071e9096f86d16da73f
b748147b2ad3412cbf75d1ffe6dc5063c86767ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUN' 'sip-files00138.txt'
a48cfe7ff133d95755bed78517c100d5
d63ef1cb5abcb1894e5d7c4c91234a924e9eb0cc
describe
'10819' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUO' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
07e88d1d489b602216a5b0e99f8dea7b
a35827abbb252878472f7aa84dbba98f101fd9ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUP' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
e212dc92bdb386540cbf4a51c8fd3f5b
3a4c258faf31c0137b5bb032169236e441e84219
describe
'111098' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUQ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
517bf32358376f667c02d9b0543b8c9d
f7500a81028a064d54a44d988b8856308ada985d
describe
'22137' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUR' 'sip-files00139.pro'
b8ee2b90344c0060bef0e1cdd5659304
5de815e68f812aa0a9dd2abfba3c875bc57d1a96
describe
'35550' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUS' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
b03849edaa919aee5843744b9301ec15
e90132eec716089db9f8b7851b06c9af1332a5f5
describe
'2509432' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUT' 'sip-files00139.tif'
c6404915c042dbbb6b9d77d967964b99
5038074c7045d0018e692f230790b5c7afa68852
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUU' 'sip-files00139.txt'
d06501f300aafa8cf91bb48147ffcf14
89a39070e6df557ae92e44409c181af06390d2de
describe
'10758' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUV' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
14c32833a294949d0010f48f8728421f
fe8483a59a6db7cd000f9d0c755e560146f7e1bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUW' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
09cdadc363dce6e9147dadb064ba6260
5f1672b52e6987a7f57cbac70790d403439bd3e4
describe
'199000' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUX' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
f66b945d9285090811aec607aa30753c
89921913f8e61c3930b50afe4a6b5f712c9d8748
describe
'2435' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUY' 'sip-files00140.pro'
22bf6523166935db7dc0b7d290448f50
6cd98c051a00665f31cea058f179245be306159c
describe
'52262' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVUZ' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
ca0288da4ca0d309ef114069311111c3
c9ac697973ea06bef921a3f2c2e15232c1621503
describe
'2510308' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVA' 'sip-files00140.tif'
de8fc74f704bcb5c2178f373c77ba6d6
500fd6949105b823cb99aff0dce4e9e1345a15eb
describe
'198' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVB' 'sip-files00140.txt'
e52f2c1bd941a716fad7dfd67b78f83e
5dc56e586cb67f993f18b1f5eb6aa5b64dd7e45a
describe
'12507' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVC' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
887cb34cbf480b25d6b56eb231cc8de3
fa6d04b15c1f44ecbc6fba5d63fde900505cb5d2
describe
'312065' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVD' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
704c4fad929e6b9e2276857ee3bf8cc5
fcd1df8da26b6ce9f8f2d82ca8412babd6ec2dd7
describe
'90661' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVE' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
a4f16377c1124cfd07d054a4c04a20f2
5280e1aeb87f417a02cb8a8ccfc20df6f9a9e314
describe
'22013' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVF' 'sip-files00142.pro'
2486a96796d1a4a4f699377b936f633e
bb30f2def540c06c0379316f684dd9b5a3eaf72d
describe
'32611' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVG' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
f203a16a794c47f5c5a48b3230625cbc
1c6a2c36ff6c3db6f6b087b2ad79a81a724bc4f1
describe
'2508956' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVH' 'sip-files00142.tif'
3d738a344a4cbf3146932dbb2c6fc8f8
b3e488471772e7dc86eaeb8d158e50bff27115e8
describe
'886' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVI' 'sip-files00142.txt'
0561a3664f945c928fc4953261a4f270
954c06802d6bfe20ac93427d50ce1a6aa4ac28b4
'2011-12-30T12:20:05-05:00'
describe
'10217' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVJ' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
1d31f97f92bd12b56e3af5d9de56dc9d
554f8b0143b42338c111d60bcc6f9634e2456b8e
describe
'311891' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVK' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
3e7d23d51fa8cca8dc6ac384b7961ab9
35d457f1b64935dfc8a4716785d34232481f921f
describe
'99579' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVL' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
3f1a8a8f948db5e9ec9c014649bd11cf
53ef35f2cc4ebc7ca59b06574b524ff0434fee4e
'2011-12-30T12:17:55-05:00'
describe
'23718' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVM' 'sip-files00143.pro'
f6e65ef7e7adcc5c9d227cad890e1ac4
d65a490b167f99b69f7b7fc07fee2a9f4d821764
describe
'36654' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVN' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
72a04a7448a5e3235ec3c8dab3ca617b
4fdfd40a197119413d97f8c4b6b59524123aa66a
describe
'2508940' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVO' 'sip-files00143.tif'
79bbdbca3d0cdc3836532b92ac82b05b
42929e9522a26c37dc2f69e608e5210a0eaf1055
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVP' 'sip-files00143.txt'
15a6ad9e1358e9b6d01801167041c82f
70be8ca0f2ebff8aed185ee5a29164770fab01c1
'2011-12-30T12:14:45-05:00'
describe
'11001' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVQ' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
3f6a78dbbe87889d001f9e36d03bb780
c54836c08ca2ecd951d9ee6d100092ad6262819f
'2011-12-30T12:13:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVR' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
227c7b2c465d74837376a882b69089c0
bdeae1fcef840e781b2644f5fe3b22b88acbf69f
'2011-12-30T12:18:30-05:00'
describe
'81265' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVS' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
6b1cf057048fcbbf3a9f2da17c56b3d1
6afe603a719dce9528745f755cddcfb1bb9bfcfd
describe
'20114' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVT' 'sip-files00144.pro'
2a1cb8f9309e6cc7fc819aff8b30b23a
6c75a15abad321a375f9be59a92dc04d3feae7b0
'2011-12-30T12:13:31-05:00'
describe
'29520' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVU' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
a05210a90f8f7788448dfd6d042c648c
f9becd0c833f0c11055728cb6962f9a4990f626f
'2011-12-30T12:13:16-05:00'
describe
'2508412' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVV' 'sip-files00144.tif'
01c091a58b76628ee0ea6f678306720f
d264abbb15046e7cae531e3724df7b43934c5d44
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVW' 'sip-files00144.txt'
ea70b39ec27662623a1b5b297911a6b4
0188ce287e27c9f4ba015ce9d0add38f50aacca2
describe
'9273' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVX' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
81dacd008656a7e06143abaab8eb88c9
8d85827c4cf0160a4419cb939b46ca4168ce8f1a
'2011-12-30T12:20:52-05:00'
describe
'312079' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVY' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
effa351689606ac7082055a1a90b73f2
728ab5d08b50eddedbbcff8169d7fc887e9fdef6
describe
'67334' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVVZ' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
423db2c377002cf5940e7423e96aec4b
b9c0746f061dd93875b284121ad93d26d0e69f90
describe
'11816' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWA' 'sip-files00145.pro'
831b7984af491a95c8c23ebb4c6d882b
100117cff919c9d523a100f59ee551e123a1c809
'2011-12-30T12:16:51-05:00'
describe
'21067' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWB' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
9e13e0824d05f82646646680d96b60a3
46e1aeba15f69dcf653a56de93192db3f16efacb
describe
'2507272' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWC' 'sip-files00145.tif'
3c73ceb7911897de9619b0e85c4f573d
d45520437db1d2a3a9cedb9037ea2f512fb62f6c
describe
'480' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWD' 'sip-files00145.txt'
9a9d345e1d244e0ee5fcfd93cb380cb5
28607dd915500138f121a7c053d79db0a4b4791c
describe
'6215' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWE' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
9236ec7f32e1d65cddcaca299cf14c69
1f93c9258e9e4308cc55116431aa7c92845985f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWF' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
bdb82d8ce1df44501e24fc0e727f39ba
5bdc833e8c479aac6065ec9a4d1af5feaa7d24ef
describe
'86193' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWG' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
22e0574dd873fdf453ebf87f42f0d0f0
e149317f77b5ca4f266b3eaaa29603729e90f05e
describe
'17985' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWH' 'sip-files00146.pro'
885e8b9546e9e39ab273a1c907ed0496
f745c5310da107d889c4b685052caf6e3f91f728
describe
'28405' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWI' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
62154af98d37aec33abb5b95e5b01b0c
debd6050c1101c6b1b26d6b08bfbf116f7f4e0af
describe
'2508172' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWJ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
73338e07965daaf21babd6534dc8aff6
794c9cf542c4ec7fb487460b9df37231ccd0b6e3
describe
'752' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWK' 'sip-files00146.txt'
3239dfac412aa7e31444c52906b59bc7
2c93c3758a961f2300eebb3bb5f68ea5d3c093a9
'2011-12-30T12:18:05-05:00'
describe
'8500' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWL' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
cbba722809420905a259809e21847ed8
c481130eec0f25f9baa5bf1a7b05fe2c3cb7ba07
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWM' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
8c98532a26ead6b5ea70b5cdf339c62b
fd3e49fb3ab8dc63b34f244369b194f61c5020eb
describe
'101900' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWN' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
02bdbe872f7e0df95f6e7aa86e05f626
6ae2beec64bf157c7b78b0cbf8cec7dd830b6a93
describe
'22508' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWO' 'sip-files00147.pro'
0127b2d6a887b2202dd97b7a952856be
da927b4a250dff2f1f7d3fcf75597b8b0f2d2aa7
describe
'34880' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWP' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
e8f5c637e0a093124a78c3dbf9b6a30a
a93fc01a6e0e4bf93860d5489bf42b2f243b6e8d
describe
'2509136' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWQ' 'sip-files00147.tif'
0074ce45dfb7886f5bfbe65464d0abd4
54597e3bacda67ee45b0f723202398d1259f3c8d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWR' 'sip-files00147.txt'
84f367a97bde5030bea3e56be925ad62
846a46ba8b9a5840716eb1e7cc7936ef4d7bd5d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWS' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
b4f1896a721b4b9dedb459aadecb389a
7d39d6c47a411a62506c9c854b1c7fe3514776e6
describe
'312030' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWT' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
18d4f055412579ececdc822975a18aeb
4516207f9527ff4c6920896072ab22f8bbf34a5d
describe
'93716' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWU' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
a8125d35c6e33fd7120afc8a9e1ae767
a1701a4aa9644927bf4ff3936927881fc1192705
describe
'21304' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWV' 'sip-files00148.pro'
d05fecc1416f3bdaa0870135a03a0412
46ca1477e89472e21d8e38b03a1558188684b023
describe
'32653' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWW' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
498311d4c02a714c73e8d8d6d63532c7
cbcf492ad4693242f96075f3232231e98e17b3c3
describe
'2508908' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWX' 'sip-files00148.tif'
126e71ca1c17a5bf77e3b1b32afd9611
e226481c60bfae91c9c232d221fdd4f82d733d1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWY' 'sip-files00148.txt'
f78c3a2301be5ba7e4fe6d8eaf0be09d
6f174af630007bd27429de02aff2ad24cd456cfb
describe
'10309' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVWZ' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
3a9744a7a2b4af6516918c27b3fca6ad
7df0d52fe4d1871f5a1db96a131c7c5c013d6863
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXA' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
353b0fdd8bb70ecfb3c0fb6fad2cca7b
aaa38ac84d9db976bb244655dd647fea1b6a2371
describe
'108367' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXB' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
577c9f1d530143dd782bd95c574ea615
c45106e48043635cff6182b01a629eab990ca001
describe
'23774' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXC' 'sip-files00149.pro'
79e9cb42c0ba241f75ebe8591934cedd
c84d4f2ae9df791f1ba00381a6b3ce82b5616973
describe
'35898' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXD' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
67fa745058a0bab6793a207609402751
5200fea9f6ec08b016e77b1e25218ecb4ad55ce8
describe
'2509212' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXE' 'sip-files00149.tif'
0494d478e830c8c02a1dca2319b82f89
aa0c046bf3e5e75f27ed81dc6d00d3a14c4a814b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXF' 'sip-files00149.txt'
0b0ee201502050e5de88f46c4d6645a9
4e0a88bdb289c305ada2df5265adad60ce158203
describe
'10745' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXG' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
891f6a943e39f069ce7e02936c1fe024
13bf9ce33f853db025fb019f7a8e42cbb6536a23
describe
'312103' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXH' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
8a462a6d6c1a633e22dc342dd441b0ba
2341cf456e960f3c24e6ff5b4bf47a47c590990a
describe
'96550' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXI' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
102d333542c190a3227eb883db7e8713
8fea483382f59677c94c01331f6ad6855a205d11
describe
'21568' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXJ' 'sip-files00150.pro'
36a85e76fc0db0cd96d7da9b005a2a23
d347087631ca13d06b3489c2a1d8dbf33d2bf94a
describe
'33271' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXK' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
8698db735d91b6cfbbe97ad867f2a0ad
cebe2acfdedccbcfd2a5ade9c164c9fc90ae9fa6
describe
'2508832' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXL' 'sip-files00150.tif'
33667a61fa7dfba0cd292d9cf2582fd6
bba4aa344a2fd12960f44d8707e68306b1b46f10
describe
'872' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXM' 'sip-files00150.txt'
228daac31b125ac5283cbd98f253c523
6ec9d9e04c83fe009f4e09d7f73ac84acb537cc0
describe
'10130' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXN' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
f28ab1a0ee87dc3043d4578a5711924d
a73d3383dde33cee7a8652b63c7c8ef0fd2ba173
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXO' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
2bd1f5c8be72659d09a00993abfb209f
4639c03e586a67b5b0818fc685291a57320cb713
describe
'95123' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXP' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
e81d6cdbd491b50d980bb5d008db25b7
ab52e16e6b8b0edf26d73151c2cdae4b703fe722
describe
'21488' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXQ' 'sip-files00151.pro'
80b2b7c109f56a0d8aa3aa6b43f45d2a
6fdcd30cd3b2eb324c45db3890a6b0ea318fc29e
describe
'33217' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXR' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
b40ac2e889b82567bafceb34ee0bce29
efd07eff235d6de0cabd6d726d3e58b0182c719a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXS' 'sip-files00151.tif'
8617cf894ffe1e802a6e7c49c2ab0a01
87b85f19ed1a08c6329142cf64e6b6ae70e380a9
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXT' 'sip-files00151.txt'
b9a37becf6964ed293ec14f5b41b68f3
0cd785e08e421761bb502824e68b9f463d09d9b9
describe
'9950' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXU' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
7c6b069b3a188d288a0db134edb49373
50ccc0e1ba0f0ec1a4bc353bf6d218cef41ff7c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXV' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
f9a8496c23a3482572f03f991348d359
83fde7b17198e81ce105bedf13c1556d8e4662e1
describe
'96017' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXW' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
0dbdb9f7b7abee340c765a3349ea0cf2
7612e5c13ea44ee307b5ed281c3b569cf137e560
describe
'21944' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXX' 'sip-files00152.pro'
80a883d51e643baee36cfa43bb56ab72
36683008f831d1af3ea030716f4b0877a3a1dd45
describe
'32906' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXY' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
14df3223b22884053a3102563e163d6b
706779a9b71dafac310c41833fbb93658ff23ce4
describe
'2508812' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVXZ' 'sip-files00152.tif'
90ec32fe1ada98baa11c50e79af93566
bfe5513d6b591974c9a44b10bf29854af80e6889
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYA' 'sip-files00152.txt'
0634f2c263128ff30b97dbe1ca0a506c
cb7ffd65428eefb9bae8623cb64f1c6a23e93875
describe
'10022' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYB' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
45d68f2296a1a822654c993c6448c796
5a47eea31b3e712c6264692241882a84a3ac0785
describe
'312046' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYC' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
3d0a83a8f56d394739ebe857ab12f650
15120aaf65e1befdc9a853d5add3e913e7ab9163
describe
'102721' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYD' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
23ad5f980d9c31f1f03419d98b268b8f
3edd51e0a99c00942a8481f8de6daf44d29c6a60
describe
'21957' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYE' 'sip-files00153.pro'
e16429cf37f602f3312a721ad54f03cd
82ece6500cf38d0500f72808f322926eae366256
describe
'33377' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYF' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
ce0eca0f95e624beab1ef05c925c5001
f8eb19e316ac8b0038372472716b33cc7cf76514
'2011-12-30T12:13:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYG' 'sip-files00153.tif'
d28611afbb2d90f17235af6d44a62afb
5ed1ab7d4f3e5680adcf718c80399acbf5268f59
describe
'883' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYH' 'sip-files00153.txt'
e9e65facb528e8b0d5896182e26b6040
4321a684d0df68106e4afc9948702c06b30feccf
describe
'10119' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYI' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
465b849552d473baf822842636bd89ba
b94a5b78b55d066e875c08389f2325723e4dfae0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYJ' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
5d7208f691fdf7a8e54dd0e3025250e6
224bcefc161eb2eb49b4a6dcec7a43078e12d4cb
describe
'107266' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYK' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
0df215f0356f36ef75a79e5773e98776
1627779af95e6dfe59e67795a41262be6ca76a19
describe
'24569' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYL' 'sip-files00154.pro'
a1fbff2ae6ccabdeb221820a8d9f5f5f
5ca16c7cec9adf50b844f94a82d53d6370b2b35d
describe
'37068' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYM' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
dadf2e38eb019738939ad9bf0db82645
84160684824cee0febcd13eb34b5360373f2f226
'2011-12-30T12:14:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYN' 'sip-files00154.tif'
16591a2b97780d030b8395f12f4ef930
eccf40d4308d835153c46f5bdc91019ea1a69ba8
describe
'977' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYO' 'sip-files00154.txt'
7ce4a5552496f1a6d99357b5427cc2cf
d650963bb81e07c00fc3c7e5b133892202cbb5ce
describe
'10989' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYP' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
0602d4222e8a9028debd9990124f8ed3
43877fae63bc91a1939487d0a02d6df7787bff50
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYQ' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
d9d6ee4b394d7582722332f36caa2af2
2a322ea70b900379f4717f48d98910375c853f62
describe
'104624' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYR' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
86281f2e3f2ede99789362b47575adfd
b8f7808525f79a0b862c4e6cd57139b1bbba726d
describe
'23115' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYS' 'sip-files00155.pro'
0c5474d5c69eb51cece95895b6fdc57d
5979ec688249e25fbc2e6ebaa35ac0c1aac90387
describe
'35218' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYT' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
4204e3a36331f687be61d58535a8c3b6
61f63ae8a9990268ec577f5a95978cb8273816e7
describe
'2509332' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYU' 'sip-files00155.tif'
68d4e56def261f4397193f8266e637e5
b34802c4e9b9e338b40ae1b9a444c80a5b34df28
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYV' 'sip-files00155.txt'
b087c57da0570055330d11a83dbfd43c
2bac9aed1feabbb80ba8ae4af27a134c0b22921b
describe
'10599' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYW' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
463858829779c20c99010c269e5abe96
0aa08b7f98ef5ea521bee4444b0edf5e0df0b905
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYX' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
88e01e83d005ae5975e950eac81768e5
8dca2c0c4622664e4a17fdfd33affd11e812fa28
'2011-12-30T12:18:20-05:00'
describe
'103554' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYY' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
10f6ef388884c3b7105aa071c7bcdb1e
1c90d9e6956d08bd77d6d059f480e7755456b690
describe
'23178' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVYZ' 'sip-files00156.pro'
fb9c2b8a3968c6f7e195ab99a479fae9
f83db2017098e37fc6cebc913aa4762ba11e3699
describe
'34613' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZA' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
d3b21c84f11abd2ac1aeb4347aea8165
7a6d2b12c4c3e8b41d990fefb2ec08a974cf8bce
describe
'2508916' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZB' 'sip-files00156.tif'
2dc15ec42187232756a445e6a5b232dc
416cf2a43405587e23413e1c4f147ce700632efe
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZC' 'sip-files00156.txt'
df977c4dd3dc2389de1438fc273300a7
0d37cce7202ebfe6ca8a65bec4870f28fc6dce24
describe
'10574' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZD' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
b0813b9ae50725bdbbe8a99376ba226b
62283334cd439e8d96585d34829555bf3a0b2bc8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZE' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
ca3b5fae4b5ddada6a3d7ef802d178d4
c90b4b35d6fa6f4b99706429acef750bd6f61044
describe
'108470' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZF' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
8a3b295d98d63335ce85272aaf0ac97a
a1a6bf11e0d610c211ad259c68e3012db8ba20ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZG' 'sip-files00157.pro'
65a029a16ada4d9d9d17bde8d5c17906
4f9c801d0cbc8a25e1c73d7a352b13bff52c83a3
describe
'35722' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZH' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
ce62435f380aa4d5f78c6671a0818265
afa323d9e049a9c497e874cce62b86f4144eb56a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZI' 'sip-files00157.tif'
472e00ea5c8fbcd77a40ec62433442e0
abe7494235e9b9870f9c75dd690d2481fcab1653
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZJ' 'sip-files00157.txt'
c5fc021f45200558bd2c68e7f6fb5984
5575c5bf6628452316807e6f314d7b5261c1af8f
describe
'10738' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZK' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
91587e6280542ca96f25fe1f5be784e1
e78a411fa31006d7964c62516644d535f26d087a
describe
'312023' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZL' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
bd7c83a03dfc1b686fa353e1f4a857e3
d0ca31c14bfb7efcf42da5efd8daee47ea11bc76
describe
'98325' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZM' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
6b0c3f714d7c7f90d402373588ce9ab3
00d841d9895b0de5415a7124a138f3b050238702
'2011-12-30T12:18:00-05:00'
describe
'20844' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZN' 'sip-files00158.pro'
a7483e2e0e3c0718e06d6f8be32fcba2
a002ff3eaa46e720a35e0b2e01d222a5e132753f
describe
'31802' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZO' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
13872e23ab7fdf1d89e955e327fbc152
becd79d81dd64a2807c660cb290b9a67926a119e
'2011-12-30T12:16:26-05:00'
describe
'2508568' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZP' 'sip-files00158.tif'
e995143be49c18a6f63f522e9d1d04b6
109ab9f867b7939c48d372735503be7291c499bc
describe
'835' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZQ' 'sip-files00158.txt'
97f4eb232da7ce64d6969036db617d36
7d905d745d3b6adc0d3128d05a44738626f7dddb
describe
'9958' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZR' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
86cb60dd8f097a83ee06dfeed957fd9a
39aca4aff0e0c56e7921e63a3b848b8c13bdf74d
describe
'312051' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZS' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
bc4a497476d3083d19c8c32d5b35751f
63c36ae302c18d9df0acebf882c7467a9e726721
describe
'92936' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZT' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
94c0e41042f9d347e52584c2f1a3dab3
531534857bfb7b5d0de51222e6ad8740ef8df0a9
describe
'22795' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZU' 'sip-files00159.pro'
5eedff29e14f89dff59eecac2eb4e645
88ef25167c924205c27acc8b2f6d89196922db84
describe
'33806' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZV' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
4efe53b6cc95c0b2cd9def3769e174dd
5088439920ed63f28aa395d127c681fe73d6907e
describe
'2509000' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZW' 'sip-files00159.tif'
d8722427dfd511811067a6267f68eae3
43cd84c0d0a8df6bc313a5ff4ba52e692516fe48
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZX' 'sip-files00159.txt'
f8697d5e2d29973fd124de0fd459006a
575ff722ecd25f089df07f05d4ead9e6506b98df
describe
'10640' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZY' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
6f2f4df1e88f92dfc0990333f13a92b9
e542d62ab3d0da8d84d5b91e2581e3e487ea4ab5
describe
'312056' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAVZZ' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
5f458884f908b71b42a44e807cfe0864
0ecec657e9fe74d054722d747eb5ab5757714c22
describe
'91856' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAA' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
83c7c46bf1e039c3e9b5860ab5f4426e
be153f80a4e3204d351c475b67fa5f27f4102826
describe
'23154' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAB' 'sip-files00160.pro'
367e11b5515ce89989d082b633e8a177
f16d2266af0b80d5bf672ee2843c77d61c3dc3df
describe
'33208' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAC' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
1b17787f0105d44a2e0c5a25304ca159
58f1201e6e6c000f0547547454431d80d46e1fcf
'2011-12-30T12:16:24-05:00'
describe
'2508824' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAD' 'sip-files00160.tif'
a7edf500d978f4f3fff6b605e37457cc
79a2e2e445e22dc5cf633f7e3af75324eafe9cea
describe
'921' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAE' 'sip-files00160.txt'
1068e6d60488478cda9cfb46f600784d
a3f2a0eb22d1e236574654f8b71d29612d6b8181
describe
'10082' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAF' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
9b0600da30591cbfa40e0461305b9bd7
1351f8ebdadb2db739b13b8ee3c12b097f2c74a6
'2011-12-30T12:15:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAG' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
ffd1d7c2f0aff4cbd9ab32981a5498f4
17a31fce8c1fd10e05b079ccf8f46cdded059d24
describe
'104780' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAH' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
bd0a4a4375dbc33bdcfee0a0f996ae92
83b22b67bbe3710c45a285eeefde1db7796f0eb9
describe
'23140' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAI' 'sip-files00161.pro'
c277877940045ff96cc737aaa7db06f6
f69491ba6e0ce3c9e01cb5d7cb5ef250f6f49e87
describe
'36635' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAJ' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
6e866167e2d8ffb52c40934c414a41a9
3d899f30fa7f5093b1d51e1ec621f13d2c2c90b6
describe
'2509192' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAK' 'sip-files00161.tif'
04f9ea514148d00435f6eba755083199
1638d3ce33950c3699b5d02bb3222b28cc92e23b
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAL' 'sip-files00161.txt'
3d1495d64ba7404611509cd577c570b8
2b967510190fb38933511587090b0622908fdad8
describe
'10902' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAM' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
c0dcf4e7ae17cbbeb57c2c2bd51bb49b
b14d5cf6e504a7f83f80bc737117031fd82182d3
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAN' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
d2d66195f8a9400cf6246aa00e6965e1
1b5b09db9d911e24461320b2e1bb2f93d2845c9e
describe
'103951' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAO' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
6c283308b43a9c53d215159899f4e348
48c786efa0d9ea6f0453c1577658807cc44ffb5d
describe
'22774' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAP' 'sip-files00162.pro'
8a54a1a2ab3c42726470d7e8cbd2316e
eca52fef0bfac14ae09af211873cebb94d0bfff6
describe
'35504' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAQ' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
165f8cd6823ff7ae6c0e36743a88774c
ed6bd85fe06d3ed84df2dfcc104f10b8da094bd0
describe
'2509060' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAR' 'sip-files00162.tif'
d3f34a64eff50c857275f0abc5b5fd52
1e86558b7eb7a3c8a6f80b2c2c07a896d008a2ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAS' 'sip-files00162.txt'
530b0031e216b375bf323c1ceffbd823
7488380a3d58fdf8e47854a70f2cf0167160ab4a
describe
'10623' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAT' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
78154e8fdc10d610d233ca774c7307c1
90e509af9efa3354f687ee7db960f65f3a5e43cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAU' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
e50d0e7463a339c5a9ef33de2c43aa64
e684c184e92b41feacc78a3a1ada749f6d22ae21
describe
'105175' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAV' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
5815a8e8651a7d26a674d92d54054cd1
69647708996832db6f8a01093a76c3b6abdd0d38
describe
'24681' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAW' 'sip-files00163.pro'
1e596bf78250ff556f148ec3f1bec552
38c7bd44c893fda0fab449ad1fe36d1aa25a7c00
'2011-12-30T12:15:09-05:00'
describe
'36644' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAX' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
9e9a5ddae97f8daa17a64b7bdda7a0df
7f530e420f7008b137b6c845a88b6d7462065cd7
describe
'2509016' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAY' 'sip-files00163.tif'
24209d7551b918e07b065d3e14b3ef04
e83a72c5ac0c6a14400872dcc37fc26184b536e4
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWAZ' 'sip-files00163.txt'
a1fad2302fe315de37966222c8951fd9
fbe1cbc7d222f7a9eb6a729c4aa1e2bb03db80c3
describe
'10809' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBA' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
245b8fe8adf7f634f2f419d2209b6480
09386686a2b485d08cafbace7f14010764b99425
describe
'311987' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBB' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
5ac52f29882993aabd5187ddd69f1e88
96025f9a0c96bb615d8fd2ef458ff387e4cac00b
describe
'103322' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBC' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
880895e91fac4db96d02d89c3bef80e5
5ff774274ce151528b1195e39909265cedcfdd4d
describe
'24641' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBD' 'sip-files00164.pro'
6477b3eacb949fa1fedb36702dc1a5b6
9b5d20452538a09f8492362f3324e571dc22b231
'2011-12-30T12:16:12-05:00'
describe
'35896' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBE' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
4bb2bc5dca08c5ee8340ec760c213b91
29962261fa4027ae31948eab73cfa135885cf997
describe
'2509364' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBF' 'sip-files00164.tif'
b2fe99543530a0c4aacd7225f7c88086
c53e0813d55a1c0d400105cb669b743fc4fe52e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBG' 'sip-files00164.txt'
0bd64ad6f0e9240b43605f8e84d51752
edcf14554b70aedff2aba4c923ad67e72754ed1e
describe
'11180' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBH' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
eea5c78ad4a3e5f15d5538e74edcace1
3e6fc6c7de2fc4b56fe3d6b8f66059ecfada0223
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBI' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
68387c0f58db5fb0352c6271ad2d007e
2c85c27ce549d68dadd4bce73f643a99975e022f
describe
'102492' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBJ' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
8c466ae591e6a205686c52be3ce5eb1a
77666c765fe2b680168f1b0ffd08e4b9d729b24c
describe
'23767' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBK' 'sip-files00165.pro'
3eaa3228db6a507bbbb1219f8438716a
193027c2e2ede00e13cb2e0752d5aa087a01c0ca
describe
'36068' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBL' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
8a9e2e1735fd3e60addffffd46ed9440
10655ad379f879b967d19c7a3a75ce0d67551385
describe
'2509292' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBM' 'sip-files00165.tif'
0947b34e44e2bb951ab76263e0c55af0
fa89e6245e997c835a7b5bbaf2244bc33fdaed7e
'2011-12-30T12:13:15-05:00'
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBN' 'sip-files00165.txt'
91f7a37df4ca544ca9c690a4b5178d21
48920c61838b97c804a191e0c0f3e1aff8f4edd5
describe
'10742' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBO' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
856cb2c3c34d84fd725fedb38f69bc81
d159ad914f40fc21d964cbd2683e3a0a8c6e4297
'2011-12-30T12:20:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBP' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
39d86f163dcb5b23333f767ca6ea1c76
501b52307210cb5fa67b7806f172c97d310e8bf8
describe
'104390' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBQ' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
d79d8132fbc28caf310777a24f778600
0316cb936e7143ce4e3c6b2a02fbd6c0e526549a
describe
'23974' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBR' 'sip-files00166.pro'
ef739743fb1ca2d2a73b525e20867a8f
03fb5e5401bc5f5556fdd6a83b964a8985c941c2
describe
'36052' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBS' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
989a30ecdd179012a6d889b62e2d7fe7
8ec7c08f1554fe400969a14d0f0452d1df863d9f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBT' 'sip-files00166.tif'
03bf938284e8e579f7b1c792e42d1a11
29204877d98dd377ea71d49995cb88a1b6b7780b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBU' 'sip-files00166.txt'
29b1882e88fb3e8b328815b8e9a96080
857588083b3bc36b4a683815befcb7b1371823ee
describe
'11101' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBV' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
433064094f255b80ad370184f0d453a3
03065895d35c7ded3ff0c221e0c32941c30f0aec
'2011-12-30T12:17:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBW' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
cfaac10e9a2532af62001eb982b2d2f6
e6b0083df481dda22f221b31e793558e3c4b01de
describe
'102685' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBX' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
dd8ba1035f5e36bd97421ded886afb72
bdedc07570d9b68bbca9a70d4c87193558cde39c
'2011-12-30T12:20:33-05:00'
describe
'23472' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBY' 'sip-files00167.pro'
f56cef87cc99e9f43bc264930118833b
c6bf7e2c9cf5e58a3066d6465d0f3f648e2e0bed
describe
'35145' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWBZ' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
3c8cf44508be549bb9af61e684b80be5
d046fba98c576a00eb689a074516e02898b674f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCA' 'sip-files00167.tif'
befa641f1dfb6bb9f49e481418cf0f15
a7f37189705e7d8f8fc2797e65c0b417f5a1eb13
describe
'939' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCB' 'sip-files00167.txt'
9fbbf17286d01dac10a0883418741053
783e5f5b829afe1ee36e1e5b4487cb9629624b78
describe
'10567' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCC' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
1d6928590b06dd7181cce157355ebba7
c976badfcde2ed9a67dd79fe358e7805ee214a45
describe
'312025' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCD' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
33b2056ac08d22370febc854deeaebd9
60796e3979dc118094a593fad972f96d38f6d718
describe
'213655' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCE' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
7e6734247714556e3e999a1d9bd5553e
2a76792579880efd06ed2d83c80dc275a507d302
describe
'2530' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCF' 'sip-files00168.pro'
4b62b396e2c97a098fdae03e910839b3
7268610f7b68769ef25ef662e54d9acdb00bbda9
describe
'55170' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCG' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
b6a319dc7883fee0c4b7d92dffc00140
776b382c78d027043026d0038b9335cbc26579d1
describe
'2510552' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCH' 'sip-files00168.tif'
674835a9a78727974b72e04da574ff14
dfa7e8831968f30f3b6c570c324e59bf43766445
'2011-12-30T12:13:44-05:00'
describe
'200' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCI' 'sip-files00168.txt'
07dac8e2e938e9a31dea23037ae125c1
97492ed97c870450dd8d99f2c595c31b43bd9b49
describe
'13396' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCJ' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
31cdb4490f6ae19d98fe4723e6de8c91
8777a10108ac16cf187ff6beca0f22b6e7434a8f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCK' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
a4c85458bde6ca2f5636a319791abbcb
42cf20085dd7e6dd98c076357421caac7a24dcb3
describe
'96957' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCL' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
6c4b5c14b56fdfaf4243eccc12145427
274e3dc5ca2fcab54b0aa680fc0bda17f79f2ce9
describe
'22936' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCM' 'sip-files00170.pro'
6aa840a04aa0dc9b9308b3bacf942e64
02b83ce3611db31ce3c84b9529dd6fa5535b42f5
describe
'33679' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCN' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
8da66a5358e8b64f8f55f5ba01a19a08
9f3cb978a1d072a59cf5214b8bad76e203f78dc9
describe
'2508912' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCO' 'sip-files00170.tif'
562a7b2b5f509409dfdb461b2fe78109
2130a7dba72f2812f52af26a71ae8d3668d54994
'2011-12-30T12:20:42-05:00'
describe
'913' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCP' 'sip-files00170.txt'
0a4163face25071e1ba86820fa0966d6
b38fcb241bba569fb8216a3a67444c03228a73da
describe
'10162' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCQ' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
75954f838b626bf3c54e3939bc2c9e76
f70612d4857cae983e3936a49c50032cf8bfa8e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCR' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
32421ea8e2174d1d670e75929d803199
ed0332edafbd620ce8bb81de09b576c9cb11ef43
describe
'88848' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCS' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
77b7fcbff76818014599248c673fe0dc
1baf4bfa62f9dcbb99607edf1c8062654d0759b4
describe
'18056' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCT' 'sip-files00171.pro'
a7e8efd98173bd6f4dd59bcf6dd926d6
76ccdc52e35159589b4e5920b5e8b615019fdc3e
describe
'29689' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCU' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
204ec944db1bdff82f07bcebbf337998
ab995cbac999c0ed8d504933780d8ad9c56e8e1e
describe
'2507996' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCV' 'sip-files00171.tif'
8f2347a20e803e91bc89d1f60e282e10
c70fb7565bc20b1f92ba5b382b71b0463b8f6866
describe
'749' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCW' 'sip-files00171.txt'
b083e89cc851702a18f6a2fe3263f83a
6585172b3bec093b045c9ad6b2917efcbe11cbd3
describe
'8730' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCX' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
e8aeb8053e7a7e66a0c709c0c323ced9
cd1c61619ca4b6835d0fa4de3d2d3f7ac58a8372
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCY' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
2c15c6739acdf7ba040a689f426f6afb
e894ab9d75f2047b92caa52eeb26f5bc95e5ee4f
describe
'124879' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWCZ' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
a322909d644764c2e1cc493e720cac41
5bfca3b81bd1f093e3d2f27c957b07b61e0087fc
describe
'24477' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDA' 'sip-files00172.pro'
10e47489e36a2b6ea2a3f5806b49b8db
a40f2109e68bf2376361280a9c3aa1a336817ce6
describe
'39471' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDB' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
23149ce8507ddddb9f96e3c8a7cbcb5d
8803e578d1151be71d11e82463044024209a530e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDC' 'sip-files00172.tif'
76c8b51e5ab2b3fc974db7d9647d2847
6fc097302ff1981f4e11400b2ec7e2ec28687c63
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDD' 'sip-files00172.txt'
b4b1ec72e6bd9690ba1b3b7fd4c84a69
e6de93337f811b2a691ecc3aa0e2082591869ab6
describe
'11359' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDE' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
3befff9f44b9936dd88487e7fb57724d
3a81b03ac84d5cfba2d0f70f88792f1faf738f25
describe
'312096' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDF' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
818d1b0faae212de015269a496e41c97
0ca34a40da2707c50be9ef82418bc479281b6103
describe
'113963' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDG' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
76cbff2315b500ca24917bf0d766817d
88359e83f73f3b114cf445e037c13b3f8c4c62b8
describe
'22701' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDH' 'sip-files00173.pro'
ed624447a1236473294d851d112d72bd
9ddacbc563d818105b16fde8a6930746dd709266
describe
'36773' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDI' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
4cf534b2d4c18cef1c9defb5a091e094
2bfab3076026ee3cfce386ceae64c8d1ec13e544
'2011-12-30T12:13:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDJ' 'sip-files00173.tif'
8cabed9c1ec981e951ee8829f6fa846c
16782f7343329cf26bb8bcb809cb6fed3bb5d91c
describe
'902' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDK' 'sip-files00173.txt'
300b7d31c8cc99643052b925c01638bc
6bb779f64555e10723f3f4363ee1c47b3993ccb9
describe
'10595' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDL' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
f49876cc0cca94b5e54a6daaead81254
f4460757026ba8eb77fdf828dbb0754464588465
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDM' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
5ded84aef56c7c0ed86d150052706202
138cea4093f9902fa4ebed597ea52aec6a5564f9
describe
'120161' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDN' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
259c750d7d248950c9ff9dee1b939313
9abf34ad7aafea17aafca73edb4384bee8cf3343
describe
'24970' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDO' 'sip-files00174.pro'
5621f54475a90ce3291603e1ce58ef05
b190bf6d7a8d59f83fddb8d08eb289fc39d8f139
describe
'39371' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDP' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
af2dfa06c54fbe7ba1cf45330559be57
e8ecaf780be5f14c0dfcbffecd0f59d32fe7740e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDQ' 'sip-files00174.tif'
b1c59ea08737fd5c05a24a4f7a5fa024
2b024bddcdfd78a2c4a1a738c76e733be2a0315f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDR' 'sip-files00174.txt'
4eece2727e3f7ffd63c2d00f0a8d0b29
02430b2d39cd94326f2f1e7bb0ebe77968a52c16
describe
Invalid character
'11233' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDS' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
f08acdf3144c8c1663f025b70fbb948b
158f699cb43055e5b80b19359742d6d6ba23bb77
'2011-12-30T12:20:54-05:00'
describe
'312000' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDT' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
418654e5b8de8b07964ddf51ec8a4eb7
5d7c50efb3074dbd986bbf9dea20d4b32c8eee42
describe
'120427' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDU' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
3cd9dcd0fff8a45572d9e27c23f96b72
91194ba036598459df76e3c63af881ee40db653c
describe
'23281' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDV' 'sip-files00175.pro'
b51a93c11d0ba313b4333c94c5e7bbea
06b30474e34298d1c57982a5a8d700e4dc712b35
describe
'36871' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDW' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
a2b5aacb60ca445a8322bb2d81ca4c49
bde9655353e69ff527b24e0cf4af37d16574c014
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDX' 'sip-files00175.tif'
68fbd27f992f31091e318e74ef97f317
1b8c260249484a11b9b07ad2b395a41de6d06153
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDY' 'sip-files00175.txt'
990c6ef9eb949cd9aa02f78fc37d895b
9262a0e465a4486c1410e0227ff661edd8938bb7
describe
'10842' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWDZ' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
40b0fa22abb9ec66ddc905c458047c9e
a02294abc2a22c7dafe0c080ff34f4b45cc97616
'2011-12-30T12:19:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEA' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
b3057a5121ef28c15d6b090ff4dc5199
e46e2a3aa4298b58b76f216cd066fd6b495063c0
describe
'120889' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEB' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
39cebd919fb6317270c331627bfbd014
271c570f538b913f7a74c22f3d2a9e5c14d68201
describe
'22503' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEC' 'sip-files00176.pro'
bec669fa89b413f173669410540f3c94
cd918ee239f1d2e421a3f223dc5ab708e536499e
describe
'37544' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWED' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
865698243477af37e749f0c4224d7cbe
b96185ad8808cd0ff532cc7307320cc3a3b910f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEE' 'sip-files00176.tif'
dc35779692e4442b1354dfb76614cd1a
45c362cd624b59f30f3788741c40570f6bba1d6d
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEF' 'sip-files00176.txt'
38c68011ad6f4f272e7177584c562caf
4de858513a9947a2b580bfe1f6c27b4191d225de
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEG' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
d4112118cc7d0d74de716c5804eeab30
5352ed84bc1ceb9d51fc92312fa5875218a17425
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEH' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
2e4fcfd5d4bc8c31612f1874d498139c
6c01b560f287152f3e3339f923899a7325dd1b59
describe
'113980' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEI' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
181ffc09270bd8347f7812a7ae0e5214
9898cb19bfdf669d4d71bbef496755df1366e6d5
describe
'22869' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEJ' 'sip-files00177.pro'
d56a4860e1c4241ffd9aef81535f1b83
b6aeec6ed0af5841a5827ca2e62b20820f8a3d15
describe
'37040' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEK' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
727b2cce008a0e66194b381740cbed1f
501be00367f8b9c2324987942465cd57e36211ff
describe
'2509300' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEL' 'sip-files00177.tif'
a9ad3067dd28904905b94dd6b17af6dd
d115edef55687cf08bf887e246484b444a8b2685
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEM' 'sip-files00177.txt'
dd60618d5093c21f6cf2e5356a8306c4
14b16ab156ee897e0c0eddf94301dd010300eb36
describe
'10711' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEN' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
be862ea3316dd921bd921060676b9802
c6db958e1d5da59bdceb9a5b46073a685b833e1d
describe
'311939' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEO' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
9a30d141837c041f93cfcb72255ed29f
32feefa768e740e1806bbaf1d43e14faa2a77b86
describe
'112161' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEP' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
8e9753ef4e3624f1db8a034c1e9792a3
94507e5272286e379db364e261a11ec9d2d23945
describe
'22790' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEQ' 'sip-files00178.pro'
0dfadd2253d3caa4a42fc8dde6722bd2
1a8422e715cc5e65ebb55aa1aca20f34336c990a
describe
'35612' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWER' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
aae3049a3e6781178fbf99bad26b803e
58a41219737c937cca013fe802f778168cf33b1e
describe
'2509308' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWES' 'sip-files00178.tif'
0d0027b743561fd7df0c16d667b9eaec
3e7433f0eee54da91a1755d9269aa4cb1a8d2d42
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWET' 'sip-files00178.txt'
eca16c483dcee8bb450f6780608b9785
2679ddca4f2ddba74187577fc843d1f650552f5d
describe
'10559' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEU' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
8f59256bf049789ac9f0861e87b35a69
a104d757c913dd0f5eb393b31052dee639431d40
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEV' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
a44ad683aa60ee6c117265a6414a368c
1c7a36da2cca6b58482ae6560de6f779d8d4785a
describe
'121314' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEW' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
8cda963ed39974beb326f2102db71a4a
674c2c92d6552f903615d9467fd2d4069673184c
describe
'22095' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEX' 'sip-files00179.pro'
3e4ab2f951eb09f917d39c394e5bbbb9
0f10655e9a279da8d001c2d75ac02f237b8e4825
describe
'36707' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEY' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
8bcb05222e302bd970cbe2504bf3d422
f305ded8a48e8cf6a28655ced13f9e8fc34ea537
'2011-12-30T12:20:19-05:00'
describe
'2508888' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWEZ' 'sip-files00179.tif'
006fd2288aed7605708f8c9278f8688e
3238de0e2bf4286a965907201297911285e5aff2
'2011-12-30T12:18:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFA' 'sip-files00179.txt'
163b860650e444dd498d628d0e4bdb0e
7e0c4e378c29ecc126e1e4ee73bd3cf8d7892d84
describe
'10718' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFB' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
e98df35ea3dd8c028f09009aeee3a3b5
f680c6bba80562e5e057afbe98f29d05a654e6bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFC' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
59ac83a2ebc4f39cae126cf43d7f928f
680cba0cb27f00af757e856a6b053409081cdeee
describe
'126815' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFD' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
6feaf8aa012aaf4515b8a46658d6d109
2043d6e84ea48362815e87212abd0a4ea8a8441b
describe
'25224' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFE' 'sip-files00180.pro'
26a1854d1823020f68af31e3011a6108
5790aa052f82a2e179023c0dc29b017eff31ef67
describe
'39751' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFF' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
12ab32e7fd992fd40975663100e493d0
45ff0c99b927e583b5ade870e2a5d5cad2aa7361
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFG' 'sip-files00180.tif'
998a3e124125f1e0166fc5b317a36690
ebdf6bccae0ffe439127bd6de51c6333025ae59d
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFH' 'sip-files00180.txt'
1b0c66f5d47a7843c7af4e6824494763
dfd3e41aa939a62fc3cf9d53ce6d417bf95874cf
describe
'11192' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFI' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
891cbdce135520d251a708ca1927cd63
ead271bf7799b8081113fcaedf109c5d0aa1298e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFJ' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
389677230748eb2b0e6553ed2b4a5e19
26932395460bc7d080a80fbaf32c6ac8317e7bd0
describe
'118083' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFK' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
fbe685da39ef2c475aa5641ce41a3702
9b364d804e01fd13f235d97c5ef579459b4aefb3
describe
'22625' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFL' 'sip-files00181.pro'
5c5b63351f15500d30d53a6fd49450fa
ecbefe8df0d50d0a6e234f548ce7c456fda69fbc
describe
'36645' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFM' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
99a3aa808abd4ee5f01431d3a00ae97a
7e1bef91965c5887dc449b9b21675fd3a2afafdd
describe
'2509044' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFN' 'sip-files00181.tif'
8930460f624101b575b09b386618a3d1
a7f46da719598033417d44e1444fc23452f68694
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFO' 'sip-files00181.txt'
76c10a9cfec6ab5455910bb6324f3847
7f83e79f0202d6b95e092da6993f9a41487a79d2
describe
'10691' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFP' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
50ffe10d1b5538a235feeaa81f877ad5
8bc858e28e09ec90eb7e170c9e4154a1692f9684
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFQ' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
062581223f16d7be819fee8c6b076ec6
bfe6d9f92116a9e7d162b41b464389ddb47621df
describe
'122798' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFR' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
029cd5dc425a80ba48a55f1aee9214fe
6906af54b09e69da26af1ff19aeb7b88830aa487
describe
'24643' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFS' 'sip-files00182.pro'
eb3d23ceaed6926ab0515e36bb720813
dc096e9a18024307ef16378c892e5c07ed34d89b
describe
'38146' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFT' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
a86019a45977ce19d42e285bd467df15
5b9b889dc728e9d8ed70d21bba8020f2d13aacac
describe
'2509168' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFU' 'sip-files00182.tif'
61ba767a73785e31423e102d21bf0b70
96c8874db2a868150258d3039506be79509ba279
describe
'978' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFV' 'sip-files00182.txt'
32c21219931bf9f5ce8281eb30d525a2
904580badf61df34727ffea679046029b3777d0c
describe
'11058' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFW' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
55bca254ef3f66c6d16ad35486c08a9e
0ffb96b9ae16b66738bd638f6fb8bdbc5ef03edc
describe
'312048' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFX' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
b3cd0d8c0fd6e321f0bd1182bc638ddf
a1aaf8cdb2a290b47db737d58583b433c9aae4d5
describe
'120351' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFY' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
20606ab0edee9dbb2962ee076529817e
4f6311f082239f707f35d80fd9aadbbe1f9e078a
'2011-12-30T12:15:25-05:00'
describe
'22414' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWFZ' 'sip-files00183.pro'
a58ad1cb64d9c5ac1c14ca2d9ad7d3ba
6134d7152f34b92cd377a87c680537c82590ea55
describe
'36676' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGA' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
c9a78dae480bf488151ad97026feb5e5
ba40fe081d3fe1671eac033fbb54b4165a90188c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGB' 'sip-files00183.tif'
86c06f0b1eef2c8555c49574d75763b0
965d2f0afac7cb12168a475d61c2eabbf06e01e9
'2011-12-30T12:19:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGC' 'sip-files00183.txt'
06be0bb862a38e344f4e058e4e298d28
819cb3da618a85a46e30ae16c513f7d1d39b5a6a
describe
'10492' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGD' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
45f23692fed0d1fd3cf71e2db864fe4b
00909f353496bbc2e12d004931d148344b2dfb39
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGE' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
bd408cd173ad0a0223205b6f59bbf928
5534ad5f9b4638590d099433ab1b8f5c208b3ff9
'2011-12-30T12:20:29-05:00'
describe
'120846' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGF' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
354f3ac1acd4bdc3ed4d7224946d796d
7fc6f1c8eaab27321ee3d208b830b2e03fd7dc86
describe
'22812' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGG' 'sip-files00184.pro'
176385b441de2f7cadb5db7d19b65cb6
48362a7ac8ff9bdf14280335eea5229d988f0f63
describe
'37119' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGH' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
588f7eb66b20c4739069306e8db17fc8
68b1c4295b3109178f5ba4b7c620c57e2a5b49e0
describe
'2509196' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGI' 'sip-files00184.tif'
6c7cfafd8bbb4fe51d2e21f9e31fbc27
c52f1d7bfafc73f7169571f66258e39dec276742
describe
'910' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGJ' 'sip-files00184.txt'
7394cf43436bff9b8146bdd558d12c63
28a734d05627af5acc86f88e84ecc72367557783
describe
'10683' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGK' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
36c35d4f2c4f2bbb7b7ae806a7a64839
0d94cdb4ceecca52d89e158a0428547e4d2b74ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGL' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
8639a206e4189baf3cfcb1ec5e0201b2
38b5758223fd3f958103eebf0e0a4bfa76fcfc99
describe
'122601' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGM' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
599defe6a718968837a1078a36a7b45d
3764ca803499a8afd768e6003f32294c4644754d
describe
'22674' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGN' 'sip-files00185.pro'
078e7dd548ffaa2161d3a62bd0d3a084
6bc44b074afeb7ccfd5c4089588036e4575c273a
describe
'36710' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGO' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
03431d44b2e5904ce06d0ed7cc5b0082
b9436f88d29d3a15510080104c009784a376a002
describe
'2509032' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGP' 'sip-files00185.tif'
3910d8f78939717e03f8584be853a35b
5bf91e6d746529439d043884c722f3da996b0570
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGQ' 'sip-files00185.txt'
a15d33ca9521eb6d1ae9a2096a43700e
d5a289d83e286ae72b73ccca57ceced8080bb4d9
describe
'10473' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGR' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
1f92ed4670312f69d1ceb8168e7c5a45
339f645013c08c2dd59a437597e2872abf76ed40
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGS' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
12a21906a06e44b07191eb6465e3c43d
7c0228ebfb9a674be1aa3712c5f10f3ee555c157
describe
'126259' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGT' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
44296c29d6f4a3b9c5a8866924db2976
0bb7fe0bc50794fd831d739c8a9926bf1ce25191
describe
'23968' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGU' 'sip-files00186.pro'
0a040aa2bbd2173fdbf27290077bcb03
d6f7d9c49311cdc017fa170c105fccc4fd616d57
describe
'38680' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGV' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
6ab1e31f62fe9143beb8852981c7edf5
52d67e071e01857f40b2b20b8446bcc1698482a6
describe
'2509336' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGW' 'sip-files00186.tif'
9eddc4337093be87b8e04fd4b106aa0f
270573e3062b3f530f5df1f4c266df62e5252edd
'2011-12-30T12:17:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGX' 'sip-files00186.txt'
49268bca2569194e6e585a5d600dd1d9
1fad0adaad79f4022d23796ab5eda75944f5a61a
describe
'10928' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGY' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
e652d913d124a6aab03369c5c895466c
51d18b5f5259bfe687eda69ffdbe5768ef0c0746
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWGZ' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
289072ce1c0ca51968b9bff25c0ca95a
fe86efe07ba46d08da46ab903f066ed272bdd0b0
describe
'117308' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHA' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
7b0f56b9997428afb6ee7e0d463d18ff
a073484931f8c1e23cb0c9bd3cba6ee21c32e124
describe
'21612' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHB' 'sip-files00187.pro'
0c9ca2db84ae4abbf98085c33f769791
5271856a569952357c7cc990b77c59a716d7e16d
describe
'36191' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHC' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
353fb974c5548a7f68394bc62a4f7cd0
20d6fd9da8b71c0aeab209cd9c92c6fd075366eb
describe
'2509040' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHD' 'sip-files00187.tif'
32172d3537dd98de9a8cdc336d2a6717
7d46a44e3134986cb929259b651a79ec86d56c85
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHE' 'sip-files00187.txt'
315d9ecb835b97d0642d20156573dff7
3c66364760c565361736e5e66284646fe03e11b8
describe
'10431' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHF' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
42c1cbe50eecb975719341f38a414261
0f042cc52100f7108891ed1ea343f8eec0661c59
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHG' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
0814eaab4bfbe74e21dcc86c73ffb2ad
f1a939fd244f3ea1084fe4524477649a8b4d8d25
describe
'127919' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHH' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
1891cf055f2c8a081761b1c1b4ff4e8e
24f3d81605855a3ff723b190fd62e705cf44f8a1
describe
'25149' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHI' 'sip-files00188.pro'
98f88db86dbde0222ba122a815c0c173
b471ae0325707f2b922a88a5d0eb076049dac0b5
describe
'40586' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHJ' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
5fd76dc11ee210a51079f712b96ac320
a4d494712b3cc2d383ba3b90f417d7038670fb41
describe
'2509684' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHK' 'sip-files00188.tif'
f51fcde6e5c649d1a57cfdfa6df80641
415a8744d63857f585206522174f03712190b5a1
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHL' 'sip-files00188.txt'
2193840bbfa4ddbbf562c60e3c4b6835
ff67c3be0e15a53ced6f6abdf193d79e58a063e3
describe
'11414' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHM' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
d551698341ee3eaa2b092c98571e8e40
d1291d0a5bd089e223e1136e60e2d92c28f7f5f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHN' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
bac41b4aa8706c164e5fe5f6754b32d3
e0911b6c062e7483fa25f489a6194e6738f7c0e9
describe
'124179' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHO' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
540cc40ceaee158bb7fddb73cb55fb12
1a0980fedd2d2202dd236077df24f78b484c6ac0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHP' 'sip-files00189.pro'
64f40ff7fbde2f45988b09e8c1b30976
631fb64f1b77718e1645e1fdee7ff0025aac1f2b
describe
'37578' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHQ' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
333cbad7d9a487b4d485900f8f5c8353
a81227c4d88b01e076e1e57d1c41c2d6a484fd15
describe
'2509476' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHR' 'sip-files00189.tif'
c22ecc6e7ea5b20c3487e96b19d9e0d6
5e9d2af6d1319b7e61fb011b50db0b806aabddc5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHS' 'sip-files00189.txt'
b50320ce8a34463af674b300b15d5c3e
aa6d35ef023785e78a4d8bd6b6bae7eddb3d2b4e
describe
'10733' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHT' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
270590f856620757a3216d2d16c0df05
121667ab2040615844553f4445d7768bf248e56b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHU' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
94fe0d022beea3a3ababf61f7e42028e
ded53bceaeccd5b6c2de83c1d2cfafac5298ba66
describe
'128281' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHV' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
49c9ebfcd214a3ee06d73392036ca3a6
01531a8f1b1d9b78bf4467582edb44f3913d6a81
describe
'23583' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHW' 'sip-files00190.pro'
ff26c192ae0e1be7fefb085abd4adf0f
37468a2c1806d47a0f97516ef32654533219f9e9
describe
'38357' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHX' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
3737571d60bbc754f5939cd4d73532b6
004dd78393b087e24c9495a312a18b9ca41f0684
describe
'2509468' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHY' 'sip-files00190.tif'
5906f3bdbd01bd53880109a63d87668a
b315b364a20a7e3cae1128436ac769b6eb6d5b84
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWHZ' 'sip-files00190.txt'
2ba6b07be4d85bf9b98e95861115925a
d3bff365a85f2ffe46c17a1189d52069a10fce2c
describe
'10978' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIA' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
ac82820b0706fa5c378de7a4b6d8cee8
afe18d5aea203dc5960e9c9d9af1210abedc89f8
describe
'311928' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIB' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
bc9e25e88430ba0f4cb6f93d193811d8
6e62542b4de23f6844c18ec4b9576a8538c7e316
describe
'117332' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIC' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
496ef31b83248c6c0a22785602c4fe41
3213337bb768f998a30cb1f12058e002888b5e99
describe
'21583' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWID' 'sip-files00191.pro'
813830be2f8e69dce47b974889c30687
e73e5902f60f0bcff7af645089da26611d283bb1
describe
'36229' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIE' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
29b1fa93253097d45da75571a043d745
52dd095e237b56adc5c1641977b8f17b9d681ed3
describe
'2508980' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIF' 'sip-files00191.tif'
605bc045d17eff77e724e87291a9f5f4
c72578c567c04b44a6c9f32d1c1b3d4e8ac5b61e
describe
'865' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIG' 'sip-files00191.txt'
1cd9a002d8dd26d40f49887cf0d1b7ca
6e142b116c8a0e3cdeb347b909fad9bc8386e8e0
describe
'10560' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIH' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
869e9b702450cccf5aeaabd8952277e3
0c0ac7e8be1f275e9011e85e9511b4456371b3e7
describe
'311961' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWII' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
755677ac98640d58fc1dba4763c8c989
38bf81541c2c5f0955e17509651e268314da1005
'2011-12-30T12:13:43-05:00'
describe
'124792' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIJ' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
09f981795e5d40c26d72d2f006c53969
aac2d11f2161670e18801490e7b9826632a990e0
describe
'23961' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIK' 'sip-files00192.pro'
f8fb114dcc9653159d71ea098a123ca6
1082b2d0ce45186ed142b09f36f376e0e1bffe1f
describe
'39792' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIL' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
24e192ce926534604d74034825aa0c13
7a2d53a8f4c5c9556aa50735f86901ad54937095
describe
'2509528' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIM' 'sip-files00192.tif'
7d0ac6606f2d2dc4bf01792521e042f1
5de63a68c583a11f5497a23fafb958b94d9b3bd8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIN' 'sip-files00192.txt'
1155380cc0806bf8f725a301118102d2
a4ec85dbc826ef061fd31f9ac8ddc16333052bc9
describe
'11258' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIO' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
cdc5be666faa9d08eb2d2898c2c8b7d2
2f81a3edac9540c5e3b4c94fd17f7451746f5f6b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIP' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
9bc553e13291506d95eda87dc00b0ec5
c761db4cc1a2d6729936cc4a926f026ae93b7731
describe
'102987' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIQ' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
6722c6a55b4c059ba6344e0685e2100f
225c1454e5586fadfefe3c6137e4cba6e47aed90
describe
'20719' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIR' 'sip-files00193.pro'
2a682a3a9c169310138f67ad76d6ed76
8b9840c808077444a84d931d7e5f93e89cbd4cd3
describe
'34165' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIS' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
7b80afac8f7b5a320b6d735a961e9875
eb9e88bbbd7023a598d67db223e6fff143a22d8e
describe
'2508776' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIT' 'sip-files00193.tif'
950c98b8e36ed8d9bcf1f33b8a8b1214
6d12e4b49f25424aac2807ce4460d8e46099fc4b
describe
'832' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIU' 'sip-files00193.txt'
6e816c5dc07a67e94632acb469183ac6
b9393e86c538168b7faea9b69f76f28eb82c3c1e
describe
'10148' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIV' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
47bb106f5e64c7cfdd842f3a3a8f4a5f
05d72b1153910f26f379a0abd215c9f1f7665126
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIW' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
b042c003fe22595e5beb922820f74938
094302e6f70e13f3cd5fe79ca8ab26d808d8a8c4
describe
'81725' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIX' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
b0ed6bea6e8e8da0fbda8f76d14b0706
aecf40e298c7396b7178515fa94fdf6ecb7fd37a
describe
'14690' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIY' 'sip-files00194.pro'
2a34f41c59c776d132eb12b3de2621a9
dc58cc431589bcb8856729884ca6a76d0dacca52
describe
'24438' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWIZ' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
7ac4e044696566c19cda2cc9cf539f03
12143025ccfb8ae96b4de5433aae68c4e7c8dd8a
describe
'2507740' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJA' 'sip-files00194.tif'
47f4a065be2f06f08411d45f566d2732
bbe7ed825b87f3de1b001c9546c8516ff09fbaaf
describe
'585' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJB' 'sip-files00194.txt'
1e51f00f0f7f9d47329351e5826e9653
ef76c54f815d0eab28c6c6aaf19311b04c377052
describe
'7470' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJC' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
90df051db4b05683d1a1f8da1ae5ca32
2717889b1d1717d61739e4868de21d172ed9d872
describe
'312093' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJD' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
6b31dc911c4409158009ae8c9cac3305
1a0f5ad41ba5470916fe023a6de9f96d3ad17730
describe
'78975' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJE' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
46af12a4511cafdb0bccbd7c684fd47b
ef57ab783e1fe2582c24d6ce8a3ebce0427097cb
describe
'18059' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJF' 'sip-files00195.pro'
17afe6ce602974003a17d21f2778dd90
e76890f7484f45a66d7f576009ac0ca0a9f8c851
describe
'27638' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJG' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
5c544c8464ed94513e3ad7e2e2422b81
18c00696ed7df72a48658acd2769a77c19e4351c
'2011-12-30T12:20:12-05:00'
describe
'2508176' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJH' 'sip-files00195.tif'
5e30cf35a95caded7939ad0ab8038e4e
30bd5a3c4fe492fca7aa5e30170cc5f72f845b68
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJI' 'sip-files00195.txt'
af94f9d6655f65c8259a0152db35c3e0
a88a2fa93bd9332756b0a67cf405c404cdb0c8f7
describe
'8347' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJJ' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
8445ede1e92205f7055be9da8a9eba5f
3f1441eacf05ec45b1d4068b3b40e8cba4cb77e0
describe
'312039' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJK' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
5e7d3c2543da4822c54dd15e62edb514
e45468cbfd91f720eccdf1c72e568e2c54a6c1e9
describe
'115921' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJL' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
f9fe3f63f674ebdab94ce1c3dfcf34d8
cb0ff7dbc521b525ba0be6ca9fa636aa79af9d1b
describe
'24931' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJM' 'sip-files00196.pro'
6d9fd22fc7fd0c2a2357827a51f0c848
d990ad037891c0a2c5c49b6dcf822ca7aafe5cc4
describe
'37627' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJN' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
d3fe2707f97b407ea86eb40ff6867d41
d205aea57915df782d8f2737259ebeca6e434cfe
'2011-12-30T12:19:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJO' 'sip-files00196.tif'
392809ed5ac3f74517bd58114d0d6f09
17f72a110388d442a249815000204a029ab7e303
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJP' 'sip-files00196.txt'
a2114fde070e37ded32a2f2d7cae5ca4
22063c4c11a50e5786e7a61ca2cfd004c06a0704
describe
'11135' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJQ' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
338983b0a1aa078a06dff35dfb5bb1f7
5f4f44882f72dc0440d8cddcf2aa4a7e7d5aae52
describe
'311847' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJR' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
baea803fdce01ade3dcf482d0419f20e
b4dd18445b340dfc961fde92eebefc890b2465cb
describe
'112197' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJS' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
2f0d0d8cd86dd2e99e4ccde1c5d87f69
1bced56ee8ef1e13cede59d68670fc86a3eceb8f
describe
'21835' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJT' 'sip-files00197.pro'
c9edb079d3e178d19cfe093d88d8af31
fb674cae4ff460f75f107bbe8cdc0d154eecaa14
describe
'34690' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJU' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
25bf2df95d7816329902ee165f73ea1a
3c9c254da836cbe982b8fc6002a62a8f2cba5a45
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJV' 'sip-files00197.tif'
f5bc8c384b04257c0867b25c95668cc6
2b4dfe4e27cff072d252335b0cc918d1cf1906d1
describe
'870' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJW' 'sip-files00197.txt'
01dd04aebfd550d8b3add6d6a87e61db
a9a4a382f1c5485c7b714ddb62390950bf02c39b
describe
'10050' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJX' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
3511c0f682aeb1aedde9276217014b6d
31ddd68f6ba4bad0af98058dc22c63293be31ef9
describe
'311920' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJY' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
0c5fbf0e1d077c39b28952ea021e2689
d23bcf57142a8e8b9b5ba815c06799449bc4c039
describe
'224663' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWJZ' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
3b4d9d369c3a59bfdf30b9b83e05c1ea
640c6fcfe0d60668d66a6b22784b3738c6aa2790
describe
'2509' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKA' 'sip-files00198.pro'
e063dda2a5b9edbb983dd2b3e6e56808
b247766d576dbed8df951976fe7e4d03e73a48f2
describe
'56494' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKB' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
362363e7dd6d2b761878a89ff3662ecb
2feb8adaa3e65ca0c2a6bf1ad4662e1e15effd3d
describe
'2510680' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKC' 'sip-files00198.tif'
65ae7c167e358a797785086f89509422
c041c316a23c4e9e4f164a1d898cf422eaca6f7b
describe
'197' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKD' 'sip-files00198.txt'
365db650f521c0b3c61247ff40ff152d
14c10714707a39659755e195f6ece55162e61ed0
describe
'13643' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKE' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
58e80a0d8526352c90ef82d456ad14ab
42a9a41ff425ce8782b8686ac5533b72cab45c51
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKF' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
809516c7151d2cea3aa9178ab6fffa4d
a0b437b55ca614c42746be73a073e4b5a0a7a5a2
describe
'99562' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKG' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
3ade281835d8f5cfa22fa679aad73c96
6d50547faee79fe38c03651b63af22ae7e5d0c11
describe
'22355' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKH' 'sip-files00200.pro'
09aa60206769c71452ec084f8d355996
4eaffdee7d1c54250da27b9ffd4ed37c42a573af
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKI' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
fda4e96bc3bcf7421cc456c5ae94b8da
c1bc8d9dc6de7123c3ee30d9b186750d90979f83
describe
'2508756' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKJ' 'sip-files00200.tif'
43510be36d51d5649b01ed00d4dbad78
f18bf538fca56bf5e303ef8322d78287f58a20cf
describe
'912' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKK' 'sip-files00200.txt'
b52cd1cfd63e224f7ed739412e482742
79fe147a564e9df7a9f7961af2fb4f54960964d7
describe
'10376' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKL' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
f23a962df1ea303e22b9f91a479be5fc
086368d03ee6c634ea5cc3fbf873dee8c06345a9
describe
'311978' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKM' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
3a58f3309fa7d15bee525611d36d9d4c
651d09d6e39eed903f927fcd1298d6b2e1dc6764
describe
'110239' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKN' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
d2c7a99d5f3509cf1833ec9f9ab34664
96d85dcc92841386e34075402faaf1c421d5537f
describe
'23255' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKO' 'sip-files00201.pro'
aea20e89107b030a491bbe311c26dc0c
38c22f23f01e78043f31d04b2182f81f57ada321
describe
'35365' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKP' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
3dc0e0074ccff46e3c14ad04f32a661f
6879804266b0ae3a7eb1521049176c0746eb4bb7
describe
'2509100' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKQ' 'sip-files00201.tif'
f3e201af9196ce7791045f297f88aafd
331019dcf17f9daa0e28c567932b32a7772f2837
'2011-12-30T12:19:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKR' 'sip-files00201.txt'
8ee7a0209e6df8bd9d54453fafd5a48f
4082da88927038e86ea3f3de1cd83fd9e84fd2f8
describe
'10436' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKS' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
9182d2484439c6ecc088e50db1d93827
555c0dd2e56deecb6cce8f0ce05605e06421e78e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKT' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
d113a68d6ca26f1bba2027de9363dec9
c0b1889e7356fe5f7e0f89e16e104d1c74102904
describe
'112416' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKU' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
7f56eeb3728bb85f4f881f119361ed2a
3a12b417ab92f3636a5a485afa34c50fcd7727e3
describe
'22545' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKV' 'sip-files00202.pro'
79451cafe3cc0d62b2b33c7fe1d12875
264f3c36c230c29451339e0d803ca09a48f28bcd
describe
'36582' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKW' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
934b90e17c852b7ded5996e14d4c046f
fac3d5dcecbf1e557b55307e50d30335abda4410
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKX' 'sip-files00202.tif'
b47178fccd0f30868c85cbb26099a000
07ca36016e838948fc54261efb514ffaaa6babee
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKY' 'sip-files00202.txt'
3c1df4bfda3f2d74cec4b56ac3b676eb
164a19a292b3a26de14a5b04899f5c429955e6db
describe
'10709' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWKZ' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
b8353b5bf98bde4019841df590ce8161
6f35e18358f9592a4842df1d2679b0289f42a0b9
describe
'312017' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLA' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
c604a5460bae0357f9fcb96d636242db
a220010f5f43b89397c2c73ed2ca6e80d9aadf19
describe
'122219' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLB' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
4b6e479daaa9de382a7057f48069a78d
4f77fb0b35773518abf1ed3556e9929488bafbc5
describe
'24187' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLC' 'sip-files00203.pro'
5ed614d474dec8787511afbac3a628fa
8da16f337ac43cae2bfcb0a797b5a414ef96f91e
describe
'39935' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLD' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
65134811765adab83af53772d4eeb379
a5c23ca9c2d8cc2fca96bd3207115c62089324e5
describe
'2509592' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLE' 'sip-files00203.tif'
76149fc07bb0af495f24852629a98040
765fc49dce7ec1d0fe5c0ed1515254b66913ebfc
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLF' 'sip-files00203.txt'
fbe8836c5f554a039aaa897c0b80f6bd
deef4c064291afd26c7159d044d0036ad9b51d52
describe
'11619' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLG' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
e95d346e37d94a0c379932252ef39eb6
1b72427f36ec9b3a9ad3a4a2be675406bd8e7aaf
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLH' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
e5256579558ab63272d20fe4cd4fe307
f5e80a7f75ee0b019f7d98d0b2cf66d4c82ca874
describe
'114434' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLI' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
017bd01edf84eeb628b832e42ab4fef0
9b780f5d7577a6805823e87a921db0b9ebdd013b
describe
'22597' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLJ' 'sip-files00204.pro'
96442193fcd01604b9994cd80df8dc4d
6507971760a30340e4ef91cca9f3a8803baced55
describe
'35757' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLK' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
3b9f30f78ae838a4fd85d27d04a6e89f
3702e1ae2c03a3c52524b292824fb94ea074293e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLL' 'sip-files00204.tif'
c61f47e02d2a259303fae3c17a91f625
36a9718571e9ca836d185d895046113366f57bcc
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLM' 'sip-files00204.txt'
19dc7ffa5a5ae8efa3ec6ca78913f2b4
3ab21ae16e1b5a9fbbb91ed6d04df0e39515741c
describe
'10843' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLN' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
5fd67010d8383be189757b74eda8a37e
0e958471763c3b7f6bc537b99815c53aabe058c2
describe
'311989' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLO' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
35a9c19edb202f6dd516a906e9628522
6d8fad475a2dca130dbc468d1be944db082c49d9
describe
'116095' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLP' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
b74bb509afb065685cb2f756b8d47823
61e75a38524053102429b0ee4a036591bed0cf59
describe
'24492' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLQ' 'sip-files00205.pro'
651624bd6978182bcef090c9ae9cfcde
56e99b96772bb278839feca67e5c084ba0d09231
describe
'38043' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLR' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
10b14fae0693ddb71f3baf9a5d819f74
f57bb9a49b7e6617000fa3e5fa9be07397cd3eec
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLS' 'sip-files00205.tif'
c3c8bf7531019b0107e6879113507686
cec13b265c8c0cf6f87900acc1c81a6304d2ed4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLT' 'sip-files00205.txt'
92613617b8ca1cdbb18e53d9263e5af5
13e8c3b7236c95dbd0a1e00a8ad04420026e38f2
describe
'11055' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLU' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
574a3ef6860d894b2448f11639045bb1
ddcff6d0eb66bd0db8a0ab050b97cf66e3020622
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLV' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
77f153a38880a8aee11f188baf271a21
25faa8e5001b1ff99c46bdfc4e24fd9c558f8f07
describe
'114389' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLW' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
15cef4f927d99003b57cbfeb0472363e
eb97e7e45f49e99400441bd472cf80e2f3f869c3
describe
'23897' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLX' 'sip-files00206.pro'
8937a65a24ca37149f3b1d15d63fc3b4
301fbecb52b3386b8495bbe46ec0d18b0c1a3066
describe
'38166' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLY' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
73726eb29aa884a5af5e0334d57ee9b1
46b968206c5ca3ce55a54eb97a1ab72e985c77d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWLZ' 'sip-files00206.tif'
7be6d5472a0184329b062ffd0024b9eb
f92a79c339de1093f2a97e51895fc96742ca1934
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMA' 'sip-files00206.txt'
df7ca3f25c9e550b68ce1c4ade1816e4
ba376a4b8074f82fc11eaa98f0ac9593ecfe47af
describe
'11033' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMB' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
eeaeea1fb5dc733fd9f45faf5e760578
1b1aafc5a777a329610163b0d44093a7fbb3226a
describe
'311945' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMC' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
18a70a15dfb89c088e3dcc9732022a36
8ef891855db575149824e6852d5a65fc984f43c7
describe
'117183' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMD' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
56910acfe4ac84b594bbe3b6a2ccda3a
291c5d291c388588efd9319b6d887bb6d0afd759
describe
'23781' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWME' 'sip-files00207.pro'
675013b3e444b1515d3295dd559af8b8
0bf61295cdefdb51f8be4ef8521783fa51b355a2
describe
'37516' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMF' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
6debe13c10a82c4b06578b7d9a8a6f9b
7272a5ffb764f1a50c607eec35f2b3c7ceebf29c
describe
'2509380' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMG' 'sip-files00207.tif'
3619af077a1545da918fe36beaf89f8e
2b7f16f5bf599388580f9d635d00e34001129dfd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMH' 'sip-files00207.txt'
40adbb7e8f74c1495cf7026c6fc7bdc5
361761a211fe470ad4366bdc341090d9f9359446
describe
'11009' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMI' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
3c439b853b88b96ada613a6871c95b99
6b692987641989f4cfbeaafeabcc1615d6bf7e7b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMJ' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
83a5c376c0ab7543ddce39d9200b7877
47632f05e0f055a5187d53eb917c6301fe627688
describe
'115801' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMK' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
a667e0323f163817bdc25ba909dd1d4a
57a77d8881b3a504a5c979f446a01e28ad850438
describe
'23087' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWML' 'sip-files00208.pro'
bffcaea76b826cb5397e407c7db68f0d
c9b836317598c48e5a143ae84e12cf132d6da406
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMM' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
02759fba05f2bc074c33d09ac84af95d
bb3e01dfd07e6059dc76e7fc6378397c2fddaff1
describe
'2509392' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMN' 'sip-files00208.tif'
9b9bfc0a6a0f15eec71bf76dd92c55bf
1b805a4930e04f6ca158c5c444c3c462b5395543
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMO' 'sip-files00208.txt'
ce9bbc910efc75e4dc095ad180ed98e2
1dd25d4933d6ea79ad883aca61650e7659414b8c
describe
'10752' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMP' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
22ae096042865692e3388c9f61efb148
5906feff064cf3504afe4a407a2f7eed9b357770
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMQ' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
6b34751f882acca6afa2e34bb63c09cc
76722aae0904657ef03117d1aeb7f6b6f5948683
describe
'119702' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMR' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
f1efe499a4b12c6ceeb5a5bc5bec9ee3
ba1ce9e4a76b900fadfc17b3e1a403d9a27b60a4
describe
'23590' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMS' 'sip-files00209.pro'
66dd984824e279a572dba12c11731ddb
5e817588380a0df2fdc744dad91d1bbb6862b14f
describe
'37822' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMT' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
9f5fe81d71eb0b87af4cbc75d139edd3
99f53c822eea1bb6d7ddbe0800ecd0c5cfdda855
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMU' 'sip-files00209.tif'
2cf48c8d0bc0cbf265eb9c21d9e1ee8b
1f19cffc9d0131063a04c4579ace480348a76879
'2011-12-30T12:13:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMV' 'sip-files00209.txt'
b1b98318b6eae1fe3ece3f0e58cdce47
83bed7a60ec2c1fe889b5b874395c4e176467380
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMW' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
110c397c13761e55c5fb4e59cfe98ba9
4b83db2e85e06566034a8e2c7a72dcb12cd60cac
describe
'312041' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMX' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
1f22de9f05aaffd99bc3526b15283c6f
e5a7ddf9488077e81023c69e1884f5cfc4901073
describe
'211437' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMY' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
eea011af230f52f0f3cb73ed179dd45a
08d8aa6ca247907133e19a12022f49d4ee282d14
describe
'1985' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWMZ' 'sip-files00210.pro'
98262dd3a89e74c57239610174dc3d26
3c87689c0d80333f4c88256cf7125664a2ceabbe
describe
'54904' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNA' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
55be699632d47dbda82215e453e75911
a1e7a33a0d438383a074863ae40d105cfb3e4e11
describe
'2511008' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNB' 'sip-files00210.tif'
b6f421a3b6af67f1521719e0912125df
ec309833ad71d82e9e276aae24e1ff847b0d831b
describe
'185' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNC' 'sip-files00210.txt'
2966af53ab9919ef326f86110c68a52e
5e998e00c167f262ae476ca58ec5f12925bd1856
describe
'13710' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWND' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
3c25cdafb6f55dcae311d30910e2d9e7
ef60e0d53b87cf92f5f6b74bb3191a5beed63b27
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNE' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
86c566f1a9a6d139a14df71704b5ad2d
915aa6289a068a5c5591cf61ce6e874896b942e9
describe
'122833' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNF' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
2eded2d5fc59669824b31c3d009664d7
81d9b556759acb970cd9b417141f8fe76462720f
'2011-12-30T12:13:13-05:00'
describe
'23847' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNG' 'sip-files00212.pro'
07ab4acf9213ff0fb8ad025b8eba3680
17d1ad831fac7bb1a6f02d1df3b478a0616d07a3
describe
'39831' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNH' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
5191246ada69c50897ee2dd7ebb6204f
88a2dce64856acf0b3e9b287a93893715a5590d1
describe
'2509888' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNI' 'sip-files00212.tif'
e91be5474076cde3eae4dbdecb313c6a
c1d4f7773dfaf6befb626648c1f823e45eaccac7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNJ' 'sip-files00212.txt'
729a6426bbd938bfbd04b274b727e9f3
e158e00059f04aacfb4e8152f215ac4a3822e397
describe
'11488' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNK' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
c9bd5177ec6bcfbdaf0095428b3198db
5b1afcff920392a5c9170ce369744a5d48fc7028
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNL' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
20f39ff39a97b021372d7045a9a78b5f
8a1c48c0d209f59e55abd3a9f6fb52f0e5fd717b
describe
'120919' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNM' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
7c36f85f44a8a9c030de6a60c93eaa71
35cd45b91992feda98a4f2803d03ad48830b66af
describe
'23672' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNN' 'sip-files00213.pro'
4c2b01fc81f7dbe88bf87850538af4fc
3578e3f6875c8a226d0b77a91926368e8061296d
describe
'38802' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNO' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
f0f5e5f462fdcb5007a9c9ba3e02781b
aa83ab20065f0d50a9a211fbf6b329fa0cb7254d
describe
'2509580' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNP' 'sip-files00213.tif'
46f8a205b7e79ec0d6d1b38023347550
ce8e9ef983effd750431092c3e73035907787761
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNQ' 'sip-files00213.txt'
7487365047addac2ae2f55746fdf5d46
7aee632f8680b2c110f7ac68177c2589bea5e103
describe
'11066' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNR' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
7d0026a4729a84c52dbc18238b17e877
35007fa5a9af18582581f0aa0ad3072d1fdb672a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNS' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
fc87e1b99cde1ff00ca0add0051fe6f2
58ab5bf610fabd466db1417cee0d2531e740acfa
describe
'114310' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNT' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
91fb742bdd0904a2624589a8561a7809
418e65b6b879b35909b5d25d467b4de3394ea374
describe
'22884' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNU' 'sip-files00214.pro'
37c4b551c70f845491fc3bdeacc61361
bad32a1a8a55eab7fb12ae86f77bec5791d2f68c
describe
'37018' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNV' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
648bd4976d1113a85be1a6e157df82b9
c8091640c0954ad392d6fdf524ece6d09e2938ce
describe
'2509356' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNW' 'sip-files00214.tif'
6b0c470974120f88dd1e9eca63298a0e
d53e0e60abb6a86f518cd5890d40edcc3ee5e4a7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNX' 'sip-files00214.txt'
e2f3f0a64890eaa4fdeb47778cb5a17f
4e218d31e2a3a482acd762b4678f4840088a43a0
describe
'10771' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNY' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
f9f5498e12c80021f118aa8bb1892211
cc4b3c200cb619463a4e92a19cd2fe1ca736007b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWNZ' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
899b787eeec181fad6cbb4404b478dd6
37d4e7911884b1bd0227a9639a3599b40bba354b
describe
'127859' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOA' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
f201defd3135dd5fc23fe6d79a65cafa
efed6d138dba4c71b6096372ff96b6a21e1ecbf7
describe
'24373' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOB' 'sip-files00215.pro'
9403b4cc6b52b869119e2b89171e2116
0889d976bd9fbfd34afd98e797a40e4dd8d52295
describe
'40116' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOC' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
8752d3f78c91a24517b03d461f397151
01f3d6edfc3d8f6b09808fc65728c38acc72a410
describe
'2509652' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOD' 'sip-files00215.tif'
2adfe981359dba683ff5bbfe2631b2e0
9da92a59b8221faf9b46335bca36fe0eba22c4a7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOE' 'sip-files00215.txt'
5abb27157fd39d50d25cd940f66e9d6d
982b84445f4e77dc6b1a96b33dfd05e07d4601e6
describe
'11692' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOF' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
8ff5904849197abca296073b5e07abcf
021df35b5974cb2701d89b4795b1352509e558b8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOG' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
ab9900740c8f9e29476a01e5dbb9f95f
7a0a059648236b16d5d36c7f9fa35c4f9384a9fd
describe
'129074' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOH' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
0b2476865f799c040d85a5ba4c73e5eb
c0b3c7f3bd5d690ec0a9747bffd9562c06bde46a
describe
'25133' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOI' 'sip-files00216.pro'
fca77516522f4a640c908e4eaf9cedb6
bfda138cbb231cce1e4f40495dfc6d86d285378d
describe
'40601' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOJ' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
a3583324de6610becbac6b1068e3b316
337dc83e6243c5e09200f8096dc46c5175ed8e1a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOK' 'sip-files00216.tif'
81bdd7bb4ca325f9260ae7ce84c28774
ceb0590c77c3f0b95aebcb7cf013f2b96211400b
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOL' 'sip-files00216.txt'
f8abcc2ef8c786c0de8a77fbdd4e1cab
42740f4e83805d5f313c3cf13745801d2d870870
describe
'11429' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOM' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
2cfbaeaac3e871f8a34f78a3fe3ec6c1
22ce736d7ebb4c799fb823a5979f46008f43f2b7
describe
'311964' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWON' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
bda84498e872f25e1dbda6571929bd23
5c9e6509c0b352f1070c68a21779be72c0e4f655
'2011-12-30T12:13:46-05:00'
describe
'118876' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOO' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
a357be93e80852f426135016f5058d31
0adf3167a897968a2ee19aa2624303c9bac5bf24
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOP' 'sip-files00217.pro'
2ab267c3f01acc7b7477a589ce84927c
371b29ba69c4c8275383d64ab2c9d6d238cfe84b
describe
'38367' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOQ' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
a401dabc740f1c368de504357da8bf3a
731b3e00a74c108ecdcc66ef32befc30db3c3dab
describe
'2509420' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOR' 'sip-files00217.tif'
e74e0753f9a1b907d64a9f58f6bfc8c7
fe927e97044057b72b658d88c8f8e424bf7aaffa
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOS' 'sip-files00217.txt'
2cdcccad5045dc712cf207e6b498107a
e7fd599f9e741fdbb0dcde8b494d96cd29e20d58
describe
'11282' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOT' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
38879cb3d5e223de4df201831c308db6
332af2552ce477d7bd39354c9f3f35e3f7b33fb8
describe
'312087' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOU' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
98aa537be27cc3c843c642fa61f9bf04
f51fe80166dad5f951d36236c0cefbb687d1d2a0
describe
'116044' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOV' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
cb6515d2331a7f1759fe6c5b34356b64
7dd6821a79dd48070c56802db7c15d0251df1b58
describe
'23103' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOW' 'sip-files00218.pro'
2287fbeec478b3df48e320ee835d63d4
e156bf8a69a59ab22cbe880834e8b14e6d431ba8
describe
'37650' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOX' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
d39b3716e3b323befe3eaae8d00f87e0
faabebf922b0b37754c5bdb06680135c941f15f0
describe
'2509620' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOY' 'sip-files00218.tif'
45a9430a9a7700970609e63027ab46a1
fd231a07d103f9eb9acf1cbd1fa5693de71d461e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWOZ' 'sip-files00218.txt'
f22f4a184961198e20f3705bfc35f313
f09475135dc5aa2b420171bac3525c07b144c781
describe
'10906' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPA' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
96f4229102e4a6b4690cc18b2ae21a2e
dd3a1b85e2b532c68b41b733256fb03be5c696dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPB' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
5bc9d9918cb0cb7cfb248eede7f8f811
63853a259bd356e69de74c810e0dc619ffdbf780
describe
'121370' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPC' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
4bfc4d5c754e7a69c5c3de184e628dcd
2b5829fe2e7a50a50f0e3e69a600b77bc130f54f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPD' 'sip-files00219.pro'
7934667babadaf8c2a2bfc7bee77967c
f126b818617b938ecd6f4f81187f319c8b495021
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPE' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
e4b1d48ee0495e2198f9fd72d751f239
153a7fe2cfd61a28c6be1520df1aa2bb21926270
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPF' 'sip-files00219.tif'
cf80378fc51a341d5665c4da7b84efb4
3de6c45c3a54c658b3142e2eb51f8bd8a9d44459
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPG' 'sip-files00219.txt'
f755ffc0b1706100421922c03156bafc
891dcf064800eacedf4b49e2e0eae1eb3acb7db1
describe
'11265' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPH' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
27dae8cd4297d6f021ddbfb7a7943c12
79d78c10b654b79ac7fdba9af7f11032d8fe6116
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPI' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
2a6506b023bba85962eee24cf775138c
81c4e62d5d2341166fdd47bf5f6ceddd53a06207
describe
'115862' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPJ' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
b7475ada3e861c4a7954f2c0b0c1de3e
a8ba1fa6138e2c96fb6028444c92c32f90acad43
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPK' 'sip-files00220.pro'
0fe5d074fd552f71e6b4f7cd652cc5c5
e5a852bd27818ff07ed2064dbae77ed730471131
describe
'36032' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPL' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
a218dae47680f19fe45d9b8d1fb8dc81
71c406872e4fc47d622812b15d83c9bc5180affd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPM' 'sip-files00220.tif'
29d034650c24fc73e52a028274f8a592
29fd1dfdd65ade872e5a5f04a685469d5897cb54
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPN' 'sip-files00220.txt'
22dc3b8c86e9ba12afa7c296afe732b7
7233e5c432883e5bad8eb3d7080621e9f237f582
describe
'10672' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPO' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
2c477e4ed9eb66b1283b063bd91b007c
418a8b2434a15052cbf4787f5aa6c9aee01adf9d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPP' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
5e645e3c815c18323ae4a2926d78a273
5ee4ecfe9207c0843ab0b90eda6729e0cb7d4030
describe
'100768' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPQ' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
ea392728775375734a3828dfd3c73a7a
831d41620663adeaa74f6788fa0838261c97a155
describe
'18157' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPR' 'sip-files00221.pro'
34935ece104d365dfadccee6da07c442
0cc8ea9b5d587b1b32b690f03e3c2ceb905c2bfd
'2011-12-30T12:18:04-05:00'
describe
'31553' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPS' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
2054718134f246803dcd4ad4e1085c4d
d1cdd9750388987cf32cf48709166860be189ac7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPT' 'sip-files00221.tif'
ecb2ea8c11bceadba5bf98f4525d56c5
3e27e6da9f32278c2b9abe8b142e18ae5006f486
describe
'755' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPU' 'sip-files00221.txt'
15125fc26bf6d39be78259900f4c67ef
957fe1bf21a441be5010836e61e58e9c513f9099
describe
'9128' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPV' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
4554c862fe67cac2ca2331a010ac5563
84c0328fbd68783ff7b11fbee617d284cf040f74
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPW' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
96d3587c881d7a66d349f49c2bdca533
b22f7785837148b85ae165fe37544619a22316dc
describe
'114340' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPX' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
6b37ef8d6204dd9907ab50b90a9793d3
871735dfb3781af5c5a3220cd12ba1f21767034e
'2011-12-30T12:15:35-05:00'
describe
'22838' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPY' 'sip-files00222.pro'
f956ac9c17978236000624f8705ca3cb
dd174e14ac389c7ae7589ef1c485b1557b21db69
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWPZ' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
f218fea627b04a85bb009cad3a7bcda0
53813263616ce66f11a1be54e07c4c6bae4ec8d2
describe
'2509352' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQA' 'sip-files00222.tif'
389d57ba538f311224a8d8c92f6efcdb
ec9cad762f29fd6403fdd958024993e2b33834c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQB' 'sip-files00222.txt'
a1a2c72278de3f2742fef9cc20f7e4d1
c325b8ed3541237c7ab0bf39fcd194baac39617a
describe
'10876' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQC' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
a606d0c4c6ba78d6fd549053f27348ad
008e53bf5817ec5f8734efd9f6b3b724835159f0
describe
'312090' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQD' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
28d73e5da92f3698e66854d90a9ad781
49f843a6359c996f47874a9af87fdbbca8ff856b
describe
'105661' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQE' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
35b09a803411014d1ed05cc84a07fc34
e2bc7674b4f824d484c63eb0d4c23744a1f8367d
describe
'23248' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQF' 'sip-files00223.pro'
fe3bc49c17041bca6ca3ff3b41f8ef27
501b3ea334427cbde5d8d2815a6e7dcd025470b1
describe
'36245' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQG' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
c9d745be76fa92eb06d984af35518045
479313a38fbe549123d4b8046b88b23d1aedae0e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQH' 'sip-files00223.tif'
d17ce4125042d1990f81346e9cfe1c6b
a9c50280054ed851c9dd8b698e0ba7ba005700c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQI' 'sip-files00223.txt'
e38e22cd5f6fa30857f49d5aed4de74b
34e511e08e373551551a0fa4154c6b1e4a15a4b6
'2011-12-30T12:19:08-05:00'
describe
'10698' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQJ' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
51f9c2c929f4aa494094294454f5db3d
b4e4cfff518e2bf405cf8291d4d2a4778e079861
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQK' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
ae30ebebb5c2eb4ae9d37d75e5c59106
b09529e303f4fd9c6b982f3f4e3fe829cfb640d3
describe
'114188' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQL' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
9b576ba1fa96f333f245d04d84763b43
f349527c115f1ab9edf0533bbe4d398e6e4c5817
describe
'21002' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQM' 'sip-files00224.pro'
4aa5fa2ec52bb8e834732bdf1fa68d6c
b17798ff0779bb8fa30722f1f6c9819f804b198a
describe
'35613' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQN' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
e3b23c35da756c76703a23d8ac62fec5
93e0cef9656c3d689e91cdb49fc329c3d8dc6c77
describe
'2509340' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQO' 'sip-files00224.tif'
aa81a7d9d60938d3a77a65a14519abcb
cd33f327fa8fdbee2b0e35e7da36e6ea622754ba
describe
'847' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQP' 'sip-files00224.txt'
b51138f71c11e6cbc02f69002e95e696
6f155763c941000ea90be24b7f67ccddf77d08b7
describe
'10476' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQQ' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
7c10947af3c04087c484fa61ca68bbbe
c1456f6c0e3788f3b181854c963d265921f5ee17
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQR' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
a7810b2a1f41b3d921fafaaf6f67dbf7
2fe61868e21976fd4c1627237993540c6d84bbce
describe
'98957' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQS' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
f1c9232628ff15a99a3138dbde8fb14c
62dfe4f6a67e556485b2c749069a88baf6e5b2ed
describe
'22258' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQT' 'sip-files00225.pro'
62f890d0fc269668903d131703c62fa1
8c3ba4076af9cb34149cd69131285bccc57a5783
describe
'35081' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQU' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
03a1af202d99279159f858c1ff6824ca
c92166bad6d1abb3ada8adc6934ffbbb67ec4087
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQV' 'sip-files00225.tif'
7df708f7d8ca1119ea5c5d90437dbe9c
a7acc4d059ff28e5c1857848bdc9a2f1d9f2ca10
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQW' 'sip-files00225.txt'
9d610a685e0bd2670555d1347181e606
2f707e06a7c7977d68ba1246731eaa62b13db56c
describe
'10582' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQX' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
e963a365eba7b962bed78fd11f90f2f3
f02a6715aef75d5146a63311236d0a344376f29b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQY' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
27cb0f7531e0a06e2177f8584c47b61e
3a3358226213c13de7c64893d97332b4f051a1cb
describe
'118410' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWQZ' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
964e46a4148a4e769304dc68a5f257c3
d21c3e8790865b36f93453b7420f5a7c5606e285
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRA' 'sip-files00226.pro'
db6141c202a64a49b4293b9c4758a9c5
cb57ca1696077d3d4d9d3247a6ed8563fc745582
describe
'37359' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRB' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
44eb02c12f21dddfdcaadb91ef91f884
f4170596d3358737439be4d61735f27b01b1abb6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRC' 'sip-files00226.tif'
88f2ad7c1972415975fbb1a15c3e1b9d
e99791353bbf4de3b5a877bc6fb0f1e99e17cd0c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRD' 'sip-files00226.txt'
c104ae5b5407dac60fcdcdd8b004042a
26caaf1ce0c4f7b8f8b77bcf448e44044abcd87e
describe
'10950' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRE' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
27aadbde833a9f85c2a736deef7e96c3
2cb8003864135f914374e2c55698179069953e87
describe
'312084' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRF' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
627cfdc61652ea03b856b2e3f445a05d
5782494dfded4403094a9a9e2aa86365e72ca722
describe
'121473' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRG' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
252c05e7986191725ac26b4cd50e9752
c91be14782b687c9616a58e9ecea5c0a8911546e
describe
'23621' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRH' 'sip-files00227.pro'
77f8ce4739a8f4205e65d644335b5a18
0b44066c003308014d1261e9479dd0f0ecd59041
describe
'38184' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRI' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
99a84ea11416c8be8cc5050410f835db
08a3e98acdb5ed6ebf7364decc47c23e32728e85
describe
'2509452' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRJ' 'sip-files00227.tif'
ad1e8aeaa974159dbf3cfdc696c0eed5
4d06ada9372bca84b14076cca0e53f4c3cec219b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRK' 'sip-files00227.txt'
aad6c3a236715d8f9baa045826c8e1e1
263182e7af8ccf0a7ddf9a58a3ce85b1751e7e2f
describe
'11471' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRL' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
28c27494f7c67bbcdd7b8b522f63beed
2ec67000e8a4f4ef6678414dacb41035e934c427
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRM' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
ffe1e2358ba8df4d0af268f199637f4c
2dddfa843b0cddd5e92bfe0df9a97daa2425511e
describe
'110862' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRN' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
5d5a947c39ea00e157c7321ecffb1d4d
aac8cf26eeeff0f206cf4d1f58e5e399534926d1
describe
'20245' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRO' 'sip-files00228.pro'
ad88879369e38675a3217dd3b8b77c27
670b9911718dae3fcd07deb12732d937008ca640
describe
'33292' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRP' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
4e7eb1325d2d478da7a7077527fee6fa
132b88872e9639de980c470df11f85bdba0a73dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRQ' 'sip-files00228.tif'
2befccbd0836cd9bb119bf0fc55ebe7b
fb5e1d76d774b58650950eb47a5f7817748b3275
describe
'813' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRR' 'sip-files00228.txt'
4381f2e6d9ef81a280f1facf60ca6b7d
f52ce9d92baf2e48b506ff35d1514917564ca75d
'2011-12-30T12:13:27-05:00'
describe
'10072' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRS' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
6dc73b5a9aef3d01735bddbb18a5ddeb
de2dce502b1dea0aaf1f809964bdf575e0d20582
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRT' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
1fa7fa44c6e9df556825c8106c5c1cc3
b78bb98927472c81677cbfad51026bb5490c0533
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRU' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
e4269d2cb3a951172c9bc50444cd1669
58070f9b903f56df6e223e43cf64a636d1c53a6f
describe
'22577' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRV' 'sip-files00229.pro'
319cca167f6318498d0899aa1c656805
39f2545004b59cd9b9b846654c17abd05743dc35
describe
'35783' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRW' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
d939502496d4cca80af0a25a8b997ff1
17e1a21b768d9ef11d0151d468f6095f9223d485
describe
'2509144' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRX' 'sip-files00229.tif'
154bc624643fd01d5a6cc44902dff629
b265006195211b146809f41ba537096faf0f0301
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRY' 'sip-files00229.txt'
50d90f355a445f028d574600abe33eda
edb0fed19e9df9ae85ae7922aa0679ca47bfed04
describe
'10736' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWRZ' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
c6b1d1856a2b45bb8153d64635dc4173
6c4ed4a7d35a86eead4dd2c89bf317158a480443
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSA' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
07b7441884870b3752a511a719bf61d7
b263fa6991f7f6aa462be81af8fe5f302cd5e1f4
describe
'119629' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSB' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
2cfaada0ddbe1ffd10f143b72d01122b
1fc2f2d25bb18e3556a35bbb9335ce7b938b6717
describe
'23134' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSC' 'sip-files00230.pro'
c0f5e585608c5284ad42c4deb2aef12d
dcd820a61a6a2c70397729eab31bc18a82b27fe9
describe
'38685' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSD' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
555dfc55cc89f46997e1296ea250e8a5
232bd9277ac0a18b21d1633f99a87ca3f9188169
describe
'2509544' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSE' 'sip-files00230.tif'
d29ba75970a5aa1da13dabb7a7526423
a88fb84865b674efd611536c706a56957e0c7166
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSF' 'sip-files00230.txt'
9c4decc47f72d180fddc07b35fb6104c
b7aaf263d9bbf397b6924c44d15d06281bd4c6e1
describe
'11025' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSG' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
953581e132b9bbf1d9c5e49034c5c89c
20911e1ad10f2e5e907e5762e56644f8f935be84
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSH' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
48590e853bc6f570642555e47b3e5bb6
0e5d268d8dfc21f71897c979fd966b5da7cbbd64
describe
'116673' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSI' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
9e66a9363ad237ee2470ab0361491438
b40b419cc92db0f480758c6d4bc336a3f2edd194
describe
'21692' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSJ' 'sip-files00231.pro'
72336083a5ea4641d4b9131df30d2073
a6824f0c74bb5a836413f84793d8a7d3420d611b
describe
'35747' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSK' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
b5410b4cf1a5f297e028cdaa007229ae
96caf561a20f3eb9e1b5f465984dfaded9453fe8
describe
'2508932' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSL' 'sip-files00231.tif'
62af1073059e22606fde93e502fb1a82
50f5f4bf5891d7c7f1e0a4194305a3d445378ae8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSM' 'sip-files00231.txt'
1c6ece0823044944540f9485e85699aa
82a1d226a90006312f9987e74939334f904dec9a
describe
'10648' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSN' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
4ac7a2c5341aa8e6c441565fe84a2311
fbc7276182141660be224e18bc138ed360768a94
'2011-12-30T12:19:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSO' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
3f486d145f75cba511352672e08ce1c5
00cfad1c12fdc7bf2a53010c8fc3f04ee46cefa9
describe
'103957' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSP' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
cbc58995a7906e560d8eda2d10b41bef
2cba4c01de1490dad7c1b3d782a13d4b1c5e7d12
describe
'22572' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSQ' 'sip-files00232.pro'
0a46dea06b160738c9abdc7c7b386e01
affe871d2625d98a9b2a52961128277cd0aded44
'2011-12-30T12:16:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSR' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
4553b0f154b1b9fe15d01d47dff04a3c
cc2d36ebe1b482c06ff18140f67401ccc9ae0d4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSS' 'sip-files00232.tif'
34b24a856bede1dc828da849b3d467d9
deaf426ae06e5bd27d9704ab0753e06b61a17b9d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWST' 'sip-files00232.txt'
81c544c914dea86a4ece699ccdb7b486
57a040aaa77f7ad8797ba2e10ac63c1a212b919d
describe
'10591' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSU' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
762597878b1e22e3548fd55f2d01d754
90363a06163d62d03f1e9979dc616dc0eb4b838f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSV' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
043e88e0e4cd7d0097f165e11abfbf89
f9ff339c4e89b3055190f26823dc648057102db4
describe
'120979' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSW' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
6cad82ab008c46adec34f7754e96296f
c81d591dca7df9322491b5bdc1e6887562534852
describe
'23581' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSX' 'sip-files00233.pro'
3b42d0aea79c912b0bd9ea3c9cabab10
f5a1ed48e00c5d0042a0445b0099066756174ba4
describe
'38613' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSY' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
1800104d3fb17cc57fae159aa5534a27
8ba67e5bc83c25277d4321e7e3f247bc5279e9cb
describe
'2509680' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWSZ' 'sip-files00233.tif'
7136a1b0c9acc40a58ae75029fbd4d9f
797e240f327a359622b77dbeb0eefb12b1d7aee1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTA' 'sip-files00233.txt'
c412043a38346ebf3041fdb876d0df12
efaf2d5f8246072e07c5f76b6ab253a64d47fbc0
describe
'11294' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTB' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
3f05027ef0ecc9ca03c13aae85b110c7
eb6744aef1841d9299db91e9569b3c5e5d7f5b54
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTC' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
3e20f0a455d38adc6fab2714ecbbeb45
05869b368f4bc11c7eec149aee95a910a2ba4d9f
describe
'116708' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTD' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
ef49b9558535b4b3743b5b8c7f70124f
d1c3cfbe0a49c5f07a396f4bc23912c89394886d
describe
'22730' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTE' 'sip-files00234.pro'
5c1aaa27bd73a782b8924cb05c91ebb5
f90eeb003e2ddde0e4d04f1a0e6b9833a651c4ec
describe
'37483' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTF' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
d0242b2e09003de56904ec888206bc13
a357114eb50626220da9fab799e666a602ad0afc
describe
'2509360' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTG' 'sip-files00234.tif'
8f84146ef30e4138ca56a85997a713c9
cd92df3d56c126ae954b8d52a2d7f83699eee3db
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTH' 'sip-files00234.txt'
885984e6f038bc8e3833b93c6fc1b567
f09dc0aa51c404958cd883a206859ee22378b7e0
describe
'10712' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTI' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
8d4bf3726db9b415d28ef6da41f691de
a1e12305c1ce547de5860a9a85fd2b66edf210bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTJ' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
6157c23aada80cc57371b7bc465ef562
f0bb951f57f4ee690d7374f5f0de88a5e3547bfe
describe
'121718' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTK' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
8b6ccef52dbd9f498a8e949717f97de8
8184331b2450d0b57b6c8d9edf381ce1b355dcf6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTL' 'sip-files00235.pro'
d1b58df3cffd9a9f5602f10842353d16
061e1bb3c14be2f3c28d3c9e4dab7d79d115dded
describe
'37726' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTM' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
a9e77a5ae8cdac03a78218c03841b943
cb7ed0fc6c606e9e88bc139005ad53e4e374cb85
describe
'2509540' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTN' 'sip-files00235.tif'
744d17d7febd51129ae954291fb8b588
b1ccf7e8b0cc50f7f85372adb7a9efb033c3e809
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTO' 'sip-files00235.txt'
6e79f4f217b5d4066c808f25b99ea10e
bf553d7373391a36e2585b641aa7956acf212e22
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTP' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
bbf0873cc0849d08e1584da9801fa498
774b6f3bb27192d362049e8b3ca102253fc1ea95
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTQ' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
7207f92de0b9dbb6f7d9dcac6971b0b0
8eaf6fac62e81c1ff33a6ad71a4df27ae44a32d9
describe
'125346' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTR' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
ca63da826beb624f8b8aa92d34967ea7
920b21e5d559e5b1ad6c26196c08421000700d70
describe
'24080' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTS' 'sip-files00236.pro'
9244973b9bb04b0db3d4ee3c9415b210
c62ae232c66ef9da2f898af9666ab7d8ea310812
describe
'39003' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTT' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
569dbc5b19c37773662735967ca1c62f
3b780548b645389a53096922f4f294bca5553c6e
describe
'2509460' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTU' 'sip-files00236.tif'
d4b0afe594ee7ce9ee6aa45a397d1d1e
56e2bbcf5cd6d3443d68ee14d1cf5d1b270f925a
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTV' 'sip-files00236.txt'
362238cd25f50bb864b8126701e722a2
b82de5ccef8cbffafe8a9815fc2ac4cc181f5ab7
describe
'11121' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTW' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
b208b9067057bbdaf0c295ce5ee3605a
29d08b945c2b262c85a7d97dedc5bac795ae11de
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTX' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
687c9b39950e192e7a5f570938260fca
d716f873190d1575dc98c561eac3499ccd053c90
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTY' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
40334de563f975d0c2da3ef732cf4aa1
f38f11993a9afafed4ed0aaecd82c42b647a7f79
describe
'23607' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWTZ' 'sip-files00237.pro'
0494a01d15282a11893b9295c9a5aa20
d5f6297982cabba50e16cd774b6dffe6aa5e00d6
describe
'38252' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUA' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
8037a1cf8555c518a558b58d9c134467
7ea83c1763a26d09425f1f677578123c94d6a3f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUB' 'sip-files00237.tif'
9cd3362c3e23a8b503d10a18bce69a92
8f1ab36a6975dd290b96f210004bdddad9ba2453
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUC' 'sip-files00237.txt'
5c23284378f65c64db0c74d183f9a9ee
af6ddb529fd2e792babf6fbc1c570f9b6fefe5cb
describe
'11044' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUD' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
c63ab307de9195b7288d2cba7b3257c7
f22ec48e500119e078ad073ac734c424908fd94f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUE' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
d90fd94848a9fdf092d6e0ce24a81983
89ab7932f5c42670917ca0dd34535eac6241e9e5
describe
'118938' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUF' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
a4ff616214fc1fb38d92c03561e0093f
244596c42f8453000b13a38c7d766d4b4687720d
describe
'23578' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUG' 'sip-files00238.pro'
6d2675d45ef30134f07c0d9be1106f79
4cfec33da7349b25f97ef5c5164e70f10fd576bf
describe
'38548' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUH' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
4129446e8cc5166e26be22ac6cde4221
6e11218453083b40116525711d0689ee67ed2da2
describe
'2509568' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUI' 'sip-files00238.tif'
4f04b2d19e892d28196dad55a012c372
cdc4aeda0c03d0c9d85e396d98c76b1b111b4c7b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUJ' 'sip-files00238.txt'
59b3ce05a6a37988d40425393120178c
5c4bf15d20ab50b3972719a0a2f540ff9c6285d0
describe
'11218' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUK' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
2fad1efce60e0226a8201d2b44b42c08
88d26d89ca41e370249c53210ace65faa89b9fe8
describe
'312002' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUL' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
3798b61535019a84f841dd69358d96eb
82fce02a064f183028baca4188426531985747a6
describe
'123586' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUM' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
0af0339ac1c349a81eeaa7c9d19e1ad1
6c884bf4a24a25472c600b3d963d19c3cc911ccb
describe
'23207' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUN' 'sip-files00239.pro'
5aab3cda2446a260422582f256fe61aa
8c938652adfcbcee0398db2f8ce7604640787ad2
describe
'38222' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUO' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
94f3acafe30bc0ccd040778ed1822adc
9d10666f958abbb3874b38a50e7423733ffe3a70
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUP' 'sip-files00239.tif'
017cf07f2532611f1d35c52a5d0c0e2c
3889b77c04eb6db0c2d81d2cef21709d036b74a6
'2011-12-30T12:14:17-05:00'
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUQ' 'sip-files00239.txt'
e607021b60cd6cba0d4810e0c8c682b6
7e4d050fc91a66ec88c33859a7afe717e649935d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUR' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
f143c2ec2caaf6bcc00c8f63f01656c9
8e9ee1780e2f1c572ed2e5233ac642fbaddfc8c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUS' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
1a59aece63b4b1b8fd64fe4b3e685de3
d85c605f0018b67397bd8c55f8a783b06d26a1f4
describe
'118210' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUT' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
42abca3df98ea4d870198bc04ba90bab
13646390c6f2047ff7cd3ca7fadbaeef8d1ebe47
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUU' 'sip-files00240.pro'
c38874e319ac0c1b6d67100e41fffe5a
b0a3b30eaae031f8669deaf903678fec6ebd6f69
describe
'36009' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUV' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
bafde39d3d5aab9b4f6e518e8ab7a815
a7a0aead533e7a73d4e04782ab9f7212f79cf1af
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUW' 'sip-files00240.tif'
88636f0bfde487cde1d8df0c88b08609
a083244a909f830ecb472729b6dfe27efb2c0a8c
describe
'874' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUX' 'sip-files00240.txt'
f98070375105ad154e1d1562951e750f
48bf37fa8d397d1e53d18f1549cfdcf95366f7ac
describe
'10490' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUY' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
2ff637862fbca7cc189420b31df46c07
d4eede7782932fd76c7e79434fa08cc1df1b7bba
describe
'312003' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWUZ' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
bb58c80233aa83a6354ae232ef0b2166
d023e6d7a4f9864b76346843b398cf0d3c8bc69f
describe
'97193' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVA' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
96e30cac97e5192de4ae5717a48e1597
f77baf0312539d331f059d2bb2bd08f2563b62a4
describe
'16578' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVB' 'sip-files00241.pro'
07794bea99233b0fece37ef381afa6bf
fac80a7b71c3a0d899e6679976b71aa7a469cb4a
describe
'28718' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVC' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
4742480094441efcdc85fea4e4da3f91
1d5917f0915d0f62f4b4a1dfcb9564b9de774c60
describe
'2508372' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVD' 'sip-files00241.tif'
921134812d282196577c7314ca2cd693
387215540fc97cc8bf02583eff43bd32f78a3c5a
describe
'673' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVE' 'sip-files00241.txt'
eafe6c7acb9ec9529188cf84662181fc
1941639cdc7b2783b51955499b14acd692f5c3bc
describe
'8576' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVF' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
29bd02633c958994a11e2f3e1aaa8773
ff4557daf2b31fd1297a978646ab571c8042181a
describe
'312042' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVG' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
36bfa7ebb75e8e35e0fbc3dc0c1618bd
9cbac1614a5e656631f460d97be95c500450d6b7
describe
'97352' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVH' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
6646f09842b92b1e57e3c66335960bf3
05b864ce966b4c18b76c675f52a5ec929d9bb5a4
describe
'16726' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVI' 'sip-files00242.pro'
4b12580240c0b58ffab1fa7903e76b52
9d30e615be091a18d638e8e40b8c442764695747
describe
'29881' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVJ' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
004556aa8e7902e3cd11babc7a8b254f
2196097a4778cb8372a6011b88de0ea86b82387b
describe
'2508324' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVK' 'sip-files00242.tif'
99615d29b11457a4cb4c5a9a1e9a16aa
cd4a019268787ec230332f9bde6705edcf9d1924
describe
'697' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVL' 'sip-files00242.txt'
8dcbc79360ca233261e531bfa5b5712c
dcf4e29817f766181115a0caef8fbed3fe22a674
describe
'8689' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVM' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
dc2f75da20ea882a734a155d8c505e0c
1c4f4ebdfa35d4575cc91048820d0ad850c4a183
describe
'311999' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVN' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
31f9c656a2b08a7214c73b8ddcd7cf95
c8e2114c526292a7c6e29100337ac1df7024bdd2
describe
'119498' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVO' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
3170735df3062ef5a2db9699fcdab40e
59400deb317a671d13c90d2a0e5d937ea3ccc30d
describe
'21883' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVP' 'sip-files00243.pro'
7c7fcb75ccb1a5a3b599be2d7e13949d
15aa4f3b511b83ac0063db0a3b7a9ab8f0193764
describe
'36678' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVQ' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
4c337f1979547c2eff4a3e2e17ee619e
f24113681faa885ab2f7a416bea095fa5f96fba6
describe
'2509376' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVR' 'sip-files00243.tif'
2552fc82c512872c53d0226b24ad20b3
326a8622b85f7d4116dce07f625bfa727f66960d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVS' 'sip-files00243.txt'
89ef5fbacc60bd0f984dd87bb9563da0
7034a574cb4ca453548ea37a3b505c5a148bfcad
describe
'10719' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVT' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
7d976adfb884907b2e17ca3196592858
acb13e0d2287aa1121afb47182c07afb5989a3f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVU' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
570225851c7e18108301222b5f286faa
87b51132e57055504be2123bbe8007f06e2a06ae
describe
'126101' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVV' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
00d01360123fcc575187b3e03176d667
c84a370e5799181d6ccba0c2b92c89ed298894d8
describe
'24067' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVW' 'sip-files00244.pro'
a45a4fb608a85d4a8cc3d04a50687964
51ad9cc53ae01efa2cd66d4c277741cb0b095c21
describe
'38794' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVX' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
4406383dab2f065f943ef37d30cb767c
8a9265adcc9b4042aa5165d579e6266795387439
describe
'2509320' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVY' 'sip-files00244.tif'
304801741f73685cce240b9da009f6b6
01a21ba8b2c5b5b67e35321c7e3e854e9dc1277f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWVZ' 'sip-files00244.txt'
0d2d71bcdee1db20762a72a273209f64
6f8161e017ad61efd797231f391ccf817e3bb8db
describe
'11483' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWA' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
73ee9ec7ae1747100be2bd25c2e9e1fd
cebfe333c31f04f18265cc49beeb7d6288f07d9d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWB' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
e76ec3c338176b5621edaa966ce59870
5fec5d91df1a4f9c730fa2cf61b60924608e6290
describe
'119648' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWC' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
55b09b07273d3e2e252996760d2972bd
0f5568696ddf3d00fdbde9d27747517b33f94ddb
describe
'22601' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWD' 'sip-files00245.pro'
ca4b4801c18e3d4edb072b296ec3c0f9
5d4600acfda4fe467b76ce5b6df90690aa9060a6
describe
'36961' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWE' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
c3bb232dfba18d88b76c4c5232f44d5b
ebf08af70355888d7878406edcb5ca62880b6a9d
describe
'2509704' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWF' 'sip-files00245.tif'
7a03a14fd8f419fc7351e2900e612aa0
8486341b88fbe4a2d99511a704d2f80772aa6607
describe
'900' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWG' 'sip-files00245.txt'
6017cb62e349798a982c984e3066ff1b
ecb230a228d6df864dd4658a3ae0f7e2c4c5fa59
describe
'10878' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWH' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
5aa094fc2498ac772c660937daeadde0
e493e87bef34c3071f0c3ccc3b2693dc4e5bac92
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWI' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
659096a5582701b70d807c18e6e77043
d6bdb81e5c0e4d29c3715de72dac6414394c0a46
describe
'123665' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWJ' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
32c85c5526a55c524e8437ad3d8efaaa
9fe1e8b14ae9ff77db34fb4fb2295a8bee6ae193
describe
'24352' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWK' 'sip-files00246.pro'
5ef0c8f36b362204ac0365afec856b5f
dedca3be9805002333e6dbc750a5d2549e93f30a
describe
'38902' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWL' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
862bded9f08578977585a3a92ad8aee0
6b70b5b2fbf1f11bce7bf9b68d91ddf10f764d78
describe
'2509692' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWM' 'sip-files00246.tif'
68e29f8a4e6ffb2df682dd5812837540
8a74d9e41eea8d723dfa74ccc0e8d4a238f6bf07
'2011-12-30T12:19:48-05:00'
describe
'986' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWN' 'sip-files00246.txt'
caccb2693ab78214958bcc124f4c96fc
b82b4e54c11c17c986154a6614d5014fbaab3d72
describe
'11220' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWO' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
25f6a609891fa380c34ce0e12bd8b82d
05e468883505b08b64f722dab8facca040393fe4
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWP' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
d84b49b6dfd3ec89d94f09ddc1f97422
38e04c6210466ba9edeef2fc8e425606f8ec39a2
describe
'134049' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWQ' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
98eb38a0b8696c53434ac97d0c5e259a
fbacd15106c353c678674b2ed60abc7cf5f3d8a0
describe
'23944' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWR' 'sip-files00247.pro'
ff289d503dd6c8d526db231a03ed19ce
ea2d6b3d9ac6900bcab00a3e14ce469915e771ef
describe
'40199' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWS' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
41823009bbeab8abbfa47579d09faa50
aedfc46cfc0cf684f835b57cce10525f8b672597
describe
'2509676' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWT' 'sip-files00247.tif'
8c94d5f494d63225a6a59e73c7fcb947
962fbe8a9a8e7862991f46a5336ad3148141ac3c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWU' 'sip-files00247.txt'
04b7cc3ce3c785c7f67493c92dc67047
2764e6fde515fbae516823983ec35d4d55254d14
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWV' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
d1e55fbe11da6815bf30481bde1cdf0a
53defa2a6eac514dd42a09970e6cf44c2581fe83
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWW' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
5af886bb2e83e3ce0c5082f477d63748
6ceaffb8ef2f30e97e4170a36a994c28e764e095
describe
'248552' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWX' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
d603ee7d624c9cfef8c84f3b98e186ed
974ad4aef3f90d0572460346721ff3b0c6eae433
describe
'2536' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWY' 'sip-files00248.pro'
af22b9659632d42945417bdff8c9a5c5
5d420a84303ff86cbefd714cde6c00edf803cdca
describe
'60559' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWWZ' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
977bb3da1bc10fe90d968ff52f415574
b5ed0ab553ff8dd0e4c68bff42dd4d7b52c40b78
describe
'2511128' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXA' 'sip-files00248.tif'
0fb4464b939c63e336e1d216a742fcdf
e792c64eb9cfa5883e1afa208c653b788513eeac
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXB' 'sip-files00248.txt'
232451ad7062e65e4b2ff4a206df454a
10b25e81e7e8cc40c972ad321f140d7be2a3f394
describe
'13997' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXC' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
a3b89e0c7d91ef49ee36e3b6d4de5e4f
a2623fb947322fbe4a64dae07e3dd9eb2b4951c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXD' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
f01291bac06de3ed65d293778878a4f1
be61e37480d0bf4e99ef8093d8b17c2811ef6fc9
describe
'109627' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXE' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
c64f6a5ae1c1d60d8ee408a78a8f992e
e89c580180d4388874070110046444719b290e69
describe
'22479' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXF' 'sip-files00250.pro'
89b68a7bc3ad94cb34cfdc7f1ea59288
2a73ced8702674076f05ba1afc8265b6ca6af060
describe
'36135' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXG' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
1071125f69562b079dad26bb790a584f
9d25892330e16717c54891f629b1c115f6e3198c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXH' 'sip-files00250.tif'
23502b41acd8d444cbc5cefc2976c7e1
bcb17ee861c2f484ddd795215f24a81e83da895c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXI' 'sip-files00250.txt'
b5ca51e5d8b180e1b6cddb5fbc636566
b40291b1a5f9d02d41805c221e7ff3ac65b7c8d5
describe
'10615' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXJ' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
22300653048f1dac2cffb8924f0ca001
80c7cecbca704f64372157c2492b22fd43f4b306
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXK' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
39e35ce6c00433fb7761a0b9829a7844
9f45d06d1bb2c6e7f7a0502f0ef51d3e0a156988
describe
'127160' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXL' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
58e4636bda456c5dd835dcccd9191bbf
766dae0d68cdda2c204ba7d9cbbdfff79c30a1df
describe
'23316' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXM' 'sip-files00251.pro'
14b0f95b25f487628f1a3c3b6290a2f7
00861eaa7ed8b0b42894e1a1cfc5d0d603f7c80f
describe
'38828' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXN' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
a71a3f703211e08a6a30b3291adfa6cc
251df8e584952e0cee38a6c609548f0b9ff98d4c
describe
'2509588' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXO' 'sip-files00251.tif'
c83c386d702e3144ea588822fc58c5d9
621426985a58e0ac25d1a814bf80e884dd988a1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXP' 'sip-files00251.txt'
bd8b56935088ec5a41f993524ee53d0d
ec86afc16bb6b9f762d7aa1962622315c23d903f
describe
'10631' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXQ' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
7f27cb12736d2c64ced58b9548172699
a93ccdb8f4c79bf8d3b8ece007c546f91f16d01b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXR' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
9f7f92006bc98f810cde9bd34e794776
0eb16eacad3cdcedb13f88610934023a498defb5
describe
'122507' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXS' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
cbca5d850f86048099706efc6c8511f7
ed0b551d8ffe5f306daec9f03876b00d053fb3c4
describe
'21918' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXT' 'sip-files00252.pro'
c8326e6852f67aaee1b4c155a23d5a1c
389f4ace688e633a4e1fcce04443451df9fcd03b
describe
'37005' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXU' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
1708d36cc010fbfa50b0d06d6d008f02
e17566c1f91284c21bf675072c0f5848545d1bb5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXV' 'sip-files00252.tif'
bbfaa19aac3a513074b48e74260c62d9
5b6eca2ad6e877c1756b3ee7e23312efb1377669
describe
'876' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXW' 'sip-files00252.txt'
97540d4df62c5f7fb1bc87d013786fe1
45c8e5243c437c6ad432ea1843160856d88ce1cc
describe
'10792' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXX' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
cf786f6f00aa10af3e56a40d03de8380
34fc1a79b4c3641a7404aaf1481e2307c717bf68
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXY' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
114783547df3ef03faa5497bcb422ec5
25d047dc642216d0502db8bb4fd9b5f3f90832f6
describe
'125064' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWXZ' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
0a2f88b20f99c4932b39716befa029b1
dcb9a978086336fa8be43ef13d3f042b2779d2f5
describe
'23298' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYA' 'sip-files00253.pro'
0a4abd789854b6aa01c4f27b65dbd2ee
a50ba728376faaf4685b5fabf1a2c71165337f3c
describe
'39254' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYB' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
ea190b21fd5e332beb4664e1856b8b21
1c7cad30e6e67a61b8811986d0409c66dd8b5a2c
describe
'2509688' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYC' 'sip-files00253.tif'
72bc153a37539d575e2e945a4afabd97
f175168a10728f8a7e704271025d21959c129720
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYD' 'sip-files00253.txt'
3655606e26622951c6b1ce6b8e141dd0
b983494fc970113c713ed9047444f0a5c43a8e6e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYE' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
8b671213623dab6bff8485328489e9a1
b7cc59dd3ca98cd56512653f47c47f2b90f014d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYF' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
4b79be518673ada99706b1d3502cfec5
37529bd2e35524a55c8b63fd282603aa8970a062
describe
'127452' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYG' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
7874893821fe9913d8a2085cced11354
7490872c2779467dc0343ff4c220777f5aa1d25e
describe
'24225' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYH' 'sip-files00254.pro'
ae2ce9e5e29ca399a7562e4297341a32
9802cf0a06c1f53f7a820b99e0172ce332eb251f
describe
'39723' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYI' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
f17e85c836a0f00620ed4aa3377a62c1
8231fff9d51e75bb0995bcc92d1e579f2fcba479
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYJ' 'sip-files00254.tif'
cd95dbfaf16f27a70148be1cbc463fd2
e0760d20b7b65f34966a9c722db496157aa391cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYK' 'sip-files00254.txt'
bdd60ec7a19338b52bc4c137a468f1c3
8548931b3a0933dd7d603cec169ff90a54da14da
describe
'11478' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYL' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
9848502fa39d893ce0ba3a2f1098382e
bae3f1efde45ad667d91519dbc0f9aab0bf901bb
describe
'312001' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYM' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
a162fec25432899e48e3391ea72345f8
19f2727f739acadf514cb2dfeddaa0e900ba049c
describe
'132962' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYN' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
1db32928da68d98b4ce3bb3d7882606f
5947af02630f8f43f89b66f6565724e673e39370
describe
'24904' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYO' 'sip-files00255.pro'
8471ef50b9a15df4793016a13063dd51
33400836e68a67a9935148e0b2476c8378b5b191
describe
'40313' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYP' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
c6b40bc7f3b071a4ca9864ae44a58aa9
44c44d7650e5bf96eb68b4de1fc342241218876c
describe
'2509656' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYQ' 'sip-files00255.tif'
fab5045bbfae542e768c378acadb19fd
4b9a7bf8afde8f0ebe4d0f417ae34c284beea525
describe
'984' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYR' 'sip-files00255.txt'
9266110730b4870eb53e1350869e11e8
5bf3ff1e05d26a673e6b4c66f2270d287c0df3c7
describe
'11557' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYS' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
f33285ad93438adf406d96a588ea8b8b
16ce69b99a94ac856fe0a4e689dd57b0378f2546
describe
'312031' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYT' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
d6c3f2f42c82216090dd64d0a804bbd2
c0cb902f63f7bd6eb0a5ac047bf10df30337acc8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYU' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
76c7a4e1e4823e871ada5567c1909776
d8bce06692f7ae6f5e1f69f09ebcdbb5f8d383ea
describe
'20732' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYV' 'sip-files00256.pro'
c59b3fdccf6d8307487eb47b20cfefaa
aa4f676727490fed3ca717b1c9569429f9d560f5
describe
'35240' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYW' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
dc45015adbc97c9a2706d37f0d844294
cb69634ee5d3b15620728f0a3db6089f8566b031
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYX' 'sip-files00256.tif'
06d484cd2a6a717fa6a216a231bfdf42
af2584b42d4c7d0dd0f435a2e94e743e7992e590
describe
'837' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYY' 'sip-files00256.txt'
67d0c5710200fd77d1c6313579447081
b36092ee686e0d35f42f2ad6121d0ad5fa20a3d7
describe
'10331' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWYZ' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
9033dc180f82c64bcfc39e5785d066f9
4bbe7ba92f26ea406cc2127ae2ca15118e84cee6
describe
'311985' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZA' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
60bf352790f85cd1e8baccbf06f63352
e3b54b378a82eda2c9ebf40f9a48e3cf266efdef
describe
'125750' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZB' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
b52890463372daaedd07e3006c13fc4e
b5a1de0c718acb0b3ecc18f5127c4ffe66069a88
describe
'23184' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZC' 'sip-files00257.pro'
070765f115c9556e689fa4d0b6763c65
ea437f3515fb11775186635d5c637e5e9b435d79
describe
'38616' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZD' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
09ca4cc69554c468b8f3fb87c337ba64
1051296a81d40b3948cae86e382248de64b4b3e7
describe
'2509444' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZE' 'sip-files00257.tif'
079bde4fedab4cae8d8c0cd6110dec1e
23ce083fe50d2a721d7e7c9a906f71d5a3806290
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZF' 'sip-files00257.txt'
f5beb2dcc3423682e73ba2e4a57ed6ac
aa9c297dc2f1eba9d428693ac83a7e974eee00b4
describe
'11139' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZG' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
9529dd0903758e29175f03a6ebe01721
aad68fb62e7d1cf2dc93fec61978f4eabd6515d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZH' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
23893241029fbf92424341276b1f8bd0
8ba69c56c0d831e55e5f324ef5c8233eb01420e6
describe
'124536' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZI' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
019b226ad2a84a5fab03167c3e0df7ba
96ecbd5eae0064cc805370b7d954a7024041b65d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZJ' 'sip-files00258.pro'
4661a46f1870d1da791e5693846aceeb
b357b5ad598458754d8c501a45197babc285d5a3
describe
'38840' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZK' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
f467526c1fb2fbdb86dc006a64c088c6
5b7d1bf3ecb3594da7c6125dd74d476672d5796c
describe
'2509552' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZL' 'sip-files00258.tif'
64f03a9bc09b70da39ae6e928d93981a
f1a761abbdea7e895d6334ac29fe0c05387f8220
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZM' 'sip-files00258.txt'
b7fc1601414993e1dc86b91846d1398c
6dbed4a80b6ad5a7b2a6103ee494e388d5bd0818
describe
'11005' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZN' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
37b5ea6a384952e1226231290b46a73b
8f339fc297425caed386e17b6f0ce826e2a2e036
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZO' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
06b470bf638a014fa23098012db8517a
3b6421b1347623ef030b8b6594f5696e5561ec7d
describe
'126761' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZP' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
c584f87b261f9bada75f43905fac0fef
8f7540d332f11a62bd6959a8a4b86428279ba73d
describe
'24963' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZQ' 'sip-files00259.pro'
53223b22f6ca6242f8f174c8ab54af95
b71b08166b2bca5baffe20809c5575df5a5db161
describe
'40285' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZR' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
71509fb35b57bf0b10837dde9f380890
067f119206164ce9d0a0e96e086db17d4ff09178
describe
'2509784' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZS' 'sip-files00259.tif'
1b97ef5efe9a895cf0e681e2ab2e7b84
0f88d6aafd2a00871cf8842ccd74720574ce00b6
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZT' 'sip-files00259.txt'
7dd4b5ea0c95a2313cfb9ad3d7a2c08c
9e089b4ac2014ab479654364809d605609d43864
describe
'11425' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZU' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
a5b3f4f0fdac422e94c0b34ed813e924
8e1f8a39c8f234eeb3cf68d5db8d34befce16e0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZV' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
e5bd44183d23034a9e1856955f846ffc
9fa66d02401cbc294adfafb9433031352eab107a
describe
'124463' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZW' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
b6df7161ee7ea47a7ae816c07b6d0922
d1a9e791244b79711cd1b7fa31b81a02b9f732e6
describe
'23320' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZX' 'sip-files00260.pro'
251a331a08b3c3627384bfe3503fa88c
84163d607627ef0b7d3386fdb7cb91e3f54b7ee6
describe
'37456' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZY' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
91c1dcb464a90fd459549f9e8a857bcd
065c91d239d9271a4b43fc985c61b61192dbe062
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAWZZ' 'sip-files00260.tif'
9d9923ada445fe33d53c9bb85bc0f049
4cbc768db8dcaf0098387c9548e070ea957a0129
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAA' 'sip-files00260.txt'
d41f7c584102b62b920b1264b98d9817
97c9c31242aa6d80d0824466f683171649d88e1c
describe
'10688' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAB' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
adfa599d6cd4de7499884d94a311b7ae
9d73bd89b29d1bda80a97e14e7d9bf8f845bd8ca
describe
'312060' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAC' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
770837274de8f69e17669692dafd807b
3c0eada878b48d1d4d36b9c8b8fa78056183f852
describe
'109455' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAD' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
ee2e131ab649035a9a71703c150649be
161c9dfb046f669ee0e152892bb6f06cee75a84a
describe
'18551' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAE' 'sip-files00261.pro'
2a0ea2b7f6b613ad975aa1b8c8f518c0
d02c24619a4b8b9d87aaf2a16a03375a2aff35a9
describe
'32056' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAF' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
de9b10a00d8c490237a12389f52a5f14
c755190fa7b6616a25a05fe7927b9accc14993de
describe
'2508480' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAG' 'sip-files00261.tif'
bfc69e5ed02c4263dd1678be4a857a5f
39c58bef10eabb52b1f3052753f808706018e581
describe
'739' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAH' 'sip-files00261.txt'
af5d563d51b70ffedbac8eb95836ef56
cc0ba98982bae46f48a68425d2ad9573097ded42
describe
'9089' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAI' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
d95d3eb2e1c178c093193a7993f1fc75
029669edf6f2819d28c3ff3734c310d88159a30e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAJ' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
3d11ecbba671e1db132261050cbfe196
decaefb5d39ecea2da276b6bb733666d661fe362
describe
'175277' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAK' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
83b12558e25ace5e0c888f6c6a95841e
a50fe889ed67f4388351dd0b38ce6c72445b10a7
describe
'63781' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAL' 'sip-files00262.pro'
431c4eb9cbc5d04b42a679b793b02e3b
8f3c075bb556bf098c8bf750ce554a849e648c2b
describe
'49812' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAM' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
fdf0ef7be9dafa69e233dc5d4fca6726
ef383898861cea62d97cf9097af175de411bf0fb
describe
'2510540' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAN' 'sip-files00262.tif'
1d3d1e2e7f313196765ba547350f503b
266054ec293d37b46bf56debabe2645112762a9a
describe
'2670' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAO' 'sip-files00262.txt'
22d0ac779eaa8d37bf01ae7308760f26
37e50e4e182a816c2850d2e01db3801cf85dc473
describe
'12317' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAP' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
f792d4d806004562fcb4f578792f797b
5c0c537f1b19c6e2a6518d003cf6c648156809fe
describe
'312115' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAQ' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
afcbcefd761a7fae90381a735592a137
24d0b0a600b7b8357d7812ef2f82e02c170374a0
describe
'189422' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAR' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
3e4158fb564198bc7ee7f6c855aee303
703176552c9de69ff891de4f4b03e11e404f5633
describe
'70262' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAS' 'sip-files00263.pro'
923e530edd07ac560f0fd9bb48b727cb
891ef464b0fa735d2f7521d16b6ff54206e8c2e0
describe
'51281' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAT' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
e4108faf9d8e2f748918cc2f488cfbba
bc66e448e2793f586e262a44a25c3ac5411a647e
describe
'2510368' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAU' 'sip-files00263.tif'
f5bbe8427105da02f43bc2db8eb9c87d
5a17ffb18b2ebe0bad9d20af30d184c77b917f18
describe
'2897' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAV' 'sip-files00263.txt'
6ec7833d4bb9d7be1a7548b82da9e6e6
5d81842e07383f68dcb584e5ab15d141190b8be0
describe
'12292' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAW' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
7390eab16d29d8fd322fbe1448b9b858
a416815d6a747dbaba768b630176ea6e6ed1cf6c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAX' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
5c2a3fd790dbb2ec0fc25d900b5889f1
9163317b005e0842f7a439485b2f5ff6163968a0
describe
'179270' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAY' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
c14321e079ee729e864525e89ecabd92
df06cb0f43b4e62b3c42badcfd18a874df0af7ac
describe
'69993' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXAZ' 'sip-files00264.pro'
f465c7afdd8b01c6f33c21c7c177e326
145a73e0ca0422c7b777c33d922965f25f3d22ac
describe
'51156' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBA' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
d030bf88e610a0d3cfa5301892101915
0c2c085d268f39dff670739eac3e07edad6e146e
describe
'2510488' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBB' 'sip-files00264.tif'
43f337c0c37696f90d99dd8d547c5b98
f4dcfdb9cc03f8281160f3b5d4c66f185f4cc60d
describe
'2913' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBC' 'sip-files00264.txt'
c83593a537fa5a0aafa79d1ff5116d88
5a7a7947a86629d4d8a9622a419aa336f4d7bf6c
describe
'12339' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBD' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
dac00eac6b3ac501c834e22cb5b67315
ccdb8af8f899e2edae3a105add79dd8a7a9f417b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBE' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
464a3ab1375c849bb62e6e477de493b0
c1c819e7efbaba0b565ce093e8e43a3874b63fa4
describe
'177698' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBF' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
15710264808c3ac3f3cdddef1d760d50
ca7969999b0c15713fb2f8f2f68be146e0a9b2ed
describe
'70267' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBG' 'sip-files00265.pro'
35f5618e669b36d3b9f5d21a3d51bf05
fd190eb38e890403d179562636b8f77b550f4d51
describe
'49394' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBH' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
7f60cfc9019f86b376b9e28fbc8a788a
d2cf88ec30d290482d6b972e0acf19741c96f29f
describe
'2510060' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBI' 'sip-files00265.tif'
04d5a02f0d6e1ceceaf52b67e20c1870
0b6ff76548eafe340352961fe41c65e42acb239b
describe
'2937' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBJ' 'sip-files00265.txt'
83cab7c2f40315d5b750264505890ed9
ed5932f36e29795dd5890c52d5958d904b2122de
describe
'12148' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBK' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
7f75168da23f05b2461037bd5290ce93
2bfe2f8da1cf7cd8054beabac39e22f683d45996
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBL' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
d90e3f370927f72081788bfa10f89e43
4b42d4d469823e6d7a6ed1d5489679ac339550c8
describe
'167826' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBM' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
1aa84947a8df56e3c775610ea5678d6f
8f2356fb3a072e88f8708929754aa89828975187
describe
'66116' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBN' 'sip-files00266.pro'
37d1cc0f5b1e8507b652497cf6f81760
bf59fe158211c5d1ed7d22b7949cb4380c614dbc
describe
'47847' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBO' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
3a3ad292bd65faf67981e9e419705448
b0c86217805608bd49f2d9dbb9ef190fb20fc8ce
describe
'2510008' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBP' 'sip-files00266.tif'
475567dc0fbd3c49ad21ee1f4edeed29
676b9fb6651a4942b84c6427220d1925ce24f889
describe
'2757' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBQ' 'sip-files00266.txt'
d55cbaa395893fc2d79e7a512e04fa41
18cf743afaed32998d44b22302879cc644b38bca
describe
'11736' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBR' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
03736d15ba76ba9a27acf290174cd722
b660cc6b8eb94b7065523a8fa990c1906d5c17c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBS' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
04056ec56fecaf4fe208367cab8d634c
d0501ce212d3ad84185a1b02ad0e67aa43cc1789
describe
'192304' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBT' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
7603c557822772be976e4a0691e32a09
c82cb9504387920e702e7c5d7c9be572cdfa0694
describe
'72723' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBU' 'sip-files00267.pro'
657ffd4a9acca91e90ca55983794e1ad
b0c8b1d34bb5d7ab67d1c98423bc1a70e7b04f8a
describe
'53304' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBV' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
1322a2d93da75be3493d7c86176dd305
b413caddde33eb7e6cd67748f5c75265078f59bb
describe
'2510476' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBW' 'sip-files00267.tif'
335a8a180a83cd0dfb2d32027b819d91
509cd5dc75a89c8654f6dc13a9538a85a76c145d
describe
'3029' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBX' 'sip-files00267.txt'
01201874e7b6d5fd04aaf97d31261327
c74e8825332b32e01c9e74e3ed91003ed6f57bf9
describe
'12578' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBY' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
bac0a2d6c78dc330336d28802c4f7826
a9982f266050775ac20e09fa1d397f8544c9b946
describe
'311998' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXBZ' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
64875e58e96c42506cd50cc55dc7ab35
1aa702eab79c7beb2ee8bde17f3706bbf8b604a5
describe
'180460' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCA' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
d40d43fb2ecf6494d7ffa95a896fbb6e
c371915f0cc5c360fd615499f571711383ba9ee2
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCB' 'sip-files00268.pro'
62660f1dff9547fd793673fe993d4aa1
eedc67d95ea9e567b552ed8b392faf99b8fa1d73
describe
'49608' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCC' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
2c0473bcc8769cfcfd787c77cfaaf6aa
d1b2c7fe36ca4d91c9390e46b6fe52c92b10d4dd
describe
'2510144' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCD' 'sip-files00268.tif'
75d9772baac9dc92e32c784e56900262
967603be83d5648c714020e9f631a449fb876fe1
describe
'2951' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCE' 'sip-files00268.txt'
e711c7e95e344f6e32ecab5bc44789b7
0fae370bf775bce975973504f894d0ab2b326603
describe
'12111' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCF' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
b0ef27a8f5cc00063b3d6f7484dc7e18
9fec5b3d346be92bd6948826a7c8943f95bb000c
describe
'311963' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCG' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
2adfc2583907a4c5949abbe3bc81c716
42ae7b0508e110928e3c69effec83d9f0b09c888
describe
'180471' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCH' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
af33d1517ed38abcfab57e5835f8915b
97fa352a634aa33d836567b68f52f0bb43128ecd
describe
'69377' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCI' 'sip-files00269.pro'
5e871345ac864bc8c0498c39e6c496d4
7350718fda86c2add79af050aaf268a18b14b6da
describe
'49641' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCJ' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
0acb3e18d1a5bacadb86ec2de0300349
fc08377df5553f32c99d5bd195e19101cc6ef174
describe
'2510100' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCK' 'sip-files00269.tif'
a16e0103fcf8365daca5d9131d2b43ef
bab6f61dbf652624b6acdf9fd36d860b3137a1b8
describe
'2852' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCL' 'sip-files00269.txt'
b13635b229a7387c781bcc48f98b7b96
9902e8e7b17f434ded17849962a85b8cabe4d726
describe
'11882' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCM' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
d0836be799c1087b1f225c02c988b492
b8f6cd21d09dbb7c9010d35fa9e1a72d119a294b
describe
'312037' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCN' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
73b5b0674fc661e444df644058e7eeee
f7d56e6448f23e136dd4e77f9732326dce8e5e66
describe
'180338' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCO' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
97ceb46549c006a7bd3896da5e5ff599
fd070603d7d9d76ebda401aa94778cb2316906b9
describe
'69815' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCP' 'sip-files00270.pro'
51f9c962334ad8cacf694b3ac605087b
54188fc17f6a7ba50f6073a7d9c314e5bd65d60e
describe
'49948' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCQ' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
d06a50585bf7bcb29141ebabbcc549d9
8bcf7199ef7d5ecb4610c03c278939074a201efb
describe
'2509988' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCR' 'sip-files00270.tif'
b00912c2ac42bf35726f262bebc00787
61832bb9659df5da7a763602de04dd2c8b41d1fd
describe
'2917' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCS' 'sip-files00270.txt'
04133892d61237967c73f6a98f155959
8c5bf8cbf5e25c94a65457db6fa70f5b4f634b55
describe
'12190' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCT' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
b9afdba8e7e6ac0d44e810740c8098b7
2f6fa4b95aaee906320f9f3a35398fe73820601f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCU' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
f560d66d0e7b5783abc8f7205be05ab5
f1f409fbf051138afdac0029f8fa2d72d5869844
describe
'175178' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCV' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
5f343cc609855dfcc638cd0cc0c9d922
9bff2954dc0bcd814560cd870dfbb717d4381cc0
describe
'73386' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCW' 'sip-files00271.pro'
eb2e86b7152e1f8601eca6b9afa58326
278e4860ca4b52f43d8f05eddb73bac6700975e9
describe
'49045' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCX' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
c0ae24d0ffe73d5ebdf4192a4f5017ba
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describe
'2509984' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCY' 'sip-files00271.tif'
b1119ca51c1648f43743ca3d3ddccb23
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describe
'3031' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXCZ' 'sip-files00271.txt'
35e8a4a0e881032360291d928eaa95cf
ca5b7a9ef7ff3885b474c78fd0aba4888986e6cd
describe
'11749' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDA' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
5a6de255622ce3a00ef59736f478d267
42b8e462ddf1241be6b1caad4899808122311791
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDB' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
92432a5ebc197198e6b1beb6038aac2d
c6202ef1b4c406335718139768a7cb55281c55e1
describe
'180640' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDC' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
7f746a4b204ab2aac5432bf5e1f4f57f
f13745afa0b7aa0dfd2b7137812d2d9b436e901f
describe
'73504' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDD' 'sip-files00272.pro'
cfef5ae5b1ec28f8b00a8cc2264b032b
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describe
'51848' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDE' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
c67d81015c6ddd23f70976f4749bdce8
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describe
'2510200' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDF' 'sip-files00272.tif'
3e55b1b540d5946b065374039140b6cc
1f74a88471620110ca845f9895386fb564849e09
describe
'3044' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDG' 'sip-files00272.txt'
8382a7655849dffad172c72657c39c99
da35f6b6aca1d43dce27138040e9082692f7b30c
describe
'12032' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDH' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
94eb943f9c62311ae0be12a2325e88e6
42c4b07aa47847efbce9a25da3f0d9c76b29c929
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDI' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
75741f4294be1426005962e9db7d6d97
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describe
'181457' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDJ' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
4c12250f759117684fb5de7608a2b521
d72c8b5acc8dedb5377832f6f216d10cb85264c9
describe
'68064' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDK' 'sip-files00273.pro'
6bf1c0ddd580e56f3a769533b74c6e31
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describe
'50410' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDL' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
75ac48bb07fd1ccfdec311756b1f36fe
66217a18eed7a2d105e384d1ffc6f69ff98413d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDM' 'sip-files00273.tif'
d9ec3d75b45bd2e8ad50c40a6618d752
fc847d957da039265fd69af836a5e0d711882d59
describe
'2866' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDN' 'sip-files00273.txt'
6bc5bdc5c589ba766401bb58c376931e
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describe
'12199' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDO' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
59698dce5c613ea84007c2301a62615f
033da9d7bfed812b15029b06508504ef3f451870
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDP' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
88640bc6086eeecb48ae72faf34ca2cc
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describe
'185810' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDQ' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
7a0fb42df24a39a1b6136a0b7c531eaf
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describe
'72318' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDR' 'sip-files00274.pro'
86a1f0ed873e5fc500081af8495e7de0
2f0a0f54694b15d231cf7c52c036b30e136b75f6
describe
'50671' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDS' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
084cea85494b949127488436a3d3b8d5
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describe
'2510416' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDT' 'sip-files00274.tif'
06c1ccdcf097f3d3ab0089323f1a8773
bb6d1e190c7a51f9c4f1e3626f92fde3ebf9615f
describe
'2991' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDU' 'sip-files00274.txt'
4944316a6d8f37f33abfaba427b176ba
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describe
'12062' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDV' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
2b44767bc4deca87af126b6bb7c1f052
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDW' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
d16291ec0eae9af6298dc55d79c00c32
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describe
'180585' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDX' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
3d90e7b9624c37d34ab42bedab1e0f6e
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describe
'68578' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDY' 'sip-files00275.pro'
9b13c6b683542cd20ac381cecee89392
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describe
'49625' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXDZ' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
bab4ab79fd48355d37d39e543e2b6e7b
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describe
'2509968' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEA' 'sip-files00275.tif'
aa09c88327b11e92c6c27dc4971e58f3
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describe
'2835' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEB' 'sip-files00275.txt'
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describe
'11848' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEC' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
3009fb091dcaeab559eb49029aa4e5e1
018809f0a566d6e596f8a8b5ae09a6c303ce9c92
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXED' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
3ac188345528a60218526f276e3bfe54
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describe
'177232' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEE' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
63e028945c136f6c2f537494ad9fac17
0da1353f5fad750e6b9ba7f462068fef27a52086
describe
'69198' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEF' 'sip-files00276.pro'
a02f86537d909ae8e15b8d88d4334691
c92282ff5627fa26ec27015d606c7d466da36cf8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEG' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
1ae477b0b344027654c7a1fbe8a33e7e
955ec104ca5dcd5239262ff9ccf082c6fb00a2a0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEH' 'sip-files00276.tif'
d36fa4da1339285ee7ccbe46d1823c32
a99fba9a8379cca7478b73004e5792a404acea5c
describe
'2863' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEI' 'sip-files00276.txt'
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describe
'11676' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEJ' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
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bf1c848776d0299e402a522db5b9860af8f69fcb
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEK' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
ab7d89f592521994f5f2a735acf8f16d
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describe
'180629' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEL' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
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describe
'66034' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEM' 'sip-files00277.pro'
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describe
'49523' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEN' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2510276' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEO' 'sip-files00277.tif'
e55c775d0adb8808282cf36ad0d7d0a4
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describe
'2733' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEP' 'sip-files00277.txt'
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describe
'12098' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEQ' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
4ddf90a4d7341ad95f386a80ff46ac10
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXER' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
d8cd9ec4f728ab8f1b8e15a6d5f2dcea
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describe
'177096' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXES' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
5f45eedb9ff76a15c0e9793d221a1772
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describe
'67674' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXET' 'sip-files00278.pro'
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describe
'48870' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEU' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
b10e0c31e708a90b620a6c3dc1bf3a3c
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEV' 'sip-files00278.tif'
4c6bf13b9989ef206ebaae3d4b4b28f3
0fb997bbaf41c617e7c114e91ef60fe1a9a7d3ae
describe
'2844' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEW' 'sip-files00278.txt'
4370242db5c79e36ac99dd66d5d2f63b
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describe
'11832' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEX' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
feb12ae34829c33f9265dc9ebd7ad2c5
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEY' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
db5ca1fad709bce379ed3fea073af65c
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describe
'172421' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXEZ' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
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describe
'67507' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFA' 'sip-files00279.pro'
fa9826c675315438c00e249803fa570b
c1a1aad437d5d90b7c2d88baa78af3bcc5925e0e
describe
'47893' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFB' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
6ad37ae399b15ea8dbba3d3b19d0c617
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describe
'2509936' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFC' 'sip-files00279.tif'
121b3dddf7a54d712a29ef742ace740b
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describe
'2782' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFD' 'sip-files00279.txt'
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describe
'11878' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFE' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFF' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
2b89e58e3410b3f380338aa5e67f3bce
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describe
'170296' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFG' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
66bbbcca6b007ea8e479aaa54d8a4bcb
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describe
'66430' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFH' 'sip-files00280.pro'
9dafdac909014c7408af2c67f564b761
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describe
'49318' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFI' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
6cc462149dff46539f195b73fcb9e8e3
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describe
'2509720' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFJ' 'sip-files00280.tif'
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describe
'2734' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFK' 'sip-files00280.txt'
1a445c6c1aebc8c52bf00a5cfc644bee
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describe
'12274' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFL' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
c4f0bf98c36aa7de7e35a75a42c6da18
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describe
'311986' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFM' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
e70de4b1ce545bb32c2fcbe7aa45ec56
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describe
'178775' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFN' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
02fbea56dab96c4d144265255d74be7e
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describe
'67768' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFO' 'sip-files00281.pro'
0c9e5ef529288fe711953de85c6a9b92
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describe
'50008' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFP' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
87319c1dee9d5a8b755cf0682e1021d6
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describe
'2510116' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFQ' 'sip-files00281.tif'
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describe
'2816' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFR' 'sip-files00281.txt'
4253330c5c981f69af8e019f9a8c4b3b
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describe
'12131' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFS' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFT' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
1a04546f6cd04b3afe6bfb98d771bbca
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describe
'172135' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFU' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
3ecd9f4145b3f1ec20193168ef47e9f0
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describe
'66928' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFV' 'sip-files00282.pro'
1bbea2a476b8568282037db1ef1734f3
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describe
'49486' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFW' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
3719c1e728739da3724417be8445f21d
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describe
'2510004' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFX' 'sip-files00282.tif'
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describe
'2762' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFY' 'sip-files00282.txt'
e920f433fdbfbda880e2dafb175558bc
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describe
'11537' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXFZ' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGA' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
452b6bab68c64f80666f1d8169fa1c11
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describe
'176005' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGB' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
ff7b81128f0ebe48263b85763481ae21
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describe
'68772' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGC' 'sip-files00283.pro'
4168071b9a610c826f7d42bc2b9f0e0f
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describe
'49924' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGD' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGE' 'sip-files00283.tif'
04baec043080aae4fad0d09b3ce36308
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describe
'2850' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGF' 'sip-files00283.txt'
5b5481b17d536f31c3b7bd5eae58b0fd
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describe
'12116' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGG' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
b620e1ac8565803042aac77f58dc9ff0
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describe
'311970' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGH' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
bfc3667d1bcad5942d73d07ac78b7815
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describe
'162221' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGI' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
d5159a6b014b9a774104fc462ced823e
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describe
'63892' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGJ' 'sip-files00284.pro'
869f4ab9a20e49818083eee085b3eb2a
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describe
'46780' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGK' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
5e5f54b2ade8abba1856ed2baf4dc0d5
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describe
'2509900' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGL' 'sip-files00284.tif'
124c5e5674a570b87af21e12c6ed2caf
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describe
'2695' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGM' 'sip-files00284.txt'
4fc5eedb5c7ac2a0100bf4b4fe968e1a
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describe
'11655' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGN' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
8bbedf4dbe155815a5ad53d94507e1fe
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGO' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
ffbd2102c77be57b45db97ce40e11a46
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describe
'171672' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGP' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
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describe
'76662' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGQ' 'sip-files00285.pro'
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describe
'46774' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGR' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2509956' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGS' 'sip-files00285.tif'
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describe
'3171' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGT' 'sip-files00285.txt'
0fe433fc7e83ced6a9a74187e1adaea0
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describe
'11711' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGU' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
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describe
'312005' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGV' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
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describe
'158178' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGW' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
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describe
'63529' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGX' 'sip-files00286.pro'
e44cdb5682557ea7180fdebf3b16db2e
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describe
'45196' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGY' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXGZ' 'sip-files00286.tif'
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describe
'2676' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHA' 'sip-files00286.txt'
f2889e1c62d51a0afbfff8d65ef25d6e
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describe
'11735' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHB' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHC' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
c7bd8bbf4956e16435d6ab4e9bbb24f8
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describe
'160302' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHD' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
5d28984d40a1b30ff2f5b5505ae5ec85
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describe
'64334' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHE' 'sip-files00287.pro'
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describe
'45999' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHF' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2510024' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHG' 'sip-files00287.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHH' 'sip-files00287.txt'
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describe
'11841' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHI' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
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describe
'342018' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHJ' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
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describe
'147492' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHK' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
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describe
'63800' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHL' 'sip-files00288.pro'
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describe
'41516' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHM' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2749516' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHN' 'sip-files00288.tif'
a0fd99c69fe102fbe97f6e8517fe5773
a890389390556ab83e582e949154127a713e9738
describe
'2674' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHO' 'sip-files00288.txt'
7e4775c3936ac96338f89f7b4c39456a
79f89756afcd4b407b6f2e95f03bad5040bf3642
describe
'9971' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHP' 'sip-files00288thm.jpg'
09fe3a23144b56ac7464c2d8fc1ab480
ab9f18e44ff782d843c72c0aa7bec80fef001fa5
describe
'400562' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHQ' 'sip-files00298.jp2'
c29fe166c014de8d2960a05241082e7e
5999dd0b24b00735f059eac3f520f119d32eadc4
describe
'56456' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHR' 'sip-files00298.jpg'
9f1361c0bbc3e664b0e30e9fe1f54c5f
69b7519e500cb1c8bb581768fd8f694ede4bace6
describe
'11974' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHS' 'sip-files00298.QC.jpg'
e63820a9618de1f8fb24964eaa708b37
d5113cd48aa84ecf002463c5e8e6eea18f71d42f
describe
'9620408' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHT' 'sip-files00298.tif'
c8ed3b92d41d29ccadc493c99ddb9cbf
14e5e460cad7539880f26950ea8dc306eb3b3077
describe
'3238' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHU' 'sip-files00298thm.jpg'
82ab76e1eb1831a5762dd9e2e94d224b
1f489a4e9eecf6214b281edf3c5624e638f0607d
describe
'379440' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHV' 'sip-files00299.jp2'
0b3954f515c37b30d502359df8bf5a71
3adbb8400cc5b5e8753d58a578c3e78c204fdd33
describe
'105183' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHW' 'sip-files00299.jpg'
3706db20bc10ee30114bce79d06ca1a1
28d699343f14a99b69f5293f7f6dff73486e0a67
describe
'16633' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHX' 'sip-files00299.QC.jpg'
116742deb030dcd717e414904649ae6d
9ad456359f07418052438c4c85da6e84108b9f7e
describe
'9116172' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHY' 'sip-files00299.tif'
a54fee2c21f396eb2090674d51f46bc5
c117fd18146ecc5745754ed3f24449a0dae6bcb9
describe
'3381' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXHZ' 'sip-files00299thm.jpg'
bc1bbe6275783098ab7a19043bd4c021
0160afff1a9b7025a42a678f07f3f2244ab319b4
describe
'127704' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXIA' 'sip-files00301.jp2'
004e35d638b77dd220b5ed23355f8b8c
b111e9ea41a722e0ebe5dbda0cf9f2f73ecd2a34
describe
'62855' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXIB' 'sip-files00301.jpg'
930c97696ad4fe9926475ed243a709b1
ad75076f64859afa9ae4f9e2e9ebf8319d362965
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXIC' 'sip-files00301.pro'
f3d234d4f5a32e874523b35dffcd1a8f
5568097a95f64ddd143a1061f6b66490630e6dcd
describe
'13761' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXID' 'sip-files00301.QC.jpg'
7bc316275ccf5cd7ef08ed97bfbdbf4e
107156cc5026236b6616f3bb2bc9159cf0d4ae25
describe
'3073068' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXIE' 'sip-files00301.tif'
5b2dd8201d853987ae3adabcda708313
71d3504f1701d4da61997443bcf63b75cf6f4e96
describe
'4781' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXIF' 'sip-files00301thm.jpg'
fe70c84bd1d3ce2118aeb8076d46265b
357fd15ec532b8405c02f27478db7e782f3b70ba
describe
'32' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXIG' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
e37247fd4d1a78d780c6cc6730c243b2
4c802243b6a3843afcfd25ec87dd0b7dc6c3635e
describe
'401405' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXIH' 'sip-filesUF00087284_00001.mets'
cedc1d0f85f8f6445274bfa63c079010
88ce4c470d4da0280c00650a877b8b90e454f967
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T18:44:16-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'523910' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAASZfileF20090121_AAAXIK' 'sip-filesUF00087284_00001.xml'
8500877f5d26e05f1787bc52e54d721a
724d59a24a1e52a165e89e3ea33bbbe9ba79d1a1
describe
'2013-12-13T18:44:12-05:00'
xml resolution