Citation
Lucky ducks and other stories

Material Information

Title:
Lucky ducks and other stories
Creator:
Molesworth, Mrs 1839-1921 ( Author, Primary )
Morgan, Walter Jenks, 1847-1924 ( Illustrator )
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver )
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
E. & J.B. Young & Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
New York
Publisher:
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge
E. & J.B. Young & Co.
Manufacturer:
Engraved and printed by Edmund Evans
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
96 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Husband and wife -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Mothers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Infants -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Boys -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Grandmothers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Human-animal relationships -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Attitude change -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Ducks -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Domestic animals -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Outdoor recreation -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Dolls -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Romanies -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1898 ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Family stories -- 1898 ( local )
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's literature ( fast )
Family stories ( local )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Title page printed in black and red colors.
General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Pictorial front cover and spine; illustrated endpapers.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mrs. Molesworth ; illustrated by W.J. Morgan.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026641969 ( ALEPH )
ALG4534 ( NOTIS )
261340750 ( OCLC )

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Full Text












Ye
Dd 1e gy Mr g-/ 6

ni wey Plehs

BUND) (QINEUEI, SS MOIES)





AND OTHER STORIES

BY

Mrs. MOLESWORTH



ILLUSTRATED BY W. J. MORGAN

Society for Tromobi nd Christian Kicwledbe
LONDON

Northomberland Avenve W-G
NEW YORK
E &I-B-YOUNG & @



LONDON
ENGRAVED AND PRINTED BY EDMUND EVANS

RACQUET CT.. FLEET ST., E.C.



CORN eagles:

PAGE
Tse Lucky Ducks : : F : : 3 . : i
Oitp Mrs. Simpxins’ Crock . : : : : : : 27
Our or THe Carriack WInpow . : : : : 5 as
Tue AFFECTIONATE GEESE. k : : : : : oe
iD Oinin gow Onin aaa : : : : : : 50
Tue Bat wHo CAME TO CHURCH . ; : : : : 5)

Mr. Nosopy
Mr. Know-Aun
Some STRANGE PEOPLE.

Danpy's REVOLT . : ; : 90



PART I.



OUNG Mrs. Mervyn was staying in the country for some weeks.
She was very young though she had been married more than two

years, and had a jolly fat baby-boy called Jerry—his real name was
Gerald—about eight months old. Poor Jerry had been ill, and less fat
and jolly than usual, and it was on his account they had come to the
country so early as June, some weeks before young JZ7. Mervyn could
get his yearly holiday. For he was a lawyer, with lots to do. It would
have been rather dull for Mrs. Mervyn alone all day with nobody but
Jerry and his nurse, delightful though Jerry was, for Mr. Mervyn had to
go up to town by an early train, and only got back late in the evening for
dinner. So Mrs. Mervyn's sister Dora had been invited to accompany
the little party, and as Dora was only fourteen and very pleased to get an
extra holiday, the arrangement suited her tastes exactly. They managed

to amuse themselves very well, for they had brought down the pony and
B



8 THE LUCKY DUCKS

pony-carriage with them, and there were plenty of pretty drives; and as
Jerry soon got better and was able to go out with them, the party was
quite complete.

Now young Mrs. Mervyn prided herself on her housekeeping. She
had never done anything of the kind before her marriage, and was never
tired of relating how much she had had to teach herself, and what a good
thing it was for girls to learn such things before they married. She had
been the youngest but one at home, and Dora was the quite youngest,
and as they had several very capable elder sisters, domestic duties had not
fallen in their way.

“’m going to teach you all I can while you're staying with me,
Dora,” she said. ‘‘ Of course country housekeeping is rather different, but
I think I am very quick at it, naturally. For though I have never kept
house out of London before, I am getting into the way of it beautifully.”

So Dora came into the kitchen with her sister every morning when
dinner was going to be ordered, and now and then cook got a holiday,
and the young ladies took her place, and spent the afternoon in making
rather indigestible cakes. And on Saturdays they went off to the market
which was held once a week in the little neighbouring town, where they
laid in a stock of eggs, and looked learned over the butter, and pinched
and pummelled the farmers’ wives’ chickens to be sure they were tender,
and not aged fowls.

“Have you no ducks?” asked Mrs. Mervyn one Saturday of the old

woman from whom they generally bought poultry.



AND OTHER STORIES. 9

She shook her head.

“t's early days for ’em yet, ma'am,” she replied. “I’ve some
beauties as ‘Il be ready for killing in two or three weeks, but I must sell
em off as they are, for I am going away for a month to visit my

daughter who is married over by Middleham.”



ea z eA
~ “Tlawe you no ducks?”

“How do you mean, you must sell them as they are?” asked
Mrs. Mervyn.

“Why, live, to be sure,” said the woman, “and a good bargain those
as buys ‘em 'll have of ’em. One-and-six each for the five of 'em, and
when fattened up they'll be noble birds, will they ducks, though I says

it, as shouldn't.”



IG THE LUCKY DUCKS

“One-and-sixpence—eighteenpence ; that does seem very little,” said
the lady. ‘And how soon will they be ready for killing, did you say?”

The poultry woman reflected.

“Four weeks'd see ’em all ready,” she said. ‘And indeed, there’s
two as’d be very nice in a fortnight. There must be lots of scraps
about your place, ma'am, as’d fatten ’’em finely—with some Indian corn,
reg’lar, as well.”

“Oh, Fanny, do buy them,” said Dora. ‘It would be such fun to
have a little farmyard of our own while we're in the country. And there _
is a—sort of a pond in the garden,” she added, with a vague idea of
ducks necessitating water. | .

“They've no call for a reg’lar pond, Miss,” said the woman. “A
bit of a gutter, the dirtier the better. Ducks is queer birds.”

Mrs. Mervyn reflected. She was really quite as eager as Dora to
become the proud possessor of the five ducklings, but she had vague
misgivings that somehow or other she might be taken in. And she
did not like the idea of her Fred—Fred was Mr. Mervyn—making
fun of her. And after all, seven-and-six for the lot! It was ridiculously
cheap.

“If Fred laughs at me I'll tell him it was to please Dora,’ she said
to herself, and so the bargain was concluded.

“T'll fetch ’em over on Monday,” said the old woman. ‘“ Monday
morning, if father can spare the boy, and if not, afternoon. Yes, maam,

thank ye; Monday for certain sure.”



AND. OTHER STORIES. é II

She seemed so honest and straightforward that Mrs. Mervyn offered
to pay her then and there. But the woman shook her head again.

“No, thank ye,” she said ; “you'll pay me when the birds is fetched.
Time enough, but thank ye all the same.”

She seemed honest, and she was so. My story is not one of cheating

and trickery, as you will see.

Dora was delighted.



* TRE DUCKS
Seemep VERY

“Tt will be such fun,’ she repeated. “And, Fanny, we magh¢
send one duck up to London by parcel post—killed and—and—what
is the word for doing up chickens and things like that, you know—
tucking them up neatly with their poor little legs and wings all close
together ?”

“ Trussed, you mean,” said the wise housekeeper.

“Oh yes, that’s it. Well, we might send it to them at home trussed,
and with bits of parsley stuck in, and say it was from our farm-yard.

Wouldn’t it be lovely ?”



12 THE LUCKY DUCKS








Chey were
“fetched

over by

Aap \ X re
SU OW! BAR .

wu Y

“Ves,” Mrs. Fanny
agreed, ‘it would be very
nice. JI think, however,
wed better eat one our-
selves first, just to be
sure, you know, that they
are really tender and
good. In a fortnight,
didn’t the old woman say
the first might be killed ?”

“T think so. Howl .
wish the time would come!
I feel in such a fuss to
pack up the duck and
send it off. Wont Elma
and Anne be astonished ?”

But before that same

Goes fortnight had come to an
Wl -na end, Dora had changed

her mind.
Monday morning
brought the ducks. They

were “fetched” over by

a boy in a basket—I don’t mean that the boy was in the basket too—I



AND OTHER STORIES. 13



see I must be more careful how I express myself! No; the basket was
carried by the boy, and inside were the five ducks, very tightly packed in,
and too terrified to have a quack left in them, poor things.

But they revived a bit when they found ‘themselves once more on
terra firma—though I am again expressing myself badly. Is Dora’s
‘sort of a pond,” in reality a very extensive puddle in the back garden—
where the rain had collected, thanks to a want of new gravel—to be
called terra firma? | really can’t undertake to say. But whether it is so
or not, there the ducks seemed very much at home, and by the next
morning had apparently forgotten all about their disagreeable experiences

of the day before.





14 THE LUCKY DUCKS

PART II.



SHOULD really be afraid to say how much
of her time during the next few days Dora
spent beside “her “pond. Not that the
ducks were entirely kept to the pond—oh
dear no!—but it was usually there that
they were to be found when she came out
to look for them. She ‘took them walks,”
which means that she drove them, with the
gentlest words and gestures, into the little
field close by, where they seemed equally
icontent and at night she “put them to
bed,” that is to say, she-decoyed them by
the sight of her plateful of scraps and hints of Indian corn into an
empty stable, where the dear creatures weré safely locked in:
And her sister Fanny was “nearly as bad” as Dora herself.
“They are really such interesting things,” she explained to her
husband, when two or three times over, not finding Mrs. Mervyn in the

drawing-room or on the verandah on his return from London, he was told

“the ladies were at the pond.” “I had no idea ducks could be so

interesting.”



AND OTHER STORIES. 15



‘Not even when you're fattening them for your own table,” Mr.
Mervyn replied. ‘I can understand that fact adding a wonderful charm

to poultry of any kind.”







































AT NIGHT SHE
¢
“Put THEM TO BED,

Mrs. Mervyn seemed rather in a hurry to change the subject,
Dora, who was with her sister at the pond of course, glanced up quickly,

but said nothing. In a moment or two however she remarked briskly



16 THE LUCKY DUCKS



that she. thought ‘“ Tottles seemed better to day.” “JI am sure he stands
firmer on his legs.” |

“ Tottles,” repeated Mr. Mervyn, “(do you mean the baby, Jerry?
Why do you give him such a ridiculous name, and—surely, Fanny, you
are not allowing the child to stand or walk yet? I have always heard, I
know my mother says so, that it is fatal to let a baby walk too soon? it
gives them—what is it ?>—-makes ’em knock-knee’d or bandy-legged, I’m
not sure which. But it’s something that shouldn’t be.”

Mrs. Mervyn could not help laughing.

“My dear Fred!” she exclaimed. ‘Jerry is only eight months old.
No fear of his wanting to walk or stand just yet. You might as well
warn me against letting him have too many lessons at his present age.
Oh no, Tottles is only one of the ducks—we didn’t think him as strong
and sturdy as the others, but he’s improving.”

‘* He couldn't stand when he first came,” said Dora. ‘At least he
always flopped down when he had walked a little bit, his legs seemed
weak. I think he had had some illness. He’s that one over there—the
one with the nearly black wings, Fred.”

‘‘ He looks pretty fat,” said Mr. Mervyn, “but, on the whole, Dora,
if your idea about him is correct, I think, though I wish Mr. Tottles well,
I would rather not eat him.”

And unfortunately,” said Mrs. Mervyn, with a little sigh, which .
might have been for Tottles himself and the fate before him, or mzght

have been for the possible effect of roast Tottles on her husband’s



AND OTHER STORIES. 17

digestion ; “unfortunately he is the very one that the woman said should
be killed first. She said in a fortnight. It’s quite that, Dora.”

| Her tone was as tragic as if she had been passing sentence of death
on some unjustly condemned prisoner. Dora started.

“Oh, Fanny,” she said, “you should let him get quite aral first.







He hasn't been able to enjoy himself half as much as the others since

they came here, with his being so weak, you see. Don't you think *
Fanny should let him get well first, Fred?”

“T should say so decidedly,” replied Mr. Mervyn. And his face was
very solemn. ‘For the sake of others, if not for his own, I should say
so, very decidedly indeed.” .

Dora's face cleared.



18 THE LUCKY DUCKS



“Oh, how very nice of you, dear Fred!” she exclaimed. ‘I wish I
could catch Tottles and make him give you a kiss.”

“It would be rather a wet one,” said Mr. Mervyn. ‘‘ Thanking you
for your kind intentions, Dora, | think we will leave Doddles’ kiss to the
imagination.”

“ Tottles,’ said Dora, “not Doddles. Doddles wouldn't suit him a
bit, would it, Fanny? They've all got names, Fred. The two little
white ones — you
wouldn't know them
apart, but Fanny and
I do—are Lily and
Snowflake, and the

thin, rather scraggy



greyish one is Hans

Lity AND SNOWFLAKE eo a

why we called him

Hans, Fanny? Oh yes, it was because his face is like one of the

geese in my Grimm, who was—oh, Fanny, do look how much better
Tottles is walking.”

“Yes, he’s gone right round the pond,” exclaimed Mrs. Meryvn.
‘He thought Perkins was going to snap up that bit of crust before he
could get to it. Perkins is the lively little duck running after Tottles,”
she explained to her husband quite seriously. ‘We called him ‘Perk’
or ‘ Perky,’ at first, and then it got into ‘ Perkins,’ ”



‘

AND OTHER STORES. 19

“Most interesting,” said Mr. Mervyn. ‘Let me see—‘ Tottles,
Lily, Snowflake, Hans, and Perkins.’ It reminds me of your favourite
memory game, Dora—‘ Alcibiades, Gladstone, Garibaldi, Simkins,
Napoleon, &c. Am I not sharp at remembering their names?”

“Dear things,” said Dora, as they at last tore themselves away from
the pond, “they ave so sweet. I don’t wonder you love them, Fred me

“Roast and stuffed, and







with apple-sauce,” murmured her
brother-in-law under his breath ;
scalligy that gis y tOrmSdy, i eCXCEDE
Dodd—no, Tottles, I mean.’

But Dora did
not catch
his words
—~at least
if she did she pretended she didn’t.

And for some little time the quintet of webbed creatures lived on in
peace and plenty, undisturbed by nightmares of sage and onions, apple-
sauce or green peas. |

But if it is darkest before dawn, sometimes, I fear, things ane
brightest and calmest just ere the thunder-clouds gather. There came a
day—a sad day for Dora, and—very nearly, a still sadder day for the

327919)

ducks—when the alarm was given, the “fools’”—or ducks’—“ paradise ’

all but destroyed.



20 THE LUCKY DUCKS

This was how it happened. There came one Saturday morning, a
telegram from Mr. Fred, to say he was bringing back a friend ‘with him
to stay till Monday. Now Saturday is an awkward day for such
surprises, and Mrs. Mervyn at once went into the question of the food
supply.

“Tt is all right,” she said to Dora, as she came out of the kitchen,
“there is enough meat in the house, but—we must have another dish at
luncheon to-morrow, and, Dora, cook said the ducks are really quite
ready: Not Tottles, but two of the smaller ones—Hans and Snowflake
are the fattest. You must try and not mind, dear.”

But Dora hid her face in her hands, and rushed up-stairs in a burst
of tears!

“T’II—T’'ll try to be good, Fanny,” she whispered penitently to her
sister, when red-eyed but composed she made her appearance an hour or

two later. ‘Only, don’t expect me to come in to luncheon to-morrow.”





AND OTHER STORIES. 2



PART III.

ORA aid come in to luncheon on Sunday, however, and was quite
as happy and merry as usual. But on her sister’s face were
some signs of housewifely care.

“Tam so sorry,” she said to the gentleman who was staying with
them, “to give you such a poor luncheon. ~ But the fact Sema nel mI
counted upon something which—which failed us unexpectedly.”

“T bet you anything you like, I can guess what the dish was,” said
Mr. Mervyn, interrupting his. friend’s assurances that he had everything
he could possibly wish for in the way of an excellent meal. ‘‘ Roast Tott
—no, I beg your pardon—roast duck—eh ?—am I not right?”

Fanny blushed a little.

“Not far wrong,” she said; ‘the truth is, I had ordered roast ducks,
or ducklings rather, for we have some of our own, quite ready for killing,
but late last night the cook sent in to tell me—it does seem very
ridiculous—that neither she nor the kitchen-maid nor the footman knew
how to kill ducks. And as it was Saturday night the gardener had gone
home, and so had the coachman and the groom. None of them live on
the premises, and of course we could not have eaten ducks only killed
the same morning.”

“Besides,” said Dora, “it would be very naughty to kill chickens or
ducks or anything on Sunday.”

‘And the long and the short of it was, that Mr. Tott—-oh dear,



22 ' THE LUCKY DUCKS



dear, I mean to say the duck—got a reprieve, and we had to put up with
—what is it ?—cutlets, instead of him,” said Mr. Mervyn.

“You would have had to put up with not having me,” said Dora,
“if they had been here. It wasn’t Tottles at all
—it was to have been Hans and Snowflake.”

“Hans and how much?” asked her
brother-in-law.

But Fanny saw some suspicious signs
about Dora’s eyes, and she knew that the
child would not stand much teasing about it,
so she changed the subject.

“T must speak to the out-door men,” she
said, hurriedly. “After all it doesn’t much matter.”

Monday came. When Mrs. Mervyn was
ordering dinner, cook returned to the question
of the ducks.

“I was very sorry, ma'am,” she said, “to

Have to disappoint you so. And it’s very stupid



se of me and the others not to be able to put our

hand to such a thing. But they do say as ducks is very queer to kill.”
“Of course, it must be done properly,” said Mrs. Mervyn, “I could

not have the poor creatures tortured. But you had better tell the
gardener to do it—let me see, to-morrow would do. They will come in

nicely for Wednesday, when I expect my aunt to spend the day.”



AND OTHER STORIES. : 23



And she mentally resolved that she would take Dora a long drive on
Tuesday, so that the fatal deed should be done without her knowing.

“ And once they ave killed,” she thought, “Dora must just try to be
sensible about it, though I do sympathize with her. I'll never have
eatable pets again—never—though, of course, we didn’t mean to make
pets of them. Why Dora was quite full of sending one home by parcel
post!”

But it was some time since Dora had alluded to this plan.

Wednesday morning at breakfast-time, Dora announced her intention —
of running out with a plateful of scraps to the ducks.

“We were out nearly all yesterday,” she said, ‘and I scarcely saw
the dear things.”

Mrs. Mervyn shivered, but said nothing. A few minutes later,
however, on her way to the kitchen, she heard Dora’s voice as merry as
ever, coming from the direction of ‘the pond.”

“ Has the gardener not killed the two ducks yet? Did you forget
my orders ?” she asked the cook.

Poor cook looked guilty.

“If you please, ma’am, no, I didn't forget. But it’s a very odd
thing, ma’am, the gardener had never killed a duck. The lady you have
this house from never keeps them. And he said as how he’d rather not.”

“How extraordinary ;” said Mrs. Mervyn, half-annoyed, half-
relieved. ‘But theres Spedding, cook”—Spedding was the coachman

—“he has lived a good deal in the country, you might have asked him.”



24 THE LUCKY DUCKS

“So I did, ma’am,” cook replied. ‘ But
bless you, ma’am, Spedding’s that soft-hearted.
‘Kill a duck,’ says he ; ‘no thank you, Martha,
I begs to be excused.’ And then I tried Dunn,
the groom, ma’am. He said if I’d give him the
carving-knife, he'd have a try at chopping their
necks off; but that I wouldn’t hear of. ‘The
_ missis wouldn't allow no brutiality,’ says 1.”
| } “Certainly not,” Mrs. Mervyn replied.
“But what are we to aoe The ducks must

Ga >
The Gardener, =



aa ee . be killed sooner or later.”
‘There's the butcher's boy,” suggested the cook. ‘He must be

used to such things ; they come in his line.”
“ Very well then, ask him. Say I'll give him something for his trouble.
To-morrow or the day after would
do. My aunt is not coming after all.” \,
And for a day or two there was no iN
talk of the ducks. That is to say, not from XS

the kitchen point of view. There was plenty ;





of chatter about them on Dora’s part—she
seemed quite to have forgotten the tragic fate

in store for her web-footed favourites.

The Coach wan

ibeas Fo Le

Another “if you please ma’am, about the
I
EXCUSE A a

ducks,” greeted Mrs. Mervyn on Friday.



AND OTHER STORIES. 25



“Well, haven’t you settled it with the butcher's
boy?” said the lady, rather impatiently. It was a dy 7

disagreeable subject, and she wanted to hear as

little as possible about it.

‘““He’s no experience of the kind, neither, if
6 * Ghe Groom
you please,” cook went on with a shake of the head. sua tea neve
a try al chopping

“ Stabbing he could undertake, but that’d never do We xk o«.



for ducks, and so I said to him. But he’s going to
speak to his master, and see if there’s any one about as ean oblige us,”

“Really,” said Mrs, Mervyn, ‘‘it is too ridiculous. I do wish I'd
never bought them.”

Some days passed—the butcher boy’s inquiries appeared to be
unsuccessful. Then one morning cook announced that a man had made
his appearance sent by the butcher to kill the ducks.

So Ce ee een Cena mnt le DN mamiAermn tet
Mrs. Mervyn. |

“He was not—not to say exactly—but still,
ma’am, | couldn’t say he was right down sober,”
said cook. ‘And Robert and me—it went to
our hearts to think of his torturing the poor
birds

we just sent him about his business, quite



Miss Dora so fond of them too—and

civil-like, of course.”



Mrs. Mervyn left the kitchen without speaking!



26 THE LUCKY DUCKS



A fortnight later they were all back in town.

“By the by,” said Mr. Mervyn one evening when they had roast
duck for dinner, ‘‘what became of Tottles and his friends? We never
eat ’em after all, did we? Not that I remember.”

Mrs. Mervyn grew very red.

“‘T—] sent them back to the farm they came from,” she said. It
was no good—I couldn’t get any one to kill them.”

Mr. Mervyn smiled.

“They'll be killed by now,” he said.

“No,” his wife replied. ‘‘ Dora made the woman promise not to kill
them till the autumn. She wanted them to enjoy the fine weather, and

after that she thought she wouldn’t mind so much.”

“Lucky ducks!” said Dora’s brother-in-law.





AND OTHER STORIES. 27





1ISS Jessie,” said nurse, “I’m going round to some of



your Mamma’s poor people this morning, as she is
not well enough to go herself, and she says you may
come with me.”

“J hope you're going to the nicest ones,” said Jessie. ‘‘ I’ve been
once or twice with Mamma, but I don’t like all her poor people. One
woman was quite cross one day, as if it was amma’s fault that she was
poor. JI like the cheerful ones that seem pleased to see us.”

Nurse smiled, though a little sadly.

« Ah, Miss Jessie,” she said, “if you knew more about it you'd not
wonder so much at their seeming cross as at their ever being cheery.

Still you’re full young enough to see the sad side of things. ! think



28 THE LUCKY DUCKS



those that we’re going to see to-day will be the kind you like. There's

old Mrs. Simpkins now; bedridden and alone as she’s been for years,

and never a grumble, and always a smile and a pleasant word for you:

it does one more good than many a sermon to have
a little talk with her.”

The other visits were quickly paid. It was
not the usual day for Jessie's mother to go her
rounds, but she had been ill and obliged to
delay her visits. Nurse had plenty of
good sense, and when she saw that in
some houses the mothers were busy
and in the midst of their work, she
delivered her message without
disturbing any one, promising
that Mrs. Vincent would come
herself as soon as she was
well enough.

“And now,’ she said,



“there is only old Mrs.





Simpkins to see. No fear
of her being busy, poor

body.”




























There was rather a high stair to climb to Mrs. Simpkins’ room.

By the time they got to the top of it Jessie was quite out of breath.



AND OTHER STORIES. 29



“If I was Mrs. Simpkins,” she said, “I'd be very glad always to
stay in bed rather than to go up and down all these steps every time I
went out.”

For Jessie had never been ill in her life, and she was very often so
sleepy in the morning when it was time to get up that she thought it
would be no punishment to stay in bed, if not for always at least for a
good long while.

Nurse tapped at the door.

“Come in,” replied a feeble voice.

They went in.

The room was clean and tidy as usual, though bare enough. The old
woman was half propped up in bed, and a little coarse knitting lay beside
her. But she did not seem to have been working, and as she caught
sight of her visitors she hastily wiped her eyes with her handkerchief
before turning to greet them with a smile

“Good morning, Miss. Good morning Mrs. Drew,” she said.
‘Well, this is kind to be sure. And how is your dear Mamma? _ I[’ve
been longing to have news of her.”

“Mamma is better, thank you,” Jessie replied, “but the doctor won’t
let her go out yet.”

“ Dear, dear,” said the old woman, “she must have had a very bad
cold. Such an active lady as she is too! But it’s an ill wind, they say,
as blows nobody any good, and it’s a pleasure to have a visit from Missy.

She does favour her Mamma, she does.”



30 THE LUCKY DUCKS

Nurse was pleased at this, and she went on talking to Mrs. Simpkins
for a minute or two. The old woman replied cheerfully, but her voice

sounded shaky, and she seemed to put some force on herself to speak

=
|Z SS,
ve Kt rey Ong
To a NOT fe ll f |
=









brightly. From time to time, too, she quietly wiped her eyes, as a tear
or two trickled unbidden down her thin cheeks. Nurse took no notice

for some minutes, but at last she could not help saying to the old woman»



AND OTHER STORIES. z gj



“T am afraid your eyes are weak to-day, Mrs. Simpkins—or—you're
not suffering more than usual, I hope?”
A wintry smile flickered over the wrinkled face.

“No, no, Mrs. Drew,” replied Mrs. Simpkins.












“God be praised I’ve naught to complain of,
anda deal, a great deal, to be Thora for:
But I’ve been having a good cry to
myself all the same—ever since
the nurse came in and straight-
ened me up this morning. I’ve
been lying thinkin’ of it. It
didn’t seem so bad till I was
settled for the day like, and had
read amy. schapter, and
had nothing to do but
to lie and think to
myself, and then I did
feel the miss of it
pretty sadly;” and a
little sob seemed to
shake her.

Nurse grew more and more puzzled.

“But can’t you tell me waz it is you miss so?” she said, while

Jessie’s face looked very grave and anxious.



32 THE LUCKY DUCKS



\

Again Mrs. Simpkins smiled, and this time her smile was more of
a real one.

“Deary me,” she said, “but I am an old silly! It’s my clock, Mrs.
Drew. At least it wasn’t my clock, but I’d come to feel as if it was.
Miss Nicholls, the dressmaker—your lady knows her—she’s been,away
nursing her sister for seven or eight months, and when she went she
left me her little clock. ’Twas partly to keep it safe, and partly to be
company to me—she’s a feelin’ heart, has Miss Nicholls—but she’s come
back, and this morning early she come for her clock. I thanked her
kindly you may be sure, and I wouldn’t have her for to know what an
old silly I am, at my age to cry for a clock.” But though she smiled as
she thus tried to laugh at herself, the tears would keep coming, and
Mrs. Simpkins had to wipe her poor old eyes again and again. “It
was such wonderful company, you'd not believe it,’ she went on, as if
to excuse her own weakness. ‘‘I never felt lonely night or day when
I heard its ticking. There seemed to come words into it—sometimes
‘twould be a verse I learnt long ago, sometimes it'd remind me of the
tick-tick of the old clock I used to listen to in our cottage at home when
I was a little girl.”

Jessie had crept closer to the bedside. Now she put out her little
hand and gently stroked the old woman’s shrivelled brown one. ‘I
understand quite well, dear Mrs. Simpkins,” she said: ‘I think I’ll
feel just like that when I get to be an—an old woman,” she added,

hesitating a little.



AND OTHER STORIES. ‘ 33



Mrs. Simpkins smiled in good earnest this time, though it was
through her tears.

‘“‘Now did you ever ?” she said, turning to nurse with great pride,
“did you ever? Such a pretty thought of Missy to comfort an old
woman with. It’s many a long day before you'll be as old as me,
Miss Jessie, and I hope and trust you'll have better than a clock for
company, but I thank your kind heart, I do.”

She seemed quite bright and cheerful before they left her, but little
Jessie was very quiet all the way home. She had a long talk with her
mother that afternoon, and the contents of her money-boy were counted
over several times.

Two or three days after that, Mrs. Simpkins again had the pleasure
of a visit from Jessie, and this time Jessie was carrying a parcel.

“Shut your eyes for a minute please, Mrs. Simpkins,” said the
little girl. “There now, open them quick and look at the mantel-piece.”

There stood a neat little clock, ticking away as if quite at home.
The poor old woman could not speak for joy.

“It's your very own,” Said Jessie. “It isn’t quite a new one. It
was in our schoolroom once, but the boys would try to wind it up and
touch the hands, so Mamma got a shut-up one. And this was rather
out of order. So we took it toa man Mamma knows who made it guzte
right, and I paid him with my own money. So it’s part a present from
Mamma and part from me, you see, and you must fancy it says to you

“With Jessie’s love.” |
D



34. THE LUCKY DUCKS



Those words and many other sweet and pleasant things did the
little clock tick to the poor lonely old woman, cheering her brave spirit
and reminding her that she was not forgotten. |

If Jessie lives to be old herself, even though she may not be poor
or lonely, I think that she will like to remember that in her bright and

merry childhood she had felt not only for but w2¢h others.





AND OTHER STORIES. 35

OUT OF THE CARRIAGE WINDOW.

W good-bye, dears,” said Mamma, a little anxiously. “You

Ny
really will be——”

« Very, very good, and careful, and as steady as old Time,”



interrupted Donald. ‘Yes, Mamma, you really may trust us. You

know Morty is always quiet, and both he and I will really do what

Janet tells us.”



36 THE LUCKY DUCKS

“Yes, Mamma,” Janet added. You really needn’t be anxious,
dear.”

‘Don’t lean on the carriage doors,” Marnma called out as her very
last injunction.

“No, no,” the three voices replied; but Papa, who was going to
see them off, put his head in at the door again for a moment. |

“Tl see that the doors are well locked, all the same,” he said,
nodding to her reassuringly.

The children were setting off on a journey all by themselves! Yes,
they were actually to travel two hours on the railway without any big
person to take care of them. It was the first time this had happened,
and Mamma, naturally, did not feel quite happy in her mind about it.
But it did not seem as if it could be helped. Morty, their cousin, was
spending his holidays with them, and it was very important that he should
have some sea-air before he went back to school. Nurse and the two
youngest children were already at the cottage where Donald and Janet
had spent many happy summers, and once there the three would be well
looked after. But neither Papa nor Mamma could take them there, as
visitors were coming this very day, nor could any reliable servant be
spared.

“Let’s travel alone,” said Donald. “We'll be quite good, and
nurse will meet us at the station at Seacove.”

And so it was decided.

Papa saw them off. He settled them in a comfortable carriage



AND OTHER STORIES. : 37



where there was only a pleasant-looking old lady in a corner, repeated
Mamma’'s charges, and stood waving good-bye as the train moved out
of the station.

The three children sat very still for some time; there was nothing

very interesting to be seen out of the windows for a good way, so Janet



wry tat!
EXCLAIMED

ee



told the boys a story in a low voice and kept them quiet till they had
passed the last big station before Seacove, for the train was a fast one
and did not stop often. At this station the lady got out, and not long
after came the place well known to Donald and his sister where they had

the first view of the sea. In their eagerness to catch sight of the silvery



38 THE LUCKY DUCKS



gleam in the distance the children all poked their heads out together ;
the door was locked, so they themselves were safe enough, but unluckily
Donald’s arm gave a tiny shove to Morty’s straw hat, the “ railway wind,”
as Donald called it, was quick to seize it, off flew the hat and went
whizzing down the line! .

“My hat!” exclaimed Morty, clapping his hands to his head, as if
expecting still to find it there.

“Morty’s hat!” repeated his cousins together. And all three looked
very blank. } . |

“Tt was quite a new one this summer,” Morty went on dolefully.
_ “Mother gave my old one to Hodgie because I was coming to you, you
see, and Hodgie wasn’t at all pleased, and now he'll make out I’m so
careless.”

“And what's to be done?” said Janet. “You can't go about
without a hat.”

“Tl lend him mine for the present,” said Donald. “I’ve got my
cricket cap in the carpet-bag.”

There was only just time to get out the cap—the bag being
_ fortunately in the carriage—when the slackening of the speed told
them they were arriving at Seacove. There stood nurse on the plat-
form, smiling and eager.

“Well, I am pleased to see you all safe and sound,” she said.
“] did feel a bit anxious to think of you travelling alone.”

But. their rather solemn-looking faces soon caught her attention ;



AND OTHER STORIES. 39

the misfortune was related. Nurse was very sympathizing, but she
was sorry too.

“ How far off was it?” she asked. Her face cleared when she heard
that it had only happened a few minutes out of Seacove. “Oh,” she
said, “that’s not so bad;” and off she set to speak to the station-master.

She came back in a minute or two quite cheerful.

“There's every chance we'll get it back again, he says. He'll
inquire down the line and let us know.”

The next morning, and the morning after that, Donald and Morty
came to the station for news of the flown-away hat, but it was not till
the third day that the answer came. Yes; the hat had been picked up
by some children playing in a field, and was to be heard of at John
Warton’s cottage half-way between Seacove and the next station, Crow-
bank, a very small one where few trains stopped.

“Tt’s not more than three miles from here where Warton lives,”
added an obliging porter.

Home hurried the boys.

“Mayn’t we go and fetch it?” they said, ‘it would be a nice walk over
the fields ;” and nurse, after some consideration, decided that they might.

“Tt is a good thing my hat’s found,” said Morty, as the cousins made

‘their way over the fields. ‘If it hadn’t been, I’d have had to give my
-shilling—that’'s all I have of my own really to spend as I like, the rest is
mother’s that I have to account to her for.”

“And two shillings wouldn't have got as good a one, nurse says,’



40 _ LHE LUCKY DUCKS



answered Donald. “I was thinking it would have been only fair to
give you my florin. It was more my fault than yours.”
“Tt was all our faults, I suppose, said Morty. ‘I know mother

wouldn't be axgry about it, but she’d be sorry. And I wouldn’t like her
SE Nh TH



to pay for another, because I know






| she’s not rich.”
They found the cottage easily.
———=== Mrs. Warton, a
gentle, civil, but

pale-faced, anx- -



ious-looking — wo-
man, with a swarm
of children ‘of all
sizes about her,
hastened to get
out the lost hat
from a cupboard

where she had put

ey it carefully away.

‘Tis a right down good one,” she said, “and quite new. ’Twould
have been a pity to lose it. It must have cost a half-a-crown at the very
least. I were asking the prices of some like it at Seacove last week for
my Bobby. He's smaller than you, sir,” looking at Morty, “but his

head’s a good size. This ’ere hat fits he beautiful.”



ae

AND OTHER STORIES. 4i





“Which is he ?” asked Donald.

Mrs. Warton looked round. “Where are you, Bobby?” she was
beginning to say, when a sort of howl from the corner of the room made
her start. It was Bobby; there he stood, scrubbing his eyes with his
knuckles, weeping valiantly. |

“It’s the ‘at,” explained an elder sister of ten.

“For shame of you, where's your manners?” said Mrs. Warton,
growing very red. “’Twas only,” she went on, “’twas only that we
tried it on for fun, like. And father, he said if nobody owned it, it
must be for he. But I’d never cry about it if I was you, Bobby.”

Bobby cried on however, his round rosy face growing redder and
wetter as the tears rolled down. Morty looked at Donald, and Donald
looked at Morty. Then Morty burst out,—

“Let him wouldn’t have been disappointed. I'll buy—” but here ne stopped short
—a shilling would not pay for another hat the same!

Donald turned to him.

“Tl give you my florin, and you’ve got a shilling to do what you
like with, that'll be plenty. She’—lowering his voice as he nodded
towards where Mrs. Warton was stariding—“ she said half-a-crown.’

“Oh, thank you, Donald, thank you,” said Morty.

Mrs. Warton was not very easy to persuade, but when the
boys put the hat on Bobby and told her to look how well it suited

him she gave in, and was nearly as delighted as Bobby himself, whose



‘42 THE LUCKY DUCKS



chubby cheeks, still shining with tears, grew rounder and chubbier with
pleasure.

~ Morty’s mother would not have seen any difference between the first
hat and the one the boys bought at Seacove, but of course Morty told
her the whole story, and she, too, was glad to think that poor little Bobby
had not been disappointed.















































AND OTHER STORIES. : 43

THE AFFECTIONATE GEESE.










4 J HAT a noise those geese are making! What can it be
Be about ?” said Miss Mildred one morning, as she
passed through the poultry-yard on her
way to the school-house, which was just
outside the Rectory gate. “Is there
anything the matter with them, Mrs.
Green ?~ :

Mrs. Green was the wife of the
Rectory gardener; she took charge of
the cocks and hens, the turkeys
and ducks and geese—under
Miss Mildred that is to say.
Miss Mildred was the clergy-

man’s only daughter, and she

\

loved all these creatures and was never tired of watching them and

their funny ways.

Mrs. Green set her arms akimbo and stood looking at the little



ae THE LUCKY DUCKS



crowd of geese and goslings cackling and jabbering‘and stretching their
long necks.

“ They're a bit put about, miss,” she said. “We've been shutting
up some of the young ones to be fattened for market for. Michaelmas. I
thought we’d had more, but we must wait a bit. There’s only two as'll }
be ready for next market day.”

“Poor things!” said Miss Mildred. She did not like to think of
her feathered pets having to be fattened to be eaten! “1 wish,” she went
on, ‘‘ 1 wish they could all live and die peacefully like the robins and the
swallows.”

“Well, miss, ’m not so sure but what the poultry has the best of it,.
after all,” said Mrs. Green. ‘“There’s a many of the wild creatures as
starves to death in the winter—and farm-yard birds is always sure of
good food, and they knows nothing about nought else.”

“Perhaps so,” said the young lady. ‘“ But I must be quick, or I'll
be late at the school.” .

When she ‘passed back again an hour or two afterwards the
excitement had calmed down. The cocks and hens were pecking
about, the ducks enjoying themselves in the pond, the geese strolling
on the grass, or strutting up and down the little lane leading to the
fields.

Miss Mildred was away from home the next day, but the morning
after, she came out to the poultry-yard as usual.

“And how about the geese? Have they got over their



AND OTHER STORIES. 45



excitement ?” she asked. “ By the by I don’t see the grey gander, Mrs.
Cieenea. |

Mrs. Green cast a quick look at the geese.

‘“‘ Now to be sure,” she said, “it’s really vemarkable,”—“ vemarkable”
was Mrs. Green’s strongest expression—“ there he’s off again and the
goose with the other two here.”

“What in the world do you mean, Mrs. Green?” asked Miss
Mildred.

Mrs. Green nodded her head upwards and looked very mysterious.

“Just you come with me, miss,” she said, ‘‘and you'll see something
as'll really surprise you ; to think that them poor birds should. be that
feelin’-—it’s a lesson for many as calls themselves Christians, and has
precious little affection in their hearts, I take it.”

Miss Mildred followed Mrs. Green, feeling very puzzled as to what
she was going to be shown.

The gardener’s wife led the way along the little lane, then up a
sloping grassy bank, at the top of which stood a gate. It was an old
gate and not a closely barred one. Any of the inhabitants of the
poultry-yard could have easily crept through it, or with even less trouble.
—it was so very rickety—could have shoved it open with the slightest
push. But I don’t suppose the brains of ‘cocks and hens or turkeys have '
yet reached the power of understanding that gates are not intended to be
“crept through or flown over.

Not being either a hen or a duck, Mrs. Green pushed it open and

t



46 . THE LUCKY DUCKS

held it for ies Mildred to pass
through. Just inside, at the edge
of the field, was a sort of little hut,
wired across at the front.

‘Look there, miss,’ said Mrs.
Green.

Miss Mildred looked.

There were two goslings in the
“| shed—two long-legged, melancholy,
silly-looking fee ad though

there was water and food in the



inside corner, and some hay too, the

[ coslings were pressing themselves against the netting,
flapping their wings from time to time, and looking
certainly as if they were growing thinner instead of
fatter. And just outside, squeezing himself as close
as he possibly could to the wire, sat the old grey
gander, whom Mildred had missed in the poultry-yard; the three
creatures, the father outside, the two young birds in their prison—all,
so to say, huddled together, from time to time giving a faint cackle of
woe.

Mildred looked up at Mrs. Green; she almost felt as if she could
cry.

“Yes, miss, isn’t it movin’ to see? But the best of it is, that they



AND OTHER STORIES. | 47



take turns, he and the mother. They had a brood of four, you see, but
the two other young ones is smaller and poorer than these, so we chose
the best two to fatten first. And ever since—'tis the third day, to-day—
would you believe it, the old birds have taken it in turn to sit here outside

to keep the young ones company; while








the gander is here, the goose is with the
other two in the yard or about the lane,
and after. ay bit, shellco),- off = toe them
and the mother'll come here. ‘Tis as true
as true, miss. I couldn’t believe it at first.
Just you come back in an hour or two, and
youll see it’s as | say
—it’ll be the goose’s
turn then to come
and comfort the poor
things.”

She was quite
right. Two hours
later, when Mildred

came back, the mother

a

z

was at the post. -And again in the afternoon the gander took his turn.-
Miss Mildred was not satisfied till she got her father himself to come:
out and see, and the rector was nearly as much touched by the sight

as-hig daughters *. 222s CH bids ine loch b Son. oet Tae



48 THE LUCKY DUCKS



«J believe in my heart, I do,” said Mrs. Green, “that they was a
talkin’ it over and settlin’ how they should do that morning you heard
them makin’ such a clatter, miss.”

“T shouldn't wonder,’ Miss Mildred replied. Then she turned to
her father.







“Papa,”







she said, ‘“we
must let them out.
A few months later perhaps
they will not mind so much—the
goslings will be getting to be old birds

themselves by then, and quite independent. But
just now it seems too cruel.”

Her father smiled, though he sighed too a little.

“ Yes,” he said, “a few months later they will’ not mind. That is
their nature. But for the present—yes, Mrs. Green, let them out, poor
things.”

The six geese, papa, mamma and their four children passed a most

happy evening together I feel sure. And no doubt the rest of their



AND OTHER STORIES. A9

relations were exceedingly interested in cackling over the whole story,
and congratulating the two goslings on their happy release.

Miss Mildred kissed her old father even more affectionately than
usual when she said good night to him.

‘Those poor geese,” she said, “I can’t forget about them! But,

’

papa, I’m so glad to think we shall a/ways go on loving each other.’

“Yes, dear,” said he, “ always.”





50 . THE. LUCKY DUCKS





OLLY was nearly eight years old, but she had never had a really

nice doll of her own. She had had two or three, perhaps more

than two or three, va¢her nice ones; one had actually been her mother’s,
and this one of course, though no longer fresh or pretty, could not be
played with much for fear of spoiling it, as its age made it valuable.
Another had been her sister’s, and one or two had been presents to

herself, but they were not very pretty. It is more than thirty years ago



AND OTHER STORIES. 5



since Dolly was a little girl; that is a long time, is it not? Many
changes have come over many things in these thirty years—among these
there have been great ones in dolls. They are not only much cheaper
but very, very much nicer. I doubt if any of the little girls I know
nowadays would at all care for the sort of doll that Dolly thought
beautiful.

But there are always goods with bads, and unfortunately—at least it
sounds unfortunate, though perhaps it is not really so—bads with goods.
-The good in Dolly’s bad was that even an ugly doll gave her immense
pleasure. What then was her delight when her mother told her one day
that she was going to buy for, her a really beautiful doll. She had
thought about it for some time and had asked the prices in several shops
-before fixing, for Dolly’s father and mother were not very rich, and they
had several children.

Dolly's face beamed with delight when she heard the good news
She felt at first as if she could scarcely believe it.

“Oh, Mamma,” she said, “how very, very good of you. Dear
Mamma, how very happy I shall be!”

“Tt is to be for your birthday,” her mother went on; “but I thought
it was best to tell you about it, because I was not quite sure what kind of
doll you would like best.”

“T would like a wax one,” said Dolly; “1 mean if it wouldn't cost
too much.”

“No,” said her mother, “it won't cost too much. We had fixed to



52 THE LUCKY DUCKS



get a wax one.” Wax dolls in those days were the only ones at all
pretty. ‘But there are two or three kinds even of wax. There are
some that open and shut their eyes, and others a good deal larger, but
which don’t cost any more because they doz’t open and shut their eyes.
Which would you like? Then too I want to know what colour of hair
you like best—dark or light ?”

Dolly considered. It was a serious matter. She opened and shut
her own eyes once or twice and gave a little tug to her fair curls, which
hung down her back, though they were much shorter than most little
girls’ hair is worn nowadays. “4

“T think, Mamma,” she said at last, “I think I'd rather have dark
hair. Dolls’ dark hair is real-er-looking than light,” which was true, for
at that time I don’t think flaxen wigs for dolls were made of hair at all.
“ And I think, Mamma, Id rather have her littler, so long as she opens
and shuts her eyes. It will be so nice to make her shut them every
night at bed-time, for she may sleep in the cradle in our room, mayn’t
she, Mamma?” —

“ Certainly,” her mother replied ; and so it was settled.

‘A few days later a rather long narrow parcel very.catefully wrapped
‘up was brought into the.drawing-room where Dolly was sitting with’
her mother.

‘From Marshall’s, if you please, ma’am,” said the servant, ‘‘ and the
boy would be glad if you'd open it to see that it’s all right.”

Dolly’s mother took the parcel in her hands. It was brown paper



AND OTHER STORIES. ' 83



outside, and had a label marked “ With great care.” She looked at it
and then she looked at Dolly.

“ Dolly, dear,” she said, “just run away to the nursery for a minute
or two. You can come back to say good-night.”

When Dolly came back to the drawing-room there was no sign of



wi

any brown paper parcel, but her mother smiled when she kissed her in a
way that Dolly quite understood.

The next two or three days seemed very long to the little girl She
was always thinking about the new doll and she felt as if the time would
never pass till her birthday came. She was sitting one afternoon sewing
beside her mother when all of a sudden she sighed so deeply that her

mother quite started.



54 THE LUCKY DUCKS



‘“My dear Dolly,” she said, ‘what is the matter? You seem very
unhappy.”

‘“No, Mamma,” she said, “I’m not unhappy, only I am so thinking
of—you know what, Mamma.”

Mamma smiled.

“Well, dear, | am sorry if it makes you sigh. I thought it would
be a pleasure to you to know, but you. almost make me wish I had not
told you till the time. It is still nearly a fortnight off, you know, Dolly.”

‘A fortnight,” Dolly repeated. “That is two weeks. It is a good
while. But I’m not sorry you told me, Mamma. _ It zs very nice to think
of. I try to fancy it to myself. Is it in this room ?”

‘No, dear, it is in the ‘present drawer’ of my chest of drawers
The top one—you know.”

“Oh, yes—you mean the chest of drawers with white knobs. I
know,” said Dolly, but she still sighed a little.

“Dolly, dear,” said her mother, “if it would set your fancy at rest
I will show you the doll. 1 don’t at all mind doing so.”

But Dolly shook her head.

“ No, thank you,” she said. ‘J think it is babyish not to be able to
wait. But, Mamma, dear, if you would do one thing——” 7

irae

“Would you please show it to Effie ?” Effie was Dolly’s little sister.
“Show it her weé/, and then she will know it exactly and we can talk

about it together.”



AND OTHER STORIES. 55

“Very well,” her mother agreed. “Call Effie and bring her to my
room.”
Effie, who knew about the wonderful doll, came running eagerly

from the nursery. She was only five, but she was a very sensible little

girl.



The Dow

“Will you wait outside, Dolly ?” said her mother, “or will you stay
in a corner and not look?”

“T’]] stay in a corner and not look,” said Dolly.

Soon she heard exclamations of delight from Effie “ Oh, Mamma!

—how lovely —what beautiful hair!” and so on.



56 THE LUCKY DUCKS



Then Dolly heard the drawer shut again and she opened her’ eyes.
Effie ran to her.

“She is a beauty, Dolly,” said the little sister, “ I’ll tell you afl about
her.” |

“Dolly,” said her mother. “I shall not lock the drawer. You may
do as you like about looking at the doll—if it worries you to keep
fancying about her to yourself I give you leave to look at her. All the
same ’—and she hesitated..

“What, Mamma?” asked Dolly. ‘Would it be gooder not to look
at her?”

“Not exactly that. It would not be naughty when I gave you leave.
But it would perhaps be good in one way, for it would show you had
self-control, which is a very good thing.”

“T won’t look at her, Mamma,” said Dolly. “Td like you to see I
want to be that thing—self—what is it?”

“ Self-controlled,’ Mamma replied: “ Master of yourself, it means,

Dolly.”

The two little sisters talked a great deal about the doll. The next
day Effie began to be afraid she did not remember quite so well what
Miss Dolly was like, so they went together to the room where she was,
and Effie climbed on a chair, opened the drawer, and carefully lifting the
tissue paper which Mamma had laid over the doll’s face, again feasted
her eyes on the waxen features.

“Yes, Dolly,” she said, ‘‘her’s quite lubly,’ and then she went on to



AND OTHER STORIES. 57



describe the beautiful black curls, the eyes, the “ smoof white skin,” till
poor Dolly felt as if she could scarcely bear it.

“ Effie,” she said at last, “let me get up on the ee [’'m not
going to look at her—I’ve fixed 1 won't. I’m going to shut my eyes—
tight, and just feel her very softly with my fingers. Mamma said I
‘might look, but I'm not going to. J want to show Mamma I’m that long
word she said—lI can’t remember it, but I know what it means.”

Down got Effie and up climbed Dolly, her eyes firmly shut, as she
had said. Effie kept calling out directions to her.

“© Your hand is near her face now, Dolly, yes, that’s her hair—if you
feel along you'll get to her feet,” thanks to which, Dolly’s fingers had
soon travelled all over the unseen treasure. After a minute or two she
gave a deep sigh of satisfaction and clambered down, taking care not to
open her eyes till she was quite out of sight of the drawer.

“Tm so glad,” she said. “I don’t mind waiting half so much now.
Effie, will you come with me every day, and you'll tell me her, and then
rec eters

Effie had no objection—whatever Dolly proposed she always
thought quite right. For several days the two little sisters visited the
wax doll in this way, Dolly remaining firm in her resolve not to look at
her. At last one day their mother, hearing their voices, came quietly
into the room and watched what they were doing.

“1 do think, Effie,” said Dolly as she got down from the chair, “I
do think I’m learning to be that that Mamma said. Won't she be

pleased ?”



58 THE LUCKY DUCKS



Mamma came forward. ;
“My little Dolly,” she said, ‘are you thinking of what I said about
self-control? I am very glad, dear, to see you have remembered it.

But perhaps you have tried yourself







enough now—would you not like to see
the doll? I shall be quite pleased to
show her to you.”
But Dolly shook her head.
a No, thank you,” she said; “I’d
rather go on.” :
And so she did till her birthday
morning !
I think she loved her pretty
doll none the less for having been
; both a self-controlled and a patient
ee little girl. One thing I am sure
of—she took excellent care of
\— her, for J saw Miss Floribel—.
which was the doll’s name—not so very long ago, though it is more
‘than thirty years since Dolly’s eighth birthday, and—considering
Floribel’s old-fashionedness, you know, and her great age—she still

looked a most respectable person.



AND OTHER STORIES. 59



THE BAT WHO CAME TO GHURCH.

E were sitting quietly in the drawing-room one







evening last September after dinner. The

lamps were lighted, but the curtains were not

SoS

drawn nor were the windows: closed. For it
was a mild evening, and in the country where
there is no one to look in—except the birds,
who of course are all asleep. when it gets dark,
and the moon perhaps, who is too calm and
dignified to be prying and inquisitive, even though
she is rather fond of gazing—what does it matter if one forgets all
about blinds? But the moon was not there that evening, not to be
seen at least. Outside, everything looked quite dark. |
Suddenly a sort of whizzing, whirring, rustling, fluttering sound
caught our ears. Up jumped Letty, who is always delighted at an
excuse for jumping up; she does so hate sitting still. 3
‘““What’s the matter ?” said auntie.
‘A big moth, I think,” said Letty. “Oh, auntie, can it be a moth ?

Do look, what an exormons one!”



60 THE LUCKY DUCKS .



Auntie looked up at the corner of the ceiling which Letty pointed to.

‘‘A moth,” she said, ‘no, indeed, Letty, it is not a moth. It is a
bat.” .

As she said the words a scream sounded through the room which
made us all jump, one or two of us indeed, I rather fancy, screaming in
return! It was Verena—she had been sitting working by the lamp when
Letty began fussing about the moth, but when she heard auntie calmly
pronouncing it to be a bat, she altogether lost her self-control. She
hopped up on to a chair, drawing her skirts tightly round her, as if she
thought the bat was crawling on the floor, instead of flapping about the
ceiling, and stood there shrieking.

‘Oh, auntie, oh, uncle, oh, Letty, oh, Frank, oh, everybody! Do
take it away—do, do. It’s the one thing I can’t bear. I shall faint if it
comes near me.”

She did look so funny, we couldn't help laughing.

““My dear Verena,” said auntie, ‘‘do come down. You're nearer
the bat than if you stayed quietly in your chair. And there’s no fear of
its attacking your /ee¢. The only thing to take care of is your hair. It
is very disagreeable when they hook their claws in one’s hair.”

With this a fresh series of screams, and a change of programme.
Verena tumbled herself off the chair and made for the door, holding her
hands to her head. When she was safely outside she opened it again a
tiny chink and called back to say we mustn’t think her silly ; she would

come back in a minute, and help us to catch the horrible creature.



AND OTHER STORIES. 61



‘‘ Better not wait for her, I think,” said uncle. So he and I got long
sticks and climbed up on the sofa and poked and banged at the bat till
the poor thing, frightened out of its wits no doubt, at last managed to
flop itself out of the window again into
the cool dark air, which was much
more to its taste, I am quite sure,
than our brightly lighted drawing-
room. Then uncle and I shut the
windows, and we were just sitting
down to laugh again at Verena’s
terrors when the door opened and
in she came. |

She was such a figure. She
had tied a towel, or a very big
handkerchief perhaps it was, all over
her head, hiding every speck of her
hair, and on the top of that she had
placed her big plaited-fibre garden
hat, and in her hand, like the old



woman of the nursery rhyme, “she
carried a broom.” You never saw any one look so funny. She peeped
in cautiously, then seeing us all sitting there peacefully, she felt ashamed

of her cowardice I suppose, and walked in.

“T’ve got a broom,” she said valiantly. ‘“ Where is he, Frank ?”



62 THE LUCKY DUCKS

‘“Oh, my dear,” replied uncle coolly, “we didn’t wait for your
assistance. The bat has retired to his usual haunts long ago. You've
nothing to be afraid of. Sit down and go on with your work.”

ly Verena sat down, feeling
rather small. But she made no
attempt to take off her eccentric
head-dress.

“Tf you please, auntie,” she
said, ‘‘ you mustn’t mind my keep-
ing on my hat. -I can’t feel quite
sure yet that he’s really gone.”

Uncle threw himself back
in his chair and fairly roared.

“Verena,” he said, “you'll be
the death of me, you absurd child.”

_ And no doubt she did look
comical—with her evening dress
on, and her head tied up as if

she were going to take a hive



of bees at the least.
_ “Jt is such a horrible idea,” said she with a shudder.. ‘To think of
a bat in one’s hair—ugh !”
‘Who told you, auntie, that they do get into people’s hair?” asked

Letty.



AND OTHER STORIES. 63





Auntie herself gave a little shudder.

‘My dear,” she said, ‘I know it by sore experience. I shall never
forget the time that a bat got into my hair.”

We all pricked up our ears at this, Verena even forgot her own
terrors.

“ T was quite a little girl when it happened,” auntie went on. ‘It
was one fine Sunday in summer.
We. were all at church, all we
children in a row, and [| remember
it was a hot morning and I was
feeling rather sleepy. I had a
great deal of fair fluffy hair, the
kind that very quickly gets tangled,
and just as I was beginning to be
afraid .that if the sermon was

much longer I should really go



to sleep, I felt something give
aesort sof atu to my wig. 1 1 eee NG
thought at first it was. my brother Charlie who was sitting next
me, and who was very fond of playing tricks, and I turned round very
sharply, quite wide awake by now, to scold him. But no, Charlie was
sitting perfectly still, his hands before him, looking rather sleepy
himself. Then again came a sharp tug and a sort of prick seemed to

come with it.



Ga THE LUCKY DUCKS





“Charlie,” I whispered, ‘something’s pulling my hair, and pricking
me. Can it bea wasp? A wasp couldn’t pull my hair, though. What
Callies Cras

“T leant forward, and Charlie peeped behind me.

““©Qh, Mabel,’ he said, and he was so startled that he forgot to
speak very low, ‘it’s not a wasp, it’s a daz. It’s all twisted up in your
hair.’”

“Oh, auntie!” exclaimed Verena and Letty and I all together,
‘what ad you do?”

Auntie looked at me.

“Children,” she said, ‘it makes me hot to think of it even now. I
screamed! Yes, 1 really did—even though it was in church. That shows
how necessary it is to be more self-controlled than you were just now,
Verena. There was such a to-do. Everybody thought | was going to
faint or something—for no one had any idea what was the matter. And
even the clergyman stopped his sermon for half a minute. They got me
out of the pew somehow. I was still toe frightened to be ashamed.
And then there was a terrible piece of business to get the creature out of
my hair, where it had twisted itself up more and more. A good deal of
it had to be cut off, and when the bat at last got free it was still
clutching at pieces of my fair locks. I was such a little girl that people
were very kind to me and forgave the disturbance I had made, but it was
a lesson to me for the rest of my life to be self-controlled. For months

afterwards [ felt myself growing scarlet if ever I met the clergyman.”



AND OTHER STORIES. .« 65



“And yet you were only a little tiny girl, and I am fourteen past,”
said Verena. ‘Auntie, I am really ashamed of myself. Still, if you
don’t mind I’d vatéier keep my hat on till bed-time. Just for fear, you

know, the bat should be hiding somewhere still.”





66 THE LUCKY DUCKS

MR. NOBODY.

“T know a funny little man,

As quiet as a mouse,

Who does the mischief that is done
In everybody’s house.

There’s no one ever sees his face,
And yet we all agree

That every plate we break was cracked
By Mr. Nobody.”

“That rogue Nobody.”

ys EAR, dear,’ said grandmamma, as she settled herself down
comfortably in the bow-window, with all—as she thought—her
work-things about her, only to discover that her scissors, her beautifully
fine embroidery scissors, were missing; ‘‘dear, dear, who can have taken
my embroidery scissors? Lucy, do you know anything about them ?”
“No, indeed, Grandmamma, I never touched them, but I’ll look for

’

them ;” and Lucy was jumping up, when Grandmamma told her not to
disturb herself. Lucy was always good-natured, but very thoughtless.

“Your German translation will not be properly prepared if you
leave it,” Granny reminded her, as she went off herself to make inquiries
in the schoolroom next door.

Allin vain. Madge knew nothing of the scissors; Prissy thought

she had seen them, but couldn’t remember where; the two little boys



AND OTHER STORIES. 67



had their knives and indignantly repelled the idea of ever touching
scissors ; and Bertie, who was very likely to have been the culprit, had
been back at school for a fortnight. No, xodody had taken the
scissors! All the same :
{though poor Grandmamma
had to borrow a pair from
Miss Sawyer, not nearly as
fine as her own) the scissors
were found the next morning
by the housemaid in the hall,
where somebody, or, to be
more correct, z0éedy had
evidently been using them
for cutting the stalks of
some violets.

“Dear, dear,” said poor
Grandmamma again, “ Mr,
Nobody is getting worse than

ever.”



“ And, if you please,
ma’am—-—’ said the voice of Ruth, the upper housemaid, just behind her.

Grandmamma shivered. When Ruth began, “ dd, if you please,
ma’am,” she knew some misfortune was about to be announced.

“Tt’s the landing window again, ma’am—one of the coloured glass



68 THE LUCKY DUCKS



panes I’m sorry to say. Somebody must have unlatched it last night and
left it swinging, and it knocked against the stone ledge and got broken,
just the same as before.”
“ Nobody unlatched it, you should say, Ruth.” Ruth stared.
“Somebody must have done it, ma’am,’ ’ she said mesoectaulliy, I Ine
young ladies are very fond of looking out of that window of a moonlight
evening, but I’ve asked them all and nobody——"

“Of course, Ruth, I told you it was nobody,” interrupted
Grandmamma rather testily. “Well, you must send for the glazier again
—five-and-sixpence each those coloured panes cost.”

Mr. Nobody’s pranks were not over yet.

Mrs. Cook requested a private interview. One of the best china
dinner-service dishes was broken. It had been stepped upon!

“Stepped upon!” Grandmamma repeated, “and what in the world
was it doing on the floor ?” Cook shook her head.

“That's just it,” she said. “I’ve asked all round; it stands to
reason it couldn't get down on the ground by itself; Ive asked
everybody, and Sally is a very careless girl, as like as not she put it
down and forgot all about it ; but she declares she didn’t, and Jane and
Baker and little Nicholas and—” a

‘Oh, I know, zodody did it. It’s nobody's fault. I’m getting quite
out of patience with—with zodody,” said Grandmamma.

And Grandmamma was not the only sufferer. Lucy was expecting

a letter from a friend about going to a concert with her. Lucy had been



AND OTHER STORIES 69



looking forward to this for some time, and wondered why the letter had

never come. Suddenly, one morning, appears a postcard.

— —s






SS

WS q
=
~ t 1
NA ys |
nm XG: e
Z 1 R

WK

ISN

SSG

Ru |




SSS
ae |





ae

ZR 6 {I}
ZY LY pr a
Kr iy »
dA go g,'}
fi

Ay ~ 0 bil!
5 Mil

TTI

; | |
i i

BRIA EAA

| i

“So sorry and disappointed you could not come. We waited for





cas

you ‘as late as we could, but had at last to go without you,” was its

message. Lucy had hard work not to cry.



70 THE LUCKY DUCKS



“They never wrote,” she said, “to tell me the day. What can Miss
Leslie mean ?”

Grandmamma was very sorry for her.

“There must have been some mistake,” she said. “ Stay—let me
think—did I not give somebody a note for Lucy two or three mornings

ago? It was the day I made you




stay in bed for breakfast, Lucy,



el" gt
aor,



for your cold.”



No, zodody had been intrusted with any letter for Lucy.

“Nobody again,” said Grandmamma. “But—oh, yes, now I
remember. You were all running off about something or other, and
nobody offered to take it to Lucy. So I put the letter on the sideboard
—there, leaning against the punch-bowl, in a most conspicuous position.

I suppose xzobody touched it ?”



AND OTHER STORIES. it



No, nobody had done so !

All the same the letter was found, though too late now to be of any
use, in the drawer of the table in the front hall; somedody had evidently
thought the hall-table a better place for it than the sideboard, only, as

usual, that somebody proved to be nobody !

“It is really going too far,’ said Grandmamma severely. ‘ Now
y going





listen, all of you, and I shall say the same thing to the servants : the first
time another of these annoyances happens I shall not rest till I bring it
home to somebody. \ will hear no more of xodody’s doings.”

The children all looked rather frightened, so did the servants, for it

\



72 Wee LOCK" IDUTCIES



was not often Grandmamma spoke like that. And- strange to say, Mr.
Nobody must have been listening in some hidden corner too. For from
that time his tricks ceased. I don’t say that nothing was broken, or
mislaid, or meddled with, but in every case somebody owned to it, or
remembered just in time to put things right again, and as not only
somebody but everydody joined in trying to be more careful and
thoughtful and exact, the house became a very much pleasanter and more
satisfactory place than when it had been given over to the pranks of the
mischievous elf.

And one evening Grandmamma, to impress the matter more
lastingly on the children’s minds, offered a prize to the one who would
make the best guess at Mr. Nobody’s real name.

A good many different answers were given, but on the whole
Grandmamma thought little Prissy’s the best.

“He has a good many names,” Prissy had written in her folded

paper, “but the oftenest ones are ‘careless,’ or ‘meddling.’”





AND OTHER STORIES. 73

“MR. KNOW-ALL.”

HARLEY FALCONER was the most good-natured boy in the

~ world. He looked it too. His round rosy face, his bright
twinkling eyes seemed brimming over with pleasant feelings towards
everybody ; he was full of interest in other people’s affairs, a little too
full of it, perhaps, and always perfectly certain that whatever went wrong
he could put it right. I almost think that at the bottom of his heart he
had a strong belief that if he had been consulted about the arrangements
of things in general, beginning with the way the world goes round the
sun, and ending with the manner in which his sister's pet poodle was
shaved, things in general would have been very much more comfortable
for everybody concerned.

He was never at a loss, and that is saying a good deal for a boy of
eleven, surely! A good deal more than most of us who have got much
further on the journey of life, some, perhaps, who are not far from its
end, would like to say for themselves! For the older, one gets, the more
clearly one sees what quantities and quantities of blunders one has made ;
how mistaken one has been about almost everything ; how differently one

would do if one could begin all over again! And queer though it may



T4 THE LUCKY DUCKS



sound, it is when we begin to see our mistakes and blunders thus clearly,
that we are really on the first steps of the ladder of wisdom.

But Charley was by no means ready at ¢izs lesson. He was quite
sure of himself always, and about everything. I think, however, that a
few things which happened to him lately laid the seeds of his growing
wiser, and that from them he began to learn that it was posszble he might
sometimes be mistaken.

Charley was a favourite at school, perhaps more a favourite with his
companions than with his teachers. For he was so ready to help, so
sorry when any of his friends were in trouble that they forgave him even
when his “help” turned out a hindrance. But to his masters, as you can
fancy, he was rather irritating.

One day little Hubert Moore was working hard at a French lesson ;
he was eager to get it finished so that he might be able to go home in
company with Charley and one or two others, who were all to spend the
evening together at Charley’s house.

“Why, Hubert, aren’t you ready yet ?” Charley said, as he shut up
his own books. ‘ Let’s see what it is you're doing? I'll help you with
ite

“It's my French exercise,” replied Hubert dolefully. “It does take
such a time to hunt up the words.” |

“Oh, bother,” said Charley, “7 don’t need to hunt ’em up. I'll tell
you them all. Fire away. What do you want to know ?”

Hubert was doing an exercise, translating French into English.



AND OTHER STORIES. Palio

Z

~ “ Mousse,” he said. ‘“ What-does ‘ mousse’ mean, Charley ?”
_ «Mouse, of course,” said Charley briskly. ‘‘ What a goose you

are not to know that! It’s almost the same.”



“Mouse” Hubert wrote down. “And what does this mean,
‘dateau-a-vapeur, Charley ?” :

“ Oh, my goodness,” said Charley. “Why, if one didn’t £vxow that,
one could guess it. ‘Vapour bath,’ of course.”

“Vapour bath” wrote Hubert obediently. “They seem. rather



76 THE LUCKY DUCKS



funny words to put in, for they make sentences together afterwards, you
know. What could a mouse have to do with a vapour bath ?”

“Oh, it’s rubbish. Exercises are always rubbish,” said Charley.
“Tf were to make a grammar now—but I say, Hubert, do be quick!”

“T’yve only two words more,” said Hubert, “ ‘sea. J know that of myself, and ‘orvage. Oh, what does ‘ovage’
miaectiing @ ich icevaras

“Jt's a misprint,” said Charley boldly. “A misprint for ‘orange.’
There, now, write it quick, Hubert. Now we can go.”

But alas, the next day poor Hubert felt little gratitude to Charley
for his well-meant assistance. When the words Hubert had trans-
lated came to be put into the sentences that made the little story, there
was the most ridiculous jumble you ever heard. Instead of ‘“ cabin-boy,”
‘““steam-boat,’ and “storm,” poor Hubert read out gravely some
extraordinary nonsense about a mouse ina vapour bath with an orange !
The French master looked up fiercely, half inclined to think Hubert.
was mocking him, but when he saw the poor child’s bewildered face his
own softened.

“Who told you such absurdities ?” he said.

“Falconer,” Hubert replied, almost crying. “He said he knevv the. -
words.” |

And as the master ran his eyes down the list—he could not help it—
he burst into a peal of laughter.

“Upon my word, Falconer,” he exclaimed, “I congratulate you!”



AND OTHER STORIES. 77

’

Charley grew very red. He hated being laughed at. And he had
to bear a good deal of it. From this time forth at school he was
constantly asked if he had enjoyed his vapour bath that morning, ice if it

was too full of mice and oranges to be agreeable; and such like



schoolboy’s witticisms. And for a few days Charley was a “¢¢le less

ready to give his opinion. But this happy state of things did not last.
Late one evening when Charley came into the drawing-room to say

good-night, he saw his mother writing a note hurriedly at her davenport.

“Oh, Mary,” she said without looking up, “can you tell me Mrs.



48 THE LUCKY DUCKS





Franklin’s number ? I am so vexed, I had quite forgotten to tell her that
the meeting is put off to-morrow, and she will be coming to fetch me
early. There is no use looking in any directory, as she has lately
changed her house.”

“ | know,” Charley replied. ‘‘ They have gone to live in Monmouth




How did you enjoy
Your vapour bath

Charley





Crescent. I met little Franklin the other day. The number is
Sseventcen, =.

“ Are you sare, Charley ?” said his mother doubtfully.

‘ Positive,” said Charley. “I thought of something in my head to
make me remember. One and seven are eight, and Bobby Franklin is

eight, so you see, Mamma!”



AND OTHER STORIES. 19



His mother addressed the letter and it was posted. But alas, the
next morning, at the time that had been fixed, Mrs. Franklin arrived, and
not a little annoyed was she to find that at considerable inconvenience
she had come for nothing.

And a few days later the letter
turned ‘up, though too late to be of »
any use. Mrs. Franklin’s number
was “seventy-one”—seven and one ~
make eight as well as one and seven.

But a still greater misfortune was
‘caused by Charley not long after
this. His sister Mary got a present
on her birthday of a tame bullfinch.
It was a beautiful bird, and, though
quite young, already beginning to

pipe very cleverly. For the first few



days Mary fed him on canary seed,
yi )

A
wa ene Way. you've F
and he seemed to do very well on it. dS eS haenn ec aecere sare ail

Ny

But one morning her mother said to
her that she thought Bully should have some other kind of seed as well.
‘«‘T remember,” she said, ‘“‘ when we were children and had a Bully,
we used to mix the canary seed with some other, but I cannot remember
what. I shall be passing a bird-fancier’s when I am out and [| will call in

and ask.”



co : THE LUCKY DUCKS



Unluckily, when Charley came in from school, Mary told him what
their mother had said.

“Oh,” said he, ‘Mamma needn’t have bothered to go asking. J
know—it’s hemp-seed. I'll run round to the grocer’s now and get some.
I’ve got threepence.” And off he set, heedless of Mary’s “Are you
guite sure, Charley ?” ;

Their mother was kept out later than she expected and had not time
to call at the bird-fancier’s. But ‘‘ Never mind, Mamma,” said Mary,
“Charley knows about it and got some of the right kind.”

And as Bully looked quite well and piped away as usual, I suppose
no one had any misgiving.

But alas, two mornings later he was found dead in his cage!. How
Mary cried, how grieved Mamma was, how everybody wondered what
could have been the mysterious cause of his death! And how the secret
was explained when the bird-fancier whom they consulted cried out in
horror.

“Why, bless you, you've been feeding him with henp-seed |
Bullfinches can’t do with hemp-seed, it’s as bad as poison to them. You
should have mixed vage-seed with the canary-seed—never hemp.”

Charley’s face grew very red. For once he had to own himself
completely in the wrong.

‘I’m so sorry,, Mary,” he said.

“If only you hadn't been save, we'd have waited to ask somebody,”

she sobbed.



AND OTHER STORIES. 81



Charley saved up his money to buy her another Bully, which took
some self-denial on his part. But I think he gained much besides the
pleasure to Mary ; the lesson was a more lasting one this time. I ¢h7nk

“Mr. Know-all” will not for long continue to be his name.





82 THE LUCKY DUCKS





oN | AMMA,” said Barbara, ‘they say there are some gypsies on the

common. Old Lidyard told me. Mayn’t we go there for our

walk this afternoon ? I do so want to see them.”

“TJ don't,” said her sister Enid, ‘gypsies are very dangerous. You
never know what they won't do. They say in the village that they
would steal children as well as ducks and chickens if they could. If you
go to see them / won't come.” |

“Tsn’t she silly, Mamma?” said Barbara. ‘I wouldn't listen to all
the rubbish the village people talk. Things like stealing children don’t

happen nowadays.”



AND OTHER STORIES. 83



“Not very often, certainly,” said her mother. “ Still I'm afraid it’s
true that gypsies don’t deserve a very good character. But you needn't
be afraid of their trying to steal you, Enid.”

‘You're much too big and fat,” said Barbara not too politely. ‘It
wouldn't be easy to hide you in a bundle, or in a hamper of pots and
pans, would it, Mamma ?”

Mamma could not help smiling. Enid was a tall, well-grown girl of
eleven, decidedly “plump,” and certainly not fairy-like.

‘“ Never mind, Enid,” said Mamma, “it's a very delightful thing to
be strong and well. But you must be strong in your mind too and not
give way to fears and fancies. As it happens, I am going to the
common myself this morning, to take some soup and other things to a
poor little gypsy boy. I heard about him yesterday in the village from
the doctor, who had been to see him. The child has been very ill with
bronchitis, and though he is better now, he needs feeding up. They age
very quiet and decent gypsies, Dr. Green says, and he was touched by
their devotion to this child.”

The little girls listened with great interest.
“Oh, ay I go with you, Mamma?” asked Barbara.

‘« And—and I too 2” added Enid.

“Yes, certainly. You may both come. You will feel quite safe
with me, eh, Enid 2”
“Of course,” Enid replied. ‘No one could steal us when we are

-with our own Mamma.”



84 THE LUCKY DUCKS



It was a pleasant walk to the cornmon, and a pleasant place when
you got there. And the little gypsy encampment—the vans drawn to
one side, and one or two tents with real gypsy fires burning cheerily in
front of them, and the dark-haired, dark-skinned, bright-eyed figures
moving about, or sitting on the short dry turf, made up a very
picturesque scene. Enid crept a little closer to her mother when a man
came forward eagerly to receive them, calling out a few words in a
strange, unintelligible language, as he did so, to some one in one of the
vans. But the pleasant smile that lighted up his dark face when “the
lady” explained her errand, reassured the little girl. |

“Ves, lady,” he said, “the little boy is very weak still, and his
mother is weary with nursing him. But the good doctor says he is
mending. Will the good lady speak to them ?”

He led the way up the short ladder into the van; there lay a lovely
little boy of four or five, a perfect picture of delicate childish beauty.
His mother, a young and pretty woman, was half-sitting, half-lying beside
him, but started up with ready courtesy when she saw her visitors. And
her gratitude for the nice soup and other good things was very pleasant
to hear.

“The boy shall thank you himself, lady,” she said, “when he is
well again ;” and she turned to her husband and said something in the
same queer language. ‘‘ Yes,” she went on, “we will be this way in
the autumn again, and we shall not forget.”

They were to move on the next morning, in haste to get to a



AND OTHER STORIES. 85:

neighbouring fair, but the doctor had raised their spirits about the child,
and his mother appeared to have no doubt but that the lady’s gifts would
quite complete his recovery.

As the visitors left the encampment all its inhabitants came forward

with smiles and thanks, so that Barbara said it made her feel “ quite

ashamed.”



WILL THE LADY SPEAK .
To THem?

“They are nice gypsies, aren’t they, Mamma °?” she went on.
“They didn’t tease to tell our fortunes as they often do.”

d

“{ think they knew I would not like it,” her Mother replied.
“Yes, they seem decent, harmless gypsies. I suppose there are great

varieties among them.” And then she walked on for some time in

silence.



86 THE LUCKY DUCKS



“What are you thinking of, Mamma dear?” asked Enid, “you are
SO quiet.”
Mamma smiled, ‘ Was I, dear?” she said. “I was thinking of

some other gypsies I saw once, many years ago, when | was a child, or

at least a young girl. It is like a strange dream to me, but I have

never forgotten it.”



“When was it? Oh! do tell us,” said Barbara, skipping in front.

“Tt was in Normandy,” her mother replied. “We were spending
some months in a quaint, old-world sort of village, not far from the sea.
The village consisted of one long straggling street of queer old houses,
and there was a beautiful and very ancient church. Our house was just
opposite it; I remember how the bells used to clang! The whole place

looked very much as it must have looked for hundreds of years, I fancy.



AND OTHER STORIES. 87





NS
Well, one afternoon, as we were coming home from a ramble on the

shore, we noticed an unusual excitement in the village. All the people
were hurry-scurrying about, putting up their shutters and calling in the
children, locking their doors and going on as if they were preparing
for a siege.

‘“* What is the matter?’ we asked.

““
were here some years ago, and we know what they






are. We shall take precautions this time. They stole
—what did they not steal? They brought bad luck
too; they would have taken all the children if they
could, they and their bears.’

hob ealiseae

ENGST, NGOSG.
they have fierce bears
that will do anything
they) tell: thems Vou
will see—but ah, run
home, little ladies and
gentlemen, and lock
ZeN your doors and gates as
oC quick as possible.’

“We ran home and

told our mother. But.



88 THE LUCKY DUCKS



we were not so frightened as the villagers. We closed the big carriage
gates and stood behind them watching for the gypsies to pass. And soon
they came—some twenty or thirty men, women and children, some walking,
some riding their great gaunt horses on the top of the packs and bundles
with which they were loaded—where they had got those strange-looking
horses I often have wondered—some leading the bears, for they had
bears, sure enough, the clumsiest, most uncouth bears I ever saw. They
had dogs too, dogs that were more like wolves, and the people themselves
were too strange to describe. They were a sort of terra-cotta, dull red
colour; their eyes were dark and bright, and they were not so much ugly
as very strange-looking. The men were tall and lank, the women
seemed mostly small, and several were bent as if from overwork or
cacrying their children, for some had babies strapped on to their backs.
We did feel aémost frightened, I can tell you! At the end of the
procession came the biggest and gauntest of the horses, led by a poor
little thin woman, who seemed half-dead with fatigue. On the horse were
strapped two children, one with bright open eyes, though. thin and
starved-looking ; the other, a little boy of four or so, lay with closed lids,
and his dull red skin seemed almost grey. The woman was weeping.

“« Stop!’ cried my mother, in French, as they passed. The woman
looked up, but shook her head.

“« Those children are faint with hunger. 1 will give you something
for them,’ my mother went on; and she sent my brother to fetch a bowl

of nice hot soup which she knew was preparing for dinner.



AND OTHER STORIES. 89



“The poor woman looked at it with starving eyes, but mother-like
held it first to the children. One drank it eagerly and smiled with
pleasure, but the other would not open his lips or eyes; he seemed
unconscious.

“*Ts he ill?’ asked my mother. The woman shook her head; she
could understand no language we tried, and we could make out nothing
of hers, except one word which sounded like ‘ Toorki,’ and as she waved:
her hands to show they had come from a great distance we thought she
must mean ‘Turkey.’ But her eyes and face were easy to understand.
She seized mother’s dress and kissed it, while the tears ran down her
face, and we could hardly help crying too, when mother gave her a little
money. Then the men in front shouted to her to come on, and the sad
little group moved out of our sight. They camped one night outside the
village, but then travelled on again, poor, homeless wanderers.”

“And did the little boy get better ?” asked Barbara.

“T do not know, I hope so,” said her mother, ‘but we never heard.
No one scemed to know who the people were exactly, but gypsies like
them are now and then seen in France, and are supposed to come from
Greece and Turkey. But what has always struck me was the
mother-love of the poor woman and her touching gratitude.”

“Yes,” said the little girls, as each clasped one of ¢hezr mother’s
arms. ‘Mothers are always kind, aren’t they, Mamma? But we are

very glad we're not gypsies, Mamma.”



go THE LUCKY DUCKS



IDAINIDIY'S IRs VOL,

3 WORM will turn,” said Dandy to himself, as he walked back to

the hearthrug very crossly. A bright fire was burning in the
grate; it was October now, and the mornings and evenings were chilly,
and the rug was very comfortable, and Dandy loved comfort. I don’t
see that he had really much to complain of. It was all because his little
mistress, Marie, would not take him out for a walk this afternoon, as he
had expected.

There were two or three reasons for this, as Marie had kindly and
patiently explained to him. One was that Dandy had had a slight cold
for some days; he had coughed a little and sneezed a good deal, and one
day he had not been able to eat his dinner, which did look as if things
were pretty bad. And as it was past four o’clock and the sun had gone
in, Marie thought it best to leave him at home. Then again, she and
her sister were obliged to pass through Farmer Burke’s fields, and there
were some cows there who sad been known to object to little dogs
snapping at their heels.

“So, Dandy dear,” Marie concluded, “ though you have always been
the most obedient of darlings, cows are rather stupid creatures, you
know. They mgfz mistake you for one of those naughty wild little dogs
who behave so badly. And zf you got a kick, how dreadful it would be!
What would your poor little ‘ missus’ do if you were hurt, dear Dandy ?”

“Rubbish,” said Dandy. It only sounded to Marie like a sort of



AND OTHER STORIES. gu



_cross little grunt, but still she saw that he was not pleased, as he
struggled off her knee and marched back to the fireplace.

“Dear little fellow! he is so affectionate,” she said to Etty, who was
not quite so blindly partial as Marie. “Stay by the fire comfortably,
Dandy dear. We won't be very long,” she called back as she shut the door.

Dandy stayed by the fire, not out of obedience, but because it was
the most agreeable place in the room: but in his heart were some very
naughty feelings.

“ A worm will turn,” he repeated to himself, for he was rather quick

at catching up smart sayings. ‘“ Does the child think







I’m to be tied to her apron-strings all my life ?.
1 don’t say so much against it in town, where
there are many dangers from dog-stealers
and omnibuses, nor when I was a
puppy and knew no better. But
nowadays—now that I am quite
grown-upand experienced—”
and here Dandy gave
himself a shake of self-

CARAS Ps importance, and then
ee _e | Sg eee stretched himself com-
placently; Ss; ity wise too
absurd. I am_ getting

DO ee Relbiek gaid Dandy | sickâ„¢: of y this, lapdog:

\



92 LET ORV AMD OT CKES



existence ; a little excitement, some hunting perhaps, or even a frolic in
a farm-yard would be a pleasant variety. No, no! my dear mistress,
you cannot expect me to be always ‘the most obedient of darlings.’
I must seize my opportunity and without delay, for I hear we are leaving
the country the day after to-morrow.”

And Dandy gave a half-playful snap at a fly that had settled on his
nose, as much as to say, ‘I could catch it if I chose,” then stretched him-
self again and settled down on the hearthrug to think over the matter.

The next day was bright and yet mild, “quite spring-like,” though
late autumn, everybody said. And determined to profit by this pleasant
weather on the last day of their time in the country) Marie and Etty set
off for a walk to say good-bye to some friends a mile or two away.

They went by the road, Dandy meekly following. He looked indeed
so very meek, that as they turned to come home Marie and Etty hesitated.

“ Mightwt we go across the fields?” said Etty. “It would be so
lovely by the brook; we could just skirt the farm-yard over the little
bridge where the turkeys are.” |

She did not see that Dandy had drawn near, and was listening
attentively.

“There are no cows that way,” said Marie consideringly. ‘Yes, I
think we may go by the fields.” }

They crossed the bridge, and made their way quickly along the pretty.
field ; the sun was shining brightly, and all seemed peaceful and charming:

“How sorry we shall be to find ourselves in town again,” said



AND OTHER STORIES. 93





Marie ; “it zs so pleas ’ but a sudden noise some way behind them
made her stop short. It came from the turkeys’ corner.
‘‘Gobble-wobble, goéé/e-gobble-wobble. Wobble-wobble-eoh!” with
a sort of shriek.
a Dear, dear! what’s the matter with the creatures ?” exclaimed Etty,

as turkey after turkey flew over the low wall at the edge of the field in



affright, gobble-wobbling most piteously, all save an old turkey-cock who
stood bravely puffing himself out as if preparing to face the enemy. “Oh,
dear! what zs the matter? And where, oh ! where is Dandy ?”

Where indeed but chasing the turkeys! There he was, after them
in hot pursuit, his little curly, silky, fluffy body quivering with excitement

and delight.
“The turkey-cock will kill him. Oh! Etty, the naughty, naughty



94 : THE LUCKY DUCKS



darling!” And off she flew, valiantly braving the irate turkey patriarch,
who was so amazed that he too took flight as Marie, by a clever dodge,
came round upon Dandy from the other side and captured him. Panting
and breathless, but triumphant, she came up to Etty.

“Just fancy Dandy doing such a thing!” she exclaimed. “ He
might have been killed.”

“ Or he might ave killed one of the little ones, and we’d. have had
to pay for it,” said Etty practically.

“T must carry him till we’re quite out of sight of the turkeys,” said
Marie ; and so she did, though her arms ached long before she thought it
safe to put him down. They were then passing through a long sloping
field at one end of which was the entrance to their own grounds. There
was a solitary cottage on the slope: Marie did not know, and could not
see, that behind the cottage a flock of geese was quietly feeding, having
strayed on to higher ground from the banks of the little brook. But
Dandy knew, Dandy saw; and no sooner was he on his own feet again
than off he set. He had tasted blood !

“Cackle, cackle, guackle, cackle, cackle!” shrieked the geese.

“Dandy, Dandy, zaughty Dandy!” screamed the girls, as they
rushed after him in terror. This time it was Etty who captured him, and
brought him back struggling and impenitent to his mistress. Marie was
by this time nearly in tears.

“Oh, Dandy, what has changed you so?” she said. ‘I wzzs¢ punish

you—yes, Dandy, I must. And I must carry him all the way home to



AND OTHER STORIES. 95

our own gate,” she went on, “and he is so heavy and hot, and J must
hold him so tight.”

The field was a very long one, fully a quarter of a mile from the
cottage and the geese to the turnstile gate, which was a side entrance to
the garden. Marie bravely carried her dog till they had mounted the
step or two to the gate and were on the path.

‘“There, naughty dog, go home!” she said, as she put him down

with a sigh of relief. “ What a time you have given us!”



Dandy glanced at her, then, terrible to relate, deliberately turned, darted

through the gate, and before the girls could realize the fact, was careering
across the field again in full flight, making straight for the unfortunate geese |

Oh, how Marie shouted—coaxing, scolding, entreating, threatening
—allin vain! Oh, how Dandy dashed along! In less than a moment
he seemed nothing but a small ball of cream-coloured cotton-wool rolling
across the grass; and the sun was in poor Marie's eyes, and she was so

desperately hot, and so breathless and exhausted, that she almost felt she



96 THE LUCKY DUCKS.



must leave dog and geese to their fate. How she got to them at last she
never knew, she found herself lying on the top of a confused heap of
struggling white wings and fuzzy hair, clutching at the latter in a sort of
despair, while the cackling and squealing were enough to deafen one. At
last to her relief Etty came up, and between them they got naughty
Dandy away, none the worse, but sulky in the extreme.

“If the old woman in the cottage sees him, I don’t know what ‘shell
say,” said Marie. But perhaps she was out, or perhaps she was asleep—

any way, the geese stalked off indignantly, but with no broken legs or



wings, and gradually cackled
themselves into quiet again. —

Dandy was shut up, and had
very plain food zzdeed to eat for
some days. And it is very doubt-
ful if Marie and Etty will bring
him into the country again next
| year. That is all he has gained
: by his revolt. But when Marie
talks of it seriously to him, as
‘she does now and then, I must
confess as he looks up at. her
with his bright eyes, through
the shaggy hair overhanging

y

‘them, he does seem sorry.







Let us hope he is so.







0
S
A
ow
My
Cy.









Full Text


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27f2800be8032cbf01078ebb8b20049c
5e209af5d59bc3b0b32b53b969200aa7b2e01f42
'2011-12-28T23:42:50-05:00'
describe
'4480' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALSR' 'sip-files00007.pro'
3be1f408235798c34b74f8bbd97dca9d
a0472e6f52e9b77f5f8e51f63ae20325bb334d18
'2011-12-28T23:47:14-05:00'
describe
'18311' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALSS' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
1dc3166bd7fca4fff3a9a5d2a6beaadc
1f9542f5287995c841357a704914c93c478e66e1
'2011-12-28T23:45:03-05:00'
describe
'14309124' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALST' 'sip-files00007.tif'
8df39a1dc5fec58e409c52fdecb9c0b7
b2c175d1553ecb6f6feadba33800012aaa3a7d3f
'2011-12-28T23:44:26-05:00'
describe
'216' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALSU' 'sip-files00007.txt'
ef8f761ce52e55df3e4d599fd91fc837
554c483439ed6a21be7ce1cf97bdf5b5d5842cc9
'2011-12-28T23:46:22-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'5494' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALSV' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
70ed24aa9d13e025c7f4a75da4d771c8
95b1b25d2a42041aa3698f529222f287093ed5d2
'2011-12-28T23:46:56-05:00'
describe
'595452' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALSW' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
6f4bce1ed05d56b607bfb033bd9d49e5
d4255348ef1f3fcd1bfaefde11514aed3eca857d
'2011-12-28T23:43:05-05:00'
describe
'9539' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALSX' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
d1088ffa4ff9319a48b5151ae4520977
0053557f85df15c2791637a2a2c396fb26cd8a69
'2011-12-28T23:45:35-05:00'
describe
'2112' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALSY' 'sip-files00008.pro'
6c12fb34063a49d726030777fae778c3
d7e6bd44c3c22a311b410707fe4ac61c33abb698
'2011-12-28T23:44:39-05:00'
describe
'2775' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALSZ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
2eae06ce4be1faac9233c1921dcf924a
d5141626fc190612b4a3131b64eba88b453faa63
'2011-12-28T23:45:40-05:00'
describe
'4781420' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTA' 'sip-files00008.tif'
d0d8dd89b9df64bb1370f8004fa76767
251351b3f2a9ad92cefdd507f3b342eb66dffa12
'2011-12-28T23:44:43-05:00'
describe
'222' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTB' 'sip-files00008.txt'
98561a3a08ff8fd2b0b2fb8f34a1783e
ea72656fd67ecbd8c05e96d22923ef174d7687e9
'2011-12-28T23:45:11-05:00'
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTC' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
840210171077666daaa77c4847940e69
bc70b4f249a5925f5075d4dfcc991fc73a8c0e05
'2011-12-28T23:43:41-05:00'
describe
'595854' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTD' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
aaa487f62543085b6374d5aa8757e688
99f272f18ff77aedf300759fa8995666a15104ab
'2011-12-28T23:46:28-05:00'
describe
'25624' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTE' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
afedf1c8602f269e5c4b4a3def0ffe87
b7883b65a75bcc465d77b4eccd36ba67f3d91e4e
'2011-12-28T23:44:24-05:00'
describe
'10827' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTF' 'sip-files00009.pro'
1e759ddeb09ac3da69f8ece18143efcd
49a18c1bdb332a51c38367f878392e0475f99253
'2011-12-28T23:44:04-05:00'
describe
'9072' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTG' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
25755899a28f52653e563a0a0eb0b607
2d11459bd9e6ae425be93a0b33b8ab479a9fefa8
'2011-12-28T23:43:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTH' 'sip-files00009.tif'
79498590f4d402fad15d391f771762da
5e5b3838da48d56cae46d093549471b281f605e8
'2011-12-28T23:43:10-05:00'
describe
'617' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTI' 'sip-files00009.txt'
595eb6ee4aaa1c08bfe1b8b96d91ec95
33a81dc3cc5a6c7bc912829de45e72c5da329b04
'2011-12-28T23:42:43-05:00'
describe
'2732' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTJ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
2b45e9ee0d469046fd6cef7e95a02bb6
c3b752ea029c2312172d414fa9efa28061def47a
'2011-12-28T23:43:52-05:00'
describe
'595878' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTK' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
71eedc23c291ab30eeeca833aad7302e
91ddfefa87aa37526a59c72213d1b620a1d5bdb3
'2011-12-28T23:46:06-05:00'
describe
'99643' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTL' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
b98830743820f7b46ba18e888791226a
8f02702db688798ef39d79df07ccea61923a4d17
'2011-12-28T23:42:49-05:00'
describe
'25446' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTM' 'sip-files00011.pro'
a67d42c1645685fea664adc8c5607561
7ac4d0a2609fd3feb7d53200c32ad1d38cfc22d0
'2011-12-28T23:44:21-05:00'
describe
'27978' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTN' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
ec3904b5fae872f64de269e261296543
8a52559ba31764bc1d2162aba4fb920890c4bdd6
'2011-12-28T23:43:44-05:00'
describe
'14316748' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTO' 'sip-files00011.tif'
48b6c37ee6cdfe883aa5631d1635f04d
8af6660448bc224223476f5249cc81ad0918a827
'2011-12-28T23:46:53-05:00'
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTP' 'sip-files00011.txt'
091630880fad722a2a443e63069543d4
ea9aeb727faac64c165ba6eb7aeecdd8afa98008
'2011-12-28T23:42:55-05:00'
describe
'7373' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTQ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
324cd61988956241084e80714990799b
dad91375f62d12b7d9014c029ea78370f2c106f3
'2011-12-28T23:45:30-05:00'
describe
'595570' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTR' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
b003c2820b98f28d7cf435fe3cd03dd1
c991a10ed9053acc2b102996e196548136363aca
'2011-12-28T23:44:57-05:00'
describe
'94757' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTS' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
03f67d7dc382cd6be2b87d2dc5dbebe4
94d8ec96cbeec8a13b2afb7a5f7e31a6819f54cc
'2011-12-28T23:47:26-05:00'
describe
'40151' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTT' 'sip-files00012.pro'
3bc411afb190bf8e589aa575649a6dbc
5b013672f3138ef10f2297e5bb974b421064608c
'2011-12-28T23:44:10-05:00'
describe
'29160' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTU' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
749d34d76944bb780c67c6ffd62c21ce
92d1ebdd6c9e711b501f782d24f0c2be78af5f4d
'2011-12-28T23:46:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTV' 'sip-files00012.tif'
e7f219e9f1f444415b3dbc39ef4dffd2
3b289655b194608c445bdf34df36e98762a776f6
'2011-12-28T23:44:12-05:00'
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTW' 'sip-files00012.txt'
395a39769eda0ef486f265f3d608fe0f
32272185d9e1ea79f17b15c4d7f89cc5bfed07de
'2011-12-28T23:45:02-05:00'
describe
'7648' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTX' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
c55e5597281fde9ec76b8675d7c6b616
b08af44b03f41c5b6649bd42bde2fe024c2a6386
'2011-12-28T23:42:58-05:00'
describe
'595569' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTY' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
785bb70335b107a2378a58ce18e7b996
214867efb0117c61a56c8d0f7e20681041de5f7f
'2011-12-28T23:43:12-05:00'
describe
'72888' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALTZ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
acceaf1b9711e1654d183995dcd073b6
c5a31df4c16a2a6f088472dbaaedadf7912c8192
'2011-12-28T23:43:04-05:00'
describe
'16490' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUA' 'sip-files00013.pro'
bf7815677294ca2d02f607eb9d5bf446
546cc0d50f03fe88bf9e66dda7f0343579682155
'2011-12-28T23:42:30-05:00'
describe
'21108' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUB' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
0eedb943add01f0a13d8e56cf9fea7ca
ddff3a15048ed2e9d6cbb049f9c9ad90e9bcd321
'2011-12-28T23:45:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUC' 'sip-files00013.tif'
cf80b039f2c95de7c7f7004e6ee4e454
140a9be5c98572e6b23ee65110bef12c03b1cb34
'2011-12-28T23:46:24-05:00'
describe
'758' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUD' 'sip-files00013.txt'
7e1c2c752d4f1286b97ab53958fa472c
8181be12e3935a9b01aa404f030000f1d75e7ad5
'2011-12-28T23:42:36-05:00'
describe
'5728' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUE' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
7192ccf95f08103cb953428db7ea14b9
c76f1fc7830ba06a707dbf26e7fa83e4aef69a41
describe
'595561' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUF' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
5a84bc56292b25de5c6b316f530aebcd
0243dd471300d01083292ed1072105fb2666693b
'2011-12-28T23:45:32-05:00'
describe
'83392' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUG' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
138494c01e9986a0985d1163c13e4136
7d2facc441c57916aeca73e682ca22896a24478d
'2011-12-28T23:42:42-05:00'
describe
'36665' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUH' 'sip-files00014.pro'
ed321f9f1b7027864dd21bb3c84c269b
f7085db094796aec32d902ae856f5b57c1c085fd
'2011-12-28T23:46:12-05:00'
describe
'27225' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUI' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
1fd601a0810eb84666aa60d30fc261a5
1b4e13df013ba98db88d427dc28fc5665f818bd4
'2011-12-28T23:46:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUJ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
bd30f5d875fd5f7c0dc697d9c47e090f
82ba9421f224dfb21a22adf869a4dba9f01ee81d
'2011-12-28T23:45:23-05:00'
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUK' 'sip-files00014.txt'
292507749680abc893cc797164943d7a
341b2b3e84e8976fd73e203a9ed69cf1b39df93a
describe
'6859' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUL' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
324abedc6617762b1d544d39da9dc97b
b0b62fbc6954ce37c3d04b24bd8fbce07d4922ac
'2011-12-28T23:45:53-05:00'
describe
'595858' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUM' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
c298abf41d5bfbd2cf7fa3cbeb8b36b1
0f8b8da37fe640344a16768635073525ccf62b30
'2011-12-28T23:44:56-05:00'
describe
'105061' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUN' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
3f99ff9c9a1dd650ca0034d39899ef77
d0dd49403df6497e0f53159dc78a994874b9b253
'2011-12-28T23:44:51-05:00'
describe
'23528' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUO' 'sip-files00015.pro'
18fe84254cc61b2580744df2540ccb18
0cc4eb196b3c5820c42e3b59e6827f947c59a8bc
'2011-12-28T23:46:18-05:00'
describe
'29170' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUP' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
c01818b6d9b936e0c6208320a0e6436c
9b983fd985900e9055171a9fbe5249ed6b873482
'2011-12-28T23:45:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUQ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
d766ba2cd80a20dc28ead1c0e4496157
25cd3deb5f5d6997ba76510dda4bba9ca49e6381
'2011-12-28T23:45:04-05:00'
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUR' 'sip-files00015.txt'
49671501cd978d7411900e482566cd1e
d2b171fb59ba97f19df131698815ce2f5fb28109
'2011-12-28T23:46:55-05:00'
describe
'7586' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUS' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
6d571cf98859b28e004176be8db49fad
073c32865f6ca4e3a9e22667aa8bd998035551aa
'2011-12-28T23:45:09-05:00'
describe
'595571' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUT' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
9fee1df25e54fad5e45bc58e6e78a407
126ed2e2d56f4f21eb4138d1ec361ba3c77e77b8
'2011-12-28T23:44:18-05:00'
describe
'94940' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUU' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
6f3dada4f1d0f410df5da349ea0e3b84
e5f6f66e77f53bd51e85fcba56d76796580f86f5
'2011-12-28T23:42:52-05:00'
describe
'19519' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUV' 'sip-files00016.pro'
d69a09ec7caf22a7856b31ffea48693b
59661ec4f74617e8f6052e08524719c1954d22e2
'2011-12-28T23:44:52-05:00'
describe
'28029' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUW' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
99bdfc300fc75e4f4db6e31d147879cc
50416b82bff4ea0cb0c0e2ecca6563cd35ddfa0f
'2011-12-28T23:44:44-05:00'
describe
'4781416' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUX' 'sip-files00016.tif'
5ffe2d199ecb6b707d2d74c9252ff80d
daeb0157f0ca0eb5513865862c7e5edb8e38cb63
'2011-12-28T23:43:09-05:00'
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUY' 'sip-files00016.txt'
feea2d6560760814ce9efbb24c82d8e8
abc724f293a99ceeafc91f819f59f1fe3f0235f9
'2011-12-28T23:43:22-05:00'
describe
'7462' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALUZ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
d38d2f69f350e65c8a45d703785c475f
d1d491ea17d41314a58b833d02f69842e3f29250
'2011-12-28T23:45:59-05:00'
describe
'595527' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVA' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
bd9358322a6784b1611d627f00cd48f4
e38a3cb577999c050467e5f5a0e7d77d490dcf53
'2011-12-28T23:45:43-05:00'
describe
'52616' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVB' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
9ba8affa0839e741c517a6c44e32e111
6c1457ae935ff8b3ebec39383c88ace7a0faf56b
describe
'19706' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVC' 'sip-files00017.pro'
d03e1db095904902ca38a8a35d4205e3
d54baa64596ad477225c7d02a688a222e825c341
'2011-12-28T23:45:08-05:00'
describe
'16196' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVD' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
0e5b709e084f6b6f540b5d1fd6541a93
b0a233be710d30e862926f9491ddb6f2348c026b
'2011-12-28T23:47:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVE' 'sip-files00017.tif'
7567d6f83d17109c2f1e8a10fe70548d
550377956f1b02867707f3df157ee3bd420692b4
'2011-12-28T23:46:37-05:00'
describe
'824' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVF' 'sip-files00017.txt'
f8f285bac7b2289e5bf8abf339f4851c
72d99e3c80ba876e82f6169808da98670ee88802
'2011-12-28T23:45:42-05:00'
describe
'4324' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVG' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
ba09eb3d2b6e22f8064503899fb03383
fee863b83d8bcd2bccdd722a4727e5e3c91c0ead
'2011-12-28T23:45:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVH' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
eb833ac76675a7c3bcf31068cb299009
2a6b36bab0de2fc3691e7851b5e7f4fb5251a38d
'2011-12-28T23:45:45-05:00'
describe
'99406' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVI' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
e2f04457e9a19f55093e104ec8c623ed
cf35338363cb4bdff56a39ba262e81c2efb980c9
describe
'27427' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVJ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
0e47d0e346c7de7a7f6ebb9ccff37b25
3b2aed199ff3eb276b05fe6d903db77983255386
'2011-12-28T23:44:38-05:00'
describe
'28254' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVK' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
a847a877c34c5db8e1deeb8ebf3f6a6c
788c3b0f03baf35c88da07e94acc68cc013af5a5
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVL' 'sip-files00018.tif'
686b0356c1bf80c9959edf50344dcc38
2e923a59b0958f835737d4e614edcab48e2226ea
'2011-12-28T23:47:21-05:00'
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVM' 'sip-files00018.txt'
a78e2eb86fc33d2b1a79e17941e5dc18
6c14868d1c24b587b3143745dacfc4c737ab5a99
describe
'7198' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVN' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
f64b10ad353443794721086836ae102e
c7c69d2240b8501dd10dd960d769b031f0ec4bc6
'2011-12-28T23:44:31-05:00'
describe
'595873' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVO' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
e17dedb20e578141551305aa3d49c3a6
e34de6e5611ea21db71c3e8f9965ccc1acf2b66d
'2011-12-28T23:46:30-05:00'
describe
'80419' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVP' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
b7727cdc92e3a735ab6e0733ade8a9e6
05c0c69d21859f6ba551d473c198a9c0b46b0867
describe
'11915' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVQ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
cd20bab6888e5df163ba22ad90c70318
7f274ae3b015970630392a178d0bac6054c85f99
describe
'21589' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVR' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
fd0453bfb22560b6819f70d5269e7988
d30e58207faf59d45f0a24116db7bc47ecb0bde4
'2011-12-28T23:44:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVS' 'sip-files00019.tif'
5462c563488251ec9aeb0447eac56482
65285a0466f904785bee08490a2879f957325a69
'2011-12-28T23:44:09-05:00'
describe
'549' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVT' 'sip-files00019.txt'
d3096f1308b4ca80d7f7d1d0bbd8d94f
0c4158106eb4adb1b8a8091531fde55a1e3eb3b0
'2011-12-28T23:46:20-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'5698' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVU' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
fff9788cf8fa8df8ac7ae861cd25e24f
c66dca0844cef0a745fc666b8c05feb11405972d
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVV' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
1b6822e1e19567ec585559f521d6cdef
5abf2de36f9330439ca89b4e47bef938b824011b
'2011-12-28T23:47:15-05:00'
describe
'94377' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVW' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
37c1f84465e07cfedb426bf8249b8e4e
69234fa6d8cd40c032eed8af9ac219bdff2f9944
'2011-12-28T23:46:10-05:00'
describe
'39092' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVX' 'sip-files00020.pro'
dfdcf6ff8cc2b474f6d538230c091641
bec1036e701e4aea10d1dfbaa24b1cc8332c0732
'2011-12-28T23:44:53-05:00'
describe
'30764' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVY' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
4b1cac30c4351f59122e6fc4af72d948
bffcb9154ab74c3867169c5abb413ade08a47469
'2011-12-28T23:45:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALVZ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
c5c107de2254c3076ffb34e1ebcd69e1
75c9cc6de6f80312bfec25edda7270fcf24826af
'2011-12-28T23:43:43-05:00'
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWA' 'sip-files00020.txt'
0c0042f2d523dbe7b5d35799a47d44d5
cc89cb775bf2e0478f4e7f53f234aaa0d99f07ab
'2011-12-28T23:45:20-05:00'
describe
'7962' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWB' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
008a7a9e941a6975ba7387f9fc9ec9f8
ea697ce22d0df4cb7188104edb9c12037723e374
'2011-12-28T23:47:16-05:00'
describe
'595573' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWC' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
9ae3bbecae3ba355c4e18ab60747ea52
14042d5d2bc8ea9ca1f0384d4a21fbb4ca0bfff1
describe
'73254' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWD' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
e68ad598ab1b973ece35d79466f04aef
3ab22de7dc1259d00f92d35a63d8f609f3f0824a
'2011-12-28T23:43:26-05:00'
describe
'19350' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWE' 'sip-files00021.pro'
09f5b2d1c7ded61db197e17dbde454a1
ff7152c98c2603f85fb3076e68ffdbd959f0bf20
describe
'22189' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWF' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
0013ebbe7ce1da5a24ba440fa791fb95
f62c536c2e6dac98b0caa353d2e252be22b616b8
'2011-12-28T23:43:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWG' 'sip-files00021.tif'
4e622b2b1768ccf6671f7144d7abe34e
ad50c8cfae2e75a8740a7775ee146924688ab049
'2011-12-28T23:43:36-05:00'
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWH' 'sip-files00021.txt'
8e02e0e5226c5aeeb5435bd7f1830f31
0b42fa9cc9175a674d707e7f463c6e5f5cc57c03
'2011-12-28T23:47:27-05:00'
describe
'5775' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWI' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
68f285df57e0ba1dd01c3124b8566a2d
8ac35476387594c54c76ea6ee3ccb0304a0e6b07
describe
'595574' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWJ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
3b048b0e9aaee71a570f7eb11f3c8aa9
bffe5656abf62ca272f31e7ea43c7eeb6647513b
'2011-12-28T23:45:26-05:00'
describe
'106181' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWK' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
30e8f08ca31b3445e0c6e345e501f576
823228d66bea5cb88d60561e6a1d66dc78f726e7
'2011-12-28T23:43:18-05:00'
describe
'30099' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWL' 'sip-files00022.pro'
4c01a4842ee2a8f92005031a8824df8a
f05cd961eae8b3b0c488bff6c7853c8e826f5c2a
'2011-12-28T23:43:25-05:00'
describe
'29861' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWM' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
2cb9326c2a0686cd62c479f165f8a11f
6201c3fc5854db5c34d341224a3ca963683414c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWN' 'sip-files00022.tif'
12a2f4b0384f12741827b55d3399d395
f9763968e5de98d324f8cf8cfecc34914cc11124
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWO' 'sip-files00022.txt'
08638be27dbaccbb47ae0e980ba9c628
44d392ae8e5f53f41227382daf23dfba6af76d55
'2011-12-28T23:45:36-05:00'
describe
'8137' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWP' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
6a40777bb802453d955c8d3fd4ffc23d
72b5d00c54da121d462709795febfdeba55c3b82
describe
'595807' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWQ' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
8c550612affc905fbce8481eb1129ec3
18de8957fdb4bcd081e41743d98d5fd74855a648
'2011-12-28T23:43:06-05:00'
describe
'106241' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWR' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
23872e7cc9be57bf1656e9cb71d6ee43
8cefc8deb7f9646ac819b4ec77cc856e46af153b
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWS' 'sip-files00023.pro'
022afe03f025e3792b2489d14a9bbe9e
141e60b886861b8627b1c9fe793e4f899df2cf07
'2011-12-28T23:44:36-05:00'
describe
'30047' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWT' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
fe94974be2d2bb656b3cd94dc92691d7
ed881fde016613a0b313b8cd6a828526fb43c29e
'2011-12-28T23:46:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWU' 'sip-files00023.tif'
9f794a558a4ec0dc1d2816fe6c941fcd
4d5d77c55615ac2f3a55b9445052b520d69cf33b
'2011-12-28T23:46:58-05:00'
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWV' 'sip-files00023.txt'
0b01af69c2598745aa191bd75a857229
4c39be2cfe925b71d67719ef20937af497809a0a
'2011-12-28T23:46:59-05:00'
describe
'8042' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWW' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
55263f5ceefc450e1810f8f3ac3ca615
67568a87b60ab35e7caf4ef2269e530030717c74
'2011-12-28T23:44:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWX' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
807830d5ad4325ba7abe2f263f56e09b
d8147861ed63e5e78410584fc6e35222d73fd171
describe
'62440' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWY' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
96766a1ce82832432d2c035e6a64c4b3
bab6e4d836e035aac166829afe251246abab309b
describe
'24287' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALWZ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
c6622bc7eea39e455f65a7473913ee32
996a52e94e65a8d9bd41ebb5174c46f66ffe8668
describe
'20059' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXA' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
1ba543282fc4fa08e06a5f4686dc4a33
d7cde4fe91a52d18763d151a346d9ad1c401262a
describe
'4781412' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXB' 'sip-files00024.tif'
f079918f5d5821fe792c988a34ff676c
402389dfad4619059bc3a4c51e15c4a08b9fa8d1
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXC' 'sip-files00024.txt'
3f1901a040723c0ec4b2162eb12d4eb4
60df40c126b3ec80434c7087ac15831018b80985
describe
'5335' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXD' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
c8cd121719a4585dd832bc44df97f3b9
994fe692a7d2a7caddb4bbb4d4c50daffb998f53
'2011-12-28T23:43:34-05:00'
describe
'595889' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXE' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
8fcca2d6e87e10ef4f6c5442223e8bce
4e1cb61a180350aa0b5be95faf951ce62e56ac5e
'2011-12-28T23:43:21-05:00'
describe
'83618' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXF' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
5377d3d639c6cf756fb966bde01b3869
5d74b663886a24ffa9786e0d41cb1793b54be6db
describe
'35393' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXG' 'sip-files00025.pro'
5602424abf5139d848b960acdfdc4ccc
4453260e9d175326d4bceb629d894ae39e0b59a1
describe
'26447' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXH' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
76a9636e32d444de24553805d03e6c8c
19178cccd70ac09a3e974fcca6c3b71281e12863
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXI' 'sip-files00025.tif'
2a3d869d5279377459b742fa5164c85c
1cc9b6eefcdd3f1c2e5236c6d8fe9e2211dd7cd0
'2011-12-28T23:42:44-05:00'
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXJ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
578c521d2b3bcf728b2466cf024c4690
63f8b9e8182d10b340e1f28b14604fb61fe3bd2f
describe
'6395' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXK' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
29fa4c4ea495f8007dbef6c92a846585
c58fb106934cdbd879bf7fbd9ded8007d1ada436
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXL' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
ec27506c1b4a78b8e1e22cfe4af47c8e
3a515a298e30e59be10d8ca6b9b135735911e6ab
describe
'113004' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXM' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
8c8afe89316b9f0ea5beda359e32dae9
483a68bc45a6762bdc93f411c59ffba4e7f0da51
'2011-12-28T23:46:16-05:00'
describe
'31475' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXN' 'sip-files00026.pro'
76d4aebb03721b24ed54691579bda2be
6149cb8f7e2f050bb3aca8696e58621df05f4a83
'2011-12-28T23:46:07-05:00'
describe
'31660' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXO' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
df60caa3780551516dbbf621986cb322
234e6949720d63208df3a9027cdd272046e123a9
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXP' 'sip-files00026.tif'
fe907f5e9359e16f24014ae1072ef475
4d37aefa73488fcbbe42d22b648f6943a29a1d1d
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXQ' 'sip-files00026.txt'
5d3cce325a0f062f2c9678fda8f2a020
ac019d225eef6b45f14a27ebe955d9a122fa277d
'2011-12-28T23:42:41-05:00'
describe
'8216' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXR' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
873b5af2c6ae07c6813a61b824e9793c
825031e9eaecb39825cc370182eb60f45cd69ab0
'2011-12-28T23:46:41-05:00'
describe
'595877' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXS' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
e9299097d58f558fc98797b6553e00da
2c9b1cc188522693840ffa690216b0af4f2071dc
'2011-12-28T23:42:53-05:00'
describe
'85490' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXT' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
a1ab2816fdaa55fc7d98810f7335ad85
4e3fd101baf7865f3ecb81f4a58a6a76465a7aba
describe
'37187' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXU' 'sip-files00027.pro'
26d313aab327709825dfcd20d7250272
fe0e1ff0c4ce111d02e68f5991fd0494302966a4
'2011-12-28T23:45:37-05:00'
describe
'27264' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXV' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
b004aa193bace704045d9eebac6f71a0
f09e2180b04a56e2e636d2b110f17fbb352ba83f
'2011-12-28T23:47:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXW' 'sip-files00027.tif'
ded95227956168fe5d707b4f71165ff6
65e434cd78569ed6e8f475dd9a7268212f34823e
'2011-12-28T23:42:37-05:00'
describe
'1541' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXX' 'sip-files00027.txt'
90e232eb56a6bb6c34ea674fbef54df9
e30d6fae994b75305851c915c7d11b3d19e586d4
'2011-12-28T23:43:53-05:00'
describe
'7396' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXY' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
6552afb228dc802e53fb5475acfac72a
0e170449e474480cf233129364cfbc144172e0f1
'2011-12-28T23:43:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALXZ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
dab1328ca429f66ce7893c079a56b125
24178d6a21df3becc17ecc8eb1d383a7a8d71597
'2011-12-28T23:47:23-05:00'
describe
'95422' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYA' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
54b979358e6345dd9f1d9f0024a36ba1
14562bed9fae3d184415d8830bbd8fd824c28a24
'2011-12-28T23:43:50-05:00'
describe
'30043' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYB' 'sip-files00028.pro'
0d5ed7bb2966ff753baae1a51f04d2dc
02b9a530e1bd1f051e6eb6a3926739c834f12765
'2011-12-28T23:44:00-05:00'
describe
'28970' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYC' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
9dcbc451fc3758fcb4db0c56b996bae8
23ec0dc4450293a3501eccea94bcecd2e8a4da2c
'2011-12-28T23:45:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYD' 'sip-files00028.tif'
f93c91a97080be18f0348fc78a7c4b6c
1abaf7a204c0b70d8fab71b6e3488abd07b494a1
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYE' 'sip-files00028.txt'
3b80a0809ae80c8b428191ec79c8fadf
8a541c95a2740a667148976d45b65c1d132596b0
'2011-12-28T23:43:33-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7457' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYF' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
82ee5977ab48b1c4aa6631470fa407b4
362b5815ab016d9f9e123530c00cb53c95fda7c2
'2011-12-28T23:46:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYG' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
3abf49ad6a8ffc2858616f2953e188f2
63c2b710ecad0e1a688f5051a67ddd61abf285e1
'2011-12-28T23:43:46-05:00'
describe
'88594' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYH' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
5b0bb44275b8a251e18adcee0379223e
e54f37ae59c5cd116c36ba479b5007c815c690df
'2011-12-28T23:43:32-05:00'
describe
'32449' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYI' 'sip-files00029.pro'
6a111d35f319686a1d4525c810cb46d5
f74cb1bc9d82ae230ba6732d3c2d30c7dded085c
describe
'27276' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYJ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
157ac463627a30dc6f7ab8284406acc1
0b8d22a1e9678b9e93d7e2e05dbb62180eea0d6d
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYK' 'sip-files00029.tif'
10b5334a861cb89b10597132bc4445bd
79a722300d0534245a77a622ccd2b42009fb3082
'2011-12-28T23:44:08-05:00'
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYL' 'sip-files00029.txt'
f3364a7315f5f84d6201e36ba600af80
b784b71405918b51e6197339b685055606d844ab
'2011-12-28T23:42:57-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7359' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYM' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
6ebbf6d298cac24f4b844b1be4b4098b
cecc2510b09e95dac10400b09ebfad6a412dbba9
'2011-12-28T23:46:40-05:00'
describe
'595407' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYN' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
fb9f7e0112da6c89bb2ad8dba4960c46
8a5f077f8ca1707f8e902d214e42fe50ed63151a
describe
'110825' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYO' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
fac563990deedd5d53ad211577dafd79
78061317d01eeade83c9a1b6d74f60f84ec5b8f6
'2011-12-28T23:46:51-05:00'
describe
'17856' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYP' 'sip-files00030.pro'
80beadcc49648f18a1bc382aeae34c44
d89b506b75526bab133cbc7e921ba81ef20bdc17
'2011-12-28T23:45:52-05:00'
describe
'28368' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYQ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
1103a3c579d7d3236df0ff60310b943b
d5859ff4900ce22ca4cb2c914dfb498dde86d6cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYR' 'sip-files00030.tif'
5708e385410bb310694e0c80d063b437
7c941fbcc74dc35e1b4b2ac0d5a3ac114b2c9498
'2011-12-28T23:44:40-05:00'
describe
'739' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYS' 'sip-files00030.txt'
021b9fe850e18e1b067d0919dc08c6cb
6e730c5dd4b596d269a6ecaa122ac0435107efd9
describe
'7244' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYT' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
254393d2da4928b52424371eef70ce17
83a048a6cbcd3fcc148e749d531ceb81c54d541d
describe
'595862' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYU' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
e76177c75a16d9ce162b87d75f1a7f9f
711ffb5a89bc49ebe0600221f8a221032db20bfe
describe
'108315' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYV' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
a042e66ffaa303a9cc9c74767cb3e322
85c7272ef8dd7e6ea03e9b21c113e77129067b24
describe
'18922' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYW' 'sip-files00031.pro'
049ad65ef467c2fd2f5a7378aa81a8b4
0216ab91eb9f2f6d0c53e7a40d2d2714780329ef
'2011-12-28T23:42:29-05:00'
describe
'31228' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYX' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
647a07a20472fd8f7f7237bf676952e2
34fb14fcdf916eca548878f576bbd8b7bf7a0366
'2011-12-28T23:43:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYY' 'sip-files00031.tif'
0d8346b26874f593bbfb60b76fea697d
35eb65379a4431c9931a5e8dcce7270680f13910
describe
'791' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALYZ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
a882f0fa3bbe4df9a89f28d1a00df6a2
3608a1f1d121aee16a774ba5734015d238f52216
describe
Invalid character
'8515' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZA' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
97453bee4bbf75296d30227de5d715cb
5c8b87551ae00168b310359e027bab16cba7d803
'2011-12-28T23:46:13-05:00'
describe
'595564' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZB' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
ea8ab986b88ef71997dfa19476fd52f3
cdb6ff693d7e1f85b091fcc91baefe9c23bb40e3
'2011-12-28T23:46:46-05:00'
describe
'97928' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZC' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
02bb4aa95b8f7fa10b6f49f1018cfb60
2770b1233c40d83fd31384230df7f3e01e8f0a05
'2011-12-28T23:43:31-05:00'
describe
'26438' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZD' 'sip-files00032.pro'
fbad328ea9465a5dcd6337f66c3b3560
a6852f0b3a2a72703215c99de722c3a3c91050d6
'2011-12-28T23:42:47-05:00'
describe
'28748' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZE' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
197669e17d99ccc4448ca12867d3c10b
37811c58b81dbc0f544c4bbd1593139277754c5b
'2011-12-28T23:45:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZF' 'sip-files00032.tif'
c8cd619f867d6f9fdc4ebcf0e34d4ac4
a19c6d02fdf67eec5c0e6f76e350d162883c3f70
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZG' 'sip-files00032.txt'
de5ababc6ca24d2dbfa282677d6e1e6e
9c654f67bb00604723601fec91c736c327702a1a
describe
'7765' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZH' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
6a857eff91c6f4e0ce6f975a6bf4903d
123c35a642d6dca69d9663a3c97b9e05ee502d7a
describe
'595884' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZI' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
afd45761174ed35f8d8f3bf6138aba4c
ab67f7ae55dc33786aab1f141f87cbf6d7195e4a
describe
'80006' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZJ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
75cfa58fa027444edd765efc01943b84
deb1d5989ece009ae35d1bbafd23bff6655426c5
describe
'34142' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZK' 'sip-files00033.pro'
23df6334b9ea9591e9bef3f9ac848ad1
f4e207dd789417ac44016bcefced057e2e4819b1
'2011-12-28T23:44:48-05:00'
describe
'24960' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZL' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
af66426d98e687ea6982e3717e25fa63
4948a87d96f35a50e32c96958e3d7c9a5b814ba0
'2011-12-28T23:47:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZM' 'sip-files00033.tif'
dbe2375d1f0dd154fc28175a0995978d
f252eca3f900ada46dc98260701e0027dd1b8d62
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZN' 'sip-files00033.txt'
7e1c0c95c704f2db6e7d381488470242
51ef1d0b4c426499bbccae25153f49d40006e6df
'2011-12-28T23:45:44-05:00'
describe
'6759' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZO' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
bb7ba240f832019d595fe6473306408f
b1e111cd9d3b887ee64d7001dd083e1a6b33dca1
describe
'595559' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZP' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
0d053a345f8b9a62048952e197933c46
13e20d9cfcc529e33d17cd739f9bd618b64e92f3
'2011-12-28T23:42:54-05:00'
describe
'104216' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZQ' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
176d1146c3478b9268d9a483459f0f66
d13a285f8a7458449b8131835c09cc66ef68dd1e
describe
'12323' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZR' 'sip-files00034.pro'
d0449c3b55aad8f2fa4eed756b16062c
944d7b317362e725d6d0a40637cfc83c8009d5a9
describe
'27760' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZS' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
086818eb59735b08b97ac59b06a28475
62c4b7badcd4f340e8cb90c937800b1a5e1ac1c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZT' 'sip-files00034.tif'
8f4c83169c558e260981548f38644266
6b9c42e4fdee083d1a9cc17d7d594b9ec1833e86
describe
'500' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZU' 'sip-files00034.txt'
e25aad148b212f436a5ca616b29bf5bd
a14064a4a0d8c98fed79aa3af1a07e2d0d6f7063
describe
'7333' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZV' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
3c2fb4b02e9a9de96d28d4f6afac3859
c7538b8b437d930854a380e689db96270b2069c6
describe
'595697' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZW' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
9adbf619e20ae04a7714bd1aa703a52d
7cd64b263e9aa479b84d66ee66dbd7580523094a
describe
'109030' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZX' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
9721c1c073202c543206fac6053371fc
ede2819dd0e35fc092dbfa46acbae9227dbbc46c
'2011-12-28T23:43:08-05:00'
describe
'23205' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZY' 'sip-files00035.pro'
2383a13d1fdc9da4ee85221bfe153f93
2ad991d7b1a027e9f8ad390451198720feb06797
describe
'30950' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAALZZ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
8d0d705b39b8a93f3af2a0f735f6012f
567583c3dbcb64cabb3ae9364e47b2b8c18288fa
'2011-12-28T23:45:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAA' 'sip-files00035.tif'
07a8689957fa82dd835356b820bca9eb
9cc1642578b2573454da1abfb8677a150fa8ac77
'2011-12-28T23:47:25-05:00'
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAB' 'sip-files00035.txt'
61ede4c16051c3eaef9e97e55ac96714
84d5300be65504f93a76ec25056b66b7414a1e86
'2011-12-28T23:46:01-05:00'
describe
'8018' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAC' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
472ded0265398f3ba20c8350a24e7892
c447fb267f91350a1a959399203659daab1deb7a
describe
'595551' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAD' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
b60bed7d0dcb345fe24bd0c18bb311e7
2455ff984244deb86c6ee6c68ab92489823640ec
'2011-12-28T23:45:33-05:00'
describe
'92688' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAE' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
fbd88e5717f63e8fb95738833f7003df
c3ba142ece23ed8f5e43130a02aaf4b01b19039e
describe
'39779' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAF' 'sip-files00036.pro'
456a97a0f01de400a0cfbca669deb610
09788b2bf0ce7e321dd2a6933680236ed0ab2c4d
'2011-12-28T23:45:18-05:00'
describe
'30140' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAG' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
3c5c4a7672d794aea3bc2344a174d7fc
313146069ec9e17826a0dc40e9d15e9a9f7c2cd9
'2011-12-28T23:45:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAH' 'sip-files00036.tif'
00c8d5a93e84b0f008d8aff84d105c7b
0f8a0a81e5dedf80533506a4f9e5c865f3d3c514
'2011-12-28T23:45:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAI' 'sip-files00036.txt'
9c08750a5f32fd975b951780f68a2b74
0c7edb6eaaef42e4c741f5ee949d94997aadaa93
describe
'7515' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAJ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
6a4cf0054a82dab07e3052db7403df3c
3cb3f29f8bfe4dcea8aa144ac1f102060dc83e82
describe
'595834' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAK' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
025b3aec439345f89d6ed671eb208176
2860ac98518f7f0b2ed78357b7a619de9a543c4e
describe
'90369' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAL' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
370a536d70aeb3e1a97511f8eb826894
898ec6eeb6319649f7e1b3d4049d0ac05e553d0e
'2011-12-28T23:47:32-05:00'
describe
'37956' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAM' 'sip-files00037.pro'
1aa910241a7e944e6a57168b99ef0c22
97bff0abbda1bfede0877b1e6a5e6e30a93a1ecf
'2011-12-28T23:47:07-05:00'
describe
'29562' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAN' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
515c7a52c53bcd6deb92c9ccf950ef29
53abf9cace637d7391e888bc9fe5c0f847e41c09
'2011-12-28T23:46:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAO' 'sip-files00037.tif'
897bbceb0aad6c90c333c3775362746b
615ccf7755469343f740de3829d99836ca26dada
'2011-12-28T23:43:23-05:00'
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAP' 'sip-files00037.txt'
cf31b3fafd0e0001b232c029204eb01f
43f86d8ea94002ea6a6e2b01ed934a878f7d325d
'2011-12-28T23:43:40-05:00'
describe
'7345' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAQ' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
d340c660e89f16f249f46cfe206155df
cf1577b43ae2b76b1c907331fc861d0cf5577b07
describe
'595531' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAR' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
f683039acf9199b772aadecb83de9e3c
408ee90c820c58dd58559c9e3bc04f6a2ce9cf2b
describe
'38774' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAS' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
25a6ddb2773d3f85ff87f45b3252e558
cfb458bd18ab66620f032d82cc70af524d031710
describe
'11237' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAT' 'sip-files00038.pro'
6ddc38d566c87cba87d20d6b7de18e7d
7719c30d70a2baafc96c6339b0821a4502e43d7a
'2011-12-28T23:42:45-05:00'
describe
'11165' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAU' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
22d2f20eae8a2f27b350bf5dfff7ce9d
e6199a556872b19559270704e022fd2cdc42d1a2
'2011-12-28T23:45:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAV' 'sip-files00038.tif'
f9af502faae32f54e5b668ea4c182328
fcdad70b067b1472e022784ad05a0933c364ae34
'2011-12-28T23:44:58-05:00'
describe
'505' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAW' 'sip-files00038.txt'
fdbf96fa1b3460dab17b01ff0edff5a9
c73f6c5e5d54322c1583e3cecf7847f15a239167
'2011-12-28T23:44:46-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3119' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAX' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
b48121e7a73afde3c1bd8d081a61ed81
45c0ae74cfa43f9243d0b66897d49a304f35e162
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAY' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
0e41650c2e621ec7584ba50b470ffb5e
fd8fe8d894878103e5295587a84b120aac6dc8a7
'2011-12-28T23:47:01-05:00'
describe
'110967' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMAZ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
5eed534bcbf1fda80ddc8002f89af002
c1faf9a295fe039cf4329398b39191d5533cf113
describe
'10666' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBA' 'sip-files00039.pro'
64a494b30b80bc74a8429d99b732289c
51c3878590879a9803a282a22446bdd4ffdd08aa
describe
'27195' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBB' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
a6192f599ba2d30fbc10adf74f93be2d
6d47a23acceb6e0ff6d88b1b50c658df1069c974
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBC' 'sip-files00039.tif'
420907c8b045d600239f50d34c18e9c6
5d5682fb1710385c06b2333fde8898e283822c54
'2011-12-28T23:45:50-05:00'
describe
'456' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBD' 'sip-files00039.txt'
af5fef8b853d6a3432222d54354d3e36
9fa28256abc4217e6cb9161bbf261a4c00b912b1
describe
'7086' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBE' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
29a70b1d15b07be4c1e9b31ac5de5f12
05c7ccd63f0e8f0d944b1e9fc83d2f9ec2ebfd27
describe
'595509' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBF' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
942a2adb991c2d38225fe0a372c08af7
fc943c45d34b6c055c1fa327984149ec9365e370
'2011-12-28T23:45:54-05:00'
describe
'86144' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBG' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
b040537e4a6875db0cc5c27a5b6e262d
6ebed06780f7212b216b217d19f006db620a7885
describe
'35623' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBH' 'sip-files00040.pro'
8a5843c24f5a537c6c61af9484ee9fc3
2897b5a50791d27df44dfcfe345fc367853b1d74
'2011-12-28T23:43:37-05:00'
describe
'27811' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBI' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
c14e82cdab6c8b24e196400d2395adf1
85514e354b92dc46aa6b047c1603ab22b73f37f6
'2011-12-28T23:44:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBJ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
2e74e40dd62bdbacdf6ea942eca63cff
bbf231f4aa39ace6df1e6a0d6b2c33b5f6bd47e8
'2011-12-28T23:45:39-05:00'
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBK' 'sip-files00040.txt'
9e854ad27cd60518ed2afaecc12dbff0
c4b713721f91ff0e649a531c908e8327286ad675
'2011-12-28T23:45:28-05:00'
describe
'7308' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBL' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
1315406b3c555ebe2b3ad9a84fc8d3a2
80ea935f7555e7c305a7407496c252e694d0f321
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBM' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
f4c83ed5b96657aedc88acdf6608ecac
7aec4b07f34922774355bb54bfd36a365518097c
'2011-12-28T23:47:04-05:00'
describe
'80754' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBN' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
2cb87e4b66aff4659b8aab5eac44b1e5
92a27ce7e517e4134e8495fa925d9f28df0b07b1
describe
'19303' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBO' 'sip-files00041.pro'
48c1c7141300295863d13dc8e7c6fe97
f02494b2944fe50622beaf0933e3988f2d2d5ecc
'2011-12-28T23:44:27-05:00'
describe
'24170' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBP' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
d982fba3a973780a4eb6be35d6fe76a5
73670a30e1cfe1c57a74fa4e00bdc997fa67fde3
describe
'4783956' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBQ' 'sip-files00041.tif'
8d7d4ee483b3f008dcaacc2a17b74ab5
b3803d9a8bf8515a4e4dc59d87927106ef4ecd84
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBR' 'sip-files00041.txt'
bfe29073112f83f1c7276d02c96edbf5
d105a0f7d554d4f44446b65ae02ebc0b582dc7de
'2011-12-28T23:45:51-05:00'
describe
'6690' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBS' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
12d3676fed3237444280789c83489205
6cb808a8fd18899105d487663de823ae88e133de
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBT' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
aa5a8251b9d2846b678972c9e8b2b6ae
38d670af61301cfedf461589f55403093ce580fa
describe
'84143' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBU' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
c5d93d04bdafb3b093b2a2bc322fce2e
837171410b9b9c20d0e25f4a2e6771266c75d013
'2011-12-28T23:43:51-05:00'
describe
'34127' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBV' 'sip-files00042.pro'
40c457a1502dc52aaf491d3ec1ea6537
4665ae357a5cd2cb57c615c6e07270af0f0bf65c
'2011-12-28T23:46:17-05:00'
describe
'27337' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBW' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
7e0b54b446c0c031e74964b291664221
70b5efa1d9af44db0b90aef2d6b0e06f6e25e5bf
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBX' 'sip-files00042.tif'
81f3aa994faa24851ef5cff30198e879
6269ba796aa5c88ace14d71cb157f489b67f7c78
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBY' 'sip-files00042.txt'
a12fea1f004e146f3b5b9713e6b21205
84feae6e1077f4992fa598cb84cd9f0729d7a788
describe
'7764' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMBZ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
798cf4caf2385faf4fc16f29cfa6d68b
3a9b9b5e40a5154a5bbda507788a7d6643b57a47
'2011-12-28T23:47:18-05:00'
describe
'595823' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCA' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
14dcf56262b66b76c986d273eb223aa9
9f5fb4aff16257037646bab718cf96f9d3f8fd6b
'2011-12-28T23:43:16-05:00'
describe
'90637' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCB' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
299cedf0ccd1b354a9339ba480386c72
d2dfced3c0b65dd8a283fdf83247d38c496234aa
describe
'37771' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCC' 'sip-files00043.pro'
fc378329a80baadc80dca89236ff9a2f
fe09048df2ffc5a68e85e22f081b500e4b7a7a4b
describe
'29347' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCD' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
dd2fb7eeb977fc545a633d8c7dc80181
066458bdd84cf1c229a430f7046e38b51371adfc
'2011-12-28T23:44:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCE' 'sip-files00043.tif'
e6d660dc7178dc53bbe4dce4148b3339
da6c52503981cbc72140d810ada4e8f85dcd29cd
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCF' 'sip-files00043.txt'
387f81b470810069c051fe55aed72525
d6292fb875237b7fb485d88693cfcda1514adba9
describe
'7052' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCG' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
1cce5a6d7ae11744a7b21b53945cd158
1a600d37ab8ac9ca40810f5e98a049eae09eae28
'2011-12-28T23:47:03-05:00'
describe
'595526' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCH' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
89164e031bc65c7181726ba6c9386e38
d84a188f003d75aec5a285aa15637f05ab405bc2
describe
'115238' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCI' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
321786107986a2c0f3f640e9ee615ba7
c060386b32bffb50445857f57a5bfb2b9dc28459
'2011-12-28T23:46:33-05:00'
describe
'28418' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCJ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
9cb06bdeb8f86b5edbaf3d71aa4cd46d
f92bf05ffc2184b5c072668cc02b0c8a6bf28983
'2011-12-28T23:43:55-05:00'
describe
'33967' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCK' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
d6fb9a2a012663a07ac649586c778763
5b0d8dbd4c15998b29be482394969ae5a4e98d23
'2011-12-28T23:46:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCL' 'sip-files00044.tif'
ba8bc4107524cf9c57fb403a48db72df
97a072e546e614dbe4116ebd42559e8f12ee9a6c
describe
'1668' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCM' 'sip-files00044.txt'
cede2aff898c0aed3c92bd63e4ec622e
04ba6a35cd7e93271f1596c1a58ce71dce29bf81
'2011-12-28T23:44:32-05:00'
describe
'8644' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCN' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
cee9e15775607bc5888a72f8e4a6e575
b20e8c72a960f4a0374899a3c702cd1666778e53
describe
'595879' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCO' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
24b7ead93ecbe793f32964b45be54dba
28913148ab9bea1a307e663713785740bd279adb
describe
'93185' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCP' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
858360b667d627e7e332c6af57b37264
e4fe00d0782e95025b1158b3f719b1b155e7b78c
'2011-12-28T23:45:55-05:00'
describe
'37090' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCQ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
9eb76f41a01c5e8f6b361bb555712ced
3fa46b931d56aa0b20290ba53d60d01bb1c67d4e
'2011-12-28T23:44:37-05:00'
describe
'30872' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCR' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
9556fc9ec8ebf0ee03e660910ca79ebf
5cbc4da077e4b010c0d73b840bd981e1c6763e8c
'2011-12-28T23:44:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCS' 'sip-files00045.tif'
ff756ca6701755ca42fd3324cd78969c
b0feb489887cc95aa1909d897465161cf64d1c8f
'2011-12-28T23:43:01-05:00'
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCT' 'sip-files00045.txt'
3d235f7df0dce864a366e2d716ea1c73
0cf72efb63e94898de092f8933038e287c43f7a0
describe
'7898' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCU' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
c6240d698acfa106fbeac5c927e5387e
4527b5d5e87a525c5f3e9cc5d075660d565da3e4
describe
'595558' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCV' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
ff86215a2458263325005cc7259bd3bf
ddbca6108e4a7a227a1bfbec3b50e8fd7b47d8b5
describe
'104462' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCW' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
e7cd01e71048b8a4a5cd0a708609a0ec
10ca875fa32844791ad12e5e7ada0fbfb827636f
describe
'10012' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCX' 'sip-files00046.pro'
22817ee8de8ec2e7d8e437d187851f18
1728fd1e6dddfe350242e2888d25268a5e6668ad
'2011-12-28T23:42:59-05:00'
describe
'25219' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCY' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
19247bc6908f28fa0dbd8ec9961d9090
c15cea47ed638ff3792c3da0d1862bd65a2377b1
'2011-12-28T23:46:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMCZ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
57a23261afc295b7dec3b8ae0e669fc6
6e5f33a84dab5ef764e0ddb8ccd8456e2c2df4dd
'2011-12-28T23:47:08-05:00'
describe
'464' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDA' 'sip-files00046.txt'
3f2708ae3baeb201dee38485492b6657
f46a8d53dbffa4e3f67ed83abde5a69d290950f2
describe
'6652' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDB' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
90b933d8b5337d46786cd00b885f02fc
89f2f6038fd7e76bddba85ca9516b247db94c516
describe
'595723' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDC' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
31882918d4bdfc2e0501c0f603892476
c85b0aab4636b6128cb3b6ea365ce944b02ffc4d
describe
'107017' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDD' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
a523d7b60023d3f91d32bec25f39ef0d
edf221d5a411ea8d702ea6b5370913877d293818
'2011-12-28T23:44:14-05:00'
describe
'18778' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDE' 'sip-files00047.pro'
04ad2c29ae252adcb8079b2b269f4ae6
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describe
'28633' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDF' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
3af2a6e170ce50c8b28b4e58b0234419
e2c90562633e3158f24c296a7c4ed99fdb759a9d
'2011-12-28T23:47:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDG' 'sip-files00047.tif'
d2f5e197c09b72a0c8e75b5b4bc3edce
6fd2fed3c93e1839754707a8fa0b46c7bdbaadb5
'2011-12-28T23:44:17-05:00'
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDH' 'sip-files00047.txt'
152f758ae670d6f4ce647784ec0b4106
b51bf5887958a9406889f71ac827ac317d61eee8
'2011-12-28T23:42:51-05:00'
describe
'7217' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDI' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
e5f18f0540bcb6fd19a47a5b512213b2
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describe
'595536' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDJ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
775884b37111631eae8508999f06f820
106406417b611a9081efa3f13917199ca909f619
'2011-12-28T23:43:49-05:00'
describe
'88679' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDK' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
a890f8d5ad2d0ff58265f25c5042ccde
6d9867c6b33f5b7a155940c8931b273558d76f4c
describe
'35578' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDL' 'sip-files00048.pro'
d70af4c1798514906d2b4fd147e264f1
3d08cd3a67033b721f92e48e3d1ec9126036a504
'2011-12-28T23:45:24-05:00'
describe
'28593' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDM' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
802bb74a0817c17d51ba9320e4f33021
08236bef2540947962d4b5ba548ff4c3c7da2f4f
'2011-12-28T23:43:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDN' 'sip-files00048.tif'
a78ef5ae36d022cfde1180fa78fcf003
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describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDO' 'sip-files00048.txt'
c06b06216aacb40184f18c6e9f67e02b
745c3591929b3bbafa2703dab43232e5673dab12
describe
'7915' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDP' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
7cfb7f782389088db2b1000b74e914ac
b32f2b5858442155040af3292aa9a3416bc6c46a
describe
'595822' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDQ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
dd713eaebda241296d55c1c731d9a071
3c9f0e7f6e9b207ca92d2c9b0a45deef4426afff
'2011-12-28T23:44:49-05:00'
describe
'87619' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDR' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
a00bb2bb9ce6381c1080c6500b035b40
94ac0a83115919c41223904faa7bf5f6d277ec53
'2011-12-28T23:44:01-05:00'
describe
'36642' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDS' 'sip-files00049.pro'
e05b7dba7412b4016c23a0135c9d0ffc
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describe
'28567' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDT' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
643ce00824416f0a06faafab85db9a44
d210fdbdeb18e033197334a9422873229fdba016
'2011-12-28T23:47:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDU' 'sip-files00049.tif'
482050164d2f60781282f3834a8397ee
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describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDV' 'sip-files00049.txt'
21e55f10eab52c165a95d3be4191f469
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describe
'7259' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDW' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
42b60ddb7f689137cc308b0cc45395a6
9c4a84fab42342cc3312cbb5a42ed3847e8b0da8
describe
'595518' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDX' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
b54bde9a74ef503f5d2a52683c68ebb0
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describe
'107934' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDY' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
547946c454069cbcac00a89357ac7e67
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describe
'29385' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMDZ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
1485a0190678f0f1b9ae6c88d1c9363b
1aed9029119c3808f0536becfd541768d7552181
describe
'31971' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEA' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
845ba93ed0cb7f717f8403d231c9ed7e
0b6afa48a1cdb08d20d7b40b2b87f5e978769df9
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEB' 'sip-files00050.tif'
aa36e82ea79bc32a0540fd0e57538901
cb07a9867da2b68d5fe1bd1ccddde8b54d0bd2fa
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEC' 'sip-files00050.txt'
9a113fdcd2ffc2d55fe73aafa10e6663
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describe
'8487' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMED' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
33391ead35416fcf3b93633966554ee6
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describe
'595501' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEE' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
7e9827b561ba3604e9643d20d10eb1af
2e90c3c0638d5e15ee8f60364e581237f365e3fd
'2011-12-28T23:47:12-05:00'
describe
'121221' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEF' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
676f861cd5e580e91cda338c44e36281
0415192c01732c3ed619985e9d85082a23ebbc35
'2011-12-28T23:42:34-05:00'
describe
'30579' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEG' 'sip-files00051.pro'
82b472741c055c49d05f9eb915edd237
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describe
'33454' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEH' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
df475c43f533fc159785918bb780d1f3
495fc512bd5d2db64859363c79a2c37f4d6b1464
'2011-12-28T23:46:00-05:00'
describe
'14309116' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEI' 'sip-files00051.tif'
5f4908a60f73f72a4d1394ec888651f1
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'2011-12-28T23:46:09-05:00'
describe
'1731' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEJ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
7e775239312dc09e0e381ba68f03446a
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describe
'8332' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEK' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
572ea4b1817b4d20fe34d1378a7ed73a
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describe
'595399' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEL' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
c0590070362f1cafac8369a7c93ec9ab
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describe
'98675' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEM' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
13d9825661a5dd3c3052fae781d1aad2
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describe
'21831' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEN' 'sip-files00052.pro'
a7461bdda972e6a49bb3bb83aae4fd1d
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describe
'28751' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEO' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
67824206a4bcd9cafe4722489934d332
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describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEP' 'sip-files00052.tif'
0bf518f568e1eb74d7d578b3abf7409e
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describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEQ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
5e0bda2ae8e0eace89da972bcf348fa0
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describe
'7488' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMER' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
ff742c31f60c24747558d2701770cd73
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describe
'595562' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMES' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
8c68db6aa7d4d7dfad540dc3768fc391
b3aab64d5349d1037609c14a1df69e63b9daece9
'2011-12-28T23:46:50-05:00'
describe
'39180' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMET' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
5c8609f11de75132f3dd4713d36b6778
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describe
'11607' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEU' 'sip-files00053.pro'
90589d41deb9cf6d012e1750f8864a39
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describe
'11587' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEV' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
ec9581bbe41e59252779367b2306ac79
e90a97deda8e09ff5a84cca2bd65fd5f3841e772
'2011-12-28T23:44:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEW' 'sip-files00053.tif'
a98baaece695ca487cf8bc5ff0cfc615
c0395ba01b595421e983df7289dfe64654f3148c
'2011-12-28T23:46:54-05:00'
describe
'510' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEX' 'sip-files00053.txt'
b4301d34879a08bb107209786c38eda0
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describe
'3351' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEY' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
3c8bf1bf49853f89c47a7631286dec0f
4f614b839a46cbfd86168b923b7c1c7d05f3e870
'2011-12-28T23:46:21-05:00'
describe
'595521' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMEZ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
7bd60369ce221ebb7e09e82b62cdd920
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describe
'92833' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFA' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
b0e49369a21e7993b7bde8e53791ae06
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describe
'13786' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFB' 'sip-files00054.pro'
b45da81071c61df46de1241f0d07f6bb
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describe
'24853' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFC' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
db754f8fa602e539bb6b677b5a90c594
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describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFD' 'sip-files00054.tif'
fee1e5bce3f97e958779f13be1f209a8
96512bc96b083255351747ac9143646369e4b0a9
'2011-12-28T23:47:05-05:00'
describe
'550' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFE' 'sip-files00054.txt'
0ff1d8da8ed86e671cf8cb20ff33d4f9
1652c3a8efc1123c8b99c0dc10b5072a5507e7c9
describe
Invalid character
'6672' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFF' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
e369b70aa1cb8744f3b2987c74cc289f
48818ce680e850b47c11bf38783f623f4fef7f90
'2011-12-28T23:42:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFG' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
9bf973c50a215bf50dbdfd1225aaf8ca
743c2c27b5a4cd8c51097d6ff2efa80f3711489a
describe
'91141' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFH' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
ccc35d147b06d504c82c651a02f1e4e0
82c72ea22f19f8587b7f7b2ce4de2f4957d79a88
describe
'37160' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFI' 'sip-files00055.pro'
40016f3f046f172e916a0c8f565e0cad
fcf47035d79cbfc523b546058f6460ada3ed4513
describe
'29363' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFJ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
5af59babe85e0a8804c353ae03916e34
95ce3f636a9281990a282dda946c1848492a1cf6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFK' 'sip-files00055.tif'
2321aca589dff5b02131471958e721da
7453bbe23b57a11f3763ffe0eb8ce2fc49aac574
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFL' 'sip-files00055.txt'
8ac028db08cbd8da208f8b0c07f4b2ee
6c3592a3a9f95ce95f261f289ab42d5845f1e675
'2011-12-28T23:47:30-05:00'
describe
'7335' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFM' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
9e2f7bd4965279019f58845993f68ccf
90462f052a5b205f68412bd009478a11a408bbe6
describe
'595519' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFN' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
eb1ed2ad945710ac63a94b2f11214652
1929766b5b4b1e780863c967f5df206556aefca9
describe
'96149' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFO' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
f44234489601adc17e8182ac3614818e
6a775e8a6b9298a0d98ba197433ec70900493e3e
describe
'38622' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFP' 'sip-files00056.pro'
cf39da8868a5e2ef07bbc0b5dec30f42
be38e8d194672179c4ce0aab7c753dfde2683a5d
describe
'31430' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFQ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
f5e1f10d28902ac7d439ef21dd350a8b
e91f9c9fdffd3da71d01c5d48c19c63502310663
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFR' 'sip-files00056.tif'
5b4b4841b04e727370831e7e00ffd163
fa5aaced7dc8084b8e1983b90c6b65fb0ec6226f
'2011-12-28T23:46:11-05:00'
describe
'1536' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFS' 'sip-files00056.txt'
adabafe362284a1efaecfb2dc9163d1b
876a9c829c5332df1eaebed570f803065a369a7f
describe
'8091' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFT' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
bf37ceae603b93110f25ab73632bd5df
3dd8091e5b5a4534c9a2d40931e591e7b06ca7af
describe
'595886' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFU' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
c9450b0d3a2be3f414859a2f5cc4dbe0
7d319aed535a8bc99d05152df7688e82eb061a6d
describe
'76109' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFV' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
82c49d546bc88d4c3623c3b8ed0bd55b
e18b674cb5c50e6a6ae5e7b854798da9ec5886db
'2011-12-28T23:46:36-05:00'
describe
'19157' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFW' 'sip-files00057.pro'
b956388d1424b7e4efe9210d9d336ed9
65a1dfcc497b7555879791211ce9beb391dea477
'2011-12-28T23:44:11-05:00'
describe
'23199' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFX' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
80bf86511b33764aec48352101360821
c84c6a89775ace9a0366bb966908aa823a08b554
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFY' 'sip-files00057.tif'
7bc6d3186303aa7fb451b31c914f691a
80d1c99162fa18ae76b4e9f2f62156bba099da01
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMFZ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
23311f9fcffb15467a6e109143e9aa76
c62d464ab2bfa823b250efd42daf86e177fc5cd7
describe
'6214' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGA' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
a8bdab667a326f9e02c8d3f1993bc876
548ca00c5b6bed8be6edef4ae6c23adcee659559
describe
'595556' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGB' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
1898d695fabd7112f214541b4177a410
2c7bb886a6ae74b3e885042cb431825a9c1262ca
describe
'79438' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGC' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
8718ba47bd52dda383cf4e0541913df3
3968006583fdc9828340209b85dc90d78affbe7d
describe
'32856' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGD' 'sip-files00058.pro'
7e8b276bc9601f177d4091696357d0f0
8bccd58f5079b986639e04c0496551367d735c13
'2011-12-28T23:44:03-05:00'
describe
'25725' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGE' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
6bf502cd8d2716b6d36f5dc7dfe99d4e
c8c9517b8fffebf7094d40b4291eb6bf5ac049e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGF' 'sip-files00058.tif'
67356cc2b5213f0b0f7172d0cff1b9ad
bbe7a216dd46718f2aa023a33c0b08f1ad7cf1b7
'2011-12-28T23:46:35-05:00'
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGG' 'sip-files00058.txt'
3906eace1aa7b795a5734aa76fba35ed
407acadcb0aca3ed85b1ee8bb2dd3a355ec97968
describe
'6772' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGH' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
f68215d47f54d39c81c7b563c24bc361
23c32c280fb0db84cc79ed94296ff17ba93e2c7b
describe
'595759' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGI' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
e84b84c6de70d29ea98dd3b0a70f16f3
67199535fa9ebc27a7ff6bcd6c6cc4b485c82ee8
'2011-12-28T23:42:31-05:00'
describe
'67596' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGJ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
67856fd8fb12a881052e178688a699cf
a4339b6c7150ca0c8ebec909dbce2d2af4b7be31
'2011-12-28T23:45:25-05:00'
describe
'13403' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGK' 'sip-files00059.pro'
4d555438611c2d76575cc94d16a740a3
8a3c4258185e9cd40d0f7faa34165e3e4870a2de
describe
'19667' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGL' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
40540cfdeabbdea24186840c9b3cc808
cb1d63947b86eeefef78147947e47adb966dcf8b
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGM' 'sip-files00059.tif'
58633d44a41fe1363bc43be508bb08d0
9eb210f5b6539e1da6c86a5fd2870757b99ca50f
'2011-12-28T23:46:23-05:00'
describe
'594' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGN' 'sip-files00059.txt'
445dec69dab905fbf37a133ec4f3ad2d
ad0cf1b15ee84e640d0df075a66e781428cbf510
describe
'5307' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGO' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
6b0d9d785ff107d7004ed92af7219465
9f5c85ff68e99d6517ac71e028e15a4955c85a77
'2011-12-28T23:43:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGP' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
edcdf62aa1cdebeac75c27e6524a7eff
17acd4551c3877d072c2c7e58f81699002b79d3a
describe
'83972' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGQ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
07419c0094cb6b4bb023264f8a178c48
97d6eb3e77c15fbbd29c5ab072b9120a196fb47b
describe
'34269' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGR' 'sip-files00060.pro'
50c74f655e255b57b0493e1d1706a895
6a17dc92a23d21af11bd463970348d99baf1554e
describe
'26927' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGS' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
bc086bd4d24fd3a67d90e926c7ce0e02
4253ac9655c58163083e3c7c8de34106acfffa64
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGT' 'sip-files00060.tif'
a7aa5009cd9ea31835786b224deea27c
799db98ceff4200434fdcce9a883d2a64c143c2c
'2011-12-28T23:45:46-05:00'
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGU' 'sip-files00060.txt'
e3e140e2dfffc8794c7ac1fb254a3485
ea6ee316d525e2e909530ee762af7778b697c451
describe
'7331' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGV' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
e1da84862247a384430ea1ed5a397324
d44f92ebca4b544e2e827120051ab1ccf5fa27ba
describe
'595888' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGW' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
70e6c6e9e0482f02fa4a88100fc7eab6
108edd71007b637f959861c6e296870eb590be09
'2011-12-28T23:45:05-05:00'
describe
'99662' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGX' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
7dd5c16f209457a50f7932e09d975784
cd7bebdfd499f6154987d80ce849aed2a6daa9ae
describe
'41022' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGY' 'sip-files00061.pro'
5f8b9a0894835cb1820d292db0ec1b0a
9219f0002d8425d6904ba6d51ebc30a168598758
describe
'33349' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMGZ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
7cd3c8c68b64954d023603951bf347f5
8cd49bc64502eef13ec8bfd5e3826aef594b7aa0
'2011-12-28T23:43:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHA' 'sip-files00061.tif'
8cde6ef3bb6bdd83e010a9e4629e67ff
806f8f924f9440a01075e96bf66e1e2b366dfa0b
describe
'1647' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHB' 'sip-files00061.txt'
f6b45983549be75dfac5a739b22f84fd
1bee5b3802686e76c6dd35438c0d732e9a569fb1
describe
'8092' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHC' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
036f3a55b2317b22ce61c0d37ec17b38
7c68de4d66c928f9f572fcc7c850fc22c7367c32
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHD' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
a7ebde764322950ba6941698c6e7c504
c54b5a13ef72659ca4c3914b567e009d54a759d8
'2011-12-28T23:47:20-05:00'
describe
'105131' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHE' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
82188668e5deff297cc1f0144455283b
6111bffa52935abdea4dde9b0971294300605018
describe
'23971' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHF' 'sip-files00062.pro'
5d481865199dfd8e250dfbb1a60476f0
c89969cf2c5c1931ec697917077dd15859c8ba46
describe
'29695' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHG' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
95f4bf63992c27fd7ac7514c7839e027
f098f69d94a62f9cbc559dde5d8d38409077d8e5
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHH' 'sip-files00062.tif'
6f1c33c1c1f8c6770262383c9776e82f
38948a507179a27de00b0161f12bc289ad88754e
'2011-12-28T23:43:15-05:00'
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHI' 'sip-files00062.txt'
edfc10ca7d77e3b3ba387fa67ab70165
24626a64c786da8916b52a2179762034c4f8bff7
'2011-12-28T23:46:02-05:00'
describe
'7839' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHJ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
b73e1b632584422c35a4ae455ee128f9
712b3704b201df35d6bc81d02a103655aa8983f5
'2011-12-28T23:43:29-05:00'
describe
'595856' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHK' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
79f9ad9c32ec4577058766f53f79d741
c94c63b8eb62754a3c2fcc59afdb5fc63da19ceb
describe
'93408' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHL' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
d3e17bc0a9885b883426b5d47227792d
a0d526eea90bd7143245f940a6583c6cc57e38dd
describe
'26030' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHM' 'sip-files00063.pro'
757fb534c696af3f20408cf0700429b9
e161a94aa0cbd938498f93d0841656c901aefc12
describe
'27135' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHN' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
36dce7e5d23ef4e2aae1210701e0e902
5453629ca6d7f7c07a4a9abf95169ed05bbc1714
'2011-12-28T23:47:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHO' 'sip-files00063.tif'
94b65645b932252c31022d1884620407
b17cff440ecda72a71a2390d15c503b71d8e43e5
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHP' 'sip-files00063.txt'
046a98054ca0b4b161bcb817d5c6aa10
6c76559a2eee4a76a06ebee8e5c4dce1ef8083a9
describe
'7351' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHQ' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
1d2cba25b49f0734564bbd6c2a74e0fd
54e59c2efefb898430b0f522086c93fe4bd21938
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHR' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
b91cc17bff46f460da765255eb2d208f
1354c39b7933cd220d182cd98c8e8cb49812c040
describe
'98843' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHS' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
d3334edc4934d772a591b8ceace0305b
f376c3ce563fe5146f7babfdaf7f88782f403d95
describe
'39482' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHT' 'sip-files00064.pro'
0d20615afa59de0b785d9052ae862dd0
5da0cd69da28b6829890fab5a360132ae837d6c6
'2011-12-28T23:43:17-05:00'
describe
'30995' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHU' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
1b3d56afa906da5b19ae56685575bc6b
da54c96aede8acd7a131b6ce9f06971e3a9b1553
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHV' 'sip-files00064.tif'
48c6166d8199b318ce84c598e57e6c0c
b19547d21cdb0715a9801023b8e25db5274f9fee
'2011-12-28T23:44:22-05:00'
describe
'1573' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHW' 'sip-files00064.txt'
71f58c04886847ffa166fe3b977d9fdd
7c8d937485ca0df37e1d67f0c133a0e1e2c4d594
'2011-12-28T23:47:33-05:00'
describe
'8020' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHX' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
8e26970720dcd818d3180a0c14339454
5c5f7db02c87f58d639ca1f80e2e034e69c16ff7
'2011-12-28T23:47:24-05:00'
describe
'595883' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHY' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
7d3be8e45952bfaf4668ef83164ebc5d
27f7977b02bc2ebf8b2f4f3d529bed0809434b81
describe
'97473' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMHZ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
8b49bb768a999fe3e98509aca04a78df
4839b8a3c9d6f3ba4cff84e897e174a63cf1abce
'2011-12-28T23:45:41-05:00'
describe
'28518' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIA' 'sip-files00065.pro'
64c87fea517e06f4a324b7fede13bd79
d91d4daeaa3d57c17950aa58695645d578c3e1cc
describe
'29682' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIB' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
91f12e13d6ec9c924b2a9d5f1249b81c
91b790eb0193761b3b9958ce168d69faf169b2d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIC' 'sip-files00065.tif'
e4bfc50db843c3a05b6af82ccff355ee
d74ab54f8dcdfd700d6680acb68eb109bd91011d
'2011-12-28T23:47:19-05:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMID' 'sip-files00065.txt'
219d963f0777b8c56a21227846894f80
b615b9b14fad206ebbe7b58eb0681b675cc9d2c8
'2011-12-28T23:47:06-05:00'
describe
'7797' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIE' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
d6e0e87c9d715e023c49ad1cb343fdb1
223a46c645284e10ddbb613b729edf2ebe083f15
describe
'595532' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIF' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
e441445765584b8cd0846cc4a02dce96
b88771ffe5294b2287608f8f049124ac27a6330e
describe
'87846' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIG' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
98dfdec72e8f94d3f7c8a1cd620153a0
81e7df31150e31b306c45a734061d3632401d7cf
'2011-12-28T23:43:13-05:00'
describe
'25410' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIH' 'sip-files00066.pro'
ebf0b8df39ac56aa764eb858a0d30993
a4db2f986ec1becf187bc7cb55072a24b8bafc33
describe
'27011' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMII' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
3e6f9b94e396ad26876f7f0c77bb7409
3d77ea84f4d38efe8f015f9c7bce1116aa3f9725
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIJ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
a731fcc236c262c884a774594aaa8b00
37e32ad9d4eff878e25f59631802f39429153a0e
describe
'1631' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIK' 'sip-files00066.txt'
39d72a7e29afad832ec4f924fdc2ce2e
cae27bd38304e99b0f936c5ac33b0188ca45fd3a
describe
'7003' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIL' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
acd6c2939904a33d9f66cc3880de7036
806a348f76167e139ee981049054481bf599a736
describe
'595699' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIM' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
02a9a68dd562a7027e658ab4d001c048
90103d9eaac9077ecd50943394428650db91b985
describe
'112375' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIN' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
068c42463c7eedcebc0aeac819a6d833
11f4362e8db3b218ef633d08953aa72bf0b50d11
describe
'28077' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIO' 'sip-files00067.pro'
b8cce3e444878053e2ac6f0ea2995cf0
6db00680ac8f8bba8481a01e57283708bfcce457
describe
'31679' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIP' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
8254d409d128600c97b74a365025b3ab
6b9c20bc5cd62814412c4ce4891dd50935029c57
'2011-12-28T23:44:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIQ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
9e0e7494a6fa7e736d181a98a5bc02d3
e63f8ce8ad12aef8b21c2387c8f9fc66f71db102
'2011-12-28T23:43:14-05:00'
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIR' 'sip-files00067.txt'
46e915342c789a92c0ab9e3f7e84ef8e
d7f94c3f849a7c2af3f6d2bd0921a52a6a999233
'2011-12-28T23:44:42-05:00'
describe
'8309' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIS' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
a88b67ffbfbc140b83f75e4bebe5b2f1
8bc59c9c38239c580de8e853c163ea51dcba2cfd
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIT' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
15027f5d9e61f66245f7a8da287c05ae
e0b3026b49f28c22bb99fbfa3c899e5fd91dc949
'2011-12-28T23:44:45-05:00'
describe
'94440' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIU' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
d634e6d0d2ff784c35514d089ca379a8
71d0e2a9f34ffb6809c4e5ef2b22782b2fee97aa
describe
'38047' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIV' 'sip-files00068.pro'
3ffea6ea364d5f3cd2c32efcad919748
7b2b281c89cbf5e01cacc751920a2400eda1d580
'2011-12-28T23:44:35-05:00'
describe
'30286' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIW' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
8c2337579842d7bc5e74560856706005
de6b385fd398554f5d068b56d2731043384f6a62
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIX' 'sip-files00068.tif'
0e40f4c9874605677beec667094ee6c6
9e5688bbd51e5142f188a40e796a18cff816fe7a
'2011-12-28T23:45:16-05:00'
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIY' 'sip-files00068.txt'
1ee80933faa1335810d36df44bff9925
0448710f0cd189cbb3c7d62ec324af801daa08e2
describe
'7772' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMIZ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
628f27b6b552cdd6e705b4c8f396f16f
6e8646c464b6a667d09c845a1cdf03ea77c662c2
'2011-12-28T23:45:47-05:00'
describe
'595405' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJA' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
c3dbf7c1655647c80ab51fb6edea8acd
38eabc4835bcef550fa3dfdf4778a8953d3c3b91
describe
'28486' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJB' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
d30cec90d3681dfab7bbb61b43abe0a0
577ca462558ac1c9fdd37a7b164ece1013ed3821
describe
'8113' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJC' 'sip-files00069.pro'
c2f05c4bad80093fa91f50e286ec8349
d0c4ab32e3e9192dbdcae7623d788e5afe67444f
describe
'8751' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJD' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
3286e8651ab5aa1a408951363c21fa64
e879cdfab3e1e8dcb128486471b1fbe0f4dcb79f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJE' 'sip-files00069.tif'
f59071fc0163d55b97d930e218301f02
322c8e4690475dbbc0f09b144decb6c597eb2283
'2011-12-28T23:46:38-05:00'
describe
'335' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJF' 'sip-files00069.txt'
50c74ab475c34cd8d28eca669e803520
a893ac348d79b9eff927172fdc160774081ddcc9
'2011-12-28T23:43:57-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2395' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJG' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
717ec66f55ebd886e4c9d4ae3a07e10b
3ef0db0a42ae31e061530afd97ce2229ee0e2045
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJH' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
450dde5900abcba452303e852ec84031
b1ffcfb2042ecc68a1564e4a6abc2acd7561b129
'2011-12-28T23:43:20-05:00'
describe
'69565' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJI' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
f89c70cda314d339134fbb47673d4f29
2f82b07864487aa5a87181cc27389f54f717dcb2
describe
'29065' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJJ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
03b5e731b026bdb626b3fcbdc30ca8f2
af0d81e1e12285f88f283428b7015fdca758bcfe
describe
'22192' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJK' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
3561dd7f1f9929a994583ab0a8364edd
9f2506ff59db8816c58708b49548bbe06775b87f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJL' 'sip-files00070.tif'
c0da8f4d6a5a28a47d6caa62d5af63f6
c8577d60aac20054bfbd62d38996112d5a247e7e
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJM' 'sip-files00070.txt'
a2f71c652341148fbc0722716a339d11
cdc531b25802b9a6695b8077351585eca0781fde
describe
'5832' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJN' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
424160115e422045d437d3c5f03a78fa
60d912ce1d821c7002a8f2b9ba8637d00aa9f3aa
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJO' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
8415a2fa48e90066e0e859e4b7b934bf
399d27eb493969f93ea3248a14709a2ec2ae29bb
describe
'124291' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJP' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
d003ee72b524854699cfd4b3f181f86c
cd644b6311407d0defb53c8d0a9d162aa4de1550
'2011-12-28T23:43:03-05:00'
describe
'25092' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJQ' 'sip-files00071.pro'
351206ae214e8553ca4849fd317d5829
623616386d503d4705005c9d5d06d3337664abcf
describe
'32928' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJR' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
336771b2e819a72156d2cec69523ddfb
83a71464d93cdfa3b02d1af08c17280015a1cf6d
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJS' 'sip-files00071.tif'
58b268a5b63b977aba960be3020b1546
e9d02ef9dbecce9beca67f78cb8e9f08c514f7ba
'2011-12-28T23:45:13-05:00'
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJT' 'sip-files00071.txt'
3d9e81889e97d80c03d93a3779c29e85
7b0d317c6901670bf400f64afa77302d34b72381
describe
'8553' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJU' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
0ae5b3df124c3441a54293ecb57da659
f5a71c24a8b38b69fe868b8342f915330f23bf3f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJV' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
aa797c0bc00e7178614cb9db3117a686
4ff18a03bce2948f6adfb735430b9dc777736d6e
describe
'92136' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJW' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
be74d536327c8aa46dc9bf4d4a7de37b
7a99273bb50bece7e88b5fd6f34a62a8661e3e2b
describe
'38028' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJX' 'sip-files00072.pro'
54068cc335bf7df1d0804e5feb259d1d
19ea1e1fbb24470ac2b2ef5a2911e5ae72cea9bd
describe
'29384' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJY' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
66c103ab7848f6da3aea9e7a428fb93a
d86613a647c8c260e7659402132b03369935580f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMJZ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
73e681e55c644c1ac47de3aed5f95ffc
325ee70ca0e773018dbf8e7b83083cf2abb61f32
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKA' 'sip-files00072.txt'
67efe8f19c0897e3fec8843ed6f8631f
f8cc96bcaab6aa5c540a0d461ca56db9fc7dc8a4
describe
'7283' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKB' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
b41da5f8d185a3c3ca8b688d160e2775
463ebb2b997b45d5c065998cb07caed3e8ccf3c9
'2011-12-28T23:46:05-05:00'
describe
'595762' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKC' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
4618910b52e010712dfb6ab154d2c2af
dd87ae629e00ebe52667e56c707d4e0a6c6e92b4
describe
'120046' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKD' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
7761ffab635c8f89310d78fc3a004644
a30f231b2087920bd02da090fe059992a4890e3c
describe
'10737' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKE' 'sip-files00073.pro'
f8290acdbe4e6d033a547bb8ac78debd
3b7687259c613519a27557fbe8ef42e35f0b6caf
'2011-12-28T23:46:42-05:00'
describe
'32688' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKF' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
aa89fb80acd022a1712715502f55116b
7cdadef9a6f037b4f2b3e89eb37a32d60055efe6
'2011-12-28T23:43:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKG' 'sip-files00073.tif'
cd28ad0cd8925edaf5d008619f08a273
611b1cd7e6c728b83be2b77cd2c75f93ff4a2d06
describe
'459' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKH' 'sip-files00073.txt'
15afe140fff2511c91611160da4d21d2
5d9bc1a815c060a207ae4d4d7dd3cb42fa8aea3f
describe
Invalid character
'8257' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKI' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
7f6325eaa41bd99eb947d6bc29c654c3
abef37dce99908d61e26bd7ae22dd81b0d655c3f
describe
'595566' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKJ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
88536a49a7e57da735d2f051c6d01baa
aa2d3f35143d12fa95248954ebebcbfb10f0ffee
describe
'98538' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKK' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
dde5124c1c2eb72c3dd1e28700de8910
5c73554004dc0d1582090a8e698ee82b6147826d
'2011-12-28T23:44:59-05:00'
describe
'19194' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKL' 'sip-files00074.pro'
50c3b8d00ad47e04b8abb0937d937af3
5d202f9f1924095f1880604978dc5964b7df4ce8
describe
'27754' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKM' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
100f69b30c0c307d316c8894a084b8ef
0b98a0c2f88d4d93249eced77e43fb25bb743dc6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKN' 'sip-files00074.tif'
b5bb059bca68144297c9e261b5f8d6fb
b525838b74f2ec6e7277de5fea7aba579365a1cd
'2011-12-28T23:43:30-05:00'
describe
'836' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKO' 'sip-files00074.txt'
933032f39433aa0249881e1a495b5081
2706978e1c0589e1cb9652fb62c82e700088bf23
'2011-12-28T23:43:42-05:00'
describe
'7366' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKP' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
2300ba00f4e6f9bcc164cee8e62cb8b7
17c4b947cb0bd006448df7b2c47bad683f20af57
'2011-12-28T23:43:00-05:00'
describe
'595872' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKQ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
1c7b763106099c02aaf30ca585208055
cfe802be18e10f05113336c382136410d485842b
describe
'84221' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKR' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
7a7c66e207e40f582dd74f7ed8f73490
7ccd4bd5c35c5df9c5fcab5bae814c550017d002
describe
'17196' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKS' 'sip-files00075.pro'
ec2355c6172e8addaee5a84195edd142
58f2c6b58b831806fd5f9c00c218862d0f3700aa
'2011-12-28T23:45:19-05:00'
describe
'25064' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKT' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
8cdd846d1cc13e099c5eb70dc96e0239
6c56b993f2cb2a90560e14de260e5b38b8e0224d
'2011-12-28T23:45:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKU' 'sip-files00075.tif'
c1e32e087422b87d720e1c9957693175
d9a0dafe9c3317fb5a8ae35601fe62e1279b7c17
'2011-12-28T23:46:32-05:00'
describe
'696' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKV' 'sip-files00075.txt'
c09a87b28864f162422ba6abf2d7116c
98cc6879b6f7a882f61f610f5ade3e90e9a1fa3a
describe
'6305' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKW' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
5b62d746155b11b4d3d09125fae04df9
64af457ef3eafc2666a283a266c02cd4a4c00867
'2011-12-28T23:46:31-05:00'
describe
'595346' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKX' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
b59bdfaeef72cf61eb38fda09a8c4fdb
5acc5a8f6ad0f2d8add0abd60408d121366de376
describe
'68049' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKY' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
6ffa3d28b8b4c47d87a208ffd975190e
e4d01800f5002edadf1832704a1aa169c1f23476
describe
'26315' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMKZ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
18100a7700fa0900bc99ce4c3c1064f8
5edb59ce97811b7bde195316365d6bbe3ecae7b1
describe
'22019' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLA' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
04cfbecfb096360501b792a5b04e4879
c6c9da4fbbfa57cc961ff6d6b559e6ba38dfdc62
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLB' 'sip-files00076.tif'
784f30acf5f90499130589070b5801a3
7af3587a73357864507fa1c0018504e54a1c5160
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLC' 'sip-files00076.txt'
c765c80e17db3c07aa8be4cf5dc45b62
ab13bb7cf8cfc18d5f261b9e2071244b2a73e5c5
'2011-12-28T23:43:07-05:00'
describe
'5505' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLD' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
786dbe0d658e0d7b7f6f120c7902c9aa
122173b5dc5c35908700ad1afae3c33051b3e6e3
'2011-12-28T23:45:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLE' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
1de26a3e7807b8acc59cce94a6ecb2c0
b50270519ea7135aa111ae624cefec91e747fc7e
describe
'79749' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLF' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
474e95794801c181a2e9d1dbf6cc4388
63ff4fb01d00b5328349603f263e7d5afef3bade
describe
'32971' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLG' 'sip-files00077.pro'
5a04d86dda37b947779c6f6db9411ee4
5e6a67858ec1fc7182e6a664ac2575e5d3fea429
'2011-12-28T23:43:11-05:00'
describe
'25328' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLH' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
cc5204378768df419d48a6c365ff281d
bbfd3c6cb3848d955ef69d486ab0133ea022cf66
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLI' 'sip-files00077.tif'
59b539bb909ee8591935c28c75442172
852d8fbbc2f618a482eb47826592a344e123a9d6
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLJ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
26cecad179578c30ae3c5fae72d99df9
c857b64095d597df218d1ab71579482fb94183ea
describe
'6117' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLK' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
30e84c6e1eb8e9f7fb9b016a1b65650d
eb24ac10c9f7064bfd3fa1f466fe0002cc8a7b22
'2011-12-28T23:44:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLL' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
d52f8068ad59ad7a88d8d9b6b5e53898
89f94c2b908c8934b5a25103ab13e31bcf4f727b
describe
'89917' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLM' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
4ddc84e9e996a5d2c15134829c69ecf6
b7d75d8e5a4e3556e62901c28ec930e193af4c83
describe
'38142' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLN' 'sip-files00078.pro'
09898c2743e1b0a1b99fda714eb77ff0
03396f8804c8e96a0d890493ab91b5a4a3f2b6ad
describe
'28522' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLO' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
00cbb40d4d1642fd0562a30fde4efdd2
447d700a86da75d01c80cf248b57426c56fdb876
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLP' 'sip-files00078.tif'
a85f3f4a309f6f1d8e7f8a427edf3ecc
3da15be5888525be39d4bdf9ca49d9536d7c9087
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLQ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
21a7d25ea016aee8068aa365efe62a81
52b5b4b0f72d95a3a87564ab764bdc308183cdb9
describe
'7258' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLR' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
3ca104011d6dab2ed35ed3b2433e87cf
4004e4dc6d1e1c03010c1465830d21aae797491a
describe
'595847' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLS' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
0bdc1f5f2789b9915ab9103b30e027f0
50fd60f5969df480c040b3b3c19f0685d53425e2
describe
'80643' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLT' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
799733c71dc709253c11dc581efa78a4
030db76c8cbb0970de6877161491f56f1aacae27
describe
'11903' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLU' 'sip-files00079.pro'
69c40b52ba6fe8d5ba941b56b07e0676
587e65bd94cc728d3a2fa274ffe44aa8d0d439fb
describe
'20434' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLV' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
64d64a36af50e557f6def294894f501b
592aeebd0a488ed6f05dce6a0784086df4dd285f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLW' 'sip-files00079.tif'
5fdeae9567bf7b5797f1a9df5326b590
b3f246ebac44fe7fc8fb599bf48235ff4dc04e62
'2011-12-28T23:47:00-05:00'
describe
'493' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLX' 'sip-files00079.txt'
c0201d2cbd000cedc415e765414a8c87
62a8d6660e65e7159e6ca16a6bafef6ab9bc4d19
describe
'5693' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLY' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
0ca7dcd2c6ead000eb1d00a9da14d868
f95dfe3285da6b4361e49eff65558ed5893ceb3a
'2011-12-28T23:46:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMLZ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
8aefaf1e4ee0ce131a69c723fd857806
5ff1ee994e2637aaba2908636c789a5026f83f46
describe
'86059' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMA' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
b396bc1b6f03cbd919a7768c5c3ef3a4
a16a27359d85247811f7a41fc0a2642c47ca728e
describe
'36643' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMB' 'sip-files00080.pro'
32b8be584beeb936928a017215709acf
a13a2e34f85620e6eb3bae50654affb7170d92e7
describe
'26995' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMC' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
39f37c9cde74c2c12a41229e48ca695d
1d1dc1b5997d3d80f853de240a3b27d5325431ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMD' 'sip-files00080.tif'
10105b4884500c4a49a661c5fc08456f
c365041dd7e68b8e4ec6df9676d8252b72e76ea6
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMME' 'sip-files00080.txt'
6a7a928e9aa346f1e1100da2826bfbb0
cc806862146fade5e86e49ec951333097e68831b
describe
'7054' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMF' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
ef917fd8d0644bef7f15f4768e181144
30f55d82378ee3a2cd522f4d1e8c1db91683b1fb
describe
'595555' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMG' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
b79cb5eaa3d9f37de6596209585a8e78
f46c87c41fa53204b7630dcb81d23a30f2b521e6
describe
'91801' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMH' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
75cd5492e2faeefaa555b4e6391f6603
b114876ae53cf8cfa35d97645a12eba424803897
describe
'17118' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMI' 'sip-files00081.pro'
775115b35b0cf7aceb8e5396f46e14e1
4082f1bfbc2a01e1fbf030c1d91a300ab812c013
describe
'25617' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMJ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
07bb92bf82287d6ce02893993c9611ad
d60f0dd4da43dffbce67e64fad13fa47d1c7b071
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMK' 'sip-files00081.tif'
f99556b9d362f18963a839d9b71aebc0
4f39d82d8ea037da2ced112a860caff39734404c
describe
'834' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMML' 'sip-files00081.txt'
8bc736e663074da8c0a1b836b692ce6c
8833177d6b77df7f723454ee545f8e1422b0712e
describe
'6820' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMM' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
9b12766b6d7e05d930687316d5fa7f75
9d6dc16b287020b784b0e707a9fdb2982d0dd2cf
describe
'595748' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMN' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
e127261303511b1b5220cf709fb3574c
75e1c3f8a828e586e85462869a6124c9b6b4e895
describe
'97764' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMO' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
fdfa725b47f4bdcc97fe42330815be1b
95fb3facef70576a615d9beedcfaee9c51328d71
describe
'17122' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMP' 'sip-files00082.pro'
5a653ab915e7fe58edf28173501f1651
e6913f18ad281d8e95aa4c0fb775636d4686e7c2
describe
'27816' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMQ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
f9e5ebe75315348527bd3f19332540fd
c8eb64185bee30aac6dd465d705c5cefa2d3e3a6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMR' 'sip-files00082.tif'
2a639d3becc6e997ea819b3c47dcd7ea
4f9593f13d3e8823d87f44e50e5c5e256620e97c
describe
'706' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMS' 'sip-files00082.txt'
400f30305947a01dc07e79feda3d4ec8
2fc3298afdd0d4d90b84ff8a1a3ab6339bcb80fd
describe
'7022' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMT' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
2775ebef64d99a5b7597d796ac3fc89a
87a3dd625f2d854224c789c037a37b2281af8471
describe
'595725' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMU' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
e453b21661f3d7618002485685583896
5bfe0440768bba2635eab61c95b9cd434a2669fc
describe
'122267' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMV' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
f1094b8540f836beb682f247c5fdbf33
26e3fc29965f120965cfaa08d6ffaa04c6304522
describe
'29862' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMW' 'sip-files00083.pro'
4f4f1ada682c82cf6ad685e7b9ac26e4
fe0b89931f70aa462ce0cf1b01caebb7ffe16a42
describe
'33842' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMX' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
87d217fea5508d9de079d5e29a0241fb
2869b9f236bbb1c6003a4109e5a8f2f87935a36c
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMY' 'sip-files00083.tif'
7b291f375d5b747ca4c4a141c2b9e29a
c1fbdfc5b7ff532f11f3113aa21f5036b4033cc6
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMMZ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
7c2956503ed2fcf64c2945b7cf1d238e
c4420a5a9f5b7b8e18ec773fe21aed455e97e926
'2011-12-28T23:47:31-05:00'
describe
'8683' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNA' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
22dacda09c178d855ebcb29bc8cd8be3
6798e98ddea292284324680340f1d9041e0223b1
describe
'595535' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNB' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
bea5b24001ed0e53ffa39cb209bbe4ad
cfd54c35641b2bfa0d48e114024450bdfb760091
describe
'83040' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNC' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
d50b8cad8c1b9b9fd059dc220f044929
b29e9e79943c4cc3e238305147354e889626d18d
describe
'33635' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMND' 'sip-files00084.pro'
7c464b69ab16276adf50d2727aa011bd
e60f668aeec7508220f36169efeb971f42879726
'2011-12-28T23:42:28-05:00'
describe
'26563' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNE' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
0ec6bc6eaa25b069da6108ba904bae94
2499c8acf7ccea960fbf177be415726d607d0aed
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNF' 'sip-files00084.tif'
9856ae3000efce12383fba661c02763b
717b29ead4535a4493d13bdfd580e34152c2fccf
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNG' 'sip-files00084.txt'
40a95a315544672dcb88292651cf5832
5b66d8f306427b2b4cc9ca2a894ebb4dac293433
describe
'6904' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNH' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
e2e33e9494efee238b1865dc3ac2f1be
d31817a8e8b3f9fbe742f93c9e7660c80ab9d65a
describe
'595552' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNI' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
d59afc7a5792c270d6b80d27e4044596
3e50b639d961dfeb5cc448e09c7df97e0bdd9fa9
describe
'27601' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNJ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
1369e0c5a8e0f9681303413bcae7f5f2
fec05daac1b6a05852db69355a5de34cab6ec15c
describe
'8143' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNK' 'sip-files00085.pro'
13885ec514937c6d2812f267c9c03f3b
6a102043b0380a281e989c87fbd70d21678ad319
describe
'8808' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNL' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
7ac1adffc24a281d86a2ed42e6f22b3b
814f7b3d487e0d3a4909b7191f7d5d3257d9b5f9
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNM' 'sip-files00085.tif'
d87d95efcc0e7bf08fc35347d1c06da2
1d5fab9a2f5fccd9bd835a3c2a572b929823373a
describe
'381' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNN' 'sip-files00085.txt'
765e9a8713ba36d18fcba4bc751cf9ff
615f20ff1576227202e0f2847fe6801f5a755633
describe
'2429' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNO' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
bf504a190c15af26b39a42e02ff8ed5c
965e74f82d51059fd166a83561385327a81f9a06
describe
'595300' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNP' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
0dd9e2680aaf3c720c9a0ec939a72e61
fadf437b4cd101fb460858822122f42d6b4a2960
describe
'103776' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNQ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
c2cb766a66dc67ced9726a73204008b4
96040a45330d848bd07a18a6d72c564e0dd60206
describe
'15882' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNR' 'sip-files00086.pro'
025b745ee55c64626ceb3424d777d7b7
e20f710e5202a922d9802cec2bc9c0f56619897a
describe
'28218' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNS' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
136364a589e0be199a6d8d8d8be3c434
1aeff1625b5ded3c1476f942648f2b536eaff624
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNT' 'sip-files00086.tif'
5efd6d6fed30b4b4a5905a1ef5c1bfcd
ac1768642541e61f7804387b015e561d07d9195c
'2011-12-28T23:42:35-05:00'
describe
'641' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNU' 'sip-files00086.txt'
883d52ee7879c11a2eb393df982989ce
8d5774dd972a84d1ccd7c264bc1063250818a7f2
describe
'7295' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNV' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
8cd57fe3544110df742f7cc838368a70
3880857e9128eef9e76f84b65204771061c44296
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNW' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
d772909c5830372bba364c263bce9619
476e84c5af4676cbbe39bcbb0f8fbbe01c979e76
describe
'82546' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNX' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
527d4f07bb33ca4114ba2572a318588d
efed425ad2db75a16d40d95913da94b0a39ef3f9
describe
'35958' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNY' 'sip-files00087.pro'
0a51915cc5e7be16ca80b1323c67bc4a
5fd70e071f4994b4ac6fc39c356bd348e8e5732e
describe
'27068' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMNZ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
a014e9913821b22d23a932adb0ba170d
47937b73b7e44c8abcc7bcbcf69823e5236db3bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOA' 'sip-files00087.tif'
2301f577d9a3c5ceae6465013f4cbb5e
0f6cc1aeaaf81a3479bb7afd64b380d6c7edfb30
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOB' 'sip-files00087.txt'
adc170902688412ddd0bc560209f0dec
d4dc6d38f7634c897616cd3ad2518f721953aadb
'2011-12-28T23:43:24-05:00'
describe
'6742' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOC' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
7696a87198573d319995d33f494cea93
88865fca6832aad4c9d107be1e89bf7fadc4db55
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOD' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
09da04eb07cf6b517959cdeab08d5425
d66063cd3614f85c39fd66c7dc41f260d441bd44
'2011-12-28T23:45:14-05:00'
describe
'95083' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOE' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
01169a1f4b22be910ef12cbe13da25c3
55cf19b6577984febb2e994d5b52468be764562a
describe
'40487' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOF' 'sip-files00088.pro'
2c4a06d56507873e2eb01c3878e43c51
fd427557f3902d2436d52839212e0bc9bfa21f02
'2011-12-28T23:46:52-05:00'
describe
'30549' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOG' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
2655838a917b478772a77f440330dc0e
3e48405f4e621839534fea750b98120eeab4a86d
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOH' 'sip-files00088.tif'
62d38803309d2270fba1431962449c52
c1c96a72cf5604ac543149f42c4bc8aedf6b49b6
'2011-12-28T23:45:01-05:00'
describe
'1606' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOI' 'sip-files00088.txt'
fcb6bbc3c2f01e5fe5f41e5366988653
d10b26c2241e46f3fb43e9f25fa31bc14e5af054
describe
'7472' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOJ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
164ccc6585a64fd1525a8a53c2bbea65
355ccaec65eed1b6b8ba3ffd10c9af6935bd87be
describe
'595554' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOK' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
b86c7a6bf0da84a3a2d9072e6d05f868
0088984eef7f1b9e316abec1d78b962f5786c807
describe
'93274' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOL' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
f792ffbb930089d51a538852131272f4
04d85c7c4f86cdaf94127cbf949de8d7f44c6ce3
describe
'18454' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOM' 'sip-files00089.pro'
00ba3cfb62d2491b4d95af2063927cbf
f6be65a24c95d0231fb62761924c07640568c980
describe
'25811' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMON' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
5a45ad7f5aaf04a9b95925298fa11a8c
c4c08289de603e3d0c7e89b72fb5e51c240bfefc
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOO' 'sip-files00089.tif'
0912edc93db0696ca4d5d531f12ee0dd
bdcb43631cea3a1b4868ffd3b76d2c5425e0492d
describe
'789' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOP' 'sip-files00089.txt'
230ab07a260a5ca7d8a0d216cba554cf
92683d6cd3e6d390efa7260b99135e61c694f285
describe
Invalid character
'6869' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOQ' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
f7539dc83d0b50eac42e5bc1f9ce252a
bae5d538baa4fe989f8938965567295ec737dc0f
describe
'595456' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOR' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
d13ea261ad8ef282bbad644b68e2ab35
8d31653edc080caf30cdb5884d339ce08958988c
describe
'107747' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOS' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
046bb60443ca844cba9e96b5bd4a6419
b21023bc5e0be3a8bd04750b7c4277433d79c313
describe
'21163' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOT' 'sip-files00090.pro'
7363961e0c6dc1eb3ccc294b8f5faf0f
92be14036ff626ea2efe4e9d25ad7fc94017022b
describe
'29900' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOU' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
50a83b66f9597c89a9a47698b7029dd8
bdd880b2208cf82d8b92224711581893c302b57f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOV' 'sip-files00090.tif'
e7257da74a6b7997b2b4c034fb0b302f
c0e068ee8e3ad04d731a7e58b6bbae69e8a5b181
describe
'849' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOW' 'sip-files00090.txt'
49b2773adb066464c45e5242477e1201
ff44095c75d2bfdacd10a75aa74c2426d7515e72
describe
'7907' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOX' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
739ec91049711ddd978ed1c0cf50fd72
e39fc9d424be3934ecaf044eac8d6a3dcf250c24
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOY' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
dc2e9f773df45cd7dcbfef9377ba00ea
9c255e517dc7c2db1767eecaf64de1acf28d60b8
describe
'111200' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMOZ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
27da3e61bae4febfa7586f3536b01e90
9e50b736c6d201e56a2df1878058ea5c2f73dfa4
describe
'24323' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPA' 'sip-files00091.pro'
1f12a10df05f80104f38f3619ccd9585
60c9885353f5903b22ce289dd64e7e24c1b358e5
describe
'30677' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPB' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
bf36e81a03c5c8c40422f350fb946717
e66c3e717963a1002289d28f6da2e36bcede77be
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPC' 'sip-files00091.tif'
dc44af15fc678f55e9a281fc562f9da2
c423b48f6c3d3c1d91e82747a97f46c65e85b401
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPD' 'sip-files00091.txt'
8aebb16e157dd76cca2f7f20f1846257
f0a3f26f4fd868370681d6a9ec852c84db74bb85
describe
'8054' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPE' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
f407737bb8e91b7e0d45d7457251f198
e2c40ffdca150ba584c1ef2ec062ed3579dcc5c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPF' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
437e8b45bb768f37c9218947de93f56c
434d422ff4e321069869d9cd4580da60175f4f4c
describe
'100467' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPG' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
06c5b9a61e2678533c32fde2df015876
62a9310b9284e29e1883522bd34532669c6d9f2d
describe
'43022' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPH' 'sip-files00092.pro'
60901c082296a65d0f4d0a8b08f43484
f9d01b248a722f2ef20d6aa6d011f634529a4a56
describe
'31158' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPI' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
8a898e260fbdbabf5e75477069910950
f84aae883162db3399af7bd5837da63afe2bca36
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPJ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
7ace00e1f804ea0cc8039fd6270fae96
b8023248ca171fa5d8b0f5b48a1b516685300e41
describe
'1688' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPK' 'sip-files00092.txt'
9f0dcafd0254484114ac6215cf98d21c
b2b1279b8aef549a1f19cbc650710500eeae6f52
describe
'7953' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPL' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
278218a775d45a366d950bafe5c59c8d
8b5543b5460e020e4565272e836ec46ed4fc6d1a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPM' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
ff45d23adfb67e40ab4bbd89c160066d
b6605afc7d08267fdcf59f3757d2db486335733f
describe
'90633' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPN' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
1c338f8e27eb5157e6cc5d6705f99f9c
d8e95ad8e2fc1e7a43fdfe75bedebb3c1556adac
describe
'38554' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPO' 'sip-files00093.pro'
0628caeda983d6563bf0f0fb607a1fd1
6dcb416acb9fa80d84c583340d06f2eb8d0a4b53
describe
'28266' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPP' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
f873e02f52ecb5ada05ce21a3fc6defc
ff923f72469181004aa056b37c01b9a3c27294f2
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPQ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
39851fed44128c94888b60f61d7d4d95
5f6dcc49019c4f24fcbdf66752111b0ae9f553ce
'2011-12-28T23:42:48-05:00'
describe
'1543' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPR' 'sip-files00093.txt'
b1e9f5a5771ea8d8700d804a1bdcd156
ba02369b2387317a32f3d439baf5d407364d1e77
describe
'7121' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPS' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
dfbdfabb05be14e4a9c8b16aa6b68c0e
49b499030ad45f0607b8e85cf05ca002bc3128e8
describe
'595557' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPT' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
7a414038745242c30a55263d4d474e6b
8b0d0085296e04b02b65e4e48958539abe7792c3
describe
'91647' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPU' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
eb4c60f9faf26d1d0bba9ca31dd84bb2
f51bb6f9066565780109dd9f714ca248ab65d3a8
describe
'38224' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPV' 'sip-files00094.pro'
594f57f9994d3db79d7e274ce2b19a80
ac56b893c2219ce727a9e1e3b9b9940b71ff6f3a
'2011-12-28T23:46:08-05:00'
describe
'29377' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPW' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
f51123429b5e071d4138080611cff50b
79b39872f40f2db2e2bc039aeab986eed6bccc07
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPX' 'sip-files00094.tif'
fb7341a41b730efbe51743c6a74cfe72
75d6027886b1638efb12a63bf47ec55d25749bdb
describe
'1542' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPY' 'sip-files00094.txt'
1073dedca972fcbe63d33b8a2e28ca9d
294f3f84bd168768d1770f1a8437381739342f44
describe
'7105' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMPZ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
8ee979baec8a43a23d40189c42c382d0
9154ebf183d2fef4cdf2088b850751addc6b2d39
describe
'595890' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQA' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
ac7676e510d10fed13a65970d28f933d
9025c264605d855f86a378714924b469869ea3f9
'2011-12-28T23:45:48-05:00'
describe
'115629' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQB' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
b584642a16a8a0eb65b23ff6a85be2c3
76c453de88b72c02217ab45a65ac5a69ab2b68b6
describe
'29439' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQC' 'sip-files00095.pro'
e2d0f0f168860d0e0e9b304b9a187ae5
9a8f183696b04c7b0e5d468e56eec8cd8edd9072
describe
'31782' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQD' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
8eab904f50c8e90f51b73fb69c65ba16
be009ad642ba1276a7734cd9bf2de4ea9d727bec
'2011-12-28T23:44:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQE' 'sip-files00095.tif'
f233302ff0688f43cf481f7a876c48bd
8f7b149a59834bd90b45fcf0528443e109a1b3c3
'2011-12-28T23:45:21-05:00'
describe
'1707' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQF' 'sip-files00095.txt'
b625ba1f80045e6da43c21a1699406de
c43fc35593109ed532c3490dab8eb21afd4dee6a
describe
'8359' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQG' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
aac7e6ac62071bf34707ed17e6eea50b
ed5d44fcc58e12e68ed645aa0372ec64a0104a11
describe
'595520' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQH' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
c495faa10532a5970b5d6a198420414e
571944a8791cda7a897ffc4175c012864b31aea4
describe
'95165' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQI' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
4c445c789545ad29f4fe48c2fc2458c2
793ac86a909cac8724cfe95ab8a80f66706c4a82
describe
'39819' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQJ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
bfb87f45f05d274750959eb6ec840d1b
73f042b6212f5df10ddfdf125bbc8c58da79a687
describe
'30290' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQK' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
027c075cda4e3bee858736897c885fc5
5a2850ad905a48a434d0a375fdc382d1e2246e09
'2011-12-28T23:46:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQL' 'sip-files00096.tif'
19e20948cfe385d7f3b831be67be0e60
8b669664c33aad46f8799ead82bf3a23b7c40d97
describe
'1592' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQM' 'sip-files00096.txt'
ccc2d4a9e60b8d5e8cb31d37a897af76
cc1b55faab7d6273c12e6aeced336ad50f97e96a
describe
'7692' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQN' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
40d391bb26684d61927c272598e96e43
4dab0513b05eafa772130bcb15630e46213ded75
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQO' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
cc1ebfe3f149ce2b0f6fdeae74271d12
dbfb97c715fc8734c30ab0c49ea6dc93e8498539
describe
'91270' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQP' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
4c6e51ff063e3e6b7ef7a162362b104a
c4ddb23596ebf2fddedaba24c6047ebc31e72ba8
describe
'24023' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQQ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
8a90c3dd33853f7fecaec4db2d0eb011
6051e35381dc7fe88903a28bb152011f5b7a3e7d
describe
'25560' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQR' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
126367e957635f0274976847a5a29ee3
9d98d7b2d18267ef0dbea4d7543e697d46265c89
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQS' 'sip-files00097.tif'
63fe5cadc451482ab5971e2bdde50227
6001d6d965f75822da2dca4c15fc7d0b4313a739
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQT' 'sip-files00097.txt'
6c44f9c997dabe34e9a608386e10b4d4
cd72933dfe52057436a624dcae439a7ef23d6a16
describe
Invalid character
'6784' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQU' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
fa937e083d429d5b0fefeb1264693cf6
29b6c4a2172b8b335e76fad683e4290ec7c01443
'2011-12-28T23:45:49-05:00'
describe
'595563' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQV' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
c82435a7e9b4576d7e90cd77361c7e59
e4a3a426b09ff646a67fb4dd1344fe517eb2f6b4
describe
'95317' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQW' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
9b85eace1e3af4de632f78e9b15985cb
9dcedd18690c4dd08952655e9c42864733d1a74d
describe
'39530' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQX' 'sip-files00098.pro'
143b1a3e674bcc964b81ad0c087e1ce5
236871ecbd308893c5e9bc0a362da989e28a7cf6
describe
'31002' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQY' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
ccd1a74ec27ffd6e931bac79603de2e2
03b37ff1ab2747627f61828fc0243130c2bbe1bb
'2011-12-28T23:43:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMQZ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
07bb6bb8ae734654ceb63ef4349b6a57
675823d30456847a05ff61a1b70dee1f038169ad
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRA' 'sip-files00098.txt'
b91a9858d310f60d58f2d4fb2820d420
e650fb601224115d5f6c76cce6c87b1b59fd5107
describe
'7606' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRB' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
eb8e96d76674ba896a49b9730336092f
1298ba9714f136e569a834a357f0c038930c3691
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRC' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
d60e2676a53b6324a830e5457a8130ff
222f9cce30bea523c6cd4a87d5c98f6f3c9bb4c5
describe
'107740' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRD' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
0fd4aa6375b5e7751d393d56f09d8478
4a7bfb8644e082757934b690a11a1c23bd9049c6
'2011-12-28T23:47:29-05:00'
describe
'29663' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRE' 'sip-files00099.pro'
992f72a6fa6b398831bcb5b84908c803
a51b47d340a3d458effc5f298a2d5d87a818cf93
describe
'31288' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRF' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
99f620226538f088901237a1089b8141
e2cd23dc6a7ea0073631dc2e9bed0cc0d45a2ef3
describe
'14322364' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRG' 'sip-files00099.tif'
d8801ee09ee61a1d755d855a4d3b1909
360fed925b71cc5485ec144a0fe755ef1920f21d
'2011-12-28T23:46:04-05:00'
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRH' 'sip-files00099.txt'
eda270522e8cbe65f3c0389573cac1a0
317829f4422d1a55d11df88faff710c8be30f7c4
describe
'8048' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRI' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
02b9cfc56dda0f0128b9717612739a7e
fa6d20fa8a53eab3c3e42ff69779073c21aedcb1
describe
'595560' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRJ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
ca0179a604e1556b09a7e74d4ff190d9
b06361045229cfc36c802b34bd252d1c2b1ad5f5
describe
'117781' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRK' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
94d98e1b22a1313683cd8e9f1721568b
31a2001540a7bc30ae78bd6f08a156776037ef9d
describe
'32675' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRL' 'sip-files00100.pro'
8755fd1c3e35455bd8e479fb72f37572
dd7c927f2094664b0f27ecee6ea7414b7bacbf40
describe
'34580' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRM' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
233e4dcd3e0fc15123df783c31c478d1
034d0ff4423d2ed0f6922e3d8c094c05905692aa
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRN' 'sip-files00100.tif'
05291d109ade324a43dbc57bb31b048e
225d817d000f53d1968d9de99fc6968af5cda7a0
describe
'1776' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRO' 'sip-files00100.txt'
96836c18d2126f4a5bf6eb7eee0dd9b9
9c7cf8b8e4617ff2052a6360a86d575f6cab8e6b
describe
'8804' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRP' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
5534aca60fb8a752e01e3dd5183bf1b4
7ebd9d56dca68d9bcdb7d856818d203ce5398bad
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRQ' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
7abd0ad811dbd3a059ae2947f7249698
3c5981011d1d9c21162e2210ffbd3b319d90b098
describe
'173205' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRR' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
e2f8c5e3a1e6a44d1253950bd742e25a
6539e9015c58417c326cd65e9999a0e5da0a6fca
describe
'36830' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRS' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
3f09689dd042436b04885a74ab5a7269
81e08e7f53733c04838d987d1cf43794850e6c07
describe
'14300520' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRT' 'sip-files00102.tif'
f73fe07fd8fa42ca2c39ac6ac75ca5b2
11d2ff688e8c8435cf1aa5b458d0612d5239e821
'2011-12-28T23:42:33-05:00'
describe
'7430' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRU' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
c1c4b43c8bf78c6fc9c98a47d50c1e3b
039a3618a7f6d19a6b3ce36757853703e0d1f85f
describe
'694789' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRV' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
4822fe9c23d253915286aa353d3547da
041e515946958cd0fc477bcfff5bbcfd9b203f52
describe
'164943' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRW' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
27947c08e0f74a48e12e127d69b31055
45fd5e16ea4b2472cf1d07f7b374d016c187ea2d
'2011-12-28T23:44:02-05:00'
describe
'35799' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRX' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
56a4e7a29befefefc06eae0cdd4c7d52
74b116d2968c97a386a20ecd647a60f5e7e345db
describe
'16682376' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRY' 'sip-files00103.tif'
69d2487cf25c433cec69011dc56c48b4
b167594a12122c199b01cbbac0539ec5bfcf1ff0
describe
'7576' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMRZ' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
edf1a7dfe8b4d4da7b65d784dcef3e33
6da665f89316ea6dfdc57bc10b4b2001b9b6934e
describe
'677401' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMSA' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
9b60d2566ef0ec46b1a22e5a250d9145
262a8eb7af416650c1d5ebe1c66f969c0a9c0882
'2011-12-28T23:44:30-05:00'
describe
'59471' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMSB' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
a50b7e6100d01d6658aaae7ed3e14174
43d6122702e161e4921a5a405be0668b5093bcfb
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMSC' 'sip-files00104.pro'
1d128f1e31103b1ec8617d1e62402d1c
9af350d3cd31ae9bf86a2ace8ee2eeb646459945
describe
'12203' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMSD' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
e2852605135aa7a97609935dcacee178
68cf4919d89e8d2c94fc5a27ff37e00ad5cc6e49
describe
'16263744' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMSE' 'sip-files00104.tif'
b80187fa27bedec055a4f51378db8c7e
bcbc98ed3848ea02b437cc08c025cae21f20eaf3
describe
'2912' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMSF' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
e01db28777230023345f3ba064f50f68
d5fdb10965e9834c7738cc4b3934b42a2f1755a9
describe
'53103' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMSG' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
8e29f1e05cca05a8e91c359edf0eb900
b67b00b9e79e1eab0f25a798a8ce8541f06c41c3
describe
'9720' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMSH' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
ece5392850ae40e654036bf69099006e
c643577a883aecea67c0575b5405c52a757a5ee8
describe
'296' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMSI' 'sip-files00106.pro'
0999dab40b92a2b7f7c0c12aedf6b46d
c9372cc648292402aebd93e6bc5b88bf248a8dc1
describe
'2883' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMSJ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
3785f014f274ac4b00953087c02b6b22
11a777825b7e84234369c7896a2784e9b3ee9168
describe
'1294132' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMSK' 'sip-files00106.tif'
81a32d53a330a0d6f2d5f33f9f3aca7a
2532523fdb56d8d54aa83d5b9d96798d88e18ee9
describe
'8' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMSL' 'sip-files00106.txt'
eea97531842f23797b90d6ab8f50fb0a
06b60433d1568e206deb7f0aad3db41c8187662e
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMSM' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
936438adcf602341faeb9c275a073427
f6023f3a27c914e48e4f311d43d492ef8b77efc1
'2011-12-28T23:47:02-05:00'
describe
'24' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMSN' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
bffd6ab13df5dd088e09b2545e2d325c
a2ff1955a023860d4c103fe6192c78b43d34a32e
describe
'150134' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAUXfileF20090114_AAAMSO' 'sip-filesUF00087283_00001.mets'
61d94718a86fe94f108c9c199222c19b
31ae025a04ce5cc3cb4c6f345f72b8e97bd2ccc4
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T00:43:06-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
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Ye
Dd 1e gy Mr g-/ 6

ni wey Plehs

BUND) (QINEUEI, SS MOIES)


AND OTHER STORIES

BY

Mrs. MOLESWORTH



ILLUSTRATED BY W. J. MORGAN

Society for Tromobi nd Christian Kicwledbe
LONDON

Northomberland Avenve W-G
NEW YORK
E &I-B-YOUNG & @
LONDON
ENGRAVED AND PRINTED BY EDMUND EVANS

RACQUET CT.. FLEET ST., E.C.
CORN eagles:

PAGE
Tse Lucky Ducks : : F : : 3 . : i
Oitp Mrs. Simpxins’ Crock . : : : : : : 27
Our or THe Carriack WInpow . : : : : 5 as
Tue AFFECTIONATE GEESE. k : : : : : oe
iD Oinin gow Onin aaa : : : : : : 50
Tue Bat wHo CAME TO CHURCH . ; : : : : 5)

Mr. Nosopy
Mr. Know-Aun
Some STRANGE PEOPLE.

Danpy's REVOLT . : ; : 90
PART I.



OUNG Mrs. Mervyn was staying in the country for some weeks.
She was very young though she had been married more than two

years, and had a jolly fat baby-boy called Jerry—his real name was
Gerald—about eight months old. Poor Jerry had been ill, and less fat
and jolly than usual, and it was on his account they had come to the
country so early as June, some weeks before young JZ7. Mervyn could
get his yearly holiday. For he was a lawyer, with lots to do. It would
have been rather dull for Mrs. Mervyn alone all day with nobody but
Jerry and his nurse, delightful though Jerry was, for Mr. Mervyn had to
go up to town by an early train, and only got back late in the evening for
dinner. So Mrs. Mervyn's sister Dora had been invited to accompany
the little party, and as Dora was only fourteen and very pleased to get an
extra holiday, the arrangement suited her tastes exactly. They managed

to amuse themselves very well, for they had brought down the pony and
B
8 THE LUCKY DUCKS

pony-carriage with them, and there were plenty of pretty drives; and as
Jerry soon got better and was able to go out with them, the party was
quite complete.

Now young Mrs. Mervyn prided herself on her housekeeping. She
had never done anything of the kind before her marriage, and was never
tired of relating how much she had had to teach herself, and what a good
thing it was for girls to learn such things before they married. She had
been the youngest but one at home, and Dora was the quite youngest,
and as they had several very capable elder sisters, domestic duties had not
fallen in their way.

“’m going to teach you all I can while you're staying with me,
Dora,” she said. ‘‘ Of course country housekeeping is rather different, but
I think I am very quick at it, naturally. For though I have never kept
house out of London before, I am getting into the way of it beautifully.”

So Dora came into the kitchen with her sister every morning when
dinner was going to be ordered, and now and then cook got a holiday,
and the young ladies took her place, and spent the afternoon in making
rather indigestible cakes. And on Saturdays they went off to the market
which was held once a week in the little neighbouring town, where they
laid in a stock of eggs, and looked learned over the butter, and pinched
and pummelled the farmers’ wives’ chickens to be sure they were tender,
and not aged fowls.

“Have you no ducks?” asked Mrs. Mervyn one Saturday of the old

woman from whom they generally bought poultry.
AND OTHER STORIES. 9

She shook her head.

“t's early days for ’em yet, ma'am,” she replied. “I’ve some
beauties as ‘Il be ready for killing in two or three weeks, but I must sell
em off as they are, for I am going away for a month to visit my

daughter who is married over by Middleham.”



ea z eA
~ “Tlawe you no ducks?”

“How do you mean, you must sell them as they are?” asked
Mrs. Mervyn.

“Why, live, to be sure,” said the woman, “and a good bargain those
as buys ‘em 'll have of ’em. One-and-six each for the five of 'em, and
when fattened up they'll be noble birds, will they ducks, though I says

it, as shouldn't.”
IG THE LUCKY DUCKS

“One-and-sixpence—eighteenpence ; that does seem very little,” said
the lady. ‘And how soon will they be ready for killing, did you say?”

The poultry woman reflected.

“Four weeks'd see ’em all ready,” she said. ‘And indeed, there’s
two as’d be very nice in a fortnight. There must be lots of scraps
about your place, ma'am, as’d fatten ’’em finely—with some Indian corn,
reg’lar, as well.”

“Oh, Fanny, do buy them,” said Dora. ‘It would be such fun to
have a little farmyard of our own while we're in the country. And there _
is a—sort of a pond in the garden,” she added, with a vague idea of
ducks necessitating water. | .

“They've no call for a reg’lar pond, Miss,” said the woman. “A
bit of a gutter, the dirtier the better. Ducks is queer birds.”

Mrs. Mervyn reflected. She was really quite as eager as Dora to
become the proud possessor of the five ducklings, but she had vague
misgivings that somehow or other she might be taken in. And she
did not like the idea of her Fred—Fred was Mr. Mervyn—making
fun of her. And after all, seven-and-six for the lot! It was ridiculously
cheap.

“If Fred laughs at me I'll tell him it was to please Dora,’ she said
to herself, and so the bargain was concluded.

“T'll fetch ’em over on Monday,” said the old woman. ‘“ Monday
morning, if father can spare the boy, and if not, afternoon. Yes, maam,

thank ye; Monday for certain sure.”
AND. OTHER STORIES. é II

She seemed so honest and straightforward that Mrs. Mervyn offered
to pay her then and there. But the woman shook her head again.

“No, thank ye,” she said ; “you'll pay me when the birds is fetched.
Time enough, but thank ye all the same.”

She seemed honest, and she was so. My story is not one of cheating

and trickery, as you will see.

Dora was delighted.



* TRE DUCKS
Seemep VERY

“Tt will be such fun,’ she repeated. “And, Fanny, we magh¢
send one duck up to London by parcel post—killed and—and—what
is the word for doing up chickens and things like that, you know—
tucking them up neatly with their poor little legs and wings all close
together ?”

“ Trussed, you mean,” said the wise housekeeper.

“Oh yes, that’s it. Well, we might send it to them at home trussed,
and with bits of parsley stuck in, and say it was from our farm-yard.

Wouldn’t it be lovely ?”
12 THE LUCKY DUCKS








Chey were
“fetched

over by

Aap \ X re
SU OW! BAR .

wu Y

“Ves,” Mrs. Fanny
agreed, ‘it would be very
nice. JI think, however,
wed better eat one our-
selves first, just to be
sure, you know, that they
are really tender and
good. In a fortnight,
didn’t the old woman say
the first might be killed ?”

“T think so. Howl .
wish the time would come!
I feel in such a fuss to
pack up the duck and
send it off. Wont Elma
and Anne be astonished ?”

But before that same

Goes fortnight had come to an
Wl -na end, Dora had changed

her mind.
Monday morning
brought the ducks. They

were “fetched” over by

a boy in a basket—I don’t mean that the boy was in the basket too—I
AND OTHER STORIES. 13



see I must be more careful how I express myself! No; the basket was
carried by the boy, and inside were the five ducks, very tightly packed in,
and too terrified to have a quack left in them, poor things.

But they revived a bit when they found ‘themselves once more on
terra firma—though I am again expressing myself badly. Is Dora’s
‘sort of a pond,” in reality a very extensive puddle in the back garden—
where the rain had collected, thanks to a want of new gravel—to be
called terra firma? | really can’t undertake to say. But whether it is so
or not, there the ducks seemed very much at home, and by the next
morning had apparently forgotten all about their disagreeable experiences

of the day before.


14 THE LUCKY DUCKS

PART II.



SHOULD really be afraid to say how much
of her time during the next few days Dora
spent beside “her “pond. Not that the
ducks were entirely kept to the pond—oh
dear no!—but it was usually there that
they were to be found when she came out
to look for them. She ‘took them walks,”
which means that she drove them, with the
gentlest words and gestures, into the little
field close by, where they seemed equally
icontent and at night she “put them to
bed,” that is to say, she-decoyed them by
the sight of her plateful of scraps and hints of Indian corn into an
empty stable, where the dear creatures weré safely locked in:
And her sister Fanny was “nearly as bad” as Dora herself.
“They are really such interesting things,” she explained to her
husband, when two or three times over, not finding Mrs. Mervyn in the

drawing-room or on the verandah on his return from London, he was told

“the ladies were at the pond.” “I had no idea ducks could be so

interesting.”
AND OTHER STORIES. 15



‘Not even when you're fattening them for your own table,” Mr.
Mervyn replied. ‘I can understand that fact adding a wonderful charm

to poultry of any kind.”







































AT NIGHT SHE
¢
“Put THEM TO BED,

Mrs. Mervyn seemed rather in a hurry to change the subject,
Dora, who was with her sister at the pond of course, glanced up quickly,

but said nothing. In a moment or two however she remarked briskly
16 THE LUCKY DUCKS



that she. thought ‘“ Tottles seemed better to day.” “JI am sure he stands
firmer on his legs.” |

“ Tottles,” repeated Mr. Mervyn, “(do you mean the baby, Jerry?
Why do you give him such a ridiculous name, and—surely, Fanny, you
are not allowing the child to stand or walk yet? I have always heard, I
know my mother says so, that it is fatal to let a baby walk too soon? it
gives them—what is it ?>—-makes ’em knock-knee’d or bandy-legged, I’m
not sure which. But it’s something that shouldn’t be.”

Mrs. Mervyn could not help laughing.

“My dear Fred!” she exclaimed. ‘Jerry is only eight months old.
No fear of his wanting to walk or stand just yet. You might as well
warn me against letting him have too many lessons at his present age.
Oh no, Tottles is only one of the ducks—we didn’t think him as strong
and sturdy as the others, but he’s improving.”

‘* He couldn't stand when he first came,” said Dora. ‘At least he
always flopped down when he had walked a little bit, his legs seemed
weak. I think he had had some illness. He’s that one over there—the
one with the nearly black wings, Fred.”

‘‘ He looks pretty fat,” said Mr. Mervyn, “but, on the whole, Dora,
if your idea about him is correct, I think, though I wish Mr. Tottles well,
I would rather not eat him.”

And unfortunately,” said Mrs. Mervyn, with a little sigh, which .
might have been for Tottles himself and the fate before him, or mzght

have been for the possible effect of roast Tottles on her husband’s
AND OTHER STORIES. 17

digestion ; “unfortunately he is the very one that the woman said should
be killed first. She said in a fortnight. It’s quite that, Dora.”

| Her tone was as tragic as if she had been passing sentence of death
on some unjustly condemned prisoner. Dora started.

“Oh, Fanny,” she said, “you should let him get quite aral first.







He hasn't been able to enjoy himself half as much as the others since

they came here, with his being so weak, you see. Don't you think *
Fanny should let him get well first, Fred?”

“T should say so decidedly,” replied Mr. Mervyn. And his face was
very solemn. ‘For the sake of others, if not for his own, I should say
so, very decidedly indeed.” .

Dora's face cleared.
18 THE LUCKY DUCKS



“Oh, how very nice of you, dear Fred!” she exclaimed. ‘I wish I
could catch Tottles and make him give you a kiss.”

“It would be rather a wet one,” said Mr. Mervyn. ‘‘ Thanking you
for your kind intentions, Dora, | think we will leave Doddles’ kiss to the
imagination.”

“ Tottles,’ said Dora, “not Doddles. Doddles wouldn't suit him a
bit, would it, Fanny? They've all got names, Fred. The two little
white ones — you
wouldn't know them
apart, but Fanny and
I do—are Lily and
Snowflake, and the

thin, rather scraggy



greyish one is Hans

Lity AND SNOWFLAKE eo a

why we called him

Hans, Fanny? Oh yes, it was because his face is like one of the

geese in my Grimm, who was—oh, Fanny, do look how much better
Tottles is walking.”

“Yes, he’s gone right round the pond,” exclaimed Mrs. Meryvn.
‘He thought Perkins was going to snap up that bit of crust before he
could get to it. Perkins is the lively little duck running after Tottles,”
she explained to her husband quite seriously. ‘We called him ‘Perk’
or ‘ Perky,’ at first, and then it got into ‘ Perkins,’ ”
‘

AND OTHER STORES. 19

“Most interesting,” said Mr. Mervyn. ‘Let me see—‘ Tottles,
Lily, Snowflake, Hans, and Perkins.’ It reminds me of your favourite
memory game, Dora—‘ Alcibiades, Gladstone, Garibaldi, Simkins,
Napoleon, &c. Am I not sharp at remembering their names?”

“Dear things,” said Dora, as they at last tore themselves away from
the pond, “they ave so sweet. I don’t wonder you love them, Fred me

“Roast and stuffed, and







with apple-sauce,” murmured her
brother-in-law under his breath ;
scalligy that gis y tOrmSdy, i eCXCEDE
Dodd—no, Tottles, I mean.’

But Dora did
not catch
his words
—~at least
if she did she pretended she didn’t.

And for some little time the quintet of webbed creatures lived on in
peace and plenty, undisturbed by nightmares of sage and onions, apple-
sauce or green peas. |

But if it is darkest before dawn, sometimes, I fear, things ane
brightest and calmest just ere the thunder-clouds gather. There came a
day—a sad day for Dora, and—very nearly, a still sadder day for the

327919)

ducks—when the alarm was given, the “fools’”—or ducks’—“ paradise ’

all but destroyed.
20 THE LUCKY DUCKS

This was how it happened. There came one Saturday morning, a
telegram from Mr. Fred, to say he was bringing back a friend ‘with him
to stay till Monday. Now Saturday is an awkward day for such
surprises, and Mrs. Mervyn at once went into the question of the food
supply.

“Tt is all right,” she said to Dora, as she came out of the kitchen,
“there is enough meat in the house, but—we must have another dish at
luncheon to-morrow, and, Dora, cook said the ducks are really quite
ready: Not Tottles, but two of the smaller ones—Hans and Snowflake
are the fattest. You must try and not mind, dear.”

But Dora hid her face in her hands, and rushed up-stairs in a burst
of tears!

“T’II—T’'ll try to be good, Fanny,” she whispered penitently to her
sister, when red-eyed but composed she made her appearance an hour or

two later. ‘Only, don’t expect me to come in to luncheon to-morrow.”


AND OTHER STORIES. 2



PART III.

ORA aid come in to luncheon on Sunday, however, and was quite
as happy and merry as usual. But on her sister’s face were
some signs of housewifely care.

“Tam so sorry,” she said to the gentleman who was staying with
them, “to give you such a poor luncheon. ~ But the fact Sema nel mI
counted upon something which—which failed us unexpectedly.”

“T bet you anything you like, I can guess what the dish was,” said
Mr. Mervyn, interrupting his. friend’s assurances that he had everything
he could possibly wish for in the way of an excellent meal. ‘‘ Roast Tott
—no, I beg your pardon—roast duck—eh ?—am I not right?”

Fanny blushed a little.

“Not far wrong,” she said; ‘the truth is, I had ordered roast ducks,
or ducklings rather, for we have some of our own, quite ready for killing,
but late last night the cook sent in to tell me—it does seem very
ridiculous—that neither she nor the kitchen-maid nor the footman knew
how to kill ducks. And as it was Saturday night the gardener had gone
home, and so had the coachman and the groom. None of them live on
the premises, and of course we could not have eaten ducks only killed
the same morning.”

“Besides,” said Dora, “it would be very naughty to kill chickens or
ducks or anything on Sunday.”

‘And the long and the short of it was, that Mr. Tott—-oh dear,
22 ' THE LUCKY DUCKS



dear, I mean to say the duck—got a reprieve, and we had to put up with
—what is it ?—cutlets, instead of him,” said Mr. Mervyn.

“You would have had to put up with not having me,” said Dora,
“if they had been here. It wasn’t Tottles at all
—it was to have been Hans and Snowflake.”

“Hans and how much?” asked her
brother-in-law.

But Fanny saw some suspicious signs
about Dora’s eyes, and she knew that the
child would not stand much teasing about it,
so she changed the subject.

“T must speak to the out-door men,” she
said, hurriedly. “After all it doesn’t much matter.”

Monday came. When Mrs. Mervyn was
ordering dinner, cook returned to the question
of the ducks.

“I was very sorry, ma'am,” she said, “to

Have to disappoint you so. And it’s very stupid



se of me and the others not to be able to put our

hand to such a thing. But they do say as ducks is very queer to kill.”
“Of course, it must be done properly,” said Mrs. Mervyn, “I could

not have the poor creatures tortured. But you had better tell the
gardener to do it—let me see, to-morrow would do. They will come in

nicely for Wednesday, when I expect my aunt to spend the day.”
AND OTHER STORIES. : 23



And she mentally resolved that she would take Dora a long drive on
Tuesday, so that the fatal deed should be done without her knowing.

“ And once they ave killed,” she thought, “Dora must just try to be
sensible about it, though I do sympathize with her. I'll never have
eatable pets again—never—though, of course, we didn’t mean to make
pets of them. Why Dora was quite full of sending one home by parcel
post!”

But it was some time since Dora had alluded to this plan.

Wednesday morning at breakfast-time, Dora announced her intention —
of running out with a plateful of scraps to the ducks.

“We were out nearly all yesterday,” she said, ‘and I scarcely saw
the dear things.”

Mrs. Mervyn shivered, but said nothing. A few minutes later,
however, on her way to the kitchen, she heard Dora’s voice as merry as
ever, coming from the direction of ‘the pond.”

“ Has the gardener not killed the two ducks yet? Did you forget
my orders ?” she asked the cook.

Poor cook looked guilty.

“If you please, ma’am, no, I didn't forget. But it’s a very odd
thing, ma’am, the gardener had never killed a duck. The lady you have
this house from never keeps them. And he said as how he’d rather not.”

“How extraordinary ;” said Mrs. Mervyn, half-annoyed, half-
relieved. ‘But theres Spedding, cook”—Spedding was the coachman

—“he has lived a good deal in the country, you might have asked him.”
24 THE LUCKY DUCKS

“So I did, ma’am,” cook replied. ‘ But
bless you, ma’am, Spedding’s that soft-hearted.
‘Kill a duck,’ says he ; ‘no thank you, Martha,
I begs to be excused.’ And then I tried Dunn,
the groom, ma’am. He said if I’d give him the
carving-knife, he'd have a try at chopping their
necks off; but that I wouldn’t hear of. ‘The
_ missis wouldn't allow no brutiality,’ says 1.”
| } “Certainly not,” Mrs. Mervyn replied.
“But what are we to aoe The ducks must

Ga >
The Gardener, =



aa ee . be killed sooner or later.”
‘There's the butcher's boy,” suggested the cook. ‘He must be

used to such things ; they come in his line.”
“ Very well then, ask him. Say I'll give him something for his trouble.
To-morrow or the day after would
do. My aunt is not coming after all.” \,
And for a day or two there was no iN
talk of the ducks. That is to say, not from XS

the kitchen point of view. There was plenty ;





of chatter about them on Dora’s part—she
seemed quite to have forgotten the tragic fate

in store for her web-footed favourites.

The Coach wan

ibeas Fo Le

Another “if you please ma’am, about the
I
EXCUSE A a

ducks,” greeted Mrs. Mervyn on Friday.
AND OTHER STORIES. 25



“Well, haven’t you settled it with the butcher's
boy?” said the lady, rather impatiently. It was a dy 7

disagreeable subject, and she wanted to hear as

little as possible about it.

‘““He’s no experience of the kind, neither, if
6 * Ghe Groom
you please,” cook went on with a shake of the head. sua tea neve
a try al chopping

“ Stabbing he could undertake, but that’d never do We xk o«.



for ducks, and so I said to him. But he’s going to
speak to his master, and see if there’s any one about as ean oblige us,”

“Really,” said Mrs, Mervyn, ‘‘it is too ridiculous. I do wish I'd
never bought them.”

Some days passed—the butcher boy’s inquiries appeared to be
unsuccessful. Then one morning cook announced that a man had made
his appearance sent by the butcher to kill the ducks.

So Ce ee een Cena mnt le DN mamiAermn tet
Mrs. Mervyn. |

“He was not—not to say exactly—but still,
ma’am, | couldn’t say he was right down sober,”
said cook. ‘And Robert and me—it went to
our hearts to think of his torturing the poor
birds

we just sent him about his business, quite



Miss Dora so fond of them too—and

civil-like, of course.”



Mrs. Mervyn left the kitchen without speaking!
26 THE LUCKY DUCKS



A fortnight later they were all back in town.

“By the by,” said Mr. Mervyn one evening when they had roast
duck for dinner, ‘‘what became of Tottles and his friends? We never
eat ’em after all, did we? Not that I remember.”

Mrs. Mervyn grew very red.

“‘T—] sent them back to the farm they came from,” she said. It
was no good—I couldn’t get any one to kill them.”

Mr. Mervyn smiled.

“They'll be killed by now,” he said.

“No,” his wife replied. ‘‘ Dora made the woman promise not to kill
them till the autumn. She wanted them to enjoy the fine weather, and

after that she thought she wouldn’t mind so much.”

“Lucky ducks!” said Dora’s brother-in-law.


AND OTHER STORIES. 27





1ISS Jessie,” said nurse, “I’m going round to some of



your Mamma’s poor people this morning, as she is
not well enough to go herself, and she says you may
come with me.”

“J hope you're going to the nicest ones,” said Jessie. ‘‘ I’ve been
once or twice with Mamma, but I don’t like all her poor people. One
woman was quite cross one day, as if it was amma’s fault that she was
poor. JI like the cheerful ones that seem pleased to see us.”

Nurse smiled, though a little sadly.

« Ah, Miss Jessie,” she said, “if you knew more about it you'd not
wonder so much at their seeming cross as at their ever being cheery.

Still you’re full young enough to see the sad side of things. ! think
28 THE LUCKY DUCKS



those that we’re going to see to-day will be the kind you like. There's

old Mrs. Simpkins now; bedridden and alone as she’s been for years,

and never a grumble, and always a smile and a pleasant word for you:

it does one more good than many a sermon to have
a little talk with her.”

The other visits were quickly paid. It was
not the usual day for Jessie's mother to go her
rounds, but she had been ill and obliged to
delay her visits. Nurse had plenty of
good sense, and when she saw that in
some houses the mothers were busy
and in the midst of their work, she
delivered her message without
disturbing any one, promising
that Mrs. Vincent would come
herself as soon as she was
well enough.

“And now,’ she said,



“there is only old Mrs.





Simpkins to see. No fear
of her being busy, poor

body.”




























There was rather a high stair to climb to Mrs. Simpkins’ room.

By the time they got to the top of it Jessie was quite out of breath.
AND OTHER STORIES. 29



“If I was Mrs. Simpkins,” she said, “I'd be very glad always to
stay in bed rather than to go up and down all these steps every time I
went out.”

For Jessie had never been ill in her life, and she was very often so
sleepy in the morning when it was time to get up that she thought it
would be no punishment to stay in bed, if not for always at least for a
good long while.

Nurse tapped at the door.

“Come in,” replied a feeble voice.

They went in.

The room was clean and tidy as usual, though bare enough. The old
woman was half propped up in bed, and a little coarse knitting lay beside
her. But she did not seem to have been working, and as she caught
sight of her visitors she hastily wiped her eyes with her handkerchief
before turning to greet them with a smile

“Good morning, Miss. Good morning Mrs. Drew,” she said.
‘Well, this is kind to be sure. And how is your dear Mamma? _ I[’ve
been longing to have news of her.”

“Mamma is better, thank you,” Jessie replied, “but the doctor won’t
let her go out yet.”

“ Dear, dear,” said the old woman, “she must have had a very bad
cold. Such an active lady as she is too! But it’s an ill wind, they say,
as blows nobody any good, and it’s a pleasure to have a visit from Missy.

She does favour her Mamma, she does.”
30 THE LUCKY DUCKS

Nurse was pleased at this, and she went on talking to Mrs. Simpkins
for a minute or two. The old woman replied cheerfully, but her voice

sounded shaky, and she seemed to put some force on herself to speak

=
|Z SS,
ve Kt rey Ong
To a NOT fe ll f |
=









brightly. From time to time, too, she quietly wiped her eyes, as a tear
or two trickled unbidden down her thin cheeks. Nurse took no notice

for some minutes, but at last she could not help saying to the old woman»
AND OTHER STORIES. z gj



“T am afraid your eyes are weak to-day, Mrs. Simpkins—or—you're
not suffering more than usual, I hope?”
A wintry smile flickered over the wrinkled face.

“No, no, Mrs. Drew,” replied Mrs. Simpkins.












“God be praised I’ve naught to complain of,
anda deal, a great deal, to be Thora for:
But I’ve been having a good cry to
myself all the same—ever since
the nurse came in and straight-
ened me up this morning. I’ve
been lying thinkin’ of it. It
didn’t seem so bad till I was
settled for the day like, and had
read amy. schapter, and
had nothing to do but
to lie and think to
myself, and then I did
feel the miss of it
pretty sadly;” and a
little sob seemed to
shake her.

Nurse grew more and more puzzled.

“But can’t you tell me waz it is you miss so?” she said, while

Jessie’s face looked very grave and anxious.
32 THE LUCKY DUCKS



\

Again Mrs. Simpkins smiled, and this time her smile was more of
a real one.

“Deary me,” she said, “but I am an old silly! It’s my clock, Mrs.
Drew. At least it wasn’t my clock, but I’d come to feel as if it was.
Miss Nicholls, the dressmaker—your lady knows her—she’s been,away
nursing her sister for seven or eight months, and when she went she
left me her little clock. ’Twas partly to keep it safe, and partly to be
company to me—she’s a feelin’ heart, has Miss Nicholls—but she’s come
back, and this morning early she come for her clock. I thanked her
kindly you may be sure, and I wouldn’t have her for to know what an
old silly I am, at my age to cry for a clock.” But though she smiled as
she thus tried to laugh at herself, the tears would keep coming, and
Mrs. Simpkins had to wipe her poor old eyes again and again. “It
was such wonderful company, you'd not believe it,’ she went on, as if
to excuse her own weakness. ‘‘I never felt lonely night or day when
I heard its ticking. There seemed to come words into it—sometimes
‘twould be a verse I learnt long ago, sometimes it'd remind me of the
tick-tick of the old clock I used to listen to in our cottage at home when
I was a little girl.”

Jessie had crept closer to the bedside. Now she put out her little
hand and gently stroked the old woman’s shrivelled brown one. ‘I
understand quite well, dear Mrs. Simpkins,” she said: ‘I think I’ll
feel just like that when I get to be an—an old woman,” she added,

hesitating a little.
AND OTHER STORIES. ‘ 33



Mrs. Simpkins smiled in good earnest this time, though it was
through her tears.

‘“‘Now did you ever ?” she said, turning to nurse with great pride,
“did you ever? Such a pretty thought of Missy to comfort an old
woman with. It’s many a long day before you'll be as old as me,
Miss Jessie, and I hope and trust you'll have better than a clock for
company, but I thank your kind heart, I do.”

She seemed quite bright and cheerful before they left her, but little
Jessie was very quiet all the way home. She had a long talk with her
mother that afternoon, and the contents of her money-boy were counted
over several times.

Two or three days after that, Mrs. Simpkins again had the pleasure
of a visit from Jessie, and this time Jessie was carrying a parcel.

“Shut your eyes for a minute please, Mrs. Simpkins,” said the
little girl. “There now, open them quick and look at the mantel-piece.”

There stood a neat little clock, ticking away as if quite at home.
The poor old woman could not speak for joy.

“It's your very own,” Said Jessie. “It isn’t quite a new one. It
was in our schoolroom once, but the boys would try to wind it up and
touch the hands, so Mamma got a shut-up one. And this was rather
out of order. So we took it toa man Mamma knows who made it guzte
right, and I paid him with my own money. So it’s part a present from
Mamma and part from me, you see, and you must fancy it says to you

“With Jessie’s love.” |
D
34. THE LUCKY DUCKS



Those words and many other sweet and pleasant things did the
little clock tick to the poor lonely old woman, cheering her brave spirit
and reminding her that she was not forgotten. |

If Jessie lives to be old herself, even though she may not be poor
or lonely, I think that she will like to remember that in her bright and

merry childhood she had felt not only for but w2¢h others.


AND OTHER STORIES. 35

OUT OF THE CARRIAGE WINDOW.

W good-bye, dears,” said Mamma, a little anxiously. “You

Ny
really will be——”

« Very, very good, and careful, and as steady as old Time,”



interrupted Donald. ‘Yes, Mamma, you really may trust us. You

know Morty is always quiet, and both he and I will really do what

Janet tells us.”
36 THE LUCKY DUCKS

“Yes, Mamma,” Janet added. You really needn’t be anxious,
dear.”

‘Don’t lean on the carriage doors,” Marnma called out as her very
last injunction.

“No, no,” the three voices replied; but Papa, who was going to
see them off, put his head in at the door again for a moment. |

“Tl see that the doors are well locked, all the same,” he said,
nodding to her reassuringly.

The children were setting off on a journey all by themselves! Yes,
they were actually to travel two hours on the railway without any big
person to take care of them. It was the first time this had happened,
and Mamma, naturally, did not feel quite happy in her mind about it.
But it did not seem as if it could be helped. Morty, their cousin, was
spending his holidays with them, and it was very important that he should
have some sea-air before he went back to school. Nurse and the two
youngest children were already at the cottage where Donald and Janet
had spent many happy summers, and once there the three would be well
looked after. But neither Papa nor Mamma could take them there, as
visitors were coming this very day, nor could any reliable servant be
spared.

“Let’s travel alone,” said Donald. “We'll be quite good, and
nurse will meet us at the station at Seacove.”

And so it was decided.

Papa saw them off. He settled them in a comfortable carriage
AND OTHER STORIES. : 37



where there was only a pleasant-looking old lady in a corner, repeated
Mamma’'s charges, and stood waving good-bye as the train moved out
of the station.

The three children sat very still for some time; there was nothing

very interesting to be seen out of the windows for a good way, so Janet



wry tat!
EXCLAIMED

ee



told the boys a story in a low voice and kept them quiet till they had
passed the last big station before Seacove, for the train was a fast one
and did not stop often. At this station the lady got out, and not long
after came the place well known to Donald and his sister where they had

the first view of the sea. In their eagerness to catch sight of the silvery
38 THE LUCKY DUCKS



gleam in the distance the children all poked their heads out together ;
the door was locked, so they themselves were safe enough, but unluckily
Donald’s arm gave a tiny shove to Morty’s straw hat, the “ railway wind,”
as Donald called it, was quick to seize it, off flew the hat and went
whizzing down the line! .

“My hat!” exclaimed Morty, clapping his hands to his head, as if
expecting still to find it there.

“Morty’s hat!” repeated his cousins together. And all three looked
very blank. } . |

“Tt was quite a new one this summer,” Morty went on dolefully.
_ “Mother gave my old one to Hodgie because I was coming to you, you
see, and Hodgie wasn’t at all pleased, and now he'll make out I’m so
careless.”

“And what's to be done?” said Janet. “You can't go about
without a hat.”

“Tl lend him mine for the present,” said Donald. “I’ve got my
cricket cap in the carpet-bag.”

There was only just time to get out the cap—the bag being
_ fortunately in the carriage—when the slackening of the speed told
them they were arriving at Seacove. There stood nurse on the plat-
form, smiling and eager.

“Well, I am pleased to see you all safe and sound,” she said.
“] did feel a bit anxious to think of you travelling alone.”

But. their rather solemn-looking faces soon caught her attention ;
AND OTHER STORIES. 39

the misfortune was related. Nurse was very sympathizing, but she
was sorry too.

“ How far off was it?” she asked. Her face cleared when she heard
that it had only happened a few minutes out of Seacove. “Oh,” she
said, “that’s not so bad;” and off she set to speak to the station-master.

She came back in a minute or two quite cheerful.

“There's every chance we'll get it back again, he says. He'll
inquire down the line and let us know.”

The next morning, and the morning after that, Donald and Morty
came to the station for news of the flown-away hat, but it was not till
the third day that the answer came. Yes; the hat had been picked up
by some children playing in a field, and was to be heard of at John
Warton’s cottage half-way between Seacove and the next station, Crow-
bank, a very small one where few trains stopped.

“Tt’s not more than three miles from here where Warton lives,”
added an obliging porter.

Home hurried the boys.

“Mayn’t we go and fetch it?” they said, ‘it would be a nice walk over
the fields ;” and nurse, after some consideration, decided that they might.

“Tt is a good thing my hat’s found,” said Morty, as the cousins made

‘their way over the fields. ‘If it hadn’t been, I’d have had to give my
-shilling—that’'s all I have of my own really to spend as I like, the rest is
mother’s that I have to account to her for.”

“And two shillings wouldn't have got as good a one, nurse says,’
40 _ LHE LUCKY DUCKS



answered Donald. “I was thinking it would have been only fair to
give you my florin. It was more my fault than yours.”
“Tt was all our faults, I suppose, said Morty. ‘I know mother

wouldn't be axgry about it, but she’d be sorry. And I wouldn’t like her
SE Nh TH



to pay for another, because I know






| she’s not rich.”
They found the cottage easily.
———=== Mrs. Warton, a
gentle, civil, but

pale-faced, anx- -



ious-looking — wo-
man, with a swarm
of children ‘of all
sizes about her,
hastened to get
out the lost hat
from a cupboard

where she had put

ey it carefully away.

‘Tis a right down good one,” she said, “and quite new. ’Twould
have been a pity to lose it. It must have cost a half-a-crown at the very
least. I were asking the prices of some like it at Seacove last week for
my Bobby. He's smaller than you, sir,” looking at Morty, “but his

head’s a good size. This ’ere hat fits he beautiful.”
ae

AND OTHER STORIES. 4i





“Which is he ?” asked Donald.

Mrs. Warton looked round. “Where are you, Bobby?” she was
beginning to say, when a sort of howl from the corner of the room made
her start. It was Bobby; there he stood, scrubbing his eyes with his
knuckles, weeping valiantly. |

“It’s the ‘at,” explained an elder sister of ten.

“For shame of you, where's your manners?” said Mrs. Warton,
growing very red. “’Twas only,” she went on, “’twas only that we
tried it on for fun, like. And father, he said if nobody owned it, it
must be for he. But I’d never cry about it if I was you, Bobby.”

Bobby cried on however, his round rosy face growing redder and
wetter as the tears rolled down. Morty looked at Donald, and Donald
looked at Morty. Then Morty burst out,—

“Let him wouldn’t have been disappointed. I'll buy—” but here ne stopped short
—a shilling would not pay for another hat the same!

Donald turned to him.

“Tl give you my florin, and you’ve got a shilling to do what you
like with, that'll be plenty. She’—lowering his voice as he nodded
towards where Mrs. Warton was stariding—“ she said half-a-crown.’

“Oh, thank you, Donald, thank you,” said Morty.

Mrs. Warton was not very easy to persuade, but when the
boys put the hat on Bobby and told her to look how well it suited

him she gave in, and was nearly as delighted as Bobby himself, whose
‘42 THE LUCKY DUCKS



chubby cheeks, still shining with tears, grew rounder and chubbier with
pleasure.

~ Morty’s mother would not have seen any difference between the first
hat and the one the boys bought at Seacove, but of course Morty told
her the whole story, and she, too, was glad to think that poor little Bobby
had not been disappointed.












































AND OTHER STORIES. : 43

THE AFFECTIONATE GEESE.










4 J HAT a noise those geese are making! What can it be
Be about ?” said Miss Mildred one morning, as she
passed through the poultry-yard on her
way to the school-house, which was just
outside the Rectory gate. “Is there
anything the matter with them, Mrs.
Green ?~ :

Mrs. Green was the wife of the
Rectory gardener; she took charge of
the cocks and hens, the turkeys
and ducks and geese—under
Miss Mildred that is to say.
Miss Mildred was the clergy-

man’s only daughter, and she

\

loved all these creatures and was never tired of watching them and

their funny ways.

Mrs. Green set her arms akimbo and stood looking at the little
ae THE LUCKY DUCKS



crowd of geese and goslings cackling and jabbering‘and stretching their
long necks.

“ They're a bit put about, miss,” she said. “We've been shutting
up some of the young ones to be fattened for market for. Michaelmas. I
thought we’d had more, but we must wait a bit. There’s only two as'll }
be ready for next market day.”

“Poor things!” said Miss Mildred. She did not like to think of
her feathered pets having to be fattened to be eaten! “1 wish,” she went
on, ‘‘ 1 wish they could all live and die peacefully like the robins and the
swallows.”

“Well, miss, ’m not so sure but what the poultry has the best of it,.
after all,” said Mrs. Green. ‘“There’s a many of the wild creatures as
starves to death in the winter—and farm-yard birds is always sure of
good food, and they knows nothing about nought else.”

“Perhaps so,” said the young lady. ‘“ But I must be quick, or I'll
be late at the school.” .

When she ‘passed back again an hour or two afterwards the
excitement had calmed down. The cocks and hens were pecking
about, the ducks enjoying themselves in the pond, the geese strolling
on the grass, or strutting up and down the little lane leading to the
fields.

Miss Mildred was away from home the next day, but the morning
after, she came out to the poultry-yard as usual.

“And how about the geese? Have they got over their
AND OTHER STORIES. 45



excitement ?” she asked. “ By the by I don’t see the grey gander, Mrs.
Cieenea. |

Mrs. Green cast a quick look at the geese.

‘“‘ Now to be sure,” she said, “it’s really vemarkable,”—“ vemarkable”
was Mrs. Green’s strongest expression—“ there he’s off again and the
goose with the other two here.”

“What in the world do you mean, Mrs. Green?” asked Miss
Mildred.

Mrs. Green nodded her head upwards and looked very mysterious.

“Just you come with me, miss,” she said, ‘‘and you'll see something
as'll really surprise you ; to think that them poor birds should. be that
feelin’-—it’s a lesson for many as calls themselves Christians, and has
precious little affection in their hearts, I take it.”

Miss Mildred followed Mrs. Green, feeling very puzzled as to what
she was going to be shown.

The gardener’s wife led the way along the little lane, then up a
sloping grassy bank, at the top of which stood a gate. It was an old
gate and not a closely barred one. Any of the inhabitants of the
poultry-yard could have easily crept through it, or with even less trouble.
—it was so very rickety—could have shoved it open with the slightest
push. But I don’t suppose the brains of ‘cocks and hens or turkeys have '
yet reached the power of understanding that gates are not intended to be
“crept through or flown over.

Not being either a hen or a duck, Mrs. Green pushed it open and

t
46 . THE LUCKY DUCKS

held it for ies Mildred to pass
through. Just inside, at the edge
of the field, was a sort of little hut,
wired across at the front.

‘Look there, miss,’ said Mrs.
Green.

Miss Mildred looked.

There were two goslings in the
“| shed—two long-legged, melancholy,
silly-looking fee ad though

there was water and food in the



inside corner, and some hay too, the

[ coslings were pressing themselves against the netting,
flapping their wings from time to time, and looking
certainly as if they were growing thinner instead of
fatter. And just outside, squeezing himself as close
as he possibly could to the wire, sat the old grey
gander, whom Mildred had missed in the poultry-yard; the three
creatures, the father outside, the two young birds in their prison—all,
so to say, huddled together, from time to time giving a faint cackle of
woe.

Mildred looked up at Mrs. Green; she almost felt as if she could
cry.

“Yes, miss, isn’t it movin’ to see? But the best of it is, that they
AND OTHER STORIES. | 47



take turns, he and the mother. They had a brood of four, you see, but
the two other young ones is smaller and poorer than these, so we chose
the best two to fatten first. And ever since—'tis the third day, to-day—
would you believe it, the old birds have taken it in turn to sit here outside

to keep the young ones company; while








the gander is here, the goose is with the
other two in the yard or about the lane,
and after. ay bit, shellco),- off = toe them
and the mother'll come here. ‘Tis as true
as true, miss. I couldn’t believe it at first.
Just you come back in an hour or two, and
youll see it’s as | say
—it’ll be the goose’s
turn then to come
and comfort the poor
things.”

She was quite
right. Two hours
later, when Mildred

came back, the mother

a

z

was at the post. -And again in the afternoon the gander took his turn.-
Miss Mildred was not satisfied till she got her father himself to come:
out and see, and the rector was nearly as much touched by the sight

as-hig daughters *. 222s CH bids ine loch b Son. oet Tae
48 THE LUCKY DUCKS



«J believe in my heart, I do,” said Mrs. Green, “that they was a
talkin’ it over and settlin’ how they should do that morning you heard
them makin’ such a clatter, miss.”

“T shouldn't wonder,’ Miss Mildred replied. Then she turned to
her father.







“Papa,”







she said, ‘“we
must let them out.
A few months later perhaps
they will not mind so much—the
goslings will be getting to be old birds

themselves by then, and quite independent. But
just now it seems too cruel.”

Her father smiled, though he sighed too a little.

“ Yes,” he said, “a few months later they will’ not mind. That is
their nature. But for the present—yes, Mrs. Green, let them out, poor
things.”

The six geese, papa, mamma and their four children passed a most

happy evening together I feel sure. And no doubt the rest of their
AND OTHER STORIES. A9

relations were exceedingly interested in cackling over the whole story,
and congratulating the two goslings on their happy release.

Miss Mildred kissed her old father even more affectionately than
usual when she said good night to him.

‘Those poor geese,” she said, “I can’t forget about them! But,

’

papa, I’m so glad to think we shall a/ways go on loving each other.’

“Yes, dear,” said he, “ always.”


50 . THE. LUCKY DUCKS





OLLY was nearly eight years old, but she had never had a really

nice doll of her own. She had had two or three, perhaps more

than two or three, va¢her nice ones; one had actually been her mother’s,
and this one of course, though no longer fresh or pretty, could not be
played with much for fear of spoiling it, as its age made it valuable.
Another had been her sister’s, and one or two had been presents to

herself, but they were not very pretty. It is more than thirty years ago
AND OTHER STORIES. 5



since Dolly was a little girl; that is a long time, is it not? Many
changes have come over many things in these thirty years—among these
there have been great ones in dolls. They are not only much cheaper
but very, very much nicer. I doubt if any of the little girls I know
nowadays would at all care for the sort of doll that Dolly thought
beautiful.

But there are always goods with bads, and unfortunately—at least it
sounds unfortunate, though perhaps it is not really so—bads with goods.
-The good in Dolly’s bad was that even an ugly doll gave her immense
pleasure. What then was her delight when her mother told her one day
that she was going to buy for, her a really beautiful doll. She had
thought about it for some time and had asked the prices in several shops
-before fixing, for Dolly’s father and mother were not very rich, and they
had several children.

Dolly's face beamed with delight when she heard the good news
She felt at first as if she could scarcely believe it.

“Oh, Mamma,” she said, “how very, very good of you. Dear
Mamma, how very happy I shall be!”

“Tt is to be for your birthday,” her mother went on; “but I thought
it was best to tell you about it, because I was not quite sure what kind of
doll you would like best.”

“T would like a wax one,” said Dolly; “1 mean if it wouldn't cost
too much.”

“No,” said her mother, “it won't cost too much. We had fixed to
52 THE LUCKY DUCKS



get a wax one.” Wax dolls in those days were the only ones at all
pretty. ‘But there are two or three kinds even of wax. There are
some that open and shut their eyes, and others a good deal larger, but
which don’t cost any more because they doz’t open and shut their eyes.
Which would you like? Then too I want to know what colour of hair
you like best—dark or light ?”

Dolly considered. It was a serious matter. She opened and shut
her own eyes once or twice and gave a little tug to her fair curls, which
hung down her back, though they were much shorter than most little
girls’ hair is worn nowadays. “4

“T think, Mamma,” she said at last, “I think I'd rather have dark
hair. Dolls’ dark hair is real-er-looking than light,” which was true, for
at that time I don’t think flaxen wigs for dolls were made of hair at all.
“ And I think, Mamma, Id rather have her littler, so long as she opens
and shuts her eyes. It will be so nice to make her shut them every
night at bed-time, for she may sleep in the cradle in our room, mayn’t
she, Mamma?” —

“ Certainly,” her mother replied ; and so it was settled.

‘A few days later a rather long narrow parcel very.catefully wrapped
‘up was brought into the.drawing-room where Dolly was sitting with’
her mother.

‘From Marshall’s, if you please, ma’am,” said the servant, ‘‘ and the
boy would be glad if you'd open it to see that it’s all right.”

Dolly’s mother took the parcel in her hands. It was brown paper
AND OTHER STORIES. ' 83



outside, and had a label marked “ With great care.” She looked at it
and then she looked at Dolly.

“ Dolly, dear,” she said, “just run away to the nursery for a minute
or two. You can come back to say good-night.”

When Dolly came back to the drawing-room there was no sign of



wi

any brown paper parcel, but her mother smiled when she kissed her in a
way that Dolly quite understood.

The next two or three days seemed very long to the little girl She
was always thinking about the new doll and she felt as if the time would
never pass till her birthday came. She was sitting one afternoon sewing
beside her mother when all of a sudden she sighed so deeply that her

mother quite started.
54 THE LUCKY DUCKS



‘“My dear Dolly,” she said, ‘what is the matter? You seem very
unhappy.”

‘“No, Mamma,” she said, “I’m not unhappy, only I am so thinking
of—you know what, Mamma.”

Mamma smiled.

“Well, dear, | am sorry if it makes you sigh. I thought it would
be a pleasure to you to know, but you. almost make me wish I had not
told you till the time. It is still nearly a fortnight off, you know, Dolly.”

‘A fortnight,” Dolly repeated. “That is two weeks. It is a good
while. But I’m not sorry you told me, Mamma. _ It zs very nice to think
of. I try to fancy it to myself. Is it in this room ?”

‘No, dear, it is in the ‘present drawer’ of my chest of drawers
The top one—you know.”

“Oh, yes—you mean the chest of drawers with white knobs. I
know,” said Dolly, but she still sighed a little.

“Dolly, dear,” said her mother, “if it would set your fancy at rest
I will show you the doll. 1 don’t at all mind doing so.”

But Dolly shook her head.

“ No, thank you,” she said. ‘J think it is babyish not to be able to
wait. But, Mamma, dear, if you would do one thing——” 7

irae

“Would you please show it to Effie ?” Effie was Dolly’s little sister.
“Show it her weé/, and then she will know it exactly and we can talk

about it together.”
AND OTHER STORIES. 55

“Very well,” her mother agreed. “Call Effie and bring her to my
room.”
Effie, who knew about the wonderful doll, came running eagerly

from the nursery. She was only five, but she was a very sensible little

girl.



The Dow

“Will you wait outside, Dolly ?” said her mother, “or will you stay
in a corner and not look?”

“T’]] stay in a corner and not look,” said Dolly.

Soon she heard exclamations of delight from Effie “ Oh, Mamma!

—how lovely —what beautiful hair!” and so on.
56 THE LUCKY DUCKS



Then Dolly heard the drawer shut again and she opened her’ eyes.
Effie ran to her.

“She is a beauty, Dolly,” said the little sister, “ I’ll tell you afl about
her.” |

“Dolly,” said her mother. “I shall not lock the drawer. You may
do as you like about looking at the doll—if it worries you to keep
fancying about her to yourself I give you leave to look at her. All the
same ’—and she hesitated..

“What, Mamma?” asked Dolly. ‘Would it be gooder not to look
at her?”

“Not exactly that. It would not be naughty when I gave you leave.
But it would perhaps be good in one way, for it would show you had
self-control, which is a very good thing.”

“T won’t look at her, Mamma,” said Dolly. “Td like you to see I
want to be that thing—self—what is it?”

“ Self-controlled,’ Mamma replied: “ Master of yourself, it means,

Dolly.”

The two little sisters talked a great deal about the doll. The next
day Effie began to be afraid she did not remember quite so well what
Miss Dolly was like, so they went together to the room where she was,
and Effie climbed on a chair, opened the drawer, and carefully lifting the
tissue paper which Mamma had laid over the doll’s face, again feasted
her eyes on the waxen features.

“Yes, Dolly,” she said, ‘‘her’s quite lubly,’ and then she went on to
AND OTHER STORIES. 57



describe the beautiful black curls, the eyes, the “ smoof white skin,” till
poor Dolly felt as if she could scarcely bear it.

“ Effie,” she said at last, “let me get up on the ee [’'m not
going to look at her—I’ve fixed 1 won't. I’m going to shut my eyes—
tight, and just feel her very softly with my fingers. Mamma said I
‘might look, but I'm not going to. J want to show Mamma I’m that long
word she said—lI can’t remember it, but I know what it means.”

Down got Effie and up climbed Dolly, her eyes firmly shut, as she
had said. Effie kept calling out directions to her.

“© Your hand is near her face now, Dolly, yes, that’s her hair—if you
feel along you'll get to her feet,” thanks to which, Dolly’s fingers had
soon travelled all over the unseen treasure. After a minute or two she
gave a deep sigh of satisfaction and clambered down, taking care not to
open her eyes till she was quite out of sight of the drawer.

“Tm so glad,” she said. “I don’t mind waiting half so much now.
Effie, will you come with me every day, and you'll tell me her, and then
rec eters

Effie had no objection—whatever Dolly proposed she always
thought quite right. For several days the two little sisters visited the
wax doll in this way, Dolly remaining firm in her resolve not to look at
her. At last one day their mother, hearing their voices, came quietly
into the room and watched what they were doing.

“1 do think, Effie,” said Dolly as she got down from the chair, “I
do think I’m learning to be that that Mamma said. Won't she be

pleased ?”
58 THE LUCKY DUCKS



Mamma came forward. ;
“My little Dolly,” she said, ‘are you thinking of what I said about
self-control? I am very glad, dear, to see you have remembered it.

But perhaps you have tried yourself







enough now—would you not like to see
the doll? I shall be quite pleased to
show her to you.”
But Dolly shook her head.
a No, thank you,” she said; “I’d
rather go on.” :
And so she did till her birthday
morning !
I think she loved her pretty
doll none the less for having been
; both a self-controlled and a patient
ee little girl. One thing I am sure
of—she took excellent care of
\— her, for J saw Miss Floribel—.
which was the doll’s name—not so very long ago, though it is more
‘than thirty years since Dolly’s eighth birthday, and—considering
Floribel’s old-fashionedness, you know, and her great age—she still

looked a most respectable person.
AND OTHER STORIES. 59



THE BAT WHO CAME TO GHURCH.

E were sitting quietly in the drawing-room one







evening last September after dinner. The

lamps were lighted, but the curtains were not

SoS

drawn nor were the windows: closed. For it
was a mild evening, and in the country where
there is no one to look in—except the birds,
who of course are all asleep. when it gets dark,
and the moon perhaps, who is too calm and
dignified to be prying and inquisitive, even though
she is rather fond of gazing—what does it matter if one forgets all
about blinds? But the moon was not there that evening, not to be
seen at least. Outside, everything looked quite dark. |
Suddenly a sort of whizzing, whirring, rustling, fluttering sound
caught our ears. Up jumped Letty, who is always delighted at an
excuse for jumping up; she does so hate sitting still. 3
‘““What’s the matter ?” said auntie.
‘A big moth, I think,” said Letty. “Oh, auntie, can it be a moth ?

Do look, what an exormons one!”
60 THE LUCKY DUCKS .



Auntie looked up at the corner of the ceiling which Letty pointed to.

‘‘A moth,” she said, ‘no, indeed, Letty, it is not a moth. It is a
bat.” .

As she said the words a scream sounded through the room which
made us all jump, one or two of us indeed, I rather fancy, screaming in
return! It was Verena—she had been sitting working by the lamp when
Letty began fussing about the moth, but when she heard auntie calmly
pronouncing it to be a bat, she altogether lost her self-control. She
hopped up on to a chair, drawing her skirts tightly round her, as if she
thought the bat was crawling on the floor, instead of flapping about the
ceiling, and stood there shrieking.

‘Oh, auntie, oh, uncle, oh, Letty, oh, Frank, oh, everybody! Do
take it away—do, do. It’s the one thing I can’t bear. I shall faint if it
comes near me.”

She did look so funny, we couldn't help laughing.

““My dear Verena,” said auntie, ‘‘do come down. You're nearer
the bat than if you stayed quietly in your chair. And there’s no fear of
its attacking your /ee¢. The only thing to take care of is your hair. It
is very disagreeable when they hook their claws in one’s hair.”

With this a fresh series of screams, and a change of programme.
Verena tumbled herself off the chair and made for the door, holding her
hands to her head. When she was safely outside she opened it again a
tiny chink and called back to say we mustn’t think her silly ; she would

come back in a minute, and help us to catch the horrible creature.
AND OTHER STORIES. 61



‘‘ Better not wait for her, I think,” said uncle. So he and I got long
sticks and climbed up on the sofa and poked and banged at the bat till
the poor thing, frightened out of its wits no doubt, at last managed to
flop itself out of the window again into
the cool dark air, which was much
more to its taste, I am quite sure,
than our brightly lighted drawing-
room. Then uncle and I shut the
windows, and we were just sitting
down to laugh again at Verena’s
terrors when the door opened and
in she came. |

She was such a figure. She
had tied a towel, or a very big
handkerchief perhaps it was, all over
her head, hiding every speck of her
hair, and on the top of that she had
placed her big plaited-fibre garden
hat, and in her hand, like the old



woman of the nursery rhyme, “she
carried a broom.” You never saw any one look so funny. She peeped
in cautiously, then seeing us all sitting there peacefully, she felt ashamed

of her cowardice I suppose, and walked in.

“T’ve got a broom,” she said valiantly. ‘“ Where is he, Frank ?”
62 THE LUCKY DUCKS

‘“Oh, my dear,” replied uncle coolly, “we didn’t wait for your
assistance. The bat has retired to his usual haunts long ago. You've
nothing to be afraid of. Sit down and go on with your work.”

ly Verena sat down, feeling
rather small. But she made no
attempt to take off her eccentric
head-dress.

“Tf you please, auntie,” she
said, ‘‘ you mustn’t mind my keep-
ing on my hat. -I can’t feel quite
sure yet that he’s really gone.”

Uncle threw himself back
in his chair and fairly roared.

“Verena,” he said, “you'll be
the death of me, you absurd child.”

_ And no doubt she did look
comical—with her evening dress
on, and her head tied up as if

she were going to take a hive



of bees at the least.
_ “Jt is such a horrible idea,” said she with a shudder.. ‘To think of
a bat in one’s hair—ugh !”
‘Who told you, auntie, that they do get into people’s hair?” asked

Letty.
AND OTHER STORIES. 63





Auntie herself gave a little shudder.

‘My dear,” she said, ‘I know it by sore experience. I shall never
forget the time that a bat got into my hair.”

We all pricked up our ears at this, Verena even forgot her own
terrors.

“ T was quite a little girl when it happened,” auntie went on. ‘It
was one fine Sunday in summer.
We. were all at church, all we
children in a row, and [| remember
it was a hot morning and I was
feeling rather sleepy. I had a
great deal of fair fluffy hair, the
kind that very quickly gets tangled,
and just as I was beginning to be
afraid .that if the sermon was

much longer I should really go



to sleep, I felt something give
aesort sof atu to my wig. 1 1 eee NG
thought at first it was. my brother Charlie who was sitting next
me, and who was very fond of playing tricks, and I turned round very
sharply, quite wide awake by now, to scold him. But no, Charlie was
sitting perfectly still, his hands before him, looking rather sleepy
himself. Then again came a sharp tug and a sort of prick seemed to

come with it.
Ga THE LUCKY DUCKS





“Charlie,” I whispered, ‘something’s pulling my hair, and pricking
me. Can it bea wasp? A wasp couldn’t pull my hair, though. What
Callies Cras

“T leant forward, and Charlie peeped behind me.

““©Qh, Mabel,’ he said, and he was so startled that he forgot to
speak very low, ‘it’s not a wasp, it’s a daz. It’s all twisted up in your
hair.’”

“Oh, auntie!” exclaimed Verena and Letty and I all together,
‘what ad you do?”

Auntie looked at me.

“Children,” she said, ‘it makes me hot to think of it even now. I
screamed! Yes, 1 really did—even though it was in church. That shows
how necessary it is to be more self-controlled than you were just now,
Verena. There was such a to-do. Everybody thought | was going to
faint or something—for no one had any idea what was the matter. And
even the clergyman stopped his sermon for half a minute. They got me
out of the pew somehow. I was still toe frightened to be ashamed.
And then there was a terrible piece of business to get the creature out of
my hair, where it had twisted itself up more and more. A good deal of
it had to be cut off, and when the bat at last got free it was still
clutching at pieces of my fair locks. I was such a little girl that people
were very kind to me and forgave the disturbance I had made, but it was
a lesson to me for the rest of my life to be self-controlled. For months

afterwards [ felt myself growing scarlet if ever I met the clergyman.”
AND OTHER STORIES. .« 65



“And yet you were only a little tiny girl, and I am fourteen past,”
said Verena. ‘Auntie, I am really ashamed of myself. Still, if you
don’t mind I’d vatéier keep my hat on till bed-time. Just for fear, you

know, the bat should be hiding somewhere still.”


66 THE LUCKY DUCKS

MR. NOBODY.

“T know a funny little man,

As quiet as a mouse,

Who does the mischief that is done
In everybody’s house.

There’s no one ever sees his face,
And yet we all agree

That every plate we break was cracked
By Mr. Nobody.”

“That rogue Nobody.”

ys EAR, dear,’ said grandmamma, as she settled herself down
comfortably in the bow-window, with all—as she thought—her
work-things about her, only to discover that her scissors, her beautifully
fine embroidery scissors, were missing; ‘‘dear, dear, who can have taken
my embroidery scissors? Lucy, do you know anything about them ?”
“No, indeed, Grandmamma, I never touched them, but I’ll look for

’

them ;” and Lucy was jumping up, when Grandmamma told her not to
disturb herself. Lucy was always good-natured, but very thoughtless.

“Your German translation will not be properly prepared if you
leave it,” Granny reminded her, as she went off herself to make inquiries
in the schoolroom next door.

Allin vain. Madge knew nothing of the scissors; Prissy thought

she had seen them, but couldn’t remember where; the two little boys
AND OTHER STORIES. 67



had their knives and indignantly repelled the idea of ever touching
scissors ; and Bertie, who was very likely to have been the culprit, had
been back at school for a fortnight. No, xodody had taken the
scissors! All the same :
{though poor Grandmamma
had to borrow a pair from
Miss Sawyer, not nearly as
fine as her own) the scissors
were found the next morning
by the housemaid in the hall,
where somebody, or, to be
more correct, z0éedy had
evidently been using them
for cutting the stalks of
some violets.

“Dear, dear,” said poor
Grandmamma again, “ Mr,
Nobody is getting worse than

ever.”



“ And, if you please,
ma’am—-—’ said the voice of Ruth, the upper housemaid, just behind her.

Grandmamma shivered. When Ruth began, “ dd, if you please,
ma’am,” she knew some misfortune was about to be announced.

“Tt’s the landing window again, ma’am—one of the coloured glass
68 THE LUCKY DUCKS



panes I’m sorry to say. Somebody must have unlatched it last night and
left it swinging, and it knocked against the stone ledge and got broken,
just the same as before.”
“ Nobody unlatched it, you should say, Ruth.” Ruth stared.
“Somebody must have done it, ma’am,’ ’ she said mesoectaulliy, I Ine
young ladies are very fond of looking out of that window of a moonlight
evening, but I’ve asked them all and nobody——"

“Of course, Ruth, I told you it was nobody,” interrupted
Grandmamma rather testily. “Well, you must send for the glazier again
—five-and-sixpence each those coloured panes cost.”

Mr. Nobody’s pranks were not over yet.

Mrs. Cook requested a private interview. One of the best china
dinner-service dishes was broken. It had been stepped upon!

“Stepped upon!” Grandmamma repeated, “and what in the world
was it doing on the floor ?” Cook shook her head.

“That's just it,” she said. “I’ve asked all round; it stands to
reason it couldn't get down on the ground by itself; Ive asked
everybody, and Sally is a very careless girl, as like as not she put it
down and forgot all about it ; but she declares she didn’t, and Jane and
Baker and little Nicholas and—” a

‘Oh, I know, zodody did it. It’s nobody's fault. I’m getting quite
out of patience with—with zodody,” said Grandmamma.

And Grandmamma was not the only sufferer. Lucy was expecting

a letter from a friend about going to a concert with her. Lucy had been
AND OTHER STORIES 69



looking forward to this for some time, and wondered why the letter had

never come. Suddenly, one morning, appears a postcard.

— —s






SS

WS q
=
~ t 1
NA ys |
nm XG: e
Z 1 R

WK

ISN

SSG

Ru |




SSS
ae |





ae

ZR 6 {I}
ZY LY pr a
Kr iy »
dA go g,'}
fi

Ay ~ 0 bil!
5 Mil

TTI

; | |
i i

BRIA EAA

| i

“So sorry and disappointed you could not come. We waited for





cas

you ‘as late as we could, but had at last to go without you,” was its

message. Lucy had hard work not to cry.
70 THE LUCKY DUCKS



“They never wrote,” she said, “to tell me the day. What can Miss
Leslie mean ?”

Grandmamma was very sorry for her.

“There must have been some mistake,” she said. “ Stay—let me
think—did I not give somebody a note for Lucy two or three mornings

ago? It was the day I made you




stay in bed for breakfast, Lucy,



el" gt
aor,



for your cold.”



No, zodody had been intrusted with any letter for Lucy.

“Nobody again,” said Grandmamma. “But—oh, yes, now I
remember. You were all running off about something or other, and
nobody offered to take it to Lucy. So I put the letter on the sideboard
—there, leaning against the punch-bowl, in a most conspicuous position.

I suppose xzobody touched it ?”
AND OTHER STORIES. it



No, nobody had done so !

All the same the letter was found, though too late now to be of any
use, in the drawer of the table in the front hall; somedody had evidently
thought the hall-table a better place for it than the sideboard, only, as

usual, that somebody proved to be nobody !

“It is really going too far,’ said Grandmamma severely. ‘ Now
y going





listen, all of you, and I shall say the same thing to the servants : the first
time another of these annoyances happens I shall not rest till I bring it
home to somebody. \ will hear no more of xodody’s doings.”

The children all looked rather frightened, so did the servants, for it

\
72 Wee LOCK" IDUTCIES



was not often Grandmamma spoke like that. And- strange to say, Mr.
Nobody must have been listening in some hidden corner too. For from
that time his tricks ceased. I don’t say that nothing was broken, or
mislaid, or meddled with, but in every case somebody owned to it, or
remembered just in time to put things right again, and as not only
somebody but everydody joined in trying to be more careful and
thoughtful and exact, the house became a very much pleasanter and more
satisfactory place than when it had been given over to the pranks of the
mischievous elf.

And one evening Grandmamma, to impress the matter more
lastingly on the children’s minds, offered a prize to the one who would
make the best guess at Mr. Nobody’s real name.

A good many different answers were given, but on the whole
Grandmamma thought little Prissy’s the best.

“He has a good many names,” Prissy had written in her folded

paper, “but the oftenest ones are ‘careless,’ or ‘meddling.’”


AND OTHER STORIES. 73

“MR. KNOW-ALL.”

HARLEY FALCONER was the most good-natured boy in the

~ world. He looked it too. His round rosy face, his bright
twinkling eyes seemed brimming over with pleasant feelings towards
everybody ; he was full of interest in other people’s affairs, a little too
full of it, perhaps, and always perfectly certain that whatever went wrong
he could put it right. I almost think that at the bottom of his heart he
had a strong belief that if he had been consulted about the arrangements
of things in general, beginning with the way the world goes round the
sun, and ending with the manner in which his sister's pet poodle was
shaved, things in general would have been very much more comfortable
for everybody concerned.

He was never at a loss, and that is saying a good deal for a boy of
eleven, surely! A good deal more than most of us who have got much
further on the journey of life, some, perhaps, who are not far from its
end, would like to say for themselves! For the older, one gets, the more
clearly one sees what quantities and quantities of blunders one has made ;
how mistaken one has been about almost everything ; how differently one

would do if one could begin all over again! And queer though it may
T4 THE LUCKY DUCKS



sound, it is when we begin to see our mistakes and blunders thus clearly,
that we are really on the first steps of the ladder of wisdom.

But Charley was by no means ready at ¢izs lesson. He was quite
sure of himself always, and about everything. I think, however, that a
few things which happened to him lately laid the seeds of his growing
wiser, and that from them he began to learn that it was posszble he might
sometimes be mistaken.

Charley was a favourite at school, perhaps more a favourite with his
companions than with his teachers. For he was so ready to help, so
sorry when any of his friends were in trouble that they forgave him even
when his “help” turned out a hindrance. But to his masters, as you can
fancy, he was rather irritating.

One day little Hubert Moore was working hard at a French lesson ;
he was eager to get it finished so that he might be able to go home in
company with Charley and one or two others, who were all to spend the
evening together at Charley’s house.

“Why, Hubert, aren’t you ready yet ?” Charley said, as he shut up
his own books. ‘ Let’s see what it is you're doing? I'll help you with
ite

“It's my French exercise,” replied Hubert dolefully. “It does take
such a time to hunt up the words.” |

“Oh, bother,” said Charley, “7 don’t need to hunt ’em up. I'll tell
you them all. Fire away. What do you want to know ?”

Hubert was doing an exercise, translating French into English.
AND OTHER STORIES. Palio

Z

~ “ Mousse,” he said. ‘“ What-does ‘ mousse’ mean, Charley ?”
_ «Mouse, of course,” said Charley briskly. ‘‘ What a goose you

are not to know that! It’s almost the same.”



“Mouse” Hubert wrote down. “And what does this mean,
‘dateau-a-vapeur, Charley ?” :

“ Oh, my goodness,” said Charley. “Why, if one didn’t £vxow that,
one could guess it. ‘Vapour bath,’ of course.”

“Vapour bath” wrote Hubert obediently. “They seem. rather
76 THE LUCKY DUCKS



funny words to put in, for they make sentences together afterwards, you
know. What could a mouse have to do with a vapour bath ?”

“Oh, it’s rubbish. Exercises are always rubbish,” said Charley.
“Tf were to make a grammar now—but I say, Hubert, do be quick!”

“T’yve only two words more,” said Hubert, “ ‘sea. J know that of myself, and ‘orvage. Oh, what does ‘ovage’
miaectiing @ ich icevaras

“Jt's a misprint,” said Charley boldly. “A misprint for ‘orange.’
There, now, write it quick, Hubert. Now we can go.”

But alas, the next day poor Hubert felt little gratitude to Charley
for his well-meant assistance. When the words Hubert had trans-
lated came to be put into the sentences that made the little story, there
was the most ridiculous jumble you ever heard. Instead of ‘“ cabin-boy,”
‘““steam-boat,’ and “storm,” poor Hubert read out gravely some
extraordinary nonsense about a mouse ina vapour bath with an orange !
The French master looked up fiercely, half inclined to think Hubert.
was mocking him, but when he saw the poor child’s bewildered face his
own softened.

“Who told you such absurdities ?” he said.

“Falconer,” Hubert replied, almost crying. “He said he knevv the. -
words.” |

And as the master ran his eyes down the list—he could not help it—
he burst into a peal of laughter.

“Upon my word, Falconer,” he exclaimed, “I congratulate you!”
AND OTHER STORIES. 77

’

Charley grew very red. He hated being laughed at. And he had
to bear a good deal of it. From this time forth at school he was
constantly asked if he had enjoyed his vapour bath that morning, ice if it

was too full of mice and oranges to be agreeable; and such like



schoolboy’s witticisms. And for a few days Charley was a “¢¢le less

ready to give his opinion. But this happy state of things did not last.
Late one evening when Charley came into the drawing-room to say

good-night, he saw his mother writing a note hurriedly at her davenport.

“Oh, Mary,” she said without looking up, “can you tell me Mrs.
48 THE LUCKY DUCKS





Franklin’s number ? I am so vexed, I had quite forgotten to tell her that
the meeting is put off to-morrow, and she will be coming to fetch me
early. There is no use looking in any directory, as she has lately
changed her house.”

“ | know,” Charley replied. ‘‘ They have gone to live in Monmouth




How did you enjoy
Your vapour bath

Charley





Crescent. I met little Franklin the other day. The number is
Sseventcen, =.

“ Are you sare, Charley ?” said his mother doubtfully.

‘ Positive,” said Charley. “I thought of something in my head to
make me remember. One and seven are eight, and Bobby Franklin is

eight, so you see, Mamma!”
AND OTHER STORIES. 19



His mother addressed the letter and it was posted. But alas, the
next morning, at the time that had been fixed, Mrs. Franklin arrived, and
not a little annoyed was she to find that at considerable inconvenience
she had come for nothing.

And a few days later the letter
turned ‘up, though too late to be of »
any use. Mrs. Franklin’s number
was “seventy-one”—seven and one ~
make eight as well as one and seven.

But a still greater misfortune was
‘caused by Charley not long after
this. His sister Mary got a present
on her birthday of a tame bullfinch.
It was a beautiful bird, and, though
quite young, already beginning to

pipe very cleverly. For the first few



days Mary fed him on canary seed,
yi )

A
wa ene Way. you've F
and he seemed to do very well on it. dS eS haenn ec aecere sare ail

Ny

But one morning her mother said to
her that she thought Bully should have some other kind of seed as well.
‘«‘T remember,” she said, ‘“‘ when we were children and had a Bully,
we used to mix the canary seed with some other, but I cannot remember
what. I shall be passing a bird-fancier’s when I am out and [| will call in

and ask.”
co : THE LUCKY DUCKS



Unluckily, when Charley came in from school, Mary told him what
their mother had said.

“Oh,” said he, ‘Mamma needn’t have bothered to go asking. J
know—it’s hemp-seed. I'll run round to the grocer’s now and get some.
I’ve got threepence.” And off he set, heedless of Mary’s “Are you
guite sure, Charley ?” ;

Their mother was kept out later than she expected and had not time
to call at the bird-fancier’s. But ‘‘ Never mind, Mamma,” said Mary,
“Charley knows about it and got some of the right kind.”

And as Bully looked quite well and piped away as usual, I suppose
no one had any misgiving.

But alas, two mornings later he was found dead in his cage!. How
Mary cried, how grieved Mamma was, how everybody wondered what
could have been the mysterious cause of his death! And how the secret
was explained when the bird-fancier whom they consulted cried out in
horror.

“Why, bless you, you've been feeding him with henp-seed |
Bullfinches can’t do with hemp-seed, it’s as bad as poison to them. You
should have mixed vage-seed with the canary-seed—never hemp.”

Charley’s face grew very red. For once he had to own himself
completely in the wrong.

‘I’m so sorry,, Mary,” he said.

“If only you hadn't been save, we'd have waited to ask somebody,”

she sobbed.
AND OTHER STORIES. 81



Charley saved up his money to buy her another Bully, which took
some self-denial on his part. But I think he gained much besides the
pleasure to Mary ; the lesson was a more lasting one this time. I ¢h7nk

“Mr. Know-all” will not for long continue to be his name.


82 THE LUCKY DUCKS





oN | AMMA,” said Barbara, ‘they say there are some gypsies on the

common. Old Lidyard told me. Mayn’t we go there for our

walk this afternoon ? I do so want to see them.”

“TJ don't,” said her sister Enid, ‘gypsies are very dangerous. You
never know what they won't do. They say in the village that they
would steal children as well as ducks and chickens if they could. If you
go to see them / won't come.” |

“Tsn’t she silly, Mamma?” said Barbara. ‘I wouldn't listen to all
the rubbish the village people talk. Things like stealing children don’t

happen nowadays.”
AND OTHER STORIES. 83



“Not very often, certainly,” said her mother. “ Still I'm afraid it’s
true that gypsies don’t deserve a very good character. But you needn't
be afraid of their trying to steal you, Enid.”

‘You're much too big and fat,” said Barbara not too politely. ‘It
wouldn't be easy to hide you in a bundle, or in a hamper of pots and
pans, would it, Mamma ?”

Mamma could not help smiling. Enid was a tall, well-grown girl of
eleven, decidedly “plump,” and certainly not fairy-like.

‘“ Never mind, Enid,” said Mamma, “it's a very delightful thing to
be strong and well. But you must be strong in your mind too and not
give way to fears and fancies. As it happens, I am going to the
common myself this morning, to take some soup and other things to a
poor little gypsy boy. I heard about him yesterday in the village from
the doctor, who had been to see him. The child has been very ill with
bronchitis, and though he is better now, he needs feeding up. They age
very quiet and decent gypsies, Dr. Green says, and he was touched by
their devotion to this child.”

The little girls listened with great interest.
“Oh, ay I go with you, Mamma?” asked Barbara.

‘« And—and I too 2” added Enid.

“Yes, certainly. You may both come. You will feel quite safe
with me, eh, Enid 2”
“Of course,” Enid replied. ‘No one could steal us when we are

-with our own Mamma.”
84 THE LUCKY DUCKS



It was a pleasant walk to the cornmon, and a pleasant place when
you got there. And the little gypsy encampment—the vans drawn to
one side, and one or two tents with real gypsy fires burning cheerily in
front of them, and the dark-haired, dark-skinned, bright-eyed figures
moving about, or sitting on the short dry turf, made up a very
picturesque scene. Enid crept a little closer to her mother when a man
came forward eagerly to receive them, calling out a few words in a
strange, unintelligible language, as he did so, to some one in one of the
vans. But the pleasant smile that lighted up his dark face when “the
lady” explained her errand, reassured the little girl. |

“Ves, lady,” he said, “the little boy is very weak still, and his
mother is weary with nursing him. But the good doctor says he is
mending. Will the good lady speak to them ?”

He led the way up the short ladder into the van; there lay a lovely
little boy of four or five, a perfect picture of delicate childish beauty.
His mother, a young and pretty woman, was half-sitting, half-lying beside
him, but started up with ready courtesy when she saw her visitors. And
her gratitude for the nice soup and other good things was very pleasant
to hear.

“The boy shall thank you himself, lady,” she said, “when he is
well again ;” and she turned to her husband and said something in the
same queer language. ‘‘ Yes,” she went on, “we will be this way in
the autumn again, and we shall not forget.”

They were to move on the next morning, in haste to get to a
AND OTHER STORIES. 85:

neighbouring fair, but the doctor had raised their spirits about the child,
and his mother appeared to have no doubt but that the lady’s gifts would
quite complete his recovery.

As the visitors left the encampment all its inhabitants came forward

with smiles and thanks, so that Barbara said it made her feel “ quite

ashamed.”



WILL THE LADY SPEAK .
To THem?

“They are nice gypsies, aren’t they, Mamma °?” she went on.
“They didn’t tease to tell our fortunes as they often do.”

d

“{ think they knew I would not like it,” her Mother replied.
“Yes, they seem decent, harmless gypsies. I suppose there are great

varieties among them.” And then she walked on for some time in

silence.
86 THE LUCKY DUCKS



“What are you thinking of, Mamma dear?” asked Enid, “you are
SO quiet.”
Mamma smiled, ‘ Was I, dear?” she said. “I was thinking of

some other gypsies I saw once, many years ago, when | was a child, or

at least a young girl. It is like a strange dream to me, but I have

never forgotten it.”



“When was it? Oh! do tell us,” said Barbara, skipping in front.

“Tt was in Normandy,” her mother replied. “We were spending
some months in a quaint, old-world sort of village, not far from the sea.
The village consisted of one long straggling street of queer old houses,
and there was a beautiful and very ancient church. Our house was just
opposite it; I remember how the bells used to clang! The whole place

looked very much as it must have looked for hundreds of years, I fancy.
AND OTHER STORIES. 87





NS
Well, one afternoon, as we were coming home from a ramble on the

shore, we noticed an unusual excitement in the village. All the people
were hurry-scurrying about, putting up their shutters and calling in the
children, locking their doors and going on as if they were preparing
for a siege.

‘“* What is the matter?’ we asked.

““
were here some years ago, and we know what they






are. We shall take precautions this time. They stole
—what did they not steal? They brought bad luck
too; they would have taken all the children if they
could, they and their bears.’

hob ealiseae

ENGST, NGOSG.
they have fierce bears
that will do anything
they) tell: thems Vou
will see—but ah, run
home, little ladies and
gentlemen, and lock
ZeN your doors and gates as
oC quick as possible.’

“We ran home and

told our mother. But.
88 THE LUCKY DUCKS



we were not so frightened as the villagers. We closed the big carriage
gates and stood behind them watching for the gypsies to pass. And soon
they came—some twenty or thirty men, women and children, some walking,
some riding their great gaunt horses on the top of the packs and bundles
with which they were loaded—where they had got those strange-looking
horses I often have wondered—some leading the bears, for they had
bears, sure enough, the clumsiest, most uncouth bears I ever saw. They
had dogs too, dogs that were more like wolves, and the people themselves
were too strange to describe. They were a sort of terra-cotta, dull red
colour; their eyes were dark and bright, and they were not so much ugly
as very strange-looking. The men were tall and lank, the women
seemed mostly small, and several were bent as if from overwork or
cacrying their children, for some had babies strapped on to their backs.
We did feel aémost frightened, I can tell you! At the end of the
procession came the biggest and gauntest of the horses, led by a poor
little thin woman, who seemed half-dead with fatigue. On the horse were
strapped two children, one with bright open eyes, though. thin and
starved-looking ; the other, a little boy of four or so, lay with closed lids,
and his dull red skin seemed almost grey. The woman was weeping.

“« Stop!’ cried my mother, in French, as they passed. The woman
looked up, but shook her head.

“« Those children are faint with hunger. 1 will give you something
for them,’ my mother went on; and she sent my brother to fetch a bowl

of nice hot soup which she knew was preparing for dinner.
AND OTHER STORIES. 89



“The poor woman looked at it with starving eyes, but mother-like
held it first to the children. One drank it eagerly and smiled with
pleasure, but the other would not open his lips or eyes; he seemed
unconscious.

“*Ts he ill?’ asked my mother. The woman shook her head; she
could understand no language we tried, and we could make out nothing
of hers, except one word which sounded like ‘ Toorki,’ and as she waved:
her hands to show they had come from a great distance we thought she
must mean ‘Turkey.’ But her eyes and face were easy to understand.
She seized mother’s dress and kissed it, while the tears ran down her
face, and we could hardly help crying too, when mother gave her a little
money. Then the men in front shouted to her to come on, and the sad
little group moved out of our sight. They camped one night outside the
village, but then travelled on again, poor, homeless wanderers.”

“And did the little boy get better ?” asked Barbara.

“T do not know, I hope so,” said her mother, ‘but we never heard.
No one scemed to know who the people were exactly, but gypsies like
them are now and then seen in France, and are supposed to come from
Greece and Turkey. But what has always struck me was the
mother-love of the poor woman and her touching gratitude.”

“Yes,” said the little girls, as each clasped one of ¢hezr mother’s
arms. ‘Mothers are always kind, aren’t they, Mamma? But we are

very glad we're not gypsies, Mamma.”
go THE LUCKY DUCKS



IDAINIDIY'S IRs VOL,

3 WORM will turn,” said Dandy to himself, as he walked back to

the hearthrug very crossly. A bright fire was burning in the
grate; it was October now, and the mornings and evenings were chilly,
and the rug was very comfortable, and Dandy loved comfort. I don’t
see that he had really much to complain of. It was all because his little
mistress, Marie, would not take him out for a walk this afternoon, as he
had expected.

There were two or three reasons for this, as Marie had kindly and
patiently explained to him. One was that Dandy had had a slight cold
for some days; he had coughed a little and sneezed a good deal, and one
day he had not been able to eat his dinner, which did look as if things
were pretty bad. And as it was past four o’clock and the sun had gone
in, Marie thought it best to leave him at home. Then again, she and
her sister were obliged to pass through Farmer Burke’s fields, and there
were some cows there who sad been known to object to little dogs
snapping at their heels.

“So, Dandy dear,” Marie concluded, “ though you have always been
the most obedient of darlings, cows are rather stupid creatures, you
know. They mgfz mistake you for one of those naughty wild little dogs
who behave so badly. And zf you got a kick, how dreadful it would be!
What would your poor little ‘ missus’ do if you were hurt, dear Dandy ?”

“Rubbish,” said Dandy. It only sounded to Marie like a sort of
AND OTHER STORIES. gu



_cross little grunt, but still she saw that he was not pleased, as he
struggled off her knee and marched back to the fireplace.

“Dear little fellow! he is so affectionate,” she said to Etty, who was
not quite so blindly partial as Marie. “Stay by the fire comfortably,
Dandy dear. We won't be very long,” she called back as she shut the door.

Dandy stayed by the fire, not out of obedience, but because it was
the most agreeable place in the room: but in his heart were some very
naughty feelings.

“ A worm will turn,” he repeated to himself, for he was rather quick

at catching up smart sayings. ‘“ Does the child think







I’m to be tied to her apron-strings all my life ?.
1 don’t say so much against it in town, where
there are many dangers from dog-stealers
and omnibuses, nor when I was a
puppy and knew no better. But
nowadays—now that I am quite
grown-upand experienced—”
and here Dandy gave
himself a shake of self-

CARAS Ps importance, and then
ee _e | Sg eee stretched himself com-
placently; Ss; ity wise too
absurd. I am_ getting

DO ee Relbiek gaid Dandy | sickâ„¢: of y this, lapdog:

\
92 LET ORV AMD OT CKES



existence ; a little excitement, some hunting perhaps, or even a frolic in
a farm-yard would be a pleasant variety. No, no! my dear mistress,
you cannot expect me to be always ‘the most obedient of darlings.’
I must seize my opportunity and without delay, for I hear we are leaving
the country the day after to-morrow.”

And Dandy gave a half-playful snap at a fly that had settled on his
nose, as much as to say, ‘I could catch it if I chose,” then stretched him-
self again and settled down on the hearthrug to think over the matter.

The next day was bright and yet mild, “quite spring-like,” though
late autumn, everybody said. And determined to profit by this pleasant
weather on the last day of their time in the country) Marie and Etty set
off for a walk to say good-bye to some friends a mile or two away.

They went by the road, Dandy meekly following. He looked indeed
so very meek, that as they turned to come home Marie and Etty hesitated.

“ Mightwt we go across the fields?” said Etty. “It would be so
lovely by the brook; we could just skirt the farm-yard over the little
bridge where the turkeys are.” |

She did not see that Dandy had drawn near, and was listening
attentively.

“There are no cows that way,” said Marie consideringly. ‘Yes, I
think we may go by the fields.” }

They crossed the bridge, and made their way quickly along the pretty.
field ; the sun was shining brightly, and all seemed peaceful and charming:

“How sorry we shall be to find ourselves in town again,” said
AND OTHER STORIES. 93





Marie ; “it zs so pleas ’ but a sudden noise some way behind them
made her stop short. It came from the turkeys’ corner.
‘‘Gobble-wobble, goéé/e-gobble-wobble. Wobble-wobble-eoh!” with
a sort of shriek.
a Dear, dear! what’s the matter with the creatures ?” exclaimed Etty,

as turkey after turkey flew over the low wall at the edge of the field in



affright, gobble-wobbling most piteously, all save an old turkey-cock who
stood bravely puffing himself out as if preparing to face the enemy. “Oh,
dear! what zs the matter? And where, oh ! where is Dandy ?”

Where indeed but chasing the turkeys! There he was, after them
in hot pursuit, his little curly, silky, fluffy body quivering with excitement

and delight.
“The turkey-cock will kill him. Oh! Etty, the naughty, naughty
94 : THE LUCKY DUCKS



darling!” And off she flew, valiantly braving the irate turkey patriarch,
who was so amazed that he too took flight as Marie, by a clever dodge,
came round upon Dandy from the other side and captured him. Panting
and breathless, but triumphant, she came up to Etty.

“Just fancy Dandy doing such a thing!” she exclaimed. “ He
might have been killed.”

“ Or he might ave killed one of the little ones, and we’d. have had
to pay for it,” said Etty practically.

“T must carry him till we’re quite out of sight of the turkeys,” said
Marie ; and so she did, though her arms ached long before she thought it
safe to put him down. They were then passing through a long sloping
field at one end of which was the entrance to their own grounds. There
was a solitary cottage on the slope: Marie did not know, and could not
see, that behind the cottage a flock of geese was quietly feeding, having
strayed on to higher ground from the banks of the little brook. But
Dandy knew, Dandy saw; and no sooner was he on his own feet again
than off he set. He had tasted blood !

“Cackle, cackle, guackle, cackle, cackle!” shrieked the geese.

“Dandy, Dandy, zaughty Dandy!” screamed the girls, as they
rushed after him in terror. This time it was Etty who captured him, and
brought him back struggling and impenitent to his mistress. Marie was
by this time nearly in tears.

“Oh, Dandy, what has changed you so?” she said. ‘I wzzs¢ punish

you—yes, Dandy, I must. And I must carry him all the way home to
AND OTHER STORIES. 95

our own gate,” she went on, “and he is so heavy and hot, and J must
hold him so tight.”

The field was a very long one, fully a quarter of a mile from the
cottage and the geese to the turnstile gate, which was a side entrance to
the garden. Marie bravely carried her dog till they had mounted the
step or two to the gate and were on the path.

‘“There, naughty dog, go home!” she said, as she put him down

with a sigh of relief. “ What a time you have given us!”



Dandy glanced at her, then, terrible to relate, deliberately turned, darted

through the gate, and before the girls could realize the fact, was careering
across the field again in full flight, making straight for the unfortunate geese |

Oh, how Marie shouted—coaxing, scolding, entreating, threatening
—allin vain! Oh, how Dandy dashed along! In less than a moment
he seemed nothing but a small ball of cream-coloured cotton-wool rolling
across the grass; and the sun was in poor Marie's eyes, and she was so

desperately hot, and so breathless and exhausted, that she almost felt she
96 THE LUCKY DUCKS.



must leave dog and geese to their fate. How she got to them at last she
never knew, she found herself lying on the top of a confused heap of
struggling white wings and fuzzy hair, clutching at the latter in a sort of
despair, while the cackling and squealing were enough to deafen one. At
last to her relief Etty came up, and between them they got naughty
Dandy away, none the worse, but sulky in the extreme.

“If the old woman in the cottage sees him, I don’t know what ‘shell
say,” said Marie. But perhaps she was out, or perhaps she was asleep—

any way, the geese stalked off indignantly, but with no broken legs or



wings, and gradually cackled
themselves into quiet again. —

Dandy was shut up, and had
very plain food zzdeed to eat for
some days. And it is very doubt-
ful if Marie and Etty will bring
him into the country again next
| year. That is all he has gained
: by his revolt. But when Marie
talks of it seriously to him, as
‘she does now and then, I must
confess as he looks up at. her
with his bright eyes, through
the shaggy hair overhanging

y

‘them, he does seem sorry.







Let us hope he is so.

0
S
A
ow
My
Cy.