Citation
To the end

Material Information

Title:
To the end
Creator:
Lockhart-Gordon, C
John F. Shaw and Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
John F. Shaw and Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
New ed.
Physical Description:
128,16 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Good and evil -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Farm life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Patience -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Faith -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Confidence -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Orphans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Clergy -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Church buildings -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Moral tales -- 1898 ( local )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
Children's literature ( fast )
Fables ( fast )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Contains prose and verse.
General Note:
Illustrated endpapers; pictorial front cover and spine.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by C. Lockart Gordon.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026790901 ( ALEPH )
ALH1014 ( NOTIS )
261340375 ( OCLC )

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Full Text




The Baldwin Library





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| % y A 3 oy
Y Z Zu & Ni | Ve “i Ny Ne \
Ss N W ee ic Kreckow sc¥

Bertie Wilmot was perched on the topmost branches, doing his best to shake the
yellow pippins into the outstretched aprons of Daisy, Pansy, and another little
flaxen-haired maiden who were capering wildly beneath.—. 1117.



To THE END

BY

C. LOCKHART GORDON,

AUTHOR OF ‘‘' HUMP AND ALL,”

Kew Edition.

_ LONDON:
JOHN F. SHAW AND Co,,
48, PATERNOSTER ROW.



ATTRACTIVE REWRRDS,





PRICE ONE SHILLING, WITH ILLUSTRATIONS,

ALL FOR THE BEST
HEROES OF THE LINE

HIS SERVANTS WHO SERVE

JUST IN TIME
PRINCESS ADELAIDE
WHITE LILIES :
HAROLD

THE SEA GULLS NEST
THE SEFTON BOYS .

AUNT MILDRED’S TREASURE

THE STRAY LAMB
FIRM FRIENDS

——_3¢ —___.

. By Emity S. Hort.

LITTLE TROUBLE-THE- HOUSE

RIGHT-ABOUT-FACE

THOSE BOYS . ‘
NEVER, FOR EVER .
TO THE END. ‘
EAST AND WEST ,
LOST MAGGIE :

LEFT BEHIND 5

OUGHTS AND CROSSES
JERRY'S LITTLE NELL
OUR ROUGIL DIAMOND

HETTIE AND THE SUNBEAMS

ROB AND RALPH .
JITANA’S STORY °
BENNIE. . °
RUTH’S RESCUE .
BLIND NETTIE 6
LEO AND DICK °
OUT IN THE STORM

CHICK; or, Yet there is Room

LETTIE’S HOME °

ELTON KEANE,
ELEANOR GRANT,
CATHARINE SHAW,
Emity S. Hott,

L. T. MEapE,
ANON.

EmiLy Brovig,

C. E, IrRvINg.

T. PauL.

M. S. MacRitcuHig,
CATHARINE SHAW.
L. T. MEADE,
EmILy Bropig,

L. T. MEADE.
GRACE STEBBING,
C. L. Gorpon.
EmiLy Bropig,

M. E. WINCHESTER.
Jesstz CHAPPELL,
JESSIE CHAPPELL,
A. PITTIS.

Mrs. FABIAN BRACKENBURY.
GERTRUDE P. Dyer.
NELLIE HELLIS,

L. Marston.

L. MARSTON.
Emity Bropig,

L. Marston,

CE. S.
CATHARINE SHAW.
M. S. MacRitcHis.
L. T. Meapg.

Lonpon: JOHN F, SHAW & CO., 48, ParernostgR Row, E.G

1266.





TO THE END.



CHAPTER I.
CONFIRMATION BELLS,

**O Jesus, I have promised
To serve Thee to the end;
Be Thou for ever near me,
My Master and my Friend.
I shall not fear the battle
If Thou art by my side,
Nor wander from the pathway
If Thou wilt be my Guide.”

IVE fresh young voices carolled forth
these words—five bright fair faces
gleamed soft and solemn in the sweet
spring sunshine, It was Confirmation

Day at St. Magna’s, and the old parish church was

crowded from end to end.

The roll of the organ ceased, the sweet notes
of the singers died away, and the five young girls
in the front oaken pew seated themselves to listen
to the Bishop’s parting words.

“Soldiers and servants of Jesus Christ,” he





8 To the End.



began, “this day you have sworn allegiance to
your great Captain; you have taken upon your-
selves the vows which were made for you at baptism;
you have promised to fight manfully against sin,
the world, and the devil, and to continue Christ’s
faithful soldiers and servants unto your lives’ end.
Now, in whose strength are you going forth to this
warfare? In your Saviour’s or your own? Are
you trusting to your strong right arm and your
good resolutions to bring you the victory, or have
you knelt, and with all the fervency of your young
hearts besought the Lord to nerve you for the
conflict for which none of us are too strong—to
shoe you for the race for which none of our feet
are too swift?

“My dear young friends, I know not the secrets
of your hearts, but God does; but if you have
never honestly raised a cry to Heaven for help
before, raise one now, I beseech you. Rush not
unarmed into the fight. Ask your Heavenly Father
to equip you with the helmet of salvation, with the
sword of the Spirit, to give you the shield of faith
and the breastplate of Christ’s righteousness, to
gird you with truth, and to shoe your feet with
peace, and then—and then alone—may you hope to
run with patience the race that is set before you—
to be faithful unto death—to continue Christ’s
faithful soldiers and servants until your lives’ end.”





Confirmation Bells. 9



More words followed—words of love, words of
counsel, words of encouragement—and then the
organ pealed forth again, the bells chimed, and the
crowded congregation poured itself forth into the
bright spring sunshine.

“To the end, to the end; Father, keep me faithful
to the end,” pleaded Edith Wilmot that night as
she knelt in the room where her little sisters
slumbered.

a To the end, to the end; dear Saviour, guard me
we —guide me,” whispered Ruth Hope with clasped
hands, as she lay on her invalid couch at the Home
Farm that evening.

“To the end, to the end; may I be true to the
end,” prayed Patience Trueman, as she gazed up
through her cottage-window at the stars that were
shining down so brightly. :

Thus three out of the five young girls that had
knelt in the oaken pew that morning started forth
on the race that was set before them—leaning on
the same strong arm—resting in the same dear love.

But what of the other two? Alas! alas! though
Violet Norman and Rose Wicks bent the knee
and folded the hands, repeating the words they
had learnt by rote from childhood, that night, no
true cry went up to Heaven for help, under no
wings of love did they seek for rest and shelter,









CHAP,
I.

Ill.
Ive

VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.

XI.
XII.
XIII.
XIV.
XV.
XVI.
XVII.
XVIII.
XIX.



CONTENTS:

CONFIRMATION BELLS p60
A FIRESIDE TALK oa0
THE HOME FARM eee
THE HAY-FIELD 060 eee

THE COTTAGE HOME ... Be.
EVENING CONFIDENCES

AN “AT HOME” AT THE KNOLL
TWILIGHT TALKS Ras ne
WAVERERS as a ve
THE DARKENED HOME
ADELBERT TERRACE ...

TAKE UP THE CROSS on
A LUNCHEON PARTY...

TEMPTATION ... a; ae
CONQUEST ae ve ie
MARRIAGE BELLS re a
A CHANCE MEETING ... a
A SAD RETURN Hie es
CONFIRMATION BELLS oes

PAGE







CHAPTER II.

A FIRESIDE TALK,

: HE short spring day had closed, and the
| firelight flickered merrily on the rose-
coloured blinds of an old-fashioned
house in High Street. Tea was being
carried out from the drawing-room, and with a
sigh of content a lady dropped into a cosy chair
near the fire and drew a work-basket to her.

“What! all the petticoats finished! Rachel,
you must have worked hard this morning; too
hard, dear, I am afraid,” and Miss Scott looked
anxiously at her sister.

“No, Margaret, I am not tired,” and the sweet
pale face that rested against the cushions of the
sofa lifted itself smilingly. “Little Mary Trueman
came round this morning, and the sight of her
well-worn garments gave my fingers new energy.”

“Poor Mrs. Trueman, she must find it hard work
to clothe her baker’s dozen, and yet Patience looked





A Fireside Talk. II



so neat and respectable this morning—quite as
respectable as Rosa Wicks, whose father earns
thirty shillings a week. Patience and Rose and
Violet and Edith and Ruth Hope were all in the
pew together, dear.”

“Were they? How strange !—just the five girls
we are so interested in. And you liked the
Bishop’s address ?”

“Liked it—I more than liked it; it sent me
out to my district with fresh energy. But oh,
Rachel, I could not help thinking of my own con-
firmation—that happy day twenty-five—no, let me
see—thirty years ago; it was just such a May day
as this, bright and beautiful—you remember it,
dear, don’t you? But I am forgetting, how should
you ?—you were only a little toddle then. Good old
Mr. Mansel was our vicar, and Bishop Wilson con-
firmed me; and father was there. -I can see him
now beaming at me from the red-lined pew in the
gallery ; and mother, dear mother, in her lavender
bonnet and white ribbons, kneeling down praying
for me, and Arthur—yes, Arthur was home from
India that year. Ah! they were all here then,
and now...” And Miss Scott’s voice faltered.

“Now, Margaret darling, they are safe at home
with the Saviour in Paradise,” and Rachel Scott’s
thin blue-veined hand stole gently into her sister’s,

“Ah, Rachel dear, what should I do without



12 | To the End.



you? I—I am always looking back, while you
are always looking forward. Yes, as I sat listening
to the Bishop’s brave stirring words to-day, I
could not help thinking what. a poor cowardly
soldier I had been; how often I had never held
up my shield of faith at all; and how sometimes I
had even been tempted to throw away my armour
and fly.”

“Tempted, Margaret, darling!—but through
God’s grace. you did not give way to the tempta-
tion. We have all bitter things to write against
ourselves; but I only trust those five young
soldiers who are starting to-day will fight as man-
fully as you have done.”

“Rachel, Rachel! hush! hush!—but Iet us
change the subject. Those dear young girls—it
was quite touching to see them. Patience True-
man’s honest open face was beaming over with
happiness; and Edith, our own dear Edith, had
such a sweet look in her blue eyes; and con-
siderate and thoughtful as usual, she helped Ruth
Hope so tenderly to the chancel.”

“Ah, dear Edith, Dr. Wilmot was only telling
me yesterday what a help and comfort she was to
him. A much greater weight of responsibility, he
says, rests on her young shoulders than he would
willingly place there, but her mother suffers so
terribly from headaches, Edith however accepts



A Fireside Talk. 13



her position, Dr. Wilmot says, most brightly, and
she is the sunshine and mainstay of the household.”

“But what of Violet and Rose, Margaret ?—you
did not tell me about them.”

“Well, dear, even their pretty faces looked
thoughtful, but Frank tells me he is anxious about
them. He says they were most regular attendants
at the class, and assented most readily to all
he had to say; but somehow or other he fears his
words have had no real influence upon them, and
that they do not at all realize the solemnity of the
step they have undertaken,”

“Ah, Margaret dear, my heart aches for them—
pretty motherless Violet, and winning, bright Rose.
God grant they are not starting forth to meet all
the trials and the temptations that lie before them
without the Good Shepherd’s arm around them.”

“God grant they are not, darling; we must pray
earnestly for them,” and Miss Scott stooped and
pressed a kiss on her sister’s forehead. “But, Rachel
dear, what hot cheeks !—you have talked enough
for to-night. Where is the book? Come, I will
read to you.”







CHAPTER III.

THE HOME FARM.
SD il sacith ie acl itineles

The call which had begun in a high
treble ended in a shrill crescendo.

Softly a door opened and closed at
the end of the corridor, and quickly with finger
uplifted a young girl came along it. “Bertie,
Bertie! hush, hush!—don’t you know mother is
lying down with a headache?”

“Oh, Edie, I quite forgot,” and the face of the
curly-headed little boy that bestrode the banisters
sobered instantly.

“T thought you did, darling, for you are generally
so thoughtful,” and Edith Wilmot stooped and
pressed a kiss on her little brother’s forehead ; “but
run up-stairs now and tell Daisy and Pansy I am
ready, and if nurse wants to speak to me she will
find me in the school-room.”

“Edie, are you really going to slave all the way







The Home Farm. 15



to the farm this hot afternoon?” was the question
that came from the depths of a wicker chair placed
just outside the school-room window, where the

old-fashioned caves of the Elizabethan house cast
a patch of shade on the gravelled pathway.

“Yes, Joan, I must; mother will not touch meat
to-day, and I want to tempt her with some of Mrs.
Muir’s fresh eggs.”

“You darling old pet, you are a model of
thoughtfulness and self-denial. I hope you are not
going however to ask me to accompany you, for
Mrs. Norman has just written to ask me to go for
a drive with her,’ and Joan Wilmot tossed into
the school-room a daintily scented envelope.

“No, Joan, I am not,’ and Edith stooped and
with a slight shade on her face picked up the
letter ; “and as to self-denial, I am sure none of
that is required in performing a little service for
mother—mother whose health has broken down in
slavery and service for us.”

“You know, Edith, I did not mean that,” and
Joan Wilmot toyed somewhat shamefacedly with a
sprig of the clematis that clambered up the red-
brick walls,

“TI know, darling, that you did not,” and Edith
turned up the pretty pouting face of her sister and
kissed it fondly ; “but, Joan dear, you zw be back
in time for your French lesson, will you not?



16 To the End.



Madame le Foi is always so vexed when she is ©
kept waiting. Ah, there is good little May learning
her verbs in the arbour, I see. Good-bye, May
darling, ’m off to the farm,” and blowing a kiss
through -her fingers Edith joined the impatient
children, who, armed with big baskets and shady
hats, were awaiting her arrival at the school-room
door.

Farms, as a rule, exercise an irresistible attraction
over most children, and a walk to the Home Farm
was the little Wilmots’ especial delight; it con-
tained such a world of interests, and it was pre-
sided over by such a kind mistress—a mistiess
who did not mind even when little footprints were
left on the red bricks of her clean dairy, nor when
little hands seized the handle of her big churn ;
nor, strange to say, even when little voices disturbed
the privacy of the secluded nook where the old
gray hen was sitting. Yes, Mrs. Muir was a mistress
‘after the children’s own heart, and they turned to
her instinctively, not only to be made busy and
happy, but also with all their little confidences,
while she—she looked on the children as a bit of
God’s own sunshine—rays of light and gladness
sent down from heaven to brighten and to cheer
this lower world of ours,

Mrs. Muir was Scotch—very Scotch some people
would say—for she pronounced her /’s with delisious



The Home Farm. 17



distinctness, and rolled out her 7s as though she
loved them. She had been brought up in comfort
and luxury, for her father had been a wealthy
Glasgow merchant; but comfort and luxury she
had turned her back upon when she became the
wife of a missionary, and consented to accompany
Alan Muir to his lonely station in southern Africa,
to the land and the work he loved so well.

Five short years passed—the golden years of
Janet Muir’s life—and then Alan Muir was called
to exchange labour for rest, work for praise, and
Janet returned to her father’s house a widow.

To her father’s house, but not to the home of
her childhood, for during her absence the wealthy
mercantile house in which her father was a partner
had become bankrupt, and he and his little orphaned
grand-daughter were now living in a quiet suburb
of Glasgow.

In tending and ministering to these dear ones,
Janet Muir sought to assuage her own sorrow, but
when her father’s days were ended, at the request
of a cousin of her husband’s, she and her little
niece turned their faces southernwards, to the
Home Farm—a home which God in His provi-
dential care ultimately designed one day should be
Janet’s own—a haven of rest and shelter for the
widow and the orphan.





CHAPTER IV.

THE HAY-FIELD.

AND is your talk with Ruthie over, dear?
Then come to yonder shady corner,
and we'll make ourselves cosy on a
hay-cock; the children have been
making me an arm-chair and they are most anxious
that I should try it.”

“ Ah, Mrs. Muir, they ave enjoying themselves!
How happy you do make them !—yes, yes, Bertie,
I see you,” and Edith Wilmot waved her parasol in
answer to her little brother’s violent gesticulations,
as perched on old Dobbin’s ample back he made
the tour of the field in the hay-cart—Pansy and
Violet, all laughter and excitement, rolling on the
load behind.

“Wee lambies, it does my heart good to see
them, and they are quite safe. I have given them
into old Robin’s charge, and he is as careful over










The Hay-field. 19



them as though they were his house-lambs; well,
and how do you think Ruthie is looking, dear ?”

“Pretty well ; perhaps a trifle pale from the heat;
but oh! Mrs. Muir, how sweet and patient she is!
—never murmuring nor complaining.”

“That she does not, dear bairnie ; even old Elspeth
said to me this morning, ‘It does my heart guid,
mem, to look at Miss Ruth, her face beams like a
glint of sunshine, and as for her sweet voice, I heard
her singing when I was stirring the porridge this
morning, and it was just like the lark a-lilting’
I expect it was Ruthie’s confirmation hymn old
Elspeth heard; she always sings it over to herself
the first thing in the morning.”

“Does-she ? Then I hope she will like this,” and
Edith produced from her pocket an illuminated
card,

“Tt is pretty, dear—very pretty, and oh, what a
needful prayer!” and Mrs. Muir repeated slowly to
herself the words——

“O Jesus, I have promised
To serve Thee to the end;
Be Thou for ever near me,
My Master and my Friend.
I shall not fear the battle
If Thou art by my side, :
Nor wander from the pathway
Tf Thou wilt be my Guide.”

The card was handed back in silence. Mrs.
B 2



20 To the End.



Muir was gazing across the hay-field, but not at the
children.

“Mrs. Muir,” at last Edith ventured to say, “ Mrs.
Muir, do you know although I love that verse I
almost tremble when I sing those words—

*O Jesus, I have promised
To serve Thee to the end.’

The end may be such a long way off, and there
may be such difficulties and trials before it comes,
and then when I think of that verse in the Bible
that speaks of vowings to God and not performing,
and remember that I have promised to my Saviour
—to my God...” and Edith covered her face
with her hands.

The far-away look in Mrs. Muir's eyes was gone;
in a minute she was back in the present. “My
bairnie, when you made the promise you did not
forget the prayer?”

“No, no, indeed I did not.”

“J thought not; then fear not to take up the
words of that sweet hymn—sing, my bairnie, with-
out a quaver of doubt—

I shall not fear the battle
If Thou art by my side,

Nor wander from the pathway
If Thou wilt be my Guide.’

I was thinking, Edith, of a little incident in my





The Hayfield. 21



own life when you spoke to me. Shall I tell it to
you, dear ?—it will help to illustrate what I mean.”

“Please do.”

“Well, my child, my Alan and I were once
spending a few weeks in the Highlands—ah me,
how long ago now!”—and again the far-away look
came into Mrs. Muir’s eyes. “Behind our wee house
there rose a hill which I was very anxious to be-
come better acquainted with, and as my husband
was always very busy with his letters in the morn-
ing, I thought some day I might scale it alone.
Alan however assured me it was far steeper than
it looked, and that it should be ascended by only
one particular path. He promised however to be my
guide one day, but laughingly he asserted I must
exercise the womanly virtue of patience, and wait
till he could claim an honest holiday. I kissed
him and told him his wife was not a southern maid,
hills had no terrors for her, and one day when he
was busy in his study I stole out of the house and
soon was on my way to Ben Dhu.

“What need to dilate on my experiences? For
the first hour I sang like a lark; during the second
I was silent; by the third I had stumbled over
a stone, and lay speechless with fatigue and
exhaustion.

“What was to become of me? Our wee housie
in the glen was plainly visible, for I had but half-



22 To the End.

way ascended the hill, but I had no strength to
retrace my steps. Oh, why, why had I not listened
to dear Alan, and waited for his strong arm to
guide me! Now perhaps I should have to spend a
night out on the hill, and hiding my face in the
bracken, I burst into a passion of tears.

“Just then I heard the furze-bushes being pushed
aside,and tramp! tramp! coming over the heather.
I raised myself, and there was Alan, my husband,
come in search of me. I need not describe our
meeting, Edith, but I will tell you, dear, I was not
upbraided. I was fed with milk and biscuits, and
after being lifted on to a Highland pony, carefully
led homewards.

“Three weeks later, Edith, my husband and I
stood on the top of Ben Dhu, and as I gazed at
the lovely landscape I said, ‘ Alan, I should never
have seen this if you had not been my guide.’

“«VYou would not have made that speech a month
ago, Wifie, said my husband, as he smilingly drew
me down to a seat on the heather; ‘you learnt
your wisdom by bitter experience, I am afraid.’
Then changing his tone, he added, ‘It is a small
matter to mistrust an earthly guide; but, oh,
Janet, my darling, may neither you or I ever mis-
trust our Heavenly Guide —our blessed, blessed
Saviour. Before us there lies a steeper than any
earthly hill to climb; may we mount it leaning on







The Hay-field. 23



the arm of our Beloved—and then, and then alone,
may we hope to reach the better land—the new
Jerusalem,’

“He is there now, my Alan,” said Mrs. Muir
softly, as she wiped away a tear; “but, Edith, there
are the children—take them to look for the eggs,
will you, dear? I will go in and get tea ready,”
and pulling her sun-bonnet over her eyes, Mrs.
Muir turned in the direction of the farm-house.
Often and often in after years when Edith was far
away from the Home Farm, and new duties and
responsibilities were weighing upon her, that
summers afternoon would rise to her remem-
brance—the deep blue sky—the sunny hay-field—
the children rolling in the hay-cart; and once more
she would fancy herself looking into Mrs. Muir’s
sweet earnest eyes; once more would she recall
the truth that the story of Ben Dhu had taught
her.







CHAPTER V.

THE COTTAGE HOME.

J] ATIENCE, tell Bob to let me have the
| bat, he’s had it for nigh half-an-hour.”

“No, Patience, I ought to keep it;
Tim hasn’t put me out yet.”

“ Now, boys, isn’t mother always telling you to
give up to one another? Come, Bob, you are the
eldest, let Tim have a turn; there’s no chance of his
putting you out, he’s but a little fellow; but run
along now, for there are the children to put to bed,
and mother’s supper to get ready,” and closing the
door on her brothers, Patience Trueman turned
back into the kitchen. Mrs. Trueman’s cottage
was small—so small that it was difficult when
night came to know where to stow away the
numerous olive branches; but a mother’s love and
tact can overcome a good many difficulties, and
few curly heads slumbered more peacefully than
did the little Truemans,

cS





The Cottage Home. 25



Tom, the eldest, was domiciled at the Home
Farm ; Ted, the next brother to Patience, was at
sea; George, Mrs. Trueman had taken in that very
day to Great St. Magna’s, where he was to act as
general factotum to his uncle, who kept an oil and
tallow-chandler’s shop ; Bob, Willie, Tim, Mary and
Nellie were all still at school; while Susie, Freddy
and Artie (the fat twins), and Jessie, the three-year-
old baby, enjoyed the freedom of home. A goodly
number of young mouths to feed, despite that three
out of the thirteen chicks had already taken flight
from the family roof-tree; not one too many, how-
ever, thought Mrs, Trueman; and when Patience,
belying her name, was all impatience to be also on
the wing (not from discontent with her cosy, snug
nest, but because she was longing to bring money
into the family exchequer), her mother declared
that straitened means with her were worth any
amount of money without her, and Patience had
to give her promise that she would bide at home
at all events till Mary grew a bit bigger,

It was mother’s supper that Patience was now
busy over, and after concocting a savoury little
dish from some scraps of meat and potatoes, she
popped it into the oven, and calling to Mary to
bring up the twins, she caught up baby Jess, and
covering her dimpled face with kisses carried her
off to bed.



26 To the End.



The upper storey of Mrs. Trueman’s cottage
consisted of three bedrooms, if bedroom the third
could be called when it was little more than a
cupboard—cupboard though it was, however, it
was the coveted possession of the elder Trueman

boys, and now that George had departed to the
~ region of oil and dips, Bob and Willie had become
its proud possessors.

Mrs, Trueman, baby, Susie and Tinrslept in the
front apartment, while Patience, Mary, Nellie and
the twins occupied the white-washed chamber that
looked over the strip of old-fashioned garden.

The air that came through the casement-window
was fragrant with the smell of roses, jasmin,
mignonette and honeysuckle, and as Patience
(after putting the children to bed) watched the
stars come out one by one, she thought, “ Truly
the lines had fallen to her in pleasant places; yea,
she had a goodly heritage.”

The hushed stillness of the room was only
broken by the deep-drawn breaths of the tired
children, when a low whisper came from the bed
nearest to the window.

“ Patience, what are you looking at ? The stars?”

“Yes, Nellie; why ain’t you asleep ?”

“Oh, I bain’t tired, Patience; do let me look
too; I do love them stars,” and the child crept on
to her sister’s knee,





The Cottage Home. 27



Patience drew together the casement, and wrap-
ping an old shawl round her little sister the two
gazed together for some minutes in silence.

« Ain't they lovely?” at last whispered Nellie.
“ Patience, be Heaven up there ?”

“J don’t know, Nellie; nobody rightly knows.”

“Oh, I hope it be—stars seem somehow so
home-like.”

“But Heaven does not require to be made
home-like, Nellie dear; Heaven is our Father’s
house, and then (and Patience’s voice lowered and
her eyes glistened) Jesus is there.”

The child’s arms tightened round her sister’s neck,
but she said nothing; when Patience was carrying
her back to bed, however, she whispered, “ Patience,
I do love the Lord Jesus.”

“T am so glad, Nellie dear, for you know the
Lord Jesus loves you very much—more than cven
mother or me,” —

“I know He does,’ and the little fair head
nestled with satisfaction on its pillow.

Tucking her little sister in securely, Patience
kissed her fondly, then ran down-stairs to look after
her savoury dish in the oven.

tee





CHAPTER VI.
EVENING CONFIDENCES.
AIRS. TRUEMAN was very tired when

she reached home, but Patience put
her into the old-fashioned arm-chair,
and took off her heavy boots, and after
a strong cup of tea and some supper she began to
revive.

“Well, Patience, some folks may like being out
and about, but to my mind there’s no place like
home,” and Mrs. Trueman stroked her daughter's
head fondly.

“What, mother! you don’t envy Uncle Tom all
his grandeur?”

“No, lass, that I don’t, though he has as tidy a
house as you would wish to set eyes on—a parlour
at the back of the shop where they takes their
meals, and a sitting-room up-stairs with a pianer
for Amelia to play on, and four bedrooms with
lace curtains at the windows; but there now, I





Of OP RT SES

Cat Re ae



Evening Confidences. 29



wouldn’t give our little place for the whole of it,”
and Mrs, Trueman gazed with satisfaction round
her cheery kitchen.

“And did George seem content to stay, mother ?”

“Ay, dear lad, he did his best to put a brave
face upon it, but his heart was in his mouth, that
I could see, when he said good-bye to me in the
parlour. His uncle, however, he slapped him on the
back, and told him that if he was a sharp lad, and
steady, perhaps some day he might write his name
over the shop.”

“Then, mother, some time perhaps George will
have a house too with a parlour and a pianer and
bedrooms and lace curtains.”

“Ah, Patience, my child, it is not money I
covet for my children ; if George only turns out an
honest God-fearing man like his dear father, my
prayers will be answered.”

“I know, mother, I know,” and looking up in
her mother’s face with a bright smile, Patience
added softly, “We all know, mother dear, your
heart’s desire for us.”

“And my heart’s desire is granted for one at
least of my children, is it not?”

Patience’s “ yes,” though a low was a very earnest
one; then drawing a stool to her mother’s fect
she repeated her conversation with Nellie that
night.



30 To the End.



“Ah, Patience, my child, what a true God in
Heaven is our God! The night your dear father was
taken how I did beseech the good Lord to let me
meet.my dear Will again some day, and to let me
bring all my dear children with me, and see how
He is answering my prayer. Dear little Nellie, I
always thought her a child beyond her years, and
she is that like her father I could almost fancy
sometimes it is his dear eyes a-lookin’ at me.” |

Eight o’clock struck, and Patience was still on a
stool at her mother’s feet; a big basket, however,
stood beside her with a pile of socks which she
was busy darning.

It was easy to see what a bond of union existed
between this mother and daughter. To Mrs, True-
man, Patience was not only a deeply-loved child,
but also a trusted companion and counsellor, while
to Patience Mrs. Trueman was just mother; but
the way in which the girl’s voice softened and her
eyes brightened when she pronounced this word
showed what a wealth of meaning it conveyed to
her.

“Patience, give me some of those stockings; I
am morg rested now.”

“No, mother, not one, you are to finish your
day like a lady,” and jumping up Patience shook.
up her mother’s cushion and pulled her gently
back upon it. “There now, that is right ; it is really





Evening Confidences. 31





quite a pleasure, mother dear, to see you for once
with your hands before you.”

“Ah, Patience, you spoil your old mother, but
I suppose I must give in to you. Well, dear, and
how did the children behave themselves ?”

“Oh, very well; Bob and Willie they had a few
words at dinner, but they soon made it up after-
wards, But, mother, I have something to tell you;
do you know J have had a visitor?”

“A visitor—and who could that be?”

“Rose Wicks! Yes, mother, you may well open
your eyes; I am sure I did mine when she walked
in, it is so long since she has been to see us; and,
mother, do you know I think she is so changed
since the confirmation—she seems somehow so much
more quiet and humble-like.”

“Tam right glad to hear it, child, for to tell you
the truth, I was afeard Rose Wicks was beginning
to get a little light-headed last winter; but there
now, I hope she has taken heed to all that good
Mr. Newton has said to her; and, Patience dear,
when you get a chance you might say a word of
counsel to her. She is a pretty lass and soft spoken,
but she has a spirit of her own, and Wicks and
his wife, I fear me well, they don’t go the right
way to manage her.”

The garden-gate now clicked, and Bob and
, Willie rushed in full of the band-of-hope meeting



32 To the End.



they had been at, and eager to hear the latest news
of George.

Mrs, Trueman answered all their questions, and
then bade Bob reach down the Bible, for “the
church clock was striking nine,” she said, and she
and Patience had a hard day’s washing before
them.

A chapter was read, prayer was offered, and by
ten o'clock all in the little cottage were peacefully
sleeping, secure in the care of Him who never
epee nor sleepeth—the God of the widow
and the fatherless.







CHAPTER VII.

AN “AT HOME” AT THE KNOLL.

JIFTEEN—love; thirty—love; thirty—
fifteen ; thirty—all!”

These were the sounds that issued
from Dr. Wilmot’s garden one bright
afternoon towards the end of July, and the moss-
covered, velvety lawn looked like some gay parterre
of flowers with the summer costumes that were
dotted over it.

“T say, Joan, do exert yourself, Violet and I
don’t want to win the set without you and Newton
getting a game.”

It was Harry Wilmot who spoke, and with a well-
directed serve he sent a ball straight at his sister.

“Harry, you add insult to injury; your serves
are aggravating enough at the best of times, but
on hot days they are positively—”

“Cruel, are they not, Joan?”

“Harry, my boy, be chivalrous and merciful,
Cc






34 To the End.





young ladies are not expected to be such ‘dabs’
at lawn-tennis as the students at Guy’s. Well,
Newton, how are you and Violet? Miss Violet,
why the weather seems to have no evil effect upon
you—positively you look as cool and fresh as your
namesakes down in the valley yonder. MHarry
has been doing all the running about for you, I
suppose; quite right too, I would do the same if
I were in his place; keep him. at it, and then he
won't have time to launch any more shafts of sar-
casm at his sister,’ and with a nod and a smile
Dr. Wilmot passed on to the cosy party seated at
tea under the cedar-tree.

The old house had been made to disgorge couches,
easy-chairs, rugs, stools, &c.; and now that all
these were temptingly arranged on the mossy turf
beneath the shade of spreading branches, the old
cedar-tree looked a nook by no means to be
despised.

“Well, Miss Scott, how do you like our im-
promptu drawing-room? It is preferable to the
house in this weather, isn’t it?—-and there is no fear
of damp with this plentiful supply of rugs that
Harry has provided for us.”

“T think it is delightful, doctor,” and Rachel
Scott leaned back in her easy-chair as she spoke,
and gazed up at the blue sky through the thick
branches.



An “At Home” at the Knoll. 35



“JT was just telling Edith that even the tea seems
more delicately flavoured, I think, when it is taken
out of doors.”

“Ah, I don’t wonder at your thinking that,
you are compelled to lead such a shut-up life.”

“Yes, but when I do get out, just think how I
enjoy it! I don’t suppose I would be drinking in
the delights of this beautiful day with half such
a keen sense of enjoyment if I had not been kept
to the house for the best part of the winter.”

“ Ah, Rachel does not require sunshiny weather
to make her look on the bright side of things,
does she, doctor?” said Mr. Newton, as he laid
a hand on the back of his cousin’s chair; “she
carries sunshine with her.”

“That she does,” said Dr. Wilmot; “I wish all
my patients did the same, it would be better for
them and for me. Ah, here comes my little bit
of home sunshine, I see, with a cup of tea for her
old father. Well, Edith, my pet, not overcome
with your duties at the tea-table? And Violet and
Pansy, my sweet flowerets, what have you been
doing to make yourselves useful?” and stooping
down Dr. Wilmot lifted a child on to each knee.

“We have been taking round the bread and
butter,” lisped the pretty pair, “and Mrs. Newton
said we did it very nicely,” whispered Daisy, while
the modest Pansy hung her head.

C2



36 To the End.



“Oh! and you haven’t been eating any, I
suppose?”

“Yes, we did have owe little piece.”

“But Edith said we might,” chimed in Daisy.

“Oh then, if Edith said you might, I suppose
I mustn’t say anything,” and Dr. Wilmot drew the
golden heads on to his shoulder. “I am glad,
however, it was only ‘one Uittle piece, for that
Scotch bun looks very rich and ‘plummy,’ and I
shouldn’t like-nurse to pay me a visit to-morrow
to ask for one of the black bottles off the shelf
in the surgery.”

“No, and we shouldn’t like it either,” and the little
fair faces looked apprehensive at the suggestion.

“No, Iam sure you wouldn’t,” and Dr. Wilmot
leaned back in his chair laughing merrily. “As
you only took ‘one little piece, however, I don’t
think you need look so woebegone, for I dare say,
after all, I shall not have the pleasure of a visit
from nurse, so put such thoughts out of your heads,
and run away now and pick up balls for ‘Sister
Joan,” and kissing the pair fondly, Dr. Wilmot
watched them trot off with satisfaction.

“Dear little pets,” said Miss Scott, “how happy
they are to be of use! I have been watching that
game of lawn-tennis with such interest, for though
I don’t understand the rules, I like to sce the deft
way in which the ball is sent backwards and for-



An “At Home” at the Knoll. 37



wards. Harry never seems to miss a chance; I
suppose he is a capital player, Dr. Wilmot ?”

“Rather too capital, I am afraid, for his poor
little sister Joan. Frank plays well to Newton,
and what a pair of broad shoulders the young
fellow has brought back! Sea-voyages evidently
agree with him.”

“Yes, I wish Lawrence looked as well ; his mother
has been bemoaning his want of roses all the
morning; but a curate’s life in the east end of
London is no sinecure.”

“No, I should think not; but, Lawrence—is
Lawrence with you? Why, to be sure; there he is
talking to the wife. I must go over and speak to
him.”

The face that turned to greet Dr. Wilmot was
a very pale one, but the deep gray eyes were clear
and sparkling, and the firm hand-clasp the doctor
received betokened no lack of vigour.

“Why, Lawrence, my dear fellow, I thought
you were hard at work in the London slums.
How came I not to see you when I was cross-
ing the lawn? You were in the back garden.
Ah, I thought so; I felt sure I could not have
overlooked your stalwart form. Well, we are de-
lighted to have you back again amongst us once
more, aren’t we, Janie?”—and the doctor turned
and looked appealingly at his wife. “ But you have



38 To the End.



lost all your country roses, your father tells me;
ah, you do look rather whitewashed—overworked,
I suppose?”

“ Overworked, dear! I should think so,” stole in
Mrs. Wilmot’s soft voice; “do you know, Henry,
how many thousand Lawrence has in his parish?
Twenty-five !” .

“Twenty-five !—and how many helpers?”

“Only the vicar a lay-reader, and myself, and
some fifteen to twenty Sunday-school teachers
and district visitors.”

“Not one for every thousand; Lawrence, my dear
fellow, I do pity you,” and the doctor sank into
a seat by his wife’s sofa.

“Pity my poor people, doctor, don’t waste your
pity on me; I wouldn’t change my lot with an
emperor’s,” and the young man raised his head
proudly. “I assure you it is not the work done
that kills, it is the work left undone—the thought
of the sheep astray—astray without a shepherd.”

“But even. that care, Lawrence, you can lay at
the feet of the Good Shepherd; your sheep can
never wander beyond His ken; He will guide both
you and them.”

“ T know it, doctor, I know it, and when I look
at our streets and alleys with their teeming, toiling
masses, that is the thought that keeps me from
despair.”



A ena





GiSUNP INI WAS.

TWILIGHT TALKS.

HE fierce burning July sun had sunk
in a blaze of glory, and lights were
beginning to twinkle here and there

in the old-fashioned casements of “ The

Knoll,” when, supper over, the few “intimates ” of

Dr. and Mrs. Wilmot who had remained to spend

the evening, strolled out through the open windows



_ to the verandah and the lawn.

Edith, to her delight, found herself pacing the
gravelled pathways side by side with Mr. Newton,
for dearly she loved ‘a talk with “the Vicar,” while
he, eagerly solicitous for the welfare of the young
members of his flock, gladly welcomed every oppor-
tunity of helping them with advice and sympathy.

“Violet tells me she has asked you for a district,
Mr. Newton.” |

“Yes, and with her father’s consent I have given
her a few cottages—those facing the Green.”

“ Where the Wicks and Widow Smart live,” and
Edith’s face wore a wistful expression,



40 To the End.



Mr. Newton gazed at her through the darken-
ing twilight. He guessed something of what was
passing through her mind,

“Edith, my child, you can work for God as dis-
tinctly as Violet does even though your sphere
does not extend beyond the limits of home.”

Edith raised her eyes with a new light in them |
—the wistful expression was gone.

“An eldest daughter and sister has such a wide
area of usefulness, I always think, and when she
brightly, patiently, and conscientiously takes up
her several duties and performs them all to the
glory of God, who can tell to what extent her
influence may be used, nor how many may be
blessed through her bright example?”

“Oh, Mr. Newton, you do help one so. Now all
this week I have been thinking that perhaps Iam
drifting too much with circumstances, our home
life is such a happy one, and the days fly past so
swiftly. Mother is not strong, and there are so
many little things to do; but last week there
flashed across me the thought that I was not
working at all for God—that I had no district or
Sunday-school class, or anything of that sort, I
mean—and then I remembered all the Bishop
said at our Confirmation about life being a battle
and we being soldiers, and I began to be afraid that
just perhaps because I was so happy I had been



SKrakew 5

















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“Rose Rose, don’t talk like that. How many a poor London girl would think
your little home a Paradise!"—#. 53.






Twilight Talks. 43
drifting too easily with the tide, that perhaps .. .”
—and Edith’s voice faltered, and her head lowered
—‘“T have not been fighting at all.”

“Edith, my child, you would like to have a
district ?”

“Oh, Mr. Newton, I should—I should—of all
things—but—”

“But if you took one, some of those ‘little
things’ to which you alluded so casually would be
thrown on the shoulders of your mother (since
Joan is still in the school-room), and your mother
is not able to bear them.”

“That is just it; mother is pretty well some
days, but other times she can barely lift her head
from the pillow.”

“Then rest content. God in His good Provi-
dence is shutting the door for you at present to
outside work; your work for Him must be at
home, and remember that piety shown at home
and requital of parents (we have it on God’s own
authority) is ‘good and acceptable’ before Him.” °

“Father, the school-mistress wants to see
you.”

Mr. Newton turned to obey the summons, and
Lawrence Newton took his father’s place beside
_ Edith.

“What a glorious night !—the stars are as bright
as diamonds,”



44 To the End.



“Aren't they? You must enjoy this taste of
country, Lawrence, after London.”

“That I do, and not the least part of my enjoy-
ment is the seeing of old friends; it is not the
physical atmosphere of London, however, that is
so depressing, it is the spiritual and moral—the
dull, degraded, hopeless depths into which most
of the poor (at least the poor around me) have
sunk, You find yourself asking wonderingly,
‘Can anything that I can say penetrate to brains
whose one thought is how to procure the bread for
which they are starving? Can any message that
I can bring brighten faces whose eyes are sunk
and wan with despair ?’—and then you remember
that your message is Divine.”

“Oh, Lawrence, what a sad picture!”

“Sad, but true. Why, only the day before
yesterday, up in a dingy attic at the top of a long
stair, I came across a young girl—not much older
than you, Edith, and yet a widow (her husband
fell from a scaffold some months ago), and there
she was toiling for dear life to keep her mother,
her two little children and herself from starvation,
and what do you think were the munificent wages
she was receiving ?”

“Tam sure I don’t know.”

“Three-farthings an hour!-—so if the poor
creature could keep on stitch! stitch! stitch! for



Twilight Talks. 45



twelve hours out of twenty-four, on the Saturday
night she would receive four-and-sixpence, out of
which she would have to pay for thread and
needles, so you can imagine what a princely sum
would be left for fuel, food, and shelter.”

“Lawrence, how caz they live?”

“That is the problem I leave you to solve. Eke
out existence somehow thcy do ; but if the poor little
bread-winner were to break down, nothing could lie
before them but the workhouse. Yes, truly, as my
Vicar said to me the other day, it is not the pleasures
and the riches of this world that choke the seed we
endeavour to sow; it is the cares, the sordid grind-
ing cares. Thank God, there is a bright side to the
picture, however. There is the mission-room with
its hearty little services, and oh, how I love to hear
the poor people pouring out their hearts to Him
who has said, ‘Come unto Me, all ye that are
weary and heavy laden, and I will give you rest!’
There are the schools, where we trust we are train-
ing the children for better and brighter things ; the
Band of Hope gatherings, the mothers’ meetings
—all, all so many little focusses of light which we
hope in time will radiate out such life-giving beams
that the entire face of our parish shall be changed.”

Mr. Newton’s talk with the school-mistress over,
he joined the party in the drawing-room. Violet
Norman was singing, but twisting herself round on



46 To the End.
the music-stool, she suddenly demanded from Frank
Newton “a yarn.”

“Oh yes, Frank, a yarn, a yarn!” shouted Harry
and Joan Wilmot, and yielding to the popular
demand, Frank led the way to the verandah,

Mr. Newton and Margaret Scott exchanged
amused glances.

“What a difference there is in character!” said
Mr, Newton, as he drew a stool to his cousin’s side
and gazed out at the two quiet figures who were
pacing so leisurely up and down the lawn.

“That there is; Edith is made to be an eldest
sister.”

“ And yet she thinks she is not doing her duty,”
and Mr, Newton repeated some of the conversation
that had taken place in the garden.

“ Dear child, she is as humble as she is unselfish.
Why, all this afternoon she has been battling with
her inclinations—pouring out tea instead of playing
at tennis, talking to her parents’ friends instead of
talking to her own, playing at ball with the children
instead of listening to Violet and Frank singing.”

“Of course she has—I noticéd all that. Yes, into
the warp and woof of everyday life Edith hath
begun to weave the golden threads of love and self-
sacrifice, One at least of my confirmation candi-
dates is, I trust, following in the footsteps of the
blessed Master who pleased not Himself.”





CHAPTER Ix.

WAVERERS.

HE next two years that passed over
St. Magna’s were uneventful ones (if
years can be called uneventful in which
habits are being formed, and character

is being moulded for eternity). Outwardly how-

‘ever there was nothing to disturb the still tenor of

village life. Every Monday morning Mrs. Trueman

and Patience were to be seen with sleeves rolled
up standing at the wash-tub; every afternoon Mr.

Newton was to be met with swift step traversing

the parish; each day and all hours of the day Dr.

Wilmot’s brougham rolled along with its red-

painted wheels.

Sunday brought the only break to the weekly
routine—Sunday, and the comings and goings of
Frank Newton and Harry Wilmot. Of late these
comings and goings of Harry Wilmot’s had been
much more frequent than usual. On the smallest





48 To the End.



possible pretext he was always running down to
St. Magna’s, and Edith (if no one else) began to
suspect that Violet Norman was the magnet that
drew him so constantly homewards.

This knowledge gave Edith some compunction,
for she feared Violet was only playing with her
brother; nor were her surmises incorrect, for to
receive and to be pleased with Harry Wilmot’s
attentions was in Violet Norman’s estimation one
thing—to marry him and to settle down at St.
Magna’s quite another.

“Edith, wish me joy!” was Violet’s salutation
one bright spring morning as she entered the
school-room of the Knoll. “Iam going to Paris.”

“To Paris!” And Edith in her astonishment
let fall the work she was so busy over.

“Yes, to Paris; Mrs. Richards has asked me to
accompany her. At first papa said ‘no, Paris was
so far away, and Mrs. Richards—well, he doesn’t
particularly care for her, but I think the truth was,
he was afraid of that nephew of hers that read with
him some years ago; but Mrs. Richards assured
him we should be quite by ourselves—no dangerous
articles in the shape of gentlemen anywhere near ;
and I—I begged and entreated, and so the end of
it is, here am I come to ask if I can do any com-
missions for you in Paris,” and with a mock courtesy
Violet pirouetted before Edith



Waverers. 49



“ Violet, you quite take away my breath; why,
whatever will your father do without you?”

“Do—why, the best he can, and when I return I
shall be received with open arms, and Aunt Hester
will actually forget to scold for one whole day.”

“Oh, Violet, I am sure your aunt loves you
very dearly.”

“Loves me; perhaps she does, but she takes a
peculiar way of showing it. No doubt it is my
fault, though, that I am so constantly in her black
books. I do so dearly love to shock her. I like to
see her peer over her blue goggles and say, ‘ Violet,
do you really mean it? Well, young girls must be
different now to what they were when I was young,”
And Violet drew a long face, and imitated with
exaggerated gesture her aunt’s demure tones. “But,
Edith, I see I am shocking you, and I am not
going to stay in the house this beautiful morning
talking any more about good prim old Aunt Hester,
Throw away that stupid mending and come out
in the garden; Joan must hear my news.”

“Violet, what will you do about your district ? ”
said Edith, as the two walked together over the
sunny lawn,

“ My district. Oh, Mr. Newton must look after
that.”

“TI wonder if he would let me have it while you
are away,” and a thoughtful look came into Edith’s

D



50 To the End.



blue eyes. “Now Joan is out of the school-room,
mother was only saying yesterday she can spare
me for a little parish work.”

“Then do take it, and keep it altogether if you
like, for I don’t think district-visiting is my voca-
tion. I never know what to say to the old bedies,
and J am tired to death of Mrs. Wick’s incessant
srumbling, and Mrs. Brown’s laments over the
difficulties of making two ends meet.”

“But, Violet, dear,” was Edith’s gentle remon-
strance, “do you think we ought to give up a duty
because it is perhaps not quite tasteful to us?”

“Now, Edith, pray don’t begin sermonizing, I
am in no mood for lectures this morning. Paris,
beautiful, bright Paris !—I can think of nothing but
Paris to-day. Oh, Joan!—where is Joan? I doso
long to tell her Iam going;” and careering along
the gravelled pathways, Violet made the old garden
re-echo with her calls.

Edith followed, but with a troubled look on her
face. Her thoughts had travelled back to another
spring morning—bright and beautiful as this one—
when she and Violet had knelt in the old church
at St. Magna’s, and sworn allegiance to the same
Master. How wrapt in devotion Violet had seemed
then, how earnestly she had sung—

“O Jesus, I have promised
To serve Thee to the end !”



Waverers. Sr





And now—now was she already beginning to waver
in that allegiance ? Was she thirsty after waters that
secmed more sweet, after pastures that appeared
more fair? Oh, Edith hoped not, she trusted not ;
and swiftly to the blue sky was raised a cry for
her friend—a cry that in after years was answered,
but through what trials? Ah, pretty, foolish Violet,
choosing your own way and following the bent
of your own inclinations to the narrow path—you
can only be brought back by the weary road of
suffering!

Some two weeks later the wicket-gate of one of
the cottages in Violet Norman’s district was pushed
open by Edith Wilmot, and as she walked up the
tiny garden she stood for a moment admiring the
lilies of the valley and the crocuses with which
the little red-tiled path was bordered.

Angry voices from within warned her that a
family altercation was taking place; so, anxious
not to become a listener, Edith hastened her steps,
Just as she reached the porch a man’s voice shouted,
“Then to London you shan’t go; for once, for all,
I forbid it,” and the back-door slammed angrily.

Edith knocked, and light footsteps were heard
running quickly up-stairs, while a weak voice in a
querulous tone bade the visitor enter.

“Good afternoon, Mrs. Wicks ; Miss. Norman has

D2



52 To the End.



gone away, so I have come to see you instead of
her.”

« And has Miss Norman gone away? Well, miss,
V’ll make so bold as to say I hope ye'll come a
bit more regular than she did, for our club money
is that behind I hardly know when last I paid it;
but sit you down, sit you down, and I'll look for
my card byand by. But Rose and her father, they
have been having one of their upsets again, and
their upsets upset me—that they do; my breath
is just all nohow;” and Mrs. Wicks undid her
cap-strings, and wiped her face with her pocket-
handkerchief.

Edith walked to the window and began remarking
on the beauty of some flowers that stood on the
sill, for she did not wish to mar her first visit by
entering on uncongenial family topics.

Mrs. Wicks, however, was not to be balked of a
grumble when she had the chance of a sympathetic
listener, and back again she went to her grievance.

“You see, miss, it’s all along o’ that there
Lunnon. Rose, she’s wild for a sight o’ the place,
and Wicks, the name of it is enough for him, ever
since his sister Jessie that was—she that lived down
in the hollow. Ah, you won’t remember her, but
the doctor he would sure—the prettiest girl all
round the country-side, and as tall and straight
as an atrow. Well, as I was a sayin’, Wicks, he



Waverers. 53



can’t bide the name of Lunnon ever since Jess
—pretty Jess—took herself there. She came back
with a broken heart, and six months saw the last
of her. But Rose, she won’t listen to such tales;
St. Magna’s, it’s a deal too dull for her.”

Once again Edith tried to turn the conversation,
and this time more successfully. Mrs. Wicks’ re-
marks were not unnoted though, and when Rose
(the traces of tears washed from her pretty eyes)
accompanied their visitor to the garden-gate, Edith
laid a hand on the young girl’s arm.

“Rose, I always feel that there is a special link
between you and me ever since that happy day
when we were confirmed together.”

“Yes, miss,” said Rose, but her tone was an un-
interested one; “why, that’s two year ago come
Easter, but it seems more like four—time goes so
slowly in this stupid little place.”

“Don’t call St. Magna’s stupid, Rose; it is our
home, and where God has placed us.”

“ Ah, life goes differently to you gentlefolks, miss,
to what it does to we poor cottagers. I’m tired to
death of being mewed up in our little place, with
nothing to listen to but grumbling—grumbling
—grumbling.”

“Rose, Rose, don’t talk like that. How many a
poor London girl would think your little home a
Paradise!”



54 To the End.

“ Ah, some folks like dullness, but I am not one
of them,” and Rose pulled open the garden-gate
with a bang.

“But a soldier does not choose in battle the post
he likes, he goes where his commander sends him,
and, Rose” (and Edith’s voice lowered), “ you and
I promised to be soldiers—good soldiers of the
Lord Jesus Christ’s! Oh, let us be faithful to
Him, and serve Him to the end!”

Rose shut the gate with a greater bang than she
had opened it, and Edith with a sad heart walked
across the green.

Was Rose too:beginning to waver in her alle-
giance? Was she forsaking the living fountains of
waters, and hewing out for herself cisterns—broken
cisterns that could hold no water?

With a sigh Edith turned and looked at the
little cottage nestling so peacefully among the tall
elms; but remembering the promise, “Be careful
for nothing, but in everything by prayer and sup-
plication with thanksgiving, let your requests be
made known unto God,” the sigh was turned into

a prayer. E

&~

HI





CHAPTER X.

THE DARKENED HOME.

] HE Jungfrau in all its snowy loveliness
| was standing out pure and cool against
the deep blue summer’s sky, when a
party of English tourists (their hands
filled with letters) seated themselves on the verandah
of the Grand Hotel de Miirren.

“Now, Miss Norman, don’t tell us St. Magna’s
has a clean bill of health yet, or we shall be having
you summoned home.”

The speaker, a tall, dark young man, with a florid
(too florid) complexion, gazed into Violet Norman’s
face with a meaning smile as he spoke,

Violet bent her head to hide her blushes, and
busily employed herself opening her letters,

“Yes, Lionel, you may thank the fever for giving
you Miss Norman as a travelling companion,” said
Mrs. Richards, from the depth of a rocking-chair,
“for [had hard work—hadn’t I, Violet—to persuade





56 To the End.



your father to allow you to accompany me even
as far as Paris?”

But Violet was deep in her letters.

“Mrs. Richards,” she said at length, looking up
with a startled expression, “what do you think ?
—Dr. Wilmot has the fever.”

“Dr. Wilmot ?—let me see, I don’t know much
about your local magnates—is not that the cheery-
faced man that drives about in the brougham
with the red wheels? Ah, I thought so; is hea
great friend of your father’s ?”

“Yes, and his daughters are great friends of
mine,” and Violet gazed across at the Jungfrau
with a troubled face.

“’Pon my word, Miss Norman, I have half a
mind to catch the fever myself, if catching it excites
your sympathy so.”

But Lionel Richards’ words grated harshly’ on
Violet, and she forgot to blush this time.

“Does your father say the doctor’s is a bad
case?” asked Mrs. Richards.

“Yes, they had sent for a London doctor. Our
laundress’s little girl, Mary Trueman, died on
Wednesday night, and Dr. Wilmot was with her
to the last; on the Thursday he sickened himself,
and now, papa says, is lying quiteinsensible. Poor
Mrs. Wilmot, what will she do?—and Edith and
Joan they just adored their father,”



The Darkened Home. 57



This was the question all St. Magna’s was asking
that afternoon too, as with sad faces and tearful
eyes they turned away in the bright summer’s sun-
shine from the doors of the closed Knoll. What
would Mrs. Wilmot and the children do? what
would they all do?—for their good doctor had been
taken away from them. Never again would his quiet,
firm step cross the threshold of their dwellings ;
never again would his bright, cheerful voice calm and
soothe them in their hours of sickness and suffering.

Yes, St. Magna’s felt very desolate that after-
noon, though the sky had not a cloud in it, and
the larks were warbling out their very little hearts
for joy; and if St. Magna’s felt sad and desolate,
what was the depth of the blank in the hearts of
the widow and the orphans?

Ah, sorrow such as theirs is not to be dwelt
upon, it can only be carried in faith to the feet of
Him who says, “I know their sorrows ;” who binds
up the broken-hearted and heals their wounds.

When the blinds of the Knoll were drawn up
again and life’s duties had once more to be faced,
Edith felt as if she was walking the world in a
dream. It seemed so strange that the sun should
shine, and all the little details of every-day life have
to be observed, when he round whom all this home-
life circled, who was its earthly mainspring and
centre, was gone; and had it not been for the



58 To the End.



strength and the courage drawn from the minutes
spent in prayer in her little wainscoted bedroom,
Edith hardly knew how those first terrible weeks
could have been got through.

It was such anguish to take down from the pegs
in the hall the hats and the coats that had hung
there so long, and Edith could hardly see for
blinding tears the creases she was smoothing out
so reverently, as she carefully folded away each
precious article. Then what heart-breaking it was
to sit at meals and never, never to hear the sound
of the red wheels rolling up the avenue; never to
spring forward to meet the glad welcome; never to
receive the loving smile, to hear the hearty words
of commendation with which Dr. Wilmot always
greeted every little act of duty performed by “his
little bit of home sunshine.”

Yes, the chasm in Edith’s life was a terribly
yawning one. Every hour, every minute of the
day she missed the dear, fatherly love that had
always so guarded and guided her; but the loss
of this precious earthly father only drove her to
walk more closely with her Heavenly Father, and
to seek to lighten by every means in her power
the weight of sorrow that rested on her mother—
her mother whose grief was so much deeper than
her own.

Mrs. Wilmot had made up her mind to leave



The Darkened Home. — 59



St. Magna’s, and to make a home in London for
her sons; for Cuthbert, the second boy, was about
to enter one of the hospitals as a student, and
Harry had not yet taken his degree. The locum
tenens waS anxious as soon as possible to take
possession of the Knoll, so the next few weeks
were busy ones; but prayer and work are the best
antidotes to sorrow.

The last Sunday evening came at length, and as
the rays of the setting sun streamed through the
painted glass windows of St. Magna’s church,
tinting the delicate tracery of the nave and arches,
and lighting up the old-fashioned galleries, they
rested for a while’on the bowed head of Edith
Wilmot, as with a heart full of surging emotions she
knelt for the last time in her accustomed corner.

“The barrel of meal shall not waste, neither shall
the cruse of oil fail,’ was the text chosen, and in
a few brief words Mr. Newton sketched the life-
history of the lone widow of Zarephath. “This
poor woman,” he said, “ must have been doing in the
eyes of the worldly wise a very foolish thing when
she took of her handful of meal to make a cake
for a stranger; but she was obeying the voice of
the Lord at the hand of His Prophet. God had
promised to take care of her future; she trusted
to Him for it.

“Are any of you, my hearers,” said Mr. Newton



60 To the End.



“passing through a similar experience to this poor
woman? Is the meal in your barrel reduced to a
handful? The oil in your cruse, is it almost wasted ?
Learn a lesson from the widow of Zarephath: obey
God, trust Him; the path of obedience must be
always the path of blessing. ‘Who is among
you that feareth the Lord, that obeyeth the voice
of His servant, that walketh in darkness and hath
no light? let him trust in the name of the Lord,
and stay upon his God. The barrel of meal shall
not waste, neither shall the cruse of oil fail.”

Edith walked home in the setting sun with a
face of chastened calm. Behind her there lay the
sunny days of childhood and girlhood, before her
stretched an untried future. Not altogether dark
was her horizon, however ; upon it there gleamed
a sure star of promise—“ The barrel of meal shall
not waste, neither shall the cruse of oil fail.”





CHAPTER XI.

ADELBERT TERRACE.

==5H, Edith, surely the cabman has made
a mistake! You don’t mean to say
that this wretched house is to be our
home?”

It was Joan Wilmot who spoke, and as she
peered out of the window of the fly her face ex-
pressed the most intense disgust. Edith jumped
up and tapped her sister warningly on the foot ;
then exclaiming, “Mother dear, here we are,” she
jumped out of the cab, and proceeded carefully to
help her mother out.

Poor Mrs. Wilmot! It was with a very heavy
heart that she lifted her deep crape veil and gazed
at her new home, after the children had left her to
see about the luggage. Blinding tears prevented
her seeing much, but what little she did see formed
a painful contrast to the brightness and the comfort
of the Knoll. It was not the comforts of the Knoll,






62 To the End.
ce I ee
however, that Mrs. Wilmot’s heart was yearning
for ; it was its associations—the tender associations
that clung and clustered round even every article
of furniture in her old home—the home whose
threshold she had first crossed as a young bride.

“Oh, Edith, how can we ever live here?” asked
Joan, as, the boxes carried up-stairs and the cabman
paid, the two girls gazed out of a window of one of
the back bedrooms, at the rows upon rows of tall
chimneys from which showers of black smuts were
falling. “There is not a tree to be seen—not a blade
of grass—not a flower—nothing but roofs and
chimneys ; I feel stifled already,” and burying her
face in her hands, Joan burst into a passion of tears.

Edith’s eyes were wet too, but she struggled
bravely with her emotion ; then laying a hand on
her sister’s shoulder she said gently—

“Joan, Joan, don’t cry like that, please— please

don’t; mother will see by your eyes what you have
been doing, and we must control ourselves for her
sake. I know it is hard work, darling, but do, do
think of mother.”

“ Edith, I have no patience with you; you expect
people to go along just like machines,” and Joan
shook her sister’s hand angrily from her shoulder.
“And as to my not thinking of mother, is it not
partly for her I am grieving? Mother knows how I
loved the Knoll, however, and I am sure she does



Adelbert Terrace. 63
not expect us to be so hard-hearted as to leave it
without a tear. Dear, dear old place! And here we
shall have no pony to ride, and no garden to play
tennis in’”—and burying her face in her hands,
Joan’s sobs broke forth anew.

Edith gave a weary little sigh as she took off
her hat and placed it on the bed. What different
things people yearned for! The pony and the
garden —why, she had hardly thought of them ; it
was her father’s love and the old home feeling for
which her heart was so sorely pining.

Knowing that her sister was tired and dispirited,
however, she attempted no further remonstrance,
but after folding away her things, she said—

“Joan, dear, I am going down to look after
mother, and see about the supper; come down
when you are ready, will you? I am sure a cup
of tea will do you good.”

Before descending to the dining-room, Edith
knelt for a few minutes in an unoccupied room on
the other side of the passage, and earnestly besought
God to bless their new home, and to give to each
one grace and strength to take up the duties that
lay before them, and to fill to His glory the niche
that He had assigned to them; then with a face
of calm quiet peace she’ went gently down-stairs.

Settling into a new home to hearts that have
any tenacity of affection is not altogether a



aa

64 To the End.



pleasurable occupation, even when the new home is
in most respects an improvement on the old; but
when (as in the case of the Wilmots) the new home
is not only not superior to the old, but infinitely its
inferior, the task is certainly a painful one.

Every hour of the day, it seemed to Edith, the
two maids that had been brought from the Knoll
would come running to ask her how they could get
along without this thing, or how they could possibly
manage without that, and it required considerable
skill and ingenuity to devise ways for filling in such
a large family party to such close quarters.

The little ones and their nurse were for the
present (through Mrs. Muir’s kindness) safely
housed at the Home Farm; Mary and Bertie at
the Rectory, and Cuthbert and Harry were striving
to gain fresh vigour and energies for their winter
studies among the Welsh mountains. All were to
assemble under the new family roof-tree, however,
in the course of a week or ten days, and Edith
determined that Adelbert Terrace should wear its
most comfortable aspect to greet them.

Comforts do not fall into the lap though like ripe
apples from a tree in autumn; time and labour
must be expended upon them, or money is required
to procure them, and of this latter article Edith was
determined not to beg from her mother ; for though

Dr. Wilmot had left his family fairly well provided



Adelbert Terrace. 65



for, as long as the boys’ education formed such a
heavy item in the yearly expenditure, there was
no surplus cash for luxuries,

Of the sum devoted to the move, thouzh, there
was still a small balance left in hand, and with this
Edith procured some cretonnes and chintzes. Then
a tour of the house was made; dingy curtains were
pulled down and new substituted, faded arm-chairs
were covered, musty bed-hangings were thrown
away, and everything that Joan declared “alto-
gether too unbearably ugly” was consigned to the
top garret. The little room that Mrs. Wilmot had
chosen for her own sanctum received special care,
most of the precious articles that had been brought
from the Knoll going to ornament it; but about’
the large top room, which was designed for the
nursery, Edith was almost in despair. What could
make the sickly paper look less bare, or the light
woodwork more bright? Joan, however, who had
something of the eye of an artist, here came to the
rescue. Why not have some of the pictures from
their old Christmas annuals cheaply framed and
hungup? And if Edith could produce some scraps,
she would paste them on the panels of the door
and varnish them; then the chimney-piece could
be covered with red cloth, and the faded carpet
covered with a bright drugget.

“Splendid suggestions,” said Edith, and she

E



66 To the End.



proceeded immediately to act upon them, for poor
little Bertie and “the flowerets” would miss sorely
the fields and the lanes, and they would now have
no long corridors and large garden to play in.

Edith’s last touches of decoration were just being
put to Adelbert Terrace when the cab containing
Harry and Cuthbert rolled up to the door, and
with a back that ached with stooping, and eyes that
were weak with working, she ran down to welcome
them. All sense of fatigue was forgotten, though,
some two hours later, when, turning to his mother,
Harry said—

“Well, mother, I don’t know whether I was in
the blues the last time I saw Adelbert Terrace, but
certainly I thought it the dullest little hole imagin-
able, but now it looks quite transformed. Is it your
presence that has cast such a glamour over it?”

“Edie and Joan are the’magicians that have
worked the transformation,” said Mrs. Wilmot, and
her loving look of thanks more than repaid Edith
for all her toil.

&
EE







CHAPTER XII.

TAKE UP THE CROSS,

|] UMMER had come and gone, and a
‘| bright log fire was crackling and blaz-
ing on the hearth of the parlour at the
Home Farm. The parlour was a very
cheery room, as what room was not where Mrs,
Muir reigned supreme? The deep, old-fashioned
bow windows were cosily draped with warm red
hangings, and in the embrasures stood large blue
pots of bright-coloured chrysanthemums. Round
the delicately-tinted walls ran a dark oak wain-
scoting, and the oval mirrors reflected tables
covered with books and work, and low cosy chairs
that seemed to invite you to rest in them.

Ruth’s couch was drawn up to the fire, and
beside it stood a large basket filled with work;
her fingers did not Seem in a very busy mood,
though, to-night, and Mrs. Muir kept gazing across
from her writing at her niece, wondering why the
E 2





68 To the End.



knitting was laid down so often, and why the gray
eyes gazed so gravely into the fire.

“Ruthie, my bairnie,” at last she ventured to
say, ‘is your back troubling you to-night ?”

“No, auntie dearie;” but the heavily-fringed
eyelids drooped, and the knitting was seized upon
with avidity.

Something was ailing the child, what could it
be? Never mind, it would come out presently.

Tea over, Mrs. Muir proceeded to unpack a
large parcel of wool that. had arrived from the
north that morning, then drawing a stool to
Ruth’s couch, she began winding the pretty,
heathery mixtures.

“Mrs. Gillespie has sent us a fine collection this
time, hasn’t she, Ruthie? See what a delicate
gray yon Shetland is, and how prettily speckled
is that Alloa yarn, and do you know what I was
thinking, childie ?—that you might make a cloud
for Edith Wilmot.”

“Oh, Aunt Janie, that would be nice,” and the
grave eyes became bright again.

“Set to work, my bairnie, then, and I’ll try and
make a few things for the bit lambies; it will be
a sorry Christmas for them all this year, and I
should like them to think there are some real
hearts at St. Magna’s that aye remember them.”

“Violet says that Joan can’t bear the life in



Take up the Cross. 69



London. Sheets after sheets she writes to her
full of complaints.”

“And how much better it would be for the poor
lassie if the time she took in writing those sheets
were spent in telling the Lord Jesus her troubles,
fle can help her, but Violet can’t. No, Ruthie,
there’s no good in kicking at the Cross; we must
aye pray for grace and strength to ¢ake it up, and
to follow the Blessed Master wherever He leads.
It’s a lesson we take years to spell out, and that
we're over and over again turned in, but it’s a
lesson once learnt that brings peace and happiness.”

Silence was only broken by the spluttering of
the wooden logs and the click of Ruth’s needles.

“ Has Violet been here to-day?” asked Mrs, Muir,

“Yes, auntie, didn’t you see her? She went
out to the garden to look for you.”

“No, childie, but perhaps I was in the orchard
—the pippins are fine this year, and I went up to
see about the storing of them.”

Another silence. Mrs. Muir was thinking—could
this visit have had anything to do with Ruth’s fit
of absorption?

Violet was fond of coming to the Home Farm,
and lately Mrs. Muir had encouraged her, for Ruth
missed Edith Wilmot sorely, and she thought it
would do the child good to hear Violet’s foreign
experiences. A breath of Swiss air, even at second-



70 To the End.



hand, sometimes conveys a tonic to a poor shut-
up invalid. These visits had not had the exhilar-
ating effect upon Ruth, though, that Mrs. Muir
had hoped for; in fact, after them she seemed more
quiet and grave; while after a talk with Edith her
whole face would sparkle with sunshine. Into the
shut-up restricted life Violet never seemed to
infuse any brightness or ozone, but only, somehow
or other, to impress the invalid with a sense of
how much she missed, and of her lack of power.

Ah, what a subtle thing influence is!—and how
easy it is to make others look out on life through
our own jaundiced spectacles. Envy, dissatisfac-
tion, restlessness, how easily they can be communi-
cated, while who among us does not know the
impetus, thank God, that can be given to us by
the strong faith of a friend ?

Violet never succeeded though in making Ruth
discontented with her lot; the patient quiet girl
followed her Saviour too closely for that; but
what she did was, by useless bemoanings over the
invalid’s lack of power, and frequent allusions to
all that she missed, thoroughly to depress the poor
girl with the sense of her own uselessness.

This was the thought that was weighing so
heavily on Ruth to-night. How she longed to be
up and doing, breaking her alabaster box at the
feet of the Master]



Take up the Cross. 71



“ Auntie,” she said at length, “I have been think-
ing over what you said just now about kicking at
the Cross, and I think I have been kicking at
mine to-day.”

“Have you, dearie—how ?”

The pale face flushed, and the gray eyes hid
themselves beneath their long lashes as with a
slight tremor in her voice Ruth said, “I have
been so longing to be up and doing; all the after-
noon I have been thinking—thinking—thinking of
all that I might do if only I was strong and
active.”

The firelight flickered on the walls, but Mrs,
Muir made no answer.

“Have I been wrong, auntie?”

“Yes, Ruthie, I think you have, but I don’t feel
as if I could say a word to you, it is a temptation
I have so often given in to.”

“Vou, auntie? How?”

“Why, dearie, after I left South Africa—oh !
the hours and the days I have spent in thinking—
thinking—thinking of all that might have been—
of the work that might have been accomplished—
of the good that might have been done, if only
your uncle had been spared. It is such a plausible
temptation to imagine we only wish our lives to be
different out of regard to the glory of the Master;
but Satan is tempting us then, transformed into.



72 Lo the End.

an angel of light. He is seeking to instil into
our hearts poisoned shafts of mistrust of our
Heavenly Father’s wisdom, and we must resist
him from the outset, Ruthie, we must say like
the Blessed Master, ‘Get thee behind me, Satan”
‘The cup which My Father hath given Me,
shall I not drink it?’ Besides, the reins once
thrown on the necks of our desires, bairnie, believe
me there is no further peace for our souls. We
think in our short-sightedness the one thing we
are longing for granted, we should want nothing
more; but Satan would soon set our desires at
work again. They must be restricted by some-
thing, and that something must be the will of God,
Pray, dearie, by all means pray for increased
health and strength—God knows it is what I ask
for you every day—but oh! to our prayers let us
_add the petition, ‘Father, not my will, but Thine
be done.’”

“Oh, auntie, I have been wrong—very wrong,”
said Ruth, after a pause, during which the gray
eyes had been gazing meditatively into the fire.
“TI see I have been listening to the whispers of
Satan—what a real enemy he is, and he knows so
exactly where to tempt us.”

“Yes, Ruthie, and our danger lies in parleying
with him ; resist him, and he will flee from us, for
greater is He that is for us, than all that are against



Take up the Cross. 73
us. Don’t you remember what your confirmation
hymn says?

*T shall not fear the battle,

If Thou art by my side.’

Trusting to Jesus, holding up the shield of faith,
we shall be able to quench all the fiery darts of
the wicked. Shall I read to you, Ruthie, some lines
your uncle wrote when laid by once for a long
time by the effects of a severe attack of fever—
he had to fight the same battle you are now
fighting ?”

SOVeS auntie O.nen a

Fetching from her desk some faded sheets of
yellow paper, Mrs. Muir bent forward in the fire-
light, and read—

“T stood ’mid the corn one morning,
The golden ears hung low,

The sun was high in the heavens,
The birds flew to and fro.

The reapers they were not many,
The fields were thick with grain ;
Oh! how could the crop be gather’ d,

Ere day began to wane?

I plied my reap-hook swiftly ;
I heeded not the sun;

For I thought of the Master’s smile,
When the day’s work was done.

I sighed as I watched the reapers
Who idled in the shade,

Busily wreathing wild flowers,
That all too soon did fade.

ey



74

To the End.



And the goiden grain around them
Hung ripe beneath the sky;

It would die were it not garner’d,
Ere winter storms drew nigh.

And my reap-hook flew the swifter,
As I look’d on the wheat ;

My sheaves—with what joy I'd lay them
Low at the Master’s feet.

Alas! as the sun wax’d hotter,
My strength soon died away ;
And when the scorching noon arose,
Faint on the ground I lay.

They bore me to the shady bank,
Where th’ idlers dreaming lay ;

My sad tears—fast they fell:
Useless I was as they.

I press’d my cheek against the sward,
The burning tears fell fast :

My sheaves--my sheaves, who’d lay them now,
The Master’s feet at last?

When lo! I felt myself enclos’d
In arms of tender grace ;

And loving hands did wipe the tears
From off my fever’d face.

And then I heard a gentle voice,
Asking in accents mild,

In tones as soft as passing breeze,
Why weepest thou, My child?

My dew-dimm’'d eyes I lifted then
To the dear Master’s face,

And told of sheaves I’d fain have bound,
His harvest-home to grace.

Again my tears were gently dried,
Again those tones so sweet—
‘Child of my love, there is a sheaf

Thou canst lay at My feet.



Take up the Cross. 75

It is the sheaf of thy sedfc7//,
More precious in My sight
Than all the toil of busy years,
Or golden off’ring bright.

‘Fret not thyself about the grain,
The golden ears are Mine,

And other hands will bind the sheaves
Thou didst for me design.

‘And thou canst for the reapers raise
Thy voice in earnest pray’r ;

And thus can help them in their toil,
And in their harvest share.’

So now in calm content I lie,
Hushing each fear to rest:

ZT” obey is more than sacrifice,
The Master's will ts best.”

That was the first time that Mrs. Muir had ever
heard Ruth allude with anything like murmuring
to her ill-health, and it was the last.

Heavily though no doubt her cross of helpless-

- ness pressed in the future, she never spoke of it,
save to One—He who gave her grace patiently to
take up and to carry it.







CHAPTER XIII.
A LUNCHEON PARTY.

Edith sat looking at the few budding
limes that adorned the narrow strip of
garden in front of Adelbert Terrace,
she could hardly realize that nearly a
year had passed since last she had seen the Knoll,
In one sense it seemed a very long year; in another
the months seem to have rolled by at a gallop;
for though, through constantly thinking of the
St. Magna’s days, the old home-life seemed quite
near, still the London life had been such a busy
one, and so much had taken place in the interven-
ing days, that looking back through the vista of
work and events, that summer’s morning seemed
quite distant when mournfully she had listened to
the shriek of the train that carried her away from
the scenes of her childhood.

Changes had taken place, too, in the quiet little
village of Wych. The pulse of still country life
had been excited by a wedding—the wedding of
Violet Norman with Lionel Richards.

Mr. Norman had used every means in his power





A Luncheon Party. 77



to resist this wedding, for the short time that
Lionel had passed as a pupil at St. Magna’s had
not prepossessed him in favour of his future son-in-
law. Persuasion was in vain though, Violet had
made up her mind; so to avoid further “scenes”
Mr. Norman gave an unwilling consent, and the
wedding had taken place some three months
previously.

The news of the engagement had been conveyed
to the Wilmots by Harry, who was spending part
of his Christmas vacation with the Newtons, and
in a postscript he begged that his knapsack might
be forwarded to him, as he intended to spend the
rest of his holidays in Scotland. A month later
he returned to Adelbert Terrace looking some
three years older than when he started, and when
his name came out among the first in the examina-
tion list, he confided to his mother the impossi-
bility of his (at present) settling at St. Magna’s,
and May saw him starting as a dector on board an
' Australian steamer. The house seemed very dull
without Harry’s merry laugh to brighten it; and
banish the thought as she would, Edith could never
meet Violet without the remembrance of her brother
flashing across her—tossing on the wide blue sea.

The Richards had taken a house at South
Kensington, for Lionel’s purse was a comfortably
lined one, though it was not as heavy as it would



78 To the End.
ultimately become, for he was heir to his aunt’s
estate at Great St. Magna’s,

Joan’s friendship with Violet had been renewed
with greater vigour than ever, and Edith saw but
little of her sister now that this loophole into a
new life had been opened up to her. It was no
wonder, though, thought Edith, that Joan wished
her horizon to be extended ;: she was so young and
bright, and shone so prettily in society, while she
—she was only an old tame tabby, never happier
than when purring at her own fireside.

How pretty Joan looked now, to be sure, as
dashing round the corner in Violet Richards’ smart
Victoria she waved her hand merrily to her sister,
Why had she come home so soon? In an instant
the problem was solved.

“Edith, you are to come back with me at once.
Violet says you must come—she has a spare ticket
for the concert this afternoon; Lionel says he
won't go.”

“Joan, how can I? I have no dress to go in.”

“Oh, yes—put on your black silk—I will lend
you my lace fichu to tie over it; but make haste,
for the carriage is waiting, and the lunch is punc-
tually at one o’clock.”

“But mother—”

“ But mother—well, here is mother to answer for
herself. Mother dear, Violet wants Edith to go



A Luncheon Party. 70





with us to the concert this afternoon—you can
spare her, can’t you?”

It is needless to repeat Mrs. Wilmot’s answer.
Not only could she spare Edith, but she was most
anxious she should not forego such an unwonted
pleasure, so a quarter of an hour saw the two girls
rolling away to South Kensington.

‘Seated at the head of her well-appointed table,
in the most becoming of costumes, Violet made
the prettiest of hostesses; thoroughly in her
element, her face sparkled with sunshine, and her
laugh was low and rippling.

Ah, how easy it is to wreath our faces with
smiles when the blue sky is above and around us!
How lovingly does our human nature stretch itself
in the sunshine of worldly prosperity! Yet the
Prophet Habakkuk said, “Although the fig tree
shall not blossom, neither shall fruit be in the
vines; the labour of the olive shall fail, and the
fields shall yield no meat; the flock shall be cut
off from the fold, and there shall be no herd in the
stalls: yet I will rejoice zz the Lord, I will joy zz
the God of my salvation.’ He had set his affections
on things above, not on things delow. His treasure
was “where rust and moth doth not corrupt;
where thieves do not break through and steal.”

“Edith, luncheon is not the time for a brown-
study. Mr. Rollo hastwice offered you strawberries.”

Edith turned and apologized smilingly to her



80 To the End.



next-door neighbour, a tall, broad-shouldered
man, with streaks of gray here and there amid his
chestnut hair.

“To think of Edith’s turning a deaf ear to straw-
berries!” said Joan; “why the other day she told
me it made her heart lighter even to hear them
called about the streets!”

“Violet, I must defend my character. I cannot
let you think I have become so degenerate as to
base my happiness on strawberries. Joan knows
it was not the love of the fruit that stirred my
heart, it was the breath they brought with them of
the country.”

“Mr. Rollo, would you believe it?” said Violet,
as lifting her daintily embroidered handkerchief to
her lips she tried to stifle her laughter. “Miss
Wilmot’s idea of happiness is the life of a dairy-
maid’s clattering about in pattens and making
cheese and butter.”

“Not a bad life either; and decidedly a more
healthy one than that of many of the young ladies
who are rolling along in the Park yonder. They
droop like flowers in heated assemblies, while the —
dairymaid threads the fields as fresh as the daisies,
and they retire to rest when she is brushing the
dew from the clover; but joking apart, Miss Wil-
mot, have you really spent nearly a year in London
without its charms having effaced the country from
your affections ?”



A Luncheon Party. 81



“My home was in the country for twenty years,”
said Edith, and as her blue eyes sought to hide
themselves Mr. Rollo saw they were dim with tears.

* * * * *

“ Mother, congratulate me; I have met a little
maiden to-day who has not yet been schooled by
the world into the lesson that it is not etiquette to
have a heart,” was Mr. Rollo’s salutation to his
mother that night.

“ Archie, don’t pretend to beacynic. I can quite
understand that you don’t meet every day with
hearts as warm and genuine as your own, but you
know that many true ones do beat even under the
well-cut garments of society.”

Mrs. Rollo, in her velvet-lined chair, and with her
ermine cloak around her, was the very picture of
an old lady, and it was easy to see at a glance that
before the chestnut hair had silvered and the deli-
cate peach-bloom had faded she must have been
remarkable for her beauty.

Tenderly cherished by a devoted husband, and
now the object of a loving son’s care, Mrs. Rollo’s
life had been a peaceful and a sheltered one; of a
soft and yielding disposition, and with few angles to
rub up against, she was the centre of a large circle
of friends, and the red-tiled Elizabethan house at
Chelsea was the scene of many a social gathering.

An enthusiastic lover of the fine arts, Archibald

F



82 To the End.



Rollo dabbled in all of them, and was a proficient ,
in none, though it was in the studio or music-room
of “the Red House” that he was most generally
to be found.

Neither of these rooms though did he frequent
to-night, but sipped his coffee meditatively by his
mother’s side.

“ Archie, what are you thinking about ?”

“The little maiden with the heart. I wish I
could get her-to sit to me for a picture.”

“Was she so very pretty then ?”

“Pretty? No, I don’t think that is the word to
apply to her. Mrs. Richards and her sister are,
strictly speaking, I suppose, prettier than she is;
but her face was so peaceful and pure it seemed to
calm you to look at her. If I were to take her
portrait now, I should paint her kneeling in some
old cathedral, with hands clasped in prayer—that
is the scene her face irresistibly brings before you.
Mother, you must cultivate her, if it is only for the
sake of the picture.”

“ Archie, I am at your service; but remember
maidens with hearts are not toys to be trifled with.
Suppose she loses hers with you, are you prepared
to give her yours in exchange ?”

“Mother, with your leave I will think out that
question with my cigar on the verandah,”





CLAP BER Xavi.

TEMPTATION,

HE snow was still lying on the ground,
and cold March winds were blowing
over the heads of the drooping snow-
drops, when another little flower opened

its cyes on the wintry earth—a baby-boy came to

gladden the heart of Violet Richards.

It was a pretty sight to see the young mother and
her child together; never had there been such a
baby before—of that she was confident.

The christening took place at St. Magna’s, and
when some three weeks later Edith entered the
nursery at South Kensington, she was surprised to
see there sitting a well-known girlish figure.

“Rose, you here! I aw astonished. Did Mrs,
Richards bring you back with her?”

“Yes, miss. Didn’t mistress tell you?”

“T haven’t seen Mrs. Richards. Pollok tells me
she is out driving. I thought I would just run up
F 2





84 To the End.



though and have a peep at the baby. The darling!
how hehas grown! And oh, Rose, now his eyes are
wide open, do let me have a good look at them.
Oh, baby, your eyes are going to be brown; you
perverse little fellow, mother did so want them to
be blue, but I was afraid they would grow darker.
Well, brown eyes or not, you area sweet baby-boy—
isn’t he, Rose? And I am sure grandpapa thought
so,” and kissing the mottled face fondly, Edith laid
the baby in his bassinette. “Well, Rose, it zs nice
to see a face from St. Magna’s; and how is the dear ©
old place, and everybody. in it ?”

“Oh, much the same as usual, miss; nothing
ever happens at St. Magna’s.”

“And your father and mother? I hope they are
quite well.”
“ Father’s as hearty as ever, thank you, miss; but
mother, you know, she’s always ailing, and she

fretted a deal about my leaving.”

“T dare say, but I thought that it was your
father that objected most to your coming to
London.”

“So he did,” and Rose hung her head and busied
herself in tucking baby into the bassinette, as the
recollection of the conversation with Edith at the
wicket-gate flashed across her; “but father, he
knows as ever since I’ve been a little girl, when I
sects my heart on a thing I always gets it in the







S.Kraton se

It was a pretty sight to see the young mother and her child together; never had
there been such a baby before—of that she was confident.—#. 83,







Temptation. 87



long run,” and the pretty girl looked up with a
wilful smile; “so you see, miss, he thought it best
to give in, I expect, when I got a chance of com-
ing along with Miss Violet (Mrs. Richards, I
mean).”

Edith sighed, but said nothing.

“ And lor, miss, what a grand place London is!”
continued Rose. “Mistress took baby and me
in the carriage in the Park yesterday, and the sight
of carriages well-nigh turned my head, and the
beautifully dressed ladies—”

“Yes, Rose, but all is not gold that glitters, and
the Park is not the whole of London, nor the rich
people that roll along its only inhabitants (though
to hear some people talk you would think they
were). There are dens and alleys in the East
End hardly fit for human habitation, where Mr.
Lawrence Newton told me poor women slave with
their needle for three-farthings an hour!”

“To think of that, miss!—and fancy Mr.
Lawrence choosing to live among them!”

“The Lord Jesus chose to leave Heaven and live
on earth for our sakes,” said Edith, in a low voice,
as she caressed gently one of the tiny pink and
white hands that lay outstretched from the bassi-
nette. “But, Rose, I must be going now; you must
ask your mistress to spare you to come over and
spend an afternoon with us some day. Sarah and



88 To the End.



Susan will be delighted to see a face from St.
Magna’s.”

The invitation thus given was at first accepted
‘with cordiality ; whenever Rose had a holiday she
always found her way to Adelbert Terrace, and
Mrs. Wilmot and Edith, glad of these opportunities
of befriending the young girl, made her most heartily
welcome.

In the course of a few months though, these
visits became fewer and fewer, and towards Christ-
mas they ceased altogether.

“Violet, does Rose have less leave than usual?”
asked Edith, one wintry afternoon, “ for she never
comes to Adelbert Terrace now.”

“No; she has just the same as when she first
came—one afternoon in the fortnight; but oh, I
dare say she is tired of Susan and Sarah’s company,
and likes spending her holiday in some more ex-
citing way than sipping tea with maids in a kitchen.
A pretty girl like that is sure to have followers,”
and Violet gave a meaning smile.

“JT hope they are desirable ones then,” said
Edith; “a young girl in that position away from
her parents always seems to me so unguarded.”

Violet leant back in her chair laughing merrily.
“Really, Edith, with a large pair of spectacles and
a large mob-cap, you might pass for a grand-
mother. Don’t think it necessary though to apos-



Temptation. 89



trophize me on my duties as a mistress, for no one
will ever induce me to pry into a servant’s private
affairs. If they are old enough to leave their
parents, I consider they are old enough to take
care of themselves. Why, I was younger than
Rose when I married,” and Violet bridled her neck
with dignity.

“ Violet, dear, you are onlyjoking; you know I
would not take such an unwarrantable liberty as to
attempt to interfere in the management of your
household; but coming as Rose does, from St.
Magna’s, you can understand what a’ special
interest we take in her, and then we were all
confirmed together.”

“So we were, I had forgotten it; but we have
talked enough about Rose. Edith, I want you
and Joan to come and lunch with Mrs. Rollo
to-morrow.”

With a woman’s quick perception, Violet had
noted the special interest Mr. Rollo took in her
friends, and this interest she resolved to fan into a
more ardent feeling, for it would be pleasant to
have Joan settled near her (and Joan it was of
course who had kindled the interest), and then to
herself would accrue a certain amount of credit in
having so well established her friend.

At Violet’s house, therefore, Mr. Rollo was con-
stantly meeting Joan, but, alas! to his chagrin,



90 To the End.



seldom accompanied by Edith, for the heat and
close confinement of town life were beginning to
tell sadly upon Mrs. Wilmot, and Edith was more
than ever tied to Adelbert Terrace now that her
mother’s headaches were bidding fair to become
chronic.

Repeated persuasion at last induced Mrs. Wilmot
to accept an invitation from the Miss Scotts, and
it was with a thankful heart Edith saw her mother
start for St. Magna’s, accompanied by little Mary.
The days that followed would have been lonely
ones to’ Edith, had it not been for the children, for
Joan and Cuthbert were little at home; in fact
Cuthbert’s “engagements” were so numerous that
they began to give Edith some cause for anxiety ;
but he refused to give any account of himself, and
steadily resented what he called “all girls’ meddling
with his private affairs.”

How Edith longed at this time for Mr. Newton’s
wise counsel, and how sorely she missed the helpful
services at St. Magna’s!—earth and its cares and
worries seemed to have such a hold upon her,
Heaven appeared so dim, so far away.

Yes; a film had crept over Edith’s spiritual life,
and she was conscious of it. No longer could she
take her burdens in trustful faith to the feet of the
Master, and leave them there. No longer could
she realize with happy assurance that “All things



Temptation. - Ol



work together for good to them that love God.”
No doubt this was partly owing to physical causes,
for jaded, exhausted nerves tell on mind as well as
body (and Edith had fallen into a wearied state as
well as her mother); but principally it was due to
the murmuring, unbelieving thoughts which Edith
knew she had given place to. How often she had
envied Violet her large house and comparative
leisure! How many times she had listened to the
devil’s suggestion that people who make only a
profession of religion seem to get along just as
well or better than people who are at the pains to.
act out what they believe. :

What was the good of getting into hot water
with Joan for urging her to some neglected duty ?
or for falling into disgrace with Cuthbert for trying
to counsel him lovingly. Why swim further against
the tide? It was hard work, and you made but little
progress. Do as others do, or at all events for a
time fold your arms and float at leisure.

These were the evil suggestions of the Tempter,
and Edith had not turned a deaf ear to them.
She did not realize that there is no such thing as
inaction in the spiritual life; that floating with the
tide means progress—onward progress to the dark
rapids of danger and death.





CHAPTER XV.
CONQUEST.
UST at this time, when Edith’s better



judgment was warped by her loose
hold of Him Who giveth to all men
wisdom liberally, and upbraideth not,
there came a letter to her—a letter from Mr. Rollo.
At first its contents completely startled Edith,
for she (like Violet) had always imagined that if
Mr. Rollo admired any one, it was Joan, and it
was some time before she could realize that the
passionate words of devotion she had just read
were addressed to herself.

Astonishment in time, though, became only
pleased surprise, and eagerly she began to question
herself. Why did she first feel sorry that Mr.
* Rollo had written such a letter? Why did she
jump to the conclusion that “no” was the only
answer to be given? Mr. Rollo was a gentleman;
a kind man and a cultivated ; he could offer her a



Conquest. 93



comfortable home; he was a good son, and filled a
certain position in society. It was true she would
have to leave her mother, but Mary was growing
up to be a nice little companion to her now, and
as a married sister she would have much more
influence and weight with Joan and Cuthbert.
Ah, Edith, Edith, why do you try to settle this
question without bending on your knees to ask
direction from above? Why not consider what
your mother, your father, would have advised ?
Why not listen to the promptings of your own
better nature? Two questions had all day long
been ringing in Edith’s ears, but she refused to
answer them. “Do I love this man?” “Is he a
Christian ?”

In the stillness of the night, though, the still
small voice of conscience sometimes makes itself
heard, and matters which we thrust from us in the
light come face to face with us in the darkness.

Lying restless on her pillow, these two questions
seemed to thunder themselves in Edith’s ears, and
unable to forget them in sleep, she rose and drew
a chair to the window.

“Did she love Mr. Rollo?” No; she couldn’t
say she did, but she liked him, and liking surely in
time would soon change itself into love. “Was he
a Christian?” Ah! this was a harder question to
answer, She had never heard him allude to religion



94 To the End.



save once in her presence, and then certainly it was
in rather a bantering tone; but he went to church
every Sunday morning, carrying his mother’s velvet
Prayer-book for her. Then does not the Bible say,
“Judge not, that ye be not judged?” Ah! but it
also adds, “Be ye not unequally yoked together
with unbelievers.” “She is at liberty to be married
to whom she will; ozy in the Lord.”

Tired with her restless night, Edith was only
awakened by the breakfast-bell, and though her
toilet was a hasty one, she only arrived down-stairs
in time to hear the clang of the front-door as it
closed on Cuthbert. She was sorry, for his break-
fast had been a solitary one, Joan having dined
and spent the night with the Richards.

Mr. Rollo had begged Edith to take twenty-four
hours to consider her decision, for he felt sure the
contents of his letter would surprise her; but feel-
ing convinced that if “no” had to be said, the
sooner it was done the better, Edith. put on her
hat and started for a wall, resolved to decide
the matter. One minute she was assailed with
weary doubt; another tempted with pleasurable
visions of the future. How pleasant it would be
to turn her back on care and worry, and to have
some one to care for and guard her! Edith’s
mind was a battlefield of conflicting emotions,
and unable to decide the contest, she wearily



Conquest. 95



pushed back her hat from her throbbing temples,
and longed for fresh air both mentally and bodily.
Just at this minute she came upon a church hidden
among the houses; its doorway was crowded, and
people were passing into it.

Was it a wedding or a confirmation? A con-
firmation; and as Edith gazed at the young girls
in white her thoughts were carried away to St.
Magna’s, to the parish church, and the bright day
in which she.had stood and vowed to serve her
God in it. How she would like to hear this con-
firmation address! She wondered if she could gain
admittance; yes, strangers were allowed in the
gallery, and in two minutes Edith was seated in it.

Ah, ye servants of God, when rising to the re-
sponsibilities of your sacred calling, ye resist the
blandishments of the world and self, and speak
only what God the Holy Spirit hath taught you,
what a mighty influence ye wield over your hearers !
Your message becomes a supernatural one, a lever
to lift burdened souls from the depth and darkness
of temptation—a glass in which they view not the
things which are seen and temporal, but the things
which are unseen and eternal—a power—a power
which is mighty, through God, to the pulling down
of strongholds, and which bringeth into subjection
every thought to the obedience of Christ.

The day was a dull one, and in the subdued light



96 To the End.

that streamed through painted windows but few
noticed the young girl in a back seat of the gallery,
who with flushed cheeks and parted lips leant
forward so eagerly to listen; but One above did—
One whose heart of love was yearning over her—
One Who knew all the circumstances of her life—
all the trial, the temptation of the present hour—
One Who Himself had suffered, being tempted,
and Who is able to succour them that are tempted.
“T beseech you, therefore, that ye receive not the
grace of God in vain,” was the theme of the Bishop’s
address, and as Edith listened, life and the things
of this life seemed to lose their hold upon her;
the film that hid Heaven from earth to roll up
and fade away. What a speck of time this life
‘looked when viewed beside the life that lasts for
ever and ever !—how insignificant seemed its events,
save as they influenced for eternity!

As if revealed by a flash of light from Heaven,
Edith saw the danger in which’ she stood, the pre-
cipice to which Satan blindfold had led her. She
knew by past experience how weak her heart was;
how easily she was influenced by those around
her; how difficult it was to realize that one thing
was needful. How then could she ever have thought
of placing her hand for the journey of life in the
hand of any but a Christian >—one who humbly, yet
fearlessly, had taken his stand on the side of the



Conquest. 97

Master—who would be a help and not a hindrance
to her on her journey heavenwards.

Yes, Edith was indeed thankful that she had
been guided to hear the words that had been
spoken that morning ; earnestly did she kneel and
beseech help both for herself and the young soldiers
who were starting forth to do battle under the
same flag as herself that day, and tremulously did
she plead rather than sing the words—

**O let me feel Thee near me:
The world is ever near ;

I see the sights that dazzle,
The tempting sounds I hear;

My foes are ever near me,
Around me and within ;

But, Jesus, draw Thou nearer,
And shield my soul from sin.”

BERS

G





GHAP TEER 2evi:
MARRIAGE BELLS. :

FOOD evening, Miss Scott.. What a




1?

wild night for you to be out in

It was Frank Newton who spoke,
and as he attempted to raise his hat,
the wind took possession of his umbrella, and
nearly carried it into an adjoining field.

‘‘The elements are not inclined to be civil to-
night—are they ?>—but I heard such a bad account
of Mrs. Wicks, I determined to go and see her;
she is fretting so dreadfully about her daughter
Rose.”

“ Rose !—let me see ; that was the pretty girl with
the high colour that used to come to mother’s
bible class, wasn’t it?” :

“Ves, Well, Violet Richards took her to be nurse
to poor little Lion, you know, and when he caught
that fatal chill she was dismissed at once. Violet
seemed to think she was in some way to blame



Full Text
xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008728200001datestamp 2008-10-27setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title To the enddc:creator Lockhart-Gordon, C.dc:publisher John F. Shaw and Co.dc:type Bookdc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00087282&v=00001dc:source University of Floridadc:language English




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DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20090112_AAAAVU' PACKAGE 'UF00087282_00001' INGEST_TIME '2009-01-14T09:52:37-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:42:21-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 299412; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-13T23:48:17-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '426426' DFID 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPAQ' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' f4bc3b522115b476fc739bdbd1b160cb
'SHA-1' 049c6602b258f508d34d464946c71d0622836052
EVENT '2011-12-28T23:09:47-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'159440' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPAR' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
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'2011-12-28T23:13:18-05:00'
describe
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dddac3885985428079b974e4d3507da9
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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d105fab4a4f930d99003fd83220a2107
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'2011-12-28T23:08:11-05:00'
describe
'143909' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPAY' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
e2b05425ba1a58d4bf348d79420ab40c
1ba4e4a9b5a6fc965f41c0e0b0a6a3fef5448d16
'2011-12-28T23:11:43-05:00'
describe
'34664' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPAZ' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
3a2875603dc4a0f018d9e11b17bc5db1
a4c935f423592d9b3fb48ad3e0898b617ec3c754
'2011-12-28T23:09:59-05:00'
describe
'10532248' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBA' 'sip-files00002.tif'
1512397156f8a6468682414f25048c1c
33b3af2389397b12fe43d170f67ffebef3fef3ad
'2011-12-28T23:08:42-05:00'
describe
'7737' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBB' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
9d295d5da539a37e7ed5f6ae7429fe0d
274885086e8efa5ceb9bb833a78ca19bc4af3a5f
'2011-12-28T23:10:07-05:00'
describe
'356900' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBC' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
194df16f932961e3bd0c8c13c759075c
1734a99313ac102734f6aeac112eafd4e831b632
'2011-12-28T23:11:49-05:00'
describe
'29729' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBD' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
2f9f9a6cd500d89cb3502ab7b0c41c14
ae60ccc20839c693513582d9b81a7073f241711c
'2011-12-28T23:10:31-05:00'
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBE' 'sip-files00004.pro'
9ef7c1baa55e6b64a07116abe6d29291
b974a89f3423f3a39975a64459dbc7132dde91f2
'2011-12-28T23:10:34-05:00'
describe
'8265' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBF' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
455d13442bf76f522623020729eaee9f
a020bf65d527e9174c4aaedef064ec5a2ea0d238
'2011-12-28T23:08:58-05:00'
describe
'2872588' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBG' 'sip-files00004.tif'
2ea21d99d1d2a2232cf44a6350651ab9
5f736f0e4804b0f8e343acbb746750fa6bc4dc37
'2011-12-28T23:11:47-05:00'
describe
'107' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBH' 'sip-files00004.txt'
9a87b4e443f7f5a3d24830e581b753c5
71232d1e54a8c548f7f2a85651883558b9fe07e7
'2011-12-28T23:09:04-05:00'
describe
'2384' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBI' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
348184f4d2620d2ac8a61a050b170221
4440070e660f8159a05be505833886d1368b6c51
'2011-12-28T23:11:57-05:00'
describe
'356967' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBJ' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
83fb164d253f33f4e8bb1854fd058cab
6f86a6bcb6643f8b3bfd4510e55552e4e83ab47f
'2011-12-28T23:13:51-05:00'
describe
'44689' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBK' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
8e5f9032c4606ebd1d0b9cdb5ea84c18
1a283409a86152d23f2a296d4c3badd96ed31bf0
'2011-12-28T23:08:28-05:00'
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBL' 'sip-files00005.pro'
73ab7f3d507f0258dbe542bd2708d23b
f86fb0450cd4619a3bf470bb04287cada5af9873
'2011-12-28T23:08:37-05:00'
describe
'12809' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBM' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
199d0046454407b49ab782ab3c8b7d15
ed9952e12ea0f32e5c0673d460b7b9d03da9c972
'2011-12-28T23:08:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBN' 'sip-files00005.tif'
c4902a578aa44ecca0002e9cd878773f
43612f14f7d2d47f64a19b8570a926e8f408bf2c
'2011-12-28T23:08:36-05:00'
describe
'89' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBO' 'sip-files00005.txt'
d1ff25956da960b9b80d020b5e0b1e01
465c9e3b06f1a9a3d7bd379172b8c29d49e7e92d
'2011-12-28T23:09:48-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'3982' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBP' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
0765162ac1d500edb54825d7dd15b454
c234047847c8387755fea3c28bc3dc3dcb45e821
'2011-12-28T23:13:26-05:00'
describe
'369812' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBQ' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
05b961ea36755859b51c36c6503609f0
2d039eb8f0dc16a445dd2177cc6ca4b97b1690d3
'2011-12-28T23:08:17-05:00'
describe
'150719' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBR' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
7ebcdcac4026bd6d77f009c68e929ca6
f2e4b742e95ae7009aea107a13e22d557e2bf07f
'2011-12-28T23:13:38-05:00'
describe
'7227' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBS' 'sip-files00006.pro'
3e2d7e47155d2359a68109a3a04c70c9
21d29ff8087a1d11d733cf93235f62befa7fc8e9
'2011-12-28T23:13:56-05:00'
describe
'40876' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBT' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
1a715a7d01537003620f80920ad647bb
ca15117f04ffd18ccc46e903bf164b30969ec28d
'2011-12-28T23:09:13-05:00'
describe
'2975932' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBU' 'sip-files00006.tif'
95034df0318278661a3211ca59022841
3149c7d57fa043d1f0f6fa65232ef821f1b717f5
'2011-12-28T23:08:12-05:00'
describe
'421' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBV' 'sip-files00006.txt'
b8494eefb8eb1a560a023873057b3dcf
9910fe8091c6377ca35a59fe652a642d4bb4ffce
'2011-12-28T23:10:26-05:00'
describe
'10154' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBW' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
a6c88c9b412f839e871ad77f8b086376
fd7c357116513e4323ea75fe30383999da2b80e9
'2011-12-28T23:09:32-05:00'
describe
'356895' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBX' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
9043c01ba6c289edf75bcda236eefd51
d1097646299481b2457b1e2fd23b01f338541404
'2011-12-28T23:10:58-05:00'
describe
'29574' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBY' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
88356888a69e3fadafcff5944c2335f2
67d916c059c73feede0c3dc25cd769c597693ac9
'2011-12-28T23:12:07-05:00'
describe
'3570' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPBZ' 'sip-files00007.pro'
f488f05d6fc61b9d55d762b38aa6b833
df2ec6fd7e68bd882a84fe711080c8d66dd90314
'2011-12-28T23:09:19-05:00'
describe
'8836' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCA' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
3d349267a7ba42e64ca220a01f02832f
8ad0a7a05b7016ae82a7ccd48dd272c65e541517
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCB' 'sip-files00007.tif'
16c8a08fca9a7e4897b54d6b535a2bda
ceb03d7a2dfd5301aa7870b5ce64459f8997bc21
'2011-12-28T23:08:26-05:00'
describe
'241' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCC' 'sip-files00007.txt'
99d1c27dfa67e41c806186c9d6613923
5641d1eef9e4869c3a6c580c52311d9665aedb48
'2011-12-28T23:13:58-05:00'
describe
'364803' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCD' 'sip-files00007a.jp2'
04dc77494c51e6cf9b16a09cd966383e
b9c8c1bdc141ef0fb7697349c4cc382edd220f3d
'2011-12-28T23:12:25-05:00'
describe
'124628' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCE' 'sip-files00007a.jpg'
7133bed14efa02107a618569b827778b
da188dfc1cdf3292fa8f758896b9fbeec8c33bbb
'2011-12-28T23:12:50-05:00'
describe
'33617' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCF' 'sip-files00007a.pro'
735848c8bac6d0506b8901ffd429ade2
e5f473f8568357e5f22a5f96dbc35fc5d3663000
'2011-12-28T23:08:23-05:00'
describe
'37855' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCG' 'sip-files00007a.QC.jpg'
7af33986e75bebf2e32bd2dcf9a31ba5
63d71711042cf64bee62d3ad9482d7f844de2701
'2011-12-28T23:11:29-05:00'
describe
'2940688' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCH' 'sip-files00007a.tif'
db394399ccaf2e4299a1e02e0cd61dda
1efb459d953d02fd14f01109b7ad02655e62ef5b
'2011-12-28T23:10:17-05:00'
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCI' 'sip-files00007a.txt'
b04fae9e25cf8eb9561c3ba753204b9c
6d44cbc0cf1ddc3e669ec534f2a555e5337556a9
'2011-12-28T23:09:09-05:00'
describe
'9458' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCJ' 'sip-files00007athm.jpg'
79bb7fdcce9f5f3d54e55163d5416726
256c86d8a338c9814f2a576a6cf8cb7e916e264b
'2011-12-28T23:12:18-05:00'
describe
'372777' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCK' 'sip-files00007b.jp2'
9b107b4ff2f4143d8867379ba554052b
9585d1a5caaaf470c576c0a5fc97739c426434e8
'2011-12-28T23:11:41-05:00'
describe
'84332' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCL' 'sip-files00007b.jpg'
8c247dd79e76b61f3acf61727119861e
c29a62af3abd8611db315d1794849092c0b3a27b
describe
'24193' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCM' 'sip-files00007b.pro'
a1527617e25eb6e5e850ea98485b1d7c
b764ce40c0e6547b37c3b81204b709a73b2f135c
'2011-12-28T23:11:08-05:00'
describe
'23760' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCN' 'sip-files00007b.QC.jpg'
5b55dbfe8b904b3fab48e20a49779cdc
4dcb9b39c3feb2130fe046ee378fce317b9a4de8
describe
'3003096' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCO' 'sip-files00007b.tif'
d987971a3eda116e65628991afbc055a
d4aa12a3c95d511f1499982aaadf622317a576b0
'2011-12-28T23:10:50-05:00'
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCP' 'sip-files00007b.txt'
7d82665c4c5721e4f182ac98f2e336c0
60d128e248f28ef60adb92c0afd6875d6cf4cb22
'2011-12-28T23:10:30-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6129' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCQ' 'sip-files00007bthm.jpg'
407452f1cc74c53926a98b9300af22d4
8faac3279cabb8455d4864010584613f915b424a
'2011-12-28T23:09:38-05:00'
describe
'2799' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCR' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
568b27a985d23762826123e4c39a1f4b
2d4b2618fe6cdbdc138f1ed80806bfeb31897ec0
'2011-12-28T23:13:19-05:00'
describe
'356957' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCS' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
c64c22509e474f6acc2fe91b6829f581
903bc42f4955e3f3772e4aec67367513c3546706
describe
'89493' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCT' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
6faab3a82e3e611ea5ac479266d9e1ec
4a60a56be8a6663f1477e1c4d8bbe9ce4c2a59b6
describe
'18289' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCU' 'sip-files00009.pro'
13cc2fe0a5526a5075501ed4f298ae9a
c2a03b8e93f5614ff53a47f08de158338ff862e2
'2011-12-28T23:09:39-05:00'
describe
'25523' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCV' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
85e213431f8b7f514eb2b50873cb2977
6149c51efc91a3ef801121c76e05f95144024d0b
'2011-12-28T23:08:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCW' 'sip-files00009.tif'
ff97bf3f97e41b6d0bee06724e47a4fa
40222237c1368e78db628e111edd9ac833acf59d
'2011-12-28T23:10:22-05:00'
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCX' 'sip-files00009.txt'
5279999d48865586c72482565148047b
8bc79e10a9bde5ac41e478e31e40ef3a597cfe77
'2011-12-28T23:14:05-05:00'
describe
'7087' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCY' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
09978453b0768cbcb322e27e8c2dc7cf
d389c6fcb4809dd34db15922a340079f8b47ff9e
'2011-12-28T23:09:56-05:00'
describe
'356952' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPCZ' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
de2283be69144d9de119f38b04af6b67
2ade320e925c4dd73f9b91f8a0817899368e2611
'2011-12-28T23:08:35-05:00'
describe
'121019' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDA' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
b662f3f6984c8a251d07d20986a6a22f
fdc1c18c27c3fa0996fb4682cdeb1a9cecd23225
'2011-12-28T23:10:10-05:00'
describe
'35703' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDB' 'sip-files00010.pro'
1172534bd1b614fea2ced81b1bfee28f
22a2cbb95beee7a3b0798b71daf276c2aaa3c78b
'2011-12-28T23:09:20-05:00'
describe
'37829' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDC' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
a4f4f28117b63dea790565fb2745a576
7e7c9131a5bbfad9867599400da9ffea3043651c
'2011-12-28T23:08:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDD' 'sip-files00010.tif'
6ab5e2261e5894be0529f3524d255fe8
e208941fb844429c84316fbd7509cff462a9c082
'2011-12-28T23:13:49-05:00'
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDE' 'sip-files00010.txt'
f1fc2a795e1606e4415ff4622b403185
5fb6381004b716cc632dd7525e2f3128f62d65e4
'2011-12-28T23:12:37-05:00'
describe
'9166' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDF' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
d79ba88bc1ed1edc8189acbd158a8b7d
ecd3da23a009fef46934b1dffa109145d6403ba7
'2011-12-28T23:13:57-05:00'
describe
'356965' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDG' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
4beaa51a05a552a10fb722d31f44ba95
b650c9d46acfe9cff623e0e4bf513fc93eb39286
'2011-12-28T23:09:30-05:00'
describe
'111236' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDH' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
3b38d00f1375512ea926c9b3a7b067e7
f9040f6fb0928428d8b94429783acc9eba5e0b3c
'2011-12-28T23:10:36-05:00'
describe
'31992' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDI' 'sip-files00011.pro'
098a63d374680d32381d393ad3ff888b
629a1b9f3463cb98bcf8f4e3899e38681d044895
'2011-12-28T23:08:48-05:00'
describe
'34773' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDJ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
64e08a78a605c47bb31435f3501133f2
725e13c0190e85b7a347d443516cf010aa4a3215
'2011-12-28T23:10:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDK' 'sip-files00011.tif'
0896b5597361b137696484b69e78ffe4
2ab6358f70e20ada2c661fc7e4ee96a6deeff58f
'2011-12-28T23:10:57-05:00'
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDL' 'sip-files00011.txt'
6aaa19b2c49b84a49c40548d85df2faf
b76bcebce4a96d0be8a47017f8e0fd495158afd6
'2011-12-28T23:11:45-05:00'
describe
'8543' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDM' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
24ace24f7c8b30386bf88d72370371b9
abceb802e370a9384ccae53b0612776888717f83
'2011-12-28T23:09:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDN' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
43b9ffdd6a8fa41f6c2bb610d5d9f0df
80edc2b163d62cbc4c85a3b246670b27891d0f3d
describe
'99192' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDO' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
b144cdb32bf8a8bbc6de5c857b12d68f
ea495ff6d5f1fb12657255825278c54808351501
'2011-12-28T23:13:15-05:00'
describe
'22385' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDP' 'sip-files00012.pro'
c55fc872f3afa9939498f678128efed1
91769a43f167f9037c08d642a116a48833a7486c
'2011-12-28T23:12:52-05:00'
describe
'29433' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDQ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
fc7aa62c9767329616022ed3a4ea2b4e
fe3e940082de8f5834fd95f2357ebcd13b6781aa
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDR' 'sip-files00012.tif'
28c4765ea66ba80c5a842e03646f4172
848c950b1f18c888a232becfa2e2158ff0c84fa5
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDS' 'sip-files00012.txt'
c1b6bd4cf0f6d9da1cd4484a4fb16612
7a984a7c2c79f2249ae70c19e9de07bd0a8ef507
'2011-12-28T23:12:36-05:00'
describe
'7672' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDT' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
a340f59b88111ead0c3ca1872340c689
10fc8ca34f6e0cccc4cc3e591424a5aff4627408
'2011-12-28T23:09:12-05:00'
describe
'356933' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDU' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
3f49c009fb5dc1f842da6a95ac02706f
c3ab8d9a0f520c1d2ed660549c11302622476b8e
'2011-12-28T23:09:58-05:00'
describe
'113721' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDV' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
11dcaf39cf42fdb7918265e96d3d6a9d
3020d83baf9a6ba8031f1c976a84fa760db50269
describe
'34076' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDW' 'sip-files00013.pro'
b1cb445c75f84d34d1c933dd6a0041a1
d8659a6c25bfca29b92e0421eadc821091c3a5f2
'2011-12-28T23:11:56-05:00'
describe
'35946' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDX' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
5502f5fb253f3868b24c386413dbd6c9
a4576bf5a0c073d15b8e321f36464ef9f54bef5f
'2011-12-28T23:08:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDY' 'sip-files00013.tif'
90e56a286c02afc3b59694b74fa41201
6e2f2b23452920c07a447010c56fe40caa812ff5
'2011-12-28T23:12:49-05:00'
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPDZ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
5f7b52c790948674ee40fb1415aa5249
7611ba9c1fcb6cb87c364dcf4cae2469cfecc1df
'2011-12-28T23:10:41-05:00'
describe
'8829' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEA' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
f37ebf1a586c89015d92c70d289a9f2a
454c327bd7056da1613b134cfb2d00484a3817e9
'2011-12-28T23:08:43-05:00'
describe
'356968' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEB' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
8b8093cad13ed35b0436efa6e14b0e20
983073429c994eca174147210e20b40afbedd181
'2011-12-28T23:14:06-05:00'
describe
'114363' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEC' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
c9d0808e548ad6bd99f4b9f7ee7f3cea
61dbdbf8d6e6851c91f4b9c2cf5373035edb3168
'2011-12-28T23:08:08-05:00'
describe
'33391' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPED' 'sip-files00014.pro'
c3fe67e12011d67faebfa120965d04b6
2a373151d78304a5f838a144fac1c1767cc6fcde
'2011-12-28T23:09:25-05:00'
describe
'36360' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEE' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
fc16e2e5befd5f259c022bad0c5ebe88
65830e3ebbee7229322d27256ad834ee7b153c21
'2011-12-28T23:08:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEF' 'sip-files00014.tif'
313a1ac0bb6bd0e85231264b15667b85
7a658af89e566bedf1163d760ef8542a20484e26
'2011-12-28T23:11:34-05:00'
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEG' 'sip-files00014.txt'
c12b595e5ebcb1fb4137fef1f09e6244
3ffd8d74d476acc192b43e23384119bc1658cf1f
'2011-12-28T23:08:29-05:00'
describe
'8833' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEH' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
3b465637df015b15f5d4a533f317b349
1a5e4d510f5d164207761009bc587852857d828a
'2011-12-28T23:13:37-05:00'
describe
'356916' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEI' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
0af23a956e53ea87fa9b3c1f1506383e
54901e86298cb0ab8c2a868f415ddab5eb2d8ecf
'2011-12-28T23:13:02-05:00'
describe
'100275' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEJ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
e6b78295ee4b59083f60212ce5e5af84
986cc7c74a4969d0e16a8f4d545cf4b06f0bc4c0
'2011-12-28T23:09:40-05:00'
describe
'28296' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEK' 'sip-files00015.pro'
d6babb6617a53a4da8a8d210fe5a7366
c7232ced217a9aee94178ae1c8cf8c0ff1380338
'2011-12-28T23:08:21-05:00'
describe
'31014' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEL' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
fcdc652b7ce31f38db84726e912a1c0a
6a8e1de33afbe3d1945eeec824414debf794a7ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEM' 'sip-files00015.tif'
20c8a83e281f99f3044124a4ac56ce2f
2120c86f1695d940863b33bf2720c39413f44f71
'2011-12-28T23:08:22-05:00'
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEN' 'sip-files00015.txt'
b1c8d9db205d63b124382ae0a5c2b806
583740310ff911f35fb858188134305dcd3f9758
'2011-12-28T23:09:34-05:00'
describe
'7394' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEO' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
e79136619eb827cf7cb767ed1407f7da
c4f931f4b84ba69e1370ca270f85500cb420a36a
'2011-12-28T23:13:10-05:00'
describe
'356954' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEP' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
779daceab5d501b3d6a6c41e5234fc58
6c322c0a4f94e403212535f853a85079afa0dc52
'2011-12-28T23:10:56-05:00'
describe
'96185' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEQ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
6964f1cddfa909bbb1c7db9c6d2f77e1
6c6d58b64de067af81d429449e06ba76bec51608
'2011-12-28T23:10:35-05:00'
describe
'21211' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPER' 'sip-files00016.pro'
80298bb6dd2ad60b1c1eccf40cd47918
2e70a618192ae7f510f33d4df1cf69e2c95c3fe6
describe
'27412' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPES' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
d97476fac4172d2179dd976304fbbb97
39d04337d46ee49cc2c02162ab8545859d315fa6
'2011-12-28T23:13:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPET' 'sip-files00016.tif'
1610fba804eb1d837434258f69ee48bb
a2e19c69bc213e07d63fdfc697b7eba6f138749a
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEU' 'sip-files00016.txt'
80ca7c5587866a3c5acf559e17cc1984
5a7f902c3117fa218637d1e2bffb229ea27ec57d
'2011-12-28T23:10:00-05:00'
describe
'7270' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEV' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
7cd2ddb569db32b5f4ea01c7694ef6b3
7efbb129d11645683a9e0f2127744f578bd32559
describe
'356947' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEW' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
14176cbb0ebb405dcc56e2ac1f0b40db
12a6b351c209d1263ea0079487ee96091faa75b9
'2011-12-28T23:13:50-05:00'
describe
'119485' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEX' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
656434ba9194eac6d7a94177cc83c345
5d4f73a11cdb46fcac70dd9cf300d2bd23b6bd11
'2011-12-28T23:09:51-05:00'
describe
'33681' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEY' 'sip-files00017.pro'
c6c3fa9e6fb8abafcb2686f67c41dcb4
9dc6d0a0b771370ea8ffc43898ec9a0d928b924c
'2011-12-28T23:08:27-05:00'
describe
'37831' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPEZ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
066abdd25b6fa2b40d04be98fe05cf65
4c4d4a1a719c660203a64bd8afdd44ae59bcb91a
'2011-12-28T23:09:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFA' 'sip-files00017.tif'
227133393416bc9a6d0679bf8edd3189
4f348aefbe68c6c47b645ceaa2b8fc6395f865f7
'2011-12-28T23:11:33-05:00'
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFB' 'sip-files00017.txt'
22ed5007357661d5137e581040b1809f
0472513a79d82bdd5a3542103e69fc47cfb97123
describe
'9353' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFC' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
533556204b299391eee5884645a39afb
da79b1e9addc587d8f9a42f87e17101fdfbf3582
'2011-12-28T23:09:41-05:00'
describe
'356956' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFD' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
b73b2fd5bf8f2588d8ae460487e8d68c
080c24629c74b2763706d87be50bb5a112a6fa52
describe
'119780' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFE' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
9286a25256062c7a4022f198ae114aae
57c94ffda8465416b47c4068e4d6b30945707571
'2011-12-28T23:08:13-05:00'
describe
'35306' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFF' 'sip-files00018.pro'
33d56de3ffb89272b222e38cf3f53dfc
26f3d32f09d410be5062c566445ccb38cf38414e
describe
'37491' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFG' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
60a1f2cdb92742525f963b880b7e9eb1
19be20f502a1674d0ff60d6b0f7ea566457c1e0b
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFH' 'sip-files00018.tif'
21cbb1db61a73af09b74de6ee8d8b7cd
9de1ddb7c3e76923ff1372c7fb39480677516746
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFI' 'sip-files00018.txt'
d6ac5e4949f5dc84e916ca2c211fdb33
b9093e1dda76a7dcbfd3791b09c060fff386ffcb
describe
'8935' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFJ' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
7fa052072b8abc27e1d7943211b66153
d5708f9495ce435e4e101f66d18ada3c5d41f349
'2011-12-28T23:08:45-05:00'
describe
'356885' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFK' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
b6ab106f8ec04dc97c6fcedde0a04c84
2fb2289843137775a12e809a5ffa5d281fbc8c41
describe
'113909' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFL' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
bbd45b35e2488003b58bb8305fac7ea9
05b9491861a1826c370693ed9cf7ce0014ed8686
'2011-12-28T23:09:17-05:00'
describe
'32979' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFM' 'sip-files00019.pro'
b2ff6126eb96a691776745f68d8df5d4
1b62baa1fda45723ee8c0736e839a748c7c9b9e4
describe
'35515' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFN' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
5ac9091777c4bff7d4a4fa32f3996e63
84a117b9d057e66198a980837721ea0d1c46bb06
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFO' 'sip-files00019.tif'
61fef1f9fd478b8c26513efb606814d6
b06f3eb69a155cf13055683b3dded41e1ae8f879
'2011-12-28T23:13:05-05:00'
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFP' 'sip-files00019.txt'
f3aec4b218c41f3ea9b04f2e7cbfae34
65267b3d6e7fde67dca8da46f7e9c4f99859855b
describe
'8778' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFQ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
7860aae66617419a02a9113264dc3472
ef5cc9ccf63e9d7373a42ac9b13282ab9440778b
describe
'356969' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFR' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
fdc37b47fcb5a9f8a91e6421be743718
33acb545a5d3401c32c0ee1968466a5ed6453441
'2011-12-28T23:13:00-05:00'
describe
'93850' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFS' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
8d27d0aa5788591cb8fb00b80e54a7fa
b0c58df408140e7cb35a1e7b7f851b6fc76f97da
'2011-12-28T23:09:16-05:00'
describe
'20172' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFT' 'sip-files00020.pro'
79ac5301f9003e341b610c1eff030332
c8ecc839810058c2a9a82a7dd218709b58488da9
describe
'27722' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFU' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
ac6746455f40117ad1f626c951dc3f43
9b045d15eaf07132862ccf7b7bcd6ba5a844c327
'2011-12-28T23:11:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFV' 'sip-files00020.tif'
84e13fae866166179cc09e6d0c41484e
206b1332091d51dad6e8b5bbaec46ab0d62c15e7
'2011-12-28T23:13:45-05:00'
describe
'872' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFW' 'sip-files00020.txt'
caf508c48a1596495e1be74c044891f4
e226798bf447de3bae377971235b80490ebaac3b
describe
'7277' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFX' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
dd4d9950b66e648ab30654ce46531cc7
a81772b60bb324c0e584a536036b69e2a5e8dc60
'2011-12-28T23:12:40-05:00'
describe
'356920' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFY' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
4d61d1f6d5b4c78d686768c682f8d6d8
0f925094ff9a16e8ed69167562267d09d9ee9956
'2011-12-28T23:11:05-05:00'
describe
'105118' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPFZ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
4708ca39209fcfa5de717f76748b21c6
2e05d656869fcd9ad4bcd132724acfa0708dc4b2
'2011-12-28T23:09:43-05:00'
describe
'30772' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGA' 'sip-files00021.pro'
cf919c163c657ae5433c8bdfa5206ad3
4cb656567dfcda14bee48017b6b2a01490c47052
'2011-12-28T23:10:51-05:00'
describe
'32358' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGB' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
01bb437cb13b7c47d5beecfc3be171db
e3767fbf4a66f024fade4b26bd17b9d66f790ffe
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGC' 'sip-files00021.tif'
1f85b339e63f2f307ecb1583e908c6bc
5fd630412b0edbb331590cf45193d1a2a7812c5e
'2011-12-28T23:12:35-05:00'
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGD' 'sip-files00021.txt'
5d17dd25d624a54bb44da8bd6603e5da
debbe5e83cc949131f8d251ac90706ac10e88eb7
'2011-12-28T23:11:48-05:00'
describe
'8273' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGE' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
eaa87ff0515769fcde6710dede698e6d
6bf033f52e3ae68e45a59f761cc2551e378a7902
'2011-12-28T23:12:58-05:00'
describe
'356830' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGF' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
763f6e0ca36271d24d675a0f3a20a4c9
d072fe66300b70bd74522a4cad33ef316b1e7981
'2011-12-28T23:09:55-05:00'
describe
'94971' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGG' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
afdcbcd099ae347741e4f54efa95081a
e588d7e00f3cfd50cc6058ebd1dedeef69a94eb6
'2011-12-28T23:13:35-05:00'
describe
'27755' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGH' 'sip-files00022.pro'
8c71ed52a2644d7c63fc4e6fd3b1e172
f7cb27b2c88895286e580bd513965dd637a65939
'2011-12-28T23:11:28-05:00'
describe
'29159' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGI' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
4cbac5d204bb26dea848b74a12939d4e
3d3808c8a267aa420d274f6703cf561e360e5070
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGJ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
2750a73bee7dd2913a618d26e876b728
baf8759124cd6bc18719bd628f8dba17bebf837f
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGK' 'sip-files00022.txt'
aa43a8ccb7ce9994ff112777ca1eba6b
43550816abff5b7805a501b56cee0093b1affda1
'2011-12-28T23:10:23-05:00'
describe
'7591' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGL' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
a4e27060b9f007264be83dc33f3e8b28
9c19df36ff043454d33d8346da4aae595ceaee1e
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGM' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
8a5865ae62f6c9be1ba15d69b1dce2c5
f8ed1a2c59be472137438ecdcbbb9e850f4d1354
'2011-12-28T23:10:33-05:00'
describe
'114203' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGN' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
e90bd4e5fc438458470b445d48e2b205
d8c5ae1e0b3ca5c238b4c5c33caf0cd29a53e5dc
'2011-12-28T23:13:06-05:00'
describe
'34132' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGO' 'sip-files00023.pro'
bd9bd7f467a30e0e08bc7b5272641d12
4eec64fbb9c7e5c7272551257859965ac3b98c3f
'2011-12-28T23:10:38-05:00'
describe
'36553' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGP' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
175ddcfbad87c9c55bba2cd562eeefbf
8d49081704abb28eb874750faf6f3ccf645ab74a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGQ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
900bcca86fdb421e61ab330a072be9bd
f18c7c87d0c3ea457cb18c154f22e4740006d2a4
'2011-12-28T23:12:09-05:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGR' 'sip-files00023.txt'
0389c520586dcb35a1a90d9424cfede6
494c9db797b79e210e4311fdeae334173016612e
'2011-12-28T23:12:45-05:00'
describe
'8899' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGS' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
334ab3353876758672290b9485c7d23d
32e6df9b113c9c75eae00cdda4fa5667b58b6e39
'2011-12-28T23:09:24-05:00'
describe
'356959' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGT' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
2b0524ba41e05a543e080ba29de7f4fb
dea3507eaa0393f323eeb38033a31aee9d5db4d9
'2011-12-28T23:13:07-05:00'
describe
'116656' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGU' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
fd2ce4643c83f6dd5a45b3d36d7970bf
51c2fd0044d4d687c1684c31c93183eab57b2e2e
'2011-12-28T23:13:32-05:00'
describe
'35197' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGV' 'sip-files00024.pro'
22cee8e611cc420bcf0f6547530d620a
cf03377165fe38a3d812ed154a1c9c8faff793d7
'2011-12-28T23:12:28-05:00'
describe
'36916' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGW' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
a5a9099a832533ed39cd8128d4c99a2f
fdb0470c63fbfcea93862215646350f4b6093198
'2011-12-28T23:13:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGX' 'sip-files00024.tif'
9e15c9daa5925e1e55d0c9b8931b5ad2
9ec162123c5e725d117fcd00164195f7ebeb721c
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGY' 'sip-files00024.txt'
78be0f3a671203ead4add752146cfbdd
ad3792cba2385828bac08effb0d6bf6b5be2c313
describe
'9173' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPGZ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
98030f3d59e9d3e09069ae3520825e08
03d6a021b313f49e333c0c2ab78a4a16393694eb
'2011-12-28T23:10:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHA' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
ca958941bb44dfe9d039af6f0ef5c196
546462408c51581378b83d7269aedaca416b6ead
'2011-12-28T23:09:49-05:00'
describe
'85983' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHB' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
8026f2acf7d19fdc729bb2f0b2fd34e1
b374b53237cbffaa6666a2dfcd6d1448e1f45a59
describe
'22470' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHC' 'sip-files00025.pro'
092d443958444a30ec23b704a6adc912
2d45a8607f43ca4ce40462cecde69ee61aec35f9
'2011-12-28T23:12:15-05:00'
describe
'26401' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHD' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
6c65fc53aba75b4778b9eca4f7eb94b5
103a385e76052fed0183f6a6dea25598fc46ca0e
'2011-12-28T23:09:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHE' 'sip-files00025.tif'
e40155be769fa3aeda1b75ce7eb231b0
5551ded3b6301d69c3b235740e429865b510645c
'2011-12-28T23:09:46-05:00'
describe
'912' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHF' 'sip-files00025.txt'
0d96cb48fc00c5e5238896654d85b964
006d3aea381204d9f4f684f8360948533c86bd5b
'2011-12-28T23:08:15-05:00'
describe
'6611' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHG' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
6919afcc9f6f2d4a65de4b1685f1baea
7451fe60af2dbbc399b6eeddbd0ccd60a6a079fb
'2011-12-28T23:09:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHH' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
0ba294f4ee94cabf62aeabd7b9447e58
9355857c1913d3f475f24062789292d9918e092d
'2011-12-28T23:08:52-05:00'
describe
'98771' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHI' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
86ddb77d0978d7ec537908785f0b8fd7
8256917f1c116bb3794d2841426c3111facfaea6
'2011-12-28T23:11:23-05:00'
describe
'21927' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHJ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
6e947c06bb12ec60f2ba47837c4555fa
a87927efa31f0fc24ecc2f41e56cdda1c8879299
describe
'29198' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHK' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
af9e97145a8a9db49d0c645ef3cd480d
f5ada81413dfe2de0392d19f9eee360580c0134c
'2011-12-28T23:11:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHL' 'sip-files00026.tif'
d06ad14dc9af3113a0f2a4fff58d2e8f
c946d350777e72d7521e0eef7167f316e1c48e80
'2011-12-28T23:11:17-05:00'
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHM' 'sip-files00026.txt'
ecedc7adb26c5fb912e1415459927b79
528f4b979dd15ea98e7883a67bbd5ceef0bd7c41
'2011-12-28T23:11:24-05:00'
describe
'7352' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHN' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
80837ec16e03bff5609e43ffa5ccce0b
1a962198b7068fbe83fa9b9395555b6e7c903543
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHO' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
f92d195d7b7828bc53a3eaab8f464c63
272139670730e36e20522a1f4191440a8e142114
describe
'119299' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHP' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
46072fae32dba6b38c00e9e180dc2efc
f5c1becba194c2166c509207a1407fda7a86970b
'2011-12-28T23:13:52-05:00'
describe
'35648' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHQ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
7b6eadef9857d05d2876d82aca5c1a44
b8dde6e79843b96d01085814f73b1e9836d6e165
describe
'38017' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHR' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
9692e40cb84abadd960673b381b27234
d9e4befddac6b4d7e79b726fd622e7d7bb35c9b2
'2011-12-28T23:09:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHS' 'sip-files00027.tif'
1fc53b244d5881a6b6ec62cd8b8bd377
0d0897c0ac16ebd29b0a4e93781f3220481aa1bb
'2011-12-28T23:12:14-05:00'
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHT' 'sip-files00027.txt'
51864eab4b99116f58261af39316ace2
a330ef0ca3b5a7e7a0d98a4fbc89988b167437f9
'2011-12-28T23:11:01-05:00'
describe
'9055' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHU' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
ec3f148e7d95723b12ec1171ddc6c31e
e695df65ed50ba8a15d880da9c23308dd4762759
'2011-12-28T23:08:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHV' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
b4c8cc584e31af365654382fbf7b1764
b262773238effcac406c7597092bac69bf9dffcf
'2011-12-28T23:10:27-05:00'
describe
'111358' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHW' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
46ffa23399e0e4caf00f95a8d4494a41
43a7c8e10d10b53d7f02975041d4fdcace90856b
'2011-12-28T23:12:01-05:00'
describe
'32921' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHX' 'sip-files00028.pro'
a8634d81460679b6ae1c988ba4a88631
3f519174d0d02983740af54d0d1e2d63825bef3b
'2011-12-28T23:08:53-05:00'
describe
'35049' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHY' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
95222efd825980019442e190a5a30687
5cdbf44a8313dcd9f95a13a89bb98d47c80f9544
'2011-12-28T23:10:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPHZ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
153efa2defe42548f5d8379de44463c9
f20f4f98cbfb3f996ac97bf77f0a1c78a273301f
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIA' 'sip-files00028.txt'
2ac3db67c97311cbdc09a0c85925839f
6da0e94286b593463205d2780ce5df32e128b43e
describe
'8905' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIB' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
f516b3a036b72b4941d97bed8ee62cda
aedb5b13105dd45b0dde32c887fcfbaae9a0c40a
'2011-12-28T23:13:25-05:00'
describe
'356940' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIC' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
21f1248fa102f19c7a444e0a6e6aa496
f3afa8b7ac13f41b2d100b46fca5ca5ab2c2b081
'2011-12-28T23:11:03-05:00'
describe
'97337' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPID' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
dc0f0a894a963691a469d7f67ca80863
4f98ba48f1b41d62124eb7d2f7f7ab8222d04251
'2011-12-28T23:13:53-05:00'
describe
'27000' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIE' 'sip-files00029.pro'
9ee2a93cc4152bddd3e64d1472ac6e8b
3ce04f20ea449e5e8172624f324c9ac98d14c307
'2011-12-28T23:13:12-05:00'
describe
'29767' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIF' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
f8560678ed3ddf510546619538e45f87
d9ca42ace8188ae0ee1d051e2453bef7793db37e
'2011-12-28T23:11:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIG' 'sip-files00029.tif'
abcc0f7c3f4b34d0ee68535210f78fe0
c3930e28ddd787941ef4df3d5c2200834e81ca1a
'2011-12-28T23:11:22-05:00'
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIH' 'sip-files00029.txt'
923b9e8d82b693df237eb0411a4fda35
9b9f94c0cbc3a2619b56560e4e555ef0cc411ae8
'2011-12-28T23:12:55-05:00'
describe
'7702' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPII' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
2e7b6e3fe18ff71a658b6f2a45024f78
292bf0cd764e72395e9b85270aaa9f6b763cc589
describe
'356818' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIJ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
5718aac7f68775817a0c2141f5600dab
1fa0becff1c5c06542b9546499adcb1a4c06e77e
'2011-12-28T23:09:01-05:00'
describe
'92358' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIK' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
3f64cef2cb45e3858a3a071608f49096
4284ecf74b50f2e024396eb0b4544b42496763e9
describe
'21527' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIL' 'sip-files00030.pro'
37246e6452f990efe8d03835e42faaaa
cb7274f19aac0c3f200436a3047b657099b15dfe
'2011-12-28T23:10:06-05:00'
describe
'27190' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIM' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
fc264dba7879bead1d150330f50de6b7
e4526a5bdfe02aeb9c2e833c94715f95dbea7b22
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIN' 'sip-files00030.tif'
8268437e0f03735f3d6e6aa9d7ab79a5
6bf4802d94954279b712542eed180d124ec7f673
describe
'913' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIO' 'sip-files00030.txt'
fc72e65465c5fc93f2150df769553e41
a1b0f53eb7e318601025f047391501a2fbd38262
describe
Invalid character
'7248' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIP' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
69427b7ef5a9762bd2e1e60ba9c6af70
364ffe2de488e7f5b8a499783e9611f5065a87ce
describe
'356964' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIQ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
1b2816169eae8a55ae106ef5e56d6616
0c3ca39d29126efa1134f3a788a4158d54d30fc0
'2011-12-28T23:09:37-05:00'
describe
'107057' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIR' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
5f58d33e19700e024aea19247b63b192
cff2ae80afd15528362a308aa1e3918e7595efb6
'2011-12-28T23:08:46-05:00'
describe
'31507' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIS' 'sip-files00031.pro'
64d6e98b6c8ce50b3152e7159f418c3f
e076ccc0d15932c46d48d60128ec90d9b7488713
describe
'34834' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIT' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
c834dde14b1b41e9ae8e96eae0e71632
db4a745862c3797cbf0e68646a8d9aee296656f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIU' 'sip-files00031.tif'
6f58ae8fc197c1e35cd043bbcbb6b7e9
edf7498de1a41ab9e934e507781611c4e50aba3c
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIV' 'sip-files00031.txt'
804d90934ca53e79e836eb39e3b94f1f
cf2e449511d1ae2c71485647d0213ce4afcfee44
describe
'8831' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIW' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
bd08431c4c968c76d94539dfe8b40fcb
956c601e04ba4150dcdda912ce9f325ff29933df
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIX' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
3cf4a7dbdc4dc1981ec579f063464fc1
c580cebaf3253fc588ebf32f52f70ac8f5a07912
'2011-12-28T23:08:32-05:00'
describe
'112872' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIY' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
25332137d24dcf3471868108b0c73bb4
515148e55c29b7d0d6f82aa0fbe455a704d9261a
'2011-12-28T23:14:09-05:00'
describe
'33655' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPIZ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
43f29897c1d2abcca84ed90d9186d72b
9d85f15ad0bb58eef414cd35ef177001b2f1fadf
'2011-12-28T23:11:02-05:00'
describe
'35376' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJA' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
3b6638a103f5c512e7479b3a069bc2bd
33837520c3a590eb730dec71f84d9208a6202dbb
describe
'2872584' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJB' 'sip-files00032.tif'
53ed85ece4bc8228145db7b20eab29b7
ec0c7bc72e096096d120adc27fa7d378a705fef0
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJC' 'sip-files00032.txt'
0234dff00cf6bc745c7962ca2076ac14
f72ee9bc9d5e06f8334eb997d20d5d323e3b94bb
'2011-12-28T23:13:09-05:00'
describe
'8572' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJD' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
7d6dcffb1752d462c9d345a88229d220
21cb3a62d9b8fb0ecc21c03d6020820ce6bb6c85
'2011-12-28T23:12:06-05:00'
describe
'356960' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJE' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
b0d03c042e884167307fce971d4ed156
0df3f39137f469113702dab89e93f8b70a2a3e37
'2011-12-28T23:10:42-05:00'
describe
'121477' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJF' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
260f310e7d629f631d80d4b65ce3e435
07a80d2c8da5e0d77ec5c34763eb0dcc89c5f9ef
'2011-12-28T23:11:06-05:00'
describe
'33848' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJG' 'sip-files00033.pro'
c3517b671379faf59b348582ebfa98d1
426734f16cd9256dc14f909700269d63a26ed0e7
describe
'37561' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJH' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
ba6ba543851616b83772bc74ba1bc214
d729c7d04ea7f15f1d95a694779d8ee879b62d7c
'2011-12-28T23:13:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJI' 'sip-files00033.tif'
f557741b9e9a97cda786e5faadc7ac2f
880f0dd80e9f578279c27e0c47bcdf90d958c16b
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJJ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
99f94ee4d46009a6a43bb3f389344fbe
19f2ac8eadf6d51c530643c1df289e43bb003136
'2011-12-28T23:10:16-05:00'
describe
'9389' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJK' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
8cca49f5911151f8c0b319d9cb0108fc
150b987fc2e5639ed4792aea80dcbb600feb214a
describe
'356944' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJL' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
7002f5f93a9cc75351c27eec5f19d917
c0a0699f5449bf711e5916cf533d689e2949f003
describe
'56396' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJM' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
4a5106a229281885dcdc81d68e78b686
ca96fd615e8da386875b2f7908786abbd7825ae9
describe
'13584' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJN' 'sip-files00034.pro'
5201a02f546a4727290afa0501f4fb44
d6da6bc718474e5bd1213f92172a1baa68e932bf
describe
'17305' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJO' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
c027c9352ba8bf6a5172fc32865e4e83
25a0467762ed32da3e3fed3e503c2c512effb08b
'2011-12-28T23:12:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJP' 'sip-files00034.tif'
42da4e9c5879d8a2fc461b8b49e1c6ed
e5a7f26feed1fa14ea3978ade57c5ab7708f0e8d
describe
'582' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJQ' 'sip-files00034.txt'
58fb155de6331ace6a5a85c2d49617cc
413ef8811a82aca2598a44bd477e21d1bbe8ac2e
'2011-12-28T23:09:35-05:00'
describe
'4816' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJR' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
c27b11e331a19e269951db40cf168a6e
dc85038b4051c66bb6ec80220d437ee838fef76f
describe
'356889' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJS' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
fabdc6f1bd968568f45cbb5f59a78bf5
568deec976858b359f21fbfe170ea11c0520cbf2
'2011-12-28T23:11:10-05:00'
describe
'102980' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJT' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
a25bc9319aa403f4e7273481764e26ec
1429102e38cbcb097c61bf23476a09472b255915
'2011-12-28T23:12:19-05:00'
describe
'19344' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJU' 'sip-files00035.pro'
b6d0be1dcadef705efa6c70254f74078
deff732713bbe149be74bad6e3e4b3113588909b
describe
'30031' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJV' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
489dcae5a45d083997fa93806ee4324f
12c61cff17c0b7579729babeff7e4cc761965d5a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJW' 'sip-files00035.tif'
4114e3dffa12ae66f555b17846381ef6
60e739df65f2073f6da7752019283d92efeb85a4
describe
'853' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJX' 'sip-files00035.txt'
de14d2414b79682fc2ac7cbc4e0418bf
f1de42ecbab9a9ff31d76c66869dcdaa1526e603
'2011-12-28T23:11:37-05:00'
describe
'8113' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJY' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
b78400fd5bd1e95f39a1a10f53cdcaa3
1e784aaa3372dbcc3ab5141e6c7a50a7c5ea41bc
describe
'356949' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPJZ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
8785f5d192fef58bfb1dedbbeed909d9
8e317dc1f7f04f05747662668b1bd58991355292
'2011-12-28T23:12:12-05:00'
describe
'110561' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKA' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
0294c3d8e6a5058d673583ec8eaa8c27
d40a0442f53350d9f888e3ff3364c3f7a88e28ac
'2011-12-28T23:11:50-05:00'
describe
'33174' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKB' 'sip-files00036.pro'
0f3dd183b01fc6542387acefe8320865
c96070cb1a0c9fb176db4261187bf0389fe57258
'2011-12-28T23:08:41-05:00'
describe
'34594' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKC' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
330329d610ef3c4d57623635c60e9ad5
5685a9f225855cffcf3ec1a6923cd0e48ed5feb6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKD' 'sip-files00036.tif'
f1dc858f68066d722801728ffc215eb1
c472c8a48d65ea1be596159b10b02a987094e5df
'2011-12-28T23:11:00-05:00'
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKE' 'sip-files00036.txt'
9fe909e6458992999088ff4872a08d99
aa930969ca3f6c872ee9a6ba999fe711daf5d410
describe
'8285' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKF' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
6c70a41f1af8c2c1fd40a157ac9045c9
d872d65356d03156a6850577b8e55b4280429a15
'2011-12-28T23:11:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKG' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
e73cd38d96665f468972d7618b9b1ea0
405812eec0b7c4eaa4fb684dacfbf8878ad38ca8
'2011-12-28T23:08:40-05:00'
describe
'115191' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKH' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
b4ed2137e8a1d86bba81a4532e3137b3
b1a6e1463bcbf18d3d31e74de8dfde41e1fd8132
'2011-12-28T23:08:19-05:00'
describe
'34213' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKI' 'sip-files00037.pro'
539d58fea8b8adba86bb0762e9c2b11f
e839cf8dee4b41c730136ac09824860d83f11b53
'2011-12-28T23:13:41-05:00'
describe
'36052' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKJ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
e586158da7c02012f72cd573db47c35f
24220499c6b02737c386b4520b6ea7671324e495
'2011-12-28T23:12:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKK' 'sip-files00037.tif'
e62452c88c41625e252ece53761dd0b5
f236514a1b4314b6faaa71d44b01d270f82b58d7
'2011-12-28T23:13:29-05:00'
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKL' 'sip-files00037.txt'
4978290d69a659adea4f271468894ca6
19698158ee28b61435887e04cb80b9c92896a6d4
describe
'8938' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKM' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
4a5ea55b11d375621eac89e70e9e02e3
fb36dfd006b2072d36686feae9e6bafcffb7fc31
'2011-12-28T23:12:13-05:00'
describe
'356941' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKN' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
422a39713e0fe9058fc0815e812748ba
ca634d3ce2874379951dea21ff852ca88216d7c1
'2011-12-28T23:08:54-05:00'
describe
'116039' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKO' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
79dfece4b36a05141bb06dfb6282eac0
c0272a01550ec8fcd2a1cbdbfe9bf6aa224ddb54
describe
'34018' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKP' 'sip-files00038.pro'
6673edf23f14a11cb3a2d5f838b8adbb
2699517d2e3d8245257549d7cd46ceecb097724b
describe
'34563' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKQ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
735433afb53d8d347ed75cdf2a33bc64
097de7ced6460570849a9dfd0a92863375b28547
'2011-12-28T23:10:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKR' 'sip-files00038.tif'
08b07694fc908a068b5e953abd6a934e
d0d1b149364b6f5348b6c79f08d6ab8b1bf7b521
'2011-12-28T23:12:30-05:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKS' 'sip-files00038.txt'
ddfa5716b6c4ea118084d2709e46b6c7
0d5a67737ae4575033545b0b10283b585cfef497
'2011-12-28T23:10:46-05:00'
describe
'8598' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKT' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
cd17ce29ea48e82d35b2ab6f4857b2e9
4691d1fcb5f5213bd453ca8c46ffe52ef17465eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKU' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
67484764738ecc43486f2f9441fa4867
63460a94cadef8d720f0d3b51f59787b3d7b95d9
describe
'110717' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKV' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
15b5b0c4c4bc5d9a1bca00358b7a3e62
3c3b446038d159dfe7be438682a0b92fc7e1d768
describe
'32502' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKW' 'sip-files00039.pro'
c4898161e6b720b15054bc9a1462c509
75026688203a06b0f913d30eef8b09bd23b7845a
describe
'34380' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKX' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
fa017ff7c7793b1e9e674ad44f1cd2be
d417403aad06f4e78af3a26e4e3d10b2bf28dde8
'2011-12-28T23:10:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKY' 'sip-files00039.tif'
3cd28f53ef5e2b05407cc04686af43a2
6f0a9421eee864d025e636c4e66ec76c7f1f7ab2
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPKZ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
c4255c1e362fb163c6e54621160b12fb
372dd306dcb79f543858638aab1ec1531ae39b24
describe
'8710' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLA' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
8c49fcb4d05f7838ffd5de58f9ed5e23
48a354aef4a24dad33bd0707a4b01cc467b11398
'2011-12-28T23:09:54-05:00'
describe
'356945' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLB' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
94d02c5fabd9503191c6ab0ad06ad126
5df0c92ffb67966990a127abb8047f89b70eac54
'2011-12-28T23:09:52-05:00'
describe
'106871' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLC' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
9fa993105e331e8d1bf109ce42379211
c1d0caaaee02f14ce1a7af54f8811b27a0ea1b00
'2011-12-28T23:12:05-05:00'
describe
'30648' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLD' 'sip-files00040.pro'
43e999b55e3200ea3ce769458a13847c
d8136aca241e15604c0c4eb171397fc6624994ca
'2011-12-28T23:12:34-05:00'
describe
'32399' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLE' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
d06d904ccd2e39de130b2e840a87e801
5e1772180534e781c5ccf96b9f7716aeaadd3b11
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLF' 'sip-files00040.tif'
e49900f06ef511f25a9b9c3ffd19ea56
d6693175039c413eeef8b4860eb37725aee7ba04
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLG' 'sip-files00040.txt'
d102235f7905076f77667fe019269da7
f460ab378aebee6d70c3e868edd0c8ed9a698079
'2011-12-28T23:10:32-05:00'
describe
'8513' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLH' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
50cd768a185b21299d82d44338cd9094
456c7df5b58c20bc868590ee2c9b2b9ac259950d
describe
'356946' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLI' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
145b1c85766c78ca0095ca144b3e9e9a
6d66a4da73a8efa5a5af0637520e449a33dddadc
describe
'106614' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLJ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
fca1db463519e737580018d6037f9074
d39310dc2b383ef1185483c1994dc84e2d10bad7
'2011-12-28T23:13:46-05:00'
describe
'23343' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLK' 'sip-files00041.pro'
2366773d41bf1649a433dd53dd03d7ff
59d98b3ee78619ef3537a4f13596ddefabf00928
'2011-12-28T23:10:55-05:00'
describe
'31713' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLL' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
7658f21710729915b5e983892b403c97
b170f86767f916f287b5c55ec29f78b97b8f0e26
'2011-12-28T23:08:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLM' 'sip-files00041.tif'
20242d6fb33b5908276c5bd051ae7ef3
cc818fcfc3cfb4b7d3fbe1ec27e384d11d739b20
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLN' 'sip-files00041.txt'
38db382be98e3f71b0c9466aa5ca62cf
062f429fede92d498482b9d5fbcf44330d8fa4a5
'2011-12-28T23:11:36-05:00'
describe
'8267' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLO' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
a245ebb211486d85cc603f08272cb2eb
8b88081382e298616e5a609c842782faa1131d37
'2011-12-28T23:13:17-05:00'
describe
'356938' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLP' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
c46bc8a1424cabbe50e8fa404ccae4d5
787d741da26051c97e246210d284bfff4538b2a5
describe
'120912' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLQ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
f7a0237486319b99ccf74e8ac3aebc05
780b67579617ce451ecca8b9b432342a0a041416
describe
'34155' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLR' 'sip-files00042.pro'
ff1b1cf1ef344d6bdb825f8a63b0b305
ab6a772fe36934725fb99cfb3873b1283d46a663
'2011-12-28T23:09:23-05:00'
describe
'37088' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLS' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
3744d42f508124fcda086b135b3c5454
ee51a26ee024c14f61883b2e4c06b212cf12ab2b
'2011-12-28T23:11:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLT' 'sip-files00042.tif'
ffd8d118a7edce7b9863fadf1dd5cf82
f769f0b41ce20de96f8d5ab7747d17856a84f373
describe
'1384' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLU' 'sip-files00042.txt'
e89caee5d67105ad45040118385ca68d
f16b686c8356a9a53bf21b34582c8bdecfedd04f
'2011-12-28T23:12:21-05:00'
describe
'9183' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLV' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
7b1745e92ae33bae76a40f65eead0572
74c3fa3c2f77a5f05967c374905ff6572bf4d872
'2011-12-28T23:08:50-05:00'
describe
'356798' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLW' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
3d2532e7456e53b247ec2d1f9d7e01c8
1ac8459a32de6a5e3260e1e625bebb37eadb23d0
describe
'128885' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLX' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
67df4b2e636df7dbe901012d77535249
70a89ec59ebe8db09043f082293425985ac5e7da
describe
'3043' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLY' 'sip-files00043.pro'
cd1c05db4fe390a57ab9c37b0e08d681
175c9005d7a7ba88ef0b7e6767ac34916d9a4b1c
'2011-12-28T23:08:25-05:00'
describe
'34817' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPLZ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
a61ce60574cd82b6e4e9eff28602c102
331c2dcbef0d912cc130daaae0ca8cc413fb46aa
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMA' 'sip-files00043.tif'
3eb47daf56c630128dbff7af7a074208
29602bcfaea5d688a56a699c96a6378d86e0ff70
'2011-12-28T23:10:24-05:00'
describe
'269' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMB' 'sip-files00043.txt'
929a4a74cd9915c1ff2da5ac3d9a4a44
8deadb31c04acc6168d9767fbe7529e1b33a69b6
'2011-12-28T23:09:14-05:00'
describe
'9304' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMC' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
a2b994f74a2ea837301eed5058ebd129
a0cd4271395e0c21e92c7bdb38fabbd3f07aae8c
'2011-12-28T23:10:09-05:00'
describe
'356902' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMD' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
b0d36b565adcef5b7fec51d6df2315e7
61c5573e0a283ec2d2f7e80ab987ff50afe2a431
'2011-12-28T23:12:31-05:00'
describe
'21462' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPME' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
24c2dff390d3ebb6b9f4ba7f0262dd2f
2586e5d16cce982349348394f3ad572db1cf6364
'2011-12-28T23:09:02-05:00'
describe
'4592' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMF' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
fc4c4c56003f80e8b181a56dc2fecd2e
b87c078af32cb1157272416afe7ab90e20cc5c4e
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMG' 'sip-files00044.tif'
9f53929a6adf4630b81f7962e2818c7a
509fa5edd1b56f3680fb5de5e455caa66d998809
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMH' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
3c5c2f37ed8c49a600b6bdcfbfbdea51
f489f3e6684a1ff49cca9d1add83ae9c8c1f3422
describe
'356899' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMI' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
4c4707c28a742b74f5da5cbfac15b442
a6b98b83559ea9434422762310911584044d6d4e
'2011-12-28T23:11:26-05:00'
describe
'100998' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMJ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
645d039fdadb5d06145837d9ffe5516c
a49f761b1f4f7af81a0e2bcf1d541d12aa032d27
'2011-12-28T23:12:04-05:00'
describe
'28702' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMK' 'sip-files00045.pro'
a463a51a2eec70d7059840fcb32ad77a
a031204eb1ad1c03fd98e869d8caddb7b216a9eb
describe
'31060' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPML' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
2f3988a1e7e8a2f0ee60138ab4743adc
6dce997b5249c7e2e12aff32541d0ffa6fbcd674
'2011-12-28T23:09:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMM' 'sip-files00045.tif'
191ff67bfd8b4561764d7c2dbdca30b5
e32cff241482d483c82b2eeb5168cad36a7c5a23
'2011-12-28T23:10:37-05:00'
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMN' 'sip-files00045.txt'
944cd12318421298915bb64318f26b46
b35d4c6a06b162876d7931dd0b368767e3aa0ad1
'2011-12-28T23:11:13-05:00'
describe
'8430' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMO' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
a5a2ade1e8d1d7b54748b5b7c990c84c
78f2f18aba94192b0850b63670b8c5e59f1318b5
'2011-12-28T23:08:20-05:00'
describe
'356773' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMP' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
4c278597245e4d1a890278a4cd0cbc08
f6a43fd43106c1e08b900e802a1431c78f15e576
'2011-12-28T23:08:39-05:00'
describe
'116457' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMQ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
c8788fccd425ae45300e4ef1a35162b2
209f806f9378217911dfe28d592454715e30f0af
describe
'33305' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMR' 'sip-files00046.pro'
d794ae5530e17edea0838d21b2eaf51d
1cb531581b91cb926f746b628db19b0b7ee2ed28
'2011-12-28T23:13:08-05:00'
describe
'35174' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMS' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
9e6cd1327706eb3d975904147c09b2be
571e1d70bf9343c4fe71349f50fd47774f4491cb
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMT' 'sip-files00046.tif'
046c3df4f9e9b1a64fc98fe86aa3c5c6
fb7d6779d2d7a41ffe3bbe4279d3c2b7df4a849a
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMU' 'sip-files00046.txt'
ead28d016ef9ddee149232c9aac0b67a
29fbc2cf8bf768c2654bf5785443d03be349e84d
'2011-12-28T23:13:31-05:00'
describe
'8714' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMV' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
6c49aa0ca4807e7819f7051a7b596143
9bce98780d83b7692f49a8d2f7287c19afdcb8e7
describe
'356794' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMW' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
1750177300122aeed057e408a60233da
17a212adc2dde7e6bde71c99e411f0e82f0fa0ec
describe
'121311' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMX' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
3df3d2bd64269d7716a22a933572d2df
3d7297abace0567fee95cec388f1148936cd889c
'2011-12-28T23:14:00-05:00'
describe
'37080' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMY' 'sip-files00047.pro'
e0402ced700a8761dfcf1b2747076726
fb67a556a4f9f19fe04fcbaa5f4e55143dc85e4b
describe
'36740' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPMZ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
a3692b84ab8d7b63519756aa0b891776
b9083da40751460d545b883267ba1f339e24923d
'2011-12-28T23:10:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNA' 'sip-files00047.tif'
89e5dee5ee3983c0e76e64a3622ecf2e
de632789eb9447b24598ad56f10fb34d878d7b87
describe
'1486' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNB' 'sip-files00047.txt'
0ece8eb83954dd49e869a76ced3c3715
c13271c50162e561a7d3c9facb21df2755562418
'2011-12-28T23:10:47-05:00'
describe
'8913' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNC' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
213f855f31323bf3374cf80d649a05f9
12528b2189c06bf34b938c763de074155d777ea6
'2011-12-28T23:13:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPND' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
ac1d3d5238f5cb4f23ac31571aa37489
6b164d98f73e1f18c3972b88d9df75476fd21a93
'2011-12-28T23:09:57-05:00'
describe
'113253' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNE' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
f3dd482b544a3cc66ee9fa775e26f6ea
05776acdd6dc6b9ca08919ef236cc0657fe295a5
describe
'33459' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNF' 'sip-files00048.pro'
0e5a51254293334bc9cab3ccf0f1978c
f9a22aa4d5a6459bd82be0b1a6549cf4609d886e
describe
'34399' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNG' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
dc9c36dfa0bd991f5b9fdc20f6a3ac9b
3367877bb1b4f6e5f10b4e28710e53e65773f49c
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNH' 'sip-files00048.tif'
6fadcc43d00ee3ccb11f5c93e06db9b6
e29ac6a19ecc613d0c089f6240772f3443f1dbb5
'2011-12-28T23:13:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNI' 'sip-files00048.txt'
5864761c8426ec7f5c1488baa7cb08fe
25880ae53429b0f808327568a8e6853202d90475
'2011-12-28T23:08:16-05:00'
describe
'8777' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNJ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
410bb6fda159b90e4730428f40f61f1e
757fe749aac4146a19973fff82bd266e41f53149
describe
'356943' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNK' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
180100d221acddcf09a5385dde87161b
fb6f05747ff56ae6135edd02b965a4194aa1e13e
'2011-12-28T23:09:10-05:00'
describe
'99703' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNL' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
ae3d715c180e9e9e19899682ba5f0a56
e8a7ef58aae33ccd8b139cbce47ad4f494c5a757
'2011-12-28T23:10:11-05:00'
describe
'21760' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNM' 'sip-files00049.pro'
cd3a3b6a15b23a7fde60c0be8bfc9ebe
deb07c36e957f2c51acda017ed45559168e73526
'2011-12-28T23:08:55-05:00'
describe
'29170' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNN' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
6542a9bd78a00c6ae57aa5028d31cb04
0c67c8e55672cbe766731310d7ceaa700af4d280
'2011-12-28T23:13:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNO' 'sip-files00049.tif'
59d05bbb8776e59f555f76e3574a7c80
f20b7796915edadd916762aef5de141f0436b8b8
'2011-12-28T23:14:02-05:00'
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNP' 'sip-files00049.txt'
78bd1a74ba12e9630845eadf65f7f89e
0f26a1439bf49b2d2fcf9423dbbfdf694863b748
describe
'7576' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNQ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
8abe381a917571ad63b8d073682132bd
7d2d4521fc8737b7d2a6f74e7d7c9438e1819794
'2011-12-28T23:08:24-05:00'
describe
'356963' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNR' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
b0ec91dd8930e2263d40d47746481659
a5b24c623be91b2ec2b1c48121226bb87283799d
describe
'120303' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNS' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
a3dfe71a00c76d6cf6a8998f7025cfa7
5e888961d0aee34933fea99a1fc0ee0bc2898115
describe
'34459' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNT' 'sip-files00050.pro'
f608d33ed28d2ca50e35798fe2597b89
a444d37966cff5abd7e6e8052df07bc47dcfef9b
'2011-12-28T23:11:07-05:00'
describe
'36737' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNU' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
50ee66f882d129e25314d0356f4edd69
5610b62e8c7c5c04addecf551c7863cd5a7b9692
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNV' 'sip-files00050.tif'
71b7be052865ec55a9286c306bb8fa67
2187998d688662ddfc69624e8efe02ec49b83700
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNW' 'sip-files00050.txt'
7c64d7396de2cc9a1cc9e114cddedf4e
f374129605ca2429e44a7adf1980ab55b91b40a6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNX' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
70a27304fcf378f8fc8e75b25bb78b17
1402eeec9aaf70049f8d092a0dcf371730565ea7
describe
'356927' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNY' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
780afe3e2160fc0cf27d3a22f7706edd
8393aa9db5d45998d9ebde829e719ca682243ecf
'2011-12-28T23:10:54-05:00'
describe
'113243' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPNZ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
73af638804246ea4fb51d18c55208acf
2983744d59cc248fab17c87fac72c8c050c72412
'2011-12-28T23:13:47-05:00'
describe
'32983' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOA' 'sip-files00051.pro'
af8b1a14ddcceccc61987f63cd054954
bc58ab7e999bf06408127ece0da4c84e09169598
describe
'35705' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOB' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
502f16fb3a643097e6dbdcaf85d7e5b7
553b988b81165e6b66b1669eb98979b662ce74c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOC' 'sip-files00051.tif'
891d9a159cef37ad0047fd6cc84b3f68
0b9d001121eb70d11eb1cb3c437632b59659279c
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOD' 'sip-files00051.txt'
27016e6c7b482253c67a52ff3a98d997
549c410627c5f84b02565b669627ffbe74d671f3
'2011-12-28T23:12:23-05:00'
describe
'8707' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOE' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
d6bb9403bcd208fa59f8be1037b25545
4ed5ebd80a6f2cda88f2d1e105a4010cd3cb62e8
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOF' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
63b10eb120e83e2aa33c58a84c3b0412
cf8713346206576941062b64f7aaf4926a0e6816
'2011-12-28T23:13:01-05:00'
describe
'114140' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOG' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
3778ba346201cb13fc367deaf07ba64e
5d17349ace5969e9e67e5d66d343147f56a071e3
describe
'33782' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOH' 'sip-files00052.pro'
beb95d8f08338398d01c81e484e4ab85
ec99cb79c7249f50a8b6bd339403b0700d284bed
describe
'34781' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOI' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
c7b5fa61cd69f3e8e19cf6cad1063086
242193ebdc90159c81fc721f881e3070576676d6
'2011-12-28T23:11:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOJ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
fe4b76869f569499fa4190cc62658777
7e0c79777e35b435747a47e00ae0ea918158acca
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOK' 'sip-files00052.txt'
4664070015bf272a0f64abc0b4f2ba37
5b2c89e69feecc0e42a7250ae02b3bf804aeb39d
'2011-12-28T23:09:26-05:00'
describe
'8666' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOL' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
8a0189ffb515c5c9ac4dfb9db23b891a
b1c1b7af2008b091e081518c5373124a69ef7da3
'2011-12-28T23:11:40-05:00'
describe
'356921' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOM' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
cc05ed5340b599807a18bd215c24392e
8a67d277efac4728075b4f4ad68eb96e3932d523
'2011-12-28T23:12:53-05:00'
describe
'116436' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPON' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
91361bcfb6e6c413c8315cf98fa7998a
9aa55298b8c0a5b4074188d4ce3980a6700a30af
'2011-12-28T23:10:43-05:00'
describe
'33665' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOO' 'sip-files00053.pro'
4a00da1b918cee8dfd101f09a47df2a5
3c398f0a92f87ca34f35c70b911ebc554eefc847
describe
'36029' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOP' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
3333c2163c8383a8f50978309a33310d
65a268255b15431c2e156ea9ff164287b1a08af0
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOQ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
42f07bca09d53dfb99f7fad962f26f9e
c72df92143b17e35aa0eb7f7647a9f87ce72bee2
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOR' 'sip-files00053.txt'
723d51b6a6170a588acd9c72e9da176a
6cfb30efe3b52bdfc7e7915af755eb7b8f57933a
'2011-12-28T23:12:10-05:00'
describe
'8719' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOS' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
7c33b5c3e8b88f62fe7db70d9f06b941
8772c759c31d80ca957e1b5d68485708ecf54861
describe
'356966' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOT' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
25aed4693efe7e74bf9006e219d53cec
98563b9acc4ec231bf6b1e7b64cbfba79e8841ff
describe
'117914' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOU' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
2f78336d854d0e0d5d57b8809ea608cd
58790e82f0e9decdd49f868b89581a8987e3b916
describe
'34323' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOV' 'sip-files00054.pro'
b3d89b87312684230f526239a3605ca6
901b64f2e094b48957d0b4f677705dbb78d092bc
describe
'36079' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOW' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
ec2341033b8882c14a51a559aea26052
b6efe1e191978171f21f6ca2be7f51566ec75e2a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOX' 'sip-files00054.tif'
e3ae35c27b324c63f6362b5e4f6b737e
569c6888737611941c7738c2876c3a015763ebc5
'2011-12-28T23:12:33-05:00'
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOY' 'sip-files00054.txt'
371650f062d60a4811fbadef1977bce7
42417926620ca17ca86b1b51a09215f3480e0dda
describe
'8991' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPOZ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
0e28f0d485112e72671b0417ecf6256d
2d7be137b0419951c9d3dbee03e3ddcbe241c928
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPA' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
e8f8b486bf5aa6af2e1dd396dbce1f1f
12bc96fde54a38eec657a8f846812d0a9ddb00cb
describe
'113773' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPB' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
a678cd2e5e867ae49c983b0efadee63e
6c54edb62a02543c78cb4ebb8bee645cb20e7d51
'2011-12-28T23:12:39-05:00'
describe
'32809' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPC' 'sip-files00055.pro'
f79522cf4287eff6a94600a9605abe05
c6f8cfd6896ab8f19dec3492154bd26170aaca46
describe
'34769' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPD' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
c40aeb2e445c4a0ae723eb1780cbb4b9
84584971a0d759c5cea3fe95f0365858926857f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPE' 'sip-files00055.tif'
4b9b135a9f5c2e9709149d1f7b63e122
ed645135197c18794f4acd3288015dea4c787a51
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPF' 'sip-files00055.txt'
2cb41d29cd04a813d9b8739f603fafd2
3090a48d71305305dfc44db0421ec543511ebfdc
'2011-12-28T23:13:55-05:00'
describe
'8886' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPG' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
5c32f858f87f4c8e7b3928ba7ea4ac7b
8ad33be675adec7dbde80393ca79afc88e00f68d
describe
'356876' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPH' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
706281efbd67cc65e38bed65583e0ddb
fbb719a210e9af67b0ba6584f06ef77fcb8758c6
describe
'99265' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPI' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
7c6d80770a972bfe667f86071b6fb05c
ec812e73801ba43c17e743b825516c176a010279
describe
'26789' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPJ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
47ae70b472fb0871b918de38aeb73fe6
992e944fa27518e2de5d74ba98ce513308b4ba8b
describe
'29427' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPK' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
89921a1f3ea82428665a37491320bc78
382d474546b993564855be86491fa337297dc622
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPL' 'sip-files00056.tif'
1550bd275a8099e954a00b7e388d9d1a
a3a65d3a6fdd4f70c779ad4957a1ac06b7a819b8
'2011-12-28T23:09:50-05:00'
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPM' 'sip-files00056.txt'
b0e672431ccda401bb17b9f41ca26437
7d0a2ced73b5ecfa62620ccdf5492ff746388e3b
'2011-12-28T23:11:14-05:00'
describe
'7322' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPN' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
5bf7a2537f2811b1dc469b47b50a1339
42660edf597b983159224e484e2c256bf5a1eb8e
describe
'356958' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPO' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
5734343b87755bceba63275631c22cfd
ba9c88e31a317531ce603c11656ea7c73f9bb9e3
'2011-12-28T23:13:04-05:00'
describe
'101943' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPP' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
2a179d16bcded6729d71010a31e879d2
c7bf689b6645ad9ca2c4340e14fa9e62e7300ea6
describe
'23307' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPQ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
af6011b76c61a4ce31ef01aa30820a8d
aba9cf04096bfd52f8fa54a410c03be1b98295eb
describe
'29571' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPR' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
d66405af8e4cfcd6732fcf2336383dbf
ac28fa9c70ba2d34dcf7c855237478f99768a600
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPS' 'sip-files00057.tif'
81a995483c3dee8f142d131a1c21211d
1e93a6735a66fde843d207e89b61e0d09aeeed07
'2011-12-28T23:10:20-05:00'
describe
'1015' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPT' 'sip-files00057.txt'
7087f6b9537edb32b28395fd524425bd
1001354a636dfaf37492cf02f6097cbf92d9e04f
describe
'7245' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPU' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
7b25d0cbc9522f2e445c02e37514b158
835cf3bff2470a3fc6d9713c99c4c12e8746187a
describe
'356950' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPV' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
41c2bdce60f11557a6535eef123bba0a
e387128ec918c450998b3574104deea2fe445e8a
describe
'109359' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPW' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
2d602a31b13eb8b20871cd1c07ade352
2cc7e86d79d8cb77789da69c8e76e05d9ee7ccf1
'2011-12-28T23:12:54-05:00'
describe
'31169' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPX' 'sip-files00058.pro'
3a8ddc4093b1e388b690886a99ebdf2e
cea372b1da69e7a4e49a6427ea911f799af4e368
'2011-12-28T23:09:33-05:00'
describe
'33776' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPY' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
128eb85417d8f393de5f1e3e72242f81
9485f622fed84d2ec67389b3d015798fac416ec8
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPPZ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
6f3fcf01d49b2db28d83e39897d4fc9c
28f2e6c44bb922c809778bc771c6bf469997d643
'2011-12-28T23:09:44-05:00'
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQA' 'sip-files00058.txt'
3cf0e94042d5307db2e02a47d4a88d08
1282f761b373c2f0a6ff73e76d66742caedacf10
describe
'8642' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQB' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
592cb807c7fb6d2b0610bf5b7c329e3c
3562b237e62887060b6d8552b98a255ed067d65a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQC' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
6fa25a684cd345cb31cee2749c0e4b3c
5156721216adc89bacfc871c9832915fa7e721f9
'2011-12-28T23:13:33-05:00'
describe
'122628' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQD' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
8d9d16517fa40b25bf0e51de00605041
614f1c30dd42faebde855a322d245ee7ef442e7b
'2011-12-28T23:11:30-05:00'
describe
'36467' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQE' 'sip-files00059.pro'
58764c84629d7b94049bba01824f1837
5f2b147f14f9f63318c6acf55aee2ae8b3a93a95
'2011-12-28T23:13:27-05:00'
describe
'37298' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQF' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
2c50fbe70b5fc600cb91d0f02d868ad1
9ba331a180008c1c4e2a037238f523b1ae24884c
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQG' 'sip-files00059.tif'
a523374c6eac2713eec50605b6603cc8
229ead7d5e76bd96c93d9b2801913c9fc4cd3383
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQH' 'sip-files00059.txt'
bb9df5c12b917c9521b808231ba10f0c
efc990308967fcc736d6448ea8eaeaeb73331f31
describe
'8815' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQI' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
e0c159ba655ee77526e17f2219a79b16
52c22465ed35a541b8bd10e1d18e7e0cb2aed1a5
'2011-12-28T23:12:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQJ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
6d04aaf49f3b58c4080b06507c2ec78d
75b9882840d1d51d527de457b959b5f236057db3
describe
'115676' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQK' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
508f4ab1be558b7261975f1092085d0c
45eb9906ada2c18e33dcebd1fd6322241237a9fb
describe
'34051' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQL' 'sip-files00060.pro'
154830cb42c9ba084cf6f4851fb2ddae
f5180b3de73bf4801fc943056beec31909960dcd
describe
'35425' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQM' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
f6c43ab9eed859ce0cdd46aee52523e6
8762512a429c3b6e8ad978a0b65a8dda25524b52
'2011-12-28T23:11:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQN' 'sip-files00060.tif'
58d8f09eaf176fe0cbe5818c0cd140bb
872bd5bbe516c0c28010bf0540b4744183a2204a
'2011-12-28T23:09:18-05:00'
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQO' 'sip-files00060.txt'
bc5f0eab719f4df5bee06b5eae181d2b
420413602d979414a96f1fdb8a9afa289be5f79b
'2011-12-28T23:08:10-05:00'
describe
'8803' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQP' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
2446a976fdf41f7274c878e4a66b94c1
7d73fce71ecfd6f8db7c58ab1500cd64e514d0a8
describe
'356908' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQQ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
6c033a3fe172357b75b9106b5202fdc7
0375059b6f4c3b7b3ce9d38a9ca0e51759f11cb6
describe
'117324' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQR' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
505e43ad243ec76ed84ec0e31f4ba23f
2985a55bc3ca89014a77ec9e50df037a3f7c034b
'2011-12-28T23:08:18-05:00'
describe
'34771' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQS' 'sip-files00061.pro'
d543ca59a4115a4f700abd2d4c8c94b9
291f89db5b832850d6528900bb61d0d21f28dc03
describe
'36545' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQT' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
331a577b6afad775cf48dfbd43d6af0f
926df605fa8d8dc887dddbafa4300dde9aa84c89
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQU' 'sip-files00061.tif'
cf6d104eaa3ffd8b2bff3c57053ca00e
40fbded5b71d484d41f4a028baee71b0ff73b59c
'2011-12-28T23:12:20-05:00'
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQV' 'sip-files00061.txt'
8a7095865e37b2b2174091f910510f7d
ae2644d235c6f469042c79cf23788cd2f885a006
describe
'9101' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQW' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
bf65e261ea99eb78fdb1089ab736ea89
bc777df1418aecc9f71298ec662cbcc79b6c9fa1
'2011-12-28T23:10:28-05:00'
describe
'356948' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQX' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
bd72ce211dffad4a3998c47607909f07
d863ac0844db66b9959085280e3c5b91ef403bf3
'2011-12-28T23:08:30-05:00'
describe
'92258' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQY' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
e317a2bcf7fd1a7e039af8bcfdefc988
1a51ac9fc1cea349ce6b5727672dc0e71d0c1f16
describe
'23590' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPQZ' 'sip-files00062.pro'
3410aadc189644ae5997b757246897db
b5f55626f60759046b77661ec952bc47b8875589
'2011-12-28T23:11:55-05:00'
describe
'26402' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRA' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
6fdd4c27a513b65606519d2174c7355f
18ec8ed509389481d63055c4520656e108f7b518
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRB' 'sip-files00062.tif'
43fb655d03ebab29fde16b83a76b4b81
acff601b6cc34d93f959841131dc26d318bccedb
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRC' 'sip-files00062.txt'
c330e0d17d78e2b5022bc38241a99cbc
20cae188040b02adbbf4e91e51356f911385facb
describe
'6628' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRD' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
6f081f8e515a81079b4cc2ae3f171936
2da1bcb20e85f2f77571b3db127a5cb9f446e00a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRE' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
a96a9fe281cf5ee58968dce118eaa966
f2a5eb68236c9538379ee3433247fbecfe93d411
describe
'101385' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRF' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
96cfadfd32741e4143a16732ad3424be
c418ee12b360434b72da8428cd63e990653b20f6
'2011-12-28T23:08:05-05:00'
describe
'22893' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRG' 'sip-files00063.pro'
98770e7a94d9844ead8b7f29cb32acba
ad9ac01a75853d3ae9f3a0fa3b27a52ef0f3830c
describe
'28819' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRH' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
2a312a8bcd13607c1d80e8c8616e5339
69e9589be0ac3f64e78c8cec3858b1625254c716
'2011-12-28T23:08:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRI' 'sip-files00063.tif'
329c866a279d8795ae2381c2eb5c8471
d565dd8dfbe1d0b7745994664d15f98a63af9c25
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRJ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
28e48676ed0a6e06469cbb1e2ee5fdea
49e8d1e9d392334526e0a1fa2e23951345e02715
describe
'7153' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRK' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
0fd389d16c83e796d1a5e953a1e3f829
659c1c660ea9c50f56d7bcb74f1f78842b59506b
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRL' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
f4142c94681f66af7cd79078f3512229
61378ab307fe804ca0f1f05cdafa6defdb7eddb4
'2011-12-28T23:09:05-05:00'
describe
'120624' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRM' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
446d4a8f7380a7a7a2ea8d41afeac6b5
310d23fad5b094ee4618c6adcb13d947d03b4e9e
describe
'35700' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRN' 'sip-files00064.pro'
74200da89030e7327ad6a7269b4ea61d
8f2e9c488926889126ab32493d66d889ca66a1db
'2011-12-28T23:10:08-05:00'
describe
'36818' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRO' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
3f38d317ed836715923011615aa969e4
c41e2289d41da5ddaad46c37ae086319e282304b
'2011-12-28T23:12:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRP' 'sip-files00064.tif'
1b0dd874e7879c9aafacdc643726bb72
eeb6a31edd5ff3688efc5969906f38f0656d7f22
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRQ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
e0cc807f66256321e446127e338d0d93
40f05b85a3c3bcf765ae91ff6f0c34111fd2f906
'2011-12-28T23:10:49-05:00'
describe
'8987' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRR' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
2262bedab2162998de5677131a64c0dc
4863dc0242d7dee4bd8dfe2c32839debdf9d7149
describe
'356942' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRS' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
b30b2c96b4618435f71fd2acb752759f
4eb7d01a11fd8a8dc7826256e1ae04e29ad1ce13
describe
'115127' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRT' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
ec10af455ee212fad25d26a224e966e9
9082ce51db788016622295dbb820f3ea45a78f5b
'2011-12-28T23:09:45-05:00'
describe
'34487' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRU' 'sip-files00065.pro'
06055cb1ab82c5cb90121b2bd1640543
63fb3c00ed2319ded5f16ef710fceb07e2b345e1
'2011-12-28T23:11:38-05:00'
describe
'35913' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRV' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
7a3789ba2b23c924817c5a1d2378cc40
882923f09e23de08b76906f652f43c821a0c3abe
'2011-12-28T23:10:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRW' 'sip-files00065.tif'
6611cfa1973f7ff9c41652600b30382a
f002acf2cba2a99a22c1c6679c6962b524d91d08
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRX' 'sip-files00065.txt'
62803d015a0e6834cae0ffa525a814b2
46f0fdcd182a924e9ece054a88d4545f39a13463
'2011-12-28T23:09:53-05:00'
describe
'8856' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRY' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
db88cc29b6f1eb4a663a24be7671b922
9d2a3d6aadda1d0aab290a0f261290a7ef7eeff8
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPRZ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
2df53cf138951f86af8b07bc6a864a0f
7bcd20ebc58fcd6e32ab66964c785569a11c17c2
describe
'128586' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSA' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
c24e33623fa81c356d160ff35092c6e4
aaf4ef993c131cadca6fdf4de8da9c7611c540ca
describe
'36802' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSB' 'sip-files00066.pro'
5d0054cc3dce60e9ac7273cb25011c72
22639585b5dc47a1a7c83372b66f8d1c99241532
describe
'38785' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSC' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
141b9a7771c2c7b6914f72d556380c16
f66e2f381cd9b9064498830b6dbe4b3ab38ccd90
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSD' 'sip-files00066.tif'
76e18a92a8d4f4cc19cee021f7700222
1bfd7aea0b11be6b5a823f4ffdf311c40d61139b
'2011-12-28T23:09:22-05:00'
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSE' 'sip-files00066.txt'
4e65b50336ea6d2583d19f9e742edaac
47d1fbc7383ffb99d447a861c95b98781ad8ac4b
'2011-12-28T23:08:04-05:00'
describe
'9294' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSF' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
13ab5adebed25ef32605f81d6a510e28
d916730847054a3978b2a7bc15600abcdfc4bae0
describe
'356936' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSG' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
f00e553cce716bad0785fe419e601ca7
7e5438a28dc3daf754cf0f13069cb9dbe3b5bcc7
'2011-12-28T23:11:11-05:00'
describe
'122828' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSH' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
6a1a16fc1dba10ab1bc74e6cd17183cc
3927a300dd7640b0246961f6657f76742880c43d
describe
'35616' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSI' 'sip-files00067.pro'
8395e531950e5032b5de06d76c8abd84
b4ce53e7a276a649e3aeea5e19485de3722c4b0b
describe
'37759' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSJ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
2560153ea8da8411bb4830b921eb8ca0
4364fb8cc8a3771aa718024debace535122cf330
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSK' 'sip-files00067.tif'
8820240aa596a98a8123f508c260a6aa
05c7e78a25d55c59c76c2c5ea23e01e75ff6f34e
'2011-12-28T23:11:32-05:00'
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSL' 'sip-files00067.txt'
9e78a31b0c33291e34ec07f488e3acac
2d5c31ef375ea467618e6aa9008e4c054c88cbb7
'2011-12-28T23:10:39-05:00'
describe
'9310' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSM' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
689af84cde2d087aebcfaa5127deba83
c0ddfe71808254ad19703e0527f7cfd12ecdf7f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSN' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
e2f2081d2f93fe3a8ee54b08067f6d54
acb250459cd714258ca0e796e565e1c719038d0e
describe
'94797' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSO' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
268a8e3f6c4ce0aca25e02c92fbe1b17
4eac79aacc1fd738a9d1a8150262ecbc594eeeb5
describe
'26498' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSP' 'sip-files00068.pro'
f4a2fd8dccd873e18e923647fb91eb25
5df65615ec0c547e7eef6a8872cfaff16ec2e6c6
describe
'28729' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSQ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
516b294af7b4e7d3e898c7d13b5d5bf5
027526fa59bd5fa2b1a838ddeb14228a016ee606
'2011-12-28T23:10:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSR' 'sip-files00068.tif'
4f4a77d868e191357a8a744be6fd0a05
28e70300ea8a79709c2dec9c9a49628951d6f130
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSS' 'sip-files00068.txt'
daf29da3e07fc9e83916e51550651c29
7908529503053685dc5ec35a83c9ff3b98cee812
'2011-12-28T23:13:36-05:00'
describe
'6897' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPST' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
916601338700a252e5fdfc6c51f12b34
dbc924ea236ea75124b632e5fdac3afdc48159d7
describe
'356878' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSU' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
0d9c75eedace38b93666fa1bad626798
1c1299b5eabd101202a079c1401a4a599f2e27e7
describe
'95947' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSV' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
d97b9f3080af9b5765947cb4dff63ba3
0973022b5c0717df8c10c5c6e6f151dccf195508
describe
'21901' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSW' 'sip-files00069.pro'
e495b6915131da6c7b7951e6e5c94b49
5409dad6bc8ca70c5983b5891b3a54ecd4c9a0dd
describe
'28714' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSX' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
af3fc0684c2a3851ff99c1f02a5f98f0
913021ace5dd6a548f4c256083340742991c3618
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSY' 'sip-files00069.tif'
95832043c8da71636a0c18281586d904
c46b889f76252a3b7ad8d61afb7185857ea1ccf4
'2011-12-28T23:10:40-05:00'
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPSZ' 'sip-files00069.txt'
6f81fccfe0a7985719fe5b8194789455
f226f36265128fa0c94db614c5830e2a0b94db2d
'2011-12-28T23:13:54-05:00'
describe
'7188' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTA' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
fe3ebd302e515c857d7a62b518807b0d
b4d31eccd7934ae99ae0273ef020660edd942d81
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTB' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
65ade6c465022b223acab5bf8cdf60be
d3bf4649a4bb6499f27b8367a26e0c8f3beb4597
describe
'109947' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTC' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
21eecaa8d48c2efca7f1fb2d90e47182
d6d5e6e1251561a8d1565e53d1b6b2fb78416fb8
describe
'32255' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTD' 'sip-files00070.pro'
4b8a6fcc4912ee7e0e7dd51286fddb9e
4e76bd837522b89088e7191fbbdb73f520f00c31
describe
'33885' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTE' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
3ec17d98945f4119ac50eb4c11d3690c
6688a05511b5d6929a3e62763ac5609abfc938ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTF' 'sip-files00070.tif'
304697c15c6bd41da2c1f63a4b31d98d
6e329273bbb4c58fb5c937913eee6e630f1bddf3
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTG' 'sip-files00070.txt'
5413719b573eb0f2c9556ddf8f3406ba
4b8912fc1566b371a9e1868bcc1270c83ce31848
describe
'8718' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTH' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
c446f7448819412734b88c1a6b1e2154
548b122c0c1bdaeaff65d73ac291e1de3bcf1a1f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTI' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
8de0f389aedcaa17d8fc1533233f18c1
c2fd87744b81ae6b29d0dfedce0383985bc3de23
describe
'113361' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTJ' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
89ec7f8fe47c04ebd8063cf7eb416011
4a440af443c33a7e33c1b9c58b2175960558ac5d
describe
'34170' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTK' 'sip-files00071.pro'
8c903eb97dea091a81bd5fffa4963e4f
f8b1da94a818e7f3cb41ee24758ca701881f9c57
describe
'35144' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTL' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
0c5feed9076ddfbdf8ec00a6f6167bfa
a18c437b51fb4c884ba1ff501486efdad6d0ad31
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTM' 'sip-files00071.tif'
5a9c80063f10c252ea38cd138ed42617
4958c08fb4f3456ea02e83dbba19a7f3bb8bdebd
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTN' 'sip-files00071.txt'
9e1e68ebef329ef1fa1032dbf5d2b800
e19abdea5fd719b42ca0b36d8b9dbe11bd7037a7
describe
'8696' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTO' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
7bd8204d48766c1568c1bb718e02da1b
76d5e7fa923210541ba3b25c38087e8e4e87ad61
'2011-12-28T23:13:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTP' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
03876b261066f4c7be9178478627e686
b0e6348931a4d9bb11d1d56bf9b81f52b70ec2b9
describe
'115122' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTQ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
b7f39ce6b60ee1f880ade36df390fe97
9608c57d06736c23ebb5a47b4d2824f73699ee96
'2011-12-28T23:12:02-05:00'
describe
'33546' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTR' 'sip-files00072.pro'
7dd3ebf7e3c840c0664dc08eabaa7e83
66e0df78c64ecb30fd8c1c5ef8f61f5d31cba1bd
describe
'36132' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTS' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
20fcf119d1c18b8137d79a41238d584b
d62711f2bb1c7dd7dc9bf5a961e465724ab458ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTT' 'sip-files00072.tif'
163349a86a128e004680b1dce24eeb98
f2d88b2a28d2d740eb1b043c9adad16cb70c97a2
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTU' 'sip-files00072.txt'
9538b21b24539bf143ac2c6ca070718b
2bb1568527bada9566cd163bc42edc9532dbb85e
'2011-12-28T23:11:27-05:00'
describe
'8560' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTV' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
834fe44f96e163293ceab34b0b919251
e588a169bd39de667fbaec06eef0f955f259eb76
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTW' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
66bd5211fac1acdb24a7d3d1d3304ff1
77309b9696470b94d9281dee59928e81f6136413
describe
'107436' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTX' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
0f3630112072f7fc0b0ec0f159e20146
2c4831b796ca966791289076b04b2793fa4fbac2
'2011-12-28T23:09:07-05:00'
describe
'31330' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTY' 'sip-files00073.pro'
1ad68b378b18f161e843cde8b4261a76
097b4fe972b7ce9792d8c68135ef41f32fb50d22
'2011-12-28T23:11:19-05:00'
describe
'33813' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPTZ' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
c83fc39c95641d3c31f26071597e3d35
866334d38d9497f13c6a1a81b6cf6941544621f0
'2011-12-28T23:09:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUA' 'sip-files00073.tif'
93ad81d0fed321408c8564d8f266b551
7aef1b5c59121cd81fd3af6405f0ff5a40d9cdaa
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUB' 'sip-files00073.txt'
fe2db8bd27d224220630f1994c40803e
d9fd063c41a35d129b1b8ceb2a6f3a973fce96d1
describe
'8274' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUC' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
0e4000fd0ca542272df6895764d32b9c
265f259a75c6273861590a5a0508750e40ed4231
describe
'356787' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUD' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
2f4fda8fcb50fcd26a3da8c3ba57d263
575ff21c29e2a507dd7d6fc59ca4c7868e73910c
describe
'116579' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUE' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
ce61a6edc732dbe37407ea93b2bee131
a4370a0bfac3bf64ef513212b0c9ab1242869212
'2011-12-28T23:12:03-05:00'
describe
'34509' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUF' 'sip-files00074.pro'
b03d5c71690e9f815363ee97231617ae
050c8046efe8eb768bce6dc090d84cbfb3af0411
describe
'37011' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUG' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
6d173f5ff3a78879ad206da392d5111e
10cefdb881847384f695fde864214c1045860191
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUH' 'sip-files00074.tif'
95829fdfc9a3a225ecd5b54aa8d938ff
f15e51a6301a15fa993b0b244590c7d0f9c1b18f
'2011-12-28T23:12:44-05:00'
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUI' 'sip-files00074.txt'
fca7fb0b47510bc5b56f52ca2f00723e
d5a6fcc4b2177f4b87c756e7b5fa8e977c64e2ee
'2011-12-28T23:09:15-05:00'
describe
'9316' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUJ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
2c01ad35df48287538af8ee8218227db
9e3597f76d5522b33ea7109d4ac8de33aab90ab0
describe
'356834' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUK' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
055aee5d36608e3d9b4822cfa5478772
ff9601703c6f819d39c74e6410463615d8ea58be
describe
'88731' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUL' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
d732bca84270a11f74a29a96baae1dd6
75f0ed4b5961346e6875facf7a7df7ad432a8291
describe
'27403' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUM' 'sip-files00075.pro'
77b7d29ef08cc12fdddad6a907eac503
d794b8eab88711be605697cfc735f5fe405e00d7
'2011-12-28T23:14:03-05:00'
describe
'26095' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUN' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
87ccb5c612479bb5c86dab553e49afb9
6b0ec6f57220561550213ae0840a8a707e515744
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUO' 'sip-files00075.tif'
a1b47f7de4aa45affcd5e2c2b7e7c8c5
4bce7f18203858b90d458a26487b8533ca95b897
'2011-12-28T23:13:44-05:00'
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUP' 'sip-files00075.txt'
ee6f30d93ea33a86797d9fbbc8a62069
ebb79f4890f509e470d64e3285503945df784de0
describe
'6955' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUQ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
3ae69a975f444c9dae91f36cef2cfd84
19eadac1fb6da50a38c80330c8a70d13ec45518f
describe
'356866' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUR' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
d07aa75ef28c835130caca3b33a00234
97cf87e5049f19bc5ddfaeb682f0882250c6795b
'2011-12-28T23:13:24-05:00'
describe
'81688' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUS' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
4b5366a2858b13278074d9c21f157875
5af50d52647609cdb8083edfcd490e7aeed40dac
describe
'29412' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUT' 'sip-files00076.pro'
0434761ac779e40d07f9180e9f401627
3c831cd2260e6edd309e2861ffb010ea04c369e4
describe
'22497' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUU' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
c8481190460e098117e787da56ca1e60
1ffc6da86d97c8a0d847c6e615551a8a729adb72
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUV' 'sip-files00076.tif'
3e5a3f5b351bfad23412356a843656a9
5f17051df3e1facbaa4d8bcfd12a6813b8d7f4e2
'2011-12-28T23:12:11-05:00'
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUW' 'sip-files00076.txt'
aa7743ef5d90937c10a2bd0061613fc4
226c33b8b53ad13730847ce0ab2b71c851765df4
describe
'5781' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUX' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
88e94c7e37bcb6eb3ccc20156dbe4e12
f1fc2d6707c6a2c40dbb2c675e0b6c02ff51eafa
'2011-12-28T23:12:26-05:00'
describe
'356613' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUY' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
5d7c9a0bb7d100d567d1d00a68f315f2
61bb9ee7740239b36e7b06e53d4a9660f3ed5f45
describe
'72894' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPUZ' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
6e601be4ef673ef0f6e8d5658b090910
e9a76b9f0be781b0a169fe9322927461eb9ebf3e
describe
'21877' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVA' 'sip-files00077.pro'
63b944de559d67ada73091ed323bfa18
509612a1cd388a066a66460ccdd547a674134474
describe
'20138' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVB' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
9289d92730a0ee99ba5b2dfb98be65bd
e4457753a487e967b1e8d03b8832e1efa3e5bd07
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVC' 'sip-files00077.tif'
c462df0a0052297294ae4c40e3d225b6
8d468a22293600016549ae67c60453d6dd47b9e8
'2011-12-28T23:11:46-05:00'
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVD' 'sip-files00077.txt'
ade30ff89484fe5bdc665d3dec6fd718
a9103fd0b8bd3472bd0035ee7ae09b3821bbac42
'2011-12-28T23:09:06-05:00'
describe
'5255' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVE' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
a21b4b99a29b069c3b5f622fb28dabef
2d9bc5dabd9ce7d9a7893f9690590f2d19faf853
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVF' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
c8d10cce9509afd38d441dcf89158c71
b056978e6191874257685fffac3f599ea5ca9aa1
describe
'114020' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVG' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
2d950be859aab9a5b13c649c1ea1f5c8
33d7fb0353b2dd0c04670a4fdbcb9489cc5d9ea7
describe
'26021' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVH' 'sip-files00078.pro'
02a514b9f7021a6b539621a9d7d4e22b
e291f9bd1e773007400407f7cea7c39686cad6fb
describe
'33721' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVI' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
db6f15d41d73c0579b5a7cc719bf60d1
86ddd99c322c34dbb4a92caf11e4882cd8cb43aa
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVJ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
8ec75a0853901b599dc2a9405ba1fc28
94e080f6d83521c7e2de86f843b7bd9e53263b73
'2011-12-28T23:08:59-05:00'
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVK' 'sip-files00078.txt'
66c94fb8583a060626e4529451db6386
624deb3df20f2c14b584235d5bc3e54d08ceb0ae
describe
'8134' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVL' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
dd2eb933a484e2e2991fc09144c01420
0029bddf1de8133ac4a9673ac28ff9c7f0ee486b
describe
'356929' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVM' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
4e8207f587fce01b30986569db8d67b6
f4cd76c3bc6a06a9e432a158071955e791eaedf7
describe
'119389' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVN' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
d4294c1b59fb8f48c5236fad789f36b3
37b28abd9aa5609142ec9868d10c5ee07b4e0542
describe
'35133' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVO' 'sip-files00079.pro'
446bcfe582024e86c9a3286be1570144
3f201770e6ffff4102c68e5f5a4a53f12cde1368
describe
'36584' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVP' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
64357f6f0496d2013c8c19936c33fb78
00712756ad4d39ec51a153ebde52dc543bf25aaa
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVQ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
6ea02496d0aada0bee39ab8ee5075652
93f586d3b4957e819a4a5d5ef7a55db2a43d22fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVR' 'sip-files00079.txt'
576c10064a4296d7827e978d8f52b91f
e475bacf9f22e0d464646fa5925da5000f52de79
describe
'8701' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVS' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
46f1341c18daad0c7ad76e531a0172bc
33f1f797fee519e9fd3015133e71f672a364b132
describe
'356870' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVT' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
477cca1d130d659d8eeecf5a56b95218
45e9068f1c5a80604126294b6d8820fcc8cbb357
describe
'106656' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVU' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
c35d68f0699ee20b25935236a128568f
0b4d9e69a1207c4e5dd53267df22f5b00e042e30
describe
'32110' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVV' 'sip-files00080.pro'
9c6b2ee4e7837b5cf2f4839f03f9fc08
56631e4eb14ef56036380bdf33ab45770c77f91d
describe
'32909' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVW' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
72c913ca6dd5e3f4d0edcd66d4458071
1c5620c20e7d63f451b40520b3376f33cdb349a4
'2011-12-28T23:12:56-05:00'
describe
'2872580' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVX' 'sip-files00080.tif'
8f634f92b493b11c79efb09463e2522c
35f9434ede9ae346ad628211e26f88e73c8c8e29
'2011-12-28T23:11:59-05:00'
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVY' 'sip-files00080.txt'
e21ce72ad0c2b998c08ff7cb7ed8c6c1
dd25e7567622b3373488651f5ef64cbfae6b2223
'2011-12-28T23:14:08-05:00'
describe
'8068' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPVZ' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
6de4abcbcbeee322365cfd8f7fa4abd6
2092b6cc60956ac55e1f4a6009e4c52876deabae
'2011-12-28T23:13:11-05:00'
describe
'356928' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWA' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
783fe4a1a01c2c741e851fd2c20e64f0
bc0c5d090bc758e405f3dba008035f73b0518e45
describe
'117114' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWB' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
62cf840fd9cc33fa5f02770043df4f54
fc6c420bda46ebabe4b2e655db15176d1d444b3c
describe
'36263' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWC' 'sip-files00081.pro'
e7c3d6715652f3cc1f56e34bd0ad2aa8
b23c04348554bd920d550f60d58f838d0bea5ec8
describe
'36775' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWD' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
1e50956df60fb7f9947ac69f4e3384af
d3c3b476ef3f4549750ac3fd18ac1b77e8f18d89
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWE' 'sip-files00081.tif'
b02c7a28ce65e11a399afde5bd53d65e
3cf83d6dc43a80d305a7fa2cb6efa4e15456e727
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWF' 'sip-files00081.txt'
011e260c8594c27ba372e9cd7d28ec36
2b12b375400e17feb3f1354ffd0290f4cbfd92f6
describe
'8822' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWG' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
c80c650dfa4f13516c897cb66e126888
bccf985d009f609765a84d30d2d19f07d46c9930
'2011-12-28T23:10:45-05:00'
describe
'356841' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWH' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
3c59407fada5eebd0a419fafacee3ae6
33af11f72e2e9214b9c40d107b4f69b7a82029e8
describe
'116712' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWI' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
0f2a5e59102947f6be18c0c5a53b49da
a3931ca5a269b621485850c576148919c24a5396
describe
'34479' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWJ' 'sip-files00082.pro'
5dc0e4fe52a89ce6802772e2af5dc372
d13eb05c30c3dfec9a104830c75c69b1ed2c3d20
describe
'35925' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWK' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
3dc5131c9fa0b380f99fe04d3e53b47c
bbc66900e636b85c74d38bb99f0d118786b5ca7d
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWL' 'sip-files00082.tif'
12c47e6e290c7c0e9353e56f2bacf1b5
e820018d41c933905445cdd83d742982c32b915e
'2011-12-28T23:11:39-05:00'
describe
'1606' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWM' 'sip-files00082.txt'
4c9ed5966a6d655802dc92f01072d5e4
1a8dffa82327f24ff98af2774b937cc1b95c2ae6
'2011-12-28T23:08:51-05:00'
describe
'8860' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWN' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
38c2066d3fa4bce5f9b5f02b65859a46
0c78cdc63f1e56afcf4b67a4764b12083807f5ed
'2011-12-28T23:08:57-05:00'
describe
'356904' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWO' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
990cba88a158669f36ba235132128888
623f99739bf8590abc5b163efecee89ff0dac9d4
'2011-12-28T23:14:07-05:00'
describe
'115464' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWP' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
1196752060a2b7c90228d9568d6e53a2
d9c69ad390640aefed1728ab117bdf54c9d0fd43
describe
'34749' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWQ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
199753ef4c56e10e0141e91954a99d40
da654dfda15951c542097e777410d508235c4520
describe
'35910' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWR' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
209a7664ca2bbb13ba497fdcdbdb812a
b6d7a561c05fc20f53aae0fc88f9d08b5dfe029b
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWS' 'sip-files00083.tif'
86d3acc0d7c767f75cd81acba9220d7f
9a2f2cf5038ef55c16e9bbae9e8892da61f3a896
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWT' 'sip-files00083.txt'
42636d5f6d03a92f08fe5670e5e1daed
8830ed5a14e0236c8bffd0947e4d33fd04834086
describe
Invalid character
'8936' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWU' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
23d3f9fced01098c385b89d21d3034a1
d3fcd5f5215e337959850fe3dcd902fc02d0ed64
describe
'356970' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWV' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
1e6445a9e06742ea3d1915cdf7d795d2
36b6be2eca464b63c783f9ab038055bb7e06e137
describe
'104680' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWW' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
8168b52424994c80da240120e78ea935
575b99e58d453a160df252f45c35d1f2a156528b
describe
'31541' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWX' 'sip-files00084.pro'
9dfd223602e1a1154fbb31833c8e3a72
442e5ac15b4a43630be15866a48d62f8c6acf387
describe
'32486' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWY' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
16cf8142dabe3d3d94e01ed1287f8c50
dd9a3b700d1cf9524dab9519224a089ac711c252
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPWZ' 'sip-files00084.tif'
ac8da8a446d61bf221a6aec4912ca9f0
c6f8a7048e0fc5a32eed902832d08fb272c5b0ad
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXA' 'sip-files00084.txt'
be88d85cec85e3cd3d030789f6fd8959
a27d04722945e3b446a690ab6c13414ab6e87405
describe
'8191' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXB' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
3b39959ed5d3a431771a591f33ead347
3607f4075dfc7155217f3449d3cacb052654e2b1
describe
'356888' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXC' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
98d41149cf66203f82a0613468b16bfd
5597d6780e793dd39e666625ace1bd893c819cc3
describe
'97212' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXD' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
dde27b1d1b4eaa01712c7f0efbe5736d
e97b9c8f9b881c4d77712b6f0530aa2017040679
describe
'22011' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXE' 'sip-files00085.pro'
2adc666ef2258d4a1f4267dbff515901
f13772b6d795f90ed59579b8378397064a358c29
describe
'29002' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXF' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
05653e4f55298d5924493b6094b17f6b
d8013049b210883dee504ba824fb997fa5a487b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXG' 'sip-files00085.tif'
3ac7aed0f2d38d5cd1c87a4e00f8dfbd
ffe98cbcb45dbd8d9d145e5334eb03c3b3b79e79
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXH' 'sip-files00085.txt'
6b70bfe10cb4bf2b45e651d9a0da7a44
d34edb540e476df8ca2b831f0b600a8a87415c4f
'2011-12-28T23:13:28-05:00'
describe
'7345' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXI' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
76f4850f6b3638b58f0f2652e1410e77
db9f3affded7649875c97f0b9c51280a0b64dcf9
'2011-12-28T23:11:31-05:00'
describe
'356922' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXJ' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
fed6ab4de73a034e3fc0d2c2282af5ed
abadfdfcb24266b0a0c2a35e543a4438adcc6d24
describe
'116913' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXK' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
aa09d270a8feb87b664e23bb97353609
538ab79b86c7a8ac950c179e09cc21be061d8050
describe
'33519' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXL' 'sip-files00086.pro'
d5b7a32df2ba9b997f8f87412429eafd
4c7133c59709f44a4c6487a78bd2f950e071318b
describe
'35335' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXM' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
77ee731a564d4c4be9a6076d7eabb608
825fe5e86af39b5543ae1936d563e8173c451328
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXN' 'sip-files00086.tif'
940144976be3e0eb07cf3b1f03b59517
6bd33fd95a6f539a2722bea11b9b8fa4c5f7b71e
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXO' 'sip-files00086.txt'
c2bc2885a3cdefcc0030bf7a923dc09b
d4c147e68ef969c56e719e6dfe9b454207b43259
describe
'9013' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXP' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
89d9942b3221ab33c8dc1579298d1184
23f26eb503ddd68283c5e880c46ea9d434fec09d
'2011-12-28T23:12:29-05:00'
describe
'356805' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXQ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
5172fd18aa777dae3491d1427b9a1062
5a5af1e4aa3a031f3101b219db48fa5bb7ebb47d
describe
'127448' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXR' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
0413ddab0419356518a275d52aaafd4d
e220f15a9a83b3922f43cac589f0e31532adafd4
describe
'5593' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXS' 'sip-files00087.pro'
859ae3b44239a4f66f455d8aaecc5314
4a79805218bd1029e29e53accfc139e8800c0cde
describe
'34768' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXT' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
60033838899de5673228b73d203035dd
c4d50bb549cc4fa9a87e57575427afddf8b215af
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXU' 'sip-files00087.tif'
00fc3a7f517857e20aec5d6d1a01ad7d
95834af6c50cf30ea1efa4fed89bd23545024e84
describe
'404' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXV' 'sip-files00087.txt'
87ddf59ecd016a6abed62178e0a74af7
7e7ce5334986d403e7668de3fca26b8bbd593e8b
describe
'9181' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXW' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
4139658f6b502a8e0d1f69cd92a557c5
82b7acaea501f726cf6b8d2e9dd99a1305a5f66a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXX' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
dd760be887bdaa05504287c1801488c9
fd58db2c0decef1e1a7f3dde431eecce0c7fef97
describe
'19246' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXY' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
11f0b2b414ed4ba6a7c6d42a1e496c12
e46df49b66ebe4ee9473bb74532b298feb6c1a51
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPXZ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
ad80d6c1a10d4f7a4199ac3f4ae13232
0c73537f0d1e97fae1490661c70244d339a9c70f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYA' 'sip-files00088.tif'
f41ad66fb01d06afecaf23bc2e920595
ab928be577d291a13c04545abf9747ffcba66815
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYB' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
b1373f5357fb314f83f38959b7b74876
bb032cc2523000dc1c61caa5b6d60b8511660154
describe
'356930' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYC' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
1b42742084ac0a3a45dc7cf94baf8e50
d6cd7629939b82acabee6dfdf85754ae6003931a
describe
'112766' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYD' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
69332fb299c185c8688377a9a949f16a
b3f3814a0d694b26b88c366519b49b13bdcf80ee
describe
'33709' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYE' 'sip-files00089.pro'
02e2b322fe2708efc9af47f89ec700aa
6be12ff864d4e13c93993658a4362e0658da44d1
describe
'35802' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYF' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
726e3d659204298933fc7d5ebce6ca69
50269e0c8f521477ceb72da872ec98ce04d8239b
'2011-12-28T23:13:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYG' 'sip-files00089.tif'
5e91977ab3bfe949bec93be750b8a179
1ff379de1e99ac6e8f82a83cad83a745da1aedbb
'2011-12-28T23:13:23-05:00'
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYH' 'sip-files00089.txt'
27e99e83868f1b51d3fd28704c4c5d38
9d6cfc038ef4d8937485268d5f2fbae5b49c192b
'2011-12-28T23:12:57-05:00'
describe
'8669' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYI' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
a680cf83dfd3158dc5bbb081bb73fe35
4397eb3dd457f7adc3d7097c93b78160a02bb9c7
describe
'356848' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYJ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
e082210ad8c0c0c3a617e69cf13566e2
d2cd5a947ccd4236851dec1a7d839cc77ec9f283
describe
'113417' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYK' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
fbff1cef64042b6cbe11856f99f7987d
01f381abbaea2cabbd67b818de852f0a28d3d98e
describe
'33090' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYL' 'sip-files00090.pro'
3b5a6fb726eaa2af37337aaf4713ee10
40144b6c019efbb0c6a8a961dae1953326780ec7
describe
'34750' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYM' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
d7aa1841c59d26dd215fad38fba22e75
53cf149d2bce49da5e5f537d789c1c4c69de8724
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYN' 'sip-files00090.tif'
c9281289ede422dc5bf526eddf7e0b1c
5e60464cfe7766ebbea8ea85f67e91bc5df71335
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYO' 'sip-files00090.txt'
625573c5d012e8495fb789c237d35c7d
2b58cf1c5ccaafb49e3e5c378982363c3f6a8482
describe
'8511' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYP' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
eaa4c66181baec70c5a9b80cd2467afe
1fa7b0c4d4501330e70c46283eedec283101bcb3
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYQ' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
9466ae1ffdaff0f3c98cd9c60300612a
9fc59b7c00ddf1a2ad3956652b9b10da22d2d61b
'2011-12-28T23:11:42-05:00'
describe
'111703' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYR' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
4af76b21806efe164804353eed041641
3d47cc7a5bcfc507ddcbf842dd099df28fbf902f
describe
'32856' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYS' 'sip-files00091.pro'
5cef141b6d28f2f2b148aa601edf80f3
53df5f7ff673b22e37c8b33fb7bc2ccbd3005694
describe
'35028' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYT' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
87e5eca2d095f46775e3ae53c68c3ff3
684845c392e7307fe0b1699038333faba4c29d92
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYU' 'sip-files00091.tif'
35c60bdeb447f65f135df7a4db91d97d
c1a94134ee9cfc70cf417d472445a42b56699793
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYV' 'sip-files00091.txt'
5e46f23bc4729b7a5c4cb81fe2129717
04051810f56d154ae116c88892558137ac3a1d02
describe
'8532' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYW' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
07e2c04cc06f51d293d6021a68e9c2b7
59092ce7d04e8fccb46d448b0eac3af522e8521c
describe
'356846' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYX' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
4c3e6ad0899de9b5a40aa08e865b946e
9c18156e47be1bb640f7e0f8d9812bdf0f6ab686
describe
'116932' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYY' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
faaa91b548efaba079de026c73680e60
d13cdea8e83f14fe06642393bd97f27c1595edc3
describe
'34877' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPYZ' 'sip-files00092.pro'
d3bf52c318e0792af3927b5a12348d05
aea23e16515a5e8cb43f7d51b70021f7feda180d
describe
'35445' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZA' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
03ea332c902075209c387823c68ff891
e409135dcc1f927e2d1d0b7fc0cccdd5f30b2290
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZB' 'sip-files00092.tif'
735eb5ab271ba1ecc71861d8c16e0ec0
e9df0f73891ecb8a468822159357d5fc92cb7ec0
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZC' 'sip-files00092.txt'
601a86e79a24a7c9a3c9a84094825e57
aada8e341311d67710acaadc48c4f5c36cf68cd2
describe
'8898' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZD' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
9d6cc6f147be141b3e4814051054f6de
ce3502b30dc1522d928d9157bf52fc646ae0afef
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZE' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
b44766398349fc34b26120c66f1ec595
9e3ce3712bb6b15f04e743abbe038980e52dfa5c
describe
'108773' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZF' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
517cb3afdb61b6a7d1442e03b3ddbadc
58089a53ce0ed5857ab64c0bf5981e5956d3d0e9
describe
'31689' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZG' 'sip-files00093.pro'
06a30743558dcec4a876a1744124140b
ce1253be062ce3b35ff4eaf94549b90198f1cb15
describe
'34319' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZH' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
e21a2f3478661853e2c3a62766163fe5
5c05dd9cc8a6060474363acbdf91f88a2302b5fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZI' 'sip-files00093.tif'
248fe873bfa74156ee5aae373eec7a9d
03082e26ab337588e08309f9120f4af234919292
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZJ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
c32c2500bc6213a3e7bb5e0fccbb64bf
e56ad28aab88a580a51e9b9e09e1ad72ce920ab2
'2011-12-28T23:10:03-05:00'
describe
'8049' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZK' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
40cd5a8eee4256c99c3671c1b38ea53d
d306a14e40a2d95d016c39d0677a7b48c84d7ee6
describe
'356914' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZL' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
c4532917aa5409a2feb823d977baa889
c68ace7eeb9c6ea11aa94717c96ac9d036b2c07e
'2011-12-28T23:10:05-05:00'
describe
'101048' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZM' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
6566a532c170e97fce4fa4f6ff0a4193
3642bbf627a24208e27621ab59861a0b561199f0
describe
'22826' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZN' 'sip-files00094.pro'
15cd8ce3f46b247c488e196154a42ead
b7f607e7738c8d718c7852055434059bff6eb9d8
describe
'29881' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZO' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
81d8556cafebc8bd49acc543a9dd9b1e
b5580609fc9d19b22cb72335522118eaa5816596
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZP' 'sip-files00094.tif'
0d28efacb1bbb23e6b5d258b158d7304
31b51f52890d12a74f9e1f706051ceff4c237c67
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZQ' 'sip-files00094.txt'
5c40ad4158f06c48c79f2e59010cdb0b
dfc1e371b29a9f053ad966608876d782119f5557
'2011-12-28T23:13:22-05:00'
describe
'7460' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZR' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
97082425471d7b1e5af4251eb34f1c74
552d23f3adbb6cc18f672acee020461b985eb1cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZS' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
3fdc100f99429f373b1846344b79260e
a3ac053513e13bb4f783756f13054dd7986ecb96
describe
'117032' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZT' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
669e419ae179c704a519004656984c46
f97ac3a840d606bf628de9311da100b2c9eef475
describe
'34475' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZU' 'sip-files00095.pro'
30c96fc2cdd1482104b18d5416d26ea4
8c99ec5fbc71931c881c4e73b89fb34ed8f81226
describe
'36779' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZV' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
23b6e713fd7a54fda374011bb0cd2207
7a0f14a2d5f0d426a92d0ca2b7b7a2575b4eebe1
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZW' 'sip-files00095.tif'
bf6da588bdb9e3b3fc4e67149dcd42a0
bba31a879d5c187c59498d9874a4341701683a6b
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZX' 'sip-files00095.txt'
ea7100a59552ce97d0e9fd8d386779ae
14316f9f80d75dfaee623bd78ff711bc9868c1e2
describe
'8957' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZY' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
5d5c5580bb06e26ed9783bdf5ad7a190
38fc53bc45aa932aa704604adfb4495d986085bf
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABPZZ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
6a6ec0118550eb494c6488edd9760d20
89ce6e1d26595122d852cbe00e1fbd3e361e9f99
'2011-12-28T23:11:18-05:00'
describe
'115767' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAA' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
288d4705446df41aa584740fd74d4ce5
bb609a3c7cbf9abfcb8009c1946a30f4544fde74
describe
'35930' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAB' 'sip-files00096.pro'
56bdc587efaab4be8efe80860dd1d6e7
42cbb0055b665872e384c9a61985ecff631950d1
describe
'35934' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAC' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
ffa36010ce60adbd7f73a490da28fb2a
25aa9f955593c8334cb94f7c3c4e80fc82f2695c
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAD' 'sip-files00096.tif'
b252257c97e2128a2712f50dce9384e1
8e41daf1537c855d6a578f4a362c37cb7ee18ae3
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAE' 'sip-files00096.txt'
4525138727d494afe00c37b6cab36ed6
e22162f38832006c5a6cfbbe8e9fe228ebcb8699
'2011-12-28T23:12:16-05:00'
describe
'8548' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAF' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
23388cf99c2b337171f3bd5866eea8ee
9e545a93e195cf0afb9c057d1a90437d8e9304a5
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAG' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
1bb7651924f0cbf6774bc1e0ba44325c
ecfa4bd8f51f470b39ebaea9ec2cd1f875de28b3
describe
'118748' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAH' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
3b17ea3f6d611f864f32a7e74af49d8b
f2c4757041036fe5176cc81fb65a7afbe44dd844
'2011-12-28T23:12:48-05:00'
describe
'35664' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAI' 'sip-files00097.pro'
dd012ee297ef49fc348bfa016fbd6f14
bf3bb3b54b3392450acdd2896a93eb5017683621
'2011-12-28T23:11:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAJ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
d3a8d050cf5f472c71c0562954109415
62413a78f285ddfca3a3de2e994e401caa75812c
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAK' 'sip-files00097.tif'
0337b4fba99f28520a104e8ea5859bb7
bff31c6db89f8409e0aa153aa68447ab39967bd9
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAL' 'sip-files00097.txt'
b04f47790557605e0f90580c39caff0d
a905f473e84805f1bceb9846fb48e5c6a91181c9
describe
'8943' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAM' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
1449864d27118ee39b764120a144512c
464ac6e45194222d8c1591e8c4b36efc108fd37b
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAN' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
b55de0b87720b139e1590a53e119060e
f04905cb02b2aeba836e053528e2825f2a9e4a11
describe
'123955' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAO' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
44d2fae7d47e2132836ef70c492d9e5a
ca60714b88fd093382e6d3ad6c362ce13cffc793
describe
'36675' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAP' 'sip-files00098.pro'
1ba92ba30e98947d4684c8c60b17d472
7976eccba8ac56816acdbf6e316d216f93beee84
describe
'38168' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAQ' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
41b990803662afc09cca7800a1c5e28a
ab222bee3e22b2c7d2503c97791bf09d164ec3e9
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAR' 'sip-files00098.tif'
defbce8360b44ba4a0a0066bca085949
b9c87fb6ad9304fa819f3aff8b2410bf329d3e2d
'2011-12-28T23:09:36-05:00'
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAS' 'sip-files00098.txt'
84a00505a2ddb93bf467b9289effad70
ac13e44171ef5e1471d33520a73aa969b8ebb3e2
'2011-12-28T23:11:20-05:00'
describe
'9258' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAT' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
6c090cbef0330ad3814cc19528080de2
f44efe7832123f0a53496dba219edb700dbfb252
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAU' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
7e7812b47039e6b967510dcebda4bee8
048d2fb6a6289539e1461b0c781edd17c03b0105
describe
'67511' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAV' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
43bf43b89546d791719957c475f8c78e
012420891c3c6bccc55b73c3610cbf2b1987b59b
describe
'16794' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAW' 'sip-files00099.pro'
891443d4d7e3fb40447724fa4569389c
a927d5c956a6e7a123c8fe6b584684a4738d1d21
describe
'19333' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAX' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
111fad150e74fa3154fd79a0c598a9c7
c771a11044ea9c36eda96e479ff37bc65a11299c
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAY' 'sip-files00099.tif'
32b9b9efa5967a9ba2251e8aef78d6b3
551b768d3ffec2d696c7f0de817d668ea9d5e671
describe
'762' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQAZ' 'sip-files00099.txt'
d9e90dac129184de16b2a0654f7841a1
fd9621c263bdca52af95c8d0cfee95bfd1fe9e6a
describe
'5162' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBA' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
09d7006505e29c7c01aec989b0850b4f
c667d2f86e50ab93f473c6edd832f9c2400d9eba
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBB' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
9f247416e13ebd3a0960d3acd6b29a33
4c73c15973bfaeb7e5d0d15528908fd324169961
describe
'96074' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBC' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
9dcb529b13954b6c72c5b544fa32ce72
b33f25789d5526eb2bf919834a589206893d4d3e
describe
'21165' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBD' 'sip-files00100.pro'
df0edc3ffeaab8bc4fb4a4573ffe343a
7bad839617cd16b48928e6d5ba90aadbd0b308dd
describe
'27933' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBE' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
fe0daf2ba3849c65901938f4923a4d59
7e370f7abc00a99711a2b3b0cdd21c133a9b5556
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBF' 'sip-files00100.tif'
f5540345c96fda62ebe1f5cec0376ec5
4eca93d1c75fe322b645ed1808edabb2a6425754
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBG' 'sip-files00100.txt'
b6df199263b88d3849598cdc9dca5409
0f2b3b7374e6d98412c1bc4595ce32fc62f5ba0a
describe
'7165' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBH' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
6e0bbdb3e3eb8518f9e719aba4c3a2de
8f486fa8fe339ab149d22c4e908436815c867b7d
describe
'356911' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBI' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
5f51686e370eeeadeef1e8a36503c978
fbc2773cefffdd595ea481deea449d3631a3258b
describe
'112386' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBJ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
64e256022a89f29bacc1a46c2e98c69e
fffb6679d9f4dfc732433e038cb6d9f64bc11fb6
describe
'33765' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBK' 'sip-files00101.pro'
b2044b49ff591c02fa16162ac4414bf7
e4c85b9e66799c8502944c12addf1e3533cd3fb8
describe
'34519' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBL' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
01adf426be7816d1c7623f1e35088443
05144c26b699eecce011945f8f685871bb8eb44d
'2011-12-28T23:11:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBM' 'sip-files00101.tif'
bc64b484cebc220d6718fad80dce9f7a
a31eca60b33f13787cf44c84716a4797a0e06d72
'2011-12-28T23:11:25-05:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBN' 'sip-files00101.txt'
c2989c6555e54a7f9715719487ab5d2a
9a98f4c9789eb177813fa7693f3956b1814268a6
describe
'8785' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBO' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
ebb5f85361327d57484276520d98aa60
e476e08adb1fe682137601ec67dcf7cce6fc4dd2
describe
'356828' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBP' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
d9556639c2270f248e9c28c7edf4d104
be1aa6e0b12ede2af48df89d2311a2a2b6a3fee3
describe
'116926' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBQ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
defead5b0a9e9bf2eda43c7a35bc0242
c65138cac135f8be4ed3e5c97919852ad7808f9d
describe
'33272' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBR' 'sip-files00102.pro'
179576e5bb7b23bd1673f750c4a9ce55
9e75efe4d302fc9585aeb78dbb9ae6477797342d
describe
'34979' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBS' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
f269b37e563361dcd859e137e086b749
848a582e6c2c21c18bd5553087af8ce6aa467367
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBT' 'sip-files00102.tif'
e2dc638cf9a6cae704ac2ce977c9f17a
a31161af3ecb5b4e61fa0a94f8469477a9100e67
'2011-12-28T23:13:20-05:00'
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBU' 'sip-files00102.txt'
382ee0d8c546236a204c15ed3f3eedab
2e4cf7354421e2e0e3b67729f44dc754fcef3461
describe
'8602' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBV' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
55cc29937ae50067b922ce233288846f
55e96d6c59afdc4678e32149da0a1e95f5cd74bd
describe
'356877' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBW' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
687e4bb0ddb93bf8b255240a56c19db9
b1b43a700104a55ab1dc2d158011ae075b65ab4c
'2011-12-28T23:08:31-05:00'
describe
'115937' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBX' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
696f884f04ffb0fdc338f1d71a3a19c7
2e4a2e39852f915c60ebf2faf6c115ab7541103e
describe
'33864' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBY' 'sip-files00103.pro'
00fc8bcdfd312bd01495e23abee02549
82ece20c13ac38047e8fafdd4bcc1a64f2536156
describe
'36395' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQBZ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
314c217d80dc331f67d171fb6a4b0b90
bd453fa044f72292c361fbe3193862f24706585a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCA' 'sip-files00103.tif'
464c2f367d509dfc6223f2550b870f95
095dfd51ef4a37efdd5730cc9490c5d39585cd34
'2011-12-28T23:13:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCB' 'sip-files00103.txt'
161f16c86660963a114a59e08aada68b
d376e8f0bc100ce8bff34965bfe9869a13204115
describe
'8977' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCC' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
36fa71322be47fea90fb5a1ec4955fbd
359e887bbb01465b9fad15e21012756f8e1fe91a
describe
'356849' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCD' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
e2b4d51e392e97442a5005b12f0b9243
2e52bfcbf781b4354de423f2518b5f4f4e572d63
describe
'114829' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCE' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
e9cd3a6067aefa2f4360eef089de7c9b
a417a0be7b22e86da4711d5c2e2dde1c0ffde5cb
describe
'34124' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCF' 'sip-files00104.pro'
beeb04ec581816b8b4815f151922d1f8
63b1349873a54c029eab7129d5501b9e65ab54b5
describe
'35579' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCG' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
aef1ee97acded6e6215c8a41f8703807
7e1d63352a8be8ed80c1435d8a2460ceb4e194dd
'2011-12-28T23:11:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCH' 'sip-files00104.tif'
60bb29d9d6ccff5d01f3675e1822379e
3801ba96030dbf6d19210341580ac88f1deed216
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCI' 'sip-files00104.txt'
6a20c8329f61ce965159334215b92983
7bfc00ac19246bd47241349054dca25fc7970fe4
describe
'8754' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCJ' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
5e3dc7e5200eea310c9e93a165ea260b
34bc396a4b70508a7fdc403b321542c7bec9faea
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCK' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
ba569cc729873a6775a80a4121516076
dd91efc2905890ee899ea561176733c442f7eaf3
describe
'106800' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCL' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
8188b0e7e440ed16778e8a01daf5d958
6df8f759b42b92d6d74f6b4aff7e331bc9b3cf4c
describe
'30399' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCM' 'sip-files00105.pro'
62605e12ffb9b35566cc6bc5e1f355d2
6b5fb75cb24c6363ac13aae577a2d103b5f76194
describe
'33156' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCN' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
7f0254d09859d13c793dff6b6b142da1
eb7dd18d49f7f728d89d78ac9b2082aefc585fd0
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCO' 'sip-files00105.tif'
db3680812460fc460b61b12fe7b11b3b
222c00fb4f883a9877fd66011d68cab30528ea72
'2011-12-28T23:08:44-05:00'
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCP' 'sip-files00105.txt'
f0335c4071f157ec4ebfaa7bf48bfdd4
677e478b4a1a28901089ee1490766f47517c9137
describe
'7824' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCQ' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
5f3a9190022c2a5e1998c3436ef0f2ea
645a6fd62f1a9c0b4aa8295d690af9dbde083400
describe
'356951' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCR' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
056104195d90be1c2dcd7f9a6a959455
726610d9da14151ef6f20f969f0ccc989bdc7a2a
describe
'107058' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCS' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
179e6c8133f10df5c81acd81bd1354b1
47722739744d7ff7c9d55950e202ef8dced5b4a7
describe
'25422' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCT' 'sip-files00106.pro'
8780570161b87e42548b626304adef1c
4e99bb5fc3d7dfda19b9748903aa857445bb6084
describe
'31295' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCU' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
76a45cc1a80aa9e895d9e12b318d3648
3bbb0f82c83b3e71d582f92d3715d54179d40480
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCV' 'sip-files00106.tif'
dbbe1a12a731590a55a32eebf11c273a
228aee2d731da00dc0d2bcad7aaf9b00411390cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCW' 'sip-files00106.txt'
a090b74f7cb46e0bd82fb200c9b51e81
4cb4a759fbdc90b093ab8592fcd9dd62f9b0f720
describe
Invalid character
'7866' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCX' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
696aaaf9d858afc41b0a08bc67cbddf2
4aab3e5a1923e768de5ac50c1c1119597f85df1a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCY' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
e5f0f1c5b4471de2f5552a79e7c12693
dcdc470e216ecb3c08b30ec907339e6cfb140e75
describe
'114009' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQCZ' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
9fc387b136b30df78cf66975ade1340d
b1044106aac27471c7c75b03ac048a2111977c9e
describe
'33479' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDA' 'sip-files00107.pro'
470b49d5fb6564c25fe56d82d1564219
e565a19ae888fdadf742f756fb8d3a77e3ae5cae
describe
'34617' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDB' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
272309ffd607d8eeb0d0ac2b0b3e82a9
9fa10bb2b852e6d12ffdced15d52d298d6d3351c
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDC' 'sip-files00107.tif'
1a24338795f6d185c896706be882ed35
64603f43355a0a33f6375078b06ef51338c22e82
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDD' 'sip-files00107.txt'
1d105c8f5b4d300213a07446efe70a3d
39d19d4848ff406d98813e3fee98eac26231ef75
describe
'8798' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDE' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
54f0b484e45c14a1fa900b619ea74fab
7fa10c1835a95cc8a5103644d6347657db7d48e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDF' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
938dffc8e72134112dfba17f21fd5d27
cbad85770faf921a7290081a12ff7c582c07ea2e
describe
'117822' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDG' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
20d4b86fc5e255d04698fbabe60a9640
4ee3f5306a83dfe2eb491f0fbe900627a4046582
describe
'34484' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDH' 'sip-files00108.pro'
dfdcd61e2f66ee9504e2afaa2ecf50ed
cca63d5c5b45aede8a0683366a80ea2d9b9d90cc
describe
'36384' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDI' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
db06ff4a44bf37ca299658483b7a6baa
980f0beca421b6331dd9f5bd763d0cf3d41ccbb3
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDJ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
be10a89c95a579e96a6c2801e1e479df
5ba0a8795023773bb2f1f4b42b54c2d98b266eeb
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDK' 'sip-files00108.txt'
406ae98ce5564c0f6b58ee2b1af4781a
d5e81300802f70f5619568b8819b8f4d69cfcbbe
describe
'9010' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDL' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
c43897ee681be3e5e7b018d2f3392658
e5d874d4dabf4028fb08cb42774747ee70a76ef0
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDM' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
148a810a664d66b81980ec5adc2bb81a
1dbc25dc494c0433a09afab1c6a2230c8dc0e832
describe
'113622' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDN' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
cd9385410de2a449e946552e39fa0bab
9ea1f123ab85471ed14d5a0322a665db155ba7dc
describe
'33630' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDO' 'sip-files00109.pro'
6567e53af0faad2c91315c1275e6b293
6bbb6fcc9165f7b3bc909caa3e2e99b5eba62cf3
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDP' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
da4f9712d1d3deb0697cd7be2ee711a7
dad5266adfd6ef5757f98f9f085d5439f20d068b
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDQ' 'sip-files00109.tif'
f38adc0cc4a897afe26d05f0bf45bea8
e574915eafa069912b44742dfa13d721ab08a625
'2011-12-28T23:12:17-05:00'
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDR' 'sip-files00109.txt'
e95e269348dbc5238db6dc12cfb3e6fb
3b6fbe0ce75f01614de0d9a9ee7e5d50e945fdf7
describe
'8789' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDS' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
74068d529db3a41b84b60123203eb071
f4ddfc449f8098c3c7938a5a195b5faf77af25e8
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDT' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
880ba1882a920ae80ed24c075320f94c
3585a23190202b807ca0c7a91e897896eef9c8f6
describe
'120604' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDU' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
ee4c5c11f46a7f38a6baf9ec3b5f41ea
acc12b99172cf5a49e2167eb6c0311078101e7e3
describe
'35339' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDV' 'sip-files00110.pro'
dbbcf35053265353d451d724c48171b3
6cf7fd976ad8fa6affc6e6e87e84502de5612e69
describe
'37091' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDW' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
a163bef906e20f5f1a34e00cd489cd7f
35f0b6eaa16e28ef31925fa39fbacb582af2cfb2
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDX' 'sip-files00110.tif'
763e3d2d1e68e77bfee327fbfa03f006
9f477484ea734ed2fe778d7ff6ebae215602fda9
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDY' 'sip-files00110.txt'
70655f2365727178940f2f8dc72a46e8
ad0ad0282c83028b03d0a7c78755a726058d9cab
describe
'9250' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQDZ' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
37cfe7ab3035ed6e13c2b2bb87ee42a1
aca44a2c7b8c10794288fb1c87affdc9360dd0ae
'2011-12-28T23:14:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEA' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
adc5345e52e3b9a3ac86886ecc6231c1
8791f3b5a7aa2200b8238b9a398b4324cd667028
'2011-12-28T23:11:04-05:00'
describe
'123857' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEB' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
845d21ddf16a017aa7b295781ef48200
d360fc8350b4bad691063b7fb556a3fd9ea2dfdd
describe
'36628' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEC' 'sip-files00111.pro'
55cfea045a1459af8caac832e741d8b1
a492913d6fb9e00acf281d4e9dc931f47a11a8f3
describe
'38167' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQED' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
3f2811e95598c5cdd4fc0adbcdc0ba11
ca6de1854db3fb57a24ba6ccd366939f18031bfe
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEE' 'sip-files00111.tif'
0e4c97ed5f092fda0eadcf5442b8b141
dd163268b2f084a3ae9ab4b3573b1e951a643813
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEF' 'sip-files00111.txt'
2e77eec2b0a72e45f49af1d1c63cc7c6
95a59d69e10c8cd65d1665f3906858410b4ccd73
describe
'9097' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEG' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
44c7a7c56038008282fb793241c50da8
4e8d3b08a48ccbf39cd7f5d5eb0e556607eae791
describe
'356962' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEH' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
d3bad956ab2ca9979681b17bd07add93
45bf22cdd0e9a1f106c6b77a8bc353b91a872f5f
'2011-12-28T23:13:48-05:00'
describe
'115283' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEI' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
7ce90faccbe57dcd9e95a9855422171d
3f890a33b4e3b9d77f80d99b4532441d095044b3
describe
'33002' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEJ' 'sip-files00112.pro'
a1505fc494b8648ab5dd9a3aaf95221f
5e06cfe2e062be4615658a2744533dc5050b5444
describe
'35517' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEK' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
98e647b3e75db4b3d2ead455fe895bab
72125a63f5c5b9694f86be562d8954fdef27016e
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEL' 'sip-files00112.tif'
2bd11093f027832ef7a318f67172af14
8c40d7460136492e55f623cd9ba8575587b369de
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEM' 'sip-files00112.txt'
fcdfd958539d69b1a0d6a02bddfe32e6
a43de87f068fd8458edd781f151895a58b5b3993
'2011-12-28T23:12:24-05:00'
describe
'8805' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEN' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
7c3fe95049cc2ed609fc0bca54d11f4a
cdb59297f9a337cd9fe42237ef448455d77f3b10
'2011-12-28T23:11:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEO' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
1bd20722fefcd1418157120438d2c775
248267cda496d60fc117c1f700bf5ea077c7a03d
describe
'97994' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEP' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
ea080aad770c016751e419d4dd244ff7
455d966d11e64a336e9f962e72c470896f90e149
describe
'20295' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEQ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
b2ecabce7f3a55d1b972cb281191baa0
8d89b0fe4243acb3cfa349f4facec38319b7a2ae
describe
'29010' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQER' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
fef7719b24a0f464abcabf262ffccc10
cdbc2b0247972712bc00f523f8a08b046fbe94a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQES' 'sip-files00113.tif'
0efffa857b76ab2ee998fe95f5c7fcdb
037f360f112a91854df2e4508eb4efdbf62dfafd
describe
'920' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQET' 'sip-files00113.txt'
ba96de3ada3c6b11c11f60401bb9cb5c
7f7b68e94086145340c12195c9654adbbafadfa9
describe
'7291' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEU' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
53c1d6ad6f56b8f90115c7e6ffb7c622
705a240c24d520d36cd9a8dec0b062fb6275b87f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEV' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
40cf897440af93abed73cbacbad363b7
fab261b7e81c5b850767479297c6173f1659187f
describe
'113710' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEW' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
2d862cfc18618b6ffa97f8e027dae2ed
d198334ec5de25f7c1f6b19b7b8dcdd3d68e208b
describe
'32726' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEX' 'sip-files00114.pro'
7898d3529a1812d21694176359760962
cb24aaf3e54076278de6218a68a8a0594892bf16
describe
'34847' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEY' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
9005fbce46d83d0e7174d62d1765470c
0eb501026ab0e465061f0ee40fdc10d2367af30a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQEZ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
3a68d92b389491120eeef7c69a3e2fa7
10c560d6c8667c5aedc4b298ba6ea718dd8afd75
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFA' 'sip-files00114.txt'
bc024d7f8a180f2893f624f7c518cc47
5e14a2bf31bb2908d599062788b2783e545bfb02
describe
'8576' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFB' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
aeb8544a2ff6cd7a2a267899805fd8d7
7f7865dda71de5c55907d882bf4afc811413a4e6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFC' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
ceb9ddac9b0e5dab992335b1dc42d72b
e583d941384a17ecbff2b56112cb6ab51f446b3f
describe
'119696' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFD' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
5f88aa875d3b8f76e75ffa523d4e2ca3
62efa6f13f8b05e9cf76a76a724a55f590a5bdcc
describe
'34438' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFE' 'sip-files00115.pro'
54f7c01fd87fd1194baeb10e6cc9f344
87538f2412ff3e09f340fee251437f5f40db7fb5
describe
'37683' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFF' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
9dceab6cb4f0709dab72dee1c59fbc2c
4e112279d723ca9fecccdba3c9633a596819c80c
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFG' 'sip-files00115.tif'
e8b8a12eb020564b79a021c7dd728226
921aa30943966b985a52450c51f7916c92fc5547
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFH' 'sip-files00115.txt'
b52bf2faa3b9aab70a8377e13d6b7e74
3462b067a2815c3bfd6447654ee520ec067f1f10
describe
'8951' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFI' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
4e54eab669b9f8a19561fdf3e4f77ee5
6d0c4a6d67915272b65f756d71d1f7606bafa0c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFJ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
2ac81d79af7759f4ec6b04f54d5f892e
2626f1de6bdea651dcb7dedcd408cfa924405e8c
describe
'111125' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFK' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
722769b2d88802db1f70de1c391ba3f5
e2e49fa48e975a1bf08f2a0b41e8965287e44b9c
describe
'32520' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFL' 'sip-files00116.pro'
ba1c7ada5dc23737d68fffe171a4dde4
eea7444837c064fbf8f260994fca685058c018b2
describe
'34134' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFM' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
01ff4de07c1bd4d4b47785b45695e535
25e95a6b343eba6066066d9ffd6125c24e72e21a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFN' 'sip-files00116.tif'
ff45e52e5a8b3eff7c9508a953390e9a
0161750ea1f6bcd6c5cc1325a648fb23b4a1fc61
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFO' 'sip-files00116.txt'
e653da7b910d7fa098a3238cf2880bd8
0cc36e328169706f412139399d2363e34355d7ba
describe
'8601' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFP' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
b350242a42b247ef1788f7912e9054d9
1750cc280f3836b8f81a9228256bb6785652ff12
describe
'356880' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFQ' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
bd810465aab4fecc2cd6b94fa4679e32
d39c61ecfbca7490c490d039e627f2baa811fa2c
describe
'112139' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFR' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
d29898cad402fa0cc92b069a123ecab7
b986c8447821b153a6a23e55a1e4f01beea54db3
describe
'33262' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFS' 'sip-files00117.pro'
70b711f56a0871efa0d802f78fa9e311
362022a4c44321990ae03f053bcb25cac222b9f6
describe
'34300' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFT' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
ab6890ab550ebf6fb05c91b73ef28c6c
c488a2ed87eda5b002c796a0123aab30d612efd5
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFU' 'sip-files00117.tif'
76bec6fd69e8e34454c7b82b16fb6955
06e70ca69a3b0967b3b8b81ffcd5b41b2ea3e116
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFV' 'sip-files00117.txt'
5646cac40af6d67843e36aa8c1ece55f
9936006e3700707f9cc8e9863b609a92c7417313
'2011-12-28T23:12:08-05:00'
describe
'8599' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFW' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
82d9a49caab36121789bfb8564aa55fb
f52e5b36f4206170a60c3f260515fa7a59ca874f
describe
'356896' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFX' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
105e83e3d67477bf4d5728a3cd169121
286e05a4ef6c99df622bdb26d3e0fbf1020b13de
describe
'103554' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFY' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
a7ced5094d00f2fc64506a3bcb8af23e
69752e241e60a2a2bd668f212aa79d2bc3997f4f
describe
'29642' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQFZ' 'sip-files00118.pro'
7c7495bb7bd1ec8411bd5f5b55e60f5f
eaab6f776eede47f253cc42f438b314df76a1260
describe
'31334' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGA' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
da4f80bb54a627a22d946d25922990cf
14303a0d5d14ca09af7a1899b452d96678999dbc
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGB' 'sip-files00118.tif'
c0916005b19c18ca0cdf5f967c6397e7
a09e8f9b7a53d956c7ccdf42f676df9e882c693f
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGC' 'sip-files00118.txt'
318d175aaf17ac094551e93b5a25e25a
8e491a460a34ec7be8015efc79a9679cd3c0edc6
describe
'8136' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGD' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
f6c2d2f605874324b3365882907c67d2
af6ea5d054206888c100defcc5194dee03f6a57f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGE' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
6bfc8a168f8d88e777a0706ee3d99e46
b759ad480967d4378ebd5a193aa12847097eb4f2
describe
'104413' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGF' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
663a7bcb84e1095a42b88b0418d56229
a4535eb7f2e5e5bb1c4ecbd5d075fd11d2918c05
describe
'29856' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGG' 'sip-files00119.pro'
21a935490e1ad57abcf87a294689411c
7ac4b5767f1232dc8a7fed994797565a6c58a10c
describe
'32941' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGH' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
4c740c8551e47d42f11933c175a028b8
ad0542f6eaef59ee08330eadeaa48062a5198083
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGI' 'sip-files00119.tif'
f03e849f66f4a31d04c015b8e4f996f6
d60575ce606a61ea96cb35944ccbde8d42b251f3
'2011-12-28T23:13:16-05:00'
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGJ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
a3b706fa894917c7cc988d14b04130a2
aa773f4a9615823bdb0d69ee96284ef6356ea379
describe
'8205' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGK' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
c7e34c7aaafc219a9c2a408e4f4e452d
c7e8abc762fe04ab948b4376a8cffb9fa942fc1a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGL' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
5eff6ec07ed97055939946ecfcf55444
f94762fba50c9d0fc9261371475683246447cdee
describe
'106027' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGM' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
53ebeb9267e76f59c906356ed1aa6c54
22690b4ca58c7dd228e3d8bbc31fa766ea64e3a1
describe
'30187' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGN' 'sip-files00120.pro'
e12674bc875c7a29a6e140ba8d37de6b
025e9b30eccb2241cd60437f6620b7217dadf7e1
describe
'32552' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGO' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
ce929cbd7827fc3c65f5dd014de70ca6
02692ea30b85c82c42f1397104268fa57f92468d
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGP' 'sip-files00120.tif'
b305d51a57cc861d698907d9be28b22d
2b145dc0a65a4d847fa916c6c1b30d1d2980d149
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGQ' 'sip-files00120.txt'
cd8a50b378df8b55629c3263a5779cbb
453cec341cb38e8c24c25e7a25f353f162854b42
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGR' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
d92b861deff1c71129ea44fc252aea9a
e722ff45896c24469be1e93a4aad10fc581ed9e5
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGS' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
ae9d056a14f7d229edd5b513d4c27121
f5532b25289b54726c2746b8a9eb7a6547121c37
describe
'118057' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGT' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
dd1a20b25af030928f3a44dfc6299b52
d104f17ce6b46b6d6fd0908442896b8717584aa8
describe
'34902' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGU' 'sip-files00121.pro'
57b2b93ebf13b8d0c1ae7c31c9f6d7bf
5ecda68e2d43c21f5b97a7f5580006e4b3e387c1
'2011-12-28T23:10:59-05:00'
describe
'36074' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGV' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
1733cc39ed974fbff322071e09c2ee55
94d058757fa39590d2fa437179fc4ad6c796d0d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGW' 'sip-files00121.tif'
7301e7ad7a22645545d94e6613b02184
e7ca314193bc8c594c52c35166cd3ddf6085a491
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGX' 'sip-files00121.txt'
5ad01e78146f4f0d93b070bf9fd3bfda
efa4ad10cd9266e750cccbf3714a6c3cfcaae097
describe
'8959' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGY' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
4e6c6a1f133837d150d382a287355b63
8655ab2b8faa8c941655fefab6f69a91d8d12f70
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQGZ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
5de4d7dd05271670c8f95106423975dd
4f1ac94ea8d4521f645bcad851ab7a9ec81d5859
describe
'116036' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHA' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
5eddbb2110d761615aabf57d835214f2
4f13c1e7cf1606303575e122e43be19ec03335e7
'2011-12-28T23:11:51-05:00'
describe
'33431' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHB' 'sip-files00122.pro'
003302c3f7ecb318e966b4943f6d723c
12e5483508c073f9ebc8f1b4c2f4667d7f363d3b
describe
'35210' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHC' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
932ab9ba47b63f9727b06549d7a0f552
115fa57b25bb9fd4b2debd5345ee81e93454f9dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHD' 'sip-files00122.tif'
35e00d4f102799bdde0e1cc08e7327a8
6691a0c1b5bd411d47c1907a392cee2d9c7a6891
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHE' 'sip-files00122.txt'
a3482f119137e35ed472d8639ff5f1ae
24cd0f894f7a457fe26d2cbc272fd1af0804fdfe
describe
'8921' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHF' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
1164384fbbc13b90c03a05a2ba9a2dc5
26f4a8bd39a221260a34b421da940915c7911243
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHG' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
9df51ead60c58707c6bb4b34d82be743
6e93ba9bf78688f925bea767cda80d06a60e907d
describe
'123703' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHH' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
4b35d0d3fd1e81a73c5b79f2ebb169bb
b22ca4a3b5dc90f0f1bfdf45766b279bd098c9cf
describe
'37028' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHI' 'sip-files00123.pro'
684782b9c3d47b4a15da478d821c5275
5f37cddfedd9f777882cb1dd2609422672e818ef
describe
'38059' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHJ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
43632ccd5cd9baf8db0ce128d999c0cc
63cbd201962b4c925b4ddfdcd9787ebe2b22e3a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHK' 'sip-files00123.tif'
aa476b9db4d37512d5950074349fb135
5f096647a7d5db736ed698904339244d9c2d486f
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHL' 'sip-files00123.txt'
79c54d943ce52de53a0db265a1707894
b5383d172cb0ab7c11e7d5785733cb0ecbae4e31
describe
'9251' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHM' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
6b59143490fcc5fd9537417fbea072d8
06e19eb27ea4a08948ef19b17ed6b519ee937179
describe
'356932' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHN' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
2086afc236a4d52bbbbe6aa67fb24c46
88719bcfd48efc2a41177af4b4607a16abd5d132
describe
'77205' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHO' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
a10fe6453e18f5893125d3a8c7b71118
53d3f7ffd7a01de3332d32220631e1be6b7f094f
describe
'19439' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHP' 'sip-files00124.pro'
bb234ac148403b94396f880d9cd37411
121ac9e2b7806706550114a99264ea52e6139662
describe
'22684' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHQ' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
9e24d69090b47f6740a51a7044c07d24
617e46ab30777386a7cde9a42b265416e1c09ab4
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHR' 'sip-files00124.tif'
1bb754260093b1e707f1deb139f5aaa8
a9b370fa80d0533aa5721cbc75fc350595e0992b
describe
'809' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHS' 'sip-files00124.txt'
fc28e9c578c7502cc90bf1a8bc1ce9a8
26349223788672f173864ee1bf9ac8b0d6420e13
describe
'5872' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHT' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
b8475ec6bc7e9bc7f247db7a6cdf0745
630cbeed9519baf13f789c320c6b4c01178f0ca1
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHU' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
487cb4686ba0346e069c316ff1d13a40
9192450bff7063f9514273446e6b4a380a821cb8
describe
'101626' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHV' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
f4bced417069db78fea9308008b6c544
a8a077ba96f686046e2dc4cbec09aef359920b32
describe
'22571' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHW' 'sip-files00125.pro'
57dad57579521a12cded6ed343d650f5
4ce555c311a1c94e27e9488aa2a4401e7cbf9bcf
describe
'29840' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHX' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
f82a570c8e0ed4edccf1621a4fca964b
8b721b7a35d4a49954fd398d3c5c976331dd49e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHY' 'sip-files00125.tif'
2510112a1122abda721ea2ee8c8956c9
c521f6cd6ceeea9632c687d935c714aa24e704d2
describe
'978' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQHZ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
00df18333c28084aae732cec0957a600
b5e200b583f67dec6e0480c1596f1bc5a7336403
describe
'7450' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIA' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
9feb8a12c3f55778bb753acf77b0e7e8
e04bd771ba4e4f1c4fad55161df5d4e6e9afb321
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIB' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
f2b0eeebc4448ab8904479d9dfcfc274
265e325ce2737cfba9e5d2ca782f9ff62bda7b93
describe
'114407' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIC' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
9937de9e3aaea9f4d87fee4f6709208c
7156b17b45a9379052bb4452a1d3549c6600318c
describe
'33539' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQID' 'sip-files00126.pro'
6e2ec1750392d5cd0d24c03506cfe5ed
d4e0bc75a935c327ae5ed724f294ebe4e6e77fa4
describe
'35530' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIE' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
589535a31528466a14fb54a3ebee38d0
c37df2ad9f87fb27965fd5f283ffcfbcc7f79957
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIF' 'sip-files00126.tif'
0d53d2d6981c2157d5e0e07081f9ed0b
53edc96e4fd94adc011c96a29a08a07a982619f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIG' 'sip-files00126.txt'
b59ae4d871d531e05ce542c49e5cd858
e2b782805fbc780de82250b44ee9cc1465ac4113
describe
'8660' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIH' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
02985ccf5ba9adcf0884fd12bd2f742d
c3b08855bc59696b5e6031b089c1f8bb0df03aef
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQII' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
954357afa1ca5be7d098f39452d0b4ec
720095c150010671c494d3cffe24e90cc3d5f28b
describe
'119342' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIJ' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
1577aec62561fba2a7553b6f05f0f547
4e4bdbe52f006ca049dff131681c021992f859cb
describe
'35960' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIK' 'sip-files00127.pro'
5767ccb6ba7a2aded1c88ba3ac8e4bda
b963bbb62396237dc196d07ef0d0966de2616ddb
describe
'37793' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIL' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
7b16918bd4ae8f46552c808e614c5640
99be3d94a0c3e5eb86e635f5a5030e3192be0b85
'2011-12-28T23:14:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIM' 'sip-files00127.tif'
81184177ef7da26d860de881839af546
eca2af05bfc1e04d797a9b30b2bffa11c2868398
'2011-12-28T23:10:04-05:00'
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIN' 'sip-files00127.txt'
ebb18b1c9be60d39c71070e2af44b53e
0b633d84bb2c8ccbec3d56340babfcec148b3fba
describe
'8939' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIO' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
2e6780a733ee62c334cb92bfdc2c3283
b792e1b604a17ed031a13b05fb5873132e346fa1
describe
'356961' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIP' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
feaa07e0ef6fcf3a823ec65ad9f3eaf3
f733e93ff73941aa4a1fa3d529a593b66e3bba0a
describe
'115431' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIQ' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
45d5d4a55fd0299b56d7c5439faa8d39
c01cb786ba663c3f4d18883bfc3852d66fe6addb
describe
'33501' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIR' 'sip-files00128.pro'
ee2ccc93ff0fade7b988575f56051925
594322bb955302998b4f9a2da4f779cdc072b32c
describe
'35177' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIS' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
1d411b9df421c855215fb8239a99da49
c91b4c25ef9a6b710feaa37b2ff57099a74faa79
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIT' 'sip-files00128.tif'
ec8032aea2debabcec1ef71483fb4225
0d6c5cb535e5b8adbcdda22c89793ec2171516dd
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIU' 'sip-files00128.txt'
bae1a4d5fcd9b34b4ffd3810ad67cf53
5084de8892f8ae387ba3e48f02fd1363602054b4
describe
'8647' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIV' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
901d3a6f11ff1f216f6134cae7bd062a
573670de4b0c2cfa6c92fc4e79e5e3bc7a9ae90c
describe
'356912' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIW' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
b06a3b95aa8993044ae53a8e94afacc8
c0ec5c8e191d525cb05c8a9c6bb1f8ee51b58d76
describe
'123444' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIX' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
14512ee8080741a9e771aba5ea726dae
55e80b0f0e8876b971c73443d129dd6ac870b98a
describe
'35799' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIY' 'sip-files00129.pro'
f1e27e57660f40fed2d88562424723ae
f616feb24d1a56d3b3a76cb49c907dfd7431b665
describe
'38953' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQIZ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
c30be107a6813a711daa84b71996b665
b3f96037f634a217ee5fb830a2db1330a202f690
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJA' 'sip-files00129.tif'
019e3d0182427b7d7fb674be5c749b8c
dd325183c90d051c0a57067293446101b62d444e
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJB' 'sip-files00129.txt'
dd708b20a165d0fa6602f7abf16cc62f
27d9f62226ca0b7c1feb66dfbbbb1e1238a2d701
'2011-12-28T23:09:27-05:00'
describe
'9200' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJC' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
18c1c25fd2236f31308e7ed0b31a5ecb
911c9cfd99b01ec30adb0e23e261c4fd8e33ee1f
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJD' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
6adc375de1d786963d942f2887a23151
f43e80d864d1fd49b1a4bb82012651b92f8f2c6b
describe
'51710' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJE' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
e2e1cb9e5a03839f380a6deb67d64aed
98d7585ad16e8c4aea2cdc7ed67ff30c0a4bb9eb
describe
'11969' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJF' 'sip-files00130.pro'
b57d8459ca4015395a68c431e475f78b
af0587d65722bc3c0292c3a607d2b11d36feeacf
describe
'12468' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJG' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
d5cc22e413778b2072d7cf09ebb224c0
c1a929a552e6e0c446a3ec2791b0e5cdd4356ac9
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJH' 'sip-files00130.tif'
3525d3ed6ef1c99ce8e08b21843309b1
dd47dca387718ada7e7e52005944f3b9ecf2cdea
describe
'521' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJI' 'sip-files00130.txt'
020e9fd068f810b96d36eccfedfd9fd3
303e45b990bea40aaff0777b3b56818eb2dceb08
describe
'3253' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJJ' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
6b2b664569e4c4cc26558602d38e4dbf
5214910c8af6e655b69d33e790ca2f34db2590bd
describe
'356955' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJK' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
87ea4ab90868fe701d32138c2e753891
596c86f8bf3b969ca0a9e00acfef2983f49f7c0f
describe
'142038' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJL' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
a3f4ca83f3ca80ba88d8e200a71acceb
6173a0c46c4dfd02e11ba5456d5ea65c3b4c6761
describe
'48221' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJM' 'sip-files00131.pro'
6a9d2b2a6a2bcc5ca579db643364038e
2265db49bbb8dbe1975a5f1214bc351a66430c7b
describe
'41585' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJN' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
d53ff01496d985378de997b2364ff493
dc7aaff0f40073863d47028dbea193e33dfc8d28
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJO' 'sip-files00131.tif'
9864b4776194a5364427bd0a108fb170
12c1fe05bff83602964c0adecaf90a7f24fedb65
describe
'2199' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJP' 'sip-files00131.txt'
9f73d6ab26296641ff244a92259e57c4
6cbe0f5f78954328ec8e6e9e0ec4d570ba7ab85d
describe
'11157' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJQ' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
2fe138ca9adc3ecb2b36731a4492c994
824afcfe407d3428fb5f42fd9a429758aa924514
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJR' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
44099095ef5412619cbbbdcdacd8e972
c298c4a1009dace36c201ac6be1056bb784a541f
describe
'114585' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJS' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
ffb3bb3164da3b594b4ed2dc930f84aa
e4bdffc8edb02eb20f79554cb8e6fb935e7073ef
describe
'17551' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJT' 'sip-files00132.pro'
0252703bf5c7f4ccb49361071fa16eb8
30877106194b30045c076fc5a78db8a36f508370
describe
'31953' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJU' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
6e79afa83cc8f2ac69cfed32c008d990
732fb0a002a5f38775a8374a61e0ffc1176d664a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJV' 'sip-files00132.tif'
03f41a5fd430d9e209c6ead865a02c83
d7b795bdb330b967a4c0f9bb66d467af957e3b49
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJW' 'sip-files00132.txt'
a6994a284f3093ac6b405b1f7df674a6
d51fe3088475302f1eae9c73f2f2833d1b51a590
'2011-12-28T23:13:59-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8434' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJX' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
0c661b839a9191710ba505956f1314b0
6d029b60e0fa47fafeb2ed4eb9af3cf011a09342
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJY' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
27e544c8772ebadf93a635aa43ae2e0a
404e716a1cf50160ce9f650b89ee651dcddf91b8
'2011-12-28T23:12:59-05:00'
describe
'149504' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQJZ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
90a7bc2ca68b6c15d734bd62afdcc1c5
425ae06034ec98643f25db3382c60f0d56fb2521
describe
'73143' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKA' 'sip-files00133.pro'
cc79a1d0a7650f5601999a8c7b134f8e
db02079ee94e0740fe0021c089b76ff01ef76c9b
describe
'42402' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKB' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
ef53acfe73af8681fb1d8aec582a6c2d
d2f2e717246e26e4313a38b97e7531508773bb6a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKC' 'sip-files00133.tif'
6503c7dcd63a237410e78e252c3d4224
c2080161330230022da2478d0364293943ed1b91
describe
'3472' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKD' 'sip-files00133.txt'
a246c1833e5156881809dba0d53f6132
bc4f9ee52c73ee9ad7905ced97d1d284f0afc5eb
describe
'10600' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKE' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
7a101048a99500d71e02f66779829ac0
12ab1707df7c6c72007eaa92b835fd13129fb1ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKF' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
465b91c17c5dbf2c0395f738154c2061
998673cc58fa5bb74e53070102a9bc80cd9290f7
describe
'121378' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKG' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
f32c735be683ec64672bf5340298404b
eed090cfc64014e5800b37f6651880971975af53
describe
'56174' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKH' 'sip-files00134.pro'
16f6c75e421b728c45475c126074961d
4c7fad20a746b104dd3e6c180e560d97db7bc31c
describe
'35654' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKI' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
7db863f95c26c3fe0d5d8be11ba6c01e
37029bbd2df255d6fd7a3844144e3932ceb01d23
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKJ' 'sip-files00134.tif'
9992f82cb77fcb4688d3c3eb530efd0b
893af2aaf16e5df7c0d1b918cd2865294d2af8a0
describe
'2582' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKK' 'sip-files00134.txt'
2ba189c0ed1e8222dbefb6ff0cc36d05
5571d7b81054a93ab150e965338f60e0beff01c4
describe
'9289' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKL' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
cc5337aebba93564c690a3f527c902e4
a3cfb8179f619d5926a721264cff276e0735bb3b
describe
'356925' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKM' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
8c74711fbf0b4914079bf38fa0266e5c
24ffbffed59c1caf73260e0dca1caf4d40196466
describe
'128265' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKN' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
9920778d0790e79337780c1f33ed6e44
5bffba50db5b2a5839cc0f084f9311fcd4abe47a
describe
'59507' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKO' 'sip-files00135.pro'
b62951a5a3c736222e564afe57e86d73
5a4e0592c4eaf88553598ca1c436f68f25a6633a
describe
'36984' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKP' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
657fc7a59861ccedff929e16c9889f64
7d8fff2fa9ab0aa35d41e1aadc5a6220e5c8df04
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKQ' 'sip-files00135.tif'
91073b23d90deeb0cb2a0a047ead0ecb
0c7b1e02c5a9d81be747b8734a864c9f768f1d4a
describe
'2767' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKR' 'sip-files00135.txt'
97527e2112b2da9d2cb87eb818427c97
abfc38f5bf589ebb4bd8420a571ddc2ce4ec94f2
describe
'9507' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKS' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
708e37481ecb7d1a99ee481b1728a005
7b4496a2f198cd56d7276a3704f0adc615a71b32
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKT' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
9ce91d51301c371e06e20d91228deca6
e12ba04e24d27f33fb8b194a31674c83095ec09d
describe
'123224' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKU' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
e6b6636d389967a47ac2e74e7862fe2a
0f94bb30de2458296d54c4a0a77115bd693023ef
describe
'50810' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKV' 'sip-files00136.pro'
e7cea58635ee17a15f3f433f9948f49f
5be3c57f0b339ee256f1e07aadc28b07a4e73d94
describe
'37558' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKW' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
0a0e64d16108d513c936865941a0de2b
1c21308246de5069257d34afbf8d5e77b5496c4d
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKX' 'sip-files00136.tif'
95fc448f861c03c6b6a7e297228eae12
9d80bec934e2acd295877ce9b45dcb0071f7fcdb
describe
'2280' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKY' 'sip-files00136.txt'
9a953cc5ad89eb4a106eb24c2aa82d02
0a93f6a4ff723782e12d9e0b0e8e715ca8f84b44
describe
'10321' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQKZ' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
6cd8c9a24fbf77df9527c1ddb6527f71
b00000800286abe7c1a60f608d9fe3a15b2834f3
'2011-12-28T23:09:08-05:00'
describe
'356939' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLA' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
376519a7472f939231822b219e8a5c5a
85f7d75ebb3c206f4d29aa4d8f81771839471b5a
describe
'102250' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLB' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
d9364880868f481c1af12ebe4f406e71
3b8e3cc18bb2ce9d2e57e8120e0210f19893d9a6
describe
'35478' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLC' 'sip-files00137.pro'
df4ce22d049926134d6428b5e787dcd9
9ec66334716d9c004360bd017e684bd8238149c3
describe
'29360' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLD' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
96f9eb91a00041059d05c3121345a198
0e6979099012147cb4f40ebaf504996a9dba6566
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLE' 'sip-files00137.tif'
dbc66c81c3b743fd64a045441571940e
7b900640d2f461e3836d7e4336e1f35519940e31
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLF' 'sip-files00137.txt'
15c851b5853a77a888b0f6607d324ac7
4bd5828eedf636233662026fc4f6bd0aa84c4bad
'2011-12-28T23:10:13-05:00'
describe
'8887' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLG' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
e7a03c41d37b844260c67f4c753d5165
e6454ccac878ab384c0b5ae1ec110b9c37be1e2c
'2011-12-28T23:12:00-05:00'
describe
'356882' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLH' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
28ef83a6c9dc4dea8f71925d05363838
ab05c52b9486f11358d0c3570ae1d4f3d68384b4
describe
'142266' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLI' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
7f5c63a2b24fd3841da06f717431848a
de684065dc988a5b2c63069965a3b231960a07ed
describe
'56236' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLJ' 'sip-files00138.pro'
6df8cefde57ee0d105b69472ebb3a1e8
47d5f3c657de1d05b5810e843348c1f9e9a208c8
describe
'40216' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLK' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
783415fd29867a70331aed82d6fa66de
9e4b46a58eb4f096042fed89546ffdd822995e0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLL' 'sip-files00138.tif'
9d6b0ac9b9c13e3231714ab31d498d41
5fd5471b7b7d742ca3b6a6a54a8795c15d56c74c
describe
'2509' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLM' 'sip-files00138.txt'
d415257a4eacb84f9b2c2939d6f4cb50
acebd179a146c792ddd2a83e7f0b6b08c2c0efd2
describe
'10341' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLN' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
5363f31ed582e0e412c022e4f6eb1027
d5a8965ef3148248bec26ff0b9cc54e2e55c2d95
describe
'356791' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLO' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
87d22008262596e39ea47d9c2ea2331e
03cefd2408f01ccaa87465d7025c08fe456a139f
describe
'139042' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLP' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
cf88462204f9ffce0bdea0426353dcdf
a4bd5d165ecb2ca02c7dcb449a6b5fb23c0a71a6
describe
'64059' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLQ' 'sip-files00139.pro'
2340acfd5bc76bbcb51ec8e22c75e8b3
7a6d3426e0f5323c5409905a5b30417ae49dc391
describe
'40212' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLR' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
3b3d3d1e18b685eb35b097e168875743
bae335bf6bd3aba98ed6882932dd06673e564bba
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLS' 'sip-files00139.tif'
45f0a9f93ed25708f7cce06f39c2827b
ffbcc576de8e5d044b17e76cff168753d361b008
describe
'2889' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLT' 'sip-files00139.txt'
2c0f0f178854be9c67fa0fd22f36e100
af6240e99772cad3608a01323856493d29fc728e
describe
'10111' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLU' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
7c625cdd42e87c02504210bb823738e5
d2f2ebff5766f213eb0b2f7e070bcf6e4c5b103b
describe
'356910' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLV' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
65276efacd41c959234b7a954238c6cc
4cdd400637988685232376bf06fadb01a6cb8533
describe
'112936' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLW' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
d51f2d3b766681ba0d59dac08fa0923b
618e5b06602dc2af13eafed2756a4f56cd9f9c0a
describe
'49838' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLX' 'sip-files00140.pro'
e3c1954c7740a38e45a09a6dfc1f124f
8bcb96f7ace9bed6c85f3974fd0b346de36073ac
describe
'33839' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLY' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
e2c80a780e78cfefecfdf9fc9f9054c1
27a621a8d8c6f6401dd15fcb364fcfcbe2162487
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQLZ' 'sip-files00140.tif'
79bf0713543b21132304ac5455b264f4
0df8273b3e6a4c6325fb2ad6f46573dd5e144fd3
describe
'2395' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMA' 'sip-files00140.txt'
9dbd5bb236399269cd4ce85d757236e7
c5da0fd161f91e549a6f9d11a73c431f6d4f6eeb
describe
'9418' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMB' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
467ba37c5cc5bdf7ebf0cabfc794d352
26a04d0262e5f8884f0470d9beac44747329f6e9
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMC' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
6ac0dca07ddfe21f35023ea9082e299a
a44a06bfda957c85a774831ff3501bc7a3270a93
describe
'124484' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMD' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
1abb6426ea43d04a0c0a3ea171894f8e
eea11c7d680c1aded7fe038adff8f289fa897880
describe
'54136' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQME' 'sip-files00141.pro'
686bbe875c16034734a35c258f0ab02a
573a82789d4fe13a1b19eb69eab969d5bb176b33
describe
'36922' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMF' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
19e61698de283b5f3c4705be1029ab57
3b7f899067d9b3ca9ee06f26c001e8c4304b98c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMG' 'sip-files00141.tif'
72b078e2c534bc77053c8f7521bd1632
42d87b8200abb684b9230df46285aeac498ec9e8
describe
'2609' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMH' 'sip-files00141.txt'
f4b0f065516db6a3be048b176de2996e
0dedf723a0503591f6c13150a5866d78264e5f46
describe
'9940' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMI' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
8e17bad8f4938a20d65fe97c2cc59c13
547fe5504b47fd124fcde5fff62f18b09ddd2d88
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMJ' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
f6c32342f1e5d7056bd2b1361ebdf395
09ec325af796296c7d02aa6dfe722ea6ecbccf9d
describe
'132815' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMK' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
696d291bb5a92c76d9d436f6457f105d
152af0bb6942df0b6e7fd4796e8e55f13fa4ba6a
describe
'60963' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQML' 'sip-files00142.pro'
2a877f171c1f63e07bd2005deb02e6fd
fc253642db7539ded1f8e947ab0f3a4a4381764e
describe
'36915' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMM' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
37292299b01ca2ab417a331ca69556ea
c9915a823cae1e015124de3f01db5d389b385cfc
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMN' 'sip-files00142.tif'
8247475effb4defe2e728bad6c3951cd
c44fb4a1003d5e18a8ae998bd0623466904b2cb1
describe
'2891' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMO' 'sip-files00142.txt'
84c428f73e510c8ea94c4b0c00e3108d
e88396dc0da5cc2afc468ebee8c6ad9a0ef0da14
describe
'9702' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMP' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
51673e18c8779a58915b165123c095c2
a0494b15eff1799acd024b1bcab61e0a51890c47
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMQ' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
c1bc161eb8ec51ac40e1e7f522a52224
2308fa98796c4090a2ba77b6b9880aed1f1bba4d
describe
'149506' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMR' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
e657a8dd88a89f9a9ae852e5e182a797
ca98ee589cc0b89df133d3ed90e2de52da6a8d18
describe
'81279' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMS' 'sip-files00143.pro'
cd0cccc66050dd035d2129302c7d8bc4
2e4beb30a3f6c4193631aa88f4741728cb61b0ae
describe
'40660' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMT' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
71485ad495760f4c7ec794d58601eb32
cd06d3ff0a850681aa5af01c5131c13734d37ee2
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMU' 'sip-files00143.tif'
baafba48d1dd23ea4c39f46d73a689b5
9ef7c53c7a1ae73018628f061a857cbf8da15184
describe
'3632' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMV' 'sip-files00143.txt'
489b435c60268e63fabd7b7859507c0c
9779bd525bc1276e7a77b23bc28542dd90fd4ab5
describe
'10434' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMW' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
a9b25066958878d5896c87b9f65b9dce
33a78f53bb6d12e59569d36d43d46ae603098401
describe
'356856' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMX' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
9706539b4ce05868c4544c20973c53b3
a38db93bb4ebf58f11dcd12d21340e20991e09d2
describe
'122292' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMY' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
4d16c91d11d85ef8601c1afbdb9fc913
a48eff732129d7f3dbde822d7158261e4288fe27
describe
'33757' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQMZ' 'sip-files00144.pro'
00f3f30e064b9cb61d2a7e555d8d6d27
0ef9c15066c8bcd4a9426e74ebde3eaa3a110654
describe
'35377' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQNA' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
df90f2ba883493060deb1b6bb9cecede
7fa471d068af33240575851099bcc685895f7ac3
describe
'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQNB' 'sip-files00144.tif'
b7a2fcb72c54e12ed13250213e3ee68d
9d4965ebcbca676d543e22d5a325ef83b8a0cf5e
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQNC' 'sip-files00144.txt'
cb639cb094600e039975ec1c67305569
fca041f2f3281e0e19c04aca07ee831a3929783a
describe
'9033' 'info:fdaE20090112_AAAAVUfileF20090114_AABQND' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
1618e93f2bb28c3e1702b76bac4bde4c
001a717abd18c09360ba0c1e177a5b4a915cad11
describe
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The Baldwin Library


EN



te






Jeo ffl tel
Ve pie

eo ae SEE BE




®

PU










“y by "% <<
Wnt OR NN:
Fi; aT




~~}








| % y A 3 oy
Y Z Zu & Ni | Ve “i Ny Ne \
Ss N W ee ic Kreckow sc¥

Bertie Wilmot was perched on the topmost branches, doing his best to shake the
yellow pippins into the outstretched aprons of Daisy, Pansy, and another little
flaxen-haired maiden who were capering wildly beneath.—. 1117.
To THE END

BY

C. LOCKHART GORDON,

AUTHOR OF ‘‘' HUMP AND ALL,”

Kew Edition.

_ LONDON:
JOHN F. SHAW AND Co,,
48, PATERNOSTER ROW.
ATTRACTIVE REWRRDS,





PRICE ONE SHILLING, WITH ILLUSTRATIONS,

ALL FOR THE BEST
HEROES OF THE LINE

HIS SERVANTS WHO SERVE

JUST IN TIME
PRINCESS ADELAIDE
WHITE LILIES :
HAROLD

THE SEA GULLS NEST
THE SEFTON BOYS .

AUNT MILDRED’S TREASURE

THE STRAY LAMB
FIRM FRIENDS

——_3¢ —___.

. By Emity S. Hort.

LITTLE TROUBLE-THE- HOUSE

RIGHT-ABOUT-FACE

THOSE BOYS . ‘
NEVER, FOR EVER .
TO THE END. ‘
EAST AND WEST ,
LOST MAGGIE :

LEFT BEHIND 5

OUGHTS AND CROSSES
JERRY'S LITTLE NELL
OUR ROUGIL DIAMOND

HETTIE AND THE SUNBEAMS

ROB AND RALPH .
JITANA’S STORY °
BENNIE. . °
RUTH’S RESCUE .
BLIND NETTIE 6
LEO AND DICK °
OUT IN THE STORM

CHICK; or, Yet there is Room

LETTIE’S HOME °

ELTON KEANE,
ELEANOR GRANT,
CATHARINE SHAW,
Emity S. Hott,

L. T. MEapE,
ANON.

EmiLy Brovig,

C. E, IrRvINg.

T. PauL.

M. S. MacRitcuHig,
CATHARINE SHAW.
L. T. MEADE,
EmILy Bropig,

L. T. MEADE.
GRACE STEBBING,
C. L. Gorpon.
EmiLy Bropig,

M. E. WINCHESTER.
Jesstz CHAPPELL,
JESSIE CHAPPELL,
A. PITTIS.

Mrs. FABIAN BRACKENBURY.
GERTRUDE P. Dyer.
NELLIE HELLIS,

L. Marston.

L. MARSTON.
Emity Bropig,

L. Marston,

CE. S.
CATHARINE SHAW.
M. S. MacRitcHis.
L. T. Meapg.

Lonpon: JOHN F, SHAW & CO., 48, ParernostgR Row, E.G

1266.


TO THE END.



CHAPTER I.
CONFIRMATION BELLS,

**O Jesus, I have promised
To serve Thee to the end;
Be Thou for ever near me,
My Master and my Friend.
I shall not fear the battle
If Thou art by my side,
Nor wander from the pathway
If Thou wilt be my Guide.”

IVE fresh young voices carolled forth
these words—five bright fair faces
gleamed soft and solemn in the sweet
spring sunshine, It was Confirmation

Day at St. Magna’s, and the old parish church was

crowded from end to end.

The roll of the organ ceased, the sweet notes
of the singers died away, and the five young girls
in the front oaken pew seated themselves to listen
to the Bishop’s parting words.

“Soldiers and servants of Jesus Christ,” he


8 To the End.



began, “this day you have sworn allegiance to
your great Captain; you have taken upon your-
selves the vows which were made for you at baptism;
you have promised to fight manfully against sin,
the world, and the devil, and to continue Christ’s
faithful soldiers and servants unto your lives’ end.
Now, in whose strength are you going forth to this
warfare? In your Saviour’s or your own? Are
you trusting to your strong right arm and your
good resolutions to bring you the victory, or have
you knelt, and with all the fervency of your young
hearts besought the Lord to nerve you for the
conflict for which none of us are too strong—to
shoe you for the race for which none of our feet
are too swift?

“My dear young friends, I know not the secrets
of your hearts, but God does; but if you have
never honestly raised a cry to Heaven for help
before, raise one now, I beseech you. Rush not
unarmed into the fight. Ask your Heavenly Father
to equip you with the helmet of salvation, with the
sword of the Spirit, to give you the shield of faith
and the breastplate of Christ’s righteousness, to
gird you with truth, and to shoe your feet with
peace, and then—and then alone—may you hope to
run with patience the race that is set before you—
to be faithful unto death—to continue Christ’s
faithful soldiers and servants until your lives’ end.”


Confirmation Bells. 9



More words followed—words of love, words of
counsel, words of encouragement—and then the
organ pealed forth again, the bells chimed, and the
crowded congregation poured itself forth into the
bright spring sunshine.

“To the end, to the end; Father, keep me faithful
to the end,” pleaded Edith Wilmot that night as
she knelt in the room where her little sisters
slumbered.

a To the end, to the end; dear Saviour, guard me
we —guide me,” whispered Ruth Hope with clasped
hands, as she lay on her invalid couch at the Home
Farm that evening.

“To the end, to the end; may I be true to the
end,” prayed Patience Trueman, as she gazed up
through her cottage-window at the stars that were
shining down so brightly. :

Thus three out of the five young girls that had
knelt in the oaken pew that morning started forth
on the race that was set before them—leaning on
the same strong arm—resting in the same dear love.

But what of the other two? Alas! alas! though
Violet Norman and Rose Wicks bent the knee
and folded the hands, repeating the words they
had learnt by rote from childhood, that night, no
true cry went up to Heaven for help, under no
wings of love did they seek for rest and shelter,






CHAP,
I.

Ill.
Ive

VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.

XI.
XII.
XIII.
XIV.
XV.
XVI.
XVII.
XVIII.
XIX.



CONTENTS:

CONFIRMATION BELLS p60
A FIRESIDE TALK oa0
THE HOME FARM eee
THE HAY-FIELD 060 eee

THE COTTAGE HOME ... Be.
EVENING CONFIDENCES

AN “AT HOME” AT THE KNOLL
TWILIGHT TALKS Ras ne
WAVERERS as a ve
THE DARKENED HOME
ADELBERT TERRACE ...

TAKE UP THE CROSS on
A LUNCHEON PARTY...

TEMPTATION ... a; ae
CONQUEST ae ve ie
MARRIAGE BELLS re a
A CHANCE MEETING ... a
A SAD RETURN Hie es
CONFIRMATION BELLS oes

PAGE




CHAPTER II.

A FIRESIDE TALK,

: HE short spring day had closed, and the
| firelight flickered merrily on the rose-
coloured blinds of an old-fashioned
house in High Street. Tea was being
carried out from the drawing-room, and with a
sigh of content a lady dropped into a cosy chair
near the fire and drew a work-basket to her.

“What! all the petticoats finished! Rachel,
you must have worked hard this morning; too
hard, dear, I am afraid,” and Miss Scott looked
anxiously at her sister.

“No, Margaret, I am not tired,” and the sweet
pale face that rested against the cushions of the
sofa lifted itself smilingly. “Little Mary Trueman
came round this morning, and the sight of her
well-worn garments gave my fingers new energy.”

“Poor Mrs. Trueman, she must find it hard work
to clothe her baker’s dozen, and yet Patience looked


A Fireside Talk. II



so neat and respectable this morning—quite as
respectable as Rosa Wicks, whose father earns
thirty shillings a week. Patience and Rose and
Violet and Edith and Ruth Hope were all in the
pew together, dear.”

“Were they? How strange !—just the five girls
we are so interested in. And you liked the
Bishop’s address ?”

“Liked it—I more than liked it; it sent me
out to my district with fresh energy. But oh,
Rachel, I could not help thinking of my own con-
firmation—that happy day twenty-five—no, let me
see—thirty years ago; it was just such a May day
as this, bright and beautiful—you remember it,
dear, don’t you? But I am forgetting, how should
you ?—you were only a little toddle then. Good old
Mr. Mansel was our vicar, and Bishop Wilson con-
firmed me; and father was there. -I can see him
now beaming at me from the red-lined pew in the
gallery ; and mother, dear mother, in her lavender
bonnet and white ribbons, kneeling down praying
for me, and Arthur—yes, Arthur was home from
India that year. Ah! they were all here then,
and now...” And Miss Scott’s voice faltered.

“Now, Margaret darling, they are safe at home
with the Saviour in Paradise,” and Rachel Scott’s
thin blue-veined hand stole gently into her sister’s,

“Ah, Rachel dear, what should I do without
12 | To the End.



you? I—I am always looking back, while you
are always looking forward. Yes, as I sat listening
to the Bishop’s brave stirring words to-day, I
could not help thinking what. a poor cowardly
soldier I had been; how often I had never held
up my shield of faith at all; and how sometimes I
had even been tempted to throw away my armour
and fly.”

“Tempted, Margaret, darling!—but through
God’s grace. you did not give way to the tempta-
tion. We have all bitter things to write against
ourselves; but I only trust those five young
soldiers who are starting to-day will fight as man-
fully as you have done.”

“Rachel, Rachel! hush! hush!—but Iet us
change the subject. Those dear young girls—it
was quite touching to see them. Patience True-
man’s honest open face was beaming over with
happiness; and Edith, our own dear Edith, had
such a sweet look in her blue eyes; and con-
siderate and thoughtful as usual, she helped Ruth
Hope so tenderly to the chancel.”

“Ah, dear Edith, Dr. Wilmot was only telling
me yesterday what a help and comfort she was to
him. A much greater weight of responsibility, he
says, rests on her young shoulders than he would
willingly place there, but her mother suffers so
terribly from headaches, Edith however accepts
A Fireside Talk. 13



her position, Dr. Wilmot says, most brightly, and
she is the sunshine and mainstay of the household.”

“But what of Violet and Rose, Margaret ?—you
did not tell me about them.”

“Well, dear, even their pretty faces looked
thoughtful, but Frank tells me he is anxious about
them. He says they were most regular attendants
at the class, and assented most readily to all
he had to say; but somehow or other he fears his
words have had no real influence upon them, and
that they do not at all realize the solemnity of the
step they have undertaken,”

“Ah, Margaret dear, my heart aches for them—
pretty motherless Violet, and winning, bright Rose.
God grant they are not starting forth to meet all
the trials and the temptations that lie before them
without the Good Shepherd’s arm around them.”

“God grant they are not, darling; we must pray
earnestly for them,” and Miss Scott stooped and
pressed a kiss on her sister’s forehead. “But, Rachel
dear, what hot cheeks !—you have talked enough
for to-night. Where is the book? Come, I will
read to you.”




CHAPTER III.

THE HOME FARM.
SD il sacith ie acl itineles

The call which had begun in a high
treble ended in a shrill crescendo.

Softly a door opened and closed at
the end of the corridor, and quickly with finger
uplifted a young girl came along it. “Bertie,
Bertie! hush, hush!—don’t you know mother is
lying down with a headache?”

“Oh, Edie, I quite forgot,” and the face of the
curly-headed little boy that bestrode the banisters
sobered instantly.

“T thought you did, darling, for you are generally
so thoughtful,” and Edith Wilmot stooped and
pressed a kiss on her little brother’s forehead ; “but
run up-stairs now and tell Daisy and Pansy I am
ready, and if nurse wants to speak to me she will
find me in the school-room.”

“Edie, are you really going to slave all the way




The Home Farm. 15



to the farm this hot afternoon?” was the question
that came from the depths of a wicker chair placed
just outside the school-room window, where the

old-fashioned caves of the Elizabethan house cast
a patch of shade on the gravelled pathway.

“Yes, Joan, I must; mother will not touch meat
to-day, and I want to tempt her with some of Mrs.
Muir’s fresh eggs.”

“You darling old pet, you are a model of
thoughtfulness and self-denial. I hope you are not
going however to ask me to accompany you, for
Mrs. Norman has just written to ask me to go for
a drive with her,’ and Joan Wilmot tossed into
the school-room a daintily scented envelope.

“No, Joan, I am not,’ and Edith stooped and
with a slight shade on her face picked up the
letter ; “and as to self-denial, I am sure none of
that is required in performing a little service for
mother—mother whose health has broken down in
slavery and service for us.”

“You know, Edith, I did not mean that,” and
Joan Wilmot toyed somewhat shamefacedly with a
sprig of the clematis that clambered up the red-
brick walls,

“TI know, darling, that you did not,” and Edith
turned up the pretty pouting face of her sister and
kissed it fondly ; “but, Joan dear, you zw be back
in time for your French lesson, will you not?
16 To the End.



Madame le Foi is always so vexed when she is ©
kept waiting. Ah, there is good little May learning
her verbs in the arbour, I see. Good-bye, May
darling, ’m off to the farm,” and blowing a kiss
through -her fingers Edith joined the impatient
children, who, armed with big baskets and shady
hats, were awaiting her arrival at the school-room
door.

Farms, as a rule, exercise an irresistible attraction
over most children, and a walk to the Home Farm
was the little Wilmots’ especial delight; it con-
tained such a world of interests, and it was pre-
sided over by such a kind mistress—a mistiess
who did not mind even when little footprints were
left on the red bricks of her clean dairy, nor when
little hands seized the handle of her big churn ;
nor, strange to say, even when little voices disturbed
the privacy of the secluded nook where the old
gray hen was sitting. Yes, Mrs. Muir was a mistress
‘after the children’s own heart, and they turned to
her instinctively, not only to be made busy and
happy, but also with all their little confidences,
while she—she looked on the children as a bit of
God’s own sunshine—rays of light and gladness
sent down from heaven to brighten and to cheer
this lower world of ours,

Mrs. Muir was Scotch—very Scotch some people
would say—for she pronounced her /’s with delisious
The Home Farm. 17



distinctness, and rolled out her 7s as though she
loved them. She had been brought up in comfort
and luxury, for her father had been a wealthy
Glasgow merchant; but comfort and luxury she
had turned her back upon when she became the
wife of a missionary, and consented to accompany
Alan Muir to his lonely station in southern Africa,
to the land and the work he loved so well.

Five short years passed—the golden years of
Janet Muir’s life—and then Alan Muir was called
to exchange labour for rest, work for praise, and
Janet returned to her father’s house a widow.

To her father’s house, but not to the home of
her childhood, for during her absence the wealthy
mercantile house in which her father was a partner
had become bankrupt, and he and his little orphaned
grand-daughter were now living in a quiet suburb
of Glasgow.

In tending and ministering to these dear ones,
Janet Muir sought to assuage her own sorrow, but
when her father’s days were ended, at the request
of a cousin of her husband’s, she and her little
niece turned their faces southernwards, to the
Home Farm—a home which God in His provi-
dential care ultimately designed one day should be
Janet’s own—a haven of rest and shelter for the
widow and the orphan.


CHAPTER IV.

THE HAY-FIELD.

AND is your talk with Ruthie over, dear?
Then come to yonder shady corner,
and we'll make ourselves cosy on a
hay-cock; the children have been
making me an arm-chair and they are most anxious
that I should try it.”

“ Ah, Mrs. Muir, they ave enjoying themselves!
How happy you do make them !—yes, yes, Bertie,
I see you,” and Edith Wilmot waved her parasol in
answer to her little brother’s violent gesticulations,
as perched on old Dobbin’s ample back he made
the tour of the field in the hay-cart—Pansy and
Violet, all laughter and excitement, rolling on the
load behind.

“Wee lambies, it does my heart good to see
them, and they are quite safe. I have given them
into old Robin’s charge, and he is as careful over







The Hay-field. 19



them as though they were his house-lambs; well,
and how do you think Ruthie is looking, dear ?”

“Pretty well ; perhaps a trifle pale from the heat;
but oh! Mrs. Muir, how sweet and patient she is!
—never murmuring nor complaining.”

“That she does not, dear bairnie ; even old Elspeth
said to me this morning, ‘It does my heart guid,
mem, to look at Miss Ruth, her face beams like a
glint of sunshine, and as for her sweet voice, I heard
her singing when I was stirring the porridge this
morning, and it was just like the lark a-lilting’
I expect it was Ruthie’s confirmation hymn old
Elspeth heard; she always sings it over to herself
the first thing in the morning.”

“Does-she ? Then I hope she will like this,” and
Edith produced from her pocket an illuminated
card,

“Tt is pretty, dear—very pretty, and oh, what a
needful prayer!” and Mrs. Muir repeated slowly to
herself the words——

“O Jesus, I have promised
To serve Thee to the end;
Be Thou for ever near me,
My Master and my Friend.
I shall not fear the battle
If Thou art by my side, :
Nor wander from the pathway
Tf Thou wilt be my Guide.”

The card was handed back in silence. Mrs.
B 2
20 To the End.



Muir was gazing across the hay-field, but not at the
children.

“Mrs. Muir,” at last Edith ventured to say, “ Mrs.
Muir, do you know although I love that verse I
almost tremble when I sing those words—

*O Jesus, I have promised
To serve Thee to the end.’

The end may be such a long way off, and there
may be such difficulties and trials before it comes,
and then when I think of that verse in the Bible
that speaks of vowings to God and not performing,
and remember that I have promised to my Saviour
—to my God...” and Edith covered her face
with her hands.

The far-away look in Mrs. Muir's eyes was gone;
in a minute she was back in the present. “My
bairnie, when you made the promise you did not
forget the prayer?”

“No, no, indeed I did not.”

“J thought not; then fear not to take up the
words of that sweet hymn—sing, my bairnie, with-
out a quaver of doubt—

I shall not fear the battle
If Thou art by my side,

Nor wander from the pathway
If Thou wilt be my Guide.’

I was thinking, Edith, of a little incident in my


The Hayfield. 21



own life when you spoke to me. Shall I tell it to
you, dear ?—it will help to illustrate what I mean.”

“Please do.”

“Well, my child, my Alan and I were once
spending a few weeks in the Highlands—ah me,
how long ago now!”—and again the far-away look
came into Mrs. Muir’s eyes. “Behind our wee house
there rose a hill which I was very anxious to be-
come better acquainted with, and as my husband
was always very busy with his letters in the morn-
ing, I thought some day I might scale it alone.
Alan however assured me it was far steeper than
it looked, and that it should be ascended by only
one particular path. He promised however to be my
guide one day, but laughingly he asserted I must
exercise the womanly virtue of patience, and wait
till he could claim an honest holiday. I kissed
him and told him his wife was not a southern maid,
hills had no terrors for her, and one day when he
was busy in his study I stole out of the house and
soon was on my way to Ben Dhu.

“What need to dilate on my experiences? For
the first hour I sang like a lark; during the second
I was silent; by the third I had stumbled over
a stone, and lay speechless with fatigue and
exhaustion.

“What was to become of me? Our wee housie
in the glen was plainly visible, for I had but half-
22 To the End.

way ascended the hill, but I had no strength to
retrace my steps. Oh, why, why had I not listened
to dear Alan, and waited for his strong arm to
guide me! Now perhaps I should have to spend a
night out on the hill, and hiding my face in the
bracken, I burst into a passion of tears.

“Just then I heard the furze-bushes being pushed
aside,and tramp! tramp! coming over the heather.
I raised myself, and there was Alan, my husband,
come in search of me. I need not describe our
meeting, Edith, but I will tell you, dear, I was not
upbraided. I was fed with milk and biscuits, and
after being lifted on to a Highland pony, carefully
led homewards.

“Three weeks later, Edith, my husband and I
stood on the top of Ben Dhu, and as I gazed at
the lovely landscape I said, ‘ Alan, I should never
have seen this if you had not been my guide.’

“«VYou would not have made that speech a month
ago, Wifie, said my husband, as he smilingly drew
me down to a seat on the heather; ‘you learnt
your wisdom by bitter experience, I am afraid.’
Then changing his tone, he added, ‘It is a small
matter to mistrust an earthly guide; but, oh,
Janet, my darling, may neither you or I ever mis-
trust our Heavenly Guide —our blessed, blessed
Saviour. Before us there lies a steeper than any
earthly hill to climb; may we mount it leaning on




The Hay-field. 23



the arm of our Beloved—and then, and then alone,
may we hope to reach the better land—the new
Jerusalem,’

“He is there now, my Alan,” said Mrs. Muir
softly, as she wiped away a tear; “but, Edith, there
are the children—take them to look for the eggs,
will you, dear? I will go in and get tea ready,”
and pulling her sun-bonnet over her eyes, Mrs.
Muir turned in the direction of the farm-house.
Often and often in after years when Edith was far
away from the Home Farm, and new duties and
responsibilities were weighing upon her, that
summers afternoon would rise to her remem-
brance—the deep blue sky—the sunny hay-field—
the children rolling in the hay-cart; and once more
she would fancy herself looking into Mrs. Muir’s
sweet earnest eyes; once more would she recall
the truth that the story of Ben Dhu had taught
her.




CHAPTER V.

THE COTTAGE HOME.

J] ATIENCE, tell Bob to let me have the
| bat, he’s had it for nigh half-an-hour.”

“No, Patience, I ought to keep it;
Tim hasn’t put me out yet.”

“ Now, boys, isn’t mother always telling you to
give up to one another? Come, Bob, you are the
eldest, let Tim have a turn; there’s no chance of his
putting you out, he’s but a little fellow; but run
along now, for there are the children to put to bed,
and mother’s supper to get ready,” and closing the
door on her brothers, Patience Trueman turned
back into the kitchen. Mrs. Trueman’s cottage
was small—so small that it was difficult when
night came to know where to stow away the
numerous olive branches; but a mother’s love and
tact can overcome a good many difficulties, and
few curly heads slumbered more peacefully than
did the little Truemans,

cS


The Cottage Home. 25



Tom, the eldest, was domiciled at the Home
Farm ; Ted, the next brother to Patience, was at
sea; George, Mrs. Trueman had taken in that very
day to Great St. Magna’s, where he was to act as
general factotum to his uncle, who kept an oil and
tallow-chandler’s shop ; Bob, Willie, Tim, Mary and
Nellie were all still at school; while Susie, Freddy
and Artie (the fat twins), and Jessie, the three-year-
old baby, enjoyed the freedom of home. A goodly
number of young mouths to feed, despite that three
out of the thirteen chicks had already taken flight
from the family roof-tree; not one too many, how-
ever, thought Mrs, Trueman; and when Patience,
belying her name, was all impatience to be also on
the wing (not from discontent with her cosy, snug
nest, but because she was longing to bring money
into the family exchequer), her mother declared
that straitened means with her were worth any
amount of money without her, and Patience had
to give her promise that she would bide at home
at all events till Mary grew a bit bigger,

It was mother’s supper that Patience was now
busy over, and after concocting a savoury little
dish from some scraps of meat and potatoes, she
popped it into the oven, and calling to Mary to
bring up the twins, she caught up baby Jess, and
covering her dimpled face with kisses carried her
off to bed.
26 To the End.



The upper storey of Mrs. Trueman’s cottage
consisted of three bedrooms, if bedroom the third
could be called when it was little more than a
cupboard—cupboard though it was, however, it
was the coveted possession of the elder Trueman

boys, and now that George had departed to the
~ region of oil and dips, Bob and Willie had become
its proud possessors.

Mrs, Trueman, baby, Susie and Tinrslept in the
front apartment, while Patience, Mary, Nellie and
the twins occupied the white-washed chamber that
looked over the strip of old-fashioned garden.

The air that came through the casement-window
was fragrant with the smell of roses, jasmin,
mignonette and honeysuckle, and as Patience
(after putting the children to bed) watched the
stars come out one by one, she thought, “ Truly
the lines had fallen to her in pleasant places; yea,
she had a goodly heritage.”

The hushed stillness of the room was only
broken by the deep-drawn breaths of the tired
children, when a low whisper came from the bed
nearest to the window.

“ Patience, what are you looking at ? The stars?”

“Yes, Nellie; why ain’t you asleep ?”

“Oh, I bain’t tired, Patience; do let me look
too; I do love them stars,” and the child crept on
to her sister’s knee,


The Cottage Home. 27



Patience drew together the casement, and wrap-
ping an old shawl round her little sister the two
gazed together for some minutes in silence.

« Ain't they lovely?” at last whispered Nellie.
“ Patience, be Heaven up there ?”

“J don’t know, Nellie; nobody rightly knows.”

“Oh, I hope it be—stars seem somehow so
home-like.”

“But Heaven does not require to be made
home-like, Nellie dear; Heaven is our Father’s
house, and then (and Patience’s voice lowered and
her eyes glistened) Jesus is there.”

The child’s arms tightened round her sister’s neck,
but she said nothing; when Patience was carrying
her back to bed, however, she whispered, “ Patience,
I do love the Lord Jesus.”

“T am so glad, Nellie dear, for you know the
Lord Jesus loves you very much—more than cven
mother or me,” —

“I know He does,’ and the little fair head
nestled with satisfaction on its pillow.

Tucking her little sister in securely, Patience
kissed her fondly, then ran down-stairs to look after
her savoury dish in the oven.

tee


CHAPTER VI.
EVENING CONFIDENCES.
AIRS. TRUEMAN was very tired when

she reached home, but Patience put
her into the old-fashioned arm-chair,
and took off her heavy boots, and after
a strong cup of tea and some supper she began to
revive.

“Well, Patience, some folks may like being out
and about, but to my mind there’s no place like
home,” and Mrs. Trueman stroked her daughter's
head fondly.

“What, mother! you don’t envy Uncle Tom all
his grandeur?”

“No, lass, that I don’t, though he has as tidy a
house as you would wish to set eyes on—a parlour
at the back of the shop where they takes their
meals, and a sitting-room up-stairs with a pianer
for Amelia to play on, and four bedrooms with
lace curtains at the windows; but there now, I


Of OP RT SES

Cat Re ae



Evening Confidences. 29



wouldn’t give our little place for the whole of it,”
and Mrs, Trueman gazed with satisfaction round
her cheery kitchen.

“And did George seem content to stay, mother ?”

“Ay, dear lad, he did his best to put a brave
face upon it, but his heart was in his mouth, that
I could see, when he said good-bye to me in the
parlour. His uncle, however, he slapped him on the
back, and told him that if he was a sharp lad, and
steady, perhaps some day he might write his name
over the shop.”

“Then, mother, some time perhaps George will
have a house too with a parlour and a pianer and
bedrooms and lace curtains.”

“Ah, Patience, my child, it is not money I
covet for my children ; if George only turns out an
honest God-fearing man like his dear father, my
prayers will be answered.”

“I know, mother, I know,” and looking up in
her mother’s face with a bright smile, Patience
added softly, “We all know, mother dear, your
heart’s desire for us.”

“And my heart’s desire is granted for one at
least of my children, is it not?”

Patience’s “ yes,” though a low was a very earnest
one; then drawing a stool to her mother’s fect
she repeated her conversation with Nellie that
night.
30 To the End.



“Ah, Patience, my child, what a true God in
Heaven is our God! The night your dear father was
taken how I did beseech the good Lord to let me
meet.my dear Will again some day, and to let me
bring all my dear children with me, and see how
He is answering my prayer. Dear little Nellie, I
always thought her a child beyond her years, and
she is that like her father I could almost fancy
sometimes it is his dear eyes a-lookin’ at me.” |

Eight o’clock struck, and Patience was still on a
stool at her mother’s feet; a big basket, however,
stood beside her with a pile of socks which she
was busy darning.

It was easy to see what a bond of union existed
between this mother and daughter. To Mrs, True-
man, Patience was not only a deeply-loved child,
but also a trusted companion and counsellor, while
to Patience Mrs. Trueman was just mother; but
the way in which the girl’s voice softened and her
eyes brightened when she pronounced this word
showed what a wealth of meaning it conveyed to
her.

“Patience, give me some of those stockings; I
am morg rested now.”

“No, mother, not one, you are to finish your
day like a lady,” and jumping up Patience shook.
up her mother’s cushion and pulled her gently
back upon it. “There now, that is right ; it is really


Evening Confidences. 31





quite a pleasure, mother dear, to see you for once
with your hands before you.”

“Ah, Patience, you spoil your old mother, but
I suppose I must give in to you. Well, dear, and
how did the children behave themselves ?”

“Oh, very well; Bob and Willie they had a few
words at dinner, but they soon made it up after-
wards, But, mother, I have something to tell you;
do you know J have had a visitor?”

“A visitor—and who could that be?”

“Rose Wicks! Yes, mother, you may well open
your eyes; I am sure I did mine when she walked
in, it is so long since she has been to see us; and,
mother, do you know I think she is so changed
since the confirmation—she seems somehow so much
more quiet and humble-like.”

“Tam right glad to hear it, child, for to tell you
the truth, I was afeard Rose Wicks was beginning
to get a little light-headed last winter; but there
now, I hope she has taken heed to all that good
Mr. Newton has said to her; and, Patience dear,
when you get a chance you might say a word of
counsel to her. She is a pretty lass and soft spoken,
but she has a spirit of her own, and Wicks and
his wife, I fear me well, they don’t go the right
way to manage her.”

The garden-gate now clicked, and Bob and
, Willie rushed in full of the band-of-hope meeting
32 To the End.



they had been at, and eager to hear the latest news
of George.

Mrs, Trueman answered all their questions, and
then bade Bob reach down the Bible, for “the
church clock was striking nine,” she said, and she
and Patience had a hard day’s washing before
them.

A chapter was read, prayer was offered, and by
ten o'clock all in the little cottage were peacefully
sleeping, secure in the care of Him who never
epee nor sleepeth—the God of the widow
and the fatherless.




CHAPTER VII.

AN “AT HOME” AT THE KNOLL.

JIFTEEN—love; thirty—love; thirty—
fifteen ; thirty—all!”

These were the sounds that issued
from Dr. Wilmot’s garden one bright
afternoon towards the end of July, and the moss-
covered, velvety lawn looked like some gay parterre
of flowers with the summer costumes that were
dotted over it.

“T say, Joan, do exert yourself, Violet and I
don’t want to win the set without you and Newton
getting a game.”

It was Harry Wilmot who spoke, and with a well-
directed serve he sent a ball straight at his sister.

“Harry, you add insult to injury; your serves
are aggravating enough at the best of times, but
on hot days they are positively—”

“Cruel, are they not, Joan?”

“Harry, my boy, be chivalrous and merciful,
Cc



34 To the End.





young ladies are not expected to be such ‘dabs’
at lawn-tennis as the students at Guy’s. Well,
Newton, how are you and Violet? Miss Violet,
why the weather seems to have no evil effect upon
you—positively you look as cool and fresh as your
namesakes down in the valley yonder. MHarry
has been doing all the running about for you, I
suppose; quite right too, I would do the same if
I were in his place; keep him. at it, and then he
won't have time to launch any more shafts of sar-
casm at his sister,’ and with a nod and a smile
Dr. Wilmot passed on to the cosy party seated at
tea under the cedar-tree.

The old house had been made to disgorge couches,
easy-chairs, rugs, stools, &c.; and now that all
these were temptingly arranged on the mossy turf
beneath the shade of spreading branches, the old
cedar-tree looked a nook by no means to be
despised.

“Well, Miss Scott, how do you like our im-
promptu drawing-room? It is preferable to the
house in this weather, isn’t it?—-and there is no fear
of damp with this plentiful supply of rugs that
Harry has provided for us.”

“T think it is delightful, doctor,” and Rachel
Scott leaned back in her easy-chair as she spoke,
and gazed up at the blue sky through the thick
branches.
An “At Home” at the Knoll. 35



“JT was just telling Edith that even the tea seems
more delicately flavoured, I think, when it is taken
out of doors.”

“Ah, I don’t wonder at your thinking that,
you are compelled to lead such a shut-up life.”

“Yes, but when I do get out, just think how I
enjoy it! I don’t suppose I would be drinking in
the delights of this beautiful day with half such
a keen sense of enjoyment if I had not been kept
to the house for the best part of the winter.”

“ Ah, Rachel does not require sunshiny weather
to make her look on the bright side of things,
does she, doctor?” said Mr. Newton, as he laid
a hand on the back of his cousin’s chair; “she
carries sunshine with her.”

“That she does,” said Dr. Wilmot; “I wish all
my patients did the same, it would be better for
them and for me. Ah, here comes my little bit
of home sunshine, I see, with a cup of tea for her
old father. Well, Edith, my pet, not overcome
with your duties at the tea-table? And Violet and
Pansy, my sweet flowerets, what have you been
doing to make yourselves useful?” and stooping
down Dr. Wilmot lifted a child on to each knee.

“We have been taking round the bread and
butter,” lisped the pretty pair, “and Mrs. Newton
said we did it very nicely,” whispered Daisy, while
the modest Pansy hung her head.

C2
36 To the End.



“Oh! and you haven’t been eating any, I
suppose?”

“Yes, we did have owe little piece.”

“But Edith said we might,” chimed in Daisy.

“Oh then, if Edith said you might, I suppose
I mustn’t say anything,” and Dr. Wilmot drew the
golden heads on to his shoulder. “I am glad,
however, it was only ‘one Uittle piece, for that
Scotch bun looks very rich and ‘plummy,’ and I
shouldn’t like-nurse to pay me a visit to-morrow
to ask for one of the black bottles off the shelf
in the surgery.”

“No, and we shouldn’t like it either,” and the little
fair faces looked apprehensive at the suggestion.

“No, Iam sure you wouldn’t,” and Dr. Wilmot
leaned back in his chair laughing merrily. “As
you only took ‘one little piece, however, I don’t
think you need look so woebegone, for I dare say,
after all, I shall not have the pleasure of a visit
from nurse, so put such thoughts out of your heads,
and run away now and pick up balls for ‘Sister
Joan,” and kissing the pair fondly, Dr. Wilmot
watched them trot off with satisfaction.

“Dear little pets,” said Miss Scott, “how happy
they are to be of use! I have been watching that
game of lawn-tennis with such interest, for though
I don’t understand the rules, I like to sce the deft
way in which the ball is sent backwards and for-
An “At Home” at the Knoll. 37



wards. Harry never seems to miss a chance; I
suppose he is a capital player, Dr. Wilmot ?”

“Rather too capital, I am afraid, for his poor
little sister Joan. Frank plays well to Newton,
and what a pair of broad shoulders the young
fellow has brought back! Sea-voyages evidently
agree with him.”

“Yes, I wish Lawrence looked as well ; his mother
has been bemoaning his want of roses all the
morning; but a curate’s life in the east end of
London is no sinecure.”

“No, I should think not; but, Lawrence—is
Lawrence with you? Why, to be sure; there he is
talking to the wife. I must go over and speak to
him.”

The face that turned to greet Dr. Wilmot was
a very pale one, but the deep gray eyes were clear
and sparkling, and the firm hand-clasp the doctor
received betokened no lack of vigour.

“Why, Lawrence, my dear fellow, I thought
you were hard at work in the London slums.
How came I not to see you when I was cross-
ing the lawn? You were in the back garden.
Ah, I thought so; I felt sure I could not have
overlooked your stalwart form. Well, we are de-
lighted to have you back again amongst us once
more, aren’t we, Janie?”—and the doctor turned
and looked appealingly at his wife. “ But you have
38 To the End.



lost all your country roses, your father tells me;
ah, you do look rather whitewashed—overworked,
I suppose?”

“ Overworked, dear! I should think so,” stole in
Mrs. Wilmot’s soft voice; “do you know, Henry,
how many thousand Lawrence has in his parish?
Twenty-five !” .

“Twenty-five !—and how many helpers?”

“Only the vicar a lay-reader, and myself, and
some fifteen to twenty Sunday-school teachers
and district visitors.”

“Not one for every thousand; Lawrence, my dear
fellow, I do pity you,” and the doctor sank into
a seat by his wife’s sofa.

“Pity my poor people, doctor, don’t waste your
pity on me; I wouldn’t change my lot with an
emperor’s,” and the young man raised his head
proudly. “I assure you it is not the work done
that kills, it is the work left undone—the thought
of the sheep astray—astray without a shepherd.”

“But even. that care, Lawrence, you can lay at
the feet of the Good Shepherd; your sheep can
never wander beyond His ken; He will guide both
you and them.”

“ T know it, doctor, I know it, and when I look
at our streets and alleys with their teeming, toiling
masses, that is the thought that keeps me from
despair.”
A ena





GiSUNP INI WAS.

TWILIGHT TALKS.

HE fierce burning July sun had sunk
in a blaze of glory, and lights were
beginning to twinkle here and there

in the old-fashioned casements of “ The

Knoll,” when, supper over, the few “intimates ” of

Dr. and Mrs. Wilmot who had remained to spend

the evening, strolled out through the open windows



_ to the verandah and the lawn.

Edith, to her delight, found herself pacing the
gravelled pathways side by side with Mr. Newton,
for dearly she loved ‘a talk with “the Vicar,” while
he, eagerly solicitous for the welfare of the young
members of his flock, gladly welcomed every oppor-
tunity of helping them with advice and sympathy.

“Violet tells me she has asked you for a district,
Mr. Newton.” |

“Yes, and with her father’s consent I have given
her a few cottages—those facing the Green.”

“ Where the Wicks and Widow Smart live,” and
Edith’s face wore a wistful expression,
40 To the End.



Mr. Newton gazed at her through the darken-
ing twilight. He guessed something of what was
passing through her mind,

“Edith, my child, you can work for God as dis-
tinctly as Violet does even though your sphere
does not extend beyond the limits of home.”

Edith raised her eyes with a new light in them |
—the wistful expression was gone.

“An eldest daughter and sister has such a wide
area of usefulness, I always think, and when she
brightly, patiently, and conscientiously takes up
her several duties and performs them all to the
glory of God, who can tell to what extent her
influence may be used, nor how many may be
blessed through her bright example?”

“Oh, Mr. Newton, you do help one so. Now all
this week I have been thinking that perhaps Iam
drifting too much with circumstances, our home
life is such a happy one, and the days fly past so
swiftly. Mother is not strong, and there are so
many little things to do; but last week there
flashed across me the thought that I was not
working at all for God—that I had no district or
Sunday-school class, or anything of that sort, I
mean—and then I remembered all the Bishop
said at our Confirmation about life being a battle
and we being soldiers, and I began to be afraid that
just perhaps because I was so happy I had been
SKrakew 5

















SP—— SES
“ EEE EE ETE aS FB
ui oe SS SSS GE A

SSS See Sa f,.

= aS



“Rose Rose, don’t talk like that. How many a poor London girl would think
your little home a Paradise!"—#. 53.
Twilight Talks. 43
drifting too easily with the tide, that perhaps .. .”
—and Edith’s voice faltered, and her head lowered
—‘“T have not been fighting at all.”

“Edith, my child, you would like to have a
district ?”

“Oh, Mr. Newton, I should—I should—of all
things—but—”

“But if you took one, some of those ‘little
things’ to which you alluded so casually would be
thrown on the shoulders of your mother (since
Joan is still in the school-room), and your mother
is not able to bear them.”

“That is just it; mother is pretty well some
days, but other times she can barely lift her head
from the pillow.”

“Then rest content. God in His good Provi-
dence is shutting the door for you at present to
outside work; your work for Him must be at
home, and remember that piety shown at home
and requital of parents (we have it on God’s own
authority) is ‘good and acceptable’ before Him.” °

“Father, the school-mistress wants to see
you.”

Mr. Newton turned to obey the summons, and
Lawrence Newton took his father’s place beside
_ Edith.

“What a glorious night !—the stars are as bright
as diamonds,”
44 To the End.



“Aren't they? You must enjoy this taste of
country, Lawrence, after London.”

“That I do, and not the least part of my enjoy-
ment is the seeing of old friends; it is not the
physical atmosphere of London, however, that is
so depressing, it is the spiritual and moral—the
dull, degraded, hopeless depths into which most
of the poor (at least the poor around me) have
sunk, You find yourself asking wonderingly,
‘Can anything that I can say penetrate to brains
whose one thought is how to procure the bread for
which they are starving? Can any message that
I can bring brighten faces whose eyes are sunk
and wan with despair ?’—and then you remember
that your message is Divine.”

“Oh, Lawrence, what a sad picture!”

“Sad, but true. Why, only the day before
yesterday, up in a dingy attic at the top of a long
stair, I came across a young girl—not much older
than you, Edith, and yet a widow (her husband
fell from a scaffold some months ago), and there
she was toiling for dear life to keep her mother,
her two little children and herself from starvation,
and what do you think were the munificent wages
she was receiving ?”

“Tam sure I don’t know.”

“Three-farthings an hour!-—so if the poor
creature could keep on stitch! stitch! stitch! for
Twilight Talks. 45



twelve hours out of twenty-four, on the Saturday
night she would receive four-and-sixpence, out of
which she would have to pay for thread and
needles, so you can imagine what a princely sum
would be left for fuel, food, and shelter.”

“Lawrence, how caz they live?”

“That is the problem I leave you to solve. Eke
out existence somehow thcy do ; but if the poor little
bread-winner were to break down, nothing could lie
before them but the workhouse. Yes, truly, as my
Vicar said to me the other day, it is not the pleasures
and the riches of this world that choke the seed we
endeavour to sow; it is the cares, the sordid grind-
ing cares. Thank God, there is a bright side to the
picture, however. There is the mission-room with
its hearty little services, and oh, how I love to hear
the poor people pouring out their hearts to Him
who has said, ‘Come unto Me, all ye that are
weary and heavy laden, and I will give you rest!’
There are the schools, where we trust we are train-
ing the children for better and brighter things ; the
Band of Hope gatherings, the mothers’ meetings
—all, all so many little focusses of light which we
hope in time will radiate out such life-giving beams
that the entire face of our parish shall be changed.”

Mr. Newton’s talk with the school-mistress over,
he joined the party in the drawing-room. Violet
Norman was singing, but twisting herself round on
46 To the End.
the music-stool, she suddenly demanded from Frank
Newton “a yarn.”

“Oh yes, Frank, a yarn, a yarn!” shouted Harry
and Joan Wilmot, and yielding to the popular
demand, Frank led the way to the verandah,

Mr. Newton and Margaret Scott exchanged
amused glances.

“What a difference there is in character!” said
Mr, Newton, as he drew a stool to his cousin’s side
and gazed out at the two quiet figures who were
pacing so leisurely up and down the lawn.

“That there is; Edith is made to be an eldest
sister.”

“ And yet she thinks she is not doing her duty,”
and Mr, Newton repeated some of the conversation
that had taken place in the garden.

“ Dear child, she is as humble as she is unselfish.
Why, all this afternoon she has been battling with
her inclinations—pouring out tea instead of playing
at tennis, talking to her parents’ friends instead of
talking to her own, playing at ball with the children
instead of listening to Violet and Frank singing.”

“Of course she has—I noticéd all that. Yes, into
the warp and woof of everyday life Edith hath
begun to weave the golden threads of love and self-
sacrifice, One at least of my confirmation candi-
dates is, I trust, following in the footsteps of the
blessed Master who pleased not Himself.”


CHAPTER Ix.

WAVERERS.

HE next two years that passed over
St. Magna’s were uneventful ones (if
years can be called uneventful in which
habits are being formed, and character

is being moulded for eternity). Outwardly how-

‘ever there was nothing to disturb the still tenor of

village life. Every Monday morning Mrs. Trueman

and Patience were to be seen with sleeves rolled
up standing at the wash-tub; every afternoon Mr.

Newton was to be met with swift step traversing

the parish; each day and all hours of the day Dr.

Wilmot’s brougham rolled along with its red-

painted wheels.

Sunday brought the only break to the weekly
routine—Sunday, and the comings and goings of
Frank Newton and Harry Wilmot. Of late these
comings and goings of Harry Wilmot’s had been
much more frequent than usual. On the smallest


48 To the End.



possible pretext he was always running down to
St. Magna’s, and Edith (if no one else) began to
suspect that Violet Norman was the magnet that
drew him so constantly homewards.

This knowledge gave Edith some compunction,
for she feared Violet was only playing with her
brother; nor were her surmises incorrect, for to
receive and to be pleased with Harry Wilmot’s
attentions was in Violet Norman’s estimation one
thing—to marry him and to settle down at St.
Magna’s quite another.

“Edith, wish me joy!” was Violet’s salutation
one bright spring morning as she entered the
school-room of the Knoll. “Iam going to Paris.”

“To Paris!” And Edith in her astonishment
let fall the work she was so busy over.

“Yes, to Paris; Mrs. Richards has asked me to
accompany her. At first papa said ‘no, Paris was
so far away, and Mrs. Richards—well, he doesn’t
particularly care for her, but I think the truth was,
he was afraid of that nephew of hers that read with
him some years ago; but Mrs. Richards assured
him we should be quite by ourselves—no dangerous
articles in the shape of gentlemen anywhere near ;
and I—I begged and entreated, and so the end of
it is, here am I come to ask if I can do any com-
missions for you in Paris,” and with a mock courtesy
Violet pirouetted before Edith
Waverers. 49



“ Violet, you quite take away my breath; why,
whatever will your father do without you?”

“Do—why, the best he can, and when I return I
shall be received with open arms, and Aunt Hester
will actually forget to scold for one whole day.”

“Oh, Violet, I am sure your aunt loves you
very dearly.”

“Loves me; perhaps she does, but she takes a
peculiar way of showing it. No doubt it is my
fault, though, that I am so constantly in her black
books. I do so dearly love to shock her. I like to
see her peer over her blue goggles and say, ‘ Violet,
do you really mean it? Well, young girls must be
different now to what they were when I was young,”
And Violet drew a long face, and imitated with
exaggerated gesture her aunt’s demure tones. “But,
Edith, I see I am shocking you, and I am not
going to stay in the house this beautiful morning
talking any more about good prim old Aunt Hester,
Throw away that stupid mending and come out
in the garden; Joan must hear my news.”

“Violet, what will you do about your district ? ”
said Edith, as the two walked together over the
sunny lawn,

“ My district. Oh, Mr. Newton must look after
that.”

“TI wonder if he would let me have it while you
are away,” and a thoughtful look came into Edith’s

D
50 To the End.



blue eyes. “Now Joan is out of the school-room,
mother was only saying yesterday she can spare
me for a little parish work.”

“Then do take it, and keep it altogether if you
like, for I don’t think district-visiting is my voca-
tion. I never know what to say to the old bedies,
and J am tired to death of Mrs. Wick’s incessant
srumbling, and Mrs. Brown’s laments over the
difficulties of making two ends meet.”

“But, Violet, dear,” was Edith’s gentle remon-
strance, “do you think we ought to give up a duty
because it is perhaps not quite tasteful to us?”

“Now, Edith, pray don’t begin sermonizing, I
am in no mood for lectures this morning. Paris,
beautiful, bright Paris !—I can think of nothing but
Paris to-day. Oh, Joan!—where is Joan? I doso
long to tell her Iam going;” and careering along
the gravelled pathways, Violet made the old garden
re-echo with her calls.

Edith followed, but with a troubled look on her
face. Her thoughts had travelled back to another
spring morning—bright and beautiful as this one—
when she and Violet had knelt in the old church
at St. Magna’s, and sworn allegiance to the same
Master. How wrapt in devotion Violet had seemed
then, how earnestly she had sung—

“O Jesus, I have promised
To serve Thee to the end !”
Waverers. Sr





And now—now was she already beginning to waver
in that allegiance ? Was she thirsty after waters that
secmed more sweet, after pastures that appeared
more fair? Oh, Edith hoped not, she trusted not ;
and swiftly to the blue sky was raised a cry for
her friend—a cry that in after years was answered,
but through what trials? Ah, pretty, foolish Violet,
choosing your own way and following the bent
of your own inclinations to the narrow path—you
can only be brought back by the weary road of
suffering!

Some two weeks later the wicket-gate of one of
the cottages in Violet Norman’s district was pushed
open by Edith Wilmot, and as she walked up the
tiny garden she stood for a moment admiring the
lilies of the valley and the crocuses with which
the little red-tiled path was bordered.

Angry voices from within warned her that a
family altercation was taking place; so, anxious
not to become a listener, Edith hastened her steps,
Just as she reached the porch a man’s voice shouted,
“Then to London you shan’t go; for once, for all,
I forbid it,” and the back-door slammed angrily.

Edith knocked, and light footsteps were heard
running quickly up-stairs, while a weak voice in a
querulous tone bade the visitor enter.

“Good afternoon, Mrs. Wicks ; Miss. Norman has

D2
52 To the End.



gone away, so I have come to see you instead of
her.”

« And has Miss Norman gone away? Well, miss,
V’ll make so bold as to say I hope ye'll come a
bit more regular than she did, for our club money
is that behind I hardly know when last I paid it;
but sit you down, sit you down, and I'll look for
my card byand by. But Rose and her father, they
have been having one of their upsets again, and
their upsets upset me—that they do; my breath
is just all nohow;” and Mrs. Wicks undid her
cap-strings, and wiped her face with her pocket-
handkerchief.

Edith walked to the window and began remarking
on the beauty of some flowers that stood on the
sill, for she did not wish to mar her first visit by
entering on uncongenial family topics.

Mrs. Wicks, however, was not to be balked of a
grumble when she had the chance of a sympathetic
listener, and back again she went to her grievance.

“You see, miss, it’s all along o’ that there
Lunnon. Rose, she’s wild for a sight o’ the place,
and Wicks, the name of it is enough for him, ever
since his sister Jessie that was—she that lived down
in the hollow. Ah, you won’t remember her, but
the doctor he would sure—the prettiest girl all
round the country-side, and as tall and straight
as an atrow. Well, as I was a sayin’, Wicks, he
Waverers. 53



can’t bide the name of Lunnon ever since Jess
—pretty Jess—took herself there. She came back
with a broken heart, and six months saw the last
of her. But Rose, she won’t listen to such tales;
St. Magna’s, it’s a deal too dull for her.”

Once again Edith tried to turn the conversation,
and this time more successfully. Mrs. Wicks’ re-
marks were not unnoted though, and when Rose
(the traces of tears washed from her pretty eyes)
accompanied their visitor to the garden-gate, Edith
laid a hand on the young girl’s arm.

“Rose, I always feel that there is a special link
between you and me ever since that happy day
when we were confirmed together.”

“Yes, miss,” said Rose, but her tone was an un-
interested one; “why, that’s two year ago come
Easter, but it seems more like four—time goes so
slowly in this stupid little place.”

“Don’t call St. Magna’s stupid, Rose; it is our
home, and where God has placed us.”

“ Ah, life goes differently to you gentlefolks, miss,
to what it does to we poor cottagers. I’m tired to
death of being mewed up in our little place, with
nothing to listen to but grumbling—grumbling
—grumbling.”

“Rose, Rose, don’t talk like that. How many a
poor London girl would think your little home a
Paradise!”
54 To the End.

“ Ah, some folks like dullness, but I am not one
of them,” and Rose pulled open the garden-gate
with a bang.

“But a soldier does not choose in battle the post
he likes, he goes where his commander sends him,
and, Rose” (and Edith’s voice lowered), “ you and
I promised to be soldiers—good soldiers of the
Lord Jesus Christ’s! Oh, let us be faithful to
Him, and serve Him to the end!”

Rose shut the gate with a greater bang than she
had opened it, and Edith with a sad heart walked
across the green.

Was Rose too:beginning to waver in her alle-
giance? Was she forsaking the living fountains of
waters, and hewing out for herself cisterns—broken
cisterns that could hold no water?

With a sigh Edith turned and looked at the
little cottage nestling so peacefully among the tall
elms; but remembering the promise, “Be careful
for nothing, but in everything by prayer and sup-
plication with thanksgiving, let your requests be
made known unto God,” the sigh was turned into

a prayer. E

&~

HI


CHAPTER X.

THE DARKENED HOME.

] HE Jungfrau in all its snowy loveliness
| was standing out pure and cool against
the deep blue summer’s sky, when a
party of English tourists (their hands
filled with letters) seated themselves on the verandah
of the Grand Hotel de Miirren.

“Now, Miss Norman, don’t tell us St. Magna’s
has a clean bill of health yet, or we shall be having
you summoned home.”

The speaker, a tall, dark young man, with a florid
(too florid) complexion, gazed into Violet Norman’s
face with a meaning smile as he spoke,

Violet bent her head to hide her blushes, and
busily employed herself opening her letters,

“Yes, Lionel, you may thank the fever for giving
you Miss Norman as a travelling companion,” said
Mrs. Richards, from the depth of a rocking-chair,
“for [had hard work—hadn’t I, Violet—to persuade


56 To the End.



your father to allow you to accompany me even
as far as Paris?”

But Violet was deep in her letters.

“Mrs. Richards,” she said at length, looking up
with a startled expression, “what do you think ?
—Dr. Wilmot has the fever.”

“Dr. Wilmot ?—let me see, I don’t know much
about your local magnates—is not that the cheery-
faced man that drives about in the brougham
with the red wheels? Ah, I thought so; is hea
great friend of your father’s ?”

“Yes, and his daughters are great friends of
mine,” and Violet gazed across at the Jungfrau
with a troubled face.

“’Pon my word, Miss Norman, I have half a
mind to catch the fever myself, if catching it excites
your sympathy so.”

But Lionel Richards’ words grated harshly’ on
Violet, and she forgot to blush this time.

“Does your father say the doctor’s is a bad
case?” asked Mrs. Richards.

“Yes, they had sent for a London doctor. Our
laundress’s little girl, Mary Trueman, died on
Wednesday night, and Dr. Wilmot was with her
to the last; on the Thursday he sickened himself,
and now, papa says, is lying quiteinsensible. Poor
Mrs. Wilmot, what will she do?—and Edith and
Joan they just adored their father,”
The Darkened Home. 57



This was the question all St. Magna’s was asking
that afternoon too, as with sad faces and tearful
eyes they turned away in the bright summer’s sun-
shine from the doors of the closed Knoll. What
would Mrs. Wilmot and the children do? what
would they all do?—for their good doctor had been
taken away from them. Never again would his quiet,
firm step cross the threshold of their dwellings ;
never again would his bright, cheerful voice calm and
soothe them in their hours of sickness and suffering.

Yes, St. Magna’s felt very desolate that after-
noon, though the sky had not a cloud in it, and
the larks were warbling out their very little hearts
for joy; and if St. Magna’s felt sad and desolate,
what was the depth of the blank in the hearts of
the widow and the orphans?

Ah, sorrow such as theirs is not to be dwelt
upon, it can only be carried in faith to the feet of
Him who says, “I know their sorrows ;” who binds
up the broken-hearted and heals their wounds.

When the blinds of the Knoll were drawn up
again and life’s duties had once more to be faced,
Edith felt as if she was walking the world in a
dream. It seemed so strange that the sun should
shine, and all the little details of every-day life have
to be observed, when he round whom all this home-
life circled, who was its earthly mainspring and
centre, was gone; and had it not been for the
58 To the End.



strength and the courage drawn from the minutes
spent in prayer in her little wainscoted bedroom,
Edith hardly knew how those first terrible weeks
could have been got through.

It was such anguish to take down from the pegs
in the hall the hats and the coats that had hung
there so long, and Edith could hardly see for
blinding tears the creases she was smoothing out
so reverently, as she carefully folded away each
precious article. Then what heart-breaking it was
to sit at meals and never, never to hear the sound
of the red wheels rolling up the avenue; never to
spring forward to meet the glad welcome; never to
receive the loving smile, to hear the hearty words
of commendation with which Dr. Wilmot always
greeted every little act of duty performed by “his
little bit of home sunshine.”

Yes, the chasm in Edith’s life was a terribly
yawning one. Every hour, every minute of the
day she missed the dear, fatherly love that had
always so guarded and guided her; but the loss
of this precious earthly father only drove her to
walk more closely with her Heavenly Father, and
to seek to lighten by every means in her power
the weight of sorrow that rested on her mother—
her mother whose grief was so much deeper than
her own.

Mrs. Wilmot had made up her mind to leave
The Darkened Home. — 59



St. Magna’s, and to make a home in London for
her sons; for Cuthbert, the second boy, was about
to enter one of the hospitals as a student, and
Harry had not yet taken his degree. The locum
tenens waS anxious as soon as possible to take
possession of the Knoll, so the next few weeks
were busy ones; but prayer and work are the best
antidotes to sorrow.

The last Sunday evening came at length, and as
the rays of the setting sun streamed through the
painted glass windows of St. Magna’s church,
tinting the delicate tracery of the nave and arches,
and lighting up the old-fashioned galleries, they
rested for a while’on the bowed head of Edith
Wilmot, as with a heart full of surging emotions she
knelt for the last time in her accustomed corner.

“The barrel of meal shall not waste, neither shall
the cruse of oil fail,’ was the text chosen, and in
a few brief words Mr. Newton sketched the life-
history of the lone widow of Zarephath. “This
poor woman,” he said, “ must have been doing in the
eyes of the worldly wise a very foolish thing when
she took of her handful of meal to make a cake
for a stranger; but she was obeying the voice of
the Lord at the hand of His Prophet. God had
promised to take care of her future; she trusted
to Him for it.

“Are any of you, my hearers,” said Mr. Newton
60 To the End.



“passing through a similar experience to this poor
woman? Is the meal in your barrel reduced to a
handful? The oil in your cruse, is it almost wasted ?
Learn a lesson from the widow of Zarephath: obey
God, trust Him; the path of obedience must be
always the path of blessing. ‘Who is among
you that feareth the Lord, that obeyeth the voice
of His servant, that walketh in darkness and hath
no light? let him trust in the name of the Lord,
and stay upon his God. The barrel of meal shall
not waste, neither shall the cruse of oil fail.”

Edith walked home in the setting sun with a
face of chastened calm. Behind her there lay the
sunny days of childhood and girlhood, before her
stretched an untried future. Not altogether dark
was her horizon, however ; upon it there gleamed
a sure star of promise—“ The barrel of meal shall
not waste, neither shall the cruse of oil fail.”


CHAPTER XI.

ADELBERT TERRACE.

==5H, Edith, surely the cabman has made
a mistake! You don’t mean to say
that this wretched house is to be our
home?”

It was Joan Wilmot who spoke, and as she
peered out of the window of the fly her face ex-
pressed the most intense disgust. Edith jumped
up and tapped her sister warningly on the foot ;
then exclaiming, “Mother dear, here we are,” she
jumped out of the cab, and proceeded carefully to
help her mother out.

Poor Mrs. Wilmot! It was with a very heavy
heart that she lifted her deep crape veil and gazed
at her new home, after the children had left her to
see about the luggage. Blinding tears prevented
her seeing much, but what little she did see formed
a painful contrast to the brightness and the comfort
of the Knoll. It was not the comforts of the Knoll,



62 To the End.
ce I ee
however, that Mrs. Wilmot’s heart was yearning
for ; it was its associations—the tender associations
that clung and clustered round even every article
of furniture in her old home—the home whose
threshold she had first crossed as a young bride.

“Oh, Edith, how can we ever live here?” asked
Joan, as, the boxes carried up-stairs and the cabman
paid, the two girls gazed out of a window of one of
the back bedrooms, at the rows upon rows of tall
chimneys from which showers of black smuts were
falling. “There is not a tree to be seen—not a blade
of grass—not a flower—nothing but roofs and
chimneys ; I feel stifled already,” and burying her
face in her hands, Joan burst into a passion of tears.

Edith’s eyes were wet too, but she struggled
bravely with her emotion ; then laying a hand on
her sister’s shoulder she said gently—

“Joan, Joan, don’t cry like that, please— please

don’t; mother will see by your eyes what you have
been doing, and we must control ourselves for her
sake. I know it is hard work, darling, but do, do
think of mother.”

“ Edith, I have no patience with you; you expect
people to go along just like machines,” and Joan
shook her sister’s hand angrily from her shoulder.
“And as to my not thinking of mother, is it not
partly for her I am grieving? Mother knows how I
loved the Knoll, however, and I am sure she does
Adelbert Terrace. 63
not expect us to be so hard-hearted as to leave it
without a tear. Dear, dear old place! And here we
shall have no pony to ride, and no garden to play
tennis in’”—and burying her face in her hands,
Joan’s sobs broke forth anew.

Edith gave a weary little sigh as she took off
her hat and placed it on the bed. What different
things people yearned for! The pony and the
garden —why, she had hardly thought of them ; it
was her father’s love and the old home feeling for
which her heart was so sorely pining.

Knowing that her sister was tired and dispirited,
however, she attempted no further remonstrance,
but after folding away her things, she said—

“Joan, dear, I am going down to look after
mother, and see about the supper; come down
when you are ready, will you? I am sure a cup
of tea will do you good.”

Before descending to the dining-room, Edith
knelt for a few minutes in an unoccupied room on
the other side of the passage, and earnestly besought
God to bless their new home, and to give to each
one grace and strength to take up the duties that
lay before them, and to fill to His glory the niche
that He had assigned to them; then with a face
of calm quiet peace she’ went gently down-stairs.

Settling into a new home to hearts that have
any tenacity of affection is not altogether a
aa

64 To the End.



pleasurable occupation, even when the new home is
in most respects an improvement on the old; but
when (as in the case of the Wilmots) the new home
is not only not superior to the old, but infinitely its
inferior, the task is certainly a painful one.

Every hour of the day, it seemed to Edith, the
two maids that had been brought from the Knoll
would come running to ask her how they could get
along without this thing, or how they could possibly
manage without that, and it required considerable
skill and ingenuity to devise ways for filling in such
a large family party to such close quarters.

The little ones and their nurse were for the
present (through Mrs. Muir’s kindness) safely
housed at the Home Farm; Mary and Bertie at
the Rectory, and Cuthbert and Harry were striving
to gain fresh vigour and energies for their winter
studies among the Welsh mountains. All were to
assemble under the new family roof-tree, however,
in the course of a week or ten days, and Edith
determined that Adelbert Terrace should wear its
most comfortable aspect to greet them.

Comforts do not fall into the lap though like ripe
apples from a tree in autumn; time and labour
must be expended upon them, or money is required
to procure them, and of this latter article Edith was
determined not to beg from her mother ; for though

Dr. Wilmot had left his family fairly well provided
Adelbert Terrace. 65



for, as long as the boys’ education formed such a
heavy item in the yearly expenditure, there was
no surplus cash for luxuries,

Of the sum devoted to the move, thouzh, there
was still a small balance left in hand, and with this
Edith procured some cretonnes and chintzes. Then
a tour of the house was made; dingy curtains were
pulled down and new substituted, faded arm-chairs
were covered, musty bed-hangings were thrown
away, and everything that Joan declared “alto-
gether too unbearably ugly” was consigned to the
top garret. The little room that Mrs. Wilmot had
chosen for her own sanctum received special care,
most of the precious articles that had been brought
from the Knoll going to ornament it; but about’
the large top room, which was designed for the
nursery, Edith was almost in despair. What could
make the sickly paper look less bare, or the light
woodwork more bright? Joan, however, who had
something of the eye of an artist, here came to the
rescue. Why not have some of the pictures from
their old Christmas annuals cheaply framed and
hungup? And if Edith could produce some scraps,
she would paste them on the panels of the door
and varnish them; then the chimney-piece could
be covered with red cloth, and the faded carpet
covered with a bright drugget.

“Splendid suggestions,” said Edith, and she

E
66 To the End.



proceeded immediately to act upon them, for poor
little Bertie and “the flowerets” would miss sorely
the fields and the lanes, and they would now have
no long corridors and large garden to play in.

Edith’s last touches of decoration were just being
put to Adelbert Terrace when the cab containing
Harry and Cuthbert rolled up to the door, and
with a back that ached with stooping, and eyes that
were weak with working, she ran down to welcome
them. All sense of fatigue was forgotten, though,
some two hours later, when, turning to his mother,
Harry said—

“Well, mother, I don’t know whether I was in
the blues the last time I saw Adelbert Terrace, but
certainly I thought it the dullest little hole imagin-
able, but now it looks quite transformed. Is it your
presence that has cast such a glamour over it?”

“Edie and Joan are the’magicians that have
worked the transformation,” said Mrs. Wilmot, and
her loving look of thanks more than repaid Edith
for all her toil.

&
EE




CHAPTER XII.

TAKE UP THE CROSS,

|] UMMER had come and gone, and a
‘| bright log fire was crackling and blaz-
ing on the hearth of the parlour at the
Home Farm. The parlour was a very
cheery room, as what room was not where Mrs,
Muir reigned supreme? The deep, old-fashioned
bow windows were cosily draped with warm red
hangings, and in the embrasures stood large blue
pots of bright-coloured chrysanthemums. Round
the delicately-tinted walls ran a dark oak wain-
scoting, and the oval mirrors reflected tables
covered with books and work, and low cosy chairs
that seemed to invite you to rest in them.

Ruth’s couch was drawn up to the fire, and
beside it stood a large basket filled with work;
her fingers did not Seem in a very busy mood,
though, to-night, and Mrs. Muir kept gazing across
from her writing at her niece, wondering why the
E 2


68 To the End.



knitting was laid down so often, and why the gray
eyes gazed so gravely into the fire.

“Ruthie, my bairnie,” at last she ventured to
say, ‘is your back troubling you to-night ?”

“No, auntie dearie;” but the heavily-fringed
eyelids drooped, and the knitting was seized upon
with avidity.

Something was ailing the child, what could it
be? Never mind, it would come out presently.

Tea over, Mrs. Muir proceeded to unpack a
large parcel of wool that. had arrived from the
north that morning, then drawing a stool to
Ruth’s couch, she began winding the pretty,
heathery mixtures.

“Mrs. Gillespie has sent us a fine collection this
time, hasn’t she, Ruthie? See what a delicate
gray yon Shetland is, and how prettily speckled
is that Alloa yarn, and do you know what I was
thinking, childie ?—that you might make a cloud
for Edith Wilmot.”

“Oh, Aunt Janie, that would be nice,” and the
grave eyes became bright again.

“Set to work, my bairnie, then, and I’ll try and
make a few things for the bit lambies; it will be
a sorry Christmas for them all this year, and I
should like them to think there are some real
hearts at St. Magna’s that aye remember them.”

“Violet says that Joan can’t bear the life in
Take up the Cross. 69



London. Sheets after sheets she writes to her
full of complaints.”

“And how much better it would be for the poor
lassie if the time she took in writing those sheets
were spent in telling the Lord Jesus her troubles,
fle can help her, but Violet can’t. No, Ruthie,
there’s no good in kicking at the Cross; we must
aye pray for grace and strength to ¢ake it up, and
to follow the Blessed Master wherever He leads.
It’s a lesson we take years to spell out, and that
we're over and over again turned in, but it’s a
lesson once learnt that brings peace and happiness.”

Silence was only broken by the spluttering of
the wooden logs and the click of Ruth’s needles.

“ Has Violet been here to-day?” asked Mrs, Muir,

“Yes, auntie, didn’t you see her? She went
out to the garden to look for you.”

“No, childie, but perhaps I was in the orchard
—the pippins are fine this year, and I went up to
see about the storing of them.”

Another silence. Mrs. Muir was thinking—could
this visit have had anything to do with Ruth’s fit
of absorption?

Violet was fond of coming to the Home Farm,
and lately Mrs. Muir had encouraged her, for Ruth
missed Edith Wilmot sorely, and she thought it
would do the child good to hear Violet’s foreign
experiences. A breath of Swiss air, even at second-
70 To the End.



hand, sometimes conveys a tonic to a poor shut-
up invalid. These visits had not had the exhilar-
ating effect upon Ruth, though, that Mrs. Muir
had hoped for; in fact, after them she seemed more
quiet and grave; while after a talk with Edith her
whole face would sparkle with sunshine. Into the
shut-up restricted life Violet never seemed to
infuse any brightness or ozone, but only, somehow
or other, to impress the invalid with a sense of
how much she missed, and of her lack of power.

Ah, what a subtle thing influence is!—and how
easy it is to make others look out on life through
our own jaundiced spectacles. Envy, dissatisfac-
tion, restlessness, how easily they can be communi-
cated, while who among us does not know the
impetus, thank God, that can be given to us by
the strong faith of a friend ?

Violet never succeeded though in making Ruth
discontented with her lot; the patient quiet girl
followed her Saviour too closely for that; but
what she did was, by useless bemoanings over the
invalid’s lack of power, and frequent allusions to
all that she missed, thoroughly to depress the poor
girl with the sense of her own uselessness.

This was the thought that was weighing so
heavily on Ruth to-night. How she longed to be
up and doing, breaking her alabaster box at the
feet of the Master]
Take up the Cross. 71



“ Auntie,” she said at length, “I have been think-
ing over what you said just now about kicking at
the Cross, and I think I have been kicking at
mine to-day.”

“Have you, dearie—how ?”

The pale face flushed, and the gray eyes hid
themselves beneath their long lashes as with a
slight tremor in her voice Ruth said, “I have
been so longing to be up and doing; all the after-
noon I have been thinking—thinking—thinking of
all that I might do if only I was strong and
active.”

The firelight flickered on the walls, but Mrs,
Muir made no answer.

“Have I been wrong, auntie?”

“Yes, Ruthie, I think you have, but I don’t feel
as if I could say a word to you, it is a temptation
I have so often given in to.”

“Vou, auntie? How?”

“Why, dearie, after I left South Africa—oh !
the hours and the days I have spent in thinking—
thinking—thinking of all that might have been—
of the work that might have been accomplished—
of the good that might have been done, if only
your uncle had been spared. It is such a plausible
temptation to imagine we only wish our lives to be
different out of regard to the glory of the Master;
but Satan is tempting us then, transformed into.
72 Lo the End.

an angel of light. He is seeking to instil into
our hearts poisoned shafts of mistrust of our
Heavenly Father’s wisdom, and we must resist
him from the outset, Ruthie, we must say like
the Blessed Master, ‘Get thee behind me, Satan”
‘The cup which My Father hath given Me,
shall I not drink it?’ Besides, the reins once
thrown on the necks of our desires, bairnie, believe
me there is no further peace for our souls. We
think in our short-sightedness the one thing we
are longing for granted, we should want nothing
more; but Satan would soon set our desires at
work again. They must be restricted by some-
thing, and that something must be the will of God,
Pray, dearie, by all means pray for increased
health and strength—God knows it is what I ask
for you every day—but oh! to our prayers let us
_add the petition, ‘Father, not my will, but Thine
be done.’”

“Oh, auntie, I have been wrong—very wrong,”
said Ruth, after a pause, during which the gray
eyes had been gazing meditatively into the fire.
“TI see I have been listening to the whispers of
Satan—what a real enemy he is, and he knows so
exactly where to tempt us.”

“Yes, Ruthie, and our danger lies in parleying
with him ; resist him, and he will flee from us, for
greater is He that is for us, than all that are against
Take up the Cross. 73
us. Don’t you remember what your confirmation
hymn says?

*T shall not fear the battle,

If Thou art by my side.’

Trusting to Jesus, holding up the shield of faith,
we shall be able to quench all the fiery darts of
the wicked. Shall I read to you, Ruthie, some lines
your uncle wrote when laid by once for a long
time by the effects of a severe attack of fever—
he had to fight the same battle you are now
fighting ?”

SOVeS auntie O.nen a

Fetching from her desk some faded sheets of
yellow paper, Mrs. Muir bent forward in the fire-
light, and read—

“T stood ’mid the corn one morning,
The golden ears hung low,

The sun was high in the heavens,
The birds flew to and fro.

The reapers they were not many,
The fields were thick with grain ;
Oh! how could the crop be gather’ d,

Ere day began to wane?

I plied my reap-hook swiftly ;
I heeded not the sun;

For I thought of the Master’s smile,
When the day’s work was done.

I sighed as I watched the reapers
Who idled in the shade,

Busily wreathing wild flowers,
That all too soon did fade.

ey
74

To the End.



And the goiden grain around them
Hung ripe beneath the sky;

It would die were it not garner’d,
Ere winter storms drew nigh.

And my reap-hook flew the swifter,
As I look’d on the wheat ;

My sheaves—with what joy I'd lay them
Low at the Master’s feet.

Alas! as the sun wax’d hotter,
My strength soon died away ;
And when the scorching noon arose,
Faint on the ground I lay.

They bore me to the shady bank,
Where th’ idlers dreaming lay ;

My sad tears—fast they fell:
Useless I was as they.

I press’d my cheek against the sward,
The burning tears fell fast :

My sheaves--my sheaves, who’d lay them now,
The Master’s feet at last?

When lo! I felt myself enclos’d
In arms of tender grace ;

And loving hands did wipe the tears
From off my fever’d face.

And then I heard a gentle voice,
Asking in accents mild,

In tones as soft as passing breeze,
Why weepest thou, My child?

My dew-dimm’'d eyes I lifted then
To the dear Master’s face,

And told of sheaves I’d fain have bound,
His harvest-home to grace.

Again my tears were gently dried,
Again those tones so sweet—
‘Child of my love, there is a sheaf

Thou canst lay at My feet.
Take up the Cross. 75

It is the sheaf of thy sedfc7//,
More precious in My sight
Than all the toil of busy years,
Or golden off’ring bright.

‘Fret not thyself about the grain,
The golden ears are Mine,

And other hands will bind the sheaves
Thou didst for me design.

‘And thou canst for the reapers raise
Thy voice in earnest pray’r ;

And thus can help them in their toil,
And in their harvest share.’

So now in calm content I lie,
Hushing each fear to rest:

ZT” obey is more than sacrifice,
The Master's will ts best.”

That was the first time that Mrs. Muir had ever
heard Ruth allude with anything like murmuring
to her ill-health, and it was the last.

Heavily though no doubt her cross of helpless-

- ness pressed in the future, she never spoke of it,
save to One—He who gave her grace patiently to
take up and to carry it.




CHAPTER XIII.
A LUNCHEON PARTY.

Edith sat looking at the few budding
limes that adorned the narrow strip of
garden in front of Adelbert Terrace,
she could hardly realize that nearly a
year had passed since last she had seen the Knoll,
In one sense it seemed a very long year; in another
the months seem to have rolled by at a gallop;
for though, through constantly thinking of the
St. Magna’s days, the old home-life seemed quite
near, still the London life had been such a busy
one, and so much had taken place in the interven-
ing days, that looking back through the vista of
work and events, that summer’s morning seemed
quite distant when mournfully she had listened to
the shriek of the train that carried her away from
the scenes of her childhood.

Changes had taken place, too, in the quiet little
village of Wych. The pulse of still country life
had been excited by a wedding—the wedding of
Violet Norman with Lionel Richards.

Mr. Norman had used every means in his power


A Luncheon Party. 77



to resist this wedding, for the short time that
Lionel had passed as a pupil at St. Magna’s had
not prepossessed him in favour of his future son-in-
law. Persuasion was in vain though, Violet had
made up her mind; so to avoid further “scenes”
Mr. Norman gave an unwilling consent, and the
wedding had taken place some three months
previously.

The news of the engagement had been conveyed
to the Wilmots by Harry, who was spending part
of his Christmas vacation with the Newtons, and
in a postscript he begged that his knapsack might
be forwarded to him, as he intended to spend the
rest of his holidays in Scotland. A month later
he returned to Adelbert Terrace looking some
three years older than when he started, and when
his name came out among the first in the examina-
tion list, he confided to his mother the impossi-
bility of his (at present) settling at St. Magna’s,
and May saw him starting as a dector on board an
' Australian steamer. The house seemed very dull
without Harry’s merry laugh to brighten it; and
banish the thought as she would, Edith could never
meet Violet without the remembrance of her brother
flashing across her—tossing on the wide blue sea.

The Richards had taken a house at South
Kensington, for Lionel’s purse was a comfortably
lined one, though it was not as heavy as it would
78 To the End.
ultimately become, for he was heir to his aunt’s
estate at Great St. Magna’s,

Joan’s friendship with Violet had been renewed
with greater vigour than ever, and Edith saw but
little of her sister now that this loophole into a
new life had been opened up to her. It was no
wonder, though, thought Edith, that Joan wished
her horizon to be extended ;: she was so young and
bright, and shone so prettily in society, while she
—she was only an old tame tabby, never happier
than when purring at her own fireside.

How pretty Joan looked now, to be sure, as
dashing round the corner in Violet Richards’ smart
Victoria she waved her hand merrily to her sister,
Why had she come home so soon? In an instant
the problem was solved.

“Edith, you are to come back with me at once.
Violet says you must come—she has a spare ticket
for the concert this afternoon; Lionel says he
won't go.”

“Joan, how can I? I have no dress to go in.”

“Oh, yes—put on your black silk—I will lend
you my lace fichu to tie over it; but make haste,
for the carriage is waiting, and the lunch is punc-
tually at one o’clock.”

“But mother—”

“ But mother—well, here is mother to answer for
herself. Mother dear, Violet wants Edith to go
A Luncheon Party. 70





with us to the concert this afternoon—you can
spare her, can’t you?”

It is needless to repeat Mrs. Wilmot’s answer.
Not only could she spare Edith, but she was most
anxious she should not forego such an unwonted
pleasure, so a quarter of an hour saw the two girls
rolling away to South Kensington.

‘Seated at the head of her well-appointed table,
in the most becoming of costumes, Violet made
the prettiest of hostesses; thoroughly in her
element, her face sparkled with sunshine, and her
laugh was low and rippling.

Ah, how easy it is to wreath our faces with
smiles when the blue sky is above and around us!
How lovingly does our human nature stretch itself
in the sunshine of worldly prosperity! Yet the
Prophet Habakkuk said, “Although the fig tree
shall not blossom, neither shall fruit be in the
vines; the labour of the olive shall fail, and the
fields shall yield no meat; the flock shall be cut
off from the fold, and there shall be no herd in the
stalls: yet I will rejoice zz the Lord, I will joy zz
the God of my salvation.’ He had set his affections
on things above, not on things delow. His treasure
was “where rust and moth doth not corrupt;
where thieves do not break through and steal.”

“Edith, luncheon is not the time for a brown-
study. Mr. Rollo hastwice offered you strawberries.”

Edith turned and apologized smilingly to her
80 To the End.



next-door neighbour, a tall, broad-shouldered
man, with streaks of gray here and there amid his
chestnut hair.

“To think of Edith’s turning a deaf ear to straw-
berries!” said Joan; “why the other day she told
me it made her heart lighter even to hear them
called about the streets!”

“Violet, I must defend my character. I cannot
let you think I have become so degenerate as to
base my happiness on strawberries. Joan knows
it was not the love of the fruit that stirred my
heart, it was the breath they brought with them of
the country.”

“Mr. Rollo, would you believe it?” said Violet,
as lifting her daintily embroidered handkerchief to
her lips she tried to stifle her laughter. “Miss
Wilmot’s idea of happiness is the life of a dairy-
maid’s clattering about in pattens and making
cheese and butter.”

“Not a bad life either; and decidedly a more
healthy one than that of many of the young ladies
who are rolling along in the Park yonder. They
droop like flowers in heated assemblies, while the —
dairymaid threads the fields as fresh as the daisies,
and they retire to rest when she is brushing the
dew from the clover; but joking apart, Miss Wil-
mot, have you really spent nearly a year in London
without its charms having effaced the country from
your affections ?”
A Luncheon Party. 81



“My home was in the country for twenty years,”
said Edith, and as her blue eyes sought to hide
themselves Mr. Rollo saw they were dim with tears.

* * * * *

“ Mother, congratulate me; I have met a little
maiden to-day who has not yet been schooled by
the world into the lesson that it is not etiquette to
have a heart,” was Mr. Rollo’s salutation to his
mother that night.

“ Archie, don’t pretend to beacynic. I can quite
understand that you don’t meet every day with
hearts as warm and genuine as your own, but you
know that many true ones do beat even under the
well-cut garments of society.”

Mrs. Rollo, in her velvet-lined chair, and with her
ermine cloak around her, was the very picture of
an old lady, and it was easy to see at a glance that
before the chestnut hair had silvered and the deli-
cate peach-bloom had faded she must have been
remarkable for her beauty.

Tenderly cherished by a devoted husband, and
now the object of a loving son’s care, Mrs. Rollo’s
life had been a peaceful and a sheltered one; of a
soft and yielding disposition, and with few angles to
rub up against, she was the centre of a large circle
of friends, and the red-tiled Elizabethan house at
Chelsea was the scene of many a social gathering.

An enthusiastic lover of the fine arts, Archibald

F
82 To the End.



Rollo dabbled in all of them, and was a proficient ,
in none, though it was in the studio or music-room
of “the Red House” that he was most generally
to be found.

Neither of these rooms though did he frequent
to-night, but sipped his coffee meditatively by his
mother’s side.

“ Archie, what are you thinking about ?”

“The little maiden with the heart. I wish I
could get her-to sit to me for a picture.”

“Was she so very pretty then ?”

“Pretty? No, I don’t think that is the word to
apply to her. Mrs. Richards and her sister are,
strictly speaking, I suppose, prettier than she is;
but her face was so peaceful and pure it seemed to
calm you to look at her. If I were to take her
portrait now, I should paint her kneeling in some
old cathedral, with hands clasped in prayer—that
is the scene her face irresistibly brings before you.
Mother, you must cultivate her, if it is only for the
sake of the picture.”

“ Archie, I am at your service; but remember
maidens with hearts are not toys to be trifled with.
Suppose she loses hers with you, are you prepared
to give her yours in exchange ?”

“Mother, with your leave I will think out that
question with my cigar on the verandah,”


CLAP BER Xavi.

TEMPTATION,

HE snow was still lying on the ground,
and cold March winds were blowing
over the heads of the drooping snow-
drops, when another little flower opened

its cyes on the wintry earth—a baby-boy came to

gladden the heart of Violet Richards.

It was a pretty sight to see the young mother and
her child together; never had there been such a
baby before—of that she was confident.

The christening took place at St. Magna’s, and
when some three weeks later Edith entered the
nursery at South Kensington, she was surprised to
see there sitting a well-known girlish figure.

“Rose, you here! I aw astonished. Did Mrs,
Richards bring you back with her?”

“Yes, miss. Didn’t mistress tell you?”

“T haven’t seen Mrs. Richards. Pollok tells me
she is out driving. I thought I would just run up
F 2


84 To the End.



though and have a peep at the baby. The darling!
how hehas grown! And oh, Rose, now his eyes are
wide open, do let me have a good look at them.
Oh, baby, your eyes are going to be brown; you
perverse little fellow, mother did so want them to
be blue, but I was afraid they would grow darker.
Well, brown eyes or not, you area sweet baby-boy—
isn’t he, Rose? And I am sure grandpapa thought
so,” and kissing the mottled face fondly, Edith laid
the baby in his bassinette. “Well, Rose, it zs nice
to see a face from St. Magna’s; and how is the dear ©
old place, and everybody. in it ?”

“Oh, much the same as usual, miss; nothing
ever happens at St. Magna’s.”

“And your father and mother? I hope they are
quite well.”
“ Father’s as hearty as ever, thank you, miss; but
mother, you know, she’s always ailing, and she

fretted a deal about my leaving.”

“T dare say, but I thought that it was your
father that objected most to your coming to
London.”

“So he did,” and Rose hung her head and busied
herself in tucking baby into the bassinette, as the
recollection of the conversation with Edith at the
wicket-gate flashed across her; “but father, he
knows as ever since I’ve been a little girl, when I
sects my heart on a thing I always gets it in the




S.Kraton se

It was a pretty sight to see the young mother and her child together; never had
there been such a baby before—of that she was confident.—#. 83,

Temptation. 87



long run,” and the pretty girl looked up with a
wilful smile; “so you see, miss, he thought it best
to give in, I expect, when I got a chance of com-
ing along with Miss Violet (Mrs. Richards, I
mean).”

Edith sighed, but said nothing.

“ And lor, miss, what a grand place London is!”
continued Rose. “Mistress took baby and me
in the carriage in the Park yesterday, and the sight
of carriages well-nigh turned my head, and the
beautifully dressed ladies—”

“Yes, Rose, but all is not gold that glitters, and
the Park is not the whole of London, nor the rich
people that roll along its only inhabitants (though
to hear some people talk you would think they
were). There are dens and alleys in the East
End hardly fit for human habitation, where Mr.
Lawrence Newton told me poor women slave with
their needle for three-farthings an hour!”

“To think of that, miss!—and fancy Mr.
Lawrence choosing to live among them!”

“The Lord Jesus chose to leave Heaven and live
on earth for our sakes,” said Edith, in a low voice,
as she caressed gently one of the tiny pink and
white hands that lay outstretched from the bassi-
nette. “But, Rose, I must be going now; you must
ask your mistress to spare you to come over and
spend an afternoon with us some day. Sarah and
88 To the End.



Susan will be delighted to see a face from St.
Magna’s.”

The invitation thus given was at first accepted
‘with cordiality ; whenever Rose had a holiday she
always found her way to Adelbert Terrace, and
Mrs. Wilmot and Edith, glad of these opportunities
of befriending the young girl, made her most heartily
welcome.

In the course of a few months though, these
visits became fewer and fewer, and towards Christ-
mas they ceased altogether.

“Violet, does Rose have less leave than usual?”
asked Edith, one wintry afternoon, “ for she never
comes to Adelbert Terrace now.”

“No; she has just the same as when she first
came—one afternoon in the fortnight; but oh, I
dare say she is tired of Susan and Sarah’s company,
and likes spending her holiday in some more ex-
citing way than sipping tea with maids in a kitchen.
A pretty girl like that is sure to have followers,”
and Violet gave a meaning smile.

“JT hope they are desirable ones then,” said
Edith; “a young girl in that position away from
her parents always seems to me so unguarded.”

Violet leant back in her chair laughing merrily.
“Really, Edith, with a large pair of spectacles and
a large mob-cap, you might pass for a grand-
mother. Don’t think it necessary though to apos-
Temptation. 89



trophize me on my duties as a mistress, for no one
will ever induce me to pry into a servant’s private
affairs. If they are old enough to leave their
parents, I consider they are old enough to take
care of themselves. Why, I was younger than
Rose when I married,” and Violet bridled her neck
with dignity.

“ Violet, dear, you are onlyjoking; you know I
would not take such an unwarrantable liberty as to
attempt to interfere in the management of your
household; but coming as Rose does, from St.
Magna’s, you can understand what a’ special
interest we take in her, and then we were all
confirmed together.”

“So we were, I had forgotten it; but we have
talked enough about Rose. Edith, I want you
and Joan to come and lunch with Mrs. Rollo
to-morrow.”

With a woman’s quick perception, Violet had
noted the special interest Mr. Rollo took in her
friends, and this interest she resolved to fan into a
more ardent feeling, for it would be pleasant to
have Joan settled near her (and Joan it was of
course who had kindled the interest), and then to
herself would accrue a certain amount of credit in
having so well established her friend.

At Violet’s house, therefore, Mr. Rollo was con-
stantly meeting Joan, but, alas! to his chagrin,
90 To the End.



seldom accompanied by Edith, for the heat and
close confinement of town life were beginning to
tell sadly upon Mrs. Wilmot, and Edith was more
than ever tied to Adelbert Terrace now that her
mother’s headaches were bidding fair to become
chronic.

Repeated persuasion at last induced Mrs. Wilmot
to accept an invitation from the Miss Scotts, and
it was with a thankful heart Edith saw her mother
start for St. Magna’s, accompanied by little Mary.
The days that followed would have been lonely
ones to’ Edith, had it not been for the children, for
Joan and Cuthbert were little at home; in fact
Cuthbert’s “engagements” were so numerous that
they began to give Edith some cause for anxiety ;
but he refused to give any account of himself, and
steadily resented what he called “all girls’ meddling
with his private affairs.”

How Edith longed at this time for Mr. Newton’s
wise counsel, and how sorely she missed the helpful
services at St. Magna’s!—earth and its cares and
worries seemed to have such a hold upon her,
Heaven appeared so dim, so far away.

Yes; a film had crept over Edith’s spiritual life,
and she was conscious of it. No longer could she
take her burdens in trustful faith to the feet of the
Master, and leave them there. No longer could
she realize with happy assurance that “All things
Temptation. - Ol



work together for good to them that love God.”
No doubt this was partly owing to physical causes,
for jaded, exhausted nerves tell on mind as well as
body (and Edith had fallen into a wearied state as
well as her mother); but principally it was due to
the murmuring, unbelieving thoughts which Edith
knew she had given place to. How often she had
envied Violet her large house and comparative
leisure! How many times she had listened to the
devil’s suggestion that people who make only a
profession of religion seem to get along just as
well or better than people who are at the pains to.
act out what they believe. :

What was the good of getting into hot water
with Joan for urging her to some neglected duty ?
or for falling into disgrace with Cuthbert for trying
to counsel him lovingly. Why swim further against
the tide? It was hard work, and you made but little
progress. Do as others do, or at all events for a
time fold your arms and float at leisure.

These were the evil suggestions of the Tempter,
and Edith had not turned a deaf ear to them.
She did not realize that there is no such thing as
inaction in the spiritual life; that floating with the
tide means progress—onward progress to the dark
rapids of danger and death.


CHAPTER XV.
CONQUEST.
UST at this time, when Edith’s better



judgment was warped by her loose
hold of Him Who giveth to all men
wisdom liberally, and upbraideth not,
there came a letter to her—a letter from Mr. Rollo.
At first its contents completely startled Edith,
for she (like Violet) had always imagined that if
Mr. Rollo admired any one, it was Joan, and it
was some time before she could realize that the
passionate words of devotion she had just read
were addressed to herself.

Astonishment in time, though, became only
pleased surprise, and eagerly she began to question
herself. Why did she first feel sorry that Mr.
* Rollo had written such a letter? Why did she
jump to the conclusion that “no” was the only
answer to be given? Mr. Rollo was a gentleman;
a kind man and a cultivated ; he could offer her a
Conquest. 93



comfortable home; he was a good son, and filled a
certain position in society. It was true she would
have to leave her mother, but Mary was growing
up to be a nice little companion to her now, and
as a married sister she would have much more
influence and weight with Joan and Cuthbert.
Ah, Edith, Edith, why do you try to settle this
question without bending on your knees to ask
direction from above? Why not consider what
your mother, your father, would have advised ?
Why not listen to the promptings of your own
better nature? Two questions had all day long
been ringing in Edith’s ears, but she refused to
answer them. “Do I love this man?” “Is he a
Christian ?”

In the stillness of the night, though, the still
small voice of conscience sometimes makes itself
heard, and matters which we thrust from us in the
light come face to face with us in the darkness.

Lying restless on her pillow, these two questions
seemed to thunder themselves in Edith’s ears, and
unable to forget them in sleep, she rose and drew
a chair to the window.

“Did she love Mr. Rollo?” No; she couldn’t
say she did, but she liked him, and liking surely in
time would soon change itself into love. “Was he
a Christian?” Ah! this was a harder question to
answer, She had never heard him allude to religion
94 To the End.



save once in her presence, and then certainly it was
in rather a bantering tone; but he went to church
every Sunday morning, carrying his mother’s velvet
Prayer-book for her. Then does not the Bible say,
“Judge not, that ye be not judged?” Ah! but it
also adds, “Be ye not unequally yoked together
with unbelievers.” “She is at liberty to be married
to whom she will; ozy in the Lord.”

Tired with her restless night, Edith was only
awakened by the breakfast-bell, and though her
toilet was a hasty one, she only arrived down-stairs
in time to hear the clang of the front-door as it
closed on Cuthbert. She was sorry, for his break-
fast had been a solitary one, Joan having dined
and spent the night with the Richards.

Mr. Rollo had begged Edith to take twenty-four
hours to consider her decision, for he felt sure the
contents of his letter would surprise her; but feel-
ing convinced that if “no” had to be said, the
sooner it was done the better, Edith. put on her
hat and started for a wall, resolved to decide
the matter. One minute she was assailed with
weary doubt; another tempted with pleasurable
visions of the future. How pleasant it would be
to turn her back on care and worry, and to have
some one to care for and guard her! Edith’s
mind was a battlefield of conflicting emotions,
and unable to decide the contest, she wearily
Conquest. 95



pushed back her hat from her throbbing temples,
and longed for fresh air both mentally and bodily.
Just at this minute she came upon a church hidden
among the houses; its doorway was crowded, and
people were passing into it.

Was it a wedding or a confirmation? A con-
firmation; and as Edith gazed at the young girls
in white her thoughts were carried away to St.
Magna’s, to the parish church, and the bright day
in which she.had stood and vowed to serve her
God in it. How she would like to hear this con-
firmation address! She wondered if she could gain
admittance; yes, strangers were allowed in the
gallery, and in two minutes Edith was seated in it.

Ah, ye servants of God, when rising to the re-
sponsibilities of your sacred calling, ye resist the
blandishments of the world and self, and speak
only what God the Holy Spirit hath taught you,
what a mighty influence ye wield over your hearers !
Your message becomes a supernatural one, a lever
to lift burdened souls from the depth and darkness
of temptation—a glass in which they view not the
things which are seen and temporal, but the things
which are unseen and eternal—a power—a power
which is mighty, through God, to the pulling down
of strongholds, and which bringeth into subjection
every thought to the obedience of Christ.

The day was a dull one, and in the subdued light
96 To the End.

that streamed through painted windows but few
noticed the young girl in a back seat of the gallery,
who with flushed cheeks and parted lips leant
forward so eagerly to listen; but One above did—
One whose heart of love was yearning over her—
One Who knew all the circumstances of her life—
all the trial, the temptation of the present hour—
One Who Himself had suffered, being tempted,
and Who is able to succour them that are tempted.
“T beseech you, therefore, that ye receive not the
grace of God in vain,” was the theme of the Bishop’s
address, and as Edith listened, life and the things
of this life seemed to lose their hold upon her;
the film that hid Heaven from earth to roll up
and fade away. What a speck of time this life
‘looked when viewed beside the life that lasts for
ever and ever !—how insignificant seemed its events,
save as they influenced for eternity!

As if revealed by a flash of light from Heaven,
Edith saw the danger in which’ she stood, the pre-
cipice to which Satan blindfold had led her. She
knew by past experience how weak her heart was;
how easily she was influenced by those around
her; how difficult it was to realize that one thing
was needful. How then could she ever have thought
of placing her hand for the journey of life in the
hand of any but a Christian >—one who humbly, yet
fearlessly, had taken his stand on the side of the
Conquest. 97

Master—who would be a help and not a hindrance
to her on her journey heavenwards.

Yes, Edith was indeed thankful that she had
been guided to hear the words that had been
spoken that morning ; earnestly did she kneel and
beseech help both for herself and the young soldiers
who were starting forth to do battle under the
same flag as herself that day, and tremulously did
she plead rather than sing the words—

**O let me feel Thee near me:
The world is ever near ;

I see the sights that dazzle,
The tempting sounds I hear;

My foes are ever near me,
Around me and within ;

But, Jesus, draw Thou nearer,
And shield my soul from sin.”

BERS

G


GHAP TEER 2evi:
MARRIAGE BELLS. :

FOOD evening, Miss Scott.. What a




1?

wild night for you to be out in

It was Frank Newton who spoke,
and as he attempted to raise his hat,
the wind took possession of his umbrella, and
nearly carried it into an adjoining field.

‘‘The elements are not inclined to be civil to-
night—are they ?>—but I heard such a bad account
of Mrs. Wicks, I determined to go and see her;
she is fretting so dreadfully about her daughter
Rose.”

“ Rose !—let me see ; that was the pretty girl with
the high colour that used to come to mother’s
bible class, wasn’t it?” :

“Ves, Well, Violet Richards took her to be nurse
to poor little Lion, you know, and when he caught
that fatal chill she was dismissed at once. Violet
seemed to think she was in some way to blame
Marriage Bells. 99



for the poor little fellow catching cold, and Rose
not liking to return to St. Magna’s with a slur upon
her character, accepted at once a situation as maid
to a family who were starting to travel on the
continent, and her parents have only heard from:
her once since.”

“Dear, dear, that isa sad state of things; and
Rose was an only child, wasn’t she?”

“Ves, and her parents’ idol—though they showed
their affection in a funny way sometimes; but for
their pretty girl to be travelling about with strangers
in ‘foreign parts’ is almost more than their hearts
can bear.”

“ ] wonder they let her leave St. Magna’s at all.”

“Well, her father did stand out against it for a
long time; but the girl’s heart was set upon a
change, and when this opportunity opened up to
her of going to London as nurse to little Lion,
I suppose her parents thought it was better for
her to be with Violet than with strangers.”

“How could Violet then dismiss her so sum-
marily? But I suppose, poor thing, she was dis-
tracted with grief.”

“Distracted! Miss Norman told me that when
she and her brother arrived in London that sad
night they were telegraphed for, they found Violet
almost in a frenzy, beseeching the doctor to save
her child, and when their worst fears were realized,

G 2
100 To the End.



her grief seemed to find no natural outlet; but up
and down the room she would pace, torturing her-
self almost to madness over second causes—How
had her darling got cold? Where could he have
taken such a dreadful chill? And when she found
out accidentally that Rose had been seen one chilly
day in the Park, with little Lion in the perambu-
lator, standing still talking to a friend, to the
nursery she flew at once, and in a few frenzied
words Rose was dismissed from the house.”

“And do you think the poor girl was really to
blame?”

“Well, Miss Norman says if any blame does
attach to her, it was not from want of heart, but
from want of head. Rose was devoted to her little
charge; but she was never thoughtful and careful
enough to make a good nursemaid.”

“Where are the Richards now?”

“Still travelling on the continent. Joan Wilmot
is with them, and we hope to beguile Edith down
here some time before Christmas.”

“That will be jolly; the place does not seem
like itself since the Wilmots left.”

Frank Newton was not the only one who held
that opinion, and many a face brightened and
many a heart cheered when Edith Wilmot was
once more to be met walking about St. Magna’s.
As for Edith, she could hardly realize that nearly
Marriage Belts. 1ol



four years had crept away since last she had re-
visited the old scenes; and every green lane
seemed to revive some memory of the past, every
grassy nook to whisper a message to her. How
delightful it was too, to stand once more in the
dear old parish church—to listen again to Mr.
Newton’s well-known voice—to his loving words of
counsel! Lawrence was at home now enjoying a
well-earned holiday. .His health had broken down
soon after the Wilmots had settled in London,
and he had been compelled to seek a curacy in the
country ; but with restored health and vigour, he
was now looking forward to returning as vicar to
the East End London parish where formerly he
had laboured as curate.

Surrounded by so many kind friends, Edith’s
visit flew past only too swiftly, and though Mrs.
Newton and Mrs. Muir would fain have taken
possession of her, she was determined to return
home by Christmas.

The winter was a severe one, and many an
afternoon Lawrence and Frank Newton carried
Edith off to skate on the pond at the Home Farm,
and then when the cheery wood fire was sputtering
and blazing, and sending rosy tongues of light
across the wainscoted walls, they would gather
round Ruth’s couch for tea, and such talks as
Edith had not enjoyed for many a long day,
i102 To the End.



“Mother,” said Frank one day to Mrs. Newton,
“doesn’t it strike you that Lawrence and Edith
have a good deal in common? They are too un-
selfish to make me feel de trop on our walks to
the Home Farm, but I can’t help noticing how
much more confidential their tones become when
they start off for a skate together.”

“Silly boy,” said Mrs. Newton, as she stroked
her son’s face fondly, “sailors are proverbially fond
of love-making, but I didn’t know they were also
match-makers. Lawrence and Edith are just like
brother and sister, and they have many tastes in
common.”

“Now, madre mia, isn’t that just what I said?
—‘they have very much in common. Yes, mark
my words, if all goes merrily as a marriage bell,
you will soon greet Edith as a daughter.”

“Well, Frank, your father and I could never
receive any one we should love better. Edith is
to us already a daughter in all but name; but in -
such an important a matter as marriage we should
not like to bias Lawrence ; he can safely be trusted
to choose wisely for himself.”

And Lawrence did choose wisely, but Frank
was quite right—Edith was the object of his choice.
Day by day her pure Christianity, her loving un-
selfishness, her high tone of character, had become
better known to him, and with the knowledge had
Marriage Bells. 103



grown up for her a love—a love which was founded
on respect, and on the thought that they were one
in Christ Jesus—heirs together of the grace of God
—fellow-pilgrims to the Heavenly city.

And what of Edith? Well, Edith knew that her
visit to St. Magna’s: had been a most enjoyable
one, and that, strange to say for such a home-bird
as herself, she was not looking forward with the
same amount of eagerness as usual to returning
to Adelbert Terrace ; but not till one frosty night
when beneath the stars Lawrence told her the
story of his love, did she divine the reason why
—that her heart was not in her own keeping.
Lawrence’s earnest burning words, though, soon
tore the film from her eyes. She had no hesitating
doubts now, no tormenting fears as she had about
Mr. Rolle, The love that had, almost imperceptibly
to herself, grown up within her from childhood for
Lawrence, burst the barriers that surrounded it,
and made itself felt at last; and with a heart of
happy thankfulness and eyes of shy satisfied trust,
Edith looked up into the grave tender face that
was bending over her, and promised Lawrence all
that he asked.


CHAPTER XVII

A CHANCE MEETING,

HE purple hills of the Clyde were wrap-
ping themselves in shadow, and the
gorgeous tints of sunset were giving
place to the deep blue of twilight,

when the Jona drew up one autumnal evening

at one of its customary landing-places,

“ My dear, if you are going to be all night getting
on board, perhaps you will allow me to get ahead
of you,” was the gruff remark which one of the
new passengers was heard to make to his wife
as he angrily pushed his way up the gangway.
Then stamping on board in an irascible manner,
he began wrangling with the porters about his
luggage, finally subsiding into a corner with a
plaid round his shoulders, over a pipe and a
“ brandy-and-soda,” muttering maledictions at the
climate, and vowing he would never come to
these plaguey northern latitudes again.

Two quiet figures were standing in the stern




A Chance Meeting. 105



of the steamer watching the mists creeping down
the mountains, when turning at the gentleman’s
loud tones the lady exclaimed—

“Why, Lawrence, surely I know that voice—yes,
it is Mr. Richards.”

“Ts it? Poor Violet, then she fas tied herself to
a pepper-box.” :

“ Joan always told me he was very hot-tempered ;
but I had no idea he was so uncontrolled as that.
But see, there is Violet ; Lawrence, I must go and
speak to her.”

The closely-veiled figure, however, that had been
standing motionless watching her husband, now
placed her hand within her maid’s arm, and turning,
pointed to the cabin staircase, and Edith with a
sigh rejoined her husband.

“Oh, Lawrence, isn’t it sad that such a peaceful
scene as this should be marred by such ill-temper ?
Look at that lovely moon turning everything into
silver !—wouldn’t you think it would calm any one
to look at it?”

Lawrence and Edith had been married four
years, and despite the cares and the anxieties
which are incidental to the happiest married life,
the time had passed to them like one long summer’s
day. Week by week Edith had learnt to know
and appreciate more the depth and true nobility of
her husband’s character. Unmoved by opposition
and undaunted by difficulties, day by day he spent
106 To the End.



himself and was spent in the service of his Master,
and often and often did Edith’s heart go up with
happy thankfulness for the love and the guidance
of such a husband.

A little girl of three years old and a baby boy
of sixteen months had been left behind in the
nursery of the East End vicarage—Mrs. Wilmot
being ostensibly in charge—though with such a
careful, trustworthy nurse as Patience Trueman to
look after her darlings, Edith knew no other care
was necded.

Yes, Mrs. Trueman had been persuaded at last
to give up her “indispensable Patience.’ But how
could she refuse anything to “Miss Edith,” the
daughter of kind Dr. Wilmot, who had so tenderly

and so skilfully ministered to her little Mary in her -

last illness, and who had only left her death-bed
to lie down on his own?

Mrs. Wilmot’s stay in London was only a
temporary one, for she was residing now at St.
Magna’s, Harry being at last settled at the Knoll
with a sweet young wife, and bidding fair to
become as great a favourite as did his father.
Cuthbert too had been taken into partnership,
and under the steadying influence of his elder
brother was sobering wonderfully, and Mrs. Wilmot
had taken a house near the Rectory to make a
home for him and her younger children. Joan
was married to an officer, and gone’ to India,
A Chance Meeting. 107





but Mary made a capital elder sister, and Bertie
and “the flowerets” were never tired of exclama-
tions of how much nicer the country was than
London.

It was not often that Lawrence and Edith took
a holiday so far away from home; but seeing her
husband’s strength flagging, Edith resolved to
steel her motherly heart, and to urge Lawrence to
start for regions where, with God’s blessing, he
might hope to regain elasticity and vigour. —

Darkness had set in by the time the Jona
had reached its last landing-place; but by the
flickering glare of the gas-lamps the Newtons saw
that the Richards were making for the same hotel
as themselves.

“We had better wait to speak to them till ade
@ héte,’ said Edith, “the luggage question is agi-
tating Mr. Richards now; but perhaps by dinner-
time he will have forgotten his grievances.”

Vain hope; table @héte came, and ‘with it Mr.
Richards (though without Violet), but the Newtons
were glad the length of the table separated them,
for he did nothing but storm at the waiters and
grumble at the dishes,

“Poor Violet, it is not to be wondered at that
she prefers dining up-stairs! Lawrence, I must
go and see her.”

“Do, dear, and I will go to the reading-room.”

Finding out from a waiter the number of the
108 To the End.



Richards’ sitting-room, Edith was soon on her
way thither, and in response to her tap, a tired
voice bade her enter.

It was quite two years since Violet and Edith
had met, for the Richards spent much of their time
abroad, and though from Joan’s description Edith
was prepared to find her friend altered, she could
hardly realize that the worn, faded woman: that
rose from the sofa to greet her was the sparkling,
brilliant Violet of former days. What Violet had
lost in appearance, though, she had gained in man-
ner, There was a depth and a genuineness about
her welcome now which meetings of other days
had always seemed to lack; and Violet’s pleasure
at this unexpected visit was so pure and unaffected
that Edith had not the heart to tear herself away.

When the clock on the mantelpiece struck the
half-hour, though, she started up.

“Half-past nine; I had no idea it was so late!
Violet, I must be running away; Lawrence will be
wondering what has become of me.”

“Late !—do you call this late? I dare say I shall
be waiting up for Lionel till half-past twelve or
one.”

“Oh, Violet, such hours must be very bad for
you!” and Edith gazed with compassion at the
worn, pale face before her. “Go and have a rest
now, you must be so tired after your day’s travelling.”

“Tired !—I am always tired,” and Violet heaved
A Chance Meeting. 109



a weary sigh. “But I shall only rest here; it is
better that I should be up when Lionel comes in.
Do stay a little longer,” she added, piteously, “the
evenings seem so long; they never were when my
little darling was with me, for when I hadn’t friends
I always sat in the nursery. I loved to watch my
baby boy—he never looked prettier than when he
was asleep; and then I used to make his pretty
things—his little frocks and pinafores; but now all
my interest in life is gone; I have nothing left to
look forward to”—and burying her face in her hands
Violet burst into a paroxysm of tears.

Edith let Violet cry in silence, for she knew it
was better the long pent-up emotion should find
an outlet, but when the sobs became less convulsive
she whispered—

“Violet, dear, 1 am so very, very sorry for you.
I know by the love I bear my own little ones
how terribly hard it must have been for you to
give up your darling; but he is safe at home now
in the arms of the Good Shepherd.”

“Don’t talk religion to me, Edith, it gives me
no comfort—how I wish it did! How I wish I had
strong faith like you, and could picture my darling
happy—happy—and look forward to meeting him
one day again! Life would become peaceful then,
if not happy. But I cannot raise my thoughts to
things above; my heart is so dead—so cold. I am
a different being from the girl that knelt with you
110 To the End.



at St. Magna’s when we were confirmed together,
I did then realize something about. heaven and
things unseen, but now I cannot—I cannot. I care
only for what I can see, and handle, and toudh.
It is my fault, I know—my fault entirely, I
quenched the light that was glimmering within
me, and chose earth and its unsatisfying pleasures
for my portion, and now I cannot raise my heart
above it.”

“God can, though, dear Violet,” said Edith ;
“perhaps with your little Lionel’s hands He is
beckoning you once more heavenwards.”

'“Oh, that I could believe it! Oh, that I could
believe it!” said poor, weary Violet, as she bent
her head on her clasped hands. “In my dreams
I see my little Lion; but there is always a wide
gulf between us, and in stretching across to grasp
my darling I wake—wake with empty hands.
Pray for me, Edith; pray that this may not be a
foreshadowing of the future. I cannot pray for
myself. I once prayed earnestly enough, but it was
for wealth, and position, and pleasure. God has
granted me my request, but sent leanness into my
soul.”

Despite the early hour at which Lawrence and
Edith started the next morning, Violet was down
to say good-bye to them, and her last-whispered
words were, “ Edith, pray for me—pray for me!”


GIA EAD B Resxevelaide

A SAD RETURN.

NOTHER year had rolled away, and
autumn had touched the woods around
the Home Farm with its red and golden
fingers—the apples were hanging russet

on the boughs, and the pears seemed. to invite you

to pick them.

A happy party were gathered in the orchard,
where the work of despoiling the heavily-laden
trees was going busily on, Tom Trueman’s sun-
burnt hands gathering quickly the golden fruit,
while Robin (a most picturesque figure in his sun-
hat) stood with a basket below ready to receive
them. Bertie Wilmot too was perched on the
topmost branches, doing his best to shake the
yellow pippins into the outstretched aprons of
Daisy, Pansy, and another little flaxen-haired
maiden who were capering wildly beneath.

Mrs. Muir was busy pouring out the tea which


II2 To the End.



old Elspeth had just brought out, and Ruth with
her sweet gray eyes was gazing smilingly at the
children.

“How little Eva is enjoying herself !—this is a
novel experience for her.”

“Wee lambie, her cheeks are getting quite sun-
burnt. I wish her father could see her.”

Eva Muir was Mrs. Muir’s niece by marriage;
her father, like her uncle, being a medical mission-
ary in Africa; but since the death of her mother,
Mrs. Muir had taken charge of her.

Round the winsome loving little Eva the tendrils
of Ruth’s heart soon twined themselves, and her
invalid life was indeed brightened by the presence
of the little child. Her education, too, Ruth had
begged to take charge of; and Mrs. Muir had
consented gladly, for she knew the occupation
would be good alike for pupil and teacher.

Just as tea was over, a figure was seen crossing
the lawn. It was Mr. Newton—no one could
mistake that rapid, swinging gait—and in an
instant the children were up and bounding off to
meet him.

With Eva on his shoulder, and Daisy and Pansy
in each hand, he was soon under the apple-trees,
and old Robin’s puckered face broke into a smile,
and Tom Trueman’s brown hands went the faster
for the presence and encouragement of the Vicar.
A Sad Return. 113



When the sun began to sink, though, and the
children had scampered off with Robin and Tom
to give the cows their supper, Mr. Newton pro-
duced a letter from his pocket, and drawing a
chair beside Mrs. Muir and Ruth, proceeded to
read it aloud. It was from Edith, unfolding a
plan that had long lain near her heart.

Would Ruth come up to London to see a far-
famed doctor? A similar case to hers (humanly
speaking) he had been the means of curing,
Lawrence and she were most anxious the effort
should be made, and would give Ruth the warmest
welcome; and if Mrs. Muir could not remain the
whole time, they would take every possible care of
her. Would Mr. Newton go to the Home Farm
and use his best powers of persuasion ?

Ruth’s pretty colour came and went fitfully
during the reading of the letter. Like stars in the
summer’s sky there had sprung up within her a
sweet hope. Was it—oh, was it possible that she
was not always to remain an invalid? But when
Mr. Newton had finished, she lay quite peacefully,
with hands crossed, gazing up at the white-flecked
sky. God had taken care of her in the past—He
would in the future—His will would be best for
her whether in sickness or prosperity.

“Well, Ruthie, dear, what is your answer?” and
Mrs, Muir stroked fondly her niece’s nutbrown hair,

H
14 To the End.



“That you shall decide for me, dear auntie,” and
the gray eyes shone with strange beauty.

“Then, dearest, we will go,” and Mrs. Muir bent
and kissed her niece fondly.

“And may God’s blessing go with you!” said
Mr. Newton.

“Amen!” whispered Ruth and Mrs. Muir softly.

Christmas had come and gone, and Ruth’s visit
to London was nearly over. It had more than
fulfilled her friends’ highest anticipations ; through
God’s mercy the treatment used had been so
blessed that by the autumn she hoped to walk
again, and with care the doctors averred she might
one day lead as active a life as her neighbours.

How Ruth’s heart bounded with joy, and how
fervently she clasped her hands in praise, when
she heard this verdict, who shall say? God was
holding out to her the prospect of renewed health
and strength—by His grace the life thus restored
should be dedicated more than ever to His glory.

Leaning back in the firelight now, with Edith’s
golden-haired little Marjorie in her arms, Ruth
made a pretty picture—her cheeks rosy with re-
turning health, and her sweet eyes sparkling with
new vigour.

The nursery at this hour was her favourite
resort. Never was she tired of telling Marjorie
A Sad Return. 118



and little Lawrence stories, or of watching Patience
bathe the baby.

It was a wild night, and every now and then, as
the rain dashed against the casements and the
wind howled. in the chimney, Edith looked up
anxiously from her sewing.

“What a dreadful night to be out in!—how I
wish Lawrence would come in!”

“JT did hear a bell,” said Ruth.

“Oh, but master always uses a latch-key,” and
Patience looked up smilingly as she drew one of
baby’s dimpled arms through the sleeve of his
little night-dress.

The years that had rolled over Patience’s head
had dealt kindly with her; she was a trifle stouter,
perhaps, but her face was as round and as ruddy
as when she had played in the lanes at St. Magna’s.
To Edith she was invaluable—always bright and
always to be relied on; and busy as a clergyman’s
wife’s life must always be, Edith was thankful
to have such a mainstay to fall back upon. The
experience Patience had gained too in the care
of her little brothers and sisters was of great ser-
vice in the Vicarage nursery; but her reign there
did not promise to be a long one, for a respectable
young carpenter at St. Magna’s had discerned her
many virtues; and one day when her mistress
could spare her she had promised to marry him.

H 2
116 To the End.



* * * * *

The bell that Ruth’s quick ears had heard was
such a faint one that it had to be pulled again ere
the parlour-maid, who was washing her crockery,
took her hands from the bowl, and proceeded
up-stairs to answer it.

“ Is—Mrs.—Lawrence Newton—at home ?”

The question was interrupted by fits of coughing,
and when it was done, the poor thing who had
asked it leant against the wall as though perfectly
exhausted.

“Yes, she is. I would be sorry if she were out
in such a night as this; but come in, ma’am, will
you ?—for the hats will be blowing into the road,
and my cap will be following them, I’m thinking,”
and the parlour-maid as she spoke held on tightly
to her well-starched head-gear.

“Tt is a dreadful—night,” came between short
dry coughs.

“ Dreadful, and one not fit for the likes of you to
be out in; but come this way, and I’ll tell the
mistress ; she’s up-stairs—in the nursery.”

The parlour-maid as she spoke threw open the
study door, and drawing a chair forward poked the
fire into a blaze.

“Thank you,” was all the poor woman could
ejaculate as she sank into the depths of the
proffered seat.

d
A Sad Return, 117



“Shall I give any name ?”

“No—no—Mrs. Newton—wouldn’t know—it ;
just say—please—some one—would like—to speak
to—her.”

‘When the servant had gone, the stranger stretched
out her thin hands over the fire, as though it were
an unwonted luxury, and raising her thick veil
gazed wistfully round the apartment. How com-
fortable it all looked, to be sure—the well-filled
book-shelves, the thick red curtains, the firelight
flickering on the wall, and the sound of the rain
pattering on the windows and the wind howling
up the chimney only made such a retreat seem the
cosier.

Through the half-open door too came the sound
of happy laughter, the snatches of the hymn that
Patience was singing her baby to sleep with, and
the sweet music of childish prattle.

The poor woman sighed heavily, and turning
once more to the fire, Boece her poor worn
fingers over it,

“ Good evening,
the study door.

“Good evening, ma’am,” and the stranger rose
and curtseyed as she spoke, but she did not seem
to find any further words wherewith to explain her
visit.

“ Are you one of our parishioners ? ”

d)

said Edith, as she pushed open
118 To the End.



“No, ma’am, no”—then burying her face in her
hands the poor woman burst into tears.

“You are in trouble,” said Edith, gently ; “do
you mind telling me what it is—perhaps I can help
you?”

No answer—only sharp catches of the breath, and
a convulsive fit of coughing.

Edith stood by distressed, hardly knowing what
to suggest, then hearing the rattle of cups in the
next room, she said—

“Lean back in your chair; I will send you in a
cup of tea; you will feel better after it, then
perhaps you will be able to tall to me.”

_“No, Miss Edith, no—please don’t—trouble—”

The mention of her maiden nameand something
in the tones of the woman’s voice caused Edith
to approach a step nearer. Surely she knew those
brown eyes, they seemed to speak to her out of
the past.

“You don’t know me, miss?”

“No,—and yet—and yet—”

“Rose—I was once Rose Wicks.”

“Rose Wicks!” Edith was too much shocked
to hide her pained surprise. Could it be possible?
Was it really true that this worn, faded creature,
this hollow-cheeked, emaciated woman was the
bright, the beautiful Rose that she had known
at St. Magna’s? “Rose, I am indeed sorry to see
A Sad Return. — 119





you looking so ill,’ and drawing a chair near to
her visitor, Edith took one of the thin hands in
hers.

The gentle touch and the sympathetic voice
completely broke down poor Rose, and it was
some minutes before she could recover herself
sufficiently to tell her sad history.

When travelling as a maid on the continent she
had become engaged to a gentleman’s valet who
was staying at the same hotel with herself. She
had believed him.to be respectable, and he had
given her to understand that he had saved enough
for them to live on in comfort. After their marriage,
though, she had found all these representations
to be false; and out of his situation as valet he
had been turned when it was discovered he had
obtained it through a false character. Lower and
lower they had sunk in the social scale, and latterly
her husband had been acting as billiard-marker
at a small tavern. He had taken to drinking and
gambling, though, and but little of his earnings did
Rose ever receive. - Her twin babies had died
some months ago from want of proper food and
ptivation, and now her husband had left her. She
could obtain no clue to his whereabouts ; food had
not passed her lips for twenty-four hours; and she
was absolutely. without a penny. Terrible fits of
coughing interrupted this sad history, and when
120 To the End.



it was done, poor worn Rose leant back in her
chair with eyes closed, perfectly exhausted, and —
Edith with a sorrowful face hurried away to fetch
her some supper.

Lawrence and Ruth were deeply distressed at
Edith’s sad account of Rose, and fearful of over-
excitement they resolved not to see her until the
morning. Patience, though, could not be kept
back from her old friend, and it was Patience’s
eager hands that lit the fire and made cosy the
little room next the nursery, and it was on Patience’s
strong arm that poor Rose clambered the staircase
to it.

The next morning she was too ill to rise; pains
like knives were darting through her chest, and
her cough was almost incessant. The doctor pro-
nounced it to be inflammation, induced no doubt
by the previous night’s exposure. With care, he
said, she might weather it. But down-stairs he told
Edith that even if Rose got over this attack, her
days were numbered ; her lungs were extensively
diseased ; consumption had already marked her
for its victim.

In ten days Rose was able to sit up again, and
her one wish was to return to St. Magna’s,

It was with a sad heart Edith took up her pen
to write to the old parents in the little cottage
under the tall elms, the cottage from which Rose
A Sad Return. I2I



was so eager to depart, and to which now she was
so anxious to return; and almost irresistibly there
flashed across Edith’s mind the remembrance of
the conversation which she and Rose had held
at the wicket-gate that summer evening now so
long ago. Couldit be possible that the bright, the
beautiful girl who had then spoken so wilfully, was
the wan, faded invalid who, propped up with cushions
by the fire with a bright hectic spot in each cheek,
was now gasping for breath ? Ah, when will we learn
that God’s choice for us is best—that the lives that
He plans for us are far, far better than any that we
can map out for ourselves—that His love is un-
fathomable—that His wisdom is unerring—that He
can safely be trusted to guide the sheep that follow
Him by the safest, the surest way home? Poor
self-willed Rose, walking in the ways of her heart,
and in the sight of her eyes !—of these things she
was now reaping the bitter fruit.

Edith’s two visitors returned together in the same
train to St. Magna’s—the patient invalid, Ruth,
who had taken up her cross of suffering and ac-
cepted God’s will in it, to a life of new health and
vigour; while the strong, ruddy, self-willed Rose
lay prostrate on the cushions opposite, with a face
white as the pillows against which she rested.

The pretty cottage beneath the elms, how peace-
ful it looked in the setting sun! But the meeting
122 To Pe End.



between Rose and her parents was a very sad one.
Mrs, Wicks threw her apron over her head and
went into loud hysterics, and though Mr. Wicks
controlled himself sufficiently to assist in carrying
his daughter to her old little room beneath the
eaves, his lips twitched with pain and his face
worked convulsively ; and when once more down-
stairs; he leant his head upon his hands, and through
his brown, horny fingers there trickled such tears
as only strong men weep, while with a voice that
was broken with emotion he murmured—

“My pretty girl—my pretty girl—didn’t I say as
Lunnon would bethe ruinof ye? Ye're going fast,
like your pretty aunt Jess; we'll soon have to lay
ye beside her.”

)
wy


CHAPTER XIX.

“CONFIRMATION BELLS.

;]EN changing years have come and gone,
and once more it is confirmation day
at St. Magna’s.

The sky is just as blue and the sun
is shining just as brightly as it did the day Edith, ©
Ruth, Violet, Patience, and Rose were confirmed
together ; and Violet, as she steps into her carriage
at the Hall at Great St. Magna’s, sighs regretfully
as she thinks of that bright spring morning. What
record have the twenty intervening years of her
life carried up of themselves to God? Ah, surely,
surely, not as fair as might have been!

Violet is a widow; in solitary grandeur she reigns
at the Hall. Wealth, position, ease, independence—
all the things she trusted life might yield her—are
hers now, and yet she is not satisfied. Her poor
hungry heart is craving—craving ; the food it re-
quires is love—love to God and love to man,




124 To the End.



Owing to illness Mr. Newton has had to give up his
pastoral duty, and Lawrence is now Vicar of St.
Magna’s. Often and often Violet drives over to
spend an afternoon with Edith, though the Hall
seems stiller and emptier than ever after a visit to
the full and happy Vicarage.

Lawrence and Edith always hope, though, that
Violet’s sorrows and loneliness will draw her
nearer to God, and that living to Him and her
neighbour, her life will not one day be a dull or
a sad one.

Ruth Hope is Ruth Hope no longer, Little Eva’s
father came back invalided to the Home Farm
some two years after Ruth’s visit to London, and
the quiet gentle girl to whom his child clung so’
fondly soon made a deep impression upon him.
Mrs. Muir refused to part with her niece, though,
and Dr. Muir’s health forbade him thinking of
returning to Africa again, so Ruth has not been
called upon to leave the home of her girlhood, nor
the aunt she loves so well. Dr. Muir still devotes
all the time and the energy (that his health will
permit) to the furtherance at home of the mission-
ary work which lies so near his heart, and Ruth
in this as in every other good work is a true
helpmeet to him.

Patience Trueman some five years past made
happy the honest carpenter who had waited for
Confirmation Bells. 125



her so long, and her cottage is the neatest and
prettiest in St. Magna’s ; in fact her husband thinks
that no man in England has a better wife, finer
children, and a happier home than he has.

And what of Rose Wicks? Ah! Rose—pretty
Rose—is sleeping beside her aunt in the cemetery
on the hill-side. What passed between her soul and
God during her last illness who can say? Mr. and
Mrs. Newton, Mrs. Muir and Ruth, and the Miss
Scotts were her constant visitors, and she would
lie very still, with hands clasped, and a thoughtful
look in her beautiful bright eyes, while they read
and prayed with her; but she never said much,
though they always hoped that in her weakness
and suffering she crept to the feet of her Saviour,
and that those outstretched arms of love, which
she had so long turned her back upon, were her
support in the shaded valley.

But oh! it is a terrible risk to run, to leave the
all-important matter of making our peace with
God to the last hour of mortal weakness, when flesh
and heart are failing ; and it seems almost an insult
to offer to the Saviour, who has died for us, the
few remaining sands of a fast-ebbing life.

Edith was thinking of all these things—of her
own past life—of the lives of four girls who had been
confirmed with her, as, the bells pealing sweet and
clear, she crossed the Vicarage lawn. How vividly
126 To the End.



her own confirmation rose up before her !—how
timidly she remembered she had sung the words—

“O Jesus, I have promised
To serve Thee to the end!”

And yet how graciously God’s Hand had been
over her; how tenderly God the Holy Spirit had
guided her in the days that were past ! Through all
the trials and temptations of the way He had pre-
served her to this hour, and with what earthly
blessings had He not crowned her? And Edith’s
eyes, as she walked up the aisle, wandered gratefully
to her husband’s white-robed figure in the chancel,
to her little Marjorie in her confirmation dress,
kneeling, with hands clasped and a face of rapt
devotion, in the same pew where she herself had
knelt just twenty years before—to the bevy of
bright boys and girls around her.

Truly her “barrel of meal had not wasted, her
cruse of oil had not failed.” “Goodness and mercy
had followed her all the days of her life ; she would
dwell in the House of the Lord for ever.”

“He that endureth ¢o-the end, the same shall be
saved,” was the theme of the address. “But howare
you to endure to the end ? ’ asked the Bishop ; “ your
hearts are so treacherous—your passions are so
blinding—your temptations are so strong. Well, you
must ask your Heavenly Father, Who has called
Confirmation Bells. 129



you, to give you strength to overcome ; you must
seek from the Lord Jesus, Who has redeemed you
for patience to persevere; you must watch; you
_ must pray; you must fix your eyes, not on the
things which are seen and temporal, but on the
things which are unseen and eternal. Like Moses,
you must have respect unto the recompense of
the reward, esteeming the reproach of Christ greater
riches than the treasures of Egypt. You must
endure as seeing Him Who is invisible. Like
Timothy, you must ezdure hardness as good
soldiers of Jesus Christ’s ; like the Blessed Master,
you must ezdure the Cross for the joy that is set
before you; and thus pardoned, guided, sanctified,
kept faithful to the end, He will present you
faultless before the presence of His glory with
exceeding joy. You shall see. Hs face; you will
walk with Him in white; for for His dear sake God
will account you worthy; you shall eat of the tree
of life that is in the midst of the Paradise of God.”

“He that shall exdure unto the end, the same
shall be saved.” “Be thou faithful unto death, and
I will give thee a crown of life.” |

The sun that shone so brightly through the
church windows of St. Magna’s rested for a minute
on Violet’s bowed head, gleamed among Ruth’s
auburn hair, lit up Patience’s honest face, and
tinted Edith’s sweet eyes as once more she sang—
128

To the End.



“© Jesus, Thou hast promised
To all who follow Thee,
That where Thou art in glory,
There shalt Thy servant be ;
And, Jesus, I have promised
To serve Thee to the end;
O give me grace to follow
My Master and my Friend.

O let me see Thy footmarks,
And in them plant mine own;

My hope to follow duly
Is in Thy strength alone.

O guide me, call me, draw me,
Uphold me to the end ;

And then in Heaven receive me,
My Saviour and my Friend.”

THE END,
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IMOGEN. A Tale of the Early British Church.

THE WHITE ROSE OF LANGLEY. A Story of the Olden Time.
MARGERY’S SON. A Story of the Fifteenth Century.

ISOULT BARRY OF WYNSCOTE. A Tale of Tudor Times.
LETTICE EDEN. A Tale of the Last Days of King Henry the Eighth,
ROBIN TREMAYNE. A Tale of the Marian Persecution.

CLARE AVERY. A Story of the Spanish Armada,

SISTER ROSE; or, The Eve of St. Bartholomew.

JOYCE MOR RELLS HARVEST. A Story of the Reign of Elizabeth.
ASHCLIFFE HALL. A Tale of the Last Century.

EARL HUBERT’S DAUGHTER; or, The Polishing of the Pearl.
A Tale of the Thirteenth Century.

VERENA;; or, Safe Paths and Slippery Byeways.
LADY SYBIL’S CHOICE, A Tale of the Crusades.

LIGHTS IN THE DARKNESS. Sketches of Alfred the Great,
Lawrence Saunders, Sir John Oldcastle, Katherine Willoughby,
Duchess of Suffolk.

*‘ Miss Holt’s Tales of English Life in the Olden Time form a very valuable
course of reading. We do not know one of her stories which does not deserve
high commendation on account of its own intrinsic merit, and also because of the
sound principles by which it is animated.”—2 cord,



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PArennoster Row, E.C.
7
John F. Shaw & Cos Publications.

STORIES BY CATHARINE SHAW,

ALICK’S HERO. Large Crown 8vo, cloth. ustrated. 2/6.
“Mrs, Shaw has added to our delight in noble boyhood, as well as to her
own reputation, in this most charming of her works.”—The Christian.

ONLY A COUSIN. Crown 8vo, 2/6.
“Tn our excavations among heaps of tales we have not come upon a brighter
jewel than this.”—Rev, C. H. Spur¢eon, in Sword and Trowel.
THE GABLED FARN;; or, Young Workers for the King,
Crown 8vo, 2/6.
“A charming story, wherein the children are described naturally.” .
IN THE SUNLIGHT AND OUT OF IT Livangelical Magazine.
A Year of my Life-story. Crown 8vo, 2/6.
“One of the pleasantest books that a girl could take into her hand, either for
Sunday or week-day reading.”—Daily Heview.
NELLIE ARUNDEL. A Tale of Home-life,
Crown 8vo, Illustrated. 2/6.

“We need scarcely say that Mrs. Shaw holds out the light of life to all her
readers, and we know of few better books than those which bear her name.”

“MOTHER MEG”; or, The Story of Dickic’s Attic. ecard:
New Edition. Crown 8vo, 2/6.
“The prettiest story Mrs. Shaw has yet written.”—The Standard,
JACK FORRESTER’S FATE. New Edition. Crown 8vo, with
Illustrations, 2/-.
CAUGHT BY THE TIDE; or, Prison Bars. New Edition.
Crown 8vo, 2/-.

SOMETHING FOR SUNDAY.
SELECTED BY CATHARINE SHAW.
Price ONE SHILLING each.
“With such werk there will be no dull Sundays.”—The Presbyterian,

Ist. OUTLINE TEXTS FOR PAINTING. 48 Texts in Packet,
2nd. HAPPY HOURS WITH THE BIBLE,
Devices for Bible Searching.
3rd. ECHOES FROM THE BIBLE,
Illustrated Papers for Bible Study.
4th, ALPHABET TEXTS for PRICKING or PAINTING.
Specially for the Little Ones.
bth MESSAGES FROM HEAVEN.
. Small Outline Texts for Painting. (Suitable for Flower Missions.)
6th, GLEAMS OF GLORY FROM THE GOSPELS,
Subjects for Bible Study.
wth A LARGE THOUGHT IN A LARGE WORD.
Outline Texts for Painting,
Sth. SCRIPTURE FEAR NOTS. Texts for Painting.
Sth. “ALL THINGS ARE YOURS.”
Outline Texts fur Painting, with Hints for Bible Searching.

10th, TEXTS FOR THE CHILDREN. For Pricking or Painting,









Loxpon : JOHN BF SHAW & Co., 48, ParerNnosreR Row, iE.C,
8
John F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.

STORIES BY E. EVERETT-GREEN.

ARNOLD INGLEHURST. A Story of the Fen Country. Larze
Crown 8vo, gilt edges, 5/-. ;

“Tt is a very remarkable book, and the descriptions of life in the Fen
Country are very life-like and good... . Altogether it is a fine idea and well
penned.”—The Guardian.

EUSTACE MARCHMONT. A Friend of the People. Large Crown
8vo, gilt edges, 5/-.

“This is a pleasant and snegestive West Country story The authoress has
written inany graceful tales of high purpose, but we doubt if she has ever turned
out a more finished narrative than this. Hustace is a very well-drawn character,
and his cousin bride a delightful creation.”—Whitchall Review,

HER HUSBAND’S HOME; or, The Dwileys of Linley Castle.
Large Crown 8vo, gilt edges, 5/-.
“Some of the scenes are particularly effective.’—The Spectator.

A SOLDIER’S SON AND THE BATTLE HE FOUGHT.
Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 2/6.
“.. . We lay it down with a feeling of gratitude that the boys of to-day have
the opportunity of reading so inspiriting a book.”—The Record.
PAT, THE LIGHTHOUSE BOY. Crown 8vo, with Tllustrations, 2/6.

“A very pleasing story of lighthouse life, with something of the desert island

charm.” —The Guardian,
MARJORIE AND MURIEL; or, Two London Homes. Crown 8yo,
with Illustrations, 2/6.
“A capital story, very prettily got up."—Record.
HIS MOTHER’S BOOK. Crown 8vo, 2/-.

“ Little Bill is so lovable, and meets with such interesting friends, that every-
body may read about him with pleasure.”—Spectaior.

LITTLE FREDDIE; or, Friends in Need. Crown 8vo, 2/-.
“ There is real pathos in this story.”"—Liverpool Courier.
BERTIE CLIFTON; or, Paul’s Little Schoolfellow. Crown 8yo, 2/-.

“Seldom have we perused a tale of the length of this with so much pleasure.”
The Schoolmaster.

FRIENDS OR FOES? A Story for Boys and Girls. Cr. 8yo, 2/6.

“This very pleasant and thoroughly wholesome story.”—Spectator.

RUTH’S LITTLE LADY. Crown 8yo, with Illustrations, 2/-.
A delightful study of children, their joys and sorrows."—Atheneun.
OUR WINNIE; or, When the Swallows Go. Crown 8yo, with Ilus-
trations, 1/6.

“The beautiful life of little Winnie is one which all children will do well
to take as an example.”—Banner.

SHADOWLAND;; or, What Lindis Accomplished. Crown 8vo, with
Illustrations, 1/6.
‘*A charming story for children, very prettily got up.”— Record,











Lonpoy: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNosrER Row, E.C.
9
John F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.

STORIES BY GRACE STEBBING,

——_+—————_



NEVER GIVE IN. The Story of Gustavus Adolphus. Large Cr. 8vo,
with Illustrations and gilt edges, 5/-.

“Some of the author’s very best work. She has drawn largely from historical
records, but has woven her material with so much skill that the story reads more
like aromance. The interest of the reader is more than sustained through these
384 closely-packed pages.”—The Record.

A REAL HERO. A Story of the Conquest of Mexico. Large Cr. 8vo,
with Illustrations, 5/-.

“We can cordially recommend this to all youthful lovers of adventure and
enterprise.” —Academy.

IN ALL OUR DOINGS. .A Story for Boys. Large Crown 8vo, 3/6.

‘€A story for boys, in which the lessons of the daily Collects are brightly
brought home to them.”"—Times,

GRAHAM'S VICTORY. A Tale of the Covenanters. Large Cr. 8vo,
with Illustrations, 5/-.
“Stirring, and ably written.”—Guardian,

“We heartily commend it to English boys and girls.”
Sunday School Chronicle.

WINNING AN EMPIRE; or, The Story of Clive. Large Crown 8vo,
with Illustrations, 5/-.

“Miss Stebbing is one of the few ladies that can write really god boys’
stories. She has caught, not only the phraseology, but the spirit of boys.”
Standard,

SILVERDALE RECTORY;; or, The Golden Links. Large Cr. 8vo,
with Illustrations, 2/6.

‘We can heartily recommend this story.”
Church of England Sunday School Magazine.

BRAVE GEORDIE. The Story of an English Boy. Large Crown 8vo,
with Illustrations, 2/6.
“Tt is refreshing to mect with such a spirited and thoroughly goo1 story.”
The Christian,
BEATING THE RECORD. A Story of the Life and Times of Giorge
Stephenson. Large Crown 8yvo, with Illustrations, gilt edges, 5/-.
“Pleasantly blends facts with fiction.”—Times.
“Just what a popular biography should be.”—Daily Graphic.

”

**A splendid book for boys.”—Vhe Christian.



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PArrrnosrer Bow, E.C,
10
John F. Shaw & Co.s Publications.



STORIES BY L, T. MEADE.

Author of ‘Scamp and I," &e.

—1 +

DOROTHY’S STORY ;; or, Great St. Benedict’s. New and Cheaper
Edition. Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 3/6.
‘«The description of Dorothy’s life is excellent.” —Spectator.
“At once a noble book, and a most interesting story.”—Court Circular,

A KNIGHT OF TO-DAY. With Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 3/6.
“ A finely-imagined story ofa good man. Itisa book well worth reading.

The Guardian,
BEL-MARJORY. A Tale. Large Crown 8vo, 5/-.

“Most interesting ; we give it our hearty commendation.”—English Independent,

SCAMP AND I. A Story of City Byeways. Crown 8vo, with
Illustrations, 2/6.

“ All as true to life and as touchingly set forth as any heart could desire.”
Athenwum.

THE CHILDREN’S KINGDOM; or, The Story of a Great Endeavour.
Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 3/6.

“A really well-written story, with many touching passages. Boys and girls
will read it with eagerness and profit.”—T'he Churchman.

WATER GIPSIES. A Tale. Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 2/6.

“Tt is full of incident from beginning to end, and we do not know the person
who will not be interested in it "—Christian World,

DAVID’S LITTLE LAD. Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 2/6.

“A finely-imagined story, bringing out in grand relief the contrast between
quiet, steady self-sacrifice, and brilliant, flashy qualities.” —Guardian,

DOT AND HER TREASURES. With Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 2/-.

“One of the tales of poor children in London, of which we have had many
examples, but none finer, more pathetic, or more original than this.”
Nonconformist.

OUTCAST ROBIN; or, Your Brother and Mine. Illustrated.
Crown 8vo, 2/-.

WHITE LILIES, AND OTHER TALES. With Illustrations,
Crown 8vo, 1/6.
“Stories of a singularly touching and beautiful character.” —Rock.

LETTIE’S LAST HOME. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 1/-.

“Very touchingly told."—Aunt Judy’s Magazine.

THOSE BOYS. A-Story for all Little Fellows. Cr. 8vo, 1/-. .
LITTLE TROUBLE THE HOUSE. Crown 8vo, 1/-.



Loxpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, ParernostEr Row, E.C.
ll
John F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.

STORIES BY BRENDA.





UNCLE STEVE’S LOCKER. Large Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 5/-

“ Brenda has never drawn two more charming pen-and-ink sketches.”
Spectator,
“ An attractive story of one of the bravest and sweetest of sirl-heroines.”
Saturday Review.

THE SHEPHERD'S DARLING. Large Cr. 8vo, with Illustrations, 3/6.

“A pretty pasteral with an attractive heroine, whose chequered life-story is

told with the grace and deli y that harmonize with the author's original

conception of the child Bonni und a story that is well told and well devised
must needs be good,”—Saturday keview. :

THE PILOT’S HOUSE; or, Five Little Partridges. With Illus-
trations by M. Inwry. Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 2/6,
“One of those admirable sketches of child-life which this writer can so well
portray.” —Bookseller.

FROGGY’S LITTLE BROTHER. A Story of the East End.
New Hlustrated Edition. Square, cloth extra, 3/6.

“Very pathetic and yet comical reading."—Quordian.

A SATURDAY’S BAIRN. With Illustrations, Large Crown 8vo,
cloth extra, 5/-.
“A pleasing story, skilfully written, and in an excellent spirit.”—Record.

LITTLE COUSINS; or, Georgie’s Visit to Lotty. With Illustra.
tions by T. Pym. Square, cloth extra, 3/6.
“Sure to satisfy any little girl to whom it may be given.” —Atheneum.

“Little girls who read it will long dream ef the delights of the shops and the
Zoo.” — Guardian,

VICTORIA BESS; or, The Ups and Downs of a Doll's Life,
With Ulustrations by T, Py. Square, cloth extra, 3/6.
“A charming book for little girls.’—Literary World.
“Told with Brenda's usual brightness and good aim as to teaching.”
Aunt Judy,

LOTTY’S VISIT TO GRANDMAMA. A Story for the Little
Ones. With Fifty Illustrations. Square, cloth extra, 2/6,
“An adimirable book for little people.”—Literary World.
‘A capital children’s story.”—Record,
‘Would form a nice birthday present.”—Aunt Judy.

NOTHING TO NOBODY. With Ilustrations. New and Cheaper
Edition. Crown 8yvo, cloth extra, 2/-.
‘CA very pretty story.”—Athenceum.

THE MERCHANT AND THE MOUNTEBANK. With Ilus-
trations by H. Peruuricx. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 1/6,
“One of Brenda’s delightful tales.”—Dritish Weekly.
“A sparkling little sketch, very prettily got up.”—The Record,





-Loxpoy: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, Parernosren Row, E.C,
12
John F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.



Large Crown Svo, Art Cloth, gilt edges, Six Shillings.

THE EARLS GRANDDAUGHTER.

By BRENDA.

THE WHITEHALL REVIEW.

“Rarely does the jaded reviewer find anything so fresh and spontaneous as Brenda's
new novel, ‘The Earl’s Granddaughter.’ It is full of ‘go’ and merriment, and the
quaint and ludicrous sayings of children. The scenes between Lady Patty and the
Bungalow children are fascinating in their life-like sincerity and grotesque comicality.
... The style of the book is simple and direct, and in it there is not a dull page.”

THE GENTLEWOMAN.

‘The Earl’s Granddaughter’ relates the doings of quite the most delightful family
that I have ever met with in books, in the children of Colonel and Mrs. Gabb. They
are original, fearless, clever, helpful, and intensely lovable, The account of their first
visit to London, given by the Gabb children to Lady Patty, is simply delightful.”

THE SATURDAY REVIEW.

“4 more delightful book for girls than this one we have seldom read. On little Lady
Patty, the Earl's Granddaughter, alone is lavished enough of character-drawing to stock
an average novel. She and her delightful little friends, the Colonel's daughters, are
living and breathing girls, and more good might be done by the tale of their doings than
by many a volume of sermons. . . . The book, as we have said, is entirely delightful, full
of health and humour. It is refreshing to be able to praise anything so unreservedly.”

THE DAILY TELEGRAPH.

“ One of the most wholesome, refreshing, and altogether charming stories of the season
is ‘The Earl’s Granddaughter,’ by Brenda... . . There is good store of healthy enter-
tainment for old and young alike in ‘ The Earl's Granddaughter.’”

THE BOOKSELLER.

“This is, without doubt, one of the best stories we have seen this year. The children
are the most unconventional, healthy, vigorous, and likeable children we have met with
for along time. The lessons of self-reliance and unselfishness, of which the story is full,
are very attractively enforced.”

THE GUARDIAN.

‘The various characters and habits of the country townsfolk are almost worthy of
‘Cranford,’ and the relations between the wild, merry family of the Gabbs, and the spoilt
and educated, rather haughty and conceited young aristocrat, are thoroughly original

and very droll.”
THE STANDARD.

“A novel for girls, and a good one. Very prettily told, and full of interesting details.
The gradual transformation of Lady Patty's character is very well worked out.”

THE LEEDS MERCURY.

“ Brenda is excelled by few in her sketches of child-life, and in ‘The Earl's Grand-
daughter’ she has given us a story breezy, varied, and interesting enough to delight all
who may be happy enough to possess it. The lives of the children at the Bungalow,
and of plain, clever Lady Patty, cannot fail to charm.”

THE RECORD.

“The Earl’s Granddaughter’ is certainly among the best work of this popular
writer. Some of the character-sketches indeed are worthy of Charles Dickens himself.
... It is along time since we have read so bright, so fresh, and so clever a tale, with
so valuable a purpose, as ‘The Earl’s Granddaughter.’”



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, Parernosrzr Row, E.C.
13
John F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.



Sunshine Stories for Woung People.

AN ENTIRELY NEW SERIES.
Crown Svo. Very attractive Cloth Bindings and Illustrations.

Price KIGHTHENPENCE each.

MAB’S BURDENS
MISS PRIMROSE

FOR WANT OF A WORD

A LITTLE CURIOSITY

BESIDE ALL WATERS
CHRISTOPHER’S NEW HOME
THE SLAVE GIRL OF POMPEII
PETER’S PROMISES .

HOW THE TIDE TURNED .
THE GOLDEN PAVEMENT .

LITTLE BOOTS

A BROTHER’S RANSOM

A WAIF OF THE WAVES
CLEMENT AND GEORGIE
THE GOLD THAT GLITTERS
LITTLE EYEBRIGHT

DORA’S MISTAKE
IN SHADOWLAND
FOR ELSIP’S SAKE

CURLEY’S CRYSTAL.

HAND IN HAND

TOO DEARLY BOUGHT

ROBERT’S RACE

LITTLE RADIANCE .

UP TO THE MARK

ACTING ON THE SQUARE.

OUR WINNIE .

TEE SECRET OF THE FOREST
THE WAY OF THE CROSS
ON THE DOORSTEPS

ROB AND MAG

FROGGY’S LITTLE BROTHER

ot

. By E. Boppy.

AGNES GIBERNE.
MABEL MACKINTOSH.
EmMA MARSHALL,
M. L. ASTREE.
EmMA MARSHALL.
Emity S. Hoi.
Mrs. MARSHALL.
SYDNEY WATSON.
FE. CHAPMAN.

J. Harrison.
ALICE LANG,
SYDNEY WATSON,
EmMA MARSHALL.
Emi.y S. Hort.
AGNES GIBERNE,
A. L. O. E.

E. EVERETT-GREEN.
J. CHAPPELL.
Mrs. MARSHALL,
J. CHAPPELL.
AGNES GIBERNE,
Mrs. MARSHALL.
J. CHAPPELL.

H. BouLtwoop,
H. BouLtrwoop.
E. EvERETT-GREEN.
E. CHAPMAN.
Emity S. Hott.
Mrs. S. LEATHES.
L. Marston,
BRENDA,



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, Parernosrer Row, E.C.

14
John F. Shaw & Cos Publications.

CHILDREN’S ANNUALS & PICTURE BOOKS.

> ——___—

Price 3/- each, Picture Boards; 5/- each, Cloth, Gilt Edges.

OUR DARLINGS.

Twelve Coloured Plates, many Illustrations, boards,
PRESENTATION EDITION, thick paper, cloth, gilt edges,

DEEDS OF DARING.

A SPLENDID VOLUME OF STORIES.

PRETTY PICTURES for LITTLE PETS.

Price 2/- each, Picture Boards; 3/§ each, Cloth, Gilt Edges.

LITTLE FROLIC ANNUAL.

STORIES AND PICTURES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

BIRDS AND BEASTS.

By J: G. WOOD,





Price {/6 each, Picture Boards; 2/§ each, Cloth, Gilt Edges.

SUNDAY SUNSHINE ANNUAL.

Epirep sy CATHARINE SHAW.

STARLIGHT STORIES.

WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS.

PETS AND PLAYMATES.

WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS.

FULL OF FUN.

WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS.

Price 9d. each, Boards; [/§ each, Cloth.

PINAFORE DAYS.

ADVENTURES BY WOOD AND WAVE.

ONLY FIVE.

FROLICS IN FARM AND FIELD.

ROUGH THE TERRIER:

HIS LIFE AND ADVENTURES.



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, Parernosrer Row, E.C,
15
John F. Shaw & Cos Publications.

SHAW'S NEW HO}LE SERIES.
MONTELY, price THRBEPENOR Wott



The following have already been issued:—

BY
. DOROTHY’S STORY : . L. T. Mave.
. WON AT LAST . : . AGNES GIBERNE.

THE END CROWNS ALL _.. Emma Marsuatu.
. THE KING’S DAUGHTERS . Entty S. Hotz.

. UNDAUNTED. 4 Tale of the Solomon
Islands z 5 . W. C. Mercarer.

x wm wp HS

6. SENT TO COVENTRY . . M. L. Riptey.

7. PAT, THE LIGHTHOUSE BOY E. Evererr-Gresn.
8 FROGGY’S LITTLE BROTHER Brenna.

9. BRITAIN’S QUEEN : ; TR RNon.

10. WATER GIPSIES . : . L. T. Meapg.

ll. ALL’S WELL; or, Alice’s Victory . Emity S. Horr.
12, JONAS HAGGERLEY ~. Jd. Jackson Wray. Aug.

13. SCAMP AND | i . L. T. Means, Sept.
14. IDA’S SECRET : . Acnes Giperne. Oct.
15. NOTHING TO NOBODY . Brenna. Nov. |
16. OUTCAST ROBIN . L. T. Mmape. Dee.

17. BISHCP’S CRANWORTH Ena Manrsnatn. Jan.
Of the earlier issue of this series ‘‘THE GUARDIAN” wrote :—

‘*We must mention with gratitude and approval Shaw’s ‘Home Series,’ a cheap
issue of capital tales. They are all thoroughly attractive and sound, with a great
deal of variety.”

Many New Tales are being included in this New Issue.



Loxpos: JOUN F. SUAW & Co., 48, Paternoster Row, E.C.
16


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