Citation
The fortunes of the fellow

Material Information

Title:
The fortunes of the fellow a companion book to The farrier's dog and his fellow
Added title page title:
Farrier's dog and his fellow
Creator:
Dromgoole, Will Allen, 1860-1934
Page Company ( Publisher )
Colonial Press (Boston, Mass.) ( Printer )
C.H. Simonds & Co
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
L.C. Page and Company
Manufacturer:
Colonial Press ; Electroptyped and printed by C.H. Simonds & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
122, [4] p. : ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Orphans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Dogs -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Horseshoers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children and death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Kindness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Will Allen Dromgoole.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026673325 ( ALEPH )
ALG5810 ( NOTIS )
261340258 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW





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THE CIRCUS CHILD.

(See page 88.)



THE

FORTUNES OF THE. FELLOW

A Companion Book to
The Farvier’s Doy and His Fellow

BY
WILL ALLEN DROMGOOLE



BOSTON
L. C. PAGE AND COMPANY
(INCORPORATED)

1898



Copyright, 1898
By L. C. PAGE AND COMPANY

(INCORPORATED)

Colonial WBress :
Electrotyped and Printed by C. H. Simonds & Co.
Boston, U.S, A.









CHAPTER

I.

Il.
III.
IV.
Vv.
VI.
VII.
VIII.

igs
i

AMONG THE GREEN HILLS
LooKING THINGS IN THE FACE
Tue LitrLe Kip’s Foixks

“I CAN’T, BECAUSE I LovE HIM.”
THE LirrLe TINSEL LADY

“THE LIGHT THAT SHINES ”
PassinG Ir ON

Lucky Docs .

PAGE
II

31
50
vir
81
95

105

113









PAGE

THE CIRCUS CHILD . ‘ : , Frontispiece

«“¢Hkr AIN’T BUDGED FROM THAT BENCH’” . 17

“THE DOG HAD HIS SUPPER OUT OF THE

BOY’S PLATE : : i : : 3 27
THE STORY OF OLD QUEEN . : ;. 5 37
“THE CHURCH BELLS WERE RINGING” . : 52
THE “FELLOW” AT HIS SELF-IMPOSED WORK . 57
“¢WHOSE BOY ARE YouU?’” , ; ene 63
“ PATCHING AND DARNING THEIR CLOTHES”. 82
THE “ FELLOW” AS NURSE : : 5 . I01

THE TRAMP SMITH . ; : ° . i Ill







THE
FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.



- CHAPTER I.
AMONG THE GREEN HILLS.

Tue farrier sat back in his sooty old shop,
among the dust and cinders, and rusted old
irons, drawing at his cob pipe, and chuckling.
Through the open door, where the south wind
came puffing, laden with the odor of wild
grape blossoms from the river woods, half a
mile away, the farrier was watching the new
boy, the little waif he had picked up in the
streets of the city and brought to his home.

It had been just one hour since they three
— the farrier, the dog, and his fellow — had
landed in the village. And all that hour the

farrier had been “righting up” his shop,
II



12 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

the dog had run off, making mysterious calls
somewhere among his old haunts, and the fe/-
low had been sitting precisely where he had
dropped down at the moment of arrival, on
the three-legged old wooden bench that stood
under the shed before the door of the smithy.
He had said very little. More than once the
farrier had called to him from within the shop,
and had received no answer. The little waif
was getting acquainted with nature; the brown
feet, that had known nothing but the hard pave-
ment’s blistering and burning, had, at last, felt
the soft grass, dewy and deliciously restful.
His glance, as he rested by the smithy door,
was fixed upon a long line of hills, rising
beyond the river, and trending away to the
southward, like a wall of living, waving green.

The farrier peeped at his new charge, and
chuckled.

“Now that there boy,” said he, in a whisper,
and with a glance around the shop, as though
an unseen presence might have been there (as
who shall say there was not), “that there boy
has set there on that there bench, a-watchin’ of
them hills, for one hour. He ain’t had no eyes
for nothin’ else. A body would a’most think



AMONG THE GREEN HILLS. 13

they was the hills o’ heaven, the way that there
little chap takes to ’em. Just drapped down
there, and ain’t stirred since, not even to look
in the shop, let alone the — house.”

At that, the beaming old face turned about
to look through the side door (for it was one
of the good farrier’s peculiarities always to
fling every door wide open; he was fond of
the sun and air, and as for the light, he
“thanked God always he hadn’t any cause
to hide from it”’) that opened off a little green
patch that he called his yard, and across which,
not ten feet from the smithy door, opened the
back door of the farrier’s house.

A woman was standing there, —a neighbor,
who sometimes came in to tidy up things for
the wifeless old smith, and who looked after his
washing, and kept him always in fresh aprons
and a clean shirt.

She had a white cloth tied about her head,
and a dust-broom in her hand, and she was
beckoning the smith to come to her.

“Tt’s all fixed and ready now,” she said,
when the farrier’s big body filled the doorway.
“Tt’s all real clean and sweet, and the little
bed’s fit for a king to sleep in. I scoured the



14 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

day you went away, and it’s a mercy I did, with
just one hour’s notice of a boy comin’. Now,
how do you think it all looks?”

She waved the dust-broom about her head,
taking in, in one grand sweep, the modest
little room and all its furnishings. First, there
was the farrier’s own big bed, pushed back a
bit to make room for the little white cot that
stood against the foot of it. It seemed very odd
to the big blacksmith to see that little child’s
bed, all white and sweet, in his own lonesome
old room, and for a moment he couldn’t quite
get familiar with it. Yet, it had a cozy look,
too, —a “homey” look, the farrier called it.

Then there was a table for the lamp, a tall
bureau with a cracked mirror on top of it, with
just glass enough left to show the smith his
own jolly old face, when he wanted to shave
himself. The mantel was covered with clean
newspapers, scalloped around the edges, and,
on one end of it, the smith’s eye fell upon
something that brought a smile to his lips.

“Now,” said he, “that looks zwe//, that looks
right. 1 wanted that put there to remind that
boy of his old hardships, if he was ever tempted
to grumble at Providence ; and to remind him





AMONG THE GREEN HILLS. 15

of his humble beginnin’s, if he ever gits pros-
perous and proud. And then again, I allowed
it would make things feel more homeful like, if
he found his own old things here waitin’ for him.”

He stepped over to the mantel, and moved a
trifle more to one side a little kit of bootblack
furnishings, — brushes and boxes of blacking
that he had picked up, unknown to the boy,
at the old tenement house in the city.

«“ They’ll be like old friends, a’most,’’ said he,
softly.

“Yes,” said the woman, “they will ; I ’most
know they will. Somethin’ carried along that
way seems ’most like folks to us when we meet
it ina strange place. I fetched a gourd along
once’t, when: we-all moved from No’th to Kel-
liny; and I used to think sometimes I’d ’a’
fairly died 0’ homesickness if it hadn’t been
for that gourd. Whenever I’d feel special far
off and alone, I’d just say, ‘’Tain’t so far ; ain’t
the gourds growin’ behind the kitchen? And
there’s one of ’em.’ Does the little boy seem
sati’'fied now ?”

“ Sat’ fied? Peep at him, yonder,” said the
farrier. “ Heain’t budged from that bench since
he struck it one hour ago. And he ain’t spoke



16 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

except to ask once what it was a-growin’ in the
wheat field over yonder ’cross the way; and’
once to want to know if the birds didn’t sing
uncommon loud, and what it was made the wind
smell so sweet. I’ve just let him be; he’s get-
tin’ acquainted with nature, and she’s a sight
better teacher than a blacksmith, I reckon.
He’s a likely boy, and somehow I took to him.
I don’t know anything about him, but I can’t
worst him any; I know that. Why, that boy
never saw a wheat field before in his life, let
alone the woods, and wild things a-growin’.”

“The land of mercy!” cried the woman, her
hands uplifted in horror.

“Just so,” said the smith; “don’t know
nothin’ about the grass a-growin’, and a good
bed to lie in nights, and soft looks, and some
one to speak to him kind. I tell you, ma’m,
that boy’? — the smith brought his hammer
hand down on the table in a way that set
every window in the room dancing — “he don’t
know anything but bricks, and mortar, and hard
words, and scuffle, and starvation, and dogs.
And now, please God, ma’m, he’s got to see
the other side o’ things. Trees and flowers ; the
good green grass a-growin’; God’s sun a-shinin’



ANY
RS



Y

\\

Ses



Sf

«“¢HE AIN’T BUDGED FROM THAT BENCH.



SS

S
EN
SN

20)







AMONG THE GREEN HILLS. IQ

in his heaven. He’s got to know the feel of a
friendly hand, and the sound of a voice to speak
him well, now and then. Yes, ma’m, please
God, he’s got to.”

“Yes,” said the woman, running her hand in
a half-caressing way over the white spread of
the waif’s little cot, “he’s got to see the other
side now. And we are all ready to help you,
farrier; that’s what my man said when you
sent me word to get things cleaned up for you.
Says my man, ‘We’re all poor enough, Lord
love us, but we ain’t going to get so poor we
can’t lend a hand to help a good deed along.
So,’ says he, ‘you go over there and help that
old Good-Heart git things righted.’ ‘ And,’ says
I, ‘that I will; for when a man has a heart
like —’”

“Pooh, pooh!” said the farrier, who didn’t
at all like to hear himself praised, “I am bound
to tell you to let up on that. That there boy
is a treasure ; I ain’t out anything, and I am in;
TI’minason. And I thank you, ma’m, mightily,
for rightin’ up things. It takes a woman to
make things shine. And now, ma’m, I’m goin’
to call the boy in, and, if you please, I'll bid you

- good day.”



20 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

The woman understood that the farrier con-
sidered there might be a scene; and that he
preferred that they two should alone be sharers
of the waif’s home-coming. So, while she could
but wonder if the smith was “growing a trifle
too soft-hearted,” and “if the street boy wouldn’t
be skittin’ of it back to the city soon,” she said
“good day,’ and passed on through a gap in
the fence to her own place, next door.

And so were they left alone, the farrier and

the fellow, in the first, sweet hour of ome that
~ one of them, at all events, had ever known.

The big fellow touched up the white pillows,
tucked a sheet a trifle more squarely under the
small mattress, moved the kit, or fancied he
moved it, a little more to the light so that it
should be the first thing to attract the boy’s
attention, then he said, aloud, and with right
hearty approval :

«There, all’s ready.”

And indeed it was quite time,— even the .
smith smiled, thinking what a great time he had
been spending fixing up so little. “Anybody
would think I had a palace,” said he, “and that
the king was a-comin’ to occupy it.” Then he
stepped to the door and called:



AMONG THE GREEN HILLS. 21

« Son!”

The boy jumped up and looked about him
like one dazed. The farrier laughed.

“Come on, son, won’t you?” said he. “I
want you special.”

The boy stood staring, —all his courage, his
old vagabond daring, and the independence with
which he had learned to meet the ills and
misfortunes of life, had suddenly deserted him.
The throat that had been parched with the
dust of the city was now choked with a
strange, new feeling of happiness. His heart
was beating in his bosom like a trip-hammer.
And all because a big, burly old blacksmith,
‘with a hard hand and a soft heart, had, in a
great, gruff, tender tone, said, “Son.”

He wasn’t a baby, this boy who had fought a
real man’s battle in his few short years, and
who had, as the farrier often said, “‘toughed it
mightily with misfortunes ;”’ so when the smith
called him “son,” in that croaking voice of his,
he got up very quickly, blinked his eyes rather
too briskly to be entirely natural, looked around
as though he had lost something, and cried,
“Now I wonder where that there dog is!”

For he had forgotten all about his old



22 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

”

“fellow” the while he had been resting and
dreaming on the smith’s bench.

The farrier laughed until he shook the ashes
out of his pipe. “Never mind the dog, son,”
said he. “He’s all right; just gone visitin’.
You can always trust a triflin’ dog to come
home at meal hours, every time.”

««¢Triflin’?’” The boy forgot siete: in
defending his old friend, as indeed the farrier
meant he should. “TI say ‘triflin’.’”’

« Ain’t you comin’ in?” said the smith; and
even as he said it the old soft-heart stepped out
the door and went across the yard to the shed,
to walk home with his new “son.”

And the neighbors, watching from their
windows, declare to this good day that they
never hope to witness a happier sight than the
way in which the street waif slipped his arm
through the arm of the smith, and walked along
at his side, quite familiar and comfortable, as
though they two had been companions near and
dear for many and many a day.

And the fatherly way in which the smith
looked down into the brown, boyish face, up-
turned to his, the neighbors said, ‘was beautiful
and good to see.”’



AMONG THE GREEN HILLS. 23

But the neighbors, if they could see, couldn’t
hear what was being said; and that was really
the best part of it. It must have been; for
they walked very slowly, sometimes quite stop-
ping, indeed, as though the distance to the
house was all too short for that which they had
to say.

The good farrier had a feeling in his heart
that this boy had not been dropped down, as it
were, into his life without a purpose; and he
understood that he was vested with a certain
great, grand responsibility: the guiding, for a
season, of a young, impressionable soul, the
shaping of a man’s life. And he resolved that
his very first move in this new duty of his
should be a thorough understanding of this
human waif, whom the waves of misfortune had
brought to his door. So he said, in quite a
confidential way :

«What was you thinkin’ about all that time
you've been settin’ there on the bench lone-
somin’ all by yourself, son?”

“Well, now,” said the boy, with a touch of
that old-time independence when he had walked
the streets of a great city with only a dog for
company, “I might ’a’ been countin’ of my



24 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

money, but I wasn’t. I was just a-settin’ there
on that bench of yours alookin’ things in the
face. And that’s all.”

«And do you like the looks of ’em, son?”

“Well,” said the boy, a funny little twinkle
in his eye, “ J just do.”

“Well, then,” said the smith, “come inside;
and see how you like the looks of things in
there.”

And he led the way into the house that was
to be theirs until one of them, at all events,
should pass on to the great, last home.

The boy stopped on the threshold and took
in the room at a glance: the table and chairs
and bureau, the broken mirror, and the familiar
old kit of brushes. But it was not the re-
minders of his former hardships that riveted
and held his attention. His glance swept
beyond all things else to the farrier’s big
bed, and the slender, white-draped cot beyond
it.

It was a boy’s bed; he was the only boy in
that establishment. Such a bed as it was, too,
all square, and soft, and white, and altogether
restful. His busy young brain flashed back-
ward for an instant to the rat-eaten floor of the



AMONG THE GREEN HILLS. 20

old tenement house, with its hard pallet of
-musty quilts. Then, in a glance, he drew the
comparison between his former poverty-pinched
couch and this wonderful creation of clean
sheets and white pillows. He turned to the
farrier, his brown face beaming :

«Say, now! is all that for me? All them
white things, and — and — al/?”

“Yes,” said the smith, who was enjoying
himself fully as much as the boy, “it is your
bed. I hope you will find your sleep pleasant
in your new bed. But I want you not to for-
get these.” The tall farrier tapped the brown
box of brushes on the mantel with his big
forefinger. ‘Never forget, not in all your life,
whatever that may be, that you have been a
poor boy, who earned his bread with these
brushes. I want you to always keep ’em nigh
you. You'll understand better some day why
I want it, and I am sure you will always
remember what I say.”

The boy’s face was a study; he stood quite
still for a moment, then whirled about with a
great concern, and said:

“T wonder, now, where that there dog is.”

And before the smith could say another word



26 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

he was out the door, in the street, back turned
the smith’s way, whistling as though he had
signed a sudden contract to summon all the
dogs in the country within the moment.

The farrier leaned against the low mantel to
laugh.

“Well, now,” said he, “if that ain’t the
peartest boy in ¢4zs village. Goin’ to let show
the tears in his eyes? Not him!”

_ When he had conquered his laughter, and the
boy his tears, the smith stepped to the window
and called out, cheerily :

« Never mind the dog, son; he’s gone visitin’,
Baydaw has. He always pays them visits, night
and mornin’. I'll tell you about ’em, sometime.
Your supper’s ready, now.”

There was an‘extra plate at the kitchen table,
and a chair that looked as though it had been
waiting specially, all those years, for this very
boy who had had zo chair, and who had at last
come to claim it.

He sat down opposite the smith and began to
eat. He had never heard of a blessing, and the
smith had never learned one. But if they were
a very hungry and a very tired pair, they
were also a very happy pair; so it may be



AMONG THE GREEN HILLS. 27

the good God accepted their happiness — for
happiness in his creatures cannot be otherwise
than pleasing —as an unspoken thanksgiving,
and was satisfied. At all events we are going
to believe so. .

When the meal was finished the dog had his

A
See



supper off the boy’s plate, while the boy sat on
the doorstep and watched the sun go down, and
the moon rise over the green hills. The far-
rier smoked his pipe, the fattest, happiest
farrier anywhere, under the smithy shed; the
crickets chirped in the clover ; the dog finished ©



28 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

his supper and stretched himself out in the
moonlight. After awhile the boy slipped down
by the cur’s side, and lay with his head against
the shaggy coat his faithful “fellow” had been
so near losing. He lay with his face up, and
his eyes wide open; so still was he that the
smith called out to him by and by, to ask if he
was asleep.

“No,” said the boy. “I was just a-countin’
of the stars. I didn’t know there was so
many.”

The farrier got up and put away his pipe.
The little brown heap of boy and dog and dirt
had reminded him of something.

He went back to the house and pulled a
bundle out of his big valise, telling himself
he “hoped it would all fit.” Then he stepped
out into the moonlight and spoke to the boy
again :

“Son,” said he, “s’pos’n’ we walk to the
river, now? I’ve a mind to show you how to
swim.”

The river—the boy was a boy; he needed
no second invitation, but was on his feet in an
instant, following the farrier, the dog following
the boy, straight down the one street of the vil-



AMONG THE GREEN HILLS. 29

lage, across the meadow beyond, to the broad,
silverish-looking stream sweeping past the green
hills, “flowing right along” to find the deeper,
stiller current of another river miles away to
the westward.

“I saw a creek once’t,’ the boy said, when
the full sweep of the stream first lay revealed
to his astonished vision. “I saw a creek once'’t.
But it was little, and muddy, and skimp. Used
to dry up summer times, and you could smell
the dead frogs in it. But ¢#zs is a river right.
And how the bushes do smell! Hey, Crinkle?”

The dog wagged his tail, and without more
ado let himself down into the water.

“Now,” said the smith, “do you throw away
them rags and follow me. You're goin’ to
know the feel of cleanness from this on.”

Later, fresh, and clean, and sleepy, the boy
drifted off to dreams between the white sheets
of his new bed. He had never said a prayer in
all his little vagabond life,— scarcely understood
the meaning of such things, indeed. But as his
head touched the pillow, that charity and a
great human sympathy had provided, it was
lifted for a last look at his big friend sitting in
the moonlight by the open window, and —



30 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

« Say, now,” he sang out in his cheery way,
“I'm mighty glad God made you.”

And with the gladness in his heart the weary
“fellow” drifted off to dreams.

The smith smoked on, the boy slept, and the
yellow cur shook himself, stretched his lazy
legs, and trotted off, down the village street,
upon one of those mysterious “ visitings” con-
cerning which the farrier had promised more
light, “by and by.”



CHAPTER II.
LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE.

Tue boy had begun to feel at home, —he
had begun to know the trees, to call them by
name, and the feel of the cool grass under his
bare feet.

The farrier had begun to feel at home with
a boy around. To be sure, there were times
when this new boy would drop down upon him
in a manner that reminded him strangely and
strongly of that other boy, that dear, dear, little
boy, who went upon that “long journey.” And
whenever that happened, the smith would, al-
most unconsciously, glance towards the spot
where he had buried the anvil that had been
the other boy’s favorite seat. Yet were the
two boys very unlike, — very unlike in 4ll things
save in their love for the big farrier.. He had a
way about him, had this soft-hearted old tinker
in iron, that went straight to a boy’s heart, and

31



32 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

captured it on the instant. Some people are
that way; not everybody, however. No, indeed ;
for boys and dogs are alike in this one respect,
—when they take to anybody they always know
that the somebody is a lover of boys, or of dogs,
as the case may be.

One day the smith was quite upset to observe
this new boy of his industriously digging away
the leaves in the hole where he had flung the
anvil the day his first little friend died. He
“dropped his hammer with a great clatter among
some stray bits of iron, and went hurrying to
the door.

«Now, now,” said he, “what are you a-doin’
of? Didn’t I tell you all about that there anvil
once?”

The boy looked up from his self-appointed
task.

“Yes, you did,” said he; “but that ain’t any
way to git shed o’ thinkin’. And trouble ain’t
a-goin’ to stay buried after it zs buried. The
only way is just to look it in the face.”

«W-e-l-1,” said the smith, slowly,— he was
beginning to have great respect for the little
waif’s wisdom, — “w-e-l-l, all right, then.”

When again he looked up from a shoe he was



LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE. 33

shaping, the old anvil was in its familiar place,
with the new boy astride it, the yellow cur
curled up at his heels, and, as he afterwards
declared, “both of them trying to grin him out
of countenance.”

After the first surprise the smith was rather
pleased to see the boy there. Somehow, it was
almost as though the other friend had come
back again, —a little older, browner, more grown
up, and a great deal more worldly wise, — thanks
to the streets for that. The smith stroked his
chin until it was hardly visible for the smut his
hands left on it.

“Now,” said he, “I am glad to see you there.
_ If you could make out to ask me for a story
now, I could a’most believe it was my little
friend come back again.”

But the boy shook his head, he didn’t like
stories, — his own hard childhood was to blame
for this perhaps, for he said:

« Always seemed to me they wasn’t any sense
in tryin’ to make believe things is what they
ain’t ; all show, and shine, and fun, you know.
Always seemed to me ’twas a heap more
better to just look things in the face, like
they zs,”



34 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

«“ But,” said the farrier, “there are true
stories, you see.”

“ But the true ones is mostly bad ones,” said
the boy. “All about work, and scuffle, and
steal, and starvation. I know ’em; and it’s
better to let ’em be.”

“Well, now,” said the smith, “s’pose you tell
me a story, then, while I’m a-shapin’ of this
shoe.”

“Me?” cried the boy. “I never knew no
stories; never had time to learn none, did we,
Crink?”

He was patting the cur’s back, and thinking
hard. That yellow cur, shaven and shorn and
forlorn as he had found him, was the one fairy
tale that had touched his starved little life.
That was his one sweet story. And the smith
was already acquainted with that. But if the
cur could talk, —ah, if the dog could tell what
he knew of those vagabond days together !

“Well,” said the farrier, “if you don’t
know any real stories, just tell me how you
picked up that way of ‘looking things in the
face,’”

“Oh, chat! I reckin I got that from Old
Queen.”



LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE. 35

“Who was she, now?” said the smith. ‘Tell
me about Old Queen.”

And, without in the least suspecting that he
was doing so, the boy settled himself in the
other boy’s place and began to tell a story.
And the old farrier was just thinking as hard
as he could, « Now if the other one could only
‘a been here to hear this story.” For some-
thing told him it was going to be a very true
story the boy was going to tell, and a sad one.

“ Everybody called her Old Queen,” said the
boy. ‘And she wasn’t so old, neither ; though
she was poor, and worked her back all bent.
She was a mighty good friend o’ mine, that
time she lived in the tenement. She showed
me how to lay a hoe-cake, and to run a seam,
and to fixa button on. She washed my clothes,
sometimes, when she had a minute. "Women is
mighty good, — some women; and —”

“Well, well,” said the smith, “go on, son;
go on.”

“T was just wishin’ that there hammer would
git done talkin’.”

At this the smith showed alarm. He tossed
the hammer aside, and, looking keenly at the
boy, said :



36 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

“See here, now; you ain’t sick, are you, nor
—nor— nothin’?”

The boy laughed so long and so loud that the
farrier was quite relieved. Though he didn’t
take up the hammer again just then; and he
didn’t explain to his new friend how his com-
plaint against the hammer’s interrupting the
story had so reminded him of the other little
friend that it almost frightened him for the
moment. In fact, while he was not at all ner-
vous or superstitious, he had almost permitted
himself to think he had suffered a presentiment.

He mopped his face with his sleeve again
and again, took his pipe down from a chink in
the wall, and, seating himself on the edge of his
own slack tub, said:

“Well, well, son; go on now.”

“Well,” said the boy, who had been a prince
of the pavement too long not to be saucy, “ first
Td like to ask if you have them spells often?”

“Right sharp,” said the sth, « And what
was it Old Queen done?”

“Evrything; ’cept starve to death; and I
ain’t certain she didn’t do that, at last. She
lived next room to me once’t in the tenement,
and she had a girl, a right peart, pretty girl,



et
= SSS SX SAS
SSSA A
SSC
SEES Ss AY
Sey
SSE a
SSS
\

SEA

SANG SENET!

SASS
|



THE STORY OF “OLD QUEEN.”







LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE. 39

too, that made her see a sight of trouble. For
Queen was poor, and the girl liked nice things,
such as her mother couldn’t buy for her. For,
somehow, after her old man died Queen got
down in the world. And you know how awful
hard it is to git up when a feller gits down in
the world. So, Queen she got down: out of
work, out of victuals, out of friends, out of grit,
—that’s what I call down. She had a way,
when things looked darkest, of settin’ herse’f
down and kind o’ figgerin’ on ’em like. ‘Lookin’
of ’em in the face,’ she called it. And she use-
ter say that after she once stared ’em square in
the face, looked ’em all over, they never seemed
quite so skeery to her again. And most always
she allowed she could find a chink of light for
to go by.

« But one day her little girl run away with the
circus and never come back any more. And
Old Queen set on the floor all night in the
dark, all still, and not sayin’ of a word to
nobody.

« At daylight she was still there, and I went
in, and says to her, ‘What you doin’ there so
long and so still, Queen?’ And she looked up,
and says she, ‘I’m just alookin’ of things in



40 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

the face.’ And I says to her ,‘ Never mind ;
maybe she'll come back to-morrer.’ But she
shook her head, and says, ‘I ain’t plannin’ no
to-morrers; I’m just a-facin’ of to-day, little
master.’ Then she set there summin’ of it all
up: ‘No money, no home, no child. If I’d’a’ had
some money she never would have gone. But
now she zs gone I’ve got to set about savin’ of
her. And I’ve got to get some work, and that’s
all.’ And she did, —a man let her take keer of
his office, and clean up his rooms. And she
made good money, and laid some: by if, may
chance, the girl ever come back.

« And one day there was a circus come to town,
— it was the ‘Carrigan Circus and Menagerie,’
—and that night Queen didn’t come home. She
never did come any more.

“The next day I went to look for her, for she
had been real good to me; and when I found
her she was in jail.

“They let on how she robbed the man she was
a-workin’ for. Stole a di’mont pin and a lot of
money out of his room when she went to clean
it up.

«“ But she didn’t do it.

“TJ always knowed she didn’t do it, from the



LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE. 4I

very first minute. And I wanted to prove it,
but Queen wouldn’t let me.

“You see, I went to see the janitor of the
buildin’; I’d seen him before, and once’t I give
him a shine, ’cause he was toler’ble poor, with
lots of little kids to keer for. And he talked
out plain to me—he liked Old Queen, too,
——all liked her whatever knowed her. But he
said she war bound to ’a’ been the one as took
the things, because there hadn’t been a soul in
that room all day but just Queen, and for one
minute only a little lady all dressed in silk, who
went up and come straight down again. Be-
cause, she said, she was mistaken in the place,
— she allowed her brother’s room was up there,
but she had got the wrong number. Then she
asked him about another house and went
away.

“ And I asked him how the little, dressed-up
lady looked, and if she hada little red Spou on
her chin, dright red.

“And he said ¢ veer and ‘her hair was like
little goldish ropes all twisted about her head in
yellow curls.’

“So I knew it was Queen’s own child had
robbed the man, and I knew Queen knew it, too,



42 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

and that she was in prison, innocent, for her
girl’s sake.

«So I went to the jail and told her I knew all
about it, and that I meant to tell, and make
them set her free.

« And she burst out cryin’, and said I must
never, never do that. She said if I keered for her,
and if I felt any kind feelin’ for the little things
she had done for me, I must never breathe a
word about her‘baby.’ ‘For,’ said Old Queen,
‘I have looked things in the face, and it would
never do for Jenny to go to jail. She’s wilful,
and heady, and foolish, and vain, but she’s got
- honest blood behind her, and all my love and
prayers to think of. They have followed her all
her life, ev’ry step. And they’ll find the heart
of her some day, and break it with repentin’,
But not if she goes to prison; that would kill
the soul of her, and that’s what I’m tryin’ to
save. I’m countin’ on my love for her to help
me. As long as she’s safe there’s a chance for
her to repent and come home to mother. And
maybe if she knew her mother suffered for her,
willin’, it would make a better girl of her, little
master ; at least it seems so to me, after lookin’
things in the face. So, unless you want to give



+s
LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE. 43

Old Queen the worst lick you can, don’t you
send her girl to jail.’

“So that’s the way it went fora week. And
me a-thinkin’ Queen had been a great simple-
ton for thinkin’ that vain Jenny cared for her
sufferin’, or her love and prayers, either. And
one mornin’, at the end of a week, they found
Old Queen dead in her bed.

«The jailer said she hadn’t eat anything for
days, and that the night before she died she called
him to her, and told him she wasn’t feelin’ so
well, and that she’d been a-lookin’ of things in
the face, and says she, ‘I ain’t afeared to go.’
And Old Queen went. And that’s all.”

There! Who ever heard of a blacksmith with
a heart like wax? The farrier got up, wiped
his eyes, blew his nose, wiped his eyes again and
said :

“T do believe this pipe is smokin’.”

“Yes,” laughed the boy, “ most pipes do when
they’re chug full of tobacco and have a coal of fire
at one end, anda man’s mouthat the other. But
(and the boy grew grave again) what I was
thinkin’ of was Old Queen. Seems to me God
makes some folks just to work, and suffer, and
adie. It don’t look right, 7 say.”



2

44 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

The smith got up, pipe in hand, went outside
and called to the boy to come to him. Across
the way, where there were no houses, lay alow,
level stretch of meadow, and through it, away
to the left, straight as an arrow, ran a long red
lane, seemingly endless.

The smith lifted his hand, welding? the fireless
pipe, and pointed.

«See that red lane, son?”

“Yes,” said the boy, “I see.”

“Looks like it ain’t got any end to it, now
don’t it, son?”

“Yes,” said the boy, “it does look long.
. As if it might just go on, and keep goin’.”

“Tve seen ’em a sight longer than that,” said
the smith. “ Away out in Texas where there’s
miles and miles o’ level, and never a tree, nora
hill, nor a house to break the view; and them
long lanes a-runnin’ until it seemed as though
they might ’a’ girdled the whole round world.
But they didn’t. Them was long lanes, but
they had their end, too. It’s a mighty long
lane that don’t have its end, somewhere, some-
zzme. And that’s what I fetched you out here
to tell you. So don’t you be a-frettin’ over
them as has to suffer and struggle in the long



LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE. 45

lane of this world’s disapp’intmints. And don’t
be a-faultin’ of God A’mighty’s ways. At the
end o’ them lanes lies Aeaven, certain ; if only
one can make out to travel of ’em patient, and
faithful, andtrue. ’Tain’t for us to be a-ques-
tionin’ if we ought to tramp on, or to set by,
under the shade with the rich and happy. God
A’mighty never made a creature yit without
makin’ a use for it, and as sure as the sun
shines in his sky, heaven lies at the end o’ the
long lanes o’ sorrow.”

The boy rose; there was a gulp in his
throat ; for he was thinking of his own “long
lane” that had so very suddenly ended among
the cool brooks and pleasant shades. “Now,”
said he, “I wonder where that there dog
is.””

The smith pointed down the street where a
streak of yellow fur was making a retreat in a
cloud of yellow dust.

“Yonder he goes, son. S’pos’n’ you follow
him. It'll do you good.”

The boy started off after his old partner,
straight up the hill to a tall, stately brick dwell-
ing, set back ina grove of rustling green trees,
among whose shades the sleek white body of



46 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

an ancient beech, solemn and ghostly, gleamed
here and there.

The gate was locked, but the dog vaulted
lightly over the low iron fence, and the boy, full
of interest, soon followed him. Then it seemed
for an instant the cur might have dropped
through the earth, out of sight, so entirely had
he disappeared in the tall, waving blue grass
that covered the lawn. His tawny body crept
like a snake through the billowy green, the boy
following, filled with a strange awe, straight up
to the neglected doorstep. The white stones
were foot deep in the last year’s drifted leaves ;
_there was a musty odor of decaying foliage,
where the same brown drifts were heaped about
the great oaken doors.

“Tt looks like dead folks’ things,” said the
boy, “this house does. Crink, old feller?”

But the dog paid no heed; he ran-on, nose
to the ground, up the steps to the big front
door, sniffing and whining. Then straight down
the steps again to the next door, and so on
to every door, stopping at last by the big, low
window where once, one sweet summer, a
baby’s arms had reached out to rescue him
from the mill-pond. Then he stopped again,



LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE. 47

sniffed, crouched under the silent, sombre sill,
and, lifting his head, gave one long, wailing
howl,—a cry of grief, of disappointment, of
loneliness, as distinctly expressive as any
human cry could be.

The boy watched and listened; as that cry
of desolation rang out over the deserted lawn
he shut his ears with his hands and burst into
tears. He had seen many human beings suffer,
in many ways; but they could speak their
sorrow, and seek sympathy and consolation.
In all his life, varied and checkered as it had
been, it was the first time he had ever come
face to face with the mental suffering of a
dumb brute.

“Oh, that poor, poor dog!” he sobbed;
“his heart’s broke; that’s what ails Azm ;
and he’s huntin’ for the little kid what died.”

That evening, when the moon was climbing
over the hill, he followed the dog to the
graveyard, and saw the white shaft of marble
that marked the spot where the cur’s first
master was sleeping. The place was over-
grown with weeds, and the tall, dank growth
that attaches to graveyards. For the man
who had been left in charge of the house and



48 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

the graves had been very sick, and there was
no one to look after things. :

The boy stood a moment in contemplation,
then he said :

«See here, now, Crink, this won’t do; you
and me have got to better this up some, son.”

And when later the good round moon looked
down as she sailed over the spot, her mellow
light revealed the dog lying in the cleared
space which the boy had made, and which
all the time was growing larger and larger,
as the brave fellow patiently plied his knife.
It was a pleasant task, evidently; for when
at last he left off to go home he stood for a
“moment in deep thought. Then he said:

«“ He done a lot for me, that there little kid
down there did. And for the smith, too, and
for that there dog there. Come, son; supper;
the bacon’s broilin’.”

That night, as he sat with the smith after
supper, in their favorite place outside the door
in the moonlight, while the smith plied his
pipe, the boy, who had been silent a long time,
thinking of the other boy, now under the white
slab, said :

“ Now, ain’t it quare, how the love of a little



LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE. ~ 4O

kid like him made so much light in the world?
First for a dog, then for a boy.”

«And for a man, too,” said the smith.
“For the light o’ the little boy’s love used to
shine in the old shop amazin’. love; the only light that always shines azd
shines, and no wind or weather can put it out.
It just shines all the way. Always remember
that, son. A good and faithful love is a light
that shines all the way.”

After awhile the boy crept into his cot,
softly; through the window he could see the
smith sitting in the moonlight with a strangely
tranquil something in his face ; the same some-
thing that was nestling in the boy’s heart, per-
haps ; for long after he fell asleep there was a
smile upon his lips, as though his dreams might
be of pleasant ways through summer woods,
bordered with flowers, and alive with singing
birds.



CHAPTER III.
THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS.

THE farrier was getting feeble; the long, hot
Southern. summer was telling on him. The
usually noisy hammer was still many a day
indeed, while the farrier found it necessary to
take a little rest.

These were the days when the boy proved a

“genuine blessing. He was not fond of the
work ; didn’t, as he admitted, “take to the shop
mightily,” but did the best he could, and
honestly tried to like it for the sake of his
good friend, the farrier. In the house, too,
the smith felt how good it was to have him, —
he got the dinner, mended up their clothes,
tidied up the place, and did numberless little
jobs that relieved and comforted the old man
in his weakness. But the smith wasn’t alto-
gether easy about the boy; his brain had been
busy about him for some time.
50



THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS. 51

One night this brain-work of the smith’s
took positive shape.

The boy was creeping into his bed, laughing
and happy, when the farrier was suddenly re-
minded of something. Perhaps it was his own
failing health suggested the thought, but as he
looked at the bright young face against the
pillow the good smith said to himself:

«“ Now that there boy ought to be learnin’ of
a prayer to say. And whoever is to teach it
to him —J don’t know.” ;

The next morning, when the church bells were
ringing and the children of the village were
hurrying down the street, he said :

«Son, put on your hat and go along with
the balance o’ the young folks to Sunday
school. I want it special.”

That was quite enough to send the boy off.
When he was gone the smith held another long
consultation with his own conscience. His
thoughts ran thus:

«Now a man ain’t fitten to raise a child. A
woman would ’a’ had that boy on his knees the
first night he landed on this floor. But I ain’t
thought of it till this blessed minute. But it
will be all right now; there’s a young woman at



52 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

that Sunday school takes all the new boys that
come there, and tells them what to do. I’ve
heard of her ; there’s‘some allows she’s a sort 0’
mother to such as ain’t got any. And she'll



right my boy; she’ll sense the soul in him, too,
and the deeps of it. Ill trust her for that.”

An hour later the boy came back, breathless
and eager. He flung off his cap and seized the
smith by both hands:



THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS. 53

“Tve come for you,” said he. “Quick!
They’re singing, and I want you to hear. It’s
like — it’s like — heaven.”

The good farrier hadn’t the heart to disap-
point the boy who had counted so strongly upon
his enjoying the church choir, so he put on his
hat and his best Sunday necktie, dusted his
pantaloons, and together they walked off to the
village church at the end of the street. That
was the first of their journeys there together; .
there were many such journeys afterward ; in-
deed, the smith used to declare it was the “ begin-
ning of their start for the Promised Land.” The
boy, however, thought differently ; the boy de-
clared the “start” was made that day in the
“ratty old tenement house where a boy and a
dog was a-tryin’ to part company.”

At all events the journey was now begun ;
well and truly begun. For that noon when the
two sat down to their dinners the smith noticed
that the boy was restless. He had just lifted
the carving-knife to thrust it into the big boiled
ham when the boy raised his hand. The smith
paused, knife in hand.

“Well, son,” said he, “what is it?”

The boy was very near blushing ; but he was



54 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW,

a brave boy, and one who never turned back
when once he had set out to do athing. So he
plunged right on, boldly, into what he had to
say.

«The lady said at the school this mornin’,”
said he, “as how it’s a mighty small feller,
‘soul’ she put it, ‘as can eat and enjoy, day in,
day out, and never thank his God for it.’ I
reckined maybe you wouldn’t mind doin’ of it.”

The old farrier was a deal nearer blushing
than the boy had been. It was a great moment
with him; a great, grave moment. He felt the
power of this moment over all the boy’s after
life. He had never asked a blessing himself,
though he had not failed to be thankful, surely.
And he couldn’t have put his thanks in words
now, no, not if his life had hung upon it.
It was a serious moment with him, truly. Sud-
denly a way opened to him. He dropped the
carving-knife across the platter, folded his hard
old hands, and said:

“You ask it, son.”

It wasn’t an ordinary thanksgiving the boy
offered, not at all. It was odd, and short, and
perhaps a trifle funny. But I am quite sure it
reached the ear for which it was intended, and



THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS. 55

that the originality of it was quite lost in the
simple sincerity in which it was offered.

He had merely bowed his head and thanked
God for those things which had been to him as
blessings, and for which he was, in truth, most
sincerely grateful. “O Lord,” said he, “I
thank you for a friend, and a dinner, and a dog.
Amen.”

He never forgot to thank God for the smith,
never; not in all his after life; and a very
unusual life it was, too, marked with many
blessings, but none great enough to blot out the
memory of his first benefactor.

That night, at retiring, the smith noticed
again the boy’s restlessness. He was beginning
to understand him so well now that he could’
almost interpret his thought, at times.

“That boy,” said he to his cob pipe, “ wants
to kneel down and say his prayers, and he
won’t do it because he ain’t ever seen me kneel
down.”

The boy went out after awhile into the
kitchen, and when he had been gone quite a
while the farrier tip-toed after him to see what
he might be doing.

There was no lamp in the kitchen, but the



56 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

moon shone through the curtainless window,
and in the full radiance knelt the boy, with
folded hands, saying his evening prayer.

The farrier went back softly, and undressing,
made ready for bed. When the boy came in,
the old friend, farrier, and father went over to
his own big bed, knelt down, and folded his
hard old hands like a little child, and prayed.
There was no more dodging after that. Prayer
and praise had been established in the smith’s
house, and, strange to say, it was the little street
waif had introduced both. And they were des-
tined to remain, despite the smith’s whispered
confidence to his hammer next morning that
“raisin’ of boys was makin’ an old softy of
hinge:

The boy had set himself a new task: keeping
the little plat about the white slab in order. So
when one morning a man sent for the farrier to
come out to his plantation and doctor a sick
horse, the boy closed the shop and went over to
the graveyard, with the dog at his heels, as was
always the case when he made that little pil-
grimage of love and gratitude.

Somehow, he loved to think of that boy; he
didn’t understand, for he was only an ignorant,





THE “FELLOW” AT HIS SELF-IMPOSED WORK,







THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS. 59

impressionable boy as yet, how a good and pure
life, though it be ever so short, blesses all with
whom it comes in contact ; and even after the
little life is ended goes on blessing and helping.
As you have seen sad-hearted mothers some-
times giving away the little clothes and play-
things of their own dead babies, to comfort and
gladden some other less fortunate little ones.
And if you think of it well, it will take the form
of a blessing, making a blessing out of death
indeed, and passing it on down, something to
blossom, like a rose, in a dry and thirsty land.
But the boy knew nothing of such things; as
he hurried to his task, he was thinking of what
the good farrier had said about the “light that
shines all the way.” That was a very beautiful
thought to him, and he remembered at the same
time something the preacher had said on Sun-
day morning in his sermon. It was something
about “Let your light so shine,” and hearing it
he remembered what the farrier had said, and
wondered if it might not mean the same thing.
So lost in thought was he that he was about
to pass by the big house on the hill without
noticing that the grass had been cut, the weeds
and dead leaves cleared away, and that every



60 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

window and door stood wide open. Smoke
was rising from the kitchen chimney, and a
black cook with a white turban on his head
appeared for a moment at an open window.

“There!” said the boy, “them there folks of
the little kid’s must be comin’ home, Crinkle;
else somebody’s makin’ themse’ves mightily at
home, son.”

But the dog was gone over the fence like a
yellow flash, straight into the open window
where he rolled out of a tangle of white lace
curtains into the arms of a housemaid who was
patting and petting him, and calling him « Bay-
daw boy,” and crying, with her face hid in the
dog’s yellow hair.

The street boy knew without telling that this
was the nurse who had tended the little boy
that died, and with his own eyes dim he
passed on up the hill to the graveyard. So
he failed to see that the dog escaped from the
nurse to be caught by the cook who gave him
another hugging; and then, after sniffing at
every door, nosing into every familiar corner,
and failing to find the missing master, leaped
the fence and went trotting on up the hill after
his new comrade.



THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS. 61

The boy was busy clearing away the weeds
that still obtruded around the pedestal of the
white slab, —so busy that he did not notice
the dog’s approach, or observe that a lady was
sitting on a rustic chair under a tree near by,
intently watching his every movement. A tall,
stately woman dressed in heavy black, and with
the traces of tears still shining in her beautiful
sad eyes.

He was upon his knees, the boy who had been
self-elected to keep the grave plat, clipping
away here and there, pausing now and then to
pat the small mound affectionately. At last his
work was finished; he put aside his knife,
pushed back his hat, observed the dog in the
grass, and said:

«Son, if I could make out to read what’s
writ there on that there white stone I’d give a
heap, 7 would.”

The dog got up, looked steadily at the boy,
then at the stone. It was the very best he
could do, but it didn’t interpret the inscription
on the slab.

“T know,” said the boy, patting the yellow
head, “you'd like to help me, but you don’t
know the language; no more do J. But we



62 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

know each other, son, and that’s something, I
can tell you.”

He leaned forward to brush away some dust
marks that clung to the white marble, saying as
he did so:

“Mustn’t be any dust on the little kid’s
stone. Poor little kid; I wonder if he knows
now how much lonesomer he lef’ the world
when he went, and — how much drighter.”

He started, and almost tripped over the tiny
mound, as a hand was placed upon his shoulder,
and a lady’s voice said:

«Whose boy are you?”

He looked up to see the black-robed figure
at his side, and the beautiful tear-washed eyes
looking down into his own. He knew it was
the little boy’s mother; and after one glance
at the sad face under its black bonnet he said
to himself :

, “Her’n broke, too,” —he was thinking of
the day when he discovered that the dog had
a broken heart.

“Whose boy are you?” said the lady again,
her hand still on his shoulder.

Well, ma’m, I ain’t rightly and really no-
body’s boy, I reckins. Though the blacksmith





“* WHOSE BOY ARE you?’”







THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS. 65

down yonder has got the biggest claim to me,”
said the boy.

«Are you his son?”

“Yes, ma’m; since the day he picked me up,
along of another stray dog, and fetched me
home.”

The boy had never been so embarrassed in
all his life; and there was a suspicious sparkle
in his eyes that were constantly lowered, and
a sort of tremble to his voice that made him
almost afraid to speak.

“You've been taking care of my little boy’ s
grave ?” said the lady.

The boy inched nearer the dog and wished
himself a hundred miles away from the spot, and
swallowed, and blinked, and blurted out gruffly :

«Sort o’ cut the weeds, if you call that any-
thing. / don’t. I’d ought to ’a’ done lots more,
seein’ how much the little kid’s gone and done
for me, But — but — now I wonder where that
there dog is.”

«There is the dog, just under your feet,”
said the lady, smiling. “Are you going? Little
boy? I say, little boy? Come up to my house
to-morrow, — that is it, yonder among the trees.
I want to see you particularly.”



66 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

The boy nodded without once looking back.
When he was well on the road home he turned
to the dog at his side, and said:

“Tf us boys is goin’ to be babies, I think
we'd better fix us up some sugar rags and
stay at home; eh, Crinkle?”

But the dog was evidently interested in other
things, for he trotted off down the street, wag-
ging his yellow tail as though something very
unusual and exceedingly pleasant was about to
~ occur.

And perhaps it may have been ; for a strange
gentleman crossing the street at that moment
spied the yellow cur and stopped.

Yes, they were evidently old acquaintances,
for the stranger stopped to pat the face lifted
to his, while to his caressing touch and gently
spoken “Baydaw! Baydaw, old boy! What!
you are still hunting for the little master?
Poor Baydaw; dear old doggie; we can’t
understand!”

The cur rubbed his nose against the stranger’s
nose, whined, and tried to lick his hand. The
boy stood watching, in his heart that old feel-
ing of fear awakened that had been there the
night when the farrier had tracked him to the



THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS. 67

rat-infested old tenement and preferred claims
to his “ fellow.”

“ Now,” said he, ‘I wonder what f¢his
means.” :

For when one has once suffered a great
shock, or a great grief, one is forever after
half fearing, half dreading a similar experience.

As the boy drew near, the man looked up
from petting the dog to inquire:

“Ts this your dog?”

Instantly the boy assumed the old swagger of
the bootblacking days.

“T don’t call him by no such names,” said
he. ‘“That’s my pardner, and him and me is
fellows.”

The man looked keenly at the boy, and then
affectionately at the dog; he even smiled, as
though (the boy thought) the partner might be
a rather shabby and unaristocratic party. And
thinking thus, the boy was instantly on the
defensive for his “fellow.”

«Say, now,” said he, “don’t you be a-reflect-
in’ on that dog. He may not shine up as peart
as some gentlemen you’ve run across, but he
ain’t any scrub, that dog ain’t. Look at that
tail; see the crinkle to it? Now if that there



68 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

dog could always saunter backwards, so’s to in-
troduce his tail first, he’d be lots more admired.
I tell him so, constant. ‘Show your good side
to strangers.’ But dogs are mightily like folks,
— determined to pitch through life head fore-
most. But he /as got a nice tail. Why, he’s
named after his own tail, that there dog is:
Crinkle, — Crink for short.”

He drew the big brush through his palms
gently ; there was an affectionate suggestion in
the touch of the slender brown fingers, and he
seemed to have forgotten the stranger and to
be back again among the hard days when they
two— boy and dog—tramped together the
streets of vagabondia, as he said softly :

«J — always — liked — his — tail.”

Was there a mist in the strange man’s eyes?
Had he heard that compliment before from a
boy’s lips? A dear, dear boy who had gone
away forever upon a long, long journey? Else
what was there in the simple words to set his
heart beating thus, and to cause it to go out in.
tender sympathy for the rescued waif upon
whom he had never before set eyes, no, not in
all his life? And to be sure, he couldn’t see
him now, either, for the mist that blinded him.



THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS. 69

So without a word he turned away and went
rapidly up the hill to the big brick house amorig
the trees, where a lady stood waiting for him at
the gate. It was the same black-robed lady
who had been in the graveyard, and as the man
drew near she pointed down the street where the
“fellows ’”’ were still standing (or rather stand-
ing still, for neither of them had stirred from
the spot), and said :

“TI want that boy.”

The boy, meanwhile, was doing a little think-
ing on his own account. “Now,” said he, “I
just do wonder what’s up this time.” Then,
with sudden vagabondish humor, not without its
touch of wisdom too, he said as the dog evinced
a disposition to follow the stranger on up to the
house on the hill:

“Come back here, sir.”’ The cur stopped,
reconsidered, and turned back. “See here,
Crinkle ; you certainly have got the largest
circle of admirers of any gentleman of my ac-
quaintance. And you have got a mighty failin’
for following the last whistle, old boy. There’s
lots of folks ready to do the same thing, I’ve
noticed, special if the whistle be uncommon
good-lookin’, and backed up with good clothes



7O THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

and a glib tongue. Ain’t that wisdom we're
talking? Ah, son, you and me ain’t studied so-
ciety from the sidewalks all these years. A
great school, son, where we got our learnin’ ;
but what we learned was — folks. Now that
“man— Hush! isthatahammer? To be sure,
and not a soul to strike for him. Come, son,
the hammer’s a-callin’ of us, and I misdoubts the
smith’s lonesome.”



CHAPTER IV.
I CAN'T, BECAUSE I LOVE HIM.

CERTAINLY the farrier wasn’t as strong as he
had been. He sat about the shop door more
than was his custom, and dreamed over his pipe
under the shed. Yet was he a very happy old
farrier. There was a new something in the
old face of him; and if the big hammer didn’t
ring as it had rung, he quite forgot it in the
ring of the young voice sounding in his ears.
And if the old feet began to grow weary, there
were young feet, able, willing, glad to run in
their stead. The summer passed,—such a
glad, good summer to the boy, such a tranquil,
quiet summer to the farrier.

The autumn came, and there was the sound
of the wary fox in the wood, as he robbed the
wild grape-vines, or pillaged among the persim-
mon-trees. Nuts were falling, — chestnut and
the sweet wild scaleybark. Pigs were fattening

71



72 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

’ on the bountiful mash nature had provided. In
the river, where the boy had learned the first
lesson of cleanliness and had first felt the cool,
delicious sense of running water upon his little
sun-baked, sand-tortured body, fish were biting,
—the perch, the cat, and the pretty speckled
trout. The boy had been happy in summer ;
in autumn he was exultant. But the days
chilled ; the nuts disappeared, the fox sought
covert. The hoar frost came, and the snow.
And with the changing weather the old smith
failed. One day when he was at work in the
shop (for he had told the boy the hammer
would be the last thing he would lay by), and
the smithy door stood wide open to admit the
winter’s sunlight, a shadow fell upon the anvil
and across the floor.

The smith looked up, nodded, finished off the
red edge of a plowshare he was repairing, and
then laid down his hammer.

“Well,” said he, “how’s the folks this morn-
in?”

“Not so well,” said the visitor, who had taken
a seat on the smith’s own stool, “not so well ;
and I have come over here, farrier, to —”’ He
paused ; somehow it seemed a very selfish,



I CAN’T, BECAUSE I LOVE HIM. 3

cruel errand he had come upon. Then he
thought of the sad, childless woman in the
big house on the hill, and took courage.

“ Got a sick horse, too?” said the farrier.
The visitor shook his head.

«My wife sent me down here to talk to you,
or toask youto come up there and talk to her.”

He paused again, and looked about the shop ;
then said :

« Where’s your dog, farrier ?”

The farrier smiled. Somehow all of his em-
barrassed friends found a refuge in that lazy
old dog of his.

“Why,” said he, “I don’t really lay claim to
that dog now. I really don’t. You know I
gave him to the little master, sir, long ago.”

«But my son gave him back to you, farrier,”
said the visitor. “You surely haven’t forgotten,

farrier.’ The farrier stood up straight, and
mopped his brow. ;

“Forgot?” said he. “Why, it was like yes-
terday the little one cried out to me: ‘I’ve sent
for you to give you back your dog, farrier.’”

The visitor lifted his hand:

“Don’t,” said he. “We haven’t learned.
to talk about him yet — at the house.”



74. THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

Then there came to the smith the lesson he
had learned from the “stray” he had picked
up in the city streets, and he resolved to pass
the lesson on to his unhappy, if more pros-
perous neighbor.

“Now, sir,” he began, just as the boy had
done, “that ain’t any way to git shed of sor-
-row. Sorrow’s somethin’ won’t stay buried,
after it zs buried. The best way is to look it
in the face; stare it out o’ countenance, so to
speak. Set beside it, till it clears out. dy
boy learned me that much.”

His boy: ah! the good farrier had opened
the way to the very object of the visitor’s call.

«Where is your boy?” he asked, feeling his
way gently, carefully.

« Off rabbit huntin’ som’ers. Be back soon.
Want him?”

« Y-e-s; I want to talk about him.”

The smith grew nervous. He dragged up an
empty nail keg and sat down upon it, got up,
turned around, and sat down again.

«See here now,” said he, “I hope there ain’t
anything you’ve come to say aginst the chap.
He seems mighty clever and — and — handy
— to me.”



I CAN’T, BECAUSE I LOVE HIM. 75

“No,” said the visitor, “I know nothing
whatever against him. In fact, I was about to
remark that he was an unusually bright, clever
boy.”

“To be sure,” said the smith. “I suspected
he was, myself.”

«And he hasn’t much opportunity here,
farrier.”

The farrier gasped. In the honest goodness
of his heart he had done what he could for
the lad, and indeed his conscience had quite
acquitted him of neglect.

“J ain’t rich,” was all the reply he could
make.

“No,” the visitor went on, with merciless
slowness. “You're a poor man, farrier. You
can’t do. much for him. He ought to’ be at
school. Ought to have been there all winter.”

«“T done the best I could,” said the poor old
smith, looking and speaking precisely like a
man before the bar of justice. “I truly done
the best I could.”

“Tam sure you did. And I am sure it is
the best you ever can do. You are getting to
be an old man, farrier.” 4

«Yes, an old man. —To—be—sure.”



76 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

«And the shop isn’t paying a great deal.”

“No, not a great sight.”

« And your hammer arm isn’t what it used
to be when another boy sat on that empty
anvil there and listened to the blows your strong
arm made with the ironhammer. The arm will
not be able to strike so hard, and so true, for
this boy, farrier.”

« But it’s ready to strike until the good Lord
says ‘ Stop,’”’ said the smith, with something of
his old spirit.

“Yes, yes,” said the visitor, “I know that.
But what I wanted to say is, that this boy is
capable of a great future. The best you can
do for him, with all your love and labor, will be
to make a first-class blacksmith of him, and to
teach him, maybe, to doctor a sick horse.
Now, that boy would make his mark in the
world, with half a showing. He could be a
lawyer, farrier; one of the best. He has a
ready wit, a keen perception, and a nimble
tongue. He ought to have this opportunity ;
and — there are no children at my place, farrier.
And my wife is grieving for the dead child, and
begging for this boy.”

The smith stood up, tall and grand looking, °



I CAN’T, BECAUSE I LOVE HIM. 77

even in his common old apron of striped ticking.
He was pale, under the soot and cinder, and his
eyes were misty. But the brave old heart of
him never once faltered.

“Say no more,” he cried. “Say no more. I
can’t begin to make out to you what that little
keen-witted, nimble-tongued chap has been to
me. He’s taught me to say my prayers, that
‘boy has. And to thank my God three times a
day for my victuals. And he’s taught me, all
hours of the day axd night, to thank him for
the boy himself. He’s p’inted out to me many
a mercy that I’d overlooked. But I ain’t no
fool; I know ever’ word you say is gospel true,
sir. I am old, and poor, and gettin’ feeble, and
I need him more for that. But I sha’n’t stand
in the lad’s way, sir. He shall decide for him-
self. Yonder he comes, across the street, with
his fishin’ poles across his shoulder. Speak to
him ; I’ll step outside, sir, for I’ve got a tattlin’
old face, and the boy will read it like a book,
sir.”

And so, in order that his old face might
not ‘betray the yearning in his heart and so
influence him against his good fortune, the
farrier stepped outside the back door of the



78 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

shop and waited, seated on a broken wagon bed,
while the boy made his choice of homes and
fathers.

He sat very near the door, where he could
hear every word; for there were no secrets
about the offer which meant so much to all.
The old dog came out where he was and sniffed
at his feet, and licked his big brown fist clinched
upon his knee, reminding the smith of the
night when he had come to part those two com-
rades in the tenement. He reached his hand
and stroked the cur’s head.

“T reckin I feel just as he felt that night, old
doggie, when he said, ‘He’s all the friend I’ve
ole

Then he heard the boy’s voice in the shop,
and listened while the man from the big house
made his offer.

It was a great offer, indeed: a home of
plenty, books, schooling, toys, and better than
all twice told and over, loving hearts to keep
and guide him.

The boy listened silently, —so silently the
smith wondered, and strained his ear, thinking
anxiety had made him deaf to the voice he
longed for,



I CAN'T, BECAUSE I LOVE HIM. 79

But when the voice came at last, so clear and
honest, the foolish old farrier was quite beside
himself with joy.

“It’s mighty good of you,” was what the boy
was saying, “and I don’t know how I ever
thought folks wasn’t good and kind. It’s a
nice home of yours, and it’s mighty good in
the lady to want me in the place of the little
kid what died. I reckin it’s because of ‘the
light’ makes her want me. She’s got it, too;
the ‘light that shines.’- But I can’t go.”

« You can’t go?”

“No,” said the boy. “I can’t leave the
smith, noways.”

“Hadn't you better think again before you
decide?” said the man.

“Tf I was to think always,” said the boy, «I
couldn’t ever stop thinkin’ of the smith. Why,
he picked me up out of the streets, the smith
did, when all the friend I had in the world was
adog. But that ain’t why I can’t go. He fed
me, and give me clothes, and a clean bed to lie
in o’ nights, and showed me what it is to be
clean and honest. But ¢hat ain’t why I can’t
go. He’s gittin’ old now, and feeble; he don’t
sleep well o’ nights, and he gives out at the



80 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

anvil sometimes; he needs me. But ¢haz ain’t
why I can’t go. He fetched me here, a stray
dog, too, like Crinkle, and he called me ‘ Sox ,’
and I can’t go because I love him. And that’s

all.”



CHAPTER V.
THE LITTLE TINSEL LADY.

One day, when the grass was growing green
again, and there was an odor of new mould in
the air, where some industrious plowman was
overturning the sod, the boy had something
very like an adventure.

He had been fishing, for the smith had said |
he needed to get away from the shop awhile.
Indeed, he had been a very industrious boy the
long, slow winter months, waiting on his ailing
old friend, patching and darning their clothes,
and thinking a great deal of Old Queen, who
had taught him to sew, and who had died in
prison rather than suffer her guilty daughter to
be punished. He had kept the place in order,
and the shop going ; and he made many a penny
that had stood them well, those days when the
snow came, and there were scant food and fuel
in the farrier’s house. The greatest thing he

81



82 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

did was to shoe a horse one day when food was
so scarce he felt almost glad the farrier could
not walk to the kitchen and take a peep into the
empty cupboard.

But at last the
spring came again ;
the farrier hobbled
back to the shop, and,
quite unexpectedly,
ordered the boy off
fishing.

With the dog at his
heels, a bucket of
bait, and a rod, the
boy set off, taking a
near cut through the
meadow that bordered
the village street, and
had just climbed the
fence that let him into
the cool woods when
something, moving very slowly down the road,
attracted his attention.

First, to his astonished gaze, a little puffy,
rolling cloud of yellow dust, out of which slowly
evolved into shape and distinctness a long line





THE LITTLE TINSEL LADY. 83

of vehicles, followed by a yet longer line of ani-
mals. The boy’s eyes and mouth were wide
open; there were few phases of vagabondism
with which he was not more or less familiar.

“Now!” cried he; “if them ain’t gypsies!
Come here, Crinkle, them yonder folks has a
fine nose for dogs, son, and a powerful likin’.”

As the caravan drew nearer, the tall tops of
chariots and cages gleaming in the sun, with a
glitter of brass here and there, the whole as-
sumed a more familiar aspect. Often such pro-
cessions paraded the city streets, but away out
here in a country lane to come upon such a
procession quite took his breath away.

In his excitement he had set his bare brown
feet in a creek that gurgled across the road.
As the water rose to his ankles, he gave vent
to his astonishment in one loud whistle, that
seemed to set the dog’s ears tingling.

«A circus!” he cried. “A circus away out
here!”

He had been ‘too closely confined with the
ailing farrier to notice the posters scattered
about the village, announcing that the “ great
show” would exhibit that day at the county
seat, three miles distant.



84 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

He had no desire to see the circus, — he had
seen a great many, “too many,” he told him-
self, “to hanker after others.” He understood
just what humbugs they were, and knew how
even the seemingly jolly old clowns had a hard
enough time of it, when out of the ring.

But he waited to see the procession pass ; he
was boy enough for that, at all events. And
the procession was all there, for it was only a
little distance to the town at which the show
had just exhibited.

« They’re all alike, son, — big tales, big blow,
same old horses, same old tricks, same old ani-
mals, same old sme//, If there’s a blessed
thing new about this one, you may have half
my dinner to-day.”

But there was something decidedly new, —
the boy held his breath and gasped when
there came .a sudden, great, grinding crash ;
a cage, big and heavy, swayed, reeled, dropped
one end heavily, and parted squarely in the
middle.

The caravan came to an abrupt halt; then
there was sudden and intense excitement, and
a great shout of fear, almost of horror, went
up, as a lithe, tawny shape flashed through



THE LITTLE TINSEL LADY. 85

space, and, with a lightning leap, cleared the
fence, and disappeared in the woods beyond
the meadow. The old lioness had escaped.

There were hurried orders, followed by a
wild pursuit ; and, as the boy stood watching,
speechless, but jubilant at the prospect of an
adventure, a shrill little voice called to him
from the caravan :

“Little boy! Oh, little boy, do give me a
cup of water out of the river where you are
standing with your feet?”

The boy forgot the lank lioness scurrying
through the woods, forgot his rods, flung on
the ground, and his bucket of bait, as he
turned to see a little wasplike figure dressed
in scarlet and seated in a great gilded chariot,
bending down like a queen from her throne
to command a drink from the brook by the
roadside. She held a little silver cup which
she was waiting for him to take, and he noticed
that the fingers and arms were bare, and coy-
ered with tawdry jewels. He was quite bewil-
dered for a moment, then he remembered Old
Queen, and his heart hardened.

“Get down and get it,” he replied. “You
ain’t got nothing to hinder, as I can see.”



86 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

In the deep blue eyes fixed upon his face,
the tears were starting.

A cross-looking woman on the seat beside
her gave the child a sharp nudge of her elbow,
and commanded her to “hold her tongue, and
not be silly.”

“But I am so thirsty,” wailed the little crea-
ture. “My throat is parched with dust, and
my feet ache so. I rode in the ring five times
last night, and climbed the trapeze twice.
And I must do it all over again to-night, and
ride in the procession too, on one foot. See!
My ankle is all swelled now.”

She thrust a tiny foot forward, to show how
the poor ankle was puffed and swollen; she had
slipped her shoe off; the little red stocking
was stretched to the utmost.

Without another word of objection, the boy
stepped to the side of the chariot, and took the
cup from the child’s hand. The sight of that
little tortured foot had stirred memories that al-
ways set his sympathies throbbing. A whiff of
the dusty streets filled his nostrils, —a glimpse
of a stray cur fleeing from persecution, —a
man who had “handed the cup of water,” in
the name of humanity.



THE LITTLE TINSEL LADY. 87

He stooped where the cool spring nestled
deep among the rocks and mosses beyond the
road, among the shades of the quiet woods, and
handed the cup, sparkling and brimming, to the
thirsty circus child.

«So good!” she laughed. “Might I have
another drink? Seems like I could drink as
much as the camels.”

“ Creek’s free,” said the boy, “and I ain’t
chargin’ for services.” Again he tramped
back to the spring, even giving a drink to
the cross woman in the carriage, after which .
they all.became quite talkative and friendly.

There were no men left in the caravan, ex-
cept those who had charge of the animals, and
- they had strict orders not to go away for an
instant. So the boy brought water, and made
himself of some use. Then he said to the
little circus girl:

“Tf you will slip off your stockings, and let
your feet down into the runnin’ water, it will
take all the swell and the ache out of them.
You'll see.”

The little circus girl had braved too many
deaths, on the bare-backed horses, the deadly
trapeze, and the tight rope, to be afraid. So



88 “THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

at a nod from the cross woman, who had been
mollified by the boy’s good nature, the little
rider jerked off her stockings, and a moment
later the red skirts were flashing over the
stream that laughed, and danced, and gurgled
about the poor ankles with delicious coolness.

They waded up and down for awhile, and the
boy “pooh-poohed” imaginary snakes, while
the circus child went off into shrieks of laugh-
ter, that made the little baby monkeys tear
at their cages and chatter like magpies.

Even the lazy old rhinoceros yawned and
grunted, and the brain of the cross woman
went dreaming of another woods, another
stream, and another child, who had waded in
the clear, cool water, and believed that child-
hood and happiness were everlasting.

And when they were tired of wading the boy
found a seat among the gray rocks, where the
little feet could swing down into the current
still. Suddenly, with a touch of his street-self,
the boy sang out, sharply:

«Say, now, what zs this circus, anyhow ? Is it
the Royal Red Lady, or is it the Runaway Lion
show? That’s what I want to know.”

“Oh!” said the little red lady, “but this is



THE LITTLE TINSEL LADY. 89

the great Carrigan Brothers’ circus and me-
nagerie.” ;

The boy drew in his breath quickly, and let
it out again in a sudden whistle. But the child
went right on with her prattle without seeming
to notice his surprise.

«“T am the Bare-back Baby Rider,” said she;
“the ‘Little Child Wonder’ they call me on the
bills. And some take me for the ‘Little Tin-
sel Lady,’ but I am not. She was another girl ;
and she is dead.”

“Dead?”

The child nodded. ‘I saw her, when she
was done dead, and she was in a white coffin ;
and she had some roses on her, white ones.
And they said her mother killed her.”

“Oh, now,” said the boy, “you ought to
know that isn’t true. How could she? TI’ll be
bound it was a horse kicked her in the stomach,
or something.”

“No, it didn’t. Our horses don’t kick. She
was a bigger girl than me, and lots older; but
they dressed her up to look lots littler than
she was. They do me, too. I’m old. I’m
twelve, but the bills say I’m six. And the
other girl was awful bad; she’d even swear.



go THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

And they said she szoZe once. But she’s dead,
now. I saw her; and she looked so still and
easy and happy lying there all white, that I
think of her whenever I’ve rode, and rode, and
played trapeze all day, and it seems real good to
be dead and go to sleep in a white coffin, and
be still.”

The boy listened, eagerly, intently. Sud-
denly a great suspicion seized him. Surprise,
wonder, doubt, were choking him dumb, so that
he could scarcely stammer out the questions
that sprang to his lips. ‘‘Wh-at w-was her
name? That other one?”

“ Gloria,” said the child, lifting a pink pebble
with her toes. The boy’s face fell. He did
not know any Gloria.

“They called her the ‘ Little Tinsel Lady,’”’
the child went on. ‘And I heard an ugly old
woman call her-‘Jenny’ in the streets once,
when we was showing. She got mighty mad
about it, and told the old woman she needn’t
ever come ‘ Jennying’ her any more, for nobody
knew her as that. She was bad, I think, for one
day when she was riding in the ring some one told
about a woman who died in jail. They said she
stole some money, but nobody believed, much,



r

THE LITTLE TINSEL LADY. QI

that she was a thief, but thought she was just
pretendin’ it, to save somebody else. And they
said she starved herself to death with grief.
And when Gloria heard it she grew right white,
and her knees shook and trembled so that she
asked the ring-master not to make her ride
right then. But the people were waitin’, and
two clowns were holdin’ up a big paper hoop
for Gloria to jump through. And the ring-
master told her to ‘go on.’ She began to cry,
then, and begged not to go. Then the ring-
master lifted his whip and struck her across the
bare shoulders, and told her to ‘clear out to the
ring.’ And she went out, sobbing ; and a long
piece of tinsel trailed behind her on the ground
where it had ripped off her tarlatan dress. red welt showed on her bare shoulder: I saw
it. And her knees shook so when she put her
foot in the ring-master’s hand to mount you'd
a-thought she would shake all to pieces. And
the ring-master swore an oath, and said he
guessed he’d ‘fix her when she came off that
horse again!’ But he didn’t, — she was ‘fixed’
already when they brought her back and laid her
on the straw. And there was blood on her
breast, dyeing the tinsel all red. She had



92 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

missed the pony’s back, and fell under his feet
when she was jumping through the hoops; and
he had set his iron foot on her breast, and tram-
_ pled her awful. The circus went right on,
though, for the ring-master came out and told
the people the ‘young lady was all right, but
scared.’ So I rode in her place, and I’ve been
riding in it ever since.

«She came to her senses when the doctor
was fixing her wounds, and began to cry for her
mother, and to beg somebody to send for the
preacher man. And nobody wouldn’t, but
the boy that feeds the apes; he went. For
the doctor said she was hurt inside and bound
to die. When the man got there Gloria cried
to him, ‘Git me out of this, let me die decent !’
So they fetched her to the hospital, and all the
time she was praying to God. Just before she
died she got real quiet, and lay real still until
_ the last minute. Then she opened her eyes
and smiled, and said ‘mother,’ and died like a
little child.”

They had left the stream and were seated by
the roadside, the child’s little feet dangling
in the water the while she talked. The boy
had sat quite still, and listened. When the



THE LITTLE TINSEL LADY. 93

story ended he sat so quiet the child turned to
look at him and there were tears in his eyes:

Then a shout sounded across the meadow, and
they saw the circus men coming back. Some
one had shot the escaped lioness, and so they
had turned back. The child climbed again into
her gilded chariot, and the boy turned back into
the meadow path to the village. There was a
great sorrow in his heart, and a great wonder in
his soul. It was the first time, in all his varied
experiences, that he had really come face to
face with the triumph of faith, and it thrilled
him with a strange, sweet sense of God’s near- -
ness and his love. k

The smith was lying on his bed, asleep, when
the boy entered the room at noon. He had
begun to feel the necessity of a noonday nap,
of late, and the boy tiptoed to the kitchen and
began to prepare a bite for their dinner.

When he looked into the room again the
smith was awake and sitting by the open win-
dow, with his hands folded and a look of peace
in his face. The boy felt that it was a good
time to speak. He crossed to the side of the
big arm-chair, and, leaning against the shoulder
of his old friend, slipped his arm around his neck.



94 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

“Well, son,” said the farrier, “what is it?”
For he hadn’t studied this odd boy for a year
and failed to understand when something moved
the heart of him.

“Why,” said the boy, “I have been a-lookin’
things in the face to-day, and I’ve come in to
tell you that Old Queen was right, and that her
prayers to God were answered. The little tin-
sel lady was her daughter, and she died in the’
hospital, ‘like a little child,’ and that’s all.”

All! the finish of a beautiful faith, born of
sorrow, and perfected in death: the Amen toa
mother’s prayer.



CHAPTER VI.
“THE LIGHT THAT SHINES.”

Ir was June; across the meadow from the
smith’s house, beyond the village street, the
Southern wheat had mellowed to a rich, ruddy
golden. At sunrise one bright. morning the
hum of a reaper was heard in the field, and
the village folks, awakening to the familiar
sound, rejoiced to remember that it was the
beginning of the Southern harvest.

The farrier, weak as alittle child, turned
upon his pillow, and listening, caught the hum
of the blade among the golden grain.

He heard the boy stirring in the kitchen, and
called to him; for the weary old smith had
had a message; and although it had come in
the day dawn, before he was fully awake
indeed, there was no mistaking the message.
One might almost have thought the reaper

95



96 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

itself had brought it, the old farrier’s solemn
message.

The boy came hurrying in, as though he, too,
might have heard the good smith’s summons.
He sat up in bed:

«We won’t open the shop to-day, son,” said
he. “But help me into my clothes and fling
open the window. I’ve a mind to watch the
reapers at work.”

The boy dragged the big chair to the window
and threw back the shutters. The river breeze
came floating in to fan the sick man’s temples ;
he drew it into his nostrils, deep, delicious
draughts, and smiled:

“T can smell the wild grapes a-bloomin’,” he
said. ‘I always loved ’em so; they always
make me think of some lives I’ve known;
humble and sweet, and bloomin’ in the wilder-
ness. Of all the wild things in the woods there
ain’t ever been anything so sweet to me as the
grape blooms in early June time. I rickerlict
“em first in the woods at home, whenst I was
a boy, like you, and followed my pappy to the
woods. He was a wood-cutter, and I was
just a boy; and whenever I smell the white
grape blossoms since, I’ve been a boy again,



“THE LIGHT THAT SHINES.” 97

followin’ my pappy through the Southern
woods.”

The boy was silent, awed, and half afraid;
it was the first time he had ever heard the
farrier talk of his home and his boyhood, and
it filled him with a strange, sad fear.

“Let the dog in, son,” the smith called out
to him cheerily. “Let our little friend’s old
dog in; he’s been one of the old farrier’s
friends, too. We want all of our friends
about us to-day.”

The boy choked back the lump in his throat,
‘and said, quite bravely, from behind the smith’s
big chair :

“Don’t say he ‘as been’ your friend, sir ;
he zs your friend, and will always be; because
he ain’t no common dog, that ain’t, and he
senses who’s been good to him better than
some folks I could name. He’s a great dog
that; him and me was fellers once.’

« Ay, ay,” said the farrier. “I ain’t forgot
it. Let himin, son; let the cur in; I want to
feel his faithful old nose against my knees once
more, before I go.”

The boy started to obey, when the farrier
called him back:



98 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

“Son,” said he slowly, his eyes fixed upon the
golden harvest where the reaper’s blade shone,
like a silver cycle, in the sun; “sometimes in a
long life it is given to a man to do no: great
deeds ; but only, it may be, just to hand a cup
of water to some sick and suff’rin’ beast. But
when the long life comes to the last mile post,
it’s good to sit a minute by the way and think
of that poor cup of water. I ain’t done no
great deeds; I have only helped a suff’rin’
horse out of its misery, now and then, and
flung a bone to a dog. It was all I could do,
son; and I love to know I done it, now.”

«Say, now,” cried the boy, “if you don’t want
to hurt my feelin’s mighty bad, you’ll hush
talkin’ that a-way. I reckin / ain’t forgot an-
other stray you picked up, and that you ain’t
mentioned in your list o’ dogs and horses. Now
I’m a-goin’ to cook your breakfast. That’s all.”

It wasn’t quite “all,” however; for instead
of going straight back to the kitchen the boy
went out to the old dog waiting at the door.
He dropped down beside his first friend, and
put his arms around the shaggy neck, and
burying his face there, wept:

“He’s goin’ from us, Crinkle,’ said he;



a

“THE LIGHT THAT SHINES.” 99

“our old friend’s goin’ from us. When us
two was fellers he was mighty- good to us.
And I ain’t forgot my duty to him since that
time he called me ‘Son.’ ”

“Son?” the familiar voice and call came to
him through the still closed door. “Let the
dog in, son.” \

He opened the door, and the sick old farrier
smiled to see how brave was his effort to hide
his grief.

' «Go in there,’ he commanded; “and be
sure you mind your manners in a sick-room.”

And with a wag of his big tail, poor Baydaw,
who had been patted, and petted, and fattened
to a lazy old age, went into the smith’s room,
the only heart among the circle of the good
man’s friends that was not heavy with the
shadow of the great parting.

The smith wasn’t hungry, though the boy
did his best with the breakfast.

«J ain’t in a notion to eat, son,” he said,
when the little cook presented himself, tray in
hand, at his side. “I couldn’t eat, noways.
Give the dog a bite, and when you've finished
yours, come and set by me. I want to speak
to you, son, special.”



100 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

All the long morning they sat there; the
smith had many things, many last things to say
to the waif of his adopting.

« You've been mighty good to me,” said the
boy. “I reckin there ain’t many boys had
such a friend as I’ve had.”

«Then pass it, son,” said the farrier. “ Pass
the good deeds on to some other unlucky
fellow on the way.”

“Some other lucky dog, you'd better say,”
the boy declared.

“T ain’t done much,” the farrier insisted,
“T couldn't. The little one’s father could ’a’.
done a sight more; but I done what I could,
and that’s all the Master asks of any. And
you must do the best you can for yourself,
and for others, — never forget there’s others,
son, when I’m gone. The shop’s yours, it’s
all I’ve got to leave you, except the ‘light ;’
the ‘light that shines,’ I’ve always — given —
you — that, — son —”’ ;

He pressed the boy’s hand and was silent.
When he roused up the boy thought he had best
lie down on his bed awhile, but the farrier said no.

“T want to see them finish that field,” said
he, “before the sun goes down.”



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THE

FORTUNES OF THE. FELLOW

A Companion Book to
The Farvier’s Doy and His Fellow

BY
WILL ALLEN DROMGOOLE



BOSTON
L. C. PAGE AND COMPANY
(INCORPORATED)

1898
Copyright, 1898
By L. C. PAGE AND COMPANY

(INCORPORATED)

Colonial WBress :
Electrotyped and Printed by C. H. Simonds & Co.
Boston, U.S, A.






CHAPTER

I.

Il.
III.
IV.
Vv.
VI.
VII.
VIII.

igs
i

AMONG THE GREEN HILLS
LooKING THINGS IN THE FACE
Tue LitrLe Kip’s Foixks

“I CAN’T, BECAUSE I LovE HIM.”
THE LirrLe TINSEL LADY

“THE LIGHT THAT SHINES ”
PassinG Ir ON

Lucky Docs .

PAGE
II

31
50
vir
81
95

105

113



PAGE

THE CIRCUS CHILD . ‘ : , Frontispiece

«“¢Hkr AIN’T BUDGED FROM THAT BENCH’” . 17

“THE DOG HAD HIS SUPPER OUT OF THE

BOY’S PLATE : : i : : 3 27
THE STORY OF OLD QUEEN . : ;. 5 37
“THE CHURCH BELLS WERE RINGING” . : 52
THE “FELLOW” AT HIS SELF-IMPOSED WORK . 57
“¢WHOSE BOY ARE YouU?’” , ; ene 63
“ PATCHING AND DARNING THEIR CLOTHES”. 82
THE “ FELLOW” AS NURSE : : 5 . I01

THE TRAMP SMITH . ; : ° . i Ill

THE
FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.



- CHAPTER I.
AMONG THE GREEN HILLS.

Tue farrier sat back in his sooty old shop,
among the dust and cinders, and rusted old
irons, drawing at his cob pipe, and chuckling.
Through the open door, where the south wind
came puffing, laden with the odor of wild
grape blossoms from the river woods, half a
mile away, the farrier was watching the new
boy, the little waif he had picked up in the
streets of the city and brought to his home.

It had been just one hour since they three
— the farrier, the dog, and his fellow — had
landed in the village. And all that hour the

farrier had been “righting up” his shop,
II
12 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

the dog had run off, making mysterious calls
somewhere among his old haunts, and the fe/-
low had been sitting precisely where he had
dropped down at the moment of arrival, on
the three-legged old wooden bench that stood
under the shed before the door of the smithy.
He had said very little. More than once the
farrier had called to him from within the shop,
and had received no answer. The little waif
was getting acquainted with nature; the brown
feet, that had known nothing but the hard pave-
ment’s blistering and burning, had, at last, felt
the soft grass, dewy and deliciously restful.
His glance, as he rested by the smithy door,
was fixed upon a long line of hills, rising
beyond the river, and trending away to the
southward, like a wall of living, waving green.

The farrier peeped at his new charge, and
chuckled.

“Now that there boy,” said he, in a whisper,
and with a glance around the shop, as though
an unseen presence might have been there (as
who shall say there was not), “that there boy
has set there on that there bench, a-watchin’ of
them hills, for one hour. He ain’t had no eyes
for nothin’ else. A body would a’most think
AMONG THE GREEN HILLS. 13

they was the hills o’ heaven, the way that there
little chap takes to ’em. Just drapped down
there, and ain’t stirred since, not even to look
in the shop, let alone the — house.”

At that, the beaming old face turned about
to look through the side door (for it was one
of the good farrier’s peculiarities always to
fling every door wide open; he was fond of
the sun and air, and as for the light, he
“thanked God always he hadn’t any cause
to hide from it”’) that opened off a little green
patch that he called his yard, and across which,
not ten feet from the smithy door, opened the
back door of the farrier’s house.

A woman was standing there, —a neighbor,
who sometimes came in to tidy up things for
the wifeless old smith, and who looked after his
washing, and kept him always in fresh aprons
and a clean shirt.

She had a white cloth tied about her head,
and a dust-broom in her hand, and she was
beckoning the smith to come to her.

“Tt’s all fixed and ready now,” she said,
when the farrier’s big body filled the doorway.
“Tt’s all real clean and sweet, and the little
bed’s fit for a king to sleep in. I scoured the
14 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

day you went away, and it’s a mercy I did, with
just one hour’s notice of a boy comin’. Now,
how do you think it all looks?”

She waved the dust-broom about her head,
taking in, in one grand sweep, the modest
little room and all its furnishings. First, there
was the farrier’s own big bed, pushed back a
bit to make room for the little white cot that
stood against the foot of it. It seemed very odd
to the big blacksmith to see that little child’s
bed, all white and sweet, in his own lonesome
old room, and for a moment he couldn’t quite
get familiar with it. Yet, it had a cozy look,
too, —a “homey” look, the farrier called it.

Then there was a table for the lamp, a tall
bureau with a cracked mirror on top of it, with
just glass enough left to show the smith his
own jolly old face, when he wanted to shave
himself. The mantel was covered with clean
newspapers, scalloped around the edges, and,
on one end of it, the smith’s eye fell upon
something that brought a smile to his lips.

“Now,” said he, “that looks zwe//, that looks
right. 1 wanted that put there to remind that
boy of his old hardships, if he was ever tempted
to grumble at Providence ; and to remind him


AMONG THE GREEN HILLS. 15

of his humble beginnin’s, if he ever gits pros-
perous and proud. And then again, I allowed
it would make things feel more homeful like, if
he found his own old things here waitin’ for him.”

He stepped over to the mantel, and moved a
trifle more to one side a little kit of bootblack
furnishings, — brushes and boxes of blacking
that he had picked up, unknown to the boy,
at the old tenement house in the city.

«“ They’ll be like old friends, a’most,’’ said he,
softly.

“Yes,” said the woman, “they will ; I ’most
know they will. Somethin’ carried along that
way seems ’most like folks to us when we meet
it ina strange place. I fetched a gourd along
once’t, when: we-all moved from No’th to Kel-
liny; and I used to think sometimes I’d ’a’
fairly died 0’ homesickness if it hadn’t been
for that gourd. Whenever I’d feel special far
off and alone, I’d just say, ‘’Tain’t so far ; ain’t
the gourds growin’ behind the kitchen? And
there’s one of ’em.’ Does the little boy seem
sati’'fied now ?”

“ Sat’ fied? Peep at him, yonder,” said the
farrier. “ Heain’t budged from that bench since
he struck it one hour ago. And he ain’t spoke
16 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

except to ask once what it was a-growin’ in the
wheat field over yonder ’cross the way; and’
once to want to know if the birds didn’t sing
uncommon loud, and what it was made the wind
smell so sweet. I’ve just let him be; he’s get-
tin’ acquainted with nature, and she’s a sight
better teacher than a blacksmith, I reckon.
He’s a likely boy, and somehow I took to him.
I don’t know anything about him, but I can’t
worst him any; I know that. Why, that boy
never saw a wheat field before in his life, let
alone the woods, and wild things a-growin’.”

“The land of mercy!” cried the woman, her
hands uplifted in horror.

“Just so,” said the smith; “don’t know
nothin’ about the grass a-growin’, and a good
bed to lie in nights, and soft looks, and some
one to speak to him kind. I tell you, ma’m,
that boy’? — the smith brought his hammer
hand down on the table in a way that set
every window in the room dancing — “he don’t
know anything but bricks, and mortar, and hard
words, and scuffle, and starvation, and dogs.
And now, please God, ma’m, he’s got to see
the other side o’ things. Trees and flowers ; the
good green grass a-growin’; God’s sun a-shinin’
ANY
RS



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Ses



Sf

«“¢HE AIN’T BUDGED FROM THAT BENCH.



SS

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EN
SN

20)

AMONG THE GREEN HILLS. IQ

in his heaven. He’s got to know the feel of a
friendly hand, and the sound of a voice to speak
him well, now and then. Yes, ma’m, please
God, he’s got to.”

“Yes,” said the woman, running her hand in
a half-caressing way over the white spread of
the waif’s little cot, “he’s got to see the other
side now. And we are all ready to help you,
farrier; that’s what my man said when you
sent me word to get things cleaned up for you.
Says my man, ‘We’re all poor enough, Lord
love us, but we ain’t going to get so poor we
can’t lend a hand to help a good deed along.
So,’ says he, ‘you go over there and help that
old Good-Heart git things righted.’ ‘ And,’ says
I, ‘that I will; for when a man has a heart
like —’”

“Pooh, pooh!” said the farrier, who didn’t
at all like to hear himself praised, “I am bound
to tell you to let up on that. That there boy
is a treasure ; I ain’t out anything, and I am in;
TI’minason. And I thank you, ma’m, mightily,
for rightin’ up things. It takes a woman to
make things shine. And now, ma’m, I’m goin’
to call the boy in, and, if you please, I'll bid you

- good day.”
20 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

The woman understood that the farrier con-
sidered there might be a scene; and that he
preferred that they two should alone be sharers
of the waif’s home-coming. So, while she could
but wonder if the smith was “growing a trifle
too soft-hearted,” and “if the street boy wouldn’t
be skittin’ of it back to the city soon,” she said
“good day,’ and passed on through a gap in
the fence to her own place, next door.

And so were they left alone, the farrier and

the fellow, in the first, sweet hour of ome that
~ one of them, at all events, had ever known.

The big fellow touched up the white pillows,
tucked a sheet a trifle more squarely under the
small mattress, moved the kit, or fancied he
moved it, a little more to the light so that it
should be the first thing to attract the boy’s
attention, then he said, aloud, and with right
hearty approval :

«There, all’s ready.”

And indeed it was quite time,— even the .
smith smiled, thinking what a great time he had
been spending fixing up so little. “Anybody
would think I had a palace,” said he, “and that
the king was a-comin’ to occupy it.” Then he
stepped to the door and called:
AMONG THE GREEN HILLS. 21

« Son!”

The boy jumped up and looked about him
like one dazed. The farrier laughed.

“Come on, son, won’t you?” said he. “I
want you special.”

The boy stood staring, —all his courage, his
old vagabond daring, and the independence with
which he had learned to meet the ills and
misfortunes of life, had suddenly deserted him.
The throat that had been parched with the
dust of the city was now choked with a
strange, new feeling of happiness. His heart
was beating in his bosom like a trip-hammer.
And all because a big, burly old blacksmith,
‘with a hard hand and a soft heart, had, in a
great, gruff, tender tone, said, “Son.”

He wasn’t a baby, this boy who had fought a
real man’s battle in his few short years, and
who had, as the farrier often said, “‘toughed it
mightily with misfortunes ;”’ so when the smith
called him “son,” in that croaking voice of his,
he got up very quickly, blinked his eyes rather
too briskly to be entirely natural, looked around
as though he had lost something, and cried,
“Now I wonder where that there dog is!”

For he had forgotten all about his old
22 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

”

“fellow” the while he had been resting and
dreaming on the smith’s bench.

The farrier laughed until he shook the ashes
out of his pipe. “Never mind the dog, son,”
said he. “He’s all right; just gone visitin’.
You can always trust a triflin’ dog to come
home at meal hours, every time.”

««¢Triflin’?’” The boy forgot siete: in
defending his old friend, as indeed the farrier
meant he should. “TI say ‘triflin’.’”’

« Ain’t you comin’ in?” said the smith; and
even as he said it the old soft-heart stepped out
the door and went across the yard to the shed,
to walk home with his new “son.”

And the neighbors, watching from their
windows, declare to this good day that they
never hope to witness a happier sight than the
way in which the street waif slipped his arm
through the arm of the smith, and walked along
at his side, quite familiar and comfortable, as
though they two had been companions near and
dear for many and many a day.

And the fatherly way in which the smith
looked down into the brown, boyish face, up-
turned to his, the neighbors said, ‘was beautiful
and good to see.”’
AMONG THE GREEN HILLS. 23

But the neighbors, if they could see, couldn’t
hear what was being said; and that was really
the best part of it. It must have been; for
they walked very slowly, sometimes quite stop-
ping, indeed, as though the distance to the
house was all too short for that which they had
to say.

The good farrier had a feeling in his heart
that this boy had not been dropped down, as it
were, into his life without a purpose; and he
understood that he was vested with a certain
great, grand responsibility: the guiding, for a
season, of a young, impressionable soul, the
shaping of a man’s life. And he resolved that
his very first move in this new duty of his
should be a thorough understanding of this
human waif, whom the waves of misfortune had
brought to his door. So he said, in quite a
confidential way :

«What was you thinkin’ about all that time
you've been settin’ there on the bench lone-
somin’ all by yourself, son?”

“Well, now,” said the boy, with a touch of
that old-time independence when he had walked
the streets of a great city with only a dog for
company, “I might ’a’ been countin’ of my
24 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

money, but I wasn’t. I was just a-settin’ there
on that bench of yours alookin’ things in the
face. And that’s all.”

«And do you like the looks of ’em, son?”

“Well,” said the boy, a funny little twinkle
in his eye, “ J just do.”

“Well, then,” said the smith, “come inside;
and see how you like the looks of things in
there.”

And he led the way into the house that was
to be theirs until one of them, at all events,
should pass on to the great, last home.

The boy stopped on the threshold and took
in the room at a glance: the table and chairs
and bureau, the broken mirror, and the familiar
old kit of brushes. But it was not the re-
minders of his former hardships that riveted
and held his attention. His glance swept
beyond all things else to the farrier’s big
bed, and the slender, white-draped cot beyond
it.

It was a boy’s bed; he was the only boy in
that establishment. Such a bed as it was, too,
all square, and soft, and white, and altogether
restful. His busy young brain flashed back-
ward for an instant to the rat-eaten floor of the
AMONG THE GREEN HILLS. 20

old tenement house, with its hard pallet of
-musty quilts. Then, in a glance, he drew the
comparison between his former poverty-pinched
couch and this wonderful creation of clean
sheets and white pillows. He turned to the
farrier, his brown face beaming :

«Say, now! is all that for me? All them
white things, and — and — al/?”

“Yes,” said the smith, who was enjoying
himself fully as much as the boy, “it is your
bed. I hope you will find your sleep pleasant
in your new bed. But I want you not to for-
get these.” The tall farrier tapped the brown
box of brushes on the mantel with his big
forefinger. ‘Never forget, not in all your life,
whatever that may be, that you have been a
poor boy, who earned his bread with these
brushes. I want you to always keep ’em nigh
you. You'll understand better some day why
I want it, and I am sure you will always
remember what I say.”

The boy’s face was a study; he stood quite
still for a moment, then whirled about with a
great concern, and said:

“T wonder, now, where that there dog is.”

And before the smith could say another word
26 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

he was out the door, in the street, back turned
the smith’s way, whistling as though he had
signed a sudden contract to summon all the
dogs in the country within the moment.

The farrier leaned against the low mantel to
laugh.

“Well, now,” said he, “if that ain’t the
peartest boy in ¢4zs village. Goin’ to let show
the tears in his eyes? Not him!”

_ When he had conquered his laughter, and the
boy his tears, the smith stepped to the window
and called out, cheerily :

« Never mind the dog, son; he’s gone visitin’,
Baydaw has. He always pays them visits, night
and mornin’. I'll tell you about ’em, sometime.
Your supper’s ready, now.”

There was an‘extra plate at the kitchen table,
and a chair that looked as though it had been
waiting specially, all those years, for this very
boy who had had zo chair, and who had at last
come to claim it.

He sat down opposite the smith and began to
eat. He had never heard of a blessing, and the
smith had never learned one. But if they were
a very hungry and a very tired pair, they
were also a very happy pair; so it may be
AMONG THE GREEN HILLS. 27

the good God accepted their happiness — for
happiness in his creatures cannot be otherwise
than pleasing —as an unspoken thanksgiving,
and was satisfied. At all events we are going
to believe so. .

When the meal was finished the dog had his

A
See



supper off the boy’s plate, while the boy sat on
the doorstep and watched the sun go down, and
the moon rise over the green hills. The far-
rier smoked his pipe, the fattest, happiest
farrier anywhere, under the smithy shed; the
crickets chirped in the clover ; the dog finished ©
28 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

his supper and stretched himself out in the
moonlight. After awhile the boy slipped down
by the cur’s side, and lay with his head against
the shaggy coat his faithful “fellow” had been
so near losing. He lay with his face up, and
his eyes wide open; so still was he that the
smith called out to him by and by, to ask if he
was asleep.

“No,” said the boy. “I was just a-countin’
of the stars. I didn’t know there was so
many.”

The farrier got up and put away his pipe.
The little brown heap of boy and dog and dirt
had reminded him of something.

He went back to the house and pulled a
bundle out of his big valise, telling himself
he “hoped it would all fit.” Then he stepped
out into the moonlight and spoke to the boy
again :

“Son,” said he, “s’pos’n’ we walk to the
river, now? I’ve a mind to show you how to
swim.”

The river—the boy was a boy; he needed
no second invitation, but was on his feet in an
instant, following the farrier, the dog following
the boy, straight down the one street of the vil-
AMONG THE GREEN HILLS. 29

lage, across the meadow beyond, to the broad,
silverish-looking stream sweeping past the green
hills, “flowing right along” to find the deeper,
stiller current of another river miles away to
the westward.

“I saw a creek once’t,’ the boy said, when
the full sweep of the stream first lay revealed
to his astonished vision. “I saw a creek once'’t.
But it was little, and muddy, and skimp. Used
to dry up summer times, and you could smell
the dead frogs in it. But ¢#zs is a river right.
And how the bushes do smell! Hey, Crinkle?”

The dog wagged his tail, and without more
ado let himself down into the water.

“Now,” said the smith, “do you throw away
them rags and follow me. You're goin’ to
know the feel of cleanness from this on.”

Later, fresh, and clean, and sleepy, the boy
drifted off to dreams between the white sheets
of his new bed. He had never said a prayer in
all his little vagabond life,— scarcely understood
the meaning of such things, indeed. But as his
head touched the pillow, that charity and a
great human sympathy had provided, it was
lifted for a last look at his big friend sitting in
the moonlight by the open window, and —
30 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

« Say, now,” he sang out in his cheery way,
“I'm mighty glad God made you.”

And with the gladness in his heart the weary
“fellow” drifted off to dreams.

The smith smoked on, the boy slept, and the
yellow cur shook himself, stretched his lazy
legs, and trotted off, down the village street,
upon one of those mysterious “ visitings” con-
cerning which the farrier had promised more
light, “by and by.”
CHAPTER II.
LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE.

Tue boy had begun to feel at home, —he
had begun to know the trees, to call them by
name, and the feel of the cool grass under his
bare feet.

The farrier had begun to feel at home with
a boy around. To be sure, there were times
when this new boy would drop down upon him
in a manner that reminded him strangely and
strongly of that other boy, that dear, dear, little
boy, who went upon that “long journey.” And
whenever that happened, the smith would, al-
most unconsciously, glance towards the spot
where he had buried the anvil that had been
the other boy’s favorite seat. Yet were the
two boys very unlike, — very unlike in 4ll things
save in their love for the big farrier.. He had a
way about him, had this soft-hearted old tinker
in iron, that went straight to a boy’s heart, and

31
32 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

captured it on the instant. Some people are
that way; not everybody, however. No, indeed ;
for boys and dogs are alike in this one respect,
—when they take to anybody they always know
that the somebody is a lover of boys, or of dogs,
as the case may be.

One day the smith was quite upset to observe
this new boy of his industriously digging away
the leaves in the hole where he had flung the
anvil the day his first little friend died. He
“dropped his hammer with a great clatter among
some stray bits of iron, and went hurrying to
the door.

«Now, now,” said he, “what are you a-doin’
of? Didn’t I tell you all about that there anvil
once?”

The boy looked up from his self-appointed
task.

“Yes, you did,” said he; “but that ain’t any
way to git shed o’ thinkin’. And trouble ain’t
a-goin’ to stay buried after it zs buried. The
only way is just to look it in the face.”

«W-e-l-1,” said the smith, slowly,— he was
beginning to have great respect for the little
waif’s wisdom, — “w-e-l-l, all right, then.”

When again he looked up from a shoe he was
LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE. 33

shaping, the old anvil was in its familiar place,
with the new boy astride it, the yellow cur
curled up at his heels, and, as he afterwards
declared, “both of them trying to grin him out
of countenance.”

After the first surprise the smith was rather
pleased to see the boy there. Somehow, it was
almost as though the other friend had come
back again, —a little older, browner, more grown
up, and a great deal more worldly wise, — thanks
to the streets for that. The smith stroked his
chin until it was hardly visible for the smut his
hands left on it.

“Now,” said he, “I am glad to see you there.
_ If you could make out to ask me for a story
now, I could a’most believe it was my little
friend come back again.”

But the boy shook his head, he didn’t like
stories, — his own hard childhood was to blame
for this perhaps, for he said:

« Always seemed to me they wasn’t any sense
in tryin’ to make believe things is what they
ain’t ; all show, and shine, and fun, you know.
Always seemed to me ’twas a heap more
better to just look things in the face, like
they zs,”
34 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

«“ But,” said the farrier, “there are true
stories, you see.”

“ But the true ones is mostly bad ones,” said
the boy. “All about work, and scuffle, and
steal, and starvation. I know ’em; and it’s
better to let ’em be.”

“Well, now,” said the smith, “s’pose you tell
me a story, then, while I’m a-shapin’ of this
shoe.”

“Me?” cried the boy. “I never knew no
stories; never had time to learn none, did we,
Crink?”

He was patting the cur’s back, and thinking
hard. That yellow cur, shaven and shorn and
forlorn as he had found him, was the one fairy
tale that had touched his starved little life.
That was his one sweet story. And the smith
was already acquainted with that. But if the
cur could talk, —ah, if the dog could tell what
he knew of those vagabond days together !

“Well,” said the farrier, “if you don’t
know any real stories, just tell me how you
picked up that way of ‘looking things in the
face,’”

“Oh, chat! I reckin I got that from Old
Queen.”
LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE. 35

“Who was she, now?” said the smith. ‘Tell
me about Old Queen.”

And, without in the least suspecting that he
was doing so, the boy settled himself in the
other boy’s place and began to tell a story.
And the old farrier was just thinking as hard
as he could, « Now if the other one could only
‘a been here to hear this story.” For some-
thing told him it was going to be a very true
story the boy was going to tell, and a sad one.

“ Everybody called her Old Queen,” said the
boy. ‘And she wasn’t so old, neither ; though
she was poor, and worked her back all bent.
She was a mighty good friend o’ mine, that
time she lived in the tenement. She showed
me how to lay a hoe-cake, and to run a seam,
and to fixa button on. She washed my clothes,
sometimes, when she had a minute. "Women is
mighty good, — some women; and —”

“Well, well,” said the smith, “go on, son;
go on.”

“T was just wishin’ that there hammer would
git done talkin’.”

At this the smith showed alarm. He tossed
the hammer aside, and, looking keenly at the
boy, said :
36 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

“See here, now; you ain’t sick, are you, nor
—nor— nothin’?”

The boy laughed so long and so loud that the
farrier was quite relieved. Though he didn’t
take up the hammer again just then; and he
didn’t explain to his new friend how his com-
plaint against the hammer’s interrupting the
story had so reminded him of the other little
friend that it almost frightened him for the
moment. In fact, while he was not at all ner-
vous or superstitious, he had almost permitted
himself to think he had suffered a presentiment.

He mopped his face with his sleeve again
and again, took his pipe down from a chink in
the wall, and, seating himself on the edge of his
own slack tub, said:

“Well, well, son; go on now.”

“Well,” said the boy, who had been a prince
of the pavement too long not to be saucy, “ first
Td like to ask if you have them spells often?”

“Right sharp,” said the sth, « And what
was it Old Queen done?”

“Evrything; ’cept starve to death; and I
ain’t certain she didn’t do that, at last. She
lived next room to me once’t in the tenement,
and she had a girl, a right peart, pretty girl,
et
= SSS SX SAS
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SEES Ss AY
Sey
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THE STORY OF “OLD QUEEN.”

LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE. 39

too, that made her see a sight of trouble. For
Queen was poor, and the girl liked nice things,
such as her mother couldn’t buy for her. For,
somehow, after her old man died Queen got
down in the world. And you know how awful
hard it is to git up when a feller gits down in
the world. So, Queen she got down: out of
work, out of victuals, out of friends, out of grit,
—that’s what I call down. She had a way,
when things looked darkest, of settin’ herse’f
down and kind o’ figgerin’ on ’em like. ‘Lookin’
of ’em in the face,’ she called it. And she use-
ter say that after she once stared ’em square in
the face, looked ’em all over, they never seemed
quite so skeery to her again. And most always
she allowed she could find a chink of light for
to go by.

« But one day her little girl run away with the
circus and never come back any more. And
Old Queen set on the floor all night in the
dark, all still, and not sayin’ of a word to
nobody.

« At daylight she was still there, and I went
in, and says to her, ‘What you doin’ there so
long and so still, Queen?’ And she looked up,
and says she, ‘I’m just alookin’ of things in
40 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

the face.’ And I says to her ,‘ Never mind ;
maybe she'll come back to-morrer.’ But she
shook her head, and says, ‘I ain’t plannin’ no
to-morrers; I’m just a-facin’ of to-day, little
master.’ Then she set there summin’ of it all
up: ‘No money, no home, no child. If I’d’a’ had
some money she never would have gone. But
now she zs gone I’ve got to set about savin’ of
her. And I’ve got to get some work, and that’s
all.’ And she did, —a man let her take keer of
his office, and clean up his rooms. And she
made good money, and laid some: by if, may
chance, the girl ever come back.

« And one day there was a circus come to town,
— it was the ‘Carrigan Circus and Menagerie,’
—and that night Queen didn’t come home. She
never did come any more.

“The next day I went to look for her, for she
had been real good to me; and when I found
her she was in jail.

“They let on how she robbed the man she was
a-workin’ for. Stole a di’mont pin and a lot of
money out of his room when she went to clean
it up.

«“ But she didn’t do it.

“TJ always knowed she didn’t do it, from the
LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE. 4I

very first minute. And I wanted to prove it,
but Queen wouldn’t let me.

“You see, I went to see the janitor of the
buildin’; I’d seen him before, and once’t I give
him a shine, ’cause he was toler’ble poor, with
lots of little kids to keer for. And he talked
out plain to me—he liked Old Queen, too,
——all liked her whatever knowed her. But he
said she war bound to ’a’ been the one as took
the things, because there hadn’t been a soul in
that room all day but just Queen, and for one
minute only a little lady all dressed in silk, who
went up and come straight down again. Be-
cause, she said, she was mistaken in the place,
— she allowed her brother’s room was up there,
but she had got the wrong number. Then she
asked him about another house and went
away.

“ And I asked him how the little, dressed-up
lady looked, and if she hada little red Spou on
her chin, dright red.

“And he said ¢ veer and ‘her hair was like
little goldish ropes all twisted about her head in
yellow curls.’

“So I knew it was Queen’s own child had
robbed the man, and I knew Queen knew it, too,
42 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

and that she was in prison, innocent, for her
girl’s sake.

«So I went to the jail and told her I knew all
about it, and that I meant to tell, and make
them set her free.

« And she burst out cryin’, and said I must
never, never do that. She said if I keered for her,
and if I felt any kind feelin’ for the little things
she had done for me, I must never breathe a
word about her‘baby.’ ‘For,’ said Old Queen,
‘I have looked things in the face, and it would
never do for Jenny to go to jail. She’s wilful,
and heady, and foolish, and vain, but she’s got
- honest blood behind her, and all my love and
prayers to think of. They have followed her all
her life, ev’ry step. And they’ll find the heart
of her some day, and break it with repentin’,
But not if she goes to prison; that would kill
the soul of her, and that’s what I’m tryin’ to
save. I’m countin’ on my love for her to help
me. As long as she’s safe there’s a chance for
her to repent and come home to mother. And
maybe if she knew her mother suffered for her,
willin’, it would make a better girl of her, little
master ; at least it seems so to me, after lookin’
things in the face. So, unless you want to give
+s
LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE. 43

Old Queen the worst lick you can, don’t you
send her girl to jail.’

“So that’s the way it went fora week. And
me a-thinkin’ Queen had been a great simple-
ton for thinkin’ that vain Jenny cared for her
sufferin’, or her love and prayers, either. And
one mornin’, at the end of a week, they found
Old Queen dead in her bed.

«The jailer said she hadn’t eat anything for
days, and that the night before she died she called
him to her, and told him she wasn’t feelin’ so
well, and that she’d been a-lookin’ of things in
the face, and says she, ‘I ain’t afeared to go.’
And Old Queen went. And that’s all.”

There! Who ever heard of a blacksmith with
a heart like wax? The farrier got up, wiped
his eyes, blew his nose, wiped his eyes again and
said :

“T do believe this pipe is smokin’.”

“Yes,” laughed the boy, “ most pipes do when
they’re chug full of tobacco and have a coal of fire
at one end, anda man’s mouthat the other. But
(and the boy grew grave again) what I was
thinkin’ of was Old Queen. Seems to me God
makes some folks just to work, and suffer, and
adie. It don’t look right, 7 say.”
2

44 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

The smith got up, pipe in hand, went outside
and called to the boy to come to him. Across
the way, where there were no houses, lay alow,
level stretch of meadow, and through it, away
to the left, straight as an arrow, ran a long red
lane, seemingly endless.

The smith lifted his hand, welding? the fireless
pipe, and pointed.

«See that red lane, son?”

“Yes,” said the boy, “I see.”

“Looks like it ain’t got any end to it, now
don’t it, son?”

“Yes,” said the boy, “it does look long.
. As if it might just go on, and keep goin’.”

“Tve seen ’em a sight longer than that,” said
the smith. “ Away out in Texas where there’s
miles and miles o’ level, and never a tree, nora
hill, nor a house to break the view; and them
long lanes a-runnin’ until it seemed as though
they might ’a’ girdled the whole round world.
But they didn’t. Them was long lanes, but
they had their end, too. It’s a mighty long
lane that don’t have its end, somewhere, some-
zzme. And that’s what I fetched you out here
to tell you. So don’t you be a-frettin’ over
them as has to suffer and struggle in the long
LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE. 45

lane of this world’s disapp’intmints. And don’t
be a-faultin’ of God A’mighty’s ways. At the
end o’ them lanes lies Aeaven, certain ; if only
one can make out to travel of ’em patient, and
faithful, andtrue. ’Tain’t for us to be a-ques-
tionin’ if we ought to tramp on, or to set by,
under the shade with the rich and happy. God
A’mighty never made a creature yit without
makin’ a use for it, and as sure as the sun
shines in his sky, heaven lies at the end o’ the
long lanes o’ sorrow.”

The boy rose; there was a gulp in his
throat ; for he was thinking of his own “long
lane” that had so very suddenly ended among
the cool brooks and pleasant shades. “Now,”
said he, “I wonder where that there dog
is.””

The smith pointed down the street where a
streak of yellow fur was making a retreat in a
cloud of yellow dust.

“Yonder he goes, son. S’pos’n’ you follow
him. It'll do you good.”

The boy started off after his old partner,
straight up the hill to a tall, stately brick dwell-
ing, set back ina grove of rustling green trees,
among whose shades the sleek white body of
46 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

an ancient beech, solemn and ghostly, gleamed
here and there.

The gate was locked, but the dog vaulted
lightly over the low iron fence, and the boy, full
of interest, soon followed him. Then it seemed
for an instant the cur might have dropped
through the earth, out of sight, so entirely had
he disappeared in the tall, waving blue grass
that covered the lawn. His tawny body crept
like a snake through the billowy green, the boy
following, filled with a strange awe, straight up
to the neglected doorstep. The white stones
were foot deep in the last year’s drifted leaves ;
_there was a musty odor of decaying foliage,
where the same brown drifts were heaped about
the great oaken doors.

“Tt looks like dead folks’ things,” said the
boy, “this house does. Crink, old feller?”

But the dog paid no heed; he ran-on, nose
to the ground, up the steps to the big front
door, sniffing and whining. Then straight down
the steps again to the next door, and so on
to every door, stopping at last by the big, low
window where once, one sweet summer, a
baby’s arms had reached out to rescue him
from the mill-pond. Then he stopped again,
LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE. 47

sniffed, crouched under the silent, sombre sill,
and, lifting his head, gave one long, wailing
howl,—a cry of grief, of disappointment, of
loneliness, as distinctly expressive as any
human cry could be.

The boy watched and listened; as that cry
of desolation rang out over the deserted lawn
he shut his ears with his hands and burst into
tears. He had seen many human beings suffer,
in many ways; but they could speak their
sorrow, and seek sympathy and consolation.
In all his life, varied and checkered as it had
been, it was the first time he had ever come
face to face with the mental suffering of a
dumb brute.

“Oh, that poor, poor dog!” he sobbed;
“his heart’s broke; that’s what ails Azm ;
and he’s huntin’ for the little kid what died.”

That evening, when the moon was climbing
over the hill, he followed the dog to the
graveyard, and saw the white shaft of marble
that marked the spot where the cur’s first
master was sleeping. The place was over-
grown with weeds, and the tall, dank growth
that attaches to graveyards. For the man
who had been left in charge of the house and
48 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

the graves had been very sick, and there was
no one to look after things. :

The boy stood a moment in contemplation,
then he said :

«See here, now, Crink, this won’t do; you
and me have got to better this up some, son.”

And when later the good round moon looked
down as she sailed over the spot, her mellow
light revealed the dog lying in the cleared
space which the boy had made, and which
all the time was growing larger and larger,
as the brave fellow patiently plied his knife.
It was a pleasant task, evidently; for when
at last he left off to go home he stood for a
“moment in deep thought. Then he said:

«“ He done a lot for me, that there little kid
down there did. And for the smith, too, and
for that there dog there. Come, son; supper;
the bacon’s broilin’.”

That night, as he sat with the smith after
supper, in their favorite place outside the door
in the moonlight, while the smith plied his
pipe, the boy, who had been silent a long time,
thinking of the other boy, now under the white
slab, said :

“ Now, ain’t it quare, how the love of a little
LOOKING THINGS IN THE FACE. ~ 4O

kid like him made so much light in the world?
First for a dog, then for a boy.”

«And for a man, too,” said the smith.
“For the light o’ the little boy’s love used to
shine in the old shop amazin’. love; the only light that always shines azd
shines, and no wind or weather can put it out.
It just shines all the way. Always remember
that, son. A good and faithful love is a light
that shines all the way.”

After awhile the boy crept into his cot,
softly; through the window he could see the
smith sitting in the moonlight with a strangely
tranquil something in his face ; the same some-
thing that was nestling in the boy’s heart, per-
haps ; for long after he fell asleep there was a
smile upon his lips, as though his dreams might
be of pleasant ways through summer woods,
bordered with flowers, and alive with singing
birds.
CHAPTER III.
THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS.

THE farrier was getting feeble; the long, hot
Southern. summer was telling on him. The
usually noisy hammer was still many a day
indeed, while the farrier found it necessary to
take a little rest.

These were the days when the boy proved a

“genuine blessing. He was not fond of the
work ; didn’t, as he admitted, “take to the shop
mightily,” but did the best he could, and
honestly tried to like it for the sake of his
good friend, the farrier. In the house, too,
the smith felt how good it was to have him, —
he got the dinner, mended up their clothes,
tidied up the place, and did numberless little
jobs that relieved and comforted the old man
in his weakness. But the smith wasn’t alto-
gether easy about the boy; his brain had been
busy about him for some time.
50
THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS. 51

One night this brain-work of the smith’s
took positive shape.

The boy was creeping into his bed, laughing
and happy, when the farrier was suddenly re-
minded of something. Perhaps it was his own
failing health suggested the thought, but as he
looked at the bright young face against the
pillow the good smith said to himself:

«“ Now that there boy ought to be learnin’ of
a prayer to say. And whoever is to teach it
to him —J don’t know.” ;

The next morning, when the church bells were
ringing and the children of the village were
hurrying down the street, he said :

«Son, put on your hat and go along with
the balance o’ the young folks to Sunday
school. I want it special.”

That was quite enough to send the boy off.
When he was gone the smith held another long
consultation with his own conscience. His
thoughts ran thus:

«Now a man ain’t fitten to raise a child. A
woman would ’a’ had that boy on his knees the
first night he landed on this floor. But I ain’t
thought of it till this blessed minute. But it
will be all right now; there’s a young woman at
52 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

that Sunday school takes all the new boys that
come there, and tells them what to do. I’ve
heard of her ; there’s‘some allows she’s a sort 0’
mother to such as ain’t got any. And she'll



right my boy; she’ll sense the soul in him, too,
and the deeps of it. Ill trust her for that.”

An hour later the boy came back, breathless
and eager. He flung off his cap and seized the
smith by both hands:
THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS. 53

“Tve come for you,” said he. “Quick!
They’re singing, and I want you to hear. It’s
like — it’s like — heaven.”

The good farrier hadn’t the heart to disap-
point the boy who had counted so strongly upon
his enjoying the church choir, so he put on his
hat and his best Sunday necktie, dusted his
pantaloons, and together they walked off to the
village church at the end of the street. That
was the first of their journeys there together; .
there were many such journeys afterward ; in-
deed, the smith used to declare it was the “ begin-
ning of their start for the Promised Land.” The
boy, however, thought differently ; the boy de-
clared the “start” was made that day in the
“ratty old tenement house where a boy and a
dog was a-tryin’ to part company.”

At all events the journey was now begun ;
well and truly begun. For that noon when the
two sat down to their dinners the smith noticed
that the boy was restless. He had just lifted
the carving-knife to thrust it into the big boiled
ham when the boy raised his hand. The smith
paused, knife in hand.

“Well, son,” said he, “what is it?”

The boy was very near blushing ; but he was
54 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW,

a brave boy, and one who never turned back
when once he had set out to do athing. So he
plunged right on, boldly, into what he had to
say.

«The lady said at the school this mornin’,”
said he, “as how it’s a mighty small feller,
‘soul’ she put it, ‘as can eat and enjoy, day in,
day out, and never thank his God for it.’ I
reckined maybe you wouldn’t mind doin’ of it.”

The old farrier was a deal nearer blushing
than the boy had been. It was a great moment
with him; a great, grave moment. He felt the
power of this moment over all the boy’s after
life. He had never asked a blessing himself,
though he had not failed to be thankful, surely.
And he couldn’t have put his thanks in words
now, no, not if his life had hung upon it.
It was a serious moment with him, truly. Sud-
denly a way opened to him. He dropped the
carving-knife across the platter, folded his hard
old hands, and said:

“You ask it, son.”

It wasn’t an ordinary thanksgiving the boy
offered, not at all. It was odd, and short, and
perhaps a trifle funny. But I am quite sure it
reached the ear for which it was intended, and
THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS. 55

that the originality of it was quite lost in the
simple sincerity in which it was offered.

He had merely bowed his head and thanked
God for those things which had been to him as
blessings, and for which he was, in truth, most
sincerely grateful. “O Lord,” said he, “I
thank you for a friend, and a dinner, and a dog.
Amen.”

He never forgot to thank God for the smith,
never; not in all his after life; and a very
unusual life it was, too, marked with many
blessings, but none great enough to blot out the
memory of his first benefactor.

That night, at retiring, the smith noticed
again the boy’s restlessness. He was beginning
to understand him so well now that he could’
almost interpret his thought, at times.

“That boy,” said he to his cob pipe, “ wants
to kneel down and say his prayers, and he
won’t do it because he ain’t ever seen me kneel
down.”

The boy went out after awhile into the
kitchen, and when he had been gone quite a
while the farrier tip-toed after him to see what
he might be doing.

There was no lamp in the kitchen, but the
56 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

moon shone through the curtainless window,
and in the full radiance knelt the boy, with
folded hands, saying his evening prayer.

The farrier went back softly, and undressing,
made ready for bed. When the boy came in,
the old friend, farrier, and father went over to
his own big bed, knelt down, and folded his
hard old hands like a little child, and prayed.
There was no more dodging after that. Prayer
and praise had been established in the smith’s
house, and, strange to say, it was the little street
waif had introduced both. And they were des-
tined to remain, despite the smith’s whispered
confidence to his hammer next morning that
“raisin’ of boys was makin’ an old softy of
hinge:

The boy had set himself a new task: keeping
the little plat about the white slab in order. So
when one morning a man sent for the farrier to
come out to his plantation and doctor a sick
horse, the boy closed the shop and went over to
the graveyard, with the dog at his heels, as was
always the case when he made that little pil-
grimage of love and gratitude.

Somehow, he loved to think of that boy; he
didn’t understand, for he was only an ignorant,


THE “FELLOW” AT HIS SELF-IMPOSED WORK,

THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS. 59

impressionable boy as yet, how a good and pure
life, though it be ever so short, blesses all with
whom it comes in contact ; and even after the
little life is ended goes on blessing and helping.
As you have seen sad-hearted mothers some-
times giving away the little clothes and play-
things of their own dead babies, to comfort and
gladden some other less fortunate little ones.
And if you think of it well, it will take the form
of a blessing, making a blessing out of death
indeed, and passing it on down, something to
blossom, like a rose, in a dry and thirsty land.
But the boy knew nothing of such things; as
he hurried to his task, he was thinking of what
the good farrier had said about the “light that
shines all the way.” That was a very beautiful
thought to him, and he remembered at the same
time something the preacher had said on Sun-
day morning in his sermon. It was something
about “Let your light so shine,” and hearing it
he remembered what the farrier had said, and
wondered if it might not mean the same thing.
So lost in thought was he that he was about
to pass by the big house on the hill without
noticing that the grass had been cut, the weeds
and dead leaves cleared away, and that every
60 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

window and door stood wide open. Smoke
was rising from the kitchen chimney, and a
black cook with a white turban on his head
appeared for a moment at an open window.

“There!” said the boy, “them there folks of
the little kid’s must be comin’ home, Crinkle;
else somebody’s makin’ themse’ves mightily at
home, son.”

But the dog was gone over the fence like a
yellow flash, straight into the open window
where he rolled out of a tangle of white lace
curtains into the arms of a housemaid who was
patting and petting him, and calling him « Bay-
daw boy,” and crying, with her face hid in the
dog’s yellow hair.

The street boy knew without telling that this
was the nurse who had tended the little boy
that died, and with his own eyes dim he
passed on up the hill to the graveyard. So
he failed to see that the dog escaped from the
nurse to be caught by the cook who gave him
another hugging; and then, after sniffing at
every door, nosing into every familiar corner,
and failing to find the missing master, leaped
the fence and went trotting on up the hill after
his new comrade.
THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS. 61

The boy was busy clearing away the weeds
that still obtruded around the pedestal of the
white slab, —so busy that he did not notice
the dog’s approach, or observe that a lady was
sitting on a rustic chair under a tree near by,
intently watching his every movement. A tall,
stately woman dressed in heavy black, and with
the traces of tears still shining in her beautiful
sad eyes.

He was upon his knees, the boy who had been
self-elected to keep the grave plat, clipping
away here and there, pausing now and then to
pat the small mound affectionately. At last his
work was finished; he put aside his knife,
pushed back his hat, observed the dog in the
grass, and said:

«Son, if I could make out to read what’s
writ there on that there white stone I’d give a
heap, 7 would.”

The dog got up, looked steadily at the boy,
then at the stone. It was the very best he
could do, but it didn’t interpret the inscription
on the slab.

“T know,” said the boy, patting the yellow
head, “you'd like to help me, but you don’t
know the language; no more do J. But we
62 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

know each other, son, and that’s something, I
can tell you.”

He leaned forward to brush away some dust
marks that clung to the white marble, saying as
he did so:

“Mustn’t be any dust on the little kid’s
stone. Poor little kid; I wonder if he knows
now how much lonesomer he lef’ the world
when he went, and — how much drighter.”

He started, and almost tripped over the tiny
mound, as a hand was placed upon his shoulder,
and a lady’s voice said:

«Whose boy are you?”

He looked up to see the black-robed figure
at his side, and the beautiful tear-washed eyes
looking down into his own. He knew it was
the little boy’s mother; and after one glance
at the sad face under its black bonnet he said
to himself :

, “Her’n broke, too,” —he was thinking of
the day when he discovered that the dog had
a broken heart.

“Whose boy are you?” said the lady again,
her hand still on his shoulder.

Well, ma’m, I ain’t rightly and really no-
body’s boy, I reckins. Though the blacksmith


“* WHOSE BOY ARE you?’”

THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS. 65

down yonder has got the biggest claim to me,”
said the boy.

«Are you his son?”

“Yes, ma’m; since the day he picked me up,
along of another stray dog, and fetched me
home.”

The boy had never been so embarrassed in
all his life; and there was a suspicious sparkle
in his eyes that were constantly lowered, and
a sort of tremble to his voice that made him
almost afraid to speak.

“You've been taking care of my little boy’ s
grave ?” said the lady.

The boy inched nearer the dog and wished
himself a hundred miles away from the spot, and
swallowed, and blinked, and blurted out gruffly :

«Sort o’ cut the weeds, if you call that any-
thing. / don’t. I’d ought to ’a’ done lots more,
seein’ how much the little kid’s gone and done
for me, But — but — now I wonder where that
there dog is.”

«There is the dog, just under your feet,”
said the lady, smiling. “Are you going? Little
boy? I say, little boy? Come up to my house
to-morrow, — that is it, yonder among the trees.
I want to see you particularly.”
66 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

The boy nodded without once looking back.
When he was well on the road home he turned
to the dog at his side, and said:

“Tf us boys is goin’ to be babies, I think
we'd better fix us up some sugar rags and
stay at home; eh, Crinkle?”

But the dog was evidently interested in other
things, for he trotted off down the street, wag-
ging his yellow tail as though something very
unusual and exceedingly pleasant was about to
~ occur.

And perhaps it may have been ; for a strange
gentleman crossing the street at that moment
spied the yellow cur and stopped.

Yes, they were evidently old acquaintances,
for the stranger stopped to pat the face lifted
to his, while to his caressing touch and gently
spoken “Baydaw! Baydaw, old boy! What!
you are still hunting for the little master?
Poor Baydaw; dear old doggie; we can’t
understand!”

The cur rubbed his nose against the stranger’s
nose, whined, and tried to lick his hand. The
boy stood watching, in his heart that old feel-
ing of fear awakened that had been there the
night when the farrier had tracked him to the
THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS. 67

rat-infested old tenement and preferred claims
to his “ fellow.”

“ Now,” said he, ‘I wonder what f¢his
means.” :

For when one has once suffered a great
shock, or a great grief, one is forever after
half fearing, half dreading a similar experience.

As the boy drew near, the man looked up
from petting the dog to inquire:

“Ts this your dog?”

Instantly the boy assumed the old swagger of
the bootblacking days.

“T don’t call him by no such names,” said
he. ‘“That’s my pardner, and him and me is
fellows.”

The man looked keenly at the boy, and then
affectionately at the dog; he even smiled, as
though (the boy thought) the partner might be
a rather shabby and unaristocratic party. And
thinking thus, the boy was instantly on the
defensive for his “fellow.”

«Say, now,” said he, “don’t you be a-reflect-
in’ on that dog. He may not shine up as peart
as some gentlemen you’ve run across, but he
ain’t any scrub, that dog ain’t. Look at that
tail; see the crinkle to it? Now if that there
68 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

dog could always saunter backwards, so’s to in-
troduce his tail first, he’d be lots more admired.
I tell him so, constant. ‘Show your good side
to strangers.’ But dogs are mightily like folks,
— determined to pitch through life head fore-
most. But he /as got a nice tail. Why, he’s
named after his own tail, that there dog is:
Crinkle, — Crink for short.”

He drew the big brush through his palms
gently ; there was an affectionate suggestion in
the touch of the slender brown fingers, and he
seemed to have forgotten the stranger and to
be back again among the hard days when they
two— boy and dog—tramped together the
streets of vagabondia, as he said softly :

«J — always — liked — his — tail.”

Was there a mist in the strange man’s eyes?
Had he heard that compliment before from a
boy’s lips? A dear, dear boy who had gone
away forever upon a long, long journey? Else
what was there in the simple words to set his
heart beating thus, and to cause it to go out in.
tender sympathy for the rescued waif upon
whom he had never before set eyes, no, not in
all his life? And to be sure, he couldn’t see
him now, either, for the mist that blinded him.
THE LITTLE KID’S FOLKS. 69

So without a word he turned away and went
rapidly up the hill to the big brick house amorig
the trees, where a lady stood waiting for him at
the gate. It was the same black-robed lady
who had been in the graveyard, and as the man
drew near she pointed down the street where the
“fellows ’”’ were still standing (or rather stand-
ing still, for neither of them had stirred from
the spot), and said :

“TI want that boy.”

The boy, meanwhile, was doing a little think-
ing on his own account. “Now,” said he, “I
just do wonder what’s up this time.” Then,
with sudden vagabondish humor, not without its
touch of wisdom too, he said as the dog evinced
a disposition to follow the stranger on up to the
house on the hill:

“Come back here, sir.”’ The cur stopped,
reconsidered, and turned back. “See here,
Crinkle ; you certainly have got the largest
circle of admirers of any gentleman of my ac-
quaintance. And you have got a mighty failin’
for following the last whistle, old boy. There’s
lots of folks ready to do the same thing, I’ve
noticed, special if the whistle be uncommon
good-lookin’, and backed up with good clothes
7O THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

and a glib tongue. Ain’t that wisdom we're
talking? Ah, son, you and me ain’t studied so-
ciety from the sidewalks all these years. A
great school, son, where we got our learnin’ ;
but what we learned was — folks. Now that
“man— Hush! isthatahammer? To be sure,
and not a soul to strike for him. Come, son,
the hammer’s a-callin’ of us, and I misdoubts the
smith’s lonesome.”
CHAPTER IV.
I CAN'T, BECAUSE I LOVE HIM.

CERTAINLY the farrier wasn’t as strong as he
had been. He sat about the shop door more
than was his custom, and dreamed over his pipe
under the shed. Yet was he a very happy old
farrier. There was a new something in the
old face of him; and if the big hammer didn’t
ring as it had rung, he quite forgot it in the
ring of the young voice sounding in his ears.
And if the old feet began to grow weary, there
were young feet, able, willing, glad to run in
their stead. The summer passed,—such a
glad, good summer to the boy, such a tranquil,
quiet summer to the farrier.

The autumn came, and there was the sound
of the wary fox in the wood, as he robbed the
wild grape-vines, or pillaged among the persim-
mon-trees. Nuts were falling, — chestnut and
the sweet wild scaleybark. Pigs were fattening

71
72 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

’ on the bountiful mash nature had provided. In
the river, where the boy had learned the first
lesson of cleanliness and had first felt the cool,
delicious sense of running water upon his little
sun-baked, sand-tortured body, fish were biting,
—the perch, the cat, and the pretty speckled
trout. The boy had been happy in summer ;
in autumn he was exultant. But the days
chilled ; the nuts disappeared, the fox sought
covert. The hoar frost came, and the snow.
And with the changing weather the old smith
failed. One day when he was at work in the
shop (for he had told the boy the hammer
would be the last thing he would lay by), and
the smithy door stood wide open to admit the
winter’s sunlight, a shadow fell upon the anvil
and across the floor.

The smith looked up, nodded, finished off the
red edge of a plowshare he was repairing, and
then laid down his hammer.

“Well,” said he, “how’s the folks this morn-
in?”

“Not so well,” said the visitor, who had taken
a seat on the smith’s own stool, “not so well ;
and I have come over here, farrier, to —”’ He
paused ; somehow it seemed a very selfish,
I CAN’T, BECAUSE I LOVE HIM. 3

cruel errand he had come upon. Then he
thought of the sad, childless woman in the
big house on the hill, and took courage.

“ Got a sick horse, too?” said the farrier.
The visitor shook his head.

«My wife sent me down here to talk to you,
or toask youto come up there and talk to her.”

He paused again, and looked about the shop ;
then said :

« Where’s your dog, farrier ?”

The farrier smiled. Somehow all of his em-
barrassed friends found a refuge in that lazy
old dog of his.

“Why,” said he, “I don’t really lay claim to
that dog now. I really don’t. You know I
gave him to the little master, sir, long ago.”

«But my son gave him back to you, farrier,”
said the visitor. “You surely haven’t forgotten,

farrier.’ The farrier stood up straight, and
mopped his brow. ;

“Forgot?” said he. “Why, it was like yes-
terday the little one cried out to me: ‘I’ve sent
for you to give you back your dog, farrier.’”

The visitor lifted his hand:

“Don’t,” said he. “We haven’t learned.
to talk about him yet — at the house.”
74. THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

Then there came to the smith the lesson he
had learned from the “stray” he had picked
up in the city streets, and he resolved to pass
the lesson on to his unhappy, if more pros-
perous neighbor.

“Now, sir,” he began, just as the boy had
done, “that ain’t any way to git shed of sor-
-row. Sorrow’s somethin’ won’t stay buried,
after it zs buried. The best way is to look it
in the face; stare it out o’ countenance, so to
speak. Set beside it, till it clears out. dy
boy learned me that much.”

His boy: ah! the good farrier had opened
the way to the very object of the visitor’s call.

«Where is your boy?” he asked, feeling his
way gently, carefully.

« Off rabbit huntin’ som’ers. Be back soon.
Want him?”

« Y-e-s; I want to talk about him.”

The smith grew nervous. He dragged up an
empty nail keg and sat down upon it, got up,
turned around, and sat down again.

«See here now,” said he, “I hope there ain’t
anything you’ve come to say aginst the chap.
He seems mighty clever and — and — handy
— to me.”
I CAN’T, BECAUSE I LOVE HIM. 75

“No,” said the visitor, “I know nothing
whatever against him. In fact, I was about to
remark that he was an unusually bright, clever
boy.”

“To be sure,” said the smith. “I suspected
he was, myself.”

«And he hasn’t much opportunity here,
farrier.”

The farrier gasped. In the honest goodness
of his heart he had done what he could for
the lad, and indeed his conscience had quite
acquitted him of neglect.

“J ain’t rich,” was all the reply he could
make.

“No,” the visitor went on, with merciless
slowness. “You're a poor man, farrier. You
can’t do. much for him. He ought to’ be at
school. Ought to have been there all winter.”

«“T done the best I could,” said the poor old
smith, looking and speaking precisely like a
man before the bar of justice. “I truly done
the best I could.”

“Tam sure you did. And I am sure it is
the best you ever can do. You are getting to
be an old man, farrier.” 4

«Yes, an old man. —To—be—sure.”
76 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

«And the shop isn’t paying a great deal.”

“No, not a great sight.”

« And your hammer arm isn’t what it used
to be when another boy sat on that empty
anvil there and listened to the blows your strong
arm made with the ironhammer. The arm will
not be able to strike so hard, and so true, for
this boy, farrier.”

« But it’s ready to strike until the good Lord
says ‘ Stop,’”’ said the smith, with something of
his old spirit.

“Yes, yes,” said the visitor, “I know that.
But what I wanted to say is, that this boy is
capable of a great future. The best you can
do for him, with all your love and labor, will be
to make a first-class blacksmith of him, and to
teach him, maybe, to doctor a sick horse.
Now, that boy would make his mark in the
world, with half a showing. He could be a
lawyer, farrier; one of the best. He has a
ready wit, a keen perception, and a nimble
tongue. He ought to have this opportunity ;
and — there are no children at my place, farrier.
And my wife is grieving for the dead child, and
begging for this boy.”

The smith stood up, tall and grand looking, °
I CAN’T, BECAUSE I LOVE HIM. 77

even in his common old apron of striped ticking.
He was pale, under the soot and cinder, and his
eyes were misty. But the brave old heart of
him never once faltered.

“Say no more,” he cried. “Say no more. I
can’t begin to make out to you what that little
keen-witted, nimble-tongued chap has been to
me. He’s taught me to say my prayers, that
‘boy has. And to thank my God three times a
day for my victuals. And he’s taught me, all
hours of the day axd night, to thank him for
the boy himself. He’s p’inted out to me many
a mercy that I’d overlooked. But I ain’t no
fool; I know ever’ word you say is gospel true,
sir. I am old, and poor, and gettin’ feeble, and
I need him more for that. But I sha’n’t stand
in the lad’s way, sir. He shall decide for him-
self. Yonder he comes, across the street, with
his fishin’ poles across his shoulder. Speak to
him ; I’ll step outside, sir, for I’ve got a tattlin’
old face, and the boy will read it like a book,
sir.”

And so, in order that his old face might
not ‘betray the yearning in his heart and so
influence him against his good fortune, the
farrier stepped outside the back door of the
78 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

shop and waited, seated on a broken wagon bed,
while the boy made his choice of homes and
fathers.

He sat very near the door, where he could
hear every word; for there were no secrets
about the offer which meant so much to all.
The old dog came out where he was and sniffed
at his feet, and licked his big brown fist clinched
upon his knee, reminding the smith of the
night when he had come to part those two com-
rades in the tenement. He reached his hand
and stroked the cur’s head.

“T reckin I feel just as he felt that night, old
doggie, when he said, ‘He’s all the friend I’ve
ole

Then he heard the boy’s voice in the shop,
and listened while the man from the big house
made his offer.

It was a great offer, indeed: a home of
plenty, books, schooling, toys, and better than
all twice told and over, loving hearts to keep
and guide him.

The boy listened silently, —so silently the
smith wondered, and strained his ear, thinking
anxiety had made him deaf to the voice he
longed for,
I CAN'T, BECAUSE I LOVE HIM. 79

But when the voice came at last, so clear and
honest, the foolish old farrier was quite beside
himself with joy.

“It’s mighty good of you,” was what the boy
was saying, “and I don’t know how I ever
thought folks wasn’t good and kind. It’s a
nice home of yours, and it’s mighty good in
the lady to want me in the place of the little
kid what died. I reckin it’s because of ‘the
light’ makes her want me. She’s got it, too;
the ‘light that shines.’- But I can’t go.”

« You can’t go?”

“No,” said the boy. “I can’t leave the
smith, noways.”

“Hadn't you better think again before you
decide?” said the man.

“Tf I was to think always,” said the boy, «I
couldn’t ever stop thinkin’ of the smith. Why,
he picked me up out of the streets, the smith
did, when all the friend I had in the world was
adog. But that ain’t why I can’t go. He fed
me, and give me clothes, and a clean bed to lie
in o’ nights, and showed me what it is to be
clean and honest. But ¢hat ain’t why I can’t
go. He’s gittin’ old now, and feeble; he don’t
sleep well o’ nights, and he gives out at the
80 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

anvil sometimes; he needs me. But ¢haz ain’t
why I can’t go. He fetched me here, a stray
dog, too, like Crinkle, and he called me ‘ Sox ,’
and I can’t go because I love him. And that’s

all.”
CHAPTER V.
THE LITTLE TINSEL LADY.

One day, when the grass was growing green
again, and there was an odor of new mould in
the air, where some industrious plowman was
overturning the sod, the boy had something
very like an adventure.

He had been fishing, for the smith had said |
he needed to get away from the shop awhile.
Indeed, he had been a very industrious boy the
long, slow winter months, waiting on his ailing
old friend, patching and darning their clothes,
and thinking a great deal of Old Queen, who
had taught him to sew, and who had died in
prison rather than suffer her guilty daughter to
be punished. He had kept the place in order,
and the shop going ; and he made many a penny
that had stood them well, those days when the
snow came, and there were scant food and fuel
in the farrier’s house. The greatest thing he

81
82 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

did was to shoe a horse one day when food was
so scarce he felt almost glad the farrier could
not walk to the kitchen and take a peep into the
empty cupboard.

But at last the
spring came again ;
the farrier hobbled
back to the shop, and,
quite unexpectedly,
ordered the boy off
fishing.

With the dog at his
heels, a bucket of
bait, and a rod, the
boy set off, taking a
near cut through the
meadow that bordered
the village street, and
had just climbed the
fence that let him into
the cool woods when
something, moving very slowly down the road,
attracted his attention.

First, to his astonished gaze, a little puffy,
rolling cloud of yellow dust, out of which slowly
evolved into shape and distinctness a long line


THE LITTLE TINSEL LADY. 83

of vehicles, followed by a yet longer line of ani-
mals. The boy’s eyes and mouth were wide
open; there were few phases of vagabondism
with which he was not more or less familiar.

“Now!” cried he; “if them ain’t gypsies!
Come here, Crinkle, them yonder folks has a
fine nose for dogs, son, and a powerful likin’.”

As the caravan drew nearer, the tall tops of
chariots and cages gleaming in the sun, with a
glitter of brass here and there, the whole as-
sumed a more familiar aspect. Often such pro-
cessions paraded the city streets, but away out
here in a country lane to come upon such a
procession quite took his breath away.

In his excitement he had set his bare brown
feet in a creek that gurgled across the road.
As the water rose to his ankles, he gave vent
to his astonishment in one loud whistle, that
seemed to set the dog’s ears tingling.

«A circus!” he cried. “A circus away out
here!”

He had been ‘too closely confined with the
ailing farrier to notice the posters scattered
about the village, announcing that the “ great
show” would exhibit that day at the county
seat, three miles distant.
84 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

He had no desire to see the circus, — he had
seen a great many, “too many,” he told him-
self, “to hanker after others.” He understood
just what humbugs they were, and knew how
even the seemingly jolly old clowns had a hard
enough time of it, when out of the ring.

But he waited to see the procession pass ; he
was boy enough for that, at all events. And
the procession was all there, for it was only a
little distance to the town at which the show
had just exhibited.

« They’re all alike, son, — big tales, big blow,
same old horses, same old tricks, same old ani-
mals, same old sme//, If there’s a blessed
thing new about this one, you may have half
my dinner to-day.”

But there was something decidedly new, —
the boy held his breath and gasped when
there came .a sudden, great, grinding crash ;
a cage, big and heavy, swayed, reeled, dropped
one end heavily, and parted squarely in the
middle.

The caravan came to an abrupt halt; then
there was sudden and intense excitement, and
a great shout of fear, almost of horror, went
up, as a lithe, tawny shape flashed through
THE LITTLE TINSEL LADY. 85

space, and, with a lightning leap, cleared the
fence, and disappeared in the woods beyond
the meadow. The old lioness had escaped.

There were hurried orders, followed by a
wild pursuit ; and, as the boy stood watching,
speechless, but jubilant at the prospect of an
adventure, a shrill little voice called to him
from the caravan :

“Little boy! Oh, little boy, do give me a
cup of water out of the river where you are
standing with your feet?”

The boy forgot the lank lioness scurrying
through the woods, forgot his rods, flung on
the ground, and his bucket of bait, as he
turned to see a little wasplike figure dressed
in scarlet and seated in a great gilded chariot,
bending down like a queen from her throne
to command a drink from the brook by the
roadside. She held a little silver cup which
she was waiting for him to take, and he noticed
that the fingers and arms were bare, and coy-
ered with tawdry jewels. He was quite bewil-
dered for a moment, then he remembered Old
Queen, and his heart hardened.

“Get down and get it,” he replied. “You
ain’t got nothing to hinder, as I can see.”
86 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

In the deep blue eyes fixed upon his face,
the tears were starting.

A cross-looking woman on the seat beside
her gave the child a sharp nudge of her elbow,
and commanded her to “hold her tongue, and
not be silly.”

“But I am so thirsty,” wailed the little crea-
ture. “My throat is parched with dust, and
my feet ache so. I rode in the ring five times
last night, and climbed the trapeze twice.
And I must do it all over again to-night, and
ride in the procession too, on one foot. See!
My ankle is all swelled now.”

She thrust a tiny foot forward, to show how
the poor ankle was puffed and swollen; she had
slipped her shoe off; the little red stocking
was stretched to the utmost.

Without another word of objection, the boy
stepped to the side of the chariot, and took the
cup from the child’s hand. The sight of that
little tortured foot had stirred memories that al-
ways set his sympathies throbbing. A whiff of
the dusty streets filled his nostrils, —a glimpse
of a stray cur fleeing from persecution, —a
man who had “handed the cup of water,” in
the name of humanity.
THE LITTLE TINSEL LADY. 87

He stooped where the cool spring nestled
deep among the rocks and mosses beyond the
road, among the shades of the quiet woods, and
handed the cup, sparkling and brimming, to the
thirsty circus child.

«So good!” she laughed. “Might I have
another drink? Seems like I could drink as
much as the camels.”

“ Creek’s free,” said the boy, “and I ain’t
chargin’ for services.” Again he tramped
back to the spring, even giving a drink to
the cross woman in the carriage, after which .
they all.became quite talkative and friendly.

There were no men left in the caravan, ex-
cept those who had charge of the animals, and
- they had strict orders not to go away for an
instant. So the boy brought water, and made
himself of some use. Then he said to the
little circus girl:

“Tf you will slip off your stockings, and let
your feet down into the runnin’ water, it will
take all the swell and the ache out of them.
You'll see.”

The little circus girl had braved too many
deaths, on the bare-backed horses, the deadly
trapeze, and the tight rope, to be afraid. So
88 “THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

at a nod from the cross woman, who had been
mollified by the boy’s good nature, the little
rider jerked off her stockings, and a moment
later the red skirts were flashing over the
stream that laughed, and danced, and gurgled
about the poor ankles with delicious coolness.

They waded up and down for awhile, and the
boy “pooh-poohed” imaginary snakes, while
the circus child went off into shrieks of laugh-
ter, that made the little baby monkeys tear
at their cages and chatter like magpies.

Even the lazy old rhinoceros yawned and
grunted, and the brain of the cross woman
went dreaming of another woods, another
stream, and another child, who had waded in
the clear, cool water, and believed that child-
hood and happiness were everlasting.

And when they were tired of wading the boy
found a seat among the gray rocks, where the
little feet could swing down into the current
still. Suddenly, with a touch of his street-self,
the boy sang out, sharply:

«Say, now, what zs this circus, anyhow ? Is it
the Royal Red Lady, or is it the Runaway Lion
show? That’s what I want to know.”

“Oh!” said the little red lady, “but this is
THE LITTLE TINSEL LADY. 89

the great Carrigan Brothers’ circus and me-
nagerie.” ;

The boy drew in his breath quickly, and let
it out again in a sudden whistle. But the child
went right on with her prattle without seeming
to notice his surprise.

«“T am the Bare-back Baby Rider,” said she;
“the ‘Little Child Wonder’ they call me on the
bills. And some take me for the ‘Little Tin-
sel Lady,’ but I am not. She was another girl ;
and she is dead.”

“Dead?”

The child nodded. ‘I saw her, when she
was done dead, and she was in a white coffin ;
and she had some roses on her, white ones.
And they said her mother killed her.”

“Oh, now,” said the boy, “you ought to
know that isn’t true. How could she? TI’ll be
bound it was a horse kicked her in the stomach,
or something.”

“No, it didn’t. Our horses don’t kick. She
was a bigger girl than me, and lots older; but
they dressed her up to look lots littler than
she was. They do me, too. I’m old. I’m
twelve, but the bills say I’m six. And the
other girl was awful bad; she’d even swear.
go THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

And they said she szoZe once. But she’s dead,
now. I saw her; and she looked so still and
easy and happy lying there all white, that I
think of her whenever I’ve rode, and rode, and
played trapeze all day, and it seems real good to
be dead and go to sleep in a white coffin, and
be still.”

The boy listened, eagerly, intently. Sud-
denly a great suspicion seized him. Surprise,
wonder, doubt, were choking him dumb, so that
he could scarcely stammer out the questions
that sprang to his lips. ‘‘Wh-at w-was her
name? That other one?”

“ Gloria,” said the child, lifting a pink pebble
with her toes. The boy’s face fell. He did
not know any Gloria.

“They called her the ‘ Little Tinsel Lady,’”’
the child went on. ‘And I heard an ugly old
woman call her-‘Jenny’ in the streets once,
when we was showing. She got mighty mad
about it, and told the old woman she needn’t
ever come ‘ Jennying’ her any more, for nobody
knew her as that. She was bad, I think, for one
day when she was riding in the ring some one told
about a woman who died in jail. They said she
stole some money, but nobody believed, much,
r

THE LITTLE TINSEL LADY. QI

that she was a thief, but thought she was just
pretendin’ it, to save somebody else. And they
said she starved herself to death with grief.
And when Gloria heard it she grew right white,
and her knees shook and trembled so that she
asked the ring-master not to make her ride
right then. But the people were waitin’, and
two clowns were holdin’ up a big paper hoop
for Gloria to jump through. And the ring-
master told her to ‘go on.’ She began to cry,
then, and begged not to go. Then the ring-
master lifted his whip and struck her across the
bare shoulders, and told her to ‘clear out to the
ring.’ And she went out, sobbing ; and a long
piece of tinsel trailed behind her on the ground
where it had ripped off her tarlatan dress. red welt showed on her bare shoulder: I saw
it. And her knees shook so when she put her
foot in the ring-master’s hand to mount you'd
a-thought she would shake all to pieces. And
the ring-master swore an oath, and said he
guessed he’d ‘fix her when she came off that
horse again!’ But he didn’t, — she was ‘fixed’
already when they brought her back and laid her
on the straw. And there was blood on her
breast, dyeing the tinsel all red. She had
92 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

missed the pony’s back, and fell under his feet
when she was jumping through the hoops; and
he had set his iron foot on her breast, and tram-
_ pled her awful. The circus went right on,
though, for the ring-master came out and told
the people the ‘young lady was all right, but
scared.’ So I rode in her place, and I’ve been
riding in it ever since.

«She came to her senses when the doctor
was fixing her wounds, and began to cry for her
mother, and to beg somebody to send for the
preacher man. And nobody wouldn’t, but
the boy that feeds the apes; he went. For
the doctor said she was hurt inside and bound
to die. When the man got there Gloria cried
to him, ‘Git me out of this, let me die decent !’
So they fetched her to the hospital, and all the
time she was praying to God. Just before she
died she got real quiet, and lay real still until
_ the last minute. Then she opened her eyes
and smiled, and said ‘mother,’ and died like a
little child.”

They had left the stream and were seated by
the roadside, the child’s little feet dangling
in the water the while she talked. The boy
had sat quite still, and listened. When the
THE LITTLE TINSEL LADY. 93

story ended he sat so quiet the child turned to
look at him and there were tears in his eyes:

Then a shout sounded across the meadow, and
they saw the circus men coming back. Some
one had shot the escaped lioness, and so they
had turned back. The child climbed again into
her gilded chariot, and the boy turned back into
the meadow path to the village. There was a
great sorrow in his heart, and a great wonder in
his soul. It was the first time, in all his varied
experiences, that he had really come face to
face with the triumph of faith, and it thrilled
him with a strange, sweet sense of God’s near- -
ness and his love. k

The smith was lying on his bed, asleep, when
the boy entered the room at noon. He had
begun to feel the necessity of a noonday nap,
of late, and the boy tiptoed to the kitchen and
began to prepare a bite for their dinner.

When he looked into the room again the
smith was awake and sitting by the open win-
dow, with his hands folded and a look of peace
in his face. The boy felt that it was a good
time to speak. He crossed to the side of the
big arm-chair, and, leaning against the shoulder
of his old friend, slipped his arm around his neck.
94 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

“Well, son,” said the farrier, “what is it?”
For he hadn’t studied this odd boy for a year
and failed to understand when something moved
the heart of him.

“Why,” said the boy, “I have been a-lookin’
things in the face to-day, and I’ve come in to
tell you that Old Queen was right, and that her
prayers to God were answered. The little tin-
sel lady was her daughter, and she died in the’
hospital, ‘like a little child,’ and that’s all.”

All! the finish of a beautiful faith, born of
sorrow, and perfected in death: the Amen toa
mother’s prayer.
CHAPTER VI.
“THE LIGHT THAT SHINES.”

Ir was June; across the meadow from the
smith’s house, beyond the village street, the
Southern wheat had mellowed to a rich, ruddy
golden. At sunrise one bright. morning the
hum of a reaper was heard in the field, and
the village folks, awakening to the familiar
sound, rejoiced to remember that it was the
beginning of the Southern harvest.

The farrier, weak as alittle child, turned
upon his pillow, and listening, caught the hum
of the blade among the golden grain.

He heard the boy stirring in the kitchen, and
called to him; for the weary old smith had
had a message; and although it had come in
the day dawn, before he was fully awake
indeed, there was no mistaking the message.
One might almost have thought the reaper

95
96 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

itself had brought it, the old farrier’s solemn
message.

The boy came hurrying in, as though he, too,
might have heard the good smith’s summons.
He sat up in bed:

«We won’t open the shop to-day, son,” said
he. “But help me into my clothes and fling
open the window. I’ve a mind to watch the
reapers at work.”

The boy dragged the big chair to the window
and threw back the shutters. The river breeze
came floating in to fan the sick man’s temples ;
he drew it into his nostrils, deep, delicious
draughts, and smiled:

“T can smell the wild grapes a-bloomin’,” he
said. ‘I always loved ’em so; they always
make me think of some lives I’ve known;
humble and sweet, and bloomin’ in the wilder-
ness. Of all the wild things in the woods there
ain’t ever been anything so sweet to me as the
grape blooms in early June time. I rickerlict
“em first in the woods at home, whenst I was
a boy, like you, and followed my pappy to the
woods. He was a wood-cutter, and I was
just a boy; and whenever I smell the white
grape blossoms since, I’ve been a boy again,
“THE LIGHT THAT SHINES.” 97

followin’ my pappy through the Southern
woods.”

The boy was silent, awed, and half afraid;
it was the first time he had ever heard the
farrier talk of his home and his boyhood, and
it filled him with a strange, sad fear.

“Let the dog in, son,” the smith called out
to him cheerily. “Let our little friend’s old
dog in; he’s been one of the old farrier’s
friends, too. We want all of our friends
about us to-day.”

The boy choked back the lump in his throat,
‘and said, quite bravely, from behind the smith’s
big chair :

“Don’t say he ‘as been’ your friend, sir ;
he zs your friend, and will always be; because
he ain’t no common dog, that ain’t, and he
senses who’s been good to him better than
some folks I could name. He’s a great dog
that; him and me was fellers once.’

« Ay, ay,” said the farrier. “I ain’t forgot
it. Let himin, son; let the cur in; I want to
feel his faithful old nose against my knees once
more, before I go.”

The boy started to obey, when the farrier
called him back:
98 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

“Son,” said he slowly, his eyes fixed upon the
golden harvest where the reaper’s blade shone,
like a silver cycle, in the sun; “sometimes in a
long life it is given to a man to do no: great
deeds ; but only, it may be, just to hand a cup
of water to some sick and suff’rin’ beast. But
when the long life comes to the last mile post,
it’s good to sit a minute by the way and think
of that poor cup of water. I ain’t done no
great deeds; I have only helped a suff’rin’
horse out of its misery, now and then, and
flung a bone to a dog. It was all I could do,
son; and I love to know I done it, now.”

«Say, now,” cried the boy, “if you don’t want
to hurt my feelin’s mighty bad, you’ll hush
talkin’ that a-way. I reckin / ain’t forgot an-
other stray you picked up, and that you ain’t
mentioned in your list o’ dogs and horses. Now
I’m a-goin’ to cook your breakfast. That’s all.”

It wasn’t quite “all,” however; for instead
of going straight back to the kitchen the boy
went out to the old dog waiting at the door.
He dropped down beside his first friend, and
put his arms around the shaggy neck, and
burying his face there, wept:

“He’s goin’ from us, Crinkle,’ said he;
a

“THE LIGHT THAT SHINES.” 99

“our old friend’s goin’ from us. When us
two was fellers he was mighty- good to us.
And I ain’t forgot my duty to him since that
time he called me ‘Son.’ ”

“Son?” the familiar voice and call came to
him through the still closed door. “Let the
dog in, son.” \

He opened the door, and the sick old farrier
smiled to see how brave was his effort to hide
his grief.

' «Go in there,’ he commanded; “and be
sure you mind your manners in a sick-room.”

And with a wag of his big tail, poor Baydaw,
who had been patted, and petted, and fattened
to a lazy old age, went into the smith’s room,
the only heart among the circle of the good
man’s friends that was not heavy with the
shadow of the great parting.

The smith wasn’t hungry, though the boy
did his best with the breakfast.

«J ain’t in a notion to eat, son,” he said,
when the little cook presented himself, tray in
hand, at his side. “I couldn’t eat, noways.
Give the dog a bite, and when you've finished
yours, come and set by me. I want to speak
to you, son, special.”
100 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

All the long morning they sat there; the
smith had many things, many last things to say
to the waif of his adopting.

« You've been mighty good to me,” said the
boy. “I reckin there ain’t many boys had
such a friend as I’ve had.”

«Then pass it, son,” said the farrier. “ Pass
the good deeds on to some other unlucky
fellow on the way.”

“Some other lucky dog, you'd better say,”
the boy declared.

“T ain’t done much,” the farrier insisted,
“T couldn't. The little one’s father could ’a’.
done a sight more; but I done what I could,
and that’s all the Master asks of any. And
you must do the best you can for yourself,
and for others, — never forget there’s others,
son, when I’m gone. The shop’s yours, it’s
all I’ve got to leave you, except the ‘light ;’
the ‘light that shines,’ I’ve always — given —
you — that, — son —”’ ;

He pressed the boy’s hand and was silent.
When he roused up the boy thought he had best
lie down on his bed awhile, but the farrier said no.

“T want to see them finish that field,” said
he, “before the sun goes down.”


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THE “FELLOW” AS NURSE.




“THE LIGHT THAT SHINES.” 103

Later, he called the boy to him again, and said :

«Son, bury me under the good green grass.
Don’t ever put a stone over me. I want the
grass ; just the good green grass to cover me.
You won’t forget, son?”

The boy said indeed he would not forget,
but to him was not given the prophetic vision
that was the passing farrier’s. Me knew that
the young lad baking his own bread, and mak-
ing it too, would not always be an humble and
obscure fellow, spending his days amid the soot
and ashes and gloom of a blacksmith’s shop.
He saw a day, a golden day for the boy, when
his great man’s heart, alive with gratitude and
tender memories, would thrill with pride to be
able to write the dead smith’s name ona marble
shaft.

Later on into the afternoon visitors came in :
the gentleman from the house on the hill, and
the good neighbors who had helped prepare the
smith’s house for the boy’s coming that other
June time. But the smith was drowsy, and
wanted to watch the reapers rather than to talk.
The doctor dropped in, too, during the day, but
only to shake his head and whisper that he
“wouldn’t last the night through.”
104 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW. -

At sunset he rallied, and spoke again of the
wild grape blossoms, and patted the dog’s head,
and talked a great deal about the little boy who
had been his former friend. “It was him made
me take to this boy,” he said to the dead boy’s
father. “It was him made me take to all boys,
and to all dogs; him as made my heart some-
thin’ softer than my old anvil out yonder.”
The visitor leaned forward, and pressed the
knotted old hammer hand of his boy’s dear
friend.

“Yes,” said he, “you remember what the
book says : ‘A little child shall lead them!’ ”

“That’s a pretty sayin’,” said the smith. “A
little child shall lead them! You mind what
he said to me that day he sent for me? am goin’ on a long journey, but I am not
afraid.” —am— not — afraid.”

He dozed off into a peaceful slumber after
that, and did not waken again until the reapers
were leaving the field across the way, for their
work was finished. So, too, was the farrier’s ;
for as the last sound of the reaping died away
he stirred in his sleep, felt for the boy’s hand,
held it fast in his own, and murmured softly of
“the light that shines all the way.”
CHAPTER VII.
PASSING IT ON.

THE old shop had not been open for a week.
The boy, after the farrier’s death, had not felt
strong enough to brave the desolation of the
old smithy. But one morning there came to
him a great longing to go there again, and to sit
among the smith’s old tools, and hold com-
munion with their absent owner. For the pos-
sessions of those we love seem very, very near
to us after their owners have left us, so near
that we can almost fancy at times the blessed
dead hover about their old haunts and belong-
ings, and that only the shifting of a scene, the
lifting of a veil, would let us into the beloved
presence.

So the boy crossed the yard to the back door
of the smithy, the dog at his heels, and sat
down on the farrier’s own old stool to look
about him. For it seemed to him as though

105
106 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

somehow he must take the farrier’s place, and
the low seat on the anvil, that had been the
proper place for boys to sit, was not the place
for him any more at all. In fact, it was as
though the boy he ad been had died along of
the smith, and the feeling of desolation that
overcame him was almost too much for him,
until a yellow old head brushed his legs, and
he looked down to see the dog begging in his
dumb fashion to be recognized.

“You're the only friend I’ve got,” he said,
just as he had said it once before. “I reckin
we'll have to be fellows, like we was then, hey,
Crinkle?”” For the poor boy, left again to the
companionship of the dog, had fallen back upon
his old habit of talking to him. So when the
cur crept to the big front door and whined,
the boy said:

«What? You want the door opened, and
the light let in? Oh, you dog, you; how can
you ask it, and /zm not here? What? He
loved the light, did he? So he did, boy; so
he did. And so we’ll let it into his shop.”

He was taking the bar down from across the
doors while he talked, and as the big chain
rattled back against the wall, the doors swung
PASSING IT ON. 107

open, and a broad, bright sheet of yellow sun-
light burst into the dark old smithy. The boy
began to look about him at the traces of neglect
and of desertion.

“No need to dodge, son,’ he said, as he
picked up the smith’s old hammer. “The very
things we run from are the things that are
going to jump out o’ their coverts to scare us
when we ain’t thinkin’ of ’em. Better face ’em,
son; better always and always look things square
in the face ; Old Queen said so, and Old Queen
knowed a lot, I can tell you. Now, look here!”

He held the hammer up to the light, the
dog looking on, as though he understood every
blessed word his poor comrade was saying, and
as though he knew precisely what a struggle
was going on in the lonely heart of him. “This
hammer has got 7vws¢ on it.”

And sure’enough, as the boy said, there was
a broad brown band of rust across the farrier’s
industrious old hammer.

“This won’t do,” said he; “somethin’s got
to be done. Now, Crinkle, we must look things
in the face, son. Somethin’s got to be done.
We can’t set down so.” :

And as though the “something” had come
108 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

to meet him, a shadow darkened the smithy
door. The boy looked up, half expecting to see
the farrier enter; for one doesn’t grow accus-
tomed to the absence of familiar forms for a
long, long time after they have disappeared.

But it was not the farrier’s shadow; oh, no;
it was only a weary, dusty, old tramp, who
nodded to the small boy in possession and
said : j

«“Where’s the smith?”

The boy was silent; the tramp’s query had
hurt him somehow, — as though there could be
any necessity for such a question with the use-
less anvil and the rusted hammer telling, as
plain as words, where the smith was gone.

“Say?” the tramp began again, “Who's the
boss here?” ;

“Well,” said the boy, “if you’ve got anything
to say you can say it to me. I’m boss, I reckon,
—leastways me and my pardner together.”

“Well, sonny,” said the tramp, “where's
your pardner, then?”

The boy pointed to the dog stretched out
beside the fireless forge.

Across the face of the tramp flitted a look of
disappointment.
PASSING IT ON, 109

~<

« Say, sonny,” said he, “I’m an old man, and
I’m mighty weary, and hungry, and thirsty. It
ain’t any joke to me to stand here and ask
questions. I give you a plain question and I’d
like a fair answer. I am a smith by trade, and
I heard the smith over here was ailin’ and |
tramped fifty miles to get here to ask a job of
him. I ain’t tasted victuals since yesterday,
and I ain’t stopped tramping, I was that pressed
to get here, to see the smith —”’

“Oh,” said the boy, “you are too late, too
late; he’s gone.”

“Gone?”

The boy gulped, and nodded.

“Gone where?”

“He’s dead,” said the boy, and right there
the poor waif broke down. Broke down after
such a brave fight as he had made; it was too
sad, too sad. Even the tramp was touched by
his grief, forgot his own sufferings in the sorrow
of the boy.

«“ Now, now then,” said he, with a new soft-
ness in his voice, “don’t you give way ; keep up
your spirits. It'll all come round right some-
how. Don’t you fret, and don’t you lose heart,
now.”
IIo THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

« He was all the friend I had,” said the boy ;
“and he rescued me. He was all the friend I
ever had, ’ceptin’ of that old dog there, and now
he’s dead. Seems like there ain’t anybody left
livin’ in the wide world, so it does.”

“Yes,” said the man; “I know it does. It
always does feel that way when some one we
love dies, or goes false to us. But time softens,
time softens. Don’t you lose your grip, and
it'll all come round right bimeby. It always
does. Might I havea gourd of water, sonny?”

The boy instantly remembered the long tramp
and the fast the traveller had mentioned.

«Sit down there on that bench outside and
rest,” said he, “while I go fetch you some
water fresh from the well. You can rest all
day if you’re minded, and I'll knock you up a
bite to eat.”

The old tramp was thankful indeed, and the
boy was not sorry to have company for awhile.
He forgot his loneliness in preparing food for
his guest, and in seeing an old face opposite
him at the table. For in spite of the neighbor
woman’s efforts to coax him away from the
empty house, he had persistently remained there.
He knew how to take care of himself quite
PASSING IT ON. III

well; he had not been lacking in experience,
poor fellow.

Later in the day a man passed through the
village with a
drove of horses,
and many of
them had cast
their shoes, or
worn them too
badly for further
travel. He drew
up before the
door of the
smithy and
called for the
blacksmith. The
boy would have
sent him away,
but the tramp
whispered himto
blow up a blaze
in the forge.

“ Blow up the fire,” said he; “I can shoe the
lot for you. I owe you that much for hospi-
tality, anyhow. I always try to pay my way.”

And while the old tramp pared and smoothed


I1i2 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

the worn hoofs, fitted and nailed and hammered, .
the boy planned and thought, and planned again.
And that night, when they closed the shop
door, and the man was about to start upon his
weary way again, the boy spoke:

“T dunno,” said he, “as I’m a-doin’ right or
not. I ain’t nothin’ but a boy, and I’ve got to
act for myself. You're old, and poor, and alone
too. fe took me in once’t, the farrier did, and
I'd like to do for a old man what a old man
did for a boy. You can open up the shop
to-morrer if you’re a, minded to.”

“On shares,” said the man. “Only on shares,
I ain’t goin’ to take no mean advantage of a
boy that’s need’n’ help and company. Besides,
you're takin’ of me without a recommend; I
ain’t forgettin’ of that.”

“He took me without any,” said the boy;
“and he said I was to ‘pass it on,’ and I’ve
done it, and that’s all.”’

But it was not quite “all.” For that night,
while the tramp lay fast asleep in the dead
farrier’s bed, a sweet sense of peace came to
the boy who had taken him in. All his grief
and doubt dropped from him for the time, and
he knew that he had done well and made no
blunder in “passing it on.”
CHAPTER VIII.
LUCKY DOGS.

TuE anvil was ringing again, sweet and clear
as a bell; the sound went pealing down the
village street, causing more than one sym-
pathetic neighbor to declare he was “right
glad to hear it.”

The blaze waved in the forge, and the
shadows that hung about the gloomy old
shop fled before the good, glad sunshine of
industry and hope.

Only in the heart of the boy the shadows
lingered. The old shop wasn’t the same, —
the ring of the hammer had a different mean-
ing to his ears. And while he felt glad to see
the place open and the old man contentedly
fitting horseshoes, he couldn’t, try as he would,
drive away the feelings of regret for the old
days when the farrier plied the hammer.

113
Ii4 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

He had never loved the work, and now it
became almost hateful to him. He understood
now that it was the farrier made it tolerable,
and without him the black soot became black
soot in reality; the cinders something to be
scrubbed off and detested.

His new friend was very thoughtful of him in
his loneliness, his first great battle with sorrow,
and very kind; begged him to run away to the
woods, or to go visiting for awhile, until he
should grow accustomed to the change. But
the boy shook his head, and hugged his old
dog.

“T ain’t never run away from nothin’ yet,”
said he, “and I don’t know how to dodge. I
always liked Old Queen’s way better: just to
look things in the face. But I “ave wondered
if houses and hammers and things didn’t know
when their folks was dead. I most know flowers
do, because I believe there isn’t a wild grape
blossom in the woods. He loved the wild
grape blossoms, — said they made him think
o’ home. And now I think they must know
he has gone home, and that they’ve left ot
bloomin’.”

“See here,” said the man, looking up from
LUCKY DOGS. ITs

the forge where he was watching a long red
bar of iron grow redder. “You run away
awhile. Ill work for the two of us; I owe
you that much anyhow, and a lot more.
Why, see here; you’ve took me in, — you’ve —
you’ve —”

“Well,” said the boy, “we'll just say I’ve
adopted you. That'll do. But I aimed to say
to you last night that whatever I have done, I
have done in his name, and you're to take it as
comin’ from him.”

The new smith was only a rough old tinker
in iton, a shoer of horses, accustomed to the
rougher side of life, and of humanity. Yet he
understood that some souls are more keenly
strung than others; and that the sensitive,
poetic, and sentimental chords may vibrate to
beautiful measures even in the heart of the
humblest. And he knew, that which the soft-
hearted, partial old farrier never did and never
would have known, that he had as well hope to
hammer snow out of the iron bar on the anvil
as to expect to make a blacksmith out of this
boy who understood human nature like an open
book ; and who, while he walked among the
cinders, lived in reality among the clouds.
116 THE FORTUNES OF THE. FELLOW.

“He'd take to books like a duck to water,”
was the new smith’s thought ; “and it’s mighty
queer some one ain’t found that out afore
now.”

Some one had, — the good we wait for always
comes about at last, and it came to the boy.
He was sitting on the bench by the smithy
door when the little boy’s father (for he has
been “the little boy” to us so long that he
must continue so to the end of the chapter
indeed) came down the street from the house
on the hill.

He saw the solitary figure on the bench, the
faithful old dog at his feet, and there sprang to
his lips the same words the boy had once used
in speaking to the dog:

“That poor, poor boy!”

For he had heard the hum of the hammer,
and full of curiosity had hastened down to see
who was at work in the shop.

He had other business there, however ; for
he had held a long .and confidential con-
sultation with his wife that morning, and the
result of the conference was this visit to the
shop.

The boy had not observed his approach; he
LUCKY DOGS. 117

was lost in thought, though now and then he
roused himself and spoke to the dog, in his old
street-boy way.

«We're fellows now,” he would say ; or else,
«“ We was fellows once’t before,” or “You're
all the friend that’s left me, Crink.”’

So that when the visitor laid his hand on the
half bowed head and said right heartily :

«“ Good morning, soz,” the boy almost laughed
out for very joy.

It was so like the good times come back again ;
and it was as though the farrier himself had
spoken; and the birds woke up and began to
sing their June matins; and the river breeze
sprung up among the trees and brought the
odor of wild grapes straight into the old shop,
and filled it with the sweet wild fragance.

The visitor seated himself on the bench beside
the boy and fanned himself with his broad straw
hat. He scarcely knew how to begin. “ Did
you think we'd forgotten you?” he said, at last ;
“left you alone in your trouble?”

«“T’ve been alone a sight before now,” said
the boy. “And I had the dog; he was a sight
o’ company, Crinkle was. Hey, son?”

« But a dog isn’t the only companion a boy
118 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

needs,” said the man, “and I have come to
carry you home now, son.” 2

“ Home?” The boy stared, as though the
word had stunned him with the sweet power of
its meaning. He had learned what home meant,
and homelessness.

«Yes; Ihave come for you. There is no
loving duty, no nice distinction of gratitude to
hinder your coming now; and your room, your
father and mother, are waiting for you.”

It was quite impossible for the boy to speak ;
all that it meant, this wonderful offer, was not
clear to him; but that one word “mother” had
nestled in his heart like a benediction, and
silenced speech.

«Did you think we had no feeling, no care
for you?” the man went on, “that we left you
alone this long week? We were trying you;
we had a wish to see how you would manage ;
how work your way alone. Now that we know
that you are brave, and true, and willing to do
your best, we wish to help you. Come, shut
up the old shop and let’s be going home — ¢o
mother.”

To mother ; in all his little life he had never
known what that meant; to “go home to
LUCKY DOGS. 119

mother.” But he knew what a mother meant, —
the love, the tenderness, the undying devotion ;
for had he not known Old Queen?

He rose with his visitor, —a new light in his
little brown face, a new joy inhisheart. “I’ve
got to go in there first,” he said, indicating with
his head the house where he had lived with the
smith for a year.

“You don’t need any of that,” said the gen-
tleman. “Give it all away if you like, and the
shop, too.”

“No,” said the boy, “I’ve got to go in there.
There’s an old kit o’ brushes and blackin’ I’ve
got to fetch along —”

“Go get the kit,” said the gentleman. “You
are quite right to keep italways. Quite right.”
And as the boy sped away to do his bidding he
thought how those old brushes must one day
appear as humble stepping-stones to braver
duties and nobler ends to the man that mast
develop out of this boy he was taking into his
heart and home.

When boy and box joined him under the shed,
he said: “Now about the shop, shall we close
the door?”

“No, sir; I think — well, the farrier said I
120 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

was to pass it on, what he done for me, and —
and — I’ve done it.”

“You've done what, my boy ?”’ said the gen-
tleman. “You have given the smithy away?

Already?”
“Well,” said the boy, a twinkle of his old
vagabondish humor in his eye, ‘you've

adopted a boy, but I’ve adopted a man, I
reckin.”

“Come,” laughed the gentleman; “come
home. I want you to forget everything that
lies behind you; I want you to be a Joy, to
learn to skip and run and whoop, to ride a
horse, to spin a top, and to forget everything
that lies behind you.”

“Yes,” said the boy, “I will. Everything
but the farrier. Come, Crinkle, we are going
home.”

And the big bushy tail waved and wagged
such magnificent approval that the boy was
fain to remark:

“Tf that dog don’t understand the present
perceedin’s, he ought to be made to haul down
his sign, because it’s obtainin’ benefits under
false pretences. And that’s all.”

“All?” No, not all. Not by any means
LUCKY DOGS. 121

“all.” The good glad years seem to go by on
wings. The sound of children’s voices may be
heard at the brick house on the hill. A new
baby, a gray-eyed little girl, toddles about in the
room of her absent brother. And summer days
a toothless old dog, fat, pampered, and lazy, lies
beside a baby’s carriage, out under the green
trees ; fancying, it may be, that he is keeping
guard over the child asleep among the silken
cushions. Perhaps—for who can discern the
depths of a dog’s mind ?— he is even dreaming
that he watches again by the little boy who
went upon that long, mysterious journey.

Sometimes a boy’s careless step, light and
springy, as boyhood’s step should ever be, may
be heard along the pebbly walk. Often the
steps stop beside the baby’s carriage, and the
sleepy old guard hears his “fellow” talking to
the baby sister crowing and cooing, baby-fashion,
among her pillows.

If the old dog shows signs of jealousy, a hand
is put out to stroke his shaggy, yellow throat,
and a familiar voice says :

“We are lucky dogs, Crink, lucky dogs, you
and I.”

And the farrier under the green grass_ is
122 THE FORTUNES OF THE FELLOW.

not forgotten, nor the little boy under the white
slab. No, never forgotten; because each of
them, man and boy, left behind that which alone
can make life beautiful, and memory precious
and eternal, —

«The light that shines all the way.”

THE END.
COSY CORNER SERIES
CHARMING JUVENILE STORIES

Price, Fifty Cents Each

THE ADVENTURES OF A FELLOW. By WILL ALLEN
DROMGOOLE,

THE GATE OF THE GIANT SCISSORS. By ANNIE FELLOWS-
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BAKER DUNN.

THE YOUNG ARCHER. By CHARLES E. BRIMBLECOM.

A LITTLE PURITAN REBEL. By EpDITH ROBINSON.

THE FARRIER’S DOG AND HIS FELLOW. By WILL ALLEN
DROMGOOLE.

THE PRINCE OF THE PIN ELVES. By CHARLES LEE
SLEIGHT.

A DOG OF FLANDERS. By “ Ourpa.”

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OLE MAMMY’S TORMENT. By ANNIE FELLOWS-JOHNSTON,

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A LOYAL LITTLE MAID. By EpItTH ROBINSON.

THE LITTLE LAME PRINCE. By Miss MuLoc#.

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GRAFF. -

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Crew. By ALPHONSE DAUDET.

A GREAT EMERGENCY. By JULIANA HORATIA EWING.

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Published by L. C. PAGE AND COMPANY
196 Summer Street, Boston
COSY CORNER SERIES

OLDER READERS

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The books of this series answer a long-felt need for a half-hour’s enter-
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PRICE, FIFTY CENTS EACH

MEMORIES OF THE MANSE. Glimpses of Scottish Life and
. Character. By ANNE BREADALBANE.

CHRISTMAS AT THOMPSON HALL. By Anruony TROLLoPE-
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IN DISTANCE AND IN DREAM. By M. F. Swretser.

WILL O’ THE MILL. By Rozerr Louris STEVENSON.



THREE CHILDREN OF GALILEE. A Life of Christ for
the Young. By Joun Gorpon. rvol., 12mo, cloth, illustrated fr.50

Beautifully illustrated with more than one hundred text and full-page
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There has long been a need for a Life of Christ for the young, and this
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and girls want something more than a Bible Story, a dry statement of facts,
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Published by L. C. PAGE AND COMPANY
196 Summer Street, Boston
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AND GIRLS
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THREE LITTLE CRACKERS. By WiLL ALLEN DROMGOOLE,
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A fascinating story for boys and girls. The adventures of a
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THE YOUNG. By JOHN GORDON. Beautifully illustrated with
more than one hundred text and full-page illustrations of
Holy Land scenery.

There has long been a need for a Life of Christ for the young,
and this book has been written in answer to this demand. That
it will meet with great favor is beyond question, for parents have
recognized that their boys and girls want something more than a
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the attention of the youthful readers, a book on this subject
should have life and movement as well as scrupulous accuracy
and religious sentiment.

MISS GRAY’S GIRLS; or, SUMMER DAYS IN THE SCOTTISH
HIGHLANDS. By JEANNETTE A. GRANT. With about sixty
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A delightfully told story of a summer trip through Scotland,
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Tramp,” etc., with fifty-five illustrations from original draw-
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A new volume by Mrs. Wesselhoeft, well known as one of our
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This Book ought to interest and appeal to every child who has
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FEATS ON THE FIORD. A TALE or NORWEGIAN LIFE. By
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by Mary WHITNEY Morrison (Jenny Wallis). New edition,
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ADVENTURE BY LAND AND BY SEA. By Lirur. H. PHELPS
WHITMARSH, author of “The Mysterious Voyage of the

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The title gives no clue to the character of the book, but the
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man, and is able to devote himself to bettering the condition of
the poor in the mining region of Pennsylvania, the scene of his
early life and adventures.

Published by L. C. PAGE AND COMPANY
196 Summer Street, Boston






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'2012-01-14T14:17:27-05:00'
describe
'67352' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKG' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
677cc9a3bc11617a08535837725d3662
52c2c4c9abeeb243909cc0d42bb901243943961a
'2012-01-14T14:13:31-05:00'
describe
'1783' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKH' 'sip-files00002.pro'
72c9b8cd1a1b9382e3897a56145e33b0
ebd3c9daf47e322e930455bda4ff2889a0af50af
'2012-01-14T14:15:06-05:00'
describe
'14787' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKI' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
edf066e8134b1046292f940611c265ea
ee5162813037b3863a308deba2543d140ad9eaf1
'2012-01-14T14:16:48-05:00'
describe
'9549276' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKJ' 'sip-files00002.tif'
804cd5e8a8c4aa2377cd86762781db40
8a79da887c644225d444472f23f67b43b6dcd475
'2012-01-14T14:13:14-05:00'
describe
'87' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKK' 'sip-files00002.txt'
1e31c1626d3dd331d2cf8b1bf9d51920
05f115c65e579524e176dcb20eee745a35e5d954
'2012-01-14T14:14:17-05:00'
describe
'3806' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKL' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
a692e80eff67182748b6a5cb210fc9aa
9aef7ce7bb49ac82017a6faaca70c04418b588cf
'2012-01-14T14:13:43-05:00'
describe
'320706' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKM' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
a41e76df3ecd6e9b0feed6cc6f48833d
e6b3c555d90668f835f66b916b5e8b7ac4d71324
'2012-01-14T14:16:01-05:00'
describe
'41097' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKN' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
371f0d24b1243e489568de57e5a5d3bc
3aee7640158bac9c08bee8921e532580b52ac85c
'2012-01-14T14:16:22-05:00'
describe
'953' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKO' 'sip-files00005.pro'
2822743ef61290b6ddab551622aae23b
25a0e163a606b491a072ba165c180f06114872d7
'2012-01-14T14:13:08-05:00'
describe
'8003' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKP' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
c1bcf7c010a95d9acb229aae7ed0c491
97eb8da4cf931574fb1bbce9c1bb340df9e2aacc
'2012-01-14T14:16:15-05:00'
describe
'2584812' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKQ' 'sip-files00005.tif'
c65772204c50147ef04c36acbed467c3
6dece38737bd787780b6eb8526cc3a03b528bd18
'2012-01-14T14:13:42-05:00'
describe
'69' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKR' 'sip-files00005.txt'
a58926bb33c8eb601dfa08833521068e
e10c3e9bb507a09e7900507f49562d3f62b1cedc
'2012-01-14T14:16:32-05:00'
describe
'2013' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKS' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
11f1b55d22504120045cd16ed480292a
7c4132ec95c61b9d660ae6192d1fa60d2e925acd
'2012-01-14T14:16:33-05:00'
describe
'320986' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKT' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
e02eee95bfc0b6b3b72965e685b628d6
e9f141ed0132c3ae5c64e2e7de467b1ae86a01e2
'2012-01-14T14:16:54-05:00'
describe
'142633' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKU' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
7a29d412ca68b9997ed10e9f30e820b1
7dc24e6d01dfe994591f457a06620b3ffb1b7894
'2012-01-14T14:12:55-05:00'
describe
'2014' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKV' 'sip-files00008.pro'
90371eb92e4c1e752cd030dfbb256bb8
fc68752ec17f1b135e8c473c40418d005fe0941b
'2012-01-14T14:15:54-05:00'
describe
'36089' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKW' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
ae98887abef83cdc84599bb19267a70c
f54416de227d436749abdab2ff5303d5b1dcf771
'2012-01-14T14:14:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKX' 'sip-files00008.tif'
12d09e9fc1104bdd58aead176d79de41
7de291cbcc6927a0aa48e20f0f86fd77234cd246
'2012-01-14T14:13:04-05:00'
describe
'97' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKY' 'sip-files00008.txt'
ac5fe982790902e97c857ef1aa4c4b9e
b48c04df21ace2862029b1af90c63f9b8981c08b
'2012-01-14T14:16:59-05:00'
describe
'9188' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABKZ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
893b3344dad347fff97492e48f9fdf32
6646436ad912d36d9dfd8b52452d271497c9d867
'2012-01-14T14:13:53-05:00'
describe
'320998' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLA' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
a2d667dbfb50d7d96a5625b665267e82
133321b9e98cf3f2171ddcf7f6b941fc22c2d221
'2012-01-14T14:14:18-05:00'
describe
'68844' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLB' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
55c575cbbe566eda68d4d77681444078
2f00cf436597a7683a2d1c83bfe019ef7a5eb14f
'2012-01-14T14:16:50-05:00'
describe
'4578' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLC' 'sip-files00009.pro'
1afd448f48fb4ac53cac85f703c36222
04901e4951d1abd242720142e6789332bbf6df2f
'2012-01-14T14:13:40-05:00'
describe
'15904' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLD' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
19c51a8df79e9b46e1486774ea453e37
95b473bea02387823d40bce94780097bdd435933
'2012-01-14T14:18:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLE' 'sip-files00009.tif'
e92a02df9369afc6e9eca933e7ecb6e1
a160c5d02ea11170583b97781b3aaf7030bf7edd
'2012-01-14T14:17:42-05:00'
describe
'264' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLF' 'sip-files00009.txt'
879dcce5c72b6d1c30d40c9ccf1f5666
3751bcd4a497f35f6130716d233973c90142aa59
'2012-01-14T14:18:18-05:00'
describe
'4045' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLG' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
ad1ede360d711d1f45bdc94b907ca3cf
6d13af4cbdd3508d42c8d66f46ead50d7ffc611b
'2012-01-14T14:14:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLH' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
881b6006d16183dda4a07be65187c9c8
5a90973280f2065ec080a9d25ca951847054394e
'2012-01-14T14:13:17-05:00'
describe
'34773' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLI' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
36129369d265814b22110c44f1ec1cc3
a47dab9ab66945e995e171a80d41bb371c3d5633
describe
'3796' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLJ' 'sip-files00010.pro'
330a44a4d56c7c5af1debde2fd5fd267
fb9fab60c2bf784b8eddbdb94dfed3d84b59b0d4
'2012-01-14T14:14:10-05:00'
describe
'7862' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLK' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
a707166d66809ed860f900eefccbf036
3b67275947ef765deff9c928659a9950ba87f9e0
'2012-01-14T14:15:57-05:00'
describe
'2584808' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLL' 'sip-files00010.tif'
783a3b85550dcbe5c6875fdb5f022cc8
201c419e23e2c1bf26caa0e7fe23dd4cecee3936
'2012-01-14T14:15:07-05:00'
describe
'289' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLM' 'sip-files00010.txt'
46f54adb43cb6a79c9184a691b7bfdb9
df977b19c948a1c8f8883b0afdbf681f27a624d3
'2012-01-14T14:12:47-05:00'
describe
'1994' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLN' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
417da6366f629a6621dc7b66c15c87e3
f2fe0182797c085923575afce082bd87677748d7
'2012-01-14T14:16:03-05:00'
describe
'320888' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLO' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
b475f59ad9483f28ff95a4b1448de847
b3f33e9eeb513b05ebbbc6969de732be72d8eb71
'2012-01-14T14:12:46-05:00'
describe
'69090' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLP' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
dbb4003d2b7014d1478f22e2570e31a0
9e7e49e791ec89042ea5349e6b299ed146210d5b
'2012-01-14T14:17:05-05:00'
describe
'9045' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLQ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
64cb77c7fbd2ee0ed71bffaab9cd230d
d919ff91b804cc0e730c7e0e6a0f04ce4556dd76
'2012-01-14T14:13:47-05:00'
describe
'18156' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLR' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
13c5942f2f10808cc9cbb9bb43af5d3e
f89c22a90d06d7be66aedb8a7adfc3aa0fd9c4b1
'2012-01-14T14:12:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLS' 'sip-files00011.tif'
014b2323af33ce984c2fa03c5c9f8e51
1d1ce5aa3f4bf690a9dfc369da2d9fb0bcec245e
'2012-01-14T14:15:42-05:00'
describe
'482' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLT' 'sip-files00011.txt'
45ba9f9c0e26670ec8322f48e652e561
36e0052a7bf04db9b92b55d57103a052f1a402e4
'2012-01-14T14:16:47-05:00'
describe
'5234' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLU' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
9b03c5b276cc4126c567559b66f3d6b9
c07d36cad8ac7360522f5e8ba1e744cd71d6ac4b
'2012-01-14T14:16:13-05:00'
describe
'320978' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLV' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
fc21adb5c2c07c1bb97e2c33d7cb0e0c
5726da1b440f130cf29c29535d2706c891411672
describe
'62495' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLW' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
9bfb392c1b8c72987fc9644688afeaab
88be6b3f364e49afc22f5d3852bd96e4672bd234
'2012-01-14T14:17:59-05:00'
describe
'11463' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLX' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
2d38c80ce13bb6e5bb32658d4e2e7830
791cd82b64f4917e6679fdcfe8d0c433f6be0207
'2012-01-14T14:13:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLY' 'sip-files00012.tif'
a0e8828614ff3d8924f5cd8c7f92b8d6
58ff7c676661c37883e7e3145987f5be4fa4240a
'2012-01-14T14:13:12-05:00'
describe
'2372' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABLZ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
65e5a7d3899bde108face39a54c25827
6fa38e84ffe91985711fe370cfa9f4a00c657854
'2012-01-14T14:14:05-05:00'
describe
'320895' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMA' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
e35a261f90ce88050a19c3608a0a7162
9a791d51c5977d586e4a157856c6950db712b728
'2012-01-14T14:15:34-05:00'
describe
'102654' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMB' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
4d2ebd55bcd6fa0edffeac5ef7de0bf3
da19d8ee546b30e741e3d540ebceb02c790eceeb
'2012-01-14T14:14:40-05:00'
describe
'11135' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMC' 'sip-files00013.pro'
5440c9d423824aa299b7d08254e8ad85
bc19c17fbb9bcc1ae7633cbe831c36f5482551e8
describe
'26185' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMD' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
8edb2e1787ef6ff3605492fa1fcc1b08
17c2d6cafa4360128a862aa44c25756622fde2e5
'2012-01-14T14:16:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABME' 'sip-files00013.tif'
d7e94b252e25ec9cd634187a3ca00673
b697a203a20782248edd45109f24e0b6a17c4da8
'2012-01-14T14:17:15-05:00'
describe
'605' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMF' 'sip-files00013.txt'
ac01e147614284f8ccda97e732ff61c0
32d4b4ad07746c13bc89cf800204f9c8236402c4
'2012-01-14T14:13:33-05:00'
describe
'6569' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMG' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
2470784d772fe77ce5ab61d11847de37
951c45a037cb10b6ec2dc888cdbc542f15c945aa
'2012-01-14T14:13:29-05:00'
describe
'320887' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMH' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
db64489bd3f0f5720e043e01e6d6b423
0bbedbe4e2bc2f074a6e6c1e6aa10fcc50606ef7
'2012-01-14T14:15:22-05:00'
describe
'48266' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMI' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
d57c674e571441d31915d0075f85c616
fd1517df4f6319e4e7d905e77333b9eb21414d7a
'2012-01-14T14:15:46-05:00'
describe
'8787' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMJ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
fab13545ca5cdc0e59e7a012deb44a7d
1f24e9b75c967e4f646ffdd69c9e9014e0a0d769
'2012-01-14T14:13:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMK' 'sip-files00014.tif'
445a982979551577fb73bddef9e966ba
f665a0950901ff94062c41fa23e44ff7a1cc97c6
'2012-01-14T14:14:06-05:00'
describe
'1818' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABML' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
b2ce040bbe38f17c024780a9d0f387d5
d70adfd4a10005c7d858915612649fb1e432f59a
'2012-01-14T14:12:42-05:00'
describe
'320966' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMM' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
33644b229e4a5a71ace3169b3ec6289d
ffaf387a46303a44a0e50dd559105dbe1c34ac9a
'2012-01-14T14:16:19-05:00'
describe
'93881' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMN' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
fc1388f942aa560292c96de8be458453
36a026aa2df291a3220e53b1984ab27176eb3111
'2012-01-14T14:16:07-05:00'
describe
'16887' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMO' 'sip-files00015.pro'
c9b2bcb41f6511cef4cb8b0ef7a663ad
fde96ff42dffacc1e31f6770ce844bad2c240f8e
'2012-01-14T14:16:06-05:00'
describe
'26820' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMP' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
e6eb531ff6363555b82163ef9e648c23
1c4f943a4132ff9a333c753a9bca0487b7f6e4b8
'2012-01-14T14:16:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMQ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
7905c671104af83ffbbc338829fa5a4d
b13c081e01c836e1853a944e877e9957be462e61
'2012-01-14T14:12:34-05:00'
describe
'719' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMR' 'sip-files00015.txt'
06cc6deeca7cc5f3d69b85e5186733bd
d42b00cda6d90a76aba86db069fdbabe0308cfe1
'2012-01-14T14:17:06-05:00'
describe
'6561' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMS' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
5095983a83f44e91f4b476f67b598596
3b2fa07bda29034c4492348aef17dfcf25cc86ac
'2012-01-14T14:13:02-05:00'
describe
'320960' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMT' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
8f353a313f7967365f70740cb4e9eec1
cc220da069eb7695032c6dee2f1ec68468de3fec
'2012-01-14T14:17:46-05:00'
describe
'143612' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMU' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
7828cd66913a605393b9f7b2c92f4a0a
70b5f48e7d9ce3918a433812564815c257ba49cd
'2012-01-14T14:14:02-05:00'
describe
'31074' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMV' 'sip-files00016.pro'
b83057142dd0dc5c525ec91bef59c4b6
bf34776658417eda04f63b45c859217a109c2340
'2012-01-14T14:17:33-05:00'
describe
'42996' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMW' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
9468d806cbfa4dc7f6661b16f19445ac
afcfe353923ff86198324027f67e25bef3d82044
'2012-01-14T14:15:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMX' 'sip-files00016.tif'
396429448718db846ed0636d23f63e54
8202d74ad5ef65d674a2b22746616d65b2f5a24a
'2012-01-14T14:16:12-05:00'
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMY' 'sip-files00016.txt'
b96d86e8e03e431a8987ce6b0394a3cd
127c88af61827900b479a0845c974dda6d0a335b
'2012-01-14T14:17:17-05:00'
describe
'10312' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABMZ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
d4a6bfe1fd34d241e155f23ca7c816c1
1271750c349d4e4e6433109f3005aa124e54b652
'2012-01-14T14:17:45-05:00'
describe
'320922' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNA' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
8a2609c5c7b103b6c2680e232f159bcf
f9008f60b9e9096f32fdb5c5d5401c192b42aa99
'2012-01-14T14:13:57-05:00'
describe
'135239' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNB' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
9c1fc54f351860d44a79975944a54540
daec0a9a78e1fa141e87cdf3fba1309c0a37c138
describe
'30144' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNC' 'sip-files00017.pro'
224fc82010113b47f9f1a5315f94e57b
0c832b970de02cba4a22892cb903077d4f1d52bf
describe
'39129' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABND' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
bad13ec280fa22df569147497b439cc5
f5fe508ceb2a1abb32b454d3c7083d760a218865
'2012-01-14T14:15:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNE' 'sip-files00017.tif'
11f5fc0a9af44e450a7fdc43747e12f8
360c391be052c69d85ed1a91e80bc0560e5efc86
'2012-01-14T14:13:30-05:00'
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNF' 'sip-files00017.txt'
c732b277bb640ff5e1720e268e6e1a8f
f9fbf8d96ffed90c1977e66e375210798726f42f
'2012-01-14T14:16:34-05:00'
describe
'9886' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNG' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
5e2f3e756548f2f1a1919d948762caf7
82eccf9d78f85e580afa64c557d940406a2bf618
'2012-01-14T14:15:08-05:00'
describe
'320865' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNH' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
89f51249381acc99bd0534dd944b81cc
18c3ccaf346bc0d5c8df3c20bca25b03bb8cc699
'2012-01-14T14:17:16-05:00'
describe
'132670' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNI' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
3154532a604f896c65a603e96eb3006f
8c9d1c697b23e210da4ae4ca31943b39078eaadd
describe
'31848' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNJ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
1c598fb4fe5807649b43202ed98a63f6
002e2369069021206fdb02ae40d84c11276c1d4b
'2012-01-14T14:15:02-05:00'
describe
'38469' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNK' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
81afb5316b1386e0df316841768e4f35
65f6241513fb09edb04517a829161a65b5a7c802
'2012-01-14T14:14:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNL' 'sip-files00018.tif'
ee97d4e17c4da2a0978fd326d42ccf88
5b2f5b2fcdf29965c60c8452465f9ded9aa79699
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNM' 'sip-files00018.txt'
3fe268acdeea0595bd53523633de9ee2
7104705099aed2d91c8a29af5c3aee861b548ff2
'2012-01-14T14:18:12-05:00'
describe
'9413' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNN' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
dde6d6249c33d0532a9f4e57ab02a4f2
95906de22aab1ab0e21b2c180e8f674615792d52
'2012-01-14T14:17:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNO' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
becae415e22511cea57b259697ae582c
dbf8cbd4354551b789a1600ef49ead2c9c8b270b
'2012-01-14T14:15:30-05:00'
describe
'135091' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNP' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
778e0bf0d199af2e6d00f7205e33224b
ddcbd148e6b162f762b2e421e052202e505ba528
'2012-01-14T14:16:38-05:00'
describe
'30262' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNQ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
e924aefdce1a79d575c9382453faf34e
af219c9039ef9ecd6f8b0dc785e5fa2a42b9d85a
describe
'38943' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNR' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
2b12ca8aa486e77dc41c5d908d2f0ee9
a1b92b69f09ed5f329444b2cb6e35aa8fb12d6bc
'2012-01-14T14:16:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNS' 'sip-files00019.tif'
87e8288187dcc5f2d1d22f94a0e51396
41a338977c1a34a970dfac3117a8fa48ddbf3e5e
'2012-01-14T14:14:28-05:00'
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNT' 'sip-files00019.txt'
15a3ddc19bc6d5948f5190c9cfc54ffe
8067b684303e98c874f36aa82ff9890d566ab825
'2012-01-14T14:14:16-05:00'
describe
'9540' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNU' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
be0659ca18487a8e61ff2fc7d8f1f2e5
c46ece6c7eb95abe4cef4db8f4da425f404e0865
'2012-01-14T14:15:18-05:00'
describe
'320943' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNV' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
263765f524b631949aa21eb77de015a9
7a849936d23c73a31c35f85ded5c58a0db3388da
'2012-01-14T14:14:46-05:00'
describe
'141855' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNW' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
daebd918cb66a6e8c38a65fd7c694517
4c39e980ccb0dc36987978a88573158df6e411f4
'2012-01-14T14:17:24-05:00'
describe
'31311' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNX' 'sip-files00020.pro'
b071fb58b312e4d6bcdbfb36d26b73e4
d3e4de8925a94e00a53d3572d2deefb96993d338
'2012-01-14T14:17:55-05:00'
describe
'41288' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNY' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
8dcb398d8bb06294468cf5602635a013
123f29012b7c808972ecf0d4e5e0c7b60d06725a
'2012-01-14T14:15:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABNZ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
75127f615c41bbcab8886ac2ec22d9dd
c44c42c885f9ea2575f2433da684241f28f5649e
'2012-01-14T14:17:28-05:00'
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOA' 'sip-files00020.txt'
cda0a35446693a95f0196c1bea6f8ba1
183bfc6842fd37d3eec34a30aa05161263a340d8
'2012-01-14T14:14:55-05:00'
describe
'9984' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOB' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
76feb504ec0c7630fdac9da0c7502c68
65c2aa8d9d4dc94f39fcac9ed935671544e76f57
'2012-01-14T14:15:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOC' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
b916d52d177f7155f8fb7a3f85c75e85
4d482554de7ad4e3eab1a132286b905897e40a13
'2012-01-14T14:13:58-05:00'
describe
'122894' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOD' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
34b524e5749870360c62e6d6d0f1b28e
eb3ea7baa72d34204500421b6563a907b2967a5f
'2012-01-14T14:18:15-05:00'
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOE' 'sip-files00021.pro'
2886382b88448d8e88b6baebb32eb496
54599db2210d8b176b2a7852ad43c7157d555ce6
'2012-01-14T14:13:15-05:00'
describe
'30691' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOF' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
421ee8c997edc6df71dcca940a963b87
fb4d1343ec1efbbe153c0191f4bdbb8f08fb49be
'2012-01-14T14:12:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOG' 'sip-files00021.tif'
fea4e900736527a2d04e0cafd16f3bea
dfd4ac4b08afe984f7e8f5d828f1c2de7edc238a
'2012-01-14T14:17:12-05:00'
describe
'139' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOH' 'sip-files00021.txt'
ca43a5d26389b3602941a9e2dde60837
affce2ea05237363eabb387b9e6f7e12d276dc64
describe
'7835' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOI' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
d176172304b8a9b0b439a6f47dbcbc93
9d366247854571061c27b8a816580fe899cd69d7
'2012-01-14T14:13:50-05:00'
describe
'320789' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOJ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
013b30cf2f191b2773fa4ab893508155
649e79427f20f203964a6cd420dad154871491cd
'2012-01-14T14:13:10-05:00'
describe
'44569' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOK' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
e26acc6266c75cb3defa06a0c5480d0b
3dd606da954f6c3fdd1b613c16281ef8bdb49dfa
'2012-01-14T14:15:53-05:00'
describe
'8327' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOL' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
838afbd394eb89ada8b96ecac1252a46
4dd48a3451059a2ac1ad61509bdaae4dbd15da18
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOM' 'sip-files00022.tif'
dda0e6b8ad384fe68c8257639d8a2a1f
ce82a8c010c5a7ca35add2f0906ee094dee1ad04
'2012-01-14T14:14:50-05:00'
describe
'1833' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABON' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
6a209975054292e93f17649667ecdc0e
56af07612da3e5129ee5963831cfcccd421ef5d3
describe
'320802' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOO' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
d7204aca6bad1ef846fe820346123fcf
7b36b46544c92a0d4b53afc63f3f5371f7b4de11
'2012-01-14T14:17:22-05:00'
describe
'130415' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOP' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
f0dadb4636d879d943116dc78ba0d8bf
bc09ef8a8e71114dc5c3254bf6bce132f2af7019
'2012-01-14T14:16:46-05:00'
describe
'29413' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOQ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
39688e00bccc308e2547cf2500f57ecd
aee30c7cd4f32cf9cc5f443db57fa743a2661177
'2012-01-14T14:13:59-05:00'
describe
'38674' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOR' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
e229b5a794428851457aa58fe7d555e3
795a31865487cb9944e8fd01ee7ded25df541aaf
'2012-01-14T14:17:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOS' 'sip-files00023.tif'
51e41725ba7cf9bba4fbb358d4db762d
ce3c2b323975067be40515383e6f5efb6a95f089
'2012-01-14T14:15:04-05:00'
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOT' 'sip-files00023.txt'
8945811f51550577217cfb628745d1b0
99bb6c7061f01a1d76e332d311634c93fc8cdf6b
'2012-01-14T14:17:11-05:00'
describe
'9525' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOU' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
ebd0f4456ac172daa27f68f976e222a4
27a10c387e953dfc8ce091b92c069439230a406d
'2012-01-14T14:16:30-05:00'
describe
'320973' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOV' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
746814f6f031892111af21a8b19f66e8
7ea461b5bf0ecd3d52ccd5ab7ae96da51e427101
'2012-01-14T14:13:19-05:00'
describe
'135778' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOW' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
5e1628e23c1202852f0da04f57d3f3fd
9a3be9b117a30314b08a7aded1936938147bf3aa
describe
'30569' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOX' 'sip-files00024.pro'
c2f7e148a3c6e863c16394486189e6af
ca3f47dc05df8715bcd89c4fe02aa2529eb67f4c
'2012-01-14T14:15:58-05:00'
describe
'40070' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOY' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
0018d4cc83a1796b0323c51232fa4fda
8b3a9e8c906288040406647996d529615e230e8f
'2012-01-14T14:15:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABOZ' 'sip-files00024.tif'
2296f303b9fd74a33082e01e0abf60b7
a93f7281f7f2761270b61284fe28bc8e1516ec8b
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPA' 'sip-files00024.txt'
bf48f99946b079b25a69cf02520a39c5
ad61e74e9b23cbc771184ab469d57882c05afdc7
'2012-01-14T14:16:24-05:00'
describe
'9522' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPB' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
2af8e5b78d4e69b25fa90958bc92d074
4569761451419d40a6bb6fc26114b49c8823288b
'2012-01-14T14:17:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPC' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
aa435a13aa648ef34bc651997a0cd8e0
7f4ab47f8be176c3556a67aea5c7ab88eec641e9
'2012-01-14T14:15:24-05:00'
describe
'137765' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPD' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
4f7a765ed96d40568319e87741182afa
b897dfde301438147a03d83eda22d40375322e94
'2012-01-14T14:14:59-05:00'
describe
'29046' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPE' 'sip-files00025.pro'
8b13054b0de16973f0e5077e45d8f643
339ac2d1ed23b3df63019526d9cdf05186afa508
'2012-01-14T14:18:09-05:00'
describe
'38805' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPF' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
58d09b9ea98ef05f289b36ea16998ce4
a43e48297b848e35da9ecf0342bd3f7924f22201
'2012-01-14T14:12:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPG' 'sip-files00025.tif'
3d0b93dd94be492c0ca419989e6d5a40
d37ca283750cf89a063aedc5e47ef9087cdf5d99
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPH' 'sip-files00025.txt'
5794afe34c5177e117f8a562f6dbcf0d
cfcae668158321ad5e49dfec45fc9d64fd80c2e5
'2012-01-14T14:16:36-05:00'
describe
'9435' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPI' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
8e4266f9a6bd1a9e477bb3e5855ba476
b6763d85fd19fdcaf1b2cf7a2c3463a46a7de298
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPJ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
bd61e19af3e64baaeaf1f1f7878a55be
7e0e39131d94a832656072757bd573e75b412348
'2012-01-14T14:14:52-05:00'
describe
'127979' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPK' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
8a54f87d84a1277a0164035fef0d617f
f614367e619703474a8f8725aef313ffd243bccf
'2012-01-14T14:15:16-05:00'
describe
'29699' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPL' 'sip-files00026.pro'
641240eb40f3d49f4f5ed0e8f4b1bd26
f378be90d02f9980df0ec5e5817ab16b0a7923a0
'2012-01-14T14:14:34-05:00'
describe
'37465' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPM' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
a53bbebec7651d3d00a85a7fe16da5d0
6515cc7f68290df50ba7ff7f571e35fe2099cede
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPN' 'sip-files00026.tif'
52d31a1aaff93562eae898bb62db4614
ec7f0ae67c8b8f7ccb5cd3faf3f50e8b5af3ce78
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPO' 'sip-files00026.txt'
0d7c8492a2ba74202850a3052fefd5ed
627011ef389f1e039baafa3c02bd7b1da369de30
'2012-01-14T14:17:47-05:00'
describe
'9396' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPP' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
e5d0e9771e97fe1f2192b9d3e7fa9fd5
9bb0ddf5d6a0cfd5975e65957e34b8d94e765187
'2012-01-14T14:18:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPQ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
0e6a9adaad0dced3c8c55fa6f32aa815
851c438a1fffb8c1aad1f02748d1fb5994628b5f
'2012-01-14T14:14:43-05:00'
describe
'130348' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPR' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
7aa57a97a81645ccaf72865a2047ef1f
f1880174db468d10de079bb4806faa2a15bd18d5
'2012-01-14T14:17:56-05:00'
describe
'29570' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPS' 'sip-files00027.pro'
5078b7694a8d815ebf5bc8deeec00844
f6ef25e99e41e1d8bebc8d7a39562c9377ffdcf8
describe
'38822' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPT' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
c250820461a2e9dcad11b95a3f49fb3d
6845e2f7252c2ae5cb464de473390f881277f36f
'2012-01-14T14:14:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPU' 'sip-files00027.tif'
79e2f41fdf9da6d2d7d90e5eb9566c0f
223377e24347870e28102c3f23d745ff7dcd4e85
'2012-01-14T14:14:14-05:00'
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPV' 'sip-files00027.txt'
5f4ae1964fe34677734f1f56268db6ba
7c1a702544827e85c788d87ab7c715f7a0197d19
describe
'9694' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPW' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
ab54b2537ae352661f338a135c8c3ea6
65b4f69e9fecce6bb90bd7a7397eacbe7782b46b
'2012-01-14T14:14:08-05:00'
describe
'320901' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPX' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
1eeda796011dff773cef1177dbc3b24d
78f362f26ce868238352c7c74432b8554f682505
'2012-01-14T14:14:48-05:00'
describe
'128833' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPY' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
e443e205370cac99eb102fdcd65453f5
18b07bf8f90d0d76c24dea9d27b9d0885fd65b62
describe
'28497' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABPZ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
b7fd31adb66b4db7635af14d0c5d459d
e4ff203c9823009b8b89c6a426870f037515a125
'2012-01-14T14:12:49-05:00'
describe
'37278' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQA' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
99c62afa25e760dbc93c4eaddd57aaa8
26481cb88a6beed96f0db1a751d4a842327b0eeb
'2012-01-14T14:15:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQB' 'sip-files00028.tif'
bd139a8946a1c36a8f906dba2be5dbbb
a3c63d62c834ad4d715799e8a275ca8663290655
'2012-01-14T14:15:26-05:00'
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQC' 'sip-files00028.txt'
45f9667e79386ca745cce26a74320b4f
436a547f1abfbe67d498bfd63ab426e0705a8de5
'2012-01-14T14:12:54-05:00'
describe
'9466' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQD' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
9a8dc6a58cf4ea299546e04fa3615d65
33578692ac7f510a7fe902fdb3cf14281c24272f
describe
'320743' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQE' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
976e3a61b2e394335a1fd6921dd59558
94688d1b0d862cc576f032e7480b57a8c8f6a4fb
describe
'125710' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQF' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
30bcf024f65ecd7fb55a5c443cac9b25
fe1583e2a66310958bd4e9bb1ae798196a9f4b91
'2012-01-14T14:18:11-05:00'
describe
'28967' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQG' 'sip-files00029.pro'
2448974907b8b306305e9895a1efe39d
ddf9dcc3aaf84108ae370438159b675f6f50b4d7
'2012-01-14T14:15:40-05:00'
describe
'38349' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQH' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
8c3c2a04b4dd4b17c5c284c6bd1dff02
d8ad7715bbb2f9e32d0d9c14361784a2039cb811
'2012-01-14T14:13:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQI' 'sip-files00029.tif'
b1b4def829b2664e51a081c7eee45a3d
e47c6d9c731d49c12fbda5d6d4910c63f204cd6d
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQJ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
3579ec128a186d2727412b1c6880eb42
2f31eac0ddd507e2ff6991ad5cb02c2979b67e26
'2012-01-14T14:17:41-05:00'
describe
'9425' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQK' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
cd624d95c415ed65ee6415ba8d0e3b2a
caffe7482f8035adbd53b9fa3ff9894bfc67e5d3
'2012-01-14T14:12:40-05:00'
describe
'320927' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQL' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
0b469651fa9f25a31c9c164476207369
ce9d149913d3d7838819599a806e7c143ed3a284
'2012-01-14T14:15:33-05:00'
describe
'122995' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQM' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
61b3db5222de8e65f47fbd2447d8539a
39984ea25b50b86d2463d2a98a70ee106576ac9c
'2012-01-14T14:15:25-05:00'
describe
'28997' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQN' 'sip-files00030.pro'
6ff47e87b78af54e539fb2605d4c8cb6
50c1fdd9092aa96b16806a2e9b447a840b82a4bc
'2012-01-14T14:16:43-05:00'
describe
'36195' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQO' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
1d92bea16247e30bad3e89e71e6df382
ada9b3105254c66fbb48e1c13b7f56b57569065d
'2012-01-14T14:17:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQP' 'sip-files00030.tif'
23a399b65c386ce5a7c63b469e71a21f
c587b84fbbfd4dce8c2e0b695d960528a4fa5611
'2012-01-14T14:14:33-05:00'
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQQ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
fcf3dcb018b676a0f498c23515c76438
9d4dc8b30d682ce9182faa9312fb53f247916eb8
'2012-01-14T14:15:09-05:00'
describe
'9368' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQR' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
d1aaf6aaca0027ee42a4edaffd672ac7
9f16e8220e0eeefbfce50d5301e0ce6fa692d7ca
'2012-01-14T14:14:35-05:00'
describe
'320769' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQS' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
efb1bf035b360fa1e0c6d9bdf7dbff4d
bab94ec5b6c448bd4fcd781e2a467d190ae318bf
describe
'110325' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQT' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
838f0ed496629ddabfe0718e2e28395b
8d8b4b8568849083306225df0abbe5970fd27e58
'2012-01-14T14:14:11-05:00'
describe
'14452' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQU' 'sip-files00031.pro'
e71a71934e692b6a9616c363d6e3ea82
fa2f33d188fdd542a2b8a48eef3624bd59633887
'2012-01-14T14:16:28-05:00'
describe
'30454' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQV' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
a681a10dbd3c8589fd303cc9b6db2c7c
9f945b53858cd6b85259124ff7a9afe07bd515a4
'2012-01-14T14:14:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQW' 'sip-files00031.tif'
1768407f5012d6f60a5c328a314bc949
d325956f5787a4d73eec86cb070bb32699ea7a35
describe
'576' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQX' 'sip-files00031.txt'
9ab11911c663f7e5c6f1e34be1f6f756
b6ec7959944550fb70faa0695e454e06638e3f74
'2012-01-14T14:12:31-05:00'
describe
'8001' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQY' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
e65b58383e6ff133a452f0e1df57f9af
4d2d494c362206820ee8345ef849b285fc4d3851
'2012-01-14T14:13:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABQZ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
e1e93c122621ae9fbb10c45b320a3e75
fdf624b3160f9dc2fe7c809d4fe6b9f7b099aa6c
describe
'126739' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRA' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
8b95360e3d13b8a8b293c0e6dbe4e1e3
adac05ed47bfa57ea5258062cc8a28663e23e060
'2012-01-14T14:13:26-05:00'
describe
'27409' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRB' 'sip-files00032.pro'
7cf777cb2bb25adfea9313b2381ea5f9
05fb50084572309a67608e98beb7758b43277dc6
'2012-01-14T14:18:14-05:00'
describe
'36537' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRC' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
eac5ca2962d9864936f66da2b5fc1919
2bc29ef763c3534a8e1ca30843eb229a6b211004
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRD' 'sip-files00032.tif'
902a52b9704da1cc8f69916c1aafb0af
e2abf257df2164ec980fd7ef5d4fcabd28b4c96b
'2012-01-14T14:13:45-05:00'
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRE' 'sip-files00032.txt'
6ccc3fcebbc17086dc5a6ac6a609bc2e
81f904e7f76bd5d2f01a4f110da599a8aabbb26d
'2012-01-14T14:15:52-05:00'
describe
'9597' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRF' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
66ab39447e9e34269d9a939821ef05bb
fcd6f52fb9c9cad033ef4b3c715b2aa2455b1842
describe
'320831' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRG' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
6de3c0edd348f0d45f753a29342721df
f4c43a30d097030d224003ba95e6965a69b29c7f
describe
'132277' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRH' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
5f7f42eb4cc43624473740428c0d0602
9a21018173d559a922641b1e510b599759c59809
describe
'30886' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRI' 'sip-files00033.pro'
ecf164dba2d4460fb1ea8088e5751705
bbbff64620e0b2425486b7b1632534e369ac6281
'2012-01-14T14:16:40-05:00'
describe
'39710' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRJ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
962d1b679f39919a1894413f6d207bbe
74db93b3cd7e1f06bfc337825acab98edf5c7b31
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRK' 'sip-files00033.tif'
ff765cf1ea96ba91dca3685784fde6ca
cc6bf1d2e1b68dafb8c7fe609ce046f7975fbc93
'2012-01-14T14:17:35-05:00'
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRL' 'sip-files00033.txt'
55e4b120776f8e3603dc2d51116a0e80
59d4edcb935399a7e7de43006d79cb825be22bb6
'2012-01-14T14:14:57-05:00'
describe
'9582' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRM' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
97710df1dee06d19617daf69ad9d662b
9888455fb423de87a5ff4331fb52aff042defa62
describe
'320773' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRN' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
e278b7f55fc7291a7460f39a41ad48ce
0d22b6f06ffc00846e0a34fcb1a977514daf2f11
'2012-01-14T14:16:44-05:00'
describe
'73198' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRO' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
0979ff912508927e6ce05e49a2c56cea
06600a0ae21d5ee872e6af5595563b30a81bc826
describe
'11493' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRP' 'sip-files00034.pro'
6ba40434e74f2bfd2f2675b8248c7f6e
0ac85816267bac1a972299d19927e21d34c45351
describe
'19350' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRQ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
e222be54eec765bb7e1fb52a05cfd16d
9660628a5f398ea0fbcbadf9791cb6513409741d
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRR' 'sip-files00034.tif'
10f45b341ec28837f583ece6aae6191f
a33e1e7b4050beee0c3532d11c3fe39a72a7a34b
describe
'465' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRS' 'sip-files00034.txt'
2eecf4d79a71e1b5d04306789cc8383e
70520d2019ed765eb24d534205866553982083be
'2012-01-14T14:16:51-05:00'
describe
'5036' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRT' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
f0a8d957585805ed79b009806b249aaa
bf46240c3516abe30c6cc7a93f287b7fd8236bf9
'2012-01-14T14:14:49-05:00'
describe
'320811' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRU' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
17a3eba42ff68c749ee95a404ae1c9d7
b9ee98ad927dec1b6a5f326b105e3e2a45d48ca4
describe
'98778' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRV' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
3971426c4620270087754336aea0ec8c
67394ced9d9827a0f4710e6779cec23c666b4b28
'2012-01-14T14:14:24-05:00'
describe
'21893' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRW' 'sip-files00035.pro'
2307f7ad57f4ed9d2a1f16f05a4d5ef5
e56395b3ff2d94e016a7e2924729142ffa0f2ae9
'2012-01-14T14:14:37-05:00'
describe
'28788' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRX' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
297ca3d60c5e294dcd4f2c1ba5d5449c
4f5b9a9a1b5c4f27d900646dd6d8a43255657f50
'2012-01-14T14:13:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRY' 'sip-files00035.tif'
5b32ad9f20e89ef1784d1baf813940c1
6b962a6ca016e23dcbad8f617b062b1181d97893
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABRZ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
86c1c00f0f88e62d5a203b2566bb6cc4
32b9aad54740b181ad3a4b1446d605315a21d5ae
describe
'7186' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSA' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
2d1ed7e0db25114e2b4bd21beeada5d4
2e69327865f848b7761b4039013b2aeefc80bcec
describe
'320953' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSB' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
3f88cda7a42c16d573b975f0e3549c17
928da7c3a88a5ce8b9ec61f049af9f486eeaa79b
'2012-01-14T14:17:00-05:00'
describe
'128416' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSC' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
e7e88d62cadc7b61917df0c8c909b63a
27c569794ab801aca11dd38ba50471cdd813462e
describe
'28512' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSD' 'sip-files00036.pro'
33af39940b958c150d32def97cd01e32
23ffb93c820572898daa6cb6749e9de2944e9735
describe
'37556' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSE' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
3b490cb29881b617059b3913c9dcee26
f81d52238104d5373a7ab5ecf470c2f6ddc12f90
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSF' 'sip-files00036.tif'
9ae94e7b4ad618337b3c8d6ea0342962
99f168487040c7333b857e3318a55ab8de267924
'2012-01-14T14:17:14-05:00'
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSG' 'sip-files00036.txt'
31da34eeda9c3afb911add505ddc2dfe
608e54a3e820c13872171c33c1c8149c56226d6f
'2012-01-14T14:12:48-05:00'
describe
'9081' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSH' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
b9dab6fe04f64ada5ad9853ac2ca1ebc
653c49d33958f7e3b2caea7c6fd06d06d9c3b41c
describe
'320837' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSI' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
e0843c549c123839bae0db60fc68a22a
6aa68e19e70eda515993c6e8222ffce6a8572cd2
describe
'124594' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSJ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
f774ae943291c6960ea7fb864bb08ed8
28c51abc12ddef741c59fff6f6a35b4693091647
describe
'28676' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSK' 'sip-files00037.pro'
a0f65ba397254fabea39ad3b5543f262
7c4ce7a6853c351ee58c006af562102e07430ac1
describe
'37177' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSL' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
8ba2ea2880a3180affc72d092d06adb6
363e8cbcb584f28f435a3e1c7c4e62f18e3cdbdf
'2012-01-14T14:12:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSM' 'sip-files00037.tif'
1e866c1a30e5a02eb9eaa51dcd475d40
89ae1703905ea03454f2585c54a5426046646029
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSN' 'sip-files00037.txt'
586ea9f4f3e45151685476799247cea0
083cb13dd34d9ed5050e62feefea994e83fc1128
'2012-01-14T14:16:55-05:00'
describe
'9300' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSO' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
87ad18bba2ab2810555ddf78b09a471d
db3062df094a41abafb60c43a31e079b11c49ebe
'2012-01-14T14:14:42-05:00'
describe
'320985' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSP' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
763718e9997161c5d1ee217fb8d8af9d
72ef2de757ddfd0f25eb32fccff03c6da170e6cf
'2012-01-14T14:17:43-05:00'
describe
'107660' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSQ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
82528cc3c930b42ac010e436f79048b8
d096a29ab9783c04993b0e0af6d9a2529dc509d8
'2012-01-14T14:13:25-05:00'
describe
'26089' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSR' 'sip-files00038.pro'
9e58e623f19866367868856fe25837de
3e75c2bc27d749dad526439f893942642febeb83
'2012-01-14T14:15:13-05:00'
describe
'33692' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSS' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
2525571b69b4bf40728918ebcf022a5b
b3dc7c2350a2b5cbc7dd4367e8cd7e1701c2aec9
'2012-01-14T14:14:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABST' 'sip-files00038.tif'
70f82fab7075feeee3fad7cf348f188d
2a49cb64b5cff5ee35938cd3110330c52d23bbb9
'2012-01-14T14:14:15-05:00'
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSU' 'sip-files00038.txt'
3a2a0868a32dead4187a66b84b740bbd
56584a87476a11e5f88c4e8cc1c911d271920e8a
'2012-01-14T14:16:49-05:00'
describe
'8791' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSV' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
7957ea03d434c4da3c5ae5c3b357a464
f21e51b70b19e364085c39ae1161f77cef067c7a
'2012-01-14T14:16:45-05:00'
describe
'320974' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSW' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
f5d3027ece042b870fb7776348253e13
b6276aa68a2b8a8d82c78fc81c19a827515f2620
describe
'113142' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSX' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
88288255520d5595c49669f092c5bc41
8fd34e3a85dfe536d67475d1111267df618c68a6
'2012-01-14T14:13:28-05:00'
describe
'27869' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSY' 'sip-files00039.pro'
9a443a5b7a0fc6284393e95d9df0ba23
2a6a2775e0f638fb5f3022a0428abb1dba46a32e
describe
'35696' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABSZ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
c91465483fd420ce8e9117ab21f6ec66
e593ba1e194e82da1573142d6415cb845a4c37c5
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTA' 'sip-files00039.tif'
28b59f004de2ed22474e0bc18e8b7f0b
881203dfd3ab79f3915f0b12884fa649e3f8da00
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTB' 'sip-files00039.txt'
618c90c409dc97f99cac023efeb476c8
c211fe133abd4b58b8d1e6bb97f578ef01d4aaba
'2012-01-14T14:12:33-05:00'
describe
'9097' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTC' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
5922205d4749bf6a447514308bc7ba7c
e91d18feb062c183a1598bf0c12f0ad48047461a
describe
'320902' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTD' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
94548cafca27cffe086a514a0a3ae60d
308004f381960470b8dcda53c3054920d481e14c
'2012-01-14T14:17:52-05:00'
describe
'124779' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTE' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
3f62b9d2bf94e4cc1c836570519db068
35c7658079cdd154582d705596800b2c9cb2f3ec
'2012-01-14T14:16:52-05:00'
describe
'29848' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTF' 'sip-files00040.pro'
6625064729bf7994f36d3fff4e789300
519ce5f4f863b0450a41e9b380e3a5473ce4c3d1
describe
'35914' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTG' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
19cb99c4f476a72d6bd691af2a0d4f22
ee3a70d70ce1c8dc7bf6ed1c981efad99aa20cf4
'2012-01-14T14:15:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTH' 'sip-files00040.tif'
3f65608086e8bf93d758c6aa39ba65d8
6f15e9230dbdcb6fbc4a0fee5d673a7669f65d49
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTI' 'sip-files00040.txt'
e74a86a04887f6ce62bce72c013e817d
65865dedcb9378dc68da17d1f7e38916d0c8be94
'2012-01-14T14:14:30-05:00'
describe
'8855' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTJ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
7c8471b2a7a2315382f93c97ccbf3530
24cdfba00329736d3bdc09c8c2e73c695213db9c
describe
'320981' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTK' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
70b3eaba6823f0b0e501c7727282cdb1
75d7ae8185ba2970c2059753d25b121b87518f61
describe
'122611' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTL' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
2823152f793d1b4437f736dfef1a4c23
36f0cac4fb062bafba2ce3b1b919942b35a11cfa
'2012-01-14T14:12:53-05:00'
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTM' 'sip-files00041.pro'
3b1688574d0be25099bf9af717688401
ddd8007ace024ba9cae123489e5417f3c0bddc0f
describe
'31373' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTN' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
bce4946a6fb4f3b1dc89f399c9c43a0b
b1c2cf714e70efcaa9769afcb94178ffbe8e966f
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTO' 'sip-files00041.tif'
476249fced0fbf8e2218e4d9508bc4d0
efc19e30ac2f9dc07b995f7eb50bca02827162ea
describe
'133' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTP' 'sip-files00041.txt'
75ac7143d0f99fc96d4eafd15c4f7f62
ad516e25949496c63456a009f044c767cbdda2d6
describe
'8010' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTQ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
b8afebf0567bf8662d82c6ba85283f3a
c222a84278096067e67fe70fa10b6eef92cce5b6
'2012-01-14T14:16:10-05:00'
describe
'320803' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTR' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
ebcd3451b71e96ca675e13873ec20bf0
5ef8a536b44cac759cfbf56610e544c0f8c6a3e3
describe
'34534' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTS' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
0581c674bc1419bb2ccb4644420d42d4
a5bc19f95819b62878825f0fac45abf3280625c1
describe
'6639' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTT' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
390fa75a3b27a6dc933b38a8889e0516
b6acacd8612a3bf865fffcdc6d05aff15920775e
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTU' 'sip-files00042.tif'
0492caa89e94152aa3fe16b426743e9f
bae5539fc5754a5813a4ccf029c636ec6443b16f
describe
'1597' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTV' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
c1ce6ad16ba346857d0f448c38dc59d9
dc9ed87f54002dca383b398de2b3c38ab915c4ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTW' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
11e9f12a4b87cc9f23bb3f7c5f9a1387
084c2fabe76299b1b81e3e33e23ff2f6fbccb715
'2012-01-14T14:12:39-05:00'
describe
'120756' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTX' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
4f9c7a796aaf9d2d11c9b6d2dcdf64c0
6af36151bc9c454a43533c07beb9b335a531af0d
'2012-01-14T14:15:10-05:00'
describe
'30350' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTY' 'sip-files00043.pro'
d67c7e7538b952a849d36cdb14559ba0
d2adf4e730b46046e88009780b72996293c91b47
'2012-01-14T14:15:47-05:00'
describe
'37920' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABTZ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
58d65c95acae5f36fd80957b87713dc7
71c7d1355a239b9437251da9adc576c63796e497
'2012-01-14T14:16:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUA' 'sip-files00043.tif'
65cf4b6af66bdf6d5f07a14d0d8cfe93
52e5a41d680247569ec93bef32e3a7926a967207
'2012-01-14T14:12:57-05:00'
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUB' 'sip-files00043.txt'
4b9c9b70f1f46bb494b5e5d9a1fe1d90
cbb417788fb59723fed002d27824bb5c8744689e
describe
'9011' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUC' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
8c1ee691caf8648cc9bcd1b331c0229c
da413dc3c5fe19f1d511b5d177938755879a6d8f
'2012-01-14T14:13:56-05:00'
describe
'320963' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUD' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
a1f45e51e2b89647c204da87c99385d3
b7b388712c308138ef44265d326a354aea1e67df
describe
'123422' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUE' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
7517c5bba88fa2f7ae8e846e353cd510
82fae687921e0f0a72f6f02c704e4cd614330d62
'2012-01-14T14:16:26-05:00'
describe
'28744' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUF' 'sip-files00044.pro'
aa7d8ca2b17302c750688a657fc1db7c
134258d2a4e63f78e17dcb000b9abf2bebc0eecb
describe
'37810' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUG' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
0b8db0990b631370c2a40e4d38bb12bc
9e0f0a4252d20d72c7cb5c2b0cfa727538b78469
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUH' 'sip-files00044.tif'
c90e240f4badbdcacf03d556ae7e52bf
3ac8bf4dee77fc04ec1f3c09421db0813a7f07fa
'2012-01-14T14:15:56-05:00'
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUI' 'sip-files00044.txt'
2bf577d19ae202b00c56bf1d35c89bfd
e40aeed8b9611ab4e952bf6209f46458693c36f1
describe
'9446' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUJ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
2616a1a35ac2ef355dab15da0e14e5ae
ad4d06084901e22b8aaeb8e862770bbfed318dbd
'2012-01-14T14:13:38-05:00'
describe
'320979' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUK' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
befae3eb4ebe769a06d882cf290c0dbd
ca1ac3dd2210262bd4c5cfc7a1c67701d5089244
'2012-01-14T14:16:02-05:00'
describe
'123433' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUL' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
d9261e3db470f4605603aaf4aad5edbf
5329b46560c8a15bb1dd49f3a865ed34f97f8ede
'2012-01-14T14:12:59-05:00'
describe
'29175' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUM' 'sip-files00045.pro'
cb7c6568194dbdf9247eb9b409c52d55
90d826215a3f079b65dda70c0e0680712e69cd05
'2012-01-14T14:15:59-05:00'
describe
'37707' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUN' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
8b6290e16ddd124c2fded30ea0ad1d48
83688bf368bfcfdcfd981975f4e1a7a2a8025d52
'2012-01-14T14:15:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUO' 'sip-files00045.tif'
591f6ebb88fedef283960ce63f1cffb8
fb1de260e84e00b418aab8a8995af2828749e3ae
'2012-01-14T14:14:20-05:00'
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUP' 'sip-files00045.txt'
e974168376d9b14ffb07aeda7960c3dd
fe21888f671dfe31981bc2e0320c94baab1ef440
'2012-01-14T14:13:07-05:00'
describe
'9301' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUQ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
9b1ac9192033cce2940d531ac90322f8
7a48a6a57a4508ec857f7bc29a912abb83dc1861
'2012-01-14T14:12:50-05:00'
describe
'320977' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUR' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
981604969323075850e53d8090750e85
719789e2ce4a0daada5147848a27c797b0eb6a8a
describe
'121396' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUS' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
06c2bb2732179392bfb16a21bcdbf87b
3fa9ac6081214bc53ad20097506bb16c402e3c82
describe
'31696' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUT' 'sip-files00046.pro'
3a969e3e57f0f88f9b489d0628d1f4e5
074125f6b94f92eb708846ec256dcd6ccec7e567
'2012-01-14T14:17:40-05:00'
describe
'37147' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUU' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
dff803cd389c4f8155d41f2ed3ca6035
782e248bb0f857dabe55ca5f13a2aa14eb4a094c
'2012-01-14T14:15:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUV' 'sip-files00046.tif'
e54c30d13be19323ad03341ba1eb9d4a
ada8649b8c9a96dc43dc2e0405df88b39e985c04
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUW' 'sip-files00046.txt'
d5dd10d83c0697777556b7f872a17306
5976d6fe56f88e97067ea11c208f57af8baf1a33
describe
'9366' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUX' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
37f7e31d51390e185ecc523f7263afb3
cca30898faa1426b816634be2f206d6abb3d8d3d
describe
'320944' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUY' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
acaf84b8cd35b9c620ccb6b4f5efd98b
f042c42bb708dd00d7f2dcbe42f8c1ec29639d33
'2012-01-14T14:17:57-05:00'
describe
'115753' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABUZ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
a21a22f70eda0ebf365df743e2508f9c
774e755783768996ad891960fb96d1aafc333830
describe
'29578' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVA' 'sip-files00047.pro'
2e7755ba25333492accf72a46c1430e8
f33a8d9acf9c82fc4aa90cfc09ac2ed10798e8fe
describe
'34971' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVB' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
eac934d1e514b6ed8136ae2256009a1d
3cceb940c9aabc5ee38b615cc51ab0011f654008
'2012-01-14T14:15:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVC' 'sip-files00047.tif'
b2d18464d8ba1bd08a156ddf3c73c91c
1c3a304ad8370175e7d6f034890f6961776ab422
'2012-01-14T14:16:16-05:00'
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVD' 'sip-files00047.txt'
be453f1ff1994c20ed6ec39b0392411e
eddc4bc0d529d4d9b0f1d8794b0f8b2ee576622d
'2012-01-14T14:13:01-05:00'
describe
'8947' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVE' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
6cb0474263559a1100f42e08708a4348
395fe340979325da20de79b9631e6bb8ce862d9c
'2012-01-14T14:14:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVF' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
cabd80e4d69ab1a2642a22d34d900ffa
57c9d621d59d0e932535a0fc6aa3d33fd39073b9
'2012-01-14T14:14:36-05:00'
describe
'121662' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVG' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
39535c33147f660f9107ad059524ef4f
892862469c723054c6ccecbff76d8dd2948941eb
describe
'29349' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVH' 'sip-files00048.pro'
e3f54cc4b33282e65d362fa35a6d2f3e
89d1e619d8b45ded2dc78e1b3974990020b77f46
describe
'36114' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVI' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
3987e3a361571c249724c83c63438e6d
83727f73d86ae9dba0325a25b3287494e451fe35
'2012-01-14T14:16:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVJ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
3b815318b59bf42a9171a4f90f8696cf
ef45f1c6aafe0e600692d88b531d5790e3baed8f
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVK' 'sip-files00048.txt'
b13156d2724da47979a6d46455a61406
212037437430662606696a886da982ea3a5f465c
describe
'9344' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVL' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
6d5a2f09b9b302136e7f12c959b0d7b4
1e6b15611345f9618208cef590b7b84509ddd026
'2012-01-14T14:13:06-05:00'
describe
'320914' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVM' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
970dee58634a3de09a111b59b590e33b
9d93ced311bd4dbad8bde56ce89877cbbf7996e6
'2012-01-14T14:15:28-05:00'
describe
'116318' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVN' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
45cce5559c0fdee69f35f1a019989c7a
5a6e4a2c004c4746a3c8da5c906c84d0b1aaed9c
'2012-01-14T14:13:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVO' 'sip-files00049.pro'
52b79f7aa8da69d28ab97c7c6c4d05c8
2921ef22419f743b702b48934046ab6a06e4fa89
describe
'37956' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVP' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
0a250a8667b479223b7f6f133cc8df80
8a71ccd016d61779c28835440a5919d6e3265180
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVQ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
1c42c7ed725419538589e529faff85e2
cd3d987d2c99cba66fae6ef64578d0e6becf223a
'2012-01-14T14:12:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVR' 'sip-files00049.txt'
3f465ed5b7f7c833e7fe2ba599362b7a
d67880a3e929422afe5e17a6f1c920371f873b7f
'2012-01-14T14:17:26-05:00'
describe
'9138' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVS' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
bee2da1ee12022e1dd8b62f7b027abae
11ce9b1ab0477e638b330483e7a7137d6a1ac2af
describe
'320993' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVT' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
77dcba53491d77b4c11a8076c30fdf81
969f4310c034bef90a44b662633b6591b3d204d7
describe
'120581' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVU' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
f7263933586a7d6005ebfc47c854856c
c72d2f7c66a27b1bacb840f08cd875a36752b5b7
describe
'30487' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVV' 'sip-files00050.pro'
07fad245dd0c03c20246d49a3175b607
8bc390d445087dc0023f8c0f9769c05aee16e693
describe
'37316' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVW' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
f23c48d7250eb9f58eba0890e343e193
d8041b63c524922f60d693ed27fdea1c81b584a0
'2012-01-14T14:15:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVX' 'sip-files00050.tif'
e9a7478322d520ba385a304584f9c79d
bbbd7dae6e282e274cfae6f852f86a9ebbbe0f28
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVY' 'sip-files00050.txt'
ea0e47190a7eb1893169459cf654ae8e
9162979c18551d9f83cfdcb0bf2cedebd4e46977
'2012-01-14T14:16:56-05:00'
describe
'9449' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABVZ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
b274947f3eda051486b93eff006411cf
ec16c9f88d20570e9bd529f1649b320edc5ed259
describe
'320964' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWA' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
22d487596a1f6803536a5f465ca4036c
b15c08696e533584e9290a282cc50fb8ed92f994
'2012-01-14T14:12:56-05:00'
describe
'112314' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWB' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
75857bc7655243092e466361964e7cd2
5d61c0cac8a44b00824d0b6ca6affd858fff90ca
describe
'29365' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWC' 'sip-files00051.pro'
228d0d977fb9a1028f0b92fc2bc39a03
b7c5da0ead458e3098f7ab1b6d253abaa1957465
'2012-01-14T14:15:45-05:00'
describe
'37245' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWD' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
6330f06ab7e5ae7db9a5715bd4de94e0
35e34e0104fa1fa5e71ec2a3ee9d6dc7333d2bc6
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWE' 'sip-files00051.tif'
7581e0ae7f2fff5c862ee6a71c6d4ce3
9e8230f3450473e761d6ecf2c3efabcd16f50df8
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWF' 'sip-files00051.txt'
4b899bac6ca170a84adb5f81384ec7a2
c6f06b63d71ffb3cc48b5db241656c8dff51101b
'2012-01-14T14:18:17-05:00'
describe
'9265' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWG' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
701e62c2ce0811b5e4fa75c9700dcea1
908cf90173e50972286617dd076fbdc66b303f3c
'2012-01-14T14:18:00-05:00'
describe
'320996' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWH' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
ab0d4a7116a588ed103e06804af3d41a
0c8906d295ae3e4d5c46fcb2bb89608e7cbffd39
'2012-01-14T14:15:37-05:00'
describe
'118017' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWI' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
5ac1162dbe8e1baf52bce20a73142b3d
25ff0738aa6019205bd008cd3abab6eb490a74ee
describe
'28786' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWJ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
25d70ce001a1e6f3e12757af0b56fce8
475b987f3aa5b1380c28454b3343825033a5e21f
'2012-01-14T14:15:39-05:00'
describe
'37803' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWK' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
2fd1c1e25e0c2ad8fc0ce463c238d030
ad5a7562a988294a67efa0c0032870cbe3a992b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWL' 'sip-files00052.tif'
dd930786d58b3789cabda3e9f1cad964
38e5b6e8cf6214c1ef9f32962d1dc385b4c54c6a
'2012-01-14T14:14:13-05:00'
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWM' 'sip-files00052.txt'
fa0aee8366f3eaeb5810761f4a2dd544
a734d3b93db6faf8e38dc02bf30ee269d61f22bd
describe
'9235' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWN' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
a217b0061f13ae5959889451b490445f
09762d777deba4582036462fa8e691eff96684fa
describe
'320984' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWO' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
16ea2e7ffb942e2bf762a840fea2ece3
ea5bec2fb9cc0129182435971fed7e76bf019221
'2012-01-14T14:16:11-05:00'
describe
'94002' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWP' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
c3528e1e468d03140946ff2b19514ecc
1d707219008ae27177bff8381b93431448ce65e7
describe
'23025' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWQ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
65f987ff09f3ecf7c44520d7d4e3f905
0aa6f76e58d298989d7ea4270f372f4e244fcbb3
'2012-01-14T14:16:23-05:00'
describe
'29672' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWR' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
ed2dedfdbcecd9606b1c42ee489f3188
7e40b1027fc410da5cc99128d5f174433403d591
'2012-01-14T14:13:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWS' 'sip-files00053.tif'
afc80e4a5adc8516f6694735bc9a4811
7d73076bf2d06bba6a2610aa3e2ec5361bef604f
'2012-01-14T14:16:09-05:00'
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWT' 'sip-files00053.txt'
7074a0dc103dedeeacde7c9411aca52f
4eadfeb701fe993d4f5a10673bb8d2122504e14c
describe
'7519' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWU' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
69e7df4b9c2615c8e12609f2d336ad30
8e06838fe0c9b865e8f14ce677c0dc51d73a7ee4
'2012-01-14T14:14:09-05:00'
describe
'320896' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWV' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
ff7cb9f0aa9a2a04f1fb268ffe05b5ce
384e88a645de73d7f05c35ab11b03c40f4971924
'2012-01-14T14:14:29-05:00'
describe
'99835' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWW' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
285f2c8460a6ddab503d461d94b50ced
5e6c1c7ce14f352c3aca2e12a78c79c805073aee
'2012-01-14T14:17:04-05:00'
describe
'21190' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWX' 'sip-files00054.pro'
3cbf34c8422e442a774252b95b068629
d214febc243b607a72a61ee1052d60dced97184f
'2012-01-14T14:15:03-05:00'
describe
'29293' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWY' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
f0cbba197863711b5cdd38f1400c49da
8faf901d120868ac748bb4978c60789f9053c0d4
'2012-01-14T14:15:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABWZ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
3c7fdee1f9c3c9506fbb286312c47d04
a2104221c8b155aea58590efc9b92f5eb1afffd1
describe
'893' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXA' 'sip-files00054.txt'
2b4791636521db2e6f07f920b9f3e8f8
73fd299a7b6db4fd90cb544f355e70caf48c4e0b
describe
'7434' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXB' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
56d52c7ae2df971eb1619c5afada9fc2
a63841a38ac79897dc7b40cb5bb4af0685a29920
describe
'320949' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXC' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
9db4bdade07122283ff31d1c1d38c310
b45fa2013e8fea2b19748d21a61875f15b76a069
'2012-01-14T14:18:10-05:00'
describe
'119019' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXD' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
a271ee050875e42cdd6528c22656bcee
eb8e1d38def3733dddc4a1683e4d7cf2c9813b07
'2012-01-14T14:17:38-05:00'
describe
'28508' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXE' 'sip-files00055.pro'
8f05cc8d46a3df9e10f53fe0bfe0d6cc
116bfeebd81ce4e6ac1d8da8c95991922f4e78b0
describe
'37893' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXF' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
81bd22f93000d251197c644e32c3cf1c
eae5c7c04b18c2048b2845e80eac3e9dc501b5d7
'2012-01-14T14:14:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXG' 'sip-files00055.tif'
b0395f69ae4643eae909dac57532119e
1f6a71a2ba7610efd8078eae3a5c1a4b5c8819c3
'2012-01-14T14:13:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXH' 'sip-files00055.txt'
6f597f109c16301f921c5e739d985c0f
9326400f88cd705e5dd21da78cda2f46e21de3b6
'2012-01-14T14:14:45-05:00'
describe
'9310' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXI' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
773a7263b3f791b0b200fb4f8c338a2a
fdc451b1c31fbe2854b628116f5c94c6f559cc17
'2012-01-14T14:15:14-05:00'
describe
'320969' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXJ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
ec87399e832c3ead70f3b2d68610524f
27909b095d53471f3a460c2ae4ee12c1b4bc95aa
'2012-01-14T14:14:53-05:00'
describe
'100419' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXK' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
c4cb065efd8a61c86d993f903db73d5f
0cd8757195a31e7d24e24fe081ed43b33f4c3453
'2012-01-14T14:17:21-05:00'
describe
'11357' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXL' 'sip-files00056.pro'
dedcb586a52670e703daaa5f8904e395
c10611d4d17143a437cdf6951e99b2aa38aad6f0
describe
'29479' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXM' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
f1731083f93ec282f7e785bdae53fe84
b869398deb27026568d76890dc2e251f7ab9adb5
'2012-01-14T14:12:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXN' 'sip-files00056.tif'
4417c8b3fe3d36e0441321c945383b89
1c8f62144e67a5c97058b5ac72070b5768499552
describe
'457' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXO' 'sip-files00056.txt'
aeadfc560ff38c9f67a17f62f1d0fb82
4e0cf481a4c640e269888aa462be3b96d7b322cf
describe
'7704' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXP' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
b338543014e9327bd6e17c7a14eefada
432f073c0defe805028076be0aea777b026687b3
'2012-01-14T14:16:14-05:00'
describe
'320988' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXQ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
e8fb2ca91723acb1fa2a5d5a0117b20d
5ace694b57de7dd71f3f96f8ac4819c01238cd03
describe
'117965' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXR' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
20d089d6bef90c997aac1295df87e518
30e2869bfc16c6ba2ce2d77ecbb12e28c1eb3cd8
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXS' 'sip-files00057.pro'
731636b9cc80d330ac370add192a3ab8
c01f0b42114604517cc779d7f0bded70c5d131df
describe
'36797' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXT' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
f770c51afb75a8c74efeb47e07eea34c
8200e82c1dda0773cfe375d192ec12642c1e8c31
'2012-01-14T14:17:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXU' 'sip-files00057.tif'
066e674bbd055b1aafa1c82612a80fdb
7e606676d5e18e0e21177eebfefefd1c27ccc515
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXV' 'sip-files00057.txt'
575ff608d5d993a78d835493a14d47d1
3000af26497ac5256bbc9a665cb62c1133daf0d2
describe
'9126' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXW' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
77a7c1c9df81b63c9f5ce4db5157a577
d1578c317aeec3c225deca1904d7f3d0ca27a1b1
describe
'320983' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXX' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
f02e3bbebdffbf65677042dd0ce018a4
9b16fc3aefecd1f90db0be61f57292b550841473
'2012-01-14T14:14:31-05:00'
describe
'119754' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXY' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
9b1f2fca6206d65a5ddbb0309ddc49ac
2d791766727fc70a140f89e5efd3185352a694d3
describe
'29734' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABXZ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
04480d128c3352d81d5d405ab82fe651
ab180eb3fbe795b94f9b221f7b9b7c9d18b4fe83
describe
'38444' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYA' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
02ba958c8d2d0ff359e41d09e9767c3f
a494e8c0efe867dba77b76f49ae6cc0fc248d952
'2012-01-14T14:13:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYB' 'sip-files00058.tif'
65fed66e9c61399f5788094afc129006
a08b8bdb9ec54bb07f2bf1c28ca3a1baf407cbe3
'2012-01-14T14:15:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYC' 'sip-files00058.txt'
e9198d45f70ca7850cce4e6eba07d53b
3bf1ee9e94a55dafccc606617a979c69953bd509
describe
'9536' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYD' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
da5dd836a5cfb87bd2c651b20cfd785c
c8eee157c6c8fc02bc91c6094137ee0c7a46efb4
describe
'320931' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYE' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
5837346b4b0dacb67e15a2cd8671ba33
2aceac60d61cea423d34d5906277204d662a5acc
'2012-01-14T14:13:41-05:00'
describe
'115876' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYF' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
93945c4048431fbeeb68eb3fac66a43b
028c07bd638eb981b91ef2232434662b255dfc97
describe
'28207' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYG' 'sip-files00059.pro'
98de9507a3923c783aa1b9dc1a52ff7e
eebb1dc85a8484af47f3444d7587894b847cb040
'2012-01-14T14:12:38-05:00'
describe
'36532' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYH' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
cb0bf4fef7d2e0d82a49cb9736d29126
b22c5c80c5d2a7448ac8f497fb9ae47ce7a4c38c
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYI' 'sip-files00059.tif'
322867085f1f952528dea2c7591133b5
1edaaf304659df38b0ea0e20b6df241b38102b52
'2012-01-14T14:18:03-05:00'
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYJ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
9f7d8ac3a249bc80d393f7d9bee56a9c
e21b006e1c051b2e90afa0ccc5b32d565983c705
'2012-01-14T14:15:55-05:00'
describe
'9077' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYK' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
81e2fd127bfebf2d05917c2829b3052e
fabb4d66c948bb9d3350817f79e28282a42de827
describe
'320997' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYL' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
713c87aac6cae070e50d71b3f5d21907
03daaa82c200c3a6231567dd37fdbc011bf97b9c
'2012-01-14T14:16:08-05:00'
describe
'119787' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYM' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
af1a6f466de7dad1b981df2d9e5d8d4e
23e9ddfebac0c0d9c752cb94f1445a6fe332e242
'2012-01-14T14:14:56-05:00'
describe
'30847' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYN' 'sip-files00060.pro'
4601813125530db66ea073d7a7bcce09
e7a2901e7ee9f5df968d33a4b7d3ed3d84e0468e
describe
'37800' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYO' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
8c3591057237ffeafe4b10279a8ff7b9
6f0baf1e800b4382888a40a1a84a0664a288a55b
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYP' 'sip-files00060.tif'
c243172ae36bdf9cff4b086d191e748c
7f10f563435b841e2eb09d093e75269d36e77702
'2012-01-14T14:14:39-05:00'
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYQ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
fce17a03f1d05f0ab1e64de56d471272
14aa7dbc3b3eb3bebb35b1d8d0d2123f0d87eec0
'2012-01-14T14:13:22-05:00'
describe
'9207' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYR' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
6174c660ace11363f1828e5a932419a7
109ded7d17901509d81ffa1b1f61c03adaca1de3
describe
'320935' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYS' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
1b987c3dde0db2cdb5c72b5f62398c0f
4c8f6c4bfe2b2ba5454f42f7048b93dad7147b4a
describe
'107609' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYT' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
a74bd784956e446105e32a69987c90ce
ae854b5ccbf57f8b5acd97ef35e4b1cccc2622db
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYU' 'sip-files00061.pro'
2fec1443399cbcbcb2b89cf6769a6c36
7af66d9b6b100ae55b3bfc769aa569e623bd7333
'2012-01-14T14:17:31-05:00'
describe
'30075' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYV' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
82e2393c4920fa2717d3a33d1edc318d
ae55099f60b1e38b8beb7b6944699049550e6bca
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYW' 'sip-files00061.tif'
d8a7916c3d4f465dafc8505658e7d8e2
11c33d9721eefc8569fdb9e014172bd2caddd225
'2012-01-14T14:13:27-05:00'
describe
'153' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYX' 'sip-files00061.txt'
9d1ce9bfad0d55ff62b74c8a0c49b6f8
95ff4a2e2b2b722dbaec925b99c2bb607b4ee4e5
'2012-01-14T14:15:31-05:00'
describe
'7846' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYY' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
7ed1d9d6ab65237b6fdc390a67e0c464
8d73be4c367aa74fd4d868622a8882cd80a89229
'2012-01-14T14:15:20-05:00'
describe
'320946' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABYZ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
41c33c68c2349ca2dfdaf8f90ce38f1e
11ab1a78d4545e0db037c7397f6ca53828c3d4b4
describe
'33972' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZA' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
2af63517842386902785252161a67db0
c9ed60f07f48e8713ed98f76cb277ab423ac2153
describe
'6718' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZB' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
f68418e7dcfbd1ea8c5ec870902e5b03
7f7bfc358f3b43732c63ea3d178f4ceed083c731
'2012-01-14T14:14:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZC' 'sip-files00062.tif'
36b37f2a053aa0dfc7bbcf24a1de65cf
e301ac0f48ddbf5698df275e7868b18f509d9822
describe
'1615' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZD' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
ddeb0f00e572c5a885a61d27591c7843
47cd7a6e7f9e799719a47400fdb29568012ce458
describe
'320995' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZE' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
4a08daedb2b48aa9a2cf17254d128031
1f542ad84f95684f0e7e20d950c1b9fcd1af7d9c
describe
'125675' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZF' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
6fa3c815c82799823d0c0b841dbbf7ab
7d72686a58e196a7cb89408ed60a670e3f330344
'2012-01-14T14:14:32-05:00'
describe
'32597' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZG' 'sip-files00063.pro'
7944519397452e7ad3d1d30084716485
edb98b43e3eff956f73b6a2cf01d747eebb855be
describe
'39233' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZH' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
c56f0596d51ca9dab764c04d07a0de4e
f24e8695c53ded0fbfb8b43399f7cc368ae731cb
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZI' 'sip-files00063.tif'
dee24f1fa89546e34c3deecc9aae7f08
c3e04fd901016b12c55e7a63f4e275819bbbf353
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZJ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
03bd43a58b5946ad190507baceb0b588
c690c2ae7e85b03c3a36ea6cece862615fb1114d
describe
'9361' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZK' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
1ce3e7bcca7e62fabd2a1f9dbb2d7c9c
53b7806e0b1bb31e2a4229dd7607f2cf901a8672
describe
'320945' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZL' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
4f40fb517080482afab40a591cd0c4da
92589906d49d7d3eabbec9e59f66fdf612f65548
describe
'113675' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZM' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
24e5014a66e8b00a2e38b8a7a362b139
94bb43ab958d1dd62e03e9c5a07535def61ba814
'2012-01-14T14:12:35-05:00'
describe
'29326' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZN' 'sip-files00064.pro'
3a55f246e69fcdae642b4187b0d2d671
1584a65608f1d05cfeb2025d776c81e5fab395c9
describe
'36843' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZO' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
968367e9c890d3f590208d9493bdae98
5c641287400d1244762edd61e849983984c25159
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZP' 'sip-files00064.tif'
f34ce1ecccec0d40fbaec696480d40d5
e53cc01500bea83eb88fbb735d712dcbdf1f967a
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZQ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
1205783df0465f0a844b5fed11e5d43f
911778db8404a350fc0459c32047de92c875f0cb
describe
'8987' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZR' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
c00a292307c2da21e4f4f91de9eba1e3
d4800833ebe573581c85240ac2222d0a0ada3989
'2012-01-14T14:17:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZS' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
0c3aec24498104c01cf06f26f1c31cd3
96b8f2e50b77e2323d8135d015fb795ddf5cf45c
'2012-01-14T14:16:39-05:00'
describe
'107917' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZT' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
51d554bdca5acfc31fe50d4611803aea
42ef88789ebc5fa82f21d69655228c26a1525eb8
describe
'28398' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZU' 'sip-files00065.pro'
b6302ab5ea85714a73078a4569729cc8
c8df36601fafd69579c74e553b67c23824300441
describe
'35073' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZV' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
db57242ddfc619b6ef3ce6c40a22b2c2
12df2eef3dd5624f6f930090b2cda80c07ebefd9
'2012-01-14T14:17:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZW' 'sip-files00065.tif'
a1b0ad2d388498bae5d4118b8db39845
45c257d9ebb1add08bbd95ac3be85b7d7adbf49a
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZX' 'sip-files00065.txt'
c7fd7ec9eb8658b64e11984ecab75fa7
5d4a05d71cdf1f1a6dca9d976dabf565ec8ff3ed
describe
'8895' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZY' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
94d14f44e4a2967e08a47f94ab36a93f
49f7b9e9428b858867be050becf63ecc03a8da73
describe
'320958' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAABZZ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
117bb180bf6150a79dc800867c90e129
2c835806551bad4dea2035cb390fa2d50957a4ab
'2012-01-14T14:15:35-05:00'
describe
'114797' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAA' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
8d0477ba37452e1e87b846c1a716e856
dd772207912887292b749ede05c883bb5add517d
'2012-01-14T14:18:05-05:00'
describe
'26524' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAB' 'sip-files00066.pro'
7ddb0b73f6e7c33bbbbeb79067bf01b5
49a103c736f487009b70cd84af82358c95434714
describe
'34347' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAC' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
c85153964dbb3411fcfc2d0b1c7f86f5
9b47c73813ec9a8acae95e6d78dc1cd1c35f38cc
'2012-01-14T14:15:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAD' 'sip-files00066.tif'
60544c00c9c6b0e71eb5ec3c5e223a0b
db9f151430cf4f10865a875aad69760d3966b852
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAE' 'sip-files00066.txt'
25d4f6fcbbdb14323ee0e6b8ffc10417
6b39e65ce22d8c7c9c427eb1ad69259156c65321
describe
'9112' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAF' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
b557f8b0c878f568ef24708fdb2a02c6
a9c4cc5064997e022b3c7815836bc09e6a9a5dc9
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAG' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
2830a1b5210cde29244061ac18c60fc8
00ec56560025eabfb23c8a4bfe69663e68100a39
'2012-01-14T14:13:32-05:00'
describe
'116631' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAH' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
7cf01c41450445b4430e91fdad3a81ed
4654f4313a76d9f2159e461e6f2a5e2316a25458
describe
'3002' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAI' 'sip-files00067.pro'
ce47afbce1f5aba6b20f427e26d44322
df2aab46d5c1cac6acdb571522a7dc5a7d724fa5
describe
'29287' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAJ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
6941d868b53d547a4f6f0497c4716b3f
ce41052ba345d3f0c79fbd599adf7a25b93812dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAK' 'sip-files00067.tif'
783ed7d43e0891ffce1cb33b3b9d2192
0dc494a43e7c45578cfeaaa268d095bfd09d828c
describe
'206' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAL' 'sip-files00067.txt'
77373be6d0b8c91d091212fbb1c8f30f
805df2923d1af05eb9212840b0174f6a2794d4e8
'2012-01-14T14:17:02-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'7636' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAM' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
31dab84c3dae0f6761c122b385a0ccc4
f1aa90946fecda9b5cea773af6bd0bfd97cd853b
describe
'320942' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAN' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
73d5a881d0feb1b61c408edd63fcb642
87c7ada3569d6705687d4a7d2cf9fd13a75327a0
'2012-01-14T14:15:48-05:00'
describe
'29569' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAO' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
1175c7afd8abced582f31d29803376d4
7eb57878bd75b82b82380b34c98a876ccb873b87
'2012-01-14T14:17:44-05:00'
describe
'5935' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAP' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
97388b5e796a3baf803186c3ba20182b
40c9dc240824a70bf4cf35f9c5c2917014251757
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAQ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
26cb596da04be222fa8f34a98b10cc53
976286df0d05b48967ef65b4fa52a342fa48f2f3
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAR' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
cab8e4ab69fdf3635037d4254ac0da3b
be0b5abc572c817aa4641b05c976365de5f93783
'2012-01-14T14:14:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAS' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
ba8104b41512ff73e9550438f3c0e898
f2ac6f38c70bb33fd4066c7d3a7e2ba82531db8a
'2012-01-14T14:13:35-05:00'
describe
'111384' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAT' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
d75965bea83f912038fd0b91323c2a9e
eb69af6b867dc4913fa2a4b61438743fb53ab6ab
describe
'27063' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAU' 'sip-files00069.pro'
b1ebd22015eea0c12911460966da579a
9216464bec81624cc1d0b56a30cdcdadab9759d1
describe
'35978' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAV' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
9a6c01d1ca422ee191fa4fc102d97530
1a83037aa49968c370085f3224e1178ce7dbb45f
'2012-01-14T14:13:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAW' 'sip-files00069.tif'
2bf55b36f553abc4dd94e1b84e31ce76
d529dcf0e3249d70634f503854ab07385513c579
'2012-01-14T14:13:51-05:00'
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAX' 'sip-files00069.txt'
a11a56d2f317edadad9d2ba7573eb7e5
1aa4494b73634b0a65e437de08ee7f5a56ffc8d5
'2012-01-14T14:13:23-05:00'
describe
'9171' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAY' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
e9fe0df44680b580084fd232c334008e
4e904fca6dfe383ddbad7f5fa5a4022960d6b1cb
'2012-01-14T14:15:23-05:00'
describe
'320992' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACAZ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
beb0415120615399bb5d73ffc5b5582c
53c29b53c58f3eac2628504e79c05a1572bf8da0
'2012-01-14T14:16:21-05:00'
describe
'120396' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBA' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
6526f864368aba18aaebc2923ca608a4
34d406f327a4056e7b0b79e7090ca904ffa10500
describe
'28797' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBB' 'sip-files00070.pro'
bc5d4ba324ca145c083bbc8a64f10d92
f31c9fb7db9fe95033bd21c2d09072ada9e1b07b
describe
'36428' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBC' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
d8aea150a53587d0eba19208327aebf7
8251a59d3a593483dcb517bbc0e6389b9a499de1
'2012-01-14T14:16:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBD' 'sip-files00070.tif'
27333c6085e0feb3531477a555ea57d1
0caf26564b3f9740f12cc735ebb30deca49baf93
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBE' 'sip-files00070.txt'
c29f7dd9472cb49f2992e605ffb342b1
910104936ee3afa4acac640bf89915423b4b63b3
describe
'8916' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBF' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
7494555ff30800642daa77276ead16b5
15a7ea95b526fe2c39260f3a00babfb5b33bcfa1
describe
'320990' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBG' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
1704df1843a7cedcf4b452c712be9231
30d4cf4310c4f4aa9b93488ef4a6ec72684c5c2e
describe
'113428' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBH' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
f3219f3b84da9e9b680f3442383acea6
716f78f90e6689d0d2ee157a51236fe7a70c7f59
describe
'26648' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBI' 'sip-files00071.pro'
4400c178945a30c134b873b2388be401
ecaf3bca75e7ffa03f0bd1aaf141d564d66386fd
describe
'33022' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBJ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
1f17d2b7e994cd98f97b590b09212332
599f847b3658a7d3986fc3f61458d43af262ffe1
'2012-01-14T14:17:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBK' 'sip-files00071.tif'
42ea93fc7b43428e4f7a67e86b9975f6
9684b83029677f87be5a99dbc66501e6acf58f93
'2012-01-14T14:12:41-05:00'
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBL' 'sip-files00071.txt'
a5c580d2bab49216ba08a3ab5437ce65
3a611d711e8d3962d46d619535179316b4560d2c
describe
'8795' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBM' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
d57bdbc507c5710e2eb6d2c4d8ddb127
8621f9091560df896d126b0b7c7bd74a99fddf69
describe
'320910' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBN' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
21a335a798439582d2d70fd3ec1ffec7
802bed195f160dff14702bc33a31dede3c09be3e
describe
'121784' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBO' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
e4eaaffb899c5eb1dd096209c29b76b8
a43afde5702f94062a6acb281163c0e478c3a65a
'2012-01-14T14:18:07-05:00'
describe
'31124' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBP' 'sip-files00072.pro'
f6f4204415f84e840539e9c13adac256
024dd5f5c73d858ac7899698e92e9aa5cc71d40a
describe
'38080' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBQ' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
532fe2d5f611eca2724d4e9f88a71297
e5b11181ffbbc8950fc74464d520feeaa9ef4eb5
'2012-01-14T14:16:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBR' 'sip-files00072.tif'
f7238f99fb770a0dcf6114f4a3a9e069
ca1f67c2c5b6d89c8cf4fad1b4e535ffa4169b6b
'2012-01-14T14:13:03-05:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBS' 'sip-files00072.txt'
9707b58ced87d9555442917720e0178c
461c2ad02f3f181198fe4fef9c532af5210e1c88
'2012-01-14T14:16:17-05:00'
describe
'9395' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBT' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
9bb35b75c0e5252e8b5790db25b2c7e6
f31088d1a36844fa45cac265ee19a0bdf5952230
'2012-01-14T14:16:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBU' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
dc8ba7bdc8952ba74c09923c3093ca13
0f0d9f608a4fa4fa82c53136bfaf58805fb6b1ef
describe
'122321' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBV' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
cc4038579e7458c162b90a418077ecda
88d0488adaf7399e1f0814207a596b006e77c3cd
describe
'30090' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBW' 'sip-files00073.pro'
ce4fd95bb365fa8a11b5086f73375908
25f5cb57effaf915854eda0a16f38836884768e5
describe
'37330' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBX' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
f54bc242e247f4f8bee06f2c1a435cfc
da51a30ce09c7bc0c0a388fcceecc51de02369c8
'2012-01-14T14:13:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBY' 'sip-files00073.tif'
bcfdd4233f6b02e884daeb88f36030e0
b968a0b50390a857ae2a70de35d01c8db0c9e903
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACBZ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
f17ff93efc2f66fe0d92df9e4b6aacfd
984093d3738028199203823cddbf32d3a899062c
describe
'8903' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCA' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
a50ee8137ec579e577ebc2b89282b139
c4b29d0611685f321a5bbf38880c1a61a9f0d8e8
describe
'320692' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCB' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
b19a0e720e10209e1c15eb7fbf3cc8cb
116eef5b309db1f7e0970a248398cfced85a7d40
describe
'73187' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCC' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
b65364fa76c09d2149a981eff3b31d23
5955458b98441ca558e988726abf74c3219a69e8
'2012-01-14T14:16:58-05:00'
describe
'10944' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCD' 'sip-files00074.pro'
00ac4a67cfc775d97a91087bdc946b5b
64f757e8feeb17bb805b7109137b7e6003c424f9
describe
'18865' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCE' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
74faf6c9c28e76fc36181b520d790805
b7e246e6f6245725d1ca9d8443fc9d4bf4cf7e4d
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCF' 'sip-files00074.tif'
2e697cf1078088a659af74b18e36834b
b3ef6df66aebde1049312bbb35c224cc12c7cfbd
describe
'441' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCG' 'sip-files00074.txt'
00d8782af8c07c5ac337308c6ba75731
3fd5bd07ce0595a6bcd3ef998438eb894291a261
describe
'4706' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCH' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
c22d5d0890937050431b783f9f3ba679
3f19dade2303e3da83e3a7a2f24c48836ccd36e1
describe
'320968' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCI' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
8eb336bc12ef8ec2df7830bca9a4fa31
3f2c7db42a4c68a7036ef6003c268190bd653bf4
'2012-01-14T14:16:20-05:00'
describe
'105554' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCJ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
867df0eb4b6d6cdf748e3dd05d6ae744
af552f10409fb97f8334e43fade3926d7b2798df
describe
'22169' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCK' 'sip-files00075.pro'
ad32963e35a7e7676c3b54bc6db9b0d8
d41bc28f9c6631d29db81dd4385e87121035e1c6
describe
'30429' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCL' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
08850cce8ed9b12215c2135636890d7a
4950588969275a65d88641b5e49895f6c0d0671f
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCM' 'sip-files00075.tif'
17916aa44dbe4226194efbde68d216a0
1d85b98bab33f85fb07c20d9146731ad8a6dafb5
describe
'902' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCN' 'sip-files00075.txt'
cd0c3b77a7b2ca6d19ee701668e84179
a8791d808cb6b41b7e15a3bc858845b6469d07eb
describe
'7326' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCO' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
c11bb6655c2a5909fdec122b14018500
26f95ef3f468e5c50654a2fd31a420a0995f06b6
describe
'320822' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCP' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
22b91c32412fecdd1cffc71897764e74
0ca6eb6cd8afa878c71b4e1cd26e12fbe005c4b2
describe
'122501' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCQ' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
4ec1b96d09f81543a48ee714b14c6bfb
b9c5dc1bcfc46d4c2dec8da65942f640c0c255fc
describe
'29919' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCR' 'sip-files00076.pro'
ece0848dd6156c5877c23cd4daa70a81
a5654a569de33918ea025748b88f97da96b65957
'2012-01-14T14:17:50-05:00'
describe
'37023' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCS' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
32794027f76fdcd368ecbf23268c4a72
9a7a608009948d118f491a87ea9555cb0486aa80
'2012-01-14T14:12:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCT' 'sip-files00076.tif'
5a6769d0722e8a8a2f3dd003174fccc7
b922d39eaf28804df0ada76e0b78b404031d2ee4
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCU' 'sip-files00076.txt'
b7f9419eeb3380b7abf559cae85c4f80
dc135e12b24183ff2d86a366f4d3495365f2786a
describe
'9450' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCV' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
1d4811c3ace0152e2b33b4290071c5e0
d084863ca4655d34c4042371f2dfb8cfa90998aa
'2012-01-14T14:15:32-05:00'
describe
'320980' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCW' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
6928f185e1923e487dc300ea1aad2667
c7877c2e75908145efa90276c00cdac769f1470b
describe
'113599' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCX' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
05570f5f9e6d7b13c027c2e5b71f1394
a913526d23a32f6a98a8e0f944cfad75606dd36e
'2012-01-14T14:17:58-05:00'
describe
'27849' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCY' 'sip-files00077.pro'
0467ecddd133b9a4cc6de86efb4c66b8
a19e0d2de43e59caea442ace5a74f65cbceeaa2f
'2012-01-14T14:12:45-05:00'
describe
'34322' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACCZ' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
bbccdf3a0024898cb5c427b7462751da
bfafeb3bf5b843e8371c98736ffc78a74e9c8875
'2012-01-14T14:17:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDA' 'sip-files00077.tif'
8ad812c9d128bd271184ee17786a16fa
23f41d19bf82256d209e158e8650a56e8f2367ca
'2012-01-14T14:13:16-05:00'
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDB' 'sip-files00077.txt'
242ab2ce4f949d1f5a544dd6fafe6f19
ed13543d5464b2af296db969b050f79cb3f69373
describe
'8667' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDC' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
683059fb26a3afffaafb536a9b3d7915
f154a8a8b170df1020601ff1771f28937811d734
describe
'320991' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDD' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
5121d8f3704c6a4344e43a27e5e0e333
4700fbb2aa3594fd048eb9eb09cb43a892a99357
describe
'120194' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDE' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
2db855a5f765bd7fb4c5ad9354c9d6d8
af5775fde5b0d301c947f64d992fe5e16476c6bf
describe
'27371' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDF' 'sip-files00078.pro'
c07998784d6f265b6bdd301419056948
a3d6ff155b253355f2d1732c8f07d48d425d3383
describe
'35665' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDG' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
e85aef50f528327ef1181b25e884c9f0
7dfa7bbcb3bf35df9cd1f72e08fa049be76cf283
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDH' 'sip-files00078.tif'
fa8aab351389c87cabad5d7771fb93ae
f7bf9d447dac9aa9db5ba50fd45035adf238359c
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDI' 'sip-files00078.txt'
be3936f1f27e890bb325a56fcbe39f85
b70dc0f7e6685691385d6a1bbf178b02ee4522b0
describe
'8869' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDJ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
9d246d1c77c5ccbe9389013680329a85
42d2464227bd0a53b54bd0c2a2a5c9744086bc51
describe
'320987' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDK' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
13947f2825ae60c2109afc3c490ffa2a
102017084365da482ddf976cbc0652c9bfbad1e0
describe
'113438' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDL' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
843e775bf7c36bc904b8bdc599c1ba77
53c52f25d8c57a009742495a582eea93f2372863
describe
'25327' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDM' 'sip-files00079.pro'
2331d17efb6d163e7ef00c258fec7a33
a80198f2b36fae8d271d02c5ccf19c393abf6d6b
describe
'32922' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDN' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
dcbdef1969b4abe3390ca33df6d85535
be913565628cd22236dab587603e5842995ce46d
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDO' 'sip-files00079.tif'
889620fd355f9c19b60b2501401ef91d
d736ccc73025c37162f1184ea45f75aff1abb016
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDP' 'sip-files00079.txt'
7cee2820eedc62fd7e47d35021d3c878
4492d99f358b95b3ea923b1a1d1c1600c34228c3
describe
'8682' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDQ' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
003bb03a972b77ce7dff4575ec1acac8
abf78f91084ba1c7356d99f07c39e556c502f266
describe
'320957' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDR' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
8a60ca561b133888315f77ba458d8f67
75ed320764e8916c8dfdd53f9ce0fd45ef641e85
'2012-01-14T14:15:38-05:00'
describe
'117627' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDS' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
be54673ed26e3d78d24c5d489eef665f
e5e5137dca9a1232a5c32fe12d3e24488accff9f
describe
'29138' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDT' 'sip-files00080.pro'
7585f89f49ba4b2ea06eebf2fec10b87
8c628863493f38468986900a23ebcbd38e39abd7
describe
'35512' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDU' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
b375d32ce80fabcc0c3766c0990e863b
19eef7c2a64186efa740725a952acb0331eda878
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDV' 'sip-files00080.tif'
615f8dbbd1e48e13821f9ddf6f4441f9
2b026d5e494ddce8bd1f08f1601b09c5741db978
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDW' 'sip-files00080.txt'
514b4561573718fa63cb0f6c8fcdd87e
e803c99896b01cf002cf41fa1e63dd3ee1b03ca6
'2012-01-14T14:14:23-05:00'
describe
'9200' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDX' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
c1f4df2216f1a030889d3fab352b4b07
adc2271c3e6e6ba5ea709cfdfc9b5f58da22b639
describe
'320972' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDY' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
5e9f8404b14d52eced6445e922a89e16
8e3d78f7ce01c38400bc7f6537000b30bb1d32cb
describe
'123333' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACDZ' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
6c5af6207ce091d3ee5ce533d738600f
c1696a19b0972a0d12953df0fb91d4e602715a9b
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEA' 'sip-files00081.pro'
d83681e4f296e40813db32860ba42a4c
06820b19764c3db49f17880a71780c1ab340f4b5
describe
'37859' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEB' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
426dfac09f18e24b3f0e0677d85e173d
0ccf394566f7cf35ffe9b96db32a155dc9ab2bf4
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEC' 'sip-files00081.tif'
438c5c5292ccbb0d4e2504ecef8c83b8
120a56adb6bd52930359f1366053fd829085ed06
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACED' 'sip-files00081.txt'
909458aac3f882f8c4438d3a3a8ad29c
9d9ce48ed445dad38ec97e1ca956030c800e54d3
'2012-01-14T14:14:27-05:00'
describe
'9314' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEE' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
b118c8d5da0aa2f261678fc3645a794d
fee0c27503c35878ad1ce1d7156343b0a2411c88
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEF' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
972479ad4cf14d6e204d4529d41c1785
e13b59d9971f2fad9ab84d67a69db5015d54b38c
describe
'118984' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEG' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
2596e331a4f6802819432dcd22289bfc
f0670457e8ae619f5c3ccaa0dfc77623320f78c6
describe
'26475' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEH' 'sip-files00082.pro'
c73365282efc005c7dbc16a99af60c5a
3bbe8029c54413f3c9f0dccfabd631d5eabefbda
describe
'34836' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEI' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
0cf137b86117b4a6e675a17c2436ac78
40e57cd36ca41f63a257076ff6d920cdb8fca480
'2012-01-14T14:14:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEJ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
9d80424a3de9963c520db0f2a38bce58
1b34ea6710d050e48a608c060ef1e261e083a282
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEK' 'sip-files00082.txt'
1f03571eb647f1454d71d26fc0d4d755
6b12d1e3c81354dac5e452de6847793fdb66cced
describe
'8919' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEL' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
2a4a7542ec73a1f26323f25b3a5c8d51
f77c621c568a77adc1e5c9eabbd6ceb1037ac93d
'2012-01-14T14:15:21-05:00'
describe
'320932' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEM' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
7bea5df99870b8eccddbf7617dc72c4f
cf1710d228793ed4d8b0ee065252c8cbbd1c0674
describe
'122749' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEN' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
916d2f36ba4ab44a006da222bd84a5e9
a20746839a70f473c16c3b802bd309c6ef3cedf0
describe
'28917' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEO' 'sip-files00083.pro'
6e6e80db5b668b5d4545f0e15cada928
0e239ef31f5f8edc5bd04aae68bf7d96fe140510
describe
'36003' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEP' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
afbccca6426f1f513c25e74c2186cde1
f9bf4a551837c2201042531bba2341a69e592949
'2012-01-14T14:18:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEQ' 'sip-files00083.tif'
1c47efd27e6704f6f0ec4617725a1829
cbb1fcb04f15086c4ae4ffd232c29c5e117730f4
'2012-01-14T14:12:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACER' 'sip-files00083.txt'
2f3e9f4ee5a795c2578e9d0007e6ff86
74a427e6ebc0fde7c986618036685fea52f2fe47
describe
'8996' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACES' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
3e5e3ebb5a5d33969a2d2fe3d13c1daa
93747e3159255a1c734a3078ed74cca96a743b7d
describe
'320819' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACET' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
808b7bf5fd89f29e1364d671baa173ae
6dac9dc32ae5d58537ba4ef457307ec37c56ef43
'2012-01-14T14:16:37-05:00'
describe
'52987' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEU' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
973f5a81a7351af8dac0a77db0610783
4d3aed5c236b4c69d30e976863114fb4f910457d
describe
'6021' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEV' 'sip-files00084.pro'
63c06f76b0f9bb615cd4b191fe5a2bb4
693462d8bd546b76c7766994105a878db116d0cf
describe
'13025' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEW' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
c57618f25b6e4576fc964daafd4380bb
cee74468e9bde2b7d62baf450882103239b98902
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEX' 'sip-files00084.tif'
e31297f6a24b6fe374217ef5bb952aa5
7823a6192b8fac86fe1e30a5b9ec1110b494a616
describe
'247' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEY' 'sip-files00084.txt'
742f5e4e5b71e9d1dcd743c6d900aa6d
bcfe4ad83480e5d1369c726f9c374a1a20052aca
describe
'3281' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACEZ' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
c4b6f5fd36529e76a9abf0e668c42011
86cc6bd7b8057a89448938ec44cb5d787c14632a
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFA' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
59e95d47b4fbbdf8a888bfd1896c1564
e539c3d72dd1c94b1831a1d4c168935e92fa9405
describe
'105048' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFB' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
a83f30e2517343023af4a0aa6f9b41cc
c62ac9a7a9817852823ee6a25afb06cec409ae1e
describe
'21968' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFC' 'sip-files00085.pro'
7093422d696eb2cbf0c26a0836438c3a
d911f5677e4a3c86688bf8bb8668f440a2a6b8d3
describe
'30313' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFD' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
0f3d9ddf5fc3457ed99c48f19b56eb3a
554a4c9d112ca3f6bdad1b9fe785d3b674038096
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFE' 'sip-files00085.tif'
f3eadea6d741db5a43e45d67e9b79d5d
b8632daa28075c0e173fae7ea334b45ab69f7a3b
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFF' 'sip-files00085.txt'
fa10041f0dfc55bd2aca1bbab5905f10
07ab6785eb459751f3eeec313921622851021331
'2012-01-14T14:13:37-05:00'
describe
'7308' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFG' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
ba9a6e0e1dfbf4327ebac0ff1228e88c
e5553506dedfbe2ab0093c6ddeb0bb2121875bce
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFH' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
17abd0dc6cfee6f6bd2ca5a55cf80529
f4002c67322cd5fa91c9fcc8cb0ca2588a0ce28f
describe
'128581' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFI' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
90bdf8ce650d78204ee1d60c10349d2f
754edbbf694e285b3fbfe7eea6a296419a0080c4
describe
'20338' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFJ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
4c3c4ea27c9b8199d932a3d548e964b2
1ca82d5f6d179238d374dcbb23bd64de456fcebd
describe
'35486' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFK' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
057052a8ea2a1602e62f706a26642394
61984d5311cfef7719d2b3b737cecc757e549891
'2012-01-14T14:16:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFL' 'sip-files00086.tif'
aaf23e76a7e7cff347295edd3bba5d72
e1751ad3fe7e9227d6ed695e605a622cea8d07f3
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFM' 'sip-files00086.txt'
7c8aab28a913582877e79d5196a68a93
b320921ea6b41ff819eb48a335e59d1e5796d8e3
describe
'9125' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFN' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
beb146b30412a7518129c64cf9c476d6
5218a6a8a4b8a49a52ccac8ee749fa84cd5c0a88
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFO' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
20b749532679a4ca338e591bc214da89
c851c61f29a47d99cefc542414a572b7455e573a
describe
'133392' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFP' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
373024ce21d1c0d097b60cf4a88b0650
2498cf08d6a2860d79fa4714d4ba96df46361e87
describe
'29718' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFQ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
7c98895603852b4f1d4c785afad65dae
0146bae275ea920713d319e257bcb4828989194f
describe
'38510' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFR' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
981470002a6e74aa3a40fe2919855771
1deed87bdc203179fde6a38a82f33af6fdcb3de7
'2012-01-14T14:17:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFS' 'sip-files00087.tif'
90354bd094636270c119728873e19d7f
35bca78e767027cdaab83bb1f2a6d7dcf12d99ba
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFT' 'sip-files00087.txt'
06f43cd3c813e277e4c8e7db2292f712
e4bf2eb424b9dbca5c045a4ec98275dcf65906fd
describe
'9672' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFU' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
4e3762eb509cf4d10712e2073b94feb9
f76d185cdbd62897706fc62b79779196b480affb
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFV' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
caf64429fec0ae7682ca3dfdd28d2145
4e53a77281849b26394d08251a32448c15df437b
describe
'109567' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFW' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
31b9cc3ae16cca5fc6e485e16258a8b7
3bf6f135424dbebd3ea6ae3b88df3ee88ed68e3c
describe
'29122' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFX' 'sip-files00088.pro'
d08fce0c9eacdf118f35c097667da0c1
fe9e8297d7a47120752d478e019d4a2f55b32f6c
describe
'34614' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFY' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
e1167a524c35af6f6515b7bb9590d680
2dd4bf644187f67b084c9bcbab62732bbb565e69
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACFZ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
48d6ff83b5953a3bb6bacdbe9203c771
8189b2d27026d3f385b528f262ee4d6b3dbd0410
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGA' 'sip-files00088.txt'
c0dae72a8255f3b9779b99d780ac73f5
3d7529cde28077db8a963923dcde80e96afd5714
describe
'8605' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGB' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
2d9a9d0d0390d5bea1f4d82840652b6b
78dbd776f032fdbf2fe881f9b24c2899ec185ccf
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGC' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
32d8ad7c33551a8cc4a3b3070511b8b7
cbf43a9ef5fbbaa4db86262f54415ad13412ab8c
describe
'110116' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGD' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
a5e6a846e2fbfacd8885e5774048c05d
0b5fd91fda82967bf8988dcc73e5a62b36df946a
describe
'28490' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGE' 'sip-files00089.pro'
061d1783eedb9feabd0c4f9dd4d0200d
c7e836f21957e1a0931ed8378967fe7edd2d6861
describe
'35640' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGF' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
9149e7f06bbc175b383ec6cdceff0ea8
51cd1032f5d60bd1f4916060bde3c7a514abe6cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGG' 'sip-files00089.tif'
56a8865e5721af672f92ad282711af2c
edaa3526309b9f0f217fca77fc620621dffa7210
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGH' 'sip-files00089.txt'
66b84fd485e806e22c6da0637d905911
7630e4c0122185a7be1be9aed986cd51e7b1a290
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGI' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
db363cd63b11a83a59b581bca4267e7a
e0397363daa28f2564d44c462df27f2295066b48
describe
'320929' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGJ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
8ce5556a19a6a6d7e0192506a584e3bc
7f7d44739241f9c15f81a25efa7ca8f78bd638c1
describe
'116324' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGK' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
1acb061946c2d12fac420f15df0b680b
98e45bf8f8c7218be5106be9ce480d576f206886
describe
'29252' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGL' 'sip-files00090.pro'
46b959cfc9dd3b08f45d08ef0b23c9c2
5a3bd3f00309b6fed342c1edf1349078916ceb2f
describe
'35734' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGM' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
da49b4e570269b795b064f85215a5297
eedfd08ab0b2353079289f2f0aa6135336554c48
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGN' 'sip-files00090.tif'
48acdd856176ebf5cfbf7cdf0cad362c
d346e3e75f70614788a210827b1726301d13d78d
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGO' 'sip-files00090.txt'
e695360e65edca67ca2b9beee644c651
6cc5f38e5affd379e1b1c296e87e783a927ed46f
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGP' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
f431cd9340e45c1ef749ba62daf9ef19
ba5fdb0a352d04c9b8202a9a0d860762ba6461e5
describe
'320975' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGQ' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
dde05121aad9b82d44272e89df66b3d8
2a9460fd537db3959c5897d5adbe8d1759cf1d46
'2012-01-14T14:13:39-05:00'
describe
'112403' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGR' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
8fe509f35d0627d68acbb38237fbc012
f008847af33fc3f70141330c1842409976869ddb
describe
'28463' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGS' 'sip-files00091.pro'
2cf898b40d4a15c7938d98792c704070
9a554f21c41a42906ecc857756e138210d114bf6
describe
'35288' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGT' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
9518f56f0a9686bce8b308468f37e5dd
07738aae8a372dfd297787922c17a6139e13aa2b
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGU' 'sip-files00091.tif'
1e9dd22c4d33591fc9951241aae58388
48577bf630f829517ed0a499860ddff9aa0f0799
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGV' 'sip-files00091.txt'
36e6cd9cd00d0a2acfb12397525754da
cbae8c219a6acdeb9a26a690fce1d69ea42e0bce
describe
'8928' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGW' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
cb7609703762aba9f8d40febfedd1725
7e757fd8507d2ab93916a465f56a70e98fa844d2
describe
'320940' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGX' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
7e4406419c400916095d35d1bc659122
41cf642f972a99d0f55eecff8d7fdd297579dada
'2012-01-14T14:18:01-05:00'
describe
'117786' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGY' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
f72cb20cc40038c0734ec61605af826d
959ee1a06ab73293634c4b35248aa8a56581e081
describe
'30609' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACGZ' 'sip-files00092.pro'
4a804c713409aab5c34ea63d63f9e8fc
72948252c7ef6b24a4534bc3e71a0c39fc222148
describe
'37581' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHA' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
69393544601da4573ca46c9ca6691329
ee450527bd73f5b96b0019def11de05d99cfdefa
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHB' 'sip-files00092.tif'
4e637f84cfc30733045b077375d923f1
ffadb623d36c73ed5f919daf8aee4995c1cfb6e5
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHC' 'sip-files00092.txt'
b3d62868698f94731fd7177d47d950ce
2bd9edbac54e00d790ca7047d391ee505c22a883
'2012-01-14T14:18:08-05:00'
describe
'9294' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHD' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
2c7a134cdf00f88bc0678d2d64df824e
ff58c77b1fb0eae59ae302a470f3d3035e619d7d
'2012-01-14T14:17:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHE' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
3a457da24d188d6ef7f8e2d2a845d1ca
700e1303e24b9f68eb0d2dc03a6aa6f8618d9e6b
describe
'104188' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHF' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
96140a98ab96909079ca96dc0ddaffeb
d70e1b2d0f62c4f00270563254f7e78188e3b6d9
describe
'27237' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHG' 'sip-files00093.pro'
527d7b8d17a223ada0313a061af2706e
041fb8dda2ea2cb4c0714bea75c582d28e4b33c1
'2012-01-14T14:16:41-05:00'
describe
'33945' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHH' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
47a8f85d485e05892af58a28b8812288
fd5f2053a622f7a390764b49d3834143516b2cfa
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHI' 'sip-files00093.tif'
2c76f70d534136eb47d7e549e2163377
e08645f26de7a836e10961e4f1c0de9cb3175aea
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHJ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
b4ee95e6f459e1f4854d94132883fecf
594f177a817844cfafea8c206838efee7752fbfc
describe
'8725' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHK' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
5c60d97ef046203564533b08cd1a538e
9e1795f1806e659f071e992e0dbaa24082cd8d8e
'2012-01-14T14:16:53-05:00'
describe
'320989' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHL' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
fdc29167022681456d285cc95a991325
26a4f7a97383d741d23a17206d1d8e961bc696ec
describe
'120103' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHM' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
83dabeaa8b1c98907c5cf17fcb0bccdb
ff0e1314e01571b4cb0eddb5946fbfbc5e13233c
describe
'30021' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHN' 'sip-files00094.pro'
e5beac83fe0f5f323ecf8edf20a8a9a0
0b81485c8a8f686b05287e521d52cb751f368a85
'2012-01-14T14:14:19-05:00'
describe
'37883' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHO' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
e3342740d037a6366021177e220e7459
dafa3b1b91d13e370e09551ff684fce5ca0e3e44
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHP' 'sip-files00094.tif'
9359533ed9d31da0563f1fb3dbf7a97d
457b627544a7af563a79fff693b2d045347a6d2f
'2012-01-14T14:13:21-05:00'
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHQ' 'sip-files00094.txt'
54967748798ab050fe1a52d47fd47ae0
1d7ec9f730ba972c76d6db5179de31f5dfd386c2
describe
'9398' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHR' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
098f3fbb513a282c6fb34e12002ebebf
7fec1ffc0e11976a54074d34c301ba872f2aa287
describe
'320924' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHS' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
4271271c4806e8f7b45f7430b795ae42
10919569c939a6de3d51ef8dc44a1c41cdd2058b
describe
'125104' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHT' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
0459a915a581ee297005637ecedbc5cc
bbb766978ce9460a2796fd6d41c8c2d0a9619535
describe
'31832' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHU' 'sip-files00095.pro'
35e4f02601bab12308200891511632f4
51dbf109cecf84abb0a95359517b40436c171c16
describe
'38578' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHV' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
3edec184d0c4e1d1731368e413564e50
19f119508111b68c30f290eb62bdea23127b8326
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHW' 'sip-files00095.tif'
46dd84bc0f4cb139516c886d53d3c055
d22098dd2db0f27e949f1bd3e3e1e15763f49267
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHX' 'sip-files00095.txt'
559a6ec7394a6097f55f6fd023f750f2
d63c26ef946cfb49641b47356897fe37bbd55187
describe
'9488' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHY' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
6969f80e41d9302b6d260ffac04f7c18
e26fce188dd42fe1c4ab71a806332197c5627c96
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACHZ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
cc9fb90c62287ef83ad0c27e6d995896
c81f1fb6e540452deecfcd171d3a0402aca779dc
describe
'118528' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIA' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
4bb601a46e9c4ec4e11eeb76db1d36bd
75efb8c88c5665b1ee60310361f47c703ff01d10
describe
'30614' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIB' 'sip-files00096.pro'
c518bfd1976247a726f5bec739d87ffa
ffaa39af421f6ce9c6b5b834a8a0715f2ad49a3e
'2012-01-14T14:14:12-05:00'
describe
'36528' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIC' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
2c7daae128122e0136a6f82db91535ab
68e2d5b5b03c1d17f888107d82fafafb5f9e498f
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACID' 'sip-files00096.tif'
1b73f6cc4032a7459c97bff86df49b63
04e23329fcfc200407bb6e49b462cff535e380b4
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIE' 'sip-files00096.txt'
2a35c7e8148d3aa9eab3428adc42ce7d
02de397d25a3f3743aa44713c3da6ceb452e35db
describe
'9373' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIF' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
b80aa0a7e24dce33472550bf8a3b3cff
c9c9409ce36dc6167d204052176266bf8d28adff
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIG' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
66dbfe872488a55d0aa284d735b4a1fc
dba1dc795e932ddf11e9b06e466e412c7a5b7cb6
describe
'119378' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIH' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
6b16ec91ede35259e5a133456e661b90
c4f2009329dc2c2e6273175867cd9a1ae1e21d02
describe
'31436' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACII' 'sip-files00097.pro'
322d62d467654386d4594f86a47504e3
769426f8e0e4a3339e01bd2ed5c947ef0d5d065b
describe
'37698' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIJ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
02d33eb58e9859824a7640c104fc93bc
76d3afbcd6befa8c3e1a1867f47f8d9db1e01074
'2012-01-14T14:15:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIK' 'sip-files00097.tif'
d53c582fb2427b1b6a7afe04e0fc7e08
26e6ec32d515ee0184446740382406c34e3be4c3
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIL' 'sip-files00097.txt'
93a5ca3515aa6f8defd18d3d3dd8983a
064c63fdbef214f2e2f54f2896f5911da7f484a0
describe
'9143' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIM' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
bc271b9d490fadfdbff405c5e6f57a30
1e5e8fc0b81476af59e1415281deb42464949841
describe
'320863' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIN' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
1f4ddf75389ac3c77e5e03ee92ee50c8
2a97330265075d93e097ec03c21f922a7989f5e6
describe
'85890' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIO' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
2d7441f10e0b5c157964ece27029bf28
e0d23b85b146cc7a87e22fde5ac4451c3db87bfc
describe
'14884' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIP' 'sip-files00098.pro'
ee1083c83bab954f5efca498809ec9ce
d8830e482be21f21097e08030ecfe13aeeed9718
describe
'22708' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIQ' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
8720fb6eb9debd6e91077d2d786cd544
17c01a87690cd698e3f6e6a4cc80f6362d2dc2ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIR' 'sip-files00098.tif'
188f35f76a3dd0c6babb00d45b43040f
751753941c8acfaeff30f2283fd119492af477ce
'2012-01-14T14:14:01-05:00'
describe
'622' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIS' 'sip-files00098.txt'
aea872edf4ca8ff985ad298259a2806f
34c42ea4f3da0cfce2fdd27bd09c7b7bf1a65b47
describe
'5778' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIT' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
07fdbe256dc863d841c8cf2b6689e569
5ac35b2b2d1c8d367ace25c40a6681e85ea5b6b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIU' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
cef5f64841f683444e3405fd65d605b7
03b4d965fcb0c3f5bbd301b2d4debe47ace9bead
describe
'98701' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIV' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
b7c8bdf5294c588c57d0ae834464bedb
82a68901fbcd5737f2d58dbd15014053cf63fa33
describe
'20398' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIW' 'sip-files00099.pro'
2442b5a444e05542fc8073fad625efa4
a76d84e0bb28996ec276a6b283a0d2c80efdf3b8
describe
'28047' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIX' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
b6f0c041c4138c4f6903032eba6b6c3c
155ff6be7706e2bfd06c7218a6476d97fc929de0
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIY' 'sip-files00099.tif'
85afb81678adb055d6603c0f80595320
1d572fadfeeaff28fed4458a180d5024655c6741
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACIZ' 'sip-files00099.txt'
9ce68906faea733dd9e835b00c93875b
1bee26f5aadc7302ad3b637b4ebe0afdf5121d1d
describe
'6941' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJA' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
122edae87579f4f10fbcd842bc1a0c71
41ecdc1df5349aed48e22e6d6a92549173c5957f
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJB' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
2deb499a9537e253987d4f525f3d3361
3025ae8d74bd180ec161652acdc28ec45063eaf5
describe
'117776' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJC' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
28f92564ef9051f0931a5e83bc86a712
5ac5d02e109034c5dbf52201c69660bb8a9e561d
'2012-01-14T14:15:11-05:00'
describe
'28065' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJD' 'sip-files00100.pro'
0ac506b42645b7dfdc021caf588bd3fe
a13c361d6cc4444b1859b517876bb882e5451553
describe
'35018' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJE' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
122ab698fb285116fba42fa67258ed4d
bff1a4832dbeb69fb7e790be1cca7b58d800dd0d
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJF' 'sip-files00100.tif'
e437d7615ff142aa97a133c4e9af0dff
01cb0d3f7bdde282b23da1e608bcf0810e908be4
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJG' 'sip-files00100.txt'
66e52bbf35fcfc3cacf4da8a2477ddd4
d5bb4764dd1798bcb324ab543637fc54aabd4ce2
describe
'9096' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJH' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
c8b944f0925209dd452587009c7f88e0
2a34843367144a3981a72f5db86cebe6b42c5a14
describe
'320911' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJI' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
31a4fa6e77623e583e7213d43b05a41f
59d10160b4dace55ee090b392c1f57b5b21c1426
describe
'115474' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJJ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
92eb7a41c6436f47a3149dea5e3e8268
ae00ecd1b4e399c4c1cd0105b39597541e9633bf
describe
'26838' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJK' 'sip-files00101.pro'
d77e98a2b097f8f3e037490b138c04bc
c5fe253af03de3a8f3c120e1eb5bc3b835a55274
describe
'34592' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJL' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
ae55a71e5e1ac0d6e9ca5c9fd62c164d
e8795bd909efcdd1400132c67430a9fee2e36492
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJM' 'sip-files00101.tif'
59985d881872aa1c5b924cfd8926489f
a7ffe6ef23794accea0502a0398d32f0f4e51f2e
'2012-01-14T14:12:43-05:00'
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJN' 'sip-files00101.txt'
451bafeda3a0ec1e6057285bbe02351f
f1906fdac2e582a1cf28d0f1fe17dd68dc3416ba
describe
'8960' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJO' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
471185d1d937a0ce1cabc6c4de38d261
d5f33124432cfec3b06d8358180ab2c1ae921391
describe
'320812' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJP' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
559990a37cda9f10e09e32ed0af267c9
bb150141c60a8a092121b4134ef6023719777839
describe
'125740' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJQ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
50089729bc57fda9dfa1b2727b7bf502
458a9f6f23dad976e7d51c1912b337b8d0a9a467
describe
'31586' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJR' 'sip-files00102.pro'
9325de0227263ae5d5ec021d080c1303
68f48182e0ca121072f0e018247212be6913f582
describe
'38402' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJS' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
0ce99226065fe6eadf8215a7c9bf02c0
162789ddfee538cf75fc17ac524287aa30db1a98
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJT' 'sip-files00102.tif'
bf0aa2d9d920df5ae3f69c06135c1109
e563c85cf2c6139775750d62175cf6862fd6cf10
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJU' 'sip-files00102.txt'
b968e8b143b46ee31118d65f53deb0a9
13e4724dc9190db1f28eb3910798e5da83f84aa7
describe
'9616' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJV' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
583ffc4ea89308dd01ef29836139517d
a5140195ca10b6cdbf6e9a4885d8682ee7bb9e20
'2012-01-14T14:13:09-05:00'
describe
'320918' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJW' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
5cd1c4b2b0078a2113d68e6e3279e7c1
2af27352b3512d542b22e4b188753e8e31774c27
describe
'113665' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJX' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
3c1344114ef6f1faa51d1dbfb6e88789
d6b1d63298d74824068a24004aeb5a0dd8db0722
'2012-01-14T14:17:53-05:00'
describe
'27683' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJY' 'sip-files00103.pro'
cff24f15ab6a08a848f0332c1efbfc20
7cf798d73b8ff0973a70f43fbe7ca562d4d03028
describe
'35634' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACJZ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
66cec4daffb2d713e15e80563a515a08
24d07c71ea9c009b223da1c681873c5aba436e09
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKA' 'sip-files00103.tif'
0671c2e58843c66a30927d3449db8dab
9a820b9dfc251cd49336b6c553223a5f1d9d6ee0
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKB' 'sip-files00103.txt'
83bb734616241b96d4abe1c695fcb82a
7b3fe07393c001b2128eb2e27c5886415a72d3ae
describe
'8881' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKC' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
e0fbf46a420a35c11dc475e1837dfd30
7058147977806bc86a8c0e504b4027cfdf1365ea
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKD' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
d63bef6923298b9d687b54b0286ca5be
d44ed979ece7f0673b0c8b7a4d3eb0198e6e6dac
describe
'112874' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKE' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
6dc6e3f92758053f02a7be7b745ebbf0
ea42641c3e2827b3afc658d2009118b61ad5ddfb
describe
'28214' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKF' 'sip-files00104.pro'
208b6d520ab1b97d95a58a5c4b4c5c37
dc3d908633e67e9118c484a412eb1b7ec3f4b31c
describe
'34874' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKG' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
aa1342059bd6863fb218566b72926d59
be187c5acd9e4e9a53f341a3be93c3cacf9d5556
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKH' 'sip-files00104.tif'
2f9b4d1c3e2ed7e1e971b3e58702c689
eb29aa6064460295a030efc2e8c4cb3227fd6ca1
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKI' 'sip-files00104.txt'
bec3aa49bcbc76e4b1e156cc44413f9a
ba9f7a716282fcba9042189f929725ddd779d404
describe
'8931' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKJ' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
dc4275c2867562be88b4b9397a1a0c36
09976487c056833cb0099af84ea2b10292632326
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKK' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
997e28cc05b0d62dcd02c791728540ea
c79a006be6bbcd130bb18978e0d97dc2794c6875
describe
'108841' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKL' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
3a5fe568a3d2fbf443981d82de3ba28c
5849c5c78eef2d8b1d1ff31cdcc82c6a86a08029
describe
'831' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKM' 'sip-files00105.pro'
8c4d3d95d7b98fcc5063f8e4df7eb2b4
89e170ff96065ba41bfa6932e117d4eedafd2788
'2012-01-14T14:14:38-05:00'
describe
'28407' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKN' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
826cea0ed3cd1287c229feb885e879ff
3fac668a334bff0b4cacdabeff974a13e6d23838
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKO' 'sip-files00105.tif'
519f58cd539f21160266d1d1d6a311f0
600d0c2ef3766d7370c12ceb937bfd5b4cb2109a
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKP' 'sip-files00105.txt'
80515cd7ea6159052aebba491bb27b53
cd5d9930f5cd5dc9b3e98d8937e4317caf86728f
describe
'7436' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKQ' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
7b1bee2d25253fcfd2d22b2eeb356f4a
2e2034cc6bf08521436c86d82e3ce7f51c60d431
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKR' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
cc153d03d41867d32251a2daf5d729b6
067ade308e1babaebb6fa62a0e3376ba7519b124
describe
'25067' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKS' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
0250cd5a110f38c1663958bffdcab70a
947c07e8ed09e0a53874d490671e7ae99cbd76af
describe
'4796' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKT' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
b1a47c8dd159ab7b33578c3d7295e81e
15279f61ffb6347ff32fe3dfffe6ec4b659ed60f
'2012-01-14T14:17:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKU' 'sip-files00106.tif'
fbbd1c0f141f8f1e2b51feffa9b2f619
563a6a0947e05b6cef003ae3b596bcf0bb0a2175
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKV' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
d151e547292218a1bb69d7689650b313
4dbb62858cac2d73c5803c5e125922fdb19f0255
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKW' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
a03e7df1e5650c66426dddd4770e50e8
b336eb46dc37b905e4c2d48970bd421839c7aa40
describe
'113539' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKX' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
1903476b9bb6c3bc86aa7f2423e7bca8
0fc582e421eb57bb71300e5d7b052ecfd874a786
describe
'30133' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKY' 'sip-files00107.pro'
33b658756da3f9be2624d2c044eacc97
8f1df619785faf3b37d3b7f750ced66e4b06fb26
'2012-01-14T14:16:25-05:00'
describe
'35832' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACKZ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
ee1c1f5b2fcc7318b376bb2c1bf18ae6
05635957706ed7f598a34fcff2586b159979c0fd
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLA' 'sip-files00107.tif'
db7c97a5e34a7bcacc1cb91460b0530a
14b38abeb46036b119c9fc70562520ee9589210f
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLB' 'sip-files00107.txt'
edcf547a57b87ebb75d257eca029034c
0d3b0c6911e0798456a676a508bcf1c9ad19f7c8
describe
'8747' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLC' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
a081be14cbcc5c17eadd424399462ca5
b080a88a051deace8da1dc36032040d0f0491cf6
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLD' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
26cff0c390681aaeb3b4bf8f41af3bb2
4e92ae8776c45981573f85ae81beaaa5823fcc26
describe
'124418' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLE' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
47f1a7ea7941aa00049c08806938a3f0
cea3602c8b9b2ad39c377ec183bff81018c1ad38
describe
'30517' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLF' 'sip-files00108.pro'
95898c6e24db7894caf87b2f96d6b9d3
1bd0b443ca59635ee230a786170ae54acdc77ac9
describe
'38022' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLG' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
e5f498771e4089c47a4c19885c9ced34
35e9b5a65cf328c2274698bc636555af84b51a4a
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLH' 'sip-files00108.tif'
806ea01c3ab9373c609e4951403b72e0
f6ddbd818781268a6c486de6a4fc9d3c9059643f
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLI' 'sip-files00108.txt'
4a4ddebfaa6f609c10e876bde5ec668a
254e6791466ca9c8c1326327427f727839477011
describe
'9899' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLJ' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
21ff59ccc4483bb038e63c8a6d2b8a89
cf584cce847f32e947139189e3b20203160d2c43
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLK' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
b21e5c0f26d6e16ef3f0f5e723831f01
934a1fe76420d56217310a3a8eb6deb8b8c557b5
describe
'96796' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLL' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
4826aac47820268c0ca4594d8ea19a0f
e4192f159c492cc305587778cad52252920e2b41
describe
'21617' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLM' 'sip-files00109.pro'
da09540c43a84b0058d64ca43fbabccf
4841690b241da14550ba1a42e1ca66360811a123
describe
'27638' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLN' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
9aaf2741d685703d57270e8537862e6d
a94b5caab72b9a016b04afdb7026b45203784aca
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLO' 'sip-files00109.tif'
c655e0eb30f5391d18309fe54827d282
b0dd8953732c271ea224b4495c1ceba771db767e
describe
'887' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLP' 'sip-files00109.txt'
d1fc8b7c7285598f9162d134f246f1da
e37fea1df07db39ff05e00e668e847a5ab8b842f
describe
'7104' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLQ' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
51a2a34eab462d466458bbecc4b61391
68104840935aa32b1e578844665a30dc394aaf58
'2012-01-14T14:15:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLR' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
93259eb6dcbf4d18e9ca38db30ec1c2a
b2d4379629e6e166466a5d5316bb37942af01223
describe
'119009' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLS' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
068efed24223d4e86809bf83431e3b9a
87dfb46c92a3de7c33ef07f0a38a8424dd19bcd5
describe
'30369' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLT' 'sip-files00110.pro'
0c22c351f257aba56c6bf40239bf181e
0b1eb3e4a43f54d6e50bdf3bbdfdeda7e3814d8d
'2012-01-14T14:14:03-05:00'
describe
'36864' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLU' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
3a83deb0184af1105309b02b53553460
5800ff3cdbef8125200b84dcd8b82d5c1208377b
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLV' 'sip-files00110.tif'
d86681204b7acb262021c8f8e30c5c1b
5a67edac50ad3fbb9282fdc6ae5f84dbd702a0e9
'2012-01-14T14:18:06-05:00'
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLW' 'sip-files00110.txt'
b16d7b090bbba95798142b01cef453bd
50d56ff6f2649d715fe792bf53e68e32ef63a3ee
describe
'9391' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLX' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
70e6f94928402c717da3e2d73679184f
40ffb292428c2a2459e9fe5271c4a0a1146dd719
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLY' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
62cfd33d4be801f22a40c9bc34c718e7
1a6bf9b35132ea081cca2b47986bd7f8f401cb45
describe
'112368' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACLZ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
84c2865db74b2ddd905db0c12d09aa6a
d213387a3177571fa5c9743637b98788efd8a4b0
describe
'29242' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMA' 'sip-files00111.pro'
7e670dd93c603858510eab8ebfde4ddb
36e3bd575122f8f472c2f8f71d494e11c31cf56f
describe
'35121' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMB' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
9e5aa3fc8475565f1e278879e8c227c3
6a2cb22a88178d031a841c32d36c42a2b8968b93
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMC' 'sip-files00111.tif'
1dc8c32fdb62bc38c8fa01a718773da3
024c24b81fdd9d23129caf32c37f7a4c18d4462a
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMD' 'sip-files00111.txt'
0db0c115fa32cd9e6dc4a36d1e0c98e9
040dabc9f667c993c6a83029452a6f9c25d564be
describe
'8606' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACME' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
66e6f655bc3cf8285dc573382e43242c
6b90331404fc5a35006f950419184c6bb68e1d00
describe
'320961' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMF' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
72322f78bfec4f482582939856109720
c3f069c56518d54e320b602be0a063da38c120d0
describe
'119241' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMG' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
0ef4dfdf9ce681e39c5c7d43dfe75795
34400d06479249c4f70731e062f3d9eb067f7fa6
describe
'27065' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMH' 'sip-files00112.pro'
5b4ed7aa05be5279e944bd901c9c16cf
0325fa542d98fd140a1b7d7f0ffb350442f91092
describe
'35515' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMI' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
871ed5b0ef8692135ecec14a55a7d780
fa5a3fd8028290248ead950098ae367d2426b1af
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMJ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
c24b971aa12855b598963c876c9e4f36
2944850d4a30908c98b31375372fd7dd3867ea16
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMK' 'sip-files00112.txt'
1d84136cbb63e0a947d8c136fa7a8025
77e587204144885f89190514f8179378bbf9b307
describe
'8763' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACML' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
7c19c18b26e4d88139046a5b1f1ba6af
706d9b16caef94312803176fe0fa9a2e8f85f0f2
describe
'320891' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMM' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
6dbae7661fa220211cc34783714e47ad
bd228914b4a0d927bf54d6ac8513234c557f90e8
describe
'111082' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMN' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
b1bb28882ccf61e3a63ee6b4177137cb
d09bc31835a77b4f2ff33f5117cc18f7e8bd061f
describe
'26738' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMO' 'sip-files00113.pro'
1799559f8796fd850bb36f7d9b5e3bf1
5a91759d0d34811b49effab82db009a5047cb916
describe
'31986' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMP' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
c04bf621fac6ecf6ef702c92040aae6f
1374e6b6d451fa772f7d374f172919e1ab22789c
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMQ' 'sip-files00113.tif'
3e9e81e99d55cb07f71a656c316de76a
65e0c4cb136b0b6f17b022dab85125e8a0415a8e
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMR' 'sip-files00113.txt'
23470a21daf7b24029aa6eb12ec18c0f
8f0d2e2dc265bf2de11ae56f0493365e9ffa5441
describe
'8352' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMS' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
112df16a75a428297d4e3eecdc3afca2
ae00d8d4af3bce88c125fe9be6037f41d387b678
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMT' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
571b29ee808d4a4ead8777cdc8c40e59
91d6522721e034f29359074a89598c56c665f98f
describe
'121139' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMU' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
9c10bdb196089d5377e0791683415f56
4c485b40fedf9d4bb1ec5b42327980bbb8cc900a
describe
'30735' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMV' 'sip-files00114.pro'
39865a55d1e78c14f6856b4e63b22ebf
f212adaf5576fdbf81e53c3abd3705cfab22ffa6
describe
'36420' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMW' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
f8476cf9bfd6485f4d9ae878dd47cb19
2ded32017602982a5b9a3e60dfbb44f20793d375
'2012-01-14T14:18:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMX' 'sip-files00114.tif'
afd3a7b5fcabe3d01351c85d92664346
e16a15900e61c5333e3c3747780cf91f31e9ae59
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMY' 'sip-files00114.txt'
8d7346ccb2ad562ac00d78cf18f47cf6
f44f5337c791b76efd73975b4e3b07b25335666d
describe
'9137' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACMZ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
c2821dadde35f308481753ce6abe8f0f
52d123fdf7232c63d971bdabd19d355246f1da75
describe
'320894' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNA' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
9e6dd3cf250633e109a1e3fea27be0a9
a3255773b9975f803575034a813e2eb59fe2c629
describe
'102915' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNB' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
2ef272d803f35a681ac72d054eda83cc
f0c11c4cc82b2f2924f0fe61dd3a27a3c60c8a69
describe
'15699' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNC' 'sip-files00115.pro'
f0304bbdd71eff9d2f345a3172c6b913
a3077e3808fab1c94ded189475e918f223508edf
describe
'30330' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACND' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
060895ae4936663ced2538df84a107e0
3ccbf3551b9ba2259f727666802ae5b9ba3782be
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNE' 'sip-files00115.tif'
aec29c960ec2f534721ec9199c1a52e4
80095b24151105aea5b091a8731bc58819d8c923
describe
'647' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNF' 'sip-files00115.txt'
2147667da91dd0f34430621a2318cbf1
53e2966d92fb2f6023724d9f8b821d334a95c338
describe
'7869' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNG' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
2c7236a4023036bc35ae68e8c3b4e264
b73a6bef5c2763ea2a280fd127d82c07ec859835
describe
'320936' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNH' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
3726c8982136a9b5424cedf51e49a388
d4d0545c14e4986851fd1ace7d313ff656f24910
describe
'130904' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNI' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
2cfc0082ffc6d2bdac6600cb5aac63a7
f8ff43e0bcf982e0a7a441630abc4d25e4ba8df8
'2012-01-14T14:13:49-05:00'
describe
'30753' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNJ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
e20b5e0a2346f4109cc3839a18adaf56
4b11ec104c836daddb8c3c63048a7d29e06b5413
describe
'38875' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNK' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
83b73d20046a29c588d20a3b4b273b1f
8e688db4b38df945e145fd85b1ce956756dd40e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNL' 'sip-files00116.tif'
1c5cadc9614d1dd604aa960f73ab6db7
53fae75b9d687304f905c8dd14716edc2460b8c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNM' 'sip-files00116.txt'
95439116b07c0623d3b20807a26e6c58
69a5f17bf52705b6e864b91a2ee06d93c1b1405e
describe
'9417' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNN' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
d740d1d9fc269df5cc8befcce980ef20
95e5c2ac8d5ca2cdf9e5859ce59c1cb8255dd91e
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNO' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
40894dcd8cb55c4e00bd1bb8c248fecc
ac423e86c8c48c02b7aa47acd0d7838e03677643
describe
'98871' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNP' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
91d44ed56bd3ccf6a975b6c2d5ab6cb2
e07277cf71c368c6bcc25a96468d55e84d7d580a
describe
'18952' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNQ' 'sip-files00117.pro'
9d308d6e0aac41b1848d56be317602f7
03c0f53c61096bfdf0794e4d1b26dd9fe1c9de5a
describe
'27747' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNR' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
47ac3c4c6ccdb4a0d89064958cc80ab6
16768b78826edb27dceaacc018c1ac248d133da0
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNS' 'sip-files00117.tif'
ba84f34ece744406286215414bdad79c
0e6f7fb24982bc71fdee6277310915c9befcb970
describe
'787' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNT' 'sip-files00117.txt'
5c3d5c3cb2074194e90ed32aff95055e
052ed90810676068913fccfd45e2c386c3e7cd48
describe
'7016' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNU' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
a552c2e6268721af745f8d36c64c1697
baba0bddcb5e161c26dba506273cafea0e764ead
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNV' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
813fc9dc8b17dbd1c3d8cee4c46b6316
debc6832ac753f244a9f0b4b4943da2ce375b8d2
describe
'121859' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNW' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
bfc17fd8b8bf65340df3d1388f24be08
75b522887bc1874887031b007fd6533afc72f1c5
describe
'28836' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNX' 'sip-files00118.pro'
99a5fde2e24613e6072d7a7592f5d8db
3ec223403f321093ecf311b72c9814da6b7c727c
describe
'36826' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNY' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
a6667665fe3b568759ebb98a12bf299b
1561cd03c6b17fb02d9de869d65d668542337284
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACNZ' 'sip-files00118.tif'
7bd5606514effea8faab78cf8b6588d3
1432ecb82b7cbe9a76357ff9944e3a725b1adadd
'2012-01-14T14:17:29-05:00'
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOA' 'sip-files00118.txt'
a27bc8bf47378cdd0abfad7d42b706c5
dca3f312c648ba29a09a1642f983137dee72503c
describe
'9262' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOB' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
1d651e3cb9afd033ec9e93054fa0c73f
66f37e230a6037a6b04eca2b06e27a5600dc50c5
describe
'320954' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOC' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
9073708d74da1229f718a7443d94d41b
4300e0ddac9b3a092ceb6d3e74fac3aae9aaa6d1
describe
'119143' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOD' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
e0233e2ea0c949dd87334138cc461883
9456d3b27449ed75445bb9932d1212fba26dabd6
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOE' 'sip-files00119.pro'
695d669db4011c0d5e4edac7ad0c167f
7c510764308da3f790890d460d6940b5c84a5f26
describe
'36066' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOF' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
b00227d55301c1ef1d281bfa1d8d3850
dc4d626f72325660b65a9459f2e15bd51a0c7f0b
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOG' 'sip-files00119.tif'
14d9fe55e29c18044bb35e95826b9afb
1ab354dd170ade452b0df46ea7d19acb1f2ad27b
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOH' 'sip-files00119.txt'
ea5e1ec0ccac3c804ed57a8a166023ef
62d531f9f8e4483c1ca6d3889e0726d5b1e34529
'2012-01-14T14:17:07-05:00'
describe
'9110' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOI' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
85850c453131ade2cd23bb4c4b83f610
b8c28fa0472d17aadd5b5aba6c0ec601703b8d0f
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOJ' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
f9688b74fd5d7849e0748b401035fb24
6099c8fec58aa251c79e8c900ed2c813d6f39299
describe
'117127' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOK' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
a3e401a5bf8045ad4a16644bd3591a5e
8dc0b1b5f0e4c843852ab3143a54e0c6ad188811
describe
'26882' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOL' 'sip-files00120.pro'
a865948e1b14dc087647588cf7bd9e48
f6ec560fe288e326505cffe3ad13190f389dc956
describe
'34068' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOM' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
9e8d1efccd57a4e6db4c4069bd241d29
ff9ac1e37becd4310d4a6faa2e8bfb4b90deb564
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACON' 'sip-files00120.tif'
4539617d130d3cf4e6717d5bbaa06de4
79d27e56d24a0f4d31217343cfa872f47c67655d
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOO' 'sip-files00120.txt'
3acf55df4f5cf51cd719770d7d1c3b6f
02a7a8d9f5576d4c13f0147a09b48b6675fa2a95
describe
'8746' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOP' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
4a29b3df3cca5581656e2aa20fb9f159
4cc57b759a7f7a62f8595eed03c9064d0e4483de
describe
'320848' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOQ' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
0ab9c6ce762396562bfac1b8864df662
043bbf0b25611c4ad6524f10bb240981e6237443
'2012-01-14T14:17:30-05:00'
describe
'121692' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOR' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
bbff9cb2017fc91af682ed7ce7678d39
7c4cc952151be37dee66961159c29288bb134457
describe
'29081' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOS' 'sip-files00121.pro'
7008dd91c7bc2c123fbd831bd48353e2
9fff219549eba614291078426a51a270913440b1
describe
'35328' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOT' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
3a5486035c2eaed0a6fb10be1c45907b
4b287610fa6fe3b04aaa3ab0ea47be77f553b764
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOU' 'sip-files00121.tif'
ac83f25ee908834956962e57efe306e1
ea1ad028d13d7560a5137934e3538d53348cc5be
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOV' 'sip-files00121.txt'
8d0b56a33223d80a588855f6104b5f81
2a5e0fa5ef5c215789baa7f936df4f54f3da5db3
describe
'8999' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOW' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
ca91d0387a03904809de504bf8a172b1
da55b108dbae80f0eb0660a32204e68768877a3c
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOX' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
d0ffd59daf366ed2233f0d5f63cf1078
59aeae04a8bcf290b368e068a7292c11ace90e16
describe
'114674' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOY' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
39a2fb13d72d837c57f47556c1005429
09a198d9e0af9aa1ad37f0eedb25a6afee8bf93a
describe
'28248' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACOZ' 'sip-files00122.pro'
f5a8d8894247fe92d151abf923748170
aca4e2558e47d641a1c19a6c6dbdfb2e066d7996
describe
'36387' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPA' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
7247a68d2bdde4f8959906f61b2fe976
30f451f79a47c4afa7fc502ced1648e49d402e5c
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPB' 'sip-files00122.tif'
e040423a0310b264dc25d3c6cc58aaf1
e8b2abfb536e7c4e2ef449e0a68c311c73c026fc
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPC' 'sip-files00122.txt'
ea692f4c60a8cbb9166ec853eccb985e
03e11b42bcf3a214f885cda9790549fdade8d206
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPD' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
fb4130ab85978b7ebdaa0cd42f136f76
920214fde508656b78e677344520bc9f347d1e1d
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPE' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
11d3f4522e04f278263f79f0e6d2919c
a96179d9cc618e943536448db7c6f792e8d7c1ff
describe
'110628' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPF' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
e09273d19aef9201fbebea7f1bd9a5ec
f6dfb1484b2632bc3b3f6193e3e55a10c9033c50
describe
'27694' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPG' 'sip-files00123.pro'
e43066c559e714b8ed7edb9d43073162
2a01b3b48aefb14f3e46ab53d924707b83ef0146
describe
'33854' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPH' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
f5776fcb5e3f77451741febccaa59ef5
c9862d5b340776d0357f8a54ef1e72fbe540de1b
'2012-01-14T14:17:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPI' 'sip-files00123.tif'
65097fa10a95b346171ad361b3a8828e
0e743d22e64a00f7bab87e441ca3841652ac5652
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPJ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
9eedb2d38bfd403e85e422aec2ba0267
3dc0594f0e9f293cac10bb342662af5b08c64bc9
describe
'8752' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPK' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
3c88b927e074bea92479064702869489
b46f31cc627953e31197103d80dedd6a0d1121d9
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPL' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
9cd2f95a1cc7b77a64e16d9e59b0aba6
fc4a8ab1f3ef51b7c7f951686c0455611782e3a9
describe
'118774' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPM' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
0dde83d20139df9565e1c730fe19ff7b
d547fde971f90cf97a4f1b0d2b8473d14901643d
'2012-01-14T14:13:05-05:00'
describe
'25475' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPN' 'sip-files00124.pro'
2818f57f79896ae61ea49044aaccd145
ebe1eceff4b9482cce1f7dd67132ebf985aa39a8
describe
'35615' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPO' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
a8d7d15ed2e2fd97cb37d93c95d92e79
f99b8b407c5b144eb2ee0cb629fcf86b8bad8089
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPP' 'sip-files00124.tif'
26d4a8a32f36a30bd611f42594c4d7a6
57f1f3cf08f0271ec0ff7fe3b09e01cef3fe9264
describe
'1034' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPQ' 'sip-files00124.txt'
3b30328f2fd2f112bf6269b6361505fd
220349c939ffc658b3738a3410ab44a83d72cb2c
describe
'9196' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPR' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
52057c6701e60836b95d3788a5de5f22
041945380d503352a40834dd331be2b08794d0be
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPS' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
1becf404bac4b8ac0745b4a1759249e5
16049024f9c764fc87dcf1647d6d179e9f2f3dba
describe
'127442' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPT' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
a9081f692e1c6fa29af829766f260223
4e3b18c7f18a1db350cbfc4299268e458ae18ef1
describe
'29433' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPU' 'sip-files00125.pro'
d2cfea90ce570e750bd511f2a2e0646c
6a3564da415b306e2cb7314a12753f3534ab5c67
describe
'37587' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPV' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
166b5db4e814fe468606d1f0a5f501cc
c7f071e9559a67000c772be23acaa7a130dec0a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPW' 'sip-files00125.tif'
47f162c3b80e4da3ab254c96b952e49e
28993bf6dd9bfe5686038590a587312b563aa12b
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPX' 'sip-files00125.txt'
568832824666061006079c78bfbebb65
8c83c99575f1f207d6c37c259525beee814acf2e
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPY' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
0a7bfa54128e2892cbb45900005f08d0
5f15702904229dcaa1067200f5bc12a1489369f7
describe
'320724' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACPZ' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
134713f00ed9c235a36e59e7908e612a
98313ae2e75d04cadb975750de4a5723121850b6
describe
'72458' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQA' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
0d27b493529efcfe131623e11d87a420
5ea6ff93bfff1aea3057689537b1b72d1ce3d3a9
describe
'7468' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQB' 'sip-files00126.pro'
f2eed6540ded7e492a82f8200e6a3553
8d8727ff4dfff6165cd50b80e56e933c7233fc5a
describe
'16496' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQC' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
117dd6d35e52daf5f858d3e05495f730
432d68f0054986d072a8d9648dcba74f1c361312
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQD' 'sip-files00126.tif'
9955163ce25690a7575f885e27fd4fa7
6d498d1070efbff307cbb2e933ab89357bbeb882
describe
'340' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQE' 'sip-files00126.txt'
b95af0a6579a6e71523b1ee276a90999
16fc1cea0e14eaa1ec8d251a6ab40a836e610eaa
describe
'3931' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQF' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
73f174808a152624b00a8edbdfb70d0c
4feef0c716680c477bee6ba10096e8742b7c7b18
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQG' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
7698ddef566127a60da6effbf7607dec
d42a6cbc135074d3911d1c9849662eddbbe5b1ef
describe
'132531' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQH' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
5817021656e63b28e5732afe68fda876
75816f55b029bca5f4859f489f9c77fbc60aa154
describe
'33722' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQI' 'sip-files00127.pro'
0a597311c5b9213e57e42e1fba92a3ca
546cf467f32962dbee46b3b2cbd5aad19b5744e4
describe
'36004' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQJ' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
260342447a62c4f1023f8c78088449ad
3efbc0ac56e5dcbbcaf99e7d00d9f4191524f605
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQK' 'sip-files00127.tif'
ae79b8408849a2dd961c8a901f8eb682
a9cce86dc0219b6b1e66d79e5f7aa29e218ebca2
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQL' 'sip-files00127.txt'
b0afb1c0a706118892c6bd4d421167a9
a1d90a00ae0892a29a1476c5f021d25672c3e5c5
describe
'9075' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQM' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
e7376107b1c46bcb7164eed02423cb41
e0a7d18f1e200bb9ad6bd0ef2369e4d494b26133
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQN' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
995c280d5505adc2ee90d6713f9eadb3
907e6917384af0d3f1ba0cd690d26bd39b503374
describe
'131477' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQO' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
701f8be02010f8ed8a3034bc644366b7
dfd642d62efda45e17c86dd6d132c34b1d3c0ce2
'2012-01-14T14:17:18-05:00'
describe
'43491' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQP' 'sip-files00128.pro'
4b1df79c0bc19e56f929a62031b03171
6ca89d7bf48edd8102c39aa6005e99be9b16a8df
describe
'35304' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQQ' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
34c5031a2ba80390a7771fef39e1bbaa
bb5ce20a21485b8ec3c8e854d59bc503586a656d
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQR' 'sip-files00128.tif'
d1736cbd9fa6faf226f3b504ab932ae1
8acb1b187b248be0282651a19c88af8795f0fae4
describe
'1890' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQS' 'sip-files00128.txt'
427ea01aa3894ec036ab5efa73b06004
bcdbf29cd83cb97e7afa8973bbd0fd249d32d948
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQT' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
cb7a06c9d4b5cce705ffcfdf7da689cd
590c0b7df914f6d66df5767c5695e23567184cea
describe
'320962' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQU' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
5d16a906d84b12d184e0f943a6f25489
1149ce1fe6c8484c9c4636af82d0e402c6339831
describe
'160382' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQV' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
30b8be03ca4ce65af3e181e2bee1862b
261a748a0c4db9cef749111c690a32d93a28ea4f
describe
'60894' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQW' 'sip-files00129.pro'
e99aed6ad6216ebff5fb60e3489318d0
fbdcd5edcea24fe3b293680ed66bb53bbe4adf12
describe
'40369' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQX' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
e214ae798f9f776082316c76fcf840b9
3c09aa245fcd7b628f9d31aca31e31a296cf9a63
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQY' 'sip-files00129.tif'
03d8d96f38e073de0959a1680dc153bf
02b9bfb7b5eb0b223cd25511d5d311dad1206e65
describe
'2558' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACQZ' 'sip-files00129.txt'
4fe8b00d71cee3635240a712baaf9141
c4033fcb814c42527f21b96c01962ad9841f66a1
describe
'9879' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRA' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
0269d6dbf678b7bd4f604f985e92da00
aec2e8c447515a6c58612358049bd5df072329f4
describe
'320879' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRB' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
60eb74cf46b1ccacbc138fbde3cac621
5caea7b2575526615e5fead8f1d9a9f684b994c2
'2012-01-14T14:16:18-05:00'
describe
'150093' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRC' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
a26c81d53c8a19fd61cdaca7ba3d38cc
5fc3a948e88da0f1a4158600a6dbaec2b62a3835
describe
'56703' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRD' 'sip-files00130.pro'
28cddc68132edd1877fc1c3eca55de80
0a06650b4746a6b1d763085be45f0465807ffd6a
describe
'38730' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRE' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
c1ef54dc4f63610eb05787b9f495400b
de78a59a9c99bdb595bb9903a3ee1f60e7fcb1af
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRF' 'sip-files00130.tif'
6833241d54fa32541ceced995f2ed564
a62633ab4b367401ca6db2bfd83545f2ecdaf625
describe
'2378' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRG' 'sip-files00130.txt'
b18b9b93639a9b1c3ef99d31b77f1acb
95bf1579467297c5bb2a644058cd867db3c23491
describe
'9494' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRH' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
76024a9394a762a8e2f2f3cc7fcf0b08
72c7a07c39a525888b4991209e530e3764cb545b
describe
'407576' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRI' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
36885add656f5008d73ab87b1ee9e399
9f7d95ae967ba441c889f6c73d0bb728a91f3960
describe
'66665' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRJ' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
2f5195e0c5e8add588fe16989d1b50b2
35eb48541f58c7e2cc0a59bf35eef325d9305966
describe
'14381' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRK' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
0487e3dfedc28b1d2ccd184521a85cb5
b9e21274356c9edf206cb1b2464c40b1f6a05b6c
describe
'9791772' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRL' 'sip-files00135.tif'
3933bbcbe4025e9c2e4a24fba4d7251d
984cbd45e115955042aed52653c6dbfe8de72733
describe
'3767' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRM' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
40fb54047c46df0ce7154e654e41d1e9
56164bfe0f8fd2f0552e6eff576ea737c60f048f
describe
'379766' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRN' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
f9375bbfc9f212a7605e9172d9d6f546
882562c2d78276f914c08345bee5253ab600f718
describe
'146467' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRO' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
36219136366dc5d832fa47da15bf97ed
67a12b432228fd4d51083efc3bc622bc492c439f
describe
'27339' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRP' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
1da4fd39ce9c3dd1c10346476c44556b
d975235d43c137a2a30ce8df3c2884df9c4c5eba
describe
'9119676' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRQ' 'sip-files00136.tif'
89471eda4384140a2ebc7057e8a0861c
ca9e90d69b69cc30602fa9b132e2b5e47dc48117
describe
'5139' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRR' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
5a382403dcd7c4d204244abf292ae422
129b2f16e11ae111e1568b5ee39004a99113f09e
describe
'67969' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRS' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
a30363364fac3eda9c43193fb09949b0
1c423984902da7772511580a156c7f7d4c257d48
describe
'34932' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRT' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
e5040182f5daf6f8a49870f819cec551
d10979be5a40dcf2c57b3f5f7557b7c3aa372199
describe
'228' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRU' 'sip-files00137.pro'
b13105af447bbf2055b08aa20cb180d3
fd4b99e7c2d88a1d9a0bab410b4999e69e143a67
describe
'7836' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRV' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
a01e49db88a87d093ccc326564b9eccc
de2e4504ad571dcffa57aed0780e568f104e5c03
describe
'1640712' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRW' 'sip-files00137.tif'
f1eab8cb64a180baafbce078f886a506
c1102a7e4d8b2b514a865a0294c4fbd1b2c11e2b
describe
'3258' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRX' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
b969720d35f9103798ab25c3db6a6c6f
49c50cdde44c50da67d281957714715c304639bc
describe
'72' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRY' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
ab4216eaf377e55cae224d22d8e20568
b9bf266afbbadd0c855159f592beb0a753915b13
describe
'189207' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACRZ' 'sip-filesUF00087263_00001.mets'
bb73c14cf78ff146775d78730bc57ca5
1a2dd76a59f63c86ff36d97c02460aecef18307c
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T09:05:56-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'245497' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAACfileF20090314_AAACSC' 'sip-filesUF00087263_00001.xml'
4d15e1469530ed55959ef4025506f9aa
89bd443471bbca1ef64c400d4a3b44dde83c63ee
describe
'2013-12-13T09:05:53-05:00'
xml resolution


xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008726300001datestamp 2008-10-22setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title The fortunes of the fellow : : a companion book to The farrier's dog and his fellowFarrier's dog and his fellow.dc:creator Dromgoole, Will Allen, 1860-1934Colonial Press (Boston, Mass.) ( Printer )C.H. Simonds & Co. ( elt; prt )dc:subject Children -- Juvenile fiction. -- Conduct of lifeConduct of life -- Juvenile fiction.Orphans -- Juvenile fiction.Dogs -- Juvenile fiction.Horseshoers -- Juvenile fiction.Children and death -- Juvenile fiction.Kindness -- Juvenile fiction.Bldn -- 1898.dc:description Publisher's advertisements follow text.dc:publisher L.C. Page and Companydc:date 1898dc:type Bookdc:format 122, 4 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00087263&v=00001002225535 (ALEPH)261340258 (OCLC)ALG5810 (NOTIS)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English