Citation
The Little V.C.

Material Information

Title:
The Little V.C.
Creator:
Burnside, Helen Marion ( Author, Primary )
Smedley, W. T ( William Thomas ), 1858-1920 ( Illustrator )
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Edinburgh
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
96 p., [2] leaves of plates : ill. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- Victoria Cross ( lcsh )
Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Religious life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Right and wrong -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Kindness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1898
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Content Advice:
The little V.C. -- Willie Dale's trial -- Little Mother May.
Citation/Reference:
Osborne catalogue,
General Note:
With added illustrated t.-p.
General Note:
The frontispiece and added t.-p. vignette are signed W.T.S. [i.e. William Thomas Smedley].
Statement of Responsibility:
by Helen Marion Burnside.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026615373 ( ALEPH )
ALG3394 ( NOTIS )
63077171 ( OCLC )

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THE LITTLE V.C.



OUR TED

Page 12

NELSON AND SONS

T.

London, Edinburgh, and New York









THE LITTLE V.C.

’

_ BY

HELEN MARION BURNSIDE
AUTHOR OF “THE Lost LETTER; OR, THE ADVENTURES OF A soeenas STAMP,”

ETC. ETC.



© Great may he be who can command
And rule with just and tender sway,
Yet is diviner wisdom taught
Better by him who can obey.” 7 it
A. A. PROCTER.



T. NELSON AND SONS
London, Edinburgh, and New York



1898 ©





CONTENTS.
“1 “OUR TED,” 4... ae eee “9
‘IL, THE STORY OF THE STANDARD, _ .... er 16.
1, “TERRIBLE TED,” bn eee wed a
Iv. BUGLER BROWN, te his wig BE
V, TEL-EL-KEBIR, .... oe ae 49 -
VI. THE LITTLE V.C., * as ae fae FEL.

WILLIE DALE’S TRIAL, ° Sa sake ase 72

<_<

LITTLE MOTHER MAY,’ me ne wl abe BBS

u





Tie: LITT LE Ve



CHAPTER I.
“OUR TED.”

OOD-DAY, sergeant.” ° ee
An old Chelsea pensioner, who was >
pottering with his one hand in his little strip. :
of garden, straightened himself up as ‘quickly —
as he could, and saluted with an expression of ~
delighted surprise on his rugged old face.
. “Good-day, general,” he returned, grasping
the hand stretched out to him with atontions
“T did not know you were back in town, sir.” .
~ © Came™ yesterday, bag and: baggage; we're —
in the “old rooms in the Terrace at present.
How. goes the world with you, old Biond? :





10 ‘OUR TED.”

“As well as age and rheumatism permit,
general. I was wishing just now that my old
back was a bit more lissom-like, for there’s a
deal wants doing in this plot of mine before
the winter. Ah, here comes our Ted, my
grandson, general ; he promised to run round
and water them dahlias for me, as he often
does, bless him !”

_ A boy in the uniform of the Duke of York’s

Military School.came running up the broad,
, sunny walk at headlong speed, and seizing the

frail old soldier’s single arm with his small,
brown hands, squeezed it affectionately.

“Here I am, gran—a bit late, I know;
but there’s been a parece at Duke o’ York’s,
and I couldn’t get away.”

_ “Where’s your manners, , Ted ? Don’t you
see I’ve company, boy?” _

Ted faced round and saluted. “ Beg pardon, .
sir; I was in a hurry, and did not see you.”
And he raised a pair of honest blue eyés to

_the general’s face.

“This is my poor son’s lad, general,” said _

the sergeant. ‘Him as you were good enough



ert © OUR TED.” Bee
to get into Duke o’ York’s, yonder.—I don’t
know what you've done with your manners
to-day, boy,” he grumbled, turning to his ©
grandson. “You might speak a word of
gratitude to his honour, who has been so
good to us all, as his father was before hin.”
The lad coloured shyly. He knew all about
the general, the hero of his childish heart, but

had never met him before. He looked him’ ~~
straight in the face as he again raised his ©

hand to his cap. “I do thank you, sir,” he’
said simply. eg
The general steadily returned the boy’s

gaze, and then laid his hand kindly on his — :
shoulder. ‘You are the son of a brave man, =
my boy, and the grandson of a brave man, >.

too, as these testify,” he added, glancing kindly
at the sergeant, and lightly touching with his
gloved finger, first the empty sleeve pinned ~
across his breast, and then the medals above
ii “You come of a good stock. What do
you think of doing with yourself?”
“Soldier, sir,” replied Ted instantly, and
_with such decision that the general laughed.

“





12 a - “oor TED.” A te

« A chip of the old block, I see, sergeant.—
‘There, get along with you, lad, and put your
back into the gardening,” and he nodded |
_ kindly to the boy, who with a sudden increase

of shyness seized the watering-pot, and sent a
deluge of water over his grandfather's toes.
- The old soldier turned away. The general
was twenty years younger than the sergeant,
and straight and.alert as a boy, but no longer
-a young man, for all that.:
“A fine lad, sergeant,” he remarked, as
they strolled down-the broad, central walk of
- the hospital grounds, and seated themselves
on a sunny bench; for there was nothing the

general liked better than a chat with the ©»

veteran colour-sergeant, while such chats =
were the crowning delight of the old fellow’s — :
life. ‘A fine lad, a true chip of the old block,
as I said just now, and he knows his own mind,
too. What*sort-of character does he bear ?”

« Well, general, it isn’t me as should answer: -
that question, being his grandfather, and par
tial, for he’s all I’ve got left, you see; but since ©
you ask me, I should say a better lad never



“OUR TED.” | 13
iSped A. right. down honest, God. fearing
lad, with his heart in the right place, is our
Ted, and: so gentle and loving to his poor
mother and me. But still; boys will be boys;
and Ted: has his faults like the rest.” .

“May I ask what they are?”

“He likes his own way just a bit, general.
“He's wilful and he’s thoughtless. The captain.
yonder at Duke 0’ York’s says he lets -his
spirits run away with him, and he leads ie
other youngsters into mischief.”

“T see. . A bit of a pickle,” remarked the
general, smiling under his heavy, griaaled
moustache.

“That's it, general. His mother worrite 7

sadly about it; but there—it’s only his spirits, a

cas I tell her,” returned the sergeant, half proud «
- and half apologetic ; on sober down fast 3
enough as’ time goes on.”

Yes, yes. But discipline is discipline all
2 the more because boys are boys, my old friend,

‘as no one knows better than yourself. How- |

ever, Tl have another talk with you: about’.
ae Ted whilst I’m in town.”



XN

14 he * © OUR “TED.”

With a cheery nod General Frazer marched
off, leaving the old sergeant to nod over his
pipe in the sunshine. He threw a keen glance
over to the boy as he passed him, still busy
amongst the dahlias, and smiléd again to
himself as he did so, for Ted’s bright face had
taken his fancy, as it did that of many people.
Sergeant Brown had fought under thé
general's father. They had been boys together
_ ‘in the same village; and when young Squire
Frazer went off soldiering, young Brown must
- needs enlist in the same regiment. The poor
-.. young squire, however, was killed in his first
- engagement, leaving a girl wife and infant son
—our general. The only son of Sergeant
Brown, in his. turn, enlisted under General
Frazer. He was a thorough soldier, and a brave
- man, but weak in health.. He became attached
to a young girl, the maid of a lady on board
~ the same ship, on the passage home from India
on sick leave, and imprudently married her—
imprudently, for poor Brown’s health was so

completely shattered by many years of Indian _

- service that he died within two years of his =



OURSTED. “|: 15

marriage, leaving a baby son—our Ted. There
were therefore many ties of long-tried affection
and mutual service uniting the family of the .
general with the humble one of the Browns,
the sons of the latter having so faithfully. fol-
lowed the fortunes of the former, and there —
having been so much similarity of fate.





| CHAPTER ie
THE STORY OF THE STANDARD.

HERE was nothing our Ted loved better
than what he called “rummaging about”

-_ Chelsea Hospital. He. knew every nook and

corner of the old place, and everything in it;
and whenever he could get leave of absence,
- or a holiday which was unoccupied by school.

~~ duties, he was generally to be found there.

He was, however, one of the crack buglers in’ ~
the school band, for he had a great love for
. music, and also a sweet. tenor voice; besides
which, his pluck and strength made him an ©
adept in games, so that he could not always,

_ be spared. Not infrequently his mother and ©

grandfather might be seen stationed outside
the railings of the playground, eagerly watch- .

G
¢



THE STORY OF THE STANDARD. - 17 ©»

ing the games or drill of the sturdy youngsters ~

within ; and they would stroll away again quite
content if they had been able to catth a glimpse
of, or.exchange a few words with, their lad,
whose superior merits they would at such —
times discuss, but on quite. different grounds
—the old soldier dwelling on Ted’s pluck,.
spirit, and activity, on his straight well-set-up

young form and soldierly quickness, whilst the. es

timid and rather querulous mother admired

his sweet voice, handsome face, and loving dis- _ 2

position, and talked of the time when he would
come home to live with her, and turn his ©

book-léarning to some account, and perhaps join — |

a volunteer band—if “ gran” thought it safe !

Chelsea Hospital was much nearer to the |

Duke of York’s than his mother’s home, ‘so a

~ Ted would often beg her to meet him there in: .

preference to spending all his time in a ’bus:
getting to Camden Town and back; and.as he
said, it was more of a change for her.

One wintry afternoon Ted and his mother *
were visiting the hospital, and, with the ser- °

‘geant, had. wandered into. the chapel, where «
ge 78 ae 2 : : "



18 THE STORY OF THE STANDARD.

the boy was pointing out to her, in the tone of
awe which he always fell into on such occa-
_ sions, the various tattered banners which Bung
from the wall.

“In my opinion they want a good dusting |
and shaking,” said Mrs. Brown; “and many ~
of them would be the better for being’ burnt
_ up and replaced by new ones. Why, just look
at this: it’s fairly dropping to bits with age ~
and dust.” |

Had the -good woman proposed to burn
up the chapel itself, Ted and his grandfather
could not have exchanged glances of greater
horror.

“Why, mother, how can you?” exclaimed -
Ted. “These banners were all taken from the
enemy in some great battle, and I'll be bound,

lots of fellows lost their lives in guarding this
ene.” -

.“The more foolish they,” muttered Mrs.
‘Brown, who, considering that she was a
soldier's widow, was sadly wanting in miliary.
ardour and patriotism.

“You are right, boy,” returned the ser- —



THE STORY OF THE STANDARD. 19
geant, not heeding Mrs. Brown’s remark.
“More gallant fellows were laid low beneath -

-that banner than any other that hangs here.

"Tis the great Eagle standard of the French,
taken single-handed at the battle of Waterloo
by Sergeant Ewart of the Scots Greys.”

“ Single-handed ? gis did he do it? Do. :

tell us all about it, gran.”

“The standard was considered sacred by is
French army, who regarded it with almost -
superstitious reverence. It was guarded by
the bravest of the brave, the 15th Regiment,
which had earned the name of ‘ the Invincibles:’
Tis gay folds have floated over many a battle-
field, and the Frenchmen had come to believe
that it could not be taken, or its guards van-

quished ; but when the Scottish regiment of —

Royal Dragoons, known as ‘the terrible Scots

Greys,’ thundered down upon them from Mont va
St..Jean at the battle of Waterloo, they ‘had .
_to tell a different tale, for the banner, still .

floating over the heads of its hitherto invin-
cible guard, caught the eye of a certain gallant

young Sergeant Ewart, who proposed +o ‘his.



20 THE STORY OF THE STANDARD.

comrades to capture it. Shouting their war-
ery of ‘Scotland for ever!’ they succeeded in
reaching its neighbourhood after performing
feats of extraordinary valour. Then Ewart,
rushing on, fought his way single-handed -
. through the remnant of its resolute defenders,
seized the banner, and carried it off the field in
triumph. He was afterwards promoted to a_
commission for this brave deed. The general’s’
lady put the story into verse, and gave me a
copy of it.”

“OQ gran, do read it to us,” cried Ted,
who had drunk in the story of -heroism with
crimson cheeks, and sparkling . “yes intently
fixed on the old banner.

“Well, come away up, and I'll see about
it,” replied the sergeant, who had himself
read the well-thumbed copy of verses in).
question till he could almost have said them |
off by heart.

The trio proceeded up the stone stairs into.

a long, bright-looking corridor, and seated “
themselves near a fire just outside what Ted —
was wont to call “gran’s own den.” Mrs. _



THE STORY OF THE STANDARD. — 21

Brown would, to say the truth, have preferred
to turn over and set in order, according to her:
own ideas, her father-in-law’s few. possessions,
but Ted would hear of her doing nothing but
sitting idly, with his hand in hers; so she ~
composed herself ¢o listen, and the sergeant,
setting ‘his wide-rimmed glasses firmly on his
nose, drew in his chair -and commenced to
read with much gusto :—

“Tar Story OF THE STANDARD.

** Never, sure, was prouder trophy on a field of battle won
Than the flag whose folds so stately glittered in the summer sun,
.When Napoleon’s brave legions, and the hosts of valiant Ney,
Faced the men of Merry England, on that sad but glorious day. ©

“ Come and gone has many a summer since this tattered banner flew
O’er-the heads of Britain’s foemen, on the field 6f ‘Waterloo ;
And the barley waves its tresses, and the light-poised poppies dance,
Where our stalwart English gunners once mowed down the men of
France,

** Jena, Austerlitz, and Friedland had, in fights but late gone by, ,
Seen that well-known Eagle standard pains scathless, proud, and
high ;
And again arrayed beneath it, midst the gleam of sword and lance,
_ Pressed the yet unconquered squadron—the ‘Invincibles’ of France. -

$s Where the battle smoke was thickest, where the guns, athirst for
blood,
Laid their foemen low the fastest, had that famous squadron stood ; _
-And the Frenchmen eae fancied that the fight for them was
“won,
‘When, their’ Eagle o’er fhiaia flying, the Tnyinetbles? came on.



-

22 THE STORY OF THE STANDARD.

* To the earth fell gallant Picton, ne’er, alas! to rise again, - at:
And at every rattling volley higher grew the heaps of slain, .
Friend and foe together falling in the stern embrace of death,
Shouting fierce, defiant war-cries as they breathed their latest breath.

** Onward swept the awful reapers for a little space, and then;
Like an ocean wave advancing, came the dauntless Scottish men ;
And the pick of Franee’s army lost at. length its laurel crown,,.
When from Jean’s green heights upon them the dragoons came
thundering down.

« High above the roar of battle, through its pall of lurid laze,
Rang the shrill defiant war-cry of the ‘ terrible Scots Greys ;’
And the stern delight of battle grew in brave young Ewart’s eyes

~ As he Yowed that sacred banner soon or late should be his prize.

‘¢ Proudly yet on high it floated: sword nor shot their course could stay ;
- Over piles of dead and dying, on they held their blood-stained way,
Till the hand of daring Ewart on the banner staff was laid, .
And its price the last defender. with his life-blood dearly paid.

~ © Thére were sounds of solemn triumph in the British camp that night

As the worn and weary victors straggled in from field of fight,
And before their stern commander, England’s ‘Iron Duke,’ laid down
The proud trophy that had covered Ewart’s name with high renown.

* But their hearts were full of sorrow, and their brows were black
with gloom, ‘
For the true and valiant comrades who would never more march home,
For the homes their dear-bought conquest had made desolate that day, ©
For the widows and the orphans.in the home-land far away. ‘

“ Oft at eve in Merry England, when the fires of winter blaze;.
Folk still talk of gallant Ewart of the ‘terrible Scots Greys,’—
Tell of how he won the standard, tell of how he fought and slew,
By the score, its stout defenders on the field of Waterloo.

© And the boys of brave old Britain, sons of those who bled of old,
Feel their hearts grow hot within them when the glorious tale is:told
That shall nerve them in the future noble deeds to daré and do,
And to fight in life’s long battle like their sires at Waterloo.”

/





‘THE STORY OF THE STANDARD. Pt

i "QO gran, what a splendid man! what a
splendid deed !” cried Fed, who, in his excite-
ment as the story proceeded, had: risen, and’
now stood with his hand on his grandfather’s
knee. Several of the pensioners had gathered —
round to listen and clap their hands softly,
while they regarded the boy benevolently, for.
they were all fond of Ted, and delighted: in

his enthusiastic love of brave deeds. “I never af

heard anything so grand before. I’d give ©
the rest of my life to do a thing like that
Did Ewart get the Victoria Cross?” ,



Phere were no Victoria Crosses in these ee

days, boy. Queen Victoria—God bless her ! ee
wasn’t pore then. He gota commission, as I
- told you.”
' “IT mean to win a Victoria Cres one of
_ these days; see if I don’t,” said Ted, nodding
to the company at large. ;
“ Deeds, not words, Fed, should be a ike ae
dier’s motto,” returned the old mar with a

warning look. “ But we haven't quite finished | .-

the poem yet ; here’s a bit more that mother’ll
like to hear.” —



(

24 ~ - THE STORY OF THE STANDARD. /
* By the peaceful sunlit river, where the sails go up and down,

Just a stone’s-throw from’ the turmoil and the rush of London town,
Stands the ancient cloistered homestead where our veterans, maimed,’

and grey, dp :
Rest from heat and toil of battle, at the close of life’s long day. /

_ © And that banner, torn and faded, hangs within the chapel now, |
Where: the lights from painted windows on its tattered glories glow,
And the weary, war-worn heroes bend their hoary heads to pray
N eath the proudly-cherished trophy of that ne re forgone day,—

‘© Ti] they answer to the roll-call that shall muster them at last,
When the shades of night are falling, and the long day’s work is past; ~
Till they see the bright dawn breaking, in the land where war
shall cease,
And the en bids them welcome to His Scie peace.”

“Yes, I like that now,” said Mrs. Brown
tearfully ; “that’s Christian, and peaceful, and
comforting-like. That’s where your dear father
has gone, Ted, and where I hope and pray
we shall all go some day.”

“T can cheerfully say ‘ Amen’ to that,” pat
in the sergeant, and his daughter-in-law went -
on,— Z

“ But I wonder at you, father, putting dan-
gerous ideas into the lad’s head with them
wild, heathen soldier-stories, that I do. I
never had no opinion of soldiers myself—par -
don my saying this, gentlemen—though I did
go and marry the dear fellow that’s gone, and



THE STORY OF THE STANDARD. 25.
never repented it neither ; but then he died
decently in his own bed, through getting. his
liyer grilled ‘in ‘that areeche Tne, as I ne
my hoy will do the same.’
_ “What! get his liver grilled?” asked the
- sergeant dryly.

“No, die in his bed, of course,” ’ returned ;
Mrs. Brown; “but in the common course. of

nature we'll all of us be gone before his time~ =

comes,” and she laid her hand lovingly on - '
Ted’s head.
Now though the veteran regarded “Mrs: ea

_ Brown with all due affection and respect, both ~
as a woman and as his son’s widow, and per-
haps most of all as the mother of Ted, the
- apple of his old eye, he could not always listen
with patience to her opinions on his profes-

sion. “She’s one of the best of women, and. -
has been the best of mothers to the little
lad,” he would say to his comrades, “but she. .
is damping in her ideas, mates ; that’s where it
is. There’s no denying she’s rather damping.”
~The old fellows smiled and shook their
- heads. They knew Mrs. Brown and her



26. THE STORY OF. THE STANDARD.

peculiarities as well as her father-in-law did;
' and to them, as well as to herself, it was
nothing short of a mystery that such a.woman
should have married into a martial family
like the Browns. Ted himself instinctively ~
avoided talking to her about his military

hopes and aspirations : it would be time enough

to tell her when the time came, he thought to

himself... It being then the hour for visitors

to leave, the sergeant gave his “damping”

- daughter-in-law his single arm, and conducted

her downstairs and to the hospital gates with a

_: kindness and courtesy which would have done

credit. to that most. courteous of gentlemen,

the general himself, Master Ted “letting off

the steam,” as he called it, by sliding down

the banister and turning coach-wheels across

. the courtyard. ; J



CHAPTER III.

“TERRIBLE TED.”

A. FEW days before the commencement of ©
the Christmas holidays, sad news went ‘-
forth from the Duke of York’s School both to. —
the hospital and the little home in Camden
‘Town—news which made Widow Brown tie
on her bonnet with trembling fingers, and
sent the old Chelsea pensioner off to the
school at a quicker pace than he had been —
known to walk at for many a year, in order to
“learn the rights of it,’ as he said, from the~
~ corporal at the lodge. The news was this:—
Boy Brown, the bugler, was laid up in the —
hospital of the school. with a broken. collar-
bone, having previously broken the head of
another “Dukie,” and half killed him. Boy



28 _ . TERRIBLE TED.”

Brown was also charged with having been ©

_ guilty of serious insubordination. Breathless __

with haste.and tremulous with anxiety, the -
old sergeant arrived at the lodge, where the
corporal, who knew him well enough, guessed
instantly what had brought him.

“You've no cause to be anxious, Sergeant
Brown,” he said kindly. “The lad’s going on
-as well as possible; he’ll soon be about again.”

‘And the other one—the one he fought

with? For God’s sake, corporal, tell me the |
rights of it. My \ad fighting and insubordin-
ate! I can’t take it in at all.”

_ “Sit you down, old friend, and I'll tell you .
as far as I know. There’s no‘call for anxiety,
‘as I said, and, between you and me, nothing
to be ashamed of. Fighting there was, and
insubordination there was, but not what you ~
think.. My word, Boy Brown’s made of the. _
right stuff! Well, it seems the youngsters .
got up a sham fight—play-acting sométhing
_ or other in the drill ground between his com-
pany and another. He was so hot at it that
he never heeded ‘the bugle call to work, and



“TERRIBLE, TED.” 29."

the other youngsters were so carried away by
_. his spirit that they never heeded it either, nor
_. the monitor coming back to warn them. ~
There was a tremendous scrimmage just at the —
‘last, you see, and Boys Brown. and Gordon.
got hurt before the thing could be put a stop
to ; a lot of the others got pretty hard knocks
in the fray.” 2
“Tt. wasn’t a fight only between the two; Es :
then—not a quarrel ?” ;
“ Bless your heart, no! The pair of them
were lying on the ground when the command-
ant and others came hurrying out, Brown’ —
waving a bit of a stick with a handkerchief -.
tied to it with-the one hand he could: use, ~
shouting ‘Scotland for ever!’ and calling on

Gordon to get up and shake hands, tilt he saw’

the poor lad was knocked senseless with a cut. A

on the head. He went into a mighty quan- —
dary then, and wouldn’t have his own hurt =

looked to till the doctor had brought Gordon, :

round and said he wasn’t badly hurt. When —
they picked hirn up and carried him into the —

hospital, he held on to his flag like a bull- »



80 “TERRIBLE TED.”

dog ; and there it i is, they tell me, , stuck up by
the side of his bed.”

A light broke in upon the sergeant. Mas-
ter Ted had got up a mimic “fight for the
standard.” The old fellow felt rather guilty.
Ted’s mother had been justified in reproaching
him for putting ideas into their boy’s head, he
._ thought ; but for the present he kept his own
“counsel.

“The young scamp! «Who'd have thought —

: of this?” he muttered. The sergeant and
the corporal regarded each other with a
twinkle of grave amusement in their eyes as
they shook hands; and having obtained per-—
mission to visit his grandson next day, the
som departed.

~ Close to the gates he came upon his
daughter-in-law, who had just alighted from

. a "bus in a condition of tearful affright. To
her he made very light of the whole matter.
He had pictured to himself the “ damping” é
‘nature of the scene that would take place if “=:
once she took in the real facts of the case, and, ~
brave soldier as he was, his spirit quailed



é TERRIBLE TED,” NA ee a

- within him. The boys had just been too keen

for their play to heed the bugle, he told her.
Ted and another had been knocked down and .
hurt. They'd be all right again and able to
go home in a few days, and meanwhile were
as comfortable as possible and full of spirits ;
but the doctor would allow no one to visit. Ted
till the morrow. The widow was much com-
forted by this report, and, being in a hurry, ~
asked no further questions; so, with a sigh of
relief, the sergeant saw her into a "bus, men-
tally resolving, for reasons of his own, that his
visit to Ted on the morrow should be: paid
first.

The sergeant’s idea of the affection and
respect due to a mother from her son was a.
very high one, and he never lost an oppor-
tunity of impressing his views on Ted.
“Love and cherish your mother as she has |
loved and cherished you, my lad,” he would
- say; “ wait upon her as she has waited on you, *
. and never vex her Gf you can help it. - Soy
“or man—to say nothing of a soldier—onee’ .
-. daught‘his duty as you have been taught yours, a

~



ao ‘TERRIBLE TED.”

_ has no excuse for not treating a woman as &
gentleman should, whatever station in life he
may be in.” ‘
_ No word had ever passed between the boy
and his grandfather on the subject, but they
both knew in their hearts that Ted’s hopes
and wishes of enlisting would bitterly pain and
. disappoint his mother, and they had hitherto
_ simply avoided the subject; but now the time _
was come, the sergeartt thought, that, from a
- word dropped here and there, she should be
brought to see what was inevitable. The won-
der was that, trained as Ted had been, and
brought up in the midst of the strongest
military influences, she should think any other _
result possible. ‘He. hoped that this escapade
of Ted’s might somehow be made to serve as
the thin edge of the wedge. ~
Early in the next afternoon the, sergeant
stumped up the hospital stairs to the ward i in ,

"which his graridson was lying, pale and

propped round with pillows, and with a gay

’“gearlet covering concealing the bandaged arm .

and shoulder.. Ted eagerly stretched out his



“ TERRIBLE TED.” 33

left hand to his visitor with his usual bright
-smile: Now the sergeant had intended to be
very stern—he indeed raised a reproving finger
and shook his head as he looked down on the
face he loved best ; but Ted only smiled.

“Yes, I know all about it, gran,” he said ;
“you need not pretend to be angry. The
commandant and the chaplain have both been —
here. I was wilful and heedless and dis-
_ obedient, I know, just as they said, and I’m |
sorry, and when I’m well I'll take my punish-
ment like a man; but, gran, I couldn’t help
it. If it was all to come over again, I couldn’t —
leave off at that moment to save my life—no,
nor Gordon either.—Could you, old fellow 2”
. And he nodded towards an opposite bed, in
- which lay another boy with his head bandaged. _

“T should think not, indeed. Why, I heard
the bugle well enough, but I couldn’t have let.
go the banner staff—not' if the Queen her-
self had come and told me to, which she
wouldn’t. I know she’d have let us fight it
out,” he’added confidently.

_ “Hush! hush! You are speaking very:
GN 3 s 4



84- ‘P)ERRIBLE TED.”

wrongly as well as foolishly,” interrupted the
‘sergeant in real displeasure. “I am surprised’
to ‘hear you say such things, and you both
_intending to be soldiers. Why, my lads, you
know as well as I do that obedience—disci-
pline, that is—is the very first and most impor-
tant lesson a soldier has to learn; all other
good qualities are as nothing without that as
-a foundation.”

Ted fidgeted and looked uncomfortable.

“Suppose, gran, a thing is a right.and good
thing to do; are you to leave it undone because
some one else tells you not to do it?”

“Heyday!” cried the sergeant, in a tone |
that brought the colour into the boy’s cheeks;
“a fine soldier you'll make indeed, my lad, if
them’s your sentiments! Who made you a
judge of right, boy?” he went on in a softer
voice. ‘A soldier’s duty is so plain and clear,
he has no need to think for himself; he has
only to do as he is told by his superiors.
Now, tell me how all this happened, from
beginning to end.”

“Well, gran, at the beginning, you see, it



“TERRIBLE TED.” 35.

was your doing. You began it,” said Ted,
with a roguish grin. “TI was just brimful of.
‘The Story of the Standard’ when I came ~
home. I told it to Gordon there, and we got
our companies together, he and I, and ar-

* ranged we would act it over, just as it hap- ”

pened, the first opportunity we got. I and

my company were Ewart and the ‘Terribles,’ a

you know, and Gordon was the standard ,
“bearer of the ‘ Invincibles’ They didn’t like
being Frenchies at first, but I talked them
over. We pretended this”—taking up a staff .
which stood by his bed with a coloured hand-
kerchief attached to it— was the Eagle stan-
dard. Well, gran, I and-my Terribles rushed °

- down from the little mound on the Invincibles, -

shouting ‘Scotland for ever!’ . They beat us off,

and we'had a really splendid fight. ‘Lots fell

on both sides ; but we got the best of it at last,
of course,-and I’d almost reached the standard

_ when the bugle rang out. We let it call, for
we couldn’t stop. I’d stretched out my hand
to seize the staff, when crack, crack it came ~
_ down, on my shoulder and arm, and I felt an



36: ‘TERRIBLE TED.”

awful pain; but I hit out at Gordon with my
left fist,.and down he went like a shot, still —
holding on to the banner staff. I.wrenched
it from him and’was making off, when I fell
over somebody and came down on my hurt:
shoulder. But I did win, and would have
died to do it.”
“ All the same,” put in the. Invincible from
the opposite bed, wagging his bandaged head
at the victor, “you ghouldn’t have had it if I
hadn’t been stunned. I’d have died for it too;
so you needn’t crow so loud, Terrible Ted.”
“We'll try it over again some day,” promptly
returned our hero; “and oh, gran, we mean
to do the six hundred too! We’ve been plan-
ning it all out as we lay here.” .
“The six hundred,” repeated the sergeant,
rather at sea. ‘‘What are you. talking of
now ?”
“Why, you aes gran—the charge of the
Light Brigade at Balaklava.

‘Into 'the jaws of death rode thesix hundred.’ —

That’s very nearly as splendid as Ewart.”



ae “‘TRRRIBLE TED.” 37

“bed

The: sergeant shook. his head. :
' “This is all very fine talk, my boys; bat
Ted, I want you to be serious. I’ve no time
now for the wigging I meant to give you
about your'breach of discipline, for your poor
mother -will be here directly, and what we are.
to say to her about this scrape of yours I do
not know. You must expect her to be ve







damping, and I fear yond hurt and one her"
with your wild talk. .

Ted sobered down at once.
“No, I won’t, gran. Poor mother! _ Of
course: I must tell her the truth—that we were
acting a battle story. You know,” he went on
in a lower tone, “the holidays are just be--
ginning, and while I’m at home I think it |
will be only fair to let her see, bit by bit, .
what's in my mind. She’d take it so hard all —
at once. But oh, gran, I do wish mother
thought as you and I do about my going for -
a soldier !”

“So do I, my boy, but: tags past praying
for ; only remember, whatever you say or do,.
that she’s the best of women and aba



38 “TERRIBLE TED.”

and don’t hurt her feelings. You may be sure _
she never had a feeling that didn’t do her.
credit, in spite of her being a bit damping now
and then. A man can’t be too kind and care-
ful where a woman’s feelings are concerned +

~remember that, Ted, my lad.”



CHAPTER IV.

BUGLER BROWN.

T was decided by the commandant that, —
considering the season, and that. -the
chief culprits had already suffered somewhat
severely from their hurts, and the cutting
short of their holidays—for both boys had to
spend Christmas in the hospital ward—they
should be let off with a sharp, public repri-
mand. Gordon was able to go home a day
or two before Ted could be moved ; his grand-
_ father therefore had plenty of opportunity for
administering the promised “ wigging” in pri-
vate. “Terrible Ted”—for the nick-name stuck —
to Boy Brown—indeed expressed much peni-_
tence for his disobedience, and. gave ready
promises of amendment; but his grandfather



40 BUGLER BROWN.

could not feel satisfied with the effect of his
eloquence, as the. boy did not seem to realize -
the real gravity of his fault, and would not —
look upon it in a serious light; so, having
turned the matter over in his mind, the old
soldier resolved to lay his perplexities before -

his friend the general, and rena an inter-. .

view for the purpose. to

- General ‘Frazer listened attentively to the
rather long-winded tale poured into his ears.
His eyes lighted up, and the humorous smile
the sergeant knew so well curled his mous-
tache as he gave two or three sharp little
nods at the crisis of the story, and he laughed
outright when the old fellow dryly repeated
his grandson’s assertion that he had begun it.

“The audacious monkey’!” he exclaimed ;
“upon my word he turned the tables on you
very cleverly ; but you must confess, sergeant, -
there: was some justice in the charge. You
throw sparks into this small powder magazine
‘of yours, and are then surprised at an explo-
sion. I really think you are most to blame,” —
and the general gave a comical glance.



BUGLER BROWN. 41
' “T begin to think I am,” was the rueful
reply ; “but excuse me, general. I want you

to understand that the trouble in my mind is. ?

this. Reasonable as the youngster is, and bid-
dable too, as long as he keeps cool, I don’t
somehow seem to be able to bring home to
him that insubordination is very, wrong. He
' listens to all that is said to him, and says he’s

. sorry; but nothing that any one says to him

‘seems to go deep enough, or to take hold.” ,
The general nodded. “TI think I under-_
stand where the difficulty lies,” he returned
thoughtfully ; “he has probably heard’-too
much about it. It goes in at one ear and out
at the other, without, as you. say, coming .
home to him. I'll see what I can do with
him. T like the lad’s spirit, sergeant ; there’s.
the making of a first-rate soldier in him, and °
he mustn’t be spoiled for want of ballast, so to
ae Where is he now?” .
“ At Duke o’ York’s for a day or oe longer,
peut oe 4
“Well, sergeant, I haven’t forgotten my
promise regarding him, and have a scheme in



42 - BUGLER. BROWN.

my mind for getting him into the Nineteenth,
but Tl have a talk with the lad himself
before going any further.”

- The general kept his word, and by atrange-
ment with the authorities went over to the
Duke of York’s, and hada long, private inter-
view with our hero. What took place at this
interview was sacred between the two. The
“general himself never told, and his little
bugler could not be induced to reveal a word.
The matron saw he had been crying, and
afterwards declared that the general’s own
-eyes were moist when she went up to offer
his honour a cup of tea, and that he was
holding Boy Brown’s hand in his as if he had
been his own son. That the interview bore
rich fruit in Ted’s after life and story was.
proved by the boy’s own conduct and devoted
love for the general. Y agd

“T could: find it in my heart to envy you

that grandson of yours, sergeant,” began the
general, when he went down to Chelsea to see
his old friend a few days later. “I have no
boy of my own, as you know, and my heart



BUGLER BROWN. ~~ 43

warms to this one of yours; you and his .
mother must let me have a share in him. I
think I can manage to get him into our regi-
mental band very shortly, if you and he are

willing.” . .
“ Willing, general! Why, it’s the very thing
- T’ve hoped and dreamed of for him. I shall
have nothing left to wish for when the. last

‘muster’s called, sir, if I can leave thé dear ~

lad under your eye; but there’s his mother,”
and the sergeant explained the difficulties
that lay before them in this direction.

The general looked grave. “That’sapity,a —
great pity,” he observed. “Well, sergeant, I
advise you simply to tell that ‘Terrible Ted’

of yours, and his mother, what I propose, and «©

leave them to settle the matter between them
during the holidays. It will be a thousand
pities if she does not hear reason, poor soul.
The boy’s life will be spoiled if she, denies him
his desires. At the same time, we must not
encourage him to act in direct opposition to -
her wishes. That would be a bad beginning
indeed.” - ;



44> x - BUGLER BROWN.

_- The general’s proposal was laid before Ted
by his grandfather on the day before he was ‘
pronounced well enough to go home, and no
sunbeam could have shone brighter than his
‘face as he jumped out of the "bus and ran.
into his mother’s arms at the door of the little
home in Camden Town. - Never had he been _
so loving and cheery and helpful, and never
- had the widow felt so proud of him. It was
her great delight to show the little red-coated
. figure off to her friends, and talk to them of ©
his good qualities ; but somehow, as the days
flew by, things did not go quite as Ted wished
and hoped. He made a point of dropping his
hints, as he had planned, and lovingly en-
deavoured to argue and coax away her opposi-—
tion; and finally he told her outright of the.
general’s offer, of his grandfather’s delight in
his prospects, and of his own anew desire .
~ for a military career.

- But, alas! it was quite a different Ted that
returned to the Duke of York’s when the
holidays came to an end—a Boy Brown that
the “Dukies” hardly recognized, who went .



BUGLER BROWN.- = 45

about his. work and play in a listless and -
- downcast manner, and was altogether un-~
satisfactory. Boy Brown had broken down .
in the anthem at chapel on Sunday morning,
it was rumoured—his favourite anthem too—
“Rest in the Lord, wait patiently for him;
and he shall give thee thine heart’s desire.”
It was quite true, that the little bugler’s
sweet, clear voice faltered and broke, and he -
had been altogether unable to sing the last -:
few words; and when he went to visit his |
grandfather, who was ailing with rheumatics,
in the afternoon; Ted’s trouble came out.
His mother had positively forbidden him to _

’ think any more of soldiering, and he had
-- given in. She had a scheme for apprenticing

him to a shoemaker when he left school, and
_the boy was just breaking his heart over the
disappointment of his hopes and dreams. .

The sergeant was “struck all of a heap,”
as he called it. That his daughter-in-law would
take on, and be more than usually damping,
he was prepared to hear; but he had never
thought that she would be so blind to her



46 on BUGLER BROWN.

son’s interests as absolutely to withhold her
consent when it came to the point. He
knew not what to advise. “It’s very hard,
my boy; but cheer up, and bear it like a
man,” he said at last. “You can be a man,
' even if you must be a shoemaker. It’s all
her love for you, Ted—don’t forget that; —
. you've done your duty, and no one can do
. more than that.” _

Ted went back a little bit cheered, and the
‘sergeant wrote one of his stiff little notes
requesting Mrs. Brown, on the score of his
rheumatism, to come and see him. This she
did ; and the old pensioner, confined to “gran’s _
own den,” was painting for her a moving pic-
ture of Ted’s trouble, when the general himself
came marching down the corridor. He had re-

~ . ceived a hint from the commandant, and saw

the situation and his opportunity at a glance.
He listened with patience and real sympathy
to the widow's tearful objections, and met
them one by one. He did not deny the hard-
ship of the matter from her point of view,
but put before her in the plainest terms the



BUGLER BROWN. | AT

injury which he believed would result to the
lad’s character, to say nothing of his pros-
pects, if she finally decided against his wishes.
At length she began to give way. “I
- thought it was just the lad’s wilfulness,” she
wailed, “and then his always being with
soldiers like. I never doubted but he’d settle
down quite contented after a bit. I’m sure,
~your honour, I never meant to do the dear lad
harm.” oe

“Then, Mrs. Brown, you will let us consider
the matter as settled. You will never repent
this day, I am sure. I promise to keep an eye
on the youngster and do my best for him.”

“ And you'll think of a poor mother’s feel-
ings, and not let him run into danger, your
honour?” —

“Tl do what I can,” replied the general,
with an amused glance at the sergeant. “Do
you know, Mrs. Brown, I think it a grand
thing to be the mother of such a soldier as,
please God, your son will turn out. I wish I
had such a one’ of my own.”

In a day or two the old sergeant was able



48 BUGLER BROWN.

to hobble across’ to Duke of York’s, and make
Ted happy with the good news of his mother’s
_ consent. A few weeks more, and Boy Brown ,
~ took leave of his envious fellow “ Dukies,” his
weeping mother, and proud old gran, and to
his own deep delight found himself a bugler
in the band of the 19th Hussars, oy Ports- ©
mouth

\



CHAPTER V.
TEL-EL-KEBIR. —

‘HERE are some natures off which any-
thing of an evil nature will glide, like

drops of water from a duck’s back, and leavé |
no trace. Our Ted’s was one of these. I do
not mean to say_that he was in any way a
prodigy of goodness or cleverness. He had as
many faults as most boys; but. he was, as his
grandfather had told the general, honest and
God-fearing. He had a kind and gentle heart,

and plenty of good sense; no one ever heard -

a, bad or untruthful word or an unkind speech

from Boy Brown’s lips. He was also perfectly

fearless; and once convinced of his duty, he

would do it simply and with his might—solid.

good qualities which, together with his bright
4

G



- 50 TEL- ED-KEBIR.

spirits 4 sweét temper, made up a very
lovable whole. Ted quickly became quite as
popular in his regiment as he had been at
school. He enjoyed the life with his whole
heart; and cheery, loving letters would come
every week from Portsmouth either to the
little home in Camden Town or to grey old
Chelsea Hospital—letters that. were proudly
read and commented on by the old sergeant
and his comrades, and shown about by the
fond mother,to her various cronies. Once or
twice the general appeared with tidings of his
protégé, and these were always satisfactory. _

Early in the spring news came of troubles
in the East, and in April it was announced
that the 19th Hussars, together with many
other regiments, were to sail for Alexandria.
' It therefore turned out that Sergeant Brown
and his daughter-in-law were amongst the
' crowds that gathered on the quay to take
leave of the soldiers on that fair, sunny morn-
ing on which the: British fleet sailed for the
seat of war; and many a sympathetic glance.
fell on the trim, soldierly little figure of the



TEL-EL KEBIR. “1
bugler of the Nineteenth, in his gay trappings,
of whom the one-armed Chelsea pensioner and
the weeping woman he supported took such
a loving and sorrowful farewell. The kindly:..
general; too, spared a minute from his own
- leave-takings to grasp his old friend’s hand and

speak a cheery word to the lad’s mother. But

time and tide. mercifully cut short the scene,
-and very soon the great ships were ploughing

their way out to sea, with the meri y sunshine
flashing back from the gay. scarlet and gold of
the military trappings of the brave men that
crowded their decks, till distance swallowed
_them up, and only the sweet silvery notes of
the bugles, or the skirl of a bagpipe sent back
a last farewell to the slowly-dispersing grows
on shore. —

As soon as possible after the fleet anchored
at Alexandria in May, Ted’s cheery little
letters began to arrive again, and the news-
papers teemed with news from the East. ° Ted
was at the bombardment of Alexandria in .
July, and then began to write of the many
wonders of Cairo. He was in the best of



52 TEL-EL-KEBIR.

health and spirits, and threatened his mother °
with all kinds of extraordinary gifts, which
he et to bring home for her at Christ-
mas; for they would make very short work.
of the Egyptians, he wrote, and get back to
England before that time. 2
Then one bright September morning came
the welcome news of the battle of Tel-el-
_ Kebir, where the..Egyptians were repulsed
with so much loss, and where Arabi Pasha,
their general, though escaping for the moment,
was taken prisoner on the following day.
This was one of the most brilliant and dashing
- achievements of. the British army; and the
Chelsea pensioners, laying their wise white ©
‘ heads together over the news, opined that it
had virtually brought the war to an end.
As we know, it did do so; but what about
our Ted and the general? That the 19th
- Hussars had been engaged was certain, but
there were weary hours of suspense before
the lists of killed and wounded were out.
General Frazer was safe—a glance satisfied
the sergeant of this; but just at the end of

\



TEL-EL-KEBIR. 53.

’ the list the other name he was looking for ©
caught his eye—“ Brown, E., bugler of the
19th Hussars, wounded in the leg.” The
~ paper fell to the ground. The old sergeant
needed his one trembling hand to brush across
his eyes; but his comrades, thronging round,
eagerly pointed out to him that the dispatch
did not say “dangerously,” or even “severely
wounded.” It might therefore be almost
nothing.

After this no individual tidings of the
wounded could be received for some little
time. They were reported to have been re-
moved to Ismailia, and “doing well.” But as
time went on a vague rumour got abroad—no

- one could tell how, or with whom it arose—

that our Ted had distinguished himself, and .
_ was on the list of those mentioned for honours.
- Boy Gordon had: remarked to some one
through the iron railings of Duke of York’s
that “Terrible Ted- had gone and done it,
and no mistake,” and the “Dukies” had been —
cheering at some grand news just received
of him. The sergeant scoffed at the idea—



54 TEL- EL- KEBIR,

a bit of a boy—a little bugler—no, no—it was
utter nonsense—a mistake in name—Brown
was not uncommon, as everybody knew;

- but he wasn’t going to deny that his boy
was as plucky a little chap as any going, for
all that. He was, however, secretly in a fever _
_ of impatience for letters; and when at last

they came, and two packets, one of which was ~
in Ted’s well-known copperplate handwriting—
‘not quite so copperplate as usual, he noted—
were handed to him, the old fellow hurrahed
like a boy, and plumped himself down, spec-
tacles on nose, to read the precious letter, in
his eagerness letting the second one drop un-
heeded at his feet. It was a long letter,
written at intervals, and enclosing a shorter
_ one for his mother ; and Ted managed to give
his grandfather a fair idea of the movements
of the army, as far as he himself had seen it.

“We started long before daybreak,” he wrote,
“and got over the six miles of desert between
us and the enemy’s position at Tel-el-Kebir in
the dark. ‘You see their position was known



‘TEL-EL-KEBIR. 5B

to be so strong, and they were just twice as -
’ many as‘ we were, that our loss would have
been so much greater if we had fought by day-
light. We were as quiet as mice ; no fires were
" allowed, not even smoking, and the formation

of the regiments was carried out by the little

light we could get from the stars. When all
was in readiness, our fellows made a charge
and stormed the enemy’s works most splendidly ~~
at the point of the bayonet. You should have
seen the Highland Brigade and the Royal
Trish go for the foe, gran—not that one
could really see anything at the time. Nota
shot was fired till we were well within their |
lines, so the Egyptians were completely taken
by surprise ; they soon fell into confusion, and
began to run. In the thick of it I was lucky.
enough to see our general fall just as we came
up. Every one was running full speed after
the enemy, too eager to notice or help him,
but I couldn’t leave him on the ground to be
trampled on. So I fell out (there was no one.
to give me orders). He did not stir, so I felt
sure he. was wounded, and I poked about in



i —_—e TEL-EL-KEBIR.

the dark to try and find a baggage horse; but
my head felt so. stupid for want of sleep, I
_., could’ find none at first (this was an infantry
ba ile on our side, you know, gran). But at

last I spied a stray beast, and led it to the gen-
eral. He was coming round then, and wasn’t '
wounded—only bruised and giddy-like. I
helped him to mount the horse; and what do
you think, gran? He made me mount behind
him! We had nearly caught up the main
body of our troops, when a shot from a
passing handful of the enemy struck my leg ;
and I soon got faint from loss of blood, and
knew nothing more till I found myself on a
canal boat going down to the hospital at
Ismailia. But the general is all right; he’s
been to see me several times. Isn’t it awfully
kind?’ The nurses and doctors are jolly kind
too, and ‘my leg is getting on all right. Tell
mother not to worry: most likely we'll be
home by Christmas after all. Tell Gordon at :
Duke o’ York’s it’s better fun to be wounded
in a real fight than in a sham one. O gran, «.





our fellows were just splendid! I'll tell you o



a

TEL-EL-KEBIR. ‘ 57

lots more when we meet.—Your loving grand-

gon, o> Tz.”

The old sergeant sea this letter brokenly.
He had to stop many a time to wipe his glasses
and pettishly complain‘of the draught from the |
window making his eyes weak ; and it was not —

_ till he had read it twice and was folding it up:
that he caught sight of the second packet on ~

the floor at his feet. “From the general him-
self!” he explained as he picked it up and _
tore it open. Yes, it was certainly from the eo
general, and this is what he wrote :— oe





“T know, my good old friend, that your ie
grandson is writing to you and his mother;
but I cannot forbear sending a line myself to
tell you what I am sure he will never do—how
gallantly he has distinguished himself. Butfor
his pluck and coolness I should probably not

have lived to return home. I was struck on.

the head, knocked down, and trampled on by
the flying enemy in the darkness, unobserved ©

by any. one, it appears, except your little lad,



58 . ee TEL+EL-KEBIR.

who saw me fall; and in spite of a rain of
bullets from detached parties of the flying foe,
he fell out, caught one of their baggage
horses—believing me to be wounded—and
came to my aid. He even groped about and ~
secured a brandy flask, a sip from which
helped to revive me, for I was only stunned
and bruised. After he had assisted me to
~ ‘mount, I made him get up behind me; and we
galloped off, and were almost in safety when
he was hit in the leg. He said nothing about
it, however ; and it was not until I had dis-
mounted amongst my own men, that I dis-
covered my gallant little bugler was insensible,
and bleeding terribly from his wound. He
was attended to at once, but I assure you I
“never spent a more painful time of suspense
than. that I experienced before the surgeon
told me the wound was not of a dangerous .
character. A few days after his arrival in the
hospital at Ismailia, however, the wound as-
sumed a dangerous appearance, and there was ~
one day when we all feared the leg could not
be saved; but, thank God! the danger passed,



*

all safely back in Merry England, and I shall.

. TEL-EL-KEBIR, 59

said ho 3 is doing well. The boy has borne thé

: suffering caused by the wound with a cheery

patience which has won'the hearts of both
doctorg and nurses, and the warm admiration
of his officers. Picture to yourself the little
fellow, heavy from want of sleep, and weak
from fatigue and lack of food, stumbling about
in the darkness under a dropping fire of bullets —

“to assist me. He isatrue hero. Yet, when =

I told him I had mentioned him for honours
in my dispatch home, he appeared thunder-
struck, and quite unable to realize that he had
done anything beyond his simple duty. Tell -
his mother from me she may indeed be proud ©
of sucha son. I hope Christmas will see us

be able to shake you by the hand and congrat-
ulate you on being grandsire of the youngest
V.C. in the British army.”

Overwhelmed by this astounding and in-.
credible news, the sergeant fell back in his
chair, the ruddy colour forsaking his face.
“No, no; its good news, not- bad,” he



60... _ 'TEL-EL-KEBIR.

_ gasped, as his comrades pressed round him in
alarm. “Read, for surely my old eyes have —
not seen aright.” .

The letter was caught up and eagerly

scanned by halfa dozen pairs of spectacled eyes,

and one by one Ted’s old friends grasped its
meaning. Then scores of war-worn hands
shook that of the sergeant, and the thin, waver-
“ing cheer of the aged arose again and again as
the news spread. Sergeant Brown’s lad—little
Ted Brown of Duke of York’s—had saved his
general’s life on the field of battle and won the
Victoria Cross !



CHAPTER VI.
THE TITTLE V.C.

ND to think, comrades,” said Sergeant —
Brown solemnly, when the excite-
ment had subsided, and he sat thoughtfully at -
the fireside still holding the precious letters in _
his hand—“ to think that only a year ago, just -”
one short year, the lad stood herein this very
- room, with his bit of a hand on this old knee
‘ of mine, and said he’d win the Victoria Cross c
one day or other, and I snapped him up sharp —
for talking boastful. -And now he’s actually
gone and done it. I remember his mother sat _
in that very chair as he said it. I’d been reading’ .
that bit of poetry the general's lady wrote about
the old Waterloo standard, you know.” oe
Se “Yes, vee I remember well enough ser-"





62 THE LITTLE V.C. ~

geant,” replied a maimed and one-eyed corporal,
‘wagging his white head; “and you mark my
words—if that there'story of yours wasn’t the
beginning of the whole thing that’s burst upon
us now, like a bomb-shell, so to speak, why,
I’m a Dutchman. ' Didn’t the little lad go.and
act it all over at Duke o’ York’s, and get. him-
self into a scrape along with that audacious

. monkey, Drummer Gordon? It was the hear-

ing about that affair as gave General Frazer
a fancy for the lad, T'll go bail.”

“Well, well, perhaps it was; perhaps I had
a finger in the pie. In fact, the youngster
had the impudence to lie there with his broken -
shoulder and tell me to my face that the be-
ginning of it lay at my door. My word, how
the general did laugh when I told him that!”
_, And the old eyes twinkled at the remembrance.
“T wonder,” he went on— I do wonder how -
our Ted’s mother will take the news.”

The next afternoon brought Mrs. Brown to
answer this question for herself. She had —
received Ted’s letter, and the stiff, little note
from her father-in-law accompanying it, in

é



THE LITTLE Y.C. 63

which he hada in the fewest words stated the
"bare facts contained in the general’s dispatch.
_ She had looked in at the Duke of York’s on
her way. to the hospital, to hear what the
- corporal at the lodge had to say about the
matter.. He had cofifirmed the news, and
the whole school seemed to have gone wild |
with excitement about it. It was even said
that there was to.be a whole holiday i in honour ~
of Ted on his return home.
Once assured of the personal safety of her
boy, the widow’s interest seemed to fens 4
Exactly what the Victoria Cross was she did’ ”
not understand, neither had she grasped the
fact that in winning it Ted had done anything
specially out of the way. zs
For. once in his life the sergeant ‘shied
himself impatient of his daughter-in-law’s
remarks. He felt their damping effect very ©
keenly ; but he soon recovered himself, and ~
patiently explained to her the wonders of Ted’s
achievement. Here again she wandered from
~ the point to bemoan her boy’s sufferings and
_.. privations, till at last, followmg the happy



64 ‘THE LITTLE V.C.

suggestion of one of their number, quite a

crowd of the old fellows escorted Mrs. Brown” .

to the reading-room, Where a Victoria Cross,
carefully preserved in a glass case with many
other mementoes of brave deeds, was pointed
out to her with reverential finger, and she was
solemnly told the circumstances under which |
it was won.

«Well, if you ated me,” said Mrs. Brown, “I |
can't say as I see much to make such a fuss
' about. Just a plain bit of. iron, worth little
enough, I should think. If it-were gold and
diamonds now, that would be something like.”
_ The sergeant turned away with a groan of
despair. ‘Gold and diamonds forsooth!” he
muttered indignantly, as if that little despised
bit of iron was not worth, in his eyes at any
_ rate, all the gold and diamond mines of Africa.

Again the old pensioners came to the rescue .
of the sorely-tried sergeant, and explained
things to Mrs. Brown. She seemed rather
impressed at last by their views of the matter,
~ especially when she understood that the Queen
herself would, with her own hand, present to



THE LITTLE. V.C. 65

her boy the decoration he had won. That, at.
any rate, she considered would be something
to tell to her friends af Camden Town, though ©
it was disappointing to have to say that the ~
thing itself was so little worth having.

The anxiously-expécted day came at length,
and the 19th Hussars were back at Ports-
mouth ; but neither Sergeant Brown nor. his
daughter-in-law were there to welcome our ©
hero. The former was too ailing, and Mrs.
‘ Brown too timid, to face an excited crowd
alone; and there was still a day or two of
waiting before Ted could obtain leave of
absence to go home and see his relations. .
Besides, the general had a little plan of his’
own. to carry out: he was determined that his
little bugler should travel to.town with him- .
self, as he could’ not forego the pleasure of
witnessing his meeting with his grandfather
and late schoolfellows. So on the arrival of
_ the train Ted was dispatched at once to Cam-
den Town, with orders not to present himself —
at Chelsea until the following morning, and
. then to bring his mother with him.

foe B®

G



66 : THE LITTLE Vv. 0.

- It still wanted about a fortnight till’ Christ-
mas when Ted and his mother alighted from
‘the omnibus at the familiar corner, and then
walked across the old courtyard of the hospital. |
During the voyage home Ted had perfectly
recovered from his wound. Not even a vestige
' of lameness remained, and it was just the same
active; light-footed boy that sprang up the
stone stairs and came walking down the long
room towards gran’s den—just the same
honest, affectionate blue eyes that met gran’s,
as the brave, brown hands clasped his arm
in their old fashion. A little taller and broader
Ted had grown, and the bronze of Eastern
suns. had darkened the rosy, boyish cheeks;
but with a joy and thankfulness that thrilled
his old heart through and through, the sergeant
knew as he looked at him that he had in very
truth got his own boy Ted back again, simple, -
loving, and God-fearing as when he went away. -

“Thank God for my lad, my dear lad Ted,”

was all he could say as he kept his trembling es:

hand on the boy’s head, and oe at him. with
acs eyes, 7

wa



- THE LITTLE Y.C. 67.

Then his old friends the pensioners crowded —
‘round, and Ted had to shake many an aged
hand, and endure many an appreciative slap
on back or shoulder, before the confusion sub- .
sided and he could look round him at the well-
remembered room and its occupants, and:
become aware that a quiet fiure seated near
the fire was General Frazer himself. He
sprang up again to salute him.

“Stolen a march on you, Brown,” remarked
the general in his clear, ringing tones. “Ay, |
my lad, I intended to do it for a purpose of
my own. I wanted to fight our battle over
again with my old friends here before you —

appeared on the scene. And-now you are.

here, there is just one thing I wish all assem-.
bled in this place, as well as your former
friends and schoolfellows at Duke of York’s,
to know, for your own sake as well as theirs.
-. — Sergeant Brown, I have much satisfaction _
a in telling you that it was through your grand-

-* son’s strict attention to duty, and entire obedi- -





--ence: to orders, as much as to his bravery
“and coolness, that I owe my life, and to which



68 : THE LITTLE -V.C..

he owes his well-deserved honours. Very
much against his will he remained in his’
- appointed place during the attack, whilst many
of his comrades, under cover of the darkness,
deserted theirs in their headlong eagerness to
pursue the enemy. Had he allowed his
ardour to run away with him, as in old days,
he would not have seen me, would have lost
his opportunity of performing a gallant and
devoted action, and would assuredly have run
himself into great and useless peril. When
the Queen he has ‘served so well fastens the
well-won reward on his brave breast, it will bé
the sign and token to us who love him—to us

- who love him,” repeated the general, drawing
the boy to his side—“as well as to his own
conscience, that he has manfully overcome the
fault that threatened to spoil a good soldier a
year ago. He has learned that ‘he who rules —
his spirit is greater than he who takes a city.’

In other words, he is no longer ‘ insubordinate’ ..*:

—eh, Ted? And now,for Duke of York’s.” on
_ Off marched the general; Ted following =
_ between his mother and the sergeant, whilst





THE LITTLE V.C. 69

as many of the pensioners as could hobble
brought up the rear.
Warm was the greeting of the corporal at
the lodge as he flung wide the gates ; and there
in the old drill-yard, where the second doughty.
fight for the standard had taken place just
a year before, the rows of “sons of the brave”
were drawn up, their commandant at their
head, to welcome “ Boy Brown” amongst them
once more, and to cheer him as only boys and ~~.
“Dukies” can cheer. The band struck up «
“See, the conquering hero comes,” and Ted; :.:
quite abashed, longed to run away. Ii was
rather worse than facing the enemy, he —
thought; but the ordeal was soon over, dis- |
cipline was relaxed,. and he was able to hide
himself amongst the rabble of boys let loose
upon him. ae
“Terrible Ted ”—for the nick-name stuck to
him faster than ever—received his Victoria’

~. Cross in due time, in company with many

“7 other brave soldiers, under the admiring eyes
‘of the multitudes that gathered to witness the
“> ..eeremony. His own general rode beside thee; :









70 THE LITTLE V.C.

royal carriage ; and Ted felt when the few kind
and gracious words were spoken to him by his
Queen, as her hand fastened the coveted medal
on his breast, while she bent a glance of smil-
ing interest on his flushed, boyish face, that
_ alla man could do and suffer in her service,

through the longest life, would fall short of the

devotion which filled his heart in return for
that kindly recognition.

Tt is while busily engaged in the service of
his Queen that we. get our last glimpse of our —
hero. It is the never-to-be-forgotten jubilee
day of 1887, and the “ Dukies” are drawn
up as a guard of honour along a certain part
of the route by which Her Majesty will pass.
The boys cast many a curious and admiring
glance at a tall and handsome young corporal
of Hussars, who is galloping and curveting ©
about in the execution of his duty. They
nudge and whisper to one another as he goes
by, for is not the name of that same corporal’
inscribed on the roll of honour hanging in the
commandant’s room at Duke of York’s? andis |
he not a V.C. man, young as he is?



THE LITTLE V.C. aay

_ This corporal is our Ted, already many steps
up the ladder of military fame. arly in the
day he managed to secure for his mother, who
has long since learned to appreciate the mili-
tary honours of her son, a comfortable and
safe position within the railings, from whence \
to view the procession ; and he has saluted his
general, looking every inch a soldier in his

_ splendid uniform. But when the drag full of ~

Chelsea pensioners drives up, and the old
~ fellows, resplendent in brand-new scarlet coats |
~~ and cocked hats, take up their appointed
station on a stand under the trees, our Ted
glances at them sadly.~ Their. faces are all
familiar to him; but, alas! the aged form he
loved so well is absent from their ranks.
Sergeant Brown has answered the last roll- ‘
call, and is resting after life’s battle. The
“well done, good and faithful servant,” which
is the reward of all true and loyal service, _

has at length greeted his ears, and he has _

“entered into the joy of his Lord.”



WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL!



ee I T was rather an effort certainly, but Willie

| Dale made it. It was his-first night at
school, and being accustomed to perform his
toilet for the night in a more leisurely manner
than his companions, he was the last out of
bed. He had noticed with surprise that

9 neither of his four room-mates had knelt to

pray before lying down, and therefore felt
some embarrassment in performing what was
‘to him so matter-of-course an action. There
was a stifled giggle from one or two of the

beds, and then a slipper, aimed at Willie’s.
kneeling form, came flying across the room;

but a hand shot out from the nearest bed,
and caught the missile before it reached Kim.



WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL. ae

Unconscious of the hostile act, the little
boy in‘a few minutes rose from his knees.
“Shall I put the candle out, J; arvis ?” he
inquired of his neighbour.

“No,” replied Jarvis gruffly. “Marshall
comes round and does that.” oe
“Good-night!” said Willie, jumping into

bed. a

No one responded, but a voice from the
farther end of the room observed, “I say, -
you new fellow, yowll' have to drop that, Bh
know; we don’t go in for humbug here.”
= ie ‘Drop what?” asked Willie in surprise.
_ «Why, saying your prayers, and that sort .

of rot. Juvenile piety doesn’t pay; you'll . .
have to drop it, young ’un, or we'll make you.”
«TJ ghall not give it up,” replied Willie; “it .
‘” is right to doit. I promised— > He was about .
to add “ my mother,” but stopped himself.

«Promised his mammy! I thought so. we
rude burst of laughter followed, and Willie's
face grew crimson; but at this moment foot-—
steps were heard approaching, ane. a master
f entered the room.

A



‘ca ae WILLIE DALE’S TRIAL.

“No more talking, boys,” said Mr. Marshall
as he put out the light, and ee further
was said that night. |

“T say, Dale,” observed Jarvis, happening
to come across our hero alone the next morn-
ing, “if you take my advice, you'll not forget
last night's hint. Those fellows will never
give you any peace if you keep on, and youll
have to give in, in the end.”

“T can’t give up saying my prayers, Jarvis,
if that’s what you mean,” replied Willie.

“Why can’t you say them in bed then ?”

“ Wouldn’t that look like being ashamed of
doing right—ashamed of Christ?” —

Jarvis stared. ‘Oh, if you come to that,”
he began nervously. “ But I say, Dale, school-’
boys can’t be so mighty particular, you know.”

He turned away, and Willie Dale shoulder-
ing his bat proceeded on his way to the
. Pplaying-field. He rose many degrees in the
opinion and favour of his schoolfellows that
afternoon by the unexpected spirit and style
of his play at cricket.

“ He’s no milksop, at any rate, and won't



WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL. 75

be a bad fellow when we’ve knocked the piety
and priggishness out of him,” remarked Holt,
the hero of the slipper, to Jarvis.

“T advise you to let Dale alone, Holt; you
‘won't find him an easy fellow to manage,” re-
plied Jarvis. -

That night, and for several following ones,
Willie’s kneeling down by his bedside was the
signal for all manner of disturbances and petty
persecutions from his room-mates. They made
all the noise they dared, and a volley of slip-
pers, wet sponges, books, and brushes flew
across the room. Willie, though he must
have received many a hard knock, took no
notice. At last, however, a well-aimed boot
struck him on the temple, and a drop of blood
fell on the sheet. Jarvis sprang out of bed.
“T say, you fellows,” he shouted, “I’m not :
going to stand this any longer; you'll just
give over bullying pee or Pll know the
reason why.”

A. laugh and a book aimed at hinisele was
the derisive answer. Jarvis sprang at .his
assailant, and after a short scuffle threw him ~



76 WILLIE’ DALE’S TRIAL.

_ down, and would have punished him severely,
had not the master’s step at that moment
‘been heard, and the combatants dived into
their respective beds. As soon-as Mr. Mar-
shall was well out of earshot, Jarvis raised his
head from his pillow— Once for all, Holt,
and you other fellows, if you don’t let Dale
* alone, you'll have me to deal with. D’ve made
up my mind to stop, this, and you all know
what I say I'll do.”
No answer was returned, and when the
next night, to the surprise of his companions
_and the intense joy of Willie Dale, Jarvis
himself knelt down at the side of his bed and
’ buried his face in his hands, no one ventured
_ to make a remark, for Jarvis was both liked

-. and respected by all except Morton and one

or two other black sheep in the school.

One night Jarvis, coming up to bed later
than usual, in consequence of having spent
the evening with a friend, found Morton,
Holt, and Kennedy surrounding Willie Dale, .
whom they held pinned against the wall. ~
They were talking loudly and excitedly. “Do



WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL. WD
_ you.mean to do it or not?” asked Holt, shak-
ing him by the shoulder.
“No,” replied Willie.

“You are afraid; that’s what it is, you
young sneak. ‘Oh, it’s no tse looking for
Jarvis; he ae here to take you under his
wing.”

“Don't be too sure of that,” said Jarvis,
coming forward. ‘“ What's up, Holt ¢”

“Oh, we're only going to have a lark, and
mean this mammy’s darling to help us, whether
he likes it or not. It’s no harm, indeed, Jarvis, |
though I now it would be no use asking you —
to join us.” *

“We only want a tuck-in at those jolly
plums on the wall below,” put in Kennedy;
' “there’s such a lot, that a few will never be
missed. Dale’s such a light weight, and the |
best climber of us all, that we're going to put
him out of the corridor window to get them;
but your pious fellows are always cowards, and.
he funks going.” . ay
_’ Willie smiled. at Jarvis.

“ Will you go or not, Dale?” ahad Morton



78 WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL.

angrily, his greedy mouth longing for the
luscious fruit.

“T will not,” replied Willie aaiatly.

“Then take that,” returned Morton furi- ©
ously, striking Willie a violent and unexpected
blow on the head. |

Willie fell to the ground, his head coming
in contact with the iron foot of a bedstead as
he fell, and lay motionless, while a thin stream
of blood began to trickle from his head.

“You've done it now!” ejaculated Holt in
consternation, kneeling on the ground and rais-
ing the injured boy’s head, while Jarvis flew
for water and’a sponge.

“JT say, cram him into bed and cover him
up; he can’t be hurt much, and Marshall will
be round directly. Quick, or we shall be
caught!”

“Can't help it if we are,” retorted Holt,
anxiously examining Willie’s head, at which
Jarvis worked away with the sponge. Willie
opened his eyes in a minute or two and at- |
tempted to rise. - oe

“There, I told you so ; he’ s all right,” ex-



WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL 79

claimed Morton, and he and Kennedy hur-

riedly proceeded to restore order in the room, |
whilst the others lifted Willie into his bed,
where he drew the bedclothes over him and
lay as if asleep. Tearing off their clothes,
the three delinquents sprang into bed the
moment before Mr. Marshall entered. .

“Not undressed yet, Jarvis! How is that?
Ah, I remember, you have been out. Well,
I must leave you to put out the light for once,
as I am going out myself.”

All right, sir; good-night,” replied Jarvis.

Jarvis then proceeded to bathe and bind up
Willie’s head as well as he could. It no longer
bled, but there was a lump as big as an egg.

“The cut isn’t much—we'll get Mother
Nelson to stick a bit of plaster on it in the .
morning; it was the blow that stunned you
for a bit,” he remarked as he completed his
friendly services and got ‘into bed himself.

The other three boys had, however, by no
means given up their designs upon the plums ;
and as soon as they felt sure that Jarvis and
' Willie were salen. there were stealthy foot-



* 80 - -WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL.

steps and whisperings heard about the room.
_ Presently the partially-clothed conspirators:
- erept out into the corridor, some little dis-
tance beneath the window of which the plum-
tree which grew in the head-master’s private
garden was trained against the wall. Next to
Dale, Morton himself was acknowledged to
_be the best climber. To his lot, therefore,
it fell to let himself down from the window, _
by means of the branches of the tree, and
possess himself of the coveted fruit. It was
a matter of difficulty and of some danger; but
having accomplished it in safety and filled his
_ pockets, he quickly scrambled back. Seated
on the window seat, the three boys greedily
devoured their booty, carelessly tossing the
stones out at the still open window as they
. sat, and then returned to their room and beds. -
On entering the schoolroom the morning
following their exploit, the boys were surprised
to find Dr. Graham seated at the desk instead
of Mr. Marshall, who usually superintended ’
the early lessons, and guilty looks of dismay _
were exchanged between two or three of them--



WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL. S15

when they perceived that several plum-stones,
and a boy’s turn-down collar, lay on the desk
‘before him. The doctor waited in silence until .
all the boys had entered, and then rose. Be
“Boys,” he began, “I am here this morn-
ing to investigate a.painful occurrence. Mrs.
Graham tells me that late last night, or dur-

ing the night, a considerable quantity of wall

fruit has disappeared from her fayourite tree.
Several plum-stones have been picked up on
the path beneath, and also this collar. I ask, |
I even entreat, that the boy to whom this
collar belongs will come forward and confess
his guilt.” The doctor paused for a minute |
or two, looking appealingly at one after
-another of the throng of young faces before
him. There was a slight stir and whispering
amongst them, but no one came forward.

“William Dale, come here,” commanded Dr.
Graham sternly. . .

Willie instantly advanced, and, rather pale
‘from the blow of the preceding night, stood
looking respectfully but inquiringly at the
doctor, who now held the collar i in his hand.

G 6 ;



82 WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL.

“Dale,” he said, “ considering your uniform
good conduct, it gives me as much pain as
surprise to find your name on this collar; it
has, as you perceive, a stain of blood on it.
Mrs. Nelson tells me that you applied to her
this morning for plaster for a cut on your head,
and that you are, as far as she knows, the only
boy in this school who has recently met with
any hurt. There are traces of this hurt also
on your bed linen, and the window of the
_ corridor outside your room was discovered
open this morning. What have you to say
for yourself in the face of these overwhelming
proofs ?”

“ Nothing, sir,” answered the boy, “ except
to assure you that I am innocent.”

“Innocent!” thundered the doctor. “Do
not add lying to your sins of theft and greedi-
ness, Dale; nothing but a full and instant
confession can now save you from expulsion
from my house.”

“T cannot confess what I did not do,” re-.
turned Willie, steadily fixing his honest eyes _
on the doctor's face. eC



WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL. 83

“ You cannot deny that this collar is yours.”

“No, sir—it is certainly mine; but I cannot
tell how it came where it was found.”

“ How did you get that cut?” was the next
question, as Dr. Graham drew the boy towards
him and examined his head.

“T fell down, sir;” but Willie changed colour
and hesitated slightly as he replied.

“Of course you did,” was the sarcastic
comment. “May I ask where and when
you fell?” . -

“Last night, and in my own room. But
indeed, sir, I was doing no wrong when it
happened ; my head struck the foot of a bed-
stead when I fell.”

_ «There is more in: this than I can fathom.
Can any of you throw light upon the matter ?”
asked Dr. Graham,.speaking to the coe in
general.

No one answered, but an audible scuffle and
disturbance was going on in a corner of the
long room.

“ Silence there!” called the doctor sternly.
——“ Well, Dale, appearances, even your own —



84 3 WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL. .

manners, are so much against you - that
. painful as it is, I have no alternative but to
believe you guilty ; yet.as you are very young,
and this is your first offence, I will give you a
chance, and delay your sentence. Go to your
room now; I will see you again in the after-
noon, by which time I earnestly hope that ye
will have come to a better spirit.”

- Willie walked quietly from the room, but
he had scarcely closed the door when the dis-
turbance previously noted by -the doctor re-
commenced. Hisses and subdued cries of

- “Coward!” “Sneak!” were heard, and the |

next moment Morton, struggling in the grasp
. of Holt and Kennedy, and forcibly propelled .
by a kick from Jarvis, was dragged up to the
doctor’s desk. :

“ What is all this?” exclaimed the doctor,
gazing wrathfully at the trio. “Have. you
- taken leave of your senses, young gentlemen?”
“Speak. up, can’t you?” whispered Holt,

with a fierce shake of Morton’s shoulder.

“What! you won't? then I shall.—Please, os
_sir, we are very sorry; we didn’t think of its ,.



_ WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL. 85

being really stealing, but we planned to get
_ the plums—Morton, Kennedy, and I—and we ©
all three ate them. But, please, sir, Morton
must tell the rest ; Dale would not join us.”
“Well, Morton, what have you to say 7”
Morton stood in sullen silence; but. piece-
meal, and by dint of patient cross-examination,
the doctor, with the help of Holt and Kennedy,
- who appeared truly ashamed of their part in

the matter and of their companion, extracted —

from his reluctant lips the main facts of what
had occurred the night before, Holt eagerly
assuring their master that both Jarvis and .
Dale had been asleep before whey left their -
. room, —
. “How do you account for Dales collar _
being found in the garden?” asked ‘Dr.
Graham.
“T cannot tell, sir; but you see our things.
_ were all lying about. We got hold of what
came first in the dark to go out to the corridor -
in. Morton must have put on Dale’s shirt,
and dropped the collar on the path.” _
_ “TI see,” agreed the doctor.—* Morton, this



86 WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL.

is not the first, time you have been guilty of
dishonest practices and. deceit; I shall now
communicate with your father. Meanwhile
you will remain alone in my study.—Holt =
and Kennedy, you will each receive a richly-
deserved thrashing.—Jarvis, go to Dale and —
inform him of this turn in events. Bring him |
back with you: —Now, boys, we will poe
to our morning’s work.”

In a few: minutes Jarvis reappeared with
Willie, and a close but silent grasp of the
hand passed between master and pupil as the
latter walked to his seat.

From that day Morton disappeared from
amongst them, and the same afternoon Ken-
nedy observed to Jarvis, “Dale’s no sneak,
after all I was sure he’d tell about us.
I don’t understand the fellow; he doesn’t
seem to have pluck enough to stand up for
himself, and yet—”

«Tt isn’t want of pluck,” returned - Jarvis ;

“Dale has enough of that, and to spare. It’s
right, not himself, Dale stands up for; he'll
bear anything rather than do what is wrong.”



- WILLIE DALE’S TRIAL. - 87

“T ‘suppose that’s being a Christian,” was
Kennedy’s thoughtful reply. “Well, I say,
Jarvis, there’s lots of us here who think they _
- might be the better for following Dale’s ex- .
ample. I know you do, old. fellow, and Holt
and I have agreed to have a try at it too.”

4



LITTLE MOTHER MAY.



AY and June were twins. May was

the elder by a few minutes only;

still those few minutes caused the birthday of

one twin to fall on the thirty-first of May,

and that of the other on the first of J une, a .

thing that does not often happen. So their

parents determined to mark the event by

naming the babies after the months in which -
they were born.

And truly these: names - suited hei as
no others could have done; for you might
have searched the world over without finding
a ‘ sweeter pair of little maidens. .Just to
look at their faces made you think of wild
' roses and bluebells, so pink and white were .



. LITTLE MOTHER MAY. 89.

they, and their eyes so soft and blue. “ June’s
_ cheeks were a wee bit pinker and her eyes a
wee bit bluer than May’s; but that was all
the difference between them, and it ‘was just
enough to know them by. Both had the same
golden-brown hair, and their tempers were as |
' sweet and sunny as their faces.

May was the more thoughtful and: sedate

of the two, and she had the more loving’
heart. Every one called her “ Little Mother

_ May,” because she was never so happy as
when tending a weak or ailing creature, and .~
she seemed to know by instinct how to do it.
May’s name-month had run out to its last —
_ day. It was Sunday, and her birthday ; both ce

birthdays were to be kept as usual on the first _
. of June, and they were going to have the treat
they loved best of all. Their Uncle Will

was the owner of a trim little ‘pleasure-boat
called the Seagull, and was going to take ©

. them and his own children for a sail down the

river to where it ran into the great, beautiful

sea, and they were to spend a long afternoon
on the beach. The little girls had been look- _



90 LITTLE MOTHER MAY.

ing forward to this treat for months; for the
past delight of it, and the anticipation of its,
return, gave them something to talk about for
a whole year.

_ May and June had been to church with
their parents in the morning, and in the
afternoon they decided to follow their father,
who had gone over the downs to speak to his
shepherd. They wanted to question him about ~
the weather, for a fresh breeze had sprung up,
and clouds were chasing each other over the’
sky rather quickly. How dreadful it would
be if the first of June should be wet!

The twins did not find their father very
quickly, and when they did, he seemed too
busy talking to the shepherd to notice them
at first. A sheep which lay at their feet was
ill, dying they feared, and Mr. Franks and
Tim were absorbed in ministering to the poor
creature. Two little lambs beside her were
crying piteously, and the sight of them awoke
all the mother instinct in May’s heart. Father
and Tim could manage the sheep, she thought
—they knew what to.do; but these neglected



LITTLE MOTHER MAY. , 91

little lambs were in her line. So;she knelt
down and began to stroke and comfort them,
and June joined her.

“ Are you there, children ?” said Mr. Franks,
looking up. “‘ Little Mother May’ is the
very person I wanted. I wish you and June
would take these poor little beasties home and
warm them upabit. I fear they'll be orphans
before long, and we shall have to bring them
up as best we can.”

The lambs were quite old or to run,
but no amount of coaxing would induce them -
to leave their mother. The children would
lead them a few yards away, and then they
would return and rub their pretty. black noses
against her side, with little cries of distress.
At length May, with tears in her eyes, picked
up one of them in her arms and started off
home with it. A well-grown lamb is no light
load for a small maiden to carry in a strong
“breeze; but she marched on bravely, soothing
it the while with loving words and hugs.
June had at first followed her sister’s example;
but finding the lamb heavy, she soon set it



Se.
92 LITTLE MOTHER MAY.

down, and slipping the band off her hat, tied it -
round the neck of her charge, and by this
’ means led or pulled it along, greatly against
its will.

Both children were heartily glad when they
reached home. June suggested making a little
pen under a tree at the corner of the grass’
plot where their favourite seat stood. This
their capable hands soon arranged, and the
lambs were placed in the tiny enclosure; but
if left for a minute alone, they again raised
- such a piteous bleating that, hot and thirsty
as she was, May could not be persuaded to
leave them, even to go in and have her tea. ~
_ June carried it out to her, and then brought
her own out also, for the twins were never
quite happy apart.

The lamb May had carried home seemed to
have quite adopted her as its special nurse ;
but she divided her attention between the
two very impartially, and was much troubled —
because they would not eat the bread dipped
in milk with which she tried to feed them. —
Presently Tim came and led the lambs away



me

3 LITTLE MOTHER MAY. 93

: * fag the night. He laughed at: ike little girl’s
distress, and told her they would eat fast
enough when they were sufficiently hungry.

“Do you think it is going to be a fine day
to-morrow, father ?” asked June when she came
to bid her parents good-night.

“Fine to-morrow? Why, yes; as far as I
can tell, it will be a beautiful day.”

“Not too windy for the boat? That is
what we came up the down to ask you about
this afternoon.”

“Why, dear me! if I hadn’t forgotten the
birthday sail altogether; I was so taken up
with that poor sheep. No, I don’t think it
will be windy at all, my darlings.” .

“Ts the sheep better, father?” asked May.

_ “Yes, Iam thankful to say she is; I think
she'll pull through now. But now I come
to think of it, it is almost a pity my little
‘girls will not be at home to-morrow. The
lambs must not go near my patient, and —
they'll be wanting some one to attend to

them sadly.” |

The twins looked grave as they went off ig





os 94 “Tne: MOTHER MAY.

_ bed; but ie said nothing, so June did not
-- ‘and they: were quickly asleep. _ -
The first of June was a perfect day, with ©”
just enough breeze to ripple the blue water of _
the river as it danced down to the sea. June
was in the wildest spirits, but May sat rather —
silently at the breakfast-table.
. * “I needn’t remind you girls to be ready when
the Seagull comes round,” said the farmer as —

Ee _he went.out. “I wish I could spare time for

a:sail myself this lovely day.”
. But when the Seagull came to the Iicalings
stage, only June was there waiting for it.
_ “Heyday! only one of you? What does.
_ ‘this mean?” cried Uncle Will as he helper
- June ‘into the boat.
_ “May will not come,” replied June solemnly.
“There are two poor lambs, whose mother is
‘ill, to be nursed, and May will not leave them
‘for any one. I don’t see why she should. epol Lb
our birthday treat for them.” me
“Nay, my dear, your birthday treat need =
_ not be spoilt. You can be happy and enjoy’ -
yourself well enough with your cousins here,





|, LITTLE MOTHER MAY. © , 95.
and I'll warrant ‘ Little Mother May’ will be
happy enough too. She'll not be the loser;”
said Uncle Will with a smile in his eyes, for
he loved May “like one of his own,” as ‘he:
often told her mother. ©

“May had never told a word of her iaistition
till it was time to get ready ; then she quietly

told her mother that the lambs wanted. her, =
and she would rather stay with them, and.
walked off with her new birthday story-book ae

to the seat under the tree, from whence: no



arguments or entreaties on June’s part could
move her. She could not help feeling a little
sad when the gleam of blue water between.

the branches of the trees caught her eye, and
she thought of the merry party on the beach ;



but she was consoled when she saw how cosy ie

her charges were, and how content under her
watchful care. Presently she found her father,

_ who had come quietly over the ‘grass, standing ele
__ by her side.

Dear ‘ Little Mother May, he said: as he.
Be stooped to kiss her, “ I never thought of your
doing this when I spoke last night. poe



96 : LITTLE MOTHER MAY.

“No, father, but I did; I make up my mind

_. to do it directly. I couldn’t have left them.”

“Well, childie, ’'m glad you didn’t, though
Fm sorry too. The poor sheep is dead, after
all. . How would you like to have these
orphans for your very own, May ?”

“O father! do you really mean it?”

“TJ do, indeed. My little girl deserves a
birthday present, I am sure.”

Who so happy as “ Little Mother May”
when she realized that the lambs were her
very own? Now, indeed, she felt rewarded
for her self-denial, and her face was quite
radiant with happiness when she told her
news to June on her return home.

If May has daughters of her own when she
grows up, I think they will be fortunate indeed
in having such a mother as she will make.

THE END.



Tene



















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THE LITTLE V.C.



OUR TED

Page 12

NELSON AND SONS

T.

London, Edinburgh, and New York



THE LITTLE V.C.

’

_ BY

HELEN MARION BURNSIDE
AUTHOR OF “THE Lost LETTER; OR, THE ADVENTURES OF A soeenas STAMP,”

ETC. ETC.



© Great may he be who can command
And rule with just and tender sway,
Yet is diviner wisdom taught
Better by him who can obey.” 7 it
A. A. PROCTER.



T. NELSON AND SONS
London, Edinburgh, and New York



1898 ©


CONTENTS.
“1 “OUR TED,” 4... ae eee “9
‘IL, THE STORY OF THE STANDARD, _ .... er 16.
1, “TERRIBLE TED,” bn eee wed a
Iv. BUGLER BROWN, te his wig BE
V, TEL-EL-KEBIR, .... oe ae 49 -
VI. THE LITTLE V.C., * as ae fae FEL.

WILLIE DALE’S TRIAL, ° Sa sake ase 72

<_<

LITTLE MOTHER MAY,’ me ne wl abe BBS

u


Tie: LITT LE Ve



CHAPTER I.
“OUR TED.”

OOD-DAY, sergeant.” ° ee
An old Chelsea pensioner, who was >
pottering with his one hand in his little strip. :
of garden, straightened himself up as ‘quickly —
as he could, and saluted with an expression of ~
delighted surprise on his rugged old face.
. “Good-day, general,” he returned, grasping
the hand stretched out to him with atontions
“T did not know you were back in town, sir.” .
~ © Came™ yesterday, bag and: baggage; we're —
in the “old rooms in the Terrace at present.
How. goes the world with you, old Biond? :


10 ‘OUR TED.”

“As well as age and rheumatism permit,
general. I was wishing just now that my old
back was a bit more lissom-like, for there’s a
deal wants doing in this plot of mine before
the winter. Ah, here comes our Ted, my
grandson, general ; he promised to run round
and water them dahlias for me, as he often
does, bless him !”

_ A boy in the uniform of the Duke of York’s

Military School.came running up the broad,
, sunny walk at headlong speed, and seizing the

frail old soldier’s single arm with his small,
brown hands, squeezed it affectionately.

“Here I am, gran—a bit late, I know;
but there’s been a parece at Duke o’ York’s,
and I couldn’t get away.”

_ “Where’s your manners, , Ted ? Don’t you
see I’ve company, boy?” _

Ted faced round and saluted. “ Beg pardon, .
sir; I was in a hurry, and did not see you.”
And he raised a pair of honest blue eyés to

_the general’s face.

“This is my poor son’s lad, general,” said _

the sergeant. ‘Him as you were good enough
ert © OUR TED.” Bee
to get into Duke o’ York’s, yonder.—I don’t
know what you've done with your manners
to-day, boy,” he grumbled, turning to his ©
grandson. “You might speak a word of
gratitude to his honour, who has been so
good to us all, as his father was before hin.”
The lad coloured shyly. He knew all about
the general, the hero of his childish heart, but

had never met him before. He looked him’ ~~
straight in the face as he again raised his ©

hand to his cap. “I do thank you, sir,” he’
said simply. eg
The general steadily returned the boy’s

gaze, and then laid his hand kindly on his — :
shoulder. ‘You are the son of a brave man, =
my boy, and the grandson of a brave man, >.

too, as these testify,” he added, glancing kindly
at the sergeant, and lightly touching with his
gloved finger, first the empty sleeve pinned ~
across his breast, and then the medals above
ii “You come of a good stock. What do
you think of doing with yourself?”
“Soldier, sir,” replied Ted instantly, and
_with such decision that the general laughed.

“


12 a - “oor TED.” A te

« A chip of the old block, I see, sergeant.—
‘There, get along with you, lad, and put your
back into the gardening,” and he nodded |
_ kindly to the boy, who with a sudden increase

of shyness seized the watering-pot, and sent a
deluge of water over his grandfather's toes.
- The old soldier turned away. The general
was twenty years younger than the sergeant,
and straight and.alert as a boy, but no longer
-a young man, for all that.:
“A fine lad, sergeant,” he remarked, as
they strolled down-the broad, central walk of
- the hospital grounds, and seated themselves
on a sunny bench; for there was nothing the

general liked better than a chat with the ©»

veteran colour-sergeant, while such chats =
were the crowning delight of the old fellow’s — :
life. ‘A fine lad, a true chip of the old block,
as I said just now, and he knows his own mind,
too. What*sort-of character does he bear ?”

« Well, general, it isn’t me as should answer: -
that question, being his grandfather, and par
tial, for he’s all I’ve got left, you see; but since ©
you ask me, I should say a better lad never
“OUR TED.” | 13
iSped A. right. down honest, God. fearing
lad, with his heart in the right place, is our
Ted, and: so gentle and loving to his poor
mother and me. But still; boys will be boys;
and Ted: has his faults like the rest.” .

“May I ask what they are?”

“He likes his own way just a bit, general.
“He's wilful and he’s thoughtless. The captain.
yonder at Duke 0’ York’s says he lets -his
spirits run away with him, and he leads ie
other youngsters into mischief.”

“T see. . A bit of a pickle,” remarked the
general, smiling under his heavy, griaaled
moustache.

“That's it, general. His mother worrite 7

sadly about it; but there—it’s only his spirits, a

cas I tell her,” returned the sergeant, half proud «
- and half apologetic ; on sober down fast 3
enough as’ time goes on.”

Yes, yes. But discipline is discipline all
2 the more because boys are boys, my old friend,

‘as no one knows better than yourself. How- |

ever, Tl have another talk with you: about’.
ae Ted whilst I’m in town.”
XN

14 he * © OUR “TED.”

With a cheery nod General Frazer marched
off, leaving the old sergeant to nod over his
pipe in the sunshine. He threw a keen glance
over to the boy as he passed him, still busy
amongst the dahlias, and smiléd again to
himself as he did so, for Ted’s bright face had
taken his fancy, as it did that of many people.
Sergeant Brown had fought under thé
general's father. They had been boys together
_ ‘in the same village; and when young Squire
Frazer went off soldiering, young Brown must
- needs enlist in the same regiment. The poor
-.. young squire, however, was killed in his first
- engagement, leaving a girl wife and infant son
—our general. The only son of Sergeant
Brown, in his. turn, enlisted under General
Frazer. He was a thorough soldier, and a brave
- man, but weak in health.. He became attached
to a young girl, the maid of a lady on board
~ the same ship, on the passage home from India
on sick leave, and imprudently married her—
imprudently, for poor Brown’s health was so

completely shattered by many years of Indian _

- service that he died within two years of his =
OURSTED. “|: 15

marriage, leaving a baby son—our Ted. There
were therefore many ties of long-tried affection
and mutual service uniting the family of the .
general with the humble one of the Browns,
the sons of the latter having so faithfully. fol-
lowed the fortunes of the former, and there —
having been so much similarity of fate.


| CHAPTER ie
THE STORY OF THE STANDARD.

HERE was nothing our Ted loved better
than what he called “rummaging about”

-_ Chelsea Hospital. He. knew every nook and

corner of the old place, and everything in it;
and whenever he could get leave of absence,
- or a holiday which was unoccupied by school.

~~ duties, he was generally to be found there.

He was, however, one of the crack buglers in’ ~
the school band, for he had a great love for
. music, and also a sweet. tenor voice; besides
which, his pluck and strength made him an ©
adept in games, so that he could not always,

_ be spared. Not infrequently his mother and ©

grandfather might be seen stationed outside
the railings of the playground, eagerly watch- .

G
¢
THE STORY OF THE STANDARD. - 17 ©»

ing the games or drill of the sturdy youngsters ~

within ; and they would stroll away again quite
content if they had been able to catth a glimpse
of, or.exchange a few words with, their lad,
whose superior merits they would at such —
times discuss, but on quite. different grounds
—the old soldier dwelling on Ted’s pluck,.
spirit, and activity, on his straight well-set-up

young form and soldierly quickness, whilst the. es

timid and rather querulous mother admired

his sweet voice, handsome face, and loving dis- _ 2

position, and talked of the time when he would
come home to live with her, and turn his ©

book-léarning to some account, and perhaps join — |

a volunteer band—if “ gran” thought it safe !

Chelsea Hospital was much nearer to the |

Duke of York’s than his mother’s home, ‘so a

~ Ted would often beg her to meet him there in: .

preference to spending all his time in a ’bus:
getting to Camden Town and back; and.as he
said, it was more of a change for her.

One wintry afternoon Ted and his mother *
were visiting the hospital, and, with the ser- °

‘geant, had. wandered into. the chapel, where «
ge 78 ae 2 : : "
18 THE STORY OF THE STANDARD.

the boy was pointing out to her, in the tone of
awe which he always fell into on such occa-
_ sions, the various tattered banners which Bung
from the wall.

“In my opinion they want a good dusting |
and shaking,” said Mrs. Brown; “and many ~
of them would be the better for being’ burnt
_ up and replaced by new ones. Why, just look
at this: it’s fairly dropping to bits with age ~
and dust.” |

Had the -good woman proposed to burn
up the chapel itself, Ted and his grandfather
could not have exchanged glances of greater
horror.

“Why, mother, how can you?” exclaimed -
Ted. “These banners were all taken from the
enemy in some great battle, and I'll be bound,

lots of fellows lost their lives in guarding this
ene.” -

.“The more foolish they,” muttered Mrs.
‘Brown, who, considering that she was a
soldier's widow, was sadly wanting in miliary.
ardour and patriotism.

“You are right, boy,” returned the ser- —
THE STORY OF THE STANDARD. 19
geant, not heeding Mrs. Brown’s remark.
“More gallant fellows were laid low beneath -

-that banner than any other that hangs here.

"Tis the great Eagle standard of the French,
taken single-handed at the battle of Waterloo
by Sergeant Ewart of the Scots Greys.”

“ Single-handed ? gis did he do it? Do. :

tell us all about it, gran.”

“The standard was considered sacred by is
French army, who regarded it with almost -
superstitious reverence. It was guarded by
the bravest of the brave, the 15th Regiment,
which had earned the name of ‘ the Invincibles:’
Tis gay folds have floated over many a battle-
field, and the Frenchmen had come to believe
that it could not be taken, or its guards van-

quished ; but when the Scottish regiment of —

Royal Dragoons, known as ‘the terrible Scots

Greys,’ thundered down upon them from Mont va
St..Jean at the battle of Waterloo, they ‘had .
_to tell a different tale, for the banner, still .

floating over the heads of its hitherto invin-
cible guard, caught the eye of a certain gallant

young Sergeant Ewart, who proposed +o ‘his.
20 THE STORY OF THE STANDARD.

comrades to capture it. Shouting their war-
ery of ‘Scotland for ever!’ they succeeded in
reaching its neighbourhood after performing
feats of extraordinary valour. Then Ewart,
rushing on, fought his way single-handed -
. through the remnant of its resolute defenders,
seized the banner, and carried it off the field in
triumph. He was afterwards promoted to a_
commission for this brave deed. The general’s’
lady put the story into verse, and gave me a
copy of it.”

“OQ gran, do read it to us,” cried Ted,
who had drunk in the story of -heroism with
crimson cheeks, and sparkling . “yes intently
fixed on the old banner.

“Well, come away up, and I'll see about
it,” replied the sergeant, who had himself
read the well-thumbed copy of verses in).
question till he could almost have said them |
off by heart.

The trio proceeded up the stone stairs into.

a long, bright-looking corridor, and seated “
themselves near a fire just outside what Ted —
was wont to call “gran’s own den.” Mrs. _
THE STORY OF THE STANDARD. — 21

Brown would, to say the truth, have preferred
to turn over and set in order, according to her:
own ideas, her father-in-law’s few. possessions,
but Ted would hear of her doing nothing but
sitting idly, with his hand in hers; so she ~
composed herself ¢o listen, and the sergeant,
setting ‘his wide-rimmed glasses firmly on his
nose, drew in his chair -and commenced to
read with much gusto :—

“Tar Story OF THE STANDARD.

** Never, sure, was prouder trophy on a field of battle won
Than the flag whose folds so stately glittered in the summer sun,
.When Napoleon’s brave legions, and the hosts of valiant Ney,
Faced the men of Merry England, on that sad but glorious day. ©

“ Come and gone has many a summer since this tattered banner flew
O’er-the heads of Britain’s foemen, on the field 6f ‘Waterloo ;
And the barley waves its tresses, and the light-poised poppies dance,
Where our stalwart English gunners once mowed down the men of
France,

** Jena, Austerlitz, and Friedland had, in fights but late gone by, ,
Seen that well-known Eagle standard pains scathless, proud, and
high ;
And again arrayed beneath it, midst the gleam of sword and lance,
_ Pressed the yet unconquered squadron—the ‘Invincibles’ of France. -

$s Where the battle smoke was thickest, where the guns, athirst for
blood,
Laid their foemen low the fastest, had that famous squadron stood ; _
-And the Frenchmen eae fancied that the fight for them was
“won,
‘When, their’ Eagle o’er fhiaia flying, the Tnyinetbles? came on.
-

22 THE STORY OF THE STANDARD.

* To the earth fell gallant Picton, ne’er, alas! to rise again, - at:
And at every rattling volley higher grew the heaps of slain, .
Friend and foe together falling in the stern embrace of death,
Shouting fierce, defiant war-cries as they breathed their latest breath.

** Onward swept the awful reapers for a little space, and then;
Like an ocean wave advancing, came the dauntless Scottish men ;
And the pick of Franee’s army lost at. length its laurel crown,,.
When from Jean’s green heights upon them the dragoons came
thundering down.

« High above the roar of battle, through its pall of lurid laze,
Rang the shrill defiant war-cry of the ‘ terrible Scots Greys ;’
And the stern delight of battle grew in brave young Ewart’s eyes

~ As he Yowed that sacred banner soon or late should be his prize.

‘¢ Proudly yet on high it floated: sword nor shot their course could stay ;
- Over piles of dead and dying, on they held their blood-stained way,
Till the hand of daring Ewart on the banner staff was laid, .
And its price the last defender. with his life-blood dearly paid.

~ © Thére were sounds of solemn triumph in the British camp that night

As the worn and weary victors straggled in from field of fight,
And before their stern commander, England’s ‘Iron Duke,’ laid down
The proud trophy that had covered Ewart’s name with high renown.

* But their hearts were full of sorrow, and their brows were black
with gloom, ‘
For the true and valiant comrades who would never more march home,
For the homes their dear-bought conquest had made desolate that day, ©
For the widows and the orphans.in the home-land far away. ‘

“ Oft at eve in Merry England, when the fires of winter blaze;.
Folk still talk of gallant Ewart of the ‘terrible Scots Greys,’—
Tell of how he won the standard, tell of how he fought and slew,
By the score, its stout defenders on the field of Waterloo.

© And the boys of brave old Britain, sons of those who bled of old,
Feel their hearts grow hot within them when the glorious tale is:told
That shall nerve them in the future noble deeds to daré and do,
And to fight in life’s long battle like their sires at Waterloo.”

/


‘THE STORY OF THE STANDARD. Pt

i "QO gran, what a splendid man! what a
splendid deed !” cried Fed, who, in his excite-
ment as the story proceeded, had: risen, and’
now stood with his hand on his grandfather’s
knee. Several of the pensioners had gathered —
round to listen and clap their hands softly,
while they regarded the boy benevolently, for.
they were all fond of Ted, and delighted: in

his enthusiastic love of brave deeds. “I never af

heard anything so grand before. I’d give ©
the rest of my life to do a thing like that
Did Ewart get the Victoria Cross?” ,



Phere were no Victoria Crosses in these ee

days, boy. Queen Victoria—God bless her ! ee
wasn’t pore then. He gota commission, as I
- told you.”
' “IT mean to win a Victoria Cres one of
_ these days; see if I don’t,” said Ted, nodding
to the company at large. ;
“ Deeds, not words, Fed, should be a ike ae
dier’s motto,” returned the old mar with a

warning look. “ But we haven't quite finished | .-

the poem yet ; here’s a bit more that mother’ll
like to hear.” —
(

24 ~ - THE STORY OF THE STANDARD. /
* By the peaceful sunlit river, where the sails go up and down,

Just a stone’s-throw from’ the turmoil and the rush of London town,
Stands the ancient cloistered homestead where our veterans, maimed,’

and grey, dp :
Rest from heat and toil of battle, at the close of life’s long day. /

_ © And that banner, torn and faded, hangs within the chapel now, |
Where: the lights from painted windows on its tattered glories glow,
And the weary, war-worn heroes bend their hoary heads to pray
N eath the proudly-cherished trophy of that ne re forgone day,—

‘© Ti] they answer to the roll-call that shall muster them at last,
When the shades of night are falling, and the long day’s work is past; ~
Till they see the bright dawn breaking, in the land where war
shall cease,
And the en bids them welcome to His Scie peace.”

“Yes, I like that now,” said Mrs. Brown
tearfully ; “that’s Christian, and peaceful, and
comforting-like. That’s where your dear father
has gone, Ted, and where I hope and pray
we shall all go some day.”

“T can cheerfully say ‘ Amen’ to that,” pat
in the sergeant, and his daughter-in-law went -
on,— Z

“ But I wonder at you, father, putting dan-
gerous ideas into the lad’s head with them
wild, heathen soldier-stories, that I do. I
never had no opinion of soldiers myself—par -
don my saying this, gentlemen—though I did
go and marry the dear fellow that’s gone, and
THE STORY OF THE STANDARD. 25.
never repented it neither ; but then he died
decently in his own bed, through getting. his
liyer grilled ‘in ‘that areeche Tne, as I ne
my hoy will do the same.’
_ “What! get his liver grilled?” asked the
- sergeant dryly.

“No, die in his bed, of course,” ’ returned ;
Mrs. Brown; “but in the common course. of

nature we'll all of us be gone before his time~ =

comes,” and she laid her hand lovingly on - '
Ted’s head.
Now though the veteran regarded “Mrs: ea

_ Brown with all due affection and respect, both ~
as a woman and as his son’s widow, and per-
haps most of all as the mother of Ted, the
- apple of his old eye, he could not always listen
with patience to her opinions on his profes-

sion. “She’s one of the best of women, and. -
has been the best of mothers to the little
lad,” he would say to his comrades, “but she. .
is damping in her ideas, mates ; that’s where it
is. There’s no denying she’s rather damping.”
~The old fellows smiled and shook their
- heads. They knew Mrs. Brown and her
26. THE STORY OF. THE STANDARD.

peculiarities as well as her father-in-law did;
' and to them, as well as to herself, it was
nothing short of a mystery that such a.woman
should have married into a martial family
like the Browns. Ted himself instinctively ~
avoided talking to her about his military

hopes and aspirations : it would be time enough

to tell her when the time came, he thought to

himself... It being then the hour for visitors

to leave, the sergeant gave his “damping”

- daughter-in-law his single arm, and conducted

her downstairs and to the hospital gates with a

_: kindness and courtesy which would have done

credit. to that most. courteous of gentlemen,

the general himself, Master Ted “letting off

the steam,” as he called it, by sliding down

the banister and turning coach-wheels across

. the courtyard. ; J
CHAPTER III.

“TERRIBLE TED.”

A. FEW days before the commencement of ©
the Christmas holidays, sad news went ‘-
forth from the Duke of York’s School both to. —
the hospital and the little home in Camden
‘Town—news which made Widow Brown tie
on her bonnet with trembling fingers, and
sent the old Chelsea pensioner off to the
school at a quicker pace than he had been —
known to walk at for many a year, in order to
“learn the rights of it,’ as he said, from the~
~ corporal at the lodge. The news was this:—
Boy Brown, the bugler, was laid up in the —
hospital of the school. with a broken. collar-
bone, having previously broken the head of
another “Dukie,” and half killed him. Boy
28 _ . TERRIBLE TED.”

Brown was also charged with having been ©

_ guilty of serious insubordination. Breathless __

with haste.and tremulous with anxiety, the -
old sergeant arrived at the lodge, where the
corporal, who knew him well enough, guessed
instantly what had brought him.

“You've no cause to be anxious, Sergeant
Brown,” he said kindly. “The lad’s going on
-as well as possible; he’ll soon be about again.”

‘And the other one—the one he fought

with? For God’s sake, corporal, tell me the |
rights of it. My \ad fighting and insubordin-
ate! I can’t take it in at all.”

_ “Sit you down, old friend, and I'll tell you .
as far as I know. There’s no‘call for anxiety,
‘as I said, and, between you and me, nothing
to be ashamed of. Fighting there was, and
insubordination there was, but not what you ~
think.. My word, Boy Brown’s made of the. _
right stuff! Well, it seems the youngsters .
got up a sham fight—play-acting sométhing
_ or other in the drill ground between his com-
pany and another. He was so hot at it that
he never heeded ‘the bugle call to work, and
“TERRIBLE, TED.” 29."

the other youngsters were so carried away by
_. his spirit that they never heeded it either, nor
_. the monitor coming back to warn them. ~
There was a tremendous scrimmage just at the —
‘last, you see, and Boys Brown. and Gordon.
got hurt before the thing could be put a stop
to ; a lot of the others got pretty hard knocks
in the fray.” 2
“Tt. wasn’t a fight only between the two; Es :
then—not a quarrel ?” ;
“ Bless your heart, no! The pair of them
were lying on the ground when the command-
ant and others came hurrying out, Brown’ —
waving a bit of a stick with a handkerchief -.
tied to it with-the one hand he could: use, ~
shouting ‘Scotland for ever!’ and calling on

Gordon to get up and shake hands, tilt he saw’

the poor lad was knocked senseless with a cut. A

on the head. He went into a mighty quan- —
dary then, and wouldn’t have his own hurt =

looked to till the doctor had brought Gordon, :

round and said he wasn’t badly hurt. When —
they picked hirn up and carried him into the —

hospital, he held on to his flag like a bull- »
80 “TERRIBLE TED.”

dog ; and there it i is, they tell me, , stuck up by
the side of his bed.”

A light broke in upon the sergeant. Mas-
ter Ted had got up a mimic “fight for the
standard.” The old fellow felt rather guilty.
Ted’s mother had been justified in reproaching
him for putting ideas into their boy’s head, he
._ thought ; but for the present he kept his own
“counsel.

“The young scamp! «Who'd have thought —

: of this?” he muttered. The sergeant and
the corporal regarded each other with a
twinkle of grave amusement in their eyes as
they shook hands; and having obtained per-—
mission to visit his grandson next day, the
som departed.

~ Close to the gates he came upon his
daughter-in-law, who had just alighted from

. a "bus in a condition of tearful affright. To
her he made very light of the whole matter.
He had pictured to himself the “ damping” é
‘nature of the scene that would take place if “=:
once she took in the real facts of the case, and, ~
brave soldier as he was, his spirit quailed
é TERRIBLE TED,” NA ee a

- within him. The boys had just been too keen

for their play to heed the bugle, he told her.
Ted and another had been knocked down and .
hurt. They'd be all right again and able to
go home in a few days, and meanwhile were
as comfortable as possible and full of spirits ;
but the doctor would allow no one to visit. Ted
till the morrow. The widow was much com-
forted by this report, and, being in a hurry, ~
asked no further questions; so, with a sigh of
relief, the sergeant saw her into a "bus, men-
tally resolving, for reasons of his own, that his
visit to Ted on the morrow should be: paid
first.

The sergeant’s idea of the affection and
respect due to a mother from her son was a.
very high one, and he never lost an oppor-
tunity of impressing his views on Ted.
“Love and cherish your mother as she has |
loved and cherished you, my lad,” he would
- say; “ wait upon her as she has waited on you, *
. and never vex her Gf you can help it. - Soy
“or man—to say nothing of a soldier—onee’ .
-. daught‘his duty as you have been taught yours, a

~
ao ‘TERRIBLE TED.”

_ has no excuse for not treating a woman as &
gentleman should, whatever station in life he
may be in.” ‘
_ No word had ever passed between the boy
and his grandfather on the subject, but they
both knew in their hearts that Ted’s hopes
and wishes of enlisting would bitterly pain and
. disappoint his mother, and they had hitherto
_ simply avoided the subject; but now the time _
was come, the sergeartt thought, that, from a
- word dropped here and there, she should be
brought to see what was inevitable. The won-
der was that, trained as Ted had been, and
brought up in the midst of the strongest
military influences, she should think any other _
result possible. ‘He. hoped that this escapade
of Ted’s might somehow be made to serve as
the thin edge of the wedge. ~
Early in the next afternoon the, sergeant
stumped up the hospital stairs to the ward i in ,

"which his graridson was lying, pale and

propped round with pillows, and with a gay

’“gearlet covering concealing the bandaged arm .

and shoulder.. Ted eagerly stretched out his
“ TERRIBLE TED.” 33

left hand to his visitor with his usual bright
-smile: Now the sergeant had intended to be
very stern—he indeed raised a reproving finger
and shook his head as he looked down on the
face he loved best ; but Ted only smiled.

“Yes, I know all about it, gran,” he said ;
“you need not pretend to be angry. The
commandant and the chaplain have both been —
here. I was wilful and heedless and dis-
_ obedient, I know, just as they said, and I’m |
sorry, and when I’m well I'll take my punish-
ment like a man; but, gran, I couldn’t help
it. If it was all to come over again, I couldn’t —
leave off at that moment to save my life—no,
nor Gordon either.—Could you, old fellow 2”
. And he nodded towards an opposite bed, in
- which lay another boy with his head bandaged. _

“T should think not, indeed. Why, I heard
the bugle well enough, but I couldn’t have let.
go the banner staff—not' if the Queen her-
self had come and told me to, which she
wouldn’t. I know she’d have let us fight it
out,” he’added confidently.

_ “Hush! hush! You are speaking very:
GN 3 s 4
84- ‘P)ERRIBLE TED.”

wrongly as well as foolishly,” interrupted the
‘sergeant in real displeasure. “I am surprised’
to ‘hear you say such things, and you both
_intending to be soldiers. Why, my lads, you
know as well as I do that obedience—disci-
pline, that is—is the very first and most impor-
tant lesson a soldier has to learn; all other
good qualities are as nothing without that as
-a foundation.”

Ted fidgeted and looked uncomfortable.

“Suppose, gran, a thing is a right.and good
thing to do; are you to leave it undone because
some one else tells you not to do it?”

“Heyday!” cried the sergeant, in a tone |
that brought the colour into the boy’s cheeks;
“a fine soldier you'll make indeed, my lad, if
them’s your sentiments! Who made you a
judge of right, boy?” he went on in a softer
voice. ‘A soldier’s duty is so plain and clear,
he has no need to think for himself; he has
only to do as he is told by his superiors.
Now, tell me how all this happened, from
beginning to end.”

“Well, gran, at the beginning, you see, it
“TERRIBLE TED.” 35.

was your doing. You began it,” said Ted,
with a roguish grin. “TI was just brimful of.
‘The Story of the Standard’ when I came ~
home. I told it to Gordon there, and we got
our companies together, he and I, and ar-

* ranged we would act it over, just as it hap- ”

pened, the first opportunity we got. I and

my company were Ewart and the ‘Terribles,’ a

you know, and Gordon was the standard ,
“bearer of the ‘ Invincibles’ They didn’t like
being Frenchies at first, but I talked them
over. We pretended this”—taking up a staff .
which stood by his bed with a coloured hand-
kerchief attached to it— was the Eagle stan-
dard. Well, gran, I and-my Terribles rushed °

- down from the little mound on the Invincibles, -

shouting ‘Scotland for ever!’ . They beat us off,

and we'had a really splendid fight. ‘Lots fell

on both sides ; but we got the best of it at last,
of course,-and I’d almost reached the standard

_ when the bugle rang out. We let it call, for
we couldn’t stop. I’d stretched out my hand
to seize the staff, when crack, crack it came ~
_ down, on my shoulder and arm, and I felt an
36: ‘TERRIBLE TED.”

awful pain; but I hit out at Gordon with my
left fist,.and down he went like a shot, still —
holding on to the banner staff. I.wrenched
it from him and’was making off, when I fell
over somebody and came down on my hurt:
shoulder. But I did win, and would have
died to do it.”
“ All the same,” put in the. Invincible from
the opposite bed, wagging his bandaged head
at the victor, “you ghouldn’t have had it if I
hadn’t been stunned. I’d have died for it too;
so you needn’t crow so loud, Terrible Ted.”
“We'll try it over again some day,” promptly
returned our hero; “and oh, gran, we mean
to do the six hundred too! We’ve been plan-
ning it all out as we lay here.” .
“The six hundred,” repeated the sergeant,
rather at sea. ‘‘What are you. talking of
now ?”
“Why, you aes gran—the charge of the
Light Brigade at Balaklava.

‘Into 'the jaws of death rode thesix hundred.’ —

That’s very nearly as splendid as Ewart.”
ae “‘TRRRIBLE TED.” 37

“bed

The: sergeant shook. his head. :
' “This is all very fine talk, my boys; bat
Ted, I want you to be serious. I’ve no time
now for the wigging I meant to give you
about your'breach of discipline, for your poor
mother -will be here directly, and what we are.
to say to her about this scrape of yours I do
not know. You must expect her to be ve







damping, and I fear yond hurt and one her"
with your wild talk. .

Ted sobered down at once.
“No, I won’t, gran. Poor mother! _ Of
course: I must tell her the truth—that we were
acting a battle story. You know,” he went on
in a lower tone, “the holidays are just be--
ginning, and while I’m at home I think it |
will be only fair to let her see, bit by bit, .
what's in my mind. She’d take it so hard all —
at once. But oh, gran, I do wish mother
thought as you and I do about my going for -
a soldier !”

“So do I, my boy, but: tags past praying
for ; only remember, whatever you say or do,.
that she’s the best of women and aba
38 “TERRIBLE TED.”

and don’t hurt her feelings. You may be sure _
she never had a feeling that didn’t do her.
credit, in spite of her being a bit damping now
and then. A man can’t be too kind and care-
ful where a woman’s feelings are concerned +

~remember that, Ted, my lad.”
CHAPTER IV.

BUGLER BROWN.

T was decided by the commandant that, —
considering the season, and that. -the
chief culprits had already suffered somewhat
severely from their hurts, and the cutting
short of their holidays—for both boys had to
spend Christmas in the hospital ward—they
should be let off with a sharp, public repri-
mand. Gordon was able to go home a day
or two before Ted could be moved ; his grand-
_ father therefore had plenty of opportunity for
administering the promised “ wigging” in pri-
vate. “Terrible Ted”—for the nick-name stuck —
to Boy Brown—indeed expressed much peni-_
tence for his disobedience, and. gave ready
promises of amendment; but his grandfather
40 BUGLER BROWN.

could not feel satisfied with the effect of his
eloquence, as the. boy did not seem to realize -
the real gravity of his fault, and would not —
look upon it in a serious light; so, having
turned the matter over in his mind, the old
soldier resolved to lay his perplexities before -

his friend the general, and rena an inter-. .

view for the purpose. to

- General ‘Frazer listened attentively to the
rather long-winded tale poured into his ears.
His eyes lighted up, and the humorous smile
the sergeant knew so well curled his mous-
tache as he gave two or three sharp little
nods at the crisis of the story, and he laughed
outright when the old fellow dryly repeated
his grandson’s assertion that he had begun it.

“The audacious monkey’!” he exclaimed ;
“upon my word he turned the tables on you
very cleverly ; but you must confess, sergeant, -
there: was some justice in the charge. You
throw sparks into this small powder magazine
‘of yours, and are then surprised at an explo-
sion. I really think you are most to blame,” —
and the general gave a comical glance.
BUGLER BROWN. 41
' “T begin to think I am,” was the rueful
reply ; “but excuse me, general. I want you

to understand that the trouble in my mind is. ?

this. Reasonable as the youngster is, and bid-
dable too, as long as he keeps cool, I don’t
somehow seem to be able to bring home to
him that insubordination is very, wrong. He
' listens to all that is said to him, and says he’s

. sorry; but nothing that any one says to him

‘seems to go deep enough, or to take hold.” ,
The general nodded. “TI think I under-_
stand where the difficulty lies,” he returned
thoughtfully ; “he has probably heard’-too
much about it. It goes in at one ear and out
at the other, without, as you. say, coming .
home to him. I'll see what I can do with
him. T like the lad’s spirit, sergeant ; there’s.
the making of a first-rate soldier in him, and °
he mustn’t be spoiled for want of ballast, so to
ae Where is he now?” .
“ At Duke o’ York’s for a day or oe longer,
peut oe 4
“Well, sergeant, I haven’t forgotten my
promise regarding him, and have a scheme in
42 - BUGLER. BROWN.

my mind for getting him into the Nineteenth,
but Tl have a talk with the lad himself
before going any further.”

- The general kept his word, and by atrange-
ment with the authorities went over to the
Duke of York’s, and hada long, private inter-
view with our hero. What took place at this
interview was sacred between the two. The
“general himself never told, and his little
bugler could not be induced to reveal a word.
The matron saw he had been crying, and
afterwards declared that the general’s own
-eyes were moist when she went up to offer
his honour a cup of tea, and that he was
holding Boy Brown’s hand in his as if he had
been his own son. That the interview bore
rich fruit in Ted’s after life and story was.
proved by the boy’s own conduct and devoted
love for the general. Y agd

“T could: find it in my heart to envy you

that grandson of yours, sergeant,” began the
general, when he went down to Chelsea to see
his old friend a few days later. “I have no
boy of my own, as you know, and my heart
BUGLER BROWN. ~~ 43

warms to this one of yours; you and his .
mother must let me have a share in him. I
think I can manage to get him into our regi-
mental band very shortly, if you and he are

willing.” . .
“ Willing, general! Why, it’s the very thing
- T’ve hoped and dreamed of for him. I shall
have nothing left to wish for when the. last

‘muster’s called, sir, if I can leave thé dear ~

lad under your eye; but there’s his mother,”
and the sergeant explained the difficulties
that lay before them in this direction.

The general looked grave. “That’sapity,a —
great pity,” he observed. “Well, sergeant, I
advise you simply to tell that ‘Terrible Ted’

of yours, and his mother, what I propose, and «©

leave them to settle the matter between them
during the holidays. It will be a thousand
pities if she does not hear reason, poor soul.
The boy’s life will be spoiled if she, denies him
his desires. At the same time, we must not
encourage him to act in direct opposition to -
her wishes. That would be a bad beginning
indeed.” - ;
44> x - BUGLER BROWN.

_- The general’s proposal was laid before Ted
by his grandfather on the day before he was ‘
pronounced well enough to go home, and no
sunbeam could have shone brighter than his
‘face as he jumped out of the "bus and ran.
into his mother’s arms at the door of the little
home in Camden Town. - Never had he been _
so loving and cheery and helpful, and never
- had the widow felt so proud of him. It was
her great delight to show the little red-coated
. figure off to her friends, and talk to them of ©
his good qualities ; but somehow, as the days
flew by, things did not go quite as Ted wished
and hoped. He made a point of dropping his
hints, as he had planned, and lovingly en-
deavoured to argue and coax away her opposi-—
tion; and finally he told her outright of the.
general’s offer, of his grandfather’s delight in
his prospects, and of his own anew desire .
~ for a military career.

- But, alas! it was quite a different Ted that
returned to the Duke of York’s when the
holidays came to an end—a Boy Brown that
the “Dukies” hardly recognized, who went .
BUGLER BROWN.- = 45

about his. work and play in a listless and -
- downcast manner, and was altogether un-~
satisfactory. Boy Brown had broken down .
in the anthem at chapel on Sunday morning,
it was rumoured—his favourite anthem too—
“Rest in the Lord, wait patiently for him;
and he shall give thee thine heart’s desire.”
It was quite true, that the little bugler’s
sweet, clear voice faltered and broke, and he -
had been altogether unable to sing the last -:
few words; and when he went to visit his |
grandfather, who was ailing with rheumatics,
in the afternoon; Ted’s trouble came out.
His mother had positively forbidden him to _

’ think any more of soldiering, and he had
-- given in. She had a scheme for apprenticing

him to a shoemaker when he left school, and
_the boy was just breaking his heart over the
disappointment of his hopes and dreams. .

The sergeant was “struck all of a heap,”
as he called it. That his daughter-in-law would
take on, and be more than usually damping,
he was prepared to hear; but he had never
thought that she would be so blind to her
46 on BUGLER BROWN.

son’s interests as absolutely to withhold her
consent when it came to the point. He
knew not what to advise. “It’s very hard,
my boy; but cheer up, and bear it like a
man,” he said at last. “You can be a man,
' even if you must be a shoemaker. It’s all
her love for you, Ted—don’t forget that; —
. you've done your duty, and no one can do
. more than that.” _

Ted went back a little bit cheered, and the
‘sergeant wrote one of his stiff little notes
requesting Mrs. Brown, on the score of his
rheumatism, to come and see him. This she
did ; and the old pensioner, confined to “gran’s _
own den,” was painting for her a moving pic-
ture of Ted’s trouble, when the general himself
came marching down the corridor. He had re-

~ . ceived a hint from the commandant, and saw

the situation and his opportunity at a glance.
He listened with patience and real sympathy
to the widow's tearful objections, and met
them one by one. He did not deny the hard-
ship of the matter from her point of view,
but put before her in the plainest terms the
BUGLER BROWN. | AT

injury which he believed would result to the
lad’s character, to say nothing of his pros-
pects, if she finally decided against his wishes.
At length she began to give way. “I
- thought it was just the lad’s wilfulness,” she
wailed, “and then his always being with
soldiers like. I never doubted but he’d settle
down quite contented after a bit. I’m sure,
~your honour, I never meant to do the dear lad
harm.” oe

“Then, Mrs. Brown, you will let us consider
the matter as settled. You will never repent
this day, I am sure. I promise to keep an eye
on the youngster and do my best for him.”

“ And you'll think of a poor mother’s feel-
ings, and not let him run into danger, your
honour?” —

“Tl do what I can,” replied the general,
with an amused glance at the sergeant. “Do
you know, Mrs. Brown, I think it a grand
thing to be the mother of such a soldier as,
please God, your son will turn out. I wish I
had such a one’ of my own.”

In a day or two the old sergeant was able
48 BUGLER BROWN.

to hobble across’ to Duke of York’s, and make
Ted happy with the good news of his mother’s
_ consent. A few weeks more, and Boy Brown ,
~ took leave of his envious fellow “ Dukies,” his
weeping mother, and proud old gran, and to
his own deep delight found himself a bugler
in the band of the 19th Hussars, oy Ports- ©
mouth

\
CHAPTER V.
TEL-EL-KEBIR. —

‘HERE are some natures off which any-
thing of an evil nature will glide, like

drops of water from a duck’s back, and leavé |
no trace. Our Ted’s was one of these. I do
not mean to say_that he was in any way a
prodigy of goodness or cleverness. He had as
many faults as most boys; but. he was, as his
grandfather had told the general, honest and
God-fearing. He had a kind and gentle heart,

and plenty of good sense; no one ever heard -

a, bad or untruthful word or an unkind speech

from Boy Brown’s lips. He was also perfectly

fearless; and once convinced of his duty, he

would do it simply and with his might—solid.

good qualities which, together with his bright
4

G
- 50 TEL- ED-KEBIR.

spirits 4 sweét temper, made up a very
lovable whole. Ted quickly became quite as
popular in his regiment as he had been at
school. He enjoyed the life with his whole
heart; and cheery, loving letters would come
every week from Portsmouth either to the
little home in Camden Town or to grey old
Chelsea Hospital—letters that. were proudly
read and commented on by the old sergeant
and his comrades, and shown about by the
fond mother,to her various cronies. Once or
twice the general appeared with tidings of his
protégé, and these were always satisfactory. _

Early in the spring news came of troubles
in the East, and in April it was announced
that the 19th Hussars, together with many
other regiments, were to sail for Alexandria.
' It therefore turned out that Sergeant Brown
and his daughter-in-law were amongst the
' crowds that gathered on the quay to take
leave of the soldiers on that fair, sunny morn-
ing on which the: British fleet sailed for the
seat of war; and many a sympathetic glance.
fell on the trim, soldierly little figure of the
TEL-EL KEBIR. “1
bugler of the Nineteenth, in his gay trappings,
of whom the one-armed Chelsea pensioner and
the weeping woman he supported took such
a loving and sorrowful farewell. The kindly:..
general; too, spared a minute from his own
- leave-takings to grasp his old friend’s hand and

speak a cheery word to the lad’s mother. But

time and tide. mercifully cut short the scene,
-and very soon the great ships were ploughing

their way out to sea, with the meri y sunshine
flashing back from the gay. scarlet and gold of
the military trappings of the brave men that
crowded their decks, till distance swallowed
_them up, and only the sweet silvery notes of
the bugles, or the skirl of a bagpipe sent back
a last farewell to the slowly-dispersing grows
on shore. —

As soon as possible after the fleet anchored
at Alexandria in May, Ted’s cheery little
letters began to arrive again, and the news-
papers teemed with news from the East. ° Ted
was at the bombardment of Alexandria in .
July, and then began to write of the many
wonders of Cairo. He was in the best of
52 TEL-EL-KEBIR.

health and spirits, and threatened his mother °
with all kinds of extraordinary gifts, which
he et to bring home for her at Christ-
mas; for they would make very short work.
of the Egyptians, he wrote, and get back to
England before that time. 2
Then one bright September morning came
the welcome news of the battle of Tel-el-
_ Kebir, where the..Egyptians were repulsed
with so much loss, and where Arabi Pasha,
their general, though escaping for the moment,
was taken prisoner on the following day.
This was one of the most brilliant and dashing
- achievements of. the British army; and the
Chelsea pensioners, laying their wise white ©
‘ heads together over the news, opined that it
had virtually brought the war to an end.
As we know, it did do so; but what about
our Ted and the general? That the 19th
- Hussars had been engaged was certain, but
there were weary hours of suspense before
the lists of killed and wounded were out.
General Frazer was safe—a glance satisfied
the sergeant of this; but just at the end of

\
TEL-EL-KEBIR. 53.

’ the list the other name he was looking for ©
caught his eye—“ Brown, E., bugler of the
19th Hussars, wounded in the leg.” The
~ paper fell to the ground. The old sergeant
needed his one trembling hand to brush across
his eyes; but his comrades, thronging round,
eagerly pointed out to him that the dispatch
did not say “dangerously,” or even “severely
wounded.” It might therefore be almost
nothing.

After this no individual tidings of the
wounded could be received for some little
time. They were reported to have been re-
moved to Ismailia, and “doing well.” But as
time went on a vague rumour got abroad—no

- one could tell how, or with whom it arose—

that our Ted had distinguished himself, and .
_ was on the list of those mentioned for honours.
- Boy Gordon had: remarked to some one
through the iron railings of Duke of York’s
that “Terrible Ted- had gone and done it,
and no mistake,” and the “Dukies” had been —
cheering at some grand news just received
of him. The sergeant scoffed at the idea—
54 TEL- EL- KEBIR,

a bit of a boy—a little bugler—no, no—it was
utter nonsense—a mistake in name—Brown
was not uncommon, as everybody knew;

- but he wasn’t going to deny that his boy
was as plucky a little chap as any going, for
all that. He was, however, secretly in a fever _
_ of impatience for letters; and when at last

they came, and two packets, one of which was ~
in Ted’s well-known copperplate handwriting—
‘not quite so copperplate as usual, he noted—
were handed to him, the old fellow hurrahed
like a boy, and plumped himself down, spec-
tacles on nose, to read the precious letter, in
his eagerness letting the second one drop un-
heeded at his feet. It was a long letter,
written at intervals, and enclosing a shorter
_ one for his mother ; and Ted managed to give
his grandfather a fair idea of the movements
of the army, as far as he himself had seen it.

“We started long before daybreak,” he wrote,
“and got over the six miles of desert between
us and the enemy’s position at Tel-el-Kebir in
the dark. ‘You see their position was known
‘TEL-EL-KEBIR. 5B

to be so strong, and they were just twice as -
’ many as‘ we were, that our loss would have
been so much greater if we had fought by day-
light. We were as quiet as mice ; no fires were
" allowed, not even smoking, and the formation

of the regiments was carried out by the little

light we could get from the stars. When all
was in readiness, our fellows made a charge
and stormed the enemy’s works most splendidly ~~
at the point of the bayonet. You should have
seen the Highland Brigade and the Royal
Trish go for the foe, gran—not that one
could really see anything at the time. Nota
shot was fired till we were well within their |
lines, so the Egyptians were completely taken
by surprise ; they soon fell into confusion, and
began to run. In the thick of it I was lucky.
enough to see our general fall just as we came
up. Every one was running full speed after
the enemy, too eager to notice or help him,
but I couldn’t leave him on the ground to be
trampled on. So I fell out (there was no one.
to give me orders). He did not stir, so I felt
sure he. was wounded, and I poked about in
i —_—e TEL-EL-KEBIR.

the dark to try and find a baggage horse; but
my head felt so. stupid for want of sleep, I
_., could’ find none at first (this was an infantry
ba ile on our side, you know, gran). But at

last I spied a stray beast, and led it to the gen-
eral. He was coming round then, and wasn’t '
wounded—only bruised and giddy-like. I
helped him to mount the horse; and what do
you think, gran? He made me mount behind
him! We had nearly caught up the main
body of our troops, when a shot from a
passing handful of the enemy struck my leg ;
and I soon got faint from loss of blood, and
knew nothing more till I found myself on a
canal boat going down to the hospital at
Ismailia. But the general is all right; he’s
been to see me several times. Isn’t it awfully
kind?’ The nurses and doctors are jolly kind
too, and ‘my leg is getting on all right. Tell
mother not to worry: most likely we'll be
home by Christmas after all. Tell Gordon at :
Duke o’ York’s it’s better fun to be wounded
in a real fight than in a sham one. O gran, «.





our fellows were just splendid! I'll tell you o
a

TEL-EL-KEBIR. ‘ 57

lots more when we meet.—Your loving grand-

gon, o> Tz.”

The old sergeant sea this letter brokenly.
He had to stop many a time to wipe his glasses
and pettishly complain‘of the draught from the |
window making his eyes weak ; and it was not —

_ till he had read it twice and was folding it up:
that he caught sight of the second packet on ~

the floor at his feet. “From the general him-
self!” he explained as he picked it up and _
tore it open. Yes, it was certainly from the eo
general, and this is what he wrote :— oe





“T know, my good old friend, that your ie
grandson is writing to you and his mother;
but I cannot forbear sending a line myself to
tell you what I am sure he will never do—how
gallantly he has distinguished himself. Butfor
his pluck and coolness I should probably not

have lived to return home. I was struck on.

the head, knocked down, and trampled on by
the flying enemy in the darkness, unobserved ©

by any. one, it appears, except your little lad,
58 . ee TEL+EL-KEBIR.

who saw me fall; and in spite of a rain of
bullets from detached parties of the flying foe,
he fell out, caught one of their baggage
horses—believing me to be wounded—and
came to my aid. He even groped about and ~
secured a brandy flask, a sip from which
helped to revive me, for I was only stunned
and bruised. After he had assisted me to
~ ‘mount, I made him get up behind me; and we
galloped off, and were almost in safety when
he was hit in the leg. He said nothing about
it, however ; and it was not until I had dis-
mounted amongst my own men, that I dis-
covered my gallant little bugler was insensible,
and bleeding terribly from his wound. He
was attended to at once, but I assure you I
“never spent a more painful time of suspense
than. that I experienced before the surgeon
told me the wound was not of a dangerous .
character. A few days after his arrival in the
hospital at Ismailia, however, the wound as-
sumed a dangerous appearance, and there was ~
one day when we all feared the leg could not
be saved; but, thank God! the danger passed,
*

all safely back in Merry England, and I shall.

. TEL-EL-KEBIR, 59

said ho 3 is doing well. The boy has borne thé

: suffering caused by the wound with a cheery

patience which has won'the hearts of both
doctorg and nurses, and the warm admiration
of his officers. Picture to yourself the little
fellow, heavy from want of sleep, and weak
from fatigue and lack of food, stumbling about
in the darkness under a dropping fire of bullets —

“to assist me. He isatrue hero. Yet, when =

I told him I had mentioned him for honours
in my dispatch home, he appeared thunder-
struck, and quite unable to realize that he had
done anything beyond his simple duty. Tell -
his mother from me she may indeed be proud ©
of sucha son. I hope Christmas will see us

be able to shake you by the hand and congrat-
ulate you on being grandsire of the youngest
V.C. in the British army.”

Overwhelmed by this astounding and in-.
credible news, the sergeant fell back in his
chair, the ruddy colour forsaking his face.
“No, no; its good news, not- bad,” he
60... _ 'TEL-EL-KEBIR.

_ gasped, as his comrades pressed round him in
alarm. “Read, for surely my old eyes have —
not seen aright.” .

The letter was caught up and eagerly

scanned by halfa dozen pairs of spectacled eyes,

and one by one Ted’s old friends grasped its
meaning. Then scores of war-worn hands
shook that of the sergeant, and the thin, waver-
“ing cheer of the aged arose again and again as
the news spread. Sergeant Brown’s lad—little
Ted Brown of Duke of York’s—had saved his
general’s life on the field of battle and won the
Victoria Cross !
CHAPTER VI.
THE TITTLE V.C.

ND to think, comrades,” said Sergeant —
Brown solemnly, when the excite-
ment had subsided, and he sat thoughtfully at -
the fireside still holding the precious letters in _
his hand—“ to think that only a year ago, just -”
one short year, the lad stood herein this very
- room, with his bit of a hand on this old knee
‘ of mine, and said he’d win the Victoria Cross c
one day or other, and I snapped him up sharp —
for talking boastful. -And now he’s actually
gone and done it. I remember his mother sat _
in that very chair as he said it. I’d been reading’ .
that bit of poetry the general's lady wrote about
the old Waterloo standard, you know.” oe
Se “Yes, vee I remember well enough ser-"


62 THE LITTLE V.C. ~

geant,” replied a maimed and one-eyed corporal,
‘wagging his white head; “and you mark my
words—if that there'story of yours wasn’t the
beginning of the whole thing that’s burst upon
us now, like a bomb-shell, so to speak, why,
I’m a Dutchman. ' Didn’t the little lad go.and
act it all over at Duke o’ York’s, and get. him-
self into a scrape along with that audacious

. monkey, Drummer Gordon? It was the hear-

ing about that affair as gave General Frazer
a fancy for the lad, T'll go bail.”

“Well, well, perhaps it was; perhaps I had
a finger in the pie. In fact, the youngster
had the impudence to lie there with his broken -
shoulder and tell me to my face that the be-
ginning of it lay at my door. My word, how
the general did laugh when I told him that!”
_, And the old eyes twinkled at the remembrance.
“T wonder,” he went on— I do wonder how -
our Ted’s mother will take the news.”

The next afternoon brought Mrs. Brown to
answer this question for herself. She had —
received Ted’s letter, and the stiff, little note
from her father-in-law accompanying it, in

é
THE LITTLE Y.C. 63

which he hada in the fewest words stated the
"bare facts contained in the general’s dispatch.
_ She had looked in at the Duke of York’s on
her way. to the hospital, to hear what the
- corporal at the lodge had to say about the
matter.. He had cofifirmed the news, and
the whole school seemed to have gone wild |
with excitement about it. It was even said
that there was to.be a whole holiday i in honour ~
of Ted on his return home.
Once assured of the personal safety of her
boy, the widow’s interest seemed to fens 4
Exactly what the Victoria Cross was she did’ ”
not understand, neither had she grasped the
fact that in winning it Ted had done anything
specially out of the way. zs
For. once in his life the sergeant ‘shied
himself impatient of his daughter-in-law’s
remarks. He felt their damping effect very ©
keenly ; but he soon recovered himself, and ~
patiently explained to her the wonders of Ted’s
achievement. Here again she wandered from
~ the point to bemoan her boy’s sufferings and
_.. privations, till at last, followmg the happy
64 ‘THE LITTLE V.C.

suggestion of one of their number, quite a

crowd of the old fellows escorted Mrs. Brown” .

to the reading-room, Where a Victoria Cross,
carefully preserved in a glass case with many
other mementoes of brave deeds, was pointed
out to her with reverential finger, and she was
solemnly told the circumstances under which |
it was won.

«Well, if you ated me,” said Mrs. Brown, “I |
can't say as I see much to make such a fuss
' about. Just a plain bit of. iron, worth little
enough, I should think. If it-were gold and
diamonds now, that would be something like.”
_ The sergeant turned away with a groan of
despair. ‘Gold and diamonds forsooth!” he
muttered indignantly, as if that little despised
bit of iron was not worth, in his eyes at any
_ rate, all the gold and diamond mines of Africa.

Again the old pensioners came to the rescue .
of the sorely-tried sergeant, and explained
things to Mrs. Brown. She seemed rather
impressed at last by their views of the matter,
~ especially when she understood that the Queen
herself would, with her own hand, present to
THE LITTLE. V.C. 65

her boy the decoration he had won. That, at.
any rate, she considered would be something
to tell to her friends af Camden Town, though ©
it was disappointing to have to say that the ~
thing itself was so little worth having.

The anxiously-expécted day came at length,
and the 19th Hussars were back at Ports-
mouth ; but neither Sergeant Brown nor. his
daughter-in-law were there to welcome our ©
hero. The former was too ailing, and Mrs.
‘ Brown too timid, to face an excited crowd
alone; and there was still a day or two of
waiting before Ted could obtain leave of
absence to go home and see his relations. .
Besides, the general had a little plan of his’
own. to carry out: he was determined that his
little bugler should travel to.town with him- .
self, as he could’ not forego the pleasure of
witnessing his meeting with his grandfather
and late schoolfellows. So on the arrival of
_ the train Ted was dispatched at once to Cam-
den Town, with orders not to present himself —
at Chelsea until the following morning, and
. then to bring his mother with him.

foe B®

G
66 : THE LITTLE Vv. 0.

- It still wanted about a fortnight till’ Christ-
mas when Ted and his mother alighted from
‘the omnibus at the familiar corner, and then
walked across the old courtyard of the hospital. |
During the voyage home Ted had perfectly
recovered from his wound. Not even a vestige
' of lameness remained, and it was just the same
active; light-footed boy that sprang up the
stone stairs and came walking down the long
room towards gran’s den—just the same
honest, affectionate blue eyes that met gran’s,
as the brave, brown hands clasped his arm
in their old fashion. A little taller and broader
Ted had grown, and the bronze of Eastern
suns. had darkened the rosy, boyish cheeks;
but with a joy and thankfulness that thrilled
his old heart through and through, the sergeant
knew as he looked at him that he had in very
truth got his own boy Ted back again, simple, -
loving, and God-fearing as when he went away. -

“Thank God for my lad, my dear lad Ted,”

was all he could say as he kept his trembling es:

hand on the boy’s head, and oe at him. with
acs eyes, 7

wa
- THE LITTLE Y.C. 67.

Then his old friends the pensioners crowded —
‘round, and Ted had to shake many an aged
hand, and endure many an appreciative slap
on back or shoulder, before the confusion sub- .
sided and he could look round him at the well-
remembered room and its occupants, and:
become aware that a quiet fiure seated near
the fire was General Frazer himself. He
sprang up again to salute him.

“Stolen a march on you, Brown,” remarked
the general in his clear, ringing tones. “Ay, |
my lad, I intended to do it for a purpose of
my own. I wanted to fight our battle over
again with my old friends here before you —

appeared on the scene. And-now you are.

here, there is just one thing I wish all assem-.
bled in this place, as well as your former
friends and schoolfellows at Duke of York’s,
to know, for your own sake as well as theirs.
-. — Sergeant Brown, I have much satisfaction _
a in telling you that it was through your grand-

-* son’s strict attention to duty, and entire obedi- -





--ence: to orders, as much as to his bravery
“and coolness, that I owe my life, and to which
68 : THE LITTLE -V.C..

he owes his well-deserved honours. Very
much against his will he remained in his’
- appointed place during the attack, whilst many
of his comrades, under cover of the darkness,
deserted theirs in their headlong eagerness to
pursue the enemy. Had he allowed his
ardour to run away with him, as in old days,
he would not have seen me, would have lost
his opportunity of performing a gallant and
devoted action, and would assuredly have run
himself into great and useless peril. When
the Queen he has ‘served so well fastens the
well-won reward on his brave breast, it will bé
the sign and token to us who love him—to us

- who love him,” repeated the general, drawing
the boy to his side—“as well as to his own
conscience, that he has manfully overcome the
fault that threatened to spoil a good soldier a
year ago. He has learned that ‘he who rules —
his spirit is greater than he who takes a city.’

In other words, he is no longer ‘ insubordinate’ ..*:

—eh, Ted? And now,for Duke of York’s.” on
_ Off marched the general; Ted following =
_ between his mother and the sergeant, whilst


THE LITTLE V.C. 69

as many of the pensioners as could hobble
brought up the rear.
Warm was the greeting of the corporal at
the lodge as he flung wide the gates ; and there
in the old drill-yard, where the second doughty.
fight for the standard had taken place just
a year before, the rows of “sons of the brave”
were drawn up, their commandant at their
head, to welcome “ Boy Brown” amongst them
once more, and to cheer him as only boys and ~~.
“Dukies” can cheer. The band struck up «
“See, the conquering hero comes,” and Ted; :.:
quite abashed, longed to run away. Ii was
rather worse than facing the enemy, he —
thought; but the ordeal was soon over, dis- |
cipline was relaxed,. and he was able to hide
himself amongst the rabble of boys let loose
upon him. ae
“Terrible Ted ”—for the nick-name stuck to
him faster than ever—received his Victoria’

~. Cross in due time, in company with many

“7 other brave soldiers, under the admiring eyes
‘of the multitudes that gathered to witness the
“> ..eeremony. His own general rode beside thee; :






70 THE LITTLE V.C.

royal carriage ; and Ted felt when the few kind
and gracious words were spoken to him by his
Queen, as her hand fastened the coveted medal
on his breast, while she bent a glance of smil-
ing interest on his flushed, boyish face, that
_ alla man could do and suffer in her service,

through the longest life, would fall short of the

devotion which filled his heart in return for
that kindly recognition.

Tt is while busily engaged in the service of
his Queen that we. get our last glimpse of our —
hero. It is the never-to-be-forgotten jubilee
day of 1887, and the “ Dukies” are drawn
up as a guard of honour along a certain part
of the route by which Her Majesty will pass.
The boys cast many a curious and admiring
glance at a tall and handsome young corporal
of Hussars, who is galloping and curveting ©
about in the execution of his duty. They
nudge and whisper to one another as he goes
by, for is not the name of that same corporal’
inscribed on the roll of honour hanging in the
commandant’s room at Duke of York’s? andis |
he not a V.C. man, young as he is?
THE LITTLE V.C. aay

_ This corporal is our Ted, already many steps
up the ladder of military fame. arly in the
day he managed to secure for his mother, who
has long since learned to appreciate the mili-
tary honours of her son, a comfortable and
safe position within the railings, from whence \
to view the procession ; and he has saluted his
general, looking every inch a soldier in his

_ splendid uniform. But when the drag full of ~

Chelsea pensioners drives up, and the old
~ fellows, resplendent in brand-new scarlet coats |
~~ and cocked hats, take up their appointed
station on a stand under the trees, our Ted
glances at them sadly.~ Their. faces are all
familiar to him; but, alas! the aged form he
loved so well is absent from their ranks.
Sergeant Brown has answered the last roll- ‘
call, and is resting after life’s battle. The
“well done, good and faithful servant,” which
is the reward of all true and loyal service, _

has at length greeted his ears, and he has _

“entered into the joy of his Lord.”
WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL!



ee I T was rather an effort certainly, but Willie

| Dale made it. It was his-first night at
school, and being accustomed to perform his
toilet for the night in a more leisurely manner
than his companions, he was the last out of
bed. He had noticed with surprise that

9 neither of his four room-mates had knelt to

pray before lying down, and therefore felt
some embarrassment in performing what was
‘to him so matter-of-course an action. There
was a stifled giggle from one or two of the

beds, and then a slipper, aimed at Willie’s.
kneeling form, came flying across the room;

but a hand shot out from the nearest bed,
and caught the missile before it reached Kim.
WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL. ae

Unconscious of the hostile act, the little
boy in‘a few minutes rose from his knees.
“Shall I put the candle out, J; arvis ?” he
inquired of his neighbour.

“No,” replied Jarvis gruffly. “Marshall
comes round and does that.” oe
“Good-night!” said Willie, jumping into

bed. a

No one responded, but a voice from the
farther end of the room observed, “I say, -
you new fellow, yowll' have to drop that, Bh
know; we don’t go in for humbug here.”
= ie ‘Drop what?” asked Willie in surprise.
_ «Why, saying your prayers, and that sort .

of rot. Juvenile piety doesn’t pay; you'll . .
have to drop it, young ’un, or we'll make you.”
«TJ ghall not give it up,” replied Willie; “it .
‘” is right to doit. I promised— > He was about .
to add “ my mother,” but stopped himself.

«Promised his mammy! I thought so. we
rude burst of laughter followed, and Willie's
face grew crimson; but at this moment foot-—
steps were heard approaching, ane. a master
f entered the room.

A
‘ca ae WILLIE DALE’S TRIAL.

“No more talking, boys,” said Mr. Marshall
as he put out the light, and ee further
was said that night. |

“T say, Dale,” observed Jarvis, happening
to come across our hero alone the next morn-
ing, “if you take my advice, you'll not forget
last night's hint. Those fellows will never
give you any peace if you keep on, and youll
have to give in, in the end.”

“T can’t give up saying my prayers, Jarvis,
if that’s what you mean,” replied Willie.

“Why can’t you say them in bed then ?”

“ Wouldn’t that look like being ashamed of
doing right—ashamed of Christ?” —

Jarvis stared. ‘Oh, if you come to that,”
he began nervously. “ But I say, Dale, school-’
boys can’t be so mighty particular, you know.”

He turned away, and Willie Dale shoulder-
ing his bat proceeded on his way to the
. Pplaying-field. He rose many degrees in the
opinion and favour of his schoolfellows that
afternoon by the unexpected spirit and style
of his play at cricket.

“ He’s no milksop, at any rate, and won't
WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL. 75

be a bad fellow when we’ve knocked the piety
and priggishness out of him,” remarked Holt,
the hero of the slipper, to Jarvis.

“T advise you to let Dale alone, Holt; you
‘won't find him an easy fellow to manage,” re-
plied Jarvis. -

That night, and for several following ones,
Willie’s kneeling down by his bedside was the
signal for all manner of disturbances and petty
persecutions from his room-mates. They made
all the noise they dared, and a volley of slip-
pers, wet sponges, books, and brushes flew
across the room. Willie, though he must
have received many a hard knock, took no
notice. At last, however, a well-aimed boot
struck him on the temple, and a drop of blood
fell on the sheet. Jarvis sprang out of bed.
“T say, you fellows,” he shouted, “I’m not :
going to stand this any longer; you'll just
give over bullying pee or Pll know the
reason why.”

A. laugh and a book aimed at hinisele was
the derisive answer. Jarvis sprang at .his
assailant, and after a short scuffle threw him ~
76 WILLIE’ DALE’S TRIAL.

_ down, and would have punished him severely,
had not the master’s step at that moment
‘been heard, and the combatants dived into
their respective beds. As soon-as Mr. Mar-
shall was well out of earshot, Jarvis raised his
head from his pillow— Once for all, Holt,
and you other fellows, if you don’t let Dale
* alone, you'll have me to deal with. D’ve made
up my mind to stop, this, and you all know
what I say I'll do.”
No answer was returned, and when the
next night, to the surprise of his companions
_and the intense joy of Willie Dale, Jarvis
himself knelt down at the side of his bed and
’ buried his face in his hands, no one ventured
_ to make a remark, for Jarvis was both liked

-. and respected by all except Morton and one

or two other black sheep in the school.

One night Jarvis, coming up to bed later
than usual, in consequence of having spent
the evening with a friend, found Morton,
Holt, and Kennedy surrounding Willie Dale, .
whom they held pinned against the wall. ~
They were talking loudly and excitedly. “Do
WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL. WD
_ you.mean to do it or not?” asked Holt, shak-
ing him by the shoulder.
“No,” replied Willie.

“You are afraid; that’s what it is, you
young sneak. ‘Oh, it’s no tse looking for
Jarvis; he ae here to take you under his
wing.”

“Don't be too sure of that,” said Jarvis,
coming forward. ‘“ What's up, Holt ¢”

“Oh, we're only going to have a lark, and
mean this mammy’s darling to help us, whether
he likes it or not. It’s no harm, indeed, Jarvis, |
though I now it would be no use asking you —
to join us.” *

“We only want a tuck-in at those jolly
plums on the wall below,” put in Kennedy;
' “there’s such a lot, that a few will never be
missed. Dale’s such a light weight, and the |
best climber of us all, that we're going to put
him out of the corridor window to get them;
but your pious fellows are always cowards, and.
he funks going.” . ay
_’ Willie smiled. at Jarvis.

“ Will you go or not, Dale?” ahad Morton
78 WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL.

angrily, his greedy mouth longing for the
luscious fruit.

“T will not,” replied Willie aaiatly.

“Then take that,” returned Morton furi- ©
ously, striking Willie a violent and unexpected
blow on the head. |

Willie fell to the ground, his head coming
in contact with the iron foot of a bedstead as
he fell, and lay motionless, while a thin stream
of blood began to trickle from his head.

“You've done it now!” ejaculated Holt in
consternation, kneeling on the ground and rais-
ing the injured boy’s head, while Jarvis flew
for water and’a sponge.

“JT say, cram him into bed and cover him
up; he can’t be hurt much, and Marshall will
be round directly. Quick, or we shall be
caught!”

“Can't help it if we are,” retorted Holt,
anxiously examining Willie’s head, at which
Jarvis worked away with the sponge. Willie
opened his eyes in a minute or two and at- |
tempted to rise. - oe

“There, I told you so ; he’ s all right,” ex-
WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL 79

claimed Morton, and he and Kennedy hur-

riedly proceeded to restore order in the room, |
whilst the others lifted Willie into his bed,
where he drew the bedclothes over him and
lay as if asleep. Tearing off their clothes,
the three delinquents sprang into bed the
moment before Mr. Marshall entered. .

“Not undressed yet, Jarvis! How is that?
Ah, I remember, you have been out. Well,
I must leave you to put out the light for once,
as I am going out myself.”

All right, sir; good-night,” replied Jarvis.

Jarvis then proceeded to bathe and bind up
Willie’s head as well as he could. It no longer
bled, but there was a lump as big as an egg.

“The cut isn’t much—we'll get Mother
Nelson to stick a bit of plaster on it in the .
morning; it was the blow that stunned you
for a bit,” he remarked as he completed his
friendly services and got ‘into bed himself.

The other three boys had, however, by no
means given up their designs upon the plums ;
and as soon as they felt sure that Jarvis and
' Willie were salen. there were stealthy foot-
* 80 - -WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL.

steps and whisperings heard about the room.
_ Presently the partially-clothed conspirators:
- erept out into the corridor, some little dis-
tance beneath the window of which the plum-
tree which grew in the head-master’s private
garden was trained against the wall. Next to
Dale, Morton himself was acknowledged to
_be the best climber. To his lot, therefore,
it fell to let himself down from the window, _
by means of the branches of the tree, and
possess himself of the coveted fruit. It was
a matter of difficulty and of some danger; but
having accomplished it in safety and filled his
_ pockets, he quickly scrambled back. Seated
on the window seat, the three boys greedily
devoured their booty, carelessly tossing the
stones out at the still open window as they
. sat, and then returned to their room and beds. -
On entering the schoolroom the morning
following their exploit, the boys were surprised
to find Dr. Graham seated at the desk instead
of Mr. Marshall, who usually superintended ’
the early lessons, and guilty looks of dismay _
were exchanged between two or three of them--
WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL. S15

when they perceived that several plum-stones,
and a boy’s turn-down collar, lay on the desk
‘before him. The doctor waited in silence until .
all the boys had entered, and then rose. Be
“Boys,” he began, “I am here this morn-
ing to investigate a.painful occurrence. Mrs.
Graham tells me that late last night, or dur-

ing the night, a considerable quantity of wall

fruit has disappeared from her fayourite tree.
Several plum-stones have been picked up on
the path beneath, and also this collar. I ask, |
I even entreat, that the boy to whom this
collar belongs will come forward and confess
his guilt.” The doctor paused for a minute |
or two, looking appealingly at one after
-another of the throng of young faces before
him. There was a slight stir and whispering
amongst them, but no one came forward.

“William Dale, come here,” commanded Dr.
Graham sternly. . .

Willie instantly advanced, and, rather pale
‘from the blow of the preceding night, stood
looking respectfully but inquiringly at the
doctor, who now held the collar i in his hand.

G 6 ;
82 WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL.

“Dale,” he said, “ considering your uniform
good conduct, it gives me as much pain as
surprise to find your name on this collar; it
has, as you perceive, a stain of blood on it.
Mrs. Nelson tells me that you applied to her
this morning for plaster for a cut on your head,
and that you are, as far as she knows, the only
boy in this school who has recently met with
any hurt. There are traces of this hurt also
on your bed linen, and the window of the
_ corridor outside your room was discovered
open this morning. What have you to say
for yourself in the face of these overwhelming
proofs ?”

“ Nothing, sir,” answered the boy, “ except
to assure you that I am innocent.”

“Innocent!” thundered the doctor. “Do
not add lying to your sins of theft and greedi-
ness, Dale; nothing but a full and instant
confession can now save you from expulsion
from my house.”

“T cannot confess what I did not do,” re-.
turned Willie, steadily fixing his honest eyes _
on the doctor's face. eC
WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL. 83

“ You cannot deny that this collar is yours.”

“No, sir—it is certainly mine; but I cannot
tell how it came where it was found.”

“ How did you get that cut?” was the next
question, as Dr. Graham drew the boy towards
him and examined his head.

“T fell down, sir;” but Willie changed colour
and hesitated slightly as he replied.

“Of course you did,” was the sarcastic
comment. “May I ask where and when
you fell?” . -

“Last night, and in my own room. But
indeed, sir, I was doing no wrong when it
happened ; my head struck the foot of a bed-
stead when I fell.”

_ «There is more in: this than I can fathom.
Can any of you throw light upon the matter ?”
asked Dr. Graham,.speaking to the coe in
general.

No one answered, but an audible scuffle and
disturbance was going on in a corner of the
long room.

“ Silence there!” called the doctor sternly.
——“ Well, Dale, appearances, even your own —
84 3 WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL. .

manners, are so much against you - that
. painful as it is, I have no alternative but to
believe you guilty ; yet.as you are very young,
and this is your first offence, I will give you a
chance, and delay your sentence. Go to your
room now; I will see you again in the after-
noon, by which time I earnestly hope that ye
will have come to a better spirit.”

- Willie walked quietly from the room, but
he had scarcely closed the door when the dis-
turbance previously noted by -the doctor re-
commenced. Hisses and subdued cries of

- “Coward!” “Sneak!” were heard, and the |

next moment Morton, struggling in the grasp
. of Holt and Kennedy, and forcibly propelled .
by a kick from Jarvis, was dragged up to the
doctor’s desk. :

“ What is all this?” exclaimed the doctor,
gazing wrathfully at the trio. “Have. you
- taken leave of your senses, young gentlemen?”
“Speak. up, can’t you?” whispered Holt,

with a fierce shake of Morton’s shoulder.

“What! you won't? then I shall.—Please, os
_sir, we are very sorry; we didn’t think of its ,.
_ WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL. 85

being really stealing, but we planned to get
_ the plums—Morton, Kennedy, and I—and we ©
all three ate them. But, please, sir, Morton
must tell the rest ; Dale would not join us.”
“Well, Morton, what have you to say 7”
Morton stood in sullen silence; but. piece-
meal, and by dint of patient cross-examination,
the doctor, with the help of Holt and Kennedy,
- who appeared truly ashamed of their part in

the matter and of their companion, extracted —

from his reluctant lips the main facts of what
had occurred the night before, Holt eagerly
assuring their master that both Jarvis and .
Dale had been asleep before whey left their -
. room, —
. “How do you account for Dales collar _
being found in the garden?” asked ‘Dr.
Graham.
“T cannot tell, sir; but you see our things.
_ were all lying about. We got hold of what
came first in the dark to go out to the corridor -
in. Morton must have put on Dale’s shirt,
and dropped the collar on the path.” _
_ “TI see,” agreed the doctor.—* Morton, this
86 WILLIE DALE'S TRIAL.

is not the first, time you have been guilty of
dishonest practices and. deceit; I shall now
communicate with your father. Meanwhile
you will remain alone in my study.—Holt =
and Kennedy, you will each receive a richly-
deserved thrashing.—Jarvis, go to Dale and —
inform him of this turn in events. Bring him |
back with you: —Now, boys, we will poe
to our morning’s work.”

In a few: minutes Jarvis reappeared with
Willie, and a close but silent grasp of the
hand passed between master and pupil as the
latter walked to his seat.

From that day Morton disappeared from
amongst them, and the same afternoon Ken-
nedy observed to Jarvis, “Dale’s no sneak,
after all I was sure he’d tell about us.
I don’t understand the fellow; he doesn’t
seem to have pluck enough to stand up for
himself, and yet—”

«Tt isn’t want of pluck,” returned - Jarvis ;

“Dale has enough of that, and to spare. It’s
right, not himself, Dale stands up for; he'll
bear anything rather than do what is wrong.”
- WILLIE DALE’S TRIAL. - 87

“T ‘suppose that’s being a Christian,” was
Kennedy’s thoughtful reply. “Well, I say,
Jarvis, there’s lots of us here who think they _
- might be the better for following Dale’s ex- .
ample. I know you do, old. fellow, and Holt
and I have agreed to have a try at it too.”

4
LITTLE MOTHER MAY.



AY and June were twins. May was

the elder by a few minutes only;

still those few minutes caused the birthday of

one twin to fall on the thirty-first of May,

and that of the other on the first of J une, a .

thing that does not often happen. So their

parents determined to mark the event by

naming the babies after the months in which -
they were born.

And truly these: names - suited hei as
no others could have done; for you might
have searched the world over without finding
a ‘ sweeter pair of little maidens. .Just to
look at their faces made you think of wild
' roses and bluebells, so pink and white were .
. LITTLE MOTHER MAY. 89.

they, and their eyes so soft and blue. “ June’s
_ cheeks were a wee bit pinker and her eyes a
wee bit bluer than May’s; but that was all
the difference between them, and it ‘was just
enough to know them by. Both had the same
golden-brown hair, and their tempers were as |
' sweet and sunny as their faces.

May was the more thoughtful and: sedate

of the two, and she had the more loving’
heart. Every one called her “ Little Mother

_ May,” because she was never so happy as
when tending a weak or ailing creature, and .~
she seemed to know by instinct how to do it.
May’s name-month had run out to its last —
_ day. It was Sunday, and her birthday ; both ce

birthdays were to be kept as usual on the first _
. of June, and they were going to have the treat
they loved best of all. Their Uncle Will

was the owner of a trim little ‘pleasure-boat
called the Seagull, and was going to take ©

. them and his own children for a sail down the

river to where it ran into the great, beautiful

sea, and they were to spend a long afternoon
on the beach. The little girls had been look- _
90 LITTLE MOTHER MAY.

ing forward to this treat for months; for the
past delight of it, and the anticipation of its,
return, gave them something to talk about for
a whole year.

_ May and June had been to church with
their parents in the morning, and in the
afternoon they decided to follow their father,
who had gone over the downs to speak to his
shepherd. They wanted to question him about ~
the weather, for a fresh breeze had sprung up,
and clouds were chasing each other over the’
sky rather quickly. How dreadful it would
be if the first of June should be wet!

The twins did not find their father very
quickly, and when they did, he seemed too
busy talking to the shepherd to notice them
at first. A sheep which lay at their feet was
ill, dying they feared, and Mr. Franks and
Tim were absorbed in ministering to the poor
creature. Two little lambs beside her were
crying piteously, and the sight of them awoke
all the mother instinct in May’s heart. Father
and Tim could manage the sheep, she thought
—they knew what to.do; but these neglected
LITTLE MOTHER MAY. , 91

little lambs were in her line. So;she knelt
down and began to stroke and comfort them,
and June joined her.

“ Are you there, children ?” said Mr. Franks,
looking up. “‘ Little Mother May’ is the
very person I wanted. I wish you and June
would take these poor little beasties home and
warm them upabit. I fear they'll be orphans
before long, and we shall have to bring them
up as best we can.”

The lambs were quite old or to run,
but no amount of coaxing would induce them -
to leave their mother. The children would
lead them a few yards away, and then they
would return and rub their pretty. black noses
against her side, with little cries of distress.
At length May, with tears in her eyes, picked
up one of them in her arms and started off
home with it. A well-grown lamb is no light
load for a small maiden to carry in a strong
“breeze; but she marched on bravely, soothing
it the while with loving words and hugs.
June had at first followed her sister’s example;
but finding the lamb heavy, she soon set it
Se.
92 LITTLE MOTHER MAY.

down, and slipping the band off her hat, tied it -
round the neck of her charge, and by this
’ means led or pulled it along, greatly against
its will.

Both children were heartily glad when they
reached home. June suggested making a little
pen under a tree at the corner of the grass’
plot where their favourite seat stood. This
their capable hands soon arranged, and the
lambs were placed in the tiny enclosure; but
if left for a minute alone, they again raised
- such a piteous bleating that, hot and thirsty
as she was, May could not be persuaded to
leave them, even to go in and have her tea. ~
_ June carried it out to her, and then brought
her own out also, for the twins were never
quite happy apart.

The lamb May had carried home seemed to
have quite adopted her as its special nurse ;
but she divided her attention between the
two very impartially, and was much troubled —
because they would not eat the bread dipped
in milk with which she tried to feed them. —
Presently Tim came and led the lambs away
me

3 LITTLE MOTHER MAY. 93

: * fag the night. He laughed at: ike little girl’s
distress, and told her they would eat fast
enough when they were sufficiently hungry.

“Do you think it is going to be a fine day
to-morrow, father ?” asked June when she came
to bid her parents good-night.

“Fine to-morrow? Why, yes; as far as I
can tell, it will be a beautiful day.”

“Not too windy for the boat? That is
what we came up the down to ask you about
this afternoon.”

“Why, dear me! if I hadn’t forgotten the
birthday sail altogether; I was so taken up
with that poor sheep. No, I don’t think it
will be windy at all, my darlings.” .

“Ts the sheep better, father?” asked May.

_ “Yes, Iam thankful to say she is; I think
she'll pull through now. But now I come
to think of it, it is almost a pity my little
‘girls will not be at home to-morrow. The
lambs must not go near my patient, and —
they'll be wanting some one to attend to

them sadly.” |

The twins looked grave as they went off ig


os 94 “Tne: MOTHER MAY.

_ bed; but ie said nothing, so June did not
-- ‘and they: were quickly asleep. _ -
The first of June was a perfect day, with ©”
just enough breeze to ripple the blue water of _
the river as it danced down to the sea. June
was in the wildest spirits, but May sat rather —
silently at the breakfast-table.
. * “I needn’t remind you girls to be ready when
the Seagull comes round,” said the farmer as —

Ee _he went.out. “I wish I could spare time for

a:sail myself this lovely day.”
. But when the Seagull came to the Iicalings
stage, only June was there waiting for it.
_ “Heyday! only one of you? What does.
_ ‘this mean?” cried Uncle Will as he helper
- June ‘into the boat.
_ “May will not come,” replied June solemnly.
“There are two poor lambs, whose mother is
‘ill, to be nursed, and May will not leave them
‘for any one. I don’t see why she should. epol Lb
our birthday treat for them.” me
“Nay, my dear, your birthday treat need =
_ not be spoilt. You can be happy and enjoy’ -
yourself well enough with your cousins here,


|, LITTLE MOTHER MAY. © , 95.
and I'll warrant ‘ Little Mother May’ will be
happy enough too. She'll not be the loser;”
said Uncle Will with a smile in his eyes, for
he loved May “like one of his own,” as ‘he:
often told her mother. ©

“May had never told a word of her iaistition
till it was time to get ready ; then she quietly

told her mother that the lambs wanted. her, =
and she would rather stay with them, and.
walked off with her new birthday story-book ae

to the seat under the tree, from whence: no



arguments or entreaties on June’s part could
move her. She could not help feeling a little
sad when the gleam of blue water between.

the branches of the trees caught her eye, and
she thought of the merry party on the beach ;



but she was consoled when she saw how cosy ie

her charges were, and how content under her
watchful care. Presently she found her father,

_ who had come quietly over the ‘grass, standing ele
__ by her side.

Dear ‘ Little Mother May, he said: as he.
Be stooped to kiss her, “ I never thought of your
doing this when I spoke last night. poe
96 : LITTLE MOTHER MAY.

“No, father, but I did; I make up my mind

_. to do it directly. I couldn’t have left them.”

“Well, childie, ’'m glad you didn’t, though
Fm sorry too. The poor sheep is dead, after
all. . How would you like to have these
orphans for your very own, May ?”

“O father! do you really mean it?”

“TJ do, indeed. My little girl deserves a
birthday present, I am sure.”

Who so happy as “ Little Mother May”
when she realized that the lambs were her
very own? Now, indeed, she felt rewarded
for her self-denial, and her face was quite
radiant with happiness when she told her
news to June on her return home.

If May has daughters of her own when she
grows up, I think they will be fortunate indeed
in having such a mother as she will make.

THE END.
Tene















xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008725500001datestamp 2008-10-30setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title The little V.C.dc:creator Burnside, Helen MarionSmedley, W. T ( William Thomas ), 1858-1920 ( Illustrator )dc:subject Christian life -- Juvenile fictionSoldiers -- Juvenile fictionCourage -- Juvenile fictionVictoria Cross -- Juvenile fictionBoys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fictionConduct of life -- Juvenile fictionChildren -- Religious life -- Juvenile fictionRight and wrong -- Juvenile fictionKindness -- Juvenile fictionChildren's storiesdc:description Osborne catalogue,by Helen Marion Burnside.With added illustrated t.-p.The frontispiece and added t.-p. vignette are signed W.T.S. i.e. William Thomas Smedley.dc:publisher T. Nelson and Sonsdc:date 1898dc:type Bookdc:format 96 p., 2 leaves of plates : ill. ; 17 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00087255&v=00001002223146 (ALEPH)63077171 (OCLC)ALG3394 (NOTIS)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English


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0a4e36e4c132bcc2108cdd2881cb2fef
1ccff3754f98a099530e2b45cadbb4498687972e
'2012-01-14T13:07:44-05:00'
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNDK' 'sip-files00005.pro'
77ff394d218bee76fef0dca43cb6ed7b
bc0ee40a73414515b773f7648220f0ac33180f61
'2012-01-14T13:06:18-05:00'
describe
'22135' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNDL' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
db92980d13045ecf5d85531050978cbb
ae4176e5a13416bca4859dd4bac385b962c2f129
'2012-01-14T13:09:17-05:00'
describe
'1557348' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNDM' 'sip-files00005.tif'
4947ab0b7bee02f55a6124e1517d10f0
cc198f9b412a8f1434305a9971a527561d1a198c
'2012-01-14T13:07:55-05:00'
describe
'124' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNDN' 'sip-files00005.txt'
204c4044c6fd94cf6bf55aedfb1fa722
8afbded4d54d44cb923010f000d2dc3f8121dda1
'2012-01-14T13:07:07-05:00'
describe
'5070' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNDO' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
613ec43e9dfee814e07752d199738b6f
b53b3a54e387ba120eca4891dcdcbd5661592bf2
'2012-01-14T13:07:13-05:00'
describe
'242425' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNDP' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
157a156f1eddd5838664b9f1a6be3676
30aa88cf3cb521b958acc18c74b0cdd804a20188
'2012-01-14T13:08:02-05:00'
describe
'160496' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNDQ' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
3f3a7dfc4cee46a3f0c6b0194fb7f61d
e31807ddd7e81eb8ca816e09763d40764ab14c8e
'2012-01-14T13:06:17-05:00'
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNDR' 'sip-files00008.pro'
a7d0cfcffd9a78d0aa9d654ce8e3b9ea
226b695dc3e28144853787161dcbf530a86babac
'2012-01-14T13:09:34-05:00'
describe
'43218' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNDS' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
1dc4f49822b011bc034717e2ca8722b6
f3437c7799bf7bfb830b85965093c9055d7c8a76
'2012-01-14T13:08:40-05:00'
describe
'1954476' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNDT' 'sip-files00008.tif'
8e6853c4254338d811500567baa06b04
87754d1971250b64ef1af8c34f998bfd037054e4
'2012-01-14T13:07:34-05:00'
describe
'206' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNDU' 'sip-files00008.txt'
27d60908b70118661e73ce280d3bb84b
8f6cddcd20f2213532500b012ecf4de242b7eed6
'2012-01-14T13:08:58-05:00'
describe
'10580' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNDV' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
2d2afd3e9b0192d0959a6caff8323e79
5c24d8e2c1e283378ecfa8c19e6312bbfbacaab9
'2012-01-14T13:10:19-05:00'
describe
'260992' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNDW' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
2d454cdac7dc0cf16252998fdd14e1b6
44b7a50083fe1de23ab06ead20ce623769c573e8
'2012-01-14T13:09:05-05:00'
describe
'121266' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNDX' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
1a82220063e93b038f9253e2da0e5ec0
87c10c262c299d1821db4edbd057c45461b50904
'2012-01-14T13:08:32-05:00'
describe
'3536' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNDY' 'sip-files00009.pro'
ecd93b6dc04f6fdb2d49b49d7e061fe3
2aba598e31221e6e88063e31d63fe44d21d06a0f
'2012-01-14T13:09:27-05:00'
describe
'31603' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNDZ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
e1fa70e48abae17b21c150228b67d873
d64b9191fe3efc767c7918f85169d63ac5150326
'2012-01-14T13:06:19-05:00'
describe
'2099976' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEA' 'sip-files00009.tif'
96d3ba96d3d8fa1a5d8efd4daad83ae6
744aeb2b7322ceea9cc8ce47053c26cb83cb78f9
'2012-01-14T13:07:42-05:00'
describe
'187' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEB' 'sip-files00009.txt'
bd6ac3157f0ae55e1726cad6e9f077e6
f9d769b0c8b02a968d79e1c6a573a973d98f01e3
'2012-01-14T13:07:30-05:00'
describe
'8235' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEC' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
c3f1aa90c6cf6d912ce8bed7cdc8b375
bd65421ac500d54c3e508110d997e872a8b45649
'2012-01-14T13:09:09-05:00'
describe
'133210' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNED' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
e157901ad1ae480f4005081841b018b8
8cebd35e583db41f980c3f0dda85c2e7b0cef7bc
'2012-01-14T13:07:49-05:00'
describe
'17313' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEE' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
7825c9bee12858c042ef021748667936
489b8d0553c482279c988ff6cd7e4a20d5e868ba
'2012-01-14T13:06:42-05:00'
describe
'5293' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEF' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
c5e66688b4529c7e404cf0032dcb70d9
dd57ca5eb02014012a1bfff36752c1a16c38744f
'2012-01-14T13:06:48-05:00'
describe
'2031704' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEG' 'sip-files00010.tif'
ebb4a0602b050c9c95d743221a725c1d
f73b2d3004cb14f86cd823d13f57e01f8e1c39d5
'2012-01-14T13:07:25-05:00'
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEH' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
df64347ff4b2378a5b1d504273720ac4
897ce535f3f7257a1b446d7f2bee301dcd504a3c
'2012-01-14T13:08:31-05:00'
describe
'252927' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEI' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
646f994c442a3bebc41838b7621f9537
e1ee4dd73ca64d52e726335f83ba07e5d6d7a011
'2012-01-14T13:06:54-05:00'
describe
'61570' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEJ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
09cb0092fffe2b8a367089cda2077438
c75a1e7bb06fa979006774f44fa1757aad92eac9
'2012-01-14T13:08:05-05:00'
describe
'8784' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEK' 'sip-files00011.pro'
d71da9721f8a207869302ebe4f3c684d
f3fefcd400f26d2f10f5be456e3d5b71701dedd7
'2012-01-14T13:06:47-05:00'
describe
'19673' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEL' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
acaac2eb48befbdfe0e16ae82672ab4b
15f24941f11a92166f14933d4415fe166838ac70
'2012-01-14T13:07:17-05:00'
describe
'2034376' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEM' 'sip-files00011.tif'
5a2f667eee3ac002e558472d590beca8
7ad75409c5e08baee54a16a74647bc911f010512
'2012-01-14T13:06:24-05:00'
describe
'497' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEN' 'sip-files00011.txt'
a8b11e06210143df47a505659fdcf086
c13e9ff7ea49cf8e32007a3320abe835179592d8
describe
'5397' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEO' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
dc922acfa31f298988d3d87d7b2fc7d0
62e307f7668a548395b346e01abef16e95ffdb3c
'2012-01-14T13:08:23-05:00'
describe
'252931' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEP' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
4c6b2fe0536402edd4554ece2557d82a
bca77a757a6c31c55137d4cfa77141801ce03ec6
'2012-01-14T13:08:01-05:00'
describe
'55523' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEQ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
fa91d33210e438bdc06cc7710baed560
1130777b66defddf6901ee98c103a45cde3f51ba
'2012-01-14T13:07:06-05:00'
describe
'7267' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNER' 'sip-files00013.pro'
d944750da0b336516986aa4878014068
cb7a6d58e46644cc7e2076adb8ef57a5fa1cd27a
'2012-01-14T13:08:08-05:00'
describe
'18525' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNES' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
0d45b2627d29ed11ca537ab8a193fda2
8d3d4f333e528b7c8ca4238d0829d4bed1150299
'2012-01-14T13:08:38-05:00'
describe
'2033864' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNET' 'sip-files00013.tif'
d0f3207ee32f8dbfddbd448392c59eec
2abc70ad1bb785fff03b9d7a59af88d896db9e07
'2012-01-14T13:07:00-05:00'
describe
'454' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEU' 'sip-files00013.txt'
2dcb9bee0dd0abe8420fb63f2f77dc18
25c97acdee4abeb5be5167ea3dc0ef3dd17f90fa
'2012-01-14T13:07:08-05:00'
describe
'5192' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEV' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
a0d45f31b65933764fa00aafe5c6527a
bea299592fd8fcaa5fa5b56d1ce9c3114f45ada4
'2012-01-14T13:10:04-05:00'
describe
'252955' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEW' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
a7f9be6cbe347fdfa5fb3b5ebc24a813
ecb863e3cb4cb248ea721b7ac759f0f3ad88ec83
'2012-01-14T13:09:19-05:00'
describe
'111513' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEX' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
a59fb916557b0b4791f758c9e8988e65
25b0d20068243878110be4efbae32ceb2a65d8fc
'2012-01-14T13:06:37-05:00'
describe
'14720' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEY' 'sip-files00015.pro'
155b72ad15710324b714401ecff20bb3
77a896e0e0778be13318bffa19517a5205a5b88a
'2012-01-14T13:09:16-05:00'
describe
'36293' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNEZ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
f000426a7bc1cc47b222175ba495623a
7d2bbd5c61dbacf1a95399c1035d01a521a00b1d
'2012-01-14T13:06:29-05:00'
describe
'2036156' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFA' 'sip-files00015.tif'
0f6594a16a1046a792537e34b163fc35
0e816c162b5120cd1a8a76c5d4dc687a0435756c
describe
'641' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFB' 'sip-files00015.txt'
c3ee3396c1d1f806b88adf097161f7ed
cd8f65dae1ed6bdd62698490d468b6817407e69d
'2012-01-14T13:07:41-05:00'
describe
'9689' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFC' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
bee610f62128a74b751e218b090f776b
b5de79172b9bbc13c9755dcb62d8a8c743f39c70
'2012-01-14T13:09:40-05:00'
describe
'252980' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFD' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
23437513b6b79d611afd11883d362f61
c4f30d195a03630c86d8453f188ec459874ddfc3
'2012-01-14T13:09:04-05:00'
describe
'133880' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFE' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
5f44ff93fc9c975c490f432d05b6c76c
6587d8a2fb32d4cff6e234ee275aea49ece5c246
'2012-01-14T13:10:06-05:00'
describe
'25350' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFF' 'sip-files00016.pro'
1f24d840a406c44ac31bb3974cec7c9b
bdfab7018b229cb300c09f47c875384e3cf45073
'2012-01-14T13:09:53-05:00'
describe
'48545' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFG' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
7614d59e4fce9d82f912814837f9efc1
8e4ec1e17e6f16d6d96a7b9815c14bba15b5071f
'2012-01-14T13:09:45-05:00'
describe
'2038552' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFH' 'sip-files00016.tif'
23a4d03218959879d0a8682fd0a48ed3
ec56dcb0a4debe509b662485435e029164f653a3
'2012-01-14T13:10:27-05:00'
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFI' 'sip-files00016.txt'
a38017bbc89aadb957f6449cb1401bfa
a004cb6756f5119cc84a2a8ae845297434efcda2
'2012-01-14T13:09:39-05:00'
describe
'13223' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFJ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
9f9451866b300b092414f9724b1c8928
2a1bfede98a066e3e577041f6ac0accd726f65de
'2012-01-14T13:07:18-05:00'
describe
'252965' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFK' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
5119843768b640494ad288e6152a7711
9084b86841cd9b54f51cfa1eab5aa08bd0fe3058
'2012-01-14T13:09:10-05:00'
describe
'153069' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFL' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
4454ad78bcb501e140912165616c2931
9f33e2fab8506fc078fcbf592223107db1f40739
'2012-01-14T13:09:00-05:00'
describe
'26815' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFM' 'sip-files00017.pro'
0ed1b2a06acc41a2136656303f26f15e
68b3903eb0896cf1fecfc7c9a0cf0863e28c93c2
'2012-01-14T13:10:10-05:00'
describe
'53168' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFN' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
fc1db67080d1d6a5e1bc3b306032a93c
8d1fceaac879976919971a1fc16009409670e220
'2012-01-14T13:10:23-05:00'
describe
'2039208' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFO' 'sip-files00017.tif'
6d0b1edc2ad0a5df554814130738c26c
4b1c2c170ec33b4038a3625967992b3a7d9f6fe6
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFP' 'sip-files00017.txt'
2cdae37b88efecb03ad5c1f01003f4bc
aff071110ae062295c494e23e6c9d4239f8ee1c5
'2012-01-14T13:09:58-05:00'
describe
'14021' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFQ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
cb97e3968083c170eac058df87c73364
d91ee37fdeb699c0129a0afb644a59a472ca7d4b
'2012-01-14T13:09:12-05:00'
describe
'252977' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFR' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
df5254ca609f31560648f97eded3f05a
fa503a9593ef07e9d71ef4d121691eeb02019cd5
'2012-01-14T13:08:24-05:00'
describe
'151080' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFS' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
31f909959240a04a057dbab7192ffa42
fcab477db4cf12c113adf73aa7bb252e37980800
'2012-01-14T13:08:53-05:00'
describe
'28099' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFT' 'sip-files00018.pro'
9e7674aaf4a97263d32f2d9690cd8789
d73e0c5b9397a959c665c0bbf22c6928b7b415bb
'2012-01-14T13:09:54-05:00'
describe
'52925' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFU' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
df62a9db7b28d2a847ba8091a8cae24f
3ee6279d6ab2ba049c2b21a1787d8165e42a390d
describe
'2038852' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFV' 'sip-files00018.tif'
fe220c1aa6f49ad2a42c8b3fe61a1db8
92c9ab846c0092a6c44dccd8cd1d5d3d5a50e839
'2012-01-14T13:06:20-05:00'
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFW' 'sip-files00018.txt'
2e9062eb9b06fdc83622c6838a4c7f60
8a2664d612b189a0299fb064d5a098fdedbeda98
'2012-01-14T13:07:50-05:00'
describe
'14184' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFX' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
396c34ffa92f908b3a1bafc598dc00b2
1cd10fe460299ebfe936e1e0202a252a42965134
describe
'252975' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFY' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
c3f3c5ecad588bc89455ba602736093a
024235d3d83bef86a100ce5922fa45deeff1e5a7
'2012-01-14T13:08:00-05:00'
describe
'155929' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNFZ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
0ed992f6ce0f119761d678f45a26e7be
0d9f5fd0ef27da806bab780673e336e509845f73
describe
'26131' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGA' 'sip-files00019.pro'
8c46a5aad0e6d3232bfee12f87e2dfec
c9dd70326a6b818be4ec370f51c5282010e3237c
'2012-01-14T13:08:49-05:00'
describe
'52454' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGB' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
ee1c69e4bfb84b376d0d08cf3dd94150
8b8cad9899dc14ba7240d130dceb1001a2bbbbb6
'2012-01-14T13:07:02-05:00'
describe
'2038920' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGC' 'sip-files00019.tif'
117d3b96c74c100c96ca78744fd75a26
c475dd7f11b6ff1825698cc71c0bed12cef7f3f9
'2012-01-14T13:08:17-05:00'
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGD' 'sip-files00019.txt'
c3e849b8dea490ca9cf6a48a89d3957d
702ef5fb8493062e85d4873d6d72828163e06fde
'2012-01-14T13:07:43-05:00'
describe
'13908' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGE' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
efc5747d2f3d5ec5afce7da5646e346f
d874e5edadf8fdce2b5c6e0207c7001d89ff0808
'2012-01-14T13:07:51-05:00'
describe
'252945' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGF' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
5e9523514fa4ea67fbcc5bf754e5108e
f072ffec72a8501b24069652c92e19ca8755fa97
'2012-01-14T13:09:35-05:00'
describe
'151553' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGG' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
a41db131dbdb97fa3bea247a76ae5204
7d16949be4459db77457cb45f3f4c1cb66712efb
describe
'28114' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGH' 'sip-files00020.pro'
93a9badcc0499b0c0d9c315a01c93b19
26b84ea7b98c500903dd78a45030be0e55ee1ff7
'2012-01-14T13:07:57-05:00'
describe
'53866' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGI' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
6c4896a3cadfbf0741285c72319b74ca
43e47d769083b6fc61633c2091a9abac47400c6d
'2012-01-14T13:07:15-05:00'
describe
'2039160' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGJ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
5ea04c2640b1ad3156841807c0f46139
960fd67d524abcc3b6533bb40fae0962af1a2c47
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGK' 'sip-files00020.txt'
086725fc956dbc2046ad3783d04e8727
f658c4b10d9a4a9b868c7b0bad0bba1ef757452f
'2012-01-14T13:06:45-05:00'
describe
'14122' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGL' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
4b0bd71aff0d2849055e137a74719978
0da3e771f5339bc37e30fd82fc2ede53010e64cf
'2012-01-14T13:06:53-05:00'
describe
'252953' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGM' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
0c19bbb8eacdbd471bd920ebdd141c45
616320f85f229de16288d897df093d30011a27da
describe
'94947' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGN' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
358981417ad247ef3293edf08d54df2d
8e50969dea4cb956b4c09575853a8616ffb17a75
'2012-01-14T13:06:25-05:00'
describe
'8884' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGO' 'sip-files00021.pro'
8a2fcf7948811eb9ee8de6175c6a7000
07d128460f8f0ee8bc6aac3cff05cd46695048d4
describe
'28879' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGP' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
fb93721dbea6c61dae87221db1337381
87008e337cfb6931eba3392f88b1ddcd7ad1f3b8
'2012-01-14T13:06:51-05:00'
describe
'2034628' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGQ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
5dc024ff55af6ea4f3cbbb9115fe4dce
f764d4370323c15f177de0c3bf07448e9346d1ee
'2012-01-14T13:08:20-05:00'
describe
'375' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGR' 'sip-files00021.txt'
f5e9bf83f037e719c4ee3d91cc7ae442
bc1b30f0c2be8b821870aa67a5b6ff4bef484a59
'2012-01-14T13:06:22-05:00'
describe
'7235' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGS' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
2412c570fefdd04fd9fc1fe52da235a7
ba98d71320f97725dff99b882b5260b4127092ea
'2012-01-14T13:08:45-05:00'
describe
'252962' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGT' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
76ff66d09e399c043eea73cc6d6091cf
cf30195679ada1dc7aa67dfcb538beaa20347c40
describe
'117765' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGU' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
12426b36bd01a317b1fe10fdd5a1690e
7b11b5635ebab2e7f911be0f371240b4d1d11547
describe
'19040' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGV' 'sip-files00022.pro'
604b00f477eaf113486c10ab55c6f721
6fd96d1315411a76251018a450b6ae530a63c4c3
describe
'40271' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGW' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
1acf6ab148a4d283cd40eadb2088d4b7
efb17ebe54cb2ee96f1ee3dfb3781bfa2c60db4a
'2012-01-14T13:07:47-05:00'
describe
'2037020' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGX' 'sip-files00022.tif'
cf113fcccb0dc459d6f091247f7c85dd
cb16cc463e742292823cbd55334016d6e44dadb0
describe
'813' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGY' 'sip-files00022.txt'
1a54f2927fab8ba854f90c0056f78951
7849d22db68de96520b2ffbe64817d686df6da50
'2012-01-14T13:09:52-05:00'
describe
'11061' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNGZ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
e501813560439de68ed621443ee7cf25
cf455de2533c4b93a283c850a79fe8b6bd767c68
'2012-01-14T13:07:59-05:00'
describe
'252960' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHA' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
c2b5140fbbbefa6ff2fe2db3ee508494
3c401d34786c00c9d456505f2e00921a32c837b7
describe
'174278' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHB' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
2732dcabb481fb777c63f123e99986ba
b80a5ae998c810d9768f17f17ce6eee0b37affa8
'2012-01-14T13:06:49-05:00'
describe
'30211' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHC' 'sip-files00023.pro'
38908d26726b5551da9b76e9c3f3b8b0
2f104b5eea13aacf99aa30942d7ad9ace9a4888b
describe
'58206' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHD' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
046ff918e84a56e25fc85d2a2c5321ca
95ea3ed699ca5c9f962be7e7a659e22fd030f6fc
'2012-01-14T13:07:40-05:00'
describe
'2039460' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHE' 'sip-files00023.tif'
c7e5fdaf46fbde2039a72ffe54586a4e
ce81ee64446b8dd95c2e224a6455ccbc15011f7f
'2012-01-14T13:07:29-05:00'
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHF' 'sip-files00023.txt'
9836c6f866fc483327145da833c66d59
4fb90dba4d6582c6834f15bf185217eef9e27fa7
describe
'15012' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHG' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
63649457d217ff5a15adf3b7318e9b90
c0be397bda0707ad80012971911fcdbfe53d2f75
'2012-01-14T13:10:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHH' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
b7675547e9b8d8854d858a577d6fd1a0
768e7d01297d93fc5e704ff2d3eca27322e831a8
'2012-01-14T13:08:04-05:00'
describe
'129974' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHI' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
55b80e9e59108eea0adee4c06464e6d6
5d9290af3f50fa8f3214d370e13840480b5d7769
describe
'24048' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHJ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
331e13aa24bc7081a4e94d13a5f7af34
4f4e8c4c08dc13800c56a7aa941b1234f563b8f6
'2012-01-14T13:10:29-05:00'
describe
'46402' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHK' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
83f7b5f942a6be5359b7c3a0ada0998f
c0d929bc16ec4e92267b3cab49f8f8b2187ee225
'2012-01-14T13:06:43-05:00'
describe
'2038716' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHL' 'sip-files00024.tif'
f22c42634bda3c5866e6c1f48da7e8b0
543424b65c4e730f3e5779e46dc8f50bb6debe54
'2012-01-14T13:07:19-05:00'
describe
'975' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHM' 'sip-files00024.txt'
f74313d28f392c54b636346c4a3028d9
3353fb9d72ea27ee142235e07ae8c4093b0ab610
describe
'13389' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHN' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
4030884d9dbbcde0a6f6aaded28d6e75
2366e79bdba01d871ca4cace4c2da5d9ee81b1ee
'2012-01-14T13:08:41-05:00'
describe
'252971' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHO' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
380e4b503ca093bbf735b90ab043ec16
6d3e383d511f338231d6e409f382168f96e7394f
'2012-01-14T13:09:28-05:00'
describe
'160111' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHP' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
55ba45d93b8f2780976b33b58f3702aa
dfb813ea2fb36ae90c5287ef0befc80dea5d052e
describe
'28158' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHQ' 'sip-files00025.pro'
97e0cde25bfd39e39d343ae2e7d7e515
f58811b76c7ddb025245b9267e68c38b55e53fc1
describe
'55590' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHR' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
dd2f2a1c5332495eacc94ad1e01ecb2a
000afb3705f7a8c50b8f3467cddf2a981f0e8e10
describe
'2039144' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHS' 'sip-files00025.tif'
c906f64d537b339b9030665e319dea77
f0e688dba751a75fd4b589f08df62becb577461a
'2012-01-14T13:10:13-05:00'
describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHT' 'sip-files00025.txt'
8b39f7f7210d1f95ff3f49dc83c2469f
ecacdf50437e4638d35c19c0e4aacbd9c857f15b
describe
'14398' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHU' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
69da53cb59ce265c5afa5817e71c9e6b
93ed9244e67a52ab57a0ac52db5138af724e7c02
'2012-01-14T13:06:39-05:00'
describe
'252883' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHV' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
0cf418397a475097897a57cc8ccac734
9452a8ee62df765e833539fe4bbc09639f2bda1b
describe
'141697' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHW' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
c26fe688343aac8792145a0e978f7bdf
7fd3535c9c5deea0401cdac65e03ee7165db5efb
describe
'26331' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHX' 'sip-files00026.pro'
709b641ce4cd58dd1affeb6d31c2eaf4
2a59fe8d53e3c8900d5ace8ad843dfcc5b9dd272
'2012-01-14T13:08:37-05:00'
describe
'50436' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHY' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
3c4ff9ea568f8a7f33468b8d2ba29e4a
c6f196d8f8ee4859cf6cbbb1f05f8027c3e3a2f8
'2012-01-14T13:10:07-05:00'
describe
'2038576' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNHZ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
54f7d8f11bdbd39eff9004cc053dce7b
a65c5c6fd231447b7a9d0c7e87dab02f5d5ebfa4
'2012-01-14T13:08:36-05:00'
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIA' 'sip-files00026.txt'
2fb8086589c0525eb80edc7e0468970f
d3b41863b277e932db79842456cde442c7ec4fd3
'2012-01-14T13:08:14-05:00'
describe
'13891' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIB' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
9742b7dd89f0a52b6a78b5c1158f4f35
d3728cd5382cb085dd896e4cae9a96f540f166ed
describe
'252979' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIC' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
b13747b5b68996f51eed66ff937ed8eb
172ae5ab44b45109144791105e83797e622e22b7
'2012-01-14T13:08:52-05:00'
describe
'152865' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNID' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
74b9c7fe89e387c45ee4d8060a498ceb
b8238e3abea60cdbf693bd1444874228171fa16f
'2012-01-14T13:07:14-05:00'
describe
'38804' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIE' 'sip-files00027.pro'
5fc37c9af9a4a19d9aaf6611ef132885
86f99d1862d7f1dca42af750987c325f73131de9
'2012-01-14T13:06:57-05:00'
describe
'50547' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIF' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
1d586c300d3cb710903cd1c2ef7af279
8776dcef600f821d492bf387170c233d5c46a9e9
describe
'2038636' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIG' 'sip-files00027.tif'
7a85aa7790dea3aa756ed5188e713f5d
914ab64269ed25d23b884c20d4034fa353d7498e
describe
'1651' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIH' 'sip-files00027.txt'
99f52830a8e38b8b7f2213ccdf38c23b
2bb1d35a0fc2ac36b807be324aa4e6c3dd508307
describe
'13332' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNII' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
120ad198196d9302b2a916e89316bd7e
21ff6b33fe27488797443d5eb5c0bec2654b6037
describe
'252954' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIJ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
5da4f525055d2008ee35bee921c7f2f5
20b63c38f24233c354b863c51661265e6438e745
'2012-01-14T13:08:46-05:00'
describe
'163496' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIK' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
7e8d884941315dda06fcd18b4d334f12
4f1385dbf6da1fa3d6c92dd4c9014104c3f35c00
'2012-01-14T13:08:57-05:00'
describe
'53287' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIL' 'sip-files00028.pro'
c95022011c5f0512a0734accc7209d7a
ebb25baa81e5e833e6f95ef465d358899bccce58
describe
'51510' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIM' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
0cea71bf0c47081a81e5f46d06ca2b57
8b2dcd417aaed572c9b2ae6a4ed0f41cc54e5a77
describe
'2038656' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIN' 'sip-files00028.tif'
56fe73a629d27fb2bfc30649390dcae9
7e00ecb4ab6a8557f12c97515f56451a6ace9f49
'2012-01-14T13:07:28-05:00'
describe
'2268' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIO' 'sip-files00028.txt'
23fc43696c7f6abd806f5bfa8e9ba9e6
479767bf622d70958dbc0d484b2f6e778bf8d31b
'2012-01-14T13:07:21-05:00'
describe
'13072' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIP' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
d57ffcd0b3b149ddb045590d0f3312cc
c93498470cb0d9dea7223c0d41797d331689053e
'2012-01-14T13:06:52-05:00'
describe
'252961' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIQ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
c4602b940976a484046c5bde0a3ea1be
754d7c927e702b249f2e143d4ff35a29f4d6c9ed
'2012-01-14T13:09:51-05:00'
describe
'149183' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIR' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
4aee907fb729f9b3d7ead2f5fedada2e
14242412c84e6e8cb584c92c6628af202bab9534
'2012-01-14T13:08:39-05:00'
describe
'26350' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIS' 'sip-files00029.pro'
1fc0667ac996ce2430a5ff3a5f7efc98
0d88336ade1af652fead462ce93c12021af7b226
describe
'52190' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIT' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
cfad615523235e159b7df2eefac1ddbc
85d41b154c317b2ab1eb6547647591c5ac0e2422
describe
'2039384' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIU' 'sip-files00029.tif'
76f99852cdc14c51962f8c53dcd01d7c
fbf8af5f59206ee2b9a81c020659f39159becf59
'2012-01-14T13:06:55-05:00'
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIV' 'sip-files00029.txt'
04fe85a672256102c1898e9822307443
f18f1e702d45f4e923e6168b52adaaaf89e7432a
describe
'13957' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIW' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
8086a842b368e463b631ab913dc06850
61282b994c5610981e003f4f68a6fb61a1fa19ae
'2012-01-14T13:09:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIX' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
a3b7c61a39c6f2ed7b72b5e14afa16f2
caf58a6a9a3ca30c478f8bfa4605dae42240202f
'2012-01-14T13:08:54-05:00'
describe
'147836' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIY' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
5882b549b1fc90292ca939fb3257c4e9
cdc0e5f7195d54a16fe37aca7b9786f69947f301
'2012-01-14T13:09:08-05:00'
describe
'35935' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNIZ' 'sip-files00030.pro'
1959a6f41adea64ccc3abaab3b0b5ab0
1ba9e84625b06d68606743bccc1ca300f83e7cbe
describe
'50257' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJA' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
adbef0b284f1df0a4c574ab05d1d1035
439a211d29d4d681ebadaaf2ac4e7985692648d3
describe
'2038796' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJB' 'sip-files00030.tif'
2bd95e04ac354cbbfb474e481084c203
bd2f12f71c64f364bb85c2ad1b2fab13ca36f788
'2012-01-14T13:07:09-05:00'
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJC' 'sip-files00030.txt'
4ea46a3486029a07c6c010771d5c73d0
b517f51ed16e312b75e56412a298781efef5f258
'2012-01-14T13:09:59-05:00'
describe
'13637' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJD' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
a2e87a828b609f8965ee0d96b13c95d2
338d7c00e6a4b34ee1431aa97ab035caf0ee52b1
'2012-01-14T13:09:03-05:00'
describe
'252964' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJE' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
e6f82fa6f500b975b4fb23fe21014ea2
c3b4311a96539719ad85ffe829649b2f63c86d01
'2012-01-14T13:07:35-05:00'
describe
'151578' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJF' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
788a557d2f24ddd205a7f6ebed970386
03810ff3293b60276cb04f67642877864c3db195
describe
'26408' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJG' 'sip-files00031.pro'
e9a59e64eadce0c701ed2ea0f70daf48
4bddf3a8926bb069670ec9d4fb62692b39f8a32d
'2012-01-14T13:10:14-05:00'
describe
'52410' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJH' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
7f474e61c1277492c878a7e28a2ab839
5978c441ca0c8b2950c7a608c755f56291fe6ae8
'2012-01-14T13:06:59-05:00'
describe
'2039228' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJI' 'sip-files00031.tif'
b424e7b168d036406fd741c65de80513
2f1a8d907ecbcb95a139dc732f246cfe05a2f493
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJJ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
dcaf98fba59e89b972c7023cc6c82ed6
0c38c3270e3139b5d477ed909ad2f7ee52923434
'2012-01-14T13:07:39-05:00'
describe
'14300' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJK' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
6e8f937cecad94513a77161f6414083e
482ce4fb48e1da3c435c58bf4137b1f62d3577c4
describe
'252976' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJL' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
2418fbe77ad70b06c34cc72a36178a8c
0b75137d8dc616c4ccd3ac28e15afe9483a60094
'2012-01-14T13:10:18-05:00'
describe
'110108' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJM' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
197c8c4751a01b5044218a3b85f58ae4
0cbbaf7854bbf7cd3d27ae8b167d81a7dc9b7e0d
'2012-01-14T13:06:26-05:00'
describe
'20976' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJN' 'sip-files00032.pro'
fcc3c3386b7b4f7e2e0330332006fac0
ab2efc35898cb499d1aea77c7e52263c3e4fcce2
'2012-01-14T13:08:12-05:00'
describe
'40021' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJO' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
1e33ae1d4d931bbd7239626f39508e1c
882ed2d81056f1a3e56bb4d05b59624d530477b1
'2012-01-14T13:07:20-05:00'
describe
'2037060' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJP' 'sip-files00032.tif'
a0803a6919c456cb5bd521d0831de525
1957a9eee7267091935e4df5b28ce2c4ace21c58
'2012-01-14T13:06:28-05:00'
describe
'834' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJQ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
4c75821157ec8f3723fcb5ce4d964a78
6bb1d248a2a818f56cfabf192430ca47771c2949
'2012-01-14T13:07:33-05:00'
describe
'11109' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJR' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
3aaa79144201f6c63fe2ef00057f1ed5
06e17225c14adf094234740c4181aac210e03a88
describe
'252950' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJS' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
e58f8cbc7ecf59ec5d47817731be295e
328a4553741137d39ffacab19f42d65a08b46ef4
'2012-01-14T13:08:21-05:00'
describe
'110644' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJT' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
1442653ed29c8c59c675a38a4f1e7d2d
50c40e342cb61dd710ee57b738d6e048c07fb1e7
'2012-01-14T13:09:41-05:00'
describe
'17782' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJU' 'sip-files00033.pro'
50824424eaf67be9cc25ec18ab970d2f
e63beb9bb4452038b30e098787ad62989a48ed9a
'2012-01-14T13:10:12-05:00'
describe
'38797' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJV' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
06c7cdc1dd6ece6cebc0393c57861e42
83f715d3a942dd01bd6a3141cbc6856dc92094d4
'2012-01-14T13:06:50-05:00'
describe
'2036744' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJW' 'sip-files00033.tif'
385c271683863e80213309ac1c99a145
d6da6775989ac124743b7a325781e0d4dae4d356
describe
'734' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJX' 'sip-files00033.txt'
1fc37bacd4bd1db6c059fb90b501ddbb
5a219df8464b1e9a79fcc04de65722f1ea70254f
'2012-01-14T13:09:20-05:00'
describe
'10138' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJY' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
c4e16d6e31907bcf51e688d0f106ecc8
b49ab04924d07bd0a024fb0fbcbf6ea616d12c2f
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNJZ' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
8e63acb1a522d61c04d150215afd56e9
682695d848f8ed5c62b0b562a8cc5b3a03043c6e
'2012-01-14T13:09:48-05:00'
describe
'143861' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKA' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
b10974472423c276a2ea95d1b9ad8b60
fb38a222393e204671c90ce27468704d706e5e53
'2012-01-14T13:09:46-05:00'
describe
'27520' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKB' 'sip-files00034.pro'
0ac0d95adeaac2f709477515f33dc9ed
220006c92d9619c9d354dcdedf8cc5561d8114f3
describe
'51711' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKC' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
4d47dfdf1f711edbade2a20d1a46120e
11af346f43e61b56b52d7d4da9c9883452b3dff3
describe
'2038872' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKD' 'sip-files00034.tif'
5039ce67104cec19f3f07f02ee4e3973
cfc672b0218f2332a6b0feaa7d631dd3617d7b56
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKE' 'sip-files00034.txt'
fe5ee5849012783bde2084e1b7712e16
7f18fa29c381c4eefed6eadb9fca1a45690d24e8
'2012-01-14T13:10:28-05:00'
describe
'13810' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKF' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
54c7dc522464405fd7ff9aada1ea6bda
ae400ed26b36ef8035d2b33545c0da227c2206b3
'2012-01-14T13:06:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKG' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
5036a01299edcafbcbfd4829a5e45ffb
2dca9562e309a219a2eba39f37e6d497644798e9
'2012-01-14T13:07:24-05:00'
describe
'159975' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKH' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
c10a4078e1e6eb1b2fb51af688425f74
8dad3c2caa93a290db29d4587cc3e90a19c4756f
describe
'26658' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKI' 'sip-files00035.pro'
d9faed29876bfb0ad231fb8ada769f66
95d8569b959a26ebf4403df0d7fc700dbfeea992
'2012-01-14T13:08:22-05:00'
describe
'55482' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKJ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
431a6c10fffc3bb7fcc521f4e67c3c3c
fc7442d966fa04bdeff043a4e076a882b7044b54
'2012-01-14T13:09:18-05:00'
describe
'2039004' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKK' 'sip-files00035.tif'
e8ea9e0113c328f8924fb4e90652e75b
1c2e9549d554b3278c94591999a49c1f59adebb2
'2012-01-14T13:06:44-05:00'
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKL' 'sip-files00035.txt'
308e590e7918c0a9637f8d3cfa62215d
2f8c8c28b81b9bb95c71ed44a4ba1e3ec2a97e24
describe
'14560' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKM' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
1dafe12385462a4cfa7a6cee8ff814c6
df6ebc5e84abfa71cf4dd2c9a3daf1a4c81f8343
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKN' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
3bca903eacf9de6ce4c06abaf6fd4682
818a9be882eb7e1f521b5c18fa6ce9fe2018ce63
describe
'133068' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKO' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
db51eebf091e7b0c8d8a4081d250b389
41bb5fa0e9bb824b79a3ea479ea905bbc07f16ed
'2012-01-14T13:09:31-05:00'
describe
'25913' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKP' 'sip-files00036.pro'
63a209f58fa8075a42b4c577f616b7bc
0643c192a5d300e63e10347229129a6568772ccd
describe
'49146' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKQ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
d8ad521e656d56da9b5ea3b2beccc8f2
e313d6141d026185ff77868e7faf1a7b92d9a5cb
describe
'2038720' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKR' 'sip-files00036.tif'
9b74948625fbda20e4401ee4cde08826
3068b673fec1389f0d3c3280c9e246102ae294e9
'2012-01-14T13:06:36-05:00'
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKS' 'sip-files00036.txt'
7bb8cc9b640ea4a3ca051def69279d4a
e9c65f2c6cb7cd783578fb2d0c340b2dac2ec7a8
describe
'13759' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKT' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
869ac8bcff9768f6e218c23642e3bc9c
650222b976f868dc76acaac478d96443e66b9d9d
describe
'252970' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKU' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
2863a973aaead1f782009bc09be6f17b
c5a3f11b18f39ed1082fc8d02784de01b74909d1
describe
'148658' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKV' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
279ffa756b4e42df6a58e0382de5e1b8
44f9a731f6037b52bbb9dc0033a33d93d282c506
'2012-01-14T13:07:37-05:00'
describe
'27349' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKW' 'sip-files00037.pro'
3dec37c9675c20d966f7a6c448dd216a
dffc5e7bae45bfa41d7f8f9b33c399bcd312c720
describe
'53509' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKX' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
d11fd9b3637c16e8b8262bec933f5268
200bdd6b30188346f382bf9eada9eb0ce5fdde78
describe
'2039536' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKY' 'sip-files00037.tif'
fa909041ff4ae608f4fd0706ffa30eab
412cb813e0f43392ac07b35bad9b2d6406571634
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNKZ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
5d2b35826d216e10bab23c5fd6ade476
f6e5df7b91b1eff64c3a305f5bee6cfbdfeca535
'2012-01-14T13:07:05-05:00'
describe
'14594' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLA' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
651072527f9bc6397ebee8d2a783bcc9
87c32aebb14140df9ea632647cf1cc74a04e16f1
describe
'252942' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLB' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
049ca8aa391681a7f9b0eec3cfae0a93
c6ae6ea16a5a9ade84eb482dc228455ae054518c
describe
'147220' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLC' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
fbf7bb5f13b3b222aa652fe910a4b3a6
012db4b3586fafd8ec6f0a34f4ba1a6c83a2dd86
'2012-01-14T13:08:10-05:00'
describe
'27106' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLD' 'sip-files00038.pro'
2ff7d0f5cef3e023ee9f5b10f8ffe9f7
d5cf5a483aa1fb02f1802765b8ac75fca4dd1a8e
describe
'51863' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLE' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
7118002f801985991990ef9111859a03
55a16e34f60cd0f44eb67262044ac20df24463af
'2012-01-14T13:08:25-05:00'
describe
'2038860' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLF' 'sip-files00038.tif'
07b5bbdf69d83e9c367fa4372f9f44a0
f3e5a69ecd40c4cc8b4f97822d32d12d3c18e05f
'2012-01-14T13:09:43-05:00'
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLG' 'sip-files00038.txt'
cf164dcf71166b18f8b8ae1bf183cbff
b7bc39b99f2084374ebb4331635f270163b63e15
'2012-01-14T13:06:46-05:00'
describe
'13909' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLH' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
f3e285f5012a18eb25b7042dfd243b11
ec617127d65c226e588168b719f5e66426e2617f
'2012-01-14T13:08:30-05:00'
describe
'252978' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLI' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
38fdb133852667e593a1dd43ae5622e0
4bb80fb9898eea506e9bd832044903bbf837dfa4
'2012-01-14T13:08:06-05:00'
describe
'143980' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLJ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
11f3a66fd4f61efa3712185dd9f464ac
c8a27c3b43c52e4d6e80a5c910a26c71a536fb16
describe
'27275' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLK' 'sip-files00039.pro'
722df93aec2ce61f7b391302b38b9c89
3a9e477f45a1bafee2c3523b21edd2c4b301eeb4
'2012-01-14T13:06:27-05:00'
describe
'52272' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLL' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
5fe6e597d8daf5031ddbf503016c2347
b8ecdae1c48ec4ca65cca1bec5ef3a9ab59b062d
'2012-01-14T13:07:11-05:00'
describe
'2039028' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLM' 'sip-files00039.tif'
8d5680686ef6fccdbc3ed72fb27407a6
27ebb1fdcd2a1b7cb166f8dfc6f13e4d04fe01f1
'2012-01-14T13:10:20-05:00'
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLN' 'sip-files00039.txt'
dfbbe72929876c7020174b4bca106d85
f302540a86b8316ae04a38a5e42783179c16d398
'2012-01-14T13:09:57-05:00'
describe
'13854' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLO' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
e6646d364b04e09fad877d1e723e446c
11892eb1eaa17e72c9de30e74c5e3a113e1f2bae
describe
'252972' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLP' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
e4536bb2774db535a13af939410bb805
4c3d694f1400101498a232eefc2bb1ef775e63ba
'2012-01-14T13:06:56-05:00'
describe
'132525' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLQ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
6cc716911fa66e421122c61d6b64aaf5
6263ddeefce6e667c57f265dc9a05e1900844c5f
'2012-01-14T13:08:15-05:00'
describe
'26866' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLR' 'sip-files00040.pro'
4025004070e6d04f6074323d686c45d7
0a2e4456117251b714afdef0cb56bf4eab0f3e0e
'2012-01-14T13:08:56-05:00'
describe
'48270' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLS' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
60179482f2c330df0bd0bb846550505e
9b76a5f9682bd57498a34b3f54479d517fe8459b
'2012-01-14T13:08:29-05:00'
describe
'2038256' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLT' 'sip-files00040.tif'
39fd16390bc740295e39cb7fba81f152
29028939b26543b6a827466f3279c7a255ca9b48
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLU' 'sip-files00040.txt'
03860c0c2d9a366a6e9ff6bef751367c
cefecee4462762af8b31a95a2fa3722e6253f593
describe
'13211' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLV' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
f9764db49fc43712b2cd6644c6db8a51
74974aadf16ba65d336ec6808e22a1bf2cd3cb35
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLW' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
8f15497322a6a61dd4f785da3d6030af
71ba7cd050452e84c63ea612cd066beb53641f42
describe
'150398' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLX' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
55c6790b95acdb627564eddecd41ba05
3056a224852eff3380d4bd39a3f38b5e5ac226e3
describe
'28685' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLY' 'sip-files00041.pro'
e83707f2a78fb10be9726faac99f254e
576458001e6586ad06f2d68ec1b5e3d6f37eda3e
describe
'53816' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNLZ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
dfbf55021addf9a5a698d969e81825c1
f4f8ea5b15ebda07fecc7db806122d2f7ac5dccf
'2012-01-14T13:07:45-05:00'
describe
'2038968' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMA' 'sip-files00041.tif'
4fc75ef63303992619314ed631bcf367
a19d6e7e0b50e9c0e86289390ca83795d5e3634d
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMB' 'sip-files00041.txt'
be7a86e678abc22e9693f86b2e71ad8b
102d2c8c8e46020c96023a0d087b98cdf77536dd
describe
'14152' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMC' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
36b9b01f1ff35eafbfbb6e4e61fe1f84
30f1dcf3b798bfa62968d51502aa9eac161c0a48
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMD' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
0a8b47162bd19213207d4f79547b61cd
74e68b710e8b55fa9a5b9dc2554138b625d2a7d9
describe
'118552' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNME' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
d6b413bbb3121a02c6f6ebaff8453cb3
0e67da31996e7d1abbcfe34862a436ace41a63ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMF' 'sip-files00042.pro'
e9652a93d40309a3f833e42f41e37a56
1895ddcf182618249e702a6c6c86aa79fa1440f9
describe
'44314' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMG' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
e7096da1dddc65b75e02daa9070b6abc
ee4ea9ad0bbe925f09e728072507f27e59ed5054
'2012-01-14T13:06:34-05:00'
describe
'2038516' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMH' 'sip-files00042.tif'
a4f7675209bd7a8540d932cd92d2572c
8b97b14f6ea5039d268b08520e12c7f4ba26807c
'2012-01-14T13:09:25-05:00'
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMI' 'sip-files00042.txt'
7e6591eb6ff0767d9e25f350d8298f6e
564acc76a96252d1b3b2b2ae760cb3195068696e
describe
'12306' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMJ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
111cb931bc03078e4721ffa0eaef562b
45e242c7672fc4f0bd30da231b2d7f3e9a634cdb
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMK' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
8b8e3aa40250d9b539fdfc92f94b61cf
3f8571c4c690f773587e46b9c3628f6c9f738b31
describe
'136582' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNML' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
f11d079a11de08694b5a74aa83c8272f
0e5ce00df3c6e5e7d62a244ea5d38bff775c71bd
describe
'26053' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMM' 'sip-files00043.pro'
5cb0e764d60ac133bae7c67121e7916a
8fa00e350649b21e8fb1707b1e9659ba15b001a6
describe
'48645' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMN' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
e06d0a7fdfc7402ae6c4e5b742febb01
b63815fc5b0d3a000e2e4543f56e87153b57053a
'2012-01-14T13:07:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMO' 'sip-files00043.tif'
f7cbb2496121345bdf1a928b6d42fd65
8d5a4b01542104968ca2317431943ada9ff12c37
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMP' 'sip-files00043.txt'
8cdc8be3cda177a1a15d924e2d3eb91e
399a716c9f7305b70a9b556de221fcd0ebd30eac
'2012-01-14T13:07:31-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'13411' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMQ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
93089501568f25f6c1ced68a81fb6377
fc7a668b60736a79fdadc7efaa11778d6addcbc2
describe
'252981' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMR' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
639d51e4b02b5b5c26f8e08ebc62263b
94a982f0de4d4e72d8ac3a216ceec42e58a313b2
describe
'45892' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMS' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
95e44a3aa8f7c900c07b6c1f11803f81
36a547da3338fea1d3b9f23690b3b1a078c2e0cf
describe
'7195' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMT' 'sip-files00044.pro'
4a03941148a0809ad0a6b98402e6d779
88587d4ee10754826ee19255c90d49179c894047
describe
'15997' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMU' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
52bbbfb69493ceb2d0072b0b67c3cf5b
8905e12d9c874cb3f6e351673496f28093531e22
describe
'2033588' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMV' 'sip-files00044.tif'
d90b92413069a52d207fa45cc46ad7f1
127a1d50b66faa1f824e11c867d89af2b96fcdc9
'2012-01-14T13:07:52-05:00'
describe
'295' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMW' 'sip-files00044.txt'
858fda8716cf630787608c385a63a715
e39fb57a32647f0b3c75441d819e0535e7d6c01c
'2012-01-14T13:08:19-05:00'
describe
'4563' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMX' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
4244e559c497878774a944e77712400b
06f53a361a9c809a3e5f0b49e0135be2782dae42
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMY' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
2d83b9e80e23c21e746071b31c4f5a55
4a50fcd9d3c0665398e06a66d30d9d16f86b59ac
describe
'106792' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNMZ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
887445fa6ce98fbc84b72f7a6e479abf
36d8a590eb440ed7cddaf9bd077d88a18af3f17b
describe
'17721' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNA' 'sip-files00045.pro'
53a01cb17874415bb6f2b218c3552bf9
7b86348ce57395aebcc3e8abae126346a4be7efd
'2012-01-14T13:09:23-05:00'
describe
'38044' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNB' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
ec41a95143de888848dfe0fe4cc3b6cf
98bb3e8dab2a3b7842b99b0f0497336f706dfef7
'2012-01-14T13:08:35-05:00'
describe
'2036672' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNC' 'sip-files00045.tif'
aa24f3994285a6c5a438691438816836
8874b672cfd7b38ae85f7c86571f72903b5fc78b
describe
'746' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNND' 'sip-files00045.txt'
c331e8951a93560eac45c2dd8cf1906a
6dd95e0a778ae8cb16589d4bf0a1362eb24806bc
describe
'9969' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNE' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
8229e207c8b94ae12df8db8424d9da80
0084807bc8ae913e183ab036b75300d4f162b18f
describe
'259854' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNF' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
015cfa10eea0368885c0dc519e43fc6e
de8c58303529b1ba862b19fd451363485c178d5c
'2012-01-14T13:06:58-05:00'
describe
'141343' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNG' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
1137e567cd34a004530859da0853537b
50cef11c5c1b29e4bb6399d8b1d9584b3a3c6547
describe
'27953' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNH' 'sip-files00046.pro'
3123ec7c049234c4332f3553fc9ee96d
3fb49fac607e0f67095cdfe45ea5aac77b92e0f7
describe
'50963' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNI' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
fbce43055a9aabc7842b3f5e4becfcb8
876449c270bbe161b811a3e54cf91912b8b98e8a
'2012-01-14T13:08:47-05:00'
describe
'2093792' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNJ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
231398ec4dfc8718b061f1b5421fddce
705df9c08cd967aa6f302560e86c92d9e722516e
'2012-01-14T13:06:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNK' 'sip-files00046.txt'
564d70eda5164cdd2611830d6351b636
d0f1c5898c6395041a03744f8acc0c76b06529d8
'2012-01-14T13:10:17-05:00'
describe
'13706' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNL' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
c25f85a7b02979ac981ee11cec3447ab
8cbc08eb93168f786ffac0dee36f865e7f329916
describe
'252963' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNM' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
df4ee2823844f7790e82911928476c0f
86b0bc9d1c1cfe308791241de52992b868f41ee7
'2012-01-14T13:08:33-05:00'
describe
'142640' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNN' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
2266a563a79aa2bbbd4cbf1be43f401a
07f82a581b88b0b61fbc07d87ef952b8129f649f
'2012-01-14T13:09:02-05:00'
describe
'26745' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNO' 'sip-files00047.pro'
a51e72649d070d045ca0328d4df6517d
e79a547498244c083986042bb97e095971356650
describe
'50250' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNP' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
5e9c5f139d4526b115186c3015688920
73724bbb3f8e63e8e9f89bcc74a5da69f307aea1
'2012-01-14T13:08:50-05:00'
describe
'2038804' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNQ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
77284b1d1d076da5e7ebf316c7097d81
aa153cace399ad7dd2c9bea0c7c3a2d2851f68fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNR' 'sip-files00047.txt'
9a2fe70f8ba0f6acff4864ee4c8f4af2
3cf39ba3e83ec79ee943840ffc13f8f59c2b28dd
describe
'13520' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNS' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
2ac596aa6ff34c14f66b8e3faa1df2bc
f0d905c08f2a60a38580edfa429b4e6d30345655
describe
'252866' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNT' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
b51d71c3af83e1feb3795b01c1171c52
332458e01ae96045d87972cae9b9d52cd659294e
describe
'131568' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNU' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
b3f8acee82ac80b0010a9e6f7f5ff600
07e0a4968ad0a225d9ad331761b0d328e81bf26f
'2012-01-14T13:08:07-05:00'
describe
'26505' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNV' 'sip-files00048.pro'
86d9b3efda9eadaac0a49a2133ed2ffb
d67cd541184fde928c87ce7682c2932e157b5088
describe
'47931' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNW' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
aa3bcc72f7accf94a529761c2480fb49
0e2a580c2a860a77b13cbb4908eabbad11ba4cb1
'2012-01-14T13:09:44-05:00'
describe
'2038512' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNX' 'sip-files00048.tif'
0737dc0eec6071dbe50191553b2ea44c
af75466e47b5883093fe96351bd13bf71e6921b3
'2012-01-14T13:07:58-05:00'
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNY' 'sip-files00048.txt'
9d28081b18ee4bd09186f11867b314cf
b8fb65e9ee51fef5a343d4e5de054def499fd086
'2012-01-14T13:08:34-05:00'
describe
'13348' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNNZ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
2b79362aa2faa22b78475302e0bb4fbf
da0673744e22ab7dc0f46dbf3ae3751fd772952d
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOA' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
3e3d7e194f148c657c9417ac22a2dc5c
63f6c2886fa1f96fd8faf8b2af7cdf8e90c1972e
'2012-01-14T13:08:44-05:00'
describe
'143308' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOB' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
50906dc0e97dd64207f2533ecdd03f53
9c837c89ab6fa643156ed94880fb0b99a5ea272c
describe
'26544' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOC' 'sip-files00049.pro'
f83ea2d3e79b681ed9dd6d987bc6c88d
5381f3e20bba828ea2260817b930d5f2b7aa5143
'2012-01-14T13:08:55-05:00'
describe
'50930' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOD' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
a227443d5f6f03fd9eb5c9c37503e2eb
1d192ddc4ae729eb54dc6bbf3df62024b277ac13
describe
'2038620' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOE' 'sip-files00049.tif'
bad7e12e150e73fd22ce97b071f65429
ed393e9ac7749654d386b56fd08250ae8c7d4b95
'2012-01-14T13:07:32-05:00'
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOF' 'sip-files00049.txt'
819a0ec96aa55940afc34f385c4b0055
0acda76a4ba0d3b0a95c2402a7db34b0fef81ec4
describe
'13653' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOG' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
0748800f0f0695810ea40725bc62cc21
a4a06d67e0c8e7e417027f42e0ffb54d11513f35
describe
'252947' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOH' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
1eaa5fad73fc4c37637ddcd7ac18c302
9d7683d89d6120a983d77875da9862347f5bc729
describe
'136843' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOI' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
bea8855e0ea5321c42a8d5b96e5d9502
8c084596b6de9663ea828f550e3c4ed1a4eed50e
describe
'27573' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOJ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
3148f157c3392e212d5bc99821ff842c
1b3fe6b8282eb6e3884894e0f01b9239e53d6655
'2012-01-14T13:07:03-05:00'
describe
'51760' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOK' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
e8e2413d5bbbd4fdc3e96363e5732314
cd162829ccbccb65d99285094322bb890c5cf123
'2012-01-14T13:07:16-05:00'
describe
'2038820' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOL' 'sip-files00050.tif'
aac3b64a5e6eeacbca5151a8eade960b
369fe985a2eb33bb94e51fa0fff7c32b5dd96372
'2012-01-14T13:07:01-05:00'
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOM' 'sip-files00050.txt'
8d2ab93d55424f3192874299a8101958
56e80a455ab706ce97d722dd86030a47cd4e0d72
describe
'13516' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNON' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
e8c75c77ec28d638bf40f1749cbe01eb
f7984c7a5fe2182df73d5d10e27a58238cdad062
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOO' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
14fb4aa829cfad2e25f6d1de8cf220ff
488dc7ed23c7a5a4f156329cd915b0d9d69a2a88
describe
'143031' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOP' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
24d47200e95070855ef842e23c9ea028
a4ded3be621d3e46207a2f4d33ac87c5274a2f0f
describe
'27435' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOQ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
b2e454c7b1529b39ba67a838a14c7b7f
2481b5b4023332b33a293815023ef584ebd2d88e
describe
'52470' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOR' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
44ba1a982e3dc82411fc646731c25c38
80519f3df15fa50e37da86e55167b1cac308e596
describe
'2038996' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOS' 'sip-files00051.tif'
52744c7a7f95fe64d836fc694b2c9251
f39a9427aed45b24e27fcfbf3f9d7c414e96d9b7
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOT' 'sip-files00051.txt'
0e870ecd326f24b8a276fde74323a783
7d27478c223611246dfd24082426b370c063fd9f
'2012-01-14T13:10:03-05:00'
describe
'14281' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOU' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
e063fb78d777b6538bacdd6a9e191c4d
7f4d8c7c5c36d0bedf7f55b894e1166456cceea3
'2012-01-14T13:06:23-05:00'
describe
'252904' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOV' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
79e628095747b67768af6a00901f23eb
b634b19a1b92c96820ea2a589fb758faecafe06d
'2012-01-14T13:10:02-05:00'
describe
'131340' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOW' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
c886fe1e0c53bd2d72769ec4a1657a39
985cda45d7bc89d7b33f64f94ff1a11b6400a0c6
describe
'27188' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOX' 'sip-files00052.pro'
f00b8cd4b47e9dd55ab3ab17f4be3711
47a742607c380a0945e719c0ecdca9312d537f95
describe
'49628' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOY' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
582ba1041a1d46ee18de7f8011889c8a
dc7be4167fc15a77aec4cfc651fcd09503d3b168
'2012-01-14T13:10:11-05:00'
describe
'2038508' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNOZ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
e183ead845e4ba58f14b9528ae3c4bb1
1ddff55014f4ce2000349ed58fb850c898e9ab04
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPA' 'sip-files00052.txt'
f648c0e14b00a5f8c8ed1798345f784e
ff80038a7c9763a15c90709bf73bde8a6ea130dc
describe
'13567' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPB' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
4fa3e58a1f3b186c3976524b518d2087
0f9a83f50590230c4b1e0b96db66691213a143cb
'2012-01-14T13:09:21-05:00'
describe
'252951' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPC' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
75311bf6019b0cc5eb38e9fe302f60d5
685bda90ffea7e789ebefa7dcabb5088031cc45b
'2012-01-14T13:08:59-05:00'
describe
'135927' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPD' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
dd101caf32752fd95fff7dc61cbd1845
0f0a2dbbc45dfaf44e40e3f5ff41b66e0f2b3ff0
describe
'25698' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPE' 'sip-files00053.pro'
300815d36fdfeeec274749fa55af6c8e
ffb85af2662c14530d268455629d660ab75c1be5
describe
'49454' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPF' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
fde0b6e45971096beb13b3037d3dae3b
6327a6619fa8f276ffe728f3d54da61315b2e060
describe
'2038320' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPG' 'sip-files00053.tif'
98a99c8510960a950ecdb12e6a737ef4
5f962f6a41c41436f27a65e034ab9aa58d8b556a
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPH' 'sip-files00053.txt'
84b04e00fde9edbf3c144a1f93f562d1
802b4d89f39360249b5b87d7a197ea0f2eda9137
describe
'13306' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPI' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
4fc12ecd154e2b0ba423cca80a968729
ba9f0404fbaf95616eeebb35022bdac039a12711
describe
'252941' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPJ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
cc048689f037095d52b843ebf7363972
31c6364116bcf195c7d7aac85df6dfcdca507119
describe
'55578' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPK' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
fe40cd5a87d7175eef14880a7899c790
b88002713e4a51f84588d161a7c17c93b4c2caad
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPL' 'sip-files00054.pro'
ecf999f0f8d129de2deae8362fbcfee0
f0135ea821a6b6422eb08ae694b2b302fbf0b275
describe
'19951' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPM' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
0426b262324a666618a7e9be5948d5ef
909b63bb0ab83c7fe820e6a8cd583eee94fe05d0
describe
'2034204' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPN' 'sip-files00054.tif'
93b5c8c71991f9bed0cab5fb2915f0aa
003cda462d492aa55f7a29adfbbbc02fb0dc33a4
describe
'358' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPO' 'sip-files00054.txt'
79f32fc8cf2377242736b10725d8cff7
022fdef3d0cfcfafca0e833b8bc07770a647229d
describe
'5433' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPP' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
eaae10f89f9adf5d14af22dde36528a6
92597900252ff874c6109e637dca1f414402ef41
describe
'252968' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPQ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
637566fd0f8b158e3db9765907c96171
7230aec5e49ef2ef5b3add1fb57b70f5b31ad506
describe
'108800' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPR' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
03ba743f2fb9ccf8ca494a41ccc34eab
d6d6b803cfb7101094f5258bd738913877da85f5
describe
'18186' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPS' 'sip-files00055.pro'
eb3bc195b556c56c8979ffeb9ea8fef5
8b23e8d64b17a54fd7e8e2f68ec554a44fe39aa4
describe
'38005' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPT' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
caff237253ced3b8590b0b1ba4f09482
244ba1d6ef296759b9c0008f3c65f20bf0965fbc
describe
'2036736' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPU' 'sip-files00055.tif'
b2a86fc50047d0c03d49cc94d8d4ced2
1dfa8fac4d5d57b429aa74a1f9673c1cc53ef182
describe
'751' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPV' 'sip-files00055.txt'
10266ecb76092c18e806595abba9a60a
8335c45758fce8117ee1fbf7cd7fd8d01e244d16
describe
'10296' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPW' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
07c72acec6d679bbdab88c510eeca8ec
09f13689281a9f15a33b340bbc32b507e23672aa
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPX' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
706e442a28cd4d1c2e56adcb371dc916
43df982cbc084a16ca3ea65251fb87cddaa64b81
describe
'139909' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPY' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
f7d48bb7f56991ebb9484783ddc6dac1
f4fc8f4aba6daf458e5cd39c50d9ddd83ee94b0f
describe
'27578' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNPZ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
e65a6f89f2758db8e543bc5c6a8f91b7
e9912110931b5f5b606a8e49b7861c4f1ac18ba0
'2012-01-14T13:10:09-05:00'
describe
'50099' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQA' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
8fc534be14438f3f5b1ceddea642a719
1b85f251a40df30f30d6642ead788b1626e870b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQB' 'sip-files00056.tif'
ffaa38129f3622a40475826a9242e90c
db134cdfc8ab23d343b5cdef5d5ad82c9750771f
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQC' 'sip-files00056.txt'
79aa7df3277e8cfc362689912f9616db
54d3cb03d42ce635c2e6eb3632350aa78625282a
'2012-01-14T13:09:13-05:00'
describe
'13748' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQD' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
e6edbcf72d8d857f5a18ec5fcd64cc13
7324a23dde388a6ffde0557ee7409bc3dfa6ffd6
describe
'252966' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQE' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
2a82ee6905786dec9850efec36d54b06
c1e7697cbb69a2137108cbb51fc24449ddae7ff9
describe
'149979' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQF' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
6470851b0ddea1c755d2e5c1a0df7fb7
e44b9d134a18b238d808259c423d33be9e20ca9b
describe
'27459' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQG' 'sip-files00057.pro'
87ca81865e80ba0981d3d0139554c7c9
c595ebdfa9172290a2f8a743211d8e66af5fd700
describe
'52872' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQH' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
bf882c07763d1927afb9e1a8c17ce7d9
605f6c967df192209cfb50c44c73a3c6b3cd73e3
describe
'2038972' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQI' 'sip-files00057.tif'
a0a595d023b92dbd3ee82df86fb9bcba
5d3b0d5cc030b6df9c1aa0511492a347405851fe
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQJ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
8d62478a145938ef9efab01b1fd9d075
b63fc2faa49fc9168e572de55c6dee6c6a62a43d
describe
'14132' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQK' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
783e4d892f5c83791ba3eb00c4033148
670bc311239370a077b63a3c0d267bc4155233f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQL' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
7f2266da9964fc8ffa1202454eeb779f
2ddf9ed84870f1db082ec6a37dd06562708b194d
'2012-01-14T13:09:26-05:00'
describe
'135198' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQM' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
37abbc43a4e162b59c8bacd9c4f78492
600b75b8259187a88168542d5f5a24e33031f6e0
'2012-01-14T13:09:47-05:00'
describe
'26779' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQN' 'sip-files00058.pro'
f69d495d2c6c3116b697f46f4bdd9e79
f6b1013680152f49b7c65165ccc79c132e745a44
describe
'50352' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQO' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
17583dc2a38150e680222a5e47c07c85
f9502b5f99b52116c4e74bd9c8ce1dd3ad22cddd
describe
'2038776' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQP' 'sip-files00058.tif'
7d48269d6c46644c554b127e04cff126
0cec600f10fbaa1eb8128712454d1626ba142313
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQQ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
dc31b656142d300f7f34bf8de0cea97b
65c5075e1df3e4669061d3474ffab480507dafed
describe
'13673' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQR' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
b777b4b670b5fb75426d4f7a8978416b
89c4de26c78bf367d0506a256b4d62621dc92c8b
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQS' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
cf01616d442ee0fec300163d02d512e2
4114a6cf01e8fc82f88d645ce58ddf20d04d793b
describe
'142296' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQT' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
d97a7a7ca24b98f4edbb753903de67b4
19fdb369b01c20c0f848580e2426dcc06dec7ec6
describe
'26475' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQU' 'sip-files00059.pro'
fe6d8db79ac27a6035a929d0283c925a
1937d57ec922ed43e0512f2f2776b529fa535135
describe
'50802' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQV' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
17459b65ca67f32e6c7889357b21adb1
2b2d366ea33d0bc6878ea320b7c1451b70f0fe7a
'2012-01-14T13:09:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQW' 'sip-files00059.tif'
3ea9d637dd5d4c49d56af9a53e7d5cef
6c172a2224d58dfdc189e45a10bea12b7e503bc6
'2012-01-14T13:10:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQX' 'sip-files00059.txt'
05aed59e7ed775f1ef882d4344bf31a4
370604a46cc9dcbff98a01b4b3797a5397d25b7f
describe
'13941' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQY' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
906e9b39efb669554112c73bd96fa52f
62a53d9260c77036a30a9b10436f4df706f25c3d
'2012-01-14T13:07:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNQZ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
c42cd6a7923965fb09b78892e32d3b0d
1b1d442e7ecc38fc757b9f881b1f69a456094499
'2012-01-14T13:08:51-05:00'
describe
'137625' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRA' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
5a2693597d8a26ef31c71b144b8ce6c5
b924921f6b325badaa901c333f6c9efd26fdb742
describe
'27062' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRB' 'sip-files00060.pro'
7812a8d6fed57297f6def20bf1e95927
19263f637de6f5dbdbb11eedd18881c2d6cea21d
describe
'49482' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRC' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
4fe5a42f243c66d6b48928944da6c471
f8cce2a7367ef72d99ec8f5ae182aa4d591245c0
describe
'2038464' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRD' 'sip-files00060.tif'
ff96f06319f13248beb6c0627f835cfd
c7f809a8cf587a7855727ed9259717af5c9c9354
describe
'1074' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRE' 'sip-files00060.txt'
f423d36dc5429df12d7568860558e51f
0d9e9f82d90b4663a9fa4455d7839e82f06f8c7c
'2012-01-14T13:10:22-05:00'
describe
'13718' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRF' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
eac40056dd0dc2acf9cc60467af72e5c
c63aefa5850dd1bd2210fd2292bf644da765e417
describe
'252946' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRG' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
29042e7859b6d15c7bd35fa133020f54
d46e5de77c57d805f4397b9b7baa8290e9bbc45a
describe
'149453' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRH' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
2b096ecbeba241f228ad7cddc6c85962
36fa5690486cf4d88d593b83b789ef1f6964efe9
describe
'28581' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRI' 'sip-files00061.pro'
d53e02ee53a214956c447597870e942b
35081174e5ba245ff0953e7e31d4276c55c31442
describe
'53695' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRJ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
09bed1cc513cdfbbcccdb2561be115f6
0f9fe7e734db083c2f4c3518a228d8b2f21e51b4
describe
'2039120' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRK' 'sip-files00061.tif'
9399481fcccff2511cd6990afb9515fa
415c9573819e8492608c9203c42737a168b9d8e1
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRL' 'sip-files00061.txt'
a8e0cf1b22dad1012d4da66204bc7eb4
4cb311eea2cc5ffd87fa654807596630f6a665b8
describe
'14172' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRM' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
c9ca7090906f1204f21820d3556a5c1c
dcbbab739d36e245a623ce5a0267128e89518bae
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRN' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
4890841f3f4e2e05814b6e890f9937ad
a17654ec6f3ac8ef37d291587b850d7c2c6ea0e9
describe
'143636' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRO' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
7b3b8889069318175db4aebfbbec0b1b
a1a8f3cba9218be01cf7cc04f701967291bc304c
describe
'28011' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRP' 'sip-files00062.pro'
d086445302939b35bd5ee0088e44e491
f99a7b50b80f179bd30eb7c4646e148b899ab1f7
'2012-01-14T13:08:03-05:00'
describe
'51906' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRQ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
661eb214ada1a93bdf458ea82981d796
1008200ee4ee86d1c67388e3a6b4cb8638d88aea
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRR' 'sip-files00062.tif'
00130444bcfaae77bc7a1361dcc69acd
066bd26e8b2f1821c26315b7cec1df0d24159fed
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRS' 'sip-files00062.txt'
2d662ebd3698b4d993f58b5ac4c32dde
3db611bb3d4b1ffc01d9559101e4b06e067d8005
describe
'14144' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRT' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
f94686247aa68ede7deb3400d767795a
ab82a34734d8175df36f1a564af521ed831fa9ac
'2012-01-14T13:10:05-05:00'
describe
'252974' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRU' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
3c65f57d01687542107b103c9db697a5
2fcffd7dd483395342a14120ff8a543014ed8060
describe
'146919' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRV' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
450f6f743e7feb42ebcd8ae2cb7d733c
62c3487b7b89709ec4151df74240ecb501fd4163
describe
'25661' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRW' 'sip-files00063.pro'
30e672fb54bcf1d70bf51a6c0a95a1ee
72f2841b55b58f494796af345e4686312a964400
describe
'49297' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRX' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
3716619124bf5e8e82e7624ef9f245be
905d29f2ed12c4fff12a3f0f017507bdcfd5a612
describe
'2038484' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRY' 'sip-files00063.tif'
11873354111e8216c4e22ce9dcd0b367
4fbe6d83a8d2c3adb22bc0cfb55cd2bc01fdfd30
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNRZ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
eeeb97f33d47ffc12c0d9e217f7619c0
c0dd67c3d5c8e20fe6e6ef3e5cfcf75d5b354b77
describe
'13239' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSA' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
a3d25c5e08a7c7542fdf265a308df7c3
427cc12bcd3c9ae899214d9280ab6cf76c1128bf
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSB' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
8a4a32353fbcf576e60c6ce74e9f9322
efd0b4fe82a7764dc9dc7ae3f427db64c8222da7
'2012-01-14T13:09:15-05:00'
describe
'136893' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSC' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
9012c232f17a32fa25715f3734daa824
ea674c638e2ea5baa0afd2ab4053e8252061d213
describe
'27710' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSD' 'sip-files00064.pro'
c561f3687bc3206df993cbdae984614c
07f38bf22c03c136d21cfbdcc317ea3fdf886fc8
'2012-01-14T13:07:56-05:00'
describe
'49992' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSE' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
3d2b3580fdd8137043598da32ef4b283
898ec1d7996e3bed86ff04ca018f0f2069fdef25
describe
'2038612' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSF' 'sip-files00064.tif'
a821e464a46e42f7675e349fc13320fc
94eccaf2fac149630896f9d7a137c9e961b87c71
'2012-01-14T13:10:00-05:00'
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSG' 'sip-files00064.txt'
b0e1f5484e4c616292e3c7954b10d406
a20abbf0103b35a095bd21c97c5f2eb3678cf71d
'2012-01-14T13:06:30-05:00'
describe
'13793' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSH' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
3bb9f7e25ffbfeba061eb0b024ef56e7
203e9d796c2418eaf62e4787421d48ba6b6a75e1
describe
'252933' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSI' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
ff885347206dd5546ce1bcede538fe9e
ef7df1e56ce2285bebbcf191ddd53fb4264be576
describe
'146799' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSJ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
4376d869bc107e6240d27991b403aae5
f6fdf40479e9218c192691effd9f1ee6c814a0b7
describe
'26426' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSK' 'sip-files00065.pro'
ccad43efc01887044446a9b5092e205c
9784274cbf4d51cd190dc1b0b4fa3eda1beba5dc
'2012-01-14T13:07:36-05:00'
describe
'51625' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSL' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
9c056fa736581525e4a4d79b287c334e
ecddfdfe65cad6c76548a3b67e21312f75b743ab
describe
'2038556' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSM' 'sip-files00065.tif'
7c32fab4783c7fcb9cc1401350c7a8b8
967473d535b2bb29da613e3f13b6bb6df3f08763
'2012-01-14T13:06:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSN' 'sip-files00065.txt'
accbfb25795036e19717f854724714d1
383b3b5587505b61566222e0052f85ee2babbe88
describe
'13316' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSO' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
14f80cdafe5717fd7231a64afcec919a
7f05e00fc03caab29acbdc36e4b48b511f6dad1b
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSP' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
617d77bd978cb3db5e932f0ed1937e4b
2d270aea19196aadfb786a4be81eedc1adcc72e0
describe
'81369' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSQ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
619b3e968f48beea926de36c4a845af1
22eb45f2be72595aae1f0d4f0d0be2edd9dd22e5
describe
'14350' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSR' 'sip-files00066.pro'
730c81ea84e04ca9dc7426b334e02ca3
db2df564a0df87f34668d30b0fdfae3deb6543fa
describe
'28539' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSS' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
60573d246a302957a4d7e3ebc8cec02e
7799fe17c8c8d421f4c901bce6cbdd9cbd388152
describe
'2035388' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNST' 'sip-files00066.tif'
ca1f1bcfbaa4cc87173ea2e5659ab8b1
0ec637b603d491286114ddc6eb5b13a07b3e7434
describe
'579' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSU' 'sip-files00066.txt'
8af808597e045c35560546483f3e1b5c
e2d23bac1126e003b3da20f9ea7e45327c6313ff
'2012-01-14T13:09:01-05:00'
describe
'7977' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSV' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
2d6505a937a3f6bb1273fa781976d926
0d0988ffc10604a6dce6a59753cd8e825d01158b
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSW' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
de686cd2a9fa654ce60dace274bde5f9
1c321b11d19c4d7ebcfb7ed9179135022e580808
describe
'111181' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSX' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
26d3560163cef5b920c23c1c9c62cae0
28a313f186128907b10c7714ea1793bd4d91d3ea
describe
'18741' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSY' 'sip-files00067.pro'
59715ee962d6e53ef97b81830aec92dd
1502d16f8091f91f38bf3d086990415e04aa0f4b
describe
'38287' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNSZ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
1ff6b5fdb2f3c5318d3d3036f956418a
eac1ed76f640b63f48ea05e0dead4d4d8cfa5be4
describe
'2036812' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTA' 'sip-files00067.tif'
db9d3dfda1d7326dae4ee7a7d0a5f774
6ff3843cd3bf10e2cf8aa289891137fd85513f4f
describe
'774' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTB' 'sip-files00067.txt'
959b95a6c6377f6ab832772585b8c4c0
829d473612ae4738a08455ae9f9827a9bdb17d83
describe
'10398' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTC' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
5efdd54a084eb6ab4ed2edd5a49b9266
a77281f018d31f62e9f5b8f377b26fb14a2c708d
describe
'252939' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTD' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
583054712a5b16cbeba74a65aa188fdb
07464e86d6333047ea722d57a3c75c7478f978ce
describe
'142837' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTE' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
0baf47c354cec84b3f673ae32dbee01e
e673eae8ef4ba1b6023400aeb02716add8f73542
describe
'28200' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTF' 'sip-files00068.pro'
5d76718d818b9c80625178ef054e81db
1bc22b6024c009566468ae21513f77e3bd974ae3
describe
'50711' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTG' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
7b92f79347d99af99ed177d7cd812088
b9a6e6fbe0682f4ddeb2ef1b7f85dc8db9e7d39f
describe
'2038652' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTH' 'sip-files00068.tif'
a7b8dfe25eb4a1db1ebdc7c99531f793
bd367ae98bf90bb58e132f85ef350c8e2128a901
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTI' 'sip-files00068.txt'
f56a0c8bf2e565634caeb06d9e3853be
fd23ecd66e35f1a095a0db044365a7fc8816c5bf
describe
'13821' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTJ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
d0753272d4a4118e948abd03267e5064
2bcbb545be12f9becbc5cdd756a8a5ae57832d6e
describe
'252924' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTK' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
e57538ff77e87d84c0463ba54be4fcab
63ded86dcdec38b09eb3d41b5425542d15a1110d
describe
'149135' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTL' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
04dce200c46ffdfff9199f003ab4f19f
1a84b441225b0b2c1424fce618fc6db10d692dc3
describe
'27097' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTM' 'sip-files00069.pro'
026fdc328a25e95c0ab5aee3ecd8d896
e0d089d3ce475b41bbf68ba8d0ce8c14e6cb6a93
describe
'52580' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTN' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
9d25395b195a8b35b1c472d3b2642b27
ca789ff6bf98487e2fecc44a8bc9a7f81e68976d
describe
'2038696' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTO' 'sip-files00069.tif'
b8eae5a06b7d6469113b70ca6697b814
93cd0f7142b5084df8169c6670597708720e62cf
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTP' 'sip-files00069.txt'
8994edc15b0ccdef404656b64f196826
f45b93969d7a547e8fb19a892817317157a5568d
describe
'13851' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTQ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
2431a1de90e4491e988d0545e574c69b
1b7f53716c1fcb9850639290831ec30c144b8611
describe
'252934' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTR' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
eb1d4ccce99403cfa0197a119b4920e6
c08d79381a8e03782ddc60669c6b58c6c2807586
describe
'140226' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTS' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
8976318c5ff1a4ca1a82bc89c4503000
3d2fe81ee80befd61466eb0b9c9bd7e86d828b9f
'2012-01-14T13:08:48-05:00'
describe
'27681' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTT' 'sip-files00070.pro'
84f5169aebbb0bfb3d483e1d9e7c1c54
7432d1a613a08b8506419da73881157bd5f9976f
describe
'51174' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTU' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
4803f7102c2be16a11ceee5b0d3a0824
d63a060f403b265394f515fae6fc03d9688f3846
describe
'2038744' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTV' 'sip-files00070.tif'
015b38e58292e6b2367969e8ed7f1e1a
a49ce6ab94c48cd4b3cb05a92738e3843fb2219d
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTW' 'sip-files00070.txt'
e1cc28ba3d155c3bf7524b8e09751f59
8e06ce375917de307319b72548185654bda99b76
describe
'13840' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTX' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
5fc795984019a9c9801dd906e92561e3
07b0421c4909e9add3fc88f03c455e5dae9c92d1
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTY' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
f4b976363c3b8d2cc44b51d020ae5b8b
ed222e3fbf13d03ee6587830a86e868f593471ca
describe
'149057' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNTZ' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
e4a609431ce3b431bec0a9ada7e1a4e2
f81290dc1842350d414888c2339552a3cc9684a4
'2012-01-14T13:09:30-05:00'
describe
'27744' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUA' 'sip-files00071.pro'
5584a56d71451fd22f3aa932b7412768
45aebd1b9c42dac0b5df3adf7c3bcc206cc21da3
describe
'52990' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUB' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
e67ce1bdb4d0eff733544e6747db1767
0568412ed36f094083827901e9a065dbdb9f6bc6
'2012-01-14T13:09:14-05:00'
describe
'2039068' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUC' 'sip-files00071.tif'
d39cb29d67c46d4b1e8cd288ed6de6d9
c26268e4e215959f502f443284fb10271148a96e
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUD' 'sip-files00071.txt'
f445dcad31417d9affcdfe6b72fb2df2
91950bf0051a4aefd02de18afe8cfce181a800a7
describe
'14352' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUE' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
2d86eed425dc9a828c6c074325188f5d
1249a105f31bfb1760a7c2295b7402370e122fc0
'2012-01-14T13:07:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUF' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
99f5f27d7a15d6e007d588c515d6caf6
82a4fad6d76848aec717866c6bacb87af801abbd
describe
'143712' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUG' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
fa614d0de23a8429a84741340c450de2
e202b7dc8832d37fc95781c4d49ebfbe4d660c54
describe
'27652' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUH' 'sip-files00072.pro'
cd1c28cd2d2e3e58877e6c0ab6403e14
200a5f1d956d0a348f83f0c5590b2f8820d7dfb8
describe
'52248' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUI' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
2317227be4f5a076d61ccf543a8fadfe
6f5e5af8158c1b23fb3beb291044f1ab9ffad4a1
'2012-01-14T13:09:42-05:00'
describe
'2038844' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUJ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
0831bfb9312b72a972aaca887b7ea837
6ca7f2f92e28b8a2a63f8acc616895771fe68726
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUK' 'sip-files00072.txt'
01b7b41bf533998cb50db017c8b755fe
a50bc430fe111d696b198d4f7a2da6060084e398
describe
'13852' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUL' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
06f421f6fd86ef7356b967d242830189
b6d43d00dd96eec002d3954e1c7d0ef2a327b409
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUM' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
7d2988b14d89c41b95544cb9854e66ca
96bc43747a3ec6485981b1cc2cce48a7456a2dc4
'2012-01-14T13:08:11-05:00'
describe
'150283' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUN' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
737644a444975e3f6f5e3322a2b3db20
7ae52939b3b42b484717be1707107c0f200ce18c
describe
'28057' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUO' 'sip-files00073.pro'
eda486d876d58c662b8facae0144bee6
e7926957f0cb319ff39df45a1c1f9bae2c2d792d
describe
'52950' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUP' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
d97272b907a773bc1b2efea7b26e66ac
054afa8c33f85ed068a1ac1e96a6863b674e1cc6
describe
'2039080' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUQ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
cdbddd154e7f3f46ab3476d7688f343c
a927795806643705da6af46aa7f55553dea17f9b
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUR' 'sip-files00073.txt'
d359948d2a8742779fee0b3663e181a8
b415dcf48dfa1d682f5fc110d0cf46c1c87733ff
describe
'14391' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUS' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
a7995d39d594189c54b2893b10ae40e7
69063cb9377dd9ec32297612798f4bcc595d5841
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUT' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
8981955e8ffdbf57a4445865db7bcb7c
b92177623beb804604fc14114c80f6b0a10c445d
describe
'145359' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUU' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
f65444703f6ddd795c8b727da20b1069
6b4ba05c10ca64560534d5407572265cfd35c8b4
describe
'28513' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUV' 'sip-files00074.pro'
3df69ef5567c341fbda0eda6e9e6fa51
4a4e0641c36ac9198c4cccb53ac132fde61a7bff
describe
'52303' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUW' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
91920fb1ae9faabb5d1c09e60406ba53
0cb4206b95481106f960305513c69efd4c1675d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUX' 'sip-files00074.tif'
3ce40178ce65e8437d028cfa341e0343
d469dae03ca2336f57729d7d607c2c66ff851fa3
'2012-01-14T13:07:38-05:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUY' 'sip-files00074.txt'
02341d84420aa1c33a149c7d23a647d7
bbdb0387ee238c4b8f8b0217a5d66eb77e7c0b23
describe
'13866' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNUZ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
792f96dc8e76a7f9b69ff6d792c6afb1
d5aa4e182168658f881f1d9e5a2c41955f1e74a8
describe
'252967' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVA' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
a666d2f7c3eabbf54aad39d6c64751d4
1533182af5981e84a3d4407cc695280b1b7b0cd9
describe
'147034' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVB' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
110e13a693bbf941451af30dbb9458fc
6a57c1e519e1b7bd323d0c38642c9987a2f82516
describe
'26902' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVC' 'sip-files00075.pro'
c8a1ee74f9a81792947fcfa41d41cf93
2c42ced1b9a3caa4314e9ebf8d9e7ccbb4af9b76
describe
'51575' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVD' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
8fbeeedf7658d3fbcf6beac70f3a6030
5c79d4f956417bfe217bbfa7637bf9c141b888de
describe
'2038764' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVE' 'sip-files00075.tif'
94c55892690103ff318da5c7ad69453b
08c55986d84dfe17f214523654ff77789b297e0b
'2012-01-14T13:08:43-05:00'
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVF' 'sip-files00075.txt'
fc97699b0c33f20c07af177d82b35e28
233504392c8bb6a805183edf849acebf6e6e9646
describe
'13834' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVG' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
05a01f5aa16f70676ad73f9cd83a9569
9f83e3345bfd887e5704c051ddd97aca8dd81f09
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVH' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
1d4b949c9a46e1e6422aeede67ea6916
1e6058697e41b64a5426487aa891719877c45659
describe
'135653' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVI' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
82732f05024388ee8c1b4717c472aae6
776f1c88a386dc3c3a6ccbaa8e109ea7dc6bac9f
describe
'27973' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVJ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
792b33c849b8526cd7d9f0aabcf26d91
da99d9496b945f41d8e4fc2dddc036425ca1f3fb
describe
'49587' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVK' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
f820d00f9ad92a5e919e0219a526d65a
afe7795ff2e4dae660a12722f8619117a226113d
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVL' 'sip-files00076.tif'
d5ceea3ecc64489ceea8b14526fb7e2c
eb8e12fb5ab80bbd1b40a35929dcab35021d174e
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVM' 'sip-files00076.txt'
859ab39f95d348c0165ff0900fc7cbc3
70ef747d4bae7e1cd8270ade88480808df371f8e
describe
'13598' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVN' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
8601a87c5b9c7a2d2cd58e1433ce3801
fa3cb59e141c6bdd927cc50a18f7a0dda1fd0bfd
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVO' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
7516b022168f0a8cc3353b022b5d4e21
ab232b627a714d6b11047f231a5de4b86ed740ff
describe
'135379' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVP' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
f8d604a1544f6daa8bea661e91096de5
62bfb5dc645d2bb9f0ff0700259b29b36cf0a485
describe
'26051' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVQ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
c2b0ef96bbd0601792e81a14f2f47ba1
e7e3afa2a6829c00a8c8f0bb08fd8a81bee90c43
describe
'48803' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVR' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
10f06771a850908731a3b86dec667fd5
0082c7582b91b350acd52b601964b5a42023a65e
'2012-01-14T13:09:06-05:00'
describe
'2038364' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVS' 'sip-files00077.tif'
2ef2a93b30d0bdd986d0969d3233eb75
d66f06f6104963e07b67e48f7e72080e660f1e63
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVT' 'sip-files00077.txt'
99c060f42cb27f3fc89308911e23b4dc
acac6ffe7cb398c25cf9c10842d8288df566980e
describe
'13084' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVU' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
d6923e785bfcb6a9a73aff302fe6d5a3
563705d17097fbda3abd83d19396e695b8fc1fed
describe
'252929' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVV' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
1d8d26485874b411503215ff7cdfbc1c
7ca8538d334799f6342ffca6f8c8092f3b446c93
describe
'98405' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVW' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
c41181c894781d40952f0eeef33127b9
f56eac1340a97482c6f623a3b32a3897aeadb82f
describe
'17923' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVX' 'sip-files00078.pro'
abd6c351a56b9fdfe684c6217ded1546
46b1ce6e1a2cf3c4a4a623345f0eaafafa7fea0e
describe
'35793' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVY' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
67076418fdba6aa5814ed55708fcd8f7
7b71c9b7c450a18e709c5e754b40551aa378ac98
describe
'2036692' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNVZ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
ecf987190eddf1b4de6e4d8b884f632f
67c596f740a8d72abc937ce63195f12d35c33e6b
describe
'738' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWA' 'sip-files00078.txt'
4947a098ad3662bc5afd97309bd26242
26f2401d8f6a079cdae422eef4dfe7fbb6acb59e
describe
'10360' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWB' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
75d8a9457df7c28c7d1208077ba022b3
2364ea29026419b3fd6d6212959e88be585f1842
describe
'252932' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWC' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
6d5249ae7618f5caed8d9b87457dce41
864c9db11aa477702ada8a815bec82f37d8d8eb1
'2012-01-14T13:06:33-05:00'
describe
'137913' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWD' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
ff846fda72836874ba0b5e935bb6e567
b17dd491b2f50a76c68be25ef86d04a9f5b8c39e
describe
'25088' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWE' 'sip-files00079.pro'
243d5d5fdf4dc469b225efa12fcea112
65372f624d8771abe301018d230ceaf977c7835a
describe
'48861' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWF' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
9a31acf82853a1ea9d4ed1fe047ab741
72ffb0dd7a1927c0c99c47290a9c6cf02389c673
describe
'2038756' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWG' 'sip-files00079.tif'
c5e55191ad1469f8a289722990da86a0
52a6bf4b6a4d26d7836b2ebf05838e1791700fc4
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWH' 'sip-files00079.txt'
7b605d96ddda97f6a511076dbe568c81
8b175855b9e3f87cce43116d7179a5b677f44a30
describe
'13572' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWI' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
231297be04d9586f5c69d2995c95d5de
fb703bfacbfec880d49c428ac6191cd78957e543
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWJ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
f33dc54e5267a6d3353dfe9679791968
ab8cbdb502e38dd8af4da6b9bfae25e6de048413
'2012-01-14T13:10:21-05:00'
describe
'124553' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWK' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
2a560c3e5a91d40a5297840856a45125
a9c756dbb4ba865233dbe47b23b83c77b2c51ecc
describe
'26140' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWL' 'sip-files00080.pro'
0ec01edc6effabfc2e4b621fec98539b
abc4f80fe90edba529f3130a2753ba1495979f57
describe
'45928' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWM' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
450ff3e572b6e9939fecc5537c8a4b7a
09238dcde7d0f269ac3c6fe0a348f0a25acfceec
describe
'2038624' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWN' 'sip-files00080.tif'
5726375f4005ca8d2810ffff3ffee4ea
a0d5013939928ed12cededd78f62aa9429131e88
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWO' 'sip-files00080.txt'
e680690a2a6a54558642d8a3270a8e3e
3dc9d5f48a4627123d349ed192be1490c61fbea0
describe
'12821' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWP' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
3f8ac30820b5836441f9369f9a2fd152
eed7edda121cb07967ef3e822fb4301945561c5c
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWQ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
c26f03b5e5de118654f87e0813ec45df
8dfa78b4367dcbd5f3aa547f2bcfd9cefcb16c38
describe
'127860' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWR' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
92b08e98e40fb61b950dbc78cb845552
2b8131d38a2a0be9447e2c6a7e2406b3d9d95c13
'2012-01-14T13:09:56-05:00'
describe
'26536' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWS' 'sip-files00081.pro'
d67a96768b12abfae0cbf3745eb0e149
65862f729480d678e49ecd9ee925dcadafe9a21a
describe
'47104' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWT' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
7aa3362ccf06a7c2b570ae950b89523e
f24b76f09a5b80ea5dd1704250841764f270811d
describe
'2038856' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWU' 'sip-files00081.tif'
dd315e62c5578f9638f01abe4ddfacf0
f915fd1c2255cf1c44192592eb85a21cc71e8179
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWV' 'sip-files00081.txt'
3f2d01691337d04a079167a8d49671c2
1faab5203a2f1ddca966855dab7e74b128111616
describe
'13290' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWW' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
b3bd8ca9b8245fcaefe3af4b6aac90b8
d3677438312884c8c888efe50ab405e1de1b7502
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWX' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
99a4f6f8e57de6841b1aea03f9a49042
8964176028b90b283551ef25aeb1f5bd93361c26
describe
'132619' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWY' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
f9c24c768ee162d02ba66b6a4bdab662
b873f5fdf7b2b8c2dd6b8c9153edc960be517047
describe
'27162' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNWZ' 'sip-files00082.pro'
a4feb2ba4415546d1f5c2d56dd067d43
0e4440c03b8becdbc121560ecccae83141130104
describe
'49995' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXA' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
fe0555c6b6a897528b10f20efd285f08
6a5b8a81c75dee64a6aa4a20afd468caf410b7e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXB' 'sip-files00082.tif'
682d3166eebe0649d6f04ae8bf8aac62
a8e6016d6896f0ab8ceaef490644cf09d3b2b246
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXC' 'sip-files00082.txt'
25458b10850c4ea739841daae7b76773
9f65a97d4d451a219a57f197b63431c4584964a8
describe
'13431' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXD' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
7563442e0ae302a8cba6d3b18be708f3
5fd062f6dd9735880dbff7a9c9024c7c2f15965f
describe
'252920' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXE' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
999225db642cdd49259bfff92c7c9825
9704fc83ca5834ed4af3aaaface41a4651899948
describe
'121732' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXF' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
b963e0ab8c40e52cfb8d20770301196d
4204615846e5a79eace921e1a7b4d3aa51bae7ea
describe
'24003' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXG' 'sip-files00083.pro'
80302832fe8b6a56d857515aaee571a2
56e0e68b91183a42e13221d5310bece6c41a4ac5
'2012-01-14T13:06:21-05:00'
describe
'44047' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXH' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
507ec515a71d3f9dd56662b40fdcff21
21821eaeefa431fd43bffcb8b8973a91360bbbe7
'2012-01-14T13:09:32-05:00'
describe
'2038100' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXI' 'sip-files00083.tif'
f23dddadc80f8f0c881e9b6a6fb1d24a
2bd667db3ccbe129f0c28929044217d9bc6febad
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXJ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
d0b4693e09fdad66a5abcc63966c815e
8dbdcb6f2e2a675bc2d7d5f6fadfb11396d87b0f
describe
'12632' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXK' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
018bfbaf4c668d805ea8c24486c23d36
8d9b1f6bcc785e17f4da99e012ada8e99e7db6eb
describe
'252894' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXL' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
027787bef62b6079f93a538690e92723
7b4e0bf22c4b782cd7863146bf516997248eb7a2
describe
'119246' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXM' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
5918e716dae5e182154f4705d5c6b066
543eafc5400337c704d53bb5341dcf29436a1553
describe
'24661' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXN' 'sip-files00084.pro'
2f948a87d7ca41e81604989c3eba5850
23d012e48ca2691717ad2ffd91ca973fc0f987f6
describe
'44071' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXO' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
563dfbb4b00bc3be62cfa7915a48165a
e774242762f8f3ca30ab9ba040b8b004a50c1cb4
describe
'2038400' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXP' 'sip-files00084.tif'
b8b8a87faa765d02295ef72d0883d66e
fc8cb3ec9ee6f247d91816594cd4045c4d22f751
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXQ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
95dcf1401e01267cac71046c491bae03
8a86023ee44e25feac6639c4007941ff27f2bb9a
describe
'12249' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXR' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
4d05e6d5190090c20428ffed5485d297
ea9ff8917bdc06f186703b39a3b98cbd42a98f1b
'2012-01-14T13:09:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXS' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
c9c0b5574e069176a0f8d0fe6494a3c6
0da2544b0fad076753a9bd14ea7e7afd1c7970a2
'2012-01-14T13:07:54-05:00'
describe
'134092' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXT' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
7dff7676cc01ae5c81019ca88ad3d826
e2cfb3662500efa1f5ae906f29c57b83d6766959
describe
'27533' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXU' 'sip-files00085.pro'
87184e9df4ec7daccd465de52c57b4dd
fcbcf585b5b6933af2b1dce08476473c5728cc38
describe
'50529' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXV' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
2397c3eaa3a25f271f676bb76f08f3f3
bcda0faf0c507ca586f94d33d96aece74d6f18f0
describe
'2038912' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXW' 'sip-files00085.tif'
6425a2b3c3c7b13f6eab93bff23a50c2
09cf95d5ca47ffbccc3d839f4df1079c8461865b
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXX' 'sip-files00085.txt'
749c923231e694d2eb20980000e50830
603af21550c2435586814ed9b313365cb1e57990
describe
'13711' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXY' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
1daeed87bc00367ebe495e5a1759f3b4
a44e72222a863605e5839ace5f9cf0b11111d8eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNXZ' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
e979fa6f0d0572ac76dbf8c5e868a8f3
af683aae117b27ce6ea684d5f7c7c12d49d311ee
describe
'139798' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYA' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
007249d10d481926644be161c1e6a430
30ba8e57bcbb531cfbd32784a9ff0d7350c46ef1
describe
'28516' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYB' 'sip-files00086.pro'
981f3e60098d3e4f8135fe230283a729
330e66d181c6348a98a5f25c926b5deaed544f42
'2012-01-14T13:09:50-05:00'
describe
'52537' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYC' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
b74a108263a1597999a7b561974bbc43
a1340dac43b533db1d3f83d20bfd14a72b21329b
describe
'2038792' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYD' 'sip-files00086.tif'
2048fc9d9794abf7ed2fa41c71164f22
1d975b13e113b8f3d2e65e72640d6508fe5e6c59
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYE' 'sip-files00086.txt'
c8a386a9e0508bb1cbd49da32b5e7ae8
257db3be4d66aad000072142fe2dc76d7941e607
describe
'13809' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYF' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
ec072af49bbb5a7010a1f6decbf652f5
6c1cf6d9584a40845d737ad308d617ebc84da3f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYG' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
2a44bd0f092ee19b426dd7dc19445add
8eb5c25bcb0021b7e34a64421a520be11cfa684b
describe
'138193' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYH' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
922bca7df89544390d0860524ac82e54
4891fa9942b20514d75901110104956a549e2b36
describe
'27381' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYI' 'sip-files00087.pro'
1324cd0531da68e2b62e3bbcb37a323d
041fc487827227b045ded3abffcea0abbfbe3bf3
describe
'51161' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYJ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
389d19e920e0f3951770ad950221bf9f
2b5b64bb7312cde4f10e1d7d6254426537dee980
describe
'2038932' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYK' 'sip-files00087.tif'
49081a938101d044668304dac8132324
13c84a61f9fd65405942ebac87fda16469d09be8
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYL' 'sip-files00087.txt'
8ae448f578245b62dfeda290b248b113
03e7e07bebea770ecd0a68e23b6409c35fa34377
describe
'13668' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYM' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
6e6a23a2a6690d6f1b229801b1f6b06d
e8a67ba27bf94703e4f6d029ee4dbe1a16e92f33
describe
'252906' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYN' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
fbebefe51f8318b6418235a256bf92fa
9eedc1a95daa1c41fcfce4b8b93e2bdf7b5bb1da
describe
'125225' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYO' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
3fc04c0359a2a4d705571b80dc1049f1
4c7be3412b1d9d410dff501ec43ad24d3b285385
describe
'25833' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYP' 'sip-files00088.pro'
4cf63ce3672036961a32b86b766a47cc
22e0d7955cc64b834c0bb46d6dec0ba99696a7f6
describe
'47451' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYQ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
d8a730a97e9b9508eb64f5b070a54b62
c7c71a9130cc9c3dc8e926910cbf4a93feb45b16
describe
'2038448' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYR' 'sip-files00088.tif'
0b59722bd95f043805fda2cc97386448
dff7d55e4386261fd1cdb30b1b1ccef2d6b5138e
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYS' 'sip-files00088.txt'
524198c01629450ae9ea6a91187e9710
b69d88fad914182bd0e3d3f1543303b412a4da40
describe
'13092' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYT' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
6c337e88b4f127140e9cf277a363d8b1
7fed779770f265b1c10954d02e3491d256e855e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYU' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
ee8a557692e38d71f08fa58650f7a7ca
8558dd29bd1620982265309ca4c73039a210b216
describe
'117967' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYV' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
c95d587cd4623fbeebd238462c50b4cf
fc595f799f6bf89c946219958772ee71c5ecca0b
describe
'23577' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYW' 'sip-files00089.pro'
0aec602d299972880111eacceff0d8c7
5b24169fc23bcef0dc2381e5266d161e219e0fa5
describe
'43745' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYX' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
8c7a9ea2c7be39cbd1438929611bfab6
a30fe04bcb2ce988b0d034e1fede0370e7a12a67
describe
'2038312' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYY' 'sip-files00089.tif'
f1c1d348245dcc77f78a75efb3d1aff9
b84db67a5035500661237661679d01ef8436268e
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNYZ' 'sip-files00089.txt'
f5094b9315482776964481da0b5c7cba
74bbda78f2f3a0d950a6e9a41e02f7837ff0a7fc
describe
'12100' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZA' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
050f243a1d6f093a987ddcd3662d7279
60c224d4b63bfb1dc8947a87dd37fddec8992bdc
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZB' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
5946c3a686c7d664c8222eefbe85d7f4
864f53752d0d65daa5187783d5981a869375b596
describe
'150144' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZC' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
a410f02257ba85b9d63ee4a700ed2cf7
97416441af2e1916410f32475df759c84885f841
describe
'27362' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZD' 'sip-files00090.pro'
4b626d5897474ab54e79c4e7afd49497
9ec280d4ed28a1396c0b7c92f5848d40266abae1
describe
'53241' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZE' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
bc474fca7c88e41adabfb8b922a84c05
195f4b1d7c05b8aacc25e9f4276369be689b9759
describe
'2038892' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZF' 'sip-files00090.tif'
19debbac55783169547de3b26a8f121c
0b7de86cd3114c249603f06eff64e5748e4a9cf5
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZG' 'sip-files00090.txt'
52f1a803bbbeebe8c36e75a65bfd7d47
2b14ca76e845cddf52864051a36d2d3414fe7eb9
describe
'14328' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZH' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
5727e2d5f164a1387910059fb41d6df0
3e9eee49507503715e225f6dc154c1bbc2b32d88
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZI' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
20e401d84124a271427dcce7d3e136e5
80c3521afbbbf8a620d464ff9f2adda5e1852706
describe
'159117' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZJ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
8e5298e6eb046a41de386f5a056ef2cd
4995c12fef42f134d3bb91595a90d8418f0b54d2
describe
'26176' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZK' 'sip-files00091.pro'
f02b56664b8ffe77ad6b271336073bb2
465784c7a11387187666c8037685b2c7a7f62bd1
describe
'52834' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZL' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
7589f8e832b0532f6005053d5e406419
40e028af41c0fd1a31f7a2b6536747fff0c2a473
describe
'2038664' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZM' 'sip-files00091.tif'
7f581b330413d2d8051d1c5f5714a01d
327c9764b312f68e224ea161a1f773c487777c12
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZN' 'sip-files00091.txt'
6e3834f352c158b5acc951667c62a0b9
53f1daad181345c02a17b230a5f6ae756a73255b
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZO' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
46452846316290144925a855ad7122e2
e6123ae43d4c91432f4e2075d7a06fc6f0184334
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZP' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
d58984a52349a28e774051f25123831a
58088a40bb9dc161c97c3b64bfce7c4e3f4f6c1e
describe
'128267' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZQ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
518a50cc61a23e2dbd8b001dc24e89d2
6e0637ef026e14bcce40fc20b3c1149ea545cdc7
describe
'26217' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZR' 'sip-files00092.pro'
bd895ad96f472a1e362d8ccc4014aa75
72cc6837867fe8348da19594863829227ff89d2b
describe
'48058' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZS' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
f5d5bc19fcb9fa6fccc79167d9529f63
1e023be984cc4e6e012e6e5433dfd155b5fd8a6c
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZT' 'sip-files00092.tif'
411c4c578be10d026b9d4d6b3730523f
75d75abcce85b915245b7e419cc89e5b15d5bdca
'2012-01-14T13:06:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZU' 'sip-files00092.txt'
7b3a347f03fb524276125075122febbc
2c8f4ac88e8d2ef52eb4a1554cbf50d505ef3b9e
describe
'13252' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZV' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
4bd90cc30e001f694f4a47327719e7e9
4b3202288e8e6658b08465277c9156726cca341a
describe
'252935' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZW' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
c4209368bc89e3baa8cc943297dd3330
d0243cffd7f25a08fd712b55a9ba37a0bd18c7df
describe
'60898' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZX' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
8418efdd51f9c29ec6c12eaa92d18af1
a427f51400e84ac7c5da10a288246ec1125d6d4b
'2012-01-14T13:10:25-05:00'
describe
'7742' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZY' 'sip-files00093.pro'
b438219d022fd5e17c1e9dd4e5f9556b
381ede5ff4f61b1f744f9c54e79b9de253438a9d
describe
'20265' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACNZZ' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
a28ae583d91d8eb2197c32d3b456ec0a
71467d91feb2401bba0168733dea26530d9a012e
describe
'2033948' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAA' 'sip-files00093.tif'
854637677e104f5a8fa3ba729bfe7259
ff8b406c0253b6ac535042d125f93ca2ca679187
describe
'327' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAB' 'sip-files00093.txt'
d7c1821187b587e79be36af7ce81ef7c
78f7584a2cd25403b76e18a7f0f6e5f64f518cd4
describe
'5473' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAC' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
7f60587e9cdf2e8a33b4909cda4d6aa1
3ad60c04c943e52d6e6bf4b249751bab6e78a42a
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAD' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
f12e6e8c106aa82b255b0e6614442e6f
acbd42b3d58875503c612f9ffcbeb1ec8c8f78c6
describe
'105165' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAE' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
57bc427018bf7f7ec9353689d58d74ac
46cb468f50a0b268e320a19bea8d6c3a7bb2e74b
describe
'16484' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAF' 'sip-files00094.pro'
641388ffd03fddd940a05e3698804e4a
2a9d378f1ea5ae846e4e3a747fa54391b05c438f
describe
'37631' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAG' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
dc4e7dc04c8cf42b5510da18a621bb66
a110740c5044c4f6b81357cb7d6aefc93f285108
describe
'2037124' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAH' 'sip-files00094.tif'
806521ec6fc2479c3556096300559a04
94fe0c63b01264cdece76fbf8384c283270453a2
describe
'677' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAI' 'sip-files00094.txt'
8fd340d9d4859abd76dd413e6c5b2697
ab0de65cd24c517a4a7d1fdff7215c823e116f22
describe
'10485' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAJ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
142711e6b0e832914f7b78f0adfe8499
ce2fd401bcf0272d561ef57fe583d4a2db7a2421
describe
'252959' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAK' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
7d9bda4b1a2c4e5bd1b88ca5d7a9d14a
8faf3b545690512d0b9bf063da2dc8a8da3d7dbe
describe
'162421' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAL' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
580f473b1d9a59d70c0e295a6f937504
f509c0114be72c6e940bd611064b5953a834d402
describe
'27962' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAM' 'sip-files00095.pro'
2210eb3af07fb8a779862411fc48609b
542ae73805d5e3b8674a126c15990e548e91991b
describe
'56347' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAN' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
67d47d6ef8b14a1e89abbbcb54f70eb1
8fa0601c13050629b4340989304a4e46d8ee9a32
describe
'2039264' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAO' 'sip-files00095.tif'
c71da3f1385ca2185eeb468cdee46b15
c4b34325c20373bd6a672c959875f5337096647e
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAP' 'sip-files00095.txt'
db9ea4da9d8ced2ea4413b3d19119272
861204ebead52f48c7ca85b69149cd6d4ae80ff2
describe
'14473' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAQ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
48e8397e0dda9f20c7e83de8f35aa11f
103af8649b6f2dbe28940903c91ef8ddbc89894a
describe
'252915' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAR' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
5b29218eca4d29b6e59c5f572834087f
79b839575fad5bb55cfc298c331bde3d595e1fd7
describe
'131829' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAS' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
5b2ddcf281171953c05c7dc66db0decf
278004a7791b5ba3257d975077ffc6133ef7aa36
'2012-01-14T13:06:38-05:00'
describe
'27342' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAT' 'sip-files00096.pro'
5a7948d0751f70a44c6b69dcdae05de9
94c051d32ecaf55b52824c9dd1a52baae8327790
describe
'49735' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAU' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
44b20b55bcd0163f5653000e3d2786ea
5044ab89e05ae798f651328d5f1fffab7a23b2f5
describe
'2038752' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAV' 'sip-files00096.tif'
0fac677a2a0af1360a6f8037d813073d
413d8dc9b677963f4073ee86697f571bd5b2537c
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAW' 'sip-files00096.txt'
f57031887ee7892d6c358e7a35a5d3cc
44b45b1cf70e2f50796a91b9a623de98f7bf5d85
describe
'13725' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAX' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
2274fca0b51331cb598dc959d74e5b19
6d95d20e5e8ff33cde1659a8aa59de7471e24575
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAY' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
18bac8f184d3c995387f1606dfa7d072
d1fcadb8a97e82eb520c60a08cd8174bf138b1c5
describe
'132220' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOAZ' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
e99b1436237e86e725ec1eae0053849a
df68cb7679580235a5061ba07722b13064a93e30
describe
'27229' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBA' 'sip-files00097.pro'
52daf7abd35074d4b7d5e1cb9331a799
4604a5442283024d34667e9fd07b0222513e1108
describe
'48863' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBB' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
8798b5e2c32ffa8c0cc292725459db3a
8a33338bdcdb1154726c7348b93c8c37b686451b
describe
'2038760' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBC' 'sip-files00097.tif'
a9f830c035d6e9b02af2e460f044465c
ae1967039dd7a61a662cba40d2a7f73d2bd2f636
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBD' 'sip-files00097.txt'
7e6c1aa935dce9e9aa531d6a3d2c7dec
8ff266f4d938b7e774fa98171ab66f901d3e82cf
describe
'13443' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBE' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
42178b3d1e84ba051fb846e9a8b86d00
250cd75d3e3a6cd0e785e599eeac7cf62281bf50
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBF' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
c45ccc46d7021ed7fe920241a0d2e9ac
69483947049205a3a384adc93e341eb7f19b053e
'2012-01-14T13:07:22-05:00'
describe
'130086' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBG' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
504a1c71317e7a96b6676d613e99b10b
8a73b4103b9effaa112fbe3eb7247d2cc389f04a
'2012-01-14T13:08:16-05:00'
describe
'26622' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBH' 'sip-files00098.pro'
93024019085e81a7460ae24acf57ed3a
6a9f6018d854e97998977a5c52a56202c524431e
describe
'48841' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBI' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
31b6834b070aafa01ac58358040c239a
105e06382c53506ae3c34ae864751a6cfb4ad45e
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBJ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
44b4ab5bfab2b7507dce884eed446ada
b55b97ffc67f65df0cd12f774a10f2f5528706f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBK' 'sip-files00098.txt'
3778e299cd08ae4c82922e0f89de0892
0436ecd94c4e711b3251c680ffcdb59ae4e6d611
describe
'13639' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBL' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
a1120f8c18ce114c2848dedeef960254
5c444ede9c18f91e6edc6304355d0e0e79a2ceff
describe
'252969' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBM' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
9fc248d24f34e1115fa1f87f6b64d7a0
bd081683ac6320757efc680309d1f5429a910ca3
describe
'126994' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBN' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
ecc7c74d8e69ffa6584598a63ac12e0a
094108cc1d5227cbeaaa4bc76d606f069d26f783
describe
'25299' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBO' 'sip-files00099.pro'
3921872c49027b19a88bb8f8ee0a2ace
2361a1a7c3914e459670082f798a99ce42847c26
describe
'46578' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBP' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
d32ee16ffd13ce719ad88cfd7e3aece6
f4dc13d46765775db4b3aa1d8979bf17bdb624a4
describe
'2038500' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBQ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
9c2b4429de591590754a03a7cbff096d
be7f4579c95ee80d79d3a095fa27e7572646edd7
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBR' 'sip-files00099.txt'
f1797be726cdb447c45d2e78784eee54
a66bfbf72b47222e634790fe94ee23a9922609dc
describe
'13012' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBS' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
5087d80ef6760e491a2905157a30d9c8
a508be43fb2f0faf8663605b6a50bec8a150a3ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBT' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
be4278eb8a66c8cb187f4c9acd9e16c1
5f061e02f72331cb283206313e03524ee2a7a256
describe
'153984' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBU' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
8210fe14f06f7a529a49b0fa1d0a5b10
e23153116e9aca645bc48d8a4030d841ab955c7b
describe
'26618' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBV' 'sip-files00100.pro'
c1a1da5b947a1ebb64d62cce8e96c476
fc2df3cb69472cc857f90c707f01c7fd71e5bf1d
describe
'53521' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBW' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
ec568c5e7262dfc276065b5fbf64735c
93877b9bf3524cc3b556a4acabe31987fe157d0b
describe
'2039672' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBX' 'sip-files00100.tif'
446a5f3282cd9bd8aafa14da3d5dcf7e
18666dfa88aa974e58b4e1fa273339c439568012
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBY' 'sip-files00100.txt'
4b6c97a93e6734134f77ff98dffac119
ce3f372b6c6025476bca392b07f195de4178e3e4
describe
'14648' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOBZ' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
f83c79e69ce6f7f4367ad893fa329711
580690b81c295ce0cf08178aeb299b790a528150
describe
'275340' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCA' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
97ac260ea71f5f059d791b92717d449d
2ece891ae26d4494683a313e942279147f6e1ab1
describe
'156961' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCB' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
75283601d77ae22ea89c63790bb14f36
1ba84a931d773019c6590dbae0c47a434cf04870
describe
'27171' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCC' 'sip-files00101.pro'
faee259d5a1a316a69c712334730e3c2
baf89f899740de10fe1fb96389aaae3449e39ff9
'2012-01-14T13:08:13-05:00'
describe
'54516' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCD' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
6bffbb716c9178e1102b3a02ba1dd01d
9d714086e9641b9d99737b0b5c128a914f9f12cb
describe
'2217304' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCE' 'sip-files00101.tif'
81f67dff0c5cb9cb3996f9efd36dc999
a0ef9fc27994cfaa0ee2e4af16bc1a8ea8e428bd
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCF' 'sip-files00101.txt'
af7ec216d72e47b0a708776452dddfeb
3d3e20249aad538d6093bc9b4a9b7360af1e1ab1
describe
'13922' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCG' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
7d792c77377c10b78944d0e36d0a0b4c
a125b1de49daffbe053c2fd64a28585325493902
describe
'281658' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCH' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
ffe287366881f8ac9aadf5c8bf8a9226
4361149fd07eb359ddfc8555e99f67c6f47bfd63
describe
'122052' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCI' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
a71c23efa7734dd7ea1228ab816ffbfd
77b9dc56db3466f1a79386c69782e715e7947b45
describe
'20025' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCJ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
c2eff31416b72576f4ab9bf89dc5d31d
6022bdf7b2309310e569dfbf24a2498e57500c50
describe
'39739' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCK' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
27f8e838b6b2601bd4d9835d42453f5f
2acfd6a19c7a9e36dda84ba926d8266fd102f7ed
describe
'2266288' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCL' 'sip-files00102.tif'
ec874baa3f6ea8cee3555b0c50da2e6e
74c0d22be7ecbf873cd750c22fa5394a5d2ae7f4
describe
'838' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCM' 'sip-files00102.txt'
f5b66591d30fb4fec21fca12efbac626
94dfda739a127056ce21eae9dc43633fc527f51d
describe
'10339' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCN' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
5ba0704bcade781eae80b8e280d4c212
7c4df669b9add4598dcf63be1cb9a2d46e2e636f
describe
'346006' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCO' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
93f8604984da3808dd09d9d48abb2c5a
4e3a890cca3c27af31cdc14e96bc503a6215a6dd
describe
'45902' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCP' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
3f616aeeba06730d29535dc523ea22cc
3f10fc75c36e2522860386b9a5c0128615608762
describe
'11129' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCQ' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
934d3e5802ee0ed7a54529f9d9809832
4cb23d02d78c277c58f8e1dcf68e0c2ef75a4806
describe
'8312196' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCR' 'sip-files00105.tif'
2866436601ed049edd5a3cec50592f64
6de76784984e7370e6dcd45028032c1b3c7ac43b
describe
'3308' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCS' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
ba26dcd463a777991c797ccd0ab1de56
65c396c8ecfcf15925b6355400fce2f6d7abcd9a
describe
'350862' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCT' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
1ac9d244ffd2c8ed6364ceff7edc5762
2734e1286d356b398b040786c299729702f2abc7
describe
'120898' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCU' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
684faf269886a7fde50ab2eb62187daa
4659a333adb168f9fcdf7e2bf4beb09721a359eb
describe
'22089' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCV' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
d4a7082b23bfcb46781a287d204a7e3b
1a1670265d91ca6ff79ff7f567b87fcfb1566afd
describe
'8428592' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCW' 'sip-files00106.tif'
b90c9705e2aa3ee78a667eb215e48f2d
9337a4a9d052206512e404b652565bbb27019ba4
describe
'5214' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCX' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
f205f27052db37417b81265f247d1667
c4bb8ed219c6887f16c3cd25fa91a87a3142b955
describe
'61815' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCY' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
d344e10e18e1cc9d7e8d07826305b11d
a7d49eae6010109ab56392f8d19b977ba9bdf640
describe
'14257' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACOCZ' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
74b4cb79232475f80b364aac56871e0b
2452d9e6789df82a5ea60f7e1b950ddfceb23eac
describe
'217' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACODA' 'sip-files00107.pro'
97cb0683e30202f0386ebaab61259b45
3a29a8606d4c343ed00f34b20d141309dae17856
describe
'3812' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACODB' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
ee5dc4138134d53a0599a8cd891b0411
55f80a795e77ab3b0113b8f227e279c1caed9e44
describe
'1505568' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACODC' 'sip-files00107.tif'
b1f756ff550718de15b3ebbc3436d145
6a4c9751d851e7e326630829f8685193e1be5133
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACODD' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
f16e704f607c4b261a308c754f3c12cb
5ab9bf1a2f5758de4b874c50d4d2cb5236693265
'2012-01-14T13:09:33-05:00'
describe
'32' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACODE' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
a0dabc61e711a74ac6d1638e3058ad02
3ffb5c40de7ba4db8bdcd0753f0ef7c2a31f4363
describe
'150530' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACODF' 'sip-filesUF00087255_00001.mets'
45844a435632a1863f579fd5c4a66245
1636885938f8deff2291fec334465ffdc1e518cc
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T10:01:49-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'193210' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAAEJfileF20090313_AACODI' 'sip-filesUF00087255_00001.xml'
c632a2fa3f8ae56a025fd0db5dc1d6e6
5eaeaa4f41ce9a8497f28e361cc18279c49f37e7
describe
'2013-12-13T10:01:51-05:00'
xml resolution