Citation
Fridtjof Nansen

Material Information

Title:
Fridtjof Nansen a book for the young
Creator:
Bull, Jacob B ( Jacob Breda ), 1853-1930
Barnard, M. R ( Mordaunt Roger ) ( Translator )
W. Isbister & Co ( Publisher )
Ballantyne, Hanson and Co ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Isbister and Company
Manufacturer:
Ballantyne Hanson & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
132, [8] p. : ill., port. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Outdoor life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Explorers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- Arctic regions ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
individual biography ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Jacob B. Bull ; translated from the Norweian by Mordaunt R. Barnard.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026611079 ( ALEPH )
ALG3208 ( NOTIS )
261339139 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

oai.xml

E20090114_AAAAKZ.xml

UF00087254_00001.pdf

UF00087254_00001.txt

00006.txt

00026.txt

00047.txt

00080.txt

00058.txt

00105.txt

00060.txt

00054.txt

00092.txt

00051.txt

00055.txt

00061.txt

00153.txt

00137.txt

00067.txt

00142.txt

00037.txt

00033.txt

00100.txt

00096.txt

00145.txt

00062.txt

00002.txt

00112.txt

00146.txt

00076.txt

00057.txt

00148.txt

00087.txt

00066.txt

00073.txt

00075.txt

00007.txt

00127.txt

00027.txt

00063.txt

E20090114_AAAAKZ_xml.txt

00114.txt

00091.txt

00071.txt

00120.txt

00059.txt

00136.txt

00150.txt

00042.txt

00012.txt

00125.txt

00023.txt

00039.txt

00122.txt

00133.txt

00072.txt

00081.txt

00020.txt

00038.txt

00151.txt

00101.txt

00011.txt

00034.txt

00010.txt

00083.txt

00143.txt

00024.txt

00110.txt

00093.txt

00117.txt

00152.txt

00022.txt

00119.txt

00111.txt

00019.txt

00126.txt

00135.txt

00070.txt

00032.txt

00138.txt

00068.txt

00107.txt

00128.txt

00140.txt

00064.txt

00008.txt

00035.txt

00095.txt

00090.txt

00016.txt

00116.txt

00118.txt

00005.txt

00103.txt

00017.txt

00139.txt

oai_xml.txt

00097.txt

00050.txt

00121.txt

00085.txt

00018.txt

00098.txt

00113.txt

00052.txt

00144.txt

00084.txt

00069.txt

00134.txt

00088.txt

00029.txt

UF00087254_00001_pdf.txt

00074.txt

00132.txt

00077.txt

00041.txt

00053.txt

00104.txt

00115.txt

00078.txt

00141.txt

00131.txt

00021.txt

00028.txt

00031.txt

00009.txt

00046.txt

00147.txt

00044.txt

00013.txt

00001.txt

00099.txt

00102.txt

00040.txt

00129.txt

00094.txt

00014.txt

00086.txt

00130.txt

00049.txt

00079.txt

00048.txt

00123.txt

00065.txt

00106.txt

00015.txt

00056.txt

00045.txt

00030.txt

00089.txt

00082.txt

00036.txt

00124.txt

00043.txt

00025.txt

00003.txt


Full Text







tie : Mh Se A> PAT Ls CNA

| Cal Lo AY <
He AS Pe SA TX Ee) Danes on chris
BO re ee EO
AE Loe oe Ar Se

7 7 Cr & =
ONS ;

wee

x 2 S CZ et 4 se

Se
Sh OS
= Poor ee










PLN Saar

SNP Oy
COT
REAR hye 4





ERIDTJOF NANSEN

A BOOK FOR THE YOUNG

BY

JACOB B. BULL

TRANSLATED FROM THE NORWEGIAN BY

THE Rev. MORDAUNT R. BARNARD

VICAR OF MARGARETTING
ONE OF THE TRANSLATORS OF ‘‘ FARTHEST NORTH”

LONDON
ISBISTER AND COMPANY Limitrep
15 & 16 TAVISTOCK STREET COVENT GARDEN
1898



,

Printed by BALLANryNg, Hanson & Co.
London & Edinburgh



ae
:

FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

CHAPTER I.

NANSEN’S BIRTHPLACE AND CHILDHOOD HomE.— BURGOMASTER NAN=
SEN, HIS ANCESTOR.— His BoyHoop anD EpucaTiIon. — Harty
Love or Sport AND INDEPENDENT RESEARCH.

In West Aker, a short distance from Christiania,
there is an old manor-house called Store Fréen. It is
surrounded by a large courtyard, in the middle of which
is a dovecot. The house itself, as well as the out-
houses, is built in the old-fashioned style. The garden,
with its green and white painted fence, is filled with
fruit-trees, both old and young, whose pink and snow-
white blossoms myriads of humblebees delight to visit
in springtime, while in autumn their boughs are so
laden with fruit that they are bent down under a weight
they can scarcely support.

Close by the garden runs the Frogner River. Here
and there in its course are deep pools, while in other
places it runs swiftly along, and is so shallow that it
can readily be forded. All around are to be seen in
winter snow-covered heights, while far away in the
background a dense pine forest extends beyond Frogner

1



2 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

Seeter,! beyond which again lies Nordmarken, with its
hidden lakes, secret brooklets, and devious paths, like a
fairy-tale. And yet close by the hum of a busy city
life with all its varied sounds may be heard.

It was in this house that, on Oct. 10, 1861, a baby
boy, Fridtjof Nansen, was born.

Many years before this, on Oct. 9, 1660, two of
Denmark’s most powerful men were standing on the
castle bridge at Copenhagen eyeing each other with
looks of hatred and defiance. One of these, named
Otto Krag, was glancing angrily at Blaataarn (the Blue
Tower) with its dungeons. “Know you that?” he
inquired of his companion, the chief burgomaster of the
city. Nodding assent, and directing his looks toward
the church tower of “Our Lady,” in which were hung
the alarm bells, the latter replied, “And know you
what hangs within yonder tower?”

Four days later the burghers of Copenhagen, with
the burgomaster at their head, overthrew the arrogant
Danish nobles, and made Frederick II absolute mon-
arch over Denmark and Norway.

It needed unyielding strength and indomitable cour-
age to carry out such an undertaking, but these were
qualifications which the burgomaster possessed, and had
at an early age learned to eraploy. When but sixteen
he had set out from Flensborg on an expedition to the
White Sea in a vessel belonging to his uncle, and had
then alone traversed a great portion of Russia. Four

1 Frognerseteren, a forest-covered hill about six miles from Chris-
tiania. Nordmarken, an extensive woodland stretching for miles and
miles to the north of Christiania.



























































































STORE FROEN.





4 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

years later he commanded an expedition to the Arctic
Ocean, and subsequently entered the service of the Ice-
land Company as captain of one of their ships.

When forty years of age he was made an alderman
of Copenhagen, and in 1654 became its chief burgo-
master. During the siege of that city in the war with
Charles the Tenth (Gustavus), he was one of its most
resolute and intrepid defenders; and so when the power
of the Danish nobility was to be overthrown, it was he
who took the chief part in the movement.

This man, who was neither cowed by the inherited
tyranny of the nobles, nor daunted by the terrors of
war or the mighty forces of nature, was named Hans
Nansen; and it is from him, on his father’s side, that
Fridtjof Nansen descended.

Our hero’s mother is a niece of Count Wedel Jarls-
berg, the Statholder! of Norway,—the man who in
1814 risked life and fortune to provide Norway with
grain from Denmark, and who did his share toward
procuring a free and equable union with Sweden.

Fridtjof Nansen grew up at Store Froen, and it
was not long before the strongly marked features of his
race became apparent in the fair, shock-haired lad with
the large, dark-blue, dreamy eyes.

Whatever was worthy of note, he must thoroughly
master; whatever was impossible for others, he must do
himself. He would bathe in the Frogner River in spring

1 Statholder, vice-regent. In the early days of the union with Sweden
the king had the right of appointing a vice-regent for Norway. The last

time the king made use of this prerogative was in 1844, and the right was
abrogated in 1872.





FRIDTJOF NANSEN. . 5

and autumn in the coldest pools; fish bare-legged with
self-made tackle in the swiftest foss;! contrive and
improve on everything pertaining to tools and imple-
ments, and examine and take to pieces all the mechani-
cal contrivances that came in his way; often succeeding,
frequently failing, but never giving in.

Once, when only three years old, he was nearly
burned to death. He had been meddling with the copper
fire in the brewhouse, and was standing in the court-
yard busied with a little wheelbarrow. All at once his
clothes were on fire, for a spark, it seems, had lighted
on them, and from exposure to the air, burst out into
flames. Out rushed the housekeeper to the rescue.
Meanwhile Fridtjof stood hammering away at his barrow,
utterly indifferent to the danger he was in, while the
housekeeper was extinguishing the fire. “It was quite
enough for one person to see to that sort of thing,” he
thought.

On one occasion he very nearly caused the drowning
of his younger brother in the icy river. His mother
appeared on the scene as he was in the act’of dragging
him up out of the water. She scolded him severely ;
but the lad tried to comfort her by saying, that “once
he himself had nearly been drowned in the same river
when he was quite alone.”

Once or twice on his early fishing-excursions he
managed to get the fishhook caught in his lip, and his
mother had to cut it out with a razor, causing the lad a
great deal of pain, but he bore it all without a murmur.

The pleasures of the chase, too, were a great source

1 Foss, waterfall.



6 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

of enjoyment to him in his childish years. At first
he would go out after sparrows and squirrels with a
bow and arrow like the Indian hunters. Naturally he
did not’ meet with much success. It then occurred to
him that a cannon would be an excellent weapon for
shooting sparrows. Accordingly he procured one, and
after loading it up to the muzzle with gunpowder, fired |
it off, with the result that the cannon burst into a hun-
dred pieces, and a large part of the charge was lodged
in his face, involving the interesting operation of having
the grains of powder picked out with a needle.

The system on which the Nansen boys were brought
_up at Store Fréen was to inure them in both mind and
body. Little weight was attached to trivial matters.
The mistakes they made they must correct for them-
selves as far as possible; and if they brought suffering
on themselves they were taught to endure it. The
principles of self-help were thus inculcated at an early
age — principles which they never forgot in later days.

As Fridtjof grew up from the child into the boy,
the two opposite sides of his character became apparent,
—inflexible determination, and a dreamy love of ad-
venture; and the older he grew, the more marked did
these become. He was, as the saying is, “‘a strange
boy.” Strong as a young bear, he was ever foremost in
fight with street boys, whom he daily met between his
home and school. When the humor took him, espe-
cially if his younger brother was molested, he would
fight fiercely, though the odds were three or four to one
against him. But in general, he was of a quiet,
thoughtful disposition.





FRIDTJOF NANSEN. v

Sometimes indeed he would sit buried in deep
thought half an hour at a time, and when dressing
would every now and then remain sitting with one
stocking on and the other in his hand so long that his
brother had to call out to him to make haste. At table,
too, he would every now and then forget to eat his food,
or else would devour anything and everything that came
in his way. :

The craving to follow out his own thoughts and his
own way thus displayed itself in his early childhood,
and he had not attained a great age before his longing
to achieve exploits and to test his powers of endurance
became apparent.

It began with a pair of ski* made by himself for use
on the Frogner hills, developed in the hazardous leaps
on the Huseby? slopes, and culminated in his becom-
ing one of Norway’s cleverest and most enduring run-
ners on ski. It began with fishing for troutlets in the
river, and ended with catching seals in the Arctic seas.
It began with shooting sparrows with cannons, and
ended with shooting the polar bear and walrus with
tiny Krag-Jérgensen conical bullets. It began with
splashing about in the cold pools of the Frogner river,
and ended in having to swim for dear life amid the ice
floes of the frozen ocean. Persevering and precise, en-
during and yet defiant, step by step he progressed.

Nothing was ever skipped over — everything was
thoroughly learned and put into practice. Thus the
boy produced the man /

1 Ski, Norwegian snowshoes; pronounced she.

2 Huseby, a farm near Christiania, where the annual ski-match was
formerly held.



1

8 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

There was a certain amount of pride in Fridtjof’s
nature that under different circumstances might have
proved injurious to him. He was proud of his descent,
and of his faith in his own powers. But the strict and
wise guidance of his parents directed this feeling into
one of loyalty — loyalty toward his friends, his work,
his plans. His innate pride thus became a conscientious
feeling of honor in small things as well as great —a.
mighty lever, forsooth, to be employed in future ex-
ploits.

Meanness was a thing unknown to Fridtjof Nansen,
nor did he ever cherish rancorous feelings in his breast.
A quarrel he was ever ready to make up, and this done
it was at once and for all forgotten.

The following instance of his school-days shows
what his disposition was: —

Fridtjof was in the second class of the primary school.
One day a new boy, named Karl, was admitted. Now
Fridtjof was the strongest boy in the class, but the new-
comer was also a stout-built lad. It happened that
they fell out on some occasion or other. Karl was do-
ing something the other did not approve of, whereupon
Fridtjof called out, «*You’ve no right to do that.” —
“Haven't I?” was the reply, and a battle at once en-
sued. Blood began to flow freely, when the principal
appeared on the scene. Taking the two combatants, he
locked them up in the class-room. “Sit there, you
naughty boys! you ought to be ashamed of your-
selves,’ he said, as he left them in durance vile.

On his return to the class-room a short time after-
ward, he found the two lads sitting with their arms









FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 9

around each other’s neck, reading out of the same book.
Henceforth they were bosom friends.

As a boy Nansen possessed singular powers of en-
durance and hardiness, and could put up with cold,
hunger, thirst, or pain to a far greater degree than other
boys of his age. But with all this he had a warm heart,
sympathizing in the troubles of others, and evincing sin-
cere interest in their welfare, — traits of character of
childhood’s days that became so strongly developed in
Nansen the leader. Side by side with his yearning to
achieve exploits there grew up within his breast, under
the strict surveillance of his father, the desire of per-
forming good, solid work.

Here may be mentioned another instance, well wor-
thy of notice : —

Fridtjof and his brother went one day to the fair.
There were jugglers and cake-stalls and gingerbread,
sweets, toys, etc., in abundance. In fine, Christiania fair,
coming as it does on the first Tuesday in February, was
a very child’s paradise, with all its varied attractions.
Peasants from the country driving around in their
quaint costumes, the townspeople loafing and enjoying
themselves, all looking pleased as they made their pur-
chases at the stalls in the marketplace, added to the
“fun of the fair.”

Fridtjof and his brother Alexander went well fur-
nished with money ; for their parents had given them six-
pence each, while aunt and grandmamma gave them each
two shillings. Off the lads started, their faces beam-
ing with joy. On returning home, however, instead of
bringing with them sweets and toys, it was seen that



10 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

they had spent their money in buying tools. Their
father was not a little moved.at seeing this, and the
result was that more money was forthcoming for the
lads. But it all went the same way, and was spent in
the purchase of tools, with the exception of a few
pence invested in rye cakes.

More than one boy has on such an occasion remem-
bered his father’s and mother’s advice not to throw
money away on useless things, and has set out with the
magnanimous resolve of buying something useful. The
. difference between them and the Nansen boys is this:
the latter not only made good resolutions, but carried
them out. It is the act that shows the spirit, and boys
who do such things are generally to be met with in
later days holding high and responsible positions.

Fridtjof was a diligent boy at school, especially at
first, and passed his middle school examination ! success-
fully. He worked hard at the natural sciences, which
had a special attraction for him. But gradually, as he
rose higher in the classes, it was the case with him as
it is with others who are destined to perform something
exceptional in the world; that is, he preferred to fol-
low out his own ideas — ideas that were not always in
accordance with the school plan. His burning thirst
after knowledge impelled him to devote his attention
to what lay nearest, and thoroughly to investigate what-
ever was most worthy of note, most wonderful, and most
difficult. High aspirations soon make themselves ap-
parent.

1 Middle school examination, passed on graduating from the grammar
school to the high school.









FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 11

The mighty hidden forces of nature had a great

attraction for him. He and his friend Karl (who after
their fight were inseparable), when Fridtjof was about
fifteen, one day got hold of a lot of fireworks. These
they mixed up together in a mortar, adding to the com-
pound some “new kinds of fluid” they had bought for
their experiment. Nature, however, anticipated them,
for a spark happening to fall on the mixture, it burst
into flames.
_ Our two experimentalists thereon seized hold of the
mortar and threw it out of the window. It fell on the
stones and broke into a thousand pieces, and thus they
gained the new experience, — how a new chemical sub-
stance should not be compounded. The humorous whim,
however, seized them to blacken their hands and faces,
and to lie on the floor as if they were dead. And
when Alexander entered the room, they made him be-
lieve that the explosion had been the cause of it all.
Thus, though the experiment had failed, they got some
amusement out of its failure.

Although Fridtjof had so many interests outside his
actual school studies, he was very diligent in his school
work, In 1880 he took his real artiwm,! with twenty-
one marks in twelve subjects. In natural science,
mathematics, and history he had the best marks, and
in the following examination in 1881 he gained the
distinction of passing laudabilis pre ceteris.

1 Hzamen artium, the entrance examination to the university. For
real artium the chief topics of examination are sciences, mathematics,
and the English language. The best mark in any subject is 1 (excel-
lent), the poorest 6 (bad).



12 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

Though brought up at home very strictly, for his
father was extremely particular about the smallest mat-
ters, yet his life must have possessed great charm for
him, spent as it was in the peaceful quiet of his home
at Store Fréen. If on the one hand his father insisted
that he should never shirk his duty, but should strictly
fulfil it, on the other he never denied him anything
that could afford him pleasure.

This is evident from a letter Fridtjof Nansen wrote
home during one of his first sojourns among strangers.
On writing to-his father in 1883 he dwells on the
Christmas at home, terms it the highest ideal of hap-
piness and blessedness, dwells on the bright peaceful
reminiscences of his childhood and ends with the fol-
lowing description of a Christmas Eve : —

“ At last the day dawned, — Christmas Eve. Now
impatience was at its height. It was impossible to sit
still for one minute; it was absolutely necessary to be
doing something to get the time to pass, or to occupy
one’s thoughts either by peeping through the keyhole
to try and catch a glimpse of the Christmas-tree with
its bags of raisins and almonds, or by rushing out-of-
doors and sliding down the hills on a hand-sleigh; or
if there were snow enough, we could go out on ski till
it was dark. Sometimes it would happen that Einar
had to go on an errand into the town, and it was so nice
to sit on the saddle at the back of the sleigh, while the
sleigh-bells tinkled so merrily, and the stars glittered
in the dark sky overhead.

“ The long-expected moment arrived at last, — father
went in to light up. How my heart thumped and





FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 13

throbbed! Ida was sitting in an armchair in a corner,
guessing what would fall to her share; others of the
party might be seen to smile in anticipation of some sur-
prise or other of which they had got an inkling — when
all at once the doors were thrown wide open, and the
dazzling brilliancy of the lights on the Christmas-tree
well nigh blinded us. Oh, what a sight it was! For
the first few minutes we were literally dumb from joy,
could scarcely draw our breath — only a moment after-
ward to give free vent to our pent-up feelings, like
wild things. ... Yes —yes—never shall I forget
them— never will those Christmas Eves fade from my
memory as long as I live.”

Reminiscences of a good home, of a good and happy
childhood, are the very best things a man can take with
him amid the storms and struggles of life; and we may -
be sure of this, — that on many a day that has been
beset with almost insurmountable difficulties, when his
powers were almost exhausted, and his heart feeling
faint within, the recollection of those early years at
Store Fréen has more than once recurred to Nansen’s
mind,

The peace and comfort of the old home, with all its
dear associations, the beloved faces of its inmates —
these have passed before his mind’s eye, cheering him
on in the accomplishment of his last tremendous under-
taking.



14 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

CHAPTER II.

Youturun, Excursions. —Srupies. —GOorES ON A SEALING EXPEDITION
4 To THE Arcric SEA.— Hunts IcE-BEAR.

THERE is hardly a boy in Christiania or its neighbor-
hood who is fond of sport that does not know Nord-
marken, and you may hear many and many a one speak
of its lakes, the deafening roar of its cascades, of the
mysterious silence of its endless forest tracts, and the
refreshing odor of the pine-trees. You may hear, too,
how the speckled trout have been lured out of some
deep pool, the hare been hunted among the purple
mountain ridges, or the capercailzie approached with
noiseless footsteps when in early spring the cock bird
is wooing his mate; or again, of expeditions on ski
over the boundless tracts of snow in the crisp winter
air beneath the feathery snowladen trees of the forest.

Tn the days of Nansen’s boyhood it was very differ-
ent from what it is now. Then the spell of enchant-
ment that ever lies over an unknown and unexplored
region brooded over it —a feeling engendered by As-
bjornsen’s! well-known tales.

Tt was as if old Asbjornsen himself, the fairy-tale
king, was trudging along rod in hand by the side of
some hidden stream —he who alone knew how to find



1 P. C. Asbjérnsen (pron. Asbyurnsen) together with Jérgen (pron.
Yurgen) Joe collected the popular and fairy tales of Norway.





FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 15

his way through the pathless forest to the dark waters
of some remote lake. And it was but once in a while
that the most venturesome lads, enticed by the tales he
had devoured in that favorite story-book, dared pry into
the secrets of that enchanted land. Only a few of the
rising generation then had the courage and the hardi-
hood to penetrate into those wilds whence they returned
with faces’ beaming with joy, and with reinvigorated
health and ‘strength. But now the whole Norwegian
youth do the same thing.

Among the few who in those days ventured there
were the Nansen boys. They had the pluck, the hardi-
ness, and yearning after adventure that Nordmarken
demanded. They were not afraid of lying out in the
forest during a pouring wet summer night, neither were
they particular as to whether they had to fast for a day
or two.

Fridtjof Nansen was about eleven years old when,
in company with his brother Alexander, he paid his
first’ independent visit to it. Two of their friends
were living in Sérkedal,! so they determined to go and
see them — for the forest looked so attractive that they
could not resist the temptation. or once they started
off without asking leave. They knew their way as far
as Bogstad,? but after that had to ask the road to
Soérkedal. Arriving at their destination, they passed
the day in playing games, and in fishing in the river.

But it was not altogether an enjoyable visit, for con-
science pricked, and as they set out for home late in

1 Sérkedal, a valley about eight miles to the north of Christiania.
2 Bogstad, a baronial manor about five miles north of Christiania.



16 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

the evening, their hearts sank. Their father was a
strict disciplinarian, and a thrashing rose up before
them, and what was even worse than that, mother might
be grieved, and that was something they could not
endure to think of.

On reaching home they found its inmates had not
gone to bed, though it was late in the night. Of course
they had been searching for the truants, and their hearts,
which a moment before had been very low down, now
jumped up into their throats, for they could see mother
_ coming toward them.

“Ts that you, boys?” she asked.

*‘ Now for it,” they thought.

“ Where have you been?” asked their mother.

Yes, they had been to Sérkedal, and they looked up
at her half afraid of what would happen next. Then
they saw that her eyes were filled with tears.

«You are strange boys!” she murmured; and that
was all she said. But those words made the hearts of
the young culprits turn cold and hot by turns, and they
there and then registered a vow that they would never do
anything again to cause mother pain, but would always
try to please her —a resolution they kept, as far as was
possible, their whole lives through.

Subsequently they had leave given them to go to
Sorkedal, and wherever else they wanted. But they
had to go on their own responsibility, and look out for
themselves as best they could. But Fridtjof never for-
got the lesson he had learned on that first expedition
to Nordmarken. Who can tell whether his mother’s
tearful face, and her gentle words, “ You are strange













FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 17

boys! ” have not appeared to him in wakeful hours, and
been the means of preventing many a venturesome deed
being rashly undertaken, many a headstrong idea from
becoming defiant.

This at all events is certain, — Nansen when a man
always knew how to turn aside in a spirit of self-denial
when the boundary line between prudence and rashness
had been reached. And for this it may be safely said
he had to thank his father and mother.

Those who are in the habit of going about in forests
are pretty sure to meet with some wonderful old fellow
who knows where the best fish lie in the river, and the
favorite haunts of game in the woods. Such a one
was an old man named Ola Knub, whose acquaintance
Nansen made in the Nordmarken forest. His wife used
to come to Store Fréen with baskets of huckleberries,
strawberries, cranberries, etc., and it was through her
Fridtjof got to know him. Often they would set off
on an expedition, rod in hand, and coffee kettle on
their back, and be away for days together. They would
fish for trout from early morning till late at night, sleep-
ing on a plank bed in some wood-cutter’s hut, after par-
taking of a supper of trout broiled in the ashes, and
black coffee.

Toward the end of May, when the birch and the oak
began to bud, and the timber floats had gone down the
river, they would start on such an expedition, taking
with them a goodly supply of bread and butter, and
perhaps the stump of a sausage.



18 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

It took them generally quite five hours to reach their
destination, but once arrived there they would imme-
diately set to work with rod and line, and fish up to
midnight, when they would crawl into some charcoal-
burner’s hut for a few hours’ sleep, or as was often the
case, Sleep out in the open, resting their backs against
a tree, and then at daybreak would be off again, to the
river. For time was precious, and they had to make the
best use they could of the hours between Saturday even-
ing and Monday morning, when they must be in school.

When autumn set in, and hare-hunting began, they
would often be on foot for twenty-four hours together
without any food at all. As the boys grew older, they
would follow the chase in winter on ski, often, indeed,
almost to the detriment of their health. Once when
they had been hare-hunting for a whole fortnight, they
found their provision-bag was empty, and as they would
not touch the hares they had killed, they had to sub-
sist as best they could on potatoes only.

In this way Fridtjof grew up to be exceptionally
hardy. When, as it often happened, his companions got
worn out, he would suggest their going to some spot
a long distance off. It seemed to be a special point
of honor with him to bid defiance to fatigue. On
one occasion, after one of these winter excursions to
Nordmarken, he set off alone without any provisions in
his knapsack to a place twenty-five kilometres (fifteen
and a half miles) distant, for none of his companions
dared accompany him. On arriving at the place where
he was bound, he almost ate its inmates out of house
and home.







FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 19

On another occasion, on a long expedition on ski
with some of his comrades, all of whom had brought a
plentiful supply of food with them in their knapsacks,
Fridtjof had nothing. When they halted to take some
necessary refreshment, he unbuttoned his jacket and
pulled out some pancakes from his pocket, quite warm
from the heat of his body. ‘Here, you fellows,” he
said, “won't you have some pancakes?” But pancakes,
his friends thought, might be nice things in general, yet
pancakes kept hot in that way were not appetizing, and
so they refused his proffered hospitality.

“You are a lot of geese! there’s jam on them too,”
he said, as he eagerly devoured the lot.

Even as a boy Fridtjof was impressed with the idea
that hardiness and powers of endurance were qualifica-
tions absolutely essential for the life he was bent on
leading; so he made it his great aim to be able to bear
everything, and to require as little as was possible.

If there were things others found impracticable, he
would at once set to work and attempt them. And
when once he had taken a matter in hand, he would
never rest till he had gone through with it, even
though his life might be at stake. For instance, he and
his brother once set out to climb the Svartdal’s peak in
Jotunheim.! People usually made the ascent from the
rear side of the mountain; but this was not difficult
enough for him. He would climb it from the front, a
route no one had ever attempted; and he did it.

Up under Svartdal’s peak there was a glacier that

1 Jotunheim, the giant’s world, a group of mountains in the centre
of southern Norway.



20 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

they must cross, bounded on its farther side by a pre-
cipice extending perpendicularly down into the valley
below. His brother relates, «I had tured giddy, so
Fridtjof let me have his staff. ‘Then he set off over the
ice; but instead of going with the utmost caution, ad-
vancing foot by foot at a time, as he now would do, off
went my brother as hard as he could — his foot slipped,
and he commenced to slide down the glacier. I saw that
he turned pale, for in a few seconds more he would be
hurled over the abyss, and be crushed to pieces on the
rocks below. He saw his danger, however, just in the
nick of time, and managed to arrest his progress by
digging his heels into the snow. Never shall I forget
that moment; neither shall I forget when we arrived at
the tourist’s cabin how he borrowed a pair of trousers
belonging to the club’s corpulent secretary —for they
completely swallowed him up. His own garment, be it
stated, had lost an essential part by the excessive friction
caused by his slide down the glacier.”

Such were the foolhardy exploits Fridtjof would in-
dulge in as a boy; but when he arrived at manhood he
would never risk his life in any undertaking that was
not worth a life’s venture.

. . . . . . . .

When nineteen he entered the university, and in
the following year passed his second examination ;? and
now arose the question what was he to be? As yet the
idea of the future career which has rendered his name
famous had not occurred to his mind, so we see him

1 Second examination, graduating as a bachelor of arts.



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 24

hesitating over which of the many roads that lay be-
fore him to adopt. He applied to have his name put
down for admission as cadet in the military school, but
quickly withdrew the application. Next he began the
study of medicine, after which all his time was devoted
to a special study of zodlogy. In 1882 he sought the
advice of Professor
Collet as to the
best method of
following up this
branch of science,
and the professor’s
reply was that he
had better go on a
sealing-expedition
to the Arctic seas.
Nansen took a. |}
week to reflect on ff
this advice before
finally deciding;
and on March 11
~ we seehim on board
the sealer Viking,
steering out of
Arendal harbour to
the Arctic ocean —
the ocean that subsequently was to mark an epoch in
his life, and become the scene of his memorable ex-
ploit.
It was with wondrously mixed feelings that he

turned his gaze toward the north as he stood on the
D

GE



NANSEN AT NINETEEN.



22 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

deck that March morning. Behind him lay the beloved
home of his childhood and youth. The first rays of
the rising sun were shining over the silent forests
whither the woodcock and other birds of passage would
soon be journeying from southern climes, and the caper-
cailzie beginning his amorous manceuvres on the sombre
pine tops, while the whole woodland would speedily be
flooded with the songs of its feathered denizens.

And there before him was the sea, the wondrous
sea, where he would behold wrecked vessels drifting
along in the raging tempest, with flocks of stormy
petrels in attendance — and beyond, the Polar sea, that
fairy region, was pictured in his dreams. Yes, he could
see it in his spirit—could see the mighty icebergs, with
their crests sparkling in the sunlight in thousands of
varied forms and hues, and between. these the boundless
tracts of ice extending as far as the eye could reach in
one level unbroken plain. When this dream became
reality, how did he meet it?

Flat, drifting floes of ice, rocked up and down in
the blue-green sea, alike in sunshine and in fog, in
storm and calm. One monotonous infinity of ice to
struggle through, floe after floe rising up like white-
clad ghosts from the murky sea, gliding by with a
soughing, rippling murmur to vanish from sight, or to
dash against the ship’s sides till masts and hull quiv-
ered; and then when morning broke, a faint, mysterious
light, a hollow murmur in the air, like the roar of dis-
tant surge, far away to the north.

This was the Arctic sea! this the drift ice! They
were soon in the midst of it. The sea-gulls circled







FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 23

about, and the snow-bunting whirled around the floes
of ice on which the new-fallen snow lay and glittered.

A gale set in; then it blew a hurricane; and the
Viking groaned like a wounded whale, quivering as
if in the agonies of death from the fierce blows on her
sides. At last they approached the scene of their ex-
ertions, and the excitement of the impending chase for
seals drove out every other feeling from the mind, and
every one was wondering “were there many seals this
year? would the weather be propitious?”

One forenoon “a sail to leeward” was reported by
the man in the crow’s-nest, and all hands were called
up on deck, every stitch of canvas spread, and all the
available steam-power used to overtake the stranger.

There were two ships; one of them being Norden-
skjéld’s famous Vega, now converted into a sealer. Nan-
sen took his hat off to her; and it may well be that this
strange encounter imbued his mind with a yearning to
accomplish some exploit of a similar perilous nature and
world-wide renown as that of the famed Vega expedi-
tion. It is a significant fact that the Vega was the
first ship Nansen met with in the Arctic sea—a fact
that forces itself upon the mind with all the might
of a historic moment, with all the fateful force of des-
tiny. It addresses us like one of those many acciden-
tal occurrences that seem as if they had a purpose —
occurrences that every man who is on the alert and
mindful of his future career will meet once at least if
not oftener on his journey through life. Such things
are beyond our finite comprehension. Some people may
term them “the finger of God,” others the new, higher,



24 FRIDTJOF NANSEN,

unknown laws of nature; it may be these names sig-
nify but one and the same thing.

That year the Viking did not meet with great
success among the seals, for the season was rather too
advanced by the time she reached the sealing-grounds.
But all the more did Nansen get to learn about the
Arctic sea; and of the immense waste of waters of that
free, lonely ocean, his inmost being drank in refreshing
draughts.

On May 2, Spitzbergen was sighted, and on the
25th they were off the coast of Iceland, where Nansen
for a while planted his foot once more on firm land.
But their stay there was short, and soon they were off
to sea again, and in among the seals. And now the
continual report of guns sounded all around; the crew
singing and shouting; flaying seals and boiling the
blubber — a life forsooth of busy activity.

Toward the end of June the Viking got frozen in
off the East Greenland coast, where she lay imprisoned
a whole month, unfortunately during the best of the
sealing season; a loss, indeed, to the owners, but a gain
for Nansen, who now for the first time in his life got
his full enjoyment in the chase of the polar bear.

During all these days of their imprisonment in the
ice there was one incessant chase after bears, — looking
out for bears from the crow’s-nest, racing after bears
over the ice, resulting in loss of life to a goodly number
of those huge denizens of the Polar regions.

“ Bear on the weather bow!” «Bear to leeward!
all hands turn out!” were the cries from morning till
night; and many a time did Nansen jump up from his



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 25

berth but half dressed, and away over the ice to get a
shot.

Toward evening one day in July Nansen was sitting
up in the crow’s-nest, making a sketch of the Greenland
coast. On deck one of the crew, nicknamed Balloon,
was keeping watch, and just as our artist was engrossed
with his pencil, he heard Balloon shouting at the top
of his voice, ‘Bear ahead!” In an instant Nansen
sprang up, threw his painting-materials down on the
deck below, quickly following the same himself down
the rigging. But alas! by the time he had reached the
deck and seized his rifle, the bear had disappeared.

“A pretty sort of fellow to sit up in the crow’s-nest
and not see a bear squatting just in front of the bows!”
said the captain tauntingly.

But a day or two afterward Nansen fully retrieved
his reputation. It was his last bear-hunt on the expe-
dition, and this is what occurred : —

_ He and the captain and one of the sailors set out
after a monstrous bear. The beast, however, was shy,
and beat a speedy retreat. All three sprang after it.
But as Nansen was jumping over an open place in the
ice, he fell plump into the sea. His first thought on
finding himself in the water was his rifle, which he
flung upon the ice. But it slipped off again into the
water, so Nansen had to dive after it. Next time he
managed to throw it some distance across the ice, and
then clambered up himself, of course wet through to
the skin. But his cartridges, which were water-tight
ones, were all right, and soon he rejoined his compan-
ions in pursuit, and outstripped them. In a little while



26 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

he saw the bear making for a hummock, and made
straight for him; on coming up to closer quarters the
beast turned sharp round and dropped into the water,
but not before Nansen was able to put a bullet into him.
On reaching the edge of the ice, he could see no trace
of the animal. Yes—there was something white yon-
der, a little below the surface, for the bear had dived.
Presently he saw the animal pop its head up just in
front of him, and a moment after its paws were on the
_ edge of the floe, on which, with a fierce and angry growl,
the huge beast managed to drag himself up. Nansen
now fired again, and had the satisfaction of seeing the
bear drop back dead into the water, where he had to
hold it by the ears to prevent it sinking, till his com-
panions came up, when they were able to haul it up on
the ice.

The captain now bade Nansen return to the ship as
quickly as he could to change his clothes; but on his
road thither he met with some others of the crew in
pursuit of a couple of bears. The temptation was too
strong for him, so he joined them. He was fortunate
enough to shoot oné of the bears that they had wounded,
and then started after bear number two, which was lei-_
surely devouring the carcass of a seal some little dis-
tance off. On coming up with it he fired. The bear
reeled and fell backwards into the water, but speedily
coming up again, made off for a large hummock, under
cover of which it hoped to be able to sneak off.

But Nansen was not far behind. It was an exciting
chase. First over a wide space of open water, then
across some firm ice; the bear dashed along for dear



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 27

life, and now the iron muscles, hardened by his exploits
on the Huseby hills and his Nordmarken experiences,
stood his pursuer in good stead. Following on the
blood-stained track, he ran as fast as his legs could
carry him. Now the bear, now Nansen, seemed to be
getting the advantage. Whenever a broad opening in
the ice or a pool of clear water came in their way, they
swam across it; bear first, Nansen ‘a good second —
and so it went on mile after mile. Presently, however,
Nansen thought his competitor in the race began to
slacken speed, and to turn and twist in his course, as:
if seeking for some friendly shelter; and coming up
within a reasonable distance he gave him two bullets,
one lodging in the chest, the other behind the ear, when
to his great joy the bear lay dead at his feet. Nansen
at once set to work to skin the brute with a penknife
—rather a tedious operation with such an instrument.
Presently one of the sailors came up, and off they started
for the ship with the skin, on their road meeting a man
whom the captain had thoughtfully despatched with a
supply of bread and meat, without which, indeed, as is
well known, a hero, especially when ravenously hungry,
is a nobody.

In all, nineteen bears were bagged during this time.

Soon after this bear-hunt the Viking set out for
home, and great was the joy of all on board when the
coast of “old Norway,” with its lofty mountain ridges,
was seen towering up over the sea. This expedition
of the Viking was termed by the sailors, ‘“‘ Nansen’s
cruise,” — an exceptional reminiscence, a monolith in
the midst of the ice!



28 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

“ Ay, he was a chap after bears!’ said one of the
sailors afterward; “just as much under the water as
over it, when he was after bears. I told him that he
was going to injure his health that way; but he only
laughed, and pointing to his woollen jersey said, «I
do not feel cold.’”

To Fridtjof Nansen this Arctic expedition became
the turning-point of his life. The dream of the mighty
ocean never left him; it was ever before his eyes with
all its inexplicable riddles.

Here was something to do — something that people
called impossible. He would test it. Some years,
however, must elapse before that dream should become
reality. Nansen must first be aman. Everything that
tended to retard his progress must be removed or shat-
tered to pieces —all that would promote it, improved
upon and set in order.

Se





FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 29

CHAPTER III.

Fripryor NANSEN ACCEPTS A PosITIoN IN THE. BERGEN MusEuM.—
CrossEs THE MoUNTAINS IN THE WINTER.— PREPARES HIMSELF
FOR THE DoctTor’s DEGREE.

Tue very same day that Nansen set foot on land
after his return from this expedition he was offered the
Conservatorship of the Bergen! Museum by Professor
Collett. Old Danielsen, the chief physician, a man of
iron capacity for work, and who had attained great re-
nown in his profession, wanted to place a new man in
charge. Nansen promptly accepted the offer, but asked
first to be allowed to visit a sister in Denmark. But a
telegram from Danielsen, ‘ Nansen must come at once,”
compelled him, though with no little regret, to give up
his projected visit.

The meeting of these two men was as if two clouds
heavily laden with electricity had come in contact, pro-
ducing a spark that blazed over the northern sky. That
spark resulted in the famous Greenland expedition.

Danielsen was one of those who held that a youth
possessed of health, strength, and good abilities should
be able to unravel almost anything and everything in
this world, and in Fridtjof Nansen he found such an
one. So these two worked together assiduously; for

1 Bergen, the metropolis of western Norway, the second largest city

in Norway.
E



30 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

both were alike enthusiastic in the cause of scicnce,
both possessed the same strong faith in its advance-
ment. And Danielsen, the clear-headed scientist, after
being associated with his colleague for some few years,
entertained such firm confidence in his powers and ca-
pabilities, that a short time before the expedition to the
North Pole set out, he wrote in a letter: —

“ Fridtjof Nansen will as surely return crowned with
success from the North Pole as it is I who am writing
these lines — such is an old man’s prophecy! ”

The old scientist, who felt his end was drawing near,
sent him before his death an anticipatory letter of greet-
ing when the expedition should happily be over.

Nansen devoted himself to the study of science with
the same indomitable energy that characterized all of
his achievements.

Hour by hour he would sit over his microscope,
month after month devote himself to the pursuit of
knowledge. Yet every now and then, when he felt he
must go out to get some fresh air, he would buckle on
his ski, and dash along over the mountain or through
the forest till the snow spurted up in clouds behind
him. Thus he spent several years in Bergen.

But one fine day, chancing to read in the papers that
Nordenskjéld had returned from his expedition to Green-
land, and had said that the interior of the country was
a boundless plain of ice and snow, it flashed on his mind
that here was a field of work forhim. Yes — he would
cross Greenland on ski! and he at once set to work to
prepare a plan for the expedition. But such an adven-
turous task, in which life would be at stake, must not



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 31

be undertaken till he himself had become a proficient
in that branch of science which he had selected as his
special study. So he remains yet some more years in
Bergen, after which he spends twelve months in Naples,
working hard at the subjects in which he subsequently
‘ took his doctor’s degree in 1888.

Those years of expectation in Bergen were busy
years. Every now and then he would become home-
sick. In winter time he would go by the railway from
Bergen to Voss,! thence on ski over the mountains to
Christiania, down the Stalheim road,! with its sinuous
twists and bends, on through Nerddal, noted for its
earth slips, on by the swift Lerdals river fretting and
fuming on one side, and a perpendicular mountain wall
on the other. And here he would sit to rest in that
narrow gorge where avalanches are of constant occur-
rence. Let them come! he must rest awhile and eat.
A solitary wayfarer hurries by on his sleigh as fast as
his horse will go. “Take care!” shouts the traveller as
he passes by; and Nansen looks up, gathers his things
together, and proceeds on his journey through the
valley. It was Sauekilen, the most dangerous spot in
Lerdals, where he was resting. Then the night falls,
the moon shines brightly overhead, and the creaking
sound of his footsteps follows him over the desert
waste, and his dark-blue shadow stays close beside him.
And he, the man possessed of ineffable pride and indom-

1 Voss, a country district of western Norway, connected with Bergen
by railway. Stalheim road, a piece of road winding in a slow decline
down a steep hill, famous for the beauty of its scenery and the engineer-

ing skill with which it has been built. Merdédal and Lerdals river must
be passed on the way from Bergen to Christiania. ;



82 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

itable resolution, feels how utterly insignificant he is in
that lonely wilderness of snow — naught but an insect
under the powerful microscope of the starlit sky, for
the far-seeing eye of the Almighty is piercing through
his inmost soul. Here it avails not to seek to hide
aught from that gaze. So he pours out his thoughts to
Him who alone has the right to search them. That mid-
night pilgrimage over the snowy waste was like a divine
service on ski; and it was as an invigorated man, weary
though he was in body, that he knocked at the door
of a peasant’s cabin, while its astonished inmates looked
out in amazement, and the old housewife cried out,
“Nay! in Jesus’ name, are there folk on the fjeld 1 so
late in the night? Nay! is it you? Suppose you are
always so late on the road!”

Even still more arduous was the return journey that
same winter. The people in the last house on the east-
ern side of the mountain, in bidding him “ God speed,”
entreat him to go cautiously, for the road over the fjeld
is well nigh impassable in winter, they say. Not a man
in the whole district would follow him, they add. Nan-
sen promises them to be very careful, as he sets off in
the moonlight at three o’clock in the morning. Soon he
reaches the wild desert, and the glittering snow blushes
like a golden sea in the beams of the rising sun. Pres-
ently he reaches Myrstélen.2 The houseman is away
from home, and the women-folk moan and weep on
learning the road he means to take. On resuming his

1 Fjeld (pron. fyell), mountain.
2 Myrstélen, the last house on the eastern side of the mountain
inhabited the whole year through.



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 388

journey he shortly comes to a cross-road. Shall it be
Aurland or Vosse skavlen?! He chooses the latter
route across the snow plateau, for it is the path the wild
reindeer follow. On he skims over the crisp surface
enveloped in the cloud of snow-dust his ski stir up, for
the wind is behind him. But now he loses his way,
falls down among the clefts and fissures, toils along step
by step, and at last has to turn back and retrace his
steps. There ought to be a seter? somewhere about
there, but it seems as if it had been spirited away. pitchy darkness sets in; for the stars have disappeared
one by one, and the night is of a coal-black hue, and
Fridtjof has to make his bed on the snow-covered pla-
teau, under the protecting shelter of a bowlder, his faith-
ful dog by his side, his knapsack for a pillow, while the
night wind howls over the waste.

Again, at three in the morning, he resumes his jour-
ney, only again to lose his way, and burying himself
in the snow, determines to wait for daybreak. Dawn
came over the mountain-tops in a sea of rosy light,
while the dark shadows of night fled to their hiding-
places in the deep valleys below—a proclamation of
eternity, where nature was the preacher and nature the
listener, the voice of God speaking to himself.

At broad daylight he sees Vosse skavlen close at hand,
and thither he drags his weary, stiffened limbs; but
on reaching the summit he drinks “ skaal® to the fjeld,”

1 Aurland and Vosse skavlen, alternative routes across the mountains
from Christiania to Bergen.

2 Seter, mountain hut, used by grazicrs during the summer months.

8 Skaal, your health.



34 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

a frozen orange, the last he has, being his beverage.
Before the sun sets again, Fridtjof has crossed that
mountain height, as King Sverre! did of yore —an
achievement performed by those two alone!



. . . . . . . . .

Fridtjof Nansen’s father died in 1885, and it was
largely consideration for his aged parent’s failing health
during the last few years that delayed Nansen’s set-
ting out on his Greenland expedition. The letters that
passed between father and son during this period strik-
ingly evince the tender relationship existing between
them. On receipt of the tidings of his father’s last ill-
ness he. hurried off at a moment’s notice, never resting
on his long homeward journey, inexpressibly grieved at
arriving too late to see him alive.

Then, after a year’s sojourn in Naples, where he met
the genial and energetic Professor Dohrn, the founder of
the biological station? in that city, having no further
ties to hinder him, he enters heart and soul into the
tasks he has set himself to accomplish, —to take his de-
gree as doctor of philosophy, and to make preparation
for his expedition to Greenland, both of which tasks he
accomplished in the same year with credit. For he not
only made himself a name as a profound researcher in
the realms of science, but at the same time equipped
an expedition that was soon destined to excite univer-
sal attention, not in the north alone, but throughout the
length and breadth of Europe.

! King Sverre, King of Norway 1177 to 1202.
2 An institution where animal life is studied.



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 35

CHAPTER IV.

NANSEN Mrets NorDENSKJOLD.! — PREPARATIONS FOR THE GREEN-
LAND EXPEDITION. — NANSEN’S FOLLOWERS ON THE EXPEDITION.
— STARTING ON THE EXPEDITION. — DRIFTING ON AN ICE-FLOE.
LANDING ON EAst CoAst OF GREENLAND.

NANSEN had an arduous task before him in the
spring of 1888, one that demanded all his strength and
energy; for he would take his doctor’s degree, and make
preparations for his expedition to Greenland.

He had already, in the autumn of 1887, made up his
mind to accomplish both these things. In November of
that year, accordingly, he went to Stockholm to confer
with Nordenskjéld. Professor Brégger, who introduced
him to that gentleman, gives the following account of
the interview : —

“On Thursday, Nov. 8, as I was sitting in my study
in the Mineralogical Institute, my messenger came in
and said a Norwegian had been inquiring for me. He
had left no card, neither had he given his name. Doubt-
less, I thought, it was some one who wanted help out of
a difficulty.

©¢ What was he like?’ I inquired.

«Tall and fair,’ replied the messenger.

“«¢ Was he dressed decently?’ I asked.

1 Nordenskjéld (pron. Nordenshuld), famous Swedish explorer, dis-
coverer of the North-east Passage.



36 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

«+He hadn’t an overcoat on.’ This with a signifi-
cant smile, as he added, ‘Looked for all the world like
a seafaring man — or a tramp.’

«¢Humph!’ I muttered to myself; ‘sailor with no
overcoat! Very likely thinks I’m going to give him
yes, I think I understand.’

«Later on in the afternoon Wille! came in. ‘Have
you seen Nansen?’ he said.

«“¢Nansen?’ I replied. ‘Was that sailor fellow
without an overcoat Nansen?’

“¢ Without an overcoat! Why, he means to cross
over the inland ice of Greenland ;’ and out went Wille
—he was in a hurry.

« Presently entered Professor Lecke with the same
question, ‘Have you seen Nansen? Isn't he a fine
fellow? such a lot of interesting discoveries he told me
of, and then his researches into the nervous,system — a
grand fellow!’ and off went Lecke.

“But before long the man himself entered the room.
Tall, upright, broad-shouldered, strongly built, though
slim and very youthful looking, with his shock of hair
brushed off his well-developed forehead. Coming to-
ward me and holding out his hand, he introduced
himself by name, while a pleasing smile played over
his face.

«« And you mean to cross over Greenland?’ I asked.

«“¢Yes; I’ve been thinking of it,’ was the reply.

“T looked him in the face, as he stood before me with
an air of conscious self-reliance about him. With every



one

1 Wille, another Norwegian, who at that time was professor at the
High School in Stockholm.



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 37

word he spoke he seemed to grow on me; and this plan
of his to cross over Greenland on ski from the east
coast, which but a moment ago I had looked on as a
madman’s idea, during our conversation gradually grew
on me, till it seemed to be the most natural thing in
the world; and all at once it flashed on my mind, ¢ And
he’ll do it, too, as sure as ever we are sitting here talk-
ing about it.’

“He, whose name but two hours ago I had not
known, became in those few minutes (and it all came
about so naturally) as if he were an old acquaintance,
and I felt I should be proud and fortunate indeed to
have him for my friend my whole life through.

“¢We will go and see Nordenskjéld at once,’ I said,
rising up. And we went.

“With his strange attire, —he was dressed in a
tight-fitting, dark-blue blouse or coatee, a kind of
knitted jacket, — he was, as may be supposed, stared
at in Drottning-gatan. Some people, indeed, took him
for an acrobat or tight-rope dancer.”

Nordenskjéld, ‘old Nor” as he was often termed,
was in his laboratory, and looked up sharply as his
two visitors entered the room, for he was, as ever,
“ busy.”



The professor saluted, and introduced his compan-
ion, ‘Conservator Nansen from Bergen, who purposes
to cross over the inland ice of Greenland.”

“The deuce he does!” muttered “ old Nor,” staring
with all his eyes at the fair-haired young viking.

“And would like to confer with you about it,” con-

tinued the professor.
.



88 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

“ Quite welcome; and so Herr Nansen thinks of
crossing over Greenland?”

“Yes; such was his intention.” Thereon, without
further ado, he sketched out his projected plan, to which
“old Nor” listened with great attention, shaking his
head every now and then, as if rather sceptical about
it, but evidently getting more and more interested as he
proceeded.

As Nansen and Professor Brégger were sitting in the
latter’s house that evening, a knock was heard at the
door, and who should come in but “old Nor” himself —
a convincing proof to Brégger that the old man enter-
tained a favorable idea of the proposed plan. And
many a valuable hint did the young ice-bear get from
the old one, as they sat opposite each other —the man
of the past and the coming man of the present — quietly
conversing together that evening.

Now Nansen sets off for home in order to prepare
for the arduous task of the ensuing spring. In Decem-
ber, 1887, he is in Bergen again, and at the end of Jan-
uary he travels on ski from Hardanger to Kongsberg,
thence by rail to Christiania.

In March we see him once more in Bergen, giving
lectures in order to awaken public interest in Green-
land; now sleeping out on the top of Blaamand,! a
mountain near Bergen, in a sleeping-bag, to test its
efficiency; now standing on the cathedra in the uni-
versity auditorium to claim his right to the degree of
doctor of philosophy, which on April 28 was honor-
ably awarded him; and on May 2 he sets out for Copen-

1 Blaamand (pron. Blohmann).





FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 39

hagen, en route for Greenland. For unhappily it was
the case in Norway in 1888 that Norwegian exploits
must be carried out with Danish help. In vain had he
sought for assistance from the regents of the university.
They recommended the matter to the government, but
the government had no 5,000 kroner! (nearly £278) to
throw away on such an enterprise, — the enterprise of a
madman, as most people termed it.

Yet when that enterprise had been carried to a suc-
cessful issue, and that same lunatic had become a great
man and asked the government and the storthing? for a
grant of 200,000 kroner (nearly £11,112) for his second
mad expedition, his request was promptly granted. A
new Norway had grown up meanwhile, a new national
spirit had forced its way into existence, a living testi-
mony to the power of the Nansen expedition.

As stated above, Nansen had to go to Denmark for
the 5,000 kroner; and it was the wealthy merchant,
Augustin Gamel, who placed that amount at his dis-
posal. Still, certain is it, had not that sum of money
been forthcoming as it was, Fridtjof Nansen would have
plucked himself bare to the last feather in order to
carry out his undertaking.

But what was there to be gained from an expedition
to Greenland worth the risking of human life, —for a
life-risk it unquestionably would be,—to say nothing
of the cost thereof? What was there to be learned from
the ice?

The question is soon answered.

1 One krone (crown) equals 1s. 14d. .
2 Storthing, the legislative assembly (congress) of Norway. ;



40 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

The island of Greenland, — for it is now well ascer-
tained that it is an island, and that the largest in the
world, —this Sahara of the North, contains within its
ice-plains the key to the history of the human race.
For it is the largest homogeneous relic we possess of
the glacial age. Such as Greenland now is, so large
tracts of the world have been; and, what is of more in-
terest to us, so has the whole of the north been. It is
this mighty ice-realm that has caused a large proportion
of the earth’s surface to assume its present appearance.
The lowlands of Mid-Germany and Denmark have been
scoured and transported thither from the rocks of Nor-
way and Sweden. The Swedish rock at Liitzen in Sax-
ony is Swedish granite that the ice has carried with it.
And the small glaciers still left in Norway, such as
the Folgefond, Jostedalsbre, Svartis,! etc., are merely
“calves” of that ancient, stupendous mass of ice that
time and heat have transported, even though it once
lay more than a thousand metres in thickness over
widely extended plains.

To investigate, therefore, the inland ice of Greenland
is, in a word, to investigate the great glacial age; and
one may learn from such a study many a lesson ex-
planatory of our earth’s appearance at the present day,
and ascertain what could exist, and what could not,
under such conditions.

We know now that, during the glacial age, human
beings lived on this earth, even close up to this gigantic
glacier, that subsequently destroyed all life on its course.
It may be safely asserted that the struggle with the

1 Folgefond, Jostedalsbre, Svartisen, glaciers in Norway.



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 41

ice, and with the variations of climate, have been im-
portant factors in making the human race what it will
eventually be, the lords of nature.

The Esquimaux in their deerskin dress, the abo-
tigines of Australia, the pigmy tribes of Africa’s pri-
meyal forests, are a living testimony of the tenacious
powers of the soul and body of mankind, — civilization’s
trusty outposts. An Esquimau living on blubber under
fifty degrees of cold is just as much a man of achieve-
ment in this work-a-day world as an Edison, who, with
every comfort at his disposal, forces nature to disclose
her hidden marvels. But he who, born in the midst
of civilization, and who forces his way to an outpost
farther advanced than any mankind has yet attained,
is greater, perhaps, than either, especially when in his
struggle for existence he wrests from nature her inmost
secrets.

This was the kernel of Nansen’s exploits —his first
and his last.

Nansen was fully alive to the fact that his enterprise
would involve human life; and he formed his plans in
such wise that he would either attain his object or
perish in the attempt. He would make the dangerous,
uninhabited coast of East Greenland his starting-point
as one which presented no enticement for retracing his
steps. He would force his way onward. The instinct
of self-preservation should impel him toward the west
—the greater his advance in that direction the greater



42 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

his hopes. Behind him naught but death; before him,
life!

But he must have followers! Where were men to
be found to risk their lives on such a venture? to form
one of a madman’s retinue? And not only that, he
must have men with him who, like himself, were well
versed in all manly sports, especially in running on ski;
men hard as iron, as he was; men who, like himself,
were unencumbered with family ties. Where were such
to be found? He sought long and diligently, and he
found them.

There was a man named Sverdrup — Otto Sverdrup.
Yes, we all of us know him now! But then he was
an unknown Nordland youth, inured to hardship on sea
and land, an excellent sailor, a skilful ski-runner, firm
of purpose; one to whom fatigue was a stranger, physi-
cally strong and able in emergency, unyielding as a
rod of iron, firm as a rock. A man chary of words in
fine weather, but eloquent in storm; possessed, too, of
a courage that lay so deep that it needed almost a

peril involving life to arouse it. Yet, when the pinch ©

came Sverdrup was in his element. Then would his
light blue eyes assume a darker hue, and a smile creep
over his hard-set features; then he would resemble a
hawk that sits on a perch with ruffled feathers, bidding
defiance to every one who approaches it, but which,
when danger draws nigh, flaps its pinions, and soars
aloft in ever widening circles, increasing with the force
of the tempest, borne along by the storm.

This man accompanied him.

Number two was Lieutenant, now Captain, Olaf Die-

ee





OTTO SVERDRUP.



44 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

trichson. He, too, hailed from the north. A man who
loved a life in the open air, a master in all manly ex-
ploits, elastic as a steel spring, a proficient on ski, and
a sportsman in heart and soul. And added to this, a
man possessed of great knowledge in those matters
especially that were needed in an expedition like the
present. He, too, was enrolled among the number.

Number three was also from Nordland, from Sver-
drup’s neighborhood, who recommended him. His name
was Kristian Kristiansen Trana—a handy and reliable
youth.

These three were all Nordlanders. But Nansen had
a great desire to have a couple of Fjeld-Finns with him,
for he considered that, inured as they were to ice and
snow, their presence would be of great service to him.
They came from Karasjok.1_ The one a fine young fel-
low, more Qven? than Lapp; the other a little squalid-
looking, dark-haired, pink-eyed Fjeld-Finn. The name
of the first was Balto; of the other, Ravna. These
two children of the mountains came to Christiania look-
ing dreadfully perplexed, with little of the heroic about
them. For they had agreed to accompany the expe-
dition principally for the sake of the good pay, and now
learned for the first time that their lives might be en-
dangered. Nansen, however, managed to instil a little
confidence into them, and as was subsequently proved,
they turned out to be useful and reliable members of

1 Karasjok (pron. Karashok), one of the northernmost districts of
Norway, chiefly inhabited by Lapps.

2 Qven, the Norwegian name for a man of the race inhabiting the
grand duchy of Finland. The Lapps ave in Norway called Finns.

2p



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 45

the expedition. Old Ravna, who was forty-five, was
a married man,—a fact Nansen did not know when
he engaged him, — and was possessed of great physical
strength and powers of endurance.

Nansen now had the lives of five persons beside his
own on his conscience. He would, therefore, make his
equipment in such manner that he should have nothing
to reproach himself with in case anything went wrong,
a work that he conscientiously and carefully carried
out. ‘There was not a single article or implement that
was not scientifically and practically discussed and
tested, measured and weighed, before they set out.
Hand-sleighs and ski, boats and tent, cooking-utensils,
sleeping-bags, shoes and clothes, food and drink, all
were of the best kind; plenty of everything, but noth-
ing superfluous — light, yet strong, nourishing and
strengthening. Everything, in fact, was well thought
over, and as was subsequently proved, the mistakes
that did occur were few and trifling.

Nansen made most of the implements with his own
hands, and nothing came to pieces during the whole
expedition saving a boat plank that was crushed by the
ice.

But one thing Nansen omitted to take with him, and
that was a supply of spirituous liquor. It did not exist
in his dictionary of sport. For he had long entertained
the opinion — an opinion very generally held by the
youth of Norway at the present day —that strong drink
is a foe to manly exploit, sapping and undermining
man’s physical and mental powers. In former days,
indeed, in Norway, as elsewhere, it was considered

G



46 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

manly to drink, but now the drinker is looked down on
with a pity akin to contempt.

Thus equipped, these six venturesome men set out
on their way; first by steamer to Iceland, thence by the
Jason, a sealer, Captain Jacobsen its commander, who,
as opportunity should offer, was to set them ashore on
the east coast of Greenland. And here, after struggling
for a month with the ice, they finally arrived, on July
19, so near to the Sermilik Fjord that Nansen deter-
mined to leave the Jason and make his way across the
ice to land. The whole ship’s crew were on deck to
bid them farewell. Nansen was in command of one of
the two boats, and when he gave the word “set off,”
they shot off from the ship’s side, while the Jason’s two
guns and a spontaneous hurrah from sixty-four stalwart
sailors’ throats resounded far and wide over the sea.
As the boats worked their way into the ice, the Jason
changed her course, and ere long our six travellers
watched the Norwegian flag, waving like a distant
tongue of fire, gradually fade from sight and disappear
among the mist and fog.

These six men set out on their arduous journey
with all the indomitable fearlessness and disregard of
danger that youth inspires, — qualifications that would
speedily be called into requisition.

Before many hours of toiling in the ice, the rain
came down in torrents, and the current drove them
with irresistible force away from the land, while ice-
floes kept striking against their boats’ sides, threatening
to crush or capsize them. sen’s boat was broken by the concussion, and had to



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. AT

be instantly repaired, the rain meanwhile pouring down
a perfect deluge. They determined, therefore, to drag
the boats upon an ice-floe, and to pitch their tent on it;
and having done this they got into their sleeping-bags,
the deafening war of the raging storm in their ears.
The two Fjeld-Lapps, however, thinking their end was























































CAMP ON THE DRIFT-ICE.

drawing near, sat with a dejected air gazing in silence
out over the sea.

Far away in the distance the roar of the surge dash-
ing against the edge of the ice could be heard, while
the steadily increasing swell portended an approaching
tempest.

Next morning, July 20, Nansen was awakened by a



48 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

violent concussion. The ice-floe on which they were
was rent asunder, and the current was rapidly drifting
them out toward the open sea. The roar of the surge
increased; the waves broke over the ice-floe on all
sides. Balto and Rayna lay crouching beneath a tar-
paulin reading the New Testament in Lappish, while
the tears trickled down their cheeks; but out on the
floe Dietrichson and Kristiansen were making jokes as
every fresh wave dashed over them. Sverdrup was
standing with hands folded behind his back, chewing
his quid, his eyes directed towards the sea, as if in
expectation.

They are but a few hundred metres distant from the
open sea, and soon will have to take to the boats, or
be washed off the floe. The swell is so heavy that the
floe ducks up and down like a boat in the trough of the
sea. So the order is given, “ All hands turn in,” for all
their strength will be needed in the fierce struggle they
will shortly have to encounter. So they sleep on the
' very brink of death, the roar of the storm their lullaby
— Rayna and Balto in one of the boats, Nansen and
the others in the tent, where the water pours in and out.

But there is one outside, on the floe. It is his
watch. Hour by hour he walks up and down, his
hands behind his back. It is Sverdrup. Every now
and then he stands still, turns his sharp, thin face with
the sea-blue eyes towards the breakers, and then once
more resumes his walk.

The storm is raging outside, and the surge is dash-
ing over the ice. He goes to the boat where Ravna
and Balto lie sleeping, and lays hold of it, lest it should



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 49

be swept away by the backwash. Then he goes to the
tent, undoes a hook, and again stands gazing over
the sea; then turns round, and resumes his walk as
before.

Their floe is now at the extreme edge of the ice,
close to the open sea. A huge crag of ice rises up like
some white-clad threatening monster, and the surf dashes
furiously over the floe. Again the man on the watch
arrests his steps; he undoes another hook in the tent.
Matters are at their worst! He must arouse his com-
rades! He is about to do so when he turns once more
and gazes seaward. He becomes aware of a new and
strange motion in the floe beneath him. Its course is
suddenly changed; it is speeding swiftly away from
the open sea — inward, ever inward toward calm water,
toward life, toward safety. And as that bronze-faced
man stands there, a strange and serious look passes
over his features. For that has occurred, — that won-
drous thing that he and many another sailor has often
experienced, — salvation from death without the media-
tion of human agency. That moment was for him what
the stormy night on the Hardanger waste was to Nan-
sen. It was like divine service! It was as if some in-
visible hand had steered the floe, he said afterwards to
Nansen. So he rolled his quid round into the other
cheek, stuck his hands in his pockets; and hour after
hour, till late in the morning, the steps of that iron-
hearted man on the watch might be heard pacing to
and fro.

When Nansen awoke, the floe was in safe shelter.

Still for another week they kept drifting south-





50 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

ward, the glaciers and mountain ridges one after another
disappearing from view—a weary, comfortless time.
Then, toward midnight on July 28, when it was Sver-
drup’s watch again, he thought he could hear the sound
of breakers in the west. What it was he could not
rightly make out; he thought, perhaps, his senses de-
ceived him; for, at other times, the sound had always
come from the east where the sea was. But next morn-
ing, when it was Ravna’s watch, Nansen was awakened
by seeing the Finn’s grimy face peering at him through
an opening in the tent.

“ Now, Ravna, what is it? can you see land?” he
asked at a venture.

“Yes — yes — land too close!” croaked Ravna, as he
drew his head back.

Nansen sprang out of the tent. Yes, there was the
land, but a short distance off; and the ice was loose so
that a way could easily be forced through it. In a
twinkling all hands were busy; and a few hours later
Nansen planted his foot on the firm land of Greenland.



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. dL

CHAPTER V.

JOURNEY ACROSS GREENLAND.— MEETING EsquimMAux. — REACHING
THE West Coast.— RETURN TO CIVILIZATION AND Homr.

WHEN Nansen and his companions, after their per-
ilous adventures in the drift-ice, landed with flags flying
on their boats on the east waste of Greenland, the first
thing they did was to give vent to their feelings in a
ringing hurrah —a sound which those wild and barren
crags had never re-echoed before. Their joy, indeed, on
feeling firm ground beneath their feet once more baffles
description. In a word, they conducted themselves like
a pack of schoolboys, singing, laughing, and playing all
manner of pranks. The Lapps, however, did not par-
take in the general merriment, but took themselves off
up the mountain-side, where they remained several
hours.

But when their first ebullition of joy had somewhat
subsided, Nansen himself followed the example of the
Lapps, and clambered up the slope in order to get a
good view over the landscape, leaving the others to pre-
pare the banquet they determined to indulge in that
evening on the sea-beach. And here he remained some
little while, entranced with the wondrous beauty of the
scene. The sea and the ice stretched far away to the
east, shining like a belt of silver beneath him, while on
the west the mountain-tops were bathed in a flood of



52 : FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

hazy sunshine, and the inland ice, the “Sahara of the
North,” extended in a level unbroken plain for miles
and miles into the interior.

A snow bunting perched on a stone close by him,
and chirped a welcome; a mosquito came humming
through the air to greet the stranger, and settled on his
hand. He would not disturb it; it was a welcome
from home. It wanted his blood, and he let it take its
fill. To the south the grand outline of Cape Torden-
skjold rose up in the horizon, its name and form re-
calling his country to his mind; and there arose in his
breast an earnest desire, a deep longing, to sacrifice
anything and everything for his beloved “Old Nor-
way.”

On rejoining his comrades, the feast was ready. It
consisted of oatmeal biscuits, Gruyére cheese, whortle-
berry jam, and chocolate; and there is little doubt that
these six adventurers “‘ate as one eats in the spring-
time of youth.” For it had been unanimously resolved
that, for this one day at least, they would enjoy them-
selves to the full; on the morrow their daily fare would
be, to eat little, sleep little, and work as hard as possible.
To-day, then, should be the first and the last of such in-
dulgence. Time was precious!

On the next day, therefore, they resumed their
northward journey, along the east coast, fighting their
way day and night, inch by inch, foot by foot, through
the drift-ice; at times in peril, at others in safety ;
past Cape Adelaer, past Cape Garde, ever forward in
one incessant, monotonous struggle. And now they
approached the ill-omened Puisortok, of which Esqui-



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 53.

maux and Huropean seafarers had many an evil tale to:
tell. There, it was said, masses of ice would either shoot

up suddenly from beneath the surface of the water, and.
crush any vessel that ventured near, or would fall down

from the overhanging height, and overwhelm it. Ther>

not a word must be spoken! there must be no laughing,

no eating, no smoking, if one would pass it in safety!

Above all, the fatal name of Puisortok must not pass
the lips, else the glacier would be angry, and certain

destruction ensue.

Nansen, however, it may be said, did not observe
these regulations, and yet managed to pass it in safety.
In his opinion there was nothing very remarkable or
terrible about it.

But something else took place at Puisortok that sur-
prised him and his companions.

On July 30, as they were preparing their midday
meal, Nansen heard, amid the shrill cries of the sea--
birds, a strange weird sound. What it could be he
could not conceive. It resembled the cry of a loon
more than anything else, and kept coming nearer and
nearer. ‘Through his telescope, however, he discerned
two dark specks among the ice-floes, now close. to-
gether, now a little apart, making straight for them.
They were human beings evidently — human beings in
the midst of that desert region of ice, which they had
thought to be a barren, uninhabited waste. Balto, too,
watched their approach attentively, with a half aston-
ished, half uneasy look, for he believed them to be
supernatural beings.

On came the strangers, one of them bending forward
H



54 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

in his kayak’ as if bowing in salutation; and, on com-
ing alongside the rock, they crawled out of their ka-
yaks and stood before Nansen and his companions with
bare heads, dressed in jackets and trousers of seal-skin,
smiling, and making all manner of friendly gestures.
They were Esquimaux, and had glass beads in their
jet-black hair. Their skin was of a chestnut hue,
and their movements, if not altogether graceful, were
attractive.

On coming up to our travellers they began to ask
questions in a strange language, which, needless to say,
was perfectly unintelligible. Nansen, indeed, tried to
talk to them in Esquimau from a conversation book
in that tongue he had with him, but it was perfectly
useless. And it was not till both parties had recourse
to the language of signs that Nansen was able to ascer-
tain that they belonged to an Esquimau encampment
to the north of Puisortok.

These two Esquimaux were good-natured looking
little beings; and now they began to examine the equip-
ments of the travellers, and taste their food, with which
they seemed beyond measure pleased, expressing their
admiration at all they saw by a long-drawn kind of
bovine bellow. Finally they took leave, and set off
northward in their kayaks which they managed with
wonderful dexterity, and soon disappeared from sight.

At six the same evening our travellers followed in
the same direction, and in a short time reached the Es-
juimau encampment at Cape Bille. Long, however,

1 Kayak, small and light boat, chiefly made of sealskin, used by
the natives of Greenland.



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 55

before their eyes could detect any signs of tents or of
human beings, their sense of smell became aware of a
rank odor of train-oil, accompanied by a sound of voices;
and they presently saw numbers of Esquimaux stand-
ing on the sea-beach, and on the rocks, earnestly watch-
ing the approach of the strangers.

It was a picturesque sight that presented itself to
the eyes of our travellers.

«« All about the ledges of the rocks,” writes Nansen,
“stood long rows of strangely wild, shaggy looking crea-
tures, men, women and children — all dressed in much
the same scanty attire, staring and pointing at us, and
uttering the same cowlike sound we had heard in the
forenoon. It was just as if a whole herd of cows were
lowing one against another, as when the cowhouse door
is opened in the morning to admit the expected fod-
der.”

They were all smiling, — a smile indeed, is the only
welcoming salute of the Esquimaux, —all eager to help
Nansen and his companions ashore, chattering away in-
cessantly in their own tongue, like a saucepan boiling
and bubbling over with words, not one of which, alas,
could Nansen or his companions understand.

Presently Nansen was invited to enter one of their
tents, in which was an odor of such a remarkable na-
ture, such a blending of several ingredients, that a de-
scription thereof is impossible. It was the smell, as it
were, of a mixture of train-oil, human exhalations, and
the effluvium of fetid liquids all intimately mixed up to-
gether; while men and women, lying on the floor round
the fire, children rolling about everywhere, dogs sniff-



56 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

ing all around, helped to make up a scene that was de-
cidedly unique.

All of the occupants were of a brownish-greyish hue,
due mostly to the non-application of soap and water,
and were swarming with vermin. All of them were



EAST GREENLAND ESQUIMAUX.

shiny with train-oil, plump, laughing, chattering crea-
tures—in a word, presenting a picture of primitive
social life, in all its original blessedness.

Nansen does not consider the Esquimaux, crosseyed



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 57

and flat-featured though they be, as by any means re-
pulsive looking. The nose he describes, in the case of
children, ‘as a depression in the middle of the face,”
the reverse ideal, indeed, of a European nose.

On the whole he considers their plump, rounded
forms to have a genial appearance about them, and
that the seal is the Esquimau prototype.

The hospitality of these children of nature was
boundless. ‘They would give away all they possessed,
even to the shirt on their backs, had they possessed such
an article; and certainly showed extreme gratitude
when their liberality was reciprocated, evidently pla-
cing a high value on empty biscuit-tins, for each time
any of them got one presented to him he would at once
bellow forth his joy at the gift.

But what especially seemed to attract their interest
was when Nansen and his companions began to undress,
before turning in for the night into their sleeping-bags;
while to watch them creep out of the same the next
morning afforded them no less interest. They enter-
tained, however, a great dread of the camera, for every
time Nansen turned its dark glass eye upon them, a
regular stampede would take place.

Next day Nansen and the Esquimaux parted com-
pany, some of the latter proceeding on their way to the
south, others accompanying him on his journey north-
ward. The leavetaking between the Esquimaux was
peculiar, being celebrated by cramming their nostrils
full of snuff from each other’s snuff-horns. Snuff in-
deed is the only benefit, or the reverse, it seems the
Esquimaux have derived from European civilization up



58 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

to date; and is such a favourite, one might say neces-
sary, article with them that they will go on a shopping
expedition to the south to procure it, a journey that
often takes them four years to accomplish !

The journey northward was an extremely fatiguing
one, for they encountered such stormy weather that
their boats more than once narrowly escaped being
nipped in the ice. As a set-off, however, to this, the
scenery proved to be magnificent, — the floating moun-
tains of ice resembling enchanted castles, and all nature
was on a stupendous scale. Finally they reached a har-
bour on Griffenfeldt’s Island, where they enjoyed the
first hot meal they had had on their coasting expedition,
consisting of caraway soup. This meal of soup was
a great comfort to the weary and worn-out travellers.
Here a striking but silent testimony of that severe
and pitiless climate presented itself in the form of a
number of skulls and human bones lying blanched and
scattered among the rocks, evidently the remains of
Esquimaux who in times long gone by had perished
from starvation.

After an incredible amount of toil, Nansen arrived at |
a small island in the entrance of the Inugsuazmuit Fjord,
and thence proceeded to Skjoldungen where the water
was more open. Here they encamped, and were almost
eaten up by mosquitoes.

On Aug. 6 they again set out on their way north-
ward, meeting with another encampment of Esquimaux,
who were, however, so terrified at the approach of the



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 59

strangers, that they one and all bolted off to the moun-
tain, and it was not till Nansen presented them with an
empty tin box and some needles that they became re-
assured, after which they accompanied the expedition
for some little distance, and on parting gave Nansen a
quantity of dried seal’s flesh.

The farther our travellers proceeded on their journey,
the more dissatisfied and uneasy did Balto and Ravna
become. Accordingly one day Nansen took the oppor-
tunity of giving Balto a good scolding, who with tears
and sobs gave vent to his complaints, “ They had not
had food enough — coffee only three times during the
whole journey; and they had to work harder than any
beast the whole livelong day, and he would gladly give
many thousands of kroner to be safe at home once
more.”

There was indeed something in what Balto said.
‘The fare had unquestionably been somewhat scanty, and
the work severe ; and it was evident that these children
of nature, hardy though they were, could not vie with
civilized people when it became a question of endurance
for any length of time, and of risking life and taxing
one’s ability to the utmost.

Finally, on Aug. 10, the expedition reached Umivik
in a dense fog, after a very difficult journey through the
ice, and encamped for the last time on the east coast
of Greenland. Here they boiled coffee, shot a kind of
snipe, and lived like gentlemen, so that even Balto and
Rayna were quite satisfied. The former, indeed, began
intoning some prayers, as he had heard the priest in
Finmarken do, in a very masterly manner, —a pastime,



60 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

by the way, he never indulged in except he felt his life
to be quite safe.

The next day, Aug. 11, rose gloriously bright. Far
away among the distant glaciers a rumbling sound as
of cannon could be heard, while snow-covered mountains
towered high overhead, on the other side of which lay
boundless tracts of inland ice. Nansen and Sverdrup
now made a reconnoitring expedition, and did not re-
turn till five o’clock the next morning. It still required
some days to overhaul and get everything in complete
order for their journey inland; and it was not till nine
o’clock in the evening of Aug. 16, after first dragging
up on land the boats, in which a few necessary articles
of food were stored, together with a brief account of
the progress of the expedition carefully packed in a tin
box, that they commenced their journey across the in-
land ice.

Nansen and Sverdrup led the way with the large
sleigh, while the others,~each dragging a smaller one,
followed in their wake. Thus these six men, confident
of solving the problem before them, with the firm earth
beneath their feet, commenced the ascent of the moun-
tain-slope which Nansen christened “ Nordenskjéld’s
Nunatak.” 1

Their work had now begun in real earnest —a work
so severe and arduous that it would require all the
strength and powers of endurance they possessed to ac-
complish it. The ice was full of fissures, and these
had either to be circumvented or crossed, a very diffi-
cult matter with heavily laden sleighs. A covering of

1 Peaks of rock projecting above the surface of the ice.



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 61

ice often lay over these fissures, so that great caution
was required. Hence their progress was often very
slow, each man being roped to his fellow; so that if one
of them should happen to disappear into one of these
fathomless abysses, his companion could haul him up.
Such an occurrence happened more than once; for Nan-
sen as well as the others would every now and then fall
plump in up to the arms, dangling with his legs over
empty space. But it always turned out well; for pow-
erful hands took hold of the rope, and the practised
gymnasts knew how to extricate themselves.

At first the ascent was very hard work, and it will
readily be understood that the six tired men were not
sorry on the first night of their journey to crawl into
their sleeping-bags, after first refreshing the inner man
with cup after cup of hot tea.

Yet, notwithstanding all the fatigue they had under-
gone, there was so much strength left in them that
Dietrichson volunteered to go back and fetch a piece
of Gruyére cheese they had left behind when halting
for their midday meal. ‘It would be anice little morn-
ing walk,” he said, “before turning in!” And he ac-
tually went—all for the sake of a precious bit of
cheese !

Next day there was a pouring rain that wet them
through. The work of hauling the sleighs, however,
kept them warm. But later in the evening, it came
down in such torrents that Nansen deemed it advisable
to pitch the tent, and here they remained, weather-
bound, for three whole days. And long days they

were! But our travellers followed the example of
I



62 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

bruin in winter; that is, they lay under shelter the
greater part of the time, Nansen taking care that they
should also imitate bruin in another respect, — who
sleeps sucking his paw, — by giving them rations once
a day only. ‘He who does no work shall have little
food,” was his motto.

On the forenoon of the twentieth, however, the
weather improved; and our travellers again set out on
their journey, having fist indulged in a good warm
meal by way of recompense for their three days’ fasting.
The ice at first was very difficult, so much so that they
had to retrace their steps, and, sitting on their sleighs,
slide down the mountain slope. But the going im-
proved, as also did the weather. “If it would only
freeze a little,” sighed Nansen. But he was to get
enough of frost before long.

On they tramped, under a broiling sun, over the
slushy snow. As there was no drinking-water to be
had, they filled their flasks with snow, carrying them
in their breast-pockets for the heat of their bodies to
melt it.

On Aug. 22 there was a night frost; the snow was
hard and in good condition, but the surface so rough and
full of lumps and frozen waves of slush, that the ropes
with which they dragged the sleighs cut and chafed
their shoulders. “It was just as if our shoulders were
being burnt,’’ Balto said.

They now travelled mostly by night, for it was
better going then, and there was no sun to broil them;
while the aurora borealis, bathing as it were the whole
of the frozen plain in a flood of silvery light, inspired



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 63

them with fresh courage. The surface of the ice over
which they travelled was as smooth and even as a lake
newly frozen over. Even Balto on such occasions would
indulge in a few oaths, a thing he never allowed him-
self except when he felt “master of the situation.” He
was a Finn, you see, and perhaps had no other way of
giving expression to his feelings!

As they got into higher altitudes the cold at night
became more intense. Occasionally they were over-
taken by a snowstorm, when they had to encamp in
order to avoid being frozen to death; while at times,
again, the going would become so heavy in the fine
drifting snow that they had to drag their sleighs one
by one, three or four men at a time to each sleigh, an
operation involving such tremendous exertion that Kris-
tiansen, a man of few words, on one such occasion said
to Nansen, “What fools people must be to let them-
selves in for work like this! ”

To give some idea of the intense cold they had to
encounter it may be stated that, at the highest altitude
they reached, — 9,272 feet above the sea, — the temper-
ature fell to below — 49° Fahrenheit, and this, too, in
the tent at night, the thermometer being under Nansen’s
pillow. And all this toil and labour, be it remembered,
went on from Aug. 16 to the end of September, with
sleighs weighing on an average about two hundred and
twenty pounds each, in drifting snow-dust, worse than
even the sandstorms of Sahara.

In order to lighten their labour, Nansen resolved to
use sails on the sleighs—a proceeding which Balto
highly disapproved of: “Such mad people he had







Cie ae FRIDTJOF NANSEN.-

never seen before, to want to sail over the snow! He
was a Lapp, he was, and there was nothing they could
teach him on land. It was the greatest nonsense he
had ever heard of! ”

Sails, however, were fortlicoming, notwithstanding
Balto’s objections ; and they sat and stitched them with
frozen fingers in the midst of the snow. But it was

















pee



SLEDGING ACROSS GREENLAND.

astonishing what a help they proved to be; and so they
proceeded on their way, after slightly altering their
course in the direction of Godthaab.t

Thus, then, we see these solitary beings, looking like
dark spots moving on an infinite expanse of snow,

1 Godthaab (pron. Gott-hob), the only city, and seat of the Danish
governor, on the west coast of Greenland.



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. - 65

wending their way ever onward, — Nansen and Sver-
drup side by side, ski-staff and ice-axe in hand, in
front, earnestly gazing ahead as they dragged the heavy
sleigh, while close behind followed Dietrichson and
Kristiansen, Balto and Ravna bringing up the rear,
each dragging a smaller sleigh. So it went on for
weeks; and though it tried their strength, and put
their powers of endurance to a most severe test, yet, if
ever the thought of “ giving it up ” arose in their minds,
it was at.once scouted by all the party, the two Lapps
excepted. One day Balto complained loudly to Nan-
sen.. “ When you asked us,” he said, “in Christiania,
what weight we could drag, we told you we could
manage one hundredweight each, but now we have
double that weight, and all I can say is, that, if we can
drag these loads over to the west coast, we are stronger
than horses.”

Onward, however, they went, in spite of the cold,
which at times was so intense that their beards froze
fast to their jerseys, facing blinding snowstorms that
well-nigh made old Ravna desperate. The only bright
moments they enjoyed were when sleeping or at their
meals. ‘The sleeping-bags, indeed, were a paradise ;
their meals, ideals of perfect bliss.

Unfortunately, Nansen had not taken a sufficient
supply of fatty food with him, and to such an extent
did the craving for fat go, that Sverdrup one day seri-
ously suggested that they should eat boot-grease — a
compound of boiled grease and old linseed oil! Their
great luxury was to eat raw butter, and smoke a pipe
after it. First they would smoke the fragrant weed





66 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

pure and simple; when that was done, the tobacco ash,
followed by the oil as long as it would burn; and when
this was all exhausted, they would smoke tarred yarn,
or anything else that was a bit tasty! Nansen, who
neither smoked nor chewed, would content himself with
a chip of wood, or a sliver off one of the “truger”
(snowshoes). “It tasted good,” he said, “and kept his
mouth moist.”

Finally, on Sept. 14, they had reached their highest
altitude, and now began to descend toward the coast,
keeping a sharp lookout for “land ahead.” But none
was yet to be seen, and one day Rayna’s patience com-
pletely gave way. With sobs and moans he said to
Nansen, —

“T’m an old Fjeld-Lapp, and a silly old fool! Pm
sure we shall never get to the coast!”

“Yes,” was the curt answer, “it’s quite true! Rayna
is a silly old fool! ”

One day, however, shortly afterward, while they were
at dinner, they heard the twittering of a bird close by.
It was a snow-bunting, bringing them a greeting from
the west coast, and their hearts grew warm within them
at the welcome sound.

On the next day, with sails set, they proceeded on-
ward down the sloping ground, but with only partial
success. Nansen was standing behind the large sleigh
to steady it, while Sverdrup steered from the front.
Merrily flew the bark; but, unfortunately, Nansen
stumbled and fell, and had hard work to regain his
legs, and harder work still to gather up sundry articles
that had fallen off the sleigh, such as boxes of pem-



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 67

mican, fur jackets, and ice-axes. Meanwhile Sverdrup
and the ship had almost disappeared from view, and all
that Nansen could see of it was a dark, square speck,
far ahead across the ice. Sverdrup had been sitting all
the while in front, thinking what an admirable passage
they were making, and was not a little astonished, on
looking behind, to find that he was the only passenger
on board. Matters, however, went on better after this;
and in the afternoon, as they were sailing their best and
fastest, the joyful cry of “Land ahead!” rang through
the air. The west coast was in sight! | After several
days’ hard work across fissures and over uneven ice,
the coast itself was finally reached. But Godthaab was
a long, long way off still, and to reach it by land was
sheer impossibility.

The joy of our travellers on once more feeling firm
ground beneath their feet, and of getting real water to
drink, was indescribable. They swallowed quart after
quart, till they could drink no more. The Lapps, as
usual took themselves off to the fjeld to testify their joy.

That evening was the most delightful one they had
experienced for weeks, one never to be forgotten in
after years, when, with their tent pitched, and a blazing
fire of wood, they sat beside it, Sverdrup smoking a pipe
of moss in lieu of tobacco, and Nansen lying on his back
on the grass, which shed a strange and delightful per-
fume all around. 5

But how was Godthaab to be reached? By land it
was impossible! Therefore the journey must be made
by sea! But there was no boat! A boat, then, must
be built. And Sverdrup and Nansen were the men to



68 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

solve the problem. They set to work, and by evening
the boat was finished. Its dimensions were eight feet
five inches in length, four feet eight inches in breadth,
and it was made of willows and sail-cloth. The oars
were of bamboo and willow branches, across the blades
of which canvas was stretched. The thwarts were made
from bamboo, and the foot of one of their scientific in-





ON THE WAY TO GODTHAAB.

struments, which, by the way, chafed them terribly, and
were very uncomfortable seats.

_ All preparations being now made, Nansen and Sver-
drup set off on their adventurous journey. The first day
it was terribly hard work, for the water was too shallow
to admit of rowing. On the second day, however, they
put out to sea. Here they had at times to encounter



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 69

severe weather, fearing every moment lest their frail
bark should be swamped or capsized. At night they
would sleep on the naked shore beneath the open sky.
From morning till night struggling away with their
oars, living on hot soup and the sea-birds they shot,
which were ravenously devoured without much labour
being devoted to cooking the same. Finally they
reached their destination, meeting with a hearty wel-
come, accompanied by a salute from cannon fired off in
their honor, when once it was ascertained who the new
arrivals were.

Nansen’s first inquiry was about a ship for Denmark,
and he learned, to his great disappointment, that the
last vessel for the season had sailed from Godthaab two
months before, and that the nearest ship, the Fox, was
lying at Ivitgut, three hundred miles off.

It was a terrible blow in the midst of their joy.
Home had, as it were, at one stroke receded many
hundreds of miles away; and here they would have
to pass a whole winter and spring, while dear ones
_ at home would think they had perished, and would
be mourning for their supposed loss all those weary
months.

But this must never be! The Fox must be got at,
and friends at home must at all events get letters by her.

After a great deal of trouble Nansen at length found
an Esquimau who agreed to set off in his kayak bear-
ing two letters. One was from Nansen to Gamel, who
had equipped the expedition; the other from Sverdrup
to his father.

This having been arranged, and boats having been
K



70 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

sent off to fetch their comrades from Ameralikfjord,
Nansen and Sverdrup plunged into all the joys and de-
lights of civilized life to which they had so long been
strangers. Now they were able to indulge in the lux-
ury of soap and water for the first time since the com-
mencement of their journey across the ice. ‘To change
their clothes, to sleep in proper beds, to eat civilized
food with knives and forks on earthenware plates, to
smoke, to converse with educated beings, was to them
the summum bonum of enjoyment, and they felt them-
selves to be in clover.

Notwithstanding all these, Nansen aia not seem alto-
gether himself. He was in a dreamy state, thinking
perhaps of nights spent in sleeping-bags up on the
inland ice, or dreaming of that memorable evening in
the Ameralikfjord, of the hard struggles they had under-
gone on the boundless plains of snow. These things
flashed across him, excluding from his mind the convic-
tion that he had rendered his name famous.

At last, on Oct. 12, the other members of the ex-
pedition joined them, and these six men, who had risked
their lives in that perilous adventure, were once more
assembled together.

His object had been attained, and the name of Fridtjof
Nansen would soon be known the whole world over!

That same autumn the Fox brought to Norway .
tidings of the success of the expedition, and a few hours
after her arrival the telegraph announced throughout
the length and breadth of the civilized world, in few
but significant words, “ Fridtjof Nansen has crossed dver
the inland ice of Greenland.”



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 71

And the Norwegian nation, which had refused to
grant the venturesome young man 5,000 kroner (nearly
£278), now raised her head, and called Fridtjof Nansen
one of her best sons. And when one day in April, after
having spent a long winter in Greenland, he went on
board the Hyvidbjérn? on his homeward journey, prepa-
rations were being made in the capital for a festival
such as a king receives when he visits his subjects.

It was May 30: the spring sun was shining with
all its brilliancy over Norway. The Christiania fjord
was teeming with yachts and small sailing-boats. A
light breeze played over the ruffled surface of the water,
while the perfume of the budding trees on its banks
shed a sweet fragrance all around. As for the town,
it literally swarmed with human beings. The quays,
the fortress, the very roofs of the houses, were densely
packed with eager crowds, all of them intently gazing
seaward. Presently a shout of welcome heard faintly
in the distance announced his approach, gradually in-
creasing in volume as he came nearer, till it merged
into one continuous roar, while thousands of flags were
waving overhead.

Eagerly the crowds pressed forward to catch the first
glimpse of his form, and when they did recognize him,
their hurrahs burst forth like a storm, and were caught
up in the streets, answered from the windows, from the
tops of houses; and when they ceased for a moment
from the sheer exhaustion of those who uttered them,
they were soon renewed with redoubled vigor. And
when finally Nansen had disembarked and had entered

1 Ividbjérn (pron. Vid-byurn), The White Bear, a trading-vessel.



72 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

a carriage, the police could no longer keep the people
under control. As if with one accord they dashed for-
ward, and taking out the horses, harnessed themselves
in their place, and dragged him through the streets of
the city in triumph.

Yes, the Norwegian people had taken possession of
Fridtjof Nansen !

But up at a window there stood the old housekeeper
from Store Fréen, waving her white apron, while tears of
joy trickled down her face. She it was who had bound
up his bleeding head when years ago he had fallen and
cut it on the ice; she it was to whom he had often gone
when in some childish scrape. He remembered her in
his hour of triumph. And as she was laughing and
crying by turns, and waving her apron, he dashed up
the steps and gave her a loving embrace.

For was she not part and parcel of his home ?



FRIDIJOF NANSEN. 73

CHAPTER VI.

ENGAGEMENT AND MARRIAGE. — HoME-LIFE. — PLANNING THE POLAR
EXPEDITION.

Two months after Nansen had returned home from
his Greenland expedition he became engaged to Eva
Sars, daughter of the late Professor Sars, and was mar-
ried to her the same autumn. Her mother was the
sister of the poet Welhaven.

The following story of his engagement is related :—

“On the night of Aug. 12 a shower of gravel and
small pebbles rattled against the panes of a window in
the house where I*ridtjof Nansen’s half-sister lived. He
was very fond of her, and of her husband also, who had
indeed initiated him in the use of gun and rod, and who
had taken him with him, when a mere lad, on many a
sporting excursion to Nordmarken.

“On hearing this unusual noise at the dead of night,
his brother-in-law jumped out of bed in no very amiable
frame of mind, and opening the window, called out,
‘What is it?’

«“<¢T want to come in!’ said a tall figure dressed in
gray, from the street below.

“A volley of expletives greeted the nocturnal visitor,
who kept on saying, ‘I want to come in.’

“Before long Fridtjof Nansen was standing in his
sister’s bedroom at two o’clock in the morning.



74 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

“Raising herself up in the bed, she said, ‘ But,
Fridtjof, whatever is it?’

«¢T’m engaged to be married — that’s all!’ was the
laconic reply.

“Engaged! But with whom?’

“Why, with Eva, of course!’

«Then he said he felt very hungry, and his brother-
in-law had to take a journey into the larder and fetch out
some cold meat, and then down into the cellar after
a bottle of champagne. Ilis sister’s bed served for a
table, and a new chapter in ‘ Fridtjof’s saga’ was inau-
gurated at this nocturnal banquet.”

The story goes, Nansen first met his future wife
in a snowdrift. One day, it appears, when up in the
Frogner woods, he espied two little boots sticking up
out of the snow. Curiosity prompted him to go and
see to whom the said boots belonged, and as he ap-
proached for that purpose, a little snow be-sprinkled
head peered up at him. It was Eva Sars!

What gives this anecdote interest is that it was out
of the snow and the cold to which he was to dedicate
his life, she, who became dearer to him than life itself,
first appeared.

Another circumstance connected therewith worthy
of note is that Eva Sars was a person of rather a cold
and repellent nature, and gave one the impression that
there was a good deal of snow in her disposition.
Hence the reason perhaps why she kept aloof rather
than attracted those who would know her. Fridtjof
Nansen, however, was not the man to be deterred by
coldness. He was determined to win her, even if he



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 7d

should have to cross the inland ice of Greenland for
that purpose.

But when she became his wife all the reserve and
coldness of her nature disappeared. She took the warm-
est interest in his plans, participated in his work, mak-
ing every sacrifice a woman can make to promote his
purpose. In all his excursions in the open air she ac-
companied him; and when she knew that he was
making preparations for another expedition, one involy-
ing life itself, not a murmur escaped her lips. And
when the hour of parting came at last, and a long,
lonely time of waiting lay before her, she broke out into
song. For in those dreary years of hope deferred she
developed into an accomplished songstress; and when
the fame of Nansen’s exploit resounded throughout
the whole north, the echo of her song answered in. joy-
ful acclaim. The maidens of Norway listening to her
spirited strains, and beholding this brave little woman
with her proudly uplifted head, learnt from Eva Nansen
that such was the way in which a woman should meet
a sorrow —such the way in which she should undergo
a time of trial.

The following story, in Nansen’s own words, will
serve to give an idea of the sort of woman she was:

“Tt was New Year’s Eve, 1890. Eva and I had
gone on a little trip to Kréderen,! and we determined to
get to the top of Norefjeld. We slept at Olberg, and,
feeling rather lazy next morning, did not set out till

. 1 Kréderen, a lake about forty miles to the northwest of Christiania.
Norefjeld, 2 mountain on the west side of the lake. Olberg, a farmhouse
at the foot of the mountain.



76 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

nearly noon. We took it very easily, moreover! Even
in summer-time it is a stiff day’s work to clamber up
Norefjeld; but in winter, when the days are short, one
has to look pretty sharp to reach the top while it is
light. Moreover, the route we chose, though perhaps
the most direct, was not by any means the shortest.
The snow lay very deep; and soon it became. impossible
to go on ski, the ascent being so steep, that we had to
take them off and carry them. However, we had made
up our minds to reach the top; for it would never do to
turn back after having gone half-way, difficult though
the ascent might be. The last part of our journey was
the most trying of all; I had to cut out steps with my
ski-staff to get a foothold in the frozen snow. I went
in front, and Eva followed close behind me. It really
seemed that we slipped two steps backward for every
one we took forward. At last we reached the top; it
was pitch dark, and we had been going from ten A.M. to
five P.M., without food. But, thank goodness, we had
some cheese and pemmican with us,-so we sat down on
the snow, and ate it.

«© Yes! there were we two alone on the top of Nore-
fjeld, five thousand feet above the sea, with a biting
wind blowing that made our cheeks tingle, and the
darkness growing thicker and thicker every moment.
Far away in the west there was a faint glimmer of day-
light, — of the last day of the old year, —just enough
to guide us by. The next thing to be done was to get
down to Eggedal. From where we were it was a dis-
tance of about six and one-half miles, a matter of little
consequence in broad daylight, but in the present in-



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. TT

stance no joke, I can assure you! lHowever, it had to
be done. So off we started, I leading the way, Eva
following.

“We went like the wind down the slope, but had
to be very careful. When one has been out in the dark
some little time, it is just as if the snow gives out
a faint light — though light it cannot really be termed,
but a feeble kind of shimmer. Goodness only knows
how we managed to get down, but get down we did!
As it was too steep to go on ski, there was nothing for
it but to squat and slide down —a kind of locomotion
detrimental, perhaps, to one’s breeches, but under the
circumstances unquestionably the safest mode of pro-
ceeding in the dark!

«When we had got half-way down my hat blew off.
So I had to ‘put the brake on,’ and get up on my legs,
and go after it. Far away above me I got a glimpse of
a dark object on the snow, crawled after it, got up to
it, and grasped it, to find it was only a stone! My hat,
then, must be further up. Surely that was it—again I
got hold of a stone! The snow seemed to be alive
with stones. Hat after hat, hat after hat, but when-
ever I tried to put it on my head, it turned out to be a
stone. A stone for bread is bad enough, and stones for
hats are not a bit better! So I had to give it up, and
go hatless.

“ Eva had been sitting waiting for me all this while. °
‘Eva,’ I shouted, and a faint answer came back from
below.

“Those miles seemed to be uncommonly long ones.

Every now and then we could use our ski, and then it
L



78 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

would become so steep again that we had to carry them.
At last we came to a standstill. There was a chasm
right in front of us,—how deep it was it was too dark
to ascertain. However, we bundled over it somehow or
other, and happily the snow was very deep. It is quite
incredible how one can manage to get over a difficulty !

‘As regards our direction, we had lost it completely ;
all we knew was that we must get down into the valley.
Again we came to a standstill, and Eva had to wait
while I went on, groping in the dark, trying to find a
way. I was absent on this errand some little time.
Presently it occurred to me, ‘ What if she should have
fallen asleep!’

“¢Eva!’ I shouted, ‘Eva!’ Yes, she answered;
but she must be a long way above where I was. If she
had been asleep it would have been a difficult matter to
have found her. But I groped my way up-hill to her,
with the consolation that I had found the bed of a
stream. Now the bed of a stream is not very well
adapted for ski, especially when it is pitch dark, and
the stomach is empty, and conscience pricks you, — for
really I ought not to have ventured on such an expedi-
tion with her. However, ‘all’s well that ends well,’
and we got through all right.

“We had now got down to the birch scrub, and at
last found our road.

“« After some little time we passed a cabin. I thought
it wouldn’t be a bad place to take refuge in, but Eva
said it was so horribly dirty! She was full of spirits
now, and voted for going on. So on we went, and in
due time reached the parish clerk’s house in Eggedal.



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 79

Of course the inmates were in bed, so we had to arouse
them. The clerk was horrified when I told him we |
had just come from the top of Norefjeld. This time
liva was not so nice about lodgings, for no sooner
had she sat down on a chair, than she fell asleep. It
was midnight, mind you, and she had been in harness
fourteen hours.

“¢He ’s a bit tired, poor lad!’ said the clerk. For
Eva had on a ski-dress with a very small skirt, trousers,
and a Lapp fur cloak.

“¢That’s my wife,’ I replied, whereupon he burst out
into a laugh. ‘Nay, nay! to drag his wife with him
over the top of Norefjeld on New Year’s Eve!’ he said.

“Presently he brought in something to eat, for we
were famished; and when Eva smelt it wasn’t cheese
and pemmican, she woke up.

“‘ We rested here three days. Yes, it had been a New
Year’s Eve trip. A very agreeable one in my opinion,
but I’m not so sure Eva altogether agreed with me!

“Two days later I and the ‘poor little lad’ drove
through Numedal to Kongsberg in nine degrees below
zero (Fahrenheit), which nearly froze the little fellow.
But it is not a bad thing occasionally to have to put up
with some inconveniences —you appreciate comforts
afterward so much the more. He who has never ex-
perienced what cold is, does not really know the mean-
ing of warmth!”

. . °

The day after the wedding the newly married pair
set out for Newcastle, where there was to be a meeting



80 : FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

of the Geographical Society, travelling via Gothenburg,
Hamburg, and London. After this they went to Stock-
holm, and here Nansen was presented with the “« Vega”
medal by His Majesty. This was a distinguished honour,
the more so as it had hitherto only been awarded to five
persons, among whom were Stanley and Nordenskjéld.
Nansen subsequently was presented with several medals
in foreign countries, and was made a Knight of the
Order of St. Olaf and Danebrog.

On their return from Stockholm to Norway, Nansen
and his wife took apartments at Marte Larsen’s, the
old housekeeper at Store Fréen, and stayed there two
months, after which they took a house on the Drammen
road. But they did not enjoy themselves there, and
Nansen determined to build a house, for which purpose
he bought a site at Svartebugta, near Lysakert It was
here that, as a boy, he had often watched for wild
ducks. It was a charming spot, moreover, and within
easy distance of the town. The house was finished in
the spring of 1890. During the whole of the winter,
while building operations were going on, they lived in
an icy cold pavillion near Lysaker railway station.

“It was here he weaned me from freezing,” says
Eva Nansen.

In this wretched habitation, where the water froze
in the bedroom at night, Nansen would sit and work at
his book on Greenland, and when he had time would
superintend the building of the new house. It was
called “ Godthaab”? —a name given it by Bjérnstjerne
Bjornson.

1 Lysaker, a railroad station about four miles west of Christiania.



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 81

In the autumn of this year Nansen set out on a
lengthened lecturing tour, accompanied by his wife.
He lectured in Copenhagen, London, Berlin, and Dres-
den, about his Greenland experiences, and also about
the projected expedition to the North Pole. Every-
where people were attracted by his captivating indi-
viduality ; but most thought this new expedition too
venturesome. Even the most experienced Arctic ex-
plorers shook their heads, for they thought that, from
such a daring enterprise, not a single member of the
expedition would ever return alive.

But Nansen adhered to his own opinions, and we see
him in the intervening years occupied with the equip-
ment required for an expedition to the polar regions
—a work so stupendous that the preparations for the
Greenland expedition were but child’s play in compari-
son.



82 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

CHAPTER VII.

PREPARATIONS FOR THE POLAR EXPEDITION. —STARTING FROM Nor—
WAY. — JOURNEY ALONG THE SIBERIAN COAsT.

NANSEN’S theory as regards the expedition to the
North Pole was as simple as it was daring. He believed
that he had discovered the existence of a current pass-
ing over the pole, and of this he would avail himself.
His idea, in fact, was to work his way into the ice
among the New Siberian Islands, let his vessel be fast:
frozen into the drift-ice, and be carried by the current:
over the Pole to the east coast of Greenland. There
articles had been found on ice-floes that had unquestion-
ably belonged to former Arctic expeditions, a fact that
convinced him of the existence of such a current.

It might take some years for a vessel to drift all that.
way; he must, therefore, make his preparations accord-
ingly. Such at all events was Nansen’s theory —a
theory which, it must be said, few shared with him. For
none of the world’s noted explorers of those regions be-
lieved in the existence of such a current, and people
generally termed the scheme, “a madman’s idea! ”

Nansen, therefore, stood almost alone in this, and
yet not altogether alone, either. For the Norwegian
people who would not sacrifice £278 for the Greenland
expedition gave him now ina lump sum 280,000 kroner:
(nearly £11,386). They were convinced of his gigantic.





FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 83

powers, and when the Norwegians are fully convinced
of a thing, they are willing to make any sacrifice to
carry it out. They believed in him now!

Nansen then set to work in earnest at his gigantic
undertaking.

First of all a vessel must be designed, — one that
would be able to defy the ice. Availing himself, there-
fore, of the services of the famous shipbuilder, Colin
Archer, he had the Fram! built—a name suggestive of
noble achievements to the youth of Norway.

On Oct. 26, 1892, she was launched at Laurvig.
During the previous night the temperature had been
fourteen degrees above zero, and a slight sprinkling of
snow had covered valley and height with a thin veil of
white. The morning sun peered through the mist with
that peculiar hazy light that foretells a bright winter
day.

At the station at Laurvig, Nansen waited to receive
his guests. A whaler, with a crow’s-nest on her fore-
top, was lying in the harbor, to convey the visitors to
the spot where the Fram was lying on the stocks.

In the bay at Reykjavik the huge hull of a vessel may
be seen raised up on the beach, with her stern toward
the sea. It is Fridtjof Nansen’s new ship that is now
. to be launched. She is a high vessel, of great beam,
painted black below and white above. Three stout
‘masts of American pitch-pine are lying by her side on
the quay, while three flagstaffs, two of them only with
flags flying, rear themselves up aloft on her deck. The
flag which is to be run up the bare staff is to bear the



1 Fram means onward.

Ee



84 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

vessel’s name — unknown as yet. Everybody is won-
dering what that name will be, and conjectures whether
it will be Eva, Leif, Norway, Northpole, are rife.

Crowds of spectators are assembled at the wharf,
while as many have clambered upon the adjacent rocks.
But around the huge ship, which lies on the slips firmly
secured with iron chains, are standing groups of stal-
wart, weather-beaten men in working attire. They are
whalers, who for years have frequented the polar seas
and braved its dangers, and are now attentively exam-
ining and criticising the new ship’s construction. A
goodly number, too, of workmen are there, —the men
who built the ship; and they are looking at their work
with feelings of pride. And-yonder is the vessel’s
architect, — that stately, earnest-looking man with tne
long, flowing white beard, — Colin Archer.

And now, accompanied by his wife, Nansen ascends
the platform that has been erected in the ship’s bow.
Mrs. Nansen steps forward, breaks a bottle of cham-
pagne on the prow, and in clear, ringing tones declares,
“Fram is her name.” At the same moment a flag on
which the vessel’s name can be read in white letters on
a red ground, is run up to the top of the bare flagstaff.

The last bands and chains are quickly removed, and
the ponderous mass glides, stern first, slowly down the
incline, but with ever-increasing velocity, toward the
water. For a moment some anxiety is felt lest she
should sink or get wedged; but as soon as her bows
touch the water the stern rises up, and the Fram floats
proudly on the sea, and is then at once moored fast
with warps to the quay.













CREW OF THE

FRAM.

M



86 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

Meanwhile Nansen stood beside his wife, and all eyes
turned toward them. But not a trace of anxiety or
doubt could be discerned on his frank and open counte-
nance; for he possessed that faith in his project that is
able to remove mountains.

The next matter of importance was to select the crew.
There was ample material to choose from, for hundreds
of volunteers from abroad offered themselves, besides
Norwegians. But it was a Norwegian expedition —her
crew, then, must be exclusively a national crew! And
so Otto Sverdrup, who had earned his laurels in the
Greenland expedition ; Sigurd Scott-Hansen, first lieu-
tenant in the royal navy; Henrik Greve Blessing, sur-
geon; Theodor Claudius Jacobsen and Adolf Juell of
the mercantile marine; Anton Amundsen and Lars
Petterson, engineers ; Frederik Hjalmar Johansen, lieu-
tenant of the royal army reserve, Peter Leonard Hen-
tiksen, harpooner; Bernt Nordahl, electrician; Ivar
Otto Irgens Mogstad, head keeper at the lunatic asylum;
and Bernt Berntsen, common sailor, — were selected.
Most of them were married and had children.

Sverdrup was to be the Fram’s commander, for Nan-
sen knew that the ship would be safer in his hands
.than in his own.

Finally, after an incredible deal of hard work in get-
ting everything in order, the day of their departure
arrived.

It was midsummer—a dull, gloomy day. The
Fram, heavily laden, is lying at Pipperviken Quay,
waiting for Nansen. The appointed hour is past, and
yet there are no signs of him. Members of the stor-



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 87

thing, who had assembled there to bid him farewell,
can wait no longer, and the crowds of people that line
the quay are one and all anxiously gazing over the
fjord.

But presently a quick-sailing little petroleum boat
heaves in sight. It swings round Dyna,! and quickly
lies alongside the Fram; and Nansen goes on board
his ship at once, and gives the order to “go ahead.”
Every eye is fixed on him. He is as calm as ever, firm
as a rock, but his face is pale.

The anchor is weighed ; and after making the tour
of the little creek, the Fram steams down the fjord.
“‘ Full speed” is the command issued from the bridge ;
and as she proceeds on her way, Nansen turns round to
take a farewell look over Svartebugta where Godthaab
lies. He discerns a glimpse of a woman’s form dressed
in white by the bench under the fir-tree, and then turns
his face away ; it was there he had bidden her farewell.
Little Liv, his only child, had been carried by her
mother, crowing and smiling, to bid father good-by, and
he had taken her in his arms.

“Yes, you smile, little one!” he said; “but I”? —
and he sobbed.

This had taken place but an hour before. And now
he was standing on the bridge alone, leaving all he
held dear behind.

The twelve men who accompanied him, — they, too,
had made sacrifices, — each had his own sorrow to meet
at this hour; but at the word of command, one and all
went about their duty as if nothing was amiss.

1 Dyna, an islet with a lighthouse in Christiania harbor.



88 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

For the first few days it was fine weather, but on
getting out as far as Lindesnes?! it became very stormy.
The ship rolled like a log, and seas broke over the rails
on both sides. Great fear was entertained lest the deck
cargo should be carried overboard, a contingency, in-
deed, that soon occurred; for twenty-five empty paraffin _
casks broke loose from their lashings, and a quantity of
reserve timber balks followed.

“Tt was an anxious time,” says Nansen. “Seasick I
stood on the bridge, alternately offering libations to the
gods of the sea, and trembling for the safety of the boats
and of the men who were trying to make snug what they
could on deck. Now a green sea poured over us, and
knocked one fellow off his legs so that he was deluged ;
now the lads were jumping over hurtling spars to avoid
getting their feet crushed. ‘There was not a dry thread
on them. Juell was lying asleep in the ‘ Grand Hotel,’
as we called one of the long boats, and awoke to find
the sea roaring under him. I met him at the cabin door
as he came running down. Once the Fram buried her
bows and shipped a sea over the forecastle. One fellow
was clinging to the anchor davits over the foaming
water; it was poor Juell again.”

Then all the casks, besides a quantity of timber, had
to be thrown overboard. Itwas, indeed, an anxious time.

But fine weather came at last, and Bergen turned
out to meet them in brilliant sunshine. Then on again,
along the wonderful coast of Norway, while the people
on shore stood gazing after them, marvelling as they
passed.

1 Cape Lindesnexs, the southernmost point of Norway.



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 89

At Beian! Sverdrup joined the ship, and Berntsen,
the thirteenth member of the crew, at Tromsé.2

Still onward toward the north, till finally the last
glimpse of their native country faded from their sight
in the hazy horizon, and a dense fog coming on envel-
oped them in its shroud. They were to have met the
Urania, laden with coal, in Jugor straits; but as that
vessel had not arrived, and time was precious, the Fram
proceeded on her course, after having shipped a num-
ber of Esquimau dogs which a Russian, named Tron-
theim, had been commissioned to procure for the
expedition. It was here that Nansen took leave of his
secretary, Cristophersen, who was to return by the
Urania; and the last tie that united them with Norway
was severed.

The Fram now heads out from the Jugor straits
into the dreaded Kara sea, which many had prophesied
would be her destruction. But they worked their way
through storm and ice, at times satisfactorily, at others
encountering slight mishaps; but the Fram proved her-
self to be a reliable iceworthy vessel, and Nansen felt
more and more convinced that, when the ice-pressure
began in real earnest, she would acquit herself well.

“Tt was a royal pleasure,” he writes, “to take her
into difficult ice. She twists and turns like a ball on a
plate —and so strong! If she runs into a floe at full
speed, she scarcely utters a sound, only quivers a little,
perhaps.”

1 Beian (pron. By-an), a village and stopping-place for the coast-
wise steamers in northern Norway, near Trondhjem.

2 Tromsé, the chief city and bishop’s see of the bishopric of same
name, the northernmost diocese in Norway.



90 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

When, as was often the case, they had to anchor on
account of bad weather, Nansen and his companions
would go ashore, either for the purpose of taking obser-
vations or for sport. One day they shot two bears and
sundry reindeer; but, when they started to row back to
the Fram in the evening, they had a severe task before
them. For a strong breeze was blowing, and the cur-
rent was dead against them. “We rowed as if our
finger-tips would burst,” says Nansen, ‘but could hardly
make any headway. ‘So we had to go in under land
again to get out of the current. But no sooner did
we set out for the Fram again than we got into it
once more, and then the whole mancsuvre had to be re-
peated, with the same result. Presently a buoy was
lowered from the ship; if we could only reach it, all
would be right. But no such luck was in store for
-us yet. We would make one more desperate effort,
and we rowed with a will, every muscle of our bodies
strained to the utmost. But to our vexation we now
saw the buoy being hauled up. We rowed a little to
the windward of the Fram, and then tried again to
sheer over. This time we got nearer her than we had
been before, but still no buoy was thrown over — not
even a man was to be seen on deck. We roared like
madmen,” writes Nansen, “for a buoy —we had no
strength left for another attempt. It was not a pleas-
ing prospect to have to drift back, and go ashore again
in our wet clothes, —we would get on board! Once
more we yelled like wild Indians, and now they came
rushing aft, and threw out the buoy in our direction.
We put our last strength into our oars. There were



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 91

only a few boat-lengths to cover, and the lads bent
flat over the thwarts. Now only three boat-lengths.
Another desperate spurt! Now only two and a half
boat-lengths — presently two — then only one!
more frantic pulls, and there was a little less. ‘Now,
my lads, one or two more hard pulls — keep to it! —
Now another— don’t give in—one more —there we
have it!’ And a joyful sigh of relief passed round the
boat. ‘Keep her going, or the rope will break — row,
my lads!’ And row we did, and soon they had hauled
us alongside the Fram. Not till we were lying there,
getting our bearskins and flesh hauled on board, did we
realize what we had had to fight against. The current
was running along the side of the ship like a millstream.
At last we were on board. It was evening by this time,
and it was a comfort to get some hot food, and then
stretch one’s limbs in a comfortable, dry berth.”

The Fram proceeded on her course the next day,
passing a number of unknown islands, to which Nansen
gave names. Among these were Scott-Hansen’s Is-
lands, Ringnes, Mohns, etc.

On Sept. 6, the anniversary of Nansen’s wedding,
they passed Taimar Island, and after a prosperous pas-
sage through open water reached Cape Tscheljuskin on
Sept. 9.

Nansen was sitting in the crow’s nest that evening.
The weather was perfectly still, and the sky lay in a
dream of gold and yellow. A solitary star was visible;
it stood directly over Cape Tscheljuskin, twinkling
brightly, though sadly, in the pale sky overhead. As
the vessel proceeded on her course it seemed to follow



92 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

them. There was something about that star that at-
tracted Nansen’s attention, and brought him peace. It
was as it were zs star, and he felt that she who was at
home was sending him a message by it. Meanwhile the
Fram toiled on through the gloomy melancholy of the
night out into the unknown.

In the morning, when the sun rose up, a salute was
fired, and high festival held on board.

A few days later a herd of walrus was sighted. It
was a lovely morning, and perfectly calm, so that they
could distinctly hear their bellowings over the clear
surface of the water, as they lay in a heap on an ice-
floe, the blue mountains -glittering in the sunlight in
the background.

“My goodness, what a lot of meat!” ejaculated
Juell, the cook. And at once Nansen, Juell, and Hen-
riksen set out after them, Juell rowing, Nansen armed
with a gun, and Henriksen with a harpoon. On getting
to close quarters Henriksen threw the harpoon at the
nearest walrus, but it struck too high, and glanced off
the tough hide, and went skipping over the rounded
backs of the others. Now all was stir and life. Ten
or a dozen of the bulky animals waddled with up-
raised heads to the extreme edge of the floe, whereupon
Nansen took aim at the largest, and fired. The brute
staggered, and fell headlong into the water. Another
bullet into a second walrus was attended with the same
result, and the rest of the herd plunged into the water,
so that it boiled and seethed. Soon, however, they were
up again, all around the boat, standing upright in the
water, bellowing and roaring till the air shook. Every

yo?



FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 93

now and then they would make a dash toward the boat,
then dive, and come up again. The sea boiled like a
cauldron, and every moment they seemed about to dash
their tusks through the side of the boat, and capsize it.
Fortunately, however, this did not occur. . Walrus after
walrus was shot by Nansen, while Henriksen was busy
with his harpoon to prevent them sinking.

At last, after a favorable journey through open water,
the Fram finally reached firm ice on Sept. 25, and
allowed herself to be frozen in; for winter was fast
approaching, and it was no longer possible to drive her
through the ice.



94 FRIDTJOF NANSEN,

CHAPTER VIII.

Drirting THRouGH THE Icr.— CuHRISTMAS.—Daity LIFE ON THE
FRAM.— BEAR-Hunt AND IcE-PRESSURE.

From Sept. 26 the Fram lay frozen in in the drift-
ice, and many a long day would pass ere she would be
loose again. Nansen’s theory of a current over the
North Pole would now be proved to be correct or the
reverse.

It was a monotonous time that was approaching for
the men on board. At first they drifted but very little
northward, each succeeding day bringing but little al-
teration; but they kept a good heart, for they had not
to suffer from lack of anything that could conduce
to their comfort. They had a good ship, excellently
equipped, and so passed the days as best they could, —
now occupying themselves with seeing to the dogs or
taking observations, etc.; while reading, playing cards,
chess, halma, and making all kinds of implements, filled
up the remainder of their time. Every now and then the
monotony of their existence would undergo variation,
when the ice-pressure set in. ‘Then there was plenty
of life and stir on board, and all hands would turn out
to do battle with the foe.

It was on Monday, Oct. 9, that the Fram underwent
her first experience of a regular ice-pressure. Nansen
and the others were sitting after dinner, as usual, chat-





By Permission of Archibald Constable & Co.

THE FRAM IN AN ICE PRESSURE. : i



Full Text
xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20090114_AAAAKZ' PACKAGE 'UF00087254_00001' INGEST_TIME '2009-01-15T12:32:24-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:42:28-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 299417; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-13T23:24:07-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '469647' DFID 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKJ' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' b90e8c09e9a788d189ca052e29f871f5
'SHA-1' 34b22bdce15d0f154cd97f673a642b900a9a4d19
EVENT '2011-12-29T04:34:14-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'132722' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKK' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
2617f833c1c45651e22853ab9c3ca5ff
ddbd940f28c7637c2a1c7d60fe4ae22e2acdd80d
'2011-12-29T04:36:41-05:00'
describe
'553' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKL' 'sip-files00001.pro'
ec014fad504c44c04878e4648d50cf67
c3fa61cc9f55e974674265454cc3946d661a072d
'2011-12-29T04:37:12-05:00'
describe
'30080' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKM' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
36bab33347de8904f1d9d496face940a
81420a65b594a7fa04864733c832fe579a6d7715
'2011-12-29T04:36:39-05:00'
describe
'11278192' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKN' 'sip-files00001.tif'
443afcf32018750fbc9597b65cb247d5
c57ef168fbcab2465b8c832740a252ca2465abbf
'2011-12-29T04:34:28-05:00'
describe
'141' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKO' 'sip-files00001.txt'
1c97f35a485ae4a674c87252e41194e8
5bf38f3bb5f7334d1af471c7fb7284010246c2fa
'2011-12-29T04:37:07-05:00'
describe
'7114' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKP' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
80ff80be442bd3b562698a361ceb0ef5
9c16b933df0d226ebbef9c33bc652eaad99668b2
'2011-12-29T04:35:55-05:00'
describe
'477908' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKQ' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
07ccfe13fed516264be6a71e29c62208
b938cd68ff7c62c57427a63952405e1a1ddb072a
'2011-12-29T04:34:18-05:00'
describe
'180624' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKR' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
2cce8d9e799eb33a9f03be2858ecdc99
79ff27a43cb1a83cca617809523ffffea0285354
'2011-12-29T04:36:32-05:00'
describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKS' 'sip-files00002.pro'
0746fde8a398e693b7e4319c4fc18fd6
a12dee30365498c64fa703471dd11b152c9e4f5f
'2011-12-29T04:37:01-05:00'
describe
'50643' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKT' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
86400416b7d4e1712978c84eb7d67713
ce693eb1ed3cb9ba72f07f99108e0ac98a35c83c
'2011-12-29T04:35:13-05:00'
describe
'11481744' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKU' 'sip-files00002.tif'
a2a56f1e0a3c1f738fe10a9dae699f93
05679a998cfcd729de9bb1b1f964558ead62c640
'2011-12-29T04:34:22-05:00'
describe
'195' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKV' 'sip-files00002.txt'
6bc8c758e92dbdd85002bfa0bd65c1b9
59e7eced4a3c58a0242b49ec0bd49ec26e402c89
'2011-12-29T04:35:07-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'11431' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKW' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
a84c51bc131328f4339f2b599a518546
924373082da7d15630bba987ab272b3a09a97233
'2011-12-29T04:36:20-05:00'
describe
'419782' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKX' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
b250bfa4211c3b8435630ae4b129245c
81ef4da87d2577158f16ab3052d1bb71db750914
'2011-12-29T04:34:35-05:00'
describe
'161749' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKY' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
f7d6e5e86eaabc8bfc6bc5ba11f660a0
1f410384c20167d20fe5bb1462b74a078ee7ceb8
'2011-12-29T04:36:23-05:00'
describe
'43370' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNKZ' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
5e7224278a3a1c2b64d024bce987e6f4
ba86a3fee05db2896c0d52770cdbaad7b73773e9
'2011-12-29T04:37:39-05:00'
describe
'10089840' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLA' 'sip-files00003.tif'
d11a725a510ca5b372bad115fce045ec
22835500c1752dcd07c3e2254df7aa6ab50d4433
'2011-12-29T04:36:12-05:00'
describe
'10181' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLB' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
76d34cfe4955dad7514e911061c9a6f8
f05df6c37be7a1b102915ce341f8df3f369f7c90
'2011-12-29T04:36:58-05:00'
describe
'420091' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLC' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
53eb409b4189f5489b766d15decec378
3f2bcc7cd5846efa1658791d5368211d2c905284
describe
'38895' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLD' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
fa6bb52d6c44c6e68c924db81907ff67
6e9f650d73766dcfec956270def26e7c830b3a25
'2011-12-29T04:37:21-05:00'
describe
'7183' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLE' 'sip-files00005.pro'
d5d0ede8419c5806e000d41bcb9ca868
b2313f0833d2e5f32addb51f933a794e13784c28
'2011-12-29T04:36:22-05:00'
describe
'11993' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLF' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
2ca0aaeff7f75e8cde5e630a4f97da82
67e9fd6f9e38f6b2c5ddb0409794c5236904ac8c
'2011-12-29T04:34:17-05:00'
describe
'3377556' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLG' 'sip-files00005.tif'
5135a12debdf56558061c19650b0a8a4
01086e24861c5a7af3d6fee4e423e7e780d79d6c
describe
'436' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLH' 'sip-files00005.txt'
c890ee46bfaa7335e3ab8045644ebd59
c73e3baa4f391f47cd76608929766435c5420805
'2011-12-29T04:34:49-05:00'
describe
'3757' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLI' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
793a5640569151efc3ac3cf60acc5f43
465b827906b6366f399fb60a69925283a902681c
'2011-12-29T04:35:08-05:00'
describe
'419966' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLJ' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
b737ad7731e1dbfd0c00509857b3cd9d
2a7e44c0e0f22b291848625d519f1c46f6a63c20
'2011-12-29T04:34:16-05:00'
describe
'16629' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLK' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
ca453811bb0f81f4a3735644faac474b
e9b90c4b3f40876f3fca57248ae1b17c3375a988
'2011-12-29T04:34:39-05:00'
describe
'1671' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLL' 'sip-files00006.pro'
42a3b9d3da47d4f5673c97bdb4f8321d
49aad31bb92e14443c45018a8bacf916721406f4
'2011-12-29T04:35:39-05:00'
describe
'4026' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLM' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
317b5c3ccc7b8f7364317d24bdf68623
3b3990df09bf40824eca5b8332c804d8b280bd7b
'2011-12-29T04:36:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLN' 'sip-files00006.tif'
e8ff504503584266cc88e972ea8e7a77
2db91610ba12ebc426768a614d60d04a864abc06
'2011-12-29T04:36:27-05:00'
describe
'198' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLO' 'sip-files00006.txt'
cb5f2c175ff3eb748a8b8fcc8f96c19b
39db50b4db1986c28da59c2b1fb2b00ae508cf6b
'2011-12-29T04:35:14-05:00'
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLP' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
269bc83ff895b36230930a0a8b5f1db8
28e1209ca6435b45039191ce210f969377ed634b
'2011-12-29T04:36:01-05:00'
describe
'420044' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLQ' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
fb6f91a12d52c17c11ac91c5d09a848c
d0fce8e0cb3ec12290b48c6eaf7597f33956a428
'2011-12-29T04:37:04-05:00'
describe
'87496' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLR' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
d4fd330704def2475674cb81a0dcf624
96367738f56ab916351b4b9fd89cc91e3f845a0b
describe
'27907' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLS' 'sip-files00007.pro'
1ddc651e83f6624ab518400e3a84fcb3
f861f3171109e6822e596f517ea14a1f34b7fd28
'2011-12-29T04:37:35-05:00'
describe
'26828' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLT' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
2ab6844ed9fd9cd64ae2dd6ec9fec78b
609472c09a30683b97ac788f21c0651e0c13dc2e
'2011-12-29T04:35:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLU' 'sip-files00007.tif'
ff4adb18ab1ed0c6fe0fd22ec03519e6
c3bb5e7b79c923b9e29dab6ff4f19d52de2deb49
'2011-12-29T04:36:03-05:00'
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLV' 'sip-files00007.txt'
fde7d60cecd197d93446749f46b98292
7c1de4875f892e8b9e60e6b983cc331c0241388b
'2011-12-29T04:34:34-05:00'
describe
'6712' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLW' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
0134a210517dc0c3cb84c78a2c464a47
bae0a0d3d9f258747d45a9931da686e377f0021b
'2011-12-29T04:36:48-05:00'
describe
'420081' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLX' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
a37784a989d77bea2ab42b93c17a8da8
b33f82507a07a6b71d81553ae26e6b7ccf470b96
'2011-12-29T04:35:04-05:00'
describe
'118500' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLY' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
f71faf1b15cd1b9d67c6aefa2757b287
6a2a9a18456b2478399ed542cb943ea8187d244e
'2011-12-29T04:37:13-05:00'
describe
'41834' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNLZ' 'sip-files00008.pro'
e9dc85ab5182dfb34ccb33cad99ae379
abdb5ab71cb2ed5b162b8ec1361a032ed1aaebfa
'2011-12-29T04:36:28-05:00'
describe
'36311' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMA' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
49d56d5f8f8ab67ff89b777a61dbbb08
81f19869ee43b3807303a6303cb8abf4291a688a
'2011-12-29T04:36:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMB' 'sip-files00008.tif'
1793e4d30060860d9fefce4642658533
45d6c817769c32a1260ac994ecbccd53a844ab92
'2011-12-29T04:37:17-05:00'
describe
'1670' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMC' 'sip-files00008.txt'
119f38e169794faef907734b9c6e61d3
b3c28e59005d9c341338379ce896e1e777f42842
'2011-12-29T04:37:31-05:00'
describe
'8749' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMD' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
1b12dcfdf7f8bab44f02858711223d36
af6cc9be2e1f621bc7345d4d431afa97cd8c72d2
'2011-12-29T04:34:37-05:00'
describe
'417396' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNME' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
f2a0ce7daa85c403176a964869ded785
214e7ed47845aeca092b43b099aad669ced24aa4
'2011-12-29T04:37:16-05:00'
describe
'45696' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMF' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
1570602e5daf9369f13856b0e1384b9f
dac38597e6116dff4c1179fda06bcdc8b73d0aa1
'2011-12-29T04:37:42-05:00'
describe
'3050' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMG' 'sip-files00009.pro'
93996f2f69edb44a8872030d6be3f730
96da0e60d2c87251e46e4c463ac5e07e20e00c3b
'2011-12-29T04:37:10-05:00'
describe
'11343' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMH' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
6b50898eaccc0fe1e353f8a1b4ee34b3
42dbc8d2f3fdd57f13f2af4f61526f16de42db9f
'2011-12-29T04:36:11-05:00'
describe
'3356080' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMI' 'sip-files00009.tif'
cd86cf1a8e0b350093dc22b6c11de718
cfb6d23d1e5eb7efd7823082ba4a17acabdaff27
'2011-12-29T04:37:44-05:00'
describe
'246' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMJ' 'sip-files00009.txt'
14880fa8f667855926071f17b6ffae2b
23915092e69edd34926117bb91d2c07d523d97c9
describe
Invalid character
'2959' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMK' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
e92c60dec8f1fe6ee32c48fe9d88b643
cf98518f378e1e5e0efd85565023bf2e7f684946
'2011-12-29T04:37:37-05:00'
describe
'420034' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNML' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
abcc3f994e73709941ec1765e040ddc1
d1762620415f19fed2dd48a5444064be22ff6680
'2011-12-29T04:36:54-05:00'
describe
'116591' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMM' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
ab71c5315263356e11ea587be9fd8df3
d21764836dcf2399edfc29d923f1da42d52fbd32
'2011-12-29T04:35:56-05:00'
describe
'42354' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMN' 'sip-files00010.pro'
09cfdd36a95b53f6123047241224ce59
6a77377f583bec28b920eb40229dbe01a84e7283
'2011-12-29T04:35:26-05:00'
describe
'35742' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMO' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
3ea0f9d9448a5dc4cceb92ab81bedfab
03fb6da6b8ef6042eb5d64d3db767099361c8c53
'2011-12-29T04:34:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMP' 'sip-files00010.tif'
09d960fa873a04b0054f7c2f32e6462a
deeeca13d68827210520583fc764f7fbcf8e6275
describe
'1684' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMQ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
26b69ed5e3f36ad481a06230a3b075f4
2fe293aff512bb5a12f15200d4914df2c7b3c1d9
'2011-12-29T04:37:43-05:00'
describe
'8559' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMR' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
d6d890c93b6a7b7a70f2754d0548a14e
7222bf7e47f1c2c02b090e1f41869770f5c0c89a
'2011-12-29T04:36:57-05:00'
describe
'420050' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMS' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
f95c1050b783ec27561009665a4d6dda
fd8087e7c36fffe100ddab3ce968ba40f2fcd4be
'2011-12-29T04:34:50-05:00'
describe
'119165' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMT' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
ed6ce9b63b69cf19c26b6b1fe7073f87
8652069eba6d5bcfcf6a12f0cc0d9b75a16e2eaa
'2011-12-29T04:34:25-05:00'
describe
'41060' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMU' 'sip-files00011.pro'
c777af5e1c0506fda926b7e59555fe99
00bce16aaeae3807d34d777842303799714a0e55
'2011-12-29T04:37:46-05:00'
describe
'36237' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMV' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
4e3e5ecf95e8c292c3b9a4e9ef5fe6eb
57639e7a4506390fcc6ddcf5ae7b90134a4f606f
'2011-12-29T04:37:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMW' 'sip-files00011.tif'
458aae00436808eae758aec532c37d9e
de52602403b0be3ab57226144dc33094957817ca
describe
'1658' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMX' 'sip-files00011.txt'
f112ad51bd1571762dd3406c16572b77
8ec67f2619972a7063dea9883e864664e05ad2b2
'2011-12-29T04:35:58-05:00'
describe
'8486' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMY' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
fa4d356b13a74484c1e8ca7094cc9e34
b9edd56fbe51eb88b9d8458c82aceef8b6ce75d2
'2011-12-29T04:34:41-05:00'
describe
'420087' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNMZ' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
3441bc1dc89adb6ad2e2d885f0a2c0ee
bc4c7d7422de3fdda03500bfe137a46dc7068f63
'2011-12-29T04:36:31-05:00'
describe
'123122' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNA' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
abe2c0549e62cf9d7ae3a5bc03ab11a8
f44e2c78280e965808bd2b15bdca14193218124f
'2011-12-29T04:34:20-05:00'
describe
'43194' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNB' 'sip-files00012.pro'
b432c3088d5979cb27cbf5018efef047
f17abc117cb61f081ce646ef82a82327eff0d3fd
describe
'37034' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNC' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
465de28ddfa26ceb6dcc5cad743c0e1d
92afbb1dcbef254649bb6ac0f272ec1315d07943
'2011-12-29T04:36:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNND' 'sip-files00012.tif'
f538080260735a3baced2ea8acba4604
8e5ac3579e8225858656660f80fecfc2c1a023b4
'2011-12-29T04:37:03-05:00'
describe
'1700' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNE' 'sip-files00012.txt'
95da2ac200c225167220dff5affa55c6
454f16ecd46e6285074f2d619cc9122a7f3e83cb
'2011-12-29T04:35:18-05:00'
describe
'8520' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNF' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
452e147e0bd43b4c51edcf6936e5fa83
7127c3de4c837e82bb48b9e6ba8ebace99bc36f6
'2011-12-29T04:35:27-05:00'
describe
'420075' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNG' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
9d7a06f2cd45215f36b1819094b15632
7730a495d302d29fa14c0f17b5f81936d4456ae3
describe
'119106' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNH' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
ff9205f02bcfa2c2bfea90110eca523b
7a432d0afcf9b78e1244cdd7263e78f5ceadc0a0
'2011-12-29T04:34:56-05:00'
describe
'41431' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNI' 'sip-files00013.pro'
8479a7b8447cc6fe8b7a2f6cd5d32bee
cd12e2ca2e4d5924dce150aead7e05d85a69fa92
describe
'36546' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNJ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
811ecac137091456ac550e5451f63874
8c6da9e8554a905e5d388215345eed3dcd5e961d
'2011-12-29T04:37:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNK' 'sip-files00013.tif'
dda4416602ee3eaeca0555dca2c0c0dd
c5b94cd8f5ddb1ed1f4b0cf4d8beb1c46cab5269
describe
'1675' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNL' 'sip-files00013.txt'
c314cf9cb12c906203d055081e0acd90
6ef0cbf26022454b5ea84ac78a78869333e73a78
'2011-12-29T04:34:19-05:00'
describe
'8859' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNM' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
641d57af2353f8e4d970a018918da522
7b81c2c4203ae4989ab8f645b91b483d79f2971f
'2011-12-29T04:37:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNN' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
231b04785d0340c8bac17a7429859553
241332d9e6622b90709118ce6d4e726755554e41
'2011-12-29T04:37:45-05:00'
describe
'117992' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNO' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
c79a7d15abe3483321985f1081c0cbef
30ce6b81fb21eb68ad81039e81ae676559936fd7
'2011-12-29T04:36:05-05:00'
describe
'41607' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNP' 'sip-files00014.pro'
361eb19df2a12bd56c83bfb3c447793e
1c3a170ec3ceabbc55e7a9f0a3d03e20aa5ee3cd
'2011-12-29T04:35:36-05:00'
describe
'36638' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNQ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
8b6f5a2291903420ea77246efd80556d
a27e5aac15a1b2c134f94e19bf2c63bfdf58e023
'2011-12-29T04:36:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNR' 'sip-files00014.tif'
e8eb5b3de5762fba3aa5b2e1e849d7c1
c5e1995e4ca734a2ccadbb1f77906ac8b0132a1b
'2011-12-29T04:36:06-05:00'
describe
'1644' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNS' 'sip-files00014.txt'
9e4f8de26a62f13698db7b218ccafefb
26a7072afcb647025d11ac3c4084968204ba86d9
describe
'8499' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNT' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
88fbecfcbc4802529c2d5789aa0d4902
8d3cb253dcceff32e36afaf04eb7b3470a83c4e6
'2011-12-29T04:37:18-05:00'
describe
'420079' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNU' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
6f50f8031c1ea131ef3d10136e0d1af9
ca5d7be34caaa816d794f8474c5bf2422bbcfb5d
'2011-12-29T04:36:16-05:00'
describe
'120614' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNV' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
675d21a166c7a598c9aa010854a1a905
ac0468df71f432aae841c91ababe9fbe25381b41
'2011-12-29T04:35:54-05:00'
describe
'41609' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNW' 'sip-files00015.pro'
7638dc47ae0949ebfe93ecd49f60db45
4641f86f8688e69d05c6a28cc17775269096b2f1
'2011-12-29T04:36:46-05:00'
describe
'37421' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNX' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
160d4169219a3e1d4589f16cb7e40afd
bf4a80d8fd53247d8e8a57f085bf5867fb503fa7
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNY' 'sip-files00015.tif'
86feacccfd208bb8f6d50764d59b6680
508ea0a7c4a0e084c6eb78ed2d6d0931340df077
describe
'1657' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNNZ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
66c4cc474edd3c4cf0ee82bfcde05ebd
372979e77d047407eccbeef403a567150353fab9
'2011-12-29T04:37:34-05:00'
describe
'8795' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOA' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
320d2eb30f9d70512c6e6dcf7cc9a143
d362c46b8c90fbc9370c1f6f1b22a595232a8f7e
'2011-12-29T04:34:26-05:00'
describe
'420070' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOB' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
277ad4d32325ec4f62c9eef41a237340
dbfd4dd63263cb71c6720e8c6f1afcd31fbfce54
'2011-12-29T04:36:53-05:00'
describe
'117909' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOC' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
f6494ff2b4045787869de33004aa0bff
ee67c09033ac959c9ac82e6ccad021b4bdabb2c8
'2011-12-29T04:37:36-05:00'
describe
'42059' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOD' 'sip-files00016.pro'
22f6022cd076fd805178c6e1ebbdf6cb
1f712e78d7da50e3e88d557fc6aecc6eda1490ef
'2011-12-29T04:35:47-05:00'
describe
'35473' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOE' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
d469646cda016177fba82710b5140014
eda75d292aa8b8c27fd7fd141edc152d89912120
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOF' 'sip-files00016.tif'
695cb4b55928a01b08d45c494e244285
b9f92279bd97b6f5eae506c97f181a8c544765bc
'2011-12-29T04:35:15-05:00'
describe
'1649' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOG' 'sip-files00016.txt'
dd2d2af5f59e86779e0746930ff4fd24
00b19b8d33db011d3fa30dd816db6b6b1bd28125
'2011-12-29T04:36:49-05:00'
describe
'8420' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOH' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
7a30b7b708c3ec15566640dc557c8f65
14bf55b159d2dadcdec1a1e06ebdbc195090c2fd
describe
'420052' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOI' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
566a53a496d39b3a45b8f9a51b342362
98b014db924380dbe6b331d0468fe79280f106da
'2011-12-29T04:35:16-05:00'
describe
'116782' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOJ' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
54d529a319f4f246684d9a4bf4ec09ac
b9515da2fb8ebe3f5dedc792d3d1d927a1cb392d
describe
'42430' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOK' 'sip-files00017.pro'
c0846b547145679db446fc6b90aeab19
907fb7fe7bae8d3d3aa06e8c1ce61b2fd966b428
'2011-12-29T04:34:30-05:00'
describe
'35714' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOL' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
8435fa881f85d9ec4e7d50c3f88f3f7d
cba9c666cc758a4127e522c649d6c8b31c710e72
'2011-12-29T04:34:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOM' 'sip-files00017.tif'
7cb840fc7dbab4f03f22bc3b71420689
46de625799ff605944d3885e378bfbdc383d3089
describe
'1696' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNON' 'sip-files00017.txt'
3f400817cd5cbaddeb47e2f76426da32
75a7c09cba3c97f0ad1b8c88e386c26151bef348
'2011-12-29T04:37:30-05:00'
describe
'8304' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOO' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
41645b7b8353dd3acfd79f4a00ed8854
0180488e650d095215a2fca69b4ed10bc55c8fab
'2011-12-29T04:35:49-05:00'
describe
'403115' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOP' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
c0021a545e655f584417078d12ff01bb
358d677d492fed82dadcdaf009c4099bafeaa917
'2011-12-29T04:34:59-05:00'
describe
'126678' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOQ' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
16db392ff37c785dd9d20d13e0013890
ff7fafeff2f9692419a3644ebb24c0c8fe70d8f1
'2011-12-29T04:36:40-05:00'
describe
'42854' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOR' 'sip-files00018.pro'
6dfd83a5aade00ea4b954f307c51b8bf
82bd2511221fd8064e63caca0369c006838132ac
'2011-12-29T04:36:51-05:00'
describe
'39840' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOS' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
ce0db649275f52541b646398d32b382d
36f7a0ea91751f1c4c735487cee5f19c42d883e6
'2011-12-29T04:35:40-05:00'
describe
'3241896' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOT' 'sip-files00018.tif'
ddc6420f8926eebac1b5aa01484a2e10
5ff0d22c156ebcb2f8b3980880ea6fb0d433bf56
'2011-12-29T04:37:29-05:00'
describe
'1715' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOU' 'sip-files00018.txt'
245fe8458794f511cb4e35c6d0549c94
313fa449866514a57712595ca7fc2ac199b0b772
'2011-12-29T04:35:01-05:00'
describe
'9386' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOV' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
c7aae297f724e9951c6143df1e2599e4
c798fe5510032aa17b41d022fbaaa3bc86277fc4
'2011-12-29T04:35:06-05:00'
describe
'420064' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOW' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
fbfc37b01f88e5e96e11d30a50533b97
f966f61a16dd101cc9f9bd0a13f359af3f254dc9
'2011-12-29T04:34:40-05:00'
describe
'102971' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOX' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
868139913a3193124b7a5cda4c5ad37c
3a57946214da94a5a9457d3dec33bd1a67a3f10b
'2011-12-29T04:36:47-05:00'
describe
'35467' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOY' 'sip-files00019.pro'
1bd87e5db7c15c1b589d55ba16642ae5
ded09ea829fa59497e9b8fd7ffbdb8ab7049e1f5
describe
'31112' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNOZ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
abee8204a2c4f608c345d191c660dbdb
0095ce2a81bf97e2ff3dc9c11b8f3af590892b1c
'2011-12-29T04:35:17-05:00'
describe
'3377552' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPA' 'sip-files00019.tif'
b9a90da7bf37e21d2d97fefd87c42813
d75f74b1e1b83bb466971e4f8d98b981b38e7d84
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPB' 'sip-files00019.txt'
4631b2e5b4152ad8892a5ee1bcf2ef3b
1e55ef1f3be28a057e99ba2b2e02d1a525a4bfd7
describe
'7336' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPC' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
b7c56e1f01019a36e4ca22a146d33d2e
0fedf120d490853377acceb7655c85b182aa3d9f
describe
'408205' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPD' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
86165eaf9ee8cabbc1fd1c49871d0b29
a47c570706f9e18f99e67633f812929dd8a4e0a1
'2011-12-29T04:36:50-05:00'
describe
'101772' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPE' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
2a5162d19cfd76f17cdfa84d9bb76c94
c1558200654202f880f2db92c702a3d32ddfedf6
describe
'35443' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPF' 'sip-files00020.pro'
0987a04791ec371e3b5c79dc45871b93
389261b9755fef682d179bc372f86c7fb107b1ba
'2011-12-29T04:34:42-05:00'
describe
'31163' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPG' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
e3dec78da58580f0fbbc945771d58bb8
cb7a29cff6b44402b21c5de59e85ce150eb237b7
describe
'3282596' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPH' 'sip-files00020.tif'
c0542254168b39dec56caa62de9950e6
336a4a31b328357553dab33de9df3d6a9cd60f38
'2011-12-29T04:36:21-05:00'
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPI' 'sip-files00020.txt'
04af2d8ce34133a5cfebf3b71a48bd63
f493ca9568f3fc732554fb36a9be8a844ec00cbb
describe
'7452' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPJ' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
48dc9599a86ceaaf7a6e57d3e9799bf1
e4b84d8199ad51d336ee7eafa2458b069d9f752e
'2011-12-29T04:35:50-05:00'
describe
'420042' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPK' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
c6197eafaf5aa2802ccad985368f6d95
8bfb99a9519af21c75d61d08ef86be112e36f168
'2011-12-29T04:34:57-05:00'
describe
'120419' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPL' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
adf7bf34f65d36bda9af8b90e31e457e
c5436d2d97ef49a8df4406fe40414273626d22a5
describe
'42664' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPM' 'sip-files00021.pro'
5611a8bbcb6bdd63d6f74ff1403a9ee5
0a4acc9a5339c721f25b538984aded621e8e53de
'2011-12-29T04:35:10-05:00'
describe
'36302' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPN' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
4bcccc89bf9ecc547ed2db497e0ac90d
cdb926e384267a1eee626e90eafa47b41a2d2c3d
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPO' 'sip-files00021.tif'
7e746134ab5dd5e9a4239ea705636141
f101023741275537ce7a5f8e6ecb5122e5e98865
'2011-12-29T04:35:28-05:00'
describe
'1706' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPP' 'sip-files00021.txt'
7ae5d320406eeae86f2c1d9e0534156e
6dfd26fa0fe479c2aec8352ccb838983b7b98c85
describe
'8813' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPQ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
8a6e1c067e58612b31b3b4c10e853f39
a55be9146248e477e367ff311aa8e78cb4409650
describe
'419943' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPR' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
32fef7e4f20342be190f6ad392ccfb5b
ad0e04a66146d838b3114ba4a22af2d47941a565
'2011-12-29T04:37:11-05:00'
describe
'116209' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPS' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
b4dc86604221bc05462a139df0344462
c128baadb3b1df07b8ef60779dcdba01757b04c0
describe
'40304' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPT' 'sip-files00022.pro'
1b05095ca15f75c7f2500571adf24f5d
4326d7542c409bf5cfaceff9a0eb1b65fd4ad7bf
describe
'36282' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPU' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
1f0ee059714f05ba2c458aa51f53969a
81559f981b33cfa95af380c63d4383edc05ec7c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPV' 'sip-files00022.tif'
12a4ed657cd7357348e384a995d59761
51354e3617ed0fccef46223df4075baa8d231ca4
'2011-12-29T04:36:26-05:00'
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPW' 'sip-files00022.txt'
28dd80da41b4f41869fd05736dc1cdc6
bf704a24a694be052e2f50d40f4bcf56a16f75a8
describe
'8620' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPX' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
fdea87685ea8f77dd3b58f643fbfa404
afbdcc444ef2fbf2b2bae99fa949c5f09aa6e2e7
'2011-12-29T04:34:45-05:00'
describe
'419996' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPY' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
63978cdd75aa163e4ec63ccda14907d9
5963be6d5ce441c575056fba4043f8861408df77
'2011-12-29T04:36:09-05:00'
describe
'113031' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNPZ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
8743ccb6a851b067fa555fd5b5faf9d3
0a5ce97ae2aee20e999c832508256373ef23ce46
describe
'38399' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQA' 'sip-files00023.pro'
074e243f16907ef88bce0b0884962fd8
0bdcee22e7887910d9494327e364bf50fb056732
'2011-12-29T04:34:09-05:00'
describe
'34762' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQB' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
47d19fdce9dd19c2fc6dd4aaa3f1103f
169a31f83cb21cc9887382b0493f7fe611700797
'2011-12-29T04:35:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQC' 'sip-files00023.tif'
db7d520e321ba66856a67c524e9283b5
cde889d93c16a2ec667e07844339629be8f82196
'2011-12-29T04:37:38-05:00'
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQD' 'sip-files00023.txt'
388284810ef22556f2af9135655c0a22
ccb29f74ba32063c5d52bf4c20e5532576905951
describe
'8012' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQE' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
4ecc987529d578f99c5aec19e9e137ec
a4cb34e0308d4104ca55aff9c5790b6d54acd59d
describe
'420059' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQF' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
851147f2f673c96b4532c3a294f7795a
1ccacac3b1059dd246f0452b78b051215c0c22d9
describe
'123014' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQG' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
856937675a8fe8c6cd78e1c6e79a7401
5fe32161fac13abdae07a191b5c0996348cd51e1
describe
'43018' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQH' 'sip-files00024.pro'
4cd81ff1b4205a96b3ac630bf63027b3
7ef45ad12ea05b0d551e09dca6001e32c8b71db4
'2011-12-29T04:37:06-05:00'
describe
'37932' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQI' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
2025b43d8089a04872e8f29a5fe2a636
65abba9bc6c180d45b16c8c33091e52e0fdd4352
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQJ' 'sip-files00024.tif'
f33be803dbdc891a8697ca7a50c3bca1
5e9e862808bc8b383b6828a6e21dca73a59349e8
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQK' 'sip-files00024.txt'
3edad5f32b157df2c97d06e9cd2d63a8
bc42cabf5c0799306956bc0143db037c77de2a7a
describe
'8609' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQL' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
ee7befcb3b30edc79d812019e67b57a7
81a6618cd49e74965f89f6ebba4a66c7be18ef21
describe
'420090' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQM' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
cc53734090b239ebd3158baa8ff45511
9f4a94bcc673d40352a4442cc5f59b0bafe7d7fb
'2011-12-29T04:34:32-05:00'
describe
'118105' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQN' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
e7c6f0b19b1ad17fda1acc3efd644e5b
3e8cfcd4f120b78b33ecd3ecd29746f52e9787a2
'2011-12-29T04:37:25-05:00'
describe
'42463' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQO' 'sip-files00025.pro'
3a9f5246f003517516569e6f4bd0724d
e00a58b3922b1685edddc314d868fa80c7d062cb
'2011-12-29T04:36:13-05:00'
describe
'35829' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQP' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
c28b9534a2874ba34b54ddda596c587d
0b34b3450f708ab28383700729e81aadd73e1fec
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQQ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
2c0c63a41d2f336a5eef3e4066737709
581f3d311dbc479c64e0daf8c330117a26c6ce67
'2011-12-29T04:36:56-05:00'
describe
'1692' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQR' 'sip-files00025.txt'
db1a13de16be4ee8bd335a1c568ef504
2e1ca37e7dd59c396aedb71ea093d928ba6f7f91
'2011-12-29T04:36:18-05:00'
describe
'8320' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQS' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
31db6b6fb2a1581f043831e6beeaa88d
83b73a792ee09fb5bd96bf8c360c869ec3b1a2ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQT' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
804bac694a1d0f0c80f2447bb9decc04
8f762f844ed7b9bc9638b8dd82a73961a9294bcd
'2011-12-29T04:37:27-05:00'
describe
'114228' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQU' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
2598027b2ac5be1b7c9a24338ad3df4f
2798e806f4f893a05935955a7647ce652b627b05
'2011-12-29T04:35:44-05:00'
describe
'40870' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQV' 'sip-files00026.pro'
ac5172cde24e37ac56a1dcd06dda425a
0607e6b07190950801efb602bae7308f4ac80138
describe
'35426' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQW' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
1dcf3e1a425b8bddb2762a6264f7551f
92a6aea04ced9838be8531e3ba514e72ffd71c84
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQX' 'sip-files00026.tif'
b91a06880718ccd287babb311eb1a60c
f21e23090761892306a3a1c6e271575faf8d3188
'2011-12-29T04:35:24-05:00'
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQY' 'sip-files00026.txt'
bbb39fc50953370120fd50e9e73d6fdf
c1b21098728aacefcc9c420f3116ef2919ebaf85
'2011-12-29T04:37:14-05:00'
describe
'8560' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNQZ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
6c99a7289f9f944c97c65957a09c0bdf
2335ef34b0fc133090d67d43779c71927ffcbcad
describe
'410748' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRA' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
e2aee37596a898ea8a3e5fba89963e02
094ef69342bfbbf6387faf1eaa59fb9bed67148b
describe
'107705' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRB' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
1e35851545b6fa5517698e72cd4a4262
c1a87263b8a3cd5eab9ecb4b3ad3eeb7e54aaf34
describe
'26136' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRC' 'sip-files00027.pro'
e3b6c706c1dc6b3cad1968da460765e7
cde37c2d5a414cfe5839acc347d64ef5d3975fd0
'2011-12-29T04:37:22-05:00'
describe
'30837' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRD' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
6834e114246133e5ab59564dae7e03cf
13b325a2528cc4e114d127cc4900b53194369850
'2011-12-29T04:34:08-05:00'
describe
'3302944' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRE' 'sip-files00027.tif'
3946128d210d44f74b329ff87310ade6
1b2688e01a70317f6bfba528b466a70b03ff55ad
'2011-12-29T04:35:57-05:00'
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRF' 'sip-files00027.txt'
35435929002f65781582e4ee6ba05cef
5bbf5b48c630c398649553d8a1197830ab6cc1ed
describe
'7606' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRG' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
cf7de0c6193c65dac7e5a2d43cc91c86
06cb665da4d6d18b80bf7cf78bdee99a4a3cf92b
describe
'420060' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRH' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
a374ae59a466bc8caa91b3eda91dbdc0
b799a49a1a6c7f2bc3a466cb84fe40db4e6d2d7f
describe
'121503' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRI' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
956d2779634b76fde18d2bbc7b9414fd
01bdbb565cfaf41dfe16e7accfc2abc615d1fb53
describe
'43077' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRJ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
d5ba99c377e07f44247e6813ce86d754
e4c7efdd9cba82fe6e084c60f92e3dc02d36d966
describe
'37992' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRK' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
b76cf852f02b15f7791860636aaa67eb
a33c8a7d3abd80cbbca8baac08dcfc7071bc25d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRL' 'sip-files00028.tif'
92f60ffc2b4585f137824c6c31b9e2b2
a04b7afd0db76afc685c4ab770b30309e5a50813
'2011-12-29T04:35:00-05:00'
describe
'1688' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRM' 'sip-files00028.txt'
04447f4cff8ce060f9f0f6f9dcc7676e
52a4accd5d1acd423a753ba2b34c8fdc91d21990
'2011-12-29T04:36:19-05:00'
describe
'8720' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRN' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
a7f75af3b147f04f6e94a4efc85a96e0
17cf0c35fc195a67380f5f8c0c4de56cbc812dde
'2011-12-29T04:34:21-05:00'
describe
'420071' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRO' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
c457a0b67fb246d860063eba531328f1
f76d541596d35f6164a1da32c74cb1907267551c
'2011-12-29T04:34:55-05:00'
describe
'121557' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRP' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
b5ab45702bb25f1e5a8e7f9b9785cf09
4c3df3aa065f03af2cdd32947dd3c06dffd13acf
'2011-12-29T04:37:32-05:00'
describe
'43698' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRQ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
d9b6118508940c1526f547e8d0f9237c
415ae19a9c9b067d6b428e62a1e9ba171dd37cf1
describe
'37336' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRR' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
659ebc2a741bfb30a0c946b903171567
56f6199a477dfd5ff61184390875f66e0a1ff12c
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRS' 'sip-files00029.tif'
97e83d476d6fafd755e27b7d03f9892e
04534cf6ea365edc2d699539e8c4aa7beca9e5e4
'2011-12-29T04:35:12-05:00'
describe
'1746' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRT' 'sip-files00029.txt'
40266f3b31ba4867ed86dacab62c653c
ab3ed509268995dc8ed1d636a807cbf5a98aea75
'2011-12-29T04:37:26-05:00'
describe
'8801' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRU' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
7d319b922e2f4303b7d0e93e2731f873
3c4ce09e3bd0491fad5b8a6acc1cbb038ba940f6
'2011-12-29T04:37:33-05:00'
describe
'420047' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRV' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
1c47caad886443dcb74278124bf1c374
5416c3941755c2f02b999741b734c96547e1e92a
'2011-12-29T04:34:46-05:00'
describe
'116608' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRW' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
769bc59598f80f2441d620bc0b634106
c22aab7e22bd2049512656bba43763fa4de7afbb
'2011-12-29T04:36:29-05:00'
describe
'41698' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRX' 'sip-files00030.pro'
a1e5c5e1d55742d24e86d844eaa7a85e
7b28514761c107485a310c7001a8e80428bb1137
describe
'36037' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRY' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
ba471a1c929e4fa62fe430ab716ba323
57ec4c50eb3aee5402093d7dc98bdb46c886a295
'2011-12-29T04:35:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNRZ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
1c57029a99012bc6ccffa42794e13c57
e7bc6a410e57206c8db13891036f873ea1b46f07
describe
'1641' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSA' 'sip-files00030.txt'
d2b4b777b8a75f2026ac94d64a4d7f2b
b7e1f423602b228b7565a38d74e850fcc6ca8964
'2011-12-29T04:35:46-05:00'
describe
'8769' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSB' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
1797589017399aa281e68994c6b30baf
da117cb52a9c2d4525d8612e288c104224e68e6d
'2011-12-29T04:34:11-05:00'
describe
'420057' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSC' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
a3274a23e7c46bb25060af7b7ef2241f
5208b5c2318bbbf14383d81869188b51f90273af
describe
'116107' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSD' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
b5553cacf1504c84a54d974fb7f4b9da
9ea315cd81e000df44cf46ff61fc4e76de3e889b
'2011-12-29T04:35:43-05:00'
describe
'41638' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSE' 'sip-files00031.pro'
cda48aad6c3aaa29bf2f78c8eca97913
929256a2fedaccbf8152373c142ad82faeb57017
describe
'35367' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSF' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
39c9ee529d484b453c4c321665ffb29d
e575b5bb8f285199c55010db3a35ad023d4f1fc4
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSG' 'sip-files00031.tif'
7d987ca05a9201ee4faf4c5984f3875a
3cfc5d3fc2b85997bb757f697a5886e5211483d2
describe
'1648' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSH' 'sip-files00031.txt'
21d27c584e7d4c32653cbdde5d1bc029
55aa86913f977fd2f6cce127167322d404980af1
describe
'8706' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSI' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
3bed6c5f4e8578ef0dc0fa9c3b873645
d9cebe7d99f2dc503f5676f2126b7b753103f14f
'2011-12-29T04:37:09-05:00'
describe
'420040' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSJ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
2d2b45dce9f6acd42e58f65ef0d51e52
c6c22409eb8176016c3077b347409b001a4dc7fd
'2011-12-29T04:35:52-05:00'
describe
'118148' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSK' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
31a709964de90c7d99526ae9f2cbccc6
f3bdcf9929c0fb09ac7ea92820f9555294aef557
'2011-12-29T04:37:40-05:00'
describe
'42982' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSL' 'sip-files00032.pro'
86500fd0222ffc52a0874fc37884ef61
be551aafd92427de8ea8817a810c068a544e2482
describe
'36839' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSM' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
bd44ef098b22d22326d4616487dbee41
0ffeedc74cddb37bff8f3edf355bae833aa5f6c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSN' 'sip-files00032.tif'
5ebb553db1811c77950dd6dfe54d8afa
4300c0bb8051fef6c3e2c51d8e707d1e2d570459
'2011-12-29T04:36:36-05:00'
describe
'1681' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSO' 'sip-files00032.txt'
00d4119a9ceb3ddd341197de32c99009
a2d99ab2713c2ad31099732b882fc5e88543cfc7
'2011-12-29T04:34:53-05:00'
describe
'8728' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSP' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
1d82a1256d958e8f21cfabc531263b7b
1e4e46f84323461d38e893e42a194a1be8c7fb73
'2011-12-29T04:37:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSQ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
bcb921a4760127e89efa85d5b079b517
8547f36568b0549758720c3e818385c2764f435c
describe
'118945' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSR' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
2f389221c1a2b60c3151d89d91d0df97
29094ea327ca3de923eee9ef99d8075c8095e8a1
describe
'42179' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSS' 'sip-files00033.pro'
dfad0a0c45d2d15046a103bdc47caa54
29fe45d4cb2a14a0771a4c9dfb8b70da7f315be4
'2011-12-29T04:35:48-05:00'
describe
'37439' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNST' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
8822052474ed875c2c9882fab4955554
d12fb64a061d49ade78a4e033e4938ae88975572
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSU' 'sip-files00033.tif'
822b58bcdcfb78991d39ca3b5c59227d
2c9949d9dcbd1339c79b9b6383fe7c61fd187bef
'2011-12-29T04:35:33-05:00'
describe
'1667' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSV' 'sip-files00033.txt'
330a658d90612054cf2505818faf8809
3c52b9b4fa36c8a5a0d6e065776d20de6bf9db44
'2011-12-29T04:34:23-05:00'
describe
'8774' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSW' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
50ff12cddf098ed76d23225954b7ecb5
2c6ea188440c85236e7614ef263d05618e9b8a93
'2011-12-29T04:35:05-05:00'
describe
'420068' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSX' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
24fcfc79db6c1eb8cb00e2d69e5a115a
f3940ba9de98c9614bd47dc6fb2c08c5d7dffefe
describe
'68708' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSY' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
93de2a817745409f8a041937e22f8843
681daa037f47828933f0c5439cbfcb793a319fc8
describe
'22041' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNSZ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
e2b53160513dd3be0462500b4598fc69
b1a22c5465991d23751147082cb8d0f6686b7c64
'2011-12-29T04:37:20-05:00'
describe
'21347' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTA' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
3cee3e47a90172c9cceeeb4992bb2ddc
98031511e06d79ba78318dcf8b89489628613a99
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTB' 'sip-files00034.tif'
93cd424556f9bc5a80e5fb3f3f4210c6
f1fc1647537ec8fac6ae606fa5c0792192f2c3dc
describe
'871' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTC' 'sip-files00034.txt'
7a9db330973b49660f2307e1e462ce90
bf09220fb9e07884c0e1877ec04dd89f8ec8a130
describe
'5263' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTD' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
6c702074ddb576c97a983efb0fd11ae7
6c6236e33a01d2b716065c949519c0f0d30eb14b
describe
'420069' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTE' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
63d0bfe0e6263eac48209441832611e4
95aed58cabfcc37acb46fdb5d717f8d74823eca4
describe
'97070' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTF' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
9eeca542bd62f285862f27102348dc65
4728affb97021f750a55ff5aaefb9a82e66d3cef
'2011-12-29T04:37:41-05:00'
describe
'33515' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTG' 'sip-files00035.pro'
0734fd0e3bf13bdc704bd8253f2d4dad
65fde69807fe96f47faa1a5222576463d96cb852
'2011-12-29T04:34:33-05:00'
describe
'29609' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTH' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
db6d640f303eb05d23fe80d868453863
4e545e2ea98dac60aff61e40f92adf7d18a96a30
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTI' 'sip-files00035.tif'
220e8f618589aa32100dff1a93028916
401edb9813c1bf84b5db523c0f3f59e7b58052f4
'2011-12-29T04:36:34-05:00'
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTJ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
48005e843a449e386a7ea467eedfadec
0830ea697f52b379ff4a5b5c7811f7e720b83375
describe
'7287' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTK' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
c8d1d3de25c47d5de7072ce7401aea7c
0cf91eb9834a3fcecd7d84f87a048271ed49fe7a
describe
'420054' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTL' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
212844306ac3d780d50e6a6354631346
1c51ed78aaee399e25ba2a8d5de6547a4724602a
describe
'119184' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTM' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
9589ab8de206c6e35d4b748215d82684
b4e2862b69979ebc73294ace25db4b64441f151f
'2011-12-29T04:36:33-05:00'
describe
'42989' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTN' 'sip-files00036.pro'
7fc010c6c1523ab5be2c5ffd51b5a74a
4c16732a036d8e5a480e45a06f0ce0837c75b223
describe
'36373' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTO' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
23d4b6761cc00d6b9f38c42dc7018af3
b6be9172ac915139857b7c2b6c7a971e386f6809
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTP' 'sip-files00036.tif'
cbc721193a5c08befc59c586613bf950
f736e2c25d9c59fd9fbba8c6b3f43015d40bd731
'2011-12-29T04:35:51-05:00'
describe
'1711' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTQ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
cb8f9149baa6c032605c2b8963dcabc9
18c3ea4ce57e460bafd3d8bbe5568878352bd452
describe
'8453' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTR' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
071de03a1fbe2a439f6e4f0aca7f1a93
a7ebce840cc1d77f3ffadcf76576f30a53d47cb7
'2011-12-29T04:35:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTS' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
e27b643c773b031607f50bb67be46d13
16559f4b2ef7ee8726d078fec995f746319c591f
describe
'122489' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTT' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
d133c3cf930151fb773d37301a937c86
4fe4c94a1c5d1af0ddb3442e2739be33a5aafb36
'2011-12-29T04:36:55-05:00'
describe
'46730' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTU' 'sip-files00037.pro'
ac7ba1f1e2d1fe206cdd2a31297686f2
7057031ca6b0f587667a5fc8a62d330f03421890
'2011-12-29T04:34:51-05:00'
describe
'36641' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTV' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
1760da017158d350367c30ee00fb1d8e
d291c2a830f56f463f852da75faa127fc15998dd
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTW' 'sip-files00037.tif'
a58e7db979f134a60b04dab6146903e6
9dfb224ad1aa165101dfa749b4e549ca73d3fccb
describe
'1849' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTX' 'sip-files00037.txt'
0d2c7560ac2c398073f26dbb0d1941fb
f200c484d9c09116944e9c50bc9641f14aeb3305
describe
'8750' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTY' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
5d4c3d27745a2cbbb834452d14625529
7fd04bd943c87e034e5c48676b806d4c50bac72a
describe
'420063' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNTZ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
0625809580e2339a144b79b773af268c
9353e5a48372bc77fce947d9a1a6cfbbd6019a2e
'2011-12-29T04:36:15-05:00'
describe
'119997' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUA' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
9602ac31bdd022d83580706633382415
4f1d1f71a64f45d315ae4cd19502735dd9d369bf
describe
'43400' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUB' 'sip-files00038.pro'
05f02f73e0867705b4bf3710b5ba2c21
96dd42305d5ff2b983d8108426e9729da531cdb7
describe
'37363' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUC' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
6b711247f21a85188f5725ffa09e649c
bdcbf542642d872b5507ce57fd784ca5ad506536
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUD' 'sip-files00038.tif'
1a08601fcc0bc34b156844d4f0bdc675
9b8d3fd8e04d852cb5ece55fa6ecff367261bdb3
describe
'1722' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUE' 'sip-files00038.txt'
ae15ab3f940c734f79d5e566947ba5c2
17e51ccc7f7eb78ef77d5d1ab9c90359a2882e82
describe
'8642' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUF' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
69e826bd26ffa630dee609394aca1559
ffb0c91623089362839baf02c1802467bbc23dec
describe
'420031' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUG' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
a676c1259378898eb9d3752dc60e3518
7c171632e3d65419b22d30affc08b80e9f97132a
'2011-12-29T04:34:58-05:00'
describe
'116049' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUH' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
0509d757ac3455669c4b97624383a055
e7383f1cc9ce8b075cfdf64f1e7f609760002e6d
'2011-12-29T04:36:02-05:00'
describe
'43127' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUI' 'sip-files00039.pro'
e9b55157ba0c2cf8351a952f465fbe8b
e88cc4d45b6305cca6e217e20228bbc52370ffe7
describe
'35840' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUJ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
2846df5e86dcf55127378a4e2dec3e62
592b08fb82476cad9b7b84b7af57851cf0156675
'2011-12-29T04:34:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUK' 'sip-files00039.tif'
0184cf5c5b256703998e5b026e5a62f8
a417ba1d2c054e5ee2826090238c548042885f4b
describe
'1933' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUL' 'sip-files00039.txt'
5c41fd74a8c7db7504a13b3edb87bea1
303e55ed7d2b9710d36aea2aed03a019939c007f
describe
'8286' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUM' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
2767895962fbb51892cab874765e6dfc
9597a5a60d6e518cf02035de7e03192d0c0a77d4
describe
'420030' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUN' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
ac014a1956f2ab112c7ff60d4a239ab6
6d9bff12df6d10b782d95ecd2a6fb16448675db9
describe
'111795' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUO' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
0eebb99c58c1d67fdf35676202fdbf28
55a7f1d217ea2ba9bc832cdef9e2227e4f524664
describe
'40601' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUP' 'sip-files00040.pro'
4b1ddfa203d240a671336b3699b43809
8c1a3c8793fb1963f2ca343b0fcebbd6e4c42722
describe
'34613' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUQ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
9b14c3e12007e1eaaca2884685db8a5b
cafd41fa4e5b6b53b83433067c65969cb696f7d2
'2011-12-29T04:35:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUR' 'sip-files00040.tif'
d10dfaa081a9c8eb9f1f0f59857700ca
55269d04a1c2dfcab7bf3d1cc95091b9cd70d7fa
'2011-12-29T04:36:08-05:00'
describe
'1619' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUS' 'sip-files00040.txt'
6e422adbebc068e0dbc2191141135bba
c3662ccfb3a4fc807b2db4fdb1859b73d7cdbd2e
describe
'8106' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUT' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
5eb0e02de2b40341799601cb4f9dd756
5e042641ecac8ec8ab3bb22128117fcfab0d475d
describe
'420086' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUU' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
8c1851b3c3370289ed2e2194bc161b9a
3cee2dbe100afd3bfabe0db96a413462491978e9
'2011-12-29T04:35:41-05:00'
describe
'89340' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUV' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
304b8a59efab5e92fcf693bd7207470a
7275065ac97af6abedd5b09f3998d449412f5f2d
describe
'31690' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUW' 'sip-files00041.pro'
a39491f8dab82a3b0ac1c412274e85ad
e80d8531a104e7a586d84c95791fd7a204e22f75
describe
'26644' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUX' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
c440e9c67b425ef3d2d85af9fae3a052
fa7d04ba178534157e16ac2b4af8ef1dfcc8f26d
'2011-12-29T04:36:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUY' 'sip-files00041.tif'
f0b5298305b88dc8c23850510c5d21ca
54c35a78524c2f19800c49763d4b632c84f0795e
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNUZ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
d06b47485b4f739f91dd9fccee51622c
c5ad6259bbc00137f2d4adee7b996084c6039165
describe
'6669' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVA' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
2fee83ae9b726c0aaf1ba2774843b79d
95d59ad044a6d3517b98ed778db64bbcde6bf6d2
'2011-12-29T04:35:11-05:00'
describe
'419913' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVB' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
6a4988b5a4efb0ed4632e7a5db721e77
68251eb77ab56f825fd57aa8552d65d91ebded25
describe
'107853' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVC' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
129b9cdeb5d2dd01b09987a63b54175c
a97bfde25f92ee7da4c4c6ff69ec546fe99f9b3d
describe
'38270' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVD' 'sip-files00042.pro'
6f68c18d39be88e3cf64a151d42face2
3768629f3e92fa47cbf4a1ab2b043ef8ff1435f7
describe
'32719' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVE' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
7a5e39f117e941ddfceb183b9f736b78
70329a272d4e7f6124a692f6af2bd817dc987dcf
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVF' 'sip-files00042.tif'
530c9028b699f6a9ee495665c1d596ce
c30e1616dad18d1b5955eb63f80fb5cfcd850c14
describe
'1541' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVG' 'sip-files00042.txt'
9e5db46b219dfef3ac91e46e08297f69
dcb2373d6c6dfecbf4b5d0efaae45be28dc671fc
'2011-12-29T04:34:15-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8306' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVH' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
56a2288e42237f8013a1b9297b7a040e
511ad4fcf16665fc25574cb9cd3aafc4705a45d0
describe
'420080' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVI' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
f38cec32a000cf4cf5da0c14e4c768e6
a7f0aea5aa1363747166c1fae43d7045f9cfd200
'2011-12-29T04:34:47-05:00'
describe
'109092' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVJ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
3ec662c6335cf7b2117cf42b5730b8f8
dd76a47cc2c7a84b1f6b17783fc0d41495d9b949
describe
'38349' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVK' 'sip-files00043.pro'
51edbcf89a83a66f2ae6a7d69dfeb3f5
3084afefaea0b724501ee8e5264bea3a08a40a2a
describe
'33243' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVL' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
b430db2f4d30c699947f9a2fcef300aa
e2698d7e88088e0bd6680f1ebda1bdb0c5e8a31f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVM' 'sip-files00043.tif'
acf0cce1bab694d9365dcbd83950f522
a7efca1033dd353d2e3a96c2e1256721dff87c2f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVN' 'sip-files00043.txt'
c16f24c9518bac59c2a47e3cdd63a17b
a0fbf0bc5d814bcadf078cc5b06b626b5a11682a
'2011-12-29T04:34:54-05:00'
describe
'7913' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVO' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
75943fdac815b134e1779a754ff325b0
ad14f4777e0a5b38424ce67586a6fc7038f9a6e4
describe
'420046' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVP' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
d2e2b2ea404833c7f7fb7dd55308d7e6
2b355547d94755199d76a068fa3ec1e00251312c
describe
'114451' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVQ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
d857abed89479268c91f3afa1f2f09d4
da732374354212b4959fd25ddfa50b98ee927628
describe
'40224' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVR' 'sip-files00044.pro'
45963ae1f87290f20aee1aeeabcfa006
10de514378f1606be154cce2c363f3e48415fa86
describe
'35391' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVS' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
83c9e8255dc0d8ee9c8ad4f8a508e71a
99671e3526f01b062bc5541203372cf5fe958d11
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVT' 'sip-files00044.tif'
833019066fe2825fc4a3666d03a55d51
cc449e8d881c2c5d40b935ada1231fa0ca46c233
'2011-12-29T04:34:10-05:00'
describe
'1597' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVU' 'sip-files00044.txt'
d91eaa1612ec9cdfcf79698508180ea7
e2f8f968b9f7ce5716674bf55bdc5d183c6189e7
describe
'8353' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVV' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
2ae32fbf78f42bf77005a38c0e32a9ee
1acc47fb31b68ad9061735329a20f5b88ca2fefb
describe
'420022' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVW' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
b1a61c1630fe2e2002ec5d1680727f02
133c183d6647926f0f42f4268d0aa58d93c093df
describe
'113926' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVX' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
8c718f6a613f371af9d53926e1c3a618
96df16daf1a85db6a5517a4a6b4a032629e7b6d2
'2011-12-29T04:35:37-05:00'
describe
'40249' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVY' 'sip-files00045.pro'
3b75740192af41ab2c71d6f4d14d22b9
1b97895e73ca3e704c09fd59ae11843aeb2d1244
describe
'34571' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNVZ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
9366346af6887eb58617d17583a62d26
a9e4bb96cc8921f788b678f21519e34fcb9e27a6
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWA' 'sip-files00045.tif'
dde0677131f9a9b3b79d3ef551bda0dd
7b6688d71b5b5a45b732f2f2519ae829b3dacba4
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWB' 'sip-files00045.txt'
1a582e4825880e7a6175ea3961b0bb70
f7e0397b081a411d6c086648517aee10a6a04ad8
'2011-12-29T04:35:34-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8356' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWC' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
65c4aa56b20b6c70f6738ceef89dc6d3
d659e520e594d0d52dceaf3ea263b39620420d4a
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWD' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
49523b2af6e78782d802d374ad160a7a
19e41533514b0dfa195706537c2dfa7acafe6be4
'2011-12-29T04:35:21-05:00'
describe
'118322' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWE' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
e23a4e4419889333ee140128e5b8ddfe
f6b730c687d9c3073cb60ce8aa20747803998c33
describe
'43393' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWF' 'sip-files00046.pro'
547dcbf9535972156f5a20299f6ba553
9e0b0d53ead3657012a6696b05189ebc1d382cdf
describe
'36444' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWG' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
95cf5a34f51788ed428a3b6c54b4efc7
c65a2adf7a60e77f18d545884f7959e73e24e117
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWH' 'sip-files00046.tif'
39dc327bee15590331a34df387283491
97fe6334e786a3993ea66922c32d55b0c423df4d
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWI' 'sip-files00046.txt'
076de28e01d5515584ddc31db6c1877a
5df4e5c45107a15c1ba43b8df7b006fc5495f3a3
describe
'8524' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWJ' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
cf48aaff6b3a6dcf5a8cb9844c2c1e6c
33ed8dacfed6546835678b823b779135bc9f39b8
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWK' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
dd46f7c65db4ff1d0cc8a523dfdba28f
487eb3b3e2fbd008e06d9066c68a9d94c54522c2
describe
'103288' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWL' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
f4a83626872a661485f0740ba76b2c38
bcd0f0e1714a3d4b9813e9700db2335d55b07aa8
describe
'37397' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWM' 'sip-files00047.pro'
c3a3e20b69f19689fc2fe84d04a6db0b
35ec064671612b83bd618e0b220f5ef70c4721af
describe
'32544' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWN' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
94ff1048d1a8744ac21fd496f45410e7
ec9e83674d4d5ffd7d0d2ca36afdb42010075e32
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWO' 'sip-files00047.tif'
d1ffc7fdbdab0cc43a499408fa5847d4
0b1176c13452f77d6555c284f6d1b777434bb2bb
'2011-12-29T04:37:23-05:00'
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWP' 'sip-files00047.txt'
2ed802f41376d11750eca4cd25beda32
cf021211e6f8363668cc3862a357ffa2c06fde5d
'2011-12-29T04:35:32-05:00'
describe
'7850' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWQ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
258b684b78e26b59a5f72d7cbb9b850c
e4ad83ffc4f5bb6c7b854223509690732fb2492a
describe
'420006' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWR' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
52456225fea26b8b9ae63d3ab8b56539
465ea008f7ebeb4ffda4931fa9367a34c45fd946
describe
'117278' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWS' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
5c0d26965c5770ac76bf1904b669973b
04c344ce833292becdf04b0d397221350f8308fc
'2011-12-29T04:36:04-05:00'
describe
'40487' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWT' 'sip-files00048.pro'
8f9b6b391f731d5f790d694b46ee8b20
00ff5c0c728c919d92ec35471edb3804381b7160
describe
'36411' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWU' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
f2e4592b2cafc004d00d2a7c844ea89e
cbf82a9e126e8307f9bdd3c2ea67b244dde4a47c
'2011-12-29T04:36:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWV' 'sip-files00048.tif'
1abfec3b0886be9762bb424c216d0bf1
3e6e272cb3097f77c6864a3482961f0191f9c174
'2011-12-29T04:34:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWW' 'sip-files00048.txt'
86ad07e21208e683eee3b58464251de2
75edc007022064be86dca4289b5bda6382817023
describe
'8931' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWX' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
288b4742fde502b7a6041de878a450a0
8518b70415afc9448c1aa229dfda11c88554b899
describe
'420088' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWY' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
4da255e164d3bd01132a6646d8cdb90c
5294c09c4b6b795ee249ce025a455771bc84983b
'2011-12-29T04:37:15-05:00'
describe
'132094' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNWZ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
ae4221e8ad6361132ccfbbf1ff189d4a
ec581ae494eb50347553fcab1909eceaad88c3f2
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXA' 'sip-files00049.pro'
f8d5d1067e82303c2a5ec7c5d45d8a6e
99279320ad5dccf6df94e0301d00a2af1c7673ef
describe
'28136' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXB' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
0ab45c996111bf16b3afad0facbd47a8
b9520f2fe35b20b83c7887f41ae8081608872b72
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXC' 'sip-files00049.tif'
c826021724e1205d58edacb1c1c05c94
62538633dc4d2aa5045a7ba03153d56c6854c042
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXD' 'sip-files00049.txt'
520d63adf7e6bb5e0334dab27a867ced
9114f2b666a363efb8d683eb84b91cff0e981be6
describe
Invalid character
'6243' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXE' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
61d1320d9b50be46c883a0b18d05baad
ea04d922dfb8f361813adb40c13275273cfaebcf
describe
'420061' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXF' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
c807001ac49fb85464e4b49956b5dc9e
567c1c8495e078f87330dd95ab142892fbdc041e
describe
'119296' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXG' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
dde8508d6e5f17d22cb03c0b2486b03e
105779a0fa4247647211b6aed80dee6b4479119d
describe
'43536' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXH' 'sip-files00050.pro'
4dd10132629cb6a89dea6e40151021d0
9a2528c19f40820db6d278b90e8f4f71f639b3a6
'2011-12-29T04:35:53-05:00'
describe
'36676' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXI' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
558f4b43d3311eb1b556973f98b26dd7
a5f41494da91726fe53c595357e2566ae5893360
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXJ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
b1111e8a7bd04d08955d05570e30d51b
ded86dcda94777c18ae0db1129d3a9aaef2e085d
describe
'1717' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXK' 'sip-files00050.txt'
05064e4e64e6a3027ae415a758944eeb
a7e082cb161f8bb97c986fb89e7c92518fa14f41
'2011-12-29T04:36:10-05:00'
describe
'8438' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXL' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
7bb3e18df680d68c8673942587ab315b
cad77b8929c4d3b60606a850a9b25624760da79c
describe
'420033' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXM' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
5ebda6955538462ed8d8c77c6f570467
f8b3079b320d0f882b110d1bbfa3549947157334
describe
'115284' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXN' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
bd16d080f026a3d615270e60da038cc2
5c2158b54e39767f7778ec6d2ba96a70bda0569c
describe
'41169' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXO' 'sip-files00051.pro'
ec71f549fce5b6cf18722ce898e1bde6
bc9c5786d0fae44a01e2cae3bdd5c83cced05dc0
describe
'35287' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXP' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
9c82151563b235294c7d65249d12ab34
ad343c2925e962fe0e698a142a90fcb1773e9481
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXQ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
da5a86c35b4348ec0620bbf1c2b415cd
9e43c6cddfd2517b7674beed5303cf230498ef43
'2011-12-29T04:34:44-05:00'
describe
'1622' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXR' 'sip-files00051.txt'
b3711494a5a6a04de392ad2074ec0e6b
b4377c36bf2fb618db39a8d994999da6b342b5f3
describe
'8326' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXS' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
754f41ca48fcd7e4f43f9b7b4471fa1b
90fe3f4617ae24bdd557e28919d9aa99de81855e
describe
'420003' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXT' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
bd317a5e80fd56885f53378afd45825a
f26b5a4e53a08cbb7b2fd81bddc7ac97e8aa4848
describe
'120362' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXU' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
6bb208466b5962041ad673317f07cae0
fe5d17486204b7f8394d764156e6871b897a1971
describe
'42431' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXV' 'sip-files00052.pro'
b30cd70df73f8362006556476e2e04e4
edb956657340cad60115b4f78f2340228c2cf46c
'2011-12-29T04:35:22-05:00'
describe
'37843' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXW' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
83e5cebe6c61d841a971ac1c843133bb
16743de84ea5b0a0d1e50f8951c3c1a746ff5f1f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXX' 'sip-files00052.tif'
ca839cc4a955ad52b2104419f24985c5
67c9f6d8fc0538760002065ba58ba8a6971146a2
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXY' 'sip-files00052.txt'
b8fa3220459aedd8b286bbb38e9a2e2f
92916e06783a26c4e3cb1bc289a0029cdca9db7c
describe
'8869' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNXZ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
7b69acaf2b0600665367c2a2df692b9b
253515bb732282de9a13fa195a988cbaa93611fe
describe
'420072' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYA' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
1b0040aa3f3edc21828b93831c83223a
2d42538419c7a74d94704e92325b5ee2c79576be
describe
'112277' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYB' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
75a94fcd95056123f36bd9b5305b3b22
62ac751fd550569ca3b4cfe2fa88d3344d81fc6f
describe
'17678' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYC' 'sip-files00053.pro'
f60b310bab09cc878e8383dab21e72b8
893f3eaea169066c7634bb2906328e2c8d57b539
describe
'30206' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYD' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
5590593c17dddce5a28bbf5db881008d
fd41b78a11904653e023cc2e8b5bbd113c9ec7cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYE' 'sip-files00053.tif'
9a4c117466c39e7b0c8940e5dd4bbaf4
46044fabc49178c4fc7b10f20fb46f51e39a310b
describe
'723' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYF' 'sip-files00053.txt'
bccce4548e9a8b9158473c36ff403674
359015013ebd889179b72dd19f5d399721154ea3
describe
'7881' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYG' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
f764b25dd02b138127a547c8453c8b9b
f65e9c158d465c9726e29c0a36e2d695207e3049
describe
'420065' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYH' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
7823a08f2b0972cfcdf77f77a52c02be
d54f12bd8d52049eba85999c172f6df89bcdfcf5
'2011-12-29T04:35:03-05:00'
describe
'116804' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYI' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
7de0eda28600d3d6da3cbad1b26fe821
c51cf790725852236fb52c2ac39f02443d9e4be7
describe
'42190' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYJ' 'sip-files00054.pro'
3cc63117e9aa1f84f81ae6fba200f163
df2c97ae40cab628d5e2df1f82134e6c550b61f5
describe
'37217' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYK' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
64348150695dfe66fb9c87f86c20c3b1
dd013370047c5566d575f44b2934bf730858d065
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYL' 'sip-files00054.tif'
40ff2c214e491a3058b97f6724a3f24d
e74682fb8915dcb1006a09e3dadb214fb31f4d05
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYM' 'sip-files00054.txt'
7cb1878335caddc81c4ce2acff77ed2f
e83e9ce0caedf83e85f94d7ceebc4a7003d5f62d
describe
'8596' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYN' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
517c5eb816eb7a94dfe24c1aa1900469
53787e75a140d51ef96964a99556ff2f0cfa2371
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYO' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
81b5e63a45fbb1fa696c08e5e03b8df4
fa8c323151317808b328e46140cfc9970192fbae
describe
'115645' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYP' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
32ab7f4df2de2b7de076336ef571c284
af0248b1d9909442ef97a767d28bad03002f6047
'2011-12-29T04:36:00-05:00'
describe
'40975' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYQ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
4ed2ccad8af537d82e61ad5eb2cb714a
e8a6ef79ace64dd1f7b0d06725afe8147a5f35b6
'2011-12-29T04:34:12-05:00'
describe
'36202' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYR' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
ee33ee08dfb7204fce4cfc88e64c605f
778cd05d5d87d8c7759cfa7aa9701f4f54240e43
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYS' 'sip-files00055.tif'
360b954a8857cfa3d43197f7d0104b0f
f7eee13e0620e856f49a1eebcbfaf6c9ea7f2d33
'2011-12-29T04:34:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYT' 'sip-files00055.txt'
afaa020b101aa7708ea282c5a80b2310
80132e015dd225bf13d7291f15901a07b9ae1db5
describe
'8656' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYU' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
4974b93629fad0b22ca7edf2e893fe69
9c9be0e1e1b19a3243bf3b9a4601dda3a8afd60b
describe
'420011' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYV' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
f4d1acc13997ff0137f5f269f615e439
a89f32b0e1abdefe32c606e2715403ef3489c56e
describe
'79928' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYW' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
6eea7b4e478e3219ba4b6d92a813f5cd
75b1f3d880a21e81dec8b54c618d78dbbdf1771f
'2011-12-29T04:35:45-05:00'
describe
'26293' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYX' 'sip-files00056.pro'
1617fb1f5b3e76981ce8a8afc5859d21
cd1c6ff65612266890dd4b1902d351904d65fa1d
describe
'24419' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYY' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
27763eb55d173de4775abeb3ca221a0f
27c085a0a53b3a6cfe6a5f89b20b324ddd2511cb
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNYZ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
5853411b1aef6944655deace031dd7e6
1243913f2d03b59fd1bbb1c450ce39d098827882
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZA' 'sip-files00056.txt'
4601c233c6fc4b287b6b7d1f79d9d298
72fffdb81fc029331194f0bf2d21615720a42d6a
describe
'5918' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZB' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
88f2a8614379b4ae2c690947ec8887a7
479d4b64fa1a6ee77b1943f81a207e28a5563397
describe
'420017' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZC' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
43598652dee555d880047e72eb4c93c5
0c7658bdf095d5ce786f00abd638dc5cce7835b5
describe
'103485' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZD' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
dc5d3e494bb454f3966b19c863458231
ae28ab704ef6f86566afa03ac934cabb149e8e27
'2011-12-29T04:35:23-05:00'
describe
'34996' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZE' 'sip-files00057.pro'
0a5f9f89f4f9a3444c4edca6857e1cd3
49d0bcc162fffb9892357efac0aa5daf0f363cdb
'2011-12-29T04:34:52-05:00'
describe
'32718' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZF' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
14eaf4c2ac3770731499f3392ef86b5f
4c658792c1c3c99d8c217e56dfebd2a25259ec95
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZG' 'sip-files00057.tif'
1095a2b417fce641423d593d993f0c61
d68f3ee23ac2a2a148ee6ea6f8fd7745aea2b64b
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZH' 'sip-files00057.txt'
75d24b6287597da682857d425beff786
2a5e6e763e3c73140ec9420b95fd598fbad84cfd
describe
'7554' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZI' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
348d23ea68124b8af4022c5172d1aba6
bb316bb002f1d73e6b5c739c29a365244661452b
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZJ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
d622ad685a09697c662acea87b047fa9
32f11bc425172ad255b8eb5ce73ca96ec809cf42
describe
'118296' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZK' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
f313ef4c3e7c01f9f071b7b591177936
c7248b4e72f082a353d461e4fb9fac6436d483e2
'2011-12-29T04:35:25-05:00'
describe
'41917' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZL' 'sip-files00058.pro'
d04f71e2f3a842b020ad205ac92e2a85
641b44e3f8c42d4a3541d090b31ab88d881ffb35
describe
'37171' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZM' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
954c4b3fc0865a09e20991ad1be7000c
9f6b6b24f4aaa7de2b26b806fef45b05ac09bea2
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZN' 'sip-files00058.tif'
ff910a0d4f94836457db6e6329070ddf
df2e9cadc6e0298402adaf9fd991646cc93f135c
describe
'1642' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZO' 'sip-files00058.txt'
e12336060110034273f0f0f62919d124
1c862b6d29ab44df17db8e3ed849e0cecf04fa41
describe
'8513' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZP' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
7f6bc0cd00cf88fc7f97e9c360b4d629
1e67191c7ac7a929e31a6e770d06adafee470f18
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZQ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
ad1649772c0075b30376a1fcf7e4faed
264edd453f87a887fb5937646c1f1a946ec4ac07
describe
'116070' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZR' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
4dc7b0688860c4a2342c6729c98b5bc9
a6c1e6f291ce6eecee3e9859c068b1bff94041eb
describe
'40696' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZS' 'sip-files00059.pro'
7c3034c617df4bf69ee0bc37bc10bff5
ea87361d49ce8a871eddb8b65fe518b70cc48d11
describe
'36485' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZT' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
a64c21161325af11a01dfb1c7492740a
b154e2d890fd8a23c627e0bfb9e9e3a85520fa6f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZU' 'sip-files00059.tif'
289918bbf4d90e06255944dfaa10193e
bf2a06f3e5abb2dcbe460bb043736a7794139cc7
'2011-12-29T04:36:17-05:00'
describe
'1659' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZV' 'sip-files00059.txt'
507c93e40ec9a2feed49230d5c7c4226
438d425a5830a74a7aec3b908c1dc91e616ffb1c
describe
'8397' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZW' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
7f9ce41a2da230bb76fa138f5e2cbcc0
be95a918ca7d69670a0618a42c5c5090d3a34c10
'2011-12-29T04:34:48-05:00'
describe
'420019' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZX' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
52f7fed5f06cdc3809facdf4f6d5ee71
cea15241ec1ffd8848366058da71c2ba0b02d803
describe
'118657' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZY' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
01ca57b838ccaf7adb1b5e16db789765
4c96811a5f2f447ec8ba1435800e7e622009e45d
describe
'41673' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABNZZ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
453ecf672631828fdb9e2954ac0b2745
b2fdd2bd03ea9d6354e4b7f249fe47b0f6fcf568
describe
'37155' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAA' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
e0d3254b8172ddbf49ab74df930b0022
74794af310b4f7fad17e22dd27fcc1cd477a34d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAB' 'sip-files00060.tif'
1dc315c7d1a3e8857edf4fac89a56a65
4f7796aa9e2ce85358fe7f13822b3bf9d2149c34
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAC' 'sip-files00060.txt'
379c3cd65b6a702f035cc621a8c408f8
863205bc499f601ac5afe312f6c370a2fa62c04b
describe
'8658' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAD' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
675d085dbae140c4957ffd588af1bae8
b2326e00ad6961dc74d4a0ffc69a8e29aa4d3466
describe
'420014' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAE' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
ffaad72153b0c66cceedb6be5ec81de4
8a09dcbe4c33cee7794152ca202aba2c0ef16c18
describe
'118786' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAF' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
3572c1200990e785cd81146c8e70f79b
a1d5001ce387b9beacc7380cf6ca35c829908885
describe
'42086' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAG' 'sip-files00061.pro'
c041aaebd0f3cd8bd7df00bafc92c01d
dd5d865c30626081d72fcfb402147357eb68d559
describe
'37055' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAH' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
57ac293eb0c0f1677d7d9394c79df836
483bfbc3e214411e1964fc97cff2bea34bce966e
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAI' 'sip-files00061.tif'
bf9c9dd6d3d9ebf62f78a8d80c0b45dc
753467999745910b4864d05835965a3a1140d8f4
'2011-12-29T04:36:30-05:00'
describe
'1672' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAJ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
16e57895fda680e695b5e03d018d1e8c
c7c0b1bb0d2dde1d8f185e26942a4eb9ca04dbac
describe
'8817' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAK' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
ecddaf594fe36a9c834d736bacb1daea
7539b8edf1877059daa3409fc0b86e11ad0b6af1
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAL' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
4f7a561eaad6a0015ef03c67e2580236
b48d540e2c9f18ee4ec9f82412c66aac4dadb525
describe
'95177' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAM' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
f938565905ecdb088315c558d7709991
fcd6af248959e78d16fe388cbf7a5a3a1aa6c3e6
describe
'12848' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAN' 'sip-files00062.pro'
f40723c5ae67a0dc81334f09c7bc26b5
477d5a6946ef9d2f94e5efe79914d20293856ff2
describe
'25953' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAO' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
477e5b6be68b4bddd99e5905710fb6f2
c6453694a5ea7473302f8840551af1daf1a0d6b7
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAP' 'sip-files00062.tif'
99c24e6b5fd2d755322421588768bee3
3c1d80058431ac2855c47bf20641c7ba1d44538c
describe
'517' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAQ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
6f2bfd5b9de0b03da56b5c0551a1ce07
887b9c1fd2844f7711bf0adf15510a6e8651d19f
describe
'6775' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAR' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
24afeb67720eeb6d92be88670cdeae87
ba1bbd47511891f6fb20bd37d9ab8f8a7ecbced3
describe
'420036' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAS' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
ca41bbdb0405d9730e8f5e661ce26749
73973c458711659a6e8882447072c1fc05020fa2
describe
'119236' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAT' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
24cf4acee8a6b737c8b9f8c9bc200e7e
2307c8db6358b830ef5150536412e65b632f5696
describe
'42153' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAU' 'sip-files00063.pro'
517c7b490321991478a67a716d55fc71
1357ac9ce91dc43c8806757fee143a30cf44ce27
describe
'36936' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAV' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
cb2f2092f9a292c740db005010e9cd35
82c9e7eb70a677fc6ae927619aaf09dada930b89
'2011-12-29T04:36:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAW' 'sip-files00063.tif'
6b5633a899d88586698408188530f911
8190aa506e9a8603b948e523ebec4020a5e45063
describe
'1666' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAX' 'sip-files00063.txt'
398f156f78d9dd8abcabcee88d0881a4
168a792c8e38826c88b2233fe90fc292fd7044df
describe
'8460' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAY' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
ed17b6f9aba36420c31a4d88652bbed7
2d8c816a7119bb4552fb7ce2784483361455fe08
'2011-12-29T04:36:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOAZ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
f10da62bce28dc8465b3c6cf117d9b63
f8a5ed4a522eb69471b5695d18f2bb9af3a23d06
describe
'115364' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBA' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
51eaf00ae1984537600a674fd348d590
505851620aa0da5496fd699bd6dde495173e9620
describe
'39313' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBB' 'sip-files00064.pro'
533f7cc28d595c947e2764b5c942d28e
de6e95202dec166582a4df60d3fab91f8c07cd2b
describe
'35546' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBC' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
ee72d08d380eff5cbf8d9a04f1580c4e
6acc5a035edec07dd77d701e6d09287f57a468d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBD' 'sip-files00064.tif'
a57b5497af2789fec52ae1e5b7440fb0
035e7c099a5ef512674d6c0eb45fa3b5551e47ab
'2011-12-29T04:35:31-05:00'
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBE' 'sip-files00064.txt'
fce577b01f90b4e038688c090023bd9f
62b555a33682594d21979bf57178e76f921ec9ff
describe
'8544' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBF' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
51c5a45d8bb6efdd0863c92fec94626b
215b0946f02721ad23cd76974ccd44a8f2c3d5c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBG' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
5e2b358386564b2016f53b71a970ac66
ff110b3461f6978a8fc9a7dfab21883e2c32e1da
describe
'120238' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBH' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
204483cc93766393518985612c431ee8
9af199e12981c6cd23d40c5a76918926994520bc
describe
'41817' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBI' 'sip-files00065.pro'
56b45ed220ab6b758f64de4d18f38999
94ba66704135b540b31827e6c8db452e424f31c6
describe
'37004' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBJ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
53e5fd528ed04dc1747b820198b52d89
774a3b8417c76f62e986bf65bb52b096d089a8bc
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBK' 'sip-files00065.tif'
61e59a5c75246d732e4890f0888c96fe
8411a1d003f1933157be6a5278f168f2e0c530f8
describe
'1647' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBL' 'sip-files00065.txt'
7179e73c8704ceeb4304960d802eeae9
835d7f58d839f30051ce6c3dbe1fa080d4668421
describe
'8537' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBM' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
3fbf889ddca5cbf8d5932b6e5bd3dbdf
101fd0d1ecf4bfb6aa67ba355648e1c1e0273e81
'2011-12-29T04:35:38-05:00'
describe
'420074' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBN' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
7399d3085551a5d7ba01773f379b2591
eab986087cc40527b0b6d574e9a4fd3355482c04
describe
'116781' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBO' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
c1c3c67f85100f8b7497d876868bd81c
eee60bf1302a4d3c3b722e8ad2e1758217aa5263
'2011-12-29T04:36:45-05:00'
describe
'41503' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBP' 'sip-files00066.pro'
7b6b81aceff8bf32747da949618c4a5e
c6905301649d378a96f2f5d50a062ff51a5261a8
describe
'36538' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBQ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
5b7f1116536700b49e50289e0a2157ed
93a45b9ea386c29ab9d4c56b48f0c892ef145d40
'2011-12-29T04:36:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBR' 'sip-files00066.tif'
680d782be03b179a9d6895797e0bc749
9e53e97e9c17af8bece5cf5bd1048737c5c4ee62
describe
'1634' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBS' 'sip-files00066.txt'
26e34b723dacc4e1b81e2ae0133adde0
4f143817a6143bd8394233ef7cbfc933ae74a7a7
describe
'8585' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBT' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
e57015af2b0e4107fcdb4d625c3c97d2
d60e2a3273db6481c38bc9ce8e939554ad40cdf9
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBU' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
f2459df96ec6370d6440b447d036faa2
3fa868c4997fbb81617b25426cb108c2efaa4fe9
describe
'115213' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBV' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
677232f83e84c105543ecda1915e9e9f
5aee46a31d3306d0eda5c31de07c70d4f5d81cb4
describe
'41838' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBW' 'sip-files00067.pro'
e375330c1239012c90b1aee8dcfa5866
f069360c50df9abd1550fea72e1673daf7934b8e
describe
'35556' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBX' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
2785e68208b7643dfb1b2a3fc17c71dc
21f81bb9bceb0c98f37ac6df06db10e05ff9d424
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBY' 'sip-files00067.tif'
af1a49bf136b89fa177acaadd5da58ff
45255e15c7fa621052fe4b97d270d50e4ce0ec72
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOBZ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
8ece88ee36c663a2abdb0cc04528bd65
f4fe94a1d459c7d3804a8ae39451b4cdeb5fb640
describe
'8376' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCA' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
92fc1596557a604bcb62c30bb224df1b
dd0471eebd7d42ecaf3c3dcc122253d5e6c8c61f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCB' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
53fe7de3fb6e46bf6cd6dd91c02776d5
d5e646b7b894b4d7c3b50318afd620fde2c189f8
describe
'115468' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCC' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
4cad724f8ad337b9287f07764218d3c6
324f9492807f0797ba03f88b7c81d9ab65068ffb
describe
'40808' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCD' 'sip-files00068.pro'
ffd24e565afce0a30335039b34273db7
74d3c327f97681113a7fee6b9789b67b7b172cd7
describe
'36209' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCE' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
46da52d107a94ad543ae22ac3fdc3082
91215117d4c069d838d5419f962513e9b754fa8b
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCF' 'sip-files00068.tif'
7ed076adbaeebff4518bc66b8c78eeb7
2c905a35053e8e30368cf2b8e3164270b33e3745
describe
'1605' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCG' 'sip-files00068.txt'
80bfee197c99f374ad2625a4037e719b
6975189d43ab98398623dab203fbb45c42b6d6e2
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCH' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
2a1f75ddb2c8aa6b4a32bf3b187a1139
88c3f030da583204271419b13103bb897689a668
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCI' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
b09458f931791447050b452a9e6ea386
f59f0177d04513e9297d341544178b8a253de157
describe
'120039' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCJ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
784ce4bd050039f58cefea432fc31767
10d0e0047882e1a432398418e0d902a934f6548e
describe
'42131' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCK' 'sip-files00069.pro'
ec4221a839e3249a459c13c6cece34d4
801dabf0495157569d1ebe7057d71ea8dd079643
'2011-12-29T04:34:27-05:00'
describe
'37445' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCL' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
b6c2df64f0ecb764d4c94617eb49d2d4
d9e0d2340a9046a2b62bef30f1af85826c3cf709
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCM' 'sip-files00069.tif'
d4256d70a938ab55301f152645d4f3d8
9c5b07d5291ab66340626d98eec4d26593b72a0c
describe
'1683' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCN' 'sip-files00069.txt'
0ac865cef136c1f49956cce89ac81da6
586a3d09a93d417826670edbab5da8234c9077dc
describe
'8886' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCO' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
397e989883ec0d449490ad7f51ade110
f467648d6099c7e6b03c6aee223699a0d42fbbd1
describe
'419992' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCP' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
569dcaab39f221aac3b885f04f1f11e2
05837159f6b0c96958978ee24154328ddc8226e9
describe
'120935' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCQ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
deaa44e6d8b3d8c28102238efee2f638
b6d7fcb9817b5ce94f32ca0b505c4cbc254c7fcb
describe
'21723' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCR' 'sip-files00070.pro'
a7d5d6495293ce89420f9f811f88deb2
cd621b505c0cb5362cce47365e3bc6d40c5189cf
describe
'32058' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCS' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
25a12279ed3d476cd7d0775720a573b0
de6dbd63139ed5eb105fea45a81494fd31f16559
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCT' 'sip-files00070.tif'
125976d0bb8d0068cde87ba8596d8639
61d1ca4ac1c55e582331145c6f8d534e04a860e3
'2011-12-29T04:36:24-05:00'
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCU' 'sip-files00070.txt'
613b7a1b13b65dbeef6392d2a5b97422
cc1507302b07fa2482b4d6681b87606cf226df35
describe
'7762' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCV' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
b498c69d7cf61ec51cca756902a5c56d
dcc6b6f042303ab0757479c85053fe6a9c69bd6d
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCW' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
eaa34c33881db9be6df66a6eaa19fe6f
f87167bb4a9a1b70de50ad758cde2c798481052a
describe
'118318' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCX' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
afca9cfd9c3cca93807df373939d214a
6bdc7799b8eea4308ccd6e6d9579b208702ae2c9
describe
'42250' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCY' 'sip-files00071.pro'
3d2f300bcd44964c8bb46bdba4c5e198
9c2c6bedcc722b35d7d1f868b0e72bc101a724bc
'2011-12-29T04:37:24-05:00'
describe
'36572' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOCZ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
b2e44e30c4cf866a38a60490cae9deba
815e341f6b3b8c97b64d1362f697e4609d5dfabb
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODA' 'sip-files00071.tif'
86da3915a4f5dc312132748afcd57c9f
6cc873a9ed042a3f179552da9156bb614509f345
describe
'1701' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODB' 'sip-files00071.txt'
f1c25bb2763d7630a840535a60f4e897
0bd7dfdc4c4beb763dac16808b419304c6df2ed7
describe
'8403' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODC' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
edc483ffbc1e5bf179d2b749200755a4
6968dc4a4900a69397fbbba20a5ca4576b121786
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODD' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
a15add8d3522abce0bbbb68056b76286
ec5dacdd72b9a993642e688082d4c8131707e642
describe
'111504' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODE' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
209d8f401bfd66d74d89b7e7c3b80f53
065f8aa88aab7d56be55f3a248c14a19cddaa13b
describe
'39879' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODF' 'sip-files00072.pro'
1d9f6349f01ffff1a99322808fadd4eb
4ed44843be1c0f4f3102aa2d67fa5a8f64dd0ef5
describe
'34976' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODG' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
447bd265399f8199171428dfe5867a08
1b985a935fb5dac7e19a31fa4755b20c84f6f56c
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODH' 'sip-files00072.tif'
d238bc8db5dc1bb62c4e54ab7625bebe
3aee66453ba6833de3709edfc770f1960365a2bf
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODI' 'sip-files00072.txt'
916a250cd784ee67e6c96b7ff537f5f9
b2ce1d44ab97672e22c619a6b131685a090cff0c
describe
'8410' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODJ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
ef45e712cbf7330068d55d6f38a2e524
c893d48b18e31451ce30c514ca51bdf681bf0673
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODK' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
2e9b38d60ead1d595d7e4c3ffd3562d7
94cb19c5b852fec339261bd6741fef6607517f6d
describe
'119820' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODL' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
8b1ac0d725db971f8a7654d719f80ec8
2c1e09a5611d2073cafce030ba6aedd8a925e893
describe
'42880' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODM' 'sip-files00073.pro'
128b6c60a9979e5033604ec326a4ff49
8a53b4f3d95140d7f0882940952f8e7bd6b36487
describe
'37282' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODN' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
dbf514b626cc0b1f2e26ecf1cba438de
53abe291695b6d3f88b5798775108bbae91bcc0f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODO' 'sip-files00073.tif'
4ace9a42e209b7be04e2afe5d41c1744
27df6b8b0a328bbb7560d04257ed892d33035c89
describe
'1702' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODP' 'sip-files00073.txt'
a19ae0dc59a3984244c6f35318451829
85ba6c633e7789172a5fffb50cf45a24ca85a12b
describe
'8693' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODQ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
ebd904a4d04d01e3e33ef0c527fdffc8
9f55c17421f78286de2724363eda021f8d4a9d04
describe
'419776' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODR' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
037d0ebd0ebaf8b9d3afe883d1e5c6ac
3d9490a49e425b857de27a13e63a9720f34e0a0e
'2011-12-29T04:35:35-05:00'
describe
'129020' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODS' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
afdaf158df3424a108feeb922e4e3092
a56c57fbfab807fecf5c461cba8948db5b86c21b
describe
'20784' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODT' 'sip-files00074.pro'
9c298f00285d67037b5277f22e4dd957
2aad10a730d05dc350624fa4edfd9f4877835abf
describe
'35580' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODU' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
d7c3a9835783b366fdead46f7df4e8d7
2f03d2d93aaf6c58349e36439767f5a89288df8c
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODV' 'sip-files00074.tif'
c2314ecbfdaa5769c07d36723cccc2fb
f79c6e1bff74c36486625dd9b58a3cbeeecd4089
'2011-12-29T04:37:19-05:00'
describe
'832' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODW' 'sip-files00074.txt'
4311228e118006c8dbcb6aadd308a441
1921f90d2f7d987daeb19c35c047401e61f79e40
describe
'8478' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODX' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
b216afd945f075953918dd70324c1832
8d5e9d0c5a3dabf7ffe80e1b917452994dc41fed
describe
'420045' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODY' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
afbb5d26bb3d51725ea7e6ac7d98b738
57b5a4e95c2d023b79b71b80a0bb1b8a52ce1277
describe
'115493' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABODZ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
8e3d36e85fc4883d31f8ea95515a8538
ad40debb5ae8cf315ae4f37586d4e7931fed3fb4
'2011-12-29T04:34:29-05:00'
describe
'39732' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEA' 'sip-files00075.pro'
97377164b643ee49a4c18a5a138071ed
3cf3a7b80743ff1b8b6ba64ec8c1d3868028f7d3
describe
'36377' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEB' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
3a01b72f67bc1a6c88d34e14a0248b0d
c5bed0f7217d20eca89d925435b677b80cf86083
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEC' 'sip-files00075.tif'
5ac8f7e6397c882d0ca958b282775d92
632c31c043002f874c15352a2357a630f48a019e
describe
'1651' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOED' 'sip-files00075.txt'
f12f63fb32a20d1734bfd0f317395493
d62c801cd30d7540f9d1b089d8079d554f4cfe20
describe
'8500' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEE' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
fb9a2bc2c1f4a52360dadb612d38d393
fb7d58bde09ee795d983b5277367c46888ea9ed1
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEF' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
c761c8540bc8c6d439128182689bfb49
e0dd09f5bb2d8065dc32c8d98cfad1aa8fa97842
describe
'119376' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEG' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
626ed79eeab4aa99b8fcb42201cb9a62
fcbf5b69bf92f48db0d5cc020562bdaf20b9030e
describe
'41729' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEH' 'sip-files00076.pro'
2f637dc8f9c2519d3961263883e06142
f7e8b2cb441cab583428119ebb7e3b009400670d
describe
'36962' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEI' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
950abb899df65ac4d7f637bce5c1ba05
78b3a30cb606c0c7f67d68d4e3f5e288ccb9e530
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEJ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
e892ecf95b12a395e58efc2f29f4d8f9
8a88e3449b55c857e0ba798c73e9e9c5136c07ba
describe
'1639' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEK' 'sip-files00076.txt'
a0aa9d0ef6ff0d4aac0d7956e35c5d02
8570d901fa28ecbd54f47c4b7a63648079302cdc
describe
'8309' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEL' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
ebae11c170bd1e45be974f887bf06253
85e6121e3f0284248ad55c1c64d6e7bb179ff6ef
describe
'420083' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEM' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
9640262b1c4442127f740ecbf622967e
2d1d689e0edde280e3fa6e59ef9c9c28dd0966d1
describe
'119706' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEN' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
9f821dfb5938b5cec3d62ea24119267e
b5ae0786857bf884460b8d3bb3bb78710bab7203
describe
'43060' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEO' 'sip-files00077.pro'
d1b22e67f9bd163c77c38ec400e9be26
6573c68e687114a0465969e18e0824b609f200fa
describe
'36964' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEP' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
b690bb96555e7d475a4089bb9bda4188
bd7fd5976f51cae23d1ee1338520813d51c7d987
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEQ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
227c68f251b6e98028b1811636178ecb
4cdde98183bd187d6c4237b300c8fc5edea74b6f
describe
'1720' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOER' 'sip-files00077.txt'
37ac8cc99ffdada863e549023dd76e5b
f3cea781dd4a6ca617f5737541fadae4713af2b9
describe
Invalid character
'8682' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOES' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
566aa877b2488d48331937a618bd0814
3cec6a09e662a7893d026facd9cfb64e3cb0c3b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOET' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
1ab6e426b26371ada0667181e5c4a3e2
eb8d9e223b7965ee26ed2c0aa457880352fe191f
'2011-12-29T04:35:59-05:00'
describe
'68981' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEU' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
916a68a03eec71047d31f75b18bc6258
71efb1b2c2264dfcf1bd132cda7f663de52ec4ed
describe
'22199' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEV' 'sip-files00078.pro'
502a18b93cec7d7fb67162e0f394ef33
3a6ac8a6f2c33df1ce00118834b37a93b3b1467d
describe
'21278' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEW' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
d40d840ad6df98e6837d2ceea7ffbe2f
422f53704bfbe1a863a97357c19a8442e357948b
'2011-12-29T04:36:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEX' 'sip-files00078.tif'
762c44c290fd0e7acc3564bf8d44dfdd
89f5d97147303dcadb27c050c8c7c1af6f188f60
describe
'876' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEY' 'sip-files00078.txt'
442f39ba2c96666a33f26429fb4ff426
5ef71c5995ab43221b835d564430d9bef98de37d
describe
'5178' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOEZ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
bba480c1c4dbc8d702181dad01076a33
b360e7decdac4ea5fb3ed38054d5a561c9e1eb91
describe
'420049' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFA' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
e64537e6d5e954c419a6abcdd4ceeb74
9955563750d83aa195b927e84c979aa59e117ba3
describe
'90008' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFB' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
d06d0b7fa257c80e9e19e1d360793005
a64c0adda356990c6b6343e1d94872f603ca4b10
describe
'31429' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFC' 'sip-files00079.pro'
8e42612206d8acf1c62beef4e524d8cc
1a50c25b3e87e7ccfe064340824d73cf804995e7
describe
'28086' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFD' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
0cb23afdfb5d77f274ea18df9055fde9
6a583a7618b46f5929e3cf52d19fc35ee17d055c
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFE' 'sip-files00079.tif'
92a82556a07984bc62fe2cd84cdbfa61
3f5b4d6f374d20dc95fadeb4cdff33b15c5b2bb3
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFF' 'sip-files00079.txt'
f8a04c441b2f2c9925fc3920a23b0f8e
e301f26df84bbe668ca4c866b47839c9cb41a6e0
describe
'7205' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFG' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
cea1b58ebeb60969d054b494c078ebab
edff5733848ff4f6d70532f29667d269655fae04
describe
'414787' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFH' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
d18e40575de551333458e82e47c30dac
ce683eb4c477926b8d6a001544d933619e8737e1
describe
'110274' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFI' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
0708a19cb63232cb8d9dabaab48f7a5d
79a57670a46cfc9c556837a7301d71f23410ca01
describe
'39100' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFJ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
f6f4ae90e3d214c962e7b40ced8cff12
23bf6cad10645924bc5307b9302d956bd5872a9f
describe
'34304' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFK' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
999e932501f7d985e25338dd4e12aab4
225229917727afb6f49f372067e183128caa6eee
describe
'3336860' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFL' 'sip-files00080.tif'
b0ef4ded9c00d42aeda141114d842acb
c8ee54c82bc2265bdbf80c09e7e9923be924fcdc
describe
'1562' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFM' 'sip-files00080.txt'
c9792c006be9cba424f6110f5ff651ea
ddef5487b2c4d2909f97035f831ab8f09013b199
describe
'8203' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFN' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
ccdfd9359085b6a11c6769e9456a10ab
37f310db5eaa388fb7b3545056c09bf947c8238f
describe
'420089' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFO' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
67ca0a2886ba18bb9409e796c77911d8
80a9f13bf68f45ed479e43cebd6fa560ab6edca3
describe
'115362' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFP' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
a958a7b0b193ba4582c799f613aa738f
f21a8eee7f42999fbc83039ba07f90623174b630
describe
'41828' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFQ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
1ddd3cda213790a89ece6658cdc1f81e
4014f4e74c918bf433f4a9392593b92dcfb7a015
describe
'36012' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFR' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
abd0af75b9917a90fb68807a22e864d4
41981af936d04dd6cd5ea6db88768a7f8b71ce1a
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFS' 'sip-files00081.tif'
363388a9f6bf979f575d7b35a73a69f4
bc94b57786c650bc8c1795cbfc9a19a977cbfe71
describe
'1663' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFT' 'sip-files00081.txt'
94468fbbe80c5e19b1bd9f6022000d91
029e5c053ba9e9e204a6ff8698d4fd58606cff5d
describe
'8552' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFU' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
cf7aa5443f69135251b5fef6e6cf997d
6770ea74ceda3851606736b9dd7e7569e1d3490d
describe
'420066' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFV' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
05debe5248dd09344eef7cd1e1e69b6e
6ca0547c465dc5a6de4c299ab7710ca6ed446c90
describe
'123680' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFW' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
99a875d379ebdb8bcd1e9131f9caed3b
5b1c92e280241599e107d82466dab1c78511662f
describe
'43469' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFX' 'sip-files00082.pro'
9049133916aa5ea1641b90256bd44f92
80dcfb89593cefe7e5ccb3c3a6aead008a3f8796
describe
'38182' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFY' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
cff0b3f145bef7dcfb86dbebc44a1c07
9d3ad0f4177cb1783e16375e9368c9bbe7810ace
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOFZ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
16d839193521193d7bda731763b0e9f3
96e7deb154b66dca6e93fd56cbb1167afea72df4
'2011-12-29T04:36:37-05:00'
describe
'1694' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGA' 'sip-files00082.txt'
589fa2e7dfa9d18bf33756150d8786a9
c7ea0ae00807f2ac9c3a5ea6f786bc5e8ccba1dc
describe
'8972' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGB' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
aac3f95f6de4292bbb3e4d90a63c2d99
b537c360362bc5903819635ebf93baf712df326f
describe
'419799' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGC' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
a57847b828dc4c57741ce85f70b0f07f
72509225217ad698f7000efa74065f665fc6af8d
describe
'109684' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGD' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
c099ec17435bcab594052ee8990922dc
0c04946cdedaa93f6d93f49fae3d05f658319cdc
describe
'39462' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGE' 'sip-files00083.pro'
23784064b8adc4a98a2aae08ffd8ecde
c3a1a92c87d7391d2dd19a70310db399ef962453
describe
'34043' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGF' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
1b663a0fcfebbfd30e096ca2315f6ce6
cee60649378b463b99f8d2d702fcece50af0b8c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGG' 'sip-files00083.tif'
bdece0f7eeadd1e42d0e8b4e74e43bf9
97c361296d2fdabf2fc8b79467b16245601807b6
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGH' 'sip-files00083.txt'
bc964d4d9d3661da47a4901f260aea7b
00beaee00b90563011e4f5b12762d55a03d0fa06
describe
'8435' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGI' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
fda81a2ad458ed955f982228a6932a3f
373c1baf2b013bcad8d81416446feab0566d06b5
'2011-12-29T04:37:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGJ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
3d95efbf3f47507ee224394b548923f5
aa7b9b9207b829799d2fbb6a8db8e77c9337d6ae
describe
'116242' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGK' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
ff7db40ae2401e729fb462ba43717424
b5274e4f4aa4b4a5f6f05a646bce6dcb9f58236a
describe
'41667' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGL' 'sip-files00084.pro'
a07db38e4e2cca303400baca05f5b562
3dbc81edc3a570caa029a1c3f1f9b3984851951d
describe
'35351' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGM' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
d1568568b4fecd0ed0b8d49e66e0b59a
e356a195dea705e453c3a23013c7c4f6fbc6739f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGN' 'sip-files00084.tif'
45e0d42205fb5f15de0b05d49269e2a0
2ccd230085d547af281532a6f1e2df500c751d78
describe
'1635' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGO' 'sip-files00084.txt'
7229a3ceb2be060054b725ebe975dad1
b7bf7044dcfc6107ef51c9f969ca9f6693768ccd
'2011-12-29T04:35:30-05:00'
describe
'8627' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGP' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
cee96cd80c5119ccb708787e7e038ec9
6c2ce83317f71ce8719f9efcb5f63436dc4e9d6a
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGQ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
23148f02ab4cf234b2c4e00e3490930b
7808fcfe301fffe2457cc97389f734122cc7f3a7
describe
'107552' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGR' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
e62e85e399da5e58d9f37992b64738f4
b2e8c3bfb57a071cfaa6bebc2066dcbc9e661cea
describe
'37250' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGS' 'sip-files00085.pro'
b235b80f36320189ae5952dd907d228b
d7a76632f7678e32d6e086025ad83ea76a7e4700
describe
'34301' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGT' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
0e14db7a53da8d12c1a5a8c439d37fae
b634b068b6bdf2ddf43b95eb57b6aafad9645ea2
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGU' 'sip-files00085.tif'
75ae8b5413190f9f28eabf3394e38792
7534bcfed46ae1bc887742de82f07cf0ca387aa5
describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGV' 'sip-files00085.txt'
faf51d8be853e4b75083ed7b875283cd
ab3a1a70ae599dffe69a66adbbc7cba944bd8ef6
describe
'8262' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGW' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
991706e3e4592d9a1d48005354a0c3af
73eaffae10c7b1485efc6ddce01bb8f5c09146c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGX' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
260768a0a19e2a979778ddc8d88c26fd
772d8f0739b8c93c2c4cd2d5a17109125001b900
describe
'117026' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGY' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
e0372ac2ba18c3b70411184d6286b5c3
1e39238725f440d79d900a70a9800a312bb15295
describe
'41120' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOGZ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
60abba15e0a4dd5cfb99b79d0dece4a6
b32e505ae00f850b23088ea35a016fb3b8daf952
describe
'36075' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHA' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
e4542020a049dfaf255fb6c0db026391
6d02d545db9658f37f9c94c1923ee0ba7e3829cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHB' 'sip-files00086.tif'
a64cfa9aef2b8a2ed87b6d204d172d58
3a622a983072d6d9b7bcacfb3f6d55d40f6349dc
describe
'1614' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHC' 'sip-files00086.txt'
a26fb101937f93c98dbe81dae21f6c4f
06912a0876c22ce2683320a852a8db8f3b677857
describe
'8563' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHD' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
b0dd40e8c956b5debabbe509c7279d1e
595622572f49a66f538335f140001b4b8d71158c
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHE' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
e8f896437f24f2cac685c1cfc2292692
2a37f2d8b36caa4a1169eb15c8a3a9b5e85fd4d9
describe
'68087' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHF' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
d18b7d20e83907ed1cfbffa40f1b0dcb
236fd7ecbade00a5ae235d0d2ce758281589311f
describe
'22530' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHG' 'sip-files00087.pro'
01a640c5878104dd25fe7449a286eec5
a610f17ccbf1eb51a47e5731f91f581c2b6ee2ed
describe
'20955' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHH' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
c5902791e90d382f3b0c82108818c05a
3d80e905e50cb3b5879a8a68da08698e1559f1dd
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHI' 'sip-files00087.tif'
51f9fa8710d86687ad40315b705b874a
7130b9f0985daf51f29d2a2ee71cfd2bd3422cf7
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHJ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
3e56f4cc96ed95c8ca615c323cfde090
8e66f7ad691f80ec995998b1ad4e5ac6303ed31f
describe
'5133' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHK' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
1e6865aa2600b78a9335ba967938ec46
1977035b517196c3cfbf9a59fc3194bf422f5dcf
describe
'411585' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHL' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
3229196d3488dc35a54e395001ab238f
c5e9795accf7f4511068b8f82077bf95c865e9d3
describe
'105452' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHM' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
c8ebbcc0b909a2b2cc77fb99672521b0
ab0e80f22a3e12c8c2ec7fb652c0c472f2942805
'2011-12-29T04:34:24-05:00'
describe
'36163' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHN' 'sip-files00088.pro'
c76a7f62abd31ca34f99e3250e34a789
57359584c8832d3fc7f0d645a8c8ffeb9d8aebe0
describe
'32174' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHO' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
99323bdd1db36d3f974bbd3f0a96a876
734d0625b8180211321b3e4b46b67c49992bf679
describe
'3309728' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHP' 'sip-files00088.tif'
1bcfbccce19c45cded316e405e39cb7e
9a988e9e550bf1ea2e75c7dc0d8eb12e2183f640
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHQ' 'sip-files00088.txt'
00a35349d120877afcb4f88d8d709071
57f7b55c4d76fed2912a76131a572ebbcc047ed2
describe
Invalid character
'7319' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHR' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
6f4ae82f795b64b593b02188dafc9669
eada277909b84cbcf98bd642e05f4f972a8f6c1c
describe
'419916' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHS' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
23aab02c96911c37b658919716015ad1
5c2bdb4339122c5ebdc0a4d2f933ff4d325951c8
describe
'110205' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHT' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
27c2f7a23676ba8870d651395cce96d5
8e97fe6ea8f219474f27c8e2a12bfd524261ed10
describe
'40069' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHU' 'sip-files00089.pro'
799813930327abc34007f76d40899fe6
f198332411f2f4470f0d96629789b851a5efeb77
describe
'34127' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHV' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
eae5b1f2ea124d302dcf093306d771e2
eaf984157ef9c6739d3198cbe02d374e85d1005b
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHW' 'sip-files00089.tif'
9196c92ded31b62afc2e0dbf5f852c36
61d16d484bc4c65c3beb8a3dd4eb5cf8061d64d3
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHX' 'sip-files00089.txt'
79e1930bc62c47289adde2225e97329b
bc476b1454da9f0f88b983219e8f33c431ddc387
describe
'7909' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHY' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
7d566718013c1a19846e2858d963885f
031c25d6de8b71fe6cee155aa1932eb8d054d88e
describe
'420048' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOHZ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
6cb6a5f1279abb90d20f8428edef07e6
032c27336cf28713c4513eb08f94881522e1ffc1
describe
'122295' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIA' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
bccc9f565e6a78eb68abe69874f825ea
a184c20fb6ad4a2b4ef4631bc955fd0d6a4475fb
describe
'43224' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIB' 'sip-files00090.pro'
3c88c22d3ccba6de4fa4eb841e550166
0e962c9f2400721908aa403def6f91f88e204f3e
describe
'37630' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIC' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
91499521d4b081116b24cce5159c3556
a9946f91003e3ffdfcb7fd4d1862ab1a4db442ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOID' 'sip-files00090.tif'
20d9b75100eaabafcae4f21fe13caadf
8819a39cddca9681d70ccb5265179f85b38d99a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIE' 'sip-files00090.txt'
76b4eb625490dd6ba5ef7e1939682cf9
d65b411b2080ff624db5c1d54983b06700efd831
describe
'8511' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIF' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
e3fda6342f87c4cc0b6ead90ccbcfb1f
15729489496a5917ca6a5527bd7567e9e1913002
describe
'426357' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIG' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
5d3f973b28342667a7af17bb73d40ac5
33cd97afacc4207d0b80133e4d467de3a4c5c032
'2011-12-29T04:34:43-05:00'
describe
'48679' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIH' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
e59d00b8d36dbd37e3f319ed5ba7c8c8
7747afe6fb2e7aa45380cfacc7d20a29053c3a76
describe
'2842' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOII' 'sip-files00091.pro'
7dd486f6f56435631f959bca74e26e3a
2003600e687a0e3c5b4aa922c0711abc72a40df2
describe
'12224' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIJ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
db2732d0baeeb24e48a01e2a874006f8
f596620960b992586f968dcc8e99ffa2522a9b44
describe
'3427984' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIK' 'sip-files00091.tif'
e53e8b1c4da59b64029cbb26c482e708
5f407e829c3d88160318bf646b96f1f93dbe704b
describe
'169' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIL' 'sip-files00091.txt'
f57c57c144aac5008fb610ab9bb65207
19add49b3a16328071ede459db78e0bcfec58958
describe
'3514' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIM' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
354eec2e36f7a9cf91db464ec0fb4a46
02063a2aa24c4d0d0614baf584ca19d86d79be21
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIN' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
d7d7094f9453fc9a61a5e362cb626e4e
849f72b601fdf3e5a06cbc912b5bd38fb288622d
describe
'116300' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIO' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
c4aa3e99ee7fb2a53c27a632e04935f0
0ac0231ee1382e2379e78772dd9dab3c16dc4878
describe
'40500' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIP' 'sip-files00092.pro'
f8f8a63635b5636702f021cbb73a4986
6071dd09aff073954809796f5d5dec1faeff1422
describe
'35842' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIQ' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
a09008108c38e18449a9a8fd39853035
5da768feed9e1e5deb5b275fb2c7fb40b4e6918a
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIR' 'sip-files00092.tif'
2bc623241aa69cd1212ef8df66e03183
b26753616b65bba0fc90c38cd9e570772e8361b8
describe
'1613' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIS' 'sip-files00092.txt'
60c406665e1ec9eecbed28f58700c2e0
11ee587edf2bee4d21303efe9100cf881551fda8
describe
'8592' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIT' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
4599b3f8475a2bf001bcc29b9c67e4ce
bc0b2ef30ede42f38d8e505a9ad1b3e31ed82054
describe
'419988' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIU' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
34d0e62ca947d87ab5a2a33488da0a91
86ab68dd4122485d267f2244ccf18ab875cc950e
describe
'110745' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIV' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
7ee99f8f8b27f1b93f89e3967f4fc07a
8e0459915c170045b64cb63408a5d17dde094cef
describe
'39260' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIW' 'sip-files00093.pro'
e337e34f4ad7144a1dfe54790366d4ce
3913615aa4037b5a5dae5a048ee631dc35f3b551
describe
'34410' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIX' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
9e267a76fd37ea82e0b5366913d374bc
0d241e077da9d3a6f4e198e369ebe5397271740e
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIY' 'sip-files00093.tif'
7b5432b8c2f1d60aec3010c1fd222422
57bfd1829afe6b2b418eb898c1cd0ae14dc5a04d
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOIZ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
287c019b4533c7b913d0bf96250c9ccc
dc097edb83116cc76311780c3003a94d089c3505
describe
'8579' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJA' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
632074cc6c64952114a9c144710d9065
a955d908944a9d3c3be2301ddf0d4d704071486a
'2011-12-29T04:35:42-05:00'
describe
'420084' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJB' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
e22cccb62b4573816a26353907382c7c
3c8da74f7eaaf30cd5040f695d511b3ee85b4521
describe
'117966' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJC' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
c61333866b253b806fa4158d1441b8a0
9b64f1cfa7a89143070621c9d94e3841f4281500
describe
'42670' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJD' 'sip-files00094.pro'
36601e404ebd6cab21d32e14126d0156
920d1704a1fda25c46b8e40b86d75c1b77ef2fcb
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJE' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
af7b1e8cd1ef8a3801b829b99f92a1c3
ddb13152f24907d491acd2f1c1d88e84de292146
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJF' 'sip-files00094.tif'
ed237eb480956db645552089ba3da67c
c562ff1dd738ae4fbaf23dacf045cffb825af187
describe
'1690' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJG' 'sip-files00094.txt'
496a075804e5d0177cb1d57603743abc
05cc26caeb9368c9b710eb66fd72278dd16cea0f
describe
'8518' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJH' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
37edb9891e08dfbc08422a8851bcc27e
5977303e244956841ce654364f3e093df17684d2
describe
'420026' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJI' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
df561dff26a51c0d31864c2375b7299e
d6e04007dbd640460d43e056fb7e7a64b24c4a67
describe
'116592' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJJ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
2d369e25ec44327b911fb16b81c934a4
b0a07bfc1ea6412c2ad3634b3bb9e5c32e7053b8
describe
'43231' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJK' 'sip-files00095.pro'
e671125e70a785a212a4c0776379681e
0edddd78c32e25da52f2a1ea569f0a721d871028
describe
'35345' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJL' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
a0cd6f47b2fb15827f86ce0db20f5652
22d948565c5e70a5be258c13e4fd4001f51dd4da
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJM' 'sip-files00095.tif'
b9f67763b894ee5c21b14467674864cd
8ff328df54b98ad8e39e6a461c207aa6eed909de
describe
'1735' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJN' 'sip-files00095.txt'
e947ebc3066ea326646a4285612339bd
45e9bb64f5fae5891fd93caa674048958b73e6f7
describe
'8461' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJO' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
c745ab125858f6e08f568941d1efe6ea
1f3135d11ce2abaa3f6b4eaece93bcd374afcee0
describe
'420027' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJP' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
b376a3d022e1f737b7b3f2b07a62f318
cfe54b86e519613fbc7e5a921f90f86736fa95f6
describe
'121417' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJQ' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
a23dd28e2a326f839295ffd091ed6664
b27535057c04a6f78f7b43f64a831c8103c1e24b
describe
'43082' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJR' 'sip-files00096.pro'
17d9cabd384870c35b03995bdd9a3a28
4ff74fe5199d51121172634cb6fe3c298957e797
describe
'38025' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJS' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
b9165de0f40dd32e9416666f65b6393b
526ef13306cd6d359662db3f77978c0b9770fe07
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJT' 'sip-files00096.tif'
88956c667f7cd28e6f6d620eb84857a5
5cf9c47d5c1a131e459dd3e42fd307f43413069c
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJU' 'sip-files00096.txt'
1e22bd4114cdb1b0ffb366b4dde0f14a
e00dc62521dc0a896b5aac6c8d68ecc22ddd00a7
describe
'8766' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJV' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
dcdc4b0b2a0362ed5b322c6cc3373811
2b5092aa2a7967fef28d1b4849cf7a5faab5797f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJW' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
81aa2807b342b2873cbfa6adfa9f08df
326725a5a340297b797d32382217f91d77f54eb6
describe
'117281' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJX' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
5b79c6d2f427b4634ea132d940bbe852
0fb0c00e9a0b87071aa4253268ea2426907dbc1e
describe
'41636' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJY' 'sip-files00097.pro'
ea924d19aa1abeaaaa3bfa8c01b9a8ec
aca976a746bc0f6ae88362af0955f15614dece91
describe
'36643' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOJZ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
8525066fffbd9cdcd816be0d611e9931
d146507a87886690c9df6841a81fa47f9f60aaab
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKA' 'sip-files00097.tif'
151cd9748691a18a5f66a3fa94f80912
36eb69e9b25b748da9dcf543723204f2d74ef6f6
describe
'1645' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKB' 'sip-files00097.txt'
6335dec510e88f6dfd7770ea9dcba978
3383c7ad987086372f4abe7dfd00c1b6b402aa89
describe
'8608' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKC' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
a25a7e34c984099c43e61e2f64312d2d
81d306b04ef798fae43dae52ff71ec5bec22c604
describe
'420012' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKD' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
e130c364ddc57769cff4f4867fb7f9a6
7b7f302ed76401a85cd8fb8c8e6eece0e64526ca
describe
'120091' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKE' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
4040f14b2a5b2c1e1cb3b887d751b996
7a84d7e1055af0998dd8cbd5e74f864963da3ded
describe
'42226' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKF' 'sip-files00098.pro'
3664118c7c186627db5469ebef260909
029aa0bdae2fb443173891548c6462e31d6fcc9d
describe
'37830' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKG' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
e3f10f617817158a6f956fe69e0e2665
3d5d9d2544c0aea3919c20af163751c6cd45ba6b
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKH' 'sip-files00098.tif'
ee2b8101ad1a9ce87da7ca6c8a5d1fe2
7520ee1901c5b7d28f97edb6487649854b58f7f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKI' 'sip-files00098.txt'
42e7f3102f36537b0998ac69366d5d1b
bf54262d1139b43ac43811297775f4a3eb465a84
describe
'8792' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKJ' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
6c8a79e6eea2bec364b54c6beb2fd82a
2c1c045d03eaf0562d4ffd06d6ef66ace2d41c89
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKK' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
ba2946715cdad1b031a78b84187870c1
e6fca2775658a986adcfed2e7d86f53393bc4fc3
describe
'55426' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKL' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
ab72de1c6b597f00c221a55b1a7aaf7d
3e04fca906bd62c886f61e8acaeff2ffbfc7af1e
describe
'16304' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKM' 'sip-files00099.pro'
7f0ee69e41d917c2c5cfc088d0f7003b
0d84e183a2f6aabac83470d90776aa9bb7579d08
describe
'16367' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKN' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
8ff4ed3d1a66bea0d686342359233634
2c8f4948cbf3b730e5d0e2d9047236d80086c47b
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKO' 'sip-files00099.tif'
8abe7101ff24964971e30a71db3ea9c7
33f772d33d63d927c730b9b4e2e025c6604f5a60
describe
'646' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKP' 'sip-files00099.txt'
763569d62eea2e841a2649acf6d762f7
1dfef4a7035418b2ddf301476cd9bb4f93c5c189
describe
'4096' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKQ' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
3ac8fae21b4f77daafd48649baac84d7
6028c00c112308db85ebee255fe6d98dc7808af5
describe
'420029' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKR' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
19ef6ee003c06ab5ffc62ccc4fc54e55
205a29960744440fdfe7691c49c9d7591bdb88bf
describe
'95795' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKS' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
46488366728f9498cccdaee70d798b45
f0c7bc95d49b459477355c9bc26d1b70d211f8cd
describe
'33994' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKT' 'sip-files00100.pro'
1a5124fd5f1662e00e71427e06a59bf6
159b089620b37019d3a9a578c56fcd67f3353d54
describe
'29210' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKU' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
94371a050db730b47259e0748886c309
d557453d6b684333672f5a89d8458aaed06ce605
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKV' 'sip-files00100.tif'
fb3c73f7ecd9748c81deca33e544672e
01925942f71662c82cc462358854c729592b8c6b
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKW' 'sip-files00100.txt'
3d3be8fe88278748ac3a6d82f9672256
dea247b7c4760fff037a6f9ed1ac6638d3fb990f
describe
'7170' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKX' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
088eab5def94b777e5105ca1332b58f0
aab15e3702fb48ca61d8638ddd0bcc2d7cba8ce9
describe
'423325' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKY' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
32c47ea80406d2b0160c59e6da2acffc
53bea44c4576fc542406764c7c4def34a7882f9e
describe
'61248' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOKZ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
a87b2612e842c6e867ace7833d71fc99
09952941638870820864a42b7b62f8b0421c4a45
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLA' 'sip-files00101.pro'
8dd0c866b444ec793b43a416d3ce2740
fd74b9713714fb129371a47d1a73ff24ea266ca4
describe
'14054' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLB' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
a2a1ed85d9d63e5e7f28789e95f74ce9
0f59a82d46e4ac974f87b585f70fe5da105daf74
describe
'3403888' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLC' 'sip-files00101.tif'
724d234220cc3387c1f546efb65aaae3
4a260e6f3d1631e56a0052966abcd176d0bdc83d
describe
'95' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLD' 'sip-files00101.txt'
f09f05c493f4e857ba3e3f6dc67090ba
432559c44fcc661ae58c5eeb56f6a27d65097af4
describe
'3570' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLE' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
9ae93b07ecbfeb91427eaae7b13958ea
93c2a867a474ffa45c9a5c3febedc46a6862764d
'2011-12-29T04:34:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLF' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
44e8a8826b23809ce87d611ffb413607
58477d878beba8fa64afb4c20a381a12a440e434
describe
'120227' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLG' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
5ff6f11b08e885a292701946cd1a5781
a45bbd954f1e339761f5437c8e2ef9e7ce75ce03
describe
'42860' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLH' 'sip-files00102.pro'
e29756d1e0a965dccd104927ed84fb07
3a218b74b6fe941d8aa336758f6ee34d5383b66b
describe
'36827' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLI' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
9c8f81c69c1a5f148d48fd5894611e59
a57eff01b1f0653131e31b56f907d2775125ac28
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLJ' 'sip-files00102.tif'
d8e99d0cf098db90515b9b1b6c7918b5
f7c2a5a63164a1eeb7a8eecff04ddd5410fc3191
describe
'1678' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLK' 'sip-files00102.txt'
26bf474eb64196cc051678cf403b9459
0f64ed3584a0cf45d9d8086b1d671df9290cb296
describe
'8655' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLL' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
d1854828d017adc53bb3188f68ea2a3b
b1b8c2288c826fa3441ab3653fea5c2ccfec5374
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLM' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
f35ae8459de0608797fb971bcf800954
6306ccc05685059d7d422385d3f5b7ae2a9cddee
describe
'118115' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLN' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
83dbcaa06994b7ea6368d474a479c26d
4cb90d9746016e1e77c6848f9dce7a172ca148ee
describe
'42011' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLO' 'sip-files00103.pro'
1f777794a5551d1bb77f64f08ed4af7a
113b19c0872198f8300a1c86c92550a60cbf3984
describe
'36139' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLP' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
b78a7a2b41b2eb71a7c3070ad1b1c2e8
7d4fe255ae23299d73f7dbf40cdb877c381bb359
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLQ' 'sip-files00103.tif'
da93c4c1d1aa2e0b65f2b33f725bb6cc
8d7c0f2835421428ac1dbae6c64bf6c748fd4b33
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLR' 'sip-files00103.txt'
bde38ee749c9d3aefb1c5d57e7ce4bbd
a0099fb50d9e261c9ac6ac134f0b2f2a318d5bed
describe
'8502' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLS' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
0fe8be42655e7ed8acd9e98df1ed5705
171f3f69a8b880b944e4dc28bc3e304497a66ada
describe
'420058' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLT' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
ff94272a465256c40506e63b20562808
dd121d2530c4fdde3acc14d7052d2d06b1c2828f
describe
'112658' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLU' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
4c0932041bb9b553328e5d116336100a
e0e0eb6a6e04d8e1809f39b9b908d57beb0f75a3
describe
'40449' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLV' 'sip-files00104.pro'
291a9c829dcf05fc15bf303e17eebbdd
2f853742e3bed1cc564b2d42bf63d1f72355ff89
describe
'34605' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLW' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
b58af877cecf01aab0400fdb0826cb05
f94cf7524677b98ab79b4251bbf08df96a19dbaa
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLX' 'sip-files00104.tif'
b7987d66418fedcbd7c79eb40b083925
f12095dbdc8957f8346df04c9c3ba893c23a3103
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLY' 'sip-files00104.txt'
4fa074e211d4ea262dd60e21850bf446
00fa4e9233ec6f7713267ef8f30467668d5d89fa
describe
'8355' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOLZ' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
be8409a02e054a0552980532650c295e
1cbb9d3d82468b0119c154ed074186e122d06d8f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMA' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
75e42418437fbacd586fcf5d22c25a37
a811006ee6bba85f68009002168bd5c058e8e134
describe
'124584' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMB' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
74b1a8ffa6c7369d859591d69c60e6b1
d1b33d95d315f7672344ffdc3ec36a4cc6573b6f
describe
'44050' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMC' 'sip-files00105.pro'
255b903d3dac603d4d75952692623e86
1e47e640c18a781c56522e920d6dac0783b1cf63
describe
'37881' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMD' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
cdbdfbb722b840e9ca427a4885cf9a64
595f4536586703817291abe8022d6a0c25d13fa4
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOME' 'sip-files00105.tif'
9ac35bc625d6471c4fb5cf8afb55f9dd
57bccbb6d3e8f80ba3099e7cacc307a1b1817aba
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMF' 'sip-files00105.txt'
c5548b091ffd5c2cc087db9bc4c55a2e
8942afd34c22688caecae9ea51f93a4fcd4e1c50
describe
'8808' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMG' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
2a7264cc25e9c5b22c0a75913490140e
73e9f04a5dd1403e94aae213b5a00c0fb0832f3f
describe
'420025' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMH' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
14641ac071d3ab112394d53be771925b
d7784d03f37177b8da43f8a1c89a6d5976719cdb
describe
'124695' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMI' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
6c2115434746654cee2c12baa07801ba
6df685e20a9875b5d9176689f8b7a10df53b3745
describe
'43522' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMJ' 'sip-files00106.pro'
14a8c2f437eab57a499c2988e142d73f
7e2b9d49c1e7580ce515b6c691e73f7c7635f8be
describe
'38809' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMK' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
2855bdcafbdc9358c211d1783e8cb78c
4669be6bddcf074310c4354efe6c1e3ad4a4fdf4
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOML' 'sip-files00106.tif'
c2c3b4978734b72e97ccf711efe02134
f8a2d675f7637edfbef2c64525538913413a06e5
describe
'1699' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMM' 'sip-files00106.txt'
d8d55b9675f142c67a23c13e8d55f96f
c44b45e10e03e0a24c607a673222afdb33a1e96c
describe
'8708' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMN' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
5fd4443bb20aed9e071f6469ae061b20
718232c185c452917decf6e89dbe3e33fa212ec8
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMO' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
8b1b6af1fcb45b1d102b15387ff7061e
bae4dc7e052c26c54a48805be716f85b52175160
describe
'114736' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMP' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
4591932f4aa02e3dd91263aaf9165b6f
59702da7585d70ae2dcbf35006245df67146d637
describe
'39888' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMQ' 'sip-files00107.pro'
8167d90fe77199f02563e7bfaf21981b
ea7f4982448ba39b8937d1f1446695ab15393210
describe
'35047' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMR' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
0a8d9c707ac776ee2c70407d3dd07aac
39b5bed997f1dae163a6273c9ff5159502e897b1
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMS' 'sip-files00107.tif'
547405bafd085bfeb8f832e31904bbf4
595b1ba8c2f3502b1b9e0297cc5fce9723feaa51
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMT' 'sip-files00107.txt'
28f193e5a40b328f22f1a61dabc6e20b
e17ec3d29e77b17d51aa19ab4a5bd58a4f5a7b96
describe
'8330' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMU' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
82be638ea869f9e9d6c164bed2376e31
eb07abd252583b1f16d6f3838418ed8e8285d384
describe
'419874' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMV' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
5afdb3172a968ddaa9cd6128d7a23f6f
96197d98d19da49f6d92bbb3b246b23aac8216c1
describe
'110758' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMW' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
ce0d26e32563f1f7928408219ad53414
e2fc5dd8917aac6b64f6b06549f0711b52a0d7b5
describe
'40533' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMX' 'sip-files00110.pro'
3e445bdecd743252d8349e8fe538aded
807914379263da0bd32fe8bb843aebc9318f5879
describe
'34084' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMY' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
287569e14a39108cc35db8faf16178ba
eb33ecbc302f7dae34403d9804d631061836bd86
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOMZ' 'sip-files00110.tif'
9eb9a784df844f560727d4da2176bb81
9781606713936906da16791c7274c7bc5d201768
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONA' 'sip-files00110.txt'
65a7bd1b5668ccfbe8fc5a484f6d70f2
47403aea8041016d94c53bf55c67cd0deb117eb9
describe
'7979' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONB' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
8b17a1d45c7e03ea82717226ffcd988a
bde796f9cc7abd6496c1e27628d0273ce89609c2
describe
'420053' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONC' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
e9f55e4a1e11a2330279fc55ab7ba965
bdfa8d6ec813c8d91cc573eefc7b4dbbd30d6a00
describe
'93064' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOND' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
e148fa0cff22fdb63b9f70952787b08b
5a2d6b419a26bdac16af9de4241e9fe27f35ba4a
describe
'35740' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONE' 'sip-files00111.pro'
5b584c06b11f3217fd24a2760d7751e2
ffa716fd3e09fdf097d8ae7b2e1d3d005b25b09b
describe
'28207' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONF' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
5ce7bc5adc66738a5525e2b441fa6b4c
ce76bcdaec275cdb4d6ebec344c9ea389260e644
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONG' 'sip-files00111.tif'
ea9224847c2bd18111a9ba640916eeb1
eb03d502cd20cf262a06befd7cd2b8a38cf29ad2
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONH' 'sip-files00111.txt'
a13b333ff1d2a3092c913d6120e05dc0
81b0fc23f69b31ecab6636776752350b23edcd70
describe
'6937' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONI' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
1fa7327377e731258152303637c125ff
2793091482a6d11ab08ba78b1295596e19be8dd3
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONJ' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
e41acd34520503bc0b6e55315106c9ea
6a4577a654f42f9376caf5df8014a2c9a16491b8
describe
'85194' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONK' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
63fc80d7c773d278489b644e98d6b48e
4b4502850c6cf2a853b02292881502a2b0d55372
describe
'31803' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONL' 'sip-files00112.pro'
a9064609169f98fef2caa118aaaace52
dca979ae71fa7cf2b5efdf97a21487b7fb663375
describe
'25136' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONM' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
87bcf096df4dfb7048508ca9679cf195
2cf0873b0888d294cd438bfa34efdd35aa18257c
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONN' 'sip-files00112.tif'
2587017fe82951d6349ea5109c50d253
3bfc15dfbbc156084ef3581237b08d92e4587723
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONO' 'sip-files00112.txt'
25464f4e8ee067a987b2f7def705ffda
741832ca7e7378d4aef09e0d47f845da10bc9f32
describe
'6406' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONP' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
8fb462e9f5773c54da6fa2695d67e08d
48f8ac6b84f571b55cd976fa4c1c6b412ce67954
describe
'419844' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONQ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
ce1945ae3807c42e0dc4391afc7b4f11
f8d78444c85f8c2d0f1dbc2c8f8226831c5a7420
describe
'111701' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONR' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
9187c2fb3c778bf4b613026c4963927c
588d0aea73990c5d6e3e98e5cfff4f29db87e91e
describe
'40404' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONS' 'sip-files00113.pro'
5e0717ecba1d6350496909bc6966efd5
1d994a88303aa5d8ddcf7553e6ca32f6b714c54b
describe
'34637' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONT' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
2d57f8e9df15ae1b62a8921ddd8909d0
604385b8cbba784141a961a1f36bf4c2365d3884
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONU' 'sip-files00113.tif'
2458da7dd58ef76eb739fb1bcd032111
374d7fed0bbdd2d74ada30b243568dd93a6fa608
describe
'1611' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONV' 'sip-files00113.txt'
311a9e8828b3975b6a2e0565a5b77084
abc9a118532b1382e068cb2c41f411a795594017
describe
Invalid character
'8135' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONW' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
061b21ca3fc4847009739c319bb9febf
8cfeb0ec398cc0ea07933a447676fd54aaaa8c96
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONX' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
6bd3a652a315f8eb093325a96b74543e
bc1253cec7296dd9e2313ce31fc87b6c6e802f3a
describe
'118293' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONY' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
1235b5ed3d93a2320e0cde14f12d1cc0
5b8dfd2f93a3cd160492426812669c4060885098
describe
'42663' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABONZ' 'sip-files00114.pro'
bcc7727e24049c3f7e72861b9eaf7413
b06dbb7320cf27c9d7c4bb1b6f80765f02cbf2f7
describe
'36569' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOA' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
1d7aa812de7225fd2f1c8bf041c6f377
69f40020effb9233614116a28ea9a5a76fbfd4b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOB' 'sip-files00114.tif'
ded6b3b4c95b0f4422520b2fcb741ac2
9c89e46a13cf2303cbc01ce505d0e2fe93d8e3ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOC' 'sip-files00114.txt'
ccac6b7f7da9287b357dae7209d1ace3
06cd07fbf318075be6d9ea6d0541021cb93cd18f
describe
'8575' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOD' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
1a08cbcf190863a98ea695b8cbe3a552
f7896ba897fcd7e885b0bb250b756ddec8cfd15c
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOE' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
4e896425d057c9cb36770e941f2bd156
8e0bd46ff752dcb2b35a45323cbf1051e4537c56
describe
'112367' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOF' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
340cc307cf104958a2fa3ba5b61b6ec6
b32f01d65e4d99a067fb0183c2e00d2b25537c66
describe
'39747' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOG' 'sip-files00115.pro'
82f210d330bacff90e6e0902d478426e
294234e8c0942c1758baaab71bfe1933a22042e2
describe
'34544' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOH' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
35fc0e2b7fad57795bdfa2fb244886dd
46dcc96ed6446fb5b0361c654e7c2126a0f7baac
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOI' 'sip-files00115.tif'
9e0ff448355fe917cf89bd770e1d15f2
88448565cb212174e8cd4e1d295fc0a695be5151
describe
'1575' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOJ' 'sip-files00115.txt'
61f35cf223537e427bb029cf9324d84f
da6cf9621f0cdf3c2ac07ade95469d70cfb46d23
describe
'8188' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOK' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
21f0e03d3dec4aa67f6f0d03d01a61ca
24f28e9e909c302306ef9c9d3c13d5c47f157c0c
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOL' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
48f788fe1084aac3d9187aa76ff58f6b
1f7543c97d5f727d6c6b537d157ad03e780aa512
describe
'122340' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOM' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
8a52403fe82fbe9378f229393df51d21
147170db8aed7a61c5af0fcf2a4f5d7226abecc3
describe
'43064' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOON' 'sip-files00116.pro'
3685807128df6a38d8c294f460551c59
4f163539eaf4115676acd2e0ad297460f8cda942
describe
'37612' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOO' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
daca133d9e94d132c80c3d153f2015db
f64cc625d690f93d3f4de8e67984b62465e2b107
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOP' 'sip-files00116.tif'
df41efebc4dc410885d81576ba8e408e
d74789f9a90c458fae9b749362170ba2799172ec
describe
'1686' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOQ' 'sip-files00116.txt'
b023e115aac0f03aa21532d4525ca9e4
150d219e195297085a65b54d804b9ff72c89dfa7
describe
'8670' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOR' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
1c1ee69121b148db42da5dcc2c8754e4
7d5bbf49ea44847c07e22d2f494242a109a7b3a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOS' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
b7cc8c66b22ba33085a462f8f1229573
2c411b6181f657daf7c412044d2e553758669f49
describe
'101635' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOT' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
182f7c813ab110f072c0608e48189452
29f3335239db5c0d18f601dd17ae33f133401709
describe
'35631' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOU' 'sip-files00117.pro'
3382a7dac7ea549e298b47749e34c4fb
27a2d27cb05382b41365ab8533d949618db8b459
describe
'31037' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOV' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
f8b04b858052dee4962fe435b44a67c5
99f8eca7fd861ab8736cdfc8c10ff60830d06a9f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOW' 'sip-files00117.tif'
0e8da86e57ba1f619883e64f08c83009
30715bfa781b7aec5c0be1688e1982f902946357
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOX' 'sip-files00117.txt'
5a08d6e1722e69e4c82fe42cd54fb6f6
69f90b62f03f9154c36e9f821ad0041e60aea806
describe
'7196' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOY' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
ff767f8d1ea86d92b398b3fc1dbdf623
958ddc25c32a3bc6acf569edecf8ee93f3d0b117
describe
'419975' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOOZ' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
e6b53569a778d4e0255305b4797dcbca
298c49bfed7c4efe30452a505da9631a3fc0ee76
describe
'128798' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPA' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
5fe1143c998918914869beefbe2169a3
d6b24a5ee67b26c79b1f3249cfc126110114e6f8
describe
'18761' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPB' 'sip-files00118.pro'
a234b9a1440788fa3afb739ab2fdc5f0
1f898ed8241b96b3080a7f2529c5fc6fcdd276a8
describe
'33858' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPC' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
1ce6c174f848770698409de7e443a9c8
8286e9254198722a9c22f3c03fe9315a94c385a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPD' 'sip-files00118.tif'
439ad355e744220ca8c82ae22cb8ad60
5fbaf67b39b2330b9ecce8f8a4112e86e7cb310d
describe
'765' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPE' 'sip-files00118.txt'
f8d4901a8a625d708f0326327cbbce95
12ca0f1cef3c3f4c4cfb4dc484289b3dec729165
describe
'8380' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPF' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
1ff4458d0e5ecc47a8280a57e33a458a
c39e5b2baf799fe959b1b3412d073b4bb9adeb11
describe
'420067' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPG' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
1161b62ce050aa25c043784c19b8b873
69b75349186efc0bd0518d24fb5f802769633674
describe
'115070' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPH' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
71060836049a6ab1e6fdbf9bc9807507
6e2fdab93d7081bd10d32dae14115be16260efe5
describe
'41212' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPI' 'sip-files00119.pro'
59b6a40dfa1e9d813527508b4655e0e7
1b882fb3a84d0bf13ec74f7ef742f810c4fcc1e7
describe
'35824' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPJ' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
5d09b9ba25018ffb0d9b50a68bdf0b41
1f6aab0b4437d8f29ebf32ba83b4608697ba904f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPK' 'sip-files00119.tif'
994e7844a2cc2322e7a6c31ddabeaa0c
afb3e34e2b6b42b0a0019e8b1ca8b0bf59192dc7
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPL' 'sip-files00119.txt'
1239f0e92578f0783d83e76d57e75c97
57e03eef5ae3be57ab315f8654a4b890fd382088
describe
'8303' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPM' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
f73aed1d875edecf06adf2661af6cebd
0ed072b90521aa2514ee81924352f65943c7d188
describe
'419997' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPN' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
a670a51051f653a2cc7c98793b147422
0b2c6d477f0efe20f2a1aa0fdd6af17368a4faf0
describe
'116684' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPO' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
2b3cf0d37ac156e226dae755d341299f
2c439e6accdc21608d3f4a7a64451cb97fedd0b2
describe
'41676' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPP' 'sip-files00120.pro'
440b58ca97de976ae7be803c5c679295
6feb0ff6558637e4de2f180a8c64ac2cb2420771
describe
'35904' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPQ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
0177e7ee7458b62e8fcb32e9023e9caf
3d3ef321b46fe53d9a24a7b82ae94bc8b349c6b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPR' 'sip-files00120.tif'
7ece4eb22d4b8cbb84fb6286e55af0c1
d5aa97ef1732eb58c1ea1e4a2e75fea3a001ae47
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPS' 'sip-files00120.txt'
418c80e5352bdec8fc6afd91040530d3
509496187fbb32878d54e1685146ca22c0d57973
describe
'8422' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPT' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
a4434ba071688c9fe548aaa047a94db5
5ae8c18fba4ead71513078dc5bda9c38696d3527
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPU' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
bddc93db140729c8eeb585896f2cf48f
19afe603d857f85638b745637f98b94db98c6e60
describe
'114436' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPV' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
d36ead3548cae8c41221ac53c7f3a967
e4d5e1b59310a5f912fd68b7354935af0dad491e
describe
'41586' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPW' 'sip-files00121.pro'
68908399519bd7a2355925f2346b85d0
46ca87778d1d539a5553e71366fcc5b67a704f42
describe
'35677' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPX' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
a755ea3b3579dadc2f55bd94f3b136d5
5150891bafee5f5188327e88bf464f18028b5ae1
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPY' 'sip-files00121.tif'
74632921bc430603601a21bc6d995638
a6667683ed9d017c146f0a0b21f2e327a41eae88
describe
'1643' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOPZ' 'sip-files00121.txt'
8c55fc2325ce789cb38601365ca5dc05
0e17748a7bb68d4b5c2171c7648a42cfc872ff0c
describe
'8830' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQA' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
3bc20c4f1ce97859da5e8fbf08b01759
72e9c0f572b97f8fc77cb5d2836dfa3fa9a27ca5
describe
'419968' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQB' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
86808679e480c7b5a1a8f314a0874c70
ccab22ada4398c0250997241f5dfc76ce6bce01f
describe
'124608' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQC' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
2263b64888c1e8ddb9f788e024dd60aa
3e8289daf424f2c996c4669d01df67a24d8eaa2c
describe
'44252' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQD' 'sip-files00122.pro'
bf40b770873e5d29aa89bb8079efc62e
fefb212f5d11e4d8a5d91a146493f9d6f19984df
describe
'38224' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQE' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
d7679f4d5d603a32243db30785b35662
b973ddf5938a538f2d10b97ab3832b85fab19b8d
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQF' 'sip-files00122.tif'
7f6a311e5e68bc73edf769acf1f39f1c
5ebeb305c6be2d98a2557252e189371c097850b3
describe
'1738' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQG' 'sip-files00122.txt'
6a26e833161435bdec7dbcab8cc34b15
62ad62a6e6ca7850ec3becf2e71f85a7504b8cc7
describe
'8739' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQH' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
383ff142c74ab3688da1d91d3652fc36
2979da172ee7ec3781c85df98aa2dd7dff8e8deb
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQI' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
072cfc5cdb58e9bd179dbb8a68a10f9e
a512e951f7b372b55794fbb8e06a20e9505392ab
describe
'124079' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQJ' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
058a12a2f1d52ccbcd56b7349613859d
af161c7ef3213d9ffc8cee893313411c75e87c44
describe
'43913' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQK' 'sip-files00123.pro'
c3c78a9d5a36efea6d0c16f2a53c133b
46e304af44f1e308c11cbae840ca433147ae630c
describe
'37603' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQL' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
1a2c5c79b90c3a039f13c261e646177c
c2c8933e6ddcddf4a4b7bfb3e294b1f3fa3ea816
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQM' 'sip-files00123.tif'
2ceb4799f6e1d6347d3503b930df5b64
f52bbfa74942630be0e95121aa4e26fb553b706d
describe
'1742' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQN' 'sip-files00123.txt'
dd61924afa779bd68ab684a4502ebe34
2a736e8fd334d03f5b63abe292f5ba1b98f2c2c9
describe
'8556' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQO' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
6973964e911c8b35e827bd2b13ddf0bf
6cdaa7a9c796c5c10b5a86db9b15d50c60132ac2
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQP' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
4d7b354f16db8af99fbbfeb8fa64f91a
e58420a36e856ad0bc8377df67a2fb8bfdcc67e8
describe
'108946' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQQ' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
037d229fab2942243468287150d0b5f5
734cd7939b2e1587e1ea582f05118a4808506945
describe
'38426' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQR' 'sip-files00124.pro'
0e55090785d78378b2e09149b51e9dd8
692859f729dc17378793933128c0f206b4bd13cb
describe
'33815' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQS' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
2a71d983f1db10580db18a9528d16124
30b49e4ed549778048ff3f8606f9835440fee9ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQT' 'sip-files00124.tif'
7626a1b40fe5f70f90f014dd934476be
9d8f297e7a892aa68e4b3f507ac868c613836acd
describe
'1536' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQU' 'sip-files00124.txt'
614fe085043402f6b33fdcff23c96317
7ed8b368563dbe722c84a3c60501919604c6d518
describe
'8099' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQV' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
9505b8e9b27e33cddc4ba7df99bd4b78
9f3947a7be9b7277189f2e99887e6d0dad128fd1
describe
'409847' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQW' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
f2d49264b58c37afa084865b418f3109
a7e20ec1edfa25518e1fc2e2d148a95dc43cacf4
describe
'128785' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQX' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
845fd576de9c2da61643f84ecabed159
a698ee31f1cc3e992d12ed30337b06b4d3f3bb2c
describe
'44611' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQY' 'sip-files00125.pro'
62285207635708f2c7fdb82c28c6635b
c2037cf793083e9dd19ff47ba5204fc5b58980c2
describe
'40256' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOQZ' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
5323d53a27806aad4d4f7883c760703a
f849dff2f88e2ac50b683d05ab4d6a478fd03b27
describe
'3296160' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORA' 'sip-files00125.tif'
a45237bccc2f897b3a68619726a62302
51a1e6cac5375c6516f1e1d804545463c528b904
describe
'1782' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORB' 'sip-files00125.txt'
2f534b4f4e62ef086b99ec8f7381f7ab
fb45d56aae0bc15c798a8a3c027a6205e85f9408
describe
'9431' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORC' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
5efeb07b49be6d018decfc433ed26f3e
4e2672cf8f5fc7f6c6744623b363b94fca9e0bf9
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORD' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
ac07fddc426755bb39f90f12260b7597
ba82be952cf41323f6649e970a4e71650fddfba5
describe
'121697' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORE' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
e6a26251b4cdc2696a6c2288beca0b81
5a34ba1616eab24f7d988c30444e0f6bdd1e1433
describe
'43044' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORF' 'sip-files00126.pro'
bc0a521835aba9807d578540b02de6ab
fb7f48b319faa1a3c1351680b467c47f8a1ecdb7
describe
'37176' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORG' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
465d39fea804f40798af763bfe44312e
593c2ffe6b32564c31b30568ac1585e79ea9ba31
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORH' 'sip-files00126.tif'
d27f515f112c89b79d4411f9cc181908
3a14a6710c278d119e8d078f9436a48be92d0b20
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORI' 'sip-files00126.txt'
9b1daa9645a2621ffc4cd3df9939449d
d26e7242448837fc55cfe029eb3e7677ca6fc7e7
describe
'8624' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORJ' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
06926f4205433f8a85c764f5277c0ea9
0b9bedde1daa7ac7ddf3980ee4cd8c0f0e0a738c
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORK' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
64feb7b641cb6651c3882969e7c5c22a
38b57f14a8168fdeb2b76fd5848e337f7ab6c9dd
describe
'110049' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORL' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
c43a57cb266418b82a2fb9f6f633e133
c47eece2c9215728d23cc4d31a683605cb5707ba
describe
'38663' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORM' 'sip-files00127.pro'
8d0142bdcf7a4678969cb3c6b5f67714
c191f40f2bfd0750aacbbc0196a7337de7a9dbae
describe
'34316' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORN' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
32af2c524a839f380365c7e120eb82c2
d7a54954316ea63fb864261c36458ffe6da6cd0f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORO' 'sip-files00127.tif'
e299f4882b6d3682d35fe6718ba48e73
2b83aebc6cc0209233ad3cc74ee151b41f8ce217
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORP' 'sip-files00127.txt'
b0085e7c1c2567005ff38940754dccf5
9554c083a11ff0379de15770047253104a93a7c2
describe
Invalid character
'8155' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORQ' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
4ef7f712517c2c03065ef273cc0e826f
fb083388a1328d6fbfeea9d910e9ab24a4f3b6e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORR' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
7b8f87eab83aec39630e14e023a9de67
454e4427a2f002277364b8ea7141696a7d361ebd
describe
'120445' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORS' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
a91a6779ae03038f7bf6314a67acf171
b2cd8fd66ad95a5b05fa269a834aa77350f49952
describe
'43085' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORT' 'sip-files00128.pro'
5b1f3f3589e5e85c6b048449813a8318
1ac9c256c4830dfd9d621bdf0a9083c0de14742f
describe
'36248' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORU' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
360883ec8b5a2454bf85d9b8d46974e7
4f1e97afcb6634b955b4e137b181f747e6f94ed2
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORV' 'sip-files00128.tif'
2336d4e7e9c668d0c65259b77ea86ad6
5db425ab6da85c4f840484dda0bdb08a4fe1fdbc
describe
'1689' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORW' 'sip-files00128.txt'
652b365e74ff5cc2b25fa7d06e7d0d1b
5b0396714164ca944aa5e621aae0adfc4536912e
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORX' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
b429f26cdb4b17534356c044040a1082
c1c73eeb7db026c580e290f61527ee12770316ff
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORY' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
dac2cd70655c00e118ba135fc3a3eb4a
770573c575fe9d77832bbc4b53fc9c0104df9cfd
describe
'120430' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABORZ' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
4f13860b9279f09e42ce1b3aa7d385bf
bf3294586c3f1a51b623f7047beb5b1190b5e5c3
describe
'42576' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSA' 'sip-files00129.pro'
5d31756ee19b3c929cd84f42cd18cfa0
fdb30e7c560e8d2bd848d03e3c5e54baced66908
describe
'37081' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSB' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
9bb412fccdf346229ca62389547299e1
05f004bca9bc06b7dea29f0415005183b5285072
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSC' 'sip-files00129.tif'
67bd92d8f13c5710c7730434add7a911
7fa23089e7d243d16e0b505979466528fd96387e
describe
'1677' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSD' 'sip-files00129.txt'
efdf9527af3327bed9a14101a9ccb9d5
6c5d8d1407677b36912abb1dc8b04f8f4549b066
describe
'8542' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSE' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
fe79c00479ed0120ea30eb5aee4d01d3
4b640033382cc5a5e8378c415f1ab3149036a093
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSF' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
d23e24c8b9fad0d6823fabab02f0fd6d
035132577ac31fcbe76213acd8a90ad78e5f94bb
describe
'64472' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSG' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
d32d63f0b337d5292db3702d587dede1
95b8d9eae7df01a25119bf428dc6586feac94771
describe
'18318' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSH' 'sip-files00130.pro'
bb3cc3de8a211c96aff777795680eb5f
5fbbfa33740324b43841c703a2c9e98f6a689691
describe
'18504' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSI' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
559a1aefec54283f7e0b1d796bff2eac
29d2c99268a40887418d4956e2a0260b7f512794
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSJ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
7f264749f821b551510bdab10573621a
ce63c9672b1cb714dabe5abe1e37e0d7fe00f02c
describe
'732' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSK' 'sip-files00130.txt'
419512cbae8d4eaec4ea5b573f14eb1c
cb2544838009484d21a4cfb3c3b384c4ddb873e2
describe
'4773' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSL' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
d6526bd84a4266be4e21f7ce7057783d
5136a91f643032bea489ab11e26fd319f8decd1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSM' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
9dd91807bed1adc468cf2b745ca1c5d6
61110310625a7fa78b9f5ddda4e8da4f7e0511e4
describe
'94718' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSN' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
bbd332266da3602ca17f1eae4fca2f6a
bb3f56ed96778d48d87bc0520da6d51e682e701c
describe
'32167' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSO' 'sip-files00131.pro'
9e73ae4bdccf5285c0d44f88bd87bbd8
39ef487ff5be79dab1f258cdd1a7da3b881a7026
describe
'28330' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSP' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
96c21f3bfdf8b1f54ae02a17a8915596
92bb8fbfb1bead76464f161a3985b8225491c939
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSQ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
47c632bc85b8e59d0fd06d072e0785a3
937effbff8e5820193cd05d30027bf6c29076afc
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSR' 'sip-files00131.txt'
535b1a841021ba380285554c986f5f9e
d7320a549394e4db16cc0c1a6d6e9292870b3204
describe
'7204' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSS' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
fd95bffbd63290e59049d6c53851f3b6
18a500f4e3531f9849f9c9155b3de049cf0a57eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOST' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
2ddebf16fee4cfc0c974248da4ccfd59
81382e0d7a8956a530102bec0de52e2ed6767013
describe
'121142' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSU' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
c7dd1c292a1338f1b92ddc48cfd6b85e
0e47457ae09ce366e98d22e50c61e5dc9b5b325a
describe
'42307' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSV' 'sip-files00132.pro'
51b4a8f3597b94a722535f840926af3e
778691cc6d22fc548946d3ed8984bff773b32eb3
describe
'36928' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSW' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
641a2cf094051426c577802d356db808
0ba7917fa76b4437116f7f320696dc15da94d5ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSX' 'sip-files00132.tif'
3dbf69110693a4c71b83c3d1252cbcfb
29f31712974baac37f88a6efd3b6de8d4126c411
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSY' 'sip-files00132.txt'
535bedf7b2cdfac536efde4e45013599
99f68356def4c857864900e4fc819bb9705b00ea
describe
'8840' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOSZ' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
65b75adbd4b81728ecbeb1010d8ed4f0
0bda78806d59c2dceb730524121df3b0054c87bc
describe
'415564' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTA' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
d8607819f3a6cdcec849a1c056706185
424de7d40df83992c254587cb9ac2a17373e6062
describe
'48282' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTB' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
1d62596f4c0eb0f272ce2d4a8c2b96c2
901baa8f884e09308b61c48a802b6e1f0f753b8c
describe
'2603' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTC' 'sip-files00133.pro'
dda847eba3e22e6d8c828c1f30c6941f
6df13a8a5ecc4ab890d35397b7b084defedfdf7a
describe
'11548' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTD' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
c28ec5b59d8d4de4e06b32bfaafc4b3e
8a503a20f2863d1f5270e792b22639aae98c2e51
describe
'3341664' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTE' 'sip-files00133.tif'
59b33b53acf8480e0f6d077a7b4521f2
2e26a9aebbf45537a3fb0067744f4dc69f72e9b2
describe
'186' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTF' 'sip-files00133.txt'
ce7f2224f4b742789b2f1a91d76a22ed
9857516de5ccfc765d7f51d28573202ba2c61e45
describe
Invalid character
'3046' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTG' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
6533dfcd46fe2661fd2bd3535fded70d
02fb913eacf2c070c2446704f8c79a4a66bc07c4
describe
'414993' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTH' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
2da433036b0f15cd8e5f78441f3948cd
ce7b633d9bb22eb33251126fce86b7c21b84c208
describe
'99684' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTI' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
3204571b2201a2fb4fa4780fe150d282
322cfe3f61dd7f5579fd330d814e13096310448d
describe
'32241' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTJ' 'sip-files00134.pro'
9bea78a8aff1a57817c4ced72be39caf
88430a4b38f9c620cc709f44e2307c5e56238f03
describe
'31667' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTK' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
921ba641c72d798b9e57c7b1a0bcaad1
992c2b87a7dfc04edc4f12181bf71dc61e956e96
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTL' 'sip-files00134.tif'
415ce1b99d5a9cf9f1a82201ea405190
fa8c1d51f31d621b8a80ca01b8079ceb328d23a2
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTM' 'sip-files00134.txt'
f31b637767e0e61a9079f5bf337bf569
ce54e2b1162f88d551a4e3b486fafec0072a93b4
describe
'7899' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTN' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
ea47f8a26448d04161ed5780feaff35a
02746fdc939661565da2793f0ea459252ffde874
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTO' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
cbd5afdb242d1e6a4ac2bdb4c9f6c03f
e34f74584a8cb8ad152004a0d2e92bf62d053d7e
describe
'112902' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTP' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
fc5a81d58bccde5623f00033b25ae8f9
cc230dbc862342c042416a45d0df992c64755fd9
describe
'38200' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTQ' 'sip-files00135.pro'
7e01a8450829dbdc4610ed763b4b3d6f
b28557c2fbfbd8db686ab9d0bb27316a73185cf7
describe
'35527' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTR' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
e81c897ef253b3efe582757f1200327b
c738bcb24bd10ac19bc05dfc167c1f79ac416c4d
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTS' 'sip-files00135.tif'
c3a0c78f2e88756e8464820db45c21dc
741a70c1796de9a0ae29032f4ff4bbb2c210e15a
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTT' 'sip-files00135.txt'
020ef7ce85d2d0913c59ae6e86f7d2e1
99efa9177e8a552d46ad79314e4620b81dd33f6f
describe
'8531' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTU' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
7d61572bfa2faec4432d80dfa442a16d
85ae736e0d6ee30bd8bc86c92fd219464c945f05
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTV' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
b2fe48f4ef53c930e37eff861d66bc98
c3d081faaeadd5629b3d0d69130b86aaf4d44df5
describe
'123300' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTW' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
f815504abb742a5132b655fb37feee9a
8c4a61b5e00d3feaeb187a7f2de7df4b22ebe342
describe
'42251' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTX' 'sip-files00136.pro'
8e979d304a18594b2622c717b9975c6a
70dda9c25ca93745cab09413a04d5bb4ba77cdb9
describe
'38512' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTY' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
08adf988c22134073dd81663063f851a
10638ad80184816bb32e9c65ac45ef284c49172c
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOTZ' 'sip-files00136.tif'
3315788926c5e6b8fd751599427b048e
693156f00448d008a7f775659cee5b86b820a4f3
describe
'1653' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUA' 'sip-files00136.txt'
eda0c4c30aa2f9aead8ba92ddfba713e
7c9bc3e7bc26b09faa37e65f16c33c75b94b14f7
describe
'8828' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUB' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
2a1c6c3947254cd42cefcaa1f1e2605d
929f0da8b85760feb8f2a8f2c974c18503bc0711
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUC' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
19d3496c66940977fab66808abb1b0da
ea79e0d7bbe61ba87d2f540c13bf955fa112b3ef
describe
'115216' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUD' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
a734bc4afbd57673684368d756fd0ea9
e138a587f3c22d644d5c7d2b01928af94dfde10f
describe
'39046' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUE' 'sip-files00137.pro'
3d5f91cd9a9aaeb9d971c9fa41c3f415
79521af4b6588e94d04530d35eb2d6bf35232bef
describe
'35847' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUF' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
f05a0bcf5abeb1d0713524a1c2cf8456
d36532a12c99bdeb9957f45dac39584b944a3d40
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUG' 'sip-files00137.tif'
83d8f4c73651e4749c301529a739daaa
89df2f95335c2f8816c452b0a02d62adf54f5668
describe
'1573' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUH' 'sip-files00137.txt'
f139f794f2692e8754c0c4665170904f
959bd814f668b219fde17aa22f83a095e5841961
describe
'8964' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUI' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
b18365ac8123ae34769741f4f4cfb737
25d5808e70a7bf680a6394129f78c900221ca454
describe
'419853' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUJ' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
815823ed22191107925b62219fc5886b
f8f7df492b381273437e6c29f71cbdb593c27c0c
describe
'106795' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUK' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
1808fc13a1fd562ec716af1b0b780da0
4fd540094ae7996d50b7a595625262943893c3e9
describe
'35679' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUL' 'sip-files00138.pro'
d3df746d9ff7c8f1b522017de83312e8
002fc2f1c0e917f3aa02eaa68421b755387283ba
describe
'33412' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUM' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
c1cb936d53587b3b32dcd426d5cb85f4
95884284dfbe9b1eb7784bacdee09e825bbab0b7
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUN' 'sip-files00138.tif'
463c2d46e5317538d28ef300b702d1b1
d6075d437e84004087dea30b4b04d14e14257f5b
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUO' 'sip-files00138.txt'
0e4e91338adcdc9532889afd14eba290
c0b46c2a67f87b51d91c74c814f1e70c538dea82
describe
'8450' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUP' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
c9fde1267ec2dde214b6b269bf090057
0eebbed6e92f4ae024e6d36f958ebfb1d912b254
describe
'419984' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUQ' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
27116311bbfde251b1e30359780af7c7
eb6cfa3f93ad009400e4a98dbc9c34b322fb6925
describe
'112283' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUR' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
4549a2ab265c19d5a55b4d8b3f98f71a
5edb9ae9cc6c2c7fd12124fd62b662c27409056f
describe
'37592' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUS' 'sip-files00139.pro'
de3c9a381d2440f699b25380e327eee4
0bd665b7d3b5b54ec8201162241afc17e45ca5c4
describe
'34704' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUT' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
b8dd3c129038b2f6725285e2ca8ec837
bd7f78de6696c87a8d7df2483c33b57d7e2f65fe
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUU' 'sip-files00139.tif'
23c62b7310f338c525b8aed063d8c250
28e6ff5f034d8c908c65504eb01984c40e2a8c8e
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUV' 'sip-files00139.txt'
8fbbbc43a30b924ba30e2e6cb1e86ee3
bd0fd68cbcb256ddd72dd310222fd295a5b6e447
describe
'8580' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUW' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
ea48b8ed515e119e569481208b0f2adb
6a0cfc004aef8fd2b15765ee431a7b78b18468c3
describe
'420077' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUX' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
6571fd7d22684c544b53fc54efd3c968
cf4c76a12967e648dc5060af55830e8305a0cc2b
describe
'36268' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUY' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
bfd2bfa2f7298403f20dfdcc4436a31e
5c08c6bb5baa172b8d9ed18e451bc5c166d7d0f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOUZ' 'sip-files00140.pro'
9b2567adaac2e4d122f702e5b05b722d
c1ff2b3575c1662603a22ede0baa79b0a40b7e6a
describe
'10564' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVA' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
d5b85ffc7efb6b61b215cf219678bbee
ba42ec68a054ec8036e87da01677107f73fd59cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVB' 'sip-files00140.tif'
3e493d6118ee3ee5621cdf48de261bf4
2043797d88ba1be9ad81e70cab5b8c1739aed723
describe
'346' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVC' 'sip-files00140.txt'
cf2d39414626f1b7e99b8931ced0be8c
fbdb89d664399d8bf0d3b778ead76d9cdc64ea07
describe
'2863' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVD' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
290bb932734bc7cbb0fdd20c638b32a5
79f28d57e18c64873d65f7af2c66925734139fac
describe
'419964' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVE' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
adaf6e78232657cb947080abe2cc8cad
2b29027f22f29a3ae1327974ae6dfa3fafbad3af
describe
'24202' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVF' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
fde48894c38ac06496b6930b4f1fc518
d9d73e638f182a9ab8a0617e0d29f7ac2cc59070
describe
'2596' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVG' 'sip-files00141.pro'
2e2bec02698e88444d282e6ac72883ff
00d5dca485119641db8a9509a283e444a65dc453
describe
'7927' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVH' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
599c16092d2f0184a15093d3c7e2bce1
380c5c300f4f1fd88a2c136c20570dba20cc3af0
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVI' 'sip-files00141.tif'
17a114a58e32a71b6c850e9be60456e6
4ae536fe4faabfe345cad02436de3b63c1be5504
describe
'126' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVJ' 'sip-files00141.txt'
1e38d4c3d73d143872b25da9cad902b7
83a376d46d09208dd978afc99d499095f3afa3bc
describe
'2219' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVK' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
59003203a5e64f69b3addc3a2f7624a3
177d5296da61e0bc25c336a9227d668e8680ad97
describe
'419989' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVL' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
537bf64cdd66917f1767dfa671a65183
30405ba7ac7d290bb976994e74ba9b86891d018f
describe
'22047' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVM' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
bf4416094e5cf3c74bb8b40223e222ed
a9d2cc29eea36cb3bde187f0cf3014e8f15052b2
describe
'3716' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVN' 'sip-files00142.pro'
46f8e6aeaabad11822411c68a0f65234
9006db6f8acb09de331093576e6f181e8e3073bc
describe
'6318' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVO' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
96943387aa99c66a2c8bac217290b513
897ccc3dce2a4b2edaf4e5e290e3aaceda9c31e8
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVP' 'sip-files00142.tif'
e4ad2ad0140bfd163aa730b77583d538
d4f489dc132c4ee99fa44bfb507adaa90377b947
describe
'218' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVQ' 'sip-files00142.txt'
8777081e404c74e8687a9ccc7e109b71
cb8a58d5969edd88518190bce197f0d58726327d
describe
'1866' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVR' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
565c42b1245da36a749666a6b8e150ad
3a6084511a5adfaf86f95661a1fd00d40b64239d
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVS' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
9e18df1dbeb3039604a96c06e3559679
4cc89573ab058d3819fc9c4457f655c61a44a8b9
describe
'77402' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVT' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
a3144e98d3b9f5795298cbd5b2464272
3c6d7e10b4d82d9242f34eb6d3685635f014b7e6
describe
'23422' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVU' 'sip-files00143.pro'
4a50b6ea1a213c87910eaa0cc27be9fd
e96cf1ce790f8dce282f9afd3a9bfe086bc5b2ed
describe
'25037' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVV' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
5c7de5e8a57e2546da3e70762d4f17d9
4de88e087a8ba7f56178c7129716bdf1ddb3d63f
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVW' 'sip-files00143.tif'
b2e05400dcc53d566466e7a9d765e389
2d85e5bb2fa67ff64931e3462196d8e60ab3a175
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVX' 'sip-files00143.txt'
a5060b7cf4e7f7d535b8a2f08fbc5468
bf4dc13bb9d84fd0ec03c3fe6912055d8e59a829
describe
'6994' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVY' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
8210a3d336c5fbec69e80d6c08e3b7b8
274ff3cdc4aad275909f10fb5e4bd0f5e0ff3e52
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOVZ' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
4aca204adf9f2506cd19f78fce22f84b
bce082ebc30bfa48d2615f43225d32bef42a8c8c
describe
'95264' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWA' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
991323ae71cea8c28e0672c468e034bb
5361270d20977874942b2f7db5744ead2e69cc3f
describe
'32654' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWB' 'sip-files00144.pro'
1dba95ee42afefec40e948fb4d12caa9
e891f990961c571ddb19c977023522402c61ec2f
describe
'29308' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWC' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
3d9054f9129bacbb860dbf7ce6c46399
aa59d7b7b8120602b2f9b565b4dbdc3cde9f0c8a
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWD' 'sip-files00144.tif'
b3222ab3e14ac2d6bb5c8ffb7379ee76
36fe2b1cebf886d40379a7b70d9af905fca67c44
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWE' 'sip-files00144.txt'
196b6a2ce3b719de2447b24e430a1f29
47c3595bf1b825953ccebdfaaeae6ceaf5dd4bfd
describe
'7784' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWF' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
76455b29f5d653c3932aed78618f6d55
9f81ae90e2e74c1c036f5daf14460268028ef31e
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWG' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
6160738d3963db127f505e5e57ef6e30
940594065053f3564c5e02e613c61ba9e4c6c119
describe
'65877' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWH' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
b4c29da3831b0faf29c3dc9931192a23
3628b35778ac3841363d5bce7c64d6b1c5f25235
describe
'23396' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWI' 'sip-files00145.pro'
afa629a1085fee21367d2449112a6ad2
282e79a80d3a7b5cded139dc1fd5a4841f7ddf09
describe
'20402' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWJ' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
fe2b755fca3e4fe22a6aa4c3562e825b
8ea0f10d2062a50a63944aadbc19ead8f249b40a
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWK' 'sip-files00145.tif'
42261ca33223db32fbf71ed5ea625a82
a2f05343b4c6f79517d741bbec6811455b056700
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWL' 'sip-files00145.txt'
e89b16fc9044dbd8e4f4853a623cf288
485aa87e0ba74144879555c7342355d76d813044
describe
'5566' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWM' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
df9888e7704bebf84ba8fc0235852ee0
1557c2e4098bbb5dc31f1de0a09d2b0c6709b197
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWN' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
bd524fabe4f7e411771cf22509c36a8c
b52076d3aa6110fecfdcfbf80de74b40e5add0a5
describe
'86013' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWO' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
dec350e3df506dc848c3122a25f16c6e
9c5edca8db3c159f528466668370ceba66addc48
describe
'26124' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWP' 'sip-files00146.pro'
7d42b3f65026f11608e19a077db2bf5e
89c560dd02cf2867d0862bbcafc5315c05a6cdd8
describe
'26958' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWQ' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
232ce69612b88f2993f5564c808c6e79
c3baa3726fae23a64533166ea7c226ede70873f2
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWR' 'sip-files00146.tif'
57f6d04eb2a4d726900ebb67e1b8c241
6f1b58224e19c40a2b9bda21cff48f4230bb1354
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWS' 'sip-files00146.txt'
b7a8843bfefadf895e4b8283a605802f
5181b673e3c622a5ebde514789055b8f15d8d1e4
describe
'7629' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWT' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
5463a2a2fd2f11e121d302bc999db871
b466b3a4789116225529ad1de9b262eb3613716e
describe
'419933' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWU' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
7c65641979161d2bb659b262830ac4a1
38b2d5a7ff25c33d9ca13110b0940e4339a3d940
describe
'80492' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWV' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
2160b32e2e89b92a5374cb36770efe9a
4b0aa02018058e24b811827ba9ec37eff3cf6e8a
describe
'26279' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWW' 'sip-files00147.pro'
a523eb2f5c5d75b99d7df8570628d075
97d335adbac717b8b34937b2101f7db541bcec91
describe
'26144' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWX' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
caaed1dbfdcf13fc33de69d7af952b9e
1c2065dd4f6fc57f36aecf7b888068d51b89db04
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWY' 'sip-files00147.tif'
01b0df95257f025af0f81786a80bc436
f9e1c712813dc84087c4506910e0f428a46f6ab8
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOWZ' 'sip-files00147.txt'
ed6816b4541597bba532fae7d3644f55
8d53c9c146e6717ad9d09ebb77a74b092f082c49
describe
'7158' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXA' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
b746a6ab8947d916b4474893170816b7
96bed4389e17c74e8a6cd07d2007e3134bbdd7fd
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXB' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
7be13c5c08bb583a2c5a9bdae54e1a93
f1bb167f67a0a6f618d99e4869805965c60f3dd9
describe
'92225' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXC' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
d92a47a45b90cf84e16e9c3915208e4d
cc511054730cf1d7b91e985e7349edf0665ec559
describe
'25594' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXD' 'sip-files00148.pro'
7096653f171e6d92a4dd0743f0189cc7
073f5b007bc6e51cd6c9becebd4a0b0869839f64
describe
'28413' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXE' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
d9e7c7b1c7713edbeda9ba1aaf58c83e
f9db513ed42fbf9b708f31b668499d8894fed3f4
describe
'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXF' 'sip-files00148.tif'
5c2613f9bdb7b3db38bba4def3be3e39
db7e1abe67bdf47a528f3deba6c01d571f039733
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXG' 'sip-files00148.txt'
a01f7c454e1bf9b4b82803a1be8ab731
71431e2050b95a9d896685184a76623653759a79
describe
'7636' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXH' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
6d7f23c87d0a2ab7dae7fd8da4038a19
cbdb04ccaa5a595fadfa186bfe49533dda25c41a
describe
'420037' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXI' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
b5b4fd224146bb8edba1618de016c69f
ca66f83a35a6731bec953e20ce1c05dbb2d22fa9
describe
'154753' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXJ' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
a32a495085d775edf4febe37c715f0c1
30a18064114751c01c20ce3adff40d027b819607
describe
'41349' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXK' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
9a9b37b4d137b94150aed4d58006b909
824ff80ca73d98ab6ae27096f665b0967a72af1f
describe
'10089716' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXL' 'sip-files00150.tif'
d50e11bd5bd4d46e0775ef13b2036820
ce61c68e246b78438729ee68a22250323167fb45
describe
'9765' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXM' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
f0ae4c64a2b7d7f46ec62fd27469414d
e1fcc3e5ac064a97e5ed51a419e7374bd7094a3e
describe
'486506' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXN' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
5a3fc12c46a76fdf180281143e577695
eb4fd07189e47b98299cce131fcabf4021582f7d
describe
'171529' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXO' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
9e764ba7f2a6e10cb9b58b20b27d7cd4
4ad45c7a74a05b962a7bdd363901b430f4c0468b
describe
'47966' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXP' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
5829637f841825f3e08935654ae253f4
687b5fbe10f8be81ee0adb08f760ba31df8d3dde
describe
'11684436' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXQ' 'sip-files00151.tif'
df9b448740cc58031f6dceb05bd453eb
c058a6c40975d7a1cde44dbf95058bbd6a152022
describe
'10688' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXR' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
33a67c72705cc52eb6a91ceabf50ef48
b89beed2d176656ea98a71012a2fdd9006cadb1f
describe
'450227' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXS' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
71f784484e35b050c41875599d533409
6207613e9f137a27b61c523f18cf43c8e9ca725f
describe
'76203' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXT' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
3d311dd355647e9d7b71908db249342d
0afd1886e9ecf698e8174445180af48bea8eafbc
describe
'13885' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXU' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
9ee934d5d14bc86c6dbc9c4c29f116b2
2b9c7e52f8042752d3efa8623d2677ebc8ff27fe
describe
'10812108' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXV' 'sip-files00152.tif'
98104ff7fc8976ee331f392f47d0848b
fca887bd8ec6a37a6305e985ac91fefa7a130039
describe
'3156' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXW' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
54be235d8eaf6b07e44336bf710928e4
3a6a4c46c966989a6df47bc56c317f9b370e10f6
describe
'115228' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXX' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
e84a4ac8455aa1d16ce3a3dee75dc7b2
dbd095dc1975a021aa31bfeac6b83b1421068064
describe
'42781' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXY' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
046bf9a3c1c6a8025fd9cd07df831c27
a7ae3ce9637651aae134afdb764f16f31cf45f25
describe
'229' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOXZ' 'sip-files00153.pro'
cfb71816194f121a71c2ef762b37ceca
ed01c9808b22611adf7e7b1ff258786bf91c369c
describe
'9878' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOYA' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
4acca94bb94332ad2daf4147dc7617c8
ad45c9d3363328a83c674805bac47f9b03b0c586
describe
'2770636' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOYB' 'sip-files00153.tif'
edfaa42efbb2defb30abf2c2d1d8db49
c6216265f53fa72063700187217b7a71fdc9a2df
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOYC' 'sip-files00153.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'3635' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOYD' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
27217b9979013daa21fed1011f5709be
a59aebe985bb738abe8e1c504130603c8aa725c2
describe
'32' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOYE' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
f23b04a849d63118272f31e5d83528fd
6508cc187372cb822ccb34593c6d93ae2df3326f
describe
'220775' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOYF' 'sip-filesUF00087254_00001.mets'
028d8518055b4d156af627521e86c272
b98ceea8c942a01d2127cc539e0af29d07830b35
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T23:17:46-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'286168' 'info:fdaE20090114_AAAAKZfileF20090115_AABOYI' 'sip-filesUF00087254_00001.xml'
448230de504e6ffc112c017ced2741ff
1309d48590d79b91ef3a625038e4a3a932a96c88
describe
'2013-12-13T23:17:49-05:00'
xml resolution


xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008725400001datestamp 2008-10-22setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Fridtjof Nansen : : a book for the youngdc:creator Bull, Jacob B. (Jacob Breda), 1853-1930Barnard, M. R. (Mordaunt Roger) ( Translator )Ballantyne, Hanson and Co. ( Printer )dc:subject Nansen, Fridtjof, -- Juvenile literature.Children -- Juvenile literature. -- Conduct of lifeConduct of life -- Juvenile literature.Outdoor life -- Juvenile literature.Explorers -- Juvenile literature.Courage -- Juvenile literature.Juvenile literature. -- Arctic regionsBldn -- 1898.dc:description Publisher's advertisements follow text.dc:publisher Isbister and Company Limiteddc:date 1898dc:type Bookdc:format 132, 8 p. : ill., port. ; 19 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00087254&v=00001002222960 (ALEPH)261339139 (OCLC)ALG3208 (NOTIS)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English





tie : Mh Se A> PAT Ls CNA

| Cal Lo AY <
He AS Pe SA TX Ee) Danes on chris
BO re ee EO
AE Loe oe Ar Se

7 7 Cr & =
ONS ;

wee

x 2 S CZ et 4 se

Se
Sh OS
= Poor ee










PLN Saar

SNP Oy
COT
REAR hye 4


ERIDTJOF NANSEN

A BOOK FOR THE YOUNG

BY

JACOB B. BULL

TRANSLATED FROM THE NORWEGIAN BY

THE Rev. MORDAUNT R. BARNARD

VICAR OF MARGARETTING
ONE OF THE TRANSLATORS OF ‘‘ FARTHEST NORTH”

LONDON
ISBISTER AND COMPANY Limitrep
15 & 16 TAVISTOCK STREET COVENT GARDEN
1898
,

Printed by BALLANryNg, Hanson & Co.
London & Edinburgh
ae
:

FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

CHAPTER I.

NANSEN’S BIRTHPLACE AND CHILDHOOD HomE.— BURGOMASTER NAN=
SEN, HIS ANCESTOR.— His BoyHoop anD EpucaTiIon. — Harty
Love or Sport AND INDEPENDENT RESEARCH.

In West Aker, a short distance from Christiania,
there is an old manor-house called Store Fréen. It is
surrounded by a large courtyard, in the middle of which
is a dovecot. The house itself, as well as the out-
houses, is built in the old-fashioned style. The garden,
with its green and white painted fence, is filled with
fruit-trees, both old and young, whose pink and snow-
white blossoms myriads of humblebees delight to visit
in springtime, while in autumn their boughs are so
laden with fruit that they are bent down under a weight
they can scarcely support.

Close by the garden runs the Frogner River. Here
and there in its course are deep pools, while in other
places it runs swiftly along, and is so shallow that it
can readily be forded. All around are to be seen in
winter snow-covered heights, while far away in the
background a dense pine forest extends beyond Frogner

1
2 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

Seeter,! beyond which again lies Nordmarken, with its
hidden lakes, secret brooklets, and devious paths, like a
fairy-tale. And yet close by the hum of a busy city
life with all its varied sounds may be heard.

It was in this house that, on Oct. 10, 1861, a baby
boy, Fridtjof Nansen, was born.

Many years before this, on Oct. 9, 1660, two of
Denmark’s most powerful men were standing on the
castle bridge at Copenhagen eyeing each other with
looks of hatred and defiance. One of these, named
Otto Krag, was glancing angrily at Blaataarn (the Blue
Tower) with its dungeons. “Know you that?” he
inquired of his companion, the chief burgomaster of the
city. Nodding assent, and directing his looks toward
the church tower of “Our Lady,” in which were hung
the alarm bells, the latter replied, “And know you
what hangs within yonder tower?”

Four days later the burghers of Copenhagen, with
the burgomaster at their head, overthrew the arrogant
Danish nobles, and made Frederick II absolute mon-
arch over Denmark and Norway.

It needed unyielding strength and indomitable cour-
age to carry out such an undertaking, but these were
qualifications which the burgomaster possessed, and had
at an early age learned to eraploy. When but sixteen
he had set out from Flensborg on an expedition to the
White Sea in a vessel belonging to his uncle, and had
then alone traversed a great portion of Russia. Four

1 Frognerseteren, a forest-covered hill about six miles from Chris-
tiania. Nordmarken, an extensive woodland stretching for miles and
miles to the north of Christiania.
























































































STORE FROEN.


4 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

years later he commanded an expedition to the Arctic
Ocean, and subsequently entered the service of the Ice-
land Company as captain of one of their ships.

When forty years of age he was made an alderman
of Copenhagen, and in 1654 became its chief burgo-
master. During the siege of that city in the war with
Charles the Tenth (Gustavus), he was one of its most
resolute and intrepid defenders; and so when the power
of the Danish nobility was to be overthrown, it was he
who took the chief part in the movement.

This man, who was neither cowed by the inherited
tyranny of the nobles, nor daunted by the terrors of
war or the mighty forces of nature, was named Hans
Nansen; and it is from him, on his father’s side, that
Fridtjof Nansen descended.

Our hero’s mother is a niece of Count Wedel Jarls-
berg, the Statholder! of Norway,—the man who in
1814 risked life and fortune to provide Norway with
grain from Denmark, and who did his share toward
procuring a free and equable union with Sweden.

Fridtjof Nansen grew up at Store Froen, and it
was not long before the strongly marked features of his
race became apparent in the fair, shock-haired lad with
the large, dark-blue, dreamy eyes.

Whatever was worthy of note, he must thoroughly
master; whatever was impossible for others, he must do
himself. He would bathe in the Frogner River in spring

1 Statholder, vice-regent. In the early days of the union with Sweden
the king had the right of appointing a vice-regent for Norway. The last

time the king made use of this prerogative was in 1844, and the right was
abrogated in 1872.


FRIDTJOF NANSEN. . 5

and autumn in the coldest pools; fish bare-legged with
self-made tackle in the swiftest foss;! contrive and
improve on everything pertaining to tools and imple-
ments, and examine and take to pieces all the mechani-
cal contrivances that came in his way; often succeeding,
frequently failing, but never giving in.

Once, when only three years old, he was nearly
burned to death. He had been meddling with the copper
fire in the brewhouse, and was standing in the court-
yard busied with a little wheelbarrow. All at once his
clothes were on fire, for a spark, it seems, had lighted
on them, and from exposure to the air, burst out into
flames. Out rushed the housekeeper to the rescue.
Meanwhile Fridtjof stood hammering away at his barrow,
utterly indifferent to the danger he was in, while the
housekeeper was extinguishing the fire. “It was quite
enough for one person to see to that sort of thing,” he
thought.

On one occasion he very nearly caused the drowning
of his younger brother in the icy river. His mother
appeared on the scene as he was in the act’of dragging
him up out of the water. She scolded him severely ;
but the lad tried to comfort her by saying, that “once
he himself had nearly been drowned in the same river
when he was quite alone.”

Once or twice on his early fishing-excursions he
managed to get the fishhook caught in his lip, and his
mother had to cut it out with a razor, causing the lad a
great deal of pain, but he bore it all without a murmur.

The pleasures of the chase, too, were a great source

1 Foss, waterfall.
6 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

of enjoyment to him in his childish years. At first
he would go out after sparrows and squirrels with a
bow and arrow like the Indian hunters. Naturally he
did not’ meet with much success. It then occurred to
him that a cannon would be an excellent weapon for
shooting sparrows. Accordingly he procured one, and
after loading it up to the muzzle with gunpowder, fired |
it off, with the result that the cannon burst into a hun-
dred pieces, and a large part of the charge was lodged
in his face, involving the interesting operation of having
the grains of powder picked out with a needle.

The system on which the Nansen boys were brought
_up at Store Fréen was to inure them in both mind and
body. Little weight was attached to trivial matters.
The mistakes they made they must correct for them-
selves as far as possible; and if they brought suffering
on themselves they were taught to endure it. The
principles of self-help were thus inculcated at an early
age — principles which they never forgot in later days.

As Fridtjof grew up from the child into the boy,
the two opposite sides of his character became apparent,
—inflexible determination, and a dreamy love of ad-
venture; and the older he grew, the more marked did
these become. He was, as the saying is, “‘a strange
boy.” Strong as a young bear, he was ever foremost in
fight with street boys, whom he daily met between his
home and school. When the humor took him, espe-
cially if his younger brother was molested, he would
fight fiercely, though the odds were three or four to one
against him. But in general, he was of a quiet,
thoughtful disposition.


FRIDTJOF NANSEN. v

Sometimes indeed he would sit buried in deep
thought half an hour at a time, and when dressing
would every now and then remain sitting with one
stocking on and the other in his hand so long that his
brother had to call out to him to make haste. At table,
too, he would every now and then forget to eat his food,
or else would devour anything and everything that came
in his way. :

The craving to follow out his own thoughts and his
own way thus displayed itself in his early childhood,
and he had not attained a great age before his longing
to achieve exploits and to test his powers of endurance
became apparent.

It began with a pair of ski* made by himself for use
on the Frogner hills, developed in the hazardous leaps
on the Huseby? slopes, and culminated in his becom-
ing one of Norway’s cleverest and most enduring run-
ners on ski. It began with fishing for troutlets in the
river, and ended with catching seals in the Arctic seas.
It began with shooting sparrows with cannons, and
ended with shooting the polar bear and walrus with
tiny Krag-Jérgensen conical bullets. It began with
splashing about in the cold pools of the Frogner river,
and ended in having to swim for dear life amid the ice
floes of the frozen ocean. Persevering and precise, en-
during and yet defiant, step by step he progressed.

Nothing was ever skipped over — everything was
thoroughly learned and put into practice. Thus the
boy produced the man /

1 Ski, Norwegian snowshoes; pronounced she.

2 Huseby, a farm near Christiania, where the annual ski-match was
formerly held.
1

8 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

There was a certain amount of pride in Fridtjof’s
nature that under different circumstances might have
proved injurious to him. He was proud of his descent,
and of his faith in his own powers. But the strict and
wise guidance of his parents directed this feeling into
one of loyalty — loyalty toward his friends, his work,
his plans. His innate pride thus became a conscientious
feeling of honor in small things as well as great —a.
mighty lever, forsooth, to be employed in future ex-
ploits.

Meanness was a thing unknown to Fridtjof Nansen,
nor did he ever cherish rancorous feelings in his breast.
A quarrel he was ever ready to make up, and this done
it was at once and for all forgotten.

The following instance of his school-days shows
what his disposition was: —

Fridtjof was in the second class of the primary school.
One day a new boy, named Karl, was admitted. Now
Fridtjof was the strongest boy in the class, but the new-
comer was also a stout-built lad. It happened that
they fell out on some occasion or other. Karl was do-
ing something the other did not approve of, whereupon
Fridtjof called out, «*You’ve no right to do that.” —
“Haven't I?” was the reply, and a battle at once en-
sued. Blood began to flow freely, when the principal
appeared on the scene. Taking the two combatants, he
locked them up in the class-room. “Sit there, you
naughty boys! you ought to be ashamed of your-
selves,’ he said, as he left them in durance vile.

On his return to the class-room a short time after-
ward, he found the two lads sitting with their arms






FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 9

around each other’s neck, reading out of the same book.
Henceforth they were bosom friends.

As a boy Nansen possessed singular powers of en-
durance and hardiness, and could put up with cold,
hunger, thirst, or pain to a far greater degree than other
boys of his age. But with all this he had a warm heart,
sympathizing in the troubles of others, and evincing sin-
cere interest in their welfare, — traits of character of
childhood’s days that became so strongly developed in
Nansen the leader. Side by side with his yearning to
achieve exploits there grew up within his breast, under
the strict surveillance of his father, the desire of per-
forming good, solid work.

Here may be mentioned another instance, well wor-
thy of notice : —

Fridtjof and his brother went one day to the fair.
There were jugglers and cake-stalls and gingerbread,
sweets, toys, etc., in abundance. In fine, Christiania fair,
coming as it does on the first Tuesday in February, was
a very child’s paradise, with all its varied attractions.
Peasants from the country driving around in their
quaint costumes, the townspeople loafing and enjoying
themselves, all looking pleased as they made their pur-
chases at the stalls in the marketplace, added to the
“fun of the fair.”

Fridtjof and his brother Alexander went well fur-
nished with money ; for their parents had given them six-
pence each, while aunt and grandmamma gave them each
two shillings. Off the lads started, their faces beam-
ing with joy. On returning home, however, instead of
bringing with them sweets and toys, it was seen that
10 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

they had spent their money in buying tools. Their
father was not a little moved.at seeing this, and the
result was that more money was forthcoming for the
lads. But it all went the same way, and was spent in
the purchase of tools, with the exception of a few
pence invested in rye cakes.

More than one boy has on such an occasion remem-
bered his father’s and mother’s advice not to throw
money away on useless things, and has set out with the
magnanimous resolve of buying something useful. The
. difference between them and the Nansen boys is this:
the latter not only made good resolutions, but carried
them out. It is the act that shows the spirit, and boys
who do such things are generally to be met with in
later days holding high and responsible positions.

Fridtjof was a diligent boy at school, especially at
first, and passed his middle school examination ! success-
fully. He worked hard at the natural sciences, which
had a special attraction for him. But gradually, as he
rose higher in the classes, it was the case with him as
it is with others who are destined to perform something
exceptional in the world; that is, he preferred to fol-
low out his own ideas — ideas that were not always in
accordance with the school plan. His burning thirst
after knowledge impelled him to devote his attention
to what lay nearest, and thoroughly to investigate what-
ever was most worthy of note, most wonderful, and most
difficult. High aspirations soon make themselves ap-
parent.

1 Middle school examination, passed on graduating from the grammar
school to the high school.






FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 11

The mighty hidden forces of nature had a great

attraction for him. He and his friend Karl (who after
their fight were inseparable), when Fridtjof was about
fifteen, one day got hold of a lot of fireworks. These
they mixed up together in a mortar, adding to the com-
pound some “new kinds of fluid” they had bought for
their experiment. Nature, however, anticipated them,
for a spark happening to fall on the mixture, it burst
into flames.
_ Our two experimentalists thereon seized hold of the
mortar and threw it out of the window. It fell on the
stones and broke into a thousand pieces, and thus they
gained the new experience, — how a new chemical sub-
stance should not be compounded. The humorous whim,
however, seized them to blacken their hands and faces,
and to lie on the floor as if they were dead. And
when Alexander entered the room, they made him be-
lieve that the explosion had been the cause of it all.
Thus, though the experiment had failed, they got some
amusement out of its failure.

Although Fridtjof had so many interests outside his
actual school studies, he was very diligent in his school
work, In 1880 he took his real artiwm,! with twenty-
one marks in twelve subjects. In natural science,
mathematics, and history he had the best marks, and
in the following examination in 1881 he gained the
distinction of passing laudabilis pre ceteris.

1 Hzamen artium, the entrance examination to the university. For
real artium the chief topics of examination are sciences, mathematics,
and the English language. The best mark in any subject is 1 (excel-
lent), the poorest 6 (bad).
12 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

Though brought up at home very strictly, for his
father was extremely particular about the smallest mat-
ters, yet his life must have possessed great charm for
him, spent as it was in the peaceful quiet of his home
at Store Fréen. If on the one hand his father insisted
that he should never shirk his duty, but should strictly
fulfil it, on the other he never denied him anything
that could afford him pleasure.

This is evident from a letter Fridtjof Nansen wrote
home during one of his first sojourns among strangers.
On writing to-his father in 1883 he dwells on the
Christmas at home, terms it the highest ideal of hap-
piness and blessedness, dwells on the bright peaceful
reminiscences of his childhood and ends with the fol-
lowing description of a Christmas Eve : —

“ At last the day dawned, — Christmas Eve. Now
impatience was at its height. It was impossible to sit
still for one minute; it was absolutely necessary to be
doing something to get the time to pass, or to occupy
one’s thoughts either by peeping through the keyhole
to try and catch a glimpse of the Christmas-tree with
its bags of raisins and almonds, or by rushing out-of-
doors and sliding down the hills on a hand-sleigh; or
if there were snow enough, we could go out on ski till
it was dark. Sometimes it would happen that Einar
had to go on an errand into the town, and it was so nice
to sit on the saddle at the back of the sleigh, while the
sleigh-bells tinkled so merrily, and the stars glittered
in the dark sky overhead.

“ The long-expected moment arrived at last, — father
went in to light up. How my heart thumped and


FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 13

throbbed! Ida was sitting in an armchair in a corner,
guessing what would fall to her share; others of the
party might be seen to smile in anticipation of some sur-
prise or other of which they had got an inkling — when
all at once the doors were thrown wide open, and the
dazzling brilliancy of the lights on the Christmas-tree
well nigh blinded us. Oh, what a sight it was! For
the first few minutes we were literally dumb from joy,
could scarcely draw our breath — only a moment after-
ward to give free vent to our pent-up feelings, like
wild things. ... Yes —yes—never shall I forget
them— never will those Christmas Eves fade from my
memory as long as I live.”

Reminiscences of a good home, of a good and happy
childhood, are the very best things a man can take with
him amid the storms and struggles of life; and we may -
be sure of this, — that on many a day that has been
beset with almost insurmountable difficulties, when his
powers were almost exhausted, and his heart feeling
faint within, the recollection of those early years at
Store Fréen has more than once recurred to Nansen’s
mind,

The peace and comfort of the old home, with all its
dear associations, the beloved faces of its inmates —
these have passed before his mind’s eye, cheering him
on in the accomplishment of his last tremendous under-
taking.
14 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

CHAPTER II.

Youturun, Excursions. —Srupies. —GOorES ON A SEALING EXPEDITION
4 To THE Arcric SEA.— Hunts IcE-BEAR.

THERE is hardly a boy in Christiania or its neighbor-
hood who is fond of sport that does not know Nord-
marken, and you may hear many and many a one speak
of its lakes, the deafening roar of its cascades, of the
mysterious silence of its endless forest tracts, and the
refreshing odor of the pine-trees. You may hear, too,
how the speckled trout have been lured out of some
deep pool, the hare been hunted among the purple
mountain ridges, or the capercailzie approached with
noiseless footsteps when in early spring the cock bird
is wooing his mate; or again, of expeditions on ski
over the boundless tracts of snow in the crisp winter
air beneath the feathery snowladen trees of the forest.

Tn the days of Nansen’s boyhood it was very differ-
ent from what it is now. Then the spell of enchant-
ment that ever lies over an unknown and unexplored
region brooded over it —a feeling engendered by As-
bjornsen’s! well-known tales.

Tt was as if old Asbjornsen himself, the fairy-tale
king, was trudging along rod in hand by the side of
some hidden stream —he who alone knew how to find



1 P. C. Asbjérnsen (pron. Asbyurnsen) together with Jérgen (pron.
Yurgen) Joe collected the popular and fairy tales of Norway.


FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 15

his way through the pathless forest to the dark waters
of some remote lake. And it was but once in a while
that the most venturesome lads, enticed by the tales he
had devoured in that favorite story-book, dared pry into
the secrets of that enchanted land. Only a few of the
rising generation then had the courage and the hardi-
hood to penetrate into those wilds whence they returned
with faces’ beaming with joy, and with reinvigorated
health and ‘strength. But now the whole Norwegian
youth do the same thing.

Among the few who in those days ventured there
were the Nansen boys. They had the pluck, the hardi-
ness, and yearning after adventure that Nordmarken
demanded. They were not afraid of lying out in the
forest during a pouring wet summer night, neither were
they particular as to whether they had to fast for a day
or two.

Fridtjof Nansen was about eleven years old when,
in company with his brother Alexander, he paid his
first’ independent visit to it. Two of their friends
were living in Sérkedal,! so they determined to go and
see them — for the forest looked so attractive that they
could not resist the temptation. or once they started
off without asking leave. They knew their way as far
as Bogstad,? but after that had to ask the road to
Soérkedal. Arriving at their destination, they passed
the day in playing games, and in fishing in the river.

But it was not altogether an enjoyable visit, for con-
science pricked, and as they set out for home late in

1 Sérkedal, a valley about eight miles to the north of Christiania.
2 Bogstad, a baronial manor about five miles north of Christiania.
16 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

the evening, their hearts sank. Their father was a
strict disciplinarian, and a thrashing rose up before
them, and what was even worse than that, mother might
be grieved, and that was something they could not
endure to think of.

On reaching home they found its inmates had not
gone to bed, though it was late in the night. Of course
they had been searching for the truants, and their hearts,
which a moment before had been very low down, now
jumped up into their throats, for they could see mother
_ coming toward them.

“Ts that you, boys?” she asked.

*‘ Now for it,” they thought.

“ Where have you been?” asked their mother.

Yes, they had been to Sérkedal, and they looked up
at her half afraid of what would happen next. Then
they saw that her eyes were filled with tears.

«You are strange boys!” she murmured; and that
was all she said. But those words made the hearts of
the young culprits turn cold and hot by turns, and they
there and then registered a vow that they would never do
anything again to cause mother pain, but would always
try to please her —a resolution they kept, as far as was
possible, their whole lives through.

Subsequently they had leave given them to go to
Sorkedal, and wherever else they wanted. But they
had to go on their own responsibility, and look out for
themselves as best they could. But Fridtjof never for-
got the lesson he had learned on that first expedition
to Nordmarken. Who can tell whether his mother’s
tearful face, and her gentle words, “ You are strange










FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 17

boys! ” have not appeared to him in wakeful hours, and
been the means of preventing many a venturesome deed
being rashly undertaken, many a headstrong idea from
becoming defiant.

This at all events is certain, — Nansen when a man
always knew how to turn aside in a spirit of self-denial
when the boundary line between prudence and rashness
had been reached. And for this it may be safely said
he had to thank his father and mother.

Those who are in the habit of going about in forests
are pretty sure to meet with some wonderful old fellow
who knows where the best fish lie in the river, and the
favorite haunts of game in the woods. Such a one
was an old man named Ola Knub, whose acquaintance
Nansen made in the Nordmarken forest. His wife used
to come to Store Fréen with baskets of huckleberries,
strawberries, cranberries, etc., and it was through her
Fridtjof got to know him. Often they would set off
on an expedition, rod in hand, and coffee kettle on
their back, and be away for days together. They would
fish for trout from early morning till late at night, sleep-
ing on a plank bed in some wood-cutter’s hut, after par-
taking of a supper of trout broiled in the ashes, and
black coffee.

Toward the end of May, when the birch and the oak
began to bud, and the timber floats had gone down the
river, they would start on such an expedition, taking
with them a goodly supply of bread and butter, and
perhaps the stump of a sausage.
18 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

It took them generally quite five hours to reach their
destination, but once arrived there they would imme-
diately set to work with rod and line, and fish up to
midnight, when they would crawl into some charcoal-
burner’s hut for a few hours’ sleep, or as was often the
case, Sleep out in the open, resting their backs against
a tree, and then at daybreak would be off again, to the
river. For time was precious, and they had to make the
best use they could of the hours between Saturday even-
ing and Monday morning, when they must be in school.

When autumn set in, and hare-hunting began, they
would often be on foot for twenty-four hours together
without any food at all. As the boys grew older, they
would follow the chase in winter on ski, often, indeed,
almost to the detriment of their health. Once when
they had been hare-hunting for a whole fortnight, they
found their provision-bag was empty, and as they would
not touch the hares they had killed, they had to sub-
sist as best they could on potatoes only.

In this way Fridtjof grew up to be exceptionally
hardy. When, as it often happened, his companions got
worn out, he would suggest their going to some spot
a long distance off. It seemed to be a special point
of honor with him to bid defiance to fatigue. On
one occasion, after one of these winter excursions to
Nordmarken, he set off alone without any provisions in
his knapsack to a place twenty-five kilometres (fifteen
and a half miles) distant, for none of his companions
dared accompany him. On arriving at the place where
he was bound, he almost ate its inmates out of house
and home.




FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 19

On another occasion, on a long expedition on ski
with some of his comrades, all of whom had brought a
plentiful supply of food with them in their knapsacks,
Fridtjof had nothing. When they halted to take some
necessary refreshment, he unbuttoned his jacket and
pulled out some pancakes from his pocket, quite warm
from the heat of his body. ‘Here, you fellows,” he
said, “won't you have some pancakes?” But pancakes,
his friends thought, might be nice things in general, yet
pancakes kept hot in that way were not appetizing, and
so they refused his proffered hospitality.

“You are a lot of geese! there’s jam on them too,”
he said, as he eagerly devoured the lot.

Even as a boy Fridtjof was impressed with the idea
that hardiness and powers of endurance were qualifica-
tions absolutely essential for the life he was bent on
leading; so he made it his great aim to be able to bear
everything, and to require as little as was possible.

If there were things others found impracticable, he
would at once set to work and attempt them. And
when once he had taken a matter in hand, he would
never rest till he had gone through with it, even
though his life might be at stake. For instance, he and
his brother once set out to climb the Svartdal’s peak in
Jotunheim.! People usually made the ascent from the
rear side of the mountain; but this was not difficult
enough for him. He would climb it from the front, a
route no one had ever attempted; and he did it.

Up under Svartdal’s peak there was a glacier that

1 Jotunheim, the giant’s world, a group of mountains in the centre
of southern Norway.
20 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

they must cross, bounded on its farther side by a pre-
cipice extending perpendicularly down into the valley
below. His brother relates, «I had tured giddy, so
Fridtjof let me have his staff. ‘Then he set off over the
ice; but instead of going with the utmost caution, ad-
vancing foot by foot at a time, as he now would do, off
went my brother as hard as he could — his foot slipped,
and he commenced to slide down the glacier. I saw that
he turned pale, for in a few seconds more he would be
hurled over the abyss, and be crushed to pieces on the
rocks below. He saw his danger, however, just in the
nick of time, and managed to arrest his progress by
digging his heels into the snow. Never shall I forget
that moment; neither shall I forget when we arrived at
the tourist’s cabin how he borrowed a pair of trousers
belonging to the club’s corpulent secretary —for they
completely swallowed him up. His own garment, be it
stated, had lost an essential part by the excessive friction
caused by his slide down the glacier.”

Such were the foolhardy exploits Fridtjof would in-
dulge in as a boy; but when he arrived at manhood he
would never risk his life in any undertaking that was
not worth a life’s venture.

. . . . . . . .

When nineteen he entered the university, and in
the following year passed his second examination ;? and
now arose the question what was he to be? As yet the
idea of the future career which has rendered his name
famous had not occurred to his mind, so we see him

1 Second examination, graduating as a bachelor of arts.
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 24

hesitating over which of the many roads that lay be-
fore him to adopt. He applied to have his name put
down for admission as cadet in the military school, but
quickly withdrew the application. Next he began the
study of medicine, after which all his time was devoted
to a special study of zodlogy. In 1882 he sought the
advice of Professor
Collet as to the
best method of
following up this
branch of science,
and the professor’s
reply was that he
had better go on a
sealing-expedition
to the Arctic seas.
Nansen took a. |}
week to reflect on ff
this advice before
finally deciding;
and on March 11
~ we seehim on board
the sealer Viking,
steering out of
Arendal harbour to
the Arctic ocean —
the ocean that subsequently was to mark an epoch in
his life, and become the scene of his memorable ex-
ploit.
It was with wondrously mixed feelings that he

turned his gaze toward the north as he stood on the
D

GE



NANSEN AT NINETEEN.
22 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

deck that March morning. Behind him lay the beloved
home of his childhood and youth. The first rays of
the rising sun were shining over the silent forests
whither the woodcock and other birds of passage would
soon be journeying from southern climes, and the caper-
cailzie beginning his amorous manceuvres on the sombre
pine tops, while the whole woodland would speedily be
flooded with the songs of its feathered denizens.

And there before him was the sea, the wondrous
sea, where he would behold wrecked vessels drifting
along in the raging tempest, with flocks of stormy
petrels in attendance — and beyond, the Polar sea, that
fairy region, was pictured in his dreams. Yes, he could
see it in his spirit—could see the mighty icebergs, with
their crests sparkling in the sunlight in thousands of
varied forms and hues, and between. these the boundless
tracts of ice extending as far as the eye could reach in
one level unbroken plain. When this dream became
reality, how did he meet it?

Flat, drifting floes of ice, rocked up and down in
the blue-green sea, alike in sunshine and in fog, in
storm and calm. One monotonous infinity of ice to
struggle through, floe after floe rising up like white-
clad ghosts from the murky sea, gliding by with a
soughing, rippling murmur to vanish from sight, or to
dash against the ship’s sides till masts and hull quiv-
ered; and then when morning broke, a faint, mysterious
light, a hollow murmur in the air, like the roar of dis-
tant surge, far away to the north.

This was the Arctic sea! this the drift ice! They
were soon in the midst of it. The sea-gulls circled




FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 23

about, and the snow-bunting whirled around the floes
of ice on which the new-fallen snow lay and glittered.

A gale set in; then it blew a hurricane; and the
Viking groaned like a wounded whale, quivering as
if in the agonies of death from the fierce blows on her
sides. At last they approached the scene of their ex-
ertions, and the excitement of the impending chase for
seals drove out every other feeling from the mind, and
every one was wondering “were there many seals this
year? would the weather be propitious?”

One forenoon “a sail to leeward” was reported by
the man in the crow’s-nest, and all hands were called
up on deck, every stitch of canvas spread, and all the
available steam-power used to overtake the stranger.

There were two ships; one of them being Norden-
skjéld’s famous Vega, now converted into a sealer. Nan-
sen took his hat off to her; and it may well be that this
strange encounter imbued his mind with a yearning to
accomplish some exploit of a similar perilous nature and
world-wide renown as that of the famed Vega expedi-
tion. It is a significant fact that the Vega was the
first ship Nansen met with in the Arctic sea—a fact
that forces itself upon the mind with all the might
of a historic moment, with all the fateful force of des-
tiny. It addresses us like one of those many acciden-
tal occurrences that seem as if they had a purpose —
occurrences that every man who is on the alert and
mindful of his future career will meet once at least if
not oftener on his journey through life. Such things
are beyond our finite comprehension. Some people may
term them “the finger of God,” others the new, higher,
24 FRIDTJOF NANSEN,

unknown laws of nature; it may be these names sig-
nify but one and the same thing.

That year the Viking did not meet with great
success among the seals, for the season was rather too
advanced by the time she reached the sealing-grounds.
But all the more did Nansen get to learn about the
Arctic sea; and of the immense waste of waters of that
free, lonely ocean, his inmost being drank in refreshing
draughts.

On May 2, Spitzbergen was sighted, and on the
25th they were off the coast of Iceland, where Nansen
for a while planted his foot once more on firm land.
But their stay there was short, and soon they were off
to sea again, and in among the seals. And now the
continual report of guns sounded all around; the crew
singing and shouting; flaying seals and boiling the
blubber — a life forsooth of busy activity.

Toward the end of June the Viking got frozen in
off the East Greenland coast, where she lay imprisoned
a whole month, unfortunately during the best of the
sealing season; a loss, indeed, to the owners, but a gain
for Nansen, who now for the first time in his life got
his full enjoyment in the chase of the polar bear.

During all these days of their imprisonment in the
ice there was one incessant chase after bears, — looking
out for bears from the crow’s-nest, racing after bears
over the ice, resulting in loss of life to a goodly number
of those huge denizens of the Polar regions.

“ Bear on the weather bow!” «Bear to leeward!
all hands turn out!” were the cries from morning till
night; and many a time did Nansen jump up from his
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 25

berth but half dressed, and away over the ice to get a
shot.

Toward evening one day in July Nansen was sitting
up in the crow’s-nest, making a sketch of the Greenland
coast. On deck one of the crew, nicknamed Balloon,
was keeping watch, and just as our artist was engrossed
with his pencil, he heard Balloon shouting at the top
of his voice, ‘Bear ahead!” In an instant Nansen
sprang up, threw his painting-materials down on the
deck below, quickly following the same himself down
the rigging. But alas! by the time he had reached the
deck and seized his rifle, the bear had disappeared.

“A pretty sort of fellow to sit up in the crow’s-nest
and not see a bear squatting just in front of the bows!”
said the captain tauntingly.

But a day or two afterward Nansen fully retrieved
his reputation. It was his last bear-hunt on the expe-
dition, and this is what occurred : —

_ He and the captain and one of the sailors set out
after a monstrous bear. The beast, however, was shy,
and beat a speedy retreat. All three sprang after it.
But as Nansen was jumping over an open place in the
ice, he fell plump into the sea. His first thought on
finding himself in the water was his rifle, which he
flung upon the ice. But it slipped off again into the
water, so Nansen had to dive after it. Next time he
managed to throw it some distance across the ice, and
then clambered up himself, of course wet through to
the skin. But his cartridges, which were water-tight
ones, were all right, and soon he rejoined his compan-
ions in pursuit, and outstripped them. In a little while
26 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

he saw the bear making for a hummock, and made
straight for him; on coming up to closer quarters the
beast turned sharp round and dropped into the water,
but not before Nansen was able to put a bullet into him.
On reaching the edge of the ice, he could see no trace
of the animal. Yes—there was something white yon-
der, a little below the surface, for the bear had dived.
Presently he saw the animal pop its head up just in
front of him, and a moment after its paws were on the
_ edge of the floe, on which, with a fierce and angry growl,
the huge beast managed to drag himself up. Nansen
now fired again, and had the satisfaction of seeing the
bear drop back dead into the water, where he had to
hold it by the ears to prevent it sinking, till his com-
panions came up, when they were able to haul it up on
the ice.

The captain now bade Nansen return to the ship as
quickly as he could to change his clothes; but on his
road thither he met with some others of the crew in
pursuit of a couple of bears. The temptation was too
strong for him, so he joined them. He was fortunate
enough to shoot oné of the bears that they had wounded,
and then started after bear number two, which was lei-_
surely devouring the carcass of a seal some little dis-
tance off. On coming up with it he fired. The bear
reeled and fell backwards into the water, but speedily
coming up again, made off for a large hummock, under
cover of which it hoped to be able to sneak off.

But Nansen was not far behind. It was an exciting
chase. First over a wide space of open water, then
across some firm ice; the bear dashed along for dear
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 27

life, and now the iron muscles, hardened by his exploits
on the Huseby hills and his Nordmarken experiences,
stood his pursuer in good stead. Following on the
blood-stained track, he ran as fast as his legs could
carry him. Now the bear, now Nansen, seemed to be
getting the advantage. Whenever a broad opening in
the ice or a pool of clear water came in their way, they
swam across it; bear first, Nansen ‘a good second —
and so it went on mile after mile. Presently, however,
Nansen thought his competitor in the race began to
slacken speed, and to turn and twist in his course, as:
if seeking for some friendly shelter; and coming up
within a reasonable distance he gave him two bullets,
one lodging in the chest, the other behind the ear, when
to his great joy the bear lay dead at his feet. Nansen
at once set to work to skin the brute with a penknife
—rather a tedious operation with such an instrument.
Presently one of the sailors came up, and off they started
for the ship with the skin, on their road meeting a man
whom the captain had thoughtfully despatched with a
supply of bread and meat, without which, indeed, as is
well known, a hero, especially when ravenously hungry,
is a nobody.

In all, nineteen bears were bagged during this time.

Soon after this bear-hunt the Viking set out for
home, and great was the joy of all on board when the
coast of “old Norway,” with its lofty mountain ridges,
was seen towering up over the sea. This expedition
of the Viking was termed by the sailors, ‘“‘ Nansen’s
cruise,” — an exceptional reminiscence, a monolith in
the midst of the ice!
28 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

“ Ay, he was a chap after bears!’ said one of the
sailors afterward; “just as much under the water as
over it, when he was after bears. I told him that he
was going to injure his health that way; but he only
laughed, and pointing to his woollen jersey said, «I
do not feel cold.’”

To Fridtjof Nansen this Arctic expedition became
the turning-point of his life. The dream of the mighty
ocean never left him; it was ever before his eyes with
all its inexplicable riddles.

Here was something to do — something that people
called impossible. He would test it. Some years,
however, must elapse before that dream should become
reality. Nansen must first be aman. Everything that
tended to retard his progress must be removed or shat-
tered to pieces —all that would promote it, improved
upon and set in order.

Se


FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 29

CHAPTER III.

Fripryor NANSEN ACCEPTS A PosITIoN IN THE. BERGEN MusEuM.—
CrossEs THE MoUNTAINS IN THE WINTER.— PREPARES HIMSELF
FOR THE DoctTor’s DEGREE.

Tue very same day that Nansen set foot on land
after his return from this expedition he was offered the
Conservatorship of the Bergen! Museum by Professor
Collett. Old Danielsen, the chief physician, a man of
iron capacity for work, and who had attained great re-
nown in his profession, wanted to place a new man in
charge. Nansen promptly accepted the offer, but asked
first to be allowed to visit a sister in Denmark. But a
telegram from Danielsen, ‘ Nansen must come at once,”
compelled him, though with no little regret, to give up
his projected visit.

The meeting of these two men was as if two clouds
heavily laden with electricity had come in contact, pro-
ducing a spark that blazed over the northern sky. That
spark resulted in the famous Greenland expedition.

Danielsen was one of those who held that a youth
possessed of health, strength, and good abilities should
be able to unravel almost anything and everything in
this world, and in Fridtjof Nansen he found such an
one. So these two worked together assiduously; for

1 Bergen, the metropolis of western Norway, the second largest city

in Norway.
E
30 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

both were alike enthusiastic in the cause of scicnce,
both possessed the same strong faith in its advance-
ment. And Danielsen, the clear-headed scientist, after
being associated with his colleague for some few years,
entertained such firm confidence in his powers and ca-
pabilities, that a short time before the expedition to the
North Pole set out, he wrote in a letter: —

“ Fridtjof Nansen will as surely return crowned with
success from the North Pole as it is I who am writing
these lines — such is an old man’s prophecy! ”

The old scientist, who felt his end was drawing near,
sent him before his death an anticipatory letter of greet-
ing when the expedition should happily be over.

Nansen devoted himself to the study of science with
the same indomitable energy that characterized all of
his achievements.

Hour by hour he would sit over his microscope,
month after month devote himself to the pursuit of
knowledge. Yet every now and then, when he felt he
must go out to get some fresh air, he would buckle on
his ski, and dash along over the mountain or through
the forest till the snow spurted up in clouds behind
him. Thus he spent several years in Bergen.

But one fine day, chancing to read in the papers that
Nordenskjéld had returned from his expedition to Green-
land, and had said that the interior of the country was
a boundless plain of ice and snow, it flashed on his mind
that here was a field of work forhim. Yes — he would
cross Greenland on ski! and he at once set to work to
prepare a plan for the expedition. But such an adven-
turous task, in which life would be at stake, must not
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 31

be undertaken till he himself had become a proficient
in that branch of science which he had selected as his
special study. So he remains yet some more years in
Bergen, after which he spends twelve months in Naples,
working hard at the subjects in which he subsequently
‘ took his doctor’s degree in 1888.

Those years of expectation in Bergen were busy
years. Every now and then he would become home-
sick. In winter time he would go by the railway from
Bergen to Voss,! thence on ski over the mountains to
Christiania, down the Stalheim road,! with its sinuous
twists and bends, on through Nerddal, noted for its
earth slips, on by the swift Lerdals river fretting and
fuming on one side, and a perpendicular mountain wall
on the other. And here he would sit to rest in that
narrow gorge where avalanches are of constant occur-
rence. Let them come! he must rest awhile and eat.
A solitary wayfarer hurries by on his sleigh as fast as
his horse will go. “Take care!” shouts the traveller as
he passes by; and Nansen looks up, gathers his things
together, and proceeds on his journey through the
valley. It was Sauekilen, the most dangerous spot in
Lerdals, where he was resting. Then the night falls,
the moon shines brightly overhead, and the creaking
sound of his footsteps follows him over the desert
waste, and his dark-blue shadow stays close beside him.
And he, the man possessed of ineffable pride and indom-

1 Voss, a country district of western Norway, connected with Bergen
by railway. Stalheim road, a piece of road winding in a slow decline
down a steep hill, famous for the beauty of its scenery and the engineer-

ing skill with which it has been built. Merdédal and Lerdals river must
be passed on the way from Bergen to Christiania. ;
82 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

itable resolution, feels how utterly insignificant he is in
that lonely wilderness of snow — naught but an insect
under the powerful microscope of the starlit sky, for
the far-seeing eye of the Almighty is piercing through
his inmost soul. Here it avails not to seek to hide
aught from that gaze. So he pours out his thoughts to
Him who alone has the right to search them. That mid-
night pilgrimage over the snowy waste was like a divine
service on ski; and it was as an invigorated man, weary
though he was in body, that he knocked at the door
of a peasant’s cabin, while its astonished inmates looked
out in amazement, and the old housewife cried out,
“Nay! in Jesus’ name, are there folk on the fjeld 1 so
late in the night? Nay! is it you? Suppose you are
always so late on the road!”

Even still more arduous was the return journey that
same winter. The people in the last house on the east-
ern side of the mountain, in bidding him “ God speed,”
entreat him to go cautiously, for the road over the fjeld
is well nigh impassable in winter, they say. Not a man
in the whole district would follow him, they add. Nan-
sen promises them to be very careful, as he sets off in
the moonlight at three o’clock in the morning. Soon he
reaches the wild desert, and the glittering snow blushes
like a golden sea in the beams of the rising sun. Pres-
ently he reaches Myrstélen.2 The houseman is away
from home, and the women-folk moan and weep on
learning the road he means to take. On resuming his

1 Fjeld (pron. fyell), mountain.
2 Myrstélen, the last house on the eastern side of the mountain
inhabited the whole year through.
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 388

journey he shortly comes to a cross-road. Shall it be
Aurland or Vosse skavlen?! He chooses the latter
route across the snow plateau, for it is the path the wild
reindeer follow. On he skims over the crisp surface
enveloped in the cloud of snow-dust his ski stir up, for
the wind is behind him. But now he loses his way,
falls down among the clefts and fissures, toils along step
by step, and at last has to turn back and retrace his
steps. There ought to be a seter? somewhere about
there, but it seems as if it had been spirited away. pitchy darkness sets in; for the stars have disappeared
one by one, and the night is of a coal-black hue, and
Fridtjof has to make his bed on the snow-covered pla-
teau, under the protecting shelter of a bowlder, his faith-
ful dog by his side, his knapsack for a pillow, while the
night wind howls over the waste.

Again, at three in the morning, he resumes his jour-
ney, only again to lose his way, and burying himself
in the snow, determines to wait for daybreak. Dawn
came over the mountain-tops in a sea of rosy light,
while the dark shadows of night fled to their hiding-
places in the deep valleys below—a proclamation of
eternity, where nature was the preacher and nature the
listener, the voice of God speaking to himself.

At broad daylight he sees Vosse skavlen close at hand,
and thither he drags his weary, stiffened limbs; but
on reaching the summit he drinks “ skaal® to the fjeld,”

1 Aurland and Vosse skavlen, alternative routes across the mountains
from Christiania to Bergen.

2 Seter, mountain hut, used by grazicrs during the summer months.

8 Skaal, your health.
34 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

a frozen orange, the last he has, being his beverage.
Before the sun sets again, Fridtjof has crossed that
mountain height, as King Sverre! did of yore —an
achievement performed by those two alone!



. . . . . . . . .

Fridtjof Nansen’s father died in 1885, and it was
largely consideration for his aged parent’s failing health
during the last few years that delayed Nansen’s set-
ting out on his Greenland expedition. The letters that
passed between father and son during this period strik-
ingly evince the tender relationship existing between
them. On receipt of the tidings of his father’s last ill-
ness he. hurried off at a moment’s notice, never resting
on his long homeward journey, inexpressibly grieved at
arriving too late to see him alive.

Then, after a year’s sojourn in Naples, where he met
the genial and energetic Professor Dohrn, the founder of
the biological station? in that city, having no further
ties to hinder him, he enters heart and soul into the
tasks he has set himself to accomplish, —to take his de-
gree as doctor of philosophy, and to make preparation
for his expedition to Greenland, both of which tasks he
accomplished in the same year with credit. For he not
only made himself a name as a profound researcher in
the realms of science, but at the same time equipped
an expedition that was soon destined to excite univer-
sal attention, not in the north alone, but throughout the
length and breadth of Europe.

! King Sverre, King of Norway 1177 to 1202.
2 An institution where animal life is studied.
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 35

CHAPTER IV.

NANSEN Mrets NorDENSKJOLD.! — PREPARATIONS FOR THE GREEN-
LAND EXPEDITION. — NANSEN’S FOLLOWERS ON THE EXPEDITION.
— STARTING ON THE EXPEDITION. — DRIFTING ON AN ICE-FLOE.
LANDING ON EAst CoAst OF GREENLAND.

NANSEN had an arduous task before him in the
spring of 1888, one that demanded all his strength and
energy; for he would take his doctor’s degree, and make
preparations for his expedition to Greenland.

He had already, in the autumn of 1887, made up his
mind to accomplish both these things. In November of
that year, accordingly, he went to Stockholm to confer
with Nordenskjéld. Professor Brégger, who introduced
him to that gentleman, gives the following account of
the interview : —

“On Thursday, Nov. 8, as I was sitting in my study
in the Mineralogical Institute, my messenger came in
and said a Norwegian had been inquiring for me. He
had left no card, neither had he given his name. Doubt-
less, I thought, it was some one who wanted help out of
a difficulty.

©¢ What was he like?’ I inquired.

«Tall and fair,’ replied the messenger.

“«¢ Was he dressed decently?’ I asked.

1 Nordenskjéld (pron. Nordenshuld), famous Swedish explorer, dis-
coverer of the North-east Passage.
36 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

«+He hadn’t an overcoat on.’ This with a signifi-
cant smile, as he added, ‘Looked for all the world like
a seafaring man — or a tramp.’

«¢Humph!’ I muttered to myself; ‘sailor with no
overcoat! Very likely thinks I’m going to give him
yes, I think I understand.’

«Later on in the afternoon Wille! came in. ‘Have
you seen Nansen?’ he said.

«“¢Nansen?’ I replied. ‘Was that sailor fellow
without an overcoat Nansen?’

“¢ Without an overcoat! Why, he means to cross
over the inland ice of Greenland ;’ and out went Wille
—he was in a hurry.

« Presently entered Professor Lecke with the same
question, ‘Have you seen Nansen? Isn't he a fine
fellow? such a lot of interesting discoveries he told me
of, and then his researches into the nervous,system — a
grand fellow!’ and off went Lecke.

“But before long the man himself entered the room.
Tall, upright, broad-shouldered, strongly built, though
slim and very youthful looking, with his shock of hair
brushed off his well-developed forehead. Coming to-
ward me and holding out his hand, he introduced
himself by name, while a pleasing smile played over
his face.

«« And you mean to cross over Greenland?’ I asked.

«“¢Yes; I’ve been thinking of it,’ was the reply.

“T looked him in the face, as he stood before me with
an air of conscious self-reliance about him. With every



one

1 Wille, another Norwegian, who at that time was professor at the
High School in Stockholm.
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 37

word he spoke he seemed to grow on me; and this plan
of his to cross over Greenland on ski from the east
coast, which but a moment ago I had looked on as a
madman’s idea, during our conversation gradually grew
on me, till it seemed to be the most natural thing in
the world; and all at once it flashed on my mind, ¢ And
he’ll do it, too, as sure as ever we are sitting here talk-
ing about it.’

“He, whose name but two hours ago I had not
known, became in those few minutes (and it all came
about so naturally) as if he were an old acquaintance,
and I felt I should be proud and fortunate indeed to
have him for my friend my whole life through.

“¢We will go and see Nordenskjéld at once,’ I said,
rising up. And we went.

“With his strange attire, —he was dressed in a
tight-fitting, dark-blue blouse or coatee, a kind of
knitted jacket, — he was, as may be supposed, stared
at in Drottning-gatan. Some people, indeed, took him
for an acrobat or tight-rope dancer.”

Nordenskjéld, ‘old Nor” as he was often termed,
was in his laboratory, and looked up sharply as his
two visitors entered the room, for he was, as ever,
“ busy.”



The professor saluted, and introduced his compan-
ion, ‘Conservator Nansen from Bergen, who purposes
to cross over the inland ice of Greenland.”

“The deuce he does!” muttered “ old Nor,” staring
with all his eyes at the fair-haired young viking.

“And would like to confer with you about it,” con-

tinued the professor.
.
88 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

“ Quite welcome; and so Herr Nansen thinks of
crossing over Greenland?”

“Yes; such was his intention.” Thereon, without
further ado, he sketched out his projected plan, to which
“old Nor” listened with great attention, shaking his
head every now and then, as if rather sceptical about
it, but evidently getting more and more interested as he
proceeded.

As Nansen and Professor Brégger were sitting in the
latter’s house that evening, a knock was heard at the
door, and who should come in but “old Nor” himself —
a convincing proof to Brégger that the old man enter-
tained a favorable idea of the proposed plan. And
many a valuable hint did the young ice-bear get from
the old one, as they sat opposite each other —the man
of the past and the coming man of the present — quietly
conversing together that evening.

Now Nansen sets off for home in order to prepare
for the arduous task of the ensuing spring. In Decem-
ber, 1887, he is in Bergen again, and at the end of Jan-
uary he travels on ski from Hardanger to Kongsberg,
thence by rail to Christiania.

In March we see him once more in Bergen, giving
lectures in order to awaken public interest in Green-
land; now sleeping out on the top of Blaamand,! a
mountain near Bergen, in a sleeping-bag, to test its
efficiency; now standing on the cathedra in the uni-
versity auditorium to claim his right to the degree of
doctor of philosophy, which on April 28 was honor-
ably awarded him; and on May 2 he sets out for Copen-

1 Blaamand (pron. Blohmann).


FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 39

hagen, en route for Greenland. For unhappily it was
the case in Norway in 1888 that Norwegian exploits
must be carried out with Danish help. In vain had he
sought for assistance from the regents of the university.
They recommended the matter to the government, but
the government had no 5,000 kroner! (nearly £278) to
throw away on such an enterprise, — the enterprise of a
madman, as most people termed it.

Yet when that enterprise had been carried to a suc-
cessful issue, and that same lunatic had become a great
man and asked the government and the storthing? for a
grant of 200,000 kroner (nearly £11,112) for his second
mad expedition, his request was promptly granted. A
new Norway had grown up meanwhile, a new national
spirit had forced its way into existence, a living testi-
mony to the power of the Nansen expedition.

As stated above, Nansen had to go to Denmark for
the 5,000 kroner; and it was the wealthy merchant,
Augustin Gamel, who placed that amount at his dis-
posal. Still, certain is it, had not that sum of money
been forthcoming as it was, Fridtjof Nansen would have
plucked himself bare to the last feather in order to
carry out his undertaking.

But what was there to be gained from an expedition
to Greenland worth the risking of human life, —for a
life-risk it unquestionably would be,—to say nothing
of the cost thereof? What was there to be learned from
the ice?

The question is soon answered.

1 One krone (crown) equals 1s. 14d. .
2 Storthing, the legislative assembly (congress) of Norway. ;
40 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

The island of Greenland, — for it is now well ascer-
tained that it is an island, and that the largest in the
world, —this Sahara of the North, contains within its
ice-plains the key to the history of the human race.
For it is the largest homogeneous relic we possess of
the glacial age. Such as Greenland now is, so large
tracts of the world have been; and, what is of more in-
terest to us, so has the whole of the north been. It is
this mighty ice-realm that has caused a large proportion
of the earth’s surface to assume its present appearance.
The lowlands of Mid-Germany and Denmark have been
scoured and transported thither from the rocks of Nor-
way and Sweden. The Swedish rock at Liitzen in Sax-
ony is Swedish granite that the ice has carried with it.
And the small glaciers still left in Norway, such as
the Folgefond, Jostedalsbre, Svartis,! etc., are merely
“calves” of that ancient, stupendous mass of ice that
time and heat have transported, even though it once
lay more than a thousand metres in thickness over
widely extended plains.

To investigate, therefore, the inland ice of Greenland
is, in a word, to investigate the great glacial age; and
one may learn from such a study many a lesson ex-
planatory of our earth’s appearance at the present day,
and ascertain what could exist, and what could not,
under such conditions.

We know now that, during the glacial age, human
beings lived on this earth, even close up to this gigantic
glacier, that subsequently destroyed all life on its course.
It may be safely asserted that the struggle with the

1 Folgefond, Jostedalsbre, Svartisen, glaciers in Norway.
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 41

ice, and with the variations of climate, have been im-
portant factors in making the human race what it will
eventually be, the lords of nature.

The Esquimaux in their deerskin dress, the abo-
tigines of Australia, the pigmy tribes of Africa’s pri-
meyal forests, are a living testimony of the tenacious
powers of the soul and body of mankind, — civilization’s
trusty outposts. An Esquimau living on blubber under
fifty degrees of cold is just as much a man of achieve-
ment in this work-a-day world as an Edison, who, with
every comfort at his disposal, forces nature to disclose
her hidden marvels. But he who, born in the midst
of civilization, and who forces his way to an outpost
farther advanced than any mankind has yet attained,
is greater, perhaps, than either, especially when in his
struggle for existence he wrests from nature her inmost
secrets.

This was the kernel of Nansen’s exploits —his first
and his last.

Nansen was fully alive to the fact that his enterprise
would involve human life; and he formed his plans in
such wise that he would either attain his object or
perish in the attempt. He would make the dangerous,
uninhabited coast of East Greenland his starting-point
as one which presented no enticement for retracing his
steps. He would force his way onward. The instinct
of self-preservation should impel him toward the west
—the greater his advance in that direction the greater
42 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

his hopes. Behind him naught but death; before him,
life!

But he must have followers! Where were men to
be found to risk their lives on such a venture? to form
one of a madman’s retinue? And not only that, he
must have men with him who, like himself, were well
versed in all manly sports, especially in running on ski;
men hard as iron, as he was; men who, like himself,
were unencumbered with family ties. Where were such
to be found? He sought long and diligently, and he
found them.

There was a man named Sverdrup — Otto Sverdrup.
Yes, we all of us know him now! But then he was
an unknown Nordland youth, inured to hardship on sea
and land, an excellent sailor, a skilful ski-runner, firm
of purpose; one to whom fatigue was a stranger, physi-
cally strong and able in emergency, unyielding as a
rod of iron, firm as a rock. A man chary of words in
fine weather, but eloquent in storm; possessed, too, of
a courage that lay so deep that it needed almost a

peril involving life to arouse it. Yet, when the pinch ©

came Sverdrup was in his element. Then would his
light blue eyes assume a darker hue, and a smile creep
over his hard-set features; then he would resemble a
hawk that sits on a perch with ruffled feathers, bidding
defiance to every one who approaches it, but which,
when danger draws nigh, flaps its pinions, and soars
aloft in ever widening circles, increasing with the force
of the tempest, borne along by the storm.

This man accompanied him.

Number two was Lieutenant, now Captain, Olaf Die-

ee


OTTO SVERDRUP.
44 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

trichson. He, too, hailed from the north. A man who
loved a life in the open air, a master in all manly ex-
ploits, elastic as a steel spring, a proficient on ski, and
a sportsman in heart and soul. And added to this, a
man possessed of great knowledge in those matters
especially that were needed in an expedition like the
present. He, too, was enrolled among the number.

Number three was also from Nordland, from Sver-
drup’s neighborhood, who recommended him. His name
was Kristian Kristiansen Trana—a handy and reliable
youth.

These three were all Nordlanders. But Nansen had
a great desire to have a couple of Fjeld-Finns with him,
for he considered that, inured as they were to ice and
snow, their presence would be of great service to him.
They came from Karasjok.1_ The one a fine young fel-
low, more Qven? than Lapp; the other a little squalid-
looking, dark-haired, pink-eyed Fjeld-Finn. The name
of the first was Balto; of the other, Ravna. These
two children of the mountains came to Christiania look-
ing dreadfully perplexed, with little of the heroic about
them. For they had agreed to accompany the expe-
dition principally for the sake of the good pay, and now
learned for the first time that their lives might be en-
dangered. Nansen, however, managed to instil a little
confidence into them, and as was subsequently proved,
they turned out to be useful and reliable members of

1 Karasjok (pron. Karashok), one of the northernmost districts of
Norway, chiefly inhabited by Lapps.

2 Qven, the Norwegian name for a man of the race inhabiting the
grand duchy of Finland. The Lapps ave in Norway called Finns.

2p
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 45

the expedition. Old Ravna, who was forty-five, was
a married man,—a fact Nansen did not know when
he engaged him, — and was possessed of great physical
strength and powers of endurance.

Nansen now had the lives of five persons beside his
own on his conscience. He would, therefore, make his
equipment in such manner that he should have nothing
to reproach himself with in case anything went wrong,
a work that he conscientiously and carefully carried
out. ‘There was not a single article or implement that
was not scientifically and practically discussed and
tested, measured and weighed, before they set out.
Hand-sleighs and ski, boats and tent, cooking-utensils,
sleeping-bags, shoes and clothes, food and drink, all
were of the best kind; plenty of everything, but noth-
ing superfluous — light, yet strong, nourishing and
strengthening. Everything, in fact, was well thought
over, and as was subsequently proved, the mistakes
that did occur were few and trifling.

Nansen made most of the implements with his own
hands, and nothing came to pieces during the whole
expedition saving a boat plank that was crushed by the
ice.

But one thing Nansen omitted to take with him, and
that was a supply of spirituous liquor. It did not exist
in his dictionary of sport. For he had long entertained
the opinion — an opinion very generally held by the
youth of Norway at the present day —that strong drink
is a foe to manly exploit, sapping and undermining
man’s physical and mental powers. In former days,
indeed, in Norway, as elsewhere, it was considered

G
46 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

manly to drink, but now the drinker is looked down on
with a pity akin to contempt.

Thus equipped, these six venturesome men set out
on their way; first by steamer to Iceland, thence by the
Jason, a sealer, Captain Jacobsen its commander, who,
as opportunity should offer, was to set them ashore on
the east coast of Greenland. And here, after struggling
for a month with the ice, they finally arrived, on July
19, so near to the Sermilik Fjord that Nansen deter-
mined to leave the Jason and make his way across the
ice to land. The whole ship’s crew were on deck to
bid them farewell. Nansen was in command of one of
the two boats, and when he gave the word “set off,”
they shot off from the ship’s side, while the Jason’s two
guns and a spontaneous hurrah from sixty-four stalwart
sailors’ throats resounded far and wide over the sea.
As the boats worked their way into the ice, the Jason
changed her course, and ere long our six travellers
watched the Norwegian flag, waving like a distant
tongue of fire, gradually fade from sight and disappear
among the mist and fog.

These six men set out on their arduous journey
with all the indomitable fearlessness and disregard of
danger that youth inspires, — qualifications that would
speedily be called into requisition.

Before many hours of toiling in the ice, the rain
came down in torrents, and the current drove them
with irresistible force away from the land, while ice-
floes kept striking against their boats’ sides, threatening
to crush or capsize them. sen’s boat was broken by the concussion, and had to
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. AT

be instantly repaired, the rain meanwhile pouring down
a perfect deluge. They determined, therefore, to drag
the boats upon an ice-floe, and to pitch their tent on it;
and having done this they got into their sleeping-bags,
the deafening war of the raging storm in their ears.
The two Fjeld-Lapps, however, thinking their end was























































CAMP ON THE DRIFT-ICE.

drawing near, sat with a dejected air gazing in silence
out over the sea.

Far away in the distance the roar of the surge dash-
ing against the edge of the ice could be heard, while
the steadily increasing swell portended an approaching
tempest.

Next morning, July 20, Nansen was awakened by a
48 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

violent concussion. The ice-floe on which they were
was rent asunder, and the current was rapidly drifting
them out toward the open sea. The roar of the surge
increased; the waves broke over the ice-floe on all
sides. Balto and Rayna lay crouching beneath a tar-
paulin reading the New Testament in Lappish, while
the tears trickled down their cheeks; but out on the
floe Dietrichson and Kristiansen were making jokes as
every fresh wave dashed over them. Sverdrup was
standing with hands folded behind his back, chewing
his quid, his eyes directed towards the sea, as if in
expectation.

They are but a few hundred metres distant from the
open sea, and soon will have to take to the boats, or
be washed off the floe. The swell is so heavy that the
floe ducks up and down like a boat in the trough of the
sea. So the order is given, “ All hands turn in,” for all
their strength will be needed in the fierce struggle they
will shortly have to encounter. So they sleep on the
' very brink of death, the roar of the storm their lullaby
— Rayna and Balto in one of the boats, Nansen and
the others in the tent, where the water pours in and out.

But there is one outside, on the floe. It is his
watch. Hour by hour he walks up and down, his
hands behind his back. It is Sverdrup. Every now
and then he stands still, turns his sharp, thin face with
the sea-blue eyes towards the breakers, and then once
more resumes his walk.

The storm is raging outside, and the surge is dash-
ing over the ice. He goes to the boat where Ravna
and Balto lie sleeping, and lays hold of it, lest it should
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 49

be swept away by the backwash. Then he goes to the
tent, undoes a hook, and again stands gazing over
the sea; then turns round, and resumes his walk as
before.

Their floe is now at the extreme edge of the ice,
close to the open sea. A huge crag of ice rises up like
some white-clad threatening monster, and the surf dashes
furiously over the floe. Again the man on the watch
arrests his steps; he undoes another hook in the tent.
Matters are at their worst! He must arouse his com-
rades! He is about to do so when he turns once more
and gazes seaward. He becomes aware of a new and
strange motion in the floe beneath him. Its course is
suddenly changed; it is speeding swiftly away from
the open sea — inward, ever inward toward calm water,
toward life, toward safety. And as that bronze-faced
man stands there, a strange and serious look passes
over his features. For that has occurred, — that won-
drous thing that he and many another sailor has often
experienced, — salvation from death without the media-
tion of human agency. That moment was for him what
the stormy night on the Hardanger waste was to Nan-
sen. It was like divine service! It was as if some in-
visible hand had steered the floe, he said afterwards to
Nansen. So he rolled his quid round into the other
cheek, stuck his hands in his pockets; and hour after
hour, till late in the morning, the steps of that iron-
hearted man on the watch might be heard pacing to
and fro.

When Nansen awoke, the floe was in safe shelter.

Still for another week they kept drifting south-


50 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

ward, the glaciers and mountain ridges one after another
disappearing from view—a weary, comfortless time.
Then, toward midnight on July 28, when it was Sver-
drup’s watch again, he thought he could hear the sound
of breakers in the west. What it was he could not
rightly make out; he thought, perhaps, his senses de-
ceived him; for, at other times, the sound had always
come from the east where the sea was. But next morn-
ing, when it was Ravna’s watch, Nansen was awakened
by seeing the Finn’s grimy face peering at him through
an opening in the tent.

“ Now, Ravna, what is it? can you see land?” he
asked at a venture.

“Yes — yes — land too close!” croaked Ravna, as he
drew his head back.

Nansen sprang out of the tent. Yes, there was the
land, but a short distance off; and the ice was loose so
that a way could easily be forced through it. In a
twinkling all hands were busy; and a few hours later
Nansen planted his foot on the firm land of Greenland.
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. dL

CHAPTER V.

JOURNEY ACROSS GREENLAND.— MEETING EsquimMAux. — REACHING
THE West Coast.— RETURN TO CIVILIZATION AND Homr.

WHEN Nansen and his companions, after their per-
ilous adventures in the drift-ice, landed with flags flying
on their boats on the east waste of Greenland, the first
thing they did was to give vent to their feelings in a
ringing hurrah —a sound which those wild and barren
crags had never re-echoed before. Their joy, indeed, on
feeling firm ground beneath their feet once more baffles
description. In a word, they conducted themselves like
a pack of schoolboys, singing, laughing, and playing all
manner of pranks. The Lapps, however, did not par-
take in the general merriment, but took themselves off
up the mountain-side, where they remained several
hours.

But when their first ebullition of joy had somewhat
subsided, Nansen himself followed the example of the
Lapps, and clambered up the slope in order to get a
good view over the landscape, leaving the others to pre-
pare the banquet they determined to indulge in that
evening on the sea-beach. And here he remained some
little while, entranced with the wondrous beauty of the
scene. The sea and the ice stretched far away to the
east, shining like a belt of silver beneath him, while on
the west the mountain-tops were bathed in a flood of
52 : FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

hazy sunshine, and the inland ice, the “Sahara of the
North,” extended in a level unbroken plain for miles
and miles into the interior.

A snow bunting perched on a stone close by him,
and chirped a welcome; a mosquito came humming
through the air to greet the stranger, and settled on his
hand. He would not disturb it; it was a welcome
from home. It wanted his blood, and he let it take its
fill. To the south the grand outline of Cape Torden-
skjold rose up in the horizon, its name and form re-
calling his country to his mind; and there arose in his
breast an earnest desire, a deep longing, to sacrifice
anything and everything for his beloved “Old Nor-
way.”

On rejoining his comrades, the feast was ready. It
consisted of oatmeal biscuits, Gruyére cheese, whortle-
berry jam, and chocolate; and there is little doubt that
these six adventurers “‘ate as one eats in the spring-
time of youth.” For it had been unanimously resolved
that, for this one day at least, they would enjoy them-
selves to the full; on the morrow their daily fare would
be, to eat little, sleep little, and work as hard as possible.
To-day, then, should be the first and the last of such in-
dulgence. Time was precious!

On the next day, therefore, they resumed their
northward journey, along the east coast, fighting their
way day and night, inch by inch, foot by foot, through
the drift-ice; at times in peril, at others in safety ;
past Cape Adelaer, past Cape Garde, ever forward in
one incessant, monotonous struggle. And now they
approached the ill-omened Puisortok, of which Esqui-
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 53.

maux and Huropean seafarers had many an evil tale to:
tell. There, it was said, masses of ice would either shoot

up suddenly from beneath the surface of the water, and.
crush any vessel that ventured near, or would fall down

from the overhanging height, and overwhelm it. Ther>

not a word must be spoken! there must be no laughing,

no eating, no smoking, if one would pass it in safety!

Above all, the fatal name of Puisortok must not pass
the lips, else the glacier would be angry, and certain

destruction ensue.

Nansen, however, it may be said, did not observe
these regulations, and yet managed to pass it in safety.
In his opinion there was nothing very remarkable or
terrible about it.

But something else took place at Puisortok that sur-
prised him and his companions.

On July 30, as they were preparing their midday
meal, Nansen heard, amid the shrill cries of the sea--
birds, a strange weird sound. What it could be he
could not conceive. It resembled the cry of a loon
more than anything else, and kept coming nearer and
nearer. ‘Through his telescope, however, he discerned
two dark specks among the ice-floes, now close. to-
gether, now a little apart, making straight for them.
They were human beings evidently — human beings in
the midst of that desert region of ice, which they had
thought to be a barren, uninhabited waste. Balto, too,
watched their approach attentively, with a half aston-
ished, half uneasy look, for he believed them to be
supernatural beings.

On came the strangers, one of them bending forward
H
54 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

in his kayak’ as if bowing in salutation; and, on com-
ing alongside the rock, they crawled out of their ka-
yaks and stood before Nansen and his companions with
bare heads, dressed in jackets and trousers of seal-skin,
smiling, and making all manner of friendly gestures.
They were Esquimaux, and had glass beads in their
jet-black hair. Their skin was of a chestnut hue,
and their movements, if not altogether graceful, were
attractive.

On coming up to our travellers they began to ask
questions in a strange language, which, needless to say,
was perfectly unintelligible. Nansen, indeed, tried to
talk to them in Esquimau from a conversation book
in that tongue he had with him, but it was perfectly
useless. And it was not till both parties had recourse
to the language of signs that Nansen was able to ascer-
tain that they belonged to an Esquimau encampment
to the north of Puisortok.

These two Esquimaux were good-natured looking
little beings; and now they began to examine the equip-
ments of the travellers, and taste their food, with which
they seemed beyond measure pleased, expressing their
admiration at all they saw by a long-drawn kind of
bovine bellow. Finally they took leave, and set off
northward in their kayaks which they managed with
wonderful dexterity, and soon disappeared from sight.

At six the same evening our travellers followed in
the same direction, and in a short time reached the Es-
juimau encampment at Cape Bille. Long, however,

1 Kayak, small and light boat, chiefly made of sealskin, used by
the natives of Greenland.
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 55

before their eyes could detect any signs of tents or of
human beings, their sense of smell became aware of a
rank odor of train-oil, accompanied by a sound of voices;
and they presently saw numbers of Esquimaux stand-
ing on the sea-beach, and on the rocks, earnestly watch-
ing the approach of the strangers.

It was a picturesque sight that presented itself to
the eyes of our travellers.

«« All about the ledges of the rocks,” writes Nansen,
“stood long rows of strangely wild, shaggy looking crea-
tures, men, women and children — all dressed in much
the same scanty attire, staring and pointing at us, and
uttering the same cowlike sound we had heard in the
forenoon. It was just as if a whole herd of cows were
lowing one against another, as when the cowhouse door
is opened in the morning to admit the expected fod-
der.”

They were all smiling, — a smile indeed, is the only
welcoming salute of the Esquimaux, —all eager to help
Nansen and his companions ashore, chattering away in-
cessantly in their own tongue, like a saucepan boiling
and bubbling over with words, not one of which, alas,
could Nansen or his companions understand.

Presently Nansen was invited to enter one of their
tents, in which was an odor of such a remarkable na-
ture, such a blending of several ingredients, that a de-
scription thereof is impossible. It was the smell, as it
were, of a mixture of train-oil, human exhalations, and
the effluvium of fetid liquids all intimately mixed up to-
gether; while men and women, lying on the floor round
the fire, children rolling about everywhere, dogs sniff-
56 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

ing all around, helped to make up a scene that was de-
cidedly unique.

All of the occupants were of a brownish-greyish hue,
due mostly to the non-application of soap and water,
and were swarming with vermin. All of them were



EAST GREENLAND ESQUIMAUX.

shiny with train-oil, plump, laughing, chattering crea-
tures—in a word, presenting a picture of primitive
social life, in all its original blessedness.

Nansen does not consider the Esquimaux, crosseyed
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 57

and flat-featured though they be, as by any means re-
pulsive looking. The nose he describes, in the case of
children, ‘as a depression in the middle of the face,”
the reverse ideal, indeed, of a European nose.

On the whole he considers their plump, rounded
forms to have a genial appearance about them, and
that the seal is the Esquimau prototype.

The hospitality of these children of nature was
boundless. ‘They would give away all they possessed,
even to the shirt on their backs, had they possessed such
an article; and certainly showed extreme gratitude
when their liberality was reciprocated, evidently pla-
cing a high value on empty biscuit-tins, for each time
any of them got one presented to him he would at once
bellow forth his joy at the gift.

But what especially seemed to attract their interest
was when Nansen and his companions began to undress,
before turning in for the night into their sleeping-bags;
while to watch them creep out of the same the next
morning afforded them no less interest. They enter-
tained, however, a great dread of the camera, for every
time Nansen turned its dark glass eye upon them, a
regular stampede would take place.

Next day Nansen and the Esquimaux parted com-
pany, some of the latter proceeding on their way to the
south, others accompanying him on his journey north-
ward. The leavetaking between the Esquimaux was
peculiar, being celebrated by cramming their nostrils
full of snuff from each other’s snuff-horns. Snuff in-
deed is the only benefit, or the reverse, it seems the
Esquimaux have derived from European civilization up
58 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

to date; and is such a favourite, one might say neces-
sary, article with them that they will go on a shopping
expedition to the south to procure it, a journey that
often takes them four years to accomplish !

The journey northward was an extremely fatiguing
one, for they encountered such stormy weather that
their boats more than once narrowly escaped being
nipped in the ice. As a set-off, however, to this, the
scenery proved to be magnificent, — the floating moun-
tains of ice resembling enchanted castles, and all nature
was on a stupendous scale. Finally they reached a har-
bour on Griffenfeldt’s Island, where they enjoyed the
first hot meal they had had on their coasting expedition,
consisting of caraway soup. This meal of soup was
a great comfort to the weary and worn-out travellers.
Here a striking but silent testimony of that severe
and pitiless climate presented itself in the form of a
number of skulls and human bones lying blanched and
scattered among the rocks, evidently the remains of
Esquimaux who in times long gone by had perished
from starvation.

After an incredible amount of toil, Nansen arrived at |
a small island in the entrance of the Inugsuazmuit Fjord,
and thence proceeded to Skjoldungen where the water
was more open. Here they encamped, and were almost
eaten up by mosquitoes.

On Aug. 6 they again set out on their way north-
ward, meeting with another encampment of Esquimaux,
who were, however, so terrified at the approach of the
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 59

strangers, that they one and all bolted off to the moun-
tain, and it was not till Nansen presented them with an
empty tin box and some needles that they became re-
assured, after which they accompanied the expedition
for some little distance, and on parting gave Nansen a
quantity of dried seal’s flesh.

The farther our travellers proceeded on their journey,
the more dissatisfied and uneasy did Balto and Ravna
become. Accordingly one day Nansen took the oppor-
tunity of giving Balto a good scolding, who with tears
and sobs gave vent to his complaints, “ They had not
had food enough — coffee only three times during the
whole journey; and they had to work harder than any
beast the whole livelong day, and he would gladly give
many thousands of kroner to be safe at home once
more.”

There was indeed something in what Balto said.
‘The fare had unquestionably been somewhat scanty, and
the work severe ; and it was evident that these children
of nature, hardy though they were, could not vie with
civilized people when it became a question of endurance
for any length of time, and of risking life and taxing
one’s ability to the utmost.

Finally, on Aug. 10, the expedition reached Umivik
in a dense fog, after a very difficult journey through the
ice, and encamped for the last time on the east coast
of Greenland. Here they boiled coffee, shot a kind of
snipe, and lived like gentlemen, so that even Balto and
Rayna were quite satisfied. The former, indeed, began
intoning some prayers, as he had heard the priest in
Finmarken do, in a very masterly manner, —a pastime,
60 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

by the way, he never indulged in except he felt his life
to be quite safe.

The next day, Aug. 11, rose gloriously bright. Far
away among the distant glaciers a rumbling sound as
of cannon could be heard, while snow-covered mountains
towered high overhead, on the other side of which lay
boundless tracts of inland ice. Nansen and Sverdrup
now made a reconnoitring expedition, and did not re-
turn till five o’clock the next morning. It still required
some days to overhaul and get everything in complete
order for their journey inland; and it was not till nine
o’clock in the evening of Aug. 16, after first dragging
up on land the boats, in which a few necessary articles
of food were stored, together with a brief account of
the progress of the expedition carefully packed in a tin
box, that they commenced their journey across the in-
land ice.

Nansen and Sverdrup led the way with the large
sleigh, while the others,~each dragging a smaller one,
followed in their wake. Thus these six men, confident
of solving the problem before them, with the firm earth
beneath their feet, commenced the ascent of the moun-
tain-slope which Nansen christened “ Nordenskjéld’s
Nunatak.” 1

Their work had now begun in real earnest —a work
so severe and arduous that it would require all the
strength and powers of endurance they possessed to ac-
complish it. The ice was full of fissures, and these
had either to be circumvented or crossed, a very diffi-
cult matter with heavily laden sleighs. A covering of

1 Peaks of rock projecting above the surface of the ice.
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 61

ice often lay over these fissures, so that great caution
was required. Hence their progress was often very
slow, each man being roped to his fellow; so that if one
of them should happen to disappear into one of these
fathomless abysses, his companion could haul him up.
Such an occurrence happened more than once; for Nan-
sen as well as the others would every now and then fall
plump in up to the arms, dangling with his legs over
empty space. But it always turned out well; for pow-
erful hands took hold of the rope, and the practised
gymnasts knew how to extricate themselves.

At first the ascent was very hard work, and it will
readily be understood that the six tired men were not
sorry on the first night of their journey to crawl into
their sleeping-bags, after first refreshing the inner man
with cup after cup of hot tea.

Yet, notwithstanding all the fatigue they had under-
gone, there was so much strength left in them that
Dietrichson volunteered to go back and fetch a piece
of Gruyére cheese they had left behind when halting
for their midday meal. ‘It would be anice little morn-
ing walk,” he said, “before turning in!” And he ac-
tually went—all for the sake of a precious bit of
cheese !

Next day there was a pouring rain that wet them
through. The work of hauling the sleighs, however,
kept them warm. But later in the evening, it came
down in such torrents that Nansen deemed it advisable
to pitch the tent, and here they remained, weather-
bound, for three whole days. And long days they

were! But our travellers followed the example of
I
62 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

bruin in winter; that is, they lay under shelter the
greater part of the time, Nansen taking care that they
should also imitate bruin in another respect, — who
sleeps sucking his paw, — by giving them rations once
a day only. ‘He who does no work shall have little
food,” was his motto.

On the forenoon of the twentieth, however, the
weather improved; and our travellers again set out on
their journey, having fist indulged in a good warm
meal by way of recompense for their three days’ fasting.
The ice at first was very difficult, so much so that they
had to retrace their steps, and, sitting on their sleighs,
slide down the mountain slope. But the going im-
proved, as also did the weather. “If it would only
freeze a little,” sighed Nansen. But he was to get
enough of frost before long.

On they tramped, under a broiling sun, over the
slushy snow. As there was no drinking-water to be
had, they filled their flasks with snow, carrying them
in their breast-pockets for the heat of their bodies to
melt it.

On Aug. 22 there was a night frost; the snow was
hard and in good condition, but the surface so rough and
full of lumps and frozen waves of slush, that the ropes
with which they dragged the sleighs cut and chafed
their shoulders. “It was just as if our shoulders were
being burnt,’’ Balto said.

They now travelled mostly by night, for it was
better going then, and there was no sun to broil them;
while the aurora borealis, bathing as it were the whole
of the frozen plain in a flood of silvery light, inspired
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 63

them with fresh courage. The surface of the ice over
which they travelled was as smooth and even as a lake
newly frozen over. Even Balto on such occasions would
indulge in a few oaths, a thing he never allowed him-
self except when he felt “master of the situation.” He
was a Finn, you see, and perhaps had no other way of
giving expression to his feelings!

As they got into higher altitudes the cold at night
became more intense. Occasionally they were over-
taken by a snowstorm, when they had to encamp in
order to avoid being frozen to death; while at times,
again, the going would become so heavy in the fine
drifting snow that they had to drag their sleighs one
by one, three or four men at a time to each sleigh, an
operation involving such tremendous exertion that Kris-
tiansen, a man of few words, on one such occasion said
to Nansen, “What fools people must be to let them-
selves in for work like this! ”

To give some idea of the intense cold they had to
encounter it may be stated that, at the highest altitude
they reached, — 9,272 feet above the sea, — the temper-
ature fell to below — 49° Fahrenheit, and this, too, in
the tent at night, the thermometer being under Nansen’s
pillow. And all this toil and labour, be it remembered,
went on from Aug. 16 to the end of September, with
sleighs weighing on an average about two hundred and
twenty pounds each, in drifting snow-dust, worse than
even the sandstorms of Sahara.

In order to lighten their labour, Nansen resolved to
use sails on the sleighs—a proceeding which Balto
highly disapproved of: “Such mad people he had




Cie ae FRIDTJOF NANSEN.-

never seen before, to want to sail over the snow! He
was a Lapp, he was, and there was nothing they could
teach him on land. It was the greatest nonsense he
had ever heard of! ”

Sails, however, were fortlicoming, notwithstanding
Balto’s objections ; and they sat and stitched them with
frozen fingers in the midst of the snow. But it was

















pee



SLEDGING ACROSS GREENLAND.

astonishing what a help they proved to be; and so they
proceeded on their way, after slightly altering their
course in the direction of Godthaab.t

Thus, then, we see these solitary beings, looking like
dark spots moving on an infinite expanse of snow,

1 Godthaab (pron. Gott-hob), the only city, and seat of the Danish
governor, on the west coast of Greenland.
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. - 65

wending their way ever onward, — Nansen and Sver-
drup side by side, ski-staff and ice-axe in hand, in
front, earnestly gazing ahead as they dragged the heavy
sleigh, while close behind followed Dietrichson and
Kristiansen, Balto and Ravna bringing up the rear,
each dragging a smaller sleigh. So it went on for
weeks; and though it tried their strength, and put
their powers of endurance to a most severe test, yet, if
ever the thought of “ giving it up ” arose in their minds,
it was at.once scouted by all the party, the two Lapps
excepted. One day Balto complained loudly to Nan-
sen.. “ When you asked us,” he said, “in Christiania,
what weight we could drag, we told you we could
manage one hundredweight each, but now we have
double that weight, and all I can say is, that, if we can
drag these loads over to the west coast, we are stronger
than horses.”

Onward, however, they went, in spite of the cold,
which at times was so intense that their beards froze
fast to their jerseys, facing blinding snowstorms that
well-nigh made old Ravna desperate. The only bright
moments they enjoyed were when sleeping or at their
meals. ‘The sleeping-bags, indeed, were a paradise ;
their meals, ideals of perfect bliss.

Unfortunately, Nansen had not taken a sufficient
supply of fatty food with him, and to such an extent
did the craving for fat go, that Sverdrup one day seri-
ously suggested that they should eat boot-grease — a
compound of boiled grease and old linseed oil! Their
great luxury was to eat raw butter, and smoke a pipe
after it. First they would smoke the fragrant weed


66 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

pure and simple; when that was done, the tobacco ash,
followed by the oil as long as it would burn; and when
this was all exhausted, they would smoke tarred yarn,
or anything else that was a bit tasty! Nansen, who
neither smoked nor chewed, would content himself with
a chip of wood, or a sliver off one of the “truger”
(snowshoes). “It tasted good,” he said, “and kept his
mouth moist.”

Finally, on Sept. 14, they had reached their highest
altitude, and now began to descend toward the coast,
keeping a sharp lookout for “land ahead.” But none
was yet to be seen, and one day Rayna’s patience com-
pletely gave way. With sobs and moans he said to
Nansen, —

“T’m an old Fjeld-Lapp, and a silly old fool! Pm
sure we shall never get to the coast!”

“Yes,” was the curt answer, “it’s quite true! Rayna
is a silly old fool! ”

One day, however, shortly afterward, while they were
at dinner, they heard the twittering of a bird close by.
It was a snow-bunting, bringing them a greeting from
the west coast, and their hearts grew warm within them
at the welcome sound.

On the next day, with sails set, they proceeded on-
ward down the sloping ground, but with only partial
success. Nansen was standing behind the large sleigh
to steady it, while Sverdrup steered from the front.
Merrily flew the bark; but, unfortunately, Nansen
stumbled and fell, and had hard work to regain his
legs, and harder work still to gather up sundry articles
that had fallen off the sleigh, such as boxes of pem-
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 67

mican, fur jackets, and ice-axes. Meanwhile Sverdrup
and the ship had almost disappeared from view, and all
that Nansen could see of it was a dark, square speck,
far ahead across the ice. Sverdrup had been sitting all
the while in front, thinking what an admirable passage
they were making, and was not a little astonished, on
looking behind, to find that he was the only passenger
on board. Matters, however, went on better after this;
and in the afternoon, as they were sailing their best and
fastest, the joyful cry of “Land ahead!” rang through
the air. The west coast was in sight! | After several
days’ hard work across fissures and over uneven ice,
the coast itself was finally reached. But Godthaab was
a long, long way off still, and to reach it by land was
sheer impossibility.

The joy of our travellers on once more feeling firm
ground beneath their feet, and of getting real water to
drink, was indescribable. They swallowed quart after
quart, till they could drink no more. The Lapps, as
usual took themselves off to the fjeld to testify their joy.

That evening was the most delightful one they had
experienced for weeks, one never to be forgotten in
after years, when, with their tent pitched, and a blazing
fire of wood, they sat beside it, Sverdrup smoking a pipe
of moss in lieu of tobacco, and Nansen lying on his back
on the grass, which shed a strange and delightful per-
fume all around. 5

But how was Godthaab to be reached? By land it
was impossible! Therefore the journey must be made
by sea! But there was no boat! A boat, then, must
be built. And Sverdrup and Nansen were the men to
68 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

solve the problem. They set to work, and by evening
the boat was finished. Its dimensions were eight feet
five inches in length, four feet eight inches in breadth,
and it was made of willows and sail-cloth. The oars
were of bamboo and willow branches, across the blades
of which canvas was stretched. The thwarts were made
from bamboo, and the foot of one of their scientific in-





ON THE WAY TO GODTHAAB.

struments, which, by the way, chafed them terribly, and
were very uncomfortable seats.

_ All preparations being now made, Nansen and Sver-
drup set off on their adventurous journey. The first day
it was terribly hard work, for the water was too shallow
to admit of rowing. On the second day, however, they
put out to sea. Here they had at times to encounter
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 69

severe weather, fearing every moment lest their frail
bark should be swamped or capsized. At night they
would sleep on the naked shore beneath the open sky.
From morning till night struggling away with their
oars, living on hot soup and the sea-birds they shot,
which were ravenously devoured without much labour
being devoted to cooking the same. Finally they
reached their destination, meeting with a hearty wel-
come, accompanied by a salute from cannon fired off in
their honor, when once it was ascertained who the new
arrivals were.

Nansen’s first inquiry was about a ship for Denmark,
and he learned, to his great disappointment, that the
last vessel for the season had sailed from Godthaab two
months before, and that the nearest ship, the Fox, was
lying at Ivitgut, three hundred miles off.

It was a terrible blow in the midst of their joy.
Home had, as it were, at one stroke receded many
hundreds of miles away; and here they would have
to pass a whole winter and spring, while dear ones
_ at home would think they had perished, and would
be mourning for their supposed loss all those weary
months.

But this must never be! The Fox must be got at,
and friends at home must at all events get letters by her.

After a great deal of trouble Nansen at length found
an Esquimau who agreed to set off in his kayak bear-
ing two letters. One was from Nansen to Gamel, who
had equipped the expedition; the other from Sverdrup
to his father.

This having been arranged, and boats having been
K
70 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

sent off to fetch their comrades from Ameralikfjord,
Nansen and Sverdrup plunged into all the joys and de-
lights of civilized life to which they had so long been
strangers. Now they were able to indulge in the lux-
ury of soap and water for the first time since the com-
mencement of their journey across the ice. ‘To change
their clothes, to sleep in proper beds, to eat civilized
food with knives and forks on earthenware plates, to
smoke, to converse with educated beings, was to them
the summum bonum of enjoyment, and they felt them-
selves to be in clover.

Notwithstanding all these, Nansen aia not seem alto-
gether himself. He was in a dreamy state, thinking
perhaps of nights spent in sleeping-bags up on the
inland ice, or dreaming of that memorable evening in
the Ameralikfjord, of the hard struggles they had under-
gone on the boundless plains of snow. These things
flashed across him, excluding from his mind the convic-
tion that he had rendered his name famous.

At last, on Oct. 12, the other members of the ex-
pedition joined them, and these six men, who had risked
their lives in that perilous adventure, were once more
assembled together.

His object had been attained, and the name of Fridtjof
Nansen would soon be known the whole world over!

That same autumn the Fox brought to Norway .
tidings of the success of the expedition, and a few hours
after her arrival the telegraph announced throughout
the length and breadth of the civilized world, in few
but significant words, “ Fridtjof Nansen has crossed dver
the inland ice of Greenland.”
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 71

And the Norwegian nation, which had refused to
grant the venturesome young man 5,000 kroner (nearly
£278), now raised her head, and called Fridtjof Nansen
one of her best sons. And when one day in April, after
having spent a long winter in Greenland, he went on
board the Hyvidbjérn? on his homeward journey, prepa-
rations were being made in the capital for a festival
such as a king receives when he visits his subjects.

It was May 30: the spring sun was shining with
all its brilliancy over Norway. The Christiania fjord
was teeming with yachts and small sailing-boats. A
light breeze played over the ruffled surface of the water,
while the perfume of the budding trees on its banks
shed a sweet fragrance all around. As for the town,
it literally swarmed with human beings. The quays,
the fortress, the very roofs of the houses, were densely
packed with eager crowds, all of them intently gazing
seaward. Presently a shout of welcome heard faintly
in the distance announced his approach, gradually in-
creasing in volume as he came nearer, till it merged
into one continuous roar, while thousands of flags were
waving overhead.

Eagerly the crowds pressed forward to catch the first
glimpse of his form, and when they did recognize him,
their hurrahs burst forth like a storm, and were caught
up in the streets, answered from the windows, from the
tops of houses; and when they ceased for a moment
from the sheer exhaustion of those who uttered them,
they were soon renewed with redoubled vigor. And
when finally Nansen had disembarked and had entered

1 Ividbjérn (pron. Vid-byurn), The White Bear, a trading-vessel.
72 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

a carriage, the police could no longer keep the people
under control. As if with one accord they dashed for-
ward, and taking out the horses, harnessed themselves
in their place, and dragged him through the streets of
the city in triumph.

Yes, the Norwegian people had taken possession of
Fridtjof Nansen !

But up at a window there stood the old housekeeper
from Store Fréen, waving her white apron, while tears of
joy trickled down her face. She it was who had bound
up his bleeding head when years ago he had fallen and
cut it on the ice; she it was to whom he had often gone
when in some childish scrape. He remembered her in
his hour of triumph. And as she was laughing and
crying by turns, and waving her apron, he dashed up
the steps and gave her a loving embrace.

For was she not part and parcel of his home ?
FRIDIJOF NANSEN. 73

CHAPTER VI.

ENGAGEMENT AND MARRIAGE. — HoME-LIFE. — PLANNING THE POLAR
EXPEDITION.

Two months after Nansen had returned home from
his Greenland expedition he became engaged to Eva
Sars, daughter of the late Professor Sars, and was mar-
ried to her the same autumn. Her mother was the
sister of the poet Welhaven.

The following story of his engagement is related :—

“On the night of Aug. 12 a shower of gravel and
small pebbles rattled against the panes of a window in
the house where I*ridtjof Nansen’s half-sister lived. He
was very fond of her, and of her husband also, who had
indeed initiated him in the use of gun and rod, and who
had taken him with him, when a mere lad, on many a
sporting excursion to Nordmarken.

“On hearing this unusual noise at the dead of night,
his brother-in-law jumped out of bed in no very amiable
frame of mind, and opening the window, called out,
‘What is it?’

«“<¢T want to come in!’ said a tall figure dressed in
gray, from the street below.

“A volley of expletives greeted the nocturnal visitor,
who kept on saying, ‘I want to come in.’

“Before long Fridtjof Nansen was standing in his
sister’s bedroom at two o’clock in the morning.
74 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

“Raising herself up in the bed, she said, ‘ But,
Fridtjof, whatever is it?’

«¢T’m engaged to be married — that’s all!’ was the
laconic reply.

“Engaged! But with whom?’

“Why, with Eva, of course!’

«Then he said he felt very hungry, and his brother-
in-law had to take a journey into the larder and fetch out
some cold meat, and then down into the cellar after
a bottle of champagne. Ilis sister’s bed served for a
table, and a new chapter in ‘ Fridtjof’s saga’ was inau-
gurated at this nocturnal banquet.”

The story goes, Nansen first met his future wife
in a snowdrift. One day, it appears, when up in the
Frogner woods, he espied two little boots sticking up
out of the snow. Curiosity prompted him to go and
see to whom the said boots belonged, and as he ap-
proached for that purpose, a little snow be-sprinkled
head peered up at him. It was Eva Sars!

What gives this anecdote interest is that it was out
of the snow and the cold to which he was to dedicate
his life, she, who became dearer to him than life itself,
first appeared.

Another circumstance connected therewith worthy
of note is that Eva Sars was a person of rather a cold
and repellent nature, and gave one the impression that
there was a good deal of snow in her disposition.
Hence the reason perhaps why she kept aloof rather
than attracted those who would know her. Fridtjof
Nansen, however, was not the man to be deterred by
coldness. He was determined to win her, even if he
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 7d

should have to cross the inland ice of Greenland for
that purpose.

But when she became his wife all the reserve and
coldness of her nature disappeared. She took the warm-
est interest in his plans, participated in his work, mak-
ing every sacrifice a woman can make to promote his
purpose. In all his excursions in the open air she ac-
companied him; and when she knew that he was
making preparations for another expedition, one involy-
ing life itself, not a murmur escaped her lips. And
when the hour of parting came at last, and a long,
lonely time of waiting lay before her, she broke out into
song. For in those dreary years of hope deferred she
developed into an accomplished songstress; and when
the fame of Nansen’s exploit resounded throughout
the whole north, the echo of her song answered in. joy-
ful acclaim. The maidens of Norway listening to her
spirited strains, and beholding this brave little woman
with her proudly uplifted head, learnt from Eva Nansen
that such was the way in which a woman should meet
a sorrow —such the way in which she should undergo
a time of trial.

The following story, in Nansen’s own words, will
serve to give an idea of the sort of woman she was:

“Tt was New Year’s Eve, 1890. Eva and I had
gone on a little trip to Kréderen,! and we determined to
get to the top of Norefjeld. We slept at Olberg, and,
feeling rather lazy next morning, did not set out till

. 1 Kréderen, a lake about forty miles to the northwest of Christiania.
Norefjeld, 2 mountain on the west side of the lake. Olberg, a farmhouse
at the foot of the mountain.
76 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

nearly noon. We took it very easily, moreover! Even
in summer-time it is a stiff day’s work to clamber up
Norefjeld; but in winter, when the days are short, one
has to look pretty sharp to reach the top while it is
light. Moreover, the route we chose, though perhaps
the most direct, was not by any means the shortest.
The snow lay very deep; and soon it became. impossible
to go on ski, the ascent being so steep, that we had to
take them off and carry them. However, we had made
up our minds to reach the top; for it would never do to
turn back after having gone half-way, difficult though
the ascent might be. The last part of our journey was
the most trying of all; I had to cut out steps with my
ski-staff to get a foothold in the frozen snow. I went
in front, and Eva followed close behind me. It really
seemed that we slipped two steps backward for every
one we took forward. At last we reached the top; it
was pitch dark, and we had been going from ten A.M. to
five P.M., without food. But, thank goodness, we had
some cheese and pemmican with us,-so we sat down on
the snow, and ate it.

«© Yes! there were we two alone on the top of Nore-
fjeld, five thousand feet above the sea, with a biting
wind blowing that made our cheeks tingle, and the
darkness growing thicker and thicker every moment.
Far away in the west there was a faint glimmer of day-
light, — of the last day of the old year, —just enough
to guide us by. The next thing to be done was to get
down to Eggedal. From where we were it was a dis-
tance of about six and one-half miles, a matter of little
consequence in broad daylight, but in the present in-
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. TT

stance no joke, I can assure you! lHowever, it had to
be done. So off we started, I leading the way, Eva
following.

“We went like the wind down the slope, but had
to be very careful. When one has been out in the dark
some little time, it is just as if the snow gives out
a faint light — though light it cannot really be termed,
but a feeble kind of shimmer. Goodness only knows
how we managed to get down, but get down we did!
As it was too steep to go on ski, there was nothing for
it but to squat and slide down —a kind of locomotion
detrimental, perhaps, to one’s breeches, but under the
circumstances unquestionably the safest mode of pro-
ceeding in the dark!

«When we had got half-way down my hat blew off.
So I had to ‘put the brake on,’ and get up on my legs,
and go after it. Far away above me I got a glimpse of
a dark object on the snow, crawled after it, got up to
it, and grasped it, to find it was only a stone! My hat,
then, must be further up. Surely that was it—again I
got hold of a stone! The snow seemed to be alive
with stones. Hat after hat, hat after hat, but when-
ever I tried to put it on my head, it turned out to be a
stone. A stone for bread is bad enough, and stones for
hats are not a bit better! So I had to give it up, and
go hatless.

“ Eva had been sitting waiting for me all this while. °
‘Eva,’ I shouted, and a faint answer came back from
below.

“Those miles seemed to be uncommonly long ones.

Every now and then we could use our ski, and then it
L
78 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

would become so steep again that we had to carry them.
At last we came to a standstill. There was a chasm
right in front of us,—how deep it was it was too dark
to ascertain. However, we bundled over it somehow or
other, and happily the snow was very deep. It is quite
incredible how one can manage to get over a difficulty !

‘As regards our direction, we had lost it completely ;
all we knew was that we must get down into the valley.
Again we came to a standstill, and Eva had to wait
while I went on, groping in the dark, trying to find a
way. I was absent on this errand some little time.
Presently it occurred to me, ‘ What if she should have
fallen asleep!’

“¢Eva!’ I shouted, ‘Eva!’ Yes, she answered;
but she must be a long way above where I was. If she
had been asleep it would have been a difficult matter to
have found her. But I groped my way up-hill to her,
with the consolation that I had found the bed of a
stream. Now the bed of a stream is not very well
adapted for ski, especially when it is pitch dark, and
the stomach is empty, and conscience pricks you, — for
really I ought not to have ventured on such an expedi-
tion with her. However, ‘all’s well that ends well,’
and we got through all right.

“We had now got down to the birch scrub, and at
last found our road.

“« After some little time we passed a cabin. I thought
it wouldn’t be a bad place to take refuge in, but Eva
said it was so horribly dirty! She was full of spirits
now, and voted for going on. So on we went, and in
due time reached the parish clerk’s house in Eggedal.
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 79

Of course the inmates were in bed, so we had to arouse
them. The clerk was horrified when I told him we |
had just come from the top of Norefjeld. This time
liva was not so nice about lodgings, for no sooner
had she sat down on a chair, than she fell asleep. It
was midnight, mind you, and she had been in harness
fourteen hours.

“¢He ’s a bit tired, poor lad!’ said the clerk. For
Eva had on a ski-dress with a very small skirt, trousers,
and a Lapp fur cloak.

“¢That’s my wife,’ I replied, whereupon he burst out
into a laugh. ‘Nay, nay! to drag his wife with him
over the top of Norefjeld on New Year’s Eve!’ he said.

“Presently he brought in something to eat, for we
were famished; and when Eva smelt it wasn’t cheese
and pemmican, she woke up.

“‘ We rested here three days. Yes, it had been a New
Year’s Eve trip. A very agreeable one in my opinion,
but I’m not so sure Eva altogether agreed with me!

“Two days later I and the ‘poor little lad’ drove
through Numedal to Kongsberg in nine degrees below
zero (Fahrenheit), which nearly froze the little fellow.
But it is not a bad thing occasionally to have to put up
with some inconveniences —you appreciate comforts
afterward so much the more. He who has never ex-
perienced what cold is, does not really know the mean-
ing of warmth!”

. . °

The day after the wedding the newly married pair
set out for Newcastle, where there was to be a meeting
80 : FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

of the Geographical Society, travelling via Gothenburg,
Hamburg, and London. After this they went to Stock-
holm, and here Nansen was presented with the “« Vega”
medal by His Majesty. This was a distinguished honour,
the more so as it had hitherto only been awarded to five
persons, among whom were Stanley and Nordenskjéld.
Nansen subsequently was presented with several medals
in foreign countries, and was made a Knight of the
Order of St. Olaf and Danebrog.

On their return from Stockholm to Norway, Nansen
and his wife took apartments at Marte Larsen’s, the
old housekeeper at Store Fréen, and stayed there two
months, after which they took a house on the Drammen
road. But they did not enjoy themselves there, and
Nansen determined to build a house, for which purpose
he bought a site at Svartebugta, near Lysakert It was
here that, as a boy, he had often watched for wild
ducks. It was a charming spot, moreover, and within
easy distance of the town. The house was finished in
the spring of 1890. During the whole of the winter,
while building operations were going on, they lived in
an icy cold pavillion near Lysaker railway station.

“It was here he weaned me from freezing,” says
Eva Nansen.

In this wretched habitation, where the water froze
in the bedroom at night, Nansen would sit and work at
his book on Greenland, and when he had time would
superintend the building of the new house. It was
called “ Godthaab”? —a name given it by Bjérnstjerne
Bjornson.

1 Lysaker, a railroad station about four miles west of Christiania.
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 81

In the autumn of this year Nansen set out on a
lengthened lecturing tour, accompanied by his wife.
He lectured in Copenhagen, London, Berlin, and Dres-
den, about his Greenland experiences, and also about
the projected expedition to the North Pole. Every-
where people were attracted by his captivating indi-
viduality ; but most thought this new expedition too
venturesome. Even the most experienced Arctic ex-
plorers shook their heads, for they thought that, from
such a daring enterprise, not a single member of the
expedition would ever return alive.

But Nansen adhered to his own opinions, and we see
him in the intervening years occupied with the equip-
ment required for an expedition to the polar regions
—a work so stupendous that the preparations for the
Greenland expedition were but child’s play in compari-
son.
82 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

CHAPTER VII.

PREPARATIONS FOR THE POLAR EXPEDITION. —STARTING FROM Nor—
WAY. — JOURNEY ALONG THE SIBERIAN COAsT.

NANSEN’S theory as regards the expedition to the
North Pole was as simple as it was daring. He believed
that he had discovered the existence of a current pass-
ing over the pole, and of this he would avail himself.
His idea, in fact, was to work his way into the ice
among the New Siberian Islands, let his vessel be fast:
frozen into the drift-ice, and be carried by the current:
over the Pole to the east coast of Greenland. There
articles had been found on ice-floes that had unquestion-
ably belonged to former Arctic expeditions, a fact that
convinced him of the existence of such a current.

It might take some years for a vessel to drift all that.
way; he must, therefore, make his preparations accord-
ingly. Such at all events was Nansen’s theory —a
theory which, it must be said, few shared with him. For
none of the world’s noted explorers of those regions be-
lieved in the existence of such a current, and people
generally termed the scheme, “a madman’s idea! ”

Nansen, therefore, stood almost alone in this, and
yet not altogether alone, either. For the Norwegian
people who would not sacrifice £278 for the Greenland
expedition gave him now ina lump sum 280,000 kroner:
(nearly £11,386). They were convinced of his gigantic.


FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 83

powers, and when the Norwegians are fully convinced
of a thing, they are willing to make any sacrifice to
carry it out. They believed in him now!

Nansen then set to work in earnest at his gigantic
undertaking.

First of all a vessel must be designed, — one that
would be able to defy the ice. Availing himself, there-
fore, of the services of the famous shipbuilder, Colin
Archer, he had the Fram! built—a name suggestive of
noble achievements to the youth of Norway.

On Oct. 26, 1892, she was launched at Laurvig.
During the previous night the temperature had been
fourteen degrees above zero, and a slight sprinkling of
snow had covered valley and height with a thin veil of
white. The morning sun peered through the mist with
that peculiar hazy light that foretells a bright winter
day.

At the station at Laurvig, Nansen waited to receive
his guests. A whaler, with a crow’s-nest on her fore-
top, was lying in the harbor, to convey the visitors to
the spot where the Fram was lying on the stocks.

In the bay at Reykjavik the huge hull of a vessel may
be seen raised up on the beach, with her stern toward
the sea. It is Fridtjof Nansen’s new ship that is now
. to be launched. She is a high vessel, of great beam,
painted black below and white above. Three stout
‘masts of American pitch-pine are lying by her side on
the quay, while three flagstaffs, two of them only with
flags flying, rear themselves up aloft on her deck. The
flag which is to be run up the bare staff is to bear the



1 Fram means onward.

Ee
84 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

vessel’s name — unknown as yet. Everybody is won-
dering what that name will be, and conjectures whether
it will be Eva, Leif, Norway, Northpole, are rife.

Crowds of spectators are assembled at the wharf,
while as many have clambered upon the adjacent rocks.
But around the huge ship, which lies on the slips firmly
secured with iron chains, are standing groups of stal-
wart, weather-beaten men in working attire. They are
whalers, who for years have frequented the polar seas
and braved its dangers, and are now attentively exam-
ining and criticising the new ship’s construction. A
goodly number, too, of workmen are there, —the men
who built the ship; and they are looking at their work
with feelings of pride. And-yonder is the vessel’s
architect, — that stately, earnest-looking man with tne
long, flowing white beard, — Colin Archer.

And now, accompanied by his wife, Nansen ascends
the platform that has been erected in the ship’s bow.
Mrs. Nansen steps forward, breaks a bottle of cham-
pagne on the prow, and in clear, ringing tones declares,
“Fram is her name.” At the same moment a flag on
which the vessel’s name can be read in white letters on
a red ground, is run up to the top of the bare flagstaff.

The last bands and chains are quickly removed, and
the ponderous mass glides, stern first, slowly down the
incline, but with ever-increasing velocity, toward the
water. For a moment some anxiety is felt lest she
should sink or get wedged; but as soon as her bows
touch the water the stern rises up, and the Fram floats
proudly on the sea, and is then at once moored fast
with warps to the quay.










CREW OF THE

FRAM.

M
86 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

Meanwhile Nansen stood beside his wife, and all eyes
turned toward them. But not a trace of anxiety or
doubt could be discerned on his frank and open counte-
nance; for he possessed that faith in his project that is
able to remove mountains.

The next matter of importance was to select the crew.
There was ample material to choose from, for hundreds
of volunteers from abroad offered themselves, besides
Norwegians. But it was a Norwegian expedition —her
crew, then, must be exclusively a national crew! And
so Otto Sverdrup, who had earned his laurels in the
Greenland expedition ; Sigurd Scott-Hansen, first lieu-
tenant in the royal navy; Henrik Greve Blessing, sur-
geon; Theodor Claudius Jacobsen and Adolf Juell of
the mercantile marine; Anton Amundsen and Lars
Petterson, engineers ; Frederik Hjalmar Johansen, lieu-
tenant of the royal army reserve, Peter Leonard Hen-
tiksen, harpooner; Bernt Nordahl, electrician; Ivar
Otto Irgens Mogstad, head keeper at the lunatic asylum;
and Bernt Berntsen, common sailor, — were selected.
Most of them were married and had children.

Sverdrup was to be the Fram’s commander, for Nan-
sen knew that the ship would be safer in his hands
.than in his own.

Finally, after an incredible deal of hard work in get-
ting everything in order, the day of their departure
arrived.

It was midsummer—a dull, gloomy day. The
Fram, heavily laden, is lying at Pipperviken Quay,
waiting for Nansen. The appointed hour is past, and
yet there are no signs of him. Members of the stor-
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 87

thing, who had assembled there to bid him farewell,
can wait no longer, and the crowds of people that line
the quay are one and all anxiously gazing over the
fjord.

But presently a quick-sailing little petroleum boat
heaves in sight. It swings round Dyna,! and quickly
lies alongside the Fram; and Nansen goes on board
his ship at once, and gives the order to “go ahead.”
Every eye is fixed on him. He is as calm as ever, firm
as a rock, but his face is pale.

The anchor is weighed ; and after making the tour
of the little creek, the Fram steams down the fjord.
“‘ Full speed” is the command issued from the bridge ;
and as she proceeds on her way, Nansen turns round to
take a farewell look over Svartebugta where Godthaab
lies. He discerns a glimpse of a woman’s form dressed
in white by the bench under the fir-tree, and then turns
his face away ; it was there he had bidden her farewell.
Little Liv, his only child, had been carried by her
mother, crowing and smiling, to bid father good-by, and
he had taken her in his arms.

“Yes, you smile, little one!” he said; “but I”? —
and he sobbed.

This had taken place but an hour before. And now
he was standing on the bridge alone, leaving all he
held dear behind.

The twelve men who accompanied him, — they, too,
had made sacrifices, — each had his own sorrow to meet
at this hour; but at the word of command, one and all
went about their duty as if nothing was amiss.

1 Dyna, an islet with a lighthouse in Christiania harbor.
88 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

For the first few days it was fine weather, but on
getting out as far as Lindesnes?! it became very stormy.
The ship rolled like a log, and seas broke over the rails
on both sides. Great fear was entertained lest the deck
cargo should be carried overboard, a contingency, in-
deed, that soon occurred; for twenty-five empty paraffin _
casks broke loose from their lashings, and a quantity of
reserve timber balks followed.

“Tt was an anxious time,” says Nansen. “Seasick I
stood on the bridge, alternately offering libations to the
gods of the sea, and trembling for the safety of the boats
and of the men who were trying to make snug what they
could on deck. Now a green sea poured over us, and
knocked one fellow off his legs so that he was deluged ;
now the lads were jumping over hurtling spars to avoid
getting their feet crushed. ‘There was not a dry thread
on them. Juell was lying asleep in the ‘ Grand Hotel,’
as we called one of the long boats, and awoke to find
the sea roaring under him. I met him at the cabin door
as he came running down. Once the Fram buried her
bows and shipped a sea over the forecastle. One fellow
was clinging to the anchor davits over the foaming
water; it was poor Juell again.”

Then all the casks, besides a quantity of timber, had
to be thrown overboard. Itwas, indeed, an anxious time.

But fine weather came at last, and Bergen turned
out to meet them in brilliant sunshine. Then on again,
along the wonderful coast of Norway, while the people
on shore stood gazing after them, marvelling as they
passed.

1 Cape Lindesnexs, the southernmost point of Norway.
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 89

At Beian! Sverdrup joined the ship, and Berntsen,
the thirteenth member of the crew, at Tromsé.2

Still onward toward the north, till finally the last
glimpse of their native country faded from their sight
in the hazy horizon, and a dense fog coming on envel-
oped them in its shroud. They were to have met the
Urania, laden with coal, in Jugor straits; but as that
vessel had not arrived, and time was precious, the Fram
proceeded on her course, after having shipped a num-
ber of Esquimau dogs which a Russian, named Tron-
theim, had been commissioned to procure for the
expedition. It was here that Nansen took leave of his
secretary, Cristophersen, who was to return by the
Urania; and the last tie that united them with Norway
was severed.

The Fram now heads out from the Jugor straits
into the dreaded Kara sea, which many had prophesied
would be her destruction. But they worked their way
through storm and ice, at times satisfactorily, at others
encountering slight mishaps; but the Fram proved her-
self to be a reliable iceworthy vessel, and Nansen felt
more and more convinced that, when the ice-pressure
began in real earnest, she would acquit herself well.

“Tt was a royal pleasure,” he writes, “to take her
into difficult ice. She twists and turns like a ball on a
plate —and so strong! If she runs into a floe at full
speed, she scarcely utters a sound, only quivers a little,
perhaps.”

1 Beian (pron. By-an), a village and stopping-place for the coast-
wise steamers in northern Norway, near Trondhjem.

2 Tromsé, the chief city and bishop’s see of the bishopric of same
name, the northernmost diocese in Norway.
90 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

When, as was often the case, they had to anchor on
account of bad weather, Nansen and his companions
would go ashore, either for the purpose of taking obser-
vations or for sport. One day they shot two bears and
sundry reindeer; but, when they started to row back to
the Fram in the evening, they had a severe task before
them. For a strong breeze was blowing, and the cur-
rent was dead against them. “We rowed as if our
finger-tips would burst,” says Nansen, ‘but could hardly
make any headway. ‘So we had to go in under land
again to get out of the current. But no sooner did
we set out for the Fram again than we got into it
once more, and then the whole mancsuvre had to be re-
peated, with the same result. Presently a buoy was
lowered from the ship; if we could only reach it, all
would be right. But no such luck was in store for
-us yet. We would make one more desperate effort,
and we rowed with a will, every muscle of our bodies
strained to the utmost. But to our vexation we now
saw the buoy being hauled up. We rowed a little to
the windward of the Fram, and then tried again to
sheer over. This time we got nearer her than we had
been before, but still no buoy was thrown over — not
even a man was to be seen on deck. We roared like
madmen,” writes Nansen, “for a buoy —we had no
strength left for another attempt. It was not a pleas-
ing prospect to have to drift back, and go ashore again
in our wet clothes, —we would get on board! Once
more we yelled like wild Indians, and now they came
rushing aft, and threw out the buoy in our direction.
We put our last strength into our oars. There were
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 91

only a few boat-lengths to cover, and the lads bent
flat over the thwarts. Now only three boat-lengths.
Another desperate spurt! Now only two and a half
boat-lengths — presently two — then only one!
more frantic pulls, and there was a little less. ‘Now,
my lads, one or two more hard pulls — keep to it! —
Now another— don’t give in—one more —there we
have it!’ And a joyful sigh of relief passed round the
boat. ‘Keep her going, or the rope will break — row,
my lads!’ And row we did, and soon they had hauled
us alongside the Fram. Not till we were lying there,
getting our bearskins and flesh hauled on board, did we
realize what we had had to fight against. The current
was running along the side of the ship like a millstream.
At last we were on board. It was evening by this time,
and it was a comfort to get some hot food, and then
stretch one’s limbs in a comfortable, dry berth.”

The Fram proceeded on her course the next day,
passing a number of unknown islands, to which Nansen
gave names. Among these were Scott-Hansen’s Is-
lands, Ringnes, Mohns, etc.

On Sept. 6, the anniversary of Nansen’s wedding,
they passed Taimar Island, and after a prosperous pas-
sage through open water reached Cape Tscheljuskin on
Sept. 9.

Nansen was sitting in the crow’s nest that evening.
The weather was perfectly still, and the sky lay in a
dream of gold and yellow. A solitary star was visible;
it stood directly over Cape Tscheljuskin, twinkling
brightly, though sadly, in the pale sky overhead. As
the vessel proceeded on her course it seemed to follow
92 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

them. There was something about that star that at-
tracted Nansen’s attention, and brought him peace. It
was as it were zs star, and he felt that she who was at
home was sending him a message by it. Meanwhile the
Fram toiled on through the gloomy melancholy of the
night out into the unknown.

In the morning, when the sun rose up, a salute was
fired, and high festival held on board.

A few days later a herd of walrus was sighted. It
was a lovely morning, and perfectly calm, so that they
could distinctly hear their bellowings over the clear
surface of the water, as they lay in a heap on an ice-
floe, the blue mountains -glittering in the sunlight in
the background.

“My goodness, what a lot of meat!” ejaculated
Juell, the cook. And at once Nansen, Juell, and Hen-
riksen set out after them, Juell rowing, Nansen armed
with a gun, and Henriksen with a harpoon. On getting
to close quarters Henriksen threw the harpoon at the
nearest walrus, but it struck too high, and glanced off
the tough hide, and went skipping over the rounded
backs of the others. Now all was stir and life. Ten
or a dozen of the bulky animals waddled with up-
raised heads to the extreme edge of the floe, whereupon
Nansen took aim at the largest, and fired. The brute
staggered, and fell headlong into the water. Another
bullet into a second walrus was attended with the same
result, and the rest of the herd plunged into the water,
so that it boiled and seethed. Soon, however, they were
up again, all around the boat, standing upright in the
water, bellowing and roaring till the air shook. Every

yo?
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 93

now and then they would make a dash toward the boat,
then dive, and come up again. The sea boiled like a
cauldron, and every moment they seemed about to dash
their tusks through the side of the boat, and capsize it.
Fortunately, however, this did not occur. . Walrus after
walrus was shot by Nansen, while Henriksen was busy
with his harpoon to prevent them sinking.

At last, after a favorable journey through open water,
the Fram finally reached firm ice on Sept. 25, and
allowed herself to be frozen in; for winter was fast
approaching, and it was no longer possible to drive her
through the ice.
94 FRIDTJOF NANSEN,

CHAPTER VIII.

Drirting THRouGH THE Icr.— CuHRISTMAS.—Daity LIFE ON THE
FRAM.— BEAR-Hunt AND IcE-PRESSURE.

From Sept. 26 the Fram lay frozen in in the drift-
ice, and many a long day would pass ere she would be
loose again. Nansen’s theory of a current over the
North Pole would now be proved to be correct or the
reverse.

It was a monotonous time that was approaching for
the men on board. At first they drifted but very little
northward, each succeeding day bringing but little al-
teration; but they kept a good heart, for they had not
to suffer from lack of anything that could conduce
to their comfort. They had a good ship, excellently
equipped, and so passed the days as best they could, —
now occupying themselves with seeing to the dogs or
taking observations, etc.; while reading, playing cards,
chess, halma, and making all kinds of implements, filled
up the remainder of their time. Every now and then the
monotony of their existence would undergo variation,
when the ice-pressure set in. ‘Then there was plenty
of life and stir on board, and all hands would turn out
to do battle with the foe.

It was on Monday, Oct. 9, that the Fram underwent
her first experience of a regular ice-pressure. Nansen
and the others were sitting after dinner, as usual, chat-


By Permission of Archibald Constable & Co.

THE FRAM IN AN ICE PRESSURE. : i
96 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

ting about one thing and another, when all at once a
deafening sound was heard, and the ship quivered from
stem to stern. Up they rushed on deck; for now the
Fram was to be put to the test—and gloriously she
passed through it! When the ice nipped she lifted
herself up, as if raised by invisible hands, and pushed
the floes down below her.

An ice-pressure is a most wonderful thing. Let us
hear what Nansen says of it :—

“It begins with a gentle crack and moan along the
ship’s sides, gradually sounding louder in every con-
ceivable key. Now it is a high plaintive tone, now it
is a grumble, now it is a snarl, and the ship gives a start
up. Steadily the noise increases till it is like all the
pipes of an organ; the ship trembles and shakes, and
rises by fits and starts, or is gently lifted up. But
presently the uproar slackens, and the ship sinks down
into her old position again, as if in a safe bed.”

But woe to them who have not such a ship to resort
to under a pressure like this; for when once it begins
in real earnest, it is as if there could not be a spot on
the earth’s surface that would not tremble and shake.

“ Virst,” says Nansen, “you hear a sound like the
thundering rumble of an earthquake far away on the
great waste; then you hear it in several places, always
coming nearer and nearer. The silent ice world re-
echoes with thunders; nature’s giants are awakening
to the battle. The ice cracks on every side of you, and
begins to pile itself up in heaps. There are howlings
and thunderings around you; you feel the ice trembling,
and hear it rumbling under your feet. In the semi-
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 97

darkness you can see it piling and tossing itself up into
high ridges, — floes ten, twelve, fifteen feet thick, broken
and flung up on the top of each other, — you jump away
to save your life. But the ice splits in front of you; a
black gulf opens, and the water streams up. You turn
in another direction; but there through the dark you
can just see a new ridge of moving ice-blocks coming
toward you. You try another direction, but there it
is just the same. All around there is thundering and
roaring, as of some enormous waterfall with explosions
like cannon salvoes. Still nearer you it comes. The
floe you are standing on gets smaller and smaller; water
pours over it; there can be no escape except by scram-
bling over the ice-blocks to get to the other side of the
pack. But little by little the disturbance calms down
again, and the noise passes on and is lost by degrees in
the distance.”?

Another thing brought life and stir into the camp,
viz., “bears.” And many atime the cry of “bears”
was heard in those icy plains.

In Farthest North, Nansen describes a number of
amusing incidents with these animals. We must, how-
ever, content ourselves with giving only a brief sketch
of some of the most interesting of these.

Nansen and Sverdrup, and indeed several of the
others, had shot polar bears before; but some of their
number were novices in the sport, among whom were
Blessing, Johansen and Scott-Hansen. One day, when
the latter were taking observations a short distance
from the ship, a bear was seen but a little way off —
in fact, just in front of the Fram.


98 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

“Hush! don’t make a noise, or we shall frighten
him,” said Hansen; and they all crouched down to
watch him.

“TI think I'd better slip off on board and tell them
about it,” said Blessing. And off he started on tiptoe,
so as not to alarm the bear.

The beast meanwhile came sniffing and shambling
along toward where they were, so that evidently he had
not been frightened.

Catching sight of Blessing, who was slinking off to
the ship, the brute made straight for him.

Blessing, seeing that the bear was by no means
alarmed, now made his way back to his companions as
quickly as he could, closely followed by the bear. Mat-
ters began to look rather serious, and they each snatched
up their weapons. Hansen, an ice-staff, Johansen, an
- axe, and Blessing nothing at all, shouting at the top of
their voices, “ Bear! bear!” after which they all took
to their heels as fast as ever they could for the ship.
The bear, however, held on his course toward the tent,
which he examined very closely before following on
their tracks. The animal was subsequently shot on ap-
proaching the Fram. Nansen was not a little surprised
on finding in its stomach a piece of paper stamped,
“Lutken & Mohn, Christiania,” which he recognized
as belonging to the ship.

On another occasion, toward the end of 1893, Hen-
driksen, whose business it was to see to the dogs that
were tethered on an ice-floe, came tearing into the ship,
and shouting, “Come with a gun! Come witha gun!”
The bear, it seems, had bitten him on his side. Nansen
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 99

immediately caught up his gun, as also did Hendriksen,
and off they set after the bear. There was a confused
sound of human voices on the starboard side of the ship,
while on the ice below the gangway the dogs were mak-
ing a tremendous uproar.

Nansen put his gun up to his shoulder, but it wouldn’t
go off. There was a plug of tow in the barrel. And
Hendriksen kept crying out, “Shoot, shoot! mine won’t
go off!” There he stood clicking and clicking, for his
gun was stuffed up with vaseline. Meanwhile the bear
was lying close under the ship, worrying one of the
dogs. The mate, too, was fumbling away at his gun,
which was also plugged, while Mogstad, the fourth man,
was brandishing an empty rifle, for he had shot all his
cartridges away, crying out, “Shoot him! shoot him! ”
The fifth man, Scott-Hansen, was lying in the passage
leading into the chart-room, groping after cartridges
through a narrow chink in the door; for Kvik’s kennel
stood against it, so that he could not get it wide open.
At last, however, Johansen came, and fired right into
the bear’s hide. This shot had the effect of making the
brute let go of the dog, which jumped up and ran away.
Several shots were now fired, which killed the bear.

Hendriksen tells this story about his being bitten : —

“You see,” he said, “as I was going along with the
lantern, I saw some drops of blood by the gangway, but
thought one of the dogs had very likely cut its foot.
On the ice, however, we saw bear-tracks, and started
off to the west, the whole pack of dogs with us running
on ahead. When we had got some little distance from
the Fram, we heard a terrible row in front, and presently
100 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

saw a great brute coming straight toward us, closely
followed by the dogs.. No sooner did we see what it
was than we set off for the ship as fast as we could.
Mogstad had his Lappish moccasons on, and knew the
way better than I did, so he got to the ship before me;
for I couldn’t go very fast with these heavy wooden
shoes, you see. I missed my way, I suppose, for I
found myself on the big hummock to the west of the
ship’s bows. There I took a good look round, to see if
the bear was after me. But I could not see any signs
of it, so I started off again, but fell down flat on my
back among the hummocks. Oh, yes, I was soon up
again, and got down to the level ice near the ship’s *
side, when I saw something coming at me on the right.
At first I thought it was one of the dogs; for it isn’t so
“easy to see in the dark, you know. But I hadn’t much
~ time for thinking, for the brute jumped right on me,
and bit me here, on the side. I had lifted my arm up
like this, you see, and then he bit me on the hip, growl-
ing and foaming at the mouth all the while.”

“*What did you think then, Peter?” asked Nansen.

“What did I think? Why, I thought it was all up
with me. I hadn’t any weapon, you see; so I took
my lantern and hit the beast as hard as ever I could,
with it on the head, and the lantern broke, and the
pieces went skimming over the ice. On receiving the
blow I gave him he squatted down and had a good look
at me; but no sooner did I set off again than up he
got too, whether to have another go at me, or what for,
I can’t say. Anyhow, he caught sight of a dog coming
along, and set off after it, and so I got on board.”
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 101

«“ Did you call out, Peter? ”

“T should think I did! I holloaed as loud as ever
I could!”

And no doubt he did, for he was quite hoarse.

“But where was Mogstad all the while?” asked
Nansen.

“Why, you see, he had got to the ship long before
me. It never occurred to him, I suppose, to give the
alarm; but he takes his gun off the cabin wall, thinking
he could manage by himself. But his gun wouldn’t
go off, and the bear might have had plenty of time to
eat me up right under his very nose.”

. On leaving Peter, the bear, it seems, had set off after
the dogs; and it was in this way it came near the ship,
where, after killing one of the dogs, it was shot.

In the course of the winter Sverdrup set up a bear-
trap of his own invention, but it did not prove very
successful. One evening a bear was seen approaching
the trap; it was a bright moonlight night, much to
Sverdrup’s delight. On reaching the trap, the bear
reared itself on its hind legs very cautiously, laid his
‘right paw on the woodwork, stared for a little while at
the tempting bait, but didn’t seem to approve altogether
of the ugly rows of teeth around it. Shaking his head
suspiciously, he lowered himself on all fours, and sniffed
at the steel wire fastened to the trap, and once more
shook his head as if to say, “Those cunning beggars
have planned this very carefully for me, no doubt.”

_ Then he got up again on his hind legs and had another
sniff, and down again on all fours, after which he came

toward the ship and was shot.
Oo
102 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

Autumn passed away and Christmas arrived while
the Fram was drifting between seventy-nine and eighty-
one degrees north latitude. This tedious drifting was
a sore trial to Nansen. He often thought that there
must be some error in his calculations, often very nearly
lost heart. But then he thought of those at, home
who had made such sacrifices for him, and of those on
board who placed such implicit faith in him; while
overhead the star —his star—shone out brilliantly in the
wintry night, and inspired him with renewed courage.

The time was now drawing near when their first
Christmas on board should be kept. The polar night,
with-its prolonged darkness and biting cold, brooded
over the ship, and ice-pressures thundered all around.

Christmas Eve was ushered in with —35° Fahren-
heit. The Fram lay in seventy-nine degrees, eleven
minutes, north latitude, two minutes farther south than
was the case a week before.

There was a peculiar feeling of solemnity on board.
Every one was. thinking of home, and trying at the
same time to Keep his thoughts to himself, and so
there was more noise and laughter than usual. They
ate and they drank and made speeches, and the Christ-
mas presents were given out, and the Framsjaa, the
Fram’s newspaper, with an extra illustrated Christmas
number, appeared.

In the poem for the day it said: —

“‘ When the ship is hemmed in by ice fathom-thick,
When we drift at the will of the stream,
When the white veil of winter is spread all around,
In our sleep of our dear home we dream.
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 103

Let us wish them a right merry Christmas at home,
Good luck may the coming year bring ;

We'll be patient and wait, for the Pole we will gain,
Then hurrah for our home in the spring.”

The menw for Christmas Eve was :—

1. Oxtrarin Sour.
2. Fisu PuppING.
3. REINDEER-STEAK AND GREEN PEAS. FRrEeNcH BEANS,
Poraroks, AND HUCKLEBERRY JELLY.
4. CLOUDBERRIES AND CREAM.
5. CAKE AND MARZIPAN. 6. BEER.

The Nansen lads knew how to live. But this night
they had no supper; they simply could not manage it.
Indeed, it was all they could do to get through an extra
dessert, consisting of pineapple preserve, honey-cakes,
vanilla biscuits, cocoa macaroons, figs, raisins, almonds,
etc.

The banquet was held in their cosey saloon, which
was lighted with electric lights; and in the evening
they had organ recitals, songs, and many other recrea-
tions. Yes, there was merriment galore on the Fram,
frozen in though she was in the Polar sea.

If it had not been for the noise of the ice-pressures
they might indeed have imagined themselves to be in
the very middle of civilization. In their inmost hearts
they longed for a pressure, —a pressure of the hand from
dear ones at home. A long time must elapse before
that could be.

Then came New Year’s Eve, with a brilliant aurora
shining overhead, and still each one on board felt that
irrepressible longing in his heart.
104 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

Nansen read out on this occasion the last salutation
he had received from Norway. It was a telegram from
Professor Moltke Moe at Tromsé: —

‘Luck on the way,

Sun on the sea,

Sun in your minds,

Help from the winds.

Wide open floes

Part and unclose

Where the ship goes.

Onward ! Good cheer !

Tho’ ice in the rear

Pack — it will clear. :

Food enough — strength enough —

Means enough — clothes enough,

Then will the Fram’s crew

Reach the Pole in months few.
Good luck on thy journey to thee and thy band,
And a good welcome back to the dear Fatherland !”

These lines, needless to say, were received with great
acclamation.

Meanwhile month after month passes without much
change. The men on the Fram live their lonely lives.
They take observations in the biting frost — Scott Han-
sen usually attends to this work. The others, who are
sitting down in the cabins, often hear a noise of feet on
the deck, as if some one were dancing a jig.

“Ts it cold?” asks Nansen, when Hansen and his
assistants come below.

“Cold? oh, no! not at all! — quite a pleasant tem-
perature!” a piece of information which is received
with shouts of laughter.

“ Don’t you find it cold about the feet either?”
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 105

“No, can’t say I do; but every now and then it’s
rather cool for one’s fingers!’ He had just had two of
his frostbitten.

One morning, indeed, when an observation had to be
taken in a hurry, Scott Hansen was seen on deck with
nothing on but his shirt and trousers when the thermom-
eter registered —40° Fahrenheit.

Occasionally they would have to go out on the ice
to take observations, when they might be seen standing
with their lanterns and tackle, bending over their instru-
ments, and then all at once tearing away over the ice,
swinging their arms like the sails of a windmill; but it
was always, “Oh! it’s not at all cold! Nothing to
speak of!”

On Friday, Feb. 2, the Fram reached eighty degrees
north latitude, an event that was duly celebrated on
board. They were all, moreover, in wonderful spirits,
especially as the gloom of winter was beginning to
lighten at the approach of spring.

By March 28 they had again drifted to the south, and
it was not till April 17 that they reached 80° 20’ north
latitude. On May 21, it was 81° 20', one degree far-
ther north, and on June 18, 81° 52’. They were pro-
gressing! But after this a back drift set in, and on
Sept. 15, 1894, the Fram lay in 81° 14’ north latitude.

The weather had been tolerably fine during the sum-
mer; but there was little else for them to do except
take observations, ascertain the temperature of the water
at different depths, etc., and collect specimens of sea-
weed, ete. And so another winter with its gloom and
darkness was approaching.
106 h FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

During this summer Nansen had often contemplated
the idea of leaving the Fram, and of going with one of
his companions on a sleigh expedition to the regions
nearer the Pole; for he feared the Fram would not drift
much farther in a northerly direction, and was most un-
willing to return home without first having done his
utmost to explore the northern regions. Accordingly
he occupied himself a good deal in making sleigh excur-
sions in order to get the dogs into training, and in other
preparations. He had mentioned his plan to Sverdrup,
who quite approved of it.

About the middle of September a rather strange thing
happened. Peterson, who was acting as cook that week,
came one day to Nansen, and said he had had a wonder-
ful dream. He dreamt that Nansen intended to go on
an expedition to the Pole with four of the men, but
would not take him with them.

«“ You told me,” he said, “ you wouldn’t want a cook
on your expedition, and that the ship was to meet you
at some other place ; anyhow, that you would not return
here, but would go to some other land. It’s strange
what a lot of nonsense one can dream! ”

Nansen replied that perhaps it was not such great
nonsense, after all; whereon Petersen said, “ Well, if
you do go, I would ask you to take me with you; I
‘should like it very much! I can’t say I am a good hand
on ski, but I could manage to keep up with the rest.”
When Nansen remarked that such an expedition would
be attended with no little danger, one. involving even
the risk of life; ‘“‘Psha!’ answered Petersen, ‘one can
but die once! If I were with you I shouldn’t be a bit
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 107

afraid!” And that he would willingly have accom-
panied Nansen to the North Pole in the middle of the
dark winter, without the slightest hesitation, is sure
enough. And so, indeed, would all the others have
done.

On Monday, Nov. 19, Nansen mentioned his scheme
to Johansen, whom he had selected to be his compan-
ion, and on the following day he took the rest of the
crew into his confidence. They evinced the greatest
interest in the proposed scheme, and, indeed, consid-
ered it highly necessary that such an expedition should
take place.

And now they all set to work in earnest about the
necessary preparations, such as making sleighs, kayaks,
exercising the dogs, and weighing out provisions, etc.

Meanwhile winter dragged on its weary way.
Another Christmas came, finding them in latitude,
eighty-three degrees, and ice pressures were increasing
daily. The New Year of 1895 was ushered in with
wind, and was dark and dreary in the extreme. On
Jan. 8, the famous ice-pressure occurred, that exposed
the Fram to the severest strain any ship ever encoun-
_ tered, and lived.

At 8 A.M. on the morning of the 38d of January
Nansen was awakened by the familiar sound of an ap-
proaching pressure. On going up on deck he was not
a little surprised to see a huge pressure-ridge scarcely
thirty paces away from the Fram, with deep cracks
reaching almost to the ship itself. All loose articles
were at once stowed away on board. At noon the pres-
sure began again, and the dreaded ridge came nearer
108 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

and nearer. In the afternoon preparations were made
to abandon the ship, the sleighs and kayaks being
placed ready on deck. At supper-time it began crunch-
ing again, and Nordahl came below to say that they had
better go up on deck at once. The dogs, too, had to be
let loose, for the water stood high in their kennels.

During the night the ice remained comparatively
quiet, but next morning the pressure began again.
The huge ridge was now only a few feet from the ship.

At 6.30 Jan. 5 Nansen was awakened by Sverdrup
telling him that the ridge had now reached the ship,
and was level with the rails. All hands at once
rushed on deck; but nothing further occurred that day
till late in the evening, when the climax came. At
eight p.m. the crunching and thundering was worse than
ever; masses of ice and snow dashed over the tent and
rails amidships. Every one set to work to saye what
he could. Indeed, the crashing and thundering made
them think doomsday had come; and all the while the
crew were rushing about here and there, carrying sacks
and bags, the dogs howling, and masses of ice pouring
in every moment. Yet they worked away with a will
till everything was put in a place of safety.

When the pressure finally was over, the Fram’s
port-side was completely buried in the ice-mound; only
the top of the tent being visible. But she had stood
the trial — passed through it gloriously; for she came
out of it all uninjured, without even a crack. ‘There
she lay as sound as ever, but with a mound of ice over
her, higher indeed than the second ratline of her fore-
shrouds, and six feet above the rails.
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 109

CHAPTER IX.

NANSEN AND JOHANSEN START ON A SLEIGHING EXPEDITION. — REACH
EIGHTY-sIx DEGREES, FOURTEEN MINUTES, NortTH LATITUDE. —
WINTER IN FRANZ JOSEPH'S LAND.

Marcu 17, 1895, was a memorable day in the Fram’s
history, for it was on that date that Nansen and Johan-
sen set out on the most adventurous expedition ever
undertaken in the polar sea. At the time of leaving
the ship, she was in eighty-four degrees north latitude.

On quitting her they fired a salute on board with all
their guns as a farewell; and, though the lads on the
Fram kept their spirits up bravely, every eye was full
of tears, something quite uncommon with them; and _
they :watched their two adventurous comrades, with
their sleighs and dogs, as they set off toward the Pole,
till they were lost to sight among the hummocks.

The ice was terribly difficult, and they had a weari-
some march over it; and, to make matters worse, a
southerly drift set in, driving them nearly as far back
as they advanced. However, they got on pretty well
till reaching eighty-five degrees north latitude, when
another back drift set in, lasting, indeed, without inter-
mission during the whole of the expedition. The dogs,
too, got worn out, and had to be killed one after the
other ; while, to add to their discomfort, their clothes

would get frozen so stiff during the day that they had
P
110 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

to thaw them in their sleeping-bags at night with the
warmth of their bodies. Very often they were so tired
in the evening that they would fall asleep with the food
in their hands. Their expedition, too, haunted them
in their sleep; and often Nansen would be awakened by
hearing Johansen call out in the night, “Pan!” “ Ba-









. NANSEN AND JOHANSEN LEAVING THE FRAM,

rabbas!” or “ The whole sleigh is going over!” or

“Sass-sass,” “‘Prr!” Lappish words to make the dogs
quicken their pace or to halt.

It was sorrowful work to have to kill these faithful

_ animals when they were worn out. Nansen himself

says that he often felt the bitterest self-reproaches, and
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 111

confessed that this expedition seemed to destroy all the
better feelings of his nature. But forward they must
go, and forward they went, though their progress was
very slow.

It was not long before Nansen became convinced
that it would be an utter impossibility to reach the Pole
through such masses of pack-ice and hummocks as they
encountered. The question, therefore, was how far
they should venture toward it before tuming their
faces southward.

On Monday, April 8, they had reached eighty-six
degrees, ten minutes, north latitude (though it subse-
quently turned out to be eighty-six degrees, fourteen
minutes, north latitude, that renowned degree of lati-
tude that became historical when the news of the Nan-
sen expedition was flashed all over the world), and
determined to go on no farther. So, on the day follow-
ing, they changed their course to the south. The going
improved a little as they travelled on. As far as the
eye could reach huge masses of ice towered aloft
toward the north, while toward the south the ice
became each day more favorable, a circumstance that
cheered them up not a little.

On Sunday, May 5, they were in eighty-four degrees,
thirty-one minutes, north latitude, and on. the 17th, in
eighty-three degrees, thirty minutes, north latitude.

They found it very hard work crossing the open
channels in the ice; and what made it harder was that
the number of their dogs diminished daily, one after
another haying to be killed as food for the Survivors.
It was absolutely necessary, however, to reach a lati-
112 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

tude where game could be procured, before their stock
of provisions gave out.

On May 19 they came on the tracks of a bear, but
did not see the animal itself. Tracks of foxes they had
already seen when in eighty-five degrees north latitude.

Tt seemed as if there was no end to these channels
which must be crossed, and of the young ice which
made hauling the sleighs such terribly hard work.
Moreover, soon they would have no dogs left to help
them, and they would have to drag the sleighs them-
selves.

May passed and June set in, and still no end to the
channels or to their excessive hard work, and not a
glimpse of land to be seen yet. Every now and then
a narwhal would be seen, or a seal, heralds, doubtless,
that they were approaching the regions of animated na-
ture. The ice, too, no longer hard and smooth, became
regular slush, so that it clogged on the under surface
of their ski, and strained to the utmost the poor
dogs, who could hardly drag their loads after them.
Everything, indeed, seemed against them! Three —
months had elapsed since quitting the Fram, and as
yet they had met with no change for the better.

On June 16 Kaifas, Haren, and Suggen were the
sole survivors of the pack, and Nansen and Johansen
had-to do dogs’ work themselves in dragging the sleighs.

But a turn for the better set in.. On the 22d, as
they were rowing the kayaks over some open water, they
were fortunate enough to shoot a large seal. Its flesh
lasted them a good while, and indeed proved a great
‘godsend, though they did set fire to the tent while fry-
FRIDTJOF NANSEN, 1138



ing blood pancakes in blubber—a mere trifle, however,
on such an expedition as theirs! They soon mended it
with one of the sleigh sails, and the blood pancakes
were voted to be delicious. + On the 24th Nansen shot
another seal, an event duly celebrated with great fes-
tivity ; viz., a supper off chocolate and blubber.

On June 80 Nansen discovered, to his great chagrin,
that they had advanced no farther south than they were
a month ago, and it began to dawn upon him that in all
probability they would have to winter up there —a
pleasant prospect, forsooth! Their stock of provisions
was nearly exhausted, and only three. dogs left.

On July 6 they shot three bears, so that all anxiety
as regards food was happily at end for the time; though
the prospect of reaching home that year, at least, was
infinitesimally small.

On Tuesday, July 23, they finally broke up “ Long-
ing Camp,” as they termed their quarters, and devoted
all their energies to their journey homeward.

The next day they saw land for the first time.
Through the telescope its hazy outline could be dis-
cerned; but it took them a fortnight to reach it, and
when they did reach it, they were so exhausted that
they had to lie up several days.

During this time Johansen was nearly killed by a
bear. Nansen tells the story :—

« After some very hard work we at last reached an
open channel in the ice which we had to cross in our
kayaks. I had just got mine ready, and was holding it
to prevent its sliding down into the water, when I heard
a scuffle going’ on behind me; and Johansen, who was
114 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

dragging his sleigh, called out, ‘Get your eun!’ I
looked round, and saw a huge bear dash at him, and
knock him down on his back. I made a grab at my
gun, which was in its case on the foredeck; but at the
same moment my kayak unfortunately slipped down
into the water. My first impulse was to jump in after
it, and shoot from the deck; but it was too risky a ven-
ture to attempt, so I set to work to haul it up on the
ice again as quickly as I could. But it was so heavy
that I had to kneel down on one knee, pulling and haul-
ing and struggling to get hold of the gun, without even
time to turn around and see what was going on behind
me. Presently I heard Johansen say very calmly, ‘If
you don’t look sharp, it will be too late.” Look sharp!
I should think I did look sharp! At last I got hold of
the butt-end of the gun, drew it out of its case, whipped
- round in a sitting posture, and cocked one of the bar-
rels which was loaded with shot. Meanwhile the bear
stood there scarcely a yard away from me, and was on
the point of doing for Kaifas. I had no time to cock
the other barrel, so I gave it the whole charge of shot
behind the ear, and the brute fell dead between us.
“The bear must have followed on our tracks like
a cat, and hiding behind blocks of ice, have slunk after
us while we were busy clearing the loose ice away in
the channel, with our backs turned toward it. We
could see by its tracks that it had wormed its way on
its stomach over a ridge in our rear, under cover of an
ice-mound in close proximity to Johansen’s kayak.
«“ While Johansen, without of course suspecting any-
thing, or even looking behind him, was stooping down
FRIDTJOF NANSEN.. 115

to lay hold of the hauling-rope, he got a glimpse of some
animal lying in a crouching posture at the stern of the
kayak. He thought at first it was only the dog Sug-
gen; but before he had time to notice how large it was,
he received a blow over the right ear that made him
‘silly,’ and over he went on his back. He now tried
to defend himself the best he could with his bare fists,
and with one hand gripped the brute by the throat, never
once relaxing his hold.

“ Just as the bear was about to bite him on the head,
he uttered those memorable words, ‘Look sharp!’ The
bear kept watching me intently, wondering no doubt
what I was up to, when all at once it happily caught.
sight of one of the dogs, and immediately turned toward
it. Johansen now let go his hold of the brute’s throat,
and wriggled himself away, while the bear gave poor
Suggen a smack with his paw that made him howl as
he used to do when he got a thrashing. Kaifas, too,
got a smack on the nose. Meanwhile Johansen had got
on his feet, and just as I fired had got hold of his gun,
which was sticking up out of the hole in the kayak. The
only damage done was that the bear had scraped a little
of the grime and dirt off Johansen’s right cheek, so that
he goes with a white stripe on it now, besides a scratch
on one hand. Kaifas, too, had his nose scratched.”

On reaching land they had to shoot Kaifas and Sug-
gen, the sole survivors of their twenty-six faithful com-
panions. It was a hard task. Johansen took Nansen’s
dog Kaifas in a leash behind a hummock, while Nansen
did the same with Johansen’s Suggen. Their two guns
went off simultaneously, and the two men stood friend-
116 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

less, alone in the desert of ice. They did not say many
words to each other on meeting.

. . . te . . . . .

Along the coast of the land they discovered there
was open water, of which they availed themselves, first
lashing their kayaks together so that they formed in
fact a double kayak. =

They rowed for several days, and were fortunate
enough to shoot a walrus; but they had no idea what
land it was, or where they were.

One evening, however, the channel closed up, and
no more open water was to be found. But on Aug. 138
it opened up again, and they were able to push on.
After twenty-four hours it closed once more, and they
had to drag the kayaks on the sleigh overland. On the
.evening of Aug. 18 they reached one of the islands they
had been steering for, and for the first time for two
years had bare earth under their feet. Here they rey-
elled in “the joys of country life,” — now jumping over
the rocks, or gathering moss and specimens of the flora,
ete., — and hoisted the Norwegian flag.

In its summer dress this northern land seemed to
them to be a perfect paradise; plenty of seals, sea-
birds, flowers, and mud — and in front the blue sea.

They were, therefore, loath to leave it, but onward
they must proceed if they wished to reach home that
autumn. But fate willed it otherwise.

They soon encountered ice again —nothing but ice
— are ice as far as the eye could reach. After wait-
ing a considerable time, they once more had open water,


FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 117

of which they took advantage by hoisting a sail; but
at the end of twenty-four hours their course was again
- blocked —a block that decided their future movements
materially; for they were compelled to winter there!
It may readily be supposed that this was not only

a terrible disappointment, but a severe trial to our two
arctic navigators. After all their labor and exertion,
after reaching open water, and buoying themselves up,
with the hope that their struggles would soon be over,
to find that hope shattered, and their plans rendered
abortive, and that they must perforce be imprisoned in
the ice for months, was enough to make them lose
heart altogether. But when once they realized their
position, they acted like men, and set. to work to build
a stone hut, on the roof and floor of which they
stretched bear hides. They succeeded in shooting sev-
eral walruses, the blubber of which provided them with
fuel, so that they might have been in a worse plight
than they were. Still, it was not altogether pleasant to
have to lie in a stone hut during a polar winter, with
the thermometer down to —40 Fahrenheit, without any
other food than bears’ flesh and blubber. Indeed, it re-
quired the constitution of a giant to endure it, and
unyielding determination not to lose heart altogether.
By working for a week, they finished the walls of
their abode, and after getting the roof on, moved into it.
They made a great heap of blubber of the walruses they
shot outside the hut, covering it over with walrus hides.
This was their fuel store. It served of course to attract
bears, which was an advantage; and many a one paid
the penalty of his appetite by being shot. At first they

Q
118 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

found it very uncomfortable at night, so they both slept -
in one sleeping-bag, and thus kept tolerably warm. But
the climax of their joy was building in the roof a chim-
ney of ice to let out the smoke of their fire. They had
no other materials to make it out of. It answered cap-
itally, however, having only one drawback; viz., that it
readily melted. But there was no lack of ice for mak-
ing another.

Their cuisine was simple in the extreme, and strangely
enough they never got tired of their food. Whatever
came to hand, flesh or blubber, they ate readily, and
sometimes, when a longing for fatty food, as was often
the case, came over them, they would fish pieces of
blubber out of the lamps, and eat them with great rel-
ish. They called these burnt pieces biscuits; and “ if
there had only been a little sugar sprinkled on them,
they would have tasted deliciously,” they said.

During the course of this winter the foxes proved
very troublesome. They gnawed holes in the roof,
stole instruments, wire, harpoons, and a thermometer.
Luckily they had a spare one, so that the register of the
temperature did not suffer. They were principally white
foxes that visited them; but occasionally they saw the
blue fox, and would dearly have liked to shoot some
specimens of that beautiful animal, only that they feared
their ammunition would not hold out. They shot their
last bear on Oct. 21, after which they saw no more till
the following spring.

It was a long, tedious winter; the weather generally
very boisterous, with drifting snowstorms. But every
now and then fine weather would set in, when the stars
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. UNG)

would shine with great brilliancy, and wondrously beau-
tiful displays of the aurora borealis would lighten up
the whole scene.

Another Christmas Eve arrived, the third they had
spent in the polar regions; but this was the dreariest
and gloomiest of them all. However, they determined
to celebrate it, which they did by reversing their shirts.
Then they ate fish-meal with train-oil instead of butter,
and for a second course toasted bread and blubber. On
Christmas morning they treated themselves to chocolate
and bread.

On New Year’s Day, 1896, there were —41° of
cold (Fahrenheit), and all Nansen’s finger-tips were
frost-bitten. Out there on that dreary headland their
thoughts wandered away to their home, where they pic-
tured to themselves all the Christmas joy and festivity
that would be taking place, the flakes of snow falling
gently out-of-doors, and the happy faces of their dear
ones within.

“The road to the stars is long and heavy!”

Nansen and Johansen slept during the greater part
of that long winter. Sometimes, like bears in their win-
ter quarters, they would sleep for twenty-four hours at
a stretch, when there was nothing particular to be done.
Spring, however, returned at last, and the birds began
to reappear on their northerly flight. The polar bears,
‘too, revisited their hut, so they got plenty of fresh meat.
The first bear they killed acted very daringly. Johan-
sen was on the point of going out of the hut one day,
120 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

when he started back, crying out, “ There’s a bear just
outside!” Snatching up his gun, he put his head out
of the door of the hut, but instantly withdrew it. “It
is close by, and means coming in.” Then he put his
gun out again, and fired. The shot took effect, and the .
wounded beast made off for some rocky ground. After
a long pursuit Nansen came up with it, and shot it in a
snowdrift. It rolled over and over like a ball, and fell
dead close to his feet. Its flesh lasted them six weeks.

On May 19 they broke up their winter camp, and
proceeded over the ice in a southerly direction, meeting
with long stretches of level young ice, making also
good use of their sail, and finally reached open water
on Friday, June 12. They now lashed the two kayaks
together, forming a double kayak, and set out to sea
with a favourable breeze, feeling not a little elated; and
in the evening lay to at the edge of the ice to rest, hav-
ing first moored the kayaks with a rope, and then got
up on a hummock to reconnoitre. Presently Johansen
was heard to shout out, “The kayaks are adrift!”
Down they both of them rushed as fast as they could.

_“ Here, take my watch!” cried Nansen, handing it
to Johansen, while he divested himself of his outer gar-
ments, and jumped into the water.

Meanwhile the kayaks had drifted a considerable dis-
tance. It was absolutely necessary to overtake them,
for their loss meant — death.

But we will let Nansen tell the story :—

“ When I got tired, I turned over on my back, and
then I could see Johansen walking incessantly to and
fro on the ice. Poor fellow! he could not stand still ;
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 121

he felt it was so dreadful to be unable to do anything. .
Moreover, he did not entertain, he told me, much hope
of my being able to reach them. However, it would not
have mended matters had he jumped in after me. They
were the worst minutes, he said, he had ever passed in
all his life.

“But when I turned over again and began swimming
once more, I saw that I was perceptibly gaining on the
kayaks, and this made me redouble my exertions. My
limbs, however, were now becoming so numb and stiff
that I felt I couldn’t go on much longer. But I wasn’t
far off the kayaks now; if I could only manage to hold
out a little longer, we were saved —and on I went. My
strokes kept getting shorter and feebler every instant,
but still I was gaining, and hoped to be able to come
up with them. At last I got hold of a ski that lay
athwart the bows, and clutched onto the kayaks. We
were saved! But when I tried to get aboard, my
limbs were so cold and stiff that I couldn’t manage it.
For a moment I feared it was too late after all, and that
although I had got thus far, I should never be able to
get on board. So I waited a moment to rest, and after
a great deal of difficulty, succeeded in getting one leg
up on the edge of the sleigh that was lying on the
deck, and so got on board, but so exhausted that I
found it hard work to use the paddle.”

When Nansen at last got the kayaks back to the
edge of the ice, he changed his wet clothes, and was put
to bed on the ice, that is to say, i the sleeping-bag, by
Johansen, who threw a sail over him, and made him
some warm drink, which soon restored the circulation.
122 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

But when he told Johansen to go and fetch the two
auks he had shot as he was rowing the kayaks back,
the latter burst out laughing, and said, “I thought
you had gone clean mad when you shot.”

On Monday, June 15, Nansen’s life was a second
time in jeopardy. They were rowing after walruses,
when one of the creatures bobbed up close by Nansen’s
kayak, and stuck its tusks through the side. Nansen
hit it over the head with the paddle, whereon the brute
let go his hold and disappeared.

But the kayak very nearly foundered, and was only
hauled up on the ice as it was on the point of sinking.

This was the last perilous adventure on this marvel-
lous expedition.
co

FRIDIJOF NANSEN. 12

CHAPTER X.

MEETING WITH JACKSON. —RETURN TO NORWAY ON THE WINDWARD.
— Fram Returns To Norway.— Roya WrELtcomE Home.

It was June 17, Henrik Wergeland’s! birthday.
Nansen had been down to the edge of the ice to fetch
some salt water, and had got up on a hummock in order
to have a good look about. A brisk breeze was blowing
off land, bearing with it the confused sound of bird-cries
from the distant rocks. As he stood listening to these
sounds of life in that wild desert, which he thought no
human eye had ever seen, or human foot trodden before,
a noise like the bark of a dog fell on his ear. He
started with amazement.

Could there be dogs here? Impossible! He must
have been mistaken. It must have been the bird-cries!
But no—there it was again! First a single bark,
then, the full cry of a whole pack. There was a deep
bark, succeeded by a sharper one. There could be no
doubt about it! Then he remembered that only the
day before he had heard a couple of reports resembling
gunshots, but had thought it was only the ice splitting
and cracking. He now called to Johansen, who was in
the tent.

‘“‘T can hear dogs over yonder!” he said.

1 Henrik Wergeland, Norwegian poet and patriot, born 1808, died
1845. .
124 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

Johansen, who was lying asleep, jumped up and bun-
dled out of the tent. “Dogs?” No! he could not take
that in; but all the same went up and stood beside
Nansen to listen. “It must be your imagination!” he
said. He certainly had on one or two occasions, he said,
heard sounds like the barking of a dog, but they had
been so drowned in the bird-cries that he did not think
much of it. To which Nansen replied that he might
think what he liked, but that for his part he intended
to set out as soon as they had had breakfast.

So it was arranged that Johansen should stay there
to see to the kayaks, while Nansen set out on this
expedition.

Before finally starting, Nansen once more got up on
the hummock and listened, but could hear nothing.
However, off he started, though he felt some doubts in
his own mind. What if it were a delusion after all?

After proceeding some distance he came on the
tracks of an animal. They were too large to be those
of a fox, and too small for a wolf. They must be dog
tracks, then! A distant bark at that moment fell on
his ear, more distinct than ever, and off he set at full
speed in the direction of the sound, so that the snow
dust whirled up in clouds behind him, every nerve and
muscle of his body quivering with excitement. He
passed a great many tracks, with foxes’ tracks inter-
spersed among them.
which he could hear nothing, as he went zigzagging in
among the hummocks, and his heart began to sink at
every step he took. Suddenly, however, he thought he
could hear the sound of a human voice —a strange
By Permission of Archibald Constab

le & Co,

MEETING OF NANSEN AND JACKSON.



Rh
126 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

voice — the first for three years! His heart beat, the
blood flew to his brain, and springing up on the top
of a hummock, he hallooed with all the strength of his
lungs. Behind that human voice in the midst of this
desert of ice stood home, and she who was waiting
there !

An answering shout came back far, far off, dying
away in the distance, and before long he discerned some
dark form among the hummocks farther ahead. It was
a dog! But behind it another form was visible —a
man’s form!

Nansen remained where he was, rooted to the spot,
straining eyes and ears as the form gradually drew near,
and then set off once more to meet it, as if it were a
matter of life and death.

They approached each other. Nansen waved his
hat; the stranger did the same.

They met.

That stranger was the English arctic traveller, Mr.
Jackson.

They shook hands; and Jackson said, —

“T am delighted to meet you!”

N. «Thanks; soam I.”

J. “Is your ship here?”

INS | GaNO KS

J. ‘How many are you?”

N. “I have a companion out yonder by the edge
of the ice.”

As they walked along together, Jackson, who had
been eyeing Nansen all the while intently, all at once
halted, and staring his companion full in the face said, —
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 127

«“ Are not you Nansen?”

« Yes, I am.”

“By Jove! Jam glad to meet you!”

And he shook Nansen by the hand so heartily as
well nigh to dislocate his wrist, his dark eyes beam-
ing with delight. Endless questions and answers took
place between them till they reached Jackson’s camp,
where some of the men were at once despatched to
fetch Johansen.

Life with Jackson was for our two northmen a life
of uninterrupted comfort and delight. First of all they
were photographed in their “‘ wild man’s attire; ” then
they washed, put on fresh clothes, had their hair cut,
enjoyed the luxury of a shave; undergoing all the
changes from savage to civilized life —changes that to
them were inexpressibly delightful. Once more they
ate civilized food, lay in civilized beds, read books,
newspapers, smoked, drank. What a change after fif-
teen months of Esquimau fare of blubber and bears’
flesh! And yet during all that time they had experi-
enced scarcely a single day’s illness.

Jackson’s ship, the Windward, was expected to ar-
rive shortly, and it was arranged that Nansen and
Johansen should embark on her for Norway.

. But our two travellers had to wait a longer time
than they anticipated, for it was not till July 26 that
the Windward arrived. On Aug. 7, however, they
went on board the ship, and steered with a favourable
wind for Vard6, where they arrived early in the morn-
ing of Aug. 13.

The pilot who came on board did not know Nansen;
128 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

but when the captain mentioned his name,:his old
weather-beaten face brightened up, and assumed an
appearance of mingled joy and petrified amazement.

Seizing Nansen by the hand, he bade him a thousand
welcomes. “Everybody,” he said, “had thought him
long dead, as nothing had been heard of the Fram.”

Nansen assured him he felt no doubt of the safety
of the ship, and that he placed as much confidence in
the Fram as he did in himself. Otto Sverdrup was in
command, and they would soon hear tidings of her.

No sooner had the Windward anchored in Vardé
harbor than Nansen and Johansen rowed ashore, and at
once repaired to the telegraph office. No one knew
them as they entered it. Nansen, thereon, threw down
a bundle of telegrams — several hundred in number —
on the counter, and begged they might be despatched
without delay. The telegraph official eyed the visitors
rather curiously as he took up the bundle: When his
eye lighted on the word “Nansen,” which was on the
one lying uppermost, he changed color, and took the
messages to the lady at the desk, returning at once,
his face beaming with delight, and bade him welcome.
“The telegrams should be despatched as quickly as
possible, but it would take several days to send them
all.” A minute later the telegraph apparatus began to
tick from Vard6, and thence round the whole world,
the announcement of the successful issue of the expedi-
tion to the North Pole; and in a few hours’ time Nan-
sen’s name was on the lips of a hundred millions of
people, whose hearts glowed at the thought of his mar-
vellous achievement.
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 129

But away yonder in Svartebugta there sat a woman,
who would not on that day have exchanged the anguish
she had undergone, and the sacrifices she had made, for
all the kingdoms of the world.

By an extraordinary coincidence, Nansen met his
friend Professor Mohn in Vardé — the man who had all
‘along placed implicit reliance on his theory. On see-
ing him Mohn burst into tears, as he said, “ Thank God,
you are alive.”

By another equally extraordinary coincidence, Nan-
sen met his English friend and patron, Sir George
Baden Powell, in Hammerfest, on his yacht the Ontario,
which he placed at Nansen’s disposal, an offer which was
gratefully accepted. Sir Baden Powell had been very
anxious about Nansen, and was, in fact, on the point of
setting out on an expedition to search for him, when he
thus met him.

That same evening Nansen’s wife and his secretary,
Christophersen, arrived in Hammerfest, and the whole
place was en féte to celebrate the event. Telegrams kept
pouring in from all quarters of the globe, and invita-
tions from every town on the coast of Norway to visit
them en route.

But the Fram ? The only dark spot amid all their
joy was that no tidings had been heard of her; and in
the homes of those brave fellows left behind there was
sadness and anxiety. Even Nansen himself, who had
felt so sure that all was well with her, began to feel
anxious.

One morning, it was Aug. 20, Nansen was awakened
by Sir Baden Powell knocking at his door with the an-
130 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

nouncement that there was a man outside who wanted
to speak to him.

Nansen replied that he was not dressed, but would
come presently.

“Come just as you are,” answered Sir Baden.’

Who could it be?

Hurriedly putting on his clothes, Nansen went down
into the saloon. A man was standing there, a telegram
in his hand; it was the director of the telegraph office.

He had a telegram, he said, which he thought would
interest him, and had brought it himself.

Interest him! There was only one thing in the
world that could interest Nansen now, and that was
the Fram’s fate.

With trembling fingers he tore open the paper, and
read, —

Fram arrived in good condition. All well on board. Am
going to Tromsd. Welcome home. P O. S.

Nansen felt as if he must fall on the floor; and all
he could do was to stammer out, ‘“ Fram — arrived!”

Sir Baden Powell, who was standing beside him,
shouted aloud with joy, while Johansen’s face beamed
like the sun, and Christophersen kept walking to and
fro; and to complete the tableau, the telegraph director
stood between them all, thoroughly enjoying the scene,
as he looked from one to the other of the party.

All Hammerfest was en féte, and universal joy was
felt the whole world through, when the tidings of the
Fram’s home-coming were made known.

The great work was ended — ended in the happiest
FRIDTJOF NANSEN. 131

manner, without the loss of a single human life! The
whole thing sounded indeed like a miracle. And a
miracle the Nansen lads thought it to be when they met
Nansen and Johansen in Troms6; and when all the brave
participators in the expedition were once more assem-
bled, theirs was a joy so overwhelming that words fail
to describe it.

| Yes, the great work was ended!

The voyage along the coast began in sunshine and
féte. At last, on Sept. 9, the Fram steamed up the
Christiania Fjord, which literally teemed with vessels and
boats of all sorts, sizes, and descriptions. It was as if
some old viking had returned home from a successful en-
terprise abroad. The ships of war fired salutes, the guns
of the fortress thundered out their welcome; while the
hurrahs and shouts of thousands rent the air, flags and
handkerchiefs waving in a flood of joyful acclamation

But when with bared head Nansen set foot on land,
and the grand old hymn —

“VOR GUD HAN ER SAA FAST EN BORG’!

was sung in one mighty chorus by the assembled multi-
tude, thousands and thousands of men and women felt
that the love of their fatherland had grown in their
hearts during those three long years, — from the time
when this man had set out to the icy deserts of the north,
to the moment when he once more planted his foot on
his native soil, —a feeling which the whole country
shared with them.

1“ A mighty fortress is our God.”
182 FRIDTJOF NANSEN.

To the youth of Norway Fridtjof Nansen’s character
and achievements stand out as a bright model, a glorious
pattern for imitation. For he it is that has recalled to
life the hero-life of the saga times among us; he it is
that has shown our youth the road to manhood.

That is his greatest achievement!
A SELECTION FROM RECENT
BOOMS: Iss UD Bry
ISBISTER & COMPANY
LTD. COVENT GAR-

DEN LONDON

+
A COMPLETE CATALOGUE

WILL BE SENT FREE BY POST ON APPLICATION TO

ISBISTER & CO. LIMITED

15 & 16 Tavistock Street, Covent Garden

LONDON
Stories of Long Ago. By Grace H:

EGENDS OF GREECE AND ROME.
KUPFER. With Eighteen Illustrations.

Crown 8vo, 1s, 6d.

“Tt ts dificult to imagine how children could obtain a more profitable intro-
duction to the subject than through this book.” —SCOTSMAN,

oor

ATURE STORIES FOR YOUNG
READERS. Part I.—Plant Life. Part
I].—Animal Life. By FLORENCE BASS.

Profusely Illustrated,
Crown 8vo, 2s. 6d. [Fust Published.

eee

HE LAUREL WALK. A New Novel.
By Mrs. MOLESWORTH, Author of ‘‘Carrots,”’
“* The Cuckoo Clock,’’ &c.

Crown 8vo, gilt top, 6s.
[Fust published.

neem

By Mrs. HUGH FRASER, Author of ‘‘Palladia.’’
Crown 8vo, gilt top, 6s.

Ve LOOMS OF TIME. A New Novel.

“A really readable seaside novel.”—DatLy CHRONICLE.

HE SOUL OF HONOUR. By HeEspa
pEeTeN Author of ‘‘Jessica’s First Prayer,’’
Crown 8vo, 8s, 6d.

“All must be touched by its pathos, and won by its ethical beauty.”
CuurcH TIMEs.
ILLUSTRATED EDITION EDITION.

, ! HE MEN OF TI MEN OF THE MOSS-HAGS. A

Story of the Covenanters. By S. R.
CROCKETT, Author of ‘‘ The Raiders,’’ &c.

Large crown 8vo, gilt top, 6s.

‘A strong, stirring, and picturesque story, which it is intpossible to read
without interest and admiration.” —SPECTATOR.



the Early Christians. By Rev. S. BARING-
GOULD, M.A., Author of ‘‘Mehalah,’’ &c.
Crown 8yvo, gilt top, 6s.

“

Pr cen A Story of the Persecution of

ween

ae TENDER MERCIES OF THE

GOOD. By CHRISTABEL COLERIDGE,
‘Author of ‘‘ Waynflete,”” &c.
Large crown 8yo, gilt top, 6s.
“ Considerably above the average.” —MorninG Post.

“_—_—_—~

UR ENGLISH MINSTERS. By the
() Very Rev. Dean FARRAR, D.D., the Very
Rev. Dean PUREY-CUST, D.D., and others.
Illustrated by HERBERT RAILTON and others.
FIRST SERIES :—Westminster, Canterbury, Durham, Wells,
Lincoln, Winchester, Gloucester.
SECOND SERIES:—St. Paul’s, York, Ely, Norwich,
St. Albans, Salisbury, Worcester, Exeter.
Demy 8vo, gilt top, each 7s. 6d.
Also in handsome French morocco, red-gilt edges, each 10s. 6d. net.

“No more accurate descriptions of the English Cathedrals have been printed
than those in these interesting and beautifully pr epared series.’
Pat Matt. GazeTTr.
AVISTOCK BOOKLETS.

In Dainty Cloth Bindings. Feap. 8vo, each
1s. net. (Post free, 1s. 2d.)
“Books to buy, to read,.to think over, and to enjoy.’—Lapy’s PicTORIAL.

“One and all ought to find a place on the bookshelf of every home.”
GENTLEWOMAN.



1. On Children.

By the late Bishop THOROLD,

2. On Being Ill.

By the late Bishop THoROLD,

3. On the Loss of Friends.

By the late Bishop THOROLD.

4. On Money.

By the late BisHop THOROLD.

5. On the Art of Living Together.
By R. F. Horton, M.A., D.D.

6. On Marriage.

By the late BisHop THoRoLp.

7. When the Worst Comes to the Worst.
By the Rev. W. Rosertson NIcoti, LL.D.

8. On Letter-Writing.
By the late Bishop THOROLD.
g. On Friendship.

By the late Bisoop THOROLD.

10. The Four Pillars of the Home.
By R. F. Horton, M.A., D.D.

11, Success and Failure.
By R. F. Horton, M.A., D.D.

12. Judgment: Human and Divine.
By the Rev. GEorGE Jackson, B.A.
Bunyan, Milton. By the Very Rev. F. W.
FARRAR, D.D., Dean of Canterbury.
Crown 8yvo, gilt top, 5s. [Fust Published.

eS REAT BOOKS. Dante, Shakespeare,

~_ewr

N GARDEN, ORCHARD, AND SPINNEY.
| By PHIL ROBINSON, Author of ‘In My Indian
Garden,’’ ‘‘ Birds of the Wave and Woodland,”’
&c. Crown 8yo, gilt top, 6s.
“A prose poem of the seasons, instinct with grace and feeling.”

SATURDAY REVIEW.
PASSO

HE SPRING OF THE DAY. By the Rev.
HUGH MACMILLAN, D.D., Author of ‘‘The
Clock of Nature,’’ &c.
Crown 8vo, gilt top, 5s.
“4 delightful and instructive book.” —GREAT THOUGHTS.

vee

HE GREAT ASTRONOMERS. Bio-
graphical Studies. By Professor Sir
ROBERT S. BALL, LL.D., F.R.S. With
numerous Portraits and Illustrations.
Demy 8vo, gilt edges, 7s. 6d.

“ The most earth-bound mortal who opens this book must go on with it.”

DaiLy CHRONICLE.
soo

Gor THE 1 FROM THE WRITINGS

OF THE LATE BISHOP THOROLD,
Author of ‘‘ The Presence of Christ,’’ &c.

Crown 8vo, gilt top, 5s.

“ There are few better books for a present.’—BRiTIsH WEEKLY.
Story-Book for the Young. By Amy E.
BLANCHARD. With Sixteen Full-page Illus-
trations by IDA WAUGH.

Feap. 4to, 3s. 6d.

“ The stories are charnting ... the illustrations are exquisite.”
Curistran Wortp.

/ ‘WENTY LITTLE MAIDENS. A

—_—s

AVISTOCK TALES. By GILBERT PARKER,
LUKE SHARPE, G. B. BURGIN, LANOE FAL-
CONER, &c. With Illustrations.
Crown 8vo. 8s. 6d,

“A delightful volume of short stories, bright, interesting, and varied.”

REcorp.
mann

ORTHWARD HO! Stories of Carglen.
By ALEXANDER GORDON.

Crown 8vo, 3s. 6d,

“ Studies of great power.”—IAN MActaREN in British Weekly.



Isles. By GEORGE TEMPLE, Author of
“Lancelot Ward, M.P.,’? &c.
Crown 8yvo, 8s. 6d.
“We can bestow high praise on tt. The story is exciting and even thrilling ;

while the local descriptions and colouring are invariably excellent.”
SATURDAY REVIEW.

Rise. A Story of Life in the Shetland

o_O

HE PROPHET’S MANTLE. By Curis-
TABEL COLERIDGE, Author of ‘‘ Waynflete,’’

&e. Crown 8vo, 3s, 6d,
“4 healthy and brightly written story.” —QUIVER.
HE INVISIBLE PLAYMATE; AND

W. V., HER BOOK. By WILLIAM
CANTON. With Two Illustrations by C. E.
BROCK.

Crown 8yo, gilt top, 8s. 6d.

“ Mr. Canton has won us with this book as surely as Mr. Barrie did with
se Ee Ogilvy.’ —ACADEMY.

—_—o_—oo

ENNYSON.. His Art and Relation to.
Modern Life. By STOPFORD A. BROOKE,
M.A., Author of ‘Early aes Literature,”

&c.
Sixth Thousand. Demy 8v0, 7s, 6a

“Tt is not going too far to say that this book comes within piaseeoe distance
of being the perfect study of Tennyson's work,” — ACADEMY.

nee

RAVEL PICTURES FROM PALESTINE.
By JAMES WELLS, D.D. With numerous Illus
trations by A. TWIDLE.

Royal 8yvo, gilt top, 7s. 6d.

“ One of the best books on Palestine that we have ever read.”
Datity CHRONICLE.

nee

HE BOOK OF. PARLIAMENT. An
Account of the Customs and Curiosities

of the Two Houses. By MICHAEL MAC-

“ DONAGH.

Crown 8vo, 6s.

“4 masterpiece of compendious information.” — PUNCH.
2.

ISBISTER & CO. LIMITED
COVENT GARDEN; LONDON, W.C.

ul
Te a ie Me shh PR pe 1 th = eta: 7 PRL Nami Ea erent 27 PNG LGR NENG Che ee a
3 NGS Oe oa |
SO en)
SRE Eire
eS CCIE ree eb COST OG Ae
ACI hn NZI eae ee OO
TOT eon SR
LOOS eS PRS BOL)




CK Ra 3
oa pate i
aoe
PS
IE
Bee ae
ne te
OES
EAE AK
' f i
ihe {4 } a .
>My {

PY ee)
Ry SS

SDSL DY OR AT PPTL LY Boa
RU EO EG ieee sy

Â¥ t i} chi 7 }
Ps ed %, hy \ So at
ALLS A RITES } VK
PVN A ANAT : ONO t me mY
eS Ey * ~< < ee ji b4 eA A, 4. : 5 A
SEAT IN TEKIN ZANA x SYA rao
“: Psa CA! ark fe) AEN. A we eA
3 ¢ Tyo AD

f
no

Sy
%

» (ihe mA iC’ ~
iD ASKS ry

? } ? b 4 EN int ‘. Gj

3 t —) \, nd |

j . Tf ; ee ~(

} f ; ‘ ml As oe * t

; nie} F ee re x xv |

XK v5 . us 5 ee

aN a z f aes

AY ; : Sa

fi: mt { e AS

4 : t :

\ > A ic Lt HY qi

- ‘ . i . F -

.?. . ‘ ‘ j :

14 : > Mis

a
. A EP ACY

Ls

ROA +
~

Co