Citation
Odysseus

Material Information

Title:
Odysseus the hero of Ithaca
Series Title:
Scribner series of school reading
Added title page title:
Odysseus
Creator:
Homer
Burt, Mary E ( Mary Elizabeth ), 1850-1918 ( Adapter )
Ragozin, Zénaïde A ( Zénaïde Alexeïevna ), 1835-1924 ( Adapter )
Charles Scribner's Sons
Scribner Press ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
New York
Chicago
Boston
Publisher:
Charles Scribner's Sons
Manufacturer:
The Scribner Press
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
xvii, 223 p., [6] leaves of plates : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Odysseus (Greek mythology) -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Trojan War -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Good and evil -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages, Imaginary -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Imaginary companions -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Imagination -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sailing -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Ships -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Magic -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Ghosts -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Monsters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Imaginary voyages -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Fantasy literature ( rbgenr )
Children's literature ( fast )
Imaginary voyages ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Pictorial front cover and spine.
Statement of Responsibility:
adapted from the third book of the primary schools of Athens, Greece by Mary E. Burt, Zenaïde A. Ragozin.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026615819 ( ALEPH )
ALG3413 ( NOTIS )
07112041 ( OCLC )

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Full Text


geuathe ee Sera
asi ie en
fy re

arte
she
oe

i



aa
Cae
i i



The Baldwin Library
University
RmB -
Florida





ODYSSEUS



I

i
| UI; i!

re

i

aban
A

i

ed

















ODYSSEUS AS A YOUTH AT HOME WITH HIS MOTHER.



ODY ss US
THE HERO OF ITHACA

ADAPTED FROM THE THIRD BOOK OF THE PRIMARY
SCHOOLS OF ATHENS, GREECE

BY
MARY E. BURT

Author of “ Literury Landmarks,” “Stories from Plato,” “Story of the
German Iliad,” “The Child-Life Reading Study” ; Editor of
“ Little Nature Studies” » Teacher in the John A.
browning School, New York City

AND

ZENAIDE A. RAGOZIN

Author of “ The Story of Chaldea,” “The Story of Assyria,” ‘The Story
of Media, Babylon, and Persia,” “The Story of Vedic India” 5
Member of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and
Ireland, of the American Oriental Society, of the
Société Ethnologique of Paris, etc.

CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS
NEW YORK CHICAGO BOSTON



Copyricut, 1898, By
CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS



Printed in the United States of America
D





To

THE TEACHER
WHOSE INTEGRITY AND PEDAGOGICAL SPIRIT
HAVE CREATED A SCHOOL WHEREIN THE IDEAL MAY
PROVE ITSELF THE PRACTICAL

AND

THOSE ENTHUSIASTIC PUPILS
WHO LOVE THE LOYALTY AND BRAVERY OF ODYSSEUS

THIS BOOK IS DEDICATED



CONTENTS

PAGE



INTRODUCTION : ° . » = xili
PART I
AN INTRODUCTION TO THE LIFE OF THE HERO,
ODYSSEUS
CHAPTER PAGE
I. About Troy and the Journey of Paris to
Greece . . . . . 3

II. The Flight of Helen : : . : 6
III. The Greeks Sail for Troy : 5 a1.
IV. The Fall of Troy . . . . 2 tg



PART II
Tue RETURN oF OpyssEus To His Own
CouNTRY
CHAPTER PAGE

V. Odysseus on the Island of Calypso . eer
VI. Odysseus Constructs a Raft and Leaves the
Island : ; . : 4 see2iG

vii



Vili

CHAPTER

VII.

VIII.
TX.

X.
XI.
XII.
XIII.
XIV.
XV.
XVI.

XVII.

XVIII.
XIX.

XX.
XXI.

XXII.

XXIII.

XXIV.

Contents

Odysseus is Saved on the Island of
Scheria é . .

Nausicaa is Sent to the River by Athena

Odysseus Arrives at the Palace of Alki-
nods . . .

Odysseus in the Halls of Alkinods

The Banquet in Honor of Odysseus.

Odysseus Relates His Adventures.

The Lotus-Eaters and the Cyclops

The Cave of the Cyclops . s

The Blinding of the Cyclops

Odysseus and His Companions Leave
the Land of the Cyclops

The Adventures of Odysseus on the
Island of Afolus. .

Odysseus at the Home of Circé

Circé Instructs Odysseus Concerning
His Descent to Hades . A

The Adventures of Odysseus in Hades .

Odysseus Converses with His Mother
and Agamemnon . ;

Conversation with Achilles and Other
Heroes. : : : :

The Return of Odysseus to the Island of
Circé . : ; ; :

Odysseus Meets the Sirens, Skylla, and
Charybdis . A i . 4

PAGE

29

38
42
47
54

57
60

64
67
72
75

78
84

87
go
94

98



CHAPTER

XXV.
XXVI.

XXVII.
XXVIII.

CHAPTER

XXIX.
XXX.
XXXI.
XXXII.
XXXII.
XXXIV.
XXXV.
XXXVI.
XXXVIT.
XXXVIII.
XXXIX.

XL.

XLI.
XLII.

XLITI.

Contents

Odysseus on the Island of Hélios

The Departure of Odysseus from the
Island of Scheria . ‘ : .

Odysseus Arrives at Ithaca. 5
Odysseus Seeks the Swineherd .



PART III
THe TRIUMPH OF ODYSSEUS

Athena Advises Telemachos . :
Telemachos Astonishes the Wooers
Penelope’s Web. i :

The Journey of Telemachos ~.
Telemachos in Pylos : ° :
Telemachos in Sparta . - .

Menelaos Relates His Adventures
The Conspiracy of the Suitors .
Telemachos Returns to Ithaca .
Telemachos and the Swineherd
Telemachos Recognizes Odysseus.
Telemachos Returns to the Palace
Odysseus is Recognized by His Dog.
Odysseus Comes, a Beggar, to His
Own House : :
Conversation of Odysseus and Penel-
ope

ix
PAGE
Iot

105
108
113

PAGE
123

128
130
135
138
141
147
151
155
158
161
165
169

172

176



x

CHAPTER

XLIV.
XLV.
XLVI.
XLVII.
XLVIII.
XLIX.
L.

LI.

Contents

Eurycleia Recognizes Odysseus . .
Penelope’s Dream. f ‘
Athena Encourages Odysseus. .

The Last Banquet of the Suitors .
Odysseus Bends the Bow . : .
Death of the Suitors i .

Eurycleia Announces the Return of
Odysseus to Penelope . .

Odysseus Visits His Father .
Vocabulary and Notes : ‘ :

PAGE
180

183
185
188



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

OpyssEUS AS A YoutH at Home witH His

MorTHER.. : : : y Frontispiece
FACING
PAGE

Tue SILVER-FooTED THETIS RISING FROM THE

WAVES i 5 a 5 ss : Io

ODYSSEUS AND MENELAOS PERSUADING AGAMEM-

NON TO SACRIFICE IPHIGENEIA : ‘ Meee
ALPHEUS AND ARETHUSA . H 3 ef 2 SEES

Tur SwINEHERD TELLING His Story To Opys-

SEUS . : : : : : : LTO

OpyssEuS FEIGNS MADNESS . ; : . 146







INTRODUCTION

IT has long been the opinion of many of the
more progressive teachers of the United States
that, next to Herakles, Odysseus is the hero
closest to child-life, and that the stories from the
“Odyssey” are the most suitable for reading-
lessons. These conclusions have been reached
through independent experiments not related
to educational work in foreign countries.

While sojourning in Athens I had the pleas-
ure of visiting the best schools, both public and
private, and found the reading especially spir-
ited. I examined the books in use and found
the regular reading-books to consist of the
classic tales of the country, the stories of Her-
akles, Theseus, Perseus, and so forth, in the
reader succeeding the primer, and the stories
of Odysseus, or Ulysses, as we commonly call
him, following asa third book, answering to our
second or third reader. This book I brought
home with me and had a careful, literal trans-
lation made. I submitted this translation to
that notable scholar, Zenaide A. Ragozin, with

xiii



XIV Introduction

whom I faithfully traversed the ground, word
by word and sentence by sentence. This ver-
sion I have carefully compared with Bryant
and rewritten, making the language as simple
as could be consistent with the dignity of the
subject-matter.

The introduction to the original book as I
found it in Greece contains many interesting
points, since it shows that educators in foreign
countries, notably in Germany, had come to
the same conclusion with our best American
teachers. The editor of the little Greek read-
ing-book says:

“Tn editing this work we have made use not
only of Homer’s ‘Odyssey,’ but also of that excel-
lent reader which ts used in the public schools of
Germany, Willman’s ‘Lesebuch aus Homer.’
We have divided the little volume into three
parts, the first of which gives a short resumé
of the war against Troy and the destruction of
that city, the second the wanderings of Odys-
seus till his arrival in Ithaca, the third his arri-
val and the killing of the wooers. We have no
apology to make in presenting this book to the
public as a school-book, since many people su-
perior to us have shown the need of such books
in school-work. The new public schools, as is
well known, have a mission of the highest im-



Lutroduction xv

portance. They do not aim, as formerly, at
absolute knowledge pounded into the heads of
children in a mechanical way. Their aim is
the mental and ethical development of the pu-
pils. Reading and writing lead but half way
to this goal. With all nations the readers used
in the public schools are a collection of the no.
blest thoughts of their authors.”

The Greek editor had never read the inane
rat and cat stories of American school “read.
ers” when he wrote that. He continues:

“ Happily the Greek nation, more than any
other, abounds in literary masterpieces. Nearly
all of the Greek writings contain an abundance
of practical wisdom and virtue. Their worth is
so great that even the most advanced European
nations do not hesitate to introduce them into
their schools. The Germans do this, although
their habits and customs are so different from
ours. They especially admire Homer’s works.
These books, above all others, afford pleasure
to the young, and the reason for it is clearly
set forth by the eminent educator Herbart:

“¢The little boy is grieved when told that he
is little. Nor does he enjoy the stories of lit-
tle children. This is because his imagination
reaches out and beyond his environments. I
find the stories from Homer to be more suit-



Lutroduction

able reading for young children than the mass
of juvenile books, because they contain grand
truths.’

“Therefore these stories are held in as high
esteem by the German children as by the Greek.
In no other works do children find the grand
and noble traits in human life so faithfully and
charmingly depicted as in Homer. Here all
the domestic, civic, and religious virtues of the
people are marvellously brought to light and
the national feeling is exalted. The Homeric
poetry, and especially the ‘Odyssey,’ is adapted
to very young children, not only because it sat-
isfies so well the needs which lead to mental
development, but also for another reason. As
with the people of olden times bravery was
considered the greatest virtue, so with boys of
this age and all ages. No other ethical idea
has such predominance as that of prowess.
Strength of body and a firm will characterize
those whom boys choose as their. leaders.
Hence the pleasure they derive from the ac-
counts of celebrated heroes of yore whose
bravery, courage, and prudence they admire.”

The editor further extols the advantages aris.
ing from the study of Homer, it making the
youthful students acquainted with the earliest
periods of Greek history, the manners and cus-



Introduction XVii

toms of the people, and he ends by quoting from
Herbart:

“Boys must first get acquainted with the
noisy market-place of Ithaca and then be led to
the Athens of Miltiades and Themistokles.”

With equal truth the American can say that
the child whose patriotism is kindled by the
Homeric fire will the more gladly respond to
the ideals set forth in the history of a Colum-
bus or a Washington.

Mary E. Burt.



PART I

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE LIFE
OF THE HERO, ODYSSEUS







CHAPTER I

ABOUT TROY AND THE JOURNEY OF PARIS TO
GREECE

On the northern shore of Asia Minor there
lies a plateau watered by many small rivers
and surrounded on all sides by mountains, only
on the north it slopes gently to the sea. On
this plateau, between the Simois and Scaman-
dros rivers, in the oldest times there stood a
very rich and powerful city, whose name was
Troy. It was the capital of a large and fertile
district, known as the Troad.

There, about 1200 B.c., reigned a king by the
name of Priam, possessed of great power and
boundless wealth, He had many sons and
daughters. It was said, indeed, that he had fifty
sons who were all married and living in their
own homes, which they had built by the king’s
wish around the royal palace.

They were all handsome and heroic young
men. One of the youngest, Paris, also named
Alexandros, surpassed the others in beauty.
He was a restless youth and not fond of his

3



4 Odysseus

home, as were the others. He had set his
heart on travelling and seeing strange coun-
tries and cities. King Priam was extremely
fond of his large family, and took pride in hav-
ing all his children about him, so that at first
he was greatly opposed to the wishes of Paris.
But the youth was so persistent and unhap-
py that the king at last consented to let him
go. Without delay, Paris called together a few
friends with tastes as adventurous as his own.
They embarked in a new ship well provided
with all that travellers need, and set sail for
the famous land on the shores of the “gean
Sea, of which they had heard so many wonder-
ful things, and which was called Hellas.
Nearly in the middle of the plain which
forms the southern part of Hellas was the city
of Sparta. It was on the river Eurotas, and
was the capital of a large district called Lace-
dzmon, and it was to this city that Paris came.
Now, there was a mysterious reason for this
strange desire of Paris—his passionate longing
to travel. In his early youth, while he was
still minding his herds on the rich pastures of
Mount Ida, he received a visit from the three
greatest goddesses of Olympos.
Hera, the queen of Heaven and consort of
Zeus—Athena, the goddess of wisdom, and



Troy and the Fourney of Paris 5

Zeus’s favorite daughter—and Aphrodite, the
goddess of love and beauty, had a dispute
among themselves.

Each thought herself the most beautiful of
the three, and they would have come to high
words about it had not Athena proposed that
they should ask the handsomest man in the
world to settle the question. This happened to
be the young royal shepherd, Paris. So the
three goddesses floated down to the slope of
Mount Ida on a snowy cloud and placed the
question before him, each promising to reward
him royally if he gave his verdict in her favor.

Paris, as might have been expected, decided
in favor of Aphrodite, who had promised him
that the fairest woman living in the whole
world should be his wife. This promise had
to be kept, being given by a goddess, but it
was the source of endless misfortune, for Paris
had a young and lovely wife who was tenderly
attached to him, while the fairest of living
women—acknowledged as such by fame in all
known countries—was Queen Helen of Sparta,
herself the wife of another man.

Her husband was one of the most renowned
_ heroes of Hellas, King Menelaos, a son of
Atreus and brother of the leader of the Greek
chiefs, Agamemnon, King of Mycene. It was



6 Odysseus

Aphrodite, then, who inspired Paris with an in-
sane desire to forsake his parents, brothers, and
wife. It washer secret guidance which led him
across the seas and through the dangers lurk-
ing among the hundreds of islands of the Ar-
chipelagos straight to the land of Lacedzemon.
This is the central of the three peninsulas
in which the Peloponnesus ends, and might be
called the middle finger of that large hand of
which Arcadia is the palm.

Paris landed, with all his companions, on
the shores of Lacedzmon, where the people
received him kindly and helped him on his
journey to Sparta, where Menelaos and Helen
gave him a cordial welcome.

CHAPTER II
THE FLIGHT OF HELEN

APHRODITE, while leading Paris to the shores
of Lacedzmon, had not forgotten her promise,
and in Sparta itself she was at work at its ful-
filment. She inspired Queen Helen with a
growing discontent and restlessness of spirit.
Menelaos had not noticed any change in her,
and it was with an utterly unsuspicious mind



The Flight of Helen 7

that he received the fatal strangers and made
them welcome guests in his land and home.

More than that, having heard the news from
Crete that his presence there was desirable on
account of some urgent business, he did not
hesitate to set sail for that island, in the expec-
tation of finding Paris and his companions still .
enjoying the hospitality of his palace after a
short absence.

This was the chance which wily Aphrodite
had contrived for Paris. He took the hint and
carried Helen away to his ship, together with
as much treasure as they could lay hands on,
and then they sailed for Troy. Little did he
heed, in his mad desire to call the most beauti-
ful woman in the world his wife, that she was
already the wife of a hero who had received
him as an honored guest in his house, and that
he was about to destroy the peace and honor
of his host.

As soon as Menelaos heard of the flight of
his wife, he hastened back to Sparta, where
he found his palace deserted and his treasure-
house robbed.

Then his heart was filled with great wrath.
He set out at once to see his brother, Aga-
memnon, to consult with him about what was
to be done. Agamemnon was ruler over My-.



8 Odysseus

cenz, and highly respected in all Hellas on
account of his power and riches.

After the two brothers had talked over this
grave affair, they announced to all the leaders
in Hellas the great and detestable crime, and
asked them for their assistance. All the king’s
chiefs of Hellas lent a willing ear to this de-
mand, for in this breach of hospitality, commit-
ted against one of them, each felt himself per-
sonally aggrieved and bound to help in the
punishment of what, in those times, was con-
sidered the most unpardonable of all crimes.
Only one of the kings held back for awhile and
needed much persuasion to join the league.
This was Odysseus of Ithaca, who could well
consider himself at the time the happiest of
mortals, for he had lately married Penelope,
one of the fairest and most virtuous maidens of
Greece. He had an infant son of great beauty.
and promise, and he owned much land and
countless herds of cattle, sheep, and swine.
Added to that, all the petty nobles of the isl-
and acknowledged him as their chief.

But a soothsayer, or seer, had greatly dis-
turbed him by informing him that if he went
to a great war he would be kept away from his
home for the space of twenty years, and even
then return to-it in the guise of a beggar, after



The Flight of Helen 9

having suffered wrecks, captivity, endless wan-
derings, and loss of comrades.

No one could doubt that Odysseus was brave,
but no one could blame him for wishing to be
excused from taking part in the war against
Troy. Menelaos and his brother, however,
would accept no excuse from him, as he was
the wisest and. craftiest of all the leaders, and
when Odysseus finally consented to join them
he set about arming and directing the young
Greek warriors with all his heart and soul.

There was another. young prince whom it
was absolutely necessary to secure, for a much
venerated oracle had given it as a decree of the
gods that Troy could never be taken without
his help. This was Achilles, son of Peleus,
king of the Myrmidons in Thessaly, and of the
beauteous ocean nymph, Thetis. Notwithstand-
ing his extreme youth, his father would not dis-
appoint the whole country, and he let him go
with those who came for him. But he sent
along with him his adopted son, Patroklos, who
was several years older, and to whom the boy
was passionately attached, and also his oldest
and most trusted servant, Phoenix. These two,
the old man and the youth, he charged, as they
‘hoped for the mercy of Zeus, to keep watchful
‘guard over Achilles, whose exceedingly impet-



10 Odysseus

uous and reckless temper exposed him to many
dangers which might be averted by a sensible
and loving word spoken in time.

The Greeks took counsel together, and it
was resolved that Menelaos should go in per-
son to Troy and demand back his wife, Helen,
as wellas his treasure and a suitable apology
for the wrong done to him and to all Hellas.
He chose for his companion the cunning Odys-
seus. On their arrival in Troy, Menelaos and
Odysseus presented themselves before Priam
and demanded the return of Helen and the
treasures.

The king at once called his people together
to deliberate upon the matter, and the two
Greek kings bravely denounced the mean act
of Paris. But the Trojans, stirred up by that
youth, abused the ambassadors and drove them
out of their city.

CHAPTER III
THE GREEKS SAIL FOR TROY

THE kings and chieftains of Hellas, having
heard that Odysseus and Menelaos had been
driven out of Troy, hastened to call together
their fleets and armies at Aulis, a city of



ya
a oe

4 N, os ee -


THE SILVER-FOOTED THETIS RISING FROM THE WAVES



The Greeks Sail for Troy tf

Beeotia on a ridge of rock running out into the
sea between two little bays, each of which
was a harbor for many ships. A hundred thou-
sand men and a thousand ships were gathered
there under the leadership of the celebrated
and heroic chiefs. The commander-in-chief of
the whole army was Agamemnon,

Among the renowned leaders were Menelaos,
the sagacious Odysseus, Ajax, and many others.
Just as they were offering a sacrifice to the
gods, in order to start out to the war with their
good will, a great miracle happened. A fear-
ful snake crept from under the altar and
climbed a tree in which there was a sparrow’s
nest nearly hidden by the leaves. There were
eight young sparrows in the nest, nine birds
with the mother. The snake devoured the
fluttering little birds, around which the mother
circled as if overcome by grief.

Then the snake darted at the mother-bird
and swallowed it, when Zeus changed the rep-
tile into a stone. The Greeks wondered at the
sight, but the soothsayer, Calchas, said to
them: “ Why do ye wonder at this? The all-
powerful Zeus has sent us this sign because
our deeds shall live forever in the minds of
men. Just asthe snake has devoured the eight
little sparrows and their mother, so shall the



12 Odysseus

war swallow up the nine coming years: and in
the tenth we shall overcome Troy.”

The ships of the Greeks lay in the tars of
Aulis while the warriors waited impatiently to
set sail. But the winds were contrary; they
would not blow, and the boats waited there year
after year; for a sacred hind had been slain
by Agamemnon, one that belonged to the god-
dess Artemis, and it was ordered by that god-
dess that no wind should arise to take them
on toward Troy until her wrath had been ap-
peased.

So Agamemnon went to Calchas, the seer,
and asked his advice, whereupon the old
prophet told him to send for his lovely young
daughter, Iphigeneia, and offer her up on the
altar as the only acceptable sacrifice to Arte-
mis. When he had placed her upon the altar
and the priest was raising his knife, the god-
dess took pity on Agamemnon and carried the
girl away in a cloud, leaving a fine white doe
instead.

And now arose a favorable wind, and the
Greeks arrived safely before Troy. How they
fought with the Trojans, how many of the he-
roes outlived the struggle, and how many fell
in the battle, all this we can learn from an old
book called the “ Iliad.” We shall select from





ODYSSEUS AND MENELAUS PERSUADING AGAMEMNON TO SACRIFICE IPHIGENIA



The Fall of Troy 13

it only those things which refer to our hero,
Odysseus ; and to complete the history of trat
hero we shall go to another book, called the
“ Odyssey.”

Both of these books are the work of the
great poet Homer, who lived many years after
the war with Troy. That we may understand
better what happened later on, we must give a
short account of the fall of Troy and of the re-
turn of Menelaos and Agamemnon to their own
country.

CHAPTER IV
THE FALL OF TROY

THE war lasted nine years, and in the tenth the
Greeks conquered Troy, not in battle, but by
means of a trick which had come into the mind
of Odysseus. He told a skilful carpenter to
build a wooden horse of gigantic size, and in it
he hid the bravest Greek warriors. When he
had done this he advised all the other Greeks
to depart without leaving anything behind
them, and so lead the Trojans to believe that
they had given up the fight and gone home.



14 Odysseus

So the Greeks burned their tenis and put off
to sea, while the Trojans from their walls
watched them with great joy, thinking them-
selves well rid of an enemy. When the last
ship had gone, the Trojans threw open the
gates of their city and rushed down into the
plain where the Greeks had had their camp, to
see how the place looked.

There they found the wooden horse, and one
of the Greeks tied to a tree, who told them he
was left there as a punishment, and that the
wooden horse was an offering to the gods.
The Trojans made up their minds to carry it
into their city and give it the best place on
their highest hill.

Then Laocoén, a priest of Apollo, stepped
forth, and said to them: “ Unhappy people!
what madness possesses you? Do ye think
the enemy gone? Do ye know Odysseus so
little? There are Greek warriors hidden in
this horse, or else some other mischief is lurk-
ing there. Fear the Greeks even when they
bring gifts.”

With these words, he thrust his spear into
the flank of the horse, and the arms of the hid.
den enemy clashed with aloud noise. Just then
two snakes of great size, sent by Athena, rose
from the sea, and sprang upon Laocoén and



Lhe Fall of Troy 15

his two sons, and, coiling around them, bit them
to death. The Trojans, in great fear at the
sight, took this as a sign from the gods that the
horse was sacred and that they must protect
it, and they moved it at once into their city,
breaking down a part of their wall to get it in.

Having done this, they gave themselves up to
feasting and making merry, without the slight-
est thought that any evil was in store for them.
But when night had come, and all were in a
deep sleep, the ships of the Greeks, which had
been hiding all the while behind a neighbor-
ing island, came back. The warriors who were
concealed in the wooden horse sprang out and
rushing wildly through the city, slew the Tro-
jans right and left without mercy. From all
sides came wailings and groans, and the flames
of the burning city rose up to the sky.

A deadly struggle took place between the
Trojans and the Greeks. Priam was slain, and
Paris and many other heroes. The victory
was to the Greeks. Troy fell never to rise
again, and the women and children were led
off to become slaves to their conquerors.

Thus was destroyed in one night the great
and glorious city of Troy, all on account of the
crime which Paris had committed against the.
laws of hospitality.



16 Odysseus

The trials of the Greeks were not yet at an
end. After their victory at Troy they em-
barked in their ships and started eagerly for
their homes. But Zeus prepared a sad fate
for them, because Ajax had violently dragged
Cassandra, the beautiful daughter of Priam,
from the altar of Athena and had made her his
slave. Thus many of the leaders perished in
the sea far from home, and some were cast on
foreign shores to die.

Menelaos was thrown by wind and waves on
the island of Crete, and he lost many of the
ships on the cliffs. Thence he strayed to the
island of Cyprus, noted for its mines; and he
roved through other lands until he came to
Egypt, where he wandered about for eight
years, when he returned to Sparta, taking
Helen with him. He became reconciled to his
wife, and they lived a quiet life far removed
from the enchantments of the wily Aphro-
dite.

But the saddest fate of all overtook Aga-
memnon, who met his death in his own house
at the hands of his wife and brother.

Agamemnon, without any accident at sea,
reached his native land. Full of gratitude, ne
kissed the earth and wept tears of joy at the
thought of meeting his wife and son.



The Fall of Troy 17

He entered his home with a glad heart, and
his faithless wife came to meet him, but she
had prepared a hot bath for him, and there he
met his death, entangled in a net which she
threw over him, for she had not forgotten the
loss of her beautiful daughter, Iphigeneia,
whom she believed to have been offered up as
a sacrifice on the altar of Artemis.

She was assisted in this dreadful deed by her
husband’s brother, who became ruler over the
land, holding sway eight years, when Orestes,
the son of Agamemnon, slew him and regained
the kingdom.

And now we come to the return of Odysseus,
the wisest of the Greeks, who wandered to the
remotest part of the earth and learned the cus-
toms of many people, and who suffered terribie
things by land and sea.







PART Il

THE RETURN OF ODYSSEUS TO
HIS OWN COUNTRY







CHAPTER V
ODYSSEUS ON THE ISLAND OF CALYPSO

ALL the Greeks who had escaped from the
destruction of Troy and had been spared the
terrors of the sea returned to their homes.
But the unfortunate Odysseus was delayed by
the fair nymph Calypso on her island, where
she made her home in a cool and beautiful
grotto. There he wept and mourned, desiring
to see his wife again and his nativeland. Each
of the gods save one, Poseidon, god of the sea,
wished to help him to find the way home.
Odysseus had brought Poseidon’s wrath upon
himself through inflicting a terrible injury
upon the favorite son of that deity, and for that
reason the wrath of the god fell on him and
he was wrecked. One day all the other gods
had assembled in the hall of Zeus, on Mount
Olympos, when Athena, the favorite daughter
of Zeus and firm friend of Odysseus, knowing
that her father in his heart was well-disposed
toward the hero, began to plead for him in a
way to excite greater pity still.

“O my father, thou great king among the

Qt



22 Odysseus

gods,” she said, “my heart is troubled on
account of the wise Odysseus, who lingers on
an island, far away from home, and suffers
greatly; for a nymph lives on the island, the
daughter of great Atlas, and with sweet words
she strives to make Odysseus forget his native
land. But he bewails his fate and is full of
sorrow, his only wish being to have a glimpse
of the smoke of his beloved country.”

Zeus thereupon ordered Hermes to depart
at once for the island and tell the nymph to
send Odysseus to his home without delay.
Hermes obeyed quickly. He bound his
winged sandals to his feet, and, taking his
golden wand in his hand, flew like a meteor
over land and sea till he reached the island
where the nymph Calypso made her abode.
He found her within the grotto, singing sweet-
ly while she wove a fine web on a golden loom.

All about the grotto there was a grove of
cypress-trees in which birds of gay colors were
sporting and springs of pure water bubbling,
and the fragrance of strange flowers filled the
air, When Hermes had gazed upon these
wonders he entered the grotto. It was bright
with a blazing fire on a spacious hearth, and
fragrant with the odor of burning cedar and
cypress.



Odysseus on the Island of Calypso 23

Calypso saw him as he came in and knew
him. She bade him sit down ona throne daz-
zling with jewels, and, placing a table before
him laden with nectar and ambrosia, invited
him to eat and drink. After he had finished
his repast, Hermes told her that Zeus had sent
him to her with the command that she should
send Odysseus without delay to his native
land. Having given this message, he disap-
peared, leaving Calypso in great grief.

Odysseus in the meantime sat by the shore
mourning and gazing out upon the sea. Ca-
lypso found him there, sitting alone, weeping
and longing for his home. She stood by him
and said: “Odysseus, my unhappy friend, do
not waste thy life any longer in sorrow. The
end of thy grief has come. Arise and prepare
to depart for thy home. Build thee a raft of
the trunks of trees which thou shalt hew down.
I will put bread and water and delicate wine on
board; and I will clothe thee in comfortable
garments, and send a favorable wind that thou
mayest safely reach thy native land.”

Thus spoke the lovely goddess, but Odysseus
could hardly believe her, and said: “I fear, O
goddess, that thou hast some other thought in
thy mind, and that thou dost not wish to send
me home when thou biddest me sail over this

{



24 Odysseus

stormy and dangerous sea. I shall never go on
to the raft against thy wish, and thou must
swear the great oath of the gods that no harm
shall come to me.”

The goddess smiled at these words, and, tak-
ing the hero by the hand, rejoined: “ Thou art
a wise man, and thy answer is well-made. I
will pledge thee a solemn oath, by the heavens
and the earth, and the waters of the Styx, that
I have no plan of evil against thee. And I
advise thee to do as I have instructed thee, to
be ready for any crisis.”

Speaking thus, the goddess went into the
grotto and Odysseus followed her. When he
had come into the spacious hall, he sat down on
his throne and the nymph brought him rich
food and wine. Then she took a seat opposite
him, and her attendants brought her ambrosia
and nectar, which she would gladly have shared
with Odysseus, that he, too, might become an
immortal.

When the repast was over, Calypso narrated
to him all the trials he would have to undergo
before he could reach his native land. While
she was relating these things the sun sank down,
and darkness came upon the island, and all who
had their abode in the grotto sought rest and
slumber.



CHAPTER VI

ODYSSEUS CONSTRUCTS A RAFT AND LEAVES
THE ISLAND

AT daybreak the goddess gave Odysseus a
large axe and a sharp adze, and led him to the
heights of the island, where the largest trees
grew. He went to work at once and cut down
twenty trees, which he hewed into proper
shape, and then tied them together with ropes
which he himself made of bark.

In this way he built a raft which was very
large and strong enough to stand the onset of
the waves. He wove a railing of willow and
fitted it around the sides of the raft, to protect
himself against the dashing waves; and he raised
a strong mast with sails shaped to it, and tightly
bound by cords and ropes. He filled the crev-
ices of the raft with wax and pitch and attached
a rudder.

At the end of the fourth day his work was all
done, and his little ship was ready to be launched.
On the fifth day the beautiful goddess prepared
the hero a bath and gave him new garments
fragrant with perfumes. She went down to.
the boat with him and put on board a skin of



26 Odysseus

dark-red wine, a larger one full of water, and a
bag of dainty food. Then she bade Odysseus
a kind farewell, and sent a gentle and friendly
wind to waft him over the waves.

Odysseus was wild with joy at the thought
that he was really on his way home once more.
He spread his sails to catch the breeze and took
his seat at the helm, steering the vessel with
great skill. He did not dare to take any sleep,
for he had to watch the sky and stars constantly
and use them as guides on his course. He
sailed along in this way seventeen days. On
the eighteenth he spied land in the distance.
It was the land of the Phzeacians, lying like a
dark spot off in the sea.

Then Poseidon, who was returning from Ethi-
opia, saw him, and his wrath grew hot against
the hero. He raised up his head and said to
himself: “Alas! the gods have strangely
changed their minds about Odysseus during
my absence in Africa. Behold! in a little
while he will be in the land of the Phzacians,
where he will find an end to his troubles.
Nevertheless, it is in my power to chastise
him.”

Speaking thus, Poseidon called the clouds to-
gether, and seizing his trident he stirred up the
sea; then he set loose all the winds until there



Odysseus Constructs a Raft 27

was a general hurricane, and he wrapped
heaven and earth in the thick darkness of
night.

The mighty waves dashed over the raft, and
Odysseus sank on his knees and trembled.
With a deep groan he said: “ Ah me, unhappy!
Am I to bear more disasters? I fear that the
warning of the goddess was too true, and that I
shall be fora long time cast about on the waves
before I reach home. With what dark clouds
Zeus has shrouded the sky! The storm grows
wild, What terrible waves are these! Help-
lessly I must perish. Happy the Greeks who
fell before Troy, fighting for their country!
Would that I, too, had met death the day when
the Trojans hurled their spears at me as they
strove to take the body of Achilles. If I had
died then, the Greeks would have buried me
with great honors. Now I shall die an inglo-
rious death.”

As he spoke a huge wave struck the raft
with such terrible force that it whirled it
around and overturned it. The helm was
wrung from his hand and he fell into the
angry breakers. The mast was snapped in
two and the ropes and sails flew off into the
sea.

Odysseus was under water a long time, striv-



28 Odysseus

ing in vain to come to the.surface. Finally he
rose, spitting the bitter brine out of his mouth.
Although he was in such a desperate plight, his
mind was on the raft. Battling bravely with
the waves he reached it, and springing on board
sat down in the middle of it. Thus he escaped
death.

The angry waves tossed him hither and
thither as the wind scatters the leaves over a
field. Then Ino, the daughter of Cadmus, saw
him and took pity on him. She took the form
of a bird, and, perching on his raft, she said to
him: “O, luckless man! why is Poseidon so
angry with thee? Fear nothing, however;
he cannot take thy life. Obey me and thou
shalt not suffer much longer. Lay aside thy
clothes, leave the raft to the mercy of the
winds and waves, and swim tothe land. Take
my veil and wind it about thy breast, and thou
shalt not have anything to fear. As soon as
thou hast reached the land, take it off and throw
it back into the sea. Then hurry away in-
land.”

Odysseus hesitated to follow Ino’s advice,
fearing some treachery. But Poseidon sent a
huge wave which struck him and scattered the
raft as if it were dry chaff. Then Odysseus at
once got astride of the swimming timber. He



Odysseus ts Saved 29

bound the veil around his breast and bravely
plunged into the boiling waters.

Poseidon saw him, and shaking his head he
said: “I verily believe thou wilt come out alive
from the sea. But the sea has had thee long
enough, so that thou wilt know its power here-
after and fear it.” Saying this he lashed up his
horses and drove off.

CHAPTER VII
ODYSSEUS IS SAVED ON THE ISLAND OF SCHERIA

ATHENA, the daughter of Zeus, seeing Odys-
seus struggling through the waves, pitied him,
and bade the winds become quiet. Two days
and two nights Odysseus floated about, but on
the third the wind calmed down and the sea
became smooth.

Ina short time he found himself near land
once more. But the shore was wild and full
of sharp rocks and high cliffs. He could see
no place on which to set foot, and he grew
downhearted. His knees gave way, and, groan-
ing deeply, he cried out: “O, luckless one! In
vain have I braved the dangers of the sea to
escape death. Now all hope has abandoned



30 Odysseus

me, since there is no way for me to get out ox
the water. I fear that when I try to approach
the land the waves will throw me against the
cliffs, and should I try to find a safe landing-
place by swimming, the surf may carry me
back into the wild sea, where some sea-monster
will swallow me up. Whatever I may do, I see
no help for me.”

While he pondered over these things a huge
wave cast him on the foamy shore. His bones
were nearly broken, and he lay exhausted until
the wave returned, when he was hurled again
with great force back into the sea. Now the
unfortunate wanderer took to swimming as his
last resort, and reached the mouth of a river,
where he was able to land.

Too tired to breathe or speak, he sank down
in a swoon. His knees and arms trembled,
and his whole body was bruised and swollen.
When his senses returned he rose and untied
the veil that Ino had given him and cast it back
into the sea. Then he knelt down and kissed
the earth, and moved to a sheltered spot where
a wild and a tame olive-tree were standing
close together, whose branches had mingled
with one another, and there he found a safe
hiding-place.

Then the godlike Odysseus lay down on a



Nausicaé ts Sent to the River 31

bed of dry leaves, covering himself up as one
does an ember, lest it should go out. Athena
came and poured sweet sleep over his eyes, that
he might find quiet rest after all his toils.

CHAPTER VIII
NAUSICAA IS SENT TO THE RIVER BY ATHENA

WHILE Odysseus lay in a deep sleep, the
goddess Athena went to the royal dwelling of
the king of the Phzeacians, Alkinods, in order
to hasten the return of Odysseus to his native
land. She entered the house, where she found
Nausicaa, the king’s daughter, sleeping in her
beautiful chamber. Near her lay two maids
who served her.

Athena came as softly as a breath of air,
and caused the szaiden to dream that her
marriage-day was near and that it was her
duty to arise and hasten to the place by the
river where they washed their clothing. In
her dream the princess seemed to hear Athena
say : “ Nausicaa, why art thou so slothful? Thy
beautiful robes lie neglected and thy wedding-
day is at hand. on which thou surely shouldst



32 Odysseus

wear garments of dazzling whiteness, and thou
shouldst give such garments to those maidens
who lead thee forth to thy bridegroom. There-
fore, as soon as day breaks thou must ask thy
father to give thee a pair of mules, and we will
hasten to the washing-place down by the river.”

At the first dawn of day Nausicaa went in
haste to her father and mother to tell them of
her dream. She found them in their splendid
hall. Her mother sat with her maidens spinning,
and the king stood on the threshold, just going
forth to meet his chiefs in council. The prin-
cess approached her father and said: “ Dearest
father, I pray that thou wilt give me two mules
and a wagon, that I may go with my maids to
the river and take all the clothes that need
washing, for it becomes the king and his sons
to wear clean garments when they go to the
council of the chiefs. Thou hast five sons,
three of whom are youths not wedded, and they
should be provided with fresh robes; they will
need them in the dance.”

The king smiled, for he saw what was in her
mind, and he ordered the mules. Then his beau-
tiful daughter brought from the linen-room the
soiled garments and put them on the wagon,
while the queen prepared a goodly lunch of
cold meat and bread and a skin of sweet wine.



Nausicad ts Sent to the River 33

Nausicaa further received from her mother
a bottle of fragrant oil with which to anoint
herself after the washing. Then she mounted
the wagon, seized the whip and reins, and drove
out of the city, the maidens of her train fol-
lowing her on foot.

When they came to the place where the river
was flowing bright and clear, they unhitched
the mules and let them browse along the bank.
Then they took their garments down from the
wagon and tossed them into the marble vats
which they had filled with the limpid water of
the stream. When they had washed them
clean they spread them on the white pebbles to
dry. Having finished the task, they took a bath
and anointed themselves with oil. Then they
sat down on the shore and ate their lunch.

The repast over, they began to play ball.
First the white-armed Nausicaa threw the ball.
She looked as tall and royal among her maids
as did Artemis, the daughter of Zeus, among
her nymphs.

Nausicaé sang a song as they frolicked on
the sand.

When it was time to go home they put the
clean garments upon the wagon and harnessed
up the mules. Just as they started, Nausicaa



34 Odysseus

once more threw the ball to one of the maidens,
who failed to catch it. The ball rebounded
from the rocks and fell into the river, at which
the girls raised such a shout that Odysseus,
who was sleeping close by, awoke.

He opened his eyes and sat up, saying to
himself: “ Woe is me! Have I reached a coun-
try where people dwell? Are they wild and
inhospitable, or friendly to the stranger and
god-fearing? It seems to me I heard cries of
women. Perhaps they were those of the
nymphs who inhabit the mountain heights, the
springs of rivers, and the green meadows, or
those of people who live near by. ButI will
see who they are.”

So Odysseus clothed himself as best he could,
by winding slender branches covered with
leaves about him, and left the thicket where he
was hidden. He went in the direction of the
voices, stalking along like a great lion. When
the girls saw him they shrieked and scattered
in every direction. Nausicaa alone stood her
ground, for Athena gave her courage. When
Odysseus saw her he wondered which would
be the better, to throw himself at the feet of
the maiden and beg her to give him some
clothes and to show him the way to the city,
or to speak to her with more formality.



Nausicaé is Sent to the River 35

It seemed better to him to remain at a dis-
tance, and so he addressed her gently, saying:
“© queen, I know not whether thou art a god-
dess or 2 woman. If thou art a goddess, I
should take thee to be Artemis, because thou
art so tall and graceful. If, however, thou art
a mortal, thrice happy thy father and honored
mother. Greatly must they rejoice when they
see their beautiful child in the choral dance.
But he will be the happiest who shall win thee
for a bride.

I once saw a young palm-tree growing up be-
side Apollo’s altar in the island of Délos. It
was the most beautiful tree the earth ever pro-
duced, and I gazed upon it with wonder and
reverence. So amI amazed at thy beauty, and
I fear to approach thee and throw myself as a
suppliant at thy feet, although I am in sore dis-
tress, for great misfortunes have befallen me.

It was only last night that I escaped from
the sea. On my way from Calypso’s isle I was
driven about for twenty days by the angry
waves ina violent storm. Now some god has
cast me on this shore to make me undergo new
trials, for I do not believe my sufferings have
come to an end. Have pity on me, O queen,
because thou art the first human being I have
met after so many misfortunes.



36 Odysseus

I do not know one person in this country.
Show me thy city, I pray, and give me an
old robe to wear, no matter how coarse and
poor, and may the gods bestow all blessings
upon thee.”

Nausicaé looked at Odysseus in pity and
answered: “ Stranger, thou dost not seem to me
to be a man of mean birth or breeding, and
thou art surely indistress. But it is Zeus who
distributes gifts to mortals, both the good and
the evil things of life, and thou must submit to
his will with patience.

Since thou hast come into our land devoid
of all things, even garments, and art helpless, I
will give thee clothing and tell thee the way to
the city. And I will tell thee about the people
living in it, for Iam the daughter of the king,
Alkinoés, who reigns over this island.” When
Nausicaé had spoken thus to Odysseus, she
turned to her maids and commanded them not
to flee from the wanderer, but to bring him
food and drink, since Zeus sent the poor and
the stranger to be cared for.

And she told them to lead him to some
lonely spot by the side of the river, where he
might bathe at his ease. So the maids came
back and led the hero to a sheltered place and
laid a cloak and tunic on the sand, and the



Nausicaii ts Sent to the River 37

bottle of oil which the queen had given Nau-
sicai, that Odysseus might anoint and clothe
himself after his bath; then they ran back to
the princess.

Odysseus bathed in the fresh water of the
river and washed the salt sea-foam from his
hair, and when the bath was over he put on the
robes that Nausicaa had sent. Athena shed a
halo of beauty over him and caused him to
look taller and stronger than before.

As he walked along the beach to rejoin the
maidens, they admired his noble and kingly
bearing, and Nausicai said to her maids:
“Surely this man does not come among our
godlike brothers against the will of the gods.
I thought him rough and homely, but now he
seems like one of the immortals. I would that
I might calla man like him my husband. Make
haste to give him food and wine, for he has
fasted a long time.”

The maids hastened to obey. They looked
over what was left of the abundant lunch and
bade Odysseus eat and drink, which he was
glad to do. The princess then yoked up the
mules and they started for home.



CHAPTER IX

ODYSSEUS ARRIVES AT THE PALACE OF
ALKINOOS

AFTER Nausicaa had mounted to her seat
on the cart, she said to Odysseus: “ Get ready
now, stranger, and we will lead thee to my
father’s palace, where thou wilt meet the chiefs
of the Pheacians. If thou art wise, take well
to heart what I shall say to thee. As long as
we are ata good distance from the city there
isno harm in going along with us. Just follow
close to the wagon with my maids,

But when we come near to the town thou
must go more slowly and tarry behind a little,
till we have reached my father’s hall, because
I dread the gossip of the baser sort of people
whom we may meet. After thou hast seen us
enter the city, then thou mayest enter it also
and inquire the way to the king’s palace. It is
very beautiful. Thou mayest easily find it by
thyself, for there is no other house in the city
as large as ours.

Enter at once and find my mother and sue
to her for protection and help, that thou mayest
reach thy native land and thy dear ones again.”



Ydysseus at the Palace of Alkinoods 39

Having spoken these words, Nausicaa touched
the mules with her long whip and they quickly
left the river, wending their way toward the
city. They reached it at sunset, but Odysseus
sat down in the sacred grove of Athena, outside
of the city to wait, and prayed to the goddess
that he might receive pity from the people of
Pheeacia.

While he prayed, the damsels went on and
soon reached the king’s palace. Nausicai’s
brothers came out and welcomed them, and un-
hitched the mules. When Odysseus had given
them time to get home, he arose and found his
way to the town. He had hardly entered it
when Athena, in the form of a young girl car-
rying a pitcher of water, met him.

“My daughter,” Odysseus said to her, “ canst
thou show me the way tothe king’s palace? I
am a stranger, and here for the first time.”
Athena answered him: “ With pleasure, stran-
ger; theking is our neighbor. Follow me, and
I will lead thee thither. But on the way do
not greet anyone or ask questions, for the peo-
ple here are not fond of those who come from
other lands.”

Thus spoke Athena and pursued her way
with Odysseus following her. She threw a veil
of darkness over the hero to hide him from



40 Odysseus

rude gazers. Odysseus beheld the beautiful
port with astonishment—the large ships, the
great market-place, and the high walls of the
city.

When they reached the palace, the girl
stopped and said: “This is the house of the
king. Go in without any fear, for they love
brave men, even when they come from afar.
The first thing to do is to find the queen,
whose name is Areté.

She is greatly honored by the king, and all
the people treat her as if she were a goddess,
on account of her gentleness and virtue. In
case the queen looks upon thee with favor, thou
mayest be sure of safely reaching home.”

Having spoken these words, the goddess
took a friendly leave of the hero, and he en-
tered the outer hall of Alkinods, where he was
bewildered by the splendor. The walls were
of brass, the doors of gold, and the thresholds
and lintels of pure silver. On each side of the
main entrance gold and silver dogs stood
guard. They were endowed with life and
were immortal, the work and gift of the divine
Hepheestus.

There were two rows of splendid seats
in the large dining-hall. They were covered
with costly mats, and the Phzeacian leaders



Odysseus at the Palace of Alkinois 41

were wont to sit there and enjoy themselves
Golden statues of boys with lighted torches in
their hands stood on beautiful pedestals and
spread light over the merry banquets. There
were fifty maid-servants in the palace. Some
of them were grinding corn in the mill. Some
spent their time in spinning and weaving, for
as the men were renowned sailors, the women
also were famous for making fine cloth.

There was a large orchard all around the
palace, surrounded by a thick hedge. In the
orchard there was a great variety of fruit-trees
—pear, apple, pomegranate, olive, and fig.
The trees were never bare of fruit, either in
summer or in winter, for an ever-blowing west
wind created such a mild climate that the trees
were constantly blooming and ripening their
fruit.

There was to be seen a tree full of blossoms,
while another bent down under the load of
ripe fruit. Thus it was with the grape-vines in
the vineyard close to the orchard. Some were
blooming, others had only begun to form fruit-
buds, while some were loaded with ripe clus-
ters ready for the wine-press. At the end of
the orchard there was a magnificent flower-
garden, in which the most fragrant flowers
were blooming. Two springs also bubbled



42 Odysseus

from the ground. One watered the orchara,
and the other ran to the very door of the pal-
ace, and all the people filled their pitchers
there. Such were the gifts Alkinods had re-
ceived from the gods.

CHAPTER X
ODYSSEUS IN THE HALLS OF ALKINOOS

AFTER Odysseus had contemplated these won-
ders to his heart’s content, he entered the main
hall. There he found the leaders of the Phe-
acians bringing offerings of wine to Hermes, as
the hour of sleep had arrived, and this was al-
ways their last ceremony before seeking slum-
ber. No one saw Odysseus as he crossed the
spacious room and came close to the king and
queen, for he was still concealed in the thick
mist which Athena had thrown round him.
Suddenly the cloud vanished, and Odysseus
threw himself at the feet of Areté, and raised
his voice in supplication.

“ Areté,” he prayed, “I have come to thy
husband and to thy feet through many hard-
ships and sorrows. May the gods give thee a
long and happy life. For many years I have
been a wanderer from home and all I love. I



Odysseus in the Falls of Alkinods 43

beg that thou wilt give mea guide and send
me to my own land.”

When Odysseus had spoken these words he
sat down amidst the ashes, close to the fire, and
all the guests grew silent and looked at him
with wonder. Then the oldest of the chiefs
arose and said: “Alkinods, this is not a royal
seat for a stranger, among the cinders of the
hearth. I pray thee, raise him up and place him
on a throne, and order the heralds to fill a cup
with wine, that we may pour a libation to Zeus,
the protector of suppliants, and bid the guest
welcome to our good cheer.”

Then Alkinoés arose and took Odysseus by
the hand. He led him to a splendid throne
but little lower than his own, while the herald
placed atable before him loaded with dainty
food. When Odysseus had eaten and drunk,
the attendants filled the cups to pour libations
in honor of Zeus, and Alkinods said to them:
“Listen, ye leaders and chiefs of the Phza-
cians. To-morrow we shall greet the stranger in
our palace with honors and offer a great sacri-
fice to the gods. And then we will consider
the best way of sending him home. But if we
should find that he is a god instead of a mortal,
we will do what seems best, for the gods do
sometimes visit us in human shape.”



44 Odysseus

Then said Odysseus: “ Nay, Alkinods, I am
not a god, nor like the gods inform or looks. I
am only a wanderer, and I could tell of fearful
sorrows; and I would willingly die if I could
only see my home once more.”

The guests all greeted Odysseus with ap-
proving words, and promised to aid him. Then
they rose, and each man went to his own home.

Odysseus remained in the hall with Areté
and Alkinoés. As they conversed, the queen
noticed the garments of Odysseus, because she
had woven them herself, and she said to
him: “Stranger, who art thou, and from what
land? Didst thou not say thou hadst come
here after many wanderings and voyages on
the stormy sea? Who gave thee garments of
my weaving ?”

Odysseus answered her: “It would not be
easy, gracious queen, to tell about all my hard-
ships and sufferings. Yet I will do thy bid-
ding. I was shipwrecked long since, and
thrown upon an island far out in the sea, where
Calypso, the daughter of Atlas, lives. She
cared for me most kindly, and would have made
me, like herself, an immortal, but I chose in-
stead the hope of seeing my own native land.

The goddess detained me seven long years
on her island before she bade me start for



Odysseus in the Falls of Alkinods 45

home. I built a raft, which she stored with
food, and she sent a pleasant breeze to carry
me across the waters. But Poseidon stirred
the winds and waves against me, and I was
thrown upon the shores of this island, near the
lavers, where thy daughter and her maids went
to wash the household linen. There the prin-
cess found me, and supplied me with food and
the garments I have on.”

“One duty my daughter left undone,” Alki-
nods said. “She should have brought thee
home with her.’ “Do not blame her, I en-
treat,” replied Odysseus, “for she bade me
come with her maids, but I lingered in a grove
to offer a prayer to Athena.” When Alkinoés
had heard this tale from Odysseus, he promised
once more to give him a ship and sailors to es-
cort him home.

Meanwhile the queen bade her servants pre-
pare a bed for the hero out on the portico, and
they covered a couch with shaggy rugs and
purple tapestries, where he could rest. Witha
grateful heart Odysseus arose, and, thanking
the king for his generous hospitality, sought the
bed, where he gave himself to happy dreams.

Odysseus rose early the next morning and
went with Alkinods to the market-place, close
to the sea, where all the Phzeacians had assem-



46 Odysseus

bled. The people gazed with admiration at
their stranger-guest, for Athena lent him great-
er dignity and beauty, and she went among the
crowds, moving their hearts to sympathy with
him.

Alkinods then addressed the assembled mul-
titude: “Hear me, ye chiefs of the Phzacians,”
he said. “This stranger has come to our land
after many wanderings and adventures. And
he asks me to send him back to his own coun-
try. Let us fit out a ship for him quickly and
launch it, and give him fifty-two young men
from among our best sailors, who shall get
everything ready for the long journey.

While they are doing this the stranger shall
come to my halls with the chiefs and princes,
where we will make a great banquet. Summon
also the bard, Demodokos, that he may enliven
the festival with his harp and songs.”

Having spoken, Alkinods rose and led his
guest back to the palace, the princes following
him. Fifty-two youths were soon chosen from
among the best seamen, and they launched a
ship speedily and went up to the royal palace.



CHAPTER XI
THE BANQUET IN HONOR OF ODYSSEUS

ALKINOOS now ordered a sumptuous feast in
honor of his guest. When the table was spread,
the herald who had gone for Demodokos came
in leading the bard, who was blind. The gods
had deprived him of sight, but had bestowed
upon him the gift of song. They gave him
a seat on a silver throne, amid the guests,
and hung his harp against a lofty pillar, close
above his head, where he could easily reach
it.

When all had eaten and drunk as much as
they desired, Demodokos took his lyre and be-
gan to sing about the heroes of Troy. It was
a song whose fame had reached over the whole
world, the story of a friendly strife between
Achilles and Odysseus before Troy, in which
Achilles held that Troy would fall by force,
but Odysseus maintained that it would come
to an end through the cunning of a few brave
Greeks.

All the guests enjoyed listening to the thrill-
ing song, but Odysseus was deeply touched, and
tears fell from his eyes. He brushed them



48 Odysseus

away stealthily, so that no one should observe
them, and drew a large purple veil over his
face until the song was finished, when he put
it away and took a goblet of wine, which he
poured out on the ground as a libation to the
gods.

Again the minstrel took his harp and sang,
and again Odysseus wept. Alkinods noticed
that the song of Demodokos moved Odysseus
to tears, and thought it might be well to stay
the music awhile and begin the games, that the
stranger might witness the athletic skill of the
Phzacians. All the princes instantly arose and
walked down to the market-place, the king
leading and the people following.

When the chiefs had taken their seats a great
number of young men hastened forward to be-
gin the games. Some of them darted over the
plain in a foot-race, raising a cloud of dust.
Others strove with all their might in wrestling-
matches, while some threw the quoit or played
at boxing and leaping. After they had enjoyed
looking at the games, Laodamas, a son of Al-
kinods, said to his friends: “Let us ask the
stranger to take part in the games. His strong
arms and legs and powerful neck show that he
is no weakling. Nor has he lost his youthful
vigor after all his hardships, although nothing



The Banquet in Honor of Odysseus 49

tires a man so much as being tossed about on
the sea.”

Then the friends of Laodamas advised him
to challenge Odysseus to take part in the
games; and this seemed right to the prince, so
he said to him: “ Father, I think thou must be
skilful in these games. Let us see thee try
them. We will not delay thee long. Thy ship
is ready for thee on the sea, and the crew is
there, waiting. But there is no greater glory
or pleasure for a man than to excel in swift-
ness of foot and strength of muscle.”

Odysseus answered him: “ Why dost thou
urge me, O Laodamas? How can I take part
in the games or find any pleasure in them after
all that I have suffered? Here I sit, a sup-
pliant, praying to be sent back to my wife and
home.” Then Euryalos scoffed at him, saying:
“Thou art right, stranger, for thy countenance
shows thou art anything but an athlete.

Methinks thou art the owner of some mer-
chant-vessel. Thou art a trader, whose head is
full of bargains. Such men can take heed of
nothing except how to increase wealth.”

These mocking words vexed Odysseus, and
he retorted : “ My friend, thou dost not speak
like a man of good mind. The gods do not
bestow their gifts equally on all men. To thee



50 Odysseus

they have given great beauty, but they have
denied thee wit. Thy words carry no weight.
Learn, then, that I am not unskilled in the
games. When I was young and strong I was
one of the best athletes. But even now, after
all my shipwrecks and hardships, I will strive
with thee, for thy words are offensive and chal-
lenge me to the proof.”

Having said this, Odysseus seized a much
larger and heavier quoit than the Phzeacian
prince could use, and swinging it in his power-
ful hand he hurled it forth. The stone whirred
through the air and fell to the ground away
beyond the marks of the other disks. Then
Athena took the form of a Phzacian and set
a mark where the quoit fell, and exclaimed as
she did so: “ Stranger, even a blind man could
easily find thy mark, for it is far beyond the
others. Sit down in peace and do not fear that
anybody else can throw so far.” Odysseus was
pleased when he heard these friendly words.
With a light heart he said to the Phzacian
youths: “ Reach my mark, if you can, young
men, and I will send a stone farther yet. But
if you cannot reach it, and prefer a match at
boxing or wrestling or foot-race, come forth. I
am ready to try any of the games with you. I
can throw a spear farther than any of you can



The Banguet in Honor of Odysseus 51

shoot an arrow. I fear nothing unless it may
be the foot-race, for I have lost my strength
with want of food and being tossed by the
waves.”

He ended, and King Alkinoés stepped for-
ward, for the young men were all silent.
“ Stranger,” he said, “thou art our dearly loved
guest, and no one can doubt thy bravery. We
do not boast that we are fine boxers or wrest-
lers. We excel in the dance and are unsur-
passed in sailing ships. Come, then, young
men, show your skill in dancing, that our guest
may tell his people when he reaches his home
how much we outdo all others in that art. And
let a herald hasten to the palace and bring
the lyre of Demodokos, which has been left
there.”

The young men arranged themselves in two
rows on the polished floors and began the dance,
while the minstrel, standing in their midst,
played on the lyre and sang most sweetly..
Odysseus looked on and greatly admired the
swift and rhythmical movements of their feet.
All danced very well; but two of the sons of
the king came out and danced alone, for none
of the others equalled them. One of them held
a golden ball in his hand, and bending back.
ward threw it so high that it seemed to touch



52 Odysseus

the clouds. The other sprang up and caught
it easily before it touched the ground.

They both danced, going through intricate
and rhythmical figures, while the other young
men stood around in a circle and clapped their
nands, keeping time. Then Odysseus said to
Alkinoés: “ Truly, no one excels the Phzacian
princes in dancing. I see the twinkling of their
feet with amazement.”

These words pleased Alkinods greatly, and
he said to his people: “ Listen, my chiefs, for
our guest seems to be a wise man. It becomes
us now to bestow upon him the gifts of hospi-
tality. In this land there are twelve kings.
Iam the thirteenth. Let each one of us bring
a fine cloak, and a tunic, and a talent of gold,
that our guest may see them before he partakes
of the evening banquet. And let Euryalos,
who spoke such scoffing words to him, try to
win back his friendship and bring a costly
gift.” All the chiefs approved the words of
King Alkinodés, and each one sent a servant to
his house to bring a valuable present.

Euryalos cheerfully obeyed the king. He
brought a brass sword with a silver hilt to
Odysseus, and said: “ My father, if I have ut-
tered any offensive word to thee, may the winds
scatter all remembrance of it. May the gods



The Banquet in Honor of Odysseus 53

grant thee a speedy return to thy country, where
thou shalt see thy wife and friends from whom
thou hast so long been separated.”

Odysseus answered: “ Hail to thee, also, my
friend! May the gods give thee all that there
is good, and may no need of this sword ever
come to thee.” Odysseus took the sword and
threw it across his shoulders.

The sun had set, and the servants carried
the gifts to the royal palace, where the queen
took care of them. King Alkinods led the way
to the palace, his guest at his side and the
princes following. When they had taken their
seats on high thrones, the king told his wife to
lay the royal presents in a chest, adding a much
richer cloak and tunic than anyone else had
given as a gift from himself.

Areté did as her husband wished, and placed
a beautiful cup of gold also in the chest, and
led Odysseus up to look at the presents. Then
she taught him how to lock the chest and un-
lock it, and her maids called him to a warm
bath, after which he anointed himself with fra-
grant oil and put on fresh garments.

While he was wending his way to the men
who sat before their wine, he met Nausicaa in
her goddess-like beauty, standing near a pillar.
“Stranger, farewell,” she said. “I wish thee



54 Odysseus

joy and a safe return to thy native land. Do
not forget that I was the first to befriend thee
in the land of the Phzeacians.”

Odysseus answered: “ May the gods be as
sure to favor my return to my home as I
shall be to make a prayer daily in thy behalf,
fair maiden, who hath saved my life.” Then
Odysseus entered the great hall and took his
place at the feast.

CHAPTER XII
ODYSSEUS RELATES HIS ADVENTURES

WHueEN they had all eaten and drunk to their
hearts’ content, the hero begged Demodokos to
sing about the invention of the wooden horse
with which Odysseus had artfully tricked the
Trojans to their own destruction.

The minstrel felt the inspiration of the song,
and began where the Greeks threw firebrands
into their own tents and sailed away from Troy,
pretending that they had given up the war.

He told how the Trojans wondered what to
do with the huge wooden horse which the
enemy had left in their city, whether to hew it
to pieces and burn it, or to drag it to the edge
of a high rock and throw it over, or whether to



Odysseus Relates His Adventures 55

spare it as an act of reverence to the gods.
This last was done, and in the night Odysseus
and his men came out of the great wooden trap
and set fire to the city while the men of Troy
slept.

As Demodokos sang, tears rolled down the
cheeks of Odysseus, but no one noticed his
weeping except the king, who said: “ It is bet-
ter to stop the song of Demodokos, as it does
not delight us all. Ever since the bard began
to sing, our guest has been weeping. He car-
ries some great trouble in his heart. Let the
song cease, and let us all make merry. Let no
grief mar our banquet. And, honored stranger,
tell us the name of thy father, and the city
which is thy home. Our seamen shall take thee
safely to thine own land, although there is a
prophecy that one of our good ships shall be
changed into a high rock, to stand forever in
front of our city, if we show such courtesies to
strangers.

Tell us truly.who thou art and whither thou
hast roamed, what tribes of men thou hast
seen, and why thou dost weep when the min-
strel sings of Troy. Didst thou lose a noble
kinsman there, or a dear friend? For a friend
is often dearer than a brother.” Odysseus. re.
plied: “In truth, O king, it is a pleasant thing



56 Odysseus

to listen to a bard like Demodokos, for his
voice is as sweet as the voice of a god.

And I cannot think of anything more de-
lightful than the joy of a contented people lis-
tening to a great poet and singer while seated
at a feast in a royalhall. But I pine to be at
home, and I will declare my name and tell the
story of my sufferings.

I am the chieftain Odysseus, son of Laertes,
and widely known to fame. I dwell in sunny
Ithaca, whose high mountains are seen from
afar, covered with rustling trees. Around itare
many smaller islands, full of people. Ithaca
has low shores on the east. It is a rugged
island, but it is the sweetest land on earth,
and has a noble race of mortals. When the
Trojan war was at an end, I started for home
with my twelve ships, but a contrary wind
drove us to Ismaros, the city of the Kikoni-
ans.

We captured it and put the inhabitants to
the sword. Then I exhorted my comrades to
fly, but, like madmen, they remained on the
sea-shore. Then they slaughtered a large num-
ber of sheep and oxen and made a feast. The
Kikonians called on their strong neighbors to
come and help them, and they came in swarms
with their brazen spears. They fell upon our



The Lotus-Eaters and the Cyclops 57

men and killed six of them from each ship,
and drove the rest back to their boats.

Brisk handling of our oars soon carried us
out into the sea, but Jove sent a hurricane that
tore our sails and split our masts, so that our
sailors drew them into the ships infear. Two
days and nights we lay helpless in our boats,
worn out with fear and grief, but the third day
the sun shone on us again, and we raised the
masts and sails to take the breeze, hoping to
reach our own land.

CHAPTER XIII
THE LOTUS-EATERS AND THE CYCLOPS

WE sailed onward in a westerly direction,
heading for the Grecian shore, and thought
our trials would soon be at an end. But in
this we were disappointed, for when we were
about to round the cape at the southern point
of Greece, we met an evil wind which always
blows there, and it drove us far to the east, be-
yond the island of Cythera.

Nine days and nine nights we were driven
about on the sea by the violent storm, and on
the tenth we reached the land of the Lotus-
eaters. These men eat flowers that look like



‘58 Odysseus

water-lilies, and they have no other food. We
landed on the shore of the mainland, and my
comrades took their evening meal close to the
boats.

When our hunger was satisfied, I sent out two
of the best men to explore the country about
and find out what sort of people the Lotus-
eaters were. I sent a herald with them, whom
they might send back with the news.

They soon found themselves among the
Lotus-eaters, who were gentle and friendly,
and gave them the lotus plant to eat. This
food is pleasant to the taste, but dangerous;
for anyone who eats of it loses all desire to
return to his own home. He forgets his cares
and troubles, but also his friends.

As soon as my comrades had eaten of the lo-
tus, they became attached to the Lotus-eaters,
and desired to remain with them. They wept
bitterly when I commanded them to return to
the ships, and I was obliged to force them to go.

I bound them down to the benches in the
ships, and the whole company went on board
in haste lest they should never think of their
homes again. Each man bent to his oars, and
the waves were soon white with the beating of
the ships against them as we sailed with all
haste in the direction of our own land.



The Lotus-Eaters and the Cyclops 59

We sailed about on unknown seas and with
sorrowing hearts until we came to the land of
the Cyclops. They are a wild people who have
no laws. They never plough the fields nor plant
them, for everything grows of its own accord
—wheat, and barley, and the vine. The grapes
yield good wine. The Cyclops do not come
together in a friendly way, but live in caves
near the mountain tops, each one in his own
den. They do not care much for one another,
and each rules his wife and children as he likes.

There is a little woody island lying at the
entrance to the land of the Cyclops, on which
swarm numberless wild goats, never disturbed
by human beings, for the Cyclops have no ships
to take them over. This island is very fertile,
but there are no sheep to eat the grass and
no. people to plough the fields. The goats are
the only inhabitants. The island has a harbor
which is safe, and the ships that enter it have
no need of anchors or fastenings.

In the midst of the harbor there is a cliff,
from which bubbles forth a spring of excellent
water, and poplar-trees grow all around it. The
soil is so rich it might bear all kinds of fruit, if
there were anyone to plant them. There are
beautiful meadows all along the coast, which
are gay with yellow fruit and pink blossoms.



60 Odysseus

We were shaping our course toward this
island, and a good breeze brought us there on
a dark night. The moon did not shine and
none of the crew saw the land until we were
upon the shore. We lowered our sails and
rested there until morning. When daylight
appeared we beheld with wonder the island
where the wild goats abounded. My comrades
walked around, admiring the beauty of the
place, while the nymphs, daughters of Zeus,
roused the goats that they might give us milk.
We took our bows and arrows from the ships
immediately and, forming three hunting-parties,
killed a great number of the nimble creatures.
Each of my twelve ships received nine goats as
its share, but mine received ten. The remainder
of the day we passed in eating and drinking.

CHAPTER XIV
THE CAVE OF THE CYCLOPS

THE next day I started with twelve men, the
crew of my own ship, to find out what kind of
men inhabited the country opposite us, leaving
all the other boats and their men on the island:
When we sailed up to the coast of the main-
land, we heard the voices of giants, and the



The Cave of the Cyclops 61

bleating of their sheep and goats. And we saw
a cave with a high roof, over whose entrance
grew laurel shrubs, and many cattle, sheep, and
goats were lying around at rest. We found an
enclosure of rough stone in the form of a court,
with tall pines and leafy oaks at the mouth of
the cave.

The largest giant of all the race of Cyclops
dwelt there and took care of his cattle all alone.
Usually he spent his time prowling all by him-
self around the mountains. He had nothing to
do with his neighbors, but led a solitary life,
plotting wicked deeds. He looked more likea
huge mountain top, with shaggy overhanging
forests, towering above other mountains, than
a human being.

We were soon inside the cave, but we did not
find the owner at home. We had carried with us
a wine-skin full of wine which a priest of Apol-
lo had given us. The wine was very fragrant
and so pleasant that no one who had once tasted
it, could let it alone. We had taken along a
basket of food also, for fear of meeting with
men of great strength and no sense of the
courtesy due to strangers.

As we looked around the cave we wondered
at what we saw. There were baskets all about
heaped with cheeses, and pens of lambs sepa.



62 Odysseus

rated into three folds, the older in one pen,
the younger in another, and the youngest in a
third. And there were pails full of whey, and
buckets of milk. My companions ate as much
of the cheese as they liked, after which they
begged to drive all the lambs and kids down
to the ship.

But I would not allow this. It was my wish
to stay there and see the cave-dweller and find
out what kind of a man he was. I thought he
would give me a handsome present, according
to the laws of hospitality. It was cold in the
cave, so we lit a fire and sat down to wait for
the owner to arrive.

He came toward evening, carrying a load of
wood on his back, which he threw down with
such a crash that my men ran with terror
into the corners of the cave. The giant drove
all such sheep and goats as would give him
milk into the cave, leaving the others in the
outside court, and then closed up the entrance
with a rock so large that twenty-four four-
wheeled wagons could not have moved it.
Having done this, he sat down and milked the
sheep and goats and gave to each its young one.

Next, he curdled half of the milk and put
the curd into woven baskets, but he kept the
other half for his evening meal. When he had



The Cave of the Cyclops 63

ended this work he lit a fire, and seeing the
strangers he began to ask them questions, to
find out who they were. His voice was deep
and frightful, like the rumbling of a volcano,
and our hearts trembled, but I found words to
answer him: ‘ We are Greeks, and come from
Troy. It was our intention to return home,
but contrary winds have driven us on this
shore.

We belong to the army of Agamemnon,
whose fame is very great because he has over-
come a strong city and conquered many na-
tions. But now we throw ourselves at thy feet
and pray that thou wilt receive us as guests, or
else give us the gifts that are due to strangers,
lest the gods avenge us.’

Having said this, I stopped, but the Cy-
clops told us that we were fools to believe in
the gods. ‘The Cyclops,’ he said, ‘care noth-
ing for the gods. We are better than they are.
If I spare thee it will be of my own free will,
and not for fear of the gods. But where are
thy ships? Are they near here or far off?’
This he said hoping to deceive us, but I saw
through his trick, and replied: ‘The storm
has thrown our ships upon the cliffs and broken
them to pieces, and we had to swim for our
lives.’



64 Odysseus

The cruel monster did not answer me again,
but he seized two of my companions and
dashed them to the ground with such force
that they died on the spot. He devoured them
as a lion devours his prey. He left nothing
of them, neither bones nor flesh nor hair. We
wept aloud and prayed to Zeus with our hearts
full of despair.

CHAPTER XV
THE BLINDING OF THE CYCLOPS

WHEN the monster had filled himself with
food, he stretched out on the floor of the cave
to sleep. Then the thought came to me to
thrust a sword into his heart. But this was
not a wise course to take, because we should
never have been able to remove the stone from
the entrance to the cave.

We passed the night in mourning and lamen-
tations. As soon as daylight appeared, the
Cyclops woke up and lit a fire and milked his
sheep again. Then he seized two more of my
companions and devoured them. When his
morning meal was done he rolled the stone
back from the door and drove his beasts out,
not forgetting to secure the entrance. We



The Blinding of the Cyclops 65

could hear his noisy shouts afar off as he led
his flocks over the grassy heights, and we be-
gan to make plans to destroy him.

We found a great club of green olive-wood
in the cave; one that the Cyclops had cut for
his own use. It was as large as the mast of a
ship, and he had laid it away to dry. I cut off
a fathom’s length from this club and handed
the piece to my companions, who smoothed off
its sides and sharpened it at one end. This
being done, I put the sharp end of it into the
fire. The stick became very hard, and then I
hid the weapon under a heap of litter which
was piled up in the cave. We cast lots to see
who should assist me to put out the eye of the
Cyclops when he was asleep.

When evening came the Cyclops returned
to the cave with his fat sheep and kids. He
seemed to suspect that there was mischief afoot,
for he did not leave any of them outside.
After milking the ewes and goats he again
seized two of my companions and made his
supper of them. But I filled a large drinking-
vessel with the wine from our wine-skin and
stepped boldly out and said to him: ‘Here is
a cup of wine which I brought, hoping that
thou wouldst spare my life, O Cyclops, for thy
wrath is boundless.’ He took the cup and



66 Odysseus

drank. The wine delighted him greatly, and
he handed me the cup after emptying it and
said: ‘Give me another draught and tell me
thy name. I will give thee a generous gift,
such as becomes a host. We, too, have wine,
but not such as yours. That tastes like nectar
and ambrosia.’

Three times I filled the cup and brought it
to him, and three times the Cyclops drank it
like a madman. When the wine had over-
powered him, I said to him: ‘Cyclops, thou
dost wish to know my name, and I will tell it,
but thou must give me the present thou hast
promised. My name is Nobody. My father
and mother gave me this name and my friends
all call me by it.’ ‘Then,’ said the Cyclops,
‘I shall eat Nobody last of all. This is my
present.’

After these words he fell asleep and, being
very drunk, he began to spew out the wine ancl
flesh he had taken. I took the piece of olive-
wood which my men had sharpened and put
the point of it into the fire and held it there
until it was a glowing coal. My comrades
stood near me and I encouraged them with
brave words. We thrust the burning stick
into the Cyclops’ eye and put it out. He
howled with pain, and, stung to madness,



Odysseus Leaves the Cyclops 67

he seized the stick and flung it across the
cave.

He called to the other Cyclops, who lived
in divers caves on the surrounding mountains,
while we hid ourselves in fear in the most
remote corners of the cave. The giants heard
him and came running to help him, but they
could not get into the cave. They stood near
the stone, close to the door, and called out:
‘What ails thee, Polyphemus? Is anyone
trying to kill thee?’ ‘Woe is me!’ cried
Polyphemus, ‘Nobody is trying to kill me.’
‘Then why dost thou shout and cry for help?’
said they. ‘If nobody hurts thee, then thou
art not hurt.’

With these words they went off, and we re-
joiced greatly that my trick had deceived them.

CHAPTER XVI

ODYSSEUS AND HIS COMPANIONS LEAVE THE
LAND OF THE CYCLOPS

POLYPHEMUS, groaning with pain, tried to
feel his way with his hands to the mouth of
the cavern. Having succeeded in this, he
rolled back the stone and sat down at the
entrance and stretched out his hands in order



68 Oaysseus

to catch us if we should happen to try to get
out among the sheep.

But we were not so foolish as to be caught
in this way. There were in the cave a number
of stout and woolly rams. Of these I put three
abreast and tied them together with twigs that
happened to be in the cave. Under each mid-
dle ram I tied one of my companions. The
two sheep, one on each side of him, hid the
man completely. For myself I selected the
stoutest ram of the flock, and, seizing his long
shaggy wool with my hands, held fast to him
with my knees and arms.

The sun rose and the animals began to hasten
out to the pastures. The Cyclops, though
nearly exhausted with pain, passed his hands
over the backs of the sheep to find out whether
any of us were trying to ride out of the cave.
He did not find out our trick, and my com-
panions all escaped safely. Last of all, the ram
that carried me came to the door, because I
was so heavy that he could hardly walk with
me hanging to him.

Polyphemus felt of his back and recognized
him at once as his favorite ram, and said:
‘Dearest of all my sheep, why dost thou ge
last? Commonly thou wert the first of the
flock to hasten to the rich pasture and the coo}



Odysseus Leaves the Cyclops 69

spring, just as thou wert the first in the even-
ing to return to thy manger. But to-day thou
art last of all. Dost thou grieve because thy
master hath lost his eye, which Nobody has put
out? But wait a little. He shall not escape
death. Couldst thou only speak, my ram, thou
wouldst tell me at once where the scoundrel is;
then thou shouldst see how I would dash him
against the rocks.’

Speaking such words as these, he let the ram
go. When we were safely out of the cave, we
gladly took to our feet and drove the fat sheep
down to our boat with all haste. Our friends
received us with tears of joy, for they thought
we had surely perished. I made signs to them
not to weep aloud, and to hurry the sheep on
board the ship. They did this with all haste,
and each man took his place at the oars.

When we were beyond the reach of the
Cyclops, I called out to tease him, ‘Ha! Cy-
clops, Cyclops, thou hast not been entertaining
a coward. Zeus and the other gods have
avenged the brave men whom thou didst so
cruelly destroy.’

The Cyclops heard my words and grew furi-
ous. He seized a large rock and threw it with
all his might toward the place where he had
heard my voice.



70 Odysseus

The rock fell in front of my ship, and the
waves which it raised carried us back on shore.
I seized a large pole and shoved the boat back
into the water, commanding my men to ply
their oars vigorously, that we might escape de-
struction. My companions begged me not to
excite the dangerous monster further ; but when
we were a long way out I shouted to him:
‘Cyclops, if ever anybody asks thee who put
out thine eye, tell him it was Odysseus, the son
of Laertes, conqueror of Troy.’

When Polyphemus heard these words he
gave a deep groan, and said to me: ‘Truly did
the wise seer, Telemos, foretell that I was to
be blinded by Odysseus. But I thought there
would comea large and powerful man, not such
an insignificant little fellow who would cheat
me with wine. Come back, Odysseus, and let
me bestow upon you the gifts which are due to
strangers. I will pray to my father, Poseidon,
to give thee a safe and speedy return to thy
native land. He can restore my eye whenever
he will, so I cherish no anger against thee.’

I knew his deceit, however, and replied: ‘I
would rather take thy life, and send thee down
to the dark halls of the dead, where thy father
could never restore thy sight.’

As soon as Polyphemus heard this, he raised



Odysseus Leaves the Cyclops 71

his hands to heaven and prayed to Poseidon.
‘My father, he said, ‘hear me, if in truth ]
am thy son. Grant me thisprayer. May Odys.
seus never return to his own country, or, il
it be thy will that he reach home and friend
again, let his return be late and sorrowful,
May his comrades all be lost, and may he ga
back in a borrowed ship, and find new troubles
waiting for him in his house.’

Poseidon was moved to wrath against me by
this prayer, and determined to take vengeance
on me. The Cyclops seized another stone, much
larger than the last, and swinging it round,
threw it at us with tremendous strength. It
fell close to the ship, but this time it drove the
boat out into the sea and in the direction of the
island where we first landed.

When we reached the island we found the
friends we had left there waiting anxiously for
our return. My men drew their boat up on to
the smooth sand and stepped upon the beach,
taking the sheep along with them. Each man
took an equal share, but they gave me the ram
which had saved my life. We took him out
upon the beach and offered him up as a sacri-
fice to Zeus.

_ But sacrifices were vain, for Zeus had more
evil for us in his mind. We spent the rest of



72 Odysseus

the day on the island, eating and drinking, and
when the sun went down we camped on the
shore for the night. In the morning I called
my men to climb the decks and cut the ropes
that kept us fastened to the shore. With all
speed they went aboard and took their oars in
hand and set sail for home, glad to escape, but
sorrowing for our lost companions.

CHAPTER XVII

THE ADVENTURES OF ODYSSEUS ON THE
ISLAND OF AOLUS

WE sailed about on unknown seas for many
days, when we reached the island where olus
made his abode. This island was surrounded
by smooth rocks and guarded by a wall of
shining brass.

£olus had twelve children, six sons and six
daughters, and they banqueted on an endless
variety of meats from day to day all the year
round. Zolus was a kindly, genial god; he
was master of the winds, and one could hear
the music of sweet pipes in his halls all day,
and the air was fresh and fragrant there.

Zolus welcomed us hospitably and kept us
with him a whole month. He inquired of the



On the Island of olus 73

fate of all our companions in the war with Troy,
and we stated what had happened to them.
Then we prayed him to send us home, and the
god very kindly gave us a sack made of skin
in which he had tied up all the contrary winds,
leaving only the west wind free to carry us
safely home.

I took the great bag of winds and bound it
fast to the main mast of the ship with a silver
chain, so that no rude wind could escape and
blow us out of our way. We sailed along nine
days and nine nights, blown by the friendly
breeze from the west, and on the tenth we saw
in the distance the mountain tops of Ithaca and
the fires along the shore.

And now I was overcome by a heavy sleep,
for I had been guiding the ship, not daring to
trust it to the hand of any of the crew. While
I lay unconscious of what was going on, my
companions talked among themselves and said
they believed that the bag which olus had
given me contained vast amounts of gold and
silver. And they spoke with great jealousy of
the prizes which I had received wherever we
had landed, while they went empty-handed.

The more they talked to one another the
more jealous and angry they grew. They un-
tied the sack and the winds rushed out, much



74 Odysseus

to their astonishment, and seized the ship, driv-
ing it round and round ina furious storm. I
started out of my sleep suddenly and found the
bag open I had so carefully guarded and my
companions weeping bitterly.

For a moment I had a mind to throw myself
into the sea and make an end of my troubles
forever. But the thought came to me that such
an action would not be noble, so I hid my head
in my mantle and lay down in the bottom of the
ship while the violent winds and towering waves
drove us back to the island we had left. We
landed there again, and, having partaken of
some food and wine, I sought the halls of Aolus.

I found the king and his wife and children at
table taking their evening meal. When Aolus
saw me he was amazed, and asked me what had
happened to me. I told him about the sense-
less action of my companions, and begged him
to assist me once more. But with a terrible
voice hereplied: ‘Begone as fast as thou canst
out of my island. I will not befriend a man
who is hated of the gods.’ In this unkind way
he sent me off, and we sadly entered our ships
and made for the open sea, trusting to the
mercy of the winds.



CHAPTER XVIII
ODYSSEUS AT THE HOME OF CIRCE

For six days and six nights we sailed without
interruption, but on the seventh day we reached
_ the city of the Lestrygonians. There the past-
sures are so rich in grass that the fields, which
are grazed by one flock of sheep during the day,
yield abundant food for another flock by night.
The inhabitants were not only inhospitable, but
they received us with a shower of stones, which
they hurled at us and at our galleys. They broke
our ships and killed my companions, spearing
them like fish. Then they carried them ashore
to be devoured. Withthe greatest difficulty I
succeeded in saving one ship and a few com-
panions from the hands of these giants, and I
- fled with them out to the high sea.

* Sadly we continued our course until we
reached an island, where the goddess Circé, a
daughter of the Sun and Ocean, lived. We
landed silently, and gave two days and
nights to rest, for we were worn out with toil
and grief. On the third day I climbed to the
top of a high hill and looked over the island.
Down below I saw a marble palace, surrounded



76 Odysseus

by a thick forest. There was smoke rising
from the grounds, so I resolved to return to my
men and send out some of them to look about
and explore.

A large stag ran down into my path, on his
way toa river to drink, and I thrust my spear
through him and flung him across my neck and
took him to the ship. I threw him at the feet
of my men, who were astonished at his size.
They prepared a banquet at once, and we
feasted upon the meat.

That night we slept on the shore again, and
in the morning I told them that I had seen a
palace standing in a thick wood, and that I
wanted to send several men there to try to
get food. When my companions thought of
all their comrades who had been slain they wept
aloud. But their tears were useless. I divided
them into two equal bands, and we cast lots to
see which party should make the adventure.

The lot fell to Eurylochos and his band of
men. They started forth, and soon came to a
beautiful valley, in which was the splendid
house of Circé, which was built of well-hewn
stone. There were beasts of prey, lions and
wolves, around it. The animals were tame;
they wagged their tails and fawned like dogs,
but the men were afraid of them. Circé was



Odysseus at the Home of Circe 77

weaving in the paiace and singing a beautiful
song. She had bright, sunny hair and a sweet
voice. The men heard her as she went back
and forth weaving, and they called aloud. She
came to the door and threw it wide open and
bade them enter.

Eurylochos alone did not go in, for he
feared that some evil would come of it. The
others followed her, and Circé seated them on
thrones and gave them food and wine, but in
the wine she had secretly infused a magic juice
which made them forget home and friends and
all desire to see their native land.

When they had eaten and drunk to their
hearts’ content, she waved her wand over them,
and at once the poor wretches were changed
into grunting pigs, which she shut up in pig-
sties and threw acorns and other food fit for
swine before them. Although thus transformed
and covered with bristles, they still retained the
human mind.

Eurylochos stayed a long time outside await-
ing the return of his companions. But as they
tarried so long, he hastened back to the ship to
tell the news. Thereupon I quickly hung my
sword over my shoulder and, taking my bow
and arrows, hurried off alone, and soon found
myself not far from Circé’s palace.



CHAPTER XIX

CIRCE INSTRUCTS ODYSSEUS CONCERNING HIS
DESCENT TO HADES

As I lingered in that dangerous valley there
appeared to mea youth whom I knew at once
to be Hermes, the messenger of the gods. He
gently took hold of my hand and, looking com-
passionately on me, said: ‘Thou most unhappy
man! Why art thou roaming alone in these
wild parts? Or art thou bound on the errand
of delivering thy friends who have all been
changed by Circé into swine? Much doI fear —
that thou mayest meet with the same fate.
Listen to my words and heed them well if
thou wouldst destroy the treacherous schemes
of Circé.

Take this little flower. Its name is Moly
among the gods, and no wicked sorcery can
hurt the man who treasures it carefully. Its
root is black. Its blossom is as white as milk,
and it is hard for men to tear it from the
ground. Take this herb and go fearlessly into
the dwelling of the sorceress; it will guard thee
against all mishap. She will bring thee a bowl
of wine mingled with the juice of enchantment,



Circé Instructs Odysseus 79

but do not fear to eat or drink anything she
may offer thee, and when she touches thy head
with her magic wand, then rush upon her
quickly with drawn sword as though about to
slay her. She will crouch in fear and entreat
thee with soft words to spare her. But do not
give way to her until she has pledged herself
by the great oath of the gods to do thee no
harm.’

When Hermes had spoken thus he left me, to
return to high Olympos, and I walked to the
house of Circé with a braver heart. AsI came
near the palace I called out to the goddess with
a loud voice, and she threw open the doors for
me to enter. She bade me sit down on a beau-
tiful throne and placed a golden foot-stool under
my feet. Then she gave me the dangerous cup
and I drank it off, but her charm did not work.

Scarcely had I drained the cup when the god-
dess struck me with her wand and said: ‘ Off
with you! Go to the pigsty, where friends
await thy coming!’ In a twinkling I had my
sword in hand and rushed upon her as if to
kill her. Circé shrieked with fear and fell on
her knees to implore my mercy. ‘Who art
thou and whence dost thou come?’ said Circé.
‘Thou art the first man over whom my magic
wine has had no power. Art thou really that



80 Odysseus

Odysseus of whom Hermes told me that he
was to come here after many wanderings?
But put up thy sword and cease to be angry
with me and let us trust each other.’

I answered her: ‘O, goddess, how can I
have faith inthy words, since thou hast changed
my companions into swine and dost plot the
same fate for me? Swear me the great oath
that thou wilt not harm me, and I shall trust
thy words.’

Circé at once took the great oath, that she
would never again try to do me any harm, and
she ordered her servants to spread a feast be-
foreme. But Ihad no desire to eat. I sat down
in silence, my mind full of grief and doubt.

When Circé saw that I did not touch the
food she said: ‘Why art thou so quiet and
speechless? And why dost thou not taste the
food and wine? I have pledged myself by the
great oath to do thee no harm!’ But I an-
swered: ‘What man with a loyal heart, O
goddess, could eat and drink with any pleas.
ure while his comrades are kept in bondage
and degradation? If thou art really kind and
wouldst have me enjoy this bounteous feast,
O let me see my dear companions free once
more!’

The goddess took her wand and went to



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'2011-12-30T10:52:21-05:00'
describe
'17146' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEF' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
b34206b29b2595dc10aeaf07ce11bc29
8aa8d7183568c5fa381409a4cc1bfef4334395f6
'2011-12-30T10:50:38-05:00'
describe
'9825068' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEG' 'sip-files00002.tif'
5ada546cd9b83de516b70b323076f314
11c3624bd342549dfe4be781331087cd4b028f86
'2011-12-30T10:50:19-05:00'
describe
'4287' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEH' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
2a7bd65e88eba21b246f88c4ce2bc3ff
b3e0128bf80a2389aa87897a311ac413f215f7ba
'2011-12-30T10:51:45-05:00'
describe
'313647' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEI' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
60d1bad3146a37c6fcf184841563b2c7
45599c383b3936d925dd5207a789a639f81a1136
'2011-12-30T10:48:27-05:00'
describe
'19989' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEJ' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
5abe2712ddf267cab3db30e4e1abddf1
b231e92f92cc78524b47583ef05a809dc03e5732
'2011-12-30T10:50:32-05:00'
describe
'489' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEK' 'sip-files00005.pro'
fdab5bd8a5e0bc4cc8dfd7326683b6e7
c9c987c1d1414fa401af93b63839d9698fcb93d6
'2011-12-30T10:49:17-05:00'
describe
'4510' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEL' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
b7d36b6afd1193a8a8851329f4e284fe
98a0cf2723588b487a51497f6b761bdf827a534e
'2011-12-30T10:48:16-05:00'
describe
'2526912' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEM' 'sip-files00005.tif'
81f33dd6035ce078b9082c4c17b66393
5f99bd42e6ec72253c01d47a8c36ce19f38734c6
'2011-12-30T10:47:24-05:00'
describe
'37' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEN' 'sip-files00005.txt'
6210e38a233b417335922272c7e734fa
a4d50c2071c02974a2d3fac7b5ff9c14e3bc4ef9
'2011-12-30T10:50:44-05:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEO' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
993f128c56ff9db3c7a66d3f77a66b34
c50b4ae06c7c6f85472f48f6266639b3c7ab52cb
'2011-12-30T10:49:54-05:00'
describe
'313618' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEP' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
1b853ae7a78edc8224eb4203216809d0
737bda7f886b733286c230117d47d56a6c72de35
'2011-12-30T10:53:14-05:00'
describe
'158008' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEQ' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
7b578b975b320805783cac0246fbc603
8dbde2f25c6699647875c5d79527d8e893d0a321
'2011-12-30T10:49:21-05:00'
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFER' 'sip-files00008.pro'
30575f672023ccd2abbfb244b847d992
1d89ad3567fb96049fa96e47e33e14bc256eed51
'2011-12-30T10:48:23-05:00'
describe
'42493' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFES' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
d95a24fdfc8f549d3ff46210e7593130
e35a135610005352c6a123281518b1bb9b214f69
'2011-12-30T10:52:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFET' 'sip-files00008.tif'
a4f4488a900d68f654687063e11e484e
81e1f825effd979d061c08fbfada9944f9234151
'2011-12-30T10:51:54-05:00'
describe
'145' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEU' 'sip-files00008.txt'
28acf65865dcd8a2abae95fa2616d657
3671c11aed46975342d63cc7f5751fc546e23e91
'2011-12-30T10:51:53-05:00'
describe
'11466' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEV' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
a2424da05a7c75141c3e4e93033de7be
3580b18d0a34331b99e43a00138634af4fee6a9b
'2011-12-30T10:48:13-05:00'
describe
'313566' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEW' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
19f6164fa3beb473245d5d8d58090127
4a1a1c003ad4593d65e31e5df2debaab18450727
'2011-12-30T10:51:56-05:00'
describe
'64125' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEX' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
efae26e8569881ba87c3946b22118f68
c4a888b9fa3d252e01d2d35ea9909f5ee984e670
'2011-12-30T10:49:44-05:00'
describe
'17500' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEY' 'sip-files00009.pro'
9f31a93338bc31087fa1eca0ebcdfe95
8b1d31126f2b02218f58cf944fd9af9449837aa7
'2011-12-30T10:49:14-05:00'
describe
'18835' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFEZ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
b1428a196fe50a026791e106f0734f0a
c102fff39f379f87208804f50efe945ed948385e
'2011-12-30T10:50:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFA' 'sip-files00009.tif'
4ab3432adab2f6eb633b24505ad97e17
4a8d03a1747c5bcb76fb8ed3d76b923a936da3cf
'2011-12-30T10:51:28-05:00'
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFB' 'sip-files00009.txt'
2ff18f218a29c3e6821505d1041ba58a
146e0f2a185139431c89221da9920ab11ca207b7
'2011-12-30T10:50:50-05:00'
describe
'5812' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFC' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
010fe8898f07fb792409ec1f4b6dff6f
6f743861d579d60935fd313c2a53543991c6e350
'2011-12-30T10:49:56-05:00'
describe
'313710' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFD' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
72f66cea06439446333befca7053eaca
b0bef6c9f712d3c7977dd0bf58d6b049ce2d5ace
'2011-12-30T10:53:19-05:00'
describe
'30471' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFE' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
96c5d2a31711416250c4085ceb628735
132c58f2093a13d1faa5b37a7325310d64ba8f55
'2011-12-30T10:50:45-05:00'
describe
'2451' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFF' 'sip-files00010.pro'
206e1a5166ce3f75624b94e42903c7af
f5b2f6d60f78145d0c24cf69da519fa922863180
'2011-12-30T10:48:10-05:00'
describe
'7080' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFG' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
ee21aca63e68f73f6187bdc9f610d883
876de2411114795ebb7698b8b2297439b3075d9c
'2011-12-30T10:51:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFH' 'sip-files00010.tif'
93848e319d27641dd314b3a181c8d1c9
6cab75a29dad9baa93f61345b8b9dfd74d7c23ce
'2011-12-30T10:47:21-05:00'
describe
'169' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFI' 'sip-files00010.txt'
ec9775c19e82d82224f84741e8d5e15e
2a7998c580a9f0e0fef943a7741954cdb716725b
'2011-12-30T10:50:07-05:00'
describe
'2045' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFJ' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
517a07c5549c2d8eea88fb614e14c1a2
4c82146dc49f75735d922658cfc3aeeaad9c31e8
'2011-12-30T10:53:22-05:00'
describe
'313518' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFK' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
d42f716d7a5f7039b0da47c290d4ded6
c8d02c723649bd0ac914ffb414b395f83e33d7f7
'2011-12-30T10:51:24-05:00'
describe
'34535' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFL' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
ebe1e296e6f28e7384b36c13cf10979e
20ffe7cd202e1e98ef637256eeb07b320d63d74c
'2011-12-30T10:49:13-05:00'
describe
'5945' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFM' 'sip-files00011.pro'
b68b866fd4b61c15ed32cedbfa6dcb3d
59ddb27bf0d1805fe408ba67717152b08ab8d0ad
'2011-12-30T10:48:43-05:00'
describe
'9036' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFN' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
d91aaf5a8782ecdca88d879fb3225a2b
29b61e1d68f780727ac9aee65b62ee78fadeafce
'2011-12-30T10:48:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFO' 'sip-files00011.tif'
c8f09d97a2ca952970c6bb5e46632472
ff6d4223257016390e7737a64b55cc3b90e29592
'2011-12-30T10:48:14-05:00'
describe
'378' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFP' 'sip-files00011.txt'
94ac9db92193bae1570a7d8492cd1252
897d69c660d9108a92dc7c99149ae8a62c19bd33
'2011-12-30T10:52:41-05:00'
describe
'2776' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFQ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
6e6841ec6f9a6ba42271ad64b4acf406
a83e36a4a5d6a4e55d3220bdad4dd3dc5d8e2253
describe
'313682' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFR' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
10fff54e56ed766824b2c66918b8a5fb
bd2606e9c76239c3c59abc5849ed2ae81ec6261e
'2011-12-30T10:50:05-05:00'
describe
'52699' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFS' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
08d15dd232ca9d089f931b4365580d77
89d9883bf910cb72765b5cef380d83121128bb92
'2011-12-30T10:48:44-05:00'
describe
'13590' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFT' 'sip-files00013.pro'
666023f54b572fc44712ca44c8e0605d
4f0716cce6b01e210f2bb15d8060b3d5f79328e7
'2011-12-30T10:48:39-05:00'
describe
'17215' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFU' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
c42bb33da0d193c2d80f60873da35b3a
3a6543815a431ca1d43474376b818946024c6095
'2011-12-30T10:50:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFV' 'sip-files00013.tif'
7cb19241885de7057e0cb3789fe57381
7519a76ecbd2021b2643d237029989f604f36fd3
'2011-12-30T10:53:13-05:00'
describe
'761' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFW' 'sip-files00013.txt'
4f5594153ad139e15eb7293271e631f4
92e0edf83a6f104180dee822d70fa9c146cb542f
describe
'5668' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFX' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
752cc1c849e23350d1aa5195374638fa
0a4f66a3bd3430ab5b2f60673bb189b43b31029d
'2011-12-30T10:50:04-05:00'
describe
'313754' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFY' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
c72e5660320dfe764c367136ca28eaf8
4b0947f6f37bf3bca0f39f067ffd3a4c22680f2d
'2011-12-30T10:49:46-05:00'
describe
'96110' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFFZ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
fc005dff04c9b1ee7bba429c5aaed56e
9ae2d9587055bb5697a652018717d6096f2c3b05
'2011-12-30T10:50:22-05:00'
describe
'28988' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGA' 'sip-files00014.pro'
2e8c9e30e63cbefcd24a3537002a2989
26b071a88b778ab51d05f6986baeb541904754ba
'2011-12-30T10:47:59-05:00'
describe
'31858' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGB' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
f79e01f4723366b322a8c392ef7f0039
71b56148661da6b117a29020a319385b6267627d
'2011-12-30T10:50:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGC' 'sip-files00014.tif'
ad5595693255f7cc575b9b123802f59c
f23afd0414a2f671283d386bc538adab252e10c4
'2011-12-30T10:47:58-05:00'
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGD' 'sip-files00014.txt'
754d9161f5d718a5ad8dbfd57a52e15f
5272937e318517599cc04732bc52ec2d7b1d11a8
'2011-12-30T10:49:45-05:00'
describe
'9669' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGE' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
45bb5500ad3b031a3d5fad9439005001
ea8459da23f4d3daf04c04a396130a8a0daa0d31
'2011-12-30T10:47:23-05:00'
describe
'313722' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGF' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
647e2171a9e9fafc9da6612065f3e5fd
13bea97a585854aefcce926ca66f438a90cec2fe
'2011-12-30T10:51:50-05:00'
describe
'94087' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGG' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
1e9b493a5b6c92b0f894d062f41653b9
09655568c2cd95c001ee40b14175d5ef4fc9bc8e
'2011-12-30T10:52:01-05:00'
describe
'21460' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGH' 'sip-files00015.pro'
b0fa92bd47e62cf391ca25d2c4578386
c0176ebf1ce25aacce04709da46a469cc6fa764f
'2011-12-30T10:49:47-05:00'
describe
'30576' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGI' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
9e4f8b49bb4d117539778f4931286059
8377cbe4e13bbf828a259e6f3550fabeb0d1f800
'2011-12-30T10:48:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGJ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
63fe95fb621b06f65aa453c4be0cb899
85b9d3bae22b2830059c9fe97653d94bfd3c0943
'2011-12-30T10:49:16-05:00'
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGK' 'sip-files00015.txt'
c16b305661a1f56e5d9ef169010a4f04
24206183d37b75d8d08429d70a64907e24ddfab0
'2011-12-30T10:52:42-05:00'
describe
'8860' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGL' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
fef522bdd76f95607a52eef68a6c60a0
3537dc5d820c5cd82f413345cfb9c5520357080d
'2011-12-30T10:50:31-05:00'
describe
'313513' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGM' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
5ea68ecf01f8cd9d621227012ed9e700
eb0c27796cf6bdfd142bed1ca994966097cd881e
describe
'49054' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGN' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
2e3a643e7846735f2e678be193a8ab56
130df764a3503693f0a2b8904104086b6c2edac1
describe
'11951' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGO' 'sip-files00016.pro'
b0d479711f49844bedde3bfbeb2520d2
8943a4f03d57d92cb02d40753dddd88004de2b56
'2011-12-30T10:51:26-05:00'
describe
'15200' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGP' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
4a3eca8ffb70a35ffacf0aa1fe944c0c
5240c4437e6b8b140dbb60d5fd2b948b14ace6d4
'2011-12-30T10:47:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGQ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
c0238302da6da326ba56f015197a4cd2
4b6effe58e58712684ea3d90cafd0355480b3f0a
'2011-12-30T10:51:00-05:00'
describe
'584' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGR' 'sip-files00016.txt'
f7e4eefb496374853e336cf256ed9fb3
c27aee423fe34b3e99169d3ec5a2ea0941747534
'2011-12-30T10:49:06-05:00'
describe
'4479' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGS' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
732b5b798c4b25053d6739f28e7d0616
c9035e130f7f754a10dc59638a356f4b3123efc6
'2011-12-30T10:52:25-05:00'
describe
'313365' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGT' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
8a4a9d9d5672af61a831605f4ec6e0e5
11a0f1e92de3fc08d8ea8cd6bfeb88ddb391a4e8
'2011-12-30T10:48:25-05:00'
describe
'44150' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGU' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
3ba46ffd9469066fcd05d19ca3cf6763
06b87f31e41c8b38300e61712a6639ed57657535
'2011-12-30T10:52:53-05:00'
describe
'9721' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGV' 'sip-files00017.pro'
53423ba3edda1fd9c09c9255ebfd418b
cd2ccc9cdcfd7bad9e7c3e9ac5668c06d81de67b
'2011-12-30T10:48:29-05:00'
describe
'13845' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGW' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
d085c29f775443350462b3b25f6f35ab
6a769f9df67a12dc301cdc41b576ab9071be793e
describe
'2526100' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGX' 'sip-files00017.tif'
d5c28ac2c9b6dd6c6e7b49a83bb65d42
4948aa6e3cb6fa44e9f7cd92084af54d33b3de68
describe
'595' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGY' 'sip-files00017.txt'
d35ac8f1dd082b0960cc0ab94c374c62
d80aa4ff2cec8be9f4a7d9c14e94ba4be9cbca43
'2011-12-30T10:53:08-05:00'
describe
'4435' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFGZ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
7ca4858e70d4ac9bdda2e5565703ff8d
5b77c6ffbc72fa952d5790eb7ab7b7eb69d92bd4
'2011-12-30T10:51:29-05:00'
describe
'313802' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHA' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
075c0bd05ec0fd554a3c08f0219309d9
f3ba8d4e41bec0d549fb76dc26a4b7900bcbe58c
'2011-12-30T10:53:04-05:00'
describe
'20938' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHB' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
52dc9212b1dedfce92f5f20c6b0db9b9
03464c0322215fc0d3ac137123e54ad9db00d720
'2011-12-30T10:50:58-05:00'
describe
'4087' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHC' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
bf45a35736e8b89df6c835687babc47a
02f909315555f2080ae7a6ac7c87c371ad8bb5d3
'2011-12-30T10:52:16-05:00'
describe
'2528140' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHD' 'sip-files00018.tif'
593caee47e1dbd6f9be886549ea94d25
90623f9dc3caebb5a71f111b56fd68d5afa95ae5
'2011-12-30T10:50:11-05:00'
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHE' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
7e714d0a4d5ff34a9a27eefa05527530
771b5d63ccf635dfd5bd2782d609835afda047e6
'2011-12-30T10:50:06-05:00'
describe
'313497' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHF' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
be046e34db9409549dc563a830b620ec
c9aca9f9597f4ab915347734c98b8c5911a3aa35
describe
'112065' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHG' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
e4d0039fe3fa31ddc3728887eeffcfa4
a47b39bf1faaec900f9267ded80cc80a061a6a97
'2011-12-30T10:49:26-05:00'
describe
'27197' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHH' 'sip-files00019.pro'
8ff08773a68fd37b7eef5a80288b8778
73c58021085b96278db760cc6dbe0128411380bf
'2011-12-30T10:49:36-05:00'
describe
'36397' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHI' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
08c163aa39d42b18cc09b9605b883ecc
88dfd3aaef1cdfce01edc5bb41e64bf949c0a223
'2011-12-30T10:50:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHJ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
96b21cb364fc4192d993f6a55575e787
8bb1ed759cbd493124e26fb9979d31eafdd3a846
'2011-12-30T10:52:15-05:00'
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHK' 'sip-files00019.txt'
f22ab1033439db3a7a9ababe7928fa6e
0bab4a7556b59076cb5045b73a18931929bcc088
'2011-12-30T10:49:04-05:00'
describe
'9635' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHL' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
4b926ec8c5b2a232e153ab49d89c1d68
543b368924ec88cd532a9c73fc81908a97b392ac
'2011-12-30T10:53:26-05:00'
describe
'313761' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHM' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
e8c547220d8dc3b0a0500365d086204b
228a29cdbb3609bb71ae03400477b2308ee06c51
'2011-12-30T10:48:02-05:00'
describe
'128913' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHN' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
c05b48195789869420f5bd586426b27f
636628645ba82d2b1823de44f2c79d32dbb2ef3e
'2011-12-30T10:52:43-05:00'
describe
'32824' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHO' 'sip-files00020.pro'
a89f4c68548fe824eba1590887d38040
2cf7e276c2ec814b208f1d739ad7b9d06aacf202
'2011-12-30T10:51:48-05:00'
describe
'42958' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHP' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
ddb12061070ef24445b0b973b00375a0
5550bfc248b171acaf1629ab2da86d0cb07b89a9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHQ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
00b9a4e4850fbbca73f34afdcadd4731
d36c778fedd4dcd84802ed8acedb0bc13c3c98dc
'2011-12-30T10:49:30-05:00'
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHR' 'sip-files00020.txt'
f3cdfe204ab4a4d3e3d00da7f919637b
0644738f332ccb7daaca2e0027b310877c0b33ae
'2011-12-30T10:50:12-05:00'
describe
'11440' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHS' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
8c65a255b0b864a65803946ea3bc8c0e
408ec5ae92e4d085719af4d1c802297249302ee7
'2011-12-30T10:50:47-05:00'
describe
'313717' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHT' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
2835b326fea9907375267679aed08f17
ab5195524d66ff7b1a59b56033f391bb9df669dc
describe
'134761' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHU' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
fda1d37fdae2fc4989b9d6b5ff606a06
3295198d319047523e62326c1d3947a3130a26de
'2011-12-30T10:52:52-05:00'
describe
'33361' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHV' 'sip-files00021.pro'
42dca206b13b3ca4d147c0264d5e030b
d65f7e6e503dd922bd27f550d7224825303bea81
'2011-12-30T10:47:40-05:00'
describe
'45229' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHW' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
63314a32483a12775e3ae020c462bcb7
01e52b33b4a1be67ef38d098592e1e6387cf22fd
'2011-12-30T10:53:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHX' 'sip-files00021.tif'
e3bf3c1c148bd469ae1c57f8752a7b54
41c8c81879b050ef030891e3e443b837433ed596
'2011-12-30T10:49:28-05:00'
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHY' 'sip-files00021.txt'
d686a2462d3bebde0fd87a22b5c563b6
ccb719920bdda3d0f0a6ecbb36590cabc1b515a5
'2011-12-30T10:51:15-05:00'
describe
'11473' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFHZ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
1dea2a6c6f7434e62eea8289fb04bed8
33d25d4335629aa5ae68b35925455e704ade28e9
'2011-12-30T10:50:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIA' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
387c7ede2220e50aa7b5e9794aedd11f
374a890e54c56fd18c3e8cb7362695f825d5ecb7
describe
'135129' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIB' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
dd1e5a0ec2642d50cc38aae0baaaccd4
d56006205e8f2242ab07bc31e230c422716eefd2
'2011-12-30T10:51:08-05:00'
describe
'32869' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIC' 'sip-files00022.pro'
032260efba1faed09b64d3b8feed5cb4
6b3d8e15e41eae4f520e31996bb546a7ee2f6519
'2011-12-30T10:52:39-05:00'
describe
'44340' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFID' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
d8eb62e39190d7eab26b540b1e564142
f5c513d2b52165beaf311e5a6bb59fc1ef65ce44
'2011-12-30T10:50:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIE' 'sip-files00022.tif'
d2c579bd5fa8adffb77084146896c0a4
70cc192227f2dc3fe946b0120aa3c9b61936030e
'2011-12-30T10:49:32-05:00'
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIF' 'sip-files00022.txt'
6d01a6d0a1a601cc225ee0b181b79d32
24214441ca74119333cb4e136d35f24756a3463d
'2011-12-30T10:51:18-05:00'
describe
'11255' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIG' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
d0cbbf32a92fae3b93a69fd8b32fa427
f8ecda083e37184d8b3864fa3f85c5ff0e4c340d
'2011-12-30T10:50:23-05:00'
describe
'313542' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIH' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
5fa7fdc76bf2f359b40e39ba70639995
b58d4c93bb991f00262aaa17c0b29f5dee41a41a
'2011-12-30T10:49:25-05:00'
describe
'60756' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFII' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
b75e34d50c8d7457110aa6970da1d17d
99b30f51efb52d98dabf2436843b7c1ef55fc4cf
'2011-12-30T10:50:02-05:00'
describe
'11343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIJ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
75a2bb5b32d73ffcf00d6afc3a485d66
3bac717ea2bd49fc83d852e78eb732ec933ec722
'2011-12-30T10:49:52-05:00'
describe
'17746' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIK' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
b456cd147e588e2799134b52f804c5a8
3f236c8aac996dd80c32d1e4dd2671440a232939
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIL' 'sip-files00023.tif'
2cb3a60450c85b031b45a8c1fc78973e
2fee946e11a3226b5ea2f7288f57611e295f93f3
'2011-12-30T10:51:10-05:00'
describe
'503' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIM' 'sip-files00023.txt'
e5a054d04b9d49dda2ae193013f81be0
9b4785fc44ef85b08b6d144288e51408cb92a9da
describe
'4825' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIN' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
fc8bd5f6e1eaffc097b19b938ad8b474
fde64688310d0f50c1ca21a0c66a9115fe8d88df
describe
'313584' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIO' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
ea259792adc6dc65eddc732b93873cfd
0f2590c0417ff0b87a10b9f08fdaee4159361f1b
'2011-12-30T10:49:55-05:00'
describe
'27154' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIP' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
1787a8944f9f901533529d1155dd222e
3fade5e09e7d043fe2c33c743eb98aeea4942d72
'2011-12-30T10:49:18-05:00'
describe
'1757' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIQ' 'sip-files00025.pro'
2c6bc3739844548f092757e1e30fa81e
3b46a558fd07fd5870d1b2f0fb82d37fa9940f6c
'2011-12-30T10:52:06-05:00'
describe
'6655' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIR' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
d430b0016ff61ad7732a2b67cdc3138c
8d82d822cb8507582de2772a31f450f85ca9a4fa
'2011-12-30T10:51:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIS' 'sip-files00025.tif'
72fcc884b9f24903308e1b239a0a4d1b
56fcbd288e681f4b4e1d7388c35a50514eb93e01
'2011-12-30T10:52:18-05:00'
describe
'108' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIT' 'sip-files00025.txt'
4e46101ffc445889085b895213ba09bb
0cd80a84f2144c37f5b5178a430bbe7c79640b75
'2011-12-30T10:51:23-05:00'
describe
'2183' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIU' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
6ce00773cafacccc4c452d86df8690a8
c465aa14171643c6a00abb86d8f9256f6dab9605
'2011-12-30T10:47:43-05:00'
describe
'313721' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIV' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
2de1c60a32bdb66669b7c63e0fa366bb
e259a0edf47e3b6f72737eadaaf9bdb94e9352d6
'2011-12-30T10:49:03-05:00'
describe
'22349' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIW' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
7b5bb614ecade59e62a5a82b354f652f
0a65175a2d82ed48ed3dce0d427c61150d7dae38
'2011-12-30T10:49:02-05:00'
describe
'3986' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIX' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
b9280eb866c590c33cd37343dc0389eb
570e8e8cf0b0915d0d9416c294955d4769aaa032
'2011-12-30T10:50:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIY' 'sip-files00026.tif'
ed11b7ac697af61753ccada16557d9d0
e534f003b6c5a105faab4fb8e28dbf5c9c80c4db
'2011-12-30T10:53:15-05:00'
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFIZ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
adb5fd7e75bef81ea4bdf8ab8f3f2fab
9811e44a69264956aab1b603355ddbbf1096f8bd
'2011-12-30T10:51:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJA' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
feabf25f7270c044a09a9f7d3d818273
dfc06dad5d0f9eeaa5552de38db35622706471bc
'2011-12-30T10:52:38-05:00'
describe
'104939' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJB' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
7ba015dbace67a507da565a3355b3ef4
160b85a9a20cf9dd81e8c343098d77876b59cd18
'2011-12-30T10:52:22-05:00'
describe
'24387' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJC' 'sip-files00027.pro'
4c5f6327a222add8df42cd7d95482720
01b3be722c116eef4a119d5a96d28f9dc46439f4
'2011-12-30T10:51:35-05:00'
describe
'33631' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJD' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
59aba044615221cd8806b952edbc532b
b897c4080a01edf1de6824a35290ee08c1ae7a04
'2011-12-30T10:50:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJE' 'sip-files00027.tif'
a23b88e46c90b81a1dfddbe1c694da9d
7e65fc23087962644eb3db7f27ec0028a7accdc1
'2011-12-30T10:48:34-05:00'
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJF' 'sip-files00027.txt'
95d86ca8c725c77aca83ca0e864a2b70
63504cd4ceeb6a489dadf700dbdd4afeee1acc26
describe
'8833' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJG' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
cff753ca289a2df3acc0485744d0b0b4
23fe0200dc832c2eac3f4bd5ba0cf49ad6544e8d
describe
'313740' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJH' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
1ae796068b3027b85465eba3603de061
2cdced32d52a079f349ad2330f28fa841d795347
'2011-12-30T10:48:24-05:00'
describe
'131745' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJI' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
c15083f0d58d36a805b30b3ab7fd2ad8
53d02e18568f5220fe2c94fb9871be37d8eba240
describe
'33213' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJJ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
ad69cacac8f243e738ce3eda5b5e4bc4
53a44f58992be1f0e4f753230e79bc13219a23a9
'2011-12-30T10:47:52-05:00'
describe
'44138' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJK' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
a329eb867eb48dd41b1f57b4e7c03ce7
7635aec3d5a85370c02a65e15f39f1342ecc18a1
'2011-12-30T10:50:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJL' 'sip-files00028.tif'
9086cecaeb8a8942877c3655f46d97fe
0cd03708fa978e1ba4f664bbbf075c9207ef8515
'2011-12-30T10:49:49-05:00'
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJM' 'sip-files00028.txt'
e6557bd0a9820676b275fde012af1900
ed758d6b30996b6f137afccbe8ff177a5f198147
describe
'11335' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJN' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
043045a02526d10cd3b933dcb2a15916
656e4f034a83b717b6e38376f7554dd3ec7c3f9d
'2011-12-30T10:52:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJO' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
842bcc6ebcaa8c8da21dbb2030f9a68f
94a06c4d8cc576f62a22d956c18e5c478369770c
describe
'131747' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJP' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
66fec1071d3b12c586dff06828d62834
26328af87e506842d47e69152d3aad25612b3dee
describe
'32231' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJQ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
6206ec9af9d996032a3faf8343d13493
8c5d5992920aa4e03ffc83a90fcb6830846eca3a
'2011-12-30T10:51:27-05:00'
describe
'43556' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJR' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
f7485c81b7dd5b43ee6bae9f7df5d13e
aa764ac483777d49c639ab3e3799cdc0a27a24bc
'2011-12-30T10:52:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJS' 'sip-files00029.tif'
bf06e2661ca8bf66373eb7657bba6839
fd7203621b7354924787312aa96048c5a2d3eb19
'2011-12-30T10:48:52-05:00'
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJT' 'sip-files00029.txt'
7f689ecfc51d2929fe7428a597e1bb8e
fcaf825950527f531f4b7c01bb30bfd55db63cf7
describe
'11237' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJU' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
f31ec65b837e5cf798e9d42b2e9bbc29
98e8605bf9bcd8a6b2ea1c2684589c1086977135
describe
'313755' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJV' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
bfec7d397239cbefee06c2c87d8c59fe
60b7d5eea46f55bdd0cdb6f030dbc266f973e0c5
'2011-12-30T10:51:52-05:00'
describe
'113446' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJW' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
55c10225b1d0d3df74c158c6cf8d9cf6
90f9ca081e0bf2f94936b681afe0061924a5475c
'2011-12-30T10:47:30-05:00'
describe
'26354' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJX' 'sip-files00030.pro'
6445afd8af6580bdab879f81bd467e57
ee8a09f336d8e3cea63a14ed85deefd2110c900b
'2011-12-30T10:49:31-05:00'
describe
'36774' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJY' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
b5ee3786423fa1af0332ff70777cf90c
6bbdedf966f13d0837577c65bea017b367072cf1
'2011-12-30T10:52:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFJZ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
0c2c46d52a061d7d7c1c710b92b109b6
566a0c36ba5a9b4458d5a0173dbf461c18ad478a
'2011-12-30T10:47:51-05:00'
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKA' 'sip-files00030.txt'
dce5dc835c3e9ea31db1e16fb8a4b68f
a28d304184c37fa7192eeb4fa44058460d622ab8
'2011-12-30T10:53:12-05:00'
describe
'10374' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKB' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
9a4181a21f0c0b9510509ef6de7652e7
4bff66292aca178b7841bd4596f5f22b352a485f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKC' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
b15bf238156f67f27ad85e66c01b20b4
4dcd5c2f1a3e105b3f2f36e9f866c5f8c6f674e4
'2011-12-30T10:51:39-05:00'
describe
'129171' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKD' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
72250623dbff199ac05fa13193e2cc3f
e59d63e9dd2ecee53534bed2d01ec65d9a69b500
'2011-12-30T10:49:22-05:00'
describe
'31420' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKE' 'sip-files00031.pro'
39bb95fe8db085365a23e6afeac50b64
9ae187c8a93a154452fc9d01327ca358b80df16c
'2011-12-30T10:52:51-05:00'
describe
'42599' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKF' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
cbe068326c8c9f1a7485d624a4d2bc2f
f5b001d88ae00d693cbb7fc7f1de4745ef44cfad
'2011-12-30T10:47:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKG' 'sip-files00031.tif'
0bf406e02bbf9ef0be01b19b01d2ca41
565b11fe26a4d3c9c92bb5407c724c814cb297cf
'2011-12-30T10:48:06-05:00'
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKH' 'sip-files00031.txt'
ba4c4dcb29abd92e37983f3aed19002d
622b5fe4cf8d1c0d7441826f1b545ed21766bb7e
'2011-12-30T10:52:44-05:00'
describe
'11223' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKI' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
0e372ea27edbcbed1ec2b7deb5cd5990
726b816f714c1396a9413ab7e17bc5c399981390
'2011-12-30T10:48:07-05:00'
describe
'313759' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKJ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
91cfde617eb3d81e4c1ae6d68a369ded
1fc39e06b28d9d473d806615a4d5e5a9896496f4
describe
'132112' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKK' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
3428462706d6ecbadc9c42fadcb3802f
60d796b1dc9a6d75ff9b737d9600a59449c3696d
'2011-12-30T10:51:07-05:00'
describe
'33491' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKL' 'sip-files00032.pro'
9f00c218ad7dddaf90aec1607949dac2
25876a82c7735561e454a7d6e386a0ccb7a1f45b
'2011-12-30T10:49:43-05:00'
describe
'43690' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKM' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
fa05aaa45569a9b3f4730de8e1065970
cd3c2a9442b5a9db4d0d3c43554f78538527215b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKN' 'sip-files00032.tif'
49bc0d5c6df4175654f7f7c4c072b56e
7d70e274f99a00e64475e0d423e227c7b6430043
'2011-12-30T10:48:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKO' 'sip-files00032.txt'
1fd6a0b4ed85055cf7bc9795bd0b2a14
5fe288ab286ec032babb484bd1f1ed5e73cd6529
'2011-12-30T10:49:27-05:00'
describe
'11268' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKP' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
164d23f1b7f75467fac798b85f807018
08810d41f8beb011184523011ddede434003a749
describe
'313744' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKQ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
fb1136d388d4528ff827f3422d749995
40137123cb2ed385d689b6205bc2ebd2613d3175
'2011-12-30T10:50:29-05:00'
describe
'134134' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKR' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
649277b111cc87dd5fa971b43dcc0e42
ca9ee9c6f3c086c3cac22923b7eb15c48234ee4f
'2011-12-30T10:49:38-05:00'
describe
'33461' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKS' 'sip-files00033.pro'
e6ba12ab7ce4d9c77e4bf0edbd2143d5
56d4a1c069a193f0e97cc9079ba1e7acd9035be5
describe
'43980' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKT' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
2145cf32bce76adf7adac0f5996481ef
00ddf55fdb1b4954e73cf5804f058afb49ccdc18
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKU' 'sip-files00033.tif'
5a50d891ee3bd2dc2d7e772374091f88
4dfbeef31985477b483c72a622371dd912951585
'2011-12-30T10:48:35-05:00'
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKV' 'sip-files00033.txt'
dbbd653fb4d052f43108bf59b118435e
ab6ca596260bac614e56642ecd775d585f5e0bca
'2011-12-30T10:47:28-05:00'
describe
'11497' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKW' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
8102bb0ede3c41b45dff0f674cd5f3c8
c0d596779fda78121e58ea1e7d702e5a263f7bd6
'2011-12-30T10:48:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKX' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
116889d28d08a121678c7017758bdf25
689c5c62253eeb6eb77aba3d544386142b8294d5
'2011-12-30T10:53:17-05:00'
describe
'113410' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKY' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
2a2889178e8e89c768e6094e85531961
b64c9ccdeed5b91238a5433706019788918255f5
'2011-12-30T10:50:49-05:00'
describe
'26128' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFKZ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
455f488b34b088eb011094518d70a807
7a87f7ef3ee9f10659969a591747ba9111340ac8
'2011-12-30T10:48:05-05:00'
describe
'37497' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLA' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
e369e2a5cc62178a6a6ad71afffac450
827142c0d4d943366902e9878b5c44fb4c3d0d99
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLB' 'sip-files00034.tif'
3ed55506eec8fbdd477d96f8dbb1a75f
bc5f04ae4d98e7960b2d65b64c3ec4bb2bd683f6
'2011-12-30T10:52:03-05:00'
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLC' 'sip-files00034.txt'
c11088f678cb71eba1eae5f0172cc97c
a9548ccc0846c0d9b228d39a8399609bc329cbca
'2011-12-30T10:47:29-05:00'
describe
'10132' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLD' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
b79e408bc83b27751b4b248dea09bb44
a3c306e1b0aff451cb3aaaa6781ceba9f495216b
'2011-12-30T10:50:03-05:00'
describe
'313760' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLE' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
4ebc1f397422ebee6f2849c043bf68df
b99bf2f74e90763ed576f5bd7d6d277970454730
'2011-12-30T10:52:32-05:00'
describe
'112928' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLF' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
7966cf0ab473936701c47f17ca5c1e68
f11339d6733fc7eb02cb02ff87493c44dcfbe079
'2011-12-30T10:49:57-05:00'
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLG' 'sip-files00035.pro'
bd6b9c610ec83994ba2fd70652426ed0
eb76f17f749575ac09176c1ef96736e4045b1d2c
describe
'32087' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLH' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
e845b0cecd6e2770c13a3cc56395c512
d9a127292a0e773e61198f880db17806d23315cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLI' 'sip-files00035.tif'
1518fb06be84fb7646c378eaadd045a7
64187b822391a4e5e73471177b5f97eafe3c79e3
'2011-12-30T10:51:19-05:00'
describe
'167' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLJ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
f7d92211670df876dd1fd3d3ed11334f
95cb32bcf8a0e2dc3711635b1083760141cf4cdc
'2011-12-30T10:47:45-05:00'
describe
'9476' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLK' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
c3ab1f20977d571489bd5ee63436d6d9
202cb13e85111b2cf9c1ef890ed88cc5a7c747e9
describe
'313726' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLL' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
36bd805df778daf9680bfdc9066d0006
2e95d67294735207202f530b8c363df15b9010c4
'2011-12-30T10:49:15-05:00'
describe
'133372' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLM' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
ebcc377b6384164ad200fae6ae2764a5
9c0428679f6f3fd6823069364956edf874acce96
describe
'33002' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLN' 'sip-files00037.pro'
ae8fef879a25eef42f11b5fceccb6c21
ad79f1ec04cf179a6100bb6ee75cc28d591ee05a
'2011-12-30T10:48:15-05:00'
describe
'44508' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLO' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
e535e72e8af2de279df2bff6af558b25
be512209383dbcc9cf0e1905d4beef58763fe2cf
'2011-12-30T10:53:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLP' 'sip-files00037.tif'
669e305fb81f8c7bdaab068d8c8f245d
7310843064b18e814cfd6f4d2ed5378f39f15aa0
'2011-12-30T10:47:50-05:00'
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLQ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
2ab2db722c6e8ba86515a16406003350
9a57ff1b705db08b74e0b23ab9303816a4b72580
describe
'11693' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLR' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
c85cf21ce5053ca666a318d7f58138cd
0223bf7650c1bee2ae12d80edf01557dab834155
'2011-12-30T10:51:43-05:00'
describe
'313757' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLS' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
192aed93e706807bdcdc68d767216756
2d20b712fa6209fe395d82dfe2c2329df45fae03
'2011-12-30T10:49:59-05:00'
describe
'129279' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLT' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
e7ae0808e5e43afca5f9811f9d1f1e71
d8a3b0fc174954fdfe9c5fbfdc05b810e61d2545
'2011-12-30T10:49:48-05:00'
describe
'31273' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLU' 'sip-files00038.pro'
2445bd34497489d06f98d552d8ffe3ea
8e8ecddcf3f12cfc696e01b98ea0952aba3edc2b
describe
'42713' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLV' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
2b492b05fa437eac1060ea60257a3e1b
ace1c49d8b89264f71c7f133e6ada599f1ee2cfe
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLW' 'sip-files00038.tif'
af9083dac8810e5a74969a3dfdb277c2
d121f7be2865294b406fda81192c6c353f0cbc0c
'2011-12-30T10:49:11-05:00'
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLX' 'sip-files00038.txt'
e35c2a50a9dc5ff60bb726fb34761790
85df25f22a8c7701c3aabd556cf3786e4a6118f2
describe
'11119' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLY' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
2246f888f687bab0e9d97774e7837a03
4c39cd250ff642f955a0e0fb5036f16f95423de7
describe
'313719' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFLZ' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
6cc5c4af5544d8f9854d6fe793de4cc0
756a63d9171cf130501fda8cd3436d6c9d0048a2
describe
'70179' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMA' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
c48e67ae2bd14b065f9bcaa2300e5ed2
5d08daa2d02a8f03d0b6e6268d41e680ca9b782e
'2011-12-30T10:50:17-05:00'
describe
'1906' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMB' 'sip-files00039.pro'
869c0d06a6727d01bde67f2df4026814
c0840837909347a14db9a1521f6be58210814871
describe
'17524' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMC' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
56428d1245e78d2fa36e163709bac595
f1e9e91a4f6d19127a89c2263ffe17e1bf1c8bf0
'2011-12-30T10:51:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMD' 'sip-files00039.tif'
8e60684a69be6a7f89286e3ef9b19c75
cee36c7298dd6369b8e3edffeecc5080a2d3529b
'2011-12-30T10:51:02-05:00'
describe
'148' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFME' 'sip-files00039.txt'
b3d67ff711d0a4353af053b9e4dcb31b
20c8c76882aa85804177b7d3b9bd400b57b01248
'2011-12-30T10:50:16-05:00'
describe
'4491' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMF' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
769d0aac7db4727204f9ae8255fd2ba9
6b4f1db67ac85ed554fb8b6791546dc1e9ca119c
'2011-12-30T10:51:12-05:00'
describe
'313751' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMG' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
5f37ddb799e12784eb3d69b802f8dd76
cb39699c8c4f778d848380f7ed820817352650f3
'2011-12-30T10:49:41-05:00'
describe
'103108' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMH' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
d3bee3698daf00ae960780714b8e0a7f
4f4c0a33d2eef149dfea5e116feb36e55c65cc84
'2011-12-30T10:47:25-05:00'
describe
'24424' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMI' 'sip-files00041.pro'
9b1363383ed3a9ae2d594c54dc8562d8
4a0cb7a20402b815a4b7c58087238a66afb3bdd0
'2011-12-30T10:51:05-05:00'
describe
'33911' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMJ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
60ef3edd8229550fe16f620a0d6c1994
bffb510abfc48456e6446f9ab060959d1d7cf696
'2011-12-30T10:50:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMK' 'sip-files00041.tif'
023e935cfe1f786fce4cf276e3e2417a
a411b4fc46738bbdd430190e76d30ca8a46d30ae
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFML' 'sip-files00041.txt'
cb64278d60ec655ef15d84750a8edad9
420915e760fb391113196edda7c3ce869e55a8b1
describe
'9194' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMM' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
1d88c1a44223fdfbf1f8d029ea95ddb1
378fb45b28ccb72f8a74042112547cd4bf4a4fb7
'2011-12-30T10:49:12-05:00'
describe
'313914' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMN' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
29fa68ac7fcb68cbb3f70f655f211c71
bd495297b058182c661bd214c77655e9e813ca8b
describe
'125886' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMO' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
79f3f4abfe97bcf37abe5d89ef1654a3
6b49fa2092baa2bc2ba7d3df3c90cba1c4c11767
describe
'30970' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMP' 'sip-files00042.pro'
7a2c60445f9813a23c8aa8c49dc5436b
5cb99b239a95bbaeead5e762f40c704eaa2c817a
'2011-12-30T10:51:34-05:00'
describe
'41799' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMQ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
c2b8bc5e6a8088a53902285583e8f7b5
3789064708cab3e7e8d3d9e69d56960f082d491a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMR' 'sip-files00042.tif'
0b2955a87448c4f83c12f988e2a94fc2
65804f0b291a6ed6128465295af34983a3b93b51
'2011-12-30T10:48:45-05:00'
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMS' 'sip-files00042.txt'
0f2111f47f75e5180c13b4427d107c7f
419ab132f4d38caa6c53e56b45023cc3e82ff7d3
'2011-12-30T10:50:21-05:00'
describe
'10936' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMT' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
8b86f63fa8a80c4f058058797bc36890
70e364f4b2a68122aea4c241ff60383520d495d9
'2011-12-30T10:52:54-05:00'
describe
'313707' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMU' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
fee843bc5ea644c61126cc2c991813d5
e5c4fa9530044950fc7eea844d89dff86f563533
describe
'134282' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMV' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
c0189c50d1b5ffbf652cfa083c73de25
172867b1f81b86695c22064b4fafb4e02363e24a
describe
'33174' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMW' 'sip-files00043.pro'
e1b677b09fb9fbeac48bef73ea7659c1
7bfd9e28e098811b2493985edb7278ab672c7c05
'2011-12-30T10:48:11-05:00'
describe
'44732' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMX' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
80e6ed4f24eec24fae7f363ff416fefc
60cefff6f09badaeb7fff75e028a43c82e5aaa5c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMY' 'sip-files00043.tif'
9bd092de1707776bbdb760a0e5a9237e
2d5c04fd0114810dd81612bdb08054381072bb21
describe
'1331' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFMZ' 'sip-files00043.txt'
c92f419d4fa755db18edcad68cd2cb44
81f648f79153abdede7011f72f32f5ff58cce8fa
describe
'11556' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNA' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
124057451b204f0b770a686279c87e05
972a58bdb54f34fd2bb0feace99c83aab7809f2d
describe
'313741' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNB' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
174643f2fe019883d3db9d1a76809ece
cf0ed7caff6b98d0016ea2b3c27910917f46495f
describe
'124473' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNC' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
4b01334e38dd7b66f5f758172638db67
feae61ebf5a017f6f97ccb27d8a6567fc92f5e9d
'2011-12-30T10:47:32-05:00'
describe
'30858' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFND' 'sip-files00044.pro'
d2b6e3939b151086e944cfe3db2a2e89
a129b23e466f2da560c7336809348f3f60ccfd2c
describe
'41895' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNE' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
159dd3388e1736e13e13ce87613d270a
57d4b60bbf284900e731bfb214910229f460c06b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNF' 'sip-files00044.tif'
9a412adf4235def2088ad87407f5ef12
d2b5f38ccb67c3d1afd21ac59662f0e1d1938a03
'2011-12-30T10:50:53-05:00'
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNG' 'sip-files00044.txt'
f14dd8a27d2bb0cdc59e92fe0c108952
001dc7e02c779be3cc6f5f676ed12b422baf4e30
'2011-12-30T10:47:31-05:00'
describe
'10913' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNH' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
5860fe092cf80812b3ba3f131a4a8da9
c06a2e4f7596edc603a8207b0c834e139a2de7f4
describe
'313619' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNI' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
5d265f786bbfb4de7ca7643b5b70e841
16507c7ec0fb0dac38eb0f9b484d849c3fc08485
'2011-12-30T10:53:02-05:00'
describe
'88394' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNJ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
6aac3112004111cb7ee6e23736b7c2fc
027bdf9817cd96c1fb498a053d773dccc531520b
describe
'20461' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNK' 'sip-files00045.pro'
10e0b65faa6b048d65e682ab14162fec
78b058009649764ce7482a7edca488f1ab574beb
'2011-12-30T10:51:09-05:00'
describe
'28186' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNL' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
08ba923dee98778918686b2a722432d4
ab153544551fc4aa2c6c622a31ed2381253b380a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNM' 'sip-files00045.tif'
74ad5ca472d14efd21bcf09dc8e543ef
0e02c857a1128b18476d9549d348b5fe7f7b28ce
'2011-12-30T10:52:19-05:00'
describe
'832' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNN' 'sip-files00045.txt'
671c00ec61c66126b7af2365cda84837
60b9acc05fe39917fe42c5c20c61bf94652fc3d0
'2011-12-30T10:53:18-05:00'
describe
'7528' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNO' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
cfba43b906a5f647d6acb09aec325908
e76d82d5015ee81d5949e1d3b39081c87177e7a7
describe
'313506' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNP' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
18589321ded3ce334af95f80dcda21a3
d3406a0560859704a34a6bc2fd50cccee6ed8eb6
describe
'19957' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNQ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
621cab5231b9ec431cb1f73f420a69c6
8e93c565758fd79d88831c5fe8a461bfe1c56392
describe
'3770' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNR' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
cfc2aabc4f6a54e7b7712e35ff70de5c
41b3a0bcee331645aae958167d0ef34417b01afd
'2011-12-30T10:52:30-05:00'
describe
'2524872' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNS' 'sip-files00046.tif'
ae3770786271bc30ea141b73a25a050c
87096fe2a078d690f1438ab3d55b815a9577d436
'2011-12-30T10:52:56-05:00'
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNT' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
7ad14088b6691e2eb35466db380919b7
8a2629619a75b4bfc8b49e5dc80c027feeffc04c
'2011-12-30T10:52:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNU' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
b3158d266ea92d235d15a574a04bf8b7
10ccd73962f50af29af29608da6988d43d227413
describe
'27992' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNV' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
e8bf8a0cf0025eedd337b18e0ef748d3
c7837e22975bb381b7fca75ca986789cfa9e13fe
'2011-12-30T10:47:20-05:00'
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNW' 'sip-files00047.pro'
7eac36256844d36f3b6409cc2d2dc4f4
e9dc120f4e10347ab7e49032f0a060627805f17d
'2011-12-30T10:52:12-05:00'
describe
'7048' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNX' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
adcef1e6ed897ee43b8a27fb338a00f5
bbde10c8f7c37480b4796af1a92d92514759624d
'2011-12-30T10:49:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNY' 'sip-files00047.tif'
bccdb1e3b0bc5a5f694ca608e3f8e399
8c179f6b38f4dd77e9509cbb8b5557fb31af725d
'2011-12-30T10:52:28-05:00'
describe
'102' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFNZ' 'sip-files00047.txt'
75379c711a5a66174a0b43e13e1d8322
0bee316521393419b9e06155d03bc0d97251e7a8
describe
'2343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOA' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
5c03ae0a596131037adc29c105a511a0
aa534710a514a172036243708c997080c1abe02e
describe
'313562' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOB' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
ec30faf0a88d896b0cc250ca7a2c0864
e1229d1123c5512fab6da658ec0616dc47b8f831
'2011-12-30T10:47:42-05:00'
describe
'17532' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOC' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
e8a70100b8fbdc7a0d9885ccdbe6cb33
9a61217e69cd430911c09be7b5e8fe4968caa58a
describe
'3263' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOD' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
0e123f374f87d29350ffc0d457083a3f
7d639d7cfd9daed6bec96787dddc88fa3f67e183
'2011-12-30T10:51:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOE' 'sip-files00048.tif'
118f0d8ac5d4f548f86ef4a0b9c904d8
e7d3e528fac56b8025670d8d7df3fa0e3de243a0
'2011-12-30T10:48:09-05:00'
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOF' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
15999e90ca4c61373de24cf36d367b4f
8be2cfd73c264c190d389dbc2a6cc86c67fb4e99
'2011-12-30T10:51:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOG' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
ea5e6878f3732589644cdd990c9932b0
89a8a719ee2fbe54977cb10c6043ee481c79b876
'2011-12-30T10:53:27-05:00'
describe
'113028' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOH' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
6392bdc1eec5da3cbb2b4f8d8e65f017
ad2934613a66bf949ee9a4a3bcb4afe65e01d484
'2011-12-30T10:48:50-05:00'
describe
'26603' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOI' 'sip-files00049.pro'
c85f9c292bb3e4e5426c2b06c9f3e423
d996d253a3eef8552ef7e9f89996363ad497b7e7
describe
'36886' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOJ' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
33e1bbd98dc1f388b70bcb70c9844b33
1966c855495c897d2e4f6ad057a977257f56e496
'2011-12-30T10:48:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOK' 'sip-files00049.tif'
a38ffa71c73297e60277074a5a3ce6d5
9b872122bcb64ebc3a8468170e2c1ddd650be82b
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOL' 'sip-files00049.txt'
21789e0e138752e330ddc445cb69cb2a
9f69126255575efb6a4499086372c4c206a11d3a
describe
'10002' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOM' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
97d224fb2af2e1c4241dd51b802518d4
11a0b699ba627719c010027f878b5f058f698dd2
describe
'313702' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFON' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
abbbadc9cdc49f78d79b6c5bee1c6889
f7a19d80be932dfe449a270d88c9a9290c6b352b
'2011-12-30T10:50:54-05:00'
describe
'135394' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOO' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
5f1ca5596ad0cf0aefd6b2b84a0fd7ff
862ba35abd523fc534fe224f27405d56ec532b5e
'2011-12-30T10:48:51-05:00'
describe
'31901' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOP' 'sip-files00050.pro'
bc6096488012fc8feb747db25d8ecf4b
f104aa7bc25b39c582a444fa3df57497f2079997
describe
'45548' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOQ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
1f1774e7f4348d0aa9a397840d671480
7c58c942d70b6803b2455940516bb3eeb70c6b2c
'2011-12-30T10:50:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOR' 'sip-files00050.tif'
760217076dd85c632659ac7eb57108c4
02901815d7ed5715d94674ca47e5183d2d4a1128
'2011-12-30T10:50:08-05:00'
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOS' 'sip-files00050.txt'
bb7a63ea612b3fc0622b50f77cb668ce
2f803b4a5c73fa80d7b20cd600448acf5e040dce
describe
'11929' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOT' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
f9dd2b12fdc19fe0690ea2a23e1eabc1
9dacbb32f29c899f9caf27d6f1bf2e623284fcd8
'2011-12-30T10:48:12-05:00'
describe
'313733' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOU' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
664afff3bc86c8d1a8dcd8a08636af73
49ddae091433b3f9d7ff086d432e6c8ecfa9041e
'2011-12-30T10:52:26-05:00'
describe
'137717' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOV' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
ffc272834168ae6780265b2b595b31b3
6aaede0b8c25b1f4b65ccfc7ccf1380fe420a25c
'2011-12-30T10:52:09-05:00'
describe
'33331' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOW' 'sip-files00051.pro'
97d8d949659384601d971cf2c9a7d567
cebb4d02bca71efde401fe105686492a3bf72f8f
describe
'45990' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOX' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
fbf612bf7e43b07d1cb010aac52c8f49
4a9d86dd9521ebda93f9e9e19a42deda823c95c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOY' 'sip-files00051.tif'
08644ae47384260547f393a7400054ce
31520f82deab8070a97f1c4de8fcbdb93d454ce0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFOZ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
1e60ac8f6f82a2d081844acb76d958a9
7f52ab503936f13e34bee8df204349dd866567fd
'2011-12-30T10:52:29-05:00'
describe
'11774' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPA' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
300dd7b5280974fa34ddb754630cf1a3
3ae4f2406b28554c2d7a3c2596dc9a43593738cc
'2011-12-30T10:48:26-05:00'
describe
'313753' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPB' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
1a289c07188a0165a6aaee053a7c4740
1713eb2d532e2edc7b9a6ffeb1a5b87a0c8fba1b
'2011-12-30T10:53:10-05:00'
describe
'123899' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPC' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
675c6f8f117db113a5f73ffcc9de49ec
d3f041170df7086822c7aae8ee9fb18a677196b9
describe
'30765' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPD' 'sip-files00052.pro'
4849a86d45c3944ed37c01024766c06b
ae15bbb85a4f8a1784d31be82b18bc23f31f607a
describe
'40652' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPE' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
d9eeffc7bc694dc44cb5930b4c6c7b86
900ec3a552c1b7e03e8cc25a922341143112911e
'2011-12-30T10:52:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPF' 'sip-files00052.tif'
d4fa265effce9195873799ca3b01855d
727eec677a6b2f2aba0abe291eb517aba61ec057
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPG' 'sip-files00052.txt'
8ff3d1a63c9cfb794424276862ccd0b3
3b4ed165b6b44fd2bdc51c83fa6ef4ab64ea287f
describe
'10576' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPH' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
84a855830bff329213c7ef81a83e56c3
d4157a2d5eb66a92553fc840806cb5f029dee95e
'2011-12-30T10:47:48-05:00'
describe
'313910' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPI' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
676e87700f4b4636f5db1ec6bbab0d79
11a6146eb2c9065b8b67721c360060c7b641b7ca
'2011-12-30T10:52:00-05:00'
describe
'112037' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPJ' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
f4618b2389133f4f03523540092ca7e3
2c6b11a246ae98dc8bf755118305a04b1976e298
'2011-12-30T10:53:05-05:00'
describe
'26804' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPK' 'sip-files00053.pro'
ed7f6e88b336ef5f85c76ec5ff6101c4
5cbdabe16e70f605a1dd7c913dd509ae76ebe429
describe
'37687' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPL' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
dc866bbfdec2e9662e3d75467c929859
19592f49f9e6177722b199d7e7f3e4123309d7b9
'2011-12-30T10:51:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPM' 'sip-files00053.tif'
ae1538f878ad55aa37f302c9148f28b3
6e2ca95f08dab972442b97c87268971bed92e9d7
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPN' 'sip-files00053.txt'
4b661901e84096b9725dd2846cbef625
be90dd46d78f35a4bddd1be328b3874f73a75b2b
describe
'9807' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPO' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
40fc1577dbe6250ea227f518aa57c66d
dbbe5fc513060603df8326eb976f5fa9430a60e1
describe
'313749' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPP' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
4881067e7598a33d6fff5bc639c96f74
a23a5007ae2824607466c6a65d3beddf31090129
'2011-12-30T10:49:42-05:00'
describe
'128795' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPQ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
069e20ff075d4b3a943b6447a5310641
379dc04122b8dd63f0930ba9b709b4335348439b
describe
'32094' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPR' 'sip-files00054.pro'
c5c5446f7c4051070e587adfabfe9a38
ab29ae36c23de3405f06856d407b2b11a37e72da
describe
'42339' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPS' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
89c82e63f0c7ef9e83412ccd25e556ab
cea1e46727793b9d3d59d352db37b85f1398bf8a
describe
'2526908' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPT' 'sip-files00054.tif'
bdb0a121ee947e9134e1a90dab8957e4
e713e1b0230322462912cc5b55df60f52f32f5c7
'2011-12-30T10:52:59-05:00'
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPU' 'sip-files00054.txt'
11a001d3722fb5764bb1e6f594062006
03d81dfc5efe2a0781f4e4034dc957beaf719f2f
describe
'11088' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPV' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
d57d4e568a468a8635452bb39a3848f6
47393fa7ef7f4e5257fcbf209479ebc5a4f4a5eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPW' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
429f9fc1201bd0e0496279a66cf81c2d
c099495c878a4a212b654c05339a47dd06096d54
describe
'124742' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPX' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
a688e94dd94860c72785b453ec9b9cca
e1bd5a590d7223969fb794af9af02a1a069e917c
'2011-12-30T10:50:36-05:00'
describe
'30065' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPY' 'sip-files00055.pro'
6e239cd9afad4a5c48c87722707a419e
ae9698ac384309f6f5fb42f09cd7c9ea6032818f
'2011-12-30T10:47:34-05:00'
describe
'40947' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFPZ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
fd44e3c506e80620ccca173faf7d2edb
493d686662d9bcbcb5f33787632eebd6a6073d28
'2011-12-30T10:49:20-05:00'
describe
'2526900' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQA' 'sip-files00055.tif'
adec1264115cf591f9d5f58d3f52b9e7
7d40cfe52b01870931a740779a66916350b62034
'2011-12-30T10:49:39-05:00'
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQB' 'sip-files00055.txt'
cc2791eb58f4a960f08d1a2a7929c8c5
1a9781907d34532fcab56708226da300591558e4
'2011-12-30T10:51:32-05:00'
describe
'11187' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQC' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
ee0ad88fc2105cd4ca334a0e0b4fc769
42597d4eab9993615c4fb08ed282c2c437f9a618
'2011-12-30T10:53:00-05:00'
describe
'313451' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQD' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
50fab807a04a1e4008956e9a854bd8eb
c90daac94595fc630bfd965fa094bfe64ac1a263
describe
'124530' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQE' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
ac9f8383798da005ead0206256725152
1d277762b3163b40e494053f0337402095162633
'2011-12-30T10:47:47-05:00'
describe
'31350' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQF' 'sip-files00056.pro'
87f0150bb81012f68c321ab50e7f3e89
25db3d5a95b0f815aae327a1b2e73f5979a2fd31
describe
'41344' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQG' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
91c02fca536ec0ce768e2b9ae42a127e
7bf191c77a78ab20f163e756728b04b2c8caa5a0
'2011-12-30T10:52:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQH' 'sip-files00056.tif'
39b472a2c8beb4de5bedae155c53245d
1f271ddce0e0bba469b146590604b70d7ee3d52b
'2011-12-30T10:47:35-05:00'
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQI' 'sip-files00056.txt'
ff738c44e0b8ca3fe25507f405aba359
58f917a3360e85f03ffb81889e3086bbc0f29e49
describe
'10604' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQJ' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
b6b53d87af433c145ab904a24fe9e01b
d5b2edd5b1066c11dd68afa74caa1578610e2a8f
describe
'313590' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQK' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
c3cb4238adcb697198a2abd2c01d0f48
8ebd68671aa3345d9cd7b592e9fccd4a3cd616c4
describe
'109100' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQL' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
8ca28a42a7e5c384429d9d5a66c7da0a
c14df94542a5d2d9d427a5aacab46bc324aca0eb
describe
'26284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQM' 'sip-files00057.pro'
e29a1c8378f123514fbd3917d3730a5d
00a7e8714da41889746d97c7fd9fe6488f687608
'2011-12-30T10:52:34-05:00'
describe
'36363' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQN' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
f1040b65c72ee087f28276f3b785cff8
0d238d607aa9ddd90fbd59cbd8a79cb40e328193
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQO' 'sip-files00057.tif'
b84d517c572fb25ed0c04ccd4fa1f04c
208edf2ab1d54050ac2551446a466cc1dfbba2a6
'2011-12-30T10:49:35-05:00'
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQP' 'sip-files00057.txt'
86c5ac8c01012606631d6ae9fae33633
9a103da1aedff46d11cc636b4d8bd57e10bfebaf
describe
'9890' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQQ' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
83bdbd46f0fe4edaa0bee386aac338cb
ac7419c37a89a555d4ca58fe44f021154df14677
'2011-12-30T10:49:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQR' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
8ca55028d70ac90869018d1b05c21adb
f55cfee16cedaa492891a11a75739b5237ae5d7d
describe
'127699' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQS' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
68f020f17e46dc372b30468ccc7b3d70
3e754c626542fa69eb0d701f509a71c88a359319
describe
'31284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQT' 'sip-files00058.pro'
812d87f0e335b7ec882f132302e7d5ee
845e76f5b40c547f0c1a60f9f59dcea6af7083f8
'2011-12-30T10:52:50-05:00'
describe
'42258' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQU' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
1e0880b6473bc11a2a73123240076e54
8cf068e39d8759d5c2c8b294f72825c61e26eb94
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQV' 'sip-files00058.tif'
7a8fbe0bbe76395a393ac648576156f8
b4cbae9f889c5f517b663fb7d6974fbb85537fff
'2011-12-30T10:51:30-05:00'
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQW' 'sip-files00058.txt'
e0d86962be7d44f6a57675d17394adf8
96fdd74e2e97cf892cbe584d4a144f90665c6730
'2011-12-30T10:48:49-05:00'
describe
'10974' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQX' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
30bfebf4c684e26f7367dd0ac7da856a
3cfca5e315602fd30a9a38fe1197351a57b0563c
'2011-12-30T10:51:22-05:00'
describe
'313903' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQY' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
bd13a99e2661681faef8171909862086
d67d6103834bf84b628110f86952e5e32a0c313a
'2011-12-30T10:49:34-05:00'
describe
'113718' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFQZ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
988723aa8b19382fb86b402558830907
dbecfc945da10c90a390de14e4507da860ffa30d
'2011-12-30T10:48:33-05:00'
describe
'26148' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRA' 'sip-files00059.pro'
9389090f778531b380db36f19e2b412a
57b456b30b82ffd10e34b9a240f1588fa565a228
'2011-12-30T10:50:14-05:00'
describe
'38238' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRB' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
c71d7476c2e9346c17a849dac952d6ad
97136bc45b1ef1c7cf1bc7c87de810b7583ba8d2
'2011-12-30T10:50:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRC' 'sip-files00059.tif'
d263aa9b05a88d9aec15d3a81c4ef5eb
c6803764c289089dbe788334f696c26cc0ca722c
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRD' 'sip-files00059.txt'
058e50d52f231d3f3d7fbb2fc3138ecc
6bd9e7f66bcd0d1ce0344aded9ca9dc62ea56509
'2011-12-30T10:48:56-05:00'
describe
'10103' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRE' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
3c89eec5aaaaa9c9737f02b6046ef00f
d475dcbf287a17d58d54e87de029e2523d2dd87d
'2011-12-30T10:53:16-05:00'
describe
'313738' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRF' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
4807bc5d97d832f27ce48f51d54c7a59
9053d8ea83bb71b6becbc008857980356a8bc7eb
'2011-12-30T10:48:01-05:00'
describe
'135207' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRG' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
f9e38857049e72b8b94c413181789066
dc2684310e49556ab4e01a9ad448a9e91aec960c
describe
'33563' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRH' 'sip-files00060.pro'
2dc2928930fa6d315b5ad0beeee84f71
cbed99cb95dca02193ff757f552afb8a5e1c6012
'2011-12-30T10:47:18-05:00'
describe
'44389' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRI' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
7464b934a54ffc53b3b01b724e8758b6
53a6d72110881247708360edf3bde82d694f8ffc
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRJ' 'sip-files00060.tif'
f501ff465b9d79af97c6a143a174e93d
6bfda7b047500e0022f8c10b37148236a937c4da
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRK' 'sip-files00060.txt'
7bfa7b24510f12e16c3124ae289662a4
fc418a6c03ee397a2b8785fb29119f580b7e26a4
'2011-12-30T10:47:22-05:00'
describe
'11578' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRL' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
615bb128bffaf48fb66e0046fcaca7d0
15892cfef06ca11e0f358613381cf54694e075e6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRM' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
ebed9a843435811679d7ecaa4bfead9c
01670500f2f8eeca1accaceb5a03bb5e546190c2
'2011-12-30T10:52:07-05:00'
describe
'123813' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRN' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
49cb92364e0b25f5a430942567c92e24
de951ff837d54a05de896d73a5458b7ec8417d86
'2011-12-30T10:50:40-05:00'
describe
'29951' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRO' 'sip-files00061.pro'
25cd62b349d475163ebd8948f69f8a6c
979d1552e4a73e196ca1278da38ef2e5128a39d5
'2011-12-30T10:48:03-05:00'
describe
'40960' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRP' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
f51992a04f53cdf27829f75f97190269
df09e324f413a6570715fe1647a38a0e8510039b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRQ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
f9a62b1264c76824936f1722c0564809
52856b4c43eeca7372639029a7c39baa24436632
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRR' 'sip-files00061.txt'
45a773c6cb8913d9c4bab698cac0dd6d
ea76533f5d6cf06dad1d977000cb767eba8ed8d0
'2011-12-30T10:48:00-05:00'
describe
'11405' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRS' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
647ea9ae3783609f0207c8feb47cab76
71c1bae4a7054a2517cf941d78e5e09e72f438ec
'2011-12-30T10:52:02-05:00'
describe
'313499' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRT' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
7d6d97f8e0158ed1d1a56d79d9253e1b
57ff1ddc74311f3a2d289a67e010f9a9c24c70ba
'2011-12-30T10:52:20-05:00'
describe
'129701' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRU' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
c4b10ff81f109448d15adfca4ca2e9b8
5be8443be221aa7ea71e84dc3c24c75e0c36c74e
describe
'32061' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRV' 'sip-files00062.pro'
0ede588b52f63261a7fe24ab36902ba4
bc66eea289d725437337c3d4871b3d67b9f64374
'2011-12-30T10:49:37-05:00'
describe
'42484' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRW' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
c3fc6c9a62208439b3a1ee0cccc7cbd2
ef7da402c0ce76442b7aee33355791cf8db87776
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRX' 'sip-files00062.tif'
80c812739e4704ef8f4e95ca5c86ba40
6ebd62ce7118ec71f6d9d856bf7e34f431f5987d
'2011-12-30T10:49:53-05:00'
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRY' 'sip-files00062.txt'
5755b8bb72d81a62dd5bf1be078f39e7
09aa22ae26c446050d5698ec50414a81071d2413
'2011-12-30T10:51:57-05:00'
describe
'11291' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFRZ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
ef47c62487d8d077f192083624059b48
e06cec1a10cf984bb1f51c26dec36ead5fec7979
'2011-12-30T10:50:48-05:00'
describe
'313750' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSA' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
9f8706948289dd51f4c776df86ddd40d
0a012212fafd310569b74fb0a4d14f1b17c4b4fe
describe
'133874' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSB' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
b39cf8ee91a5bf81debab3e9dc481a2a
8d466c58e1b970f6199ab129d7dc87c807004ee7
describe
'32916' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSC' 'sip-files00063.pro'
53ac54ab10f4fe4c8719afb9f190d3f0
9a111518f587cf17cbba13d409c4e9f79d470a4e
'2011-12-30T10:51:16-05:00'
describe
'44236' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSD' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
f111cad94e902e630ca5671cf7a04081
1375ebd46ba626b2cbf8271870b5f16d0cb58191
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSE' 'sip-files00063.tif'
7d7889ba8a2fccdae62d807a16b6e6e8
adce69a59f1b416d52f57c44736d19f5e5d869ba
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSF' 'sip-files00063.txt'
b291efa20da914ba1b32310bf1cd58ef
6e01a8a8d93200242ae640f2627bdbd3f084bc89
describe
'11531' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSG' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
6d11f21e5a8d284b15f525015ec892c7
d89826f5bca18c0279ab68d11cbc37128307013d
describe
'313906' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSH' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
08bbb566fdbca09132317e93dc0a431b
5e3d1aa42049b20e32b3bd93569cd541a9d61636
describe
'127105' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSI' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
647fbfed58b927dbf5e6172305a56c13
e886f20799d58c170da95b3c2b12b9e8351ed52e
'2011-12-30T10:48:08-05:00'
describe
'31663' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSJ' 'sip-files00064.pro'
5d50c88ea3eddd15f1f3012ffde9a18d
85baf3e3ff49dcc11cb5241efb5cfde6a06e1518
describe
'41798' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSK' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
c0903ca60b1718569c4022bb1cc0bcfd
3c023f6a8c018748c2b57069a54a68cc604a0571
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSL' 'sip-files00064.tif'
4b54d77c580195b035222c189e3f3a2c
76143fcf5d5848b4f1bfb02cc40f03aa6bda5af0
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSM' 'sip-files00064.txt'
bb251c916d1214a801c12f60f0dc73f6
f7728c69aa4be27b08a0619eb52c7b31a2594e80
describe
'11079' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSN' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
a87d1973e8d4baf24b6c4413eb69ea0e
0943ae9d9518dc479b9e1c2b039ed5e259417e2c
describe
'313661' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSO' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
c2d74a8eff6b7221ec6090a37a78dae5
e4b28db977c68119ca66b0d13a58045d8508acf4
describe
'116533' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSP' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
6cf7f485f0e061baa54f5578fec8c03b
16689055086dde0e3ce159adef6b48a2580854cb
describe
'27648' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSQ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
72e5f30632777579f5232f8997ff397c
9dc551236fbe8a8a3e8d2e4581e1f9fb1da99065
describe
'38750' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSR' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
2c167730d39944b17ca2514d3ffab499
cdcd1b0c1e00fd2d89eb1284515905363740da76
'2011-12-30T10:47:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSS' 'sip-files00065.tif'
94087365995dd26884434f70cb6d4084
972678323f1aa5479cde7aa37ff5899edadccd49
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFST' 'sip-files00065.txt'
c505da9ec6151041dbc824455825d457
30f537046cd1feb14822f386ae21101da61813fd
'2011-12-30T10:53:01-05:00'
describe
'10937' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSU' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
c2d26f5d43fadfe673b0568481179b9c
cbeda1b3c19ed9fe55638a5399a3a2ada780e69b
describe
'313705' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSV' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
e03c9d5ecd1edc055754157c33f1bd11
af9592fa2c0096a0f0248a3896a1b469ccdc7dc3
'2011-12-30T10:53:25-05:00'
describe
'113994' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSW' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
9ec4f8a55b6dcb996a169280943555cc
eebc865902dc3716aa4f13e34a1e56dddddf748c
describe
'26886' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSX' 'sip-files00066.pro'
d8bd92e0831cfdff26f59b0b7af15e01
21c9061ee80bd62d781575aaa574920a0a463c1c
describe
'37109' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSY' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
9971649a3d397ee76b1eb6fe71addb9f
9f35ee07bb35fa3068b58c9136a9675bc4fd8241
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFSZ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
8e4424af6efa18451641c7a21d98ed77
926522c00ff0559b9dd4e8628774e0a96b2b4bd1
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTA' 'sip-files00066.txt'
efa73f523a98a3a8afb2cf58cb8c5d8b
5f7650fd0334b7ac7e8f4782e9bbb13384711685
'2011-12-30T10:51:03-05:00'
describe
'9723' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTB' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
423c4631c987aba2648311d1bfcc61eb
b5cd1bcc3d907ee8fd58538dfc25de66e2286a9b
'2011-12-30T10:53:28-05:00'
describe
'313734' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTC' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
713516ccfcc8b9cfb14ac26f993c0a51
572d2be4ef930172ed989ff6f974e8c914ffce84
describe
'131115' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTD' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
b6c6fc92188135c3727d1313e354be9b
d610e9c8d3cb5eb3c4e3d4228c59952271eb45ee
'2011-12-30T10:50:01-05:00'
describe
'31815' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTE' 'sip-files00067.pro'
604d0cd1ce9b1843e2326a0e84f116f2
b517fd0542b82838dd320c21b06edf24186a4c02
describe
'42936' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTF' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
b3304309b55a18803fcc5561f79c71f4
a4bddab93e21ca25b2bd5c774ca5aa0f8c55718e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTG' 'sip-files00067.tif'
c92f660ca6ed0c1ae363e25b9c1c6cc2
f9504a5c4ff3fffc07c4da62d26b4d9fa3647f61
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTH' 'sip-files00067.txt'
bf1a6e1f6a537d94ee191dd0cc0c3dc8
ebaf6fefe6cb78b3e00ca42e923606be3183ded7
describe
'11350' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTI' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
bd610103debb4a981e215aee26e45442
8f9a6213d0aea6578c49bef5f70b0d3d2155a914
'2011-12-30T10:47:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTJ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
635d2412e41aacfe821bb5a0d94b27d6
6147984ce096f0ca513a7426353b785a78d542c2
describe
'123005' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTK' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
82d32bd1d55d7a24b8e24b9928b60bf9
1b5cf4593e9759512569e8b6da76829435e1a20b
describe
'30069' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTL' 'sip-files00068.pro'
db3e1ddeb4767f6b9d8ef39e88bd48e7
75a7f4e20535992381fe0e89218f86c3207d9ec6
'2011-12-30T10:49:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTM' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
86ab338e009e14b216badf4b2f51a41f
398113db1e087f02ddac3ef345ac39d5eef6bea4
'2011-12-30T10:50:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTN' 'sip-files00068.tif'
ffbf1fac2aef884281a70162b53f2f10
51cded982f8763bd68d80d57aa26c22ef883da4f
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTO' 'sip-files00068.txt'
01479b713f6f7cb267c0928d15ab9555
52f1d854cefe293df794331a783aa69d7dd78211
describe
'10801' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTP' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
3536c5f78f55ecdbe412207b62bbfde7
4076d218dd3dab34606530e96b82509f1f69e26c
describe
'313752' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTQ' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
db6d274ee816b927d7404a625c4ac7e9
a16456f65da2ce5cbbfbe85adef07fbac53d34ac
describe
'129830' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTR' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
8f74bf85e76ba3f757716873f1f1c2e8
f746f38d637b4a4a2445630d2ca458760ededfe7
describe
'32699' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTS' 'sip-files00069.pro'
34df89f458a38c1fcf480e65be5022d1
ec4939abce655f67d791c1de6bb61e2e77022c3f
describe
'43648' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTT' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
0547bd00b10998b69b8d843f107bbd7f
bd85a2176bb17584fbfbfcda8a3d9b202fcfc934
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTU' 'sip-files00069.tif'
6df02ce0c5784dcb521a7a153f2a0645
cefcbb9ddac7d2b72d3abfe395f6973d9373378d
'2011-12-30T10:51:37-05:00'
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTV' 'sip-files00069.txt'
9d278c084107de61367a66449b0fc236
6b2c67167de5779f9ac3b6a500dee1656bdc39b0
describe
'11315' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTW' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
8d37419d5a1e4abc53c7edf7e3abc43b
147a4b459932dc8e47dfd8c8d923316a767cb951
describe
'313742' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTX' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
08cc7d2b83b52ad432aed29f8dcdf260
c998accdb28c8ff600fc0dbe2ade245b2201ef79
describe
'114541' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTY' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
6a3e6836bc56b52cf2a0864f9cc8e7b4
40ec4f1956ec817d6663ba7a0f5c2c8656abf70c
describe
'27426' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFTZ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
511a9524f72f8aea6e2994bbc2db7de8
8f260395b72e05e7e1377fbe461b663561cbdc41
describe
'37948' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUA' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
aa93e50cd6f91f8b01b84a015d75e037
7a57677e2f174e674adb316129a8adebfc95c994
'2011-12-30T10:53:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUB' 'sip-files00070.tif'
c053d8a167561a839a4ca825b86543fe
108a3349fd19b972dbcfef6a5235aa86a6171970
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUC' 'sip-files00070.txt'
f52e82a9ae81c4b53a718f5053169748
7b2669ea9c6353c37be23586dbc9e9ca5087aed0
describe
'9982' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUD' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
ac19e5a3252a2f9ea3f6e932ce02a01b
fcd9935eee0a0351b735343a140ecbf59b85bad8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUE' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
00febcd1255250b807b6bfc7cf56bfab
5844b657febc71e07a9f43306e2c76d074d72d06
describe
'131488' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUF' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
468691fbee64070779acc495150261be
80625ab3ec30652385d125644ecb9ed1067a0caf
describe
'32966' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUG' 'sip-files00071.pro'
a8a6fb3ba55c78ca7d2f431cb28d2538
8934f1b8012c0ff03f9858b1ba6a04be66d414d9
'2011-12-30T10:51:51-05:00'
describe
'43546' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUH' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
1c4ad2fe9325ef0410b759f49dd553dd
53a66c26b0bf29bfce21d5868a520051ba78b852
'2011-12-30T10:50:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUI' 'sip-files00071.tif'
6cb616e350d53f50f11aadc1906b76fc
5f44985812f8807dae88d79ab523ad5187d4ae80
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUJ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
cf2323843b64c0c6194a49fed7367eeb
e7eeca0ad5ff41490120b30d0c9f1be5bfb0f0f3
'2011-12-30T10:52:45-05:00'
describe
'11577' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUK' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
faf7f2aaeecfb6bbcc69dd183325ec6a
74975b029565ca72efd478d5b193adb6ac2e6a09
describe
'313732' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUL' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
d13e6196325ae09e9d7fb28229f0e799
74d3175bc2ce62f34deb793e661892b5c86adf06
describe
'127993' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUM' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
bfbcb2a006ac112821fe3927bc6c8624
24598389c93479162273945fa6f42dbb328e3b63
describe
'31395' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUN' 'sip-files00072.pro'
e3efa67e0485b9f5f14418225bbbb9d3
25523d753ad5a8d219bf9f9131014ef5a6a7de26
'2011-12-30T10:53:07-05:00'
describe
'42675' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUO' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
e4f9e5966967085b4886720ee7949bd9
09872adcf5d04970554d38a31dfa5d825874555d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUP' 'sip-files00072.tif'
2eb82c9825e08546d7171f44d0856548
978a13a700a9842a1e46184cc1388dd01ae48e8b
'2011-12-30T10:50:18-05:00'
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUQ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
b014a6656af2512ab799b2553d89aea4
3e851fd025e40f63bf78562ac1a34dd532f97218
describe
'11059' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUR' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
8ec2d9cea70a8511a079ef2b865f038f
675fde1358604b1db8753cbc2b204e6d838c3e49
describe
'313844' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUS' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
1274ece7f5ac1ed43e4b902e924301c4
1b24aaf2156c7a8cc92bc205a4adbc59b239d19f
describe
'131431' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUT' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
f641c90d40847140d6bd00d631c7a24d
918f7e6b798917f49451709381cc05a16a81a7f1
describe
'32566' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUU' 'sip-files00073.pro'
fa704fd5057caad2680243ff876f5938
4374b5bb2c1c135f12883a10a8cb3078dab18cdb
describe
'43488' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUV' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
58c0c392495bedf25385db75a92c5a05
647a6597829644cb65f1dd68d584cb49dd4e0a62
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUW' 'sip-files00073.tif'
48552301787d1cd9521128fad46fa858
cd96a6e0a8d09afd63b65abe995109182ec9974f
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUX' 'sip-files00073.txt'
2f64cdd859fba06533743070e3fd4309
4e522b9eca654ccd9f6467c79585ee690c9d88d4
describe
'11611' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUY' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
37516804cabed112961cd4409c978ffa
083ff5edd0b1f4f9391dc79d1bc1c7b0717e8387
'2011-12-30T10:50:52-05:00'
describe
'313686' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFUZ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
9fc18580954d7283e4f454b215620b43
6360f54557f4f6de8bb774b85d80fd64fc52de87
describe
'115616' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVA' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
3836380a9621d26d13476a836886dd85
8b0b5fbd3118e61a104a8ddb97447698187f8b5b
describe
'27499' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVB' 'sip-files00074.pro'
70115ccf0a5d71344770bf068b51feb6
334db7dd175e2d0e3a5463e8ac4268c257c2393e
'2011-12-30T10:50:09-05:00'
describe
'37372' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVC' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
95ee2e7b54ba92577a8cea9351acd603
33653d62cf010a3772fe15a4fd59e404ed4d3df4
'2011-12-30T10:47:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVD' 'sip-files00074.tif'
0d01e4f21d46ade7abc37acf6526086b
0a98b4d822b5acce127514aba619682d33af6a24
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVE' 'sip-files00074.txt'
4f50ef2e823e89b7160b29a15f1f5e14
8008816f00f754f8ac5632a5e748164887d2402c
describe
'9798' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVF' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
9f54c4fb2ea771b800296cf1dec57032
74d99bc240d5527534261599fe958a578fe6c38f
describe
'313046' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVG' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
0afd4b0a2d64b689a28a548526e7191c
86a747c3300aca7e4f8bc9f5f4de96ff44fe7486
'2011-12-30T10:51:41-05:00'
describe
'110226' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVH' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
c0119c9b5816dd21ab2cd3cce11b4126
06c91fd413ae117a4bfd562d9f8113348567ad92
describe
'26123' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVI' 'sip-files00075.pro'
2067d642600d29ab0c37594d84d78463
273cc4ff7d8d5f26dc3a2748d4f15dd9e1fc0255
describe
'35463' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVJ' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
4c0059678c7419a2d167f7e6967a0a91
44d01f738c0fac4631fbe53752007b8f3e2ee0d9
'2011-12-30T10:51:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVK' 'sip-files00075.tif'
41e18852870a86f7775ec608044655c4
106a328d942e9cb27c02a9463c0554a53573a228
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVL' 'sip-files00075.txt'
92b6302d784d80b9bcb5fe1b2f845316
214d290bba4ece40730356d699e5c6e6b8dece06
describe
'9603' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVM' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
ed7ea3df200cc3e522269ed88d87f2f2
6509105437a05ccc25509f6e8c60b5243728e22c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVN' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
974b2b0ff40b05b201fd2c25d75f17ff
56bdbbf30596953cc18550c2545dcb7f89816b65
describe
'131212' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVO' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
b4e9c3ade01f941e5415b468a759d66f
d5fbb0eb4e01ea0c9e59436ac917eeae5d9701cd
'2011-12-30T10:47:27-05:00'
describe
'32625' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVP' 'sip-files00076.pro'
76984f5856c5fb1feb83eb14607d6e11
040781ad52601f2ed7714d606deb034ab66a5ee9
'2011-12-30T10:48:40-05:00'
describe
'42653' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVQ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
660e0832040c1441413642304f5d55b3
b0e2e8d83dea46cab089579dd17249c0eddfc10a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVR' 'sip-files00076.tif'
622fe88ecf56d802affb9263b5cf3fec
fd2d474ba7291f07fe22432d95030ba1d168da37
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVS' 'sip-files00076.txt'
60a908e765f46722e605452253215fd4
f9a6a84202021362f8fd084e842213191be564b7
describe
'11259' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVT' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
b7cc49693d3693c33daa7ca26adc2df3
d333d3175d94cf026249358badf2ac0a7d8f1785
describe
'313739' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVU' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
7e40f56277ca01645cb05b69d763a3ca
d202fbca0cb74a270b8b4c138a5f5a9e9b40cbbe
describe
'129459' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVV' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
727d9417ee2bad2fc12b8e5313b0286d
0da57917f14e0443dddf2ed2f47bc40c43aa2a13
'2011-12-30T10:52:40-05:00'
describe
'32239' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVW' 'sip-files00077.pro'
eef3f547ba4c2d68c7c64eb908e387db
3a230bcba3ad6db5bac807917985665404b2f51f
describe
'43064' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVX' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
3cc75d71fa09f72ad391325f8f3d387d
a973011aea9b20710be32a2243b26d5fc79bc437
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVY' 'sip-files00077.tif'
218769998d23c4fdd38bf5ad1b437045
2a14561f409cae3c41f84ead217e7f2183a0e9c5
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFVZ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
00d5c4d3b350ee7d7a9d5386bce47710
ce44ca09601732cf542cbadc9b2f2dd55091d75f
'2011-12-30T10:52:24-05:00'
describe
'11231' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWA' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
2011ed7ac2ab673d1779ecb3a5bc2400
0e6f1da71bae2f605688fe30dd24ecbc576d2658
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWB' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
a17cbe042768cbd117bc78a5c6691c62
68fd0a047e1a62756446d5bb69746e6d4109863f
describe
'130530' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWC' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
6f31e939da58fd7dad2afba77d17942b
ae590441990862d9ea54b6d8c51e4932b5b13f46
describe
'32925' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWD' 'sip-files00078.pro'
b9ef57755d22d805f7af1e762587566d
a5fbd701605e9702f9df450a03ac51657fef0cf7
'2011-12-30T10:51:33-05:00'
describe
'43669' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWE' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
ee4a24efdd932b6f264432b0c259b9c4
0f2f8d74cea73d1ffa1f915dfeaa6d4f6d91a061
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWF' 'sip-files00078.tif'
6c960072722dde1b69a73a0468a3eae9
8bcbdf24cbad08d1916ac92f051d4517c0c94a74
'2011-12-30T10:52:31-05:00'
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWG' 'sip-files00078.txt'
31b4791fcdc13c58dd57f2fa4c080529
07e42a92990598c5b716f8f58afdc62f343ac467
describe
'11008' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWH' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
20867400c550dbbd952125dd3e0f4973
e3893b951686ae29f6bbfb7dfccab2ae50e19035
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWI' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
c5c82c40f295fbeafe8a251146245e58
367ca8e9b2e2f5834df6f966e4971afacc15b470
'2011-12-30T10:51:55-05:00'
describe
'126389' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWJ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
4ad0f8d242a13b0ca5891bc979ef8372
962820d69e6f7bcb885a8ce18596fbaf98a635c8
describe
'31826' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWK' 'sip-files00079.pro'
9bd63b970812e6682fa4fdbba093b6dc
e429e057985f4cdd225de3eadecebad6f96ae3d5
describe
'41847' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWL' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
8e4c8817ed4d40d206cb3e34bb74265c
f6224ad746522d513b71063736c3dddd698b6cbf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWM' 'sip-files00079.tif'
d3049c49b9b75c2b9c593dd09485df1c
92936750e1faeb886c484027f11aecef946b1fcf
'2011-12-30T10:48:42-05:00'
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWN' 'sip-files00079.txt'
9bf3753b3e97fa2da99a57982966f48f
949277122deff51213b61d2c9420dc6b2e9ca5c2
'2011-12-30T10:53:21-05:00'
describe
'10795' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWO' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
c7dee63e7d25b3c1e5e9d9e9765732fe
e32cf2d2c0ed99c6aa8d65a1d741d3c97c3a5198
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWP' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
55d25225c91d7d92816dfa92e4b2fd2d
b4376c6850956af8cb5884375e983eeeb73bf7dc
'2011-12-30T10:51:14-05:00'
describe
'130457' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWQ' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
fede91aa6ca78608dbe300c53f5e9e1f
9c7635822a8c0bdb18c910546856588ed193e622
'2011-12-30T10:52:33-05:00'
describe
'32572' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWR' 'sip-files00080.pro'
38963d9fc5fa949bc48e052487788408
92fd8015496e04309e58349b9dea656b9ba2251f
'2011-12-30T10:49:33-05:00'
describe
'43006' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWS' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
7fc5b3846676ffa54b9c745f77bf2ce9
928a922e960f13b105fa7c849293b318ecfcf20d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWT' 'sip-files00080.tif'
c69450dda7c35535932ec7ecff51179c
5e3518ac372e5a7142b27e18e19ced40db0e2a9a
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWU' 'sip-files00080.txt'
3fa6714870a7261ab1e5f689ad4ed52c
64e8e38008e1adb1642513a3168ffb1f505b8a13
describe
'11118' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWV' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
c14c0fb95eaaa7440bd4817007a67f2d
f4b6b64751bd24291817dd0f64f3c675b84821de
'2011-12-30T10:52:11-05:00'
describe
'313737' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWW' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
2ddfcd4a5ea66b5bbc055610af351387
67a52599224906928ec9f861a4c261f89f5acd0e
'2011-12-30T10:47:49-05:00'
describe
'131131' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWX' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
20c5cabd5b11f701856c45f28d1bee81
d6eb69764fe00dfe6a4ce1bb6d2a1a1b745887e8
describe
'33166' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWY' 'sip-files00081.pro'
dc5057c15b536408314044231eb4ac44
18d43ccb5f45c539d842da794fa96b3f3e70e9c1
describe
'43361' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFWZ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
fb43bb44645c75074e79649d2f69548d
a0c57a0fff74177c042066d986358ed111327939
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXA' 'sip-files00081.tif'
474ab0998d873fa013ae15155d928432
7bcb0650d8f2fbf1328d4ed1a505ae1bb54d4205
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXB' 'sip-files00081.txt'
8825c5dce9d0a9b864092c3de1402836
eb3f067ae0b77e2374871355e1802f0f6c0df920
describe
'11880' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXC' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
2cd698924ba2d3f126e5c7bb9b03b13d
2d2261fc608e3bd625de609164f804d753302e1e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXD' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
fdb082383d34bb6bbfa46e03560d7427
9c98a25a73701f9c45893fec5d3d8fa6dc7eb6f0
'2011-12-30T10:48:20-05:00'
describe
'114709' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXE' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
2de47b21c4d0cc2c79a47cce2729dc0a
928076f7f8aac98ceee20ceae46652ef1009cdf8
'2011-12-30T10:48:31-05:00'
describe
'27221' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXF' 'sip-files00082.pro'
5f869d71096281209aa3c2862a28f0e1
763f9d74ca96e770a3c070e2f54294015334fda4
describe
'37672' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXG' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
58f1a774740e0c55ad1a0f07eabd8c70
2af9a53eafd0bb47f2a350a4a48195331221d290
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXH' 'sip-files00082.tif'
35a9323f2689f9fb4857ab56761516fa
0b5d5ca2f5c6647236213e2cd58316e70958c3b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXI' 'sip-files00082.txt'
cbc1c9cdbd53e2789fe63ae1652ccf25
f2e8a727ca6b25bae86da243fa2b7a0e95dc2e2f
describe
'9923' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXJ' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
24b9ae6107f93e4a50c2ec99fd20dca9
09499ca2a18461f8c9186c12f2272cb3a061ba86
describe
'313743' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXK' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
c206696cba598378ba12088f11e035fb
187024e1223147a8684f970bc94a3d0dcc54d29d
describe
'129664' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXL' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
52c454b3835b9d34912d268c8482887f
3d9081c93b1255af63020c325df83f0b72edea5e
describe
'32435' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXM' 'sip-files00083.pro'
592a37508dc4b497054ba6952fbeb46e
aa5df17281bf343ee57ce98ff28b6f7a962f97fd
'2011-12-30T10:48:28-05:00'
describe
'43403' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXN' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
4c55e58d7f099d76fa2e80f38d8dcd23
95017f01bd0e9ef74bfe5999373ccad3e1b69a23
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXO' 'sip-files00083.tif'
fcd22c2b9cf612e77dc6857e4a4bfb46
e95f14688916ab11f70858ec2e6d202a4860424e
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXP' 'sip-files00083.txt'
3b2e77bd4d3b4923d6c0e97fe4e5bdbe
fe24abfb6a2e0fbbda0e21ebfc79c1cffb0e23d4
describe
'11133' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXQ' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
b9991fdb7d3b220e01ec67ac9eab152d
e770cfda928e528c971f4a8733df9604081e481d
'2011-12-30T10:47:37-05:00'
describe
'313667' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXR' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
ca754c57abab0809c5c253a3851c7f17
fc0b2f0c468dc97ffce52442d564df18d9cda109
describe
'125027' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXS' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
35993dce99c61522fe62f00f677180ac
963460a7e4b6b48a86a0e4792ee07c73105c8a54
describe
'31603' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXT' 'sip-files00084.pro'
a6d1595df748cc8ffb0fe72c2479d5c7
14b38263cd6d59501bc99f61e97293931509e155
describe
'41561' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXU' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
5f3faae8032c2e99aa04a4c9ab28afb8
55c4432b25a02b189126a27165e8f18d1805172c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXV' 'sip-files00084.tif'
d5d06e5e0cc08073bee0f0deeeefd90a
c3eb02796b65c8f52c4b93643b9113e9a73b9ccb
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXW' 'sip-files00084.txt'
26e5d9c1c448eb36d688de5e25be4102
bae209c08b855344a5fd9a097860f639b425f394
describe
'11130' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXX' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
cab66499daecff87b3da51d4d2fad5fe
1878c6fc2777f35a8fadb6cc5b412242e26fd1e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXY' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
688a291876db32918ab261f39bda3012
a371d4581cb448c3ac7d96c28a19f943acf515ec
describe
'114804' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFXZ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
ada1225d86832e3ceff2177e9e252663
c6be9e5aa01b2777e82471215c97bfce66ed3120
describe
'28157' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYA' 'sip-files00085.pro'
0ced173631ab6b973198cb668b2a6c62
3b6d8a74f8cbb6f8c419a7fcd0ce887530c8b188
describe
'38571' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYB' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
f3bef583a3ca63a5d5c00b7351d5e5ed
335b676531a3f56cfb7bb5b7a3cee8842825a18f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYC' 'sip-files00085.tif'
61456fd569c6586971f5ce01bb795d26
0e632923b96b1827f318e4dc8030a3bf639fb1d4
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYD' 'sip-files00085.txt'
c0fab9cd0d6a4e95cf623fd7b3b59966
74c074feae3a1f87cf59175bfdcd03ad1e79ebcd
'2011-12-30T10:51:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYE' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
6158700d0934cab0118f0b00f8d9fb25
980866aa7ab4873fc53fc72a27feab04345775e5
describe
'313716' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYF' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
e4f443874ff5b2c54edec94e46255062
368f72f1219906f414ae9221f164187657a6be83
describe
'126798' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYG' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
de449a884c6f1505509f2799e49fe8d7
5fc227175c3ac6b212422d627bb56a9932f1393b
describe
'31484' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYH' 'sip-files00086.pro'
20536c2c2cd20edea7ab664eab975fb0
06eda322018fe42324266c5902049e8dc96c98ac
describe
'41686' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYI' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
f130c2363f997352bf8407c553597d8d
7293e068a41026aaeda44f53d095292922e6ac0a
'2011-12-30T10:49:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYJ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
233a73e37fc3b5fe7369f31915468734
2542df1f5059a32a38c3db807be5e398273f10b5
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYK' 'sip-files00086.txt'
40e9d7eae226e5e73ffbc845baec5696
16db13ae093394a7d197ae5926ce441365463a3a
describe
'10890' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYL' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
1c2e693c6b2dcce1a6c90f739c6b7c0f
01eeb8bc9ed2540209fa308052c9f5518d508e58
'2011-12-30T10:49:07-05:00'
describe
'313758' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYM' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
378f19401bd0579471810f7625ff19ca
f858af44b594bf76cce47a017c568dd1ae1901e2
'2011-12-30T10:49:23-05:00'
describe
'134605' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYN' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
8691086172120d864266e8b70959e297
7c51c7f20f1138d18346839202b14685c21bc74e
describe
'34117' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYO' 'sip-files00087.pro'
051778276d0af44c1697c47238384d99
5f7a7bb6ac701261b7c5d45d7d82b417c225fd1b
'2011-12-30T10:48:48-05:00'
describe
'44789' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYP' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
1ceadcadfe1021d64fd9910b59b1a3a2
4b0ae6765ae3cc2b07c202e96d0020d4177d6027
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYQ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
14539a2155c05d36cac82a13dd535ffe
7409e09517751527cfcfe81e6eb791ae86b44d2a
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYR' 'sip-files00087.txt'
0262d241ce5acd27ea72691880254d9b
e8821fe8f4d0d9435b8695429ae97039e52a9421
describe
'11653' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYS' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
3fae872cd44466c2dbcc883f5fb21fc9
b4a5d318060be850bb94a95625bb94295971f43b
describe
'313491' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYT' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
15726470ed7938cfd6810c6748db018b
6e890629fe1c961a71b931bcdb80c97fdc4f2518
describe
'117237' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYU' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
84091aa6089e86e4dfde3cd2e026b22f
a8e3e7d5c3e76535f15235daddf3e94cba20491e
describe
'28298' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYV' 'sip-files00088.pro'
d66cac9c6b827c89ffa1b3e68f22d2c1
0410598684996c3163dd6919469881599e059923
describe
'38596' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYW' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
73caaae3d337a48cf062cc817bccb5a2
cee257412212fa78e0f32626d2bd211a92d78f9c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYX' 'sip-files00088.tif'
064b0f2319836c72db342c467cf17d23
bd1100927b9299984f7a36359cdac0ba4156fb1e
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYY' 'sip-files00088.txt'
b4ddd745bfa933a58528819ddba84c31
28cd30caa349a1555c93b5cd5fcc90bed6ae32b4
describe
'10754' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFYZ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
03dd0c751e03a24f1bb63c86f59b659c
26ea6f36f4692780defe100cad6242915af578d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZA' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
12b9d436fd57fa5f9997a0603bf0e9cb
456da0e5b3b79e8611c80a72e3997ee280e38829
describe
'127465' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZB' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
7a0376f09a7ed4fd2fbfe8bdc31298c6
d813fb88f44f265e63c32a77cdcf32af5db7d4c0
describe
'32220' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZC' 'sip-files00089.pro'
7ccc30bfe1f28d34cbba37b352a23968
2be8089f3a52d77f7f50dc1fb0b43614fd737751
describe
'42854' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZD' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
52cb572d87d65a81fa2899d00234fec4
c5f7752e9e0849741253a55871a26bc790d3866a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZE' 'sip-files00089.tif'
4f264bc39a734835dfb017554b68dfff
338dce775ebc1fea529ccf0077bd033d0cf311ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZF' 'sip-files00089.txt'
9503fb06e7cd8b4431f42d51193e14e9
be01c43dd90928e0160c8fd17c6e3091e763bd22
describe
'11113' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZG' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
57b58a979d35fd9643b0f2b30ca56ee7
331eb6f8b72b1be7c9df7c1f01d51c9959dfc9d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZH' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
2cc1d56976c6d30f90aad070e3ccb790
5bc2c8ed21450a95f5374a195a31b07e105f13c1
describe
'127167' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZI' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
db3da412b89d71e246fe5c9fa768a78f
bc87574bd22a74b1a678195541c729cc549c94fd
describe
'31967' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZJ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
e808db11b53184335a88ae682da64875
fafaeb9f4bf7eefa74f8f91ea4fb84a0a1690745
describe
'41753' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZK' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
652ed4f4874a5a399ca54d4dc05c63e2
c65039db555e4bdafd107f4cb6c13e82c69b2d7c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZL' 'sip-files00090.tif'
d74c27c4a216ecf992851c20d0d47917
bc5e9e1800f9d849a43accef83b84da0ed86ba67
describe
'1272' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZM' 'sip-files00090.txt'
07df9f93cb6ebd2fbb22409b52d783cd
6949e8bcab36f63b45542929370ec156c7d1f255
describe
'10973' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZN' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
afea8669b6b07f650044e41fa0382fae
203d02b09c325fdf4362d167564feb4dcee540bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZO' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
76d923ae0264723f056d45b92fe4ee05
59bec294dfbc6063830d1e5a56b362786d54d690
describe
'125206' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZP' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
e216c3f35de737400ac398895ba24bb9
9dabd7d755dbef835c10d582a7c639d7767fbb2f
describe
'31287' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZQ' 'sip-files00091.pro'
1f5240b4a25224ca74fc50435a9b9bc6
647d8f2ae1d12055b7c8a1b65669eb022f2fc714
'2011-12-30T10:50:27-05:00'
describe
'42201' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZR' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
2cda1a0a6f319b37827b68cc71d911ac
72e1a13b1959faccc113172b1152f87d13676eff
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZS' 'sip-files00091.tif'
1d3de53d6d62804ad179ba7a1a932550
900a306f869983b622e586fe7f2d0ac513d235ed
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZT' 'sip-files00091.txt'
b0ace33198fb16e2419c09e8ea6bc765
3c56fbd0a59f311202a9e744ccd49af24e9f063f
describe
'10861' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZU' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
e035edb7e6a3639969a60f245bb09d2a
ab08d75f3422ba3e0e181cab59f65e80bf7cf889
'2011-12-30T10:48:19-05:00'
describe
'313656' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZV' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
2668da01312b60d917c3d5d4280efcf9
ab130bb62216a333970406cca56e67d6968e8967
describe
'112136' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZW' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
9e2b463541adfd59e6dea0703ffe3df0
cb36c5756484cb077dbde79098b33f6487ca1b36
describe
'26597' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZX' 'sip-files00092.pro'
6c23c409b4093efc9664e068b9c85add
e94eb15db0d678d84cf932d4fa10a9b79e08c553
describe
'37413' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZY' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
5e6a8c12135833e2d0ae4b9cd8d54e94
1ec88415f669ab8c20f81566444efdf48c80a362
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAFZZ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
4d4eae95e7ea436b66d7ca684abb0a7a
48c06cbbba238195841a4f06c9e7a61e6f34fd58
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAA' 'sip-files00092.txt'
2680f968ece7e5c9d2603ac7dbc16c43
5cacfcf1ee715c84873c614b5104ba0f997bab5c
'2011-12-30T10:53:23-05:00'
describe
'10670' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAB' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
7cc81321d930a89342e3f0a86843b970
2c7c2ac833ad5d1d32a76a5c91496ef267f49829
describe
'313671' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAC' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
634e309fe4caec62b16c7f78cc619c3a
829a72fc91ff831d267dec4b5bb9910ec32b3197
'2011-12-30T10:51:38-05:00'
describe
'131570' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAD' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
75a75d7399c78ee85efe8ddd5418da64
8fe1181f26028c03b8cb718d676b582d76b47c03
'2011-12-30T10:50:37-05:00'
describe
'32889' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAE' 'sip-files00093.pro'
cc4fbba48ca4d6a76f2da68fa7b3fec5
3f2b68899da2ec5727d0d84c214ba9a6984c6109
describe
'44706' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAF' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
2340ac1e8c07c4d921e1f8654ed2119f
c7be2d0342df93c991a3b241c1db382823a8be4c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAG' 'sip-files00093.tif'
8c37c22f0a1a458aa29234ee05406ab5
54424058000cde4521c04a95d72dce551ae249df
'2011-12-30T10:48:54-05:00'
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAH' 'sip-files00093.txt'
a0707396c7b27a25dd39a8c94771d073
01c96412ed4dadf4bcb9658e0826fe027c999974
describe
'11713' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAI' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
a3a1b4684a6dcc6fa8af2989f950a650
439758b065a0653ab8161d9b9991a7ce0aba8553
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAJ' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
eeb0c6c4b9bef4758ac00d709643425e
2480f5209d09c2a7a5f7da6d970f07a13ad83068
describe
'125777' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAK' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
33d7eedf0bb67d0be57e70c54f9d9573
4d2c5ff4d4cc7123ebc0fc5719578a2e821399af
'2011-12-30T10:53:20-05:00'
describe
'30600' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAL' 'sip-files00094.pro'
69d5a47895ae6573604b5393ee0a64ab
052336fa5722c95dd2c438d7462a81d45f12d860
describe
'42657' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAM' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
e3cc623ff1b0cb76ab1c386954665011
4f7bdf366385a109ad532b94c315d70dbd1533df
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAN' 'sip-files00094.tif'
dfd8b29f4350f44eef568ea18f939cfa
9cc3269c834d0c94a6a641eae7271063f497b446
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAO' 'sip-files00094.txt'
2349bff04687c4e6401d13ddb20d34fa
727bd8728b81ced440a06ba233e140ffd6962892
describe
'11011' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAP' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
3239e9e4ec182c96e2a29dd2867c3955
3a529c8b49cd0d9fd05509a35c1a95818270d5ea
'2011-12-30T10:51:49-05:00'
describe
'313556' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAQ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
6e3f62dd00b246f21eaee8afcab31d4a
e905f136b51c3c8296df0c5c259cc8536e098870
describe
'110095' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAR' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
4b8f5470c7b7fdbba2aad6f6424c90c3
63b873e5cc51d28a9fcfa41767560e42dac82bd5
describe
'26063' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAS' 'sip-files00095.pro'
64bf6bb7975dfed52ab39bb7e33c51ae
d249c2b974c99f62376d4aa4f8bec24bbd342195
describe
'36377' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAT' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
1f81a600d6a376790f767d52d42a2a7b
2e15617060c70d3c1554731c939ebc73326c5145
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAU' 'sip-files00095.tif'
7b5413943b77e2fccac43389a78c31ee
478c16e324b142a4d0dada8c51cbc12c54395024
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAV' 'sip-files00095.txt'
978da56ba48e7633ad5b4bad83b70630
1e7f17b3745be3090682c1dfa3d4d0f8e5eb5bde
describe
'9858' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAW' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
db670f78d6bac3434858a80bf990a7bc
2bd824de32fb222e3d88412438e76df9cb09248f
describe
'313735' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAX' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
55a17b153cc0e0be72b7d749d492089d
56e5edd9431606c8bf8e1e5d76fa76bd8f3d1e7f
describe
'126135' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAY' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
442882e636c3d6eb0973929eacf0d81f
782b193f25f78ab1c45fd47d9acd504a41b9a12c
describe
'31600' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGAZ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
892f6f20d91c267ccbe003812114bf93
60bd32b0c0c18a7e68227bcc046ee8a8de07badf
describe
'42288' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBA' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
6daeba5252871a49088d6d016a5e4261
728e45eaa361e2df2b563a8d3c24076449d322c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBB' 'sip-files00096.tif'
fcdaf2d3920ed7cb389fbe132f8e6c44
ab0bf880191df6c6501a3ac41c9b5c65c1180d12
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBC' 'sip-files00096.txt'
f14d838c4cef4bb264c25e1700943200
b0286c04e9158305b684048da6fa1209545b04bb
describe
'10815' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBD' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
5e42b86a2f1c20c1094bbf0e0b29411e
fb180d88067e2aaac6094440635b76ed6b0c8be3
'2011-12-30T10:51:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBE' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
1ac274a46d9b3677bd6ce245c417e327
7a77cd6c01033de2e27f673530a5270e55ecee47
describe
'127029' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBF' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
09670c07604dfd3b612ebf4e15adc9d5
fcbac5b867c00c538ac5f044a949c5106a87dfd5
'2011-12-30T10:47:41-05:00'
describe
'31640' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBG' 'sip-files00097.pro'
4f6a1a68e53bc2d03ed9748777dd7541
cd7e8f461da18176da35edcba49ed16fb9a312c0
describe
'42464' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBH' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
b0bfc277d653cde63b53b9f59cf829ea
cfa52dcf76ff6436cfdc56c242286b4f133f10e5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBI' 'sip-files00097.tif'
5d294e8f30427469b06177da53b7f9da
9a057ea89e28089e3e33186be8d650920015e95c
'2011-12-30T10:48:21-05:00'
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBJ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
53338532d72be5b0a093a75de5115a45
3aa4a6b183f98888d88752c7a623cecbd8c75904
describe
'11099' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBK' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
f0b8b0d4b9aa9ff42a59a837c3531014
b464fb64b3af23b9d1074e51e8686ab35c02a591
describe
'313422' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBL' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
4b54ea201bddcdff7e82bd7d7f1f9758
26163c32c64d1e58ab525d8d542778421d0ca9f9
describe
'132165' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBM' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
18ed9adfe1f5b07ad89c17a8497590d6
c6df5ab559204a94352971e65bea7fbe67874556
describe
'32959' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBN' 'sip-files00098.pro'
f8372bfb99b908d05a66aa151546babd
a929aac4a9f79398aa7cae2da68f29d3d6aa16ce
describe
'43640' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBO' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
5140d032b9f33dc853b5617cc3263268
0078cd20e4f91e16c31c64fd11ec2464e0a52216
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBP' 'sip-files00098.tif'
d4e0e6f41d0f9fc278cd0a4027e4a986
7a02ca972e6723d90b0269dc2c88794b7b12037f
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBQ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
93bd1e3bc6ab75498a5c7a2a01038d98
4c58843d4650287f240853d712ec7dee58d154a0
describe
'11450' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBR' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
c6936a96ff23f9525615c45a74e82661
d064e5ad2fc8e84d9f1a19902d03763b6c38e94f
describe
'313708' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBS' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
9b0317260f36a2a6fc69d9a6ff8b6508
b7018c609d44e9d1a435f17b08ef3be54bc2b745
describe
'128937' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBT' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
a52b8a3f91c857db82f71455ede023fb
ab3cebae53787c5bb016e97e2fc210724652766c
describe
'32330' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBU' 'sip-files00099.pro'
75c29af39d96aadac9d5bd61a6a8e206
7a504bd584987a1e7785cdd434255f3184edc5f9
'2011-12-30T10:47:46-05:00'
describe
'43133' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBV' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
f82a55615a358d692510797b40e8aea0
66afd65bec89f89f66eff9e3451e78566ff9fefb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBW' 'sip-files00099.tif'
d429e1f069d8370b3436df9caf61a961
481a11c799310c97d056d3fed6956149483fa1c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBX' 'sip-files00099.txt'
8440980a545ff990b23dfb2f1f8ae145
dbe31f964c31dfba66003fdbb1efedf9d96c1e77
describe
'11364' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBY' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
4273bbd03cfcc2b7f50df0b383a857c8
af97ec2832247cd82b4c408a42d4c25c4b26b1d8
describe
'313711' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGBZ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
a6eacbba50eddf5b0415017bb37b9809
4b72f6af6327919ae85225717cccffef771128f9
describe
'111784' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCA' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
a49a093a46439226283d4bc55d21e4b9
21faf8e678c8848dd8a1af2dc68036f58b2580ce
describe
'26703' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCB' 'sip-files00100.pro'
a462051fa8a140737660b5d540d1396c
fc0b8d352f326f876ea2dddefe597d3971ae65ce
describe
'37675' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCC' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
399506613b78b6b547927b2a62fa3c08
fe72c1d68eac338e95bec88a554aeefb3033737d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCD' 'sip-files00100.tif'
945cf212c089838e3504aee1227a8ba5
0f8fa0e483dddbff753622d1afa4762c1d521063
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCE' 'sip-files00100.txt'
04fb4b4e626a1a28d061593e1d672506
9f08b959e86cde1e0f1ae1d831e38aaa10ef6822
'2011-12-30T10:49:09-05:00'
describe
'10243' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCF' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
e0e01e1c61e1f335e917c777349707a5
f4e105274f12a98b9942f74249aecd5a8a0b239b
'2011-12-30T10:49:00-05:00'
describe
'313748' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCG' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
18acb8fc3a98dc92964a4236aa59132c
52c262d980d288cf68fdf8e96886d453d6dd03e0
describe
'127527' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCH' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
c71687ad1c724be85d074a4cd2b5ea0e
5a5371790437fe1544f35a42e27ec90a4ffb47e9
describe
'32165' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCI' 'sip-files00101.pro'
1fc00b572cd382acb7861d3e26e82bab
babfb417936599eaf138f28cc069c05288aa14ad
describe
'42098' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCJ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
543dd7a033fc2588f8da010f750e0277
11ef5ab9400f5b214f2e4cf310192b04a28067ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCK' 'sip-files00101.tif'
d389c444b9999c44fa4a09b97d0e4c68
d61a6d33fa6aafdc8722bffcb795ddf78d56d0d2
'2011-12-30T10:51:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCL' 'sip-files00101.txt'
8e9969b665c9e556c0cdd63a5488693a
298818deb7abec8256d4398688cdb842b3b3e16d
describe
'11632' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCM' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
e7269b1c967b279eeba71bdb12f5c264
ae7fc9aa87ea5bab09b00209af1d3d5102d036b0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCN' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
20282714a9fc37d7b8d4471a2325c0a3
aa9df024cd50f285b0f3fd02fb32aacd2e315fd5
describe
'123136' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCO' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
8c7e2c85f1745748b20ac56f797bf3a2
9131cf224786bc403111eb5a410e2c8b1ec1358b
describe
'30277' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCP' 'sip-files00102.pro'
f08d82cc800f6968c8565b1909cfd24b
c356f7b89814199c053fb9ada731217ce5c31423
describe
'40446' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCQ' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
f1a737aa145292920e04ca374536427f
a64a950be34f600ac535ffe077a37d7912a90ae1
'2011-12-30T10:49:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCR' 'sip-files00102.tif'
4bb07854343ed22d63dc1a42f822b73f
c5cf8c2587bb0395dd5a3459686f2ff09057dbb5
'2011-12-30T10:52:23-05:00'
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCS' 'sip-files00102.txt'
4a94dcfca4ca4f9660a9a2b74fbc2f16
b185fd2f4895d5a5f10e765be67ccead09f0c939
describe
'10505' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCT' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
aa2d72bf8d1cd9958533757323d96f48
e6663ded674479208776b0f06cb1bd28ba339c15
describe
'313692' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCU' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
b1dadcb4df58b41c609c7de4e789bd1c
41df3fc737954bb7bddb1a69ae88a36bcc72431c
describe
'117221' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCV' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
c88a8f03990d2754f0d7573ee2ab50fb
72810571febd604e2d7a578f3eef0290d2006be3
describe
'28715' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCW' 'sip-files00103.pro'
396bbcad00a56c82ede91462d2685593
67744a8a7c5a6486eff1669eaab20b88ccedae80
describe
'38351' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCX' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
e446183f98d9ffce1a4f2050f3702bfd
751ac7c198c661b3b53b066afcd62cac8fc46e4e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCY' 'sip-files00103.tif'
60449915e4e4e9dbb624dfaf4502050c
1c380ac9543963e8e676842dba42dc20a980505d
describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGCZ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
8442ba8977ac1c8b5f8720cf45667a05
8a0a6946e158a7e33446f508f7b5eec7932be8f5
describe
'10362' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDA' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
1fe9c0996a0fc5feb2f98e6b3730e3d2
0887e69ecd6a1714f1634857c60d22374e7439bc
'2011-12-30T10:53:03-05:00'
describe
'313643' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDB' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
e71c095e481f7145ddd7ffc64633d383
36ab60bf498e217eb4a0d486f02ca5144c460b5f
describe
'125434' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDC' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
24f005549cce4436a7534c28df8e3fd1
a9b95a33387bee33d7830c400cbba91d1c21f217
describe
'31745' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDD' 'sip-files00104.pro'
4b08553197741e75b4bb3c9a45e9fb2d
d835e923500ecaaa705ca515b4390c7146c2253f
'2011-12-30T10:47:53-05:00'
describe
'41870' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDE' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
668fddfbdfe780982030d9941103bd2d
e6ac12e259607350c666ed1588158bda3e3ac4f2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDF' 'sip-files00104.tif'
99e2bcf33d11bd94264bd070f4b211d1
15f3baef2d9360fa953f99ccf7d1fef804f047f8
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDG' 'sip-files00104.txt'
b2595dd3e8e4ee42a1995593425d534f
ecf025fa29616f4513b5d2ced904e8c8500a2838
describe
'10945' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDH' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
629a9bb7e52a390e8a62846ab490b26c
13da94d0da9760c680374ea36959230c905bf633
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDI' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
2d3ae40bfe2d9a6ba7e883bd0dc38d3a
e3be23b08dccdf7e4e6952e3d82db2c1e2d90bb9
describe
'127781' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDJ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
eafb94fdf777ab757e9e98c5b2afb941
5992441c4232dbc5e560af08c30f1ad94200316d
describe
'31794' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDK' 'sip-files00105.pro'
c4623ec052ab2d4ed5a1846c759f007d
a1230272ae612151f7c496f8124a45b07de5731c
describe
'42008' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDL' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
9a1c322b784ca7efffe7a1cacc73dd96
e5a262e13f0177600b542d2a88e57f96f942b0ed
'2011-12-30T10:48:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDM' 'sip-files00105.tif'
6c9325cd2b3cbcc4172d36d7535b2540
7fee4b8f755d4cdf5fd7b468f28b08a4e54336ed
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDN' 'sip-files00105.txt'
3b6c770d4de8f2f86be8eab0447c16bb
c0006e2e424613af83d57392001f64897744f581
describe
'11285' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDO' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
1da2a7a5a72169811fe2a8cf23b368fe
33840c0946dc9833c6f769d06a105c9ffbfc1d1e
describe
'313650' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDP' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
bd4446f9d4f11c4bb6f30acaa2106bb3
9f448ffd7ce0c515c13dda09bd4b72d2b846d55b
describe
'112760' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDQ' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
a4968279b94b9f728372c3bbbf4a32a8
2431c2fba313cdee03aa4db08f06b71b3e2e7acb
describe
'26736' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDR' 'sip-files00106.pro'
d2092587bab31cd527daa8ccf67ca944
8fa0b095ef58a91fae04c5d4dc4c5b37e3e46355
describe
'36467' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDS' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
bbccbbea00548135cce4cb573ce7c197
7f8ae49145246d8d06ac227fb8f238fa06ce98f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDT' 'sip-files00106.tif'
4ab3865caa1738635ac53ddb1461f67e
e1c05b5948280ad41dcc3154a8bce2062dd710af
'2011-12-30T10:48:55-05:00'
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDU' 'sip-files00106.txt'
1610a94380ba3146900c2976d5ce6c1e
48edce979517856f3e8c3be43e5fb9d3b81d92da
describe
'9739' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDV' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
43313d380ab85e0adac4ee0923c76d1a
0e67c7de4c8a0bcd46520dad79706e3c8ae42c93
describe
'313831' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDW' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
f3f1552d1eebabe46d7252b2bb8df6f6
f543063c6cf0462236388aec94d48d7afe60e5ac
describe
'130671' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDX' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
13b4038a4ce401ee4bb8e81670b71797
7d7c4de0dc1ab460f7f81d5790da5e67de084941
describe
'32681' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDY' 'sip-files00107.pro'
82f8dab7a8641901895afbdb4760ee2b
d67cf0a3341f1b365b12f5d9ab53580566bfc935
describe
'44579' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGDZ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
b3acc355aa0418d89695b22dcce15f10
abed6b61c43b3a5a642cd480bba65fe40f5b4b78
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEA' 'sip-files00107.tif'
1d28d110a6e8d70ece9561012050a10a
f72045d976ac4bfb11842fa1c66334126a1976a6
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEB' 'sip-files00107.txt'
ddfeca0752912c3da0ab0fe4d3e9f8f9
a1dd91215af3d8e1d8255ce2c7b575395f17c833
describe
'11904' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEC' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
ef794bb3e1408607409f0de863fb9e36
4adad6c0a566fd54d741d70ac775a610dbda9c31
'2011-12-30T10:50:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGED' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
f5ab576fcda2fda901e1bed57e1eac64
144038294535c699aee82e7ff4e697978bb9cc60
describe
'120873' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEE' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
b1229177de03247365bb776809f3565a
d1fcb8572c49e0914634e65810791be98f3452d7
describe
'30314' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEF' 'sip-files00108.pro'
247a7dbecba8d4a42a5c7fb7fda35b77
114d203e4b08de098a2457f393b2cdd18006d0a9
describe
'40086' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEG' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
7fe464934724d781cc6018d012ee17d8
bcac641bc6d2d371c21813b91011335ea765cc5b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEH' 'sip-files00108.tif'
27a9247d23f143d9b6db810d50a64cf4
ca7317dd1abb96d2b98907e563c4947b35ad0919
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEI' 'sip-files00108.txt'
86084202a5ad9609d7c068f9d71239a1
a02ad12856d478d777e2712560eff57b3eabdf00
describe
'10582' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEJ' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
fb90015ef247d40cf821f3b1061cf99a
3beaa9091a74b1e85eebdfeecb67346b6258a336
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEK' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
448bdcf732d9334fa6308c7db39846ad
e3e1840db2d4de58bf847f96b757539a90fbd3dc
'2011-12-30T10:50:41-05:00'
describe
'131813' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEL' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
0059e2c40d76deed7bd60724bca20814
2fa2abccd4b7d8a4c991f213e5c9ad6af524b734
'2011-12-30T10:51:13-05:00'
describe
'33600' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEM' 'sip-files00109.pro'
1ed46ce7ec82ca1fc55d377cf930afaa
57df4c5051875c273c978dab7928eae9550348bb
describe
'43259' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEN' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
0dde74e22e066ada780b7fef7077df22
b87249815098c8089277c016e0f90663ef80e075
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEO' 'sip-files00109.tif'
12abc70c4288cdc0bd10f098431d0959
dbeac445c015b712b7fecae977fbf89a5d13efef
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEP' 'sip-files00109.txt'
b6da0a73551485230fe357d3598a71cc
3b3d4dc32407ba11b20ff08daf603a6788f68117
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEQ' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
b7513ba018dab117076de6f548edac53
f8396c86f5ba2ef4632a64d0ab124284ea530325
describe
'313890' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGER' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
3a99b3a3bf9c4fce935ec554e6991503
d093ff965b1a7d4588ab3fe8d2eec736a04485f0
describe
'128345' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGES' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
f61bdd62297accbc2f631613575b1a44
90cd646ce1531a5a3ef1a8e0ad8b7925d6b3f97a
describe
'31907' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGET' 'sip-files00110.pro'
7cd4ede7b0dc5022c03327d9c2dfbb7f
25fea83df93ceb6d19ae37c62683895ee1c103e7
describe
'43475' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEU' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
6cb1cb61f077e6f1bd6047de657b923e
96a6ab5ce6a65752152fb8abcf32e59b5e7f34cb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEV' 'sip-files00110.tif'
f0241b82a352fe6b004b39fb0c859c95
42f9e9f8ec7983a8b96be607e03d275e2f911e9f
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEW' 'sip-files00110.txt'
02a3c486a3af81e6b4150b3064f311a3
3c0a0a0507b57c00e2b92953a51323bb0179d116
describe
'11303' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEX' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
c7ecf826c0f042b4d9003f853f4f6299
c71d56dbbe18d5afbccd7017b8eb59aac9bf2be8
describe
'313355' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEY' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
5d7643406bc0056f306e8d01906ac62f
62e808db1d4364b28831330f3f20949eaed4a51e
describe
'112925' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGEZ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
6bec71fb9739382624f9bccfd815e846
a07b1e2e49ee1612f268451d0dcb1e986762e60b
describe
'27540' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFA' 'sip-files00111.pro'
84e0af28ba8a662a84e61ebe90cb9914
1d1cf3c83d93d6fa3ec69a7a4c94a8c73792f55a
describe
'37634' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFB' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
4d2cf9b7eebbe6bb6814c4be9ced1ad3
eb644d1f3f1d52cb02963f3d82431256f24840f9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFC' 'sip-files00111.tif'
3dee261030a69d0c4efde0be3e9699e0
c3535ff18abb7a2dc7af57e025096fadd1544386
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFD' 'sip-files00111.txt'
5f4f86c959d64c7e7528fee531afdb21
740f4be39aa98437a0f6eb7e95adced4b7185bcc
describe
'9830' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFE' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
df91fd9536b37a37f6f15d22fb40a91e
7a121eecd7597f2634f78295cbb649a4d80d77a3
describe
'313638' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFF' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
686814f6d662da75ca91ed19ae50eeb9
87a9beffccd7418d67721a02fd8c74a07a490451
describe
'111716' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFG' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
05d8d52202d61224ca055ecb2cd0dceb
69e5b7a9e7fb69632f9223a8446525f4612c9e64
describe
'27821' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFH' 'sip-files00112.pro'
78143dec74fdf3a0bcbd34362eb19ed8
bea7a7b25479266a81492a16849810dc847c130c
describe
'36030' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFI' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
06dff0f00adc2c1d94851df06a9b3ee6
232e817bf27b38573b93aae6e3f7ceba13958e3e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFJ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
acd0c509bc1fd3dbda50db9412d815fc
6d1c4637d1814a01a6a536be70e8c9f2d2105c5b
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFK' 'sip-files00112.txt'
68f333e35a6be1d7fe6f757ddcf9d0a1
bd48aa4dd5511c70f162514480898abc933ad7b8
describe
'9349' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFL' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
b147d4fea92d82480b29d832913265fc
eff3f2055b768f362ddf5226d44211816d1af09f
'2011-12-30T10:49:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFM' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
7585aac8e40607220dbca14dcd6abc2b
ddb22c3f6ed80483e6ae72a8ce8fc46176ca6826
describe
'127208' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFN' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
4aaf6c6cd42592cd23ed6dda28d4b728
4885b4caf53ff9b49d50ddf87b16ac5c8952584e
describe
'32790' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFO' 'sip-files00113.pro'
d0c245b16194f98c12ab4da671dba4d6
5e2e59da6086f4eebda62e28e25347a593ca855c
describe
'41934' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFP' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
3240383d90bdc5a988f16ebd6de06aec
6732d66d62274b5706d5e0563b8b9162d81cb2cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFQ' 'sip-files00113.tif'
874ff3221c4575f3eaf9a34eddfa1c6b
efccbc6b6b094182e99eb3c892c96000f937cba9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFR' 'sip-files00113.txt'
08db3abb8ed3474c0706340637f25caa
38f58d853a63c1ba674880ac75bb9f2b1092a47f
'2011-12-30T10:47:39-05:00'
describe
'10938' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFS' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
c995070de80ddf55b6b86c0dcf6b5ffb
74e326f0a9955efdd54ee194c60f8e1f38d9f2f4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFT' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
0a0d6c65c08752767dd2e072db3fd61d
8d20e424bd23e75d2e9dcf2f8a5b2659563bbf83
describe
'130631' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFU' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
60ba6a130df6c798723436d56dc25896
752153c911f8b81cc05b8561084ee9393c313bd0
describe
'33398' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFV' 'sip-files00114.pro'
aec46c8770a575665072372c5687634c
57985916041d786fdfd08fce93bff69b8c4229de
describe
'42584' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFW' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
de24c57edfe30503de31caff9c72f0f1
e9af0d302ec032019c3ecf8d2ef2a1a53978cfb2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFX' 'sip-files00114.tif'
72e35c40ac8ecdca93960ad70ed36d3c
9a8fb56a0ddf3f9f77610a5ff6246c577d79559b
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFY' 'sip-files00114.txt'
f0b780077ef5bd8cc7fc2051a4dd531d
446a7a65b899aa22c3c08db3b1e2929249df1681
describe
'11215' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGFZ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
d31372f7c37df8fad45b2b47e34088c3
d8254ae92a5ff9620f6e60eb9b6a919d74558a7a
describe
'313689' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGA' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
4f8f44360e37bbcc79282ba77887afaf
6dedfe3a054821c4f14888765e2859f7095a9ab9
describe
'114307' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGB' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
efc5102c2225e4e17ebc7b4945794451
de73f0e88aa3cbaac19b544fda134b39f8a358de
describe
'26921' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGC' 'sip-files00115.pro'
2a781f3baab2056d5e1aa3a1f7a169f0
807f3195b30add974ddc542eebc961fc5cfe364a
describe
'38097' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGD' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
f9e5ea8e4cbd6059def3034f5cabecfa
0f4a7a2eedd459b6cf109ee20d52fcbb61e9f905
'2011-12-30T10:47:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGE' 'sip-files00115.tif'
e7ef5edca375a607fd57dc24cd7f4eda
8bf91c6f1d51991dd653a949107d546e38131ccb
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGF' 'sip-files00115.txt'
02ac9c5919c30615c20d103784434c44
885ac44c28488e6b34e3d5163b4188cd1f309e1f
describe
'10722' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGG' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
34b1cc2fef4958c6e0fc2e927f5ea3ef
06cb5425ca1c3db3c63c267e3c9af6871101fac6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGH' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
c08c5ff861b3aa385fe7dc505786225d
65f4b7986a777c52d45b34230c6168cc50a7146c
describe
'126477' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGI' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
a9696fe9e5ae483b8be50616cd0202dd
b0ee33dd30233f9dec0fb9132526cc48e5c07372
describe
'31720' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGJ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
28814f6dd5b21147557e76095b6ae253
2bd7748bd7849503490b7eefa7cd6269f89a7ce5
describe
'41922' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGK' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
f2f929540b747388737cbdabeda7673c
26e32da09b61b55ac184afcfb1d06898029bff51
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGL' 'sip-files00116.tif'
c6566cafef7fc8bced986fae1e181451
16630033af6c698c09f95579a02dc0c94f79d9b8
'2011-12-30T10:52:36-05:00'
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGM' 'sip-files00116.txt'
13482dd0c52cfc9940be0d0b1fd196b9
beabcf8fdace0c8b2ff7bba865b85078ba93037e
describe
'10797' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGN' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
ed07c388c8de935ea924962689d0c643
90f6dde7a4a20dcc0a46cbb0a6cdd6b92ff68aab
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGO' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
04350a45a659c62d439893d109782cb6
a4c38f42eb552c9349c4747353f49117a7152d09
describe
'123209' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGP' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
240aae08de4bde9c5a478233a9cfa87f
f8deb5407c02ccb297791275f611d5f3346fdba3
describe
'30352' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGQ' 'sip-files00117.pro'
0ac567cdadf1e890d61be608564284d3
894b7abe3ca0e551c4fe84c78b8de638d69d84b0
describe
'41911' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGR' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
9d1f42306e872ade21db387b7274b288
ac5b328e117a31c056f84c5b92d8be8f1496c58a
'2011-12-30T10:52:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGS' 'sip-files00117.tif'
3f81c56a1955b4093b553eb671d095ff
dec89c21e8a211efd6047efd82685e346f5c64d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGT' 'sip-files00117.txt'
f112d64c1ff1c6b0587f0762c6f8470e
b57d4f83411020a43c7d0ca163123f9f565d7e1d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGU' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
2a7070d7de22786b98a609167cf25da8
9ca48dd2a04c8c7142504ac23638533b5d8cda90
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGV' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
5b77c5ba08a20f096324ec1315247300
e5601f918fabf89235b1a83b04f00dec90cf3a08
describe
'113086' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGW' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
e8dcd006f7606b9df5873e7e3f2ce74c
c7e67cc82b9384ec3a42dcd0014ed07120278027
describe
'27490' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGX' 'sip-files00118.pro'
ee4695e5576ea7b156427c8541b1ce5f
cbe8716e9a354a53cf29f27d1f88d080854484d9
describe
'37355' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGY' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
120d22b09eada3aca2edfc92e3c213f0
92dacf6454878523675ffb3dbf599691e774fda1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGGZ' 'sip-files00118.tif'
071a27d6b94b29fa6efd39b5e6dcb9ab
3c689f71b29ed3a5f672b729c72fdde983e49bc6
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHA' 'sip-files00118.txt'
dc9f29f5fca62fd19b2f486baa6e3aff
37d375d17f71bdf5ae9104f446e6a846765c4527
describe
'9918' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHB' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
c408109308ae46252462c68eee45ae95
06fc4039fd9a8074cdb4f4f1710d6d25e8ad65f0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHC' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
b33a2ffb5f1ff0a712f399890774ab46
74c958689716b71f0a7bc3b1eedc67be69015cd9
'2011-12-30T10:51:25-05:00'
describe
'128826' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHD' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
e31c8aa08fb84003801a907169080c43
fd6856b049616db985b90c0ab913706e4d869bfb
'2011-12-30T10:50:55-05:00'
describe
'32397' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHE' 'sip-files00119.pro'
ec1b508ddf40f039e20318fd831dbd8f
44c1f3ac0715b22735aba56ed6b6951a9bdfd736
describe
'42980' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHF' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
ccafb014596c0fe194ec145a435df774
c2552c63d19f6104eb897ead67de6be9d7e0a69c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHG' 'sip-files00119.tif'
de91c03971755848bf1064b0c6fee1c8
ad4e9e14aac63612157a0614e9755de510da9d0d
'2011-12-30T10:49:29-05:00'
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHH' 'sip-files00119.txt'
e7a5330c941571dc85447fb49bdfe314
8292da8673a0f4cd64a290ba9016a4f593ea2822
describe
'11012' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHI' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
3c5351bbf6d8d852da7690922d70a728
9a877da95348df7f632cda6899582a590a4fadcb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHJ' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
0172833afa7376eed2d26049a8322884
cc28ff65b275b86f8a54411833cd8f4570a76a03
describe
'128085' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHK' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
18be91e290a20bd443a95de272a9a507
13c0ac58d6cf30a9b24cac74e67a9759f63bbae4
describe
'32297' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHL' 'sip-files00120.pro'
e3249d1abeeffd38fb970b6c7356cce2
0074fa669cb2e19c9119d7b42c3257d4cdaebf09
describe
'43024' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHM' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
06163edf75d428cdc1b733d41d6acc77
c38990e376f1a72f0d8042b563c4ff7cab6a4943
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHN' 'sip-files00120.tif'
4e5225ed56b03176b055c82801c4b77e
14998615cba6bf1fa2ef2a8a5e4b47be16c0e303
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHO' 'sip-files00120.txt'
0c6345a2498f8478d6dfc22e55a5dfa9
839f5451ce94c82504a712f2b552c6e07617d65e
describe
'10813' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHP' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
bf01aae2a39dd049056ebc2525591e63
ff4bb9f3bbccdeb998013de4e8a66d06a6a057e1
describe
'313693' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHQ' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
89fa559838a51e0a8e226ad2191caac4
eabfd46a717a21f29b7d962b452548f6a57b90f0
describe
'130864' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHR' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
6610093d54cb32e1909ab135f51d69b1
99683690af0514db93e53a69b8dbefec6179d513
describe
'32854' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHS' 'sip-files00121.pro'
3d8dae5c02bb12d0f9b1add4fc70b938
3a3eb6e3e59e9de8c6e9a35344038ddaf69bad41
describe
'43335' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHT' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
271d0230b11b6990c300a6cde47da4df
733d0633844bd10d80b30585fb3bbffe7ca5b92c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHU' 'sip-files00121.tif'
0883d940cddf017b55345a91e7fe0a16
15760665c468f55dea74e2b24d0967f13229903c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHV' 'sip-files00121.txt'
680194e4bd29265858737169094687f5
1c5466bbfe2d34bbd4db81cb2bf4e0076bc38722
describe
'11690' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHW' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
5d64487fcb9e07e549fc2e2b40bedc43
b975980447f6b9db2e300f41128c9a9026f82d66
describe
'313628' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHX' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
fe0ccfa1465f914e3d4dc3504a532d15
41e90b5a96b2b2a9dcb2c6b873830c9788dae7ff
describe
'109606' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHY' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
c9ccda0216053c1eb878d401495745e8
03b03a728e961299031087020a8706d5284e6606
describe
'26168' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGHZ' 'sip-files00122.pro'
89530666788134536b62df2387a087dd
2ac0035ee52b5171a387b2c49e75238bf5ef3c82
describe
'35873' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIA' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
d58a4f20f639ababb45d85688782aec5
ebe2976743f220340e12814197c148bfd49bde6d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIB' 'sip-files00122.tif'
d640732ea5a6183f35547833448caf8a
d02c8640da8732e8ae6025a9ab76618b56708c2f
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIC' 'sip-files00122.txt'
56a1d1ea19d490b0d5dc6d5e0de04fdf
e7256e661e5436a20134ae126a355876c3b3ecef
describe
'9477' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGID' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
38be95b961af71d74f6c787c20fe0622
518571a776a4b764127ec942128d9917143d6a74
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIE' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
d81292024935aeddd6b70c597a56f988
154b7ed2ab665c29309a1414141139b1cc7e1003
describe
'132733' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIF' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
91223e2717d9a3486bd5e2a54b3bd683
1876091718207e9b0eb7f27568f134188774596c
describe
'33208' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIG' 'sip-files00123.pro'
f5b8ac8320338f372c063f57586bdaca
c08622ac41a21d95408da99079877b7a6861f5ad
'2011-12-30T10:49:40-05:00'
describe
'44660' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIH' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
2f4fe2fe11ae8c232e43316fff0dc1f9
34e4a4d2bf99049faa663b93c0fef026116e9ee9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGII' 'sip-files00123.tif'
6453e4c531572cf18f61631de2501dc8
482c3d11db55f0a12bd584217e10e9418016991e
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIJ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
fbd69c9d8fe604973cbe5db7e52ad02c
bd4c3042a1ef264de1fe02c1c932a0380698000c
describe
'11745' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIK' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
654d46a955f38f68f003c7aa6a26e789
95aaf7e6c04067b9bd828d619251acc563b320da
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIL' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
d46ecd50f6befaa07f1c8f0f0baebdc2
d55eb5aabeae1fd94911e8ac4bc4bcafbd636bad
describe
'120963' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIM' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
398de7e8cb85da271bd6eaaee00829e8
11aedfd3bc8853ca36f9792b02ac5f967a1fa6bd
describe
'30746' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIN' 'sip-files00124.pro'
ed972c8c5d28eeac8d92663ece612712
f148848f6b4da68c2dfa2385f18ad8afd473daad
describe
'40486' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIO' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
b2bda9e5c1afb3f5cc79fdf986648b78
130f06401448a1f9bd37c218dd83929247c584ba
'2011-12-30T10:48:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIP' 'sip-files00124.tif'
de004b8773fbcb5e3372a3a9d31779da
7073530b2be0fe3709a60362b753dfe50cd7d00f
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIQ' 'sip-files00124.txt'
3c262121ee496453e2bb499a698f95d7
ff614320f947afdb08f6c209927ea9f9b32f2a1e
describe
'10696' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIR' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
22641b49a1227e939133cb0446fb775b
880c35c7e3d2ca9b47ea887618134f88cfd0160c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIS' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
177fc05b5e4cf2d5951e9aeb7f7ddb1d
ad1cb490f1078667e2cf787ce744984008e27bf3
'2011-12-30T10:50:59-05:00'
describe
'131479' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIT' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
2ea0f8ac30e824d2984c887d3d64204f
731e93d94b697bc1463fa8ebc019db52fbf959f5
describe
'33511' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIU' 'sip-files00125.pro'
7c331116ae0a03ddd6578635b0edbed3
3d81278b065ff21b03f41891180cefad796b1675
describe
'44462' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIV' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
56980dafc6142a49b2d94b0fcb063781
9640c38b10c9e0c883238679ffcc129028351d87
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIW' 'sip-files00125.tif'
2fe95aa25f7153d399512f58d96e38c2
32bcd34fb78d73c7139fd88181731539bfa3f8ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIX' 'sip-files00125.txt'
d037622a0b4d3e547c96a6f9216d5f45
50d26ed49549b0dc64b8247d7862d81a6a0e0e5d
describe
'11588' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIY' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
1493eb9f80b3055c08a73393ddc3f655
d43c05e980545693e2d8aa7004330dbc89ef58de
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGIZ' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
795affe9738b5e097178aebd92633cde
edc1ffa654bca3090f1dd5b2badd8c275eff1231
describe
'112363' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJA' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
e19101946ee4db790c4b6534025537b2
a7c9c43cd1ccf3c5f2b75a3ad6860273874172d0
describe
'27464' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJB' 'sip-files00126.pro'
ecc39e7d1f565b1fbf0133db73de12b3
512d3b07a5e89c99445f992601d592a74a7437a2
describe
'36066' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJC' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
2185362e6601bd127fbc3420e2bf20c5
21613d1137178c3c110928cc170fe787fbdde4e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJD' 'sip-files00126.tif'
f4da6f2a3c301d2238b4fdffba60d092
37ef8d49716ddf8cdd7e18540bb180f9906a4fc2
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJE' 'sip-files00126.txt'
b2094af27f0c36fafe3f182086239392
730eafe27a738438395432e0a45abd72b6428e47
describe
'9754' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJF' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
7c2a47b818d0d3aa03ff7c8572370bd0
f2fbd4177ae4f2c69e231ee1d8455de5580a4e09
describe
'313655' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJG' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
846d49ef1e82910a2d335da83f5029e5
4f84b22f544279e933f1dd5885f1d5a52524b1a5
'2011-12-30T10:50:00-05:00'
describe
'134640' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJH' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
0c6a7dd2466863e5b9e4fddbdb6a0c39
53f487ce6339bfca3a6ae7e260f7d398cf799436
describe
'33276' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJI' 'sip-files00127.pro'
271263f2ab3868eb8adb5fff2d02079b
bd39ff3a3746979d2f507b95d62427ac8be42f1b
describe
'45117' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJJ' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
f54ec6b978c6b68a61233b878207a03f
08c6ffedcdfa57b6f6f52d30a9f50dd9d3b6a7e4
describe
'2526904' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJK' 'sip-files00127.tif'
774bfe76868c5dc9526ad7a7ef046512
a50ea86d6ba4953c4d788da1ff987f954787aa62
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJL' 'sip-files00127.txt'
d81e57437625a45d1f0b439d351f3c0a
6da7292944c1570a55f47b7df14095d43481e96d
describe
'12013' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJM' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
0afd7dcdbab9dd791e654db4f59ce11b
d2540fa74d78fa4175825ca7f6109bcbea3c8551
'2011-12-30T10:51:40-05:00'
describe
'313736' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJN' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
26bba4b833005f6f22dc849c1ddcf7e5
e9ec2c2ea89569c3362b410f5e1fea2906ba5837
describe
'130173' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJO' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
fd3a5f73df485a7e9ef10ec36fd033bd
5c19f0d8f1b6027628ce33414ab63e9df1861f68
describe
'32375' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJP' 'sip-files00128.pro'
05d19ca562f7c296e7aa440192b917cf
a7ddc6fc485cd1076453a348bf4a342c249daf45
describe
'43340' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJQ' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
d28ac47e2ce2c00a40c356873c248032
9b09cbdc0d2c79808da00ad644a8d9e1cc0c5559
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJR' 'sip-files00128.tif'
e20607cfaf0d5d671b6c9091fb2b6113
794327626dba06b1618087797f5a65ca4b6c56ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJS' 'sip-files00128.txt'
69efdd624e68f290fe523caaf9322c0c
cb9d16162731c08fc4b1e4a05ce16cce3faea5b7
describe
'11055' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJT' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
77d1cd5801678bd27109b9fd5a574e5d
25430390f7bbd4f5cff5a279b7024128a009fcd5
describe
'313403' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJU' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
252e5f935f7ccf248843c1e169365fad
beac6d0da99e1661e657de0e4996aa9eba2d9309
describe
'113948' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJV' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
745355b5030e67c2c8b0a8c3684f1fd0
84d9782974642819122ef16703ee7c1d8491a440
describe
'26912' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJW' 'sip-files00129.pro'
f9173948f0424c872dc0bc85dab36ed7
c9775501a2664afd3739b41a3061e0f8dd67d06d
describe
'38021' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJX' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
e2167840d0a552e1fb33fe4fce8e4621
d7932887e8df2780682ec56046c0ecbb1e35b76b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJY' 'sip-files00129.tif'
c3bab67c0368ac8ab690d7d8551dde92
2b6c8551654bf4fdaad6bb9a2d5a97fd1615ab3f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGJZ' 'sip-files00129.txt'
9f65f9a65ab1816537cd7c685e769e44
70f155e136174f923e8e26dfeabca8ec267bee50
describe
'10207' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKA' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
981b9af6be15c1b61826a59711b6ae9f
967401e0e1c4e64e791f2b849f689c6caabe1a66
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKB' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
d3af133f77e173ec772cf80096584fb5
7749c458164699e9645102d05b251bfd455e7092
describe
'137648' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKC' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
9a800c9964069a1c87ccc5f5e856c5f5
11a8c03b7514e84735217b6696499945e9575455
describe
'34468' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKD' 'sip-files00130.pro'
b813bdccdd81a99ee81b421392bc8010
5061d878250c34347685326df86206147107987d
describe
'45036' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKE' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
a2ca39e78fe3da7a1b7cf04d7dc55395
ed28e4153a22ccaeababb735ac2f932210b71eb7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKF' 'sip-files00130.tif'
22a8563dad52396b5b70bfdad4a3ff68
cdbd7aae084de84d716291877b3c33eefb454d91
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKG' 'sip-files00130.txt'
c056c2f42f88820a3b07b2d29600b749
5241b99fb2987c70e8a4fac571272baff1b7cd65
describe
'11284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKH' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
da8580cdf487cd4f86d5ae6af2170580
8ce6e3e8c310c90ba712ffb1bc23bffa100a7c77
describe
'313694' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKI' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
7152e89b5b0ed9fd9afc248cd961e3ba
dd61e460a282306d36123fe0ef6d048a814296b5
describe
'124838' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKJ' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
93089c88b8c4b60e449e93f8b7e8c220
2db8659029302a6b4f94e4b1d144322080cc94d2
describe
'31062' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKK' 'sip-files00131.pro'
288876930a1bad099c74d18e4888a984
95c1fa8c68a64db379db1495d84430bda66d4fa4
describe
'41064' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKL' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
1a6c55cdb20828b48076a9a696ce55fd
08c230dc5b60292d45bd194b5546dd0cf2dc5ec3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKM' 'sip-files00131.tif'
d83f144973b0f90080896cb65095caca
18d5e84ef3483a8949f684610384049b775104bd
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKN' 'sip-files00131.txt'
2d3cdee30bb6112cd9ee1e8e2d7d36e4
fc8ca37872a03f8d5169070285ab3f096c9c9cc9
describe
'10879' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKO' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
45dfef329b908496846996ff9ed4b344
b38e0dff094e375409c613c6cb0fa2c813161db9
'2011-12-30T10:51:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKP' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
a25856eb0d250257d806c647cb6c1523
b6f66e18648469cd9c4e0c15e242c328d8ae63b9
describe
'128863' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKQ' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
fe77c34e888e230e89e947ba5b1fd2ee
a35ab23fda4f96e78ef304629af707bfafd16323
describe
'32576' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKR' 'sip-files00132.pro'
31f5e516ad02e7e3961395b65026d8ae
e492941a52bd01652049171e04af270a8fb5bce7
describe
'42571' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKS' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
12c721691b678d062f7c27f80e2cff8c
c6733d2d7cf86301b522603b103550f25d28525a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKT' 'sip-files00132.tif'
1bd16c828f6a6035a40426adf83d42ea
8d6711b9595a8d31962382d3886f13edc7b48300
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKU' 'sip-files00132.txt'
09792c0f8de8a7ed61ec834a473b1161
2d5441b970ea0313c13a59d03fa952aea0a36be1
describe
'11070' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKV' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
42e78c04d7059c0435047132d86c3592
0152c937a2e175c16614bfd91a78c5496050c9e9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKW' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
d943baf9907cca25342e485a30f13502
86fa58cfeec17f02620937cb5ce0933a66fbffd9
describe
'113002' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKX' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
d7c3e439c074c8b6773aef1205a1a7df
9b622c0ff3507b6832cdbcb84fc8a45aef9d8f3e
describe
'27143' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKY' 'sip-files00133.pro'
d66f3b538ca9e67bdc27a467bc947937
877ce7707c81d3ae35ca8b6fc47bb439cf9a4fc2
describe
'36997' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGKZ' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
b38424c1de2761a7b0ce20380e2b6dc1
af25db3730d94b856a701628d97ffa66c26becc0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLA' 'sip-files00133.tif'
1bdd8e2e116389b895b8bc1eae0d1f75
2ec8f762ff460c436888291a581ec328ab5e80f8
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLB' 'sip-files00133.txt'
b17733adf8a7e9a0d593f4b00c7651c3
76a8f115ecd7228b1be1263df926f7ee294c61f3
describe
'10037' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLC' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
4ac2299fb65641a89d759ec015ff7515
9e7ab0bc3ca88460f3a71548e76eb707cb5b86e1
describe
'313712' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLD' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
53da1ee79210f2b3cb92a1116c9376a8
6a5ea81e91b4f89fbe26ded30f0c9c969147fb25
describe
'130678' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLE' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
213183d00bd73af2d9de8296acf226d7
edaea55bf6218770ece07621631e593294927b19
describe
'32442' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLF' 'sip-files00134.pro'
6b2a83c83ddc111ca53c9d496e99421b
78266ddcd17ffb9dbdaacf84f3149e69f244e695
describe
'42704' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLG' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
6d73834b1a88e67b0f9d64d615389a0c
ceeac325f13a07927900d8c141d1f5474556a00e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLH' 'sip-files00134.tif'
1d83dfb5bdd4505e439e18a8bd5886de
a75cdfa95eaac0e984109045b8b71aa2fc13a52e
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLI' 'sip-files00134.txt'
f2d432ef04c05a085998856e744ab60c
30d13091bb7f5258faae49dad9eea321683d53ff
'2011-12-30T10:48:04-05:00'
describe
'11097' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLJ' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
bc4001cf33f53aa554c043cc010db976
33187c418c996fa40fbc4a4c0a271ba6fd492e30
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLK' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
9c61dd52129592eeeb5f7555959869af
e50f68a0e1d2128b6932701fe244b1ebe65e0fce
describe
'115227' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLL' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
5fe8d1724102667b47935244acf71e70
0221dec897e08f2b701fd2da3689392f42a22eee
describe
'27064' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLM' 'sip-files00135.pro'
4cb972186000debe44b397dbb8525cd3
4672714779e7f016ef776db05de950bdce1a134f
describe
'38156' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLN' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
4f2c3774ea65bdba3b7c995852082304
0e8756f429f84ffeddfe2423eca6aa23633be43e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLO' 'sip-files00135.tif'
8ec6d8ba4a5d759696a28bb2c8ecdde2
d991d5a77d3672c721da438a3b0c8f11b906e78e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLP' 'sip-files00135.txt'
b7c380e3b96242a1fc468406258f4d36
2161bec3668333d818aff9e80e798ed507a17a19
describe
'10113' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLQ' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
49330f752154efdafcc830a33a449a3c
e170616ec79e2deeadca00911ade168624b724d9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLR' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
2b289783ae5757f448b13328544e0222
983afca5f44da02a2c23d589228f27c57a638aae
describe
'116587' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLS' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
5f0e9d9265ad878447e54f026ec0fd66
cd23d384710c977f074ec432aadc5253d9553cba
describe
'27638' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLT' 'sip-files00136.pro'
186f3dad435857559df1b1d6bc81a10b
d61d56e9f7d39888d0522950f916a8d3e376928c
describe
'37706' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLU' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
d39448cafbb08f24b6d901e1761ce2ae
f87b360e4cd118616c0cd12964e17233190c33e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLV' 'sip-files00136.tif'
9cc83947767ecb1191acce8b2c18fabd
6665829d7c0510e2c9326b489ea32aa35680bd34
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLW' 'sip-files00136.txt'
e7ce893c87ca714b88a46f7bb13089d7
265bf01a451520610e871d2cf074533d41d8ae5d
describe
'9939' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLX' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
0e7d310b219db899bc31ad7748b4c210
c6df7c9207bd73a0e8fa4fbf7d699ee58d37abe7
describe
'313868' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLY' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
bda18b0f1a7f1e07d1cbfe2ddf5dde30
181eb22b671d185b6896d88b677147c8f46d95dd
'2011-12-30T10:47:57-05:00'
describe
'129197' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGLZ' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
49988462cc747bdc601e476abb039d76
352da94919f0993a14529aa3aa1b27c4a82cb306
describe
'31709' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMA' 'sip-files00137.pro'
8cacf95d698dc4f55093ae4e79710868
4847bdc63f1cfa79bc7acec1601b6a6e14444d83
describe
'43841' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMB' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
e0bb259213e7a3e3813e46e8895dddb2
71fbd51f0ac571aacb52275cbcd39ff032944c84
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMC' 'sip-files00137.tif'
b51e6d4b3229237ca663f6ccbf54cf6e
a6e6c461265dbab14b0ad1777e831cb669baa6d4
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMD' 'sip-files00137.txt'
16e3a854a36cbab06584cca305ef7ded
46b8ff7c64ebb6d119fc92d30d737c78471aae11
describe
'11224' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGME' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
c07dd7b1664a9bb5364b362fe1a201f4
bfad12fb02d9b15ff5b0a1fe70f502f002100e8e
describe
'313685' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMF' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
4d8bc2927d04c979372dce01d0d1df28
1bca4b7d807a6a7c95100e5cadd0a1110669b845
describe
'131311' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMG' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
537f49aaca286100b64fef181ea883a0
1a32b4fe5394ef6bce167186e41b11b85772f508
describe
'32727' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMH' 'sip-files00138.pro'
00da0fcdf5929dca80370d88135159aa
e5a1e104e3c1ce537c01a742f14e410449749b40
describe
'42864' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMI' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
2d90a05e4f719e14ba6b08a2bd9575af
d91998ddacb1eca17d0f9dc0947dc898b84e6a08
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMJ' 'sip-files00138.tif'
2defb6e2ec43c37ddb9528bf18bca36b
893d2f7b73a3a5c1a3c559ac0b6fff19f56facbf
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMK' 'sip-files00138.txt'
0917824cddd7f92196f19212e034e8f2
e9fc321b1c035b5995b48f12ae3ef265979e2b00
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGML' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
e3ad085921d36bc6a85f04f331df7c0d
334ef5ea96088dce73c9d654b2633f74542038be
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMM' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
53348fe1c69e542f1c16add85dfa70c5
324fcd5202daf0ae640af8d011971c4134eee0fe
'2011-12-30T10:52:46-05:00'
describe
'128561' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMN' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
7fa1305086bc4182cc5149a1276ef0a6
af36154b7b8e9c788aee5e4d340d235774976943
describe
'31551' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMO' 'sip-files00139.pro'
f19f252ee94c36411a5825e571799bec
2776b794b5ed98ed98daaf7a5ef3e71afa846f21
describe
'42217' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMP' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
f70f0d8f1e198b516634afcfb554c4ae
013d7877b824d5d35e9eaac49105eb946bd0612f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMQ' 'sip-files00139.tif'
2b53f6d401d3429f0c3bb1e1e95ad1e8
4976ac2577ecf6795fc49a29d6cf7adf05501e37
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMR' 'sip-files00139.txt'
0cf67914cec4e60048f42ad5aa0750a5
39be51a3925b9671869d35d793dfb33acad420dd
describe
'11352' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMS' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
5e86e1fc315ea524fd8b90400542dba5
ab69f2b0bc89ea0436162a22c8bb0631e3a6e81f
describe
'313746' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMT' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
28bad0c9f41a741457777c45dd9c7a76
4cf1ad814e44d8f655c412c72b824d76b023fe91
describe
'132883' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMU' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
0afba39afa9241e20da369a3fcd25738
9ede65a3ac1de913983bbca6c2d2a1a5a506a267
'2011-12-30T10:47:19-05:00'
describe
'32812' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMV' 'sip-files00140.pro'
26597287f2846d3b7010520774ad8d81
419bb1fc2b10b4fa12d587d371e26565612518da
describe
'43209' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMW' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
79c5a8fd26810fa97b2e791c2849d9b2
990bc1f9e2daed708efd054d56653be43b68f349
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMX' 'sip-files00140.tif'
a40567346908a8dc6daf96f029fcb237
18c9ee3c16ff651997a7df6b631a2b7a2050d52f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMY' 'sip-files00140.txt'
2a2e1b389a6a2c34d16b47986450e410
5e6e937da80511242930ebf729ee6fb45fe4e747
describe
'11159' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGMZ' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
25d88c8e56f1365c50802013ef70d1a0
a9c677b08a45782362d360659525c790e9fb26ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNA' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
8557b6fd6698b94029c6e181f049b4d4
ad5c1a347618943fd8f21235bb0b0e7782345e5e
describe
'160731' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNB' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
9252ddac6140a977aa9f8c97c8763082
49f0918725cd8ab844aecec1106da5bb6bf81e05
describe
'781' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNC' 'sip-files00141.pro'
29363e4ad2bcce41c03ea45e323fa95b
f341412f0aaa8ea2bedaacfc8db8be215fe824f4
describe
'44432' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGND' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
dfdbeeb8b94818ec181f8fd985312b4d
c06d026806a4b612240b9b8d909a64f523e10522
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNE' 'sip-files00141.tif'
e4765951d0f494b5386cc78363e1787a
2185e58a38e788fb3a49edb61e47b43ec9770c68
describe
'141' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNF' 'sip-files00141.txt'
eeb8a15e0bd6591a37909812ffcd32f6
a66978ba7e12d9a23b03376c230fc94c6898b2dc
describe
'11586' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNG' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
62f17b3f04aa1f6b6ab310a4ea498758
b9e8d5fa9f86db58e44ad937cf011c18a308f86b
describe
'313731' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNH' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
e8013d739fee7a5c265fa3e9537d8a74
923824b8992cfde209cfbe5b9f9b3fbbd5a407ef
describe
'117311' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNI' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
80812c7677626f7d0fd64cd2b9d73ebe
d609c8f265160e04598d34f94b53713a8a38d355
'2011-12-30T10:51:36-05:00'
describe
'27081' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNJ' 'sip-files00143.pro'
56b52a27cc71606ed971a95aaa6ca083
e7533b25f220c22f2c2b8be8d55c2e304735e1d2
describe
'39366' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNK' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
61465e5f24d421e472915e7962621512
4fd98aced249d2cc56079d18904f70f8764c7a0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNL' 'sip-files00143.tif'
8c9c56f6c06589b573de6055373b85da
596efa1f1cf2e1697996c9ced308aa267390b148
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNM' 'sip-files00143.txt'
06f8ebb6e7907baeb60140b7fce186de
2829f4d2657d4b6b636f17aa191166bafd01014a
describe
'10658' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNN' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
0293a59a2e345976fe44964e0f7f6245
cfdadea7a3b573518c5856e20fc1634cc0f843c3
describe
'313696' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNO' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
63c770ab21029a099dfe8a024b450031
c94ffdac8493c08eea76e6dd2ddf573a9b45d658
describe
'126117' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNP' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
a715740c1df9c00a876156e6876b5ab0
da67c0accc36b917aa930b16dffe11bd8c701dcd
describe
'30359' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNQ' 'sip-files00144.pro'
5dc08a615ecb28640bf946bbd120c7bb
c0e33fedd2b2b48ada4df885336030abdc9b3c85
describe
'42382' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNR' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
c28e850ba4f24f5096cf3fe5e829a7d5
cf6e0c4411f962efc5f4167d3a8ec169648a732a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNS' 'sip-files00144.tif'
2545c2c0b0e6769049db8297bb8e654c
0c8da1c7ab4b6b7aed8806c03c88ac2c96818b59
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNT' 'sip-files00144.txt'
699587a13a235df6854721cbe3866d50
652ad11dfe130b641916f044159f59fc42bb3f98
describe
'11281' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNU' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
1b3509c83d9b3cc84481931ba061b3c4
42559f7349d34a4e8b70a032d5d0434d094c9f21
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNV' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
f9a29392e62a96ecc78678b91e3905df
8ada786f83806e794e912a86914f00324a19c895
describe
'134570' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNW' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
04984ece3ce7760d041f37aafbe91d3c
694d06d2361bdf5b89250377d381a736e7d23926
describe
'32095' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNX' 'sip-files00145.pro'
7939ff075090570fd1c680fe4a0d6889
b7ecb320cfc6d7ca5754429fbed01072b598a27b
describe
'45991' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNY' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
dd69d38a558f4e2de70f2e852a857d0b
dbdf4e0f725e84528dae3788c71778f23f8d98f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGNZ' 'sip-files00145.tif'
e80d0d8432a49fa06c31acb50764ac4d
2873c3c3332834bc90f7ab501eb26a6f7397a9d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOA' 'sip-files00145.txt'
05d834a2e566e8bc47aa7a002e3ce608
09091aef624906764d3341f03c2f1921468511c1
describe
'12401' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOB' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
b02abe108fa9dfcde2e98a084852b036
1f10ad8d704f24ede2dbabb06d61b52a6c5bdec4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOC' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
02293f72c4b025cfa04449ba86c32717
ed4594f29f4e530036bd1698500512ec76ad1992
describe
'133647' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOD' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
e171f695d504c89138ed4c13344555cd
7606e3c62be34aaf1377a0f13933f5723f1e0119
describe
'32331' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOE' 'sip-files00146.pro'
dccf0b678776cc2f45302e875c6b5adf
fcbbceea3ab75856a89ab1fbe8280f8f2be2dde7
describe
'44160' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOF' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
c0792f230109bd1d1676c96185a7b6eb
ca72ab8211d065b0f01974aa3bf1c22236e4c72f
'2011-12-30T10:48:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOG' 'sip-files00146.tif'
bfca6f5c91ae62aa2c62601a6cc33c85
2ffa26bfaf97682e2acb6d41fdc11e0c1a4d9a3d
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOH' 'sip-files00146.txt'
a551dc8e401605bc9d821c48392e9b4a
6cfb4e21ae01be9752748a39776bb13607d24d40
describe
'11729' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOI' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
f91a13aa3e90e9f1c6c2d7df8c6a402c
088b18f764a4dab3676cf6e6b1f9edae223f0367
describe
'313415' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOJ' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
5a4d05404588e5adc2a9594637c3e427
bd97c35c76ba74d2b42a69d6b1719ff9ef1e1774
describe
'136394' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOK' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
f6beceb4aa940195b1e6daa04606fe5f
7f7f649b49e68b48ae9e033fa0cef9ee22581352
describe
'33064' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOL' 'sip-files00147.pro'
22c91d622e8756afc57b7261912cf409
46ef290add39122f21c7aa39bfd3b7cad66f0076
'2011-12-30T10:49:10-05:00'
describe
'45432' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOM' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
2be4b7ddf253b8b01826eef0aad90fb8
c3500a907bc8ae4a6dbf655697e6d901e65e3f06
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGON' 'sip-files00147.tif'
fda74b39dd0e9bec41bbe0f8bbadcceb
51cc614c1e1693dc1772e004a903436cd572852e
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOO' 'sip-files00147.txt'
ed3a548c270b41255b0a670413b9b976
36cc8eba11ca81597f0739020fed02c09c237441
describe
'349012' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOP' 'sip-files00147a.jp2'
fb398dd61647ac9ec32dee7de4c6ced6
441632c959dd2ab480955e53654a9f9bc6075699
describe
'114236' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOQ' 'sip-files00147a.jpg'
bafc8be159874ce130d2a5ad32cc2542
3c13f6f6ec670ca2b426051f1d1712815b2da5ef
describe
'31913' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOR' 'sip-files00147a.pro'
069388e9fa94e12973069a984c9faa70
3e996a057c705315f506c0ce4644c02c09de790e
describe
'38923' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOS' 'sip-files00147a.QC.jpg'
4a0e5fabbd42641cbc0660e577d8340a
72ca96599576b68b6d207bac2e82cf9f877651c9
describe
'2814984' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOT' 'sip-files00147a.tif'
de8451a9144fbfc8d37672b84acf8693
9fc3eb100e1085c43c7b57214b1395a8ae8c4fc9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOU' 'sip-files00147a.txt'
d27eac95a40b65b002a6d33d96e8023a
55a8a21c6e15d10e63965df779bc6a9034c4b651
describe
'9833' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOV' 'sip-files00147athm.jpg'
541cefb54126bfac0c0ce913a22e6e43
4ac425996b31619e5647a37352e5657035b763d2
describe
'11941' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOW' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
fd2140884cf9ce593e15dc57b09f64fe
21dcc91d6613cd3f6eba04211f808fbdd242c80c
describe
'349254' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOX' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
0a488d9462448d89672ccdd4fc0bcd23
b02fd92923b0b905a8724a1a4d4957392b9afb25
describe
'104422' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOY' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
f082d025f575c57837be87d897973f47
945d33ee9f3bc792b19c83de33a330f1eab1c6ac
describe
'27963' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGOZ' 'sip-files00148.pro'
4c9666d2a8d06d4c3e5d2e1349701de4
c9062f2c7b863144df7d3c88ce61fcacc5912a59
describe
'35826' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPA' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
eab1e070812d5c9d5cde5b6fc97562f8
c5b49d7fccb0dc397cd0655bfe80e13b08ffb9b3
describe
'2816332' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPB' 'sip-files00148.tif'
6aa01fef82ecbb7049e4a67b04f97c5a
51d4a24ff38afa4778b5121749a40a651aa89848
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPC' 'sip-files00148.txt'
3895a642aafc08a14871530203906d73
6a3b017b2f3c40a109f9259db0fba95e9781c72c
describe
'8970' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPD' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
27ec1835942950881877cdc501ccdd34
a82ecba73506be2b9eea8cbdc2d2acb7e4c8cf55
describe
'313646' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPE' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
ea6baf49c83d6d992fa78c20eee6c758
cd5f776992561a719605a1bf6f05b41ea3b08ed3
describe
'20616' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPF' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
46dc1f9763763efd8cd81f61105993b1
19467c89ff7584197a7c5677ecb380f29d54a671
describe
'3864' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPG' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
8c99258abb0c5bd243df4629dc8998f1
8a52b3dff1c04bc346abb14b9f4225fce69fba75
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPH' 'sip-files00150.tif'
d6b9c867df09a50350f555dabbbe57c3
d0454ca72944124b4bc39961a7aa6a87acee3c43
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPI' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
0d7cc57569e2fb525c7c15713245dc17
9db4d4bdda03d6283909d9775cc75127bf14a516
describe
'313847' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPJ' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
be70d98046a11e83a0c059ae99a1f544
4e6abefbfe1ea7597b97dbb1ced730c9c154cba4
describe
'23369' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPK' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
d70d3b9a91f7fddc2fdaeccfb7eadd77
b355a6b01b33d8770a234b267f1bdf062bcfb295
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPL' 'sip-files00151.pro'
b0171617b1cc0a6b39b2e987b628e9db
a64fb7ca25733daeec7134138097727afce79c78
describe
'5433' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPM' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
e4165cca31d618ced6304e21a8d0dae4
b4063fc7fe98e716960f405c681e882c349d44ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPN' 'sip-files00151.tif'
de7bb033665741bccf92be5fa7e8ff69
be01389b0d5205a52127a61162cc1f92cdcb86f1
describe
'76' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPO' 'sip-files00151.txt'
60fe6a3ac50985be75df7ee4e7d9fd11
03f6472b2d1db2949197848c5a2e73d13b2096d5
describe
'1592' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPP' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
a7ba476a97b6218e26c84f66d67cb885
1bd682be825b1d5d595b4cf1ac01cd431bf09ae1
describe
'313531' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPQ' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
8d03166c22f2217566086afa4ca90e6f
723f4ed8b84224f08bd23f1a5c21a05432e2f43f
describe
'20899' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPR' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
2c79be968f65a38a5ef4270a3a62f157
1636fbeb629e069aebee5f64cd39e55c2d0675ed
describe
'3872' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPS' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
a832e4fbabf2157284f246b5950f9230
22108e00d24ac866c731dd601683cf2b47f835d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPT' 'sip-files00152.tif'
59939f3ed77f1b0227d06943c6761165
908e1af081942a353570b413acc8ac708fd89d6c
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPU' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
dc79fe8737b974233b43ddb502669c38
efe934d6994eb1102833ef7bb640c3567f568720
describe
'313715' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPV' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
605d0f7fd5b41219c6b57b29234f2dc5
285c71f6a99fbce94d374cd1960057b6e49885c1
describe
'110178' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPW' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
1db9b4a6383e0d53ff80f834e06bfdea
27f512f5bfb909335986b33d97797a26f2a15145
describe
'25083' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPX' 'sip-files00153.pro'
407653207e427142e3020e762fdd3102
84987d49ae2c597d4009de4596f16089da4201a7
describe
'36151' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPY' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
7b2434acf8815ba47f910c7fa74e6b30
0c201ffd2af720f70208a921d89d2cbda1355079
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGPZ' 'sip-files00153.tif'
0204abd2038ebca95040b72a0230cd24
1fd2c9132446169169a6a13a5ed65a291f8c0e6a
describe
'1011' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQA' 'sip-files00153.txt'
a2983c735710dec89648325debcf2d2c
230bad52d960d2850452f316fe189a525b1966b1
describe
'9696' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQB' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
0945362537baa77ddff384da18c8c0a3
bfecc669dc250012b748e07054027d6f3b495a41
describe
'313471' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQC' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
c9ca440d9d0dd4282324a371fe6394a4
30042587160a8550ac5dcfaef1e0ec1fefbef0c9
describe
'126916' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQD' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
3c8627c9724cc64fd068a8a8caf50a60
0e2f6965d8443b3d4588a5252cb35a42fadf4fdf
describe
'30701' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQE' 'sip-files00154.pro'
f1c45f56fe7e5f6c80763c8433937758
95afa3426523aa9fd7736f635f085876de37a72c
describe
'41680' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQF' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
83e57365d340c97be7c3c151373be3c3
5d66b75cdc2dc6330e44fe9bac39b3d8c826b589
'2011-12-30T10:52:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQG' 'sip-files00154.tif'
98ef2798e770ab08cafabe4966ddc786
0bf55a2a26b7032a4ebca8ac9599fc4162835c55
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQH' 'sip-files00154.txt'
8dce80a1dc6df9456fb72d19136ad988
5599cadf72aa0b8f521fc67f8feec2bd24eb2cd2
describe
'11028' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQI' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
868ef81ef6e948efe2cf16286801850a
b63bc5335d77857cb0538517a0bcd15a1bea86bc
describe
'313728' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQJ' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
3a013d2fb8fbab61c95a39885709ee72
4810b60646ce1e1fb92d8c23fbe0b2f765272dea
describe
'133965' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQK' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
257b1b285bb76c462d3854643b0702cf
118710ce02c929ebf0af25da8a94699b49f10d7e
describe
'34018' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQL' 'sip-files00155.pro'
64f5c46d8cca0296c3e4937bbdbc7c35
13e906d13517b4f7b6aa8635f7f5a53f1d20053f
describe
'44602' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQM' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
4797cca2be8c1280558b7b6fb2d6407e
f1d7d92544f84e0a9097295add96fe5a2db9723c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQN' 'sip-files00155.tif'
7bb285bcf49d5f6a815b5bb64e23d76b
15b07f07ce02f1e8ba20c44724aae7762ac0083f
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQO' 'sip-files00155.txt'
cb639699d1d780e9a6e98b51289fd612
f50b85a796c350fc16ca885b916b60d07eac8653
describe
'11389' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQP' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
6d8afccfb05a8a2f82e719f9bf66e7a8
3d02304d7243c8f216201a2539a665036ec21af8
describe
'313745' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQQ' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
869fbac7b9a8762a8ca2d1cc7012342f
28f1ef6b3e1e7226efb65dca612cd42a0a8ed764
'2011-12-30T10:50:13-05:00'
describe
'126820' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQR' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
8c79ba513a11d6edbdcbcc658de53009
976d0001a4b111e7e5f0768655bb7bec4dd23a65
describe
'31113' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQS' 'sip-files00156.pro'
e08896f9a9a8bfbd05ae0590e2c06976
dd10a556d52766eeb02a48176703ce362ec8728f
describe
'41285' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQT' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
d6eb6feaf33e66e3113327fe04f82d7a
ae3b2fd96cb9fb2774857d206b68028f70697d97
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQU' 'sip-files00156.tif'
4435b3fcfcec060027c804f910235b0d
a30b46946975d7bc678d9a41476a5dd03d6cda42
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQV' 'sip-files00156.txt'
b5e335dc18bb951c8d52a4d6fa398923
5f9e9d2f27c81a7e3a4f71a229ea47ec4beb4432
describe
'10971' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQW' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
fb37b2bd9e2fcc64dd0dbae73e446eb4
a337d6c555d5eb55a06b07edc53c8b4720570d0b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQX' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
862fbf7a7ff4bde3eef5fb1b6ceef609
851b8ca662bd25716961d5314cb8c2ac2c725d8a
describe
'132848' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQY' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
dbd4aa490d37dd61b3de2736316110d0
3571ee933d69204cf5dc7cb9a732815e1f7b42d9
describe
'33381' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGQZ' 'sip-files00157.pro'
9c3feb80a020b667f7714af22f43f4c3
e4420752366e7d21b7010bb42534ee62fd421ae0
describe
'43442' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRA' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
985e0ddec9e0640f11169a9d681330f7
297301df12fa464587405f1a4a51d8004e59582a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRB' 'sip-files00157.tif'
d876e9f2ec530adb922171e4e4fd53b0
ed21bd18e64ac3d87c9091acf6a5c69026a04e10
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRC' 'sip-files00157.txt'
cecc027171e6ecbeae87b4f65e3b1509
8103770a37d5fa202ecce94240474097ecf55b1b
describe
'11220' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRD' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
c1238a68541814f07faa38a6db3eed09
77ecf6c8df9e5f0f785d07b813c58fc08bdbda62
describe
'313706' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRE' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
cdcc258b1b275f08f224c8b2e8fc66cd
13966ede546729a9edc34b686905ef1fd36d2391
describe
'111472' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRF' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
bb662d082290aa2df0c5f9ea10f422f1
2db80c5111106d0bd455fa0996a7594bb07db098
describe
'26416' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRG' 'sip-files00158.pro'
fc9a3e56abd819976d146becd7e72a39
6f189174ff593ac7d34da999ab5de4ee5630db23
describe
'36545' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRH' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
0109b9e2d40e72af22949f767e9678eb
96d0f14bbeb7af8f73c9f75e388fcb6363a2344f
'2011-12-30T10:48:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRI' 'sip-files00158.tif'
be52eade8b824bbe450b3e75576c123e
d4fc58d24d745d3062cf80c8b56f63fb5093f8e2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRJ' 'sip-files00158.txt'
556e7291f9d3c61998f4dece0ec6d4b1
550347cd24a4bf64ff031e775034e710459131d6
describe
'9951' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRK' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
2dea29931e13ef3bc00d72ca58d4f3c0
0d2b6d1b9ad12d0407bca7ad317ad78af6b45a49
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRL' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
8d1b68f1cac5ff0762f955bea6aea0e1
b91ac1ce7d3456eb599ffeb798b00dcb2f750c11
'2011-12-30T10:51:46-05:00'
describe
'130706' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRM' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
1dfb045709e41b985e37f7bd1137ada5
e37e5a0cc963cc4de8f8de93171feda2cbe22b98
describe
'32667' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRN' 'sip-files00159.pro'
cec3ecffff786910e1e5e6c2f1c67f31
707f5e2a5614ac3646c43ed00fd10ade60f2a0c6
'2011-12-30T10:51:59-05:00'
describe
'43924' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRO' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
aa0d3b47a81ea2e326e54a63d6776381
c33a78dd8e082ad1b01c2db4f643946b8b0112bf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRP' 'sip-files00159.tif'
dc6e3bff5265ea0cb55bdb32cc72be23
bb35a6f29d0ff7959e8cf4a673c0947abff31ca8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRQ' 'sip-files00159.txt'
6deefae90d232b2bf17492a855153b42
fbdfdea68c538387fc6d180c86cb8908b3a33087
describe
'11312' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRR' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
5a5c3f2b2ccbe96237bba94b638da367
281e82a7da20b7941b685fa2501575814ab813ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRS' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
32ff196c1f0bc82891553ccd7e049abc
8130109d610ee2cd549074fd3e5def008027e636
describe
'110078' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRT' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
93369c3e640282bbd36d73a1aa75ccb7
d021502f77e9905411a5af8117baac141a910a40
describe
'25859' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRU' 'sip-files00160.pro'
f4c8a7f14c26a84d1085e2d65c6d5600
2ae42f78a3883f3e47eb4bd6aec7abdf6872a24d
describe
'35878' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRV' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
31384eec7eb3890fb75a69d18853a5bf
8b10405d698bf684e4ea1d22e2eab93fbd5dd833
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRW' 'sip-files00160.tif'
771313c36e2468f08139992ecdb07d88
ffa07d47555282d6ca46d8cf1c71e8363772f2f9
describe
'1074' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRX' 'sip-files00160.txt'
df7ba846ff261768bcd6c452f2e947ce
ba553dbeba69352c47a722724f68ba621104192e
describe
'9177' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRY' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
62dcad41275af3c41ad02d1b5e8b13c5
cd43db4fbf2fd87dfc4afc6a1873224b0c06b195
describe
'313676' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGRZ' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
051eaa3e02cfae6367ee1e5f4970dc41
c761c145d6ac1dde1bd6e8bea751cd3ac6746211
describe
'134137' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSA' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
e44dbc20355b21eb24de7ef2125f3442
277568a6d61bf904868478735d9973088952fe8e
describe
'32638' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSB' 'sip-files00161.pro'
53771d645ccce39d52764ba0d02d6841
096d7ca4689926e27f8c1f020a0ffbb2020fb96a
describe
'44819' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSC' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
cdd4dfab0098df405f6411e03a96b6d6
3a939d5d704e38e6633f7021b643bb8117f9f608
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSD' 'sip-files00161.tif'
7ddd6c816146e538ab6aaccdb5ef8708
36eab401ff16236b6e8f380fe9683fbae09a0ab4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSE' 'sip-files00161.txt'
47d17466b12015f743680ccf0d5a303d
08ff94ceecd102bd8c3a69da1f399bdd57e404d1
describe
'11501' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSF' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
a75b0a4ea6652894df0690b4534e3926
da3ab1f523827cdc3b9bb780cf37b63984382b33
describe
'313690' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSG' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
574dfa7b21095cdcb2f4a05978923b7a
a50ad3ba10400fb708d692aeb2e175acffd5710f
describe
'131725' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSH' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
97da6a9a04217966d1867deb1e9e59d5
d67bba8e5a235fcd9ddaf836c3405cda68d236b0
describe
'32796' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSI' 'sip-files00162.pro'
b47ec532542740f719bf8fd04a3e1cba
d9314e07d4289f69f1b03b99469c256c9f761d41
describe
'43726' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSJ' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
0207e79207c8389987899c2d7dc09381
3bcb0535e1db2d95b569858e7ee3fb80ff428e5b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSK' 'sip-files00162.tif'
4164b78d0f1d86f6cb13864e485b572a
8317563d285720fb15dc217596102249a8fbed3f
'2011-12-30T10:48:57-05:00'
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSL' 'sip-files00162.txt'
61d4c998b0f99d7ba18d815a7afe9242
08b3ed694f7fd73592aafd537f84cbc389e4569f
describe
'11620' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSM' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
6bc3bf50eacf917547b87a8dc0b52f67
1f0d4adf5799a0ad4ca6130d0c2a6dda190d7976
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSN' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
61926ce037445d4fa6485b7106e7ba6c
e1933099afcee7f06c280016c201f8c5fa229620
describe
'127840' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSO' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
014f00be3dbdfaf9ff4f7c4038b38c82
31e982dcc8b39564fd1260a73d65e00f9a52d20a
describe
'32019' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSP' 'sip-files00163.pro'
398110b3663ad0d9e8f956d113848a1c
49872a1b67f1da43ee8a41fd904be20faf791059
describe
'43389' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSQ' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
1a11010c2608c94a0f1cc78a0ff0e968
b657858e6bf523ddc2d4cb1d3509d4ed3f9c7317
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSR' 'sip-files00163.tif'
486d0bf0b3f77c4f531678b2fc101e69
ed861f1468c78ac30cc1d56ab789dd0f3367f579
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSS' 'sip-files00163.txt'
a888b7ae0a26c13cd19693eb5520ee5d
43fc99b4953615f25fc9a0e6b928daea7d635087
describe
'11332' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGST' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
94ac962e24d1abe5ef5a7bbcf60a0089
fc2d4ef7dd50cb8c4ade57db169720c8823b9060
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSU' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
158df3d1c7c7ada148ff6fd67985df2d
75ae70780fa0139ce02447922a992d13ba994192
describe
'127859' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSV' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
ae864541682789c665a008811d100daf
141c52f87e2f40030f0e8459d97ae71726ce4215
describe
'31256' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSW' 'sip-files00164.pro'
c45442cf3e56980a308e283990f205af
9b3cc6273c953543f46574512315e29e300a9b94
describe
'41967' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSX' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
7291be68184e9b7c8bfd102a5e6735ba
6470956bf775ee065cf5489ce72f6a2397f2a44e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSY' 'sip-files00164.tif'
33e32d9d8ab8b041641ebadc97a9910d
f760800d638bb7382fe2664b70564d4782e61a83
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGSZ' 'sip-files00164.txt'
19174e8142a82c2061a6604f32888894
d993d28ad0d48ce9fafcce76b001e8bf39af9a96
describe
'10849' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTA' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
0751cebc6b0417e0670ba3d5598d9bd2
cb491f9b7b62734f8977c8dbdb2f163d213153b2
describe
'313659' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTB' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
07fffa1cbee4bf5503eef62e5d70c064
bbcaf15ef74bc6f961fe5a00914b14c3661a6dfe
describe
'115655' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTC' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
23ebc779859e17042c960f3df46a273a
1e8374a675ff65317bbe9cb0d9e241874e69f1cb
describe
'27225' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTD' 'sip-files00165.pro'
ac29e8c3a681a79574459f58ff05d390
de025409c34ace49d403092e63f82d7be4104b22
describe
'37683' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTE' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
da80f987124d5eb6009302eef38c53a4
e386416fbac37b4a31b867d9da2a31fa06e54d9d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTF' 'sip-files00165.tif'
d7aad798522a976be3b8c7a0d6161d3f
c1adde228ffea2a8b5ef21259fd2067d13078d03
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTG' 'sip-files00165.txt'
132c3a450c56f053e70ece62ba3f5f1b
47a7936e6dec0b7588d8ddf2d5021722ea1be47c
describe
'10221' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTH' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
9eee528909f0ecd4e2f8009e7c551555
d1396c76ac39679ed082f4c71d13dc599eddfe92
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTI' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
7b7b318cac6709dd580165811330b291
0636de6159afd84bc2f09c688f32f2259188b259
describe
'126503' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTJ' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
c708508870366496e0f342eded0638b2
3518598eba200a408eae932521ad583d7eb8d513
describe
'30987' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTK' 'sip-files00166.pro'
2bfa4e1043371771a163c8f60c304a2d
5694103b18e2a9ea90646e9aaf019c20d6f063ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTL' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
4d80b023653d3b78e4d6813555ee2ab4
1617f75ad8c64012cb6880b000315593a9258d88
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTM' 'sip-files00166.tif'
ef0ae0d3a1abd900487bb7b0bd73b425
8cb8e1cb1b614f83df48ca1410c5bed38778c2a2
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTN' 'sip-files00166.txt'
4123bd2e4ae46e6a5fbba23ab5c093da
185608ce15940ecbce21c482b0de05989a170adf
describe
'11758' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTO' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
d7c0cabdb9a8cc06b9e6751f1b37af95
0a487362d449ae3b971cd1e6479512ce99aab0e8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTP' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
adde2ddcb792a86ae9f41887795c126e
5841d1eac508d398b8f1f9640f58c7e90b4ea909
describe
'122712' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTQ' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
87d5de72c7d00392762560c3be184e2b
2e005627e5416b88c7c4bed117fe75f1e4754a1c
describe
'29878' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTR' 'sip-files00167.pro'
ac9b549b944619971ec2cf3271ff21f5
d7fa692ba4d71b5189c6f6d78968df574d366f34
describe
'40678' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTS' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
2013d405f3a3629a8dbae6945f171cc9
64772a79ca65204e72e7d62d204de1bf35b98644
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTT' 'sip-files00167.tif'
9a50e8cf643bf19ca43d2e7318bfd939
264bc4b4fef41bdefb1a68e9a39d512b09812315
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTU' 'sip-files00167.txt'
9bf22fc92c3198b88604a1c3820f9952
164f797d0ca8ee56c02043b290bb9cd91c8fef13
describe
'10587' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTV' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
9f04977c5e860fb906e447ad1ec97c60
bb56aea653af65a72b20ef43f7a2fa13f952e5f8
describe
'313623' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTW' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
3c8b02cd8a8a9e1f9c9a394e3ee2e89e
85194d2b73bbab83381c40216b86a74f59fceba8
describe
'108791' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTX' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
6b26031080fa9bd5ed7e1d871634138f
c90d62e1e47f719566333ecd758d4560b93f5be8
describe
'24972' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTY' 'sip-files00168.pro'
4e32e8c2a292417560189fa30d75506f
5066542d10209da66de328e207261bad064ec444
describe
'34265' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGTZ' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
ce80c25db3fea6aca72a45e410a39e03
670b2c7b9a1b1a6a2aad5e04f6fac143438f4635
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUA' 'sip-files00168.tif'
c36be18afdc9e651d25b478addaf88c8
5f2935c52a2ab446f692a12197835a53ed8e694b
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUB' 'sip-files00168.txt'
4f03bbd136a15d507e6e0d33384edab6
343a4e2dbd04ac0b2c84c9f3b05949063568bbb9
describe
'9255' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUC' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
94af2bfcde7d8a93ae2ff25f693accff
c35d32af3312e16a9e68c285931f6ecf5529b6d8
describe
'313812' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUD' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
bfe9461ecdf4681b27b21c8588f4c7e3
130b18e85eb604336d8313a4a57bcd73b8ba8c09
describe
'130915' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUE' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
21c112c12abe29faf1459774868ff8e1
deaaf5735d1ad40e1e60ab2b3dd20ff9761ac6df
describe
'31984' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUF' 'sip-files00169.pro'
283290662d749c03ab3433839a9caa09
db6b4dda699057835f265184fbc014474b8c01f3
describe
'43902' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUG' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
d1c672a50a5ae55bf93296fc360b37f3
b76838cfc0d61354b9299fd8d00a110bb74c1b72
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUH' 'sip-files00169.tif'
194f10151e24ee71177cefd98da551d4
6e4d27d5df5efde5925dfdb3a98d4802fd84ebc6
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUI' 'sip-files00169.txt'
f1b386cbb8cef123a34da9814e619052
839137923a8d3aa632b68b0656d336cba15e4e54
describe
'11365' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUJ' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
6d1e25244ff8a45755cc207769e3b173
49de3010a6a73d44c8a7c489452324a57ff36da5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUK' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
ff3cc285a5250925bf9f0f44767e1a29
62ded046b4cf7a81552ea37eacea1bba5115bca9
describe
'125801' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUL' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
18468607aa133a1c3abc445a44e6cd71
88faafa3d200d65d7dba20780bf73b5e1699c644
describe
'30874' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUM' 'sip-files00170.pro'
58162474a2a942fb4f2503b8cd90a747
c3b96ecdc0527d34423ff01f71dc74db66e6bd2c
describe
'42962' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUN' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
138bbe0e4deb65ba87f3b37e4f45c29d
427895cdecd4c25f2ffe68a4c3918dffa1586ef1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUO' 'sip-files00170.tif'
63e3c5a786a2d0d0a955c2af02e84230
bc80acf543fa44eb4c56cf2492d6d9273fdbbd4c
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUP' 'sip-files00170.txt'
dc663f774aadc012a067b9ace23bc26b
9fad428cd605a31074359f05d398cdbde9e78d48
describe
'10988' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUQ' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
0ca2906a433c76b12197c72b60466fb7
3a41258293ba0ebcc5aae46344202a979dee1e4c
describe
'313725' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUR' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
00babc38e33c42afb8eb25e1c04310ab
fdfaec1b7a31f5dbeb561bf86c4e63fd166d3366
describe
'109179' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUS' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
af39d0484fb2b11fe72beed111cfb5c6
70b2f68678291e3d50c1198174dbf81e86325010
describe
'25845' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUT' 'sip-files00171.pro'
23f274e665ea0e61ba74c03291989258
79697bbf9f4fb6e17d6effc3f454f573498a4562
describe
'36672' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUU' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
30b5bc9fd5ff347b8a4b5dee2cb8ce07
a0082fc3c74c31f473be62be403ed15b3a6a8815
'2011-12-30T10:49:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUV' 'sip-files00171.tif'
e4e6c3fd2bd6ea96147aa14a53101cb2
b13e2425fe8a101333b2bd9df16b233c7f4fbf13
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUW' 'sip-files00171.txt'
858d9839ebbbdbd6bf3901058719fde7
56fd218b3eeeb152c3603ce6e3182803be40afb6
describe
'9787' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUX' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
3ffe85eb34131f3921e0e6cecb488d3a
5b9695d1b5e76447440b541a03e8b3dcff7ca299
describe
'313533' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUY' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
3b9e1f66a1f634acbb4987e733d029bd
aa2ba234a445c980c3c380a5d9cb449e728d8a7c
describe
'129051' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGUZ' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
962bd6031ab79973134d7c26929bfa02
c440e849700c4e66d0d4dea375806abf81a29805
describe
'31990' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVA' 'sip-files00172.pro'
e713ddae51b415399d80b0e3c4bac2cc
8f7e4b74d8ea93e5e27b976e5ebebbba45048f9b
describe
'42836' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVB' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
45d9e08effb6e9eb7b61dee31034e686
fdcaa1f91bde45329ebcb1c474fce762d0cdb875
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVC' 'sip-files00172.tif'
083dffdedb4dfaae2d1bc44700268566
b94affb0b5035fd9b5e534082607342fe8a5527d
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVD' 'sip-files00172.txt'
5f34e78784d1c61ec3c093e6a724b4fd
03c74f8630c8ed30b73d16206408bf8359cfd891
describe
'11167' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVE' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
f5dc8db92f87c0483e418acca8821f90
384a4d889eabfa79f4059b8f05ddef94d477af91
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVF' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
421ac8825a2bb9ef5c82a09e98ce4fc5
183340eebdb869f822629c64374c9cb0232c2508
describe
'130261' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVG' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
6c8a329b091bfdede9455ddd501c4744
cb944e24b6f65d57648618d629e5b196cfb9cf89
describe
'32227' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVH' 'sip-files00173.pro'
148b52c9845a1bd37d7eea9c4a785e2c
8c714ba787d3083cc9fcf798635e820b5c092f1a
describe
'42711' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVI' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
3a2f39f28d2ee9d270501f03a20031a1
9816cb10b544ad874e16779e0234b5403d033972
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVJ' 'sip-files00173.tif'
a90bd1a2d1795bcc6ace6a98b21caf78
f5aab80caf592344ea826825067e499af5312403
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVK' 'sip-files00173.txt'
594baa92e4cfa3c590488dbd7f90e19e
20bc5d92834e567097b70540c088f8004b8809b0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVL' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
9125c657617b3ff7a7c1020fdd1c0459
6e5854d2a196793db360fcfae12c8acd966a6edb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVM' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
b16151f25a61465691ea7a8e39003725
b0bc6f7959dc9a3a7ffc390612671e7e4bc08800
describe
'130807' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVN' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
8b594ace8bc4d61f395f4ed8ee04104a
fc86871a6e342b570fbf22003997b49c61f97b89
'2011-12-30T10:48:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVO' 'sip-files00174.pro'
6b843a4a609462612a017217b1d8e021
19db2aa9e18cc74ce0fdec02cd360b11f9a8c7be
describe
'42928' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVP' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
ed0b272d010ce2c20446c080abcf3b3f
d06f3ab3a1da764d6293084f8f3422918ecc43e8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVQ' 'sip-files00174.tif'
8e0f290764ab76d1c6fbe2107a9659f6
b2cab8e3980620e2d5e80e7be37adf6b265fb1c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVR' 'sip-files00174.txt'
5351e48d7a74e5ed1e4d2bb6a642fdb0
1d693b39ea688925622933ec47693fe68d2e3de2
'2011-12-30T10:47:38-05:00'
describe
'11061' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVS' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
63267e61bd4bc0528a4457f61c9a7bcd
b174b1044c75fb23a177b41c35ad47157baecff3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVT' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
5c6e65bc52289df3ed02142e6ae4985f
1b176bf888e18785ac129d49aeffba41868f0ebb
describe
'127946' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVU' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
46de9109abe8f4b3754304bceb866c6d
3bf0d38d73705f69f342a6c0fd97093dd870eb90
describe
'31908' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVV' 'sip-files00175.pro'
3f4893ae78cb8d5f26d13110ce35612f
4ab1cf89262b43bce839b3e53e3105395694a056
describe
'42463' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVW' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
f9e725cce22dc3659aa415297b87e099
2aa567c7925d58cd24f53c2feab0c8f91090982f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVX' 'sip-files00175.tif'
e177f87824dc6b5170d148e3a2250e23
e3c43e032b58590d03b8022adba5fbc91b46096a
'2011-12-30T10:48:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVY' 'sip-files00175.txt'
bfb66bd1500a48d95846eee75d9d0983
8b414267c249dc1b3661b78b15c82c9b1eaafef5
describe
'11463' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGVZ' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
529761a94dba3085308d0aa2b17d94a7
f0a8b8b0e084d0364899386052d648905e79f185
describe
'313764' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWA' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
39163b14cdc1d9fa7481f6ce2cfe8c22
55e47a6a76420302b85789f99803fc6595cc3086
describe
'134182' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWB' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
a8e35d1d726b317320322fe6ff6158f7
65688b7d1b33183b7821e4a30bb88b9cf55494ff
describe
'33368' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWC' 'sip-files00176.pro'
4fae018dc84101b091bd451ed9a43882
daaceeeeecd9d24a8c914cc725e8cb3e45fd11f5
describe
'43801' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWD' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
353ae01d6c20fa3697d3ae6019b9ae94
6b89aa75097d037361e3abb1ff1dcaa1ad28d85b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWE' 'sip-files00176.tif'
c49096b7895a3e617850b8ee44c9de64
38e1f952278e3a448093bf2b44ba30663c92df0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWF' 'sip-files00176.txt'
39f285faf0d7d4f70cfd8a8fb4230d95
b30972ada5735f50d64e08fd52d32761f867123e
describe
'11421' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWG' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
320286781a6c420966d0e0cdc624193d
4162d281c2f18f71f1c8c8fa79390bbc71fdf98e
describe
'313909' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWH' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
c4c00b341cbfe8a1cb14a246d237ab06
5c1a9d5c18d5097b163c15f65d2dd67d46d34efa
describe
'40449' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWI' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
4895c5540e834cf63d3fe9c9a7f51d45
226f86a018736e93f358edde2b8c46b0f25e1a62
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWJ' 'sip-files00177.pro'
d029e2696ad8218fb123b8f662bfd961
c1f928d4718113ab0989548dc2aed8e28efebe76
describe
'11180' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWK' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
4de4287958a7b828682074be93f6bb59
29cca372000067c1c958a2c2861f99549f284a01
'2011-12-30T10:48:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWL' 'sip-files00177.tif'
c9d0c779551b388481c8518b9f004611
49d514bf283e9955249d7d187598999f929915b8
describe
'80' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWM' 'sip-files00177.txt'
58670197ecde916654d538069910a652
2d62130e4ab808a36d84de781d857f8d5ca18320
describe
'3297' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWN' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
9a86b9b47185ec781143751c0f830be2
f94db28bd416a7a9ccfdfd6178c41f570ff86744
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWO' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
dbf9297021fa9e858a6aa2fa827f893a
7cb29a76315ecc71124bd21b2a2197f473feacec
describe
'113361' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWP' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
af1530dd2ea098fa24242d15ab71648e
97971fc274d4f7dca0bbde325c978ef947498c0c
describe
'27108' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWQ' 'sip-files00179.pro'
d0f05834bdd694578c4544000ce309d8
bb0fca079bfb5a534399c6b1c2a4ab6e647e2a85
describe
'37878' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWR' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
f05f042b5c77035b83add4e8d95492af
763a5e0403561a4bb541826df1472514d94a6802
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWS' 'sip-files00179.tif'
a70361b639fee4559243b19bbc3163d0
e1616300dfe8b63183db0af43b5cd78b72710651
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWT' 'sip-files00179.txt'
17e00454d0ebb6cbb6fa25a2cc30ad57
bf7935710048df6dd0ac0669cbe1fdc7bea1a2e7
describe
'9868' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWU' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
f51a2843be70d1760768ee535f4acfbf
0bf9307386834ccf5ff7d1875fc7e06cfc7be049
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWV' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
3fc674990280834a64fde5d2ad896e3e
e1996a93a9e0657b08ddf661b720e94626651d3e
describe
'127216' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWW' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
f2398fca29005d2bc69f244d50636384
29a771e7b9615dcb7914e94c84c8fd9d5e1ea9e3
describe
'30933' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWX' 'sip-files00180.pro'
b1e1a880f846021dd0adf6961f78050b
66a6c59ad282e08c9f680e7d17e6f3d70ffcfdb1
describe
'42003' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWY' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
8188f1387fb418ac8d7c816aaa7a421d
876cfabee22b6bdb81f3459886df573f136fa9dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGWZ' 'sip-files00180.tif'
efb9ae905dc29f4eaf7d44d9063ec41e
8b0d9028efd266905f74248d2bc2a303868489c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXA' 'sip-files00180.txt'
9a905b2478be16581407a225a0f4e628
a81b0961bb6ef5a4c423a32cb49c8d0194c50f69
describe
'11057' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXB' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
f9a243e98705f1e9b890032464e6de27
4b2f8d0c7b55309bc2817423d6685a99dc67dfe4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXC' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
5da1c6aaf34d0c79e6823b9dbf2a6b77
eb18f02c616cfa2d3d8a568b9f8a9ee4b9a8c599
describe
'134908' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXD' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
7cbc2fcaf912887bb2a4978b8ee25cd0
b1dbf14f79c47c247a2809dcdc7a3aac8cedaee4
describe
'33881' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXE' 'sip-files00181.pro'
16c41f3b42f2da28352de575a6ac2de4
bf980e8eb25f1454f3cc3887d20c93c41f8c5a90
describe
'44567' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXF' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
d09994af9e1d3c6d7e6bd848d453778b
04a4c946d4f2a40c78e13ceadb28ab81093db6fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXG' 'sip-files00181.tif'
bb455f4367d6704080fbc07efcb688a2
f74ec96f460365cb89b43ad0510160dbd59f2a71
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXH' 'sip-files00181.txt'
157402f7996399e96063d3caa38a10f4
a1a30070ef5a31228af477cd4d3dd9d0abd14916
describe
'11512' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXI' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
04475198d23e60e4fb722d49d858aae9
f0e93a0740ddd5341e72c4d71393afad43d915c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXJ' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
ca0a4f5e9eaaeaea6dfa835cbcf1ecd9
403c02d28910ca02b4d747f95dfedc1109306a7b
describe
'121061' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXK' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
9dfa04c1397b2b295df66b27f9c311c9
6517be859f83317e33c3adc98fb9273c9946936d
describe
'30584' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXL' 'sip-files00182.pro'
a6bbaa238fd414d50096a9cdd9981afc
d168034759c3023cc6a18e946cb16ee45e90c21f
describe
'40976' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXM' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
6e12a3c6adb38623de50f5c2b17fbcc6
ca96e3040388fcbd4905891e03685740e27d5abf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXN' 'sip-files00182.tif'
a242e67039c32f4b50b07e1132d9c213
87eab87865aef6184ff7432ae9623b7e8d601a4d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXO' 'sip-files00182.txt'
e40f23b98dd386e1781f9d0667b62e82
82514f8b663a2786bbcab96dc48cbd1f92c1d2fd
describe
'10660' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXP' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
2d472105b479a406e37e9dac8740a78c
92c3ce1f900b02fa22fb2aaa78ee906484ad6650
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXQ' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
d7a67a796d88531baa39d6f30a3bc6c0
2b6aa3bf6c7f346746caeba067d9c9102ed23730
describe
'113648' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXR' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
3e463db4618c08906b0ae095c775c5e4
950891aef8d8f5e1996110bd2bb3ae956e4717dc
describe
'26841' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXS' 'sip-files00183.pro'
43de0ba8c539c0d91f8be5cb7ca424c8
b00c91182d7daf92a48f0cb0f74690d3856f56d7
describe
'37024' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXT' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
9069c3a0fd50e88118b0cc3ec24fe3bb
8280499543a33ff58c26f4c634486c59cfe77550
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXU' 'sip-files00183.tif'
82b51ba536adcc6a48ab76d334a025ee
afe681ab14e4f692aff5cc630eb617e3e516d748
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXV' 'sip-files00183.txt'
e54ad95b9cb20d0286917e541bdad911
36b6c1e653dfbd4148a48854dd28ea98a9b813a2
describe
'10375' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXW' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
8ef9fa80f2d65231a785d54081959efb
8bba82ccba798c9bdf6ce268905a61ab6f011f88
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXX' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
5e20f403dec74f05512b0437a9b83c71
18ed04a67f45519b7fe9dc44cc40cbc1c599cf86
describe
'129162' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXY' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
8480da0ce773a9a0caea345669c2b6ff
2cf36a0fe34a88d35ba967a12392584a78b6548b
describe
'31654' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGXZ' 'sip-files00184.pro'
ec0924ce424e5652e04c332a6756997b
86ed841ffa034057fe8d7d2398ee9d471d1d806d
describe
'42218' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYA' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
98a939cb33e839f82c235c441f6feedf
fe9d2d75c51d05cc21ac3cc4027ed059735c0e90
'2011-12-30T10:47:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYB' 'sip-files00184.tif'
04aa45a6e923279e7bac3a3059b302d0
3c6673826245623d29f9cef5c03ff93612e83f2c
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYC' 'sip-files00184.txt'
3bc47f1ca564fc0871964877c1117e3b
80c478abdd51ded30a0683a193a107c2863b1464
describe
'11265' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYD' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
9e5fc72eb79a288f67edbd6486f9490d
5f76dd6a9c75519aad7160f0e48b42edaacf05cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYE' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
cc9772c88470505bc19fa4bdd813493c
b77f092f0f2923e46c56c60ed8246c0290302cd3
describe
'134782' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYF' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
7326298d9df224e17e55af3efd89f5cb
a2ba837cdf5209482117d9c2cd7974e0581c3e03
describe
'33052' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYG' 'sip-files00185.pro'
9b45d36b826641dad1d5c598e6c3850d
14b3a958b588c237e9b7fc0610980983e7700a0f
describe
'44250' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYH' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
5c1703171cc98cf78ddcb767d103bbd2
671fb89009f0e298aa9a911920dc81940ebdf6ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYI' 'sip-files00185.tif'
fb81ecbba3ce34b000c78cd0be1c2d27
8964324b090cf535c8087b48717cc729a4208e77
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYJ' 'sip-files00185.txt'
86f4fd8314d11e989ae24737d382cc5a
22e513afeb4b0be8566c37f9fbd07102a366f30c
describe
'11679' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYK' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
750703ddb6a4445b0109dc2591699a7d
e46334e84d2eb31327891362d27a8e6d47df56f6
describe
'313701' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYL' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
95b7a2181a48afc29fdc8d244b6303a0
4a5019210ee9ea0e2db46c634b381a4ea63f27ef
describe
'127187' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYM' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
2fc1eafb9cd7fe140174d64727ba2378
462b4ddb72b3b6328a181664a1dfb92be8d836cc
describe
'32027' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYN' 'sip-files00186.pro'
90285511b8c21d1a083e557be22c8c34
1c23f564df55d64b8ac620f0f6718b48215ce145
describe
'42710' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYO' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
d2e2c0f7007bc219131aa1fba6197b31
b64b4c3c280358474ad8996a44f801a3ba5cb056
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYP' 'sip-files00186.tif'
d775cf32c5c3f40faa5c4684735c4466
18ddcebc5fb1a42654de2f157c3b09276cb6bbc7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYQ' 'sip-files00186.txt'
44ed459434180f092b28ca132d21da37
001c53ac8b840bbacdd0163bb6ef6acf19985701
describe
'11277' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYR' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
5d0a2badea06c33e6e89142725d7a57a
79f566302c0ceee9d57936a6d12e633d764749f9
describe
'313727' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYS' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
26d78501d909a7862e5947bcdfe6ee7b
8b2e8cabd8056a33ef91cd731d1920fbba368103
describe
'112042' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYT' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
ffe938d922b8cbf07965f1f42971eea7
d42e41e78359b18fd6ebcaef29b385197afb6b4a
describe
'27030' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYU' 'sip-files00187.pro'
8807cef4cb079c95656e25d6ea19c8a0
2ce9084a675e859a02e6626b0f434372fc03e1a7
describe
'36866' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYV' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
b6f8e8c38d5af40aa74601921ee6066d
63aee5dc500a8bf1b83f47b0c22f57986ea8c607
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYW' 'sip-files00187.tif'
a5211f4ce5ce3c2a5b97bfaca03918e7
40979558d19c7f8f878694d38899c2644407dd3c
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYX' 'sip-files00187.txt'
4d854df2bf333f6988f8732755a44816
2939d9e822d2ea22d596f42dda3f2db754c9f712
describe
'10425' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYY' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
257c759c2fb871a807891a9a35034e56
f1c5d523824e76446de1a0464afb2768e0301a0d
describe
'313639' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGYZ' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
854a695de5d460b628c1e6c8ddb4e3a6
04e50e17e4ece955716b6eda4cb361b9b52a29e4
describe
'126947' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZA' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
d742beeb909bccb5398092cd152850c9
772e1308e9a4416229cf6963adcd0fc64aabc049
describe
'31791' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZB' 'sip-files00188.pro'
2230c970ac9020c4723539619481707e
fec6ff4d6bf77102700d0ef163caec31d265325d
describe
'41765' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZC' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
2429ee6c8546d46e97c7f0f4a4e6b2a0
bc07c81a9d4faca513f8300ca6be9d1c0f0ca635
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZD' 'sip-files00188.tif'
8619d7925cfce7623027db9f415ac20e
b187fb78cb2d12478143e9673004d8cb4410eb13
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZE' 'sip-files00188.txt'
b04e270d0c250d70dcfea9a1d4c89ac7
790ff4f4c347e897fad724303d997b7ca598811f
describe
'11580' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZF' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
889a7111d9e1055e3e158c9c4b32fe5c
9f07ba7f9a190a5bd12d486fd975ff364d0487ae
describe
'313695' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZG' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
032c02c3a52e45b967d455f6c322ad41
78d7f715cdb07cbfd6c4214bf823c1a22c3849d1
describe
'135036' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZH' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
5ed0253739c256a10282f980ff9676eb
e4df07f95e14725343412504538bd1a323f9999f
describe
'33340' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZI' 'sip-files00189.pro'
fb569501f820bd4dbf0b75cfee962178
a963139af0d3d729eb666f2d6421aff8639cbab2
describe
'44750' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZJ' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
22f5c84b71a093f64ef9bf19a616e267
069d87262b6dde9074b1dfb97487c794a98a3ec9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZK' 'sip-files00189.tif'
c3cbd27bf9aa0ae74b08d8af5a2ba179
71d57837cba8748dbd5cb1bad0336910eb7ef616
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZL' 'sip-files00189.txt'
850d260478199210e9a9bb5898161beb
5b27e18c5e7a4842b705ced67d56bb58649a7617
describe
'11804' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZM' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
75574ec40a22b1a6dbb4712379d93589
956c4cab9ec2472372e5e6666a57e31e7600359d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZN' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
6b45a7f5714e8d70c88b37f78bfea99c
99b3547357a8ac74bf8c2aa9e2022e7c87f22402
describe
'112438' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZO' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
7c35944be0e7eb77ebf220275b81f8cd
8d7e301424f20c23d601b9f43c66a9ce87985334
describe
'26721' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZP' 'sip-files00190.pro'
1eed99c6f53bbf8fc5dcb327c25fcd49
4743cc1acb1d47df017113f00b7be9257a26a584
describe
'37399' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZQ' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
16b79bf4b38d95d773c46478f76eb156
b7e11e16dc4f03bcd2175f307bdbb58c1362ae83
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZR' 'sip-files00190.tif'
beeb759c64f56ad89ca577159105346d
abec971bfaf64f72f078a5541cc30cade60b210a
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZS' 'sip-files00190.txt'
b022b5f18aa20d270184b9d0b59ec12a
3847d49495522788f622a4ea496b6263b5974a89
describe
'10153' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZT' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
8e432da78780b9ae5f1bc3e46846931d
0f356c88a26b13225909eb098433436b7832bc75
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZU' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
0907e4e34c5f88cf786c5fc064da46de
74f21c81845c26471d779a077621d71dc07666e0
describe
'127232' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZV' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
e5688c3618370017f5ab4b2f0e16a6a5
5b0ed647b2e5cd154f16fb599e94d84acdaeb35d
describe
'31036' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZW' 'sip-files00191.pro'
1eec9c055b5973c6a70efa394d6bf90a
8baea8e9aec8d242097f84baa9729f18f410b556
describe
'42608' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZX' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
b17ffd9dc7b0fb0bdc42197da1855644
e723bc9081ff54c785209c6ce741f80f3e5943cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZY' 'sip-files00191.tif'
142faaee872b2cd35b76ab3e47eecbeb
7f6fbb7fa0bf9793966aa15893d1503a9ad03f1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAGZZ' 'sip-files00191.txt'
20bdc235a50dcd3d7e9570c44b9b4e0a
b307bc16c9a3e5db85ac2585b56b9c726ae6e66c
describe
'11392' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAA' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
d1dc6eb6cf400ae22f60fe5d753b7138
d2c1a3c19f4968f69d4e48ee7e508197a8438d35
describe
'313456' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAB' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
ee3c8c94c9c29e90397c0622aef2428c
6b20ea81851a3737647c298d83a20fbdd399d817
describe
'135646' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAC' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
86d8ac4dad12c668bc051a5526886262
739da8adc8ce3f7106b4348b28c71a23bb571fda
describe
'33353' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAD' 'sip-files00192.pro'
646cf01f3a0d6ed60c240e580942c45a
30e32749306d7c67ba6b52924a6851857c316eed
describe
'45273' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAE' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
dcf0bdbe5c520d50e12cc96e4faae649
bdc439ed112baee8992a279ce7fa11f11f171963
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAF' 'sip-files00192.tif'
873bbf7f68a2983b1c8c50efdfcf737f
a1359580ff9699e493f047cfc5f6cca81b9cdfa9
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAG' 'sip-files00192.txt'
f7ecfe64b8d7742d8925f4d6e803a3a6
38296c1801c22cec0145667a311e7953ff99c4c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAH' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
547fc904959f5f11a72adfaff3c5d657
a75feabd28151adfacf649c40fa60726236a6ad2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAI' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
eaa51e08286c97ab95b50d797c46b30c
b5df3a9d95d20df5201a3703660881951f77c787
describe
'113651' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAJ' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
1fb65d0b03143dbccb7254730f659eca
4793f00b3c6101e79d12efb6dafe9cccd4231264
describe
'26544' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAK' 'sip-files00193.pro'
00db97aa340e7d56adca57fafc705025
c5be995f10848a1473dc674959b4c0f691b7a789
describe
'37532' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAL' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
4d9b32b4d22758a33f0dddc967df597b
0d5c92bcb309d8d8e7433ae60f4a4a365c39cfac
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAM' 'sip-files00193.tif'
a51a543f2d6ca29ae1210b1c229126b6
d8fcf988e0e9a60d103536251318aad9d3773402
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAN' 'sip-files00193.txt'
d75200c4b7791798acaa22be1359e9b3
ed4428a5ddb5638b63e01c714d7f22b058a37dcb
describe
'10317' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAO' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
a035f61285e986a523a9ad6ef595e672
0a69511bce5a2285724bc7fefb42c38afd08c90d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAP' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
9de380637dd7a6b4978fc2c8dc8f7a28
a3beae31a9d215f8a4f8664c57be7f5cf8f41d44
describe
'125287' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAQ' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
7f14692b24696a116fa0e0732fa65a67
7b91eed93c93704b27080d5ab9eeeed800d285a6
describe
'30344' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAR' 'sip-files00194.pro'
5fdea9899bf2a3ee33b1f91a7f00abdf
e10973fbce3fd7439f7b323b2b0688b1eaa82c8e
describe
'42092' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAS' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
ba5391f084a1c735ecadf9523991a10a
7dc30f9c88d4cb1bfe0af233532e41df42abd594
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAT' 'sip-files00194.tif'
28f4266467345e6bb77675d241354e42
90f1f0667d351bcb8dd5cbdb0d62ff29a3824547
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAU' 'sip-files00194.txt'
5718ae135df097321f925fdc859cbc28
6de014f9b5a07c64e3846138bac2a4939cba57bb
describe
'10787' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAV' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
6453b9a26e8f138084c601772c42f32a
2810aff170f3cac544dc88ca0519587346140ee1
describe
'313880' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAW' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
2f7b4e1a43fe5745fb356133779c09df
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describe
'127923' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAX' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
0c64090e7685ae9d50c52c0ad8f8f952
ae42bc9c42238c6d43ee86864da010ccef7a62b6
describe
'31252' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAY' 'sip-files00195.pro'
acaaf81c62e17c448003b2ae4726d1c8
baaa5c21429a1d4fa254a6048b39e0f25841e258
describe
'43914' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHAZ' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
0fbeb4d912b9dd3741cf815b511a0810
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBA' 'sip-files00195.tif'
5652870535cfb65bc6b8fe812856ceca
46e4a75c0f51037f0f1ad807d25661dd4c22beeb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBB' 'sip-files00195.txt'
21a0cdb7cf74be3aeec5988f22010f31
2f253630f61eea8fd2c453954753dea6c8d0e1d0
describe
'11371' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBC' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
16ab9b42d7b16d29f580fcd98efd471d
2eaaceb57b5cc2a1806608b5a1003d24191697a6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBD' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
cf469d1f27021c70408a6af74fcd0c0b
b1ebfa362fcba114f92087c8bdbd2985bd6b4d47
describe
'129299' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBE' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
504c3e722926a6e0a6fa41d7fe803c1d
52bd65ec05cc499661c611faebf1d96a49f9d00b
describe
'31673' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBF' 'sip-files00196.pro'
b611c384d8d685a40eaa9b4381f3a02c
818252472c60bf2d0239e115c9f1e18d390493dc
describe
'42587' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBG' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
e62c9cdd92f6c854a739c8b1e065eff7
36e9d18b2524c275b7d1c1ee74f0b26d05188412
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBH' 'sip-files00196.tif'
635b4c6111d2506ddb6834afa665f5d4
d47fc76c8156c4d5acebe952b28151013b643c53
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBI' 'sip-files00196.txt'
48a5072de56ac8530b94faa1193ae00c
07b93bd3e5929aadc1524b88a6a8e821d556001b
describe
'10809' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBJ' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
198cb36428eab684fb5e628a9dc61ad7
6bc3d0c68bd420a1603c51f29adf76d945a4a9ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBK' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
0af89ee39078a9031a2622fe974e5abe
97057bdd40ccf5dea3bbd6b356e5bea863fa662c
describe
'115374' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBL' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
51aba3c107b8049282f0ce66163ec2b4
c4b7adaf4e2052e82c6c0f4ef83158a25f23418c
describe
'26179' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBM' 'sip-files00197.pro'
03532b4e368239d34aa8c6e0ea90093c
64db9b5d840b6cc4360d5a743173a7e912255779
describe
'37243' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBN' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
0e1e5ef0b8a4e43dd5c3ccec7f74d781
213752e92d0cd7e2d412aea37b18b5354f39cada
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBO' 'sip-files00197.tif'
9ffa75aeefdb8cada80a84eb3e736fb3
6186a39c818e23c980f0cf06d6d01a282c4e3434
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBP' 'sip-files00197.txt'
b74817b85ab2215b397f67c1c1afeb71
d4175049ddbee0e0473fb5c0d1dfc42c567f920c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBQ' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
75d148bf2eb848f907cbf82a3e20de8c
dbc1e73ec21d53018d962861abdd7bd7c16dc587
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBR' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
682b15f79d129940ad6a129d3d9b1735
fb20c2ac54d98a76ec33e5f6b3ab8f8edb90261f
describe
'130748' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBS' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
238beedd21b45e3f6052ff534cf90f0b
3abb24180b68be2fc1397106c90c15887900b9b0
describe
'32849' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBT' 'sip-files00198.pro'
4bac39f2c2b80597e09e3500007bf357
0c0a198c8adaaf5679bf4d52e829c72a6848ec28
describe
'44059' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBU' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
24174e8e1ad14f68688a34224fca264f
087c60bc40849b2586902f864aa26b62f86bf5ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBV' 'sip-files00198.tif'
a9d2964a530087c31f280c6c0bde370b
d764e55d7da8f4d34d50a0a8fa1225c5a09f87f6
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBW' 'sip-files00198.txt'
34504da42d638a89c4ace7275cee7b29
8f89af4db62cfe66e04e77f749dcb742bb5ca017
describe
'11529' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBX' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
ddfe95701494dfc8714f93e0ce5975ef
49fc94d22c58ea124fb51ddb520f53633b3b7ba2
describe
'313674' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBY' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
32186d7674be676cd4464645b7d59781
88f236328a9ad0a96f7be496569200f9c3c9482b
describe
'131252' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHBZ' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
6b798bcddfb427f45458e460fa13b477
7b37ef94d7fe1289770c73090190e8587582a486
describe
'31651' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCA' 'sip-files00199.pro'
5e447161b9a10c55aecaf1453be74fbc
709b5ff0c28d37db981a873de8ae894823b6970c
describe
'43725' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCB' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
3782561c2b055f3315a41eebd9d9e3ac
5ba510ad11c468319da651aa4055d8f1b342bad9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCC' 'sip-files00199.tif'
27005cc7df51536eab7dcb7faf388845
1dcd2c03478f56d84bc3b79b6a58b81cd5893557
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCD' 'sip-files00199.txt'
185b318cfe84f46c47ad0d5a6f7935f9
2f24e9fa5596bc8351ef737af6e9ff62d2c3420d
describe
'11419' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCE' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
ccf61c2776a1f093d4687f104a6b0a77
7e8de26fcbe6af7ec7a0fc6da6091fbd0dd30a85
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCF' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
88b05c3042f24226373f890ae047cec6
0108a3c1d803dd59d6c4bda0a7963d00848f72ca
describe
'132653' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCG' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
a129ac68824a543e29e3fdbccea6e6f2
230916f224fdcdb97f18c03f1fa050e2cbf193a1
describe
'32934' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCH' 'sip-files00200.pro'
7546474d75464cc08657464affb6592e
9d9a1d64f12d62a002aa439086e3c12ce6030b83
describe
'43438' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCI' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
b61e226ce56ffa7f08954d0decc7ee43
83c6780a7e421bda69069f162bd3d399d49879c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCJ' 'sip-files00200.tif'
35ca38fcbd90115e5e21b8b4628dcb65
8cfa37353fadfc948961a07297b90d5d995d243c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCK' 'sip-files00200.txt'
d4f841cb6a37fcf6c29efc2af2e86318
53e5da423bfe5c84a30a9196a461dd4a476993bd
describe
'11447' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCL' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
a9d5688e3e09029bbdc6bceb4dca7237
b63326c7085ac3ad3c1ce8afa5e382f448c0ac5e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCM' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
f8ade4352b6530147f6352dd80910984
397b465443d5b83aa762e7ec05e0f78140e1dc2a
describe
'117165' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCN' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
2e89a6b89f3b378d1c66b55db6601764
9c57efd25a0ecf518a107790f9163e57c4623000
describe
'27388' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCO' 'sip-files00201.pro'
8d9439b16e99019be254627d1a7d517d
1a281e10b23779a7bbae5e58e8ef224245a833c3
describe
'38565' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCP' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
248fc21fe1fe42c512e1f225f4605725
c3f5bb842f4e0aa43f35f64aac19f4f78782d416
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCQ' 'sip-files00201.tif'
b70f78e0766954e5581d9484e3ff137e
8dc8cb08f0f307d960804863fc59d020ff4afa4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCR' 'sip-files00201.txt'
9530538f9b8fae19e416e91d8e9de09d
4c6f3613153bab54222e9a88c9f18003761338d6
describe
'10268' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCS' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
40d8e3f78ce96ee3fb1c752af0385472
565a92cb115bb6a6c3f15bd9ab73da67d35b475b
describe
'313704' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCT' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
5111f2740c79d5bd04f653dffb770889
59003302e6c9b4368a0081468f4f246ba57d93de
describe
'122869' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCU' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
325df0cc5ea7a16bcfb0d144addb3cc2
fb1973e0563b5d50c93385f40a927da270fc75b6
describe
'31168' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCV' 'sip-files00202.pro'
d3177140b8e5291624eacb6eb118c8c6
1970193fb6cdb0c955dfac14584b33f261a0158f
describe
'41033' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCW' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
5994fa0952d9b6574a27a11ef1935110
7772816f0a4cdda4d0c7b4304d8a8d4ecc571324
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCX' 'sip-files00202.tif'
94b52e675b68e964aea9c2533fc803dd
8659128b11278335aa6dc9189711894e20841d18
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCY' 'sip-files00202.txt'
e1a7cc5ad2b0d1def4190517963cdcd5
b6aae7c0728a379ce806f79ad174ef2d55d9f779
describe
'11190' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHCZ' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
c883e9ef714b2d3bda4ef40513bfeb26
91201d5cc6ae1b685e4e98c08366aedc44bfc39a
describe
'313730' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDA' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
673fdc3f7da8d33432919c2943e1db6b
700b19a97f686e3dfd8b3c5015ddf2b96d2ec995
describe
'120697' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDB' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
685f861e1521278e5764ac1fe275d112
76e34bcb95b0510dc9aff0e2e9764cf357e49d4f
describe
'29484' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDC' 'sip-files00203.pro'
6258d2952100b6d2b0b7afeeff6fb0a6
0cd197c17f480699c6c6c958208a8d898d0bf1d6
describe
'39671' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDD' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
34469b6e8f8e7bbccac038c74d09f864
5e69964e74e0ccb7ae34333259cbe9155e40d1ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDE' 'sip-files00203.tif'
1d4c71750a63e573e7a6f3396e05455f
66302757ebe8d0627c8fe432bf44937c19c3252d
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDF' 'sip-files00203.txt'
baa75061fc75d68391e2ba994b0e6b7f
3f2d548e33bb94bd98026862bee60c7059acf0e9
describe
'10887' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDG' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
4ca27182cd7922f09e782ab5142387b2
f3d4987bd40311f88f6664cea324bed413c69ea2
describe
'313574' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDH' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
515e30962b3c165e84e864f81f767234
7aecf6a14bdb399916b4897bd7df8d3563a51704
describe
'115147' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDI' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
4865e4706e7ab99da6ff7b23ecb707fb
cac0412929e604c47519740d5704505d930b374d
describe
'27172' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDJ' 'sip-files00204.pro'
7c2c36ce3c4563bb06d8ca3ea4a10b52
3be6f656be4a25807bac3b36be4553533cd97579
describe
'37104' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDK' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
2a3b647e0e5d0bb3c22f7f7c91fcab79
225564de20490815aa7a324590f447552bd0e598
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDL' 'sip-files00204.tif'
9efc1323a622fadf055094ff543d3d7c
bc4edf717aac2b5951f3849699fb322b73125b98
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDM' 'sip-files00204.txt'
8bbd7af656e51a6e6000b15ac41c225a
7d0a657bdf38f97195acce46a08f957664b5a8b5
describe
'9743' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDN' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
60b23ad663435281f129806bf73f6dfb
03deff58a75f7d4fd02aff9f20aeeee0ce678b70
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDO' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
664f6c88dac357d25a792896683fc7ad
59482e3cbc019e23dec3207f3a2d1e65dfd79e65
describe
'135366' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDP' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
261c9bab5a50838630b4f079e5be583f
1db37699da888f4f6e777cb4ad1df61ea4594e25
describe
'32924' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDQ' 'sip-files00205.pro'
71ae2a26af1ae2045d6b1303100ca734
ee4c205d9023c2e8228b17a10eddac6e8ebee6d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDR' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
0101f0364cd2cc7410b13fb3212d5083
02f260ccdcec70cdda06e73549434716891bc3a4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDS' 'sip-files00205.tif'
b89c21576d6fac0f55afe320e37c1c8f
53da80c58e78be1a989b8ae63b812164c389cbc9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDT' 'sip-files00205.txt'
61a9e1486efdefe4410460c7c3207274
7a93c26b7b0dab22927b5e599f679007ed25c7ef
describe
'11733' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDU' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
11a9bb8130303afe4da5f7039b264b91
700e9d25bbca5b2ae6e39f25cf06b4ddabdd74aa
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDV' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
4e903ef62effa32ef5455d816e5e6736
2d2d5c68180591cf94de1c886434137ac6cb0327
describe
'129852' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDW' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
1956a74ccb01de3109b2ebe516d63ff8
7fa794142a21ca8269cf8e77a79349655de1cadd
describe
'31976' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDX' 'sip-files00206.pro'
704f27acc4266f180cbe58fc2d53c5c4
29451a851e50b85464db5c03f368ef9a9bf6fd19
describe
'43245' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDY' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
4b850e40625caad3047ef4655000380d
5496a00db77e79483d0fcd7fdc71c9d21090f021
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHDZ' 'sip-files00206.tif'
0ae8eb0bf70139f65eff7927a8c04176
dd066541545c911dba489d4cb530ea8d69b06898
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEA' 'sip-files00206.txt'
a679c469b1b8fe01a3e27371f8534cb4
6ce422f132691ff5f9aa6d96d4e52967e7332fb4
describe
'11155' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEB' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
9a9c3915a31c68518a9ba0fddab7be63
4ffa129f439ec46deb2cc3e3a13271506882e4e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEC' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
89deaebcde6353d6de05b0ac5f8fbabf
1ad2217266c94e74fdb9a0ebdfca342ddfa16e75
describe
'128492' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHED' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
daf36b983fe21878d26e55cef8a8d324
714d58bd2d711687c131cf7508cd1ceb1e5ed765
describe
'31922' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEE' 'sip-files00207.pro'
63cca89873ee338a828188f544b01df7
a1cd2bd755efec52046a38e122649c7df6545455
describe
'42760' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEF' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
652703a81e3e997f151b2390c891ab33
d756de03b46733476a2b9817a33c384051008b4e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEG' 'sip-files00207.tif'
bc6b7b3e8fa32446ed745a8a2e5a4e8c
540ada1b67d3cfc19cb1bbf99d0736af452e821c
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEH' 'sip-files00207.txt'
9734de90cfc3170f95a10a8c21bed7c5
a7aace32b19e664087b9bb5b10712443e0ea27b9
describe
'11893' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEI' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
36a8346e2b680a43c934ac8bd2c8caa5
aa6db956f9721a2dbc1be02cec68ab83124630bf
describe
'313709' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEJ' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
4eef3facb8a56a34874b9830c222810e
fef956e99885cc037e6b44abba505be73813fafe
describe
'112045' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEK' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
bed57e770cca0cd39bb25adc4d3f4ef0
1213f247be99a629769afdb13fe7d25aa999c38d
describe
'26496' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEL' 'sip-files00208.pro'
e0d87b4d8c5d6e60d788512700fffee6
b95ad8dca06edbf1eeedc393c929b695b814bc54
describe
'36402' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEM' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
f5d032968e2f5cce27f7434a9c445dad
eb82bc95a8cbea808c2f92da7736a3049ba77a34
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEN' 'sip-files00208.tif'
339338a941c668ebfa8a89257f1e000d
5f49bced2fcfa7cbb508e677e0472c04f0a36728
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEO' 'sip-files00208.txt'
c6d84bdc206118fb6c452460a400afd9
b00e75d98e0583dc6db56a40c337be4726f84377
describe
'9637' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEP' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
3058925ff16151b9b2581c63345759e9
b433991d9cfc77b0e4a4200e234e494d0eb9fb97
describe
'313747' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEQ' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
f5f69be9015c31e1b4560d0100aa7ea3
a676258d88f50fe9fdbc45ec3416c8b6d0bc4dc4
describe
'132282' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHER' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
04c33d80a9b56670ca9b14f0c51ad4b3
68cd9c54c3803c8a853d3b0fbf14af888cc61b01
describe
'32769' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHES' 'sip-files00209.pro'
310c6c19d7726d541ee71a9410ca8e78
ad25a899de83ba3d36c190ee90c5f77290722c3d
describe
'43812' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHET' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
8375f0599a4326a3ee10a3e5786d1e50
0f9f1150506a3685b4097f74807d8c8859434f7f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEU' 'sip-files00209.tif'
70acf8045390a7aff063bb42e5bc0711
febf51030f7dc45c953ee9776a3613f20fa13ec4
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEV' 'sip-files00209.txt'
90bbebc084b9053282ef011473514dc3
13505740604e0d399082a82d611a60a505e973a1
describe
'11576' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEW' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
5d9626a6d55c0890295fc548b82fce4d
c9375d33a8f470c5ca209ed950396c6313888dc2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEX' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
50e5e510672cb3cc274a0df8fb1257c7
599f83bddd865d666aa4619140afef5f75983f05
describe
'123809' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEY' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
616058d1719d0c1003aa39099d0b0bbe
d58e307317b0f8dd8511b7fea32e03b8a8367910
describe
'30598' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHEZ' 'sip-files00210.pro'
d49cae5daa366221430e8a52840bfc2a
32e53e69ee816389fc4c13756e028798c94d32a7
describe
'41558' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFA' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
03b677b9d280acd24d69a1f00bf5faee
ec18e893893257fb82fb1622749e0138270d7b3e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFB' 'sip-files00210.tif'
d9da1676f1f188e734b4faab1a80113f
1965720764791742245b2b5532af4f9fea304eef
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFC' 'sip-files00210.txt'
5879d1274c66f68a9058dce7b4a463bf
3abaa67b681d2d3f25a02f197a2b86eaff6ba858
describe
'10891' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFD' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
ac424da1cab04ba85ac27b3d58adc457
6fcee5c482a2912321792feea2f88b19df8b8276
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFE' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
95c848feab9b21ac6471fc6538d55e0c
ac771f0fe11a91fba4804fe1dfae35f2f4c9e636
describe
'123928' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFF' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
f9295f54a954fee37f4aa604d3f624a8
ebccfd5b9c9ea1d16f26fa7a62bab0e703941977
describe
'30806' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFG' 'sip-files00211.pro'
a858ff8892d838ead994b381a4c80ddf
ec207447a9058db7e77b3448e20b2d19a790916d
describe
'41332' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFH' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
c05f801c71e2b8f0bcb76f2492129198
23766a67172fc1ba23a8ee1a539b3b61ef784299
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFI' 'sip-files00211.tif'
eb9ab18316adaa30f8f2f49806141b01
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFJ' 'sip-files00211.txt'
56f4a7484a0582041d214f42dc222999
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describe
'10915' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFK' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
3b8dee9484b68fd2f310dcc0b6934336
6cf7076049a99da87a9fc90c890559bf705e6c42
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFL' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
0fdc141352c5bbe9b9542b8a5279ff92
8f220aff353b2c88ccedf49bcca0bb297feb63ba
describe
'114344' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFM' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
213456c81ba1626368f915e2302a01ab
ae30f0503ca3741a254c446207e9fffcb22e0b02
describe
'27296' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFN' 'sip-files00212.pro'
091b88187fc4fb091d14052a912e027d
cc3da534b59f6b037f507b70803204fb2161d58b
describe
'37505' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFO' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
d808329e109a1a6530e5b429be5d6636
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFP' 'sip-files00212.tif'
c064ac2a0841da5b061a2390d70017ba
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describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFQ' 'sip-files00212.txt'
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describe
'10215' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFR' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFS' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
8ec0652264bcb5169a52a06b9ae66682
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFT' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
0a5a878dc6d799230b29501c7edfe6cc
1a7bb58eb45309c1a44506c1096257f7bc49bdef
describe
'30940' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFU' 'sip-files00213.pro'
fa63432b33a3e2aecd0b54c7547a5837
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describe
'41023' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFV' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFW' 'sip-files00213.tif'
9e4ccf7798cf721b85f2056229c8d61a
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describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFX' 'sip-files00213.txt'
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describe
'11140' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFY' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
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describe
'313698' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHFZ' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
f9c4bf9c5a8a7e71908725de9a69d3ee
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describe
'101115' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGA' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
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describe
'24048' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGB' 'sip-files00214.pro'
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describe
'33098' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGC' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
42529a3f14269c77c6b0373d080b8eb4
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGD' 'sip-files00214.tif'
98da3ac6f2ea660ee92a7fe5652a7914
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describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGE' 'sip-files00214.txt'
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describe
'9140' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGF' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGG' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
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describe
'106116' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGH' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
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f332e91ecd610266fab539e38dd2cbad88b53b64
describe
'25055' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGI' 'sip-files00215.pro'
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describe
'35565' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGJ' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
d9a278f5ab9f8de9e40b5f4ce66aae20
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGK' 'sip-files00215.tif'
6ec0810b0250c38ebaeac2ccf8cb8766
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describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGL' 'sip-files00215.txt'
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describe
'9537' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGM' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
7d868a0d5ebc61a8faa6c8943a54d8a8
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGN' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
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describe
'132211' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGO' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGP' 'sip-files00216.pro'
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describe
'43059' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGQ' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
8f051882f00d942c51b10332ed74b03c
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGR' 'sip-files00216.tif'
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describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGS' 'sip-files00216.txt'
8e1c13a400deefdc64a20ba74c80b1dc
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describe
'10972' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGT' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
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describe
'313480' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGU' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
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describe
'110909' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGV' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
859e127d0ca69f32e5c74de84524b04b
1f8103cadba78cebf484ca064937ca3589e1db85
describe
'26253' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGW' 'sip-files00217.pro'
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describe
'36007' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGX' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
c9bdf05136f30124473a566135fed07f
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGY' 'sip-files00217.tif'
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describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHGZ' 'sip-files00217.txt'
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describe
'9874' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHA' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHB' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
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describe
'126760' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHC' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
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describe
'31697' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHD' 'sip-files00218.pro'
e15553437d32ad5fc241602192acb2b7
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describe
'42391' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHE' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
0052075d920ff58cd42c47b3bb864f09
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHF' 'sip-files00218.tif'
26a09f06b88e2cc71925120c3adae5a1
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHG' 'sip-files00218.txt'
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describe
'11199' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHH' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
eee955cf3fd855e9bdfe4221f2f14bbe
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHI' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
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describe
'131703' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHJ' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
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describe
'32383' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHK' 'sip-files00219.pro'
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describe
'43363' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHL' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHM' 'sip-files00219.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHN' 'sip-files00219.txt'
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describe
'11513' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHO' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHP' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
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describe
'111856' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHQ' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
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describe
'26602' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHR' 'sip-files00220.pro'
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describe
'36649' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHS' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHT' 'sip-files00220.tif'
83c7738a412f18d5860953f47e06ee7a
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHU' 'sip-files00220.txt'
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describe
'9545' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHV' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHW' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
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describe
'132118' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHX' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
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describe
'32086' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHY' 'sip-files00221.pro'
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describe
'42658' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHHZ' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIA' 'sip-files00221.tif'
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describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIB' 'sip-files00221.txt'
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describe
'11293' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIC' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHID' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
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describe
'124703' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIE' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
9b7ef2842a4a860af7f89b7f8894c216
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'2011-12-30T10:53:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIF' 'sip-files00222.pro'
122c7d6a8b6bdaccf902a37db1814a2e
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describe
'40844' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIG' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIH' 'sip-files00222.tif'
da277d266305bd1fd6c973f1f31799d2
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHII' 'sip-files00222.txt'
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describe
'11039' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIJ' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIK' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
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describe
'125612' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIL' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
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describe
'30994' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIM' 'sip-files00223.pro'
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describe
'41614' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIN' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIO' 'sip-files00223.tif'
d2a7cecccecb33574cdafa587c05b169
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIP' 'sip-files00223.txt'
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describe
'10940' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIQ' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIR' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
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describe
'125502' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIS' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
eee1510dd7e4a618d5756df6b3a1f0b5
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describe
'31275' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIT' 'sip-files00224.pro'
c54c53cfeec4ea69e8ffbb5bfffaffa7
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describe
'41370' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIU' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
0bb64bb595a7c0272a59bb6eb74ffc26
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIV' 'sip-files00224.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIW' 'sip-files00224.txt'
2e8e2ad554ba4502f82d078b4f656c85
d08b212e72efc32750a19fff24ca0307f33473e5
describe
'11071' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIX' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
cbf7eaa358c40558423380c67654cabb
9e9f6265a688b76b2630f15897146e95db015e07
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIY' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
eeebd6eec1ed43efb8aac9397d85064b
665cc5b04336d62c49c547effe8a8bc238902fe4
describe
'107177' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHIZ' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
c3ebb6deccdd57086b2b79b1eeedff6a
690e465165ee5f1150624e42d86fb67b2fdc0cfa
describe
'25912' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJA' 'sip-files00225.pro'
4cfc10769a2db3b27647109161be2d3b
f52914299194704b4b593e4c6c3261cc5f44ed33
describe
'35423' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJB' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
f9eca43d8a770cf0575e8d15f78c1087
951cb9bb55e8000f70025c1edef3284725e12c98
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJC' 'sip-files00225.tif'
7414ff90661213e4d7e4e67f69069b4d
77e2e46bcb2b4593d47021bc431d1b08812257a7
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJD' 'sip-files00225.txt'
9f9171bc0470f8351cecef60d35e0f87
d938e61697e5d3298b0fb5549973286d41764645
describe
'9710' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJE' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
34231068c10c1bc1f3d72dd8353c94b7
9abf252259653e88f3d3ea7ae4deb124cead754b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJF' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
76467b1ae5beb954f03ae42f8755e2b6
13c07159858b3ab22fec903b5b85cd23d8ecbaef
describe
'106282' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJG' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
356cb110741488f0a782caa99faee3b3
63a1637048a16c8bc966a3767f55e69df3f67206
describe
'25096' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJH' 'sip-files00226.pro'
4104bc375a1f3f7450048a8e18db1db1
3df68eb0a285bf3ef60b0931c0d706f24e9e648b
describe
'34833' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJI' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
310f4a0b5eb95d61c32b7eb6d61d5b31
f6d85a05215e80087c54bb02d0543111b8997ad5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJJ' 'sip-files00226.tif'
18e43e0669e6774046e9bfb9843ec1f7
c3e0ed284f69a05adb9e13a10c247b175d18703c
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJK' 'sip-files00226.txt'
0e29223cecbf691d01c9fc1b85334a7e
3fec6661537cd7f660f25f68e01f265e111c9ac5
describe
'9338' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJL' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
c1571d7b99a321bbc543e4ca8edc58b7
6e8aeaa5f0fe0c12f7d3b06ce9888f4deac02f78
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJM' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
e6e217acf558a214154daa3fba7accd0
953f5cd450926426a494cbb7a283d15b6d6ff7a7
describe
'124283' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJN' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
59d6e7e907b012149e3ad340b9455b06
0ad71393d34d2ef89a329ce22b1bc414b7501222
describe
'30706' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJO' 'sip-files00227.pro'
0552a333b5340395d7ddd747aba82152
7913b6d84232ee52e48eed43894017a7d4dffb92
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJP' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
8c8c3f5f1bede31a4f5fc09b0aff5542
3fee896d3f6705adc2086d352e6dc0fa932e87d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJQ' 'sip-files00227.tif'
8ce71f7539ad0e4b846e5fb3173613d2
cf7f771c88e9a1b9307183e09ef5ecdff2a35219
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJR' 'sip-files00227.txt'
2b3d532e90ceed527db0a37b30042aa2
3f46042afbe236742c32f55f53005ccb3407cee3
describe
'11616' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJS' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
2cb0ff2f221e4ea8f678c0479ce5326d
972788a4c1c8b0497dbc8877f0fd9d46543a9248
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJT' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
0fdc54c2bc69790652b4609077949591
e39e8f987f4029bc009eb01a81b31d0560e795cd
describe
'130444' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJU' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
de79fce5307e8ffd74e3944f4b33950c
dd8fd8e67d0712b62203342d9c2be10a7954b056
describe
'32325' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJV' 'sip-files00228.pro'
eb0b6b20d5589bb8a02c844af4d026ae
79c53f53dd1a213dc05f3aebc8f02c3d10f6cc9f
describe
'43351' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJW' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
95c9c29166ce265b8523b80133d98dd6
5794a63e6ed7eced5a9d616179657cb5cd2a1e3f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJX' 'sip-files00228.tif'
2867c9c9c607f8c9420fba07174492c2
9135710ebd4393d6a3a8c1121ca295fbf9933d16
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJY' 'sip-files00228.txt'
40e13a7cc1d2c12897c373dc982c54b0
ef89cba676b72093af88e43ab989221bc30aa399
describe
'11248' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHJZ' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
f6c90323aabc958596121578b2f2a537
4f200cf264c5ba5c5a3f17ea8684124d3c608028
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKA' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
807a639b7134969ca59f449a5fd7fe00
ffae35fc05a59dab43e517dd56ae7cdb3358f665
describe
'123960' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKB' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
945f5b06a8d448c075550336e86ba4c6
4073fac7d1993f2fad502d4939d74e44f88965c9
describe
'30406' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKC' 'sip-files00229.pro'
2694ea7f35a222ec72d1da0b25164548
5919c97ec45451d675d8cc45ade5ecf4437c1d45
describe
'40798' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKD' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
cefa30ca58d2ece95993bb941f125f2c
ca408a5cb78bc0e2e91498a16a63ded55ca780f4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKE' 'sip-files00229.tif'
5cfa0d4c6058673bc09851624aa8255c
3fa160ec2ba3ac1a83cce7809e642dc5c1d38b94
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKF' 'sip-files00229.txt'
5942a2e7c123fe800ce5f00cab0fc9ca
3104449114e47ae95aee7294b09859c99f72219e
describe
'10928' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKG' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
95ebfa7df2d4cadf02e28116afc04bcd
684f49a9bec1b3dfca489dd3340b3e2c8429a057
describe
'313723' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKH' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
363647355de93cd666f49c806f6c9b27
c28d5166184aa82a5c86c32675d7dd63d32e4b92
describe
'127408' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKI' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
d861b03e308635ed9915aaac9bb0c48c
2eb9f2cfdbb902f617aa078258a2af6094226907
describe
'31857' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKJ' 'sip-files00230.pro'
3a784338ee9025e73a6d10317b819df6
529801303c893361e06c2d64b024e24c32bebec9
describe
'42104' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKK' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
e864b3e5f61fd8b796ff8828968cb7e2
129b0e9012b0e1431a6738d60751f1e8e3d830ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKL' 'sip-files00230.tif'
931da8fb462918db0a47897b464e3381
095cf26457c0bff1394f29b1c166835cad17b5a7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKM' 'sip-files00230.txt'
ea90a35ba075d841b064c9ed8f2f9342
f94a363df432d42b8a349dd7589dd5335096961f
describe
'10994' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKN' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
acd9c2cfdb457e940fd6a31d13a79f64
5d3d26dd093207eed242733cb9f9bff0fda5d3c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKO' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
0b2d4e5704364011ab17145df49b453a
daf486ed7550c9381bba29d042cefb679eee1b02
'2011-12-30T10:52:10-05:00'
describe
'123857' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKP' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
0a1b8ac2328ad155f45c15fc1800486a
b40aa7fe0f102cfd550de88324452836b413d5a7
describe
'30575' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKQ' 'sip-files00231.pro'
bfc28da8abcf6af7ef297c639c4f9bdb
b46b886625f7ab5a3274540673518bf9d3cbdfbf
describe
'40709' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKR' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
c17df51fba23823025c004d8301dc3f3
b72abadb5ac8df9aa0dc7c5a82e1cccf88695114
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKS' 'sip-files00231.tif'
25b9c69c6556e05e38a37b314dd40656
cabf9d98e575932f85e33808e47735088aa56319
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKT' 'sip-files00231.txt'
f9e921ace14a10d7347f6611aa3c2e7e
665c7ed987484e8c95694e4c8213b8a81f538da8
describe
'10951' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKU' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
58b225f4578e972f6331cc8a1802e941
1764c2447bb56724b43194b3be6ad131f4d5b624
describe
'313634' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKV' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
06b2e8b24b6a51b20f27bf76377a458c
8cb3d1eebd30e20157e0aa5fe788f16ca66de842
describe
'104490' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKW' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
a8398c7dbb8a98e7b5855a14dbe551d8
89acee6f03c181867c07b8718e58b1fc32918745
describe
'24330' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKX' 'sip-files00232.pro'
a93165e4e0a5c6b808bb8f924d790f72
1e4e2eebe6f6aa74913f939be1a052b00389946b
describe
'34039' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKY' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
b4337b0cc01ce6a1c0476e2b1547eb71
1a43cc9c59984e87ffc9cf6dbfc2c43a3753b443
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHKZ' 'sip-files00232.tif'
b2c3a72845e6ab16ad7ebc72c75692f3
20e8b00f2e284d02f3e76ef04a11a8c00bcfb0fb
describe
'963' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLA' 'sip-files00232.txt'
00e76a6438846496c59d7ebd59dcb664
46bcfd92f5dfbcded5204aeab9c195139faf39a1
describe
'9108' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLB' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
71bfa222c2cd0eb06fff2318409e91ca
660742aac6a190666dee84f58bf0dbf4693a7388
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLC' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
e7cf61c514e2e52c4e381590dddaa316
182d6826eb804c7cd04fe9ef582a4b5766ba1233
describe
'110201' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLD' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
227d66b97ed62bc65d247ee9a1b189a7
6fcb8c4aa7098b812d275121da9cff98b80246f4
describe
'26195' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLE' 'sip-files00233.pro'
c799c77a02c2fcc44345b22ec37b2ccb
26182faecb1447b360656aab2091144af5dc780b
describe
'36083' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLF' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
c263efa6f9fedf019dcb45c7f5a547f9
c22f996e76c2791cba8b9dc2e91026a5b8373e80
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLG' 'sip-files00233.tif'
1809a586d96067d73e47cb5afb6234fa
59bf92384c54305faf395995d692d3f92c687305
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLH' 'sip-files00233.txt'
a17030d3fdb4a2c36955cb92a7f7a3be
7770ae5fb9138941ec20182c41e1f09749ab6830
describe
'9892' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLI' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
5ee7db352335ccbca8d81f32282f2ae0
326df5cbd8eb70fe3fca60ddfa2c259663438fb1
describe
'313836' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLJ' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
9a02163404f49d4ec84085144dad4fb6
55bd047dd31687ae3bdcbabbb29ccb88df629441
describe
'127519' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLK' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
66141f213f3c249b723df082d3c03e7e
99c9037fabb828a03cc85e247b01b6821b62868a
describe
'32296' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLL' 'sip-files00234.pro'
bfa030959aa38675f9b9261ec8a96c46
f5d0d08e4413441e192ba7a5d9d4d56dc38e5b7d
describe
'41697' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLM' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
b30b9d8b071ec86a42d6bfaa832f525d
38df53ebc3809262e588c7f3d79e680cdb8b6b3f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLN' 'sip-files00234.tif'
b266436c59820070dc35a054aed75f31
cfeeaf6e787066866ac8f187d18a911d5ffeb5fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLO' 'sip-files00234.txt'
2d7521f7f495c0aac4577117b404402c
21d86563c5ce6ab81668656e7614b7359a014ec4
describe
'10788' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLP' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
f8670db42d10b9e32b9ead185d8cade5
f0b72314687d0bd9d9cd4276ff42c214c7bfa486
describe
'313660' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLQ' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
8b8f0631169f4443676f9d75b3b41812
b0ca5b8a77abfe5f9c684459a67ddd01009ae1d0
describe
'109883' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLR' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
0f593411744fa34ffbd3bda0ea0ce9e1
044d5b35062e44b2ca999ad1e3ac213375be4053
describe
'25575' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLS' 'sip-files00235.pro'
04c872c020d686b55ee4287f4dcd52be
f79fb5b86c1861c8abfbc94e4810eb5cffe66c53
describe
'35793' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLT' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
aeec865b57c6e00fb06e0ec212ff0aef
47469e3f0d0367a03c935d81896a384b2670a624
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLU' 'sip-files00235.tif'
6efb2dc781ae7663f615b107cce2552b
6d00b5296fe8a686ffd1c4ed0c14b87d8c8df9e7
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLV' 'sip-files00235.txt'
e97987f28ea7fe4625e354364a027b41
d652a4ff2cc85b17741f052d0f4a05bea45dc890
describe
'10023' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLW' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
61856edb27e067d7622c42bcda641bad
48722e601414fc3206cdc3a0657b06a8941ccf98
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLX' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
19e4b43e01aba7b9c2fc16a0cf9dc530
92e9ffc45e7050a5336b0528620128cc73b4bdae
describe
'122807' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLY' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
742403abe25824541fcfff751b26fee6
0cfe6f628c1f341ff81f188ef25e672e00c89b42
describe
'30327' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHLZ' 'sip-files00236.pro'
f4f3fc65c0dcf4681a8d1f1c336a79cb
f98d7d4b1b58ba492b39f7fa51a011df216c56a5
describe
'40193' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMA' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
5bd013ca04ea4c023053cb4ea24770fe
56bacb7ebf2c442b2b010f0fb4198520460fe413
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMB' 'sip-files00236.tif'
2c667bb12a4d846fc38ac8246594a5b3
30441c16a4749bf2e87f72107696a64af7d74ec3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMC' 'sip-files00236.txt'
09a755aa04a708d2c78c8bb8b0e95d16
222e1dc5d0fe5c3e0b7df09d934e8c83aa2ca628
describe
'10662' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMD' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
f3b57582e4d4e4a1a811861e5692dc13
dc210e90773105c84443af60bbd28352b075d09b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHME' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
47b03d443ed783cb9ce4786558f65786
0ffdb81bce0d629bd8500c90403ec12d1f58de01
describe
'128130' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMF' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
407be6de8d44b34dc7bf534c38793b79
560c03cfb98aae05bf0947b87162e9745f3bb178
describe
'31188' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMG' 'sip-files00237.pro'
fe9af6b4b32a8fef4934edf27bceb067
e4c20b290d943646f56ab3c240b78c226ef97c52
describe
'42856' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMH' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
58d38d955a78052b29652d9d366e7e64
a23c9acd8773689bb8eaecdabf2d4236dbf60411
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMI' 'sip-files00237.tif'
d000039ccedb0a2df77f25111844f811
044a1c3fa314b77a1181038e316d6ed19814eeab
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMJ' 'sip-files00237.txt'
d7c3c1a9511684f52248293579cd75f4
1238e827744ed8bbc4f46479bf5e4a9a7dfb0ee4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMK' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
e2a9bd4e16e9e12c651a14ef6de57134
303e92ce3b2788fb110f67fb53d2598eaa570d4d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHML' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
68a131396bf366229a9d66f1c92552e8
1afd34e05f0f4b42d56f0e84a8203f448e545d1f
describe
'125546' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMM' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
b60a0e85dd72c185b77d7efdecb3b4b2
c23cca14e892ee1ade38ce97984c64f728d60ea0
describe
'31070' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMN' 'sip-files00238.pro'
64e1edb6b3d1de8203853b80f54e72ee
82c868036256248d60f93c30821888485f62f51a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMO' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
97418b454bc42e1f4894d52e5d2e3395
13201fa31f355e61c5960a508ca5b5b8474b85a9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMP' 'sip-files00238.tif'
205df433727f41041925883c74871714
538db932f599da3f1f178ba667f99207ca157fad
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMQ' 'sip-files00238.txt'
13659e6a577d06732ae3de46438de6e4
892e9d7f3ea1f8c4399ccde56db9445cd15b4cc3
describe
'10575' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMR' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
044552232d45194acf6cf3b805f063cb
da57b39b8a6efbf31b9c56d4c66ff941ab095e72
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMS' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
7c14c5c889552bc8901b88598b23df0a
94d9f17da7a84af3ad7891d2046e8f1349cd5922
describe
'128529' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMT' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
309a804dabe639261a11aac6368e07e9
1f52757103d40675c0bbffa3ff335aaa75ad9563
describe
'31488' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMU' 'sip-files00239.pro'
a4a9633d8fcd344b3de36cf04b28acf7
901feaed5940098fce69e057ecc78185a87eb2ae
describe
'42840' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMV' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
f3e8cd14983c7f45b0339290031ada57
2b27a90192a855f00e3b9fff0a4b2dda5d6d0ff6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMW' 'sip-files00239.tif'
07844ca1bfd0e3431cb5901c65ce22d2
221851711514bab806aac130c71f414e2f134895
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMX' 'sip-files00239.txt'
8e7c8b59529ba816c336edbea615b551
7660b3b147ca65cee1c59170c124aba9e2f29cf9
describe
'11272' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMY' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
ea67fe4c7d081ad2f94d88de2f382a88
7dc1d6f275c59d11d28c99f2d151e49335fffd1e
describe
'313886' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHMZ' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
418b73940d3373418e5c7a3f8aa8ff86
7866aceaed291d90bbac2014b075d42e8c42a678
describe
'123935' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNA' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
fbf4ab2d8124682d24569ee0368abd1f
c77b9b832879c60e2fa02174942cae448da415af
describe
'30373' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNB' 'sip-files00240.pro'
e3f30f67cfdd2dc01de600c2063f5cc7
00a04b9c8af0fc0b032b014bf0264119583fd6ec
describe
'40187' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNC' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
88f06dfce41c52339f346c177b51a366
cf83a0f982e88ef920de3367d6f1f0ee827ade20
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHND' 'sip-files00240.tif'
c7d0a187c29c44e88ec5011e858d96f1
33ff870f25f6e4076064593909517b03194fe5dc
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNE' 'sip-files00240.txt'
1b53e8bc851fb9d95ead213d159739ef
1f13b47e52d23d2b19310f0b0838d87ae092fc3d
describe
'10528' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNF' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
8266c8bbf9e128aa4e04165216c02927
09c169d2622178b64c01fa845d9f66c7a40b9cd1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNG' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
75b308252d87fa70076b55928ad87624
f81aee45187008ae2c23847611d915e00cf76409
describe
'104854' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNH' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
66f7d457015479831d595751602271c3
0b9d4a0eaf8f070ce301899285949ebc4c7f8b21
describe
'24433' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNI' 'sip-files00241.pro'
fa167164167b3c8093f5d50a4500bb72
bf7b069cfb7bead26b74071b495713a168ec3582
describe
'34055' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNJ' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
3038c779b6a95658a547cdc489bcc597
27faf9e198ecb7b04419769d5d1e173bda31d0b2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNK' 'sip-files00241.tif'
1ad364c050f7c56105ff8563d3435040
f43b30885dcb303fa8e66628b9f7d6951c90affb
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNL' 'sip-files00241.txt'
f59d34d70ca51bbd43f9ed9608b8ba0b
61bcf97ea4fbe745fd37faffc0c871ab43ac7a13
describe
'9157' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNM' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
1325906047b7c9583de065a9829badc1
76fb4ee1425a0c0a1b67c87dbb69be2e54737e06
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNN' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
0ba5e73416a67f7fe00a6533095c4f89
4a1c8c372fa6061042075fb4fd9755e2a2580875
describe
'124491' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNO' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
ea0273b06eefc7ce1fafcce18c4fa601
1e139b260faf8fae2e425cf823f649c3b22d5f35
describe
'31295' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNP' 'sip-files00242.pro'
2f1bc800978a5301afc3ade4cee18703
4197a75886d173f5f73229b8f18ffdbc9a7651ce
describe
'41328' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNQ' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
8179a24565e43757e721cea170501f9d
9d04e6cd34987591c48b1485b6e1d08b96f600f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNR' 'sip-files00242.tif'
0843ff4b752ca4852b6aec2cbd4a1f82
135529c30f1e83f15d0111f58a7be8df4f0e7c57
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNS' 'sip-files00242.txt'
a3f46fa7bdf96f6494022013d020a32d
0eaa23da020d378d52f423de5b9684e282a3d528
describe
'10778' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNT' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
15bd3b0ffea016cde13368b971db917b
362cb5d0611e059dce1131d89b8abcb99b36de53
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNU' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
c4c9b49ca700006c6305156b7f6bb630
fef879441082fbba63c2e24240748698ff8eb295
describe
'128843' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNV' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
5cd14a940616083dc4e93c7bd528ec98
5d9bb89cf4441a7a5e0e8ef187e1254f6c80ea75
describe
'32400' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNW' 'sip-files00243.pro'
063619b461b36f7f702e05855f81810e
5892fc8d71f9fab31f3e078cc67c5032fec4037b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNX' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
61f3780fbd5fd78babfdf9a4c2831c3f
27ccbfc464626699b2821355827bc1bbb6fab1f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNY' 'sip-files00243.tif'
850798ee70fad2302666d13b0104b2ae
18c53c41d83ea9f664137dd43a0be5ffc04ac3f4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHNZ' 'sip-files00243.txt'
0ff4971bd7f3d82d5be617d4e0a4bb6d
889a77675be29f15192a6dd29a0b4b6bb3c82319
describe
'11361' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOA' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
45c4795697f4e73f30bcf9f4a4246c3a
27a97488c912c1f91d6c603138de7afa01f65146
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOB' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
e230572138f445354e2e4d77c69af6d5
770240656abc798878e4c6b2f0b734356b65a4b1
describe
'131269' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOC' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
ef96e2be6886058edb22558baeae9f32
7ac615ed605a5acb35092f25c07a799b6b843fa0
describe
'32712' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOD' 'sip-files00244.pro'
4fa35e9739300f7d1311e9ef6357a574
6f522a466a6302347d103897ca1aaa23e99c50df
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOE' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
8e72e8dbda2e48c8ab49fc1dc0b62fa2
86092923aff36290971df0b9c2f03ddfd207ec8b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOF' 'sip-files00244.tif'
ca726fb4d04d00d6049e30050ca8daed
7c18f40eb80136a3f7e83fabc5c37576c4e251af
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOG' 'sip-files00244.txt'
40220fc6572e55bcd435b8f7bf2a6fa4
982dc33607c31516b096495c42547b3c8ee03f3e
describe
'10978' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOH' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
a93212994396880611fc41a28e0513d2
53a9be43c40cccf51f1be5a9091ebdfe94b47428
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOI' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
ad62cc2afb98516cb2fab87d4ca23676
d7ef088a5b6170161ea2e94caf1fac3ab729ab79
describe
'130314' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOJ' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
5a8aa3db8cb6b14a5d9c3530d597772c
7a976bdf039677e11a36c7285ea00970a9619bfb
describe
'32483' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOK' 'sip-files00245.pro'
f3126f1dd095c362a40341036e4ae749
180f8b280f052e9e2454aae76fb1082e291f73aa
describe
'43194' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOL' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
bc025154b57b33fae19856d086384288
89a7651ec69006ac9ca31c94ea55c2d61d842988
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOM' 'sip-files00245.tif'
78d725543eb93f1ba40372bade142530
ff51b8b7387151546ed11b701710e16bd5f92d7c
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHON' 'sip-files00245.txt'
df7cd12805e0144c7c6a8f55202dfab2
8c133cf79ac773b4354364f034db8d6a1278c832
describe
'11468' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOO' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
6566c21f4917b60686618ab0276502bf
fc80b96cb360d09de45cd1dbc52b24e30f5b3dee
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOP' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
6617c7f2633eb9a76f0109f3ce04e218
d17785e274d38bb29d77497ecf707e3ed5733d46
describe
'116689' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOQ' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
da52120a239bf57d08d3d895c91c8b30
6d52de48cfaf6d258e3118dafa39abe83aab0b82
describe
'28402' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOR' 'sip-files00246.pro'
fa08c70b60f85e601d58a5e6d70bdc4b
fc09db4f4ec4ffd68bbe824c0022670a51617a39
describe
'38522' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOS' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
9d1b68ad9669e3dba1cead1c917a1066
42ff326d9bba97f811f78b208e18540fd25302b0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOT' 'sip-files00246.tif'
1804c227719453b3c0b9836476a6c720
8859acf9e42df5c4feb759a8a852f67f734edf75
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOU' 'sip-files00246.txt'
da1c3e87b21692787f0743d9a8990325
f7f929a0517d26b212311992f1d62e3c6c576021
describe
'10160' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOV' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
431b82bb1ebe88364e3923d5b20c0c69
7980709dc185184a4d30dab8d18560f438647613
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOW' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
dfbe12bfdd6abbb7bdf19e0a33c002ee
51918fc52672481b8cd978720bb4990530a085d5
describe
'106466' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOX' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
5af741d40f325e81c41c67a50632c225
53c93f79537ecc0cb5c213e4b6ddf18f5e030f77
describe
'37553' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOY' 'sip-files00247.pro'
8a15441899d5437ce0af845c5cde294a
25731661d0d95291062ed1f14db71f31cf659694
describe
'31000' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHOZ' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
4bd09f942c99b6098c8162f4265fa1b3
acca7076b26a72013ed7b44dad1300684cc11c8a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPA' 'sip-files00247.tif'
1a37234a74df06b5726627fdfb844884
c2e3831cbf9b42ae317639863ef7353b22f75534
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPB' 'sip-files00247.txt'
1c9a3b80c4586d1bcffd2821cd2753b7
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describe
'8326' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPC' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
941f906362be40aee0efa9d2ef305d69
c70c5b6aaed25afd8547730225dd78c84ddb637d
describe
'313870' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPD' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
e0fa8339c810b0cf280ec74edafe2c58
4a5df8b77411ffde336a0ed4f4f30cabde64e8cd
describe
'135477' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPE' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
2427fa3ef1c70907cef0464228c02aa8
0d760c57601824573402d0a2bf36b073d9b1a55a
describe
'51548' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPF' 'sip-files00248.pro'
8252c01217ff3908853fa29c89eab0b4
6158f0644e840ac40f75b1bb41af5280a05bf205
describe
'39970' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPG' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
a0dc36652d90f6dad520be2656ae2364
ae70d7d775079a829c6b3b0ae8acf71ce4928f79
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPH' 'sip-files00248.tif'
f448b0880fc8a304916955d5b0803738
eba899b3bc05359942cb1cbe572d13250afbc666
describe
'2203' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPI' 'sip-files00248.txt'
86c0487b7c76e5cc192c93037635a16c
4acc19f9fbd49cf7e0bec4e64f3c112b40a4e601
describe
'10003' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPJ' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
7c9adee8a94c32eb1dac5ad4f4c52242
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describe
'313578' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPK' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
6439deb6af35bc23404d67bd7fe1fa6f
e92ef7ea028d9aea49a8d71048834ad8d8434b09
describe
'127329' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPL' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
e3ea3dcf467c8cad281f19813a9cd8b4
1649992156cda471aa194f89a2b0eababa3b11c1
describe
'46864' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPM' 'sip-files00249.pro'
afcd00cbce5fd0a7d26a1a5b7a3a8812
ba4fc5ec68497e0ff4abab9277d9416907f7ec91
describe
'38205' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPN' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
3fc1f75e04491f0a95c389cd2e047d65
4813f95e6a3cff24793172617d9e810c2eeda87f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPO' 'sip-files00249.tif'
bbe6b955c6426a4054a993fe78a0de3e
11b174ecc9ad1ee34ada070b8e25034915f61311
describe
'2008' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPP' 'sip-files00249.txt'
e48ec01ee3971332470a2b4734215b47
bc0bb4585e471e1cffdacc6db928dcc7c61e6448
describe
'9883' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPQ' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
78ba15d46b347c4caf297c1172d664a1
390f62a94248108b002fc9e7ab11dc18a7163245
describe
'313700' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPR' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
d9095c3b9cad0bf715841d1dc8f70049
85c5820d5429f9ceb44eaf95341320635d58abeb
describe
'132160' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPS' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
c7c5b41f571ee2e960a168679935280c
7decd647581708ba567186a9bdf712db92cacd41
describe
'48998' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPT' 'sip-files00250.pro'
8b124906df5097a6da515574ad7264c3
5a278271bd10b9f6e5272b67be6b657f7159af0c
describe
'39284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPU' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
9d228f4b1e9a142b3a868c5de9006fff
ae7375755eba8acad0f8e89bae5ca7bdef59c2af
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPV' 'sip-files00250.tif'
c1417a876f4a81b215c1599cf57cbed5
94044bf5ffb99a3997315461607c3b1052380d9a
describe
'2123' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUIfileF20090119_AAAHPW' 'sip-files00250.txt'
cd53137d1cfecc21ee1cd9b057858e39
ac9b46cdb0633854de9ee7a168a2dfee5f80a539
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xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008708300001datestamp 2008-10-23setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Odysseus : the hero of Ithacadc:creator Homer.Burt, Mary E. ( Contributor, Contributor )Ragozin, Zenaide A. ( Contributor, Contributor )dc:publisher Charles Scribner's Sonsdc:date 1898dc:type Bookdc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00087083&v=00001dc:source University of Floridadc:language English




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The Baldwin Library
University
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Florida


ODYSSEUS
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ed

















ODYSSEUS AS A YOUTH AT HOME WITH HIS MOTHER.
ODY ss US
THE HERO OF ITHACA

ADAPTED FROM THE THIRD BOOK OF THE PRIMARY
SCHOOLS OF ATHENS, GREECE

BY
MARY E. BURT

Author of “ Literury Landmarks,” “Stories from Plato,” “Story of the
German Iliad,” “The Child-Life Reading Study” ; Editor of
“ Little Nature Studies” » Teacher in the John A.
browning School, New York City

AND

ZENAIDE A. RAGOZIN

Author of “ The Story of Chaldea,” “The Story of Assyria,” ‘The Story
of Media, Babylon, and Persia,” “The Story of Vedic India” 5
Member of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and
Ireland, of the American Oriental Society, of the
Société Ethnologique of Paris, etc.

CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS
NEW YORK CHICAGO BOSTON
Copyricut, 1898, By
CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS



Printed in the United States of America
D


To

THE TEACHER
WHOSE INTEGRITY AND PEDAGOGICAL SPIRIT
HAVE CREATED A SCHOOL WHEREIN THE IDEAL MAY
PROVE ITSELF THE PRACTICAL

AND

THOSE ENTHUSIASTIC PUPILS
WHO LOVE THE LOYALTY AND BRAVERY OF ODYSSEUS

THIS BOOK IS DEDICATED
CONTENTS

PAGE



INTRODUCTION : ° . » = xili
PART I
AN INTRODUCTION TO THE LIFE OF THE HERO,
ODYSSEUS
CHAPTER PAGE
I. About Troy and the Journey of Paris to
Greece . . . . . 3

II. The Flight of Helen : : . : 6
III. The Greeks Sail for Troy : 5 a1.
IV. The Fall of Troy . . . . 2 tg



PART II
Tue RETURN oF OpyssEus To His Own
CouNTRY
CHAPTER PAGE

V. Odysseus on the Island of Calypso . eer
VI. Odysseus Constructs a Raft and Leaves the
Island : ; . : 4 see2iG

vii
Vili

CHAPTER

VII.

VIII.
TX.

X.
XI.
XII.
XIII.
XIV.
XV.
XVI.

XVII.

XVIII.
XIX.

XX.
XXI.

XXII.

XXIII.

XXIV.

Contents

Odysseus is Saved on the Island of
Scheria é . .

Nausicaa is Sent to the River by Athena

Odysseus Arrives at the Palace of Alki-
nods . . .

Odysseus in the Halls of Alkinods

The Banquet in Honor of Odysseus.

Odysseus Relates His Adventures.

The Lotus-Eaters and the Cyclops

The Cave of the Cyclops . s

The Blinding of the Cyclops

Odysseus and His Companions Leave
the Land of the Cyclops

The Adventures of Odysseus on the
Island of Afolus. .

Odysseus at the Home of Circé

Circé Instructs Odysseus Concerning
His Descent to Hades . A

The Adventures of Odysseus in Hades .

Odysseus Converses with His Mother
and Agamemnon . ;

Conversation with Achilles and Other
Heroes. : : : :

The Return of Odysseus to the Island of
Circé . : ; ; :

Odysseus Meets the Sirens, Skylla, and
Charybdis . A i . 4

PAGE

29

38
42
47
54

57
60

64
67
72
75

78
84

87
go
94

98
CHAPTER

XXV.
XXVI.

XXVII.
XXVIII.

CHAPTER

XXIX.
XXX.
XXXI.
XXXII.
XXXII.
XXXIV.
XXXV.
XXXVI.
XXXVIT.
XXXVIII.
XXXIX.

XL.

XLI.
XLII.

XLITI.

Contents

Odysseus on the Island of Hélios

The Departure of Odysseus from the
Island of Scheria . ‘ : .

Odysseus Arrives at Ithaca. 5
Odysseus Seeks the Swineherd .



PART III
THe TRIUMPH OF ODYSSEUS

Athena Advises Telemachos . :
Telemachos Astonishes the Wooers
Penelope’s Web. i :

The Journey of Telemachos ~.
Telemachos in Pylos : ° :
Telemachos in Sparta . - .

Menelaos Relates His Adventures
The Conspiracy of the Suitors .
Telemachos Returns to Ithaca .
Telemachos and the Swineherd
Telemachos Recognizes Odysseus.
Telemachos Returns to the Palace
Odysseus is Recognized by His Dog.
Odysseus Comes, a Beggar, to His
Own House : :
Conversation of Odysseus and Penel-
ope

ix
PAGE
Iot

105
108
113

PAGE
123

128
130
135
138
141
147
151
155
158
161
165
169

172

176
x

CHAPTER

XLIV.
XLV.
XLVI.
XLVII.
XLVIII.
XLIX.
L.

LI.

Contents

Eurycleia Recognizes Odysseus . .
Penelope’s Dream. f ‘
Athena Encourages Odysseus. .

The Last Banquet of the Suitors .
Odysseus Bends the Bow . : .
Death of the Suitors i .

Eurycleia Announces the Return of
Odysseus to Penelope . .

Odysseus Visits His Father .
Vocabulary and Notes : ‘ :

PAGE
180

183
185
188
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

OpyssEUS AS A YoutH at Home witH His

MorTHER.. : : : y Frontispiece
FACING
PAGE

Tue SILVER-FooTED THETIS RISING FROM THE

WAVES i 5 a 5 ss : Io

ODYSSEUS AND MENELAOS PERSUADING AGAMEM-

NON TO SACRIFICE IPHIGENEIA : ‘ Meee
ALPHEUS AND ARETHUSA . H 3 ef 2 SEES

Tur SwINEHERD TELLING His Story To Opys-

SEUS . : : : : : : LTO

OpyssEuS FEIGNS MADNESS . ; : . 146

INTRODUCTION

IT has long been the opinion of many of the
more progressive teachers of the United States
that, next to Herakles, Odysseus is the hero
closest to child-life, and that the stories from the
“Odyssey” are the most suitable for reading-
lessons. These conclusions have been reached
through independent experiments not related
to educational work in foreign countries.

While sojourning in Athens I had the pleas-
ure of visiting the best schools, both public and
private, and found the reading especially spir-
ited. I examined the books in use and found
the regular reading-books to consist of the
classic tales of the country, the stories of Her-
akles, Theseus, Perseus, and so forth, in the
reader succeeding the primer, and the stories
of Odysseus, or Ulysses, as we commonly call
him, following asa third book, answering to our
second or third reader. This book I brought
home with me and had a careful, literal trans-
lation made. I submitted this translation to
that notable scholar, Zenaide A. Ragozin, with

xiii
XIV Introduction

whom I faithfully traversed the ground, word
by word and sentence by sentence. This ver-
sion I have carefully compared with Bryant
and rewritten, making the language as simple
as could be consistent with the dignity of the
subject-matter.

The introduction to the original book as I
found it in Greece contains many interesting
points, since it shows that educators in foreign
countries, notably in Germany, had come to
the same conclusion with our best American
teachers. The editor of the little Greek read-
ing-book says:

“Tn editing this work we have made use not
only of Homer’s ‘Odyssey,’ but also of that excel-
lent reader which ts used in the public schools of
Germany, Willman’s ‘Lesebuch aus Homer.’
We have divided the little volume into three
parts, the first of which gives a short resumé
of the war against Troy and the destruction of
that city, the second the wanderings of Odys-
seus till his arrival in Ithaca, the third his arri-
val and the killing of the wooers. We have no
apology to make in presenting this book to the
public as a school-book, since many people su-
perior to us have shown the need of such books
in school-work. The new public schools, as is
well known, have a mission of the highest im-
Lutroduction xv

portance. They do not aim, as formerly, at
absolute knowledge pounded into the heads of
children in a mechanical way. Their aim is
the mental and ethical development of the pu-
pils. Reading and writing lead but half way
to this goal. With all nations the readers used
in the public schools are a collection of the no.
blest thoughts of their authors.”

The Greek editor had never read the inane
rat and cat stories of American school “read.
ers” when he wrote that. He continues:

“ Happily the Greek nation, more than any
other, abounds in literary masterpieces. Nearly
all of the Greek writings contain an abundance
of practical wisdom and virtue. Their worth is
so great that even the most advanced European
nations do not hesitate to introduce them into
their schools. The Germans do this, although
their habits and customs are so different from
ours. They especially admire Homer’s works.
These books, above all others, afford pleasure
to the young, and the reason for it is clearly
set forth by the eminent educator Herbart:

“¢The little boy is grieved when told that he
is little. Nor does he enjoy the stories of lit-
tle children. This is because his imagination
reaches out and beyond his environments. I
find the stories from Homer to be more suit-
Lutroduction

able reading for young children than the mass
of juvenile books, because they contain grand
truths.’

“Therefore these stories are held in as high
esteem by the German children as by the Greek.
In no other works do children find the grand
and noble traits in human life so faithfully and
charmingly depicted as in Homer. Here all
the domestic, civic, and religious virtues of the
people are marvellously brought to light and
the national feeling is exalted. The Homeric
poetry, and especially the ‘Odyssey,’ is adapted
to very young children, not only because it sat-
isfies so well the needs which lead to mental
development, but also for another reason. As
with the people of olden times bravery was
considered the greatest virtue, so with boys of
this age and all ages. No other ethical idea
has such predominance as that of prowess.
Strength of body and a firm will characterize
those whom boys choose as their. leaders.
Hence the pleasure they derive from the ac-
counts of celebrated heroes of yore whose
bravery, courage, and prudence they admire.”

The editor further extols the advantages aris.
ing from the study of Homer, it making the
youthful students acquainted with the earliest
periods of Greek history, the manners and cus-
Introduction XVii

toms of the people, and he ends by quoting from
Herbart:

“Boys must first get acquainted with the
noisy market-place of Ithaca and then be led to
the Athens of Miltiades and Themistokles.”

With equal truth the American can say that
the child whose patriotism is kindled by the
Homeric fire will the more gladly respond to
the ideals set forth in the history of a Colum-
bus or a Washington.

Mary E. Burt.
PART I

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE LIFE
OF THE HERO, ODYSSEUS

CHAPTER I

ABOUT TROY AND THE JOURNEY OF PARIS TO
GREECE

On the northern shore of Asia Minor there
lies a plateau watered by many small rivers
and surrounded on all sides by mountains, only
on the north it slopes gently to the sea. On
this plateau, between the Simois and Scaman-
dros rivers, in the oldest times there stood a
very rich and powerful city, whose name was
Troy. It was the capital of a large and fertile
district, known as the Troad.

There, about 1200 B.c., reigned a king by the
name of Priam, possessed of great power and
boundless wealth, He had many sons and
daughters. It was said, indeed, that he had fifty
sons who were all married and living in their
own homes, which they had built by the king’s
wish around the royal palace.

They were all handsome and heroic young
men. One of the youngest, Paris, also named
Alexandros, surpassed the others in beauty.
He was a restless youth and not fond of his

3
4 Odysseus

home, as were the others. He had set his
heart on travelling and seeing strange coun-
tries and cities. King Priam was extremely
fond of his large family, and took pride in hav-
ing all his children about him, so that at first
he was greatly opposed to the wishes of Paris.
But the youth was so persistent and unhap-
py that the king at last consented to let him
go. Without delay, Paris called together a few
friends with tastes as adventurous as his own.
They embarked in a new ship well provided
with all that travellers need, and set sail for
the famous land on the shores of the “gean
Sea, of which they had heard so many wonder-
ful things, and which was called Hellas.
Nearly in the middle of the plain which
forms the southern part of Hellas was the city
of Sparta. It was on the river Eurotas, and
was the capital of a large district called Lace-
dzmon, and it was to this city that Paris came.
Now, there was a mysterious reason for this
strange desire of Paris—his passionate longing
to travel. In his early youth, while he was
still minding his herds on the rich pastures of
Mount Ida, he received a visit from the three
greatest goddesses of Olympos.
Hera, the queen of Heaven and consort of
Zeus—Athena, the goddess of wisdom, and
Troy and the Fourney of Paris 5

Zeus’s favorite daughter—and Aphrodite, the
goddess of love and beauty, had a dispute
among themselves.

Each thought herself the most beautiful of
the three, and they would have come to high
words about it had not Athena proposed that
they should ask the handsomest man in the
world to settle the question. This happened to
be the young royal shepherd, Paris. So the
three goddesses floated down to the slope of
Mount Ida on a snowy cloud and placed the
question before him, each promising to reward
him royally if he gave his verdict in her favor.

Paris, as might have been expected, decided
in favor of Aphrodite, who had promised him
that the fairest woman living in the whole
world should be his wife. This promise had
to be kept, being given by a goddess, but it
was the source of endless misfortune, for Paris
had a young and lovely wife who was tenderly
attached to him, while the fairest of living
women—acknowledged as such by fame in all
known countries—was Queen Helen of Sparta,
herself the wife of another man.

Her husband was one of the most renowned
_ heroes of Hellas, King Menelaos, a son of
Atreus and brother of the leader of the Greek
chiefs, Agamemnon, King of Mycene. It was
6 Odysseus

Aphrodite, then, who inspired Paris with an in-
sane desire to forsake his parents, brothers, and
wife. It washer secret guidance which led him
across the seas and through the dangers lurk-
ing among the hundreds of islands of the Ar-
chipelagos straight to the land of Lacedzemon.
This is the central of the three peninsulas
in which the Peloponnesus ends, and might be
called the middle finger of that large hand of
which Arcadia is the palm.

Paris landed, with all his companions, on
the shores of Lacedzmon, where the people
received him kindly and helped him on his
journey to Sparta, where Menelaos and Helen
gave him a cordial welcome.

CHAPTER II
THE FLIGHT OF HELEN

APHRODITE, while leading Paris to the shores
of Lacedzmon, had not forgotten her promise,
and in Sparta itself she was at work at its ful-
filment. She inspired Queen Helen with a
growing discontent and restlessness of spirit.
Menelaos had not noticed any change in her,
and it was with an utterly unsuspicious mind
The Flight of Helen 7

that he received the fatal strangers and made
them welcome guests in his land and home.

More than that, having heard the news from
Crete that his presence there was desirable on
account of some urgent business, he did not
hesitate to set sail for that island, in the expec-
tation of finding Paris and his companions still .
enjoying the hospitality of his palace after a
short absence.

This was the chance which wily Aphrodite
had contrived for Paris. He took the hint and
carried Helen away to his ship, together with
as much treasure as they could lay hands on,
and then they sailed for Troy. Little did he
heed, in his mad desire to call the most beauti-
ful woman in the world his wife, that she was
already the wife of a hero who had received
him as an honored guest in his house, and that
he was about to destroy the peace and honor
of his host.

As soon as Menelaos heard of the flight of
his wife, he hastened back to Sparta, where
he found his palace deserted and his treasure-
house robbed.

Then his heart was filled with great wrath.
He set out at once to see his brother, Aga-
memnon, to consult with him about what was
to be done. Agamemnon was ruler over My-.
8 Odysseus

cenz, and highly respected in all Hellas on
account of his power and riches.

After the two brothers had talked over this
grave affair, they announced to all the leaders
in Hellas the great and detestable crime, and
asked them for their assistance. All the king’s
chiefs of Hellas lent a willing ear to this de-
mand, for in this breach of hospitality, commit-
ted against one of them, each felt himself per-
sonally aggrieved and bound to help in the
punishment of what, in those times, was con-
sidered the most unpardonable of all crimes.
Only one of the kings held back for awhile and
needed much persuasion to join the league.
This was Odysseus of Ithaca, who could well
consider himself at the time the happiest of
mortals, for he had lately married Penelope,
one of the fairest and most virtuous maidens of
Greece. He had an infant son of great beauty.
and promise, and he owned much land and
countless herds of cattle, sheep, and swine.
Added to that, all the petty nobles of the isl-
and acknowledged him as their chief.

But a soothsayer, or seer, had greatly dis-
turbed him by informing him that if he went
to a great war he would be kept away from his
home for the space of twenty years, and even
then return to-it in the guise of a beggar, after
The Flight of Helen 9

having suffered wrecks, captivity, endless wan-
derings, and loss of comrades.

No one could doubt that Odysseus was brave,
but no one could blame him for wishing to be
excused from taking part in the war against
Troy. Menelaos and his brother, however,
would accept no excuse from him, as he was
the wisest and. craftiest of all the leaders, and
when Odysseus finally consented to join them
he set about arming and directing the young
Greek warriors with all his heart and soul.

There was another. young prince whom it
was absolutely necessary to secure, for a much
venerated oracle had given it as a decree of the
gods that Troy could never be taken without
his help. This was Achilles, son of Peleus,
king of the Myrmidons in Thessaly, and of the
beauteous ocean nymph, Thetis. Notwithstand-
ing his extreme youth, his father would not dis-
appoint the whole country, and he let him go
with those who came for him. But he sent
along with him his adopted son, Patroklos, who
was several years older, and to whom the boy
was passionately attached, and also his oldest
and most trusted servant, Phoenix. These two,
the old man and the youth, he charged, as they
‘hoped for the mercy of Zeus, to keep watchful
‘guard over Achilles, whose exceedingly impet-
10 Odysseus

uous and reckless temper exposed him to many
dangers which might be averted by a sensible
and loving word spoken in time.

The Greeks took counsel together, and it
was resolved that Menelaos should go in per-
son to Troy and demand back his wife, Helen,
as wellas his treasure and a suitable apology
for the wrong done to him and to all Hellas.
He chose for his companion the cunning Odys-
seus. On their arrival in Troy, Menelaos and
Odysseus presented themselves before Priam
and demanded the return of Helen and the
treasures.

The king at once called his people together
to deliberate upon the matter, and the two
Greek kings bravely denounced the mean act
of Paris. But the Trojans, stirred up by that
youth, abused the ambassadors and drove them
out of their city.

CHAPTER III
THE GREEKS SAIL FOR TROY

THE kings and chieftains of Hellas, having
heard that Odysseus and Menelaos had been
driven out of Troy, hastened to call together
their fleets and armies at Aulis, a city of
ya
a oe

4 N, os ee -


THE SILVER-FOOTED THETIS RISING FROM THE WAVES
The Greeks Sail for Troy tf

Beeotia on a ridge of rock running out into the
sea between two little bays, each of which
was a harbor for many ships. A hundred thou-
sand men and a thousand ships were gathered
there under the leadership of the celebrated
and heroic chiefs. The commander-in-chief of
the whole army was Agamemnon,

Among the renowned leaders were Menelaos,
the sagacious Odysseus, Ajax, and many others.
Just as they were offering a sacrifice to the
gods, in order to start out to the war with their
good will, a great miracle happened. A fear-
ful snake crept from under the altar and
climbed a tree in which there was a sparrow’s
nest nearly hidden by the leaves. There were
eight young sparrows in the nest, nine birds
with the mother. The snake devoured the
fluttering little birds, around which the mother
circled as if overcome by grief.

Then the snake darted at the mother-bird
and swallowed it, when Zeus changed the rep-
tile into a stone. The Greeks wondered at the
sight, but the soothsayer, Calchas, said to
them: “ Why do ye wonder at this? The all-
powerful Zeus has sent us this sign because
our deeds shall live forever in the minds of
men. Just asthe snake has devoured the eight
little sparrows and their mother, so shall the
12 Odysseus

war swallow up the nine coming years: and in
the tenth we shall overcome Troy.”

The ships of the Greeks lay in the tars of
Aulis while the warriors waited impatiently to
set sail. But the winds were contrary; they
would not blow, and the boats waited there year
after year; for a sacred hind had been slain
by Agamemnon, one that belonged to the god-
dess Artemis, and it was ordered by that god-
dess that no wind should arise to take them
on toward Troy until her wrath had been ap-
peased.

So Agamemnon went to Calchas, the seer,
and asked his advice, whereupon the old
prophet told him to send for his lovely young
daughter, Iphigeneia, and offer her up on the
altar as the only acceptable sacrifice to Arte-
mis. When he had placed her upon the altar
and the priest was raising his knife, the god-
dess took pity on Agamemnon and carried the
girl away in a cloud, leaving a fine white doe
instead.

And now arose a favorable wind, and the
Greeks arrived safely before Troy. How they
fought with the Trojans, how many of the he-
roes outlived the struggle, and how many fell
in the battle, all this we can learn from an old
book called the “ Iliad.” We shall select from


ODYSSEUS AND MENELAUS PERSUADING AGAMEMNON TO SACRIFICE IPHIGENIA
The Fall of Troy 13

it only those things which refer to our hero,
Odysseus ; and to complete the history of trat
hero we shall go to another book, called the
“ Odyssey.”

Both of these books are the work of the
great poet Homer, who lived many years after
the war with Troy. That we may understand
better what happened later on, we must give a
short account of the fall of Troy and of the re-
turn of Menelaos and Agamemnon to their own
country.

CHAPTER IV
THE FALL OF TROY

THE war lasted nine years, and in the tenth the
Greeks conquered Troy, not in battle, but by
means of a trick which had come into the mind
of Odysseus. He told a skilful carpenter to
build a wooden horse of gigantic size, and in it
he hid the bravest Greek warriors. When he
had done this he advised all the other Greeks
to depart without leaving anything behind
them, and so lead the Trojans to believe that
they had given up the fight and gone home.
14 Odysseus

So the Greeks burned their tenis and put off
to sea, while the Trojans from their walls
watched them with great joy, thinking them-
selves well rid of an enemy. When the last
ship had gone, the Trojans threw open the
gates of their city and rushed down into the
plain where the Greeks had had their camp, to
see how the place looked.

There they found the wooden horse, and one
of the Greeks tied to a tree, who told them he
was left there as a punishment, and that the
wooden horse was an offering to the gods.
The Trojans made up their minds to carry it
into their city and give it the best place on
their highest hill.

Then Laocoén, a priest of Apollo, stepped
forth, and said to them: “ Unhappy people!
what madness possesses you? Do ye think
the enemy gone? Do ye know Odysseus so
little? There are Greek warriors hidden in
this horse, or else some other mischief is lurk-
ing there. Fear the Greeks even when they
bring gifts.”

With these words, he thrust his spear into
the flank of the horse, and the arms of the hid.
den enemy clashed with aloud noise. Just then
two snakes of great size, sent by Athena, rose
from the sea, and sprang upon Laocoén and
Lhe Fall of Troy 15

his two sons, and, coiling around them, bit them
to death. The Trojans, in great fear at the
sight, took this as a sign from the gods that the
horse was sacred and that they must protect
it, and they moved it at once into their city,
breaking down a part of their wall to get it in.

Having done this, they gave themselves up to
feasting and making merry, without the slight-
est thought that any evil was in store for them.
But when night had come, and all were in a
deep sleep, the ships of the Greeks, which had
been hiding all the while behind a neighbor-
ing island, came back. The warriors who were
concealed in the wooden horse sprang out and
rushing wildly through the city, slew the Tro-
jans right and left without mercy. From all
sides came wailings and groans, and the flames
of the burning city rose up to the sky.

A deadly struggle took place between the
Trojans and the Greeks. Priam was slain, and
Paris and many other heroes. The victory
was to the Greeks. Troy fell never to rise
again, and the women and children were led
off to become slaves to their conquerors.

Thus was destroyed in one night the great
and glorious city of Troy, all on account of the
crime which Paris had committed against the.
laws of hospitality.
16 Odysseus

The trials of the Greeks were not yet at an
end. After their victory at Troy they em-
barked in their ships and started eagerly for
their homes. But Zeus prepared a sad fate
for them, because Ajax had violently dragged
Cassandra, the beautiful daughter of Priam,
from the altar of Athena and had made her his
slave. Thus many of the leaders perished in
the sea far from home, and some were cast on
foreign shores to die.

Menelaos was thrown by wind and waves on
the island of Crete, and he lost many of the
ships on the cliffs. Thence he strayed to the
island of Cyprus, noted for its mines; and he
roved through other lands until he came to
Egypt, where he wandered about for eight
years, when he returned to Sparta, taking
Helen with him. He became reconciled to his
wife, and they lived a quiet life far removed
from the enchantments of the wily Aphro-
dite.

But the saddest fate of all overtook Aga-
memnon, who met his death in his own house
at the hands of his wife and brother.

Agamemnon, without any accident at sea,
reached his native land. Full of gratitude, ne
kissed the earth and wept tears of joy at the
thought of meeting his wife and son.
The Fall of Troy 17

He entered his home with a glad heart, and
his faithless wife came to meet him, but she
had prepared a hot bath for him, and there he
met his death, entangled in a net which she
threw over him, for she had not forgotten the
loss of her beautiful daughter, Iphigeneia,
whom she believed to have been offered up as
a sacrifice on the altar of Artemis.

She was assisted in this dreadful deed by her
husband’s brother, who became ruler over the
land, holding sway eight years, when Orestes,
the son of Agamemnon, slew him and regained
the kingdom.

And now we come to the return of Odysseus,
the wisest of the Greeks, who wandered to the
remotest part of the earth and learned the cus-
toms of many people, and who suffered terribie
things by land and sea.

PART Il

THE RETURN OF ODYSSEUS TO
HIS OWN COUNTRY

CHAPTER V
ODYSSEUS ON THE ISLAND OF CALYPSO

ALL the Greeks who had escaped from the
destruction of Troy and had been spared the
terrors of the sea returned to their homes.
But the unfortunate Odysseus was delayed by
the fair nymph Calypso on her island, where
she made her home in a cool and beautiful
grotto. There he wept and mourned, desiring
to see his wife again and his nativeland. Each
of the gods save one, Poseidon, god of the sea,
wished to help him to find the way home.
Odysseus had brought Poseidon’s wrath upon
himself through inflicting a terrible injury
upon the favorite son of that deity, and for that
reason the wrath of the god fell on him and
he was wrecked. One day all the other gods
had assembled in the hall of Zeus, on Mount
Olympos, when Athena, the favorite daughter
of Zeus and firm friend of Odysseus, knowing
that her father in his heart was well-disposed
toward the hero, began to plead for him in a
way to excite greater pity still.

“O my father, thou great king among the

Qt
22 Odysseus

gods,” she said, “my heart is troubled on
account of the wise Odysseus, who lingers on
an island, far away from home, and suffers
greatly; for a nymph lives on the island, the
daughter of great Atlas, and with sweet words
she strives to make Odysseus forget his native
land. But he bewails his fate and is full of
sorrow, his only wish being to have a glimpse
of the smoke of his beloved country.”

Zeus thereupon ordered Hermes to depart
at once for the island and tell the nymph to
send Odysseus to his home without delay.
Hermes obeyed quickly. He bound his
winged sandals to his feet, and, taking his
golden wand in his hand, flew like a meteor
over land and sea till he reached the island
where the nymph Calypso made her abode.
He found her within the grotto, singing sweet-
ly while she wove a fine web on a golden loom.

All about the grotto there was a grove of
cypress-trees in which birds of gay colors were
sporting and springs of pure water bubbling,
and the fragrance of strange flowers filled the
air, When Hermes had gazed upon these
wonders he entered the grotto. It was bright
with a blazing fire on a spacious hearth, and
fragrant with the odor of burning cedar and
cypress.
Odysseus on the Island of Calypso 23

Calypso saw him as he came in and knew
him. She bade him sit down ona throne daz-
zling with jewels, and, placing a table before
him laden with nectar and ambrosia, invited
him to eat and drink. After he had finished
his repast, Hermes told her that Zeus had sent
him to her with the command that she should
send Odysseus without delay to his native
land. Having given this message, he disap-
peared, leaving Calypso in great grief.

Odysseus in the meantime sat by the shore
mourning and gazing out upon the sea. Ca-
lypso found him there, sitting alone, weeping
and longing for his home. She stood by him
and said: “Odysseus, my unhappy friend, do
not waste thy life any longer in sorrow. The
end of thy grief has come. Arise and prepare
to depart for thy home. Build thee a raft of
the trunks of trees which thou shalt hew down.
I will put bread and water and delicate wine on
board; and I will clothe thee in comfortable
garments, and send a favorable wind that thou
mayest safely reach thy native land.”

Thus spoke the lovely goddess, but Odysseus
could hardly believe her, and said: “I fear, O
goddess, that thou hast some other thought in
thy mind, and that thou dost not wish to send
me home when thou biddest me sail over this

{
24 Odysseus

stormy and dangerous sea. I shall never go on
to the raft against thy wish, and thou must
swear the great oath of the gods that no harm
shall come to me.”

The goddess smiled at these words, and, tak-
ing the hero by the hand, rejoined: “ Thou art
a wise man, and thy answer is well-made. I
will pledge thee a solemn oath, by the heavens
and the earth, and the waters of the Styx, that
I have no plan of evil against thee. And I
advise thee to do as I have instructed thee, to
be ready for any crisis.”

Speaking thus, the goddess went into the
grotto and Odysseus followed her. When he
had come into the spacious hall, he sat down on
his throne and the nymph brought him rich
food and wine. Then she took a seat opposite
him, and her attendants brought her ambrosia
and nectar, which she would gladly have shared
with Odysseus, that he, too, might become an
immortal.

When the repast was over, Calypso narrated
to him all the trials he would have to undergo
before he could reach his native land. While
she was relating these things the sun sank down,
and darkness came upon the island, and all who
had their abode in the grotto sought rest and
slumber.
CHAPTER VI

ODYSSEUS CONSTRUCTS A RAFT AND LEAVES
THE ISLAND

AT daybreak the goddess gave Odysseus a
large axe and a sharp adze, and led him to the
heights of the island, where the largest trees
grew. He went to work at once and cut down
twenty trees, which he hewed into proper
shape, and then tied them together with ropes
which he himself made of bark.

In this way he built a raft which was very
large and strong enough to stand the onset of
the waves. He wove a railing of willow and
fitted it around the sides of the raft, to protect
himself against the dashing waves; and he raised
a strong mast with sails shaped to it, and tightly
bound by cords and ropes. He filled the crev-
ices of the raft with wax and pitch and attached
a rudder.

At the end of the fourth day his work was all
done, and his little ship was ready to be launched.
On the fifth day the beautiful goddess prepared
the hero a bath and gave him new garments
fragrant with perfumes. She went down to.
the boat with him and put on board a skin of
26 Odysseus

dark-red wine, a larger one full of water, and a
bag of dainty food. Then she bade Odysseus
a kind farewell, and sent a gentle and friendly
wind to waft him over the waves.

Odysseus was wild with joy at the thought
that he was really on his way home once more.
He spread his sails to catch the breeze and took
his seat at the helm, steering the vessel with
great skill. He did not dare to take any sleep,
for he had to watch the sky and stars constantly
and use them as guides on his course. He
sailed along in this way seventeen days. On
the eighteenth he spied land in the distance.
It was the land of the Phzeacians, lying like a
dark spot off in the sea.

Then Poseidon, who was returning from Ethi-
opia, saw him, and his wrath grew hot against
the hero. He raised up his head and said to
himself: “Alas! the gods have strangely
changed their minds about Odysseus during
my absence in Africa. Behold! in a little
while he will be in the land of the Phzacians,
where he will find an end to his troubles.
Nevertheless, it is in my power to chastise
him.”

Speaking thus, Poseidon called the clouds to-
gether, and seizing his trident he stirred up the
sea; then he set loose all the winds until there
Odysseus Constructs a Raft 27

was a general hurricane, and he wrapped
heaven and earth in the thick darkness of
night.

The mighty waves dashed over the raft, and
Odysseus sank on his knees and trembled.
With a deep groan he said: “ Ah me, unhappy!
Am I to bear more disasters? I fear that the
warning of the goddess was too true, and that I
shall be fora long time cast about on the waves
before I reach home. With what dark clouds
Zeus has shrouded the sky! The storm grows
wild, What terrible waves are these! Help-
lessly I must perish. Happy the Greeks who
fell before Troy, fighting for their country!
Would that I, too, had met death the day when
the Trojans hurled their spears at me as they
strove to take the body of Achilles. If I had
died then, the Greeks would have buried me
with great honors. Now I shall die an inglo-
rious death.”

As he spoke a huge wave struck the raft
with such terrible force that it whirled it
around and overturned it. The helm was
wrung from his hand and he fell into the
angry breakers. The mast was snapped in
two and the ropes and sails flew off into the
sea.

Odysseus was under water a long time, striv-
28 Odysseus

ing in vain to come to the.surface. Finally he
rose, spitting the bitter brine out of his mouth.
Although he was in such a desperate plight, his
mind was on the raft. Battling bravely with
the waves he reached it, and springing on board
sat down in the middle of it. Thus he escaped
death.

The angry waves tossed him hither and
thither as the wind scatters the leaves over a
field. Then Ino, the daughter of Cadmus, saw
him and took pity on him. She took the form
of a bird, and, perching on his raft, she said to
him: “O, luckless man! why is Poseidon so
angry with thee? Fear nothing, however;
he cannot take thy life. Obey me and thou
shalt not suffer much longer. Lay aside thy
clothes, leave the raft to the mercy of the
winds and waves, and swim tothe land. Take
my veil and wind it about thy breast, and thou
shalt not have anything to fear. As soon as
thou hast reached the land, take it off and throw
it back into the sea. Then hurry away in-
land.”

Odysseus hesitated to follow Ino’s advice,
fearing some treachery. But Poseidon sent a
huge wave which struck him and scattered the
raft as if it were dry chaff. Then Odysseus at
once got astride of the swimming timber. He
Odysseus ts Saved 29

bound the veil around his breast and bravely
plunged into the boiling waters.

Poseidon saw him, and shaking his head he
said: “I verily believe thou wilt come out alive
from the sea. But the sea has had thee long
enough, so that thou wilt know its power here-
after and fear it.” Saying this he lashed up his
horses and drove off.

CHAPTER VII
ODYSSEUS IS SAVED ON THE ISLAND OF SCHERIA

ATHENA, the daughter of Zeus, seeing Odys-
seus struggling through the waves, pitied him,
and bade the winds become quiet. Two days
and two nights Odysseus floated about, but on
the third the wind calmed down and the sea
became smooth.

Ina short time he found himself near land
once more. But the shore was wild and full
of sharp rocks and high cliffs. He could see
no place on which to set foot, and he grew
downhearted. His knees gave way, and, groan-
ing deeply, he cried out: “O, luckless one! In
vain have I braved the dangers of the sea to
escape death. Now all hope has abandoned
30 Odysseus

me, since there is no way for me to get out ox
the water. I fear that when I try to approach
the land the waves will throw me against the
cliffs, and should I try to find a safe landing-
place by swimming, the surf may carry me
back into the wild sea, where some sea-monster
will swallow me up. Whatever I may do, I see
no help for me.”

While he pondered over these things a huge
wave cast him on the foamy shore. His bones
were nearly broken, and he lay exhausted until
the wave returned, when he was hurled again
with great force back into the sea. Now the
unfortunate wanderer took to swimming as his
last resort, and reached the mouth of a river,
where he was able to land.

Too tired to breathe or speak, he sank down
in a swoon. His knees and arms trembled,
and his whole body was bruised and swollen.
When his senses returned he rose and untied
the veil that Ino had given him and cast it back
into the sea. Then he knelt down and kissed
the earth, and moved to a sheltered spot where
a wild and a tame olive-tree were standing
close together, whose branches had mingled
with one another, and there he found a safe
hiding-place.

Then the godlike Odysseus lay down on a
Nausicaé ts Sent to the River 31

bed of dry leaves, covering himself up as one
does an ember, lest it should go out. Athena
came and poured sweet sleep over his eyes, that
he might find quiet rest after all his toils.

CHAPTER VIII
NAUSICAA IS SENT TO THE RIVER BY ATHENA

WHILE Odysseus lay in a deep sleep, the
goddess Athena went to the royal dwelling of
the king of the Phzeacians, Alkinods, in order
to hasten the return of Odysseus to his native
land. She entered the house, where she found
Nausicaa, the king’s daughter, sleeping in her
beautiful chamber. Near her lay two maids
who served her.

Athena came as softly as a breath of air,
and caused the szaiden to dream that her
marriage-day was near and that it was her
duty to arise and hasten to the place by the
river where they washed their clothing. In
her dream the princess seemed to hear Athena
say : “ Nausicaa, why art thou so slothful? Thy
beautiful robes lie neglected and thy wedding-
day is at hand. on which thou surely shouldst
32 Odysseus

wear garments of dazzling whiteness, and thou
shouldst give such garments to those maidens
who lead thee forth to thy bridegroom. There-
fore, as soon as day breaks thou must ask thy
father to give thee a pair of mules, and we will
hasten to the washing-place down by the river.”

At the first dawn of day Nausicaa went in
haste to her father and mother to tell them of
her dream. She found them in their splendid
hall. Her mother sat with her maidens spinning,
and the king stood on the threshold, just going
forth to meet his chiefs in council. The prin-
cess approached her father and said: “ Dearest
father, I pray that thou wilt give me two mules
and a wagon, that I may go with my maids to
the river and take all the clothes that need
washing, for it becomes the king and his sons
to wear clean garments when they go to the
council of the chiefs. Thou hast five sons,
three of whom are youths not wedded, and they
should be provided with fresh robes; they will
need them in the dance.”

The king smiled, for he saw what was in her
mind, and he ordered the mules. Then his beau-
tiful daughter brought from the linen-room the
soiled garments and put them on the wagon,
while the queen prepared a goodly lunch of
cold meat and bread and a skin of sweet wine.
Nausicad ts Sent to the River 33

Nausicaa further received from her mother
a bottle of fragrant oil with which to anoint
herself after the washing. Then she mounted
the wagon, seized the whip and reins, and drove
out of the city, the maidens of her train fol-
lowing her on foot.

When they came to the place where the river
was flowing bright and clear, they unhitched
the mules and let them browse along the bank.
Then they took their garments down from the
wagon and tossed them into the marble vats
which they had filled with the limpid water of
the stream. When they had washed them
clean they spread them on the white pebbles to
dry. Having finished the task, they took a bath
and anointed themselves with oil. Then they
sat down on the shore and ate their lunch.

The repast over, they began to play ball.
First the white-armed Nausicaa threw the ball.
She looked as tall and royal among her maids
as did Artemis, the daughter of Zeus, among
her nymphs.

Nausicaé sang a song as they frolicked on
the sand.

When it was time to go home they put the
clean garments upon the wagon and harnessed
up the mules. Just as they started, Nausicaa
34 Odysseus

once more threw the ball to one of the maidens,
who failed to catch it. The ball rebounded
from the rocks and fell into the river, at which
the girls raised such a shout that Odysseus,
who was sleeping close by, awoke.

He opened his eyes and sat up, saying to
himself: “ Woe is me! Have I reached a coun-
try where people dwell? Are they wild and
inhospitable, or friendly to the stranger and
god-fearing? It seems to me I heard cries of
women. Perhaps they were those of the
nymphs who inhabit the mountain heights, the
springs of rivers, and the green meadows, or
those of people who live near by. ButI will
see who they are.”

So Odysseus clothed himself as best he could,
by winding slender branches covered with
leaves about him, and left the thicket where he
was hidden. He went in the direction of the
voices, stalking along like a great lion. When
the girls saw him they shrieked and scattered
in every direction. Nausicaa alone stood her
ground, for Athena gave her courage. When
Odysseus saw her he wondered which would
be the better, to throw himself at the feet of
the maiden and beg her to give him some
clothes and to show him the way to the city,
or to speak to her with more formality.
Nausicaé is Sent to the River 35

It seemed better to him to remain at a dis-
tance, and so he addressed her gently, saying:
“© queen, I know not whether thou art a god-
dess or 2 woman. If thou art a goddess, I
should take thee to be Artemis, because thou
art so tall and graceful. If, however, thou art
a mortal, thrice happy thy father and honored
mother. Greatly must they rejoice when they
see their beautiful child in the choral dance.
But he will be the happiest who shall win thee
for a bride.

I once saw a young palm-tree growing up be-
side Apollo’s altar in the island of Délos. It
was the most beautiful tree the earth ever pro-
duced, and I gazed upon it with wonder and
reverence. So amI amazed at thy beauty, and
I fear to approach thee and throw myself as a
suppliant at thy feet, although I am in sore dis-
tress, for great misfortunes have befallen me.

It was only last night that I escaped from
the sea. On my way from Calypso’s isle I was
driven about for twenty days by the angry
waves ina violent storm. Now some god has
cast me on this shore to make me undergo new
trials, for I do not believe my sufferings have
come to an end. Have pity on me, O queen,
because thou art the first human being I have
met after so many misfortunes.
36 Odysseus

I do not know one person in this country.
Show me thy city, I pray, and give me an
old robe to wear, no matter how coarse and
poor, and may the gods bestow all blessings
upon thee.”

Nausicaé looked at Odysseus in pity and
answered: “ Stranger, thou dost not seem to me
to be a man of mean birth or breeding, and
thou art surely indistress. But it is Zeus who
distributes gifts to mortals, both the good and
the evil things of life, and thou must submit to
his will with patience.

Since thou hast come into our land devoid
of all things, even garments, and art helpless, I
will give thee clothing and tell thee the way to
the city. And I will tell thee about the people
living in it, for Iam the daughter of the king,
Alkinoés, who reigns over this island.” When
Nausicaé had spoken thus to Odysseus, she
turned to her maids and commanded them not
to flee from the wanderer, but to bring him
food and drink, since Zeus sent the poor and
the stranger to be cared for.

And she told them to lead him to some
lonely spot by the side of the river, where he
might bathe at his ease. So the maids came
back and led the hero to a sheltered place and
laid a cloak and tunic on the sand, and the
Nausicaii ts Sent to the River 37

bottle of oil which the queen had given Nau-
sicai, that Odysseus might anoint and clothe
himself after his bath; then they ran back to
the princess.

Odysseus bathed in the fresh water of the
river and washed the salt sea-foam from his
hair, and when the bath was over he put on the
robes that Nausicaa had sent. Athena shed a
halo of beauty over him and caused him to
look taller and stronger than before.

As he walked along the beach to rejoin the
maidens, they admired his noble and kingly
bearing, and Nausicai said to her maids:
“Surely this man does not come among our
godlike brothers against the will of the gods.
I thought him rough and homely, but now he
seems like one of the immortals. I would that
I might calla man like him my husband. Make
haste to give him food and wine, for he has
fasted a long time.”

The maids hastened to obey. They looked
over what was left of the abundant lunch and
bade Odysseus eat and drink, which he was
glad to do. The princess then yoked up the
mules and they started for home.
CHAPTER IX

ODYSSEUS ARRIVES AT THE PALACE OF
ALKINOOS

AFTER Nausicaa had mounted to her seat
on the cart, she said to Odysseus: “ Get ready
now, stranger, and we will lead thee to my
father’s palace, where thou wilt meet the chiefs
of the Pheacians. If thou art wise, take well
to heart what I shall say to thee. As long as
we are ata good distance from the city there
isno harm in going along with us. Just follow
close to the wagon with my maids,

But when we come near to the town thou
must go more slowly and tarry behind a little,
till we have reached my father’s hall, because
I dread the gossip of the baser sort of people
whom we may meet. After thou hast seen us
enter the city, then thou mayest enter it also
and inquire the way to the king’s palace. It is
very beautiful. Thou mayest easily find it by
thyself, for there is no other house in the city
as large as ours.

Enter at once and find my mother and sue
to her for protection and help, that thou mayest
reach thy native land and thy dear ones again.”
Ydysseus at the Palace of Alkinoods 39

Having spoken these words, Nausicaa touched
the mules with her long whip and they quickly
left the river, wending their way toward the
city. They reached it at sunset, but Odysseus
sat down in the sacred grove of Athena, outside
of the city to wait, and prayed to the goddess
that he might receive pity from the people of
Pheeacia.

While he prayed, the damsels went on and
soon reached the king’s palace. Nausicai’s
brothers came out and welcomed them, and un-
hitched the mules. When Odysseus had given
them time to get home, he arose and found his
way to the town. He had hardly entered it
when Athena, in the form of a young girl car-
rying a pitcher of water, met him.

“My daughter,” Odysseus said to her, “ canst
thou show me the way tothe king’s palace? I
am a stranger, and here for the first time.”
Athena answered him: “ With pleasure, stran-
ger; theking is our neighbor. Follow me, and
I will lead thee thither. But on the way do
not greet anyone or ask questions, for the peo-
ple here are not fond of those who come from
other lands.”

Thus spoke Athena and pursued her way
with Odysseus following her. She threw a veil
of darkness over the hero to hide him from
40 Odysseus

rude gazers. Odysseus beheld the beautiful
port with astonishment—the large ships, the
great market-place, and the high walls of the
city.

When they reached the palace, the girl
stopped and said: “This is the house of the
king. Go in without any fear, for they love
brave men, even when they come from afar.
The first thing to do is to find the queen,
whose name is Areté.

She is greatly honored by the king, and all
the people treat her as if she were a goddess,
on account of her gentleness and virtue. In
case the queen looks upon thee with favor, thou
mayest be sure of safely reaching home.”

Having spoken these words, the goddess
took a friendly leave of the hero, and he en-
tered the outer hall of Alkinods, where he was
bewildered by the splendor. The walls were
of brass, the doors of gold, and the thresholds
and lintels of pure silver. On each side of the
main entrance gold and silver dogs stood
guard. They were endowed with life and
were immortal, the work and gift of the divine
Hepheestus.

There were two rows of splendid seats
in the large dining-hall. They were covered
with costly mats, and the Phzeacian leaders
Odysseus at the Palace of Alkinois 41

were wont to sit there and enjoy themselves
Golden statues of boys with lighted torches in
their hands stood on beautiful pedestals and
spread light over the merry banquets. There
were fifty maid-servants in the palace. Some
of them were grinding corn in the mill. Some
spent their time in spinning and weaving, for
as the men were renowned sailors, the women
also were famous for making fine cloth.

There was a large orchard all around the
palace, surrounded by a thick hedge. In the
orchard there was a great variety of fruit-trees
—pear, apple, pomegranate, olive, and fig.
The trees were never bare of fruit, either in
summer or in winter, for an ever-blowing west
wind created such a mild climate that the trees
were constantly blooming and ripening their
fruit.

There was to be seen a tree full of blossoms,
while another bent down under the load of
ripe fruit. Thus it was with the grape-vines in
the vineyard close to the orchard. Some were
blooming, others had only begun to form fruit-
buds, while some were loaded with ripe clus-
ters ready for the wine-press. At the end of
the orchard there was a magnificent flower-
garden, in which the most fragrant flowers
were blooming. Two springs also bubbled
42 Odysseus

from the ground. One watered the orchara,
and the other ran to the very door of the pal-
ace, and all the people filled their pitchers
there. Such were the gifts Alkinods had re-
ceived from the gods.

CHAPTER X
ODYSSEUS IN THE HALLS OF ALKINOOS

AFTER Odysseus had contemplated these won-
ders to his heart’s content, he entered the main
hall. There he found the leaders of the Phe-
acians bringing offerings of wine to Hermes, as
the hour of sleep had arrived, and this was al-
ways their last ceremony before seeking slum-
ber. No one saw Odysseus as he crossed the
spacious room and came close to the king and
queen, for he was still concealed in the thick
mist which Athena had thrown round him.
Suddenly the cloud vanished, and Odysseus
threw himself at the feet of Areté, and raised
his voice in supplication.

“ Areté,” he prayed, “I have come to thy
husband and to thy feet through many hard-
ships and sorrows. May the gods give thee a
long and happy life. For many years I have
been a wanderer from home and all I love. I
Odysseus in the Falls of Alkinods 43

beg that thou wilt give mea guide and send
me to my own land.”

When Odysseus had spoken these words he
sat down amidst the ashes, close to the fire, and
all the guests grew silent and looked at him
with wonder. Then the oldest of the chiefs
arose and said: “Alkinods, this is not a royal
seat for a stranger, among the cinders of the
hearth. I pray thee, raise him up and place him
on a throne, and order the heralds to fill a cup
with wine, that we may pour a libation to Zeus,
the protector of suppliants, and bid the guest
welcome to our good cheer.”

Then Alkinoés arose and took Odysseus by
the hand. He led him to a splendid throne
but little lower than his own, while the herald
placed atable before him loaded with dainty
food. When Odysseus had eaten and drunk,
the attendants filled the cups to pour libations
in honor of Zeus, and Alkinods said to them:
“Listen, ye leaders and chiefs of the Phza-
cians. To-morrow we shall greet the stranger in
our palace with honors and offer a great sacri-
fice to the gods. And then we will consider
the best way of sending him home. But if we
should find that he is a god instead of a mortal,
we will do what seems best, for the gods do
sometimes visit us in human shape.”
44 Odysseus

Then said Odysseus: “ Nay, Alkinods, I am
not a god, nor like the gods inform or looks. I
am only a wanderer, and I could tell of fearful
sorrows; and I would willingly die if I could
only see my home once more.”

The guests all greeted Odysseus with ap-
proving words, and promised to aid him. Then
they rose, and each man went to his own home.

Odysseus remained in the hall with Areté
and Alkinoés. As they conversed, the queen
noticed the garments of Odysseus, because she
had woven them herself, and she said to
him: “Stranger, who art thou, and from what
land? Didst thou not say thou hadst come
here after many wanderings and voyages on
the stormy sea? Who gave thee garments of
my weaving ?”

Odysseus answered her: “It would not be
easy, gracious queen, to tell about all my hard-
ships and sufferings. Yet I will do thy bid-
ding. I was shipwrecked long since, and
thrown upon an island far out in the sea, where
Calypso, the daughter of Atlas, lives. She
cared for me most kindly, and would have made
me, like herself, an immortal, but I chose in-
stead the hope of seeing my own native land.

The goddess detained me seven long years
on her island before she bade me start for
Odysseus in the Falls of Alkinods 45

home. I built a raft, which she stored with
food, and she sent a pleasant breeze to carry
me across the waters. But Poseidon stirred
the winds and waves against me, and I was
thrown upon the shores of this island, near the
lavers, where thy daughter and her maids went
to wash the household linen. There the prin-
cess found me, and supplied me with food and
the garments I have on.”

“One duty my daughter left undone,” Alki-
nods said. “She should have brought thee
home with her.’ “Do not blame her, I en-
treat,” replied Odysseus, “for she bade me
come with her maids, but I lingered in a grove
to offer a prayer to Athena.” When Alkinoés
had heard this tale from Odysseus, he promised
once more to give him a ship and sailors to es-
cort him home.

Meanwhile the queen bade her servants pre-
pare a bed for the hero out on the portico, and
they covered a couch with shaggy rugs and
purple tapestries, where he could rest. Witha
grateful heart Odysseus arose, and, thanking
the king for his generous hospitality, sought the
bed, where he gave himself to happy dreams.

Odysseus rose early the next morning and
went with Alkinods to the market-place, close
to the sea, where all the Phzeacians had assem-
46 Odysseus

bled. The people gazed with admiration at
their stranger-guest, for Athena lent him great-
er dignity and beauty, and she went among the
crowds, moving their hearts to sympathy with
him.

Alkinods then addressed the assembled mul-
titude: “Hear me, ye chiefs of the Phzacians,”
he said. “This stranger has come to our land
after many wanderings and adventures. And
he asks me to send him back to his own coun-
try. Let us fit out a ship for him quickly and
launch it, and give him fifty-two young men
from among our best sailors, who shall get
everything ready for the long journey.

While they are doing this the stranger shall
come to my halls with the chiefs and princes,
where we will make a great banquet. Summon
also the bard, Demodokos, that he may enliven
the festival with his harp and songs.”

Having spoken, Alkinods rose and led his
guest back to the palace, the princes following
him. Fifty-two youths were soon chosen from
among the best seamen, and they launched a
ship speedily and went up to the royal palace.
CHAPTER XI
THE BANQUET IN HONOR OF ODYSSEUS

ALKINOOS now ordered a sumptuous feast in
honor of his guest. When the table was spread,
the herald who had gone for Demodokos came
in leading the bard, who was blind. The gods
had deprived him of sight, but had bestowed
upon him the gift of song. They gave him
a seat on a silver throne, amid the guests,
and hung his harp against a lofty pillar, close
above his head, where he could easily reach
it.

When all had eaten and drunk as much as
they desired, Demodokos took his lyre and be-
gan to sing about the heroes of Troy. It was
a song whose fame had reached over the whole
world, the story of a friendly strife between
Achilles and Odysseus before Troy, in which
Achilles held that Troy would fall by force,
but Odysseus maintained that it would come
to an end through the cunning of a few brave
Greeks.

All the guests enjoyed listening to the thrill-
ing song, but Odysseus was deeply touched, and
tears fell from his eyes. He brushed them
48 Odysseus

away stealthily, so that no one should observe
them, and drew a large purple veil over his
face until the song was finished, when he put
it away and took a goblet of wine, which he
poured out on the ground as a libation to the
gods.

Again the minstrel took his harp and sang,
and again Odysseus wept. Alkinods noticed
that the song of Demodokos moved Odysseus
to tears, and thought it might be well to stay
the music awhile and begin the games, that the
stranger might witness the athletic skill of the
Phzacians. All the princes instantly arose and
walked down to the market-place, the king
leading and the people following.

When the chiefs had taken their seats a great
number of young men hastened forward to be-
gin the games. Some of them darted over the
plain in a foot-race, raising a cloud of dust.
Others strove with all their might in wrestling-
matches, while some threw the quoit or played
at boxing and leaping. After they had enjoyed
looking at the games, Laodamas, a son of Al-
kinods, said to his friends: “Let us ask the
stranger to take part in the games. His strong
arms and legs and powerful neck show that he
is no weakling. Nor has he lost his youthful
vigor after all his hardships, although nothing
The Banquet in Honor of Odysseus 49

tires a man so much as being tossed about on
the sea.”

Then the friends of Laodamas advised him
to challenge Odysseus to take part in the
games; and this seemed right to the prince, so
he said to him: “ Father, I think thou must be
skilful in these games. Let us see thee try
them. We will not delay thee long. Thy ship
is ready for thee on the sea, and the crew is
there, waiting. But there is no greater glory
or pleasure for a man than to excel in swift-
ness of foot and strength of muscle.”

Odysseus answered him: “ Why dost thou
urge me, O Laodamas? How can I take part
in the games or find any pleasure in them after
all that I have suffered? Here I sit, a sup-
pliant, praying to be sent back to my wife and
home.” Then Euryalos scoffed at him, saying:
“Thou art right, stranger, for thy countenance
shows thou art anything but an athlete.

Methinks thou art the owner of some mer-
chant-vessel. Thou art a trader, whose head is
full of bargains. Such men can take heed of
nothing except how to increase wealth.”

These mocking words vexed Odysseus, and
he retorted : “ My friend, thou dost not speak
like a man of good mind. The gods do not
bestow their gifts equally on all men. To thee
50 Odysseus

they have given great beauty, but they have
denied thee wit. Thy words carry no weight.
Learn, then, that I am not unskilled in the
games. When I was young and strong I was
one of the best athletes. But even now, after
all my shipwrecks and hardships, I will strive
with thee, for thy words are offensive and chal-
lenge me to the proof.”

Having said this, Odysseus seized a much
larger and heavier quoit than the Phzeacian
prince could use, and swinging it in his power-
ful hand he hurled it forth. The stone whirred
through the air and fell to the ground away
beyond the marks of the other disks. Then
Athena took the form of a Phzacian and set
a mark where the quoit fell, and exclaimed as
she did so: “ Stranger, even a blind man could
easily find thy mark, for it is far beyond the
others. Sit down in peace and do not fear that
anybody else can throw so far.” Odysseus was
pleased when he heard these friendly words.
With a light heart he said to the Phzacian
youths: “ Reach my mark, if you can, young
men, and I will send a stone farther yet. But
if you cannot reach it, and prefer a match at
boxing or wrestling or foot-race, come forth. I
am ready to try any of the games with you. I
can throw a spear farther than any of you can
The Banguet in Honor of Odysseus 51

shoot an arrow. I fear nothing unless it may
be the foot-race, for I have lost my strength
with want of food and being tossed by the
waves.”

He ended, and King Alkinoés stepped for-
ward, for the young men were all silent.
“ Stranger,” he said, “thou art our dearly loved
guest, and no one can doubt thy bravery. We
do not boast that we are fine boxers or wrest-
lers. We excel in the dance and are unsur-
passed in sailing ships. Come, then, young
men, show your skill in dancing, that our guest
may tell his people when he reaches his home
how much we outdo all others in that art. And
let a herald hasten to the palace and bring
the lyre of Demodokos, which has been left
there.”

The young men arranged themselves in two
rows on the polished floors and began the dance,
while the minstrel, standing in their midst,
played on the lyre and sang most sweetly..
Odysseus looked on and greatly admired the
swift and rhythmical movements of their feet.
All danced very well; but two of the sons of
the king came out and danced alone, for none
of the others equalled them. One of them held
a golden ball in his hand, and bending back.
ward threw it so high that it seemed to touch
52 Odysseus

the clouds. The other sprang up and caught
it easily before it touched the ground.

They both danced, going through intricate
and rhythmical figures, while the other young
men stood around in a circle and clapped their
nands, keeping time. Then Odysseus said to
Alkinoés: “ Truly, no one excels the Phzacian
princes in dancing. I see the twinkling of their
feet with amazement.”

These words pleased Alkinods greatly, and
he said to his people: “ Listen, my chiefs, for
our guest seems to be a wise man. It becomes
us now to bestow upon him the gifts of hospi-
tality. In this land there are twelve kings.
Iam the thirteenth. Let each one of us bring
a fine cloak, and a tunic, and a talent of gold,
that our guest may see them before he partakes
of the evening banquet. And let Euryalos,
who spoke such scoffing words to him, try to
win back his friendship and bring a costly
gift.” All the chiefs approved the words of
King Alkinodés, and each one sent a servant to
his house to bring a valuable present.

Euryalos cheerfully obeyed the king. He
brought a brass sword with a silver hilt to
Odysseus, and said: “ My father, if I have ut-
tered any offensive word to thee, may the winds
scatter all remembrance of it. May the gods
The Banquet in Honor of Odysseus 53

grant thee a speedy return to thy country, where
thou shalt see thy wife and friends from whom
thou hast so long been separated.”

Odysseus answered: “ Hail to thee, also, my
friend! May the gods give thee all that there
is good, and may no need of this sword ever
come to thee.” Odysseus took the sword and
threw it across his shoulders.

The sun had set, and the servants carried
the gifts to the royal palace, where the queen
took care of them. King Alkinods led the way
to the palace, his guest at his side and the
princes following. When they had taken their
seats on high thrones, the king told his wife to
lay the royal presents in a chest, adding a much
richer cloak and tunic than anyone else had
given as a gift from himself.

Areté did as her husband wished, and placed
a beautiful cup of gold also in the chest, and
led Odysseus up to look at the presents. Then
she taught him how to lock the chest and un-
lock it, and her maids called him to a warm
bath, after which he anointed himself with fra-
grant oil and put on fresh garments.

While he was wending his way to the men
who sat before their wine, he met Nausicaa in
her goddess-like beauty, standing near a pillar.
“Stranger, farewell,” she said. “I wish thee
54 Odysseus

joy and a safe return to thy native land. Do
not forget that I was the first to befriend thee
in the land of the Phzeacians.”

Odysseus answered: “ May the gods be as
sure to favor my return to my home as I
shall be to make a prayer daily in thy behalf,
fair maiden, who hath saved my life.” Then
Odysseus entered the great hall and took his
place at the feast.

CHAPTER XII
ODYSSEUS RELATES HIS ADVENTURES

WHueEN they had all eaten and drunk to their
hearts’ content, the hero begged Demodokos to
sing about the invention of the wooden horse
with which Odysseus had artfully tricked the
Trojans to their own destruction.

The minstrel felt the inspiration of the song,
and began where the Greeks threw firebrands
into their own tents and sailed away from Troy,
pretending that they had given up the war.

He told how the Trojans wondered what to
do with the huge wooden horse which the
enemy had left in their city, whether to hew it
to pieces and burn it, or to drag it to the edge
of a high rock and throw it over, or whether to
Odysseus Relates His Adventures 55

spare it as an act of reverence to the gods.
This last was done, and in the night Odysseus
and his men came out of the great wooden trap
and set fire to the city while the men of Troy
slept.

As Demodokos sang, tears rolled down the
cheeks of Odysseus, but no one noticed his
weeping except the king, who said: “ It is bet-
ter to stop the song of Demodokos, as it does
not delight us all. Ever since the bard began
to sing, our guest has been weeping. He car-
ries some great trouble in his heart. Let the
song cease, and let us all make merry. Let no
grief mar our banquet. And, honored stranger,
tell us the name of thy father, and the city
which is thy home. Our seamen shall take thee
safely to thine own land, although there is a
prophecy that one of our good ships shall be
changed into a high rock, to stand forever in
front of our city, if we show such courtesies to
strangers.

Tell us truly.who thou art and whither thou
hast roamed, what tribes of men thou hast
seen, and why thou dost weep when the min-
strel sings of Troy. Didst thou lose a noble
kinsman there, or a dear friend? For a friend
is often dearer than a brother.” Odysseus. re.
plied: “In truth, O king, it is a pleasant thing
56 Odysseus

to listen to a bard like Demodokos, for his
voice is as sweet as the voice of a god.

And I cannot think of anything more de-
lightful than the joy of a contented people lis-
tening to a great poet and singer while seated
at a feast in a royalhall. But I pine to be at
home, and I will declare my name and tell the
story of my sufferings.

I am the chieftain Odysseus, son of Laertes,
and widely known to fame. I dwell in sunny
Ithaca, whose high mountains are seen from
afar, covered with rustling trees. Around itare
many smaller islands, full of people. Ithaca
has low shores on the east. It is a rugged
island, but it is the sweetest land on earth,
and has a noble race of mortals. When the
Trojan war was at an end, I started for home
with my twelve ships, but a contrary wind
drove us to Ismaros, the city of the Kikoni-
ans.

We captured it and put the inhabitants to
the sword. Then I exhorted my comrades to
fly, but, like madmen, they remained on the
sea-shore. Then they slaughtered a large num-
ber of sheep and oxen and made a feast. The
Kikonians called on their strong neighbors to
come and help them, and they came in swarms
with their brazen spears. They fell upon our
The Lotus-Eaters and the Cyclops 57

men and killed six of them from each ship,
and drove the rest back to their boats.

Brisk handling of our oars soon carried us
out into the sea, but Jove sent a hurricane that
tore our sails and split our masts, so that our
sailors drew them into the ships infear. Two
days and nights we lay helpless in our boats,
worn out with fear and grief, but the third day
the sun shone on us again, and we raised the
masts and sails to take the breeze, hoping to
reach our own land.

CHAPTER XIII
THE LOTUS-EATERS AND THE CYCLOPS

WE sailed onward in a westerly direction,
heading for the Grecian shore, and thought
our trials would soon be at an end. But in
this we were disappointed, for when we were
about to round the cape at the southern point
of Greece, we met an evil wind which always
blows there, and it drove us far to the east, be-
yond the island of Cythera.

Nine days and nine nights we were driven
about on the sea by the violent storm, and on
the tenth we reached the land of the Lotus-
eaters. These men eat flowers that look like
‘58 Odysseus

water-lilies, and they have no other food. We
landed on the shore of the mainland, and my
comrades took their evening meal close to the
boats.

When our hunger was satisfied, I sent out two
of the best men to explore the country about
and find out what sort of people the Lotus-
eaters were. I sent a herald with them, whom
they might send back with the news.

They soon found themselves among the
Lotus-eaters, who were gentle and friendly,
and gave them the lotus plant to eat. This
food is pleasant to the taste, but dangerous;
for anyone who eats of it loses all desire to
return to his own home. He forgets his cares
and troubles, but also his friends.

As soon as my comrades had eaten of the lo-
tus, they became attached to the Lotus-eaters,
and desired to remain with them. They wept
bitterly when I commanded them to return to
the ships, and I was obliged to force them to go.

I bound them down to the benches in the
ships, and the whole company went on board
in haste lest they should never think of their
homes again. Each man bent to his oars, and
the waves were soon white with the beating of
the ships against them as we sailed with all
haste in the direction of our own land.
The Lotus-Eaters and the Cyclops 59

We sailed about on unknown seas and with
sorrowing hearts until we came to the land of
the Cyclops. They are a wild people who have
no laws. They never plough the fields nor plant
them, for everything grows of its own accord
—wheat, and barley, and the vine. The grapes
yield good wine. The Cyclops do not come
together in a friendly way, but live in caves
near the mountain tops, each one in his own
den. They do not care much for one another,
and each rules his wife and children as he likes.

There is a little woody island lying at the
entrance to the land of the Cyclops, on which
swarm numberless wild goats, never disturbed
by human beings, for the Cyclops have no ships
to take them over. This island is very fertile,
but there are no sheep to eat the grass and
no. people to plough the fields. The goats are
the only inhabitants. The island has a harbor
which is safe, and the ships that enter it have
no need of anchors or fastenings.

In the midst of the harbor there is a cliff,
from which bubbles forth a spring of excellent
water, and poplar-trees grow all around it. The
soil is so rich it might bear all kinds of fruit, if
there were anyone to plant them. There are
beautiful meadows all along the coast, which
are gay with yellow fruit and pink blossoms.
60 Odysseus

We were shaping our course toward this
island, and a good breeze brought us there on
a dark night. The moon did not shine and
none of the crew saw the land until we were
upon the shore. We lowered our sails and
rested there until morning. When daylight
appeared we beheld with wonder the island
where the wild goats abounded. My comrades
walked around, admiring the beauty of the
place, while the nymphs, daughters of Zeus,
roused the goats that they might give us milk.
We took our bows and arrows from the ships
immediately and, forming three hunting-parties,
killed a great number of the nimble creatures.
Each of my twelve ships received nine goats as
its share, but mine received ten. The remainder
of the day we passed in eating and drinking.

CHAPTER XIV
THE CAVE OF THE CYCLOPS

THE next day I started with twelve men, the
crew of my own ship, to find out what kind of
men inhabited the country opposite us, leaving
all the other boats and their men on the island:
When we sailed up to the coast of the main-
land, we heard the voices of giants, and the
The Cave of the Cyclops 61

bleating of their sheep and goats. And we saw
a cave with a high roof, over whose entrance
grew laurel shrubs, and many cattle, sheep, and
goats were lying around at rest. We found an
enclosure of rough stone in the form of a court,
with tall pines and leafy oaks at the mouth of
the cave.

The largest giant of all the race of Cyclops
dwelt there and took care of his cattle all alone.
Usually he spent his time prowling all by him-
self around the mountains. He had nothing to
do with his neighbors, but led a solitary life,
plotting wicked deeds. He looked more likea
huge mountain top, with shaggy overhanging
forests, towering above other mountains, than
a human being.

We were soon inside the cave, but we did not
find the owner at home. We had carried with us
a wine-skin full of wine which a priest of Apol-
lo had given us. The wine was very fragrant
and so pleasant that no one who had once tasted
it, could let it alone. We had taken along a
basket of food also, for fear of meeting with
men of great strength and no sense of the
courtesy due to strangers.

As we looked around the cave we wondered
at what we saw. There were baskets all about
heaped with cheeses, and pens of lambs sepa.
62 Odysseus

rated into three folds, the older in one pen,
the younger in another, and the youngest in a
third. And there were pails full of whey, and
buckets of milk. My companions ate as much
of the cheese as they liked, after which they
begged to drive all the lambs and kids down
to the ship.

But I would not allow this. It was my wish
to stay there and see the cave-dweller and find
out what kind of a man he was. I thought he
would give me a handsome present, according
to the laws of hospitality. It was cold in the
cave, so we lit a fire and sat down to wait for
the owner to arrive.

He came toward evening, carrying a load of
wood on his back, which he threw down with
such a crash that my men ran with terror
into the corners of the cave. The giant drove
all such sheep and goats as would give him
milk into the cave, leaving the others in the
outside court, and then closed up the entrance
with a rock so large that twenty-four four-
wheeled wagons could not have moved it.
Having done this, he sat down and milked the
sheep and goats and gave to each its young one.

Next, he curdled half of the milk and put
the curd into woven baskets, but he kept the
other half for his evening meal. When he had
The Cave of the Cyclops 63

ended this work he lit a fire, and seeing the
strangers he began to ask them questions, to
find out who they were. His voice was deep
and frightful, like the rumbling of a volcano,
and our hearts trembled, but I found words to
answer him: ‘ We are Greeks, and come from
Troy. It was our intention to return home,
but contrary winds have driven us on this
shore.

We belong to the army of Agamemnon,
whose fame is very great because he has over-
come a strong city and conquered many na-
tions. But now we throw ourselves at thy feet
and pray that thou wilt receive us as guests, or
else give us the gifts that are due to strangers,
lest the gods avenge us.’

Having said this, I stopped, but the Cy-
clops told us that we were fools to believe in
the gods. ‘The Cyclops,’ he said, ‘care noth-
ing for the gods. We are better than they are.
If I spare thee it will be of my own free will,
and not for fear of the gods. But where are
thy ships? Are they near here or far off?’
This he said hoping to deceive us, but I saw
through his trick, and replied: ‘The storm
has thrown our ships upon the cliffs and broken
them to pieces, and we had to swim for our
lives.’
64 Odysseus

The cruel monster did not answer me again,
but he seized two of my companions and
dashed them to the ground with such force
that they died on the spot. He devoured them
as a lion devours his prey. He left nothing
of them, neither bones nor flesh nor hair. We
wept aloud and prayed to Zeus with our hearts
full of despair.

CHAPTER XV
THE BLINDING OF THE CYCLOPS

WHEN the monster had filled himself with
food, he stretched out on the floor of the cave
to sleep. Then the thought came to me to
thrust a sword into his heart. But this was
not a wise course to take, because we should
never have been able to remove the stone from
the entrance to the cave.

We passed the night in mourning and lamen-
tations. As soon as daylight appeared, the
Cyclops woke up and lit a fire and milked his
sheep again. Then he seized two more of my
companions and devoured them. When his
morning meal was done he rolled the stone
back from the door and drove his beasts out,
not forgetting to secure the entrance. We
The Blinding of the Cyclops 65

could hear his noisy shouts afar off as he led
his flocks over the grassy heights, and we be-
gan to make plans to destroy him.

We found a great club of green olive-wood
in the cave; one that the Cyclops had cut for
his own use. It was as large as the mast of a
ship, and he had laid it away to dry. I cut off
a fathom’s length from this club and handed
the piece to my companions, who smoothed off
its sides and sharpened it at one end. This
being done, I put the sharp end of it into the
fire. The stick became very hard, and then I
hid the weapon under a heap of litter which
was piled up in the cave. We cast lots to see
who should assist me to put out the eye of the
Cyclops when he was asleep.

When evening came the Cyclops returned
to the cave with his fat sheep and kids. He
seemed to suspect that there was mischief afoot,
for he did not leave any of them outside.
After milking the ewes and goats he again
seized two of my companions and made his
supper of them. But I filled a large drinking-
vessel with the wine from our wine-skin and
stepped boldly out and said to him: ‘Here is
a cup of wine which I brought, hoping that
thou wouldst spare my life, O Cyclops, for thy
wrath is boundless.’ He took the cup and
66 Odysseus

drank. The wine delighted him greatly, and
he handed me the cup after emptying it and
said: ‘Give me another draught and tell me
thy name. I will give thee a generous gift,
such as becomes a host. We, too, have wine,
but not such as yours. That tastes like nectar
and ambrosia.’

Three times I filled the cup and brought it
to him, and three times the Cyclops drank it
like a madman. When the wine had over-
powered him, I said to him: ‘Cyclops, thou
dost wish to know my name, and I will tell it,
but thou must give me the present thou hast
promised. My name is Nobody. My father
and mother gave me this name and my friends
all call me by it.’ ‘Then,’ said the Cyclops,
‘I shall eat Nobody last of all. This is my
present.’

After these words he fell asleep and, being
very drunk, he began to spew out the wine ancl
flesh he had taken. I took the piece of olive-
wood which my men had sharpened and put
the point of it into the fire and held it there
until it was a glowing coal. My comrades
stood near me and I encouraged them with
brave words. We thrust the burning stick
into the Cyclops’ eye and put it out. He
howled with pain, and, stung to madness,
Odysseus Leaves the Cyclops 67

he seized the stick and flung it across the
cave.

He called to the other Cyclops, who lived
in divers caves on the surrounding mountains,
while we hid ourselves in fear in the most
remote corners of the cave. The giants heard
him and came running to help him, but they
could not get into the cave. They stood near
the stone, close to the door, and called out:
‘What ails thee, Polyphemus? Is anyone
trying to kill thee?’ ‘Woe is me!’ cried
Polyphemus, ‘Nobody is trying to kill me.’
‘Then why dost thou shout and cry for help?’
said they. ‘If nobody hurts thee, then thou
art not hurt.’

With these words they went off, and we re-
joiced greatly that my trick had deceived them.

CHAPTER XVI

ODYSSEUS AND HIS COMPANIONS LEAVE THE
LAND OF THE CYCLOPS

POLYPHEMUS, groaning with pain, tried to
feel his way with his hands to the mouth of
the cavern. Having succeeded in this, he
rolled back the stone and sat down at the
entrance and stretched out his hands in order
68 Oaysseus

to catch us if we should happen to try to get
out among the sheep.

But we were not so foolish as to be caught
in this way. There were in the cave a number
of stout and woolly rams. Of these I put three
abreast and tied them together with twigs that
happened to be in the cave. Under each mid-
dle ram I tied one of my companions. The
two sheep, one on each side of him, hid the
man completely. For myself I selected the
stoutest ram of the flock, and, seizing his long
shaggy wool with my hands, held fast to him
with my knees and arms.

The sun rose and the animals began to hasten
out to the pastures. The Cyclops, though
nearly exhausted with pain, passed his hands
over the backs of the sheep to find out whether
any of us were trying to ride out of the cave.
He did not find out our trick, and my com-
panions all escaped safely. Last of all, the ram
that carried me came to the door, because I
was so heavy that he could hardly walk with
me hanging to him.

Polyphemus felt of his back and recognized
him at once as his favorite ram, and said:
‘Dearest of all my sheep, why dost thou ge
last? Commonly thou wert the first of the
flock to hasten to the rich pasture and the coo}
Odysseus Leaves the Cyclops 69

spring, just as thou wert the first in the even-
ing to return to thy manger. But to-day thou
art last of all. Dost thou grieve because thy
master hath lost his eye, which Nobody has put
out? But wait a little. He shall not escape
death. Couldst thou only speak, my ram, thou
wouldst tell me at once where the scoundrel is;
then thou shouldst see how I would dash him
against the rocks.’

Speaking such words as these, he let the ram
go. When we were safely out of the cave, we
gladly took to our feet and drove the fat sheep
down to our boat with all haste. Our friends
received us with tears of joy, for they thought
we had surely perished. I made signs to them
not to weep aloud, and to hurry the sheep on
board the ship. They did this with all haste,
and each man took his place at the oars.

When we were beyond the reach of the
Cyclops, I called out to tease him, ‘Ha! Cy-
clops, Cyclops, thou hast not been entertaining
a coward. Zeus and the other gods have
avenged the brave men whom thou didst so
cruelly destroy.’

The Cyclops heard my words and grew furi-
ous. He seized a large rock and threw it with
all his might toward the place where he had
heard my voice.
70 Odysseus

The rock fell in front of my ship, and the
waves which it raised carried us back on shore.
I seized a large pole and shoved the boat back
into the water, commanding my men to ply
their oars vigorously, that we might escape de-
struction. My companions begged me not to
excite the dangerous monster further ; but when
we were a long way out I shouted to him:
‘Cyclops, if ever anybody asks thee who put
out thine eye, tell him it was Odysseus, the son
of Laertes, conqueror of Troy.’

When Polyphemus heard these words he
gave a deep groan, and said to me: ‘Truly did
the wise seer, Telemos, foretell that I was to
be blinded by Odysseus. But I thought there
would comea large and powerful man, not such
an insignificant little fellow who would cheat
me with wine. Come back, Odysseus, and let
me bestow upon you the gifts which are due to
strangers. I will pray to my father, Poseidon,
to give thee a safe and speedy return to thy
native land. He can restore my eye whenever
he will, so I cherish no anger against thee.’

I knew his deceit, however, and replied: ‘I
would rather take thy life, and send thee down
to the dark halls of the dead, where thy father
could never restore thy sight.’

As soon as Polyphemus heard this, he raised
Odysseus Leaves the Cyclops 71

his hands to heaven and prayed to Poseidon.
‘My father, he said, ‘hear me, if in truth ]
am thy son. Grant me thisprayer. May Odys.
seus never return to his own country, or, il
it be thy will that he reach home and friend
again, let his return be late and sorrowful,
May his comrades all be lost, and may he ga
back in a borrowed ship, and find new troubles
waiting for him in his house.’

Poseidon was moved to wrath against me by
this prayer, and determined to take vengeance
on me. The Cyclops seized another stone, much
larger than the last, and swinging it round,
threw it at us with tremendous strength. It
fell close to the ship, but this time it drove the
boat out into the sea and in the direction of the
island where we first landed.

When we reached the island we found the
friends we had left there waiting anxiously for
our return. My men drew their boat up on to
the smooth sand and stepped upon the beach,
taking the sheep along with them. Each man
took an equal share, but they gave me the ram
which had saved my life. We took him out
upon the beach and offered him up as a sacri-
fice to Zeus.

_ But sacrifices were vain, for Zeus had more
evil for us in his mind. We spent the rest of
72 Odysseus

the day on the island, eating and drinking, and
when the sun went down we camped on the
shore for the night. In the morning I called
my men to climb the decks and cut the ropes
that kept us fastened to the shore. With all
speed they went aboard and took their oars in
hand and set sail for home, glad to escape, but
sorrowing for our lost companions.

CHAPTER XVII

THE ADVENTURES OF ODYSSEUS ON THE
ISLAND OF AOLUS

WE sailed about on unknown seas for many
days, when we reached the island where olus
made his abode. This island was surrounded
by smooth rocks and guarded by a wall of
shining brass.

£olus had twelve children, six sons and six
daughters, and they banqueted on an endless
variety of meats from day to day all the year
round. Zolus was a kindly, genial god; he
was master of the winds, and one could hear
the music of sweet pipes in his halls all day,
and the air was fresh and fragrant there.

Zolus welcomed us hospitably and kept us
with him a whole month. He inquired of the
On the Island of olus 73

fate of all our companions in the war with Troy,
and we stated what had happened to them.
Then we prayed him to send us home, and the
god very kindly gave us a sack made of skin
in which he had tied up all the contrary winds,
leaving only the west wind free to carry us
safely home.

I took the great bag of winds and bound it
fast to the main mast of the ship with a silver
chain, so that no rude wind could escape and
blow us out of our way. We sailed along nine
days and nine nights, blown by the friendly
breeze from the west, and on the tenth we saw
in the distance the mountain tops of Ithaca and
the fires along the shore.

And now I was overcome by a heavy sleep,
for I had been guiding the ship, not daring to
trust it to the hand of any of the crew. While
I lay unconscious of what was going on, my
companions talked among themselves and said
they believed that the bag which olus had
given me contained vast amounts of gold and
silver. And they spoke with great jealousy of
the prizes which I had received wherever we
had landed, while they went empty-handed.

The more they talked to one another the
more jealous and angry they grew. They un-
tied the sack and the winds rushed out, much
74 Odysseus

to their astonishment, and seized the ship, driv-
ing it round and round ina furious storm. I
started out of my sleep suddenly and found the
bag open I had so carefully guarded and my
companions weeping bitterly.

For a moment I had a mind to throw myself
into the sea and make an end of my troubles
forever. But the thought came to me that such
an action would not be noble, so I hid my head
in my mantle and lay down in the bottom of the
ship while the violent winds and towering waves
drove us back to the island we had left. We
landed there again, and, having partaken of
some food and wine, I sought the halls of Aolus.

I found the king and his wife and children at
table taking their evening meal. When Aolus
saw me he was amazed, and asked me what had
happened to me. I told him about the sense-
less action of my companions, and begged him
to assist me once more. But with a terrible
voice hereplied: ‘Begone as fast as thou canst
out of my island. I will not befriend a man
who is hated of the gods.’ In this unkind way
he sent me off, and we sadly entered our ships
and made for the open sea, trusting to the
mercy of the winds.
CHAPTER XVIII
ODYSSEUS AT THE HOME OF CIRCE

For six days and six nights we sailed without
interruption, but on the seventh day we reached
_ the city of the Lestrygonians. There the past-
sures are so rich in grass that the fields, which
are grazed by one flock of sheep during the day,
yield abundant food for another flock by night.
The inhabitants were not only inhospitable, but
they received us with a shower of stones, which
they hurled at us and at our galleys. They broke
our ships and killed my companions, spearing
them like fish. Then they carried them ashore
to be devoured. Withthe greatest difficulty I
succeeded in saving one ship and a few com-
panions from the hands of these giants, and I
- fled with them out to the high sea.

* Sadly we continued our course until we
reached an island, where the goddess Circé, a
daughter of the Sun and Ocean, lived. We
landed silently, and gave two days and
nights to rest, for we were worn out with toil
and grief. On the third day I climbed to the
top of a high hill and looked over the island.
Down below I saw a marble palace, surrounded
76 Odysseus

by a thick forest. There was smoke rising
from the grounds, so I resolved to return to my
men and send out some of them to look about
and explore.

A large stag ran down into my path, on his
way toa river to drink, and I thrust my spear
through him and flung him across my neck and
took him to the ship. I threw him at the feet
of my men, who were astonished at his size.
They prepared a banquet at once, and we
feasted upon the meat.

That night we slept on the shore again, and
in the morning I told them that I had seen a
palace standing in a thick wood, and that I
wanted to send several men there to try to
get food. When my companions thought of
all their comrades who had been slain they wept
aloud. But their tears were useless. I divided
them into two equal bands, and we cast lots to
see which party should make the adventure.

The lot fell to Eurylochos and his band of
men. They started forth, and soon came to a
beautiful valley, in which was the splendid
house of Circé, which was built of well-hewn
stone. There were beasts of prey, lions and
wolves, around it. The animals were tame;
they wagged their tails and fawned like dogs,
but the men were afraid of them. Circé was
Odysseus at the Home of Circe 77

weaving in the paiace and singing a beautiful
song. She had bright, sunny hair and a sweet
voice. The men heard her as she went back
and forth weaving, and they called aloud. She
came to the door and threw it wide open and
bade them enter.

Eurylochos alone did not go in, for he
feared that some evil would come of it. The
others followed her, and Circé seated them on
thrones and gave them food and wine, but in
the wine she had secretly infused a magic juice
which made them forget home and friends and
all desire to see their native land.

When they had eaten and drunk to their
hearts’ content, she waved her wand over them,
and at once the poor wretches were changed
into grunting pigs, which she shut up in pig-
sties and threw acorns and other food fit for
swine before them. Although thus transformed
and covered with bristles, they still retained the
human mind.

Eurylochos stayed a long time outside await-
ing the return of his companions. But as they
tarried so long, he hastened back to the ship to
tell the news. Thereupon I quickly hung my
sword over my shoulder and, taking my bow
and arrows, hurried off alone, and soon found
myself not far from Circé’s palace.
CHAPTER XIX

CIRCE INSTRUCTS ODYSSEUS CONCERNING HIS
DESCENT TO HADES

As I lingered in that dangerous valley there
appeared to mea youth whom I knew at once
to be Hermes, the messenger of the gods. He
gently took hold of my hand and, looking com-
passionately on me, said: ‘Thou most unhappy
man! Why art thou roaming alone in these
wild parts? Or art thou bound on the errand
of delivering thy friends who have all been
changed by Circé into swine? Much doI fear —
that thou mayest meet with the same fate.
Listen to my words and heed them well if
thou wouldst destroy the treacherous schemes
of Circé.

Take this little flower. Its name is Moly
among the gods, and no wicked sorcery can
hurt the man who treasures it carefully. Its
root is black. Its blossom is as white as milk,
and it is hard for men to tear it from the
ground. Take this herb and go fearlessly into
the dwelling of the sorceress; it will guard thee
against all mishap. She will bring thee a bowl
of wine mingled with the juice of enchantment,
Circé Instructs Odysseus 79

but do not fear to eat or drink anything she
may offer thee, and when she touches thy head
with her magic wand, then rush upon her
quickly with drawn sword as though about to
slay her. She will crouch in fear and entreat
thee with soft words to spare her. But do not
give way to her until she has pledged herself
by the great oath of the gods to do thee no
harm.’

When Hermes had spoken thus he left me, to
return to high Olympos, and I walked to the
house of Circé with a braver heart. AsI came
near the palace I called out to the goddess with
a loud voice, and she threw open the doors for
me to enter. She bade me sit down on a beau-
tiful throne and placed a golden foot-stool under
my feet. Then she gave me the dangerous cup
and I drank it off, but her charm did not work.

Scarcely had I drained the cup when the god-
dess struck me with her wand and said: ‘ Off
with you! Go to the pigsty, where friends
await thy coming!’ In a twinkling I had my
sword in hand and rushed upon her as if to
kill her. Circé shrieked with fear and fell on
her knees to implore my mercy. ‘Who art
thou and whence dost thou come?’ said Circé.
‘Thou art the first man over whom my magic
wine has had no power. Art thou really that
80 Odysseus

Odysseus of whom Hermes told me that he
was to come here after many wanderings?
But put up thy sword and cease to be angry
with me and let us trust each other.’

I answered her: ‘O, goddess, how can I
have faith inthy words, since thou hast changed
my companions into swine and dost plot the
same fate for me? Swear me the great oath
that thou wilt not harm me, and I shall trust
thy words.’

Circé at once took the great oath, that she
would never again try to do me any harm, and
she ordered her servants to spread a feast be-
foreme. But Ihad no desire to eat. I sat down
in silence, my mind full of grief and doubt.

When Circé saw that I did not touch the
food she said: ‘Why art thou so quiet and
speechless? And why dost thou not taste the
food and wine? I have pledged myself by the
great oath to do thee no harm!’ But I an-
swered: ‘What man with a loyal heart, O
goddess, could eat and drink with any pleas.
ure while his comrades are kept in bondage
and degradation? If thou art really kind and
wouldst have me enjoy this bounteous feast,
O let me see my dear companions free once
more!’

The goddess took her wand and went to
Circe Lustructs Odysseus 81

the pen and drove out the swine. She then
anointed them with a magic ointment, and
their bristles fell off and they stood up and
were menagain. They knew me, and each one
seized my hand, shedding tears of joy. Then I
sent for the rest of my men at the ship, who
eagerly came up, and together we entered the
halls of Circé, all of us weeping with joy.

Circé’s heart was softened also, and she said
tome: ‘Son of Laertes, noble Odysseus, do not
weep and grieve any longer. I know what
hardships thou hast endured on land and sea.
Take courage, for thy sufferings will soon be
at an end. Go down to the sea and hide thy
boat near the shore and come back to my halls,
thou and all thy men, where I will make it a
happy home for all until thou art rested and
ready to sail again for thy native land.’

We stayed a whole year on the island of
Circé, feasting and enjoying ourselves, and fully
recovered our strength. The desire of reach-
ing my beloved Ithaca grew stronger within
me day by day, and at last I begged Circé to
allow us to depart. ‘I am not willing, O son of
Laertes,’ Circé answered, ‘that thou shouldst
remain here against thy wish, but it is neces-
sary that thou shouldst, before departing from
my island, descend into Hades, to the palace of
82 Odysseus

Pluto and Persephone, to consult the spirit t
the Theban seer, Tiresias, on whom Perseph-
one has bestowed the priceless gift of pre-
serving his memory even in Hades, whereas all
the other souls are moving about as empty
shadows.’

Hearing this, I grew desperate and no longer
had any desire to live or see the light of day.
I said to the goddess: ‘ Who will show me the
way to Hades? for no living mortal has ever
gone there before.’ She replied: ‘Do not
worry about a guide, Odysseus, for there will
be no need of one. Launch thy boat, unfurl
the sails, and quietly sit down. The north wind
will waft thee to the shore of Hades. There
flows the river Styx, black and terrible. It
flows between the poplars and willows in the
groves of Persephone, and meets the broad
waters of Okeanos. Sail up its dark stream
until thou dost reach the rock where its two
branches meet and swirl and roar. There
leave thy boat and dig a ditch in the ground, a
foot deep and a foot wide, in which thou shalt
pour honey, milk, wine, and water as an offer-
ing to the dead.

At the same time pray to the gods of Hades,
and promise the shades of the dead that after
thou hast arrived in Ithaca thou wilt sacrifice
Circé Instructs Odysseus 83

to them a whole heifer, the best of thy flock,
and to Tiresias especially a black ram. Then
take two sheep, a male and a female, kill them,
and burn them as a sacrifice to the nations of
the dead.

At once there will arrive the souls of the
departed. They will come by thousands, anx-
ious to drink of the blood, that they may have
their minds again. But draw thy sword and
hold them’ back until the spirit of Tiresias ar-
‘rives. He will tell thee how to get back to thy
native land.’

As Circé said this the daylight appeared, and
I woke my companions and told them to make |
ready to go with me. We started at once for
our ship, and got everything in readiness to.
leave. I told them that before setting out for
our own country we had, by the advice of
Circé, to go down to Hades in order to consult
the seer Tiresias about our journey. When
they heard this they sat down, and wept, and
began to tear the hair from their heads.

Circé meantime came up by stealth, and put
two sheep into the ship, and we sailed sadly
away.
CHAPTER XX
THE ADVENTURES OF ODYSSEUS IN HADES

WITH a heavy heart we sailed from Circé’s
island bound for the gloomy Hades. As the
wind was favorable, we soon reached the place
of which the goddess had told us. There we
left the ship and did those things which Circé
had counselled us to do. As soon as the dark
blood of the sheep began to flow into the trench
countless souls came flocking from Hades and
begged to taste of the blood, that their mortal
minds might be restored to them.

Young wives and girls, old men and young
warriors who had fallen in battle, airy forms,
ghosts of all kinds of people, flitted like bats
around me in that dark place with fearful cries,
and I turned pale with fear. I drew my sword
and waved them back until I should ques-
tion the soul of Tiresias.

But first came the soul of Elpenor, one of
my companions who had gone with me to the
palace of Circé. We had left him dead in the
halls of the goddess, since we had no time to
bury him. Now, when I saw him a great pity
stirred my heart, and I shed tears and said to

84
Adventures of Odysseus in Hlades 85

him: ‘ Elpenor, how didst thou come into these
dread regions of darkness? Thou hast come
more quickly on foot than I in my quick ship.’

The phantom knew me, for, being as yet un-
buried, he was not one of the shades, and had
not lost his memory or voice, nor did he need
to drink of the blood. He moaned and replied:
‘Noble Odysseus, it was an evil fate which the
gods had decreed for me. I drank too much
wine and that caused my death. I lay down to
sleep on the roof of Circé’s palace and could
not remember the way to the stairs when thou
didst call us to the ships. In my haste I fell
from the roof and broke my neck, and my soul
came down to Hades.

I pray thee now by all those whom thou dost
love—thy wife, thy father, and thy son—that
thou leave not my body unburied in the palace
halls, lest I bring on thee the anger of the gods.
But on thy return to Circé’s isle burn my body,
together with my armor, and pile up a mound
of earth over my ashes. Plant my oar upon
my tomb—the oar with which I used to row
while I was living.’

I made the promise, but at this moment the
soul of my mother, whom [I had left hale and
strong among the living when I went to the
war, approached and tried to get at the trench.
86 Odysseus

I wept to see her, but with a heavy heart I for-
bade her coming nearer until I had spoken with
Tiresias. At this moment troops of souls came
flocking out of Hades, and from the countless
throng the Theban seer came leaning on a
golden staff, and he ordered me to lay aside my
sword and permit him to drink of the blood.

When he had drunk, he spoke to me and
said: ‘Odysseus, man of many woes, why dost
thou leave the light of the sun and come down
among the dead? Doubtless thy heart’s desire
is to return safely home. But much suffering
isin store for thee. Poseidon will not permit it,
because thou hast blinded his son, Polyphemus.
Still, thou mayest overcome all difficulties and
see Ithaca at last, if thou dost not harm the
cattle and fat sheep of the Sun on the island of
Trinacria.

But if thou dost kill them and eat of their
flesh, I warn thee that nothing will save thy
comrades or thy ships. Even then thou mayest
be saved, but it will be on a strange ship, alone,
and after dreadful sufferings. And at home
thou wilt find other misfortunes awaiting thee.

There will be a mob of lawless men rioting
in thy house, squandering thy riches, and trying
to get thy wife to marry one of them. Thou
shalt kill these violent men in thy halls by cratt
Odysseus Converses with His Mother 87

or in open fight. After that thou shalt reach a
good and prosperous old age, and find a peace.
ful death far away from the sea. All that I
tell thee shall surely happen.’

CHAPTER XXI

ODYSSEUS CONVERSES WITH HIS MOTHER AND
AGAMEMNON

WHEN Tiresias had gone, my mother came
back to the dark trench and drank of the
blood. She knew me at once and cried out:
‘Oh, my child, how didst thou ever come
down to this gloomy place alive? Art thou
on thy way home from Troy? And hast thou
not seen Ithaca yet, nor thy wife and child?’

I answered her: ‘Dear mother, I was com-
pelled to come down here in order to consult
the soul of the prophet Tiresias about my
return; for 1 have not yet touched foot to
Grecian soil. Ihave been driven about on
strange seas from year to year, and have suf-
fered misfortune after misfortune. Oh, tell me,
my mother, how didst thou die? Did some
lingering disease waste thy life, or didst thou
meet a sudden, painless death?

Tell me of my father and of my son, Do
88 Odysseus

they still hold rule over Ithaca? Or has some-
one snatched it away from them, thinking |
was never to return? How fares my wife, Pe-
nelope? Is she still faithful to the husband of
her youth, or has she married another?’

To all this my mother answered: ‘ My son,
Penelope is in the home where thou didst leave
her, and she weeps for thee day and night.
Nobody has usurped thy kingdom, and Telem-
achos has charge of thy royal estates. But
thy father dwells on thy farm, and shares the
life of the servants. He seldom goes down to
the city. The grief he feels for loss of thee
has made him old, and will hasten his death,
as it caused mine, for I could not live without
thee.’

So spake my mother, and I longed to clasp
her to my heart. Three times I threw my
arms around her, and three times she passed
through them like a shadow. Then I cried out
in sorrow: ‘Oh, my dear mother! why can I
not clasp thee to my heart and hold thee in my
arms, that we may lose for a while our sense of
loneliness and misery ?’

My mother spoke and said: ‘Itis the lot of
all our race when they are dead. When life
departs we have no bones and flesh, but the
soul flies off and flits about from one place to
Odysseus Converses with His Mother 89

another. Hasten back to the pleasant daylight,
and when thou dost reach home tell thy wife
what I have said.’

When my mother had gone, I saw the soul of
Agamemnon approaching, together with the
shades of those of his companions who had per-
ished with him. The moment he had drunk of
the blood he knew me and raised a loud wail.
He stretched out his hands to me, and I tried
to seize them, but I clutched only the empty
air.

Then I began to weep, too, and said to him:
‘Famous son of Atreus, King Agamemnon,
tell me how thou didst die. Did Poseidon
wreck thee on the sea in a terrible storm, or
didst thou fall in war, fighting on the land ?’

Whereupon the king told me the dire story
of his home-coming and his death at traitors’
hands. ‘When I trod my native soil again
after a long absence,’ he said, ‘I was overcome
with joy at the thought of seeing my wife and
children once more. ButI was slaininmy own
home, and my wife did not even close my eyes
as my soul came on its way to these dark
realms.’

I answered: ‘Alas! how the gods must hate
the family of Atreus on account of the unfaith-
fulness of its women !’
90 Odysseus

Agamemnon replied: ‘Oh, son of Laertes,
thou art a fortunate man, for thou hast a faithful
wife. Penelope is wise and virtuous. I remem-
ber, when we were ready to start for Troy she
was a young wife with a little babe in herarms,
which she pressed to her bosom. He must be
aman now. Thouarta happy father. Thou
wilt see thy son at home in Ithaca,

No such good fortune can ever come to me.
My wife did not even let me see my son before
she slew me. Tell me about him, I beseech
thee, how he is. Does he still live in Sparta?’

‘Son of Atreus,’ I said, ‘do not ask me where
thy son is. I cannot tell whether he is alive or
not, and this is no time for idle conjectures ;’
and we wept as I spoke.

CHAPTER XXII

CONVERSATION WITH ACHILLES AND OTHER
HEROES

WHILE we were conversing thus, the shades
of Achilles and Patroklos came near. The soul
of Achilles recognized me, and he said: ‘ Odys-
seus, son of Laertes, how darest thou descend
into the gloomy habitation of the dead? This
is the greatest labor thou hast undertaken.’
Conversation with Achilles and Others ot

I answered: ‘Godlike Achilles, I came here
to consult the seer Tiresias about my return
to my own country, for I have never yet
reached Grecian soil, but have wandered about
suffering great misfortunes. No one is happier
than thou art, O Achilles. When thou wert
alive all men honored thee as if thou wert a
god, and now thou art a king and rulest over
the dead.’

Then he replied: ‘Do not try to console
me, Odysseus. I would rather be the slave of
a poor man, and in the light of the sun, than to
be in Hades and rule over all the dead. But
tell me, Odysseus, how fares my noble son?
Does he fight in the wars, and is he in the front
ranks? And Peleus, my aged father, tell me of
him. Is he still king of the Myrmidons? Or
do they hold him in contempt, now that he is
old, and I am not there to uphold him?’

I answered him: ‘I know nothing about
thy aged father, O Achilles, but I have many
things to tell thee about thy son. I brought
him from Skyros, myself, in a ship to Troy, and
placed him in the Greek army. There he sur-
passed everyone except Nestor and myself in
the wisdom of his advice, and when we went
forth to battle he fought among the foremost,
slaying many illustrious foes.
92 Odysseus

‘Above all, his powers shone forth when we
were hidden in the wooden horse. All the
other leaders of the Greeks gave signs of fear.
They grew white and shed tears; but his face
never turned pale, and no tear came into his
eyes. He called on me to leave the horse and
rush upon the foe, and he smote the Trojans,
carrying death and destruction among them.
When we finally subdued the city, thy son took
rich booty and safely reached his own country.’

As soon as Achilles heard this news he re-
joiced. He strode proudly off over the field of
Elysian asphodels, well pleased that he had left
such a mighty son on earth.

After Achilles had departed, many other
souls came and talked with me. Only the soul
of Ajax kept aloof, still angry over a victory
which I gained near the ships when I took the
weapons of Achilles as my share of the booty.
Little did that victory and the arms please me,
since they caused the grave to close over such
a hero as Ajax.

I spoke to his soul in gentle words: ‘Ajax,
son of Telamon, did not even death appease the
anger against me which thou didst feel on ac-
count of my receiving the arms that brought
such a calamity upon the Greeks? For thou
wast our tower of strength, and the weapons
Conversation with Achilles and Others 93

proved fatal to thee. Come nearer and speak
to me, for I bewail thy death.’ I spoke sooth-
ingly yet Ajax gave no answer. His spirit
vanished away among the other spirits.

Then I beheld Minos, the lawgiver of Crete,
who held a golden sceptre in his hand and
judged the dead. He had under him the great
wrong-doers of one part of Hades. With him I
saw Tantalos, who stood in a pool of water, suf-
fering at the same time a painful thirst. As
often as he tried to put his lips to the water it
sank down away from him so that he could not
reach it.

I saw Sisyphos, also, who suffered great
punishment, for he rolled a large rock uphill
with both hands, straining every muscle of his
body to the utmost to move it. No sooner had
he pushed it to the top of the hill than it rolled
back with deafening noise to the bottom of the
valley. Again the unfortunate man toiled to
move it upward, the sweat covering his body
and clouds of dust hovering over his head.

Then I saw the shade of Herakles, but the
hero himself sits among the gods on Mount
Olympos. And there came myriads of souls,
making a terrible noise, which filled me with
dread, lest I might look upon the Gorgon, and
I hastened back to the ship. I ordered the
94 Odysseus

crew to go on board, and they took their oars
and rowed until we reached the open sea, where
favorable winds caught by the sails wafted us
back to Circé's isle.

CHAPTER XXIII

‘THE RETURN OF ODYSSEUS TO THE ISLAND
OF CIRCE

WHEN we reached Circé’s isle, we dragged
our vessel up on to the beach, and lay down to
sleep on the shore. At break of day I sent my
comrades forth to bring the body of Elpenor
from the palace. We took it out to a rocky
place on the shore, and cut down trees to
build a funeral pyre. There we burned the
body and performed the funeral rites, and we
built a tomb and placed an oar at the top of it.

All this was done quietly, but Circé saw us
and came with her maids, bringing a generous
supply of food and wine. Standing in our
midst, she said: ‘Brave men, who living have
gone down to Hades, all men die once, but you
are permitted to die twice. Take food, eat
and drink all day long, and to-morrow at day-
light depart for your native land. I will show
Odysseus Returns to the Island of Circe 95

you the way and teach you how to avoid all
danger.’

We spent the whole day on the shore, eating
and drinking, but when the sun sank down
and the earth was covered with darkness my
companions went near the ship to seek rest.
But I sat down by Circé, who questioned me
about my visit to Hades. After I had told her
everything, she said: ‘Odysseus, so far all is
well, but there are a great many new dangers
ahead. Listen carefully to what I say. First,
thou must pass the Sirens, who bewitch with
their melodious voices all who listen to them.
Woe to him who allows his ship to go near
them! He will never reach his native land, or
see his wife and children again. The Sirens
sit in a green field and sing, while the bones
of dead men lie in heaps near them. Do not
listen to them, but pass them by unnoticed.

Or, if thou wouldst enjoy the matchless sing-
ing and not pay the forfeit with thy life, let thy
men bind thee hand and foot to the mast of
thy ship, so that thou canst not by any effort
- stir a limb when the great longing seizes thee.
And give thy men strict orders to make thy
bonds tighter shouldst thou entreat them to
loose thee. Before thou art bound, thou shalt
knead soft wax in thy palms and fill the ears
96 Odysseus

of thy companions with it, that no sound may
enter.

Thence thou wilt come to the narrows
where Skylla and Charybdis dwell. On each
side of the narrows is a steep cliff, one of which
is so high that its sharp top reaches the sky.
It is so slippery that no one is able to climb up
or down its sides, nor could he if he had twenty
hands and feet. Not even a bird can safely
perch on it.

No boat has ever come to the spot and left
it without being wrecked, except Jason’s, when
he was in search of the Golden Fleece, and he
escaped because a goddess was his guide, to
pilot him through. A dark gray fog forever
broods over the head of the cliff, and on its
western side there yawns a fearful cave, where
Skylla lives.

She is a terrible monster that barks like a
savage dog, day and night. She has twelve
shapeless feet, and six heads set on long necks.
Each of her mouths showsthree rows of deadly
teeth. Half of her body is hidden in the rock,
but she thrusts out her heads and snatches
her prey, fish, whales, dolphins, or men. No
sailor escapes, or, indeed, any living creature
that passes that way.

The other cliff is not so high, but is still more
Odysseus Returns to the Island of Ctrcé 97

dangerous. There, under:the foliage of a wild
fig-tree, Charybdis dwells, ‘who sucks in the
dark waters of the sea three times a day and
belches them forth again three times with a ter-
rible noise. Woe to thee if thou art near when
she sucks the waters down, for not even Posei-
don himself could save thee. It would be better
far to steer close to Skylla, for then only six of
thy men would be snatched from the benches,
but if Charybdis seizes thy ship all must perish.

These pests are immortal. Do not try to
overcomethem. They cannotdie. It is better
to fly from them with all haste. It would be
rashness and not courage to attack them.

Next in thy voyage thou wilt come to the
island of Trinacria, where the fine flocks of
Hélios are feeding. Two shining nymphs,
daughters of the Sun, tend them. There are
seven herds of oxen and seven herds of sheep,
fifty in each herd and flock. These creatures
are immortal, and greatly beloved of Hélios,
who will send destruction to thy ship and crew
if any harm come to them. Forbid thy men to
touch the cattle, even though suffering for
food. If thou art wise enough to escape these
dangers, thou shalt reach thy home without
further mischance.’

As the goddess finished, day broke. Circé
98 Odysseus

sought her own dwelling, while we put to sea
with a favorable wind, and soon the island
faded from our sight.

CHAPTER XXIV

ODYSSEUS MEETS THE SIRENS, SKYLLA, AND
CHARYBDIS

WHEN I saw that we were near the home of
the Sirens, I said to my men: ‘It is not wise
that only one of us should know the oracles of
Circé, and I will tell you all she said to me, that
ye may escape from the perils before us; and I
disclosed her sayings to them. Then I took a
handful of wax and warmed it in the sun until
it was soft, and carefully clogged up their ears.

They, in turn, tied me to the mast, hand and
foot, so firmly that I could not stir a limb, hav-
ing first received my command that they should
not loose my bonds on any account. Then
they bent to their oars, and rowed close to the
Sirens, so that they could see me and I could
hear their bewitching songs.

‘Come to us, O renowned Odysseus,’ they
sang; ‘pride of the Greeks, come and listen to
our voices. Noone ever yet passed us without
stopping and admiring our sweet songs. Come,
Odysseus Meets the Sivens 99

that we may sing to thee about Troy and thy
friends, for we know everything that is going
on in the whole world.’

Thus they sang, and their songs thrilled me.
A great desire came over me to stop and listen
to them, and with nods I entreated my com-
rades to set me free. But they sprang up and
bound other cords about me, so that I strug-
gled in vain. Then all the men plied their oars
until the water was white with foam, and when
we were out of sight of the island and could no
longer hear the songs of the Sirens, my men set
me free, and I took the wax from their ears.

Hardly had we escaped from the Sirens when
we beheld a black fog and towering waves
and heard a frightful noise. My men were so
scared that the oars fell from their hands and
the ship stood still. I hastened from one end
of the boat to the other, speaking cheerful words
to each rower. ‘My dear friends,’ I said,
‘have no fear. This is not the first time we
have encountered danger. We have been saved
from the hands of the Cyclops through our
own valor and clever devices, and we are not
going to break down now. Listen, and I will
tell you what is to be done. Keep your seats
and ply your oars with all your might; but

ou, O helmsman, steer thy ship clear of that
100 Odysseus

fog and the whirling waves.’ Thus I spoke,
and they willingly obeyed my words.

Yet I said nothing to them about Skylla, lest
they should lose heart and hide in the bottom
of the ship. Thus we passed in between the
two cliffs, the one of which harbored Skylla and
the other Charybdis, who, with a terrible noise,
swallowed the brine of the sea and belched it
out again with a roar like the mingling of fire
and water.

But I forgot the command of Circé to fly
from these monsters without fighting. I put
on my shining armor and took a spear in each
hand, and went on deck, and stood in warlike
attitude ready to attack Skylla if she should
raise a hand to seize one of my men. I looked
for a long time, but I could not see her.

We sailed on, the uproar increasing. My
men grew white with fear. The salt waters
whirled so that we could look into a deep
watery pit and see the blue sand. The rocks
were hidden by a thick mist. Suddenly Skylla
thrust forth a mighty hand and snatched six
of my brave men, as a fisherman pulls out fish
with a hook. I saw their hands outstretched
toward me as they were lifted up into the air,
and I heard their cries for help. Woe is me!
This sight will haunt me as long as I have life,
CHAPTER XXV
ODYSSEUS ON THE ISLAND OF HELIOS

WHEN we had escaped from the terrible
Skylla and Charybdis, we came to the island of
Helios, the island of the Sun, and heard from
afar the lowing of the cattle and the bleating
of the sheep. Then I remembered the words
of Tiresias and Circé, and I advised my com-
panions not to land there at all, but to go right
on, lest we suffer some new disaster.

My crew would not listen tome. They com-
manded me to land on theisle. I then made
them take an oath not even to look at any of
the cattle. We prepared our evening meal,
and when it was over we talked of our dear
companions whom Skylla had devoured, and
we mourned over them until we fell asleep.

We remained a whole month on this island,
on account of unfavorable winds. We found
the roomy grot where the nymphs danced, and
the seats where they sat—the nymphs who
tended the flocks of Hélios.

As long as we had a plenty of bread and
wine my comrades were satisfied and spared

the cattle. But when our store of food was
tor
102 Odysseus

exhausted they roamed all over the island to see
what they could get to appease their hunger.
They snared birds and caught fish with hooks,
and lived on them or anything else that came to
hand. But they grew poor and lean with hun-
ger and nearly starved. I went offalone into the
island, where I had found a quiet nook, and sent
up prayers to the gods to show us the way out
of our difficulties. There I fell asleep.

While I slumbered, Eurylochos called my
men together, and said: ‘All kinds of death
are bad enough, my brave friends, but death by
starvation is the worst. Let us kill the best of
these cattle and offer sacrifices to the gods, and
then eat and live. If we ever get to Ithaca we
will make restitution, for we will build altars to
the Sun and place costly gifts upon his shrine.
But if it is his will to destroy us in his anger,
then let us die amid the billows of the deep, for
that is better than to die by famine.’

Thus spoke Eurylochos, and the others lent
a willing ear. They seized the best of the
cattle at once, and slaughtered them, and pre-
pared a hearty meal. They offered up petitions
to the gods, standing round their victims with
young oak-leaves in their hands. Then they
covered the thighs with caul, and laid slices of
fat over these, and poured on water and roasted
Odysseus on the Island of Flélios 103

it until it was consumed. All the rest was cut
into smaller portions and scorched on iron
prongs.

At this moment I awoke and hurried down
to the ship, and with horror found the dreadful
meal prepared. One of the nymphs, immortal
shepherdess, flew to the Sun to tell him that
my men had slain his cattle. Hélios was deeply
angered, and spoke thus before the assembled
gods: ‘Father Zeus and all ye immortal gods,
behold the comrades of Odysseus! They have
slaughtered my heifers, which gladdened my
heart as I went up to heaven and down to
earth.

‘If they do not pay me well for this great
wrong, I shall go down among the dead and
give them light, but I will give no light to the
living.’ ‘Shine on, O Sun, in the bright sky,’
said Zeus, ‘for I will cut their ship to pieces
with a thunder-bolt, as it tosses on a black sea.’
I could only chide my comrades. I could not
think of any sufficient redress, for the cattle
were dead.

And here happened a wonder which amazed
my comrades. The skins of the dead animals
crawled over the ground, and the flesh lowed as
they had done when alive. Nevertheless, my
companions continued to kill and eat the best
104 Odysseus

oxen in the herds for six days, when a favor-
able wind sprang up, and we went on board
and set sail once more.

After we had lost sight of land, and nothing
was before us but sky and sea, a sudden dark-
ness shrouded the heavens, and there arose a
violent storm. The vessel was hurled hither
and thither by the towering billows ; the hurri-
cane tore the sails and dashed the mast against
the pilot’s head, crushing the bones, and he was
cast headlong into the sea.

Then Zeus sent a thunder-bolt into the ship,
and broke it nearly in two. The boat was filled
with a sulphurous smoke, and my comrades
were shaken off into the sea and drowned.
They floated round me, but I moved about in
the ship until the bottom and the sides had
broken away from each other and the mast
had snapped off at its base. I took the mast,
which had a thong of bull’s-hide round it, and
tied it to the keel. I took my seat upon this
frail craft, and the storm whirled me about.

After awhile the west wind ceased, and the
south wind began to blow, which was still
worse for me, since it took me back to dread
Charybdis. All night long I was tossed on the
waves, and at dawn I drew near to Charybdis.
As the monster was swallowing the salt brine,
Odysseus Departs from Scherta 105

I caught hold of the fig-tree and clung to it like
a bat till she should throw up my poor raft. I
waited long, but at last the timbers were thrown
out of the whirlpool, and I dropped down upon
them, and sat on them and rowed with my
hands. I floated about on the waters for nine
long days, and on the tenth I came to Calyp-
so’s island. She welcomed me, and detained
me seven years, as I have already told thee, O
Areté, and why should I repeat a tale already
narrated ?”

CHAPTER XXVI

THE DEPARTURE OF ODYSSEUS FROM THE
ISLAND OF SCHERIA

ALL the guests had listened with deep atten-
tion to the recital of Odysseus; all were greatly
interested, and when he ended they did not stir
or speak a word. Alkinods was the first to
break the silence, and he said: “Renowned
Odysseus, since thou hast come to our country,
I hope that thy sufferings are at an end and
that thou wilt reach thy native land safely and
soon.” Then the King turned to his guests and
addressed them: “ Phzeacians, let us each pre-
106 - Odysseus

sent one more gift, a large tripod and a vase, to
the hero who has come among us.”

The Phzacians received his words approv-
ingly, and each went at once to his home to
sleep. But when morning came they all sent
their gifts to the ship, where they were packed
carefully under the benches by the King him-
self, and the guests returned to the palace,
where a banquet was spread for them.

Alkinods sacrificed an ox to Zeus, and they
sat down at the table. The enjoyment ran
high, and the old poet, Demodokos, sang sweet
songs. They feasted all day, and when the sun
was near its setting Odysseus said: “King
Alkinoés, let us pour out the last libation and
offer up the last prayer, for all things have
come to pass that my soul desired. May the
gods bless thy gifts. May I find my home, my
wife and child, and friends. I pray the gods
to grant thee all that is good, and may no evil
ever befall thy land. Be pleased to send me
hence, and fare thee well.”

Thus he spoke, right glad that the day was
done and eager to set sail. The people ap-
proved his timely words, and seizing their gob-
lets they poured out wine on to the ground,
an offering to the gods, and they wished god-
speed to their guest. Odysseus arose and
Odysseus Departs from Scherta 107

placed a goblet in the hands of the Queen,
addressing her thus: “Farewell, O Queen, I
wish thee a long and happy life, a peaceful old
age down to the grave, from which no one
may escape; rejoice in the possession of thy
home, thy people, thy children, and the King,
thy husband.”

So spoke Odysseus, and left the hall. The
King sent a herald to show him the way to the
port where the ship was waiting for him. At
‘the same time Areté also sent down some
maids, who carried a new cloak and tunic, a
well-wrought coffer full of gifts, and an abun-
dance of food for the journey.

These things the crew took from their hands
and stowed away inthe hold of the vessel.
They spread a nice bed for him on the deck,
where he might sleep quietly. When every
thing was ready, Odysseus embarked, and the
sailors slipped the cables and took their seats
at the oars. Odysseus fell into a deep, sweet
slumber, but the ship flew forward faster than a
bird could fly, making rapid headway toward
the island of Ithaca.
CHAPTER XXVII
ODYSSEUS ARRIVES AT ITHACA

WueEN the morning star arose the ship
reached Ithaca. It entered a harbor called
Phorkys, where there was a grotto sacred to
the nymphs, and it was shaded at the entrance
by an olive-tree. Stone vases stood around in
the grotto, and there bees had stored up honey.
The nymphs spun their fine thread from stone
spindles there, and wove their sea-purple robes.
Springs of cool water flowed through the
grotto, and there was an entrance for mortals
and one which was kept holy for the gods.

When the ship touched the beach the sailors
disembarked and carried the sleeping Odysseus
on arug on to the shore and laid him down,
They brought his presents also from under the
ship’s benches and laid them under the olive-
tree, a short distance from the road, for fear
that some evil-minded person would take them
before Odysseus woke up.

Then the crew sailed homeward, but Posei-
don saw them and was angry because his pur-
pose to cause Odysseus endless suffering had

been thwarted. He at once complained to
108
Odysseus Arrives at Ithaca 109

Zeus that the Phzacians had restored Odys-
seus to his native land, with gifts finer and
more valuable than anything he could have
brought from Troy. Zeus listened to his
complaint and gave him authority to destroy
the Phzacian boat and its crew. Poseidon
promptly repaired to the island of Scheria, and
when the ship came in sight of the town he
transformed it into a towering rock, that it
might hide the island from mariners and the
Phzeacians would no longer be tempted to es-
cort strangers to their homes.

The ship had gone, and it was broad day-
light when Odysseus awoke. He did not rec-
ognize his own country, he had been away
from it for such a long time, and besides that,
Athena had spread a dense fog over it. His
first thought was that the Phzeacians had de-
ceived him and left him on an unknown shore.
He began to accuse them of treachery, and
prayed to Zeus to punish them. He looked
around and found that his gifts had been care-
fully placed, so he knew that he had not been
robbed. He counted his gifts and examined
them.

There were tripods and vases of gold and
brass and beautiful hand-woven garments. He
paced up and down the shore and wept and
110 Odysseus

wailed aloud. Then Athena appeared to him
disguised as a shepherd lad.

When Odysseus saw her, he hastened to her
and said: “Hail, fair youth! I am a stranger
and find myself for the first time in this place.
I entreat thee to tell me the name of this coun-
try, and what kind of people inhabit it.” The
goddess answered him: “ Truly, stranger, thou
must come from a far-off land that thou dost
not know Ithaca, which is known from the ris-
ing to the setting of the sun.

“It is indeed a stony island but it is not bar-
ren, nor is it a good place for raising horses. It
is richin grain and grapes. It hasan abundance
of dew and rain, and most delicious wine is made
here. Nowhere can be found handsomer goats
or finer cattle. Every kind of tree grows in
its forests, and its springs are never dry. The
fame of Ithaca has reached even as far as Troy
itself which, I am told, lies far from Hellas.”

Odysseus was overjoyed to find that he was
in his own country. But he did not venture to
tell his name to the shepherd, nor whence he
came. Instead of that he told a long story that
he came from Crete, which he had been obliged
to leave because he had killed the King’s son,
who had robbed him.

Athena smiled and, assuming the form of a
Odysseus Arrives at Ithaca 111

beautiful woman, took him by the hand and
said: “Thou crafty man, why dost thou tell
such lies? Dost thou not know Athena, daugh.
ter of Zeus, who has protected thee everywhere
and saved thee from all danger? I have just
come again to assist thee in hiding thy treas-
ures and to tell thee what thou must encounter
in thine own palace. But thou must not repeat
anything which I tell thee, nor make thyself
known to any man or woman. And thou must
bear many indignities in silence until the right
time comes, for there are many violent men in
thy halls.”

Odysseus’s heart was filled with joy. He
knelt down and kissed the soil of his native
land. “Tell me, is it true,” he said, “that I am
in my own beloved Ithaca? I pray thee, god-
dess, do not jest with me.”

“Thy native land! Such ever is thy thought,”
answered the goddess. “Any other man would
have hastened with all speed to his wife and
home. But thou must wait and come not at
once into the presence of Penelope. She sits
within thy palace, weeping night and day be-
cause thou dost not come. Hide thy gifts here
in this grotto, and I will tell thee what to do
next.”

With a glad heart Odysseus saluted the
112 Odysseus

nymphs of the cave and spring: “ Hail to you,
nymphs of my native land, daughters of Zeus!
I thought I should never see you again. I
shall bring you rich gifts in days to come, if it
please Athena to keep me from harm.” After
he had carried the presents into the grotto and
carefully hidden them, he sat down with the
goddess among the gnarled roots of the olive-
tree, and they laid plots to destroy Penelope’s
impudent suitors. Athena told him about the
trouble they had caused her; how they had es-
tablished themselves in her own home, trying
to win her for a wife. For three years the no-
ble Penelope had kept these arrogant men in
suspense, deluded with empty hopes, while she
waited for her husband’s return. When Odys-
seus heard these words he was greatly disturbed,
and said: “ Woeisme! I might have been slain
in my own home but. for these timely words.
Now I am forearmed. Stand by me, I pray, in
my great need, and give me strength to meet my
enemies. If thou art my helper, I can resist,
single-handed, three hundred foes.”

“ Take courage,” said the goddess. “ But to
carry out our plans I must change thee to a
miserable old man with a wrinkled face and
clad in ragged garments, so that no one can
recognize thee.
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Odysseus Seeks the Swineherd 113

Then must. thou go to thy faithful swine-
herd, Eumaios, who loves thy wife and child
and thy whole house.

Thou wilt find him as he feeds the swine
on acorns in a field near the mountain, Korax,
and the spring, Arethusa. He will tell thee all
the doings in thy house. Meantime I will take
my way to Sparta. Telemachos, thy son, is
there. He went to visit Menelaos and try to
find out if there were any news of thee. I will
call him to return to Ithaca.”

The goddess touched Odysseus with her
magic wand. At once he shrank and withered
into a wrinkled, shabby, old beggar. Then she
gave him a staff and a tattered sack and sent
him to his loyal swineherd while she took her
way to Sparta.

CHAPTER XXVIII
ODYSSEUS SEEKS THE SWINEHERD

OpyssEus left the haven by a narrow stony
path and took his way to the dwelling of his
faithful swineherd, who thought more of the
welfare of his master than did all the rest of
the servants whom Odysseus had. He found
him seated in the yard which he himself had
114 Odysseus

made of stone for the swine of the absent King,
and had enclosed with a thick hedge of thorns.
He had driven strong posts of oak around it,
also. Inside the yard he had made twelve
sties, and in each sty there were fifty sows
with their little ones. The males were kept
outside and were fewer in number, for Euma-
ios was compelled to send a very fat one to the
suitors every day, and therefore there were
only eighteen score.

Near them were four large savage dogs as
guards. They were more like wolves than
dogs. Eumaios was busy making a pair of
sandals from an ox-hide, for his own use. The
other swineherds had gone on errands, three
of them to drive pigs to pasture, while the
fourth had taken a hog to the suitors in the
city.

When the dogs saw Odysseus they barked
and rushed upon him, and they would have
torn him to pieces, but Eumaios drove them off
with stones and said: “Thou poor old man,
the dogs came very near tearing thee limb
from limb, and that would have been a great
shame and sorrow to me.

The gods have already sent me trouble
enough. Here I sit weeping and mourning
for my beloved master, and take care of his
Odysseus Seeks the Swineherd 115

swine in order that strangers may eat them.
Who knows where he may be wandering as
a beggar among people who speak another
tongue? But come, old man, let us go into
my lodge and eat, and then thou mayest tell me
who thou art and what misfortunes thou hast
suffered.”

Odysseus followed the swineherd into the
cabin. Eumaios threw an armful of rushes on
the floor and covered it with a rug of goat-skin
and bade his guest be seated.

Odysseus was gratified at this kind recep-
tion, and said to the swineherd: “May Zeus
and all the other immortal gods give thee, my
host, all the good of earth for thy hospitality.”

The good swineherd answered him: “ My
guest, I should consider it a great sin not to
receive a stranger hospitably, even if he looked
more miserable than thou. Strangers and beg-
gars are children of Zeus. The hospitality I
can extend to thee is slight but sincere, for ser-
vants have little to offer, especially when, like
me, they have new masters. Odysseus loved
me much. Would that the gods might send
him back to us. He would have paid me for
my toil. He would have given mea home, a
little land, and a wife. But he is dead. May
the whole race of Helen be destroyed, for it
116. Odysseus |

was she who brought noble men to destruc.
tion.”

The swineherd drew his belt around him
and hastened to the pen where the pigs were
shut up. He seized two little pigs and slew
them and roasted them ona spit over the fire.
He sprinkled salt over the savory meat and
brought it to Odysseus. And he brought deli-
cate wine in a wooden cup, as well.

Then he said: “ Eat, stranger, for this is the
best I have to give. The suitors, who fear
neither god nor man, eat the fat hogs. They
gorge themselves with the costliest food in the
house, both wine and meat, and only these lit-
tle lean porkers are left for us. Yet there is
still an abundance, for my master was very rich.
He had twelve herds of horned cattle and as
many swine on the mainland, and twelve flocks
of sheep and goats. Here, on the island, graze
eleven flocks of goats, tended by as many trusty
herdsmen, each of whom has to send a fattened
goat for the table of the suitors every day. As
for myself, I take care of these swine, and each
day I choose the best to send to the city.”

Odysseus ate the flesh and drank the wine
while Eumaios was telling him these things,
and could hardly keep from giving vent to his
anger. But he kept silence and meditated ven-
Odysseus Seeks the Swineherd 117

geance on the suitors. When the meal was
done he said: “Tell me, I pray thee, all about
thy rich and kind master. Thou didst say that
he went out with Agamemnon to fight the Tro-
jans. Perhaps I know him and can give thee
some information concerning him.”

The noble swineherd answered: “ Be silent,
aged man, for we have ceased to believe the
tales told us by wanderers. Every beggar who
comes this way calls on my mistress and tells
her falsehoods about seeing Odysseus, and tries
to make her think that he will come home in a
short time. Then she treats him kindly and
loads him with gifts.

How shall we know but thou dost make up
just such a story in order to receive a tunic and
amantle? It is a fact that my master does not
return, Who knows on what spot of the earth
his bones are mouldering, or what dogs and
birds have devoured him? I shall never cease
to grieve for him. He loved me as he would
have loved ason. I shall never find such a kind
master again. Evenmy father and mother were
not so good tome. Although he will never be
with us any more, I keep on doing his will.”

Odysseus replied: “Thou dost see that I am
half naked for want of clothing, but I will never
take a reward, even though I am in rags, until
118 Odysseus

Odysseus is really here. I hate the wretch
who tells lies to enrich himself as I hate death.
I call Zeus to witness, and this hospitable board
and the hearth of Odysseus, that what I tell
thee will come true. Odysseus will be here at
the end of this month, and he will be avenged
on those men who have robbed him and in-
sulted his wife and son.”

“And yet I will not give thee any reward
for thy news, old man,” said Eumaios, “for
Odysseus is dead. He will never come again.
Drink in peace and let us talk of other things.
Do not take this great oath,as much as we
wish—Laertes, Penelope, Telemachos, and I—
that Odysseus might come. But now, as if we
had not troubles enough, a new one has come
upon us. I know not what evil demon put it
into the mind of Telemachos to go to Sparta
to inquire about his father. And the ungodly
Suitors have sent out a ship to watch for him,
and kill him on his return. We shall lose him,
too, if Zeus does not hold a protecting hand
over him.

But tell me, dear old man, from what coun-
try dost thou come? Who are thy parents?
Tell me of thy toils and sufferings.”

The time had not yet come when Odysseus
thought it best to reveal himself. He wanted
Odysseus Seeks the Swineherd 119

to stay with the swineherd until his son should
return, and he had had the opportunity of
making the best plan for ridding his house of
the suitors. So he told the swineherd a long
string of stories. He said he was a son of the
King of Crete; that he went to Troy, where he
met Odysseus and fought by his side. Return-
ing, he wandered about, and, after many ad-
ventures, met Odysseus again getting ready to
return to Ithaca. As for himself, he had been
robbed even to his clothing and cast on this
island.

He told the tale so well that the swineherd
believed him, and even killed a fat hog in his
honor. And he made him welcome to his lodge
and prepared a good bed for him near the fire,
and covered him with goat-skins. The night
was cold and damp, and a cutting wind was
blowing outside. The other servants lay down
near Odysseus to sleep, but Eumaios took a
sharp sword and thick mantle and went out
near the pens to watch the swine all night.
Odysseus saw with gratitude how faithfully
this servant attended to his duty.

PART Ill

THE TRIUMPH OF ODYSSEUS

CHAPTER XXIX
ATHENA ADVISES TELEMACHOS

AT the time when Odysseus was wrecked,
after his comrades had eaten of the cattle of
Hélios, and he was cast up on to the island of
Calypso, Athena prayed to Zeus, her mighty
sire, that he might be restored to Ithaca, his
native land. She prayed that Hermes, the
messenger of the gods, might be sent to Ca-
lypso with the express command that she
should send Odysseus home. Zeus smiled and
granted the request.

Then Athena tied golden sandals under her
feet and taking a long, heavy spear, she rushed
like a whirlwind down from the heights of
Olympos and stood at the doorway of Odys-
seus’ house, among the men of Ithaca. She
found the haughty suitors assembled there
eating and drinking.

Telemachos saw the goddess before anyone
else. She was disguised to resemble Mentor,
a wise chief who had led the Taphians in the
Trojan war. Telemachos rose at once, like a
gracious host, and took the right hand of the

123
124 Odysseus

stranger and gave him a hearty welcome.
Athena saw with anger how the ungodly woo-
ers ate and drank and rioted gluttonously,
while the servants of Telemachos were obliged
to administer to their wants. Some of them
were kept mixing the wines and water in large
craters; others had to clear and clean the
tables, and others again prepared and carved
the meats and carried them round to the
suitors.

Telemachos led the stranger away from this
noisy hall, that he might not be annoyed by
their boisterous behavior. He bade him sit
down ona throne, and placed a foot-stool under
his feet. Then he drew his own chair from
among the suitors and sat near the stranger,
hoping to hear news of his absent father. A
maid brought a silver pitcher and basin and let
the stranger wash his hands. A table was
placed before him, laden with the choicest
viands, while a herald filled a goblet with wine
for him. When they had enjoyed their meal,
Telemachos asked the stranger his name and
country.

“T am Mentor, son of the Taphian King,”
said Athena. “I came here in my ship witha
crew of friends, on a journey to the Isle of
Cyprus, in search of copper, and I brought
Athena Advises Telemachos 125

fron to give in exchange. I am an old friend
of Odysseus. I have left my ship in the bay,
back of the forest. Laertes will tell thee who
Iam. It is said that he does not come to the
palace any more, but lives alone in the coun-
try, mourning over the loss of his son day and
night. It seems that the gods have long de-
layed Odysseus. Who knows where heis? I
am sure that he is not dead. And now tell me,
what feast is going on here, and who are these
men? Are they invited guests? Is it a ban-
quet I see, or is there to be a wedding? Itis
not a pleasant sight in any case, for the men are
coarse in their actions and ungodly in their
speech. Every friend of Odysseus must feel sad
to see them in this place.”

“As long as my father was here,” answered
Telemachos, “our house was respectable and
rich. But the gods have forsaken us, and we are
destined to destruction. No news of my father’s
death has ever reached us; nevertheless, all the
‘young men of the first families of Ithaca and the
surrounding isles flock to our house and seek
my mother for a wife and squander my father’s
riches. My mother does not favor the idea of
another marriage, and has not promised herself
to any of the suitors. She fears them, and so
she does not reject their suits, yet she will
126 Odysseus

not end the trouble by marrying one of them.
They will not go away, but make themselves
at home here and eat up my inheritance.
They only want a favorable opportunity to
kill me.”

Athena grew angry at this, and said: ‘I
would that Odysseus might come this very
moment to chastise these atrocious fellows.
Woe to them if he should appear at the door
with his helmet and shield and two tough
spears, just as he looked when I first beheld him
in my own home. Then these suitors would
find a bitter marriage-feast and a speedy end.
Vengeance, however, rests with the gods.

Now, let me consider the best way to get
these suitors out of the house. Asan old friend
of thy father, let me advise thee. To-morrow
call thy people together in council and tell the
suitors to depart. If thy mother has any in-
clination to wed again, send her to her father’s
house. He is rich and powerful, and can give
her a splendid wedding, such as is suitable for’
the daughter of a king, and bestow an ample
dower.

Then launch thy finest ship. Man it with
twenty good oarsmen and put out to sea in
search of thy father. Sail to Pylos first and
consult with Nestor, and go to Sparta next and
Athena Advises Telemachos 127

see Menelaos, who has returned from Troy re-
cently. Stay with him awhile if he can assure
thee that thy father lives. But if he tells thee
that thy father is surely dead, return as quickly
as possible and build a mound to him, and cause
the altar to be piled high with sacrifices and the
funeral games to take place. Then let thy
mother marry again.

Thou art no longer a child, and it is not
seemly to allow such indignities. Be brave and
act without fear, that men may honor thee.
When thou hast performed these deeds, let
thy care be to drive out the suitors. But now
I must return to my ship, for my companions
will be uneasy over my long absence.”

“ Thou hast spoken to me as a father speaks
to a son,” answered Telemachos. “TI shall bear
thy words in mind. And now I pray thee stay
awhile to rest and bathe. I cannot let thee go
to thy ship without some handsome gift, such
as one always bestows upon an honored guest.”

“Telemachos, do not detain me longer,” re-
plied Athena. “I must depart at once. Keep
thy gift until I return, and then I will take itto
my home.” She vanished as she spoke, and all
that Telemachos saw was a fleet-winged bird
flying upward highintheair. Telemachos was
astonished, and knew that he had been talking
128 Odysseus

face to face with some deity. He thought over
all that the goddess had told him, and resolved
to do exactly as he had been instructed.

CHAPTER XXX
TELEMACHOS ASTONISHES THE WOOERS

THE feast continued. The wooers ate and
drank but were silent, for an illustrious bard was
singing to them of the Trojan war. Telemachos
walked forth in the midst of them, his heart in-
spired with courage. Penelope had heard the
song as she satin her chamber over the hall, and
she came down the lofty stairway attended by
two maids. She implored the bard, with tears
to change the song, since it was the one most
sacred to her and made her sad.

Then said Telemachos: “ My mother, let thy
heart be strong to bear this song which all men
love. The bard must sing the song with which
he is inspired. Retire now, I pray thee, to thy
room, and take thy maids with thee. There
teach them to spin and weave—a task meet
for a princess. But leave to me the ordering
of the feast and the care of the suitors. Such
Telemachos Astonishes the Wooers 129

a duty belongs to a man, and the authority is
mine.” Penelope was amazed at his words.
She withdrew to her own rooms with her at-
tendants and wept and mourned for her absent
lord until she fell asleep.

When the minstrel had finished his song, the
suitors began to be noisy and riotous again.
Telemachos could no longer restrain himself.
“Ye insolent suitors of my mother,” he said to
them, “cease your uproar. Your lawlessness
knows no bounds. To-morrow I will call a
general assembly of all the Ithacans and warn
you to depart. If ye remain in my house
wasting my goods and eating food that is not
your own I will call down vengeance from the
gods, and ye shall die in this very palace.”

The suitors were astonished at his courage
and his words. He had never before spoken
out with authority. Antinods and Euryma-
_chos, the most insolent of them, began to ridi-
cule him and excite the others to make fun of
him. And they asked Telemachos what guest
he had been entertaining so secretly and what
news he had brought from his father. The
suitors danced and sang, eating and drinking,
until evening, before they went home.

Telemachos then sought his own couch. His
old nurse, Eurycleia, led the way with two
130 Odysseus

torches. ‘ She had been a faithful servant since
Laertes, in his early manhood, had bought her
for the price of a hundred oxen.

Telemachos sat down on his bed, and remov-
ing his tunic handed it to the nurse, who folded
it and smoothed it and hung it up. He lay
down and covered himself with soft fleeces,
while Eurycleia went out and carefully locked
the door. But sleep did not come to him, All
night he thought of what the coming day would
bring.

CHAPTER XXXI.
PENELOPE’S WEB

THE next morning, at dawn of day, Telem-
achos rose from his bed and put on his gar-
ments. He hung his sword over his shoulder
and fastened his sandals on his feet and strode
bravely forth. He summoned his heralds at
once and bade them call a council of the Itha-
cans. The people came at the appointed time,
and Telemachos, sceptre in hand, took his place

efore the assembly and called it to order.

“T have not summoned you, my friends,”
he said, “in order that ye may see some enter-
Penelope's Web 131

taining show, but out of dire necessity. I bring
no news of war and I have nothing to say that
concerns the public good. You all know the
grief which has befallen me on account of my
father, your king and leader, who loved you as
a parent loves his children. But Odysseus is
gone and there is no hope of his return. This
misfortune is not enough, for every day the
young men of the leading families of Ithaca
and the surrounding isles meet in my house
and vex my mother with unseemly and importu-
nate offers of marriage.

There they are now installed, eating our
food, drinking our wine, and wasting our
money, for Odysseus is not here to drive them
out. I have no way of expelling them from
my home. My friends, consider these wrongs
and help me to drive these robbers from the
house of your king. It would be a shame to
the people of Ithaca if it were noised around
that they left the son of their chief in the hands
of plunderers without giving him help.”

Thus spoke Telemachos, the tears running
down his cheeks, and he threw the sceptre on
the ground. The people were greatly moved,
and felt pity for the youth who had to suffer
such wrongs, but they were silent. Only An-
tinods, the most insolent of the suitors, took
132 Odysseus

up the word and said: “ Shameless Telemachos,
how dost thou dare to chide us for this state
of things! Thy mother is the one to blame.
She has been leading us on for three whole
years. She is skilful and crafty. She prom-
ised, three years ago, to choose one of us for a
husband as soon as she should finish the wind-
ing-sheets for old Laertes in case of his death.

Then she began to weave upon her loom a
dainty web of vast length and width. And she
said to each one of us: ‘Do not urge me to
marry, I pray, until I finish these shrouds for the
hero Laertes, when his hour of death shall come.
I have spun an abundance of fine thread, and it
must not be wasted. Besides that, the dames
of Greece would speak ill of me if I should
leave my husband’s father without a shroud,
for he has had great wealth all his life.’ In
this way Penelope gave us hope, and we were
too generous to persist in forcing her to choose
at once.

She went on in this way, weaving the great
web by day, and every night she unravelled by
torchlight all that she had woven by sunlight.
She has deceived us long enough. We have
discovered her fraud; for a woman who has
seen her unravelling the web has told us all
about it. She must finish the work and make
Penelope's Web 133

her choice among her suitors. If thou dost
wish us to leave thy house, thou shalt send thy
mother to her parents and let her father com-
mand her to marry one of us, according to her
choice. When this is done no one will disturb
thee any longer.

If, however, Penelope prefers to treat the no-
ble sons of Greece with such malice and craft,
we will go right on consuming thy goods.
She will thus make a great name for herself,
but she will impoverish thee.”

“JT shall never send my mother away from her
husband's house,” rejoined Telemachos. “ Liv-
ing or dead, my father is in distant lands, and
if I should dismiss his wife of my own will, I
should invite the hatred of the gods on my
guilty head. She would call upon the Furies
to haunt me; all men would curse me; and her
father would demand ample satisfaction of me.
I will never speak the word to send her forth.
Now, get you gone and cease squandering my
riches or I ea call down the wrath of the
gods on you.”

Having said this, Telemachos sat down, and
Zeus sent two eagles flying over the heads of the
wooers, close to each other. They looked down
upon the crowd of people and tore each other's
heads and vanished. The Ithacans saw the
134 Odysseus

deadly omen, and a venerable prophet among
them stood up and said: “Noble youths, I
advise you seriously to depart from this royal
house, for this is a sign that Odysseusis coming
home. Woeto you if he finds you in his palace.
You will all meet a direful end.”

Eurymachos answered him: “ Old man, keep
thy advice and thy forebodings for thine own
children. We do not need them. Advise
Telemachos to change his mind and send his
mother home to her father, instead of prating
foolishly to us. As long as he keeps her here
we shall continue to consume his wealth, until
he has nothing left. And we will punish thee
severely if thou dost incite this young man to
violence.”

Telemachos, thinking it best to be discreet, re-
plied: ‘“ Now hear me, Eurymachos, and all ye
suitors. Give me a good ship and twenty men,
that I may go from land to land in search of
my father. If I find that he lives and may re-
turn, I will wait one year longer for him to
reach home. But if I hear that he is not alive,
I will come back and build a mound to his
memory and give him a funeral worthy of such
a king. Then shall my mother make her
choice and wed.”

Mentor, the stanch friend and adviser oi
The Fourney of Telemachos 135

Odysseus, sat among the Ithacans in the assem-
bly. When he saw how Telemachos was put
to shame, he grew angry. He rose to his feet,
and addressed the people: “No king ever
again should be wise and good. He should
be hard and unjust, since no one of you has
enough love for Odysseus to stand by his son.
I am less ashamed of the impudent suitors,
than I am of the weaklings who see what they
are doing and who dare not interfere.”

“Foolish old Mentor,” said one of the suit-
ors, “what art thou saying! If Odysseus,
himself, should come hither, he would not be
able to drive us out. If anyone thinks himself
strong enough to do it, let him try it. Ye Itha-
cans disperse to your homes, and leave Mentor
to provide the boy with a ship.” So saying he
dispersed the crowd, and the wooers all went
into the palace to continue their revelry.

CHAPTER XXXII
THE JOURNEY OF TELEMACHOS

TELEMACHOS left the assembly and went
down to the sea-shore alone, and washing his
hands in the surf called on the goddess who
136 Odysseus

had appeared to him the day before to come to
his assistance. At once Athena stood by his
side in the guise and with the voice of Mentor.
She urged him to hasten his journey. Telem-
achos took new courage, and returned at once
to his house where he found his old nurse,
Eurycleia, alone. He revealed to her his in-
tention, and asked her to assist him in getting
everything ready for the journey. He bade
her draw twelve jars of the best wine, and
twelve skins of the finest meal to put aboard
the ship.

When the old nurse heard this she wept and
beat her breast. ‘ Dear child,” she said, “ who
has put such a thought into thy mind? Why
shouldst thou, an only son and well beloved,
wander off to a distant land? Be warned by
what thy father had to suffer because he left
his own country. The suitors will plot to kill
thee and divide thy wealth. Stay here, at
home; there is no need that thou shouldst
venture over the fearful sea.”

Telemachos answered her: “ Take courage,
my good nurse; this journey is advised of a
god. Do not let my mother know of my de-
parture for eleven or twelve days, lest she
weep and mourn.”

The nurse promised most. solemnly that she
The Fourney of Telemachos 137

would keep his secret and execute his orders,
She drew the wine into the jars and filled the
strong skins with meal. Meantime, Athena,
blue-eyed goddess, taking the form of Telem-
achos, went through the city and urged the
men to repair to the ships at sundown, for she
had chosen the best boats in Ithaca for the
youth, and found for him a crew that was glad
to serve him.

Then the blue-eyed maid went to the palace
and poured sleep upon the eyelids of the drunken
suitors. They gladly sought their beds in their
own homes. Taking the form of Mentor, she
next appeared to Telemachos and bade him fol-
low her to the beach. When they reached the
galley, he found his comrades waiting. They
hurried up to the palace for the wine and meal,
which they soon brought tothe ship and stored
in the hold. Then the crew slipped the cables
which held the ship to the shore. Athena took |
her seat at the stern and Telemachos sat near
her. The sails were spread and the sailors be-
gan to ply their oars. Athena raised a favor-
able breeze and the vessel glided forward cut-
ting her way through the roaring waters.
CHAPTER XXXIII
TELEMACHOS IN PYLOS

AT sunrise the ship arrived at Pylos. The
people of that town were all assembled on the
shore, where they were sacrificing coal-black
oxen to Poseidon. Some were burning fat upon
the altar, and others were distributing food
among those who were offering up the sacrifices,
while all were eating.

The Ithacans touched land. Telemachos and
Athena disembarked, leaving the crew to guard
the ship, and went up to the crowd. On the
way Athena cheered Telemachos and advised
him what to say to the people. Whenthey had
come near enough to the inhabitants to be seen
by them, the people rose and came to meet the
strangers. First of all, the son of Nestor, Pei-
sistratos, approached and took each of them by
the hand and led them to the feast. He bade
them be seated near his father and brought
them the choicest meat.

After the strangers had eaten, Peisistratos
filled a golden goblet with wine, and handed it

138
Telemachos tn Pylos 139

to Mentor, as the elder. Mentor was pleased
with the young man’s good breeding and he
took the goblet and poured out a part of it on
the ground as a sacrifice to Poseidon, with a
prayer for a safe return. Then he handed the
goblet to Telemachos, and he did likewise.

When the feast was over, Nestor, the King
of Pylos, said to his guests: “ The time has
come, dear strangers, when it is fitting to ask
your names, and from what land you come.
Do you roam the seas as pirates, or do you
come on an errand?”

“ We are Greeks,” said Telemachos. “We
come from Ithaca to seek tidings of my father,
the unfortunate Odysseus, who went to war
against Troy with thee and the other Greek
chiefs. We have never heard anything of him
during all these long years and do not know
whether he is living or dead. I pray thee tell
me anything thou may’st know about him, and
conceal nothing.”

“My son,” Nestor replied, “thou dost call to
mind the great sufferings borne by the men of
Greece ere we succeeded in conquering Pri-
am’s town. It would take years to tell thee of
the brave deeds of the Greeks, how they fought
and where they fell. We passed nine years in
worrying the enemy, and there was no man
140 Odysseus

who gave better counsel or performed nobler
deeds than did Odysseus. Art thou then his
son? I look on thee in wonder. Yes, thou art
like him. How strange to hear so young a
man speak as he did!

After the destruction of Troy, the surviving
Greeks embarked, and we set out for home.
But when we reached Tenedos, thy father re-
turned to Troy to join Agamemnon and the
others, who had stayed behind, to appease the
wrath of Athena, for a Greek had committed
sacrilege in her temple.

Our voyage was prosperous, and we all
reached home except Menelaos, who wan-
dered about in Crete and Egypt for a long
time. It is said that the noble son of Achilles
returned home safely, and that Agamemnon
was slain in his own house, and his son took
vengeance on his murderers. There isa rumor,
too, that many suitors hang about thy mother,
and, in spite of thy remonstrances, consume
thy riches. Be brave, my son, and yield not.
Odysseus may come again. Go at once to
Menelaos, for he may have news of thy father.
I will give thee swift horses and a chariot, and
my sons will drive.”

All day Telemachos discoursed with Nes-
tor, and when the sun went down, they poured
Telemachos in Sparta 141

wine on the earth and burned an offering to
the gods. Telemachos and Mentor arose to
retire to their ship, but Nestor begged them
to be his guests and go to the royal palace.
Mentor, as the elder of the two, excused him-
self, in order to join the crew, and suddenly
disappeared. Nestor recognized that Telem-
achos was attended by the goddess, and
offered a prayer to her. The assembly dis-
persed, and Nestor, with his guest and his
sons, retired to his palace.

CHAPTER XXXIV
TELEMACHOS IN SPARTA

BEForE the sun was fairly up, they all arose
and seated themselves on the smooth stone
benches that loomed up in the gloaming, white
and shining, before the gates of the palace.
Nestor bade one of his sons to prepare an of-
fering to Athena, of the best heifer in the fields.
He sent another son to call a skilled workman
to plate the heifer’s horns with gold, and two
others yet to bring the crew from the ship.
He told the remaining two sons to bid the
142 Odysseus

maids prepare a sumptuous feast in honor of
their guest.

In a moment there was a busy scene. The
heifer was brought up from the fields, and her
horns were adorned with pure gold in hopes
that Athena would see it and be pleased. The
sailors came from the ship, except two who
were left as guards. The heifer was slain and
parts were burned as an offering to the god-
dess, and cakes and wine also were thrown into
the flames to complete the sacrifice. They
roasted the flesh on long iron forks with five
prongs, and feasted upon it.

Then Nestor said to his sons: “Bring now
the chariot and horses and let our guest depart
in search of news concerning his renowned
father.’ The horses were soon harnessed to
the car, which was stored with wine and bread
and dainties fit for a prince. Telemachos
climbed into the seat. Peisistratos took his
place beside him and grasped the reins. The
horses dashed off in high spirit, and Pylos was
soon left in the distance. All day the horses
sped along. At night they rested by the way
and early the next morning went on again as
swiftly as before. As the sun went down they
found themselves in Sparta, the land of plenty,
and at the gates of Menelaos, the king.
Telemachos tn Sparta 143

Here they found many guests assembled at
the wedding banquet of Hermione, the daugh-
ter of Menelaos. That day she had been given
as a bride to Neoptolemos, the son of Achilles.
A minstrel was playing a harp and singing,
while two dancers performed graceful feats to
give life to the feast.

One of the attendants of Menelaos saw the
strangers drive up, and stepped out to see who
was coming. Then he hastened back to Mene-
laos and told him that two strangers of princely
bearing were at the palace gate, and asked if
he should unharness their horses or send them
on their way. Menelaos was vexed that any of
his servants should be so lax in hospitality, and
told him he had acted like a foolish child, and
reminded him of the gifts that had been show-
ered on them when they wandered so long in
foreign lands. And he bade him hasten to un-
harness the steeds, and give them oats and
barley, and bid the strangers welcome to the
feast.

Telemachos and Peisistratos were amazed at
the beauty of the palace. They bathed in the
marble baths, rubbed themselves with oil and
put on the splendid tunics that were brought
them. After that they entered the great hall,
where each was seated on a throne near the
144 Odysseus

king. A handmaid brought a golden pitcher
and a silver bowl for their hands, and a table
was placed before them laden with choice food.
When they had eaten enough, golden beakers
of wine were handed them, and then the mon-
arch gave his hand to each of them, saying:
“Ye have come in good time, my friends. As
soon as ye have finished your feast, I will ask
your names and whence ye come, for ye look
like sons of kings.”

As they sat there Telemachos, bending his
head toward Peisistratos, said, in a low tone, so
that he thought no one else would hear: “ Sure-
ly, O son of Nestor, the Olympian home of
Zeus himself could not be more glorious than
this palace. See the gold and ivory, and shin-
ing brass. These things are beyond price in
richness.” Menelaos caught the words, al-
though he spoke so low, and said: “ My sons,
there is no palace that can compare with the
home of the gods. The riches which you look
at in astonishment I collected while wandering
in Egypt and in Crete. I find no pleasure in them,
however, for I found my brother, King Aga-
memnon slain when I reached home. Would
that the men who fought before Troy had their
share of this wealth! I often weep and mourn
for them in my palace, and am unable to eat or
Lelemachos in Sparta 145

sleep on account of the misery I have brought
upon my friends.

For none of them do I mourn so much as I
do for Odysseus, who suffered the most of all
on my behalf. I would gladly give all my
wealth, if I only knew him to be safe. But we
do not know whether he is dead or living.
How much his old father must have grieved
for him. How many tears his wife, Penelope,
must have shed, and his high-minded son,
Telemachos, what sorrow he has suffered.”

New despair filled the heart of Telemachos,
and tears fell from his eyes. He held his purple
mantle to hide his grief and wept in silence.
When Menelaos saw this, he at once suspected
that the young man was no other than the sor-
rowing son of Odysseus, and he felt perplexed
for want of suitable words. He could not de-
cide whether to question him about his father,
or to wait and let the youth speak out of his
own will.

Just then Helen entered the hall from her
high-roofed chamber, looking like a goddess in
her dazzling beauty. She sat down at her hus-
band’s feet, while servants ran to bring the mat
which she was weaving and the distaff filled
with fine-spun purple thread. Her fingers flew
over the dainty work while she questioned the
146 Odysseus

king: “‘Didst thou ask the strangers their
names? It is not possible that there can be any
man so like to Odysseus except his son, as is
this youth! I see him with astonishment. His
father left him at home a little babe, when the
Greeks went forth to war for my sake. Is it
not true that this is Telemachos?”

Menelaos replied: “ My wife, I think thou hast
spoken truly. The young man has the hands,
the feet, and the features of Odysseus, and he
cannot hide his grief at the mention of that
hero’s name.” Peisistratos took up the word
and said: “ He is, indeed, the son of Odysseus,
O king! My father, Nestor, sent me with him
to inquire what you might know of the long-lost
chieftain, and to beg you to give him advice,
for he has to suffer great wrongs in his house
and there is no one to assist him.”

Menelaos was heartily glad to hear that his
guest was really Telemachos. But the remem-
brance of his old friend overcame him and he
wept bitter tears. “I thought when I was in
Troy,” he said, “that I should one day welcome
Odysseus tomy home. I would have given him
land and cities and brought to Sparta all his
people and his wealth. Then we would always
have lived close together and nothing could
have parted us. But he has never returned.”


ODYSSEUS FEIGNS MADNESS.
Menelaos Relates His Adventures 147

The tears fell from his eyes and Helen wept
as well. Peisistratos then said to Menelaos:
“Son of Atreus, my father says that thou art
good and wise. Let us not, I entreat, continue
this sad discourse, since this is a day that
should not be given to lamentations. I lost a
brother, also, at Troy. But we will honor
these heroes at a proper time, with tears and
by cutting off our locks. Let us not spoil the
feast with mourning.”

They spent the rest of the day in making the
festival as cheerful as if there were no grief to
be hidden, and when night came the Argive
Helen ordered the servants to prepare beds for
them in the portico and cover them with tapes-
tries, while she poured for them a soothing wine
and dismissed them to their slumbers. The
heralds led them to their couches, where they
found a welcome rest.



CHAPTER XXXV
MENELAOS RELATES HIS ADVENTURES

THE next morning Menelaos rose from his
couch very early, put on his garments, hung
his sword over his shoulder, laced his sandals,
148 Odysseus

and went into his hall looking like a god. He
sat down near Telemachos, and asked him to
tell him frankly why he had come to Sparta.

Telemachos then told him of the evil deeds
of the suitors, and besought him to give him
every possible clew to his father’s whereabouts.
Menelaos was indignant over the young man’s
wrongs.

“Shame on the cowards who wish to rule
over thy father’s house,” he said. “Let Odys-
seus return and he will tear them to pieces asa
lion tears a young deer. Grant, O father Zeus,
and Athena, and Apollo, that Odysseus may
yet give those ungodly suitors a bitter wedding
feast. But I will tell thee of my travels and
what was told me by the Ancient Spirit of the
sea.

It happened that the gods detained me many
days in Egypt to sacrifice and do penance, for
I had forgotten to make proper offerings to
them. The island of Pharos lies just off the
coast of Egypt. There I remained until the
daughter of the Ancient Sea King, seeing my
distress, came to my rescue.

My men and I had wandered over the island
in search of food until we were nearly starved,
when she discovered us, and told us that our
efforts would be useless unless we consulted
Menelaos Relates His Adventures 149

with her father. ‘If thou canst ensnare him
and hold him in thy grasp,’ she said, ‘he will
tell thee how to reach thy home. He is a seer,
and can tell thee all that has taken place there
during thy absence. At noon-tide he comes
out from the ocean caves covered with brine,
and lies down among the sea-calves, rank with
the smell of salt. He counts them five at a
time, and then he stretches himself out among
them and goes to sleep. He is very shrewd,
and when thou hast caught him he will struggle
and take all sorts of forms to escape thee. He
will turn into a reptile, and into fire and then
will change to water. But hold him fast, and
when he looks as he did when first perceived
by thee, ask him how to find thy home.’

The next morning, I sought the aged sea-god
as I had been bidden. I took three old com-
rades whom I knew to be trusty, and we went
down into the depths of the sea. The god-
dess brought us four fresh hides that had just
been taken from sea-calves newly slaughtered,
and we dressed ourselves in them to deceive
her father. She scooped out places for us to
lie in on the sands and we waited for him to
come. The smell was sickening and beyond
endurance, so the goddess put ambrosia under
our noses. When the sun was highest in the
150 Odysseus |

heavens, the sea-calves came in groups and
ranged themselves around in rows on the sand.
The old seer came out and counted all, and
did not notice our fraud. Then he lay down
to sleep. At once, we rushed upon him and
caught him. He began to take all kinds of
shapes. First, he was a lion; then a serpent, a
panther, a boar, a fountain of water, and a tree.
We held on until he was tired of trying to
escape.

At last he took his proper form, and began
to question me. ‘Son of Atreus,’ he said,‘ who
hath taught thee how to make me a prisoner?
What is it thou wouldst know?’ ‘Tell me
what god is angry with me, O Proteus,’ I re-
plied. ‘Why am I detained on this island?
Why can I not reach my home?’ ‘Thou didst
not make acceptable sacrifices to Zeus,’ said
Proteus. ‘And thou wilt never see thy home
again until thou hast offered up a hundred
oxen to the immortal gods.’

‘I will perform that rite speedily, oh proph-
et, I replied. ‘But tell me about my com-
rades in the Trojan war. Did they reach home
in safety ?’

Then Proteus told me all; how Ajax died
amid his ships; how Agamemnon was slain in
his own hall; and of Laertes’ son he said that he
The Conspiracy of the Suttors 151

had seen him sitting in a grotto on Calypso’s
Isle. There upon the rocks or at the ocean-
side he weeps and mourns day after day, and
gazes out upon the deep. His comrades are
lost, and he has no ship with which to return
to Ithaca. And after he had spoken he plunged
into the sea while I returned to my ships,
offered up the hundred oxen to Zeus and sailed
for home. And now, Telemachos, I pray thee
remain awhile with me, and I will dismiss thee
with a chariot and swift horses, and a cup of
priceless worth with which to pour libations to
the gods.”

Telemachos took new courage when he heard
that his father still lived, and begged that he
might go back at once to Pylos to join his
crew. In a moment all were busy in the
palace of Menelaos preparing gifts and a feast
that the youths might depart on the morrow.

CHAPTER XXXVI
THE CONSPIRACY OF THE SUITORS

OnE day while Telemachos was in Sparta,
the guest of Menelaos, the suitors were more
riotous than usual. They diverted themselves
152 Odysseus

in the palace of Odysseus by throwing the dis-
cus and javelin. Only Antinods and the hand-
some Eurymachos kept apart from them.
Then Noémon, who had given Telemachos his
ship a few days before, approached them and
said: “ Antinods, I would gladly know when
Telemachos will return from Pylos. I lent
him my ship, and I need it for I intend to go
to Elis, where I have business.”

The suitors were completely taken by sur-
prise, for they had not heard that Telemachos
had gone to Pylos. They thought that he was
out at the farm with his swineherd. Anti-
nods asked: “When did Telemachos sail, and
what crew did he take? Did he use force in
getting thy ship or didst thou lend it will-
ingly?”

“ He was welcome to the ship,” replied No-
émon. “Who would not have done such a ser-
vice to a man who has had so much to endure?
The young men who went with him belong to
the best families of Ithaca.” Noémon could
not get any news of Telemachos, so he went
home; but the suitors conspired to kill Telem-
achos. They decided that Antinods should
man a ship with a crew of twenty men, and lie in
ambush in the waters near Ithaca, in order that
they might catch Telemachos, on his return.
The Conspiracy of the Suitors 153

This wicked plot of the suitors was betrayed
to the queen, by her faithful herald, Medon.
Penelope was overcome with grief, and wept _
bitterly, and her loyal attendants mourned with
her. ‘“ What new grief is this which befalls me
now?” shesaid. “Is it not enough that death
has robbed me of my husband? Am I also to
lose my only child, without even having seen
him before his departure? , Alas! why did no
one tell me he was going, that I might have
prevented his journey? Haste ye to Laertes
and tell him what has happened, that he may
make some plan to upset this plot to destroy
his heir, the son of Odysseus.”

Then Eurycleia, the nurse, tried to console
her with these soothing words: “ My daughter,
I will not hide the truth from thee any longer:
I gave Telemachos a generous supply of food
and wine, all that he could use on his journey.
And I promised him solemnly that I would not
tell thee of his departure, since he had a great
dread that thou wouldst weep and mourn, and
spoil thy lovely face and injure thy health.
Now dry thy tears and bathe, and put on fresh
robes. Then go to thine altar in the upper
chamber with thy maids. There pray to
Athena and burn incense to her. Do notalarm
good old Laertes needlessly.”
154. - Odysseus

Penelope followed the old nurse’s advice.
She went to the altar, at the highest part of the
house, and there she prayed to Athena: “ Hear
me, daughter of Zeus! If ever my beloved
husband has sacrificed to thee the fat limbs
of oxen or sheep, and has built thee altars,
save my son, Telemachos, and destroy the
suitors, who fain would destroy him.” The
goddess heard her prayer, and sent sweet
slumber and a pleasant dream to assuage
her grief. In her sleep she saw her sister, who
said to her: ‘Be of good cheer, Penelope;
no harm will come to thy son, for a god
goes with him.” To her, the wise Penelope,
yet dreaming, answered: “ My sister, why is
it thou hast never come to me before? Thy
home is far away. I weep because I have lost
my noble husband, and now his enemies con-
spire to slay my only son.” The dream replied:
“Take heart. Do not fear. Athena sent me
to tell thee that she will protect thy son.”

“Oh, tell me,” cried the queen, in her dreams,
“tell me if my husband lives, since thou art
sent by a goddess.” But the shadow vanished
through the closed door, and mingled with the
air. Penelope awoke with a glad heart, cheered
by the prophetic dream.

In the meantime the suitors spoke among
Telemachos Returns to Ithaca 155

themselves, for they were too foolish to under.
stand the spirit of the queen. “Surely,” they
said, “ Penelope is making ready for her wed-
ding. She does not suspect that we have
planned to kill her son.” “Do not deceive
yourselves, my friends,” said Antinoéds. “ Be
silent and act.” Then he chose twenty men,
and they went down toa well-fitted ship, and
took their places at the oars. They waited
until it was dark, when they quietly rowed
out into a narrow strait, through which, they
thought, Telemachos was sure to sail on his
return, and there they waited.

CHAPTER XXXVII
TELEMACHOS RETURNS TO ITHACA

HAVING encouraged Penelope, the goddess
Athena sped to Sparta, where she found Te-
lemachos, with Nestor’s son, asleep upon the
porch. She stood beside his bed, and warned
him that he ought to return home, since Penel-
ope’s father had given her counsel to wed the
richest of the suitors, and had promised a
generous dower. “Do not delay,” the god-
dess said to him; “no one can tell what a
156 Odysseus

woman will do to help the man she is to
marry.

And also beware of the suitors. whom thou
hast offended. They lie in wait in the narrow
passage between Samos and Ithaca. They hope
to catch thee on thy way home and slay thee.
Do not go that way. Sail only when it is dark,
A god will watch over thee. When thou dost
come to the first harbor in Ithaca, disembark,
and let thy crew go on in the ship and take it
back to the town. But thou shalt make thy
way to the hut of thy loyal swineherd, and he,
will take tidings of thy safe return to thy —
mother.”

Athena said this and vanished. Telemachos
turned to Peisistratos and said: “ Let us arise
and set forth on our journey with all haste, oh
son of Nestor.” But Peisistratos begged him
to wait until it was fairly light. Menelaos had
slept lightly, he was so agitated with the great
event of seeing his beloved comrade’s son, and
he rose as soon as it was light. Telemachos
heard him approaching, and hastily threw on
his tunic and cloak and went to meet him.

Telemachos urged a hasty departure and
Menelaos did not think it proper to try to de-
tain him. He said: “A host is hateful who is
too affectionate. It isas wrong to keep a guest
Zelemachos Returns to Ithaca 157

who is in a hurry to go as it is to thrust a
stranger out when he wants to stay. Let me
bring thee costly gifts, and when thou hast
had thy morning meal I will hasten thee on
thy way.” The car was heaped with gifts, a
golden goblet, a silver beaker, a robe that glis-
tened with handwrought embroidery, the work
of Helen, a goblet of silver with golden lips.
Peisistratos gazed with wonder at their beauty
as he placed them in the car.

They washed their hands in a silver bowl and
ate and drank from the bounty which had been
placed before them. Then they mounted the
car which had been brought to the palace gates.
Nestor’s son took the reins, Menelaos poured
wine on the ground, an offering to the gods for
their safety and prosperity, and off they sped
over the plain. Two birds flew on before them,
an eagle that had clutched a goose and bore it
off in its talons, a sign that Odysseus would
come and put an end to the suitors, and this
omen cheered Telemachos. :

All day the horses bounded on shaking their
splendid harness. The son of Nestor plied the
lash. At night they rested in a friendly lodge
and the second day they reached Pylos. They
drove directly to the ship, lest Nestor, in his
great love for his guest, should detain him.
158 Odysseus

With an offering and a prayer to Athena he set
sail. A prospering breeze swept over the sea
and bore them rapidly along. At night Telem-
achos landed at the nearest port and sent the
crew on to take the ship to the town.

CHAPTER XXXVIII
TELEMACHOS AND THE SWINEHERD

V'HEN daylight appeared Odysseus and Eu-
maios rose from their beds and sent the serving
men out into the fields with their swine, but
they themselves remained at home and prepared
breakfast. In a little while they heard foot-
steps outside. The dogs pricked up their ears
and wagged their tails without barking.

Odysseus, perceiving this, said to the swine-
herd: “There must be some friend of thine
coming, since the dogs do not bark.” The
words had hardly passed his lips when Telem-
achos entered the hut. Eumaios started to
his feet and hastened to welcome his young
master. He took him in his arms as a father
would a son who had been away a long time,
and kissed his face and hands.

Tears dropped from his eyes and he said:
Telemachos and the Swineherd 159

“My dear Telemachos, I did not dare to hope
ever to behold thee again. Come in that I may
rejoice with all my heart at seeing thee once
more enter my cabin after thy return from a
strange country. Seldom dost thou come to
see thy servants, for thou dost live in town,
where thou must watch the suitor train con-
sume thy wealth day by day.”

To this Telemachos made answer: “This is
quite true, my father; but I come here to learn
of thee how matters are at the palace. Is my
mother there, or has some wooer won her for a
bride?”

“Thy mother is still at home,” replied the
sturdy swineherd. “She has a loyal heart, but
she wastes her life in weeping.” Saying this
he took the lance from the young prince, who
had come farther into the cabin. Odysseus
arose to give him his seat, but Telemachos said
to him: “ Keep thy seat, stranger, I will sit else-
where.”

Odysseus sat down again. The swineherd
took an armful of twigs and covered it with
fleeces, and Telemachos seated himself upon it.
Next he brought bread and meat and set them
before his young master, who, when he had
eaten, asked his faithful servant who the stran-
ger was and whence he came.
160 Odysseus

“ The stranger says that he came from Crete,”
answered Eumaios. “Lately he has run away
from a ship where he was robbed, and has come
here. I leave him to thee, however; do with
him as thou dost like.” “Thy words do not
please me, Eumaios,” said Telemachos. “How
can I receive a stranger in my house, since I
cannot protect him there if any of the godless
wooers insult him. It would be better for him
to stay here; and lest he be a burden to you
I will send out food and clothes for him, and I
will help him to go wherever he wishes.”

To him the sagacious Odysseus replied:
“ My friend, I hear with grief the story of thy
wrongs. Art thou willing to let this go on?
If I were as young as thou art I would lose
my life before I would suffer such things—thy
guests insulted, thy servants beaten, thy riches
thrown away, thy food consumed by gluttons.”

“ Thy words are sharp, dear stranger, and I
shall answer them with the truth,” said Telem-
achos. “Thou dost not yet understand that
there isa great crowd of suitors; not simply
five or ten. What can I do single-handed
against such a multitude? But you, Eumaios,
hasten to the city, secretly, and tell my mother
that I have returned and am staying here.
Then come back at once and let no one know
Telemachos Recognizes Odysseus 161

where Iam, for the lovers are plotting a bloody
death for me.” The swineherd hastily bound
his sandals on to his feet, took his staff, and
hurried off.

CHAPTER XXXIX
TELEMACHOS RECOGNIZES ODYSSEUS

IT was not long after Eumaios had left the
cabin when Athena, in the guise of a beautiful
woman, appeared to Odysseus and beckoned
him to come outside. Telemachos was op-
posite to her, but he did not see her, for the
gods are not visible to all. Only Odysseus and
the dogs were conscious of her presence. The
dogs did not bark but ran into a corner of the
cabin, crouching and whining. Odysseus left
the room and stood before the goddess, who
spoke to him in these words: “Son of Laertes,
of noble birth and great wisdom, make thyself
known to thy son. Tell him all the truth.
Advise with him how to put an end to that in-
solent crowd of suitors. I shall never be far
from thee myself and will help thee. I long to
see them attacked.”

When she had finished speaking she touched
162 Odysseus

Odysseus with her golden wand. That touch
changed him instantly into a handsome, well-
made man in the full vigor of robust manhood.
His rags became seemly garments. His cheeks
flushed with renewed health and the heavy
beard on his chin grew dark again. After the
goddess had done this she vanished and Odys-
seus went back into the lodge. His son glanced
at him in amazement and then turned his eyes
away from him lest he should irreverently look
upon a god.

“Stranger,” he said, “I think thou art an
immortal whose home is in the heavens, for
thou hast been transformed in looks and garb.
Let me bring a sacrifice and offer it to thee, to-
gether with beautiful gifts, and perhaps thou
wilt be gracious to us and keep us from harm.”

Odysseus replied: “Nay, I am not a god,
nor like the gods. I am thy father, he for
whom thou hast mourned and endured so many
sufferings.” Saying this he kissed his son and
wept.

“I pray thee do not deceive me,” said
Telemachos. “ Thou surely art a deity and not
my father. No mortal could change from a
ragged old beggar toa young and stately man
in a moment.”

Odysseus answered him: “ Telemachos, it is
Lelemachos Recognizes Odysseus 163

not like a son to gaze upon thy father with
astonishment. No other Odysseus will ever
come into this cabin. Iam thy father. I have
wandered twenty years in foreign lands, and
now have come tomy own home. Thou hast
seen a miracle which Athena wrought, for she
makes me look like a beggar or a king as she
pleases. The gods have all power to put men
in high places or to humble them.”

Odysseus sat down and his dear son ap.
proached him and threw his arms around him in
a loving embrace, and together they wept tears
of joy. At last Telemachos inquired: “ Dear
father, in what ship hast thou come, and what
sailors brought thee hither? Thou couldst not
have come on foot.”

“The Phzeacians brought me across the sea
and left me sleeping on the shore in Ithaca,”
replied Odysseus. “And they gave me rich
presents of gold, and silver, and brass, and
embroidered garments hand-woven from their
own looms.

These have I hidden, and Athena has sent
me to advise with thee how best to destroy
the arrogant crew of suitors that so long has
robbed my house and vexed my wife. Tell me
now how many there are and what kind of
men, so that I can judge whether we two alone
164 Odysseus

may attack them, or whether we need the help
of others.”

“My father,” answered Telemachos, “thy
sweet fame has resounded through our halls,
my whole life long. How often have I heard
of thy courage and the strength of thy power-
fularm. But how is it possible for us two to
fight against such a multitude? Fifty-two of
the wooers come from one town with six ser-
vants. Twenty-four come from Samos, and
twenty more from Zakynthos, and twelve from
Ithaca. If we attack them all I fear that we
shall come to grief. It is better for us to look
around and find an ally.”

Again Odysseus made reply: “ Dear son, take
courage. Zeus and Athena, most powerful of
the gods, are on our side. Early to-morrow
thou must go to the city and mingle with the
suitors. The swineherd shall lead me disguised
as an old beggar to my palace. Keep down
thy wrath if the wooers speak insultingly to me.
Do not resent it except to administer a gentle
reproof, though they strike me with their
spears and abuse me with bad language. The
day of their death is at hand. When Athena
gives me the sign, I will nod to thee and thou
shalt remove my weapons from the great hall
to an upper room. Tell the suspicious suitors
Telemachos Returns to the Palace 165

that the arms gather too much dust where they
now hang on the walls, and besides that, a god
has warned thee that in their drunken brawls,
the wooers may harm each other. Let no one
know of my arrival, not even Laertes, Eumaios,
or my wife, Penelope.”

All day the illustrious father and his son
conversed and laid their plans. At noon they
killed a yearling pig, and roasted it and made
a hearty lunch. Once more Athena touched
Odysseus with her wand and changed him into
a poor old beggar, tha. Eumaios should not
recognize him. At evening the swineherd
returned. On entering his cabin he told his
young master that the suitors had learned of
his safe return to Ithaca. Then he prepared a
supper for them, and they ate and drank to
their heart’s content, when they retired to rest.

CHAPTER XL
TELEMACHOS RETURNS TO THE PALACE

EARLY the next morning Telemachos rose,
tied his shining sandals under his feet, took his
spear and stood ready to go to the city. He
166 Odysseus

called the swineherd to him, and said: “ Eu-
maios, Iam going back to the town to see my
mother. I know that she will not cease to be
anxious about me until she sees me in my own
home. Take this stranger there, too, where he
may beg, and thus supply his wants. I can-
not receive every poor man into my own
house; my trials are too great. It makes no
difference to me whether he likes it or not. I
am forced to tell the truth about it.”

“My friend,” said Odysseus, “I do not care
to stay any longer. I think myself it is better
for me to go to the city, where a beggar may
have a fair chance. I am too old to be of ser-
vice here. Go thy way, my son, and let thy
servant lead me hence, as thou hast commanded.
But let me first warm me at the fire, for I am
cold and the way is long.”

Then Telemachos went out of the lodge and
sped toward thecity. His old nurse, Eurycleia,
was the first to see him, and she ran out to wel-
come him, and the other servants came around
rejoicing. Next came Penelope, as beautiful
as Artemis, and threw her arms about her son,
and kissed him on his brow and eyes. “Hast
thou indeed returned, Telemachos, my son? I
never hoped to see thee again. Tell me about
thy father. Hast thouany news of him? What
Lelemachos Returns to the Palace 167

has happened? What hast thou seen?” So
did the queen greet her son.

“ Dear mother, do not waken my grief again,”
Telemachos replied. “I have barely escaped
a cruel death. But go to thy bath and put
fresh garments on, and then pray to the gods
and promise them great sacrifices if Zeus will
avenge our wrongs.” Penelope willingly did
her son’s bidding, but Telemachos betook him-
self to the market place to show himself to the
people.

When Telemachos came into the public
square the suitors thronged around him with
smooth speeches, but in their hearts they kept
on plotting his death. He wanted them to see
that he was in Ithaca, but he did not care to be
in their company, so he took his place among
some friends of his father. One of the crew
came up to ask where he might deposit the
splendid gifts of Menelaos, and Telemachos
told him to hide them until the suitors had
been defeated or had won the victory.

Then Telemachos came back to the palace
in company with a stranger who had joined
his crew at Pylos, and they sat down near
the queen, who was spinning. The servants
brought them wine and food, and after they
had eaten, Penelope begged that her son would
168 Odysseus

recite to her the story of his journey. In the
meantime Odysseus and Eumaios had started
for the city. When they reached the spring
where the citizens of the city went for water,
they encountered Melanthios, a goatherd, driv-
ing goats into town. Two servants followed,
helping him. As soon as he saw Eumaios and
his guest, he said: “Look! There is one
knave leading another. Verily, the gods bring
like and like together. Thou miserable swine-
herd, whither dost thou take that worthless
beggar, this vagabond who rubs his shoulders
on every door-post, asking for crusts, eating
gluttonously, and telling tales of woe?

Just hand him over to me to guard my sta-
bles and clean my yard, and I will give him
whey to drink, which will fatten his limbs.
But work does not suit such a fellow. He
would rather ramble idly about and beg for
food to fill his empty stomach. Let him once
come to the palace of Odysseus and the guests
that woo the queen will fling footstools at
him.” With that Melanthios kicked him in the
thigh. Odysseus hesitated a moment and con-
sidered whether it were better to slay the goat-
herd with a blow from his staff, or whether he
should submit to the indignity in silence. The
latter seemed the better course.
Odysseus 7s Recognized by His Dog 169

But Eumaios grew angry and said: “ Melan-
thios, wait till Odysseus returns. He will give
thee thy deserts, thou villain! All day long
dost thou loafin the city, leaving thy master’s
flocks to take care of themselves.” Melanthios
answered him: “Just hear what this cur has to
say! I shall take him off and sell him fora
slavesome day. Would that Telemachos might
die this moment under the hands of the suitors,
and go down to Hades to join his father!”
With these words he hurried off to the house of
his master where he sat down among the crowd
of wooers.

CHAPTER XLI
ODYSSEUS IS RECOGNIZED BY HIS DOG

AFTER awhile Odysseus and Eumaios came
to the house. As they drew near they waited
a little to listen to the music, for a minstrel had
begun a song, and while singing he played
thelyre. “Surely, Eumaios,’” said Odysseus,
“anyone would know that this is the palace of
aking. See how stately the structure is, and
how spacious the court beyond the massive
gates! And there are walls and towers and
170 Odysseus

countless rooms. No one but Odysseus could
have built such a fortress. I hear the sound of
the lute and perceive the tempting odor of
roasting meat, and there are crowds of guests
coming and going. There must be a banquet
within.”

Eumaios replied: “ True, my friend, this is
the house of Odysseus. Now, let us consider
what we are to do. Shall I take the lead and
go in first, or wilt thou go first and let me
follow?” Odysseus, the sagacious, made an-
swer: “Go in before me, and I will follow by
and by.”

They were standing near the stable doors
while talking. The filth from the stalls of the
mules and oxen had been piled there by slov-
enly servants, who should have removed it day
by day to fertilize the fields. There, on the
unwholesome heap, a poor, neglected dog was
lying, devoured by noxious insects and ver-
min. It was Argus, whom Odysseus himself
had raised before he went to Troy. In times
gone by, the young men of Ithaca had made
him most useful in the chase. He had scented
the stag, the hare, and the wild goat for them
many atime. But now that he was old no one
cared for him, and he was left to die.

As soon as he saw Odysseus drawing near
Odysseus ts Recognized by His Dog 198

he pricked up his ears and wagged his tail.
But he had not strength enough to get up and
come to his master, although he moved as if he
would gladly have done so. Odysseus saw
this and burst into tears, but he turned his
face away in hopes that Eumaios would not
notice it.

But the good swineherd saw it and so Odys-
seus questioned him: “ Eumaios, what dog is
this that lies upon this filth? He is well built,
and surely is of a fine stock. Is he fleet in the
chase or a mere house-dog kept for show?”

“This dog, stranger,” answered Eumaios,
“belongs to my dear master. If thou hadst
enly seen him before Odysseus went to Troy
thou wouldst have been astonished at his swift-
ness. He performed wonders in the chase.
No wild animal was able to escape him. But
his master has died far from home, and the
careless servants will not even throw him a
bone.”

The swineherd passed on into the hall where
the suitors sat, but Odysseus stood looking at
the faithful beast, the only creature that had
recognized him. The joy of seeing his old
master was too great, and Argus sank down
and died.
CHAPTER XLII
ODYSSEUS COMES, A BEGGAR, TO HIS OWN HOUSE

TELEMACHOS was the first to notice the swine.
herd entering the hall, and he made a sign for
him to come and sit by him. Presently Odys.
seus, too, entered in the guise of a forlorn old
beggar, and sat down near the door. Telem.
achos handed Eumaios a whole loaf of bread
and as much meat as he could hold in his two
hands, and bade him take it to the beggar.
And he told him to tell the poor old man to
ask a pittance from every suitor present.

Odysseus took the food, and after thanking
Telemachos, prayed to the gods to give him
everything good. Then he placed his food in
a wallet on the ground, and began to eat, while
a minstrel entertained the assembly with sweet
music. When the bard ceased his singing,
the suitors began a noisy conversation, and
having a signal from Athena, Odysseus arose
and went from one wooer to another asking
alms. Each one gave him something, and asked
him who he was and whence he came.

Melanthios, the goatherd, and the favorite of
172
Odysseus Among the Suitors 173

Eurymachos, wishing to make mischief, told
them that Eumaios had brought the old man
along but did not, himself, know who he was.
Antinods hearing this, said: “ Eumaios, foolish
swineherd, why didst thou bring that vile beg-
gar here? Are there not beggars enough to
eat up the wealth of thy master without him?”

Eumaios answered him most courteously:
“ Antinoés, though thou art high born thou art
not well bred. Thou hast always spoken con-
temptuously to all the servants of Odysseus,
but chiefly tome. Beggars come as they like.
No one expects to invite them. Only people
of rank are invited toa feast. But I heed not
thy abuse so long as I can serve the wise Pe-
nelope and her powerful son.”

Then Telemachos, seeing that a quarrel was
brewing, interposed: “ Hold thy peace, Eumai-
os, make no words with Antinoéds. He takes
delight in ugly words. Nothing pleases him
more than to stir up ill-feeling. Surely Anti-
noés, thou art a father to me when thou dost bid
me turn a stranger into the street and insult
him. Pray let the old beggar approach thee
and receive a pittance, for thou shouldst not
feast on the food belonging to others and never
bestow any gifts. All the suitors except thyself
have given him a dole.”
174 Odysseus

Antinods made response: “Telemachos, thou
boaster, if each suitor would bestow upon him
such a gift as I will make, he would not come
here again very soon.” With that he seized a
footstool and held it up where all could see
it. The beggar approached him with a piti-
ful story of wanderings and hardships. Anti-
noéds spurned him saying: “ What demon hath
brought this chattering beggar to spoil our
pleasure? Get thee gone, or thou wilt soon be
much the worse for coming. Thou art a bold
and impudent old beggar.”

Odysseus withdrew, saying as he went:
“ How strange it is that so fine a form can con-
ceal so foul a mind. Thou wouldst not give
even salt to a suppliant, nor a crust of bread
from thine own table, without begrudging it.
But thou dost feed gluttonously at the table of
an absent chief.” Antinods grew more angry,
and rejoined: “Thou insolent beggar, thou
shalt not leave this hall unpunished.” With
that he raised the footstool and struck Odys.
seus on the shoulder. The chief stood like a
rock, not in the least disturbed. But he made
menacing motions with his head and retired to
the door, where he put down his wallet and
lifted up his voice to call down vengeance frow
the gods.
Odysseus Among the Suttors 175

Antinods spoke again with insulting words,
and one of the guests rebuked him. He was so
angry, however, that he did not heed it. Te-
lemachos saw the blow, and could hardly re-
strain his anger. Word was carried to Penel-
ope that a penniless stranger had been insult-
ed and struck in her halls, and she said to her
maids: “I would that Apollo with his bow
might strike Antinods down.”

Then she called the swineherd to her apart-
ment and said: “ Bring the beggar hither. I
should like to speak with him. It may be that
he has seen Odysseus, for he seems to have
wandered far.”

The swineherd took the queen’s message to
the stranger, but he begged that he might not
comply with the request until the suitors had
left the house. “I knew Odysseus well,” he
said, “ but I dread these violent men. There-
fore, ask Penelope to let me wait until sunset
when [I can sit by the fire and warm myself,
and tell her all that she shall inquire.”

The queen thought the beggar’s answer was
a prudent one, and was satisfied. At sundown
the swineherd left the palace to return to his
hut. The suitors kept up the revel until late
in the evening, and then went home leaving
Odysseus in his own palace.
CHAPTER XLIII
CONVERSATION OF ODYSSEUS AND PENELOPE

AFTER the revellers had left the palace, Odys.
seus said to his son: “ Now is the time to hide
all these weapons where the suitors cannot find
them, when their hour of need shall come. If
they ask for them tell them that the arms were
losing their polish in these smoky rooms, and
also that the gods had warned thee to remove
them since some dispute might arise in which
the wooers heated with wine and anger would
attack each other.”

Telemachos at once obeyed. He called his
old nurse to see that the servants were in their
own apartments and the doors of the palace
made fast while he removed the arms to an
upper room. Then he retired to rest, leaving
Odysseus sitting by the hearth in the large
dining-hall awaiting the arrival of Penelope.
She was not long in coming. Her maids
placed a chair, inlaid with silver and ivory, for
her near the fire, and threw a large woolly rug
before it for her feet.

The queen, stately as a goddess, took her
176
Odysseus and Penelope 177

seat there while her maids carried away the
dishes and food left by the suitors. They heaped
great logs on the fire. Then Melantho, an im-
pudent maid, said to Odysseus: “ Art thou here,
thou beggar! Begone, or I will take a fire.
brand and drive thee out!” Odysseus rejoined:
“Such is the fate of beggars. They must wan-
der far and take abuse. It is true that I am
ragged, but I am.not unclean. Once I was
rich and had my own palace. I often gave to
beggars and I had many servants. But it
pleased the gods to make me poor. Thou pert
woman, surely the queen, Penelope, never
taught thee, and thy bad conduct will not es-
cape the eye of Telemachos.”

Penelope saw and heard all this and the high-
breeding of the beggar did not escape her keen
notice. She turned to the saucy maid and
said: “Shame on thee, thou bold creature.
Thou dost know full well that this stranger has
remained here at my own request, that I might
inquire if he knows aught of my husband.”

Then the queen asked her matron to spread
a rug for the poor old man. Odysseus sat
down and Penelope began to question him.
“ Who art thou, stranger?” she asked. “ Where
is thy home? Whence hast thou come?” Odys-
seus answered her: “ My gracious queen, I am
178 Odysseus

the son of a king and I come from Crete. [f
am aman of sorrows and have wandered far.
But do not ask me of these things, for I do not
wish to lament over unhappy days.

Strong ties of friendship bind me to Odys-
seus. Twenty years ago, when he went to
Troy, I received him as a guest in my house,
because contrary winds and a stormy sea had
thrown him upon my island. I led him to my
palace and gave him the best of food and wine,
Twelve days he remained with me, both him-
self and his companions, On the thirteenth a
favorable wind arose and they went on to
Troy.”

Odysseus kept on inventing one tale after
another, such as might seem probable, and the
tears rolled down Penelope’s cheeks. Odys-
seus could have wept, too, when he saw how
deep her loyalty and affection were rooted.
The lady had no doubt of the genuine charac.
ter of her guest, but she cautiously strove to
prove the truth of his words, so she questioned
him yet farther, asking him to describe Odys-
seus and his comrades—how he looked and
what dress he wore.

Odysseus responded truthfully: “He wore
a cloak of purple wool, with two clasps of
gold, hand-wrought. The pattern showed a
Odysseus and Penelope 179

hound struggling with a spotted fawn, intent
to kill it. Besides this he had on a delicate
tunic of shining cloth, spun, doubtless, by his
queen, for the women gazed at it in wonder.

He was accompanied by a herald named
Eurybates, a hunchback with a dark complex-
ion, but Odysseus seemed to value him above
all the rest, for he was a clever and a faithful
man.”

When Odysseus had finished speaking, Pe-
nelope exclaimed, with a burst of passionate
grief: “Stranger, I was moved to pity when I
first saw thee in my halls, but thou shalt be
held as an honored guest from this time for-
ward. Thou hast spoken truly of the garments,
for I shaped the folds in them myself and put
on the clasps. Alas! I shall never see him
again. It was acruel fate that took him from
mae su

Odysseus was deeply moved, and tried to
speak consoling words. ‘Weep not,” he said,
“for grief will wear away thy beauty and thy
health. Odysseus lives and will return. I met
him lately on his homeward way, laden with
wealth which he had gathered in the country
of the Thesprotians.

He will come alone, for his comrades were
destroyed off the island of Trinacria, for they
180 Odysseus

had slain the oxen of the Sun. He would have
arrived here before me, only that he stopped to
consult an oracle whether to come secretly or
not. He is safe and will not long remain away
from thee. Here I take the great oath that
Odysseus will come within a month.”

The wise queen answered him: “I would
that thy words might prove true, O stranger,
but the thought is deep in my heart that Odys-
seus isno more. My maidens, lead this guest
to the bath agd spread a couch for him where
he can rest quietly, and to-morrow he shall
share the morning meal with Telemachos.”

Then said Odysseus to her: “Fair queen, I
care not for fine covers and soft beds. Wilt
thou permit me to lie down on the floor near
the fire, as I am used to do? I care not for
the bath; either, unless there is some old ser-
vant»who knows how to give a foot-bath to
aged feet.”

CHAPTER XLIV
EURYCLEIA RECOGNIZES ODYSSEUS

PENELOPE admired the prudence of the poor
old beggar, and called Eurycleia, bidding her
to bathe the stranger’s feet as carefully as it
Eurycleca Recognizes Odysseus 181

they were the feet of her master. The nurse
filled a bright brass basin with warm water
and knelt down to execute the command of her
royal mistress, saying: “My poor Odysseus!
My heart is sore for him. Who knows but he
may be wandering like thee, weary and foot-
sore! Perhaps he is an object of ridicule among
serving-women who will not suffer him to come
near the bath.

Stranger, I will wash thy feet for the sake of
my absent master, and to please that gracious
queen who has commanded me to do so; but
most of all because thou art in need of it
through suffering. Surely I never saw anyone
who bore so close a resemblance to my lord as
thou.”

Odysseus replied: “It has often been said
that I look like Odysseus by those who knew
us both, O aged dame.” Then he turned his
feet away from the light, for fear that Eury-
cleia would recognize a scar and discover who
he was. But it was in vain, for as soon as she
passed her hand over it she knew it. It was
a scar that came where a wild boar had once
torn the flesh when Odysseus was hunting on
Parnassos.

The old servant was so overcome with joy
that she laughed and cried at the same time.
182 Odysseus

She let his foot fall against the basin, which was
upset with a loud clang, while the water was
spilled over the floor. She laid her hand on
Odysseus’ beard, and said in a voice trembling
with emotion: “ Dear son, thou art Odysseus.
I knew thee the moment that I touched the
scar.”

Then Eurycleia turned to tell Penelope that
her lord had come, for the queen had not seen
the upsetting of the basin. But Odysseus laid
his finger on the old servant’s lips, and with his
left hand drew her closer and said: “ Be silent.
Let no one know that I have come, for I must
slay the suitors by stratagem. If they know
that I am here they will prevent me and de-
stroy us all.”

The loyal handmaid arose to bring another
basin of water. She bathed his feet and
anointed them. And he moved to the fire and
took his seat, while he pulled his ragged gar-
ments over the scar to hide it, lest it might
betray him.
CHAPTER XLV
PENELOPE’S DREAM

WueEN Odysseus was again seated by the
hearth, Penelope began to speak to him further:
“ Stranger, one more question I must ask thee,
and then I will leave thee, for the hour of sleep
isnear. All day long I keep at my tasks to try
to forget my grief, for the gods have visited
me with sore misfortunes. I teach my maids
to spin and weave and care for the palace.
But when night comes strange dreams flit
through my mind, and new sorrows spring up
in my heart.

There are from day to day assembled in my
home all the young men of the best families
of Ithaca and the neighboring isles, who insist
that I shall choose one of them for a husband.
But as I am not willing to comply, they remain
in my house and destroy my property. Iam
not able to drive them out, and do not know
how to help myself. Listen toa dream I had
the other night. Perhaps thou canst explain
it to me.

I dreamt that there was a flock of twenty
183
184 Odysseus

geese in my court-yard, and they picked corn
out of the water and ate greedily. Suddenly
an eagle swooped down upon them from above
and broke their necks and tore them to pieces.
Then he flew off, leaving them scattered about
the yard. I bitterly bewailed the loss of my
geese, and so did my maids. After awhile the
eagle came back and, perching on the roof, said
to me: ‘Take courage, Penelope, this is no
dream. The geese are the wooers, but I, the
eagle, am thy husband, and I have come to kill
those impudent robbers that vex thee.’”

Odysseus answered her: “The eagle gave
the right explanation, O lady. The dream
could not have had any other meaning. _Odys-
seus will come and slay the wooers, and not
one shall escape him.”

-“ Dreams do not always come to pass,” re-
joined Penelope, “ but I heartily wish that this
might be fulfilled. Be patient a little longer,
for I have one thing more to say. To-morrow
is a decisive day, for it may be the one that
drives me from the palace. I shall propose a
contest for my hand. Twenty years ago Odys-
seus set up twelve axes, one behind the other,
in the court. Through the rings of the han-
dles he shot an arrow, although he stood at a
great distance. I will challenge the suitors to
Athena Encourages Odysseus 185

take the same bow and send the arrow through
the rings as Odysseus did. He who succeeds
shall lead me forth a bride, to his own palace.”

Odysseus responded: “ Do not let the con-
test be put off. Odysseus will be at hand a
long time before any of the suitors can bend
his bow.”

“Thy words, O stranger, are comforting,”
said Penelope. “I could sit and listen to thee
all night. But as thou art in need of rest, I
will retire to my apartment, and the maids shall
spread rugs before the fire for thee.” Penel-
ope, having said this, went up to her room,
her maids following her, and she wept, think-
ing of her royal lord, until Athena closed her
eyes in sleep.

CHAPTER XLVI
ATHENA ENCOURAGES ODYSSEUS

OpyssEus was lying on his bed, but he could
not sleep, for he was thinking how he might de-
stroy the suitors. Suddenly Athena appeared
to him, and said: “Odysseus, why dost thou
lie awake? Thou art in thine own house and
near thy wife and child.” “All this is true,
186 Odysseus

O goddess,” answered Odysseus. “But I am
only one and the suitors are many. How
shall I, single-handed, meet this multitude of
men?”

“Sleep in peace, Odysseus,” returned Athena.
“To lie awake saps the life and strength of
men. The time has come when all thy suffer-
ings shall end. The gods protect thee and
they are stronger than armed warriors.” Thus
spoke the goddess, and, closing his eyelids with
sweet slumber, she flew up to Olympos.

While Odysseus was sleeping, his wife had
waked, and, sitting on her bed, addressed a
prayer to Artemis: “ Rather let me die, O god-
dess, than become the wife of any other man
than Odysseus. The very thought vexes me
day and night. Just nowI had a dream. I
seemed to see Odysseus just as he was when
he started out for Troy. I was so glad that I
could not believe that it was not a reality.”

She prayed aloud, and soon daylight ap-
peared. Odysseus heard the voice and it filled
his heart with anxiety. He arose and hastily
placed the rugs on which he had slept on a
bench in the palace. Then he went out into
the open air. Telemachos had risen also, and
he went forth to the market-place. Eurycleia
called the servants together and ordered them
Athena Encourages Odysseus 18%

to be quick about their work, for a festival was
to be celebrated that day and the wooers would
come early.

There was a busy time. The menials obeyed,
some bringing water, some sweeping the floors,
others polishing the benches and covering them
with royal tapestries. The servants of the
suitors came also and cut wood for the fires.
Eumaios arrived early, driving three fat hogs.
He saluted Odysseus and asked him if he were
well treated by the suitors, or if they contin.
ued to scoff at him. Odysseus answered him:
“May the gods punish the ruthless men who
perpetrate such wrongs in a stranger’s home.”
While they were talking together the goatherd
joined him, and repeated the sneers and abuse
of the preceding day. Odysseus took no notice
of it, except to shake his head as one who plans
direful things.

The master herdsman now came along with
a fat heifer and choice goats for the day’s ban-
quet. Offering his hand to Odysseus, he ex-
claimed: “ Hail to thee, stranger! A long and
happy life be thine! Methinks my master must
be clothed in rags and wandering like thee.
Thou dost bring his image to my mind. I
hope he may return and drive these suitors out
of his palace.” “Be sure that he will come,
188 Odysseus

herdsman; thou wilt see him with thine own
eyes, when he slays the ruthless suitors, and
then thou wilt know who is lord of the palace,”
replied Odysseus.

The suitors were talking apart from the rest
and conspiring to take the life of Telemachos,
when an eagle wheeled over their heads, tearing
a timid dove. With hearts foreboding ill at
this omen, they went into the hall to begin the
banquet, while the herdsman went his way first
saying, “ When Odysseus comes, call on me,
and I will show how strong my arm is to deal
a blow at his enemies.”

CHAPTER XLVII
THE LAST BANQUET OF THE SUITORS

THE suitors had now arrived in the great ban-
quet-hall and taken their places at the tables.
The servants brought bread and meat and
placed it before them, while Melanthios filled
their goblets with wine. Telemachos placed
Odysseus near the door, and gave him an ample
supply of food, saying: “Eat and drink, stran-
ger, without fear. None of the wooers shall
assail thee, for I will stand guard.”
The Last Banquet of the Suitors 189

One of the suitors, an evil-minded man with
a rich father, said to his companions: “ My
friends, this stranger enjoys his meal greatly.
It does not become any one of us to begrudge
good things to the guests of Telemachos. I,
too, wish to give him a present, which he in
turn may bestow on some other beggar.”” With
that he seized an ox’s foot and hurled it at
Odysseus.

Odysseus dodged it by holding down his
head. Telemachos grew angry and rebuked
the suitor in these words: “Ktesippos, thou
hast escaped death. It is well that this stranger
avoided thy blow, for if thou hadst struck him,
my sharp spear would have pinned thee to the
wall, and thy father would have prepared a
burial instead of a wedding for thee.”

Dreadful forebodings of woe began to fill the
hearts of the suitors. Their speech became
rambling and they laughed insanely. They ate
and drank like men deranged.

Penelope now entered the great hall and took
her seat upon a magnificent throne, right in
front of the suitors. She heard the maudlin
laughter and saw the gluttonous feasting as
the revel ran high. Then Athena came and
moved her mind to immediate action, and she
went up to the farthest chamber with her maids,
190 Odysseus

where the arms of Odysseus were stored. His
bow and deadly arrows, so long unused, were
there, with rich treasures and perfumed gar-
ments. She wept as she took the bow from its
case and went out, followed by the servants,
who carried down costly prizes, such as Odys-
seus gave when festivals with games were held
in his halls.

She took her place, standing before the
suitors, and addressed them: “ Ye noble suitors,
listen to my words. Cease to eat and drink
and come to the contest. Too long have ye
lived at my table, giving as an excuse that ye
would win me asa bride. The suitor who can
bend this bow and send this arrow through
these twelve axes shall claim me as his wife,
and I will follow him to his home.”

Penelope called to the swineherd and the
herdsmen to place the rings and carry the bow
to the suitors. Each in turn tried to do so, but
were overcome with grief at seeing their mas-
ter’s weapons, and laid them down.

Antinods lifted up his voice and chid them:
“Ye foolish peasants, must your eyes flow with
tears at this feast? Bring the bow or leave the
palace. Methinks we shall have hard work to
bend this bow, for none of us have such sinews
as had Odysseus.”
The Last Banquet of the Suttors 191

Then Telemachos took up the bow and
laughed. “I must have lost my wits,” he
said, “for I am glad that this contest will take
place. There is not such another woman in
Greece as my stately mother. Make no delay
then. I long to see the man who can bend the
bow. I would that I might bend it myself and
win the right to keep her in her own home.
Then I should be spared the grief of losing
her.’

Telemachos took off his cloak and laid his
sword aside. He placed the axes in a row and
took the bow and made three attempts to bend
it, but did not succeed. He would have ac-
complished the feat if he had made one more
effort, but Odysseus made a sign to him to de-
sist, so he set the bow against the wall and
went back to his seat.

The first suitor to make the trial had never
peen pleased with the insolence of the wooers,
and had great foresight and was called their
seer. His hands were soft and delicate. He
could not bend the bow, but he predicted that
it would be the instrument tc bring death to
the whole crew.

Antinods reproached him for his prophecies,
and ordered Melanthios to light a fire and
bring a slice of fat, that the bow might be
192 Odysseus

warmed and oiled to make it pliable. They
warmed it and rubbed it with oil, and tried to
bend it. One after another, each in turn, they
made trials, but all in vain.

In the meantime Odysseus went to the swine-
herd and the master of the herds, who had dis-
played such loyalty, He said to them: “My
friends, what if Odysseus should come; would
you take part with him, or join the crowd of
suitors? Speak truly.” The two men an-
swered, appealing to the gods to bear witness,
that they would stand by their master to the
end.

“ Behold,” said Odysseus, “I am the master
that you love. I have come to my own land
after twenty years of suffering, and among all
my servants I hear none pray for my return
save youtwo. And now that you may surely
recognize me I will show you the scar made by
a boar on Parnassos.” He raised his ragged
tunic for a moment and they looked at the
scar. They recognized their long-lost master,
and threw their arms around him and wept,
and kissed his hands and feet.

Odysseus begged them to desist, lest the suit-
ors should notice it and discover him. And he
instructed them to bring the bow to him and
place it in his hands, after all the wooers had
The Last Banquet of the Suitors 193

failed to bend it. And he told them to shut
and lock the doors, so that the maid-servants
could not hear the groans of the dying men,
for they might run out and warn the town.

Eurymachos and Antinods were the last to
make trial of the bow. Eurymachos sat be-
fore the fire and warmed it on both sides, but
he could not bend it. He was vexed beyond
measure, and said: “It is not that I care for
Penelope, for there are other women that would
suit me just as well, but if we are weaker than
Odysseus our sons will hear of it in future
times and be ashamed of us.”

Antinoés took up the word: “ Eurymachos,”
he said, “this is a day held sacred to Apollo,
god of the silver bow. He should have no
rival. Let the bow alone, lest the god beangry
and leave the axes standing ina row. Noone
will dare totouch them. Let Melanthios bring
goats, and we will offer up sacrifices to the god
and invite his aid. Then we shall have strength
to win in this struggle.”
CHAPTER XLVIII
ODYSSEUS BENDS THE BOW

THE suitors approved the words of Antinods.
The heralds filled their cups with wine, and
the wise Odysseus waited until they had drunk
to their hearts’ content.

Then he lifted up his voice and said: “ Hear
me, ye suitors of Penelope, while I advise that
you defer this trial of your strength until anoth-
er day. Apollo will then bestow the power on
one of you to triumph over the others. Let me
practise with the bow to-day, to see if I have
any of my youthful strength, or if I have lost it
through suffering and want.”

The suitors were moved with desperate fear
and anger. “Thou senseless beggar,” said An-
tinods, “is it not enough that we allow thee to
sit at a banquet with the proudest men alive?
Thou art drunk and thy mind wanders. What
would come to thee if thou shouldst bend this
bow? Verily we would sell thee for a slave to
the great enemy of men.”

Then said Penelope: “Indeed, Antinods, it

194
Odysseus Bends the Bow 195

is not large-minded to deny this poor old man
the pleasure of trying the bow.

Dost thou think I would go forth as the wife
ofa beggar? Nay, the stranger has no hope
of that. Do not let your minds be teased with
such thoughts.”

Eurymachos, the leading suitor, rejoined:
“Our care is not that thou wilt wed this man.
But we fear the ridicule of the people, who will
say, ‘ These are great men, indeed, who are out-
done in strength and skill by a miserable old
beggar.’ It would be anever-ending shame
to us.”

“Nay, Eurymachos,” replied Penelope, “ real
shame comes on him who robs a good man and
brings trouble to his family. This beggar
claims to be of good blood, and his arm is
sinewy. Let him try the bow. I make a sol-
emn promise that if Apollo grant him the
honor of bending the bow, I shall do no less
than bestow upon him a tunic and a cloak, and
sandals, and I will give him a sword with
which he can defend himself. Then he can go
where he likes.”

Telemachos saw that the great crisis was at
hand. “ Mother,” he said, “it rests with me to
give the bow or withhold it. Such matters
beiong ta men, and in this palace the authority
196 Odysseus

is mine. Take thy maids, then, and retire to
thy apartments, and ply the tasks most suitable
to women.”

The queen recognized her son’s wisdom, and
withdrew with her maids to the upper rooms.
There she wept for the beloved monarch, her
absent lord, until Athena sent a soothing sleep
to comfort her.

In the meanwhile the swineherd took up the
bow and undertook to carry it to Odysseus.
The suitors shouted their disapproval, and he
became confused and set it down. Telema-
chos called out above the clamor and gave
command for him to carry it along. The suit-
ors laughed to hear the young man’s voice ring
out like a trumpet and drown all other noises.
Odysseus took the bow and turned it from side
to side, examining it in every part. Telema-
chos, in a low tone, bade Eurycleia make fast
all the doors, and the master herdsman tied the
gates of the outer court with a ship’s cable.

The suitors grew uneasy, and one of them said
to another: “See the beggar, how he turns the
bow this way andthat! He would have us think
that he is an expert in the use of bows.” Odys-
seus stretched the cord and made it fast from
end to end. He put it to his ear to try its
tenseness as a minstrel tunes his harp. It sang
Odysseus Bends the Bow 197

like a bird. With perfect ease he drew the
cord and let the arrow fly. It screamed like a
swallow and went through every ring from the
first one to the last. The suitors turned pale.
Zeus sent a loud thunder-clap and Odysseus
rejoiced at the omen. He sprang to the
threshold with his bow in hand and a quiver
full of arrows at his side, and shouted: “ The
contest is ended. Now I will choose another
target.”

Antinoés had just put a golden goblet to his
lips, and was about to drink the delicious
wine. An arrow pierced his throat. He
dropped the cup and fell to the ground, and
as he fell his feet struck the table. The bread
and meat were scattered in every direction
over the floor. The suitors sprang to their
feet and looked for the weapons on the walls.
The spears were gone, and the lances and all
the armor.

Even yet they were blind to the fact that
the stranger had slain Antinods purposely.
They poured out threats. “Fool,” they said,
“what art thou doing? How couldst thou be
so careless! Thou hast slain the noblest man
in Ithaca. Dogs and vultures shall devour thee.
Never again shalt thou be allowed a trial with
the bow.”
198 Odysseus

“ Dogs,” cried Odysseus, “ ye little thought
your chief would ever return from Troy, and
therefore ye have robbed me of my wealth
and vexed my wife with offers of marriage, re-
gardless of the laws of god and man. But now
the hour of your death has come and your
doom is certain.”

The suitors trembled and looked for some
open door through which to fly for safety. Only
Eurymachos took courage to make a defence.
“Tf thou art indeed Odysseus, thou hast good
cause to complain of wrongs,” he said. “But
thou hast slain the leader, Antinoéds, who
prompted us to do these wrongs. He had no
thought of love for thy wife. He wanted to gain
thy land and rule over thy people. Spare the
rest of us and we will make ample restitution.”

A dreadful frown spread over Odysseus’
face, and he replied: “ Eurymachos, I will not
take thy wealth nor will I spare thy life. Now
choose between the two, either to fight or fly
from death. Be sure no suitor shall escape my
vengeance.”

The suitors all grew faint with fear. Eurym-
achos cried out to them: “Ye Ithacans, this
man will stand there at the door and shoot us
all down one by one. Out with your swords!
Hold up the tables for shields, and rush upon
Odysseus Bends the Bow 199

him, all of you, at once. Drive him out of the
gates, and then hurry through the city and give
a general alarm.”

With a fearful shout Eurymachos then drew
his own sword and sprang toward Odysseus.
A deadly arrow from the famous bow met him
and he fell upon the table, upsetting it, and he
went spinning round with it on the paved floor,
while the food and cup of wine were scattered
all about. His head struck upon a stone and
his feet against a chair. Death closed his
eyes.

Another suitor drew his sword and rushed
toward Odysseus. Telemachos met him with
a lance and slew him. Then Telemachos
sprang to his father’s side and said: “My
father, I will bring thee javelins and a shield,
and I will arm myself and the swineherd and
the master herdsmen.” “Make haste, my son,”
responded Odysseus, “for I have but few ar-
rows left.”

Telemachos hastened to the room where the
arms had been stored and clothed himself in
brass. His loyal herdsmen also put on splen-
did armor, and they hastened back to Odys-
seus with a complete outfit for him. The chief
had used up his arrows, and now he dressed
himself in armor and took the lances. Just
200 Odysseus

then he perceived that the suitors had by
some means been supplied with armor also.
He called to Telemachos, who had left the
door ajar leading to the apartment where the
arms had been placed for safety.

Melanthios, the goatherd, had sneaked in
and was slyly bringing shields and helmets
down tothem. Telemachos saw him, and gave
orders to the herdsmen to lock the doors of
the armory and secure the spy. They hast-
ened to the armory and found Melanthios,
who had come back fora second load. They
cast him on the floor and tied his arms down so
that he could not move them. Then they took
a rope and made two loops in it and swung him
safely to the timbers in the roof, saying: “‘ Me-
lanthios, thou hast a soft bed, and it is where
thou canst keep watch. In the morning thou
canst drive thy goats to the suitors’ banquet.”
They locked the doors and left him there and
took their places at Odysseus’ side.
CHAPTER XLIX
DEATH OF THE SUITORS

THE combat grew more stubborn. Athena,
in the guise of Mentor, stood near Odysseus
and cheered him on. “Woe unto thee, Men-
tor, if thou dost dare to help Odysseus,” cried
one of the suitors. ‘“ We will not spare thee
when we have slain him. More yet, we will
drive thy wife and children out of Ithaca and
keep thy wealth.” The goddess, in great anger
at this audacity, turned toward Odysseus and
said: “Thou art not so swift and terrible in
fighting, O Chieftain, as thou wert before the
walls of Troy.”

Athena said this to spur Odysseus on, but she
did not remain at his side. She changed her-
self into a swallow and perched upon a rafter
of the great hall, to put his prowess to a greater
test. When she had gone, the suitors grew
braver and threw their spears at Odysseus thick
and fast. But their aim was uncertain, and they
struck pillars and panels and the wall, for the
goddess turned their shafts aside.

Odysseus and Telemachos and their faithful
201
202 Odysseus

servants hurled their lances, and the weapons
always hit the mark. The cowherd struck
Ktesippos in the breast and exclaimed, as the
suitor fell: “Ktesippos, I give thee this spear
in exchange for the ox’s foot which thou didst
throw at Odysseus as a gift when he asked alms
Ofathees

Four of the wooers fell to the ground at once
and the remainder retreated to the farthest cor-
ner of the hall. Still they rallied for another
onset. Odysseus rushed in upon them and cut
them down right and left, while Athena from
above shook her fearful zgis. The surviving
wooers were stricken with terror and ran about
like a herd of oxen chased by a swarm of gad-
flies. Only the minstrel Phemios and the herald
Medon were spared. Both of them had served
the suitors most unwillingly and had secretly
advised with Telemachos.

Odysseus searched up and down the hall to
see if any suitor could be found alive. As fishes
lie upon the beach when they have been poured
out from the nets upon the sand, so lay the mul-
titude of wooers. Not one survived.

Then Odysseus called Eurycleia and bade
her summon all of the impudent and unfaithful
servants who had taken sides with the suitors.
They came into the hall and with loud laments
Return of Odysseus to Penelope 203

took up the slain and carried them out as they
were commanded, and placed them in a walled
court. Then they cleaned the hall with water
and sponges, and polished the wood and set
everything in order.

When this was done, they were driven like a
flock of birds into a narrow place outside and
hung to a beam to die wretchedly. Melan-
thios also was brought down from the armory
and cast among the dogs to die.

The palace now was purged with the smoke
of sulphur, and the air was purified with in-
cense. The loyal servants crowded about
their chieftain and welcomed him with glad
salutations. They kissed his hands and face,
and wept and laughed for joy. Odysseus was
deeply moved and sobbed aloud.

CHAPTER L

EURYCLEIA ANNOUNCES THE RETURN OF
ODYSSEUS TO PENELOPE

EURYCLEIA, with an exulting heart, now hur.
ried up the lofty stairs and stood by the queen
in her royal chamber. “Penelope,” she cried,
“my child, Odysseus has come. Thy husband
204 Odysseus

is here, and he has slain the whole crew of in-
solent suitors who squandered his riches
and scoffed at his son.” Prudent Penelope an-
swered her: “Eurycleia, thou art mad. The
gods have taken thy wits away. Do not mock
me with such idle tales. If any other maid
had come on such an errand and waked me
from sleep, I would have dismissed her with
anger.”

“Nay, dear child, I do not mock thee;
Odysseus has come and is now sitting by the
hearth. The beggar whom they scoffed at in
the hall was Odysseus. Telemachos knew it,
but dared not tell thee until the suitors should
be slain.”

Penelope rose from her couch and seized
Eurycleia by the hands.

“Tell me, dear nurse,” she said, “tell me
truly, if in fact my husband has returned, how
was it possible that he alone could destroy such
a multitude of haughty men!” “I did not see
it,” responded the old nurse, “ but I heard the
groans of the dying men as I sat with the other
maids in our own rooms. The doors were
locked to bar us from the hall. When Telem-
achos called me, I found Odysseus surrounded
by the slain. When we had washed the hall
and purged it with smoke and purified the air
Return of Odysseus to Penelope 205

with incense, thy husband ordered me to call
thee. Follow me now, my child, that your heart
may be gladdened after it has been oppressed
so long with sorrows.”

Penelope replied again: “ Nay, I cannot be-
lieve it. The gods may have slain the suitors
under the guise of Odysseus, but he has per-
ished far away from home and never will
return.”

“ My daughter,” said the aged nurse, “ what
words are these? I recognized Odysseus my-
self by the well-known scar made by the boar’s
tusk. I turned to tell thee, but he laid his fin-
ger on my lips and said: ‘Be silent. Let no
one know that I am here until the suitors all
are slain, or else they will destroy me. Now
follow me. I pledge my life that I speak the
truth.”

Penelope descended from her royal bower
uncertain how to meet her lord. She crossed
the threshold and sat down at the hearth,
opposite Odysseus, who was seated beside a
stately column in the blazing light of the fire.
He did not lift his eyes to look at his wife,
but waited for her to make the way open for
him to speak. Penelope was speechless. She
looked at her husband and seemed sometimes
to recognize him, and then the resemblance
206 Odysseus

faded out and he did not seem at all like
Odysseus.

Telemachos became impatient and spoke to
her, chiding her. “Mother,” he said, “thou
art hard-hearted and unkind. Any other wom.
an would extend a hearty welcome to her hus-
band after he had suffered so many years of
hardship, wandering in foreign lands. Take
thy place at my father’s side and question him.
Verily thy heart is harder than a stone.” “My
son,” answered Penelope, “I seem to have lost
the power to speak. I am dazed and cannot
even command myself to look at him. If this
is indeed Odysseus we soon shall know each
other, for there are secrets known to us two
only.”

Odysseus smiled and said: “My son, be
patient, and let thy mother put me to the test.
She does not know me in these rags, but she
will soon be convinced that I am Odysseus. It
is more important now to prevent the news
that the suitors have been slain from spreadin,y.
They have friends all over the city. Wh»
knows but what they may rise up against us.
I deem it best that we bathe and put on fresh
garments, and let the servants do the same.

And let the minstrel bring his lyre and
strike up such music as prompts the dance, 80
Return of Odysseus to Penelope 207

that those living near us may report that a wed-
ding is being celebrated. Then we may safely
venture forth and see what is to be done.”

Thus spoke the monarch, and his commands
were gladly obeyed. Telemachos and the ser-
vants went their way to the baths and arrayed
themselves in splendid clothing. The bard
took his harp and woke the pleasing strains,
and the palace halls resounded with mirth and
dancing.

After awhile those outside were heard to
say: “Shame on Penelope! She weds a sec-
ond time, and does not even know whether her
absent lord is dead or living. She might have
waited for him to return.”

Meantime Odysseus followed a servant to
the bath, and when he had been bathed and
anointed he put on garments suitable for a
king. Athena gave him a more majestic ap-
pearance, and caused his hair to fall in heavy
curls, like the petals of the hyacinth. When he
came back to the great hall and stood before
the queen, he looked like an immortal.

“Lady,” he said, “ the gods have given thee
a stubborn heart. Any other woman would
have given a glad welcome to her husband
after he had been absent twenty years.” To
this Penelope responded: “ Not so; I have no
208 Odysseus

pride nor a cold heart. But I should be un-
worthy of my lord if I accepted a stranger
without putting him to the proof. I remember
well when thou didst go to Troy. Thou didst
command Eurycleia to carry thy massive bed
out into the open air and cover it with fleeces.”

“Nay, woman, no living man could perform
such a feat. I built that massive frame myself.
It was a tall olive-tree that grew within one of
the courts. Round it I built a royal bower,
and, cutting off the great limbs of the tree,
shaped them and fastened them to the trunk.
In this wise I built the frame, and no one could
move it without dragging the tree out by the
roots. That is a secret known only to thee
and me.”

Penelope had put the final test, and knew
that this was surely Odysseus. She rose from
where she sat and ran to him and threw her
arms about his neck and kissed his brow.
“ Odysseus, do not be angry with me,” she
said. ‘Many are they who have tried to prac-
tise deception upon me. Thou hast made me
believe in thee.” These words pierced Odys-
seus’ heart and brought him the relief of tears.
He pressed his faithful wife to his bosom again
and again.
CHAPTER LI
ODYSSEUS VISITS HIS FATHER

EARLY the next morning Odysseus dressed
himself in his splendid armor and bade his
son and servants accompany him to the farm,
They took their weapons and went forth, Odys.
seus leading the way. It was not long before
they came to the green fields which were cared
for by Laertes. He had built his house there,
and surrounded it with cabins, where his ser-
vants slept.

Odysseus was anxious to know whether his
father would recognize him or not, so he said
to one of the men: “Go into the house and call
my father. Let me see whether he will know
me, after I have been so long away.” Placing
his weapons in their hands, he went down into
the orchard. There were no servants about,
for they had all gone off to gather thorns with
which to build a fence.

There Odysseus saw his father working
around a young tree that he had just planted.

He was’ clad in old, coarse clothes that had
209
210 Odysseus

been repeatedly patched, a goat-skin cap, and
gloves to protect his hands from the briers.

It was pitiful to see the want of hope in the
old man’s face as he moved about brooding
over his troubles. Odysseus was uncertain
whether he should throw his arms about his
father’s neck and clasp him to his heart and
kiss him, or whether it were better to question
him.

_ He approached Laertes gently and, having
greeted him, said: “ My friend, thou art a skil-
ful farmer. Every fig and vine and pear and
olive has been carefully trained. But no one
seems to care for thee. Thy master treats thee
badly, for thou art ill-clad and unkempt. An
old man deserves better things. Thy face does
not look like the face of a servant. Indeed one
might take thee for a king. Now tell me, who
owns this orchard? And tell me also if this
land is Ithaca. I desire to learn what became
of Odysseus, the son of Laertes. He was
once my guest and one that I made most
welcome.”

Laertes wept. “Thou art indeed in Ithaca,
O stranger,” he said. “ But thou dost seek in
vain for Odysseus. The land is full of wicked
men, and there is no host to load thee with
generous gifts, a recompense for thy hospital
Odysseus Visits His Father 211

ity. Oh, tell me of my son; when did he lodge
with thee? Woeis me! The beasts and birds
have long since devoured him. No mother
folded his shroud about him, nor did his father
or his loyal wife weep upon his bier. Tell me,
what is thy name? Where is thy ship? How
didst thou come here?”

Odysseus was overcome with pity, and in-
vented a tale to prepare Laertes for his unex-
pected coming. Then he clasped the dear old
manin his arms and kissed his trembling hands,
and said: “I am thy son, my father; I am the
Odysseus of whom thou dost inquire. Here
is the scar given me by the wild boar as I
hunted on Parnassos. And for further proof I
will tell thee of the orchard-trees thou gavest
me when I wasachild. There were thirteen
pear-trees, forty fig-trees, and ten apple-trees.
Forbear thy weeping and cease to mourn, I
have slain the suitor-robbers who were destroy-
ing my riches, and I have taken possession of
my house again.”

Overwhelmed with joy, the old king trem-
bled from head to foot. The sturdy chieftain,
Odysseus, saw it and drew him to his heart to
keep him from fainting, and held him there
until his strength came back. Then they went
up to the house, where a supper had been pre-
212 Odysseus

pared, and Telemachos was waiting. Laertes
went to the bath and came back clad like a king.
The grief had left his face, and he took on his
old majestic appearance. As they sat at the
banquet, relating the experiences of the past
years, Dolius and his sons, the servants who
had gone in search of thorns, returned. Dolius
recognized Odysseus and seized him by the
hand and saluted him with joyful greetings,
and his sons gathered round the chieftain eager
to take his hand.

Meantime the souls of the suitors had gone
down to the abode of Pluto. Hermes led them,
and they followed, crying and wailing like bats
ina dark cave. The shades of Achilles, Aga-
memnon, Ajax, and other heroes saw them and
constrained them to relate the mishaps that
had brought them there. Then Agamemnon’s
ghost responded: “Fortunate Odysseus! His
fame shall last forever, and poets shall sing the
praises of Penelope in all the coming ages.”

Ere Odysseus and Laertes had finished their
feast, the news of the dreadful death of the
suitors spread over the city. The wooers had
many friends, and they came to the palace
weeping and mourning, ready to avenge their
slaughter. Finding that Odysseus was not at
home, they proceeded to the market -place.
Odysseus Visits Hts Father — 213

The father of Antinods arose and lifted up his
voice crying for vengeance, but Medon, the
herald, warned them that a god had taken part
against them and that strife would be useless.

Halitherses, a wise and reverend citizen,
took up the word: “Ye men of Ithaca,” he
said, “give ear to what I have to say. Odys-
seus was not the cause of your misfortunes, but
you, yourselves. Ye would not check the in-
solence of the suitors, even when Mentor bade
you do it. Contend not with Odysseus nor
bring down his wrath upon us.”

The Ithacans were now divided against
themselves. Half of them took up arms to
make war on Odysseus, and started for his
father’s house. In this adversity Athena did
not forget her favorite chief, but armed herself,
and, taking on the guise of Mentor, placed her-
self at Odysseus’ side. A son of Dolius was
first to announce that a crowd was marching
against them, when they all arose quickly,
donned their armor, and went outside.

Then Odysseus cried out to Telemachos:
“Now is the moment to show thyself a hero,
my son. Do not bring disgrace upon thy fore-
fathers, for they are renowned over the whole
world for their bravery.” Telemachos re-
sponded: “There is no danger of that, my
214 Odysseus

dear father, as I shall show thee presently.”
When Laertes heard this he rejoiced and said:
“This is a happy day forme. How blest am
I to see my son and grandson rivals in brave
deeds.”

Athena now drew near to the old king, and
inspired him with youthful courage. He
swung his spear aloft and threw it at the lead-
er of the host and smote him to the earth.
Odysseus and Telemachos rushed into the fray
with double-edged swords. They would have
made an end of the whole multitude, but Athe-
na called aloud: “ People of Ithaca, cease from
fighting! Retire at once from this contest and
shed no more blood.”

The Ithacans grew pale with fright at hear-
ing the voice of the goddess. They threw
down their weapons and ran toward the city
in a panic of fear. Odysseus shouted in tri-
umph as he gave chase, but Zeus sent a thun-
der-bolt down as a sign to Athena that she
should restrain him. The goddess called to
him to cease the pursuit, and, taking the guise
of Mentor, she moved the minds of Odysseus
and his enemies to mutual pledges of peace
and good-will.
VOCABULARY AND NOTES

shil’ les—also called Pelides, the hero of the ‘‘ Iliad.” He was
the son of Peleus (king of Phthia in Thessaly) and the sea-
nymph, Thetis.

fE g&' an—a sea east of Greece.

Z@' o lus—the keeper of the winds, and king of Lipara, one of the
fEolian isles north of Sicily.

Ag amem’ non—leader of all the Greek chiefs in the Trojan war.

A’ jax, or Aias—king of Salamis and cousin of Achilles. He was
the son of Telamon and was called Ajax the Greater.

Al ex 4n’ drés—Paris, son of Priam.

Al kin’ 6 6s—king of Scheria, father of Nausicaa. He gave aid
to Odysseus when he was stranded on the island.

An tin’ o 6s—the boldest of the suitors.

Aph ro di’ te—Venus, the goddess of love and beauty. The island
of Kythera (Cythera), south of Greece, was the seat of her
worship.

A pol’ lo—the Sun-god, brother of Artemis and son of Zeus and
Leto. The island of Delos was his mythical birthplace and
his principal oracle was at Delphi.

Ar ca’ dia, or Arkadia—the central district of the Peloponnesus.

A re’ té (4 ra’ té)—wife of Alkinods and queen of Scheria.

Ar e thi’ sa—a spring ‘‘ where the swine of Eumaios ate ‘abun-
dance of acorns and drank the black water.’ ”? (See Baedeker’s
Greece—Ithaca.) Arethusa was also the name of a water-
nymph inhabiting the spring.

Ar’ gus, or Argos—the most celebrated dog known to fame. He
belonged to Odysseus.

Ar’ te mis, or Diana—goddess of the moon and sister to Apollo.
She was called the hunter-goddess and the protector of ani-
mals.

215
216 Odysseus

As' pho del—a flower sacred to Persephone. The souls of the
departed were supposed to wander in meadows adorned with
these beautiful flowers.

A thé’ né, or Athena; Latin, Minerva—the patron deity of
Athens. The city was named for her. Ruskin calls her the
“* Queen of the Air,’’ and explains her real significance as be-
ing the inspiration of the soul, which corresponds to the phys-
ical vigor and life received by inhaling the pure air. She is al-
ways called the ‘‘Goddess of Wisdom.”

A' treus (a’ triise)—-son of Pelops and father of Agamemnon.

Aw’ lis—a bay and town on the coast of Greece, about thirty miles
north of Athens. ‘‘The scanty ruins of Aulis lie on the
rugged ridge of rock which stretches into the sea between the
two bays. The little town never attained any importance, for
its site was unfavorable for the development of a community ;
but the two sheltered bays were excellently adapted to be the
rendezvous of a fleet.”” (See Baedeker’s Greece—Aulis. )

Cad’ mus, or Kadmos—the founder of Thebes in Boeotia. Accord-
ing to tradition, he came from Phoenicia and brought the alpha-
bet to the Greeks and the knowledge of working in metals.

Cal’ chas, or Kalchas—a soothsayer. He offended Agamemnon
by declaring that the Greeks suffered from the wrath of the
gods through his offences.

Calyp' so—the goddess of Silence, daughter of Oceanos and
Tethys, and queen of Ogygia. She tried by every art to de-
tain Odysseus on his way home from Troy.

Cas san’ dra—a daughter of Priam, and a prophetess, taken cap-
tive in the Trojan war and awarded to Agamemnon.

Cha ryb’ dis—a whirlpool off the coast of Sicily, a little to the
north of Messina.

Cir' cé, or Kirké—the daughter of Hélios, the Sun. She was an
enchantress who lived on the island Aiea. She infused into
the vine the intoxicating quality found in the juice of the
grape. ‘‘ The grave of Circe used to be pointed out on the
island of St. George, close to Salamis,” (See Baedeker’s
Greece—Salamis. )

Cy’ clops, or Kyklops, also called Polyphemus—a monstrous one-
Vocabulary and Notes 217

eyed giant. He was the son of Poseidon. It was due to his
prayer for revenge that Odysseus was kept so long wandering
on the sea.

Cy the’ ra, or Kythera—a rocky island lying south of Greece. It
was the seat of the worship of Aphrodite.

Dé’ los—an island about sixty miles southeast of Athens, It is
the mythical birthplace of Apollo and Artemis,

Dé mod’ o kos—a bard at the court of Alkinoés.

E’ lis—a district and a city in the northwestern part of the Pelop-
onnesus. Like Sparta, the city had no walls. It was pro-
tected by the sacred peace of Olympia.

The plain or precinct of Olympia is situated in the district of
Elis. Pyrgos is the nearest railroad station. ‘‘ Olympia owed
its high importance throughout the entire Grecian world to

. the famous Olympic games in honor of Zeus, which took place
periodically for centuries. Excavations there have brought to
light many magnificent pieces of sculpture, among them the
Hermes of Praxiteles.”’

E] pé' nor—one of the comrades of Odysseus. He fell from the
roof of Circe’s palace and was killed.

E lys’ ian—pertaining to Elysium, the abode of dead heroes and
other happy spirits,

Eu mai’ os, or Eumzeus—the swineherd of Odysseus.

Eu rd’ tas—a river of southern Greece.

Eu ry’ a los—a son of Alkinods.

Eu ry clei’ a (i r¥ cli’ 4)—the nurse of Odysseus and Telemachos.

Eu ry’ 16 chos, or Eurylochus—one of the companions of Odys-
seus.

Eu ry’ ma chos, or Eurymachus—one of the suitors of Penelope.

Gor’ gon—a monster of fearful aspect, a daughter of Phorkys and
Ceto. Her hair was entwined with serpents, her hands were
of brass, her body covered with scales, and anyone gazing
upon her was turned into stone.

Hel’ en, or Helené—a daughter of Tyndareus and Leda. She was
the wife of Menelaos and was always called ‘‘ the most beau-
tiful woman in the world.”

Hel’ las—Greece, the land of the Hellenes.
218 Odysseus

Hé' li os—the god of the Sun.

He phais’ tos, or Hephestus—Vulcan. He was the blacksmith
god, the god of fire, and a worker in metals,

Hé' ra, Héré—Juno, the wife of Zeus. She was worshipped as
the queen of heaven and was regarded as a model of womanly
virtue. Argos was the chief centre of the worship of Hera.

Hér' a kles, or Hercules—a celebrated hero whose deeds are con-
nected with many localities. There is a cave near Nemea
where he is said to have slain a lion, not far from Stymphalos,
where he put the Harpies to flight, and Erymanthos, the
scene of the killing of the Erymanthian boar. There are tra-
ditions of his heroism connected with Thessaly (Thebes) and
Locris, also.

Her’ bart—a German philosopher and pedagogian.

Her’ més, or Mercury—the messenger of the gods, also their
herald.

Her mi’ 6 ne—the daughter of Menelaos and Helen.

Ho’ mer—the greatest of the Greek poets and author of the
“«Tliad” and ‘‘ Odyssey.”

T’ da—a mountain of Asia Minor, east of Troy.

Il’ i ad—an epic poem, probably the greatest ever written, devoted
to the deeds of Achilles, and taken by the best scholars of
modern times as an interpretation of Greek life, Greek
thought, and the Greek religion.

I’ no, or Leucothea—a daughter of Cadmus, a sea-nymph who
helped Odysseus by giving him an enchanted veil. .

Iph i genei’a—the daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra.
‘*Ulrichs has discovered the site of the famous Temple of
Artemis or Diana, where Agamemnon was on the point of sac-
rificing his daughter Iphigeneia, before the departure of the
Greek fleet for Troy.” (See Baedeker’s Greece—Aulis.) To
appreciate the character of this famous woman one must read
the ‘‘Iphigeneia in Aulis” of Euripides and the “ Iphigeneia
in Tauris’ of Goethe.

Ith’ a ca, or Ithaka, Greek Ithaké—a rocky island with an area
of 374 square miles and 12,500 inhabitants. ‘*‘ The world-wide
fame of this little island is of course due to the Homeric epic of
Vocabulary and Notes 219,

the Odyssey, in which the misfortunes and wiles, the wan-
derings, and home-coming of Ulysses (Odysseus), King of
Ithaca, have been handed down to posterity in undying verse.
Even if the person of the hero be relegated to the realm of
myths, it is indisputable that the descriptions of the poem rest
upon a more or less exact local knowledge ; and this is evident
not only in the account of the situation and general character
of the island but alsoin numerous small details. . . . The
island became almost entirely depopulated in the middle ages,
in consequence of the raids of pirates and the Turkish wars,
and did not begin to recover until the Venetian epoch. But
similar conditions of life make the modern islanders resemble
the ancient. To this day the Ithacans are distinguished by
their bold seamanship, their love of home, and their hospital-
ity.”” (See Baedeker’s Greece—Ithaca.)

Ja’ son, or Iason—the hero who undertook the expedition in search
of the Golden Fleece.

Ktes ip’ pos, or Ctesippus—one of the suitors of Penelope.

Lak e dai’ mon, or Lacedeemon—a district in southeastern Greece.
Sparta was its capital.

La ér' tes—the father of Odysseus.

La o’ da mas—a son of Alkinoés.

La o' co Gn, or Laokoén—a young priest of Apollo. He warned
the Trojans not to accept the wooden horse left by the Greeks
and was destroyed by a serpent.

Lo’ tus—the Egyptian water-lily, also a tree. The lotus-eaters
ate of the fruit of the lotus-tree and forgot their homes and
friends.

Me 1&n’ thi os—a servant of Odysseus, a goatherd who sympa-
thized with the suitors and served them.

Men e 1a’ os, or Menelaus—a son of Atreus and brother of Aga-
memnon. Menelaos was the king of Sparta and husband of
Helen, :

Men’ tor—the wise counsellor of Telemachos.

Mil ti’ 4 des—the hero of the battle of Marathon, fought 490 B.c.
In this battle the Greeks, numbering 10,000 men, conquered
ten times as many Persians.
220 Odysseus

Mi’ nos—a son of Zeus and ruler over Crete.

Mo’ ly—a fabulous plant having magic properties. It had a white
blossom and a black root.

My cé’ nz, or Mykénai—an ancient city of Argolis, in the north-
eastern Peloponnesus. ‘‘ Dr. Henry Schliemann, in 1876, made
rich discoveries there, weapons, ornaments, vessels of gold,
silver and clay,” skeletons ‘‘ surrounded by bands of gold,
golden shovels engraved with battle-scenes,” etc. (See
Baedeker’s Greece—Mycene and Athens.)

Myr’ mi déns—a warlike people of Thrace, ruled by Achilles and
taken by him to the Trojan war as followers.

Nau sic’ a a—the daughter of Alkinods.

Né dp tol’ € més—the son of Achilles.

Nés' tor—the leader of the warriors of Pylos, in southwestern
Greece. :

O ke’ a nos, or Oceanus—the god of the river Oceanus, and son
of Heaven and Earth.

Od ys’ seus (stise), or Ulysses—the son of Laertes and Anticleia
and the hero of Homer’s Odyssey. Being summoned to the
Trojan war, he feigned madness, and harnessed a mule and a
cow to a plough and began ploughing the sea-shore. Palamedes,
to test his madness, placed his infant son, Telemachos, in
front of the plough, and Odysseus quickly turned it aside. He
became famous for his bravery and craft in the war. He is
looked upon by critics as the most perfect type of adult Greek
ideals.

O lymp’ os, or Olympus—a mountain in Thrace. The home of the
gods.

O rés' tés—the son of Agamemnon.

Par’ is, or Alexandros—a son of Priam. At his birth there was a
prophecy that he would be the ruin of his country; hence he
was cast out upon Mount Ida, where he was found and rescued
by a shepherd. (See Introduction.)

Par nas’ sos—a mountain near the north coast of the Corinthian
Gulf. It is 8,070 feet high and commands a view of Mount
Olympos to the north, Eubcea on the east, the islands of the
Archipelago, the Peloponnesus, and even Mount Korax.
Vocabulary and Notes 221

Pat’ r6 klos, or Patroclus—the intimate friend of Achilles. His
death at the hands of the Trojans provoked Achilles to action.

Pei sis’ tra tos—a son of Nestor.

Pé’ leus—the father of Achilles.

Pel op on nés’ us—the peninsula of lower Greece.

Pe nel’ o pe—the wife of Odysseus. The greatest heroine of an-
cient romance.

Pér séph’ Sne, or Proserpine—daughter of Demeter (Ceres),
‘*She was the goddess of Spring and was allowed to spend
two-thirds of the year with her mother, while the remaining
time she dwelt with her husband, Hades, in his underground
abode.”’ Eleusis, twelve miles west of Athens, was the centre
of the worship of Demeter and Persephone. (See Baedeker’s
Greece—Eleusis. )

Phai a’ ki ans, or Pheacians—the people of the island of Scheria,
over whom AlkinoGs ruled.

Phé’ mi os—a bard at the court of Odysseus.

Phor' kys—the harbor where the Phzeacians landed Odysseus on
his return to Ithaca. ‘‘The Bay of Vathy,’”? says Baedeker,
‘¢ disputes with the Bay of Dexia the honor of being the Har-
bour of Phorkys.”

Plu’ to, or Hades—a son of Rhea and Kronos and brother of Zeus
and Poseidon.. Pluto was the ruler of the lower world.

Po sei’ don, or Neptune—brother of Zeus and Hades. Poseidon
was the ruler of the seas and was the first to train and employ
horses.

Pol y phe’ mus, or Polyphemos or Cyclops—the son of Poseidon.
He was one of the Cyclops or Kyklops who were said to live
in the heart of burning mountains, particularly in Mount
/étna.

Pri! am, or Priamos—king of Troy and father of Paris.

Pro’ teus—an ocean deity who lived at the bottom of the sea. He
took care of Poseidon’s sea-calves and was famous for his
evasiveness,

Py’ los—a town (and bay) in the southwestern part of lower
Greece. It was the centre of Nestor’s kingdom.

Sa’ mos—‘‘at present a little village on the island of Cephalonia,
222 Odysseus

the starting-point of the boats to Ithaca. In Homer, the island
of Cephalonia, or its east part, is called Samé; and in the latter
part of the Odyssey, Samos appears as belonging to the king-
dom of Ithaca.’? (Baedeker.) Samos, a large island near
Asia Minor, is not related to the Samos of the Odyssey.

Ska man’ dros, or Scamander—a river of the Troad or plains of
Troy.

Scher’ i a—an island northwest of Greece. ‘‘The ancients identi-
fied Corfli with the Phzeacian island of Scheria, mentioned in
the ‘Odyssey,’ as ruled over by Alkinods.”” (Baedeker.)

Skyl' la—a rock in southwestern Italy. It was supposed to be the
abode of a monster with many heads and hands.

Sky’ ros—a large island east of Greece.

Sim’ o is—a river in the Troad, and a branch of the Scamander.

Si’ rens—daughters of Acheléos and a Muse, or, according to an-
other account, daughters of Phorkys. They failed to care for
Persephone when Pluto seized her to carry her off, and Deme-
ter took revenge by transforming them into monsters half
woman and half bird.

Sis’ y phos—a hero who secured a fountain to the citadel of Corinth
by betraying Zeus. Sisyphos was punished by being obliged
to roll stones up-hill in Hades.

Spar’ ta—a town in the southern part of the Peloponnesus, on the
Eurotas. It was the chief city of Lacedzemon and the home
of Menelaos and Helen. It had no walls, but its acropolis
was covered with temples. Ancient Sparta was noted for the
bravery of its people. At present Sparta has about 3,600
inhabitants. There are few relics of its ancient greatness.

Styx—a stream of water in central lower Greece. ‘‘The thread
of water descends from a huge cliff against a background
of dark moss, which has earned for the brook the name
of ‘Black Water.’ At the bottom of the cliff the water loses
itself in a chaos of rocks. The ancients saw in the icy cold-
ness of the water and in the barren tract around an image of
the underworld.” (See Baedeker’s Greece.) To swear by
the Styx was to take “‘ the great oath of the gods.”

Tan’ ta los—a king of Phrygia punished by the gods for treachery
Vocabulary and Notes 223

and for cruelty to his son. He was doomed to suffer from
hunger and thirst while standing close to food and water
which he could not reach,

Té 1é' ma chos—the son of Odysseus and Penelope.

Ten’ e dos—an island in the neighborhood of Troy or Ilium.

Them is’ to kles—a great statesman of Athens, and a leader of the
Greeks in the Persian war when the Greeks won the battle of
Salamis.

The’ seus (Thé' stise)—a son of AZgeus and AXthra. Like his
counterpart Herakles, Theseus performed wonderful deeds,
and finally became ruler of Athens.

Thes’ sa ly—a large province of northern Greece.

Thé’ tis—a sea-nymph, the mother of Achilles.

Tires’ ias, or Teiresias—a Theban seer. He retained his con-
sciousness after death, and Odysseus descended into Hades
to consult with him before he could reach Ithaca.

Troy, Ilios, or Ilium—a city of Asia Minor and the scene of the
Trojan war. Dr. Schliemann has identified the city with
Hissarlik, and in his excavations there found many evidences
of the war, such as spears, helmets, etc.

Zeus, or Jupiter—a son of Kronos and Rhea. His abode was
supposed to be on Mount Olympos, in Thessaly. He was
considered the highest of the gods, ruler of the heavens and
the earth.

Za’ kyn thos, or Zante—an island near Corft,