Citation
The story of a Persian cat

Material Information

Title:
The story of a Persian cat
Creator:
Chappell, Jennie, 1857-
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
64 p., [2] leaves of plates : ill. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Persian cat -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children with disabilities -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Bullying -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Gratitude -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Repentance -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Added title page, engraved.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Jeannie [sic] Chappell.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026628797 ( ALEPH )
ALG3947 ( NOTIS )
181652024 ( OCLC )

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THE STORY OF A PERSIAN CAT:



















































































































































































































































































THE ACCIDENT.

Page 17



THE STORY OF

LO eee SuAeN, © Aan



MUFFIE



T. NELSON AND Sons
London, Edinburgh, and New York





THE STORY OF

‘A PERSIAN CAT

‘BY

JEANNIE CHAPPELL

Author of “ Little Radiance,” ‘‘ The Youngest Princess,” °
&e, &e.



T. NELSON AND SONS -«
_ London, Edinburgh, and New York

1898







Il,

III.

Iv.

VIL

CONTENTS.



©

A FAIR EXCHANGE,

FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY, bese
THE THANK-OFFERING, eee
FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN,

FIVE SHILLINGS ae

“THROUGH GOOD COMES BETTER, AND FROM

BETTER, BEST,”



17

27

36

45

53

Baatge
Ni Lt Sh



THE STORY OF
Gee RES AG Nee Wieee



CHAPTER I.
A FAIR EXCHANGE.

T was a funny-shaped little bundle,

tied up in a red silk handkerchief,

and the owner deposited it very carefully

in a corner of the railway carriage seat at
her side.

Maurice and Kathie instantly began to
wonder. what was in it—not that they
were inquisitive children; but when one
has been shut up in a train for five hours,
every fresh passenger that enters, and all

his or her belongings, become objects of _
keen interest. Besides, there was some-





10 A FAIR EXCHANGE.

thing about this bundle which seemed
different from ordinary bundles, and the
person who brought it in with her—a
_ middle-aged lady—seemed to regard it
. with quite affectionate eyes.

It might have contained apples, of
course, or nuts, or buns ; but such things
don’t squirm about. And—pop !—while
Maurice and Kathie were. staring, the
mystery was solved, for out at one of the
openings of the handkerchief there sud-

denly peeped the end of a kitten’s tail!
_ And the end of that tail was the be-
ginning of my story.

The lady took the bundle on her lap,
and out at another opening instantly
popped a kitten’s head. Such a pretty
head! Tabby in colour, and chubby and
round, with a dear, little pink nose and
big, innocent, blue eyes; while the hand-
some ruffle of long fur in which it was set
proclaimed the pussy-baby to be no ordi-

nary cat, but an aristocratic Persian.

Maurice and Kathie exchanged a beam-
ing smile. Then they looked up at their



A FAIR EXCHANGE. 11

mother, and gathered her smile into their
own, then back at the kitten with an
added tenderness; so that when they met
the lady’s glance, she thought they were
‘two of the sweetest-looking children she
had seen in her life.

So she smiled back at them.

“Kitty isn’t used to travelling,” she

said. ‘It has come a long way to-day.”
“Tsn’t it a dear?” said Kathie. “Isn’t
it funny ?”

As fast as the lady pushed pussy back
into the handkerchief at one point it
peeped out at another, its pink nose, or
fluffy tail, or tiny white paw being always
visible. How the children laughed !

“T ought to have had a basket for it,”.
said the lady. “But I brought it away
in rather a hurry, and they could not find
one.—Now be quiet, pussy, and be good.
We're nearly home now, and then you
shall have some nice milk.”

“Mi-e-ew !” squeaked the kitten, as if
it understood.

“Oh, do you think it is thirsty ?” cried



12 A FAIR EXCHANGE.

Kathie. “Fancy it saying ‘mew’ when
you said ‘milk’! The pretty dear! I do
believe it knows.”

“ There is a little milk left in our bottle,
isn’t there, mother?” asked Maurice.

‘“‘Here is some milk certainly,” replied
their mother ; “but we haven’t a saucer.”

“Tve got a scallop-shell im my bag!”
exclaimed Maurice. ‘When the train
stops again that will do fine.”

It seemed a long time before the next
halting-place was arrived at, and mean-
while Kathie was wetting her fingers at
the mouth of the milk-bottle, and holding
them for the kitten to lick.

“T suppose your children do not happen
to want a kitten?”. observed the pussy’s
owner, addressing Mrs. Sterling.

“Yes, we do—we do!” Maurice and
Kathie exclaimed in a breath, answering
for themselves. ‘‘O mother, we do want
a kitty!”

“Do you mean that you are seeking a
home for this little creature?” asked Mrs. .
Sterling.



A FAIR EXCHANGE. 13

“JT should be very glad to give it away
to people who would be kind,” replied. the
lady. “I do not really require the cat
myself.”

“O mother, do let us have it! Do—
do!” begged the children. “You know
we would be kind. And such a little
beauty too—a real Persian!” .
_ “But how should we carry it home?”
asked Mrs. Sterling.

“T’ve nothing but ferns in my little
basket,” said Kathie, seeing that their
wish was all but granted. ‘We could
carry them somehow else, and put pussy
in that. Or perhaps,” she added, smiling
shyly up at their new acquaintance—
“perhaps you'd like the ferns? They’re
nice little ones—hart’s-tongue, and pen-
ferns, and one real lady-fern. Do you’
like ferns ?” "2

“T love them; but I should not like to
take away yours,” answered the lady.

“Oh, but do,, please!” urged Kathie.
“T should be so pleased if you would.”

So it came about that before the great



14 A FAIR EXCHANGE.

London terminus was reached, what Mau-
rice termed “a good swop” had been
effected: The fern roots were tied up in
the red silk handkerchief, and a wriggling
ball of fur was safely caged in Kathie’s
basket, with many fond assurances, as, |
“We shall soon be home now, uy
dear! Don’t cry!”

They decided to call the kitten ““Muffie.” »
That was Kathie’s suggestion, because,
she said, its tail was just like one of the
ends of grandma’s squirrel boa.

“That’s a regular girl’s reason!” laughed
Maurice, with the superiority of his sex
and additional two years of age. “ Better
eall it ‘Boarie, I should think.”

Muffie proved to be an affectionate
little creature, and just as cunning and
playful as she was pretty. The children
were very proud when a friend of their
mother’s said she knew some one who had
given ten shillings at a bazaar for a kitten
that was no handsomer. ‘“ You must take
care of it,” she added, “for it is quite
worth stealing.”



A FAIR EXCHANGE. 15

Maurice and Kathie declared that
Muffie was the “darlingest” kitten ever
seen, and that they wouldn’t part with
her “ for worlds.”

But before Muffie had lived with them
a month, something happened—something
they can never forget—which made them,
at least as far as the latter resolution was
concerned, actually change their minds.

They were riding with their father in a
tram-car one day, along a busy thorough-
fare, on their way to a large clothing-store,
to buy Maurice a new overcoat.

As they passed a hospital, some one
signalled to the driver to stop, and with
some difficulty an anxious-looking woman
. got in, carrying in her arms a boy, whose
worn face and intelligent dark eyes sug-
gested that he was at least ten years old,
though he was no bigger than Kathie. .

The car was already quite full, but the
conductor had no doubt concluded ‘that
some one would make room for the poor
woman and her pitiful burden. And he
was right, for the “some one” was Maurice



16 _ A FAIR EXCHANGE.

Sterling, who at once jumped up, saying
pleasantly, “Take my seat, please.”

The woman did so with a grateful look,
and as she settled herself and her charge,
the children saw that the boy’s legs were
perfectly helpless and limp, and almost
as thin as sticks. He was paralyzed. —

Meanwhile a strange commotion had
arisen at the end of the car next the
entrance, and was spreading. Passengers
were springing to their feet and staring
down the road behind the vehicle with
their eyes dilated with horror. One or
two jumped out in panic. -

“What is it? What's the matter?”
asked people at the inner end, for those
standing up entirely blocked out their
view of what was happening.

The next moment there was a thun-
dering rattle, a fearful crash against the
hind part of the tram-car, and with a
splintering of wood-work and a smashing _
of glass, the vehicle was almost ‘thrown
over on its side by the shock.

(9)



FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY. 17

CHAPTER ITI.
FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY.

THe next thing that Kathie knew was
that some one was dragging her out of
the general confusion. The next minute
she was in the conductors arms, who
quickly handed her over to her father.

“O father, what has happened?” she
sobbed, clinging to him. “Are we safe
now? Where’s Maurice ?”

“Here I am!” answered the boy,
springing towards them. He was very
pale, and his hands were bleeding; but
he declared he was “all right—only
scratched a little with the broken glass.”

“Then we three are uninjured,” said
Mr. Sterling. “Thank God for that! I
fear some of our companions are a good
deal hurt. Take Kathie home, Maurice
dear, or take her out of this crowd and
wait for me. I think I may be of some

use to the others.”
; (9) 2



18 FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY.

Maurice would much rather have lin-
gered in the midst of the scene of action,
exciting though painful as was the sight
of the rescue of unfortunate passengers
and the efforts to right the car. But as he
hesitated, his father gave him some pence.

“Go over to White the confectioner’s
shop,” he said. “It is just across the road,
and Mrs. White knows us. Get some hot
milk for yourself and Kathie, and ask
Mrs. White to be kind enough to bind
up your hand.”

“What happened, Maurice, really ?”
asked Kathie, as, clinging closely to her
brother, she let him make a way through
the mass of curious bystanders that had
collected round the spot.

“A heavy two-horse van bolted—that
is, the horses did—and ran into us. I
didn’t see myself, but that’s what I heard
somebody say.”

“ Are many of the people hurt ?”

“T shouldn’t wonder. I fell on top of
a gentleman, and that saved me; but he
said he believed his wrist was broken.”





:
:



FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY. — 19

“Q Maurice, I wonder what became
of that cripple boy!” exclaimed Kathie.
“T do hope he isn’t hurt, poor dear!”

“The horses shied at a steam-roller in
George Street,” said a man whom they
were just then passing; “and the driver
had had a drop too much, and was not
up to his work.”

“A ’bus might have got out of the
way,” said another, “but the car couldn’t ;

' and the van, swerving across the road,

caught itin the rear. There'll be damages
for some of ’em to pay.”

- “Tt’s a good thing the hospital is so
close,” said Maurice. “Look! they’re
taking a lady in now.”

They had by this time reached the
confectioner’s shop, and kind Mrs. White
wanted them to go into her parlour ; but
they preferred to stay where they could
see the steps of the hospital opposite, and
catch glimpses of what was going on at
the scene of the disaster. She gave
them some nice hot milk with ginger
and sugar in it—“‘to warm their poor



20 FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY.

little insides after their fright,” she said—
and tied up Maurice’s cut fingers with
linen rag as carefully as his own mother
would have done.

While this was going on they saw
several of their fellow-passengers enter
the friendly doors of the hospital—all
except one able to walk. Among these
Maurice recognized the mother of the
little cripple.

“But where can the poor boy be?”
said Kathie anxiously. ‘“O Maurice,
suppose they haven’t got him out yen
I’m afraid he'll be dead.”

“Do you mean Davie Dent?” auleed
Mrs. White.

“We don’t know his name,” said Kathie.
“But his mother had to carry him, and
they got in just here. He didn’t seem
able to use his legs.”

“ Ah, yes, that’s Davie. I know him
and his mother well,” said Mrs. White.
“She brings him to the hospital every
Tuesday, and always calls here for a yes-
terday’s bun before she takes him in.”



FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY. 21

“ And can’t he walk at all?” ;

“He has never been able since he was
two years old. His mother is a widow, a
superior sort of woman, but very poor. I
hope, please God,” added Mrs. White,
with tears in her kind eyes, “that she is
not badly injured, for poor little Davie has
nobody but her in the world.”

At that moment Maurice exclaimed,
“ Here’s father!” and Mr. Sterling entered
the shop, with, to the children’s surprise
and relief, the very subject of their con-
versation nestling in his arms.

“T’m going to carry him home,” he

explained. “It is only as far as Brick-
wall Street; and his mother has gone
over the way to have her shoulder seen
to—she is afraid it is out of joint.”
_ Davie gave Maurice a beautiful smile
as he recognized him as the boy who had
made room in the car for his mother, and
more hot milk was asked for.

Maurice and Kathie wanted to go with
their father when he set out for Brickwall
Street, but he said it would be better for



22 FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY.

them to return to their home, which was
not more than a mile away.

So the brother and sister went back
alone, and told all the exciting story to
their mother; and she gave them “ coffee
for tea”—a great treat—to refresh them,
and opened a pot of her choice apple-jelly,
because Kathie was too much upset to
want anything to eat, and said over and
over again how thankful they must be
that they were not hurt.

When Mr. Sterling came back he
brought additional news. He had re-
mained with Davie Dent until his mother
came back from the hospital; her dis-
located shoulder had been set, but it was
likely to be some time before she would
be able to follow her occupation—that of
first-class ironing—because, unfortunately,
_ it was her right side that was hurt.

“We must go and see her, poor thing,
and see after them a little,” said Mrs.
Sterling. “It isn’t much we can do;
but I’m sure we can manage a trifle of
help, if only out of gratitude to God that



FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY. 23

we have been preserved from pain and
’ sorrow ourselves.”

Kathie remembered this when she saw
her mother take the old red-velvet rose
out of her last winter’s bonnet, and after
carefully trimming up the frayed edges,
put it in her left-off summer one, to make
a change for autumn, for she knew that
she ad meant to have a brand-new
bonnet that very week.

“Morrie,” she said, as they played at

- cat’s-cradle in the fire-light next evening,
“don’t you think it would be nice if we—
just you and I, I mean—could give some-
thing to thank God for not letting any of
us be hurt yesterday ?”

“We do give to the missionary-box,”
said Maurice, “and the Homes. I don’t
know what more we could give.”

“ Something special, I mean, and extra.”

“ A thank- offering like?” said Maurice.

“Yes,”

“But we're both saving up as hard as
ever we can for father’s birthday,” objected
Maurice.



, 24 FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY.

“So we are. I forgot that,” said
Kathie. “But perhaps there might be
some other way. Hark! there’s mother.
Now we shall hear all about Davie.”
And the little girl ran to meet her.

But Mrs. Sterling had not much more
to tell the children than they had pre-
viously learned from Mrs. White. The
Dents were quite alone in the world, and
‘very poor; but how poor no one would
have guessed from the appearance of their
neat little home.

“Davie seems to be a dear boy, and.
devoted to his mother,” she said. “But
his case is not a very hopeful one, I fear.
If anybody could do anything for him, I
believe it would be Dr. Stiltz, whose
treatment cured young Barton. But he
is, of course, quite out of the question.”

“Tf you were only rich, mother, eh?”
said Maurice suggestively.

“Ah, Sif? Well, if we can’t do what
we would, we must do what we can,”
replied Mrs. Sterling. “TI have promised
that as to-morrow is half-holiday, you two



FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY. 25

children shall go and keep Davie company
while Mrs. Dent goes to the hospital
again about her shoulder. I knew you.
would like to.”

“Oh yes!” cried Kathie. ‘And then
we can take him something perhaps.”

When the brother and sister set out
the following afternoon on their errand of
kindness, Kathie carried a posy of golden-
_ brown chrysanthemums, cut from her own
pet plant, and Maurice a favourite book
of adventure, which had been his latest
school prize.

Davie’s home was the ground-floor
room of a shabby house in a street that
swarmed with children; boys, girls, and
babies were running in ad out of nearly
all the open front doors, and playing on
the doorsteps, and climbing the broken
railings. They stared hard at Maurice
and Kathie, seeing at a glance that they
were not of themselves, and some of
the ruder ones “ made faces” at them.

“Give us a flower!” shouted one boy,
planting himself in front of the little girl.





26 FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY.

“Oh, I really can’t,” she replied.

“Thank you, miss; I thought you
would.” And making a snatch at her
beautiful chrysanthemums, the impudent
boy bore them away triumphantly to the
other side of the road, where he waved
them above his head, grinning and danc-
ing, and singing a song about “the bo-kay
what a young lady give me.”

Maurice, of course, dashed after him,
though Kathie vainly tried to hold him
back. It would have been better, perhaps,
to have borne the loss; but what boy
could calmly bear to see his sister insulted
and robbed? After a struggle and a few
energetic cuffs about the miscreant’s ears,
in the administration of which Maurice
was encouraged by many a “Go it!” and
“Walk it into him!” from the crowd of
children that instantly collected round,
proving the general unpopularity of the
young thief, the unlucky flowers, or what
remained of them, were rescued and carried
back to Kathie, who, pale and trembling,
stood awaiting the issue of the conflict.



THE THANK-OFFERING. 27

The vanquished one slunk in sullen
rage round the nearest corner, but not
till he had assured Maurice with a vin-
dictive look that threatened far more
than his words that he “owed him one,”
and should not forget.

Maurice carelessly said, “All right,”
but he little thought under what cir-
cumstances he should see that coarse, ill-
favoured countenance again.

CHAPTER III.
THE THANK-OFFERING.

“THat was Sam Bangs, I shouldn’t won-
der,” said Davie, when they told him. “He
lives next door, on the second floor. He’s
horrid. All the little children round here
are afraid of him. But I’m glad you
licked him ; he’s an awful coward.”
“What a noisy place for you to be
in,” said Kathie, thinking how different
Davie’s gentle face and thoughtful, dark



28 THE THANK-OFFERING.

eyes were from the faces ey had seen
out in the street.
. “Oh, I don’t mind it,” answered the
cripple. “It’s quiet enough when they
are all at school.”

“Then it’s rather dull, I suppose?”
said Maurice. :

“Tt isn’t very lively when mother’s out

all day,” Davie admitted. “But I didn’t
seem to notice it so much when Napoleon
was here.”

“Who ?.” asked Maurice, staring.

“ Napoleon, my cat,” answered Davie,
with a rather sad little laugh. “We
called him Napoleon Bonaparte because
_ when he came to us, poor chap, he was
a stray, half starved, and all bony part.”

“Where is he now, then 2?”

“He met with an accident—got run
over by a bicycle—and had to be killed.
And I do miss him something awful.”

“Tm so fond of. cats,” said Kathie
sympathetically. “What was yours like?”

“ He was a beauty—a silver-orey tabby
and a half Persian. Such a tail he had—



THE THANK-OFFERING. 29

like a squirrel almost. Ah, I shall never
have such a beauty again.”

“Perhaps you wouldn't care for
another?” said Kathie, and though her
heart beat fast as she waited for his
answer, she could not have told whether
she most hoped he would say “yes” or
“no.” ¢

“Oh, yes I should!” answered Davie,
“ specially if it was anything like dear old
Nap. I don’t know that I should care
for a black or a spotted one.” .
_ Kathie looked all round the shabby

little room. Spotlessly neat and clean as
everything was, it looked dreadfully dull
and bare—no tempting rows of books, ‘as
there were in her own home, no plants or
flowers, no piano or violin, no chess-table
in the corner. As her eyes came back
from their tour of investigation, they met
her brother’s, and a wordless question
flashed between them.

The chrysanthemums were placed in
water in an empty jam pot, and the chil-
dren left Davie with the book of travels



30 THE THANK-OFFERING,

cuddled up affectionately in his arm, and
a face quite rosy with pleasure at the
promise of seeing them soon again.

For some distance the sister and brother
walked hand in hand and without speak-
ing. Then Kathie said,—

“T know what you were thinking of
when Davie talked about his pussy.”

“Well, it did seem sort of funny,”
Maurice confessed, “specially after what
you said last night about a thank-offering,
and its being a Persian too. Poor chap,
he doesn’t have a very festive time of it
most days, I reckon.”

“T knew you thought just the same as
I did, Morrie,” said Kathie, squeezing her |
brother's hand, and giving a little skip of
satisfaction. “We've got such a lot of
things, haven’t we? And Davie has got
nothing, hardly, and can’t even go out
except on those dreadful crutches. We
must ask mother, of course; but I’m sure
she won’t mind.”

Mrs. Sterling did not “mind,” but she
was surprised when her boy and girl asked



THE THANK-OFFERING. 31

her if they might give away their beloved
Mutffie to Davie Dent; she was also a good
deal touched, for she knew how much true
gratitude and sympathy must be in their
young hearts to cause them to wish to
make such a, sacrifice.

_It was not by any means because
Kathie had changed her mind that two or
three warm splashes fell on Muffie’s soft
fur as she coaxed the kitten into the hay-
lined basket in which its short journey to
Brickwall Street was to be taken.

“ But I know Davie will be kind to you,
you little pet,” she said, “or we would
never let you go. And we'll come and
see you sometimes, dear—very often, per-
haps—so you won't forget us. And Morrie
and I are going to pay for your meat and
milk every week, just the same as if you
lived with us—at least, while Mrs. Dent
is out of work. I’m sure Davie will love
you ever'so much and make you happy.”

Then with lingering “good-byes” and
many kisses on the silky top of Muffie’s
head (which the kitten returned—“ just as





32 THE THANK-OFFERING.

if it understood,” Kathie said—in little
tender dabs of its damp little nose all over
her chin), the lid was at length fastened
down. But it was lifted up again at the
last moment, that an empty cotton-reel
might be slipped in, “in case Muffie felt
lonesome going along, and wanted some;
thing to play with.”

Kathie was disappointed that her mother
would not let her accompany Maurice to
Brickwall Street when he took the kitten;
but after their previous experience she
thought it not right for her little girl to
venture into such a rough neighbourhood
without a grown-up~protector.

She anxiously watched for Maurice’s
return, and when he came back his face
was still radiant with the reflected joy of
Davie’s delight in his present.

“J just wish you could have seen him,”
he said. “Why, he was so pleased, and
surprised, and so grateful to us, that he
very nearly cried. He said Muffie was
- almost exactly like his Nap, only so much
handsomer-—just as if Nap had come back



THE THANK-OFFERING. 33

a lot improved by being away. And
Muffie took to him like anything; you
never would have believed it. She took
to him from the first, just as she did to us;
but of course he was very gentle and nice
to her. He’s really an awfully nice sort
of boy. She lay on his breast, and put
her paws up under his chin, and purred
like anything. He was delighted.”

“T’m so glad we thought of it,” cried
Kathie, dancing, while her eyes, all their
tears dry now, sparkled like stars. “ And
you didn’t meet that horrid boy ?”

“No, I didn’t see anything of him,”
Maurice replied; “but I shouldn’t have
cared if I had. Tm not afraid of him.”

"And the boy spoke truly ; he had plenty
. of courage, as was by-and-by to be proved.
But he might, at least, have felt a trifle
uneasy had he known that he had been
narrowly watched, both going in and com-
ing out of the Dents’ house, by the cunning
eye of Master Bangs ; moreover, that his
visit, the: object of which was speedily

ascertained, formed the subject of an ear-
©) 3.



34 THE THANK-OFFERING.

‘nest discussion between that youth and
his particular chum in a dark doorway
after he—Maurice—was safely in bed and
asleep that night.

“T can grab her easy enough,” quoth
the chum, who was a resident in the same
house as the Dents; “and that shop at
the corner opposite the ‘Lion’ is about
the best. The ole woman there won’t
ask no questions; and she’s so blind she’d
never know you again if so be it was to
be asked after.”

“Tt’s a fine cat,” said Sammy. “I
ketched a sight of it through the winder.
It’s a real Pershun cat—not like that
mangy thing he used to have, what ’ad
got all his years tore with fightin’. It’s
worth five bob to buy, and I dessay the
ole woman ’ud give two or p’r’aps three for
it. Id let it go for one, that I would,” he
added, “if only to be quits with my fine
young gentleman as brought it here.”

“Well, you promise you'll go halves, . _

fair and square, if I nab the cat, don’t
you?” said his friend. And on the bargain



THE THANK-OFFERING. 35

being confirmed with the necessary em-
phasis, he concluded, “ Very well, then;
look out for me at dinner-time to-morrow.”

It was several days before the Sterlings
saw anything of the Dents again; and
then Kathie went with her mother, full
of the hope of seeing her dear Muffie once
more.

Mrs. Dent was at home, and seemed
very pleased to receive the visitors; but
as soon as they entered they felt that
the room was strangely clouded.

Kathie’s eager question, “How is
Muffie ?” soon brought a confession of the
cause of their trouble. The cat was lost.
It had disappeared about noon on the
very next day after Maurice had taken it
there, and had not been seen since.

“And the worst of it is,” said poor
Davie, fairly breaking down, “I’m ’most
certain that bully of a boy Bangs has
somehow made away with it, and done it
to spite Master Maurice for licking him
_ the other day. The boy upstairs owns he -
went and told him who gave it to me;



36 FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN.

and somebody—I’m sure it’s him, for
it’s just like his ways—comes and mews
just outside this window every night. I
thought it was Muffie the first night, and
mother got up to see, and then we heard
him run away.”

“T’m‘as sorry for missie as ever I can
be,” said Mrs. Dent, seeing Kathie’s
mouth quiver as she silently tried to keep
back her tears, “for J know what store
she set by the pretty creature.”

“Tt was such a dear!” sobbed Kathie.
“And to think of that dreadful boy!
How I wish Maurice had let him alone!
He said he’d remember it. O poor, poor,
sweet little Muffie !”

CHAPTER IV.
FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN.

Karate cried herself to sleep that night,
and Maurice—well, the things he vowed
in the heat of his indignation he would

he



FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN. 37

like to do to Sammy Bangs, I had perhaps
better not set down here. . It certainly did
seem hard, after parting with their pet to
make Davie happy, that the only result
should be to cause both him and them-
selves a great deal of sorrow. And the
uncertainty as to Muffie’s fate was the
saddest part of it.

Kathie whispered their trouble in her
prayers every day, for she knew that
nothing is too small for God to help.

It was about four days after the dis-
appearance of Muffie that Maurice was
playing with some companions in the
park, when their attention was attracted
by seeing a number of children running
towards the lake where the ducks were
kept. So they ran too.

When they came nearer the spot they
saw that a boy had climbed into one of
the overhanging trees, and was creeping
along a branch that stretched a good way
over the water, apparently with the hope
of being able to reach a ball an was
floating just underneath.



38 FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN.

A very queer feeling ran through
Maurice as he recognized in the venture-
some youth who was the centre of ob-
servation none other than Sammy Bangs.

Something inside him—I’m sure it was
not himself, or, at least, not his best self—
said, “ Wouldn’t it serve him right if-—’

And at that very instant snap went the
bough, and Sam Bangs was plunged head
first into the lake. Maurice felt just as
if he had done it.

The boy disappeared under the water, ~
which at that part was quite deep enough
to drown him. Then he came up again,
clutching wildly at the detached branch,
which, however, was not big enough to
keep him afloat. Then he went down
again, and most of the children stood
staring in helpless, fascinated silence.
But a few ran away, they hardly knew
whither, shouting “ Help! help!”

Maurice could swim well—his father
had taught him; and while strangely-
mingled thoughts of God, and the Bible,
and lis mother, and of Him who died for



FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN. 39

His worst enemies flashed all at once
through his mind, he flung off his jacket
and clambered over the iron railing that
protected the lake. The next minute he
was dragging Sam through the water to

the nearest bank, and by the time assist- -

ance arrived, both were standing safe but
dripping on dry ground.

He did not wait for thanks—he did not
even know whether or not Sam recognized
him—but hurried away home, as he knew
his mother would wish, to get off his wet
clothes.

“Tt was nothing much to do after all,”
he said, as he sat toasting his already
glowing feet by the fire and sipping the
hot beef-tea which his mother had made
him, “because I knew I could swim.
You can’t fairly call it brave, for there was
nothing to be afraid of. But just for the
fraction of a minute. I did almost feel as
if ’'d rather leave him there to flounder
out the best way he could.” Pa

“But you conquered, dearie,” said his
mother, dropping a kiss on the top of his



40 FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN.

curly head, “and that is what makes
mother’s heart glad.”

Later in the day a certain musty little
shop opposite the Lion was the scene
of a strange argument. It was a shop
where birds and animals of various kinds
were kept in cages for sale. Inside were
canaries, linnets, and redpoles, tame rats,
and white mice; on the pavement outside
stood hutches filled with rabbits, guinea-
pigs, and pigeons. In one box, with a
wire front, was curled up a very pretty,
fluffy, tabby kitten, and chalked on the
side of the box were the words: ‘“ Pure
Persian cat for sale. Only 5s.”

The argument was between the near-
sighted old lady who kept the shop and a
shock-headed boy of anything but pre-
possessing’ countenance.

“You give me two bob for it, didn’t
you?” he was demanding.

“Yes; I know I did. What of
that?” .

“Well, if you'll let me have it back Pll
clear that lot off in three weeks, and a



FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN. 41

tanner extra inter the bargin. I kin earn
pence when I likes.”

“ A likely tale indeed !” said the woman
incredulously. “If I was fool enough to
let you take the cat away, it’s a lot I
should see of you, or your ‘tanners’ either,
again.”

Then Sammy, after the manner of boys
of his sort, whose word cannot be be-
lieved, declared with an oath that he
really would pay up as he said, if only
Mrs. Cummins would let him Sage back
“the Pershun cat.”

“Tt were stole, there!” he confessed,
as she still remained obdurate. “‘ That’s
why I wants it. An’ the chap I got it of—
leastways the chap it belonged to by rights
—has done me a rare good turn, and—”

“There, shut up, and be off with you!”
cried Mrs. Cummins. “ You swore when
you brought the cat here as you’d come
by it honest, and I believe you now about:
as much as I did then. The cat’s mine,
bought and paid for, and you’re not goin’
to have it agin, to go and sell to some-



42 FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN.

body else—not if you went down on your
bended knees. Now be off, I tell you, or

Tl send for a bobby—that I will—and give
you in charge.”

However, poor untutored Sam’s remorse
and his unavailing desire to make up for
the wrong he had done Maurice eradualy
made him desperate.

One foggy November afternoon, just as
dusk was closing in, and before the gas
in the streets and shops was well lighted,
Maurice was going home to tea from a
special class that he attended once a week,
when he stopped to look at some rabbits
that were exposed for sale outside a
stuffy-looking little corner shop.

As he stood there, hidden by the
piled-up hutches, he saw a boy about
his own size slip stealthily inside the
shop, which was full of cages of all kinds
and very dark.

A minute or two later he darted out
again, carrying in his arms a struggling |
bundle of grey fur—a little Persian
cat.



FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN. 43

The outside gas-burners at the next
shop flared up brilliantly at the same
moment, and instantly Maurice recognized
Sam Bangs and Muffie.

Before he had time to speak to him,
the kitten made a wild spring for liberty,
and escaped. Both boys instantly gave
chase; but Maurice, understanding animals
better than Sam, went to work in a more
judicious way, and soon had the happiness
of clasping his own dear little Muffie safe
and sound in his arms.

He expected next to have to dispute
possession of the animal with Sam, but
that youth had suddenly disappeared.

Too exultant with delight to consider
at present the how and why of Muffie’s
residence in that little shop, Maurice was
setting off homewards at once with his
restored pet purring on his breast, when a
policeman approached him from behind
with business-like strides, and laid a heavy
hand upon the boy’s shoulder.

“Whose cat is that?” demanded the
constable sternly.



AA FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN.

“Mine!” was Maurice’s instant reply,
as he faced the man in amazement.

“T shall have to trouble you to prove
that before I let you go,” answered the
policeman; and Maurice saw to his
horror that he was fast becoming the
centre of a staring crowd of men, women,
and children. ;

“Tt is mine!” he repeated. “We lost
it—at least, a boy we gave it to lost it;
and—and I’m swre it’s the same.”

An old woman, bare-headed and very
much excited, was pushing her way.
through the crowd

“T saw him—I saw him slip into the
shop, and open the cage, and take it out!”
she cried. ‘TI ain’t so blind but I did see
that. I was just behind the parlour-door,
but I couldn’t get out fast enough to
ketch the young scamp.”

“Tt was that other boy—it wasn’t me!”
protested Maurice. “J saw him ‘do it
too; he’s run away.”

“You'll have to come along with me all
the same,” said the constable, who had



FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD. 45

never loosened his grip on our hero's
arm.

Protests, tears, entreaties were all in
vain. Maurice Sterling was marched off
in custody towards the nearest police-
station, surrounded and followed by an
ever-increasing concourse of interested
spectators. To crown his misery, Muftie,
scared by the crowd and the noise, sud-
denly leaped from his embrace, scaled the
nearest wall, jumped down on the other
side, and was once more lost.

CHAPTER V.
FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD.

Tue next five minutes was the most
dreadful of all Maurice’s twelve years
of life. What a sudden and complete
revulsion from the joy which had so
closely preceded it! He could hardly
‘realize that it was actually himself who
was .being thus ignominiously hustled



46 FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD.

along. Was he only dreaming that this
dreadful thing had occurred ?

But no! it was all too horribly, solidly
real—the streets and shops he knew so

well, the dank fog, and the staring, inqui-
sitive faces around him. With the irre-
pressible tears running silently down his
cheeks, the poor boy’s heart rose in pite-
ous entreaty to the One who, he knew,
could help him—the One who knew he
had done nothing to merit the shameful
position he was in.

But see! the crowd parts, and a boy -
pushes eagerly through to the policeman’ s
side. Itis Sammy Bangs, all the best in
his nature brought to the surface by the
sight of his hero suffering for his fault.

“« Please, sir,” he breathlessly gasped,
“it wasn’t him; it was me. TJ stole the
cat. I’ve got to go to prison ’stid of him.”

“What do you mean?” demanded the
policeman, pausing.

“T stole the cat!” repeated Sammy.
“Tt. was his first, an’ he give it to an-
other chap, an’ another chap nabbed it



FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD. AT

"way from him, an’ I sold it to the ole
woman, an’ we went halves, an’-—”

“You'd better come with me to the
police-station, both of you, and explain
there,” said the constable, who could make
neither head nor tail of this rigmarole,
but suspected that the new-comer was far
more likely to be the true culprit than the
respectable-looking lad he had first appre-
hended.

At the police-station the several state-
ments of the four persons most concerned
were patiently listened to by the inspector,
Sammy frankly confessing all his guilt in
the matter, and telling how “the young
gentleman” (whose name he did not:
know) had jumped into the lake to save
his life; while Maurice, though keeping
strictly to the truth, endeavoured to say
as little as he possibly could to make
things bad for Sammy.

The police inspector, as it happened,
knew Mr. Sterling very well, which fact
went in favour of Maurice; and Mrs.
Cummins, fearing reprimand, or worse,



48 FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD.

for not making stricter inquiries before
she bought the cat, and hoping that if
she effectively represented her case to
Mr. Sterling, he might be induced to
make some reparation to her for her loss,
withdrew the charge. So the group thus
strangely brought together separated on
more or less amicable terms, Maurice
shaking hands heartily with Sam Bangs,
while the latter promised to do his very
utmost to find and restore the lost cat.

The children were not long in com-
municating to Davie the happy intelligence

that Muffie was at least not dead; and
together they scoured the neighbourhood
in which the cat had escaped, with an
house-to-house inquiry as to whether the
inhabitants could give them any informa-
tion concerning their missing pet.

The gentle knock at the door, followed
by the modest and apologetic “ Please, do
you happen to have seen a tabby Persian
kitten about ?” generally met with a sym-
pathetic answer, even though, as was nearly
always the case, it was in the negative.



FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD. 49

One or two persons, however, fancied
they had noticed the animal described.
Once it was in somebody’s front garden,
another time it had been observed on the
roof of an outhouse, and yet again, to the
children’s great distress, a cat bearing
apparently a strong resemblance to Muffie
had been seen taking refuge in a tree by
the churchyard gate from the persecutions
of a group of unfeeling boys.

Failing to obtain any news that was of
any practical use to them, Mr. Sterling
suggested that bills should be printed
offering a reward of five shillings for the
recovery of the cat. This, he thought,
would be pretty sure to result in the
return of Muffie, if the animal were still
anywhere in the neighbourhood. “The
chance of earning five shillings will stir
up the observation and intelligence of
every boy and girl in the place,” he
said. oe

It stirred up something, certainly, as
the knocks at the Sterlings’ front door

during the day or two succeeding the ex-
(9) 4



50 FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD. -

hibition of the bills abundantly proved ;
but it is doubtful whether the qualities of
either observation or intelligence were
thereby conspicuously displayed. Indeed,
it would even seem that the prospect of
the reward had so dazzled the eyes of
some of the youngsters who read about it
as to prevent them from distinguishing a
Persian pussy from a tailless Manx cat,
or a kitten from an elderly Tom with the
marks upon him of many.a midnight fray.
Members of the feline race of all sorts
and sizes were brought hourly for the
inspection of the advertiser.

“Large cats, small cats, lean cats, brawny cats,
Brown cats, black cats, grey cats, tawny cats,
Grave old mousers, gay young friskers,
Pussies all, with tails and whiskers.”

But among all these numerous applicants
no Muffie, nor any cat resembling her,
- once appeared.

“T wonder, now,” said Mr. Blaney,
the stationer, as he picked out for Maurice
one of his finest mapping pens, “‘ whether
Miss Woolman can have got hold of it.”



FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD. 51

“Who is Miss Woolman?” asked the boy.
‘Have you never heard of her? I’m
surprised at that,” said Mr. Blaney. “She
lives at the house that stands by itself with
the trees all round it in Church Grove.”
“T know the house,” exclaimed Maurice.
“Tt’s rather a queer, dull, shabby, unin-
habited, peculiar-looking place, isn’t it ?”
“That's the one. And Miss Woolman
is rather peculiar, too, if none of your
other adjectives will fit her,” said the
stationer. “She is said to be very well
off, and not quite right in her mind, you
know; but whether that’s true or not, I
can’t say. However, it isa fact that she
keeps an uncommon lot of cats—picks up
all the strays she can find, you know; and
spmciimies) perhaps, gets hold by mistake
of some that are not astray. Jt seems
as if she ean’t get enough to satisfy her.
Then she never lets them go out of doors,
if she can help it; so there’s not much
chance of their finding their way home
again. There,” concluded Mr. Blaney,
“that’s about as fine and flexible a nib



52 FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD.

as youd find in a hundred; it’s just
perfect.”

“Thank you very much,” said Maurice.
“ And you think this Miss Woolman may
be taking care of our Muffie?”

“Well, there wouldn’t be any harm in
your just calling to inquire, would there ?”

“No, indeed. I'll go this very day;
and thank you for telling me.”

Neither Mr. nor Mrs. Sterling could
possibly spare time from their other duties
to accompany the children to Church
Grove that afternoon; but as the next day
would be Sunday, and the suspense of
uncertainty hard to bear, the brother and
sister received permission to go if they
liked by themselves. |

So in the afternoon they set out to-
gether, conscious that a certain flavour of
_ adventure surrounded this errand from
which all previous visits of inquiry had
been free. —

Kathie held Maurice’s hand very tightly
as they entered the heavy, rusty, iron
gate to Elm Lodge, as the house that



“THROUGH GOOD COMES BETTER.” 58

stood by itself was called. Viewed from
within the shade of those tall, now gaunt
and leafless trees, it looked even more
gloomy and uninviting than from without.
The stone steps were grey and green with
long neglect, and the dim, narrow windows
had apparently not been cleaned for years.

Three times Maurice knocked at the
door without receiving any reply; but a
chorus of mews in various tones from
inside sounded reassuring. They had
evidently come to.the right house, and
Miss Woolman’s interesting family were
apparently under the impression that
their purveyor of meat had arrived.

CHAPTER VI.

“THROUGH GOOD COMES BETTER,
. AND FROM BETTER, BEST.”

Art last the door was opened a few inches
by an elderly person of the charwoman
type, who was extremely deaf.



54 ‘THROUGH GOOD COMES BETTER,

Maurice’s inquiry, “Is Miss Woolman
at. home?” had to be repeated several
times before it elicited the reply, “ Yes,
she is. What do you want?”

“We want to’ see her, please.”

“What do you want to see her about ?”
demanded the woman. ‘She don’t give.
to no school treats.- She’s got enough
to do with her money without that.”

“We are not begging for anything,”
answered Maurice, colouring. “We want
to ask her about a cat.”

“Oh, acat!” The servant’s face softened,
and she opened the door a trifle wider.
Then after a few moments’ hesitation
she said, “I'll ask if she'll see you.” And
pushing back several inquisitive pussy-
faces that were peering out, she shut the
door again, and left the children to wait
upon the step.

It was not long, however, before she
returned. They might walk in, she said.

Maurice and Kathie were thereupon
conducted into what, in any other house,
would have been the drawing-room, but



AND FROM BETTER, BEST.” 55

its furnishing and occupants were the
strangest they had ever seen.

There were arm-chairs all round the
apartment, filled with downy - looking
‘cushions covered with satin or silk, and
curled up in almost every one of them
was a sleepy cat. By the side of each
chair or underneath it was a pretty, fancy
china saucer, containing refreshment for
the feline pet. Ona thick sheepskin rug
in front of a magnificent fire sprawled
three or four more fat and lazy creatures ;
while several flannel-lined baskets in the
cosiest corners of the room contained
pussy-mothers purring blissfully among
their broods of little ones.

The children could not help being both
amused and pleased by this curious cat
show. But Maurice said, “I don’t see
what they want with such lovely cushions.
I should just like one or two of them for
poor old Davie when his back aches.”

At that moment the door opened, and
a lady, not-much better attired than the
servant, entered the room. Her rusty,



56 “THROUGH GOOD COMES BETTER,

black gown was in need of mending in
several places; she wore no neat, white -
collar or frill round her neck; and her
grey hair appeared, a8 Maurice rather
irreverently told his mother afterwards,
“as if she usually brushed it with the
carpet-broom.” Nevertheless, there was
something not at all unpleasant in the
expression of her bright, dark eyes and
brown face, and her greeting of “ Well,
now, what do you want of me?” though
abrupt, was not unkind.

Once more Maurice uttered his oft-
repeated inquiry as to whether she had
seen anything of a Persian tabby kitten.

“Have you lost one?” sharply de-
manded Miss Woolman.

“Yes. It ran away in Market Road,”
answered the boy; “and as that is near
here, and we heard that you are kind to
cats, we thought perhaps you had found it
astray, and were taking care of it.”

“ And this cat you speak of is yours ?
What is your name?” was the lady’s
next query.



AND FROM BETTER, BEST.” 57

“My name is Maurice Sterling. And
—well, Muffie isn’t exactly ours now,
though she was until the other day,” ex-
plained our hero. “She really belongs
to Davie Dent. We gave her to him;
but he—”

“Davie who?” interrupted Miss Wool-
man,

“Davie Dent, who lives in Brickwall
Street. But he's a cripple—paralyzed—
so he can’t look about after it himself;
so we are trying to find it for him.”

“Ts his mother living ?”

“Oh yes!” replied Maurice, wonder
ing what that could have to do with the
ownership of Muffie. “But she has to
go out to work; or she would, if she had
not hurt her arm. She can’t go round
after the cat.”

“Goes out to work, does she?” repeated
Miss Woolman. “Are they poor, then?”

“Oh yes, very,” Maurice told her,
while Kathie edged closer to him and
took hold of:his hand. These irrelevant
questions would indeed suggest that Miss



58 ‘THROUGH GOOD. COMES BETTER,

Woolman was “not quite right in her
mind.” ‘Please, ma’am,” added the boy
after a pause, In which Miss Woolman was »
staring silently into the fire, “do you think
you have seen our Muffie anywhere?”

“Kh? What? Muffie? Ah, the cat
you are talking about!” said this singular
lady; waking up as if fromadream. “I
have had a little Persian cat here for two
or three days. J don’t. ‘know if it is the
one you are looking for. I'll find it, and
you shall see.”

She left the room again, and Kathie
whispered, “I shall be glad to get away
from here; shan’t you, Morrie? She’s
very peculiar, isn’t she ?”

“JT don’t know. I rather like her,”
answered the boy. ‘And I don’t believe
she’s any more out of her mind than you
or I. IT tell you what, though, Kathie.
I’ve a notion—”

Once again, however, were Maurice’s
remarks cut short by the entrance of Miss
Woolman, and this time Muffie was in
her arms.



AND FROM BETTER, BEST.” 59

Kathie sprang forward with a cry of
delight.

“It is—it is our own dear kitty! i
she exclaimed. ‘O Muffie, you darling, -
come to me!”

The immediate hoisting of Muffie’s flag
of rejoicing—her beautiful ostrich- feather-
like tail—and the evident pleasure with
which she purred round the children’s feet °
were incontestable evidence that they
were indeed old friends. Miss Woolman
did not attempt to dispute their right to
the cat; but she did, much to their dis-
appointment, object to letting them take
her away with them then and there.

“ How are you going to carry her?” she
said. ‘ You'll go and lose her again. You
ought to have brought a basket with you.”

“So we ought,” said Kathie. “ How
stupid of us not to thnk! But we would
hold her very tight—indeed we would.
We would be sure not to let her get
away.”

“We're so anxious, you see, for Davie
to have her again,” said Maurice. “He



60 “THROUGH GOOD COMES BETTER,

has been so unhappy ever since she was
lost.”

“Leave Davie Dent’s address with me,”
said Miss Woolman. “I. will send out
to buy a fish-basket, and I'll promise you
- Davie shall have his cat—well, before he
goes to bed to-night. I will take her to
him myself.”

And, unwilling as the children were to
depart without the cat, they were obliged
to give way to Miss Woolman’s wish.

Their feet were winged with gladness
as they ran along to Brickwall Street,
and their radiant faces told Davie their
happy news before they could find breath
to speak. Mrs. Dent was there, and
fully entered into the children’s joy.

“And Miss Woolman is going to
bring Muffie herself to-night, Davie, be-
fore you go to bed,” they said. “She
promised.” &

“Miss Woolman!” exclaimed “Mrs.
Dent. “Surely that’s your— What
sort of a person is she?” Davie’s mother
inquired. |



AND FROM BETTER, BEST.” 61

The children, between them, described
her as well as they could.

“Tt must be—it is the same!” cried
Mrs. Dent.—“< Davie dear, Miss Wool-
man is your godmother! I wonder if
she recognized our name ?”

“Tm sure she did,” said Maurice.
“T thought so at the time. When she
heard it she seemed quite strange.”

“My godmother!” Davie was repeat-
ing. “I didn’t know I had one.”

‘When you were a baby, Davie,” said
his mother, “although I had you chris-
tened (I was not a converted woman),
I did not realize the solemnity of the rite.
I chose Miss Woolman to be your god-
mother, not because she was a Christian
woman, who would endeavour to fulfil the
duties of her position, but simply because
she was well off. J have never talked to
you about her, because soon after your :
dear father died she much wanted me to
marry a cousin of hers; and because I
would not, she, quite regardless of her
relationship to you, threw us over in



62 ‘*THROUGH GOOD COMES BETTER,

dudgeon. .I have never seen or heard of
her since. And to think she should be
coming to see us to-night !”

Maurice and his sister returned home
in such a state of excitement that they
could neither eat nor sleep. Muffie was
found, but that was the least wonderful
part of the story they had to relate.
They had found a godmother—Kathie,
notwithstanding certain notable points of
incongruity, would insist on calling her
a fairy godmother—for poor Davie Dent.
Davie and his mother were hencefor-
ward to be relieved from all care, and to
have every comfort and luxury that money
could buy—aincluding, of course, treatment
for Davie by the celebrated Dr. Stiltz.
Miss Woolman was to give up her ex-
travagant number of cats, and lavish the
whole love of her heart upon her godson.
Davie and his mother were to remove
from Brickwall Street to Elm Lodge,
which was to be completely transformed
by their presence and on their behalf;
and Muffie, dear little Muffie, was to be



AND FROM BETTER, BEST.” 68

the household pet, honoured and beloved
as the indirect benefactor of them all.

Thus the children built castles and
dreamed dreams on that happy, never-
to-be-forgotten night. And, unlike most
of such airy visions, these for the greater
part actually came true.

Miss Woolman did open her eyes to
the fact that human beings are a good
deal better as objects of tenderness than
the best of cats. She took Davie and his
mother in their sadness and poverty into
her heart and home; and after a while
their quiet, Christian lives’ awoke within
her a sense of still higher but long ignored
duties and responsibilities.

Through his godmother’s generosity

~Davie’s disease received the best treat-
ment from the most skilled physicians ;
and though he never quite recovered the
_use of his limbs, his condition became
‘very much improved.

And who do you think is his faithful
attendant, companion, valet, and friend ?
None other than Sammy Bangs! His



64 ‘“ THROUGH eso COMES BETTER,”

connection with the Sterlings proved a
turning-point in his life. He began, -
at Maurice’s invitation, to attend the
Sunday-school class of which our hero’s
father was the teacher; and there his one
conspicuous virtue, that of gratitude, was
developed in‘all its beauty by the wonder-
ful gospel story. He grieved genuinely
over his past sins, and proved his repent-
ance, as in the case of the cat, by deeds
rather than words. His devotion to

Davie knows no bounds, and it seems as *

though he can never do enough to atone
for the hours of unhappiness he caused
him years ago.

THE END.



















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Full Text



The Baldwin Library
University






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THE STORY OF A PERSIAN CAT:
















































































































































































































































































THE ACCIDENT.

Page 17
THE STORY OF

LO eee SuAeN, © Aan



MUFFIE



T. NELSON AND Sons
London, Edinburgh, and New York


THE STORY OF

‘A PERSIAN CAT

‘BY

JEANNIE CHAPPELL

Author of “ Little Radiance,” ‘‘ The Youngest Princess,” °
&e, &e.



T. NELSON AND SONS -«
_ London, Edinburgh, and New York

1898




Il,

III.

Iv.

VIL

CONTENTS.



©

A FAIR EXCHANGE,

FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY, bese
THE THANK-OFFERING, eee
FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN,

FIVE SHILLINGS ae

“THROUGH GOOD COMES BETTER, AND FROM

BETTER, BEST,”



17

27

36

45

53

Baatge
Ni Lt Sh
THE STORY OF
Gee RES AG Nee Wieee



CHAPTER I.
A FAIR EXCHANGE.

T was a funny-shaped little bundle,

tied up in a red silk handkerchief,

and the owner deposited it very carefully

in a corner of the railway carriage seat at
her side.

Maurice and Kathie instantly began to
wonder. what was in it—not that they
were inquisitive children; but when one
has been shut up in a train for five hours,
every fresh passenger that enters, and all

his or her belongings, become objects of _
keen interest. Besides, there was some-


10 A FAIR EXCHANGE.

thing about this bundle which seemed
different from ordinary bundles, and the
person who brought it in with her—a
_ middle-aged lady—seemed to regard it
. with quite affectionate eyes.

It might have contained apples, of
course, or nuts, or buns ; but such things
don’t squirm about. And—pop !—while
Maurice and Kathie were. staring, the
mystery was solved, for out at one of the
openings of the handkerchief there sud-

denly peeped the end of a kitten’s tail!
_ And the end of that tail was the be-
ginning of my story.

The lady took the bundle on her lap,
and out at another opening instantly
popped a kitten’s head. Such a pretty
head! Tabby in colour, and chubby and
round, with a dear, little pink nose and
big, innocent, blue eyes; while the hand-
some ruffle of long fur in which it was set
proclaimed the pussy-baby to be no ordi-

nary cat, but an aristocratic Persian.

Maurice and Kathie exchanged a beam-
ing smile. Then they looked up at their
A FAIR EXCHANGE. 11

mother, and gathered her smile into their
own, then back at the kitten with an
added tenderness; so that when they met
the lady’s glance, she thought they were
‘two of the sweetest-looking children she
had seen in her life.

So she smiled back at them.

“Kitty isn’t used to travelling,” she

said. ‘It has come a long way to-day.”
“Tsn’t it a dear?” said Kathie. “Isn’t
it funny ?”

As fast as the lady pushed pussy back
into the handkerchief at one point it
peeped out at another, its pink nose, or
fluffy tail, or tiny white paw being always
visible. How the children laughed !

“T ought to have had a basket for it,”.
said the lady. “But I brought it away
in rather a hurry, and they could not find
one.—Now be quiet, pussy, and be good.
We're nearly home now, and then you
shall have some nice milk.”

“Mi-e-ew !” squeaked the kitten, as if
it understood.

“Oh, do you think it is thirsty ?” cried
12 A FAIR EXCHANGE.

Kathie. “Fancy it saying ‘mew’ when
you said ‘milk’! The pretty dear! I do
believe it knows.”

“ There is a little milk left in our bottle,
isn’t there, mother?” asked Maurice.

‘“‘Here is some milk certainly,” replied
their mother ; “but we haven’t a saucer.”

“Tve got a scallop-shell im my bag!”
exclaimed Maurice. ‘When the train
stops again that will do fine.”

It seemed a long time before the next
halting-place was arrived at, and mean-
while Kathie was wetting her fingers at
the mouth of the milk-bottle, and holding
them for the kitten to lick.

“T suppose your children do not happen
to want a kitten?”. observed the pussy’s
owner, addressing Mrs. Sterling.

“Yes, we do—we do!” Maurice and
Kathie exclaimed in a breath, answering
for themselves. ‘‘O mother, we do want
a kitty!”

“Do you mean that you are seeking a
home for this little creature?” asked Mrs. .
Sterling.
A FAIR EXCHANGE. 13

“JT should be very glad to give it away
to people who would be kind,” replied. the
lady. “I do not really require the cat
myself.”

“O mother, do let us have it! Do—
do!” begged the children. “You know
we would be kind. And such a little
beauty too—a real Persian!” .
_ “But how should we carry it home?”
asked Mrs. Sterling.

“T’ve nothing but ferns in my little
basket,” said Kathie, seeing that their
wish was all but granted. ‘We could
carry them somehow else, and put pussy
in that. Or perhaps,” she added, smiling
shyly up at their new acquaintance—
“perhaps you'd like the ferns? They’re
nice little ones—hart’s-tongue, and pen-
ferns, and one real lady-fern. Do you’
like ferns ?” "2

“T love them; but I should not like to
take away yours,” answered the lady.

“Oh, but do,, please!” urged Kathie.
“T should be so pleased if you would.”

So it came about that before the great
14 A FAIR EXCHANGE.

London terminus was reached, what Mau-
rice termed “a good swop” had been
effected: The fern roots were tied up in
the red silk handkerchief, and a wriggling
ball of fur was safely caged in Kathie’s
basket, with many fond assurances, as, |
“We shall soon be home now, uy
dear! Don’t cry!”

They decided to call the kitten ““Muffie.” »
That was Kathie’s suggestion, because,
she said, its tail was just like one of the
ends of grandma’s squirrel boa.

“That’s a regular girl’s reason!” laughed
Maurice, with the superiority of his sex
and additional two years of age. “ Better
eall it ‘Boarie, I should think.”

Muffie proved to be an affectionate
little creature, and just as cunning and
playful as she was pretty. The children
were very proud when a friend of their
mother’s said she knew some one who had
given ten shillings at a bazaar for a kitten
that was no handsomer. ‘“ You must take
care of it,” she added, “for it is quite
worth stealing.”
A FAIR EXCHANGE. 15

Maurice and Kathie declared that
Muffie was the “darlingest” kitten ever
seen, and that they wouldn’t part with
her “ for worlds.”

But before Muffie had lived with them
a month, something happened—something
they can never forget—which made them,
at least as far as the latter resolution was
concerned, actually change their minds.

They were riding with their father in a
tram-car one day, along a busy thorough-
fare, on their way to a large clothing-store,
to buy Maurice a new overcoat.

As they passed a hospital, some one
signalled to the driver to stop, and with
some difficulty an anxious-looking woman
. got in, carrying in her arms a boy, whose
worn face and intelligent dark eyes sug-
gested that he was at least ten years old,
though he was no bigger than Kathie. .

The car was already quite full, but the
conductor had no doubt concluded ‘that
some one would make room for the poor
woman and her pitiful burden. And he
was right, for the “some one” was Maurice
16 _ A FAIR EXCHANGE.

Sterling, who at once jumped up, saying
pleasantly, “Take my seat, please.”

The woman did so with a grateful look,
and as she settled herself and her charge,
the children saw that the boy’s legs were
perfectly helpless and limp, and almost
as thin as sticks. He was paralyzed. —

Meanwhile a strange commotion had
arisen at the end of the car next the
entrance, and was spreading. Passengers
were springing to their feet and staring
down the road behind the vehicle with
their eyes dilated with horror. One or
two jumped out in panic. -

“What is it? What's the matter?”
asked people at the inner end, for those
standing up entirely blocked out their
view of what was happening.

The next moment there was a thun-
dering rattle, a fearful crash against the
hind part of the tram-car, and with a
splintering of wood-work and a smashing _
of glass, the vehicle was almost ‘thrown
over on its side by the shock.

(9)
FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY. 17

CHAPTER ITI.
FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY.

THe next thing that Kathie knew was
that some one was dragging her out of
the general confusion. The next minute
she was in the conductors arms, who
quickly handed her over to her father.

“O father, what has happened?” she
sobbed, clinging to him. “Are we safe
now? Where’s Maurice ?”

“Here I am!” answered the boy,
springing towards them. He was very
pale, and his hands were bleeding; but
he declared he was “all right—only
scratched a little with the broken glass.”

“Then we three are uninjured,” said
Mr. Sterling. “Thank God for that! I
fear some of our companions are a good
deal hurt. Take Kathie home, Maurice
dear, or take her out of this crowd and
wait for me. I think I may be of some

use to the others.”
; (9) 2
18 FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY.

Maurice would much rather have lin-
gered in the midst of the scene of action,
exciting though painful as was the sight
of the rescue of unfortunate passengers
and the efforts to right the car. But as he
hesitated, his father gave him some pence.

“Go over to White the confectioner’s
shop,” he said. “It is just across the road,
and Mrs. White knows us. Get some hot
milk for yourself and Kathie, and ask
Mrs. White to be kind enough to bind
up your hand.”

“What happened, Maurice, really ?”
asked Kathie, as, clinging closely to her
brother, she let him make a way through
the mass of curious bystanders that had
collected round the spot.

“A heavy two-horse van bolted—that
is, the horses did—and ran into us. I
didn’t see myself, but that’s what I heard
somebody say.”

“ Are many of the people hurt ?”

“T shouldn’t wonder. I fell on top of
a gentleman, and that saved me; but he
said he believed his wrist was broken.”


:
:



FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY. — 19

“Q Maurice, I wonder what became
of that cripple boy!” exclaimed Kathie.
“T do hope he isn’t hurt, poor dear!”

“The horses shied at a steam-roller in
George Street,” said a man whom they
were just then passing; “and the driver
had had a drop too much, and was not
up to his work.”

“A ’bus might have got out of the
way,” said another, “but the car couldn’t ;

' and the van, swerving across the road,

caught itin the rear. There'll be damages
for some of ’em to pay.”

- “Tt’s a good thing the hospital is so
close,” said Maurice. “Look! they’re
taking a lady in now.”

They had by this time reached the
confectioner’s shop, and kind Mrs. White
wanted them to go into her parlour ; but
they preferred to stay where they could
see the steps of the hospital opposite, and
catch glimpses of what was going on at
the scene of the disaster. She gave
them some nice hot milk with ginger
and sugar in it—“‘to warm their poor
20 FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY.

little insides after their fright,” she said—
and tied up Maurice’s cut fingers with
linen rag as carefully as his own mother
would have done.

While this was going on they saw
several of their fellow-passengers enter
the friendly doors of the hospital—all
except one able to walk. Among these
Maurice recognized the mother of the
little cripple.

“But where can the poor boy be?”
said Kathie anxiously. ‘“O Maurice,
suppose they haven’t got him out yen
I’m afraid he'll be dead.”

“Do you mean Davie Dent?” auleed
Mrs. White.

“We don’t know his name,” said Kathie.
“But his mother had to carry him, and
they got in just here. He didn’t seem
able to use his legs.”

“ Ah, yes, that’s Davie. I know him
and his mother well,” said Mrs. White.
“She brings him to the hospital every
Tuesday, and always calls here for a yes-
terday’s bun before she takes him in.”
FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY. 21

“ And can’t he walk at all?” ;

“He has never been able since he was
two years old. His mother is a widow, a
superior sort of woman, but very poor. I
hope, please God,” added Mrs. White,
with tears in her kind eyes, “that she is
not badly injured, for poor little Davie has
nobody but her in the world.”

At that moment Maurice exclaimed,
“ Here’s father!” and Mr. Sterling entered
the shop, with, to the children’s surprise
and relief, the very subject of their con-
versation nestling in his arms.

“T’m going to carry him home,” he

explained. “It is only as far as Brick-
wall Street; and his mother has gone
over the way to have her shoulder seen
to—she is afraid it is out of joint.”
_ Davie gave Maurice a beautiful smile
as he recognized him as the boy who had
made room in the car for his mother, and
more hot milk was asked for.

Maurice and Kathie wanted to go with
their father when he set out for Brickwall
Street, but he said it would be better for
22 FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY.

them to return to their home, which was
not more than a mile away.

So the brother and sister went back
alone, and told all the exciting story to
their mother; and she gave them “ coffee
for tea”—a great treat—to refresh them,
and opened a pot of her choice apple-jelly,
because Kathie was too much upset to
want anything to eat, and said over and
over again how thankful they must be
that they were not hurt.

When Mr. Sterling came back he
brought additional news. He had re-
mained with Davie Dent until his mother
came back from the hospital; her dis-
located shoulder had been set, but it was
likely to be some time before she would
be able to follow her occupation—that of
first-class ironing—because, unfortunately,
_ it was her right side that was hurt.

“We must go and see her, poor thing,
and see after them a little,” said Mrs.
Sterling. “It isn’t much we can do;
but I’m sure we can manage a trifle of
help, if only out of gratitude to God that
FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY. 23

we have been preserved from pain and
’ sorrow ourselves.”

Kathie remembered this when she saw
her mother take the old red-velvet rose
out of her last winter’s bonnet, and after
carefully trimming up the frayed edges,
put it in her left-off summer one, to make
a change for autumn, for she knew that
she ad meant to have a brand-new
bonnet that very week.

“Morrie,” she said, as they played at

- cat’s-cradle in the fire-light next evening,
“don’t you think it would be nice if we—
just you and I, I mean—could give some-
thing to thank God for not letting any of
us be hurt yesterday ?”

“We do give to the missionary-box,”
said Maurice, “and the Homes. I don’t
know what more we could give.”

“ Something special, I mean, and extra.”

“ A thank- offering like?” said Maurice.

“Yes,”

“But we're both saving up as hard as
ever we can for father’s birthday,” objected
Maurice.
, 24 FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY.

“So we are. I forgot that,” said
Kathie. “But perhaps there might be
some other way. Hark! there’s mother.
Now we shall hear all about Davie.”
And the little girl ran to meet her.

But Mrs. Sterling had not much more
to tell the children than they had pre-
viously learned from Mrs. White. The
Dents were quite alone in the world, and
‘very poor; but how poor no one would
have guessed from the appearance of their
neat little home.

“Davie seems to be a dear boy, and.
devoted to his mother,” she said. “But
his case is not a very hopeful one, I fear.
If anybody could do anything for him, I
believe it would be Dr. Stiltz, whose
treatment cured young Barton. But he
is, of course, quite out of the question.”

“Tf you were only rich, mother, eh?”
said Maurice suggestively.

“Ah, Sif? Well, if we can’t do what
we would, we must do what we can,”
replied Mrs. Sterling. “TI have promised
that as to-morrow is half-holiday, you two
FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY. 25

children shall go and keep Davie company
while Mrs. Dent goes to the hospital
again about her shoulder. I knew you.
would like to.”

“Oh yes!” cried Kathie. ‘And then
we can take him something perhaps.”

When the brother and sister set out
the following afternoon on their errand of
kindness, Kathie carried a posy of golden-
_ brown chrysanthemums, cut from her own
pet plant, and Maurice a favourite book
of adventure, which had been his latest
school prize.

Davie’s home was the ground-floor
room of a shabby house in a street that
swarmed with children; boys, girls, and
babies were running in ad out of nearly
all the open front doors, and playing on
the doorsteps, and climbing the broken
railings. They stared hard at Maurice
and Kathie, seeing at a glance that they
were not of themselves, and some of
the ruder ones “ made faces” at them.

“Give us a flower!” shouted one boy,
planting himself in front of the little girl.


26 FRIENDS, AND AN ENEMY.

“Oh, I really can’t,” she replied.

“Thank you, miss; I thought you
would.” And making a snatch at her
beautiful chrysanthemums, the impudent
boy bore them away triumphantly to the
other side of the road, where he waved
them above his head, grinning and danc-
ing, and singing a song about “the bo-kay
what a young lady give me.”

Maurice, of course, dashed after him,
though Kathie vainly tried to hold him
back. It would have been better, perhaps,
to have borne the loss; but what boy
could calmly bear to see his sister insulted
and robbed? After a struggle and a few
energetic cuffs about the miscreant’s ears,
in the administration of which Maurice
was encouraged by many a “Go it!” and
“Walk it into him!” from the crowd of
children that instantly collected round,
proving the general unpopularity of the
young thief, the unlucky flowers, or what
remained of them, were rescued and carried
back to Kathie, who, pale and trembling,
stood awaiting the issue of the conflict.
THE THANK-OFFERING. 27

The vanquished one slunk in sullen
rage round the nearest corner, but not
till he had assured Maurice with a vin-
dictive look that threatened far more
than his words that he “owed him one,”
and should not forget.

Maurice carelessly said, “All right,”
but he little thought under what cir-
cumstances he should see that coarse, ill-
favoured countenance again.

CHAPTER III.
THE THANK-OFFERING.

“THat was Sam Bangs, I shouldn’t won-
der,” said Davie, when they told him. “He
lives next door, on the second floor. He’s
horrid. All the little children round here
are afraid of him. But I’m glad you
licked him ; he’s an awful coward.”
“What a noisy place for you to be
in,” said Kathie, thinking how different
Davie’s gentle face and thoughtful, dark
28 THE THANK-OFFERING.

eyes were from the faces ey had seen
out in the street.
. “Oh, I don’t mind it,” answered the
cripple. “It’s quiet enough when they
are all at school.”

“Then it’s rather dull, I suppose?”
said Maurice. :

“Tt isn’t very lively when mother’s out

all day,” Davie admitted. “But I didn’t
seem to notice it so much when Napoleon
was here.”

“Who ?.” asked Maurice, staring.

“ Napoleon, my cat,” answered Davie,
with a rather sad little laugh. “We
called him Napoleon Bonaparte because
_ when he came to us, poor chap, he was
a stray, half starved, and all bony part.”

“Where is he now, then 2?”

“He met with an accident—got run
over by a bicycle—and had to be killed.
And I do miss him something awful.”

“Tm so fond of. cats,” said Kathie
sympathetically. “What was yours like?”

“ He was a beauty—a silver-orey tabby
and a half Persian. Such a tail he had—
THE THANK-OFFERING. 29

like a squirrel almost. Ah, I shall never
have such a beauty again.”

“Perhaps you wouldn't care for
another?” said Kathie, and though her
heart beat fast as she waited for his
answer, she could not have told whether
she most hoped he would say “yes” or
“no.” ¢

“Oh, yes I should!” answered Davie,
“ specially if it was anything like dear old
Nap. I don’t know that I should care
for a black or a spotted one.” .
_ Kathie looked all round the shabby

little room. Spotlessly neat and clean as
everything was, it looked dreadfully dull
and bare—no tempting rows of books, ‘as
there were in her own home, no plants or
flowers, no piano or violin, no chess-table
in the corner. As her eyes came back
from their tour of investigation, they met
her brother’s, and a wordless question
flashed between them.

The chrysanthemums were placed in
water in an empty jam pot, and the chil-
dren left Davie with the book of travels
30 THE THANK-OFFERING,

cuddled up affectionately in his arm, and
a face quite rosy with pleasure at the
promise of seeing them soon again.

For some distance the sister and brother
walked hand in hand and without speak-
ing. Then Kathie said,—

“T know what you were thinking of
when Davie talked about his pussy.”

“Well, it did seem sort of funny,”
Maurice confessed, “specially after what
you said last night about a thank-offering,
and its being a Persian too. Poor chap,
he doesn’t have a very festive time of it
most days, I reckon.”

“T knew you thought just the same as
I did, Morrie,” said Kathie, squeezing her |
brother's hand, and giving a little skip of
satisfaction. “We've got such a lot of
things, haven’t we? And Davie has got
nothing, hardly, and can’t even go out
except on those dreadful crutches. We
must ask mother, of course; but I’m sure
she won’t mind.”

Mrs. Sterling did not “mind,” but she
was surprised when her boy and girl asked
THE THANK-OFFERING. 31

her if they might give away their beloved
Mutffie to Davie Dent; she was also a good
deal touched, for she knew how much true
gratitude and sympathy must be in their
young hearts to cause them to wish to
make such a, sacrifice.

_It was not by any means because
Kathie had changed her mind that two or
three warm splashes fell on Muffie’s soft
fur as she coaxed the kitten into the hay-
lined basket in which its short journey to
Brickwall Street was to be taken.

“ But I know Davie will be kind to you,
you little pet,” she said, “or we would
never let you go. And we'll come and
see you sometimes, dear—very often, per-
haps—so you won't forget us. And Morrie
and I are going to pay for your meat and
milk every week, just the same as if you
lived with us—at least, while Mrs. Dent
is out of work. I’m sure Davie will love
you ever'so much and make you happy.”

Then with lingering “good-byes” and
many kisses on the silky top of Muffie’s
head (which the kitten returned—“ just as


32 THE THANK-OFFERING.

if it understood,” Kathie said—in little
tender dabs of its damp little nose all over
her chin), the lid was at length fastened
down. But it was lifted up again at the
last moment, that an empty cotton-reel
might be slipped in, “in case Muffie felt
lonesome going along, and wanted some;
thing to play with.”

Kathie was disappointed that her mother
would not let her accompany Maurice to
Brickwall Street when he took the kitten;
but after their previous experience she
thought it not right for her little girl to
venture into such a rough neighbourhood
without a grown-up~protector.

She anxiously watched for Maurice’s
return, and when he came back his face
was still radiant with the reflected joy of
Davie’s delight in his present.

“J just wish you could have seen him,”
he said. “Why, he was so pleased, and
surprised, and so grateful to us, that he
very nearly cried. He said Muffie was
- almost exactly like his Nap, only so much
handsomer-—just as if Nap had come back
THE THANK-OFFERING. 33

a lot improved by being away. And
Muffie took to him like anything; you
never would have believed it. She took
to him from the first, just as she did to us;
but of course he was very gentle and nice
to her. He’s really an awfully nice sort
of boy. She lay on his breast, and put
her paws up under his chin, and purred
like anything. He was delighted.”

“T’m so glad we thought of it,” cried
Kathie, dancing, while her eyes, all their
tears dry now, sparkled like stars. “ And
you didn’t meet that horrid boy ?”

“No, I didn’t see anything of him,”
Maurice replied; “but I shouldn’t have
cared if I had. Tm not afraid of him.”

"And the boy spoke truly ; he had plenty
. of courage, as was by-and-by to be proved.
But he might, at least, have felt a trifle
uneasy had he known that he had been
narrowly watched, both going in and com-
ing out of the Dents’ house, by the cunning
eye of Master Bangs ; moreover, that his
visit, the: object of which was speedily

ascertained, formed the subject of an ear-
©) 3.
34 THE THANK-OFFERING.

‘nest discussion between that youth and
his particular chum in a dark doorway
after he—Maurice—was safely in bed and
asleep that night.

“T can grab her easy enough,” quoth
the chum, who was a resident in the same
house as the Dents; “and that shop at
the corner opposite the ‘Lion’ is about
the best. The ole woman there won’t
ask no questions; and she’s so blind she’d
never know you again if so be it was to
be asked after.”

“Tt’s a fine cat,” said Sammy. “I
ketched a sight of it through the winder.
It’s a real Pershun cat—not like that
mangy thing he used to have, what ’ad
got all his years tore with fightin’. It’s
worth five bob to buy, and I dessay the
ole woman ’ud give two or p’r’aps three for
it. Id let it go for one, that I would,” he
added, “if only to be quits with my fine
young gentleman as brought it here.”

“Well, you promise you'll go halves, . _

fair and square, if I nab the cat, don’t
you?” said his friend. And on the bargain
THE THANK-OFFERING. 35

being confirmed with the necessary em-
phasis, he concluded, “ Very well, then;
look out for me at dinner-time to-morrow.”

It was several days before the Sterlings
saw anything of the Dents again; and
then Kathie went with her mother, full
of the hope of seeing her dear Muffie once
more.

Mrs. Dent was at home, and seemed
very pleased to receive the visitors; but
as soon as they entered they felt that
the room was strangely clouded.

Kathie’s eager question, “How is
Muffie ?” soon brought a confession of the
cause of their trouble. The cat was lost.
It had disappeared about noon on the
very next day after Maurice had taken it
there, and had not been seen since.

“And the worst of it is,” said poor
Davie, fairly breaking down, “I’m ’most
certain that bully of a boy Bangs has
somehow made away with it, and done it
to spite Master Maurice for licking him
_ the other day. The boy upstairs owns he -
went and told him who gave it to me;
36 FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN.

and somebody—I’m sure it’s him, for
it’s just like his ways—comes and mews
just outside this window every night. I
thought it was Muffie the first night, and
mother got up to see, and then we heard
him run away.”

“T’m‘as sorry for missie as ever I can
be,” said Mrs. Dent, seeing Kathie’s
mouth quiver as she silently tried to keep
back her tears, “for J know what store
she set by the pretty creature.”

“Tt was such a dear!” sobbed Kathie.
“And to think of that dreadful boy!
How I wish Maurice had let him alone!
He said he’d remember it. O poor, poor,
sweet little Muffie !”

CHAPTER IV.
FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN.

Karate cried herself to sleep that night,
and Maurice—well, the things he vowed
in the heat of his indignation he would

he
FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN. 37

like to do to Sammy Bangs, I had perhaps
better not set down here. . It certainly did
seem hard, after parting with their pet to
make Davie happy, that the only result
should be to cause both him and them-
selves a great deal of sorrow. And the
uncertainty as to Muffie’s fate was the
saddest part of it.

Kathie whispered their trouble in her
prayers every day, for she knew that
nothing is too small for God to help.

It was about four days after the dis-
appearance of Muffie that Maurice was
playing with some companions in the
park, when their attention was attracted
by seeing a number of children running
towards the lake where the ducks were
kept. So they ran too.

When they came nearer the spot they
saw that a boy had climbed into one of
the overhanging trees, and was creeping
along a branch that stretched a good way
over the water, apparently with the hope
of being able to reach a ball an was
floating just underneath.
38 FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN.

A very queer feeling ran through
Maurice as he recognized in the venture-
some youth who was the centre of ob-
servation none other than Sammy Bangs.

Something inside him—I’m sure it was
not himself, or, at least, not his best self—
said, “ Wouldn’t it serve him right if-—’

And at that very instant snap went the
bough, and Sam Bangs was plunged head
first into the lake. Maurice felt just as
if he had done it.

The boy disappeared under the water, ~
which at that part was quite deep enough
to drown him. Then he came up again,
clutching wildly at the detached branch,
which, however, was not big enough to
keep him afloat. Then he went down
again, and most of the children stood
staring in helpless, fascinated silence.
But a few ran away, they hardly knew
whither, shouting “ Help! help!”

Maurice could swim well—his father
had taught him; and while strangely-
mingled thoughts of God, and the Bible,
and lis mother, and of Him who died for
FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN. 39

His worst enemies flashed all at once
through his mind, he flung off his jacket
and clambered over the iron railing that
protected the lake. The next minute he
was dragging Sam through the water to

the nearest bank, and by the time assist- -

ance arrived, both were standing safe but
dripping on dry ground.

He did not wait for thanks—he did not
even know whether or not Sam recognized
him—but hurried away home, as he knew
his mother would wish, to get off his wet
clothes.

“Tt was nothing much to do after all,”
he said, as he sat toasting his already
glowing feet by the fire and sipping the
hot beef-tea which his mother had made
him, “because I knew I could swim.
You can’t fairly call it brave, for there was
nothing to be afraid of. But just for the
fraction of a minute. I did almost feel as
if ’'d rather leave him there to flounder
out the best way he could.” Pa

“But you conquered, dearie,” said his
mother, dropping a kiss on the top of his
40 FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN.

curly head, “and that is what makes
mother’s heart glad.”

Later in the day a certain musty little
shop opposite the Lion was the scene
of a strange argument. It was a shop
where birds and animals of various kinds
were kept in cages for sale. Inside were
canaries, linnets, and redpoles, tame rats,
and white mice; on the pavement outside
stood hutches filled with rabbits, guinea-
pigs, and pigeons. In one box, with a
wire front, was curled up a very pretty,
fluffy, tabby kitten, and chalked on the
side of the box were the words: ‘“ Pure
Persian cat for sale. Only 5s.”

The argument was between the near-
sighted old lady who kept the shop and a
shock-headed boy of anything but pre-
possessing’ countenance.

“You give me two bob for it, didn’t
you?” he was demanding.

“Yes; I know I did. What of
that?” .

“Well, if you'll let me have it back Pll
clear that lot off in three weeks, and a
FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN. 41

tanner extra inter the bargin. I kin earn
pence when I likes.”

“ A likely tale indeed !” said the woman
incredulously. “If I was fool enough to
let you take the cat away, it’s a lot I
should see of you, or your ‘tanners’ either,
again.”

Then Sammy, after the manner of boys
of his sort, whose word cannot be be-
lieved, declared with an oath that he
really would pay up as he said, if only
Mrs. Cummins would let him Sage back
“the Pershun cat.”

“Tt were stole, there!” he confessed,
as she still remained obdurate. “‘ That’s
why I wants it. An’ the chap I got it of—
leastways the chap it belonged to by rights
—has done me a rare good turn, and—”

“There, shut up, and be off with you!”
cried Mrs. Cummins. “ You swore when
you brought the cat here as you’d come
by it honest, and I believe you now about:
as much as I did then. The cat’s mine,
bought and paid for, and you’re not goin’
to have it agin, to go and sell to some-
42 FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN.

body else—not if you went down on your
bended knees. Now be off, I tell you, or

Tl send for a bobby—that I will—and give
you in charge.”

However, poor untutored Sam’s remorse
and his unavailing desire to make up for
the wrong he had done Maurice eradualy
made him desperate.

One foggy November afternoon, just as
dusk was closing in, and before the gas
in the streets and shops was well lighted,
Maurice was going home to tea from a
special class that he attended once a week,
when he stopped to look at some rabbits
that were exposed for sale outside a
stuffy-looking little corner shop.

As he stood there, hidden by the
piled-up hutches, he saw a boy about
his own size slip stealthily inside the
shop, which was full of cages of all kinds
and very dark.

A minute or two later he darted out
again, carrying in his arms a struggling |
bundle of grey fur—a little Persian
cat.
FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN. 43

The outside gas-burners at the next
shop flared up brilliantly at the same
moment, and instantly Maurice recognized
Sam Bangs and Muffie.

Before he had time to speak to him,
the kitten made a wild spring for liberty,
and escaped. Both boys instantly gave
chase; but Maurice, understanding animals
better than Sam, went to work in a more
judicious way, and soon had the happiness
of clasping his own dear little Muffie safe
and sound in his arms.

He expected next to have to dispute
possession of the animal with Sam, but
that youth had suddenly disappeared.

Too exultant with delight to consider
at present the how and why of Muffie’s
residence in that little shop, Maurice was
setting off homewards at once with his
restored pet purring on his breast, when a
policeman approached him from behind
with business-like strides, and laid a heavy
hand upon the boy’s shoulder.

“Whose cat is that?” demanded the
constable sternly.
AA FOUND, AND LOST AGAIN.

“Mine!” was Maurice’s instant reply,
as he faced the man in amazement.

“T shall have to trouble you to prove
that before I let you go,” answered the
policeman; and Maurice saw to his
horror that he was fast becoming the
centre of a staring crowd of men, women,
and children. ;

“Tt is mine!” he repeated. “We lost
it—at least, a boy we gave it to lost it;
and—and I’m swre it’s the same.”

An old woman, bare-headed and very
much excited, was pushing her way.
through the crowd

“T saw him—I saw him slip into the
shop, and open the cage, and take it out!”
she cried. ‘TI ain’t so blind but I did see
that. I was just behind the parlour-door,
but I couldn’t get out fast enough to
ketch the young scamp.”

“Tt was that other boy—it wasn’t me!”
protested Maurice. “J saw him ‘do it
too; he’s run away.”

“You'll have to come along with me all
the same,” said the constable, who had
FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD. 45

never loosened his grip on our hero's
arm.

Protests, tears, entreaties were all in
vain. Maurice Sterling was marched off
in custody towards the nearest police-
station, surrounded and followed by an
ever-increasing concourse of interested
spectators. To crown his misery, Muftie,
scared by the crowd and the noise, sud-
denly leaped from his embrace, scaled the
nearest wall, jumped down on the other
side, and was once more lost.

CHAPTER V.
FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD.

Tue next five minutes was the most
dreadful of all Maurice’s twelve years
of life. What a sudden and complete
revulsion from the joy which had so
closely preceded it! He could hardly
‘realize that it was actually himself who
was .being thus ignominiously hustled
46 FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD.

along. Was he only dreaming that this
dreadful thing had occurred ?

But no! it was all too horribly, solidly
real—the streets and shops he knew so

well, the dank fog, and the staring, inqui-
sitive faces around him. With the irre-
pressible tears running silently down his
cheeks, the poor boy’s heart rose in pite-
ous entreaty to the One who, he knew,
could help him—the One who knew he
had done nothing to merit the shameful
position he was in.

But see! the crowd parts, and a boy -
pushes eagerly through to the policeman’ s
side. Itis Sammy Bangs, all the best in
his nature brought to the surface by the
sight of his hero suffering for his fault.

“« Please, sir,” he breathlessly gasped,
“it wasn’t him; it was me. TJ stole the
cat. I’ve got to go to prison ’stid of him.”

“What do you mean?” demanded the
policeman, pausing.

“T stole the cat!” repeated Sammy.
“Tt. was his first, an’ he give it to an-
other chap, an’ another chap nabbed it
FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD. AT

"way from him, an’ I sold it to the ole
woman, an’ we went halves, an’-—”

“You'd better come with me to the
police-station, both of you, and explain
there,” said the constable, who could make
neither head nor tail of this rigmarole,
but suspected that the new-comer was far
more likely to be the true culprit than the
respectable-looking lad he had first appre-
hended.

At the police-station the several state-
ments of the four persons most concerned
were patiently listened to by the inspector,
Sammy frankly confessing all his guilt in
the matter, and telling how “the young
gentleman” (whose name he did not:
know) had jumped into the lake to save
his life; while Maurice, though keeping
strictly to the truth, endeavoured to say
as little as he possibly could to make
things bad for Sammy.

The police inspector, as it happened,
knew Mr. Sterling very well, which fact
went in favour of Maurice; and Mrs.
Cummins, fearing reprimand, or worse,
48 FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD.

for not making stricter inquiries before
she bought the cat, and hoping that if
she effectively represented her case to
Mr. Sterling, he might be induced to
make some reparation to her for her loss,
withdrew the charge. So the group thus
strangely brought together separated on
more or less amicable terms, Maurice
shaking hands heartily with Sam Bangs,
while the latter promised to do his very
utmost to find and restore the lost cat.

The children were not long in com-
municating to Davie the happy intelligence

that Muffie was at least not dead; and
together they scoured the neighbourhood
in which the cat had escaped, with an
house-to-house inquiry as to whether the
inhabitants could give them any informa-
tion concerning their missing pet.

The gentle knock at the door, followed
by the modest and apologetic “ Please, do
you happen to have seen a tabby Persian
kitten about ?” generally met with a sym-
pathetic answer, even though, as was nearly
always the case, it was in the negative.
FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD. 49

One or two persons, however, fancied
they had noticed the animal described.
Once it was in somebody’s front garden,
another time it had been observed on the
roof of an outhouse, and yet again, to the
children’s great distress, a cat bearing
apparently a strong resemblance to Muffie
had been seen taking refuge in a tree by
the churchyard gate from the persecutions
of a group of unfeeling boys.

Failing to obtain any news that was of
any practical use to them, Mr. Sterling
suggested that bills should be printed
offering a reward of five shillings for the
recovery of the cat. This, he thought,
would be pretty sure to result in the
return of Muffie, if the animal were still
anywhere in the neighbourhood. “The
chance of earning five shillings will stir
up the observation and intelligence of
every boy and girl in the place,” he
said. oe

It stirred up something, certainly, as
the knocks at the Sterlings’ front door

during the day or two succeeding the ex-
(9) 4
50 FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD. -

hibition of the bills abundantly proved ;
but it is doubtful whether the qualities of
either observation or intelligence were
thereby conspicuously displayed. Indeed,
it would even seem that the prospect of
the reward had so dazzled the eyes of
some of the youngsters who read about it
as to prevent them from distinguishing a
Persian pussy from a tailless Manx cat,
or a kitten from an elderly Tom with the
marks upon him of many.a midnight fray.
Members of the feline race of all sorts
and sizes were brought hourly for the
inspection of the advertiser.

“Large cats, small cats, lean cats, brawny cats,
Brown cats, black cats, grey cats, tawny cats,
Grave old mousers, gay young friskers,
Pussies all, with tails and whiskers.”

But among all these numerous applicants
no Muffie, nor any cat resembling her,
- once appeared.

“T wonder, now,” said Mr. Blaney,
the stationer, as he picked out for Maurice
one of his finest mapping pens, “‘ whether
Miss Woolman can have got hold of it.”
FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD. 51

“Who is Miss Woolman?” asked the boy.
‘Have you never heard of her? I’m
surprised at that,” said Mr. Blaney. “She
lives at the house that stands by itself with
the trees all round it in Church Grove.”
“T know the house,” exclaimed Maurice.
“Tt’s rather a queer, dull, shabby, unin-
habited, peculiar-looking place, isn’t it ?”
“That's the one. And Miss Woolman
is rather peculiar, too, if none of your
other adjectives will fit her,” said the
stationer. “She is said to be very well
off, and not quite right in her mind, you
know; but whether that’s true or not, I
can’t say. However, it isa fact that she
keeps an uncommon lot of cats—picks up
all the strays she can find, you know; and
spmciimies) perhaps, gets hold by mistake
of some that are not astray. Jt seems
as if she ean’t get enough to satisfy her.
Then she never lets them go out of doors,
if she can help it; so there’s not much
chance of their finding their way home
again. There,” concluded Mr. Blaney,
“that’s about as fine and flexible a nib
52 FIVE SHILLINGS REWARD.

as youd find in a hundred; it’s just
perfect.”

“Thank you very much,” said Maurice.
“ And you think this Miss Woolman may
be taking care of our Muffie?”

“Well, there wouldn’t be any harm in
your just calling to inquire, would there ?”

“No, indeed. I'll go this very day;
and thank you for telling me.”

Neither Mr. nor Mrs. Sterling could
possibly spare time from their other duties
to accompany the children to Church
Grove that afternoon; but as the next day
would be Sunday, and the suspense of
uncertainty hard to bear, the brother and
sister received permission to go if they
liked by themselves. |

So in the afternoon they set out to-
gether, conscious that a certain flavour of
_ adventure surrounded this errand from
which all previous visits of inquiry had
been free. —

Kathie held Maurice’s hand very tightly
as they entered the heavy, rusty, iron
gate to Elm Lodge, as the house that
“THROUGH GOOD COMES BETTER.” 58

stood by itself was called. Viewed from
within the shade of those tall, now gaunt
and leafless trees, it looked even more
gloomy and uninviting than from without.
The stone steps were grey and green with
long neglect, and the dim, narrow windows
had apparently not been cleaned for years.

Three times Maurice knocked at the
door without receiving any reply; but a
chorus of mews in various tones from
inside sounded reassuring. They had
evidently come to.the right house, and
Miss Woolman’s interesting family were
apparently under the impression that
their purveyor of meat had arrived.

CHAPTER VI.

“THROUGH GOOD COMES BETTER,
. AND FROM BETTER, BEST.”

Art last the door was opened a few inches
by an elderly person of the charwoman
type, who was extremely deaf.
54 ‘THROUGH GOOD COMES BETTER,

Maurice’s inquiry, “Is Miss Woolman
at. home?” had to be repeated several
times before it elicited the reply, “ Yes,
she is. What do you want?”

“We want to’ see her, please.”

“What do you want to see her about ?”
demanded the woman. ‘She don’t give.
to no school treats.- She’s got enough
to do with her money without that.”

“We are not begging for anything,”
answered Maurice, colouring. “We want
to ask her about a cat.”

“Oh, acat!” The servant’s face softened,
and she opened the door a trifle wider.
Then after a few moments’ hesitation
she said, “I'll ask if she'll see you.” And
pushing back several inquisitive pussy-
faces that were peering out, she shut the
door again, and left the children to wait
upon the step.

It was not long, however, before she
returned. They might walk in, she said.

Maurice and Kathie were thereupon
conducted into what, in any other house,
would have been the drawing-room, but
AND FROM BETTER, BEST.” 55

its furnishing and occupants were the
strangest they had ever seen.

There were arm-chairs all round the
apartment, filled with downy - looking
‘cushions covered with satin or silk, and
curled up in almost every one of them
was a sleepy cat. By the side of each
chair or underneath it was a pretty, fancy
china saucer, containing refreshment for
the feline pet. Ona thick sheepskin rug
in front of a magnificent fire sprawled
three or four more fat and lazy creatures ;
while several flannel-lined baskets in the
cosiest corners of the room contained
pussy-mothers purring blissfully among
their broods of little ones.

The children could not help being both
amused and pleased by this curious cat
show. But Maurice said, “I don’t see
what they want with such lovely cushions.
I should just like one or two of them for
poor old Davie when his back aches.”

At that moment the door opened, and
a lady, not-much better attired than the
servant, entered the room. Her rusty,
56 “THROUGH GOOD COMES BETTER,

black gown was in need of mending in
several places; she wore no neat, white -
collar or frill round her neck; and her
grey hair appeared, a8 Maurice rather
irreverently told his mother afterwards,
“as if she usually brushed it with the
carpet-broom.” Nevertheless, there was
something not at all unpleasant in the
expression of her bright, dark eyes and
brown face, and her greeting of “ Well,
now, what do you want of me?” though
abrupt, was not unkind.

Once more Maurice uttered his oft-
repeated inquiry as to whether she had
seen anything of a Persian tabby kitten.

“Have you lost one?” sharply de-
manded Miss Woolman.

“Yes. It ran away in Market Road,”
answered the boy; “and as that is near
here, and we heard that you are kind to
cats, we thought perhaps you had found it
astray, and were taking care of it.”

“ And this cat you speak of is yours ?
What is your name?” was the lady’s
next query.
AND FROM BETTER, BEST.” 57

“My name is Maurice Sterling. And
—well, Muffie isn’t exactly ours now,
though she was until the other day,” ex-
plained our hero. “She really belongs
to Davie Dent. We gave her to him;
but he—”

“Davie who?” interrupted Miss Wool-
man,

“Davie Dent, who lives in Brickwall
Street. But he's a cripple—paralyzed—
so he can’t look about after it himself;
so we are trying to find it for him.”

“Ts his mother living ?”

“Oh yes!” replied Maurice, wonder
ing what that could have to do with the
ownership of Muffie. “But she has to
go out to work; or she would, if she had
not hurt her arm. She can’t go round
after the cat.”

“Goes out to work, does she?” repeated
Miss Woolman. “Are they poor, then?”

“Oh yes, very,” Maurice told her,
while Kathie edged closer to him and
took hold of:his hand. These irrelevant
questions would indeed suggest that Miss
58 ‘THROUGH GOOD. COMES BETTER,

Woolman was “not quite right in her
mind.” ‘Please, ma’am,” added the boy
after a pause, In which Miss Woolman was »
staring silently into the fire, “do you think
you have seen our Muffie anywhere?”

“Kh? What? Muffie? Ah, the cat
you are talking about!” said this singular
lady; waking up as if fromadream. “I
have had a little Persian cat here for two
or three days. J don’t. ‘know if it is the
one you are looking for. I'll find it, and
you shall see.”

She left the room again, and Kathie
whispered, “I shall be glad to get away
from here; shan’t you, Morrie? She’s
very peculiar, isn’t she ?”

“JT don’t know. I rather like her,”
answered the boy. ‘And I don’t believe
she’s any more out of her mind than you
or I. IT tell you what, though, Kathie.
I’ve a notion—”

Once again, however, were Maurice’s
remarks cut short by the entrance of Miss
Woolman, and this time Muffie was in
her arms.
AND FROM BETTER, BEST.” 59

Kathie sprang forward with a cry of
delight.

“It is—it is our own dear kitty! i
she exclaimed. ‘O Muffie, you darling, -
come to me!”

The immediate hoisting of Muffie’s flag
of rejoicing—her beautiful ostrich- feather-
like tail—and the evident pleasure with
which she purred round the children’s feet °
were incontestable evidence that they
were indeed old friends. Miss Woolman
did not attempt to dispute their right to
the cat; but she did, much to their dis-
appointment, object to letting them take
her away with them then and there.

“ How are you going to carry her?” she
said. ‘ You'll go and lose her again. You
ought to have brought a basket with you.”

“So we ought,” said Kathie. “ How
stupid of us not to thnk! But we would
hold her very tight—indeed we would.
We would be sure not to let her get
away.”

“We're so anxious, you see, for Davie
to have her again,” said Maurice. “He
60 “THROUGH GOOD COMES BETTER,

has been so unhappy ever since she was
lost.”

“Leave Davie Dent’s address with me,”
said Miss Woolman. “I. will send out
to buy a fish-basket, and I'll promise you
- Davie shall have his cat—well, before he
goes to bed to-night. I will take her to
him myself.”

And, unwilling as the children were to
depart without the cat, they were obliged
to give way to Miss Woolman’s wish.

Their feet were winged with gladness
as they ran along to Brickwall Street,
and their radiant faces told Davie their
happy news before they could find breath
to speak. Mrs. Dent was there, and
fully entered into the children’s joy.

“And Miss Woolman is going to
bring Muffie herself to-night, Davie, be-
fore you go to bed,” they said. “She
promised.” &

“Miss Woolman!” exclaimed “Mrs.
Dent. “Surely that’s your— What
sort of a person is she?” Davie’s mother
inquired. |
AND FROM BETTER, BEST.” 61

The children, between them, described
her as well as they could.

“Tt must be—it is the same!” cried
Mrs. Dent.—“< Davie dear, Miss Wool-
man is your godmother! I wonder if
she recognized our name ?”

“Tm sure she did,” said Maurice.
“T thought so at the time. When she
heard it she seemed quite strange.”

“My godmother!” Davie was repeat-
ing. “I didn’t know I had one.”

‘When you were a baby, Davie,” said
his mother, “although I had you chris-
tened (I was not a converted woman),
I did not realize the solemnity of the rite.
I chose Miss Woolman to be your god-
mother, not because she was a Christian
woman, who would endeavour to fulfil the
duties of her position, but simply because
she was well off. J have never talked to
you about her, because soon after your :
dear father died she much wanted me to
marry a cousin of hers; and because I
would not, she, quite regardless of her
relationship to you, threw us over in
62 ‘*THROUGH GOOD COMES BETTER,

dudgeon. .I have never seen or heard of
her since. And to think she should be
coming to see us to-night !”

Maurice and his sister returned home
in such a state of excitement that they
could neither eat nor sleep. Muffie was
found, but that was the least wonderful
part of the story they had to relate.
They had found a godmother—Kathie,
notwithstanding certain notable points of
incongruity, would insist on calling her
a fairy godmother—for poor Davie Dent.
Davie and his mother were hencefor-
ward to be relieved from all care, and to
have every comfort and luxury that money
could buy—aincluding, of course, treatment
for Davie by the celebrated Dr. Stiltz.
Miss Woolman was to give up her ex-
travagant number of cats, and lavish the
whole love of her heart upon her godson.
Davie and his mother were to remove
from Brickwall Street to Elm Lodge,
which was to be completely transformed
by their presence and on their behalf;
and Muffie, dear little Muffie, was to be
AND FROM BETTER, BEST.” 68

the household pet, honoured and beloved
as the indirect benefactor of them all.

Thus the children built castles and
dreamed dreams on that happy, never-
to-be-forgotten night. And, unlike most
of such airy visions, these for the greater
part actually came true.

Miss Woolman did open her eyes to
the fact that human beings are a good
deal better as objects of tenderness than
the best of cats. She took Davie and his
mother in their sadness and poverty into
her heart and home; and after a while
their quiet, Christian lives’ awoke within
her a sense of still higher but long ignored
duties and responsibilities.

Through his godmother’s generosity

~Davie’s disease received the best treat-
ment from the most skilled physicians ;
and though he never quite recovered the
_use of his limbs, his condition became
‘very much improved.

And who do you think is his faithful
attendant, companion, valet, and friend ?
None other than Sammy Bangs! His
64 ‘“ THROUGH eso COMES BETTER,”

connection with the Sterlings proved a
turning-point in his life. He began, -
at Maurice’s invitation, to attend the
Sunday-school class of which our hero’s
father was the teacher; and there his one
conspicuous virtue, that of gratitude, was
developed in‘all its beauty by the wonder-
ful gospel story. He grieved genuinely
over his past sins, and proved his repent-
ance, as in the case of the cat, by deeds
rather than words. His devotion to

Davie knows no bounds, and it seems as *

though he can never do enough to atone
for the hours of unhappiness he caused
him years ago.

THE END.







Se aaa Dy aL hi rede eee





SS yey ae yO OTT ITS



; e
EN oR a SE Ra CLONE Se SEE SOUT TT EN) S TES




er ae ne ee



xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008707900001datestamp 2008-10-21setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title The story of a Persian catdc:creator Chappell, Jennie, 1857-Thomas Nelson & Sons. ( Contributor )dc:subject Children -- Juvenile fiction. -- Conduct of lifeConduct of life -- Juvenile fiction.Christian life -- Juvenile fiction.Persian cat -- Juvenile fiction.Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction.Children with disabilities -- Juvenile fiction.Bullying -- Juvenile fiction.Gratitude -- Juvenile fiction.Repentance -- Juvenile fiction.Bldn -- 1898.dc:description Added title page, engraved.dc:publisher T. Nelson and Sonsdc:date 1898dc:type Bookdc:format 64 p., 2 leaves of plates : ill. ; 17 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00087079&v=00001002223696 (ALEPH)181652024 (OCLC)ALG3947 (NOTIS)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English


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describe
'120970' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHYM' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
e81fbbe4cc7ed3fd69a4da7973f545cf
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'2011-12-28T16:32:28-05:00'
describe
'25441' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHYN' 'sip-files00016.pro'
c39969db9cce73b1a71c5e0d846c4a2c
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'2011-12-28T16:34:10-05:00'
describe
'39235' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHYO' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
ac53c39a7e22093a6e5a031ac9587a3b
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'2011-12-28T16:33:50-05:00'
describe
'2337060' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHYP' 'sip-files00016.tif'
1ac0c7721816ce61a7f8129307cc88bf
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describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHYQ' 'sip-files00016.txt'
1f237ff62842360c13cb583989ad714d
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describe
'9734' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHYR' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
df36695298f85aa6249d335b3d150564
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'2011-12-28T16:33:05-05:00'
describe
'290024' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHYS' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
725fea055ab13b3237b368dcab8b552e
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'2011-12-28T16:32:52-05:00'
describe
'117603' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHYT' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
703384c7660ca39d9a70155d186bd8ad
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'2011-12-28T16:32:29-05:00'
describe
'24361' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHYU' 'sip-files00017.pro'
4fd6bed9743c935fd22ac07d7795c0e6
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'2011-12-28T16:33:00-05:00'
describe
'38397' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHYV' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
ad155062a94622856c9faa077a32ff1d
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHYW' 'sip-files00017.tif'
a1a85af473a9c0c9fbaac75d91736a11
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describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHYX' 'sip-files00017.txt'
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describe
'9229' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHYY' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
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describe
'290006' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHYZ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
a514d197f52ab9325baaa7e4de2cfe17
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'2011-12-28T16:33:14-05:00'
describe
'113669' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZA' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
a10dda9061c2a6373d65c4ada1bf86f7
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'2011-12-28T16:33:01-05:00'
describe
'23882' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZB' 'sip-files00018.pro'
507eb42a9ada39dee577e419e13e2279
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describe
'36565' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZC' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
e1d8e778334c5f1e88d6091113ec06d3
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZD' 'sip-files00018.tif'
031423120e97e2e55e2101bf214c1289
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'2011-12-28T16:32:45-05:00'
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZE' 'sip-files00018.txt'
d4bfed5f87b5a56f1671388fdcbcf08f
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'2011-12-28T16:33:11-05:00'
describe
'9247' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZF' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
9f6b8bef14852bb3ba5ab05d0d24b0f0
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describe
'284468' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZG' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
a0b576ec9e7b157c5bdb4a5328c3127d
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'2011-12-28T16:33:42-05:00'
describe
'116388' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZH' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
a82e2b2afee7d170a79d4d04ecc3c812
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'2011-12-28T16:32:50-05:00'
describe
'23939' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZI' 'sip-files00019.pro'
fdd145d92101cabb960963ba85582af5
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describe
'39055' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZJ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2292568' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZK' 'sip-files00019.tif'
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'2011-12-28T16:33:24-05:00'
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZL' 'sip-files00019.txt'
a3d6af55499bfed5b98bb9bf0703d33f
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'2011-12-28T16:33:37-05:00'
describe
'9979' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZM' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
ffd20b93d4d5708da96bffd5329d4f0e
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'2011-12-28T16:34:06-05:00'
describe
'289829' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZN' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
5610955bea543709edba9358fdc880d1
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'2011-12-28T16:32:34-05:00'
describe
'118735' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZO' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
02ff80d64777a36e01516e6c7f425ee8
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describe
'25506' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZP' 'sip-files00020.pro'
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'2011-12-28T16:32:46-05:00'
describe
'37766' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZQ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
08fbf6a6630392d9924dfcdd1565b21a
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZR' 'sip-files00020.tif'
b7792b66985adabf3217ede95cea92f1
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describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZS' 'sip-files00020.txt'
0cd5449611a7c9b72331e83451ac7b0d
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describe
'9357' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZT' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
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describe
'283519' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZU' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
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describe
'127201' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZV' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
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'2011-12-28T16:33:12-05:00'
describe
'26023' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZW' 'sip-files00021.pro'
6329940ddb8fe40361211d4a3432d031
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describe
'40928' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZX' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
435e49d53ad7ba97adc88fd6f892ec5b
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'2011-12-28T16:33:40-05:00'
describe
'2285152' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZY' 'sip-files00021.tif'
e60251046057d67a885c9357569eb947
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'2011-12-28T16:33:23-05:00'
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAHZZ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
4ee279aec10c7d8a6c61cfe533a00b86
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describe
'9909' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAA' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
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describe
'284462' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAB' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
1cb5ff4eda5a31a07521c4bd663a0187
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describe
'118277' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAC' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
a668573fc2c924b42b444a17a5152b24
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describe
'24382' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAD' 'sip-files00022.pro'
e7731cca4e3eb2c83fced2090e3b0bca
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describe
'37794' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAE' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
6db239e92d6424d6c71375a62e9505b4
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAF' 'sip-files00022.tif'
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describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAG' 'sip-files00022.txt'
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describe
'9611' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAH' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
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'2011-12-28T16:33:43-05:00'
describe
'278811' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAI' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
cfcb2536f918c12cfedbe5a1a4a1c69b
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describe
'108444' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAJ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
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'2011-12-28T16:33:48-05:00'
describe
'20545' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAK' 'sip-files00023.pro'
d11930ecfde15dbbbb9cd40155cff91b
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describe
'35167' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAL' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
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'2011-12-28T16:33:04-05:00'
describe
'2248068' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAM' 'sip-files00023.tif'
8c3e9a674c25e29048adb93237b010dc
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'2011-12-28T16:34:09-05:00'
describe
'842' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAN' 'sip-files00023.txt'
b2e2c68d5ecd7f055a4694db4e5cb715
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describe
'9182' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAO' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
b5f14d4ab0bfd5629190e868c0591518
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'2011-12-28T16:34:04-05:00'
describe
'290022' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAP' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
5209cb80ee7a3c3407e29bdb013ce367
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'2011-12-28T16:32:56-05:00'
describe
'117921' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAQ' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
b23b9e055a03725fcc430698fb968430
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describe
'25216' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAR' 'sip-files00024.pro'
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describe
'37756' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAS' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
e726f0ffcef89f5e019b9529d9c2bcdf
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'2011-12-28T16:33:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAT' 'sip-files00024.tif'
ab0130e3533a83a2a4feba71913214c5
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'2011-12-28T16:32:48-05:00'
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAU' 'sip-files00024.txt'
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describe
'9417' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAV' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
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'2011-12-28T16:34:13-05:00'
describe
'289962' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAW' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a3f542ce7fec22c9a9099d9ef743b149
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describe
'118945' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAX' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
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describe
'24841' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAY' 'sip-files00025.pro'
13eb65979cad3fdf54722d38f7c5708c
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describe
'38822' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIAZ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
052270f745ade03181a78ea38097211d
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBA' 'sip-files00025.tif'
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describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBB' 'sip-files00025.txt'
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'2011-12-28T16:33:29-05:00'
describe
'9706' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBC' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
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describe
'289958' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBD' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
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'2011-12-28T16:33:49-05:00'
describe
'111812' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBE' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
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describe
'23528' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBF' 'sip-files00026.pro'
53505dd1ea44b4eaf01f857253a1bb4f
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'2011-12-28T16:32:39-05:00'
describe
'35622' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBG' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
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'2011-12-28T16:33:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBH' 'sip-files00026.tif'
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describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBI' 'sip-files00026.txt'
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describe
'9353' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBJ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
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describe
'290005' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBK' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
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describe
'118920' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBL' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
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describe
'25821' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBM' 'sip-files00027.pro'
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describe
'38551' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBN' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBO' 'sip-files00027.tif'
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describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBP' 'sip-files00027.txt'
a9f9f120b9238bbfae0d33ac9f5597e5
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describe
'9554' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBQ' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
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describe
'289859' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBR' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
28863fb3fc9bdd00f73eb11d4b2c7d52
46f4a47705c3eff2eac99b33a30fce65d6a1ca3b
'2011-12-28T16:33:44-05:00'
describe
'119915' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBS' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
c0a0b65f4528bf7a4180e854b64f6fc4
10fc8034ab97813e66e75243147b59e307b45aa1
describe
'26071' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBT' 'sip-files00028.pro'
c5af858d4d336d6fa63d6fbb9e282c7d
2b12050a233a16726a1d8a9b7a63fd88cc31df85
'2011-12-28T16:33:28-05:00'
describe
'38401' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBU' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
07ccd865e2a4265ddecd48b572676638
a1e4a12d50ac2371b96c8fae752adc05090d3f3a
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBV' 'sip-files00028.tif'
a80cf4d1bd14bc81a1b904955c193755
2ea80cd39bccc198c589f9a912fe963948ba8811
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBW' 'sip-files00028.txt'
71b9b1b971eaff0fd0c07e43021e2f8f
fb7b2a8b460418a977bd137fca3f25cf20093239
describe
'9708' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBX' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
6479d53c75445f16564b5cb72714f3d3
cdc3e8eb1da12ced83862ddf7b3cee967a42b458
describe
'289977' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBY' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
b85551d213dbc00fc5cc528e7add9ee8
718f9ee655be05c5ccc5b0f4c987ad2ea58e8d51
describe
'111473' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIBZ' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
1679216541b96aa04aada337c32ae97e
9c834387b813fdef6bc8f8caabeaf7b79bedaed0
describe
'23733' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICA' 'sip-files00029.pro'
95218d24b0bbd9ddf4409dc261f91126
a6a9dd32b3f34612753a7b623309dd10a7c80f44
'2011-12-28T16:33:22-05:00'
describe
'35307' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICB' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
52906e0080a593376409ace8134ef72a
cb5c65e967bf0357ce1c5c01d81266b737a17e42
'2011-12-28T16:32:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICC' 'sip-files00029.tif'
1d8603adfd2e79d95b4835d88ae5ff30
475629625b1ba6bd26c9d20c6917f94cde747f0e
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICD' 'sip-files00029.txt'
da69f2da443ae5c7bca7750ef7a1ff4f
d8703b63d453cf136c4b056104f269a2bd5c4c73
describe
'8659' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICE' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
1eea71c9db8123dc4c0bfaa77a062eea
00422f5b1c8bb3f23c4ea2ff47294edefe91cf20
describe
'290000' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICF' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
9a4d6e76f260b1e3276c17faf497ef3f
a10c35513d60f3a152725e8672e498e93132bb5c
describe
'117166' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICG' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
4212500d487dc6a6bee1041d3bcaf598
b9ae62ed7a08fd12f5ce83e6df80f782d319c423
'2011-12-28T16:33:17-05:00'
describe
'25393' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICH' 'sip-files00030.pro'
cb944a9034bb930b9cdac16e90859e95
118ecafa8fd9b15d8865297c565a2569abeed1b4
describe
'37698' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICI' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
9104987f39f58062f2198bded2ed2565
1d351ecb4c8d158f7ecc31da7a89678e474b804c
'2011-12-28T16:33:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICJ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
6d963e42a5ade75dbeada083a80d02c0
21fe9b3438bbc27452fb8cb463ac6abc16b76470
'2011-12-28T16:33:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICK' 'sip-files00030.txt'
b837dc97daf45a8b3ea76db79135cb0d
2f2078c82695f4cc5b43ccb4071786075e76f134
describe
'9876' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICL' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
a394ebb50e62c380980613ab4573f5be
58da1fb7199193e5133274fcb24203d9b4057e15
'2011-12-28T16:33:06-05:00'
describe
'289850' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICM' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
d9c79b00af8d2838c1e66a1ae17f134c
0857e1fefda8deb9f0d08518eb8460bdf2c6f485
'2011-12-28T16:32:59-05:00'
describe
'119302' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICN' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
8fe5f7c42a7388a404b101c976b628ee
f007d996334b6fc70f7b1758a58cb88486818d20
describe
'25223' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICO' 'sip-files00031.pro'
4992154b091402223ac326b705dae3ad
e4edc46059fe3d1545c308e4792abcc70e9efdb3
describe
'38766' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICP' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
7a9e249d32de104eeab4fd6f6df74999
ba174e84c0ec358e91ec80423744962d7c09c1b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICQ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
8e7df8c399d20da4fdf9808550285ca7
dfe741b86137ddf9b8fe7ab0300a51c4f8cf6988
'2011-12-28T16:33:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICR' 'sip-files00031.txt'
ac511546d31b7f4f55925b2f724360f2
5480f09f14ca81f644375a641c7160180cc5724c
describe
'9874' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICS' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
34088ed027d7d533585479508fa14e20
5dcc55d62c2a7ee536a6b4dfd9b76dd421baafbb
'2011-12-28T16:32:41-05:00'
describe
'290026' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICT' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
6da7680d9112c2cf756c4a8e6cf6bdb9
24142a3572e25797fc34b02c6e90166c63b5ae83
'2011-12-28T16:33:52-05:00'
describe
'122303' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICU' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
d3ede9d8e37dc3974aa288f48ef1f405
9b7bc0f8717cfe6bd154301c5b735d8c0a09e064
'2011-12-28T16:33:30-05:00'
describe
'26660' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICV' 'sip-files00032.pro'
f2ae150803ff9fe2f9c1f3eda65a1761
a7477a9464a7e4386acb9651b0df4588b2107bbb
describe
'39172' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICW' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
6c25f6b9bee9a2f3d727dacfbd97c8e5
6763c8beae271d401987b66d788eb2d14ab58bb6
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICX' 'sip-files00032.tif'
3e84b0f2b36e0c2fd48de04e459947a3
53ea34307026ebde6d7bc623710a37fadba2a7f1
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICY' 'sip-files00032.txt'
b725bc86fd8d8b292a9d1c2fe09b8146
1024252371ac79264902448b96df7f4c363bdc45
describe
'9693' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAICZ' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
4f31e8069684de55fbb2ba390ac45d29
07109014c973dc438cadc51c92150c485b9173c7
describe
'289992' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDA' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
10f28c239bdd2afa599b7ebc7205b8e1
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describe
'98137' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDB' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
0190427558409d80f433c078bfaf960e
03b72cdff945fa15a612fe9cc18ec0f24f90df95
describe
'20392' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDC' 'sip-files00033.pro'
96b68d68e778a2a3af413b2f84f083a4
8e1b6de0b4db682b614d89f1e38dc9ef7f7008b8
describe
'30890' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDD' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
153a4221a34ab799057918f83684527c
1c034dfecb23f93d7ce753f42103fef071435f80
'2011-12-28T16:32:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDE' 'sip-files00033.tif'
6963183efa00abf683498126abec59f3
2df2f379c9d0e7fc7c6dc2d1570713cdf3214934
describe
'837' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDF' 'sip-files00033.txt'
226eb6d8832a07b7ad33c7e9076125d8
f875ee382623ebfa2935f13d1db5f7724d2dc98f
'2011-12-28T16:33:35-05:00'
describe
'8290' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDG' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
33a61d8af3cdcec733c9b0a0872eb7e0
194b7c3c419e3842ace3e81f4e2dcd8e1e481f6b
describe
'289798' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDH' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
91d1bee14e4fd55e3791b91bd224e11d
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describe
'109830' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDI' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
517dacb1e61735af40337a3630da3e29
394e58f89a57c733c69d0203cb95017ecd8faf6b
describe
'23142' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDJ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
d3fa1488f0df2589358616bba92e519a
a2f3eb8235d2634922665157a2d1476e34ebc566
'2011-12-28T16:33:39-05:00'
describe
'36090' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDK' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
6b3d08ea9b3c172c8f2e0ece9d158223
5c49d9ce9b2c5e4490e744f13c55751437a4988d
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDL' 'sip-files00034.tif'
cd68c0368eba7d2963ac32f95ac71bfa
b9b099b55ec7dcf1ea78f4e32a5e351b1afc3fd1
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDM' 'sip-files00034.txt'
88b8f54a5ce1125075612358580c7ad6
17ce157ed80d2b4b86fe017cb9b837be37b2ded6
describe
'9232' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDN' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
b29d61f1c907262fc58c0201eecf8f8c
e35280fa5f9866f5a601b88da35f9873a17f5f34
describe
'290016' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDO' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
864e7b98915b5095b7ddbfc31e99f85a
bb9847b1cb96f5dc68c5a92fe1d83ac7dc84b71a
describe
'115705' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDP' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
08effb7572dd9161abb471e20681f462
d2290196f84be655e56a2df9ce56c5c0f7eede4e
describe
'24818' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDQ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
c9936edc267b4a32d14039cc862324ed
95b6b6839d922a2271d3f182da2cde9147ebf234
describe
'37653' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDR' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
64cbf253d1c74ec0fdb56d34174e2e69
927b29cc80509491f4ea0d2616eded6c76a1df0f
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDS' 'sip-files00035.tif'
24c543208e083f51e0cf43a35ba944e2
58d3ab5b99d6552132012ea323cebc29e8fa9b6f
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDT' 'sip-files00035.txt'
1b2084e24737ee04707bcdb990327924
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describe
'9466' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDU' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
d2b9bca6a8ea7cdbf2c0c2e52ce47e2f
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describe
'289946' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDV' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
56329b2e5fbdb29f56b49f856b15081c
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describe
'118419' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDW' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
a73e818f00f0005f33188bf154511e64
8dc322ef0246d185ab6ef71f60b9096180de921f
describe
'25162' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDX' 'sip-files00036.pro'
0ec6d89c13dc5fae91f7319349d02a89
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describe
'38299' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDY' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
ae08344e2e4e97feb9a0f664010d3b15
8e8681453bee4f3a1d8e6ca1ee5a674e80be3124
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIDZ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
0cc816f05850cb50446766b9bd1f1647
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describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEA' 'sip-files00036.txt'
0d60004ff3c96a936aa390059b8bf95a
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describe
'9732' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEB' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
70c3335a332a8e90d68a4ae2d1626020
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describe
'289833' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEC' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
6fc67a829c08d949cc0637ad26dff9dc
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describe
'122505' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIED' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
b85fb1d5cefeb676b84fba8a2f30f720
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describe
'26383' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEE' 'sip-files00037.pro'
cbcfa623a3eed205f4bf76dd98c5f8c0
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describe
'39483' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEF' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
9e82bc11660cff9c8b5df83de12f5d16
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEG' 'sip-files00037.tif'
9e01e6c9d14e8fddff24085f885f2ab9
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describe
'1074' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEH' 'sip-files00037.txt'
abb274a891145324ec2b07854f942431
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describe
'9820' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEI' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
44be21e74d14279eda43b45d1e0057c0
3146fe8c5de24edaee93a19db5ea5adba085f7fa
'2011-12-28T16:33:41-05:00'
describe
'289806' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEJ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
a2481a14498644c35585dd8fb05a6abe
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describe
'123996' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEK' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
c415c170ee44c2cd44a69d40c31527cc
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describe
'26324' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEL' 'sip-files00038.pro'
6ae53eddda129f1f4a7109994cd0b8eb
db25bb4c23e648439d788bd83498732884a4004a
'2011-12-28T16:32:57-05:00'
describe
'40190' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEM' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
b80206f541ab5ebc391a31fb0101b5da
bdf9ce2cb5514b8b8e5fdc66d61598428aa4ab5e
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEN' 'sip-files00038.tif'
7f7ddeba9a8c4c9dee4d43a985f90eec
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describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEO' 'sip-files00038.txt'
2fc41b5d16b0fcbb3cdb97fde015f103
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describe
'9857' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEP' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
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describe
'289807' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEQ' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
c0332b3a9aa70233abb8033ce266d4eb
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describe
'125350' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIER' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
23deca5c4380ec190c4c7d230cca8fa4
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describe
'27161' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIES' 'sip-files00039.pro'
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describe
'40392' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIET' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
1be6d217b6feb4c7db2b7e06cd61bb3e
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEU' 'sip-files00039.tif'
b3e130a633e01a89ac0ffa3a8a7c82d2
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describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEV' 'sip-files00039.txt'
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describe
'10022' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEW' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
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describe
'289957' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEX' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
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describe
'118998' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEY' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
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describe
'25782' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIEZ' 'sip-files00040.pro'
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describe
'37958' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFA' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFB' 'sip-files00040.tif'
e38b1d0faf6b0c2b718b30ae710093d4
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describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFC' 'sip-files00040.txt'
f78aa5c834d0d1d5560f34a6e568b415
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describe
'9783' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFD' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
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describe
'290012' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFE' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
889306e147a6651bf41b8bc22155feb9
018e333f7a5040b8195efbff0035f158734d8bd9
'2011-12-28T16:33:27-05:00'
describe
'119644' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFF' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
294a3b52d5bb47947ffac04c3f971d2b
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describe
'25504' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFG' 'sip-files00041.pro'
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describe
'38250' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFH' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
d5a0643537e815179dfa42e818689a08
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFI' 'sip-files00041.tif'
e36b6f851f93d7f9efdd95d9adc1aca0
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describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFJ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
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describe
'9808' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFK' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
e6d2351382d33a09ffebaab7e1bf2fae
f22e3675e73c759de23a7527b25679cac7e0b54a
'2011-12-28T16:33:02-05:00'
describe
'289914' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFL' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
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describe
'98663' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFM' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
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describe
'20260' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFN' 'sip-files00042.pro'
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describe
'31488' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFO' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
80390f9a5ebe2a11b57ec09f1f103891
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFP' 'sip-files00042.tif'
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describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFQ' 'sip-files00042.txt'
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describe
'8324' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFR' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
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describe
'289871' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFS' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
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'2011-12-28T16:33:57-05:00'
describe
'119553' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFT' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
12d7a76c8e7b074004d64c2ac7cffa61
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describe
'25415' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFU' 'sip-files00043.pro'
826ac4abdfb8dbb85a9dcfbf3568b6e0
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describe
'38648' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFV' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2335812' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFW' 'sip-files00043.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFX' 'sip-files00043.txt'
be0972bb60da66de4c7ad4ddddf20e47
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describe
'9356' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFY' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
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describe
'289832' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIFZ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
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describe
'120111' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGA' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
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describe
'25592' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGB' 'sip-files00044.pro'
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describe
'38417' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGC' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGD' 'sip-files00044.tif'
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describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGE' 'sip-files00044.txt'
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describe
'9641' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGF' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
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describe
'289817' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGG' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
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describe
'120482' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGH' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
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describe
'25618' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGI' 'sip-files00045.pro'
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describe
'38786' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGJ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGK' 'sip-files00045.tif'
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describe
'1015' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGL' 'sip-files00045.txt'
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describe
'9908' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGM' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
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'2011-12-28T16:34:00-05:00'
describe
'289846' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGN' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
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describe
'113649' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGO' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
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describe
'24390' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGP' 'sip-files00046.pro'
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describe
'37146' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGQ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGR' 'sip-files00046.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGS' 'sip-files00046.txt'
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describe
'9589' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGT' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
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describe
'289869' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGU' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
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describe
'115682' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGV' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
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describe
'25264' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGW' 'sip-files00047.pro'
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describe
'37087' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGX' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGY' 'sip-files00047.tif'
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describe
'1011' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIGZ' 'sip-files00047.txt'
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describe
'9778' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHA' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
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describe
'289998' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHB' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
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'2011-12-28T16:33:13-05:00'
describe
'112077' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHC' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
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describe
'24007' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHD' 'sip-files00048.pro'
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'2011-12-28T16:33:26-05:00'
describe
'36023' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHE' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHF' 'sip-files00048.tif'
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describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHG' 'sip-files00048.txt'
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describe
'9416' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHH' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
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describe
'289851' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHI' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
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describe
'119182' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHJ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHK' 'sip-files00049.pro'
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describe
'38021' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHL' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHM' 'sip-files00049.tif'
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describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHN' 'sip-files00049.txt'
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describe
'9219' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHO' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
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describe
'289862' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHP' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
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describe
'113497' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHQ' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
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describe
'24102' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHR' 'sip-files00050.pro'
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describe
'36665' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHS' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHT' 'sip-files00050.tif'
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describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHU' 'sip-files00050.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHV' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
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describe
'289866' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHW' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
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describe
'97870' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHX' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
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describe
'19854' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHY' 'sip-files00051.pro'
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describe
'31605' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIHZ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIA' 'sip-files00051.tif'
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describe
'823' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIB' 'sip-files00051.txt'
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describe
'8533' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIC' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
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describe
'289834' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIID' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
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describe
'118926' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIE' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
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describe
'25743' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIF' 'sip-files00052.pro'
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describe
'39562' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIG' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIH' 'sip-files00052.tif'
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describe
'1034' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIII' 'sip-files00052.txt'
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describe
'9692' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIJ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIK' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
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describe
'122047' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIL' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
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describe
'25588' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIM' 'sip-files00053.pro'
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describe
'38987' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIN' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIO' 'sip-files00053.tif'
69f2f60e46699fbd3055e5eb96a860ac
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIP' 'sip-files00053.txt'
d24b387186a8a0a97c14fc39fb63e298
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describe
'9880' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIQ' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
df286ed1c553a25c0fcc833004cbc0d9
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describe
'284485' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIR' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
825edb95cfca0907afe6a30b104b08f3
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describe
'132127' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIS' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
dc348fbddb53df2a71230f7c6f92af84
b613a118a446443cd25054c94cf98bd1d78af954
describe
'27028' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIT' 'sip-files00054.pro'
0dbfb3decb85e4a1c820a166aa2eea0e
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describe
'42526' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIU' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
2455618de8f1652f9b97aed4f0c9059b
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describe
'2293196' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIV' 'sip-files00054.tif'
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describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIW' 'sip-files00054.txt'
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describe
'10447' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIX' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
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describe
'286132' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIY' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
1fe79f444cbafd5db56a09f6a1280f88
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describe
'124650' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIIZ' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
0abfe396dd1fff36226fe7af23b77367
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describe
'26268' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJA' 'sip-files00055.pro'
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describe
'39052' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJB' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
433fbde0355fde266fafebd3551738b9
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describe
'2306168' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJC' 'sip-files00055.tif'
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describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJD' 'sip-files00055.txt'
d1ce54224f3975466abcd47ff27eeb2a
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describe
'10098' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJE' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
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describe
'289984' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJF' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
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describe
'116355' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJG' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
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describe
'26784' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJH' 'sip-files00056.pro'
d8ec7f065fdaab770c31d715a05df99e
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describe
'36434' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJI' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
255349dcdd4f9f199b2ff91fb057c9bf
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJJ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
6ee07412c1494bd6597e081503040d4a
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describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJK' 'sip-files00056.txt'
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describe
'9315' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJL' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
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describe
'289863' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJM' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
dddf3d95129e16aa575b5f9bd4fecb96
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describe
'124291' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJN' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
414e312102225afe53292a3ff9bed5d0
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describe
'27529' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJO' 'sip-files00057.pro'
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describe
'39904' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJP' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
24a4576dec9b9bfe0f11f7a423aabce0
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describe
'2335808' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJQ' 'sip-files00057.tif'
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describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJR' 'sip-files00057.txt'
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describe
'9770' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJS' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
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describe
'290028' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJT' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
c85bf85c22bd6f974143c5d8c9367912
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describe
'113035' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJU' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
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describe
'24308' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJV' 'sip-files00058.pro'
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describe
'36083' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJW' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJX' 'sip-files00058.tif'
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describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJY' 'sip-files00058.txt'
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describe
'9448' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIJZ' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
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describe
'289997' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKA' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
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describe
'102725' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKB' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
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describe
'21139' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKC' 'sip-files00059.pro'
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describe
'34076' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKD' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
a0b1a7200ffadf74c65b3af3a1c6fa41
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKE' 'sip-files00059.tif'
d544513f292977465c009aee6bc2eae7
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describe
'867' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKF' 'sip-files00059.txt'
80ac9575372f02201b4ea5642a7a8ace
e65347b14f0506ce13395f9fb8c88dd9024524f4
'2011-12-28T16:32:44-05:00'
describe
'8785' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKG' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
4770c10f00be774f13196a84c7819824
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describe
'290009' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKH' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
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describe
'115436' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKI' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
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describe
'25170' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKJ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
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describe
'37931' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKK' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
0fc2b870d17625ba805210f8055f6901
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKL' 'sip-files00060.tif'
ca76c1a1412a424ab63d8b488fb67bd0
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKM' 'sip-files00060.txt'
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describe
'9393' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKN' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
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describe
'289861' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKO' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
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describe
'118867' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKP' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
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describe
'26316' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKQ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
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describe
'38049' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKR' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKS' 'sip-files00061.tif'
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describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKT' 'sip-files00061.txt'
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describe
'9730' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKU' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
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describe
'289818' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKV' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
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describe
'115987' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKW' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
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describe
'24559' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKX' 'sip-files00062.pro'
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describe
'37668' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKY' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIKZ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
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describe
'977' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILA' 'sip-files00062.txt'
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describe
'9568' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILB' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
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describe
'289848' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILC' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
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describe
'110864' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILD' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
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describe
'23318' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILE' 'sip-files00063.pro'
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describe
'36292' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILF' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILG' 'sip-files00063.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILH' 'sip-files00063.txt'
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describe
'9629' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILI' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
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describe
'289999' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILJ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
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describe
'113287' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILK' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
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describe
'24624' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILL' 'sip-files00064.pro'
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describe
'35624' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILM' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILN' 'sip-files00064.tif'
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describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILO' 'sip-files00064.txt'
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describe
'9464' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILP' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
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describe
'289774' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILQ' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
78989bd1658341446cff127c3c63cc5c
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describe
'113544' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILR' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
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describe
'24180' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILS' 'sip-files00065.pro'
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describe
'36152' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILT' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILU' 'sip-files00065.tif'
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describe
'978' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILV' 'sip-files00065.txt'
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describe
'9211' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILW' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
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describe
'289856' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILX' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
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describe
'109771' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILY' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
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describe
'23448' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAILZ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
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describe
'36192' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMA' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
fe25bd563e9075ade5e5ce1c70793164
f27ad617d6257439a0adbd9da43239313bf973c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMB' 'sip-files00066.tif'
9be5f9c2701e89e974ba784148fd6270
24d3fc3595082e55906c38ec34b611f6b66a44bd
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMC' 'sip-files00066.txt'
868decc5b18c594177a1265028017a66
ff0c24abae72b62e142cc1caeee18422d67dce14
describe
'9372' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMD' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
e8eb2b54e55b8080df2180efbe3b5a65
479da54e1fb0480768d862355571574ccdc6b27f
describe
'289815' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIME' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
4ab8f2e90c28d02a2d1ac815cd5dd3c2
b20556d342ebd97f610ccd7dac0fe05789cca8de
describe
'116762' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMF' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
3cc389d8597e67a25cb801300de6bdf9
68529a7b7dcf0d17b8a8104f81c14ea5fbfd769d
describe
'25231' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMG' 'sip-files00067.pro'
c362cb2463fbcbfa8fa59dd85c01e024
768e8f5b6c97b1772ae373aa35a87720289ec19e
describe
'37970' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMH' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
1dc865a7247c0333fe758291f064b6b0
f0b4b2e5f1315920a3b83dbf09108e5dbfa663fe
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMI' 'sip-files00067.tif'
4c1c1f2cddfca4156c9743911c9e2033
541fc24d4148e29a9cb2cc50d64fca87207f4045
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMJ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
b12e992afd0f24a67be2d8df2b097fda
27f817aaea2663b5e4a16f7ce11c7ce855a1694f
describe
'9550' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMK' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
857bec2ed2c3e7c5d99ca57ebd3e2aab
a10d3c83b0da5684694b9cfbdd5d9c02a532919d
describe
'289773' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIML' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
b6f08f738970d7e6dacc9c9d90a9ec47
4d729e38d03c2e561dcd530c15e6e8cae39b7205
describe
'123705' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMM' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
68986f924d4678ddac66cf8ac4623cd5
1d7c63b7dfc35d6a7dfbff76b94aade04d71aa15
describe
'26545' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMN' 'sip-files00068.pro'
3e5a5651a7b39e394d7b6ae6aa9b29fe
16a0caf12ca3c181e120c4c4e69a87f596edf99c
describe
'40648' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMO' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
af6c785ec5822f1946b7280b01a50f77
3a85f131def34b036cc02a3f34ea1d7f088da266
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMP' 'sip-files00068.tif'
cdae6bafe4d81f5b43707c73de12c39d
acea0365280d3c4f2aad14c5fada7d894b2f8d81
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMQ' 'sip-files00068.txt'
fde84482566a2227124c42b8e6a42c3c
a11f0032c1c25920fd7296585c01cd754f7e92e8
describe
'9932' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMR' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
96106763fa56ee5e52f044602cad8ded
f96e4e638b68326fa73b8d4cf88f8921fd3daf37
describe
'289868' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMS' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
d50624403864e6b8f9f1d1b8e775a4cf
1a429f053f8abacc1dbbaba7e3db9e6678400340
describe
'121660' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMT' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
26e4890fc83fe8a08f2637dea0f62b5d
a3d04991dd92917f02f0db68b81ed94c9ff1b9bb
'2011-12-28T16:34:15-05:00'
describe
'25474' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMU' 'sip-files00069.pro'
38ce7c89b28f2721d82e9482fa1f3f0c
7d6465f8fb6b8610e203aeb19744fcd6d741e6ed
describe
'39687' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMV' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
22579795078c00f986ab852cb019581e
4a5e1f566d81d601ca5121b3a1dbab7ac140385e
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMW' 'sip-files00069.tif'
7b8d838dcb9d821f1eba3975c02f58ba
701c5855d40b921fbda03473fa85065c234bf4bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMX' 'sip-files00069.txt'
42c3121ab75e10912dda8da0a3bc7d27
813679aaf7f68bc618c47c091684d68af330df56
describe
'9748' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMY' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
7fd5d6118ac82ee525e617931d120c5b
d24baf1b3f88411be29abaf54fd72f7255cd4930
describe
'289821' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIMZ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
8860a3b9a0ec73f6e5ecfe9f3889f1a4
0f06287f9adea7b60a32571bfeac69f5e8dff7ed
describe
'88126' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINA' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
a9d7252d1c63826e55167168735f05ac
34a24ce5a607143ce45341a78a59cf7c92a090ed
describe
'16525' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINB' 'sip-files00070.pro'
9cae15ece8d7275e6d20e9b3861feb25
6e503d7446a20c510acbddca648a64adadcf5b22
describe
'27485' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINC' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
e8a8ca6e1060a9f068de41121953c6a7
58382c5a6d197f38d28fbdbfb9b804a029b7dbb0
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIND' 'sip-files00070.tif'
f7c8d8886abd45994d5a7f589cc5bade
af625d1ec0dffd46b0c791ed85bd4569cfc68c0d
describe
'658' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINE' 'sip-files00070.txt'
05eb24c66a1642b5d3f298df51261b5e
10af01e5d8b0ac35b066c7a0c8bbd6471a26c68d
describe
'6910' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINF' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
7503902a0e1e2b5511d1d2787a9c2744
7b9609f91afc8aa07e2cebbcd277aee16882447d
describe
'289892' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAING' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
1ad5d693d3c8a83a962356179dfd3545
f68024906b42628a05cd32ec7549dae8157bc137
describe
'23844' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINH' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
ae88d027a8728032755ff2bcbdfe2ee0
3c01a69888941f59d8402b201076b8b31452fb92
describe
'6506' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINI' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
9b9162030d8de7db97e65656feec4479
e416309148bddf0c9280dabcfec4c003308fb986
describe
'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINJ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
eadb87f9ee19b765755e8fca0a725a78
9044ab4069a87bbdd85ca45fd8da0019521f9b6a
describe
'2038' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINK' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
d7c0d69186f03115077906faacd279dc
fa2473a12d1a78a099be6f28522a82836655e703
describe
'325693' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINL' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
22d51df9bfe87b2a763f284082e196c9
085734c1430d64db5209bc98611fbbf9df316bd7
describe
'65425' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINM' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
ec4f9390ed2f237da1bcfa856e8cf5d0
4a203141ef775bc4274fd1db193e78987b56497c
describe
'14878' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINN' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
10b1564222f767ac52ff9beb0a16f04e
b4d02dcfbabdefbecc2162707c979dddd0eb2b3b
describe
'7822988' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINO' 'sip-files00073.tif'
528a79f84d390d45f3f22f7820fc5843
0344f9213d091fb55477abdeddca6074ec2543bd
describe
'3926' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINP' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
6426169b6ddc3546ccfbb1dfe07bc901
fda735677d3fbbf8570c6958153abd272020828e
describe
'323328' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINQ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
5ab49cabe93c3b2bc106e7a7b9c0d0cb
0c4f019e4b52227e2369da93bba3078c15484f9a
describe
'61563' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINR' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
9e7dd7442fb6a69a1dc061ddd7b8877e
f3e8664005e1ac96262d3af5efb020cdd1c7f9e1
describe
'10079' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINS' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
75cbb52cfde9e1afab98ba4f9c33b2cf
d8d546adfabf34b83f3a38e1851dc4c28937574b
describe
'7770112' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINT' 'sip-files00074.tif'
66c0f6e29eff57ca725faca99a815778
e3f51723cf177e75cf3b32640188c2fabdd1b52f
describe
'2366' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINU' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
ede05d1f21725578571ff497f3f3bc0a
03d9b5d5dacb09d0c54b89a237a37304870f01c8
describe
'44012' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINV' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
7140b52f7ec982dce87a298855f4c6ce
88ced6b3d1a9eac7432a6fcff9d7953e751cf59c
describe
'18116' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINW' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
f4ad3ee2c1417143f3824c9cb6a1fc61
1907504c6ef79de7be9b3a48cdc81230166728ce
describe
'213' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINX' 'sip-files00075.pro'
596de1d34d35b68001b199fab2ae0f06
aef04840f5e0e31dbc5effe72cf6bbcb6a952f63
describe
'5032' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINY' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
0df5fff58ca291a7ea3baf60dde149e1
eb82a0ce32f64678b3de0656f89b9689f4fbec31
describe
'1065364' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAINZ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
281cc4fd59dd167eefa4bc26eb81249f
d54c375f420947a21a1039bebd7215ed168f2b8d
describe
'2394' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIOA' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
5417ad7dbb49f2907263135c20826073
d21997e3c2cfff8ca943733690f4e644ca284abe
describe
'40' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIOB' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
199f40cd102e6bda984146f6732120c1
292c1564050d829416ccc6fe3370fff039ac0f40
describe
'102764' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIOC' 'sip-filesUF00087079_00001.mets'
db753dfe5700f7d0957c47c3d4a9c29b
0199324617db582a4f2f07748ea8f0f22e479b26
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T02:08:30-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'131379' 'info:fdaE20090109_AAAAYLfileF20090112_AAAIOF' 'sip-filesUF00087079_00001.xml'
1fab9af30b45e9438f22263aafff87df
d329ca140d05411f3665813acc2331de76a7de2e
describe
'2013-12-14T02:08:29-05:00'
xml resolution