Citation
The story of the Rhinegold (Der Ring des Nibelungen)

Material Information

Title:
The story of the Rhinegold (Der Ring des Nibelungen) told for young people
Creator:
Chapin, Anna Alice, 1880-1920
Wagner, Richard, 1813-1883
Harper Brothers ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York ;
London
Publisher:
Harper & Brothers
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1897
Language:
English
Physical Description:
xx, [1], 138 p., [12] leaves of plates : ill., music ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Mythology, Norse -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Gods, Norse -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Goddesses, Norse -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Heroes -- Mythology -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Love -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Giants -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Dwarfs -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Magic -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Dragons -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Operas -- Stories, plots, etc -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Fantasy literature ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Anna Alice Chapin ; illlustrated.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026628527 ( ALEPH )
ALG3935 ( NOTIS )
259974056 ( OCLC )

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WOTAN AND BRUNNHILDE



THE

STORY OF THE RHINEGOLD

(DER RING DES NIBELUNGEN)

Told for Woung People

BY

ANNA ALICE CHAPIN

ILLUSTRATED



NEW YORK AND LONDON
HARPER & BROTHERS PUBLISHERS
1898



SoG

Copyright, 1897, by HarPeR & BROTHERS.



All rights reserved.



TO
THE MASTER’S DAUGHTER
EVA WAGNER
WITH HEARTFELT GRATITUDE
FOR HER KINDNESS AND ENCOURAGEMENT
THIS BOOK
fig Dedicated



PREFACE

The Story of the Rhinegold contains the four
operas of Richard Wagner’s “ Nibelungen Ring,”
atranged for young people. The “Nibelun-
gen Ring,” or “Nibelungen Cycle,” is built
upon a colossal foundation: a number of the
great Teutonic myths, welded together with the
most masterly skill and consistency. It is evi-
dent that Wagner, like William Morris and other
writers, has taken from the fragmentary mytho-
logical tales such material as would serve his
purpose, adapting such incidents as he chose and
as he considered appropriate to his work. But
there are so many different versions of these old
stories that it is very difficult to trace Wagner’s
plot to its original birthplace. The various
tales contained in the ancient sagas are so seem-
ingly contradictory that anything connectedly
authoritative appears impossible to trace. The



vi Preface

one thing which seems to remain the same in
almost all versions of the stories, ancient and
modern, is the background of mythology, that
great, gloomy cycle of gods, with the ever-recur-
ring note of Fate which seems to have im-
pressed all searchers in myths alike, and which
inspired Wagner when he formed his mystical,
solemn Fate motif.

Odin, Wuotan, Wodin, or Wotan, according
to the different names given him in the old le-
gends, is the central figure in the framework.
If I read the story aright, the Norns, or more
properly Nornir, are next in importance. They
and their mother, the Vala, are the medium
through which the relentless something behind
the gods made itself felt in the world. The
three sisters are named respectively Urdr, Ver-
dandi, and Skuld—freely translated Past, Pres-
ent, and Future; or, as they were once styled, as
correctly perhaps, Was, Is, and Shall Be. It is
a question whether Erda and Urdr, the oldest
Norn, might not originally have been identical.
Dr. Hueffer speaks of Erda as the “ Mother of
Gods and Men,” but though “the Vala” is
often found in mythology, the name Erda is rare-
ly mentioned, whereas the titles for the three
Norns seem to be unquestionably correct. The



Preface vii

term Vala is usually translated as Witch, or
Witch-wife, but, though a Vala was indeed a sor-
ceress, she was a prophetess as well.

A step lower than the gods, yet gifted with
supernatural power and far removed from the
characteristics of human beings, were the dwarfs
and the giants. The giants, we are told, were
creatures belonging properly to the Age of
Stone, which explains the fact that there were
left but two representatives of the race at the
time of the Golden Age. The dwarfs come
under the head of elves. They were gifted
with the utmost cleverness and skill. The
giants were stupid and clumsy, and, save for
their superhuman strength and size, entirely in-
ferior to the small, sly dwarfs.

The world was strangely peopled in those
days; many of the heroes were demi-gods, that
is, descended from some god or goddess, and
witches, dwarfs, and sorcerers mingled with hu-
man beings.

Many mortals, also, had magic power then.
Otter, the son of Rodmar, changed himself
into the animal for which he was named, and
while in the shape of the otter he was caught
and killed by three of the gods who were wan-
dering over the earth in disguise. Rodmar de-



viii Preface

manded weregild,* and Loki, with a net, caught
Andvari, a rich and malignant dwarf, and com-
manded him to pay a ransom of gold and gems,
enough to cover the skin of the otter; for |
such was the weregild demanded by Rodmar.
Andvari, of necessity, gave the gold for his own
release, even adding a wonderful wealth-breeding
Ring to cover up a single hair in the skin which
the rest of the treasures had left unconcealed.
The dwarf cursed the Ring, and the curse attend-
ed it through all its manifold ways of magic, to
the end of the story.

Rodmar’s remaining sons, Fafnir and Regin,
killed their father and fought for the treasure.
Fafnir obtained it, and, turning himself into a
monster-worm, went to Glistenheath (sometimes
called Glittering Hearth) to guard his wealth.
Regin called upon Sigurd, a young hero, to aid
him, and, being a master-smith, forged for him
a sharp sword named Gram. Some versions
give the forging of the sword to Sigurd, but
there are many sides to the story. The sword
was sometimes called Gram, and oftener Bal-
dung, until Wagner gave it the more expressive

* Weregzid is almost untranslatable. It may mean
payment, tax, forfeit, or ransom. ~



Preface ix

name of Nothung, or Needful. Prompted by
Regin, Sigurd slew the Dragon at Glistenheath,
and, after tasting the blood by accident, was
able to understand the language of birds, and
was told by two of Odin’s ravens that Regin was
treacherous. After slaying Regin, Sigurd rode
away with two bundles of the treasures slung
across his horse’s back. He found and awak-
ened Brynhildr, a beautiful woman asleep in a
house on a hill. (She is known in the different
tales in which she has figured as Brynhildr, Brun-
hild, Brunehault, and Briinnhilde.) The next
part of the tale is most clearly set forth in the
“ Nibelungenlied,” an epic poem in Middle High
German dialect, containing a story—or, more
correctly, a series of stories—which originally
belonged to the entire Teutonic people. These
have been found in multitudinous poems and
sagas, from those written by the ancient Norse-
men, and most primitive in form, to the modern
books, essays, and poems of writers who have
been impressed with the interesting and pictur-
esque aspects of the strange, complicated old
story. The “Nibelungenlied” itself deals rather
with the period of Christianity—with the knights
and ladies of the time of chivalry—than with the
primeval gods and heroes of the Golden Age.



x Preface

The substance of its contents may be found in the
“Edda” and in the “ Thidrekssaga ” (thirteenth
century), and the original manuscripts of the
“Nibelungenlied ” itself date from the thirteenth
to the sixteenth century.

The story contained in this poem is, briefly
told, as follows:

Siegfried, son of Siegmund and Sieglind,
woos Kreimhild, the sister of King Gunther, of
Burgundy, promising, in return for her hand, to
aid Gunther in winning Brunhild, Queen of Iss-
land (Iceland). Siegfried, with the help of his
cloud-cloak, conquers Brunhild for Gunther—
first in three athletic games, which she makes a
test for all suitors; and later when, after the
marriage, she proves stormy and untamed. He
takes her Ring and girdle, and gives them to his
wife, Kreimhild. They possess magic proper-
ties, and Brunhild, when deprived of them, loses
her great power and becomes like any ordinary
woman. She sees her Ring on Kreimhild’s hand
one day, and, realizing that it is Siegfried, and
not her husband Gunther, who has conquered
her great strength and stolen her magic circlets,
she tells her wrongs to Hagan, who promises re-
venge. Hagan is the Knight of Trony, and he
and his brother Dankwort are Gunther’s vassals.



Preface xi

Hagan entices Kreimhild to reveal to him the
secret of her husband’s safety in battle, and she
tells him that Siegfried once slew a dragon and
bathed in the blood, which made him invulnera-
ble, save in one place, between his shoulders,
where a leaf fell, protecting the skin from the
blood. Kreimhild is entirely deceived by Ha-
gan, and, not suspecting his treachery, she sews
a circle of silk upon her husband’s vesture over
the vulnerable spot, that Hagan may better
know how to protect the hero’s one weakness
when they are in battle. It is there, where the
circle -of silk is sewn, that Hagan stabs him.

There is much more in the “ Nibelungenlied,”
and a character famous in poesy and sagas is in-
troduced later in the poem—Atli, or Attila, King
of the Huns; but he has nothing to do with our
story, though some one has drawn a resem-
blance between his character and that of Hun-
ding. The “Nibelungenlied,” after Siegfried’s
death, contains very little connected in any way
with Wagner’s four operas.

There are other versions of this tale, as there
are of all ancient stories. There are many tales
of the killing of the Dragon and the awakening
of Brunhild, and the personality and history of
the latter have passed under diverse alterations



xii Preface

in color and development. One story says that
Brynhildr, the Valkyrie, was made to slumber
by her father Odin, who pricked her in the temple
with a sleep-thorn. Many writers tell of a fire-
circle which surrounded the sleeper and guarded
her slumbers. She is known as a great queen,
a woman gifted with magic powers, and a dis-
obedient Walkiire in different tales; and her
character changes as constantly as her history
in the various legends where we read of her.
Sigurd, Siegfried, and Sinfiotli are, in many
respects, so similar that they might safely be
termed identical, though sometimes, as in Will-
iam Morris’s “Sigurd, the Volsung,” they ap-
pear as distinct characters.

Out of this confused and complicated sea of
myths, legends, and old Norse stories Wagner
has drawn the material for his wonderful cycle.

His gods and goddesses are taken, with very
few changes, directly from their original place—
the Teutonic mythology. His giants and dwarfs
are also unaltered ascomplete races. In his usage
of them he differs in some respects from the older
stories.

Fafnir, the son of Rodmar, becomes the giant
Fafner, and his brother Fasolt is added. Regin
is transformed into Mime, the master-smith. In-



Preface xiii

stead of Otter, who must be covered by gems,
we have the love goddess Friea, and instead of
the hair which the Ring must cover in the old
legend, it isin Wagner’s adaptation one of Friea’s
beautiful eyes. Fafner hides in Hate Hole in-
stead of upon Glistenheath, and is killed by
Siegfried instead of Sigurd. The lonely Walkiires’
Rock takes the place of the house on the hill,
and instead of being made invulnerable by the
Dragon’s blood, Siegfried is protected by Briinn-
hilde’s spells—a fancy which seems more poetic
and beautiful, but which originates, I believe,
entirely with Wagner. Gutrune takes the place
of Kreimhild, and Hagan is not Gunther’s vassal,
but his half-brother. These are, after all, appar-
ently slight changes, yet to Wagner’s cycle a new
poetry seemstohavecome. The barbaric aspects
of the tale have faded, and all the simple beauty
of those wild, noble gods and demi-gods has
gleamed forth as gloriously as the wonderful
Rhinegold, which the master has made next in
importance to the gods and the dusk of their
splendor.

Before going further, perhaps it might be well
to say a few words of explanation as to the mo-
tifs which form the key-notes of Wagner’s Break
musical dramas.



xiv Preface

When he set his poem of the Nibelungen
Ring to music, he was not satisfied with merely
beautiful airs and harmonies linked together with
no purpose save the lovely sounds. He wished,
above all, to have his music fit his words; and
for every character and thought and incident,
and indeed for almost everything in his operas,
he wrote a melody, and these descriptive musical
phrases are called motzfs. Each one has its mean-
ing, and when it is played it brings the thought
of what it describes and represents, and it makes
a double language—what the characters on the
stage are saying and what the music is saying, as
well. Through the motifs we understand many
things which we could not possibly comprehend
otherwise.

That Wagner wished to give the impression
that Erda was the mother of all beings, divine
and human, at the beginning of the world, he has
shown by the fact that the motif of the Primal
Element—the commencement of all things—is
identical with hers, save that where she is indi-
cated the melody takes a minor coloring, denot-
ing her character of mystery as well as the gloom
in which her prophetic powers must necessarily
envelop her. The contrasting, yet harmonizing,
elements of earth and water are also shadowed



Preface XV

forth, I think, in this motif of the Primal Ele-
ment, which is used for the Afzne, and also for
the Goddess of the Earth. When the Vala’s
daughters—the Nornir—are mirrored in the mu-
sic, the same melody appears, fraught with the
waving, weaving sound of their mystic spinning.

The motifs in Wagner’s operas are, above all,
descriptive. For example, note the Walhalla,
Nibelung, and Giant motifs.

The first of these, full of power, substance, and
dignity, not only is descriptive of the great palace
itself, but also represents the entire race of gods
who inhabit it, seemingly secure in their conscious
glory and sovereignty. To indicate Wotan, the
King of the gods and the ruler in Walhalla,
Wagner has constantly made use of this motif.

Its melody is measured, strong, and simple, and
the nobility of those worshipped gods of primeval
years seems to breathe through it.

The Nibelungs were so intimately associated
with their work that they were scarcely more
than living machines—soulless exponents of the
art of the forge and the anvil; so when we hear
in the music the beat of hammers—the sharp,
metallic clang in measured time, our first
thought is that the hammers are swung by the
Nibelungs. How cramped is their melody, how



xvi Preface

monotonous and hopeless is the regular fall of
the hammers! When we hear it hushed and
veiled with discords, we seem to come in con-
tact with the narrow, darkened souls of the
Nibelungs.

And now we come to the motif of the
giants.

It is, like themselves, heavy, lumbering, with a
slur that is like the stumbling of heavy feet.
Clumsy and ungraceful, it and what it represents
cross the idyllic beauty of the motifs of Friea,
Walhalla, the King, the Rhinegold, and the rest,
with a harsh and disagreeable sense of an in-
harmonious element. How different from the
majestic gods, and the clever, small-souled Nib-
elungs, are these great creatures who are all
bodies and no brains, and who are so ably repre-
sented by the music allotted them in the operas!
Yet, in their own way, they and their motif are
excessively picturesque !

In these three motifs we can see the genius
which formed them, and so many others, even
greater in conception and execution. Scattered
throughout The Story of the Rhinegold will be
found a few of these motifs—only a few and not
the most lovely —but enough I think to help
one, in a small way, to follow the operas with



Preface xvii

more interest and understanding than if one did
not know them.

One of the simplest motifs in the book is one
of the most important: the Rhinegold motif.
It is like the blowing of a fairy horn heralding to
the world of sprites and elves the magic wonder
in the river.

In the olden days they had a lovely legend of
the formation of the Rhinegold. They said
that the sun’s rays poured down into the Rhine
so brilliantly every day that, through some
magic—no one knew exactly how—the glowing
reflection became bright and beautiful gold,
filled with great mystic powers because of its
glorious origin—the sunshine.

And that was the beginning of the Rhine-
gold.









CONTENTS





Dart
THE RHINEGOLD, or DAS RHEINGOLD
PAGE
IPRELUDE Sg ules tre hater sneh ni Seliger oti ihe Livia cel Mein elie mts k Mast vel caked
CHAPTER
tS DHE RHINE=MAIDENS (3 i erie et ele aatieee ao
LI CHASOLT:“AND:FAFNER 312060000. 5: Waste eeu en been IS
PDL INIBELHEIMEA Vspige os Sima jones ee Me esualice Cie nen oe TO
LV. “THE RAINBOW. BRIDGE: 2) eo) sea ee ee fe te 0) 24
Dart 17
THE WARRIOR GODDESS, or DIE WALKURE
PRELUDE ere rise cee tee tote een oie nee eh ebenl t octirahceenn gS
CHAPTER
I, THE Housrt or HUNDING . . . . «© © e e + 37
II. THE DAUGHTER OF WOTAN .... +. « + +» 45
III. BRUNNHILDE’S PUNISHMENT . oats oles Ue cabeure mee
Dart Tit
SIEGFRIED

PRELUDE Seite eee See eee RENO Sie ghee on ee ete Og



XX Contents



CHAPTER PAGE
T, ‘SIEGFRIED AND -MIME 360055 ue ie ie) OF.
DE VHATE: HOLE. 008) 2 Scua ia haa Sietace eg tesa eee O

III. Tue MountTain Pass . . . . 1 5 6 « a 88
IV. THE WALKURES’ Rock . . . . 1 1. 1 ew ee QS

Part 1
THE DUSK OF THE GODS, or GOTTER-
DAMMERUNG

PRELUDE?) (210 stiles oy 2 hel ae Sad a ee Pepe n ah te ee OS

CHAPTER
I. THE HALL OF THE GIBICHUNGS ... . . . I07
II. THE WALKURES’ Rock ONCE MoRE. ... . II3

III. THe RuINE CHIEF’s BRIDE . ... .. . « 118
IV. ON THE BANKS OF THE RHINE. . . . . «+ F24

V. THE LAst TWILIGHT . . .. . 2. + « «© « 133



ILLUSTRATIONS

WOTAN AND BRUNNHILDE . 2 . 1. 1... Frontispiece
THE GLEAMING TREASURE . . . . . . . . Facingg. 10
A- WARRIOR GODDESS. 60 ES ee ee 34
THE WALKURE APPEARS. 05-020 0 pn ee 50
SIEGFRIED ‘AT. THE FORGE? 2.308 fo pe 76
THE DEATH OF THE DRAGON ........ $ 82
BRUNNHILDE ON THE WALKURES’ ROCK. . . . “* 104
GUTRUNE AND SIEGFRIED ........ a IIo
BRUNNHILDE AND SIEGFRIED . ..... . oh 116
GUNTHER AND BRUNNHILDE. . ......,. + ¢ 122
HAGEN-AND SIEGFRIED °°. 68 8000 05.2 eo 128

AFTER SIEGFRIED’S DEATH . . . ..... * 130



Patt 7

THE RHINEGOLD, or DAS RHEINGOLD










Motif of the Rhinegold

PRELUDE

WE have, all of us, read of the Golden Age,
when the gods ruled over the world, and giants
and dragons, dwarfs and water-fairies inhabited
the earth and mingled with mortals. The giants
were then a strong, stupid race, more rough than
cruel, and, as a rule, generous among themselves.
They were very foolish creatures, and constantly
did themselves and others harm; but their race,
even at that time, was dying out, and there were
left of it only two brothers, Fasolt and Fafner.

The dwarfs, or Nibelungs, were entirely differ-
ent. They were small and misshapen, but very
shrewd, and so skilful were their fingers that
they were able to do the most difficult work in
the finest metals. They lived in an underground
country called Nibelheim (Home of the Dwarfs),
where they collected hoards of gold and gems,
and strange treasures of all kinds; and Alberich
was one of them. He was a hideous creature,



4 The Story of the Rhinegold

so dark and evil-looking, with his small, wicked
eyes and his hair and beard the color of ink,
that he was always called Black Alberich —a
very suitable name.

As for the dragons, they were rare even in
those days, and though we shall have to deal
with one by-and-by when we are further on in
my story, I shall not say much about them now.

The water - fairies were beautiful spirits who
lived in the depths of the river Rhine. They
were simple and innocent, as became children of
the Golden Age, and very lovely to look upon.
In the peaceful twilight-land under the water
they were perfectly happy, dancing in and out
among the rocks at the river bottom, and sing-
ing soft songs, which, when wafted up to the
surface of the Rhine, sounded like the faint
sighing ripple of the river as it rolled onward
through the valleys and the woods.

And the water-fairies had one great happi-
ness in their quiet, shadowed lives. I will tell you
what it was: On the top ofa tall black rock in the
river Rhine there rested a magical treasure, more
wonderful than any of the Nibelung hoards, or
the possessions of the gods themselves—a bright,
beautiful Gold, the radiance of which was so great
that when the sun shone down into the river and



Prelude 5

touched it the gray-green water was filled with
golden light from depth to depth, and the fairies
of the Rhine circled about their treasure, singing
and laughing with delight.

What a wonderful time it must have been—the
Golden Age—when such things were possible!

You smile and say that they were not possible,
even then! Remember that this is a fairy tale—
a day-dream—such as might come to you while
watching the sunlit ripples dancing on the water,
and hearing the little waves lapping on the peb-
bles—a fairy tale, that is all.

The Golden Age, as I think of it, seems a pe-
riod in which anything might have happened.
Closing my eyes, I can picture the majestic gods
moving, great kings and queens among human
beings; great kings and queens made young by
Friea’s apples of youth. Friea was the Goddess
of Love, Youth, and Beauty. She was the same
as Venus, the Roman goddess, called Aphrodite
by the Greeks, of whom, perhaps, you have read
elsewhere. All that I am writing about happen-
ed, you know, in Germany; and to the people
there the gods—or rather men’s ideas of them,
and their names for them—were different from
those of other lands.

So the King God, instead of being Jupiter, or



6 Lhe Story of the Rhinegold

Zeus, or Jove, was called Wotan, or sometimes
Odin. And the Queen Goddess was neither Juno
nor Here, but Fricka; and the wild Thunder God
was Thor; and the Goddess of the Earth Erda,
which means the earth. She was the wisest of
all the gods and goddesses (though Logi, the
Fire God, was the quickest and cleverest), and
she could prophesy strange things about the
gods and the world, and everything happened
just as she prophesied.

She would sink into the earth and dream, and
all her dreams came true. She would tell them
to her daughters, the three Norns, or Fates, and
they would weave them into a long golden
thread, into which they had spun the world’s
history.

They spun under a great ash-tree which grew
by the Fountain of Wisdom, and was called the
Tree of the World.

One day Wotan, the king of the gods, came to
the fountain for a draught of the Water of Wis-
dom. He drank, and left one of his eyes in
payment. He tore a limb from the World-Ash
and made it into a spear; and the spear, having
strange figures upon it representing Law and
Knowledge, was typical of the wisdom and pow-
er of the gods, and so long as that wisdom and



Prelude 7

that power endured no sword could break the
spear nor could remain whole at its touch.

But the World-Ash, robbed of its branches,
withered away and died, and the Fountain of
Wisdom became dry.

And these things were the beginning of the
end of the Golden Age. But wise people say
that the Golden Age did not end until men
began to value gold for its own sake and the
love of gain, and to do wrong things to possess
it. And now I will tell you how it all happened.

Motif of the Primal Element,



out of which come the Erda, Norn, and Rhine Motifs



Song of the Rhine Maidens

Wei - a wa - ga, wa-ver-ing wa - ters,

-o-



weaving and whirl- ing! Wa-la-la wei - a!

CHAPTER I

THE RHINE MAIDENS

AT the bottom of the river Rhine, about the
dark rock where rested the invisible Rhinegold,
there swam one morning before sunrise the Gold’s
fair guardians, the three children of the Rhine.
They were beautiful maidens, these three water-
spirits, the most lovely of all the river people,
and their names were Flosshilde, Woglinde, and
Wellgunde. They were singing softly, and glanc-
ing constantly up to the rock’s crest, waiting for
the appearance of the Rhinegold, which could
only be seen when the sun had risen up above
and sent its rays into the water to disclose the
treasure. They sang a little rippling refrain that
meant nothing except laughter and joy, and



The Rhine Maidens 9

sounded very like the ripples of the water them-
selves:

“Weia waga—”
sang Woglinde,

“Wavering waters, weaving and whirling,
Walala weia!”

And so they sang on, till their voices mingled
so with the ripple that both voices and water
became almost one in sound.

Now, while these three lovely maids, seem-
ing almost part of the water in their dresses: of
shimmering blue-green, with pale wreaths of
river flowers in their hair, and their white arms
looking frail as moonbeams as they raised them
through the water—while they moved about the
rock singing and laughing together, a strange,
dark little man stood near watching them. He
had risen out of a black chasm in one of the
rocks, and he had come from far Nibelheim,
through an underground passage. He had small
eyes, his hair and beard were the color of ink,
and he looked very wicked. Can you guess who
he was?

He shouted gruffly to the Rhine Maidens, and
they, being much amused at his ugly appearance,



10 The Story of the Rhinegold

drew near with laughter and mocking words.
They led him wild chases in among the rocks,
they played with him merry games of hide-and-
seek—merry for them, but not at all so for him,
for he was clumsy in motion compared with them,
and he became very angry because he could not
follow them over the rocks.

“ Smooth, slippery, slush and slime,” he grum-
bled. ‘The dampness makes me sneeze.”

At last, just as he had become thoroughly
angry, there appeared suddenly a strange bright-
ness at the top of the rock—a wonderful golden
light that glowed with ever-increasing brilliance
down into the water.

“Ah, see, sisters!’ cried Woglinde. ‘The
awakening sun laughs down into the depths.”

“Yes,” said Wellgunde, with soft delight, “it
greets the slumbering Gold!”

“With a kiss of light the Gold is aroused!”
said Flosshilde. And, joining hands, they swam
excitedly about the rock, singing in bursts of
gladness:

“ Weia waga,
Weia waga,
Rhinegold, Rhinegold,
Glorious joy.”

“You gliders,” questioned Alberich (for it was





THE GLEAMING TREASURE



The Rhine Maidens II

he), “what is this that-gleams and glistens over
yonder ?”

Laughing at his ignorance, the nymphs told
him that it was a magical Gold; that whoever
made a Ring from it would have greater power
than any one else alive; that he could possess
all the wealth of the world if he wished; and
they so described the fairy powers of the treas-
ure that Alberich’s wicked soul began to thrill
with desire to have it as his own.

The sisters further told him that the Gold was
safe from thieves, because it could only be stolen
by some one who had made up his mind never
to love any one except himself so long as he
might live.

“We have nothing to fear,” said gentle Wog-
linde, “for every one who lives must love.”

But Alberich pondered silently. “All the
wealth in the world!” he thought. “For that
who would not give up love?” And he sprang
wildly up the rocks.

“ Listen, waves and water-witches!” he shout-
ed, as he reached towards the gleaming treasure.
“Never will I, the Dwarf, give love to any creat-
ure save myself through all my life.” And while,
with wild cries, the Rhine Maidens hastened near
to prevent him, Alberich, the Nibelung, tore the



12 The Story of the Rhinegold

Rhinegold from the tall, black rock, and fled with
it into the black chasm, and so to Nibelheim.

And, left behind, the nymphs could only wail
for their lost joy with sobs and cries of “ Sorrow,
sorrow! Ah—to rescue the Gold!”

But it was too late. And in the dark hol-
low chasm, Alberich, fleeing with the treasure,
laughed at their despair.



(oe Cle-0-0 fies atid App oie sate
ese! p=
————— ~ pe=|
La = -
J. pesante.

co SSS Se
2



Motif of the Giants

ee
CSSe

Motif of Friea



CHAPTER II

FASOLT AND FAFNER

ONE morning not long afterwards the rising
sun shone upon strange things up among the
gods.

Wotan, and Fricka his wife, waking upon the
mountain-top where they had slept that night,



14 The Story of the Rhinegold

gazed up to where, built among the clouds, the
spires of a wonderful palace glittered in the sun-
shine— Walhalla, the fair, new home of the gods.

It had been built at Wotan’s command by
Fasolt and Fafner, the two brother giants, and
they had been promised, in payment, the god-
dess Friea. But Wotan had never intended giv-
ing her to them, and so he told Fricka when
she spoke anxiously of the reward promised the
giants, declaring that the goddess was as pre-
cious to him as to her.

Even as he spoke Friea rushed wildly in, call-
ing upon him to save her from the rude giants.
In answer, Wotan asked where Logi, the Fire
God, could be found, saying that where cunning
and craft were needed, Logi was the one most
to be sought after. But, look as he might, the
wayward Fire God was nowhere to be seen.

And then came the great brothers, bearing huge
clubs, and fiercely clamoring for a reward for their
labors in building Walhalla.

“You slept while we worked,” they said. “ Now
claim we our payment.”

““What price do you demand ?” asked Wotan,
pretending not to remember any promised re-
ward. “ What will you take as wages?”

“Would you deceive us so?” cried Fasolt, in



Fasolt and Fafner 15

astonished rage. ‘‘Friea you promised us. We
worked right heartily to win us so fair a woman.”

“Hush!” muttered Fafner. “ Listen to me!
Without Friea’s apples of youth the gods will
grow old, and their glory will fade away. They
will die like human beings if Friea be taken
from them.”

So the giants talked together, planning how to
steal the lovely goddess, who stood aside trem-
bling, fearing that Wotan would refuse to pro-
tect her from the two savage workmen.

He meanwhile merely murmured softly to
himself, “Logi is long coming,” and gazed ex-
pectantly about. But still the Fire God could
not be seen.

Thor and Froh, two other gods, had appear-
ed. The giants were growing more impatient and
Friea more despairing, when Logi at last arrived.
When he did he talked on a variety of subjects
before he would pay any attention to the affairs
that were worrying the other gods and the giants.
But at last he set his clever brain to work at some
plan by which his fair sister Friea might be saved.
Knowing well the love of wealth characteristic
of the giants, he told the story of the Rhinegold
and the stealing of it by the Nibelung. He said
that he had heard the maids weeping for their



16 The Story of the Rhinegold

lost treasure, and had promised them that Wotan,
the King God, would return it to them in time.
The two giants began to feel the same desire for
it that Alberich had had, and to whisper togeth-
er concerning it, so vividly did Logi describe its
powers.

“It seems,” muttered Fafner, “that this Gold
is worth even more than Friea.” And he cried
out suddenly: ‘Listen, Wotan, you wise one!
We will give up Friea; but you will instead be-
stow upon us the Nibelung’s Gold.”

“We will hold her meanwhile as ransom !”
cried Fasolt. And they dragged her away, de-
spite her piteous appeals, to Riesenheim (or
Home of the Giants), leaving the gods perplexed
and sorrowing for their lost goddess.

As they stood silently together a mist seemed
to steal upward from the ground, and floated be-
tween them. A strange shadow rested upon the
faces of the gods. They looked pale and wrinkled;
their hair was white.

“ Alas! What has happened ?” wailed Fricka,
faintly.

The gods were growing old.

“See, then,” said Logi, the shrewd one. “Our
Youth Goddess has gone. We are old; we are
gray. The race of gods will come to an end.”



Fasolt and Lfafner 17

Wotan started and looked about him. His
face was pale.

“Down, Logi! Let us go down to Nibelheim !”
he cried. ‘The Gold shall be had for ransom.”

The gods called out good wishes after them
through the mist, and Wotan, the King God, and
his fire-servant, Logi, went down through the
hollow, shadowy passages under the earth to
Nibelheim, the home of the dwarfs.





CHAPTER III

NIBELHEIM

ALBERICH had forged a Ring from the Rhine-
gold, and, wearing it, possessed absolute pow-
er over the rest of the Nibelungs. He was the
King Dwarf, ruler over all Nibelheim, the Land
of Gloom. Ah! what a land of gloom it was!
Through the dark shadows there streamed fit-
fully a lurid light from the forges where the
dwarfs were working; their hammers clanged
monotonously on the anvils. Slowly they laid
the results of their toil in great heaps, and Al-
berich laughed at their weariness and gloated
over the treasures, which he promptly claimed as
his own.

Among the Nibelungs was one particularly



Nibelheim 19

crooked and ill-shapen, named Mime. He was
Alberich’s half-brother, and, not unnaturally,
hated the Black King with all his strength; for
Alberich treated him even more cruelly than the
others.

Mime, at Alberich’s command, made a won-
derful cap of darkness out of some of the Rhine-
gold, which not only had the power of making
its wearer invisible at will, but could change him
into whatever shape he wished. This Alberich
wore, and changed himself into a column of
mist, in which shape he found he could move
about much faster, and make things much hard-
er for the dwarfs.

“ Hohei, all you Nibelungs! Kneel to your
King! Now he is everywhere, all about you,
unseen, but felt and heard, you idlers!”

And the column of mist drifted off through a
rocky passage, leaving Mime whimpering upon
the ground.

Now, with the clang of the hammers there
mingled the sound of steps, and from the black
crevice in the rocks came two figures slowly
down to Nibelheim. One was tall and majestic,
with a helmet of gold and steel, a long cloak
with strange designs upon it, and a deep golden
beard that hung far down over his breast; one



20 Lhe Story of the Rhinegold

of his eyes was missing, and in his hand he bore
a great spear.

The other was clothed in brilliant red, his eyes
were bright, his step swift as a springing flame in
dead grass. They were Wotan and Logi search-
ing for the Rhinegold.

Logi accosted Mime in friendly fashion, and
asked what was wrong with him.

“That wretch, my brother!” grumbled the
Dwarf. “He treats us all cruelly. Leave me
in peace!”

“How came Alberich by his power?” asked
the Fire God.

“From the ruddy Rhinegold he made a Ring.
With it he rules us. But,” asked the Nibelung,
staring at them, “who are you both?”

“Friends that perhaps may free the Nibel-
ung people,” laughed Logi, and at the same time
Alberich appeared, scolding, screaming, and ill-
treating all who came in his way. Driving Mime
away with the rest of the dwarfs, he, scowling,
asked the two gods what they wished.

“We heard of the wonders worked by Albe-
rich,” answered Wotan. ‘‘We come to behold
them.”

“Pooh! I know you well,” said the Dwarf
King. “Such notable guests”—and he sneered



Nibelheim 21

—‘“could only have been led by envy to Nibel-
heim.”

“Surely you know me,” said Logi. ‘I have
lit your forges, gnome. Cannot you trust me?”

“To be sure I know you,” grinned Alberich.
“ And I will always trust you to be untrustwor-
thy. I don’t fear you.”

“‘ How brave you are,” said Logi, in pretended
admiration.

“Do you see that treasure?” said the Nibel-
ung, proudly pointing to a great heap of gold
and gems.

The gods assented.

“But,” said Wotan, “what good does it do
you, here in Nibelheim ?”

Alberich glared at him, and then laughed.

“Ha! ha! But wait!” he said. “You gods!
You gods! You have looked down upon us
Nibelungs. Now we, with the help of the Gold-
en Ring, will sway the whole world. We will
storm the gates of Walhalla! Beware! Ha!
ha! Do you hear me? Beware!”

Wotan, in anger, started forward, but Logi
slipped in front of him.

“Most wonderful are you, O Nibelung!” he
said, admiringly. “I salute you as the might-
iest creature alive. But tell me one thing, O



22 The Story of the Rhinegold

wise one. How guard you your Ring from
thieves?”

“Does Logi think that all are as foolish as
himself?’ asked Alberich. “That danger I pro-
vided for. A Cap of Darkness, called the Tarn-
helm, is mine, to change me into whatever shape
I wish, and also to hide me at any time. So,
my friend, guard I my Ring, sleeping or waking,
as I wish.”

“Wondrous above all it seems!” cried Logi.
“Prove it, O Dwarf!”

“That I will. What shape shall I take?”

“Whatever you wish,” answered Logi. “It is
sure to be wonderful.”

Alberich placed the metal cap upon his head
and became a great dragon, writhing on the
ground.

“ Wonderful!” cried the gods.

“ Yet I should again like to behold its magic.
Is it possible to become small as well as large by
its aid?” asked Logi. “I beg of you show us if
you can become small, O great one!”

“Nothing easier!” cried Alberich, beginning
to enjoy himself. “ Look, then, O gods!” He
placed the helmet on his head and vanished. A
toad hopped on the ground in his stead.

“Quick! Hold him!” cried the Fire God;



Nibelheim 23

and Wotan firmly held the toad with his foot,
while Logi lifted up the Tarnhelm, which still
rested upon its great head. And behold! Al-
berich lay at their feet, struggling and roaring
with rage.

The Fire God produced a rope, and the two
gods bound the Nibelung and carried him with
them up the dark passage-way through which
they had descended, and left behind them the
crimson fires, the clanging hammers, the gloom,
and hopelessness of Nibelheim.





Motif of Alberich’s Spell

CHAPTER IV

THE RAINBOW BRIDGE

OuT of the underground world into the wild,
mountainous country above, veiled still with the
strange gray mist of age, came the two gods and
their captive, Alberich.

He was snarling and grumbling, being much
enraged at being bound by the hated gods, and,
above all, at having his beloved Tarnhelm in the
hands of Logi, whom he especially detested. Also,
he feared that he would be forced to give up the
Ring, which he still wore on his finger; and, partly
to prevent the gods from wishing for this, he soon
consented to give them the hoard which his ser-
vants, the Nibelungs, had collected in Nibelheim.
Touching the Ring with his lips, he murmured a
command, or spell, and from the under-world
came the little dark dwarfs bearing great loads
of treasure, which they placed at his feet.



The Rainbow Bridge 25

Ashamed, and hating that they should see him
a captive, Alberich loudly ordered them off with
threats and harsh words, and then demanded that
the gods should release him, while the Nibelungs
crept back into the dark hole that led to. Nibel-
heim.

Logi, casting the Tarnhelm upon the pile, asked
if the Dwarf should be freed.

“ He wears a bright Ring,” said the King God.
“ Let it be added to the heap!”

“The Ring!” wildly cried Alberich. “The
Ring! Iwill never give it up! It is mine!”

“Thief! You stole it from the Rhine Chil-
dren,” said Wotan. ‘“ Do you call it, then,
yours ?” and he tore the Ring from Alberich’s
finger and placed it on his own.

“Let him go!” he said to Logi, who obeyed,
and the Nibelung was free. Rising from’ the
ground, he glared horribly at the gods.

“Listen to the spell I cast on the Ring!” he
said, with a peal of wild laughter. ‘“ None who
possess it shall ever through it come to happi-
ness. Sorrow attends it, and whoever owns it
shall know grief. His death shall be sad, his life
a failure. This doom shall attend the Ring until
it comes back to my hand. Hear the spell Al-
berich has placed on the Gold!”



26 The Story of the Rhinegold

He laughed again, and vanished in the dark
hole that led to Nibelheim.

Wotan stood silently gazing at the Ring on
his finger. Logi, looking off in the distance,
saw Fasolt and Fafner nearing, with Friea. As
she came closer, the gray mist began to clear
slightly away, though it still hung about in
heavy clouds, hiding Walhalla’s spires. Fricka,
Thor, and Froh, quickly drawing near from an-
other direction, spoke of the growing warmth
and clearness of the air.

“Dear sister, welcome back to us!” cried
Fricka, as the giants strode out with Friea.
But, when the two goddesses started forward
to meet each other, Fasolt caught hold of his
captive and held her fast.

“Wait! Wait!” he cried. “ Where is the ran-
som ?”

“ Behold it!” said Wotan, pointing to the heap
of treasure.

The giants declared that when a pile of gold
had been erected high enough to hide the
Love Goddess from view, they would return
her to the gods—but not before. Accordingly,
a heap was made which, as it grew higher with
added treasure, soon hid Friea entirely, save
for a gleam of her bright hair, which Fafner’s



The Rainbow Bridge 27

keen eye descried. The Tarnhelm. must go to
hide it.

That accomplished, Fasolt strained his eyes to
find an unfilled crevice. Through a tiny space he
beheld one of the goddess’s eyes, and demanded
the Ring to fill up the chink.

“The Ring!” exclaimed Wotan, starting back.

“The Ring!” cried Logi. “Nonsense! It is
the Rhine Children’s treasure. The King God
will return it to them.”

“ Foolish you are,” said Wotan, in a low voice.
“T shall keep it myself.”

“Bad is the prospect for the fulfilment of my
promise to the weeping Rhine Children,” said
Logi, softly.

“Your promise does not bind me,” said the
King of the Gods. “TI shall keep the Ring.”

“ Hand over the ransom!” cried Fafner, loudly.

“Never!” said Wotan.

“Then Friea is ours!” roared the sine and
they grasped her once more.

The gods, in chorus, begged Wotan to give
the wranglers the treasure, but he was deaf to
their entreaties. His eyes were fastened upon
the bright Ring’s glitter; he was blind to all else.

Suddenly the light seemed to die out from the
world. All grew dark. From a black chasm in



28 The Story of the Rhinegold

the rocks rose a woman’s figure in a strange halo
of blue light. Her face was pale, with a look of
deepest mystery upon it. Lifting her hand, she
spoke in low, solemn tones to Wotan:

“Hear my warning! Avoid the Ring, with its
terrible spell! Heed me, O Wotan!”

“Who are you who warn me?” asked the god.

“T understand all things; wisest in all the
world am I. The witch-wife Erda, men call me,
Mother of the Norns. Listen, listen, listen! A
day of dusk and gloom is coming for the gods.
Beware of the Ring!”

' She sank down into the earth once more.
The blue light faded away. As she vanished
she spoke again:

“Think well on what I have said!”

She was gone. Slowly the light came back to
the world. Lost in thought, Wotan stood a mo-
ment; then turned quickly to the giants, and
tore the Ring from his finger.

“Tt is yours!’ he declared; and he tossed it
on to the pile. “Back to us, Friea!” and the
Love Goddess gladly flew back to their midst.

Fafner and Fasolt began fighting over the
Ring at once, and Alberich’s dark spell quickly
made itself felt. For Fasolt, seizing the Ring,
was killed by his brother, who, with Ring and



The Rainbow Bridge 29

treasure, fled away to a far cave, named Hate
Hole, and there, in the shape of a great dragon,
guarded his hoard in loneliness for many years.
But that is a different part of my story.

After the death of Fasolt and the flight of
Fafner with the treasure, the clouds hanging
low over the gods were cleared away by a great
storm, and, as Walhalla appeared shining in the
sun, a rainbow bridge spanned the space be-
tween the palace and the gods, who passed over
it to their new home.

“These gods—how foolish and blind!” said
Logi to himself, as he went with them. “TI feel
ashamed that I am one of them, bound to share
in their doings.”

The beautiful palace glittered brightly. The
gods smiled as they passed over the rainbow
bridge. Only from the Rhine below there came
a sound of wailing.

“O Rhinegold! Rhinegold!” sang the weep-
ing Rhine daughters. ‘We long for your light.
Trustful are those in the water; false are those



‘Walhalla Motif







Patt 17

THE WARRIOR GODDESS, or D/E
WALKURE









PRELUDE

I SHALL now take a long leap in my story,
going on to a time when the gods had been
happy in Walhalla for many years. Wotan
alone felt dreary forebodings, though, as yet,
there were no real signs of any downfall of the
gods. So heavy were these presentiments that
he began to fill his halls with heroes able to
defend Walhalla, if Alberich should ever regain
the Ring, and, keeping his word, storm the gates -
of the gods’ palace. At Wotan’s command, his
nine daughters, the Walkiires (or Warrior God-
desses) watched over all combats between he-
roes, carrying those who were killed to Walhalla,
where Friea’s smiles brought them to life again.

And this was not the only strange thing that
had come to pass since the gods had entered
their new palace.

Among Wotan’s descendants were a race of
people called the Volsungs, and at the time of

3



34 The Story of the Rhinegold

which I am writing only two of them were alive,
a boy and a girl, who had been brought up from
babyhood almost like brother and sister, and
who were very much alike, having the golden
hair of their ancestor Wotan, and eyes in which
there was a curious glitter, as bright as that of
the snake’s glance.

Both were as beautiful as the sun, like all the
Volsungs; both were strong and warm-hearted
and noble, and they loved each other as much as
though they had been really brother and sister. _

While still very young, they became separated
for years; for, while the boy was out hunting,
the girl, Sieglinde, was stolen away by a robber
named Hunding. She led a dreary life as the
Robber’s servant, until she became a woman.
But she always felt confident that help would
come to her in time, because one night, at a
feast given by Hunding, a stranger had entered,
robed in the rough garb of a wanderer, but with
kingly bearing. One of his eyes was missing.
He had struck a sword into the trunk of a great
tree which grew up from the centre of Hunding’s
house, declaring that whoever could draw it out
should have it for his own. And all had tried
their best, but the blade would not yield an
inch.





ESS

A WARRIOR GODD



Prelude 35

Then the Wanderer had laughed and depart-
ed. But Sieglinde, thinking of it dreamily, re-
membered that, while he had frowned on the
others, he had looked kindly on her; and, gaz-
ing at the sword, she began to feel, after a while,
that whoever could pull it forth would be her
rescuer. And so the years passed.

She did not know that the Wanderer had
been none other than the first father of all
the race of Volsungs—Wotan, the king of the
gods.

Siegmund, the boy, as he grew to manhood,
became a very wolf in wildness, but a great war-
rior, and a stanch hero. He. led a roving life,
with few friends, and, alas! many enemies. His
generous heart brought him into sad dilemmas
sometimes; as, for instance, when, at a maid-
en’s request, he defended her from her relations,
who wished to marry her to some one whom she
hated. When, in doing battle for her, he killed
one of her kinsmen, she had flung herself upon
the dead man and accused her defender of
cruelty.

He fought the rude warriors who were press-
ing up about her until his weapons were torn
from him, and he was driven away into the
woods through a wild storm which seemed to



36 The Story of the Rhinegold

blow him on with irresistible violence, until he
found himself at the door of a house.

Utterly exhausted, he staggered in, filled only
with the desire to.rest and shelter his tired body
from the storm. And the house was that of
Hunding, the Robber.





Volsung Motif

CHAPTER I

THE HOUSE OF HUNDING

OUTSIDE the storm was raging, the great
pines were bending in the wild gale, the thun-
der and lightning were in mad commotion.

Inside, rude as the hut was, there were warmth
and apparent peace. A large fire burned on the
hearth, and sent its fitful glare from time to time
flashing about the bare hall; now shining on the
sword-hilt in the great oak-tree growing in the
centre; now lighting the dark corners with a
faint red gleam. A heap of skins was beside
the hearth, and upon this Siegmund sank ex-
hausted.

As he lay there the door opened, and Sieg-



38 Lhe Story of the Rhinegold

linde came quickly from an inner room. Fright-
ened by the sight of a stranger, she accosted
him in trembling tones. Receiving no answer,
she came nearer, and, looking down at him, she
saw a strong, tall man, with golden hair, and
a face as beautiful as the sun. Caught over his
shoulder was a great black bear-skin, and his
face was like that of a king among men. His
eyes were closed as she bent over him; but,
after a moment or two, he opened them and
gasped faintly, “Water! Water!” only to sink
back once more, exhausted, as Sieglinde hast-
ened away to draw him a draught at the spring.
She was soon back with what he had asked for,
and, giving it, looked down kindly as he drank.

When he had finished, he gazed up at her and
saw a beautiful maiden, with the rough, gray skin
of some wild animal worn loosely over her long
white robe. She had hair of as deep a gold as
his own, and a face full of sweetness and a sym-
pathy that he had never known before.

Rising from the hearth, he gently wished her
good fortune, and thanked her for her kindness
to a friendless man, who must now pass on his
way lest the sorrow which followed his foot-
steps should come to her; and, so saying, was
about to leave the house when Sieglinde, who



The House of Hunding 39

in some way felt that this man was to be her
rescuer, sprang forward and begged him to stay,
saying that as sorrow had dwelt in the house for
many days she did not fear its coming. So he
consented to remain until Hunding, who was out
hunting, should return.

Going back to the hearth, he stood there
quietly looking, in a long silence, towards Sieg-
linde, and both felt, I think, that it was Fate
that he, and none other, should stay and rescue
her. So they stood silently waiting for the Rob-
ber’s return, and the fire crackled and glowed
and flickered about the hall.

Suddenly, Sieglinde started; for the sound of
hoofs broke the stillness, and they could hear
the Robber leading his horse to the stable. Al-
most directly afterwards the door opened, and
Hunding himself came in. He was not a pleas-
ant-looking creature, for he was very tall and
very broad-shouldered, and as wild in appear-
ance as a wolf, and his face was dark and angry.
His long hair and beard were black and tan-
gled, his eyes were fierce, and he wore queer,
jangling armor and bands of steel on his bare
arms.

He stopped short, and sternly pointed to the
stranger, glaring at Sieglinde in great anger.



40 The Story of the Rhinegold

Reading a fierce question in his look, she an-
swered, quietly:

“JT found this man weary upon the hearth.
Need drove him into the house.”

Hunding relented a little; and, after handing
her his shield and weapons, said quietly to Sieg-
mund:

“Safe is my hearth! Safe for you is my
house!’ Then, turning to Sieglinde, he rough-
ly bade her hasten with the supper. She bore
away the heavy weapons and rested them against
the tree in the centre of the hall; then went about
arranging the evening meal. As they sat down
on the rough seats around the scantily spread
table, Hunding asked his guest his name, and
whence he had come on so stormy a night.
Sieglinde leaned eagerly forward as the warrior
began his tale.

He told them the story of his life, only call-
ing himself Woful the Wolfing instead of Sieg-
mund the Volsung. And when he came to the
tale of the maiden and her kinsmen, and of how
he had killed one of them, and fought the others
until he was disarmed and driven into the forest,
Hunding rose in great anger and stood looking
at his guest with wrath in his eyes.

“You win every one’s hate,” he declared.



The Hlouse of Hunding 4I

“My friends sent for me to help them revenge
the shedding of blood. I went to their aid, but
it was too late.’ Now, when I return, I find the
enemy himself upon my hearth. They were my
friends against whom you fought; and, though
to-night custom makes you safe as a guest in
my house, to-morrow you shall die, Wolfing!
So be prepared !”

So both the Robber and his servant, the maid- ,
en Sieglinde, went away, leaving Siegmund alone
by the hearth, sad and a little perplexed. For
Sieglinde, as she left the hall, had pointed swiftly
towards the sword - hilt buried in the tree. The
fire leaped up wildly as he stood gazing towards
the oak, and the light touched the bright hilt
and painted it red for a moment, then died once
more. Siegmund dreamily wondered if the light
on the steel had been left by the glance Sieg-
linde had cast towards it. For you see he had
fallen in love with this lovely woman, who look-
ed at him so kindly, and whose face was as fair
and beautiful as the sun.

The gold and rosy flashes from the fire grew
fainter, the shadows deepened, and Siegmund
fell asleep.

Now perhaps you wonder why he stayed there
instead of going out into the night, where he



42 The Story of the Rhinegold

would be safe. There were three good reasons
to keep him.

In the first place, he was too brave a hero to
fly from danger; and, in the second place, he
did not want to leave the beautiful maiden alone

-in the Robber’s power; and the third reason was
as good a one as either of the others. . Hunding
had said: “Custom makes you safe as a guest in
my house,” which meant that it would be both
unfair and wrong if he, Hunding, killed a stran-
ger taking shelter under his roof. This was
called the Law of Hospitality, and the law was
never taken advantage of by any honorable
guest. So, if Siegmund had run away after
Hunding had so well observed the Law of Hos-
pitality he would have been dishonorable as
well as cowardly, and it was just as though he
had given a promise that he would not go away
that night.

In the meantime Siegmund lay asleep. From
an inner room came the beautiful maiden swiftly
to his side. Awaking him, she told him to hurry
away while there was yet time. She said that

‘she had sprinkled some sleep spices into Hund-
ing’s wine, and that he would slumber soundly
and long; and she begged the guest to go away
quietly into the night and save himself.



The House of Hunding 43

Finally, she told him of the Wanderer who had
come and struck the sword into the oak-tree, and
told him, too, how she had waited in vain for
some hero who would draw forth the sword and
rescue her.

Siegmund said that he would claim the sword
for his own, and drag it from the tree, and, as
he spoke, the door opened wide. Perhaps the
good fairies unlatched it. Without, it was very
still; the storm had ceased, and the moon was
shining wondrously.

Then Sieglinde, looking in his face, seemed
to see there a resemblance to some one she had
known long ago, and, gazing into his eyes, she
asked him if he were really a Wolfing.

“No, a Volsung!” replied the hero, proudly.
And she cried out in joy: “A Volsung! Are
you, too, a Volsung—one of my race? It was
for you, indeed, that the Wanderer struck the
sword into the oak.”

Springing to the tree, Siegmund laid his
hand on the hilt and broke into a wild chant,
naming the sword which he had come to,
when in such pressing need, Nothung (or Need- ©
ful).

With a mighty wrench he drew it out of the
oak’s trunk, and held it above his head.



44 The Story of the Rhinegold

“TI am Siegmund the Volsung!” he shouted,
exultantly.

Then he asked her more gently if she would
follow him away from the house of the enemy
Hunding, telling her that if she would be his
wife he would defend her with Nothung, and
make her life one long spring-tide.

“ As you are Siegmund, I am Sieglinde !” cried
she, aloud. “It is right that the Volsungs should
become joined as one.”

And into the night they went away together ;
for the storm had ceased and the brightness of
the moonlight was most marvellous.

Sword Motif



Britinnhilde’s Call



Motif of the Volsung’s heroism

CHAPTER II

THE DAUGHTER OF WOTAN

UP in the mountains near a rocky gorge, where
the wind swept and the wild pines grew, stood
Wotan, king of the gods, and before him, await-
ing his orders, was his favorite daughter, Briinn-
hilde, the Walktire.

She was very beautiful, more beautiful than
any woman who ever breathed. Her hair was
golden bright, her figure queenly. When she
moved, the motion of a bird was not more fleet
and graceful, and her face was what you might
suppose the face of a goddess would be. She



46 The Story of the Rhinegold

wore long white robes and glistening armor,
and the wings in her bright helmet were like
snow. She bore a spear and shield also, for you
know she was a goddess of war, and, as her busi-
ness was to attend the battles of heroes, she ar-
rayed herself accordingly.

She moved restlessly, and seemed anxious to
be off, for at the top of a rocky slope was not
her horse, Grani, waiting for her to spring on
his back and gallop away through the clouds?

Wotan, whom, of course, you remember, stood
leaning on his spear. He looked for the moment
glad, for he was very fond of his descendants, the
Volsungs, and he also believed that Siegmund
would one day kill Fafner, the Dragon, with the
sword which had been placed in the oak for the
purpose, and would return to the Rhine Maidens
their treasure. When this should come to pass,
the gods would have no more fear of Alberich.

When Wotan thought of all these possibilities,
the dusk of the gods’ bright day seemed far off.
So it was with a thrill of joy in his voice that he
spoke to Briinnhilde, and bade her make ready
to attend the fight between Siegmund and Hund-
ing, which, as the Robber was already hunting for
his guest with fierce hounds, was sure to occur
that day.



Lhe Daughter of Wotan 47

“Aid the Volsung, my brave maiden!” said
the King God. “Overthrow Hunding! Hasten
to the battle!”

“Hoyotoho!” shouted the Walkiire, waving
her spear as she sprang up the rocks. “ Hoyo-
toho! Hoyotoho !”

On a high pinnacle of boulders she paused,
and looked down on Wotan once more. “Look
well, father! Here comes Fricka. I leave you
to her.”

With a clear burst of laughter she sped on
again. Her boisterous “ Hoyotoho!” died away
among the echoes.

In a golden car, drawn by two rams, came
Fricka, the queen of the gods. She seemed in
great haste, and, springing to the ground, stood
in all her majesty before the King God, with
anger in her eyes.

“T ask for right!” she began, drawing her scar-
let draperies about her. And she went on to de-
mand vengeance for Hunding; vengeance upon
Siegmund, the guest, for having taken advantage
of the host who had observed so well the Law of
Hospitality ; vengeance upon him who, from the
house of Hunding, had stolen the Robber’s ser-
vant, Sieglinde.

All this made Wotan very unhappy, for he



48 The Story of the Rhinegold

loved Siegmund, and already in his heart had
forgiven him for what he had done. Yet he
knew that all wrong must bring punishment,
and asked Fricka what she wished him to do.

“Call back the Walkiire!” said the Queen
Goddess, and there was a look of triumph on
her face. ‘“ Break the Volsung’s sword! Prom-
ise me!”

There was a pause.

“‘J_promise,” said the god, covering his face
with his hands.

Triumphant and satisfied, Fricka drove away,
and, as she went, Briinnhilde, who had returned
while the King and Queen were talking together,
and had led her horse into a cave near by, came
to her father, asking why he seemed so sorrow-
ful.

Tenderly drawing her to him, he told her the
story you know so well, of the stealing of the
Gold, the building of Walhalla, and the prophecy
of Erda. He told her of the day of which the
Earth Witch had spoken, when the world would
be in twilight,and gloom—the Dusk of the Gods.

He told her, too, the hopes he had had of the
great deeds to be done by Siegmund. He let
her see how it filled him with the deepest sorrow
to overthrow the Volsung. But the Volsung had



The Daughter of Wotan 49

taken advantage of the Law of Hospitality, and
Wotan had promised that he would overthrow
him; and the promise must be kept. He bade
her vanquish Siegmund in the coming battle and
give the victory to Hunding; then, heart-broken,
he wended his way among the rocks, and was
gone.

Sadly Briinnhilde gazed after him. Her heart,
too, was aching, because, though she loved to
carry heroes to Walhalla, she loved still more
to aid them in battle. She went slowly into
the cave.

It was growing darker. Now, from out the
gloom that filled the rocky gorge came Sieg-
mund and his beautiful wife, Sieglinde, seeking
rest in a sheltered place. Sieglinde was almost
exhausted, for the way they had come was long
and hard; and, after trying vainly to make her
tired limbs carry her farther, she fainted at the
young Volsung’s feet. Tenderly he carried her
to a rock near by, and, seating himself upon it,
gently supported her and stooped down to listen
to her breathing.

As he raised his head, satisfied that she still
lived, a grave, sweet voice sounded on his ear.
He turned his eyes to where stood a beautiful
woman in white and steel, one arm on the neck

4



50 The Story of the Rhinegold

of her horse. It was the Walkiire, who, accord-
ing to her custom, came to warn the man who
was shortly to be killed in battle. It grew still
darker.

“Siegmund,” said the Walkiire, “look on me!
Soon you must follow me!”

Siegmund, wondering, asked who she was.

“Only those who are shortly to die may see
my face,” answered Briinnhilde. “I bear them
away to Wotan, in Walhalla. There you will
find innumerable heroes who have died in bat-
tle. They will welcome you.”

Siegmund asked if his father, Volse, were
among the heroes.

Briinnhilde answered “ Yes.”

Quietly the young warrior asked if his beau-
tiful bride might accompany him.

The Walkiire slowly shook her head.

“Lonely upon the earth she remains,” she
answered. ‘“Siegmund will see Sieglinde no
more.”

“Then greet Walhalla and the heroes for
me,” said the Volsung; “for there I will fol-
low you not.”

“You have looked on the face of the Wal-
kiire,” said Briinnhilde. “You must die.”

And, by degrees, she made him understand





¢ APPEARS

WALKURE

‘THE



The Daughter of Wotan 51

that death was awaiting him, that he was doom-
ed to be killed by Hunding. In despair Sieg-
mund raised Nothung, the sword, and declared
that he would kill his wife and himself, so that
they might be together in death. But Briinn-
hilde, who had felt her heart grow more and
more tender towards this unhappy pair, started
forward, bidding him hope, and declared that
she would help him, instead of Hunding, in the
combat, and save both himself and his wife.

“T shall be with you in battle,” she promised;
and she hurried away, leading her horse.

It grew darker and darker. Storm-clouds were
gathering, and the rocky gorge was filled with a
dense, black shadow. In the distance came the
sound of Hunding’s horn. Waving his sword,
Siegmund sprang up the rocks to meet the
enemy.

Sieglinde, dreaming softly where her husband
had left her, was awakened by a wild burst of
thunder and lightning. She started up frantical-
ly, trying to see through the darkness. Clouds
were all about her, veiling the rocks on every
side. Hunding’s deep horn-call sounded near-
er and nearer. Finally, from a high rock among
the trees on the top of a wooded slope she
could hear the voices of the combatants and the



52 The Story of the Rhinegold

clash of weapons. Suddenly, in a vivid glare of
lightning, Briinnhilde appeared among the clouds,
stooping low over Siegmund, and protecting him
with outstretched shield. Clear and strong rang
out her voice over the tumult:

“Be firm, Siegmund! Strike quickly.”

But now Sieglinde, staring wildly up through
the darkness, paralyzed with fright, saw a fierce
crimson light— the light that heralded the ap-
proach of the angry King God—and Wotan
stood revealed in the clouds above Hunding.

“ Away from my spear!” he cried, in a terri-
ble voice. ‘“ Let the sword be splintered!” And
he stretched out his weapon, made from the
World-Ash. Nothung was shivered in pieces
upon it, and the Robber Hunding, with one blow
killed Siegmund, the Volsung.

With a great cry Sieglinde sank to the ground,
but through the cloudy darkness came Briinn-
hilde. She lifted the poor woman on her horse,
and, urging Grani to flight, sped away through
the clouds.

Wotan, left alone with the Robber, turned
towards him in contemptuous anger. Before
his gaze Hunding sank to the earth in death.

Suddenly the King God burst into supreme
wrath.



The Daughter of Wotan 53

“ Briinnhilde, who has disobeyed me, must be
punished!” he cried. And, leaping upon his war-
horse, he was gone through the clouds.



Motif of Siegmund and Sieglinde’s Love





Slumber Motif

CHAPTER III

BRUNNHILDE’S PUNISHMENT

IT was a custom of the Walkiires to meet
every evening after their wild rides, at a rock
called “The Walkiires’ Stone,” and thence go
on to Walhalla.

Upon the afternoon of the combat which had
proved fatal to the Volsung, the Walkiires ar-
rived one after the other at the rock. Only one
was missing—Wotan’s favorite, Briinnhilde.

The maidens sang merrily their Hoyotoho,
waved their spears and climbed the rocks, and



Briinnhilde’s Punishment 55

kept a sharp lookout for Grani’s appearance in
the clouds, But it was very late before Briinn-
hilde was anywhere to be seen. When she
came, she brought with her Sieglinde, whom
she was supporting. In answer to her sisters’
anxious inquiries, the Walkiire told them of her
disobedience and Sieglinde’s sorrow, and begged
them to protect Siegmund’s wife, and herself
as well.

“ And see, O sisters, if Wotan draws nigh!”
she begged.

“A thunder-cloud approaches,” called Ort-
linda, one of the Walkiires, from her high pin-
nacle of rock.

“The clouds grow thicker,” cried Waltrauta.
“Our father comes,” they exclaimed in uni-
son.

“Shelter this woman,” begged Briinnhilde.
For she knew that Wotan, in his rage, might
kill the wife of the warrior whom he had over-
thrown. But the maidens feared their father’s
anger, and would give no aid. So, at last, Briinn-
hilde told Sieglinde to fly and hide herself in
the forest, and that she, the Walktire, would re-
main behind to bear the brunt of Wotan’s an-
ger. Briinnhilde drew from under her shield the
splinters of Nothung, which she had picked up



56 The Story of the Rhinegold

on the battle-field, and gave them with words
of kindness and comfort to Sieglinde, who, mur-
muring tender thanks, sped away into the woods
and was gone.

Then even Briinnhilde’s brave heart began to
fail her. A great storm had arisen, and amid
the crash of thunder came Wotan’s voice
calling her name in tones of anger. Trem-
bling, she took her place in the centre of the
group of maidens, concealed from view by
them.

Surrounded by red light came Wotan, having
left his war-steed snorting in the wood.

“Where is Briinnhilde?” he demanded. But
the Walktires, in trembling tones, merely asked
‘the cause of his anger. In growing rage, Wo-
tan commanded Briinnhilde to come forward
and receive her punishment, reproaching her
in. scornful words for hiding among her sis-
ters.

Quietly the Walkiire came out from among
them, and stood before him. She was quite
ready to receive her sentence, whatever it might
be, and bent her head to listen to her father’s
words.

Her punishment, Wotan told her, was to be
this: She was to be-laid in helpless sleep, at the



Briinnhilde’s Punishment 57

mercy of the first passer-by who might choose
to awaken her. Him she must follow as his
wife, for, when she was awakened from her
sleep, she would be a woman—a goddess no
longer.

Heart-broken, Briinnhilde sank to the ground
with a cry. To be made mortal seemed to her
the most terrible punishment possible. And it
seemed so to the other Walkiires as well. They
besought the King God to have mercy on their
sister, but he was firm.

Amid wails of despair and pity for Briinnhilde,
the Walkiires separated and rushed wildly out of
sight in all directions. Only the echoes of their
cries and the last faint sound of their horses’
hoofs remained as they rode off through the
clouds.

The storm died away. All was quiet now.
Slowly Briinnhilde rose from where she lay and
pleadingly spoke to her father, asking pardon for
her disobedience and begging for some mercy
and tenderness. At last, when she found that,
though he still loved her as dearly as ever, he
was firm in his decision, she asked only one fa-
vor of him—a last one—that he should place a
circle of flame about the rock where she was to
be laid asleep, flame so fierce and high that only



58 The Story of the Rhinegold

a brave man might come through it and awaken
her.

Wotan consented, and, overcome by his love
for her, drew her into his arms in a last, sad em-
brace. He bade her farewell with a tenderness
that comforted her even then, and, stooping, kiss-
ed her long and lovingly.

Her eyes closed. Her head sank back against
his shoulder. Laying her on a rock that made
a rude couch, he placed her shield on her arm
and her spear at her side. He looked down with
deepest sorrow on the face of this, his most beau-
tiful child, the War Goddess, and then, raising
his spear, commanded Logi to light a ring of fire
about the rock.

Great billows of flame spread from left to
right, and glowed in a brilliant circle about the
sleeping goddess, casting a dim glare on her fig-
ure, and lighting up the quiet night-sky.

Standing in the red firelight, Wotan once more
stretched out his spear in a spell, and pronounced
these words:

“Only he who fears not my spear can pass
through this fiery bar.”’

And, so saying, he passed from out the charm-
ed circle and left behind him the Walktire in her
long, fire- watched sleep, to be broken only by



Lriinnhilde’s Punishment 59

one who feared not even the spear of Wotan,
the king of the gods.



The Sleep of the Walkiire







Dart 111

SIEGFRIED











Motif of Mime’s Meditation

PRELUDE

WHEN Sieglinde ran into the woods with the
pieces of the broken sword, Nothung, she took
shelter in a cave where a wicked old dwarf lived
alone. There a little boy was born. But Sieg-
linde had never thoroughly recovered from the
shock of her husband’s death. The way through
the woods had been difficult, and she had en-
dured great hardships; so one day she called
the Dwarf to her and gave him the broken sword,
telling him to keep it for her son until he grew
old enough to have a weapon of his own, and
she told the Dwarf that she was Sieglinde, and
that her husband had been Siegmund, the Vol-
sung, and she finally said that she wanted the
child to be named Siegfried; then she sank back |
and died. And so Siegfried, who was a very
little baby then, never, really, saw either his
father-or mother.

The only father he knew, as he grew older,



64 The Story of the Rhinegold

was the Dwarf, who was none other than Mime
Alberich’s half-brother. And he could not help
knowing that Mime was wicked and sly, though
the Dwarf pretended to love his foster-son, and
tried to arouse some love in return.

Now, perhaps, you wonder, if Mime was so
wicked, why he took care of the boy. I will
tell you.

Mime, like every one else, wanted the Rhine-
gold, and could not get it, for Fafner, the Drag-
on, guarded it by night and day at Hate Hole.
And being as sly and evil-minded as the rest of
the Nibelungs, he had concocted a plot by which
he thought he could obtain it. He hoped Sieg-
fried, when he grew older, would slay Fafner
with the sword Nothung, and win the Rhine-
gold. You see he hoped to accomplish Fafner’s
death through Siegfried, just as Wotan had
once tried to do through Siegmund. Only, af-
ter Siegfried had attained the Gold, Mime hoped
to be able to poison him and steal from him the
treasure.

But, to accomplish this, the broken sword
must be mended, and this Mime could not do.
Its splintered edges baffled even him — clever
smith as he was. So he set to work forging
other swords, and trying to fashion a blade keen



Prelude 65

enough to satisfy the boy-Volsung, and also to
kill the Dragon at Hate Hole. But every weap-
on he made Siegfried broke into pieces, and de-
manded a stronger and still stronger sword, until
Mime was in despair.

It angered him terribly, too, that Siegfried,
more by instinct than anything else, knew how |
wicked his heart was, and how full of bad, cruel
thoughts. The little, dark Nibelung could not
understand how the boy, beautiful as the sun,
golden-haired and keen-eyed, strong of limb and
true of heart, loved to roam in the wide for-
ests all the day, merrily blowing his silver horn
and making friends with the woodland creatures,
only returning to Mime’s cave at night. He
could not realize the pleasure that the soft for-
est voices gave to the youth just growing into
manhood; how he loved the wolves and bears
better than the cringing, evil-eyed, horrible little
Dwarf in the cave at home—the only home he
knew. :

As for Siegfried, the only thing he wondered
at was that he ever went back to the cave at all.
Why did he not roam away forever into the
forest, search out that far, strange place called
the world, that really seemed as if it must be a
different universe from the one in which, he lived?

5



‘66 The Story of the Rhinegold

He could not tell. He only knew that a strange,
irresistible something seemed to draw him back to
Mime’s side every night—a something he could
not explain or even understand. Meanwhile time
passed.







Motif of Forest Life, sometimes called Motif of Love Life

Motif of the Forging of Nothung





**No-thung! No-thung! No-ta-ble Sword!”

CHAPTER I

SIEGFRIED AND MIME

THE cave was a dark one, but it was not al-
together a bad place in which to live. It was
as lofty as a stately cathedral, and the Dwarf’s
forge, built on one side, lent a fitful red light and
a little warmth to the dim, cold atmosphere.



4



68 The Story of the Rhinegold

Skins of animals gave it a semblance of com-
fort; and, indeed, to a wild creature like Sieg-
fried, it would have been a most desirable home
had it not been for the continual presence of
Mime. On the day on which I will open my
story, Mime was sitting on a low stool trying to
fashion a sword which would not break in the
hands of the impetuous young Volsung, who,
at that particular moment, was, as usual, out in
the woods with his friends, the wild beasts. As
he hammered, Mime grumbled crossly because he
had to work forever with swords that seemed of
no use to the crazy boy, who insisted on smash-
ing them all, and racing off to the woods, merely
demanding as he went a better and a stronger
weapon.

“There is a blade that he could not break,”
muttered the Nibelung, as he worked. “ No-
thung he would find firm in his hands, but I can-
not weld the splinters. Ah! if I could, I should
be well repaid.” He paused, and then went on,
mysteriously murmuring to himself:

“Fafner, the great, wicked worm! Well guards
he the Rhinegold. Only Siegfried can overthrow
him. This can only be done by Nothung, I feel
sure. And, alas! I cannot shape Nothung, the
sword,”



Stegfried and Mime 69

He began to hammer once more, grumbling
continually because Siegfried insisted that he
should make swords, and snarling with rage be-
cause every weapon he forged fel to pieces in
the boy’s strong hands.

Suddenly, from without, came a clear, merry
voice, shouting a blithe “ Hoyho!” and the next
moment in came Siegfried himself, leading a
great bear, which he had harnessed with a bit
of rope.

“ Ask the foolish smith if he has finished the
sword, Bruin!” he cried to the bear, and, holding
back the great creature firmly, he pretended to
chase Mime, who, springing behind the anvil,
cried, savagely:

“Take him away! I don’t want the bear! I
have done my best with your sword.”

“Good!” laughed the boy. ‘Good-bye, Bruin;
run away,” and he freed the great creature, send-
ing him lumbering off into the woods again.

Then, turning to the trembling Nibelung, he
again asked for the sword, and Mime handed it
to him. The young Volsung took it into his
hands quickly, scorn on his handsome face and
anger in his eyes. He was dressed in a wild for-
est costume of wolf-skins, and his yellow hair
curled over his shoulders. He, indeed, made a



70 The Story of the Rhinegold

great contrast to Mime, and one could not won-
der that they did not get on well together.

“What a toy!” he cried out. “Do you call
this a sword?” and, striking it on the anvil, he
broke the blade into a hundred slivers, and then
burst into a rage with the smith, who had pre-
tended to give him a sword fit for battle, and
had shaped him so foolish a switch, as he called
it. And finally, thoroughly out of breath, he
flung himself upon the stone couch at one side,
and not all Mime’s coaxings could appease his
anger. He finally confessed that he did not
know why he ever returned to the cave, be-
cause, he said frankly, he could not help detest-
ing the Dwarf, and was much happier when away
from him. And then he broke into a passionate
description of the wood-life he loved so well; the
mating of the birds in the spring-time, and the
way they loved and helped each other; the care
that the mother deer lavished upon her little
ones; the tenderness among all the forest creat-
ures that seemed so beautiful and mysterious
to him.

“T learned watching them,” said Siegfried, al-
most sorrowfully, “what love must be. Mime,
where is she whom / may call mother?”

“ Nonsense!’ said Mime, and tried to draw



Stegfried and Mime 71

Siegfried’s mind away from the dangerous topic;
for he had never told him anything about his
parents, always calling him his own son. And
he feared the boy’s anger if he should ever know
that he had been deceived.

But, thoroughly aroused, the young Volsung
fiercely demanded the names of his father and
mother, declaring that he was far too unlike
Mimeto be his son. At last the Nibelung con-
fessed the truth, and told him the story of his
mother’s death, and of how she had left her child
in his care. And, when the boy asked for proof,
he slowly crept away, to return with the broken
sword Nothung, the mending of which was so
hard a riddle even to his sly brain.

Wildly excited, Siegfried commanded him to
work at it anew and do his best to weld the
pieces; and, with a shout of delight and hope,
he went merrily away into the woods, leaving
Mime in saddest, deepest perplexity.

Despairing, he murmured at the hopelessness
of the task, which his rather unruly young charge
had set him, and was sitting, a picture of dis-
couragement and misery, when from the dark
woods came a stranger clad as a wanderer, and
bearing a great spear. He advanced to the door
of the cave and asked in slow, grave tones for



72 The Story of the Rhinegold

rest and shelter. Mime was at first frightened,
then angry, and finally refused to harbor the
strange guest, until the Wanderer made the fol-
lowing proposal: Mime was to ask him three
questions, and if they were not correctly answer-
ed the host should have the privilege of cutting
off his guest’s head. To this Mime consented,
and, after a little thought, thus chose his first
question :

“Tell me what is the race down in the earth’s
depths?”

And the Wanderer made answer: “In the
earth’s depths dwell the Nibelungs. Nibelheim
is their land. Once they were ruled by Black
Alberich, who owned a magic Ring by which
he possessed untold wealth. What is the next
question ?”

Again Mime pondered.

“ Now, Wanderer, since you know so much of
the earth’s depths,” he said, “tell me what is
the race that dwells upon its surface?”

“The giants dwell upon its surface. Two of
them, Fasolt and Fafner, fought for Black Al-
berich’s hoard. Fafner guards it now as a drag-
on. Put your third question!”

“What race dwells in the sky above?” de-
manded Mime.



Stegfried and Mime 73

And the Wanderer answered, majestically:

“The gods dwell above in Walhalla. Their
King is Wotan, who owns a spear made of the
World-Ash. With that spear he rules the
world.”

And, as he spoke, Wotan, the Wanderer, struck
the earth with the haft he held, and a peal of
thunder crashed suddenly out upon the silence.

As Mime cowered, terror-stricken, recognizing
his guest, the Wanderer again spoke.

He said it was only fair that he should have
the same right he had given to Mime, and de-
clared that he should ask three questions with
the privilege of cutting off the Nibelung’s head
if they were not answered aright.

“Tell me, O Dwarf,” he began, “what was
that race which Wotan loved, and yet treated
harshly ?”

“The Volsungs,” answered Mime, partially re-
covering from his terror. “Siegmund and Sieg-
linde were descended from the race. Siegfried
is their son—the strongest Volsung who ever
lived.”

“Well answered!’ said the Wanderer. ‘Now
listen and reply! A sly Nibelung watches Sieg-
fried, knowing that he is fated to kill Fafner, the
Dragon. What sword must he use to kill him?”



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'2011-12-30T04:53:03-05:00'
describe
'39485' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPJ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
b99f7a147eed1c79e03e8bab955939d9
f42924385ce2b62d93a627cff4969dc8b2514578
'2011-12-30T04:51:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPK' 'sip-files00013.tif'
ae52ec873579222f9e08544b374c8d0a
80ea2bbd39d989fdba56d0101501d47687ef8a60
'2011-12-30T04:54:10-05:00'
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPL' 'sip-files00013.txt'
ac24377ced19e8a5277aab59793635f2
0fd2c200801d3da845fd53258eaff8ca7e4ca7e0
'2011-12-30T04:53:37-05:00'
describe
'9665' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPM' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
214d66ff2c204856d27669e521b4691d
ff50f94ccf351cb9430738745562c26bf2b1e399
describe
'335206' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPN' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
6ef0422baa2f00055444100a385a09bb
524822a97c26afdac528a250eae0b8f78a55ebcb
'2011-12-30T04:52:12-05:00'
describe
'115452' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPO' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
189a0c303ebea39a1e7f0b2f29d6f0e9
37855ff87577ec9eaf3a181a485aca872e5782fd
'2011-12-30T04:52:53-05:00'
describe
'31087' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPP' 'sip-files00014.pro'
705b5e7734130b8e2e618b54a85d4571
ffefbcc00c6247c2ca7a4b3d7c95781ef5db325f
describe
'38769' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPQ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
2d0ceb716ed7c1f518c80e9c9ed708eb
051d462f78128d304976b7d3d1c2ae9ca700557b
'2011-12-30T04:53:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPR' 'sip-files00014.tif'
fc20bfd8def5efa9aec4cb6644c0e0d7
7b1237a6faffc219c1907af09bbbe15568e5ed85
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPS' 'sip-files00014.txt'
d7f1ddb6efdb91df6729587223ba5f33
c9525aa33a2fcba2949c3f55bf21cfab556bb7ab
'2011-12-30T04:51:17-05:00'
describe
'9519' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPT' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
88472ee918c1bf613f33fa94b0d5a61b
79a223c1d7aaed8d4a30537083e785d62455dc44
describe
'335535' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPU' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
5c22dfc0e29084b6ed717ec8acefef4b
198f7c33653e1a338514f7bde094b6ea0f1452ad
'2011-12-30T04:52:05-05:00'
describe
'134226' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPV' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
9eff6ae92693f15b74bf1fa6e92d51f1
9b5c9206888d795384335b8b42d50a2d1694851d
'2011-12-30T04:54:56-05:00'
describe
'33284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPW' 'sip-files00015.pro'
01226ecf541f26acdfe7af79e4adbb8a
1f38e13892cf27bed954203b77ada961dd6700ab
'2011-12-30T04:53:23-05:00'
describe
'42367' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPX' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
7503d51661d93e3da25f0f6a338cb90b
16b2e0b924bb32e61b5e30fbf718f43757e69d44
'2011-12-30T04:50:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPY' 'sip-files00015.tif'
8e81428e22c9dde612fe8d216c568ded
fd3ab2154c06eb2e5eb3ac592c0968613bedc9c2
'2011-12-30T04:54:24-05:00'
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASPZ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
14a6215de83d92048352ab20114e91c7
52a77bb47a9876ce6cf8305dac3720a2a52c2af0
'2011-12-30T04:55:12-05:00'
describe
'10126' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQA' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
c5633c7f3574fcf71c191be3ba3708b3
2ba55daefa9f39ec153991a59c458996cda78d2a
'2011-12-30T04:55:46-05:00'
describe
'335527' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQB' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
d5c328445294204ed569290181e95126
bb46a42b9396a861dfafc42a678b5807c735586a
'2011-12-30T04:52:01-05:00'
describe
'117872' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQC' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
f19413172c1d5b9996267e44f45e8a48
8a577d04de25a98429ddb7a3e89c8467fbff6dc4
'2011-12-30T04:53:10-05:00'
describe
'32458' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQD' 'sip-files00016.pro'
26a8c863353ddbd889e758620aa23ff9
14d8dd026ca660e6b28a5b3d7e2c5c82bb3d3a31
'2011-12-30T04:54:08-05:00'
describe
'39744' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQE' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
7b56a8febb6fd459da4394f1932576e9
bf477f1f7d33c08dc6d6c66788879a0f699f1501
'2011-12-30T04:50:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQF' 'sip-files00016.tif'
38bfbfebcfe0c04f30401150c47db6ce
b9b64cce3d993e5895a162548589c8de648cb035
'2011-12-30T04:54:14-05:00'
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQG' 'sip-files00016.txt'
15ecb456a8bd7497cde894c0901b7035
47a629c03fd350fddceaa9e623fae0c65fd19a3f
'2011-12-30T04:53:28-05:00'
describe
'9934' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQH' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
eaeb31a9286d5f2d836cff401d751c1f
8bdc48d33fc93c121e9ef7a64bffb0525695b2e1
'2011-12-30T04:50:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQI' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
3dd465317dbc571bcb40cd901eea5364
6d11c04649098d73b827f5a90d8df0c501434749
'2011-12-30T04:52:07-05:00'
describe
'128540' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQJ' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
9f03fadc217f201a6fb88405eaca5f73
4fed5f8f4bd29ccc55e985d841a0c25fb05640c7
'2011-12-30T04:51:52-05:00'
describe
'33093' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQK' 'sip-files00017.pro'
984e3bfa66fc1b07d82ce454dd0d9213
4c9dd1c68d803db190394b74522a434e1669996c
describe
'41683' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQL' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
488c9247148b16678037439d621f76c9
c4865348cf86fc260181e0206adb0e8af6c6a30f
'2011-12-30T04:52:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQM' 'sip-files00017.tif'
767fc87e7da03de649f6413131909ad8
ab1687ead0c4e326e3b14d27b876110c4633da49
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQN' 'sip-files00017.txt'
f3daf33a33f666de1e27facf2bb8d8cf
901c13e5bf2243a9c9d184c7dbcc4347432aaa50
'2011-12-30T04:54:23-05:00'
describe
'9945' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQO' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
32ed91e3d538d89f71af08700f74614d
9a992427d2cdb28ab71391cc354026f272ff284b
'2011-12-30T04:50:29-05:00'
describe
'335520' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQP' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
562746904cd2fce13c2fc53a4a7e3bd2
eb3bc311f11f5d0d5d08e9586485182839edf883
'2011-12-30T04:51:11-05:00'
describe
'117912' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQQ' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
596d06b707b619a878bbd0613e06fadf
44edac3dc717d418ece08ca9a2c67f46efe38e1b
describe
'32156' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQR' 'sip-files00018.pro'
5787f3bd89879c3116d4ec33fda3f7ea
7baf7517f0d1b0e905cce2a7e70fbe74ca3d1a94
'2011-12-30T04:54:36-05:00'
describe
'39043' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQS' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
5936da51543e1fa1b3827d16560e045e
953eff703b092202ba4c3e11c2add0e53ff8d433
'2011-12-30T04:55:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQT' 'sip-files00018.tif'
b1ed05b930bd0b403bd766eca8de7bc5
1453a58d17a77899002f017edcee8b58c26f1d89
'2011-12-30T04:51:06-05:00'
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQU' 'sip-files00018.txt'
92fe37b10caffc8205f35e9ebd6eeddd
3e24b5d939cc4d86d2e31f03b5d5d3cf4603af4f
'2011-12-30T04:51:53-05:00'
describe
'9933' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQV' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
dde48c8ed325a77c7409c507f93e01c0
6969d95d60df0879b52666fc54a9e50c05b4523e
describe
'335529' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQW' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
761404f62e4a4453d91edd8a46ede40c
50cc232b814ea7d18f4e4cf622e63ac4f686e6e6
'2011-12-30T04:53:36-05:00'
describe
'128697' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQX' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
d010b1897dfb2b27e36e2f241874da9e
0592a3d18fe9f14468ffaabc2d353f01a2ed739b
'2011-12-30T04:53:14-05:00'
describe
'31940' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQY' 'sip-files00019.pro'
cbf55aa2321406a537c8e238662741e7
9f917b6595e4f689e8a7856c6fd32d081856c81e
'2011-12-30T04:52:09-05:00'
describe
'41446' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASQZ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
3cccbcb4f13fc14cbc1fa00a4431fd53
9074ee186c224eede0ed22020727f1bfcf23062c
'2011-12-30T04:52:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRA' 'sip-files00019.tif'
d7a9d310af79ec8ead360f2ec7abd30a
e87893ad8ddbddcf08d2d178226ead1a860981aa
'2011-12-30T04:55:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRB' 'sip-files00019.txt'
9d1ad6f1731bd2e92ffd3f3b270890cc
1a260ee018f9427a2ed9e72a712e7489655e54c0
'2011-12-30T04:51:37-05:00'
describe
'9871' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRC' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
ff8f8800dc6782bc7b96941f152ea598
4b11b5887b5bf58422b33ae81be05ecfbcd8c1ef
'2011-12-30T04:53:41-05:00'
describe
'335350' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRD' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
a68b2d06dd7b87f2c007a7413b956342
92b8b475d4bfce0db7a2147a6f5e861bc54f5387
'2011-12-30T04:54:59-05:00'
describe
'119903' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRE' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
1a13f3122a0d806d562bac82caafd421
3ad5f1901c99a69dd65b744f32b63754a89d7c74
'2011-12-30T04:54:28-05:00'
describe
'32984' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRF' 'sip-files00020.pro'
531c964dd5c7f6df5150251af80d18ec
f976bf9142f34c00d8d55207c02047a191d02463
'2011-12-30T04:54:57-05:00'
describe
'40107' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRG' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
40736bf8136ce5123b5a6b360c6f7df1
bf67af5e61d741a60b47b31360008443210fa019
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRH' 'sip-files00020.tif'
cee4336838f96b3806cb3804b89454fc
fa6c39e2db4e1a80f0f8e8a1968f264104c1f236
'2011-12-30T04:55:42-05:00'
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRI' 'sip-files00020.txt'
34c042bb39afa44abbb0a5dc16c22d53
29fa9df0b967ae7d78163546ea817428bd7bffe5
'2011-12-30T04:52:27-05:00'
describe
'9698' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRJ' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
b8073967ef4e9d5dfc159742adcc8643
f06ec940116fc41d07c8cbed412a6e4af3419a90
'2011-12-30T04:53:11-05:00'
describe
'335198' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRK' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
ba0570d85056c75860215f5ce8997e57
6caf3146a72e1461196b21fc685da9ea13394329
'2011-12-30T04:50:47-05:00'
describe
'131176' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRL' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
ec6d6d418ceb691151092b312808cadb
5d7ca8f1f12593f5c1f27f392a51988b7391e01a
'2011-12-30T04:51:38-05:00'
describe
'32571' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRM' 'sip-files00021.pro'
db27319390c161fca4b9a0a4fbe69c23
ef50659165a96d328af9ccd4e70516a42377048e
describe
'42243' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRN' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
dcba58cd97d2452b9adf776bc9a1fd47
cdbc61f45bbe57a1044eec01a771483fee9c7e5b
'2011-12-30T04:50:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRO' 'sip-files00021.tif'
4044ae7035a54a13f5e013d73846ccc1
478ca15057c3ad5f5502582153b13112ff0e4b06
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRP' 'sip-files00021.txt'
993aab54262775660a16ae20841e60d2
8974d4ffc1fabbc1d667cec7f971978bdb98b1dd
'2011-12-30T04:55:45-05:00'
describe
'9913' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRQ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
cb16d18719ca7924b2c46c4a5d71b352
cb1ac7d3cea8509efa3e5276b2c2a244636d517d
'2011-12-30T04:53:51-05:00'
describe
'335370' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRR' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
f14d4c9a5c9579f84e7e31caa28339c7
e38bf49c291a7006fc94948d50b4bd250f1abfbc
describe
'114864' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRS' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
bfe0e8ac5fb2f11ce2928a76078d2711
7f0910022ba86aa9b828641033b7ba4308e597cc
'2011-12-30T04:55:07-05:00'
describe
'30943' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRT' 'sip-files00022.pro'
bc3f76f3d3746195f58b3cfcd93420a9
8141ab254fefa7bb66dbc4c5c31b1f5ddba57ec2
'2011-12-30T04:55:06-05:00'
describe
'38685' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRU' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
f8c0a7884cc0a30414fcfa90968cf316
4a021dce7eb40396c2b0e053c66d01b58eb28331
'2011-12-30T04:50:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRV' 'sip-files00022.tif'
b95221de3937dad57fda5252a2c1e671
1df54f69fafcfcb3cc7c6756d2bad25159d7c0f5
'2011-12-30T04:55:39-05:00'
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRW' 'sip-files00022.txt'
11c8e30970eac3ac1f662d565805fce4
23e1c866ec0d29b08b0781c1c00d7a823a651418
describe
'9391' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRX' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
2f0c633803beaf24d588de6e499a0831
900e1de770f35d9d1dc54381b96f740c3a1eb9e7
'2011-12-30T04:54:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRY' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
680f8ba17e4c0aab96789a597df8c003
ffd67bea089437a0af724e09d52c0cc8c20ef548
'2011-12-30T04:53:19-05:00'
describe
'82704' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASRZ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
0ea0ff3444fd3c6672ed3b5754c0abc2
b89d03a87cacdffbc443d77b580beab651ec2bbf
'2011-12-30T04:50:08-05:00'
describe
'17819' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSA' 'sip-files00023.pro'
9fd26d6198554fdd98ed6c7eecd9afb2
8a6e99462ba083c6a895e0b51a2666726726c7bd
'2011-12-30T04:52:11-05:00'
describe
'25366' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSB' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
ff5fdb0bf10dee262aea450a70c9ff27
42f5bc5195f39ac605198c828f6ab3608beac2fd
'2011-12-30T04:51:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSC' 'sip-files00023.tif'
2722bf6d04e8fc8cf161e3842c36e9b8
9f54a55efc67f1d6d8315758a88541cec3322a2a
'2011-12-30T04:55:40-05:00'
describe
'718' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSD' 'sip-files00023.txt'
ef9c9b3474085b65849bc88b557a0421
0e60d9702b543b4cf15b81eb9ebfa4f8b552479b
'2011-12-30T04:54:27-05:00'
describe
'6551' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSE' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
9eab3f66cbac07085ec24f1c4fa2d61a
08e7afc7b5705cfc3b0022a974604a931816aa35
'2011-12-30T04:55:30-05:00'
describe
'335269' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSF' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
adc486952d71adbff564471c2080919d
dc5a933bfb5b2a1c1343d27c8d1ee049d57b684f
describe
'26442' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSG' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
97099c6f409b41cc19594a993f839278
7261a855ecd115c47987c15ec87251fd80f944a5
'2011-12-30T04:52:32-05:00'
describe
'5269' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSH' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
2686b237c7ec9f9d4f8f452bbb19047f
7c70d0314a9c763f6667addbcf1869976a2a0e82
'2011-12-30T04:54:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSI' 'sip-files00024.tif'
a2d765699a9213ffc2ce69ee073c6d0c
fd965f4867a5fa2a046d52e7c97e13477dccdfe1
'2011-12-30T04:55:50-05:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSJ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
0e8b2f7be9edccc1106f27ff5ecccce8
dcbc94a711c7256323eb22cfe9f24c9cfdf2d6b5
'2011-12-30T04:54:41-05:00'
describe
'335220' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSK' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
bd8634573b2a8499cf846a5556df91cd
6fe2745ab519a2f332a21b3f79243338b86f8284
describe
'62743' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSL' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
9264c660d97e182de0473f9a28c9f65d
1baf8b1185e793d813973111dd3d9ece01ecab82
'2011-12-30T04:54:00-05:00'
describe
'16285' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSM' 'sip-files00025.pro'
f6dde3d46af59cdaf094b9ee72cddce0
b57575ac52c6b46dbc73e7c095e2f58b5e5736ac
describe
'17877' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSN' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
452e2a64bb9978f2d2dfd7fca9d92fe1
8a0aebf8dc1cb800014b542b47d25acc5147019d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSO' 'sip-files00025.tif'
aec71ebf8a4cdc09d3c22ad2bbe557ff
985cdc0e8fce89e6cde633281611d0a8877e3de2
'2011-12-30T04:52:49-05:00'
describe
'809' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSP' 'sip-files00025.txt'
2621474e45c1680d1189cd27ea0c398b
f39c1c8ce9cdb80d1fcc4f555e2e57c7b646d25f
describe
'5267' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSQ' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
142a2086a75402045d53ac9d017a0c96
48ea202bc2c1feb782978f6fac995cfda3c39491
'2011-12-30T04:53:06-05:00'
describe
'335088' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSR' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
57218ffa9d3e38bef7c8fbd125eb0988
8f43f99d80fec3ecf3df17dd0243f9e830f2d428
describe
'50597' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSS' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
9b7266a3b40ccbfcda23fcf9360d782f
25868f7b51d917bc5771cb325af5e9894739ba79
'2011-12-30T04:55:41-05:00'
describe
'14850' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASST' 'sip-files00026.pro'
5c57ba8e40f377c49d8f813aee821d6a
b2b4f75585aaae30c5a6e7694b0b73054e9b295f
'2011-12-30T04:55:27-05:00'
describe
'15751' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSU' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
c7ab83281633c61bfc3e3254d582d1a2
f0b75a726b2fdeb028bd3aa5a5c9cdd49bd7f094
'2011-12-30T04:52:54-05:00'
describe
'2697772' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSV' 'sip-files00026.tif'
45784219e7f219c90d359dfe5c2dfffc
5ffb7a617711935b568cec40e262b76b08593aef
'2011-12-30T04:54:40-05:00'
describe
'677' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSW' 'sip-files00026.txt'
e4890749ddf0650f0d1c50505cfd05a9
d29c4246fd5c4f4d7b4850fe20baffdaa35af77e
describe
'4556' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSX' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
f23448d8b48665df317022202cd3cfd2
f842ef6b08aeb98f2426e4542fb56ac1ef9bca75
'2011-12-30T04:50:57-05:00'
describe
'335205' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSY' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
e57238e6d0bac0721d4769cb4a596bc4
67ee302e840ece242f1eafed1bebdc4c6c4d1d80
'2011-12-30T04:51:46-05:00'
describe
'54892' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASSZ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
15c15aa93864added708637b00af2fd6
0e044039fd927bdbf43844d70b1a9f093913563c
'2011-12-30T04:55:57-05:00'
describe
'14694' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTA' 'sip-files00027.pro'
7a5f45ac3d049b9f3cab29c1b7528990
e7dbd0c5faacc44708ebe5cf099bfc7050d94642
'2011-12-30T04:53:22-05:00'
describe
'15712' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTB' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
2b467a5da5a6cbd333ff057758179d47
2b51d6d63e7b20ebcdb150725a0aaa902af1fe79
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTC' 'sip-files00027.tif'
feadc2b6bbb985b0e2da78225beed293
c9ac45283d3f5cf24a740feb82dfec24efb66a95
describe
'702' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTD' 'sip-files00027.txt'
6a8a258a075b54dde643b025d7dc7582
30e91991a4df0844579cd7c24391172545972b4e
describe
'3996' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTE' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
10e0e49766b7edcd2f6764cb86f48fa8
95d5da1b9a1b78ad0ad96a5aa2038817abf04398
describe
'315606' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTF' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
231e1b81bf3434ac4bf91b8c246d21f7
25a200844e29a884a8182643a2c5639b19b5c01c
'2011-12-30T04:52:33-05:00'
describe
'16597' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTG' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
956d8b035d07fb684320fad348bbee77
b23ea80cd085b806d4b2d5e169fe86a363ce84f6
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTH' 'sip-files00029.pro'
9df17d7af95a3ec40c4c3b75ba18a4ce
c4b5c75329456bf5b8070f83aa59a2278fdefc09
'2011-12-30T04:53:26-05:00'
describe
'4816' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTI' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
d3fef2be6fc9c04f71f565bf0b5f1565
d93ca520788fe12806374980b65df47928ebf499
'2011-12-30T04:51:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTJ' 'sip-files00029.tif'
d7a41a2aa2af2ce3fc5e5c62575555cd
7d57ca1e45eb030b0b7a1001292b5a5b5db39559
'2011-12-30T04:54:11-05:00'
describe
'96' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTK' 'sip-files00029.txt'
2537c12fcf299bc421a172c3b8834fb4
9bcdcaea37c55f59dcb8adb56728056b874553dd
'2011-12-30T04:52:57-05:00'
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTL' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d91bb49b84c578a909d6e098b368fa9a
6ddf876da648c1316e4da5b205712d3a7b3fe10a
'2011-12-30T04:55:21-05:00'
describe
'264527' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTM' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
c14c04502d054434f555b121990af476
cb938ad2c0885f7081d7dc47d24ecc0ff69b3287
'2011-12-30T04:50:40-05:00'
describe
'11086' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTN' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
cfd0b88cb4195d45a0489666f16b0ba1
3dfe52a08038e2369170999cdc1772350301f570
'2011-12-30T04:53:47-05:00'
describe
'3023' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTO' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
8571fdf2a0976c6be379260dc64d5949
16939ae52d0874cd4dd23e54caadd75cfbf7d5ab
'2011-12-30T04:54:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTP' 'sip-files00030.tif'
8225164e9d9d79342ecf76057a411483
17d93dc73eabeabcfa35356d008c271748f31f44
'2011-12-30T04:54:42-05:00'
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTQ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
e21370b9213a031269492137a51f5e6c
f4f96b079962225091bbf6c8be585258ee68c44e
'2011-12-30T04:50:35-05:00'
describe
'335476' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTR' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
2bc672256e072c4723da4258b101ca0f
75d867ce9cafd2ca3dff046858559cec68252320
'2011-12-30T04:53:27-05:00'
describe
'95038' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTS' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
1fbf334552e62f9f85f736c72e5f70db
1046ab11dd6f6a57a43be86f04f3cc76f61a9b69
'2011-12-30T04:50:28-05:00'
describe
'25169' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTT' 'sip-files00031.pro'
be58fbb5d02581d6c15de9a66bf743d0
110d6d26efc545492f703be8ec3ce137471e746a
'2011-12-30T04:51:39-05:00'
describe
'32551' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTU' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
a4034292c3da3cec773aa1986add2f58
aeac8c0c7b70e878d32c370d03bdd69d02c2f907
'2011-12-30T04:53:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTV' 'sip-files00031.tif'
27bfeeaee6b4890169bb707d0843ee64
99a1cf3f43c8f6471ae8c4859d7ea41f966eff4d
'2011-12-30T04:52:04-05:00'
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTW' 'sip-files00031.txt'
efe12702a4aea86e8467dbd62fe04398
7a220ffc1b05dc68b8e9c65320965e95a000e692
'2011-12-30T04:52:16-05:00'
describe
'8011' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTX' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
708ea8c25f861fc62090364e7f2ee8ab
c4d589127353d78a7e90fcfc719c5bfcddd6ac3e
'2011-12-30T04:50:22-05:00'
describe
'335416' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTY' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
103c7f4ee53f31b117f03ab523e92b90
4f0c1e7a8f7efbed262070428e6edb84d5423ecf
describe
'115959' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASTZ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
39756c6ac2e4422e0487c5c799088a42
50b6370ba50de018c7c4da6419da21def1875129
'2011-12-30T04:54:37-05:00'
describe
'33183' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUA' 'sip-files00032.pro'
7ab3ebae7cca144b57a083431e1d65c7
2e35c2213e9b63cb2b6d2a8a2039dcd8ba5ba9b4
'2011-12-30T04:50:58-05:00'
describe
'39775' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUB' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
c35ae42b7619134a8541e800e07df3fd
810bfb4bfa57426ed3c0e320c19e3d917ab7165a
'2011-12-30T04:51:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUC' 'sip-files00032.tif'
fd86f66d69fbb7bae25385df94feee7d
30c356e42d73d43d8e998ff6f8a39c7a1901e484
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUD' 'sip-files00032.txt'
8770ac3a726c21b50abeb00bc60ba6c9
0408ff9b58de2cda3655e83d66dec11353e682fc
describe
'9805' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUE' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
aa5b7c28baa8e63899664bd40a36af72
e1f6f6e364816e69556861ae773b2e2e06928354
'2011-12-30T04:51:08-05:00'
describe
'335178' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUF' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
bba35baf65f76a958cbc103bbff23e19
1a7e7527ea5e29a034d8c21dfcbe544b16d0f71f
'2011-12-30T04:51:50-05:00'
describe
'117473' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUG' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
fba7ba55e2427cb94232bbe22356d1ff
bc3decf02168c19e0fcfd3285c2f257456a6af1b
describe
'31646' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUH' 'sip-files00033.pro'
fffe0e65d3a57447aa28f02906bccaea
05eb2e199f34772642d5084c5103fa9346a162be
describe
'39985' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUI' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
42757f12f9c205a4eb6568c59fe4d083
b419450f69c4e5dee3a9f9946a46a65454c649fc
'2011-12-30T04:50:26-05:00'
describe
'2699068' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUJ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
5bc7b109ab260af4a27eddcbe3152395
e5f28a02f588ccea38244324d0f0fb8670b54b45
'2011-12-30T04:52:46-05:00'
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUK' 'sip-files00033.txt'
e2098a9cafdddfa24de9112a2675b60e
48f84962c810113b3965907e7c9595178be1472a
'2011-12-30T04:51:23-05:00'
describe
'9683' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUL' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
9ae1a776e20128152693bb4844ec86ed
4b6867b6c0629a4353af047e2db6d10e23196d67
describe
'335494' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUM' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
c26272a19bd28a7578aa7e78bf86a4fa
429470392a73331b15873f41b4ff2068b87d19ae
describe
'108501' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUN' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
efca9719c4cf7f50f2bbdb56190cd68d
830289cc7eae4e40a989f936a5860e6cd325ac39
'2011-12-30T04:50:14-05:00'
describe
'30936' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUO' 'sip-files00034.pro'
285000af564a42490c3b4c2b663e5e6d
b5565991561e2404cf13c5845fab27af276deff5
describe
'38855' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUP' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
88a9a2231a1f2ccb7b409c0f22eb0046
debad93432685e6bf47da95a053dd59a270db040
'2011-12-30T04:52:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUQ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
3e4f6ed40020d201af1189f00fa29e15
1597f366d7017acf6d6025f17896bd13d7fd3e04
'2011-12-30T04:50:05-05:00'
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUR' 'sip-files00034.txt'
6e3e36fb0a19e1b2e807324d8648945b
01e92949b5a111b95235ae67851a80573384b8bc
'2011-12-30T04:50:53-05:00'
describe
'9661' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUS' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
f8cf075eac03ce0d04993b21cbd6ad8c
e51363a043c92ea57a22c9d3ae718c667b0c0831
describe
'335346' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUT' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
e4f7eac4927c3f514b3e7b54e9ded2e6
96571fb49657b97fae799d200343e522dd2a8e1e
describe
'76226' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUU' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
920fd3c4ef1dde8343816c5fa2d0d005
4f494510cf21593864799338e623cca4c46ea889
'2011-12-30T04:51:29-05:00'
describe
'14838' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUV' 'sip-files00035.pro'
bdb14ee900158a227badac845a794372
dcae859a590daa691a148e80388b05a8be789fd7
'2011-12-30T04:52:40-05:00'
describe
'25710' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUW' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
e44c566b94ae472baacb2735feb5af70
2943a5cb0c8b582526f8c915af34aec8ed1c2f5d
'2011-12-30T04:50:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUX' 'sip-files00035.tif'
da08fd78667503a1a83d408347c7fc2e
9374f0b4130d17f3ea0e965fdbb9ba5fcd661dae
'2011-12-30T04:55:14-05:00'
describe
'651' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUY' 'sip-files00035.txt'
324e2eb28b56c3c143e4353a7b7c67ef
901bdd386c134a33360b3baf3ce7e1a48a6ff1ec
describe
'6717' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASUZ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
01d7d9d53e86b925251e41109b778445
9675d0146e156579931fa9ed6426ddd027090143
'2011-12-30T04:55:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVA' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
613ba021a90e5d407800de9057f711c9
b9e048cafbbb5f0294dd21fa8e563f04ed999952
describe
'91418' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVB' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
25958735a06d915bf3e8604788de9b64
5a13646a9d1cb11b323655f7d13087038c10c499
describe
'21371' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVC' 'sip-files00036.pro'
6219993611f50953f8e2e5165d8cf29c
8a8942f2cc90fd43baa4a50916c32156cf4befa1
'2011-12-30T04:51:47-05:00'
describe
'30451' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVD' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
d1898c65551f2c429e25c222ce4ad770
62f526f75b5b239f7444d143de06114811eb7608
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVE' 'sip-files00036.tif'
930e43c1b1e95a5b0e3cb05a4c092e70
3fa77034abe6534a6f008299b5c93786192fe454
'2011-12-30T04:54:21-05:00'
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVF' 'sip-files00036.txt'
daca74d5da18d8f3b3b324fea45b3dfc
5abb0e5ae92850b418279faa90f6c7cbeab61d82
describe
'7712' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVG' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
b29b6628d2c9bc9e12f8426a033b3cd3
041a5c1e2b87f397171e6f8bc6779286abef014a
'2011-12-30T04:54:32-05:00'
describe
'335530' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVH' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
0a21bfe60ad6ec99d472f4e65b46d32f
b9fc66c1ca88ee86b990378b5a131e1b5a372af6
'2011-12-30T04:52:34-05:00'
describe
'95089' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVI' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
7607ad21b3c3eb4c141bf74d7879dbd8
b5bbae939266848ae875f963a985fb47307954b3
'2011-12-30T04:51:55-05:00'
describe
'25831' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVJ' 'sip-files00037.pro'
c788fdb93d47d94b20940665a586c512
c9537e6fb9411398778ef96ae293e37aa3d96de8
describe
'32360' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVK' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
1ef632fede4d59ec2608417cce6268a2
f3000018d0ae1835235cd0f33394234285578913
'2011-12-30T04:51:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVL' 'sip-files00037.tif'
b436f480f8c649aa568426dad472ba60
52a89e01bd4d04294d0d409f206e506f2c498b75
'2011-12-30T04:51:04-05:00'
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVM' 'sip-files00037.txt'
d42fa674d84755f3d06b75a95a3126c4
326c644dea5ebc6a92b10cbe6c747e02a7e4bf61
describe
'8786' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVN' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
e70237916b0764fdbb3e10e6c7bd23ce
2563f46e6a2a0380b3476158bd50bb7d02abedbb
describe
'335203' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVO' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
f5be0fa5f5f9def33c300f251ce71efb
8b7e38bab977caa7258142d36d7afc8a735ef365
describe
'116015' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVP' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
9b7acab5b7ceea592f15b8118a0b193d
9379fa8f7183351f3b84ae3bdcd9430fdcd60696
'2011-12-30T04:55:32-05:00'
describe
'27655' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVQ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
692cf9677615a40d981289103aac527a
17cd154a19a0ebec26f5d9cc2833ff6ded04561e
'2011-12-30T04:53:18-05:00'
describe
'35473' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVR' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
416be5d0e4ebbf16a573d31e820096c7
bcbb959eae9c321b38f30eefec513ca12b136860
'2011-12-30T04:51:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVS' 'sip-files00038.tif'
6c6faa35eed6acb87854f18d021285f2
5c3325ca45ebfe2160fa657ce7676fdee3925723
'2011-12-30T04:55:20-05:00'
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVT' 'sip-files00038.txt'
1c1eb23b3414cd1138774311b7b5c357
1c18b88a054d6c3bb3532afc815cdc04b52ac187
'2011-12-30T04:52:41-05:00'
describe
'9026' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVU' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
df486913b73399732e510a02a1e7bb3e
fc5e97430f1e53a35ff4daceb2136e867aa1db07
'2011-12-30T04:53:49-05:00'
describe
'335180' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVV' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
d8e64e0d2e326b18f529b7bc29868063
9daed99be0df8e6db0fb51c802711033c3f61c06
'2011-12-30T04:50:16-05:00'
describe
'91657' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVW' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
5b0b611fa7559cbb9209f89385bc1d1d
069e3e944a8efaa13a80ab1935c914de49f60d92
describe
'792' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVX' 'sip-files00039.pro'
5aab68cb1988ae9bf22502f6e7f1a1aa
7996174144101a2e18348b32dd599a283f377abb
'2011-12-30T04:54:53-05:00'
describe
'20384' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVY' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
fe51975def8d162368ec23eec422d846
dcc6bcc465e6905c7af2415355356db89caf9e7b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASVZ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
93589d33399dd81ddaa8aea084f6b523
b3d247b691eea45775b2f30f42ee469be41cafec
describe
'152' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWA' 'sip-files00039.txt'
1f6c6f800201aefc8bead0601914bba5
7b65b506f7569aea04c8d7f78536bc09eaf851bd
describe
'5077' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWB' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
c794cc4505792744f6e84572899e44f5
85cf0ed5ac3962557159a84f9839726577c7094d
describe
'335276' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWC' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
b5f7602d42de1dd809fe71011ae730c2
66f3dbde10edaa9e9b42bea1c5e56049f2158f0b
'2011-12-30T04:51:49-05:00'
describe
'116185' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWD' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
8b0dbdb564dbac300d5afc210373feeb
fbc420c9264d04eb70223e17d96f2ea7c43fa3e2
'2011-12-30T04:54:29-05:00'
describe
'30712' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWE' 'sip-files00041.pro'
745479c4ccb714b58a4087bea29b9fe0
6b80ba0096da22443bae098523bfb293f7388406
'2011-12-30T04:55:28-05:00'
describe
'38701' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWF' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
1a51a1bd7b5758815a481b1ea1d4eb61
a5138e051c627846d84d20e1405eab2cc2065ccf
'2011-12-30T04:55:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWG' 'sip-files00041.tif'
d4aba98aeb2d67c5e21754d6edb48b19
79122e59e858e62dfb052627ef9a49e5fd5a0d05
'2011-12-30T04:51:48-05:00'
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWH' 'sip-files00041.txt'
40f7965ba1d528538d426767fc821467
249ec7aa63352d8c973f84c0aac7547e3c487efe
describe
'9882' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWI' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
7fc8deff9dd07e37e0c8100451714fa0
dcfb67d751cfd0bca6bfc8487227e39391a4d15b
'2011-12-30T04:51:32-05:00'
describe
'335278' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWJ' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
d9d226bbc7745f79a013348f3991ad81
58515c2f82a3d23e73b73b73ed7e652ede0f721f
'2011-12-30T04:53:33-05:00'
describe
'51565' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWK' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
abca30ff857e3cd7a99e4f8658e7fc40
d382e8f9b4f96d9a126371e0fa476c74358f6331
describe
'9994' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWL' 'sip-files00042.pro'
b1280dbb578490eb9ce7ca6e4e99c9ae
0275a965c89160f965e5d1daa10a8047eeab6c79
'2011-12-30T04:51:36-05:00'
describe
'15601' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWM' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
92780f504fa93dec87ab563f2b6cd2c3
2a4a37e79557ab069e6f0d3d7ad1a951b4dc709c
'2011-12-30T04:54:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWN' 'sip-files00042.tif'
83603eb98a497392d39ed199968271f5
fc89f7316ae4cec6ae011df34841f3ebeaf099d6
describe
'403' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWO' 'sip-files00042.txt'
8294751fd430485fb825f5012f4cb838
4489c3669a0834cf24d2f383d51370b2aa6c1930
describe
'4118' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWP' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
c18d64bd91f28091b50986c4f4b654bd
85907a032d53abe0e3959ec244fd8551da0ae5b5
'2011-12-30T04:51:00-05:00'
describe
'335508' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWQ' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
2d461291ff69c7a51eb9542cdcf98239
8596331c1757609a3395ba85c6371afa9d81877e
describe
'81602' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWR' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
7eb3639031d1933cc1cd27c61e3272c0
f0a31dd2105d7ff8df2d8103938eff62e82d7d91
'2011-12-30T04:50:06-05:00'
describe
'6991' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWS' 'sip-files00043.pro'
c87610d3ed8aabdeb8114ac5930edc6a
b4d94b59016cd329e35d6354693b31ea04d46ae4
describe
'24710' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWT' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
45473b6147eff78f78c7398c49b89c76
ee44753a77912a64e986d018320c01ca4ec064b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWU' 'sip-files00043.tif'
f59399352c23c6a6f1b60c08ac108e54
abef7309a49f307b7bca44e758c86de612fa468b
describe
'400' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWV' 'sip-files00043.txt'
cd86bb415de32b4748d58d6e0c24ab24
9f854db8d64144f57e3099366d36f67ea7c72e6d
'2011-12-30T04:51:26-05:00'
describe
'6782' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWW' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
5fe3f32572abc24e55d9d234e469a6c6
be587715f78b5151d967de0d92491b05bc382d92
'2011-12-30T04:52:42-05:00'
describe
'335517' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWX' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
8af907c9e7e2ebb291e163602dd5ad30
8b58a285b4eefbcbab115b3b5553ee959cff4129
describe
'111415' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWY' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
9d50a956613554a2f950a39f4db3d925
2b3f786ea18be8a7d8e634b103c67e92480801f6
'2011-12-30T04:55:18-05:00'
describe
'31830' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASWZ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
9b53d3211a68cd8952684adba7c0c4b0
2cfe78484b53ad37d19941d98964003e2c0dda6c
'2011-12-30T04:54:55-05:00'
describe
'38636' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXA' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
d840ac33b2cded7e2fc09020425272e0
807f513f8a9e917936e317ecc75e449d0e7cf386
'2011-12-30T04:55:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXB' 'sip-files00044.tif'
b568aa1728f0a92652942a285c4cadb9
210e8d9faec570993b94e2c6d6b75097c832546d
'2011-12-30T04:55:08-05:00'
describe
'1262' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXC' 'sip-files00044.txt'
cbb157249d6bff5b107ae400fd527f26
d6fcccfc15cd3ec8b3878f3d7f75d02d347b2642
'2011-12-30T04:53:16-05:00'
describe
'9915' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXD' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
5c7324e578f1eecda8cb4af612be40f0
44a725754242f13b330711ce628af0d7064f5376
describe
'335445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXE' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
f43e87cfda2ffb0fb885034e87105187
274c2bd29ea0323bb6de02d969c54569d97baebb
describe
'114526' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXF' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
bed484ca339986e9c250c2ee0fe5fe18
ca4ed6b381bc4eeb71b93ca207528576efee51d8
describe
'31898' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXG' 'sip-files00045.pro'
4602a5fd5cdb02fb7ee4c68f0719bff1
838041c39b227c1f9f0008701b74909a2bde7bb5
describe
'40111' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXH' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
b576fad608d901416b1033a15ab24df5
e616a6e6b366a046f012dc244d4cde74073b123a
'2011-12-30T04:50:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXI' 'sip-files00045.tif'
3596062f06c91ea7801add60e525b866
5e7d4f219b3ddff644ff191800e8753ea1a07baa
'2011-12-30T04:50:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXJ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d5dfea3905cb2d8c4f65e679c9cee91b
a2cde31516df9f28fa3a49784304c0869306221f
'2011-12-30T04:50:02-05:00'
describe
'9703' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXK' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
b875e1529e931897f94b6d885cc154b6
928a62f564eb884b975bf7cf26ddbf21aeaa2650
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXL' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
9126bb9f3569e95b78ef488a7935648c
b5466f44a40bb7ef83dff710f7b688373a5d93ff
'2011-12-30T04:54:47-05:00'
describe
'105741' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXM' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
7603ca011b24ea7a0e148522aef604b2
458794a729642bdaa4346c67468330e99bfa9309
describe
'30357' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXN' 'sip-files00046.pro'
78bad545f535175ab4d1fa8026ee2f62
197875baa9ac1a12c53e89cdcbfb81c2d55c8fdb
'2011-12-30T04:55:13-05:00'
describe
'37128' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXO' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
987b334842132f3f19d56747a3e15ef0
1ef4a1d205a6a23426b5508b5d967f59d9035d8a
'2011-12-30T04:52:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXP' 'sip-files00046.tif'
773472a5ba60ec09b0853397bbda1f42
eaf27f9f2a150b85136456c38a9d786cfd74832b
'2011-12-30T04:52:43-05:00'
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXQ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
b69c32475f807db286efcb127e9a0ba9
a61b11b5aa3d90dabff6aa4ac6406aeccc11787c
describe
'9691' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXR' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
04b3468b606d4152a00c2d94e23e4d5a
91aab8636dcc03c40cbe3db99a71bc3de82366d8
describe
'335091' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXS' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
d930353272745019fc0568958daf47ca
cc5ee61f7eb608b2c998224f1e583ed182f6e514
describe
'45065' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXT' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
af9da2fb806e19b902d3cc3a1b1b2d88
a84dc312ea152fdb35249c93bec7b0b88492ebf1
'2011-12-30T04:52:10-05:00'
describe
'10291' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXU' 'sip-files00047.pro'
0f6aa168042d7c18ac13ccafbce02781
b1893446a311d0afa9ec0fef4773167ef0eb24e4
describe
'14708' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXV' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
799fb9dd8c7f148585b47f75911b77fb
2682226946855a006cb71a0fe616ec9303c4c606
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXW' 'sip-files00047.tif'
8235f106b922877a10c2a0b2b5d27c45
84c516bfb3e5ef6225c97aa5d167d2e1f7168e3f
'2011-12-30T04:53:09-05:00'
describe
'433' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXX' 'sip-files00047.txt'
a16107a6366f56ccb4ffbccd61ad71d0
61e906d0c232d176036c22ddfc7c713d668fc45f
'2011-12-30T04:51:25-05:00'
describe
'4026' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXY' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
e05dbe1618b2876b6508852e57464740
9132617e7f01bd265cb3234e62c718ef4cc47ca5
'2011-12-30T04:52:03-05:00'
describe
'335105' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASXZ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
17c8e1a2ce94e661db1dbb160f31b2b9
9b41c0d24514e3cf18b065ddcf569afe1c6f1c55
describe
'94674' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYA' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
1df0633e279616d7a214f93d6efb10ba
7010c5a40430e4da6f74aac13b91e021965b9c09
describe
'17290' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYB' 'sip-files00048.pro'
42ee3a39c0ce9af2af110dabc7634f00
8746deec9d83b57f63e03edd71e7bfc54b583522
describe
'28329' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYC' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
f1aecbc0399d956d9035c5f0b0177a08
52378ba428869d13e2710fa11f8c84a39b62c22b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYD' 'sip-files00048.tif'
6e73a8fdaaef626068f015d724500c03
2c28cb7ee4ce0b3eb36f8beaa96af5b49cdd3a58
'2011-12-30T04:53:05-05:00'
describe
'749' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYE' 'sip-files00048.txt'
45ed17b10d365ef38a0dd2f77ad934e2
1d6af0ab156a69489dbe6d7e9c7bd7f7a68da562
describe
'7348' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYF' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
5896f955999543eb6452163aaf3dbb19
35a5188baa6569b909796d19a2c7f38ff99040ce
describe
'335229' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYG' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
d5617cc7b9fb2fb4dbeabff7fded506e
9d5ff98c672e8c7397c1c5942c7e2c18ece326bf
describe
'124340' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYH' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
60d7b51047fec0f4b7b1aa9d79ee0e52
743f23c23a138344f9f9384dbf1b24bc4a72348d
describe
'29890' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYI' 'sip-files00049.pro'
e074e9be0accb3c3dbcb937f56cc8fcc
4f61f644f51051bbc14f090b288dd2462366b366
'2011-12-30T04:54:33-05:00'
describe
'38896' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYJ' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
e40d8ec36c65e9925b61f1af537e1680
99dd0af08870b538157b240f4733daaa9dcd677d
'2011-12-30T04:52:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYK' 'sip-files00049.tif'
791056c83553c58fa8cc9f3c8002aa7a
323f5cb411a1ca8e6a79f5523278304746c19230
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYL' 'sip-files00049.txt'
76ef784e33b81a245ce6a9c9d2ba9e3b
a2f12f30e6745a8b5e27897c6bd681b52e9805b6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYM' 'sip-files00049a.jp2'
0f00c1bbc272d123d2d5687a85dec55a
29a1027d5e81c1903abe4983c04dc22c4922a841
'2011-12-30T04:54:06-05:00'
describe
'128941' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYN' 'sip-files00049a.jpg'
39ea6c07c092c5f13bce38c7083df395
54c720f39dcf3095c0f9d6efa215da9212e3387d
describe
'28039' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYO' 'sip-files00049a.pro'
80935cbd55c4a64187926ce8a375bb08
e88e633b0b1b7353a39fcfa373245a3f468bdf0f
describe
'39273' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYP' 'sip-files00049a.QC.jpg'
72a50e94796e8d4ca4d0acaf86a68c95
955eea0f24d94f1c0d5b64c41b3e39ecd0ff404f
describe
'2701136' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYQ' 'sip-files00049a.tif'
dd3bbc33cca4e84301cbcb646d9308a4
0c2e5b856a9f0cdf9041eba11a2d6c1f68f0d8b8
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYR' 'sip-files00049a.txt'
2e114be64328bf21edf2ab68e7328131
3b11160a3de3d051da09f1b9b6e37e0b0b0b2b09
describe
'9976' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYS' 'sip-files00049athm.jpg'
03cddee3627ed413c05742742953ae08
c38f0ab52bb1fda78d6be18b02d8829805fb8740
'2011-12-30T04:51:20-05:00'
describe
'9656' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYT' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
91a70ff59c3335d1e9945cc766384254
4206e3d75d8c75829662d49106273d17a06db366
describe
'335085' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYU' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
634eb2818aad35acb3e37a13b085c19e
44189e3820d4ea4a978cebda8a54e4c7c706d4d1
describe
'121541' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYV' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
8037f79214cf307e59e9909dfcb5283f
eab9876cee70700f2b2d76cf066a7b4b92dda3c6
describe
'26214' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYW' 'sip-files00050.pro'
6e3591b4debbb6066b5ca4257f7cc8f3
7ca3321a18d37573891bf3f5e712fb8c06dd319a
describe
'36662' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYX' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
e98cec31e1372c47a6c10ac8560c8baf
03fc7b73519cf0b38994cbe27683fe032ee64d55
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYY' 'sip-files00050.tif'
1bf10a8639f349a89b0b15db5223c00a
6f2d6aabf95ab0d936b018eff58aade004ce49b4
'2011-12-30T04:55:24-05:00'
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASYZ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
102fefa9865d15048ac97b17911533d0
a4d6bebeb819f099b3dfd5fcc4df0855d3c18142
'2011-12-30T04:50:18-05:00'
describe
'9436' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZA' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
d8c9d640a06c8961ae7307d0706dc0e4
925e4c60a30b0d47bd57ccecbdcf775022e1f7a2
describe
'334832' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZB' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
7edf196c8d169e0b0ad21293b61ea2f6
0fb82571e3fe0625f5b0b3736f4e87cbda2cad1d
describe
'115003' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZC' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
4abc7574c9c4cff50f0c9c7f9670d4b7
28523d53c67eacfdd5af5bed6754c7f256ef6d89
describe
'28184' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZD' 'sip-files00051.pro'
fbea5d28db8f67837e5b3c46c93cc6b4
c1d7e634954b1770a4f90f6e124c16d24bf37df9
'2011-12-30T04:50:20-05:00'
describe
'36577' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZE' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
13475b638f1934930204c3d1644a3c1c
cfb3e3b01e34b207f6b4ee4bf3355ae266469773
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZF' 'sip-files00051.tif'
fb54cd55f279232bd0718453ea86d04e
66cb2651ffd9a149e6433b274f065ed4e297b7b9
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZG' 'sip-files00051.txt'
e04fda57ec99490da0e2c80d71efb24f
2cdb13761eb31adc69db5242ae675d98b65a76cc
describe
'9782' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZH' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
a08d6843bdce51264db6ffc0e0a81e31
4ea7bf0325e09abee9be72fe65907c537ca722c4
'2011-12-30T04:53:45-05:00'
describe
'335364' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZI' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
8e41612f618eaa9cb8e2ce7b95323f50
369ec613298750c74005aadd9eec40689d46e671
'2011-12-30T04:53:48-05:00'
describe
'66928' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZJ' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
43fed66808ad4809ba81fb350c9efc97
687262b3e35b0f3d4c164a1030f3d96722c3ba57
'2011-12-30T04:53:01-05:00'
describe
'12507' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZK' 'sip-files00052.pro'
899f0261f7d53a10fd0b9894fe687a6b
bffda995e83b909de4c1912c2e06eaf3c52dae42
'2011-12-30T04:55:43-05:00'
describe
'19736' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZL' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
75344647d160aabaf044339ef4035bd0
9f96d0a76f82f273238190d499e9ba596c456eb6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZM' 'sip-files00052.tif'
d4ca093f4d16a61089925fecb8ed1c05
04c1c20d14364729a6cbb94a421defe2e11471a5
describe
'522' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZN' 'sip-files00052.txt'
114e896576507fe3d3914ad64db4f140
71b04cd86d0c723fa2b29afe5dc5efc871ac0fca
describe
'5295' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZO' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
669e02e893032ef3ce2f640d27ec49e9
62c1827f00bff4547973b0c87c3db4ac37eb1717
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZP' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
feb6e21f219119e0717c0b729789eeae
e31c28f633473ec635026bd5bdc0f6ad1788fcfc
describe
'104803' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZQ' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
bf3c488d1c17ee092c11864099fa34dc
66a3f1585ebfd0e23770a08bd258927f4fe3bb12
'2011-12-30T04:54:35-05:00'
describe
'22365' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZR' 'sip-files00053.pro'
57a4707b5247ad1bcbc7d31286bf21ec
91a6412d3fd066174e825871211245c651104a21
'2011-12-30T04:53:04-05:00'
describe
'32944' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZS' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
b4ae78f4edc91fdf509a249c272842a4
126b81a8cd25c0558dff4085c630556b2cff2c2b
'2011-12-30T04:55:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZT' 'sip-files00053.tif'
ca265d0dc5dc5ff33e2e215904746d10
1db4821d1a0c239634437b31ba336e4bd55ffd8a
'2011-12-30T04:54:43-05:00'
describe
'924' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZU' 'sip-files00053.txt'
55548faf74c047c5cb352f2ca6edab53
c3643d1fb651b69c9a30e7ed15a62afaa7b4148d
describe
'8294' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZV' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
63b930337520b0a8c8fb2f3be0d5fb1e
3d0d8c6afda43611640333dc2783fff7a5e1a5bb
'2011-12-30T04:54:34-05:00'
describe
'335112' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZW' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
017d286edad0be9cee5022e217d289ad
a7278749890a7627e5d8ac5021888cd1c3f1fe80
describe
'123588' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZX' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
657ffef29de8cc57f858f246d339df2c
df0386d11cb884ee29686f702a750abefb2fccc7
'2011-12-30T04:51:16-05:00'
describe
'30706' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZY' 'sip-files00054.pro'
1d7e94711f48d2efd77df1598ffa6101
433064d2195786db9bf98cf73d0e653e472c6fb0
'2011-12-30T04:52:47-05:00'
describe
'40476' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAASZZ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
e9818d6e8bc4837e9de600d30b4c29f7
b8be1b1d4c55b4c8058a35c44059e0ca644c4a07
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAA' 'sip-files00054.tif'
64176facaf95ecc99077fce96b0605b6
bcea3f3c0dbf585dca226f8260b2fc8ae298cd7b
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAB' 'sip-files00054.txt'
c74c36a842ab323aa5197cd3f6241733
05b12cbb2aefa1a3c13b6e370deba261f9bb0551
describe
'9962' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAC' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
2ae21a003d367c9d32be199eb8dd81c7
9f6bad3f915aa976dc9fa5cd890af9cc681580f7
'2011-12-30T04:53:53-05:00'
describe
'335537' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAD' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
a165b88f80c3fc00fb2b725ede1b7d99
f0fbba991b918a73549541cdf82f75fd16df9b0a
describe
'121784' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAE' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
8e020285e66b305eac2a4d7fe96e6260
0bca01e3326114799d555d4fe3fe7b13a3270ee5
'2011-12-30T04:50:07-05:00'
describe
'29542' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAF' 'sip-files00055.pro'
93efafd5a7d5bc2953cdbb60a6e0a218
6a03287a66e90d8760af585a22f9da46a920c7a9
'2011-12-30T04:53:39-05:00'
describe
'39044' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAG' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
636820347037cc073adf9e912edc50c7
4734e9f23fb90020423f02b3403a096cecca1867
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAH' 'sip-files00055.tif'
24f1aff13782ff039293fba3ab36b0f7
ea22bd88a23846160e9b17270619517b188f389b
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAI' 'sip-files00055.txt'
4fc82dcbf314eb9963602237ebfef72e
2d525c2decc6cf2c709fd8d6495941b452be4dc8
describe
'10008' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAJ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
a2cd5f4a29e4118d88f48f23bd9ffe2c
567bd2556c3dd2b4c484f4696018e9d8811e22b6
describe
'335498' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAK' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
ff2558c5e4a79fe589ea2ad6c6974087
78ac7c930e5208b955c84731de034ae63154d23e
describe
'117086' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAL' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
39ff28fe63d0eb958efd91f2df8fa71f
e4a5a7c9a035f52a16f0e16d4813817ea89d2fea
'2011-12-30T04:50:27-05:00'
describe
'28913' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAM' 'sip-files00056.pro'
1b4eb867229c0e81daeb7fc9c4d56f2f
972fabccce47a04c1f17fb10866288961a3c347c
describe
'38353' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAN' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
a8f817809be445968c3bc155f4e0f6b3
53a99ab1b4fb0b785f941738f2c6ab590ed00109
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAO' 'sip-files00056.tif'
17b10e42614856837e1fe5878feac62d
6c6fac9832b160d2e0e301089ef3d2d24c7ac54c
'2011-12-30T04:51:59-05:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAP' 'sip-files00056.txt'
8ec3794aa87d02e82c747dfbd1d00a48
eb4e4207f70b6e3c1449ef7f758881e59d23c1e4
describe
'9439' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAQ' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
be53655dfee5b6e6293a0455c1b8fc32
ec6a27ad217f38abeda54712ea4009215f9b7d30
'2011-12-30T04:53:57-05:00'
describe
'335395' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAR' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
3b6c883a05aeb7091fd37a0b433be4bb
02c6eeda6a7de44959a714236df5998dacecdcf6
describe
'123285' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAS' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
d2bac9f2f82288bccfc83ba5ccf71d62
c721c9d2d1b53baef29e50e871df299809399600
'2011-12-30T04:53:50-05:00'
describe
'30649' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAT' 'sip-files00057.pro'
dead533d105c99a64b36daca3069fee6
37089b4bae5e1b44c1c4840e4bccafb29ef5e86c
describe
'40168' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAU' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
b271414bc20ce3a99ca8b22f36e602e2
e571e5fd87651247b9e304838a6dbb968e272e80
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAV' 'sip-files00057.tif'
cb76a9e595824fd527c9fc6b8f7d2216
7b949232339d10dfbdf54e448035ed3372b5e2d1
'2011-12-30T04:50:25-05:00'
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAW' 'sip-files00057.txt'
58c8fcae0cb192b6bdfde67765001223
18ccbfc3e866d00807bd7a5c171eb14970e9950c
describe
'9779' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAX' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
efd45982ef3459c694dee377025f0449
d6db14f3b936b41a9d6f20e276264deead214b17
describe
'335357' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAY' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
42fed7c0e3673d95a683ce0dacd7d24e
8682b51e76a6de06261dc0ddc81bb704e7d1a51d
describe
'114929' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATAZ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
d8bb6d45cdc91a50247ac8f167952fa9
3b2c24b10eec24b3ba17ca3e27f7c7c3149e8083
'2011-12-30T04:52:29-05:00'
describe
'25779' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBA' 'sip-files00058.pro'
3235cc4b99bce2eab75f26bde4bf589b
5868e1f546eee1f9e00a0f67eddf99c6175f2fa8
describe
'36897' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBB' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
dc35c630f10aab8edfdc42c9af73da6a
4608c4e130e5fcd229f273f4d077333cd1a83c6c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBC' 'sip-files00058.tif'
0e3cc0c9a0d6b990175c3fe142d5b5b4
245586f58dc5d77046ca3d3581e911e1ac2f3592
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBD' 'sip-files00058.txt'
c8ff286a3c8ccfa59871c1e39dadf8f3
fa57935c4583593a33d56dda4e17833139a864d1
'2011-12-30T04:54:02-05:00'
describe
'9557' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBE' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
c999204740da483b9ea1466f0dfaa2db
28dadc45f874db52698862199f3dd4b9fcf32114
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBF' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
9500905e111cb43eb1a1260b383160ae
2273b5a0e2663fdce2aa600b1b4d0a2e43882e78
describe
'24811' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBG' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
dbe569af00e1bd384a63884923659d90
fe04bee0beffd33e2d1d3faa15bf0e59748a5dcd
'2011-12-30T04:54:46-05:00'
describe
'5469' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBH' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
91a1ab0ea7097b2d5b3b81c08a72bc3a
535efe351fba28cdb42a2a463678e019a31da321
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBI' 'sip-files00059.tif'
b01c408720cb00872064789a834db32c
d6ef4f99df8dcd190c788bc2ebd5ef794ebe8f9c
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBJ' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
afc911fd330f647b35294bfbd114ce03
a9fd7f784d736d4bcbef57603c340997be4ad10e
'2011-12-30T04:55:31-05:00'
describe
'335457' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBK' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
2911b308e1bc8660d2c78c4321406bd8
4aa3d0bb9ae47f15275c3c16450de71fb921e090
'2011-12-30T04:52:31-05:00'
describe
'30639' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBL' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
a5e17b46e832bfd888c11f2b04e5a8bb
a0bbe39166433437931b0f19374bc37f6b9ca802
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBM' 'sip-files00060.pro'
0e81cc6f0f9f4c71f039d287ee406966
941556f744c6b53d7570217db15207ac5a2e1bb4
'2011-12-30T04:50:43-05:00'
describe
'7516' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBN' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
df59ecbec533b1ca4fee599e34c93389
ba7cdb9dd3c69c1e73bf098c8e685f50eb500e6e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBO' 'sip-files00060.tif'
b5a2693724818479200465450db16414
fd0902553dd301fbaea511a912de8e70521627b7
describe
'107' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBP' 'sip-files00060.txt'
5be35521f137b44a70d87a6e28623cd3
dfa3e4db393e7bcd4e4fe8e56938f0a7cd6c1223
'2011-12-30T04:54:03-05:00'
describe
'2260' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBQ' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
5d6b9356a7c968485103bdec6711b964
befa72952478df9e105250df8e7c0563b6b61b66
'2011-12-30T04:55:04-05:00'
describe
'335225' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBR' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
9c6df4bbaaae04a0fa25c9f4290fafb4
c744d0be738beb8977cb400b6148dc8a2dc2dbd0
'2011-12-30T04:54:54-05:00'
describe
'27182' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBS' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
faf6e224b25edda05ac1c0b11184a9d9
8a6c1e4ec8ea886f21d0e4f66423e31f22e66f46
describe
'5858' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBT' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
5f222dfe7eda29a7963e490fe5c03661
7106d962b483bf27c43f78bad1f6fd8dba4e5465
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBU' 'sip-files00061.tif'
f3d2a677468270cef0705b030b2863cb
eaddf80668ce921cebbe9842851ee2dc06a3a6e4
'2011-12-30T04:53:35-05:00'
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBV' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
fc7068b8a2ff0392d151b1095a4a3ee7
3d8a6b9da197471492dc881b769f1e96af81ca69
describe
'335109' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBW' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
80a214523199d1b39d202b029f6cdf8d
cf01df166f5d6022808b7340be86968826ccfaf5
describe
'108085' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBX' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
44de9739baec94380e3777707d404177
bf56287b52c2ea2fb3012578104a0e0b5980f592
describe
'22753' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBY' 'sip-files00062.pro'
21a2f0a43e87c95914ab58c63693b13e
eedbb43516fe0d6c9fbfe9410e7d10ae82c78a67
describe
'34916' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATBZ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
459aa1ddfd5d6ccf79c81e8e7e0aa7f3
690a4115f8feaec3fb38d20ecfe178efefc89129
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCA' 'sip-files00062.tif'
715ee60736d5c22c5425415d63ef9f87
5999e4a97b022eec3798d20d45de6837f068ef18
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCB' 'sip-files00062.txt'
3b94af675196ccf9e966614a63e0743a
ffa6ea1fa886ca9558549e004da97c3360e8497f
describe
'8613' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCC' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
e7dce45131328639d118bd4f820e22de
37c4df9a4f4bba3bcfba648d5777b86922ac91bd
describe
'334983' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCD' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
e5ae4d03c46408cf75025c8e7250f0a1
4a792b9db8ee3a0de74b88a8db2adae621aa5319
'2011-12-30T04:51:12-05:00'
describe
'137056' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCE' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
5a16059248cfd891c8300c3c31128edf
bc5d4548023fd997138e97baac1bff89bb9d2f10
'2011-12-30T04:54:45-05:00'
describe
'32257' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCF' 'sip-files00063.pro'
7567558c348c9079bcea305659919aa5
2bdfc51ea22043328978ea3b41a5800f46af217b
'2011-12-30T04:50:24-05:00'
describe
'43529' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCG' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
6fb3feaefd875f0091baf41456f93304
3194a7e1b05aa96c6792e64d6d597c8f6a44848c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCH' 'sip-files00063.tif'
90102de00666bc3975cb26bc9a435fa8
83e19b2472053a7f5fd6e47bdb8ee9ffabde9a87
'2011-12-30T04:50:15-05:00'
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCI' 'sip-files00063.txt'
158ed6a9d6f9a67f522fe58174a2e923
e8c19303fcd98e559266b7f1ba98f78cdf0567fd
'2011-12-30T04:53:24-05:00'
describe
'10501' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCJ' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
dbdc16dcd52487bb7a00239d63a9c51a
dfcac73385bbc3b33cb24631dbca0a9634d05cef
'2011-12-30T04:55:22-05:00'
describe
'335266' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCK' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
ef303ed0a14381caedfd5cb9e75f85dc
481cb47b8e8798d0ba3d01e6109dc3e442c22225
describe
'118153' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCL' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
9638e064b20fd1298414a5b67c8a4118
c61d38b0bb9b49bbd0efda464bcd27f11ff28e94
describe
'692' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCM' 'sip-files00064.pro'
09a219307c84c779b0c0f482abce1b29
a4534fe64df4fad431a9af3d36982077df39aa78
'2011-12-30T04:55:58-05:00'
describe
'24703' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCN' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
a510b232061003d0393fd3f95c6481dc
a3bff2aa376a5fd8c56e4a7255f69a2b6ce2ec1d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCO' 'sip-files00064.tif'
fea62e4bfb2ab701cda52098dd5ace0a
8a0b7546e4b836a6836423dac1cc8d55d13d57e0
'2011-12-30T04:54:01-05:00'
describe
'156' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCP' 'sip-files00064.txt'
42557213be83d1f77f962f8dca5a12a3
fcc28bd172332b43fd6a334af6d18bbb121179ca
describe
'5989' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCQ' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
e82a48f8637f446b99b0f7250b0e1d78
caeec10217f6160d198b74f5b3a35503a538e8a0
describe
'335372' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCR' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
fb7de4a439611730802a29f13d177ef7
c05de2f8cffeb52d3305c42c74ef72d57f13af19
describe
'131861' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCS' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
50d342cba5eefc87e51657cf77fb33c8
d1cc05fd0c211fb16498da7c8e9498f6aa1d4e89
'2011-12-30T04:51:28-05:00'
describe
'30105' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCT' 'sip-files00066.pro'
9b8fc5ffcbf39a0d6faf807be6102edc
a8c9ba5448c94021159e9548e874e86934deaf12
describe
'41008' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCU' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
2d11e8ed1e70010656df95ef556684ee
1db7f4ca08d824bd72d1f3f02437e966601f30be
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCV' 'sip-files00066.tif'
c758564a5d4bf8a0615aeda0ed68d0af
ba885cb7e22df7c45572ae81db1aef1a905ea743
'2011-12-30T04:54:39-05:00'
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCW' 'sip-files00066.txt'
43f4768d391e43de254350424714029e
6e73d6e259ab26cb2e8c877eed5ceb92e8b2732b
'2011-12-30T04:53:12-05:00'
describe
'9732' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCX' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
14420c75ce79878cd67580fe0442bfbe
a8fef701d3e19edef85bd7c233dbe8b00cfc3f63
'2011-12-30T04:54:51-05:00'
describe
'335343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCY' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
5ce41a5177b73d6270dfcb3768a9449b
9eec0233f2699f48eaaa8882e71b0ca531f02842
describe
'68712' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATCZ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
6f429da2c78a7318815ef6a0b63c3ed7
4fac4aedad5a1c99b432428c4dba025530b80ce4
describe
'7602' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDA' 'sip-files00067.pro'
db9146122c0ac3c092c73ef71e446c15
c9396c2353f1e6485ddc2c042ae4385d4d1c7c47
'2011-12-30T04:50:09-05:00'
describe
'16437' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDB' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
9e2b393707d5ade52db87d271816b3cb
51b3d2e035e26dfa3a51ac8ea6bd3f5bb2879fa1
'2011-12-30T04:51:18-05:00'
describe
'2701128' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDC' 'sip-files00067.tif'
84559213feb80d9424f12369f4858f64
fdbddbb2c61aa103b3de62997167cf9d3b017f59
'2011-12-30T04:51:43-05:00'
describe
'306' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDD' 'sip-files00067.txt'
634a76bf6955635a011dbe51c4561edc
b446388544f40b56044e09611f34482103135173
describe
'4167' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDE' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
dbd14ff3ded9a12fed434898a59376b5
0ad267bad6f3d4fd4bf497cc6b18d115fe1ebc1d
'2011-12-30T04:52:38-05:00'
describe
'335507' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDF' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
1b0ad1884dfc42482d17c7ad1611818d
69fd19888bc148218d2d4d48bcdb24634b7b24ec
describe
'107591' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDG' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
86c51fb2a2eabd3b4f7f432854d75a96
0a2aecc7424ad8736999b8af3df4ac90736f9407
describe
'16271' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDH' 'sip-files00068.pro'
09358c6df64e52e73a8ed515e7592026
0450aaa7dd2c98cefd5952c70b204605e1f72f9d
describe
'30680' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDI' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
8e878937b319ba55f20394ce2eaad67c
332b110b8f59850326aadb91b2451d44c6fcf264
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDJ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
21dcf0281c386ada13204008ac491dd9
4b0ec9bea611a18571c77c730b6eac283854a379
describe
'738' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDK' 'sip-files00068.txt'
2dac881c5700cc85e6322915a15a4dd0
9ddb030d0bdea479d1fa643e379dd66a63f702ba
describe
'7893' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDL' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
437af8c9aaca7c29680dcb0b9e393bfa
b7144f2602d0f2634602611fdb5fe6416bf2208b
describe
'335348' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDM' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
361bcbf62ab8e5739b9175d86d47e192
394c7c7e141e60998f2d9d59f1dc662e0e4e57b8
'2011-12-30T04:54:20-05:00'
describe
'132083' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDN' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
6138ef2a1643f9ce24ee7c19e269ed90
6b842d3ad30ecc96a891875e27e9527d15568125
describe
'33481' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDO' 'sip-files00069.pro'
70934faf418b58eaea3120ddb133ada1
873cab55458088c8d4cfed22e21e7e98655e6455
describe
'43445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDP' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
2ce5bf134be042195e2ed2198959b706
2eabd0da646519a431897ab881fc06994d94acc2
'2011-12-30T04:51:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDQ' 'sip-files00069.tif'
3344be4bdb5d59b072296d13fd3c972a
03c02fb420478e8e1b1801a17e7d44952ddc7177
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDR' 'sip-files00069.txt'
48bd241cf8a07d020d3091041f49dd77
e352d89b0c3c26eeb48aed330dd2348b9fcb7625
describe
'10607' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDS' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
6b86eeace29a9dfbcbaddd364da3a05a
c315fdd5f89493e8bc360ead794c2b9c18203276
describe
'335487' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDT' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
91aef8435b45ec03cb2bca92659de68e
342a2ad55b4224e2f71174039f6ca9a7e1ec60b0
describe
'124856' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDU' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
02ce0e59207808feba19b8b81af14d5b
f815970f564313df6a861bfe891e7183ef5ee6d9
'2011-12-30T04:55:47-05:00'
describe
'31843' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDV' 'sip-files00070.pro'
65ecb0ef1cbbc23db2c109095c319823
26587d5778ef8ff422508f7d8b4ce79edb7eef96
'2011-12-30T04:54:15-05:00'
describe
'40941' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDW' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
047dc338f1c0a9555ed7229d3d0d148d
859bd05165a0ee4e62dee8864d80a21080c56d87
'2011-12-30T04:50:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDX' 'sip-files00070.tif'
f6f8b8dde388bb05bfcab13ed615ab02
5a58fc4c91d4417f5021652eacd37c7c17a5725c
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDY' 'sip-files00070.txt'
ec2094a3b510cdebe65390044bc38fe9
067b40066596badb30c06e47603d7ae5629d6451
describe
'10135' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATDZ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
95cbae4f023ccf7618d5ba20fa455104
d90584ed1afcc2b4145552a6b3e2b45bcdd4ba7e
describe
'335235' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEA' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
44a99e523898d153630b10620bdabf0b
6c6525dcdca822b09d788b6f563414aaa423b89b
'2011-12-30T04:50:30-05:00'
describe
'125038' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEB' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
c86404f8b347958dd9c6de25ea2328c7
d7873912330ab8993dde7d76e631dbc3265f0362
'2011-12-30T04:54:49-05:00'
describe
'30325' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEC' 'sip-files00071.pro'
957785ffe13c82f1933559bdef26a6d7
e4e99825969783754c6f32f685b13368e5eb401d
describe
'40100' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATED' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
a3e79ff1261226c21ddeb5928db9f7e4
6b3688e3f04ff050e83c7e98323c6ee3813e3e42
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEE' 'sip-files00071.tif'
17bdb78e7dfa4cdebec36b5c719dbdec
c0948e1ed20dbcdfa3d48109a263340728d62851
'2011-12-30T04:54:09-05:00'
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEF' 'sip-files00071.txt'
d7e3174403050f6074b9134dfcd615f0
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describe
'10571' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEG' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
b6d8a7c105e306e693f7ca1f28478657
7e65776defea8a7cb7c18154c1a1de09615021cb
'2011-12-30T04:53:40-05:00'
describe
'335524' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEH' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
437e5d9064154a2c20244f2ce79e3826
b2fb127c88a8a175acfe2b40710f595c2b7e9d59
describe
'127343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEI' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
171b10eace8548b4027b15cadb7d2f6c
7035f437f3815bbb663f49a06990b61e3fa880cb
describe
'31469' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEJ' 'sip-files00072.pro'
aafdab06c260f0d359a1199898487fa1
2cbf378ab8669785a90c5a655971bf6546b925e2
'2011-12-30T04:55:03-05:00'
describe
'41552' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEK' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
db1e35fcc767a62bcb7e754dc1e0bc72
8c0133f9bef45a63887458289e75cb41993c51fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEL' 'sip-files00072.tif'
4ec3473dbf53db565ad0a453a4fab853
17e10fd439c1c60bcd1a011440d0d9858d2e812d
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEM' 'sip-files00072.txt'
15f9b030d2e6dfce05e7ebd240d7bb7c
de7ce8dd011a13e24eebff1a086f27f4db7db631
'2011-12-30T04:53:54-05:00'
describe
'10034' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEN' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
1bd08fcbe62e235cf5116b686c11e170
09231254bce1e75789c13ffb11ae5681ec7f3e17
describe
'335114' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEO' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
359e43cd0ed4cbd0d9e41b1d43f0c42b
49b647ea5b0acadb07f1e8f351c81d72ed3e2a0a
'2011-12-30T04:53:55-05:00'
describe
'125417' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEP' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
5bcc4c9c0c6b83747da772487da160ec
af71e1e4fd3ec4caedb987cdc338201405cdd17d
describe
'31600' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEQ' 'sip-files00073.pro'
2373dd80b73a68e03c7658f9a7d15634
7ac29dec8623a8e1f6c01bf2dff41e4c4dcb0564
describe
'41643' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATER' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
f0c0206125f81b9c1463992e85aa878c
8cc3efdd2c93f32aee78e14edf055a52c6da73d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATES' 'sip-files00073.tif'
f4b76cf4467a1f5da79a44691d2dbe77
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describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATET' 'sip-files00073.txt'
398d86f47eb7fddfc8de9cd8e490e7e9
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describe
'10192' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEU' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
6cd85ab9723117f25a7d0b2ff44e3c69
cd87680c57276e7106d811e503e88936bb8b818a
describe
'335270' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEV' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
9089dd7b8f88b4e96f015bddd07faf1f
9a339bf3758dad3f6a59aada8f9fc7b8a520c2d3
'2011-12-30T04:51:05-05:00'
describe
'117622' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEW' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
40a88c36d427fa7882bc8f36496ccbdc
8c1301cef51ae593eedf1515cba754552c3d186c
'2011-12-30T04:52:24-05:00'
describe
'29313' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEX' 'sip-files00074.pro'
0a5bcb748baa2ffcfcdebde4da785ee7
6f171a9690ffccd762a326cf651a4078904423f0
describe
'38610' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEY' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
7bd84a58bb6a13ee5a2e6bd1b2729f92
78113d0669f0b1a61477c076cc626ef3c9bdc933
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATEZ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
d29fe890d5c1ffbd686f52410abcebcc
f4d12ff008171722d84ea060e410a9cc375f26ad
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFA' 'sip-files00074.txt'
0326879abb84603056c15708e5349611
a705d284888d6cdbfcba68cb52e50986c672b45b
describe
'9442' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFB' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
f6a35d39a432a96b7f5452dcae805887
f93c8ccdc2fe3a552bdeda0174c74fa8e5f88614
describe
'335452' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFC' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
97a2bbcba3717f3eab1930d1b98c668d
ef206b7035d1ec2a78b17ebf463d2e105ec58a45
describe
'81496' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFD' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
f00ac650ae775720a2221a00be27088b
7b9dbe4b54b640a415671b02d4ca4530fb4b13b1
describe
'14867' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFE' 'sip-files00075.pro'
f05d0e892034404e8f4f973ffea80c12
75e0e1fcf6395baca37aa2c289b983d24cf6655b
describe
'24891' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFF' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
a6e83a47f44980aadb291803f9a709fb
c042db7932b98cf163b637d2e16b93685edf0a40
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFG' 'sip-files00075.tif'
47696d32ed8480b13aeb4a08f9e51e1d
8119e9c64cdc9ce19a3eaa4f88bc39deb2d6fb50
describe
'624' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFH' 'sip-files00075.txt'
b6a6023195ce9e668957da9755c92576
b5abc1a46ec95b87d1404fe63ec94772947862d5
'2011-12-30T04:50:41-05:00'
describe
'6566' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFI' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
aa737a69a335d7083dcbc14f79a9ac52
1bd13452319737d5d1a04acae8005521275ba7a8
'2011-12-30T04:55:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFJ' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
5660b3a7bb348e51d5638cfc7493f863
58bedc208fb4561d884a6cd9d6117968ca97d093
describe
'90115' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFK' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
edeb0fc7821f3237f6f4f35dbcf1d09b
bc3d5f5ba20fcae9db030252f85c9a02271bfe96
describe
'15382' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFL' 'sip-files00076.pro'
a9f6849c0524b2c8a06152a04fb7b75b
bdf1fae081986deec7020d2f3ba5810a9d5c374b
describe
'26637' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFM' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
a799982c7f66eadff4e410a5c1da0ffe
9f2773c0cc7c6586359298f41b6c71fda4053748
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFN' 'sip-files00076.tif'
8bb72e60d5c78eb50ff66834083caf60
8bbe6ccbc94ab2b65a455ec24e9a31aa6cdda536
describe
'681' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFO' 'sip-files00076.txt'
29e4a9a800c5da97037bf14c79480907
4cf2b1383de98b709d04ffb52bd16b207a6292a3
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'7499' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFP' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
915d2ca5702f3760cd3d19e54f6a81a2
855b56d141dbe8e313e6dd46072e088b74e727e5
describe
'335451' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFQ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
888f4c38d0ea98dd0e5d8fb9371df3ee
5b556e0c0de260baf9100df07f100039c6104dda
'2011-12-30T04:50:42-05:00'
describe
'132689' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFR' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
95101a23c7a9616cfa13089abc343fe1
5c1b9914c2a5c5b580b182835c6b0de42bbe087c
describe
'33004' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFS' 'sip-files00077.pro'
1844395d8da7642def7b7822f30d65ac
577b0186dc67e97a38ae408f3d42ed26c5e4b7b5
describe
'42316' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFT' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
136e60daaff85788f96c5189df3c1b99
49f548e2c8310188f4468cff65bdff0b6458de13
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFU' 'sip-files00077.tif'
1e0b11cefdd96aaa958a6259b2e0791c
0bb3f8d032fe1e3f4579e47edc1d46578210bc23
'2011-12-30T04:52:52-05:00'
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFV' 'sip-files00077.txt'
e454b5ed054e86371d81e700992d9c0b
48712dbd9cd3598342140f247a961ab0eb0dfec5
describe
'10446' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFW' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
d3e9eaadb5165db2fca035f0b00b6463
deb97627bd2711a28bace71e4357dd70587ea2e3
'2011-12-30T04:52:25-05:00'
describe
'335503' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFX' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
3b304abb8bb71437bd117b70b7ba7d30
c24fbef245cc8f8a885b3428765a3c06bfe590e4
describe
'118358' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFY' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
4b121796a0f19a117c44e8dc7030e707
af05fbdacc4cccd37e1bf89faa81122d09187998
'2011-12-30T04:54:25-05:00'
describe
'28006' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATFZ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
1c6ddf143be240f2d6aaf1cace092312
17d213286d62f22b6a786b87ed2c087200a59be6
'2011-12-30T04:50:55-05:00'
describe
'38269' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGA' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
57f84ec68021fa553c5e1bdd0600af63
66ae7556fa7317df2b4590a4112c17540bfaf335
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGB' 'sip-files00078.tif'
448c532d25b5d711724d07a3b49a14d6
ac49f8da6067780dc335fd634c82a28f5dbaf4ff
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGC' 'sip-files00078.txt'
bb00ecbe476942bbce0d6c435aa33c4b
f291961cf03133cedb2d5bc30ffe0bf61642ffd3
'2011-12-30T04:53:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGD' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
c8aead167be460a8cb93f9bde89c4ea9
08f6e2b55875112b63a86ba90d5ca122fc4e4859
describe
'335250' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGE' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
2d3e46609e9b7c1e792f903049d16c11
5985acbef9e2907ce66a1f832ac8086f7a289a86
'2011-12-30T04:55:17-05:00'
describe
'124854' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGF' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
42f10daa7e7e8a5a37d68c78c2b6f9b2
2907beaddbc1e959f25839aeaa544cbd5f1f4e6b
describe
'29879' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGG' 'sip-files00079.pro'
5cc5f57e4c5a4a0fd1a51e83c31435f1
6cfbddeeac7e1c9c0df26d2e96063b58320801b3
describe
'39397' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGH' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
9c1564426a02334c0925bf5309ad378c
87171b5a4d492807120b1d815acad14c53b593e1
'2011-12-30T04:52:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGI' 'sip-files00079.tif'
6985bb363538db872c4281447fa31b57
b44f07480627309e1f34e7ad4eae4bb2c9996859
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGJ' 'sip-files00079.txt'
10efa0e5d97e3b5fe136f131c5446065
2b4a7704827a7ab249ac49c0f77c6a6d2d5c4f57
describe
'10080' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGK' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
c7240e127f806e056482ae219a41b4f4
8e6a54cc971cf8f062f32bfbc7392a3914c77075
'2011-12-30T04:54:18-05:00'
describe
'335528' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGL' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
ad2f2c6e0e514b8b6976c27644a8acbb
63eb65959e001802a61bbf78afcd5a852e6b5939
describe
'125214' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGM' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
113b2a29cb753492cd6ee2b5bbc63501
ce2eea0c45295b178e8bddf9a70c812b19dda010
describe
'30724' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGN' 'sip-files00080.pro'
3154969913e72dddd80177ceaa6da1c2
cf49dad93cefd01e2df906330ef0a899483daa80
describe
'40706' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGO' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
d42e4fdaf358d6722a60df42ed0a8619
c1cd05f4707f9e1c7b93489b7192126abe8f947b
'2011-12-30T04:55:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGP' 'sip-files00080.tif'
e64fac4f28d3b81a9af22a1792a17cac
13402650fea9025e6b9f708e09710a5532182a0b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGQ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
ef56e3a660f7a2439d398df7d960b4b9
e0780d9f5361251021900889ab5320c671dc53ae
'2011-12-30T04:50:32-05:00'
describe
'10599' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGR' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
a858de49b92793b28dcd478fd21f58ed
d4610b86418133d40c0cee3ac2c84b5c74b792c0
describe
'335274' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGS' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
a981b408ce1e16094aef7eeea4612942
30d1bd27fe8006f3b8482325065abb74a81d6735
'2011-12-30T04:51:01-05:00'
describe
'122830' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGT' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
8194ef0e5046152a415c34d1fbcb5298
4132907b0cb74cfad72ef31180e7950e1529249d
'2011-12-30T04:55:51-05:00'
describe
'26845' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGU' 'sip-files00081.pro'
ba2da9e305f59f4731081a3a640d70ae
7519304a599478c39c8ca5edc81fdea84183166d
describe
'37770' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGV' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
840e8dbb36f94ac9114dc4f7585513d5
bef817966a553be66e88ab66711abd4424f39a34
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGW' 'sip-files00081.tif'
10b2d59a1974fe99937e0780cacb8b4d
385074b727627e1ab2727a66a9fa192ebb7e0be6
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGX' 'sip-files00081.txt'
b2985cba1224f01bd7b4cc1b998786f6
46209767d37063687e3650d5d2159ca18983c110
describe
'9823' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGY' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
a7ae98a82ec42dfa24d99d077565eeff
72c544311f6d2116fb37f5ff965f4414e6eea514
describe
'335398' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATGZ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
eba26595f1b04b3bc5c292991fd0085a
910ed41e90e20ac20a84ab0f7b8a0ce7951f80a7
describe
'125311' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHA' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
e8ecbaa8626e9a21c07998b4eaa152d3
eeeac4b3ec88b2a09755f2244fd1b032a80d7b82
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHB' 'sip-files00082.pro'
38e2f07261abae137625e375626075af
b5343af73168b82c34ac16c7d95f2a6a534fad42
describe
'28493' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHC' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
1ca19905aa8e6c9e7aec8cb813793e98
f01069000b88a02f6a9eade756b8aaf8125f6c23
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHD' 'sip-files00082.tif'
0c3f79b5d01356db942b9411fadbcd4d
362920561e37511eede11c65da34cca0f8adce95
'2011-12-30T04:50:56-05:00'
describe
'70' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHE' 'sip-files00082.txt'
25edff8c2f348da57eeab77616e2f550
32136522744d95535827c6f6d744f4d2f1c47dc8
describe
'6702' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHF' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
6d3581683b867435dbdbc1c438facbdf
8c56792e0b98f5da23184170841091c2d72facf3
describe
'335201' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHG' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
4e088e360c5a32f6d759d39e27576cf0
7e1c7c1f3af2b58034416aad446be6ed75f256cc
describe
'141171' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHH' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
4ec9ae7641ec125eba4131daa35584ae
7d352976af00a0cfd318043c6827199df6599a47
'2011-12-30T04:55:19-05:00'
describe
'32141' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHI' 'sip-files00084.pro'
b77b7e402272059875a679fa758ee568
1fe99c55b8ea40c14d2c62595013a6efd3d7d893
describe
'42985' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHJ' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
73cd0e8ec7f0fc2b8e042cd405c2c9d9
92aa308049c8dfe6d86f6b42f07636806b1d520b
'2011-12-30T04:55:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHK' 'sip-files00084.tif'
89b354330a63e0f50da57817b9a4a010
243a9bbbe450e42fe0e027d7a77b61293e476232
'2011-12-30T04:53:43-05:00'
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHL' 'sip-files00084.txt'
a009ff91767e3c9b95c3744a25de6f50
7360633c54bb6798988a9c8afd3c95cc77bbcde2
describe
'10220' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHM' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
3870e68e0c80f558d531d9e7fd37b57e
790dfeaf2c81c8a2f485db918912952e9181b864
describe
'335538' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHN' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
07c60d9d01da3f9e5ec9dfcd9033c066
e3a6de3d61dd7244fa7818043b02823ec2708122
describe
'135616' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHO' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
2163a6cb2f517955f275305d75477540
42eed6163656c64377cfad86c08dcc3cf4658cc2
describe
'30361' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHP' 'sip-files00085.pro'
8ae8b936b043b1291ebd00f4f1e65b29
aebebd2d52a1376d21826b508a8ec3ac17d4847f
'2011-12-30T04:53:13-05:00'
describe
'41705' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHQ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
d573c18b3f2eb6989e1a781e093aa688
0b26b6bc2abf09cfc2e0b70f3482c3ee8e9498cd
'2011-12-30T04:55:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHR' 'sip-files00085.tif'
50aef85ffc6047021280a497d28e3c15
ed6a51cd80ffbb9c1110f8afb17e37d8613c3318
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHS' 'sip-files00085.txt'
a354f5ad7b7bea19a40a938fd1ca712e
10f5d12ead7371f770f54a75a2939155faa1553e
describe
'9837' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHT' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
8244f040101d095d81d531fd8f8172c0
dd75644fb8e5ce7bd47288f46c39696941c27790
describe
'335509' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHU' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
24952d646cc7bfcc57ae524171c5c857
fc1e456f8cd35afa057ed80072319339a42c382c
describe
'62565' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHV' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
f5bf420cbba9ccc2191e524a2ae729df
24aaa25eb63288cf6be3e84cf853f9b0017ff8ee
describe
'5412' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHW' 'sip-files00086.pro'
f9891cfc13a5e0e0b72eda156cb64ea8
2ab9b7031a8ae1fa3e52c59cacd3d4ef8812f332
'2011-12-30T04:51:45-05:00'
describe
'15598' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHX' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
fbbeb938e8eccde9cf79f4ec8375c24b
78631ffbee9711af8bfd62c840a98114ba03d403
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHY' 'sip-files00086.tif'
f5750f5c2f83134f780a472b08c81ccd
51f93842896b6b03b968953bc3f9b74852a9c156
describe
'250' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATHZ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
0f3462c0ae7f696315c37f713c35c308
d186945e87244352aefa1012acc1311edb05d18d
'2011-12-30T04:51:58-05:00'
describe
'3885' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIA' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
bf6b4f9a8998d92b29ffb157a9937aae
88646e758f2ead6357bd8a1af5d1766b535d28e4
describe
'335330' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIB' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
6e4594e9168ad77853f3cfb9285fe111
b0499516791e00e5978bf66f8058026ad217314e
describe
'94902' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIC' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
4ea1ac98e26987ee3b13f54586a6495a
82415a362897a4cbf1e248df35a7992183cd00ed
describe
'14816' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATID' 'sip-files00087.pro'
443851925451031513b3ce8043319169
aebc0b80348c9eb0f0e6b3823ee564cc7c707f30
describe
'28381' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIE' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
1512f79c97d077ba8a8941379553696f
ce74ade1f042cdd605c2e62cd55db82f2709d456
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIF' 'sip-files00087.tif'
d89083cafb9d3fee625bb9d32a9b4277
9be0e032079d30a5dbeb56ff148ba44e398ac7d0
describe
'700' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIG' 'sip-files00087.txt'
94d4d41f3d722c298447ed3f365ae184
b163f9f8f9326cdd79f7c48d29ab8a975a051c0f
describe
'7517' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIH' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
159db9a2053b4a0630780430fda45d53
452206243a8dd6f4ec9f529c8c05ce06f8f701f6
describe
'335511' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATII' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
49d565abf4d3a779a1bb33d01b0e77bb
d9e2838b2010436cbcb461be8a31ce6478629d6b
describe
'126211' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIJ' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
d742866e399ad85793354d2c043473a2
84a030e9015de3f9278a98f3f9053c1eabccf669
describe
'29399' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIK' 'sip-files00088.pro'
1ac6206c1169bdbb5dc99a932c123b35
cbf0900595da36503aa4f56d2137b3e413d47db5
'2011-12-30T04:55:55-05:00'
describe
'39950' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIL' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
93b631c5b1bb756cf1f333ac7fb5e2c4
3db64ac2b276787904ab1a519fa4fa90535cc278
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIM' 'sip-files00088.tif'
cfc43aae2c0f399c81743b7fe52a3372
400275d60e8a356d58843a7b0314c541ec013372
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIN' 'sip-files00088.txt'
7c67b4745e021e6b335a8fdf4a655309
5275534988d819a68e8cea1065b2d7af336a3f00
'2011-12-30T04:52:30-05:00'
describe
'10276' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIO' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
2bdbb4d5120b37ce437ff9cede866f23
21c3b3b95807147edef98ec65d6f1dcb73dea43b
'2011-12-30T04:52:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIP' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
d3573f160fce664063d0e87513f98838
8ffaa65fcea29046600da01ab033a77ece435fa8
describe
'124808' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIQ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
c1a71d74d3f602a11c4cd0f11aeea178
294041edf2fab3b98a81790bb761e2626013ae3d
describe
'28819' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIR' 'sip-files00089.pro'
184d77700d2addc8fb46e5f6b7d906ba
61dd4c7a5ab7a647aa55ded8522d87ba148772a0
describe
'40120' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIS' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
a216cb98bb95394b2b3f02b55778e200
cbc635cae4d590e1e54a242f3904543665ea4a7b
'2011-12-30T04:52:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIT' 'sip-files00089.tif'
a576fdd4c4168395351a05126f5ec6a8
a3efd613fadbf804db7a5d6b48024471e8787415
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIU' 'sip-files00089.txt'
beb8830cd1e4ff0ba09443a496b65b71
17665557a1774f39a92dd96b26327aca5342c924
'2011-12-30T04:52:37-05:00'
describe
'9717' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIV' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
201c7c3524c0ea0fdd78bc861c4f8b2d
8a739cafec1b6127b7a9461552cfecb9f0d58060
describe
'335522' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIW' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
f741470a29c6e5b355a9dc802fbaf05d
7e48cc0fd87bb61a49bb51a5472863ec4077878a
describe
'128137' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIX' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
6a381fffc13e2e028b2f727b01b4863f
c79c7b4534ac6ace404dfdaa3be0ced0a34caa43
describe
'30804' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIY' 'sip-files00090.pro'
6feca0dbc608a3cd9f15c52e04f5c6ec
c1ef6c758ab0483566437caea12d25229e7438d4
'2011-12-30T04:50:44-05:00'
describe
'40718' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATIZ' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
d806b4c5872a7582386c304a405b3eb2
514edbe05328defe1b98b88a115a7ae34a896f56
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJA' 'sip-files00090.tif'
2d2cfe46db9a37b2c9fecf61b3b9db34
727a840d0ac983c7f35631a4bd7cdf191656822f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJB' 'sip-files00090.txt'
2876f635ccc769288650b0e7b9459434
7746420fcd509904d9eb040048a9730678499a34
describe
'10003' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJC' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
c4152a59fbf825e8bf5d466f4ea16cc2
52f415254418f991d6535b32d7eefc22549834a6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJD' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
921788431dafa784ad90dbdee5efab5e
f5807ae14bd5ebcd0caf4d3def453fd2b1abd1b4
'2011-12-30T04:51:40-05:00'
describe
'129959' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJE' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
6823c165e518505cace5e17920b90964
680f4c7f4266857fa522556113e70fcf716e7d7e
'2011-12-30T04:53:34-05:00'
describe
'30395' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJF' 'sip-files00091.pro'
e3401567faed441b4e31b3c6beb946de
9ca7690a5fc771d93166eb8212df85d747652ac8
describe
'41371' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJG' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
cf83e3ec16b93f372a188356800c5b18
b3fe2ea0fce58d0542412e2ec82f876589d3e788
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJH' 'sip-files00091.tif'
622cec6551735c5f70c1eeb4423d339a
5f1cf08d2c5fe647c6d13235c4cb99d8ab92cdbc
'2011-12-30T04:55:10-05:00'
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJI' 'sip-files00091.txt'
4637c83e006db567c2ac092e48c5338f
b8868164cb03aeda41064812bf7cba5c40988366
describe
'10575' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJJ' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
8d6b7b9a7814b8cefe6f2fbd1c0f6207
dbd030f9a243d6567ebd57e91d9bf048b23e30d6
describe
'335249' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJK' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
9e98e50b6193fc7154b81c90a1728ba9
aeac77726da82f28c2663883f820711479e84f07
describe
'64648' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJL' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
5463a801d836d4603687151b011418c0
d47e5b648e582d1aa28ca8c6c2772d2acadd5ccf
describe
'3404' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJM' 'sip-files00092.pro'
81923f9e9db2bd27e60e224b079769dd
ac36015c8400a84d63b3fa15bf6436eb27f761b4
'2011-12-30T04:53:52-05:00'
describe
'16280' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJN' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
1b19be716f36ef2dda86f95b1c702bc6
fd6fac562634cd4f3dd3c5913df2d5897815ddb7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJO' 'sip-files00092.tif'
a24173f32446c8e592d6e103588f7cd7
c849bade7b865cf16be728cfb45e21ede8e8ba31
describe
'185' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJP' 'sip-files00092.txt'
3c04a5404e993ea9d77463ac4176536c
5eb0d51c49bc0767feded53546bc27d98971fee1
describe
'4439' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJQ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
d507f6af6e7b2f05a6d3552aa49a4bbe
040dac20f28ee330f6a26de0c3019e868cf588f8
'2011-12-30T04:50:12-05:00'
describe
'335246' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJR' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
c6029ff25fb736331977542fc9ff93d2
de5de6e53caaae278059f2af87abb4470f0fe9aa
describe
'29792' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJS' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
8066a82167a7cee8e798fa2c95a8f5d1
3830be9c2832126dd0610eeb3fe6caf01713d337
describe
'5977' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJT' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
eb1a1193e2f6d0e63e3e88cafad2cbd4
9e878e5e89d654bd09a6c3a329bd7bbae158b942
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJU' 'sip-files00093.tif'
91c065dd8fea90332c225f0b099fb412
3097dbe67a7da3506a9bdec687e5b25544201dbb
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJV' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
80dec617a3c8f2acf0f46dbcba11bafa
75f51542c648463f97c2f90398046e9a1f1699fb
describe
'334836' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJW' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
e1ef4266c759c8477659f80ab3b5abbe
83b67a24dda8d138397c8c5d0b85184046e24193
'2011-12-30T04:53:56-05:00'
describe
'33430' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJX' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
1984d56bc94c93d450e4ba308b9da928
ce54c9e4fb413e13886925c0c9fda34818d44b7f
describe
'777' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJY' 'sip-files00094.pro'
b93837a68caec12adc51c42e303a0775
d958dd97f0eec3f773c5bd2cd3d8ffd88b0396df
describe
'6641' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATJZ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
b467389c60737ec7db181851a69cb858
d1d37ab1d12e5299a4936af6cfffe8364346d4b8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKA' 'sip-files00094.tif'
b39809115c0dbb5b8e948b97fa5112c0
55e701bcd4b4236009b034bf711dd418c8cbcc6b
describe
'68' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKB' 'sip-files00094.txt'
beaf5ec66be9119d57782101420d4399
5de7f43d5a650c78b49e3367614a3ff36d006d5a
describe
'1819' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKC' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
ad6ecbfc711870eb5f0a090210935baf
a93263c7e1ce3a59e8231adab7323b18a29b07bc
describe
'335483' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKD' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
70871deac581f9454e1c9d160bc3a021
b59056c168ae81ff00e6bbe462b617bcca56ea50
describe
'32009' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKE' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
9054eacc37a8b68eb9ad5ccfa9a5f0a7
381d2e76d25a051e0b27b3368adfeebb98c392fe
'2011-12-30T04:55:09-05:00'
describe
'6426' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKF' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
47e38c5c5ce5bf9f0dd65054a83cc0ab
0269ee176196750541574c1760b5c736aa6d8d4a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKG' 'sip-files00095.tif'
994f65968020ea641429f7d4b151fbd6
7e64b8441044f0a0a9c9870dba302e55c25f7077
describe
'1589' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKH' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
4980376433e248707277ed6a145f3f6c
033ebe7085dc4c27ec1c157aab0e70d0aba0d738
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKI' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
57832bc6679b4a24bc6840772052d6ca
347d866b3ed1babdaec565218582d3a52748505b
describe
'114088' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKJ' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
eae606f498918037cc87c6902d21680b
4cd3a5722dc9330c7af69e151138f2b2707f6dae
describe
'24145' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKK' 'sip-files00096.pro'
4499ab96445e59dff2fecf43d0636a95
ebff0513af030dba1289888e3242ece9c04c614e
describe
'35637' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKL' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
936076fc00a71cae3c1e4ce3e5066135
7d85cbf811859b33282d349971bdcf53c5ee7191
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKM' 'sip-files00096.tif'
58ce41b3cbf28472399e175090f53450
071178d3a0c82b8fc6576176885b234cc80c5c2a
'2011-12-30T04:51:33-05:00'
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKN' 'sip-files00096.txt'
ed4a6f3db7587a7a56ac7e1da4878c5e
a460706f2231bedba0ecadd7c57e3659a2950b1d
describe
'8604' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKO' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
a6aedf252cdf781f12ef23dab95e239c
fcb414d0466b9c6815cdccda292c5829d31d56d8
'2011-12-30T04:54:13-05:00'
describe
'335256' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKP' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
15c7d910ec8d61ec375e0874eb41b85e
bdf314984cbb17eb5eb0278a9297b7dfe03dad85
describe
'132700' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKQ' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
9a9a16fbf0e49dd1fed587149a61948f
4eee26ba362a8f1a42f5ed1020b135e2a6cffbb1
describe
'31286' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKR' 'sip-files00097.pro'
039fd5dff14b34fb09bd3f1008768f3b
ca2653a00f9bafbf53ce078e4d8965fd323ca44c
describe
'43194' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKS' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
aebdb26714673439626d3f3824f092dd
b9deaf718355526657ec827a4712c6edc9ba501c
'2011-12-30T04:50:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKT' 'sip-files00097.tif'
479a0d817c17d720212d75a2efad4a97
9aad7bc83f76b3ec07544433ff14abf249599750
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKU' 'sip-files00097.txt'
2b18c86657ab64f038014df235ab3958
3956f00f7fa52c5ea9c2ded6859c6d38b6d64ce7
describe
'10626' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKV' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
819fbe815946ab0f996e1cc2e17f900d
317d94d3df78149020599d21ef043aae5095a467
'2011-12-30T04:53:59-05:00'
describe
'335257' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKW' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
a9f2f3d18a74edb46604aca2d0ee8be3
9b9816f4822d1a28461c9a5a61f7382992acbe39
describe
'134131' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKX' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
620edb93ca302e2c2223fd50f8beabbb
ed7aca656fee0e54fa5c4c5dc7304571ddb9a5b8
'2011-12-30T04:54:44-05:00'
describe
'32148' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKY' 'sip-files00098.pro'
89cb38504167edd43fc002181571f06a
24d6e4666640b36fcf8ae44db2fd08b89e52b7a7
describe
'41916' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATKZ' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
87770d3c8171ca3fab79abb896c74737
f1e1aa784e106bb75942f5a798d8357924c38918
'2011-12-30T04:51:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLA' 'sip-files00098.tif'
921071d331d4b896227e2945dfee6967
922dc6042650b5aed7831c08a365726306868983
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLB' 'sip-files00098.txt'
ddb9d5a364fd5fce34c8c4b983d82928
271923c3cdd5b8d8c94ec3a7eb778a83c0523ef6
describe
'9808' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLC' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
ece819599e5a767331431239467dccc9
4f5f1157e80d79a23f506703adacadc4d5ff8827
'2011-12-30T04:55:16-05:00'
describe
'335136' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLD' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
c6caf7673def12c4d0f324453158dbec
9f98a9379e204662e765497330c7816a250dbfd7
describe
'56030' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLE' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
9249c799fed028e8e8b447fa9148fce7
afe2a3fd58c73099048a675eb53e349e1d3d899f
describe
'6271' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLF' 'sip-files00099.pro'
34136ff3f9d8e8c789b66e293bc318b4
d5f8de3a7dd495eb76fc181c5e4b9139db365820
describe
'13553' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLG' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
372208d7f2a004bbd7e53fd655eda8e6
8598eb4d2f9196a6b48f7adc3c6c406146c87458
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLH' 'sip-files00099.tif'
26caf4e578f85a5c1f041011f9ac879d
58ac43c14253ae79c7f16faf7e7c8eb314bcf9bc
describe
'255' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLI' 'sip-files00099.txt'
0087d17a5806a240ad3e4a22a2f9872d
adb14214902ca6fa8bda621fa4fdeac3bab0770f
describe
'3610' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLJ' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
7d13d38848d4f3bbcef9750033fc4487
98a7b96dd3f5743d0844793db0a594eef75aee31
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLK' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
71402f2a8aa49d11868680ae70450888
5114ec857619c5818818b52a5dc55b71a1946955
describe
'106208' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLL' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
ef9008d281d290794deb5c076def2990
c692e4d251ba52ffc00e323419dd1e8df1cede65
describe
'12290' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLM' 'sip-files00100.pro'
33e4a34f9f721488e29fc297248fabd7
c04c8034042d4fb25ab884dcee39d5e6e348db5b
describe
'30235' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLN' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
2fa36a644c8222e5735bf7faeca31f76
093283aa65f53cf841afca6257e358bbf11b4eb3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLO' 'sip-files00100.tif'
d0a1e402089f34783284c70853f986a6
f7780d992ff448e1dd00b1ee1bbc574b52b658be
'2011-12-30T04:51:10-05:00'
describe
'609' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLP' 'sip-files00100.txt'
3dd1f710a0d2f49cd231b61ef0fd4ecd
b2a3b64ebc74bd05c17ed82ec86e4bd51526f241
describe
'8218' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLQ' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
dbe8dc96e9551803812e07a2e8d5a73e
85983efc12d80fced72caef563e332c4b61e4ee9
describe
'335095' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLR' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
a123c7dd0fa254a7c9017aef15912f0b
04dfad5c406bb3ec115bf3353a708ab1e3fa9415
describe
'133773' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLS' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
6bd8170f231cf5bb8f9af2d779433ac0
15f24445afccda4794311531741761fafb7703b7
describe
'31740' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLT' 'sip-files00101.pro'
98e6f46e75655c0f6a4a5927484807b5
cca5cdc96438a5d8930489895dbb8c79a65b8310
describe
'42235' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLU' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
c629d8a3ec74a717c0d2f5023aac5e62
f30e65772a3c0bda8eae435f6adbde79757cab76
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLV' 'sip-files00101.tif'
863be00ac0c3d0ffe56f79f569d7453e
09a00830079aa5c78df2ad57c4311228a1f222a8
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLW' 'sip-files00101.txt'
08650ef90f8a78f5e4755a171931a13f
c96a52a646f6a7eb44b49ce9dcdb34fea12091b1
describe
'10076' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLX' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
a9488cdca88e6a79e80d989166579ecd
f6f051ccc4b3bb19081d1f05200dac2d1923ca27
describe
'335475' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLY' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
45b3472b6cd525fa955644f70d849be4
a42fc1f566787f69a334e7a0b096095c8f9ddeab
describe
'129653' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATLZ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
da3e79df11bc375029f91eea918336b4
b8027970c32fb883e407002cac98b14d5741528b
describe
'30477' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMA' 'sip-files00102.pro'
b3d9bc6d4b7e73e48e55931703e1abad
6b8053ef3b6b6974ce4bad7b69247a0ce8de71b5
'2011-12-30T04:53:30-05:00'
describe
'41151' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMB' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
037e50bc45a188c85cde714e4285854a
efaf435e3efd4a12ac9744e97cdd44c31789ba75
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMC' 'sip-files00102.tif'
87a1e1f99408335c25eac4f8e06964db
22d4921842d55c015d680ae786c1eb25b9b24eff
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMD' 'sip-files00102.txt'
da669d07bbcfd11e756233b161995fdb
8bfbf7043a3c4313493dfc0bfed9af558eccf4d2
describe
'10046' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATME' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
f862b597ae5fae9f395c1cf06996416f
3f7c499526a08980ee8c2c3996fa55652da562f3
describe
'335144' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMF' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
9953ead05104c1594b092d054556b6b8
05b9f162af96ca0d9ba08853e943905cc0134ead
describe
'137723' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMG' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
3e4a0aae8258f365e237209525fa695f
bb4bf6857a23b600c2dece99805375b5e9271185
describe
'32804' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMH' 'sip-files00103.pro'
33e7d5590fb5b54f0da591e4dda3b4d5
4dd99c904ae93342df96f6e67aa9e8ebce75763a
'2011-12-30T04:54:26-05:00'
describe
'42586' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMI' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
acc5aee6902a9d9126eae3cdf8e83bfc
b3034afbcb3e38227bc75bd5f10873001814b6b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMJ' 'sip-files00103.tif'
3953cd457ed5bc0c69ae62eaaf931135
1790eb7a5b20b66ecf2a64fb63b9b2cfd556de87
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMK' 'sip-files00103.txt'
f1b53e5b3e214d9a2bd07a3a3a7e828f
56c10e4da95ed2c2224f256176ba7d2dd30f8179
describe
'10174' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATML' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
baaa0dce602739eb89f8c95397247584
a2670740b911334e6e9ddb6b70647d3bd7101400
describe
'335351' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMM' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
be61c1f104fac046295003af15fa9b32
3559dca1a663148c0c3ef7f20de18f1fb9e2bff4
describe
'139383' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMN' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
ec789bcc9f6c01e9eaac27954f66a419
f75ef763a56af714d0672f34a8d6ffa6a981b040
describe
'32321' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMO' 'sip-files00104.pro'
59798f18c189d063476d2001174acd34
72eeb68961a1f6a961089a4017aaefe95f3dfe22
describe
'42511' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMP' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
3195d7131eaac4b4f5335bd0c8e04a8f
11da9597ae3b84f5713fc0a03491b9e6f808cec4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMQ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
3348e1d313a540b7504c39d4d114f2c7
0aa98df16749904ca57b74ed543e51e0674b91e6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMR' 'sip-files00104.txt'
947d16486c395f8ee1e6fe490c5e15b1
efed32ddc0332ee15ab42fd2427f290f6b511983
'2011-12-30T04:50:19-05:00'
describe
'9970' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMS' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
db8aeef47bedb9af63dd222d83c9db33
03ae5e920918f9a0ddc29dd9087ccec5f7cbdcb7
describe
'335259' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMT' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
6ebf21d2b548890363e287af744eda1a
152b16d3ad933dac7b4e5a4f361e338db023567d
describe
'127346' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMU' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
8ab3e7fa2930184ad7bf9d6a906623d8
9243c3ad33ccd5b268e3bd39cd14f4d1f94b2701
describe
'28450' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMV' 'sip-files00105.pro'
08ca2309bde95311f2662efb84f272f9
fa1961ea76dcc844ec849d7d0fef3c508420b749
describe
'40195' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMW' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
931d22a830014f62f197c39597e6423b
99a9fdd71cfb04f0306755a6d0801e6fc0bcd29d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMX' 'sip-files00105.tif'
0f52636ee724236e09b1f6a348659206
676326fb5b14792ab7d32e7acdb22443b03dc122
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMY' 'sip-files00105.txt'
832bd26a511fe40b3a5dd29c22720c34
359a22b0a60519b86534b0846a67b427b7375649
describe
'10212' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATMZ' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
4d9f586b1eb1d54d73b973ef6fe83812
7d35eb5a95a8a6f819a092cdd8dfaeaac63bb4ea
describe
'335526' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNA' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
b760d2ce16db30f8268124d98071e1aa
2c8a7447faf3bb7737c08d252d121b18bb025dd2
describe
'129020' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNB' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
37aee4b89b62c5a1a018195d2bce8817
c44b051e8d387d0c876a1427adff509629a5879e
describe
'29320' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNC' 'sip-files00106.pro'
c53bd7f054414600d57c86de526c1a23
130486baa8b3247ce05053d045cfa35b287dacc3
describe
'39922' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATND' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
4873461bb16dfde511cf2398ca0c4bb0
1be785d99cb39961af96c09d9fd222cf7273967e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNE' 'sip-files00106.tif'
dced9472bdcf5dcea7137dec8f61ed74
82920b72612f18b5c6c0a5217fc99891386aa09f
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNF' 'sip-files00106.txt'
369c26cb7d199138e4de9ecb9afe0c3c
b36f4e6cf96fb1c61bd455da99d037e2f08fc5af
describe
'10027' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNG' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
3a24dfac0ea73f178a5718647f4fb07c
228a7909bb7b1b97979194b577f04e04433ca217
describe
'334946' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNH' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
3893dfcf15207af031a53ea9342adda8
835d7e9e19738242ee2198e4400a11dcb3482954
describe
'131307' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNI' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
f95576ddbd69395316ed5ec5d1b1b453
d5bebc40c53174e254c9c81ec03c0ed26db15c96
describe
'29424' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNJ' 'sip-files00107.pro'
a7e16d84eb95400568ed99afb4d86df3
44e063412913fbfa329b41b79cd577218fc8917d
describe
'39167' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNK' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
63e275f1593d9ff1ffa29cbcb5d17fa4
27d70f7fa73e402e3b24bad5717e2e6dd7e55d7a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNL' 'sip-files00107.tif'
055442fb490979c8a603588808ab2185
7de482e09844ffdf5bec8c7318d29b05fcf30bd0
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNM' 'sip-files00107.txt'
4aed5956ee963aac7068d0c97c79474a
edc6414b7427a24fff39e8710c00ad683916f096
'2011-12-30T04:50:49-05:00'
describe
'9481' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNN' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
72c77896b0e63a9ade36887ff02ff409
69ca22bedd4ca6b06ea2f7db09c99cc1e6118c46
describe
'335363' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNO' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
58f4b13c8485433ac130c236554f407d
ce66c12c8020cd4d4ba46b9625c1c758dda5d3f6
describe
'126755' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNP' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
09a9fc4fc9cbdfa4cf4ea2751758c48c
6e567e5b8fd0c3d3fd83476720edc9759730b6e5
describe
'28222' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNQ' 'sip-files00108.pro'
43e7fb71cfe5ad1054b234febf36a2c7
481b4ebcd35ea708c6c561a2efc468ee12ceffa4
'2011-12-30T04:54:05-05:00'
describe
'38056' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNR' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
12b88e7c8ca1c19332fabaa3f9296e56
ad54a17b9493f07ecd39b7294bdb6d83084ece08
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNS' 'sip-files00108.tif'
407f1830d510f0cc7d29b486c6144de0
9c4075eec0a3db4e14b96a0fe7ee36917da49057
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNT' 'sip-files00108.txt'
904ea974feb2e81d3692e6e4366d0e9c
4a44ef40758554116f153ce90ae17738cddea011
describe
'9089' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNU' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
98ecf2e2d7f2752acdc45afc7bdc32f3
490cb33e34fcb65636fea3d1109fb6d8202d3b08
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNV' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
2bc25149a03039ee8c0777a570fda521
591501be505571425b8b6a27175995bdb29bf9d4
describe
'128744' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNW' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
4c1948b0cbde90912e1b07ced3246b0a
adf31c5560c663838053463f42dcd52afde1bea3
describe
'28296' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNX' 'sip-files00109.pro'
cf735aa55d32bed6be77d2d987efcb20
2fd8878cd7470352c7faaed95b0bcead4635442f
'2011-12-30T04:51:13-05:00'
describe
'38527' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNY' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
12ca4dcfff974b3a08eae6affd4bb22c
1664d27904d96a9747b98fe7e23fb4f2666549ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATNZ' 'sip-files00109.tif'
1c85b8e0cf934f608b17f3e0f34c0c46
9a66574fc352d37e560e8f11b0518d9233631243
'2011-12-30T04:53:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOA' 'sip-files00109.txt'
8914582821dad018deffe3007b9a26f1
f79eb14e2b765551af390af37645a7b6bf82504b
describe
'8973' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOB' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
1c6f56f888af8139f919d14cf9770dbc
6a7b43dbb959bc1efc622bc58ae47fd6560b1caf
describe
'335505' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOC' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
781f56aadd0049ef21a3e3333ccebeab
a287ae3e8f39b7efce7ae1bb1022dcbd0e6098ef
describe
'158816' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOD' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
6307b2c66feb5da4a3997afe7ddd2c12
f6ef34a71e9340a08ee33d425c8995e22d2ba5bc
describe
'817' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOE' 'sip-files00110.pro'
d30f6319ba9b9ce06afcc44b458190bb
d1f4c6d6f7b094ef615de84f7195a63798f87276
describe
'35864' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOF' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
5ad328dbd78640cd366d6d75a6f5b32a
09650bf51a838974abe731217a70f34e84a7541f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOG' 'sip-files00110.tif'
cbde96869bc7ec113d5410c849469708
7923d19fc16d1b6e8d91cb536bf4b0c691687ae1
describe
'159' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOH' 'sip-files00110.txt'
29717f8adc782011234743ab6fe1bbdf
a131145f4f6c414ce91e5939dc60604d4be0f312
describe
'8209' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOI' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
db72bf3484460c12549726dd61dd2ef9
fea8682e6a28243eab2f60398c7c30b4306b4ae5
describe
'335456' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOJ' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
560b8836bdd47c1cfe6dd96f350804ea
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describe
'111622' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOK' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
81233b407eae15c8900d80c3ebaa7283
f7bbc995975a11e401d594a55f3ab13de00e13ac
describe
'26693' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOL' 'sip-files00112.pro'
94259ec4fe07356dc7928f73ada32167
cfaa96d916a09a485d07a8a6a96057840184d611
describe
'33301' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOM' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
01bf23ca71da43f8ee1efdb4cbd6f87e
f6558d63b55b652fc45a24a8c4f7f9bddb180508
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATON' 'sip-files00112.tif'
2cc53557fe150404b72b50684cb275a2
fd99890c41680cbf9d20865e48e5ec1beff56a1b
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOO' 'sip-files00112.txt'
10397a5e490b2d6c2383f5ef7ad234d1
ca96d2d5b5b6f81e4b53031af4d97546641751ec
describe
'8301' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOP' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
1411e76245674ae9e1c7b894a0fe4467
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describe
'335280' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOQ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
5eface597e74a8c934d95761e1009540
8ada7b637ad3ac792bd6279e8ccd9ccfb2e62dba
describe
'102839' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOR' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
742e226d84f18b18c3327583cb479e5f
43678dc684e414f2a801c1f7ada27b60df31346a
describe
'14164' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOS' 'sip-files00113.pro'
0ebcf2b3bf86150321b4869aa04f5805
869f0ffce0f15cc6fa671ffc6409b239fc89fa56
describe
'28198' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOT' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
26e2ae15cc92b116684beee975c49993
7a259cbe8763698520fa1464c946dd189fb24b86
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOU' 'sip-files00113.tif'
8e4521c7920676593e8bfbfe219c5bbe
680d2632da0a69fd0302cf165a0bf9955cd9ef65
describe
'619' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOV' 'sip-files00113.txt'
4f6b593771c4be0118446c1649373b62
4152f3ddc4b46defe442b62fd5a3e25712b05c9e
describe
'7394' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOW' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
b675c1b96cefe64e6c2ee185f4d5cf39
ad1d2397342229ad68e1d478b036be1208e83f31
'2011-12-30T04:50:50-05:00'
describe
'335359' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOX' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
8635a0ea77cdfa9a933ea483859c758b
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describe
'116087' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOY' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
db3748e03965ce99c8dadf125725fb92
41ad941c0e9a3b66800ec83a7bebf57755db4e32
describe
'16404' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATOZ' 'sip-files00114.pro'
1f5133b5b24fe2fb93183378dec36cd2
d56a108da05bde403aa39e439e244706c2f1dc76
describe
'32890' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPA' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
6e88c11d5297c2f136a1e52f6bd0783d
39a30335bdbf03113c9c9bfb19517ef6a85af53a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPB' 'sip-files00114.tif'
2a00251b6c0560db4d3ed9f1adb37cea
1b18d85d107a43092120ae27b63e28bbf2cf4465
describe
'741' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPC' 'sip-files00114.txt'
2667f4792fb475ff9114be516ed0ac06
f8a642c7c6e512f2a596c894d415607a54626df5
describe
'8097' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPD' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
bdc7a023e1299cda8df16f174971c71a
57f44081836aa8184f7667f66aeb0385d91676ce
describe
'335523' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPE' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
f6df1a5b358c986b22066237bef5dc62
acf613356e2f70a1bb1fd83258f3d75744dcfe53
describe
'129602' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPF' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
86f62e95922898190f7653b873cc2c17
b85176bdafd1e5c58efdfa63c1d2e2337b0fc83c
describe
'31402' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPG' 'sip-files00115.pro'
6b517d581595f94e2eb44e5df8ba1323
1db4222ab5a46d5d140574dd4be2103fee6be359
describe
'42184' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPH' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
582186a49538559e0efe8f50a8f8b1dc
f965deb3d8f9758b44c9894925f0251a567efb2a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPI' 'sip-files00115.tif'
e7c457ba098cb1aac1be7ebf64e146d7
2541481ba235ec3ac68f44fb5202107bf97ce258
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPJ' 'sip-files00115.txt'
6eba6e0323ec832b4a2fe6bc91a98f04
0e7de837f61cc53fd3cc57fbbc0700f5c29fb625
'2011-12-30T04:51:22-05:00'
describe
'10313' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPK' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
b06006728dceee69e724cab01f9eab91
e3c486ab924cb06cbcc5584904d5899dd37a0d45
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPL' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
7eabd4d7b923edc0759491de53d647ff
1b4b9b4d4703028cc4dff9f0397a840ef80d05d3
describe
'134383' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPM' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
e2841b8832f1a9174708a3c4012305a8
9b4ae9986c70874e5c4de82d65d7b76526a11f93
describe
'31889' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPN' 'sip-files00116.pro'
30df4e1404ae19d540ad9e01ab96d26d
404e538e328f3ab8ce569212fb99c1a7cc2c2f08
describe
'42353' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPO' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
9a1930f8d74c8acbad92149ba18b3f22
bfa130624e0a4abbeabe492ce5b580c7193e314f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPP' 'sip-files00116.tif'
22b4d5dcb7ec9054c9c81bd914788a32
d29b53b30a6219928364e1b6e242f42f6762d2e2
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPQ' 'sip-files00116.txt'
68e9168f6388c07c564e5f48b6943658
a917121cc5e489da79abd26ef62b9f70afeac3f6
describe
'10191' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPR' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
f0d87e7063b525938eb1f8eaaa527630
a5e3f94cddf75f8ac47f27285fdf445ba347d933
describe
'335045' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPS' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
38129b86fb3f62e89841e9445b49c83e
2a953c60e7ac392c77e3aa6b0bbd25a5bb0607f8
describe
'136360' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPT' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
e98c9c6c30690e37faba06690aedfbfe
215ca7fa962dd81e1b16047aed2e75e38c07cd3e
describe
'31425' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPU' 'sip-files00117.pro'
c741dcc19bc7939345c1551b3bc6f411
8c02bc455831b969433a7b23457b2e5de25d31cb
describe
'42452' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPV' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
38b51fe975918f84d0dc3907f809460e
18ba579b4d59dbfc018141a119a36639fd6ba064
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPW' 'sip-files00117.tif'
ff4b1dc6bb11ed96b5b8afc1f4b3780c
12ddcd053e6a6d60a5039f0e3002f13278a5eaaf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPX' 'sip-files00117.txt'
4c82406c7dc8cafb8ec67def2145ffe6
7e96f7e609935de5439798a2885c093dc022ae55
describe
'10499' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPY' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
4d3e09ac2f549dedb51ca3e8f8050a65
d79318abb0d0e55541e22dd414f6cca67f1d0297
'2011-12-30T04:55:36-05:00'
describe
'335227' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATPZ' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
3feed89e342244887a60c8e8e4392b83
2eea36b6774468b0fd4022cd14f6f475a6d79054
describe
'130450' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQA' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
3c35effac228577131e5562a6a024ba7
1ec64a7cf6d2ab8663f64ba86ff2f36e966a2f0b
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQB' 'sip-files00118.pro'
0f529185b8765acd127e4689f343bbe7
2b317c169a4d83ef3f9e596828825532e8f5c377
describe
'29387' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQC' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
23941759aa22e8d14c1c19298c485e2c
fce42d149a40722469a0c240285c0a7f710c6d81
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQD' 'sip-files00118.tif'
c946ae95fe622119169a098e4deb9ff4
ad5b88c09093d1cf17ff4917a07c09c7dd6c3aea
describe
'127' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQE' 'sip-files00118.txt'
eba9b9fe747e00309edf21a70cd5117c
56110505c0ff266f018fd07b9b3b9d901825cca5
describe
Invalid character
'7163' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQF' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
7642aa25cc1bfec4e8ca9b5bd12ed92f
8ae93dfdf77b5ee17f0d98fab616929486cc4082
'2011-12-30T04:52:02-05:00'
describe
'335484' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQG' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
03ec8a580efb4ac3d582d7c421059dc9
68adddaab2687b32fa95dbda04805533c5d36995
'2011-12-30T04:55:29-05:00'
describe
'125005' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQH' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
09bc7657e06e87dec9fd4e630a8f6456
d706076e3614c21bdc0989533fca95bbce444fef
describe
'28904' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQI' 'sip-files00120.pro'
a142278e9679b6a30102cbe167539c8f
7bfb3f5d93df0d9c1c6b0442ad157d787c47701f
'2011-12-30T04:53:38-05:00'
describe
'39926' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQJ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
ae5cfa97a40a455e3e6007a1fb2bcfb3
67c780463d58b2073b19a266e983fd534b02e6b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQK' 'sip-files00120.tif'
cb625cc1745aa5fb05ce564c59853e92
31b98cf15b32da1a1a69c67457986841f1e77ef0
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQL' 'sip-files00120.txt'
10a17ca79c637a9a8834a2e45732e63d
47adb7e37fe9bc5310d9b8cc72f4d3db55b7728a
describe
'9842' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQM' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
f51178424407b642f787263ebb1c9c2f
e0ac0d7f151e8f35f2698c9024f341567af2e7a5
describe
'335124' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQN' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
6cbe9b4b0d2b27eb9e99f21549f30955
b59c2525d9bdbf2bf9940268e80029d805d022df
describe
'135080' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQO' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
694fbcf78194d61881f55f626e1e9cbb
d52d63a6956e14146f3daf15243b54b45d2c4b0e
describe
'31792' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQP' 'sip-files00121.pro'
f68c088b1a0834e6e189bd550e839dde
4cc09966ecce8604e73a6ae48f8e0503b6e29dcc
describe
'42905' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQQ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
6a70bdb355bd9114caf6e0c51d3afc03
6efb523f5cf3532c029ccdd209bea8131a2954a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQR' 'sip-files00121.tif'
469c706bee31c1667b7c4d07f7a44154
2c75074bb232724055cd2399e6527547789a4182
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQS' 'sip-files00121.txt'
e98a496f7c5fa5be8f4fba428174027a
d7b7830330ce4d01ee9d14a23c316fa7530e42b9
describe
'10652' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQT' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
46885ec68b2dd59d602bc0f2d3209c29
75601b6a784c9962fbbc296f57f6945ab8e6718f
describe
'335402' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQU' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
18ce65a5bb2f1e1942ba86dca74962d5
c4855379513d6333b1c26a33ff720a041da299f8
describe
'135614' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQV' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
661151c2d6a4cea953d5ed153156a8bd
7a58e7c5c577dce5e3b9b9392e9b643ac9121791
describe
'31352' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQW' 'sip-files00122.pro'
b25b6945b3ddc5c1ae6c9b8d070a8796
f76705b6b5d5bf58f019067d51ae504f355a20f7
describe
'41693' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQX' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
ff80e7cec84cdf9de251b68c6f8a4dba
46b8c09c3a4f7691850f9c1948c401bbddb4ddff
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQY' 'sip-files00122.tif'
8cdd2b3a8b16bbf6f5491e9efab2b977
567814a99759d487dd89e0de4560a69ba6edc2cb
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATQZ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
4e6e04447d3d6483958e208a14513547
85f95996942b0518a61b645750ea762ebb316f4f
describe
'10017' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRA' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
52989ef1b27841a4ce1e2f1cf6ada43a
917d762f0df4360dfb927f269e5abd0ffe2578e9
describe
'335465' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRB' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
e0b89b5115c2ac7984d211c8d29b7368
3b11e4bdbdee13f65bc34d7b8a0b1675ef4385ca
describe
'133800' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRC' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
ed9793badbd6a7536a0fb544d2df3aae
d4bbb2dfd2293dc0779a9057c3463b0305efbaea
describe
'31697' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRD' 'sip-files00123.pro'
e542576b9d385fdeb2972b9bfaef51ef
46edcebe0987b165101f23c3263ef49556b49a1b
describe
'43189' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRE' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
89ee59d8f051f26011b4fa27a23ef130
6874c6ef6906df41b96c1189e1a8f83caeab8c2e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRF' 'sip-files00123.tif'
c4b6ecf55935bf52ffd2ad39a2812575
f7bdc2034bfa828c5699426f542e48d93b8592f2
describe
'1272' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRG' 'sip-files00123.txt'
3a874a01ac6921648159be8a0230c697
4ea67977f8d32d99d72c1f52c4d7e9688e679ba1
describe
'10598' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRH' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
fd79adefcd10a2b805a81543e7f94efe
f6e3e6d6718bc00e0464adb16169b2eb2e381045
describe
'335532' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRI' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
0bbc6af539d2833ef79bf726e7b4c835
deff6af5fbc3c14f38c95c610f3c5674afbb9c98
'2011-12-30T04:53:15-05:00'
describe
'97113' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRJ' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
e53333972226b1d71d90d61eac9df271
cfcd76c41d82db373bede4b863cf4a3920b79b6f
describe
'15563' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRK' 'sip-files00124.pro'
b445963f093f50b4b3dd0dc3f947be2c
eefecc2790d66410282eaff589021df3ca1ef1da
'2011-12-30T04:52:48-05:00'
describe
'28869' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRL' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
87b2d5c0a89670e5e5335b245f8e39a2
998f9eac3d00795231022a55feb0b105a1ac9e7e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRM' 'sip-files00124.tif'
bf3a1770c00d8ca716fe356d30bb5d15
24319d92dca0dc51da0c8576996c3f539fa004b0
describe
'699' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRN' 'sip-files00124.txt'
abab3177b2aea768b9c46e893a958595
c454c17100ba17ade84709dafbb03247b0654107
describe
'7294' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRO' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
35b5fb8d055334d1b744a4220a00bc26
4027830c3f910058fe12a1f92d484a556f62d3f8
describe
'335127' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRP' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
0f0ec09a65a402a515cc84bee72d1b75
f042fd7b958b2ed0cd513e930831a42c06b1f1f4
describe
'104683' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRQ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
110a79fd99434d10a2980ca97e47ee38
4bb300f88de18a188dc9276b798c862017ec533e
describe
'13342' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRR' 'sip-files00125.pro'
a07bed50eef06526a0eb3b777b89be10
2ebc190f37c15c0c54ea884a4fd8e375551d2977
describe
'29849' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRS' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
c13b6a5d9cf8ce66572ddb83fc45d181
de4108f5301f0e900e425c085c81b122e6a73a21
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRT' 'sip-files00125.tif'
34e0325db10caa371a42262a187006d7
43fdb7e940301fa0b9492e5cd62d341d8affdb13
describe
'629' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRU' 'sip-files00125.txt'
f27f2ec0fa9e924764c6ab5222092593
a5d71299d67f7506247311131d95647f1ec9acc4
describe
'8125' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRV' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
2cabce0b3a797a209328bb4296120936
50b13b01887b77ab9cc5539f18897ef7fe687fff
describe
'335418' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRW' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
f1bcdabd2601d9f6f4ce7654c2ca516c
7866633a990d03acc36d30313dc7addaa831e0ce
describe
'136045' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRX' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
60210e1d2bfaae82e3686a43458ac16c
82d755ad4da9f9a7dc391218603c247beecbabb3
describe
'31663' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRY' 'sip-files00126.pro'
c5d99999bad07405f93800a6db453ef4
a4653998ca7d2fc87f0a32155e49a9ebbe32efbd
describe
'41865' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATRZ' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
c878b6aaa792c72e977ce225e40d165c
76ab44beacca8a6411a40a74eac4931a68156039
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSA' 'sip-files00126.tif'
eedcee002a0c648cd1abb50b3c09a77e
c096518d82f550054091124652fdc47757d0b05b
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSB' 'sip-files00126.txt'
6e0ee275dcc7e2796a6ac62077c80efa
31b58905eb2c0706f6e53fa658e4fe92209d06e1
describe
'10058' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSC' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
68f94a915b1d09719fd2ef776512e345
0e3ee9e15a8a294ab9cbc3d1175a17704df0a4bc
describe
'335334' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSD' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
94de9dc601caad9ad627e25ce8269b48
ce76dcf86e4fd4d92a074e7f973faf1fc16ec07e
describe
'134738' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSE' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
af8ab70ec5874b9f0e2cb9ce93f53d65
fbdf8daf4f317d502bcc2f98fb1ec7197f32b994
describe
'31373' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSF' 'sip-files00127.pro'
3962819821a63df45061b650a2378c12
58b268a3f92139b9aa6947cbbc4233000b2832e1
describe
'42266' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSG' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
d24dd43b7cdcad62892563f35602c0ce
2b9b8ea0d25c0c6da3eae787c83b152e4d7ace87
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSH' 'sip-files00127.tif'
14337e2d39f9241e4a87a8e4a68a63d8
1abd74cdf95ae4c2df69466c6d8afd139b2d6bd3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSI' 'sip-files00127.txt'
bc9acf2f3a423709dfb6986ce915d9a6
e1425fd28cc5af87e69d28ad681f94bf1a42cf7e
describe
'10378' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSJ' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
e0486929c6a3b312fcfc0b7f5318652d
df19ced4458649f5d2f73c20a0a6d61c9b33797c
describe
'335262' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSK' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
3e0645a6412090c2b835f46521040cfe
4ccd5adc2875a5a7bd111156e19717d53133de84
describe
'124703' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSL' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
868d72283721642e291ddc77122e798b
77331a74d53935c5b11794d67495832aa7c01126
describe
'28465' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSM' 'sip-files00128.pro'
5e97d3c3cc2f93bf8bc8e41d7622ac60
02abde636f93553631464e4a04b5e7e848be5e4b
describe
'38653' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSN' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
e6b45c1424ab560a81d987334173fb47
e151dcdc5b7ca099916bcce1b92514760740c88e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSO' 'sip-files00128.tif'
aecb17ad602a2ec406b97aa1b6a27a97
45eb2333632d5cde0b40c84a9ea5e663699545fa
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSP' 'sip-files00128.txt'
3eac76826120233d5a04d745e4ccb615
710feaa21dd7a37f83043bbb29a7be15b361be96
describe
'9803' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSQ' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
350c7c48f7f66c708b2cdea714399c39
da487726e74cb8682a1e20b410fbe3f12a8ef6e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSR' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
d4e2da5fa4b0f5e7a8f70493130336e6
edf61f86a295286ce9c5bd270f08f38c62d1126d
describe
'127648' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSS' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
241196930b79f19ee4d4e9ab8be93a05
613e255e4b977dfd255574a1453c6681f68ddb7c
describe
'32533' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATST' 'sip-files00129.pro'
479fce4345f5f145705e4b9e0cdd01bb
ffd8bed6461b5cad960b149bc35b677af58e72c6
describe
'41944' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSU' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
89f678a3b543ce59816c083cd5359a7f
e96593e64b721a4c61c275f55523bfc1958c1864
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSV' 'sip-files00129.tif'
b31ab7bc6f9bc8a0ac4c9c5b31ed23d8
60efa418a9150497ca79e5ac0e93cbda6e748a6d
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSW' 'sip-files00129.txt'
98393336688f8680a00ab3beb4d5c2c4
e3930d8fad3b21a2729d22c1d7d7ad259ece211b
'2011-12-30T04:52:00-05:00'
describe
'10653' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSX' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
d7f34a881ffba1560f49b2cb344b0f4d
3554624e72350946d9a6172de19c9d28079eee1e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSY' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
18291c3689c6f8e2d91ca85751fadab2
b1f3e6b7c217135ccaafaa883d1665cf328101ed
describe
'122384' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATSZ' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
e7d9c54f5ebccada94b18ffd668bec7a
70755c1bb792b3812528c630e4cc4cdef0a51dc8
describe
'29690' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTA' 'sip-files00130.pro'
a9d3f939c6fb6d26ba21ba9262f67ab0
95182c9bcda78570a1c47eaed04b317ac9dcc46e
describe
'38604' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTB' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
59559ed7add313f830943f739366cafa
7bacb2d1105e599ff0a3e16fa9d9235b9abad902
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTC' 'sip-files00130.tif'
be0ba34a5e7d58294b2f54a013a15570
7496c47c0d8e43f7e24c2b88aefe10b732433a95
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTD' 'sip-files00130.txt'
f795b3017d0a45860c8bdf3b3a17e4c5
45874a963161a2074f0dd97a1d8f679aa68eb768
describe
'9685' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTE' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
204d3dfce5a54ef1f1e4d25c30b040a2
773e60e879ff81d7e756906fad5838370aab1687
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTF' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
d9ec1f598bb9f4d55788aa8cfb2a5a05
f264e53a54dc85ddc04dd384aec3cd7c5b3a5fb3
describe
'73018' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTG' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
27f001c3b4667501a19b8b14a867a9aa
036c6b72b9afcbd0c03aef02e35cf58cba937d57
describe
'13882' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTH' 'sip-files00131.pro'
99c4bc24aaabd9bbd74772287599fcf3
99238efc1a4c1456365b98700a62a5c36a1e3ae6
describe
'22491' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTI' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
98e847d53093a68349597d021d74ac1d
65401bbf5b9c49dfc471f24ad9cad204276bc840
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTJ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
6e85ad103637dff21ef4b6631e5767f3
baa482d939e4424f54dba96589de84c9f5b87fe8
'2011-12-30T04:55:38-05:00'
describe
'556' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTK' 'sip-files00131.txt'
606db51de0445e59e019a24825a93f9c
b4bc0e44021a38619d86b138204e5a4ae1e81ff3
describe
'5859' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTL' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
0d488d177c760624bdaedd5d22701777
e348f1e27b08662ced36bebcb4a8b37b2ef69d2c
describe
'335425' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTM' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
29351437e7162348544d81c67f19f3fe
723d20443beda3155d0c7341bb91c4cd6283e1e1
describe
'94692' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTN' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
f3343a9f82b652502e6dacf5ffcbabe7
472dc8fefd6e939ce8bb3c9083c98a38de0b07af
describe
'14363' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTO' 'sip-files00132.pro'
1524f543cd6387160c6e8b8133a9f165
ce47797c106d0674d533d0a4f50f2c477200b626
describe
'28684' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTP' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
a274ab4b6905bef8ff91b6ba6ad179fc
f5a1ea27a7120c617bed0fb7e14cd2f2f7e296fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTQ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
ad62f1d63583beba89a2f742652db9af
d36ade58f101de1571a2888ba916ce8b1675e1dc
describe
'672' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTR' 'sip-files00132.txt'
9a9887baf20a653bb0bedc2994895441
1298feccc9bb0d155a6563aef1b2bd0c904b0d88
describe
'7608' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTS' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
820167f8288e45ba0c6bdd1a2b9263cf
e8dff8ab752122e7538738804299fd40530d2735
describe
'335533' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTT' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
495745c08a3627eb16eca3710d25528e
8031364597d0913ea47c83abce9c7d72e8c655a9
describe
'128397' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTU' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
ff7aa4e43f485bb5cb20870567a0d525
00ed14861b0a2c7e0ca7bcbb677795cb8d08bef1
describe
'32345' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTV' 'sip-files00133.pro'
bfe1ba0376225c1279d263388ca83833
8747aac3f0d5f6b0036fb82bfa74daea4d4f3829
describe
'40564' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTW' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
56b07300aa849bc633e2dc11a26660ca
d00067a3548a0a5e2c6021faa0ff1f7d1817ef7b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTX' 'sip-files00133.tif'
f2a05eab2bf4e78a4a17c508884a4db7
93945f2da575d98a7d5681b711e8d48a2de3d82a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTY' 'sip-files00133.txt'
855aade95ceaa859fffc49f8bcbeec39
dfe0502fc2510d8f2902db75f92dc52d21c8dd7f
describe
'10092' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATTZ' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
0a910a89555137059727bf6a06b028e9
9e6cd661f9e9c196a840a783ae410c8b9d16f00d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUA' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
f2c461772fea7956cf346a9ed602aba5
aa45f9e8ce051b76827cc6441d763fb806242868
describe
'120032' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUB' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
45e68ec2f49b9448bb29020152b752a6
7a172033b76d12bff99cf67ae23f7ae7ffae8546
describe
'30928' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUC' 'sip-files00134.pro'
fdbdee0d324e519a204573b1f21ebaf4
7c753b7fe36654caf0fc96fab9d68ec2e8704779
describe
'39385' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUD' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
1872590b399e63a63b9f5656b717cc70
714987a1f20a596e2a2c3120653095f9be560189
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUE' 'sip-files00134.tif'
05af35431dac49c63dff83114bb8d93e
6fbf70ee4b06fa6a9aec1061f96b2c4a8fb3c425
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUF' 'sip-files00134.txt'
09d5577344d2bc04a47dd11dc30f02e3
87b5e9e544b717743a557c395dc2c97762432e85
describe
'9789' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUG' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
a45243c58815a699b2f4ce7dd01d7e61
5bfdaa3b25f9a3c5fc1d4b4bffbe0651ece6ad85
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUH' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
61bf0057a04f8159f7321cd550ab7f24
1a22e8da17f491f13106f7922ea10c9466177d90
describe
'119933' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUI' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
86436d75592c384e4932ea78efc12b5b
85cda56a1429d53ad9a9465b6de93dfe8d9a2b09
describe
'31045' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUJ' 'sip-files00135.pro'
449c82d5559a4cccee77038177b9ab14
b24c2bda855f3fd0ac976281bda88c6217fa0533
describe
'39993' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUK' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
38f7c3e741008cf977f8cdf723208e18
982b7bf780ed5befe56452f5849b7f25f70d1931
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUL' 'sip-files00135.tif'
00a46202e4834a4723cfd9b689f3d956
340efee781d568515c0f8532f1004b396609941f
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUM' 'sip-files00135.txt'
e20cd624dd0decc0fb634c36974de114
25f09b171f22b5a97a29b4206e4f0ee284bd4a6d
describe
'9750' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUN' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
5764ec284efbdca86a57c93c2e1b9d45
522126bca624a2c12a785ed08939a06b00cc0da2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUO' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
7de608a75ce063fa8ea5b455a33c15f2
656374ff7c663ee3a34af7a0bb30dbfe019a5a02
'2011-12-30T04:53:17-05:00'
describe
'67137' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUP' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
b7adf5499662bf5699aa8d60b1b360cb
6309af694beae3433fcb94d3e5eef8ed22da197f
describe
'10224' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUQ' 'sip-files00136.pro'
f4a6862e29d58b13d31c8c5dc5c977ce
8f7c419b842585bc6002727bf33f3c2ba667a003
describe
'20237' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUR' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
07ddc3913bcb674dc69c3209ba78e2e4
0e45f1310eb13a07c18e10092ff619e245ab76ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUS' 'sip-files00136.tif'
c69aabcbe8cc402ca1cf27b73bf81429
4fe94ea5a582ae939e1e6d2b116e22030e8e41ef
describe
'431' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUT' 'sip-files00136.txt'
0c191f63a2b1169d609011bc7951edf6
499fcec1455441928fb93c0b1ab5cca9479c0173
describe
'5133' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUU' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
4f5dd1c20477a71fb2a6635c097692a7
f790cabe027c8abce1e507d45ef56294357411e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUV' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
0dbf3615667c25d8b424f2ee8870c1a1
762587de49ea31b072c597c25c9dfc549cf6219e
describe
'50769' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUW' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
e4e3cb63f8815a927166982fa91bd25a
dd29aacb71ee2f85fb4179d3d56f251ce4268b71
describe
'8488' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUX' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
fb02bc62590798977c4c378044a6a18d
ffe5b174271ed5f33228caf47a6a11f7ce73670e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUY' 'sip-files00137.tif'
e00c720d48afc31f6a86faa1073c9d1e
590c38bccd8bc32479193a7f9f1852753634d961
describe
'2006' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATUZ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
dbed16b4805a9ecb1951526f6d89313a
92d70b6c98f23ee2fb1c8167b36d508233bfce00
describe
'335534' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVA' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
0f23868b3062e0befd78f1206262af00
c00fae9fa22ba0faa037021566b10f2750254450
describe
'56773' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVB' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
543e4515b4c7d724ad58c450af27b4bd
0ba2aa9b6527f4ca1aab61a3885201d649ade699
describe
'1567' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVC' 'sip-files00138.pro'
38178510901f982060a2510148f52ca2
893866ea6490bf814bc0d56e3088eefa293d0f00
describe
'10469' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVD' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
f6eee0220d715ed74d1c82acadc1d0f5
5bc7c998d8977a34f28898f4bb27814f3085147f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVE' 'sip-files00138.tif'
eda4860bedcfa64f6c621b00db12a93e
ddc40b7a489eb664a2e925d7e3aa6782c7dd2939
describe
'105' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVF' 'sip-files00138.txt'
ec6071cd4956003f6075beaccc74d976
cce2a06a6e53b7f855b45de699d4468b849a9848
describe
'2529' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVG' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
87aa560a245df427b7c2b47c7f7e1bc3
788b9b4f64c216ec9cab756694de446e8961cfaa
describe
'335379' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVH' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
5914fd9ac457c5b2136ec1726a8ecf81
1f26325224df714c0b734577a098349047cf96a5
describe
'46183' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVI' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
206b3e9072b0c849bbe090cd97017930
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describe
'8767' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVJ' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
23bc81c9273850f425effb41cfcb6d24
5427de559840ffd3d74ef9aefd4f3dce462dd099
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVK' 'sip-files00139.tif'
efa88a0da0345fc92c11bb5dff988afb
fa9f8ee51d0ea2de74d711329c2093510e842dee
describe
'1837' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVL' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
9aedb515254557633afe6e154358ec88
e2c87d9ca87654ea3e040a7faed82eb9a6553e31
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVM' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
881c4bd8e64af396864443f0f9b1c2aa
a397ee6370235ab94f049e3cc679784bc09d1e8d
describe
'118073' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVN' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
2352b4491ce4afe70748747699f1a792
898ba6de2c2bf8cf7066dca3163e3520b7972a8d
describe
'22401' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVO' 'sip-files00140.pro'
69dfb1200f328e9027d37418764d9f49
02e5f181c04449546ffcd58113d18f0f3b2c9859
describe
'34723' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVP' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
28e26bb9b532775a241d9b416691ab44
3209bfe4310b8b57d37e9938bdd0f6ab326253c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVQ' 'sip-files00140.tif'
a88375c8f75a6733cd1aaddce99abcc3
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describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVR' 'sip-files00140.txt'
2cc06a9120d4611a3d4858aa06e25943
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describe
'8336' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVS' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
6ab423cd47b4a79ab322106da76092f1
70703eaa4d7c6fdcd676b7b72c6f0eec60189b92
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVT' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
a1358db88dc7c0c61c7a432c9e3d74a6
d1e05cc8274410581387e0bfb5dc9be19d187b47
describe
'146465' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVU' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
e9453248d7819910bac2a9263e015c75
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describe
'30899' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVV' 'sip-files00141.pro'
e581e1d4b74e1d4e23ea480567bd5bd8
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describe
'43494' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVW' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
556ec617a9c3cca9492e72bfbcdd4d51
7aa5e40edc38ee75ed3abca1a1ecbd64a7e52fe5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVX' 'sip-files00141.tif'
3dcd41eeb6a9deefc78900a4cf4c0994
a465be7afee6c4c1c9d7a0fde3df1de4508f8c54
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVY' 'sip-files00141.txt'
84c7a99b35e5d20e28b2fa32dc6cb305
43243e0fb8569e79252bf8c4b601357bfda4bfbc
describe
'10382' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATVZ' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
111bfb7211b990da849559cc56fed083
881c59ccc04096ccf4e5c237307c6e98f72bb60b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWA' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
a9ca9800dcb1cbf99ea6804c216bfa2f
a2e5aaf23b5647bfa5a5cd628cfcf275c4b09ed3
describe
'141894' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWB' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
77b9651ca6c2594a2f73ebac062d4f3c
e71f9a5b8be15b5ca3b7cd2e0c5c5fde96edd54c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWC' 'sip-files00142.pro'
00fa69d2549f4885ff2dbee6e1902a45
d98f66b76e64ea088bb6f70db2ea2cd53354b9fc
describe
'31165' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWD' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
7da93746ba03f185260d8eb510356a87
d8e0916412825481a40a475dcd1b9ebaee1f0159
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWE' 'sip-files00142.tif'
80c11422f0c51463a411bed64d3679c1
5fd8713ea91347890c2318ed0d2458c3cba6f39c
describe
'99' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWF' 'sip-files00142.txt'
1ac13569ed3ec5734defea2dfeb0e68e
5bdb734b63354ac0cf606c6a3d7864467af58e86
describe
'7440' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWG' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
7155ccbf68e9f404dc948fae59eeddf6
698dbd784414b78b3de5dd17a150a0233e34ffce
describe
'335486' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWH' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
565099acb131b8ac5afa558dcab8c8d3
4689dd10673f0e19aa97f36f2530c3e21a0a9c29
describe
'138498' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWI' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
06a16c39432ae0d85bf4195a9521485e
aa6bd8067a7288d40a8cfaf4532733481b4f5e35
describe
'30667' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWJ' 'sip-files00144.pro'
7d8d40fc401bfc1e73bff1129a0f47e2
8dd171f4ec543e8c500747b78dc99172b3057c90
describe
'41332' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWK' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
aafcd28e853e21584145d28f8ff997b1
10b1ea0836b85f711e58d722a206f9308b7bcd56
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWL' 'sip-files00144.tif'
28dd679058661915b3baf3c433e14281
bf8740346ea96d6ee6cfe1715ee13c62cd6669c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWM' 'sip-files00144.txt'
101603eb067ede409eabc58f27491c57
ca25082680dbabe11a19f4c3a432681467f71a8e
describe
'10133' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWN' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
95b45a32c255eea9e815be488699aa53
21cc4f5db515e83f4481751e32636ab3b33689f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWO' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
47caf69868fa62400f7112e21a649cc2
625ac7cd6c0001b31a734bbcaf658d8c70ab0fdd
describe
'82239' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWP' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
a2c27e80c684efc7da6db9ddb1053c09
f3b8a35e203571cb3a5820725190f1286c3ad54d
describe
'8931' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWQ' 'sip-files00145.pro'
cc6966826ddb8dcdbf2d5b9906befd5e
29521079d21f546ff2db26eb796f6aba34334de8
describe
'21139' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWR' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
d70ae18a1d4d5e84e4e27ee0562cc4fc
36cbd599426cef3f4047eee06721132357a3f608
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWS' 'sip-files00145.tif'
3b657d5bf4ea50eb3e3c6ff64a575096
84b467c5962989da93bbe1dcd6071abfcf018592
describe
'385' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWT' 'sip-files00145.txt'
19e7bf1206f46513111ee1c7cabc3a36
a442401ced3c2e18afc272428a754d880a0068d9
describe
'5000' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWU' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
053df34d01d32695dda4ec10e439fa33
744495dedb11abd04442659f97a9e8d91b70907f
describe
'335499' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWV' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
ef8caa2c2136ed2178a1f6ea510832d3
d587f7ebc94b16fe0c63193e014920587e4aa672
describe
'114134' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWW' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
ba15066752f70459ac49454d056e07da
aa8f31a077482c5bfd8015c181e0f5ca1eee6edf
describe
'13896' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWX' 'sip-files00146.pro'
a4973edf4e757b38889e374d8b66fa8d
d700adbb3fe1783eaf7daf3aa1b761ffbf2c5554
describe
'32373' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWY' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
537b5a88dc4e09a9482d685b86dfee77
227def367164350802d6ffc8538384f70b7c3b09
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATWZ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
988b8c31370a14122db47702f20a0b17
aaed199ade372c0bd5a14b6efedf75dca10d7651
describe
'659' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXA' 'sip-files00146.txt'
f2a7e8ae9cca0f912ac23a3559bb3726
c460d3b6a628c15173c27c00816deaf0200e0f38
describe
'7910' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXB' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
90ca94044fed5b3bf946b9adaa752a6f
6e7bb6493703498307f67ba18719524b69dc31a1
describe
'335423' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXC' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
5d0a2b6eb1571e3a10d97ceb8d5f1953
528d10848a0f4b8fbfedc39067b479bf0a8244ed
'2011-12-30T04:55:01-05:00'
describe
'150302' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXD' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
b5315205b8d95aac247ed8f3bed9180e
85cc56befbab73d73f2d56ae7b22cbd7a5731260
describe
'32930' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXE' 'sip-files00147.pro'
ccd7b393e293b8be8ba6ac1d6430fc17
9193cea839af47a572eb2efceeb2e5f8b9e8eb08
describe
'45207' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXF' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
ac9681d4f020b357ddf5a7758cf903bb
f7d2ea2efa55525da329f3b66da64767ab9b1306
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXG' 'sip-files00147.tif'
938a8fc0d52891ec7b80a3578ec7245e
823eeda65c15bb9994e17d5e5146043d097e402d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXH' 'sip-files00147.txt'
076cbbb4b1dda68c1e63b67251e828d1
63cc204ca8c65ad5b1d31cc6c968c936dc54d8b0
describe
'10995' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXI' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
3049ebf87976abf9f53ce471693023e4
969e58a705bd7330d363470080442fd0e3e06e2e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXJ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
b32d067f3bb6a45d77a062d0b3272710
183fc92c8ae8d64c18fa55b3bfd83a31965d079d
describe
'146529' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXK' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
469504c430f2f57b0e92ee6313529c1b
c59ca513f695feae56aefa58f67927093d7386ec
describe
'32197' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXL' 'sip-files00148.pro'
a3c246aae0e9c6e274cbef2180375d3c
8bf39efa719e95962f9ded2ad0d6509ebe9913d6
describe
'44321' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXM' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
6b0ce49d5facf90e8ad1a45a077a866c
fcf514ad6b46f6032169f2b9017c165d9eac0742
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXN' 'sip-files00148.tif'
f3ee2cecf8fdd509ede742e38fe744e0
0ad969e4ea510ef2c85f10436e7ec23a8ef0ea5e
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXO' 'sip-files00148.txt'
fe492eb7bc54cda3f8eb6fdbdeb0a0f3
743da53b97c15d4febe2db11387102fd17af8716
describe
'10509' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXP' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
da792c93fccb0ed300641b86a38a73cd
c3eeebec8b73ce422bd18f1874f0a2b08db7131e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXQ' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
4983883c1c44ce527e4d26ba53f87a67
60a35db558d615ad28b0b15956626850a0ee05df
describe
'129488' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXR' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
73ce85c2fd3062b7c6d40f1342fd414d
97ce584b71c11f030949f875c6f028cfd568e4f1
describe
'30413' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXS' 'sip-files00149.pro'
17483a37a1ae5a978962933c6576d0fd
85e9a0922ca6c949cf67eb2ba47be551ce6abfc1
describe
'40236' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXT' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
0be18be7606b6033a0fbfc1186ba9a2c
b072c54134ac1e67efa0b3df787199983662bce4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXU' 'sip-files00149.tif'
c597555f5a87b504e4b8722a5d68cd27
74b7046211ada80e835d5d0be18745aea938cbbe
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXV' 'sip-files00149.txt'
7c1359e3b65bd27d354f9509d6cee19a
fbb47f6503fe1d8608947c2bc61cde082f20b9d1
describe
'10087' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXW' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
a3d3079d2a03d64a6369eea93539fdf8
e735bea45cfb0247868b40b1f47560ce0bcb67d3
describe
'335174' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXX' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
59684ec173b80abb0b9f7aa4d4f812c0
4efddbbff0f018e5f9298664fc3ac95b47f2f806
describe
'126265' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXY' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
7626281f3ae085468fd74538deccecc8
367dfe2951b8763c7f016478c5a12e577fb4e241
describe
'2541' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATXZ' 'sip-files00150.pro'
f92cefe8d3def9fa281d4b9476e1fe1d
3cbb7d7ea9c7c4d572900dd0ea71596f9af520e8
describe
'29042' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYA' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
cf9b524ba2e7e3d5dcc5366f43ac4247
93d4300557c8cd87b59cb2eb85e2ea7027917ead
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYB' 'sip-files00150.tif'
ba95c01c92c124879d5e4d31757b872d
bb745e803f9e136ebfafc9fbac43fdea26704ff0
describe
'161' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYC' 'sip-files00150.txt'
ae8f20e45cb83095428efd9c1fbf4a28
3f7719734cff1a7690a5f8877214b3b4717b2faf
describe
Invalid character
'7067' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYD' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
c3be14161f2725c4fcbc75851d7ef085
e5dd67f267a053a2f94c2bfd6f4875871d5041fe
describe
'335514' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYE' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
bd45bd2a7677b657a9f59637615b684e
2235cc0b5045e949a747743ebc264cdce50c2999
describe
'126366' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYF' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
85b70ada814671e965a9fa71d27657dd
3159e1b34cbda64daecbfe0265b2c173ab76f182
describe
'31009' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYG' 'sip-files00152.pro'
3d21ca071321085f9d3a85828098b2da
9c4e46cfecd03f75d2e03f30b2f0d4f16af868bb
describe
'40866' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYH' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
ff83497f90d11d6f4a2ffd5764f059ef
aaee0b5b40ca886b65769d46f5e4c2a378a89792
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYI' 'sip-files00152.tif'
84fc07d49fe08bf76588af316db7c2b1
147dae1d10ca3bde75f2905a7c13d2794088f3ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYJ' 'sip-files00152.txt'
9ac4e0ea79a45c6def420a84533ca4db
6d71d0a61faf8528e6d76facbfee638ed731fda4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYK' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
f764b7c76839139088a3d586d8f7d930
d51db2366ec6ab620674956827d0d1845d0965df
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYL' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
d26bfc0cb1405d37c764b1828c3e5907
2698df8188f7841f7743b219bd5aa6455780d903
describe
'85404' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYM' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
75806204814675e7373ce93d16b8083b
1c5bcab1fdee54de00c5ca67fdd80e435718767e
describe
'14331' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYN' 'sip-files00153.pro'
40a9807f87c636a9b9aa88e9b0a96d2f
a2972074f848ce753b8875d297e44c07e0725df3
describe
'25438' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYO' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
e3d5f2c1bb4cef9160d4b26c1e3cde4c
43f3b3aa2371457ae9a968244d800658eeeb560e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYP' 'sip-files00153.tif'
eb0665c6527b94775abbffdd5f1f298e
f34f763590a71d0fadbe9bb01ad28d884b66064f
describe
'598' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYQ' 'sip-files00153.txt'
1ba727ca579bb33841915679a330f91d
6b7c58d84f047600be16955ca4aa46967760ce27
describe
'6787' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYR' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
de9844a452d57e0ba657d53fa24e4990
6ac067f9a7737270b2f4c218fc0080258123b1f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYS' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
87c9a5dbcce99488919c56ce99bafd4a
23dbb6cf2c10343054d37db421b38661f70a7b5c
describe
'112866' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYT' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
5ef86a80881aae2c237060c346a4d178
3fa6e9ff0a1745b9475f947ecc5b624e696531f2
'2011-12-30T04:51:07-05:00'
describe
'18911' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYU' 'sip-files00154.pro'
36c848b2c7666c03bf05f5cf57b1bf4b
5da181a716d188ad9399ace41345da2fadc481b5
describe
'33515' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYV' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
e8b56c5dddbea427ac46b1269654aca4
50f989ec2c1379eb3f66540d922c874abc075c67
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYW' 'sip-files00154.tif'
7a2aa907fdc658dfe3992a181b4c0e1c
70baf29308b91ab5ed1671bbd75aceaac71418a1
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYX' 'sip-files00154.txt'
972dc0726aa1610610719a0de5a355cc
6aaa71d2e7dfd9de0a3ec95b14a3a8ce1df9d2bc
describe
'8441' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYY' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
e3393d1ce6ff5beab0c170841a3f0e16
4a12bfc2cd15de99be3ca9d7e94e0637eecac8ab
describe
'335285' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATYZ' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
1bdbf2a76d4e8662be12d4befb1b627a
5f316d72216fa225918ec5c8a1e1289878c0a90e
describe
'132710' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZA' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
8b4c62706daa3928e729574a464dd16b
22341528864c0414545ff1495c750bc00d9de48a
describe
'30252' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZB' 'sip-files00155.pro'
dfa378b1f5b939df86d3af622141c5dc
f2fa64e2b5980a905aaa56e4e6157a44c00413cc
describe
'40985' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZC' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
e9abe2f1cc282f5e066b10ba41679aa3
87897cabba7b17ea3035dc687af5aef6910259a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZD' 'sip-files00155.tif'
d952be69a0f2297d36e85a0e07eaf0b7
8ca500f61ec415de2c3f8d828e8bcb60ab09f642
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZE' 'sip-files00155.txt'
a94b11edc85034bdf88a1c07cbcd082f
a6bbebffa25c06f53335405a09028acac212ad7d
describe
'10249' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZF' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
cd036984602bbd8cde51411532b4d1fe
4379ef2237760f2103ae813a01d2ab86400743ec
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZG' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
603cf914610bb2ed43cee8c02a763481
7ef108bb9020d2531fd579543d2843ff833beb69
describe
'127861' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZH' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
a5babab310e7a6b89e89c63265cd50fc
439bb7a638a5ea79e9dd3afeb1ce9d8e616864c3
describe
'28585' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZI' 'sip-files00156.pro'
e0025872828503a99cd47b079807cfc5
ac39084430f52b65d39d2d66358b81ca0ff81e79
describe
'39387' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZJ' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
6fb9bab99fc52eee94ee80774659b3d7
a9cd8031ff9bbdc2f4f1613319042738523fc489
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZK' 'sip-files00156.tif'
60491005b4a2bd4e20c98ec2a2809424
ed0ad48c30cf9302ed17e125bf81561ee1c4023f
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZL' 'sip-files00156.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZM' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
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describe
'335441' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZN' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
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describe
'132865' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZO' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
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describe
'29001' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZP' 'sip-files00157.pro'
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describe
'41094' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZQ' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZR' 'sip-files00157.tif'
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describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZS' 'sip-files00157.txt'
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describe
'9931' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZT' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
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describe
'335525' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZU' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
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describe
'119792' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZV' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
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describe
'867' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZW' 'sip-files00158.pro'
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describe
'28589' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZX' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZY' 'sip-files00158.tif'
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describe
'155' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAATZZ' 'sip-files00158.txt'
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describe
'6971' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAA' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
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describe
'335271' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAB' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
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describe
'85557' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAC' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
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describe
'8927' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAD' 'sip-files00160.pro'
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describe
'23133' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAE' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAF' 'sip-files00160.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAG' 'sip-files00160.txt'
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describe
'5827' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAH' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
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describe
'335234' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAI' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
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describe
'108503' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAJ' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
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describe
'16445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAK' 'sip-files00161.pro'
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describe
'31091' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAL' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAM' 'sip-files00161.tif'
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describe
'739' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAN' 'sip-files00161.txt'
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describe
'7847' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAO' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAP' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
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describe
'142242' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAQ' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
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describe
'32153' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAR' 'sip-files00162.pro'
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describe
'44014' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAS' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAT' 'sip-files00162.tif'
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describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAU' 'sip-files00162.txt'
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describe
'10649' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAV' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAW' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
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describe
'142188' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAX' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
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describe
'33130' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAY' 'sip-files00163.pro'
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describe
'44850' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUAZ' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBA' 'sip-files00163.tif'
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describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBB' 'sip-files00163.txt'
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describe
'10695' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBC' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBD' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
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describe
'140277' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBE' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
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describe
'32567' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBF' 'sip-files00164.pro'
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describe
'44755' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBG' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBH' 'sip-files00164.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBI' 'sip-files00164.txt'
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describe
'10292' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBJ' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBK' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'30516' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBM' 'sip-files00165.pro'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBO' 'sip-files00165.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBP' 'sip-files00165.txt'
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describe
'10618' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBQ' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBR' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
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describe
'138300' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBS' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
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describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBT' 'sip-files00166.pro'
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describe
'32617' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBU' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBV' 'sip-files00166.tif'
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describe
'116' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBW' 'sip-files00166.txt'
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describe
'7837' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBX' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBY' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
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describe
'114639' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUBZ' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
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describe
'22173' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCA' 'sip-files00168.pro'
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describe
'32897' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCB' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCC' 'sip-files00168.tif'
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describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCD' 'sip-files00168.txt'
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describe
'8143' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCE' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
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describe
'335519' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCF' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
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describe
'106062' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCG' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
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describe
'14092' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCH' 'sip-files00169.pro'
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describe
'29515' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCI' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCJ' 'sip-files00169.tif'
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describe
'671' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCK' 'sip-files00169.txt'
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describe
'7414' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCL' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
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describe
'334969' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCM' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
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describe
'137086' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCN' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
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describe
'30802' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCO' 'sip-files00170.pro'
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describe
'42366' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCP' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCQ' 'sip-files00170.tif'
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describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCR' 'sip-files00170.txt'
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describe
'10143' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCS' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
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describe
'335325' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCT' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
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describe
'140705' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCU' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
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describe
'31257' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCV' 'sip-files00171.pro'
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describe
'42333' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCW' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCX' 'sip-files00171.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCY' 'sip-files00171.txt'
9396d2da091361af1e808a1b3eac4f8f
6c73abee36ec1eb017d32523a81b18994a53a181
describe
'10495' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUCZ' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
5ef82d011bc377f40f22caace28f05b4
b536a267a64697f619fad338196c8c3580ce53a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDA' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
98d913f3093cd9c7e13d28052de2e879
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describe
'142918' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDB' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
ea0a3fab3fb6fe5f3160e7327bee32f3
7595f5b453327ec21658b593ff9f14cf5a47799a
describe
'31296' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDC' 'sip-files00172.pro'
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describe
'43010' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDD' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
849cd76ea05db0777a98febe7ef37ca5
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDE' 'sip-files00172.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDF' 'sip-files00172.txt'
8d958df8d007aeb12e38301f0f96bf64
4aba4b33efd28030eff63d6a3faccefe7c211f21
describe
'10399' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDG' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
45b74c7ca03757f57cafb37d09d790db
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describe
'335118' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDH' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
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describe
'147625' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDI' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
c6c53701087f64eed80488ba8718692a
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describe
'32456' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDJ' 'sip-files00173.pro'
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describe
'45234' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDK' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDL' 'sip-files00173.tif'
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describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDM' 'sip-files00173.txt'
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describe
'10853' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDN' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDO' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
fb96888af1fee8dff6f4f3d5c66b883e
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describe
'64733' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDP' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
7bf85914d08a1ed59cf9fe12a41cabdb
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describe
'742' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDQ' 'sip-files00174.pro'
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describe
'15280' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDR' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
3514079e9c2bbad720c3592c9a4acdfd
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDS' 'sip-files00174.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDT' 'sip-files00174.txt'
c9afef6fa004d63bf662523ed1bbb9b5
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describe
'3631' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDU' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
372c90c8be8edb8e527df0a3d67449b6
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describe
'335035' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDV' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
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describe
'138966' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDW' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
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describe
'32174' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDX' 'sip-files00176.pro'
e8dbfd46538a67c7bf1d24a7626865e5
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describe
'43922' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDY' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
3dcd57df63c43e97cad4b7d784dd6dd7
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUDZ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
f4da5640dee9ff8443a0ee5bdc31b16f
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describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEA' 'sip-files00176.txt'
8da13c02621bb10d3a601ec8cdda8df8
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describe
'10553' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEB' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
0148f7d83e23dcdbef9ed9ed913ef97b
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describe
'335482' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEC' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
842e420aafb32afb5635e11eaf700e2f
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describe
'135330' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUED' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
334e88b3b710a64c315cc481df3915ff
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describe
'31326' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEE' 'sip-files00177.pro'
1590bdaa3239d7df5a8a96c75cd3813b
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describe
'42315' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEF' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
cecaed84339a0204a1f2aafc061c88d4
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEG' 'sip-files00177.tif'
1b3def37434696875dbd39b6c0b96ad7
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEH' 'sip-files00177.txt'
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describe
'10104' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEI' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
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describe
'335297' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEJ' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
20eed6ae049944d2ed9b328fd6950ea7
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describe
'122726' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEK' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
3baeafa97263713a56153af97de3e811
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describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEL' 'sip-files00178.pro'
8e8c34fc00a05afc04d0565b44ebe867
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describe
'29843' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEM' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
1d4f8c3a7bafab6a670eb2eacfa0459f
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEN' 'sip-files00178.tif'
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describe
'103' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEO' 'sip-files00178.txt'
505b467d30e9f5f9311dd279d149e829
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describe
'7443' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEP' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
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describe
'335506' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEQ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
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describe
'126391' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUER' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
dc76489b2d6d21112bdf7b290a1bb6eb
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describe
'29357' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUES' 'sip-files00180.pro'
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describe
'40519' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUET' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
a517a7cd149da78bd044b775665de111
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEU' 'sip-files00180.tif'
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describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEV' 'sip-files00180.txt'
928f555ddbf2fff5e3aa627da07fcc19
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEW' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
7c05eaf4d4f03882eda6cdc2f69373fa
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describe
'335192' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEX' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
de1fe5cac3a144c3fe4c3807fe1e6377
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describe
'63944' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEY' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
e2949422fba380ad12e73aa35fb2bb3b
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describe
'3720' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUEZ' 'sip-files00181.pro'
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describe
'17046' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFA' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
a66ec15f5476030c553805b3c6338fcf
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFB' 'sip-files00181.tif'
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describe
'194' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFC' 'sip-files00181.txt'
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describe
'4845' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFD' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFE' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
678ed36aeafbae2ee68ea5da00fd7713
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describe
'101682' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFF' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
5ffb13c9d3c0fe8b1e1b77ed68b6e6e5
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describe
'17730' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFG' 'sip-files00182.pro'
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describe
'31151' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFH' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
d4b5d44bc1a5e4b540e44692937e6b8d
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFI' 'sip-files00182.tif'
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describe
'770' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFJ' 'sip-files00182.txt'
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describe
'8028' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFK' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFL' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
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describe
'128373' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFM' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
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describe
'31618' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFN' 'sip-files00183.pro'
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describe
'40430' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFO' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFP' 'sip-files00183.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFQ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
1f8bfb04d757b8d42493864619ed333d
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describe
'10256' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFR' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFS' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
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describe
'126499' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFT' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
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describe
'30907' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFU' 'sip-files00184.pro'
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describe
'40708' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFV' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFW' 'sip-files00184.tif'
3ce78a98356d7cb07333accdd25eb0f4
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFX' 'sip-files00184.txt'
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describe
'9709' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFY' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUFZ' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
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describe
'131396' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUGA' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
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describe
'31591' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUGB' 'sip-files00185.pro'
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describe
'41630' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUGC' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
c35ed0a5b827d7d974a64940422b79a5
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUGD' 'sip-files00185.tif'
ec569d2cc8490cca5a95ffdd8a596fa5
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describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUGE' 'sip-files00185.txt'
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describe
'10477' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUGF' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
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describe
'335473' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUGG' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
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describe
'125008' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUGH' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
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describe
'29257' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUGI' 'sip-files00186.pro'
c37a52ca02b69a507f33de2902dd0dc6
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describe
'39046' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUGJ' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
ae43adcd59a10749f50812f41243c826
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUGK' 'sip-files00186.tif'
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describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAATJfileF20090118_AAAUGL' 'sip-files00186.txt'
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xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008707800001datestamp 2008-10-21setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title The story of the Rhinegold (Der Ring des Nibelungen) : told for young peopledc:creator Chapin, Anna Alice, 1880-1920Wagner, Richard, 1813-1883Harper Brothers. ( Contributor )dc:subject Mythology, Norse -- Juvenile literature.Gods, Norse -- Juvenile literature.Goddesses, Norse -- Juvenile literature.Heroes -- Juvenile literature. -- MythologyLove -- Juvenile literature.Giants -- Juvenile literature.Dwarfs -- Juvenile literature.Magic -- Juvenile literature.Dragons -- Juvenile literature.Operas -- Stories, plots, etc. -- Juvenile literature.Bldn -- 1898.dc:publisher Harper and Brothersdc:date 1898, 1897.dc:type Bookdc:format xx, 1, 138 p., 12 leaves of plates : ill., music ; 19 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00087078&v=00001002223684 (ALEPH)259974056 (OCLC)ALG3935 (NOTIS)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English












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500 My 1897.





The Baldwin Library

Rm ——





WOTAN AND BRUNNHILDE
THE

STORY OF THE RHINEGOLD

(DER RING DES NIBELUNGEN)

Told for Woung People

BY

ANNA ALICE CHAPIN

ILLUSTRATED



NEW YORK AND LONDON
HARPER & BROTHERS PUBLISHERS
1898
SoG

Copyright, 1897, by HarPeR & BROTHERS.



All rights reserved.
TO
THE MASTER’S DAUGHTER
EVA WAGNER
WITH HEARTFELT GRATITUDE
FOR HER KINDNESS AND ENCOURAGEMENT
THIS BOOK
fig Dedicated
PREFACE

The Story of the Rhinegold contains the four
operas of Richard Wagner’s “ Nibelungen Ring,”
atranged for young people. The “Nibelun-
gen Ring,” or “Nibelungen Cycle,” is built
upon a colossal foundation: a number of the
great Teutonic myths, welded together with the
most masterly skill and consistency. It is evi-
dent that Wagner, like William Morris and other
writers, has taken from the fragmentary mytho-
logical tales such material as would serve his
purpose, adapting such incidents as he chose and
as he considered appropriate to his work. But
there are so many different versions of these old
stories that it is very difficult to trace Wagner’s
plot to its original birthplace. The various
tales contained in the ancient sagas are so seem-
ingly contradictory that anything connectedly
authoritative appears impossible to trace. The
vi Preface

one thing which seems to remain the same in
almost all versions of the stories, ancient and
modern, is the background of mythology, that
great, gloomy cycle of gods, with the ever-recur-
ring note of Fate which seems to have im-
pressed all searchers in myths alike, and which
inspired Wagner when he formed his mystical,
solemn Fate motif.

Odin, Wuotan, Wodin, or Wotan, according
to the different names given him in the old le-
gends, is the central figure in the framework.
If I read the story aright, the Norns, or more
properly Nornir, are next in importance. They
and their mother, the Vala, are the medium
through which the relentless something behind
the gods made itself felt in the world. The
three sisters are named respectively Urdr, Ver-
dandi, and Skuld—freely translated Past, Pres-
ent, and Future; or, as they were once styled, as
correctly perhaps, Was, Is, and Shall Be. It is
a question whether Erda and Urdr, the oldest
Norn, might not originally have been identical.
Dr. Hueffer speaks of Erda as the “ Mother of
Gods and Men,” but though “the Vala” is
often found in mythology, the name Erda is rare-
ly mentioned, whereas the titles for the three
Norns seem to be unquestionably correct. The
Preface vii

term Vala is usually translated as Witch, or
Witch-wife, but, though a Vala was indeed a sor-
ceress, she was a prophetess as well.

A step lower than the gods, yet gifted with
supernatural power and far removed from the
characteristics of human beings, were the dwarfs
and the giants. The giants, we are told, were
creatures belonging properly to the Age of
Stone, which explains the fact that there were
left but two representatives of the race at the
time of the Golden Age. The dwarfs come
under the head of elves. They were gifted
with the utmost cleverness and skill. The
giants were stupid and clumsy, and, save for
their superhuman strength and size, entirely in-
ferior to the small, sly dwarfs.

The world was strangely peopled in those
days; many of the heroes were demi-gods, that
is, descended from some god or goddess, and
witches, dwarfs, and sorcerers mingled with hu-
man beings.

Many mortals, also, had magic power then.
Otter, the son of Rodmar, changed himself
into the animal for which he was named, and
while in the shape of the otter he was caught
and killed by three of the gods who were wan-
dering over the earth in disguise. Rodmar de-
viii Preface

manded weregild,* and Loki, with a net, caught
Andvari, a rich and malignant dwarf, and com-
manded him to pay a ransom of gold and gems,
enough to cover the skin of the otter; for |
such was the weregild demanded by Rodmar.
Andvari, of necessity, gave the gold for his own
release, even adding a wonderful wealth-breeding
Ring to cover up a single hair in the skin which
the rest of the treasures had left unconcealed.
The dwarf cursed the Ring, and the curse attend-
ed it through all its manifold ways of magic, to
the end of the story.

Rodmar’s remaining sons, Fafnir and Regin,
killed their father and fought for the treasure.
Fafnir obtained it, and, turning himself into a
monster-worm, went to Glistenheath (sometimes
called Glittering Hearth) to guard his wealth.
Regin called upon Sigurd, a young hero, to aid
him, and, being a master-smith, forged for him
a sharp sword named Gram. Some versions
give the forging of the sword to Sigurd, but
there are many sides to the story. The sword
was sometimes called Gram, and oftener Bal-
dung, until Wagner gave it the more expressive

* Weregzid is almost untranslatable. It may mean
payment, tax, forfeit, or ransom. ~
Preface ix

name of Nothung, or Needful. Prompted by
Regin, Sigurd slew the Dragon at Glistenheath,
and, after tasting the blood by accident, was
able to understand the language of birds, and
was told by two of Odin’s ravens that Regin was
treacherous. After slaying Regin, Sigurd rode
away with two bundles of the treasures slung
across his horse’s back. He found and awak-
ened Brynhildr, a beautiful woman asleep in a
house on a hill. (She is known in the different
tales in which she has figured as Brynhildr, Brun-
hild, Brunehault, and Briinnhilde.) The next
part of the tale is most clearly set forth in the
“ Nibelungenlied,” an epic poem in Middle High
German dialect, containing a story—or, more
correctly, a series of stories—which originally
belonged to the entire Teutonic people. These
have been found in multitudinous poems and
sagas, from those written by the ancient Norse-
men, and most primitive in form, to the modern
books, essays, and poems of writers who have
been impressed with the interesting and pictur-
esque aspects of the strange, complicated old
story. The “Nibelungenlied” itself deals rather
with the period of Christianity—with the knights
and ladies of the time of chivalry—than with the
primeval gods and heroes of the Golden Age.
x Preface

The substance of its contents may be found in the
“Edda” and in the “ Thidrekssaga ” (thirteenth
century), and the original manuscripts of the
“Nibelungenlied ” itself date from the thirteenth
to the sixteenth century.

The story contained in this poem is, briefly
told, as follows:

Siegfried, son of Siegmund and Sieglind,
woos Kreimhild, the sister of King Gunther, of
Burgundy, promising, in return for her hand, to
aid Gunther in winning Brunhild, Queen of Iss-
land (Iceland). Siegfried, with the help of his
cloud-cloak, conquers Brunhild for Gunther—
first in three athletic games, which she makes a
test for all suitors; and later when, after the
marriage, she proves stormy and untamed. He
takes her Ring and girdle, and gives them to his
wife, Kreimhild. They possess magic proper-
ties, and Brunhild, when deprived of them, loses
her great power and becomes like any ordinary
woman. She sees her Ring on Kreimhild’s hand
one day, and, realizing that it is Siegfried, and
not her husband Gunther, who has conquered
her great strength and stolen her magic circlets,
she tells her wrongs to Hagan, who promises re-
venge. Hagan is the Knight of Trony, and he
and his brother Dankwort are Gunther’s vassals.
Preface xi

Hagan entices Kreimhild to reveal to him the
secret of her husband’s safety in battle, and she
tells him that Siegfried once slew a dragon and
bathed in the blood, which made him invulnera-
ble, save in one place, between his shoulders,
where a leaf fell, protecting the skin from the
blood. Kreimhild is entirely deceived by Ha-
gan, and, not suspecting his treachery, she sews
a circle of silk upon her husband’s vesture over
the vulnerable spot, that Hagan may better
know how to protect the hero’s one weakness
when they are in battle. It is there, where the
circle -of silk is sewn, that Hagan stabs him.

There is much more in the “ Nibelungenlied,”
and a character famous in poesy and sagas is in-
troduced later in the poem—Atli, or Attila, King
of the Huns; but he has nothing to do with our
story, though some one has drawn a resem-
blance between his character and that of Hun-
ding. The “Nibelungenlied,” after Siegfried’s
death, contains very little connected in any way
with Wagner’s four operas.

There are other versions of this tale, as there
are of all ancient stories. There are many tales
of the killing of the Dragon and the awakening
of Brunhild, and the personality and history of
the latter have passed under diverse alterations
xii Preface

in color and development. One story says that
Brynhildr, the Valkyrie, was made to slumber
by her father Odin, who pricked her in the temple
with a sleep-thorn. Many writers tell of a fire-
circle which surrounded the sleeper and guarded
her slumbers. She is known as a great queen,
a woman gifted with magic powers, and a dis-
obedient Walkiire in different tales; and her
character changes as constantly as her history
in the various legends where we read of her.
Sigurd, Siegfried, and Sinfiotli are, in many
respects, so similar that they might safely be
termed identical, though sometimes, as in Will-
iam Morris’s “Sigurd, the Volsung,” they ap-
pear as distinct characters.

Out of this confused and complicated sea of
myths, legends, and old Norse stories Wagner
has drawn the material for his wonderful cycle.

His gods and goddesses are taken, with very
few changes, directly from their original place—
the Teutonic mythology. His giants and dwarfs
are also unaltered ascomplete races. In his usage
of them he differs in some respects from the older
stories.

Fafnir, the son of Rodmar, becomes the giant
Fafner, and his brother Fasolt is added. Regin
is transformed into Mime, the master-smith. In-
Preface xiii

stead of Otter, who must be covered by gems,
we have the love goddess Friea, and instead of
the hair which the Ring must cover in the old
legend, it isin Wagner’s adaptation one of Friea’s
beautiful eyes. Fafner hides in Hate Hole in-
stead of upon Glistenheath, and is killed by
Siegfried instead of Sigurd. The lonely Walkiires’
Rock takes the place of the house on the hill,
and instead of being made invulnerable by the
Dragon’s blood, Siegfried is protected by Briinn-
hilde’s spells—a fancy which seems more poetic
and beautiful, but which originates, I believe,
entirely with Wagner. Gutrune takes the place
of Kreimhild, and Hagan is not Gunther’s vassal,
but his half-brother. These are, after all, appar-
ently slight changes, yet to Wagner’s cycle a new
poetry seemstohavecome. The barbaric aspects
of the tale have faded, and all the simple beauty
of those wild, noble gods and demi-gods has
gleamed forth as gloriously as the wonderful
Rhinegold, which the master has made next in
importance to the gods and the dusk of their
splendor.

Before going further, perhaps it might be well
to say a few words of explanation as to the mo-
tifs which form the key-notes of Wagner’s Break
musical dramas.
xiv Preface

When he set his poem of the Nibelungen
Ring to music, he was not satisfied with merely
beautiful airs and harmonies linked together with
no purpose save the lovely sounds. He wished,
above all, to have his music fit his words; and
for every character and thought and incident,
and indeed for almost everything in his operas,
he wrote a melody, and these descriptive musical
phrases are called motzfs. Each one has its mean-
ing, and when it is played it brings the thought
of what it describes and represents, and it makes
a double language—what the characters on the
stage are saying and what the music is saying, as
well. Through the motifs we understand many
things which we could not possibly comprehend
otherwise.

That Wagner wished to give the impression
that Erda was the mother of all beings, divine
and human, at the beginning of the world, he has
shown by the fact that the motif of the Primal
Element—the commencement of all things—is
identical with hers, save that where she is indi-
cated the melody takes a minor coloring, denot-
ing her character of mystery as well as the gloom
in which her prophetic powers must necessarily
envelop her. The contrasting, yet harmonizing,
elements of earth and water are also shadowed
Preface XV

forth, I think, in this motif of the Primal Ele-
ment, which is used for the Afzne, and also for
the Goddess of the Earth. When the Vala’s
daughters—the Nornir—are mirrored in the mu-
sic, the same melody appears, fraught with the
waving, weaving sound of their mystic spinning.

The motifs in Wagner’s operas are, above all,
descriptive. For example, note the Walhalla,
Nibelung, and Giant motifs.

The first of these, full of power, substance, and
dignity, not only is descriptive of the great palace
itself, but also represents the entire race of gods
who inhabit it, seemingly secure in their conscious
glory and sovereignty. To indicate Wotan, the
King of the gods and the ruler in Walhalla,
Wagner has constantly made use of this motif.

Its melody is measured, strong, and simple, and
the nobility of those worshipped gods of primeval
years seems to breathe through it.

The Nibelungs were so intimately associated
with their work that they were scarcely more
than living machines—soulless exponents of the
art of the forge and the anvil; so when we hear
in the music the beat of hammers—the sharp,
metallic clang in measured time, our first
thought is that the hammers are swung by the
Nibelungs. How cramped is their melody, how
xvi Preface

monotonous and hopeless is the regular fall of
the hammers! When we hear it hushed and
veiled with discords, we seem to come in con-
tact with the narrow, darkened souls of the
Nibelungs.

And now we come to the motif of the
giants.

It is, like themselves, heavy, lumbering, with a
slur that is like the stumbling of heavy feet.
Clumsy and ungraceful, it and what it represents
cross the idyllic beauty of the motifs of Friea,
Walhalla, the King, the Rhinegold, and the rest,
with a harsh and disagreeable sense of an in-
harmonious element. How different from the
majestic gods, and the clever, small-souled Nib-
elungs, are these great creatures who are all
bodies and no brains, and who are so ably repre-
sented by the music allotted them in the operas!
Yet, in their own way, they and their motif are
excessively picturesque !

In these three motifs we can see the genius
which formed them, and so many others, even
greater in conception and execution. Scattered
throughout The Story of the Rhinegold will be
found a few of these motifs—only a few and not
the most lovely —but enough I think to help
one, in a small way, to follow the operas with
Preface xvii

more interest and understanding than if one did
not know them.

One of the simplest motifs in the book is one
of the most important: the Rhinegold motif.
It is like the blowing of a fairy horn heralding to
the world of sprites and elves the magic wonder
in the river.

In the olden days they had a lovely legend of
the formation of the Rhinegold. They said
that the sun’s rays poured down into the Rhine
so brilliantly every day that, through some
magic—no one knew exactly how—the glowing
reflection became bright and beautiful gold,
filled with great mystic powers because of its
glorious origin—the sunshine.

And that was the beginning of the Rhine-
gold.



CONTENTS





Dart
THE RHINEGOLD, or DAS RHEINGOLD
PAGE
IPRELUDE Sg ules tre hater sneh ni Seliger oti ihe Livia cel Mein elie mts k Mast vel caked
CHAPTER
tS DHE RHINE=MAIDENS (3 i erie et ele aatieee ao
LI CHASOLT:“AND:FAFNER 312060000. 5: Waste eeu en been IS
PDL INIBELHEIMEA Vspige os Sima jones ee Me esualice Cie nen oe TO
LV. “THE RAINBOW. BRIDGE: 2) eo) sea ee ee fe te 0) 24
Dart 17
THE WARRIOR GODDESS, or DIE WALKURE
PRELUDE ere rise cee tee tote een oie nee eh ebenl t octirahceenn gS
CHAPTER
I, THE Housrt or HUNDING . . . . «© © e e + 37
II. THE DAUGHTER OF WOTAN .... +. « + +» 45
III. BRUNNHILDE’S PUNISHMENT . oats oles Ue cabeure mee
Dart Tit
SIEGFRIED

PRELUDE Seite eee See eee RENO Sie ghee on ee ete Og
XX Contents



CHAPTER PAGE
T, ‘SIEGFRIED AND -MIME 360055 ue ie ie) OF.
DE VHATE: HOLE. 008) 2 Scua ia haa Sietace eg tesa eee O

III. Tue MountTain Pass . . . . 1 5 6 « a 88
IV. THE WALKURES’ Rock . . . . 1 1. 1 ew ee QS

Part 1
THE DUSK OF THE GODS, or GOTTER-
DAMMERUNG

PRELUDE?) (210 stiles oy 2 hel ae Sad a ee Pepe n ah te ee OS

CHAPTER
I. THE HALL OF THE GIBICHUNGS ... . . . I07
II. THE WALKURES’ Rock ONCE MoRE. ... . II3

III. THe RuINE CHIEF’s BRIDE . ... .. . « 118
IV. ON THE BANKS OF THE RHINE. . . . . «+ F24

V. THE LAst TWILIGHT . . .. . 2. + « «© « 133
ILLUSTRATIONS

WOTAN AND BRUNNHILDE . 2 . 1. 1... Frontispiece
THE GLEAMING TREASURE . . . . . . . . Facingg. 10
A- WARRIOR GODDESS. 60 ES ee ee 34
THE WALKURE APPEARS. 05-020 0 pn ee 50
SIEGFRIED ‘AT. THE FORGE? 2.308 fo pe 76
THE DEATH OF THE DRAGON ........ $ 82
BRUNNHILDE ON THE WALKURES’ ROCK. . . . “* 104
GUTRUNE AND SIEGFRIED ........ a IIo
BRUNNHILDE AND SIEGFRIED . ..... . oh 116
GUNTHER AND BRUNNHILDE. . ......,. + ¢ 122
HAGEN-AND SIEGFRIED °°. 68 8000 05.2 eo 128

AFTER SIEGFRIED’S DEATH . . . ..... * 130
Patt 7

THE RHINEGOLD, or DAS RHEINGOLD




Motif of the Rhinegold

PRELUDE

WE have, all of us, read of the Golden Age,
when the gods ruled over the world, and giants
and dragons, dwarfs and water-fairies inhabited
the earth and mingled with mortals. The giants
were then a strong, stupid race, more rough than
cruel, and, as a rule, generous among themselves.
They were very foolish creatures, and constantly
did themselves and others harm; but their race,
even at that time, was dying out, and there were
left of it only two brothers, Fasolt and Fafner.

The dwarfs, or Nibelungs, were entirely differ-
ent. They were small and misshapen, but very
shrewd, and so skilful were their fingers that
they were able to do the most difficult work in
the finest metals. They lived in an underground
country called Nibelheim (Home of the Dwarfs),
where they collected hoards of gold and gems,
and strange treasures of all kinds; and Alberich
was one of them. He was a hideous creature,
4 The Story of the Rhinegold

so dark and evil-looking, with his small, wicked
eyes and his hair and beard the color of ink,
that he was always called Black Alberich —a
very suitable name.

As for the dragons, they were rare even in
those days, and though we shall have to deal
with one by-and-by when we are further on in
my story, I shall not say much about them now.

The water - fairies were beautiful spirits who
lived in the depths of the river Rhine. They
were simple and innocent, as became children of
the Golden Age, and very lovely to look upon.
In the peaceful twilight-land under the water
they were perfectly happy, dancing in and out
among the rocks at the river bottom, and sing-
ing soft songs, which, when wafted up to the
surface of the Rhine, sounded like the faint
sighing ripple of the river as it rolled onward
through the valleys and the woods.

And the water-fairies had one great happi-
ness in their quiet, shadowed lives. I will tell you
what it was: On the top ofa tall black rock in the
river Rhine there rested a magical treasure, more
wonderful than any of the Nibelung hoards, or
the possessions of the gods themselves—a bright,
beautiful Gold, the radiance of which was so great
that when the sun shone down into the river and
Prelude 5

touched it the gray-green water was filled with
golden light from depth to depth, and the fairies
of the Rhine circled about their treasure, singing
and laughing with delight.

What a wonderful time it must have been—the
Golden Age—when such things were possible!

You smile and say that they were not possible,
even then! Remember that this is a fairy tale—
a day-dream—such as might come to you while
watching the sunlit ripples dancing on the water,
and hearing the little waves lapping on the peb-
bles—a fairy tale, that is all.

The Golden Age, as I think of it, seems a pe-
riod in which anything might have happened.
Closing my eyes, I can picture the majestic gods
moving, great kings and queens among human
beings; great kings and queens made young by
Friea’s apples of youth. Friea was the Goddess
of Love, Youth, and Beauty. She was the same
as Venus, the Roman goddess, called Aphrodite
by the Greeks, of whom, perhaps, you have read
elsewhere. All that I am writing about happen-
ed, you know, in Germany; and to the people
there the gods—or rather men’s ideas of them,
and their names for them—were different from
those of other lands.

So the King God, instead of being Jupiter, or
6 Lhe Story of the Rhinegold

Zeus, or Jove, was called Wotan, or sometimes
Odin. And the Queen Goddess was neither Juno
nor Here, but Fricka; and the wild Thunder God
was Thor; and the Goddess of the Earth Erda,
which means the earth. She was the wisest of
all the gods and goddesses (though Logi, the
Fire God, was the quickest and cleverest), and
she could prophesy strange things about the
gods and the world, and everything happened
just as she prophesied.

She would sink into the earth and dream, and
all her dreams came true. She would tell them
to her daughters, the three Norns, or Fates, and
they would weave them into a long golden
thread, into which they had spun the world’s
history.

They spun under a great ash-tree which grew
by the Fountain of Wisdom, and was called the
Tree of the World.

One day Wotan, the king of the gods, came to
the fountain for a draught of the Water of Wis-
dom. He drank, and left one of his eyes in
payment. He tore a limb from the World-Ash
and made it into a spear; and the spear, having
strange figures upon it representing Law and
Knowledge, was typical of the wisdom and pow-
er of the gods, and so long as that wisdom and
Prelude 7

that power endured no sword could break the
spear nor could remain whole at its touch.

But the World-Ash, robbed of its branches,
withered away and died, and the Fountain of
Wisdom became dry.

And these things were the beginning of the
end of the Golden Age. But wise people say
that the Golden Age did not end until men
began to value gold for its own sake and the
love of gain, and to do wrong things to possess
it. And now I will tell you how it all happened.

Motif of the Primal Element,



out of which come the Erda, Norn, and Rhine Motifs
Song of the Rhine Maidens

Wei - a wa - ga, wa-ver-ing wa - ters,

-o-



weaving and whirl- ing! Wa-la-la wei - a!

CHAPTER I

THE RHINE MAIDENS

AT the bottom of the river Rhine, about the
dark rock where rested the invisible Rhinegold,
there swam one morning before sunrise the Gold’s
fair guardians, the three children of the Rhine.
They were beautiful maidens, these three water-
spirits, the most lovely of all the river people,
and their names were Flosshilde, Woglinde, and
Wellgunde. They were singing softly, and glanc-
ing constantly up to the rock’s crest, waiting for
the appearance of the Rhinegold, which could
only be seen when the sun had risen up above
and sent its rays into the water to disclose the
treasure. They sang a little rippling refrain that
meant nothing except laughter and joy, and
The Rhine Maidens 9

sounded very like the ripples of the water them-
selves:

“Weia waga—”
sang Woglinde,

“Wavering waters, weaving and whirling,
Walala weia!”

And so they sang on, till their voices mingled
so with the ripple that both voices and water
became almost one in sound.

Now, while these three lovely maids, seem-
ing almost part of the water in their dresses: of
shimmering blue-green, with pale wreaths of
river flowers in their hair, and their white arms
looking frail as moonbeams as they raised them
through the water—while they moved about the
rock singing and laughing together, a strange,
dark little man stood near watching them. He
had risen out of a black chasm in one of the
rocks, and he had come from far Nibelheim,
through an underground passage. He had small
eyes, his hair and beard were the color of ink,
and he looked very wicked. Can you guess who
he was?

He shouted gruffly to the Rhine Maidens, and
they, being much amused at his ugly appearance,
10 The Story of the Rhinegold

drew near with laughter and mocking words.
They led him wild chases in among the rocks,
they played with him merry games of hide-and-
seek—merry for them, but not at all so for him,
for he was clumsy in motion compared with them,
and he became very angry because he could not
follow them over the rocks.

“ Smooth, slippery, slush and slime,” he grum-
bled. ‘The dampness makes me sneeze.”

At last, just as he had become thoroughly
angry, there appeared suddenly a strange bright-
ness at the top of the rock—a wonderful golden
light that glowed with ever-increasing brilliance
down into the water.

“Ah, see, sisters!’ cried Woglinde. ‘The
awakening sun laughs down into the depths.”

“Yes,” said Wellgunde, with soft delight, “it
greets the slumbering Gold!”

“With a kiss of light the Gold is aroused!”
said Flosshilde. And, joining hands, they swam
excitedly about the rock, singing in bursts of
gladness:

“ Weia waga,
Weia waga,
Rhinegold, Rhinegold,
Glorious joy.”

“You gliders,” questioned Alberich (for it was


THE GLEAMING TREASURE
The Rhine Maidens II

he), “what is this that-gleams and glistens over
yonder ?”

Laughing at his ignorance, the nymphs told
him that it was a magical Gold; that whoever
made a Ring from it would have greater power
than any one else alive; that he could possess
all the wealth of the world if he wished; and
they so described the fairy powers of the treas-
ure that Alberich’s wicked soul began to thrill
with desire to have it as his own.

The sisters further told him that the Gold was
safe from thieves, because it could only be stolen
by some one who had made up his mind never
to love any one except himself so long as he
might live.

“We have nothing to fear,” said gentle Wog-
linde, “for every one who lives must love.”

But Alberich pondered silently. “All the
wealth in the world!” he thought. “For that
who would not give up love?” And he sprang
wildly up the rocks.

“ Listen, waves and water-witches!” he shout-
ed, as he reached towards the gleaming treasure.
“Never will I, the Dwarf, give love to any creat-
ure save myself through all my life.” And while,
with wild cries, the Rhine Maidens hastened near
to prevent him, Alberich, the Nibelung, tore the
12 The Story of the Rhinegold

Rhinegold from the tall, black rock, and fled with
it into the black chasm, and so to Nibelheim.

And, left behind, the nymphs could only wail
for their lost joy with sobs and cries of “ Sorrow,
sorrow! Ah—to rescue the Gold!”

But it was too late. And in the dark hol-
low chasm, Alberich, fleeing with the treasure,
laughed at their despair.
(oe Cle-0-0 fies atid App oie sate
ese! p=
————— ~ pe=|
La = -
J. pesante.

co SSS Se
2



Motif of the Giants

ee
CSSe

Motif of Friea



CHAPTER II

FASOLT AND FAFNER

ONE morning not long afterwards the rising
sun shone upon strange things up among the
gods.

Wotan, and Fricka his wife, waking upon the
mountain-top where they had slept that night,
14 The Story of the Rhinegold

gazed up to where, built among the clouds, the
spires of a wonderful palace glittered in the sun-
shine— Walhalla, the fair, new home of the gods.

It had been built at Wotan’s command by
Fasolt and Fafner, the two brother giants, and
they had been promised, in payment, the god-
dess Friea. But Wotan had never intended giv-
ing her to them, and so he told Fricka when
she spoke anxiously of the reward promised the
giants, declaring that the goddess was as pre-
cious to him as to her.

Even as he spoke Friea rushed wildly in, call-
ing upon him to save her from the rude giants.
In answer, Wotan asked where Logi, the Fire
God, could be found, saying that where cunning
and craft were needed, Logi was the one most
to be sought after. But, look as he might, the
wayward Fire God was nowhere to be seen.

And then came the great brothers, bearing huge
clubs, and fiercely clamoring for a reward for their
labors in building Walhalla.

“You slept while we worked,” they said. “ Now
claim we our payment.”

““What price do you demand ?” asked Wotan,
pretending not to remember any promised re-
ward. “ What will you take as wages?”

“Would you deceive us so?” cried Fasolt, in
Fasolt and Fafner 15

astonished rage. ‘‘Friea you promised us. We
worked right heartily to win us so fair a woman.”

“Hush!” muttered Fafner. “ Listen to me!
Without Friea’s apples of youth the gods will
grow old, and their glory will fade away. They
will die like human beings if Friea be taken
from them.”

So the giants talked together, planning how to
steal the lovely goddess, who stood aside trem-
bling, fearing that Wotan would refuse to pro-
tect her from the two savage workmen.

He meanwhile merely murmured softly to
himself, “Logi is long coming,” and gazed ex-
pectantly about. But still the Fire God could
not be seen.

Thor and Froh, two other gods, had appear-
ed. The giants were growing more impatient and
Friea more despairing, when Logi at last arrived.
When he did he talked on a variety of subjects
before he would pay any attention to the affairs
that were worrying the other gods and the giants.
But at last he set his clever brain to work at some
plan by which his fair sister Friea might be saved.
Knowing well the love of wealth characteristic
of the giants, he told the story of the Rhinegold
and the stealing of it by the Nibelung. He said
that he had heard the maids weeping for their
16 The Story of the Rhinegold

lost treasure, and had promised them that Wotan,
the King God, would return it to them in time.
The two giants began to feel the same desire for
it that Alberich had had, and to whisper togeth-
er concerning it, so vividly did Logi describe its
powers.

“It seems,” muttered Fafner, “that this Gold
is worth even more than Friea.” And he cried
out suddenly: ‘Listen, Wotan, you wise one!
We will give up Friea; but you will instead be-
stow upon us the Nibelung’s Gold.”

“We will hold her meanwhile as ransom !”
cried Fasolt. And they dragged her away, de-
spite her piteous appeals, to Riesenheim (or
Home of the Giants), leaving the gods perplexed
and sorrowing for their lost goddess.

As they stood silently together a mist seemed
to steal upward from the ground, and floated be-
tween them. A strange shadow rested upon the
faces of the gods. They looked pale and wrinkled;
their hair was white.

“ Alas! What has happened ?” wailed Fricka,
faintly.

The gods were growing old.

“See, then,” said Logi, the shrewd one. “Our
Youth Goddess has gone. We are old; we are
gray. The race of gods will come to an end.”
Fasolt and Lfafner 17

Wotan started and looked about him. His
face was pale.

“Down, Logi! Let us go down to Nibelheim !”
he cried. ‘The Gold shall be had for ransom.”

The gods called out good wishes after them
through the mist, and Wotan, the King God, and
his fire-servant, Logi, went down through the
hollow, shadowy passages under the earth to
Nibelheim, the home of the dwarfs.


CHAPTER III

NIBELHEIM

ALBERICH had forged a Ring from the Rhine-
gold, and, wearing it, possessed absolute pow-
er over the rest of the Nibelungs. He was the
King Dwarf, ruler over all Nibelheim, the Land
of Gloom. Ah! what a land of gloom it was!
Through the dark shadows there streamed fit-
fully a lurid light from the forges where the
dwarfs were working; their hammers clanged
monotonously on the anvils. Slowly they laid
the results of their toil in great heaps, and Al-
berich laughed at their weariness and gloated
over the treasures, which he promptly claimed as
his own.

Among the Nibelungs was one particularly
Nibelheim 19

crooked and ill-shapen, named Mime. He was
Alberich’s half-brother, and, not unnaturally,
hated the Black King with all his strength; for
Alberich treated him even more cruelly than the
others.

Mime, at Alberich’s command, made a won-
derful cap of darkness out of some of the Rhine-
gold, which not only had the power of making
its wearer invisible at will, but could change him
into whatever shape he wished. This Alberich
wore, and changed himself into a column of
mist, in which shape he found he could move
about much faster, and make things much hard-
er for the dwarfs.

“ Hohei, all you Nibelungs! Kneel to your
King! Now he is everywhere, all about you,
unseen, but felt and heard, you idlers!”

And the column of mist drifted off through a
rocky passage, leaving Mime whimpering upon
the ground.

Now, with the clang of the hammers there
mingled the sound of steps, and from the black
crevice in the rocks came two figures slowly
down to Nibelheim. One was tall and majestic,
with a helmet of gold and steel, a long cloak
with strange designs upon it, and a deep golden
beard that hung far down over his breast; one
20 Lhe Story of the Rhinegold

of his eyes was missing, and in his hand he bore
a great spear.

The other was clothed in brilliant red, his eyes
were bright, his step swift as a springing flame in
dead grass. They were Wotan and Logi search-
ing for the Rhinegold.

Logi accosted Mime in friendly fashion, and
asked what was wrong with him.

“That wretch, my brother!” grumbled the
Dwarf. “He treats us all cruelly. Leave me
in peace!”

“How came Alberich by his power?” asked
the Fire God.

“From the ruddy Rhinegold he made a Ring.
With it he rules us. But,” asked the Nibelung,
staring at them, “who are you both?”

“Friends that perhaps may free the Nibel-
ung people,” laughed Logi, and at the same time
Alberich appeared, scolding, screaming, and ill-
treating all who came in his way. Driving Mime
away with the rest of the dwarfs, he, scowling,
asked the two gods what they wished.

“We heard of the wonders worked by Albe-
rich,” answered Wotan. ‘‘We come to behold
them.”

“Pooh! I know you well,” said the Dwarf
King. “Such notable guests”—and he sneered
Nibelheim 21

—‘“could only have been led by envy to Nibel-
heim.”

“Surely you know me,” said Logi. ‘I have
lit your forges, gnome. Cannot you trust me?”

“To be sure I know you,” grinned Alberich.
“ And I will always trust you to be untrustwor-
thy. I don’t fear you.”

“‘ How brave you are,” said Logi, in pretended
admiration.

“Do you see that treasure?” said the Nibel-
ung, proudly pointing to a great heap of gold
and gems.

The gods assented.

“But,” said Wotan, “what good does it do
you, here in Nibelheim ?”

Alberich glared at him, and then laughed.

“Ha! ha! But wait!” he said. “You gods!
You gods! You have looked down upon us
Nibelungs. Now we, with the help of the Gold-
en Ring, will sway the whole world. We will
storm the gates of Walhalla! Beware! Ha!
ha! Do you hear me? Beware!”

Wotan, in anger, started forward, but Logi
slipped in front of him.

“Most wonderful are you, O Nibelung!” he
said, admiringly. “I salute you as the might-
iest creature alive. But tell me one thing, O
22 The Story of the Rhinegold

wise one. How guard you your Ring from
thieves?”

“Does Logi think that all are as foolish as
himself?’ asked Alberich. “That danger I pro-
vided for. A Cap of Darkness, called the Tarn-
helm, is mine, to change me into whatever shape
I wish, and also to hide me at any time. So,
my friend, guard I my Ring, sleeping or waking,
as I wish.”

“Wondrous above all it seems!” cried Logi.
“Prove it, O Dwarf!”

“That I will. What shape shall I take?”

“Whatever you wish,” answered Logi. “It is
sure to be wonderful.”

Alberich placed the metal cap upon his head
and became a great dragon, writhing on the
ground.

“ Wonderful!” cried the gods.

“ Yet I should again like to behold its magic.
Is it possible to become small as well as large by
its aid?” asked Logi. “I beg of you show us if
you can become small, O great one!”

“Nothing easier!” cried Alberich, beginning
to enjoy himself. “ Look, then, O gods!” He
placed the helmet on his head and vanished. A
toad hopped on the ground in his stead.

“Quick! Hold him!” cried the Fire God;
Nibelheim 23

and Wotan firmly held the toad with his foot,
while Logi lifted up the Tarnhelm, which still
rested upon its great head. And behold! Al-
berich lay at their feet, struggling and roaring
with rage.

The Fire God produced a rope, and the two
gods bound the Nibelung and carried him with
them up the dark passage-way through which
they had descended, and left behind them the
crimson fires, the clanging hammers, the gloom,
and hopelessness of Nibelheim.


Motif of Alberich’s Spell

CHAPTER IV

THE RAINBOW BRIDGE

OuT of the underground world into the wild,
mountainous country above, veiled still with the
strange gray mist of age, came the two gods and
their captive, Alberich.

He was snarling and grumbling, being much
enraged at being bound by the hated gods, and,
above all, at having his beloved Tarnhelm in the
hands of Logi, whom he especially detested. Also,
he feared that he would be forced to give up the
Ring, which he still wore on his finger; and, partly
to prevent the gods from wishing for this, he soon
consented to give them the hoard which his ser-
vants, the Nibelungs, had collected in Nibelheim.
Touching the Ring with his lips, he murmured a
command, or spell, and from the under-world
came the little dark dwarfs bearing great loads
of treasure, which they placed at his feet.
The Rainbow Bridge 25

Ashamed, and hating that they should see him
a captive, Alberich loudly ordered them off with
threats and harsh words, and then demanded that
the gods should release him, while the Nibelungs
crept back into the dark hole that led to. Nibel-
heim.

Logi, casting the Tarnhelm upon the pile, asked
if the Dwarf should be freed.

“ He wears a bright Ring,” said the King God.
“ Let it be added to the heap!”

“The Ring!” wildly cried Alberich. “The
Ring! Iwill never give it up! It is mine!”

“Thief! You stole it from the Rhine Chil-
dren,” said Wotan. ‘“ Do you call it, then,
yours ?” and he tore the Ring from Alberich’s
finger and placed it on his own.

“Let him go!” he said to Logi, who obeyed,
and the Nibelung was free. Rising from’ the
ground, he glared horribly at the gods.

“Listen to the spell I cast on the Ring!” he
said, with a peal of wild laughter. ‘“ None who
possess it shall ever through it come to happi-
ness. Sorrow attends it, and whoever owns it
shall know grief. His death shall be sad, his life
a failure. This doom shall attend the Ring until
it comes back to my hand. Hear the spell Al-
berich has placed on the Gold!”
26 The Story of the Rhinegold

He laughed again, and vanished in the dark
hole that led to Nibelheim.

Wotan stood silently gazing at the Ring on
his finger. Logi, looking off in the distance,
saw Fasolt and Fafner nearing, with Friea. As
she came closer, the gray mist began to clear
slightly away, though it still hung about in
heavy clouds, hiding Walhalla’s spires. Fricka,
Thor, and Froh, quickly drawing near from an-
other direction, spoke of the growing warmth
and clearness of the air.

“Dear sister, welcome back to us!” cried
Fricka, as the giants strode out with Friea.
But, when the two goddesses started forward
to meet each other, Fasolt caught hold of his
captive and held her fast.

“Wait! Wait!” he cried. “ Where is the ran-
som ?”

“ Behold it!” said Wotan, pointing to the heap
of treasure.

The giants declared that when a pile of gold
had been erected high enough to hide the
Love Goddess from view, they would return
her to the gods—but not before. Accordingly,
a heap was made which, as it grew higher with
added treasure, soon hid Friea entirely, save
for a gleam of her bright hair, which Fafner’s
The Rainbow Bridge 27

keen eye descried. The Tarnhelm. must go to
hide it.

That accomplished, Fasolt strained his eyes to
find an unfilled crevice. Through a tiny space he
beheld one of the goddess’s eyes, and demanded
the Ring to fill up the chink.

“The Ring!” exclaimed Wotan, starting back.

“The Ring!” cried Logi. “Nonsense! It is
the Rhine Children’s treasure. The King God
will return it to them.”

“ Foolish you are,” said Wotan, in a low voice.
“T shall keep it myself.”

“Bad is the prospect for the fulfilment of my
promise to the weeping Rhine Children,” said
Logi, softly.

“Your promise does not bind me,” said the
King of the Gods. “TI shall keep the Ring.”

“ Hand over the ransom!” cried Fafner, loudly.

“Never!” said Wotan.

“Then Friea is ours!” roared the sine and
they grasped her once more.

The gods, in chorus, begged Wotan to give
the wranglers the treasure, but he was deaf to
their entreaties. His eyes were fastened upon
the bright Ring’s glitter; he was blind to all else.

Suddenly the light seemed to die out from the
world. All grew dark. From a black chasm in
28 The Story of the Rhinegold

the rocks rose a woman’s figure in a strange halo
of blue light. Her face was pale, with a look of
deepest mystery upon it. Lifting her hand, she
spoke in low, solemn tones to Wotan:

“Hear my warning! Avoid the Ring, with its
terrible spell! Heed me, O Wotan!”

“Who are you who warn me?” asked the god.

“T understand all things; wisest in all the
world am I. The witch-wife Erda, men call me,
Mother of the Norns. Listen, listen, listen! A
day of dusk and gloom is coming for the gods.
Beware of the Ring!”

' She sank down into the earth once more.
The blue light faded away. As she vanished
she spoke again:

“Think well on what I have said!”

She was gone. Slowly the light came back to
the world. Lost in thought, Wotan stood a mo-
ment; then turned quickly to the giants, and
tore the Ring from his finger.

“Tt is yours!’ he declared; and he tossed it
on to the pile. “Back to us, Friea!” and the
Love Goddess gladly flew back to their midst.

Fafner and Fasolt began fighting over the
Ring at once, and Alberich’s dark spell quickly
made itself felt. For Fasolt, seizing the Ring,
was killed by his brother, who, with Ring and
The Rainbow Bridge 29

treasure, fled away to a far cave, named Hate
Hole, and there, in the shape of a great dragon,
guarded his hoard in loneliness for many years.
But that is a different part of my story.

After the death of Fasolt and the flight of
Fafner with the treasure, the clouds hanging
low over the gods were cleared away by a great
storm, and, as Walhalla appeared shining in the
sun, a rainbow bridge spanned the space be-
tween the palace and the gods, who passed over
it to their new home.

“These gods—how foolish and blind!” said
Logi to himself, as he went with them. “TI feel
ashamed that I am one of them, bound to share
in their doings.”

The beautiful palace glittered brightly. The
gods smiled as they passed over the rainbow
bridge. Only from the Rhine below there came
a sound of wailing.

“O Rhinegold! Rhinegold!” sang the weep-
ing Rhine daughters. ‘We long for your light.
Trustful are those in the water; false are those



‘Walhalla Motif

Patt 17

THE WARRIOR GODDESS, or D/E
WALKURE



PRELUDE

I SHALL now take a long leap in my story,
going on to a time when the gods had been
happy in Walhalla for many years. Wotan
alone felt dreary forebodings, though, as yet,
there were no real signs of any downfall of the
gods. So heavy were these presentiments that
he began to fill his halls with heroes able to
defend Walhalla, if Alberich should ever regain
the Ring, and, keeping his word, storm the gates -
of the gods’ palace. At Wotan’s command, his
nine daughters, the Walkiires (or Warrior God-
desses) watched over all combats between he-
roes, carrying those who were killed to Walhalla,
where Friea’s smiles brought them to life again.

And this was not the only strange thing that
had come to pass since the gods had entered
their new palace.

Among Wotan’s descendants were a race of
people called the Volsungs, and at the time of

3
34 The Story of the Rhinegold

which I am writing only two of them were alive,
a boy and a girl, who had been brought up from
babyhood almost like brother and sister, and
who were very much alike, having the golden
hair of their ancestor Wotan, and eyes in which
there was a curious glitter, as bright as that of
the snake’s glance.

Both were as beautiful as the sun, like all the
Volsungs; both were strong and warm-hearted
and noble, and they loved each other as much as
though they had been really brother and sister. _

While still very young, they became separated
for years; for, while the boy was out hunting,
the girl, Sieglinde, was stolen away by a robber
named Hunding. She led a dreary life as the
Robber’s servant, until she became a woman.
But she always felt confident that help would
come to her in time, because one night, at a
feast given by Hunding, a stranger had entered,
robed in the rough garb of a wanderer, but with
kingly bearing. One of his eyes was missing.
He had struck a sword into the trunk of a great
tree which grew up from the centre of Hunding’s
house, declaring that whoever could draw it out
should have it for his own. And all had tried
their best, but the blade would not yield an
inch.


ESS

A WARRIOR GODD
Prelude 35

Then the Wanderer had laughed and depart-
ed. But Sieglinde, thinking of it dreamily, re-
membered that, while he had frowned on the
others, he had looked kindly on her; and, gaz-
ing at the sword, she began to feel, after a while,
that whoever could pull it forth would be her
rescuer. And so the years passed.

She did not know that the Wanderer had
been none other than the first father of all
the race of Volsungs—Wotan, the king of the
gods.

Siegmund, the boy, as he grew to manhood,
became a very wolf in wildness, but a great war-
rior, and a stanch hero. He. led a roving life,
with few friends, and, alas! many enemies. His
generous heart brought him into sad dilemmas
sometimes; as, for instance, when, at a maid-
en’s request, he defended her from her relations,
who wished to marry her to some one whom she
hated. When, in doing battle for her, he killed
one of her kinsmen, she had flung herself upon
the dead man and accused her defender of
cruelty.

He fought the rude warriors who were press-
ing up about her until his weapons were torn
from him, and he was driven away into the
woods through a wild storm which seemed to
36 The Story of the Rhinegold

blow him on with irresistible violence, until he
found himself at the door of a house.

Utterly exhausted, he staggered in, filled only
with the desire to.rest and shelter his tired body
from the storm. And the house was that of
Hunding, the Robber.


Volsung Motif

CHAPTER I

THE HOUSE OF HUNDING

OUTSIDE the storm was raging, the great
pines were bending in the wild gale, the thun-
der and lightning were in mad commotion.

Inside, rude as the hut was, there were warmth
and apparent peace. A large fire burned on the
hearth, and sent its fitful glare from time to time
flashing about the bare hall; now shining on the
sword-hilt in the great oak-tree growing in the
centre; now lighting the dark corners with a
faint red gleam. A heap of skins was beside
the hearth, and upon this Siegmund sank ex-
hausted.

As he lay there the door opened, and Sieg-
38 Lhe Story of the Rhinegold

linde came quickly from an inner room. Fright-
ened by the sight of a stranger, she accosted
him in trembling tones. Receiving no answer,
she came nearer, and, looking down at him, she
saw a strong, tall man, with golden hair, and
a face as beautiful as the sun. Caught over his
shoulder was a great black bear-skin, and his
face was like that of a king among men. His
eyes were closed as she bent over him; but,
after a moment or two, he opened them and
gasped faintly, “Water! Water!” only to sink
back once more, exhausted, as Sieglinde hast-
ened away to draw him a draught at the spring.
She was soon back with what he had asked for,
and, giving it, looked down kindly as he drank.

When he had finished, he gazed up at her and
saw a beautiful maiden, with the rough, gray skin
of some wild animal worn loosely over her long
white robe. She had hair of as deep a gold as
his own, and a face full of sweetness and a sym-
pathy that he had never known before.

Rising from the hearth, he gently wished her
good fortune, and thanked her for her kindness
to a friendless man, who must now pass on his
way lest the sorrow which followed his foot-
steps should come to her; and, so saying, was
about to leave the house when Sieglinde, who
The House of Hunding 39

in some way felt that this man was to be her
rescuer, sprang forward and begged him to stay,
saying that as sorrow had dwelt in the house for
many days she did not fear its coming. So he
consented to remain until Hunding, who was out
hunting, should return.

Going back to the hearth, he stood there
quietly looking, in a long silence, towards Sieg-
linde, and both felt, I think, that it was Fate
that he, and none other, should stay and rescue
her. So they stood silently waiting for the Rob-
ber’s return, and the fire crackled and glowed
and flickered about the hall.

Suddenly, Sieglinde started; for the sound of
hoofs broke the stillness, and they could hear
the Robber leading his horse to the stable. Al-
most directly afterwards the door opened, and
Hunding himself came in. He was not a pleas-
ant-looking creature, for he was very tall and
very broad-shouldered, and as wild in appear-
ance as a wolf, and his face was dark and angry.
His long hair and beard were black and tan-
gled, his eyes were fierce, and he wore queer,
jangling armor and bands of steel on his bare
arms.

He stopped short, and sternly pointed to the
stranger, glaring at Sieglinde in great anger.
40 The Story of the Rhinegold

Reading a fierce question in his look, she an-
swered, quietly:

“JT found this man weary upon the hearth.
Need drove him into the house.”

Hunding relented a little; and, after handing
her his shield and weapons, said quietly to Sieg-
mund:

“Safe is my hearth! Safe for you is my
house!’ Then, turning to Sieglinde, he rough-
ly bade her hasten with the supper. She bore
away the heavy weapons and rested them against
the tree in the centre of the hall; then went about
arranging the evening meal. As they sat down
on the rough seats around the scantily spread
table, Hunding asked his guest his name, and
whence he had come on so stormy a night.
Sieglinde leaned eagerly forward as the warrior
began his tale.

He told them the story of his life, only call-
ing himself Woful the Wolfing instead of Sieg-
mund the Volsung. And when he came to the
tale of the maiden and her kinsmen, and of how
he had killed one of them, and fought the others
until he was disarmed and driven into the forest,
Hunding rose in great anger and stood looking
at his guest with wrath in his eyes.

“You win every one’s hate,” he declared.
The Hlouse of Hunding 4I

“My friends sent for me to help them revenge
the shedding of blood. I went to their aid, but
it was too late.’ Now, when I return, I find the
enemy himself upon my hearth. They were my
friends against whom you fought; and, though
to-night custom makes you safe as a guest in
my house, to-morrow you shall die, Wolfing!
So be prepared !”

So both the Robber and his servant, the maid- ,
en Sieglinde, went away, leaving Siegmund alone
by the hearth, sad and a little perplexed. For
Sieglinde, as she left the hall, had pointed swiftly
towards the sword - hilt buried in the tree. The
fire leaped up wildly as he stood gazing towards
the oak, and the light touched the bright hilt
and painted it red for a moment, then died once
more. Siegmund dreamily wondered if the light
on the steel had been left by the glance Sieg-
linde had cast towards it. For you see he had
fallen in love with this lovely woman, who look-
ed at him so kindly, and whose face was as fair
and beautiful as the sun.

The gold and rosy flashes from the fire grew
fainter, the shadows deepened, and Siegmund
fell asleep.

Now perhaps you wonder why he stayed there
instead of going out into the night, where he
42 The Story of the Rhinegold

would be safe. There were three good reasons
to keep him.

In the first place, he was too brave a hero to
fly from danger; and, in the second place, he
did not want to leave the beautiful maiden alone

-in the Robber’s power; and the third reason was
as good a one as either of the others. . Hunding
had said: “Custom makes you safe as a guest in
my house,” which meant that it would be both
unfair and wrong if he, Hunding, killed a stran-
ger taking shelter under his roof. This was
called the Law of Hospitality, and the law was
never taken advantage of by any honorable
guest. So, if Siegmund had run away after
Hunding had so well observed the Law of Hos-
pitality he would have been dishonorable as
well as cowardly, and it was just as though he
had given a promise that he would not go away
that night.

In the meantime Siegmund lay asleep. From
an inner room came the beautiful maiden swiftly
to his side. Awaking him, she told him to hurry
away while there was yet time. She said that

‘she had sprinkled some sleep spices into Hund-
ing’s wine, and that he would slumber soundly
and long; and she begged the guest to go away
quietly into the night and save himself.
The House of Hunding 43

Finally, she told him of the Wanderer who had
come and struck the sword into the oak-tree, and
told him, too, how she had waited in vain for
some hero who would draw forth the sword and
rescue her.

Siegmund said that he would claim the sword
for his own, and drag it from the tree, and, as
he spoke, the door opened wide. Perhaps the
good fairies unlatched it. Without, it was very
still; the storm had ceased, and the moon was
shining wondrously.

Then Sieglinde, looking in his face, seemed
to see there a resemblance to some one she had
known long ago, and, gazing into his eyes, she
asked him if he were really a Wolfing.

“No, a Volsung!” replied the hero, proudly.
And she cried out in joy: “A Volsung! Are
you, too, a Volsung—one of my race? It was
for you, indeed, that the Wanderer struck the
sword into the oak.”

Springing to the tree, Siegmund laid his
hand on the hilt and broke into a wild chant,
naming the sword which he had come to,
when in such pressing need, Nothung (or Need- ©
ful).

With a mighty wrench he drew it out of the
oak’s trunk, and held it above his head.
44 The Story of the Rhinegold

“TI am Siegmund the Volsung!” he shouted,
exultantly.

Then he asked her more gently if she would
follow him away from the house of the enemy
Hunding, telling her that if she would be his
wife he would defend her with Nothung, and
make her life one long spring-tide.

“ As you are Siegmund, I am Sieglinde !” cried
she, aloud. “It is right that the Volsungs should
become joined as one.”

And into the night they went away together ;
for the storm had ceased and the brightness of
the moonlight was most marvellous.

Sword Motif
Britinnhilde’s Call



Motif of the Volsung’s heroism

CHAPTER II

THE DAUGHTER OF WOTAN

UP in the mountains near a rocky gorge, where
the wind swept and the wild pines grew, stood
Wotan, king of the gods, and before him, await-
ing his orders, was his favorite daughter, Briinn-
hilde, the Walktire.

She was very beautiful, more beautiful than
any woman who ever breathed. Her hair was
golden bright, her figure queenly. When she
moved, the motion of a bird was not more fleet
and graceful, and her face was what you might
suppose the face of a goddess would be. She
46 The Story of the Rhinegold

wore long white robes and glistening armor,
and the wings in her bright helmet were like
snow. She bore a spear and shield also, for you
know she was a goddess of war, and, as her busi-
ness was to attend the battles of heroes, she ar-
rayed herself accordingly.

She moved restlessly, and seemed anxious to
be off, for at the top of a rocky slope was not
her horse, Grani, waiting for her to spring on
his back and gallop away through the clouds?

Wotan, whom, of course, you remember, stood
leaning on his spear. He looked for the moment
glad, for he was very fond of his descendants, the
Volsungs, and he also believed that Siegmund
would one day kill Fafner, the Dragon, with the
sword which had been placed in the oak for the
purpose, and would return to the Rhine Maidens
their treasure. When this should come to pass,
the gods would have no more fear of Alberich.

When Wotan thought of all these possibilities,
the dusk of the gods’ bright day seemed far off.
So it was with a thrill of joy in his voice that he
spoke to Briinnhilde, and bade her make ready
to attend the fight between Siegmund and Hund-
ing, which, as the Robber was already hunting for
his guest with fierce hounds, was sure to occur
that day.
Lhe Daughter of Wotan 47

“Aid the Volsung, my brave maiden!” said
the King God. “Overthrow Hunding! Hasten
to the battle!”

“Hoyotoho!” shouted the Walkiire, waving
her spear as she sprang up the rocks. “ Hoyo-
toho! Hoyotoho !”

On a high pinnacle of boulders she paused,
and looked down on Wotan once more. “Look
well, father! Here comes Fricka. I leave you
to her.”

With a clear burst of laughter she sped on
again. Her boisterous “ Hoyotoho!” died away
among the echoes.

In a golden car, drawn by two rams, came
Fricka, the queen of the gods. She seemed in
great haste, and, springing to the ground, stood
in all her majesty before the King God, with
anger in her eyes.

“T ask for right!” she began, drawing her scar-
let draperies about her. And she went on to de-
mand vengeance for Hunding; vengeance upon
Siegmund, the guest, for having taken advantage
of the host who had observed so well the Law of
Hospitality ; vengeance upon him who, from the
house of Hunding, had stolen the Robber’s ser-
vant, Sieglinde.

All this made Wotan very unhappy, for he
48 The Story of the Rhinegold

loved Siegmund, and already in his heart had
forgiven him for what he had done. Yet he
knew that all wrong must bring punishment,
and asked Fricka what she wished him to do.

“Call back the Walkiire!” said the Queen
Goddess, and there was a look of triumph on
her face. ‘“ Break the Volsung’s sword! Prom-
ise me!”

There was a pause.

“‘J_promise,” said the god, covering his face
with his hands.

Triumphant and satisfied, Fricka drove away,
and, as she went, Briinnhilde, who had returned
while the King and Queen were talking together,
and had led her horse into a cave near by, came
to her father, asking why he seemed so sorrow-
ful.

Tenderly drawing her to him, he told her the
story you know so well, of the stealing of the
Gold, the building of Walhalla, and the prophecy
of Erda. He told her of the day of which the
Earth Witch had spoken, when the world would
be in twilight,and gloom—the Dusk of the Gods.

He told her, too, the hopes he had had of the
great deeds to be done by Siegmund. He let
her see how it filled him with the deepest sorrow
to overthrow the Volsung. But the Volsung had
The Daughter of Wotan 49

taken advantage of the Law of Hospitality, and
Wotan had promised that he would overthrow
him; and the promise must be kept. He bade
her vanquish Siegmund in the coming battle and
give the victory to Hunding; then, heart-broken,
he wended his way among the rocks, and was
gone.

Sadly Briinnhilde gazed after him. Her heart,
too, was aching, because, though she loved to
carry heroes to Walhalla, she loved still more
to aid them in battle. She went slowly into
the cave.

It was growing darker. Now, from out the
gloom that filled the rocky gorge came Sieg-
mund and his beautiful wife, Sieglinde, seeking
rest in a sheltered place. Sieglinde was almost
exhausted, for the way they had come was long
and hard; and, after trying vainly to make her
tired limbs carry her farther, she fainted at the
young Volsung’s feet. Tenderly he carried her
to a rock near by, and, seating himself upon it,
gently supported her and stooped down to listen
to her breathing.

As he raised his head, satisfied that she still
lived, a grave, sweet voice sounded on his ear.
He turned his eyes to where stood a beautiful
woman in white and steel, one arm on the neck

4
50 The Story of the Rhinegold

of her horse. It was the Walkiire, who, accord-
ing to her custom, came to warn the man who
was shortly to be killed in battle. It grew still
darker.

“Siegmund,” said the Walkiire, “look on me!
Soon you must follow me!”

Siegmund, wondering, asked who she was.

“Only those who are shortly to die may see
my face,” answered Briinnhilde. “I bear them
away to Wotan, in Walhalla. There you will
find innumerable heroes who have died in bat-
tle. They will welcome you.”

Siegmund asked if his father, Volse, were
among the heroes.

Briinnhilde answered “ Yes.”

Quietly the young warrior asked if his beau-
tiful bride might accompany him.

The Walkiire slowly shook her head.

“Lonely upon the earth she remains,” she
answered. ‘“Siegmund will see Sieglinde no
more.”

“Then greet Walhalla and the heroes for
me,” said the Volsung; “for there I will fol-
low you not.”

“You have looked on the face of the Wal-
kiire,” said Briinnhilde. “You must die.”

And, by degrees, she made him understand


¢ APPEARS

WALKURE

‘THE
The Daughter of Wotan 51

that death was awaiting him, that he was doom-
ed to be killed by Hunding. In despair Sieg-
mund raised Nothung, the sword, and declared
that he would kill his wife and himself, so that
they might be together in death. But Briinn-
hilde, who had felt her heart grow more and
more tender towards this unhappy pair, started
forward, bidding him hope, and declared that
she would help him, instead of Hunding, in the
combat, and save both himself and his wife.

“T shall be with you in battle,” she promised;
and she hurried away, leading her horse.

It grew darker and darker. Storm-clouds were
gathering, and the rocky gorge was filled with a
dense, black shadow. In the distance came the
sound of Hunding’s horn. Waving his sword,
Siegmund sprang up the rocks to meet the
enemy.

Sieglinde, dreaming softly where her husband
had left her, was awakened by a wild burst of
thunder and lightning. She started up frantical-
ly, trying to see through the darkness. Clouds
were all about her, veiling the rocks on every
side. Hunding’s deep horn-call sounded near-
er and nearer. Finally, from a high rock among
the trees on the top of a wooded slope she
could hear the voices of the combatants and the
52 The Story of the Rhinegold

clash of weapons. Suddenly, in a vivid glare of
lightning, Briinnhilde appeared among the clouds,
stooping low over Siegmund, and protecting him
with outstretched shield. Clear and strong rang
out her voice over the tumult:

“Be firm, Siegmund! Strike quickly.”

But now Sieglinde, staring wildly up through
the darkness, paralyzed with fright, saw a fierce
crimson light— the light that heralded the ap-
proach of the angry King God—and Wotan
stood revealed in the clouds above Hunding.

“ Away from my spear!” he cried, in a terri-
ble voice. ‘“ Let the sword be splintered!” And
he stretched out his weapon, made from the
World-Ash. Nothung was shivered in pieces
upon it, and the Robber Hunding, with one blow
killed Siegmund, the Volsung.

With a great cry Sieglinde sank to the ground,
but through the cloudy darkness came Briinn-
hilde. She lifted the poor woman on her horse,
and, urging Grani to flight, sped away through
the clouds.

Wotan, left alone with the Robber, turned
towards him in contemptuous anger. Before
his gaze Hunding sank to the earth in death.

Suddenly the King God burst into supreme
wrath.
The Daughter of Wotan 53

“ Briinnhilde, who has disobeyed me, must be
punished!” he cried. And, leaping upon his war-
horse, he was gone through the clouds.



Motif of Siegmund and Sieglinde’s Love


Slumber Motif

CHAPTER III

BRUNNHILDE’S PUNISHMENT

IT was a custom of the Walkiires to meet
every evening after their wild rides, at a rock
called “The Walkiires’ Stone,” and thence go
on to Walhalla.

Upon the afternoon of the combat which had
proved fatal to the Volsung, the Walkiires ar-
rived one after the other at the rock. Only one
was missing—Wotan’s favorite, Briinnhilde.

The maidens sang merrily their Hoyotoho,
waved their spears and climbed the rocks, and
Briinnhilde’s Punishment 55

kept a sharp lookout for Grani’s appearance in
the clouds, But it was very late before Briinn-
hilde was anywhere to be seen. When she
came, she brought with her Sieglinde, whom
she was supporting. In answer to her sisters’
anxious inquiries, the Walkiire told them of her
disobedience and Sieglinde’s sorrow, and begged
them to protect Siegmund’s wife, and herself
as well.

“ And see, O sisters, if Wotan draws nigh!”
she begged.

“A thunder-cloud approaches,” called Ort-
linda, one of the Walkiires, from her high pin-
nacle of rock.

“The clouds grow thicker,” cried Waltrauta.
“Our father comes,” they exclaimed in uni-
son.

“Shelter this woman,” begged Briinnhilde.
For she knew that Wotan, in his rage, might
kill the wife of the warrior whom he had over-
thrown. But the maidens feared their father’s
anger, and would give no aid. So, at last, Briinn-
hilde told Sieglinde to fly and hide herself in
the forest, and that she, the Walktire, would re-
main behind to bear the brunt of Wotan’s an-
ger. Briinnhilde drew from under her shield the
splinters of Nothung, which she had picked up
56 The Story of the Rhinegold

on the battle-field, and gave them with words
of kindness and comfort to Sieglinde, who, mur-
muring tender thanks, sped away into the woods
and was gone.

Then even Briinnhilde’s brave heart began to
fail her. A great storm had arisen, and amid
the crash of thunder came Wotan’s voice
calling her name in tones of anger. Trem-
bling, she took her place in the centre of the
group of maidens, concealed from view by
them.

Surrounded by red light came Wotan, having
left his war-steed snorting in the wood.

“Where is Briinnhilde?” he demanded. But
the Walktires, in trembling tones, merely asked
‘the cause of his anger. In growing rage, Wo-
tan commanded Briinnhilde to come forward
and receive her punishment, reproaching her
in. scornful words for hiding among her sis-
ters.

Quietly the Walkiire came out from among
them, and stood before him. She was quite
ready to receive her sentence, whatever it might
be, and bent her head to listen to her father’s
words.

Her punishment, Wotan told her, was to be
this: She was to be-laid in helpless sleep, at the
Briinnhilde’s Punishment 57

mercy of the first passer-by who might choose
to awaken her. Him she must follow as his
wife, for, when she was awakened from her
sleep, she would be a woman—a goddess no
longer.

Heart-broken, Briinnhilde sank to the ground
with a cry. To be made mortal seemed to her
the most terrible punishment possible. And it
seemed so to the other Walkiires as well. They
besought the King God to have mercy on their
sister, but he was firm.

Amid wails of despair and pity for Briinnhilde,
the Walkiires separated and rushed wildly out of
sight in all directions. Only the echoes of their
cries and the last faint sound of their horses’
hoofs remained as they rode off through the
clouds.

The storm died away. All was quiet now.
Slowly Briinnhilde rose from where she lay and
pleadingly spoke to her father, asking pardon for
her disobedience and begging for some mercy
and tenderness. At last, when she found that,
though he still loved her as dearly as ever, he
was firm in his decision, she asked only one fa-
vor of him—a last one—that he should place a
circle of flame about the rock where she was to
be laid asleep, flame so fierce and high that only
58 The Story of the Rhinegold

a brave man might come through it and awaken
her.

Wotan consented, and, overcome by his love
for her, drew her into his arms in a last, sad em-
brace. He bade her farewell with a tenderness
that comforted her even then, and, stooping, kiss-
ed her long and lovingly.

Her eyes closed. Her head sank back against
his shoulder. Laying her on a rock that made
a rude couch, he placed her shield on her arm
and her spear at her side. He looked down with
deepest sorrow on the face of this, his most beau-
tiful child, the War Goddess, and then, raising
his spear, commanded Logi to light a ring of fire
about the rock.

Great billows of flame spread from left to
right, and glowed in a brilliant circle about the
sleeping goddess, casting a dim glare on her fig-
ure, and lighting up the quiet night-sky.

Standing in the red firelight, Wotan once more
stretched out his spear in a spell, and pronounced
these words:

“Only he who fears not my spear can pass
through this fiery bar.”’

And, so saying, he passed from out the charm-
ed circle and left behind him the Walktire in her
long, fire- watched sleep, to be broken only by
Lriinnhilde’s Punishment 59

one who feared not even the spear of Wotan,
the king of the gods.



The Sleep of the Walkiire

Dart 111

SIEGFRIED





Motif of Mime’s Meditation

PRELUDE

WHEN Sieglinde ran into the woods with the
pieces of the broken sword, Nothung, she took
shelter in a cave where a wicked old dwarf lived
alone. There a little boy was born. But Sieg-
linde had never thoroughly recovered from the
shock of her husband’s death. The way through
the woods had been difficult, and she had en-
dured great hardships; so one day she called
the Dwarf to her and gave him the broken sword,
telling him to keep it for her son until he grew
old enough to have a weapon of his own, and
she told the Dwarf that she was Sieglinde, and
that her husband had been Siegmund, the Vol-
sung, and she finally said that she wanted the
child to be named Siegfried; then she sank back |
and died. And so Siegfried, who was a very
little baby then, never, really, saw either his
father-or mother.

The only father he knew, as he grew older,
64 The Story of the Rhinegold

was the Dwarf, who was none other than Mime
Alberich’s half-brother. And he could not help
knowing that Mime was wicked and sly, though
the Dwarf pretended to love his foster-son, and
tried to arouse some love in return.

Now, perhaps, you wonder, if Mime was so
wicked, why he took care of the boy. I will
tell you.

Mime, like every one else, wanted the Rhine-
gold, and could not get it, for Fafner, the Drag-
on, guarded it by night and day at Hate Hole.
And being as sly and evil-minded as the rest of
the Nibelungs, he had concocted a plot by which
he thought he could obtain it. He hoped Sieg-
fried, when he grew older, would slay Fafner
with the sword Nothung, and win the Rhine-
gold. You see he hoped to accomplish Fafner’s
death through Siegfried, just as Wotan had
once tried to do through Siegmund. Only, af-
ter Siegfried had attained the Gold, Mime hoped
to be able to poison him and steal from him the
treasure.

But, to accomplish this, the broken sword
must be mended, and this Mime could not do.
Its splintered edges baffled even him — clever
smith as he was. So he set to work forging
other swords, and trying to fashion a blade keen
Prelude 65

enough to satisfy the boy-Volsung, and also to
kill the Dragon at Hate Hole. But every weap-
on he made Siegfried broke into pieces, and de-
manded a stronger and still stronger sword, until
Mime was in despair.

It angered him terribly, too, that Siegfried,
more by instinct than anything else, knew how |
wicked his heart was, and how full of bad, cruel
thoughts. The little, dark Nibelung could not
understand how the boy, beautiful as the sun,
golden-haired and keen-eyed, strong of limb and
true of heart, loved to roam in the wide for-
ests all the day, merrily blowing his silver horn
and making friends with the woodland creatures,
only returning to Mime’s cave at night. He
could not realize the pleasure that the soft for-
est voices gave to the youth just growing into
manhood; how he loved the wolves and bears
better than the cringing, evil-eyed, horrible little
Dwarf in the cave at home—the only home he
knew. :

As for Siegfried, the only thing he wondered
at was that he ever went back to the cave at all.
Why did he not roam away forever into the
forest, search out that far, strange place called
the world, that really seemed as if it must be a
different universe from the one in which, he lived?

5
‘66 The Story of the Rhinegold

He could not tell. He only knew that a strange,
irresistible something seemed to draw him back to
Mime’s side every night—a something he could
not explain or even understand. Meanwhile time
passed.




Motif of Forest Life, sometimes called Motif of Love Life

Motif of the Forging of Nothung





**No-thung! No-thung! No-ta-ble Sword!”

CHAPTER I

SIEGFRIED AND MIME

THE cave was a dark one, but it was not al-
together a bad place in which to live. It was
as lofty as a stately cathedral, and the Dwarf’s
forge, built on one side, lent a fitful red light and
a little warmth to the dim, cold atmosphere.



4
68 The Story of the Rhinegold

Skins of animals gave it a semblance of com-
fort; and, indeed, to a wild creature like Sieg-
fried, it would have been a most desirable home
had it not been for the continual presence of
Mime. On the day on which I will open my
story, Mime was sitting on a low stool trying to
fashion a sword which would not break in the
hands of the impetuous young Volsung, who,
at that particular moment, was, as usual, out in
the woods with his friends, the wild beasts. As
he hammered, Mime grumbled crossly because he
had to work forever with swords that seemed of
no use to the crazy boy, who insisted on smash-
ing them all, and racing off to the woods, merely
demanding as he went a better and a stronger
weapon.

“There is a blade that he could not break,”
muttered the Nibelung, as he worked. “ No-
thung he would find firm in his hands, but I can-
not weld the splinters. Ah! if I could, I should
be well repaid.” He paused, and then went on,
mysteriously murmuring to himself:

“Fafner, the great, wicked worm! Well guards
he the Rhinegold. Only Siegfried can overthrow
him. This can only be done by Nothung, I feel
sure. And, alas! I cannot shape Nothung, the
sword,”
Stegfried and Mime 69

He began to hammer once more, grumbling
continually because Siegfried insisted that he
should make swords, and snarling with rage be-
cause every weapon he forged fel to pieces in
the boy’s strong hands.

Suddenly, from without, came a clear, merry
voice, shouting a blithe “ Hoyho!” and the next
moment in came Siegfried himself, leading a
great bear, which he had harnessed with a bit
of rope.

“ Ask the foolish smith if he has finished the
sword, Bruin!” he cried to the bear, and, holding
back the great creature firmly, he pretended to
chase Mime, who, springing behind the anvil,
cried, savagely:

“Take him away! I don’t want the bear! I
have done my best with your sword.”

“Good!” laughed the boy. ‘Good-bye, Bruin;
run away,” and he freed the great creature, send-
ing him lumbering off into the woods again.

Then, turning to the trembling Nibelung, he
again asked for the sword, and Mime handed it
to him. The young Volsung took it into his
hands quickly, scorn on his handsome face and
anger in his eyes. He was dressed in a wild for-
est costume of wolf-skins, and his yellow hair
curled over his shoulders. He, indeed, made a
70 The Story of the Rhinegold

great contrast to Mime, and one could not won-
der that they did not get on well together.

“What a toy!” he cried out. “Do you call
this a sword?” and, striking it on the anvil, he
broke the blade into a hundred slivers, and then
burst into a rage with the smith, who had pre-
tended to give him a sword fit for battle, and
had shaped him so foolish a switch, as he called
it. And finally, thoroughly out of breath, he
flung himself upon the stone couch at one side,
and not all Mime’s coaxings could appease his
anger. He finally confessed that he did not
know why he ever returned to the cave, be-
cause, he said frankly, he could not help detest-
ing the Dwarf, and was much happier when away
from him. And then he broke into a passionate
description of the wood-life he loved so well; the
mating of the birds in the spring-time, and the
way they loved and helped each other; the care
that the mother deer lavished upon her little
ones; the tenderness among all the forest creat-
ures that seemed so beautiful and mysterious
to him.

“T learned watching them,” said Siegfried, al-
most sorrowfully, “what love must be. Mime,
where is she whom / may call mother?”

“ Nonsense!’ said Mime, and tried to draw
Stegfried and Mime 71

Siegfried’s mind away from the dangerous topic;
for he had never told him anything about his
parents, always calling him his own son. And
he feared the boy’s anger if he should ever know
that he had been deceived.

But, thoroughly aroused, the young Volsung
fiercely demanded the names of his father and
mother, declaring that he was far too unlike
Mimeto be his son. At last the Nibelung con-
fessed the truth, and told him the story of his
mother’s death, and of how she had left her child
in his care. And, when the boy asked for proof,
he slowly crept away, to return with the broken
sword Nothung, the mending of which was so
hard a riddle even to his sly brain.

Wildly excited, Siegfried commanded him to
work at it anew and do his best to weld the
pieces; and, with a shout of delight and hope,
he went merrily away into the woods, leaving
Mime in saddest, deepest perplexity.

Despairing, he murmured at the hopelessness
of the task, which his rather unruly young charge
had set him, and was sitting, a picture of dis-
couragement and misery, when from the dark
woods came a stranger clad as a wanderer, and
bearing a great spear. He advanced to the door
of the cave and asked in slow, grave tones for
72 The Story of the Rhinegold

rest and shelter. Mime was at first frightened,
then angry, and finally refused to harbor the
strange guest, until the Wanderer made the fol-
lowing proposal: Mime was to ask him three
questions, and if they were not correctly answer-
ed the host should have the privilege of cutting
off his guest’s head. To this Mime consented,
and, after a little thought, thus chose his first
question :

“Tell me what is the race down in the earth’s
depths?”

And the Wanderer made answer: “In the
earth’s depths dwell the Nibelungs. Nibelheim
is their land. Once they were ruled by Black
Alberich, who owned a magic Ring by which
he possessed untold wealth. What is the next
question ?”

Again Mime pondered.

“ Now, Wanderer, since you know so much of
the earth’s depths,” he said, “tell me what is
the race that dwells upon its surface?”

“The giants dwell upon its surface. Two of
them, Fasolt and Fafner, fought for Black Al-
berich’s hoard. Fafner guards it now as a drag-
on. Put your third question!”

“What race dwells in the sky above?” de-
manded Mime.
Stegfried and Mime 73

And the Wanderer answered, majestically:

“The gods dwell above in Walhalla. Their
King is Wotan, who owns a spear made of the
World-Ash. With that spear he rules the
world.”

And, as he spoke, Wotan, the Wanderer, struck
the earth with the haft he held, and a peal of
thunder crashed suddenly out upon the silence.

As Mime cowered, terror-stricken, recognizing
his guest, the Wanderer again spoke.

He said it was only fair that he should have
the same right he had given to Mime, and de-
clared that he should ask three questions with
the privilege of cutting off the Nibelung’s head
if they were not answered aright.

“Tell me, O Dwarf,” he began, “what was
that race which Wotan loved, and yet treated
harshly ?”

“The Volsungs,” answered Mime, partially re-
covering from his terror. “Siegmund and Sieg-
linde were descended from the race. Siegfried
is their son—the strongest Volsung who ever
lived.”

“Well answered!’ said the Wanderer. ‘Now
listen and reply! A sly Nibelung watches Sieg-
fried, knowing that he is fated to kill Fafner, the
Dragon. What sword must he use to kill him?”
74 Lhe Story of the Rhinegold

“ Nothung!” cried Mime,eagerly. “Nothung is
the name of the sword. Siegmund once drew it
from a great tree. It was broken by the spear of
Wotan. Now a clever smith”—and he rubbed
his hands gleefully — “understands all this, and
he hoards well the splinters, knowing that with
these alone can Siegfried kill the Dragon.”

The Wanderer burst out into laughter.

“ But who will mend the sword?” he asked.

Mime sprang to his feet in despair, filled with
terror and rage; for that was the one question
he could not answer—that was his riddle, his
everlasting mystery.

Quietly Wotan rose from the hearth where he
had been sitting.

“T gave you three chances to ask me the ques-
tion which I have now asked you. Foolishly,
you let them all slip by. Listen while I answer
it! Only he who has never felt fear can forge
Nothung anew.”

He strode to the door of the cave, and there
paused, looking back.

“Guard well your head, O Dwarf! I leave it
to him who knows not fear.”

Smiling quietly, the Wanderer disappeared in
the wood’s depths, and thunder and lightning
followed him as he went.
Swegfried and Mime 75

Mime was left — puzzled, despairing, terror-
stricken. His vivid imagination began to con-
jure up before him visions of Fafner, the Drag-
on, and he had fallen behind the anvil, so great
was his fear, when Siegfried came hastily in, ask-
ing once more for the sword.

Mime, creeping out from behind the anvil,
could not at once collect his scattered wits, and
merely muttered:

“Only he who has never felt fear can forge |
Nothung anew. My wits are too wise for that
job.”

Finally, as Siegfried demanded why he had
not worked at the sword, he said, slowly:

“ T was fearing for your sake.”

“ Fearing!” said Siegfried. “What do you
mean by fearing?”

Mime described the tremblings, shudderings,
and quakings aroused by fear, and Siegfried re-
marked, as he finished :

“All that must seem very queer. I rather
think I should like to feel all that— but how
shall I learn ?”

Mime, delighted, told him of Fafner, and said
that the Dragon would teach him, or any one
else, the art of fearing, and ended by promising
to lead him to Hate Hole the next day.
76 The Story of the Rhinegold

“Does the world lie that way?” asked the boy.

“To Hate Hole it is close at hand,” respond-
ed the wicked little Nibelung, beginning to feel
rapture glow in his heart.

But, when Siegfried again demanded the sword,
the smith fell once more into despair, wailing that
he could not shape it, that only one who knew not
fear could forge it anew.

Straight to the hearth sprang the strong young
Volsung with the splinters of Nothung.

“ My father’s blade will I forge!” he cried; and
he began to move about merrily, brightening the
fire and hunting for the file with which to work
on the broken blade.

Mime watched him with wondering eyes. So
swiftly and well did he work that even the clever
smith could not understand. And, as he dragged
at the rope of the bellows and blew up the fire in
the forge, this is the song that Siegfried sang:

“Nothung, Nothung, notable sword!
Who did thy bright steel shiver?
To shreds I have shattered the noble blade,
In the pot I shall melt each sliver.

“Oho, oho, aha, aha, oho!
Bellows blow,
Brighten the glow!


SIEGFRIED AT THE FORGE
Sugfried and Mime 77

“Far in the woodlands wild and fair,
*Mid the thickets, a tree felled I;
I have burned the brown ash into coal,
On the hearth I have piled it high.
“Oho, oho, aha, aha, oho!
Bellows blow,
Brighten the glow!
“The coal from the tree how bravely it flames!
The fire how fierce to see!
It sends its wild sparks scattering far,
And the steel shreds it smelts for me.
“Oho, oho, aha, aha, oho!
Bellows blow,
Brighten the glow!”

Meanwhile Mime was busy about something,
too. He was preparing a poison for Siegfried,
which he did not intend to give him until after
he had slain the Dragon. Round, round the
cave capered the Dwarf, filled with delight at the
pleasant prospect he saw before him.

At last the sword was finished, and Siegfried
fitted it into its handle. It was mended anew.

Waving it aloft, he broke into a new verse of
his song:

“Nothung, Nothung, new and young!
I have given thee life and might!
Dead and desolate hast thou lain,
Now leapest thou fearless and bright.
78 The Story of the Rhinegold

Show now thy sheen to the cowards all,
Shatter deceit, and on falsehood fall.”

He sprang to the anvil and swung the blade
high in the air.

“See, Mime, so serves Siegfried’s sword!” he
shouted, exultantly.

Down came the flashing steel, and the anvil
was shattered in pieces. Mime sank to the
ground in terror, but, holding his father’s sword
above his head, and filled with absolute joy and
triumph, stood young Siegfried —he who had
never felt fear,and who had forged Nothung
anew.











Siegfried Motif




Motif of the Niebelungs’ Hate





ae
— ee



a rae
Siegfried’s Horn-call

CHAPTER II
HATE HOLE

To Hate Hole, in the dark time before dawn,
came the Wanderer, and found Alberich waiting
and watching near the entrance. The Dwarf was
fearfully enraged at the sight of the old god,
whom he hated with all the strength of his wick-
ed Nibelung soul. He burst into a torrent of
abuse and anger as Wotan drew near, speaking
of the broken promise of the giants and the de-
ceit by which the Gold had been obtained from
the Nibelungs, and again threatening the down-
fall of the gods when the Ring should come
back to his hands. The Wanderer answered
80 The Story of the Rhinegold

quietly that a hero was even then drawing near
through the woods—a hero fated to kill Fafner
and obtain the Gold; and, with hidden sarcasm,
he bade the Dwarf attempt to use the youth for
his own ends.

The King God believed in the workings of
Fate. The Norns wove continually, and all that
they wove came to pass. No one could change
the histories wound into their golden cord, un-
til the Dusk of the Gods had come, when they
also would, in the Last Twilight, be gone for-
ever. So, feeling as he did, it mattered very
little whom he aided, whom he harmed. He
even went so far as to arouse Fafner for Albe-
rich, and ask him to give the Dwarf the Ring.
The old Dragon snarled and yawned and went
to sleep again. The Wanderer turned to the
Nibelung, with a great laugh.

“Listen!” he said. ‘Remember, O Albe-
rich, what I say. All things work in nature’s
course. You can alter nothing.”

And, so saying, he vanished in the dark woods,
and a faint, pale flicker of lightning shot through
the forest as he went. Alberich crept hastily
into a crevice in the rocks on one side, and the
dawn broke just as two figures came into the
little green glade by Hate Hole.
Hate Hole 8I

The figures were those of Siegfried and Mime;
for the Nibelung, true to his word, had led
the boy to the place where he was to learn to
fear.

“If you do not hastily discover fear here, my
dear boy, you never will anywhere,” said the
Dwarf, with a chuckle. And he described at
great length the means which Fafner would use
to teach the art, saying that the Dragon’s breath
was fire, and his twisting tail strong enough to
crush any hero. But Siegfried merely laughed,
and said that he would find the great worm’s
heart and strike Nothung into that; and then he
bade Mime be gone. The Nibelung crept away
out of sight among the trees, and as he went he
muttered, in an exasperated undertone:

“Fafner and Siegfried! Siegfried and Faf-
ner! Oh, that each might kill the other!”

The boy, left alone, sat under a linden-tree,
looking up through the branches. At first Mime’s
figure pervaded his brain, and he could not help
remembering the horrible little creature. But,
after a while, thoughts of his mother crept in —
very vague and formless thoughts—for this for-
est youth had never in his life seen a woman.
Leaning back, he gave himself up to the en-
chantment of the summer-day, dreaming boyish

6
82 The Story of the Rhinegold

dreams, and listening to the forest voices all
around him.

Have you ever sat in a great, green wood and
watched the soft flickering shadows from the
little leaves overhead dance back and forth
on the moss? Have you heard the great surge
of music made of a thousand tiny sounds, the
hum of little, unseen insects, the ripple of far-
away brooks, the faint sigh of the wind in the
tall reeds, the rustling of the trees, the melodies
that seemed made by the touch of some master-
hand on a great harp?. That was what Sieg-
fried saw and heard that summer day when he
lay under the linden-tree and dreamed day-
dreams.

After a while a little bird began to sing in the
tree above him, and after listening for a moment,
and wondering whether it brought him a mes-
sage from his mother, he resolved to try to imi-
tate it, remembering that Mime had once said
that some people were able to talk with the
birds. So he fashioned a flute out of a reed
and tried to play upon it the melody that the
bird sang. Finally, however, he gave it up in
despair, and instead, as he began to feel lonely,
he blew a loud blast on his horn—to bring him
a friend, he said to himself.


THE DEATH OF THE DRAGON
~

Hate Hole 83

And what sort of a friend do you think it
brought him?

Well, it waked Fafner, the monster worm;
and he dragged his huge scaly body to the door
of the cave and peered out, and you may fancy
like what sort of a friend he looked.

Siegfried burst out into laughter when he saw
him.
“At last!” he cried, merrily. “My call has
brought me something truly lovely!”

“What is that?” growled Fafner, glaring at him
as though he were a small insect of some sort.

“Hey! You can talk, can you?” cried Sieg-
fried. ‘“ Being so wise, you should be able to
teach me how to fear. I have come for that.”

Fafner laughed, and showed his teeth, bidding
the boy come and be eaten.

“T come, growler!” said the young Volsung;
and, drawing his sword, he sprang boldly at the
great, hideous creature at the cave’s opening.
Fafner reared to receive him, and the combat
began. It was fierce, but not very long, for the
boy was strong and Nothung was sharp, and
soon Alberich’s spell had again worked its mis-
ery ; and, indeed, it could be said of the dying
Dragon that his death was sad—his life had been
a failure.
84. The Story of the Rhinegold

Before he died he told Siegfried to beware of
Mime, and then spoke slowly and sadly of the
race of giants that had come to an end.

“Siegfried,” he began once more— but he
never: finished, poor old Dragon; for, just at the
word, he rolled over and died. And that was
the end of the race of giants.

Stooping down, the young warrior drew his
sword from out the Dragon’s heart. In so do-
ing, a drop of blood fell on his hand. It burn-
ed like the cruellest fire. He raised it quickly
to his mouth to relieve the smarting; and, as
the blood touched his lips, a strange thing hap-
pened—he could understand the language of
birds. Yes, as the same little singer that he
had heard before began to twitter, he could
understand what it was saying to him.

“Hey! Siegfried will have now the Nibe-
lung’s hoard! He will find the hoard in the
hole. The Tarnhelm would aid him through
wonderful deeds; but the Ring would give him
might over the world.”

With a laugh and a word of thanks to the lit-
tle singer, the boy stepped into the cave to look
for the treasure. At the same minute Mime
crept near from behind the clump of bushes.
Alberich sprang out from his rocky crevice, and
flate Hole 85

the two little Nibelungs met, snarling, capering,
and making faces with rage.

Each claimed the Ring, and called the oth-
er names, and each proved himself a marvel in
wickedness and greed, and they were nearing a
point when blows were not far off when the
hero himself stepped out from the cave with the
Tarnhelm thrust into his belt, and the Rhinegold
Ring upon his finger. The dwarfs hastened out
of sight.

The heaped-up hoard of the Nibelungs, Sieg-
fried had left, for he knew little of its use, and
he cared nothing for wealth. Indeed, both Helm
and Ring he had taken only because the bird had
so advised him. He could not fancy what good
either of them would do him.

“Hey! Siegfried has now the Helm and the
Ring!” sang the wood-bird in the tree. “Trust
not in Mime! The Dragon’s blood will tell Sieg-
fried what the treacherous Dwarf really means.”

At this point, Mime himself appeared, smiling
and bowing, and holding in his hands a horn
of wine for Siegfried. He said that it would
refresh the boy after his labors, but we know
that it was poisoned. Thanks to the Dragon’s
blood, Siegfried knew it too, and read all the
cruel thoughts that were passing through Mime’s
86 The Story of the Rhinegold

brain, and, in a burst of anger, he finally raised
his sword and killed the treacherous Dwarf with
one blow.

So that was the end of the Nibelung Mime,
the cleverest smith, they say, that ever lived in
the world—even though he could not fashion
Nothung, the sword. From a black crevice in
the rocks came Alberich’s laugh, loud and mock-
ing—the echo of his own wicked thoughts.

Siegfried turned away wearily, and, seating him-
self under the linden, listened for the bird’s song
again. As it did not come at once, he looked up
into the branches and spoke:

“You seem very happy, flying among your
brothers and sisters, birdie. But I am all alone.
I have no brothers nor sisters, and my father and
mother are both dead. Tell me where I may find
a loving friend. I have called one so often, but
none ever comes.” He sighed. “Sing now, sing,”
he begged; and again the bird’s twitter sounded
from among the leaves above him.

“Hey! Siegfried has slain now the wicked
Dwarf. I know where he'll find a glorious bride.
On a rock she sleeps amid fire. If he passed
through the blaze and awakened her, Briinn-
hilde would then be his.”

Wild with excitement and joy, Siegfried sprang
fTate Hole 87

to his feet and asked if he would really be able
to do this.

“ Briinnhilde is won only by him who knows
not fear,” said the wood-bird, and flew off before
him, guiding him through the woods.

In a transport of joy Siegfried followed, and,
shouting with delight, he began his journey to
the far-away rock in its circle of flame, where
the Walkiire, in her long penance of sleep, wait-
ed for the hero brave enough to pass through
the fire and awaken her.

Song of the Wood-Bird



I know where he’ll find a glo-ri-ous bride.”


Erda Motif

CHAPTER III

THE MOUNTAIN PASS

A WILD storm was raging among the moun-
tains. Great winds swept down from the high
peaks and up from the valleys and crashed roar-
ing through the woods. The thunder rumbled,
and flashes of blue lightning shot across the dark
sky. The heart of the tempest seemed to be at
a rocky pass just below the path that led up to
the Walkitires’ rock.

Here, before a huge black cleft in the side of
the mountain, stood the Wanderer, the wild storm
The Mountain Pass 89

all about him. With outstretched spear he was
singing a strange chant, an awakening song, down
into the black chasm before him; singing it to
the wise woman of the world, Erda, the Earth
Witch.

He called her by name, and bade her rise from
her sleep and speak with him; and, as he chant-
ed, a faint blue light glowed in the chasm, and
Erda rose slowly from the black depths. Frost
seemed to cling to her garments, and light
gleamed all about her. Her face wore the same
look of mystery as when she came so many years
before to warn Wotan against the Ring.

In slow, dreamy tones she asked what the
Wanderer wished, and why he had aroused her
from her slumber of wisdom. He answered that
he had come to ask her to prophesy once more;
to tell him the wonders that she had dreamed.

“T sleep and dream!” answered the Earth God-
dess. ‘I dream and search for wisdom. But,
while I sleep, the Norns are awake. They weave
their rope and spin. Why do you not seek them
and ask them your questions?”

The Wanderer answered that they could only
weave the histories of the world, but that she, in
her wisdom, could, perhaps, tell him how to avert
coming ill. But Erda shook her head dreamily,
90 The Story of the Rhinegold

as though in a trance, and answered that she
could tell him nothing; that the ways of the
world bewildered her, and that she longed to
return into her dark chasm and dream once
more.

But Wotan restrained her. He told her of
the Walktire’s disobedience and his own wrath.
He spoke of the sorrow and grief that weighed
heavily on his mind, of his forebodings, and that
the Dusk of the Gods seemed nearer and nearer.
And, after asking again for counsel, in vain, he
said that he had grown to feel very little dread
of the Dusk of the Gods. It was destiny, and he
almost longed for it. And he spoke tenderly of
the Volsung, who was even then drawing near
to pass through the flame and free the Walkiire
from her chains of sleep.

When she was awakened, Wotan said—gifted
with the power of prophecy for a moment—she
would, by some deed, release the world from the
sadness that it had labored under for so long,
and she would expiate the old sin of the stealing
of the Gold that was the beginning of the end of
the Golden Age.

“Then sleep once more!” said the Wanderer.
“ Dream and foresee the end! Away, Erda—all-
fearing, all-sorrowing ; away to eternal sleep!”
The Mountain Pass gI

Slowly the Goddess of the Earth slipped down
into the darkness, and the blue light faded
away.

The storm had ceased. Only faint, distant
rumbles of thunder sounded in the high hills;
faint, shivering winds crept through the moaning
forest-trees, and a little light stole over the moun-
tain pass from the rising moon.

From the depths of the forest came Siegfried,
staring about him and looking in vain for his
small feathered guide.

It had vanished, and he concluded, after a
moment, that he had better go on alone, find
his way to the fire-circle without a guide, and
awaken the sleeping maiden. He started up the
pass; but, suddenly, a voice said slowly close
beside him:

“Where are you going, boy?”

He turned and saw the Wanderer.

“Perhaps he can tell me the way,” thought
Siegfried ; and, aloud, he answered: “I am seek-
ing for a rock surrounded by fire. A woman
sleeps there whom I will wake.”

The Wanderer asked him who suggested such
an idea to him, and questioned him closely as to
his life and deeds.

Siegfried answered simply and frankly, until,
92 The Story of the Rhinegold

when he spoke of his good sword, the Wanderer
burst into a loud peal of laughter.

“Why do you laugh at me?” asked the boy.
“Listen, old questioner! Tell me the way, or,
if you cannot do that, say nothing at all,” for
he was in a thoroughly bad humor, and in the
woods he had never been taught to accord old
age much honor. So he strode up to the Wan-
derer and demanded that he should tell him the
way, threatening to serve him like Mime if he
insisted on barring the pass. For Wotan was
~ standing directly before the rocky way, and, as
Siegfried was in great haste, it exasperated him.

“You will not tell me, then?” he said, finally.
“Then get out of my way! I will find the rock
for myself. My little bird-friend showed me in
which direction the slumbering woman lies.”

“The bird!” said Wotan, wrathfully. “It fled
to save its life. The King-Ravens barred its
way.”

For the god had sent his two great birds to
turn back the little guide, just as he himself in-
tended to attempt to turn back Siegfried.

He had said in his spell, when he left Briinn-
hilde sleeping on the rock: “Only one who fears
not my spear can pass through the fire bar.”
Now, this must be the test. Would this strong,
The Mountain Pass 93

beautiful boy recoil before the haft made of the
World-Ash, or would the Dusk of the Gods come
through human courage, overthrowing the might
of the gods?

The Wanderer stretched out his great spear,
the spear which had strange figures upon it rep-
resenting Law and Knowledge; the spear which
was typical of the wisdom and the power of the
gods; the spear upon which Nothung, the sword,
had once been shattered.

“The weapon you swing,” said the Wanderer,
“ was once shivered upon this haft. It will again
snap on the Eternal Spear.”

Siegfried drew his sword.

“Then you are my father’s enemy !” he cried.
“ Then you broke his defence! Stretch out your
spear! My sword shall break it in pieces!”

And a great peal of thunder crashed among
the hills as Nothung broke the Eternal Spear
with which Wotan had ruled the world.

The old god stooped and gathered up the
broken pieces of his once mighty haft, and,
with slow steps, passed out of sight in the for-
est depths. The Dusk of the Gods seemed, in-
deed, at hand.

As Siegfried stood gazing after his retreating
figure, he suddenly became conscious of a great
94 The Story of the Rhinegold

glare that seemed to grow brighter and brighter
every moment. Looking up the pass before
him, he beheld great billows of flame rolling
about a high peak— billows that seemed to
surge down towards him as though defying him
to conquer them.

“Ha! Wonderful glow!” shouted Siegfried.
“In fire will I bathe! In fire will I find my
bride!”

And blowing a long, clear call on his silver
horn, he sprang into the sea of flame, and pass-
ed up the steep, fiery way that led to the Wal-
kiires’ rock.


Motif of Siegfried the Protector

CHAPTER IV
THE WALKURES’ ROCK

THE fire rolled and surged about him, the
great red flames twisted around him, and in
many colors the vistas opened here and there
like rainbow avenues. For the colors in fire are
more beautiful than those in an opal.

As he passed up the steep way, and trampled
the flames and beat them back, laughing at their
scorching heat, they began to burn lower and
sank into a narrow, bright circle of fire behind
him; unobtrusive and not at all fierce, just, in
96 The Story of the Rhinegold

fact, what they had been until a hero drew near
to pass through them. Then they had done their
best to keep him from their fair, sleeping cap-
tive; but they were conquered, the wild, bright
flames; and they died down to almost nothing
as the Volsung, still blowing a merry call on his
horn, sprang up the rocks to the summit of the
mountain.

It was quiet and calm there, full of deep peace
and silence. It seemed as if even the trees and
flowers were asleep. No sound broke the still-
ness, no leaf moved or insect darted. It was as
though Nature were laying her finger on her lip
and saying, “ Hush—hush! This place is en-
chanted.”

It was broad day, and the blue sky, reaching
overhead, seemed to smile down on the young
hero as he stood gazing wonderingly about him.

On one side stretched the dark wood, reaching
down the mountain-side—the wood into which
his mother had run, bearing the splinters of
Nothung, so many years before. As he looked
into the dark depths he was amazed to see a war-
horse asleep under the trees. It was Grani, who
had fallen under the same spell as his mistress.
As Siegfried took a step forward, he suddenly
stopped short in overpowering surprise. For be-
The Watkire’s Rock 97

fore him, upon a rock, lay a figure clad in bright-
est steel, with shield and spear and helmet gleam-
ing in the sun.

“Ts it a warrior?’ thought the young Vol-
sung, drawing near—for Mime had described to
him the bright armor the great heroes wore in
battle. ‘“ Perhaps,” thought Siegfried, as he bent
over the sleeper, “he would rest better if his hel-
met were loosened.” And he unfastened it care-
fully and took it off. Masses of golden curling
hair gleamed like sunny clouds about the fair
face of the Walkiire.

“Ah, how beautiful!” cried Siegfried, softly.
“The face is like that of the sun smiling be-
tween mists.”

He bent down still lower.

“How heavily he breathes! I would better
open his armor,” said the boy. Drawing his
sword, he cut off the mail in which the sleeper
was arrayed. When the last ring was loosened
and he had lifted off the suit of mail-armor, he
started erect, filled with a strange, wonderful
feeling that he had never known before. The
sleeping Walkiire, no longer dressed in steel like
a warrior, but in long, white, womanly robes,
was so marvellous and beautiful that this lion-
hearted young Volsung felt fear at last in

7
98 The Story of the Rhinegold

the presence of the first woman he had ever
seen.

Timidly he drew near, wondering how he
should arouse her.

“ Awaken, beautiful woman!” he cried, tremu-
lously. But she did not hear. At last he bent
over her and kissed her.

Brtinnhilde opened her eyes.

Starting up, she lifted both arms towards the
sky, and cried, in glad though solemn tones,

“Hail, Osun! Hail, O light! Hail, O glori-
ous day! Long was my sleep—I am awakened!
Where is the hero who awakes me ?”

The young Volsung, drawing timidly near, an-
swered that it was he who had come through the
fire and awakened her, and that his name was
Siegfried ; and he said, too, that, as she had first
aroused fear in his heart, she must bring his cour-
age back to him. Passionately, he told her that
he loved her; but Briinnhilde could not remem-
ber that she was no longer a Walkiire, and at
first she did not want to be a woman and a mor-
tal’s wife—however great that mortal might be.

But, after a time, with a sudden great rush of
passion, she felt in some strange way that she
cared no longer for the gods and their glory, and
loved only Siegfried, and longed to serve him and
The Walkire’s Rock 99

be his wife. So she promised to marry him, and
she said that the Norns might break their rope
of histories, for the Dusk of the Gods drew near.

She taught Siegfried many strange things and
much wisdom—the wisdom of the gods. And she
gave him her weapons, forgot that she had ever
been a Walkiire, and loved him with all her heart.



Motif of Peace
RULE

rt

a
ae

iv

oo
a i
a


Part 1

THE DUSK OF THE GODS, or
GOTTERDAMMERUNG

a
Motif of the World-Ash-Tree

PRELUDE

HOLDING in his hand his broken spear, the
king of the gods wended his way to Walhalla.
He sent forth stanch messengers to hew the
World-Ash into a thousand pieces and pile
them high about the gods’ palace. Then he as-
sembled round him his heroes and the Walkires
and the rest of the divinities, and sat in silence
awaiting the Dusk of the Gods.

All the gods, far and wide, knew that the Last
Twilight was impending; and fate relentlessly led
all thingstotheend. To the Walkiires’ rock came
the Norns in the gray of dawn to spin. From
hand to hand passed the golden cord. Each told
a history in gloomy, chanting measures.

The oldest Norn sang of the days when the
World-Ash was green and the Fountain of Wis-
dom purled softly in the shadow of the wide
branches. She sang of Wotan’s coming to the
104 The Story of the Rhinegold

spring and drinking; of the tearing of the limb
from the World-Ash; of the withering of the
great tree. Her song ceased. She flung the
cord to her sister.

The second Norn wound slowly as she sang.
Her tale was of the making of the great spear
with which Wotan had ruled the world until one
stronger than the gods had shivered the haft
and overpowered the Ruler. She sang of how
Wotan had now ordered that the World-Ash
should be broken and piled about Walhalla. She
paused, and the youngest Norn took the rope.

She sang of the bright palace where Wotan
sat among the gods and heroes, with the great
fagots from the World-Ash heaped around him.
She sang that, when these fagots should be light-
ed and Walhalla burned, the Dusk of the Gods
would come.

They sang of many. strange events— these
Norns— events of the past, of the present, of
the future. They sang of the circle of fire lit
by Logi about the rock. They sang of the
Rhinegold stolen by Alberich; they sang long
and sadly of the gods and their king.

“The web is tangled,” said the first Norn.

“ Alberich’s spell tears at the strands,” said the
second, and flung it to the third.


BRUNNHILDE ON THE WALKURES’ ROCK
Prelude 105

“T cannot reach the rope—it is too short,”
said the youngest, putting out her hand.

The cord snapped. It had stretched across
the past, but it could not touch the future. It
was, indeed, too short.

“It breaks!” wailed the Norns, crouching in
dread, as the faint light of day appeared.

“At an end is our wisdom!” they murmured
in chorus, and wound the broken bits of the
rope about their gray-shrouded bodies; then fled
like mist into the earth, down to their mother,
Erda, the all-wise one, she who had first prophe-
sied the Dusk of the Gods.

When she had taught him all the wisdom
that she knew, and given him all she had, Briinn-
hilde bade her hero go forth into the world and
win fame and honor by great deeds. He must
journey to the far lands peopled by brave men
and high heroes and prove his courage and his
strength. She would wait for him patiently, and
he would come back to her when he had made
all men know and honor him.

She gave him Grani, her stanch war-horse, and
he placed on her finger as a parting love-gift the
beautiful bright Ring that he had won at Hate
Hole, and then he bade her farewell, and blithe-
106 The Story of the Rhinegold

ly passed down the mountain-side, blowing a
clear, merry blast on his horn.

Briinnhilde stood on the Walkiires’ rock and
gazed yearningly after him, and the young hero
went forth into far lands to know men and do
great deeds, and find at last that strange place
called the world.



Motif of Briinnhilde



iA eae tHe —
| oe Het Pn







Motif of Hagen

CHAPTER I
THE HALL OF THE GIBICHUNGS

ON the banks of the river Rhine there lived
a great warrior named Gunther, who was one of
a valiant race called Gibichungs. He was the
head of a great tribe of kinsmen and vassals, and
his lands were wide and his halls spacious. His
sister, Gutrune, was a maiden very fair and sweet
to look upon, as beautiful as her brother was
brave. They were both generous and noble, and
would have done nothing but good all their lives
108 The Story of the Rhinegold

had it not been for the evil influence of their wick-
ed half-brother Hagen, the son of Alberich, the
Nibelung. When their father, the brave Gibich,
had died, their mother, Grimhilde, had wedded
the Nibelung, and after a while had died herself,
leaving wild, dark Hagen as a brother to Gun-
ther and Gutrune.

He was a sinister and gloomy warrior, with
gleaming black eyes and blood.that seemed of
ice, for never did his cheek flush or his lip red-
den. Pale he was and cold, dark-haired and sad,
and his heart was black and cruel. He, too, was
working to obtain the Rhinegold.

One day Gunther, sitting on a high throne be-
side his sister, asked Hagen what greater wealth
could belong to the Gibichungs ; what deed their
chief could do that would aid the good fortune
of the race and its vassals.

Hagen answered that it would be fitting for the
head of the Gibichungs to wed, and he craftily
told Gunther of the fire-encirled rock where dwelt
the fair maiden, Briinnhilde. The fire could only
be conquered, he said, by Siegfried, the Volsung,
who would make a fitting husband for Gutrune.

Now, Hagen knew that Siegfried had already
won the Walkiire; but he was laying a plot, and
the plot was wicked and deep. He told Gun-
Lhe Hall of the Gibichungs 109

ther that Siegfried would go through the fire
and bring Briinnhilde to the Rhine Chief if he
could be given a magic-potion—a potion that
would make him love Gutrune.

While they spoke of these things, a horn was
heard, in the distance at first, but coming nearer
and nearer. Soon a boat came down the river
Rhine—a wide barge—holding a horse and a tall
man in bright armor. Siegfried, in his travels
through the world, had heard of the Gibichungs,
and had come to see the great Rhine Chief,
Gunther. As the boat touched the shore, he
sprang from it, and hailed the warrior, in loud
tones, asking if he would be friend or enemy.
In answer, Gunther said that his house, his lands,
his people were all at the service of the hero
whose fame had reached even the hall of the
Gibichungs; and Siegfried offered the strength
of his arm and the might of his sword for Gun-
ther’s defence and aid at all times.

So they made a vow, promising to remain true
to each other, as heroes and brave men should.

“T have heard that you hold the Nibelungs’
hoard,” said Hagen, when Gutrune, at a sign
from him, had left the hall, and the three war-
riors were alone.

“T left it in the cavern,” said Siegfried. “TI
IIo Lhe Story of the Rhinegold

cared nothing for the Gold. This is all I took”
—and he showed the Tarnhelm. ‘“ What is its
use—do you know?”

“It is the most artful of all the Nibelung’s
work,” said Hagen. “It will change you to
whatever shape you will, and carry you to the
farthest lands in a moment, if it is your wish.
Did you take any more of the hoard?”

Siegfried answered that he had carried away
a Ring, but that it was now worn by a beauti-
ful woman.

Even as he spoke, Gutrune, the fair lady of the
Gibichungs, came out from her room at one side
of the hall, bearing a drinking-horn, which she
offered to Siegfried. It was customary in those
days that a maiden should offer wine to a guest
coming to the house of her race. So Siegfried,
without a thought, lifted the horn and drank the
mixture, saying softly to himself: “ Briinnhilde,
I drink to you!”

But, alas! it was not wine that was in the
drinking-horn, but the love-potion—the terrible
magic potion—which, as it touched the hero’s
lips, laid a cloud upon his memory and a fire
within his heart, so that he straightway forgot
Briinnhilde and loved only Gutrune, the lady of
the Gibichungs.


GUTRUNE AND SIEGFRIED
The Fall of the Gibichungs III

As he gazed passionately upon her, she turned
away, filled, perhaps, with momentary regret for
what she had done, and left the hall in silence.

When she had gone, Siegfried stood looking
after her for a moment, and then, arousing him-
self from his reverie, turned to Gunther, asking
if he were married.

The Rhine Chief replied that he had never
wed, because only one bride would satisfy him,
and she was out of reach of even his valor; for
she was surrounded by fire, and only he who
could pass through the blaze could win her.

Merrily, Siegfried replied that he would go
through the flame and bring the bride to Gun-
ther if he might have in payment Gutrune for
his wife.

And the two heroes went through a ceremony,
very binding in those days, which was called the
Oath of Brotherhood. It meant that they must
remain as faithful to each other as though they
were really brothers, and that should one prove
false to his vow the other would have the right
to kill him.

Then the two entered the boat and went
away down the Rhine, Siegfried to take Gun-
ther’s shape, with the aid of the Tarnhelm, and
go through the fire to win the maiden; Gunther
112 The Story of the Rhinegold

to wait on the banks of the Rhine until Sieg-
fried brought him the bride, and then took his
own shape once more.

Hagen, left alone in the hall, mused deeply as
night drew near.

“ Siegfried, unknowing, brings his own bride
to the Rhine. He brings me the Ring!’ He
paused, and then continued, in tones of bitter
scorn: “Little as I deem you all, you brave
partners and happy companions—small as you
are, and as I hold your natures—you still may
serve the need of the Nibelung’s son!”



Motif of the Love-Potion


Motif of the Magic-fire Circle

e

CHAPTER II

THE WALKURES’ ROCK ONCE MORE

AS afternoon darkened into evening Briinn-
hilde sat on her high rock looking at the Ring
on her finger with loving eyes, and thinking ten-
derly of the hero who had placed it there, and
who was perhaps, even then, leaving the paths
of men to come to her side once more.

Suddenly a flash of lightning appeared across
the sky and a clap of thunder sounded far away.
Strange sounds broke the stillness, sounds well
remembered by her: the hoofs of wind-horses
speeding through the clouds, the whistling of
rushing blasts, the ring of steel armor. Starting
up in wild excitement, she saw a black thunder-

cloud rushing towards the rock.
8
114 The Story of the Rhinegold

“Briinnhilde! Sister! Are you asleep or
awake?” called the clear voice of one of the
warrior goddesses, as a war-horse sprang to earth .
from the midst of the clouds.

With a cry of joy Briinnhilde ran to meet the
Walkiire, saying:

“Waltraute, truest sister, welcome!” and ask-
ing tenderly about the rest of the maidens and
her father Wotan.

But Waltraute was sad and anxious, and seem-
ed in fearful haste. She interrupted Briinnhilde’s
passionate description of her hero and her happi-
ness in his love by sad words of the gloom that
reigned in Walhalla. She told the story of the
hewing of the World-Ash, the fagots piled high
about the great palace; of the gods and heroes
assembled in awe. She spoke of Wotan sitting
in silence holding his broken spear in his hand.

She said that once, and once only, had he
spoken, and that he had then said: ‘“ When the
Rhine daughters gain from Briinnhilde the Ring
the world will be released from the power of the
spell.”

Waltraute begged Briinnhilde to give her the
Ring, so that she, Waltraute, might carry it to
the Rhine Maidens.

“If you wish, you may ward off the shadow
The Walkires’ Rock Once More II5

of the gods,” said the Walkiire, kneeling at her
sister’s feet. But Briinnhilde looked at her as
though in a trance.

“ Like a sorrowful dream it seems—this that
you tell me. I do not understand it. I am no
longer one of the gods. You, pale sister—what
have you to do with me?”

Passionately, Waltraute asked for the Ring
which she wore, but Briinnhilde replied that it
was Siegfried’s love-gift, and that she would
never give it up. Again Waltraute besought
her, for the sake of the gods, the bright mighty
gods, who were going to destruction, to give up
the magic circlet.

Briinnhilde answered quietly that she prized
love more than the welfare of all the gods, and
that the Ring was dearer to her than the palace
of Walhalla; and she bade Waltraute be gone,
refusing once for all to give up Siegfried’s
gift.

“Woe! woe!” wailed the Walkiire, speeding
wildly away. ‘Woe for you, sister! Woe for
the gods in Walhalla! Woe!”

She was gone, amid thunder and rushing
winds,

Sitting again on the rock alone, Briinnhilde
looked down to where the guarding fire-circle
116 The Story of the Rhinegold

burned brighter and brighter. A horn-call
sounded in the distance.

“Siegfried!” cried Briinnhilde, rushing for-
ward.

But who was that who sprang from out the
fire and stood before her? Not Siegfried, sure-
ly, but some stranger—a stranger with face
partly masked by a curious helmet of some
sort.

No wonder that she did not recognize her
hero in the man before her, who, by the aid of
the Tarnhelm, bore the semblance of Gunther,
the Gibichung. He told her that he had come
to take her away with him and marry her;
and when she ordered him to yield before the
strength of the mighty Ring on her finger, he
caught her hand and tore the circlet from it,
placing it on his own.

“Now yield to me! You must be my wife,”
he commanded; and, weak and powerless, Briinn-
hilde was conquered and led away by the war-
rior, who was none other than Siegfried —had
she but known it!—Siegfried, her hero, who did
not remember her at all, and only looked upon
her as the bride of his brother-hero Gunther, the
bride that must be delivered safely into the real
Gibichung’s hand.


BRUNNHILDE AND SIEGFRIED
The Walkires’ Rock Once More 117

For Siegfried cared nothing for her himself,
and thought only of the fair maiden down in the
great hall built upon the shore of the Rhine—
Gutrune, the lady of the Gibichungs.

And that was how the Nibelung’s spell again
brought sorrow and misery to the wearer of the
Rhinegold’s Ring.



Tarnhelm Motif


Motif of Revenge

CHAPTER III

THE RHINE CHIEF'S BRIDE

IT was night on the Rhine. Hagen sat asleep
before the hall of the Gibichungs, leaning against
a pillar. Before him crouched his Nibelung fa-
ther, Alberich, who had come to speak with him
through his dreams.

They spoke of the Rhinegold in mysterious
undertones, Hagen in the voice of one who
talks in sleep. They spoke of the Dusk of the
Gods which drew near so quickly, and of the
might which would be theirs when the Ring
fell into their hands. And until dawn came
they concocted plots deep and cruel.

Then the Nibelung’s small, dark figure disap-
The Rhine Chief’s Bride 11g

peared in a pale mist, and all that was left of
him was the echo of his voice, as he called,
faintly, while vanishing :

“Be true, Hagen, my son; be true! Be true!
True!” The voice died away into silence.

As the dawn broke and the rising sun was
mirrored brightly in the Rhine, Hagen awoke
with a start. At the same moment Siegfried
appeared, saying that he had hastened to the
hall of the Gibichungs with the aid of the Tarn-
helm, leaving Gunther and his bride to follow
in a barge up the Rhine.

As. Gutrune came out to meet him, he hailed
her exultantly, saying that he had won: her.as
wife when he brought the wild mountain- maid
to her brother. He told her and Hagen the tale
of how he had gone through the fire and found
the woman within the enchanted circle, and had
conquered her, and had brought her to Gunther,
who had waited at the foot of the mountain.
The only thing that he did not tell them was
that he had torn the Ring from the woman’s fin-
ger, and so vanquished her. Strange to say, he
had forgotten that as completely as he had for-
gotten his old love for Briinnhilde and his first
journey through the fire. Now, when he looked
at the bright circlet on his finger, he remembered
120 Lhe Story of the Rhinegold

that it was one which he had obtained at. Hate
Hole, but had forgotten that it had ever left his
hand. So that was the beginning of more sorrow.

Siegfried and Gutrune went into the hall to-
gether, and Hagen called the vassals about him
from far and wide to welcome the bride to her
new home on the Rhine. When the barge came
slowly up the river, strong warriors plunged into
the water to meet it, and dragged the boat close
to the shore. From the hall came Gutrune, full of
welcome and kindness. For you know she had
no idea it was Briinnhilde whom she had caused
the hero to forget, and she was really glad to
greet her brother’s bride. At her side walked
Siegfried, and they were followed by innumer-
able women who had come trooping out to be-
hold the new lady of the Gibichungs.

But, as Gunther led his pale, sad bride from
the boat, she suddenly stood still, trembling and
shuddering, and staring with wild, bewildered
eyes at Siegfried. Her voice shook and her
face was as white as death as she asked how he
came there with Gutrune; and when he showed
that he had totally forgotten her and looked
upon her only as Gunther’s bride, she staggered
and sank into the young hero’s arms, whisper-
ing, faintly and sorrowfully :
The Rhine Chief's Bride 121

“ Siegfried knows me not !”

Calling to Gunther to come near, the Volsung
pointed to him and bade poor Briinnhilde arouse
herself, for the great chief’s sake. But, as Sieg-
fried stretched out his hand, she saw the Ring,
and, starting wildly up, asked furiously how he
came by it—saying that Gunther had torn it
from her on the Walkiires’ rock, and demand-
ing of Gunther why he had given it to Siegfried.

Now, of course, the Rhine Chief had never
even seen the Ring, and thought, not unnatu-
rally, that Siegfried had taken it from Briinnhilde
and then kept it for himself from a feeling of
greed and a desire to possess it. The young
hero, when questioned, merely answered that it
was one he had found at Hate Hole, and that
he had won it from no woman, but a monster
worm which he had killed. And he thought
that he was telling the whole truth, for it was
all that he could remember.

But Brinnhilde, who knew nothing of the
magic-potion, saw in his words the deepest and
most terrible deceit, and she burst into such rage
and despair that Siegfried declared that he would
try to satisfy her by swearing the Spear-Oath.

So Hagen held out his spear, and Siegfried
placed his hand upon the point and declared by
122 The Story of the Rhinegold

the haft of war that he had never harmed the
woman, or been for a moment false to Gunther,
and bade that very spear bring him death if he
had.

Breaking into the circle which the warriors
made around Siegfried, Briinnhilde declared him
a traitor and deceiver, and called down the ven-
geance of the gods upon his head.

For her heart was broken, poor Briinnhilde!
and she hardly knew what she said or did; so
that when Siegfried and the others ceased try-
ing to pacify her and left her alone with Gun-
ther and Hagen, and when the latter crept up
to her and said that he would avenge her wrongs
and kill the hero who had made her love him
and had then deserted her, she told him how to
do it. She said that she had placed divine spells
. of protection upon every part of his body ex-
cept his back.

“For I knew,” said Brinnhilde, with momen-
tary tenderness, “ that he was too brave to ever,
in flight, turn that to an enemy.”

“ At his back shall my spear-point strike!” said
Hagen, exultantly. ‘In his back shall he be
wounded unto death!”

Raising her arms towards the sky, Brunnhilde
broke into wild, passionate words of revenge.


GUNTHER AND BRUNNHILDE
The Rhine Chief’s Bride 123

For she had almost lost her reason through the
shock of sorrow at finding Siegfried false to her,
and she declared that that was the sacrifice that
was needed to lift the sorrow off so many hearts;
that was the one great deed that must bring
relief after so much misery. Earth and heaven
cried aloud for one thing, she said —Siegfried’s
death.

As she stood, almost transfigured by her own
words, sounds of joy and merriment drew near,
and the wedding procession of Siegfried and
Gutrune passed by. Gunther caught Briinn-
hilde’s hand and drew her into the crowd of
men and women, and she passed on with the
other bridal couple to be married.

Loudly and merrily rang the laughter, and the
sounds of festivity rose high. But Hagen, like a
dark, evil spirit, laughed, because he seemed at
last so near to his desires.


Fate Motif

CHAPTER IV

ON THE BANKS OF THE RHINE

WHERE the steep rocks led down to the river
Rhine, and the low shrubs grew in green luxu-
riance, where the wildest part of the wild forest
was mirrored in the water, came the three water-
fairies, Woglinde, Flosshilde, and Wellgunde, to
sing in the quiet, golden light of the late after-
noon. They sang sorrowfully and regretfully of
their lost treasure; they circled like wind-ripples
upon the surface of the Rhine, and tossed the
On the Banks of the Rhine 125

bright drops of water about with a soft, splash-
ing sound as of tiny bells. The river murmured
like a harp lightly played upon by fairy fin-
gers, and the voices of the nymphs were as
sweet as the tones of the wind moving through
the rushes.

To this lovely, magic-haunted spot came Sieg-
fried, looking for a bear which he had wound-
ed during a hunt, and had tracked through the
woods. The nymphs began to talk to him, and
as he answered merrily they drew nearer to the
rock where he stood, telling him that they would
see that he found his bear if. he would, in pay-
ment, give them the Ring that he wore upon his
finger.

Laughingly, he answered that he had slain a
dragon before he could obtain that Ring, and
that it would be foolish to give it up now for
the sake of a bear.

After a few more merry words the nymphs be-
came suddenly serious. Rising together to the
surface of the water, they raised their arms tow-
ards him and spoke solemn words of proph-
ecy. They told him that sadness awaited him;
that the Ring would bring him nothing but
ill-hap; that it was made of the stolen Rhine-
gold, and that a spell had been laid upon it
126 The Story of the Rhinegold

that brought sorrow and death to whoever pos-
sessed it.

“ As the monster worm fell,” said the Rhine
Maidens, slowly, “so will you fall—and soon!
Give it to us, that we may hide it in the river!
For that alone can break the spell.”

And, as Siegfried laughingly shook his head,
they continued to plead still more earnestly.
They bade him avoid the spell, saying that its
history had been woven into the Norns’ great
rope; that it must be shunned and feared. But
Siegfried scoffed at the Norns and the rope, and
said that Fafner had warned him of this danger
long ago; that he had no fear of his life, and
would freely fling that away.

“Farewell, Siegfried!” said the Rhine Maid-
ens, as they turned to leave him. “A stately
woman will soon possess your circlet. She will
better do our bidding. Let us go to her!”

They swam swiftly away, leaving Siegfried
laughing on the shore. For he thought noth-
ing of their words, believing their prophecies
to have been threats because he would not give
them what they wished.

Laughing still, he blew a long call on his horn,
which was answered on all sides by the other
hunters, who soon made their appearance, most
On the Banks of the Rhine 127

of them carrying game of some sort — bear or
deer; and Hagen, who was one of the first to
come into the little glen down by the Rhine,
made sport of Siegfried, because he, the best
hunter of them all, had no booty to show for his
day’s sport.

Siegfried laughingly told them about the three
Rhine Maidens who had warned him of his ap-
proaching death; and Gunther, moving apart
from the others with a curious shadow and sad-
ness on his face, started terribly, while Hagen
merely laughed a harsh, revengeful laugh.

Gunther did not forget his Oath of Brother-
hood; and, though he believed that Siegfried
had déceived him, he hated to harm him, or allow
him to be harmed, without better cause. He
shuddered and shook his head when the young
hero brought him the horn of wine. The rest
of the hunters flung themselves down under. the
trees, and drank merrily and rested in the deep-
ening golden light of the afternoon, but Gunther
sat apart from them, gloomy and silent, like one
who dreamed sad dreams, and could not arouse
himself.

At last, Siegfried, noticing his depression, said
that he would tell him the story of his boyhood,
if it would amuse and cheer him.
128 The Story of the Rhinegold

And sitting down on the stump of a great
tree, with his shield and weapons at his feet, and
on all sides the warriors listening eagerly to his
words, the young Volsung began his tale, and
Hagen stood near, leaning on his spear, a look
of grim expectation on his dark face.

It was of Mime that Siegfried spoke first,
Mime and the life in the cave; the forging of
Nothung, and finally the journey to Hate Hole,
and the slaying of the monster worm, Fafner.

He told how the Dragon’s blood had given
him power to understand the language of birds;
and, as he spoke, memories of the soft woodland
voices and the rustling of the trees passed ten-
derly across his mind. He told of the winning
of the Rhinegold Ring and the Tarnhelm, of the
treachery of Mime, and of how he had killed him
with Nothung.

Then he paused, for Hagen came up to him
with a drinking-horn filled with wine, which he
bade him swallow, saying it would help to clear
his memory. Siegfried raised it to his lips and
drank, and Hagen stood near, leaning on his
spear, and smiling grimly. For the wine had
in it something that would, indeed, bring back
the young hero’s memory, and Hagen knew
that, when he remembered Briinnhilde, he would


HAGEN AND SIEGFRIED
On the Banks of the Rhine 129

be as one deaf and blind to all else, and would
so prove an easy victim.

Siegfried put down the drinking-horn, and,
after a moment’s silence, resumed his tale, while
the memory of the forest sounds passed softly
and constantly across his brain. He told, in ten-
der tones, how the bird had sung to him of a
glorious bride sleeping amid fire far away; and
of how he had passed through the enchanted
flame-circle, and, with a kiss, awakened her from
her long sleep; and he spoke her name with such
love and tenderness that even Hagen’s wicked
heart should have been touched for a moment;
but he only stood leaning on his spear and smil-
ing—always smiling—as one smiles who has
knowledge greater than his fellows.

Gunther started up wildly as Siegfried whis-
pered the name of “Briinnhilde”; for the Rhine
Chief understood all now, and realized in that
short time what deep wickedness it must have
been that had parted the noble Volsung and his
bride. There had been no deceit, no treachery,
no broken Oath of Brotherhood — none of the
wickedness had been on the young hero’s side.
Gunther dropped his head in horror.

But Hagen took a step forward.

“See you those Ravens?” he said, slowly, point-

9
130 The Story of the Rhinegold

ing to two great black birds flying upward from
the Rhine. They were Wotan’s King- Ravens,
which had been sent out to bring tidings back
to Walhalla, and who were returning there with .
news. that the Dusk of the Gods was at hand.
Siegfried turned to gaze after them as they flew.
It was growing late. The yellow afternoon light
was deepening to red gold. The sun was set-
ting. The Ravens flew away, their broad. black
wings bathed in the ruddy light, and it was like
the light of a great fire.

“They arouse in me revenge!” cried Hagen,
and he raised his spear and stabbed the young
Volsung in the back. Siegfried staggered wild-
ly; and then, raising his shield, tried to crush
Hagen with it. But then even his great strength
left-him, and he fell back upon the ground, while
the warriors drew near with exclamations of
horror. and faces on which a great awe had
fallen.

“JT have been revenged,” said Hagen, and pass-
ed up the rocks and out of sight amid the grow-
ing dusk. The sunset was as red as blood now.
There was an ominous look in its lurid light—
yet a strange peace also. It lay on the head and
figure of the young hero like a king’s crown and
robe.


AFTER SIEGFRIED’S DEATH
On the Banks of the Rhine 131

In the hush that had fallen, Siegfried raised
himself upon his arm and spoke.

He spoke of Briinnhilde, his bride; again
he seemed to be on the Walkiires’ rock; again
she lay before him asleep; again he awakened
her with a kiss) He seemed to look into her
eyes, to hear her voice; she was his once
more.

And with the words “ Briinnhilde beckons to
me! Greeting!” Siegfried sank back and died.
And the last light from the setting sun went out
of the sky.

It was very dark—very dark and silent. The
warriors raised the hero upon their shoulders and
bore him up the rocks. After a while the moon
rose, and the pale light touched the helmets
of the men and Siegfried’s armor as the proces-
sion passed up through the shadows. A mist
was rising from the Rhine, and it was very
still.

Siegfried was dead, the last of his race—the
noble race of Volsungs. He was the bravest of
them all, this son of Siegmund and Sieglinde,
who had so loved each other. He had done
many great deeds with his good sword No-
thung. He had been a courageous man and the
highest hero in the world, and he had won the
132 The Story of the Rhinegold

love of Briinnhilde, the noblest woman ever born.

And he was dead—Siegfried, the Volsung.



Death Motif


Motif of the Dusk of the Gods

CHAPTER V

THE LAST TWILIGHT

ALONE through the great hall of the Gibi-
chungs wandered Gutrune, awaiting Siegfried’s
return from the hunt. Going to Briinnhilde’s
chamber in the hope of finding a companion
in her anxiety, she saw that the room was emp-
ty, and remembered that she had seen, some
time before, a woman’s figure descend towards
the Rhine. As she thought of her brother’s
wild, strange bride, Gutrune shuddered. She
moved restlessly about the hall, listening for
the clear horn-call that always heralded the
coming of the Volsung.

Suddenly, Hagen appeared with a look of tri-
umph on his dark, evil face; and, directly after-
134 The Story of the Rhinegold

wards, many people came running, in wild con-
fusion, carrying torches, and lamenting the hero’s
death. And, finally, came the warriors bearing
Siegfried upon a great bier.

With wails of anguish, Gutrune flung herself
on her knees beside her hero, and pushed Gun-
ther away wildly when he strove to comfort
her, calling him the murderer of her husband.

But Gunther denied the charge, and pointed
to Hagen, accusing him, in heart-broken tones, of
having slain their hero. Hagen answered, with
calm defiance, that he had, indeed, killed Sieg-
fried, and that he now demanded as booty the
Ring that gleamed upon the finger of the Vol-
sung.

Fiercely, Gunther claimed the circlet for his
sister, as widow’s dower. Hagen sprang forward
to attack him, and the half-brothers fought wild-
ly together for the Rhinegold Ring. At last,
with an exultant gesture, Hagen raised his sword
above his head; for, at his feet lay Gunther, the
Gibichung—dead.

“The Ring!” cried the Nibelung’s son, and
he sprang to the bier. But, ere he could touch
Siegfried’s hand where gleamed the circlet, it
raised itself threateningly. And even Hagen
started back in terror. On all sides people trem-
The Last: Twilight 135

bled with fear and horror. Gutrune screamed
wildly as her eyes encountered her brother’s
body on the ground.

Into this place of sorrow and confusion came
a tall woman, robed in white, with a face most
beautiful in its gentleness and strength; and be-
fore so calm and tender a gaze the crowd part-
ed, as though in awe, to let the woman pass.

It was Briinnhilde, who had heard from the
water-maidens everything that had happened
on the shores of the Rhine. She understood all
now. She understood that he had never been
false, knowingly; that his last loving words had
been of her—and her alone. And she had come,
with her great wisdom and her great love, to
bring peace to the turbulent hearts gathered
about Siegfried’s bier.

She stood for along time gazing down on the
face of her hero— The highest hero of worlds,”
she called him. She looked around her and
smiled upon the confusion and sorrow, and, be-
fore the tenderness and solemn sweetness of that
smile, the confusion seemed to die away and the
sorrow seemed but as something too small to be
shown.

Piteously, Gutrune sobbed out words of regret
for the wrong which had been done Briinnhilde,
136 The Story of the Rhinegold

and reproached Hagen for his share in the plot.
But Briinnhilde hardly heard.

In slow, solemn tones, she ordered a funeral
pyre to be lighted on the banks of the Rhine,
and, bending over Siegfried, she spoke tenderly
of his love and of his nobility and truth.

Then, turning away, she raised her arms on
high and broke into sublime words, in which
she reproached Wotan for his wrath, and added
that already his Ravens were on their way to
Walhalla to carry the long-deferred tidings. of
the last Twilight—so close at hand.

“Rest! Rest! O gods!’ she said, softly, and
paused. She turned towards Siegfried again and
drew the Ring from his finger. Then she spoke
to the three invisible Rhine children, and told
them to take the circlet from her ashes when
she had been burned with her hero.

The pyre was erected now, and Siegfried’s
body had been placed upon it. Grani was led
in, and Briinnhilde laid her arm upon his neck
tenderly, and spoke of the warrior who was dead
and of the leap into the flames they were both
about to take. Wildly, she seized a torch and
lighted the pyre; and, as the flames rose high,
she sprang upon the horse’s back and raised him
for a leap.
‘The Last Twilight 137

“Siegfried! Siegfried! See!” she cried—and
her voice echoed both far and near. “ Gladly
greets thee thy bride!”

Into the flames sprang Grani, the stanch war-
horse, and the Walkiire was gone from the eyes
of men forever. But, behold! Her deed
brought release from the sin and sorrow of many
years.

The flames, rising’ high and higher, made a
great fiery wall between the earth and sky. The
Rhine Maidens swam up to the shore and caught
a bright circlet lying near in the midst of a heap
of ashes. Hagen, springing after it, was lost in
the Rhine’s rushing waters forever.

But now a wonderful sight met the gaze of the
awe-stricken people crouching in the hall of the
Gibichungs.

In the high heavens, Walhalla’s stately towers
appeared in a bright ring of fire. The fagots
made from the World-Ash had at last caught
fire. Dimly could be seen the great array of
gods and heroes awaiting the Last Twilight,
and the end.

Wildly, and still more wildly, leaped the flames.
Walhalla was surrounded with red fire—it could
no longer be seen. A fearful light glowed upon
eatth and heaven.
138 The Story of the Rhinegold

Lo! the Dusk of the Gods was come.
* * * % *

And that was how the Last Twilight came to
Walhalla, and how Briinnhilde lifted the spell off
the world and expiated the old sins of so many
years before.

And that was how the Golden Age came to
an end, and a better and nobler era of truth and
happiness reigned upon the earth.

So the enchanted Rhinegold came back to the
hands of its first guardians—the maidens of the
river; and, after great sorrow and turmoil, there
was at last peace.



Motif of Briinnhilde’s Expiation

FINIS