Citation
Tommy the adventurous

Material Information

Title:
Tommy the adventurous
Cover title:
Tommy the adventurous, the story of a brother & a sister
Portion of title:
Story of a brother and a sister
Creator:
Cartwright, S. E
Copping, Harold, 1863-1932 ( Illustrator )
Blackie & Son
Place of Publication:
London ;
Glasgow ;
Dublin
Publisher:
Blackie and Son, Limited
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[1],192, 32 p., [3] leaves of plates : ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Behavior -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Aunts -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Interpersonal relations -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Imagination -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Thieves -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Curiosity -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1898 ( rbprov )
Juvenile literature -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
Children's literature ( fast )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Ireland -- Dublin
Scotland -- Glasgow
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations signed by Harold Copping.
General Note:
Engraved title page.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
General Note:
Pictorial front cover and spine.
Statement of Responsibility:
by S.E. Cartwright ; with three illustrations by Harold Copping.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026624219 ( ALEPH )
ALG3758 ( NOTIS )
259708632 ( OCLC )

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Full Text




NORWICH

oe BOARD.



2 La BUYER. Ltr, SO | iN
ri a x



AWARDED ane

For regularity of attendance,

good conduct, and proficiency.

GEORGE WHITE,

CHAIRMAN OF PHE BOARD.



SYDNEY. COZENS-HARDY,

clean

es WN











J. & S, 4000. 3,97, F. NO. 42,

The Baldwin Library

KiB















M3
*€4’ TALL STERN-LOOKING MAN SEIZED FLORA BY THE ARM

AND TOMMY BY THE COLLAR.”



TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS

BY

Ss. E. CARTWRIGHT

Author of ‘Such a Popular Girl”, ‘ Almost a Heroine”, &c.

WITH THREE ILLUSTRATIONS BY HAROLD COPPING



LONDON
BLACKIE & SON, Litrmp, 50 OLD BAILEY, EC.
GLASGOW AND DUBLIN
1898



CONTENTS.

CHAP. Page
I. Aunt Jann’s COMPANIONS,. » »« » 6 + + « « 7
TDs TLOMMY IN! TOWN eu feces. Soe Sine coor eue eral

TiI> Frorna’s Femnp,. 6 6 es oe ee Re ee re OD
Vo Der MISTA RB eee ee ee eee eles abe eee,
V. Tommy Hsoapms rromM tHE Dunaron, . .. . . 65
VI. Apour Cuevmr Boys, . . . 1.22 0 « « + 88
VII. Av vam Reorory, . . « « © © © «© «© © +» 100
VIII. Tum Sonoon Feast, . . . 1. 1 «© «© «© © «© + LIT
IX. Tam Iratran Again, . . 2. . 6» «© « « « 184
X. Dousrrun KinpNess, .. . . se es . 149
XI. How to Buiwp a Hovusz,. . . . .... . 165

XII. Wetcome Homp,. . . « » « 0 « ites 180



ILLUSTRATIONS.

Page
‘“‘A TALL STERN-LOOKING MAN SEIZED FLORA BY THE

ARM AND ToMMY BY THE CoLuar,” . . . Frontis. 61

‘WITH A ORY OF TRIUMPH TOMMY RUSHED HEADLONG ON

PHM OPHIER, os Geo eck hehe ON 8 oie hee nee e ee Oe

“To's ALL RIGHT,—HN’S GONE; FANOY IF HE'D COME

BAOK AND CAUGHT US!” , . 6 © © © » « « » 124







TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

CHAPTER I.

AUNT JANE’S COMPANIONS.

3] BOY and girl were standing side by side on the
4] door-step of a country house, disconsolately
watching the back of a carriage that was fast
disappearing in the distance. They were feel-
ing unusually downcast, having just parted with their
parents for—as it seemed to them—the almost intermin-
able period of a month. However, even the depth of
low spirits brought about by this separation could not
long keep them silent.

“They always come back again,” ventured Flora, with
the hopefulness of seven.

“Ah! but this time they are crossing the sea. Very
likely they’ll be shipwrecked,” rejoined Tommy, his hope-
fulness subdued by an extra year of experience.

“T thought it was only sailors who were shipwrecked,”
urged the little girl.

“You're a silly thing, that’s what you are,” said
Tommy, in such a tone of conviction that it left no room
for argument. “Of course, you can’t know anything





8 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

about the sea,” he continued, “when you haven't yet
begun to learn geography. Why, I dare say you don’t
even know the difference between a bay and an isthmus!”

“T don’t believe you do yourself!” exclaimed Flora
defiantly.

This abrupt statement happened to be perfectly true,
and Tommy thought it best to change the subject.

“ After all, it’s no good talking about lessons when we
have a holiday. We might as well be doing them,” he
remarked with some sense. “Besides, we have to look
after Aunt Jane, as she is our visitor. You know Mama
particularly said we were to be companions to her. She
repeated it twice just before the carriage started.”

“But how can we be companions to a grown-up per-
son?” interrupted Flora.

“T dare say you can’t, but I can,” said Tommy con-
fidently. ‘You seem to forget,” he added, “that I was
eight last week, and shall go to school and wear cloth
clothes at Christmas.”

“Nurse says you won't find them nearly so comfortable
as sailor suits,” interposed the little girl.

“What does Nurse know about it, indeed? Has she
ever worn cloth knickerbockers, or sailor suits either, I
should like to know?”

Poor Flora was silent, being now thoroughly puzzled.
Theoretically she knew that Nurse was always in the
right. And yet Tommy’s argument seemed sound.

However, Tommy had often observed that though his
sister was rather slow at retorting to arguments, she
would return again and again to the same point until
she had thoroughly mastered the case. The only chance
of peace lay in an instant change of subject.



AUNT JANES COMPANIONS. 9

“Tt doesn’t seem as if we were obeying Mama’s last
words,” he remarked. “I should think Aunt Jane has
been by herself for at least a quarter of an hour. I’m
going to look after her.”

“So am I!” cried Flora, suddenly losing all interest in
the question of clothes. And the two children ran in-
doors together.

Miss Jane York was an elderly lady, being aunt to the
children’s father, at whose request she had consented to
leave her comfortable London house for a month and
mount guard over her young nephews and nieces during
their parents’ absence. The invitation had fitted in well
with her plans, as she had arranged to have her house
painted that summer, which, under other circumstances,
would have necessitated a prolonged stay in sea-side lodg-
ings, where the cookery might have been indifferent and
the drainage doubtful.

Now, Oakdale Court was a thoroughly comfortable
country house in a beautiful neighbourhood, and it
would be a pleasant occupation to superintend the
training of Fred’s and Mary’s dear little children for a
few weeks. That was what poor Miss York said to her-
self. She had only seen the children now and then for
a few minutes in the drawing-room, and retained a pleas-
ing recollection of pink cheeks, downcast blue eyes, and
clean white muslin frocks. Besides, they had an excellent
nurse, and a most competent daily governess who took
charge of the two elder children during the whole morn-
ing. Consequently the responsibility did not seem ex-
cessive.

The bustle of saying good-bye to the travellers being
over, Miss York went straight to her room to rest. She



10 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

had travelled down from London the day before, and her
head was still aching from the effects of the railway jour-
ney. An hour’s rest on the sofa before luncheon was
what she felt she required, and to ensure getting it with-
out any interruptions she prudently locked the door of
her bedroom. Determining to give herself every chance
of recovery, she did not even take a book, but lay with
closed eyes dreamily devising little plans for enter-
taining the dear children who had been left under her
charge.

In the afternoon, if sufficiently rested, she intended to
go for a drive, and it occurred to her that Tommy and
Flora would probably consider it a great treat to be
allowed to accompany her. She was a kind old lady,
and fully intended that the children should be so happy
for the next month as never once to miss their parents.
‘When she came to think it over, the poor little things
had looked rather downcast that morning, in spite of
being given a holiday to cheer them up.

Aunt Jane was not personally acquainted with many
children, but she had once read a beautiful poem about
a pet dog that pined away, refused food, and died when
its master went abroad, and it was not unnatural to
suppose that children were at least as affectionate as
dogs. Supposing anything of the sort happened to dear
chubby Tommy, or pretty golden-haired Flora, whilst
their parents were away! Aunt Jane’s brow wrinkled
with anxiety.

The fate of the two little ones did not worry her so
much. She felt a sort of confidence that Nurse would
be able to curb their infant affections sufficiently to insist
upon their eating. At this moment a terrific noise in



AUNT JANE’S COMPANIONS. Il

the passage suddenly caused her to start up, trembling
with alarm.

“What is it?” she cried feebly. ‘Oh, dear! my poor
head! What is it?”

“Tt’s us!” shouted Tommy, battering at the door for
admission; “it’s only us coming to see how you are
getting on. And Flora was in such a hurry she caught
her toe in the mat and tumbled down. Didn’t you hear
a bump? She knocked her head against the wall and
dropped the vase she was bringing you.”

“What vase was she bringing me? I really can’t hear
what you say through that door, wait a moment till I
open it.” And Aunt Jane rose languidly from the sofa,
and began to straighten her cap in front of the looking-
glass.

“Oh, don’t trouble!” rejoined Tommy; “TI will make
you hear right enough.” And putting his lips to the
keyhole he bawled: ‘It’s all her own fault. I wanted
to carry it because she’s too young, and she pushed me
away and ran upstairs in such a hurry that she tumbled
at the top. That’s how it happened. And the water is
all spilt, and bits of broken china everywhere. She'll cut
her hands I expect, but she won’t listen—”

“You haven’t said it all!” interrupted a shrill voice
mingled with tears. ‘You haven't said that they were
my own flowers out of my very own garden, that I’d
picked for Aunt Jane. Better than any you've got, so
you needn’t laugh at me. There!”

A loud shriek from Tommy irresistibly suggested the
" idea that his sister was revenging her want of luck on
his person with some sharp instrument.

“Tt was only a little pinch,” said Flora scornfully.



12 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“No, I haven’t a pin or a needle either! There now,
you can see!”

“Then your fingers are as sharp as pins,” answered
Tommy, ostentatiously rubbing his arm as he heard Miss
York unlocking the door. “And you're a sneak too,”
he added in a lower voice. ‘Only sneaks pinch. Luke
says so—and he knows. He was at school eight years
before he came here.”

“Papa said you were not to talk to the stable-boys,’
began Flora, just as Aunt Jane opened the door.

“Where is the broken vase?” said the old lady. “No,
don’t touch it, Tommy; you will only cut your fingers.
I will ring for the housemaid to come and sweep up the
bits. But, my dear children,” she exclaimed, putting up
her eye-glass and inspecting the fragments more nearly,
“what was it you broke? Surely not one of the picces
of Worcester china out of the drawing-room? Dear!
dear! how did you come to meddle with one of the
drawing-room ornaments? That was very naughty, you
know.”

“We couldn’t find anything else,” said the boy ob-
stinately, “and the flowers were dying. If Flora hadn’t
been so silly it would have been all right. Come on,”
he exclaimed, suddenly catching his sister's arm, “here
comes Nurse. We had better be off before she sees the
mess!” And in another moment the children were flying
headlong down the stairs.

After giving directions for the removal of the broken
china, and indulging in a few mournful laments over the
fate of the valuable vase, Miss York returned to her
room, and having carefully locked the door again lay
down upon her sofa, She had scarcely had time to

)



AUNT JANE’S COMPANIONS. 13

close her eyes and compose her mind to rest, when she
was roused up by the sound of muffled footsteps and a
gentle scratching on the door.

From sheer force of habit she was about to say “Come
in”, when she luckily reflected that the housemaid never
begged for admission in this way. The bare idea of that
highly respectable servant crawling down the passage on
hands and knees,—as from faintly audible sounds she
guessed her present visitor was doing,—was ridiculous
in the extreme. Besides, from certain low murmurings
she soon learned that two persons were encamped on the
mat. In fact, there could be no reasonable doubt that
after an absence of about five minutes Tommy and Flora
had returned to the attack.

“Aunt Jane,” whispered Tommy through the keyhole,
“we want to say something.”

Meeting with no reply, he repeated this observation
several times in louder and louder tones.

Miss York lay perfectly still and silent, hoping that if
the children received no answer they would soon tire of
waiting and go away. This plan seemed to succeed, for
presently there was complete silence, broken only by an
occasional low scratching sound.

“Look there!” cried Tommy suddenly, quite forgetting
in his excitement that he had intended to whisper.
“Just look, Flora! Isn’t it beautiful? And that’s only
the beginning. As she’s so sound asleep we'll scratch
all we meant to say on the outside of her door, and then
when she comes down to lunch she'll see it and know
what we—”

Miss York did not stay to hear more. Springing up,
she pulled open the door so quickly that both the chil-



14 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

dren fell forward on their faces. As for the neat brown
paint that she had vainly hoped to save, it was already
adorned with various wild flourishes and rudely-formed
letters.

Tommy recovered himself first, and rising to his feet
proceeded to explain his intentions and illustrate his
method of carrying them out.

“This is what I did it with,” he began, exhibiting an
old pocket-knife with a broken blade. “And this is how
I did it,” he continued, suddenly gouging a large piece
of paint off the door and offering it to Miss York for
inspection.

The poor old lady stood aghast. Without any clue to
the children’s motive their action seemed a deliberate
outbreak of vice, bordering on insanity. She turned
despairingly to Flora, whose innocent blue eyes were
fixed on a pair of rusty scissors that she was holding in
a menacing attitude.

“You naughty children! You very naughty children!”
was all Aunt Jane could find to say.

“You don’t understand,” began Tommy. “You think
we scratched the door because we liked doing it. Well,
that wasn’t the reason at all.” He paused for a moment
to contemplate affectionately the lump of paint on the
point of his broken knife. “It was a message to you,”
he continued. “We couldn’t get into your room or
make you hear, so we were going to write a sort of
letter to say that if you wanted us we were in the
garden—”

“We can’t write it now, because we've said it,” inter-
rupted Flora, looking regretfully at her scissors.

Tommy shook his head solemnly. ‘No, we can’t



AUNT JANE’S COMPANIONS, 15

write the letter now,” he repeated; “but,” and his face
lighted up with a happy thought, “we'd better scratch
out what we've written!”

Before Miss York could interfere the door was scored
with half a dozen deep cuts, compared with which the
original injuries were a mere nothing.

“That'll do,” cried Tommy, coolly shutting up his
knife, and taking not the slightest notice of his aunt’s
shriek of dismay. ‘Nobody can read it now,” he added
consolingly. ‘We don’t want everybody to read our
letters to you—we like them to be secret.”

Miss York was so bewildered by this explanation that
for a moment she stood speechless, pointing with a
trembling finger at the spoilt paint.

The children took advantage of her silence to run off
without further discussion.

“Tf you want us,” cried Tommy from the bottom of
the stairs, “you can shout to us out of the window; we
are sure to hear.”

Miss York returned to her room, and for the third
time composed herself to rest on the sofa. If there was
one thing more certain than another, it was that she had
no intention of shouting through the window, as her
nephew elegantly expressed it. She was only too thankful
to think that she had seen the last of the children for
the present.

“Tés very hard,” remarked Tommy, as he strolled
round the strawberry-bed—“ it’s very hard to-be a com-
panion to people who lock themselves into their bedrooms
and only come out to scold!”

“But we oughtn’t to have hurt the paint,” replied
Flora, who, now that her excitement was over, was



16 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

beginning to feel rather frightened at what she had
done.

“What's the good of saying that now?” inquired the
boy scornfully. ‘Besides, your scissors made bigger
scratches than my knife.”

“Both points scratched,” remarked Flora. In spite
of being rather frightened and repentant she could not
help feeling a little proud of having done exactly twice
as much damage as her brother.

“Only girls use scissors,” observed Tommy, who had
been half-jealous all along of his sister’s weapon; ‘and
I wonder what Nurse will say when she finds you’ve
taken them out of her workbox,” he continued viciously.

“They are only her very old ones. She hardly ever
uses them,” muttered Flora, feeling very aggrieved at
Tommy’s remarks, as he had distinctly encouraged her
to take the scissors, and, in fact, first put the idea into
her head.

Tommy frequently did this sort of thing, for, though
in the main a kind-hearted boy, it must be admitted
that he was unnecessarily fond of teasing his younger
sister. Now, however, he saw that he had gone too far,
as poor Flora was puckering up her face and preparing
to cry.

“Oh, you silly girl!” he said, squeezing her hand
with rough kindliness. ‘It was only a joke, don’t you
see? Nurse doesn’t mind about these old scissors. I
dare say she has quite forgotten that she has any scissors
by this time. Just come along and see if there are some
strawberries left on these beds.”

The children were well within their rights this time,

for when most of the strawberries had been picked, the
(11 829)



AUNT JANE’S COMPANIONS. 17

gardener removed the nets which were used to protect
the crop from the birds and allowed Tommy and Flora
to finish up the little fruit that remained. The search
after the scattered strawberries took them some time, and
their attention was too much absorbed for more talking.

“T do believe we've eaten them all,” said Flora at last,
rising from her knees and wiping her juicy fingers on her
pinafore.

“Oh, I say!” exclaimed Tommy suddenly, “we've
forgotten all about Aunt Jane; and after Mama told me
so particularly to look after her whilst they were away;
and of course visitors ought to be given things first.
But I am afraid there are no first or last strawberries
now,” he added, ruefully surveying the bed.

“Perhaps she doesn’t like strawberries, as she’s so
old,” suggested Flora.

But this pleasing supposition was soon dispelled, as
both the children remembered seeing their mother send
off a box of early fruit as a present to their aunt, before
she left London.

There was a melancholy silence for about a minute,
and then Tommy said decidedly: “We must get her
some gooseberries. They are not quite ripe, but I think
they will do.”

“How shall we get her to unlock the door again?”
inquired Flora, as they ran off to carry out this idea.

“Oh, Ive thought of all that,” replied Tommy, whose
mind, it must be owned, was remarkably nimble. “It
won't do to go knocking again, she'll only think we’ve
come to disturb her. Ive got a good plan; and goose-
berries are better for it, really, than strawberries, though
they aren’t quite so nice to eat.”
ri (829) B

i



18 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

All this time Aunt Jane was lying on the sofa in her
bedroom, trying to compose her shattered nerves and
rest her aching head. She closed her eyes and lay
quietly between sleeping and waking, just conscious of
the soft summer breeze that wafted the sweet scents of
the garden through the open window. It is true that
her enjoyment was slightly tinged by anxiety lest she
should catch cold; but the odour of the honeysuckle
was so delicious, and the effort of rising to close the
window so great, that she determined to risk it.

Aunt Jane never noticed that she had fallen asleep
until she began to dream. And her dream was not at all
a pleasant one. She fancied that she was working in a
coal-pit, when the roof began to give way. It all seemed
terribly real. She even felt the coal falling on her in
lumps, such as one puts on the fire, and in the midst of
her fright she had time to think how terribly the black
dust would dirty her white lace cap.

“T never will put on my best cap again to go down in
a coal-pit,” she thought. ‘No, it’s no use telling me that
the Lord Mayor orders it. If he wants to be smart he
can wear his cocked hat. Dear me! this is no joke!”

And indeed it was not. For at that moment there
was a loud shout of “Look out!” from the other miners,
followed by a tremendous fall of coal. Aunt Jane put
her hands over her face and screamed, feeling sure that
this time she could not possibly escape. And as she
screamed she woke.

“Now that was a very remarkable dream,” observed
the old lady, lying back on the sofa cushions and looking
up with intense relief at the perfectly solid white ceiling
overhead. ‘Ah! J know what must have put such a



AUNT JANE’S COMPANIONS. 19

ridiculous thing into my head,” she continued, as con-
sciousness gradually returned. “Of course I read in the
papers yesterday how the Lord Mayor was getting up
a subscription for the people who were injured in that
dreadful mining accident. Well, happily it was only
a dream!”

But was it? At that moment there was a real shout
of “Look out!” and a shower of hard objects fell all over
the room, one hitting Aunt Jane on the side of the nose.
She sat up, wondering if she could really be going mad.
But one glance on the floor explained it all. The carpet
was strewn, not with lumps of coal, but with hard green
gooseberries that had evidently been showered in through
the open window. Below on the gravel-path stood the
two children, holding a very dirty pocket-handkerchief,
into which they were plunging their hands, evidently
preparing for another throw.

Aunt Jane did not hesitate. She rang the bell and
gave some orders. In a very short space of time the
children were being led into the house, ignominously
taken prisoners by the nursemaid.

“And a fine mess your dress is in, Miss Flora!” she
said. ‘And clean on this morning too! Nurse says
you are to come and have it changed at once. And
Master Tommy is to go to Miss York in her room.”

Flora went off to the nursery rather envying her
brother, for she could not bear the fuss and trouble of
putting on clean frocks; and, besides, Nurse was sure to
have a good deal to say on the subject of the dirty one.
But perhaps after all Tommy had the more disagreeable
interview of the two. For when he found that Aunt
Jane had been a good deal hurt by the blow on her face,



20 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

and that the hard gooseberry had left quite a bruise on
her cheek, he felt heartily ashamed of his thoughtless-
ness. He was sensible enough to know that if the blow
had been on her eye the results might have been very
serious.

“We did not mean to hurt you a bit,” he began;
“only to give you a sort of jump. And the gooseberries
aren’t half bad, I’ve bitten several to try. You see, we
had finished the strawberries before we remembered that
you were a visitor, and ought to have things first.”

“Thank you for thinking of me,” said Aunt Jane, who
was certainly a very kind old lady. And Tommy felt
more ashamed of himself than ever

To show his sorrow he insisted upon getting a can of
hot water and helping Miss York to bathe her cheek, to
which attentions she submitted cheerfully, although it is
probable that she would have preferred the assistance of
her maid.

“Shall you write and tell Papa about the goose-
berries?” inquired Tommy anxiously as this operation
was coming to an end.

“No, I don’t wish to trouble your parents now that
they have gone abroad for a holiday,” said Aunt Jane.
“But I know when they return they are sure to ask if
you have all been good children, and it would have been
a great pleasure to me to have given them both a truth-
ful and a pleasant answer.”

“You shall be able to do so! You shall indeed!” cried
Tommy. “We won’t do one troublesome thing all the
month they are away.”

“Tm afraid that is expecting an impossibility,” sighed
Aunt Jane. “But if you will do your best, and try to



TOMMY IN TOWN. 21

show a little consideration for other people, I shall be
quite contented.”

Tommy promised faithfully that he would do his best,
and then at Miss York’s request left her to try and con-
clude her much interrupted rest on the sofa.

CHAPTER IL

TOMMY IN TOWN.

FTER what had occurred in the morning, Aunt Jane
must have been a very forgiving person to take
Tommy for a drive with her in the afternoon. But she
was quite determined to act kindly towards the children
whilst their parents were away; and Tommy’s plump
cheeks and engagingly simple smile never failed to soften
people’s hearts towards him. However, Miss York had
profited sufficiently by her experience of the morning
not to attempt taking both children out in the carriage.
If all went well, and the drive proved a success, Flora
might have her turn to-morrow. For the present she
was condemned to a quiet walk with the nursery party.
Tommy felt rather proud of sitting in the great open
carriage by the side of such a dignified old lady. He
sometimes went for drives with his mother in a little
pony-cart, and on one or two occasions he had been
squeezed into a corner of the wagonette, almost hidden
between the grown-up people. But now he was occupy-
ing the principal seat in the great open carriage that was
seldom used except for visitors, who were either too
grand or too infirm to climb higher. It was on beauti-



22 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

fully easy springs, and the cushioned-seat reminded
Tommy of a feather-bed. He wondered that his mother
so seldom drove in this delightful carriage, and preferred
rattling about everywhere in a tiny pony-cart. To be
sure, the pony really went quicker than the pair of fat
brown horses, who jogged along at the slowest of trots,
with their sleek sides shining like looking-glass in the sun.

Tommy glanced at his aunt, and then at himself. He
was sure they looked exactly like an old picture that
hung in the nursery, of the Queen and the Prince Consort
driving through Hyde Park. In the picture they were
bowing to the people on either side, and this Tommy
considered added greatly to the grace of their attitudes.
Almost before he thought about what he was doing he
made a low bow to an old man who was passing, who
immediately returned it in the most polite manner.
This was exceedingly gratifying. Tommy could not
resist bowing to the next person with exactly the same
result. It seemed to him after all not very difficult to
behave like a king or queen, and for the next few
minutes he continued to bow graciously to everybody
he met. A few people stared at him in surprise, but far
the greater number smiled and returned his salute.

“Who is that lady?” inquired Aunt Jane, turning
suddenly towards him. ‘I mean the one we have just
passed, who was nodding at you. Some friend of your
mother’s, I suppose?”

Tommy said nothing, being somewhat ashamed of the
way in which he had been amusing himself. Fortunately
at that moment they were approaching the town of Tor-
bury, and Miss York became so absorbed in considering
at what shop she could buy a simple bonnet for wearing



TOMMY IN TOWN. 23

in the country that she forgot to pursue the subject any
further.

Torbury was several miles from Tommy’s home, so
that a visit to it was something of an excitement.
Rather to Miss York’s relief he did not wish to come
into the shops with her, being afraid that if he once got
inside a house he should miss some of the wonders that
seemed to be perpetually passing in the streets. As the
carriage was waiting in front of a large milliner’s in the
chief street of the town, Tommy really saw a great deal
of life by merely sitting still and opening his eyes. In
the course of the first few minutes he counted that no
less than three policemen, four volunteers, and a monkey
on a barrel-organ went past within a few yards of him.
He could have touched the monkey by putting out his
hand; in fact the man very politely stopped close to the
carriage and played a little tune on the organ twice over.
When he had finished he waited for a moment, as if
expecting some applause. Tommy, who was always
anxious to be agreeable, gave him an encouraging smile,
and the man began the tune for the third time. When
it was at an end Tommy smiled again, but rather faintly,
as he was getting tired of the organ, and would have
been glad to turn away and look for fresh objects of
interest on the other side of the road. However, he felt
that it would be distinctly rude to turn his back on this
kind stranger who was taking so much trouble to amuse
him, so he sat patiently, trying not to look wearied of
the performance.

All at once the organ stopped. Tommy felt that this
was his opportunity, and that he must speak before the
tune began for the fourth time,



24 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“Thank you for playing to me,” he said, as gratefully
as he could. “The music was very nice indeed, but I
won't trouble you to stay here any longer. I daresay
you are busy.”

To his surprise the man did not move away, but taking
off his ragged cap held it out towards the carriage, at the
same time speaking rapidly in a foreign language.

“Dear me, this is dreadful!” thought Tommy. “If
that man is an Italian—and his face is so brown I think
he must be—I shall never make him understand that I
don’t want any more music. I wonder if Jones could
explain it to him.”

He glanced up at the old coachman’s broad back as
he sat half-asleep upon the box. Jones did not turn
round, never even haying noticed that the organ was
playing close to the carriage. Tommy did not like to
call out to him, and was wondering what to do next,
when the Italian began to speak in very broken Eng-
lish.

“A penny,” he said; “only one penny, one leetle
penny.” And as the boy stared at him in astonishment
at the funny foreign accent, he continued beseechingly:
“One leetle penny. We are hongrie, vary hongrie.”

Tommy turned scarlet as it occurred to him that this
was probably what the man had been waiting for at the
end of each tune. He put his hand in his pocket, and
drew out two dirty handkerchiefs, the broken knife, and
some string, but, as might have been expected, not the
smallest coin. He remembered, longingly, the money-box
on the corner of the nursery shelf, in which he kept all
his treasure, consisting of a half-crown and quite a heap
of pence and halfpence. But unfortunately a penny in



TOMMY IN TOWN. 25

his pocket would have been more useful than a bag of
gold at a distance.

“Tm so sorry, I haven’t any money here. Really I
haven't,” said Tommy apologetically, and much afraid
that the man would not believe him.

And indeed the poor Italian could scarcely believe
that this smartly-dressed little gentleman, sitting alone
in such a grand carriage, had nothing to give him.

“One leetle penny,” he repeated, clasping his hands.
“Only one leetle penny for bread.”

Tommy was so moved by this appeal that he felt he
must do something at once. ‘“ Wait a moment,” he cried.
“Tl ask Aunt Jane for some money.” And scrambling
out of the carriage he ran into the shop.

If the Italian did not quite understand his words, at all
events he could see that the boy meant kindly towards
him. He stood back against a wall and waited quietly
for Tommy’s return.

Now the shop into which Ronny rushed in search of
his aunt happened to be a large millinery and dress-
making establishment, and it must be owned that he felt
terribly shy when the glass door slammed behind him,
and he found himself in a large show-room, surrounded
by a number of very smartly-dressed ladies. His shy-
ness turned to real terror when he suddenly noticed that
several of the gayest ladies had no heads. But just as
he was preparing to fly from such a horrible sight, he
made the soothing discovery that after all they were
only wire frames on which various new dresses were
being displayed. However, there were several alive
ladies in the room also, and one of them,—who looked
like a duchess at least, and wore such a stiff black silk



26 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

dress that she couldn’t have tumbled down if she tried,—
came up to him and inquired what he wanted.

“Ts Aunt Jane here?” he asked timidly.

“Aunt Jane?” repeated the lady in some bewilder-
ment.

“Yes, Aunt Jane. She went in at this door a long
time ago, but I can’t see her here now.” And Tommy
looked carefully round the room, as if he thought Miss
York might be hiding under some of the piles of rich
silk and brocade that lay scattered about on the tables.

“The carriage from Oakdale Court is waiting outside
the door,” remarked a younger lady, advancing to join
in the discussion.

“Of course,” said Tommy eagerly; “that’s what we
came in. It’s my papa’s carriage, and Aunt Jane is
staying with us while he and Mama are away. But
Mama likes driving in the pony-trap best. She says it
goes quicker.”

“T think I know who you are looking for now,” said
the lady who resembled a duchess. ‘She is upstairs in
the millinery department. This young lady shall show
you the way.”

“Oh, thanks! I can find it right enough,” cried
Tommy; and anxious not to give any more trouble he
ran off up the stairs, and opened the first door he saw.

Exactly at that moment Miss York happened to be
standing in front of the looking-glass in the act of trying
on a new bonnet. She gave a violent start at the unex-
pected appearance of her impetuous little nephew, and
the lace bonnet catching in a glove-button was twitched
off her head, and hung suspended ridiculously from her
wrist. Now Miss York was an old lady who had a great



TOMMY IN TOWN. 27

regard for the proprieties of life, and it seemed to her
painfully shocking to be standing there before three
shop-women and a small boy, without any covering on
her head beyond a scanty twist of gray hairs. She col-
oured with confusion, and made a desperate effort to
release the entangled bonnet, at the same time threaten-
ing Tommy with instant punishment if he did not run
away at once.

It is needless to say that Tommy risked the punish-
ment and stayed. He had no intention of causing
annoyance, but he had never even imagined what Aunt
Jane would look like without a cap or a bonnet, and he
simply stood spell-bound before such an extraordinary
sight.

“Go away, you very naughty child!” cried Aunt Jane,
tugging at the bonnet with the energy of despair.

* Allow me, madam,” interposed one of the shop-
women, skilfully disentangling the lace and replacing
the bonnet on Miss York’s head.

This act instantly restored the old lady’s self-respect.
With her usual dignified manner she turned to Tommy,
—who was standing open-mouthed in the doorway,—
and inquired what was the reason of his “pursuing her
into the shop in this unheard-of manner ”.

“Tm very sorry if you don’t like it, Aunt Jane,” said
Tommy, who dimly perceived that he had produced
rather a disturbance. “I only want a penny,” he added
hurriedly; “only one penny, and Ill go away directly.”

“A penny, indeed!” repeated Miss York. ‘ What do
you want with a penny, I should like to know?” Kind
old lady though she was, she could not help feeling irri-
tated with the boy for putting her in such an undignified

1?



28 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

position. She felt hot all over whenever she remembered
what an absurd figure she must have looked standing
bareheaded with her few gray hairs exposed to the piti-
less light of day. ‘Go back to the carriage at once,”
she said severely, ‘“‘and sit there quietly until I come
out.”

“Oh, but I can’t go without a penny. I can’t, really
shouted Tommy, running towards his aunt, and tugging
at her dress in great excitement. ‘There’s a poor man
starving to death, and a monkey. At least, they are
both very hungry. They said so. It’s quite true, though
I couldn’t understand it all, because he was an Italian,
you know. They always are, Nurse says, unless they
are Germans. But he must be very hungry or he
wouldn’t ask for bread; at least, I never do—only cake
and biscuits.”

“J don’t quite understand,” interrupted Miss York.
“Ts anybody in distress, do you say?” She instinctively
produced her purse as she spoke, for she could never
resist a tale of woe.

“Oh, thank you, thank you!” cried Tommy, who now
felt that his request was as good as granted. “Yes,
he’s very hungry, he said so himself. Why, what’s that
you've given me? It’s not a penny, is it? Sixpence,
did you say? That will buy him a nice lot of bread,
won't it? But are you sure you will have enough left
to do your shopping?” he asked with an anxious after-
thought. “I shouldn’t like to take all the money you've
got.’

Miss York could not help smiling. as she held up her
well-filled purse. Tommy gave one hurried look, and
feeling satisfied that he was not leaving his aunt in

1?



TOMMY IN TOWN. 29

extreme poverty, he lost no time in running downstairs
with the much-prized sixpence tightly clasped in his ©
hand. But hardly had he disappeared from the room
than Miss York was calling to him to return. Receiving
no answer, she hurried to the window just in time to see
her nephew engaged in conversation with a peculiarly
shabby foreigner, whose swarthy face and tattered coat,
though possibly picturesque, had a disreputable look to
English eyes.

“Come back! Come back at once!” cried Aunt Jane,
leaning out of the window and raising her gentle voice
to the best of her ability. ‘Oh, dear! He doesn’t hear!
He is sure to catch small-pox or something, talking to
that dreadful man!” she cried, turning in great distress
to the sympathetic shopwoman at her side. ‘“Can’t one
of you go down and stop him!” she exclaimed vehemently.
“Think if anything happened to him! Colonel York’s
eldest son, and such a dear child, though sadly thought-
less. And the newspapers full of fever cases!”

However, there was no need for any interference.
Tommy had caught sight of his aunt at the window,
and guessing the meaning of the words he could not
hear, he thought it prudent to cut short his interview
with the Italian, who went off down the street well
pleased with his sixpence, and smiling gratefully at the
little boy who had taken such trouble to get it for him.

After this adventure Miss York thought it safer to
take Tommy into all the shops with her, and it was not
until she had almost completed her purchases for the
day that she again left him in the carriage.

“T shall not be more than five minutes at the most,”
she said. “I am just going into that confectioner’s at



30 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

the corner to get something. It will not be very amus-
ing, so you had better stay quietly here till I return.”

Tommy guessed at once by something rather mysteri-
ous in his aunt’s manner that she was going to buy
sugar-plums for them, and wanted to keep it a secret.
So he readily promised to sit very still, and not cause
her any anxiety by standing on the seats, or hanging
out over the sides of the carriage to see how the wheels
go round. Tommy was very fond of sweets, and would
not willingly have interfered with the purchase of them
by any misconduct on his part. Besides, he was really
grateful to Miss York for so quickly forgiving his rude
intrusion at the milliner’s, and he firmly determined to
repay her by being a very good boy indeed.

For at least three minutes Tommy sat perfectly still,
amusing himself by admiring the beautiful array of fancy
cakes that stood in the confectioner’s window. There
was one in particular, covered with pink and white
sugar, that made him feel positively hungry to look at.
It was not so large as some of the others, yet Tommy
liked it much the best. He was a trifle greedy, but at
the same time he had a considerable appreciation of
beauty, and liked things to look pretty as well as taste
nice. Then he turned his eyes to the shelf above, where
stood rows of glass jars, each one containing a different
kind of sweet.

“T wonder which she will choose,” speculated Tommy.
“Of course I like butter-scotch best; while Flora al-
ways wants chocolate, and the little ones don’t care
what it is so long as it’s sweet. I don’t believe they
know the difference. Nurse always likes them to have
soft things best, so that they can’t choke— Hullo!”



TOMMY IN TOWN. 31

This last word was exclaimed out loud. And no
wonder. As Tommy sat gazing absently at the shop-
window, he had distinctly seen a rough-looking man,
who was sauntering along the footpath, put his hand
quickly into the carriage as he passed and snatch out a
parcel.

“Hullo! That’s not yours!” cried Tommy.

The man made no answer, but hurried on without
even turning his head. It was a critical moment. If
Tommy ran into the shop to tell Miss York what had
happened the man would probably disappear before he
came out, for after what had occurred there could be
no doubt that he was a thief. The parcel contained,
amongst other things, some lilac ribbon for Aunt Jane’s
cap, which it had taken much time and trouble to get
in quite the right shade. It seemed too ungrateful to
let this precious ribbon be lost while Aunt Jane was
busy buying sweets for them. Tommy determined that
he would save it, and without pausing to consider any
possible difficulties, set off racing down the pavement.

The thief instantly turned up a side street, and
quickened his pace.

On ran Tommy, panting so that he could scarcely
breathe. His cap had fallen off as he jumped out of the
carriage, and of course he could not spare the time to
stop and pick it up. This did not distress him much; a
fact of far greater importance was that the lace of his
Oxford shoe had come undone, and was trailing on the
ground, Once or twice he nearly fell over it, and the
shoe by degrees became so loosened that at last it actually
slipped off. However, wild with excitement, Tommy
ran on as if nothing had happened,



32 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

The thief probably felt little fear of being caught by
so young a boy. Still, he knew that if it ever occurred
to Tommy to call for help, which up to this time he had
never thought of doing, it might turn out an unpleasant
affair. After glancing round to make quite sure that there
were no other pursuers, the man suddenly plunged down
a dark alley between two rows of miserable houses. Then
he appeared to stumble and fall to the ground.

With a little cry of triumph Tommy rushed headlong
upon him, and was just seizing the coveted parcel when
the man, who had only been pretending to fall in order
to deceive, sprang to his feet and hit out savagely with
his fist, rolling the little boy over and over in the gutter.
Poor Tommy, blinded with mud, and quite out of breath
after his long run, was unable to rise, but continued to
cling convulsively to the end of the brown-paper parcel.

“Drop that!” growled the man roughly, “or it'll be
the worse for you!” accompanying his words with another
blow.

Tommy dropped back, half-stupefied with pain and
fright. Only one idea remained in his poor battered
little head; namely, that he must save Aunt Jane’s lilac
ribbon from that dirty man.

Angered by the child’s obstinate grasp, the thief raised
his foot, and was preparing to deal a kick with his heavy
boot, which would probably have silenced Tommy for
many along day. But just at that moment he himself
received a tremendous blow on the back from a wild
tattered figure that darted out from under a low door-
way.

The friend who had come at such a timely moment
to Tommy’s assistance was none other than the poor



“WITH A CRY OF TRIUMPH TOMMY RUSHED HEADLONG ON
THE THIEF.”





TOMMY IN TOWN. 33

Italian, whose wife and children inhabited a miserable
lodging in this very alley. It so happened that he had
just hurried back to them, bringing some food bought
with the famous sixpence, when the noise of a struggle
brought him to the door. Apparently the Italian knew ~
nothing of the rules of fair fighting, or else he considered
that this was no occasion for standing on ceremony.

At all events, having once knocked his adversary down,
he continued to belabour him on the head and shoulders
with a stick, and even to dance on his prostrate body.
The monkey all the while clung to his master’s shoulder,
jabbering wildly. The inhabitants of the wretched
houses poured out into the lane, and a crowd quickly
collected, which only dispersed at the approach of a
policeman.

All this time Tommy had been lying half-stunned in
the gutter. Though still conscious enough to hug the
brown-paper parcel, he did not know much of what was
going on, and when the policeman lifted him up and
propped him against the wall, he was quite unable to
explain what had happened.

“Them furriners are always at the bottom of all the
mischief,” said the policeman, who was much puzzled by
the strange group before him.

The thief seized the opportunity to begin a long story,
explaining how the Italian and the little muddy boy
were accomplices, who had first stolen a parcel out of a
shop, and then half-murdered him for trying to stop
them. Tommy was far too knocked about and stupefied
to contradict, and the Italian chattered angrily in his
own language, which nobody understood.

Then the policeman, fairly dismayed by so much con-
(M329)



34 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

flicting evidence, said he should take them all three
into custody, and they could repeat their stories to the
magistrate. This suggestion had the merit of at once
reducing the party, for the thief, suddenly diving under
the arms of some of the spectators, disappeared down
the alley. Scarcely was he out of sight when the Italian
started off in the opposite direction.

The poor policeman was more bewildered than ever.
There remained nothing for it but to march Tommy off
to prison. He was not quite sure that he was doing
right; but, on the other hand, it seemed very probable
that Tommy was a thief. The boy was hatless, shoeless,
covered with mud, and clinging to a parcel through the
torn paper of which could be seen several articles that
evidently did not belong to him. It was really very
difficult for the policeman to decide rightly. But before
he had dragged Tommy very far the Italian again darted
down the lane, beckoning and gesticulating to an old
lady, who was following him as fast as she could.

“Aunt Jane!” cried Tommy, his voice suddenly return-
ing, “I’ve got it—it’s quite safe! If the ribbon is a little
dirty, I couldn’t help it—I couldn’t, really!”

When Miss York came, bit by bit, to understand the
story, she clasped Tommy in her arms, and almost cried to
think of the risks he had run in defending her property.
Then she did not lose a moment in thanking the Italian,
and making him a handsome present in acknowledgment
of his timely help.

‘When she had come out of the confectioner’s shop
and missed her nephew, she had been quite at a loss
what to do next. Jones had been sitting half-asleep
upon the box, and had never even noticed that the



FLORA’S FRIEND. 35

little boy had left the carriage. Miss York might have
searched for hours without finding Tommy if it had
not been for the ready wit of the Italian, who, finding
it impossible to make the policeman understand that
the muddy little boy was really a young gentleman
belonging to a grand carriage, had run off in search of
his friends, and almost dragged the old lady to the scene
of action.

The unfortunate policeman was most apologetic for his
mistake, and did his best to make up for it by carrying
Tommy carefully back in his arms to the carriage; for,
in addition to other injuries, he had stepped on a bit
of broken glass and cut his shoeless foot. Aunt Jane
followed behind, slowly picking her way down the muddy
back streets; and the Italian brought up the rear of the
procession with the monkey on his shoulder, and holding
the parcel, that had caused all the trouble, in his hand.

CHAPTER III.

FLORA’S FRIEND.

OMMY was fit for nothing but to go to bed after the
adventures of the afternoon. It is true that he was

at first very anxious to stay up for tea, on finding that
Aunt Jane had actually bought the very pink-and-white
cake that he had so much admired in the confectioner’s
window. She showed it to him in the carriage on the
way home, carefully wrapped up in silver paper; and as
he admired the beautiful sugar ornaments, he felt more



36 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

than ever glad that he had not allowed the thief to run
off with his kind aunt’s lilac ribbon.

“You are sure the ribbon’s not hurt?” he inquired
anxiously at least half a dozen times during the drive.

“Tt’s quite safe, my dear,” was Miss York’s invariable
reply. Still, she carefully kept the parcel out of sight;
for as the paper cover had been torn half off, and the con-
tents bespattered all over with mud, it was not probable
that the lilac ribbon would be of much further use. But
she did not wish Tommy to be disappointed by discover-
ing that his efforts had been in vain.

Long before they reached home, however, the little
boy’s head was aching so much that he forgot everything
else, and was only too glad when Nurse gave him a
basin of bread and milk, and tucked him up in bed
just as if he had been Gerald or the baby. All next
day he had to keep very quiet, on account of the cut
in his foot, which, though not serious, prevented his
putting on a boot.

At first he was rather proud of hobbling about the
house with his foot tied up in bandages, but when Flora
ran out to play in the garden after lessons, leaving him
indoors to amuse himself with a book, he certainly felt
very disconsolate. If the truth must be told, a book
was no great amusement to Tommy, who could not read
sufficiently well to enjoy it by himself. On the present
occasion he was listlessly turning over the leaves, looking
again and again at the few pictures, and wondering what
they were about, when the door quietly opened and Aunt
Jane walked into the school-room. She had a proposal
to make.

“In my young days,” she said, “children were all



FLORA’S FRIEND. 37

taught to occupy themselves, and very much happier
they were for it. Now, can you or Flora knit?”

“No,” answered Tommy, somewhat surprised by this
question. ‘But of course boys never work.”

“Oh, don’t they, indeed!” said Aunt Jane. “Why,
I have known village schools where the boys knitted
whilst the girls sewed. There is no reason why boys
should be more idle and awkward than girls.”

“T think I should like to try,” began Tommy, with a
sudden recollection of how he used to enjoy working in
the nursery with a bit of cotton tied to a pin.

Miss York smilingly produced a large parcel—the very
one, indeed, that Tommy had rescued on the previous
day. The lilac ribbon had already been removed and
handed over to the maid, to be cleaned as well as might
be. There remained several large skeins of wool, in
various bright shades.

“T will begin to teach you at once,” said Aunt Jane,
“and when Flora comes in she can learn if she wishes.”

No sooner said than done. Tommy was a very atten-
tive pupil, and by luncheon-time he had learnt how to
make a stitch with tolerable ease and rapidity.

“ And now what shall I make this afternoon?” he said
to his aunt whilst he ate his dinner, which he had down-
stairs in the middle of the day. Miss York liked the
company of one of the children at breakfast and luncheon,
although, since she had known them a little better, she
could not help feeling thankful that Flora still had her
meals in the nursery.

“Well,” she replied thoughtfully, “of course there are
a great many useful things you can knit after a time,
such as mittens and comforters—”



38 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“Oh, but it would seem silly to make these now, in
the middle of summer!” he interrupted.

“They would be ready for the winter if you began
now,” suggested Miss York

But Tommy evidently did not take to the idea. Like
many other people who have only just acquired an
accomplishment, he rather underrated its difficulties, and
it seemed to him that he could manufacture any garment
he chose in a very short time.

“How about woollen reins for playing horses?” sug-
gested Aunt Jane, rising to the occasion. “I have seen
children playing very nicely with them on the sands at
the seaside.”

The little boy was immensely pleased at this idea.
“T will work at it all the afternoon,” he said. “And I'll
make Flora work too, only she must learn how to make the
stitches first. And then when it’s finished I'll harness
her and pretend she is a pony.”

After luncheon Tommy was allowed to hop across the
garden, and sit working under the shade of a large tree.
It seemed very curious being out of doors with only a
bedroom slipper on his foot, and Nurse had some diffi-
culty in preventing the two little ones from knocking
up against it every moment. Gerald, who was a fat little
boy of four, never could understand that it hurt people
to be trodden on; and the baby was at an age when he
crawled, rolled, and tumbled over everything. However,
Tommy sat on the rug, working away most industriously,
and very proud he felt when he could show Nurse a
whole inch of knitting.

Flora’s conduct was very disappointing. She looked
upon all kinds of work as only to be done at lesson-



FLORA’S FRIEND. 39

times; and having tried a few times and failed to make
a stitch, she impatiently threw away the wool and went
off to play on the lawn with Gerald.

*T sha’n’t let you play with my reins if you don’t helr
to make them!” shouted Tommy from his rug under the
tree.

“T don’t want to!” retorted Flora promptly. She felt
pretty sure that Tommy would tire of his new employ-
ment long before the reins were finished; and even if he
did not, the pleasure of contradicting was almost equal to
the possible joys of playing horses.

After a slight dispute of this kind Flora generally went
off and played with the little ones for a time, just to
impress upon Tommy the fact that she was quite inde-
pendent of him. But, to tell the truth, she punished
herself far more than her brother by this proceeding, for
Gerald only cared for very babyish games, and, besides,
would not do anything that she told him. For instance,
this particular afternoon, no sooner had Flora invented
a beautiful game, in which they had to pretend that the
lawn was sea and they were fishermen in a boat, than
Gerald insisted upon upsetting everything. First, he
said he must be captain and give the orders. Now this
was clearly impossible, as he was three years younger
than his sister. Then he ventured to say that the boat
could not possibly sail because it was only an old carriage-
rug. Of course Flora couldn’t stand that, especially as it
happened to be true. She told Gerald so, tapping his
head with a stick to enforce the observation, and he most
ungratefully responded by a dismal howl of distress that
brought Nurse running to the spot.

“Really there’s no peace with you, Miss Flora!” she



40 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

exclaimed angrily. She had been busy sewing under
the tree when disturbed by Gerald’s cries, and in jumping
up her thimble, scissors, and needle-case had rolled off
her lap into the grass—a mishap calculated to make
anybody feel impatient. ‘There are young ladies I’ve
heard of,” she continued, “who'd be a pleasure to have
in the nursery, they’d be sucha help with the little ones.
Tve known them play with the baby for an hour together,
let alone telling stories to their younger brothers and
sisters to keep them quiet, whilst one got through a bit of
work. Instead of that, it’s nothing but worry when you
get with the little ones! I declare, they’re as good as
gold when they’re alone.”

So saying, Nurse led off the still sobbing Gerald, and
Flora was left alone.

For a time the little girl stood still, pouting her lips,
tearing bits of grass to pieces in her fingers, and, in short,
exhibiting all the signs of an approaching fit of sulks.
She was ashamed to go back to Tommy after having so
proudly asserted that she could amuse herself better with-
out him. There was not much left to do except hide her
discomfiture as best she could from the eyes of the party
under the tree.

Now, this part of the garden was only divided from
the fields by an iron railing, over which the children
could easily climb. Presently Flora was sauntering
along in the meadow, making a great pretence of collect-
ing a large bunch of flowers so that nobody should
suspect she was not perfectly happy. In reality she
was merely snatching off the first things that came to
hand, not caring what they were. The effect, as may be
imagined, was hardly satisfactory, and directly she had



FLORA’S FRIEND. 4]

strayed far enough from the others not to be noticed, she
threw the ill-assorted bunch of dandelions, daisies, and
sorrel into the ditch. Then, after looking round to see
that she was not noticed, she ran quickly to a little gate,
opened it, and hid herself in the friendly shade of the
New Forest.

Some forty years before this the children’s grandfather
had laid out a plantation within sight of his house to com-
memorate the birth of his eldest son, now Colonel York.
Some family friend, joking over the puny size of the
freshly-planted trees, had laughingly called it the New
Forest—a name that had stuck to the plantation ever
since. It was a very favourite resort of the children’s
whenever the grass was dry enough to permit of their
crossing the field to reach it, and the name had long since
lost most of its absurdity. Indeed, to the children it
always seemed a very real forest, for often as they had
played in the corner nearest the house they very seldom
had time or courage to penetrate far into the shady depths,
where the brambles and ferns had grown into a tangled
mass under the tall trees.

Poor Flora, scolded by Nurse, and divided from the
other children by her own act, was just in the condition
of reckless ill-temper that inclines one to undertake
desperate adventures. It was not enough for her to
remain as usual just inside the wooden wicket-gate, where
the trees had been cleared away, and the sun shone merrily
down on the rabbit-cropped turf. That was no new
place; the children often played there for hours, whilst
the nurses sat sewing on a mossy bank. Nurse never
cared to go far into the wood; she said it was gloomy.
And so indeed it was, and for that very reason Flora



42 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

liked it this afternoon. So turning her back resolutely on
the sunshine, she plunged into the thickest part of the
undergrowth.

At first it was a dreadful struggle getting along at all,
the brambles seemed so extraordinarily anxious to pre-
vent her from pushing past them. Not content with
inflicting several rents on her pretty pink cotton frock,
they scratched her hands and face, so that at any other
time she would probably have turned back, in tears.
But now Flora’s temper was thoroughly roused. She
felt as if the brambles were continuing the opposition
from which she had been suffering all the afternoon, and
the more they tore at her the harder she pushed and
struggled.

Gradually the ground became clearer as she advanced
further into the wood, and the dense mass of trees kept
out more and more of the sun. Even the brambles seemed
to shrink from growing in that chilly solitude. The ground
was bare except for a thick carpet of fir-spines, in which
no fern or grass cared to root. It was quite easy to walk
now, and Flora tried to believe that she had found a
delightful place and was enjoying herself immensely.

But in reality she almost regretted the loss of the
brambles. Struggling with them had occupied her
thoughts, and though they were not pleasant they were
rather companionable. There was something very
gloomy and almost alarming about walking on and on
through thousands of fir-trees, all exactly alike, with
their tall straight stems running up like pillars into the
dark green roof overhead. There were no birds or
squirrels to amuse her. Everything alive seemed to
have been left behind in the sunshine, outside the wood.



FLORA’S FRIEND. 43

A quarter of an hour passed; then half an hour. Flora
began to feel as if she had been in that wood the whole
afternoon. It seemed an endless time since she had left
the merry party upon the lawn. If she went back now
it would be nearly tea-time, and in the bustle of going in
and undressing Tommy would forget to tease her about
the knitting. Besides, they were to have the famous
pink-and-white sugar-cake for tea; that in itself would
attract all the attention.

As soon as Flora remembered the sugar-cake she deter-
mined to return home at once for fear it should be all
divided before her arrival. However, it is one thing to
decide to leave a wood and quite another thing to find
one’s way out. After running up and down in several
directions, all of which looked exactly the same, it sud-
denly occurred to the little girl that she was lost.

Flora did not settle down quietly under an idea of this
kind. Without a moment’s hesitation she began to scream.
Now this certainly seemed a most useless proceeding, as
she was apparently alone in the wood, and her voice
could not possibly reach as far as the garden. How-
ever, curiously enough, she had not screamed for more
than two or three minutes when a friend came to her
assistance.

It is true that his first appearance frightened her worse
than anything that had gone before. There was a kind
of shout, followed by much cracking and snapping of
small boughs. Then she saw something sliding rapidly
down the smooth stem of one of the tall fir-trees, and
just as she had redoubled her shrieks under the im-
pression that it was a brown bear descending to eat her,
avery dusty and untidy gentleman alighted upon his feet



44 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

at her side. _In his hand he held a stick with a little
net attached to one end.

Flora’s screams stopped suddenly at this wonderful
sight. She stood staring at the stranger in absolute
silence.

“Are you hurt?” he asked, naturally rather surprised
at the loud shrieks of distress having stopped so com-
pletely on his appearance.

Still no answer, for Flora was much more shy than
Tommy, and though she longed to ask the stranger all
about that funny little net, she could not summon up
courage to speak a word.

“Do you want anything?” repeated the gentleman
twice; and then, as Flora still remained silent, he added:
“T really can’t help you unless you tell me what is the
matter. If you don’t want anything, it is no good my
waiting here.”

Thinking that he was about to leave her again, Flora
puckered up her face and uttered a dismal wail.

“Oh, don’t ery,” said the gentleman kindly. “I
won't leave you if you don’t like it. But really you
must try to be a sensible little girl and explain what you
want to do.”

He spoke so pleasantly that Flora’s shyness soon melted
away, and she gave him a very detailed account of the
afternoon’s proceedings.

“And now I suppose you want to go home before
Tommy eats all the sugar-cake?” he said, when the story
was finished.

Flora nodded her head, at the same time creeping a
few steps nearer, and confidentially taking his hand.

“Well, it won’t do to leave you out in the wood all



FLORA’S FRIEND. 45

night, so perhaps we had better be starting home at
once,” remarked the gentleman cheerfully, as he put his
net under his arm, and picking up a small case that was
lying at the foot of the tree, hung it across his shoulders
with a leather strap. “I should have liked an hour
more,” he muttered to himself; “but still I have done
a very good afternoon’s work.”

“Why were you climbing a tree?” asked Flora as they
walked along, her curiosity gradually getting the better
of her shyness.

“Why shouldn’t I?” said the stranger, laughing.

“Oh, I don’t know. I thought only boys climbed
trees, not grown-up gentlemen,” replied the little girl in
a puzzled tone. ‘And why did you take a fishing-net
with you?” she continued. ‘There can’t be any fish up
there.”

“How do you know that whales don’t make nests in
fir-trees?” he said solemnly. ‘You’ve heard of sea-eggs,
haven’t you? Well, one always climbs trees to get eggs.”

Flora grew very red.“ You are only laughing at me,
and I really wanted to know,” she muttered.

“Yes, to be sure; it’s a shame not to explain things
properly,” said the gentleman good-naturedly. “I
remember I hated being crammed with nonsense when
I was a child. Well,” he continued, “I was catching
moths to put in my collection. This is a famous wood
for moths. There is something on the bark of the trees
that they like, I suppose.”

‘But how do you prevent them from flying away ?”
inquired the little girl.

“Unfortunately I have to kill them,” replied her friend.
“But I think, if it is properly done, the moths don’t



46 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

suffer at all.” Then he opened the case and showed her
a bottle in which was placed something that poisoned
moths and butterflies, so that they died without a struggle
directly they smelt it. ‘You must come and see my
collection some day,” he added, seeing how much in-
terested she seemed.

“ But where is your home” interposed Flora anxiously.
“T can walk quite two miles, and Tommy always says
he walked five once, but I don’t think he really knows.
Besides, we are never allowed to go very far, because
of being back in time for tea.”

“Well, my home just at present is at the rectory,”
replied the gentleman, “so you won’t have to walk very
far, or be late for your meals when you come to see—”

“But I thought Mr. Barnard lived at the rectory?”
she interrupted.

“Exactly so. I am Mr. Barnard,” answered the
stranger, laughing at her bewilderment. “You don’t
understand that?” he added, seeing that she remained
silent.

Flora looked very confused. She did not understand
what he said, and what was more, she did not believe it
Mr. Barnard, she knew, was an old gentleman with white
hair. She saw him in church every Sunday, and could
likewise remember perfectly when he had christened
baby. Besides, she often met him on the road when she
was going for walks with Nurse. Altogether there was
no possibility of mistake.

“You don’t seem to remember having seen me before ?”
said the gentleman.

“No, I don’t,” blurted out Flora. ‘And I don’t see
how you can be the rector either.”



FLORA’S FRIEND. 47

“The rector! No, I should think not!” and her friend
burst out laughing. “I am only the rector’s son,” he
continued; “and I remember you as a very small person
in a perambulator. Only I have been abroad for some
years since that.”

“Then you aren’t a rector?” inquired Flora, slowly
grasping the situation.

“No, indeed! I’m an engineer by trade,” he replied
merrily. “But here we are at the edge of the wood.
Can you run home by yourself, or shall I take you back ?”

“Oh, take me back, please!” cried the little girl, hold-
ing his hand fast. She knew by experience that she
was not nearly so likely to be scolded by Nurse for being
late, if she returned under the protection of a stranger.
Besides, she wanted to exhibit her new friend to Tommy.

After all, Flora was not so very late, for by way of
giving Tommy a little extra treat, to make up for his
injuries, Nurse allowed the children to have tea on the
lawn this fine afternoon. It took a considerable time
to carry out tea-cups and spread rugs, so that everybody
could sit in a convenient manner round the pink-and-
white sugar-cake, which formed the centre of the feast.
The preparations were not quite complete when Flora
and her friend came in sight.

“Here you are!” shouted Tommy, hobbling across the
lawn towards them. He was longing to know where
Flora had been all this time, and who it was returning
with her.

The little girl did not keep him long in suspense.
“T was lost,” she began directly, “and he came and
found me. He was ina tree in the New Forest, catching
moths with a fishing-net. And they are all dead now in



48 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

a bottle. It doesn’t hurt them a bit. And he makes
engines—”

“Can you really?” interrupted Tommy excitedly.
‘‘Pve a little one that Papa gave me on my last birthday.
It goes by steam, and I’ve broke it, and we can’t mend
it. But of course you'll know the way.”

“T will do my best,” said Mr. Barnard; “but I must
tell you at once that I never have made anengine. I’m
only a sort of soldier.”

“Then why did you say you were an engineer if it
wasn’t true?” inquired Flora severely.

“Well, you see, it is true, only you didn’t understand
me,” he said cheerfully. “There are different sorts of
engineers. Iam the sort that the Queen sends about
with her armies to build bridges, and fight alittle
between.”

“Have you ever killed aman?” asked Tommy solemnly.

“Never.”

The children looked a trifle disappointed. They
would have liked to hear how it was done. On the other
hand, it would have been a great responsibility to ask
almost a murderer to have a slice of pink-and-white
sugar-cake.

“Then you have never even been hurt yourself, I
suppose?” persisted Tommy.

“Oh, yes, I have,” replied Mr. Barnard, quite glad to
be able to supply a few stirring details. “I was un-
conscious for nearly a week, and I still have a great
scar all across my forehead, as you can see.”

The children looked at him with awe-struck admiration.

“How did it happen?” inquired Tommy breathlessly.

“Well, if you must know, a very awkward workman



THE MISTAKE. 49

dropped a big stone off the top of a wall when I was
walking underneath. Yes, that’s the real truth,” he
continued, laughing at the children’s downcast faces.
“JT wish I could tell you that it was a black man trying
to chop off my head with a huge sword, but unfortu-
nately the facts are much duller.”

“Still, you know a lot of funny things, I dare say,”
said Tommy, “although you haven’t killed anybody, or
even been properly wounded.”

This being the opinion of both the children they
begged their new friend to stay to tea, which he did;
and Flora, as a token of peculiar favour, lent him her
own mug to drink out of. Nurse said that a. gentleman
ought to have a proper tea-cup, but Mr. Barnard pro
fessed himself perfectly satisfied, and as he had the mug
filled three times, and ate two slices of cake, besides a
lot of bread and jam, it seems certain that he must have
enjoyed his tea.

CHAPTER IV.

THE MISTAKE,

ILORA,” said Tommy a few days later, “I have a
plan.”
“You always have,” retorted the little girl, “but they
never come to anything.”
“Oh, don’t they though! Didn’t I think of putting
a pillow on the top of the drawing-room door to fall on
Emily’s head when she came to dust in the morning?”

“Yes, and it fell on Papa’s instead, when he came
(1 829) D



50 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS,

down early to look for a book. I don’t call that much
of a plan.”

“But I really do have some very good ones,” pleaded
Tommy. “And, besides, you know you spoilt my best
one when we hid in the apple-house, and were going to
stay there all night and eat as many as we liked, only
you got frightened, and began to cry directly it became
dark.”

“Tt wasn’t the dark I minded,” said Flora angrily;
“T am not a bit afraid of it at home. Only you said the
rats were coming to bite our toes.”

“If you interrupt so often I shall never be able to tell

you what we are going to do. . . . Oh, bother! There’s
the bell to go to lessons.” And Tommy began to walk
slowly off.

“Oh, I must know! Please tell me first!” cried his
little sister, running after him and tugging at his coat,

“No, I can’t stop to talk now. I must go to lessons,”
answered Tommy virtuously. “If you hadn’t been so
cross you would have heard all about it before.” Then
secing that Flora was preparing to make her disappoint-
ment known to the household in a loud roar, he added
hastily: “If you are good Pll tell you about it after
dinner. Come behind the holly hedge in the garden,
and I'll be waiting by the sweet peas.”

Nursery dinner was apt to be a terribly long meal
when one was in a hurry to get out. Flora found it so
on this occasion, and she became so impatient when
Gerald asked for a second helping of rice pudding that
she could not resist slyly slapping his fat hand. As
Nurse saw her, she was punished by not being allowed
to leave the nursery until the other children were also



THE MISTAKE. 5l

ready to go out, so that she gained nothing by her im-
patience.

It was always rather difficult for Flora to secure a
private interview with Tommy when Nurse was in the
garden. Long years of practice had rendered her skilful
in detecting when the children were plotting to run off
together and do mischief; for that, I am sorry to say, is
what Tommy’s plans generally meant. However, the
opportunity came when Gerald, who was pretending to
have a tea-party all by himself in a corner of the lawn,
put a stone in his mouth, and choked so shockingly that
Nurse had to run to him and pat his back violently,
which took up all her attention.

Flora was watching intently to see if the stone went
up or down, when she felt a tug at her sleeve.

“Come here,” whispered Tommy. ‘“She’s so taken
up with Gerald’s chokes she won’t notice anything.”
Tommy had no intention of referring to his younger
brother’s misfortunes in an unfeeling manner, but an
attack of choking in the nursery was no great novelty,
and was sure to end very dully in Nurse extracting the
object from the victim’s mouth with her finger. If there
had been the faintest chance of a more eventful termina-
tion pure curiosity would have kept Tommy rooted to
the spot.

“Well, what’s your great plan?” inquired Flora breath-
‘ lessly, when they were sheltered behind the holly hedge.
“Has it anything to do with gooseberries ?”

“Much better than that!” cried Tommy. “We can
get into the gooseberry-bed any day. This is quite a
new thing. What do you say to going to tea with Mr.
Barnard to-morrow ?”



52 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“Has he asked us? Oh, what fun!” And Flora
clapped her hands with delight.

“Well, he hasn’t exactly asked us again,” admitted
Tommy, ‘but you know he said the other day he’d be
glad to see us whenever we liked to come and look at
his moths. So of course we can go when we like.”

“Without asking anybody’s leave?” said the little
girl, rather awe-struck by this audacious proposal.

“Tl tell you what. If we stop to ask everybody’s
leave we shall never go at all!” exclaimed Tommy.
“Aunt Jane will say we are not wanted, and Nurse will
be afraid of our catching cold or getting our feet wet.
And they won’t do more than scold a little when we
come back. I sha’n’t mind that if we’ve had great fun
with Mr. Barnard first.”

It sounded very delightful, and yet Flora could not
feel quite easy in her mind. She knew that it would be
impossible to thoroughly enjoy even tea with Mr. Bar-
nard if she was expecting all the time to be put to bed
in disgrace on her return. But it was no use trying to
make Tommy understand this feeling. When he had a
plan in his head he never would admit any objections to
it. All his plans seemed perfect until they turned out
failures, and then he never liked to be reminded of them
again. Just at present he was so full of paying a visit
to the rectory that it seemed the only thing worth living
for.

“Now don’t you be a silly,” he said, “and go and say
anything that will make Nurse guess what we're going
to do. You be very good at your dinner to-morrow, so
that you won’t be kept in with the children. And then
directly you come into the garden we'll creep off. I



THE MISTAKE. 53

dare say it will take them most of the afternoon to guess
where we've gone to, and all that time we shall be play-
ing with Mr. Barnard. Now, promise to do exactly as
I tell you, or I'll run off by myself without waiting for
you.”

Flora promised, because she could not bear to be left
behind. Whatever Tommy did she liked to do too,—
even if it frightened her.

On the following day Tommy, having finished his
dinner, politely held open the dining-room door for Aunt
Jane to pass out. He was dreadfully afraid she might
offer to walk about the garden with him until the nursery
dinner was finished, and the younger ones came out to
play. She sometimes did that on fine afternoons, and
usually Tommy was very proud of showing his aunt the
flowers, and telling her their different names. But to-
day he did not want anybody to interfere with him or
notice which way he went. Fortunately, Miss York
went straight to the drawing-room, as she was anxious
to finish writing a letter.

Tommy ran into the garden, and crouched down behind
the holly hedge, close to a row of sweet peas. It was
the place where he and Flora always hid when they
wanted to be out of sight of the windows, and she was
sure to look for him there. He waited impatiently for
what seemed a very long time, but nobody came.

“Bother Flora! Bother the nursery dinner! Bother
Gerald and Baby!” exclaimed Tommy. “I dare say the
silly little things are choking again, or something. I'll
just go off without Flora if she isn’t quick.”

But although he talked to himself in this desperate
way he did not attempt to move, for the expedition



54 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

seemed a little too formidable to be undertaken entirely
alone. So he passed the time as best he could in mak-
ing a sort of house out of the loose earth in the flower-
border; but as soon as he built it up it all slipped down
again, and excepting getting his hands very dirty he did
not do much. At last there was a sound of hurried
footsteps, and Flora came running round the corner
with a very red face. She gave a cry of delight when
she saw Tommy.

“Oh, I was afraid you would have gone!” she said,
throwing herself breathlessly on the ground. “Nurse
was called away, so I couldn’t ask her if I might run out,
and I waited a long time, and at last, as she didn’t come
back, I ran off without asking.”

“ And without your hat,” remarked Tommy. “I sup-
pose you couldn’t get it for yourself? You'll look very
funny running down the road with nothing on your
head.”

“T couldn’t help it,” replied the little girl half-crying.
“Tf I had waited for Nurse to bring my hat you would
have gone without me.”

“Well, there isn’t any time for you to go back now,”
said Tommy. “I hope you won’t get a sunstroke and fall
down dead like a man Mama told me about who didn’t
wear a hat in hot weather. I dare say you won't,” he
continued reassuringly, as his sister looked still more
inclined to cry at this gloomy prospect. “Tl tell you
what. Tl make a cap out of my pocket-handkerchief,
and then you'll be all right.”

Certainly the cap would have looked better if Tommy
had not been in the habit of using his handkerchief as a
sort of bag in which he carried marbles, gooseberries,



THE MISTAKE. 55

and sometimes even rare specimens of caterpillars and
snails. But Flora did not notice the dirt much, as with
deep interest she watched her brother knotting the four
corners, so as to make it into the shape of a small round
basin.

“That'll do,” he said, pulling it down over her ears
like a nightcap; “the sun won't hurt you now. It’s
a pity you have such an old pinafore on,—and it’s all
sticky too.”

“We had jam-roll for dinner,” explained Flora; “and
the jam was hot, and I dropped it—”

«Well, never mind,” interrupted Tommy; “I dare say
nobody will notice. You look all right. We must be
off before Nurse comes out. You creep after me, so that
our heads won’t show.”

Instead of running down the path to the end of the
garden, where there was a little gate on to the road,
Tommy chose to crawl the whole way on his hands and
knees between the rows of cabbages and beans. He was
closely followed by Flora, who imitated him exactly.
It was a much slower mode of progression than walking
down the garden path; but then it was so much more
exciting. The children quite felt as if they were cscap-
ing from enemies, and as if some real danger might over-
take them if thetops of their heads were seen for a moment.

A bitter disappointment awaited them at the end of
the garden, where they found the little iron gate, out of
which they intended to go,. locked fast.

“Can Aunt Jane have guessed what we were going
to do, and had it shut up?” inquired Flora in a frightened
voice.

“Not she,” said Tommy; “she didn’t guess any more



56 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

than Nurse. I know what it is. I heard Papa telling
the gardener to put a padlock on the gate, because boys
have been getting into the garden and stealing goose-
berries. That’s what it is.”

“Yes; but how can we open it?” asked Flora, return-
ing to the root of the matter.

The boy looked grave. It would be terribly dull
to give up the expedition now that they had actually
started. He looked at the gate doubtfully. It was
not very high, but there were iron spikes along the top.
“T think we might climb over if you pushed me up,
and when I’m at the top I'll pull you,” he said.

Flora was a brave little girl, and would never allow
herself to be beaten by her brother, although he was
a year older. First she supported him until he had
climbed high enough to catch hold of the spikes. He
was very heavy, and she had to push with her head as
well as her hands to get him up at all. Perhaps it was
rather lucky that she had not a proper hat on, or it
would certainly have been spoilt. And when it came to
Flora’s turn to climb over the gate she had nobody to
ee her from behind, and very hard work she found it.

ut she struggled up valiantly, much encouraged by
Tommy’s good advice from the other side, where he had
climbed down into the road. Unfortunately, just as
Flora was at the top of the gate he fancied that he
heard someone coming in search of them.

“Be quick! Do be quick!” he cried, “or we shall be
caught!” And poor Flora, in trying to hurry, missed
her footing, and would have fallen into the road and
been badly hurt, if her dress had not caught in one of
the sharp spikes, so that she hung suspended.



THE MISTAKE. 57

Oh, oh!” she gasped, “I can’t move! Help me down,
unhook me!”

This was easier said than done, as standing on tiptoe
Tommy could not nearly reach the top of the gate.
He pushed at Flora’s feet, but he could not lift her up
high enough to undo the frock. The poor little girl was
dreadfully frightened, besides being half-choked by hang-
ing in such an uncomfortable position. She begged her
brother to run back to the house and fetch Nurse to
release her, but Tommy could not make up his mind to
do this.

“Tf we get Nurse there'll be no more fun,” he said.
“We shall just be punished and sent to bed directly
after tea.”

“JT would rather get down and be punished,” sobbed
Flora, who felt that any change would be for the better.

“ But you would rather have a little fun first, wouldn’t
you?” pleaded Tommy; and without waiting for any
reply he gave a last tug at her feet.

There was a loud rending noise! The frock had torn
right down from the waist to the hem, and with a little
scream Flora fell into the road on the top of Tommy.
Both of the children got up covered with dust, but except
for a few scratches, neither of them was much hurt.

“We must run at once, or somebody will find us.
Oh, come on! Never mind your frock; it looks all
right!” cried Tommy; and they both started off up the
road.

“T can’t run any more,” panted Flora, after a few
minutes. ‘I want to rest.”

“We can’t rest here,” said Tommy, who was also
rather breathless. ‘Somebody will see us and tell Nurse.



58 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

We'll get into the fields. I know there’s a path to the
rectory across them.”

“Do you know the way?” inquired Flora presently,
as they were sauntering through the fields cooling them-
selves after their run.

“Of course; I know all the ways about here,” returned
her brother loftily. ‘I’ve been to the rectory often with
Mama.”

“‘How often?” asked Flora. ‘I don’t remember when
you went.”

“Oh, well, I have been—more than once; and I’ve
often driven to the door when Mama has been calling
there, and sat in the carriage outside. I didn’t care to
go in then,” explained Tommy, “because they were all
so old, but now that our Mr. Barnard is there it will
be quite different.”

In spite of the confidence with which Tommy spoke,
he was not really very sure of the right direction across
the fields, and it was rather a relief to him when, after
about half-an-hour’s walking, they saw a gray stone house
among the trees.

“There it is!” he exclaimed. ‘Didn’t I tell you 1
knew the way?”

“Is that the rectory? It doesn’t look like it,” said
Flora doubtfully.

“Because you see the back of it from the fields, of
course,” explained Tommy. “And you've only gone in
by the front door before.”

“Sha’n’t we go in at the front door to-day?” she in-
quired.

Tommy did not answer. To say the truth, it was
rather weighing on his mind how they were to get into



THE MISTAKE, 59

the house. It requires a good deal of courage to walk
up to a front door by yourself and ring the bell if you
have never done it before. On the whole, he rather
hoped that they should see Mr. Barnard somewhere about
the garden, which would save them from having to ex-
plain their errand to a strange servant. Now that they
were actually in sight of the house, Tommy could not
help feeling acutely conscious that the brim of his straw
hat was almost off and his hands exceedingly grimy from
the earth with which he had been playing before they
started. However, he derived a little comfort from the
thought that he was tidy and clean compared with Flora
in her torn dress, soiled pinafore, and dirty handkerchief
cap.

The children walked on towards the house almost in
silence. They were both feeling rather shy now that
their journey was so nearly over. Straight in front of
them stood a gate leading from the fields into the garden.
They opened it, stopped for a minute to listen, then
walked a few steps further, and finally crouched down
behind a large rhododendron bush, which hid them from
the windows.

“You see I did know my way to the rectory right
enough,” repeated Tommy, all the more defiantly because
of certain unpleasant doubts which would come into his
head. Of course it was the rectory; only he wished it
would look a little more like it. The house was so very
large and gray that it rather frightened him, and he
wished that he could see the other side, with which he
was more familiar. Above all things, he longed to catch
sight of Mr. Barnard, but though he looked in every
direction there was not a sign of the young man to be seen.



60 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“Tl tell you what,” said Tommy, “he must be indoors
reading the newspaper perhaps, or writing letters like
Aunt Jane. I might peep in at one of the windows and
try to see him.”

This seemed to both the children a decidedly easier
method of entering the house than ringing at the bell.
The windows of the lower rooms were about four feet
from the ground, so that with a little pushing from his
sister Tommy easily scrambled up, and seated himself
on the window-sill.

“Do you see him?” inquired Flora’s eager voice from
below.

“Well, ’'m not quite sure,” Tommy hesitated. “There’s
somebody there, but the room is so dark—”

“T’m sure I could see if you’d get down and let me
climb up,” interrupted Flora impatiently. It was very
dull work standing on the lawn and receiving little frag-
ments of information from Tommy above.

“What's the use of fussing?” replied the boy. “You
couldn’t tell who it was if you did get up here; nobody
could. You can’t see anything but his back.”

“Make him turn round then!” cried Flora, who was
skipping about excitedly. ‘Here, I know how,” she
continued, picking up a stick that was lying on the
ground and tapping the window with it before Tommy
could interfere.

“ Don’t do that!” he began angrily. Then without any
warning he slid down from the window-sill, and ran behind
the rhododendron, which had previously sheltered them.

“What's the matter?” said Flora, running after him.

“Tt isn’t him!” gasped Tommy in an awe-struck
whisper. “It’s an old man with a white beard.”



THE MISTAKE. 61

“Perhaps it’s the rector,” suggested Flora hope
fully.

“The rector hasn’t a beard, you silly! And it’s all
your fault for knocking on the window in that stupid
way instead of keeping quiet!”

Tommy, being frightened, felt it a sort of comfort to
abuse his sister. But before the two children had time
to quarrel seriously, something so terrible happened that
it seemed like a realization of the very worst dreams
they had ever had.

A tall stern-looking man in black clothes suddenly
stalked round the rhododendron, and before the children
had time to cry out, much less run away, he seized Flora
by the arm, and Tommy by the collar of his coat. Then
without a word of explanation he marched them off to-
wards the house.

The children were far too frightened to make any
effort to escape. There was something about the silence
and sombre clothing of their captor which made Tommy
think of an executioner, and vaguely expect the appear-
ance of a beheading-block or gallows, round the next
corner. Flora was spared this terrible anticipation, as
she had never heard of the existence of such a person;
but she was dreadfully frightened all the same. It is
certain that if the children had only guessed that the
cross-looking man, who was holding them so tightly,
was only a fidgety old butler, who did not approve of
strangers prying about the place, they would not have
been half so terrified.

The little procession entered the house and crossed a
large, dark, stone-paved hall, where their footsteps echoed
as if they were walking in an empty church. This was



62 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

all so unusual and alarming that poor Flora’s nerves
broke down, and she began to cry.

“Be quiet, can’t you! Mr. Arnold will soon give you
something to cry about if you go on with that noise!”
said their guide, roughly shaking her by the arm.

It was the first time he had spoken, and his words were
far from reassuring. Flora’s only reply was to cry a
little louder, and lean back with all her strength, so that
she had to be dragged like a sack.

At the end of the hall was an open door, through
which the man pushed his charges, whom he then let
loose, standing close to them, however, so that they
should not escape. The room was very large and dark,
being lined with high book-cases almost up to the ceiling.
Tommy recognized it as the same room he had looked
into through the window. He also knew again the old
gentleman with the long white beard, who was sitting
by the table, and he rightly concluded that this must be
Mr. Arnold.

“Now, what were you children doing in my garden?”
asked the old gentleman sternly. ‘You know you had
no business there at all, Where do you come from?”

Then Tommy did a very wrong and foolish thing.
He remembered that in fairy stories, when boys wander
by mistake into ogre’s castles, they never give their
real names and addresses on being questioned, but always
invent some long story to satisfactorily account for their
appearance. So he thought he would do the same, for-
getting that fairy stories were not intended as practical
guides to conduct.

“We are starving!” he began in a whining voice like
a professional beggar. ‘We haven’t had anything to



THE MISTAKE, 63

eat for nearly a week, And we came to beg a crust of
bread; that’s what we came for.”

“Smith,” said Mr. Arnold addressing his servant,
“does that little boy look as if he had not seen food for
several days?”

“No, sir,” replied the butler; “he doesn’t, sir. It’s
my belief he is not telling the truth, sir.”

“Well, perhaps it wasn’t a whole week,” interposed
Tommy; “I can’t quite remember. It may have been
yesterday we finished our last crumb, and then we found
some berries in the hedge this morning for our breakfast.
And we were told to come and beg at your house. The
gypsies said we were to. They beat us if we don’t beg.”

“Do you mean to say you belong to gypsies?” said
Mr. Arnold putting on his spectacles, and looking
critically at the chubby red-cheeked little boy before him,

“Yes, we run behind a caravan,” continued Tommy,
inventing as he went on. “I don’t think we are real
gypsies, though. I believe they stole us when we were
little. And they beat us and starve us; they are very
cruel people. They are sure to beat us if we don’t get
back to the caravan by tea-time. So please may we go
now?” And he began to edge towards the door.

“Not so fast,” said Mr. Arnold. The butler at once
seized Tommy by the collar and held him tightly.
“Now,” said the old gentleman, “I don’t think you are
speaking the truth, but I will send down to the village
and inquire if there are any gypsies in the neighbour-
hood. If you are telling me a falsehood I shall have you
punished. Smith, put these children in a room where
they cannot hurt anything, and lock the door for the
present,”



64 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

At these words Tommy and Flora were led away down
along passage. Presently Smith opened a door which
creaked on its hinges as if not very often used. “Now
you two young imps just stay in here quietly, and not
make any more noise, or it'll be the worse for you,” he
said grimly.

“What's going to happen to us?” asked Tommy in a
trembling voice.

“That depends on what we find out about you,’
answered Smith. ‘I expect you are little liars, and very
likely thieves into the bargain, in which case prison will
be the best place for you.”

“Oh, but we can’t go to prison!” cried Tommy,
frightened beyond measure by this terrible threat. “We
aren’t gypsies really; we aren’t the sort of children who
are sent to prison. We live at Oakdale Court. Colonel
York is our papa.”

“Well, that’s a good story if you never told one
before!” said Smith scornfully. “Colonel York’s children
indeed! When your clothes are nothing better than a
bundle of rags, and you don’t look as if you’d ever been
in a tub in your lives! Unless you make up your mind
to speak the truth when Mr. Arnold sends for you again,
youll get such a punishment as you deserve.” And
striding out of the room, he slammed the door and locked
it behind him.

)



TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON. 65

CHAPTER V.

TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON.

T was a most uninteresting little room in which Tommy

and Flora were shut up. There was no furniture in

it, not even a carpet on the floor; and although there

were several shelves round the walls, there was nothing

on them. Apparently it had once been used as a store-

room, but there was not a sign of a jam-pot or sugar-jar
to be seen now.

It seems sad to relate that the first thing the children
did when they found themselves alone was to quarrel
over whose act it was that had brought them into this
miserable situation.

“Tt’s all your fault!” cried Tommy. “If you hadn’t
knocked on the window with your silly stick the old
gentleman would never have seen us.”

“And if yowd never made your stupid plan we
shouldn’t have got into this dungeon at all!” retorted
Flora; who was sitting on the bare boards rubbing her
tear-stained face with her torn frock.

“No wonder they want to send us to prison when you
look such a scarecrow!” observed Tommy bitterly.

The injustice of this reproach at first fairly took away
Flora’s breath. Was it not Tommy who had urged her
to come on, assuring her that she looked all right in spite
of a torn dress and jam-stained pinafore? And had he
not up to this moment encouraged her to believe that
she looked quite neat with a dirty knotted handkerchief
on her head in place of a hat? It was too bad of him to

turn against her now.
(31329) E



66 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“And I don’t look a bit worse than you do!” she
cried passionately. ‘You're just like a gutter-boy your-
self, with your nasty earthy hands, and your coat all
green from rolling on the grass, and—”

“Don’t be silly! It’s no good getting angry,” inter-
rupted Tommy, who was conscious that his appearance
was not what it might have been. Also, he felt rather
guilty at having led his sister into such a terrible adven-
ture, and thought it best to change the subject before
she reminded him how much cause she had to complain.
“The great thing now is to escape,” he remarked very
sensibly. “There are two ways out of this dungeon.”

“T don’t see them!” sobbed Flora.

“Why, the chimney of course, and the window!” cried
Tommy, who in spite of his distress could not help
being rather proud of his superior powers of observation.
“T shall try the window first,” he continued, “and if we
can’t get out of that we must try to crawl up the chimney.
I know that boys used to crawl up the chimneys when
they cleaned them a long time ago, so I suppose we can.”

Theoretically nothing could be more simple than this
plan, only, unfortunately, in practice it was difficult to
get out of a window protected by iron bars which were
only a few inches apart. And when they put their
heads up the chimney, it looked so black and narrow
that escape that way was felt to be impossible. The
children were in despair.

“T wonder what he means to do to us,” said Tommy
solemnly. ‘I think he must be a very cruel man, or he
wouldn’t keep a regular dungeon with bars across the
window to shut people up in.”

“Do you think he means to kill us?” whispered Flora.

!??



TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON. 67

“Oh, dear! I wish we were home again in the nursery.
Tll never run out on the road without Nurse any more
—never!”

“Perhaps youll never be able to,” remarked her
brother. ‘Perhaps he means to keep us here all our
lives, so that we shall never be able to go into his garden
again.”

“What shall we have to eat?” inquired Flora anxiously.

“Bread and water, most likely,” said Tommy, who
felt quite an authority on the treatment of prisoners.
“But perhaps he'll starve us,” he continued, “and then
pretend that we died of an illness, so that he shouldn’t
be punished.”

“Oh, we must get out! Do try and get out!” cried the
little girl, almost frantic with terror at this gloomy prospect.

“Don’t make such a noise then, and I'll see what I
can do; only I’m sure it’s no use,” replied Tommy
despondently. He returned to the window and opened
it. Then he looked attentively at the thick bars. ‘That
one at the end seems rather bent,” he said. “There
might be room to squeeze through there.”

A moment later he gave a shout of joy, as with a
great effort he pushed his head between the bars.

“What is it like outside? Is it a long way down?
Can we jump?” cried Flora, who was dancing about the
room in a great state of excitement at the prospect of
being saved after all.

“Tt’s rather high,” replied Tommy, stretching his head
out as far as it would go. “A good deal higher than a
mantelpiece, I sHould think. But there are a lot of
shrubs underneath. If I could get through I would
climb down them.”



68 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

But, unfortunately, the chief difficulty was to get
through. Try as he would Tommy could not get his
body forward ; and, what was almost worse, he found it
impossible to draw his head back. ‘It seems to have
grown fatter since I squeezed between the bars!” he
exclaimed, struggling until his ears were quite red and
gore,

“Shall you have to stay there always?” inquired Flora
anxiously.

“T don’t know. It seems like it!” cried Tommy with
growing terror. “No, it’s no good dragging at my coat!”
for his sister was trying forcibly to extract him from his
painful position. “Leave go, I say! You hurt! And I
can’t get out any way.”

Overcome with the horror of his fate Tommy began to
ery. Flora was so alarmed by this sad sight that she
ran to the door of the room and began to kick it violently,
screaming for help at the top of her voice.

In another moment there was a frightful crash. ‘The
iron bars, although they looked so strong, were only
fastened into a wooden window-sill which had become
rather rotten with age. While Tommy was struggling
with all his might, suddenly one of the bars against
which he was pushing gave way, and, unable to recover
his balance, out he fell.

Flora heard her brother's frightened cry as he fell, and
turned just in time to see the soles of his boots dis-
appearing out of the window. Almost frantic with
terror the poor little girl redoubled her shrieks for help,
beating and kicking the door with hands and feet, as if
by sheer force she hoped to break it open.

After what seemed a very long time heavy footsteps



TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON. 69

were heard outside, and Smith slowly turned the key in
the lock.

“How dare you make such a noise, you little good-for-
nothing brats!” he began. Then catching sight of the
open window and broken bar he stopped suddenly and
gave a loud whistle of astonishment. “Got out that
way, have you!” he exclaimed. “It’s a chance if the
boy hasn’t broken a leg or arm at least! Here, you had
better come with me;” and taking Flora’s hand rather
more gently, he led her away to another part of the
house, and left her in charge of the old housekeeper.

For several minutes Flora was too frightened and
miserable to do anything but sob convulsively, but grad-
ually Mrs. Grey soothed her into a quieter state, and she
told the old woman the whole true history of Tommy’s
plan, and how they had mistaken Mr. Arnold’s house for
the rectory.

“Bub why did your brother say you belonged to
gypsies?” inquired Mrs. Grey, not knowing what to
believe,

“Oh, I don’t know,” said Flora. ‘“I expect he was
only pretending. We often pretend things. Sometimes
I’m a little black pig, and he’s the butcher and kills me
with a paper knife. That’s in the winter, when we play
indoors.”

“Well, I really believe you are telling me the truth
this time,” said the housekeeper. ‘And Mr. Arnold has
sent down to the village, I know, to find out if there are
any gypsy caravans about. He'll be in a pretty way
over all this.”

Mrs. Grey was quite right. Poor Mr. Arnold was in
a terrible fuss over the story that Smith brought him in



70 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

the library. He had not meant to do more than punish
the children by shutting them up for an hour, so that
they might be too frightened ever to come trespassing
in the garden again. And now he was very much afraid
that the boy might be badly hurt by his fall from the
window.

Without even waiting to put on a hat Mr. Arnold
accompanied Smith out into the garden. But in vain
the two old men searched the shrubbery round the
house. No little boy could they find. It was easy to
see where Tommy had fallen, because the iron bar
loosened at one end was still hanging from the window,
and beneath there was a laurel bush, with several small
twigs broken at the top, into which he had evidently
tumbled. For a long time Smith felt sure that he was
still hidden in that bush, and it was not until he had
searched it all over as carefully as if he had been looking
for a bird’s nest that he became convinced the little boy
could not be there.

“Well, unless he has burrowed underground like a
mole I can’t make out whatever has become of him,”
said the old butler. ‘But there, he can’t have broken
his leg or he wouldn’t have moved from the spot where
he fell.” And this was all the consolation he could give
Mr. Arnold, who at last unwillingly relinquished the
search and went indoors again.

The next step was a consultation with Mrs. Grey, who
gave it as her opinion that Flora really spoke the truth.
“‘T washed her face and tidied her hair, sir,” she said,
“and she’s really a nice-looking little thing; and though
her clothes are shamefully torn and dirty they are of good
material. Besides, her linen is marked with a Y.”



TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON. val

“Very well, then,” said Mr. Arnold, “I will order the
carriage at once, and you must get ready to take the
child back to Oakdale Court and find out if there is any
truth in the story. I only wish we could find the boy.
But perhaps he has run home—if he is really Colonel
York’s son, which I can scarcely believe.”

In another quarter of an hour Flora was driving home
in a comfortable close carriage by the side of Mrs. Grey.
She asked once or twice where Tommy was, but on being
told by the housekeeper that she would probably find
him sitting in the nursery when she got back, she did
not trouble any more about him, but gave herself up to
the undivided pleasure of eating sweet biscuits, which
had been given her by the kind old woman.

But Tommy was not at home in the nursery; indeed,
his adventures were far from being at an end. When
the bar of the window against which he was leaning
suddenly gave way and he fell out, he gave a loud cry of
terror, firmly believing that he was going to be dashed
to pieces. But most fortunately, as we know, a large
laurel bush broke his fall, and he found himself lying
on his back in the middle of it, unhurt except for a few
scratches. With some little trouble he managed to dis-
entangle himself and slip down to the ground in safety.

His spirits rose as he realized that he had actually
made his escape. If Flora would only come to the
window now he might manage somehow to help her
down, and then they could both run away together.
He called her several times, but, as we know, the poor
little girl was making such a noise in kicking the door
and screaming for help, that she could hear nothing else.
And when Tommy presently heard a man’s voice speak-



72 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

ing inside the room he guessed that someone had been
brought to the spot by Flora’s cries.

“Tf we are both caught again it will be as bad as
ever,” he thought; “I had better try and get away
whilst I can.” He did not quite like leaving Flora with
the enemy, and yet it seemed really best to escape while
he could, and carry the news of their capture home.

Of course it was out of the question to leave the garden
by the way they had come in, as to do this Tommy would
have been obliged to cross the lawn, where he might
easily have been seen from the windows. So he crept
along under the shrubs in the opposite direction, keeping
as close as he could to the walls of the house, and hoping
that he would presently find some back door out into
the road. He went as fast as he could, knowing that
before long someone was sure to come out and search
for him under the window.

When he had gone about a dozen yards the shrub-
bery came to an end, but, peeping out from behind
a thick yew-tree, he could see a large wooden door
standing open, which evidently led into a stable-yard.
Tommy hardly knew what to do next. If he stayed
where he was the terrible Mr. Arnold would certainly
find him before long, while by crossing the stable-yard
he might very possibly see another way out. He at
last decided to try this course, although it required
some courage to leave his shelter and boldly walk into
this unknown land.

With a beating heart Tommy slipped quietly through
the great open door, and his first glance was across the
yard to see if there was any other way out. To his
great delight he saw another door on the opposite side,



TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON. 73

which, though shut, looked as if it would open easily
with a latch. He was just going to dart across to it,
when his eyes fell on a large black dog lying outside his
kennel, apparently asleep in the sun. He was chained up,
but the kennel was so near the closed door that Tommy
thought that, if he woke up, he could probably reach
far enough to bite anyone passing through. Tommy
was not afraid of dogs that he knew; in fact the children
made a great pet of their old Dash at home. Buta quiet
little brown spaniel that one has known all one’s life is a
very different thing to a large black strange dog in some-
body else’s stable-yard. On the whole it seemed best to
be careful.

It took Tommy several minutes creeping on tiptoe to
cross the yard noiselessly. At last he reached the closed
door, and his hand was actually on the latch when, with
a tremendous roar, the black dog sprang up, and, tugging
savagely at his chain, tried to reach the intruder. Tommy
rushed back out of his reach, and wondered what to do
next. To pass close by the kennel, where the dog con-
tinued to bark furiously, was clearly out of the question.
And yet there seemed to be no other way out.

While he was standing undecided in which direction
to turn, a loud voice came from inside the stable.

“Lie down, Watch, can’t you!” shouted the unseen
man, who was probably a groom. ‘Stop that noise, or
[ll be out to you with a whip!” he continued angrily, as
the dog barked even louder than before.

Tommy was distracted with terror. It was a choice
between going on and being bitten, and staying where
he was to be caught and dragged back to prison. As he
looked round the stable-yard in despair, he noticed for



74 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

the first time a ladder leading up to the open door of a
loft. The next moment the terrified boy had climbed
up, and was crouching down behind a great. heap of hay.

He was only just in time. Irritated by the constant
noise, the groom left his work and stepped out into
the yard.

‘Go and lie down there!” he shouted. ‘Go in, or I’ll
pretty soon make you!” And Tommy could hear the
crack of a whip, and the rattling of the dog’s chain as,
growling sulkily, he went back to his kennel. “Whatever
can make old Watch so noisy this afternoon?” muttered
the man. “Some tramps been about again, I suppose.
Wish I could just catch ’em. I’d loose the old dog, and
make ’em run pretty quick!”

Tommy shuddered at this awful threat as he lay cower-
ing behind the hay. As the door of the loft was open,
he could distinctly hear all that went on in the yard
below, and it was a great relief when the groom, with a
parting shout at Watch, went back into his saddle-room.

Then at last Tommy dared to sit up and look round
him. As long as the man was walking about outside he
had lain quite still, with the hay almost covering his face,
hardly liking even to breathe for fear of being heard.
There were no windows to the loft, but enough light
came through the open door to show the smooth wooden
floor and the great rafters of the sloping roof. The loft
was more than half full of hay and straw piled up in
great square heaps, which felt deliciously soft and springy
when one climbed upon them.

Altogether it was just the kind of place where Tommy
and Flora would have delighted to play for any length
of time, if they had found it under happier circumstances.



TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON. 75

But one cannot play much by one’s self, especially when
one is hungry and frightened. So, instead of climbing
on the tempting bundles of straw, and making nests in
soft heaps of hay, Tommy sat still, wondering when it
would be safe for him to come out from his hiding-place.
Tf he heard the groom leaving the yard, he had quite
made up his mind to get down the ladder as quietly as
possible and run back into the garden. Anything was
better than the chance of having that dreadful great dog
loosed upon him; and perhaps by creeping along behind
the shrubs he might find some way out across the fields
that he had not noticed before.

After waiting for a long time, Tommy heard the groom
come whistling out of the saddle-room, and shut the door
behind him. This seemed rather hopeful, as if he did
not mean to return at once. Probably he was going
home to his tea, in which case he would be away for at
least half an hour, and, what was almost as important, he
would be too far off to notice if Watch began to bark
again.

It was, however, a dreadful shock to Tommy, just as he
was beginning to feel a little more cheerful, suddenly to
hear the ladder creaking under the weight of heavy foot-
steps. Evidently the groom was coming up to the loft,
and at any moment might discover the boy’s hiding-place.
Tommy lay still and gave himself up for lost. However,
just as he was expecting the man to enter, there was a
loud slam, and the loft became dark.

At first Tommy could not-make out what had happened,
but as he heard footsteps going down the ladder, and be-
coming fainter in the distance, it presently occurred to
him that the groom had only come up to shut the door



76 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

of the loft so that it should not swing in the wind. The
immediate danger was over, yet it cannot be said that
the prospect of escape was very hopeful.

When all was quiet outside Tommy crawled along the
floor, feeling his way on his hands and knees between the
bundles of hay. A faint glimmer of light came in round
the edge of the door, which guided him safely to the
place. In breathless anxiety he put up his hand and
felt carefully all over the rough wood. His worst fears
came true—there was no handle inside!

It was greatly to Tommy’s credit that he did not sit
down and cry at this point. He probably would have
done so if a plan had not just then come into his head;
and, as we know, he was so fond of plans, that in the
excitement of carrying out a new one he almost forgot
his troubles.

He remembered that most doors of this kind only shut
with a latch and do not lock. By putting his eye to the
erack round the door he made sure that this was the case.
Now, it only remained to find something sufficiently long
and thin to push through, and the latch might be lifted
from the inside. The difficulty was to find the exact
instrument suited for the operation.

Tommy tried to remember what he had in his various
pockets, but as he filled them up with a fresh collection
of treasures every day, and Nurse with equal regularity
emptied them every evening, of course it was impossible
to be quite sure what he had in his possession at any
particular time. So, kneeling close up to the crack in



TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON. 77

order to get all the light that was to be had, he emptied
everything out on to the floor.

Now, the contents of Tommy’s pockets may have been
sometimes dirty—Nurse said they always were—but at
all events nobody could call them dull. On the present
occasion he seemed to have a little of everything in
them except a pocket-handkerchief, for this, it may be
remembered, had been taking the place of Flora’s hat all
the afternoon. But interesting as it was to examine an
addled thrush’s egg or finger a lump of wet clay, proud
as one might feel of a partially dried mole-skin and half
a tallow candle, none of these much-prized objects seemed
quite to meet the requirements of the case. To be sure,
there was the broken knife, it being a companion from
which Tommy never willingly parted. But useful as it
was in many ways, a blade broken off to about an inch
long was not of much value in the present emergency.

When Tommy had emptied both his pockets without
finding what he wanted, he by no means gave up the
search. There are many other places besides those
ordained by the tailor in which a little boy with a taste
for making collections can stow away objects of an in-
teresting nature. Not to go into further details, Tommy
regarded his loose sailor blouse merely in the light of
an elastic pouch, capable of containing almost anything
that might be put into it.

Having felt all over this capacious receptacle, he pres-
ently drew out a piece of whalebone, about eight inches
long, which he had picked up on the nursery floor when



78 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

some dressmaking was going on. It is impossible to say
what vague instinct had led him to tuck away such an
unpromising-looking toy inside his blouse; but he gener-
ally went upon the principle that things always come in
useful some day. Certainly, upon the present occasion
the bit of whalebone proved the prudence of this habit.
Nothing could have been more exactly suited for the
task in hand, and after two or three efforts the latch
lifted and the door swung open.

Tommy gave a cry of horror—the ladder was no
longer there! The groom had evidently taken it away
after shutting the door of the loft.

This disappointment following on so many hopeful
efforts was too great to be borne patiently, and Tommy
shed a few bitter tears, which he, however, immediately
rubbed away with the back of a very dirty hand. But he
was a sensible little boy, and knew that it was no good
erying over things that could not be helped. He saw
at once that he could not get down from the loft without
a ladder. He had already had quite enough of jumping
for one day; besides, there were no shrubs in the yard
for him to fall on, but hard stone pavement, and it was
quite twice as high from the ground as the window had
been.

Of course, as the door was now open it was no longer
dark in the loft, so Tommy thought it a good oppor-
tunity for carefully examining every corner. To his
great astonishment he very soon came across a trap-door
in the floor which he had been too occupied to notice



TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON. 79

before. There was an iron ring in it, which was evidently
meant for a handle. Tommy seized it with both hands,
and pulled so hard that the trap-door opened with a
jerk, and he fell on his back.

Scrambling to his feet he looked eagerly down the
hole. It was not very large, but still there was plenty
of room for a little boy to climb through, and he could
see projecting pieces of wood that were evidently in-
tended as rough steps. Tommy could not make out
clearly what there was below, but he guessed that it
probably led into the stables, and not daring to wait
any longer for fear the groom should return, he began
to climb down.

Two or three of the steps were missing towards the
bottom; however, it did not much matter, as by that
time he could see some straw underneath on which he
let himself fall, frightening an old white pony by whose
head he tumbled, so that it started back and nearly
broke its halter. Tommy was almost as much alarmed
as the pony, and lost no time in edging along the side
of the stall, keeping as far from its occupant’s heels as
possible.

In another moment he had opened the stable door,—
and then suddenly shrank back in dismay.

An untidy little donkey-cart, full of rags, bottles,
and old boots, was. just entering the yard. Watch
sprang to the end of his chain barking furiously, but
the man who was leading the donkey took no notice
of the noise. Quietly leaving the cart in the middle of



80 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

the yard he walked off towards the house, carrying a
large empty sack under his arm. Tommy had seen rag-
and-bone carts before, and he easily guessed that the
man was going to the back-door to buy anything that
the cook would sell; and it was not likely that he would
be very long about it, as people of his profession are not
fond of waiting for their purchases to be examined.

A new plan came into Tommy’s head. He ran out of
the stable, and climbing into the back of the donkey-cart
crawled under a large piece of sail-cloth that was spread
over some sacks, either to hide their contents or to keep
them dry in case of rain. Old Watch barked louder
than ever when he saw this proceeding, but as he could
not speak the ragman luckily never imagined what had
caused this fresh burst of indignation, but fancied that
the dog was still protesting against his presence in the
yard. He hurriedly put down his half-filled sack almost
on the top of Tommy, and then led the donkey out on to
the road, throwing a large stone at Watch as he passed
the kennel.

Of all the hiding-places Tommy had yet tried this was
much the most disagreeable. The rags smelt horribly,
and he was in danger of being suffocated every moment,
as the sacks shook about with the jolting of the rough
cart. He bore it as long as he could, until he thought
that they must have gone some distance from Mr.
Arnold’s house. Then he wriggled as close as he could
to the back of the cart, and, seizing his opportunity
when the wheels were making a loud noise going



TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE. DUNGEON. 81

over some stones, he slipped gently down on to the
road

The ragman walked on, leading his donkey, without
noticing that anything had happened. But Tommy,
afraid that he might turn round, got into the ditch and
crouched down among the long grass and brambles. As
it was the summer there was no water in it, only some
slimy black mud, but this really seemed quite nice after
the contents of the cart.

The little boy lay quite still until the ragman was out
of sight. Then he slowly crawled out on the road, feel-
ing very stiff, hungry, and desolate. He had not the
least idea in which direction to go, for the children very
seldom went further from home than Nurse cared to
walk, and were much fonder of playing in the garden
than going on the roads.

Tommy was still wondering which way to turn when
he heard a horse trotting quickly towards him. He had
a dreadful idea that perhaps Mr. Arnold had found out
the direction of his flight, and was sending to fetch him
back. But just as he was preparing to again take refuge
in the ditch the horse came round the corner, and his
rider gave a loud shout of surprise.

It was Mr. Barnard. Flora’s Mr. Barnard, as the
children had named him, so that there should be no
confusion with the old rector.

“Hullo, Tommy! What on earth are you doing out
here at this hour?” exclaimed the young man, pulling up

so suddenly that his horse nearly backed into the hedge.
(21829) F



82 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

‘“¢ Where are all the others?” he continued; “Miss York?
Nurse? And what have you been doing to your foot?”

Tommy looked down, and saw a little trickle of blood
coming out of his boot on to the dusty road. In climb-
ing down from the loft he had knocked his foot, and the
old cut—given by the bit of broken glass when he was
pursuing Aunt Jane’s lilac ribbon—had begun to bleed
afresh, but in his terror and excitement he had not
noticed it before.

“JT must have hurt it,” he began. ‘We've been shut
up in a dungeon, and I’m so tired! Please take me home!”

Tommy tried hard to behave in a manly fashion,
worthy of the hero of so many adventures, but he could
not quite manage it; and it was a very tearful and
forlorn little boy that Mr. Barnard lifted up in front of
him.

“Never mind, we shall soon be home,” said the young
man cheerfully. ‘Now, Tommy, you must manage to
hold on somehow while the horse canters. They'll be
pretty anxious about you at home, I expect; and, besides,
I want to get back to the rectory in time for dinner.”

A quarter of an hour later Mr. Barnard was-entering
Oakdale Court with what looked like a bundle of dirty
clothes in his arms. “I think he has gone to sleep,” he
said, laying his burden in Nurse’s lap. “I found him
crying in the road. He is only fit for bed now, that’s
certain.”

Poor Aunt Jane could not thank Mr. Barnard enough
for bringing back her nephew. Ever since Flora re-



ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 83

turned about tea-time in Mr. Arnold’s carriage the poor
old lady had been quite ill with anxiety. She had sent
servants to all the neighbouring houses and farms seck-
ing for news of the missing boy, and as the evening came
on she had been spending all her time composing tele-
grams to Switzerland, in which she tried to break
Tommy’s loss gently to his parents.

“Well, I mustn’t stay any longer, or my parents will
be sending out to look for me,” laughed Mr. Barnard.
“Tf you will allow me, Miss York, I will come over to-
morrow afternoon and see how you are all getting on.
T fancy those children ought to have a tale worth telling,
to judge by the look of Tommy’s clothes.”

Miss York assured him again and again that she
should be only too glad to see him whenever he could
come to Oakdale Court; and it was with considerable
difficulty that he at last cut short her. profuse thanks,
and started home to his long-delayed dinner.

CHAPTER VI.

ABOUT CLEVER BOYS.

HE following afternoon, true to his word, Mr. Barnard
was sitting between the two children on the lawn

at Oakdale Court. ‘Tommy was again a cripple, and
Nurse said he would not be able to wear a boot for at
least a week. Though a little depressed at this prospect



84 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

Tommy was full of conversation, and had just given
Mr. Barnard a detailed account of the whole of their
previous day’s adventures.

Tommy’s imagination was exceedingly lively, and he
frequently embellished a story until it was almost unre-
cognizable. However, on the present occasion he felt
that so many extraordinary things had really happened,
that it would be a perfect waste of time, as well as an
impossibility, to improve upon them. So he gave a
very correct version of the whole affair; and Flora, who
had no scruples about contradicting in the interests of
truth, did not feel obliged to interrupt him more than
once or twice.

“Well, Tommy,” said Mr. Barnard when the story
was quite finished, “do you really want to know my
opinion about yesterday’s doings ?”

“Yes,” replied the little boy, rather doubtfully.
Until that moment he had made sure that Flora’s friend
would be on their side against Nurse, Aunt Jane, and all
the grown-up people who so severely condemned rash
plans of amusement. But at Mr. Barnard’s words he
felt a certain misgiving.

“You see, it’s no good pretending to be friends if we
don’t tell each other exactly what we really think,” con-
tinued Mr. Barnard pleasantly. ‘“ And after what you’ve
told me yourself, I think you behaved very badly.”

Tommy hung his head and grew very red. He had
not felt in the least ashamed when Nurse had scolded
him that morning; but it was a very different thing

EE eee eee



ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 85

to find that this gentleman,—who was a soldier, and
had been all over the world,—thought him in the
wrong.

“T dare say you consider yourself a very kind-hearted,
affectionate boy,” continued Mr. Barnard. “And yet
for several hours yesterday you gave about ten people
dreadful trouble hunting for you; not to mention that
both your aunt and your nurse were, I am sure, suffer-
ing terribly from fright the whole time.”

“Nurse couldn’t eat any tea at all,” interposed Flora,
“And I saw her crying, only she looked out of the
window and pretended she wasn’t.”

“Just what I expected,” said Mr. Barnard. “And I
suppose you know that the reason your Aunt Jane had
to stay in bed to-day is, that she made herself quite ill
worrying about you yesterday. You may call what you
did only thoughtlessness; I call it selfishness.”

“J didn’t mean any harm,” mumbled Tommy. “ But
people are always stupid. They stop your doing things
directly they find out; or else they put it all off till next
week, or by and by. I don’t want to do things by and
by. I want to do them directly I think of them.”

“Nurse doesn’t like his plans,” explained Flora. “She
says they always mean mischief and tearing our clothes.”

“TI don’t wish to spend the whole afternoon finding
fault,” continued Mr. Barnard, “but I should like to
know why you told Mr. Arnold such a silly untruth
about your belonging to gypsies, and travelling in a
caravan.”



86 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

Tommy looked rather foolish. He had no reason to
give that was worth mentioning.

“All the people in fairy tales do,” he murmured.
“When the giant catches them they always tell stories.”

“T am sorry for you if you have no better excuse
than that,” remarked Mr. Barnard briskly; “because,
you see, it’s all nonsense, and you know it. You have
no more right to go about telling stories because Jack
the Giant Killer did, than I have to chop off people’s
heads if they happen to look like giants.”

“Was Mr. Arnold a giant?” inquired Flora, who was
getting rather puzzled.

“No; certainly not. I dare say you children will be
surprised to hear that Mr. Arnold isa perfectly harmless
old gentleman.”

“Then why did he shut us up in a dungeon with iron
bars, so that we couldn’t get out?” interrupted the little
girl.

Mr. Barnard laughed. ‘Well, from all you have told
me,” he said, “I feel sure it wasn’t a real dungeon, but
only a store-room. And as for those terrible bars, they
were put to prevent thieves from getting in and steal-
ing the jam, not to stop boys and girls from getting
out.”

“But why did he frown and seem so cross if he is
really good?” persisted Flora, only half satisfied with
this explanation.

“He is old, and has had a great many troubles,” said
Mr. Barnard. ‘And when people are sad they some-



ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 87

times shut themselves up at home and can’t bear to be
disturbed. We ought to be sorry for him, really, living
all by himself with nobody to take care of him.”

The children were silent, trying to take in this new
idea of their dreaded enemy.

“T dare say he didn’t think Tommy looked very nice
with his nose pressed against the window,” said Flora
presently.

“Then I don’t know what he can have thought of you,”
rejoined Tommy. ‘Your face was much dirtier than
mine, and Nurse says your dress is only fit to be torn
up for rags, and your—”

“Well, I expect there wasn’t much to choose between
you,” interposed Mr. Barnard soothingly. “Now,” he
continued, ‘in consequence of your silly trick yesterday,
it will be a whole week, at least, before you are both
able to spend the afternoon with me; for, of course, it
would be quite useless your coming until Tommy’s foot
is better.”

The children looked very downcast.

“It’s all because of Tommy’s stupid plans,” complained
Flora. ‘He thinks them so clever; I don’t. They
always end by our being punished.”

“Tf you are so sure they will turn out badly, why do
you follow him?” inquired Mr. Barnard.

-“ Because I like to see what’s going to happen.”

“Well, if yesterday’s doings are an example of the
kind of thing that usually happens when Tommy has
a plan, I should prefer being left behind,” remarked Mr.



88 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS

Barnard. “Do you know, Tommy rather reminds me
of a boy I knew very well, a long time ago.”

“ Will you make it a story, please?” requested Flora.

“Certainly, on one condition. You must both promise
not to try and do any of the new naughty things I tell
you about.”

“Oh, no, we won't,’ said Tommy confidently. “We
can think of quite enough naughty things of our
own.”

“And I should like the boy’s name to be Charlie, and
for him to be seven years old, because that’s my age,”
added Flora.

“Tm sorry to disappoint you,” said Mr. Barnard;
“but as it’s a true story I can’t help his name being
George, and his age about twelve.”

“Oh, well, it doesn’t matter,” rejoined the little girl
cheerfully. “ But you will make him do a lot of amusing
things, won’t you?”

“Whether his doings were amusing or not, you must
judge,” said Mr. Barnard. “In the meantime you
interrupt me so often that I don’t get a chance of telling
them.”

“We won't speak again,” cried both the children.
And they kept their resolution for at least three minutes.

“This boy George was an only child,’ began Mr.
Barnard. “I don’t remember that he ever wanted
brothers and sisters. He was rather greedy, and liked
having everything to himself. And as he was used to
being alone, he had made up all his games for one person.



ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 89

If children were invited to spend the day with him he
hardly knew what to do with them, and it generally
ended in their looking on while he played by himself.
He can’t have been a very pleasant little boy, but his
parents thought him perfect. They were so fond of him
that they could not make up their minds to send him to
school at the same age as most little boys, but kept him
at home until he was almost twelve.”

“ Didn’t he do any lessons?” inquired Tommy eagerly.

“Yes; a gentleman used to come every morning to
teach him. But whenever George felt unusually idle he
used to get a headache about breakfast-time; not until
he had eaten as much as he wanted, though. And then
by the time his tutor came he would be lying on the
drawing-room sofa with his eyes shut, and there were no
lessons that day. Then at other times when he was
supposed to prepare his lessons alone in the evening, he
was very fond of going to his father and asking to be
shown how to doa sum or translate a bit of Latin. Now
his father was such a clever man that he dearly loved
books himself, and used to forget that telling George
exactly how to do his lessons was not the same thing as
letting him find out for himself. Very often the rector—
his father was rector of a country parish—would go on
translating page after page, while George just wrote
down all he said without taking the trouble to think for
a moment.”

“T wish I could do that,” murmured Tommy regret-
fully,



90 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“Well, it isn’t such a good plan as it sounds,” said
Mr. Barnard. “I happen to know that when George
at last went to school he had to begin at the beginning,
and learn everything over again, being put back in a
class with boys three or four years younger than himself,
to the disgust of the master and his own shame. For I
must tell you that George thought himself a wonderfully
clever boy, and his dear, good, unwise parents had
encouraged him in the belief. Now, his father, the rector,
as well as being fond of books, had rather scientific
tastes—”

“What's that?” interrupted Flora.

Mr. Barnard looked rather perplexed. He was not
accustomed telling stories to children, and found their
perpetual interruptions and demands for explanations
rather trying. ‘It means—well, I hardly know how to
explain what it means,” he answered. ‘ Perhaps it will
be simpler if I tell you what the rector used to do, and
then you will understand. Whenever he was not doing
things in the parish—”

“What sort of things?” inquired Flora.

“Oh, going to the village school, or visiting sick people.
But if you stop me again I shall really forget what I was
going to say. Let mesee... . I was telling you about
the rector. He used to go out late at night, looking at
the stars through great telescopes, and then he would
shut himself up in his study for hours, reading difficult
books, and making calculations about planets and comets
and those sort of things. And his study was full of



ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 91

queer instruments—electric batteries, which gave such
shocks that one had to be careful how one touched them ;
and microscopes through which a flea looked as big as a
mouse; not to mention glass jars of all sorts and sizes.
Some of them held poisons, while others held powders
which made beautiful colours when they were burnt.
And then there were things that smelt dreadful, and
things that exploded when one didn’t expect it.”

“T should have liked to see all that,” remarked Tommy
with a longing sigh.

“So did George,” continued Mr. Barnard; “and as his
father was able to try so many curious experiments, he
was very fond of imitating him ina small way. Of course,
George was never allowed to touch the instruments and
chemicals, for fear of accidents. But I'll tell you the
kind of thing he used to do. He once was away on a
visit with his parents where he was allowed to stay up to
late dinner. I have told you that he was sadly spoilt.
Well, in the middle of dinner, instead of sitting quiet as
little boys should, he began to tell the lady next him
what a lot of scientific facts he knew about the different
gases in the atmosphere, and that kind of thing. And
then he offered to show her a little experiment—how the
force of the air would keep water from coming out of a
bottle if you turned it quickly upside-down. So he
turned the water-bottle upside-down, and made a flood
all over the clean table-cloth. ‘That’s a very clever boy
of yours,’ remarked an old gentleman to the rector;
‘only I should have begun by teaching him that water



92 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

always finds its own level.’ And everybody laughed.
But George was never invited to that house again.”

“Tell me some more things that he did,” said Flora,
who found the story getting more interesting as the
accidents began.

“Another day,” said Mr. Barnard, “several ladies came
to tea with his mother. George, as usual, was allowed
to sit in the drawing-room and talk as much as he liked.
Indeed his poor mother, blinded by her affection, began
to tell how quick he was with his lessons, and how he
was sure to grow up very clever and scientific, like his
father. Then George was encouraged to show the ladies
a specimen of his talents; so, after asking if they knew
the way to make an egg so strong that it couldn’t be
broken, he got araw egg from the kitchen and began to
explain how one might press as hard as one liked on
the two ends without breaking it. Perhaps his fingers
slipped; but at all events the egg suddenly smashed,
making a horrible mess on the carpet, and splashing over
a lady’s dress. Everybody went away soon after that,
without waiting for more experiments.”

“Did he ever get punished?” inquired Tommy with
sympathetic interest.

“Not half so often as he deserved,” replied Mr. Barnard.
“OF course, as long as his parents thought him perfect,
nobody liked to interfere. However, sometimes he got
into a little trouble, as you will hear.

“Tt was the autumn, and somebody had sent the rector
a haunch of venison, so he was giving a dinner-party to



ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 93

several of the neighbouring clergymen and their wives,
that they might all enjoy the gift together. George
didn’t like venison, so he said he would have tea in the
school-room by himself, and he persuaded his mother to
order him all the things he liked best, such as a roast-
fowl, and tartlets made of strawberry-jam. Besides, he
intended to taste all the sweets as they came out of the
dining-room.

“But there was another reason as well as his dislike for
venison which prevented him from wanting to dine that
evening. For some time past he had been thinking over
a new invention for sweeping chimneys. He did not
mean to tell anyone about it until he was quite sure it
would work well, and he never could get a quiet time for
trying when there was nobody about to seo him. But
now he felt sure that, in the fuss of preparing for the
dinner-party, nobody would have leisure to notice what
he was doing.

“So, just before dinner, when his parents were dressing
and the servants all busy, he slipped out to the poultry-
yard and caught an old duck, who was asleep in her
house. Then he wrapped the poor thing so tightly up
in his coat that she could not make a noise, and crept
quietly up the back-stairs to the top of the house, where
there was a trap-door leading on to the roof. Out he
got, although, of course, it was a forbidden place. I
suppose he thought that if his invention turned out
particularly clever, nobody would remember to scold
him for being disobedient. Then he looked for the



94 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

blackest chimney he could see, so as to give it a fair .
trial; and taking the poor duck in his hands, he pushed
her down, thinking that her fluttering and struggles as
she fell would clean out all the soot.”

“Did it?” cried both the children together.

“You shall hear. Of course, George was very anxious to
see the result of his experiment as soon as possible. So he
got back through the trap-door and ran downstairs. He
could hear a tremendous noise in the kitchen, so he went
there first. Everything was black; the soot was lying in
heaps on the floor, and sprinkled all over the table on
which the sweets were spread out. But the worst was
round the fireplace, where the cook was standing, looking
like a negress. At her feet lay broken the largest dish
of the best set of china, which she had dropped in her
fright. The venison had rolled off into a heap of soot in
the fender. The unfortunate cook was screaming with
terror as she looked at a dreadful black thing bobbing
up and down in the soup-tureen, into which it had fallen.
Two or three other servants were standing about, talk-
ing excitedly of earthquakes and gunpowder- plots.
Presently the poor duck flopped out of the soup-tureen,
and ran quacking all about the kitchen, leaving a long
sticky trail of wet soot behind her. At the same moment
the cook caught sight of George looking in at the door,
and she guessed what had happened.”

“Was she angry?” inquired Flora.

“Furious; as well she might be,” replied Mr. Barnard.
“She ran at George and shook him till he could hardly



ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 95

stand. None of the others interfered; in fact, I believe
they were delighted to see the spoilt child getting pun-
ished at last.”

“And did his father and mother find out?” asked
Tommy.

“Not that evening. So as not to make a fuss before
the visitors, the servants only said that the soot had come
down the kitchen chimney and spoilt all the dinner.
There was nothing fit to eat except the roast-chicken
and tartlets, which had already been carried up to the
school-room. So, of course, they had to be taken to the
dining-room for the visitors; and George crept off to bed
without any supper, for the cook said she would not give
him so much as a dry crust. And even his indulgent
parents were very vexed next day when they heard all
about it, and how the duck was so much hurt that it had
to be killed.”

“Who killed it?” interrupted Tommy.

“The cook cut off its head herself with the chopper, in
the back kitchen,” replied Mr. Barnard promptly.

“You tell stories so nicely,” remarked Flora. ‘You
remember all the things we want to know, which most
people think doesn’t matter. Go on.”

‘Well, there isn’t much more to say about that story,”
answered Mr. Barnard, “except that George was not
punished half so much as he deserved.”

“Tm sorry for that,” said Tommy. Next to hearing
about the bad deeds of surpassingly naughty boys, he
enjoyed being told of the terrible punishments they



96 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS,

received. “George ought to have been whipped,” he
observed resentfully.

“JT quite agree with you,” answered Mr. Barnard,
“but you know he was a spoilt child. Now,” he con-
tinued, looking at his watch, “‘I must go home in a few
minutes, so I can’t possibly tell you everything George
did.”

“Tell us the worst thing, if you’ve only time for one,”
interrupted Tommy.

“Very well, I will tell you the one that got him into
the greatest trouble. I don’t know that it was really so
bad as when he hurt the poor duck, or used to crush all
the butterflies he saw under the pretence that he was
catching them to make a collection. Not that he meant
to be cruel, only he never stopped to think whether he
was hurting animals or not. However, this was what
people always talk of as the worst thing he ever did.”

“T hope it was very, very bad,” murmured Tommy,
his face beaming with anticipation.

“Tf you won’t interrupt me you shall hear,” said Mr.
Barnard. ‘A few days before Christmas George had an
unusually clever idea for giving his parents and some
uncles and aunts a great treat on Christmas-day, when
they were going to have a family dinner at the rectory.
This dinner took place every year, and the old-fashioned
dining-room used to be decorated with holly and ever-
green, till it looked very festive. But it, unfortunately,
occurred to George that it would be a great improve-
ment if, instead of the table being lighted up by common



ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 97

wax candles, they could burn some of those beautiful
red and blue lights that his father sometimes showed
him in the study. He wondered that nobody had
thought of the possibility of doing this before; only
grown-up people never did seem to have very good
ideas. However, George was quite satisfied that he
knew all about how to make the coloured fire himself
without consulting anybody. So one afternoon he
watched his father start out for a walk, and then quietly
went into the study to help himself to the materials
needed for making an illumination.”

“T thought he wasn’t allowed to go into the study
alone,” began Flora.

“He was disobedient,” replied Mr. Barnard. ‘“ Besides,
as I told you before, he meant to do such clever things
that nobody would scold him for being naughty. At all
events he did go into the study, and opened a great
cupboard full of shelves, on which stood rows and rows
of bottles and jars, with paper labels on them. He didn’t
try to stop and read the labels, because he didnt know
the names of any of the things his father used. But he
was quite sure that he knew them by sight. When he
came to look the jars were more alike than he had
fancied, and it was rather difficult to distinguish between
them. However, there was not much time for hesitating,
as he was afraid that someone might find him in the study.

“So he took what seemed to be the jars he remem-
bered seeing his father use, and hurried ‘up to his bed

room. Here he locked the door, and prepared to try a
(21 829) @



98 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS,

few experiments in illuminating the room. First he
lighted a candle, and then he took up the jar containing
the powder that was to turn the flame red. He thought
he would try a little bit, and supposing after all it was
not the right stuff, there would still be time to run down
to the study and change it. Unfortunately, hardly had
he sprinkled a few grains in the candle than there was a
tremendous bang, and he fell flat on his back. It seems
that George had made a trifling mistake between the
jars, and brought the stuff that exploded instead of the
stuff that made colours.”

“Did he change it?” asked Flora.

“No; there wasn’t much chance of doing that when
it came to the point,” replied Mr. Barnard. ‘“ The jar had
burst into a thousand pieces, the room was full of nasty
black smoke, and George’s hands were all bleeding, and
hurt him quite sufficiently to take away the least desire
to go on with his experiments. His only wish now was
to get out of the room as soon as possible. Most unluckily
he had locked the door, and in his hurry and fright he
tried to turn the key so violently that it got stuck in the
lock. His shouts and the noise of the explosion brought
some of the maids to the passage outside, but they were
not strong enough to break open the door, and could do
nothing but run up and down screaming wildly for
help.”

“Was George burnt to death?” inquired Tommy in an
awe-struck voice. The story seemed to be taking rather
an oppressively serious turn.





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0b82aa3f522ed676e8cbb17f5bec8b751515daca
'2011-12-30T10:55:19-05:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHJR' 'sip-files00014.txt'
1e51ab60ebae2c9cd88ce8c5a0ee7c60
aa9449c16ed5cd4b65584dea40b7d7e99d6d7187
'2011-12-30T10:59:12-05:00'
describe
'8771' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHJS' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
2feccfed3898e0b38c29fdf95f9a7298
53cc32f5cb98ce8d2f3cbf6f98e9efa9c20fb542
'2011-12-30T10:55:43-05:00'
describe
'325353' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHJT' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
12633c9d34628cc997f334f55944e571
8bc8674cca70c4c4349a984d776fe821184dfe5a
'2011-12-30T10:57:10-05:00'
describe
'131087' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHJU' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
9568df0f31b14150f2e6134db6919301
8c54f7df154efdd0929fe73b23861b0c6cec62b6
describe
'39588' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHJV' 'sip-files00015.pro'
f807eaefd292fb0059f90ef2df27e66a
b7ee00f331f331ddbec4b630df51eb45af7474bf
describe
'39404' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHJW' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
a4b84e20b8b057ada522fe044845257b
3cb8479f6ebd340859a0f33ea1ecb8c600ae92ef
'2011-12-30T10:57:34-05:00'
describe
'2619992' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHJX' 'sip-files00015.tif'
a29a438a46432d9cb48d651568435a63
7c97f21c7d6d6032516fce9b54f4bf865a9745bd
'2011-12-30T10:57:13-05:00'
describe
'1628' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHJY' 'sip-files00015.txt'
6aa2e5bd2e86a74bbdd0c40b72757962
a2c3bb6f175cead27e1407955aab85ec101378a4
describe
'9233' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHJZ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
4272e468fa79a832a16af06c65490f32
c8721fdbdf58ced317a084f5a4fb0323eaba42f8
describe
'325621' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKA' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
e89927fdaeb9e95b21462d3db155f16f
65344f92358b93ea9ab282dd994bf35f96a5c5cf
'2011-12-30T10:57:37-05:00'
describe
'133586' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKB' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
233b7aab37240c385735ae75d91c7b81
19c44afc50854d221f9b42fff3d499ab6c4630cc
'2011-12-30T10:54:53-05:00'
describe
'40800' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKC' 'sip-files00016.pro'
43c394437ac1c829cb031c5df5b14eb3
dcc11b813a9da818c44878b0f45763c04abdc8e0
'2011-12-30T10:56:05-05:00'
describe
'39648' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKD' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
b3dda42cba4f3853c86a6a2f407a018a
d4acf02bf2bd1e72ce8e5585abc0181028944caf
'2011-12-30T10:59:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKE' 'sip-files00016.tif'
e2be0812b6ab785dbc6371cda1f8ebf7
380cd7fa66ad45933fe6b004cddfcdd37dcbbe3d
'2011-12-30T11:00:37-05:00'
describe
'1678' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKF' 'sip-files00016.txt'
e6973dc063ed218ea5ff39f7dc076905
bb470c71269d5ccca431b0997f8399c1c22f28b5
'2011-12-30T10:55:16-05:00'
describe
'9241' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKG' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
36445745b11a4274eb56b39d64c124b4
e08ccaf9ce91e552aec768eadae828f7a63224dd
'2011-12-30T10:55:25-05:00'
describe
'325516' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKH' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
acf6d99cc5c88552e51cadf65a400233
0e9dfaa2d8e0aec728ee551507ef3885a4abf220
'2011-12-30T10:56:10-05:00'
describe
'138144' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKI' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
bc65a9a74a1fbd97a6eb990402409193
8d7e9686ce7796361f85da0933c388c41e1c923e
'2011-12-30T10:57:02-05:00'
describe
'43880' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKJ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
86d6211475410aaca8391645d569231f
b1aa6bf06938a0a2e1e82c4b8842413623fd1412
'2011-12-30T10:55:01-05:00'
describe
'41540' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKK' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
0e22dbe7782a4c725694d4c0bcb10b6a
a61f259e8237c1afe330f4b23958b3aab41f96fb
'2011-12-30T10:56:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKL' 'sip-files00017.tif'
7d80e2417762b92fcfd36ad38636089f
65af63d7e20fc4be5067960c113866939a86e352
'2011-12-30T11:00:19-05:00'
describe
'1721' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKM' 'sip-files00017.txt'
6c8b96903fd8a839dddc481917259a39
90cdc2f11753c7df5dc3278bba2f861ee0a2b93f
'2011-12-30T10:59:53-05:00'
describe
'9680' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKN' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
3f65f5d6464b7d8a5d905c12170e0eba
2746187c0e199ebc46d6b56c781da8124222cade
'2011-12-30T10:58:25-05:00'
describe
'325623' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKO' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
827c211a4b693514037a611173aea093
f747701709aa38fc1ac9dc38f5b1445994303786
'2011-12-30T10:59:07-05:00'
describe
'132023' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKP' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
af4df8ef5bbbd3d935a46e219171f641
a4868f7443b4d93a5fd5f77c7f41bb3cd52362cb
'2011-12-30T10:58:32-05:00'
describe
'39094' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKQ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
ef51beec3bf6f7d00cb9e2e64092bce6
3c59c2071e3e547ae9fb4f2b7599d9e0b978d000
describe
'39836' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKR' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
80baae0b16f6496fc623cf8b25367744
4fe8a22f6609e8c33ea1a3676d977bd27aca86f3
'2011-12-30T10:56:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKS' 'sip-files00018.tif'
64118a64a854b2f1b3f8f9f4e0b8b344
142d443b99d339302d5f655b4b4c0377bb5f38e2
'2011-12-30T10:59:02-05:00'
describe
'1614' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKT' 'sip-files00018.txt'
4576588fc345a67efc04c67ff36abe4a
b73c19f5c4589b1925a6c5e9f4391ead46b9b20c
'2011-12-30T10:59:00-05:00'
describe
'9737' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKU' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
e3e83b4fe7c496b15b4b054638094c28
901c0f77528a6f09648dab9b933315de4182b1db
'2011-12-30T10:56:14-05:00'
describe
'325227' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKV' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
5ab47136d56a2729ac4b440b6c88c264
4338b07eaf35495d295d6f69b41b2ee8dff4c851
'2011-12-30T10:59:56-05:00'
describe
'132335' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKW' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
e3f3c53880b164c0b16624e90722266c
7680fa7d90d638520575268b89cae36c9f237e71
'2011-12-30T10:59:21-05:00'
describe
'39958' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKX' 'sip-files00019.pro'
6ce2c4bf50c6d2f270967e25cc9f129d
4354ad87e3f1b56733523adcbd1d7141a427440f
'2011-12-30T10:55:39-05:00'
describe
'39703' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKY' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
c36595897a1050d55f7f82cff932b458
37bb41f0710f417d80503a96a0ff5d197816d811
'2011-12-30T10:59:58-05:00'
describe
'2618652' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHKZ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
391a49c286fa3c74b3b9655eef35b6eb
4ae25388d0a509d7142c85e0a9ec4043fa8f79b7
describe
'1631' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLA' 'sip-files00019.txt'
1b9a8bacf48c57c45c6c049ed84ecf32
5afbefedbc0bb56df3cdfde8aa57a906c5922e03
'2011-12-30T10:54:42-05:00'
describe
'9194' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLB' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
b8dad8f742b5c3df98640cf51addf4cf
61d58eca04dc9d84b13e736ca39f4d63385d4714
'2011-12-30T11:00:08-05:00'
describe
'325578' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLC' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
f56e51369ebe5ad825d30a8703e48dc7
ccd2a850af68884389fe50bfee65431d69a73c84
'2011-12-30T10:59:13-05:00'
describe
'132260' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLD' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
7243b68881deee16b4b2226ff66312e0
ba12b81b060172c8d99927ca487abe9d3a9c8455
'2011-12-30T10:57:11-05:00'
describe
'40482' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLE' 'sip-files00020.pro'
d0dca1c96f8d2d0ef74a87728def80da
869b377a466f8b52477d8067c205e67f92dea17a
'2011-12-30T10:54:45-05:00'
describe
'39457' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLF' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
f27dfc54de2746c789786fba42d7d267
53f0e526fba82d91f1790a4cfa4e3e0912fc1c39
'2011-12-30T10:56:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLG' 'sip-files00020.tif'
045df4d8aed0645e6c6391b803bb82a3
4a9dbcd0c78930f2040ae7a26c91e7c5476d553f
describe
'1663' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLH' 'sip-files00020.txt'
7b8248c339d4ec8fb68077ee3133b948
13b2b8e5565d5df24d2779a27095b79ac5ddf89f
'2011-12-30T10:56:51-05:00'
describe
'9532' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLI' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
37740e068e79b860baffe7aa708f798f
f8147446a5f49f453abb377299e05d08323210f7
'2011-12-30T11:00:16-05:00'
describe
'325388' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLJ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
b6eb08b8226214b56e18a5a358040a46
c46e9f8e05612f5a3efd3dce5a5b12384b5094ff
'2011-12-30T10:57:32-05:00'
describe
'130808' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLK' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
00e703386661632fe197a108c331b0ad
8c3d573112c696ef9ae610332cb582263351ba4a
'2011-12-30T10:58:04-05:00'
describe
'40343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLL' 'sip-files00021.pro'
d3fda5f7ff8e5c2cc1916f461e4b245b
3391356291ded2f220aa02ee76e9ec702ae4664a
'2011-12-30T10:55:48-05:00'
describe
'39041' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLM' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
f10e631d186e6af67e9672ffb183dd4c
7a989770b4d03979ecb33fb6380d517a09434f05
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLN' 'sip-files00021.tif'
1717750008d6e69e3b039b62649fda84
4dd70bed6599ea29716eed3fb119626b4820c4d6
'2011-12-30T10:54:56-05:00'
describe
'1595' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLO' 'sip-files00021.txt'
2c76647c35a9019b9e2c074762b4c370
f7ff013637c822aa1d03ed15b247542d1317de03
'2011-12-30T10:54:50-05:00'
describe
'9360' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLP' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
c93809157f322af099b97975bb83f443
1d95bec7432ebf12c560c057d27ba02cc58725e0
'2011-12-30T10:59:49-05:00'
describe
'325595' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLQ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
2e9d666fcbb155fa284c34afee4865c7
12db026219158a1b74bbbe7e67681a68432fec50
'2011-12-30T10:59:26-05:00'
describe
'130020' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLR' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
5028a5970ae0647aa49d8b0ce5121901
ba8ab0626880d569ba709d013563bc82a52004bf
'2011-12-30T10:54:58-05:00'
describe
'38647' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLS' 'sip-files00022.pro'
2412d69c5a73fc3d5a355e582ce8e4d5
94c7352d732f5687b39c8cb6103cd1aa8411aba0
describe
'39390' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLT' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
9a7da91b597952605f4c75c4d1cbdedf
16fff17002abddd39f475c998cd07756f7a3d0af
'2011-12-30T10:55:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLU' 'sip-files00022.tif'
4f242a301adea89c887c507bdae5a92c
910a218299e4bc73d6b59c7eef0de4bf7a599a7c
'2011-12-30T10:55:54-05:00'
describe
'1601' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLV' 'sip-files00022.txt'
e6be5efdde98d0275a647e0214abbddd
7beae307583e13beff57944885c748c909dbcfa9
'2011-12-30T10:55:24-05:00'
describe
'9483' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLW' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
3f53f69c86c39dce63527768f1a96fe6
2ef5d76cbbb4c0db9d455036ff71055cf95eefea
'2011-12-30T11:00:03-05:00'
describe
'325164' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLX' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
103bf7161be082e4cdc4d7ae8ee572d4
e72005c5dedaea8be7c0099ea9f9397093b8fa2c
'2011-12-30T10:54:54-05:00'
describe
'130457' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLY' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
5c4d97cce2b59e0ff18b58523d796c72
3d338ded1e5188120f46b675a14a28659529279a
'2011-12-30T10:59:34-05:00'
describe
'39306' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHLZ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
67d2ead2feb9c938b44976d0bfcc9372
f2a9ea12764152698b95f2cc5705e8b46615cb77
describe
'38853' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMA' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
d9f006704b23e0f5e3e8d32f96cc1b5c
a5d68593c311f069dbcdeb09c9bfb35287f45bdc
'2011-12-30T10:59:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMB' 'sip-files00023.tif'
56a6a2ebbb0abc079e9731e454b6fd07
52ce63e9e97cf04117316af42634130f6d9f7115
describe
'1650' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMC' 'sip-files00023.txt'
414aa50fa6b97a44aea05b35dd1f9697
2300b9b63b0ba17d2c8c3f54defe1b647715e076
'2011-12-30T11:00:09-05:00'
describe
'9586' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMD' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
9ec38d7d6074e2d5bc45a4b3e6bc3940
0a0cb0dbebb3051c5f6ee63d528431c4b97ca92e
describe
'325637' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHME' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
6c9a2014053f2b86077d72f364f480d3
4d144ee300e01c31e6c8fa5040e8bc4893b10b53
'2011-12-30T10:59:31-05:00'
describe
'127851' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMF' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
95e9fec35f10112a8fd81dee0408542c
677affe6b9872d78aeb3fbf8ff1d159eaef2cd52
'2011-12-30T10:57:05-05:00'
describe
'41808' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMG' 'sip-files00024.pro'
1e7dd423e94ba9cc9a68322f9a44e6fb
2227da341cdd606ef4255e0ee765431dce16047b
'2011-12-30T10:57:18-05:00'
describe
'38535' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMH' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
bf2eff0dd466bf161d78eb6bd178cf69
6cb16bc76577c16248ca11c324481fbc0991ada1
'2011-12-30T10:58:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMI' 'sip-files00024.tif'
2180a436440f9458eedaf3cfb2705220
d7bca356f5b5a70460e8748aa3700ee964854063
'2011-12-30T10:55:59-05:00'
describe
'1689' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMJ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
ae0fd4948e897d51cd9949d6cf68266f
78d17a65eae81bfb5756da9a63fb0165a413502b
describe
'8846' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMK' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
3fceac9aa5163db6f70470fa011e0629
37fe1888df5de5bae6eb149a58cad4ee00fa7365
describe
'325530' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHML' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
d7a128c8152788b6835c756694a8c1c2
7a30fb5234096f26748d7c5bb61b781a21d81c61
'2011-12-30T10:57:06-05:00'
describe
'139913' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMM' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
3ba2b5f4eb88a1c3cc720528bbd5cbd6
39b9fdff8ba7f9cd3556f0b9d2bf17600df51d06
describe
'42869' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMN' 'sip-files00025.pro'
1e08f9a55978ac2466853ae4c5e5f2d7
47a39d2cfc39dc90447a1ef28176d7e16644c6a9
describe
'41612' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMO' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
517121cfc7cacfb695a1cb6dc6bcec14
876395cd5a510e0e7ca2d592a0d4edb4145a2af2
'2011-12-30T10:56:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMP' 'sip-files00025.tif'
07a89c3795c382f400468c940491e5c1
b76386b13fb16e87ccdec6c9a22dbd8eff3b67ac
describe
'1749' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMQ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
54565f0dfb54c0ec2805cc4651c1262e
4af2c52fc2a9a11cb40d5df59fd2ca4a0ef173e6
'2011-12-30T10:58:54-05:00'
describe
'9505' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMR' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
eb305a2b6952eb3b5f58f9320021a3b4
64b1cda7e23eba237e7a84882bc3bf6f814c8630
'2011-12-30T10:54:35-05:00'
describe
'325608' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMS' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
afa16cc012ca863a78d35646a50f099b
7f8a696dc97bfd3a596b95f76ccd61f31b28499b
'2011-12-30T10:56:33-05:00'
describe
'135096' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMT' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
52a1e2753f7d88c555b03241d352f0e1
e7f2e3e7f59a5b3fd8e2fcaa1fcbe1cb0b36293e
'2011-12-30T11:00:06-05:00'
describe
'43225' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMU' 'sip-files00026.pro'
e87c468d722f6076b90b0dcc3481c202
ea4508b8be587631c72487557ba46fd6d05a66fe
'2011-12-30T10:56:12-05:00'
describe
'40459' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMV' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
e65ae05a5ea09e6b0c52d3cce5a3ab49
9fa51d85bd68b82fbc6697977b0607054ddc6777
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMW' 'sip-files00026.tif'
753affe8a2578fcdd0108198cb967d0f
1286446bba71848b665ac45109783452cf6b4a44
'2011-12-30T10:58:12-05:00'
describe
'1710' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMX' 'sip-files00026.txt'
e5b33ce135c62387ab08549cc748252a
f7260d6aaba829d8b887f0a2d1a54c69dfdb2f95
describe
'9540' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMY' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
59c71e4240543f50383565d830b9c7ab
0ec82f85a32aba1613f636ba8afcaec6bf054d4f
'2011-12-30T10:55:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHMZ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
0b013e4da3ec6be3a7cc6944c45bfb0e
37ae84ce04f11f268976b3b9d22c75a552251191
'2011-12-30T10:57:58-05:00'
describe
'127362' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNA' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
27f9493f258a508a7d3d4721d2925bbd
2c784c6a5d4fdd9defceaae5ccc616974c574c56
describe
'40834' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNB' 'sip-files00027.pro'
8e9e94d7f841c1effe0ac54595a8df74
1c0359a3e5a5503f2fb4bad3b7587ac637811cd0
describe
'38306' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNC' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
fadf12aa96632bdd54ca3230a72ea018
8e855995104941e78f0d2a51e587e72165ca63ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHND' 'sip-files00027.tif'
9d59e2daf0f4c2198eeeb3dacc34008f
4fe4e23dfd7cf6d0ee4bcbadbe9aba610ee15c68
'2011-12-30T10:59:04-05:00'
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNE' 'sip-files00027.txt'
e8ad58c9da21b71722ec5e3e20d7dfe9
b51edf4e75b81573553bcf7c22de14a995da155f
'2011-12-30T10:57:15-05:00'
describe
'9223' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNF' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
caf0ff0b7be2f4e7b999406db411646b
eaf36545901a9380882f827b8375473fb511d3be
'2011-12-30T11:00:43-05:00'
describe
'325627' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNG' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
f2e65e613dc0d05224c246b5e23a0462
6e6f0560d9b59e14585b271c1e69287c0e0a8467
'2011-12-30T10:54:49-05:00'
describe
'119771' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNH' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
7027fb0b1ddbd1424d5e412a78a92c06
9d438fbaa2691588c672fb4fde748b621533d9b6
'2011-12-30T11:00:05-05:00'
describe
'35254' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNI' 'sip-files00028.pro'
ed9276963be42a26ec3b479517958c68
072b3aa2c2b18014a9f0fc7fd998d0a900b13eee
'2011-12-30T11:00:12-05:00'
describe
'35798' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNJ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
b18d875858ed94bdc13d4532c52e19ea
16f17d67b30a81c957144bf4ae346ac235282a7d
'2011-12-30T10:58:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNK' 'sip-files00028.tif'
1c5269c0d45fde9eceaf5917721d499f
b503b5800c8b36acaa1a70bb5c3e50db4dea1f98
'2011-12-30T10:59:20-05:00'
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNL' 'sip-files00028.txt'
369527e1d5cdb8875eabe83728a9e467
3a52d8276b7fd5ef7b1c52472c682034b7a06dcc
describe
'8452' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNM' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
36a10100970bb6cc0e35fdb9f71e1ad2
47479c93553b38872dde94833649dff6aa642d19
'2011-12-30T11:00:26-05:00'
describe
'325296' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNN' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
998c2e0a7654b67f1017808a4c59e1ec
35a1e029fe5df0d60239c71ec1282e47f0b1a856
'2011-12-30T10:55:57-05:00'
describe
'138494' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNO' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
616f9336fc2c2bed034fde0c04ff13b7
a0373a13f98f6f8d85fa4138c4ead20656ac3ad5
'2011-12-30T10:57:52-05:00'
describe
'43138' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNP' 'sip-files00029.pro'
c8a046284ea498000255bcda3b1662ea
bd08831a0d379866e3996af4045b89ea723aac95
'2011-12-30T10:59:22-05:00'
describe
'42263' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNQ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
c9724ad9dd5fdfdc16f5510baae07ba5
39d6479b6bbb34cfa8ab7a7e68757f42e6545373
'2011-12-30T10:55:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNR' 'sip-files00029.tif'
3bdccb36d3c1d579892edfb0efc1b038
b017ee54dc52c1a7747c00c6927a93d671199ec8
'2011-12-30T10:56:55-05:00'
describe
'1755' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNS' 'sip-files00029.txt'
102c411188b335d572849e5015874828
e62d9c75dfc0e6286f074373f1276c2b0c795344
'2011-12-30T10:58:33-05:00'
describe
'9432' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNT' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
244b3d5b1448174c9f51f1a968fb94b7
ae07be1c7c8b7e79c1aedbaf001afd97250aedca
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNU' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
0fdb68dac7175a135045ebc81a27500f
13472573a36c6967e07d9c0c99f3408860b12b12
'2011-12-30T11:00:44-05:00'
describe
'136463' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNV' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
387837cf57c6ae7763531710c3ea64e8
4ec7e7078bcff00b8b008fb0746ebcb69ed3da70
'2011-12-30T11:00:25-05:00'
describe
'43304' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNW' 'sip-files00030.pro'
0d455fd62e155560c069077e846a3ac9
88486ef2d854b8d449c2017abe270bb3e04b2d92
describe
'40801' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNX' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
bbe66d8d3c2dc1107d8efe79ee53378a
73c72918b9b59e75515d44fb3bcb800f4960d048
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNY' 'sip-files00030.tif'
9ec4ebd5cae9bd49837d53b3c79afe31
20887dd2b1bf2c0df00d799ee43930078d5e17cd
describe
'1733' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHNZ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
38a7fff4a6322b0ed63150c5f482b37e
7fdb005501e9e9ef0c01e2850d2e7015cfb151bc
'2011-12-30T10:59:42-05:00'
describe
'9420' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOA' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
b1ad1cf1a16502aa63583937a00eb6a6
406a627d89387820b82e6f4bdde321ae73264c99
describe
'325469' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOB' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
5e5ce70179bce334138ec1267dd1e7c5
0c0080d8a0111d346eea1dc18c8719221b5eabb4
describe
'128471' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOC' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
0ed5b89e3e2c8d7d70c0f3bb1694f19f
1a8216c0c6f94c09fa9a93c4077f77331cf8d882
describe
'40796' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOD' 'sip-files00031.pro'
a2562b31cbb272ffc6f3ff181bc45159
f834b5558e94a756d529c365813d7b3515bfcc5d
'2011-12-30T10:55:35-05:00'
describe
'38843' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOE' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
7247e706376133216a942698ae84b233
b052be65454d771786ce391c1b76b1231dbe2dc6
'2011-12-30T11:00:14-05:00'
describe
'2620592' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOF' 'sip-files00031.tif'
d5eaac65844c13c4e4d9509c6019dcd3
e1fd42c7b1fed1240e7f3c566ab2018a0bcc62ea
describe
'1669' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOG' 'sip-files00031.txt'
6014700abee0de745c7e1c9f445f9822
3c6b1678027b6529cd4ba8c4404b0061375fa21b
'2011-12-30T10:58:14-05:00'
describe
'8786' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOH' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
7d6d58f7ccd37d17fa75be1e85540ea9
6fa0907afb822030dc8c6922bf68ec11d7a8b761
describe
'325181' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOI' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
1bf259f541ee24ccb0498f53a73781b9
32ffcb96aa8708df2fbdb13ac20392d3854c9afd
'2011-12-30T10:57:50-05:00'
describe
'130432' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOJ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
89fc437652554a3bb704e2e98393a555
a833446547f936d9353d1c6f6880771f55753056
'2011-12-30T10:58:42-05:00'
describe
'40560' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOK' 'sip-files00032.pro'
346ebc93a133e4d80ee195f00fd479a5
06bf1b37873285b01328538afd26d6d7a7ac7459
'2011-12-30T10:55:30-05:00'
describe
'38962' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOL' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
339b7332f1e23c5e60e9003f6f2e8f19
b56b947a2d125ef3727cc9919db8368911161444
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOM' 'sip-files00032.tif'
36e7d6af99cad63b7375aff399def030
de7c65097d6fcaa9da5475d8bb71b9405146914f
'2011-12-30T10:56:57-05:00'
describe
'1672' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHON' 'sip-files00032.txt'
5d40d4265c07205cc1d341e210de1c0c
db0e36a854ebc412953f1b9c7bce693449262327
'2011-12-30T10:58:38-05:00'
describe
'9449' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOO' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
242aa96aab736ffd3d81e0389253ab2d
e356efc27670e9a927f4d76362578edb9e6edaf4
describe
'325445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOP' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
befac736e73b54b9160ed4f726d27191
07e3b66c0e5441770a3a740c7ef76b8f17697c5d
describe
'128249' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOQ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
014d0b8ae50247b62450a3fe8a32cc38
c88a6219da481ea9aff4fa30eda374b8c799af9d
'2011-12-30T11:00:28-05:00'
describe
'38943' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOR' 'sip-files00033.pro'
65a418e6f83fb2798d481c6fefeff597
3cb3f7481e9c24707d90a9c1d8d8b1648e8baf00
'2011-12-30T10:57:20-05:00'
describe
'38173' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOS' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
d49f4bcd9341264b2ac70187b0d91104
ea0f6349fcb3b3e197638b3478f8f41621d8974c
'2011-12-30T11:00:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOT' 'sip-files00033.tif'
e3a7fc4afab652dab67560562f7105a1
97a084f6594554d1441d2df74e0717622f1fc172
'2011-12-30T10:54:44-05:00'
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOU' 'sip-files00033.txt'
a0e9307b1958eb8603e3293afb099c9e
a7afa56250fe76caf273e43e23709df5c89582d1
'2011-12-30T10:58:00-05:00'
describe
'9093' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOV' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
883b054a575cc161a2fed8ab114d980d
c4e663b2cc70f44d50c6928f3c0c1f68b9532f60
'2011-12-30T10:58:09-05:00'
describe
'325228' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOW' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
f615fa167294a46f063053c8c4ad6f9d
255c06dfc8ac097ab94bce622409ff85610bb637
describe
'130516' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOX' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
f13da50459aabba467cfa960f2b9c149
6e6dd7fa6c2b1d3e1724521e8033090fbbca665e
'2011-12-30T10:57:53-05:00'
describe
'41841' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOY' 'sip-files00034.pro'
aad817beb823a89e3d103b33eb4bbbfb
be4a79d49c2ef8b8093ac3f948295c355edf7646
describe
'39026' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHOZ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
6ab84fef0a71d54c7b87d51efca5071a
448b549b67f2725bfaaba3e8ba718d78a71f25bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPA' 'sip-files00034.tif'
000e48bef389ec03933796ac16a96cec
f80feb482912ac500c9adc177f6c37e37afb266a
describe
'1659' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPB' 'sip-files00034.txt'
44e6830f451c0d80ee5b818a56fcbcae
f037c141b77edbafcd5de2606c3370dec2742fdf
describe
'8977' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPC' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
e6809320895e478be4bb4ab754d86a82
c7358edb053c361ba0a7da2707bb1bf0805b514b
'2011-12-30T10:56:19-05:00'
describe
'325631' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPD' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
eb1743d461d64a245afc4db65c6e2824
0f1c8db67e6e0ff15cb20e73d70e1cd3240a388b
'2011-12-30T10:56:49-05:00'
describe
'127253' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPE' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
e377950e718d4eb90ea2d5f42a6e428b
dbacf698a5bbdd3a30f07ed951b2e81e5ed39a7e
'2011-12-30T10:58:27-05:00'
describe
'39879' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPF' 'sip-files00035.pro'
7cec8b29cbb8ad6ffe326dd677d1b457
432073ba87cab8cd8eb6a2eb01a2d9fd0cec117e
'2011-12-30T10:57:04-05:00'
describe
'39603' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPG' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
f0ec27dda4619574223e0aa73d7de038
7242a573cf0df5311f65793ee9cd59008d195cac
'2011-12-30T10:56:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPH' 'sip-files00035.tif'
d0af80a79809f77976a933a94e460f13
2a10a695e91c99f0cbface5555ea83de6e8207d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPI' 'sip-files00035.txt'
b1e30043d7cf673f2d8cc41f63060a57
cb1fec7ad439cfbae61465fe54a0e269ae88fed4
'2011-12-30T10:59:16-05:00'
describe
'9343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPJ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
ff6664ba2986708ce1fe5a82026e934d
163b8a871f23b826266d2cc06e409074d2003c4f
'2011-12-30T10:59:29-05:00'
describe
'325390' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPK' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
b03cb699749ed0c8ddfb653c0da12587
7690b1f597bcd3b2c383c4c9ef597649467d2498
describe
'134850' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPL' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
656a0d1cb182afc909cda6525d19a182
6f7c4f89ca3333967bc40c9c870e1acb4df53248
describe
'42553' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPM' 'sip-files00036.pro'
f49a22f6a6c6ae42d378ac4d935d5ad3
7251a6a2838d13b62f9ac36fa144eeba3a257406
'2011-12-30T10:55:56-05:00'
describe
'40682' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPN' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
5d7b1b6349b0db470412644f625ed2b0
513a7c1dd2851f15d187e3b771fbc664d1048eec
'2011-12-30T10:55:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPO' 'sip-files00036.tif'
4012616eef4c04419dab82372c42699e
3b7c4d65c368843ab2b1376f7150f1584a818a03
'2011-12-30T10:55:51-05:00'
describe
'1741' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPP' 'sip-files00036.txt'
dce6ba4230cc6b27e8430f15e294c2c9
9f82d76997594eac5942b80254944465317438dd
describe
'9207' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPQ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
2f827dbcff6cba02c4ab1f5ecb7a04ec
459eaf3152a7284f524ba893d98d9d671872d000
'2011-12-30T11:00:46-05:00'
describe
'325194' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPR' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
f62a895296b2bb02374d358dfb699ba6
beefef30f3100723f0d114706c580be5d6e17857
describe
'136910' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPS' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
059b408f7bb3c161ce67e600a3ea79c6
ed90fd3829fc0f61d6d0c810cb42ef5f28ff0fa4
'2011-12-30T10:56:21-05:00'
describe
'44984' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPT' 'sip-files00037.pro'
a99974591b9496ba8021864c69dc4c69
c3c61a617e3cf28169538fc270dd6c856e74adca
describe
'41186' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPU' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
b6e64c323e3d024856cd5386b809234f
1cfabd74a06a4e9a2d98a22244a3494bfa6fadfd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPV' 'sip-files00037.tif'
0fdc6c09ff4c69254ec84358ccc2c089
6829d434d1e30cdfaf3b65615445fd9889723248
'2011-12-30T10:56:38-05:00'
describe
'1766' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPW' 'sip-files00037.txt'
b3a4021ecda87cda3f5e0fd9fe2fb4e5
4dd9cc34e947957211386c67877dd0eb8a0d1b92
'2011-12-30T10:55:15-05:00'
describe
'9479' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPX' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
9c3ef4d1bae60ff431d439e0747cccde
32a900127c9b733aed299d3a2f3bf7325a204dec
describe
'325633' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPY' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
14742972e4dd774917134db129c719db
984045d149dd17c22f1a3ced52d7b06b3cf55dd4
describe
'131116' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHPZ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
13c77abafc9ea1125f67ef6f545cefe8
c81000c9e5d73e0069cfc52e1cf5e5d3676371a6
describe
'40227' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQA' 'sip-files00038.pro'
29e0e6092d9f64c933dff373980c3741
db5a784f78f9595526ac9f6dca616988597a79b0
describe
'39819' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQB' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
88046b5762b1b5938aaa5800662e04a6
456882be7e447009e047c58482c33c56f5d1d877
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQC' 'sip-files00038.tif'
7e1df1c6eeb19670be39b2529a496ffe
e3c6f76b070677eea5bacb7528b298f3c1ca4df2
'2011-12-30T10:56:28-05:00'
describe
'1653' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQD' 'sip-files00038.txt'
00850156f4bb67533896ee1e2dfbb0b4
08e91817f315a0b84661edd32883ab0386b37188
describe
'9584' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQE' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
b4330e4e2dee25820f531f266bd235ff
173d79a200fc4e57e4f89a9a948013e1121696b0
describe
'325615' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQF' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
3cf6b5be43e0b96b77c80098febe3539
ee6d632fbb6f7d61a0bbc5ed556ebb68332b1fc6
describe
'147528' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQG' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
bd6a4a19bb19c7ef2d24f66a5a60b6d0
9f963e9dffb2b987903f79550b44e946522f929c
'2011-12-30T10:58:47-05:00'
describe
'43300' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQH' 'sip-files00039.pro'
e43ce310b4b71c0082c2118c00d0dc45
650afad225107f872c10c601a6f91c8128871d02
describe
'41755' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQI' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
fec5d66f6b16f4f017603a37ec2d1b68
7e4f4f14eeaa2622a31074cceff1ea57b2884ce9
'2011-12-30T10:57:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQJ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
ca02ad1017fe9fe9275bf443d02af55c
3fcee030702ebfe00fbc5eed45564bbb1afcdf0f
'2011-12-30T10:59:03-05:00'
describe
'1818' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQK' 'sip-files00039.txt'
5a6ff203dffee0a1c0bc58b6d0b28146
a3bd7a7b1e8e7382227e1f6bff139cfa6bb2ddea
'2011-12-30T10:59:52-05:00'
describe
'9614' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQL' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
0af4a72976c7a300a84b3ca3f4813285
5992d6a7bcf5037705360edac721b59f9d06f794
describe
'325602' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQM' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
ea92af7cfa35bcba743d909ae0baf707
7b453606a85dc17675df7a40002303c3442c3435
'2011-12-30T11:00:29-05:00'
describe
'150840' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQN' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
d2e8c4d196a19d415562a3ecb930bb0b
69e1acc7bf51ea5df8e5589863855bc1fa1fa90d
'2011-12-30T10:56:41-05:00'
describe
'2133' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQO' 'sip-files00040.pro'
55e1979152d3147d4a43436d93ff1471
ffc3a89b0c60d02fb70f8ea8dc460df0626061ba
describe
'33799' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQP' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
b2755ea70a0b2546db93a4024558778c
1833717b4f4514001458f7469e0ddaedf4b304be
'2011-12-30T10:58:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQQ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
db31293ecc5e5413fef9788af823e7bf
086cea29c72baf4c04159cf38e0c53f1e8f86fa4
'2011-12-30T10:54:39-05:00'
describe
'234' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQR' 'sip-files00040.txt'
4a2e19079e1e3433171d80068e1d0617
f8c92a70149323f733dcdfe8329080ceddf0d8b1
'2011-12-30T11:00:32-05:00'
describe
'8652' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQS' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
bed982d30a4a00219d9fe401a45f6704
945a4004faf264cbab7b91ef5071568bfb527127
'2011-12-30T10:55:29-05:00'
describe
'325372' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQT' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
0c0035aba0b38ef4b867786fc9c455d0
3e7aa0c52cf9060ec1e704a84d78a148e96c7756
'2011-12-30T10:57:39-05:00'
describe
'140040' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQU' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
34367b64553415bc0574d16fe2ba121e
569c54ee73912bc8845342e81fb3ded265fba3ff
describe
'41709' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQV' 'sip-files00042.pro'
9be3dc5378e141901259c946ff2a2edd
268a024b292fed752d8cffa6062b158982aa82eb
describe
'40917' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQW' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
4d3f53b7909e0d834ea1e5de7358dbdb
b3039188b8854905cf26a26dbe048ca546356363
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQX' 'sip-files00042.tif'
446547052be7c109f8443715f1ef13c5
e1d8f6e636f49f6ad98b4c436108f18cbb02f064
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQY' 'sip-files00042.txt'
6e8451052af67dd2a98c616afee6e78f
2a0f9601062eb78c6382f2e8b0d2288627ecbef9
'2011-12-30T10:59:55-05:00'
describe
'9495' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHQZ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
f4429a620fe0f70a901338527400537f
59065daae97d5840dcabdf4ca889b3e38e0e75a4
describe
'325442' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRA' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
a780f4be12e2f6e5c6f19a13ee1b6ffa
691342ee58c448028d1ae5527ccda165968077c7
'2011-12-30T10:56:39-05:00'
describe
'134903' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRB' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
a64cfda0ec782f0b3ef154ec4be5ab25
0b50223962e2512ad1db9af094181c3126226703
'2011-12-30T10:57:22-05:00'
describe
'44662' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRC' 'sip-files00043.pro'
a6857305bf6191cd85494e584416342e
7aa597fc1682e783f7deda6884819da03e5b9101
'2011-12-30T10:58:36-05:00'
describe
'41220' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRD' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
6326965708e336434aff5a5df041accb
29bc2c34d7f979549e7a02f742c4f1923cfffb1b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRE' 'sip-files00043.tif'
aef444b7891f80b7d1f250f5ea64d03f
87751f344ea80d7e3669ce6a588f2e91da4819e0
describe
'1750' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRF' 'sip-files00043.txt'
c7a7f3c06d0a24c78ea4e41bd27fffbe
42f83b14d08c2e52bdd7e67b4c570bf9ba3b8eda
describe
'9510' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRG' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
b85170f32f6d3b61b7343867b9ab74be
acc76a684cefd65450a9be0a4ea3ae7ce40b7f98
'2011-12-30T11:00:35-05:00'
describe
'325278' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRH' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
c02d04ec0537a3750caa0634d0442cb0
ae91969cd218eb70a8547efd6c3d7c5ba5a69946
'2011-12-30T10:55:21-05:00'
describe
'114508' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRI' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
2dc5549f93d105c1981dcd81357835db
23cb6020e52e1dc9c575072110f0c9800e15621b
'2011-12-30T10:57:31-05:00'
describe
'34519' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRJ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
38cdb650f4a783a7b8dfd669f04d7634
2ea5abefbe93f3332c066096bdb96be958de5159
'2011-12-30T10:54:55-05:00'
describe
'33835' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRK' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
9824aebf3fa150c587babb68be908af9
13cfefa269577cafc99ae60341c45f8e2fd6ad3a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRL' 'sip-files00044.tif'
55e34c2bb6c5dceaf82f0496f01c7fbf
125dc83b594b7d6bc6834d131d8b06cbe28e512f
'2011-12-30T10:57:09-05:00'
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRM' 'sip-files00044.txt'
68526aa661261836f067539361a70b6f
1d96414932c358ce6aa11a18762012e45831f873
describe
'8093' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRN' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
ec137e6d39ab4f2cffcb270f2e9bdf4b
2a106de14d9706acee0c85837ea3df9b6fb801f7
describe
'325178' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRO' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
d5281e8615beb7f15e2f6dc9f0a14a79
400bc12f2db11fba368b2668f774864457e43f85
describe
'129569' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRP' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
96947aa14770933ff2e77f78e933f118
5f4916406f3ccb17c4e8a7eabe85a68bb8b017f4
'2011-12-30T10:57:07-05:00'
describe
'43552' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRQ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
8009dd631009b274b7e7c134440d52c8
5769be3cc7d0989769466f515528959cec36ee4d
describe
'40241' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRR' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
54c426bfd0db44424bfef31e6656c557
1c24522132ff2ad4583b4ec75a04a116d19ef736
'2011-12-30T10:58:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRS' 'sip-files00045.tif'
c8bb1695f83415a2d8742e448eb28f8f
1f43ccc108a6bb4a5d95654540cecd15ff8467d8
'2011-12-30T10:56:58-05:00'
describe
'1712' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRT' 'sip-files00045.txt'
76931c59113aba6b4fb4f8fecd624649
bd2cb5fb0f7fdaff97f64c69ef5afc1eb0df2c94
describe
'9384' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRU' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
94e1c1906d30f86e808e515e57e9215b
f75d6986a98658be9a84efb0ae3ddd75b2b711ac
describe
'325386' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRV' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
598e70459da0d97d5a0cd5790c54804e
a164da8fb134ea8cdf8da9aed10cda90ffa771ba
'2011-12-30T10:55:47-05:00'
describe
'129321' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRW' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
8e5b7ace8f635b43e2676cf2ec136b9d
1399d862456444b4f00f3957cf645e33189ed4bd
describe
'42039' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRX' 'sip-files00046.pro'
54b95bf99e5d3f35bdc470a5ca688e23
6c9392206512cb1a5f4883edfe35505b5a6e6adf
describe
'39228' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRY' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
3a21884414175dbd222f3ea9b12845e4
d34e583b2d549bfdd83987c56c8d1133fde26efa
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHRZ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
ebc276412f1c915b882e2b24444bac87
685a50951f836801c7984bc03fe813eefda26945
describe
'1680' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSA' 'sip-files00046.txt'
ec92cb6a0bce66d14a7fac6c158cfc9c
0effc9124d8ceb6b64fd63b28d31e3d172a7c87e
describe
'8937' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSB' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
8f88caa1d73ae02ce84543fb6c653876
7a55c237bff0fe8eeb0c78e3e35efa98b1235829
describe
'311538' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSC' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
d20609e9492b2b92290f91142e269d67
937fd272a88ab009b9034e7d29813bfaec98618e
'2011-12-30T10:58:18-05:00'
describe
'137776' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSD' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
633322bf480b9b12e64e44ca5fbad8cc
d9c23876a6b73a0118e4ed7f98d221d57f93364a
describe
'41667' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSE' 'sip-files00047.pro'
14e7168b541d8c637c3473ab84ce31ad
8fa0ad8f36287dfacdfb046ade5225eb9117114e
describe
'41914' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSF' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
4bf7b6b1cc75bf7c0e11127f94b1662d
4f7044988e965e57fc681313e8e1849f4a0728ee
describe
'2509296' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSG' 'sip-files00047.tif'
11fc252ec3e68e0fbead046acdca15b0
9c6e1b28b841ffc09668dd466cce3712047fefb6
'2011-12-30T10:55:18-05:00'
describe
'1654' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSH' 'sip-files00047.txt'
99850108cf71713f63db045432d78462
1fcd9d2362850667f46dc1dcfa3eba2858acb517
describe
'9792' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSI' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
5958abdc864db00a35797c7d0783a913
750fe83b3bc29a792da1222b4ebcecaa576c3032
describe
'311480' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSJ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
23cffa4a7b28534aaa9bccb598d49919
d32a74ca1c927141614d83709291dd0ba06403e1
describe
'139779' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSK' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
4c0367edda218cc6a64787675cdf35cd
599019988c79a860681cb256313736d14175a09d
describe
'42281' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSL' 'sip-files00048.pro'
5e0d14b06c321e436eb9a46a58efcbf4
085249db87bd9eb7d5f3a14eb25b5b8c4ce4b700
'2011-12-30T10:58:29-05:00'
describe
'43095' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSM' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
6698380b34433d5b6a0c6d6118cfc073
17be3c88a6b373e4837865b2064e4af929327034
'2011-12-30T10:54:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSN' 'sip-files00048.tif'
bb47f1af04de3c7ce3dc0345ee7d2ed6
8ffbf258cb760e85718ad7671bf530e36456e1c9
describe
'1738' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSO' 'sip-files00048.txt'
9efbc514552acf2f5362dd92fa20a1d0
d8aaf142851332f5fa3918aa4fcb07b61da14ae5
'2011-12-30T10:55:49-05:00'
describe
'10006' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSP' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
9ceed223ef4d6bc9c629abfc0399f773
266635cf3310a0f5c15c15c5aaafbc2f96360e59
'2011-12-30T10:58:48-05:00'
describe
'311542' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSQ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
2e92571a8a02a7c05d9d3d4641d36dad
2508b496aee504d67d6af7e54080e8d3a19ecdd4
describe
'137450' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSR' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
74c7953ae81e8930afab28e9f0a283dc
0391b051888970bf6a3c9ab2e88afc12a9d407e1
'2011-12-30T10:58:28-05:00'
describe
'42855' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSS' 'sip-files00049.pro'
ea853326bef647bb86b9ded5a87d2ef1
e191656e7f7fee68945389906080589822c0982d
'2011-12-30T10:54:51-05:00'
describe
'42284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHST' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
f7af987ee9514f09ae526fc0be5a641e
04941c0afa40f172157f051f8bd14bb2c84312a2
'2011-12-30T10:59:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSU' 'sip-files00049.tif'
d66da24e0d5a14ad8380da5dec20c0fd
03bd5c9153ccd32c202ef3498c0101cdc66340e4
'2011-12-30T10:58:46-05:00'
describe
'1752' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSV' 'sip-files00049.txt'
4e7c8d3e643e0ad85c14eb8b572180ed
19fb4bb8bd736a918c9172e298ffc9d8ecce190d
describe
'9872' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSW' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
663db9d09bafc5c3995670c5eb315ff8
acaec21e70f83a6541adf470ab28f8fcc37e70ae
'2011-12-30T10:59:43-05:00'
describe
'311397' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSX' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
4d5323c1b2710aaa3b1eaf2544f78a89
e52b0007fc0c1f5fb949e12dee933c3ef755b350
describe
'142068' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSY' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
ce5d54351603dbdb5cd2e9c09118fdc3
577097fb39cce26343921999c34ccb97564e230a
'2011-12-30T10:57:17-05:00'
describe
'43290' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHSZ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
191d2435d074553cd30f47071aa1af97
d21f5a2c82e4775b0cdd44bfcf4e43239f5ee8d4
describe
'43058' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTA' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
002e5f565d7b713f6931cabb5833ce6e
6e22dfa058d245c5407d3af83c834315429c8301
describe
'2508016' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTB' 'sip-files00050.tif'
9d0c3e26046ac511be67d96bb901f82b
22cd8b9451098a5b4ba0c3adc3faa83a812192c6
describe
'1771' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTC' 'sip-files00050.txt'
fec2dd49b5a4ed2af02da864e5888031
b4d3f60b81ed97c23763c3560ddc7d75db9ad24c
'2011-12-30T10:55:40-05:00'
describe
'9827' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTD' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
62f164f83a8815f5fb0ec1e654e6982c
329e5197b1fa03d4d505573e337848a73ee00808
describe
'311490' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTE' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
78e871a8accc0eea8ec1c0e00e81c9af
d640d2e2ace341545ce9fe78e52bdce7f6d266ff
describe
'142548' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTF' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
2551841c1bfbea5421b2499034a7433b
899bc6215fe3cdf313b37b0dcf5487b320f61cab
'2011-12-30T10:57:45-05:00'
describe
'44299' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTG' 'sip-files00051.pro'
c1d27af873502c0481554fee0630829c
00cbf60ace88062b8f9bde4d9d4b138a96b770f7
describe
'43155' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTH' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
62a128b7f60b442ac0be5b82306d37eb
afa5819a275ff3b621ebb1a1e520e58bcaeca6bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTI' 'sip-files00051.tif'
97b6b04e3559488d226f501ca5848dd1
6b4d3b58d56d48937c194fc23ee1751d60136ae2
'2011-12-30T11:00:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTJ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
23a85d2188cd9fd76898220f47c587ed
06cc5a5d13625bd88b221a6cfb5fe5bccfddbcc9
describe
'9991' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTK' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
7ba84dc32a38b0a5da78d56a1ea0a9d5
5043d3d171a1728ef654662bdf289aa76dfd97cc
'2011-12-30T10:57:55-05:00'
describe
'311392' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTL' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
39b92ef4dc8a7e27e11589fd06d8702b
7adb67d4af66ec3d8f14f34a51bfd4e99ed06894
'2011-12-30T10:59:18-05:00'
describe
'131646' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTM' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
d727740526429e4cbd85343a5274baa9
95e10eaa5724a3b77bfdd1d994ae3efda0315fc8
describe
'44237' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTN' 'sip-files00052.pro'
a5355b2d250fd8e8f28608ad31b2faff
ac281bed68d6db2bf698a19190d0e65b991d3907
'2011-12-30T10:59:36-05:00'
describe
'42683' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTO' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
044dbd33560e5f7022a7fcc88e7f2c5e
47d08573df64661067e7f448cc4dcd5c5c93d1b1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTP' 'sip-files00052.tif'
780135f9726147a6bde1989cd99637ac
bd73d58dcb9be47469e3d15027cf8584b5e0103f
describe
'1757' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTQ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
0044da660fd5d1da18d58cb46a5004ab
921aa8e5116a7473821d32ed9e9b4a613787a577
'2011-12-30T10:57:44-05:00'
describe
'9418' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTR' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
6417076eca3e597cd12d207e8df6837b
6ee851fbb65cc1c50fe1b230c9f2039f2f04e605
describe
'311370' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTS' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
e76c3154891d33dca734e9245d90f765
0c509eff3aaeac5ad5a1ab322eab2410835b023b
describe
'127417' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTT' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
96bc328b8486fb4809d12bbc262d2e88
842ad793ab3e3eb19602cd8099ea14b05c53e7c3
describe
'36738' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTU' 'sip-files00053.pro'
3b057154faf443476fe237c9b0f08c69
8a4f617dd48fc5fc4c6f7eb131a5d82cf79f7b30
describe
'39862' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTV' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
2a4384426cce8ef1cc2aa979f4ca463e
c68146c6c0be655a74651a1b180b541c4a54c926
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTW' 'sip-files00053.tif'
05e8d293de364e35cfe79759060afe38
1ce45a5085b554acc724ae47a8efdf93ff563818
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTX' 'sip-files00053.txt'
e3b82ed00201c048d18434cfb6e36037
1be5b32b4b817b1018dbf20dc26ca38ede072daa
describe
'9448' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTY' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
dab6d60c0cae243db03a6532ac12585e
f8206d82b38ef36698e4033e51f22288f1fcbc51
describe
'311401' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHTZ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
b80216efc3c3ee0f96d1a24465161462
e0d0e20947fd4c20ac867b561fbca67d1a74c290
'2011-12-30T11:00:13-05:00'
describe
'131965' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUA' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
e6823192f38b1a9f322532a718dca036
dd5bcb6a44600c3cbc0886c271588b79c35b56ba
'2011-12-30T10:55:02-05:00'
describe
'39381' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUB' 'sip-files00054.pro'
37263ba0099fbef518934c93b0e23b7c
00f9fac99f47339f14c97a7abfe2484fdb99cb2c
describe
'41771' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUC' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
8b3d82f136a786e907ca5ba6c92a8ea2
8e994bd634eae0ed10bb5f818563816213dad628
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUD' 'sip-files00054.tif'
f6469b83b9a1141d73181a795af81dfa
dc4dc8862e9d42d0125f1f191d6c8a774cf7d606
'2011-12-30T10:59:11-05:00'
describe
'1630' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUE' 'sip-files00054.txt'
5bef4c50c6514124a5d8ec0f27fbf08e
fc931a7328d8030395af00a0b0b0fdea3b486f7b
'2011-12-30T10:57:08-05:00'
describe
'9845' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUF' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
d902ce904f8a7bef189d252b6369a604
9e3b927dceb7c6ad7c79f8f1eb84fd15b9980867
describe
'311318' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUG' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
17a41856cbbf3de9dcf0197cba0e3963
acfbf904d146b88ca8211397c82d155772363c34
'2011-12-30T10:54:48-05:00'
describe
'137771' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUH' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
dd673655c571c13cab782de34a0c0647
8a5b68fef2459d4b4426278a440f541994ccbe69
'2011-12-30T10:56:36-05:00'
describe
'38155' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUI' 'sip-files00055.pro'
ce1b0708d8247b51e16c0639a41e0354
1df2d91b0a15f20fd66ac6f1a4c341bb244fc6e2
'2011-12-30T10:58:30-05:00'
describe
'40950' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUJ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
7958c32fb96d3d1daa30dd1f37a4c8dd
7448eecf4617eca16933f9a1930cab03a7e9fb40
'2011-12-30T10:55:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUK' 'sip-files00055.tif'
d9691f9f64338299b6b89326f3c779f8
2881a319e3a80fa8f9b4af9b982ae12d0fe7b285
'2011-12-30T10:57:28-05:00'
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUL' 'sip-files00055.txt'
110febda250f4954c605fadc7019ad85
6933b227f52f0c075f544c96e6d859dfde9b524d
describe
'9641' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUM' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
868397ebcd7cbcf4a66d1e2e304f632a
24a9384c80bbcb7ae7756c824b4af2bcf39736f9
'2011-12-30T10:55:33-05:00'
describe
'311280' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUN' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
71e77534fe5a273bbf2bf9d3771d02cb
9ad2f5afd81a02a25749722a19e222bb0aa3c670
'2011-12-30T10:57:43-05:00'
describe
'145257' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUO' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
112684846ba2587686c0dbccbaf1b69d
82a01f991d4603382eead4a43759f2390fc6e3df
'2011-12-30T10:57:14-05:00'
describe
'41881' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUP' 'sip-files00056.pro'
ad7451ca94c1c302cbfee7e6982d77d8
2559f29b011d443fda9f50d749d87f7eabb41b06
'2011-12-30T10:55:13-05:00'
describe
'43685' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUQ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
b4c402d20693277832c37e31ec7cac3b
11e5f18212e5746b5587e5d2623d3fa3d1993110
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUR' 'sip-files00056.tif'
d1c7290d3e99a5eda335901795cea406
1d277a8dfa9dbb63dc6a721ac1ae1689f7ce45ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUS' 'sip-files00056.txt'
3bd72df15e39c23b3be89f328e20651b
4554404b977b56a66e59d1be01329dcdf5e3328f
'2011-12-30T10:56:54-05:00'
describe
'10048' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUT' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
7b7e476d7ed1c7061a21ce6fc0affb9e
cfb0cfb9c12992b14339cbeddcb80cf36b34d3f1
'2011-12-30T10:55:22-05:00'
describe
'296484' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUU' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
f732b8746e1608e56e196ce3117b17b7
f054f6a03ff5b9b9aabfa52af5d0d183e039fec9
'2011-12-30T11:00:24-05:00'
describe
'134576' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUV' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
99963da09660e5553745643d75b80d61
fd971f028205313d117a0304cbe6f7cb60512712
describe
'36803' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUW' 'sip-files00057.pro'
ce4aa164ae425396d96b5b688dfbf267
fe25012ee5774dec563980b24a5b6f0d10063dc9
'2011-12-30T10:54:31-05:00'
describe
'40626' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUX' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
9c68bdcce9706fac33a46b5a6f28c60d
6817584c04217870bb5cd838f1914b34756a44ee
'2011-12-30T10:59:51-05:00'
describe
'2388892' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUY' 'sip-files00057.tif'
92834abebf7d462b915a3e560494edc2
2ed48a7112979d8c6da4eea9c659ad55c93f019c
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHUZ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
9627699e7c66f0303635714015b6ddae
b3899c25c131726c00190bfa5876b6544dd50a5b
'2011-12-30T10:58:39-05:00'
describe
'10372' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVA' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
7d59b0b88874516e7c697f5f2bb030fa
8eed88670ad670a4ff61971a4de0290f6acd7947
describe
'311526' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVB' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
00c3a70990b49927cbcf5f445ecff366
6c9d838c066f7901a189cc560d3cdaa4e2a3240f
describe
'121739' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVC' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
913bf71ab91df9cf1bb7f0a5dda0a291
13c514dde49122f15d9338739f087506dd54f626
'2011-12-30T11:00:38-05:00'
describe
'33864' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVD' 'sip-files00058.pro'
319112206927c185a97641f13af71048
1f641b334cf8f3533804322e87096aad5320c983
'2011-12-30T10:59:35-05:00'
describe
'36218' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVE' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
28fb6153549bc7030415a868bbfec150
382f10a2f461a88feb9a225d8dc401a0e40022e2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVF' 'sip-files00058.tif'
3e4d111830a05199b2b49f94a64e64ce
4a283a3b2157b03e7efaa7345b26018da0153ea7
'2011-12-30T10:57:26-05:00'
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVG' 'sip-files00058.txt'
b53aaae64e5847e20cb29c99bef23708
ab61921759eb12ea84bd2a68c2a04e71dabca56e
describe
'8808' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVH' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
b5779bd18abfea28d27cf6d8b2b670d4
709a7a4a3783c129e17e6525dd3b0f8e64dd2525
describe
'311462' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVI' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
1df96813bcd4bb51ffbbc132f52f2621
dedbe956400c5ebe0f3fc482a23e9ea092cdfdfa
'2011-12-30T10:55:55-05:00'
describe
'138295' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVJ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
f00738d896472da25459b465359eae61
b82eee6ea0e740280ecbf16c9739566c43315694
describe
'39956' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVK' 'sip-files00059.pro'
c322ea6d2a12c22e0841f089cf1c70ec
174c1fe2a15711b7dda18a5fa20b45df3965aa53
'2011-12-30T10:58:49-05:00'
describe
'41537' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVL' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
92817ed55ae6b882a29b14840c72c620
2a08352c9ca09fb12173d63483a10a7e8f5ee1f0
'2011-12-30T10:57:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVM' 'sip-files00059.tif'
198d7c53540c562cf44971526b8ed5d8
86dfe42c305eff942905990efa02113ab18a84b3
describe
'1641' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVN' 'sip-files00059.txt'
5fd2f2e90cfae04efa8fd05da35ba903
8d04799598e61f82c16cebe7c5b74fa717c740dd
'2011-12-30T10:59:40-05:00'
describe
'9437' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVO' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
3220446419f6efcbc957e1f1c51c37f0
e4b3de5b8909c15f99bd5d95d8c34ce77fe32014
describe
'311558' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVP' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
6df7818727572b956a2f80374421fd64
9efa1252864d197d2eb7174a35bd958c88ef4763
describe
'139459' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVQ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
be652ef4afe256f9be4f891b154a068a
f12f8c7a277fd71ccbf973cc8d2a33a15f019908
'2011-12-30T10:57:57-05:00'
describe
'39580' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVR' 'sip-files00060.pro'
f63ed171c8c5b91d9c25ead83538817c
163c4851428c7b6c202bc8cb06e71bbf1bb659f1
'2011-12-30T10:58:37-05:00'
describe
'41906' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVS' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
607c554c491c3a79d2a62989f5331e77
f61dccd61c263d8f0cbed791ecf4220adef38c7c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVT' 'sip-files00060.tif'
6af2ed5eb85ca0f7e2966af257c1ad54
4f59dcfd4094fd21b3a3b78e56e9cce6191afe78
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVU' 'sip-files00060.txt'
8b312db469fc098534768d84b446aa85
b0b2058d89d80cfa125db94ad31a9e70dbdf8d45
describe
'10037' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVV' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
54c59fc76cab21903eaba97916798968
be18805804cb0d95a664d7fbf9708db60a69bd81
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVW' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
01d085179dc587182e65a82616e19ccb
aabdb2f1462e6e30f4c34e911bd55882b45e40a1
'2011-12-30T10:56:07-05:00'
describe
'130918' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVX' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
369caeba37289f41ef0d1b226a2dcb0d
7f5cd41dfeb4a75e253d635bcd706a3e7b0da825
describe
'41009' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVY' 'sip-files00061.pro'
cf64a7a6bbcd18b687751dfb3ea06269
48dc4c19fd0238f5fce77a354e24e336a6e4c3d3
'2011-12-30T10:56:23-05:00'
describe
'43040' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHVZ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
d6a1ab39625df178afc01e4a5a84b292
fc25ec7b19d1b1e44f953f61e18294e592a30593
'2011-12-30T10:55:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWA' 'sip-files00061.tif'
fd64118f4e71cb362596273d3deb936a
2e06713e15aff9144329d3c98c66413aa4d1789d
describe
'1682' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWB' 'sip-files00061.txt'
eb4a23b7eb1ab2385cae188f7ac915a2
f4d049cd76050b53f73c7d53e112e2f74a139c54
'2011-12-30T10:58:51-05:00'
describe
'10163' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWC' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
dbc97f7213e507ce2a2372de4eb62055
f73b357f5faf62c16216577ff6d97797fdfbdcc1
describe
'311551' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWD' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
c5beb29e58b6c6d718380b013bd5f38c
ad3aca16755ce652427cab23ccc2a050d90e7aca
'2011-12-30T10:59:23-05:00'
describe
'136833' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWE' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
3c60ad83636e84ec96d8b369ced89f36
049504ba837209ad0ab97a7fd4a794b6e6a03269
'2011-12-30T10:54:43-05:00'
describe
'40674' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWF' 'sip-files00062.pro'
2d49146922a38c4e8412797489c1402b
26c385c177fba9ff636bcba3471d5ff837a9b1a9
describe
'41516' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWG' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
267fed446b1cfd609d348c25b311d41e
19cfb0943c8a2d6c304f3cd79ed33a0f9be2e286
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWH' 'sip-files00062.tif'
36c04a335e8944b9cffb35e607a24413
353a4469f5f50f5c305e86886427e57f1f3671ef
describe
'1671' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWI' 'sip-files00062.txt'
9fce44a422b7f095839961337d48a3f7
df05dd721fee9115e6306eb130c92e916183277a
describe
'9295' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWJ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
ad63db50ab67eb10baccd8d6d2502bea
d5d432ef70ccb394ca3f3f39c5d2d14cdc69abd5
'2011-12-30T10:56:46-05:00'
describe
'311388' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWK' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
96f9525bc7c24ab9ec2b6c3617553fe2
2b8e6a289de03f616149a3d999327fbef0d488c3
'2011-12-30T10:55:32-05:00'
describe
'139349' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWL' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
fbe440b4f14910e44ea48b02cbf4d1f0
41276f321f8535e0d53cf2d609901484e910bc58
describe
'41899' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWM' 'sip-files00063.pro'
36468f76e668cbed11e7dfb715f65df1
cafd2dde82bc3aae6d2b661e65dd65d5a7e44aa8
'2011-12-30T10:58:19-05:00'
describe
'41900' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWN' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
9e84b93fe5f6a312a1ec6d05428fdfd2
a97f524958f2b5dd4e021113e849e4baf44b24f7
'2011-12-30T10:57:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWO' 'sip-files00063.tif'
4c435d87185cf47d37b96cf706466dc3
5c9a768633815ad194dc16dccf2d70765ca3cea0
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWP' 'sip-files00063.txt'
cd4c4887e6c7372aa547cae16190fc71
42942d90880fbbdacb7197a8e0537ae48bad8471
describe
'9565' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWQ' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
88978f63d21eb9e8597ab13db9268a3e
65ac90ab6a6ea3c201f9fabf148597e9f16132bb
describe
'311134' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWR' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
33b9e0a1220bdafb150cf5bd0f70291f
2c0c7b6182a6867e60db8543023ceff133987333
'2011-12-30T10:56:34-05:00'
describe
'134222' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWS' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
582ae43085299dc275a69e231a436f30
b52480c51f708b8d2b8a7a2ca1d8099cadb06ba6
describe
'40313' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWT' 'sip-files00064.pro'
0a0dbb2f94698d7eee8a78645ba3bc65
a52702dcd9923d39ce71818a61154bf93a7dfd7a
describe
'39999' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWU' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
47bf8c0c3cb14df8bbcf689bbde0e5c8
b1eb161b0ab53bfa333d2e1f173d0b25628247d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWV' 'sip-files00064.tif'
799bf3aaa0d44013db7026fcf588596a
3ad79c0ac5c7932e2445cbbef56253196fccd939
describe
'1611' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWW' 'sip-files00064.txt'
bec8792e833c3b78dcdd4d9dbc82c82f
6ba8a7e523bfb41c5066899770e2344efc126c62
'2011-12-30T10:56:24-05:00'
describe
'9413' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWX' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
8256428267f36071e3fc95cfe32d128f
d00a897ead10cec7ebd3ecce30f012c55f54874e
'2011-12-30T10:55:10-05:00'
describe
'311498' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWY' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
2f1fca78bc0789a8422d727189491b70
1d83972441305bee57d8f3fb7ab8f787b36375cd
'2011-12-30T10:54:37-05:00'
describe
'143520' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHWZ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
94f72ef08ac9117fb2360876e63e2e10
7df4d029a6005963794d9c58015099d73911351e
'2011-12-30T10:54:47-05:00'
describe
'43234' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXA' 'sip-files00065.pro'
2ee37e8321b9d69bc9773cfdf620a9ad
7a0cb73a5a71349acd45e56336a925cddf555cfc
describe
'43791' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXB' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
6dad61c9f51ead54a916dfa244ef2ed3
e5488d87af307de8bd1859c7bcda51a08f2c3c40
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXC' 'sip-files00065.tif'
2fd3481c46a8aeb690c5fd53abeb375d
b7aaf54c87204ea8476e56d0c03c20bc239395e6
'2011-12-30T10:57:54-05:00'
describe
'1720' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXD' 'sip-files00065.txt'
b13009c205da8834cc4dbfcc3d3d51ca
8fb96ce4d88aaf9825d95e437a353d93cbd3b5b2
describe
'10128' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXE' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
a7e75823e7f342e76429780df34c96cc
dfeb991442f384ee0cb0249553f1dbe96f567e3c
describe
'312160' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXF' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
6a7ef6e7064e34bb79f58524b4b36e88
bc7aa67fdd504a03f502cafa60b73cad4a9646ce
'2011-12-30T10:59:38-05:00'
describe
'133861' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXG' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
e9d8cb4c77e6764f9b68633b1eb2a75c
3c5aa23470e587ab75450423235a2fadb7ab6eee
describe
'37807' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXH' 'sip-files00066.pro'
4acb06826aa931d7e0c106ec03d4240b
78d3ffa8728732c36c9b5c5dd62759c296af5f30
describe
'40171' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXI' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
4562b20e894ee282f3388cbdeb32b59b
0beea62a4c7a0fb3411d4f94ae44d0483bec6a85
describe
'2515124' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXJ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
edfed09cf6e24331c438b57a04dd19ab
46b200b7fac739d0214e4f03aa20de83029a1df9
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXK' 'sip-files00066.txt'
7c7049425816fee2dc66477a67be80ee
1aaa60737b2ab1b7ff742fd0db1bd16b7770d294
'2011-12-30T10:59:08-05:00'
describe
'9252' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXL' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
ee95704fbdd3d3bd6acb97ee6e2c7c2e
4137ed6b8fcd8eb6357b50bee00a438795d2ab1d
'2011-12-30T10:58:59-05:00'
describe
'325206' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXM' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
4d460b955e878f15e998d808954e828d
0c02d92416b5369ddeff64b8c55b8623db89685e
describe
'114777' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXN' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
2ae9139c9ddeb4927f775937f9c475eb
c3ac586ac72c70c7ab45779fd8bddf50f055cb10
describe
'34804' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXO' 'sip-files00067.pro'
4ae69bd0bf463e5ec85b606c715927df
c95495ec7522f2f9206cfe15a6f8956be84b4637
describe
'34777' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXP' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
d1ed7fe6836b8899e5e340b0060d1ed0
e386a0b501facbfaa80b20a19fbad65ed9988c33
'2011-12-30T10:58:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXQ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
2086eaf0cd15dfd94abbca43a5c268e7
1f91afa9c3689228fd6f4e2e708d93db7b24f7b9
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXR' 'sip-files00067.txt'
46de5fe633796a1949d88dfc77a7e49e
4661240982a99b4e5bdec97c88e37c47c0b2585c
describe
'8776' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXS' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
06d6b7e3c8b2a28b248ff889dd6482b9
0946ffdfef9b5f4ea15c45357013cdfd9e3b8cab
'2011-12-30T10:57:38-05:00'
describe
'314197' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXT' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
96d4e62f7a5e37ff222d1464aa04d5bc
5afda91785f06e63709fa6cc8bb494917cd59de7
describe
'143863' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXU' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
e6faffe255a79b415bf06b0f8b93d27b
d96e5172bc54056ce64fcd70ae0717d46489f07c
describe
'43532' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXV' 'sip-files00068.pro'
68c782d1bab5cd499b774605e6b784d2
abeb37d2ff88391f060dc78fc13f20ebe83b4035
describe
'41761' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXW' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
cc317590d5b894da05e1bd148b2d6fad
d726856efccd071925617afabd1388b7ad549356
'2011-12-30T10:58:23-05:00'
describe
'2530660' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXX' 'sip-files00068.tif'
1a33542d11dd4a52febec3c8d428fb9a
6e87cc02ea909a86c1712c434894e80a21b6cda3
describe
'1728' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXY' 'sip-files00068.txt'
9df97a21abc8e90f559840b46ece087b
8af7bd8e959a908a43af91ba96eb04888e38b6e4
describe
'9791' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHXZ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
ccf3d886e0aa847298896b9ef1c2af38
4f16b873a073e6be7fd764f8529f8bdfb384134b
describe
'305553' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYA' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
31496d9b1f1af65fb4705c3a934157e9
3d8a01cc55c9d868fa81f8279c5d556574259e1d
describe
'146137' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYB' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
f6cd7c37484f78b2a805095e786c758e
bec7bc6a09ef35b6da2334ca733b8055c9161c8f
describe
'38889' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYC' 'sip-files00069.pro'
bae20d63b01a3758022a7ce5d3c99bf3
d6da25701da7a9319e7a3634f6e74b26689ecafe
describe
'43818' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYD' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
32a11a03a652b8ec65e47f2f9b47e287
6a9ce3f3fee8144eec10be4b440adebba8c99923
'2011-12-30T10:58:22-05:00'
describe
'2461432' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYE' 'sip-files00069.tif'
2d1f372fef534446047ebf336c71c442
dd7aff2b7efe298e18e1ace8e6fe5a0970cf6235
'2011-12-30T10:58:02-05:00'
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYF' 'sip-files00069.txt'
f55b28588b1bd88963e4fe140d5cd096
9a30493ef7395de05dccbbbba3e10ecaf7c4348e
'2011-12-30T10:55:53-05:00'
describe
'10510' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYG' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
1046b91b07ff2bf9bba4828669ac0e2a
8454ed6276a3e4277b54e03f822f046accef3164
describe
'300909' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYH' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
2db61faa8b0646d4b1f7128ebf69bc9c
db61ab030a279895793a72e3d7c96de46bfcc936
describe
'141005' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYI' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
67c476df63bc86788c414517cc1996f0
efcc231440a57f4541ae7b00bd0ce6a1377e1096
'2011-12-30T10:57:47-05:00'
describe
'41004' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYJ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
6a312d238d2d26badf06df63a51b106c
6f29e93732cf21e51ae2259786941d8c2eecd4ac
describe
'43332' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYK' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
17d6b959449e6af8185d81994d389dda
39a7d3f6027fb6a403c751f345c0f84a4b2b87c6
'2011-12-30T10:57:51-05:00'
describe
'2425792' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYL' 'sip-files00070.tif'
90ee15beec6a3342e46aeff6bd9bb7fc
d59e23ada07251160e7c435bcda20af039a0a0d8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYM' 'sip-files00070.txt'
a0c3217488dde0d466e71538c52f1a65
41c5d4fd622d41496a37f6c734ade879a9d167f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYN' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
2c7212b726135728b506ee212ad420e0
fe77be411bc4e2d365a61266bac4259655417fb8
describe
'310531' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYO' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
5dedbdd719d2302f3b1947ac0ceb0425
1de1edcf8edda105ea3b54362e65f74044d4f75a
'2011-12-30T10:56:00-05:00'
describe
'138288' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYP' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
4e3c2154fef8e8317a17a261d1529afa
8ab115927b8161a03c435062bf79c8c9d0f9492b
describe
'41021' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYQ' 'sip-files00071.pro'
cf04628b2f6f289d7db254940055adf3
43288e04d17b03603484419a91d987d3397657db
describe
'42170' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYR' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
4d4821ee0f32e2374a6ae757a9c8d930
8e141360e2e1cbaae19ef694290dce2c17023dfc
describe
'2501528' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYS' 'sip-files00071.tif'
04991ca5045e3080ece91954f870899e
3b42770d8716fe69683aa50fc1ee34e700872092
describe
'1675' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYT' 'sip-files00071.txt'
817467b829cf5d1972f6372dd73056be
3638899016f5ca1b9fa7f2fa2335a93216ed9c0f
describe
'10019' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYU' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
08e3bbda46f47a6d6d873ffcb531126e
412b6e1cf46c10931a83eb2605c4800031980e00
'2011-12-30T10:56:50-05:00'
describe
'325211' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYV' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
7a151dba03050f6168ef1c6c302acbc4
2f0b663284e800118b7a06fd261ecd929f09da5e
'2011-12-30T11:00:04-05:00'
describe
'134193' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYW' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
2fc0832779fa74feb4b8f93939f2359e
779eb0fc5d807e2db1a18c71d33189c760fbdde1
'2011-12-30T10:56:47-05:00'
describe
'41908' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYX' 'sip-files00072.pro'
7fa560bb29b2ef9784a292afb48f9685
c7088856ef39083a214486d1f58586d7c928cd24
'2011-12-30T10:57:24-05:00'
describe
'39429' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYY' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
e878a1c21721b8050ca2303d33d2ede1
207e4b3ce3da1ac82f910ac9d4579c9a032621fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHYZ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
5c5756c77698b1fc3a0062fc966fcdfb
0f3c908df1d830f9aa5b9708dc670cbce4a3b3fc
describe
'1662' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZA' 'sip-files00072.txt'
f9b9fb9b36ea06345de1d8370d25209e
5256d29e5a44597f2ffa1bbb92233cdd991bc94a
describe
'8912' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZB' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
368dc823bc3cf468b38d117b9ed76307
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describe
'307386' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZC' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
01e041c30d97104d26b83a544b62c5fa
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describe
'114807' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZD' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
5e085feb36b78a33caea67209f558b59
b372a061d0575329a35744665b99280f937cba92
'2011-12-30T10:57:23-05:00'
describe
'31583' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZE' 'sip-files00073.pro'
630d8eab5b3168035b17bff42fd50edb
feede66650143cdcdc1c7924f21a260b0d6de1dc
'2011-12-30T10:54:46-05:00'
describe
'35079' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZF' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
880f6ba5d117e07b2e0e5e7313a585bc
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describe
'2476284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZG' 'sip-files00073.tif'
a8b18f655a741e3381052957ce32e56f
0ea7eb87cb9eb7f7859ec8775c99f3df8bf31df0
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZH' 'sip-files00073.txt'
7acff4c664044464037f274d90136795
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describe
'8472' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZI' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
ba1ee62fa36b24b86a47fecc975b12b0
ce9ac15feed885903ac4a75d827bb2e6f5ab9c87
describe
'325346' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZJ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
6d459555122d4d2d88063b190df7bd14
d7265e8f3ea136dd9b1e6937f7bb9f8beac1f8a4
describe
'124551' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZK' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
794de64f2240893952c1735ab33fcb00
91e4410977118ae5937e5bb678f6e2a4514bbe3d
'2011-12-30T10:55:45-05:00'
describe
'36674' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZL' 'sip-files00074.pro'
4bd330e3c2be01812a10d0ebcba9b0e5
9cf72814b6dff8d6be0219adaaf94efdad8dd5d7
describe
'35710' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZM' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
efd0965ba8c9ef71a2960dbd4ad79d30
192d76849565890c630b2fb7b9bd078ec6ca59c4
'2011-12-30T10:58:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZN' 'sip-files00074.tif'
e888f9bd66dc0607fc040c7ce2be8675
c1e9512dbfd04d69a14b18cdcb8c09bda71378b4
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZO' 'sip-files00074.txt'
9bd72150a7202b97e5450175cb79fd9b
640a469e206cfd7f9a4345267ea3fa5a12c7b18c
describe
'8804' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZP' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
0068eee899459754ea28bb3da83037ce
83eb6f51a08aa0ca65dd9ebb7ab9383ec5c4e4b1
describe
'316898' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZQ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
1316af2f1ebfa089b076c25ec3a13041
f05954a80a3fc1502e17383a4dca4af75a0db7e3
describe
'139463' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZR' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
02f9c9b1ee885ae4da501bc345ef871d
8f20bafe3a22b2abf15259ad09788cbb3283bc1a
'2011-12-30T10:57:21-05:00'
describe
'43759' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZS' 'sip-files00075.pro'
4d8f96c5553f5339190a75f73db6eb4c
02315877468508ff89be91881f72c30c7ec20df9
'2011-12-30T10:54:34-05:00'
describe
'42017' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZT' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
e55151b3d904505f489c7bd47c692f15
b99523e5d478ca1631946f47f8169782d80cc425
describe
'2552020' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZU' 'sip-files00075.tif'
02efa16abbc95a5b6c78e07afad375e8
b3c9ed4645bed3667f66e1d63bd3dc1be9ab0bd1
describe
'1717' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZV' 'sip-files00075.txt'
653db81d0c7556ab1aac6cb56cfce5ab
6638b04325b07b7a600602cef2e11c3bb07e4c85
'2011-12-30T10:58:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZW' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
32a43a6d0516a15d86236983d4e40683
5fbd84684ff395201ad3533b8ced012c6dd93249
'2011-12-30T10:56:20-05:00'
describe
'324912' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZX' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
18339f6966a65b3c2e10b99676338a96
d47394ae5787d55035958aafeda64b560608d2d0
describe
'128933' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZY' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
aef5a8f66826cd6531f274913a80ec96
eba4ce82b70316392e15c65e0834bccca146c203
describe
'38501' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACHZZ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
4ad4d81648738c2f0197fe9e2491ea3f
5df83ca836f253d7b730d98319512a13cc3f8088
describe
'37694' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAA' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
d20bf740bef34f83da2166f85294fe4b
3012dccebeb050dd49c7a40e298ec0ba53979900
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAB' 'sip-files00076.tif'
6c80921c2c96daef2fbdebc8ccfdd1b4
355796d1dff4b85f48c8d1ef97fb233f83bd705b
describe
'1594' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAC' 'sip-files00076.txt'
fe1b5ecfc13c40ffb748cb0b512b5a45
0955a5ea99e59c87a3d8c8617b47501e90bd5b4d
describe
'8888' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAD' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
319ffdd224b4b4e21ad953e312309a91
74b2db534caab32ef5e4b868e188bf6e9bf0c582
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAE' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
722987252cb5dc7b683f40fa44797cc9
f8811a5497adcd94572f5b6b896c97138559eda5
describe
'129774' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAF' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
94bb82fcfab388a9b7ed6e21e2ab3625
07365bf862c088c5a4a148b3c71f0370ac1233be
'2011-12-30T10:56:56-05:00'
describe
'40161' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAG' 'sip-files00077.pro'
2e31e00bde39b3b5eba21f82cc090406
964b02c26fef5b5432c0dcf62c4c58d13f6bea3f
describe
'38898' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAH' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
80c44100eea61cb671c4cd8ac354f472
8ce6fca1279c0c80065640c4fe0d4170427b5284
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAI' 'sip-files00077.tif'
a81527ebcb68dc2e39b97141b53d9769
0850477a512f1fc2a512e33c66d3b30560cf4893
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAJ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
4cf7759f3eb172143e5abf251a1dc3e3
eac567fe5ace8fd7e715b282164f861e0eb11c70
'2011-12-30T11:00:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAK' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
8c0f359b4144a744ea9be5bbae22f3f8
a8ba3ebab60f8325bd70c51d121d136d61d2f524
describe
'325235' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAL' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
63c8cf67cf43efa0cef3008ba13e7c71
1f7fe7ac72f7373aefb673d05f4a1acd8bd6a65b
describe
'128564' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAM' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
8333c044699c933d27a915e2dc62d9d3
1744b2ffd7bafe1a6d8e16ed757e973d8441efb7
describe
'38546' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAN' 'sip-files00078.pro'
064a71c249c834704ed58da7f47bd96b
b17f5c9a1b833137a8a6d403befcf8e0634f8dd4
describe
'37821' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAO' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
a70d701220ae1be640153d829fc77122
a9872485d95bd1b54122f0cde57f4427b9e482ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAP' 'sip-files00078.tif'
55e4809cb237ef2f160d88326b3caaf7
18aea64cdd50178c6541a03756a9b4bb59307da7
describe
'1589' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAQ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
822ae7296a0bd5fbed63e8301c43aa91
07550f2946f2ee00b427f249a29c5180e2c0133a
describe
'8508' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAR' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
2656fc6a41601813345dad3b07b44b37
faf5e52e5821d3b1ef153a711fb1388c01490033
'2011-12-30T10:55:12-05:00'
describe
'325432' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAS' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
293e5c728c239eefe6268174751cd381
9993fe4b985dd86a9895a283108586753ed3dc0d
'2011-12-30T10:55:17-05:00'
describe
'135319' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAT' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
146b1e32abf70a4b4b7f754157bb62c9
a4b17a3ef6078fe4ee49e80686801538830871d0
describe
'41776' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAU' 'sip-files00079.pro'
2f9c4c702d0324d566c41b2af19b2d0a
562a4bdb2bb8b0fb2ffd5c87f0a75a1518cc725e
'2011-12-30T11:00:11-05:00'
describe
'39967' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAV' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
39522059dbd592b2352f3bdeb2be860a
d77b5ec5edd47c03de6039e5ff3e2e983e8ee361
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAW' 'sip-files00079.tif'
698360efa6b145c58002e9626ff94d6b
c95a5805cdde3a3fe50c3b348f62d7c8433ca47b
'2011-12-30T11:00:23-05:00'
describe
'1697' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAX' 'sip-files00079.txt'
9fd0e911da60b221f0b67ce98ffd4afc
f9633001c53102785b0ef452225bda272bcfb220
'2011-12-30T10:57:35-05:00'
describe
'9184' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAY' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
7dd09af7eb103df375b21e1c225dd0a6
af189eaa9e021b869dac0b877b833ac7df572f84
'2011-12-30T10:56:32-05:00'
describe
'325567' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIAZ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
f1b256f6c35e461dc59fb0bbd7fc6d61
166cb42085161881023d083dcd3ebb3c3f106c5b
describe
'140393' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBA' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
09ef0fad55cfdb8de821262c554f6246
ee2112c7d5066f756035daf4d636b4af504ea3f8
describe
'43617' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBB' 'sip-files00080.pro'
9d3cc56f4371d64a487be20bce102152
022e8ea345d677943ea134be1b8381b13b1688f8
'2011-12-30T10:56:30-05:00'
describe
'41464' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBC' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
319d508d027a44f207531d1a2378d5f2
94dfb8c0f9295912a7c098fe9359332b5a3d547b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBD' 'sip-files00080.tif'
34e5fe30a771142a088dd67c3bce1b56
b3764b6d308fd560951612a67d96f21a69b16b28
'2011-12-30T10:55:28-05:00'
describe
'1787' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBE' 'sip-files00080.txt'
c770f49ed4a4b09f55dd6d4e5293563a
ca3caf6105e6d3d71c7770a55265a0675d558c89
describe
'9139' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBF' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
fa2ec8c8dbc9273d10ab2504685655f6
d9aeb9e3b3b8f4de6aa7d68b65d058c2bbacf3ab
describe
'311475' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBG' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
a6fa64b6f5fea2e77dd708e794165d15
e58e87742ce9ab8bc1bd1b26cd0e329b7cb573d9
'2011-12-30T10:55:23-05:00'
describe
'135078' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBH' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
7dab55a18cfa9b5c6e2f214a5cdc4d6d
17699ed068bd8c178436217aeb22bfe9305d5c50
'2011-12-30T10:57:03-05:00'
describe
'43247' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBI' 'sip-files00081.pro'
2f8f32dbe939851856da690d7ef4a793
0ba6e07d69019c45934ff43a97d1fddb13780116
describe
'43080' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBJ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
23221c95f872944f2d8a0ae3f65f43a3
33808c91039ca6408d9dc7cb711d0da05b7429f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBK' 'sip-files00081.tif'
761ada55bfa09c53cd3182348711fd26
71c3e41ee36bcea817f1dbab430885d13719b7fa
describe
'1703' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBL' 'sip-files00081.txt'
075e493c4117d89ce0c97228dff1ab4f
17a896d7f17a04a2f64f59d5a3155325e09e22c0
describe
'10007' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBM' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
e8d6c6b8e16b1354cde7b093b1259894
a3d4fd38843dcf981bb7323e366eddc1f2a9af92
describe
'311491' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBN' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
09168598a5e84fafc8e6a61ffd5e293f
af622e9d4f40ed11ac5cc76d6194f3e350e1925c
describe
'140012' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBO' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
a458613b0590792a9de8e0a6bc2b8ccf
fa0ce631a741e19a4f7350d9258a96894075ea07
describe
'45000' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBP' 'sip-files00082.pro'
5264b7302a026aa24b64edd576e1a4cf
8c9acd0ec89b9af37f84207dc8d373628b7dcca4
'2011-12-30T10:54:38-05:00'
describe
'43704' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBQ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
866e551f1a8981f291c466f67508c46a
e64acd6785b5e7a6a7a6bc7e19e9aae12b922fa4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBR' 'sip-files00082.tif'
010693eb047d2dc023bebaf62466bf1c
2485015deb536ea16336dfccc53bb3e1b457496c
describe
'1792' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBS' 'sip-files00082.txt'
f4c1859d83b0224fd18f4000e2db0700
5030a178020fd7e2b54069907c97894897d2cef6
describe
'9907' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBT' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
96600a6c15176aee6f71e49b254b0a51
13055c644d4f8c0d9fd196b4f2cc035e95e38cc2
'2011-12-30T10:54:41-05:00'
describe
'311495' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBU' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
31f85fe01a3c1c3b556e29ff9e9af180
88e46563c2a6d96f28b1ed585b6dc7c5c8ede36e
describe
'144307' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBV' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
e990d0c803f9c810b25e01a135dfa9f5
0de494f361336a8ed48d601a84e561cb37866450
'2011-12-30T10:59:48-05:00'
describe
'42131' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBW' 'sip-files00083.pro'
ac8cd35ace013569a970028ca44020bc
113b0c085f45ac115039c9e78ef8a39205b92dac
describe
'44074' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBX' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
8ac70f472aaf3eaec828e5b1cba96047
134f5e20c513c622b9350be3cb7df89c0b372ed4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBY' 'sip-files00083.tif'
91ff707ed1f4f6eda80f1e3954f9e9e4
03a0a50ee716911efd792160ff8b19e5d47042eb
describe
'1726' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIBZ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
3bc0601ea49b7933ed8c0a9a594cc96c
6b111df222c462f8e8b619faf7d669bb62070ad7
describe
'10429' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICA' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
32ee4fde0d4165d3d2ae5709478df373
3d04dc8761d0a26b97052df75cf931ffeae369fb
describe
'311504' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICB' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
7c5d086d98e5623cb60e7ec05907f7bc
5816594c4048126daebd2fae4107abbd253c7d4c
describe
'150765' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICC' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
deea6ef697b6ce4976b6af7f034d5bf4
4a74681d66cd6a4b8f91a9981e810c4ede8a4f93
'2011-12-30T10:58:43-05:00'
describe
'44347' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICD' 'sip-files00084.pro'
dee133a83823bc799a90f1ded043a7a9
d01c5a09919570fb9514263923a47f8c2faacbdd
describe
'44240' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICE' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
14aa68dd1b69f85a1280cfc4bb66d536
140ca73867e29f3d92703fd7a7bd6735723b5ac8
'2011-12-30T10:57:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICF' 'sip-files00084.tif'
83b2df71c16ec35b4b44e36e4afddd35
6240584b179101cc5fa8474fab13cd6b5ca36227
'2011-12-30T11:00:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICG' 'sip-files00084.txt'
3338f82be2e5b2423fbd63feda3ec81d
eb96a3a18434d57916335cd21d42f1bce2b58a09
describe
'9787' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICH' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
b885b33c5227a4b2f54575561dc10192
a33eaad1544588aae12aab00abef6ee3d2920123
describe
'311521' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICI' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
5995af859b56f9ae285a996c1cf168cf
aca9276e40ddaf081c3c4caa6aa9c70f418df87d
describe
'134365' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICJ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
63a4a4db91a97099693c976699a39745
54a6e164eba836c3adba38e1f58355ae66634d49
'2011-12-30T10:59:33-05:00'
describe
'38573' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICK' 'sip-files00085.pro'
6733852d6a15d90adfcb59c902b2aee0
9cd9a89a49a10fd66b67599936eb1b095d623636
describe
'41278' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICL' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
8a4340d97379489a787700d67e3aaf44
ee4a8531a7bb37d865854d925ae856d933e549b9
'2011-12-30T10:57:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICM' 'sip-files00085.tif'
65faa6279e1269af915aa245bc0f32f0
22123d6b890ef3088009252ac27ec78b81aaab52
describe
'1573' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICN' 'sip-files00085.txt'
65604627a561bd96dbd4fdf11e2a1d79
e598691e4e22f074e499a8c2d983c2bb96490ed0
'2011-12-30T10:59:45-05:00'
describe
'9805' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICO' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
01ac187e8c63efdbce1f3a137f0b3e9d
8fd9e04b7a47d4fb61820d065d195ba8ad0404eb
describe
'311548' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICP' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
36088e64a7bcad86c667d2a430fdbf03
35e45b4bea348860c1a09e25c0e7db09dd972b5d
describe
'136208' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICQ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
dc15569a137e4aaa043f25abb4ee57a8
28f4b8ccde73956f6bd9fabd6ded1e506b432c47
describe
'39431' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICR' 'sip-files00086.pro'
c8ccf638f4d2e534f571132f9d1beb1a
14b40c78f814e067131c532bfe6e18fdbd99bb4f
'2011-12-30T10:59:24-05:00'
describe
'41555' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICS' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
91442b8a4931219b36c9109a45165fca
532e31be5107af7bdae5eec18cc5b93b3d8ef868
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICT' 'sip-files00086.tif'
62fc4b771c817ce0878de479fbec051c
fcecd6fb35351527c62dd7a1584fdd9eeeb5872a
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICU' 'sip-files00086.txt'
2cb756110795757cc0a16a3dfdca03bc
18f2c474b445387fcbf4e37d4b30ef9d3d76ad4b
describe
'9742' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICV' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
a20bbf25bc8e5befa659ca13cc54c979
6663284bc0c6649e6992a8a14ec6150c82c05278
'2011-12-30T10:56:04-05:00'
describe
'311427' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICW' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
4060d327925f78c486f402adc0c94857
cccd409d55a8edc08b012e5826e412ec2bd33002
describe
'134702' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICX' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
6152533aaa3a6ca86654d44965d7fdfe
a41ceba1516c2460c11d33daecaf1672b890cde9
describe
'39468' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICY' 'sip-files00087.pro'
35aeea81da39c422cf839461a9dfb510
8f52cd5babe703a3a21820b712f7d811991aa9fa
describe
'40419' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACICZ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
f6a505a78d3c4372de4f100bbd034ea8
c1eab680413b83264a4600bcc0276c7789b900f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDA' 'sip-files00087.tif'
b5c01ccd7538176cc74a571f6bfebd7e
f4584c3882aa4e6fd41dce33cbd796ad32b53138
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDB' 'sip-files00087.txt'
a69c2a81a3e8d543ae08c8840d1c4f0c
17ff3175346f553ecf534a8cdf417e8f674c48cb
describe
'9409' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDC' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
1a8985380710a514aa761e9188b0f40b
581badc4ee329f71ffe758f6a2d2733799b65831
'2011-12-30T10:55:36-05:00'
describe
'311355' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDD' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
e18684bd28beadd0521b45f2c1ea4c9a
f217e70b45a517055d1234fb52a87323982b5ec0
describe
'129976' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDE' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
d38e69e1a2f7504ec53ca51795c94329
bd5a727752600c6baae957ee6ddb1ea1703fd020
describe
'38130' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDF' 'sip-files00088.pro'
9f562be36d6d4583685b357a567551b2
997dd73b7ae68859b2adad16657af035ef17c13c
describe
'39679' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDG' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
6742ba076dfae1b06fda3e7a93d44790
d707edc65c26da04353f230b08d2497528cd27b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDH' 'sip-files00088.tif'
b80cfaa64634959168b8bf95880f87ac
2c66e971cc32dd46e2cb045262f82873ebcc00bc
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDI' 'sip-files00088.txt'
4e03a44e7e96fa822371507f9a90d074
6773d6c96a19cec416cbaf0923386886873a76d0
describe
'9834' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDJ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
540ffb4d2fa1eabc993d9c45e241379f
d7f4415cf4e9cbf85e773938bc65c82a890ccd60
describe
'311322' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDK' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
ed6732fd26801a4d646d9c6c8b3a8cc1
b718364ded9ab122efc8541ff64f38ea3bfe69ef
describe
'136286' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDL' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
8f71e8b8c0d5a955189f26e7c30be4a2
17812bbbfd2f1ae728033a609a9ac4a39ffc35ba
describe
'40880' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDM' 'sip-files00089.pro'
35309ace23dbf4522539d79a986dd788
09c0e86f26bb3c8c72d2ca8b5491e3aa234c7eb6
describe
'41927' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDN' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
cc03d8321544f4aee0f7470206ca94a8
ffa913352a108960d9bea77ac7131a657e1c7afa
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDO' 'sip-files00089.tif'
b70bee2e939fd662ca16fd81fc28684b
fbad96cee7f6f2f85eafae50db84a2c4c8d4519b
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDP' 'sip-files00089.txt'
bd2d5408d1b337e0e10698be334f6f75
6b29a54b827ad65591d748941cec57918586dc7a
describe
'9689' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDQ' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
9aed4091f84cb079fd05a22b997ecfc3
d0242b00372439fb4b9bc595337df530ec9e7cdf
describe
'311482' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDR' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
525486c4ed9ad155fc1be92725c16483
83d573ccf866890356d158d5ca9b5f3994b83549
describe
'127355' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDS' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
d41a691e9e2eac2a009982676f496cb5
982cfd1e3793c015bd007fa9fb578ca73225e81c
describe
'38154' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDT' 'sip-files00090.pro'
2e73d14a7cff063540981802aaa47978
03a57031bfcd3bfa7b3392d49054b123287e4712
describe
'38937' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDU' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
45e0ed733b2edcdd4a1e4689f227b498
a8818b5d1ef932386b2e072ba385f7d53ccacebe
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDV' 'sip-files00090.tif'
083857c21e08d28e98ec069410536304
54cd07e53fc3c2b8eb937f92c11428cc064b7708
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDW' 'sip-files00090.txt'
05fdd30283de2eb5df55f2ba4facc301
e2349560988a1d51f43b220b6cf389b29dfbd50d
describe
'9542' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDX' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
0a8dbd58e469f5c58ae20f16a1987460
7c8c1bf25361989e77ce787187921a989b7f6d3b
describe
'311271' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDY' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
28d1d79ec214293f7c7ec813bf09fc7d
c490ffd8b5d39b236645bdb87433a210688f4c9d
'2011-12-30T10:57:01-05:00'
describe
'132763' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIDZ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
e60167e64e828a39e604f5ee9161b881
d12b6b2987b38867fd811b60ae95c60ef70ce9b2
describe
'37989' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEA' 'sip-files00091.pro'
211f9f8a41a8728d824afbe08e95c9b5
6375d2622ceddd47a4f6b032105fb6b66ff07b3f
describe
'39391' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEB' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
0cbf938d1f63950be82124c75a2aec97
18e6a225f5d1d52d85359b13ff77aae8cf79945c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEC' 'sip-files00091.tif'
1e82004c978d9b5bbe97991bd3ad7574
3bbb6f8bc61599e45b8a5361856f6535527a239f
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIED' 'sip-files00091.txt'
622ae5a292e076c15766e10e6d017fa1
97d30228144153174d1a4f62933d75028d18b722
'2011-12-30T11:00:36-05:00'
describe
'9700' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEE' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
def12a4ff66f11be0f2ac887a03cd3bf
0692afe6a44685730de4ce946d830ba9439883f3
describe
'311539' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEF' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
12b575337b76e2161bf037f2591634e2
ab10f89801f954bfd3f5dff75ca692afb0539f6e
describe
'119198' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEG' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
e8d4118f8c70a760b9ceaaa0679e200c
2ceccd80c4af4d8717e23bbd38fe6b3a328935d4
'2011-12-30T10:59:01-05:00'
describe
'31741' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEH' 'sip-files00092.pro'
accdec79247586a847a58de6a5d42a7b
f3cb881c0301c142e383837542efe89ac60715cb
describe
'36018' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEI' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
1f84a3048ba4b40e2d330cab69fe9b8e
b4e5dc9cc4b7ba5683a95ae1143ce0af7af86503
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEJ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
8cd9d5b66310e64e13a9c6b344c635e6
7a15a0b01ceb93c4ecafade6674ebf284f67b2ab
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEK' 'sip-files00092.txt'
4bf20f36b69813b0f15bb7967425ca70
8455877b5c916159762ec565340bb3d4b39d2f2c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEL' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
b9877188d3870ac7eaccb1aadcac7798
89a7eb111a5ed67bb08841962449d611a4c0aea1
describe
'311502' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEM' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
607fc3a8066e3a1f4824e6ccc5809ff6
072567b08cd1402f0964a89320d894d2d3b13d7e
'2011-12-30T11:00:31-05:00'
describe
'130434' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEN' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
69a94fd0eaa7e0c2e9ba7bfabd3fc05e
0ab940e089cf29580940eb4c33d31703d75df5c5
describe
'38116' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEO' 'sip-files00093.pro'
668594e0bcfb7e4bbe97d59afaee0627
ce31c35f61e26465880a9982a3154856332fb2df
describe
'40136' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEP' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
c07be2173051de187f96bcce18a526ef
df9134b6cd981cb280d8a1c7ef5fbd05ec1eef29
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEQ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
367ae17df93c87a37ed640bc830dcd65
dac061b22458efb5d73cd15734cde22360f339ff
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIER' 'sip-files00093.txt'
cbf4cfc26c5d195d081f0df04e922eec
7d297a87336a9456b3f5242e6715d8b72f8439c2
describe
'9611' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIES' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
5cdb1a93074901ffe61f1c1a35a1e845
ae1febbfce4cd1832133f48471a7be0fb104f0cd
describe
'311389' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIET' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
4080b9bc94ebc0876b5ba47a32f679f4
7d2e8b5e8087240fc0cfc5f39fa15266fa747d5d
describe
'125758' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEU' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
98f3b9a2b37cf2f87601c232916fcfda
9a03e8192dae362a1ee8236f8e11e3c0a9ce0bf5
describe
'37540' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEV' 'sip-files00094.pro'
dafa504efb19df609f5c448f3016e5af
80395bc8f98f39a33bab9ba96138a180783e71ed
describe
'38783' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEW' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
fe9313eaee245b034e22106c7e7d522e
70c32510a7857d199fe9580c58d531e6f6351f3b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEX' 'sip-files00094.tif'
aff5c3b086e6837ac0a2a5bf9bbf8513
85617c5005631070c5cd92d6b7b747292ec90802
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEY' 'sip-files00094.txt'
a92aae4278d7798c03ce4b2459f0f506
12298166dc2f6a1da94df3d55759a3ffa6fac271
describe
'8969' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIEZ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
3c4d4269ba613e2cc7065611b3062d22
02145fb88c15df856d04312ea4e2376c96c8dd03
describe
'311544' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFA' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
a817b048c1d2c329896b3c819492ac8a
5a2934e09be2bb9505156e514f843adadbb9f775
'2011-12-30T10:55:44-05:00'
describe
'122671' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFB' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
5ca4cb7a37a5f95a719a72dbf3fb3c89
fe19b86b74c2795bc6e690156cfef89e57862c33
describe
'33955' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFC' 'sip-files00095.pro'
d8d18c38eb01a66ae60af8dd6cf2be3c
750128be18ae67d7631ae91f3f4a6122e5548907
describe
'37494' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFD' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
b2145a3ec45558db90c906fad16e4b53
aa4170ed1ea800fc67e2405f264295f8efcdc920
'2011-12-30T11:00:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFE' 'sip-files00095.tif'
60c0dbba1286edcc06755ef4d4a3714f
c0246fc24c8b8dc155ef5d337ee10ddf6e9e8f46
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFF' 'sip-files00095.txt'
d4216a0d82fb5dee15295fca42c3ca71
f702db689672f0df77505c67327e4fc7b6278813
describe
'8972' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFG' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
cd7dfa216cf7101dcd22e610b9d2a4bf
85ba629edc5e2ba2c5367432569e445381e8d096
describe
'311393' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFH' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
6355e839069a4145aeb359e852fafed0
f84b1ff332d9cb34b962ffa74cdae8b44c75ea87
'2011-12-30T10:58:11-05:00'
describe
'124449' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFI' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
ac14a45d21a0643b0a9b5dd79d70160c
729b8f6bb99233bb296644195a091b90d9e504d2
describe
'34563' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFJ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
59080018cf532846d4591f2a5c8205e0
9d049b023c04278a59855b1260c4a5bd076b2c99
describe
'37850' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFK' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
6bd827d26cff6a0be8275e708696a474
1555f70c00ef19f04ff92f33134171da3ee305f4
describe
'2508008' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFL' 'sip-files00096.tif'
ad097db612601578e260fbf5ff5e2a37
aca1d2197228a7d810d11a0bafbed7ea57f5d367
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFM' 'sip-files00096.txt'
3af680b7cd291092abfe80883783d0bd
e7c162d20a27b9c6bfed93e7b8255267c667353a
describe
'9245' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFN' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
b7199096c3b638af3515a90c08b5d6b0
78a4c4d6bd1789ac86deb333937c5da4c9f1158b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFO' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
c19f6a276e76b874cb032f94dcf7bbed
c818c72e628beb44c9d05c82371a37b589e06bb3
describe
'118578' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFP' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
a9359f4bcc2d00dd480ff34d66aa4a6d
ffeda35a2c68ebdaa18856142138f13da55b0241
describe
'34511' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFQ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
88059defeb0e22951db329c1a7c0c111
401f6b5a91260540a68dc7f2997ba0d48daa9176
describe
'36650' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFR' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
5d514b28a127599ef690d02b8d1f88a5
b242c606b7079808358a8aac8dfe2f046fd57866
'2011-12-30T10:59:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFS' 'sip-files00097.tif'
83d462b5ee5c7f43d013968c4837960d
73900588c81427a46508fda2011187498a9f922d
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFT' 'sip-files00097.txt'
d6b4fbb6dbb91ae8fc4491aa402bf659
3e3d4586e0af7e96b5d23a6f3956e88feb2203c2
describe
'9019' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFU' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
d9be57421642f571e76e2e7617143f7a
f38c8a77a8ad70ce17cd5b3cf17c4b4a7d8683fe
describe
'311358' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFV' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
8bbb6676c9bb93334f4de2f09ec4cade
5fd3d6af2812d04e65f9da8dc46bb70825d2ebb3
'2011-12-30T10:57:41-05:00'
describe
'125864' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFW' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
bd53b6a885e345396cc8d99ee76f83a2
fa014852891ab32a8ffb8598606bb20186a3e6c2
describe
'38580' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFX' 'sip-files00098.pro'
15673b4f95b111f5cc153dbffb1e4a05
1493de2865bbc8ab60d4caf7ae0671bdd1d7bc29
describe
'38706' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFY' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
cddcfea858ae417af25dd2c272ace950
b5aee40694a621d9cdcff1f87c65b03f377c3c38
'2011-12-30T10:59:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIFZ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
d4896f498abfa7d0045dd7dc5253ad3f
527a430ab37cab4eed89196a9d5a743176d90962
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGA' 'sip-files00098.txt'
f3abcc1bc75805a335856da27eb533b3
1e1d4d8f8adf6233476ecd75d11d50f2bd941b1d
describe
'9015' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGB' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
ab9510a93427725384257b660052a710
294f3e74ff4b3854dbf7483d6db7c044efe31418
describe
'311198' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGC' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
8a2fce9f9378d5162971270eea4dd998
c963e46fef4806b66b9349d62d41de57e39baa33
describe
'131510' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGD' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
d0434c22b0a853bbf52891f8ff309a3f
ac8f0e924bde3f12bcadb7a6ddb49a43399ee411
describe
'39165' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGE' 'sip-files00099.pro'
b8732f67c68e720636b2aaa57e6dbdb0
bcbb8c4ebf36e2c443c6c79fb5663e13bf7a3326
describe
'40648' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGF' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
6c1223ccd6d6dcc83471b71b25308720
1319de48c6475ed80c6c698c295b52827e01e2cb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGG' 'sip-files00099.tif'
e636050ff96c89f79e13a3c0439aead3
aa90341e96563ecda353b9dead38668294ec275e
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGH' 'sip-files00099.txt'
edc01d89f97a062e5673839f9ff7f5d0
7903c26adf3662f96846f76ca5db6b20af334aa5
describe
'9712' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGI' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
7c303255b32e6d27887a876bbcd52f65
5c519e3b3dcf7de32ce3a06d6722b164772d8495
describe
'311528' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGJ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
2f5e26ca7f02930b9a891976122988b6
0caaeca99fe3d585f5d3cb51033dd160c28d588c
'2011-12-30T10:59:28-05:00'
describe
'136504' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGK' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
35ce2b51470a6e77d4ecac8044185456
d8b2ecf23215c604da2f3047982d76249adab5bf
describe
'39504' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGL' 'sip-files00100.pro'
3e47cd176310fc7cecb97c96c582cca3
5f84732fc165917bff6b6fe66c20800ac0e32460
describe
'41703' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGM' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
63fef460e3b0c9f5cd89b0120e9293f0
f2c18803488c4b73098287dbf931948c95ada401
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGN' 'sip-files00100.tif'
9993c134f2c0d6de48e7e18f102ac77b
d8ba66721ccbe0e97fba973c59f86df78ceb35f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGO' 'sip-files00100.txt'
7f44729c7e8f439efe8c62e7c5325a76
b02a6c97e0c4e75a96aac90823d8b9e0759b3bb6
describe
'9840' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGP' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
be24d601c59ab4ff52ac1d72fb031b6e
9ca9b89826d6c74079b45b9d1021c1def3cefc28
describe
'311371' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGQ' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
044727a963137bad3a1bc8099ce9eee2
29bc933e9831cc465690d290be06d9b0f015dc25
describe
'129776' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGR' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
0f99e2d28d29d7797a348f4e58ac1f50
9660ed53d1f958e58792618a66c58f993ce08297
'2011-12-30T10:57:42-05:00'
describe
'39215' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGS' 'sip-files00101.pro'
6bd76517c4296ae79f56a306220653e4
11aea00ec6a013b79ef9195653d14b25a8994769
describe
'40038' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGT' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
f9b7b1db7f21c6586eb5f1865cfadebb
c0369f03c4702c717fafde81c60eef2f150ae42f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGU' 'sip-files00101.tif'
ff896f968948126c02ce48c998dbdbeb
63f7e2a01a925cf570d7c5966de638f9808c6d57
'2011-12-30T10:55:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGV' 'sip-files00101.txt'
75d95c6290c7bca48612f57c887575c0
f3e439f1d4a81fe4c5f9f743964b8428426caaf9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGW' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
5903c3f04be57b6d83e6b1d507c45d0b
8ee91ebd20150579cc87fefdf523be22b24be31f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGX' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
76e3306133f7401263a016a1c58b5047
5baf72bbaa81ddd857cf5817af41c81dbc699806
describe
'130806' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGY' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
808502ee31602c665c658a27b3a86904
8696df512e46e5c316084343718acf82aa6b69f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIGZ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
c0835942c9c28d90ecf030db7f453054
515de6facb6f918cb02d2608192129ea05847040
describe
'40323' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHA' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
21818fbdc0f9204dc1aae32fe1e45229
550efa455f1691cbaf34cf4c6db9f8576383b145
'2011-12-30T11:00:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHB' 'sip-files00102.tif'
dd24f6208d19ca64a1719b14941d07ce
89359a96d83827e9fbc9c025b8568d49dc707284
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHC' 'sip-files00102.txt'
f5dd5cc0697a0dc79da51dbdeb91ebad
dcd8c73f317c595f4b39179976b00bd40adf2ae4
describe
'8993' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHD' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
e9b90209681ce478ad24a49cad25e987
9fa0a2e60cf350451fb26ae9a4d14c023811dded
describe
'311363' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHE' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
e31a37791bf34f8da9a27bb51216d7c5
1e0e157537fc515f22cae5485c1724e0bffc3062
'2011-12-30T10:56:06-05:00'
describe
'139613' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHF' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
e90c26bd228119d651cb90736c762cad
648678df6034b3f33e9e4de66b6b5e177076e0d8
describe
'40986' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHG' 'sip-files00103.pro'
813a8e4a053bf6c83f24af58bb649400
2e3df41f0814e8a6dcc18e1411443afb3b45dc97
describe
'42421' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHH' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
f8b2d064ee84d6a1fb4579154cc7591c
b424451bee1e713cf2ba64d05f664453c58e026d
'2011-12-30T10:55:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHI' 'sip-files00103.tif'
b789a0316f3b408aa3692e56e87aa200
d1d9eb1c12dbdbd23a530f3697fab4032d4a7d90
describe
'1615' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHJ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
13f0fad66294858eba58fd4ea2e76b1a
4ff1491489ee26a57d4e465b7248249b6794ef29
describe
'9922' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHK' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
4e1a288fa4d1b38437fb81fbc7187c94
1c32c62131b99a7221aa62ae8dca4628eb96a659
'2011-12-30T10:58:44-05:00'
describe
'311555' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHL' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
f88651734852c3956799f5e4be2edd38
f97a5a90eb7296150462f0653beaf22097a04504
describe
'125562' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHM' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
bddd431ef9d551c6e227388277002a78
91af73138cd3c2a2c626a1f0bc97d79421c5c9ca
describe
'35400' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHN' 'sip-files00104.pro'
ee975d719bd7d4c8e93ea1f74eab8b9e
c9006a78dd43923c6e7a6c84accfe8468361e213
describe
'39209' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHO' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
fc612837068e22b08a8c86cb4c08c403
d50ceb85a02ca4dcc43310687d8953ce9697f34b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHP' 'sip-files00104.tif'
ce81a1ecfcbf782300526231babc9c15
90448d46507335e705ee9215cb6552c3c51bc98c
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHQ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
900b7f24eec6ad24373ca80541b885c7
1e94ed9a5072e8c5dad1e245b9b8deccb590f2d8
'2011-12-30T10:57:19-05:00'
describe
'9036' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHR' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
f5c7998f0ca602e3ff244051985d9bb0
b02dfb5fb68fda89fff778bdadafadcea341ef73
describe
'311556' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHS' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
40e9a43fd2693693c02518d352b9476b
92e9c65271ecb7348090994b169333b4843f1ca4
describe
'127919' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHT' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
192343faa9f344c1c23ffca579f0cea4
3068ff91c27b559a0e4d696150aeeba6f2d9017c
describe
'38270' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHU' 'sip-files00105.pro'
5bc89ab7d0f703f67dc51aa4a376f1e3
6fdc5ae2798d358d270c9b527956b6095ac58351
describe
'39448' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHV' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
08b77051641fd1bb9ba5f8839ed06ade
ef81cceaca769969b8530cfe771cbcc80c8b6911
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHW' 'sip-files00105.tif'
344403f965c1a0d3ddcc2a38973df3ae
1efbf636ef1f496a67408e7c6b5d443d2f6228d8
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHX' 'sip-files00105.txt'
32b0c60529d7e0ae977b180262b24e96
9e5ec1dfde2604048470c61d66c34a22019f0622
describe
'9895' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHY' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
71b857f166a4615e87b62dca60def428
43b2d6ff21e2bd43df75f583a435905d8266609a
describe
'311467' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIHZ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
7b74caeeecf8500e2d1ab50681122e0a
169f5e9109d4ea942d3b132ee9e3c44e7a8f19b4
describe
'128298' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIA' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
644a7448a6d07612136f1f7b9556acfc
c29ca59717e2027716f494610a18cf84cd593314
describe
'38865' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIB' 'sip-files00106.pro'
50fbf2549eb2ad805c8006331228c4f7
80647764b334c420421bf54cbddaeb63d9da5b57
describe
'39661' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIC' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
f03677f590c997ecde465719d49019fe
92d4662f81972e5b9f70c796fe7c6dc149a3a598
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIID' 'sip-files00106.tif'
46e87338adcfc9dbee567ef12465d129
c1ce5069e8ed1507730407e1fb84b303f92554ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIE' 'sip-files00106.txt'
06f5b7e269c2d7cdff3bafc1c9d5bb76
7ff6b15fa2bed8c9f2d4b6cfa35dab9d677dccfb
describe
'9316' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIF' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
65f4258dc7e1dbaacda3060eb35dd2da
c0e60d124d71c0cb8a2f1d5ae0c905b8ca603151
describe
'311283' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIG' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
90f01bd3f00e8a577e055436fac397ab
a74da6ab69be9df797e099c75a6022cfdd22522e
describe
'137248' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIH' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
da392b772298fa6eddc3427349b58df0
9069e24cdf1acf634a801392e8f76e08db12767e
describe
'39366' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIII' 'sip-files00107.pro'
84be36f97f36c5e07895e862ba8e9025
a310a8ec5b059a228b1c76a76095343c425cf8f4
'2011-12-30T10:56:09-05:00'
describe
'42461' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIJ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
9d9ee8886b7a1389988294cf56b4a8b4
f6772c9e47a5bd79644c94afcc35680e615d21ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIK' 'sip-files00107.tif'
bf6a3fbc1c800d564ebb8441f321d08c
fa4ed5e4c52590f81e24c6c1fd89cef9450fdecd
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIL' 'sip-files00107.txt'
850d9e82840e05cfbd1c25ab85e1bf03
996c9635f4eb7debc77cb04cbc3106ebbad4e7be
describe
'10240' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIM' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
c747a3260ce754dce835c8ec3b941ea9
81fed2c8448c713aebd12417208b83521106736e
'2011-12-30T10:58:21-05:00'
describe
'311267' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIN' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
f13bf6366306519f7f0deaa11dbf45bb
85ef9c8689a1fe0bdeafa5018763f287b88d67bd
describe
'128402' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIO' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
63166dc7e215919191e8361ed69d625d
a15794227467c19fd7e0f3ba510f46ee61921b37
describe
'36777' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIP' 'sip-files00108.pro'
dc2ccdaec6a9e28615852d91235f9ac7
984fc551eec53e33177e54d06581bde11ce0904a
describe
'39855' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIQ' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
b425f04737d0ae52ffc3548a4e921cd5
6d0066a4e031724ed8921d4caeb14cdf3be0f8cd
'2011-12-30T11:00:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIR' 'sip-files00108.tif'
68fa06443652915a10da35e293cff664
32a9c1767f67d8917f837fcbbcd19e8af35c0cb0
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIS' 'sip-files00108.txt'
f8ae278b798561155d3c783071998ae1
1961222ad37ba06ad2fd27830ea112c2d0e19639
describe
'9487' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIT' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
2a083ce302f93bbfbf885b516c3002ce
1f48388abe9adf669e8320adfc4e80adf71c3279
describe
'311439' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIU' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
611206cac9431e60ef150b6f8a485d40
3eec59fdf46eb98647f0f49dd08d6bf38dcb0364
describe
'116909' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIV' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
f37dd2dda1ea85c20422ba8f3d6cc3f7
f38a704901902b54010d805f98ff1f97ce43c02e
'2011-12-30T11:00:45-05:00'
describe
'31987' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIW' 'sip-files00109.pro'
bb30a02148cfbe9e5a525d070b81e7e2
e796b3e91755905fbb1dabb58ff61f49b7e633bb
describe
'35306' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIX' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
43396e3b7eb8272abdab7df22c74b06f
8d93a00f78fac6fc738e15e4540fa784aaa53251
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIY' 'sip-files00109.tif'
f97dd1e727da4d344382349b5dfa696f
7c6eff222bc3ffe4f49c15701c282d8431dd73a7
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIIZ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
b1c6d1cddc8f77649dbc90a5fe93111b
b2c0b0e6a29c75a0827df97c422a162729e67bc9
describe
'8716' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJA' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
117b7908142d194b24c4275ce0f1ffe4
a33fdb53747e3e891edaffedbe6ce31eb7047769
describe
'311317' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJB' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
9edd6fdc72051aa5b14a4c5dc6c8959c
89db20e93595ab801cb7911e875750a8a2db48fc
describe
'126215' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJC' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
f7305d552a71a4ed2846abf37f41bb48
4aa49c4eb03458c1237ef6c42f37576cc17cd892
'2011-12-30T10:58:24-05:00'
describe
'35414' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJD' 'sip-files00110.pro'
5e1dfc7d2e8dc62df6d5fd6d65f53125
1558ce58b19707fb013cb37904a35496de00a910
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJE' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
293f08c57de8930f5814bfa3f63f4799
eae893d39f34415c70b1eeb8f6fcadd21ed316b4
'2011-12-30T11:00:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJF' 'sip-files00110.tif'
c914ab36920b9e2f6a2bef0d50e568ba
c994f9616d7ab2d0da58e36833f24d72bd559547
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJG' 'sip-files00110.txt'
4987e5811a77700e2634e8e146e1b32d
5c3f477928463c8fd08802b522043a8c982f98a2
describe
'9143' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJH' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
07c06a29df62d17c620a84183020d952
6d25820e9880cf44240c35365634cb2f59d9f919
describe
'311559' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJI' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
750fb0fa723bc4fd7f1a434205db1414
130d3142bd3688d45244bf782b67ee8010f4f2a9
describe
'118642' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJJ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
c0feac8f58ee8d0478663801f1fcd848
70f89c94f7e91e10a6561a2800666041d7c78da2
describe
'31582' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJK' 'sip-files00111.pro'
277089c20b40265d0767117bb6882a63
ab1a986a9946633634b3146f3102adfe35eb37a6
'2011-12-30T10:56:11-05:00'
describe
'36511' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJL' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
7f800917fb90b3d530de9dfd1aaa6ae9
4dbd4b70be7420944b9ddfa0a111cae0432b8fb3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJM' 'sip-files00111.tif'
60fd9a7ebd574165b1f518f3a36af05b
a5cafbbb7d1849eec3a7bcc3d3ecfc787d9d6548
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJN' 'sip-files00111.txt'
303d9f1b9a3a024586debc742420e6b1
c3030aea03a77969b9761c93c8bea0d73e72854d
'2011-12-30T10:58:10-05:00'
describe
'9256' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJO' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
bcaa01945fdd8777caad2404a5d95f0e
0dabac99591616779cbd5d7a80f4e7ecc51caac6
describe
'311534' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJP' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
52a153805eba4eb11cba8b071ed6321b
9fdbaf64cafc49a51d892fef5e52144fe4ad3471
describe
'126436' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJQ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
bcc8d431be5617d8af257ec52e020b8b
66e30b95bc33daa23269297bf6209bc3705d5646
'2011-12-30T10:56:01-05:00'
describe
'35947' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJR' 'sip-files00112.pro'
a7d48789e01cefc579b947cd44334359
2395f5baee8dd68ce47cee28af6112b4acbe06eb
describe
'38098' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJS' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
4725e9035d8f96730904485de8c2f742
e39c3312a1ab5ef46bdb974406dcf1962971832f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJT' 'sip-files00112.tif'
49fef771675e46f1bd7bc0e126e446fd
56e6e74cee4a67bb0df2a83fb209eab95771594d
'2011-12-30T10:54:57-05:00'
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJU' 'sip-files00112.txt'
8506a19915159a177620fad02da25542
ae41a3ac7dd7b3fb30c789533172c3db6f28187c
describe
'9451' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJV' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
1dd922868f38dd9454d9216f680f5c92
7fcdf62172d05d429f0287ce627a05a0efb446ce
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJW' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
018a7e79132d0f58d17715ba1dfae86b
a41d470ac72609c4811679f7899ad864d4fd5f75
describe
'121529' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJX' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
166be04dd85758defc32fab2817dcb74
a6be002285cdd8865e10b070262c204d960d7d0c
'2011-12-30T10:56:59-05:00'
describe
'36461' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJY' 'sip-files00113.pro'
575bc3a4b759ca5b0011201cc76fea3a
698ea52fbc2235204b4c23eb4c10839f030e0228
describe
'37407' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIJZ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
e09fa5332f08facc0cbd3792d947a4ed
470c57eb9733fbb45efecdb8d80246a4c1a2868a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKA' 'sip-files00113.tif'
128f994168b4902e210d117eb805e04b
c45611e1aa2a2ef3c0f52b9c28fad8ddb4a9324b
'2011-12-30T10:57:36-05:00'
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKB' 'sip-files00113.txt'
8c0d16297c8cd2950561c19258600505
a1a53f10936ab016c341643f650b948a19c074d3
describe
'9237' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKC' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
3d8eeb209f8885ab83bed6b4f92df9cb
96c8681204b16d590d06c4d0502ad0bb73bd2f6c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKD' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
0471c7fe04a36b040b97e57900d40325
d14b8adbfb01c06395659d288670516114f54826
describe
'124240' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKE' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
e351488a21e3622b8060c21d04e165f9
43bb7cd76ae837b502870e4268c0a6329743e60c
describe
'36666' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKF' 'sip-files00114.pro'
2ba9b74cdb79849f9f5194b9ae89c3e2
de42455bb1d8420c750e9b4c670e9d3febee4e53
describe
'38114' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKG' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
30232e0b37771c99f76bb26683692007
fe1be902e5a40f9ed3ed778cdc4b894aa0549c1f
'2011-12-30T11:00:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKH' 'sip-files00114.tif'
c682651c7be3ffc4e26f676efe94dc42
56fc1453f86d8390d9393495c4b4d4297ea09508
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKI' 'sip-files00114.txt'
c485542f54fa968cdc6dec2ea72c2991
5914fe14620e863b3445c217f83875edf2c2edee
'2011-12-30T10:59:17-05:00'
describe
'9145' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKJ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
deafc4c84650757595e16a132f74ca79
e498f2e440e54f229c352dd44f3063ccf886137b
describe
'311382' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKK' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
c36d34930e0d6f929d04d13d0ff84c1a
2807f599a944fc09d797423b68a296cf6f3a0074
describe
'129975' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKL' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
0af5e8595e55456e7e71037a3f567647
636ee5b557b4c3db19347a9e7499aa41d32cb357
describe
'37111' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKM' 'sip-files00115.pro'
2d5ddbadc67252c295dbe3288193ae85
36a6170007745e6571115e99ea6523f6eaa1a844
describe
'40061' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKN' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
c46d05739c3c230b907227ae3ed9a539
0fda375d40e9c31b6b0d6dddc71d16b30efd6717
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKO' 'sip-files00115.tif'
d8d14bd1240a43be02535f30e9c9c8a9
c419594e20d7bcdc378501e66bcc0bd28d755fab
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKP' 'sip-files00115.txt'
94633f9f674964028f1e7c86d311b25e
a6de923dd50882d34cebb3f1ffc7e752d98638d2
'2011-12-30T10:56:37-05:00'
describe
'9811' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKQ' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
9ef01265997e1e36c436ba5944124337
debbcf13f7380e7a1f00d457cf611883ff071c37
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKR' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
8efc910c60bc3e940fc673f17a4df3fa
4231cd977e88c1e5a39937db54cea7cefd43d743
describe
'121969' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKS' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
9c4f715d596bd549ef0253fe35eb2513
58cb195ebbf5743fdd2155a975df9518f7807b49
'2011-12-30T10:54:59-05:00'
describe
'32444' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKT' 'sip-files00116.pro'
2c608d9dce8e43d89e33c42d17ee921f
82ec83b917490b6f37517f37954556be6d2833a9
'2011-12-30T10:58:55-05:00'
describe
'37708' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKU' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
3a49baeeae600839f557cf1d9914715d
3440976aaddd0400483800d0cd2bba71afb2843d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKV' 'sip-files00116.tif'
9e5cd36b4a177f8df52be9db36820f39
85ed537148a992fa29d475f9a718cd81d058ddb3
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKW' 'sip-files00116.txt'
684fc3d146e80f2920d912a15fb5a1e6
2aed75ab6c87c71cc0ef534333804f3f63dd8991
describe
'9338' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKX' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
ea27c856fe749b179e1a7931cb4d7cf4
e901ea0a43ec5bfdf2f104c42bea4019b397b499
describe
'311519' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKY' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
e802c1c809e6ae35e1a5302c5d36f636
b3b18224ba8f7606c9d4fefcf520000c41851462
describe
'122942' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIKZ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
839971539a0568259e81501308306825
e3dce6e0fdd998feaef3073547a3f940f6a8d031
describe
'34549' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILA' 'sip-files00117.pro'
5584bdb62cd7ae0dd9060732df9ed6ff
c4f1e7c122b9461ced67249189b480265963ece1
describe
'37212' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILB' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
f1518a6b47677c4f9bec9a6c6fee2acf
1d890481264f26b9d9a9f1f4f248c61ceb9ff247
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILC' 'sip-files00117.tif'
5787f9b9d53b83528cb6ab579ef7bf76
9b7c0f243f98bf248792e10884c84d984dd5d451
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILD' 'sip-files00117.txt'
fb7dce5933937644e80f5f91c87c938b
79eb14f499dd90b86efc809689329bb418234163
'2011-12-30T10:55:08-05:00'
describe
'8879' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILE' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
59fc00a01691565fe133586508fe2e09
600cd4292145db33f4ffab53c9b3608ae155cfc7
'2011-12-30T11:00:39-05:00'
describe
'311554' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILF' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
5405e2a890ed85ab8234e6871ed53947
045c632c53d17baf6da1a52a8f2e9307438e9fe1
describe
'125916' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILG' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
b50b64a141f1d428d6ee0778c3ce6ae3
3c8efc54330b7f8f67d1f53042e3e348e14ff117
describe
'35466' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILH' 'sip-files00118.pro'
e73f2807f333e79f137e238dd31dfed2
6fca20ed8b2949fb939d050154fafefe7467fbc7
describe
'39046' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILI' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
61a4090ede8872616b208a0b724b1c55
10da78adaef6a96dddeeabae1d530f422343168d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILJ' 'sip-files00118.tif'
ec1101841800de533c0bbfb856e22eec
8fc12e4e6f3a93dea33370ee4e717c75983b8a41
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILK' 'sip-files00118.txt'
190f1529d3dc8ea3da94314c043766d6
fc2aee5247e9f969ac33ea979683e1aae1181379
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILL' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
56e2cec3432eacf7b3b11dca9ba60c2c
2e2bdf4b352a4e7954c6f3ae6897db8f587b12f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILM' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
02d29ce7f1392c966e713b34d63c90c7
5476b2d54586b98208d5f55b4355d852e462bab2
describe
'129945' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILN' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
eb8ce3758d0b970932f5ea0ca9d859a6
288e49ef44e57c39cbb9fc100a9c1ec7d73c1dd1
describe
'37567' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILO' 'sip-files00119.pro'
afc4a72cb33f4bb544527a195bca9faa
0fb34ae417f76bec7e5c368ee7b952087ee521d0
describe
'40449' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILP' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
6941ad51edc33f204e01041d53eacf41
bb7f0eb980fd29c84191bb315af58812150994f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILQ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
45c6f85781bfb96ec6fda9a76efae9f0
b5cc853cbf5f55045f06e633da46224d78199a31
'2011-12-30T10:59:41-05:00'
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILR' 'sip-files00119.txt'
a201a8de7d1dda705ff63d501c59c5ff
ded62bc4bb10cb950212614781eddb8e39549589
describe
'9784' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILS' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
acf2db674a1744e3eb58e4f7445f4420
ab58adbdcd14a0539e657b96bb686c6548925273
describe
'311549' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILT' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
ec662998e8b46dc4003160fc306eb44c
48774cb497646ef98ddfd454542926a569820de3
describe
'124846' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILU' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
dea6569c4bcf1a1023ca6c8913c30960
37f7848dae06db5abb0c0e07c07ef4dcfeaffdb9
describe
'34020' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILV' 'sip-files00120.pro'
1134730cc057a3f80070a65ae64b9c62
cc000b1228acd614962708593beaa1246e4a6290
describe
'38030' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILW' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
0abea9407f4ac845af277f5c4786f5e1
35de79546634ef44a5022ab36cfd01a6b2c4ac77
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILX' 'sip-files00120.tif'
e749f1929b39d45fbe6b859931c02ab2
eadbc33cefd85d3923217ea6ed26c61b07b6f81b
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILY' 'sip-files00120.txt'
77ed6da8cb3c658363c3560ef8d17652
19b87cb170dfcabffaddf047e516946e4d4b3f28
describe
'9132' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACILZ' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
7fed7e3d82ccf3701402ad5dd7ed797b
34a9c112994cdad22926ba40bf73d7855a2cbbf0
describe
'311550' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMA' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
af304681b4f2f23fad0abc9000812ac6
0fcc03a040ff13f9acb67db12abbb4e9cc66eee3
describe
'121943' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMB' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
6e0fe5fcb2dbf76f6c4a91fc75c745e5
81cb4c928ddb09ee6c2f4279bddb585d7236dfa1
describe
'35335' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMC' 'sip-files00121.pro'
a8448af5bfee5a1117092ebbfb57c3d8
41e10e82680218362330a13f102db839a83a1647
describe
'37048' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMD' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
e281aaa5d90957e44671906bd57fa6ba
a390a8edb1d1e8fb64bf024bab6cfff5a9545360
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIME' 'sip-files00121.tif'
fbab37b5e29d9d9c026116b1727091df
92f5d5882468a93b344a2ce46c771aa6900e5d14
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMF' 'sip-files00121.txt'
595b705024d08530eb1ae0a0d2aee29a
9e74a851394e5fc3e56d8c3e8595843803db38c9
describe
'9285' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMG' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
3e67f6e52fb3e15f44db04402ba65594
71f4bddcb1016085515a6af1a44f81b549941d51
describe
'311488' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMH' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
bcca7b70200c3d80ea0385afb4d4a95f
1704bf68689b4462256961774d1025d820e7ff20
describe
'123699' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMI' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
1ea38112ab0de89d29933c0af360c0d6
26acd88047a165369efc275043742f015e912170
'2011-12-30T10:56:22-05:00'
describe
'34767' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMJ' 'sip-files00122.pro'
76631896d0fe24c7e0621faec3071860
cfdd4e620836c982dd2da6b0962e1d3a788afe32
describe
'38051' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMK' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
e6cf4e356c6892810be1c802492ab73e
18ece43409522337a04ca8f0735b240475c4116e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIML' 'sip-files00122.tif'
c6b8de067257b3a973fe0d4269118e93
ae7e3f120aa0e43be26330a3d21d849f9faa8145
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMM' 'sip-files00122.txt'
c3147b84fa8bc0e9a7687bb21378f699
1c25b2ead446875262a71759e7f2dad34dc29a92
describe
'8983' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMN' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
bdaffaec8dee0258b584a6526007579f
fa75396c308df3f5911733469eace2453027ec32
describe
'311395' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMO' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
629e36c1a97825949eb2d29858fe3e72
52fa3fb507da42b498a54f426114ed7009b9ab43
describe
'131694' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMP' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
180af09949c966796322dd58479022c5
e1edc2c7ef09f87fb4632c503189c90ec5edc464
describe
'39654' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMQ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
14afb538a6ada5c64cebaac7e2b5c61d
59dfa20418ea72a7bc7b7f82ba0b0a81a4dc1a2c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMR' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
9f580fb751edc3c9b561ed9d0cf95038
1054f3eddff2d5130306154940e4250f0da4f574
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMS' 'sip-files00123.tif'
89ac18de24c4e89ff3566075d3074dfe
d6bf7fb88ba0968e4b0ce3f4e887aea9d9d85a7a
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMT' 'sip-files00123.txt'
6c4dab58bd6cbb933d2d32790be5dd69
203629d03da1989f562859f856f2973b22a53d06
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMU' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
034edd327108d11fe1ee0921def19b10
0faa44230e699ac115fa8ff6af39d3f624187020
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMV' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
49cc7ef3be9960f160af6b15701635e6
d1b0cac5502f1bc4b9a458c0170403e8c6d09eb6
describe
'131630' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMW' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
3282bbf009277faf98ba38989368e634
0cc59fac318d6f178d7d37c1bbccfa21e772c92c
describe
'36727' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMX' 'sip-files00124.pro'
a27362cfff2a2d2330ba4f3219060445
d45beb46e7489c2690f481865a1949df729095ce
describe
'39804' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMY' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
b10ea45a10def18105d8ba413689a6bb
7db26a3cbd5283822f2f09d47c15ca9f0c362fd7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIMZ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
71ccef697e6a7ccaca8f011c2910d944
8bd423d3b0fe5588afddb4125ea2c94f92530348
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINA' 'sip-files00124.txt'
e043edfeac1e9844bac77d348dfd40af
4190a0910fcaaccb0d3f328c9e0f00b944bcc3b2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINB' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
920aba1112d02ad95aee9d306a265c4d
760ba584666ab6eb71df32066719435b76806cfd
describe
'311381' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINC' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
7d5d94ec9d9d9814fd2f86297f6c7974
9e5ea1b2705651bc6d359f580663b033c099fad4
describe
'100122' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIND' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
d6c648a59bbefdeddff6b249907d4ac6
d46c070e0e346ba8a1f11f5ed803f998d9730095
describe
'26201' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINE' 'sip-files00125.pro'
d76b74eff6234a6bced4b96267421be1
6219fccc23651fbc4294a70bae2ae66135aba52d
describe
'29598' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINF' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
8905f13eba73d794f1041c351d932ec0
fe4eb6401c34aadd5cf55ff29485a558019b645b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACING' 'sip-files00125.tif'
4cd2075ed973a9367f6bda0cb89f4fcc
56544769d5f20fb7e4a31b9682a11ffd25977c2b
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINH' 'sip-files00125.txt'
8788693ba02e4f3382a45db4705318b5
9132ba7efa877629f886faf4fe49dfa7ede3bc8f
describe
'7175' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINI' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
0e695a02ae202b428689a363cfc440cf
87e58faa941314148048e6dec5530fd485f4ca63
describe
'311396' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINJ' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
a809cf460edaeeac9cea75b6ff3ea6c6
34ba01cf06fab8368b64b0d5d7ae70497f32531d
describe
'114629' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINK' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
bb0f58bd82f8bb232080ab87ce78c4f4
c0767f29fb4d1a49c2e5df2dfbc1eda387a1c3f4
describe
'32523' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINL' 'sip-files00126.pro'
0c2478e7b728cab75d64a5f7e65ce1d3
77721aa488950482cb33b0b03622016fe4dfb6a5
describe
'33736' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINM' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
44aa7be90f3a279f3972c4fae3ff24c1
0d4bab5c7ec7b4f568a95bc1afc7697106d03966
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINN' 'sip-files00126.tif'
0820f6db6875665fb92478896d0ae2fc
cf9e414776d80c8f2fee87c7cffcfbded0667ec6
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINO' 'sip-files00126.txt'
1789c13be7b717dce83ba1a6a94029e2
b647351e8520372a654bb33390dd97eaf0c4052f
describe
'8526' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINP' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
111f422a0de1d66440fcafccacecfd34
36c6a463520d7a3edca3d39bd8534371711540fd
describe
'311263' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINQ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
dea8d519e8bbacbaf7640e0aa24201bd
eaf1e199999251d625b4d5ec12f5b5e344244e36
describe
'134774' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINR' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
fb6795fdc916f202a44722ecf8540470
fd6e2915568e8dc8b158092b1e153df5b0680249
describe
'40898' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINS' 'sip-files00127.pro'
e91c9a98e679f008e7dfd41a72853f02
89f4fb1a8955319103a4c745eb4180880cd82395
'2011-12-30T10:59:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINT' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
4771749325132348e79aedd99aad064c
25a2ea49148055eced2fb119624944bea0e4821e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINU' 'sip-files00127.tif'
70bc0f0272f78042cc695dcb2fa15023
18bdb987921f8034bf80b46f1135d3d0ee435710
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINV' 'sip-files00127.txt'
c0a8d219701bf777b9c06574a753e1af
8df53153a2db5a9f5d24df502073833826daeea5
describe
'9535' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINW' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
36b51c5ef78cf1e64b13b183f3272937
b70d82ff29ae01f2056549f83e96ef852231c7f5
describe
'311319' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINX' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
af3a8b63fe4168f1f43b59ba54dbe4ee
36aafe4460f6ef8a978160aaf8020f8a3a8a974f
describe
'135028' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINY' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
5460ae60c76709d6e5d3630d38c38516
831201fb3de8a42b45e79503f42668bd5beb313a
describe
'40071' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACINZ' 'sip-files00128.pro'
c8fa4db794dbffc4a31ae175852e978c
289df74de8d02c0b96a9b5e27091778fe16f6941
'2011-12-30T11:00:17-05:00'
describe
'41521' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOA' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
6815d8277f03f8b356261649b0eeb8a2
ab26863d1eb1bdaabb54f0a4790199bc892326b1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOB' 'sip-files00128.tif'
c8a843147cb9a82756bd59515c05cfa7
0ecc1eaf01cd2857080f6216b2857721be83d029
'2011-12-30T11:00:40-05:00'
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOC' 'sip-files00128.txt'
1a38889360d14cca06efbc1a7353d8b5
ee71c09910a10cd470a1cf981a1779e8fedba687
describe
'9735' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOD' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
f656c3b46d183e4c506b6eed63a3a7d9
dd443cb8b23a5e9a9ecca02ac281523d14126f94
'2011-12-30T10:59:44-05:00'
describe
'311415' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOE' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
fc1f6e6e494d497fd4de6444b48bf735
8b5dc59160011b3103d5e14362cd8b0bcbedac8a
describe
'128223' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOF' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
9ac5888fde4705e3a938f9dd7cf7fc88
2f537013325ff3133c1d6142a083f2957fc4bae7
describe
'37185' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOG' 'sip-files00129.pro'
bbb7a682f201878c2d76e6e277e8491c
ecba08ae03007a2a4b768881ed24540672469bd3
describe
'40555' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOH' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
230640bd3ed8d59734cb66fa9c81eb00
3b4f2e8bdda3aaf3e406ec6859b2d1bc1bf60c63
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOI' 'sip-files00129.tif'
adfaff8cfa2dabbcda3c7d9a3f6fd125
54b926e34a9e487059de2e6ac5e53e748b9fbc32
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOJ' 'sip-files00129.txt'
0d768bbfbfd630a9c5a778c28926b9ba
a6e4b8f0a306387fc10ea8d267c779e0b56e461b
describe
'9591' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOK' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
f2b69f76b84f2d5c0459bb177116bb56
a1beeb7195f5f2c6e84690565a8dd35b96c3fa98
describe
'311362' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOL' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
a1340d9950253dbafc03b54180150c4b
0d64e63a8aaad5b74935dfb3fb8b5d18aa91403e
describe
'130854' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOM' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
4dfa32b6b4d2aa097eae42848cc941d2
b7c83a63b56c3b383f051d45d082ee462f8d3798
'2011-12-30T10:57:25-05:00'
describe
'39472' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACION' 'sip-files00130.pro'
d193849122e758fdef16104b8268b352
6c35c51823ef7413b931fe7fface5e27d67f8843
'2011-12-30T10:57:16-05:00'
describe
'40476' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOO' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
768cab854acb0e7db8a70139bf0a1721
c96a04f75b034146873e5afe95282878a99aab37
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOP' 'sip-files00130.tif'
2e4666cc7a6ea25740eba5a70b438be8
0e4392fbd5609c636550459414f8ac8f0557d565
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOQ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
526e439576f62b66c48833f8728043b1
ac1c43b932b94f7d5d4fdf48dcad346017d5376b
describe
'9182' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOR' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
d1ba95ed1a9d3a7e56f7be9953f96fed
85d44ac0b762f5f018cacdc01df33847e34efed3
describe
'311390' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOS' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
34fbb6d3a144cd08e81838b836a2ec9a
eb299fd5f0e3492e4749d785f8e1a08a091f438f
describe
'123778' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOT' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
d137ad5ac2709c724af03b5067f743bc
095f1aac10c4ebb873c8567389b60bcb49706579
describe
'35677' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOU' 'sip-files00131.pro'
fec466bbce99ce9b3adfe2ab348c064d
445b1572a9c5467871d6e380b4ce225e431eace7
describe
'38568' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOV' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
0c92ff907d6573ce832260cdc62ed122
b1e815e934b18e358d6b0791bb7eb62555d38d20
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOW' 'sip-files00131.tif'
f4446c4d81fd4ae91b0f4623470f9fa6
9f0124bb37e6f74a3b0f73edc0c3266fb54912ce
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOX' 'sip-files00131.txt'
2b61c8848c8fe10d07c9c108a83cac11
7901753ff9d215867b1e45610b32a9845d7586d8
describe
'9230' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOY' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
aa639f3fb3f143f2ac91450f6b76d4b2
716b2ad2e5489a51d41572fe622125960568bc36
'2011-12-30T10:58:56-05:00'
describe
'311073' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIOZ' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
4bb6233466ab8108fff18cb11835d9e2
cee12d0fdf4cf9f86b28f6f9227a8886d794ba99
'2011-12-30T10:59:50-05:00'
describe
'134336' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPA' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
59c74b136710f11f67832ceaf6aac775
c962854bcbbac3eeff412fb3ecd40b300d0be98d
describe
'37804' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPB' 'sip-files00132.pro'
cedf98936849d5262651a061ed8f2fba
d228bf7e4681054382541fb943ef9ec5ae39fdd5
describe
'40611' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPC' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
0060f8baf92ed6a9b8623ca394812f05
1ca9c91e42a7b200979acd1960e43f760a8486ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPD' 'sip-files00132.tif'
2094bc7f476af332c57724441d2d8999
5f40bdc21867415d260e8723c8dec2b8207a4677
'2011-12-30T10:58:17-05:00'
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPE' 'sip-files00132.txt'
95560ff06f3f28ad89757bbf9184b054
d1dfaa7ba90384e244b9556a2321d29f0f587504
'2011-12-30T10:59:05-05:00'
describe
'9496' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPF' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
e3e75a3aba96083dff4f0a7e710ba5ee
b857ffe806819db9ab7b22c70b19d2eb7941286a
describe
'311329' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPG' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
2c56d86ead9918a8f9101bfa07a79c8c
68bc5266f8c0b5e83faff408f02c6fd0bdcec7ca
describe
'137937' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPH' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
beb18513c2ee23710254bbffe84f6dcb
7ddea5c980025ecf4b028f884e9f8fc46e173d98
describe
'38496' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPI' 'sip-files00133.pro'
ae0a58a35cae09d186df8cd7216ac95b
582a75cdde3353af340aa7ed83aa76618013c5ec
describe
'40954' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPJ' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
248e6ab30dd247cd4d61af38d2cd3638
5b90bb4a4623d139b573369e33ce5ffbcba6c3d2
'2011-12-30T10:55:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPK' 'sip-files00133.tif'
72ccb2305752804be63dd9f1b57e0feb
ea26f81852d5ace997db579cb7909b433662bab1
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPL' 'sip-files00133.txt'
d543d4e9ec0eb00b4be574962d111735
96325c2cf78e3d243bf53aa7619c425e338c0616
describe
'9658' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPM' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
689ccaa587e4d1bb1aec94965c48e8f4
c4ec90efaeec4238df4e0e9ab202b7531e5decba
describe
'311303' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPN' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
1eb45421dbaec9eb6fe2b31f89e5e9de
cbd718c066c45eb7f399f401f763af4212ddba1f
describe
'157207' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPO' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
05a27ff3681dbaf57cf6ae7e53fc767b
62352b22614c20ae16405d121f8327b4faf718cf
describe
'2144' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPP' 'sip-files00134.pro'
27e18665efd85ab3868e560c8a96e721
29860d981d0ccd7116842c6f8f94e07fc9f5d48f
describe
'37712' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPQ' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
16291109d50d6995fd54e368b4617557
e36bb6a43d9e96509204935d55a3a0a6a1fa6ac3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPR' 'sip-files00134.tif'
5ac255eb3d9b8f2983998415993d0b6c
745c96ae0381c6408c2b939d13c43eb4a2472f23
describe
'128' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPS' 'sip-files00134.txt'
d8bcf195d3aab4067d431bdd369566a6
4e7e19f93cced0f693defbe09d733bb99ca7fff6
describe
'9880' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPT' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
d585f1e737460e6d174c0f128821444b
f5352cf0dee7fb76704911776cffd84350a98a4f
describe
'311784' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPU' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
709e7cd0fbb3ecb69a0b0d082ec23315
0915615a2307902d1e7088f07fb02925cabe62e5
describe
'128264' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPV' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
6d0d4ab542c56e35b09b02b8eb9a8d31
18239ccfbe0d0da8b7c88da53989c61810b1a018
describe
'36584' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPW' 'sip-files00136.pro'
5124acf95104d862d5da1005c1be2f6a
7dc33c01e00e66a9471b56a9ec160695b9144a97
describe
'40418' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPX' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
448fbd0e44455ab46b6f87036df335fa
a708e347a074f69ce405634e2be2153c751f6ad9
describe
'2511240' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPY' 'sip-files00136.tif'
a6de86931d3d627801be242054df96e8
95d8f05838e3e4449ebbdc8f41eecdd610718f6f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIPZ' 'sip-files00136.txt'
5b499883fb7a2124c73c5b17dc0af864
c289cc16e434957912cc806b0118c6f955dd99ff
describe
'9782' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQA' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
836249b30011b3c89844a4d84b18b9bf
31b9041b8a4ce08eff6d1086f16be1e914f259eb
describe
'311367' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQB' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
7e8cabfb9e81d1e0903c5f28befe47a5
36b5c8deb29e74bd48fc84cb5001e2ac71640cc8
describe
'130722' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQC' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
e28ca22a0431ce81aa20a7d6d3df23a4
43cd1956520bd83f6ce9e9abe2c59eadf604c495
describe
'38256' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQD' 'sip-files00137.pro'
b88fa28a9c2bb2323aafc9501add8d3f
89e9065b909b86adaba755dde6b62749e6468b9c
describe
'40509' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQE' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
950ebd2bd65cf61c2584594ffc3040a8
9dccecb6707e28de5b233528431c102cc1d63782
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQF' 'sip-files00137.tif'
93b0210508fdb96e76261d67ce659a4e
0232f5475d69a6f7697c1fdd1a703d758ee49982
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQG' 'sip-files00137.txt'
e8f9af84af9050b46cd00d79331f9e24
3ca5aa254339ea7d2d7e125b43ea6e96eee441c5
'2011-12-30T10:55:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQH' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
6fb6da36f2909d261460e65a8cc12be5
e8b05bec82986615ec11a9db204ff34e738d7294
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQI' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
8255f0352e0dbf023cff826e15928a43
b3405f2df710fec8f012edfd97cf7faa34f74597
describe
'127652' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQJ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
a9bc7993ff3fbf85d107725ac402cd9f
29670d1d67574aab42d24ed5d262acfbbacedfe6
describe
'36695' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQK' 'sip-files00138.pro'
e1407cf389c4d1394d3803aa89e52a87
cbc7569bf65dc245f76bb73ec4984ca1599c8c75
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQL' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
02da4a1f2f128d5cbabcd2942ba0db3d
c2e3f11830e0b962ab5fd15f651c2598b11cf681
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQM' 'sip-files00138.tif'
968ef1ac0d5f21dd3e63e2568dcb9b0b
8554a3c091eca725fb3d4f073a9e45875830131c
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQN' 'sip-files00138.txt'
4ab60951efd82a68b455b4d3beef8e3a
2a7907582da6b13b7502eb0cfb27efec2214570b
describe
'9605' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQO' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
a96fb654485bed1c22a4e9cec18d8465
6c33852c582a1c04281185f024f02172adb71670
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQP' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
c71aaa926da6414e5a4effa220cfb318
d273166b9427cf651d2e23240bf1d0631ed72877
describe
'129390' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQQ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
b27cb787da660e1f386f4df51d6806cf
dec13aa3828eb057cd1be4180dd32340a45802be
'2011-12-30T10:57:46-05:00'
describe
'37071' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQR' 'sip-files00139.pro'
36ac6ae05ab63cd047ada251da17c00a
40dc90e210a22d7a0171310d592d9044e1491ab8
describe
'40911' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQS' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
83560761b8e7a5f393e3b683d3fd3857
02710a45b494fb8b44ba9562b85bb474e360d89d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQT' 'sip-files00139.tif'
2869654b7729d75d705cfda09f5bbd29
1574647279bab6cea0c3e99b69eb23558723821d
'2011-12-30T10:56:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQU' 'sip-files00139.txt'
b1f4cae11bee93776d9012a74aeca108
5f7fc09b3d45a930b22377a345e5b6887f235579
describe
'9932' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQV' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
bdb47e072135af1b4155d5e58a6f0955
b1547d613c8aa19d95eecd1270c8a7cf484d1561
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQW' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
1486814a29320a38b40db14a722a8f3b
df14498610378d94923db98919082605069cf099
'2011-12-30T11:00:30-05:00'
describe
'130415' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQX' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
1f0c4b12477bf9e6bb8304f481619837
5f47e786e0d19561e106ca8c48edade2d453eb88
describe
'37124' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQY' 'sip-files00140.pro'
bc5f21b1c81888c469a16f8f41a5206b
aba79a9d3d9f7cd398738edce35037cc37f6f015
describe
'40208' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIQZ' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
23094be34323302fe5b1236d028a533d
d36bea5f38d33a9cbbf5ba37be64e14c53e83210
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRA' 'sip-files00140.tif'
ba901a8f49bef29f028e863833ba4440
04d1597d64f515cb521c4c1135ecef1ad40241da
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRB' 'sip-files00140.txt'
6165ddc6caa0c379e7687a85cedfa224
bcf3b854122e75c58c0e54303ff1f68ccf60298e
describe
'9772' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRC' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
45bb2a38b184d32c3e6fb0a690a3310e
094b32d8f3cb7dd1fcd7ea7ca93d827b115b371c
describe
'311416' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRD' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
3b39e9d57b466df3d5959a6acb7f52da
913ee7bb19f6cf2f213e9cd950937e7dee9b6e44
describe
'134337' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRE' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
a00373ab3b9175f756caf68a21335812
7317787aec503a77b7ed5a61e28e0a988f0f5b26
describe
'39529' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRF' 'sip-files00141.pro'
b3b33461d701cf142949192d518712d2
dced519554fc76005bc2fb21d687252a852cc807
describe
'41567' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRG' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
8eaa3adbf55d19039692a43752ca2448
cd09bb1ef5fbaec4cec7aaf0c61f70c51bcdd505
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRH' 'sip-files00141.tif'
3ba4f482c678c4879bf9e61cf957400d
7051132134e479f5829e84dfbfdf8aa6e0287147
describe
'1557' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRI' 'sip-files00141.txt'
2d70be01d117975ccb0e3cd4fec11853
00a70e91a3c34b4abce62c39353495401443d186
describe
'9987' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRJ' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
a52a675e83d0be176821e039b586e78c
0239cc663b28bae955023aeed4f9dde2172c6d5d
describe
'311290' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRK' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
eb474f6805a18a5dbedfeebac47076a2
ff13da7216f28cc18379d23acdbb17332a8d34ce
describe
'133749' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRL' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
4e5d08bbb22ec42674481bbe0ee98ecb
d6629b98f325a6680080107db042df5d995c8e6e
describe
'38983' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRM' 'sip-files00142.pro'
5cef83c8e6d79c8388c8e18b4e688a00
adbed5ef248e3dce8eda950e9342ad74f17559f8
describe
'41251' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRN' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
153345820b7d3dd1528c4b102b90eaa5
fc147618fa297441c205be155453e7411f9361ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRO' 'sip-files00142.tif'
1b7c1628df2a83bd75663d2e31e6919f
185e8b56ab0c7e260711df6eb2679f470a493321
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRP' 'sip-files00142.txt'
7a9b51da0d579892d8bb57f7584f4051
4543aae56f7e917464c03e3c70831bb2a6ca3ed3
describe
'9686' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRQ' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
3c85605829f8eed5afa0d250802c3ef6
ca0cf254ac4d054946909304d4d88e132806ad39
describe
'285336' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRR' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
e5efeccb3c28d718a46d597eead6fc6c
0363137982a56a0ec5986a10a1ff09ffe1139327
describe
'121891' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRS' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
676d5506d72de991ad2fe32a92274e22
4ae66ab2f21f46dd41c67858398544df44b90bf5
describe
'34946' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRT' 'sip-files00143.pro'
42a0190d97b3b4261f624316c056ccc7
9f440d46bd7be351c158fe029308712473fde932
describe
'39719' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRU' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
18ef612d58b16fa12eaba501fcf70430
2538202030a38b26fa6b53cc6cdcf271919eb802
describe
'2299560' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRV' 'sip-files00143.tif'
f59b057cfdfbbca28cf1e24494b83c29
faaf288433ace16899e4dce5970d80e6f8e4807c
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRW' 'sip-files00143.txt'
e1353f7ae689e5621563085bbf8dd464
b46f282b2e64cb15a504c4d9cf8fd93dfc1b1df8
describe
'10417' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRX' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
b420f572e2935ba4013eda1711186a61
8f38a832b8db83cc11fc93a02fd8014f97b2a505
describe
'296826' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRY' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
cd1a4733c9196be515b354da17361423
c0a7055e5360a92a32e5c4c2698774a2e28f6aad
describe
'97888' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIRZ' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
f97978cec2a6f4b79eded01cde7cc0ad
8309c59193b63ef4c050deaff0c1202131d39e77
describe
'27459' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISA' 'sip-files00144.pro'
6cf2133df62e26cfb4ebf91a1ae3ac4f
44cbbe552533a5ec4faa6d4d942d9811ba78b3cb
describe
'30253' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISB' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
5e5d384bf698668d6eaa2bde57aa6ce8
993e92aa593fea94ff33f9c4529db27ccf1fbf65
describe
'2391556' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISC' 'sip-files00144.tif'
b650f60cd97d7522254d3117f26018ca
8e3aa6fbb3da3ed40a94302fd4baed3b5986e83e
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISD' 'sip-files00144.txt'
f0b6cf8d41cc2c48baf2b315303851f5
8c3fc48887b033a07fe4b79a79a21edbeef348dc
describe
'7599' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISE' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
81c4fa4b0d529024b3e008e8bdc408f3
3481e848bf195916a00b24c56501fc2a41b96873
describe
'294544' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISF' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
e9c550c96e1eb65a1d07f52fc8e4ee43
845ed729c95cf7d66cc2b42920e319c05d4f9a16
describe
'122256' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISG' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
d1a371f0e6f6061f3bf8ebdedbc2ce35
5a40e8c7a9aae49eee4c77534ec9c98fe687ca70
describe
'33847' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISH' 'sip-files00145.pro'
7fd3b0bf915c601e5fc057966b79a0d3
cc4bf54420347e82a520762a08ff78c88699ee16
describe
'38917' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISI' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
f309bf644f2d2ebb07d3578c13f647c0
ce8718aabdc75f9975c3ea8cfc296a162e7ae22c
'2011-12-30T10:58:26-05:00'
describe
'2373356' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISJ' 'sip-files00145.tif'
6a0d3eefcda9c1cc4d4855bdb7869de4
33a1d6cb3048f2634aac52b962a02a156795d9e3
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISK' 'sip-files00145.txt'
fc3f68fb35bc1f7f040530e01b3f76ba
afce0aa1a46265eed767370cd472a0aef39971de
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISL' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
cc7405e2348d2af2c772062b11b3e552
8fd553ad95494354a4d3f2d3c58ac1f1014793a9
describe
'311414' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISM' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
bf4292de5b3bc98d3bac7bb8cce9774a
676fbd2621b7dc3d17d84b656e817e8db95ff84c
describe
'127768' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISN' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
d72c04c5b0897a9ada482765b9737845
cc4f29b119fabdb57d7499f301a087a05b51d0fb
describe
'37364' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISO' 'sip-files00146.pro'
5d9b30314026adbfc7f5e74633468c3e
8fbd06916ccbbe99b66655fa13061d499e0816d3
describe
'40806' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISP' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
bff33339711291a77cd04c1f9fad8e4f
effab66b68354b348615e8586d0f63988d6b0fc4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISQ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
64b164cd2f3faddb7c90fb9b7db7c2b6
0cf8ed17f425df05b4d6f5e134b1273b820b8a56
describe
'1542' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISR' 'sip-files00146.txt'
d72f3cb08ce9603bd623076ad99e280a
7220789d7570ae8bc2adbbf5ab4d7e193430a2af
describe
'9710' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISS' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
5267351221ec74fdf0496922299e2c9c
eb7f1f073ec2af33dbfa53225e30f1cb4850846a
describe
'283592' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIST' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
cc2a0ae0b0d033b1d0db03cd11b69a64
7a9042cad48935c3e4667d49d59c49e9aaed3c4c
describe
'125519' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISU' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
558ea1ca5a11496cb06f49042eb2d5cf
b39aa1ace9da7561f4e6caa349d4db6039236d98
describe
'35308' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISV' 'sip-files00147.pro'
31c56847d8eb21de729436c090dba524
afc96692c43868b7db6f7799a3d9bbde228c8bea
describe
'41258' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISW' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
807297f84a5e44d084897645d1524b42
1953c902f6c9be04a2ed89dacbbfb343b69f8141
describe
'2285968' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISX' 'sip-files00147.tif'
5269f916ca4535bf671d8687a562501d
fcd8bd33a50a3bde86b5b10575269409314d5437
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISY' 'sip-files00147.txt'
fd08858cdc2615b47d219c5cfc0eb144
b4bff709122a8ed43ccaf1a9b572d08012a2d8a4
describe
'11007' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACISZ' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
0d70dec9e72d828f3dfeeb81e3652211
d492fd91f311f8ad2abaeb1f9205fb638e9c360b
describe
'311512' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITA' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
90c4d2d590f6df59b8b978f6306a971b
a7c36010822ea9c13023b47ae82de9a9268e1ff2
describe
'119608' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITB' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
5ea49f8e09f5b905082a6fbf524ed5e1
d6ac8645d463db4f201332ce6e411c278ee0a3f5
describe
'37073' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITC' 'sip-files00148.pro'
c0858855c8ae4edbc6fce67b809fe074
bf5d0ffb7cf00c74a957a9e1dd1d675950aa5c50
'2011-12-30T10:59:57-05:00'
describe
'38598' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITD' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
ff08e4f6a8aa10312d12517d3a819f4e
bdc6240656c9815a86c48896ee70c345a40b7077
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITE' 'sip-files00148.tif'
fd1e9c1632515bc4310b249f07520c48
2dc340ffa2d729e558c258445b1cd4b336e1013f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITF' 'sip-files00148.txt'
19de843181b3b2f99d68c265fdd4dd75
9257114ef901e0e420bcfeaaedd3f52e451521ee
describe
'9405' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITG' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
407838f225f0499d44d3059e68db0784
5a4cbc63aa7358c177ea3e7eba5a5f24f58ff8f4
describe
'285578' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITH' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
78dd2bb1b8b48ba3b2b775af6450a12c
276c21a67a9e251d5168551843d2bd264ff9d447
describe
'133120' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITI' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
9b55d62346b3c9e7eb6163600546b7d5
eae34a70eaf7df19088f78cbc72f7370a4621f23
describe
'37335' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITJ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
30f2cdf5435b34101deb6fe8e2a520c8
74cc59d6e7dc6772bcc3db161a223b746246e1d3
describe
'42107' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITK' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
971503369332633ef667d32e58d9c2aa
fd8c4206164a2443f73fb10dd2694e6ba298bdc1
describe
'2301504' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITL' 'sip-files00149.tif'
b342651396e5f7db716cfeeca9f488d9
0233218da136aa4513a5d7b8de6cfb68fd0ab78a
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITM' 'sip-files00149.txt'
c09b0f90133c33b2319374f30a654956
e131bf9d32a0017a2c3180d887f23686164bcb38
describe
'11201' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITN' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
37a5138251b2ab33be3a561ef86a7641
38946e2fa84235b78af3abfd35705e3f18c19b9c
'2011-12-30T10:55:34-05:00'
describe
'311533' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITO' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
6740269cba3a6455f24d288e62d9caaf
e3028ba1c763249a6ad911c432bab2debe0813df
describe
'129579' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITP' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
96d6604c4533508c5c657772d306d635
eb015ed682252dd1c69618b7ccee8bb05647a7ed
describe
'36149' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITQ' 'sip-files00150.pro'
3f896778ceef1401f55816bff2091126
3be0f679cb549b55d64a71bc05c4070545004bb5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITR' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
a5e67537c9ac132763a858420a1c701c
09f9508aaf3312ce7d24a3833aa96401a94b923f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITS' 'sip-files00150.tif'
1da0c59f93bd1faea84e90da4c87805b
4a270adaf24abe8c5b0b114a45e55670d09aa654
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITT' 'sip-files00150.txt'
3ce26f30e0e5437e7224679bad0e9f10
da676e91fbe30bfabc753863b0817ecc64a3fec2
describe
'9945' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITU' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
a76684f17e76766a42249a653c74c0ca
72c754b35ed48278dd3bb3433bc14713177bffed
describe
'287702' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITV' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
725774835f198b667e1f8fa530f70e4f
9284c625753c32732ebf3f7d58398a2e751e88fb
describe
'136989' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITW' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
6a66e2be39e63f3546281c0f424a8f88
aaa5dbc29df46aa2b3da7d3237ec67d986043d83
describe
'38979' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITX' 'sip-files00151.pro'
f38030e1b3bddce634bc7380c7f0b5a7
1e03a13dd3ead551ba72dd6f5a7c0f56ece3f9b2
describe
'42822' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITY' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
6944651807aa469276881d0aa1e9329d
d8be6763d7a82405c129f477f58df6af3709014a
describe
'2318980' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACITZ' 'sip-files00151.tif'
1e5821ef9a7399c9c7bfdec12c6a830e
ba5c895fe60a021aba46a90483a29b547609b753
describe
'1544' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUA' 'sip-files00151.txt'
8031299cc3f2a04d791755670423e153
1f5bc9d2af55eeddf660e722d286b9b47f651d39
describe
'10935' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUB' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
afa118242980d057e979562a9bfb092a
a775406759ba2f40a865eee90813948492cdefc9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUC' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
a46154f7325ef02e4b2e6e1069173a8b
f69f97669782b3afb14f447c62dccedbe59217bf
describe
'129992' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUD' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
6c6a11226a4e169657f2ed8cd1bb1fa8
c41e54cd805d76d6cdd90e807183d9f897eb949f
describe
'39843' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUE' 'sip-files00152.pro'
61acc4284f732d8565d1e2ebaf87ba20
5878edf559d140967312f9c5dc04226bd1052161
describe
'39929' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUF' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
40fb24a8cdc489d42e5606d2d55698a6
608c982eaf52ea8cbbe7d6a52a298e6937e1ec35
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUG' 'sip-files00152.tif'
f38ce950e2b40a66b1e522916009daee
88d766d0fc65e494587b2b68d2d807cecff75347
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUH' 'sip-files00152.txt'
4305f4bed71676ede39196f1b846ef30
69e136d006801652b1d270ca0f347ce2d90aa446
describe
'9354' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUI' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
ab177486bfff972b35ab32c312908a8c
f10ec84ec4274f90971db998015b50f6500b1ee6
describe
'295197' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUJ' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
dc03b65ede421f79ba70d2705227e28f
66fba93b8b859697810a63bf9b148214ff0c6324
describe
'141192' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUK' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
fc43b251c0548c10092ecc08aae83c33
4c5bb6c5ec2266cd01c3ca4a0e4d2deb6595be49
describe
'38587' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUL' 'sip-files00153.pro'
4d02caf00c0f4110a0029d255e37b638
b09a731b5baa52c1584d4f7a90d132f84145c8d5
describe
'45056' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUM' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
fdb42517339253a1db2f76d653427328
46c3039baa7bc017dbca6daa7bfd74758d515ce2
describe
'2379184' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUN' 'sip-files00153.tif'
602ce5b344f1204d1d2cda754b4e9020
1ac995cdaecd7b5907fc97c746f3c1c6aff43bdf
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUO' 'sip-files00153.txt'
08e374c748f819561efcac4b10e60321
e671759506ff3a299b53f81e6176fe4f5e335c7a
'2011-12-30T10:56:52-05:00'
describe
'11048' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUP' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
7e93a425a8d923a1e12a3fc845fd3f65
b1f70675b40c105b72c58c7490bf23296cac6122
describe
'311383' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUQ' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
4fac29b295e5182b8ce64dc5f602cd3c
63a99fc7d755ea93a192ea0233f1679e4ef902a8
describe
'125050' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUR' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
9371cfccefea6cb39896c548e48f84b8
b44f37a4c069eb98feca68e2c263b2ace1339b68
describe
'36204' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUS' 'sip-files00154.pro'
834e555e5c5185396e512a60efa4cccf
cc8a71dcb7ba1becc434e2ec7994dc399f1b8e06
describe
'38659' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUT' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
246aaf7f3c747794738c6ad226946aa9
cd7966080668b71f685787c58d17690382757bff
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUU' 'sip-files00154.tif'
2ada84f2175d1da545cce68a9e49b517
2857135fb40457c922337bb01c1f2ffecaa8b366
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUV' 'sip-files00154.txt'
6fafc48749b52b8ac34f5144fd2d0ab6
100c365b4af14120421a3b003202a8f269801260
describe
'9545' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUW' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
57753849ee1c3b5f50b3ba7c7d6873c6
d32ae2889b0f0ff4af341054551f843021606e85
describe
'296266' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUX' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
7bec69cb04829494267effb50da1e778
2b8cbbb047c4aa79b9ddc4460c22e46448e87299
describe
'140217' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUY' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
bee3daeffa8133da1ae4b49302e6dc69
19eb4cc96859452ba40eaecdb600dba52f725ed9
describe
'40193' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIUZ' 'sip-files00155.pro'
9a3b7ed76c10cfc394dab26d2d062a3a
36ba7f8f98e4b519cc33509ce599901ea806ad44
describe
'44932' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVA' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
59eebb893637e9401d466682ed3d5e2a
161b83bcdd7c4c371dac755b281444d1ce09a312
describe
'2386952' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVB' 'sip-files00155.tif'
0d63dce70bde882b2a6ad42ff3a3ba97
5c0594b09edf4b49b6830c11ae236bb61fb4f3b6
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVC' 'sip-files00155.txt'
1483f0da5e29cc784b8b12ee2bfdb88a
f621b1ca39059c3a32cc269e9edd6830544cf213
describe
'10486' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVD' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
94202297d908c856648f144bad15e044
3d2c6f1ea7f5d3eb1a57522eb7c6c58d83bcd2f1
'2011-12-30T10:57:30-05:00'
describe
'311255' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVE' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
b7fe0a94a371372b6ac03ad79d510c4c
31cb0d4ab18167746277f327216f54f7013e7cc6
describe
'136061' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVF' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
fa8ad29059da1e4ba40a047e01bb3ea7
d3301bf63079b368e0aca5cfeb3b549f93a02917
describe
'39795' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVG' 'sip-files00156.pro'
94c343a4730947b1acf8b70bec33968b
257946e469ad9990e4ffe79f90721a709a26bfaf
describe
'42328' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVH' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
d5a877561eac46c489f12aff6ba77713
39950deca09b373f0e929f4e86364a8caaa52105
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVI' 'sip-files00156.tif'
930c6dec4f7f6817ed0f020173069584
adcb74c0ec5f585b45aed4ca704752305dc2b78f
describe
'1661' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVJ' 'sip-files00156.txt'
8a221e01acfc6961de1bfd2c3fc28766
cb0171365d377d1fd2aa0416a5ea63ec6b00e1e6
describe
'9716' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVK' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
359fa7335c2cbdd90ce0aa782dce6487
4cb6256be0ac11cd418f25e996725eff1e2aa2bd
describe
'295070' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVL' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
df2e7159b7e4793cd11cc6cd7b82f307
2f6c8bb40f5d1191eeda6bb462ef10f4b5099e02
describe
'143669' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVM' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
bd9595f45cfafcb02d5c86b92f81c9b7
94912eb888e4f49862ac5a3c33afd097018614ce
'2011-12-30T10:57:56-05:00'
describe
'39465' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVN' 'sip-files00157.pro'
c0be5685928115bb6d80d6a20c34db9f
fc978e7772f17576cd475fb0418edef621a51533
describe
'45439' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVO' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
d61f8872696e7f51f7508e2c4d988c81
d05dabacc583c006ef45e8aba9f6a7b794825fc5
describe
'2377964' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVP' 'sip-files00157.tif'
199fc7ff6b8a6f54ef15b741e9d25646
3a7bbe0b5e2cc05e2d4d33094f3ed396dc40c3e6
describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVQ' 'sip-files00157.txt'
222ce7edcc3ae22ed03f68f250deb0a7
734f96831442e4ce5b520f3660e31cad36e198f3
describe
'10946' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVR' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
535dc75798014fe156038d6decd9fc6d
aac44d0217705482d9e6b9584a7dc4c00c14e360
describe
'288706' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVS' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
afff8567520d900b3ba0b75246184412
9600c0870f4d7b7ed39a96441ea5a562bec99e2f
describe
'141036' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVT' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
2950ea939b0b06e54e4b990cdc55fad7
00642c9270176c745c7086d81cab6707f9a76884
describe
'37780' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVU' 'sip-files00158.pro'
62bb7b6c3ea804befea01c0cfb154bc9
be0df50a150150bb75d5de920a89d20cbcd31d91
describe
'45951' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVV' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
31833783068ee0b5b3ec9b46615673a0
a58890c19217893f6d9b19f851097ee651720ee4
describe
'2326744' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVW' 'sip-files00158.tif'
b381000f80790d9f8d59ceccab79a559
82d5170d75e0b6582f08b4d40c10b1a9113b7af2
describe
'1563' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVX' 'sip-files00158.txt'
3c9807d85af13631919986b8b44dd777
3cc95200b53e06dae63a19f31550176626a02dae
describe
'11266' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVY' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
2e896e30268cb76e42e0b908de612c71
208d352cd3e46701b135f097151c98a6bc615e9f
describe
'282715' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIVZ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
c3a3d923cf70d7ee9edd408c9881cad3
52ded2c62a202961abed875d9536f38cc078a7df
describe
'113917' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWA' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
33f07f827f944c062eab83d9bffaddd3
f847a0289af8193f729d659f62dcb3a7583f86fa
describe
'29703' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWB' 'sip-files00159.pro'
1977cf72993ed6b63132ba8daea9beeb
a6f60031ed4a9025b1e6d61cc3ad667ed6fc730b
describe
'36785' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWC' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
85218d13835de35ea2aaa899eb34a8cf
37d652976bed08c48a4dfc998a248138669d2951
describe
'2278976' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWD' 'sip-files00159.tif'
23aff96c017bccdaf2c582a19b60c177
64c97902ee13dc0afd8d5f1b4b411bfee8f529b1
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWE' 'sip-files00159.txt'
f73b4c1d0434a4aecc9acb647025bb1b
d0bae98e0c73f3173142e0f46cdc525593cfe991
describe
'9973' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWF' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
115a3471db1e151be80f965bf1a38fbf
2f4e6676458e6d0b254d2ff93cb6b43e64871ac8
'2011-12-30T10:55:46-05:00'
describe
'311543' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWG' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
80fee58ad57138112b8d17d2de401622
37706ca3e888845bbdb0a8d74505b0259afbc06f
describe
'114053' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWH' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
3a6271ab29d3bc564af285cd73b42f87
2234ef3e549fddcfa21526dfc08efecdf6107ac8
describe
'32169' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWI' 'sip-files00160.pro'
ca4131df3426507acb8cef6319225309
70d03347521ec9aab576e3368b62b578df1e74fc
describe
'35894' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWJ' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
52d31d33d9a8078a0b8970e3a2d4a0ab
8f1e0c09a3f98e2d0e030019256616a652573ca7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWK' 'sip-files00160.tif'
864cf4e805df4018dcfb38c619a99a4b
244fab2302a045cd17ea51c1909481f333e9cc1d
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWL' 'sip-files00160.txt'
fa536700c8d37920ee7a935c1dc5729e
eeb8f131c45cb5bb74a64e3c1eb8a24ffdac23ac
describe
'8812' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWM' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
56488d7017c4bfc98945e36c1bdda819
24e6387ee4a77a074e5c18e9039cc355fe5b43a0
describe
'286982' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWN' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
a76141a5df2d2d7502660367548b8506
ddd86768e98d18d2075d4effad041ab843edb351
describe
'133677' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWO' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
4a3e2aff6f71bc8af9f5dbae3026cb0f
9d83d8a1e1695f765b6b0b5b3700eb2b63dc756e
describe
'35697' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWP' 'sip-files00161.pro'
7703b6f008fe272c89ad89d363c7c7a2
cccb242e0f3bb5021fc268a848308d962f0a3bf2
describe
'43460' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWQ' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
526e0b1ce0813dc4fbe3532689c2e580
43bde86647f718fbe82489395e17be0627651e93
describe
'2313156' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWR' 'sip-files00161.tif'
dedce68552a7dfce02e9319aed84f41c
0d829c97d055f42eb1bfbe142ec8a37098603bf7
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWS' 'sip-files00161.txt'
c26448816b49cd16e8a20dd638b87398
fe88e67a01e7d5648d75dd4185217fad0077fe67
describe
'11191' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWT' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
9c932fa88d76fca0f74e0faa977873be
2549fc98f4dce025d746bc8669d30bb74dbf60eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWU' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
4b70b5685f42aef2187f6af02699e76c
b359ab38181136d4db849c7fa68fd1bd1a3f612e
describe
'128656' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWV' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
c1b7b3932736d0d2c05c0393e4e521e6
f5d2502d7af9ade7967c15d497219aad0ce7d60f
describe
'37639' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWW' 'sip-files00162.pro'
8ce091a00d62fd6f21794a3dfbdbe895
f3fbf1c268e8a324d8f159e57ac0551b51249a33
describe
'40127' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWX' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
07f3e8599a4327d0c428264cb862842e
3e0140d4c018e17b76390f36eb436dcf14900bdd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWY' 'sip-files00162.tif'
a1e720ad432a3a18ede5cded52e8d290
352fcc8481458400ba14556b62e87c2ee210d88d
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIWZ' 'sip-files00162.txt'
5383eeb08ee5afa4913deed4156e4dd5
016003c998c5a5119f596d0608540c810c421de8
describe
'9862' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXA' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
52c489ff81b32ee37d8d2f2b5cc756a1
55f5c32859cdd350f0c06b3ddd74b0564aa3d6db
describe
'295271' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXB' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
e3c38758c1dfd1f91dd476c8f40385d3
9a96dfe999c87ab492d3f92fad225a838efdb13c
describe
'134012' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXC' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
a129ea96e88018a6dacbdab4f0749167
7ce93c01c1c8e58790553337ae3f4d2d05de6b27
describe
'36823' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXD' 'sip-files00163.pro'
c974a34f85e80e13dc8cb165b959e111
2f029b0bb667da26cb3269cbf2ccc86b6ebb0924
describe
'43398' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXE' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
b2f956b41bd431c78f2f5ccf5c7ec8da
46f47e2813728c42b94fd9e4907b747a23ed34d6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXF' 'sip-files00163.tif'
51f3e3eebead1ae6f3ced4cb866db6c4
c80f302fd878745a58799b8e4884ed6f61e68f54
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXG' 'sip-files00163.txt'
e3b3551cf313731237e0cd20a820d58c
e237efe275c09f326037dc11e9651e9d88c07d67
describe
'10545' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXH' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
f25052fa4889bf29961f828ba4347235
b75940a751e66f8727cdd971990f4e467c7eeb21
describe
'298650' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXI' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
c8477dd0deb3881b3ec826ff3b582786
a241b2ffc11760af44a38b7cf90a83f226df07cc
describe
'130585' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXJ' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
d8f939014810cc4a7202ae1fb334563a
7dd5e18b04954a9b2797cae62ca9ba948f15df6e
describe
'34732' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXK' 'sip-files00164.pro'
062a10ed28b660d669a528e4e6ad9208
8a6e9e0ac3549b8a945da1e282b243ec7da0a67b
describe
'42527' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXL' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
ca6d4a36ed26ca80a6933c3e5360fd8b
b3089bdfee6b0c14b4fd50302277fb2c701d21cd
describe
'2406372' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXM' 'sip-files00164.tif'
f6249e92ec7cf302456508695279b966
d56ed7345b0e72357b296f30ce4577ec352cab3c
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXN' 'sip-files00164.txt'
0f2362e863a14d34c00c4b9bc840474d
a5c3bccbc343e6ee6697cbfcde03b434c3fdf4a9
describe
'10234' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXO' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
96789812573c0a5a99feda64b2d1a165
9a72202dff5f1bf7fe51c2bc29470595714a76a2
describe
'296014' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXP' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
797ecf6ba7838a87ed2a7bc3cc6142bf
0281b117fcafbda2b7946faac27ee56e705dbd87
describe
'130317' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXQ' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
bc783bcde040680a951db55204190178
395c8ad47319306af02be6aaad4126820cd69833
describe
'34097' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXR' 'sip-files00165.pro'
3b7bafae2aa21696c1f1aaabd7ec61d4
9a4c77061f8972949af8193367a449296e27435c
describe
'41094' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXS' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
ef91ad2b48016277f4ce6bd3704f2920
eb12da0db0aadbabec329cb886d7b9e2ca6c32c4
describe
'2385008' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXT' 'sip-files00165.tif'
d486e1c7e29d8bca02a0f3c605d5813c
714a855ec83a82b5af1fbb1f3334c10443553cd2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXU' 'sip-files00165.txt'
5b6a31dfc4c646669df07b88f1755de1
5a2cceedbe1783a2e5e433721b004d09087c346a
describe
'10080' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXV' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
74efd50cb7223940991252b14717aa06
f3e630dc88231ba009d328bce9299814b07bd47e
describe
'311557' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXW' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
40966fa92dee8f818626d6362ed20a59
9c806b6add6169f041b17a5f787e6b71d65f637d
describe
'129531' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXX' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
44a845153d695149e11c25c6ee1a2ff7
7aea4f0659ada124da8ba1122fca93e776fd6d7b
describe
'37186' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXY' 'sip-files00166.pro'
aca631580b4082b661578fdb2d4454e4
a96d85c732ff9ddcede6cf9c015d2f86b93d5695
describe
'40232' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIXZ' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
ddc57bc1865c234eeff947776a74a7ef
3fce2ee222081cf84c236c44a00c01238388ef4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYA' 'sip-files00166.tif'
2d598d6b020fc40a87bd10469984cd61
7eca939281c58bfd35c20df1df2d642bba8db1b9
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYB' 'sip-files00166.txt'
ac67a3a4c2a77e6dceb23739d8c613d1
652e206f86679c0d249473d48188a2181ec0002b
describe
'9981' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYC' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
8a1c30bdbf2520d84709991734fa1168
9f57523c5d956825b33c3c268e86608612a8060b
describe
'287962' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYD' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
f0e99b317c30c21028f23a0c1d916798
b54a19ca8221e88e8fa32306de22b7bda7dc4747
describe
'133036' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYE' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
d4885aa7e2089210787dee51dcad5bf0
9d3a4777af9b410ffba7f2769b207fdb2904b262
describe
'35519' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYF' 'sip-files00167.pro'
5a50a3cd11b35afb058fb9dda6c3fca0
dabc693f916500697d5d06235f735d1a401140e4
describe
'41923' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYG' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
dd887fbd8a00cd0c7c4ba6360ac05a32
21423963bcdae8acb0db3e6a7299f405040b951d
describe
'2320924' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYH' 'sip-files00167.tif'
abb9931b8f7b2fc2775c5828f3b4cd00
6ab9dadd7f9727ff92b88d5fd9a337e3f64e4a1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYI' 'sip-files00167.txt'
c14af15dc1a3efb0a2c85c738d8f8c7b
e788a60581dc40b58988623eedb025bf75b8d118
describe
'10879' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYJ' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
95710d30544de89095f3b98cba2a09ac
bb45566440e45605e2b6e06c8fbfff5dfe8f7480
describe
'287990' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYK' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
0f2cf81b05d65f55e6849bc13588641b
f27fda955a1ded46488e5b9f082a8686165a92ee
describe
'139195' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYL' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
a4ba8ebc9477cca61ae9f12f8c26b352
9631b529b9696f78d9d2ca4f443f56b892afb257
describe
'39458' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYM' 'sip-files00168.pro'
e6ceb85f07b3d1402b502d1bc12dd135
ad156a0f8dae7738ca567896edd005313f5564d0
describe
'44724' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYN' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
938ffcbe23541bbcdc22e5fc8779dc68
5a64ab012ea3bf9d6cb2a51323e99dd060e2f8cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYO' 'sip-files00168.tif'
e1c8fcdc93c71d977a8d9f3c9d2e40fc
544f7bc3476968bd5c2f5877a3a2be6093f0aea8
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYP' 'sip-files00168.txt'
ecaf1fa90e82728fd7b495034bf44ef7
93d664af4b7200091bc997280c17e4c2cc0f6516
describe
'11368' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYQ' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
ab9b7f6b1da86346f16115566686ad01
e4084828458b2b498e1e81cbf3d2d185a0218d23
describe
'287895' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYR' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
45a3c360161f83bc29ff649bf2b590ac
e603bd7976106eadb675b123ab10b264c681c8dc
describe
'134784' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYS' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
4f0c14cbfe66a9466fa15ea409345107
8bddbf6fd39302656cd4e2285f54940c3c6ca4d7
'2011-12-30T10:59:54-05:00'
describe
'37331' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYT' 'sip-files00169.pro'
6381b174d5cbb70d88e30deb63a163df
1bee17155040df0ba688dbf1738267fd9f628c6f
describe
'42007' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYU' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
53fc3f8f819b9e0f48e953cb066d3875
a2d903860a1b5bafbc915513f44b9d49b57e03ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYV' 'sip-files00169.tif'
317747968b14154194be2b84ce69129a
9cc5ce7d88db3f57a8455e385f7ea712a5f019ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYW' 'sip-files00169.txt'
d81f08adecf3cfcccf24128ab91bd307
6a4a58965470564d36115a47b935788920f58e35
describe
'11394' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYX' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
1a9c37fd18eef7ae3db1fafd52b272ca
d423ad3cd245c30dede5a088e7ca187d46d97051
describe
'287850' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYY' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
0ebf13b23abcf225a987961707a60f19
9ee1a52a8efc875df121e5d2f343f311554d6f0e
describe
'135863' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIYZ' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
c8bf2a8098e2758060f0c0f59f181bd4
6c1002c8a7a4e602ebeffd6c4546e051e5f3e826
describe
'37497' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZA' 'sip-files00170.pro'
4f27f3c92de5f5ff2bc5388e26e0e1b5
0a856cee8ee76625ad5f8d06aa7d57748a31a760
'2011-12-30T10:56:15-05:00'
describe
'41874' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZB' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
03adafdc2f4e3a15a389891c6867606b
19dcd13dd14774a0df390bccf8b9a722df12352e
describe
'2319736' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZC' 'sip-files00170.tif'
7393fc61b6aaf2c1701a94e91fb1c19b
b718d90696d7890c3e9123f9878a94d150e8e0e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZD' 'sip-files00170.txt'
509ea3f0d87ab6c79a5ef6695542d124
91e052cc8ac7295cd5b92694cba2cffb8ee116f5
describe
'10876' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZE' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
b83d6ed2034c5c4413c23bcf5296aaf4
05f26cdf6866aa0935c88b357e4fd5c16bb33d22
describe
'288227' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZF' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
ad7fbb79baa323bd2e9b567c98ea17bb
0e249234e2bff303a9f3c9bee0738cc3161e014a
describe
'138296' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZG' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
b9ab33d402f18479b7916bb967f5795f
67d902c24ef5182aae34c0881647be5c904be45f
describe
'38707' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZH' 'sip-files00171.pro'
2e1f3f7687495b00a628fa11c4d3e603
0fe48dd25586d583fc03eb53bd5e1c80554f14af
describe
'42667' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZI' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
53c0d147d7aac7aa28276fd5e91f7dce
f8bdae74349eb6997a8221a9907b9ecc4bfe162c
'2011-12-30T11:00:47-05:00'
describe
'2322864' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZJ' 'sip-files00171.tif'
859f410eaddaee8a76063704e327c222
71fe2a62c77cf7768d6a2c80053ab81971a382cc
describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZK' 'sip-files00171.txt'
e3460706c92145a64b50e379c371a242
3623af8cce39405fcae1c3ffe18b8b189137fbc7
describe
'10925' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZL' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
842d5fc590d19ed132ab3e9181384758
a1536759e07ec8978421d1f45bc0d2dfaad85a5b
describe
'288239' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZM' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
039c2d5441bdf83b146abcf65b391fe2
eb6d8d234af16cee573b189286d1f6fe9156eb99
describe
'125340' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZN' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
f63c0932f10b383d9ae28fc2fb99a37f
38d142b08547c4eb744792b8c2c7b343eac09191
describe
'32865' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZO' 'sip-files00172.pro'
de1e9ac98b6b448431a91dc858b66437
47f4e3cf8db52dbc72814770b820601fb953ee97
describe
'40049' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZP' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
220aa14ce84d94b405b304884e825b79
fe4c6adbbf23b69498295d13026bf0496e028b06
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZQ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
1579275f5831a3fbaa9c0b98b294fd49
db8e17dee0012253d972955cfe7723db74a93c1a
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZR' 'sip-files00172.txt'
b42f9738b160fbdde8fb1c0d4da24470
4fc9108498ff2402a4ca7d4722a620f18a5e4521
describe
'10077' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZS' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
ba308947c6d3ca51cfb7107227a5f236
ca5731185d04d4523a12cb944d08a99f1cdccd1b
describe
'288149' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZT' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
90cfba5fff52cab6d60754cb9d8a7209
aff54495bed525c0bee50e68f2e3395b8083dfc2
describe
'139155' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZU' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
e87f24a3970e737028550c38a262a5c1
3638c437202f540ef39afc32735df4d60f624048
describe
'38304' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZV' 'sip-files00173.pro'
58dcfbbd423a5c03aedf926724dedd41
a2cd6ef26fad070386cb1b193f21c3b5cb225381
describe
'45191' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZW' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
a5015863d31eb97592519b745c04f9c1
31b42bae8a0fab633e4d9673f60ed6942e56483a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZX' 'sip-files00173.tif'
92db0a6a30c2d3e0f309c77cd4426028
c2bcfe2959b09478e9675a0eb11d96bd9d63cac1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZY' 'sip-files00173.txt'
6b4e28c1b71d590f3af1126edd4a2c25
d265804b6e20deb9d28e22b7c903d84b48688728
describe
'10834' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACIZZ' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
7f4aff7b913b4e6d25b79d4d701d77c4
8be526f13a43691b8fae52e82a8db778e1ddde92
describe
'287929' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAA' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
c5042b7e697d5f850ce2bd2615c93186
9930fe98b35b302ed092759f6702ee8461eff1e8
describe
'146791' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAB' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
38e602a79c6910f9f5ea2864a8327519
f1c80c39307de4043d34672bfeb1dd0033132599
describe
'41624' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAC' 'sip-files00174.pro'
eed1079afe4caefe27d9116640ec2045
8dd5d836eedc742a6740a1ec25905305841d7bdf
describe
'46743' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAD' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
5c326535a5c92666c4e29ad90e97f74f
b3502c2dfc440d017b6ab5f3cf9754b46d9a1756
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAE' 'sip-files00174.tif'
25836196f991a2180cd8137c2d6f6941
2611c591d33f20add0d230cb540c20dd93153d7c
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAF' 'sip-files00174.txt'
18bd2bf3f5b2483d8674c26a8b582723
0d7aea5455185d00cbe23b057fc1ab95f111460d
describe
'11588' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAG' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
990e28edeccff39c6ee498ac78ac78e8
1d2b0fdf67b61c128e0ab23cb3e47a8fcc1eeb6a
describe
'287906' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAH' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
307166a8c6edf7735f2c318ecd6e1fa6
911dd4994ac25b1a3e968df74654ed921f429f46
describe
'129011' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAI' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
9c204293c8fcc6d373afabb906c7db3b
dca281d414bdff08f0758f7c8466b98224ceed4f
describe
'35363' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAJ' 'sip-files00175.pro'
cf3cb86a771147f469bb530db81020db
2a8a5928796ba15b2e4f9cb55fcd6bd6cf362d90
describe
'41123' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAK' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
55fa4a5554ff17f8baf49d9cac4b5187
272cb77b549304c2b687066505f2aae10cb208af
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAL' 'sip-files00175.tif'
a0c02b61c8e871cc51c97e606627aa76
4235d2e497eadcfdfb0baf9e8afb5602adaa2367
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAM' 'sip-files00175.txt'
a4a354a731056a7dc286ab0e73bc01e2
e286623622a1a7cb5cee078999e58766bb568a0f
describe
'10329' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAN' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
7cdbd4035af4f2947d75920d2fd37ae1
2c2f12bda7913d8cda6c55590671b0b7d31edeb1
describe
'287864' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAO' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
843021ad091c3b6ca2eff7b278f6de23
00f4cde48947269a8814143b9a6586e1212677b7
describe
'121105' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAP' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
2fecf5113118dbe1a71997a55ba0ec75
e5c6cff88df4fc9fe96fb7fc9e0e183332e30732
describe
'33047' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAQ' 'sip-files00176.pro'
c8f01bfb8278d3406ba354b44a5bbaac
80e8e0fb807b4a2c645b3ff1740b4e100d1fba1a
describe
'38089' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAR' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
05838f3923108acc5af3d1f38990d6ea
eaf686b6999e65d90adb59f95e4e21a8b1dd0f0c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAS' 'sip-files00176.tif'
c69d205126a1d75854fe3f0529935f89
0db70f35ba990e3321053c82271c6a3123f95a51
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAT' 'sip-files00176.txt'
28dfec2a66e1e9f6d3131e8485aae45b
bbeb966694c1720ad9b803a7899cf358a528c59b
describe
'9841' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAU' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
b4c795392c6e6bb67fcb622789c9eb36
367d4a4ac3441967b0a1dd4b3b30d7df9432cac5
describe
'288244' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAV' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
1fa546013ed32c814c840d0c4086d1be
28a3ec1a8db845f05fc95b07af4deb1628e5b44d
describe
'138806' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAW' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
663cf9e60fb860667e948c5ecddbab31
8e46b89aaa847dbc81284899ce1e4a316565cf0d
describe
'39107' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAX' 'sip-files00177.pro'
54ba8a82f2a684d526dabc4dce81cc72
6143bb4abf333c37218cc514037f6c449e9280d1
describe
'44067' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAY' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
89f97c7394c7c195b05b793d76dfdd1f
6f05f930cb4047b3f191381c2d68f8b9e182817e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJAZ' 'sip-files00177.tif'
841957d364c05c0557156fcee4fa81ac
3a8d32bf3dea706d6e62f40c6fa509880e7e193f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBA' 'sip-files00177.txt'
6d1d05ff83c406630f2ded34b4152c48
763634c950eeb492a943a4c3930e6b94d36638b1
describe
'11207' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBB' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
8c141a0fba834efec1ab2a3c1def98dd
b5045c7bbcfab1559c0e33deb542314bb0963268
describe
'288085' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBC' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
8b894667ea6d3ebcdd44984581599ff3
dee534db953f7f19ded9b4b6124cd625d0907de8
describe
'135610' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBD' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
c25361c5d936de89ac1d322d97b8ea6f
cc1a3635001f9ae0b09e0af65cbefe4420a3d86b
describe
'36129' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBE' 'sip-files00178.pro'
13af72fc7f0a23a75ace450a3db93e98
33c0d3c321feca99cf10c68f82869974039bbe6b
describe
'43233' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBF' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
f32aea42dc19dc8237865e3af6070121
3209815b74d930b54b96e0a634f72c09047746bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBG' 'sip-files00178.tif'
b9bed05842d7e05cd3df98d99da2256a
5bd4b6e01eb9e159b740784c7897c05d6c17f425
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBH' 'sip-files00178.txt'
f88d42dae4c2f7cab7ff337fc2c159f9
a5b7abf2b72625cd4dbcc750ed59902f754343d3
describe
'10950' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBI' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
14a1fa809ce3756051fa5066ede79025
57e1ccbb94da7855ca04a384b267629ff88dfd50
describe
'288007' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBJ' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
841d888c2ff9cc86ff358efcb2d4cc66
165a12deebb77bb1fe19d3d853ab9e4e4e532956
describe
'142907' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBK' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
d2008384f8118d61f5e89e26e8d22de9
34b8ce1a2d8373b386339abbaec5b9d434de6647
describe
'40281' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBL' 'sip-files00179.pro'
3b69e5ba1aee89272a840d789a47b5c8
fd13bdcaf13fdbd1eee43b42f2a3a08a7c1298f3
describe
'45651' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBM' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
12aee6e23fb29cc26f148ee85ce3bac2
860b7e7cd7bb4fbb1b4b45d0d4fab381ff13b63b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBN' 'sip-files00179.tif'
8f22fe8d19dc3b4f077d1660b9033ae3
0ed73f7fba306780ce245e31304d8d03afb8ee01
describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBO' 'sip-files00179.txt'
67dc6e64360057f62c28a546578db048
bc2bd77045fe06d80d3b5160e42666324a74234a
describe
'11233' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBP' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
696ebcf1a3005e35d8d459abb647efcc
4e7a4fb2d416575e574afaa42aabdb09265aa25c
describe
'288065' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBQ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
30a159ccc67e8e8534348917cbc92f9a
6e0d11e90fdb6bf819aa41b9d54803818bfad67a
describe
'139998' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBR' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
c1d5dbba1c704643da234fa19256b106
ac84911ea69f3964e2dabc197741d36d45e05e10
describe
'40545' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBS' 'sip-files00180.pro'
8a3a5da64d8a2f068b58934285fb43e2
e000152e89bd182f2d5160df79dcada15de30f46
describe
'45447' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBT' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
e78f9e97c5dcf3b7ed4fe26bd882172d
975cbbcf59e11666c5a548bf4917e85f5080ec62
describe
'2321680' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBU' 'sip-files00180.tif'
b746b97b93346507700d8e6bb01a5c08
ec81fd8318d396c4464083f76915c9ad0fa40011
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBV' 'sip-files00180.txt'
8ce68fceded9c47d920d3abd3a8aea7f
e8fcd05d2a58b092959c2f25605c4d917a430061
describe
'11601' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBW' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
ef17ab04cbf29ee527a865e36bc47f06
86cb49146189f7e67a92071ad1008cd74a27e356
describe
'288145' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBX' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
bd6d83d21ce08233f52c22c699f53ecd
91e6966a9ff03feedcc7a24a95490017087b6c4d
describe
'135500' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBY' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
5fbda74fd66a8a48fc2353416dec47eb
e49a76fa648e112288cf45a0ed31b4b65d783ccc
describe
'36296' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJBZ' 'sip-files00181.pro'
68fa2bc258ecdcee7328dc85c833811c
45fc10a645bc55d88c544b3ddf30de215ab80a94
describe
'41792' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCA' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
d85dff34786174edb36861ca2575f72e
753a135519f6184fa4d21aa1bd1b59cfe808a936
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCB' 'sip-files00181.tif'
cb3b68c05bfc82ea9c68758f3664f30a
7d3e1db37dfbb7e8d80b79419e9151ab7584dee5
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCC' 'sip-files00181.txt'
8ad37c766054662fdb2367bccb3634f7
3a9509491ddc9fcd186f613df0204b695d9b1a16
describe
'11005' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCD' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
412e50e5b4a90687385a8347f2c3b237
6b9dbd773f5455fc77c19e88b8a8b42042482bad
describe
'288077' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCE' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
bbf7886b2f0a3f19b869ff2e5ae6f286
cf138faeed4644ef5da28f2513c9a07fc2375509
describe
'137010' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCF' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
896cbed77396a23f5996de6efb343072
4f8e7a94054452450177e074ab8d78247eefb52e
describe
'35707' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCG' 'sip-files00182.pro'
6f39ef8fd48055898b68fa5a77638538
4e8aa786cabb9a93a2f27e3616af1ed5eac36737
describe
'43339' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCH' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
318056f08acb4c0e8421d2a3d74daabd
74d9142415ee8fbab8da87978ddced148eb5dc2e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCI' 'sip-files00182.tif'
db60509a7d114ca3b1e99902f8d2180e
4e9ce473d73ad3e93b1f7b289e95bc9203c0b122
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCJ' 'sip-files00182.txt'
7e985d776276961ff5e717a1936c6c6e
1e5cf3e32bd70c00a2e5527172edeeeb16c976ba
describe
'11223' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCK' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
cfb7a07d7e46944719305fdd0739a200
f059e69b7bdc97371511d8dafa6daace43ce2cad
describe
'287965' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCL' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
65a9f5f3b2c6fa21efb6dbcfec000b78
1b65fc397f72252eb85bf58b8f6edbae6bf0ba35
describe
'137309' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCM' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
f217ecf26b9127988d5b754efd3ca9c7
9dcbc80ec1bf9c47e98519a62e38a26c8ad92a16
describe
'39236' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCN' 'sip-files00183.pro'
680ee62bf90d47748d1ea99e5982b11e
85059f677bf2c438d65c551e6d4b16f73b073313
describe
'44081' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCO' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
16c506396fe43205cf617d4884b69586
d73032e55a4e5663cd931ff1df6b0dca462f5547
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCP' 'sip-files00183.tif'
aa96cd3e794cc265e45af22ea02f09d2
78adbbbd9e803c85e851986c1ecccedd3a945c2e
describe
'1559' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCQ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
2587738f7a503b1d5aae470a9e79e560
c945f245ebe0418a9ee09194afba1f5292627052
describe
'11036' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCR' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
b31940bc618b6d4db19c59fc071a6d1a
62036092f290eaff9f698dbce8469d2186a40e45
describe
'288229' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCS' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
74590bc05cd57139992f9e6aa230a080
0e01dc97c880e9fe4d642e88bf0c0443aea81b00
describe
'132804' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCT' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
4fbbe0bf4de8560ac9823a07142390d2
1651a564ecdc135be1e18cc0219d106f6fc1aba8
describe
'36040' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCU' 'sip-files00184.pro'
7d89e59e859c65863aab8e03b14e9b77
6cf1e3e69e4cb19d07cea611ab37f6deb9395d08
describe
'42728' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCV' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
f6105829b86ee6214564fd08b4376c3d
239cec95629cc43448d62e0d91ca30ea8c61f4c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCW' 'sip-files00184.tif'
bbd69ff916f6847b247b0130af5e4080
5e6cf27f12279db3c0ea7cbed5cb37b6e3ba7148
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCX' 'sip-files00184.txt'
67ad78d11f12aa8a3e70cb90bb090836
5bd6cdcc03ad2f331b43f885cf8a4b6b444a9eb6
describe
'10819' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCY' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
9cd0e2295bc37b71f1b3b1dec3a5781f
6c77a4e4c5f4f3962d0a7abf540c4d86fc0ffd4b
describe
'287771' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJCZ' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
3c1202eb6ae1ea2f33db4f76f5988519
076b7615ede58a23989ca60f1c7000e78f2548c8
describe
'138647' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDA' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
0968ded59b1e85268e10393cd3401559
79e6308abb130a0c97ee5abeaf2ac095b573b37b
describe
'37261' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDB' 'sip-files00185.pro'
e9ae4a15a9ba9dfd5187f89f377bea9b
46612f36bebb8f1888d0be81566362d8db49c68e
describe
'45011' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDC' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
1491559822ad5df207cc5ddff551594a
51f9797f2ac02e705292f6bdad1616fe4fadb7bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDD' 'sip-files00185.tif'
ac61a8b46e1fae5ca45073e21cf1de28
e5c8acc0e1dda50a3be1818b5d6031f72bd4e251
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDE' 'sip-files00185.txt'
cb01b35791ebc42fce609fbec940a2a7
8cc9a021651751db16ba0845dc7c1c35abff2838
describe
'11424' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDF' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
3c80e2cc5e064bbb7171373e5c1b90af
a5872403ad0c4dc99a09195598fbcd42165b5dfe
describe
'288248' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDG' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
7cb09a0fbef8ab70f58f460a318ac7ae
cee9283af29bea0e2dbec7e895450c722ed6870c
describe
'144782' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDH' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
8cf610b2399061f468a74aea64118076
1bb83867aaca75009d7a5602f07ab4507340c241
describe
'38788' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDI' 'sip-files00186.pro'
9fb99596df3d753e50003836f8f2a8e7
57c545b3cca1374874beab258872d044aff15648
describe
'46315' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDJ' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
42945332e923e0e7a3f56a938afa8c8d
7857ee456f29715f33ab58e71b6a96779f13cd4c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDK' 'sip-files00186.tif'
70284ae50435436756de46eb13aca2ae
dd77699b57c46f8519c93df39e34a5b9e4692abb
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDL' 'sip-files00186.txt'
3a074cb008c6fadfa30a3e0d77ae7b20
b2730b13df1fd05a9b04c7dab5c0002e4f6605f2
describe
'11868' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDM' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
a2e89b816d90f94b9eea640362f57134
8c9a09ff72d4a9fecd6a412994b650e04f690596
describe
'287655' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDN' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
8d3a91f09d8a66202d21910f950dbb94
04ab35c3f8116c2a49a806e24cf40e6085393531
describe
'134691' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDO' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
eea05de9fa75d964fbda13e548cdc8f9
d85586420f498362b3dacf857b98da32a68b7028
describe
'36280' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDP' 'sip-files00187.pro'
c60e38bde7796f4cbe6eb65c3f76a8a6
2c7de567afe90fedc0ba770f6720d52b9c869882
describe
'44129' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDQ' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
f555c9043163b21b72131c2ecdf48bf2
3db70bcf86b57271e8e775380d3daaaafc99dcfd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDR' 'sip-files00187.tif'
d2ee7f1b3ea466b353381750b7932b70
782cf4ab93feaa5bebc46a9ffbc9759f1aeb24c7
describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDS' 'sip-files00187.txt'
f7c62212dec2718ceab164ae547a3363
a8c33c9eb3783ef958c6fc7a12b145fe655e23b8
describe
'11773' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDT' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
669c520050afc208495b5c0ace866da5
7b3477d857f81e63a0d55104541f638ee2d4d519
describe
'288231' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDU' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
d441e935cf4c26263af45e6f4a893d59
5ac19722eab2a021f67f6e331fa755443ada61ba
describe
'140708' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDV' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
2bfe283a90a8b668803cee53514ff102
da90bf9dec9f7cf6369b9492c87ff1ac014e933b
describe
'38058' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDW' 'sip-files00188.pro'
48cec1d080b65f4c0793c9158da136c1
edcf3641ee44c857081c74c165cb8b9af2c1efa7
describe
'44720' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDX' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
bccf6aea0510f536cd9d16e4461b87b1
85abb5861b07929f542605acc37f0c01ab0f2c47
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDY' 'sip-files00188.tif'
c9175dd7b01cd08ffe839068612e2e8f
767ac0f21f9fc0b57b496a9a682f9e6b829bbbb8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJDZ' 'sip-files00188.txt'
ecde7705d537677c41ad6e610a662d7e
f9583949670b58c9dbd75e0bbe15bac7e2b6162b
describe
'11235' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEA' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
e598e55e615d66f76f90869a41261dd1
e7777fa0e42f3e8f48e4a463f65e415d61affb40
describe
'287992' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEB' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
c8c4d142f53d44253a6f89aca448c1c6
36167ab6ddb4a2ca121590a4ef82276622eb52a9
describe
'142142' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEC' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
ec3ff9dfae6764bc8c139264e15d8369
65fee714b21ae92292147d36c3818491756ca5a2
describe
'37507' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJED' 'sip-files00189.pro'
8ed86e5ecc8288fbdf91e26a5b35fd5f
8895ab1c63a9d13e579f4bda6719f60a1049ac5e
describe
'44270' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEE' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
d418dff4f9ca78bc0886ef65d8ffca2b
9ffaaf14bf219acd52469ae1a35f1b02399ce4f4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEF' 'sip-files00189.tif'
d5aff98c2e8b4b6b031051d99467bafd
6896e3a1c90c9579849d1da6c8ae055fd9f9823c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEG' 'sip-files00189.txt'
fc5f3993edbea006d975fc49156d1c38
8bf20cb4fe3a915b3ebad62e47fc5c70912bad63
describe
'11318' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEH' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
4f0b831756d576d354ecfdd15d1aae31
2627e07b4cc4fd1a63d4721051c0e15157af1d39
describe
'287959' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEI' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
3b76366be4fb9e96dae8914ed408a447
420c86000ad51f0f313e445b60ce1dbfb3f7df8a
describe
'116911' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEJ' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
f8ba15df5dc2429e3a1f9b501f4fbdd1
b50814f38790fc60a25b265f7b1c7e7cd946b8d6
describe
'29764' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEK' 'sip-files00190.pro'
fb2ad2ecb9aef491306f88cb36b47659
fcfe877f7c4affd3b2ab67fee14d4dd38c014bd0
describe
'34973' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEL' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
507d34cb539bc67e8f9a7f18d2e2c8c1
d882fe5e79c73c33f4f27839fa187945c8e29b34
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEM' 'sip-files00190.tif'
28813a71de4e584438dc18fc544a3fb0
f972df12eb120f970f22e9af9e803a3296bf31c5
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEN' 'sip-files00190.txt'
ee4aeda5ddadb833205468995f04a1c4
4a598b66c7d3740e2e5624db73a08f6d5e078cdf
describe
'9337' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEO' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
db0805c1ca4e1fc66571bcbfcedd064e
b314768198fd6c74d699e5b6e529acf3e3bad7ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEP' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
84f5569ab0c3ffd17f96cfd8e220594a
e05eb919d2056970b409d491be3821f3aa46ed83
describe
'127163' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEQ' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
aa8dea989de7f470a3fb474ee01f1a45
77179fe33b35b4af70972545ea4d8811544435f7
describe
'33394' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJER' 'sip-files00191.pro'
e2539d4b0313eac68e8ba1d9dfb8e251
83c1c7a7b9756ce1a0fdf82851380bc20d768a69
describe
'38961' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJES' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
6ff95519b55876beba31f8377648ab20
bc2da9b36b04c34665b67e1b468a640682700054
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJET' 'sip-files00191.tif'
2d8ae79bf5263aadc158acf3f99cc023
dd8a462a27d0eceb4f43d9ec6906a633b6760bac
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEU' 'sip-files00191.txt'
f474d2d2dfd2656615ad7df8c69fd97b
a5c6b61d2f222a059f454d9f483976470d86adf0
describe
'10180' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEV' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
ae9499fe7425c1a31e35580d6c81740d
3c0aafc71324ad78ec24c5dfa9e233f0070b5593
describe
'288246' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEW' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
68b5a4897c849e3685e26d7a41f8d5a4
1d78d82319accece909d77c4554b663d4845762a
describe
'123808' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEX' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
65d850b8eb516caea0d65cbcc70a5941
f4ecc382c8a9a0ae98cb7db67ea54e6ce52cd7a0
describe
'31920' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEY' 'sip-files00192.pro'
02c23edd0c5faa2a66175519f5967e10
19e2d119e526bf7bcedbd252f246a6b8f0c5b656
describe
'39536' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJEZ' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
788356e1450b7c34c77d3b623c9fa9e2
a6999905cfdcc255dbb0269a48547d3f55ab77b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFA' 'sip-files00192.tif'
ab9b5dcc266b423dc0820de431e29991
550634d8701375976eea4e658cbc6eb8af5ddd41
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFB' 'sip-files00192.txt'
a41d7232d96eb340f237b21f063e78ce
e9b2259023b649be62d741e74f8c07106df6f286
describe
'9833' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFC' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
61a3b5a54b86255f74658cb36f85ceef
c82de2a85c11bca2381eac41b6091c3504bc46cc
describe
'288006' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFD' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
af1b6ae566c8c8814b6260b42aa5a014
a56ce64deb7974fae32ac3c72fde235622c3383d
describe
'135208' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFE' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
77205725987d8565b1065943bb720bea
1131a99cac36be39f1ba6a0d0e1ce0fd47ce5980
describe
'34367' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFF' 'sip-files00193.pro'
d3b613f535c2fb6a1ddd830e68cfc8a1
c93dbc217dc7b94008f34596aa9a9d024a7122d2
describe
'42047' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFG' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
802fc90a0cd4d8e0b3ca51084e8e3e46
f3be382ea698f37b485c47705b0a54a758be488e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFH' 'sip-files00193.tif'
899f2af36789207f0af722e914f71fbe
93b1632de680f526858e065007c8c9f28be51f0f
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFI' 'sip-files00193.txt'
facaceba18f5bb858b43d3f9ede466e4
44dafe7e6a461efa1c2a9bef4981de11f3dcef00
describe
'11045' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFJ' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
613d423c3cc5a38b52d96b5b689d38c5
46a1df48e5c09b983d97b8fc871cda2681b536c0
describe
'287917' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFK' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
c965c0d1595a212829dabb33a66a5c0c
c841bdc0dd8b493fbc88336d3a2be50bb7b2b571
describe
'142467' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFL' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
7ea78abdf440177d40be6c08ed0b39b2
69249c904c709fe4556515f85c4185414415f397
describe
'39651' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFM' 'sip-files00194.pro'
4d136c4df83fb076ca12dd217878e4d4
7422142ec08dcb07d81b580287384f497ec4bcc2
describe
'45685' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFN' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
b39ea186c1320084053fb9ed58cee71e
936a51204232190b25ad689cd93094a235a12e69
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFO' 'sip-files00194.tif'
1193bb5090c78e2df6bf18caca912b74
d1ca2a72ac163c41d2a7e536f58ff7b6315b01cc
describe
'1570' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFP' 'sip-files00194.txt'
6b4a9589f97c1259faa9c414f51cae22
45e39578459e171e64a2ca06ff42d5cc99f43401
describe
'11172' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFQ' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
5639ed3cbe38507e5d075dcaad9cdbea
cc5aa37f5d2a1d781b222e73b5fee3de1b35f77d
describe
'288175' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFR' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
60df3962da632bb224621d96bf08f908
6e1af1fac5c6f021bef4d7842d47865919400666
describe
'145244' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFS' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
f83ecbdf466ff6e74859f1b24e54b176
0d29e84d8297f1578ca21cba67675a34f0a7868a
describe
'40168' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFT' 'sip-files00195.pro'
999b5cbd7008f46465a774bad77c921f
04dbc36059c489d1173a97a0d05ca4e0c4b7662f
describe
'44508' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFU' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
a72f10b6085166f4618136d1c683e571
88f782887972b3c22bce4b3c9fc38b34243d896e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFV' 'sip-files00195.tif'
25de5c1b53e44aaebc23e3102b6bde21
0faf788d4bdf13b26bc2a71a4924916311005125
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFW' 'sip-files00195.txt'
a12a6bdb18d915761b359039736882d8
65b3759f97cae5e460658d389f5231cbaf16e32d
describe
'11466' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFX' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
4c78d88b214f0f4a5a5934fc01d95149
4382f1f87a7b1653f486a07992f8db67dbfd1ab5
describe
'287997' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFY' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
ba6809a1c4b974948b9a148b634cee94
0ad63efef3a03b0a921346d2ae0836ca7ca4dce0
'2011-12-30T11:00:07-05:00'
describe
'142579' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJFZ' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
4f2396276de41511adbc8650748fd517
73a80265a911621d19d77bd2ac9c07606fa4ce74
describe
'38223' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGA' 'sip-files00196.pro'
8cc3ec06cbcbd18ce3e57c4cd197e4af
94e86f3861e3814be267820e7994c55496e01012
describe
'44806' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGB' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
1a8273be3b6af0160ee2210b8587d194
d7d4c106f2e293103defd7ec161ca5c3a90f2a47
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGC' 'sip-files00196.tif'
2a48963900368c63a2054b680a44f733
250991eb52d09e8b32a36cfed3ec2fab8c4a4e82
describe
'1624' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGD' 'sip-files00196.txt'
8167de0598c21ddfd9c808130088ad08
fc93fa6478ca479e4ea235f051150936b445b221
describe
'11047' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGE' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
f8f4c465686a9d4113cff9007455d732
1cf7b2f5e0f37783095adc017f81ba11cc184584
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGF' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
6f11ccd4c636e4623ae58709c7842230
e210938b614c1def22b207ebcb7308d2766a0c11
describe
'130022' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGG' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
0b2fc69556f343b163367ee1b90c2e2d
1147b130c1241b8ea51b3d9472ed350557158dc5
describe
'32728' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGH' 'sip-files00197.pro'
e2f796f2e3fb3f09678a8aaac5315919
1105b0bd36932b05462f2381d54638afdb37b988
describe
'41817' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGI' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
e46a2f22cff4695184d73b0bf843c63a
9582cb58906fbe1c419fcadeececdfdba25efa97
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGJ' 'sip-files00197.tif'
83777c0aea8691983a61e251512c0047
289f5f85d31663b26762543be1e662fc62fc6754
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGK' 'sip-files00197.txt'
799b2f5248a5dc6d78bdce2102e47f8e
024eb3340a7e42e9b9a7b0a28c34321f2c05751e
describe
'11014' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGL' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
ad27d3dd68cf83472142deeb4e121cf5
6ff3216505cbe11f108490cbf50f69fa7b878c8c
describe
'288139' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGM' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
5630417d5c93ce554941c4304f958ca5
9dee80969ac2915a306e0c4ecdd1ee71b2aee18a
describe
'132663' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGN' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
d5410add4ec81ae6b159c598be044edc
efd3c7ce82979c97c76ac24220f74741c7b30ca7
describe
'36147' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGO' 'sip-files00198.pro'
fbb770b3821c7ec5134132301c86148a
c56def0faa11e53295733d903d248ceda4a164bc
describe
'42244' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGP' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
dbb3ab08b8266cd78d4e0183172a4e5a
0a33776c4725ff2684d77c701ef2d850a0905851
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGQ' 'sip-files00198.tif'
c4d6f4f9f8c69242ad0bff1bfdbb7185
1661c22b17cfeddce3fe56e6a56b36c909e607da
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGR' 'sip-files00198.txt'
9b3717a069da1880193282f2580eb5e0
1b6a38fba4975f76379cc626bcf79e5240f81676
describe
'10861' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGS' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
4d9a408325ca38b0d6e8ba49a0ba3034
46af429c6ef73bd156f8f0277eb54ace8de3cfca
describe
'288013' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGT' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
7bfef1ba7138ed8208a7feee19484b6e
d3e96a5d678b1e3f2a5ee84fcf33ee8b1930e3ec
describe
'139240' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGU' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
706612e7d70104a9eb491fe3bbef6f2e
8d388ac5b7997db4ba81efce4655a2ccd9468bcb
describe
'38818' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGV' 'sip-files00199.pro'
b51a40055e93bb5e48fd184a8ab48076
aab21813d80257fc28c9b595842577baa2c9ec11
describe
'43103' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGW' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
13cc4430438f3ab36770fc8884b090c3
40cf5145fdf7ee335ed2b9594c8aabdea751e34e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGX' 'sip-files00199.tif'
69ac94aefe1eaab5cf7c10ce3e93c7dc
5853f8f941a672c1001e92eee3fd6fa9ff898af3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGY' 'sip-files00199.txt'
20bd7acdf64cb8eaa4deb1d5f20afc40
d52de0609c6dd9caf1d99648ea11dbfc47baffac
describe
'10991' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJGZ' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
8b0704a712892cc23fbfdc00ee93f445
e67861f5634766e10aee1f544ef73e23a66bf6b7
describe
'288144' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHA' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
7de2140eeb039e26f322d725208680ea
61ee7d21620da94645579eebdc7d6d2c539cd5c0
describe
'132353' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHB' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
6b717abaaa98f1e2f66abaf485847d19
171f3beca67decd71bcd634d1f96d83311400b00
describe
'36685' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHC' 'sip-files00200.pro'
1a7e0df1a0afbce59a1835ee5912ce21
c45eaa01c0e124c9e0640aaa73d8242f4d845b86
describe
'41233' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHD' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
e1f53b2782e5832370f250f53c530b31
fb40ea1b4e9d0b65cfa1cdea250defe7948994f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHE' 'sip-files00200.tif'
8da9ea59a539f5647eaabef293ba0be9
b78f9651883c04893a2c6f3316e15c936d5efa40
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHF' 'sip-files00200.txt'
61279b3a5303bb02c0e2f96e947f8678
36d68300b354c0af1ad267653ce33e186ccd28db
describe
'10674' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHG' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
e9e9da25af83a8e3df9faed8100a4ca7
ebfe511e9c0be1b9a82baf26faa673a946e81bca
describe
'288189' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHH' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
b8df2e22afcd36c005bff765a4abb025
b3a037b937422a55172e89b07b7c37f05b626504
describe
'137980' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHI' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
52bff897a87a79d806a3349b92097ce1
517b54b6a15d44ae6984a433e34686d7ed9cd8aa
describe
'36194' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHJ' 'sip-files00201.pro'
b15d78eab39647f6ec5268eb91706c18
f92def627ac39ed570f97e837f8ae72b2e57b1ab
describe
'43822' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHK' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
fcdb11c7eaea5420c98c1f06f7edbd8e
c0760b1ef0e5155e86e83607f16701ff0cfe3d80
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHL' 'sip-files00201.tif'
20e3a055a0655fcc74b641d1d6fbefd8
98433ad72b1d6c1594fa2579d5f42fd58e1732f1
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHM' 'sip-files00201.txt'
5ab112849f8100fe61ebb06fc5f0cffa
082b19509d4c4120fd599b8128074d2d45c39782
describe
'11114' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHN' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
b0b85500f15539e9e6525a9cd2bf6082
2f5e2a8e70a3481ee7670754378a6337cacf8df2
describe
'287946' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHO' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
172f983debe47a0d959257997fb9c33f
0bcad4ada6fd7dca7b51acb0c0d60e8347c0be6f
describe
'140001' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHP' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
ec78590ee918af41967049b36de77abf
ce8c8534e6eb5041f477e8a5b9bba690254cb167
describe
'36568' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHQ' 'sip-files00202.pro'
86638265f09d4a49599cb3b02893a00e
f74fa7d884e04d417b2cb6a6a36dcf4f00f35bf7
describe
'44409' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHR' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
1be89fa5736a4f15ad8341fd40093a74
4cbf4873fa28dff01adcff3cc760d4dd065e3f80
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHS' 'sip-files00202.tif'
073a7dc45720a7e20e48ea7bf5630835
2c3b4efeeb4441b2de1386a292cb2552c88f7dcd
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHT' 'sip-files00202.txt'
107fc10a6a6fb8076fcd2bd35d863adf
7ea0e66afdd32df59fabc1a623f4d2496fe8e868
describe
'11361' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHU' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
126863fa55798ec03e60eb1df47a6b1a
b0bedfe282d497aed8bb236653807ce12a331eee
describe
'287978' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHV' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
9c0b03c4f54c62ffc613da1876b9a996
02ae133aeaf160b36e64eb2b518d503125913f41
describe
'68565' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHW' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
7e91acd6aaa68538608abcedd32cc76d
542fdf63e8153068844bde16eba24f6978047e7d
describe
'9850' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHX' 'sip-files00203.pro'
cd1086de165d26fa8645d0171e3228b3
66fdff17c964bc0a5ea1e583f884c6d109f076c5
describe
'17728' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHY' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
33e19776d6371f432362284ae422ed0a
8554bb049312317652166e0710f06021e7f47fef
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJHZ' 'sip-files00203.tif'
c68bbed0e93d90f8a690f83f786a365c
05a6795b969558053b69dc18cbf976c3cd502452
describe
'454' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIA' 'sip-files00203.txt'
965f9f9c6c6006eef6281e55b2413a9a
05223bf2a5553e3356082298ab170784007b9e30
describe
'4532' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIB' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
68404dfd96aa56cc1218908a16ecb76e
c3d79ef51e77e23ae9d672c82c3a44f4a2deb46f
describe
'287770' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIC' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
b340074167efb986baf0d5452165c0bc
e3ef911ad456d0c155ef6450ebde6eb6ea0c497f
describe
'153934' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJID' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
1c1c0eaffb6ee47cd50b4327a5e1aeb0
4f1fb7451c5613818c671703bd41c498e8e21800
describe
'46443' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIE' 'sip-files00204.pro'
b0a46e50bca95b4fd62d2e2859ca2116
00664298c4d3d94c8120efd6a4ebe1a5bdd7a15e
describe
'43996' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIF' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
a959529719e3342901dd5b86373b5c25
6d1c11d21fd7e7668be612dd4933c64b87ecfab4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIG' 'sip-files00204.tif'
6c3bc0375e6821a1f9f3a7f487d2c822
3c6837c71674024a224fc696a6ecdffa943817d4
describe
'2067' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIH' 'sip-files00204.txt'
eb9a7fc30179337bf053bda41c130350
fff6886e0860d73a0ed46bbdc6e03dd8869d7a32
describe
'11337' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJII' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
cb3e2158b2510b794b55fcb687cd8e93
01b85d1dff0d3f06271f58359cf996155fbf6edf
describe
'287821' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIJ' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
a0062fff135d27d8b6ab7fcef1f9aa54
2c8884d60d74abb66a003cc4859c64139a560b0d
describe
'173502' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIK' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
305fa7e3eb448a06eb567b48be74ae14
114d458e4bd829ad7f33657b3ba7225c3008ae85
describe
'67591' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIL' 'sip-files00205.pro'
5596b573e58226e630789b599aa813f2
1d58187f15c201badc63f69cd47f8f59e0e51895
describe
'49833' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIM' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
34c43198820221d1dae004dca171eff1
283ccf827b01158859db1c329eba19a107406b4e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIN' 'sip-files00205.tif'
6a74a8479dcbc5e9ad9abf403c7fcd14
a4a8937c37362e634f5769e80674e63c9d5cf002
describe
'2892' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIO' 'sip-files00205.txt'
be42c69056f0a259295261de01043e60
5251a25203c5dfc3e7f8ea1ef8e62a6d17f36707
describe
'12297' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIP' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
eb0df5c3940e4aa8f35fdbb261b581e7
9a26a3e569d2740898868c47e1eae6ae908c9ce4
describe
'288046' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIQ' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
24abf32d63512775d393b97a5f21871a
218141887d2fe5294378b45d75a018dac7d53e2b
describe
'186897' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIR' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
028e7b35c1aaab9504029f49163e1810
e2410b40db6f5548253d44779cb19144eb30370e
describe
'3410' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIS' 'sip-files00206.pro'
c854b469fa44d30c54102a1cc2aed7a1
347ae22a0cc5dae0ccda50aaf4e10d8641ba38c3
describe
'44142' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIT' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
38ebdfb435ed6f940af7b078d59b515e
e236b618d1368dfc880dbb4857cd01bcb20ddc69
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIU' 'sip-files00206.tif'
4bc96077dbdaa2a84dab00ff60a2c552
2b0172fa9916389fc9416514ac9185d0618fabf3
describe
'153' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIV' 'sip-files00206.txt'
53b691314fa6f3b5adc00f35812b1502
85f8f8fb017e7ae4471763129d2256128a2c3fca
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'10256' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIW' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
23c5a3f4d9599254f63c54893a84aef6
edfbc4bc739b919047b2882e6f2a8193e6edae30
describe
'288008' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIX' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
cf689d69d2a4cf5016fe0b2116ede69d
b9a8b1af6dfc10246a77c2d8abcdb75bf04c2700
describe
'166947' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIY' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
8e8046b48b9186846eba9eaf940bd00b
d9aa8101f1ffa52b294f69273a6ed6fe5a005a95
describe
'66734' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJIZ' 'sip-files00207.pro'
6b58b9ed26f65de54c1aa98caa3ca951
a7979a46e60d4d9d91c8f8b0b0a4f2992777b07f
describe
'47046' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJA' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
4e0c5463c6792a50671a194690c2a06f
9691e64990a7b5a4b2ac1a173b9d6aa24730fcd2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJB' 'sip-files00207.tif'
525d112aef344ee7be9d46292c4337b9
6dd24d455e41b003374720993ab9245d78154df9
describe
'2873' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJC' 'sip-files00207.txt'
0933580efe6b72a955157da72a9947fe
edede232e6e2f49986ed74df8870a51294a548f2
describe
'12064' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJD' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
d0c7f4af855aa6c85a567834b063e6f7
10b90c7ab1c72ff5f9877b6b3d66052da5896cf1
describe
'287937' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJE' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
0c800a5451d184eff216798ff7d6b588
52f9d802a6592269dcf5fa774296cdc9a1453516
describe
'178897' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJF' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
4452fc5d3cecc6dc5d9c57af72cbadb9
9e30480171d62ec5a3ecf86563f010d8b425fad8
describe
'47041' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJG' 'sip-files00208.pro'
19b4e6005a4725bcd9fd4a112440095c
fd1cb2304bd53be6cdbdf9f6fb9ef613b1571cd8
describe
'48566' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJH' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
a1c906cc9dd733c2b75b804c3e279036
a4748aa9516554f6d7dfd664e3422a96d76cc3d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJI' 'sip-files00208.tif'
c170f25f81ca0886010a939df700d378
631e992b5dd5530d69da44c866febde4dfbcb1f2
describe
'2185' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJJ' 'sip-files00208.txt'
39f4432ed11af4cf74c8dfd80a298a4d
69c894e4f1a83920e2066cf329ae8f8add20c191
describe
'11899' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJK' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
a702435dcc6dce8a1e60284688be406d
369d52c7ee65f81bc3bd6bf2d490a0f4c5c59303
describe
'288024' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJL' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
549b1427207dd7a4963e4a275d0ca11b
06208c683411645e51d6c06ea2bea3b0da8aac2c
describe
'189889' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJM' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
e425dd2fb8adb26b8544e4319014116a
df4efb6508389f5cc49e5636c6ea232a38caf1d3
describe
'50908' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJN' 'sip-files00209.pro'
275b7af828739dd058f23d9d9614bea7
10345febd4d23efcf00147c0fee3e4e3fb15daba
describe
'49908' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJO' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
9b5ca58db0a1d800ad182ce674a10600
b3bac93699b4df1ac3b1517d0807bccc02f03724
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJP' 'sip-files00209.tif'
b5c31eda6cd1302f89b2beca36cfa35b
2b21083d6723db22274866e5dfa243fe97486a40
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJQ' 'sip-files00209.txt'
a3eb3d8b6ceff2e13c7c8f6385c452cf
9e90d56d87fe2eeeba619f7e1d28b6f5ceb22608
describe
'12395' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJR' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
4ac2342403c1e6bf644be16bf74af361
ef3b481027fe1b64bb845011c3da03be05727fb0
describe
'288009' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJS' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
29575feb95b19cfca4bcb5871a96c4ae
fef3526ff25a5e8ae5269aab08e06fed36540a49
describe
'164373' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJT' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
b9ca042ce5498c0396cb6701dcbcfd5b
17dfeaff337314b423de8013a621f5f557a119a0
describe
'67074' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJU' 'sip-files00210.pro'
1adcd4a4517a2d85a4cd23cc0f613979
49a8b748e1e4e65115019018b2563d050aeae835
describe
'47502' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJV' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
248d4222b1f7ce4116885e8a944839ff
7e318735e6efdf007f282917e3903705223842b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJW' 'sip-files00210.tif'
d1ff7adbf3dd224272e40d752dc50f2a
0d6447d05bc0afaf1b7efad70064ce4faeece935
describe
'2919' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJX' 'sip-files00210.txt'
dcd25ef0e7c4ce7989cb291d385ddc56
9d7b49ba6df9ce46c30a06b64b9f4b04dc3b76cf
describe
'11893' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJY' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
fdd3a819d3b2d3103ccbc19773874fc9
d6ee6d0c2dc947225148f140e8f4152243208821
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJJZ' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
90d7e13385cd4e0616888c4a26a6a140
81f4e0ebaf4469efa3c5bb92ebd0c57e668b85b1
describe
'172644' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKA' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
dd3db8e1715e096d012defaa88f6eee3
19898c290b24883e62a5bb8d8c028e6ad380e248
describe
'69189' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKB' 'sip-files00211.pro'
b042ca54fb638fb3b06c92bb8a5e48d6
73a67dd5cf6bcba3c357300e9f7bb883d2481990
describe
'50160' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKC' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
d70a2bcd0b3dddb5c0342f3e84a7678f
e84135781d0bf2c063525f535e9b663edf65e281
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKD' 'sip-files00211.tif'
66d2377944fd9d19e4ad4e2445ee829d
32a5033b4660a5668be68ae54e076a944b74594f
describe
'2949' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKE' 'sip-files00211.txt'
4d29b3e9fb040ec9a0eba92b2ac65802
c2754152c2fbef5888c1e39debc80eb39a37bbb5
describe
'12746' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKF' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
e5ac05f210b02627187f4eb3c9da4fd0
419f071d2f690187668a30e712f430cd1c5004ee
describe
'288228' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKG' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
4706bf1a12542cc7d8084baa8d680cc9
258a3e8c021d5788a3909a29efcc565e12d42e5a
describe
'177761' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKH' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
14cb13872060782ddea1cd1dec1c8ddd
ea27afea1399bef3818095b70235ca5f2f0f7b54
describe
'75347' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKI' 'sip-files00212.pro'
92f07b4893dff80ba50980a9d33d61cf
e018f83cb2b959c204b9a168f98f7f59215919c2
describe
'51011' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKJ' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
81200723101822971862c8fe4d309082
1a7b1cdea7d41051e32c80e9fe4c4dde92b26338
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKK' 'sip-files00212.tif'
b19b920e208a4c115f46cb4160ee86c3
f5be93846f722bc24a20ecc87b42730e580c3838
describe
'3216' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKL' 'sip-files00212.txt'
e61956d55cfa119b144122e9575dc7ed
d81b4935e4884e65bdb3b4b908a877ae7b79ebee
describe
'12696' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKM' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
b8241e3f72b5270b49d8b9b21aaa5ba0
446a607da625fb709c0cbd64ee5529fc8b069912
describe
'287865' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKN' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
965f51560f697538b472b65a1754fcb1
a0bbd25c5e32ab25b70e900b09f297cf410be526
describe
'156490' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKO' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
c85ca81abe18ed1869af4bef9a2cdd16
24a2be7dd658dacd6f9ed08e3eeaaa033d21c6d5
describe
'54559' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKP' 'sip-files00213.pro'
7c68999e7f4001e09ff30ac28dd68895
b14f7331b10b347bb9de0b633288ea67140f6fb0
describe
'45706' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKQ' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
59c59e3f0fa748c50c7f27c63c1a282d
a6aaf836910e1cf48b34701dfbee4d54aa51d488
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKR' 'sip-files00213.tif'
3842001dd4e6dca40f2c53f6f03029b5
cec7f1d3f1bb3512cf6dda7cc430bc0d3cb3570c
describe
'2372' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKS' 'sip-files00213.txt'
36ca067c27972d6cc227275d68b1be29
bce8e6e158b73835787d67ee9887806ffeca579f
describe
'11915' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKT' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
86e63b7b2639793addb3392e7a9c7c05
e11e7771f2fe5e482fa7110f8e222a8228490adf
describe
'288003' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKU' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
3aba43d1639f01fa7bc6125efb4e1c1c
0118ead1e396c3d6559f76b55456465977790675
describe
'168795' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKV' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
bd510d1bf655c0315269ee12838af256
954aed33c59ee08c47e681d1b54ae217c1cc36c6
describe
'69382' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKW' 'sip-files00214.pro'
7696b82c1efa2d8a3c057778f5a19e22
4187cc87eb93ef1c00c6bf83846c8db0b97fbe46
describe
'50140' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKX' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
00f5d866d394468b8818e47015e4bfca
5f4a41076e372cf565ae6ed448c75aac75a48606
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKY' 'sip-files00214.tif'
43d0633278a7f2562295a604515251b2
77e45a4777c900d9a8731b84363220b922be2ad4
describe
'2968' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJKZ' 'sip-files00214.txt'
479eb6acab7fb2d8edc46a52f20de28c
66bb059bc6056a77946dca3f3125a8cb0cc28586
describe
'12235' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLA' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
28960b895503b4b7afa5473a9fe7d5ff
2b453b390072d2eec37b10d772ab6b50c26d9d51
describe
'287996' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLB' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
0518b5eda3cefa2bd651298cf7bee4e5
1d19647be95c001361283b6d0549f95cd05452d0
describe
'158626' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLC' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
61ce5ccbecb30d74a49e798874f32206
618f865cb9c9345477f7d51ea14f3ca872fa9433
describe
'60481' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLD' 'sip-files00215.pro'
01cf24bae4d567cb68d6ff2910fb9b7f
0be79d3abd617438a334a8a7a82136f6cb59b1bc
describe
'45175' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLE' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
6e5357a8f7629ff7d5a6b62e35aa2908
0c9d043a1f616b70fcdbf1b474476eeab1e147c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLF' 'sip-files00215.tif'
10e918ca528065a61e91bc6c9aff1b92
9dd97d4bce7c7bdcb30b6e02d84a2192b9c4516e
describe
'2610' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLG' 'sip-files00215.txt'
d9f4e978e976d22741fb8e6ed5dfdd67
9efbe86b127bb9556a879b66569d778e7fb7130b
describe
'11869' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLH' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
8a94699d980d190e5338eff16b258210
67f3242ecf47dcf1e4be5505a09eaadaed8bc791
describe
'287786' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLI' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
91b96c0538c65ac47437b0691d188f91
85951184838358fa11d7fc8ac686fc905d6e6190
describe
'169982' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLJ' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
ef3bd5d92a41ed0c9a2c7b3e975c215a
8344a029985a711f2916c3cd1bd3cb76fae60fe0
describe
'39941' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLK' 'sip-files00216.pro'
e355a217f15b28fd0cbc41c1093eb55d
a76dcd6d14840f99eb9d3bc0caa2aa8251669e78
describe
'46010' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLL' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
86076ca2e703db9e3fc379a20d7de923
7c608487926ab669f6bf91b10dfa2f8b35d1f8fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLM' 'sip-files00216.tif'
44eea60e3429aea2331df6565644f404
900d4fb6b2e25cad0b3aeb09b47a54a3cb0991c1
describe
'1838' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLN' 'sip-files00216.txt'
21983fbdab325f532eb886e61e53da25
64faf18ded8dc51dafe57b78acef3fa5edcbd4ca
describe
'11523' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLO' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
a6ac764538ab090841ff2a0bcc95e9b3
b4572a54c301408efa5a433d94039dd36e1261f7
describe
'287966' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLP' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
532d1d921f9db991d9339f976fc5d278
772c5538926bff8b1dcdac148598630fe5b24e75
describe
'160802' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLQ' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
fa371dd0562eb95195e199843182edf4
9251ab9e3abcbc92f33f6d4fa1eb14cb28e81165
describe
'60915' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLR' 'sip-files00217.pro'
3e5c3cbd3b0a1f172598701ce2bd5855
e3a774a92c6ab492af436847faec48275339824c
describe
'46200' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLS' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
ab4bcc25dd17384d803ef16b7a4d3abb
655e30b6f19e17ef5ceab98231d5385d0fb82e00
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLT' 'sip-files00217.tif'
ad5ba364f6066a7c740ec7232672b2b9
31de9c2dfc55695009a9574938a3e83fcec307c1
describe
'2637' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLU' 'sip-files00217.txt'
7ff4ae5b0ed7d5e244de9250ea07e24b
c0f453e1d8bbcd08c7bfd572e6c3f7b9b4610ab8
describe
'12023' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLV' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
59656ee1c5ef10b2cbe9d87e8d8d53d0
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describe
'288028' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLW' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
3604a569ad1a85f6816ecd9b18d28a39
2ee521635b77928468bedeb69387caddfc93a4e2
describe
'189730' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLX' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
29a3ee68f9848b9e023a2869b5462bd1
3c593834d63bbea4305bf0d288aa65b0f10eaba3
describe
'2897' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLY' 'sip-files00218.pro'
d8e28dab2f3ea6540cd5d581c93c11e7
1a71750e100b800014d16a1c91f0bffd7d18e4c9
describe
'48141' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJLZ' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
aaf1941e90b122fb7b3aa2b36f870aef
eaae73bf30f696341052e6e080fb4461ac4d3752
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMA' 'sip-files00218.tif'
c2868638177998b3499ce699c7873059
86bc3bb36d184e70d46d3632ca52a51cbc16a55a
describe
'137' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMB' 'sip-files00218.txt'
d066a3c0f6678ece77fa27df0506d146
a30a16afafbcc7d61be40e67e44c50cde0a1c04d
describe
'12171' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMC' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
09636fff6f1f0e9f9cc98457be89f233
d4dec0866ddb54a01533e19a4367d66dce944702
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMD' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
fd557c861fadf2646cb2cc78e040ee05
8dcb5f465a02e7e45eb795f67f9f40d2d1ab316d
describe
'158210' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJME' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
da8572a1af3b956e2d9f1335b95f56bc
4f98ab4d64ea13e36b9eef304d99695ad48fafcd
describe
'57310' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMF' 'sip-files00219.pro'
e90d14abf8526f6ffc08d63ce4dbc727
a58cce5881c63687be742a8e7942c9c254ce93c9
describe
'45682' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMG' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
53a4976de0fa25b35c98d998e3d6d298
bef0a13729b7905d605522e934fa7a27fb833ea0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMH' 'sip-files00219.tif'
e271b0ad11f8fc10d5d8f4f73eb1f6c7
1cc554c86addd6fec9c8692f7ebdc5ca035ce0b7
describe
'2500' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMI' 'sip-files00219.txt'
328a7974776d1cf714c3e28b3420443b
000dcefe5a40393a6e5b1ef7a0eab597e8c59152
describe
'11710' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMJ' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
89d1c1538df1d22796140c9ff2ebe522
ee30293e2b6e46f369acb5a341a4af616eb00757
describe
'288211' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMK' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
e47bf66d722057beeefe00b655ffaad2
df340001c96fff1b6b40f5b82d1be8bff5de7ea1
describe
'162976' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJML' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
375343b576ea4de3148db1908cc166fb
f9f88c24baeae39ed322a361db7f780f3cb55935
describe
'65618' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMM' 'sip-files00220.pro'
8adf43c55e5e67d3a5504a01585a6eac
f9c71d8f18918c3a85eb953e8bcccb86094f7379
describe
'47114' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMN' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
3653cd4ce2fe8cd09d87e07f0ae5cffe
70d6d245ec92236d63feb54330a8939fa6b59b44
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMO' 'sip-files00220.tif'
1919630a6bb15f1904a72ffeac396b18
6226e451b164e52b4a4e3adda3789638e80982de
describe
'2830' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMP' 'sip-files00220.txt'
11bdebb99ffec18d4503c6f028b26169
7ca339203c649ffdf94a0b8c5c305a7079e2daee
describe
'11939' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMQ' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
45c04917a78607e7cbbbb2797da9b0bf
514a155bd11fae80efdadfff9ceb5cab8af59067
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMR' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
d3fb9bbf07529fc4c2b5632f295e2635
79f9452292a3635336ed45094119c6969975a521
describe
'165271' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMS' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
456432ed57205994324b96bf25be11c8
d23288535aa09a26770940acaae8e80e6fdb7ac3
describe
'65292' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMT' 'sip-files00221.pro'
29aa5c137b01d3c458448299530fba7b
7407a1f336744c759b44cc76da57208ebb111004
describe
'47972' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMU' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
653a84c927b4238066f208a005c84505
da2411afb031253f8e5b68af064ee72e829873ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMV' 'sip-files00221.tif'
9e06c7226c65fa73120d2fd576d9c81f
51a19b25678f160d882a32119a392cd12c49c689
describe
'2808' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMW' 'sip-files00221.txt'
b4535dca6cf4d9f381af7ab28a49b639
00618ecd35cc94c20511299b3064731d18442053
describe
'11940' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMX' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
9d6b6ca45ea9b662434616a96a1600a2
92ae071a0984331389b58692f07d8bb6c4266a21
describe
'288206' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMY' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
0906488fdde4050065db612194509e9e
ec6789d127e54c6882fdb1d08d5918534c6eb7c4
describe
'165481' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJMZ' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
c118787852d52967e1ca6b6925dfd0b4
ec72d66ed7964a8ef89e623ca28401169f68ef8e
describe
'36799' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNA' 'sip-files00222.pro'
bc26abe84faa2b0b7a6b0ae636e0f5c0
5db410c88cbbc30f4188bf1ed0d5b478367151ea
describe
'44953' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNB' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
eaa13fffe04407f0291900ffa60afe09
9d77886bb32aa403a29bae767a0047364b74f358
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNC' 'sip-files00222.tif'
fcc7600145a8ca95ec14f325582336e9
0b01831631c4fe4468afc8b9137726c26717715d
describe
'1740' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJND' 'sip-files00222.txt'
5dda3355211506ab8ca2c137ee754d04
b5f121491ed31e92b3fdbfc46e783002860b9f8f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNE' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
29c944b9ca6eb9f10f6ee3780578a73f
5fb136ea9e6fa69416a8e520dd0444c82b8a650a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNF' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
6013a12e171d1d4a3684273e57101b62
b0d0831215713365abda5a5622a2cf3ddbbed5a8
describe
'143279' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNG' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
686e5705bb97caf9445ff90589f3e782
15357b42c432ce00c5e202dbee16078ce9b2d349
describe
'47107' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNH' 'sip-files00223.pro'
76ec6061d82a714a4223bf70c39d461f
e2262b852391cc2248dbcba22def6db14bfd904d
describe
'41754' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNI' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
4561d9a1fe9202e18c2b44ce7c9d095c
7c474ba3b6a6b323c22091d9520d4bd7f2e293b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNJ' 'sip-files00223.tif'
135bf0624f08fc654fbb4a88a283ea9c
470caa9aa383c0220652ecf2c24b6c4d94e7b60d
describe
'2039' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNK' 'sip-files00223.txt'
079466ae3016cb42bca160463925565b
b4da9d9897ecc2b52aeb5f56231cab2416c9d893
describe
'11422' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNL' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
06cc4ac9891c703e8e25bdc90a9c92b8
20203731f38c5c4eac812e7511b6e349ac0a308c
describe
'287976' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNM' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
8a7fd67517a6f3cc89ebfa4b2ee7115a
99eaa29a1fc278ef400bf9c74caea0e7219ed41a
describe
'164573' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNN' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
951ba59e9dadb6d972a0923c6b7cafd8
770c6f0b3e6f9c93640f731940ed0525ed67a399
describe
'64011' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNO' 'sip-files00224.pro'
a795312350aef0a213960f121f83bd34
8fed957d60d861d1c88c1144bf80afed0380f28b
describe
'47487' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNP' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
9184789edb0e0c70be01886d5952809c
4b3e0416fdbb487ec32d5924333ff331866fa9b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNQ' 'sip-files00224.tif'
947088ab7d6b41aa74c4a9bc161bcb7a
3eccbd40f5a690bcfd4b606e57fcca22d538e829
describe
'2756' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNR' 'sip-files00224.txt'
03bac68863f499d2da76d89da86edb12
55f8abff54191ffa5699143cd793059f04d898c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNS' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
0f66fb8c0c570c58bd8e5cba3ffd42f7
0f9502758e4f4010167e13a13f47f352281e7fee
describe
'287860' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNT' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
074a91960d291375284a1884ca652012
5c5560b316446e2f9b4dcb26e2352735aac92bab
describe
'155379' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNU' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
8a02491db4a37d911a8ae9110a7c3130
c2e60ef791463c47d1301453a9a82b373d38bc00
describe
'55700' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNV' 'sip-files00225.pro'
995424e9347026f2d4d50a3161574dfa
fa139883ea1b8732f8a60ad18a9b1bbfa6c41db0
describe
'46858' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNW' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
e0ae9fccbb4ea03bfb88644c3d36a460
e9af58525ed9bf3818b079375ba8dbc935901a37
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNX' 'sip-files00225.tif'
3f779d79486f140fba85f4dd99cba304
5a79c2d9a62a857ed449dcfa3e79377eab57fd7d
describe
'2383' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNY' 'sip-files00225.txt'
9efe65b0fb82485de584dd8dedec285f
a76d71cfc45103ad2f51f99b03a3a2fa3c6e9737
describe
'12570' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJNZ' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
df50c05bac8c72ab2f886e3f4492c8ae
4a2a532889251c70ca4a3e506293458d9cdc3a28
describe
'287954' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOA' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
85f561ce6a6ec18ad8f04b8f4bf7883b
1c7459f269f3df61e90c161ef24a8baeda7e1604
describe
'168111' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOB' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
d2579a7c72be500e1fa14c1a1a03d90b
fab1532cb7ef3cfa936432279caaa01dda9a8d1f
describe
'39173' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOC' 'sip-files00226.pro'
15f3b2e1a540a6ca34b33d28dda47939
f792b50d43d07610c5dea93b4ad875f325544abb
describe
'46011' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOD' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
c770d7cbeca4e406c88c0eea477088bc
812b634a8b3eaf4d5426e882955bde60bbadbbc8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOE' 'sip-files00226.tif'
29ab019430c57dafb3f4b4db7dd5819e
d033bc407cc753a9bd24438fb27cc20090f65cc3
describe
'1769' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOF' 'sip-files00226.txt'
20775bea50dee05e5ab49aff0231d451
c4348dfd3fdfc9072db88df2d6ffb327f071627c
describe
'11832' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOG' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
1ed632100d528b7490e9b803a46bffb1
88a9874cafc2e69c6b8a16b8794a03dd60ba7ffa
describe
'288192' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOH' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
5c915c83e5e0b2402f18df63c72d9412
3cdd7d4b7c6739964e96f0c81d7e4c23e9711596
describe
'154903' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOI' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
85f027268b136a57dc528bac6f1038a8
f0955ac0e8beeaeea4a2b2d4859e61640f3b14f0
describe
'54244' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOJ' 'sip-files00227.pro'
e295c2bbf87de0a24f9467a3797566ed
06d5a265dca83a6d97d07dd35e78ace5f5748ebb
describe
'44850' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOK' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
1b2b570ccbeb96c5666f819ac7625c61
509032795841a16bb883b7af04ac4b0e254049ec
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOL' 'sip-files00227.tif'
095c8adc7e6944463e78c6f9fa691282
edfd66c24f5a784d510525dc1c6764e2e9091307
describe
'2335' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOM' 'sip-files00227.txt'
92f71fcd121c7d18895e88678315b60e
243e977dc47127f251ae6d03af9e3b42f908a928
describe
'11567' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJON' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
8c691276d029e291d385f7ba92505f18
49f1442169064623774eb3cd8643e59c7e20335e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOO' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
3db446e4e79b872d10b7e1722176317a
df20d30be4d1f264d74d065d8355dddbc2883f5d
describe
'177935' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOP' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
10a2d00b779db181561675e9a62b2d2b
b5fce984ff3b06a47d0f4af79cecf82602ebfc57
describe
'39474' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOQ' 'sip-files00228.pro'
3fbbad76132cb35c678ee1bced1f27a5
b3e868b7e29d83a7b36834d0be7f1d09823b2d9c
describe
'49654' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOR' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
531a2e3bbf05077afebe4562a6ab2d1f
c4919adf35cf8234f3e84d9a6f38807afa057ae6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOS' 'sip-files00228.tif'
eb10f647c89c64be7ef56e4d9ec0bc19
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOT' 'sip-files00228.txt'
39a618d507066974edb498b51c3fc3ba
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describe
'12116' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOU' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
0bbe82377388229ecff0003d1fa3443e
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describe
'288236' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOV' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
334b58df153bc29f2bc5d5648c596a4e
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describe
'169921' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOW' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
ff7ebb9e83447eff13990086d2630ded
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describe
'57143' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOX' 'sip-files00229.pro'
f6fafb9343a61712304f0288c2e7cd16
cd55cad494b23e6923a50150a1a97e4f6e46334f
describe
'49960' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOY' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
50168991f7fcafdbf77002b5a4aed779
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJOZ' 'sip-files00229.tif'
1408b0e0d916519a263ed4e120ab8681
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describe
'2400' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPA' 'sip-files00229.txt'
6c4b532f91241cab90041cfeca906ce4
3c36260725293194f9cef9accb896c5131969a29
describe
'12734' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPB' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
3716037ffb46fcade356b3c7b8b3578f
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describe
'288011' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPC' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
d05f802b91eb98f025b55afe6b695b92
1c7b6a662d923b2668bc1e54fd0e50cf7a9e43de
describe
'174736' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPD' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
7f02a4368197c85bf5c577540fa92538
bf39f503c9ac408aef0ddf599019353d9a3bdf13
describe
'36534' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPE' 'sip-files00230.pro'
790e1810c1009526d102984a7174182e
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describe
'47780' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPF' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
ebb1e5ad7423de221a304a4b788b1b73
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPG' 'sip-files00230.tif'
5d85765f60a56e375c546d5f7a546730
4dd657693057210398b213b68e7a1fd81c0e5b69
describe
'1612' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPH' 'sip-files00230.txt'
71ea9b797579b903a8adbfcb558d71b8
5bf9925ff18a6e09fcdb7a2d987f7c3364c65e8c
describe
'12097' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPI' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
feb3ebba5944bbc10437d6dca0277357
3d1374a15011cfd825d2bd2e25a10cff3f7fd468
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPJ' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
2c502a1444b5ee739d413837ce2fb187
b34d07c0b38865406c721adab82d7b10810dc0e2
describe
'156400' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPK' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
b885cf11e45977d555c58f4c34cd6049
1cd19369d3e8a7cff9a76c7bd788401eddc3125d
describe
'43240' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPL' 'sip-files00231.pro'
709475002477321696baadccfd6695f7
aa5e37bd780d08e07e0efb8b5ae4dfb1bf8e2b5a
describe
'47560' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPM' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
ec7e31a90e07b12b93634bcc1cbbb608
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPN' 'sip-files00231.tif'
e1c0d0169803297fd809df945a5c3513
e770cf6a0e53c87d110251e07b2dcad1e9f90d1f
describe
'1828' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPO' 'sip-files00231.txt'
4f092c46fa67a0a179ffec47878e861c
d214c3b6ddde62f72b86130b31996848964a174a
describe
'12049' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPP' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
8fa398cd7ce3c7f1bc9b994629e9af09
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describe
'287802' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPQ' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
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describe
'149191' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPR' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
f783606f01de1c20ab3bb477542bfffa
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPS' 'sip-files00232.pro'
d9856b85525fe9ec646b67fd882230c3
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describe
'47422' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPT' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
b5a928844d119fee5650ba04443d4991
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPU' 'sip-files00232.tif'
3b9bce880c7a0c4f152310d736618f63
52520e23355eb38aeb8deb4df4593ae2b299b531
describe
'1632' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPV' 'sip-files00232.txt'
7807925027d1cabedf9ec3ea274c3dcc
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describe
'12269' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPW' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
de0023f92eaf0c6a34a415adbc78fdf4
9c6fd93e61c1cdad56b1f3bacbce9cc8a5894d99
describe
'287859' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPX' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
8ff142d1025cf69a0203f27ade2d03eb
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describe
'171358' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPY' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
8fe7e0d4203155d3f740970fa73da5cc
3357eaca1751116c38c94871749f448c3817694e
describe
'59040' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJPZ' 'sip-files00233.pro'
f9c0bf54e360238d78f8b3dca122fd87
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describe
'48878' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQA' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
ac3a9cb08ba91368bff3163dc32c1549
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQB' 'sip-files00233.tif'
5de71040edc9152d3b31fac2e3ea1752
dddee7430b99483f98e6eb679400d0e542cb505a
describe
'2553' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQC' 'sip-files00233.txt'
228b5d5f3e1cd2b05d28c7cf26699586
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describe
'12613' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQD' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
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describe
'287979' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQE' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
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describe
'188450' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQF' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
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describe
'50876' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQG' 'sip-files00234.pro'
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describe
'52696' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQH' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQI' 'sip-files00234.tif'
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describe
'3785' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQJ' 'sip-files00234.txt'
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describe
'13387' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQK' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQL' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
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describe
'175418' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQM' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
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describe
'64006' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQN' 'sip-files00235.pro'
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describe
'50067' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQO' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQP' 'sip-files00235.tif'
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describe
'2730' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQQ' 'sip-files00235.txt'
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describe
'12202' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQR' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
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describe
'288055' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQS' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
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describe
'97154' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQT' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
37b7b8a2130baf789be6f49742239ff6
aae8b679df52a89a3614a92a5f957b24b1cbb2c0
'2011-12-30T10:54:30-05:00'
describe
'17850' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQU' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
c789eec7da2441a93bebf5a3edaec34d
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQV' 'sip-files00237.tif'
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describe
'3445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQW' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
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describe
'396705' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQX' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
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describe
'81403' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQY' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
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describe
'16109' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJQZ' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
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describe
'9526472' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJRA' 'sip-files00238.tif'
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describe
'3761' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJRB' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
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describe
'369264' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJRC' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
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describe
'77550' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJRD' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
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describe
'13748' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJRE' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
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describe
'8873336' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJRF' 'sip-files00239.tif'
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describe
'3111' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJRG' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
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describe
'93643' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJRH' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
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describe
'35659' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJRI' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJRJ' 'sip-files00241.pro'
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describe
'8662' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJRK' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2254744' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJRL' 'sip-files00241.tif'
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describe
'3477' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJRM' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
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describe
'32' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJRN' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
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describe
'337947' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJRO' 'sip-filesUF00087076_00001.mets'
fb0dead19b09ef7aea2e37323dfa6031
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describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T20:33:07-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'440489' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUDfileF20090118_AACJRR' 'sip-filesUF00087076_00001.xml'
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e25538cf682348f865ee9f6dd45315749b82c31c
describe
'2013-12-13T20:33:03-05:00'
xml resolution


xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008707600001datestamp 2008-10-23setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Tommy the adventurousdc:creator Cartwright, S. E.Copping, Harolddc:publisher Blackie and Son, Limiteddc:date 1898dc:type Bookdc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00087076&v=00001dc:source University of Floridadc:language English



NORWICH

oe BOARD.



2 La BUYER. Ltr, SO | iN
ri a x



AWARDED ane

For regularity of attendance,

good conduct, and proficiency.

GEORGE WHITE,

CHAIRMAN OF PHE BOARD.



SYDNEY. COZENS-HARDY,

clean

es WN











J. & S, 4000. 3,97, F. NO. 42,

The Baldwin Library

KiB









M3
*€4’ TALL STERN-LOOKING MAN SEIZED FLORA BY THE ARM

AND TOMMY BY THE COLLAR.”
TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS

BY

Ss. E. CARTWRIGHT

Author of ‘Such a Popular Girl”, ‘ Almost a Heroine”, &c.

WITH THREE ILLUSTRATIONS BY HAROLD COPPING



LONDON
BLACKIE & SON, Litrmp, 50 OLD BAILEY, EC.
GLASGOW AND DUBLIN
1898
CONTENTS.

CHAP. Page
I. Aunt Jann’s COMPANIONS,. » »« » 6 + + « « 7
TDs TLOMMY IN! TOWN eu feces. Soe Sine coor eue eral

TiI> Frorna’s Femnp,. 6 6 es oe ee Re ee re OD
Vo Der MISTA RB eee ee ee eee eles abe eee,
V. Tommy Hsoapms rromM tHE Dunaron, . .. . . 65
VI. Apour Cuevmr Boys, . . . 1.22 0 « « + 88
VII. Av vam Reorory, . . « « © © © «© «© © +» 100
VIII. Tum Sonoon Feast, . . . 1. 1 «© «© «© © «© + LIT
IX. Tam Iratran Again, . . 2. . 6» «© « « « 184
X. Dousrrun KinpNess, .. . . se es . 149
XI. How to Buiwp a Hovusz,. . . . .... . 165

XII. Wetcome Homp,. . . « » « 0 « ites 180
ILLUSTRATIONS.

Page
‘“‘A TALL STERN-LOOKING MAN SEIZED FLORA BY THE

ARM AND ToMMY BY THE CoLuar,” . . . Frontis. 61

‘WITH A ORY OF TRIUMPH TOMMY RUSHED HEADLONG ON

PHM OPHIER, os Geo eck hehe ON 8 oie hee nee e ee Oe

“To's ALL RIGHT,—HN’S GONE; FANOY IF HE'D COME

BAOK AND CAUGHT US!” , . 6 © © © » « « » 124




TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

CHAPTER I.

AUNT JANE’S COMPANIONS.

3] BOY and girl were standing side by side on the
4] door-step of a country house, disconsolately
watching the back of a carriage that was fast
disappearing in the distance. They were feel-
ing unusually downcast, having just parted with their
parents for—as it seemed to them—the almost intermin-
able period of a month. However, even the depth of
low spirits brought about by this separation could not
long keep them silent.

“They always come back again,” ventured Flora, with
the hopefulness of seven.

“Ah! but this time they are crossing the sea. Very
likely they’ll be shipwrecked,” rejoined Tommy, his hope-
fulness subdued by an extra year of experience.

“T thought it was only sailors who were shipwrecked,”
urged the little girl.

“You're a silly thing, that’s what you are,” said
Tommy, in such a tone of conviction that it left no room
for argument. “Of course, you can’t know anything


8 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

about the sea,” he continued, “when you haven't yet
begun to learn geography. Why, I dare say you don’t
even know the difference between a bay and an isthmus!”

“T don’t believe you do yourself!” exclaimed Flora
defiantly.

This abrupt statement happened to be perfectly true,
and Tommy thought it best to change the subject.

“ After all, it’s no good talking about lessons when we
have a holiday. We might as well be doing them,” he
remarked with some sense. “Besides, we have to look
after Aunt Jane, as she is our visitor. You know Mama
particularly said we were to be companions to her. She
repeated it twice just before the carriage started.”

“But how can we be companions to a grown-up per-
son?” interrupted Flora.

“T dare say you can’t, but I can,” said Tommy con-
fidently. ‘You seem to forget,” he added, “that I was
eight last week, and shall go to school and wear cloth
clothes at Christmas.”

“Nurse says you won't find them nearly so comfortable
as sailor suits,” interposed the little girl.

“What does Nurse know about it, indeed? Has she
ever worn cloth knickerbockers, or sailor suits either, I
should like to know?”

Poor Flora was silent, being now thoroughly puzzled.
Theoretically she knew that Nurse was always in the
right. And yet Tommy’s argument seemed sound.

However, Tommy had often observed that though his
sister was rather slow at retorting to arguments, she
would return again and again to the same point until
she had thoroughly mastered the case. The only chance
of peace lay in an instant change of subject.
AUNT JANES COMPANIONS. 9

“Tt doesn’t seem as if we were obeying Mama’s last
words,” he remarked. “I should think Aunt Jane has
been by herself for at least a quarter of an hour. I’m
going to look after her.”

“So am I!” cried Flora, suddenly losing all interest in
the question of clothes. And the two children ran in-
doors together.

Miss Jane York was an elderly lady, being aunt to the
children’s father, at whose request she had consented to
leave her comfortable London house for a month and
mount guard over her young nephews and nieces during
their parents’ absence. The invitation had fitted in well
with her plans, as she had arranged to have her house
painted that summer, which, under other circumstances,
would have necessitated a prolonged stay in sea-side lodg-
ings, where the cookery might have been indifferent and
the drainage doubtful.

Now, Oakdale Court was a thoroughly comfortable
country house in a beautiful neighbourhood, and it
would be a pleasant occupation to superintend the
training of Fred’s and Mary’s dear little children for a
few weeks. That was what poor Miss York said to her-
self. She had only seen the children now and then for
a few minutes in the drawing-room, and retained a pleas-
ing recollection of pink cheeks, downcast blue eyes, and
clean white muslin frocks. Besides, they had an excellent
nurse, and a most competent daily governess who took
charge of the two elder children during the whole morn-
ing. Consequently the responsibility did not seem ex-
cessive.

The bustle of saying good-bye to the travellers being
over, Miss York went straight to her room to rest. She
10 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

had travelled down from London the day before, and her
head was still aching from the effects of the railway jour-
ney. An hour’s rest on the sofa before luncheon was
what she felt she required, and to ensure getting it with-
out any interruptions she prudently locked the door of
her bedroom. Determining to give herself every chance
of recovery, she did not even take a book, but lay with
closed eyes dreamily devising little plans for enter-
taining the dear children who had been left under her
charge.

In the afternoon, if sufficiently rested, she intended to
go for a drive, and it occurred to her that Tommy and
Flora would probably consider it a great treat to be
allowed to accompany her. She was a kind old lady,
and fully intended that the children should be so happy
for the next month as never once to miss their parents.
‘When she came to think it over, the poor little things
had looked rather downcast that morning, in spite of
being given a holiday to cheer them up.

Aunt Jane was not personally acquainted with many
children, but she had once read a beautiful poem about
a pet dog that pined away, refused food, and died when
its master went abroad, and it was not unnatural to
suppose that children were at least as affectionate as
dogs. Supposing anything of the sort happened to dear
chubby Tommy, or pretty golden-haired Flora, whilst
their parents were away! Aunt Jane’s brow wrinkled
with anxiety.

The fate of the two little ones did not worry her so
much. She felt a sort of confidence that Nurse would
be able to curb their infant affections sufficiently to insist
upon their eating. At this moment a terrific noise in
AUNT JANE’S COMPANIONS. Il

the passage suddenly caused her to start up, trembling
with alarm.

“What is it?” she cried feebly. ‘Oh, dear! my poor
head! What is it?”

“Tt’s us!” shouted Tommy, battering at the door for
admission; “it’s only us coming to see how you are
getting on. And Flora was in such a hurry she caught
her toe in the mat and tumbled down. Didn’t you hear
a bump? She knocked her head against the wall and
dropped the vase she was bringing you.”

“What vase was she bringing me? I really can’t hear
what you say through that door, wait a moment till I
open it.” And Aunt Jane rose languidly from the sofa,
and began to straighten her cap in front of the looking-
glass.

“Oh, don’t trouble!” rejoined Tommy; “TI will make
you hear right enough.” And putting his lips to the
keyhole he bawled: ‘It’s all her own fault. I wanted
to carry it because she’s too young, and she pushed me
away and ran upstairs in such a hurry that she tumbled
at the top. That’s how it happened. And the water is
all spilt, and bits of broken china everywhere. She'll cut
her hands I expect, but she won’t listen—”

“You haven’t said it all!” interrupted a shrill voice
mingled with tears. ‘You haven't said that they were
my own flowers out of my very own garden, that I’d
picked for Aunt Jane. Better than any you've got, so
you needn’t laugh at me. There!”

A loud shriek from Tommy irresistibly suggested the
" idea that his sister was revenging her want of luck on
his person with some sharp instrument.

“Tt was only a little pinch,” said Flora scornfully.
12 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“No, I haven’t a pin or a needle either! There now,
you can see!”

“Then your fingers are as sharp as pins,” answered
Tommy, ostentatiously rubbing his arm as he heard Miss
York unlocking the door. “And you're a sneak too,”
he added in a lower voice. ‘Only sneaks pinch. Luke
says so—and he knows. He was at school eight years
before he came here.”

“Papa said you were not to talk to the stable-boys,’
began Flora, just as Aunt Jane opened the door.

“Where is the broken vase?” said the old lady. “No,
don’t touch it, Tommy; you will only cut your fingers.
I will ring for the housemaid to come and sweep up the
bits. But, my dear children,” she exclaimed, putting up
her eye-glass and inspecting the fragments more nearly,
“what was it you broke? Surely not one of the picces
of Worcester china out of the drawing-room? Dear!
dear! how did you come to meddle with one of the
drawing-room ornaments? That was very naughty, you
know.”

“We couldn’t find anything else,” said the boy ob-
stinately, “and the flowers were dying. If Flora hadn’t
been so silly it would have been all right. Come on,”
he exclaimed, suddenly catching his sister's arm, “here
comes Nurse. We had better be off before she sees the
mess!” And in another moment the children were flying
headlong down the stairs.

After giving directions for the removal of the broken
china, and indulging in a few mournful laments over the
fate of the valuable vase, Miss York returned to her
room, and having carefully locked the door again lay
down upon her sofa, She had scarcely had time to

)
AUNT JANE’S COMPANIONS. 13

close her eyes and compose her mind to rest, when she
was roused up by the sound of muffled footsteps and a
gentle scratching on the door.

From sheer force of habit she was about to say “Come
in”, when she luckily reflected that the housemaid never
begged for admission in this way. The bare idea of that
highly respectable servant crawling down the passage on
hands and knees,—as from faintly audible sounds she
guessed her present visitor was doing,—was ridiculous
in the extreme. Besides, from certain low murmurings
she soon learned that two persons were encamped on the
mat. In fact, there could be no reasonable doubt that
after an absence of about five minutes Tommy and Flora
had returned to the attack.

“Aunt Jane,” whispered Tommy through the keyhole,
“we want to say something.”

Meeting with no reply, he repeated this observation
several times in louder and louder tones.

Miss York lay perfectly still and silent, hoping that if
the children received no answer they would soon tire of
waiting and go away. This plan seemed to succeed, for
presently there was complete silence, broken only by an
occasional low scratching sound.

“Look there!” cried Tommy suddenly, quite forgetting
in his excitement that he had intended to whisper.
“Just look, Flora! Isn’t it beautiful? And that’s only
the beginning. As she’s so sound asleep we'll scratch
all we meant to say on the outside of her door, and then
when she comes down to lunch she'll see it and know
what we—”

Miss York did not stay to hear more. Springing up,
she pulled open the door so quickly that both the chil-
14 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

dren fell forward on their faces. As for the neat brown
paint that she had vainly hoped to save, it was already
adorned with various wild flourishes and rudely-formed
letters.

Tommy recovered himself first, and rising to his feet
proceeded to explain his intentions and illustrate his
method of carrying them out.

“This is what I did it with,” he began, exhibiting an
old pocket-knife with a broken blade. “And this is how
I did it,” he continued, suddenly gouging a large piece
of paint off the door and offering it to Miss York for
inspection.

The poor old lady stood aghast. Without any clue to
the children’s motive their action seemed a deliberate
outbreak of vice, bordering on insanity. She turned
despairingly to Flora, whose innocent blue eyes were
fixed on a pair of rusty scissors that she was holding in
a menacing attitude.

“You naughty children! You very naughty children!”
was all Aunt Jane could find to say.

“You don’t understand,” began Tommy. “You think
we scratched the door because we liked doing it. Well,
that wasn’t the reason at all.” He paused for a moment
to contemplate affectionately the lump of paint on the
point of his broken knife. “It was a message to you,”
he continued. “We couldn’t get into your room or
make you hear, so we were going to write a sort of
letter to say that if you wanted us we were in the
garden—”

“We can’t write it now, because we've said it,” inter-
rupted Flora, looking regretfully at her scissors.

Tommy shook his head solemnly. ‘No, we can’t
AUNT JANE’S COMPANIONS, 15

write the letter now,” he repeated; “but,” and his face
lighted up with a happy thought, “we'd better scratch
out what we've written!”

Before Miss York could interfere the door was scored
with half a dozen deep cuts, compared with which the
original injuries were a mere nothing.

“That'll do,” cried Tommy, coolly shutting up his
knife, and taking not the slightest notice of his aunt’s
shriek of dismay. ‘Nobody can read it now,” he added
consolingly. ‘We don’t want everybody to read our
letters to you—we like them to be secret.”

Miss York was so bewildered by this explanation that
for a moment she stood speechless, pointing with a
trembling finger at the spoilt paint.

The children took advantage of her silence to run off
without further discussion.

“Tf you want us,” cried Tommy from the bottom of
the stairs, “you can shout to us out of the window; we
are sure to hear.”

Miss York returned to her room, and for the third
time composed herself to rest on the sofa. If there was
one thing more certain than another, it was that she had
no intention of shouting through the window, as her
nephew elegantly expressed it. She was only too thankful
to think that she had seen the last of the children for
the present.

“Tés very hard,” remarked Tommy, as he strolled
round the strawberry-bed—“ it’s very hard to-be a com-
panion to people who lock themselves into their bedrooms
and only come out to scold!”

“But we oughtn’t to have hurt the paint,” replied
Flora, who, now that her excitement was over, was
16 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

beginning to feel rather frightened at what she had
done.

“What's the good of saying that now?” inquired the
boy scornfully. ‘Besides, your scissors made bigger
scratches than my knife.”

“Both points scratched,” remarked Flora. In spite
of being rather frightened and repentant she could not
help feeling a little proud of having done exactly twice
as much damage as her brother.

“Only girls use scissors,” observed Tommy, who had
been half-jealous all along of his sister’s weapon; ‘and
I wonder what Nurse will say when she finds you’ve
taken them out of her workbox,” he continued viciously.

“They are only her very old ones. She hardly ever
uses them,” muttered Flora, feeling very aggrieved at
Tommy’s remarks, as he had distinctly encouraged her
to take the scissors, and, in fact, first put the idea into
her head.

Tommy frequently did this sort of thing, for, though
in the main a kind-hearted boy, it must be admitted
that he was unnecessarily fond of teasing his younger
sister. Now, however, he saw that he had gone too far,
as poor Flora was puckering up her face and preparing
to cry.

“Oh, you silly girl!” he said, squeezing her hand
with rough kindliness. ‘It was only a joke, don’t you
see? Nurse doesn’t mind about these old scissors. I
dare say she has quite forgotten that she has any scissors
by this time. Just come along and see if there are some
strawberries left on these beds.”

The children were well within their rights this time,

for when most of the strawberries had been picked, the
(11 829)
AUNT JANE’S COMPANIONS. 17

gardener removed the nets which were used to protect
the crop from the birds and allowed Tommy and Flora
to finish up the little fruit that remained. The search
after the scattered strawberries took them some time, and
their attention was too much absorbed for more talking.

“T do believe we've eaten them all,” said Flora at last,
rising from her knees and wiping her juicy fingers on her
pinafore.

“Oh, I say!” exclaimed Tommy suddenly, “we've
forgotten all about Aunt Jane; and after Mama told me
so particularly to look after her whilst they were away;
and of course visitors ought to be given things first.
But I am afraid there are no first or last strawberries
now,” he added, ruefully surveying the bed.

“Perhaps she doesn’t like strawberries, as she’s so
old,” suggested Flora.

But this pleasing supposition was soon dispelled, as
both the children remembered seeing their mother send
off a box of early fruit as a present to their aunt, before
she left London.

There was a melancholy silence for about a minute,
and then Tommy said decidedly: “We must get her
some gooseberries. They are not quite ripe, but I think
they will do.”

“How shall we get her to unlock the door again?”
inquired Flora, as they ran off to carry out this idea.

“Oh, Ive thought of all that,” replied Tommy, whose
mind, it must be owned, was remarkably nimble. “It
won't do to go knocking again, she'll only think we’ve
come to disturb her. Ive got a good plan; and goose-
berries are better for it, really, than strawberries, though
they aren’t quite so nice to eat.”
ri (829) B

i
18 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

All this time Aunt Jane was lying on the sofa in her
bedroom, trying to compose her shattered nerves and
rest her aching head. She closed her eyes and lay
quietly between sleeping and waking, just conscious of
the soft summer breeze that wafted the sweet scents of
the garden through the open window. It is true that
her enjoyment was slightly tinged by anxiety lest she
should catch cold; but the odour of the honeysuckle
was so delicious, and the effort of rising to close the
window so great, that she determined to risk it.

Aunt Jane never noticed that she had fallen asleep
until she began to dream. And her dream was not at all
a pleasant one. She fancied that she was working in a
coal-pit, when the roof began to give way. It all seemed
terribly real. She even felt the coal falling on her in
lumps, such as one puts on the fire, and in the midst of
her fright she had time to think how terribly the black
dust would dirty her white lace cap.

“T never will put on my best cap again to go down in
a coal-pit,” she thought. ‘No, it’s no use telling me that
the Lord Mayor orders it. If he wants to be smart he
can wear his cocked hat. Dear me! this is no joke!”

And indeed it was not. For at that moment there
was a loud shout of “Look out!” from the other miners,
followed by a tremendous fall of coal. Aunt Jane put
her hands over her face and screamed, feeling sure that
this time she could not possibly escape. And as she
screamed she woke.

“Now that was a very remarkable dream,” observed
the old lady, lying back on the sofa cushions and looking
up with intense relief at the perfectly solid white ceiling
overhead. ‘Ah! J know what must have put such a
AUNT JANE’S COMPANIONS. 19

ridiculous thing into my head,” she continued, as con-
sciousness gradually returned. “Of course I read in the
papers yesterday how the Lord Mayor was getting up
a subscription for the people who were injured in that
dreadful mining accident. Well, happily it was only
a dream!”

But was it? At that moment there was a real shout
of “Look out!” and a shower of hard objects fell all over
the room, one hitting Aunt Jane on the side of the nose.
She sat up, wondering if she could really be going mad.
But one glance on the floor explained it all. The carpet
was strewn, not with lumps of coal, but with hard green
gooseberries that had evidently been showered in through
the open window. Below on the gravel-path stood the
two children, holding a very dirty pocket-handkerchief,
into which they were plunging their hands, evidently
preparing for another throw.

Aunt Jane did not hesitate. She rang the bell and
gave some orders. In a very short space of time the
children were being led into the house, ignominously
taken prisoners by the nursemaid.

“And a fine mess your dress is in, Miss Flora!” she
said. ‘And clean on this morning too! Nurse says
you are to come and have it changed at once. And
Master Tommy is to go to Miss York in her room.”

Flora went off to the nursery rather envying her
brother, for she could not bear the fuss and trouble of
putting on clean frocks; and, besides, Nurse was sure to
have a good deal to say on the subject of the dirty one.
But perhaps after all Tommy had the more disagreeable
interview of the two. For when he found that Aunt
Jane had been a good deal hurt by the blow on her face,
20 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

and that the hard gooseberry had left quite a bruise on
her cheek, he felt heartily ashamed of his thoughtless-
ness. He was sensible enough to know that if the blow
had been on her eye the results might have been very
serious.

“We did not mean to hurt you a bit,” he began;
“only to give you a sort of jump. And the gooseberries
aren’t half bad, I’ve bitten several to try. You see, we
had finished the strawberries before we remembered that
you were a visitor, and ought to have things first.”

“Thank you for thinking of me,” said Aunt Jane, who
was certainly a very kind old lady. And Tommy felt
more ashamed of himself than ever

To show his sorrow he insisted upon getting a can of
hot water and helping Miss York to bathe her cheek, to
which attentions she submitted cheerfully, although it is
probable that she would have preferred the assistance of
her maid.

“Shall you write and tell Papa about the goose-
berries?” inquired Tommy anxiously as this operation
was coming to an end.

“No, I don’t wish to trouble your parents now that
they have gone abroad for a holiday,” said Aunt Jane.
“But I know when they return they are sure to ask if
you have all been good children, and it would have been
a great pleasure to me to have given them both a truth-
ful and a pleasant answer.”

“You shall be able to do so! You shall indeed!” cried
Tommy. “We won’t do one troublesome thing all the
month they are away.”

“Tm afraid that is expecting an impossibility,” sighed
Aunt Jane. “But if you will do your best, and try to
TOMMY IN TOWN. 21

show a little consideration for other people, I shall be
quite contented.”

Tommy promised faithfully that he would do his best,
and then at Miss York’s request left her to try and con-
clude her much interrupted rest on the sofa.

CHAPTER IL

TOMMY IN TOWN.

FTER what had occurred in the morning, Aunt Jane
must have been a very forgiving person to take
Tommy for a drive with her in the afternoon. But she
was quite determined to act kindly towards the children
whilst their parents were away; and Tommy’s plump
cheeks and engagingly simple smile never failed to soften
people’s hearts towards him. However, Miss York had
profited sufficiently by her experience of the morning
not to attempt taking both children out in the carriage.
If all went well, and the drive proved a success, Flora
might have her turn to-morrow. For the present she
was condemned to a quiet walk with the nursery party.
Tommy felt rather proud of sitting in the great open
carriage by the side of such a dignified old lady. He
sometimes went for drives with his mother in a little
pony-cart, and on one or two occasions he had been
squeezed into a corner of the wagonette, almost hidden
between the grown-up people. But now he was occupy-
ing the principal seat in the great open carriage that was
seldom used except for visitors, who were either too
grand or too infirm to climb higher. It was on beauti-
22 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

fully easy springs, and the cushioned-seat reminded
Tommy of a feather-bed. He wondered that his mother
so seldom drove in this delightful carriage, and preferred
rattling about everywhere in a tiny pony-cart. To be
sure, the pony really went quicker than the pair of fat
brown horses, who jogged along at the slowest of trots,
with their sleek sides shining like looking-glass in the sun.

Tommy glanced at his aunt, and then at himself. He
was sure they looked exactly like an old picture that
hung in the nursery, of the Queen and the Prince Consort
driving through Hyde Park. In the picture they were
bowing to the people on either side, and this Tommy
considered added greatly to the grace of their attitudes.
Almost before he thought about what he was doing he
made a low bow to an old man who was passing, who
immediately returned it in the most polite manner.
This was exceedingly gratifying. Tommy could not
resist bowing to the next person with exactly the same
result. It seemed to him after all not very difficult to
behave like a king or queen, and for the next few
minutes he continued to bow graciously to everybody
he met. A few people stared at him in surprise, but far
the greater number smiled and returned his salute.

“Who is that lady?” inquired Aunt Jane, turning
suddenly towards him. ‘I mean the one we have just
passed, who was nodding at you. Some friend of your
mother’s, I suppose?”

Tommy said nothing, being somewhat ashamed of the
way in which he had been amusing himself. Fortunately
at that moment they were approaching the town of Tor-
bury, and Miss York became so absorbed in considering
at what shop she could buy a simple bonnet for wearing
TOMMY IN TOWN. 23

in the country that she forgot to pursue the subject any
further.

Torbury was several miles from Tommy’s home, so
that a visit to it was something of an excitement.
Rather to Miss York’s relief he did not wish to come
into the shops with her, being afraid that if he once got
inside a house he should miss some of the wonders that
seemed to be perpetually passing in the streets. As the
carriage was waiting in front of a large milliner’s in the
chief street of the town, Tommy really saw a great deal
of life by merely sitting still and opening his eyes. In
the course of the first few minutes he counted that no
less than three policemen, four volunteers, and a monkey
on a barrel-organ went past within a few yards of him.
He could have touched the monkey by putting out his
hand; in fact the man very politely stopped close to the
carriage and played a little tune on the organ twice over.
When he had finished he waited for a moment, as if
expecting some applause. Tommy, who was always
anxious to be agreeable, gave him an encouraging smile,
and the man began the tune for the third time. When
it was at an end Tommy smiled again, but rather faintly,
as he was getting tired of the organ, and would have
been glad to turn away and look for fresh objects of
interest on the other side of the road. However, he felt
that it would be distinctly rude to turn his back on this
kind stranger who was taking so much trouble to amuse
him, so he sat patiently, trying not to look wearied of
the performance.

All at once the organ stopped. Tommy felt that this
was his opportunity, and that he must speak before the
tune began for the fourth time,
24 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“Thank you for playing to me,” he said, as gratefully
as he could. “The music was very nice indeed, but I
won't trouble you to stay here any longer. I daresay
you are busy.”

To his surprise the man did not move away, but taking
off his ragged cap held it out towards the carriage, at the
same time speaking rapidly in a foreign language.

“Dear me, this is dreadful!” thought Tommy. “If
that man is an Italian—and his face is so brown I think
he must be—I shall never make him understand that I
don’t want any more music. I wonder if Jones could
explain it to him.”

He glanced up at the old coachman’s broad back as
he sat half-asleep upon the box. Jones did not turn
round, never even haying noticed that the organ was
playing close to the carriage. Tommy did not like to
call out to him, and was wondering what to do next,
when the Italian began to speak in very broken Eng-
lish.

“A penny,” he said; “only one penny, one leetle
penny.” And as the boy stared at him in astonishment
at the funny foreign accent, he continued beseechingly:
“One leetle penny. We are hongrie, vary hongrie.”

Tommy turned scarlet as it occurred to him that this
was probably what the man had been waiting for at the
end of each tune. He put his hand in his pocket, and
drew out two dirty handkerchiefs, the broken knife, and
some string, but, as might have been expected, not the
smallest coin. He remembered, longingly, the money-box
on the corner of the nursery shelf, in which he kept all
his treasure, consisting of a half-crown and quite a heap
of pence and halfpence. But unfortunately a penny in
TOMMY IN TOWN. 25

his pocket would have been more useful than a bag of
gold at a distance.

“Tm so sorry, I haven’t any money here. Really I
haven't,” said Tommy apologetically, and much afraid
that the man would not believe him.

And indeed the poor Italian could scarcely believe
that this smartly-dressed little gentleman, sitting alone
in such a grand carriage, had nothing to give him.

“One leetle penny,” he repeated, clasping his hands.
“Only one leetle penny for bread.”

Tommy was so moved by this appeal that he felt he
must do something at once. ‘“ Wait a moment,” he cried.
“Tl ask Aunt Jane for some money.” And scrambling
out of the carriage he ran into the shop.

If the Italian did not quite understand his words, at all
events he could see that the boy meant kindly towards
him. He stood back against a wall and waited quietly
for Tommy’s return.

Now the shop into which Ronny rushed in search of
his aunt happened to be a large millinery and dress-
making establishment, and it must be owned that he felt
terribly shy when the glass door slammed behind him,
and he found himself in a large show-room, surrounded
by a number of very smartly-dressed ladies. His shy-
ness turned to real terror when he suddenly noticed that
several of the gayest ladies had no heads. But just as
he was preparing to fly from such a horrible sight, he
made the soothing discovery that after all they were
only wire frames on which various new dresses were
being displayed. However, there were several alive
ladies in the room also, and one of them,—who looked
like a duchess at least, and wore such a stiff black silk
26 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

dress that she couldn’t have tumbled down if she tried,—
came up to him and inquired what he wanted.

“Ts Aunt Jane here?” he asked timidly.

“Aunt Jane?” repeated the lady in some bewilder-
ment.

“Yes, Aunt Jane. She went in at this door a long
time ago, but I can’t see her here now.” And Tommy
looked carefully round the room, as if he thought Miss
York might be hiding under some of the piles of rich
silk and brocade that lay scattered about on the tables.

“The carriage from Oakdale Court is waiting outside
the door,” remarked a younger lady, advancing to join
in the discussion.

“Of course,” said Tommy eagerly; “that’s what we
came in. It’s my papa’s carriage, and Aunt Jane is
staying with us while he and Mama are away. But
Mama likes driving in the pony-trap best. She says it
goes quicker.”

“T think I know who you are looking for now,” said
the lady who resembled a duchess. ‘She is upstairs in
the millinery department. This young lady shall show
you the way.”

“Oh, thanks! I can find it right enough,” cried
Tommy; and anxious not to give any more trouble he
ran off up the stairs, and opened the first door he saw.

Exactly at that moment Miss York happened to be
standing in front of the looking-glass in the act of trying
on a new bonnet. She gave a violent start at the unex-
pected appearance of her impetuous little nephew, and
the lace bonnet catching in a glove-button was twitched
off her head, and hung suspended ridiculously from her
wrist. Now Miss York was an old lady who had a great
TOMMY IN TOWN. 27

regard for the proprieties of life, and it seemed to her
painfully shocking to be standing there before three
shop-women and a small boy, without any covering on
her head beyond a scanty twist of gray hairs. She col-
oured with confusion, and made a desperate effort to
release the entangled bonnet, at the same time threaten-
ing Tommy with instant punishment if he did not run
away at once.

It is needless to say that Tommy risked the punish-
ment and stayed. He had no intention of causing
annoyance, but he had never even imagined what Aunt
Jane would look like without a cap or a bonnet, and he
simply stood spell-bound before such an extraordinary
sight.

“Go away, you very naughty child!” cried Aunt Jane,
tugging at the bonnet with the energy of despair.

* Allow me, madam,” interposed one of the shop-
women, skilfully disentangling the lace and replacing
the bonnet on Miss York’s head.

This act instantly restored the old lady’s self-respect.
With her usual dignified manner she turned to Tommy,
—who was standing open-mouthed in the doorway,—
and inquired what was the reason of his “pursuing her
into the shop in this unheard-of manner ”.

“Tm very sorry if you don’t like it, Aunt Jane,” said
Tommy, who dimly perceived that he had produced
rather a disturbance. “I only want a penny,” he added
hurriedly; “only one penny, and Ill go away directly.”

“A penny, indeed!” repeated Miss York. ‘ What do
you want with a penny, I should like to know?” Kind
old lady though she was, she could not help feeling irri-
tated with the boy for putting her in such an undignified

1?
28 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

position. She felt hot all over whenever she remembered
what an absurd figure she must have looked standing
bareheaded with her few gray hairs exposed to the piti-
less light of day. ‘Go back to the carriage at once,”
she said severely, ‘“‘and sit there quietly until I come
out.”

“Oh, but I can’t go without a penny. I can’t, really
shouted Tommy, running towards his aunt, and tugging
at her dress in great excitement. ‘There’s a poor man
starving to death, and a monkey. At least, they are
both very hungry. They said so. It’s quite true, though
I couldn’t understand it all, because he was an Italian,
you know. They always are, Nurse says, unless they
are Germans. But he must be very hungry or he
wouldn’t ask for bread; at least, I never do—only cake
and biscuits.”

“J don’t quite understand,” interrupted Miss York.
“Ts anybody in distress, do you say?” She instinctively
produced her purse as she spoke, for she could never
resist a tale of woe.

“Oh, thank you, thank you!” cried Tommy, who now
felt that his request was as good as granted. “Yes,
he’s very hungry, he said so himself. Why, what’s that
you've given me? It’s not a penny, is it? Sixpence,
did you say? That will buy him a nice lot of bread,
won't it? But are you sure you will have enough left
to do your shopping?” he asked with an anxious after-
thought. “I shouldn’t like to take all the money you've
got.’

Miss York could not help smiling. as she held up her
well-filled purse. Tommy gave one hurried look, and
feeling satisfied that he was not leaving his aunt in

1?
TOMMY IN TOWN. 29

extreme poverty, he lost no time in running downstairs
with the much-prized sixpence tightly clasped in his ©
hand. But hardly had he disappeared from the room
than Miss York was calling to him to return. Receiving
no answer, she hurried to the window just in time to see
her nephew engaged in conversation with a peculiarly
shabby foreigner, whose swarthy face and tattered coat,
though possibly picturesque, had a disreputable look to
English eyes.

“Come back! Come back at once!” cried Aunt Jane,
leaning out of the window and raising her gentle voice
to the best of her ability. ‘Oh, dear! He doesn’t hear!
He is sure to catch small-pox or something, talking to
that dreadful man!” she cried, turning in great distress
to the sympathetic shopwoman at her side. ‘“Can’t one
of you go down and stop him!” she exclaimed vehemently.
“Think if anything happened to him! Colonel York’s
eldest son, and such a dear child, though sadly thought-
less. And the newspapers full of fever cases!”

However, there was no need for any interference.
Tommy had caught sight of his aunt at the window,
and guessing the meaning of the words he could not
hear, he thought it prudent to cut short his interview
with the Italian, who went off down the street well
pleased with his sixpence, and smiling gratefully at the
little boy who had taken such trouble to get it for him.

After this adventure Miss York thought it safer to
take Tommy into all the shops with her, and it was not
until she had almost completed her purchases for the
day that she again left him in the carriage.

“T shall not be more than five minutes at the most,”
she said. “I am just going into that confectioner’s at
30 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

the corner to get something. It will not be very amus-
ing, so you had better stay quietly here till I return.”

Tommy guessed at once by something rather mysteri-
ous in his aunt’s manner that she was going to buy
sugar-plums for them, and wanted to keep it a secret.
So he readily promised to sit very still, and not cause
her any anxiety by standing on the seats, or hanging
out over the sides of the carriage to see how the wheels
go round. Tommy was very fond of sweets, and would
not willingly have interfered with the purchase of them
by any misconduct on his part. Besides, he was really
grateful to Miss York for so quickly forgiving his rude
intrusion at the milliner’s, and he firmly determined to
repay her by being a very good boy indeed.

For at least three minutes Tommy sat perfectly still,
amusing himself by admiring the beautiful array of fancy
cakes that stood in the confectioner’s window. There
was one in particular, covered with pink and white
sugar, that made him feel positively hungry to look at.
It was not so large as some of the others, yet Tommy
liked it much the best. He was a trifle greedy, but at
the same time he had a considerable appreciation of
beauty, and liked things to look pretty as well as taste
nice. Then he turned his eyes to the shelf above, where
stood rows of glass jars, each one containing a different
kind of sweet.

“T wonder which she will choose,” speculated Tommy.
“Of course I like butter-scotch best; while Flora al-
ways wants chocolate, and the little ones don’t care
what it is so long as it’s sweet. I don’t believe they
know the difference. Nurse always likes them to have
soft things best, so that they can’t choke— Hullo!”
TOMMY IN TOWN. 31

This last word was exclaimed out loud. And no
wonder. As Tommy sat gazing absently at the shop-
window, he had distinctly seen a rough-looking man,
who was sauntering along the footpath, put his hand
quickly into the carriage as he passed and snatch out a
parcel.

“Hullo! That’s not yours!” cried Tommy.

The man made no answer, but hurried on without
even turning his head. It was a critical moment. If
Tommy ran into the shop to tell Miss York what had
happened the man would probably disappear before he
came out, for after what had occurred there could be
no doubt that he was a thief. The parcel contained,
amongst other things, some lilac ribbon for Aunt Jane’s
cap, which it had taken much time and trouble to get
in quite the right shade. It seemed too ungrateful to
let this precious ribbon be lost while Aunt Jane was
busy buying sweets for them. Tommy determined that
he would save it, and without pausing to consider any
possible difficulties, set off racing down the pavement.

The thief instantly turned up a side street, and
quickened his pace.

On ran Tommy, panting so that he could scarcely
breathe. His cap had fallen off as he jumped out of the
carriage, and of course he could not spare the time to
stop and pick it up. This did not distress him much; a
fact of far greater importance was that the lace of his
Oxford shoe had come undone, and was trailing on the
ground, Once or twice he nearly fell over it, and the
shoe by degrees became so loosened that at last it actually
slipped off. However, wild with excitement, Tommy
ran on as if nothing had happened,
32 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

The thief probably felt little fear of being caught by
so young a boy. Still, he knew that if it ever occurred
to Tommy to call for help, which up to this time he had
never thought of doing, it might turn out an unpleasant
affair. After glancing round to make quite sure that there
were no other pursuers, the man suddenly plunged down
a dark alley between two rows of miserable houses. Then
he appeared to stumble and fall to the ground.

With a little cry of triumph Tommy rushed headlong
upon him, and was just seizing the coveted parcel when
the man, who had only been pretending to fall in order
to deceive, sprang to his feet and hit out savagely with
his fist, rolling the little boy over and over in the gutter.
Poor Tommy, blinded with mud, and quite out of breath
after his long run, was unable to rise, but continued to
cling convulsively to the end of the brown-paper parcel.

“Drop that!” growled the man roughly, “or it'll be
the worse for you!” accompanying his words with another
blow.

Tommy dropped back, half-stupefied with pain and
fright. Only one idea remained in his poor battered
little head; namely, that he must save Aunt Jane’s lilac
ribbon from that dirty man.

Angered by the child’s obstinate grasp, the thief raised
his foot, and was preparing to deal a kick with his heavy
boot, which would probably have silenced Tommy for
many along day. But just at that moment he himself
received a tremendous blow on the back from a wild
tattered figure that darted out from under a low door-
way.

The friend who had come at such a timely moment
to Tommy’s assistance was none other than the poor
“WITH A CRY OF TRIUMPH TOMMY RUSHED HEADLONG ON
THE THIEF.”


TOMMY IN TOWN. 33

Italian, whose wife and children inhabited a miserable
lodging in this very alley. It so happened that he had
just hurried back to them, bringing some food bought
with the famous sixpence, when the noise of a struggle
brought him to the door. Apparently the Italian knew ~
nothing of the rules of fair fighting, or else he considered
that this was no occasion for standing on ceremony.

At all events, having once knocked his adversary down,
he continued to belabour him on the head and shoulders
with a stick, and even to dance on his prostrate body.
The monkey all the while clung to his master’s shoulder,
jabbering wildly. The inhabitants of the wretched
houses poured out into the lane, and a crowd quickly
collected, which only dispersed at the approach of a
policeman.

All this time Tommy had been lying half-stunned in
the gutter. Though still conscious enough to hug the
brown-paper parcel, he did not know much of what was
going on, and when the policeman lifted him up and
propped him against the wall, he was quite unable to
explain what had happened.

“Them furriners are always at the bottom of all the
mischief,” said the policeman, who was much puzzled by
the strange group before him.

The thief seized the opportunity to begin a long story,
explaining how the Italian and the little muddy boy
were accomplices, who had first stolen a parcel out of a
shop, and then half-murdered him for trying to stop
them. Tommy was far too knocked about and stupefied
to contradict, and the Italian chattered angrily in his
own language, which nobody understood.

Then the policeman, fairly dismayed by so much con-
(M329)
34 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

flicting evidence, said he should take them all three
into custody, and they could repeat their stories to the
magistrate. This suggestion had the merit of at once
reducing the party, for the thief, suddenly diving under
the arms of some of the spectators, disappeared down
the alley. Scarcely was he out of sight when the Italian
started off in the opposite direction.

The poor policeman was more bewildered than ever.
There remained nothing for it but to march Tommy off
to prison. He was not quite sure that he was doing
right; but, on the other hand, it seemed very probable
that Tommy was a thief. The boy was hatless, shoeless,
covered with mud, and clinging to a parcel through the
torn paper of which could be seen several articles that
evidently did not belong to him. It was really very
difficult for the policeman to decide rightly. But before
he had dragged Tommy very far the Italian again darted
down the lane, beckoning and gesticulating to an old
lady, who was following him as fast as she could.

“Aunt Jane!” cried Tommy, his voice suddenly return-
ing, “I’ve got it—it’s quite safe! If the ribbon is a little
dirty, I couldn’t help it—I couldn’t, really!”

When Miss York came, bit by bit, to understand the
story, she clasped Tommy in her arms, and almost cried to
think of the risks he had run in defending her property.
Then she did not lose a moment in thanking the Italian,
and making him a handsome present in acknowledgment
of his timely help.

‘When she had come out of the confectioner’s shop
and missed her nephew, she had been quite at a loss
what to do next. Jones had been sitting half-asleep
upon the box, and had never even noticed that the
FLORA’S FRIEND. 35

little boy had left the carriage. Miss York might have
searched for hours without finding Tommy if it had
not been for the ready wit of the Italian, who, finding
it impossible to make the policeman understand that
the muddy little boy was really a young gentleman
belonging to a grand carriage, had run off in search of
his friends, and almost dragged the old lady to the scene
of action.

The unfortunate policeman was most apologetic for his
mistake, and did his best to make up for it by carrying
Tommy carefully back in his arms to the carriage; for,
in addition to other injuries, he had stepped on a bit
of broken glass and cut his shoeless foot. Aunt Jane
followed behind, slowly picking her way down the muddy
back streets; and the Italian brought up the rear of the
procession with the monkey on his shoulder, and holding
the parcel, that had caused all the trouble, in his hand.

CHAPTER III.

FLORA’S FRIEND.

OMMY was fit for nothing but to go to bed after the
adventures of the afternoon. It is true that he was

at first very anxious to stay up for tea, on finding that
Aunt Jane had actually bought the very pink-and-white
cake that he had so much admired in the confectioner’s
window. She showed it to him in the carriage on the
way home, carefully wrapped up in silver paper; and as
he admired the beautiful sugar ornaments, he felt more
36 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

than ever glad that he had not allowed the thief to run
off with his kind aunt’s lilac ribbon.

“You are sure the ribbon’s not hurt?” he inquired
anxiously at least half a dozen times during the drive.

“Tt’s quite safe, my dear,” was Miss York’s invariable
reply. Still, she carefully kept the parcel out of sight;
for as the paper cover had been torn half off, and the con-
tents bespattered all over with mud, it was not probable
that the lilac ribbon would be of much further use. But
she did not wish Tommy to be disappointed by discover-
ing that his efforts had been in vain.

Long before they reached home, however, the little
boy’s head was aching so much that he forgot everything
else, and was only too glad when Nurse gave him a
basin of bread and milk, and tucked him up in bed
just as if he had been Gerald or the baby. All next
day he had to keep very quiet, on account of the cut
in his foot, which, though not serious, prevented his
putting on a boot.

At first he was rather proud of hobbling about the
house with his foot tied up in bandages, but when Flora
ran out to play in the garden after lessons, leaving him
indoors to amuse himself with a book, he certainly felt
very disconsolate. If the truth must be told, a book
was no great amusement to Tommy, who could not read
sufficiently well to enjoy it by himself. On the present
occasion he was listlessly turning over the leaves, looking
again and again at the few pictures, and wondering what
they were about, when the door quietly opened and Aunt
Jane walked into the school-room. She had a proposal
to make.

“In my young days,” she said, “children were all
FLORA’S FRIEND. 37

taught to occupy themselves, and very much happier
they were for it. Now, can you or Flora knit?”

“No,” answered Tommy, somewhat surprised by this
question. ‘But of course boys never work.”

“Oh, don’t they, indeed!” said Aunt Jane. “Why,
I have known village schools where the boys knitted
whilst the girls sewed. There is no reason why boys
should be more idle and awkward than girls.”

“T think I should like to try,” began Tommy, with a
sudden recollection of how he used to enjoy working in
the nursery with a bit of cotton tied to a pin.

Miss York smilingly produced a large parcel—the very
one, indeed, that Tommy had rescued on the previous
day. The lilac ribbon had already been removed and
handed over to the maid, to be cleaned as well as might
be. There remained several large skeins of wool, in
various bright shades.

“T will begin to teach you at once,” said Aunt Jane,
“and when Flora comes in she can learn if she wishes.”

No sooner said than done. Tommy was a very atten-
tive pupil, and by luncheon-time he had learnt how to
make a stitch with tolerable ease and rapidity.

“ And now what shall I make this afternoon?” he said
to his aunt whilst he ate his dinner, which he had down-
stairs in the middle of the day. Miss York liked the
company of one of the children at breakfast and luncheon,
although, since she had known them a little better, she
could not help feeling thankful that Flora still had her
meals in the nursery.

“Well,” she replied thoughtfully, “of course there are
a great many useful things you can knit after a time,
such as mittens and comforters—”
38 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“Oh, but it would seem silly to make these now, in
the middle of summer!” he interrupted.

“They would be ready for the winter if you began
now,” suggested Miss York

But Tommy evidently did not take to the idea. Like
many other people who have only just acquired an
accomplishment, he rather underrated its difficulties, and
it seemed to him that he could manufacture any garment
he chose in a very short time.

“How about woollen reins for playing horses?” sug-
gested Aunt Jane, rising to the occasion. “I have seen
children playing very nicely with them on the sands at
the seaside.”

The little boy was immensely pleased at this idea.
“T will work at it all the afternoon,” he said. “And I'll
make Flora work too, only she must learn how to make the
stitches first. And then when it’s finished I'll harness
her and pretend she is a pony.”

After luncheon Tommy was allowed to hop across the
garden, and sit working under the shade of a large tree.
It seemed very curious being out of doors with only a
bedroom slipper on his foot, and Nurse had some diffi-
culty in preventing the two little ones from knocking
up against it every moment. Gerald, who was a fat little
boy of four, never could understand that it hurt people
to be trodden on; and the baby was at an age when he
crawled, rolled, and tumbled over everything. However,
Tommy sat on the rug, working away most industriously,
and very proud he felt when he could show Nurse a
whole inch of knitting.

Flora’s conduct was very disappointing. She looked
upon all kinds of work as only to be done at lesson-
FLORA’S FRIEND. 39

times; and having tried a few times and failed to make
a stitch, she impatiently threw away the wool and went
off to play on the lawn with Gerald.

*T sha’n’t let you play with my reins if you don’t helr
to make them!” shouted Tommy from his rug under the
tree.

“T don’t want to!” retorted Flora promptly. She felt
pretty sure that Tommy would tire of his new employ-
ment long before the reins were finished; and even if he
did not, the pleasure of contradicting was almost equal to
the possible joys of playing horses.

After a slight dispute of this kind Flora generally went
off and played with the little ones for a time, just to
impress upon Tommy the fact that she was quite inde-
pendent of him. But, to tell the truth, she punished
herself far more than her brother by this proceeding, for
Gerald only cared for very babyish games, and, besides,
would not do anything that she told him. For instance,
this particular afternoon, no sooner had Flora invented
a beautiful game, in which they had to pretend that the
lawn was sea and they were fishermen in a boat, than
Gerald insisted upon upsetting everything. First, he
said he must be captain and give the orders. Now this
was clearly impossible, as he was three years younger
than his sister. Then he ventured to say that the boat
could not possibly sail because it was only an old carriage-
rug. Of course Flora couldn’t stand that, especially as it
happened to be true. She told Gerald so, tapping his
head with a stick to enforce the observation, and he most
ungratefully responded by a dismal howl of distress that
brought Nurse running to the spot.

“Really there’s no peace with you, Miss Flora!” she
40 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

exclaimed angrily. She had been busy sewing under
the tree when disturbed by Gerald’s cries, and in jumping
up her thimble, scissors, and needle-case had rolled off
her lap into the grass—a mishap calculated to make
anybody feel impatient. ‘There are young ladies I’ve
heard of,” she continued, “who'd be a pleasure to have
in the nursery, they’d be sucha help with the little ones.
Tve known them play with the baby for an hour together,
let alone telling stories to their younger brothers and
sisters to keep them quiet, whilst one got through a bit of
work. Instead of that, it’s nothing but worry when you
get with the little ones! I declare, they’re as good as
gold when they’re alone.”

So saying, Nurse led off the still sobbing Gerald, and
Flora was left alone.

For a time the little girl stood still, pouting her lips,
tearing bits of grass to pieces in her fingers, and, in short,
exhibiting all the signs of an approaching fit of sulks.
She was ashamed to go back to Tommy after having so
proudly asserted that she could amuse herself better with-
out him. There was not much left to do except hide her
discomfiture as best she could from the eyes of the party
under the tree.

Now, this part of the garden was only divided from
the fields by an iron railing, over which the children
could easily climb. Presently Flora was sauntering
along in the meadow, making a great pretence of collect-
ing a large bunch of flowers so that nobody should
suspect she was not perfectly happy. In reality she
was merely snatching off the first things that came to
hand, not caring what they were. The effect, as may be
imagined, was hardly satisfactory, and directly she had
FLORA’S FRIEND. 4]

strayed far enough from the others not to be noticed, she
threw the ill-assorted bunch of dandelions, daisies, and
sorrel into the ditch. Then, after looking round to see
that she was not noticed, she ran quickly to a little gate,
opened it, and hid herself in the friendly shade of the
New Forest.

Some forty years before this the children’s grandfather
had laid out a plantation within sight of his house to com-
memorate the birth of his eldest son, now Colonel York.
Some family friend, joking over the puny size of the
freshly-planted trees, had laughingly called it the New
Forest—a name that had stuck to the plantation ever
since. It was a very favourite resort of the children’s
whenever the grass was dry enough to permit of their
crossing the field to reach it, and the name had long since
lost most of its absurdity. Indeed, to the children it
always seemed a very real forest, for often as they had
played in the corner nearest the house they very seldom
had time or courage to penetrate far into the shady depths,
where the brambles and ferns had grown into a tangled
mass under the tall trees.

Poor Flora, scolded by Nurse, and divided from the
other children by her own act, was just in the condition
of reckless ill-temper that inclines one to undertake
desperate adventures. It was not enough for her to
remain as usual just inside the wooden wicket-gate, where
the trees had been cleared away, and the sun shone merrily
down on the rabbit-cropped turf. That was no new
place; the children often played there for hours, whilst
the nurses sat sewing on a mossy bank. Nurse never
cared to go far into the wood; she said it was gloomy.
And so indeed it was, and for that very reason Flora
42 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

liked it this afternoon. So turning her back resolutely on
the sunshine, she plunged into the thickest part of the
undergrowth.

At first it was a dreadful struggle getting along at all,
the brambles seemed so extraordinarily anxious to pre-
vent her from pushing past them. Not content with
inflicting several rents on her pretty pink cotton frock,
they scratched her hands and face, so that at any other
time she would probably have turned back, in tears.
But now Flora’s temper was thoroughly roused. She
felt as if the brambles were continuing the opposition
from which she had been suffering all the afternoon, and
the more they tore at her the harder she pushed and
struggled.

Gradually the ground became clearer as she advanced
further into the wood, and the dense mass of trees kept
out more and more of the sun. Even the brambles seemed
to shrink from growing in that chilly solitude. The ground
was bare except for a thick carpet of fir-spines, in which
no fern or grass cared to root. It was quite easy to walk
now, and Flora tried to believe that she had found a
delightful place and was enjoying herself immensely.

But in reality she almost regretted the loss of the
brambles. Struggling with them had occupied her
thoughts, and though they were not pleasant they were
rather companionable. There was something very
gloomy and almost alarming about walking on and on
through thousands of fir-trees, all exactly alike, with
their tall straight stems running up like pillars into the
dark green roof overhead. There were no birds or
squirrels to amuse her. Everything alive seemed to
have been left behind in the sunshine, outside the wood.
FLORA’S FRIEND. 43

A quarter of an hour passed; then half an hour. Flora
began to feel as if she had been in that wood the whole
afternoon. It seemed an endless time since she had left
the merry party upon the lawn. If she went back now
it would be nearly tea-time, and in the bustle of going in
and undressing Tommy would forget to tease her about
the knitting. Besides, they were to have the famous
pink-and-white sugar-cake for tea; that in itself would
attract all the attention.

As soon as Flora remembered the sugar-cake she deter-
mined to return home at once for fear it should be all
divided before her arrival. However, it is one thing to
decide to leave a wood and quite another thing to find
one’s way out. After running up and down in several
directions, all of which looked exactly the same, it sud-
denly occurred to the little girl that she was lost.

Flora did not settle down quietly under an idea of this
kind. Without a moment’s hesitation she began to scream.
Now this certainly seemed a most useless proceeding, as
she was apparently alone in the wood, and her voice
could not possibly reach as far as the garden. How-
ever, curiously enough, she had not screamed for more
than two or three minutes when a friend came to her
assistance.

It is true that his first appearance frightened her worse
than anything that had gone before. There was a kind
of shout, followed by much cracking and snapping of
small boughs. Then she saw something sliding rapidly
down the smooth stem of one of the tall fir-trees, and
just as she had redoubled her shrieks under the im-
pression that it was a brown bear descending to eat her,
avery dusty and untidy gentleman alighted upon his feet
44 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

at her side. _In his hand he held a stick with a little
net attached to one end.

Flora’s screams stopped suddenly at this wonderful
sight. She stood staring at the stranger in absolute
silence.

“Are you hurt?” he asked, naturally rather surprised
at the loud shrieks of distress having stopped so com-
pletely on his appearance.

Still no answer, for Flora was much more shy than
Tommy, and though she longed to ask the stranger all
about that funny little net, she could not summon up
courage to speak a word.

“Do you want anything?” repeated the gentleman
twice; and then, as Flora still remained silent, he added:
“T really can’t help you unless you tell me what is the
matter. If you don’t want anything, it is no good my
waiting here.”

Thinking that he was about to leave her again, Flora
puckered up her face and uttered a dismal wail.

“Oh, don’t ery,” said the gentleman kindly. “I
won't leave you if you don’t like it. But really you
must try to be a sensible little girl and explain what you
want to do.”

He spoke so pleasantly that Flora’s shyness soon melted
away, and she gave him a very detailed account of the
afternoon’s proceedings.

“And now I suppose you want to go home before
Tommy eats all the sugar-cake?” he said, when the story
was finished.

Flora nodded her head, at the same time creeping a
few steps nearer, and confidentially taking his hand.

“Well, it won’t do to leave you out in the wood all
FLORA’S FRIEND. 45

night, so perhaps we had better be starting home at
once,” remarked the gentleman cheerfully, as he put his
net under his arm, and picking up a small case that was
lying at the foot of the tree, hung it across his shoulders
with a leather strap. “I should have liked an hour
more,” he muttered to himself; “but still I have done
a very good afternoon’s work.”

“Why were you climbing a tree?” asked Flora as they
walked along, her curiosity gradually getting the better
of her shyness.

“Why shouldn’t I?” said the stranger, laughing.

“Oh, I don’t know. I thought only boys climbed
trees, not grown-up gentlemen,” replied the little girl in
a puzzled tone. ‘And why did you take a fishing-net
with you?” she continued. ‘There can’t be any fish up
there.”

“How do you know that whales don’t make nests in
fir-trees?” he said solemnly. ‘You’ve heard of sea-eggs,
haven’t you? Well, one always climbs trees to get eggs.”

Flora grew very red.“ You are only laughing at me,
and I really wanted to know,” she muttered.

“Yes, to be sure; it’s a shame not to explain things
properly,” said the gentleman good-naturedly. “I
remember I hated being crammed with nonsense when
I was a child. Well,” he continued, “I was catching
moths to put in my collection. This is a famous wood
for moths. There is something on the bark of the trees
that they like, I suppose.”

‘But how do you prevent them from flying away ?”
inquired the little girl.

“Unfortunately I have to kill them,” replied her friend.
“But I think, if it is properly done, the moths don’t
46 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

suffer at all.” Then he opened the case and showed her
a bottle in which was placed something that poisoned
moths and butterflies, so that they died without a struggle
directly they smelt it. ‘You must come and see my
collection some day,” he added, seeing how much in-
terested she seemed.

“ But where is your home” interposed Flora anxiously.
“T can walk quite two miles, and Tommy always says
he walked five once, but I don’t think he really knows.
Besides, we are never allowed to go very far, because
of being back in time for tea.”

“Well, my home just at present is at the rectory,”
replied the gentleman, “so you won’t have to walk very
far, or be late for your meals when you come to see—”

“But I thought Mr. Barnard lived at the rectory?”
she interrupted.

“Exactly so. I am Mr. Barnard,” answered the
stranger, laughing at her bewilderment. “You don’t
understand that?” he added, seeing that she remained
silent.

Flora looked very confused. She did not understand
what he said, and what was more, she did not believe it
Mr. Barnard, she knew, was an old gentleman with white
hair. She saw him in church every Sunday, and could
likewise remember perfectly when he had christened
baby. Besides, she often met him on the road when she
was going for walks with Nurse. Altogether there was
no possibility of mistake.

“You don’t seem to remember having seen me before ?”
said the gentleman.

“No, I don’t,” blurted out Flora. ‘And I don’t see
how you can be the rector either.”
FLORA’S FRIEND. 47

“The rector! No, I should think not!” and her friend
burst out laughing. “I am only the rector’s son,” he
continued; “and I remember you as a very small person
in a perambulator. Only I have been abroad for some
years since that.”

“Then you aren’t a rector?” inquired Flora, slowly
grasping the situation.

“No, indeed! I’m an engineer by trade,” he replied
merrily. “But here we are at the edge of the wood.
Can you run home by yourself, or shall I take you back ?”

“Oh, take me back, please!” cried the little girl, hold-
ing his hand fast. She knew by experience that she
was not nearly so likely to be scolded by Nurse for being
late, if she returned under the protection of a stranger.
Besides, she wanted to exhibit her new friend to Tommy.

After all, Flora was not so very late, for by way of
giving Tommy a little extra treat, to make up for his
injuries, Nurse allowed the children to have tea on the
lawn this fine afternoon. It took a considerable time
to carry out tea-cups and spread rugs, so that everybody
could sit in a convenient manner round the pink-and-
white sugar-cake, which formed the centre of the feast.
The preparations were not quite complete when Flora
and her friend came in sight.

“Here you are!” shouted Tommy, hobbling across the
lawn towards them. He was longing to know where
Flora had been all this time, and who it was returning
with her.

The little girl did not keep him long in suspense.
“T was lost,” she began directly, “and he came and
found me. He was ina tree in the New Forest, catching
moths with a fishing-net. And they are all dead now in
48 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

a bottle. It doesn’t hurt them a bit. And he makes
engines—”

“Can you really?” interrupted Tommy excitedly.
‘‘Pve a little one that Papa gave me on my last birthday.
It goes by steam, and I’ve broke it, and we can’t mend
it. But of course you'll know the way.”

“T will do my best,” said Mr. Barnard; “but I must
tell you at once that I never have made anengine. I’m
only a sort of soldier.”

“Then why did you say you were an engineer if it
wasn’t true?” inquired Flora severely.

“Well, you see, it is true, only you didn’t understand
me,” he said cheerfully. “There are different sorts of
engineers. Iam the sort that the Queen sends about
with her armies to build bridges, and fight alittle
between.”

“Have you ever killed aman?” asked Tommy solemnly.

“Never.”

The children looked a trifle disappointed. They
would have liked to hear how it was done. On the other
hand, it would have been a great responsibility to ask
almost a murderer to have a slice of pink-and-white
sugar-cake.

“Then you have never even been hurt yourself, I
suppose?” persisted Tommy.

“Oh, yes, I have,” replied Mr. Barnard, quite glad to
be able to supply a few stirring details. “I was un-
conscious for nearly a week, and I still have a great
scar all across my forehead, as you can see.”

The children looked at him with awe-struck admiration.

“How did it happen?” inquired Tommy breathlessly.

“Well, if you must know, a very awkward workman
THE MISTAKE. 49

dropped a big stone off the top of a wall when I was
walking underneath. Yes, that’s the real truth,” he
continued, laughing at the children’s downcast faces.
“JT wish I could tell you that it was a black man trying
to chop off my head with a huge sword, but unfortu-
nately the facts are much duller.”

“Still, you know a lot of funny things, I dare say,”
said Tommy, “although you haven’t killed anybody, or
even been properly wounded.”

This being the opinion of both the children they
begged their new friend to stay to tea, which he did;
and Flora, as a token of peculiar favour, lent him her
own mug to drink out of. Nurse said that a. gentleman
ought to have a proper tea-cup, but Mr. Barnard pro
fessed himself perfectly satisfied, and as he had the mug
filled three times, and ate two slices of cake, besides a
lot of bread and jam, it seems certain that he must have
enjoyed his tea.

CHAPTER IV.

THE MISTAKE,

ILORA,” said Tommy a few days later, “I have a
plan.”
“You always have,” retorted the little girl, “but they
never come to anything.”
“Oh, don’t they though! Didn’t I think of putting
a pillow on the top of the drawing-room door to fall on
Emily’s head when she came to dust in the morning?”

“Yes, and it fell on Papa’s instead, when he came
(1 829) D
50 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS,

down early to look for a book. I don’t call that much
of a plan.”

“But I really do have some very good ones,” pleaded
Tommy. “And, besides, you know you spoilt my best
one when we hid in the apple-house, and were going to
stay there all night and eat as many as we liked, only
you got frightened, and began to cry directly it became
dark.”

“Tt wasn’t the dark I minded,” said Flora angrily;
“T am not a bit afraid of it at home. Only you said the
rats were coming to bite our toes.”

“If you interrupt so often I shall never be able to tell

you what we are going to do. . . . Oh, bother! There’s
the bell to go to lessons.” And Tommy began to walk
slowly off.

“Oh, I must know! Please tell me first!” cried his
little sister, running after him and tugging at his coat,

“No, I can’t stop to talk now. I must go to lessons,”
answered Tommy virtuously. “If you hadn’t been so
cross you would have heard all about it before.” Then
secing that Flora was preparing to make her disappoint-
ment known to the household in a loud roar, he added
hastily: “If you are good Pll tell you about it after
dinner. Come behind the holly hedge in the garden,
and I'll be waiting by the sweet peas.”

Nursery dinner was apt to be a terribly long meal
when one was in a hurry to get out. Flora found it so
on this occasion, and she became so impatient when
Gerald asked for a second helping of rice pudding that
she could not resist slyly slapping his fat hand. As
Nurse saw her, she was punished by not being allowed
to leave the nursery until the other children were also
THE MISTAKE. 5l

ready to go out, so that she gained nothing by her im-
patience.

It was always rather difficult for Flora to secure a
private interview with Tommy when Nurse was in the
garden. Long years of practice had rendered her skilful
in detecting when the children were plotting to run off
together and do mischief; for that, I am sorry to say, is
what Tommy’s plans generally meant. However, the
opportunity came when Gerald, who was pretending to
have a tea-party all by himself in a corner of the lawn,
put a stone in his mouth, and choked so shockingly that
Nurse had to run to him and pat his back violently,
which took up all her attention.

Flora was watching intently to see if the stone went
up or down, when she felt a tug at her sleeve.

“Come here,” whispered Tommy. ‘“She’s so taken
up with Gerald’s chokes she won’t notice anything.”
Tommy had no intention of referring to his younger
brother’s misfortunes in an unfeeling manner, but an
attack of choking in the nursery was no great novelty,
and was sure to end very dully in Nurse extracting the
object from the victim’s mouth with her finger. If there
had been the faintest chance of a more eventful termina-
tion pure curiosity would have kept Tommy rooted to
the spot.

“Well, what’s your great plan?” inquired Flora breath-
‘ lessly, when they were sheltered behind the holly hedge.
“Has it anything to do with gooseberries ?”

“Much better than that!” cried Tommy. “We can
get into the gooseberry-bed any day. This is quite a
new thing. What do you say to going to tea with Mr.
Barnard to-morrow ?”
52 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“Has he asked us? Oh, what fun!” And Flora
clapped her hands with delight.

“Well, he hasn’t exactly asked us again,” admitted
Tommy, ‘but you know he said the other day he’d be
glad to see us whenever we liked to come and look at
his moths. So of course we can go when we like.”

“Without asking anybody’s leave?” said the little
girl, rather awe-struck by this audacious proposal.

“Tl tell you what. If we stop to ask everybody’s
leave we shall never go at all!” exclaimed Tommy.
“Aunt Jane will say we are not wanted, and Nurse will
be afraid of our catching cold or getting our feet wet.
And they won’t do more than scold a little when we
come back. I sha’n’t mind that if we’ve had great fun
with Mr. Barnard first.”

It sounded very delightful, and yet Flora could not
feel quite easy in her mind. She knew that it would be
impossible to thoroughly enjoy even tea with Mr. Bar-
nard if she was expecting all the time to be put to bed
in disgrace on her return. But it was no use trying to
make Tommy understand this feeling. When he had a
plan in his head he never would admit any objections to
it. All his plans seemed perfect until they turned out
failures, and then he never liked to be reminded of them
again. Just at present he was so full of paying a visit
to the rectory that it seemed the only thing worth living
for.

“Now don’t you be a silly,” he said, “and go and say
anything that will make Nurse guess what we're going
to do. You be very good at your dinner to-morrow, so
that you won’t be kept in with the children. And then
directly you come into the garden we'll creep off. I
THE MISTAKE. 53

dare say it will take them most of the afternoon to guess
where we've gone to, and all that time we shall be play-
ing with Mr. Barnard. Now, promise to do exactly as
I tell you, or I'll run off by myself without waiting for
you.”

Flora promised, because she could not bear to be left
behind. Whatever Tommy did she liked to do too,—
even if it frightened her.

On the following day Tommy, having finished his
dinner, politely held open the dining-room door for Aunt
Jane to pass out. He was dreadfully afraid she might
offer to walk about the garden with him until the nursery
dinner was finished, and the younger ones came out to
play. She sometimes did that on fine afternoons, and
usually Tommy was very proud of showing his aunt the
flowers, and telling her their different names. But to-
day he did not want anybody to interfere with him or
notice which way he went. Fortunately, Miss York
went straight to the drawing-room, as she was anxious
to finish writing a letter.

Tommy ran into the garden, and crouched down behind
the holly hedge, close to a row of sweet peas. It was
the place where he and Flora always hid when they
wanted to be out of sight of the windows, and she was
sure to look for him there. He waited impatiently for
what seemed a very long time, but nobody came.

“Bother Flora! Bother the nursery dinner! Bother
Gerald and Baby!” exclaimed Tommy. “I dare say the
silly little things are choking again, or something. I'll
just go off without Flora if she isn’t quick.”

But although he talked to himself in this desperate
way he did not attempt to move, for the expedition
54 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

seemed a little too formidable to be undertaken entirely
alone. So he passed the time as best he could in mak-
ing a sort of house out of the loose earth in the flower-
border; but as soon as he built it up it all slipped down
again, and excepting getting his hands very dirty he did
not do much. At last there was a sound of hurried
footsteps, and Flora came running round the corner
with a very red face. She gave a cry of delight when
she saw Tommy.

“Oh, I was afraid you would have gone!” she said,
throwing herself breathlessly on the ground. “Nurse
was called away, so I couldn’t ask her if I might run out,
and I waited a long time, and at last, as she didn’t come
back, I ran off without asking.”

“ And without your hat,” remarked Tommy. “I sup-
pose you couldn’t get it for yourself? You'll look very
funny running down the road with nothing on your
head.”

“T couldn’t help it,” replied the little girl half-crying.
“Tf I had waited for Nurse to bring my hat you would
have gone without me.”

“Well, there isn’t any time for you to go back now,”
said Tommy. “I hope you won’t get a sunstroke and fall
down dead like a man Mama told me about who didn’t
wear a hat in hot weather. I dare say you won't,” he
continued reassuringly, as his sister looked still more
inclined to cry at this gloomy prospect. “Tl tell you
what. Tl make a cap out of my pocket-handkerchief,
and then you'll be all right.”

Certainly the cap would have looked better if Tommy
had not been in the habit of using his handkerchief as a
sort of bag in which he carried marbles, gooseberries,
THE MISTAKE. 55

and sometimes even rare specimens of caterpillars and
snails. But Flora did not notice the dirt much, as with
deep interest she watched her brother knotting the four
corners, so as to make it into the shape of a small round
basin.

“That'll do,” he said, pulling it down over her ears
like a nightcap; “the sun won't hurt you now. It’s
a pity you have such an old pinafore on,—and it’s all
sticky too.”

“We had jam-roll for dinner,” explained Flora; “and
the jam was hot, and I dropped it—”

«Well, never mind,” interrupted Tommy; “I dare say
nobody will notice. You look all right. We must be
off before Nurse comes out. You creep after me, so that
our heads won’t show.”

Instead of running down the path to the end of the
garden, where there was a little gate on to the road,
Tommy chose to crawl the whole way on his hands and
knees between the rows of cabbages and beans. He was
closely followed by Flora, who imitated him exactly.
It was a much slower mode of progression than walking
down the garden path; but then it was so much more
exciting. The children quite felt as if they were cscap-
ing from enemies, and as if some real danger might over-
take them if thetops of their heads were seen for a moment.

A bitter disappointment awaited them at the end of
the garden, where they found the little iron gate, out of
which they intended to go,. locked fast.

“Can Aunt Jane have guessed what we were going
to do, and had it shut up?” inquired Flora in a frightened
voice.

“Not she,” said Tommy; “she didn’t guess any more
56 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

than Nurse. I know what it is. I heard Papa telling
the gardener to put a padlock on the gate, because boys
have been getting into the garden and stealing goose-
berries. That’s what it is.”

“Yes; but how can we open it?” asked Flora, return-
ing to the root of the matter.

The boy looked grave. It would be terribly dull
to give up the expedition now that they had actually
started. He looked at the gate doubtfully. It was
not very high, but there were iron spikes along the top.
“T think we might climb over if you pushed me up,
and when I’m at the top I'll pull you,” he said.

Flora was a brave little girl, and would never allow
herself to be beaten by her brother, although he was
a year older. First she supported him until he had
climbed high enough to catch hold of the spikes. He
was very heavy, and she had to push with her head as
well as her hands to get him up at all. Perhaps it was
rather lucky that she had not a proper hat on, or it
would certainly have been spoilt. And when it came to
Flora’s turn to climb over the gate she had nobody to
ee her from behind, and very hard work she found it.

ut she struggled up valiantly, much encouraged by
Tommy’s good advice from the other side, where he had
climbed down into the road. Unfortunately, just as
Flora was at the top of the gate he fancied that he
heard someone coming in search of them.

“Be quick! Do be quick!” he cried, “or we shall be
caught!” And poor Flora, in trying to hurry, missed
her footing, and would have fallen into the road and
been badly hurt, if her dress had not caught in one of
the sharp spikes, so that she hung suspended.
THE MISTAKE. 57

Oh, oh!” she gasped, “I can’t move! Help me down,
unhook me!”

This was easier said than done, as standing on tiptoe
Tommy could not nearly reach the top of the gate.
He pushed at Flora’s feet, but he could not lift her up
high enough to undo the frock. The poor little girl was
dreadfully frightened, besides being half-choked by hang-
ing in such an uncomfortable position. She begged her
brother to run back to the house and fetch Nurse to
release her, but Tommy could not make up his mind to
do this.

“Tf we get Nurse there'll be no more fun,” he said.
“We shall just be punished and sent to bed directly
after tea.”

“JT would rather get down and be punished,” sobbed
Flora, who felt that any change would be for the better.

“ But you would rather have a little fun first, wouldn’t
you?” pleaded Tommy; and without waiting for any
reply he gave a last tug at her feet.

There was a loud rending noise! The frock had torn
right down from the waist to the hem, and with a little
scream Flora fell into the road on the top of Tommy.
Both of the children got up covered with dust, but except
for a few scratches, neither of them was much hurt.

“We must run at once, or somebody will find us.
Oh, come on! Never mind your frock; it looks all
right!” cried Tommy; and they both started off up the
road.

“T can’t run any more,” panted Flora, after a few
minutes. ‘I want to rest.”

“We can’t rest here,” said Tommy, who was also
rather breathless. ‘Somebody will see us and tell Nurse.
58 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

We'll get into the fields. I know there’s a path to the
rectory across them.”

“Do you know the way?” inquired Flora presently,
as they were sauntering through the fields cooling them-
selves after their run.

“Of course; I know all the ways about here,” returned
her brother loftily. ‘I’ve been to the rectory often with
Mama.”

“‘How often?” asked Flora. ‘I don’t remember when
you went.”

“Oh, well, I have been—more than once; and I’ve
often driven to the door when Mama has been calling
there, and sat in the carriage outside. I didn’t care to
go in then,” explained Tommy, “because they were all
so old, but now that our Mr. Barnard is there it will
be quite different.”

In spite of the confidence with which Tommy spoke,
he was not really very sure of the right direction across
the fields, and it was rather a relief to him when, after
about half-an-hour’s walking, they saw a gray stone house
among the trees.

“There it is!” he exclaimed. ‘Didn’t I tell you 1
knew the way?”

“Is that the rectory? It doesn’t look like it,” said
Flora doubtfully.

“Because you see the back of it from the fields, of
course,” explained Tommy. “And you've only gone in
by the front door before.”

“Sha’n’t we go in at the front door to-day?” she in-
quired.

Tommy did not answer. To say the truth, it was
rather weighing on his mind how they were to get into
THE MISTAKE, 59

the house. It requires a good deal of courage to walk
up to a front door by yourself and ring the bell if you
have never done it before. On the whole, he rather
hoped that they should see Mr. Barnard somewhere about
the garden, which would save them from having to ex-
plain their errand to a strange servant. Now that they
were actually in sight of the house, Tommy could not
help feeling acutely conscious that the brim of his straw
hat was almost off and his hands exceedingly grimy from
the earth with which he had been playing before they
started. However, he derived a little comfort from the
thought that he was tidy and clean compared with Flora
in her torn dress, soiled pinafore, and dirty handkerchief
cap.

The children walked on towards the house almost in
silence. They were both feeling rather shy now that
their journey was so nearly over. Straight in front of
them stood a gate leading from the fields into the garden.
They opened it, stopped for a minute to listen, then
walked a few steps further, and finally crouched down
behind a large rhododendron bush, which hid them from
the windows.

“You see I did know my way to the rectory right
enough,” repeated Tommy, all the more defiantly because
of certain unpleasant doubts which would come into his
head. Of course it was the rectory; only he wished it
would look a little more like it. The house was so very
large and gray that it rather frightened him, and he
wished that he could see the other side, with which he
was more familiar. Above all things, he longed to catch
sight of Mr. Barnard, but though he looked in every
direction there was not a sign of the young man to be seen.
60 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“Tl tell you what,” said Tommy, “he must be indoors
reading the newspaper perhaps, or writing letters like
Aunt Jane. I might peep in at one of the windows and
try to see him.”

This seemed to both the children a decidedly easier
method of entering the house than ringing at the bell.
The windows of the lower rooms were about four feet
from the ground, so that with a little pushing from his
sister Tommy easily scrambled up, and seated himself
on the window-sill.

“Do you see him?” inquired Flora’s eager voice from
below.

“Well, ’'m not quite sure,” Tommy hesitated. “There’s
somebody there, but the room is so dark—”

“T’m sure I could see if you’d get down and let me
climb up,” interrupted Flora impatiently. It was very
dull work standing on the lawn and receiving little frag-
ments of information from Tommy above.

“What's the use of fussing?” replied the boy. “You
couldn’t tell who it was if you did get up here; nobody
could. You can’t see anything but his back.”

“Make him turn round then!” cried Flora, who was
skipping about excitedly. ‘Here, I know how,” she
continued, picking up a stick that was lying on the
ground and tapping the window with it before Tommy
could interfere.

“ Don’t do that!” he began angrily. Then without any
warning he slid down from the window-sill, and ran behind
the rhododendron, which had previously sheltered them.

“What's the matter?” said Flora, running after him.

“Tt isn’t him!” gasped Tommy in an awe-struck
whisper. “It’s an old man with a white beard.”
THE MISTAKE. 61

“Perhaps it’s the rector,” suggested Flora hope
fully.

“The rector hasn’t a beard, you silly! And it’s all
your fault for knocking on the window in that stupid
way instead of keeping quiet!”

Tommy, being frightened, felt it a sort of comfort to
abuse his sister. But before the two children had time
to quarrel seriously, something so terrible happened that
it seemed like a realization of the very worst dreams
they had ever had.

A tall stern-looking man in black clothes suddenly
stalked round the rhododendron, and before the children
had time to cry out, much less run away, he seized Flora
by the arm, and Tommy by the collar of his coat. Then
without a word of explanation he marched them off to-
wards the house.

The children were far too frightened to make any
effort to escape. There was something about the silence
and sombre clothing of their captor which made Tommy
think of an executioner, and vaguely expect the appear-
ance of a beheading-block or gallows, round the next
corner. Flora was spared this terrible anticipation, as
she had never heard of the existence of such a person;
but she was dreadfully frightened all the same. It is
certain that if the children had only guessed that the
cross-looking man, who was holding them so tightly,
was only a fidgety old butler, who did not approve of
strangers prying about the place, they would not have
been half so terrified.

The little procession entered the house and crossed a
large, dark, stone-paved hall, where their footsteps echoed
as if they were walking in an empty church. This was
62 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

all so unusual and alarming that poor Flora’s nerves
broke down, and she began to cry.

“Be quiet, can’t you! Mr. Arnold will soon give you
something to cry about if you go on with that noise!”
said their guide, roughly shaking her by the arm.

It was the first time he had spoken, and his words were
far from reassuring. Flora’s only reply was to cry a
little louder, and lean back with all her strength, so that
she had to be dragged like a sack.

At the end of the hall was an open door, through
which the man pushed his charges, whom he then let
loose, standing close to them, however, so that they
should not escape. The room was very large and dark,
being lined with high book-cases almost up to the ceiling.
Tommy recognized it as the same room he had looked
into through the window. He also knew again the old
gentleman with the long white beard, who was sitting
by the table, and he rightly concluded that this must be
Mr. Arnold.

“Now, what were you children doing in my garden?”
asked the old gentleman sternly. ‘You know you had
no business there at all, Where do you come from?”

Then Tommy did a very wrong and foolish thing.
He remembered that in fairy stories, when boys wander
by mistake into ogre’s castles, they never give their
real names and addresses on being questioned, but always
invent some long story to satisfactorily account for their
appearance. So he thought he would do the same, for-
getting that fairy stories were not intended as practical
guides to conduct.

“We are starving!” he began in a whining voice like
a professional beggar. ‘We haven’t had anything to
THE MISTAKE, 63

eat for nearly a week, And we came to beg a crust of
bread; that’s what we came for.”

“Smith,” said Mr. Arnold addressing his servant,
“does that little boy look as if he had not seen food for
several days?”

“No, sir,” replied the butler; “he doesn’t, sir. It’s
my belief he is not telling the truth, sir.”

“Well, perhaps it wasn’t a whole week,” interposed
Tommy; “I can’t quite remember. It may have been
yesterday we finished our last crumb, and then we found
some berries in the hedge this morning for our breakfast.
And we were told to come and beg at your house. The
gypsies said we were to. They beat us if we don’t beg.”

“Do you mean to say you belong to gypsies?” said
Mr. Arnold putting on his spectacles, and looking
critically at the chubby red-cheeked little boy before him,

“Yes, we run behind a caravan,” continued Tommy,
inventing as he went on. “I don’t think we are real
gypsies, though. I believe they stole us when we were
little. And they beat us and starve us; they are very
cruel people. They are sure to beat us if we don’t get
back to the caravan by tea-time. So please may we go
now?” And he began to edge towards the door.

“Not so fast,” said Mr. Arnold. The butler at once
seized Tommy by the collar and held him tightly.
“Now,” said the old gentleman, “I don’t think you are
speaking the truth, but I will send down to the village
and inquire if there are any gypsies in the neighbour-
hood. If you are telling me a falsehood I shall have you
punished. Smith, put these children in a room where
they cannot hurt anything, and lock the door for the
present,”
64 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

At these words Tommy and Flora were led away down
along passage. Presently Smith opened a door which
creaked on its hinges as if not very often used. “Now
you two young imps just stay in here quietly, and not
make any more noise, or it'll be the worse for you,” he
said grimly.

“What's going to happen to us?” asked Tommy in a
trembling voice.

“That depends on what we find out about you,’
answered Smith. ‘I expect you are little liars, and very
likely thieves into the bargain, in which case prison will
be the best place for you.”

“Oh, but we can’t go to prison!” cried Tommy,
frightened beyond measure by this terrible threat. “We
aren’t gypsies really; we aren’t the sort of children who
are sent to prison. We live at Oakdale Court. Colonel
York is our papa.”

“Well, that’s a good story if you never told one
before!” said Smith scornfully. “Colonel York’s children
indeed! When your clothes are nothing better than a
bundle of rags, and you don’t look as if you’d ever been
in a tub in your lives! Unless you make up your mind
to speak the truth when Mr. Arnold sends for you again,
youll get such a punishment as you deserve.” And
striding out of the room, he slammed the door and locked
it behind him.

)
TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON. 65

CHAPTER V.

TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON.

T was a most uninteresting little room in which Tommy

and Flora were shut up. There was no furniture in

it, not even a carpet on the floor; and although there

were several shelves round the walls, there was nothing

on them. Apparently it had once been used as a store-

room, but there was not a sign of a jam-pot or sugar-jar
to be seen now.

It seems sad to relate that the first thing the children
did when they found themselves alone was to quarrel
over whose act it was that had brought them into this
miserable situation.

“Tt’s all your fault!” cried Tommy. “If you hadn’t
knocked on the window with your silly stick the old
gentleman would never have seen us.”

“And if yowd never made your stupid plan we
shouldn’t have got into this dungeon at all!” retorted
Flora; who was sitting on the bare boards rubbing her
tear-stained face with her torn frock.

“No wonder they want to send us to prison when you
look such a scarecrow!” observed Tommy bitterly.

The injustice of this reproach at first fairly took away
Flora’s breath. Was it not Tommy who had urged her
to come on, assuring her that she looked all right in spite
of a torn dress and jam-stained pinafore? And had he
not up to this moment encouraged her to believe that
she looked quite neat with a dirty knotted handkerchief
on her head in place of a hat? It was too bad of him to

turn against her now.
(31329) E
66 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“And I don’t look a bit worse than you do!” she
cried passionately. ‘You're just like a gutter-boy your-
self, with your nasty earthy hands, and your coat all
green from rolling on the grass, and—”

“Don’t be silly! It’s no good getting angry,” inter-
rupted Tommy, who was conscious that his appearance
was not what it might have been. Also, he felt rather
guilty at having led his sister into such a terrible adven-
ture, and thought it best to change the subject before
she reminded him how much cause she had to complain.
“The great thing now is to escape,” he remarked very
sensibly. “There are two ways out of this dungeon.”

“T don’t see them!” sobbed Flora.

“Why, the chimney of course, and the window!” cried
Tommy, who in spite of his distress could not help
being rather proud of his superior powers of observation.
“T shall try the window first,” he continued, “and if we
can’t get out of that we must try to crawl up the chimney.
I know that boys used to crawl up the chimneys when
they cleaned them a long time ago, so I suppose we can.”

Theoretically nothing could be more simple than this
plan, only, unfortunately, in practice it was difficult to
get out of a window protected by iron bars which were
only a few inches apart. And when they put their
heads up the chimney, it looked so black and narrow
that escape that way was felt to be impossible. The
children were in despair.

“T wonder what he means to do to us,” said Tommy
solemnly. ‘I think he must be a very cruel man, or he
wouldn’t keep a regular dungeon with bars across the
window to shut people up in.”

“Do you think he means to kill us?” whispered Flora.

!??
TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON. 67

“Oh, dear! I wish we were home again in the nursery.
Tll never run out on the road without Nurse any more
—never!”

“Perhaps youll never be able to,” remarked her
brother. ‘Perhaps he means to keep us here all our
lives, so that we shall never be able to go into his garden
again.”

“What shall we have to eat?” inquired Flora anxiously.

“Bread and water, most likely,” said Tommy, who
felt quite an authority on the treatment of prisoners.
“But perhaps he'll starve us,” he continued, “and then
pretend that we died of an illness, so that he shouldn’t
be punished.”

“Oh, we must get out! Do try and get out!” cried the
little girl, almost frantic with terror at this gloomy prospect.

“Don’t make such a noise then, and I'll see what I
can do; only I’m sure it’s no use,” replied Tommy
despondently. He returned to the window and opened
it. Then he looked attentively at the thick bars. ‘That
one at the end seems rather bent,” he said. “There
might be room to squeeze through there.”

A moment later he gave a shout of joy, as with a
great effort he pushed his head between the bars.

“What is it like outside? Is it a long way down?
Can we jump?” cried Flora, who was dancing about the
room in a great state of excitement at the prospect of
being saved after all.

“Tt’s rather high,” replied Tommy, stretching his head
out as far as it would go. “A good deal higher than a
mantelpiece, I sHould think. But there are a lot of
shrubs underneath. If I could get through I would
climb down them.”
68 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

But, unfortunately, the chief difficulty was to get
through. Try as he would Tommy could not get his
body forward ; and, what was almost worse, he found it
impossible to draw his head back. ‘It seems to have
grown fatter since I squeezed between the bars!” he
exclaimed, struggling until his ears were quite red and
gore,

“Shall you have to stay there always?” inquired Flora
anxiously.

“T don’t know. It seems like it!” cried Tommy with
growing terror. “No, it’s no good dragging at my coat!”
for his sister was trying forcibly to extract him from his
painful position. “Leave go, I say! You hurt! And I
can’t get out any way.”

Overcome with the horror of his fate Tommy began to
ery. Flora was so alarmed by this sad sight that she
ran to the door of the room and began to kick it violently,
screaming for help at the top of her voice.

In another moment there was a frightful crash. ‘The
iron bars, although they looked so strong, were only
fastened into a wooden window-sill which had become
rather rotten with age. While Tommy was struggling
with all his might, suddenly one of the bars against
which he was pushing gave way, and, unable to recover
his balance, out he fell.

Flora heard her brother's frightened cry as he fell, and
turned just in time to see the soles of his boots dis-
appearing out of the window. Almost frantic with
terror the poor little girl redoubled her shrieks for help,
beating and kicking the door with hands and feet, as if
by sheer force she hoped to break it open.

After what seemed a very long time heavy footsteps
TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON. 69

were heard outside, and Smith slowly turned the key in
the lock.

“How dare you make such a noise, you little good-for-
nothing brats!” he began. Then catching sight of the
open window and broken bar he stopped suddenly and
gave a loud whistle of astonishment. “Got out that
way, have you!” he exclaimed. “It’s a chance if the
boy hasn’t broken a leg or arm at least! Here, you had
better come with me;” and taking Flora’s hand rather
more gently, he led her away to another part of the
house, and left her in charge of the old housekeeper.

For several minutes Flora was too frightened and
miserable to do anything but sob convulsively, but grad-
ually Mrs. Grey soothed her into a quieter state, and she
told the old woman the whole true history of Tommy’s
plan, and how they had mistaken Mr. Arnold’s house for
the rectory.

“Bub why did your brother say you belonged to
gypsies?” inquired Mrs. Grey, not knowing what to
believe,

“Oh, I don’t know,” said Flora. ‘“I expect he was
only pretending. We often pretend things. Sometimes
I’m a little black pig, and he’s the butcher and kills me
with a paper knife. That’s in the winter, when we play
indoors.”

“Well, I really believe you are telling me the truth
this time,” said the housekeeper. ‘And Mr. Arnold has
sent down to the village, I know, to find out if there are
any gypsy caravans about. He'll be in a pretty way
over all this.”

Mrs. Grey was quite right. Poor Mr. Arnold was in
a terrible fuss over the story that Smith brought him in
70 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

the library. He had not meant to do more than punish
the children by shutting them up for an hour, so that
they might be too frightened ever to come trespassing
in the garden again. And now he was very much afraid
that the boy might be badly hurt by his fall from the
window.

Without even waiting to put on a hat Mr. Arnold
accompanied Smith out into the garden. But in vain
the two old men searched the shrubbery round the
house. No little boy could they find. It was easy to
see where Tommy had fallen, because the iron bar
loosened at one end was still hanging from the window,
and beneath there was a laurel bush, with several small
twigs broken at the top, into which he had evidently
tumbled. For a long time Smith felt sure that he was
still hidden in that bush, and it was not until he had
searched it all over as carefully as if he had been looking
for a bird’s nest that he became convinced the little boy
could not be there.

“Well, unless he has burrowed underground like a
mole I can’t make out whatever has become of him,”
said the old butler. ‘But there, he can’t have broken
his leg or he wouldn’t have moved from the spot where
he fell.” And this was all the consolation he could give
Mr. Arnold, who at last unwillingly relinquished the
search and went indoors again.

The next step was a consultation with Mrs. Grey, who
gave it as her opinion that Flora really spoke the truth.
“‘T washed her face and tidied her hair, sir,” she said,
“and she’s really a nice-looking little thing; and though
her clothes are shamefully torn and dirty they are of good
material. Besides, her linen is marked with a Y.”
TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON. val

“Very well, then,” said Mr. Arnold, “I will order the
carriage at once, and you must get ready to take the
child back to Oakdale Court and find out if there is any
truth in the story. I only wish we could find the boy.
But perhaps he has run home—if he is really Colonel
York’s son, which I can scarcely believe.”

In another quarter of an hour Flora was driving home
in a comfortable close carriage by the side of Mrs. Grey.
She asked once or twice where Tommy was, but on being
told by the housekeeper that she would probably find
him sitting in the nursery when she got back, she did
not trouble any more about him, but gave herself up to
the undivided pleasure of eating sweet biscuits, which
had been given her by the kind old woman.

But Tommy was not at home in the nursery; indeed,
his adventures were far from being at an end. When
the bar of the window against which he was leaning
suddenly gave way and he fell out, he gave a loud cry of
terror, firmly believing that he was going to be dashed
to pieces. But most fortunately, as we know, a large
laurel bush broke his fall, and he found himself lying
on his back in the middle of it, unhurt except for a few
scratches. With some little trouble he managed to dis-
entangle himself and slip down to the ground in safety.

His spirits rose as he realized that he had actually
made his escape. If Flora would only come to the
window now he might manage somehow to help her
down, and then they could both run away together.
He called her several times, but, as we know, the poor
little girl was making such a noise in kicking the door
and screaming for help, that she could hear nothing else.
And when Tommy presently heard a man’s voice speak-
72 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

ing inside the room he guessed that someone had been
brought to the spot by Flora’s cries.

“Tf we are both caught again it will be as bad as
ever,” he thought; “I had better try and get away
whilst I can.” He did not quite like leaving Flora with
the enemy, and yet it seemed really best to escape while
he could, and carry the news of their capture home.

Of course it was out of the question to leave the garden
by the way they had come in, as to do this Tommy would
have been obliged to cross the lawn, where he might
easily have been seen from the windows. So he crept
along under the shrubs in the opposite direction, keeping
as close as he could to the walls of the house, and hoping
that he would presently find some back door out into
the road. He went as fast as he could, knowing that
before long someone was sure to come out and search
for him under the window.

When he had gone about a dozen yards the shrub-
bery came to an end, but, peeping out from behind
a thick yew-tree, he could see a large wooden door
standing open, which evidently led into a stable-yard.
Tommy hardly knew what to do next. If he stayed
where he was the terrible Mr. Arnold would certainly
find him before long, while by crossing the stable-yard
he might very possibly see another way out. He at
last decided to try this course, although it required
some courage to leave his shelter and boldly walk into
this unknown land.

With a beating heart Tommy slipped quietly through
the great open door, and his first glance was across the
yard to see if there was any other way out. To his
great delight he saw another door on the opposite side,
TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON. 73

which, though shut, looked as if it would open easily
with a latch. He was just going to dart across to it,
when his eyes fell on a large black dog lying outside his
kennel, apparently asleep in the sun. He was chained up,
but the kennel was so near the closed door that Tommy
thought that, if he woke up, he could probably reach
far enough to bite anyone passing through. Tommy
was not afraid of dogs that he knew; in fact the children
made a great pet of their old Dash at home. Buta quiet
little brown spaniel that one has known all one’s life is a
very different thing to a large black strange dog in some-
body else’s stable-yard. On the whole it seemed best to
be careful.

It took Tommy several minutes creeping on tiptoe to
cross the yard noiselessly. At last he reached the closed
door, and his hand was actually on the latch when, with
a tremendous roar, the black dog sprang up, and, tugging
savagely at his chain, tried to reach the intruder. Tommy
rushed back out of his reach, and wondered what to do
next. To pass close by the kennel, where the dog con-
tinued to bark furiously, was clearly out of the question.
And yet there seemed to be no other way out.

While he was standing undecided in which direction
to turn, a loud voice came from inside the stable.

“Lie down, Watch, can’t you!” shouted the unseen
man, who was probably a groom. ‘Stop that noise, or
[ll be out to you with a whip!” he continued angrily, as
the dog barked even louder than before.

Tommy was distracted with terror. It was a choice
between going on and being bitten, and staying where
he was to be caught and dragged back to prison. As he
looked round the stable-yard in despair, he noticed for
74 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

the first time a ladder leading up to the open door of a
loft. The next moment the terrified boy had climbed
up, and was crouching down behind a great. heap of hay.

He was only just in time. Irritated by the constant
noise, the groom left his work and stepped out into
the yard.

‘Go and lie down there!” he shouted. ‘Go in, or I’ll
pretty soon make you!” And Tommy could hear the
crack of a whip, and the rattling of the dog’s chain as,
growling sulkily, he went back to his kennel. “Whatever
can make old Watch so noisy this afternoon?” muttered
the man. “Some tramps been about again, I suppose.
Wish I could just catch ’em. I’d loose the old dog, and
make ’em run pretty quick!”

Tommy shuddered at this awful threat as he lay cower-
ing behind the hay. As the door of the loft was open,
he could distinctly hear all that went on in the yard
below, and it was a great relief when the groom, with a
parting shout at Watch, went back into his saddle-room.

Then at last Tommy dared to sit up and look round
him. As long as the man was walking about outside he
had lain quite still, with the hay almost covering his face,
hardly liking even to breathe for fear of being heard.
There were no windows to the loft, but enough light
came through the open door to show the smooth wooden
floor and the great rafters of the sloping roof. The loft
was more than half full of hay and straw piled up in
great square heaps, which felt deliciously soft and springy
when one climbed upon them.

Altogether it was just the kind of place where Tommy
and Flora would have delighted to play for any length
of time, if they had found it under happier circumstances.
TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON. 75

But one cannot play much by one’s self, especially when
one is hungry and frightened. So, instead of climbing
on the tempting bundles of straw, and making nests in
soft heaps of hay, Tommy sat still, wondering when it
would be safe for him to come out from his hiding-place.
Tf he heard the groom leaving the yard, he had quite
made up his mind to get down the ladder as quietly as
possible and run back into the garden. Anything was
better than the chance of having that dreadful great dog
loosed upon him; and perhaps by creeping along behind
the shrubs he might find some way out across the fields
that he had not noticed before.

After waiting for a long time, Tommy heard the groom
come whistling out of the saddle-room, and shut the door
behind him. This seemed rather hopeful, as if he did
not mean to return at once. Probably he was going
home to his tea, in which case he would be away for at
least half an hour, and, what was almost as important, he
would be too far off to notice if Watch began to bark
again.

It was, however, a dreadful shock to Tommy, just as he
was beginning to feel a little more cheerful, suddenly to
hear the ladder creaking under the weight of heavy foot-
steps. Evidently the groom was coming up to the loft,
and at any moment might discover the boy’s hiding-place.
Tommy lay still and gave himself up for lost. However,
just as he was expecting the man to enter, there was a
loud slam, and the loft became dark.

At first Tommy could not-make out what had happened,
but as he heard footsteps going down the ladder, and be-
coming fainter in the distance, it presently occurred to
him that the groom had only come up to shut the door
76 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

of the loft so that it should not swing in the wind. The
immediate danger was over, yet it cannot be said that
the prospect of escape was very hopeful.

When all was quiet outside Tommy crawled along the
floor, feeling his way on his hands and knees between the
bundles of hay. A faint glimmer of light came in round
the edge of the door, which guided him safely to the
place. In breathless anxiety he put up his hand and
felt carefully all over the rough wood. His worst fears
came true—there was no handle inside!

It was greatly to Tommy’s credit that he did not sit
down and cry at this point. He probably would have
done so if a plan had not just then come into his head;
and, as we know, he was so fond of plans, that in the
excitement of carrying out a new one he almost forgot
his troubles.

He remembered that most doors of this kind only shut
with a latch and do not lock. By putting his eye to the
erack round the door he made sure that this was the case.
Now, it only remained to find something sufficiently long
and thin to push through, and the latch might be lifted
from the inside. The difficulty was to find the exact
instrument suited for the operation.

Tommy tried to remember what he had in his various
pockets, but as he filled them up with a fresh collection
of treasures every day, and Nurse with equal regularity
emptied them every evening, of course it was impossible
to be quite sure what he had in his possession at any
particular time. So, kneeling close up to the crack in
TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON. 77

order to get all the light that was to be had, he emptied
everything out on to the floor.

Now, the contents of Tommy’s pockets may have been
sometimes dirty—Nurse said they always were—but at
all events nobody could call them dull. On the present
occasion he seemed to have a little of everything in
them except a pocket-handkerchief, for this, it may be
remembered, had been taking the place of Flora’s hat all
the afternoon. But interesting as it was to examine an
addled thrush’s egg or finger a lump of wet clay, proud
as one might feel of a partially dried mole-skin and half
a tallow candle, none of these much-prized objects seemed
quite to meet the requirements of the case. To be sure,
there was the broken knife, it being a companion from
which Tommy never willingly parted. But useful as it
was in many ways, a blade broken off to about an inch
long was not of much value in the present emergency.

When Tommy had emptied both his pockets without
finding what he wanted, he by no means gave up the
search. There are many other places besides those
ordained by the tailor in which a little boy with a taste
for making collections can stow away objects of an in-
teresting nature. Not to go into further details, Tommy
regarded his loose sailor blouse merely in the light of
an elastic pouch, capable of containing almost anything
that might be put into it.

Having felt all over this capacious receptacle, he pres-
ently drew out a piece of whalebone, about eight inches
long, which he had picked up on the nursery floor when
78 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

some dressmaking was going on. It is impossible to say
what vague instinct had led him to tuck away such an
unpromising-looking toy inside his blouse; but he gener-
ally went upon the principle that things always come in
useful some day. Certainly, upon the present occasion
the bit of whalebone proved the prudence of this habit.
Nothing could have been more exactly suited for the
task in hand, and after two or three efforts the latch
lifted and the door swung open.

Tommy gave a cry of horror—the ladder was no
longer there! The groom had evidently taken it away
after shutting the door of the loft.

This disappointment following on so many hopeful
efforts was too great to be borne patiently, and Tommy
shed a few bitter tears, which he, however, immediately
rubbed away with the back of a very dirty hand. But he
was a sensible little boy, and knew that it was no good
erying over things that could not be helped. He saw
at once that he could not get down from the loft without
a ladder. He had already had quite enough of jumping
for one day; besides, there were no shrubs in the yard
for him to fall on, but hard stone pavement, and it was
quite twice as high from the ground as the window had
been.

Of course, as the door was now open it was no longer
dark in the loft, so Tommy thought it a good oppor-
tunity for carefully examining every corner. To his
great astonishment he very soon came across a trap-door
in the floor which he had been too occupied to notice
TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE DUNGEON. 79

before. There was an iron ring in it, which was evidently
meant for a handle. Tommy seized it with both hands,
and pulled so hard that the trap-door opened with a
jerk, and he fell on his back.

Scrambling to his feet he looked eagerly down the
hole. It was not very large, but still there was plenty
of room for a little boy to climb through, and he could
see projecting pieces of wood that were evidently in-
tended as rough steps. Tommy could not make out
clearly what there was below, but he guessed that it
probably led into the stables, and not daring to wait
any longer for fear the groom should return, he began
to climb down.

Two or three of the steps were missing towards the
bottom; however, it did not much matter, as by that
time he could see some straw underneath on which he
let himself fall, frightening an old white pony by whose
head he tumbled, so that it started back and nearly
broke its halter. Tommy was almost as much alarmed
as the pony, and lost no time in edging along the side
of the stall, keeping as far from its occupant’s heels as
possible.

In another moment he had opened the stable door,—
and then suddenly shrank back in dismay.

An untidy little donkey-cart, full of rags, bottles,
and old boots, was. just entering the yard. Watch
sprang to the end of his chain barking furiously, but
the man who was leading the donkey took no notice
of the noise. Quietly leaving the cart in the middle of
80 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

the yard he walked off towards the house, carrying a
large empty sack under his arm. Tommy had seen rag-
and-bone carts before, and he easily guessed that the
man was going to the back-door to buy anything that
the cook would sell; and it was not likely that he would
be very long about it, as people of his profession are not
fond of waiting for their purchases to be examined.

A new plan came into Tommy’s head. He ran out of
the stable, and climbing into the back of the donkey-cart
crawled under a large piece of sail-cloth that was spread
over some sacks, either to hide their contents or to keep
them dry in case of rain. Old Watch barked louder
than ever when he saw this proceeding, but as he could
not speak the ragman luckily never imagined what had
caused this fresh burst of indignation, but fancied that
the dog was still protesting against his presence in the
yard. He hurriedly put down his half-filled sack almost
on the top of Tommy, and then led the donkey out on to
the road, throwing a large stone at Watch as he passed
the kennel.

Of all the hiding-places Tommy had yet tried this was
much the most disagreeable. The rags smelt horribly,
and he was in danger of being suffocated every moment,
as the sacks shook about with the jolting of the rough
cart. He bore it as long as he could, until he thought
that they must have gone some distance from Mr.
Arnold’s house. Then he wriggled as close as he could
to the back of the cart, and, seizing his opportunity
when the wheels were making a loud noise going
TOMMY ESCAPES FROM THE. DUNGEON. 81

over some stones, he slipped gently down on to the
road

The ragman walked on, leading his donkey, without
noticing that anything had happened. But Tommy,
afraid that he might turn round, got into the ditch and
crouched down among the long grass and brambles. As
it was the summer there was no water in it, only some
slimy black mud, but this really seemed quite nice after
the contents of the cart.

The little boy lay quite still until the ragman was out
of sight. Then he slowly crawled out on the road, feel-
ing very stiff, hungry, and desolate. He had not the
least idea in which direction to go, for the children very
seldom went further from home than Nurse cared to
walk, and were much fonder of playing in the garden
than going on the roads.

Tommy was still wondering which way to turn when
he heard a horse trotting quickly towards him. He had
a dreadful idea that perhaps Mr. Arnold had found out
the direction of his flight, and was sending to fetch him
back. But just as he was preparing to again take refuge
in the ditch the horse came round the corner, and his
rider gave a loud shout of surprise.

It was Mr. Barnard. Flora’s Mr. Barnard, as the
children had named him, so that there should be no
confusion with the old rector.

“Hullo, Tommy! What on earth are you doing out
here at this hour?” exclaimed the young man, pulling up

so suddenly that his horse nearly backed into the hedge.
(21829) F
82 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

‘“¢ Where are all the others?” he continued; “Miss York?
Nurse? And what have you been doing to your foot?”

Tommy looked down, and saw a little trickle of blood
coming out of his boot on to the dusty road. In climb-
ing down from the loft he had knocked his foot, and the
old cut—given by the bit of broken glass when he was
pursuing Aunt Jane’s lilac ribbon—had begun to bleed
afresh, but in his terror and excitement he had not
noticed it before.

“JT must have hurt it,” he began. ‘We've been shut
up in a dungeon, and I’m so tired! Please take me home!”

Tommy tried hard to behave in a manly fashion,
worthy of the hero of so many adventures, but he could
not quite manage it; and it was a very tearful and
forlorn little boy that Mr. Barnard lifted up in front of
him.

“Never mind, we shall soon be home,” said the young
man cheerfully. ‘Now, Tommy, you must manage to
hold on somehow while the horse canters. They'll be
pretty anxious about you at home, I expect; and, besides,
I want to get back to the rectory in time for dinner.”

A quarter of an hour later Mr. Barnard was-entering
Oakdale Court with what looked like a bundle of dirty
clothes in his arms. “I think he has gone to sleep,” he
said, laying his burden in Nurse’s lap. “I found him
crying in the road. He is only fit for bed now, that’s
certain.”

Poor Aunt Jane could not thank Mr. Barnard enough
for bringing back her nephew. Ever since Flora re-
ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 83

turned about tea-time in Mr. Arnold’s carriage the poor
old lady had been quite ill with anxiety. She had sent
servants to all the neighbouring houses and farms seck-
ing for news of the missing boy, and as the evening came
on she had been spending all her time composing tele-
grams to Switzerland, in which she tried to break
Tommy’s loss gently to his parents.

“Well, I mustn’t stay any longer, or my parents will
be sending out to look for me,” laughed Mr. Barnard.
“Tf you will allow me, Miss York, I will come over to-
morrow afternoon and see how you are all getting on.
T fancy those children ought to have a tale worth telling,
to judge by the look of Tommy’s clothes.”

Miss York assured him again and again that she
should be only too glad to see him whenever he could
come to Oakdale Court; and it was with considerable
difficulty that he at last cut short her. profuse thanks,
and started home to his long-delayed dinner.

CHAPTER VI.

ABOUT CLEVER BOYS.

HE following afternoon, true to his word, Mr. Barnard
was sitting between the two children on the lawn

at Oakdale Court. ‘Tommy was again a cripple, and
Nurse said he would not be able to wear a boot for at
least a week. Though a little depressed at this prospect
84 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

Tommy was full of conversation, and had just given
Mr. Barnard a detailed account of the whole of their
previous day’s adventures.

Tommy’s imagination was exceedingly lively, and he
frequently embellished a story until it was almost unre-
cognizable. However, on the present occasion he felt
that so many extraordinary things had really happened,
that it would be a perfect waste of time, as well as an
impossibility, to improve upon them. So he gave a
very correct version of the whole affair; and Flora, who
had no scruples about contradicting in the interests of
truth, did not feel obliged to interrupt him more than
once or twice.

“Well, Tommy,” said Mr. Barnard when the story
was quite finished, “do you really want to know my
opinion about yesterday’s doings ?”

“Yes,” replied the little boy, rather doubtfully.
Until that moment he had made sure that Flora’s friend
would be on their side against Nurse, Aunt Jane, and all
the grown-up people who so severely condemned rash
plans of amusement. But at Mr. Barnard’s words he
felt a certain misgiving.

“You see, it’s no good pretending to be friends if we
don’t tell each other exactly what we really think,” con-
tinued Mr. Barnard pleasantly. ‘“ And after what you’ve
told me yourself, I think you behaved very badly.”

Tommy hung his head and grew very red. He had
not felt in the least ashamed when Nurse had scolded
him that morning; but it was a very different thing

EE eee eee
ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 85

to find that this gentleman,—who was a soldier, and
had been all over the world,—thought him in the
wrong.

“T dare say you consider yourself a very kind-hearted,
affectionate boy,” continued Mr. Barnard. “And yet
for several hours yesterday you gave about ten people
dreadful trouble hunting for you; not to mention that
both your aunt and your nurse were, I am sure, suffer-
ing terribly from fright the whole time.”

“Nurse couldn’t eat any tea at all,” interposed Flora,
“And I saw her crying, only she looked out of the
window and pretended she wasn’t.”

“Just what I expected,” said Mr. Barnard. “And I
suppose you know that the reason your Aunt Jane had
to stay in bed to-day is, that she made herself quite ill
worrying about you yesterday. You may call what you
did only thoughtlessness; I call it selfishness.”

“J didn’t mean any harm,” mumbled Tommy. “ But
people are always stupid. They stop your doing things
directly they find out; or else they put it all off till next
week, or by and by. I don’t want to do things by and
by. I want to do them directly I think of them.”

“Nurse doesn’t like his plans,” explained Flora. “She
says they always mean mischief and tearing our clothes.”

“TI don’t wish to spend the whole afternoon finding
fault,” continued Mr. Barnard, “but I should like to
know why you told Mr. Arnold such a silly untruth
about your belonging to gypsies, and travelling in a
caravan.”
86 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

Tommy looked rather foolish. He had no reason to
give that was worth mentioning.

“All the people in fairy tales do,” he murmured.
“When the giant catches them they always tell stories.”

“T am sorry for you if you have no better excuse
than that,” remarked Mr. Barnard briskly; “because,
you see, it’s all nonsense, and you know it. You have
no more right to go about telling stories because Jack
the Giant Killer did, than I have to chop off people’s
heads if they happen to look like giants.”

“Was Mr. Arnold a giant?” inquired Flora, who was
getting rather puzzled.

“No; certainly not. I dare say you children will be
surprised to hear that Mr. Arnold isa perfectly harmless
old gentleman.”

“Then why did he shut us up in a dungeon with iron
bars, so that we couldn’t get out?” interrupted the little
girl.

Mr. Barnard laughed. ‘Well, from all you have told
me,” he said, “I feel sure it wasn’t a real dungeon, but
only a store-room. And as for those terrible bars, they
were put to prevent thieves from getting in and steal-
ing the jam, not to stop boys and girls from getting
out.”

“But why did he frown and seem so cross if he is
really good?” persisted Flora, only half satisfied with
this explanation.

“He is old, and has had a great many troubles,” said
Mr. Barnard. ‘And when people are sad they some-
ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 87

times shut themselves up at home and can’t bear to be
disturbed. We ought to be sorry for him, really, living
all by himself with nobody to take care of him.”

The children were silent, trying to take in this new
idea of their dreaded enemy.

“T dare say he didn’t think Tommy looked very nice
with his nose pressed against the window,” said Flora
presently.

“Then I don’t know what he can have thought of you,”
rejoined Tommy. ‘Your face was much dirtier than
mine, and Nurse says your dress is only fit to be torn
up for rags, and your—”

“Well, I expect there wasn’t much to choose between
you,” interposed Mr. Barnard soothingly. “Now,” he
continued, ‘in consequence of your silly trick yesterday,
it will be a whole week, at least, before you are both
able to spend the afternoon with me; for, of course, it
would be quite useless your coming until Tommy’s foot
is better.”

The children looked very downcast.

“It’s all because of Tommy’s stupid plans,” complained
Flora. ‘He thinks them so clever; I don’t. They
always end by our being punished.”

“Tf you are so sure they will turn out badly, why do
you follow him?” inquired Mr. Barnard.

-“ Because I like to see what’s going to happen.”

“Well, if yesterday’s doings are an example of the
kind of thing that usually happens when Tommy has
a plan, I should prefer being left behind,” remarked Mr.
88 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS

Barnard. “Do you know, Tommy rather reminds me
of a boy I knew very well, a long time ago.”

“ Will you make it a story, please?” requested Flora.

“Certainly, on one condition. You must both promise
not to try and do any of the new naughty things I tell
you about.”

“Oh, no, we won't,’ said Tommy confidently. “We
can think of quite enough naughty things of our
own.”

“And I should like the boy’s name to be Charlie, and
for him to be seven years old, because that’s my age,”
added Flora.

“Tm sorry to disappoint you,” said Mr. Barnard;
“but as it’s a true story I can’t help his name being
George, and his age about twelve.”

“Oh, well, it doesn’t matter,” rejoined the little girl
cheerfully. “ But you will make him do a lot of amusing
things, won’t you?”

“Whether his doings were amusing or not, you must
judge,” said Mr. Barnard. “In the meantime you
interrupt me so often that I don’t get a chance of telling
them.”

“We won't speak again,” cried both the children.
And they kept their resolution for at least three minutes.

“This boy George was an only child,’ began Mr.
Barnard. “I don’t remember that he ever wanted
brothers and sisters. He was rather greedy, and liked
having everything to himself. And as he was used to
being alone, he had made up all his games for one person.
ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 89

If children were invited to spend the day with him he
hardly knew what to do with them, and it generally
ended in their looking on while he played by himself.
He can’t have been a very pleasant little boy, but his
parents thought him perfect. They were so fond of him
that they could not make up their minds to send him to
school at the same age as most little boys, but kept him
at home until he was almost twelve.”

“ Didn’t he do any lessons?” inquired Tommy eagerly.

“Yes; a gentleman used to come every morning to
teach him. But whenever George felt unusually idle he
used to get a headache about breakfast-time; not until
he had eaten as much as he wanted, though. And then
by the time his tutor came he would be lying on the
drawing-room sofa with his eyes shut, and there were no
lessons that day. Then at other times when he was
supposed to prepare his lessons alone in the evening, he
was very fond of going to his father and asking to be
shown how to doa sum or translate a bit of Latin. Now
his father was such a clever man that he dearly loved
books himself, and used to forget that telling George
exactly how to do his lessons was not the same thing as
letting him find out for himself. Very often the rector—
his father was rector of a country parish—would go on
translating page after page, while George just wrote
down all he said without taking the trouble to think for
a moment.”

“T wish I could do that,” murmured Tommy regret-
fully,
90 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“Well, it isn’t such a good plan as it sounds,” said
Mr. Barnard. “I happen to know that when George
at last went to school he had to begin at the beginning,
and learn everything over again, being put back in a
class with boys three or four years younger than himself,
to the disgust of the master and his own shame. For I
must tell you that George thought himself a wonderfully
clever boy, and his dear, good, unwise parents had
encouraged him in the belief. Now, his father, the rector,
as well as being fond of books, had rather scientific
tastes—”

“What's that?” interrupted Flora.

Mr. Barnard looked rather perplexed. He was not
accustomed telling stories to children, and found their
perpetual interruptions and demands for explanations
rather trying. ‘It means—well, I hardly know how to
explain what it means,” he answered. ‘ Perhaps it will
be simpler if I tell you what the rector used to do, and
then you will understand. Whenever he was not doing
things in the parish—”

“What sort of things?” inquired Flora.

“Oh, going to the village school, or visiting sick people.
But if you stop me again I shall really forget what I was
going to say. Let mesee... . I was telling you about
the rector. He used to go out late at night, looking at
the stars through great telescopes, and then he would
shut himself up in his study for hours, reading difficult
books, and making calculations about planets and comets
and those sort of things. And his study was full of
ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 91

queer instruments—electric batteries, which gave such
shocks that one had to be careful how one touched them ;
and microscopes through which a flea looked as big as a
mouse; not to mention glass jars of all sorts and sizes.
Some of them held poisons, while others held powders
which made beautiful colours when they were burnt.
And then there were things that smelt dreadful, and
things that exploded when one didn’t expect it.”

“T should have liked to see all that,” remarked Tommy
with a longing sigh.

“So did George,” continued Mr. Barnard; “and as his
father was able to try so many curious experiments, he
was very fond of imitating him ina small way. Of course,
George was never allowed to touch the instruments and
chemicals, for fear of accidents. But I'll tell you the
kind of thing he used to do. He once was away on a
visit with his parents where he was allowed to stay up to
late dinner. I have told you that he was sadly spoilt.
Well, in the middle of dinner, instead of sitting quiet as
little boys should, he began to tell the lady next him
what a lot of scientific facts he knew about the different
gases in the atmosphere, and that kind of thing. And
then he offered to show her a little experiment—how the
force of the air would keep water from coming out of a
bottle if you turned it quickly upside-down. So he
turned the water-bottle upside-down, and made a flood
all over the clean table-cloth. ‘That’s a very clever boy
of yours,’ remarked an old gentleman to the rector;
‘only I should have begun by teaching him that water
92 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

always finds its own level.’ And everybody laughed.
But George was never invited to that house again.”

“Tell me some more things that he did,” said Flora,
who found the story getting more interesting as the
accidents began.

“Another day,” said Mr. Barnard, “several ladies came
to tea with his mother. George, as usual, was allowed
to sit in the drawing-room and talk as much as he liked.
Indeed his poor mother, blinded by her affection, began
to tell how quick he was with his lessons, and how he
was sure to grow up very clever and scientific, like his
father. Then George was encouraged to show the ladies
a specimen of his talents; so, after asking if they knew
the way to make an egg so strong that it couldn’t be
broken, he got araw egg from the kitchen and began to
explain how one might press as hard as one liked on
the two ends without breaking it. Perhaps his fingers
slipped; but at all events the egg suddenly smashed,
making a horrible mess on the carpet, and splashing over
a lady’s dress. Everybody went away soon after that,
without waiting for more experiments.”

“Did he ever get punished?” inquired Tommy with
sympathetic interest.

“Not half so often as he deserved,” replied Mr. Barnard.
“OF course, as long as his parents thought him perfect,
nobody liked to interfere. However, sometimes he got
into a little trouble, as you will hear.

“Tt was the autumn, and somebody had sent the rector
a haunch of venison, so he was giving a dinner-party to
ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 93

several of the neighbouring clergymen and their wives,
that they might all enjoy the gift together. George
didn’t like venison, so he said he would have tea in the
school-room by himself, and he persuaded his mother to
order him all the things he liked best, such as a roast-
fowl, and tartlets made of strawberry-jam. Besides, he
intended to taste all the sweets as they came out of the
dining-room.

“But there was another reason as well as his dislike for
venison which prevented him from wanting to dine that
evening. For some time past he had been thinking over
a new invention for sweeping chimneys. He did not
mean to tell anyone about it until he was quite sure it
would work well, and he never could get a quiet time for
trying when there was nobody about to seo him. But
now he felt sure that, in the fuss of preparing for the
dinner-party, nobody would have leisure to notice what
he was doing.

“So, just before dinner, when his parents were dressing
and the servants all busy, he slipped out to the poultry-
yard and caught an old duck, who was asleep in her
house. Then he wrapped the poor thing so tightly up
in his coat that she could not make a noise, and crept
quietly up the back-stairs to the top of the house, where
there was a trap-door leading on to the roof. Out he
got, although, of course, it was a forbidden place. I
suppose he thought that if his invention turned out
particularly clever, nobody would remember to scold
him for being disobedient. Then he looked for the
94 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

blackest chimney he could see, so as to give it a fair .
trial; and taking the poor duck in his hands, he pushed
her down, thinking that her fluttering and struggles as
she fell would clean out all the soot.”

“Did it?” cried both the children together.

“You shall hear. Of course, George was very anxious to
see the result of his experiment as soon as possible. So he
got back through the trap-door and ran downstairs. He
could hear a tremendous noise in the kitchen, so he went
there first. Everything was black; the soot was lying in
heaps on the floor, and sprinkled all over the table on
which the sweets were spread out. But the worst was
round the fireplace, where the cook was standing, looking
like a negress. At her feet lay broken the largest dish
of the best set of china, which she had dropped in her
fright. The venison had rolled off into a heap of soot in
the fender. The unfortunate cook was screaming with
terror as she looked at a dreadful black thing bobbing
up and down in the soup-tureen, into which it had fallen.
Two or three other servants were standing about, talk-
ing excitedly of earthquakes and gunpowder- plots.
Presently the poor duck flopped out of the soup-tureen,
and ran quacking all about the kitchen, leaving a long
sticky trail of wet soot behind her. At the same moment
the cook caught sight of George looking in at the door,
and she guessed what had happened.”

“Was she angry?” inquired Flora.

“Furious; as well she might be,” replied Mr. Barnard.
“She ran at George and shook him till he could hardly
ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 95

stand. None of the others interfered; in fact, I believe
they were delighted to see the spoilt child getting pun-
ished at last.”

“And did his father and mother find out?” asked
Tommy.

“Not that evening. So as not to make a fuss before
the visitors, the servants only said that the soot had come
down the kitchen chimney and spoilt all the dinner.
There was nothing fit to eat except the roast-chicken
and tartlets, which had already been carried up to the
school-room. So, of course, they had to be taken to the
dining-room for the visitors; and George crept off to bed
without any supper, for the cook said she would not give
him so much as a dry crust. And even his indulgent
parents were very vexed next day when they heard all
about it, and how the duck was so much hurt that it had
to be killed.”

“Who killed it?” interrupted Tommy.

“The cook cut off its head herself with the chopper, in
the back kitchen,” replied Mr. Barnard promptly.

“You tell stories so nicely,” remarked Flora. ‘You
remember all the things we want to know, which most
people think doesn’t matter. Go on.”

‘Well, there isn’t much more to say about that story,”
answered Mr. Barnard, “except that George was not
punished half so much as he deserved.”

“Tm sorry for that,” said Tommy. Next to hearing
about the bad deeds of surpassingly naughty boys, he
enjoyed being told of the terrible punishments they
96 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS,

received. “George ought to have been whipped,” he
observed resentfully.

“JT quite agree with you,” answered Mr. Barnard,
“but you know he was a spoilt child. Now,” he con-
tinued, looking at his watch, “‘I must go home in a few
minutes, so I can’t possibly tell you everything George
did.”

“Tell us the worst thing, if you’ve only time for one,”
interrupted Tommy.

“Very well, I will tell you the one that got him into
the greatest trouble. I don’t know that it was really so
bad as when he hurt the poor duck, or used to crush all
the butterflies he saw under the pretence that he was
catching them to make a collection. Not that he meant
to be cruel, only he never stopped to think whether he
was hurting animals or not. However, this was what
people always talk of as the worst thing he ever did.”

“T hope it was very, very bad,” murmured Tommy,
his face beaming with anticipation.

“Tf you won’t interrupt me you shall hear,” said Mr.
Barnard. ‘A few days before Christmas George had an
unusually clever idea for giving his parents and some
uncles and aunts a great treat on Christmas-day, when
they were going to have a family dinner at the rectory.
This dinner took place every year, and the old-fashioned
dining-room used to be decorated with holly and ever-
green, till it looked very festive. But it, unfortunately,
occurred to George that it would be a great improve-
ment if, instead of the table being lighted up by common
ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 97

wax candles, they could burn some of those beautiful
red and blue lights that his father sometimes showed
him in the study. He wondered that nobody had
thought of the possibility of doing this before; only
grown-up people never did seem to have very good
ideas. However, George was quite satisfied that he
knew all about how to make the coloured fire himself
without consulting anybody. So one afternoon he
watched his father start out for a walk, and then quietly
went into the study to help himself to the materials
needed for making an illumination.”

“T thought he wasn’t allowed to go into the study
alone,” began Flora.

“He was disobedient,” replied Mr. Barnard. ‘“ Besides,
as I told you before, he meant to do such clever things
that nobody would scold him for being naughty. At all
events he did go into the study, and opened a great
cupboard full of shelves, on which stood rows and rows
of bottles and jars, with paper labels on them. He didn’t
try to stop and read the labels, because he didnt know
the names of any of the things his father used. But he
was quite sure that he knew them by sight. When he
came to look the jars were more alike than he had
fancied, and it was rather difficult to distinguish between
them. However, there was not much time for hesitating,
as he was afraid that someone might find him in the study.

“So he took what seemed to be the jars he remem-
bered seeing his father use, and hurried ‘up to his bed

room. Here he locked the door, and prepared to try a
(21 829) @
98 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS,

few experiments in illuminating the room. First he
lighted a candle, and then he took up the jar containing
the powder that was to turn the flame red. He thought
he would try a little bit, and supposing after all it was
not the right stuff, there would still be time to run down
to the study and change it. Unfortunately, hardly had
he sprinkled a few grains in the candle than there was a
tremendous bang, and he fell flat on his back. It seems
that George had made a trifling mistake between the
jars, and brought the stuff that exploded instead of the
stuff that made colours.”

“Did he change it?” asked Flora.

“No; there wasn’t much chance of doing that when
it came to the point,” replied Mr. Barnard. ‘“ The jar had
burst into a thousand pieces, the room was full of nasty
black smoke, and George’s hands were all bleeding, and
hurt him quite sufficiently to take away the least desire
to go on with his experiments. His only wish now was
to get out of the room as soon as possible. Most unluckily
he had locked the door, and in his hurry and fright he
tried to turn the key so violently that it got stuck in the
lock. His shouts and the noise of the explosion brought
some of the maids to the passage outside, but they were
not strong enough to break open the door, and could do
nothing but run up and down screaming wildly for
help.”

“Was George burnt to death?” inquired Tommy in an
awe-struck voice. The story seemed to be taking rather
an oppressively serious turn.


ABOUT CLEVER BOYS. 99

“Not quite,” said Mr. Barnard. ‘“ He was very nearly
suffocated, but managed just in time to push the window
open and get a breath of air. The gardener heard him
shouting, and ran with a ladder that he used for pruning
fruit-trees; but it was not very long, and would not reach
all the way. However, old Jacob very bravely stood on
the top bar, and holding on to the window-sill as best he
could, managed to get George out. Unhappily, when
they were both almost safe, the poor gardener missed
his footing and fell to the ground, breaking his leg, and
as he was an elderly man, he has been lame ever since.
George was a wretched sight, with his eyebrows singed
off and his hands badly cut. However, he got better
much sooner than he deserved.”

“And did he try any more experiments?” asked
Tommy.

“No; the last one cured him of being too clever.
That, and finding himself at the bottom of the lowest
class when he went to school. For after the explosion
George’s parents suddenly found out what all their
friends had known for a long time, namely, that he was
becoming perfectly spoilt, and a most unpleasant boy.
So he was sent off to school as soon as his burns and
cuts were cured.”

“Ts he alive now?” inquired Flora, who was of a very
practical turn of mind, and liked to know the beginning
and end of everything.

“T will tell you a secret,” said Mr. Barnard. ‘My
name is George!”
100 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

And before the children quite understood what he
meant he had mounted his horse and started for home.

CHAPTER VII.

AT THE RECTORY.

BOUT a week later Tommy and Flora actually paid
their long-promised visit to the rectory to spend
the afternoon with their new friend. As may be imagined,
they went in a very different fashion to that in which
they had set out the time before. As they drove through
the lanes with Aunt Jane, in the grand carriage which
she always used, it would have been difficult to find two
cleaner, better-dressed children. If by any chance they
had met Mr. Arnold now, he would certainly not have
recognized them as the wretched little tattered figures
that had been dragged before him by Smith. But Mr.
Arnold, being old and sad, did not care to stroll about
the lanes, or even to leave his study, so the children saw
nothing of him during their drive, although they peered
with terrified curiosity through the trees in the direction
of his house.
The first quarter of an hour at the rectory was rather
a shy period. The whole party sat round the drawing-
room, Flora and Tommy on rather high, straight-backed
chairs, with their fect swinging a few inches off the
ground. Aunt Jane in her best bonnet was telling the
AT THE RECTORY. 101

rector and Mrs, Barnard all about her last: visit to Swit-
zerland, and how dreadfully overcrowded she found the
hotels. It was not very amusing, and the children were
delighted when their own Mr. Barnard presently offered
to take them out until tea-time.

“Now we have a long afternoon,” he said as they
left the drawing-room. ‘What would you like to do
first?”

“See the moths!” cried Flora.

“No—your gun!” said Tommy.

Ié was the first time they had spoken since they entered
the house, but directly they found themselves in the hall
they made up for their long silence by chattering away
as if they would never stop.

“Look here, we shall waste all our time and see
nothing,” said Mr. Barnard after a time. ‘You had
better follow me, and I will show you everything in turn
that is at all amusing.”

So Mr. Barnard led them away to his sitting-room at
the other end of the house, rather wondering what he
should find to amuse children of their ages. But he
soon discovered there would be no difficulty about that.
Everything they saw they liked to examine, and ask
where it came from, and how long it had been there.
And as Mr. Barnard had kept all his treasures in this
room ever since he was a boy, and even now brought
new pictures and ornaments back for it whenever he
returned home on leave, it certainly contained a very
interesting collection. At last, possibly thinking that
102 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

not a single thing in the room would be left in its place
if they stayed there any longer, he suggested taking the
children into the garden.

“But we haven’t seen half your things yet,” they ob-
jected.

“Never mind, you can come back another day and
look at them again. Just now I want to show you the
garden.”

“Which is the gun you shoot people with?” inquired
Tommy, staring upwards at the gun-rack.

“TI told you before that I have never shot anyone,”
replied Mr. Barnard. ‘Sometimes I kill rooks with that
little rifle.”

“Oh, do kill some now! We'd much rather see that
than the garden!” cried Tommy.

“But it’s not the time of year, people only shoot
rooks when they are quite young in the spring,” ex-
plained Mr. Barnard. And then seeing the disappointed
faces of the children, he continued: “If you like I will
fire at a target, or a bottle in the pond.”

“Oh, the bottle! the bottle, please!” shouted Tommy.
“Will it smash when you hit it?”

“Tf I hit the bottle there will be no doubt about
the smash,” replied Mr. Barnard. “But I may
miss.”

The children laughed loudly at this excellent joke.
That a soldier, whose business it is to kill men, should
talk of not being able to hit a medicine-bottle was very
funny.
AT THE RECTORY. 103

There was some little difficulty about finding a bottle,
but at last one was discovered at the back of a cup-
board.

“Do you know, my mother pretends that she has ill-
nesses, on purpose to collect more old medicine-bottles
for me to practise at when I come home,” said Mr.
Barnard.

“Does she really? That’s very kind,” observed Flora
seriously.

“Well, she really keeps the bottles for me,” replied
Mr. Barnard. ‘But as for the illnesses, ’m afraid she
gets them, because she is growing an old lady and catches
cold easily.”

The children followed their friend with as much ex-
citement as if he had been going to shoot a tiger. They
had to cross a farmyard full of many varieties of poultry
before they reached the pond, which was in the middle
of a field. At any other time they would have taken
the greatest interest in the geese and turkeys, but now
they were too eager for the shot to care about anything
else. last they reached the pond. It was covered with ducks,
and Mr. Barnard declared that he did not dare shoot
for fear of hurting them. He shouted and clapped his
hands, but the ducks did not seem to find these demon-
strations particularly alarming, and quite declined to
leave the water.

“Tl make them go fast enough!” cried Tommy. And
suddenly picking up a large stone, he threw it into the
104 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

pond with such force that the dirty water splashed up
in every direction.

“Hullo! Stop that!” exclaimed Mr. Barnard, wiping
a bit of wet mud off his face. “Well, that was a stupid
trick of yours,” he continued in a vexed tone of voice, as
he noticed that Flora’s clean white frock was disfigured
by several stains. ‘What do you suppose your Aunt
will say if I bring you back covered with mud? You
may be quite sure she will not trust you out with me
again.”

“Tt was all Flora’s stupid fault for standing so close,”
began Tommy.

“Indeed! I should have said it was all your stupid
fault for throwing the stone like that,” interrupted Mr.
Barnard. “If you are going to be so rough I must take
you both straight back to the house, as I can’t undertake
the responsibility of keeping you clean.”

“T won’t do it again,” said Tommy. “But,” he added
rather triumphantly, “it’s cleared all the ducks off the
pond. Look at that big white one waddling up the
bank with all the little ones after her.”

“Yes, but what is that I see in the middle of the
pond?” said Mr. Barnard, looking up from his occupation
of brushing Flora’s frock with a handkerchief. “It looks
like a little duck drowning,—only, of course, ducks
don’t usually drown.”

“Perhaps it was too young to go on the water without
its mother,” suggested Flora; “and now she has gone
away, it can’t swim by itself.”
AT THE RECTORY. 105

“Tl tell you what it is!” exclaimed Mr. Barnard,
“that duckling must have been hurt with the stone.
You see it can’t swim, and keeps turning over on its
back. We must try to get it out or it will be drowned.”

As it happened, getting out the duckling was a matter
of some difficulty. Mr. Barnard could not reach it from
the bank, and after several unsuccessful efforts to stretch
further he was obliged to go across the field and cut a
long stick out of the hedge. He was as quick as possible,
but before he returned the poor duckling’s struggles had
become very faint.

“Tt’s nearly dead!” cried both the children, who were
leaning over the pond watching with breathless excite-
ment.

“Do stand back!” shouted Mr. Barnard as he ran
across the field; “it will only make matters worse if
you both get your feet wet.”

The children drew back a few inches, they were too
interested to stand further away. When, with consider-
able trouble, the stick was at last pushed under the
duckling, and it was drawn safely to land, they both
shouted for joy.

“Tt’s all right now!” exclaimed Tommy in a tone of
considerable relief, for he had been a good deal frightened
at the idea of having begun by killing the duckling,
on a day when he meant to be on his very best be-
haviour.

“Tm afraid it’s not feeling very well yet,” said Mr.
Barnard, looking doubtfully at the gasping little creature,
106 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

which lay on the grass, unable to do anything but pant
and shiver.

However, fortunately the duckling was more stunned
than actually injured. The stone. could hardly have
touched it; but without help it would, no doubt, have
been drowned from want of strength to keep above
water. As it was, after lying still for a few minutes,
it suddenly got up and staggered off through the long
grass, quacking loudly for its brothers and sisters.

“There! the old duck has heard it; she is coming
back!” said Tommy. “And now, may we see you shoot
the medicine-bottle?”

“Why, I had quite forgotten what we came out for,
in the excitement of saving the duck’s life,” said Mr.
Barnard. ‘“ But where is the bottle? My rifle is leaning
against that oak-tree—I put it there before I went to
cut the stick,—but I don’t see anything else.”

“ Here it is, but I can’t get it out,” remarked Flora,
holding up her pocket, unnaturally swollen and hard.
It was difficult to understand how she had ever squeezed
the bottle in by herself, and it required most careful
management to slowly draw it out without cracking open
the strained seams.

“You have been carrying it all the time, have you?”
said Mr. Barnard. “To tell the truth, I forgot all about
it. And I hope you will never carry a large glass bottle
in your pocket again,—or even a small one. If you had
tumbled down and broken it, you would have been
badly cut.”
AT THE RECTORY. 107

“But I didn’t,” observed Flora calmly.

“You may not have such good luck next time,”
answered Mr. Barnard. ‘At all events, I beg you will
never carry glass, or even knives, in your pockets when
you take walks with me. You can do as you like with
Nurse.”

The children laughed heartily at this suggestion,
knowing that Nurse would have liked them to carry
nothing in their pockets except handkerchiefs, if she
could have had her way.

At last the bottle, tightly corked, was thrown into
the pond, and bobbed about on the water just like a
live thing.

“Now you must stand some way back,” said Mr.
Barnard. “No, Tommy, I sha’n’t shoot as long as you
stay by the pond. I don’t want to smash you instead of
the bottle,”

“But you can aim straight,” remarked Tommy.
“And I like being quite close to the pond to see what
happens.”

“Oh, by all means,” said Mr. Barnard, “stand as
close to the pond as you like if it amuses you, but I
sha’n’t aim straight past your head, or, in fact, fire at all,
unless you are obedient.”

Directly Tommy heard these words he ran back. He
had no intention of losing the sight of a shot for the
pleasure of a little disobedience. Only, he always liked
to try how far he could go with strangers; if possible,
stopping just short of punishment.
108 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

It was almost a disappointment to the children when
the first shot smashed the bottle so that there was nothing
left to fire at. They were proud of their friend’s skill,
but would have liked the entertainment to last longer.

“Can’t you shoot anything but bottles and rooks?”
inquired Flora.

“Yes; iron targets, and bits of paper pinned to a
tree,” replied Mr. Barnard. “Perhaps I will show you
that another day, now we must see something else.”
He spoke decidedly, feeling that Flora’s clean frock
would never be safe until they left the neighbourhood
of the pond.

As they were passing back through the farmyard an
old gander came hissing towards them. . Both the
children shrank back a little. They had never seen
geese before except at a respectful distance, and they
found them rather alarming.

“Why, you don’t mean to say you are afraid?”
laughed Mr. Barnard. “Do you think they will bite or
kick?”

“T don’t like them,” said Flora stoutly.

But Tommy, though he was no braver than his sister,
was considerably more boastful. “I’m not afraid!” he
shouted; “Tl drive them! Ill make them fly over the
wall, so that they'll never come back any more!”

He ran forward a few yards waving both arms. The
gander did not run away, but stood still and hissed.
This was very alarming, Tommy had quite expected
him to run away.
AT THE RECTORY. 109

“Go away, you old thing! Go away!” shouted
Tommy, without running forward any further; in fact,
he began to edge backwards.

“How about driving the gander away?” cried Mr.
Barnard. ‘“ Why, I think he is driving you!”

Tommy grew very red, he did not like being laughed
at. “I’m not afraid of an old bird,” he said sulkily,
and clapping his hands he ran a few steps forward.
The gander suddenly stood up on tiptoe and opened out
his great wings, until he looked double his former size.
In reality he was merely stretching himself in the sun-
shine; but he looked so imposing and warlike that the
little boy could not stand it any longer. With a cry of
fright he turned and ran. Unfortunately the yard was
full of rough stones, and Tommy, being too terrified to
look where he was going, soon fell flat on his face in the
mud.

“Oh, was there ever such an unlucky child!” ex-
claimed poor Mr. Barnard, going to pick him up.
“Come, you needn’t make such a noise,” he continued,
“you know you aren’t hurt.”

“Oh, I didn’t know that it was only you! I thought it
was the gander on my back!” said Tommy, his screams
stopping suddenly as he saw that it was Mr. Barnard
pulling him up.

“The truth is you are not as brave as you think,”
replied Mr. Barnard, “besides having a perfect talent
for falling into every bit of mud that is to be found.
But still, if one of you had to tumble down, I am thank-
110 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

ful it was not Flora in her white frock. I think I can
brush your mud off when we get back to the house.”

“Who is that funny old man?” asked Flora, when
they were presently crossing the lawn. “There, under
the tree,” she added, pointing to a bent figure in the
distance. “ What can he be doing?”

Indeed the old man’s appearance and occupation were
sufficiently peculiar to account for the child’s curiosity.
He was hobbling along, with a crutch under one arm,
while in the other hand he held a long stick, with which
he made vicious little pokes at the ground as if he
wanted to hurt it.

“Why, that is Jacob,” explained Mr. Barnard. “He
was our gardener once, until he broke his leg saving a
bad boy who didn’t deserve it.”

The children stared at the old man with the greatest
interest.

“Tis son is our gardener now,” continued Mr. Bar-
nard; “but Jacob lives with him, and whenever it is a
fine day he goes slowly about the place picking up dead
leaves and bits of rubbish. You see he can’t stoop, so
he carries a stick with a sharp point, and digs it into
anything he wants to take up. No stray scraps of paper
escape his eye and blow about the garden. But I'll take
you to speak to him.”

The children were-delighted at the chance of seeing
this remarkable person and his delightful weapon, a little
nearer. When Jacob shook hands solemnly with them
both, and mentioned that he had seen their father .
AT THE RECTORY. 111

christened, and remembered their grandfather as a boy,
they were almost too busy staring at the old man to
answer suitably.

“T’ve told them how you saved my life and lost the
use of your leg, Jacob, so no wonder they want to have
a good look at you,” explained Mr. Barnard.

“Ah! Master George was a terrible young gentleman
in his day. Up to all manner of tricks he was,” began
the old man.

“Come, that’s not fair, Jacob,” said Mr. Barnard. ‘I
won't have you telling tales about me to these children,
or I shall never get them to respect me properly. And
look, there’s a servant coming out of the house to say
that tea is ready.”

“Oh, do let us just see the other corner of the garden
before we go in!” pleaded Tommy. “I know Aunt Jane
is sure to take us away directly tea is over. She will
think it’s getting late, or we are in the way, or some-
thing.”

“Very well, then, I will allow you just five minutes
more, and you may see as much as you can in the time,”
said Mr. Barnard.

The children did not waste a moment. They ran up
and down, peeping into every tool-shed and cucumber-
frame they came across. They thought it the very
nicest garden they had ever seen.

“Take care of the bees!” called out Mr. Barnard, who
was some way behind them. As the children did not
seem to understand what he meant, he hurried on, and
112 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS

came up with them just as they were examining with
the greatest interest a row of what looked like small
round huts. ‘Look out!” he repeated, pulling Tommy
back by the arm. “ You will be stung all over if you go
any nearer.”

“But where are the bees?” inquired the little boy,
looking up in the air. “I only see one or two—not more
than there are all over the garden. Please let me go,”
he continued, trying to pull away his arm, “I want to
look at those funny things.”

“What do you think they are?” asked Mr. Barnard.

‘They look like dolls’ houses,” suggested Flora; “ only,
of course, you couldn’t leave dolls out of doors all
night.”

“ And they can’t be houses, because they haven’t any
doors,” added Tommy.

“Oh, haven’t they?” said Mr. Barnard. “ Look again.
I can see the front door, and one of the family just
coming out.”

“Where is it? Do show us!” cried the children, look-
ing in every place but the right one.

“Don’t you see that little hole near the bottom? It
isn’t a very large door certainly, but if you watch a
minute you will see lots of people going in and out.”

“They are bees—I see them!” shouted Tommy. “It’s
a bee-hive, I do believe!”

Both the children were much excited at this discovery.
They did not keep bees at Oakdale Court, and up to this
time they had only seen solitary ones humming about
AT THE RECTORY. 113

the flowers. ‘I should like to watch them all day,” said
Tommy enthusiastically.

“And miss your tea,” suggested Mr. Barnard, “for
that is what we shall do if we are not quick. Come
along, we mustn’t waste any more time.”

The children kept looking behind them as they slowly
walked away from this interesting corner of the garden.

“Stop, Flora!” said Mr. Barnard suddenly. ‘“ Don’t
move your hand!”

The little girl obeyed, and stood quite still. Even the
hand with which she was just pushing back the loose
hair from over her eyes remained stiffly in the air, and
when she felt a little slap on her neck she neither moved
nor spoke.

“Tt’s all right now,” cried Mr. Barnard a moment
after, “you needn’t stand like a statue any longer. But
I may tell you your obedience just saved you from being
badly stung. There was a bee entangled in your hair,
and if you had touched—”

“Where is the bee?” interrupted Tommy eagerly.

“Well, ’'m sorry to say he is dead,” said Mr. Barnard.
“T don’t like killing bees as a rule, but it seemed better
than letting Flora be stung.”

“Better for Flora,” corrected Tommy. ‘How she
would have run about screaming if the bee had stung
her neck!”

“T dare say she wouldn’t have run as fast or screamed
as loudly as a certain boy did when an old gander just

looked at him.” Tommy shrugged his shoulders im.
(31829) H
114 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

patiently, but Mr. Barnard continued: ‘I can tell you
one thing, if you had been in Flora’s place you would
certainly have been stung, because you never would have
done exactly as you were told. Perhaps you will remem-
ber about the bee, next time you are inclined to argue
for a few minutes before obeying.”

Tommy walked on without answering. He was not
at all fond of remembering things which people said were
for his good. They never seemed very interesting some-
how.

A beautiful tea was waiting in the drawing-room at
the rectory; but the children found it rather a doubtful
pleasure trying to hold a cup of tea, and at the same
time eat hot muffins without dropping crumbs on the
carpet. They had never had afternoon tea in a drawing-
room before, so that they both anxiously copied all that
Aunt Jane did in order that they might behave properly;
and as she managed to sit on a sofa and talk without
putting down either her plate or cup, they thought it
right to try and do the same.

With all their care, an accident must have happened
before long, if Mrs. Barnard had not come to their help.
She was a very kind old lady, and quite saw the extreme
difficulty of doing not only two, but three or four things
at once. So after clearing the books and newspapers off
the corner of a table she made the children sit close to
it, as comfortably as if they had been in the nursery at
home. And it is scarcely fair to tell how many mufling
and pieces of hot buttered toast they ate.
AT THE RECTORY. 115

“‘My dears, I think you really must have finished,”
said Miss York gently, just as Tommy was having his
third piece of bread and jam.

If the children had still been imitating their aunt they
would have come to an end of their tea long before, and
been now waiting with their gloves on, for the carriage
to come round; but by this time they had forgotten all
about trying to behave exactly like grown-up people, in
their enjoyment of the excellent tea.

“They will certainly make themselves ill,” said poor
Miss York hopelessly, ‘“‘and we shall not be home until
very late.”

“Well, as a British soldier, I will be brave enough
to stop them,” said Mr. Barnard; “and you must admit
it requires some courage to turn one’s guests out in the
middle of a meal. Now, Tommy and Flora,” he con-
tinued, “you must only finish what you have got on
your plates, and not take any more. If you are hungry
when you get home you must ask Nurse for a little dry
bread before you go to bed.”

The children laughed merrily at this idea, for, without
meaning to be greedy, they had already eaten quite twice
as much as they usually did at tea.

“ And while they are finishing I want to ask you some-
thing,” said Mr. Barnard, crossing the room and sitting
down beside Miss York on the sofa. ‘‘We have a school
treat here on Saturday, and I should very much like
Tommy and Flora to join us. If you will trust them to
me I will see that they don’t come to any harm.”
116 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“Tt’s very kind of you,” began Miss York, “and no
doubt they would enjoy it exceedingly; but,” she con-
tinued doubtfully, “they are not easy to manage. Iam
afraid you will soon repent of your offer.”

“Well, I have kept them in pretty good order this
afternoon,” said Mr. Barnard. ‘That encourages me to
hope I may manage another day.”

“You certainly seem to have great control over them,”
replied Miss York. ‘Why, they look quite tidy still,
although they have been running about the whole after-
noon.”

This was quite true, for before Mr. Barnard brought
the children back to their aunt he had called a maid to
brush their clothes and make them look as neat as pos-
sible.

“T think I can manage them,” he repeated, ‘if you
will let me try.” And at last Miss York was persuaded
into saying that the children should be sent over to the
rectory after dinner on Saturday.

Tommy and Flora’s delight at this prospect knew no
bounds, and they promised at least a dozen times not to
give any trouble at all.
THE SCHOOL FEAST. 117

CHAPTER VIII.

THE SCHOOL FEAST.

NE whole day, and two more nights, and a lot of

hours to wait!” said Tommy with a deep sigh, as he

was playing in the garden one afternoon. “I don’t

believe Saturday is ever coming. The time doesn’t seem
to move a bit.”

“ Nurse won't let me talk about it any more at dinner,”
remarked Flora. ‘She says she’s tired to death of hear-
ing about the school feast, and she’ll be glad when it’s
over.”

“T would talk about it all day without stopping, and
all night too, if it would make it come any quicker,” said
Tommy obstinately, “but it doesn’t. It seems as if the
more you thought about a thing the slower it comes.”

“Well, let us play at something and try to forget it,”
suggested Flora. ‘Nurse isn’t coming out this after-
noon, because she is busy finishing a piece of work with
the sewing-machine, so we might get away from Susan
and climb on the fagots.”

This proposal was sufficiently exciting to make Tommy
forget his complaints as to the slow passage of time.
When only Susan the nurse-maid came out with the
children the two elder ones usually seized the oppor-
tunity to do exactly as they liked, and one of the pet
treats they allowed themselves at these times was climb-
118 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

ing on the fagot-pile. Nurse would never have permitted
this for a moment, as it always meant several large tears
to be mended in their clothes afterwards. But quiet,
good-natured Susan, sitting under a tree on the lawn
busily making daisy-chains for Gerald, never even noticed
when the two elder ones ran off together.

At the end of the kitchen-garden was a waste corner
- where all such boughs as were blown off the trees in the
winter were dragged, to be cut up into fagots and pea-
sticks. It was certainly a delightful place for climbing,
if one did not mind scratches and tears. Tommy and
Flora did not, perhaps, actually enjoy being hurt, but
they did not notice a little pain in the excitement of
play, and were rather proud of exhibiting their scars
afterwards. But then, as Nurse often said, their skin
mended itself and their clothes did not, which made a
great difference, and accounted for her dislike to their
damaging the latter.

Just at present the climbing-place was rather reduced
in size, owing to so many of the pea-sticks being in use.
But there was enough left to do duty for a mountain,
with a robber’s cave near the top, in which both children
crouched down and hid whenever the gardener came
anywhere in sight. This was quite a necessary precau-
tion, because they always pretended that he was the
policeman coming to catch them, and of course it would
have been ridiculous to let him see their hiding-place.

At other times the gardener was a great friend, who
endeared himself by a pleasing habit of suddenly pro-
THE SCHOOL FEAST. 119

ducing a bunch of grapes or a basket of ripe peaches
from the greenhouse, into which the children were
strictly forbidden to enter on their own account. But
quite unintentionally he often gave the deepest offence
by destroying the robber caves, which they had spent
hours in building and fitting up with convenient seats
and shelves.

Of course, when he told one of the men to go and tidy
up the fagots, which seemed slipping all over the path,
he had no intention of spoiling anybody’s home; and he
never guessed how annoying it was to the children to
come out sometimes and find the whole shape of the
mountain altered, not a trace left of any cave, and their
best spears taken away to support some drooping dahlias.
Gardeners solely intent on keeping a place neat are apt
not to regard children’s feelings, any more than they do
those of the caterpillars and worms; and though none of
the victims are in a position to rebel, they naturally feel
rather bitter about the injustice of their case.

However, on this particular afternoon the children
played for as long as they liked without any interference.
Susan was only too thankful not to hear them either
crying or quarrelling, and as they were so quiet she
fondly believed they were equally good. So she con-
tinued to make daisy-chains for the little ones without
troubling her head any further.

“JT have just thought of such a good plan!” exclaimed
Tommy, after about an hour. ‘‘Couldn’t we get on the
top of the garden wall, and pretend the enemies are
120 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

coming down the lane on the other side, and we'll drop
things on their heads to stop them? We can easily
climb up the sticks.”

“But we've been told not to get on the wall for fear
we should fall over,” objected Flora. ‘And, besides,
Nurse says it doesn’t look nice to see us peeping over
into the road.”

“JT think it looks very nice,” persisted Tommy; “I
can’t see any harm init. And, besides, we are pretend-
ing to be robbers now, so it doesn’t matter how rude we
are.”

This seemed such a sensible argument that Flora gave
in at once, and they both began heaping up the sticks
to a sufficient height to enable them to look over into
the lane. This was not a very difficult job, as the fagots
were thrown together in an angle of the garden wall, so
with a little extra building up they could easily be made
into a sort of ladder by which to climb up. It was not
the first time that the children had peeped over into the
lane, but this idea of making the wall a kind of watch-
tower from which to view their enemies was quite a new
plan, and Tommy was very proud of it.

“T say, we've forgotten something!” he cried, when
they were both comfortably established on a heap of
fagots, with their elbows and chins resting on the top of
the wall. ‘“We’ve forgotten to bring up anything to
drop on the enemies’ heads as they go under. It ought
to be boiling water or melted lead, I fancy,” continued
Temmy, who read history with his governess. ‘“That’s
THE SCHOOL FEAST. 121

what people in castles used to throw out of the window
when the enemies were trying to get in.”

“But didn’t it burn?” asked Flora, who had a whole-
some dread of playing with hot things ever since she
had once scalded her fingers in trying to lift the kettle
when Nurse was out of the room.

“Oh, soldiers don’t care,” said Tommy loftily. “And
they didn’t mind if it burnt the enemies’ heads off; that’s
what they meant it to do. But as we can’t get those
sort of things we will only drop stones. I dare say we
shall kill a lot of people that way.”

Flora was not at all shocked by this suggestion. She
knew that Tommy only meant killing in play, and that
nobody would be any the worse for his ferocious words.

“T suppose I’m to get the stones,” she said in a matter-
of-fact voice; for she knew from long experience that
running all the errands generally fell to her share.

“Gravel will do,” said Tommy. “It won’t take you
long, as there’s a lot on the path.”

Flora got down and set about her task methodically,
scraping up the earth and gravel with both hands, and
pouring it into her pocket until that long-suffering re-
ceptacle would hold no more. Then she shovelled as
much as she could into the skirt of her frock, and hold-
ing it like a great bag, managed with some difficulty to
climb back to Tommy’s side.

The dangerous part of being on the top of a wall with
a lot of gravel in your lap, is that, sooner or later, you are
almost sure to be tempted to drop a little of it upon the
122 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

heads of those below. Rather unfortunately it happened
to be market-day, and considerably more people than
usual were passing along the lane under the garden
wall.

At first the children were content to peep over in
silence, not making a sound for fear someone might look
up and see them. Then when nobody was in sight they
threw over a handful of gravel, and pretended that
enemies were falling dead by the dozen. This was all
very well while it lasted, but the danger really began
when it occurred to Tommy how amusing it would be
to pretend that the real people who passed by on their
way from market were the enemies with whom they
were at war.

“Tt will be much funnier,” he said, “and of course we
won’t hurt them. Besides, if they look up we can hide
behind the wall.”

They began very cautiously by dropping just two or
three tiny stones on an old woman’s back who was walk-
ing past with her arms full of baskets. As she went on
without apparently noticing that anything unusual had
happened, they felt emboldened to repeat the experi-
ment on several other people. Some of them looked
round, and one woman even put up her umbrella under
the impression that it was beginning to rain. This so
amused the children that they laughed aloud, and forgot
to duck their heads.

“T think she saw us,” whispered Flora, rather fright-
ened.
THE SCHOOL FEAST. 123

“T don’t care if she did,” answered Tommy defiantly.
“Look out! Here comes the chief of all the enemies.
He is galloping in his war-chariot! Don’t you see him?”
He pointed to a stout elderly farmer, with a red face,
seated in a little gig drawn by a pony.

As the farmer was passing under where the children
sat, he felt a heavy shower of small stones on his head
and neck. He looked quickly up, and had just caught
sight of two round, smiling, faces, when a second shower
falling in his eyes half-blinded him. The pony also was
dreadfully frightened by this sudden downfall of gravel
from the clouds, and started off plunging and kicking.
It was as much as the farmer could do to prevent an
accident, and as the pony galloped wildly along with
the gig swinging from side to side of the road, both the
children stretched over the wall, watching it with con-
siderable anxiety.

“Will he be hurt?” asked Flora.

“No, I don’t think so,” answered Tommy hopefully.
“Ah! the pony is getting slower,” he said in a minute.
“The man is turning round. I believe he is looking for
us. Oh, I hope he won’t come back!”

It was quite true. The farmer having at last succeeded
in stopping his pony was looking back to try and catch
sight of the naughty children who had pelted him, in-
tending to return and either punish them himself, or ask
their parents to do so. He was naturally very angry,
and quite determined that he would make them sorry
for what they had done. But now nothing was to be
124 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

seen except a high blank wall, with no sign of a face
looking over it. So, as it was getting rather late, and
he was in a hurry to return home, he drove on grum-
bling, and determining to look well about him next time
he came down the lane.

“Tt's all right,” exclaimed Tommy, “he’s gone! I
wish we hadn’t thrown quite so much gravel, though; I
quite forgot it would frighten the pony. Fancy if he’d
come back and caught us!”

This terrible thought so sobered the children that they
soon after returned to Susan, and spent the rest of the
afternoon peacefully making daisy-chains.

Saturday came at last. The sun shone. There was
not even a threatening cloud in the sky. How the
children got through their morning’s lessons it is difficult
to say, as their eyes were fixed the whole time intently
on the window, and only wandered occasionally to their
books. But at last all the tasks were over, as much
dinner eaten as their excited condition would allow,
and the two children started, accompanied by Susan,
who was to return and bring them back after tea.

“Has anybody come?” inquired Tommy eagerly, as
Mr. Barnard met them at the rectory.

“Nobody yet, I’m thankful to say,” he replied, taking
the children into the empty dining-room. “Now you
two must sit quite still for five minutes whilst I eat my
lunch, I have been go busy getting things ready all the
morning I have not had a minute—”

“What sort of things?” interrupted Flora, who always
M329
66

ALL RIGHT,—HE’S GONE; FANCY IF HE’D COME BACK
AND CAUGHT US!”


THE SCHOOL FEAST. 125

liked to get to the bottom of a subject, or a little lower
if possible.

“Oh, sacks and pennies and gooseberries,” said Mr.
Barnard, cutting himself some cold beef. “And I had
to ride into Torbury to settle about something. By the
by, Tommy, if you look out you will see a friend this
afternoon. No, I won’t tell you who it is; you must
guess. And now I really can’t say another word, or all
the school will be here before I have eaten my lunch.”

Almost before Mr. Barnard had finished speaking, a
servant came to say that the children were assembled in
the field. ‘All right,” he said, “I shall be there in one
minute. Come on,” he added, turning to Tommy and
Flora, “I must make up for this at tea.” And eating a
hunch of bread and cheese as he went, he led the way
out to the field.

The school children were all standing about in groups,
looking rather shy. But soon some young ladies who
lived near came and began to play games with the girls,
while Mr. Barnard started the boys with some cricket at
the other end of the field.

Tommy and Flora enjoyed themselves immensely.
Nurse had very thoughtfully only dressed them in what
they called “second best” clothes, so that they were able
to play without any fear of accidents, beyond a few
excusable green stains from slipping on the grass.

The time passed so quickly, that when a loud bell
was heard, and all the games stopped suddenly, they
could not imagine what was going to happen.
126 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“Why are they all running to the gate?” asked
Tommy, as he saw Mr. Barnard walking across the field.
“Why, tea, of course! You didn’t think it was tea-
time? Well, I'll tell you a secret. I’ve been thinking
of nothing else the whole afternoon!”

The children only laughed, knowing, of course, that
grown-up people never really think about their meals.

“Tt’s to be out of doors! Oh, how jolly!” exclaimed
Tommy, as he caught sight of some long tables arranged
under the trees on the lawn. ‘But who are all those
people sitting down?” he continued. “They don’t go to
school, do they ?”

“No, not at present,” said Mr. Barnard; “perhaps
they did sixty or seventy years ago. They are a few of
the oldest men and women in the parish, and they like
to come every year, although some of them are so blind
that I don’t think they can see anything. But it seems
quite as great a treat to them as to the children.”

“One of them has a wooden leg,” remarked Flora, who
had been examining the group of old people attentively.
“May I go a little nearer? I want to look at it.”

“Well, I don’t think there is much time now,” said
Mr. Barnard. “ Besides, sometimes people who are lame
do not care to be looked at.”

“T shouldn’t mind,” replied Flora. “If I had a
wooden leg I would show it to everyone—”

“How could he walk here?” interrupted Tommy.

“None of the old people walk,” said Mr. Barnard.
“One of the farmers is very kind, and lends a wagon
THE SCHOOL FEAST. 127

every year for them to come in. That reminds me, I
must just go and thank him, and ask what time he can
take them back this evening.”

So saying, he walked on a few yards, and shook
hands with an elderly man whose back was turned to
the children.

At that moment the rector stood up between the
tables and cried, “Silence!” Everybody stopped talking,
and the boys took off their hats. Tommy, seeing this,
also took off his, although he did not know what was
going to happen. Then the school children began to
sing their grace. It sounded very pretty, like a little
hymn. Tommy and Flora were quite sorry when it was
over, and everybody sat down, with a great clatter of
mugs and plates.

But just then they both caught sight of something
that put tea and grace entirely out of their heads. The
elderly man to whom Mr. Barnard was talking had
turned round, and they recognized him as the red-faced
farmer they had pelted with gravel, two days before.

“What shall we do?” whispered Flora. “It’s the
same man, I’m quite sure. And he is sure to tell Mr.
Barnard, because he was so angry.”

“Perhaps he won’t notice us,” replied Tommy in an
equally low voice. ‘Take care not to look at him, and
if he comes near put your pocket-handkerchief up to
your face, and I'll do the same.”

Just then, however, one of the ladies who were helping
came and told Tommy and Flora to follow her to a little
128 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

table some way off, where Mrs. Barnard was having her
tea. A few minutes earlier the children would have
been rather disappointed at not eating in the midst
of the crowd, but now they were only too thankful to
escape a little further from the terrible red-faced man.

At all events they found such a feast awaiting them
as was quite sufficient to put all unpleasant thoughts
out of their heads. Kind old Mrs. Barnard being rather
delicate could not take much part in entertaining the
school-children, and she was delighted to make herself
useful by looking after Tommy and Flora at tea, and
loading their plates with fruit and cakes.

“ Fullo!” exclaimed Mr. Barnard, coming up presently
with a great kettle in his hand; “you young people
aren’t eating up everything, I hope, because I’m simply
famishing.”

“Do sit down and have something now, George,” said
his mother. “Surely you have attended to everybody
by this time.”

“Not at all! There is a whole table of boys still
suffering from thirst! But when I have filled up the
mugs all round I shall be only too glad to come and
make friends with that excellent cake in front of Tommy.
And please keep a place for Mr. Price at your table,
Mother. As he is so kind about lending his wagon he
deserves a comfortable tea this hot day.”

The children looked at each other with alarm. Could
this mean that the dreaded man with the red face was
actually coming to sit down next them! The very idea
THE SCHOOL FEAST. 129

made them so nervous that they started at every foot-
step, and Flora upset a cup of tea through trying to look
over her shoulder while she drank.

“You don’t seem getting on very fast with your cake,”
remarked kind Mrs. Barnard. ‘Perhaps you would like
some fruit better. Try a peach. I know they are ripe,
because they came out of a friend’s orchard-house.”

Tommy stretched out his hand to take one of the
tempting peaches, but just as he touched the soft velvety
skin there was a sound of voices, and Mr. Barnard came
in sight accompanied by the alarming Mr. Price.

Tommy drew back his hand as suddenly as if he had
been bitten by a snake.

“No, I won’t have one, thank you,” he said. “I
would rather not. I don’t want any more, I have quite
finished.”

The old lady was naturally much surprised by this
behaviour, and offered the dish of peaches to Flora.
They looked delicious; but Tommy kicked his sister so
hard under the table that she did not dare to take one,
although she could not help staring longingly after them.

“May we go?” asked Tommy hurriedly. “We've
quite finished our tea, and we want to run about.”

“But you have had so little to eat, my dears,” said
hospitable Mrs. Barnard, much distressed at the refusal
of her valued peaches, which she had been carefully
keeping as a great treat for the children. “Here,
George,” she cried, appealing to her son as he came

nearer. “What can be the matter with Tommy and
(31 820) I
130 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

Flora? They haven’t eaten half as much as they did
the other day, and they decline to have any fruit.”

“Why, what’s up with you both?” said Mr. Barnard
cheerfully.

“We don’t want any more. We want to go and play,”
mumbled Tommy, holding his pocket-handkerchief up to
his face, and speaking as well as he could behind it.

“Yes, we don’t want any more,” repeated Flora, with
her handkerchief also up to her eyes.

“Well, you are funny children. But there will be
two extra peaches for Mr. Price and me,” remarked Mr.
Barnard. ‘Yes, of course you can go back to the field
if you like. Only, I don’t think you will find anybody
to play with yet; the other children are much too
sensible to run away in the middle of a good meal.”

Very disconsolately Tommy and Flora wandered about
the deserted field, thinking regretfully of their half-
finished tea and those beautiful peaches which they had
been so unwillingly obliged to refuse. The merry voices
of the school-children could be heard in the distance, as
they lingered round the well-laden tables; but they
seemed in no hurry to finish their feast and return to
play. However, after a few minutes a solitary figure
came through the gate which led from the garden to the
field. Tommy and Flora recognized it directly.

“Tt’s that dreadful Mr. Price!” gasped Tommy, seizing
his sister’s hand. “He must be coming to catch us now!
Where can we hide? Oh, where can we hide?”

“There’s a little cow-house in the further corner of the
THE SCHOOL FEAST. 131

field,” said Flora. “I saw it when we were playing,
before tea. Nobody will look inside there.”

Hand in hand the two children ran as fast as they
could to the opposite corner of the field. The door of
the shed was open. The children ran in and crouched
down in a dark corner, for fear the red-faced farmer
should follow, and drag them out.

In point of fact Mr. Price had never even noticed
Tommy and Flora the whole afternoon, and at present
he was merely coming across the field to see where they
had turned out his horses, which had brought the wagon
with the old people. After looking round he soon saw
them grazing under some trees, and, quite contented, he
returned to help Mr. Barnard to set the boys running
races after tea. But Tommy and Flora, firmly believing
that Mr. Price was searching everywhere with the in-
tention of finding and punishing them, were afraid to
come out of the cow-house, and passed a miserable half-
hour sitting in the dirt and dark.

At the end of that time they heard approaching foot-
steps, and the door was pushed back violently. For one
moment the children cowered down in the greatest
terror. Then they recognized Mr. Barnard in the dim
light, and sprang up with a cry of delight.

At first the young man could not understand what
had happened. He had missed the children soon after
tea, and then remembered having seen them both run
off with their handkerchiefs up to their faces. He
wondered. if they could possibly have toothache, or he
132 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

feeling ill. It took him a long time to find out their
hiding-place; perhaps he never would have done so if
someone had not noticed the children entering the little
shed.

When Mr. Barnard had heard the whole story he
looked rather grave. It was a difficult thing to know
exactly what advice to give.

“TI tell you the only thing to be done,” he said
presently. ‘You had better come with me and beg Mr.
Price’s pardon.”

“Oh, we can’t! we can’t!” cried both the children,
drawing back at this alarming proposal.

“That’s all nonsense,” said Mr. Barnard sternly; “1
suppose you are afraid of being punished. You two
seem to forget that it is impossible to have your own
way without paying for it after. However, you have
brought your own punishment upon yourselves this
time, for I believe you have been far too much fright-
ened to enjoy anything this afternoon.”

Tommy and Flora admitted that this was true. And
after a little more conversation they began to see that
it would be better to get the worst over at once than to
spend the rest of the day dodging out of sight and try-
ing to hide. So, each clinging to one of Mr. Barnard’s
hands, they came out of the shed, and went in search of
Mr. Price.

After all, it was not nearly as dreadful as they ex-
pected. Although the old farmer had been naturally
very angry when his pony was frightened into running
THE SCHOOL FEAST. 133

away, he soon forgave the children when he saw their
frightened faces, and heard from Mr. Barnard that they
were really sorry for what they had done.

“So we'll say no more about it,” concluded Mr. Price
kindly. “For you gave me a good fright on Thursday,
and it seems I’ve given you one to-day, and now we're
quits!”

The children were much amused at this statement,
and thought the old man very kind to turn the matter
off with a little joke, instead of a long lecture as they had
expected.

“ And now that your minds are at rest, do you think
you can eat some more tea?” suggested Mr. Barnard.

“Perhaps we could take a little more,” said Tommy.

“ Just a little more,” echoed Flora

They returned to the tea-table, where there were still
enough cakes left for an excellent feast.

“But I’m sorry to tell you that all the peaches have
been eaten,” said Mr. Barnard. ‘You see, however much
one repents a foolish act, one can never escape from all
its consequences.”

The children nodded their heads. It was a moral
they could understand.
134 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

CHAPTER IX.

THE ITALIAN AGAIN.

HEN once the children had made their peace with

Mr. Price, there was nothing more to interfere

with their perfect enjoyment of sack-races and scram-

bling for nuts. And the sense of relief during the last

hour or two was so great that it more than made up for

the previous anxiety. Besides, Mr. Barnard had a sur-
prise in store for them of the most delightful kind.

When all the pennies, gooseberries, and nuts for
which the school-children had been racing and scram-
bling were exhausted, a bell was rung as a signal for
them to assemble on the lawn.

“Are they all going away now?” asked Tommy.

“Not quite yet,” said Mr. Barnard. “First there
will be a little entertainment, at which you will see one,
or perhaps I ought to say two, old friends.”

The children looked doubtfully at him. Surely he
could not mean Mr. Price, who, though very kind, was
scarcely an old friend. Besides, under no circumstances
could he be described as two old friends. They could
not understand it at all, until a few minutes later they
caught sight of a picturesquely ragged foreigner standing
in the rectory garden, with a barrel-organ in front of
him, on which sat a monkey in a red coat.

“Tt’s my Italian man!” shouted Tommy. ‘Look,
Flora! It’s my Italian and his jolly little monkey!
THE ITALIAN AGAIN. 135

Just like they were before, when they drove away that
horrid man! Where did they come from? How did
you find them?”

“Well, I was wondering what to get to amuse the
school-children when they were tired of playing,” said
Mr. Barnard. “And we’ve had a conjuror and a Punch-
and-Judy before, so I wanted to find something new. I
only thought of the Italian and his monkey this morn-
ing, and I had to ride over to Torbridge in a great
hurry to find them, and scarcely got any luncheon in
consequence, so I hope they will be appreciated.”

However, there could be little doubt that the perform-
ance was a most popular one. The school-children sat
in rows on the lawn, whilst the Italian played his organ
opposite them, and sang songs with quaint merry tunes,
and words no one could understand. Meanwhile the
monkey danced in the open space between them, snap-
ping its fingers and imitating all its master’s gestures so
faithfully that one might almost have supposed it was a
tiny, shrunken old man instead of an animal.

But it had other accomplishments besides dancing.
From a box at the back of the organ the Italian pro-
duced a little wooden gun, with which the monkey went
through his drill, and then stood perfectly still, like a
real sentinel on guard. Then two small wooden swords
were brought out with-which the monkey and his master
fenced, until poor Jacko suddenly gave a loud cry and
fell forward on his face, while the sword dropped from
his thin black hand.
136 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

For a moment the children were all dreadfully afraid
that the clever little fellow had met with an accident;
but at a word from his master up he jumped and ran
all round the audience, bowing and rattling a tin money-
box. They were all so relieved to see him alive and
unhurt, that very many of the pennies which had been
won in the races quickly found their way into the tin
box, which became so heavy that Jacko was glad to
put it down on the organ before he began his next per-
formance.

This consisted in putting on a smart dress and walking
up and down with a parasol, bowing from side to side
in imitation of a fashionable lady.

“Now, I’m afraid you must go,” said Mr. Barnard,
coming up to Tommy and Flora when the last of Jacko’s
tricks was over. “The carriage has been waiting at
least a quarter of an hour for you, and I don’t dare
keep you any longer, or Miss York will be getting
anxious. And, you know, we agreed the other day that
it was a great shame to frighten her when she is so
kind.”

“Did you talk to the Italian man when you were
standing by him just now?” asked Tommy as they
walked towards the carriage.

“Yes, in a sort of way,” replied Mr. Barnard. “He
can’t speak English and I can’t speak Italian, but we
both talk shocking bad French and understand each
other somehow. He was telling me how grateful he
was for the chance of making a little money to-day,
THE ITALIAN AGAIN. 137

because he is trying to collect enough to pay his journey
back to Italy before the winter.”

“But why does he want to go back to Italy?” said
Flora.

“Tor several reasons,” answered Mr, Barnard. ‘Of
course it is his home, and his relations live there. Then
his wife and children wander about with him, and the
Kinglish climate seems very wretched to them in the
winter. And perhaps the most important reason of all
is, that Jacko was so ill last Christmas with the cold, that
he will probably die if he is not taken to a warmer
country for the winter. Now, the man is very fond of
his monkey; and, besides, he tells me that this is the
cleverest one he has ever trained, and can do more tricks
than most monkeys. So, of course, Jacko is quite a
valuable possession.”

Tommy and Flora would have liked to ask many
more questions on this interesting subject; but Mr.
Barnard was obliged to hand them over to Susan and
return to the field before they had time to learn more
than that the Italian was so poor he hardly ever had
meat for dinner, while his babies ran about barefoot. Of
course, first Susan, and then Aunt Jane and Nurse, had
to hear a good deal about the school feast and the
wonderful performing monkey, before Tommy and Flora
would go to bed quietly. However, when once there
they were so tired out with excitement that they soon
fell asleep.

Rather early next morning Flora was wakened by
138 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

someone shaking her gently. She opened her eyes slowly,
being still rather sleepy, when to her astonishment she
saw Tommy standing by her bedside, half-dressed.

“Why have you got up? I haven’t been called yet,”
she began. But Tommy put his hand on her mouth
and pointed to the door leading into the night-nursery,
where the two younger children slept with Nurse.

“Don’t wake them,” he whispered. “I wish you
could come and talk in my room, where they can’t hear.
But I suppose you mustn't.”

Flora shook her head. She knew that it would be
against all rules to get up before she was called, and
cross the passage to Tommy’s little room on the opposite
side.

“Then we must talk very low,” said the boy. “Ive
a capital plan, only it’s a great secret—the greatest I
ever had. Do you want to hear it? Mind, you mustn’t
tell anybody one word.”

Of course, Flora could not resist the temptation to hear
all about this wonderful secret, and promised faithfully
not to repeat it to anyone.

“Well, then,” said Tommy, “it’s about the Italian
man. I’m sure he'll never get enough money to go
home, if he is so dreadfully poor. And people don’t
give him anything but pennies and halfpennies, except
Aunt Jane when I was knocked down getting her ribbon;
and that can’t happen again, because she never takes me
to Torbridge now. She says it makes her so nervous.
It doesn’t me. I should like to go, and have another
THE ITALIAN AGAIN. 139

pink-and-white sugar-cake after. But, you see, we must
do something to get money for the Italian man, or else
he won’t be able to go home, and poor Jacko will die of
the cold.”

“What can we do? Shall I get my money out of the
nursery-drawer?” asked Flora, quite as anxious as her
brother to help in the great work of saving the monkey’s
life.

“Oh, we shall want much more than that,” returned
Tommy. “I suppose you've only got a few pennies?”

“T’ve got a new shilling and two farthings!” said
Flora defiantly. She was a little hurt at the rejection
of her kind offer; and, besides, did not like the con-
temptuous way in which Tommy alluded to her wealth.

“ Anyhow, you can’t get it without Nurse knowing,
and she would be sure to stop you,” observed Tommy.
“Now, my plan is not to tell anybody, but do it all by
ourselves. Like this. There are a great many things in
the house that nobody wants,—they aren’t any use at all.
But if they were sold in a shop we should get a lot of
money for them—quite enough to pay for the Italian
man and Jacko going home before it gets cold.”

“But how can we sell things in a shop when we never
go to a shop by ourselves?” said Flora, detecting a weak
spot in the plan.

“Ah! Dve thought of a way,” answered Tommy, smiling
triumphantly. ‘You know Luke has often to ride to
Torbridge and do errands for Aunt Jane or the house-
keeper. I shall get him to take the things to be sold.”
140 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“You were told not to talk to the stable-boys,” began
Flora. But her brother quickly interrupted her with a
timely reminder that, after all, it was his plan and not
hers.

Soon after this there were sounds from the night-
nursery which showed that the little ones were waking
up, and, according to their usual custom, beginning to
play in bed. Tommy took warning, and glided quietly off
before he was discovered. Although Gerald and Baby
were awake, it would probably be another hour before the
housemaids began their work. This was plenty of time
for him to do all he wanted.

Anyone who had peeped behind the drawn blinds into
the drawing-room at Oakdale Court that morning might
have seen a small figure running up and down in the
dimly -lighted room, busily collecting objects off the
various tables, which he threw together in a heap on the
floor. Plenty of light struggled through the curtains
and blinds for Tommy to see his way in and out among
the furniture; and as he had already pretty well settled
what to take, he did not lose much time in hesitating
between the different ornaments.

Tommy’s idea was remarkably simple. He understood
that it would save Jacko’s life and add much to the
Italian’s happiness, if enough money could be collected
for them to go abroad before the winter. Now, how
many things there are in every house that are not only
useless, but that nobody cares about! Surely it would
be not only permissible, but even a virtuous act, to take
THE ITALIAN AGAIN. 141

some of this property which was lying idle, and apply
it to the wants of the suffering poor.

“Of course, I won’t take anything Mama really wants,
like the ink-bottle or the tongs,” reflected Tommy. “But
I’ve heard her say myself what a dreadful trouble it is for
the servants having to keep all these silver things clean,
and I know that poor White sometimes has to spend the
whole afternoon polishing them.” He stopped in front
of a table covered with small silver ornaments, antique
spoons, and curiously-shaped snuff-boxes. “They are no
use, they aren’t,” thought Tommy. “ Mama never takes
snuff, and she wouldn’t be such a silly as to faint, so she
can’t want a scent-bottle. Then that little silver cow,—
what’s the good of that to a grown-up person? I dare say
Gerald or Baby would like it to play with, but it seems
nonsense to keep it in the drawing-room.”

Considered from the stand-point of sheer utility, very
few of the ornaments escaped criticism. Tommy just
left enough on the table to prevent it from looking pain-
fully bare, the rest he added to the heap he had already
collected on the floor.

It was a curious and varied collection that the little
boy made. A pair of old Chelsea china candlesticks
seemed to Tommy so ugly that there was no doubt the
drawing-room would look better without them. And
what could anyone want with a tiny little inlaid clock on
a bracket, when there was a splendid big one out in the
hall which struck so loudly that it could be heard all
over the house}
142 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

When Tommy came to examine it, quite half the
furniture of the room was either ugly or useless, and
the only limit to his collection was the extreme difficulty
of carrying away more than a certain amount without
exciting observation. He was obliged regretfully to
leave behind an Indian cushion, so stiff with gold em-
broidery that nobody ever dared to lean against it; but
the bundle wrapped up in one of the drawing-room
table-cloths was already so heavy that he could scarcely
lift it.

“T don’t think anyone will miss those stupid things,”
thought Tommy as he cast a last look back round the
room. “It is much nicer with all this rubbish out of
the way. And how glad the Italian man will be to get
such a lot of money! I dare say he never had so much.”

A distant sound of drawing up blinds and opening
shutters warned Tommy that it was time for him to dis-
appear before the housemaids came down. He laboured
off with the large bundle in his arms to his bedroom,
where he wrapped it in an outer covering of sheets of
paper taken out of the chests of drawers. Then he tied
it securely together with some string, of which he always
kept a large collection in his pockets. It did not make
a very neat parcel even then, but still there was nothing
remarkable about it. The next thing was to push it
under his bed until it was time to get up.

Directly Tommy was dressed he asked permission to
go out into the garden hefore breakfast. There was no
difficulty about this being allowed, in fact Nurse was
THE ITALIAN AGAIN. 143

always glad to get him out of the way while she was
dressing the younger ones; so, with her usual caution to
him about not dirtying his clothes, she let him run off.
He went straight to the stables in search of Luke.
Now it was quite against rules to talk to the stable-boy.
Tommy knew that perfectly well, but to carry out the
plan he had in his head it was absolutely necessary that
he should say a few words to Luke, and give him the
parcel that he had brought out of the house for that
purpose.

“You are to take this to Torbridge after breakfast,”
said Tommy, “and sell it at a shop and bring back the
money.”

“What shop did you say I was to take it to, please
Master Tommy?” asked Luke, who did not quite under-
stand these directions.

“Oh, I don’t know the name,” replied Tommy im-
patiently. ‘“ Any big shop where they keep things like
clocks and ornaments.”

“ Ah, that would be Tauner’s, perhaps—”

“Very likely,” interrupted Tommy, who was in a hurry
to return to the house before his absence was noticed.
“Well, you just take the parcel there and they'll know
what to do, right enough; they’ll give you some money
for it. Mind you don’t forget.”

Luke, who never doubted that the young gentleman
had been sent out to the stables with a message by Miss
York, promised to ride to Torbridge directly after break-
fast and leave the parcel at Tauner’s. He did not
144 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

trouble to think what there was inside of it, taking it
for granted that the shop-people were expecting the
parcel and would understand what was to be done. In
the meantime the bundle was put down in a corner of
the saddle-room, and Tommy returned triumphantly
to the house.

Now, a great many things happen in all families that
grown-up people consider are much better not mentioned
to the children. Consequently, when in the course of
the morning the housekeeper brought an extraordinary
story to Miss York about a most audacious theft that
had been committed the night before, Tommy and Flora
were told nothing about it, and continued to do their
lessons in blissful ignorance of the fact that the rest of
the household was plunged into the wildest confusion.

Poor Miss York had a terrible morning’s work. First
the housekeeper came in a great state of agitation, and
excitedly related how a robber had broken in during the
night, and that they all had, undoubtedly, had a narrow
escape of being murdered in their beds! As she became
calmer she explained that the only damage at present
discovered was the loss of about half the drawing-room
ornaments. She thought it very probable, however,
that in the course of the day other things about the
house would be found to be missing.

The next person who came to give evidence was White,
the butler, who had been polishing up the silver orna-
ments only a few days previously, so that he was quite
certain they were all safe then. Lastly, the housemaid
THE ITALIAN AGAIN. 145

had shut up the room herself the night before, and was
positive that at that time there was nothing wrong.

Luke, who might have thrown some light on the
mystery, had ridden off to Torbridge immediately after
breakfast, telling the coachman that he had been ordered
to take a parcel of Miss York’s toa shop. Tommy, the
only other person capable of explaining everything, was
in the school-room doing his lessons as well as could be
expected, considering that his head was full of all the
pleasure he was going to give the Italian.

Miss York was particularly careful that the children
should not suspect anything had happened. She strictly
forbade the servants to mention the subject of the
robbery to them for fear of their being frightened; and
though Tommy thought it was a little strange when he
was told to accompany the nursery party for a walk on
the road in the afternoon, instead of being allowed to
play in the garden as usual, yet he never guessed that
they were trying to get him out of the way before the
policeman came to examine the premises.

The examination was dreadfully unsatisfactory. No
footsteps were found outside; no signs of how the thief
had opened the window and got in. At last the police-
man told Miss York that he was afraid the theft must
really have been committed by someone inside the house;
and though she protested that she could not possibly
suspect any of the servants, she could not help feeling
very uncomfortable and wretched at the bare suggestion.

Again and again she walked round the drawing-room,
(36 829) K
146 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

with a fond hope that her eye might suddenly light on
the missing articles lying in dark corners; but, of course,
she could find nothing. Late that evening, however, her
anxiety was in one sense relieved, though in another it
became greater than ever.

At first Miss York could hardly understand the letter
which was handed to her just as she had finished her
dinner. She read it through twice, and then inquired
where it had come from. The butler replied that a
messenger had brought it from Mr. Tauner’s at Torbridge,
and that he had been told to deliver it at once. Miss
York read the note again; from which it appeared that
a boy from Oakdale Court had that morning brought a
large parcel to the shop, saying something about some
money he expected to receive for it. Mr. Tauner him-
self was out at the time, and the shopman had sent the
boy away, saying that he did not understand the message,
and that he must call again another day. When Mr.
Tauner returned and examined the contents of the
parcel, he found such a curious mixture of articles
that he thought it best to communicate with Miss York
at once.

Very little sleep did poor Miss York get that night,
and her head was aching terribly when she came down
to breakfast next morning. However, she made an
effort to talk to Tommy through the meal, so that he
should not notice there was anything wrong. The little
boy himself was not quite so lively as usual. He was
bitterly disappointed, Nurse having forbidden him to
THE ITALIAN AGAIN, 147

run out before breakfast on account of some new shoes
which she felt sure he would scratch on the gravel.

Consequently, he had not yet been able to ask Luke for
the money which he felt no doubt the shopman would
send back, in exchange for the drawing-room ornaments.
Tommy had told the stable-boy that the money was to
be given to him; but this request had not seemed strange,
as he was always fond of carrying messages between the
stables and the house. As it was, Luke, on returning
from Torbridge, had simply told the coachman that he
had left the parcel as desired at Tauner’s, and that the
shopman had told him to call another day.

Many times that morning did poor Miss York long to
be home in her comfortable London house, where the
ornaments never disappeared mysteriously, and ‘there
was no occasion to suspect anybody of stealing. She hat
told the housekeeper and butler of the letter received
from Mr. Tauner, and they were both of opinion that
it was her duty to send for a policeman and have Luke
removed to prison. But the kind old lady shrank from
this course, and hour after hour passed while she re-
mained undecided what to do next.

Just before lunch-time, to her great relief, Mr. Barnard
appeared. He was riding by, and had just looked in to
inquire how Tommy and Flora had been getting on since
the school feast.

“Oh, they are quite well; just at present they are
at lessons,” said Miss York. “But if you can spare a
few moments, pray sit down. Such a terrible thing has
148 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

occurred, and I am not used to managing men and
boys; if you would only give me your advice as to what
had better be done. The housekeeper says Luke is
a thief, and ought to go to prison; so does White.
He wanted to go for the policeman himself, but I
couldn’t—”

“Will you tell me the whole story from the begin-
ning,” interrupted Mr. Barnard; “then I think I can
judge better.”

It took Miss York some time to collect her faculties
sufficiently to do this; but at last she managed to relate
all that had happened from the moment that the house-
maid had first drawn up the blinds in the drawing-room
on the fatal morning, until White’s last terrible sugges-
tion of sending Luke to prison.

“It’s very mysterious,” remarked Mr. Barnard when
she had finished. “Some china missing, you say, and
a cushion, as well as the silver? I can’t understand it
at all. But if you will allow me, I will go and question
Luke. His parents live in our parish, and I knew him
as a child, so perhaps I shall be able to get the truth out
of him.”

Miss York was only too happy to find someone willing
to help her, and begged Mr. Barnard to go out at once to
the stables.
DOUBTFUL KINDNESS. 149

CHAPTER X.

DOUBTFUL KINDNESS.

\ ELL, what is it?” asked Miss York eagerly, when
some quarter of an hour later Mr. Barnard

returned to the house. ‘Has the boy told you any-

thing? Did he confess that he stole the ornaments?”

“Tt’s a most extraordinary case,” answered Mr. Bar-
nard; “I can’t make out what has happened. Luke
quite denies any knowledge of the missing articles, and
he seemed as if he hardly knew what I was referring
to—”

“T told the servants not to say a word about it to
anyone outside the house,” interrupted Miss York.

“The boy, certainly, seemed perfectly innocent. And
yet when I asked him if he knew Tauner’s shop at
Torbridge, he replied that he had been sent there with
a parcel of yours only yesterday morning. Now, what
do you make of that?”

“T never sent any parcel to Tauner’s,” said Miss
York. “The boy must be telling a downright lie, unless
there is some mistake.”

“TI don’t think he can be mistaken,” replied Mr.
Barnard. “He is quite positive about the parcel, which
he describes as so large and heavy he could scarcely
carry it when riding. He says Tommy brought it out
to the stables before breakfast, and told him that it was
to be taken to Torbridge immediately.”
150 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

They looked at each other for a moment in silence,
trying to puzzle out what had happened.

“T think you had better send for the children,” said
Mr. Barnard at last.

“But why?” objected Aunt Jane, who was very un-
willing that her little charges should hear of anything
so unpleasant as a robbery. “What is the use of talking
to them on the subject? They can know nothing about
it.”

“No, I don’t really see how they can,” agreed Mr.
Barnard. “But Tommy will at least be able to explain
who sent him out to the stables with the parcel.”

“T suppose so,” said Miss York sadly. She was almost
beginning to wish that the drawing-room ornaments had
never been found, if their discovery meant that in future
she must suspect one or other of the trusted household
servants of being a thief in disguise. ‘“ Will you fetch
the children from the school-room yourself?” she said.
“And be very careful not to alarm them by any reference
to this painful subject.”

Mr. Barnard did his errand with so much discretion
that the children never guessed there was anything
unusual going on until they were led into the library,
where Miss York was sitting very pale and silent, in
spite of the bright sunshine that was streaming in gaily
at the window.

“Don’t you feel very dull sitting here all by yourself?”
asked Tommy. “Of course, I mean when Mr. Barnard
isn’t paying a visit,” he added hastily. ‘That would be
DOUBTFUL KINDNESS. 151

very nice, but when he goes you won’t have anybody to
talk to.”

Miss York did not answer. In point of fact she was
positively trembling with nervousness, and the worry of
wondering how to begin the unpleasant subject which
' was filling her mind.

Mr. Barnard noticed her distress. “Shall I ask them ?”
he said. Miss York nodded her head. “Very well,” he
continued. ‘Now, Tommy, tell me who gave you a large
parcel that you carried to the stables yesterday morning,
and left with Luke?”

“Who gave me a parcel?” repeated Tommy vaguely.
Twenty-four hours seemed as long to him as a month to
grown-up people; and although he had been in such a
hurry to carry out his plan at first, when the excitement
of scraping together the drawing-room ornaments was
over, and he received no money in exchange, he almost
lost all interest in the subject. “I don’t think anybody
gave me a parcel,” he repeated again, quite believing
that he was speaking the truth—as indeed he was.

“Come, Tommy, this won’t do at all!” said Mr. Bar-
nard sternly. He thought the boy was telling a de-
liberate untruth, and the idea both angered and vexed
him. “It’s absurd for you to say that you didn’t give
Luke a parcel yesterday,” he continued; “a very large,
heavy parcel. You could scarcely carry it from the
house. And there were all sorts of strange things
inside it—scent-bottles, china candlesticks—”

“‘Oh, you mean those old things out of the drawing-
152 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

room!” exclaimed Tommy, his face lighting up with a
gleam of comprehension.

“Now, my dear child, do be careful, and try to be
very accurate,” interrupted Aunt Jane; “so much
depends on our knowing the exact truth. Who really
gave you that parcel?”

Tommy looked puzzled. “I don’t know what you
mean,” he began; “nobody gave me a parcel, nobody at
all!”

“ Really I am quite ashamed of you!” said Mr. Bar-
nard hastily. ‘“ How can you attempt to deny that you
took the parcel to the stables, when Luke is equally
clear that you handed it to him in the yard 9”

“Of course I gave that parcel to Luke. But I didn’t
know that was what you were talking about. I thought
you said somebody gave me a parcel. And they didn’t.”

Tommy stopped suddenly; he was getting thoroughly
puzzled. He knew very well what he meant, but there
seemed little hope of his making it clear to other people.

One thing was painfully apparent however, namely;
that Aunt Jane was looking upon him with grave, sad
eyes, while Mr. Barnard’s voice was short and sharp,—
quite different to anything it had been before. Tommy
had never felt himself the object of such universal dis-
approval, even when he had done things that he under-
stood to be naughty.

Up to this point, it must be remarked, the removal of
the drawing-room ornaments had not struck him in the
light of an offence. On the contrary, his mind being
DOUBTFUL KINDNESS. 153

quite full of the good he was going to do the Italian, he
had entirely lost sight of the fact that in carrying out
his benevolent plan he was gravely injuring several
other people.

“Can you explain about the parcel, Flora?” asked
Mr. Barnard, turning hopelessly to the little girl.

“Oh, no; it’s impossible the poor child can know
anything about it!” exclaimed Aunt Jane. “ Why, how
should a little girl, who is always in the nursery playing
with her dolls, know anything about this audacious
robbery ?”

“Tm not always playing with dolls!” said Flora
indignantly; “and I know just as much as Tommy.
He told me all about it before he began,—when Nurse
was asleep.”

‘What do you mean? What does she mean?” asked
Aunt Jane, turning from one child to the other, and
looking at them earnestly through her spectacles, as if
the truth might be read on their faces if only her eye-
sight were sufficiently good.

“Tell it your own way, children. Don’t hurry. Say
anything you know about the drawing-room ornaments,”
said Mr. Barnard encouragingly. He was beginning to
hope that, after all, Tommy had not told untruths, but
only misunderstood his questions.

It took the children a long time to explain the whole
story. So, as to make it perfectly clear, they first
described all the wonderful tricks that the monkey had
performed at the school feast, and then dwelt at great
154 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

length on its illness last winter, and the absolute neces-
sity for its passing this winter in a warmer climate.
Then they dilated on the Italian’s fondness for it, and
added that he also had a wife and children to whom he
was attached, though probably in a lesser degree than to
the monkey.

“Because, of course, they are only just a common
woman and babies, who can’t do tricks or anything
amusing,” explained Tommy. “But, still I dare say he
is fond of them—”

“But what has all this to do with the robbery?”
interrupted Aunt Jane, naturally enough.

“We were telling you all we knew about the drawing-
room ornaments,” began Flora, “but there’s nothing
about robbers in it.”

“Go on,” said Mr. Barnard, who saw that the only
way to arrive at the truth was by not interrupting the
story.

“Well, of course we wanted some money dreadfully
to help the Italian,” continued Tommy, “and we couldn’t
think how to get any. Flora said we'd better take it
out of our money-boxes, but I knew that wasn’t half
enough. So then I made a beautiful plan.” The little
boy then described all that he had done, concluding the
story by proudly saying: “The things I took were no
use to anybody in the drawing-room; and now, when
we get the money from the shop we shall give it all to
the poor Italian man. So it was a good plan, wasn’t
it?”
DOUBTFUL KINDNESS. 155

“But why did you tell Luke that you had been sent
out to the stables with a parcel?” inquired Mr. Barnard.

“J didn’t tell him that,” answered Tommy. “I dare
say he thought it out of his own head, because I’m often
sent with parcels, but I didn’t say it.”

“Well, ’'m very glad to hear you did not tell an
untruth,” said Mr. Barnard. And Miss York was so
delighted by this explanation that she was inclined to
forgive Tommy at once, and indeed to regard his con-
duct rather in the favourable light in which he did
himself. But Mr. Barnard could not quite admit that
Tommy was a sweet, unselfish child, as the kind old lady
suggested. “It’s all very well, you know, wishing to
help the Italian,” he said, “but Tommy quite forgot
that there was no charity in giving away other people’s
property, and also that Luke might easily have been
taken up as a thief.”

When Tommy thoroughly understood the pain and
anxiety he had already caused several people by his
thoughtless conduct, he was as sorry as anyone could
desire, and most desirous to undo the harm he had done.
“May I run off and tell everybody I took the things,
and then they won’t think Luke a thief any longer?” he
said.

Miss York would not allow this, but she sent for the
butler and housekeeper, and after allowing them to hear
Tommy’s story, begged that they would do their best
to contradict any unkind tales that might be repeated
about Luke.
156 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“Tt’s very difficult to stop a report of that sort when
it once gets about,” said Mr. Barnard. “People hear
someone spoken of once as a thief, and they repeat it
without troubling to inquire if it is true or not.”

Tommy looked ready to cry. “I meant to be so
kind,” he said, “and make everybody glad; and now
Luke’s been scolded for nothing, and the Italian man
won't get any money, and the monkey will die. It does
seem hard!”

“You see, you didn’t set about your kindness quite in
the right way,” observed Mr. Barnard. “You must
always remember that there are a lot of people in the
world, and it is never right to help one by injuring
another. But perhaps we can do something for the
Italian now,” he continued.

“Oh, no, we can’t. We haven’t nearly enough money,”
answered Tommy gloomily.

“Perhaps not by yourself,” said Mr. Barnard. “ But
supposing one or two other persons joined you—Miss
York, for instance, or myself?”

The children were delighted at this proposal. “That
will be the best plan of all. We never thought of that!”
they cried, and immediately ran off to collect their money
from the nursery.

“ All’s well that ends well,” remarked Mr. Barnard,
after they left the room. “And it’s a comfort to think
that we are not surrounded by thieves, and that Tommy
has spoken the truth, so far as he understands it.”

Yes, indeed! The dear child!” exclaimed Aunt Jane
DOUBTFUL KINDNESS. 157

fondly. “It’s exactly what I should have expected of
Fred’s son—to be so unselfish and tender-hearted,” she
continued. “His dear father was just such another
child—always trying to help. . . . Oh! what can have
happened? What a terrible noise!”

There was indeed an extraordinary confusion of sounds
entering by the door, which, as usual, the children had
left open behind them. It was only natural that Miss
York, being accustomed to a perfectly well-regulated
London house, should start up in terror, under the im-
pression that some dreadful accident had occurred.

“Shall I go and see?” inquired Mr. Barnard. “Perhaps
it isn’t as bad as it sounds. At all events, the children
are alive, and haven’t lost their voices!”

After all, the disturbance was caused in the most
simple manner imaginable. Tommy and Flora, full of
zeal for this new plan by which the Italian and his
monkey were to be benefited, had rushed to the nursery,
and seizing their money-boxes had emptied all the con-
tents into a pocket-handkerchief. Unfortunately they
did not stop at this point, but proceeded to lay violent
hands on the money-boxes belonging to the two younger
ones. Baby was so absorbed in cutting a new tooth on
an india-rubber ring that he took no interest in anything
outside this occupation; but Gerald, sitting in a high
chair by the table cutting out paper dolls with a very
blunt pair of scissors, both saw and resented the attack
on his private property.

“And he only had one sixpence,” explained Tommy,
158 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

when recounting the scene afterwards to Mr. Barnard.
“Nobody but a little silly would make such a fuss about
sixpence! Baby didn’t cry. He’s not such a greedy
thing as Gerald.”

“He doesn’t know that he can buy sugar-plums with
pennies,” interrupted Flora. ‘That's why he didn’t
cry.”

“Well, he did cry and screech afterwards,” continued
Tommy, “but that was when the chair fell on him.
Gerald was getting off it, you see, in a great hurry to
stop us from taking his money, and Nurse generally lifts
him down, because he sits on a high chair. Only she
was out of the room, so he caught his toe in the bar and
tumbled. And Baby was sitting on the floor sucking
that old ring, and Gerald couldn’t stop himself, and the
chair came too, because his leg was caught in it.”

“T see,” said Mr. Barnard. ‘That accounts for part
of the row. What else happened ?”

“Nurse came in then,” continued Tommy, “and just
because Gerald and Baby were screaming she thought it
must be our fault. And she was angry with us for taking
their money, and made us put it all back again. . I do
think it’s a great shame that those greedy things should
keep all their pennies to spend on sweets, when the poor
Italian man and his monkey are starving. Tm afraid
they'll grow up very wicked if Nurse spoils them
so.”

“TI wouldn’t worry about that,” remarked Mr. Barnard,
“there seems several more pressing things to consider
DOUBTFUL KINDNESS. 159

at this moment. For instance, why are your eyes so
red,—and Flora’s too, I fancy ?”

The children hung their heads, and remained silent.

“Very well,” continued Mr. Barnard, “we won’t say
any more about that, neither will we talk of Gerald’s and
Baby’s faults. It is perfectly natural that they should
take more interest in the sugar-plums they know, than
in the Italian they have never seen. And to tell you
the truth, Tommy, I believe I should show fight if any-
one insisted on taking the contents of my money-box
against my will, even for a good purpose.”

Both the children laughed at this, because, of course,
they knew that grown-up people have purses, and not
‘money-boxes.

In the end it was all arranged beautifully. Aunt Jane,
being a rich old lady, always anxious to do good with
her money, promised to add enough to Tommy and
Flora’s collection to enable the Italian to return to his
country, and Mr. Barnard promised to see him and settle
about the journey. In fact, he said that he would ride
into Torbridge that very afternoon and tell the Italian
what was to be done for him, and then go on to Tauner’s
shop and give directions for the drawing-room ornaments
to be sent home. '

“T really don’t know what I should have done without
your kind help,” said Miss York gratefully, as the young
man left the house.

Mr. Barnard smiled at the old lady’s earnestuess. He
liked helping people, only he did sometimes wish that
160 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

they would not so often require his assistance just before
meals, for it was already luncheon-time, and he had to
ride back to the rectory, where his parents were expect-
ing him.

“JT think we'll ask Susan to take us a little walk on
the road this afternoon,” said Tommy, as he joined his
sister in the garden after dinner that day.

“ But it’s so dull on the road,” objected Flora. “You
know we never like road walks, though Nurse makes us
take them in the winter, when she says it’s too cold to
play in the garden.”

“Of course we don’t like them generally,” said Tommy;
“but to-day I have a particular reason, something I’ve
thought of—”

“Not another plan?” interrupted Flora anxiously.

“Oh, you needn’t be frightened,” answered Tommy.
“Tt has nothing to do with running away, or the drawing-
room ornaments, or anything of that sort. At least,” he
added, “it has something to do with the ornaments; only
you'd never guess what. I'll tell you presently perhaps.”

Flora had to be content with these vague hints. Susan
was coming out with the two little ones, and Tommy ran
to her, asking if they might take a little walk on the road
leading to Torbridge. Nurse had announced her inten-
tion of staying indoors to finish some needlework, so it
was not necessary to consult her about which way they
went, and Susan was always willing to do anything they
asked, besides being quite glad of an excuse for going
outside the garden, which she considered dull.
DOUBTFUL KINDNESS. 161

So they were, presently, all walking down the road,
Susan leading Gerald by the hand and pushing Baby’s
perambulator, while the two elder ones ran on in
front.

“This isn’t very amusing,” grumbled Flora.

“I don’t want amusing things, I want to do good,”
replied Tommy. “You just keep quiet, and you'll soon
see.”

In a few minutes he asked if they might get over a
stile into some fields to pick flowers. Susan made the
expected reply that, as she could not lift the perambu-
lator over the stile, she must stop in the road with the
two little ones. But she gave Tommy and Flora per-
mission to go into the field for a few minutes, which was
all they wanted.

“Now,” said Tommy, when they had wandered some
way from tho stile; “now, do you see these cottages at
the bottom of the field?”

“Yes,” answered Flora expectantly.

So far there was not anything very interesting about
the sight of two or three old cottages with irregular
thatched roofs.

“Do you know who lives in these cottages?” continued
Tommy. “I’m sure you don’t. Well, Luke’s mother
lives there, and I’m going to see her—”

“But do you know her?” interrupted Flora.

“Well, not exactly,” admitted the little boy. ‘Only
I know Luke has a mother, and she lives there. He told

me that one day.”
(31 829) L
162 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“But why do you want to see her, then?” asked Flora
with natural astonishment.

“Why, it’s like this,” said Tommy. ‘You see, she'll
be very sorry if she hears that people thought Luke was
a thief. Mr. Barnard said she would be this morning,
and I think so too. So I’m just going to tell her that it’s
all right, and that I took the things; so there wasn’t any
thief at all. Don’t you think that will make her quite
glad again?”

This sounded so reasonable that Flora had no ob-
jections to offer. Besides, she was really curious to see
Luke’s mother. Until that moment it had never occurred
to her as probable that stable-boys had relations. They
had always seemed solitary beings, created expressly for
the purpose of occupying a little room over the coach-
house and exercising the horses, their domestic affections
being apparently limited to pelting the stable-cat. Apart
from charitable motives, therefore, this opportunity of
becoming acquainted with such a rare work of nature
as a stable-boy’s mother seemed too good to be neglected.
Both the children hurried off in the direction of the
cottages,

It happened that about this time Mr. Barnard was
riding towards Torbridge on purpose to settle poor Miss
York’s business with the Italian and Tauner. On the
road he passed Susan and the perambulator with the
two little ones, and there was something so distressed
about the nurse-maid’s appearance that he stopped to ask
what had happened.
DOUBTFUL KINDNESS. 163

“Qh, please sir, it’s Master Tommy and Miss Flora!”
she answered. “I let them go into the field to pick a
few flowers, and now they’ve run off out of sight. And
I can’t leave the perambulator with the little ones to go
after them, and they are such children for getting into
trouble as never was before, it’s my belief!”

“Perhaps I can see them,” said Mr. Barnard, standing
up in his stirrups and looking over the hedge. Being at
a greater height than Susan, he had a view over the
brow of the hill, and soon caught sight of two little
figures looking through the palings into a cottage garden.
“Tt’s all right! There they are!” he exclaimed. Then
suddenly a dreadful recollection came into his head of
how the rector had said at breakfast that there was a
child lying ill of scarlet fever at those very cottages.
“Look out! Try and hold my horse!” he cried, dis-
mounting and scrambling over the stile without even
waiting to see if Susan caught the reins or not.

Mr. Barnard ran as fast as he could, shouting as he
went in the hope of attracting the children’s attention.
But he soon found that his shouts were merely a waste
of much-needed breath, both Tommy and Flora being far
too full of their own affairs to notice any sounds however
loud. So he ran on in silence, thinking regretfully of
his school-days, and the handsome cups he had received
as prizes for winning races. He seemed to have grown
much slower in the last ten years, but in reality he was
feeling so anxious that no pace would have satisfied him.

Most fortunately the children had some difficulty in
164 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

opening the garden gate, and they were still fumbling
with the latch,when Mr. Barnard rushed up breathlessly
behind them, and seizing their arms pulled them away
from the cottages before he found breath to give any
explanation.

“You mustn’t go there—the people are ill—something
infectious—you'll catch it and be ill too!” he panted out
as he led them back to Susan.

“Oh, we didn’t know that,” said Tommy, a little
frightened, having often heard Nurse talk of infectious
illnesses as if they were just as dangerous as loose lions
and bears. “We were only going to see Luke’s mother,”
he continued, “and tell her that of course he wasn’t a
thief.”

“JT think perhaps it is just as well you didn’t see her,”
remarked Mr. Barnard. “You meant well, but she would
hardly have thanked you for suggesting the possibility.
Hullo! where’s my horse?”

“Oh, please sir, ’'m so sorry!” said Susan penitently ;
“but I’d just caught the rein, and he jerked his head up,
and it slipped out of my hand! And he’s gone back
down the road towards the rectory, I think.”

“Then I must go back and look for him, I suppose,”
observed Mr. Barnard with a sigh. “Tommy, how long
a holiday are your parents taking? A month? Well,
they must want it after living with you! At this rate I
I shall have to ask the Queen to give me at least a week's
extra leave!”
HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE. 165

CHAPTER XI.
HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE.

WISH you would put down that stupid old pencil

and play something nice,” said Flora one wet day,
when the children were all in the nursery. She had
made the same remark several times before, but as, so
far, it had not effected any change in Tommy’s conduct
she felt justified in repeating it: This time she drew
attention with a sharp pinch, to the fact that she was
speaking.

“Be quiet!” answered Tommy angrily. “Don’t you
see that I am busy ?”

“But you are only scribbling,” objected Flora.

“Scribbling indeed! That shows how much you know
about it!” Tommy remained silent for a whole minute
to emphasize the contempt in which he held his sister’s
judgment. But very soon the desire to explain his new
plan to an eager listener got the better of his dignity.
“You may come and look at this if you like,” he said,
pointing to a large sheet of paper on the table.

“What is it?” asked Flora. “It seems a sort of picture,
but I can’t understand what it’s about.”

“Tt’s something cleverer than a picture,” said Tommy
proudly. “It’s a sort of map—a map of all the different
rooms in a house I’m going to build.”

“Going to build a house!” repeated Flora. The idea
was too vast to be taken in all at once.


166 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“You just stay quiet and I'll tell you all about it,”
said the little boy. “I’ve written the names on all the
rooms, but of course that won’t be much use to you as
you can’t read writing. It doesn’t matter, though, as I
can say it—”

“But what shall you build it of?” interrupted Flora.

“T haven’t quite settled. There are lots of things that
will do,” answered Tommy loftily. ‘But you just look,”
he continued. “This is the dining-room, that is the
drawing-room, and the bedrooms are really up above;
only I can’t make them look like it on paper.”

“How shall you get up to them?” inquired Flora.

“Oh, dear! that reminds me I’ve quite forgotten the
stairs!” exclaimed the new architect in extreme conster-
nation. “Well, I must squeeze them in somewhere.”
He drew a row of little black lines, connected by two
long straight strokes. ‘“'They don’t look very like stairs,
Im afraid,” he said modestly. ‘But, you see, there’s so
little room on the paper.”

“They'll do all right,” said Flora, who was longing to
proceed to further details. “And how many bedrooms
shall we have? I should like four, because, you see, there
are four best dolls who have all their arms and legs, and
they could live in them.”

“Tt’s not going to be a stupid little doll’s hoes in-
deed!” answered Tommy in great indignation. ‘You
didn’t think I’d take so much trouble for that? Why,
it’s to be big enough for us to live in when we are play-
ing in the garden, and I mean to have lots of rooms—
HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE. 167

fourteen, perhaps,—and then we can have visitors if we
like.”

“Oh, yes! well have Mr. Barnard,” said Flora
promptly.

“Well, I hardly know. Of course we should like him,
but—” Tommy hesitated. ‘The fact is,” he continued
at last, “I really don’t see how we can reach high enough
to build grown-up rooms. The ceilings would be such a
long way above our heads, you know.”

“So they would, I never thought of that,” said the
little girl. “But do tell me some more about the house.”
And from that moment until bed-time the two children
talked of nothing but the wonderful building which they
were going to begin on the following day.

By the next morning, fortunately, the rain had stopped,
and it was possible to go into the garden and choose a
spot on which to begin the great work. This took longer
than might have been expected, because, of course, it was
an understood thing that all the smoothest pieces of
lawn, and most level bits of gravel path, belonged to the
gardener, and the children were not allowed to interfere
with them. As a rule they were quite content to have
any stray corner for a playground; but now it did seem
a pity, when they were going to take such time and
trouble in erecting a really ornamental building, that it
should not be considered worthy of a prominent position
on the lawn.

However, Tommy knew by experience that it is no
good arguing against prejudice. Only the summer before
168 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

he had begun a most successful copy of an African
village on the tennis lawn, when just as he was hammer-
ing in the stakes which were to support the wattled fence
surrounding the huts, the gardener appeared, and in-
dignantly scolded him for spoiling the grass. As Tommy
very reasonably pointed out, it was impossible to build a
fence strong enough to keep out lions and elephants
without making any holes in the ground. Even a gar-
dener ought not to expect such an impossibility as that.
But he might as well have argued with the wind. His
stakes were pulled up, and the material that he and
Flora had so laboriously collected for building the huts
was ignominiously removed on a wheel-barrow.

Taught by this hard lesson, the children were quite
determined to keep their new building sufficiently out of
sight for the gardener to have no excuse for destroying it.
After much deep thought, and many long consultations
on the rival advantages of various situations, they at
last settled on an open spot in the middle of a shrubbery,
where it seemed probable that they would be allowed to
work undisturbed. Unfortunately they only just had
time to trace out the plan of the ground floor with a
stick in the soft earth when Susan came to call them in
to lessons.

There was no more going out until the afternoon, but
naturally both Tommy and Flora imagined many im-
provements and additions to the house while they were
doing sums and writing copies. The latter especially
always seems a lesson invented on purpose to give
HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE. 169

children a little extra time for thought. Grown-up
people are so easily satisfied that it is possible they
might find it sufficient occupation for their minds to
write the same word in the same way over and over
again down a whole page. But children require more
active interests than can be aroused by the effort to copy
capital letters as perfectly as if they had been printed.
At all events, on the present occasion, by the time
lessons were over, Flora had designed a large linen cup-
board, while Tommy had thought out the details of a
very perfect bath-room.

Tommy was so full of his new plan that he told Aunt
Jane all about it at great length during dinner-time.
The kind old lady was truly delighted to hear that the
children had at last found such a quiet, reasonable amuse-
ment, and she felt especially thankful to hear of their
having chosen so retired a spot for their building that
there would be no need to interfere with it. She could
not bear spoiling the children’s pleasure, and yet if this
four-storied brick house, about which Tommy was chat-
tering so fast, had been begun on the lawn, she felt a
melancholy conviction that she would have been obliged
to side with the gardener and have it removed. As it
was, she could safely reply with an encouraging smile to
her little nephew’ s excited descriptions of the glorious
appearance his house would present when finished; she
even promised to come out when she returned from her
drive in the afternoon and choose which bedroom she
would have for her very own.
170 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS

The afternoon happened to be exceedingly warm, and
the children soon found out that it is harder work to
dig the foundations of a house than to settle how many
rooms it is to contain. At the end of half an hour they
had not nearly dug round the line that they had traced
the night before, on the place where the walls were pre-
sently to stand.

“J don’t like this,” said Flora, stopping suddenly and
throwing down her spade. “I thought we were going
to build up, not dig down. It isn’t any more amusing
than gardening.”

“Oh, yes, it is!” answered Tommy. “And you haven't
to pull up any tiresome weeds, you know.”

“ And there isn’t any nice watering either,” returned
Flora. “I like gardening best.”

“But think of the house when it’s finished,” urged
Tommy. “Think of the stairs, and bedrooms, and
everything.”

“Tt will take a long time building fourteen rooms like
you said yesterday,” remarked Flora.

“Well, perhaps we sha’n’t want quite fourteen rooms.
I think we might do with ten.”

Half an hour later Tommy was prepared to consider
ten rooms an ample allowance for any house; but up to
this point he was still feeling very brave and industrious.
“Tf you don’t work I won’t allow you to live with me,”
he remarked severely, and at this terrible threat Flora
seized her spade, and dug up nearly a wheel-barrow full
of earth without again stopping to take breath,
HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE. 171

In choosing a place for building their house, the chil-
dren had remarked as one of the great advantages of the
shrubbery, that they would be working in the shade. To
a certain extent this proved to be true, though an extra-
ordinary number of hot little rays of sun managed to
squeeze between the branches and get into their eyes
whichever way they turned. And if the shrubs kept off
some of the sun they also kept off every breath of air, so
that it was really a most oppressive spot in which to
take violent exercise.

“It’s no use! I’m hot, and I won't go on any more,”
said Flora, throwing away her spade for the second time,
and with even more decision than she had done at
first.

Tommy did not reprove her as before, in fact he was
so hot himself that it was a great relief to have a good
excuse for stopping work.

“T think we've made about enough foundations,” he
remarked. “It seems time to begin getting bricks.”

“Oh, I know where there are several against the
garden wall! They were left by the mason when he
built the new greenhouse!” cried Flora, all on the alert
at the prospect of changing her occupation. “Shall I
fetch them now?” she continued eagerly. “I can carry
quite two in my frock.”

But Tommy scornfully rejected the idea of using mere
common masons’ bricks. He intended to make some-
thing very superior himself, for his own use.

“Do you know the way to do it?” asked Flora
172 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

regarding this bold scheme with mingled doubt and
admiration.

“Of course I do!” replied Tommy. “Why, bricks
are only earth and water mixed together and then baked
hard. Anybody can make them.”

“Of course they can!” echoed Flora, running for the
watering-pot, which she presently dragged back three-
parts full, the fourth part having mainly splashed over
her boots in her vain effort to hurry along.

It was certainly much more amusing work making
bricks than digging foundations. There was already a
great heap of loose earth that they had dug out lying at
their feet, and it did not take long to empty the contents
of the watering-pot over it. The result was one of the
largest and most perfect mud-pies ever scen. Both the
children plunged in their hands, and for some time
fingered the soft wet earth with silent delight.

“We mustn’t waste our time any longer,” said Tommy
at last, “or the bricks won’t be ready before the sun goes
down. And I suppose we shall have to dry them in the
sun, as we aren’t allowed to play with fire. Besides,
there aren’t any fires in the summer, and I don’t think
we shall be allowed to take them into the kitchen.”

Now, directly the children tried seriously to make
bricks, they discovered that though the mud was charm-
ingly cool soft stuff to play with, it was not easy to keep
it in any regular shape. It was very tiresome to care-
fully pat a brick into a neat square, and then see it sink
down a mere untidy lump under one’s very eyes.
HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE. 173

“Nasty things! Why can’t they stay as they’re put?”
cried Tommy.

“Perhaps it wants a little more water mixed with it,”
suggested Flora.

This was her remedy for everything; and her fondness
for adding a little water to all their games got her into
a good deal of trouble with Nurse, who did not at all
admire the effect of wet splashes on clean cotton frocks.

But even after the addition of a whole canful of water
the bricks would not keep their shape. In despair poor
Flora trudged off and fetched another canful, after which
the bricks became more sloppy and shapeless than ever.
They would not even stay in lumps now, but were really
not much better than muddy puddles.

“T never saw such tiresome bricks as these are!
Never!” cried poor Tommy, who felt that if things went
on at this rate the prospect of building a three-storied
house containing even ten rooms was a little remote.
For the first time a doubt entered his head as to whether
he quite understood the whole art of brick-making. It
was very unpleasant to have to confess this to Flora, and
after some thought he hoped that he had found a way
out of the difficulty.

“Perhaps I'll just go and talk to the gardener for a
few minutes about these bricks,” he said presently.
“There may be several ways of making them, and
though of course this way is all right, it doesn’t seem
avery quick one. You can stay here and prepare some
more earth,”
174 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

Flora was quite willing to be left for any length of
time to the delight of stirring earth and water together
with a spade, and letting the soft brown mud trickle
gently between her fingers. The sensation of plunging
her hands and arms undisturbed into a sea of mud, had
for her a charm which can only have been due to the
fact that she was very seldom in a position to do it.

“Tt’s not our fault! It’s that stupid earth!” cried
Tommy, returning breathlessly in about ten minutes’
time. “It’s the wrong sort. We must have clay-earth,
like it is by the pond. The gardener said so, but of
course I didn’t tell him we were going to get it.”

“T don’t see why the earth by the pond is any better
than this,” objected Flora, who had grown so fond of her
heap of mud that she did not like to hear it disparaged,
in spite of its inability to form good solid bricks.

“Don’t be so silly!” cried Tommy briskly. “It isn’t
the common earth by the pond that I mean, but that
nice red mud which they put at one corner where the
water leaked out last summer. That’s clay, and we must
get some.”

“The watering-pot would be a nice thing to carry it
in,” suggested Flora.

“So it would,” answered Tommy. “It would hold
such a lot, and then we shouldn’t have to dirty our
clothes so much.”

This careful thought came rather late in the day, as
two pairs of muddy hands had been rubbing themselves
for the last half-hour all over a pink-cotton frock and a
HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE. 175

pair of neat blue-cloth knickerbockers. But the children
felt none the less meritorious for making the suggestion.
Talking about keeping clean seemed almost as good, and
was not nearly so tiresome, as avoiding dirt.

About four o’clock that afternoon Mr. Barnard rode
over to Oakdale Court with a note from his mother to
Miss York. He found the old lady just returning from
a drive, and she begged him to leave his horse in the
stables and stay to tea. Miss York had made a great
favourite of the young man ever since he came to her
assistance with the children; and at her request he con-
tinually looked in to see how they were getting on.

“T believe you regard me as a kind of lion-tamer or
snake-charmer!” he said one day.

Miss York laughed, and admitted that though she did
not look upon her nephew and niece as exactly wild
beasts, still she felt considerable respect for the abilities
of any person who could subdue them into goodness.

However, on this particular afternoon Aunt Jane,
finding that tea was not quite ready when she returned
from her drive, proposed to Mr. Barnard that while wait-
ing for it she should fulfil her promise to Tommy, by
going to see how his house was getting on.

“The dear little fellow was so full of his game at lunch-
time,” she said to her companion as they crossed the
lawn. “They are pretending to play at building a house,
you know, and the sweet little things actually asked me
to come over and choose what room I would have!
There is something so wonderfully beautiful about a
176 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

child’s imagination, is there not? And how completely
we lose the power in later life!”

Mr. Barnard did not answer for a moment. They
were walking towards the shrubbery, and he could just
see enough of the mud-heap through the bushes to make
him wonder if Tommy’s house had existed solely in his
imagination.

“T think if you will wait on the lawn I will just see
what they are doing,” he said presently.

“ Ah! that will do quite as well as if I pushed through
those branches myself,” answered Miss York, who, being
in her best mantle, naturally very much preferred re-
maining on the lawn to squeezing through a thick
shrubbery.

Mr. Barnard was remarkably active for a grown-up
person, and found his way to the open space where
the house was to stand, having only met with such
trifling accidents as crushing in his hat under a bough,
and scratching his nose against a holly-bush. But no
children could he find. He called, thinking that they
might be playing in another part of the shrubbery.
Still there was no answer. After looking all round he
noticed the two spades flung carelessly aside, and arrived
at the conclusion that the children, from some cause, had
left off playing in this particular spot for the present.
The unmistakable print of a muddy little hand on the
smooth stem of a beech-tree near the outside of the
shrubbery, confirmed this impression.

“T think they have stopped building their house,”
HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE. 177

said Mr. Barnard, crawling out to Miss York on his
hands and knees down the passage the children had
made into the middle of the shrubbery. It was certainly
rather low to be used with ease by a grown-up person;
but on the whole, stooping hurt less than crashing through
the branches above.

“The difficulty is, that I solemnly promised to come
out and see them,” said Aunt Jane, hesitating between
her desire to keep her word, and a great longing to go
and enjoy tea comfortably in the cool drawing-room.

“Wouldn’t it do if I went to find the children while
you rest a little indoors?” suggested Mr. Barnard. And
this idea seemed so sensible that Aunt Jane acted upon
it at once.

Now, it is difficult to explain why one of the first
places where Mr. Barnard went to search for Tommy
and Flora was the pond in the field, He had no reason
for believing that they were there beyond a general
impression that they would never have deserted that
fascinating mud-heap except to get into a greater mess
somewhere else. For this purpose no place seemed more
suitable than a pond in a corner of a field.

Yet at the first glance it seemed as if he had made a
mistake. The pond was standing in peaceful solitude,
with not so much as a cow near it. There were some
signs of disturbance, it is true, about the green weed
floating on the surface of the water, but there was na
evidence to prove that it had been caused by sticks and

stones in the hands of children.
(M329) M
178 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

However, as Mr. Barnard walked through the rank
grass round the banks, he stumbled over something that
very soon showed him he was on the right track. It
was a large new watering-pot, smeared inside and out
with sticky red clay, so that the original colour of the
paint could hardly be seen.

While he was wondering over the children’s fatal talent
for getting hold of everything they were not meant to
touch, and invariably spoiling it, loud cries of distress
arose in the distance.

“What has happened? Are you hurt?” shouted Mr.
Barnard, starting off in the direction of the sounds.

There was no reply, except a series of dismal shrieks;
so, fearing that some accident had happened, he hurried
on as fast as he could towards the stile.

As he was climbing over it he saw Tommy and Flora
running across the field towards him, both screaming at
the top of their voices. When they came nearer he
could see that there was something the matter with
them; both their faces and hands being a burning red
colour, covered with small white swellings.

A dreadful idea occurred to him then, namely, that
the children had perhaps caught scarlet fever from the
cottages a few days before, and that the eruption was
just breaking out. His thoughts turned pityingly to
poor Miss York, who did not even know that her
charges had been near any infection, as, thinking that
there was really no danger, he had not worried her by
telling of their attempts to visit Luke’s mother.
HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE. 179

“How long have you been like this? When did it
begin?” he asked anxiously, as the children sank down in
the grass at his feet with continued lamentations.

“Oh! It hurts! it hurts!” cried Tommy.

“Oh! It hurts! it hurts!” echoed Flora.

“But how long has it been hurting? Do try and tell
me?” urged Mr. Barnard.

“ Ever since we tumbled in the ditch!” moaned Tommy.
“We were sitting on a rail and it broke, and the ditch
was full of sting-nettles, and they hurt dreadfully!”

“Sting-nettles! Is that all!” exclaimed Mr. Barnard,
with rather unfeeling cheerfulness. He knew that sting-
nettles do not prove fatal, and he was immensely relieved
by this explanation.

However, he soon remembered to be more sympathetic,
and searched the hedges for cool dock leaves to put on
the poor sufferers’ swollen faces and hands. This remedy
had so much effect that in a few minutes the whole
party was able to start homewards.

But Tommy’s house was never finished. How could
it be, when Nurse made a rule that very evening that
the children were never to go to the pond by themselves,
or play with clay, on any pretence whatever?
180 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

CHAPTER XII.
WELCOME HOME.

OOD news! Good news!” shouted Tommy, rushing

into the nursery one morning just as the little ones

were finishing their breakfast. ‘They are coming home

on Thursday! Next Thursday! Only three days off!
They wrote to Aunt Jane this morning to tell her so.”

““Whose’s coming home?” asked Gerald stolidly, as he
scraped his spoon round and round inside his cup of
bread and milk, that not a crumb should be wasted.

“Oh, the silly! Do you hear him asking who is
coming home?” cried Tommy derisively. “As if it
could be anyone except Papa and Mama. I dare say
he’s forgotten them, though. Very likely! He’s such
a baby!”

“Master Tommy, do leave the nursery at once and
let the little ones finish their breakfast in peace!” ex
claimed Nurse at this point. “Yes, you can go too,’
she added, turning to Flora, who was exhibiting her
excitement at the prospect of her parents’ return by
kicking the table, and balancing her chair on one leg.

The children gladly took advantage of this permission,
to run off together to their favourite hiding-place behind
the sweet peas, where they could talk over the good
news undisturbed.

“T want to think of something to do on Thursday to
show we are glad,” remarked Tommy. “TI don’t want it
WELCOME HOME. 181

to be only like a common day—just breakfast, dinner,
tea, bed. I should like something more joyful than
that.”

“But we should starve if we didn’t have breakfast,”
began Flora.

“Of course I didn’t mean not to have it!” interrupted
Tommy; “and dinner too. Only I want other things
as well. Uncommon things, like fireworks or balloons,
you know.”

“But we haven't any,” remarked Flora, truly enough.

“Well, perhaps not these things exactly; but you
might try to think of something like them,” answered
Tommy impatiently. “Any sort of thing that would
give them a great surprise when they came back would
do.”

“Tf we drove to the station to meet them, and then
crawled under the seats of the carriage and hid just
before the train came in, and jumped out suddenly under
their legs when they were driving home, that would be
a surprise for them,” observed Flora thoughtfully.

Tommy shook his head. He liked the idea himself,
but he had often noticed that grown-up people when
startled seldom take a joke very well; indeed, they
frequently go so far as to lose their tempers with the
joker.

“It mustn’t be anything to do with hiding behind
doors, or making them jump. They won’t like it if
they are tired after the journey,” he remarked, with
rare prudence,
182 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“It's sucn a pity they don’t care for the same things
as we do,” observed Flora, who had been looking for-
ward to crawling under the carriage-seat, and also felt
confident that if she had been in her parents’ place,
nothing would have given her greater amusement than
the little surprise under discussion.

“T should like to do something with flags,” began
Tommy, after a few moments of deep thought. “People
always have flags to meet them when they have been
away a long time—flags and arches.”

‘What shall we make them of?” inquired Flora prac-
tically.

“That’s the best of it,” explained Tommy; “ you can
make a flag of anything. The drawing-room curtains
would make dozens of flags.”

‘‘Oh, but we should never be allowed to cut them
up.”

“Of course not,” replied Tommy; “I know that well
enough. I only meant to show how you can make any-
thing into flags: pocket-handkerchiefs, dusters, table-
cloths!”

At this rate it seemed there would be no difficulty
about manufacturing flags. The only question that
remained to be settled was where to display them.

“T should like the railway-station best,” said Tommy.
“Tf we could get there without anybody seeing us, and
hang flags up those posts, and make a sort of arch across
the door into the waiting-room with laurels. Of course
they would have to be very high up, not to knock
WELCOME HOMES. 183

people’s heads; but we could stand on the luggage-trucks
to reach. It wouldn’t be very difficult.”

But after some reflection the children were sadly
compelled to confess that there were greater difficulties
in the way of this plan than even the height of the
waiting-room door. Indeed, when Mr. Barnard came
in the afternoon, and they explained their idea to him,
he unhesitatingly pronounced it to be absolutely out of
the question; and he at last contrived to persuade them
that the annoyance their parents would feel if they ap-
peared on the station without leave, might more than
counterbalance the pleasurable excitement of being re-
ceived by laurel arches and strings of flags.

“What I advise,” continued Mr. Barnard, “is that
you should consult your aunt, and get up some sort of
festivity at home.”

The children did not take to this notion at first. It
seemed rather dull to merely decorate the house, when
they had dreamt of swarming up the station posts, and
hanging flags from the topmost weather-cock, under the
admiring eyes of the railway porters. But, surprising
as it may seem, when Mr. Barnard at last persuaded
them to take Aunt Jane into their confidence, they found
that she was full of new and most interesting ideas on
the subject of giving a cheerful welcome to their parents.

It was entirely due to Miss York that anybody
thought of dressing up Tommy and Flora as Spanish
peasants, and letting them stand on the door-step hold-
ing a large flower-wreathed banner with “Welcome
184 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

Home” printed on it in large gold letters. No less
than three journeys did Miss York make to Torbridge
to buy the exact materials she required for those cos-
tumes; and if Spanish peasants are often dressed as
were Tommy and Flora, then Spain must be one of the
very gayest countries in the world.

The children had always been fond of dressing up in
any old scraps that Nurse could spare them, but it was
quite another thing to see Miss York buying yards of new
pink ribbon and dozens of gilt buttons straight from the
shop for the sole purpose of adorning their fancy dresses.
Nurse said it was a great waste of good material; but in
the bottom of her heart she was delighted that the chil-
dren should have such a clean and quiet occupation,
which kept them entirely out of mischief.

Of course, they could not make the dresses them-
selves, but they spent hours in watching Miss York and
her maid sewing the gilt buttons all over a black velvet
jacket, and arranging dainty bows round a white muslin
body that was to be worn over a smart pink-silk skirt.
Possibly they would have tired of such a peaceful occu-
pation before long, but for three days it kept them
perfectly absorbed.

The eventful Thursday arrived at last. It was a
whole holiday; which was a wise arrangement, as there
was not the remotest prospect of getting any lessons
done by the children in their present state of excitement.
Besides, there were so many little things wp to the last
moment to finish, that they were once or twice reduced
WELCOME HOME. 185

to wishing that their parents’ train would come in
late,

The gold-paper letters, for instance, which they had
securely pasted on to the white banner on Wednesday
afternoon, all seemed to have become unaccountably
loose by Thursday morning. All excepting the W,
which Tommy had put on by mistake upside down, and
which was perverse enough to stick so firmly that it
hardly could be removed, even with warm water.

And the dreadful part of it was that now nobody
seemed to have any time to help with the banner. All
the servants were busy giving last touches to the furni-
ture before their mistress came home, and it was quite
difficult to get the cook even to make a cup of paste,
Aunt Jane herself was completely occupied in giving
directions to the gardener about arranging fresh flowers
in all the rooms. She knew that the children’s fancy
dresses were finished and lying on their beds ready to
put on, but more than that she could not do at present.
Besides, at the best of times Miss York was not fond of
dabbling with paste. So Tommy and Flora were left to
repair the banner by themselves as well as they could.

By an especial piece of good fortune, it came into Mr.
Barnard’s head to walk over that morning and see how
the preparations for a triumphal reception were getting
on. He found Miss York without much trouble, as she
was in the drawing-room directing the gardener to fill a
stand with geraniums and maidenhair fern. By her
advice he went to look for the children in the school-
186 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

room. They were both in tears when he opened the
door.

‘Hullo! Who is hurt now?” cried Mr. Barnard, in
some alarm at this depressing spectacle. “Not been
fighting, I hope?” he added, looking from one tear-
stained face to the other.

“Oh! its those nasty letters!” moaned Tommy;
“they won't stick!”

“And this horrid paste!” sobbed Flora; “it sticks to
everything!”

Mr. Barnard did not smile at these contradictory state-
ments, he saw that the case was much too serious for
smiling. At least half the letters were off the banner,
and to make the matter worse, many of them were
sticking tightly to the children’s hot hands and paste-
smeared clothes.

“It’s no good going on like this,” said the young man
with decision. ‘We must have some hot water before
we can do anything.”

“But the cook won't give it us,” sighed Tommy;
“she’s so cross this morning. Everybody’s cross. And
Nurse said if we teased any more she would take us for
a walk on the road—”

“And she meant it too,” chimed in Flora. “And then
we couldn’t stick on the letters at all, and the banner
would never be ready, and everything spoilt.”

“Tl tell you what,” said Mr. Barnard, “I will go and
get the hot water. Of course it is all your fancy that
people are cross; only children are cross, not grown-up
WELCOME HOME. 187

people. But at the same time it is a very hot day, and
they are all very busy, so they won’t like to be interrupted
perhaps.”

The children never knew what Mr. Barnard said or
did to calm the cook’s ruffled feelings, but the fact re-
mained that she gave him not only a canful of hot water,
but also a cupful of fresh paste, so that after their hands
and faces had been washed clean, the letters were stuck
on to their proper places without any further difficulty.

“Now,” said Mr. Barnard, “carry the banner straight
away and put it in an empty room, where nobody will
knock it down or sit on it, and leave it there till you
want it in the afternoon.”

“Oh, we know a very good place where nobody goes!”
cried Tommy. “It won’t be in anybody’s way, and will
keep quite clean. Come on, Flora. Take up your stick
and we will carry it between us.”

After this Mr. Barnard went away, feeling that there
could be no further mistakes or accidents. However, he
promised Miss York that he would return in the after-
noon to see the ceremony.

Now, Colonel and Mrs. York were expected to arrive
about four o’clock, and a quarter of an hour before that
time Tommy and Flora came out of their bedrooms,
looking like two smart dolls in very ornamental peasant
costumes.

“Let us get the banner,” said Tommy, “and then we
can stand in the hall quite ready, until we hear the
carriage.”
188 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

“Ves, that will be best,” agreed Flora, who knew that
if they once began to play there would soon be an end
of her pink-silk skirt. Now, she was very proud of
that skirt, and unwilling that anything should happen
to it.

The two children went upstairs to the top of the house,
where there were some disused attics. Strictly speaking
they were not supposed to go into these rooms, which were
full of old furniture and spare crockery; but Tommy
had found his way into them more than once when playing
hide-and-seek, and it now occurred to him as just the
quiet place he required for storing away the banner.
Nobody had ever seen him up there, consequently
nobody knew where to look when, a few minutes later,
the children were missing and could nowhere be found.

“Oh! what can have become of them? Where can they
be?” cried Miss York, dreadfully vexed by this untimely
disappearance. “Why, their parents will be arriving
almost directly, and will be so anxious to see them!
Besides, I have been looking forward for days to Mary
and Fred seeing the dear children in their pretty fancy
dresses. It really is too disappointing!”

It did, indeed, seem strange that the children should
have disappeared so entirely. Nurse had sent them down
to the hall, beautifully dressed, with well-brushed hair
and clean faces, and after that nothing had been seen of
them.

“Fortunately it is the summer, so there are no fires,
or else I should believe they had been reduced to
WELCOME HOME. 189

ashes,” remarked Mr. Barnard, who arrived about this
time.

“But the kitchen!” cried Miss York. ‘They never
could have fallen into the kitchen fire, could they %”

“Trust the cook for that!” laughed Mr. Barnard.
“She would not have them in the kitchen on any account.
But shall I go and look for them ?”

“Oh, do! please do!” exclaimed the lady anxiously;
“their parents may arrive at any moment. And here are
Gerald and Baby coming from the nursery, looking so
pretty in their white frocks and blue sashes, and as
likely as not the elder ones are spoiling their clothes
and getting dirty all over. Oh, dear! I wish I had never
let them out of my sight!”

“Tl soon find them,” said Mr. Barnard consolingly.
But to tell the truth, he did not know very well which
way to turn. Having carefully examined all the sitting-
room, he walked slowly upstairs, stopping every few steps
to call the children. Presently he heard some stifled cries
of distress, coming as it were from a great distance.

“Ts it you, Tommy?” he shouted. “Where are
you?”

“Up here! We can’t get out!” came in a melancholy
voice from a long way off.

Mr. Barnard did not hesitate any more, but ran up
the second flight of stairs to the top of the house. He
had never been in this part of the house before, but he
was in too great a hurry to wait until he could find a
servant to show him the way. He simply hastened on
190 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

in the direction of the cries, down a long passage with
several doors on either side of it, leading into servants’-
rooms and store-cupboards. The last door was about an
inch open, and Tommy’s little round nose could be seen
pressing against the crack.

“You naughty children! Why do you give so-much
trouble, hiding up here when we are all waiting for
you?” began Mr. Barnard.

“We can’t get out—the door won't open!” explained
Tommy tearfully.

“What nonsense! Why, it is open!” cried Mr. Barnard,
giving it an impatient push. The door remained firm;
it would open exactly an inch, but no further.

“It’s the table,” said Tommy. ‘There were a lot of
dusty old things piled up against the walls—chairs and
tables, you know, that aren’t being used, and when we
came up here to get the banner we thought we would
climb on them just for a minute, and they all came
rolling down in front of the door, and we can’t move
them away.”

“Tf it’s only chairs and tables I think I can manage,”
observed Mr, Barnard, and telling the children to stand
out of the way, he pressed with all his weight against
the door, which slowly gave way inch by inch.

“Oh, we aren’t too late, are we?” cried the children

_ eagerly as they crept out into the passage. “We were so
afraid they would come, and there would be no banner,
no nothing!”

“Well, there won’t be much unless you are quick,”
WELCOME HOME. 191

rejoined Mr. Barnard, ‘Just look at your clothes!” he
added mournfully, for the gay pink-silk and black-velvet
bore most evident traces of the dusty furniture among
which the children had been playing. But there was no
time to do more than remove the most conspicuous cob-
webs from Flora’s hair, and hastily beat Tommy all over
like a little carpet. As they rushed into the hall the
carriage could be heard coming up the drive.

It was a moment of intense anxiety as Tommy spread
out the banner, which he had been carrying tightly
rolled up in his arms. “Oh, the W!” he screamed—‘ it’s
coming off! What shall we do?”

There was not a moment to spare. Mr. Barnard
snatched the pin out of his neck-tie, and stuck it firmly
through the large gold letter.

“You've pinned it on crooked!” cried Flora.

“ Never mind, no one will notice,” he answered desper-
ately, pushing the children into their places as the
carriage drew up at the door.

Colonel York was not generally considered a timid
man, but it is certain that he felt exceedingly shy when
he entered the hall and was greeted by a shower of
flowers that Gerald and Baby were strewing out of orna-
mental baskets, while Tommy and Flora stood in the
background waving a large white banner between them.
Tommy’s face was overclouded by a slight shade of
anxiety. He could not help wondering if his parents
would notice the crooked letter.

But in another moment Mrs, York had run forward
192 TOMMY THE ADVENTUROUS.

and swept all four children together in her arms, “ It’s
beautiful, dears! quite beautiful!” she cried, as she kissed
them indiscriminately all over.

Tommy heaved a little sigh of intense relief. It was
evident that the tiresome gold letter had not spoilt his
parents’ pleasure in their welcome home.

THE END.

NSE SAE gS Sa te UA ak le
PRININD BY BLAOKIN AND SON, LIMITED, GLASGOY.
Rawr









BLACKIE & SON’S
BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

BY G. A. HENTY.

In crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges.

At Agincourt: A Tale of the White Hoods of Paris, With
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lustrations by W. H. Mararrson. 6s,

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tae ’
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The Tiger of Mysore: A Story of the War with Tippoo
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A Knight of the White Cross: A Tale of the Siege of
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When London Burned: A Story of Restoration Times and
the Great Fire. By G. A. Hunty. With 12 page Mlustrations
by J. Frnnemore. 6s.

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(11) A
2 BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

BY G. A. HENTY.

“Among writers of stories of. adventure for boys Mr. Henty stands in the very
first: rank.”—Academy.

In crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges.

The Lion of St. Mark: A Tale of Venice in the Fourteenth
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any story more delightful, more wholesome, or more vivacious. From first to
last it will be read with keen enjoyment.”—The Saturday Review.

By England’s Aid: The Freeing of the Netherlands (1585-
1604). By G. A, Henry. With 10 page Illustrations by ALFRED
Pearse, and 4 Maps. 6s.

“The story is told with great animation, and the historical material is most
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With Wolfe in Canada: or, The Winning of a Continent.
By G. A. Henry. Illustrated with 12 page Pictures by Gorpon

Browne. 6s.

“(A model of what a boys’ story-book should be. Mr. Henty has a great power
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Bonnie Prince Charlie: A Tale of Fontenoy and Culloden.
By G. A. Henry. Illustrated with 12 page Pictures by Gorpon
Browne. 6s.

“Ronald, the hero, is very like the hero of Quentin Durward. The lad's
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variety of incident, Mr. Henty has here surpassed himself.”—Spectator.

For the Temple: A Tale of the Fall of Jerusalem. By
G. A. Henry. With 10 page Illustrations by 8. J. Sonomon, and

a Coloured Map. 6s.
“Mr. Henty’s graphic prose pictures of the hopeless Jewish resistance to Roman
sway adds another leaf to his record of the famous wars of the world. The book
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True to the Old Flag: A Tale of the American War of
Independence. By G. A. Hunty. With 12 page Illustrations by

Gorpon Browne. 6s.

“Does justice to the pluck and determination of the British soldiers. The son
of an American loyalist, who remains true to our flag, falls among the hostile red-
skins in that very Huron country which has been endeared to us by the exploits
of Hawkeye and Chingachgook.”—The Times.

‘““Mr,. Henty undoubtedly possesses the secret of writing eminently successful
historical tales; and those older than the lads whom the author addresses in his
preface may read the story with pleasure,”— Academy.
Specimen Illustration from
“WITH COCHRANE THE DAUNTLESS”,

STEPHEN BEATS OFF THE GREAT WAR-CANOE SINGLE-HANDED,


-4 BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

BY G. A. HENTY.

“Mr. Henty is one of our most successful writers of historical tales,”—Scotsman.

In crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges.

The Lion of the North: A Tale of Gustavus Adolphus and
the Wars of Religion. By G. A, Henry. With 12 page Pictures
by J. Scu6npere, 6s.

“A praiseworthy attempt to interest British youth in the great deeds of the
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live again in Mr. Henty’s pages, as those deserve to live whose disciplined bands
formed really the germ of the modern British army.”—A thenewm.

The Young Carthaginian: A Story of the Times of
Hannibal. By G. A. Henry. With 12 page Illustrations by C0. J.
STANILAND, RB.I. 68.

“The effect of an interesting story, well constructed and vividly told, is en-
hanced by the picturesque quality of the scenic background. From first to last
nothing stays the interest of the narrative. It bears us along as on a stream
whose current varies in direction, but never loses its force.”—Saturday Review.

Redskin and Cow-boy: A Tale of the Western Plains. By
G, A. Henry. Illustrated by Aurrep Prarse 6s.

“Tt has a good plot; it abounds in action; the scenes are equally spirited and
realistic, and we can only say we have read it with much pleasure from first to
last. The pictures of life on a cattle ranche are most graphically painted, as are
the manners of the reckless but jovial cow-boys.”—imes.

With Clive in India: or, The Beginnings of an Empire.
By G. A, Heyty, Illustrated by Gorpon Browne, 6s.

“Among writers of stories of adventure for boys Mr. Henty stands in the very
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of their children.” —Academy.

In Greek Waters: A Story of the Grecian War of Inde-
pendence (1821-1827). By G. A. Henry. With 12 page Illus-
trations by W. 8S, Sracry, and a Map. 6s,

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than usual, the whole result leaves nothing to be desired.”—Jowrnal of Education.

The Dash for Khartoum: A Tale of the Nile Expedition.
By G. A. Henry. With 10 page Illustrations by J. Scudnpere@ and
J. Nasu, and 4 Plans. 6s.

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which fall to be recorded after the dash for Khartoum has been made and failed
are quite as interesting as those which precede it.” Academy.
BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 5



BY G. A. HENTY.
“Mr, Henty is the king of story-tellers for boys.”—Sword and Trowel.



In crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges.

Through the Fray: A Story of the Luddite Riots. By

G, A, Hpnvy. With
12 page Illustrations
by H. M. Pacnr. 6s.
“Mr, Henty inspires a love
and admiration for straight-
forwardness, truth, and cour-
age. This is one of the best
of the many good books Mr,
Henty has produced, and de-
serves to be classed with his
Lacing Death.”—Standard.

Captain Bayley’s
Heir: A Tale of
the Gold Fields of
California. By G.
A. Henry. — Ilus-
trated by H. M.
Pager. 6s.

“A Westminster boy who
makes his way in the world
by hard work, good temper,
and unfailing courage, ‘he
descriptions given of life are
just what a healthy intelli-
gent lad should delight in,”
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St. Bartholomew’s

Eve: A Tale of
the Huguenot Wars.
By G. A. Henry.
Illustrated by H. J.
Draper. 6s.

“What would boys do without Mr. Henty? Ever fresh and vigorous, his books
have at once the solidity of history and the charm of romance. St. Bartholomew's
ive is in his best style, and the interest never flags. The book is all that could
possibly be wished from a boy’s point of view.”—Journal of Education.

In Freedom’s Cause: A Story of Wallace and Bruce. By

G. A. Heyty. Illustrated by Gorpon Brownz. 6s.

“His tale of the days of Wallace and Bruce is full of stirring action, and will
commend itself to boys.”—A thenewm.

By Right of Conquest: or, With Cortez in Mexico. By
G. A. Henry. With 10 page Illustrations by W. 8S. Sracry. 6s.

“By Right of Conquest is the nearest approach to a perfectly successful histori-
cal tale that Mr, Henty has yet published.” —Academy.











































































Reduced Illustration
from “A Knight of the White Cross”.
6 BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



BY G. A. HENTY.
“Mr, Henty is one of the best of story-tellers for young people.”—Spectator.

In crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges.

Beric the Briton: A Story of the Roman Invasion. By
G. A. Henry. Il-
lustrated by W. Par-
KINSON. 63.

“We are not aware that
anyone has given us quite so
vigorous a picture of Britain
in the days of the Roman con-
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ty Roman character, with its
indomitable courage, stern-
ness, and discipline. Bevic
is good all through.”—Spec-
tator.

By Pike and Dyke:
A Tale of the Rise
of the Dutch Re-
public. By G. A.
Henry. With 10
page Illustrations by
Maynarpd- Brown,
and 4 Maps. 6s.

“The mission of Ned to
deliver letters from William
the Silent to his adherents at
Brussels, the fight of the Good
Venture with the Spanish
man-of-war, the battle on the
ice at Amsterdam, the siege
of Haarlem, are all told with
a vividness and skill which

y "4 XN .
his ee ee oe Reduced Illustration from ‘ At Agincourt”.

Wulf the Saxon: A Story of the Norman Conquest. By
G. A. Heyy, Illustrated by Ratpu Pracock. 6s.

“Wulf the Saxon is second to none of Mr. Henty’s historical tales, and we may
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many a tedious tome. The points of the Saxon character are hit off very happily,
and the life of the period is ably reconstructed.”—T'he Spectator,

Through the Sikh War: A Tale of the Conquest of the
Punjaub. By G. A. Hunvy, With 12 page Dlustrations by Han
Horst, anda Map. 6s.

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character, seem admirably true. . . . On the whole, we have never read a more
vivid and faithful narrative of military adventure in India.”—The Academy.


BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 7



BY G. A. HENTY.

“No more interesting boys’ books are written than Mr. Henty’s stories.” —
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Ln crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges.

With Lee in Virginia: A Story of the American Civil
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Under Drake’s Flag: A Tale of the Spanish Main. By
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On the Irrawaddy: A Story of the first Burmese War.
With 8 Illustrations by W. H. Ovrrenp. Crown §Svo, cloth
elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“Stanley Brook’s pluck is even greater than his luck, and he is precisely the
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Through Russian Snows: A Story of Napoleon’s Retreat
from Moscow, By G. A. Hunry. With 8 Illustrations by W. H.
OverrmNnn, and a Map. 5s.

“Julian, the hero of the story, early excites our admiration, and is altogether
a fine character such as boys will delight in, whilst the story of the campaign is
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In the Heart of the Rockies: A Story of Adventure in
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One of the 28th: A Tale of Waterloo. By G. A. Huyry.
With 8 page Illustrations by W. H. Overenn, and 2 Maps. 5s.
“Written with Homeric vigour and heroie inspiration. Tt is graphic, pictur-

esque, and dramatically effective . . . shows us Mr. Henty at his best and
brightest. The adventures will hold a boy of a winter's night enthralled as he

8

rushes through them with breathless interest ‘from cover to cover ’.”—Observer.

Facing Death: or, The Hero of the Vaughan Pit. A Tale of
the Coal Mines. By G. A. Henry. With 8 page Pictures by
Gorpon Browne. 5s.

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good book to give as a present to a boy who is worth his salt, this is the book we
would recommend,”—Standard.
8 BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



BY G. A. HENTY.

“Ask for Henty, and see that you get him.”—Punech.

In crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges.

The Cat of Bubastes: A Story of Ancient Egypt. By
G. A. Henry. Illustrated by J. R. Wucurnin. 5s.

“The story, from the critical moment of the killing of the saered cat to the
perilous exodus into Asia with which it closes, is very skilfully constructed and
full of exciting adventures, It is admirably illustrated.”—Saturday Review.

Maori and Settler: A Story of the New Zealand War. By
G. A. Henty. With 8 page Illustrations by ALFRED PEARSE. 5s.

“Tt is a book which all young people, but especially boys, will read with
avidity.” —Athenewm.

“A first-rate book for boys, brimful of adventure, of humorous and interesting
conversation, and of vivid pictures of colonial life.’’-—Schoolmaster.

St. George for England: A Tale of Cressy and Poitiers.
By G. A. Henry. Illustrated by Gorpon Browne. 5s.

“A story of very great interest for boys. In his own forcible style the author
has endeavoured to show that determination and enthusiasm can accomplish mar-
yellous results; and that courage is generally accompanied by magnanimity and

”
gentleness.”"—Pall Mall Gazette.

The Bravest of the Brave: With Peterborough in Spain.
By G. A. Henry. With 8 full-page Pictures by H. M. Pau. 5s.

“Myr. Henty never loses sight of the moral purpose of his work—to enforce the
doctrine of courage and truth, mercy and lovingkindness, as indispensable to the
making of an English gentleman. British lads will read The Bravest of the
Brave with pleasure and profit; of that we are quite sure.”"—Daily Telegraph.

For Name and Fame: or, Through Afghan Passes. By
G. A. Henry. Illustrated by Gorpon Browne. 5s.

“Not only a rousing story, replete with all the varied forms of excitement of a
campaign, but, what is still more useful, an account of a territory and its inhabi-
tants which must for a long time possess a supreme interest for Englishmen, as
heing the key to our Indian Empire.”—Glasgow Herald.

A Jacobite Exile: Being the Adventures of a Young English-
man in the Service of Charles XII. of Sweden. By G, A, Henry.
With 8 page Illustrations by Paut Harpy, and a Map. 5s.

“Incident succeeds incident, and adventure is piled upon adventure, and at the
end the reader, be he boy or man, will have experienced breathless enjoyment
in a romantic story that must have taught him much at its close.”—Army and
Navy Gazette.

Held Fast for England: A Tale of the Siege of Gibraltar.
By G. A. Hunry. Illustrated by Gorpon Browne, 5s.

“Among them we would place first in interest and wholesome educational
value the story of the siege of Gibraltar. . . . There is no cessation of exciting
incident throughout the story.”— Atheneum.
BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 9



BY G. A. HENTY.

“Mr. Henty’s books are always alive with moving incident.”—Review of Reviews.

In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

Condemned as a Nihilist: A Story of Escape from Siberia.
By G. A. Hunry. Illustrated by WaAurer PAcET. 5s,

“The best of this year’s Henty. His narrative is more interesting than many
of the tales with which the public is familiar, of escape from Siberia. Despite
their superior claim to authenticity these tales are without doubt no less fic-
titious than Mr. Henty’s, and he beats them hollow in the matter of sensations.”
—National Observer.

Orange and Green: A Tale of the Boyne and Limerick.
By G. A. Henry. Illustrated by Gorpon Browne. 5s.

“The narrative is free from the vice of prejudice, and ripples with life as
vivacious as if what is being described were really passing before the eye. aoe
Should be in the hands of every young student of Irish history.”—Belfast News.

In the Reign of Terror: The Adventures of a Westminster
Boy. By G. A. Henry. Illustrated by J. Scuénperc. 5s.
“Harry Sandwith, the Westminster boy, may fairly be said to beat Mr. Henty’s

record. His adventures will delight boys by the audacity and peril they depict.
The story is one of Mr. Henty’s best.”—Saturday Review.

By Sheer Pluck: A Tale of the Ashanti War. By G. A.

Henry, With 8 full-page Pictures by Gorpon Browne. — 5s.
“‘Morally, the book is everything that could be desired, setting before the boys

a bright and bracing ideal of the English gentleman.” —Christian Leader.

The Dragon and the Raven: or, The Days of King
Alfred. By G. A. Hunvy. With 8 page Illustrations by C. J.
STANILAND, RI. 5s,

“A story that may justly be styled remarkable. Boys, in reading it, will be
surprised to find how Alfred persevered, through years of bloodshed and times

of peace, to rescue his people from the thraldom of the Danes. We hope the
book will soon be widely known in all our schools.”—Schoolmaster.

A Final Reckoning: A Tale of Bush Life in Australia.
By G. A. Huyry. Illustrated by W. B. WoLtEn. 5s.

“ All boys will read this story with eager and unflagging interest. The episodes
are in Mr. Henty’s very best vein—graphic, exciting, realistic; and, as in all Mr.
Henty’s books, the tendency is to the formation of an honourable, manly, and
even heroic character.”—Birmingham Post.

The Young Colonists:
By G. A. Henry. With 6 Illustrations by Simon H. Vepprr.
38s. 6d.

“Fiction and history are so happily blended that the record of facts quicken

the imagination. No boy can read this book without learning a great deal of
South African history at its most critical period.”"—Standard.

A Chapter of Adventures: or, Through the Bombard-
ment of Alexandria. By G. A. Henry. With 6 page Ilustrations
by W. H. Overenp. 383s. 6d.

“Jack Robson and his two companions have their fill of excitement, and their
chapter of adventures is so brisk and entertaining we could have wished it longer
than it is."—Saturday Review.
10 BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



BY KIRK MUNROE.



In crown 8v0, cloth elegant, olivine edges.

Through Swamp and Glade: A Tale of the Seminole
War. By Kirk Muyroz, Illustrated by Vicrorn Perarp. 5s.

“The hero of Through Swamp and Glade will find many ardent champions, and
the name of Coachoochie become as familiar in the schoolboy’s ear as that of
the headmaster.”—St, James's Gazette.

At War with Pontiac: or, The Totem of the Bear. By
Kirk Mounros. Illustrated by J. Finnewore. 5s.

“Is in the best manner of Cooper. There is a character who is the parallel of
Hawkeye, as the Chingachgooks and Uncas have likewise their counterparts.”—
The Limes.

The White Conquerors of Mexico: A Tale of Toltec
and Aztec. By Kirk Munro. Illustrated by W. S. Sracry. 5s.

“Mr. Munroe gives most vivid pictures of the religious and civil polity of the
Aztecs, and of everyday life, as he imagines it, in the streets and market-places
of the magnificent capital of Montezuma.”—The Times.

Crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

Two Thousand Years Ago: or, The Adventures of a
Roman Boy. By Professor A. J. Cuurcnw. With 12 page Illus-
trations by Aprirn Marin. 6s.

“ Adventures well worth the telling. The book is extremely entertaining as
well as useful, and there is a wonderful freshness in the Roman scenes and
characters,”—The Times.

The Clever Miss Follett, By J. K. H. Denny. With
12 page Illustrations by Gurrrupr D. Hammonp. 6s.

‘Just the book to give to girls, who will delight both in the letterpress and
ie illustrations. Miss Hammond has never done better work.”—Keview of
eviews.

The Heiress of Courtleroy. By Annu Bratz. With 8
page Illustrations by T. C. H. Casrim. 5s.

“We can speak highly of the grace with which Miss Beale relates how the
young ‘Heiress of Courtleroy’ had such good influence over her uncle as to win
him from his intensely selfish ways.”—Guardian.

Under False Colours: A Story from Two Girls’ Lives.
By Saran Doupyey. Illustrated by G. G. Kinpurni. 4s.

“Sarah Doudney has no superior as a writer of high-toned stories—pure in
style and original in conception; but we have seen nothing from her pen equal
in dramatic energy to this book.”—Christian Leader.
BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 11



BY GEORGE MANVILLE FENN.

as Mr. Fenn stands in the foremost rank of writers in this department.”—Daily
ews.

In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

Dick o’ the Fens: A Romance of the Great East Swamp. By

G. Manvitty Funny. Illustrated by Frank Dapp. 6s.

“We conscientiously believe that boys will find it capital reading. It is full
of incident and mystery, and the mystery is kept up to the last moment. It is
rich in effective local colouring; and it has a historical interest.’”—Zimes,

Devon Boys: A Tale of the North Shore. By G. Manviuie
Fry, With 12 page Illustrations by Gorpon Browne. 6s.

“An admirable story, as remarkable for the individuality of its young heroes
as for the excellent descriptions of coast scenery and life in North Devon. It is
one of the best books we have seen this season.”—Atheneum.

The Golden Magnet: A Tale of the Land of the Incas. By
G. Manvinte Fenn. Illustrated by Gorpon Browne. 6s.

“There could be no more welcome present for a boy. There is not a dull page
in the book, and many will be read with breathless interest. ‘The Golden Mag-
net’ is, of course, the same one that attracted Raleigh and the heroes of West-
ward Ho !"—Journal of Education.

In the King’s Name: or, The Cruise of the Kestrel. By
G, Manvinin Fenn, Illustrated by Gorpon Browne. 6s.

“The best of all Mr, Fenn's productions in this field. It has the great quality
of always ‘moving on’, adventure following adventure in constant succession.” —
Daily News.

Nat the Naturalist: A Boy’s Adventures in the Eastern

Seas. By G. Manvinie Fenn. With 8 page Pictures. 5s.

“This sort of book encourages independence of character, develops resource,
and teaches a boy to keep his eyes open.”—Saturday Review.

Bunyip Land: The Story of a Wild Journey in New Guinea.
By G. Manvitiz Fenn. Illustrated by Gorpon Brownz. 4s.

“Mr. Fenn deserves the thanks of everybody for Bunyip Land, and we may ven-
ture to promise that a quiet week may be reckoned on whilst the youngsters have
such fascinating literature provided for their evenings’ amusement.”—Spectator.

Quicksilver: or, A Boy with no Skid to his Wheel. By
Groren Manvinte Frnn. With 6 page Illustrations by Frank
Davp. New edition, 3s. 6d.

“ Quicksilver is little short of an inspiration. In it that prince of story-writers
for boys—George Manville Fenn—has surpassed himself. It is an ideal book for
a boy's library.”—Practical Teacher.

Brownsmith’s Boy: A Romance in a Garden. By G.
Manvitte Fenn. With 6 page Illustrations. 38s. 6d.

“Mr. Fenn’s books are among the best, if not altogether the best, of the stories
for boys. Mr. Fenn is at his best in Brownsmith’s Boy.”—Pictorial World.

*,* For other Books by G. MANVILLE FENN, see page 22.
12 BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



BY GEORGE MAC DONALD.

In crown &yo, cloth elegant.

A Rough Shaking. By Grorczk MacDoyaup. With
12 page Illustrations by W. PARKINSON. 6s.

“One of the very best books for boys that has been written. It is full of
material peculiarly well adapted for the young, containing in a marked degree
the elements of all that is necessary to make up a perfect boys’ book.”—
Teachers’ Aid.

At the Back of the North Wind. By Gore Mac-
Donaup. With 75 Illustrations by ArrHur Hucurs. 5s.

“*The story is thoroughly original, full of fancy and pathos. . . . We stand
with one foot in fairyland and one on common earth.”—Z'he Times.

Ranald Bannerman’s Boyhood. By Guo. Mac Donaxp.
With 36 Illustrations by Arruur Hueurs. 5s.

“The sympathy with boy-nature in Ranald Bannerman’s Boyhood is perfect.
It is a beautiful picture of childhood, teaching by its impressions and suggestions
all noble things.” —British Quarterly Review.

The Princess and the Goblin. By Grorer Mac Donan.
With 32 Illustrations. 38s. 6d.

“Little of what is written for children has the lightness of touch and play of
fancy which are characteristic of George Mac Donald’s fairy tales. My. Arthur
Hughes's illustrations are all that illustrations should be.” —Manchester Guardian,
The Princess and Curdie. By Groran Mac Donan.

With 8 page Illustrations. 38. 6d.

“There is the finest and rarest genius in this brilliant story. Upgrown people
would do wisely occasionally to lay aside their newspapers and magazines to
spend an hour with Curdie and the Princess.” —Shefgield Independent.

BY ASCOTT R. HOPE.

Young Travellers’ Tales. By Ascorr R. Hops. With
6 Illustrations by H. J. Drarrr. 33s. 6d.

“Possess a high value for instruction as well as for entertainment. His quiet,
level humour bubbles up on every page.” —Daily Chronicle.

The Seven Wise Scholars. By Ascorr R. Horn. With
nearly 100 Illustrations by Gorpon Brownr. 5s.

“As full of fun as a volume of Punch; with illustrations more laughter-
provoking than most we have seen since Leech died.”—Shefield Independent.
Stories of Old Renown: ‘Tales of Knights and Heroes.

By Ascorr R. Horn. With 100 Illustrations by Gorpon Brownz.
38s. 6d.

“A veally fascinating book worthy of its telling title. ‘There is, we venture to
say, not a dull page in the book, not a story which will not bear a second read-
ing.”—Guardian.
BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 13



BY HARRY COLLINGWOOD.

In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

The Log of a Privateersman. By Harry Conzine-
woop. With 12 page
Illustrations by W.
RAINEY, RI. 68,

“The narrative is breezy,

vivid, and full of incidents,

faithful in nautical colouring,

and altogether delightful.”—

Pall Mall Gazette.

The Pirate Island:
A Story of the South
Pacific. By Harry
CoLuinawoop. With
8 page Pictures by
C. J. STANILAND and
J. R. Wetts. 5s.

“A capital story of the sea;
indeed in our opinion the
author is superior in some
respects as a marine novelist
to the better-known Mr, Clark
Russell.”—7he Times.

The Log of the
“Flying Fish”:
A Story of Aerial
and Submarine Ad-
venture. By Harry
CoLtinewoop. With
6 page Illustrations
by Gorpon Browne.
3s. 6d.

“The Flying Fish actually surpasses all Jules Verne’s creations; with incred-
ible speed she flies through the air, skims over the surface of the water, and darts
along the ocean bed. We strongly recommend our schoolboy friends to possess
themselves of her log.” —Athencewm.

*,* For other Books by Harry Collingwood, see pages 22 and 23.







Reduced Ilustration
from “The Log of a Privateersman”.

Banshee Castle. By Rosa Muinotnanp. With 12 page
Illustrations by Joun H. Bacon. 6s.
“One of the most fascinating of Miss Rosa Mulholland’s many fascinating
stories.” —Athenceum.
Giannetta: A Girl’s Story of Herself. By Rosa Mutnonanp.

With 8 page Illustrations by Lockuarr Boctr. 5s.
“One of the most attractive gift-books of the season.” —The Academy.
14 BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



BY ROBERT LEIGHTON.

Ln crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges.

Olaf the Glorious. By Roserr Letcnroy. With 8 page
Illustrations by Raney Peacock, and a Map. 5s.

“Ts as good as anything of the kind we have met with. Mr. Leighton more
than holds his own with Rider Haggard and Baring-Gould.”—Vhe Times,

“Among the books best liked by boys of the sturdy English type few will take
a higher place than Olaf the Glorious. . . —National Observer,

The Wreck of ‘‘The Golden Fleece”: The Story of a
North Sea Fisher-boy. By Roserv Lriauron. With 8 page
Illustrations by F. Branewyn. 5s.

“This story should add considerably to Mr. Leighton’s high reputation. Bx-
cellent in every respect, it contains every variety of incident. ‘The plot is very
cleverly devised, and the types of the North Sea sailors are capital.’—The V'imes.

The Pilots of Pomona: A Story of the Orkney Islands.
By Roserr Leicuton. Illustrated by Joun Lutcuron. 5s.

«A story which is quite as good in its way as 7'reasure Island, and is full of
adventure of a stirring yet most natural kind. Although it is primarily a boys’
book, it is a real godsend to the elderly reader.”—Glasyow Evening Times.

The Thirsty Sword: A Story of the Norse Invasion of
Scotland (1262-63). By Rorrrr Lerewron. With 8 page Ilus-
trations by A. Prarsn. 5s.

“This is one of the most fascinating stories for boys that it has ever been our
pleasure to read. From first to last the interest never flags.” —Schoolmaster,

BY SHEILA E. BRAINE.
To Tell the King the Sky is Falling. By Suntza E.

Bratne. With over 80 quaint and clever Illustrations by ALICE
B. Woopwarp. 8vo, cloth, decorated board, gilt edges, 5s.

“Tt is witty and ingenious, and it has certain qualities which children are
quick to perceive and appreciate—a genuine love of fun, affectionateness, and
sympathy, from their points of view.”—Bookman.

A Girl’s Loyalty. By Frances Armsrrona. With 8 page
Ilustrations by Joun H. Bacon. 5s.

“There is no doubt as to the good quality of A Girl’s Loyalty. The hook is
one which would enrich any girls’ book-shelf.”—St, James's Gazette.

A Fair Claimant: Being a Story for Girls. By Franons

Armstronec. Illustrated by Gerrrupr D. Hammonn. 5s.

“Ag a gift-book for big girls it is among the best new books of the kind, The
story is interesting and natural, from first to last.” —Westminster Gazette,
Specimen Illustration from
“TO TELL THE KING THE SKY IS FALLING’,



THE GNOMES BRING THE GONDOLA TO TOYLAND.
16 BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

TWELFTH EDITION OF THE UNIVERSE.

The Universe :- or, The Infinitely Greatand the Infinitely Little...
A Sketch of Contrasts in Creation, and Marvels revealed and
explained by Natural Science. By F. A. Poucuer, m.p. With
272 Engravings on wood, of which 55 are full-page size, and 4
Coloured Illustrations. Twelfth Edition, medium 8vo, cloth ele-
gant, gilt edges, 7s. 6d.; also morocco antique, 16s.

“Dr, Pouchet’s wonderful work on Zhe Universe, than which there is no book
better calculated to encourage the study of nature.”—Pall Mall Gazette.
“We know no better book of the kind for a schoolroom library.”— Bookman.

BY G. NORWAY.

In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

A Prisoner of War: A Story of the Time of Napoleon
Bonaparte, By G. Norway. With 6 page Illustrations by Rost.
BARNES, A.R.W.S, 38. 6d.

‘More hairbreadth escapes from death by starvation, by ice, by fighting, &c.,
were never before surmounted. . . . Itisa fine yarn,’—Vhe Guardian,

A True Cornish Maid. By G. Norway. With 6 page
Illustrations by J. Finnemorn. 3s. 6d.

«There is some excellent reading. . . . Mrs. Norway brings before the eyes
of her readers the good Cornish folk, their speech, their manners, and their ways.
A True Cornish Maid deserves to be popular,” —A thencewn,

* * For other Books by G. Norway seo p. 28.

Dr. Jolliffe’s Boys: A Tale of Weston School. By Lewis
Hoven. With 6 page Pictures. 33, 6d.

“Young people who appreciate Jom Brown's School-days will find this story a
worthy companion to that fascinating book.’”"— Newcastle Journal.

The Bubbling Teapot. A Wonder Story. By Mrs. L. W.
Cuamenry. With 12 page Pictures by WALTER SATTERLEE. 35. 6d.

“Very literally a ‘wonder story’, Nevertheless it is made realistic enough, and
there is a good deal of information to be gained from it.”—The Times.

Thorndyke Manor: A Tale of Jacobite Times. By Mary
C. Rowsgrtt. Illustrated by L. Lusiiz Brooke, 33s. 6d.
“Miss Rowsell has never written a more attractive book than Z'horndyke
Manor.”—Belfast News-Letter,
Traitor or Patriot? A Tale of the Rye-House Plot. By

Mary C. Rowsetn. Illustrated. 33. 6d.

“Here the Rye-House Plot serves as the groundwork for a romantic love
episode, whose true characters are lifelike beings.” —Graphic,
BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. VW



BY DR. GORDON STABLES.

In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

For Life and Liberty: A Story of Battle by Land and
Sea. By Dr. Gorpon Srasies, R.N. With 8 Illustrations by
Sypnry Pacer, and a Map. 5s.

“The story is lively and spirited, with abundance of blockade-running, hard
fighting, narrow escapes, and introductions to some of the most distinguished
generals on both sides.”—Zhe Times.

To Greenland and the Pole. By Gorpow Srasies, mv,
With 8 page Illustrations by G. C. Hinpury, and a Map. | 5s.

“His Arctic explorers have the verisimilitude of life. It is one of the hooks of
the season, and one of the best Mr. Stables has ever written.”—Truth.

Westward with Columbus. By Gorpon Srastus, ap.’
With 8 page Illustrations by A. PrarsE. 5s.

“We must place Westward with Columbus among those books that all boys
ought to read.”—The Spectator.

’Twixt School and College: A Tale of Self-reliance. By
GORDON STABLES, 6.31., 1.D., RN. Illustrated by W. PARKINSON. 5s.
“One of the best of a prolific writer's books for boys, being full of practical

instructions as to keeping pets, and inculeates in a way which a little recalls Miss
Ndgeworth’s ‘Frank’ the virtue of self-reliance,” —A theneeum.



With the Sea King’s: A Story of the Days of Lord Nelson.
By ¥. H. Winner. Illustrated by W. 8. Stacny. 4s.

“Just the book to put into a boy’s hands. Every chapter contains hoardings,
cuttings out, fighting pirates, escapes of thrilling audacity, and captures by corsairs,
sufficient to turn the quietest boy’s head. The story culminates in a vigorous
account of the battle of Trafalgar. Happy boys!”—T'he Academy.

Storied Holidays: A Cycle of Red-letter Days. By E. 8.
Brooks. With 12 page Illustrations by Howarp Py Lr. 3s. 6d.

“Tt is a downright good book for a senior boy, and is eminently readable from
first to last.” —Schoolmaster.

Chivalric Days: Stories of Courtesy and Courage in the
Olden Times. By E. 8. Brooxs. With 20 Illustrations. 3s. 6d.

“We have seldom come across a prettier collection of tales. These charming
stories of boys and girls of olden days are no mere fictitious or imaginary sketches,
but are real and actual records of their sayings and doings.”—Literary World.

Historic Boys: Their Endeavours, their Achievements, and
their Times. By E. 8. Brooxs. With 12 page Illustrations. 3s, 6d.
“A wholesome book, manly in tone; altogether one that should incite boys to
further acquaintance with those rulers of men whose careers are narrated. We
advise teachers to put it on their list of prizes,” —Knowledge.
(111 B
18 BLACKIE & SONS BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



BY HUGH ST. LEGER.

In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

An Ocean Outlaw: A Story of Adventure in the good ship
Margaret. With Illustrations by Wintiam Rarnny, Rr. 4s.

‘“*We know no modern boys’ book in which there is more sound, hearty, good-

humoured fun, or of which the tone is more wholesome and bracing than My, St.

Leger’s.’—National Observer.

Hallowe’en Ahoy! or, Lost on the Crozet Islands. By
Hue Sr. Lecer. With 6 Illustrations by H. J. Draper. 4s,

“One of the best stories of seafaring life and adventure which have appeared
this season. It contains a capital ‘fo’c’s'le’ ghost and a thrilling shipwreck. No
boy who begins it but will wish to join the Britannia long before he finishes
these delightful pages.” —A cademy.

Sou’wester and Sword. By Hven Sv. Lear. With 6
page Illustrations by Han Hursr. 4s,

_ “As racy a tale of life at sea and war adventure as we have met with for some
time. . . . Altogether the sort of book that boys will revel in.”—Athenewm.



Meg’s Friend. By Anice Corxray. With 6 page Illustra-
tions by Roperv Fowner. 3s. 6d.

“One of Miss Corkran’s charming books for girls, narrated in that simple
and picturesque style which marks the authoress as one of the first amongst
writers for young people.” —The Spectator,



Margery Merton’s Girlhood. By Axicu Corkran, With
6 page Pictures by Gornon Brownr. 3s, 6d.

“Another book for girls we can warmly commend. There is a delightful
piquancy in the experiences and trials of a young English girl who studies
painting in Paris.”—Saturday Review.

Down the Snow Stairs: or, From Good-night to Good-morn-
ing. By Anice Corxran. Illustrated by Gorpon Browne. 38s. 6d.

“A gem of the first water, bearing upon every page the mark of genius. It is
indeed a Little Pilgrim’s Progress.” —Christian Leader.

Grettir the Outlaw: A Story of Iceland. By S. Barine-
GouLtp. With 6 page Illustrations by M. Zeno Dimmer. 4s.

“Ts the boys’ book of its year. That is, of course, as much as to say that it
will do for men grown as well as juniors. It is told in simple, straightforward
English, as all stories should be, and it has a freshness, a freedom, a sense of sun
and wind and the open air, which make it irresistible.’—National Observer.

Gold, Gold, in Cariboo: A Story of Adventure in British
Columbia. By Curve Pamurpers-Woiiny. With 6 page Ilustra-
tions by G. C. Hinpiey. 3s. 6d.

“We have seldom read a more exciting tale of wild mining adventure in a
singularly inaccessible country. ‘There is a capital plot, and the interest is sus-
tained to the last page.” —The Times,
BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 19



BY CHARLES W. WHISTLER.

In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

Wulfric the Weapon-Thane: The Story of the Danish
Conquest of East -— —————_—___—_ -
Anglia. With 6 [| =
Illustrations by W.
H. Mareerrson.
ds,

“A picturesque and ener-
getic story. A worthy com-
panion to his capital story,
A Thane of Wessex. One
that will delight all active-

minded boys.” — Saturday
Review.

A Thane of Wes-
sex: Being the
Story of the Great
Viking Raid of 845.
By Cuarirs W.
WHISTLER, With
6 Mlustrations by
W. H. Maraurson.
3s. 6d,

“This is one of the best
books of the season, ae
The story is told with spirit
and force, and affords an

excellent picture of the life
of the period.”—Standard.



His First Kanga- ‘ Reduced Illustration
roo: An Austra- from “Wulfric the Weapon-Thane”.
lian Story for Boys. By ArrHuR Frrres. Illustrated by Percy
F. 8. Spencr. 8s. 6d.

‘XS lively story of life on an Australian stock-station, where the monotony of
things is agreeably diversified by not only the bounding kangaroo, but also the
up-sticking bushranger.”— Scotsman.

A Champion of the Faith: A Tale of Prince Hal and the
Lollards, By J. M. Catnwett. With 6 page Illustrations by
Hersert J. Draper. 4s.

‘Will not be less enjoyed than Mr. Henty’s books. _ Sir John Oldcastle’s pathetic
story, and the history of his brave young squire, will make every boy enjoy this
lively story,”— London Quarterly.
20 BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR. YOUNG PEOPLE.



BY ANNIE E. ARMSTRONG.

In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

Violet Vereker’s Vanity. With 6 page Illustrations by
GERTRUDE Dremarin Hammonp. 38s. 6d.
‘A book for girls that we can heartily recommend, for it is bright, sensible,
and with a right tone of thought and feeling.” —Shefield Independent.
Three Bright Girls: A Story of Chance and Mischance.
By Annm E. Armsrrona. Illustrated by W. Parkinson. 8s. 6d.
“Among many good stories for girls this is undoubtedly one of the very best.”
—Teachers’ Aid.
A Very Odd Girl: or, Life at the Gabled Farm. By Anntm
KE, Armstrong. Illustrated. 3s. 6d.

p és The book is one we can heartily recommend, for it is not only bright and
interesting, but also pure and healthy in tone and teaching.”—Vhe Lady.

The Captured Cruiser: By C. J. Hyye. Tllustrated by
FRANK BRranowyn. 3s. 6d.

“The two lads and the two skippers are admirably drawn. Mr, Hyne has
now secured a position in the first rank of writers of fiction for boys.”—Spectator.

Afloat at Last: A Sailor Boy’s Log of his Life at Sea. By
Joun C. Huronnson. 3s. 6d.
“‘As healthy and breezy a book as one could wish to put into the hands of
a boy.” —Academy.
Picked up at Sea: or, The Gold Miners of Minturne Creek.
By J. C. Hurcunson. With 6 page Pictures. 35. 6d.

Brother and Sister: or, The Trials of the Moore Family.
By Exiaserra J. Lysaeut. 3s. 6d.

Life’s Daily Ministry: A Story of Everyday Service for
Others. “By Mrs. E. R. Prrman. With 4 page Illustrations.
Cloth extra, 3s. 6d.

“ull of stirring interest, genuine pictures of real life, and pervaded by a broad
and active sympathy for the true and good.”—Christian Commonwealth.

Dora: or, A Girl without a Home. By Mrs. R. H. Reap. With
6 page Illustrations. 33. 6d.

“Tt is no slight thing, in an age of rubbish, to get a story so pure and healthy
as this.”—The Academy.
BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. ‘21



BY EDGAR PICKERING.

In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

Two Gallant Rebels: A Story of the Great Strugele in La
Vendée. By Epgar Pickrrinc. With 6 Illustrations by W. H.
OVEREND, 38s. 6d.

“There is something very attractive about Mr. Pickering’s style. . . . Boys
will relish the relation of those dreadful and moving events, which, indeed, will
never lose their fascination for readers of all ages.”—U'he Spectator.

In Press-Gang Pays. By Epn@ar Pickertne. With 6
Illustrations by W. 8. Sracny. 3s. 6d.

“Tt is of Marryat we think as we read this delightful story; for it is not
only a story of adventure with incidents well conceived and arranged, but the
characters are interesting and well-distinguished.’’—Academy.

An Old-Time Yarn: Wherein is set forth divers desperate
mischances which befell Anthony Ingram and his shipmates in the
West Indies .and Mexico with Hawkins and Drake. By Epear
Pioxertnc. Illustrated by Atrrep Puarse. 33s. 6d.

“And a very good yarn it is, with not a dull page from first to last. There isa
flavour of Westward Ho! in this attractive book.”— Educational Review.

Silas Verney: A Tale of the Time of Charles II. By Epaar
Proxertne. With 6 page Illustrations by ALrrep PEARSE, 33, 6d.
“ Altogether this is an excellent story for boys.”"—Saturday Review.

BLACKIE’S NEW THREE-SHILLING SERIES.
Beautifully illustrated and handsomely bound.

Highways and High Seas: Cyril Harley’s Adventures on
both. By F. Franxvorr Moors. With 6 page Illustrations by

ALFRED PEARSE. 35.

“This is one of the best stories Mr. Moore has written, perhaps the very best.
The exciting adventures are sure to attract boys.’ Spectator.

Under Hatches: or,.Ned Woodthorpe’s Adventures. By
F. Frayxrort Moorz. Illustrated by A. Fornsrier. 33.
“The story as a story is one that will just suit boys all the world over. The
characters are well drawn and consistent.”—Schoolmaster.
Perseverance Island: or, The Robinson Crusoe of the 19th
Century. By Dovuenas Frazar. With 6 page Illustrations. 38s.

“This is an interesting story, written with studied simplicity of style, much in
Defoe’s vein of apparent sincerity and scrupulous veracity; while for practical
instruction it is even better than Robinson Crusoe.”—Illustrated London Neus:

Girl Neighbours: or, The Old Fashion and the New. By
Saran Tyrer. Illustrated by C. 'T. GARLAND. 3s.

“One of the most effective and quietly humorous of Miss Sarah Tytler’s stories.
It is very healthy, very agreeable, and very well written.”—The Spectator.
22 BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



THREE-SH'LLING SERIES—Continued.

Beautifully illustrated and handsomely bound.

The Missing Merchantman. By Harry Coriinewoop.
With 6 page Illustrations by W. H. OverEND. 8s.

“One of the author’s best sea stories. The hero is as heroic as any boy could
desire, and the ending is extremely happy.”—British Weekly.

Menhardoe: A Story of Cornish Nets and Mines. By G.
Manvitir Fenn. Illustrated by C. J. Sranmmanp, R.I. 3s.

“The Cornish fishermen are drawn from life, and stand out from the pages in
their jerseys and sea-boots all sprinkled with silvery pilchard scales,”—Spectator.

Yussuf the Guide: or, The Mountain Bandits. By G. Man-
VILLE Finn. With 6 page Illustrations by J. Scudnperc. 383.

‘‘Told with such real freshness and vigour that the reader feels he is actually
one of the party, sharing in the fun and facing the dangers.” —Pall Mall Gazette.

Patience Wins: or, War in the Works. By Groren May-
VILLE Fenn. With 6 page Illustrations. 33.

“Mr. Fenn has never hit upon a happier plan than in writing this story of
Yorkshire factory life. The whole book is all aglow with life.” —Pall Mall Gazette.

Mother Carey’s Chicken: Her Voyage to the Unknown
Isle. By G. Manvinin Fann. With 6 page Illustrations by A.
Forestier. 35.

“Undoubtedly one of the best Mr. Fenn has written. The incidents are of
thrilling interest, while the characters are drawn with a care and completeness
rarely found in a boy’s book.” —Literary World.

Robinson Crusoe. With 100 Illustrations by Gorpon
Browne. 38s.

‘One of the best issues, if not absolutely the best, of Defoe’s work which has
ever appeared.” —The Standard.

Gulliver’s Travels, With 100 Illustrations by Gorpon
Browne. 38s.

“Mr. Gordon Browne is, to my thinking, incomparably the most artistic,
spirited, and brilliant of our illustrators of books for boys, and one of the most
humorous also, as his illustrations of ‘Gulliver’ amply testify.”—Zruth.

The Wigwam and the War-path: Stories of the Red
Indians. By Ascorr R. Horn. With 6 page Illustrations. 38s.

“Is notably good. It gives a very vivid picture of life among the Indians,
which will delight the heart of many a schoolboy.”—Spectator.
BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 23



THREE-SHILLING SERIES—Continued.

Beautifully illustrated and handsomely bound.

The Loss of John Humble: What Led to It, and What
Came of It. By G.
Norway. With 6 page
Illustrations by Joun
Scuonpere. New Edi-
tion. 8s.

“This story will place the
author at once in the front rank,
It is full of life and adventure.
The interest of the story is sus-
tained without a break from first
to last.”—-Standard.

Hussein the Hos-
tage: or, A Boy’s
Adventures in Persia.
By G. Norway. With
6 page Illustrations by
JOHN Souénperc. 8s.

“ Hussein the Hostage is full
of originality and vigour, The
characters are lifelike, there is
plenty of stirring incident, the
interest is sustained throughout,
and every boy will enjoy follow-
ing the fortunes ot the hero.”—
Journal of Education.

Cousin Geoffrey and

I. By Caroninz
Austin. With 6 page 3 Ee 3 see eres
Illustrations by W. Reduced Illustration from “ Cousin Geoffrey”.
PARKINSON. 33.

‘*Miss Austin’s story is bright, clever, and well developed.” —Saturday Review.



The Rover’s Secret: A Tale of the Pirate Cays and Lagoons
of Cuba. By Harry Cotzinewoop. With 6 page Illustrations by
W. C. Symons. 3s.

“ The Rover's Secret is by far the best sea story we have read for years, and is
certain to give unalloyed pleasure to boys.”—Saturday Review.

The Congo Rovers: A Story of the Slave Squadron. By
Harry CoLtincwoop. With 6 page Illustrations. 3s.

“No better sea story has lately been written than the Congo Rovers. It is as
original as any boy could desire."—Morning Post.
24 BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

BLACKIE’S HALF-CROWN SERIES.

Lllustrated by eminent Artists. In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

Marooned on Australia, being the Narration of Diedrich
Buys of his Discoveries in Terra Australis Incognito about the
year 1630. By Ernest Favenc.

“A remarkably interesting and well-written story of travel and adventure in
the Great Southern Land.”—School Guardian.

My Friend Kathleen. By Jeyyim Cuarrntt.

"4 pleasantly-written story for elder girls, who will admire Kathleen’s cour-

age, and learn much from her nobility of character.”—Board Teacher.

A Girl’s Kingdom. By M. Corser-Srymour.

“The story is bright, well told, and thoroughly healthy and good.”—Ch. Bells.

Laugh and Learn: The Easiest Book of Nursery Lessons
and Nursery Games. By Jennerr Humpureys.

“One of the best books of the kind imaginable, full of practical teaching in
word and picture, and helping the little ones pleasantly along a right royal road
to learning.” —Graphic.

Reefer and Rifleman: A Tule of the Two Services, By
Lieut.-Col. Purcy-GRrovus.

“A good, old-fashioned, amphibious story of our fighting with the Frenchmen in
the beginning of our century, with a fair sprinkling of fun and frolic.”—Z'imes,
A Musical Genius. By the Author of the “Two Dorothys”.

“Tt is brightly written, well illustrated, and daintily bound, and can be strongly
recommended as a really good prize-book,”—Yeachers’ Aid.

For the Sake of a Friend: A Story of School Life. By
MARGARET PARKER.

- An excellent school-girl story. . . . Susie Snow and her friend, Trix Beres-

ford, are charming girls.”—A theneum.

Under the Black Eagle. By Ayprew Hivuiarp.

“The rapid movement of the story, and the strange scenes through which it
passes, give it a full interest of surprise and adventure.’’—Scotsman,

The Secret of the Australian Desert. By Eryusr
FAVENO.
“We recommend the book most heartily; it is certain to please boys and
girls, and even some grown-ups.”—Guardian.
A Golden Age: A Story of Four Merry Children. By Ismay
THorN. Illustrated by Gorpon Browne.
“Ought to have a place of honour on the nursery shelf.”—The Atheneum.


BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 25



HALF-CROWN SERIES—Continued.
‘Illustrated by eminent Artists. In crown 8vo, cloth elegani.

BY BEATRICE HARRADEN.

Things Will Take a Turn. By Buarrice Harrapen.
With 44 Illustrations
by Joun H. Bacon.



‘Perhaps the most bril-
liant is Uhings Will Take a
Turn, ..-. A tale of humble
child life in East London. It
is a delightful blending of
comedy and tragedy, with an
excellent plot.”—Zhe Times.

The Whispering
Winds, and the
Tales that they Told.
By Mary H. Desrn-
HAM. With 25 Illus-
trations by. Paup
Harpy.

“We wish the winds would
tell us stories like these. It
would be worth while to climb
Primrose Hill, or even to the
giddy heights of Hampstead
Heath in a bitter east wind,
if we could only be sure of
hearing such a sweet, sad,
tender, and stirring story as
that of Hilda Brave Heart, or

even one that was half so
good.” —Academy. From “Things will Take a Turn”. (Reduced.)

Hal Hungerford. By J. R. Hurcurysoy, B.A.

“Altogether, Hal Hungerford is a distinct literary success.” —Spectator.

The Secret of the Old House. .By E. Evrrert?-Green,

“Tim, the little Jacobite, is a charming creation.”—
White Lilae: or, The Queen of the May. By Amy Watton.
“ Every rural parish ought to add White Lilac to its library.”—Academy.

Miriam’s Ambition. By Everyy Evererr-Green.
“Miss Green’s children ‘are real British boys and girls.” —Liverpool Mercury.

The Brig “Audacious”. By Anan Coz.

“Fresh and wholesome as a breath of sea air."—Court Journal.






26 BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



HALF-CROWN SERIES—Continued.

Illustrated by eminent Artists. In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.
Jasper’s Conquest. By Exizasera J. Lysacur.
“One of the best boys’ books of the season.” —Schoolmaster.
Little Lady Clare. By Evetyy Evernrr-Green.
“Reminds us in its quaintness of Mrs. Ewing's delightful tales.”—Liter. World.
The Eversley Secrets. By Evenyn Evernr?-Greey.
“Roy Eversley is a very touching picture of high principle.’”—G@uardian.

The Hermit Hunter of the Wilds. By G Srasuxs, zy.
“Will gladden the heart of many a bright boy.”—Methodist Recorder.

Sturdy and Strong. By G. A. Heyry.

“A hero who stands as a good instance of chivalry in domestic life.”—Z'he
Empire.

Gutta-Percha Willie. By Gzoraz Mac Donatp.
“Get it for your boys and girls to read for themselves.”—Practical Teacher.
The War of the Axe: or, Adventures in South Africa. By
J. Purcy-GRroves.
“The story is well and brilliantly told.”—Literary World.

The Lads of Little Clayton. By R. Srean.

**A capital book for boys.”—Schoolmaster.

Ten Boys who lived on the Road from Long Ago to Now.
By Janz Anprews. With 20 Illustrations.
“The idea is a very happy one, and admirably carried out.”—Practical Teacher,
A Waif of the Sea: or, The Lost Found. By Kats Woop.
“Written with tenderness and grace.”—Morning Advertiser,
Winnie’s Secret. By Karz Woop.
“One of the best story-books we have read.”—Schoolmaster.
Miss Willowburn’s Offer. By Saran Doupyey.
“Patience Willowburn is one of Miss Doudney’s best creations.” — Spectator.
A Garland for Girls. By Lovisa M. Atcorr.
“These little tales are the beau ideal of girls’ stories.”—Christian World.
Hetty Gray: or, Nobody’s Bairn. By Rosa Munnonnanp.
“Hetty is a delightful creature—piquant, tender, and true.”— World.
Brothers in Arms: A Story of the Crusades. By F. Bay-

FORD Harrison.
“Sure to prove interesting to young people of both sexes.” —Guardian.

Miss Fenwick’s Failures. By Esmé Srvuarvr.

“A girl true to real life, who will put no nonsense into young heads.” —G@raphice.
Gytha’s Message. By Emma Lusuin.

“This is the sort of book that all girls like."—Journal of Education.

A Little Handful. By Harrier J. Scriprs.

“He is a real type of a boy.”—The Schoolmaster.
BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 27



HALF-CROWN SERIES—Continued.

Illustrated by eminent Artists. In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.
Hammond’s Hard Lines. By Sxeuron Kuprorp.

“Ttis just what a boy would ey
choose if the selection of a ®@
story-book is left in his own
hand.” —School Guardian.

Dulcie King’: A Story
for Girls. By M.
CorBer-SHyMour.

“An extremely graceful,
well-told tale of domestic life.

. +. The heroine, Dulcie, is a

charming person, and worthy

of the good fortune which she

causes and shares.”—G@uar-
dian.

Hugh Herbert’s In-
heritance. By |
JAROLINE AUSTIN.

“Will please by its simpli-
city, its tenderness, and its
healthy interesting motive.

It is admirably written.’

Scotsman,

Nicola: The Career of
a Girl Musician. By
M. Corsper-Srymour,

Jack o’ Lanthorn:
A Tale of Adventure. <
By Henry Frits. Reduced Illustration from “A Girl in Spring-time”.

My Mistress the Queen. By M. A. Pavutt.

The Stories of Wasa and Menzikoff.

Stories of the Sea in Former Days.

Tales of Captivity and Exile.

Famous Discoveries by Sea and Land.

Stirring Events of History.

Adventures in Field, Flood, and Forest.

“Tt would be difficult to place in the hands of young people books which
combine interest and instruction in a higher degree.”—Manchester Courier.

A Rough Road: or, How the Boy Made a Man of Himself.
By Mrs. G. Linnasus BANKs.
“Mrs. Banks has not written a better book than A Rough Road.”—Spectator.







= aa St
28 BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



HALF-CROWN SERIES—Continued.



The Two Dorothys. By Mrs. Herserr Marry.

“A book that will interest and please all girls.”—T'he Lady.

A Cruise in Cloudland. By Henry Frirn.

“4 thoroughly interesting story.”—St. James's Gazette.

Marian and Dorothy. By Ayyim E. Armsrrone.

“This is distinctively a book for girls. A bright wholesome story.”—Academy.

Stimson’s Reef: A Tale of Adventure. By C. J. Hyyn,

“Tt may almost vie with Mr. R. L. Stevenson’s Treasure Island.”—Guardian.

Gladys Anstruther. By Louisa Tompson.

“Tt is a clever book: novel and striking in the highest degree.”—Schoolmistress.

BLACKIE’S TWO-SHILLING SERIES.
Illustrated by eminent Artists. In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

Sydney’s Chums: A Story of East and West London. By
H. F. Grruen.

Daddy Samuel’s Darling. By the Author of “The Two
Dorothys ”.

May, Guy, and Jim. By Exrinor Davenrorr ApaAms.
A Girl in Spring-time. By Mrs. Mansuran.

In the Days of Drake. Being the Adventures of Humphrey
Salkeld. By J. 8. Fnerciuer.

Wilful Joyce. By W. L. Roorrr.

Proud Miss Sydney. By Grraupine Mocxurr.

Queen of the Daffodils. By Lesum Laine.

The Girleen. By Evrru Jounsronr.

The Organist’s Baby. By Karunezy Kyox.
School-Days in France. By An Otp Girt.

The Ravensworth Scholarship. By Mrs. Henry Crarke.

Sir Walter’s Ward: A Tale of the Crusades. By Witniam
EVERARD.

Raff’s Ranche: A Story of Adventure among Cow-boys and
Indians. By F. M. Houmes.

The Joyous Story of Toto. By Lavra E. Ricwarps.
Our Dolly: Her Words and Ways. By Mrs. R. H. Rua.
Fairy Fancy: What she Heard and Saw. By Mrs. Ruan
New Light through Old Windows. By Grecason Gow.
Little Tottie, and Two Other Stories. By Tuomas Arcumr.
BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 29



TWO-SHILLING SERIES—Continued.

Mttustrated by eminent Artists. In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.
An Unexpected Hero. By Exiz. J. Lysaaur.
The Bushranger’s Secret. By Mrs. Hunry Cuarke, ma.
The White Squall. By Joun C. Hurcunsoy.
The Wreck of the ‘‘Nancy Bell”. By J. C. Hurcusson.
The Lonely Pyramid. By J. H. Yoxatt.
Bab: or, The Triumph of Unselfishness. By Ismay THory.
Brave and True, and other Stories. By Greason Gow.
The Light Prineess. By Grorex Mac Donaxp.
Nutbrown Roger and I. By J. H. Yoxatt.
Sam Silvan’s Sacrifice. By Jusss Conman.

Insect Ways on Summer Days in Garden, Forest, Field,
and Stream. By Jennert Humeureys. With 70 Illustrations.

Susan. By Amy Wauron.

A Pair of Clogs. By Amy Watton.

The Hawthorns. By Amy Watroy.

Dorothy’s Dilemma. By Caronine Austin.
Marie’s Home. By Caronme Austin.

A Warrior King. By J. Evetyy.

Aboard the ‘“‘Atalanta”. By Heyry Frrru.
The Penang Pirate. By Joun C. Hurcueson,
Teddy: The Story of a “Little Pickle”. By Joun C. Hurcusoy,
A Rash Promise. By Cxcin1a Serpy Lownpes.
Linda and the Boys. By Crciiia Seney Lownpzs.

Swiss Stories for Children. From the German of Mapam
JoHANNA Spyrt. By Lucy WHEELOCK,

The Squire’s Grandson. By J. M. Caunwstt.
Magna Charta Stories. Edited by Arrmur GILMAN, A.M.

The Wings of Courage; axp Tue Cxoup - SPINNER.
Translated from the French of Groner Sanp, by Mrs. Corkran.

Chirp and Chatter: Or, Lussons rrom Fierp anp TREE.
By Anon Banks. With 54 Illustrations by Gorpon Browne.

Four Little Mischiefs. By Rosa Mu.uornanp.
80 BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

TWO-SHILLING SERIES—Continued.

Illustrated by eminent Artists.

In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

Naughty Miss Bunny. By Cuara Moinonnanp.
Adventures of Mrs. Wishing-to-be. By Auicm Corxray,

LIBRARY OF FAMOUS BOOKS FOR
BOYS AND GIRLS.

In Crown 8vo.

Autobiographies of Boyhood.

Holiday House. By CATHERINE
SINCLAIR.

Log-book of a Midshipman.

Parry’s Third Voyage.

Passages in the Life of a Galley-
Slave.

The Downfall of Napoleon. I!
Sirk WALTER Scorr.

What Katy Did. By SusANn CooL-
IDGE.

What Katy Did at School.

Wreck cf the ‘‘ Wager”.

Miss Austen’s Northan: -vy Abbey.

Miss Edgeworth’s The Good Gov-
erness.

Martineau’s Feats on the Fiord.

Marryat’s Poor Jack.

The Snowstorm. By Mrs. Gorn.

Life of Dampier.

The Cruise of the Midge. M. Scorr.

Lives and Voyages of Drake and
Cavendish.

Edgeworth’s Moral Tales.

2

oy

Tllustrated.



Cloth extra, 1s. 6d. each.

Marryat’s The Settlers in Canada,
Michael Scott’s Tom Cringle’s Log.
Natural History of Selborne,

Waterton’s Wanderings in S.
America.

Anson’s Voyage Round the World.

Autobiography of Franklin.

Lamb’s Tales from Shakspeare.

Southey’s Life of Nelson.

Miss Mitford’s Our Village.

Two Years Before the Mast.

Children of the New Forest.

Scott’s The Talisman.

The Basket of Flowers.

Marryat’s Masterman Ready,

Alcott’s Little Women.

Cooper’s Deerslayer,

The Lamplighter, By Miss CumMINS,

Cooper’s Pathfinder.

The Vicar of Wakefield.

Plutarch’s Lives of Greek Heroes.

Poe’s Tales of Romance and Fan-
tasy.

BLACKIE’S EIGHTEENPENNY SERIES.

With Illustrations.
A Chum Worth Having.
RENCE COOMBE.
Penelope and the Others.
WALTON.
The ‘‘Saucy May”. By Henry
Frit.
The Little Girl from Next Door.
By GERALDINE MoOKLER.
Uncle Jem’s Stella. By Author of
“The Two Dorothys”.
The Ball of Fortune. By C. PHarsn,
Thom aTy, Failing. By DAariny
ALE.
Warner’s Chase: or, The Gentle
Heart. By ANNIE S. SWAN.

By FLo-

By AMY

In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

Climbing the Hill. By ANNIE 8.
SWAN.

Into the Haven. By ANNINS. SWAN.

Down and Up Again, By Gruason
Gow.

Madge’s Mistake.
ARMSTRONG.

The Troubles and Triumphs of
Little Tim. By Grue@son Gow.

The Happy Lad: A Story of Peasant
Life in Norway. By B. BJGRNSON.

A Box of Stories. Packed for Young
Volk by HORACE HAPPYMAN.

The Patriot Martyr, and other Nar-
ratives of Female Heroism.

By ANNIE E.
BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YouNG PEOPLE. 31



THE EIGHTEENPENNY SERIES.—Continued.

With Illustrations.

Olive and Robin: or, A Journey to
Nowhere. By the author of ‘The
Two Dorothys”.

Mona’s Trust: A Story for Girls. By
PENELOPE LESLIE,

Reduced Illustration
From ‘A Chum Worth Having”.

Little Jimmy: A Story of Adventure.
By Rey. D. RIck-JONES, M.A.

Pleasures and Pranks. By Isa-

BELLA PRARSON.

In a Stranger’s Garden: A Story
for Boys and Girls. By CONSTANCE
CUMING.

A Soldier’s Son: The Story of a Boy
who Succeeded, By .NNETTE Lys-
TER.

Mischief and Merry-making. By
ISABELLA PEARSON.



In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

Littlebourne Lock, By F. BAYForD
HARRISON.

Wild Meg and Wee Dickie. By
MARY EK. RopEs,

Grannie. By Evizaperu J. Lysagut.

The Seed She Sowed. By
EMMA LESLIE.

Unlucky: A Fragment of a
Ginl’s Life. By CAROLINE
AUSTIN.

Everybody’s Business: or,A
Friend in Need. By Ismay
THORN.

Tales of Daring and Dan-
ger. By G. A. HEN'ry.
The Seven Golden Keys. By

JAMES E. ARNOLD.

The Story of a Queen, By
Mary C, ROWSELL.

Edwy: or, Was he a Coward?
By ANNELTE LYSTER.

The Battlefield Treasure,
By F. BAYFORD HARRISON.

Joan’s Adventures at the
North Pole. By ALICE
CORKRAN.

Filled with Gold, By J. Prr-
RET.

Our General: A Story for
Girls. By ELIZABETH J.
LYSAGHT.

Aunt Hesba’s Charge. By
ELIZABETH J. LYSAGHT.

By Order of Queen Maude:
A Story of Home Life. By
Louisa Crow.

The Late Miss Hollingford.
By RosA MULHOLLAND.

Our Frank. By AMY WALTON.

A Terrible Coward. By G.
MANVILLE FENN.

Yarns on the Beach. By
G, A. HEN'TY.

Tom Finch’s Monkey.
HUTCHESON.

Miss Grantley’s Girls, and theStories
she Told Them. By THOS. ARCHER.

The Pedlar and his Dog. By MARY
C. ROWSELL.

Town Mice in the Country. By
M. E. FRANCIS.

Phil and his Father.
THORN. :

Prim’s Story.

By J. CG.

By IsMAY

By L. E, TIDDEMAN.

* *Also a large selection of Rewards at 1s., 9d., 6d., 3d., 2d., and Id, A
complete list will be sent post free on application to the Publishers.
32 BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



_BLACKIE’S”
SCHOOL AND HOME LIBRARY.

Under the above title the publishers have arranged to: issue, for
School Libraries and the Home Circle, a selection of the best and most
interesting books in the English language. The Library includes lives
ances ancient and modern, records of travel and adventure by sea
and land, fiction of the highest class, historical romances,
natural history, and tales of domestic life.

The greatest care lias been devoted to the get-up of the Library.
The volumes are clearly printed on good paper, and the binding made
specially durable, to withstand the wear and tear to which well-citcu-
lated books are necessarily subjected.

books of

In crown Svo volumes.

Dana’s Two Years before the Mast.
Southey’s Life of Nelson.
Waterton’sWanderingsinS.America.
Anson’s Voyage Round the World.
-Lamb’s Tales from Shakspeare.
Autobiographyof Benjamin Franklin.
Marryat’s Children of the New Forest.
Miss Mitford’s Our AMEE

Scott’s Talisman.

The Basket of Flowers.

Marryat’s Masterman Ready.
Alcott’s Little Women.

Cooper's Deerslayer,

Parry's Third Voyage.

Dickens’ Old Curiosity Shop. 2 vols.
Plutarch’s Lives of Greek Heroes.
The Lamplighter.

Cooper’s Pathfinder,

The Vicar of Wakefield.

White’s Natural History of Selborne.
Scott’s Ivanhoe. 2 vols.

Michael Scott’s Tom Cringle’s Log.
Irving’s Conquest of Granada. 2 vols.

Strongly bound in imperial cloth.



Price 1s. ga. each.

Lives of Drake and Cavendish.

Michael Scott’s Cruise of the Midge.

Edgeworth’s Moral Tales.

Passages in the Life of a Galley-Slave.

The Snowstorm. By Mrs. Gore.

Life of Dampier.

Marryat’s The Settlers in Canada.

Martineau’'s Feats on the Fiord.

Marryat’s Poor Jack,

The Good Governess. By
Edgeworth.

Northanger Abbey. By Jane Austen.

The Log Book of a Midshipman.

Autobiographies of Boyhood.

Holiday House. By Catherine Sinclair.

Wreck of the ‘‘Wager”’.

What Katy Did. By Miss Coolidge.

What Katy Did at School. By Do.

Scott’s Life of Napoleon.

Essays on English History. By Lord
Macaulay.

The Rifle Rangers. By Captain Mayne
Reid.

Maria

‘The Library is one of the most intelligent enterprises in connection with

juvenile literature of recent years.

A glance at the list proves that

the editing is in the hands of some one who understands the likings of

healthy boys and girls.

existence.’’"—Bookman.

One of the healthiest juvenile libraries in

Detailed Prospectus and Press Opinions will be sent post free on Application.

LONDON:
BLACKIE & SON, Limirep, 50 OLD BAILEY, E.C.

, Gis % ff: ‘ 3
LShHETOE