Citation
The pilot of the Mayflower

Material Information

Title:
The pilot of the Mayflower a tale of the children of the pilgrim republic
Series Title:
Creators of liberty series
Creator:
Butterworth, Hezekiah, 1839-1905
D. Appleton and Company
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
D. Appleton and Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
viii, [1], 248, [6] p., [12] leaves of plates : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Pilgrims (New Plymouth Colony) -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Pilots and pilotage -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Frontier and pioneer life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Indians of North America -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Ships -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sailors -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Seafaring life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Determination (Personality trait) -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Imagination -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Liberty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Tales -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
History -- Fiction -- Massachusetts -- New Plymouth, 1620-1691 ( lcsh )
Colonies -- Juvenile fiction -- Great Britain -- America ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
Children's literature ( fast )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Pictorial front cover and spine.
General Note:
Engraved title page.
General Note:
Contains prose and verse.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements precede and follow text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Hezekiah Butterworth ; with illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026616947 ( ALEPH )
ALG3461 ( NOTIS )
03786436 ( OCLC )
98000006 ( LCCN )

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Full Text


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+- THE PILOT OF +
THE MAYFLOWER

BY
HEZEKIAH: ee

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THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER

A TALE OF THE CHILDREN
OF THE PILGRIM REPUBLIC



Books by Hezekiah Butterworth.

UNIFORM EDITION. EACH, 12Mo0, CLOTH, $1.50.

‘
True to his Home. 4 Zale of the Boyhood of Franklin,
Illustrated by H. WINTHROP PEIRCE.

“Mr. Butterworth’s charming and suggestive story presents the most inter-
esting and picturesque episodes in the home life of Franklin, as well as a narra-
tive of the salient phases of his public life. The author has succeeded most
happily in carrying out his plan of “story-telling education”’ based on Froe-
bel’s principle that “life must be taught from life.”

The Wampum}; or, The Fairest Page of History. A Tale
of William Penn's Treaty with the (ndians. Mlustrated by
H. WINTHROP PEIRCE.

‘Historic truth is the foundation of all the incidents in this finely written,
instructive, and wholly charming book. The personality and character of
William Penn are most admirably treated, and his figure looms up to its noble
proportions in the historic perspective.” —Phzladelphia Press.

The Knight of Liberty. .4 Tale of the Fortunes of La-
Jayette, With 6 full-page Illustrations,

“No better reading for the young man can be imagined than this fascinat-
ing narrative of a noble figure on the canvas of time.” — Boston Traveler.

The Patriot Schoolmaster; or, The Adventures of the
Two Boston Cannon, the ‘\Adams” and the ‘‘ Hancock.” A
Tale of the Minutemen and the Sons of Liberty. With Illus-
trations by H. WINTHROP PEIRCE,

The true spirit of the leaders in our War for Independence is pictured in
this dramatic story. It includes the Boston ‘Tea Party and Bunker Hill; and
Adams, Hancock, Revere, and the boys who bearded General Gage, are living
characters in this romance of American patriotism,

The Boys of Greenway Court. 4 svory of the Early
Years of Washington. With 1c full-page Illustrations by H.
WINTHROP PEIRCE,

“ Skillfully combining fact and fiction, he has given us a story historically
instructive and at the same time entertaining.” —Boston Transcript.

In the Boyhood of Lincoln, 4 Story of the Black Hawk
War and the Tunker Schoolmaster. With 12 full-page Illus-
trations and colored Frontispiece.

“‘The author presents facts in a most attractive framework of fiction, and
imbues the whole with his peculiar humor. The illustrations are numerous and
of more than usual excellence.” —New Haven Falladium.

The Log School-House on the Columbia. with 13
full-page Illustrations by J. CARTER BEARD, E. J. AUSTEN,
and Others.

“This book will charm all who turn its pages. There are few books of
popular information concerning the pioneers of the great Northwest, and this
one is worthy of sincere praise.”— Seattle Post-Intelligencer.

New York: D. APPLETON & CoMPANY, 72 Fifth Avenue,





HN inthrob Peirce,

The pilot telling the story of Hudson.
(See page 59.)



THE PILOT
OF THE MAYFLOWER

A Tale of the Children
of the Pilgrim Republic

BY
HEZEKIAH BUTTERWORTH

AUTHOR OF TRUE TO HIS HOME, THE WAMPUM BELT, ETC.

ILLUSTRATED



NEW YORK
D. APPLETON AND COMPANY
1898



CopryricHt, 1898,
By D. APPLETON AND COMPANY.





Sword, pot, and platter of Miles Standish.

PREFACE.

_ Tus volume, the eighth of the Creators of Liberty
Series, although it should really have been the first, is for
the most part but fact in picture. The voyage of the May-
flower is one of the most important events in the history of
the New World, and the writer has sought to bring into his
narrative all the known incidents that took place on the
ship during this voyage, which brought our own Argonauts
to our shores. While the methods of fiction have been em-
ployed in the story, they have not departed from the his-
torical spirit. As a method of fiction, the good pilot of the
Mayflower has been made a story-teller, but his stories are
substantially true. The incident of the jackscrew and the
service that it rendered, and that of the copper chain, so far
as such a chain became a gift from the Pilgrims to Massa-
soit, and was made by that chief a sign of peace in his rela-
tions to the colony, were suggested by the Pilgrims’ own
records. The decision of all the Pilgrims who survived the

great sickness not to return with the Mayflower, but to
Vv





vi THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

struggle on for the cause of human liberty, is one of the
noblest examples of moral heroism, and the first Thanks-
giving in the colony, with Massasoit for a guest, closes in
a picturesque way the narrative of the decisive part of a
history which will ever be sacred to America and the Eng-
lish race. These events it has been our aim to present in
pen picture.

The other volumes of this series of books have been suc-
cessful in finding a large audience of young readers, for
which the writer is grateful. The story of the children of
the Mayflower is a haunting theme. He has sought to
make this interpretation of the life of the young Pilgrims
of the Mayflower the best of the series, and he will be glad
if it should awaken an interest to study the Pilgrims’ litera-
ture in those original documents that are now placed within
the reach of all.

It was a Greek adage that “ A people are known by the
heroes they crown.” It is true of our own land. The Pil-
grim Fathers followed the faith of Columbus in moral
enterprise. They stood firm in the storms that would have
wrecked common lives, and have added their names to those
who walked by faith in the great and decisive events of

human history.
H. B.

28 WorcESsTER STREET, Boston, Mass.



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER : PAGE
I.—THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS . : : , . ; 1
II.—T#E BOYS AND THE JACKSCREW . : ‘ a : poaeolet
III.—* By Anava River” . , ‘ . , , ~ 18
IV.—THE PILOT AND THE LITTLE PILGRIMS,—THE STORY OF
THE CAPTIVE INDIAN TUSQUANTO . ; ; 5 . it
V.—EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER . . 2 : , . 89
VI.—THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL . ‘ : eae . 46
VII.—THE TALE or Henry Hupson . ; 3 ; 5 . 56

VIII.—THE voraGE oF THE MAYFLOWER.—*‘ A MAN OVERBOARD” 695
IX.—Tue MayrLowEerR aT sEA—A LEAK.—“ BEAR HARD TO

THE WEST” . ‘ . ; 6 . : 5 eee
X.—THE LEGENDARY SWORD ; % , : 5 6 . 80
XI.—THE coMPACT OF THE MAYFLOWER . 5 : 8)
XII.—THE FIRST DISCOVERY . , . : naeeeas : ao
XIII.—Pitot Coprrn’s SECOND STORY . : : : : . 106
XIV.—KipnapPepD InpIANS.—“ OUR PILOT” . 3 . a . 116
XV.—THE MAN WHO GAVE UP ALL.—THE GOLDEN CHAIN . . 124
- XVI—THE ROCK or FaITH . 3 . : : : : . 1380
XVII.—ELDER BREWSTER’S LOOKING-GLASS . : : 5 . 189
XVIII—In THE woops .. : : Bees j : : . 1538
XIX.—THE THATCH GATHERERS.—HERO, THE MASTIFF OF THE
MAYFLOWER.—A NIGHT UNDER-A TREE . ; 0 . 158
XX.—Inprans : f : A 5 ; 3 , : . 165
XXI.—Tue INDIAN MILL.—A CURIOUS EVENT 5 ; ; . 173



ait THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

CHAPTER i PAGE
XXII.—Massaso1t.—THE COPPER CHAIN 5 nears . . 184
XXIJII.—Deraty or ELLEN More. : 5 : 4 . 195
XXIV.—THE DEPARTURE OF THE MAYFLOWER ‘ ; : . 2038
XXV.—Losr. , ; . . : 6 3 : : . 210
XXVI.—TuHE Waite Foot Kine . ; , 5 ‘ : . 220
XXVII.—THE COPPER CHAIN AGAIN . % 0 5 5 . 229
XXVIII.—Tue First THANKSGIVING . 2 s ‘ : . 2384
XXIX.—“GoopD CHEER!” . : A 7 : : ; ; . 240
APPENDIX.
Tue PLYMOUTH OF TO-DAY .- . ‘ , ; 7 i : . 244
THE LANDING OF THE PILGRIMS . earns 5 : : : . 246
Compact Day. , : 5 , 6 a p , , a . 248



Elder Brewster’s chair and cradle of Peregrine White, Pilgrim Hall. |





Governor Carver’s chair and ancient aninnine wheel’ Pilgrim Hall.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

FACING
PAGE
The pilot telling the story of Hudson . . .~ Frontispiece
The embarkation of the Pilgrims ; : 25
From the picture by Robert Weir, in the ee at Washington.
The departure from Delftshaven 42
From the painting by Charles Lucy.
Reading the compact in the Mayflower’s cabin 90
The Mayflower in Plymouth harbor . 105
From the painting by William F. Halsall.
Plymouth Rock 131
The canopy under which Plymouth Rock is now preserved . 186
The landing of the Pilgrims 149
From the painting by Henry Sargent.
The fort and meeting-house, 1621 170
View of Leyden Street, Plymouth colony . 185
The return of the lost boy . 216
National Monument to the Forefathers 244







Pilgrim Hall, Plymouth.

THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

CHAPTER I.

THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS.

“Bravtirut Leyden! ”

It was a rugged Scottish sailor who ae He had been
a fisherman on the coasts of New England and the Banks of
Newfoundland. He was among the few sailors that had
ever seen these mysterious coasts, for the time was the spring
of 1620. He was held to be a wonderful man in those re-
markable times, for he had seen American Indians.

A man who had seen American Indians before 1620
never wanted companionship. These Indians were to the
Europeans the children of Nature, about eo every one



2. THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

wished to hear. Columbus had awakened a strange and
vivid curiosity in the dusky race, as he had presented to
Isabella the bejeweled Caribs, with splendid figures and
strong arms holding aloft gorgeous birds, on the occasion of
the festival at Santa Fé in honor of the discovery of the
New World. Captain John Smith had thrilled England
with Indian tales, to which was added the sylvan romance
of Pocahontas, who had died at Gravesend in 1617, a con-
vert to the Christian faith and the wife of a gallant English-
man.

These were times before De Foe and his nursery-haunt-
ing narrative of Robinson Crusoe, but all men who had seen
Indians were like De Foes in the public eye.

Delightful as were such sea adventurers, traders, and
fishermen to men and women, they were as giants in the
imagination of the children. What child had not heard of
the lovely Pocahontas, of how she stayed the war club, and
of her marriage amiid the English hedgerows?

Sebastian Cabot, in 1502, had brought three Indians
from Newfoundland to England, and had presented them
to Henry VII. They were the first Indians ever seen in
England. What were their names? We do not know.
What became of them? We do not know, but this we are
pleased to know, that they filled England with wonder.
We are told that when they were found in America they
were clothed with skins of beasts and lived on raw flesh,
“but that, after two years’ residence in England, they were



THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS. 3

seen in the king’s court clothed like Englishmen.” And
this was in those far, wise days of Henry VII, nearly one
hundred years before the Pilgrim Fathers began their wan-
derings.

In 1576 Captain Martin Frobisher brought to England
an Indian whose history was more strange than romantic.
He had attracted him to his ship by the ringing of a bell,
and so seized him, canoe and all. The savage retained his
native fierceness, and we are told that he inflicted terrible
injuries upon himself, not being able to injure others. He
died of England’s cold. There were hearts that pitied him,
both for his sufferings and for the injustice that had been
done him.

The Scottish sailor whom we introduced to the reader
with the words “ Beautiful Leyden” was approaching the
quaint Holland city on a very remarkable undertaking. He
was to pilot the Pilgrim Fathers, or the younger part of the
exiled church of J ohn Robinson, from Leyden to Southamp-
ton, and thence to the New World, where he had been be-
fore, and had seen Indians.

His name was Robert Coppin, a hardy, simple, true-
hearted Scotchman, and his services had been secured in
England by one Thomas Nash, who was bringing him to
Leyden to meet the Pilgrims, then preparing to cross the sea.

“Our pilot,” they came to call him, and there is such
tenderness and significance in the words that we must use
him for the character by which to interpret the life of the



4 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

children of the Pilgrims on board the Speedwell, the May-
flower, on the smooth, pleasant waters of the early part of
the voyage that changed the history of mankind, on the bil-
lows of the storms that followed, and then among the In-
dians on the rude and wintry New England coast. “ Our
pilot ” has a friendly sound, and this pilot had a kindly
heart.

Robert Coppin, “ our pilot,” might well exclaim “ Beau-
tiful Leyden!” He had seen many cities in his day, but
never one like this on the borders of the old Rhine. Leyden
was the oldest city in Holland; here were the ruins of a for-
tress founded before Christ; here was a city of heroes.

When it had been besieged by the Spaniards, the Prince
of Orange had broken the dikes and let in the sea.

Then the prince said to the people:

“As a compensation for your losses I will remit your
taxes or build you a university. Which shall it be?”

The people chose the university. It stood there now,
with its roofs glimmering over the canals and above the
lime trees.

The people had chosen well; some of the greatest schol-
ars of Europe are associated with the University of Leyden.

Robert Coppin, the pilot, who had seen Indians, drifted
up one of the canals under the lime trees. The spring was
waning; the trees were filled with song birds and the gardens
with flowers.

“Thomas Nash,” said the merry sailor, “why do the



THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS. 5

Separatists wish to leave this goodly place? Why do they
not remain here?”

He saw the. church, the tiled roofs, the pleasant gables
and open lattices, and the long lines of water streets or canals.

“ There are not many towns like this,” he added. “One
could stay here forever, if his soul were only content.”

“But the souls of these people are not content.”

“Why, why, Thomas Nash? Have they not liberty?”
asked our pilot.

Some children came down to the landing under the
lime trees. Among them was Ellen More, who had
found a home in the family of Edward Winslow, and
who was to become a little Pilgrim on the Mayflower by
and by.

“Yes,” said Thomas Nash, “ they have liberty, but they
fear that it will not last. Yonder is the common cause of the
discontent.”

“What—the children?”

“Yes, the children. The Separatists wish to found a
home where their children can enjoy religious freedom and
be educated. Go with me to their meetings and you shall
hear.”

They landed under the lime trees.

The Scottish seaman felt a little touch on his hand.

He looked down into a child’s face. It was a beautiful
face, amid waving hair.

“What is your name, my girl?”



6 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“ Ellen More.”

“Do you belong to the Brownites?” The Brownites
were a sect of dissenters.

“Elizabeth Winslow keeps me, sir. She is not my own
mother, but she is a good, good mother to me. May I ask
you something, sir?”

“ Aye, aye—ask on; prattle like yours always holds me.
What is it you would know?”

“ Are you a pilot, sir?”

“ Aye, aye.”

“ Are you to be our pilot, sir?”

“ Aye, aye; and I'll pilot true such girls as you, and
I would die for such a crew. You see I can talk in
rhymes.”

“ And mother Elizabeth said that you had seen Indians.
Will you tell us children all about what you saw in New
England some day, sir?”

“ Aye, aye, my pet; some day—my heart hogs you to
think of it—some day, some day, when I am off duty upon
the open sea. I have heard of your foster father before,”
he added. “Edward Winslow; he has been a great trav-
eler. He is rich, and he is much esteemed, and he is going
to leave this beautiful city, and all, and take you with him,
my pet. Oh, this is a beautiful world; and God is good,
Vm thinking, but men’s hearts are hard. I will tell you
about the Indian that I saw some day.”

“ And you will tell all the children, sir?”



THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS. q

“Yes, yes, you great little heart, all. How many will
there be of you?”

“Twelve little ones, and as many young folks, I heard
mother Elizabeth say.”

“ That is quite a company of children and young people.”

“But you are to be our pilot.”

“T must go now—methinks such as you ought to have a
better pilot than I. And you have, though I am a rough man
that says it—you have, you have. Such as you have a
Pilot that the eye does not see.”

He left the canoe and followed Thomas Nash to the
house of John Robinson, the pastor of the church in Leyden.
The place where the goodly man’s house stood is still marked
in Leyden. It is near the great church, which is also in-
scribed, the tablets being the gifts of grateful sons of the
Pilgrims in America.

Then Robert Coppin, our pilot, stood face to face with
this aged man, the prophet of America, who was to build
beyond the seas, but never to go to the new colony that he
had builded.

There was to be a gathering of the exiles in that house
that day. The pilot would hear what these people had to
say, and then he would better understand their case and
cause. Perhaps he would meet there again the sweet face
of Ellen More, if the Winslows should come to the meeting.
He hoped he would, for he was a lonely man, and the child’s
touch mag ade him very happy.



8 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

There are people that it is a blessing for a lonely heart
to know, and little Ellen More, to whom Edward Winslow
had given a home, was one of them.

The little girl came to the meeting as the pilot had
hoped. She was led by the hand of a lovely lady, Mistress
Elizabeth Winslow. é

After the religious exercises were over, Pastor John Rob-
inson said: “ Our pilot is here, a lusty Scotchman whom we
are glad to welcome. He brings to us a letter from Robert
Cushman, our English agent. This letter I will read.”

He read the letter, which stated that the Mayflower, a
ship of one hundred and eighty tons, Thomas Jones master,
would soon leave London for Southampton, and take there
a company of English immigrants, who would sail in her to
the Hudson River.

The Mayflower! It was probably the first time that
John Robinson’s people heard the name! It was to be a
ship of destiny, the winged messenger of heaven to the west-
ern world!

The people listened to the tidings with intense in-
terest.

“But,” said John Robinson, “this is not the most im-
portant information to us now and here that our good Scotch
pilot has brought. The letter further says that a sixty-ton
pinnace, the Speedwell, has been purchased by the Adven-
turers, our company, and that she is to be fitted out here in
Holland, and that she is to take you to Southampton, and to



- THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS. 9

go with the Mayflower to the new country, and is to remain
there for a year. I will read you this part of the letter.”

There was silence as he read this part of the letter which
so concerned the pastor’s congregation. He then said pleas-
antly: “Our pilot here has seen the New World, and he may
be able to tell us what we need most to carry. Speak out,
Robert Coppin, our people have eager ears to hear you! ”

Robert Coppin, “ our pilot,” holding his hat in his hand,
bowed low and said:

“ May it please your reverence and your honors, if I may
thus address you, who do not desire titles or any flattering
words, the best things that you can carry, which you do not
now have, are, in my humble opinion, presents for the In-
dian chiefs.”

“That is a good thought,” said Edward Winslow, who
had traveled much, and had read the letter of Sir Walter
Raleigh and other adventurers in the New World. “A

very good thought, Master Coppin; and may I ask what’

trifles most please the Indians on these new coasts? ”
“ Chains for the neck,”’ said he, “ and belts for the waist.

The Indians wear chains made of shells. Free chains among:
these people are emblems of dignity and power.
that holds a treasure that can lie upon the breast is Nery,
highly esteemed by the lords of the forest.”

“But,” said Mr. Winslow, “we would hardly be able to
carry to them gold or silver chains.”

“A copper chain with a medal would do as well,” said







10 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

the pilot. “You can buy such chains at the shops in the
town.”

Little Ellen More’s eyes danced. “A copper chain with
a medal for a chief,” said she to her foster mother, Elizabeth
Winslow, when the two had gone out upon the street. “TI
wish that I had such a chain.”

Our pilot had joined Mistress Elizabeth Winslow and
Ellen, and had heard what Ellen had said.

“T will buy you a copper chain and medal if your mother |

is willing, little girl,” said he.

“May I carry it over the sea?”

“Tf the mistress wills.”

“ And give it to an Indian chief?”

“Tf she so wills.’ The answer made light the steps of
the girl.

They came to a shop where jewels, rings, and chains
with medals of Holland were sold, and our pilot asked them
to enter the place. He there purchased a copper chain with
a medal, and put it over Ellen’s neck.

“See,” said he, “it reaches nearly to the floor. “ But
an Indian is tall and big.”

“You are very kind to my little girl,” said Elizabeth
Winslow. “I am glad indeed that we are to have you for
our pilot. I love them that love children; such people are
true friends to all men, and I can read your heart.”

The pilot wondered if indeed the copper chain would
ever find an Indian chief.



\
|
|





CHAPTER II.
THE BOYS AND THE JACKSCREW.

In the houses in the neighborhood many of the people
were preparing their goods or effects for removal to the
quay where lay the ship that was to take them to Southamp-
ton and thence across the sea, three thousand miles wide, to a
wilderness as wide as the sea.

The immigrants had sold most of their household prop-
erty, but each had retained something that he wished to take
to the new land. This one had a chair that he wished to
keep; that one a stand or table with sacred associations.
Elder Brewster had a chest and a looking-glass. The chest
is still to be seen in Pilgrim Hall, Plymouth; America’s
“ Ark of the Covenant” it came to be, on account of the
purpose to which it was put on the last days of the voyage
of the Mayflower. Of this we will tell you the story in
its place. The looking-glass which, with Elder Brewster’s
Bible, may still be seen at Plymton, near Plymouth, in an
ancient Brewster house, is perhaps the most precious of all
American mirrors. Into it all of the Pilgrim fathers and
mothers may have looked, including Robinson of Leyden,
their old pastor, who expected to follow then when the



12 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

younger members of the church should have planted their
church in the wilderness, but who was called to make another
pilgrimage from which none return.

Every one seemed to wish to take on board the little ship
more articles than it could be allowed to carry.

As soon as it became known that the pilot had come and
was at the house of the Pilgrim pastor, the boys and young
men began to gather there to meet him. They wished to
see a man who had been to the land whither they were going.
Among the boys was Jasper More, a brother of little Ellen
More, of the Winslow family. Love Brewster and Wrastle
Brewster, sons of the amiable Elder Brewster, as also John
Billington and John Hooke, a servant in the Allerton
family.

At last the day before that set for the departure came.
The children gathered with the others at Robinson’s house.

They were a merry group on this serious day. John
Robinson seems to have loved young people, and to have won
them as a common father. They appealed to him when in

doubt, and he decided their cases with a sympathetic heart. .

A friend of mankind is always the children’s friend.
Two of the boys and a carpenter came bringing a jack-
screw. They wished to take it on board the ship. The

boys were carrying the screw, and the carpenter was follow- .

ing them.
“That is a curious instrument that you have there, my
friend,” said Elder Robinson to the carpenter. “It is not



THE BOYS AND THE JACKSCREW. 13

great for size, but they tell me that there is power in it,”
looking toward the pilot.

“ Aye, aye, sir, that there is. There has been many a
ship saved from wreckage by a jackscrew. Are you going
to take it on board?”

“That is what I would do,” said the carpenter. “ But
they say that we are in danger of overloading the ship with
storage, that nothing more must go on board of the barges
which are to take us to the ship—not so much as an axe or
hatchet. That instrument might prove very much of serv-
ice in case of a strain on the ship during the voyage.”

“Which may Heaven prevent,” said good Elder Robin-
son. “It is the duty of people to live where they can do the
most good, and carry with them where they go the things
that will be most useful. I am not the captain of the ship,
but if I were I would admit the jackscrew.”

“But, my good man,” said Coppin, “ may it please you,
Tam to be the pilot and so one of the mates, and I know the
value of a jackscrew. We may see hard weather before we
reach the American coast. I will take it on board; the
captain will not object to that. It is small baggage that i
will have to carry.”

One of the boys shouted—* Our pilot! ”

“ Aye, aye, boys; it is good hearts that ye have to say
that. Put down the jackscrew under the trees, until after
the meeting has been held, and I will see that it is taken
on board the ship from the barges. I am to be pilot of



14 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

this goodly company, thank Heaven, and to do your bid-
ding.”

“Our pilot!” said the boys. They all felt that there
was something in the Scotchman’s heart to trust.

“T am glad, my boys, of all this good will. I have seen
the shores on which you are going to settle. I am going
with you, and my heart as well as my hand shall be true
toyou. I wish that I were going to share your lot, but that
will never be the fate of Robert Coppin, the sailor and
fisherman; he must follow the sea, he must follow the
sea!”

“You have seen the Indians,” said Jasper More.

“ Aye, aye; I have seen a forest king in all of his wam-
pum and feathers, with his bow and quiver, and his lusty
men.”

“Will they harm us where we settle?” asked Love
Brewster.

“No, no, I mind not, or they would not have done so
if the captains on the coast had not stolen some of them and
carried them away.”

“Will you tell us about those stolen Indians?” asked
Wrastle Brewster.

“ Aye, aye, my lads, some day, some pleasant day on the
sea. The people are gathering now, and Elder Brewster de-
sires me to stay to this godly meeting.”

“Yes, yes, my good sailor,” said the elder, “I wish you
to stay that you may see what a precious freight you are to



THE BOYS AND THE JACKSCREW. 15

pilot to the unknown shore. Men’s hearts are more than
any gold that they can possess, and it is the worth that is in-

‘visible that determines the destinies of men. It is the elect ~

of time that you are to meet to-day, sir, and to pilot into
the empty world where Heaven has opened the gate of op-
portunity. I like you well, sir, I like you well. But no more
now; the people are coming, and this is our last day to-
gether here! ”

Robert Coppin bowed his head.

The boys took off their hats and shouted again: “ Our
pilot! ”

The Scotchman watched the people as they gathered.
How noble and yet how simple they looked! Captain
Carver and his wife; William Brewster, the deacon, and
Mistress Brewster; Edward Winslow and Mistress Winslow,
and beautiful little Ellen More; William Bradford and Mis-
tress Bradford; Isaac Allerton and his family; Captain
Miles Standish and Rose Standish; William Mullins, his
wife, and the afterward historic Priscilla, then a Puritan
girl; the Hopkinsons; the Billingtons; the Tilleys; the Chil-
tons; and John Alden, who was one day to marry Priscilla.
Many were young people. Their dress was simple; they
wore the crown of character. They had dwelt together in
Leyden in love and unity for nearly twelve years—pilgrims,
led by an invisible hand.

He watched them there as they came toward the house
through the sunny streets cooled by the lime trees. It was



16 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER. |

a silent throng—as still as the placid canals. Some of the
women were weeping.

He saw the children as they came. Pastor Robinson
was to speak especially of the children and to them that
day. Ellen More and her brother Jasper had already inter-
ested him, and his heart went out in pitying love to them
because they were dependent on others, and in a sense
alone in the world. He could feel for broken families and
be as arms, heart, and guidance to such, for such was his
nature.

The sun rose high over the canals and the lime trees.
The storks sat listlessly on the chimneys and gables. The
black flat-bottomed boats lay idling on the waters. In the
square students in dark habits passed thoughtfully to and
fro. Leyden is beautiful now; it was so in 1620.

Why were these people going out of these serene streets
on the Rhine across an uncertain sea into a wilderness of
savages, wild beasts, and tangled trees? Why? why? the
pilot asked as he stood there and wondered. ?

There was not a church, a school, a roof in all the land
to which they were going. Nota single road. The blazed
trail of the red hunter was there; the frail tent of bark and
skins. Not a library was there on all the shining shores.
The forest lords knew not their own history. They were
probably the descendants of some wandering Asiatic race.
Their gods were the beings of a rude imagination. They
had not the vices of the old nations, but to shed blood was



THE BOYS AND THE JACKSCREW. 17

their glory, and revenge was the sweetest passion of life.
The race that seeks blood will perish.

Why? why?

The people had assembled now in the great room. He
would go in and stand by the door, holding his hat in his
hand. He would hear what the grave and gentle pastor had
tosay. This was to be the good man’s last discourse. He
would listen intently. The pastor should answer the ques-
tions that kept rising in his mind on this late midsummer
day, amid the beautiful serenity that ends in the low Rhine
lands the last shortening days of July.

What will the pastor say? He will at least tell his peo-
ple, his young people, why he wills them to go.

The young people all bent a friendly look on the pilot as
they passed into the room. The children sat so that they
could look upon him, as he stood there with his bowed head,
hat in hand. He had seen many strange seas—the Spanish
Main, the island of Newfoundland. They had been told
this; and he had seen a red Indian king.



CHAPTER III.
“BY AHAVA RIVER.”

Tue room was still. The occasional sob of a woman
caused the children’s faces to wear a look of sympathy and
wonder. One woman spoke aloud to another who was deaf,
breaking the silence. She, said, “Not one of us will ever
see this place again, not one! ”’

John Robinson arose, bowed his head in silence, and then
read Luther’s version of Psalm OC, which the company sung.

The house had very large rooms, and a garden which was
a kind of park and now blowing with flowers. In Robinson’s
garden were some twenty or more cabins, and here the poor
people lived. His congregation worshiped in his house, and
the place where this socialistic community dwelt in wonder-
ful harmony and love is now marked with the beautiful in-
scription:

“ON THIS SPOT LIVED, TAUGHT, AND DIED,
Joun Rosrinson, 1611-1625.”

Robinson’s congregation must have numbered some five
hundred. The Dutch came to love this wandering church,
and gathered about the doors of the church, home, and

garden.
18



“BY AHAVA RIVER.” 19

Such people were gathering now, and a whisper went
round that it was the pilot who was standing hat in hand in
the door.

“Tt is sorry that we are that they are going,” said a
rugged Hollander to the pilot in English. “It is kind
hearts that they have, ‘and there is never one of them but
pays his debts. They all know the meaning of the text,
‘Owe no man anything’; ah, they do speak the truth and
pay their debts, but they dispute about doctrines, much is
the pity, I think. What have you here outside? ”

The pilot looked down on the blooming grass, and saw it
was the jackscrew to which the Hollander alluded.

“Tt is a tool that I am going to put on board the boats
that go to the ship as soon as the meeting is over,” said the
pilot. ;

Here the pastor arose again and spread out his hands.
How holy and noble he looked! There were tears in his
eyes, but his face glowed.

“ Here,” said the Hollander to the pilot, “take it away.”

“What, my friend?” asked the pilot.

“That jackscrew; it is out of harmony with the place;
this is a spot where one should take off his shoes, I mind;
and that thing looks like a trespasser—a sinner, it is a world-
ly thing—let me take it out into the garden.”

“Your spiritual sense is keen indeed, my friend,” said
the pilot.

The old Dutchman took the jackscrew and carried it into



90 THE PILOT OF THE. MAYFLOWER.

the garden and set it down amid the flowers, then took it up
again and left it among some weeds, “ where it belonged,”
as he said as he came back and looked into the door again.

John Robinson prayed. The prayer seemed to rise into
the regions of spiritual mystery, and the reverent old Hol-
lander listened as though a very prophet was speaking.

Then the pastor uttered the strange words “By the
River Ahava.”

The pilot listened.

What did it mean? He had never heard of that river be-
fore; in all of his sailings and wanderings he had not
found it.

Then Robinson repeated an ancient record from sacred
Hebrew history:

“And there at the river by Ahava, I proclaimed a fast,
that we might humble ourselves before God, and seek a right
way for us, and for our children, and all our substance.”

He related the Hebrew story that had left this simple
record. He preached from each clause, but when he came
to speak on the clause “and for our children” the room
was silent, and the pilot stepped within the door. Robert
Coppin saw that the pastor had made in his interpretation
the Zuyder Zee a River Ahava, and that “our children ”
were a cause of the event of this memorable day.

“Why do you venture upon the ocean,” said Robinson
in substance, “to find a home in an unknown land? This is
a pleasant place, amid the lime trees, the canals, the sea



“BY AHAVA RIVER,” OL

meadows, the ancient homes, and the towers of learning ‘and
the spires of faith? Why do you leave the pleasant lands of
the vineyards of the Rhine? Children, hear me; ye young
people whom I have so much loved, and shall always love,
listen to me; ’tis the last time that I shall open to you my
heart.

“Tt is for your sakes that the boats that are to bear you to
the Speedwell will sail in the cool of the day.

“Tt is England that has caused you to go into exile, but
her blood flows in our veins; we love her history, her name,
and we must remain Englishmen. In Holland, by the pleas-
ant sea, you are losing your language. This must not be.
The language of old England, of the heroes of faith, of the
homes of our fathers, must be kept sacred. It will be so in
the wilderness.

“You are changing in character here. The habits of a
city of luxury are taking away your strength of soul. Your
faith must be kept pure; wealth is nothing, fame is nothing,
character is all.

“You must be educated; all of you must be educated
in the free air of faith. There must be planted for you in
the wilderness a place where education shall be free.

“ My children, I may never be able to follow you into the
wilderness. It matters not. Your parents may suffer—it
matters not, if so be it is Heaven’s will. It matters not if you
can be educated for a higher life of the freedom of the faith
that the suffering world waits.



99 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“Go forth, go forth, prisoners of hope. All light has
not yet been revealed. New light will break forth from the
world in the wilderness. Some minds can go as far as
Luther, some as far as Calvin, some can see truth in very
vision, but do you not resist new truth, and you must only
follow me as far as I follow the truth of Christ! ”

The pilot saw, as it were, the serene pastor’s soul. The
purpose of the pilgrims was now clear to him. They were
to face the perils of the world, of the seas, and the wilderness,
not for themselves, but for their children; not for their own
comfort, but for the comfort of those who were to come after
them. They loved welfare more than wealth, and others
more than themselves.

Many of them had become poor for this purpose of the
help of mankind. They were not going to seek for riches,
they were leaving worldly riches behind. They had turned
their backs on ease and comfort and the hopes of peace, all
of which might have been theirs.

‘When and where in all history was there ever an assem-
bly like this?

At the close of the discourse, the communion was admin-
istered to those who were to go and those who were to stay.
That scene is worthy of a painting.

Then they went out into the great garden, many of them
leading the children by the hand.

The pilot went out to find his jackscrew in the weeds
“where it belonged.” He took it up, and was about to



“BY AHAVA RIVER.” 23

make his way with it toward the barges that were to go down
the canals to the Speedwell, when he was met by a sea cap-
tain who had come up here from Delftshaven.

“They will all wish to come back again,” said the cap-
tain, in the hearing of the company.

“Pilot,” said Elder Brewster, “you have been to the
country; do you think that we shall ever wish to come back
again?” Roe

“Nay, nay,” said the pilot, “a man’s country is in his soul.
Nay, nay, not one of you will ever wish to come back.”

But the captain’s words echoed.

“ Shall we wish to return with you again, when the ship
lifts her wings for old England, I wonder?” said Elizabeth
Winslow. “O pilot, those words of the captain’s are a hawk
in the sky. What do you think?”

“Shall we wish to come back?” said Rose Standish,
echoing the dark prophecy.

“Nay, nay,” said the pilot. “Come back? Did you
ever hear a woman wish to return from any place where were
the best prospects for her children? Come back, come back?
No; it is prospects that make the heart happy. Present
hardship is nothing if the future is bright.”

“But the Israelites longed for the fleshpots of Egypt,”
said one who had heard what the captain had said.

“There are no Israelites of that kind here, please your
honor,” said the pilot. “The world grows better, else what
is the use a the world?”



94 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“Right, right you are,” said Parson Robinson. “ There
will never be an age when there will be not a better one to
come. The world will be better when we go out of it than
when we came into it, or it ought to be. Whatever happens
to this one or that, it matters not; it is the destiny of these
people to sail. God’s time has come. The sea may rage,
the savages of an unknown land may uplift their weapons
of war, but the time has come for the truth to make a new
nation of free men, who may own their souls, and found a
new nation in faith.”

The pilot turned away and went down to the boats that
were to take them to the Speedwell which lay at Delfts-
haven, some ten or more miles away.

Little Ellen More ran after him.

“© pilot, pilot, do you think that we will ever want to
come back again?”

“No, no, my little one, you will never come back again,”
? ? & ?
said the pilot.

His words were prophetic. Little Ellen More would
never come back.

Of their departure on that day of the glowing prophecy
of Robinson, and of the dark words of Captain Bradford, the
leader wrote a single sentence that might well be set in
gold. Were we to be asked what is the most beautiful
sentence in all history, we would say it was this:

“So they left that goodly and pleasant city which had
been their resting place near twelve years, but they knew





The embarkation of the Pilgrims.



“BY AHAVA RIVER.” 25

that they were pilgrims, and looked not much on those
things, but lifted up their eyes to the heavens, their dearest
country, and quieted their spirits.”

The words pictured Robinson’s own soul, which was the
sentiment of all.

That evening the company went on board the boats that
were to convey them to the Speedwell at Delftshaven; they
started for the ship early in the morning, and Robinson went
with them.

Some of the children wished to go in the boat with the
pilot, and they were allowed so to do. The older colonists
sought the boat of Robinson, Brewster, and Carver, that they
might talk with him as they went along the canal in the late
midsummer day.

The barges were moored near the Nan’s Bridge, oppo-
site the Klok-steeg, where Robinson’s house and garden
were.

They were to go by the way of the Vliet, as a part of the
canal between Leyden and Delft was called. They would
pass a water gate. After some nine miles on the Vliet they
would come to a city and wide canal called The Hague.
They would here find the still placid waters lined with noble
trees, and they would pass in view of Oud-Delft, and the Old
Kirk with its lancet windows, and perhaps in sight of the red-
tiled house in which William the Silent, the father of the
cause of liberty in the Netherlands, had thirty-six years be-
fore been assassinated. They would pass the gates of Delft,



26 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

and leave the town, and enter the Delftshaven Canal, at the
end of which their ship would appear.

The dikes were high in this part of the Low Countries,
and the tide was full, and they found themselves sailing
above the land. They may have stopped at Delft, and
probably did. If so, their journey lasted a large part of
the day.

And now they are upon the canals.

As they passed the gates of Delft, and beheld the slender
spire fading against the sky, Elizabeth Winslow called the
children around her, and pointed out to them the red gables
of the palace of William the Silent.

“Who was William the Silent?” asked litle Ellen More
of her foster mother.

“He was the defender of the liberties of the people of
Holland. Had he not been, it is probable that we should
never have found in that colony a home. For the sake of
liberty he broke the dikes of the sand dunes and let in the
sea. And the sea fought for Holland. He died a martyr,
and his last thoughts were for liberty.”

They were approaching the village of Overschie, and the
children asked Mistress Elizabeth to tell them the story of
the death of William in the cause of liberty, because of this
tragedy all the people had heard.

Mistress Elizabeth was not loth to speak of these things
with the fading town of Delft, that she would never see
more, still in view.



“BY AHAVA RIVER.” oT

THE STORY OF THE SILENT PRINCE.

“William,” she said, taking Ellen More in her arms,
“was a man of few words and wonderful wisdom in council.
So they called him William the Taciturn, or William the
Silent. He was bred to courts, and he lived in a very
splendid way; but when he espoused the cause of liberty he
sold his valuables and gave up all show and vainglory, and
was glad to live like one of the people. He announced him-
self a convert to the Holland faith, and asked to lead the
armies of the Netherlands in the cause of liberty.

“ His love for the cause of the liberty of the people grew,
until he thought and dreamed of nothing else. He felt that
Heaven had given this cause to him, and that he was invisi-
bly, as it were, in the little country of the dikes leading the
hopes of mankind.

“ The war for liberty was waged against Philip of Spain,
who claimed the country for the Spanish crown.

“William was sometimes successful and sometimes de-
feated in a long war, but.in 1579 he laid the foundation of
the Dutch Republic, and Holland and Zeeland proclaimed
him their Stadtholder.

“But Philip of Spain, enraged at the loss of the country
which he claimed as his hereditary right, offered twenty-five
thousand gold crowns for his head.

“Perilous days were his then. He went about his new
republic of freedom as a marked man. The town of Delft



28 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

was beset with mysterious men—ruffians, some of them, per-
haps, Spaniards in disguise, some Italians, all adventurers,
whose presence was suspected and feared.

“There was a little, thin, dark-minded man named Bal-
thazar Gerard, who appeared before the Prince of Parma, in
the interest of the Spanish king, and asked for money to go
to Delft as a pretended refugee. The money was refused,
but a councilor of the prince said to him: ‘Go forth and
defray your own expenses, and if you succeed the king
will reward you, and you shall make yourself an immortal
name.’

“ He came to Delft pretending to be a friend to William.
He obtained a commission to go to France, and there
was made a commissioner to bear dispatches to the Dutch
court, and was admitted into the presence of the prince.

“ When he met the prince with the dispatches he trem-
bled. He had come unarmed this time, and he had prepared
for no way of escape; but the prince’s door was open to him
now, and he would come again.

“On Sunday morning, as the bells were tolling, Bal-
thazar entered the courtyard.

“¢ What brings you here to-day?’ ted the sergeant of
the halberdiers.

“¢T would like to go to church across the way,’ said the
wily conspirator, ‘but see, I have only this travel-stained
attire, without fit shoes or hose.’

“The little dusty stranger with his pious.words did not



“BY AHAVA RIVER.” 99

excite the suspicion of the guard. The latter spoke to an
officer about the matter, and the officer probably asked the
prince for money that the messenger of France might be
able to appear at church decently.

“‘William’s heart responded to the appeal, and he fur-
nished Balthazar with the money for his own ruin.

“On Tuesday, July 10, 1584, the dinner hour was an-
nounced in the palace. The prince with his wife on his
arm, followed by the ladies and gentlemen of his family,
started to enter the dining room. The prince was dressed
like a plain man. He wore a beggar’s hat, a high ruff, and.
a loose surcoat of gray.

“ As he passed along the white face of a little man met
him in the doorway.

““T have come for my passport, prince,’ said the little
man.

“< Who is that?—what does he mean?’ asked the prin-
cess, noticing with alarm the pallor of the man’s face.

““ Merely a person who has come for a passport,’ said he.
‘Give him one,’ he said to his secretary.

“¢T never saw so villainous a face,’ said the princess to
William in an undertone.

“The company passed on to the tables. After the meal
William camé out into the vestibule, and began to ascend
the stairway, upon the left side of which was a recess. Sud-
denly there was a report of a Bee and the prince fell back,

exclaiming:



30 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“*OQ my God, have mercy upon my soul! O my God,
have mercy upon my poor people! ’

“His sister rushed toward him, and saw that he was
dying.

“¢To you commend your soul to Christ?’ she asked.

“<¢T do,’ he answered, and soon after expired in the arms
of his wife.

“ Balthazar had accomplished his purpose. He was cap-
tured and torn to pieces. This is a terrible tale for you to
hear, but if we should ever lay the foundation of a free
colony, and it should grow, we shall owe much to him who
perished for liberty under the red roofs of yonder palace.”

The children looked back. It was, as we may suppose,
near night now. Delft was fading.

The placid canal that led to the port was near. They
still had some miles to go. We can not be sure of the time,
but we will suppose it to be near nightfall when the barges
drifted into the last canal.

“That is a hard story, little Ellen More,” said our pilot,
“but you should know what liberty costs.”

“The Indians could not do a more terrible thing than
that,” said she. And she added: “ The great chief will be
good .to us, for we will give him the copper chain.”



CHAPTER IV.

THE PILOT AND THE LITTLE PILGRIMS.—THE STORY OF THE
CAPTIVE INDIAN TUSQUANTO.

In the long summer twilight and evening the Pilgrims
drifted along the still waters of the canal between Delft and
Delftshaven, which is now as it was then. The water runs
on a level with the wide green plain, on which flocks and
herds grazed then as now. The great fans of windmills
turned in the air. Around the mills were farm sheds, with
walks of powdered shells, and flower gardens that were fan-
tastically arranged amid the green lawns and that blazed
with color. As they passed the gates of Delft, two airy
fortalices shadowed the warm, flower-scented air. They
could not sleep. Winslow says that “the night was passed
with little sleep for the most, but with friendly entertainment
and Christian discourse.” There must have been several
boats, for the Pilgrims numbered one hundred and two, and
the people who went to Delftshaven to bid them a last fare-
well in the morning were many, and their baggage was great,
for many of the exiles had been or were people of means.

The way from the fortalices of Delft to Delftshaven
was a clear one. We will picture it as taking pine late in



32 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

the day. The weather was mild. The pilot had little to do,
and the children turned from Mistress Elizabeth Winslow
to him, and when he sat down after the afterglow had
faded, Ellen More said:

“You said that you would tell us of the Indians that you
have met in your voyages.”

“ Aye, aye, that I did, my little Pilgrim, and if it suits
you well I will tell you of one that I have seen. He was a
chief, or a sagamore, or lord, but I did not find him on the
coast of the new land at all; I met him in England.”

The children and young people gathered closely around
the pilot.

“Ah! ah! what are you about to do?” said Captain
Reynolds. “Away with your story-telling, but I would
not refuse to hear something entertaining myself now, seeing
everything is so quiet; there is a bit of the child left in me
yet, and I will take a seat among the children and be a
child in my ears, as I used to be when my father told sea
tales of the Hebrides. Go on, go on, and I'll not bother you.
The ship goes fair.”

THE STRANGE STORY OF TUSQUANTO.

“There is a country on the cool side of the sea which
Sir Francis Drake first saw, which some call New Albion,
but which he named New England. There is a harbor there
which the Virginia Company call Plymouth, from our
Plymouth. It is a fine country in summer time; great vines



THE PILOT AND THE LITTLE PILGRIMS. 33

are there, heavy with grapes; the sea is full of fish, and the
sky of birds; but oh, the winters—o-o-o-oh! may you never
see the like, or hear the wind blow there!

“Who has not heard of Sir Ferdinando Gorges? He
was the friend of Raleigh, you know, and the enemy of
Essex, as all Englishmen have heard, and he served Eliza-
beth with so much valor on the sea that the crown made him
Governor of Plymouth in 1604—the Plymouth of the oaks,
the grapes, the harbors of fish, where the sky is full of
wings, and the summers are so lovely, and the wind blows
so cold.

“ Now Plymouth is called by the Indians Pawtuxet, and
some fifteen or sixteen years ago Captain Weymouth, one of
the knight’s captains, found at this town of Pawtuxet a
solitary Indian, a lord, a sagamore, or chief, who told a ter-
rible tale. Listen to it—it haunts me sometimes when I am
all alone.

“The Indian said that all of his people were dead. That
a great blight had fallen upon them; that they suddenly
turned yellow and died, and that there was none left to
bury them, and that he alone was left.

“ Alone, all alone, he had gone to his tent, and cried
out when there was none to hear. He could only say ‘ alone,
alone, alone,’ to the sea and the stars.

“Was his story true?

“The sailors went on shore; they entered the evergreen
forests, and wandered among the oaks, the vines and rocks,



384 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

and they found it even as Tusquanto, or Tusquantum, the
lonely forest lord, had said.

“
“They found that it had been so. There were whole
villages of the dead; the bodies lay unburied, with only
the ravens to lament for them. —

“$o Tusquanto was left alone with the dead nation, cry-
ing out on the shores that blosomed still, though the people
were dead.

“Captain Weymouth told the wandering chief of his
own land, of England over the sea. He told him, I think,
of his master Sir Ferdinando, who would welcome such as
he. I hope this is so, for some think that he carried Tus-
quanto away as captive; but be this as it may, Captain Wey-
mouth sailed away from Plymouth with Tusquanto, the only
surviving Indian of Pawtuxet. Now if I were a poet I
would write a poem about Tusquanto and his lament for the
dead tribes.

“Sir Ferdinando, of the Virginia Colonization Com-
pany, was delighted to meet the Indian lord. He took him
to his courtly home, and instructed him in the English
language. He taught him how to talk, that the Indian
might tell him about the country and people over the sea.

“Marvelous were the tales that the Indian began to tell.
Sir Ferdinando used to say that the more he conversed with
him the better hope he gave him of the lands over which he
had been made governor. Tusquanto told him of goodly



THE PILOT AND THE LITTLE PILGRIMS. "35

rivers in the new country, of mountains that pierced the
sky, of roaring waterfalls, of harbors rich in fish, of fruits
that delighted the taste.

“He kept Tusquanto for three years, and then loaded
him with gifts and sent him back to New England as a
land pilot with Captain Thomas Dermer, a sea rover in his
service.

“ Dermer went to the land of the dead a year ago to see
if the tales that Tusquanto had told Sir Ferdinando were
true.

“The men from the ship, guided by Tusquanto, entered
the forests. The woods were still, save the birds singing
there. Grand trees and great lakes were there. It was a
glorious country. Tusquanto had spoken truly.

“They came to a place called Namasket, now Middle-
boro, Massachusetts.

“Tusquanto had told them of a great forest king named
Massasoit. He lived at Pokonoket, a land of green woods
and bright rivers, a day’s journey away. Captain Dermer
sent a message to this great forest king.

“Two kings came to meet him. One of them may have
been a brother to the great king. They were clad in glit-
tering shells, in plumes, and were followed by stately men
with bows and quivers of arrows.

“Captain Dermer wondered when these giants appeared.
He had great reason for surprise, as you shall hear.

“ One of the forest lords approached the captain.



36 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“*Your face is white,’ cried he. ‘You belong to the
race that steal. You steal our people from the fishing
grounds, and carry them away. You are here to steal, and
you shall suffer for your crimes. You shall not return to
the ship; follow the chiefs! follow me!’

“* Captain Dermer is no thief,’ pleaded Tusquanto.

“The whole pale race are thieves!’ cried the red lord.
“They steal our people and carry them away on their great
boats with wings. Listen!

““ Many moons ago we found one of your winged boats
off the shore.

“We stole up to it at night and burned it, and we car-
ried away three of the men. We have kept them to cut wood
and draw water and to make sport for us. They are with
us now. You shall follow back the chiefs to cut wood and
draw water and make sport for us. :

“*The men that we led captive talk our language now.
One of them says that your God will punish us for what
we have done to him. But your God can not do it; we
are too many—we are too many.’ Here the Indian be-
gan to dance and ery out, ‘We are too many! we are too
many!’

“Then Tusquanto said: ‘The men whom you hold are
innocent. They never meant you harm. You do them
wrong to make them captives.’

““But your people do the same. You must follow us
back, and cut wood and draw water and make sport for us.



THE PILOT AND THE LITTLE PILGRIMS. 37

Your God can not harm us; we are too many!’ Then he
danced again.

“*T have brought the sea captain here as a messenger of
a great king,’ said Tusquanto. ‘He comes to meet a king
asa man of honor. We are not to blame for what others
have done. We came to smoke the pipe of peace.’

“Then the great Massasoit spoke.

“ the pipe of peace together, and I will set the captives that we’
hold free. Massasoit is a man of honor!’

. “Then they smoked the pipe of peace together. It was
May time. The birds sang and the Indians danced. There
were Indian runners there, and they brought back the white
captives after a little time. The captives were Frenchmen.

“Such is my story; it is substantially a true one. I
would like to see the great Massasoit. Would not you, my
children? ”

The young people dreamed over the tale: the silent
land; the Indian lord; Tusquanto at the home of Sir Fer-
dinando; the journey toward the Indian country in the
silent woods; and the great king Massasoit, who was gov-
erned by a sense of justice, mercy, and honor.

“JT wish that we might live in Massasoit’s country,” said
little Ellen More. “It may be that the copper chain is
for him. I hope that it is.”

So thought all the little Pilgrims.



38 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“We must attend to our own work now, pilot,” said
Captain Reynolds. - “ Were I to emigrate, I would go to the
country of Massasoit. He must be a godlike chief.”

In the last light of the long sunset little Ellen More held
up the copper chain. Would that chain ever gleam under ~
the forest trees on the neck of some bronze lord of the far,
far West?



CHAPTER V.
EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER.

Tux rising light of the morning at Delftshaven revealed
the outline of the Speedwell, which was to take the Pilgrims
to Southampton. The sails of the ship were already set to
the fresh breeze. The tide was at its full, and there was
given them but a brief time for parting after the baggage
was hurried on board. The pastor fell upon his knees and
prayed for his flock with streaming eyes.

The full tide beat against the ship and they must be
gone. The Union Jack rolled out, and high in the air the
pennant blew westward. The ship swung away from the
pier and drifted down the channel along the “ creeping
Maas beyond the isle Ysselmonde. The company fired a
volley with small arms, a cannon boomed, the smoke cleared
in the sun; Holland faded away, the forms of loved ones
vanished; they would never see the country nor their old
friends there again. Their sails were set to the west; they
were to work the miracle of the ages under the setting sun.

The young folks gathered around the pilot again when
they saw that his hands were free. They had dreamed of

the Indian chiefs of which he had spoken. =
4



40 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

He told them another story of an Indian captive who
was still alive, and whom perhaps they would sometime meet
in the new country, as Indians who could speak English were
of great value to the colonists.

EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER.

“Tt was Sir Ferdinando Gorges who used to tell this tale,
and it was a favorite story among the traders who were look-
ing for fortunes beyond the sea. —

“¢T was one day surprised,’ said Sir Ferdinando, ‘ to see
one Henry Harley come bringing to me an Indian giant.’

“¢ Here is an Indian who can talk English,” ’ said Har-
ley. ‘“He might be valuable to us as a pilot.” ’

“¢¥From whence does he come?’ asked Sir Ferdinando.

“¢“From near Plymouth. He was captured with
twenty-nine other natives, and was taken to Spain to be sold
for aslave. He escaped slavery, and was brought to London,
and he has been exhibited here as a wonder.” ’

“ A wonder he was, lofty in stature, with a haughty face.
He used to say ‘ Welcome! welcome!’ to the crowds who
‘visited him in London. He was a wonder in intellect as well
as in body. He acquired the English readily, and he soon set
Sir Ferdinando wondering in the most unexpected way, as
you shall be told.

“Sir Ferdinando was ambitious, of great wealth, and
hoped to hear of a gold mine on the coasts of the northern
seas, such as had been found in Peru.



EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER. 41

“The Indian wonder came to understand this, and to see
in it a way of escape. So one day he began to speak of the
golden treasures worn by the Indian lords of Pokonoket and
places like that. The eyes of the knight must have enlarged,
and his hearing become keen.

““Gold, Epenow? Did you say gold?’

“«Yes, master, such as your lady wears on her neck.
Gold, not wampum, but gold.’

“* Where did your people find this gold?’ asked Sir Fer-
dinando.

“*Tn the rocks and in the caves.’

“*Do you know where the caves of gold are?’ asked the
trader.

“*Yes, master. We light our council fires there.’

“* Could you pilot my men to the caves of gold?’

““Yes, master, yes. The Indian lords mingle gold with
their wampum. Gold is as thick as berries in the wampum
maker’s lodges. I could take your men to the workers in
wampum and gold.’

“Sir Ferdinando needed to hear no more. He fitted out
a ship and loaded Epenow with presents, and dreamed
golden dreams, like the Spanish sailor who went to find the
fountain of youth.

“So the tall Epenow became suddenly not only a won-
der, but a very great man among the traders, and they sailed
away with him, and he feasted the minds of the adventurers
with marvelous tales of the treasures of the country.



42 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“He must have told them how many of the people had
died of the plague, and they must have imagined that the
gathering of treasures would be easy in such a land. This
was in June, 1614.

“They came to the Plymouth country, where there were
sandy capes and great green islands.

“Tn the harbor where the ship was moored the wonderful
Epenow asked leave to invite his friends on board. They
came and he welcomed them lustily, and probably talked
much in English for English ears, but he talked with the
Indians in the Indian tongue for a very different purpose.
Some of these Indians were his relatives, and among them
were his brothers.

“You may be sure that he and his brothers met most
graciously, and that he had much to say to them that was not
in the English tongue.

«“ When they were gone he said to his English friends:

“ morrow.’

“ them that thou hadst come to reveal the secrets of their
country,’ said the captain. ‘I must guard thee from
harm.’

“Then the captain put upon Epenow flowing garments,
so that he could be caught and held, in case his friends
should seek to tear him away. He also placed two men
over him, to guard him during the visit of his friends.







The departure from Delftshaven.



EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER. 43

“The next day the Indians came in twenty canoes.
How lovely they must have looked in the summer sea!

“ Epenow shouted to them in English. What he meant
by this I can not say. He and they knew.

“The captain ordered his musketeers to be prepared
against any surprise, for all his hopes were centered in the
friendly service of the Indian giant, who must have looked
very queerly in his flowing robes.

“The Indians drifted about on the sea in their canoes
until the captain called to them to come on board. They
were armed with bows and arrows.

“The chief men came at the captain’s call.

« Epenow was in the hold of the ship. The captain was
in the forecastle.

““Come to me, Epenow,’ said the captain.

“Epenow started up and walked toward the captain,
the two guards walking beside him.

“Suddenly he was gone. Whence? where? He had
vanished. He had stepped back. His loose garments were
seen floating in the air, when nothing more was to be found
of him. He had gone over the side of the ship.

““T tried to catch him by his coat,’ said a sailor, ‘ but he
could not be stayed.’

“The sailors rushed to the side of the ship, but were met
by a flight of arrows.

“The canoes disappeared from the sea as rapidly as
Epenow had gone over the side of the ship. The musket-



44 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

eers fired, but the swift canoes swept the waters like wings
of birds, and gone was the wonderful Epenow, and gone
were the Englishmen’s hopes of finding caves of gold
through the pilotage of the sharp-witted Indian captive.

“Tt made the Indians laugh to tell the story of how
Epenow had got away.

“Tt was a sorry voyage that the English made on their
return, without gold or treasure of any kind, and with the
tale of how foolishly they had been outwitted.

“Fancy Sir Ferdinando when the news was brought to
him! But the Indian was not more cunning and deceitful
than had been his captors, and he had a right to be free,
though not by such arts as these.”

“Do you think that we will ever see Epenow?” asked
little Ellen More. “I would be afraid of him.”

“You are not unlikely to meet both Epenow and Tus-
quanto; but were I Epenow, I would be very careful never
to fall into the hands of the English again.”

“T do not blame Epenow for what he did,” said one of
the boys. “I would have done the same. Such things
must make the Indians look upon the traders as enemies.
Deception does not pay.”

“No, my lad,” said the pilot. “They pay dearly who
handle this coin, be they English or Indians.”

“Ts your story quite true?” asked Wrastle Brewster, one
of the boys.



EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER. 45

“Yes; in substance both the stories of Tusquanto and
Epenow are true; you must allow a story-teller to use his
imagination when that only serves to make a fact a picture.”

Some four days were passed on the voyage to Southamp-
ton. There were spires rising in the sunset. Gables—the
palace where Anne Boleyn spent her few happy days with
Henry VIII.

Netley Abbey gleamed afar. Along the sea were great
walls mantled with ivy. On the hills rose great clusters of
oaks. Near by was the New Forest, and farther away lay
Winchester with its cathedral, where were buried the early
kings.

They were approaching the place where Canute ordered
back the sea and it did not obey him.

They were in Southampton Water.



CHAPTER VI.
THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL.

Tue heroes and saints of the world are those who build
life the direct opposite of their natural character, on the
principle that it is only that which is true that has any right
to exist. The Leyden Pilgrims had learned this truth when
they had given up wealth and the prospects of ease in age
that they might live for the highest principles of the soul.
Many of them had been men who had loved their own will,
but had come to see that strength and power lie in giving up
one’s will for the good of a common cause.

The happy midsummer voyage from Leyden was over,
and their troubles were now to begin. They had fallen into
the hands of selfish, overbearing men, who were to carry
them across the sea. They expected to go in two ships.
The smaller of these was the Speedwell, Captain Reynolds,
of which the pilot was good Robert Coppin. She was a
pinnace, as we have said, without decks, of some sixty tons.

The larger ship was the Mayflower, Captain J ones, of
which Christopher Martin was to be the governor for the
company, and which awaited them on Southampton Water.

The voyage of the Speedwell from Delftshaven to



THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL. AY

Southampton Water was full of promise. But the little
ship had been overmasted in Holland, a thing which will
cause the timbers to spring at sea. It has been claimed
that this was purposely done, as Captain Reynolds had con-
tracted to remain in the service of the colony a year, and
wished to escape his obligation. The charge may not have
been well founded, but perilous times for the little Speed-
well were at hand.

It was the purpose of the Pilgrims to have the Mayflower
and Speedwell leave Southampton Water about August
1st, and they expected to arrive on the Hudson River in
October, after a voyage in summer and early autumn
weather.

They were not supposed to be sailing for Plymouth on
the bleak New England coast, where the good Scottish pilot,
Robert Coppin, had seen Indians, but for the sheltered
shores of the Hudson, of which “ our pilot ” will have some
stories to tell.

The overmasting of the Speedwell in Holland, causing
her to leak as soon as she was out on the high sea, changed
the whole plan of the voyage, and was the cause of great
events, which had a powerful and far-reaching influence on
the destiny of the American nation. The hardships of
New England were to school American life.

On a serene day in early August the two ships, the
Mayflower, Captain Jones, and the Speedwell, Captain Rey-
nolds, sailed out of Southampton Water, leaving behind the



48 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

beautiful views of the ivied walls and towers. A part of
the Pilgrims were on the larger and a part on the smaller
ship. The two ships sailed in view of each other, and every-
thing indicated a prosperous voyage. The young folks felt
secure, for “our pilot ” was on board.

The Speedwell crowded on sail, and for a little time
made her name good. But on the wide sea she began to
strain under the canvas, and the boards in her hull spread
apart, and it became hard to keep out the water. The con-
dition grew worse and worse.

“T must consult Captain Jones,” said Captain Reynolds.
“The pinnace will soon fill with water and will sink. We
can never cross the sea as we are now.”

To the leaks we may fancy that Robert Coppin brought
the unwelcome jackscrew, and that the boys cheered when
they saw him about to apply the powerful push to a refrac-
tory beam. The leak was stayed, and we may hear the
pilot say to Wrastle Brewster:

“Ho, my hearty! ”

And the boys respond:

“Ho, my hearty!”

But a stayed leak may cause two leaks to open. The
jackscrew could do much, but it could not overcome the
Atlantic Ocean.

“Tt is little use for a pinnace like this to contend against
the sea,” said the pilot. “We will have to go ashore again.”

“You will not leave us?” said the boys.



THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL. 49

“No, no; I have shipped for all the way.”

Some of the boards sprung so that one could lay one’s
hand between them. It was useless to try to bail out the
water; one might almost as well have tried to bail the
ocean. |

It was a bitter disappointment to the Pilgrims to find
the little ship in this pitiful and perilous state.

“We must go back and repair,” said Captain Reynolds
to Captain Jones.

“Tt will cause us to arrive late on the Hudson,” said
Captain Jones. “But we must put back, or the pinnace
will sink.”

So the ship put back and anchored in Dartmouth Har-
bor, and the Speedwell was overhauled, and was made, as
was supposed, seaworthy.

The two ships started out again, the Speedwell following
close to the Mayflower, crowded with her sightly sails. But
they had hardly gone a hundred leagues beyond Land’s End
when the Speedwell began to yawn and to leak again, and
Captain Reynolds declared to Captain Jones that they must
take back the ship or she would go to pieces. So the two
ships went back again to the coast—this time to Plymouth.
They unloaded the Speedwell, sent back twenty discouraged
people to their homes, and with one hundred and two per-
sons on board set sail for the Hudson, on the 6th of Sep-
tember; or, strangely enough, they set sail from Plymouth,
England, to arrive in Plymouth, New England, for it was



50 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

another power than their own that was directing their
voyage.

What a sifting of people there had been to elect the
heroes who were to make this voyage, in which human
destiny was so greatly concerned! Macaulay said that God
sifted the nations of the world to make the band of Pilgrim
pioneers. Those who had lacked faith had been left behind
in England; the aged had been left in Holland, and now
those who had not the courage had been sent home.

One of the discouraged adventurers, Mr. Cushman, has
left some account of the terrible days when the Speedwell
was found leaking. You may like to read it—it is a
picture.

“ Our pinnace [, the Speedwell, ] will not cease leaking;
else, I think, we had been half way at Virginia. Our voy-
age hither hath been as full of crosses as ourselves have been
of crookedness. We put in here to trim her; and I think,
as others also, if we had stayed at sea but three or four hours
more, she would have sunk right down. And though she
was twice trimmed at [South]hampton; yet now she is as
open and [as] leaky as a sieve: and there was a board, two
feet long, a man might have pulled off with his fingers;
where the water came in as at a mole hole.

“Friend, if ever we make a Plantation, GOD works a
miracle! especially considering how scant we shall be of
victuals; and,“most of all, ununited amongst ourselves, and

devoid of good tutors and regiment [leaders and organiza-



THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL. 51

tion]. Violence will break all. Where is the meek and
humble spirit of Moszs? and of Nenemran, who reedified
the walls of Jerusalem, and the State of Israel? Is not the
sound of Rrnosoaw’s brags daily heard amongst us?) Have
not the philosophers and all wise men observed that, even
in settled Common Wealths, violent Governors bring, either
themselves, or [the] people, or both, to ruin? How much
more in the raising of Common Wealths, when the mortar
is yet scarce tempered that should bind the walls?

“Tf I should write to you of all things which promiscu-
ously forerun our ruin, I should overcharge my weak head,
and grieve your tender heart: only this I pray you, Prepare
for evil tidings of us, every day! But pray for us instantly
[without ceasing]! It may be the Lord will be yet in-
treated, one way or other, to make for us. I see not, in
reason, how we shall escape, even the gasping of hunger-
starved persons: but GOD can do much; and his will be
done! ”

Such a man had not the inspiration for a voyage of the
Argonauts. He went back among the discouraged twenty,
as he should have done.

Robert Coppin brought with him the jackscrew from
the Speedwell when he came on board the Mayflower for the
last time. :

The young folks, after all their terrors, cheered when .
they saw the jackscrew in his hand.

“Tt is shipped for all the voyage,” he said, “like myself.



52 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

The ocean has beaten me once, but I will have a wrestle
with her again.”

“ Cheer, cheer for Robert, our pilot,” said Wrastle Brew-
ster.

“Don’t call me that,” said the lusty sailor; “call me
Bob. We'll get somewhere yet, by the aid of the jack-
screw. It minds me that Providence only knows where we
will land, but we will land somewhere.”

And now the Mayflower is on the sea. It is the sixth of
September. The weather is fair, but the season is getting
late. In a few days or weeks they may expect the equi-
noctial gales.

‘Captain Jones was a hard, testy man. He domineered
over the Pilgrims, and their governor insulted them with
high words. But in the beautiful weather of the early days
of the voyage he probably did not prevent “ our pilot ” from
relating to the little Pilgrims his adventures in the New
World.

England was gone, and the women and the children
must have felt the influence of the kindly heart of “ our
pilot.”

“Tell us new stories now that we are on the new ship,”
said little Ellen More.

“Once when I was in the woods,” said the pilot, “I
saw a little deer amid the cedars, and I made chase for it
so as to get a range to shoot it for our meat.

“T followed it with an Indian trail, when what do you



THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL. 53

think I saw? The animal suddenly went up into the air,
and there it remained. I was amazed. I thought that it
had fallen under the power of some Indian wizard, who,
they say, work enchantment.

“But the deer in the air uttered a pitiful cry, and it
touched my heart. I heeded the cry and went to it. Its
head was hanging down in the air. Its eyes stood out of
its head and its tongue was out of its mouth.

“Tt had been caught in an Indian snare. The Indians
bend over the top of a birch tree and put a noose on it, and
hold it to the ground by a wooden bar set in two notches in
trees, so that it will slip out when a foot gets entangled in
the noose and cause the tree to fly up. This snare had a
powerful birch for its pole, and the deer was young and
slender, and so was lifted into the air as by magic.

“T cut the noose, and it did look at me so pitifully that
I let it go. One hates to kill an animal that he has re-
leased. We love everything that we help and hate every-
thing that we injure. So we must love everybody and
everything.”

“Even Captain Jones?” asked the child.

The pilot did not answer. The wind was fair, the sky
blue, and the ocean a long, rippling splendor, and such was
the voyage for many days.

“Will you not tell us some stories of the Hudson, where
we are going?” asked Ellen More.

“ Aye, I will, if the weather continues fair,” said “ our



54 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

pilot,” “and it may be like this all of the way. But the
season is getting late, and it is storms I fear; I am preparing
for storms; the time for them is at hand.”

He told them tales of the sea birds. Captain Jones be-
times gave him a harsh word, but he was used to such
treatment on the sea.

“ Tt is not the storms that I fear,” said he, “it is the cross
waves and the sickness that such water brings.”

The Mayflower went on and on in the bright September
days.

They were going, as they thought, to New Amsterdam,
where the Dutch had a great plantation. They were to
build up an independent English colony beside the Dutch
colony. So when Pilot Robert promised to relate to the
little Pilgrims some stories that he had heard in the shipping
places of the colonist companies in London and in Holland,
even profane Captain Jones did not object; he liked to hear
such stories himself. He was looking for rough weather,
and he did not object to his pilot’s making merry a few idle
hours when the ship was yet going fair.

There were some rough and reckless people on board,
who had the ungovernable spirit of Captain Jones. Brad-
ford, in his so-called Log of the Mayflower, relates a brief
but vivid story of the career of one of these. He says,
writing after the manner of the Puritans:

“And I may not omit here a special work of GOD’s
Providence. There was a proud and very profane young



THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL. 55

man, one of the seamen; of a lusty able body, which made
him the more haughty. He would always be contemning the
poor people in their sickness, and cursing them daily with
grievous execrations, and [he] did not let [stop] to tell
them, That he hoped to help to cast half of them overboard
before they came to their journey’s end; and to make merry
with what [property] they had. And if he were by any
gently reproved, he would curse and swear most bitterly.

“But it please GOD, before they came half [the] seas
over, to smite this young man with a grievous disease; of
which he died in a desperate manner and so [he] was him-
self the first that was thrown overboard. Thus his curses
light{ed] on his own head: and it was an astonishment to
all his fellows; for they noted it to be the just hand of GOD
upon him.”

In this manner the Pilgrims viewed all of the events of
life. They believed that Providence was their real pilot,
and that they were on the sea of destiny. Every event that.
happened they held to be ordered by God. In all things
their faith was their anchor. They were Argonauts sailing
not for themselves, but for the welfare of mankind.



CHAPTER VII.
THE TALE OF HENRY HUDSON.

Day after day the Mayflower moved on under heavy
sail. The white wings of the birds that followed her far
out of Southampton Water disappeared, and the New
World’s ark, the ship of the new Argonauts, was steadily
piloted over the calm solitude of the waters toward the west.

Many of the passengers who had been sick in the early
days of the voyage were well again. Governor Carver and
his wife, Rose Standish and Elizabeth Winslow—how sad
was the fate that awaited these lovely and gentle spirits!—
might talk now of the nation that they hoped to found where
the children would be educated in freedom of faith, and in
which the ancient prophecies should be fulfilled.

We can fancy Elder Brewster repeating to them the
ancient Jewish prophecy:

“ A stone is about to be cut out of the mountain without
hands, that will break into pieces all the other nations of
the earth.”

“But what will become of the Indian races?” said
Elizabeth Winslow, whose heart loved every one and pitied

all who were unfortunate.
56



THE TALE OF HENRY HUDSON, 57

“They will either become converted to God or will
perish,” said the elder. “They have been a bloody and
revengeful race, and it may be their hour of salvation is
come, or that their cup of iniquity is full.”

“We must all labor to bring them to a knowledge of the
truth,” said the amiable lady. “ Who do you think these
rfces are, and how do you imagine that they found Amer-
ica?”

“JT think, my lady, that they may be the descendants
of the lost tribes of Israel. Or they may have been wan-
derers from the regions of the Nile across Asia in the days
of the Shepherd Kings. Or they may be the descendants
of some Mongolian race.”

“How did they find America?”

“That would not have been difficult in the long gone
days. The strait between Asia and America (Behring’s) is
not wide now, and it must once have been very narrow, and
perhaps there was once no strait there at all. And nations
wandering across Asia could have easily. made the passage
to America in boats.”

“Oh,” said Mistress Elizabeth, “if the Indians are the
descendants of the lost tribes, and we could convert them,
what a glorious voyage this would be! It makes my heart
throb to think of it.”

“One of two things,” we imagine the prophetic Carver
to have said, “ will happen to these races. They will either
give up their savagery or perish. That is the law of the



58 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

human kind when a superior race mingles with a lower
race.”

“Tt was Robinson’s wish that we might win the Indian
races back to God. Of this he dreams continually; for this
he prays. Oh, that he could have crossed the sea with us,
and inspired us for this great work! ”

“ We are being guided by an unseen hand,” said Carver.
“But whether we are to found a new nation or to convert
an old one we can not see; we can only know that whatever
may happen, the law of righteousness will live, and those
who obey it will rise and those who reject it may fall.”

“Our people have not treated the Indian races well on
their voyages,” said Rose Standish. “TI hope we will follow
the heart of Robinson in all that we do.”

The October moon was on the sea. The ship was drift-
ing fair, and Robert Coppin, the pilot, came toward this
group who were reviewing the thoughts of Elder John Rob-
inson in regard to the conversion of the Indians, and listened
to their hopes and plans.

The young people and children gathered around him.
The little audience was almost a solid one, and they engaged
in most earnest conversation as the ship’s lights swayed under
the moon and stars.

‘When the older people had ceased to talk in regard to
the conversion of the Indians, Love Brewster said:

“Now let me ask ‘our pilot’ what he has heard in re-
gard to the Hudson River, where we are going. Pilot



THE TALE OF HENRY HUDSON. 59

Coppin, who was Henry Hudson, and how did he find the
river where the Dutch have settled? We should surely
know more of him.”

To this inquiry Elder Brewster assented as one emi-
nently proper to be made. Mistress Bradford, Mistress
Standish, and Mistress Winslow seemed as interested in the
question as the boys Jasper Richard More and Wrastle and
Love Brewster. Mary Allerton and Priscilla Mullins sat
side by side, eager to hear what Coppin would say. The
whole company became silent, and under the moonlit sails

Robert Coppin related the following strange story:

CAST ADRIFT.

“Tt is a story to draw tears that I will tell you now.

“There was once a hardy sailor, and where he is now no
one knows, be he living or dead. His name was, as you
have already guessed, Henry Hudson, and he dreamed of
making great discoveries in the north after the manner of
those that had been made in the Spanish Main. His early
life is a mystery, but he had one boy whom he dearly loved,
and he took this boy wherever he went on his many voyages.

“He made many voyages, and those of them to the
north had filled the shipping world with wonder. He pre-
pared for a fourth voyage, on which he expected to find a
polar sea.

“While dreaming of the lands he would discover, and
that would make him rich and famous, he became acquainted



60 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

with a young man of most engaging manners but dissolute
habits, named Henry Greene. The better class of people
had withdrawn from association with this false-hearted
youth, and even his own family had left him to his own
fate.

“The great navigator pitied him, and sought to reform
him. He took him into his heart and his own home, and he
said to him one day:

“* Henry, go with me to the north. You shall share in
the glory of the discoveries we will make, and on your return
I will report you to the crown and secure for you a place in
the royal service.’

“Henry Greene loved roystering and dissolute company,
but he was so abandoned by friends and fortune that he
accepted the invitation to sail to the mysterious countries
of the north, where the nights were long, where the ice
mountains glittered in the moon, where the northern
lights filled the sky with wonder. So he made himself a
~ devoted friend of the captain, and Henry Hudson sailed .
away for Greenland in April, some eleven years ago (1610),
with insufficient provisions, and he reached Greenland in
June.

“They came to a strait in the ice lands that led to an
inland sea (Hudson Bay). Here was a land of desolation
and surprise. But it was a land of winter and night, of
savage animals and lone Indians.

“The summer passed, and Hudson, having failed to find



te a a

THE TALE OF HENRY HUDSON. 61

a country that promised him wealth, proposed to his men to
winter in the wild regions of darkness, ice, and snow.

“He was a quick-tempered man, although he so much
loved his son and had taken such a friendly interest in the
fascinating Henry Greene.

“The men rebelled at the thought of staying in the
land of desolation, where there was neither wealth nor
glory for them. They knew that their provisions were
scanty, and there was but a poor prospect of hunting in
the cold.

“¢T will have to leave some of you behind,’ said the
irritable captain, when the men complained that the ship’s
provisions were getting low.

“The men began to plot against him, and among his.
secret enemies was Henry Greene.

“One day, when his friends were below decks, one of
the conspirators closed the hatch and shut them down, and
the mutineers at once seized the captain and bound him, and’
put him, with his son and some friends, among them a
faithful carpenter, on board the shallop, which they had
towed after the ship. They then formed a company of their
own to sail the ship, and they made Henry Greene captain,
and resolved to return immediately to England. That
was a dark day when Henry Hudson, a man of noble parts,
met Henry Greene.

“Yor a time the ship drew the shallop after her. Then
came the fatal time to cut the rope. As they did so, the



62 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

lost navigator heard a voice ringing through the air that
pierced his heart.

“Tt was that of the villain, Henry Greene!

“Henry Greene, captain, sailed away, leaving the shal-
lop rocking on the icebound sea, with only provisions for a
few days. Whatever became of Henry Hudson we do not
know. Ships were sent out to find him, but he was never
seen. He probably has perished amid the ice, he and his
faithful son.

“But we do know what became of the faithless Henry
Greene. He landed on the coast for provisions, and was
set upon by the natives and murdered.

“ The survivors undertook to take the ship home. Their
provisions failed, and when they came to Iceland they were
too weak to walk the decks. They told their tale. So all
of these people who were engaged in plans to cast others
adrift were themselves cast adrift on the sea and on the
world.

“ But it was this same Henry Hudson, with his faithful
boy, who discovered the land for which we are now sailing,
and which they call New Amsterdam. He passed through
raging waters [Hell Gate] and came to a most beautiful bay,
and sailed up a river through a land of plenty, which we may
find, and have better luck than he. The best thing that
can be said of any man is that he is true-hearted, and all who
are will have the heartache some day in this troubled world.

“T+ ‘is a hard and lonesome story.”



THE TALE OF HENRY HUDSON. 63

“Ts it the Hudson River that was found by the captain
whom they cast adrift in the ice to which we are going? 22
said little Ellen More to our pilot, as he sat with a very
troubled and far-away look in his face.

“ Ah! child, ah! child, you may well ask me that.
Older heads might think that question. I wonder myself if
we shall find ourselves there at last.”

The child was startled at the strange look in the pilot’s
face. She laid her white hand on his rough palm and
said:

“Tt may be that we will go to the country of the
great and good Indian king of whom you spoke. It |
may be that we are carrying the copper chain to him. It
makes me feel glad to think of it. How I should like to
see him wearing it with a pleased look! And all under
the greenwood trees. Do you think I will, Pilot Cop-
pin?”

The pilot smiled and then he shuddered.

The Mayflower was carrying a dark secret in the head of
her captain which it is probable that only the pilot suspected.
His suspicion, were it so, would not have troubled him had
not his heart turned toward the Pilgrims in their high pur-
pose, struggles, and sufferings.

Was the Mayflower really bound for the Hudson
River? :

Only Captain Jones and the planters of the Dutch col-
onies in England and Holland really knew. But the



64 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

pilot would know some day. There would come to him
a secret order from Captain Jones that would disclose to
him his real purpose. So under a dark secret were they
crossing the sea; the angel of Providence was still in all

events.



CHAPTER VIII.
THE VOYAGE OF THE MAYFLOWER.—“ A MAN OVERBOARD.”

Tux serene days passed, and cross waves began to shake
the ship and to cause a renewal of seasickness among the
passengers. The blue sky became overcast and wild, sullen
under clouds drifted across the wide gray canopy of cloud
that shut out the sun.

Storms were approaching. One of them struck the ship
in such a manner as to cause her to strain and tremble. The
waves became higher and higher. The sea rolled green and
white under a dim gray light.

‘The Mayflower was in the middle of the great ocean,
and a hundred times a day seemed to be lost as she sank
into the trough of the sea.

The first storm was succeeded by another. The rain
fell in sheets and the nights were blackness. The wind
lashed the waves. It seemed impossible that the ship could
ever survive the war of the elements that raged on every
side.

“O pilot,” said Rose Standish, “did you ever see
weather like this before?”

“Many a time, lady.”
65



66 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“ Did the ship live?”

“You may comfort your heart when I tell you that she
did.”

“ We are but a speck in infinity,” said Mistress Bradford,
“and I do not feel that I shall ever rest my foot on the land
again. But what matters it if you may live to carry the
Gospel to the Indians? I have ceased to care for myself.”

Storm followed storm. One day Captain Jones said to
the pilot:

“We can not bear a bit of sail; we shall be forced to
hull” (to drift without sails).

The days when the ship was in hull were terrible indeed.
All felt their helplessness. The women cried; the children
gathered in a pitiful group and cried out:

“O pilot, when will this weather be over?”

“Keep up your courage, my hearties. I have weath-
ered storms as hard as these. You shall live to see sunny
skies again, and great oak forests, and Indian kings. Heay-
en holds her own in her hands, and John Robinson’s prayers
have not gone up to heaven in vain. Trust, trust, trust! ”

Poor little Ellen More clung to the pilot wherever he
went, even at the wheel.

“Tam all alone,” she said; “you do pity me, don’t you?
I am all alone in the world and on the sea.”

“Tt is the Mistress Winslow that is good to ye,” said the
pilot. “She is good to everybody. You must cling to her,
and not to a poor rover like me.”



THE VOYAGE OF THE MAYFLOWER. 67

“But, pilot, I love you.”

“Tove me, love me, Ellen More? Oh, that these dull
old ears should ever hear that. O my little girl, that goes
right to my heart, and while Robert Coppin lives you shall
never want for a friend. Little Ellen More, I would die
for such as thou.” :

“O Master Coppin, do you say that? Suppose we
were to go down?”

“Then I will go down with thee in my arms. What
am 12?—a poor sailor! What is life to me? Iam not sent to
convert the Indians. I would love to die for such a heart
as yours, Ellen More.”

“You will let me cling to you, won’t you?”

“Yes, yes, my darling heart. This old pilot will let you
do that—he will now.”

“ At the wheel?”

“Yes, at the wheel.”

“ And if I should die, you tell me the way I must go.
Pilot, pilot, you will tell me the way.”

“© Ellen More, Ellen More, this breaks my heart. But
T will be true to the wheel. If a true heart will bring us to
land, you will see the light of the shore again. Living or
dying, I will be true to thee, Ellen More.”

“ And I will cling to thee, Pilot Robert—let me call you
that—you are our pilot.”

“No, no, child.”

“Then who is?”



68 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“God. He holds the waters in the hollow of his hand.”

As the ship lay in hull, drifting sailless and helpless, a
great wave dashed over her, and the cry arose:

“John Howland has gone overboard! ”

“Overboard! a man overboard! ” passed from lip to lip.

“John Howland is overboard! ” cried the captain.

The ship was rolling from side to side. One could see
but a little way ahead, for everywhere in a dim light rose
the billows.

John Howland, who was in the service of Governor John
Carver, was a strong, lusty young man, one of the last of the
passengers who would seem likely to meet with any accident.

He had come above the gratings when the ship was roll-
ing and the waves dashing above the decks, and had been
thrown into the sea.

“ John Howland is overboard! ” said little Ellen More to
the pilot, in terror. “You save him, oh do!”

The topsail halyards hung over the helpless ship and
out into the water.

John Howland went down some fathoms under the
waves, but he was buoyed up, and, strange as it may seem,
caught hold of the dragging halyards under the sea, and his
strong arm held to them with a grasp like death.

The pilot saw that the halyards were shaken by a power
under the waves.

“Haul up the halyards, gently, gently, for Heaven’s
sake, gently, man! ”



THE VOYAGE OF THE MAYFLOWER, 69

He seized the ropes.

They drew up the halyards. John Howland came up
with them. The pilot shouted as he saw the young man’s
head.

“Saved!” he cried. “Pass the word. John Howland
is saved! It is a miracle.”

They drew John Howland up into the ship by a boat
hook.

“But for the halyards I should have perished,” said the
young. man.

“But for the providence of God you would have per-
ished,” said Elder Brewster.

They carried him below and laid him down. The
shock left him with but little strength and he fell ill.

“John Howland, a good spirit was with thee in the
storm,” said the pilot. “You will recover, and will see
the light of land. May be that you will live to tell
your grandchildren of this strange event; may be you
will.”

Calmer weather came under colder skies. The women
shrank from the chill. The children felt the bitter weather,
all except little Ellen More. She tented under the great sea
coat of Pilot Robert, and helped him with brace and wheel
to direct the rudder to the gray west.

November was now on the ocean. One of the passen-
gers, William Butler, in the service of Dr. Samuel Fuller,
we think, fell very sick. He longed to see the new land,



70 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

and the heart of all went out to him as he lay in his bunk
day by day, tossed by the dark agitated sea.

One morning a deep silence fell upon all.

“Tt is over,” said Dr. Fuller to our pilot. “ You must
do your office.”

They wrapped the body in the scanty clothing he had
brought in his chest.

Then Elder Brewster knelt down beside the dead, and
the sublime words of Hebrew psalmody, “ Lord, thou hast
been our dwelling-place in all generations,” rose amid the
storm.

Our pilot took up the body gently and laid it in the
great graveyard of the deep, and as it sunk from sight for-
ever all bowed in tears, and heard the elder’s voice saying:

“Until the deep gives up its dead! ”





CHAPTER IX.

‘THE MAYFLOWER AT SEA.—A LEAK.—“ BEAR HARD TO. THE
WEST.”

Iw these troubled days of the equinox, the cross seas, and
the long-continued fall storms, the captain was one day seen
to be in an unusually ugly and profane mood. He called to
him the ship’s carpenter and stormed at him, then the
pilot, and talked to him in a high tone. One of his exclama-
tions rose above the winds. It was:

“Tf it can not be replaced we shall all go down, and the
ranters will go with us. That is all.”

Some of the Pilgrims, many of whom were lying on their.
beds, which were soaked with the dashing of the sea, heard
these ominous words and started up. The dismal exclama-
tion of Captain Jones was passed from one to another, and
when it reached little Ellen she said: |

“Then I will never live to give the copper chain to the
red forest king. But Pilot Robert, he can save us.
like his has power with God.” A great sea dashed upon the
ship, and the water came over the decks.

Edward Winslow went to the pilot, seeing that the cap-

tain was in no mood to be questioned.
6 71



"2 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“Pilot, what was it that the captain said? That the
ship was in danger?”

“The ship is straining, sir, and there is a leak. The
main beam has sprung out of place.”

Edward Winslow went back to the men of the May-
flower.

“The ship,” said he, “is straining from stem to stern.
Even our pilot says that we are in danger.”

“ What shall we do? Shall we have to return?” asked
many voices.

The captain came below.

“Ts the ship in danger?” asked Elder Brewster.

“Tn danger? Well, I should say she was. The main
beam is sprung, and the men are toiling at the pumps.
What a miserable expedition all this is! ”

“Would you advise us to return?” asked the governor
of the ship, who was the adviser of the Pilgrims.

“No!” thundered the captain. “It is as far from here
to England as it is to America. We will go on or go down.
We would be as likely to go down in an attempt to return as
we would to go on. No, no, whistle, ye winds, and dash
over us, ye seas! We will go on or down, and it is down
that we will go unless the beam can be forced into place
again.”

Many of the women—the Pilgrim mothers—were sick,
but they started up and began to pray and to talk in the
language of faith to each other.



THE MAYFLOWER AT SEA. 13

The waves rolled high, and the ship quivered, and the
leak grew. There were faith, terror, brave words, and falter-
ing lips among the little nation sitting by their sea-soaked
beds in the dim light below. Sea after sea smote the wind-
ward side of the ship. The frail bark seemed as a thistle
down in a November hurricane.

For hours the terror lasted. Night came, a darkness of
death. Few dared to sleep. :

The gray morning rose over the ocean. The sailors were
worn out, and hope seemed to have fled.

At last the Pilgrims heard a firm step on the stairs.
There was faith in it, and it was coming down. The men
lifted their hands when they saw who it was. The women
cried out and wept.

“Robert Coppin, our pilot,” said Elizabeth Winslow,,
“ean you save the ship?”

“Pilot Robert, you have come to be our Moses,” said
Rose Standish. “TI can feel it, I can feel it.”

“ God help you to save us,” cried Mistress Carver.

A child’s voice rose above the rest.

' “We will! he will!”

It was Ellen More.

The pilot bent his face, full of love and pity, on the
child.

“TI will do everything human power can for you, my
girl.”

“The chief must have the copper chain,” said she.



Th _ THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“ Aye, aye, and I have seen as dark a stress of weather as
this, but never a ship so strained in mid-ocean.”

A new resolution seemed to come to him with the words
es the child and the vision of the copper chain.

’ He suddenly put his hand to his head and exclaimed:

“Thank God!”

“What?” asked many voices.

“The jackscrew, boys, where is the jackscrew? Bring
me the jackscrew! ”

They brought the curious instrument out of the baggage;
he seized it and rushed toward the broken rib of the ship,
crying, “ Send the ship’s carpenter to me!”

He applied the power of the screw to the beam, or rib,
which had been wrenched from its place. The ship’s car-
penter joined him at once, and Wrastle and Love Brewster
stood by him and a crowd gathered around him.

The captain came roaring down and cleared the boys
away.

“ A jackscrew!” cried one of the officers. “A jack
straw might answer as well.”

“But the beam is moving back,” said the pilot.

“Then,” said the officer, “the Power that uplifted the
arm of Moses must be in it; if you can do that you can do
more than old Canute did when he ordered back the sea.”

But the beam moved. Slowly, and at times it obeyed
the power applied, when the ship righted and the beam was
lifted into its place.



THE MAYFLOWER AT SEA. 5

“The beam does not spring back,” said the pilot, “and
I move it into place a little every time the ship rights.”

Hour by hour he applied the jackscrew, and the captain
and the officers of the ship and the Pilgrim company came
and stared as they saw Robert Coppin and the ship’s car-
penter overcoming the elements and the adverse forces of
gravitation, until the rib of the ship stood firm again.

At last the pilot started up.

“Wrastle Brewster,” said he, “go and tell little Ellen
More that the Mayflower is safe! It was not the jack-
screw—no, no, it was a Power behind the jackscrew
that guided us and has provided for us. Providence
has ordered that the Pilgrim company shall build an
everlasting habitation of faith and freedom beyond the
sea!”

They came to calmer waters.

The Indian summer weather, so beautiful upon the land,
sends its influence far out to sea.

One day the captain said to Pilot Robert:

“We must run landward soon. Steer hard toward the
west.”

“Captain, it is the Hudson River for which we are
booked to sail.”

“Pilot Robert Coppin, don’t you dare to reply to me or
to ask me any questions. It is your office to obey, and not
to reason aloud or to argue with any one. I know my busi-
ness, sir. Steer hard toward the west.”



%6 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER. —

“You surely are not deceiving these poor people? ”

“The people’s affairs are no part of your duties, sir.
Steer toward the west. If we shall touch upon the Plym-
outh country what is that to you? You are to obey me,
sir, and to ask no questions. I have given you great liber-
ties in this voyage, and these people seem to have brought
you over to them. They did not employ you; it was I,
and I know what I am doing, and do not want and will never
receive any unasked-for advice from any inferior officer.
So not one word more. Cease you story-telling; stop all
this association with women and children. Attend in the
future strictly. to your own duties, and bear toward the
west! ”

Robert Coppin, pilot, had probably expected such an
order. He understood it. It was in his contract to obey
the captain and not to follow his own sense of equity, of the
truth of which he could not be sure.

But to “bear hard to the west ” would take the ship to
a long sandy cape in Massasoit’s country, before it could
come to the Hudson River. That cape was known as Male-
bar and also as Cape Cod.

What was the captain’s purpose in prolonging the jour-
ney amid the wintry seas?

Had he been bribed by the Dutch to keep away from
their rich territory at Manhattan?

If so, no one on board but the pilot could have suspected
it at this time.



THE MAYFLOWER AT SHA. TT

So the Mayflower goes on her way over the troubled -
waters.

There is a white wing in the sky. A sea bird appears.
The pilot bears hard to the west! . i

Beside the jackscrew there were other things that the
Pilgrims were bringing over the sea that excited the in-
terest of all in the days of quiet water. Elizabeth Wins-
low had a curious mortar and pestle. Where would it
find use?

Mistress Brewster had a looking-glass, into which it was
the delight of the young people to see their faces. It was
taken out of the chest at times and passed around, and was
very carefully handled. It answered the question:

“ How do I look now?”

Mistress Elizabeth Winslow had a very beautiful figured
mat, which was like a picture to unroll. It was green.

“It is fine enough for a king,” said Pilot Coppin one
day when Mistress Winslow had unrolled it. “The Indian
kings sit down on the ground when they are in council.
Perhaps we shall hold a council with an Indian chief some
day. If so, we would want that mat.”

“The Indian chief smokes in his council,” said John
Billington, the boy. “Perhaps he would want your silver
pipe.”

“That is a point well taken, my boy. But I would be
slow to give away the pipe that the Traders’ Company gave
tome. Let me go to get the pipe.”



78 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

It was in the few calm days of the latter part of the voy-
age. The people seemed all to fall into the spirit of amusing
and entertaining each other.

So Mistress, Brewster brought out the looking-glass and
laid it down on the famous chest on which the compact
would one day be signed, and the sea-worn people looked
into it to see “ how they looked now.”

Mistress Brewster spread out the green rug before the
chest, and Pilot Coppin came bringing the silver pipe, which
was his special treasure, it having been given him for faith-
ful service on the high seas.

Others brought out litle keepsakes and treasures, and
related the simple history of them.

John Billington had a quick fancy. He began to tell
little Ellen More a fairy story: how that the mat would some
day be unrolled under the oaks of Virginia, and a great king,
with fur robes and feathers and pearl shells, would come and
sit upon it, and smoke the silver pipe.

Ellen, too, was a child of imagination, and she called
Pilot Coppin to hear the wonderful tale that John had
told.

“Strangely enough,” he said, “such dreams as these
come true. The soul’s purpose is in them and behind them.
I believe in fairy stories, though others do not. There is
good suggestion in them. The world is governed by sug-
gestion.”

“ Say you that, Pilot Coppin?” asked Elder Brewster.



THE MAYFLOWER AT SEA. 19

“Yes, yes, think of the power of the suggestion in the
parable of the prodigal son! ”

“You may be right, Pilot Coppin. I had not thought
of life in that way, but I will take a look at it so. You are
a very hopeful man. A ship needs a hopeful man for a
pilot.”

“So does the ship of life, Elder Brewster; one that
would say good cheer if a boat were going to pieces on the
waves, and in that spirit the chances are that we would not
be lost.”

Whales were seen spouting in these days of calmer water.
The ship drove on and on, into the sunlight, into the shade,
into the red morning, into the pale starlight, into the night. :

Whither go they? The sails are the wings of destiny.
Whither go they? The nation of nations is on the sea.
On and on.

On and on. Will the mat ever be spread for an Indian
king, or the copper chain given to chief or sagamore? On
and on!



CHAPTER X.
THE LEGENDARY SWORD.

Tue Pilgrims were long making preparations for their
journey, and they crowded into their baggage many strange
and curious things beside the copper chain and the jewel to
give to some great forest lord. Some of these curious things
are still to be found in old houses in the cape towns and
elsewhere among Puritan descendants.

Among these interesting relicts none is more wonderful
than Miles Standish’s sword, which may still be seen in
Pilgrim Hall in Plymouth.

When the seas began to run smoother again, the boys
and girls of the Mayflower importuned Robert Coppin for
stories in the idle hours.

Who were the boys and girls of the Mayflower? It was
the colonization plan of Robinson, of Leyden, that the
young people should sail first for the founding of a new
colony, and that the older people should follow them. He
himself expected to join them in the New World when the
fathers of the Pilgrim republic should sail, but he did not
live to poilow, them. The pilot of the Argo of old did not



THE LEGENDARY SWORD. 81

return, and the prophets of great movements do not often
live to see them fulfilled, except in faith and promise.

When we look at the names of the boys and girls of the
Mayflower, it would seem that they were a large part of the
company of that ship of destiny. One wonders as one
reads it.
There were Jasper More and William Latham, two boys
in the service of John Carver, the first governor. Jasper
More died in Cape Cod harbor.

There were Love Brewster and Wrastle, or Wrestling,
Brewster, two sons of Elder Brewster, and Richard More
and his brother, in the same family.

There was Ellen More in the Winslow family. She was
a sister of the boys of the same name. The More children
were orphans.

There were Bartholomew Allerton, Remember and
Mary Allerton, and John Hooke, a servant boy in the Aller-
ton family.

There were Joseph Mullins, a child, and the famous
Priscilla Mullins, a girl, in the Mullins family.

There was Resolved White. Peregrine White was born
on board of the Mayflower.

There were Giles Hopkins and Constance Hopkins, and
three more children of the Hopkins name. Oceanus Hop-
kins was born on the Mayflower.

There were two boys in the Billington family, John and
Francis.



82 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

There were Henry Samson and Humility Cooper, both
children in the Tilley family, and John Tilley and Elizabeth
Tilley, a son and daughter.

There were Mary Chilton, Joseph Rogers, and John
Cooke, and a son in the Tinker family; Samuel Fuller and
two boys by the name of Turner. There were Samuel
Eaton, a baby, and several young people in the service of
the principal families.

There were thirteen children of the leading Pilgrims on
board, and most of these were boys. Nobly enough, the
Pilgrims brought their adopted children, or the children of
their charity, with them.

There were more than twenty young people on board the

“our pilot,” who had seen Indians and

ship, and to these
gazed on the wonderful shores and fishing grounds of the
new land, became more and more interesting; his heart
drew them all to him; he was “ Sinbad the Sailor ” to these
young emigrants.

Miles Standish was the man of valor among the com-
pany. Of him the young people must have stood in awe.

But one day when the sun was struggling through the
clouds and the waves were merciful, the boys, among whom
were the Brewsters, ventured to look at Miles Standish’s
sword.

It was a very curious sword. It had an inscription on it
that no one could read. The emblems of the sun, moon,

and stars were stamped upon it.



THE LEGENDARY SWORD. 838

“That is a strange sword that you have, Master Stand-
ish,” ventured Wrastle Brewster, who was young and bold.

“Would you like to see it bend?”

“ Aye, aye, Master Standish! ” cried the boys.

The stout man bent the sword and said:

“ A Damascus blade, or like it.”

“Where did it come from?” asked Richard More.

“From the air! ”

The boys’ eyes were filled with surprise.

“There are mines in the air as well as on the earth,”
said Standish. “This sword is said to have been made of
meteoric metal.”

“When was it made?” asked Wrastle Brewster.

“A thousand years ago, it may be,” said the sturdy
man, flashing it in a sunbeam. “In the days of Charle-
magne, or of Peter the Hermit, or of the Crusades. I do
not know when it was made. It is claimed that it was once
a magic sword, but the charm upon it does not extend to
me. I have nothing to do with any heathenish enchant-
ments.”

“What is engraved upon it?” asked Mary Allerton.

“That John Robinson, with all his learning, was not
able to tell. An old man in Amsterdam poked it over with
his long nose, and said that those were magic words to pro-
tect a devotee from evil. But I am no devotee to the faith
of the pagans for which the charm was wrought. My pro-
tection comes only from my faith, honor, and courage.”



84 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“Where did you get it?” asked little Ellen More, as
Robert Coppin lifted her up above the heads of those who
were crowding close to the rugged Standish.

“Now why did you ask that, little girl? That is a
secret, a story.”

“Tell us the story, Master Standish,” said Ellen More.
“Pilot Coppin tells us stories. Do stories hurt any one?”

“No, no, my little girl. It is Coppin’s little girl you
seem to be—he has made you that by stories. Stories are
fairy lands to such as you—well, never mind, the world is
governed by imagination. I might refuse the boys, but I
could never refuse such as you; marry, I could not. Well,
here is the story of the sword, and an old one it is. Sit
down and you shall hear! ”

The short, stout, ruddy man turned the sword upward,
as saluting on parade.

“T was once, as you know,” he said, “a soldier in the
Netherlands. Lars, all, and be quiet while I speak. In
those days we were in Ghent, and one day I beheld a com-
pany of soldiers about to capture a girl who was out on
some errand in the streets. I protected the girl, and en-
abled her to return safely home.

“ Her father was an old armorer. He was very grateful
to me for what I had done, for his daughter seems to have
been all the world to him. So one day he made his way to
me. He had something under his silk mantle. Ears all,
now, and be quiet while I am talking.



THE LEGENDARY SWORD. 85

““T want to speak with you in private,’ said he. ‘Is
any one around?’

“*No one, sir,’ said I.

“He began to unfold his silken scarf or mantle.

“*You saved my daughter,’ said he. ‘I have brought
a little present to you—not much to look upon, but it is the
most precious gift I have. It came from the skies.’

“He drew back the mantle fold by fold, and the sword
appeared.

“Meteor metal,’ said he. ‘Damascus, and it has a
grand legend, one worthy to make it sacred to a man of
honor.’

“He held it aloft, looking around to see that no one
was approaching.

“What is the legend?’ I asked, and motioned him to
sit down.

“He sat down. An animation as of youth came into his
withered face. How intense and how grateful he looked,
that old armorer of Ghent!

“He said that when he was a young man he went to the
East to engage in the war against the Turks, to bear the
Cross against the Crescent. He was taken prisoner, and was
carried into an Ottoman town, and there was cared for by
avery beautiful young woman. She came to love him, and
she told him of her love; but he said to her that there was
one whom he loved and who loved him in his own land, and
that to be a true man to all good people his heart must be



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THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER

A TALE OF THE CHILDREN
OF THE PILGRIM REPUBLIC
Books by Hezekiah Butterworth.

UNIFORM EDITION. EACH, 12Mo0, CLOTH, $1.50.

‘
True to his Home. 4 Zale of the Boyhood of Franklin,
Illustrated by H. WINTHROP PEIRCE.

“Mr. Butterworth’s charming and suggestive story presents the most inter-
esting and picturesque episodes in the home life of Franklin, as well as a narra-
tive of the salient phases of his public life. The author has succeeded most
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bel’s principle that “life must be taught from life.”

The Wampum}; or, The Fairest Page of History. A Tale
of William Penn's Treaty with the (ndians. Mlustrated by
H. WINTHROP PEIRCE.

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The Knight of Liberty. .4 Tale of the Fortunes of La-
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trations by H. WINTHROP PEIRCE,

The true spirit of the leaders in our War for Independence is pictured in
this dramatic story. It includes the Boston ‘Tea Party and Bunker Hill; and
Adams, Hancock, Revere, and the boys who bearded General Gage, are living
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WINTHROP PEIRCE,

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trations and colored Frontispiece.

“‘The author presents facts in a most attractive framework of fiction, and
imbues the whole with his peculiar humor. The illustrations are numerous and
of more than usual excellence.” —New Haven Falladium.

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full-page Illustrations by J. CARTER BEARD, E. J. AUSTEN,
and Others.

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popular information concerning the pioneers of the great Northwest, and this
one is worthy of sincere praise.”— Seattle Post-Intelligencer.

New York: D. APPLETON & CoMPANY, 72 Fifth Avenue,


HN inthrob Peirce,

The pilot telling the story of Hudson.
(See page 59.)
THE PILOT
OF THE MAYFLOWER

A Tale of the Children
of the Pilgrim Republic

BY
HEZEKIAH BUTTERWORTH

AUTHOR OF TRUE TO HIS HOME, THE WAMPUM BELT, ETC.

ILLUSTRATED



NEW YORK
D. APPLETON AND COMPANY
1898
CopryricHt, 1898,
By D. APPLETON AND COMPANY.


Sword, pot, and platter of Miles Standish.

PREFACE.

_ Tus volume, the eighth of the Creators of Liberty
Series, although it should really have been the first, is for
the most part but fact in picture. The voyage of the May-
flower is one of the most important events in the history of
the New World, and the writer has sought to bring into his
narrative all the known incidents that took place on the
ship during this voyage, which brought our own Argonauts
to our shores. While the methods of fiction have been em-
ployed in the story, they have not departed from the his-
torical spirit. As a method of fiction, the good pilot of the
Mayflower has been made a story-teller, but his stories are
substantially true. The incident of the jackscrew and the
service that it rendered, and that of the copper chain, so far
as such a chain became a gift from the Pilgrims to Massa-
soit, and was made by that chief a sign of peace in his rela-
tions to the colony, were suggested by the Pilgrims’ own
records. The decision of all the Pilgrims who survived the

great sickness not to return with the Mayflower, but to
Vv


vi THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

struggle on for the cause of human liberty, is one of the
noblest examples of moral heroism, and the first Thanks-
giving in the colony, with Massasoit for a guest, closes in
a picturesque way the narrative of the decisive part of a
history which will ever be sacred to America and the Eng-
lish race. These events it has been our aim to present in
pen picture.

The other volumes of this series of books have been suc-
cessful in finding a large audience of young readers, for
which the writer is grateful. The story of the children of
the Mayflower is a haunting theme. He has sought to
make this interpretation of the life of the young Pilgrims
of the Mayflower the best of the series, and he will be glad
if it should awaken an interest to study the Pilgrims’ litera-
ture in those original documents that are now placed within
the reach of all.

It was a Greek adage that “ A people are known by the
heroes they crown.” It is true of our own land. The Pil-
grim Fathers followed the faith of Columbus in moral
enterprise. They stood firm in the storms that would have
wrecked common lives, and have added their names to those
who walked by faith in the great and decisive events of

human history.
H. B.

28 WorcESsTER STREET, Boston, Mass.
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER : PAGE
I.—THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS . : : , . ; 1
II.—T#E BOYS AND THE JACKSCREW . : ‘ a : poaeolet
III.—* By Anava River” . , ‘ . , , ~ 18
IV.—THE PILOT AND THE LITTLE PILGRIMS,—THE STORY OF
THE CAPTIVE INDIAN TUSQUANTO . ; ; 5 . it
V.—EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER . . 2 : , . 89
VI.—THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL . ‘ : eae . 46
VII.—THE TALE or Henry Hupson . ; 3 ; 5 . 56

VIII.—THE voraGE oF THE MAYFLOWER.—*‘ A MAN OVERBOARD” 695
IX.—Tue MayrLowEerR aT sEA—A LEAK.—“ BEAR HARD TO

THE WEST” . ‘ . ; 6 . : 5 eee
X.—THE LEGENDARY SWORD ; % , : 5 6 . 80
XI.—THE coMPACT OF THE MAYFLOWER . 5 : 8)
XII.—THE FIRST DISCOVERY . , . : naeeeas : ao
XIII.—Pitot Coprrn’s SECOND STORY . : : : : . 106
XIV.—KipnapPepD InpIANS.—“ OUR PILOT” . 3 . a . 116
XV.—THE MAN WHO GAVE UP ALL.—THE GOLDEN CHAIN . . 124
- XVI—THE ROCK or FaITH . 3 . : : : : . 1380
XVII.—ELDER BREWSTER’S LOOKING-GLASS . : : 5 . 189
XVIII—In THE woops .. : : Bees j : : . 1538
XIX.—THE THATCH GATHERERS.—HERO, THE MASTIFF OF THE
MAYFLOWER.—A NIGHT UNDER-A TREE . ; 0 . 158
XX.—Inprans : f : A 5 ; 3 , : . 165
XXI.—Tue INDIAN MILL.—A CURIOUS EVENT 5 ; ; . 173
ait THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

CHAPTER i PAGE
XXII.—Massaso1t.—THE COPPER CHAIN 5 nears . . 184
XXIJII.—Deraty or ELLEN More. : 5 : 4 . 195
XXIV.—THE DEPARTURE OF THE MAYFLOWER ‘ ; : . 2038
XXV.—Losr. , ; . . : 6 3 : : . 210
XXVI.—TuHE Waite Foot Kine . ; , 5 ‘ : . 220
XXVII.—THE COPPER CHAIN AGAIN . % 0 5 5 . 229
XXVIII.—Tue First THANKSGIVING . 2 s ‘ : . 2384
XXIX.—“GoopD CHEER!” . : A 7 : : ; ; . 240
APPENDIX.
Tue PLYMOUTH OF TO-DAY .- . ‘ , ; 7 i : . 244
THE LANDING OF THE PILGRIMS . earns 5 : : : . 246
Compact Day. , : 5 , 6 a p , , a . 248



Elder Brewster’s chair and cradle of Peregrine White, Pilgrim Hall. |


Governor Carver’s chair and ancient aninnine wheel’ Pilgrim Hall.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

FACING
PAGE
The pilot telling the story of Hudson . . .~ Frontispiece
The embarkation of the Pilgrims ; : 25
From the picture by Robert Weir, in the ee at Washington.
The departure from Delftshaven 42
From the painting by Charles Lucy.
Reading the compact in the Mayflower’s cabin 90
The Mayflower in Plymouth harbor . 105
From the painting by William F. Halsall.
Plymouth Rock 131
The canopy under which Plymouth Rock is now preserved . 186
The landing of the Pilgrims 149
From the painting by Henry Sargent.
The fort and meeting-house, 1621 170
View of Leyden Street, Plymouth colony . 185
The return of the lost boy . 216
National Monument to the Forefathers 244




Pilgrim Hall, Plymouth.

THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

CHAPTER I.

THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS.

“Bravtirut Leyden! ”

It was a rugged Scottish sailor who ae He had been
a fisherman on the coasts of New England and the Banks of
Newfoundland. He was among the few sailors that had
ever seen these mysterious coasts, for the time was the spring
of 1620. He was held to be a wonderful man in those re-
markable times, for he had seen American Indians.

A man who had seen American Indians before 1620
never wanted companionship. These Indians were to the
Europeans the children of Nature, about eo every one
2. THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

wished to hear. Columbus had awakened a strange and
vivid curiosity in the dusky race, as he had presented to
Isabella the bejeweled Caribs, with splendid figures and
strong arms holding aloft gorgeous birds, on the occasion of
the festival at Santa Fé in honor of the discovery of the
New World. Captain John Smith had thrilled England
with Indian tales, to which was added the sylvan romance
of Pocahontas, who had died at Gravesend in 1617, a con-
vert to the Christian faith and the wife of a gallant English-
man.

These were times before De Foe and his nursery-haunt-
ing narrative of Robinson Crusoe, but all men who had seen
Indians were like De Foes in the public eye.

Delightful as were such sea adventurers, traders, and
fishermen to men and women, they were as giants in the
imagination of the children. What child had not heard of
the lovely Pocahontas, of how she stayed the war club, and
of her marriage amiid the English hedgerows?

Sebastian Cabot, in 1502, had brought three Indians
from Newfoundland to England, and had presented them
to Henry VII. They were the first Indians ever seen in
England. What were their names? We do not know.
What became of them? We do not know, but this we are
pleased to know, that they filled England with wonder.
We are told that when they were found in America they
were clothed with skins of beasts and lived on raw flesh,
“but that, after two years’ residence in England, they were
THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS. 3

seen in the king’s court clothed like Englishmen.” And
this was in those far, wise days of Henry VII, nearly one
hundred years before the Pilgrim Fathers began their wan-
derings.

In 1576 Captain Martin Frobisher brought to England
an Indian whose history was more strange than romantic.
He had attracted him to his ship by the ringing of a bell,
and so seized him, canoe and all. The savage retained his
native fierceness, and we are told that he inflicted terrible
injuries upon himself, not being able to injure others. He
died of England’s cold. There were hearts that pitied him,
both for his sufferings and for the injustice that had been
done him.

The Scottish sailor whom we introduced to the reader
with the words “ Beautiful Leyden” was approaching the
quaint Holland city on a very remarkable undertaking. He
was to pilot the Pilgrim Fathers, or the younger part of the
exiled church of J ohn Robinson, from Leyden to Southamp-
ton, and thence to the New World, where he had been be-
fore, and had seen Indians.

His name was Robert Coppin, a hardy, simple, true-
hearted Scotchman, and his services had been secured in
England by one Thomas Nash, who was bringing him to
Leyden to meet the Pilgrims, then preparing to cross the sea.

“Our pilot,” they came to call him, and there is such
tenderness and significance in the words that we must use
him for the character by which to interpret the life of the
4 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

children of the Pilgrims on board the Speedwell, the May-
flower, on the smooth, pleasant waters of the early part of
the voyage that changed the history of mankind, on the bil-
lows of the storms that followed, and then among the In-
dians on the rude and wintry New England coast. “ Our
pilot ” has a friendly sound, and this pilot had a kindly
heart.

Robert Coppin, “ our pilot,” might well exclaim “ Beau-
tiful Leyden!” He had seen many cities in his day, but
never one like this on the borders of the old Rhine. Leyden
was the oldest city in Holland; here were the ruins of a for-
tress founded before Christ; here was a city of heroes.

When it had been besieged by the Spaniards, the Prince
of Orange had broken the dikes and let in the sea.

Then the prince said to the people:

“As a compensation for your losses I will remit your
taxes or build you a university. Which shall it be?”

The people chose the university. It stood there now,
with its roofs glimmering over the canals and above the
lime trees.

The people had chosen well; some of the greatest schol-
ars of Europe are associated with the University of Leyden.

Robert Coppin, the pilot, who had seen Indians, drifted
up one of the canals under the lime trees. The spring was
waning; the trees were filled with song birds and the gardens
with flowers.

“Thomas Nash,” said the merry sailor, “why do the
THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS. 5

Separatists wish to leave this goodly place? Why do they
not remain here?”

He saw the. church, the tiled roofs, the pleasant gables
and open lattices, and the long lines of water streets or canals.

“ There are not many towns like this,” he added. “One
could stay here forever, if his soul were only content.”

“But the souls of these people are not content.”

“Why, why, Thomas Nash? Have they not liberty?”
asked our pilot.

Some children came down to the landing under the
lime trees. Among them was Ellen More, who had
found a home in the family of Edward Winslow, and
who was to become a little Pilgrim on the Mayflower by
and by.

“Yes,” said Thomas Nash, “ they have liberty, but they
fear that it will not last. Yonder is the common cause of the
discontent.”

“What—the children?”

“Yes, the children. The Separatists wish to found a
home where their children can enjoy religious freedom and
be educated. Go with me to their meetings and you shall
hear.”

They landed under the lime trees.

The Scottish seaman felt a little touch on his hand.

He looked down into a child’s face. It was a beautiful
face, amid waving hair.

“What is your name, my girl?”
6 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“ Ellen More.”

“Do you belong to the Brownites?” The Brownites
were a sect of dissenters.

“Elizabeth Winslow keeps me, sir. She is not my own
mother, but she is a good, good mother to me. May I ask
you something, sir?”

“ Aye, aye—ask on; prattle like yours always holds me.
What is it you would know?”

“ Are you a pilot, sir?”

“ Aye, aye.”

“ Are you to be our pilot, sir?”

“ Aye, aye; and I'll pilot true such girls as you, and
I would die for such a crew. You see I can talk in
rhymes.”

“ And mother Elizabeth said that you had seen Indians.
Will you tell us children all about what you saw in New
England some day, sir?”

“ Aye, aye, my pet; some day—my heart hogs you to
think of it—some day, some day, when I am off duty upon
the open sea. I have heard of your foster father before,”
he added. “Edward Winslow; he has been a great trav-
eler. He is rich, and he is much esteemed, and he is going
to leave this beautiful city, and all, and take you with him,
my pet. Oh, this is a beautiful world; and God is good,
Vm thinking, but men’s hearts are hard. I will tell you
about the Indian that I saw some day.”

“ And you will tell all the children, sir?”
THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS. q

“Yes, yes, you great little heart, all. How many will
there be of you?”

“Twelve little ones, and as many young folks, I heard
mother Elizabeth say.”

“ That is quite a company of children and young people.”

“But you are to be our pilot.”

“T must go now—methinks such as you ought to have a
better pilot than I. And you have, though I am a rough man
that says it—you have, you have. Such as you have a
Pilot that the eye does not see.”

He left the canoe and followed Thomas Nash to the
house of John Robinson, the pastor of the church in Leyden.
The place where the goodly man’s house stood is still marked
in Leyden. It is near the great church, which is also in-
scribed, the tablets being the gifts of grateful sons of the
Pilgrims in America.

Then Robert Coppin, our pilot, stood face to face with
this aged man, the prophet of America, who was to build
beyond the seas, but never to go to the new colony that he
had builded.

There was to be a gathering of the exiles in that house
that day. The pilot would hear what these people had to
say, and then he would better understand their case and
cause. Perhaps he would meet there again the sweet face
of Ellen More, if the Winslows should come to the meeting.
He hoped he would, for he was a lonely man, and the child’s
touch mag ade him very happy.
8 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

There are people that it is a blessing for a lonely heart
to know, and little Ellen More, to whom Edward Winslow
had given a home, was one of them.

The little girl came to the meeting as the pilot had
hoped. She was led by the hand of a lovely lady, Mistress
Elizabeth Winslow. é

After the religious exercises were over, Pastor John Rob-
inson said: “ Our pilot is here, a lusty Scotchman whom we
are glad to welcome. He brings to us a letter from Robert
Cushman, our English agent. This letter I will read.”

He read the letter, which stated that the Mayflower, a
ship of one hundred and eighty tons, Thomas Jones master,
would soon leave London for Southampton, and take there
a company of English immigrants, who would sail in her to
the Hudson River.

The Mayflower! It was probably the first time that
John Robinson’s people heard the name! It was to be a
ship of destiny, the winged messenger of heaven to the west-
ern world!

The people listened to the tidings with intense in-
terest.

“But,” said John Robinson, “this is not the most im-
portant information to us now and here that our good Scotch
pilot has brought. The letter further says that a sixty-ton
pinnace, the Speedwell, has been purchased by the Adven-
turers, our company, and that she is to be fitted out here in
Holland, and that she is to take you to Southampton, and to
- THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS. 9

go with the Mayflower to the new country, and is to remain
there for a year. I will read you this part of the letter.”

There was silence as he read this part of the letter which
so concerned the pastor’s congregation. He then said pleas-
antly: “Our pilot here has seen the New World, and he may
be able to tell us what we need most to carry. Speak out,
Robert Coppin, our people have eager ears to hear you! ”

Robert Coppin, “ our pilot,” holding his hat in his hand,
bowed low and said:

“ May it please your reverence and your honors, if I may
thus address you, who do not desire titles or any flattering
words, the best things that you can carry, which you do not
now have, are, in my humble opinion, presents for the In-
dian chiefs.”

“That is a good thought,” said Edward Winslow, who
had traveled much, and had read the letter of Sir Walter
Raleigh and other adventurers in the New World. “A

very good thought, Master Coppin; and may I ask what’

trifles most please the Indians on these new coasts? ”
“ Chains for the neck,”’ said he, “ and belts for the waist.

The Indians wear chains made of shells. Free chains among:
these people are emblems of dignity and power.
that holds a treasure that can lie upon the breast is Nery,
highly esteemed by the lords of the forest.”

“But,” said Mr. Winslow, “we would hardly be able to
carry to them gold or silver chains.”

“A copper chain with a medal would do as well,” said




10 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

the pilot. “You can buy such chains at the shops in the
town.”

Little Ellen More’s eyes danced. “A copper chain with
a medal for a chief,” said she to her foster mother, Elizabeth
Winslow, when the two had gone out upon the street. “TI
wish that I had such a chain.”

Our pilot had joined Mistress Elizabeth Winslow and
Ellen, and had heard what Ellen had said.

“T will buy you a copper chain and medal if your mother |

is willing, little girl,” said he.

“May I carry it over the sea?”

“Tf the mistress wills.”

“ And give it to an Indian chief?”

“Tf she so wills.’ The answer made light the steps of
the girl.

They came to a shop where jewels, rings, and chains
with medals of Holland were sold, and our pilot asked them
to enter the place. He there purchased a copper chain with
a medal, and put it over Ellen’s neck.

“See,” said he, “it reaches nearly to the floor. “ But
an Indian is tall and big.”

“You are very kind to my little girl,” said Elizabeth
Winslow. “I am glad indeed that we are to have you for
our pilot. I love them that love children; such people are
true friends to all men, and I can read your heart.”

The pilot wondered if indeed the copper chain would
ever find an Indian chief.



\
|
|


CHAPTER II.
THE BOYS AND THE JACKSCREW.

In the houses in the neighborhood many of the people
were preparing their goods or effects for removal to the
quay where lay the ship that was to take them to Southamp-
ton and thence across the sea, three thousand miles wide, to a
wilderness as wide as the sea.

The immigrants had sold most of their household prop-
erty, but each had retained something that he wished to take
to the new land. This one had a chair that he wished to
keep; that one a stand or table with sacred associations.
Elder Brewster had a chest and a looking-glass. The chest
is still to be seen in Pilgrim Hall, Plymouth; America’s
“ Ark of the Covenant” it came to be, on account of the
purpose to which it was put on the last days of the voyage
of the Mayflower. Of this we will tell you the story in
its place. The looking-glass which, with Elder Brewster’s
Bible, may still be seen at Plymton, near Plymouth, in an
ancient Brewster house, is perhaps the most precious of all
American mirrors. Into it all of the Pilgrim fathers and
mothers may have looked, including Robinson of Leyden,
their old pastor, who expected to follow then when the
12 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

younger members of the church should have planted their
church in the wilderness, but who was called to make another
pilgrimage from which none return.

Every one seemed to wish to take on board the little ship
more articles than it could be allowed to carry.

As soon as it became known that the pilot had come and
was at the house of the Pilgrim pastor, the boys and young
men began to gather there to meet him. They wished to
see a man who had been to the land whither they were going.
Among the boys was Jasper More, a brother of little Ellen
More, of the Winslow family. Love Brewster and Wrastle
Brewster, sons of the amiable Elder Brewster, as also John
Billington and John Hooke, a servant in the Allerton
family.

At last the day before that set for the departure came.
The children gathered with the others at Robinson’s house.

They were a merry group on this serious day. John
Robinson seems to have loved young people, and to have won
them as a common father. They appealed to him when in

doubt, and he decided their cases with a sympathetic heart. .

A friend of mankind is always the children’s friend.
Two of the boys and a carpenter came bringing a jack-
screw. They wished to take it on board the ship. The

boys were carrying the screw, and the carpenter was follow- .

ing them.
“That is a curious instrument that you have there, my
friend,” said Elder Robinson to the carpenter. “It is not
THE BOYS AND THE JACKSCREW. 13

great for size, but they tell me that there is power in it,”
looking toward the pilot.

“ Aye, aye, sir, that there is. There has been many a
ship saved from wreckage by a jackscrew. Are you going
to take it on board?”

“That is what I would do,” said the carpenter. “ But
they say that we are in danger of overloading the ship with
storage, that nothing more must go on board of the barges
which are to take us to the ship—not so much as an axe or
hatchet. That instrument might prove very much of serv-
ice in case of a strain on the ship during the voyage.”

“Which may Heaven prevent,” said good Elder Robin-
son. “It is the duty of people to live where they can do the
most good, and carry with them where they go the things
that will be most useful. I am not the captain of the ship,
but if I were I would admit the jackscrew.”

“But, my good man,” said Coppin, “ may it please you,
Tam to be the pilot and so one of the mates, and I know the
value of a jackscrew. We may see hard weather before we
reach the American coast. I will take it on board; the
captain will not object to that. It is small baggage that i
will have to carry.”

One of the boys shouted—* Our pilot! ”

“ Aye, aye, boys; it is good hearts that ye have to say
that. Put down the jackscrew under the trees, until after
the meeting has been held, and I will see that it is taken
on board the ship from the barges. I am to be pilot of
14 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

this goodly company, thank Heaven, and to do your bid-
ding.”

“Our pilot!” said the boys. They all felt that there
was something in the Scotchman’s heart to trust.

“T am glad, my boys, of all this good will. I have seen
the shores on which you are going to settle. I am going
with you, and my heart as well as my hand shall be true
toyou. I wish that I were going to share your lot, but that
will never be the fate of Robert Coppin, the sailor and
fisherman; he must follow the sea, he must follow the
sea!”

“You have seen the Indians,” said Jasper More.

“ Aye, aye; I have seen a forest king in all of his wam-
pum and feathers, with his bow and quiver, and his lusty
men.”

“Will they harm us where we settle?” asked Love
Brewster.

“No, no, I mind not, or they would not have done so
if the captains on the coast had not stolen some of them and
carried them away.”

“Will you tell us about those stolen Indians?” asked
Wrastle Brewster.

“ Aye, aye, my lads, some day, some pleasant day on the
sea. The people are gathering now, and Elder Brewster de-
sires me to stay to this godly meeting.”

“Yes, yes, my good sailor,” said the elder, “I wish you
to stay that you may see what a precious freight you are to
THE BOYS AND THE JACKSCREW. 15

pilot to the unknown shore. Men’s hearts are more than
any gold that they can possess, and it is the worth that is in-

‘visible that determines the destinies of men. It is the elect ~

of time that you are to meet to-day, sir, and to pilot into
the empty world where Heaven has opened the gate of op-
portunity. I like you well, sir, I like you well. But no more
now; the people are coming, and this is our last day to-
gether here! ”

Robert Coppin bowed his head.

The boys took off their hats and shouted again: “ Our
pilot! ”

The Scotchman watched the people as they gathered.
How noble and yet how simple they looked! Captain
Carver and his wife; William Brewster, the deacon, and
Mistress Brewster; Edward Winslow and Mistress Winslow,
and beautiful little Ellen More; William Bradford and Mis-
tress Bradford; Isaac Allerton and his family; Captain
Miles Standish and Rose Standish; William Mullins, his
wife, and the afterward historic Priscilla, then a Puritan
girl; the Hopkinsons; the Billingtons; the Tilleys; the Chil-
tons; and John Alden, who was one day to marry Priscilla.
Many were young people. Their dress was simple; they
wore the crown of character. They had dwelt together in
Leyden in love and unity for nearly twelve years—pilgrims,
led by an invisible hand.

He watched them there as they came toward the house
through the sunny streets cooled by the lime trees. It was
16 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER. |

a silent throng—as still as the placid canals. Some of the
women were weeping.

He saw the children as they came. Pastor Robinson
was to speak especially of the children and to them that
day. Ellen More and her brother Jasper had already inter-
ested him, and his heart went out in pitying love to them
because they were dependent on others, and in a sense
alone in the world. He could feel for broken families and
be as arms, heart, and guidance to such, for such was his
nature.

The sun rose high over the canals and the lime trees.
The storks sat listlessly on the chimneys and gables. The
black flat-bottomed boats lay idling on the waters. In the
square students in dark habits passed thoughtfully to and
fro. Leyden is beautiful now; it was so in 1620.

Why were these people going out of these serene streets
on the Rhine across an uncertain sea into a wilderness of
savages, wild beasts, and tangled trees? Why? why? the
pilot asked as he stood there and wondered. ?

There was not a church, a school, a roof in all the land
to which they were going. Nota single road. The blazed
trail of the red hunter was there; the frail tent of bark and
skins. Not a library was there on all the shining shores.
The forest lords knew not their own history. They were
probably the descendants of some wandering Asiatic race.
Their gods were the beings of a rude imagination. They
had not the vices of the old nations, but to shed blood was
THE BOYS AND THE JACKSCREW. 17

their glory, and revenge was the sweetest passion of life.
The race that seeks blood will perish.

Why? why?

The people had assembled now in the great room. He
would go in and stand by the door, holding his hat in his
hand. He would hear what the grave and gentle pastor had
tosay. This was to be the good man’s last discourse. He
would listen intently. The pastor should answer the ques-
tions that kept rising in his mind on this late midsummer
day, amid the beautiful serenity that ends in the low Rhine
lands the last shortening days of July.

What will the pastor say? He will at least tell his peo-
ple, his young people, why he wills them to go.

The young people all bent a friendly look on the pilot as
they passed into the room. The children sat so that they
could look upon him, as he stood there with his bowed head,
hat in hand. He had seen many strange seas—the Spanish
Main, the island of Newfoundland. They had been told
this; and he had seen a red Indian king.
CHAPTER III.
“BY AHAVA RIVER.”

Tue room was still. The occasional sob of a woman
caused the children’s faces to wear a look of sympathy and
wonder. One woman spoke aloud to another who was deaf,
breaking the silence. She, said, “Not one of us will ever
see this place again, not one! ”’

John Robinson arose, bowed his head in silence, and then
read Luther’s version of Psalm OC, which the company sung.

The house had very large rooms, and a garden which was
a kind of park and now blowing with flowers. In Robinson’s
garden were some twenty or more cabins, and here the poor
people lived. His congregation worshiped in his house, and
the place where this socialistic community dwelt in wonder-
ful harmony and love is now marked with the beautiful in-
scription:

“ON THIS SPOT LIVED, TAUGHT, AND DIED,
Joun Rosrinson, 1611-1625.”

Robinson’s congregation must have numbered some five
hundred. The Dutch came to love this wandering church,
and gathered about the doors of the church, home, and

garden.
18
“BY AHAVA RIVER.” 19

Such people were gathering now, and a whisper went
round that it was the pilot who was standing hat in hand in
the door.

“Tt is sorry that we are that they are going,” said a
rugged Hollander to the pilot in English. “It is kind
hearts that they have, ‘and there is never one of them but
pays his debts. They all know the meaning of the text,
‘Owe no man anything’; ah, they do speak the truth and
pay their debts, but they dispute about doctrines, much is
the pity, I think. What have you here outside? ”

The pilot looked down on the blooming grass, and saw it
was the jackscrew to which the Hollander alluded.

“Tt is a tool that I am going to put on board the boats
that go to the ship as soon as the meeting is over,” said the
pilot. ;

Here the pastor arose again and spread out his hands.
How holy and noble he looked! There were tears in his
eyes, but his face glowed.

“ Here,” said the Hollander to the pilot, “take it away.”

“What, my friend?” asked the pilot.

“That jackscrew; it is out of harmony with the place;
this is a spot where one should take off his shoes, I mind;
and that thing looks like a trespasser—a sinner, it is a world-
ly thing—let me take it out into the garden.”

“Your spiritual sense is keen indeed, my friend,” said
the pilot.

The old Dutchman took the jackscrew and carried it into
90 THE PILOT OF THE. MAYFLOWER.

the garden and set it down amid the flowers, then took it up
again and left it among some weeds, “ where it belonged,”
as he said as he came back and looked into the door again.

John Robinson prayed. The prayer seemed to rise into
the regions of spiritual mystery, and the reverent old Hol-
lander listened as though a very prophet was speaking.

Then the pastor uttered the strange words “By the
River Ahava.”

The pilot listened.

What did it mean? He had never heard of that river be-
fore; in all of his sailings and wanderings he had not
found it.

Then Robinson repeated an ancient record from sacred
Hebrew history:

“And there at the river by Ahava, I proclaimed a fast,
that we might humble ourselves before God, and seek a right
way for us, and for our children, and all our substance.”

He related the Hebrew story that had left this simple
record. He preached from each clause, but when he came
to speak on the clause “and for our children” the room
was silent, and the pilot stepped within the door. Robert
Coppin saw that the pastor had made in his interpretation
the Zuyder Zee a River Ahava, and that “our children ”
were a cause of the event of this memorable day.

“Why do you venture upon the ocean,” said Robinson
in substance, “to find a home in an unknown land? This is
a pleasant place, amid the lime trees, the canals, the sea
“BY AHAVA RIVER,” OL

meadows, the ancient homes, and the towers of learning ‘and
the spires of faith? Why do you leave the pleasant lands of
the vineyards of the Rhine? Children, hear me; ye young
people whom I have so much loved, and shall always love,
listen to me; ’tis the last time that I shall open to you my
heart.

“Tt is for your sakes that the boats that are to bear you to
the Speedwell will sail in the cool of the day.

“Tt is England that has caused you to go into exile, but
her blood flows in our veins; we love her history, her name,
and we must remain Englishmen. In Holland, by the pleas-
ant sea, you are losing your language. This must not be.
The language of old England, of the heroes of faith, of the
homes of our fathers, must be kept sacred. It will be so in
the wilderness.

“You are changing in character here. The habits of a
city of luxury are taking away your strength of soul. Your
faith must be kept pure; wealth is nothing, fame is nothing,
character is all.

“You must be educated; all of you must be educated
in the free air of faith. There must be planted for you in
the wilderness a place where education shall be free.

“ My children, I may never be able to follow you into the
wilderness. It matters not. Your parents may suffer—it
matters not, if so be it is Heaven’s will. It matters not if you
can be educated for a higher life of the freedom of the faith
that the suffering world waits.
99 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“Go forth, go forth, prisoners of hope. All light has
not yet been revealed. New light will break forth from the
world in the wilderness. Some minds can go as far as
Luther, some as far as Calvin, some can see truth in very
vision, but do you not resist new truth, and you must only
follow me as far as I follow the truth of Christ! ”

The pilot saw, as it were, the serene pastor’s soul. The
purpose of the pilgrims was now clear to him. They were
to face the perils of the world, of the seas, and the wilderness,
not for themselves, but for their children; not for their own
comfort, but for the comfort of those who were to come after
them. They loved welfare more than wealth, and others
more than themselves.

Many of them had become poor for this purpose of the
help of mankind. They were not going to seek for riches,
they were leaving worldly riches behind. They had turned
their backs on ease and comfort and the hopes of peace, all
of which might have been theirs.

‘When and where in all history was there ever an assem-
bly like this?

At the close of the discourse, the communion was admin-
istered to those who were to go and those who were to stay.
That scene is worthy of a painting.

Then they went out into the great garden, many of them
leading the children by the hand.

The pilot went out to find his jackscrew in the weeds
“where it belonged.” He took it up, and was about to
“BY AHAVA RIVER.” 23

make his way with it toward the barges that were to go down
the canals to the Speedwell, when he was met by a sea cap-
tain who had come up here from Delftshaven.

“They will all wish to come back again,” said the cap-
tain, in the hearing of the company.

“Pilot,” said Elder Brewster, “you have been to the
country; do you think that we shall ever wish to come back
again?” Roe

“Nay, nay,” said the pilot, “a man’s country is in his soul.
Nay, nay, not one of you will ever wish to come back.”

But the captain’s words echoed.

“ Shall we wish to return with you again, when the ship
lifts her wings for old England, I wonder?” said Elizabeth
Winslow. “O pilot, those words of the captain’s are a hawk
in the sky. What do you think?”

“Shall we wish to come back?” said Rose Standish,
echoing the dark prophecy.

“Nay, nay,” said the pilot. “Come back? Did you
ever hear a woman wish to return from any place where were
the best prospects for her children? Come back, come back?
No; it is prospects that make the heart happy. Present
hardship is nothing if the future is bright.”

“But the Israelites longed for the fleshpots of Egypt,”
said one who had heard what the captain had said.

“There are no Israelites of that kind here, please your
honor,” said the pilot. “The world grows better, else what
is the use a the world?”
94 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“Right, right you are,” said Parson Robinson. “ There
will never be an age when there will be not a better one to
come. The world will be better when we go out of it than
when we came into it, or it ought to be. Whatever happens
to this one or that, it matters not; it is the destiny of these
people to sail. God’s time has come. The sea may rage,
the savages of an unknown land may uplift their weapons
of war, but the time has come for the truth to make a new
nation of free men, who may own their souls, and found a
new nation in faith.”

The pilot turned away and went down to the boats that
were to take them to the Speedwell which lay at Delfts-
haven, some ten or more miles away.

Little Ellen More ran after him.

“© pilot, pilot, do you think that we will ever want to
come back again?”

“No, no, my little one, you will never come back again,”
? ? & ?
said the pilot.

His words were prophetic. Little Ellen More would
never come back.

Of their departure on that day of the glowing prophecy
of Robinson, and of the dark words of Captain Bradford, the
leader wrote a single sentence that might well be set in
gold. Were we to be asked what is the most beautiful
sentence in all history, we would say it was this:

“So they left that goodly and pleasant city which had
been their resting place near twelve years, but they knew


The embarkation of the Pilgrims.
“BY AHAVA RIVER.” 25

that they were pilgrims, and looked not much on those
things, but lifted up their eyes to the heavens, their dearest
country, and quieted their spirits.”

The words pictured Robinson’s own soul, which was the
sentiment of all.

That evening the company went on board the boats that
were to convey them to the Speedwell at Delftshaven; they
started for the ship early in the morning, and Robinson went
with them.

Some of the children wished to go in the boat with the
pilot, and they were allowed so to do. The older colonists
sought the boat of Robinson, Brewster, and Carver, that they
might talk with him as they went along the canal in the late
midsummer day.

The barges were moored near the Nan’s Bridge, oppo-
site the Klok-steeg, where Robinson’s house and garden
were.

They were to go by the way of the Vliet, as a part of the
canal between Leyden and Delft was called. They would
pass a water gate. After some nine miles on the Vliet they
would come to a city and wide canal called The Hague.
They would here find the still placid waters lined with noble
trees, and they would pass in view of Oud-Delft, and the Old
Kirk with its lancet windows, and perhaps in sight of the red-
tiled house in which William the Silent, the father of the
cause of liberty in the Netherlands, had thirty-six years be-
fore been assassinated. They would pass the gates of Delft,
26 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

and leave the town, and enter the Delftshaven Canal, at the
end of which their ship would appear.

The dikes were high in this part of the Low Countries,
and the tide was full, and they found themselves sailing
above the land. They may have stopped at Delft, and
probably did. If so, their journey lasted a large part of
the day.

And now they are upon the canals.

As they passed the gates of Delft, and beheld the slender
spire fading against the sky, Elizabeth Winslow called the
children around her, and pointed out to them the red gables
of the palace of William the Silent.

“Who was William the Silent?” asked litle Ellen More
of her foster mother.

“He was the defender of the liberties of the people of
Holland. Had he not been, it is probable that we should
never have found in that colony a home. For the sake of
liberty he broke the dikes of the sand dunes and let in the
sea. And the sea fought for Holland. He died a martyr,
and his last thoughts were for liberty.”

They were approaching the village of Overschie, and the
children asked Mistress Elizabeth to tell them the story of
the death of William in the cause of liberty, because of this
tragedy all the people had heard.

Mistress Elizabeth was not loth to speak of these things
with the fading town of Delft, that she would never see
more, still in view.
“BY AHAVA RIVER.” oT

THE STORY OF THE SILENT PRINCE.

“William,” she said, taking Ellen More in her arms,
“was a man of few words and wonderful wisdom in council.
So they called him William the Taciturn, or William the
Silent. He was bred to courts, and he lived in a very
splendid way; but when he espoused the cause of liberty he
sold his valuables and gave up all show and vainglory, and
was glad to live like one of the people. He announced him-
self a convert to the Holland faith, and asked to lead the
armies of the Netherlands in the cause of liberty.

“ His love for the cause of the liberty of the people grew,
until he thought and dreamed of nothing else. He felt that
Heaven had given this cause to him, and that he was invisi-
bly, as it were, in the little country of the dikes leading the
hopes of mankind.

“ The war for liberty was waged against Philip of Spain,
who claimed the country for the Spanish crown.

“William was sometimes successful and sometimes de-
feated in a long war, but.in 1579 he laid the foundation of
the Dutch Republic, and Holland and Zeeland proclaimed
him their Stadtholder.

“But Philip of Spain, enraged at the loss of the country
which he claimed as his hereditary right, offered twenty-five
thousand gold crowns for his head.

“Perilous days were his then. He went about his new
republic of freedom as a marked man. The town of Delft
28 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

was beset with mysterious men—ruffians, some of them, per-
haps, Spaniards in disguise, some Italians, all adventurers,
whose presence was suspected and feared.

“There was a little, thin, dark-minded man named Bal-
thazar Gerard, who appeared before the Prince of Parma, in
the interest of the Spanish king, and asked for money to go
to Delft as a pretended refugee. The money was refused,
but a councilor of the prince said to him: ‘Go forth and
defray your own expenses, and if you succeed the king
will reward you, and you shall make yourself an immortal
name.’

“ He came to Delft pretending to be a friend to William.
He obtained a commission to go to France, and there
was made a commissioner to bear dispatches to the Dutch
court, and was admitted into the presence of the prince.

“ When he met the prince with the dispatches he trem-
bled. He had come unarmed this time, and he had prepared
for no way of escape; but the prince’s door was open to him
now, and he would come again.

“On Sunday morning, as the bells were tolling, Bal-
thazar entered the courtyard.

“¢ What brings you here to-day?’ ted the sergeant of
the halberdiers.

“¢T would like to go to church across the way,’ said the
wily conspirator, ‘but see, I have only this travel-stained
attire, without fit shoes or hose.’

“The little dusty stranger with his pious.words did not
“BY AHAVA RIVER.” 99

excite the suspicion of the guard. The latter spoke to an
officer about the matter, and the officer probably asked the
prince for money that the messenger of France might be
able to appear at church decently.

“‘William’s heart responded to the appeal, and he fur-
nished Balthazar with the money for his own ruin.

“On Tuesday, July 10, 1584, the dinner hour was an-
nounced in the palace. The prince with his wife on his
arm, followed by the ladies and gentlemen of his family,
started to enter the dining room. The prince was dressed
like a plain man. He wore a beggar’s hat, a high ruff, and.
a loose surcoat of gray.

“ As he passed along the white face of a little man met
him in the doorway.

““T have come for my passport, prince,’ said the little
man.

“< Who is that?—what does he mean?’ asked the prin-
cess, noticing with alarm the pallor of the man’s face.

““ Merely a person who has come for a passport,’ said he.
‘Give him one,’ he said to his secretary.

“¢T never saw so villainous a face,’ said the princess to
William in an undertone.

“The company passed on to the tables. After the meal
William camé out into the vestibule, and began to ascend
the stairway, upon the left side of which was a recess. Sud-
denly there was a report of a Bee and the prince fell back,

exclaiming:
30 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“*OQ my God, have mercy upon my soul! O my God,
have mercy upon my poor people! ’

“His sister rushed toward him, and saw that he was
dying.

“¢To you commend your soul to Christ?’ she asked.

“<¢T do,’ he answered, and soon after expired in the arms
of his wife.

“ Balthazar had accomplished his purpose. He was cap-
tured and torn to pieces. This is a terrible tale for you to
hear, but if we should ever lay the foundation of a free
colony, and it should grow, we shall owe much to him who
perished for liberty under the red roofs of yonder palace.”

The children looked back. It was, as we may suppose,
near night now. Delft was fading.

The placid canal that led to the port was near. They
still had some miles to go. We can not be sure of the time,
but we will suppose it to be near nightfall when the barges
drifted into the last canal.

“That is a hard story, little Ellen More,” said our pilot,
“but you should know what liberty costs.”

“The Indians could not do a more terrible thing than
that,” said she. And she added: “ The great chief will be
good .to us, for we will give him the copper chain.”
CHAPTER IV.

THE PILOT AND THE LITTLE PILGRIMS.—THE STORY OF THE
CAPTIVE INDIAN TUSQUANTO.

In the long summer twilight and evening the Pilgrims
drifted along the still waters of the canal between Delft and
Delftshaven, which is now as it was then. The water runs
on a level with the wide green plain, on which flocks and
herds grazed then as now. The great fans of windmills
turned in the air. Around the mills were farm sheds, with
walks of powdered shells, and flower gardens that were fan-
tastically arranged amid the green lawns and that blazed
with color. As they passed the gates of Delft, two airy
fortalices shadowed the warm, flower-scented air. They
could not sleep. Winslow says that “the night was passed
with little sleep for the most, but with friendly entertainment
and Christian discourse.” There must have been several
boats, for the Pilgrims numbered one hundred and two, and
the people who went to Delftshaven to bid them a last fare-
well in the morning were many, and their baggage was great,
for many of the exiles had been or were people of means.

The way from the fortalices of Delft to Delftshaven
was a clear one. We will picture it as taking pine late in
32 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

the day. The weather was mild. The pilot had little to do,
and the children turned from Mistress Elizabeth Winslow
to him, and when he sat down after the afterglow had
faded, Ellen More said:

“You said that you would tell us of the Indians that you
have met in your voyages.”

“ Aye, aye, that I did, my little Pilgrim, and if it suits
you well I will tell you of one that I have seen. He was a
chief, or a sagamore, or lord, but I did not find him on the
coast of the new land at all; I met him in England.”

The children and young people gathered closely around
the pilot.

“Ah! ah! what are you about to do?” said Captain
Reynolds. “Away with your story-telling, but I would
not refuse to hear something entertaining myself now, seeing
everything is so quiet; there is a bit of the child left in me
yet, and I will take a seat among the children and be a
child in my ears, as I used to be when my father told sea
tales of the Hebrides. Go on, go on, and I'll not bother you.
The ship goes fair.”

THE STRANGE STORY OF TUSQUANTO.

“There is a country on the cool side of the sea which
Sir Francis Drake first saw, which some call New Albion,
but which he named New England. There is a harbor there
which the Virginia Company call Plymouth, from our
Plymouth. It is a fine country in summer time; great vines
THE PILOT AND THE LITTLE PILGRIMS. 33

are there, heavy with grapes; the sea is full of fish, and the
sky of birds; but oh, the winters—o-o-o-oh! may you never
see the like, or hear the wind blow there!

“Who has not heard of Sir Ferdinando Gorges? He
was the friend of Raleigh, you know, and the enemy of
Essex, as all Englishmen have heard, and he served Eliza-
beth with so much valor on the sea that the crown made him
Governor of Plymouth in 1604—the Plymouth of the oaks,
the grapes, the harbors of fish, where the sky is full of
wings, and the summers are so lovely, and the wind blows
so cold.

“ Now Plymouth is called by the Indians Pawtuxet, and
some fifteen or sixteen years ago Captain Weymouth, one of
the knight’s captains, found at this town of Pawtuxet a
solitary Indian, a lord, a sagamore, or chief, who told a ter-
rible tale. Listen to it—it haunts me sometimes when I am
all alone.

“The Indian said that all of his people were dead. That
a great blight had fallen upon them; that they suddenly
turned yellow and died, and that there was none left to
bury them, and that he alone was left.

“ Alone, all alone, he had gone to his tent, and cried
out when there was none to hear. He could only say ‘ alone,
alone, alone,’ to the sea and the stars.

“Was his story true?

“The sailors went on shore; they entered the evergreen
forests, and wandered among the oaks, the vines and rocks,
384 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

and they found it even as Tusquanto, or Tusquantum, the
lonely forest lord, had said.

“
“They found that it had been so. There were whole
villages of the dead; the bodies lay unburied, with only
the ravens to lament for them. —

“$o Tusquanto was left alone with the dead nation, cry-
ing out on the shores that blosomed still, though the people
were dead.

“Captain Weymouth told the wandering chief of his
own land, of England over the sea. He told him, I think,
of his master Sir Ferdinando, who would welcome such as
he. I hope this is so, for some think that he carried Tus-
quanto away as captive; but be this as it may, Captain Wey-
mouth sailed away from Plymouth with Tusquanto, the only
surviving Indian of Pawtuxet. Now if I were a poet I
would write a poem about Tusquanto and his lament for the
dead tribes.

“Sir Ferdinando, of the Virginia Colonization Com-
pany, was delighted to meet the Indian lord. He took him
to his courtly home, and instructed him in the English
language. He taught him how to talk, that the Indian
might tell him about the country and people over the sea.

“Marvelous were the tales that the Indian began to tell.
Sir Ferdinando used to say that the more he conversed with
him the better hope he gave him of the lands over which he
had been made governor. Tusquanto told him of goodly
THE PILOT AND THE LITTLE PILGRIMS. "35

rivers in the new country, of mountains that pierced the
sky, of roaring waterfalls, of harbors rich in fish, of fruits
that delighted the taste.

“He kept Tusquanto for three years, and then loaded
him with gifts and sent him back to New England as a
land pilot with Captain Thomas Dermer, a sea rover in his
service.

“ Dermer went to the land of the dead a year ago to see
if the tales that Tusquanto had told Sir Ferdinando were
true.

“The men from the ship, guided by Tusquanto, entered
the forests. The woods were still, save the birds singing
there. Grand trees and great lakes were there. It was a
glorious country. Tusquanto had spoken truly.

“They came to a place called Namasket, now Middle-
boro, Massachusetts.

“Tusquanto had told them of a great forest king named
Massasoit. He lived at Pokonoket, a land of green woods
and bright rivers, a day’s journey away. Captain Dermer
sent a message to this great forest king.

“Two kings came to meet him. One of them may have
been a brother to the great king. They were clad in glit-
tering shells, in plumes, and were followed by stately men
with bows and quivers of arrows.

“Captain Dermer wondered when these giants appeared.
He had great reason for surprise, as you shall hear.

“ One of the forest lords approached the captain.
36 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“*Your face is white,’ cried he. ‘You belong to the
race that steal. You steal our people from the fishing
grounds, and carry them away. You are here to steal, and
you shall suffer for your crimes. You shall not return to
the ship; follow the chiefs! follow me!’

“* Captain Dermer is no thief,’ pleaded Tusquanto.

“The whole pale race are thieves!’ cried the red lord.
“They steal our people and carry them away on their great
boats with wings. Listen!

““ Many moons ago we found one of your winged boats
off the shore.

“We stole up to it at night and burned it, and we car-
ried away three of the men. We have kept them to cut wood
and draw water and to make sport for us. They are with
us now. You shall follow back the chiefs to cut wood and
draw water and make sport for us. :

“*The men that we led captive talk our language now.
One of them says that your God will punish us for what
we have done to him. But your God can not do it; we
are too many—we are too many.’ Here the Indian be-
gan to dance and ery out, ‘We are too many! we are too
many!’

“Then Tusquanto said: ‘The men whom you hold are
innocent. They never meant you harm. You do them
wrong to make them captives.’

““But your people do the same. You must follow us
back, and cut wood and draw water and make sport for us.
THE PILOT AND THE LITTLE PILGRIMS. 37

Your God can not harm us; we are too many!’ Then he
danced again.

“*T have brought the sea captain here as a messenger of
a great king,’ said Tusquanto. ‘He comes to meet a king
asa man of honor. We are not to blame for what others
have done. We came to smoke the pipe of peace.’

“Then the great Massasoit spoke.

“ the pipe of peace together, and I will set the captives that we’
hold free. Massasoit is a man of honor!’

. “Then they smoked the pipe of peace together. It was
May time. The birds sang and the Indians danced. There
were Indian runners there, and they brought back the white
captives after a little time. The captives were Frenchmen.

“Such is my story; it is substantially a true one. I
would like to see the great Massasoit. Would not you, my
children? ”

The young people dreamed over the tale: the silent
land; the Indian lord; Tusquanto at the home of Sir Fer-
dinando; the journey toward the Indian country in the
silent woods; and the great king Massasoit, who was gov-
erned by a sense of justice, mercy, and honor.

“JT wish that we might live in Massasoit’s country,” said
little Ellen More. “It may be that the copper chain is
for him. I hope that it is.”

So thought all the little Pilgrims.
38 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“We must attend to our own work now, pilot,” said
Captain Reynolds. - “ Were I to emigrate, I would go to the
country of Massasoit. He must be a godlike chief.”

In the last light of the long sunset little Ellen More held
up the copper chain. Would that chain ever gleam under ~
the forest trees on the neck of some bronze lord of the far,
far West?
CHAPTER V.
EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER.

Tux rising light of the morning at Delftshaven revealed
the outline of the Speedwell, which was to take the Pilgrims
to Southampton. The sails of the ship were already set to
the fresh breeze. The tide was at its full, and there was
given them but a brief time for parting after the baggage
was hurried on board. The pastor fell upon his knees and
prayed for his flock with streaming eyes.

The full tide beat against the ship and they must be
gone. The Union Jack rolled out, and high in the air the
pennant blew westward. The ship swung away from the
pier and drifted down the channel along the “ creeping
Maas beyond the isle Ysselmonde. The company fired a
volley with small arms, a cannon boomed, the smoke cleared
in the sun; Holland faded away, the forms of loved ones
vanished; they would never see the country nor their old
friends there again. Their sails were set to the west; they
were to work the miracle of the ages under the setting sun.

The young folks gathered around the pilot again when
they saw that his hands were free. They had dreamed of

the Indian chiefs of which he had spoken. =
4
40 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

He told them another story of an Indian captive who
was still alive, and whom perhaps they would sometime meet
in the new country, as Indians who could speak English were
of great value to the colonists.

EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER.

“Tt was Sir Ferdinando Gorges who used to tell this tale,
and it was a favorite story among the traders who were look-
ing for fortunes beyond the sea. —

“¢T was one day surprised,’ said Sir Ferdinando, ‘ to see
one Henry Harley come bringing to me an Indian giant.’

“¢ Here is an Indian who can talk English,” ’ said Har-
ley. ‘“He might be valuable to us as a pilot.” ’

“¢¥From whence does he come?’ asked Sir Ferdinando.

“¢“From near Plymouth. He was captured with
twenty-nine other natives, and was taken to Spain to be sold
for aslave. He escaped slavery, and was brought to London,
and he has been exhibited here as a wonder.” ’

“ A wonder he was, lofty in stature, with a haughty face.
He used to say ‘ Welcome! welcome!’ to the crowds who
‘visited him in London. He was a wonder in intellect as well
as in body. He acquired the English readily, and he soon set
Sir Ferdinando wondering in the most unexpected way, as
you shall be told.

“Sir Ferdinando was ambitious, of great wealth, and
hoped to hear of a gold mine on the coasts of the northern
seas, such as had been found in Peru.
EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER. 41

“The Indian wonder came to understand this, and to see
in it a way of escape. So one day he began to speak of the
golden treasures worn by the Indian lords of Pokonoket and
places like that. The eyes of the knight must have enlarged,
and his hearing become keen.

““Gold, Epenow? Did you say gold?’

“«Yes, master, such as your lady wears on her neck.
Gold, not wampum, but gold.’

“* Where did your people find this gold?’ asked Sir Fer-
dinando.

“*Tn the rocks and in the caves.’

“*Do you know where the caves of gold are?’ asked the
trader.

“*Yes, master. We light our council fires there.’

“* Could you pilot my men to the caves of gold?’

““Yes, master, yes. The Indian lords mingle gold with
their wampum. Gold is as thick as berries in the wampum
maker’s lodges. I could take your men to the workers in
wampum and gold.’

“Sir Ferdinando needed to hear no more. He fitted out
a ship and loaded Epenow with presents, and dreamed
golden dreams, like the Spanish sailor who went to find the
fountain of youth.

“So the tall Epenow became suddenly not only a won-
der, but a very great man among the traders, and they sailed
away with him, and he feasted the minds of the adventurers
with marvelous tales of the treasures of the country.
42 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“He must have told them how many of the people had
died of the plague, and they must have imagined that the
gathering of treasures would be easy in such a land. This
was in June, 1614.

“They came to the Plymouth country, where there were
sandy capes and great green islands.

“Tn the harbor where the ship was moored the wonderful
Epenow asked leave to invite his friends on board. They
came and he welcomed them lustily, and probably talked
much in English for English ears, but he talked with the
Indians in the Indian tongue for a very different purpose.
Some of these Indians were his relatives, and among them
were his brothers.

“You may be sure that he and his brothers met most
graciously, and that he had much to say to them that was not
in the English tongue.

«“ When they were gone he said to his English friends:

“ morrow.’

“ them that thou hadst come to reveal the secrets of their
country,’ said the captain. ‘I must guard thee from
harm.’

“Then the captain put upon Epenow flowing garments,
so that he could be caught and held, in case his friends
should seek to tear him away. He also placed two men
over him, to guard him during the visit of his friends.




The departure from Delftshaven.
EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER. 43

“The next day the Indians came in twenty canoes.
How lovely they must have looked in the summer sea!

“ Epenow shouted to them in English. What he meant
by this I can not say. He and they knew.

“The captain ordered his musketeers to be prepared
against any surprise, for all his hopes were centered in the
friendly service of the Indian giant, who must have looked
very queerly in his flowing robes.

“The Indians drifted about on the sea in their canoes
until the captain called to them to come on board. They
were armed with bows and arrows.

“The chief men came at the captain’s call.

« Epenow was in the hold of the ship. The captain was
in the forecastle.

““Come to me, Epenow,’ said the captain.

“Epenow started up and walked toward the captain,
the two guards walking beside him.

“Suddenly he was gone. Whence? where? He had
vanished. He had stepped back. His loose garments were
seen floating in the air, when nothing more was to be found
of him. He had gone over the side of the ship.

““T tried to catch him by his coat,’ said a sailor, ‘ but he
could not be stayed.’

“The sailors rushed to the side of the ship, but were met
by a flight of arrows.

“The canoes disappeared from the sea as rapidly as
Epenow had gone over the side of the ship. The musket-
44 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

eers fired, but the swift canoes swept the waters like wings
of birds, and gone was the wonderful Epenow, and gone
were the Englishmen’s hopes of finding caves of gold
through the pilotage of the sharp-witted Indian captive.

“Tt made the Indians laugh to tell the story of how
Epenow had got away.

“Tt was a sorry voyage that the English made on their
return, without gold or treasure of any kind, and with the
tale of how foolishly they had been outwitted.

“Fancy Sir Ferdinando when the news was brought to
him! But the Indian was not more cunning and deceitful
than had been his captors, and he had a right to be free,
though not by such arts as these.”

“Do you think that we will ever see Epenow?” asked
little Ellen More. “I would be afraid of him.”

“You are not unlikely to meet both Epenow and Tus-
quanto; but were I Epenow, I would be very careful never
to fall into the hands of the English again.”

“T do not blame Epenow for what he did,” said one of
the boys. “I would have done the same. Such things
must make the Indians look upon the traders as enemies.
Deception does not pay.”

“No, my lad,” said the pilot. “They pay dearly who
handle this coin, be they English or Indians.”

“Ts your story quite true?” asked Wrastle Brewster, one
of the boys.
EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER. 45

“Yes; in substance both the stories of Tusquanto and
Epenow are true; you must allow a story-teller to use his
imagination when that only serves to make a fact a picture.”

Some four days were passed on the voyage to Southamp-
ton. There were spires rising in the sunset. Gables—the
palace where Anne Boleyn spent her few happy days with
Henry VIII.

Netley Abbey gleamed afar. Along the sea were great
walls mantled with ivy. On the hills rose great clusters of
oaks. Near by was the New Forest, and farther away lay
Winchester with its cathedral, where were buried the early
kings.

They were approaching the place where Canute ordered
back the sea and it did not obey him.

They were in Southampton Water.
CHAPTER VI.
THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL.

Tue heroes and saints of the world are those who build
life the direct opposite of their natural character, on the
principle that it is only that which is true that has any right
to exist. The Leyden Pilgrims had learned this truth when
they had given up wealth and the prospects of ease in age
that they might live for the highest principles of the soul.
Many of them had been men who had loved their own will,
but had come to see that strength and power lie in giving up
one’s will for the good of a common cause.

The happy midsummer voyage from Leyden was over,
and their troubles were now to begin. They had fallen into
the hands of selfish, overbearing men, who were to carry
them across the sea. They expected to go in two ships.
The smaller of these was the Speedwell, Captain Reynolds,
of which the pilot was good Robert Coppin. She was a
pinnace, as we have said, without decks, of some sixty tons.

The larger ship was the Mayflower, Captain J ones, of
which Christopher Martin was to be the governor for the
company, and which awaited them on Southampton Water.

The voyage of the Speedwell from Delftshaven to
THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL. AY

Southampton Water was full of promise. But the little
ship had been overmasted in Holland, a thing which will
cause the timbers to spring at sea. It has been claimed
that this was purposely done, as Captain Reynolds had con-
tracted to remain in the service of the colony a year, and
wished to escape his obligation. The charge may not have
been well founded, but perilous times for the little Speed-
well were at hand.

It was the purpose of the Pilgrims to have the Mayflower
and Speedwell leave Southampton Water about August
1st, and they expected to arrive on the Hudson River in
October, after a voyage in summer and early autumn
weather.

They were not supposed to be sailing for Plymouth on
the bleak New England coast, where the good Scottish pilot,
Robert Coppin, had seen Indians, but for the sheltered
shores of the Hudson, of which “ our pilot ” will have some
stories to tell.

The overmasting of the Speedwell in Holland, causing
her to leak as soon as she was out on the high sea, changed
the whole plan of the voyage, and was the cause of great
events, which had a powerful and far-reaching influence on
the destiny of the American nation. The hardships of
New England were to school American life.

On a serene day in early August the two ships, the
Mayflower, Captain Jones, and the Speedwell, Captain Rey-
nolds, sailed out of Southampton Water, leaving behind the
48 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

beautiful views of the ivied walls and towers. A part of
the Pilgrims were on the larger and a part on the smaller
ship. The two ships sailed in view of each other, and every-
thing indicated a prosperous voyage. The young folks felt
secure, for “our pilot ” was on board.

The Speedwell crowded on sail, and for a little time
made her name good. But on the wide sea she began to
strain under the canvas, and the boards in her hull spread
apart, and it became hard to keep out the water. The con-
dition grew worse and worse.

“T must consult Captain Jones,” said Captain Reynolds.
“The pinnace will soon fill with water and will sink. We
can never cross the sea as we are now.”

To the leaks we may fancy that Robert Coppin brought
the unwelcome jackscrew, and that the boys cheered when
they saw him about to apply the powerful push to a refrac-
tory beam. The leak was stayed, and we may hear the
pilot say to Wrastle Brewster:

“Ho, my hearty! ”

And the boys respond:

“Ho, my hearty!”

But a stayed leak may cause two leaks to open. The
jackscrew could do much, but it could not overcome the
Atlantic Ocean.

“Tt is little use for a pinnace like this to contend against
the sea,” said the pilot. “We will have to go ashore again.”

“You will not leave us?” said the boys.
THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL. 49

“No, no; I have shipped for all the way.”

Some of the boards sprung so that one could lay one’s
hand between them. It was useless to try to bail out the
water; one might almost as well have tried to bail the
ocean. |

It was a bitter disappointment to the Pilgrims to find
the little ship in this pitiful and perilous state.

“We must go back and repair,” said Captain Reynolds
to Captain Jones.

“Tt will cause us to arrive late on the Hudson,” said
Captain Jones. “But we must put back, or the pinnace
will sink.”

So the ship put back and anchored in Dartmouth Har-
bor, and the Speedwell was overhauled, and was made, as
was supposed, seaworthy.

The two ships started out again, the Speedwell following
close to the Mayflower, crowded with her sightly sails. But
they had hardly gone a hundred leagues beyond Land’s End
when the Speedwell began to yawn and to leak again, and
Captain Reynolds declared to Captain Jones that they must
take back the ship or she would go to pieces. So the two
ships went back again to the coast—this time to Plymouth.
They unloaded the Speedwell, sent back twenty discouraged
people to their homes, and with one hundred and two per-
sons on board set sail for the Hudson, on the 6th of Sep-
tember; or, strangely enough, they set sail from Plymouth,
England, to arrive in Plymouth, New England, for it was
50 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

another power than their own that was directing their
voyage.

What a sifting of people there had been to elect the
heroes who were to make this voyage, in which human
destiny was so greatly concerned! Macaulay said that God
sifted the nations of the world to make the band of Pilgrim
pioneers. Those who had lacked faith had been left behind
in England; the aged had been left in Holland, and now
those who had not the courage had been sent home.

One of the discouraged adventurers, Mr. Cushman, has
left some account of the terrible days when the Speedwell
was found leaking. You may like to read it—it is a
picture.

“ Our pinnace [, the Speedwell, ] will not cease leaking;
else, I think, we had been half way at Virginia. Our voy-
age hither hath been as full of crosses as ourselves have been
of crookedness. We put in here to trim her; and I think,
as others also, if we had stayed at sea but three or four hours
more, she would have sunk right down. And though she
was twice trimmed at [South]hampton; yet now she is as
open and [as] leaky as a sieve: and there was a board, two
feet long, a man might have pulled off with his fingers;
where the water came in as at a mole hole.

“Friend, if ever we make a Plantation, GOD works a
miracle! especially considering how scant we shall be of
victuals; and,“most of all, ununited amongst ourselves, and

devoid of good tutors and regiment [leaders and organiza-
THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL. 51

tion]. Violence will break all. Where is the meek and
humble spirit of Moszs? and of Nenemran, who reedified
the walls of Jerusalem, and the State of Israel? Is not the
sound of Rrnosoaw’s brags daily heard amongst us?) Have
not the philosophers and all wise men observed that, even
in settled Common Wealths, violent Governors bring, either
themselves, or [the] people, or both, to ruin? How much
more in the raising of Common Wealths, when the mortar
is yet scarce tempered that should bind the walls?

“Tf I should write to you of all things which promiscu-
ously forerun our ruin, I should overcharge my weak head,
and grieve your tender heart: only this I pray you, Prepare
for evil tidings of us, every day! But pray for us instantly
[without ceasing]! It may be the Lord will be yet in-
treated, one way or other, to make for us. I see not, in
reason, how we shall escape, even the gasping of hunger-
starved persons: but GOD can do much; and his will be
done! ”

Such a man had not the inspiration for a voyage of the
Argonauts. He went back among the discouraged twenty,
as he should have done.

Robert Coppin brought with him the jackscrew from
the Speedwell when he came on board the Mayflower for the
last time. :

The young folks, after all their terrors, cheered when .
they saw the jackscrew in his hand.

“Tt is shipped for all the voyage,” he said, “like myself.
52 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

The ocean has beaten me once, but I will have a wrestle
with her again.”

“ Cheer, cheer for Robert, our pilot,” said Wrastle Brew-
ster.

“Don’t call me that,” said the lusty sailor; “call me
Bob. We'll get somewhere yet, by the aid of the jack-
screw. It minds me that Providence only knows where we
will land, but we will land somewhere.”

And now the Mayflower is on the sea. It is the sixth of
September. The weather is fair, but the season is getting
late. In a few days or weeks they may expect the equi-
noctial gales.

‘Captain Jones was a hard, testy man. He domineered
over the Pilgrims, and their governor insulted them with
high words. But in the beautiful weather of the early days
of the voyage he probably did not prevent “ our pilot ” from
relating to the little Pilgrims his adventures in the New
World.

England was gone, and the women and the children
must have felt the influence of the kindly heart of “ our
pilot.”

“Tell us new stories now that we are on the new ship,”
said little Ellen More.

“Once when I was in the woods,” said the pilot, “I
saw a little deer amid the cedars, and I made chase for it
so as to get a range to shoot it for our meat.

“T followed it with an Indian trail, when what do you
THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL. 53

think I saw? The animal suddenly went up into the air,
and there it remained. I was amazed. I thought that it
had fallen under the power of some Indian wizard, who,
they say, work enchantment.

“But the deer in the air uttered a pitiful cry, and it
touched my heart. I heeded the cry and went to it. Its
head was hanging down in the air. Its eyes stood out of
its head and its tongue was out of its mouth.

“Tt had been caught in an Indian snare. The Indians
bend over the top of a birch tree and put a noose on it, and
hold it to the ground by a wooden bar set in two notches in
trees, so that it will slip out when a foot gets entangled in
the noose and cause the tree to fly up. This snare had a
powerful birch for its pole, and the deer was young and
slender, and so was lifted into the air as by magic.

“T cut the noose, and it did look at me so pitifully that
I let it go. One hates to kill an animal that he has re-
leased. We love everything that we help and hate every-
thing that we injure. So we must love everybody and
everything.”

“Even Captain Jones?” asked the child.

The pilot did not answer. The wind was fair, the sky
blue, and the ocean a long, rippling splendor, and such was
the voyage for many days.

“Will you not tell us some stories of the Hudson, where
we are going?” asked Ellen More.

“ Aye, I will, if the weather continues fair,” said “ our
54 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

pilot,” “and it may be like this all of the way. But the
season is getting late, and it is storms I fear; I am preparing
for storms; the time for them is at hand.”

He told them tales of the sea birds. Captain Jones be-
times gave him a harsh word, but he was used to such
treatment on the sea.

“ Tt is not the storms that I fear,” said he, “it is the cross
waves and the sickness that such water brings.”

The Mayflower went on and on in the bright September
days.

They were going, as they thought, to New Amsterdam,
where the Dutch had a great plantation. They were to
build up an independent English colony beside the Dutch
colony. So when Pilot Robert promised to relate to the
little Pilgrims some stories that he had heard in the shipping
places of the colonist companies in London and in Holland,
even profane Captain Jones did not object; he liked to hear
such stories himself. He was looking for rough weather,
and he did not object to his pilot’s making merry a few idle
hours when the ship was yet going fair.

There were some rough and reckless people on board,
who had the ungovernable spirit of Captain Jones. Brad-
ford, in his so-called Log of the Mayflower, relates a brief
but vivid story of the career of one of these. He says,
writing after the manner of the Puritans:

“And I may not omit here a special work of GOD’s
Providence. There was a proud and very profane young
THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL. 55

man, one of the seamen; of a lusty able body, which made
him the more haughty. He would always be contemning the
poor people in their sickness, and cursing them daily with
grievous execrations, and [he] did not let [stop] to tell
them, That he hoped to help to cast half of them overboard
before they came to their journey’s end; and to make merry
with what [property] they had. And if he were by any
gently reproved, he would curse and swear most bitterly.

“But it please GOD, before they came half [the] seas
over, to smite this young man with a grievous disease; of
which he died in a desperate manner and so [he] was him-
self the first that was thrown overboard. Thus his curses
light{ed] on his own head: and it was an astonishment to
all his fellows; for they noted it to be the just hand of GOD
upon him.”

In this manner the Pilgrims viewed all of the events of
life. They believed that Providence was their real pilot,
and that they were on the sea of destiny. Every event that.
happened they held to be ordered by God. In all things
their faith was their anchor. They were Argonauts sailing
not for themselves, but for the welfare of mankind.
CHAPTER VII.
THE TALE OF HENRY HUDSON.

Day after day the Mayflower moved on under heavy
sail. The white wings of the birds that followed her far
out of Southampton Water disappeared, and the New
World’s ark, the ship of the new Argonauts, was steadily
piloted over the calm solitude of the waters toward the west.

Many of the passengers who had been sick in the early
days of the voyage were well again. Governor Carver and
his wife, Rose Standish and Elizabeth Winslow—how sad
was the fate that awaited these lovely and gentle spirits!—
might talk now of the nation that they hoped to found where
the children would be educated in freedom of faith, and in
which the ancient prophecies should be fulfilled.

We can fancy Elder Brewster repeating to them the
ancient Jewish prophecy:

“ A stone is about to be cut out of the mountain without
hands, that will break into pieces all the other nations of
the earth.”

“But what will become of the Indian races?” said
Elizabeth Winslow, whose heart loved every one and pitied

all who were unfortunate.
56
THE TALE OF HENRY HUDSON, 57

“They will either become converted to God or will
perish,” said the elder. “They have been a bloody and
revengeful race, and it may be their hour of salvation is
come, or that their cup of iniquity is full.”

“We must all labor to bring them to a knowledge of the
truth,” said the amiable lady. “ Who do you think these
rfces are, and how do you imagine that they found Amer-
ica?”

“JT think, my lady, that they may be the descendants
of the lost tribes of Israel. Or they may have been wan-
derers from the regions of the Nile across Asia in the days
of the Shepherd Kings. Or they may be the descendants
of some Mongolian race.”

“How did they find America?”

“That would not have been difficult in the long gone
days. The strait between Asia and America (Behring’s) is
not wide now, and it must once have been very narrow, and
perhaps there was once no strait there at all. And nations
wandering across Asia could have easily. made the passage
to America in boats.”

“Oh,” said Mistress Elizabeth, “if the Indians are the
descendants of the lost tribes, and we could convert them,
what a glorious voyage this would be! It makes my heart
throb to think of it.”

“One of two things,” we imagine the prophetic Carver
to have said, “ will happen to these races. They will either
give up their savagery or perish. That is the law of the
58 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

human kind when a superior race mingles with a lower
race.”

“Tt was Robinson’s wish that we might win the Indian
races back to God. Of this he dreams continually; for this
he prays. Oh, that he could have crossed the sea with us,
and inspired us for this great work! ”

“ We are being guided by an unseen hand,” said Carver.
“But whether we are to found a new nation or to convert
an old one we can not see; we can only know that whatever
may happen, the law of righteousness will live, and those
who obey it will rise and those who reject it may fall.”

“Our people have not treated the Indian races well on
their voyages,” said Rose Standish. “TI hope we will follow
the heart of Robinson in all that we do.”

The October moon was on the sea. The ship was drift-
ing fair, and Robert Coppin, the pilot, came toward this
group who were reviewing the thoughts of Elder John Rob-
inson in regard to the conversion of the Indians, and listened
to their hopes and plans.

The young people and children gathered around him.
The little audience was almost a solid one, and they engaged
in most earnest conversation as the ship’s lights swayed under
the moon and stars.

‘When the older people had ceased to talk in regard to
the conversion of the Indians, Love Brewster said:

“Now let me ask ‘our pilot’ what he has heard in re-
gard to the Hudson River, where we are going. Pilot
THE TALE OF HENRY HUDSON. 59

Coppin, who was Henry Hudson, and how did he find the
river where the Dutch have settled? We should surely
know more of him.”

To this inquiry Elder Brewster assented as one emi-
nently proper to be made. Mistress Bradford, Mistress
Standish, and Mistress Winslow seemed as interested in the
question as the boys Jasper Richard More and Wrastle and
Love Brewster. Mary Allerton and Priscilla Mullins sat
side by side, eager to hear what Coppin would say. The
whole company became silent, and under the moonlit sails

Robert Coppin related the following strange story:

CAST ADRIFT.

“Tt is a story to draw tears that I will tell you now.

“There was once a hardy sailor, and where he is now no
one knows, be he living or dead. His name was, as you
have already guessed, Henry Hudson, and he dreamed of
making great discoveries in the north after the manner of
those that had been made in the Spanish Main. His early
life is a mystery, but he had one boy whom he dearly loved,
and he took this boy wherever he went on his many voyages.

“He made many voyages, and those of them to the
north had filled the shipping world with wonder. He pre-
pared for a fourth voyage, on which he expected to find a
polar sea.

“While dreaming of the lands he would discover, and
that would make him rich and famous, he became acquainted
60 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

with a young man of most engaging manners but dissolute
habits, named Henry Greene. The better class of people
had withdrawn from association with this false-hearted
youth, and even his own family had left him to his own
fate.

“The great navigator pitied him, and sought to reform
him. He took him into his heart and his own home, and he
said to him one day:

“* Henry, go with me to the north. You shall share in
the glory of the discoveries we will make, and on your return
I will report you to the crown and secure for you a place in
the royal service.’

“Henry Greene loved roystering and dissolute company,
but he was so abandoned by friends and fortune that he
accepted the invitation to sail to the mysterious countries
of the north, where the nights were long, where the ice
mountains glittered in the moon, where the northern
lights filled the sky with wonder. So he made himself a
~ devoted friend of the captain, and Henry Hudson sailed .
away for Greenland in April, some eleven years ago (1610),
with insufficient provisions, and he reached Greenland in
June.

“They came to a strait in the ice lands that led to an
inland sea (Hudson Bay). Here was a land of desolation
and surprise. But it was a land of winter and night, of
savage animals and lone Indians.

“The summer passed, and Hudson, having failed to find
te a a

THE TALE OF HENRY HUDSON. 61

a country that promised him wealth, proposed to his men to
winter in the wild regions of darkness, ice, and snow.

“He was a quick-tempered man, although he so much
loved his son and had taken such a friendly interest in the
fascinating Henry Greene.

“The men rebelled at the thought of staying in the
land of desolation, where there was neither wealth nor
glory for them. They knew that their provisions were
scanty, and there was but a poor prospect of hunting in
the cold.

“¢T will have to leave some of you behind,’ said the
irritable captain, when the men complained that the ship’s
provisions were getting low.

“The men began to plot against him, and among his.
secret enemies was Henry Greene.

“One day, when his friends were below decks, one of
the conspirators closed the hatch and shut them down, and
the mutineers at once seized the captain and bound him, and’
put him, with his son and some friends, among them a
faithful carpenter, on board the shallop, which they had
towed after the ship. They then formed a company of their
own to sail the ship, and they made Henry Greene captain,
and resolved to return immediately to England. That
was a dark day when Henry Hudson, a man of noble parts,
met Henry Greene.

“Yor a time the ship drew the shallop after her. Then
came the fatal time to cut the rope. As they did so, the
62 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

lost navigator heard a voice ringing through the air that
pierced his heart.

“Tt was that of the villain, Henry Greene!

“Henry Greene, captain, sailed away, leaving the shal-
lop rocking on the icebound sea, with only provisions for a
few days. Whatever became of Henry Hudson we do not
know. Ships were sent out to find him, but he was never
seen. He probably has perished amid the ice, he and his
faithful son.

“But we do know what became of the faithless Henry
Greene. He landed on the coast for provisions, and was
set upon by the natives and murdered.

“ The survivors undertook to take the ship home. Their
provisions failed, and when they came to Iceland they were
too weak to walk the decks. They told their tale. So all
of these people who were engaged in plans to cast others
adrift were themselves cast adrift on the sea and on the
world.

“ But it was this same Henry Hudson, with his faithful
boy, who discovered the land for which we are now sailing,
and which they call New Amsterdam. He passed through
raging waters [Hell Gate] and came to a most beautiful bay,
and sailed up a river through a land of plenty, which we may
find, and have better luck than he. The best thing that
can be said of any man is that he is true-hearted, and all who
are will have the heartache some day in this troubled world.

“T+ ‘is a hard and lonesome story.”
THE TALE OF HENRY HUDSON. 63

“Ts it the Hudson River that was found by the captain
whom they cast adrift in the ice to which we are going? 22
said little Ellen More to our pilot, as he sat with a very
troubled and far-away look in his face.

“ Ah! child, ah! child, you may well ask me that.
Older heads might think that question. I wonder myself if
we shall find ourselves there at last.”

The child was startled at the strange look in the pilot’s
face. She laid her white hand on his rough palm and
said:

“Tt may be that we will go to the country of the
great and good Indian king of whom you spoke. It |
may be that we are carrying the copper chain to him. It
makes me feel glad to think of it. How I should like to
see him wearing it with a pleased look! And all under
the greenwood trees. Do you think I will, Pilot Cop-
pin?”

The pilot smiled and then he shuddered.

The Mayflower was carrying a dark secret in the head of
her captain which it is probable that only the pilot suspected.
His suspicion, were it so, would not have troubled him had
not his heart turned toward the Pilgrims in their high pur-
pose, struggles, and sufferings.

Was the Mayflower really bound for the Hudson
River? :

Only Captain Jones and the planters of the Dutch col-
onies in England and Holland really knew. But the
64 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

pilot would know some day. There would come to him
a secret order from Captain Jones that would disclose to
him his real purpose. So under a dark secret were they
crossing the sea; the angel of Providence was still in all

events.
CHAPTER VIII.
THE VOYAGE OF THE MAYFLOWER.—“ A MAN OVERBOARD.”

Tux serene days passed, and cross waves began to shake
the ship and to cause a renewal of seasickness among the
passengers. The blue sky became overcast and wild, sullen
under clouds drifted across the wide gray canopy of cloud
that shut out the sun.

Storms were approaching. One of them struck the ship
in such a manner as to cause her to strain and tremble. The
waves became higher and higher. The sea rolled green and
white under a dim gray light.

‘The Mayflower was in the middle of the great ocean,
and a hundred times a day seemed to be lost as she sank
into the trough of the sea.

The first storm was succeeded by another. The rain
fell in sheets and the nights were blackness. The wind
lashed the waves. It seemed impossible that the ship could
ever survive the war of the elements that raged on every
side.

“O pilot,” said Rose Standish, “did you ever see
weather like this before?”

“Many a time, lady.”
65
66 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“ Did the ship live?”

“You may comfort your heart when I tell you that she
did.”

“ We are but a speck in infinity,” said Mistress Bradford,
“and I do not feel that I shall ever rest my foot on the land
again. But what matters it if you may live to carry the
Gospel to the Indians? I have ceased to care for myself.”

Storm followed storm. One day Captain Jones said to
the pilot:

“We can not bear a bit of sail; we shall be forced to
hull” (to drift without sails).

The days when the ship was in hull were terrible indeed.
All felt their helplessness. The women cried; the children
gathered in a pitiful group and cried out:

“O pilot, when will this weather be over?”

“Keep up your courage, my hearties. I have weath-
ered storms as hard as these. You shall live to see sunny
skies again, and great oak forests, and Indian kings. Heay-
en holds her own in her hands, and John Robinson’s prayers
have not gone up to heaven in vain. Trust, trust, trust! ”

Poor little Ellen More clung to the pilot wherever he
went, even at the wheel.

“Tam all alone,” she said; “you do pity me, don’t you?
I am all alone in the world and on the sea.”

“Tt is the Mistress Winslow that is good to ye,” said the
pilot. “She is good to everybody. You must cling to her,
and not to a poor rover like me.”
THE VOYAGE OF THE MAYFLOWER. 67

“But, pilot, I love you.”

“Tove me, love me, Ellen More? Oh, that these dull
old ears should ever hear that. O my little girl, that goes
right to my heart, and while Robert Coppin lives you shall
never want for a friend. Little Ellen More, I would die
for such as thou.” :

“O Master Coppin, do you say that? Suppose we
were to go down?”

“Then I will go down with thee in my arms. What
am 12?—a poor sailor! What is life to me? Iam not sent to
convert the Indians. I would love to die for such a heart
as yours, Ellen More.”

“You will let me cling to you, won’t you?”

“Yes, yes, my darling heart. This old pilot will let you
do that—he will now.”

“ At the wheel?”

“Yes, at the wheel.”

“ And if I should die, you tell me the way I must go.
Pilot, pilot, you will tell me the way.”

“© Ellen More, Ellen More, this breaks my heart. But
T will be true to the wheel. If a true heart will bring us to
land, you will see the light of the shore again. Living or
dying, I will be true to thee, Ellen More.”

“ And I will cling to thee, Pilot Robert—let me call you
that—you are our pilot.”

“No, no, child.”

“Then who is?”
68 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“God. He holds the waters in the hollow of his hand.”

As the ship lay in hull, drifting sailless and helpless, a
great wave dashed over her, and the cry arose:

“John Howland has gone overboard! ”

“Overboard! a man overboard! ” passed from lip to lip.

“John Howland is overboard! ” cried the captain.

The ship was rolling from side to side. One could see
but a little way ahead, for everywhere in a dim light rose
the billows.

John Howland, who was in the service of Governor John
Carver, was a strong, lusty young man, one of the last of the
passengers who would seem likely to meet with any accident.

He had come above the gratings when the ship was roll-
ing and the waves dashing above the decks, and had been
thrown into the sea.

“ John Howland is overboard! ” said little Ellen More to
the pilot, in terror. “You save him, oh do!”

The topsail halyards hung over the helpless ship and
out into the water.

John Howland went down some fathoms under the
waves, but he was buoyed up, and, strange as it may seem,
caught hold of the dragging halyards under the sea, and his
strong arm held to them with a grasp like death.

The pilot saw that the halyards were shaken by a power
under the waves.

“Haul up the halyards, gently, gently, for Heaven’s
sake, gently, man! ”
THE VOYAGE OF THE MAYFLOWER, 69

He seized the ropes.

They drew up the halyards. John Howland came up
with them. The pilot shouted as he saw the young man’s
head.

“Saved!” he cried. “Pass the word. John Howland
is saved! It is a miracle.”

They drew John Howland up into the ship by a boat
hook.

“But for the halyards I should have perished,” said the
young. man.

“But for the providence of God you would have per-
ished,” said Elder Brewster.

They carried him below and laid him down. The
shock left him with but little strength and he fell ill.

“John Howland, a good spirit was with thee in the
storm,” said the pilot. “You will recover, and will see
the light of land. May be that you will live to tell
your grandchildren of this strange event; may be you
will.”

Calmer weather came under colder skies. The women
shrank from the chill. The children felt the bitter weather,
all except little Ellen More. She tented under the great sea
coat of Pilot Robert, and helped him with brace and wheel
to direct the rudder to the gray west.

November was now on the ocean. One of the passen-
gers, William Butler, in the service of Dr. Samuel Fuller,
we think, fell very sick. He longed to see the new land,
70 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

and the heart of all went out to him as he lay in his bunk
day by day, tossed by the dark agitated sea.

One morning a deep silence fell upon all.

“Tt is over,” said Dr. Fuller to our pilot. “ You must
do your office.”

They wrapped the body in the scanty clothing he had
brought in his chest.

Then Elder Brewster knelt down beside the dead, and
the sublime words of Hebrew psalmody, “ Lord, thou hast
been our dwelling-place in all generations,” rose amid the
storm.

Our pilot took up the body gently and laid it in the
great graveyard of the deep, and as it sunk from sight for-
ever all bowed in tears, and heard the elder’s voice saying:

“Until the deep gives up its dead! ”


CHAPTER IX.

‘THE MAYFLOWER AT SEA.—A LEAK.—“ BEAR HARD TO. THE
WEST.”

Iw these troubled days of the equinox, the cross seas, and
the long-continued fall storms, the captain was one day seen
to be in an unusually ugly and profane mood. He called to
him the ship’s carpenter and stormed at him, then the
pilot, and talked to him in a high tone. One of his exclama-
tions rose above the winds. It was:

“Tf it can not be replaced we shall all go down, and the
ranters will go with us. That is all.”

Some of the Pilgrims, many of whom were lying on their.
beds, which were soaked with the dashing of the sea, heard
these ominous words and started up. The dismal exclama-
tion of Captain Jones was passed from one to another, and
when it reached little Ellen she said: |

“Then I will never live to give the copper chain to the
red forest king. But Pilot Robert, he can save us.
like his has power with God.” A great sea dashed upon the
ship, and the water came over the decks.

Edward Winslow went to the pilot, seeing that the cap-

tain was in no mood to be questioned.
6 71
"2 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“Pilot, what was it that the captain said? That the
ship was in danger?”

“The ship is straining, sir, and there is a leak. The
main beam has sprung out of place.”

Edward Winslow went back to the men of the May-
flower.

“The ship,” said he, “is straining from stem to stern.
Even our pilot says that we are in danger.”

“ What shall we do? Shall we have to return?” asked
many voices.

The captain came below.

“Ts the ship in danger?” asked Elder Brewster.

“Tn danger? Well, I should say she was. The main
beam is sprung, and the men are toiling at the pumps.
What a miserable expedition all this is! ”

“Would you advise us to return?” asked the governor
of the ship, who was the adviser of the Pilgrims.

“No!” thundered the captain. “It is as far from here
to England as it is to America. We will go on or go down.
We would be as likely to go down in an attempt to return as
we would to go on. No, no, whistle, ye winds, and dash
over us, ye seas! We will go on or down, and it is down
that we will go unless the beam can be forced into place
again.”

Many of the women—the Pilgrim mothers—were sick,
but they started up and began to pray and to talk in the
language of faith to each other.
THE MAYFLOWER AT SEA. 13

The waves rolled high, and the ship quivered, and the
leak grew. There were faith, terror, brave words, and falter-
ing lips among the little nation sitting by their sea-soaked
beds in the dim light below. Sea after sea smote the wind-
ward side of the ship. The frail bark seemed as a thistle
down in a November hurricane.

For hours the terror lasted. Night came, a darkness of
death. Few dared to sleep. :

The gray morning rose over the ocean. The sailors were
worn out, and hope seemed to have fled.

At last the Pilgrims heard a firm step on the stairs.
There was faith in it, and it was coming down. The men
lifted their hands when they saw who it was. The women
cried out and wept.

“Robert Coppin, our pilot,” said Elizabeth Winslow,,
“ean you save the ship?”

“Pilot Robert, you have come to be our Moses,” said
Rose Standish. “TI can feel it, I can feel it.”

“ God help you to save us,” cried Mistress Carver.

A child’s voice rose above the rest.

' “We will! he will!”

It was Ellen More.

The pilot bent his face, full of love and pity, on the
child.

“TI will do everything human power can for you, my
girl.”

“The chief must have the copper chain,” said she.
Th _ THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“ Aye, aye, and I have seen as dark a stress of weather as
this, but never a ship so strained in mid-ocean.”

A new resolution seemed to come to him with the words
es the child and the vision of the copper chain.

’ He suddenly put his hand to his head and exclaimed:

“Thank God!”

“What?” asked many voices.

“The jackscrew, boys, where is the jackscrew? Bring
me the jackscrew! ”

They brought the curious instrument out of the baggage;
he seized it and rushed toward the broken rib of the ship,
crying, “ Send the ship’s carpenter to me!”

He applied the power of the screw to the beam, or rib,
which had been wrenched from its place. The ship’s car-
penter joined him at once, and Wrastle and Love Brewster
stood by him and a crowd gathered around him.

The captain came roaring down and cleared the boys
away.

“ A jackscrew!” cried one of the officers. “A jack
straw might answer as well.”

“But the beam is moving back,” said the pilot.

“Then,” said the officer, “the Power that uplifted the
arm of Moses must be in it; if you can do that you can do
more than old Canute did when he ordered back the sea.”

But the beam moved. Slowly, and at times it obeyed
the power applied, when the ship righted and the beam was
lifted into its place.
THE MAYFLOWER AT SEA. 5

“The beam does not spring back,” said the pilot, “and
I move it into place a little every time the ship rights.”

Hour by hour he applied the jackscrew, and the captain
and the officers of the ship and the Pilgrim company came
and stared as they saw Robert Coppin and the ship’s car-
penter overcoming the elements and the adverse forces of
gravitation, until the rib of the ship stood firm again.

At last the pilot started up.

“Wrastle Brewster,” said he, “go and tell little Ellen
More that the Mayflower is safe! It was not the jack-
screw—no, no, it was a Power behind the jackscrew
that guided us and has provided for us. Providence
has ordered that the Pilgrim company shall build an
everlasting habitation of faith and freedom beyond the
sea!”

They came to calmer waters.

The Indian summer weather, so beautiful upon the land,
sends its influence far out to sea.

One day the captain said to Pilot Robert:

“We must run landward soon. Steer hard toward the
west.”

“Captain, it is the Hudson River for which we are
booked to sail.”

“Pilot Robert Coppin, don’t you dare to reply to me or
to ask me any questions. It is your office to obey, and not
to reason aloud or to argue with any one. I know my busi-
ness, sir. Steer hard toward the west.”
%6 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER. —

“You surely are not deceiving these poor people? ”

“The people’s affairs are no part of your duties, sir.
Steer toward the west. If we shall touch upon the Plym-
outh country what is that to you? You are to obey me,
sir, and to ask no questions. I have given you great liber-
ties in this voyage, and these people seem to have brought
you over to them. They did not employ you; it was I,
and I know what I am doing, and do not want and will never
receive any unasked-for advice from any inferior officer.
So not one word more. Cease you story-telling; stop all
this association with women and children. Attend in the
future strictly. to your own duties, and bear toward the
west! ”

Robert Coppin, pilot, had probably expected such an
order. He understood it. It was in his contract to obey
the captain and not to follow his own sense of equity, of the
truth of which he could not be sure.

But to “bear hard to the west ” would take the ship to
a long sandy cape in Massasoit’s country, before it could
come to the Hudson River. That cape was known as Male-
bar and also as Cape Cod.

What was the captain’s purpose in prolonging the jour-
ney amid the wintry seas?

Had he been bribed by the Dutch to keep away from
their rich territory at Manhattan?

If so, no one on board but the pilot could have suspected
it at this time.
THE MAYFLOWER AT SHA. TT

So the Mayflower goes on her way over the troubled -
waters.

There is a white wing in the sky. A sea bird appears.
The pilot bears hard to the west! . i

Beside the jackscrew there were other things that the
Pilgrims were bringing over the sea that excited the in-
terest of all in the days of quiet water. Elizabeth Wins-
low had a curious mortar and pestle. Where would it
find use?

Mistress Brewster had a looking-glass, into which it was
the delight of the young people to see their faces. It was
taken out of the chest at times and passed around, and was
very carefully handled. It answered the question:

“ How do I look now?”

Mistress Elizabeth Winslow had a very beautiful figured
mat, which was like a picture to unroll. It was green.

“It is fine enough for a king,” said Pilot Coppin one
day when Mistress Winslow had unrolled it. “The Indian
kings sit down on the ground when they are in council.
Perhaps we shall hold a council with an Indian chief some
day. If so, we would want that mat.”

“The Indian chief smokes in his council,” said John
Billington, the boy. “Perhaps he would want your silver
pipe.”

“That is a point well taken, my boy. But I would be
slow to give away the pipe that the Traders’ Company gave
tome. Let me go to get the pipe.”
78 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

It was in the few calm days of the latter part of the voy-
age. The people seemed all to fall into the spirit of amusing
and entertaining each other.

So Mistress, Brewster brought out the looking-glass and
laid it down on the famous chest on which the compact
would one day be signed, and the sea-worn people looked
into it to see “ how they looked now.”

Mistress Brewster spread out the green rug before the
chest, and Pilot Coppin came bringing the silver pipe, which
was his special treasure, it having been given him for faith-
ful service on the high seas.

Others brought out litle keepsakes and treasures, and
related the simple history of them.

John Billington had a quick fancy. He began to tell
little Ellen More a fairy story: how that the mat would some
day be unrolled under the oaks of Virginia, and a great king,
with fur robes and feathers and pearl shells, would come and
sit upon it, and smoke the silver pipe.

Ellen, too, was a child of imagination, and she called
Pilot Coppin to hear the wonderful tale that John had
told.

“Strangely enough,” he said, “such dreams as these
come true. The soul’s purpose is in them and behind them.
I believe in fairy stories, though others do not. There is
good suggestion in them. The world is governed by sug-
gestion.”

“ Say you that, Pilot Coppin?” asked Elder Brewster.
THE MAYFLOWER AT SEA. 19

“Yes, yes, think of the power of the suggestion in the
parable of the prodigal son! ”

“You may be right, Pilot Coppin. I had not thought
of life in that way, but I will take a look at it so. You are
a very hopeful man. A ship needs a hopeful man for a
pilot.”

“So does the ship of life, Elder Brewster; one that
would say good cheer if a boat were going to pieces on the
waves, and in that spirit the chances are that we would not
be lost.”

Whales were seen spouting in these days of calmer water.
The ship drove on and on, into the sunlight, into the shade,
into the red morning, into the pale starlight, into the night. :

Whither go they? The sails are the wings of destiny.
Whither go they? The nation of nations is on the sea.
On and on.

On and on. Will the mat ever be spread for an Indian
king, or the copper chain given to chief or sagamore? On
and on!
CHAPTER X.
THE LEGENDARY SWORD.

Tue Pilgrims were long making preparations for their
journey, and they crowded into their baggage many strange
and curious things beside the copper chain and the jewel to
give to some great forest lord. Some of these curious things
are still to be found in old houses in the cape towns and
elsewhere among Puritan descendants.

Among these interesting relicts none is more wonderful
than Miles Standish’s sword, which may still be seen in
Pilgrim Hall in Plymouth.

When the seas began to run smoother again, the boys
and girls of the Mayflower importuned Robert Coppin for
stories in the idle hours.

Who were the boys and girls of the Mayflower? It was
the colonization plan of Robinson, of Leyden, that the
young people should sail first for the founding of a new
colony, and that the older people should follow them. He
himself expected to join them in the New World when the
fathers of the Pilgrim republic should sail, but he did not
live to poilow, them. The pilot of the Argo of old did not
THE LEGENDARY SWORD. 81

return, and the prophets of great movements do not often
live to see them fulfilled, except in faith and promise.

When we look at the names of the boys and girls of the
Mayflower, it would seem that they were a large part of the
company of that ship of destiny. One wonders as one
reads it.
There were Jasper More and William Latham, two boys
in the service of John Carver, the first governor. Jasper
More died in Cape Cod harbor.

There were Love Brewster and Wrastle, or Wrestling,
Brewster, two sons of Elder Brewster, and Richard More
and his brother, in the same family.

There was Ellen More in the Winslow family. She was
a sister of the boys of the same name. The More children
were orphans.

There were Bartholomew Allerton, Remember and
Mary Allerton, and John Hooke, a servant boy in the Aller-
ton family.

There were Joseph Mullins, a child, and the famous
Priscilla Mullins, a girl, in the Mullins family.

There was Resolved White. Peregrine White was born
on board of the Mayflower.

There were Giles Hopkins and Constance Hopkins, and
three more children of the Hopkins name. Oceanus Hop-
kins was born on the Mayflower.

There were two boys in the Billington family, John and
Francis.
82 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

There were Henry Samson and Humility Cooper, both
children in the Tilley family, and John Tilley and Elizabeth
Tilley, a son and daughter.

There were Mary Chilton, Joseph Rogers, and John
Cooke, and a son in the Tinker family; Samuel Fuller and
two boys by the name of Turner. There were Samuel
Eaton, a baby, and several young people in the service of
the principal families.

There were thirteen children of the leading Pilgrims on
board, and most of these were boys. Nobly enough, the
Pilgrims brought their adopted children, or the children of
their charity, with them.

There were more than twenty young people on board the

“our pilot,” who had seen Indians and

ship, and to these
gazed on the wonderful shores and fishing grounds of the
new land, became more and more interesting; his heart
drew them all to him; he was “ Sinbad the Sailor ” to these
young emigrants.

Miles Standish was the man of valor among the com-
pany. Of him the young people must have stood in awe.

But one day when the sun was struggling through the
clouds and the waves were merciful, the boys, among whom
were the Brewsters, ventured to look at Miles Standish’s
sword.

It was a very curious sword. It had an inscription on it
that no one could read. The emblems of the sun, moon,

and stars were stamped upon it.
THE LEGENDARY SWORD. 838

“That is a strange sword that you have, Master Stand-
ish,” ventured Wrastle Brewster, who was young and bold.

“Would you like to see it bend?”

“ Aye, aye, Master Standish! ” cried the boys.

The stout man bent the sword and said:

“ A Damascus blade, or like it.”

“Where did it come from?” asked Richard More.

“From the air! ”

The boys’ eyes were filled with surprise.

“There are mines in the air as well as on the earth,”
said Standish. “This sword is said to have been made of
meteoric metal.”

“When was it made?” asked Wrastle Brewster.

“A thousand years ago, it may be,” said the sturdy
man, flashing it in a sunbeam. “In the days of Charle-
magne, or of Peter the Hermit, or of the Crusades. I do
not know when it was made. It is claimed that it was once
a magic sword, but the charm upon it does not extend to
me. I have nothing to do with any heathenish enchant-
ments.”

“What is engraved upon it?” asked Mary Allerton.

“That John Robinson, with all his learning, was not
able to tell. An old man in Amsterdam poked it over with
his long nose, and said that those were magic words to pro-
tect a devotee from evil. But I am no devotee to the faith
of the pagans for which the charm was wrought. My pro-
tection comes only from my faith, honor, and courage.”
84 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“Where did you get it?” asked little Ellen More, as
Robert Coppin lifted her up above the heads of those who
were crowding close to the rugged Standish.

“Now why did you ask that, little girl? That is a
secret, a story.”

“Tell us the story, Master Standish,” said Ellen More.
“Pilot Coppin tells us stories. Do stories hurt any one?”

“No, no, my little girl. It is Coppin’s little girl you
seem to be—he has made you that by stories. Stories are
fairy lands to such as you—well, never mind, the world is
governed by imagination. I might refuse the boys, but I
could never refuse such as you; marry, I could not. Well,
here is the story of the sword, and an old one it is. Sit
down and you shall hear! ”

The short, stout, ruddy man turned the sword upward,
as saluting on parade.

“T was once, as you know,” he said, “a soldier in the
Netherlands. Lars, all, and be quiet while I speak. In
those days we were in Ghent, and one day I beheld a com-
pany of soldiers about to capture a girl who was out on
some errand in the streets. I protected the girl, and en-
abled her to return safely home.

“ Her father was an old armorer. He was very grateful
to me for what I had done, for his daughter seems to have
been all the world to him. So one day he made his way to
me. He had something under his silk mantle. Ears all,
now, and be quiet while I am talking.
THE LEGENDARY SWORD. 85

““T want to speak with you in private,’ said he. ‘Is
any one around?’

“*No one, sir,’ said I.

“He began to unfold his silken scarf or mantle.

“*You saved my daughter,’ said he. ‘I have brought
a little present to you—not much to look upon, but it is the
most precious gift I have. It came from the skies.’

“He drew back the mantle fold by fold, and the sword
appeared.

“Meteor metal,’ said he. ‘Damascus, and it has a
grand legend, one worthy to make it sacred to a man of
honor.’

“He held it aloft, looking around to see that no one
was approaching.

“What is the legend?’ I asked, and motioned him to
sit down.

“He sat down. An animation as of youth came into his
withered face. How intense and how grateful he looked,
that old armorer of Ghent!

“He said that when he was a young man he went to the
East to engage in the war against the Turks, to bear the
Cross against the Crescent. He was taken prisoner, and was
carried into an Ottoman town, and there was cared for by
avery beautiful young woman. She came to love him, and
she told him of her love; but he said to her that there was
one whom he loved and who loved him in his own land, and
that to be a true man to all good people his heart must be
86 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

true to her. Then the young woman loved him because his
heart was true to the woman in the West, and to show him
her respect for his honor she gave him this sword, which she
said had been used in the Persian wars, and had a magic
power to protect any man of honor from harm. Ears, all;
be still while I speak. My honor shall protect me from
harm, and this sword shall guard my honor, and the sword of
Standish shall not only protect me from harm but you from
harm, my little Ellen, and all you boys and girls from harm
if you are ever in peril. It shall be drawn in honor for
you all.”

“TJ shall never fall into harm,” said little Ellen More,
“because I am carrying to the chief the copper chain.
The red chiefs do not harm those who carry them pres-
ents.”

“No, no,” said John Alden, “and gifts from the heart
are more powerful for good than swords.”

The sun was still struggling among the clouds, and the
sea was growing rough again. A wild night followed. The
next morning at daybreak came a cry from a sailor, perhaps
in the rigging.

“Land! I see land! ”

They rushed to the deck.

Captain Jones was standing on deck staggering against
2 breeze, but with a broad smile on his face.

“T see land! ” said Robert Coppin, shading his eyes.

“Where?” said Ellen More.
THE LEGENDARY SWORD. 87

“There!” answered Coppin, pointing; “there, in oC
gray light.”

“That is a cloud,” said Mary Allerton.

“No, no, my girl, a cloud lies not low like that. I can
see it glint. Look at the flocks of birds flying low there.”

“And the whales,” said Ellen; “one, two, three! ”

“Back, children, back,” said Pilot Coppin, “and leave
me to my duty now.”

There was great excitement on board. The sun disap-
peared, another storm was overhanging the sea.

But this was not the Hudson River, it was Cape Cod.

The ship plowed on under heavy sail, with rough
waters before it. Several passengers were sick, and the cry
of land set their pulses to beating again.

“I wish that it were here we were to land,” said several
of the men as the clouds lowered above them, and these men
were sailors.

Nearer and nearer drew the ship to the land. fine
captain was advised to seek shelter here.

Land! But there was no one to welcome them; no
houses, no warm inns, no hospitable roofs of any kind.

Winter was near. The trees were bending in the keen
winds of the north.

Wild men were there, wild beasts. The shores were
beaten by storms. :

Mystery was there, an unknown destiny for those who
would nae that land their home.
88 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

But freedom was there; men there might own them-
selves, might hope, and trust, and live, and seek one an-
other’s welfare beyond the world of prisons and chains.

“Land!” The sound was glorious. Land where men
could be free! Should they find rest here, or should they
‘seek to go farther?

It is a common story now that Captain Jones had
been bribed by the foreign traders with the Dutch colony
on the Hudson to betray and deceive the Pilgrims, and to
land them on the shores of Cape Cod. This may have been
so, but it is not proved. We like to think that Captain
Jones was an honest man.

The breaking of the storm revealed a fine harbor and
shores covered with rugged oaks, sweet woods, and ever-
greens. The country seemed to invite the exiles to stop
here, and the sea to forbid them to go farther.

The late fall storms off the coast were terrible, and Rob-
ert Coppin, “ our pilot,” spoke favorably of the land, which
he had seen under different skies and in milder seasons.
The influence of the pilot must have been very great at
this time.

So the 11th of November found the Pilgrim company
in Provincetown (Malabar or Malebar) Bay.

Little Ellen More began to talk of the green mat and the
copper chain again,
CHAPTER XI.
THE COMPACT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

Tue shores were goodly to behold. The land was much
as now, except that the giant trees are now gone. There were
green junipers there, mingled with sassafras. The ground
was carpeted with prince’s pine. The witch-hazels, which
bloom in the fall, were there, and probably the red berries
of the checkerberry among the creeping Jenny. However
the latter may have been, wild fowl filled the coves, and
fish sported in the shallow waters.

Whales were there in the deep waters. Robert Cop-
pin, who was an experienced fisherman, was much excited
when he saw what a harvest of the sea was there. “Our
master and his mate,” says a relation, “professed that we
might have made £3,000 or £4,000 worth of all.”

“We found great mussels,” says the relation, “very fat
and full of sea pearls, but the company could not eat them
without being made sick. They caused even the sailors to
east them up.”

The water was very shallow near the shore, so that those
who landed had to wade, and in freezing weather.

Were they to land here and to seek for a place of settle-
90 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

ment, or to put out to sea again? They decided to give up
for the present the Hudson River plan, and to look for a
place of home making here.

But they must have a government here. What should
it be?

If all were to obey it, it must be founded on the votes
of the majority. The will of the majority must be the
new king in this empty land. But they must have officers
to execute this will. Who should they be? What should
they be called? They must have a governor and council.

How should the will of a majority of the people be
made known? By an election.

The new state must have a constitution or agreement.
The agreement must be one that a majority of the people
would sign. It must be a compact, such as is the Constitu-
tion of the United States to-day, which the people pledge
themselves to support before they can vote.

There is an old chest to be seen pictured in Pilgrim Hall
in Plymouth, on which a compact was probably written, and
studied, and signed. The original chest is in the keeping of
the Connecticut Historical Society. This compact was the
first constitution of a republic in the New World, and all of
the republics of the Western world have followed its princi-
ciple of self-government. The Declaration of Independ-
ence as a seed was in it. The Constitution of the United
States as a beginning was in it. The fall of the Bastile and
the Erench Constitution in a prophetic sense were in it.
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THE COMPACT OF THE MAYFLOWER. 91

That simple paper on Elder Brewster’s chest, if the legend
of the chest may be trusted,* was to bring a new order of
government into the world. Destiny was to say to its
spindles, “'Thus forever go on! ”

What a day that was, the 21st of November, N. S.
It should be celebrated everywhere, in all lands where free-
dom by self-government is now, and as long as freedom
through self-government shall last.

See Elder Brewster as he considers that paper with the
rest. Did he dream of what he was doing? There were
forty-one adult men on board; would they all sign it, or
would some of them object to signing it?

The leaders must read it to all, then they must question
all, and every one who agreed to sign this paper would give
to the Pilgrim Constitution his vote.

One by one, as he listened to the reading said, “I will
sign it.” Forty-one said, “I will sign it.” The charter of
agreement was unanimously adopted. The first republic
of America was founded in the cabin of the Mayflower, amid
lowering skies and foaming seas.

What was the compact? Let the young reader not skip
it, but read it. Every word is gold:

In the name of GOD, Amen. We, whose names are
underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread Sovereign



* The proof that the lid of the chest was used for the purpose is want-
ing, but such seems to have been the tradition.
92 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER. .

Lord King Jamus ; by the grace of GOD, of Great
Britain, France, and Ireland King ; Defender of the
Lath ; ke.

Having undertaken for the glory of GOD, and ad-
vancement of the Christian faith, and honour of our King
and country, a Voyage [Expedition] to plant the first Colony
in the northern parts of Virginia ; [we] do, by these pres-
ents, solemnly and mutually, in the presence of GOD and
one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into
a Cwil Body Politic, for our better ordering and preserva-
tion; and furtherance of the ends aforesaid: and, by
virtue hereof, to enact, constitute, and frame such just and
equal laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions, Offices, from time
to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the
general good of the Colony ; unto which, we promise all due
submission and obedience.

In witness whereof, we have hereunder subscribed our
names. Cape Cod, 11th of November, in the year of the
reign of our Sovereign Lord King JAuES, of England,
France and Ireland 18 ; and of Scotland &4. Anno Dom-
ini 1620.

Would you like to see how some of these signatures
looked?—signatures of more value to mankind than those
of the emperors of Rome in their purple, or of monarchs of
the middle ages in their pomp and power, signatures whose
importance did not cease with the death of the signers, but
remained a force unto this day in the advance of humanity.
THE COMPACT OF THE MAYFLOWER, 98
ibm. frubfoed. fi: (Prem.
so Duhon — Wa LRov:sit Uleytor »
hh ibe Broher Chomat chen
Vyles Sfondisk. Foon winylo
at UAT meee Cov tbk Gootlsondlh.
ols Badford th, Southuth

HANDWRITING OF THE PILGRIMS.

Like John Hancock’s signature to the Declaration of
Independence, these names are penned in a bold, strong
hand. By it each man became a king in the will of all the
rest and his own. That was a glorious day for America.
They elected John Carver governor. In that election the
folkmote, or town meeting, was begun, and the folkmote
was the pattern of the future republic.

A grand scene followed that poets should sing, musicians
set to the music of the waves, and painters spread upon
canvas.

After sixty-three days at sea they were now to
land.

They must wade a “ bow’s length” or more in the cold,
94 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

shallow waters. So in the ship’s boat the leaders came to
the shore.

The pines welcomed them, the birch, the holly, the ash,
the mossy oaks, the carpet of evergreen. Faith welcomed
them in the air unseen.

They fell upon their knees. That was the first public
thanksgiving in New England—it was on Compact Day.
They faced the future by faith.

The people of Provincetown have been considering the
celebration of this day. They should do so, and call to
it the nation’s noblest men. The whole country should
join with them in the memory of an event that must ever
rank foremost among the heroic and prophetic deeds of the
world.

They at first found no human being in the open woods—
no print on the sand, no abandoned homes or cabins, no
tombs. The place was but one of the vast solitudes of the
sea. The inhabitants of the land had nearly all been
swept away by a plague a few years before.

On Monday, 13th of November, O. S., they unshipped
their shallop and drew her to the land for the ship’s car-
penter to repair. It took many days to make the boat sea-
worthy. In the meantime they would explore the coast
in a smaller boat, and would go inland to see if any people
could be found.

As they returned at night from the first landing they
brought pine or juniper boughs to burn on board the ship.
THE COMPACT OF THE MAYFLOWER. 95

These boughs made a bright fire and filled the room with a
resinous odor as they were burned.

How cheerful must have been the fire in the cabin of
the Mayflower on that lonely night amid the rolling seas
and the tenantless woods!

“Robert Coppin,” said Ellen More, “you are to go out
with the men and explore. Will you not tell us what you
discover, on the evening after you return from exploring?
The boys and girls will all want to hear. They will not
let us go. Bring more juniper, and tell us about all that
you shall see in the woods, by the green boughs as they
burn.”

“That I will, my darling girl—that Robert Coppin
will.”

“ And you will have eyes for us?”

“Yes, yes, Robert Coppin will be eyes for you.”

“ And ears?”

“Yes, yes, and ears, Ellen More, Ellen More. I love
the young folks on the Mayflower; my heart beats with
theirs, and it will be a dark day to me when I leave them.”

“May be that you will come back to us some day, Rob-
ert Coppin.”

“Ah, if you were my little girl I would come back to
you, but you have better friends than I can ever be to you,
and it is my lot to roam the sea.” He added, “ But I shall
never forget this voyage.”

“The storms?” asked Ellen.
96 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“ Ah, no, not the storms, but the hearts in ihe storms.
There have been hearts in the storms.”

“Your heart has been in the storms,” said Ellen.
“Pilot Coppin, Pilot Coppin, it will all be well if you only
lead us where we are to go. I would love to suffer if it
would make happy such a heart as yours.”

“ Ellen More, Ellen More, I would die for such a one as
you, but the world will pass us both by. What is a pilot?
It may be for those who do their duty there is some better
world than this. But the sailor must do his duty, and be
forgotten. He is one wave of the ocean that comes up and
sinks down again.”

“But the ocean must have that one wave, Robert Cop-

pin.”
“Thou hast well said, my girl. It will make my heart
beat faster to think each day when I am on land that I will
return to tell my adventures to the boys and girls of the
Mayflower and to you, Ellen More, who will ever have a
warm place in my lonely heart.”
CHAPTER XII.
THE FIRST DISCOVERY.

Tue return of Pilot Coppin after the men had made
their first expedition inland was hailed by all who had re-
mained on board as a matter of intense interest. He came
to tell a tale by the not unlikely juniper fire. He doubtless
brought them Indian corn, parched acorns, and nuts, for
such he had found in abundance, and it was his habit to
share what most pleased him with others.

It is night on the Mayflower, a calm night now, under
the moon and stars. The fire burns brightly and the lamps
low. The men who have been on land, except Coppin, go
to their bunks, weary with their hard journey.

Pilot Coppin sits down in the cabin among the women
and the boys and girls. John Billington makes trouble in
getting into a place to hear the tale of the first adventure.
He was a boy who, we may fancy, was always making
trouble by his restlessness. He had his father’s tempera-
ment, a man who, although he discovered the Billington
Sea, was hanged in 1630; so even the good Pilgrims had
a bad man among them, whom their example failed to re-

strain.
97
98 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER,

“lear ye, hear ye all!” began Pilot Coppin, using an
ancient form of arresting attention, “and I will tell you the
tale of our first adventures in the woods.

“The woods—you should see them! They stand open
like arcades; one could ride through them. They must be
beautiful in summer. The blue jays, the wonder birds,
that always come peeking about, are there now, with their
feather caps on that bob up and down. There are ospreys’
nests in the dead trees and crows’ nests in the pines. There
are withered flowers and red berries everywhere.

“ Hear ye, hear ye all! What day is this?—the 17th of
November. The first thing we saw as we went into the
woods was, marching in single file, six Indians with a dog,
coming in the direction that we were traveling.”

“Tndians! ” cried the boys. The pilot bade them be
silent.

“You should have seen how surprised they were when
they saw us. They gave a cautious, mysterious whistle to
the dog, and turned on their heels, as though they had seen
the Evil One himself, and their dark heels flew like drum-
sticks in a battle. How they did run! They vanished.
What do you suppose their thoughts could have been
on seeing our faces, our armor, and our guns? The dog
did not stop to defend them; he caught their fear, and
made off with them without stopping so much as to turn to
bark.

“We hurried on after them, calling out, ‘Ho, here, ho!’
THE FIRST DISCOVERY. 99

Our voices must have caused them greater terror than be-
fore.

“We next saw them on top of a hill, looking down to
watch the bushes move as we pressed on our way.

“We called, ‘Ho, here, ho!’

“The friendly tone of our voices seemed to have
changed their minds and won their confidence, for they now
waited for us.

“We made signs to them that we wanted food and
shelter. They understood us. They gathered sticks for us
and made a fire, and gave us wherewith to eat. So we
found them at last friendly, and passed the night among
them, keeping a guard.

“Tn the morning we arose and followed the Indians to
a runlet or little stream, and thence into a strange, gloomy
wood where there was some underbrush that tore our armor.
‘We showed the Indians that we wanted to find a spring of.
fresh water. We would fain eat our biscuit and cheese with
the live water that flowed out of the earth. So we pushed
on after the wandering savages.

“We came at last to a valley [Truro] full of wood-gale
and long grass, and there we saw a deer at a spring, which
had gone there for water.

“We hurried to the spring to drink after the deer. Oh,
how clear the water ran! How refreshing it looked! We
dropped down to drink. We never tasted better water than
that. ‘No ale ever was so good. It was the first time that
100 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

our men drank water from the natural spring in the new
land. They said that they must settle near a spring.

“We soon found other ponds [Pond Village in Truro]
and came to great cornfields. Springs and cornfields, gale-
fiends [bayberry] for tallow. Think of that!”

“And the Indians were friendly,” said Ellen More,
possibly thinking of the copper chain.

“TI would have liked to have been there,” said John
Billington.

“You would not have left the Indians over friendly,”
said Pilot Coppin, “if you were up to such antics there as
you are here.”

The pilot continued: “We found a path. Then we
eame toa wonder. The path led to heaps of sand. We un-
covered one of these heaps on which was a mat. We
found there a mortar and a bow and arrows. The place
was a grave. We had come upon an Indian graveyard.

“Then we went on over stubble fields where had been
corn. Around it were great fields full of nuts, and woods
still green with the matted leaves of strawberry vines.

“Listen! The path led to another wonder—to a cellar
of corn, a little barn of corn, as it were, in the earth. An
abandoned Indian cabin was near. }

“We dug open the cellar, which was a covering of sand,
and found thirty-six ears of corn. It was in a basket.

“¢ The corn is a treasure,’ said Master Bradford, ‘ but it
is not ours.’
THE FIRST DISCOVERY. 101

“¢ What shall we do with it?’ asked Master Hop-
kins:

“¢Take it for our necessities,’ said Standish, ‘and pay
for it if the owners should ever demand it.’

“The ears of corn were surrounded with shelled corn.
We found a kettle there. We filled the kettle with shelled
corn and bore it away on a staff. We covered up the
corn bin, and agreed to tell the owners, should we ever find
them, that we took the corn from necessity, and would pay
them for it.

“We passed the night under the cover of a great fire.
In the morning we went out again to explore, and we found
another curious thing indeed. What was it?

-“TZisten! The queer thing that we found was a living
tree bowed over almost like a hoop, so that the top touched
the ground.

«¢ What should ever make a tree grow like that?’ asked
Master Hopkins, in great wonder.

“Come here,’ said one of the men. ‘See here these
acorns strewed around the bended top of the tree; fat ones;
if I could take any more things back to the ship, I would
gather them up.’

“¢Ton’t you see,’ said Stephen Hopkins, ‘that tree is
an Indian snare?’

“How does it work?’ asked one.

“ us away. Master Bradford,’ he cried, ‘come on.’
102 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“Master Bradford was far behind us. We went on,
wondering what next we would find.

“Master Bradford followed at a distance. When he came
to the place of the bent tree and the acorns on the ground,
he, too, was puzzled, and stopped to see what it meant.

“He went about the place here and there, when all at
once we heard him cry out in a voice of great terror:

“¢ Ho, here, ho!’

“We looked around, and what do you think we saw?
The tree had straightened up, and there was Master William
Bradford tripped up and hanging by the leg.

“* Ho, here, ho!’ he cried again.

“
“He is caught in the Indian snare,’ said Stephen Hop-
kins. ‘Hurry back, and cut the cord. His leg may be
broken. Hurry!’

“We hurried back to the place.

“What has happened?’ asked the men.

“«The tree! the tree! the tree!’ he exclaimed. ‘The
tree has caught me!’

“¢ But trees do not have such cunning,’ said I. ‘Look
here; his foot is noosed by an Indian rope.’

““ Out the cord,’ said Hopkins. ‘The snare was set for
a deer.’

“We cut the rope, which was curiously made. The
snare was fashioned by making a noose of the rope and
spreading it upon the ground under the leaves among the
THE FIRST DISCOVERY. 103

acorns. The tree was bent down and attached to a cross
bar which would slip out of some notches when it was pulled
aside, and cause the top to fly up, and the noose was tied
to the top of the tree. Deer or other animals which should
become entangled in the noose would cause the cross bar to
fly out of the notches, and would be jerked up into the air.
The Indian who set such snares visited them daily, or from
time to time.

“The trapper would find the animal that had been
caught alive, but sometimes with broken or dislocated limbs.
A small deer would be suspended in the air.

“ William Bradford did not stop to gather any acorns in
that place, fat and tempting though they looked. He made
the best of his time to get away, and he cast his eyes about
him after that experience.

“ We traveled toward the place that lay nearest to the
ship. We heard whirring wings as we came. They were
partridges. There were great flocks of geese and ducks in
the coves. We met with a buck that had not been en-
trapped in a snare like William Bradford.

“The country must be a beautiful one in its season, and
a goodly one to live in, except in winter, and even then it
would be goodly if one had shelter, which we have not now,
but will have if we remain here.

“Be happy, then. If you find a place here you will be
in a land of living springs, full of health, of woods full of
game, ee as an English lord might covet, and of friendly
104 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

Indians, to whom you have only to give your hearts to find
good hearts in return.”

“ And the copper chain! ” added Ellen More.

“Hear ye all. I have come back like the spies in the
days of the wandering Hebrew tribes, and Robert Coppin
has no evil report to bring of the land. It is a land of
grapes as well as of other goodly things, and no giants are
there; no, no giants are there, notwithstanding the snare
into which fell our good friend William Bradford! ”

The Pilgrim family may have kindled the juniper fire
again, and parched corn as they continued to talk over the
events of that expedition. The women’s hearts were
cheered. The children’s eyes glowed.

“How I wish I could get to the shore! ” said sprightly
John Billington.

“There are others who have the same wish for you,” said
one of the women, tartly.

“T would have given the Indians something if I had
been there,” said Ellen More, her heart always beating with
generous impulses.

“Not the copper chain,” said Pilot Coppin.

“No, that would have been too soon. That is for the
great chief. I wish that he would come to visit us here.
Pilot Coppin, could you not find him and bring him to us?
Tell him that I have a copper chain for him; I would like to
put it on him with my own hands.”

“No, my girl; a man by the name of Hunt, a character-




The Mayflower in Plymouth harbor.
THE FIRST DISCOVERY. 105

less trader, enticed some Indians on board his ship by prom-
ises or presents, and he sailed away with them, perhaps
thinking to sell them for slaves, and the Indians must re-
member his treachery, and they would be shy of ever going
on shipboard again.

“This,” he added, “is our first discovery. We are go-
ing to make another expedition, and when we return I will
tell you another story, if I find anything to tell, and you
may be sure that we will see some strange sights.

“T have brought some corn and acorns and red berries
for the sick on board. And here are some flowers from
trees that bloom in the fall. Ellen More, you may take the
things to them, and speak a cheering word for me. Tell
them Robert Coppin remembered them.”

The little girl went to the bunks where lay the sick, with
the witch-hazel blossoms, perhaps, and the presents from the
land. Then the sea grew silent and the lights went out, and
many dreamed of the new land of which the pilot had told
them.

Little Ellen More bid Pilot Coppin good-night, saying: |

“Do you think we shall ever see the great chief sitting on
the green mat, and wearing the copper chain?”

“That is a fairy dream, my girl, but dream on, dream
on; many fair dreams in life become things and prove
true. We can not tell what awaits us.”

A solitary light hung in the cabin. "What would be the
next, story that the pilot would have to tell?
CHAPTER XIII.
PILOT COPPIN’S SECOND STORY.

Tue shallop was being repaired on the shore.

“Let us set off on an adventure again,” said Captain
Jones, “and Coppin, who knows more about these parts than
I do, he shall go with us.”

He addressed Masters Carver and Bradford, the Pilgrim
leaders.

So the women and the boys and the girls of the May-
flower saw another expedition set forth from the havened
ship on the longboat, and they all waited impatiently for
their pilot to return again and tell under the lonely cabin
light the wonders that he saw.

Their interest in these tales of wood lore was most
intense. The Pilgrims were already inclined to settle here,
and the women must have favored the plan as they gazed
out toward the billowy sea. Every incident that the pilot
related seemed possibly associated with their future home.

He came back, and the men brought evergreens for the
women and berries for the sick, and the pilot had Indian
baskets which he gave to his favorites, among whom we may
picture neue Ellen More.
PILOT COPPIN’S SECOND STORY. 107

“Hear ye again!” he said, as the odor of the juniper
filled the cabin, and the wind had a far-away sound. “ Hear
ye again! ”

He did not lack for ears or still feet. Even John Bil-
lington was quiet for an hour. He began:

“Tt was a rough day when we set forth, as you know
(Monday, November 27th). There were winds and cross
winds, and we had to row near the shore, and when we came
to land to wade in water above our knees.

“Tt blowed and snowed all the blind day, and then it
froze. Ah-a-me, some of the people that went out will
never forget that day, I mind; it made me, an old sailor,
shrivel up; I can seem to feel the pitiless wind now.

“We came to a place which we called Cold Harbor [the
Pamet River]. We landed, and marched through the storm
up hill and down among the frozen trees that creaked as
they rocked in the keen winds. Ah-a-me, ah-a-me! that was
our third day out, and they were all dreadful days.

“Then we concluded to go back to the place where we
had found corn, and which we well called Cornhill.

“ Here we found sand heap after sand heap, little gran-
aries or barns, or green cellars in the earth. As we laid
them open the yellow corn appeared. We were obliged to
break open the ground with our cutlasses, it was frozen so
hard; but, rejoice everybody, we secured as much as ten
bushels of corn.”

“ But whom did you pay for it?” asked Ellen More.
108 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“There was no one there to pay.”

“But some one worked hard to raise it; what is he
to do?”

“Tt was probably an Indian woman,” said the pilot.

“But it was as hard for her to work in the fields as
for a man. What will she think when she comes back?”
said Ellen.

“She will think that the needy have been to her sand
barn,” said the pilot.

“But why did you not leave something for her there?
Some money, or some bowls, or some clothes?” asked Ellen.

“Bless your heart, my child, we hadn’t anything to
leave.”

“You will have something next time, won’t you?”

“Well, marry, marry, yes, that I will, beshrew me if I
don’t. I pity the Indian woman, too, when she cones back
and finds her corn gone. We ought to have left some
treasures for her in the baskets in the cellar. That would
have shown her that we did not intend to steal, and it would
have made her friendly.”

“Does the winter here last long?” asked the girl.

“Yes; four months.”

“Four months. Now suppose the woman who raised
the corn has children, and that she comes wandering away
back from somewhere for food for her children, and finds
the corn gone, and nothing in her baskets to buy any?”

“Now do not worry any more about that, my little
PILOT COPPIN’S SECOND STORY. 109

heart. That same question is troubling Elder Brewster, as

I can see. We will carry presents when we go again, to’
show the Indians that we mean to treat them honestly and

to make them friendly.” He continued his narrative:

“We sent back to the ship those who were chilled and
weak, and then eighteen of us set forth on new adven-
tures.

“On the last day of November we found beaten paths,
and we resolved to follow them, which we did for five or six
miles. They led us to an open field. In the middle of it
was a mound, and a mat lay upon it. We knew that it was
a grain bin or a grave.

“We tore up the mat.

“Under it was another mat.

“Under that was a board.

“On the board were painted the prongs of a crown.

“Here was the grave of some white wanderer. Who
could have died in this lonely place?

“Then we found bowls, and trays, and dishes. I have
brought back one of the dishes. Here it is. Where was it
made? ”

The people passed it round and turned it over.

“In France,” said one of the servants, who had been on
the European continent.

“We found there a bundle. It was something tied up
ina blouse. It contained the bones of aman. On the head
was yellow hair. No Indians have yellow hair.
110 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“We discovered something yet more mysterious. Hear
ye all!

“Tt was a little bundle.

“Tn it were the bones of a child. The little body was
bound about with beads, white beads—here they are!”

Some of the children began to shed tears at the sight of
the beads.

“The body was that of a Frenchman,” said one.

“ The little child was his, perhaps,”’ said another.

“But these are Indian beads—wampum.”

“The Indians buried the child,” said Ellen More. “It
may have been a little girl. I love the Indians for giving
her beads—she could never reward them.”

“That is so, Ellen; I thought of that.

“We left the grave, and near by we found houses made
of poles bent together at the top and covered with mats. In
them were wooden bowls, trays, and dishes. We thought
that some English traders had encamped there, or had
traded off these things with the Indians for corn. There
were eagles’ claws there, hartshorn, parched acorns, and
bundles of flags with which to make matting.” Pilot Cop-
pin had brought back some of these things. How strange it
all seemed.

The next morning Master Carver, who acted as the Pil-
grim leader, called the pilot.

“Master Coppin, can we see you in the cabin?”

“ Aye, aye, at your service, sir.”
PILOT COPPIN’S SECOND STORY. Al1

The pilot found the leaders of the Pilgrims in consulta-
tion. Should they attempt to settle here, or go out to sea
again? Those who desired to settle here made these argu-
ments, which we copy in part:

First.—There was a convenient harbor for boats, though
not for ships.

Secondly.—Good corn ground ready to their hands, as
they saw by experience in the goodly corn it yielded, which
would again agree with the ground, and be natural seed for
the same.

Thirdly.—Cape Cod was like[ly] to be a place of good
fishing; for they saw daily great whales, of the best kind for
oil and bone, come close aboard their ship, and, in fair
weather, swim and play about it. “There was one whale,”
said they, “ when the sun shone warm, which came and lay
above: water, as if it had been dead, for a good while to-
gether, within half a musket shot of the ship. At which,
two were prepared to shoot, to see whether it would stir or
no. He that gave fire first, his musket flew in pieces, both
stock and barrel; yet, thanks be to God, neither he nor any
one else was hurt with it, though many were there about.
But when the whale saw its time, it gave a snuff, and away!”

Fourthly.—The place was likely to be healthful, secure,
and defensible.

But the last and especial reason was, That now the heart
of winter and unseasonable weather were come upon them,
so that they could not go upon coasting [surveying] and dis-
119 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

covery without danger of losing men and boat; upon which
would follow the overthrow of all, especially considering
what variable winds and sudden storms “do there arise.”
Also cold and wet lodging had so “ tainted the people (for
scarce any of them were free from vehement coughs) as if
they should continue long in that estate it would endanger
the lives of many, and breed diseases and infections among
them.” Again, they had yet some beer, butter, flesh, and
other victuals, which would quickly be all gone; and then
they should have nothing to comfort them in the great labor
and toil they were like[ly] to undergo at the first.

“Others again urged greatly going to Anguum or An-
goum [Agawam, now Ipswich], a place twenty leagues off
to the northwards, which they had heard to be an excellent
harbour for ships, [with] better ground and better fishing.

“Secondly.—For anything they knew, there might be,
hard by them, a far better seat; and it should be a great
hindrance to seat [settle] where we should remove again.”

We take these arguments in part from the Narration
of the Pilgrims. Other reasons were set forth against set-
tling where they were.

“Robert Coppin,” said the leader of the council, “ you
have been in these parts before, and we have heard you say
that when you were here you came to a harbor beyond this,
large, and opening into a fine land!”
“Yes, your honor! ”

“How far was that harbor from this?”
PILOT COPPIN’S SECOND STORY. 113

“Some twenty-four miles, or the like of that, your
honor.”

“What is it called?”

“We called it Thievish Harbor, sir.”

“That name has an evil sound, pilot; it bodes no good.
Why did you call it that?”

“One of the Indians stole our harpoon while we
were there. It is a goodly harbor, sir, and the country
around it is fertile, a place of fine fishing, grand woods,
and fields. It is called Patuxit by the natives. I was a
sailor on the whaler Scotsman from Glasgow when I first
saw it.”

“Pilot, what would you advise us to do?”

“To make another expedition, sir; to see that harbor be-
fore you decide where you will settle.”

They studied the maps and charts of the coast which
they had brought.

“Shall we follow our pilot’s advice?” said one.

The men voted to make an expedition to the harbor that
the pilot had described, and so it was owing to Robert Cop-
pin, “ our pilot,” that Plymouth and not Provincetown be-
came the landing place of the Pilgrims. This counsel of
the pilot in the cabin of the Mayflower is a point of history
worthy of note in the celebration of the deeds of the New
England pioneers. But Plymouth Harbor was not Thievish
Harbor, as he dreamed. Still it was his vision of a better
harbor that led to decisive events.
114 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

They had decided to make a third expedition, and the
thought of it filled their minds with new plans.

“We must now consult with Coppin,” said one, “ and we
must prepare——”

Boom! What was that?

The ship reeled. A scent of powder filled the cabin.
Explosion followed explosion.

All started up.

“What was that?” asked all.

The women trembled. Jasper More, who was ill, was
thrown into convulsions.

A man came leading out a boy who was crying.

“Francis Billington, what have you been doing?” cried
Standish in a severe voice. “ What caused that explosion? ”

“ Daddy’s gun.”

“ How, you young rascal, how?”

“T took it down, and it went off.”

“But there was more than one explosion, you little
savage!”

“ Squibs, sir.”

“Who made the squibs? ”

‘oe sir”

“What for?”

“ Because father makes ’em, sir.”

“ But there is a keg of powder near his bunk.”

“Yes, sir.”

“Where is that now?”
PILOT COPPIN’S SECOND STORY. 115

“Tt is there, sir.”

“Run!” cried several voices.

The women screamed.

The boldest men ran to the Billington bunk.

The musket was there, the exploded squibs, with weap-
ons and pieces of iron. But the keg, or rather half a keg, of
powder stood there harmless. Had a single spark reached it
the history of the Mayflower and of the Pilgrim company
would probably then and there have come to an end.
CHAPTER XIV.
KIDNAPED INDIANS.—“ OUR PILOT.”

Tue Billingtons, we are led to suppose, were a rather
-unquiet family, though perhaps to this restlessness may be
due the early discovery of the so-called Billington Sea.
John Billington, Sr., came to a terrible end, as we have said,
and whether his wife’s tongue was as sharp as has been rep-
resented we do not know, but one of her boys, as we have
seen, came near blowing up the Mayflower in his strange
experiments with his father’s powder, and another John
Billington threw the colony into great excitement in the
first summer after the landing, as we shall relate in our nar-
rative.

“Raree show,” said John Bilington one day, with the
shores in sight. “Raree show! ”

“ And what do you mean by that?” asked Pilot Coppin.

“Wouldn’t it be a jolly thing to go hunting for In-
dians, and take them back to England and show them for a
wonder? Then one could bring them back as pilots, and dis-
cover gold mines and the places where the old arrow makers
hid their treasures. Raree show! ”

“Raree show!” cried Francis Billington, whose fancy
KIDNAPED INDIANS.—‘‘OUR PILOT.” 117

was awakened by the suggestion of Indians on exhibition in
London.

“That would not happen,” said Pilot Coppin; “if you
were to go hunting Indians you would not capture them,
they would capture you! ‘Raree show! Raree show!’
They would put you up on exhibition in the owl swamp,
and the owls would call out ‘Whoo? whoo?’ That would
make a ‘ raree show’ for the ravens to caw at, and the woods
are black with crows! ”

“My folks are always agitating something or other,”
said Mistress Billington. “What my boys will come to
goes beyond my ken. If they do not capture Indians, the
Indians will be likely to capture them. John’s head is
always in the wrong place, and the hands of Francis are
usually found in the same quarter.”

“ Shall we see Tusquantum should we , land here?” asked
Ellen More. “You told us how he was kidnaped and car-
ried away.”

“Tt is not unlikely that we may find him.”

“He could talk for us with the other Indians,” said
Ellen More. “He understands English.”

“The trumpets of the winds are sounding again,”

said
Wrastle Brewster. “Pilot Coppin, the ship is at anchor,
and you have nothing to do. Tell us other stories of the
Indians of whom you have heard—stories of-adventures in
these parts, told by returned sailors on the English docks.”

“Tell us more stories about kidnaped Indians,” said
118 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

young John Billington, “ for my mind already goes roaming
through the forests, and I will one day meet with adventures
there.” :

“ And J,” said his brother Francis.

“You have already had adventures enough to satisfy a
fleet,” said Mistress Billington. “ Where would we have
been had a spark touched that keg of powder? And fire all
around that keg, and squibs bursting! Oh, it drives me
wild when I think of it!”

“ Kidnaping,” said Pilot Coppin, “is an evil business.
When Pinzon, one of Columbus’s captains, stole four In-
dians to sell them for slaves, Columbus commanded that
they be set free, and in that he showed his nobility of charac-
ter. . Kidnapers are usually kidnaped in some form in the
end, for the law of justice must be fulfilled, and to every
man be meted the measure wherewith he metes.”

He continued: “John Verazzini, the Florentine in the
service of Francis I, had some strange experiences among
the savages, we are told. Sailing along the New England
coast in 1524, nearly a hundred years ago, he landed some
twenty men, who went into the interior. When the In-
dians beheld the white men in armor they took to their
heels, probably thinking that they were gods or monsters.

“But there was one old woman who could not hobble
away. Old as she was, she carried a child on her back,
in the Indian way, and there was a young woman with her,
about eighteen years of age, who had three children on her
KIDNAPED INDIANS.—“ OUR PILOT.” 119

back. The old woman was filled with the greatest terror
when she saw the white men coming, and the young woman,
burdened with the children, was greatly terrified. The
braves ran; they had neither old age nor children on their
backs to hinder them.

“There was a meadow of bright grass near. The old
woman suddenly sank down in the grass, and lay perfectly
still. The young woman did the same, and the grass waved
like a sea, and had not these peor people been seen to disap-
pear there, the meadows would only have seemed to be in-
habited by the Indian birds, which they call conquiddles.

“ But the sailors dashed into the grass after them.

“When the old woman saw that she was discovered, she
set up a wild howling, and the children followed her exam-
ple. The young woman sprang up, and it was a quick wit
she had.

“She pointed to the way the men had gone, and cried
out in Indian: ‘Gone! gone! there! there! go! go!’

“T do not blame her for sending these strange men after
her people, since they had deserted her with her babies.

“They attempted to seize and carry her away, but she
kept up such a noise as made them willing to let her go.
They kidnaped one of her children and took it away.
Verrazzini, on another voyage, was himself captured by In-
dians, and it is said that he was eaten by them.”

He continued: “Some nine years ago Captain Edward
Harlow ws sent out to discover the island of Cape Cod.

A
120 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

He sailed past this place, and found that Cape Cod was not
an island at all, but a part of the mainland. He enticed
three Indians whom he met on Montregon Island to come
on board his ship. One of these Indians was called Pechmo.

“When Pechmo found that the English intended to
make him a captive he leaped overboard and escaped.

“The ship’s boat hung over the stern. One day Captain
Harlow was astonished to find that the other two savages
were gone, and that the boat had disappeared. Pechmo
had returned under the cover of the night or a storm, cut the
boat from under the stern, and helped his comrades to
escape.

“«We must rescue the boat,’ said Harlow.

“He cast his eyes on the shore.

“¢There it is, said he. ‘Bring it back!’

“They set out in some light craft to bring it back.
When the sailors came to where the boat lay they found it
filled with sand.

“We must clean it out,’ said the mate.

“They were about to do so when a shower of arrows fell
among them. The boat, filled with sand, had been moored
under the cover of bushes or trees, or some safe protection.
The men were glad to get safely back again.

“Now, many such things had happened on the coast,
and the Indians must have come to believe that the traders
are thieves.”

“Ellen! ”
KIDNAPED INDIANS.—‘“‘OUR. PILOT.” 121

It was the voice of Mistress Carver.

“ Jasper is going to leave us. The voyage has been too
hard for your little brother. He is dying.”

The Mores were four orphan children. They had been
taken into the families of the Pilgrims in Holland: Ellen
into the family of Edward Winslow, Jasper More into that
of John Carver, and the others into that of Elder: William
Brewster. It seems strange that these Pilgrim families
should have brought the orphans with them. Only one of
these children lived to grow up, and he changed his name to
Mann.

~ Ellen More followed Mistress Carver to the bunk where
her brother was lying, faded and white.

He looked up to Ellen.

The wind was whistling in the rigging, and the boy must:
have known that his grave would soon be made in the sea.

“T pity you, brother,” said Ellen More. “ What can I
do?”

“Ts the pilot on board?”

The girl turned swiftly away.

“Pilot Coppin, come. I can do nothing. Oh, do come!
Jasper is going away. What can you do?—do something—
quick! ” :

The pilot came and stood above the dying boy.

“ Pilot? ”

“Well, my boy?”

“You have been good to Ellen.”
122 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

He lay very still. The broad form of Elder Brewster
bent above the four little orphans.

“Pilot,” whispered the boy, “I am going to father and
mother now. It would make me happy to kiss your hand.”

The pilot put his hard hand to the white lips, but the
power to move those little lips was forever gone.

The little form lay still and white.

They wrapped it up. The pilot took it into his arms
and went away and left it by itself, and when he came back
his arms were empty, but he bent down and kissed Ellen
More.

Did he take it with him that day as he went on board
the shallop? It was hard weather that day, and the ocean
would make no account that another little form had been
added to its unnumbered graves.

When Ellen asked about her brother’s remains she was
told that they had been taken away by our pilot.

“ What our Pilot does is well,” said Elder Brewster.

“Our Pilot ’—she understood in part all the good man
would imply. Yes, heart of little Ellen More; yes, heart of
the great ocean of the multitudinous waves, what our Pilot
does is well, in all the providential mysteries of the world.

Those were hard, dark days; if we have sprinkled a little
fiction for the sake of illustration in our vision of the past,
the narrative is substantially true. Those were days of
child heroes on the sea, and their little hearts, like the souls
of the Pilgrim mothers, shared the common suffering. But
KIDNAPED INDIANS.—‘“ OUR PILOT.” 123

the harvest of all good endeavor and good work is sure, and
they who seek their happiness in spiritual things, and live
for the welfare of all men and all time, will not in the end be
disappointed. This little colony, for whom waited not so
much as a roof, a fireplace, or any comfort in the cold, was
to give expression to ideas which would furnish the model
of a great republic that should dominate mankind. So
right ideas grow and triumph in the world.
CHAPTER XY.
THE MAN WHO GAVE UP ALL.—THE GOLDEN CHAIN.

Tue third expedition of discovery, this one under Pilot
Coppin, sailed away from the Mayflower on December 6th.
Those who remained on board eagerly awaited the return of
the explorers.

It was Sunday on the Mayflower, December 10 (20th).

The tide had gone out of the harbor,leaving the channels
lying like open rivers, and had come back again, over those
dark meadows of the sea. The fourteen men who had gone
out under “ our pilot” in search of a place of good anchor-
age, a land of springs of fresh water and of broad timber,
had not come back again. They were on Clarke’s Island
then, as the place is called to-day, and was named so then
for the first time.

The people were gathering, many of them helpless and
weak, in the cabin to receive words of comfort from Elder
William Brewster, one of the most beautiful characters to
be found in the records of mankind. The young people
gathered there, and they came with willing ears, for they
had come to regard this great-hearted, loving man as a
father.

£

124
THE MAN WHO GAVE UP ALL. 125

All gathered in a circle. There were two dogs on board,
and they too came, and Mistress Billington was about to say
“Seat!” to them, when we may see good Elder Brewster
passing by and saying: “Let the dumb creatures listen, so
that they be quiet.”

The ship rocked to and fro. It was probably the first
meeting house and pulpit in the empty New England
world.

The people sat with folded arms. It was the darkest
day in all their lives, and they wondered what the glorious
man of faith, verging on sixty, would say.

We can not know now what his words were, but their
meaning may come to us in sympathetic interpretation.

“Since we last met two of our number have been. laid
away in the sea and many have sickened, and fourteen have
gone out from us into the stress of the cloud and storm to
seek for a place of habitation. He who knows the end from
the beginning has guided us well.

“ My hair is turning gray, and I stand before you as your
servant, having no will but to serve you. I have given up
all my worldly possessions for this service, as you all know.
I have sought no worldly gain or honor. I stand before
you as your elder, conscious of my needs, and only wait-
ing for that blessed man, John Robinson, to come over
the sea.

“T do not often speak of myself, as you also know, and
if I so speak to-day it is but to show you that I seek nothing
126 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

here but to be your servant in faith, and to carry the Gospel
to those tribes who have never heard the word.

“My manner of life to this day is known to you all. I
was a student of Cambridge, and I served the court under
that goodly gentleman, William Davidson, for eleven years. .
I was sent with him by the queen into the Low Countries,
in Leicester’s time, and the keys of Flushing were given to
me to keep. After such affairs of state I returned to my
father’s house at Scrooby, and there united with that church
and society that has crossed the stormy sea. I have been
imprisoned for the good of this people; I have turned my
back on honors and public gifts for the sake of this people;
I have given up my private fortune for you, and, bless God,
I stand before you to-day, on this rocking ship, with empty
hands. JI am simply your elder, and I would never seek to
be your pastor, lest you should say of me that I sought for
myself what belongs only to the elect ministry of God.

“But was there ever on earth a company of God like
this? The sea rocks beneath, the sky lowers above us, and
the winds whistle around us, but we have Faith. We are
driven as exiles into a wilderness of savages, but we have
Faith that the cross of redemption arose even for them. We
know not whence our food is to come, but we have Faith;
whence our shelter is to come, but we have Faith. The
plague of the sea is upon us, but we have Faith. We may
perish after the view of men, but we have Faith. There
is a Faith that overcomes the world, and a Faith that is over-
THE MAN WHO GAVE UP ALL. 127

come by the world, and living is dying; we have the Faith
that overcomes the world.”

Little Ellen More was there. She had put on her neck
the copper chain.

When the good elder had gone to all the bunks to speak
out of his good heart of faith to the sick, he touched the little
girl on the shoulder. g

“ Why do you wear the gift chain, my little one?”

“Not for ornament, sir.”

“T knew that; your little heart could have no vanity
like that in these dark days.”

“T put it on, sir, because I have Faith.”

“That gives my heart help, my little one. Faith in what,
may I ask?”

“ Faith that I am carrying the chain to the forest king,
and that that king will wear it in love and protect us all.
Pilot Coppin thinks God’s gift of love to the great king is
in this chain.”

“Pilot Coppin isa good man. There are not many like
him. He practices well what I try to preach.

“Little one, did you know that I once received a gold
chain to wear?” he continued. “It was a Holland chain.”

“No, no,.was it? Where is it now?” asked Ellen
eagerly.

“Tt was only given me to wear in honor of the states.
It belonged to the secretary of the queen, and I gave it back
to him. Your chain minds me of it.”
128 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“You gave back your gold chain, and I am to give up
mine? You wore your chain that the queen might be
pleased that you had served her, did you not?”

“Yes, yes, that the queen might see that the Netherlands
had approved of what I had tried to do.”

“TJ am wearing my chain for a king.”

“What king?”

“The Indian king. Pilot: Coppin will tell you about
him.”

“What faith! You are the Syrophcnecian woman’s
real little daughter.”

“That is a long word, Elder Brewster; who was she?”

“ Ask Elizabeth Winslow, your foster mother, some
other time, when you are alone with her. She will tell you
her story.”

A disease like the scurvy was threatening the people on
board, and especially the women and the servants. The one
desire of all hearts was to reach land, to feel again the steady
earth under their feet.

“Tf we must perish, let us die on the land,” said one
woman to another. ;

“T am so weary, so weary,” said Rose Standish, “ but I
will never complain; I hold to the faith of Brewster, who
counts all gains as losses for the sake of the cause of the
Cross in the world.”

“ Oh, that they would come back,” said Elizabeth Wins-
low, “and tell us that they had found a place of springs! ”
THE MAN WHO GAVE UP ALL. 129

Elder Brewster heard, and answered:

“* All my springs are in thee.’ ”

Night came, and the ship rocked and rocked even in
the haven, in which a thousand ships might find shelter.
The lamp light swung, the sickness increased. Even the two
dogs caught the depression of that dreariest of all the dreary
nights on the Mayflower, and howled.

Yet to-morrow would be a day that would cause the
merry bells of the world to ring for these tempest-tossed peo-
ple, and that for a thousand years. But they could know
nothing of this, save by faith.

The statue of Faith rises over Plymouth Harbor, with
its face toward the serene blue sky. It stands for more than
any other statue in the Western world, and when the traveler
sits down beneath it and looks up to it, his eyes fill with
tears, and he chokes to speak, and he knows the meaning of
the apostolic words, “of whom the world was not worthy.”
He himself must be destitute of worth whose heart does not
melt there, and feel the aspiration for a better life.

Such was the life on the Mayflower during those perilous
days, of which Pilot Coppin will give an account to those
who are waiting his return.

Let us continue the picture. How did the Pilgrims who
were left on board the Mayflower during the expedition feel
as they watched for the return of the explorers on the winter
coast? The leading men of the company were among the
explorers, except Elder Brewster and John Alden.
CHAPTER XVI.
THE ROCK OF FAITH.

Ir was December 12th (22d).

“ They are coming,” cried the Billington boys, who were
ever on the alert.

“Scat!” said Mistress Helen Billington to the dogs,
which seemed to have scented land, and started up at every
announcement that caused an excitement on board.

“ What do you suppose that they have found?”

It was a blue day, and the boat of the explorers rose
clearly in view.

Elder Brewster looked off on the harbor, and John
Alden, the cooper, stood beside him. In popular tradition
John Alden disputes with Mary Chilton the honor of being
the first to step on Plymouth Rock. John Alden did not go
out with the explorers at all. At the final landing of the Pil-
grim company at a later date, he or Mary Chilton, as we
shall picture, may have been the first to stand upon the rock.
A long legend gives the honor to Mary Chilton, who mar-
ried John Winslow, Governor Edward Winslow’s brother,
whose tomb may be seen from Tremont Street in King’s
Chapel buvene ground, Boston. The famous Com-


Plymouth Rock.
THE ROCK OF FAITH. 131

mander Winslow, of the Grand Pré romance, was of this
family.

The boat came on, the people crowding to the rail of
the ship to welcome it. John Howland, who had been
washed overboard during the voyage and marvelously res-
cued, and who is supposed to have sung amid the storm that
beat upon the explorers, is seen to turn his hearty face
toward the ship.

“Oh! he! ho! Good harbor!” shouted he.

“Good harbor!” echoed the company.

“ Springs! ”

“Springs! ” echoed all.

“Timber! ”

“Timber! ” chorused the company.

“The clouds are lifting,” said Elder Brewster. “The
Old World lies behind us—the gates of the New World
are opening. I can see them as in a vision. The hand of
Love is behind all events.”

“Good cheer! good cheer! ” rang out a voice. Whether
John Howland really sang in the storm or not, Robert Cop-
pin did ery out, “Good cheer!” when he saw Plymouth
Harbor, and we may well suppose that he cried “Good
cheer! ” now.

He merits the name of Good Cheer Coppin from this
time. It may be said that Plymouth Harbor was not the
one of his dreams. But he was certainly the pilot that
_ directed the Pilgrims to Plymouth Harbor, though he came
*

132 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

near carrying them north, and who must have thrilled
the hearts of the men when he first saw the harbor by the
ery of “ Good cheer! Good cheer!” an exclamation
worthy to give a name to some Plymouth school or insti-
tution.

“Good cheer! ” answered all to the heart of Pilot Cop-
pin. Even the dogs barked in the general joy.

Up the side of the ship climb the explorers. The sails
go up again; the anchor is lifted. The Mayflower moves
on again in clearer air toward Plymouth Harbor, and enters
the deep channels of the wide haven, so beautiful in calm, so
dreary in storm. Good Cheer Coppin, what story hast thou
now to tell?

They stood on the deck again—the men who had found
the rock and the springs: Robert Coppin, pilot, the leader;
Governor Carver, William Bradford, Edward Winslow,
John Tilley and Edward Tilley, two inseparable brothers;
Richmond Warren and Edward Doty, and John Clarke, the
mate of the Mayflower, and several sailors.

The people pressed around them.

“Tt is no common story that I bring you now,” began
Pilot Coppin, on his return, as he sat down amid the com-
pany, as before; “there are few accounts that can surpass
it, I mind. If you shall found a colony, and it shall grow,
what will the people of the future say of the song that was
sung when the sky lashed the billows, and darkness filled
the sea, when the rudder hung loose, and the sails were torn,
THE ROCK OF FAITH. 133

and men lay sick and dying? They will say that Faith has
not failed in the world.

“Listen again, and I will tell you what we saw.

“From the beginning the wind was cold, and the blasts
beat upon us. The spray dashed over us and froze on our
clothes, and we were clad in coats of ice that were heavy
as iron.

“Edward Tilley fell back as one dead, and his brother
watched over him. Our gunner was also sick unto death.

“Out into the heavy waters we sailed; we saw a point
ahead at last where we might come to shore. Indians were
there and a fire. We spent the night on the shore, and then
divided into two companies, one to go on by water and
one by land. We came together again at night and en-
camped, setting a sentinel. We prayed there in the light of
the fire, and then we sang a psalm. Oh, to have heard those
men singing in the woods by the sea in the storm! That
was a song of Faith.

“The fire blazed warm against the black oe Then
we lay down, and all was still save the dashing of the sea.

“Suddenly at midnight the sentinel cried:

“¢ Arm! arm!’

“We rose up. There was a hideous cry in the air. We
discharged two muskets; then all became still again, and we
concluded that it was wild beasts or sea monsters that we
had heard.

“Tn the morning we knelt upon the ground and prayed
134 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

for guidance and protection. Then we carried our arms
down to a place near where the shallop lay and laid them
down on the ground.

“A cry rent the air. It was wild and strange and
hostile. It was like the cry that we had heard at mid-
night. ;
“One of the company who had gone into the woods came
running back, crying ‘Indians! Indians! ’

“There was a rattling in the trees. It was a shower
of arrows.

“* Collect your arms!’ said Standish. He had kept his
own snaphance [a hand gun fired by a flint and steel]. We
hurried to recover our arms.

“The ery of the Indians was now loud, wild, and fearful.
It was like this: ‘Woath! Woath! Ha! Ha! Woath!?

“The trees, as it were, became Indians, and the Indians
trees. The trees with big trunks seemed to encase Indians.
We could see plumed heads peer around the bark of such
trees and disappear.

“We discharged our pieces, but we might as well have
fired into the empty air.

“ At last one of the Indians was wounded, and he uttered
a dismal ery—so woeful that it went to the hearts of the
rest. He fled, and all followed his example. They proba-
bly did not understand our death-dealing pieces.

“Tt was a dark morning. We went out from our shelter
and found eighteen arrows on the ground. Here is one of
THE ROCK OF FAITH. 185

them; it is headed with a hart’s horn. The encounter took
place at Neuset [Eastham].

“We started out upon the sea again, hoping for good
weather, but it began to snow and rain. The wind rose
in the afternoon and the seas rolled rough; the stays of the
rudder broke and two men made a rudder of their oars.

“Tn this terrible water I yet felt a light within. It was
Faith.

“Good cheer, be of good cheer, all!’ I cried. But
we had but Faith to give us good cheer. Outside of that
light everything seemed to be going against us.

“There came a fearful blast, and the sea tossed and
our mast split in pieces.

“Good cheer, be of good cheer, all!’ I cried again.
‘T can see the harbor!’ Then Master Howland sang. Was
there ever a song like that? *

“T gave a wrong command, but that was overruled by
the hand of an unknown power. We fell upon an island.

“ Our mate, Clarke, was the first to leap to the shore.

“T seize the land in the name of King James!’ he
cried. So we called the place Clarke’s Island.

“We built our fires in the darkness, prayed, and sang
again. The next day we rested there, for it was the Sab-
bath. We found a great rock there where we assembled,
and in the afternoon and sunset of that still day we saw the



* It seems to have been a tradition that this man sang amid the storm.
10
136 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

great harbor lying in the distance to which Providence had
directed my soul.

“ We could sing the psalms of Leyden in these perilous
days. Winslow, Bradford, and Hopkins could pray and
give counsel, and John Howland sang—the man servant of
our governor—may his life be long! *

“Monday morning broke clear; the dark sea rolled
calmer and the blue sky arched the subsiding waves.

“¢ That is not your harbor,’ said the men to me.

“¢No,’ I answered, ‘ that is not the harbor that I saw on
.the Scotsman from Glasgow, but it is your harbor, and
the one to which Providence has directed you.’

“We got ready to sail into that harbor, and entered it on
more quiet water.

“<«There is a great rock yonder,’ said John Howland,
the singer, ‘let us land there.’

“The rock stood out in the shallow water like a monu-
ment. We drifted up to it. John Howland leaped upon
it in the name of King James of England. We are going
to lift anchor and go back there, the place to which I
directed them, though that was not the harbor that I had
then in my mind.

“The harbor is marked on the chart by the name of New
Plymouth, after the beloved Plymouth, where the people

* Mrs, Hemans has made use of this tradition :

“ Amid the storm they sung,
And the stars heard, and the sea.”


The canopy under which Plymouth Rock is now preserved.
THE ROCK OF FAITH. : 137

were kind to us in our distress. It is not Thievish Harbor,
as I supposed; you will be glad of that. It is a place of
springs, of living waters, pure and cool.

“ On that strange rock—whence did it come?—you, too,
may land. It looks as though Heaven set it there as a
lonely wharf to signal the souls of heroes. Happy is the
woman who shall first set her foot upon it. If Provi-
dence is indeed your guide, her name shall live in a glory
more great than Captain Miles Standish ever won in
Flanders.”

So the pilot’s dream of a better harbor had ended well.
His invisible faith would one day turn into a monument.

We have no love for those who try to destroy great na-
tional traditions. Nearly all such legends are found, after
all, to rest on a firm basis of fact. But the traditions that
Mary Chilton or John Alden were the first of the Pilgrims
to step upon Plymouth Rock, as we have shown, can not be
true. No woman accompanied the Pilgrims on the expedi-
tion led by Pilot Coppin in the open boat, and John Alden,
as we have related, was not with them. The tradition in
regard to Mary Chilton is likely to be true in the general
landing of the Pilgrim company, when the women and chil-
dren left the ship, but that event did not occur on Fore-
fathers’ Day. What matters it? In substance the fore-
father legend is true.

The Faith of that day no one can ever dispute, and the
victory was in the Faith, as achievement always is. To the
138 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER,

eleventh chapter of Hebrews we may add: “ By faith Amer-
ica was discovered by Columbus and in faith the Pilgrim
Fathers founded the nation.” It is unwritten Scripture,
but it is as true as that in the famous chapter which has been
called the Westminster Abbey of Hebrew History.
CHAPTER XVII.
ELDER BREWSTER’S LOOKING-GLASS.

Tue Mayflower is on the sea again. She is headed for
the rock, for the land of the living springs. From one of
these springs, at the place of the old Bradford house, the
visitor to Plymouth yet may drink. It is a public foun-
tain now.

The young folks talked of what they would do when
they had landed, and Mistress Brewster sat down beside her
boys, who bore the curious names of Love and Wrastle, the
last, we suppose, in reference to the story of Jacob and the
angel. Mary Allerton joined the company—she who out-
lived all the Pilgrims, dying in 1699, having lived at Plym-
outh nearly eighty years.

“What can a boy do in a country like that?” said Love
Brewster.

“Build,” said Joseph Rogers. “It is builders that live.
What they build is their thoughts and life. If I live I
will build, and I will begin to build by helping others to
build.”

“That is a proper and sensible thing for a boy to say,”
said Mistress Brewster. “Now, John euun Btn: I have
140 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

some fears about you. What will you do? Something
useful, I hope.”

“T’ll become an Indian chief; that would be the most
useful thing anybody can do.”

“ And I’ll help him,” piped Francis Billington.

“Beshrew the boy!” profanely said Helen Billington,
or “Goody Billington,” his mother. “Hear him now—
if he’d a-gone only a little further with his squibs we’d all
have been drowned. An Indian chief—Mistress Brewster,
the trouble is that my boys’ minds are too active. I think
that they will make discoveries.”

“T would like to discover Tusquanto, or Tusquantum,
about whom the pilot told.”

“ And why Tusquantum?” asked Mistress Billington.

“Why, Goody mother, he would be a tongue for us.
He lived with Sir Ferdinando Gorges for years, and was
educated by the trader. He would be a tongue for us.”

“We will need a tongue, an Indian tongue,” said Mis-
tress Brewster. “Now that was a sensible remark. You
ean be sensible. I do think that the boy who could find Tus-
quantum would be very useful to us. Now good thoughts
are the souls of good actions, May be that you may find
Tusquantum. Who knows?”

“Let us look over the presents again,” said Love
Brewster.

“Yes, yes, bring out the box of presents that we are
going to give to the friendly Indians—to those who do us
ELDER BREWSTER’S LOOKING-GLASS. 141

service,” said Mistress Brewster. “It makes the heart mel-
low to look over the things that we expect to give away.”

Love Brewster brought a curious box. Many of the
people had followed the counsel of Pilot Coppin, who had
advised the Pilgrims to purchase gifts in Leyden to be
offered to the Indians, and had brought gifts with them,
beside the copper chain.

“Now, gifts are heart money,” said Mistress Brewster,
“and here is our treasury. Here are knives—I wonder who
will receive them—and scissors—I hope some of the Indian
women will receive those. And here are necklaces—the In-
dians are very fond of necklaces, the pilot says.”

“Here is a tin whistle,” said Mistress Billington.
“That’s yours, John. You’d better keep it yourself; you
may need it when you get lost in the woods, going to be an
Indian chief.”

“Mary,” said Mistress Brewster to Mary Allerton, “ let
us have a little treat now. You are a careful girl. You
may go to my chest and bring out the looking-glass, and
we'll all look into it and see how we look in this strange
country before we land. Handle it very carefully. John
Robinson himself may have looked into that glass. It
would be a goodly sight if all the faces that have been seen
in that glass could appear on it again.”

Elder Brewster’s looking-glass, the supposed looking-
glass of our narrative, is still to be seen at the old Brewster
house in Plympton near Plymouth. All of the Pilgrims,
1492 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

and probably John Robinson, may have seen their faces in
that glass. What a revelation, indeed, it would be could
it bring back again all of the faces that had passed before it!

The looking-glass was brought out by the careful hands
of Mary Allerton, perhaps out of the traditional chest, yet
to be seen, whose hinges turned the leaf of a new destiny in
the world.

“We have looked into it before,” said Mistress Brews-
ter. “We will now look into it for the last time together.
Whatever the Pilgrim men may do in making a colony,
there will never much be known of the Pilgrim women, I
think. But whether we live or perish, we have been faith-
ful and true.”

She passed the glass from one to another carefully. The
whole company gathered in a little circle to see how they
looked before they set foot wpon the land. It was like the
opening of a family album to-day, only the faces vanished
with the look, and the glass could never bring them back
again.

What faces looked into the glass, and’ wondered what
would be their destiny in this new world of storms and
waves!

Some of the women wept when they:saw how their faces
had grown thin and faded.

“ Never mind,” said Mary Allerton, “summer will come,
and that will bring us everything—so the pilot says! ”

The faces lightened. .
ELDER BREWSTER’S LOOKING-GLASS. 143

“Here, Rose Standish, you may see now,” said Mistress
Brewster, passing the glass.

Rose Standish had dreamed of finding Virginia, a land
of fair skies, sunshine, and flowers, and not this land of
snows. She saw how thin and white she had grown as she
looked into the glass. But there was Faith in her face.
Miles Standish, one of the heroes of Flanders, had not sailed
on any vain purpose for the new land, however rugged the
shores might be found.

“Miles is a brave man,” she said, “and I must be a
brave woman. Faith is everything, but I have faded some.”

New faces crowded around Mistress Brewster to look
into the wonderful glass, which to them was like a magic
mirror. Mistress Catharine Carver was there, and Mistress
Elizabeth Winslow, both of them soon to die on the white
shores of the land now lying in view.

Mistress Martin was there, the wife of the treasurer of
the company, who also would fall a victim to the hard life
in the winter woods.

Susanna White was there, the mother of the first white
child born in New England.

Mistresses Hopkins, Tilley, Tinker, Ridgedale, Chilton,
Fuller, and Eaton were there, and these all were to fall be-
fore the sickness that would come upon the colony.

Lively Mary Chilton looked into the glass, and Priscilla
Mullins peeped shyly over her shoulder.

“ And now let me and my two rapscallions have a look,”
144 _ THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

said Mistress Billington, who, like her family, was noted
for her almost profane manner of speaking.

“Scat!” she said to her son John; “let your mother
look first. Well, I do look as though I couldn’t help it—I
do declare! don’t I now? Now, John, ’tis your turn; you
don’t look much like an Indian chief now; you'd better not
let any Indian chief get hold of you. And don’t you ever
go to wandering anywhere into the woods; ’tis a very
uncertain mind that you have. We may have to give
away some of these knives and curious things to ransom you
from some savage. The Indians will be more likely to get
you than you will be to find some ancient arrow maker and
to become a chief. Scat! ”

This last exclamation was addressed to John, after the
pseudo young chief had taken a peep into the magic glass.

“Now let your brother look—he that is going to help
you find Tusquantum and to become a chief. They say that
the great king of the woods here has a brother chief. There
—scat! ”

She pushed Francis, of the powder episode, away from
the glass, and said in a kindly tone, “ Now let the children
have a look. If we are going to have any future in these
empty woods—how the wind howls!—it is to be in them.
Here, children, come and look, and I’ll be a mother to you.
I have a good heart, now, if I do talk rough.”

Ellen More looked into the glass. Mistress Billington
was about to say “Scat!” but she saw tears in Ellen’s eyes,
ELDER BREWSTER’S LOOKING-GLASS. 145

and she drew the girl to her bosom and said, “ You poor
little motherless child! ”

“Never mind, Goody Billington,” said Ellen, “never
mind; the pilot will come back again! ”

“What makes you think so much of him, Ellen?”

“Oh, he thinks good things.”

“That he does—now, he does. He talks by what he
does, now—Pilot Coppin don’t boast of being a good man,
but he is a good man, and I love him, my girl, because he
loves you.

“Seat! seat! scat!”

What had happened now?

The Billington boys were breathing upon the precious
glass, and drawing their fingers over the mist.

“ Always in some mischief! What made you think of
that? Your heads are loose! There, go!”

The rough, kindly woman gave them a push.

“Here, Mary,” said Mistress’ Brewster, “you may put
the looking-glass away again, very carefully, very carefully.
We may never all look into it again.”

On, on moved the Mayflower. The sky was black and
billowy, and the waves seemed lashing each other. The
white wings of sea birds rose through the cold mist and
spray. The ship came to anchor. .

In several of the bunks were sick people. It was dark
by day and darker by night, and there were no sun, moon,

or stars,
146 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

Yet the founders of a nation were rocking on those wild
waves. The cabin light burned as it hung and swung, but
it was the light of Faith in all these hearts that was to be the
torch of destiny.

Would they ever find the great forest lord with the sim-
ple offering of the copper chain? Would they ever meet
Tusquantum and make him their tongue to the Indian
tribes? And would the summer that was thought to bring
them all things ever come, with warmth and healing, flowers
and birds, and memories that would make them doubly
grateful for the blooming fields and winged skies? We shall
see. Faith beckons them on.

They are in quiet waters now. Pilot Coppin points out
to the wathful eyes the famous rock.

“Good cheer!” he said. “ Behind the rock are springs,
and behind the springs rise the hills where we may build.
Good cheer! ”

“Good cheer! good cheer!” echoed the voices of the
women and children.

A party of men landed to hew timber and to prepare
for the landing of the Pilgrim company, which was soon
to follow.

“We are going on shore,”

said Pilot Coppin to young
John Billington; “what can I do for you when I get
there?”

“Find Tusquantum, and I will find the way to all good

fortune, sir!”
ELDER BREWSTER’S LOOKING-GLASS. 147

“ Aye, aye! you are keen, my boy—it is an Indian to
speak for us that we will need to find if we are to live in
peace with the natives. And now, Ellen, my little girl of
the Mayflower, what can I do for you?”

“Find the great chieftain of all the lands, and tell him
we have brought for him a copper chain from the lands of
his brother kings over the sea! ” |

“ Aye, aye, my girl of the Mayflower, I will look for
them both—Tusquantum and Massasoit, or Ousamequin, as
some call him.”

“That will be a great day, Pilot Coppin.”

“Yes, my little one, a great day.”

“ And he will sit under the great trees?”

“The great trees with beards of moss! ”

“Smoking a pipe of peace?”

“Yes; the forest king, not the trees.”

“ And will he wear a plume?”

“ Aye, aye, he will be all paint and shells and feathers.”

“ And great lords will be around him?”

“ Aye, aye, the lords of the forest, with bows and
quivers.”

“They will not shoot their arms?”

“No, no; they will stand up straight like images. They
will not shoot. Their wampum belts will shine in the
sun.”

“What is wampum, Pilot Coppin?”

“ Shells—shells of pearl.”
148 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“Will the women be there?”

“Likely—they have girdles of shells.”

“ And plumes?”

“Yes, the plumes of the eagle, or the purple jay that
bobs his head when he spies you, and says ‘ Haw, haw!’ ”

“Oh, I am so glad, Master Coppin! You will not let
John go off and be a chief, will you? He’s nothing but a
boy.” ;

“Tt would be a sorry day if John should ever find him-
self among the Indians. They would take him to make
sport for them, I fear.”

“You will see what I will do when we land,” said John.

They did.

How the children of the Mayflower must have looked
out upon that desolate shore! How they must have con-
trasted it with Leyden, and Delft, and Southampton, and old
Plymouth! Instead of ivied walls and towers and ringing
bells, a single rock. Instead of gay shops, a promise of a
few frozen springs. Instead of homes, woods of which to
build houses.

“ach family must build its own house, and all must
said the governor. In this plan

erect a Common House,”

was begun the New England village.

The company was now prepared to land. Pilot Coppin
gently bore down to the ship’s boat the light form of little
Ellen More.

The pilot helped the women carefully, remembering


The landing of the Pilgrims.
ELDER BREWSTER’S LOOKING-GLASS. 149

Mrs. Bradford, who had been drowned from the Mayflower.
So the women and children set foot on the rock in the home-
less land.

At this landing of a rather uncertain date, we may re-
peat that Mary Chilton (Winslow) may have been the first
of the Pilgrims to set foot on Plymouth Rock. She proba-
bly was, else there would not have been such a tradition
among the descendants of the Pilgrims. The explorers
landed on December 11th (21), and the Pilgrim company
at a little later date, and so it is true that December 21st is
Forefahers’ Day, now usually celebrated on the 22d.

The Pilgrim company could hardly have landed at any
one time, for there was serious sickness on board. The
Mayflower lay off in the harbor that Pilot Coppin had hailed
with “Good cheer!” and the shallop and longboat passed
to and fro between the ship and the land.

Good Cheer Coppin’s work is not over. The Mayflower
is to lie here until the birds come back again in the blue
skies of an early spring. The Pilgrims are yet to face a
terrible winter on land, but the genial New England spring
is to come in early March, and when Pilot Coppin shall say
“ Good cheer! spring has come again! ” the colony will have
begun that long era of glorious life in the current of which
we find ourselves now, in that grand stream of the ocean of
human destiny. We must follow these events.

And now the Pilgrim Fathers are upon the land. They
pass Christmas Day in felling trees, and the captain of the
150 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

Mayflower entertains them on board in the evening. He
probably told them tales of the Halloweens or the Christmas
greens of their old home of the hollies and ivies; or perhaps
causes John Howland to sing of the mistletoes. We know
not. Captain Jones was a rough, jolly man, and we do not
like to believe that he betrayed the Pilgrims and brought
them here by stealth. He was true to them in the winter
of their sorrows.

They must build a Common House, a place for public
worship, a fort, and must bring to the fort their cannon, and
for all these things the Mayflower must wait. They must
make some seven houses for the heads of the. families; these
they must fashion of timber cut from the trees, and cover
with thatch. The trees are there, monarchs of the forests. -
The meadows of thatch are there, glistening with ice foam
by the sea. Hack, hack, hack, sound the axes. The thatch
gatherers are at work in the keen gray mornings. The sick
still wait on board the ship. It is in this way that the new
nation begins to build.

But the reaction from the voyage comes, a kind of
scurvy, a fever of exhaustion, and many sicken and die.
The serving men die, Rose Standish dies, several of the chil-
dren die. The hardship of the sea seems to follow them.

But the work of the building goes on. The sickness in-
creases. The winter is wild, snowy, and cold. Wolves
howl in the forest. But February lights up the earth, and
the bluebirds come out of the woods. The mornings grow
ELDER BREWSTER’S LOOKING-GLASS, 151

red, and the angels of spring are in the air. Spring came
early that year in the true sense of the term. March was
like April.

The green mat was rolled up in the Common House, and
the copper chain was still a thing of faith—it was waiting.

Who can picture the distress of that winter? One after
another dying in the Common House!

They must bury the dead at night, lest the Indians
should know their helpless condition; they must dig the
graves deep, lest the wolves should uncover them.

When some were burning with fever, the deep storms
came, the sea winds driving the bulletlike snow against the
rude walls of the house made of logs and clay. The wind
drifted in, drove the smoke down the chimney, and often
made the company hover together for warmth.

They went out very still in the night with the bodies
of the dead. They waited for the moon to rise to bury the
wasted forms in the rude coffins. The carpenters must have
spent their nights in the solemn work of preparing boxes
for the dead.

Imagine a scene on such a night! The moon rises on
the white, silent snows, and hangs over the cold, glittering
harbor. Afar in the dark forests, where the pine boughs
are covered with ice, wolves—called “ lions ”’—are howling
for food. The sky is red in the distance with an Indian
camp fire.

Out of the Common House come the bearers in the keen
159 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

air with the body of the dead. They bear the burden on
their backs to the hill. The gravedigger, with his dark
lantern, meets them there. They lower the body into
the deep earth. They hear the wolves howl. No words
are spoken. The grave is filled in the moonlight, is leveled
and covered with snow. Night after night, with short in-
tervals, the silent scene is repeated. The moon has not
often looked down on a spéctacle more pitiable.

The lights of Leyden were three thousands miles away.
The native inhabitants of the land were dead except a few
wandering families. Even the wild cat knew not where to
find its prey, so dead and empty was the land, and so pitiless
were the cold and storms.

In that awful January and February what would a his-
torian have written in his book of prophecy? Ye who sit
by your warm fires in luxurious rooms may well recall the
days of old New England, for in those terrible times the
faith of the Pilgrim Fathers never failed or faltered. There
was “no room in the inn,” but the magi were on the march,
and the star of destiny hung in the clouds over those eight or
more rude houses by the sea.


CHAPTER XVIII.
IN THE Woops.

Tux first thing that the Pilgrims did on landing from -
the ship, now moored in Plymouth Harbor, was to build a
Common House. This was to serve as a shelter for all, for a
place of public worship. The country was already named
New Plymouth on the old chart, and report has it that it
was named by Prince Charles. The first house was named
the Common House. It would serve for a fort, or a place
of defense, until a stronger fortification could be built. The
place of the Common House is still marked in Plymouth.
It is near the rock.

To this house the sick were to be brought. Here the
goods of the ship were to be stored for a time. Here for the
first days of their history on shore the Pilgrims lived as one
family. Here almost daily the people sickened and some
died.

John Billington and his sons, whom we are sorry to re-
cord from Morton as “one of the profanest families
amongst them,” were at once restless and eager to explore.

“Captain’s mate,” said the senior Billington one day,
“let us make a journey into the woods and aco what we can
154 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

find. Let us make a journey of discovery. Everything
seems very silent here. There must be something to be
found. I climbed a tree the other day, and thought I saw
a sea.”

“ May I go, father?” said young John Billington.

“Why should you want to go, John?”

“To find the ancient arrow maker,” said John.

i “No, not now. There are always ancient ‘arrow mak-
ers’ in your head, and I wonder if such imaginations will
ever bring you any good.”

The two men set out, carrying but a single musket.

“We may be in danger,” said the mate. “We have
seen fires in the woods not many miles away ever since we
landed.” ;

“Yes, and we may not be in danger. The Standish
party found nothing alarming when they went out to ex-
plore, and they brought home an eagle. It was a beau-
tiful bird, and they roasted it and they say that it tasted
as sweet as the meat of a lamb. I did not get a taste
of it.”

“One bird could not be divided among a hundred
hungry people,” said the mate.

The woods hung with withered grapes and glowed with
bitter red berries. Partridges flew up from the red and yel-
low seed pods of leafless rose bushes. There were rabbit.
tracks here and there, and green patches of teaberries and

princes’ pine.
IN THE WOODS. 155

Strawberry leaves carpeted the open places, covered with
frost, but retaining their summer color. It was Roger
Williams who said that God might have made a better berry
than the strawberry, but he did not, and the same Pilgrim
found strawberries so abundant that “a ship could have been
loaded with them.”

Suddenly the mate cried “ Halt! ”

John Billington stopped. Before them rose some de-
serted houses made of poles.

“Indians,” said the mate.

“There are none there now—there is no smoke.”

“Let us move cautiously,” said the mate. “ We may
be struck with arrows.”

“The arrows are not poisonous,” said Billington.
# “Those were not that we found in the first encounter.”

The two men approached the huts with sharp eyes.
There was no movement within.

There was water near. It was a sea. It grew as they
went on.

In the midst of the sea was an island. It was a beautiful
spot in the primeval forest. It may be seen to-day as it was
of old, a few miles out of Plymouth, and it is still called
“ Billington’s Sea.”

If there were Indians there they hid themselves. The
Indians felt that they had good reason to hide from the
white adventurers, even when they were superior in num-
bers, for a number of them had been stolen from Cape Cod,
156 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

and the two or three who had returned must have told very
alarming stories of England and Spain, as Pilot Coppin’s ©
stories have already revealed.

They returned to the Common House, where William
Bradford fell sick, and to which the news was brought that
Christopher Martin, the treasurer, was dying on board the
Mayflower.

“Have you brought home nothing, father?” asked
young John Billington.

“ Nothing—there was nothing to bring.”

“What did you find, father?”

“ A sea and an island. I could not bring them back
with me. They will stay where they are.” :

“They can do us no good. Did you see any Indians
there?”

“No, but we saw the place where they lived. That
would be a good place for you to go and be chief; a no In- '
dian chief of no Indians. It is a fine country.”

“Did you find it?” asked Mistress Helen.

“What, Mistress Helen?”

“The discovery that you were to make.”

“T found a sea! ”

“A sea? What good did it do for you to climb up a
tree and discover nothing? Clarke found an island and
Coppin a harbor, and all you have discovered was a sea.
You did not even bring home an eagle. Scat! scat! Land
of mercy! what was that?”
IN THE WOODS. 157

A little chipmunk ran out of one of the logs, and darted
under the blockhouse.

“That was not a mouse or a rat,” said she. “It was
striped. He’s gone for good; he was a squirrel like. What
a good soup he would make,” she added, with sudden good-
heartedness, “for some of the sick people here! There are
more and more falling sick, and I pity them. What did we
ever leave London for?”

It would be hard to say, but the family left to the sea a
name, and that sea came to be associated with a sad history.
CHAPTER XIX.

THE THATCH GATHERERS.—HERO, THE MASTIFF OF
THE MAYFLOWER.—A NIGHT UNDER A TREE.

Tue sickness increased. A hospital was built and a
storehouse. Lots were assigned to heads of families, and
houses, made of oak and clay, and roofed with thatch, were
built for the Pilgrims who had families.

We have spoken of dogs on the ship. The company
brought with them two dogs to Plymouth, one of these a
huge mastiff, which seems to have been called Hero, and
belonged to John Goodman. The other was a spaniel, and
is assigned to Peter Browne, who died at Plymouth, 1633.

As thatch was of great service in roofing houses, the
cutting of thatch in the abundant sea meadows became
avery useful employment. The thatch was best cut at low
tide, was bound in bundles, and left to dry upon the shore.

Among the thatch gatherers were the same John Good-
man and Peter Browne. John Goodman may have lost his
life by thatch gathering, we can not be sure, but he did not
long survive a most terrible adventure.

Four men had gone out to cut and bind thatch, and of
these wore oun Goodman and Peter Browne, who took the
THE THATCH GATHERERS. 159

mastiff and spaniel with them. Noon came to them after
some hours of labor, and John Goodman and Browne being
friends went away together to eat their meal. They came
upon a pond of fresh water, and hastening toward it saw
there a deer.

“Tsn’t it beautiful?” said Goodman. “ A stag—look
at its antlers! ”

The dogs saw the stag and crept around their masters,
waiting for a signal to give chase to the animal.

“Tet the dogs give chase,” said Browne. ‘“ We’ve
sickles to dispatch it if they bring it down. Hero, hist
—go!”

The great mastiff started, the spaniel following. The
stag looked up for a moment, lifting its head high in the air,
then bounded away.

The dogs and stag were soon lost to view, but the men
followed the cry of the dogs. The chase became exciting,
and the two men heeded not whither they were going. On,
on, went the animals, and on the men, following the cry in
the empty woods and through thickets, until suddenly the
dogs became silent.

“ What has happened now?” said Browne, panting.

“The dogs have lost the stag,” said Goodman.

It was so. In a short time the dogs came back to them
panting, and crouched down as though ashamed of their
failure. How the stag escaped the men could not know.
It may have leaped some stream.
160 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“Where are we?” said Goodman.

“Which way is east? There is no sun.”

“The dogs must lead us,” said Browne. ‘“ Here, Hero,
home! ”

But the dog, which understood the word and knew what
to do in its own land, could not obey the direction here.
It followed the scent of animals, rather than the course
back again.

The shadows of the afternoon were falling. The men
wandered around and around, following the bewildered
dogs, and night came on, and the woods were black and
starless.

“We must get to the shelter of some thick trees and
remain there until morning,” said Goodman.

“But it is bitter cold,” said Browne, “ and our clothing
is poor. We shall perish before morning. See, snow is
falling, only it is too cold to snow hard.”

The cold increased. It became terrible.

“We must walk around and around the tree all night
long,” said Goodman. “ We should die were we to go
to sleep. My feet are like ice. I must keep the blood cir-
_ culating. Walk! walk!”

“Tt is easy to say that, but my feet are numb. Where
will the people think that we are gone?”

“They will think that we have been captured by the
Indians, and we shall add to their trouble in the sickness.
Why did we lose our senses? Walk! walk!” . 7%
THE THATCH GATHERERS. 161

Around and around a clump of high trees they ran.
But the night grew more and more severe.

A cry echoed through the forest.

“ What was that?” asked Browne.

“ A lion [wolf]. Walk! walk! ”.

“We must climb the trees. Is there no way to make a
fire?”

“ None—walk! walk!”

The mastiff began to answer the wolf with a cry of de-
fiance and seemed about to break away from them.

Browne seized the dog, saying:

“T must hold it. We must not let it go away from
us—we may need it here.”

Another ery rang through the black forest, and an-
other.

“There are a pack of them near,” said Goodman.
“ But we mustn’t climb the trees till they are upon us, and
we must set the dogs on them should they come.”

The dogs howled, barked, and cried savagely. The
wolves were unused to such sounds and seemed to fear them.
They barked, but kept at bay.

The excitement of the situation roused the latent blood
of the men. They walked violently, and stopped to listen.
They caught each other in their arms, and struggled with
each other to keep their blood warm. But with all their
efforts Browne cried: “ My feet are frozen; I fear that I
shall never see the ship again.”
162 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“ Walk! walk! ” still cried Goodman, and the two kept
on going round and round in the dark circle.

Morning came at last. Goodman dragged Browne to
the foot of a hill, and leaving him there went to the top
and climbed a tree.

“Cheer up!” he cried. “ Browne, Browne, up, up,
come on! ”

“ What do you see?” called Browne.
“The harbor.” .

“ What else? I am numb.”
“T see the ship.”

“ Come down to me, I can not walk more.” ’

“T see smoke. Fire—fire—where there is smoke there
is fire. Keep up heart. I am coming down!”

He came down, but Browne was unable to move farther.

He clasped him under the arms and. dragged him for-
ward, Hero following and howling.

Goodman put his life into the struggle. He loved his
friend and would die rather than leave him.

“ Home! ” said the half-frozen man to Hero.

The dog could follow human tracks now and obeyed.

The people heard the dog call and ran out of the Com-
mon House. They took the poor thatch gatherer in their
arms and bore him home.

“ We thought that the Indians had carried you away,”
said distracted Helen Billington.

“Seat!” she cried out to the faithful dog. “ Take the
‘THE THATCH GATHERERS. 163

cripple to Dr. Fuller in the new house. The governor is
there! ”

They carried him to the new house. Governor Carver
received him there and laid him down before the fire.

Dr. Fuller tried to take off the poor man’s shoes. They
were frozen to his feet.

“ Shall I live, doctor? ” faltered Browne.

“Yes, yes, you will live.”

“ But Goodman, will he live?”

“ He is not frozen,” said the doctor.

“No, no,” said Goodman. ‘“ My being compelled to
carry him is what saved me.”

He turned white.

“Goodman, Goodman, this is not the end. I may
live, but it will be through your life. I do not care
for myself, but I do care for you—I love you as my own
life.”

“T have no children. You have. I’m all right, all
right.”

The doctor grasped his hand and felt of his pulse.

“You are coming round again,” said he.

Browne did come round again. He recovered from his
affliction slowly, but was for a long time lame.

But Goodman had received a shock, and for him there
was small hope of recovery. His strength had gone out
of him.

“Tf it must be one of us, it had better be I,” we may
164 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

fancy him to have said, for such seems to have been his
spirit.

He hobbled about for a time. One day his spaniel was
attacked by two wolves and ran for protection between its
master’s legs. Goodman secured a stake and threw it at the
wolves, which, we are told, sat down and “ grinned at him.”

The poor spaniel was not used to such company as this.

Goodman seems never to have been well after that dark
night in the woods. One night he died.

They had heard a cry of Indians about New Plymouth
the night before. They must not know that men were
dying; they must not know that there were graves on
the hill.

So they went out at night and broke the frozen sod, and
they carried the body to the hill and laid it into the earth.
They covered it with the clods of earth, and covered the
clods of earth with snow, and the next snowstorm covered all.

The hill lay white in the morning, and the spaniel
howled for its good master at night, but John Goodman
would never share his meal with the beautiful animal again.
CHAPTER XX.
INDIANS.

To John Billington and his wife Helen was assigned the
charge of the Common House. Their sons, John and Fran-
cis, were not the most trustworthy boys to live in such a place,
but John seems to have desired to see Indians, and if the
latter were to appear anywhere in town it would be there.

Robcrt Coppin came over from the ship from time to
time to talk with the young people, and the old, as well, in
the Common House.

Indians were lurking around. Great columns of smoke
rose here and there in the distance like pillars of the sky.
The heavens were red at night with camp fires, or forest fires
where camps had been. One day two Indians appeared on
a hill beckoning.

John Billington, the boy, saw them and came running
home screaming, setting his nervous mother in a tremor.
Miles Standish and John Hopkins went out to meet the
Indians, and the latter disappeared.

And you never asked them to make you their chief,”
said Pilot Coppin to John in a bantering way. “ What did

they look like? ”
165
166 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“T didn’t look long,” said the boy. “ One of them said
‘Hoach,’ and that word did sound awful. When you find
~Tusquantum I will ask him what it means.”

“¢ Ah he’ means yes in Indian,” said Coppin, “and
‘keen’ is art thou. .‘ Pinese’ or ‘ pnise’ means one who
talks with the dead.”

“Tf I had said to one of them ‘ Keen pnise?’ he would
have said ‘ Ah he’?” .

“He might have so answered; perhaps he was not a
prophet.” :

“He didn’t look like a prophet—the one that waved his
hand around so, and so, and so,” said John.

Helen Billington looked upon the boy with staring eyes.

“He will keep venturing,” said she, “farther and far-
ther, and some day he’ll meet an Indian that will whirl him
around so, and so, and so!”

Ellen More sat in terror before the Common House fire
as she listened to this startling prophecy. 3

“They are mounting the cannon,” said she. “They
say the minion weighs twelve thousand pounds, and the sacre
fifteen hundred pounds, and they have made Miles Standish
captain. I hope the captain will never fire those guns upon
the Indians. I wish that he would send for the great chief
to come here. The chief could lay down his arms on the
other side of the brook, couldn’t he?”

“Yes, yes, my simple-hearted little girl, that he could.”

“Then we could give him the copper chain’ and the
INDIANS. 167

jewel, and make a feast for him, and ask him to come again
and bring his wife and children.”

“ His wife and children! His squaw,” said Mistress Bil-
lington, “ and his papooses.”

“What isa squaw? That don’t sound well.”

“The squaw-sachem, she means,” said Pilot Coppin.
“The queen.”

“That sounds well. What was that other word, Mis-
tress Billington?”

“His papooses, you poor little simpleton.”

“What’s papooses, Mistress Billington?”

“ His little naked brats,” said the woman, who is sup-
posed not to have been overnice in descriptive words.

“He wouldn’t do that, would he?”

“Why, child, the chief is a great big, black, half-naked
savage; a giant, painted like a painted image, such as you
used to see in the museum of Leyden. And he grins—just
like that!” Helen Billington made a dreadful grimace.

“O Mistress Billington! I’m sorry for him if he acts
like that. Now I think the copper chain would look real
pretty on him. It would make him lift up his eyebrows
so, and look pleasant.”

“He will make ye lift up your eyebrows so, and look
pleasant if he were to get his hand into your hair. He
tomahawks ’em! ”

“OQ Mistress Billington! that sounds sad. What is
that?”
168 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

Robert Coppin put up his hand.

“The little girl need not be told about such things until
she gets older. Let her keep her illusions of the great forest
chief sitting under the oaks wearing the copper chain.”

“She might as well fancy a bear with a crown on his
head eating out of a silver tureen with a gold spoon. But
let the girl dream her dreams. She looks peaked. I hope
that she is not going in the way that her little brother went.”

“J think that I will live to see the chief sitting under the
trees, with the birds all singing around him, and see him
lift up his eyebrows so, real friendly and pleasant like.
Elder Brewster says that everything is possible to faith.”

“That’s right, my own little girl. Let us have faith.
T have faith; one thing what we came here for was that our
faith might be free.”

Ellen More lived in the new house of Edward Winslow,
the traveler, and Mistress Winslow’s goodness of heart is
seen in making a home for this little orphan girl. _

There were a few pleasant days, sky blue days, in that
short and terrible winter. On such days Pilot Coppin
would come over from the Mayflower when there was noth-
ing for him to do, and help the Pilgrims in their building.
He could use the jackscrew in the mounting of guns.

“Tt has saved us once,” we may fancy him to say, “and
it shall now be used to protect the company it saved.”

“ Ay, ay,” said the ship’s carpenter, “that was a lucky
thought that brought the jackscrew on board and saved the
INDIANS. 169

main beams. Success is the product of tools; the more
things we provide for ourselves to help us the more we ad-
vance. ’Tis the things that lift that help life.”

“Yes,” said Pilot Coppin, “and it is those people who ©
lift and not lean that make good colonists. We can not
know how much that jackscrew has done for the world, or
rather the thought that caused the jackscrew to lift the main
beam, and that won the battle of the ship against the seas.”

On one of the sky blue days Pilot Coppin said to Mis-
tress Winslow: “The voyage has told upon you. You need
sunshine. Let us go out on the beach and gather shells.
We will take, if you like, Ellen with us.”

“O Pilot Coppin! you have the good cheer for us all
that was in your heart when you saw the harbor. I am not
well; the sunny air may give me new life; let us go.”

They went down to the shore, the pilot leading Ellen by
the hand.

It was low tide. The sea seemed almost to have left
the harbor, except in the deep channels which looked like
rivers. Great blackfish lay about, looking like rocks. The
floor of the harbor was covered with shells. In the far sea
whales were spouting.

There was kelp everywhere, and at places there were
piles of shells that the Indians had thrown away in their
transient settlements.

Ellen picked up a very curious shell on the beach, among
the dead starfish.
170 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“What a queer shell that is, Pilot Coppin! I never saw
one so beautiful.”

“That is a pettywinkle,” said the pilot, picking another
mollusk of the same kind out of some kelp in which it had
become entangled. “ Some call it the periwinkle. Is yours
dead?” \

“T do not know—how can I tell?”

“Put it up to your ear and listen.”

Pilot Coppin handed his shell to Mistress Winslow.

The good woman and Ellen both put the shells to their
ears.

“What do you hear?” asked Pilot Coppin.

“T hear, I hear the sea; I hear, I hear England, and the
murmur of winds and bees amid the hedge rows; I hear, I
hear the voices of my soul!”

Mistress Winslow held the shell to her ear as she
spoke.

“‘ What do you hear, Ellen?”

“T hear, I hear the far away—the far, far away. What
makes it do so?”

“The echo of the ocean is in it,” said Pilot Coppin.
“The dead shell sings forever of the ocean.”

“Tt makes one feel that life is an ocean,” said Mistress
Winslow; “that the soul is on an ocean of which we know
not the beginning nor the end. I am going to take my shell
back home. I will listen to it when I am lonely. How
that sound does make me feel—so lonely, so litfle, and yet


The fort and meeting-house, 1621.

a
INDIANS. 171

so full of hope! It gives me faith where everything is vast;
all must be well.”

Ellen found a larger periwinkle, and took both of the
shells home with her.

“Will they sing of the sea by the fire?” asked Ellen.

“Yes, they will sing of the sea by the fire or anywhere,
and they will forever sing of the sea. They seem to say that
this world may be small, but that life is large, and better
things await us far away! ”

“T feel that is true, Pilot Coppin, and whether we live
or die we are all pilots like you, and may I be like you, a
pilot of good cheer, whatever may happen. I sometimes
think that I shall not live long.”

Ellen More stood dumb at these words, and her lips
quivered.

“T think of Jasper,” she said, “when I listen to the
shell. What good did my little brother’s life do, Master
Coppin?”

“He made better the hearts of those who cared for him,
and those who loved him, and who remember him.”

“Tt may be that I will make you happier for loving me,
Pilot Coppin.”

“That you have already. The ocean has a million
waves every minute, and it could not do without one of
them. We all need each other, and the Pilgrims need the
children; it was the children that caused them to sail in the
far away world of which the shell sings.”
172 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

Elizabeth Winslow tottered as she entered the new house
under the thatched roof.

She put the shell on the rough log shelf over the fire-
place.

The people came in and were told of the song in the
shell. They heard it and wondered. They, too, went out
and gathered periwinkles and ornamented the rude shelves
of their cabins with them. The first ornaments of the house
were probably the periwinkle shells. Such shells have been
favorite adornments of the Pilgrim homes, and may still be
found on the beaches and in the old houses. They sing of
a larger life than any other music, of a larger world for the
soul and of infinite hope.

The memory of the periwinkle deserves to be cherished,
like the arbutus flower, among the things that awaken Pil-
grim memories. No music better interprets the thought of
these prisoners of hope in their thatched cabins on these
shores by the stormy winter sea.
CHAPTER XXI.
THE INDIAN MILL.—A CURIOUS EVENT.

Joun Briurneroy, Senior, often went out to explore, and
his sons followed his example.

One day they came home bearing some corn husks.
Pilot Coppin was at the Common House when they came
im, and at once took a lively interest in what they had
found.

_ “The land of Goshen! ” said Mistress Billington, “ what
have you brought home now? Husks? Where did you
find so many?”

“ Near the mill, mother,” said John Billington.

“What is that?”

“ A rock with a hollow and a great stone pestle, like that
fora mortar. The Indians have been grinding or pounding
corn there. They threw away the husks, and I have brought
home some of them.”

“What will you do with them?”

“ Strip them and make a pillow of them,” said John.

“We could braid them and make mats of them,” said
Mistress Billington. “ They would braid like strips of cloth.
What kind of a place was it where you found them ee
174 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“There were tulip trees there, and withered trilliam,
and bayberries, and red berries.”

“One might make tallow out of the bayberry,” then
said our pilot. “The land must be full of things that we
can learn to use. Even the walnuts would yield us oil. I
will go with you, John Billington, some day to see the In-
dian mill.”

One day in February Pilot Coppin and the two Billing-
ton boys set out for the mill. It was found near a cornfield,
and great heaps of husks were near. The ground squirrels
had taken possession of these, and darted away under cover
when they saw strangers approaching. The corn was
ground here by breaking it with a stone pestle and rolling
over it a huge round stone as it lay in the hollow of the rock.
The Indian women did the grinding.

There were gardens here where beans had grown. The
favorite Indian dish in that country was succotash, made of
corn and beans boiled with venison. This also became a
common food among the Pilgrims.

All was silent in the place except the notes of the pilfer-
ing blue jays.

The three sat down on the grinding rock. Suddenly
one of the great husk heaps stirred, and presently it toppled
over and a head rose out of it. The apparition seemed to be
an Indian woman.

She threw up her arms with a sound like “ warregah ”;
she kept her form out of sight under the husks and writhed


THE INDIAN MILL.—A CURIOUS EVENT. 175

about with terror; she probably had never seen a white.
man before.

She began to scatter the heap about in such a way that
the flying husks filled the air. Higher and higher they
flew, then the cloud settled down in a heap again, but there
was no woman to be seen.

“She has been playing partridge,” said Pilot Coppin.
“ Hark! ”

Far away through the green tangle of brier bushes by
the side of the cornfields, there arose a wild cry of terror.
“Warregah! ”

“She is calling to some one,” said Pilot Coppin.

They carried back husks from the deserted mill, and
John Billington told the story of the partridge trick in the
Common House.

“ Ah, never did that happen except in your mind, boy;
there are no Indians about here now, or only wanderers,” said
Mistress Billington. “ You see them in your mind; some
folks see ghosts that have guilt on their consciences.”

But a thatch gatherer soon after saw twelve Indians
near the town, and hid in the thatch while they passed, and
Miles Standish lost his tools in the wood about the same
time. Some one had carried them away, and it could not
have been any of the colony. Now and then, here and
there, signs of Indians lurking about the settlement were to
be seen. Were these Indians friendly or hostile?”

At night the far heavens glowed, as they had done for a
176 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

long time, from Indian fires. The settlement wore an air
of mystery at such times, as the moon rose golden, like a
night sun over the sea.

There were sweet teaberries or checkerberries, partridge
berries, and chestnuts in burs, to be found in the woods.
These made the evening in the Common House cheerful at
times, especially when the winds blew, the snow flew, and
lions (wolves) were heard in the deep woods afar.

John Alden was the youngest of the men. He was a
cooper. After the death of Rose Standish he became inti-
mate with Miles Standish, and the two found much in com-
mon in the principle of supply and want which is a law of
brotherly friendships.

One morning when the advent of spring was in the air,
Mistress Billington chanced to open the door of the Common
House; as she did so she threw back her hands and cried:

“Seat! ”?

She stepped back, then renewed her courage, and ex-
claimed:

“What are you standing there for? Go home and put
on your clothes. Did I ever see the like? Nothing but an
apron on this cold day. Scat!”

The men in the room started up. A giant stood in the
door. He wore only a girdle and apron for decency; his
head was plumed, and by his side was a bow and two arrows.

The men came to the door. John Alden was there and
Miles Standish. The men had gathered there to “consult
THE INDIAN MILL.—A CURIOUS EVENT. 177

about an expedition, they having made Miles Standish the
captain of their forces.

The Indian’s face lighted with a friendly expression as he
said:

“Wetcome, Enerisumen! ”

The men were filled with wonder, and while they were
at a loss as to what to say, the lusty visitor exclaimed:

“T am Samoset—a chief.”

“Whence did you come?”

“From where the wind comes in full moon—from the
north.” :

“ How can you speak English?” asked John Alden.

“T have lived among the traders on the North [Maine]
coast! I talk English a little; Tusquantum speaks Eng-
lish better; he has lived in the Englishman’s country.”

John Billington, the lad, came leaping to the door.

“Do you know Tusquantum?” he cried. “Let me
signal for Pilot Coppin.”

The news of the arrival of Samoset ran through the
place. John Alden brought a gay shawl or blanket and
put it over the Indian’s shoulders that he might appear more
presentable to the women, and thus quieted the indigna-
tion of Mistress Billington.

Edward Winslow came hurrying toward the Common
House, followed by Elder Brewster. Ellen More came to
the door and looked in, and seeing the chief or sagamore

sitting within as in a robe of state, she exclaimed:
178 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“ John Billington, let us go to the hill and signal.”

“T have signaled, Ellen.”

The men, led by Governor Carver, gave Samoset a warm
greeting. They set before him hot drinks and meat, and
built a great fire.

At noon Pilot Coppin came from the ship, and in the
afternoon all the men sat down to talk with Samoset.

He told them tales of the chiefs and sagamores, and pic-
tured the glory of Massasoit, whose kingdom extended from
the capes to the bays.

“ He once went forth in mighty power,” he said of Mas-
sasoit, “attended by thousands of warriors. When he
stamped his feet the Narragansetts trembled and the Pequots
hid. Then the great Death came—the dark spirit that
swept away the warriors. The braves died in heaps; they
turned yellow; there were none to bury them. Their bones
lie white in the empty forests, and the wind whistles among
them when it bends the trees. Only one is left; he went
away from the place because he saw the spirits of the dead
when he wandered alone. The dead warriors came back
again! ”

In the midst of his narration Captain Miles Standish
strode to and fro.

“ Samoset,” he said at last, ‘they have made me a cap-
tain here—a sagamore. I am to do justice here for the
governor. Your people have been lurking in hiding about
the place. That is not right. Some of them have stolen
THE INDIAN MILL.—A CURIOUS EVENT. 179

my axes and wedges, and have carried them away. That
is not right. They must bring the tools back again, or I
shall lay them on the earth with my firearm. Standish has
to speak so; justice compels him to speak so; Standish has
spoken.”

The new captain stamped his foot on the split log floor.
The master of the Common House roiled the big drum.

“ Thunder,” said Samoset.

“You must summon your people to bring back the
tools”” The drum rolled again. Samoset may have
thought that the master of the Common House was the same
that rolled the “ thunder drum” of the spies. Be that as it
may, he was cowed and overawed by the big little captain,
and he evidently determined to recover the lost tools.

They sheltered him that night at the house of Stephen
Hopkins, and set a guard over the place.

“Welcome, Englishmen!” the words passed from lip
to lip.

“Samoset,” said Pilot Coppin, “I have told the people
here of Tusquantum. Do you know Tusquantum?”

“ Samoset knows Tusquantum. He meets him in the
hunting grounds. Tusquantum is the only Indian left
alive in Pawtuxet. He has lived in the Englishman’s
country.”

“Samoset must bring Tusquantum here.”

“Samoset will seek him out and bring him here. The
ghosts will not follow him now. He is afraid that the Eng-
180 . THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

lish will carry him away again in their big canoes. But
you do right. Your captain puts his foot down so!”

Little Ellen More wanted to speak to this forest lord.

“May I?” she asked of Pilot Coppin.

“Yes, yes, speak! ” said the pilot.

“T wish I might see Massasoit,” said she.

“He is a very big man for a little one to see—he is a
mighty chief.”

Little Ellen shrunk away, but she still kept the hope that
she would one day bear to him, mighty as he was, the cop-
per chain.

When Samoset went away the Pilgrims presented him
with a knife, a bracelet, and a ring.

He returned in a few days bringing other Indians with
him.

The party were decently and picturesquely dressed, and
painted and plumed.

They left their weapons on the ground before pe
ing the place.

Samoset came in proudly. He carried a bundle in his
hands. He saluted Miles Standish respectfully, and laid
down the bundle at his feet.

He opened the parcel. ‘In it were the missing tools.

Such an example of honor should have won the hearts:
of the Pilgrims. It should have shown them the possibili-
ties of the Indian character. Pilot Coppin’s heart responded

a

to such a truly noble deed.
THE INDIAN MILL.—A CURIOUS EVENT. 181

“Tt is a good tale that I will have to tell of you, Samoset,
on the docks of London or Southampton. The people will
here bear me witness that I have always spoken well of your
race. I wish I could relate what I have seen to-day to King
James himself, but that a poor pilot like me will never be _
called to do. But men who carry good reports do good in
the world. I can do that.”

“Pilot, you speak of King James. How does King
James look? Is he as grand to look upon as the great, Mas-
sasoit? ”

“T have never seen the great Massasoit, Samoset. I
want to see him before I sail away. I wish to carry over the
sea to the traders good reports of him.”

“He is larger than your captain, pilot. I wish to
ask you one thing more: Does King James do justice to
his people, as Massasoit does? Would he have returned
the lost tools? Those tools were not stolen—they were
found.”

“Governor Carver, you must answer me here. Does
King James always do justice in his dealings with men?
Heaven forbid that I should judge the king. Elder Brew-
ster, you should reply for me.”

Elder Brewster must have thought of English prisons
and persecutions and confiscations as he saw the restored
tools lying upon the ground. But could he say that the
pagan king was more honest than his own?

“ Ask me not now! Melchizedek paid tribute to Abra-
«

182 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

ham. It may be like that now. I wish to see the great
Massasoit.”’

Samoset lifted his hands.

“Hz 1s comine! He is on his way; the great Massasoit
is coming! ”

Ellen More clapped her hands as she heard this an-
nouncement. She hurried back to Mistress Elizabeth Wins-
low. :

“ Massasoit is coming—the great Massasoit is coming! ”
she cried.

“We must lay the green rug for him,” said the lady,
who had been used to ceremony.

“He has sent back the lost tools to the captain,” said
Ellen. “The captain spoke hard to Samoset when he asked
him to find the tools. You do not think that Massasoit is a
better man than the captain, do you?”

“We is a pagan,” said Mistress Winslow. “But any
king who puts honor above self-interest deserves to be enter-
tained upon a field of cloth of gold. Massasoit shall have’
my green rug when he comes—it is the most beautiful of
the goods of the colony. I believe him to be every inch a
king!”

Mistress Winslow brought out the rug and spread it out
on the floor. Ellen laid the copper chain upon it.

“Thoughts are things sometimes,” said Mistress Wins-
low.

“JT dreamed of it,” said Ellen. ‘TI shall see it, and the
‘THE INDIAN MILL.—A CURIOUS EVENT. 183

spring is coming—the bluebirds are here already, and the
pilot says that they bring the spring on their wings. Oh,

I am so glad! ”
She danced about saying, “ Massasoit is coming!” Had
the king been an old friend of hers she could not have been

more happy. .

18
CHAPTER XXII.
MASSASOIT.—THE COPPER CHAIN.

Ture is one coming to New Plymouth who is truly
noble—not noble because he is hoping to gain something,
or fearing to lose something, not noble because he has
schemes by which he would bring other men into slavery,
but noble because it is noble to be noble, and because to
have a royal nature is a debt that a king owes to his place
among men. He did right because it was right; we wonder
if King James himself, who claimed to own the country be-
cause English explorers had discovered it, was really as
noble as this grand forest king, who spake to the Pilgrim
Fathers the truth in benevolence, and who kept his word
for forty years, and that after the descendants of the Pil-
grims had broken the sacred promises of the Fathers.

Tt was Thursday, March 22, 1621, “a fair, warm day.”

In the flood of light under the blue sky the forest birds
were singing. The pink arbutus, full of odor, was breaking
through the melting snows; the forest streams were running
down the slopes, where the maples were turning red.

Plumes rose above the line of what is now called Wat-

F

son’s Hill, a height overlooking the town.
184


WL vdittiams. oft

why OL aS : 5
be eh a a eaectalna "Uo p-BROWN. J.GOODMAN — W. BREWSTER. J. BILLINGTON .ILALLERTON. F.COOKE ~ & WINSLOW
OL

SABA Yet PLYMOUTH 1622. Pe UA



View of Leyden Street, Plymouth colony.
MASSASOIT._THE COPPER CHAIN. 185

“They are coming!” shouted the young people around
the Common House.

The people rushed out of their houses to a point where
they could see the advancing plumes.

Massasoit was indeed coming with his brother Prince
Quadequina, who always attended him. This brotherly
affection of Massasoit, who was also called Ousamequin,
for his brother was one of the characteristics of the king
which it is pleasing to recall and record.

The king and the prince had with them sixty warriors,
men of great stature. They were plumed and painted,

and armed with bows made of the springing woods of the
forest.

They stopped on the brow of the hill and looked down
on the Pilgrim settlement and upon the harbor where the
Mayflower lay.

First to the Pilgrims came Samoset again. He had
brought with him another Indian, who had not the air of a
dweller in the forest.

“T am Tusquantum,” said the latter, addressing Goy-
ernor Carver. “TI have seen the land of the white king,
and have lived in his country. Tusquantum is a friend of
the Englishman. Iam come to say that Massasoit is com-
ing to visit you. He is now here.”

There was in the company one who we may fancy
hoped to find in Tusquantum a teacher; it was John Billing-
ton. It is said that John Billington, Senior, had been a
186 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

poacher in England; be that as it may, he had an adven-
turous spirit, and his sons inherited the same.

“The tongue of the English has come,” said Pilot Cop-
pin, who had made known the value of such a man as Tus-
quantum, or Squanto, as he came to be called by the Eng-
lish.

So came Squanto before the royal train appeared.

The royal Indians now beckoned from the hill. It was
not thought wise to send Governor Carver to the king,
though an act of confidence would have been most worthy.

The Indian king, some of whose subjects had been
treacherously stolen and carried away to be sold as slaves,
could not be certain that he would not be betrayed by the
new settlers. So he would not come down the hill until he
had first made an understanding with the Pilgrims.

“T will go to the king,” said Edward Winslow. Mis-
tress Winslow unrolled again the green mat, and Ellen
More brought out the copper chain for the ceremony of
the welcoming of the chief.

“Here are a pair of knives as a present to the king,”
said Carver.

“* And here are the copper chain and jewel,” said Ellen
More.

The little girl felt that she had somehow fulfilled a mis-
sion in the world.

Edward Winslow advanced to the hill beneath which
ran a brook. He wore an armor and carried a sword. In
MASSASOIT.—THE COPPER CHAIN. 187

his pockets were presents, and on his arm was the copper
chain.

The scene is so pleasantly described in Morton’s, or
Mourt’s, Narration, that we give it here. Here is Mourt’s
record of it:

“Thursday, the 22d of March [1621], was a very warm
day.

“ About noon, we met again about our public business;
but we had scarce been an hour together, but Samoset came
again; and Squanto, the only [surviving] native of Patuxet,
where we now inhabit (who was one of the twenty captives
that, by Hunt, were carried away; and had been in Eng-
land, and dwelt in Cornhill [London] with Master John
Slaney, a Merchant; and could speak a little English), with
three others; and they brought with them some few skins
to truck; and some red herrings newly taken and dried, but
not salted.

“And [they] signified unto us, that their great Saga-
more Masasoyt was hard by, with Quadequina his brother,
_and all their men. They could not well express in English
what they would; but, after an hour, the King came to the
top of a hill over against us [Watson’s Hill], and had in his
train sixty men; that we could well behold them, and
they us.

“We were not willing to send our Governor [John
Carver] to them; and they [were] unwilling to come to us.
So Squanto went again unto him, who brought word that
188 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

we should send one to parley with him; which we did, which
was Edward Winslow; to know his mind, and to signify
the mind and will of our Governor, which was to have trad-
ing and peace with him.

“We send to the King a pair of knives, and a copper
chain with a jewel to it. To Quadequina, we send likewise a
knife, and a jewel to hang in his ear. And withal a pot of
strong water [spirits, brandy?]}; a good quantity of biscuit
and some butter, which were all willingly accepted.”

Edward Winslow approached the king and the prince on
the hill.

“T salute you, O king, in the name of your brother over
the sea, King James of England, France and Ireland.

“My king salutes you with words of love, O Massasoit.

“My king sends through us his messages of peace, O
Massasoit.

““T am come to be a hostage, O king. I will remain here
while you shall go down and cross the brook, and meet my
king’s people there. The governor there awaits you.”

“T would not keep you, O messenger, as an hostage,”
said Massasoit. ‘There need be no such thing among
men of honor and faith. Let us go down to the brook and
meet the messengers of your king, the white brother from
over the sea! ”

“T will remain here with Quadequina,” said Edward
Winslow; “but before you go, I wish to present to you in
the name of our king, your white brother, and for thé gov-
MASSASOIT.—THE COPPER CHAIN. 189

ernor here, and all his people, and the men on yon ship
lying on the sea, this chain and jewel. It stands, O king,
for friendship, for love, for peace, for brotherhood. May I
put it upon your neck?”

Massasoit took the copper chain. As he held it up the
jewel twinkled in the sun, and the light of it made the heart
of little Ellen More dance on that bright March day. Her
dream was fulfilled.

Then Massasoit with a stately tread, wearing the copper
chain, came slowly down the hill toward the brook.

Captain Miles Standish with a half dozen musketeers ad-
vanced to meet him.

As the king came to the edge of the sunny, rippling
water, the six musketeers fired their muskets.

The sound of so many muskets astonished Massasoit. He
saw that the English had secret power.

They brought the green rug from the house of Edward
Winslow, and laid it down for Massasoit. He sat down
upon it.

Little Ellen More had gone to Pilot Coppin, and had
taken him by the hand.

“See, see,” she said, “he is wearing the copper chain.
It will be well with us here. Do you think he looks as
noble as King James? ”

Here is the account of the event from Mourt’s Narration
or Journal:

“ Captain Standish and Master Allerton met the King at
190 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER..

_the brook with a half dozen volunteers. They saluted him,
and he them. So on going over, the one on the one side, and
the other on the other, conducted him to a house, then build-
ing, where we placed a green rug and three or four cush-
ions.”

As soon as Massassoit was seated on the green rug a
trumpet sounded, and a drum rolled through the air.

Governor John Carver with more musketeers was com-
ing down from the Common House to meet the king.

The governor bowed low as Massasoit arose and ex-
tended his hand. Governor Carver took the red hand and
kissed it. Then the two conferred together, and a banquet
was prepared for them.

In that conference they made a treaty of peace.

It was a treaty that, simple as it is, is worthy of immortal
record. The primer of the brotherhood of man is in it.
The heart of the Indian king flowed forth in the goodness
that seeks the universal good of mankind.

Read it, analyze it, this treaty of the copper chain, with
so many lying dead on Burial Hill, with so many hearts
beating with hope and faith, and the Mayflower lying in the
harbor:

“1. That neither he, nor any of his, should injure, or
do hurt, to any of our people.

“9, And if any of his did hurt any of ours, he should
send the offender [to us] that we might punish him.

“3, That if any of our tools were taken away, wheff our
MASSASOIT.—THE COPPER CHAIN. 191

people were at work, he should cause them to be restored;
and if ours did any harm to any of his, we should do the like
to them.

“4, If any did unjustly war against him, we would aid
him. If any did war against us, he should aid us.

“5. He should send to his neighbor[ing] confeder-
ates, to certify them of this, that they might not wrong
us; but might be likewise comprised in the Conditions of
Peace.

“6. That when their men came to us, they should leave
their bows and arrows behind them, as we should do our
pieces, when we came to them.

“7. Lastly, that doing this, King James would esteem
him as his friend and ally.

“ All of which the King seemed to like well; and it was
applauded of his followers,” says Mourt, and adds:

“ All the while he sat by the Governor, he trembled for
fear.”

How did Massasoit look? The old recorder says:

“In person, he is a very lusty man, in his best years, [of]
an able body, grave of countenance, and spare of speech. In
his attire, [he was] little or nothing differing from the rest
of his followers; only in a great chain of white bone beads
about his neck; and at it, behind his neck, hangs a little
bag of tobacco, which he drank [smoked] and gave us to
drink [smoke].”

The treaty that was then concluded lasted forty years,
192 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

and the pledge that accompanied it is one of the most poetic:
events of our history.

What was the pledge?

It was made in the gift of the copper chain.

“While you shall wear this chain, the red man and the
white man shall live in peace,” in effect said the Pilgrim
legislation.

“ Massasoit will never cease to wear the chain,” said the
king, or like words. ‘ Whenever he sends the copper chain,
it shall be the message of peace to the whole race.

“ Tf enemies shall plot against you, he will know it, and
he will warn you by a messenger with the copper chain.

“Tf he shall need you to help him against an enemy, he
will send you a messenger with the copper chain.

“Whenever he shall send you the copper chain, it shall
be a sign of friendship, brotherhood, and peace. Massasoit
will be true to the gift of the copper chain! ”

He went away, Governor Carver escorting him down
to the brook where the two embraced and parted.

The people now looked for Edward Winslow’s return,
but instead came Quadequina.

The prince was young and of noble bearing. He started
in alarm as the trumpet sounded.

The muskets rattled again.

“Put them away,” he said; “TI like them not.”

The men laid down their muskets, and the prince sat
down, probably on the green mat of good Mistress Winslow.
MASSASOIT._THE COPPER CHAIN. 193

Poets have sung of the field of the cloth of gold, and
painters have vied with each other in bringing back that
romantic scene. But more to the world than the grand
display of wealth, jewels, and personal splendor that took
place when Henry VIII met Francis I on the field of the
cloth of gold in 1520, just one hundred years before, were
Mistress Elizabeth Winslow’s green rug, and the matters
that were concluded on it that March day at New Plym-
outh, and more in value to the English and French races
than all the jewels of Henry and Francis, and of the glitter-
ing courts of England and France, was that copper chain,
which proved a talisman to the Pilgrims, and protected the
“nation of the West as it lay in its cradle waiting to rise and
lead a new world.

The day should be recalled by the history classes of
our schools: Thursday, March 22, 1621. The copper chain
was the wampum belt of New England, and it represents
that nobility which is common to the better heart of the
races of men.

It was the last day, we may suppose, that Mistress Eliza-
beth Winslow took part in any event of this changeable
world, if indeed she were there.

The reaction of the awful voyage upon the sea seems
never to have left her. The common disease which had
spared her long was now upon her, just as the birds were
singing, the arbutus blooming, and she had seen, as we
may hope, the King of Pokonoket sit down on her green
194 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

mat, and conclude the treaty of peace that would protect
her husband and make her household treasure immortal.

When Edward Winslow returned from being hostage
he saw that she was failing. He told her all the things that
happened while he was “on the other side of the brook.”

Ellen More sat beside her as the fever did its work. She
must have been glad that she came. She had lived to see
the bow of promise on the cloud. ©

Lovely Elizabeth Winslow died on March 24, 1621,
two days after the treaty of peace. And Ellen More wept
by the still, white form, and wondered if on the great ship
of life the Pilot were still on board.
CHAPTER XXIII.
DEATH OF ELLEN MORE.

Tr is beautiful weather now, but the sickness in the
colony has not ended.

The coming of Massasoit and the death of Mistress
Elizabeth Winslow had brightened and darkened the life
of little Ellen More. Her heart went out to Pilot Coppin
in her loneliness. She drooped, and one spring day she did
not come out of Edward Winslow’s house, but sent word
to the Billingtons in the Common House that she was ill and
wished to see Pilot Coppin once more.

“ John, you go and signal for him,” said Mitre Billing-
ton; “the pilot is proper attached to the child. I wouldn’t
wonder if she had the same complaint as Mistress Winslow
had; with frail people it follows a hard voyage, sooner or
later. Her two little brothers have died of it, but her brother
Richard seems to pean, Go, John; I don’t believe that
you will have to go again.”

John Billington, the lad, was never slow to do any-
thing for little Ellen More. He signaled to the ship from
the hill, and was answered by the Pilot, who eney the sign,
196 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

and who soon came to the shore in a boat, where he was
met by John.

“Ellen is sick,” said the latter, “and wants to see you.
She is at her home, the Winslow house.”

“Tt is the last time,” said Pilot Coppin. “TI have seen
her growing thin, and a little fever will carry her off. She
will follow Mistress Winslow—I feel that will be so—I saw
the disease coming, when she held my hand as Massasoit sat
on the green mat.”

The pilot went to the house of Edward Winslow, and
there found Ellen waiting most anxiously for him to come.

“QO pilot, pilot,” said Ellen, “I was afraid that you
would not get here in time. I am going away.”

“Where, where, my Ellen?”

“Where Jasper went, where Mistress Winslow has
gone. Do you know what happened when they buried Mis-
tress Winslow? It was in the daytime. The birds were
singing, and her grave was surrounded by flowers. Here |
are some of them—no mayflowers of Holland ever smelled
so sweet as these, and they blossomed amid the snow. I like
the birds that sing in the storm when the light is breaking
in the cloud, and I love these little ground flowers that
blossom amid the snow.”

She tried to reach some of the mayflowers that stood in
a bowl on a board, but she fell back on the bed saying:

“T am so tired, I feel more and more tired—TI shall fall

asleep soon, and then I will go away after the rest.”
DEATH OF ELLEN MORE. 197

Pilot Coppin took her little hand and covered it with
his two hard hands.

“Pilot, I have something that I want to say before I
fall to sleep and go away. You have a silver pipe.”

“Yes, yes, little one; it was a present to me.”

“The Indians smoke when they make treaties of peace,
do they not? Massasoit did; they said that Indians always
do. It is their custom to smoke when they sit down to make
peace.”

“So I have been told.”

“Pilot, I love Massasoit; he has a good spirit; he sees
God in the sky, and in the forests, and everywhere, and
he wants to do right. Did you see the look on his face when
he said that the treaty that he agreed to keep was right? It
was a look of the Great Spirit.”

“Yes, I never could have believed that the face
of a savage could have that light; but it did, Ellen,
it did.”

“Did you see how he trembled when he sat on the mat,
and how the prince shook when the trumpet was blown?
Pilot Coppin, I want you to do one thing more for me. Oh,
you have been so good to me, so good. I can go away now
that you are here—the Pilot is on board.”

“Not the Great Pilot, Ellen.”

“Yes, he is on board, too.”

“What is it, Ellen? What do you want me to do?”

“T want that you should give to Massasoit the silver
1980 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

pipe. Let John carry it to him; the people do not like
John, but he has been good to me.”

“TJ will let Tusquantum carry it to him, Ellen.”

“Let John go with him.”

“Tf Mistress Billington will.”

“She is not liked here, but she, too, was always good
tome. What you say makes me happy, Pilot Coppin. I am
going to sleep now. You hold my hand while I sleep. You
will know when I go away.”

Her eyes closed. She was indeed very, very tired. Ed-
ward Winslow came into the curtained room and stood
silent for a time, and then he said:

“My little orphan girl is almost through, Pilot Coppin.
T am glad that you can be here. You had her heart.”

Ellen began to breathe lightly, and her heart beat slowly.

Tt was a mild spring day, and the birds were singing
without.

John Billington, the boy, came to inquire about Ellen.
He brought some arbutus flowers from the brook where they
grew profusely. The arbutus was the flower of the Pil-
grims; it came amid the snow, as the iris to the cloud, and
it should be always entwined with Pilgrim memories.

Ellen again and again seemed to have gone away, but
life fluttered, like a bird’s wing, and lingered.

She opened her eyes at last as in surprise.

“Pilot Coppin?”

“Yes, Ellen.”


DEATH OF ELLEN MORE. 199

“Tam going away now. All is well everywhere, Pilot
Coppin. You are here—and the Great Pilot, he will pilot
you, too; the Pilot is on board.”

She fell asleep, and went away amid the odors of the
mayflowers.

The pilot lifted the curtain of the little sleeping room
and came out into the common room. John was there,
and Edward Winslow sat before the fire.

“Ellen has gone,” he said. “John, go with me and
let me tell your mother. She has a good heart for such
times as these. Heaven only knows how I loved that
child. I am ready to sail now. She wanted that I should
give my silver pipe to Massasoit. That I am going to do,
and then I will wait to sail. I never shall forget that little
heart, it is a spirit now—Ellen More, Ellen More! ”

They buried her in the warm light of the vernal sky
in the open earth, for there was now no longer any fear of
Indians or of wolves.

Pilot Coppin brought the silver pipe from the ship, and
when the little grave had closed he took it to the Common
House. 5

“There remains but one thing more for me to do,” he
said to Mistress Billington. “TI must do it before we sail,
for the April weather is in the skies, and Master Jones says
that we must soon away. I am going to carry the silver
pipe which the traders gave me to Squanto, and send it
by him ie Massasoit, and give it to him in the name of
200 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

James, his brother king over the sea. I want John to go
with me—I am doing this for Ellen’s sake.”

“ And it is loth I would be to hinder either of you from
obeying the wishes of the dead,” said Mistress Billington.

The two went away to find Squanto, who had his dwell-
ing on one of the inland clearings where were fields of
maize.

The streams were flowing free, and yellow cowslips
lined their banks. The wild geese were coming back and
the few Indians who came here were preparing to plant
corn.

“Tt is a beautiful country,” said the pilot, “and I would
be glad to remain with you here, but in a few days I shall
be on the sea again.”

They found Squanto, and gave into his keeping the
silver pipe.

“T will take it to Ousamequin [Massasoit],” he said,
“and tell him that the pilot of the great ship has sent it to
him in the name of the English king. Master Coppin, do
you know what he will do with the silver pipe?”

“No, what, Tusquantum? ”

“He will keep it until he finds one of his sagamores
or warriors who has done some deed nobler than he has
done, then he will send it to him. That is the rule of the
great Massasoit—that the noblest shall have the best. He
is no common chieftain; he has a big heart, and the eye
of the heart that sees what is right. This is not a treaty
DEATH OF ELLEN MORE. 201

present like the copper chain—that he will keep forever,
and give to those who follow him. But this silver pipe, this
will be buried in his grave, and laid on his heart there, or
else, if he find that one of his sagamores has done a deed
of the soul, he will send it to him, as to one more worthy
than he to keep the treasure. He loves to reward deeds of
the soul.”

Squanto turned to John Billington.

“Son of the men of the Mayflower, you are yet young;
you have met noble men in your own land, but none of
them has more value in his spirit than our king of the
forests, whose kingdom is Pokonoket, whose town is So-
wams, and whose royal seat is at the burying ground of
his race at Mount Hop [Hope]. You may live to learn
lessons of virtue and honor some day from the Indian king.
Your own people will do well if they will obey the law
of justice that is ours. I hope some day, boy, to meet you
again.”

He did. ;

“John Billington,” said the pilot, “if ever you should
hear of the silver pipe again, write to me at my Scottish
home over the sea.”

“That I will be ready to do, Pilot Coppin. I think
that you have planted a good seed in the silver pipe, though
I know not how it will happen. It will be many a year
before we shall forget you, Pilot Coppin, and I will write
to you if good befall us after you are gone.”
202 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER,

“Or if evil befall you, I will wish to hear all.” He
added: “ John, we all have our work to do in life. No
wind stirs the leaves in vain, nor does any keel vainly
plow a single furrow of the sea. I feel as though it was
the hand of Providence that made me the pilot of the May-
flower, and that even the little life of Ellen More was not
given to the world and the wilderness home for nought! a

The pilot looked upon the little settlement, and the ship
with lifting sails.

“These people are founding a nation,” he said, “who
will make men their rulers, as they elected Governor Carver.
When they landed here they agreed that each family should
erect its own house, and all should build a Common House.
Other people will come here, and the colony will grow, and
build on in that way. It is the true way to found a nation in
the will of the people. I can see the nation that is to be in
the pattern that these exiles have made.”

The pilot had the true vision.
CHAPTER XXIV.
THE DEPARTURE OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“Tue boat from the Mayflower is coming in again!”
said John Alden to Miles Standish one day in early spring.
“What brings her back, I wonder? She flies the flag, and
Captain Jones is on board. Robert Coppin is with him.”

“Tt is almost time for her to sail,” said Miles Standish,
“and Captain Jones has long been weary of us and the
new land. But he has grown more kindly toward us of
late. Yes, the captain is on board the boat.”

The two stood on the high ground of the town, and
watched the boat as it approached the land.

It was an early spring day. The sky was warmer and
bluer than they had ever seen it before. The wild geese
were honking high in the mild, serene air. The bluebirds
were on the wing, and the sea glimmered with flocks of
joyous wings.

The boat touched the shore, and Captain Jones and
Robert Coppin came up to the Common House. Standish
went to meet them.

“The weather is fine,” said the captain to Miles Stand-
ish, “so fine that we must be going now. he men are
204 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

already trimming the sails, and it will be up anchor soon.
Standish, do you want to know why I have come?”

“You have grown mellow of late, Captain Jones. I
mind me that you have come to offer to take back letters
and gifts to our people at home.”

“Marry, my good friend. That I have, and better than
that. I have come to offer to carry back any of the com-
pany who wish to return to England. Standish, I have
been so much with these people that I pity them. It would
be better for the weak women and the children to return.
I have seen such people die until my heart has turned
sick. Send for the governor and let me talk with him. I
will go into the Common House and wait.”

Richard More, the lad “ put out” to the Brewster fam-
ily, was near.

“ Richard,” said Captain Jones, “go and call the elder.
Tell him that Captain Jones is at the Common House, and
has a message for him.”

John Alden, who had been with Miles Standish, went
away to ask the attendance of Governor Carver at the Com-
mon House.

The captain stood in the sunny door of the Common
House and looked out over Burial Hill.

“Half of your people lie there,” he said to Standish,
“without so much as one gravestone. You are going to
plant that field of the dead, I am told. O Standish, Stand-
ish, think what those poor people suffered! May I never
THE DEPARTURE OF THE MAYFLOWER. 205

see the like of it again. In God’s name send the orphans
back with me. Let Leyden, where they were born, shelter
them again. Let John Robinson care for them. At least
let Mary Allerton and Remember Allerton return.”

Governor Carver came out of his house and was soon
at the door of the Common House. He was followed by
Bradford and Elder Brewster. These men with Standish
and John Alden sat down together in the house.

“Governor Bradford, I am getting ready to sail, and to
leave you alone in the wilderness. I am not so hard a man
as I was. I have come to respect this colony, to love the
people and to pity them. I know the secret of Burial Hill.
Governor, I am willing to take you and your people back
again.”

“T am touched by your kindness, Captain Jones, but I
have no wish to return. How is it with you, Elder Brewster?
I would not prevent any one from returning who wishes
to go, but while there is any hope of founding a colony
here, where men may be free, I must remain here. I, too,
know the secrets of Burial Hill.”

“J have no wish to return,” said Elder Brewster.
“While there is any hope that we may found a colony
where faith may be free, I must remain here. I, too, know
the secrets of Burial Hill.”

“My place is here,” said Miles Standish, and at the
word “here” he struck the floor with his magic sword.

“Tere I remain,” said John Alden.




906 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“ And with you all here will I live and die,” said Wil-
liam Bradford.

“But Captain Jones has shown no ordinary nature in
this thing,” said the governor. ‘“‘ Miles Standish, sound the
trumpet, and call all of the people together and let me
tell them what the captain has said.”

The trumpet was sounded from the door. In a short
time nearly fifty of the hundred and two people who sailed
from Delft for the new land sat down on the log benches,
wondering what had caused the trumpet to be sounded.

“Speak for me, Elder Brewster,” said the governor.

The elder arose and bent forward.

“My people, you that are left—you, the remnant of
my people, you that are left of the blessed company of
John Robinson—hear!

“The Mayflower is about to sail. Your letters home
must be finished at once. Captain Jones here will take
them back, and it is a ready and willing spirit that he
shows. But hear! The captain is willing to take you back
to the old world, and to your old home. How many of you
wish to go? As many as wish to go back to the old world
again let them rise and stand, that we may dismiss you
with our blessing.”

No one arose. There was a deep silence. A future
destiny was in the silence.

.“The wilderness may be stormy,” said Stephen Hop-
kins, “ but that old world, that old world is stormier! No,
THE DEPARTURE OF THE MAYFLOWER. 207

no, whatever may happen to me and mine, let me live and
die here, where there is hope for mankind.”

“Edward Winslow,” said Elder Brewster, “what say
you?”

“T must live in free air,” said the great traveler, “I and
mine. We have seen many graves open and close here,
but I have no wish to return.”

“Remember Allerton, orphan, what say you?”

“T have no wish to leave my mother’s grave, and the
place of her dearest wishes for the welfare of our com-
pany.”

“Mary Allerton, orphan?”

“T have no desire to go back. I wish to live with those
who have suffered and survived.”

“ Priscilla Mullins, you, too, are an orphan, and
the graves of both of your parents are here. What say
you?”

““¢ Where thou livest, I will live!’ ”

“Elizabeth Tilley? Thou, too, art an orphan. Thy
father and mother sleep with the rest.”

“Where thou diest, I will die!’ ”

“Mary Chilton? Thou wert among the first of the
women to land on this rocky shore. Thy father died on
the Mayflower, in the harbor, and thy mother perished
here in the dark days of the storm. What sayest
thou?”

“Tt is the answer of Ruth, the Moabitess, that I, too,
208 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

would return. I, who was among the first to step upon
these shores, would be the last to leave. I speak from the
heart, and my voice is like the others. Let me live here,
and die here, and be laid in the earth beside my parents
who gave their all for this cause! ”

Tears were flowing.

There was a long silence. They had made their decision.
It was the first election in America.

Then Robert Coppin rose up.

“You are all unwilling to leave this new free land. I
must go; I would that I could stay. Send your messages
home by me, and say of me that I was ever true to you,
and that I loved you.”

“ Pilot Coppin has been true,” said they all.

He went toward the door.

“Let me go once more to the spot where Ellen More
lies buried.”

The company talked an hour or more, then Cap-
tain Jones and Robert Coppin went down to the boat, and
were rowed out to the Mayflower, bearing letters and mes-
sages.

The next morning in the red light of the sun the ship
spread her sails. The women went up on Burial Hill to
see her lift her anchor, put out the flag of their old land,
and move slowly, slowly, into the dim distances of the
blue air and sea. She bore away one heart that all loved—
it was that of Robert Coppin, “ our pilot.”
THE DEPARTURE OF THE MAYFLOWER. 209

The ship was leaving three thousand miles of empty
ocean behind her, but the wide sea was to be a defense to
the Pilgrim colony. The great republic could have been
planted as well in no other place and in no other way. It
is faith and obstacles that produce power.
CHAPTER XXV.
LOST.

“Brow the trumpet! Do something! Oh, my heart
is clean gone. Blow!”

It was a summer day; the sky was full of birds, the
forests of leaves, and the whole country bright with berries
and flowers.

There was excitement in the Common House. John
Billington, the lad, liked to wander afar into the forest,
but he usually returned at night. He had been gone two
days now, and it was nearing the nightfall of the third
day.

Mistress Billington was given to scolding John, but she
loved him, and now that he did not come back she moved
about from place to place in nervous agitation.

“Miles Standish,” she said, “where do you think
John, my John, has gone?”

“The Indians may have got him!”

- “Don’t say that. This mortar pestle is harder than
your head, but not harder than your heart. Don’t you turn
on me, captain though you are—I’m not a woman to take
any sarse pm you. If the Indians have got him they will
LOST. ; OAL

return him—I would as soon trust him to their mercies as
to yours. Is Tusquantum here?”

“Yes, Mistress Fliptongue.”

“Then send him to me. My b’ye [boy], my b’ye, he
will find my b’ye! Go! go! Night is coming on. If
he don’t come back to-night not a wink of sleep will I have.
Vl wander, I’ll howl, I'll cry out to the top of the heavens.
Go! go! You don’t know a mother’s feelings—you haven't
any feelings anyhow. Your heart is a wooden clapper. Go!
You may command the musketeers, but I rule here in the
block house. If any Indians have done harm to my b’ye,
it is because you have hardened them to do it by your show
of authority.”

“T enforce the law as a lawful subject of King James—
nothing more.”

“King James owns nothing on this side of the water.”

“Who does?”

“Not he, nor you, nor Governor Bradford. The In-
dians own the land. If they had discovered you, would
they have owned you? But this is neither here nor there.
My b’ye, my b’ye! ”

Miles Standish might under other circumstances have
threatened the poor woman with arrest as a shrew, but he
did not stop to argue more now. He saw her baking man-
chets in a wild way, now running to the manchets at the
fire, now to the door, now sending for Dr. Fuller, now for
the trumpeter, and he merely said:
212 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“The woman is distracted. I will send out a hunting
party to-morrow if the boy does not come back. The Bil-
lingtons are always in trouble, but the boy must be found.”

The summer night came and passed, but the boy did not
come back. Mistress Billington met Miles Standish at the
door in the morning.

“T haven’t slept a wink to-night. I’m mad, Miles
Standish, mad. Now what are you going to do with me?”

“Find the boy. I’ve got a party together already, and
Squanto is going with them. You may go on baking man-
chets, Mistress Billington; if the boy is with the Indians,
he is safe, and Squanto will find him.”

“Tf he is with any of Massasoit’s Indians he is safe,”
said Mistress Billington. “I would trust that king as soon
as I would King James.”

The trumpet blew. The-party formed by Miles Stand-
ish were ready to go into the forests along the shore, by the
way of a boat, which would enable them to explore the
coast and the woods.

Mistress Billington shrieked when she heard the
trumpet, then she became calm, and went on with her cook-
ing of fish and baking of manchets. She had many mouths
to provide for and few to help her.

She went to the door from time to time to listen. Be-
fore her lay cornfields glimmering in the sun. Squanto
had showed the settlers how to plant the fields, putting
alewives into the hills of corn. Squanto had taught the
LOST. 218

colonists many things beside fertilizing the plowed earth
with alewives—as how to tread eels out of the mud in
springtime, how to plant beans, and ensnare water fowl.

He was the man of “ good cheer”

in the colony now that
Pilot Coppin had gone.

The party with Squanto went to Nauset Paden ‘
where dwelt Aspinet, who was a friend of Massassoit, and
probably one of the latter’s sagamores. On their way,
night coming on, they stopped at Cummaquid. There
they met one of the most amiable Indians of whom we have
any record, Yanough. Mourt says of him that he “ was
very personable, gentle, courteous and fair conditioned,
and not like a savage save for his attire.”

The English inquired if a white boy had been seen at
Cummaquid.

“He is safe,” said the chief of Cummaquid. “ But he
is not here; he is at Nauset. Rest with us, and I will
guide you to him.”

The chief made a feast for the hungry strangers, and set
his people to serving them. He was a young man, and had
a fine courtesy with his hospitality. The English wondered
that such a heart could be found in a savage.

A strange thing happened while the English were being
entertained here by the amiable sachem. There had been
lost boys in this country before John Billington went
astray.

The strange happening was very dramatic, and it is
914 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

briefly told by Mourt in his Narration. We might make a
story of it, but we will quote it here from Mourt in its
original simplicity. The old writer says:

“One thing was very grievous unto us at this place.
There was an old woman, whom we judged to be no less
than a hundred years old; which came to see us because she
never saw English [before]; yet could not behold us,
without breaking forth into [a] great passion, weeping and
crying excessively. We demanding the reason of it; they
told us, She had three sons, who, when Master Hunt was in
these parts, went aboard his ship to trade with him; and
he carried them captives into Spain, for Tusquantum at that
time was carried away also: by which means, she was de-
prived of the comfort of her children in her old age.

We told them, “ We were sorry that any Englishman
should give them that offense; that Hunt was a bad man,
and that all the English that heard of it condemned him
for the same: but for us, we would not offer them. any
such injury; though it would gain us all the skins in the
country. So we gave her some small trifles, which some-
what appeased her.”

It was as hard for this old woman to lose her whole
family as for nervous Mistress Billington to be parted from
John. .There are episodes in which the simple narrative
is better than any of the lights of fiction, and this is one.

These Indians were those that attacked the English
at the time of the exploration from Provincetown. Can
LOST. 215

it be wondered at that they should have regarded the ex-
plorers as enemies after having had some of their own
people stolen by the crew of an English ship like the May-
flower?

Strange as it may seem, Squanto had been carried away
by the same adventurers that had taken the old woman’s
sons.

“T pity you,” said Squanto to the ancient Indian. “ But
these white people are not like those. They are your
friends, and the others are your enemies.”

The words were kindly, but they did not bring back her
sons to comfort her in her lonely old age.

The original narrative of Mourt thus pictures the con-
tinuance of the journey:

“We took boat to Nauset, Iyanough and two of his
men accompanying us. Ere we came to Nauset, the day
and tide were almost spent, insomuch as we could not go
in with our shallop: but the Sachem or Governor Cumma-
quid went ashore, and his men with him. We also sent
Tusquantum to tell Aspinet, the Sachem of Nauset, where-
fore we came.”

While in this interesting country, where they had first
landed, they found the owners of the corn that they had
taken for their necessities in the winter. They arranged
to pay them for it, and did so to the satisfaction of the
owners of the ground barns.

Tusquantum hurried forward to Nauset to Aspinet, and
15
216 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

told the chieftain his errand. The Indian was pleased to
receive the messenger from the English, and to learn that
the latter were on their way to his country. He sent for
the boy. John Billington came to the royal residence, ac-
companied by warriors.

“Tusquantum,” he said, “you have been true to me.
I never thought to meet you here. I did not mean to run
away from Plymouth. I got lost in the woods, and when
I thought I was travelling toward home, I was going away
from it. Tusquantum, do you remember that silver pipe,
and what you said to me then? Let me go back with
you.”

“ Boy, the English are coming for you in a boat.”

“Let us make the English happy when they see how we
have used their lost boy,” said Aspinet. “ English boy, come
here. Your friends are coming for you. Let me put on
your neck a string of my beads, and cover you with our
own ornaments.”

They dressed the boy as though he was one of the royal
family, or as for a harvest dance.

Then Aspinet summoned his warriors, a hundred in
number, and mounted the boy on the back of one of
his men of great stature, and they marched down to the
sea.

The boat was in sight, but in shoal water, far from the
land.

They carried the boy out to the boat, bedecked like a




With wopleince.



The return of the lost boy.
LOST, 217

young chief. The party wondered indeed when they saw
him safe and so arrayed and attended. ‘

And happy was Mistress Billington when the boy came
running to the Common House in hig royal apparel.

“TI never will say ‘scat’ again to any Indian. It is
hard to tell in this world who are our friends or who are
our enemies. Our life is all full of misunderstandings, and
sometimes I think that all people mean well, only all are
alike blind, and we do not follow the teaching of the Ser-
mon on the Mount as we used. to do. I sometimes feel
just as I should not, and I mean to be a better woman now
that John has come home. Sit down, John, and tell us all
about where you have been, and where Squanto found you.
You used to say that you wanted to become an Indian chief,
and now you do look like one, indeed. What would Pilot
Coppin say were he to see you now?”

Pilot Coppin? He was on the docks of London or
Southampton, or perhaps in his old home near Glasgow
now.

John told his story.

“So the Indians have returned a lost boy to the. white
race who have robbed them of their own boys,” said good
Elder Brewster. . “ That is noble.”

“You ought to tell Massasoit of that,” said Mistress
Billington to Squanto. “ Perhaps you will.”

“I will tell the King of Pokonoket what Aspinet has
done,” said Squanto. “I am going to Sowams, where he
218 THE PILOT OF. THE MAYFLOWER.

lives, and he shall know it all. He will send Aspinet some
gift. It was a deed worthy of a chain. Aspinet took off
his own chain and gave it to the boy.”

“Tt may be that Massasoit will send to Aspinet the
copper chain,” said Elder Brewster.

“No, he would never do that,” said Squanto. “ That
chain is a pledge—a treaty chain—he would never do that!
He would send him some other present—it may be that
we shall some time find the heart of Massasoit in this thing.
This is a deed of the spirit. It is the deeds of the soul that
please him well.”

“ Miles Standish,” said Mistress Billington, “ would you
be as magnanimous as that?”

“ Now that your boy has returned you will have to com-
mand your tongue better than of late, Mistress Billing-
ton, or I will have to ask Governor Bradford to command
you.”

“The land of Goshen! Well, let time tell which of us
is right; time tells the truth about all things, so I need have
nothing more to say.”

The Pilgrims were very thoughtful that night. They
assembled in the Common House and sang some psalms
from the old Ainsworth collection, John Howland, who
sang in the storm, leading the voices. Then they went out.
The whip-poor-wills were filling the woods with their
mournful notes. Tireflies were in the woodland pastures.

The great moon hung over the harbor and shone on the
LOST. 219

level graves on the hill, and on the brook and the fields of
corn below.

The air was full of odor, now that the dew was falling.
The wild rose and sweetbrier ‘grew everywhere; there were
laurels and sweet ferns on the rocks, and marsh flowers on
the borders of the sea.

A dark form passed westward in the moonlight. It was
Tusquantum.

“Good night,’”’ he said to the men as he was about to
eross the brook. “It is cooler traveling at night. I am
going to Pokonoket—it is a friendly message that I will bear
to Massassoit. Tusquantum will come back again! ”

The doors of the seven houses opened and closed, and
all was as silent in Plymouth town as was the moonlit bury-
ing place on the hill.
CHAPTER XXVI.
THE WHITE FOOL KING.

Ocroser was at hand. The red leaves began to hang
like banners on the trees. The cool wind strewed the by-
ways with leaves, and there were gatherings of flocks of
birds in the old Indian cornfields. The leaves of the corn
rustled in the Pilgrims’ fields. The nights with the cop-
pery moon of the fading year grew long again.

Mistress Billington began to kindle chimney fires again
in the Common House, and the people gathered there at
night and recalled the dark winter of death, and told over
the stories of the terrible voyage, and recalled Good Cheer
Coppin and Captain Jones, who, notwithstanding an un-
proved suspicion that he purposely landed them at Cape
Cod, was so very good to them in the winter of their suf-
ferings that they liked to think of him now.

One night in the middle autumn all the old voyagers
in New Plymouth met at the Common House. Mistress
Billington made for them nocake and served it with a de-
licious sauce of berries.

Suddenly the door opened and Squanto appeared. He
was ne tongue of the English, and he was always
THE WHITE FOOL KING. 221

welcome. He was the story-teller now that Pilot Coppin
had gone.

“ve wonder to tell,” said he, when only halfway
across the room. “ You that have ears give them to me.”

“What is it?” asked Governor Brewster. “Has a ship
been seen?”

“No, no, it relates to John Billington here. Massasoit
has given the silver pipe to the sannap who rescued the
2?

“Why should he do that?” asked Governor Bradford.
“Tt was no common deed. The English once stole the

boy

boys of the tribe that rescued him, and you sent your cap-
tain against Corbitant when you thought he was plotting
against Massasoit.”

“How wonderful,” said Elder Brewster. “ Love brings
- love and hatred hatred, and to forgive is to be forgiven.
Massasoit is our Melchizedek. We may well pay tribute
to him. Such a man is without father or mother, without
beginning of years or end of days.”

“Would you have done as well, Miles Standish?” said
Brewster reprovingly. “ Be a little careful, a little careful;
your ways in Flanders were sometimes hard. Does it not
shame us to find among pagans such a man as Yanough?”

Squanto took his place among those who read fortunes
in the fire, or at least saw pictures there. He was asked to
tell some tale of this land of Pawtuxet, in which he was the
only survivor of the plague.
922 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“The sachem of Nauset had a sister once,” he said, and
then paused. He continued in Indian narrative style:
“She wanders; she wails with the winds; she cries when
the winds bite and the wolf howls. She married the White
King Fool.”

These words startled the company.

“Who was the White King Fool?” asked Edward
Winslow.

Priscilla Mullins and Mary Chilton locked arms and
stood close to Squanto. The young folks gathered closely
around him.

“Let me poke the fire first,” said Mistress Billing-
ton, “sith the tale will be a still one, then you may
begin.”

She poked the fire and the sparks flew.

“The Indians’ memories are long,” he began, “and
the Nausets have much to remember; but to hearts that are
kind the Nauset is kind, and his heart melts for those who
do him well.

“Tt was moons ago in winter. The Nausets were housed
in their cabins, and telling smoke talk tales and parching
and pounding their corn.

“ A runner came. His breath was spent.

“¢Qut, out!’ he cried. ‘There’s a great bird lit on the
sea!”

“The Nausets ran out of their tents. A monster was
in full view on the ocean with spread wings. It was a
THE WHITE FOOL KING. 223

ship, but they had never seen a ship like that before. It
was not like that that carried their boys away.

“The monster seemed fighting with the storm. But
the storm’s wings were bigger than its own; the storm drove
the monster into the shoals and upon the rocks, and as many
men as you have fingers came trembling in from the sea.

“The Nausets saw them. They watched them. They
said:

“«The sea has sent them to us for us to punish them
for stealing our people who never came back again.’

“The men were white. They made themselves shelters,
and found food in the sea.

“The Nausets watched them.

“One day they fell upon them with a whoop that
startled the wind. They captured them all and carried them
away.

“<“Now,’ said the Nausets, ‘we will be revenged upon
them for those who stole our people, who never came back.’

“Would they kill them? No. Would they make them
work in their fields? No. What would they do with them?
They would make ‘fools’ of them; they would send them
around as presents to the sagamores to make sport for the
people, as little foxes make sport, as the tame blue jays make
sport, as the papooses make sport.

“So they sent the white fool men as gifts to the saga-
mores.

“The sachem of Nauset’s sister was young and very
224 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

handsome. Her eyes were black and sparkled, her cheeks
were soft and clear. She was the light of the tribe.

“Now one of the white fool men was young. He had
white hair, his eyes were blue, his form was straight. The
Indians loved to look upon him when he did fool tricks
for them.

“He came from the land called France. I have seen
the land. It is very warm and fair.

“ The princess loved to see this man, whom they called
France, make sport. Every day she asked her brother the
king to send for him.

“There were young braves who loved the princess, and
they wrestled with him, and leaped with him, and per-
formed many antics with him, that she might admire them.

“But it was not these she began to admire; it was
France, for a soft heart had this same princess.

“ One day there was to be a feast, and the princess asked
her brother the king to bring out the young man France
again for sport.

“Tt was to be a great feast and she said:

“¢We must have high sport to-day. What shall the
game be?’

“
“She shrank back. ‘ Not that, not that,’ she said.

“¢ Why not?’ asked the king. ‘That is the finest sport
of all.’

“The feathering of the tree was to bind a noble form
THE WHITE FOOL KING. 225

to a tree, and to shoot arrows at the tree, to show how near
to the form they might strike the wood and yet not hit the
man. When the sport was over the tree would be found
pictured with feathers, and if the braves had shot well, the
bound man would escape, leaving his picture in the form
of arrows sticking into the tree. But if a bowstring went
wrong, when the arrows flew near the breast or the head,
the captive was wounded or fell dead.

“Tt was high noon in the forests on the edge of the
sea. The young man France had been bound against the
trunk of an old oak, and to the braves who were to show their
skill places were assigned by the king.

““¢ The bowman who shall shoot his arrow nearest to the
mark and leave the captive unharmed shall be taken into
my council, and be honored by me above the others,’ said
the king.

“There were lovers of the princess among the braves.
It was understood that the one who sent his arrow nearest
to the captive and left him unharmed would be favored
by the king as the winner of the princess.

“The shooting began at the foot of the tree. The
princess stood in her tent, more beautiful, it seemed, than
ever before. :

“The arrows feathered the tree at the feet of the cap-
tive. Then they ran up the tree one by one, and fell under
his arms, near his heart. Not an arrow drew a drop of

blood.
226 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“Then they feathered the oak above the captive’s
shoulders, when one arrow struck through his hair.

“ When the princess saw this she rushed out to the tree.
Another arrow grazed the captive’s cheek.

“¢T will see how near to his eye I can lodge an arrow,’
said a young warrior, filled with hope at the appearance of
the princess.

“The princess rushed upon the raised bow and seized
the bowman’s hand. .

“¢Never!’ she cried. ‘I have given my heart to him.
I will make him my chief—unbind the cords! ’

“They unbound the captive, and she led him away to
her tent. In a few moons she was married to him, and the
braves of other tribes came to call him the ‘ Fool King.’

“ A child was born to them, and they lived in happiness
in their tent, and roamed the woods together. But the
sickness of the land fell upon him and he died, and the
child died with him at the time. ;

“The princess saw them buried in one grave, and
then her heart broke and her mind gave way. She rushed
into the forests and wandered away. They thought that she
went to the rescue of the other white captives, who had been
made fool men. But she never came back. They saw her
flying from place to place, but she heeded no one’s call.
They hear her at times on windy nights when wolves cry
and winds are out, but her cry is like the winds.

“She used to come back alone to the White King’s
THE WHITE FOOL KING. 227

grave. They sometimes saw her fleeing away in the morn-
ing, but she never visited her people. Then she was lost
to every one, and they heard her voice no more. If you
will go with me I will show you the tree that was feathered
on the day of the feast. The Indian girl’s heart is true,
and Death is cruel when he slays the one she loves. She
loves to be a slave to the one to whom she gives her
heart.”

The Pilgrims listened to the legend, and pitied the
princess who cried in the storm.

Then they talked of their loved ones in England and
Holland; of John Robinson, of the people who were wait-
ing to come. They talked of their own loved ones who
were sleeping on the hill, of Rose Standish and Ellen More.

Then John Billington, the lad, said:

“T am going to write to our pilot to-morrow, to Good
Cheer Coppin.”

“That is right, boy,” said Elder Brewster. “Send him
my message of good cheer; may he find other ports for the
exiles of the world.”

“Say to him good cheer for me,” said Edward Winslow.
“T well remember how he rose up in the boat on that awful
day, and shouted ‘Good cheer! I see a harbor!’ ”

“So do I,” said Governor Bradford. “Tell him, boy,
Governor Bradford wishes him good ,cheer.”

Then one after another said the same words, and John
Howland led a company of singers in one of Ainsworth’s
228 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

psalms, as he had sung amid the raging waters when our
pilot said, ‘I see a harbor! ”

They wondered what Pilot Coppin would say when he
read John’s letter, and learned that the silver pipe had come

back to the cape again.
CHAPTER XXVII.

THE COPPER CHAIN AGAIN.

In the early fall, when the woods glowed with an un-
usual brightness and the old oaks began to wear a russet
hue, Mistress Billington went out to a storehouse that had
been built during the summer, carrying a pail of hot tallow
in her hands. It was “ dipping-candle ” day with her; she
had saved tallow from the animals for food after the early
fall huntings, and with this she planned to have some good
lights for the Common House in the late fall and winter
to come.

She was about to enter the storehouse where a kettle had
been set in the chimney, when she was seen to stop sud-
denly and to throw up one hand.

“Scat! scat! scamper, or I will pour the tallow all over
you! ”

She turned, and came running toward the Common
House, spilling the hot tallow as she came. Her eyes pro-
truded, and her face was flushed.

“Run!” she cried out to the men in the Common
230 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

House. “He stands there by the soap barrel. Run! O my
eyes, O good pity, did I ever see the like!”

“What is it?” asked the men.

“The evil one of the woods,” cried the excited woman.
“You never saw his like. He is half Indian and half bear,
and he has claws around his neck! ”

The men hurried to the storehouse. They found there
an Indian who presented a strange appearance indeed. He
wore an apron of wild-cat skin, around his neck was a
string of birds’ claws, and half of his face was painted
black. By his side was a pouch or bag of shells, and over
his forehead waved a white plume.

He laughed, which brought out his white teeth promi-
nently, and they contrasted curiously with his half black
and half copper face.

The men beckoned him to follow them. He did so in a
friendly way to the Common House.

When Mistress Billington saw him coming into the
house her terrors were renewed. She turned around and
around, and seizing the cooling tallow, threatened to make
a candle of the Indian, but finally set it down before him,
with her familiar expression, “The land of Goshen!” but
followed it up with one equally scriptural, “‘ He’s an Amale-
kite! ”

The Indian did not understand her terrors, but simply
said, “ Much squaw,” having learned a few English words
from some one, possibly Squanto. He added, “Truck, truck.”
THE COPPER CHAIN AGAIN. 231

He took up the tallow stick and began to eat the cool-
ing tallow, which caused the good woman to lift up her
hands in astonishment.

“Much goodt! ” he said.

The men tried to talk with him, but he did not compre-
hend what they would say. He simply said: “No ears,”
and called for Squanto, adding, “ Truck, truck! ”

Squanto had gone away to the hunting grounds.

The men thought that he might be a messenger.

They asked him whence he came, but received no an-
swer that they could understand, except “Truck, truck! ”

Then he thought of some English words.

“The little girl,” he asked suddenly; “little spirit? ”

“He means Ellen More,” said Mistress Billington,
softening and throwing her apron over her head at the
thought of the sorrows of the never-to-be-forgotten spring.

“Gone,” said she, pointing upward.

“Gorn?” echoed the Indian in a forlorn voice. “ Little
girl gorn?”

He sat down on the doorsill, and did not speak a word
for a long time.

The men consulted together, as the last rays of the sun
sprinkled the hills. They pointed him to the woods and
motioned him away.

He rose up and shook his head: “ Truck! ”

“Tndian go now,” said one of the men pointing to the

sunset.
16
939 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

He again shook his head, but stood like a statue:
“Truck! ”

Then one of the men attempted to lead him down to the
brook. But he refused to go.

Another ordered him away with decisive gestures.

He put his hand into his bag of shells, and drew some-
thing out very carefully. It gleamed. It was the copper
chain.

“He has been sent by Massasoit,” said Mistress Billing-
ton. “Let him come in again.”

They gave him a place by the fire.

“J wish the green mat were here,” said Mistress Billing-
ton, “and I would that Mistress Winslow and Ellen were
here, which they will never be again. The Indian is a mes-
senger of peace, and his paint is meant for ornament. I
think the black paint is intended to make whiter his plume.”

She called him “White Plume” now, and hurried
about to get a supper for him. She was full of bustle to
serve him, and was sorry for her first treatment of him.

The Pilgrims’ hearts melted when they saw the copper
chain. The old days of the voyage came back to them
again, with thoughts of the pilot and the little grave on the
hill.

In the evening Squanto came back to the Common
House. He talked for a time with the Indian, when his
errand was made clear.

Massasoit desired to send a party of Indians to truck
THE COPPER CHAIN AGAIN. 933

with the Pilgrims—that is, to sell furs. Massasoit would
like to visit the English again, when the leaves were falling.

They spread a mat for the white-plumed messenger by
the fire.

Then they talked of “ our pilot ” who had gone over the
sea, of Ellen More and the copper chain, and they wished
that the “ little spirit” could have been there to have seen
the beginning of the mission of peace of that little present
that had been brought to the great and generous forest
king.

The copper chain went about from place to place on
messages like this. Wherever any Indian bore it, and held
it up to glimmer in the sun, there was amity, good will, and
peace. The Mayflower brought no treasure that was equal
in noble influence to the copper chain.
CHAPTER XXVIII.
THE FIRST THANKSGIVING.

Tr was one that can never be repeated. It may be.
painted from the imagination, and sung in song, and acted
in tableau, but the race is gone that made that festival a
thrilling scene. The Pilgrims had produced their first har-
vest on American soil. They must return thanks to God
for the bounty of the fields, and for the promise that the
harvest gave them of harvests yet to come. The Indians
had protected them after the promise that Massasoit had
made when he received the copper chain. They must in-
vite the Indians to their feast; they must send for the good
Massasoit; the monarch of the forest must come back to
them bringing the copper chain.

Says Bradford of the Pilgrims at this time: “They be-
gan now to gather in ye small that they had, and to fit up
their houses and dwellings against winter, being all well
recovered in health and strength, and had all things in
good plenty.”

Tt was Indian summer, the time of the elu of the
woods. The cranberry meadows were turning red, and their
borders were lined with purple gentians. Wild grapes
“THE FIRST THANKSGIVING, ~— 235

hung from the oaks and junipers, under the fluttering leaves,
which had turned yellow. The birds were gathering in
flocks, and the ospreys had gone away from their nests of
sticks of wood piled high on the dead trees.

Governor Bradford called his men who were most swift
of foot to his house one day.

“Go to Sowams in the Pokonoket country,” said he,
“and inquire for Massasoit. If he be there, tell him that
we are now ready to receive him; invite him to come with
his chief men to partake of the Thanksgiving feast with us.
If he be not there, find him. He may be at the gathering
of harvest on the Mt. eee Lands, or at the fishing grounds
on one of the rivers.’

The men departed gladly. They were full oe. confi-
dence in the heart of the grand old chieftain; they loved
him. Every Indian on their way would bid them good
speed when they told their errand.

Massasoit was the heart of his people.

With the Pilgrims all was preparation.

Hunters were sent out for deer and wild turkeys, for
partridges, quail, and rabbits, of which the woods were
full.

The chimneys of the thatched houses smoked. The
kitchens were busy. The Brewster house was especially
a scene of anticipation for the invited guests. Priscilla
Mullins lived there.

It was Thursday, in the first days of November. The ©
936 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER,

“ nocake,” and

samp, the probable succotash, the possible
like dishes were made. The game was prepared for roast-
ing. Massassoit had sent back word by the messengers
that he would dine with Governor Bradford on that great
day.

It was a still morning—so still that one might hear
the leaves falling in the crystal air. The witch-hazels
were blooming; like some lives ‘they blossom in the fall.
The woods were full of odors. The sun rose over the sea.
The doors of the seven dwellings and four public houses
were open, and the smoke of ovens rose from the seven
chimneys.

A yell rent the air. The people stood still for a moment,
then ran out of their houses.

“ Massasoit is coming! ” cried the sentinel.

Massasoit was indeed coming with the copper chain,
and he was bringing with him ninety warriors.

The people gathered by the sides of the path that ae
to the governor’s house, and waited to welcome the Indians
as they should come marching in.

The Indians came plumed and painted, in cloaks orna-
mented with mystic figures, in bows and quivers, and circles
of glittering wampum. By the side of Massasoit walked, as
we may suppose, the stately Quadequina, his brother, who
loved him, and was seldom absent from him. It may be
that Annawon was there, for he lived to be very old.
“Pnieses”” were there, the Indian mystics, who thought
THE FIRST THANKSGIVING. 237

that they held communion with the dead. Tusquantum was
there, the interpreter.

The Indians, led by Massasoit, wearing the copper chain,
marched down the hill to the governor’s door, and were
welcomed there by the governor.

The welcome was followed by the roll of a drum.

It was the signal for prayer.

They entered the meeting house.

All stood silent, the Indians following the example
of the worshipers. Then Brewster, with uncovered head,
returned thanks to God for the harvests of the year, for the
amity of the Indians, for the promise and hope of the
future. It was probably the first public prayer that the
Indians had ever heard.

The feasts followed the services in the church.

Ninety warriors were many to feed, but ample prepara-
tions had doubtless been made.

The day was mild, and they spread the tables in the
open air.

The Indians engaged in leaping and other feats of skill.
Miles Standish led out his little company of twenty soldiers,
and caused them to go through the customary drill.

The Indians yelled with delight as they witnessed the
manceuvers of the soldiers. The scene was wholly new to
them.

The Thanksgiving lasted three days, during which the
English and Indians entered into a better understanding
238 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

with each other, so as to partin the brotherhood of love and
peace.

The last day of this memorable feast fell on Saturday.
For this farewell meal the Pilgrim mothers had made their
most bountiful and delicate dishes. The feast may have
begun with puddings and nocake, and delicacies made of
nuts, instead of ending with such things, as that was not
an uncommon method of old colony times.

What did they have to eat on that day? Was their pro-
vision as good as that which could be made to-day? Prob-
ably, and better. The venison may have had rich stews and
gravies; the wild turkeys may have been flavored with
beechnuts; the clam chowder may have had rare relishes;
the game of many kinds may have found that flavor of the
home oven that no others can equal. The meal probably
began or ended with plum porridge. Succotash was the
great Indian dish, and that may have been provided with
venison. Wild geese may have been served.

The Indians contributed to the meal. They brought
oysters. That was probably the day of the first oyster stew
ever eaten by white people on the New England coast.

It was the beautiful time of the year.

The forest, full of the odors of the fall, seemed to stand
still in these last glorious days of the fading season.

The Pilgrims remembered the stormy voyage on those
bright days; the terrible sickness; the burial of their loved
‘ones at night under the white stars, or amid the drifting
THE FIRST THANKSGIVING. 239

snows. They remembered the sailing away of the May-
flower, leaving them there firm in the faith that they were
fulfilling the will of God.

We may well remember Elder Brewster’s glorious words
at this period, as he bid the Pilgrims to be true to their pur-
pose in the world, whatever might come:

“ Blessed will it be for us, blessed for this land, for this
vast continent! Nay, from generation to generation will
the blessing descend. Generations to come will look back
to this hour and these scenes of agonizing trial, this day of
small things and say: ‘ Here was our beginning as a people.
These were our fathers. Through their trials we inherit
our blessings. Their faith is our faith; their hope our hope;
their God our God.’ ”

Such a voice as that in the wilderness is one for which
this nation should be thankful. We are what we are because
these heroes of faith were what they were. No record on
earth can surpass the scenes of that Pilgrim year, whose
faith bowed the skies, touched the heart of the savages, and
turned the wail of prayer into the Thanksgiving psalm in
the harvest suns of November. Faith is immortal power.

Massasoit went away, bearing the copper chain.
CHAPTER XXIX.
“Goop CHEER! ”

Tue pilot of the Argo and of the Argonauts did not
return from Colchis, where Jason had found the Golden
Fleece. The fifty heroes of Greece with their fifty oars,
who overcame the dragon, live on in fame; Orpheus for-
ever sings in the remembrance of art, and Hercules still
leads the inspirations of human achievement. But the man
who piloted all has left small record in these golden dreams
of fable.

It was so with our pilot, who said in the storm and the
stress of the sea, “Good cheer!” The Mayflower came
back again, but so far as we know he never returned. He
left his word of “ good cheer” in the New World, but he
probably found an unmarked grave on some Scottish
heather, or an unknown resting place in the sea.

But his words of good cheer did not die on the winds.
The Faith Monument at Plymouth may not be the most
artistic work of memorial art in America, but the lover of
the spirit of history feels there, as he surveys the majestic
face of stone uplifted to the skies, as he can feel nowhere
else in the Western world. It is a statue with a soul, and
“GOOD CHEER!” 241

every true American should stand on the Plymouth Rock of
Faith, and should sit down in the shadow of that colossal
statue, and think of what Faith did in the sublime events
that have made our history glorious in the achievements
of character. On Burial Hill and around it rest the men
who bowed to the heavens, and sang in the storm, and saw
the visions of destiny, to whom character was everything.
They were precisioners indeed, but they held the faith of
the heroes of Hebrew history; and Westminster Abbey has
no nobler dust than is gathered here, amid these arbutus-
blooming hills. It is they who said, as interpreted by the
poetic eloquence of Daniel Webster: “ Advance then, ye
future generations! ”

A farewell glance at the humble Scottish pilot, who
cheered the children of the Mayflower.

He sits on the docks of London.

“Pilot Coppin,” says a shipmate, ‘ there’s a letter for
you in the shipping office; it comes from over the sea.”

The pilot hurries away for the letter. He secures it and
looks at it.

“Tt is from that boy, John Billington,” he says.

He sits down in the sun, where the Thames rolls by,
bearing outward and inward the argosies of the waters.

He reads with wonder the generous epistle, and claps
his hands on his knees when he has put it away to read
again.

It is a short message:
242 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

“Prror Coprriyn—‘ Good Cheer’: We are all happy
now, and Squanto is with us. Massasoit has given the silver
pipe to the sannap who rescued me when I was lost in the
woods.

“© Pilot Coppin, how strange it all is! The Indians
who had been robbed of their own people did not harm
me; they rescued me, and they sent me back to my home
with a chain about my neck. They were happy to do it.

“The people all wondered at it, and Massasoit gave the
silver pipe to the Indian who found me when I was lost.

“We think of you, Pilot Coppin; we remember the
jackscrew; we love to tell of the time when you cried
“Good cheer—I see a harbor!’ Elder Brewster says that
the harbor will welcome the pilgrims of the world.

“The people all tell me to say to you ‘ Good cheer’ for
them. So good cheer, good cheer forever, Pilot Coppin,
and good-by, from your loving friend,

“ Joun Briteron.”

“Good cheer! good cheer!” repeated the pilot. “It
cheers me now that I spoke those words out of the faith
of my heart. Happy are they all who say ‘ good cheer’ to
the struggling world!”

He goes to St. Paul’s Cathedral, and kneels down there
on the stone floor among the poor people, and says, “ Let
me thank God for the faith of the Mayflower.” He thinks.
of the words that had been given him in the storm, of little
“GOOD CHEER!” 243

Ellen More in her grave on Precisioners’ Hill, and he rises up
as the great bell peals, and goes out singing in the sun-
shine as his old comrade of the sea had sung in the storm.

Reader, it was Faith that made this nation what it is.
Make a pilgrimage to Plymouth Rock, and in the faith of
the American Argonauts face the new problems of life,
and live for the things that live. There are few records of
faith more tender and inspiring than the simple story of the
children of the Mayflower.
APPENDIX.

THE PLYMOUTH OF TO-DAY.

We repeat—every American should stand on Plymouth
Rock. It is the place to renew the faith of the fathers in
republican liberty. Plymouth was the immortal camping
ground of a new march of the world, and she shall live in
eternal memory, and forever be a place of pilgrimages.

She has marked the events of her heroic history clearly
and well. Not only rises the Faith Monument over the
town, the harbor, the graves, the Billington Sea, but a few
miles away stands the pillarlike Standish Monument on
Captain’s Hill, an expression of strength in solitude worthy
of the hero it commemorates.

Over the doors of Pilgrim Hall may be seen the allegory
of the welcome of the Indians to the Pilgrims. In the hall
are glorious paintings of incidents in Pilgrim history, which
follow the original traditions. Here one may study the
Standish sword; may find Elder Brewster’s precious chair
imprisoned in glass and iron, almost as great a treasure as
the coronation stone of Westminster Abbey. Here in a side
room may be seen the bones of the sachem of Nauset; we
know not of any other remains of an Indian chief to be seen
in New England. The kettle that was buried with the chief
is placed in the case with his bones.

Here we may find the curious mortar and pestle of the
244


National Monument to the Forefathers, at Plymouth, Massachusetts,
erected 1859-1888.
THE PLYMOUTH OF TO-DAY. 945

Winslow family, once used by Mistress Elizabeth Winslow,
who adopted the little orphan Ellen More.

Go out and stand on the Rock under the granite canopy
in whose chambers are precious relics; then go to the
place where Elder Brewster’s house stood, and drink from
the spring that flowed when that good man was living. Stop
on your way where the Common House stood. These places
are all marked, and are near each other.

Then go to Billington Sea, two miles or more from the
town through the woods. The so-called “sea” is a lovely
lagoon with a wooded island. The oak leaves there are
bright in summer, and the carpet of moss and evergreens
under them will recall the times of the sagamores.

And, finally, stand on Burial Hill, and look out on the
sheltered harbor where the Mayflower lay in the dreary
winter of the great sickness, whose harvest was graves.

In Pilgrim Hall is the manuscript of a poem which
caught the spirit of the great event of the Pilgrims’ history.
It was written by Felicia Hemans, set to music by her sister,
Miss Browne (Mrs. Arkwright), and given to Sir Walter
Scott to place for publication. It is said to have been com-
posed one evening after tea, when Mrs. Hemans had been
reading an account of the landing of the Pilgrim Fathers,
in a paper sent to her by a brother in Canada. An auto-
graph copy of the poem was secured by James T. Fields,
and given in his will to the Pilgrim Society for Pilgrim
Hall.

The picture of the landing of the Pilgrims in this poem
is far from perfect; the coast is not “rock bound,” nor did
the Pilgrims keep “unstained” their “freedom to worship
God”; but few poems ever more truly caught the spirit
946 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

of an event. It is, and will probably ever be, the national
hymn of Forefathers’ Day. One may well repeat it when
standing in view of the two monuments and of the solemn
sea, and at no place more appropriately than at the graves
of the precisioners and of their early descendants.

THE LANDING OF THE PILGRIMS.

The breaking waves dashed high,
On a stern and rock-bound coast,

And the woods against a stormy sky
Their giant branches tossed.

And the heavy night hung dark,
The hills and waters o’er,

When a band of exiles moored their bark
On the wild New England shore.

Not as the conqueror comes,
They, the true-hearted, came;

Not with the roll of stirring drums,
And the trumpet that sings of fame;

Not as the flying come,
In silence and in fear,

They shook the depths of the desert’s gloom
With their hymns of lofty cheer.
THE LANDING OF THE PILGRIMS. 947

Amidst the storm they sang,
And the stars heard, and the sea!

And the sounding aisles of the dim woods rang
To the anthem of the free!

The ocean eagle soared
From his nest by the white waves’ foam,
And the rocking pines of the forest roared,
This was their welcome home!

There were men with hoary hair
Amidst that pilgrim band,

Why had they come to wither there,
Away from their childhood’s land?

There was woman’s fearless eye,
Lit by her deep love’s truth; _

There was manhood’s brow, serenely high,
And the fiery heart of youth.

What sought they thus afar?
Bright jewels of the mine?

The wealth of seas? the spoils of war?
They sought a faith’s pure shrine!

Ay, call it holy ground,
The soil where first they trod;

They have left unstained what there they found,
Freedom to worship God!

17
248 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

COMPACT DAY.

Tue Pilgrim Fathers lived not for their own age alone,
but for all time. They brought the free school with them
in their purpose on the Mayflower. The schools of the
nation celebrate many holidays, and they should add to the
number Compact Day, November 11th, O. S. (22d, N. S.).

The principle of popular government was that day regis-
tered on the lid of William Brewster’s chest, if the chest
tradition be true, amid the children of the new nation. The
Pilgrim Mothers, as well as the Pilgrim Fathers, may claim
a thought of gratitude on that memorial day, and the chil-
dren of the Mayflower may be recalled as the inspiration
of these grand and worthy deeds, of which the past fur-
nishes but few examples, which the future may not exceed.

The school is the foundation of national character. The
republic must put its trust in the virtue of the people, and
education must be the pillar of its strength.

The compact that was made for order in the Pilgrim
republic, whose hall of legislation was a rocking ship in a
desolate harbor, was to protect not only exiles, but the chil-
dren of exiles, while education should produce men and
generations of men, who should regard justice as more than
position, welfare more than wealth, and virtue more than
any other thing.

The Pilgrims came to the wilderness to found the school,
to guard the school, and the school may well esteem it an
honor and saered trust to celebrate this purpose on Compact
Day. On this day it will ever be a worthy thing to relate
in some form the simple story of the children of the May-
flower.
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breeziness and fun. It begins well and goes on etter, and from the time Syd joins
his ship, exciting incidents follow each other in such rapid and brilliant succession that
nothing short of absolute compulsion would induce the reader to lay it down.” —London
Sournal of Education.

See Seca te ee Laer LD
New Vork: D. APPLETON & CO., 72 Fifth Avenue.
D. APPLETON & CO.’S PUBLICATIONS.



GEORGE H. ELLWANGER’S BOOKS.

HE GARDEN’S STORY; or, Pleasures and Trials
of an Amateur Gardener. With Head and Tail Pieces by
Rhead. 16mo. Cloth, extra, $1.50.

‘‘This dainty nugget of horticultural lore treats of the pleasures and trials of an ©
amateur gardener. From the time when daffodils begin to peer and the ‘secret of the
year’ comes in to mid-October, Mr. Ellwanger provides an outline of hardy flower-
gardening that can be carried ‘on and worked upon by amateurs. . . . A little chapter
on ‘Warm Weather Wisdom’ is a presentment of the cream of English literature.
Nor is the information of this floral calendar confined to the literary or theoretical
sides. ‘Plant thickly; it is easier and more profitable to raise flowers than weeds,’ is a
practical direction from the garden syllabus.” —Philadelphia Public Ledger.

‘One of the most charming books of the season. . . . This little volume, printed
in excellent taste, is redolent of garden fragrance and garden wisdom. . . . It is in no
sense a text-book, but it combines a vast deal of information with a great deal of out-
of-door observation, and exceedingly pleasant and sympathetic writing about flowers
and plants.” —Christian Union. %

‘A dainty, learned, charming, and delightful book.”—New York Sun.

HE STORY OF MY HOUSE. With an Etched
Frontispiece by Sidney L. Smith, and numerous Head and Tail
Pieces by W. C. Greenough. i6mo. Cloth, extra, $1.50.

* An essay on the building of a house, with all its kaleidoscopic possibilities in the
way of reform, and its tantalizing successes before the fact, is always interesting; and
the author is not niggardly in the gocd points he means to secure. It is but natural to
follow these with a treatise on rugs full of Orientalism and enthusiasm; on the literary
den and the caller, welcome or otherwise; on the cabinets of porcelain, the rare edi-
tions on the shelves, the briefly indicated details of the spoils of the chase in their
proper place; on the greenhouse, with its curious climate and wonderful botany and
odors, about which the author writes with unusual charm and precision; on the dining-
room and the dinner. . . . The book aims only to be agreeable; its literary flavor is
pervasive, its sentiment kept well in hand.”—New York Evening Post.

' ‘When the really perfect book of its class comes to a critic’s hands, all the words
he has used to describe fairly satisfactory ones are inadequate for his new purpose, and
he feels inclined, as in this case, to.stand aside and let the book speak for itself. In its
own way, it would be hardly possible for this daintily printed volume to do better.”—
Art Amateur.

N GOLD AND SILVER. With Illustrations by
W. Hamilton Gibson, A. B. Wenzell, and W. C. Greenough.
16mo. Cloth, $2.00, Also, limited edition de luxe,-on Japanese
vellum, $5.00.

CONTENTS: The Golden Rug of Kermanshah ; Warders of the Wcods;
A Shadow upon the Pool; The Silver Fox of Hunt’s Hollow.

‘* After, spending a half hour with ‘In Gold and Silver,’ one recalls the old saying,
‘Precious things come in small parcels.’ ”’—Chvistian Intelligencer.

“ One of the handsomest gift-books of the year.” —Philadelphia Inquirer.

“The whole book is eminently interesting, and emphatically deserving of the very
handsome and artistic setting it has received.”—New York Tribune.



D. APPLETON & CO., 72 Fifth Avenue, New York.


D. APPLETON & CO.’S. PUBLICATIONS.



eee REMUS. His Songs and his Sayings. By
JoEL CHANDLER Harris. With new Preface and Revisions,
and 112 Illustrations by A. B. Frost. Library Edition. 12mo.
Buckram, gilt top, uncut, $2.00. Also, Zaition de luxe of the
above, limited to 250 copies, each signed by the author, with
the full-page cuts mounted on India paper. 8vo. White vcl.
lum, gilt top, $10.00.

“The old tales of the plantation have never been told as Mr. Harris has told them.
Each narrative is to the point, and so swift in its action upon the risibilities of the
reader that one almost loses consciousness of the printed page, and fancies it is the
voice of the lovable old darky himself that steals across the senses and brings mirth
inextinguishable as it comes; . . . and Mr. Frost’s drawings are so supe:latiy ely good,
so inexpressibly funny, that they promise to make this the standard edition of a stand-
ard book.”—New York Tribune.

“An exquisite volume, full of good illustrations, nd if there is anybody in this
country who doesn’t know Mr. Harris, here is an op ortunity to make his acquaint-
ance and have many a good laugh.”—New York Herald.

“There is but one ‘Uncle Remus,’ and he will never grow old... . It was a
happy thought, that of marrying the work of Harris and Frost.”—New York Mail
and Express.

“ Nobody could possibly have done this work better than Mr. Frost, whose appre-
ciation of negro life fitted him especially to be the inter; reter of ‘ Uncle Remus,’ and
whose sense of the humor in animal life makes these drawings really illustrations in the
fullest sense. Mr. Harris’s well-known work has become in a sense a classic, and this
may be accepted as the standard edition. ”—Philadelphia Times.

‘*A book which became a classic almost as soon as it was published. . . . Mr. Frost
has never done anything better in the way of illustration, if indeed he has done any-
thing as good.”—Boston Advertiser.

‘We pity the reader who has not yet made the acquaintance of ‘ Uncle Remus’
and his charming story. . .. Mr. Harris has made a real addition to literature purely
and strikingly American, and Mr. Frost has aided in fixing the work indelibly on the
consciousness of the American reader.”—T7he Churchman.

“The old fancies of the old negro, dear as they may have been to us these many
years, seem to: gain new life when they appear through the medium of Mr. Frost’s
imagination.”—New York Home Fournal.

“Tn his own peculiar field ‘Uncle Remus’ has no rival.. The book has become a
classic, but the latest edition is the choice one. It is rarely riven to an author to sce
his work accompanied by pictures so closely in sympathy with his text.” —San Fran-
cisco Argonaut.

“We say it with the utmost faith that there is rot an artist who works in illustra-
tion that can catch the attitude and exoression, the slyness, the innate depravity. the
eye of surprise, obstinacy, the hang of the head or the kick of the heels of the mute and
the brute creation as Mr. Frost has shown to us here.” —Baltimore Sun.



New York: D. APPLETON & CO., 72 Fifth Avenue.



























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describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDEJ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
0aa4e50517a0c833bdad680d285c7f96
b84ce65a5865b49976290830ec73da8322cb5fd4
'2011-12-30T19:24:38-05:00'
describe
'448985' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDEK' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
772eff4412046ad0451715ff69035a35
959b5ff1d9dab1c3e6706180ad5dbf8a786a3245
'2011-12-30T19:17:42-05:00'
describe
'100743' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDEL' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
3f84666e7e53326421d01168414b2758
49e81c545f98f12f4d12ee53dd1647f3886df813
'2011-12-30T19:20:31-05:00'
describe
'29199' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDEM' 'sip-files00013.pro'
1d5451cd3378113ed7edbeaca3debc69
d26ebb9d3460615fc88cb6f2c255b11ada47ea81
'2011-12-30T19:19:35-05:00'
describe
'29749' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDEN' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
64d1ab676f65ae0dabac6f4ae8e5c8ac
cb2851218258a21ef3714baeef92eb7acbee7864
'2011-12-30T19:21:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDEO' 'sip-files00013.tif'
cf97d7d872b6fb5f6638cf936758d802
bd43c48f267aca13ee67a946427bd16e6c55b95f
'2011-12-30T19:20:57-05:00'
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDEP' 'sip-files00013.txt'
d244fd300bc68a2bff0d17dbc7ebebdb
c5377aa5ae0d3e582bef8c668564b85701a5c07e
'2011-12-30T19:25:16-05:00'
describe
'7175' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDEQ' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
8c99a1d454d12c37c2218b11aad83261
2e31b37ae1bce4dfa3079f5813722dbdd212f421
'2011-12-30T19:22:14-05:00'
describe
'448909' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDER' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
5df1c253352979ad3528178e44a6ec51
6dc26b2c6d17406ef1dc487a56d364dc555a5829
describe
'98630' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDES' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
3043429005cf3dd46fe8f5f7249f036e
6df08b2b64f692ffa67e97b58a467880367a6122
'2011-12-30T19:26:14-05:00'
describe
'33815' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDET' 'sip-files00014.pro'
e41bb8314e7d71d8dc022a439e75af1a
b344362e54251eddb6bad73f7a8f11843f0687d4
'2011-12-30T19:20:14-05:00'
describe
'30077' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDEU' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
e65e3d30a56cf80919f32ac893ddc91e
0cce41ba877e8a0eb5046f94bdccab4583cd1a13
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDEV' 'sip-files00014.tif'
650428f2130182f413d15d8420af056e
d0b55867a65a54f20efe5a6e7764ca574fcf3f05
'2011-12-30T19:19:32-05:00'
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDEW' 'sip-files00014.txt'
a508975c835629693b37e8d681cb169b
355ebf326d8849cdf2fbcc89f38b033503c47650
'2011-12-30T19:23:49-05:00'
describe
'7166' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDEX' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
d280261b7e659731176711ed97aa6dc9
53525ed704f42a409320bf5bd24b5bb5d1981a41
'2011-12-30T19:18:44-05:00'
describe
'448951' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDEY' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d92f194ba4f2c483928bf873bb483644
de20b1c4769fc811f971a81ea73bcde31749c1af
'2011-12-30T19:19:54-05:00'
describe
'69334' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDEZ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
e1ebdb4be07b397af38d4b26e7553ec2
1a55806248bf3e287ca133ac88f98a3887a82206
'2011-12-30T19:17:11-05:00'
describe
'33198' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFA' 'sip-files00015.pro'
c1df52e83b7b32aea835b126c97a8cf5
0ea9cdc91e05dacaaeb2e1c95811efc2742fe8dd
'2011-12-30T19:20:35-05:00'
describe
'21101' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFB' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
68932bbade640d50952e6cfc768512ce
9f933ac61522e4bcea82df52bf94c4dd18222bf6
'2011-12-30T19:25:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFC' 'sip-files00015.tif'
f68484bd143891dc7346babb125f76b1
8ae92144ec1e9f3a7404f8c81f8d6c5a6da3c610
'2011-12-30T19:17:18-05:00'
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFD' 'sip-files00015.txt'
4ac0035c61aa68af49711167556f3296
3fbc9f2ae2d0a0643d64c18d70a448fb36485373
'2011-12-30T19:22:04-05:00'
describe
'5438' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFE' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
d53450aaceb49ffda9275a7bc16f3f26
0a2f36bc6221dcdaf7670337c9b34de748a078f7
'2011-12-30T19:20:21-05:00'
describe
'448977' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFF' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
e7021fc332a8b73febfcf45e87d068b7
dd4f1eb341ef7903959d5dc77f488bddb5969124
'2011-12-30T19:24:27-05:00'
describe
'64503' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFG' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
7366df76858867c6837db1e547ed3ebe
62e4d870e9b595d7549a8caaa163920f8e23bcbd
'2011-12-30T19:21:08-05:00'
describe
'11263' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFH' 'sip-files00016.pro'
28c8d32929db5c27e54d717a401a83fb
e9126689154a05476aad5a92cc1a604193f07868
'2011-12-30T19:24:07-05:00'
describe
'17583' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFI' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
622aa76cd292e7cc4cafc1f09d0a1ce9
85956f6f5fbe3f6adaf006862220210aea481e68
'2011-12-30T19:19:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFJ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
5e81e63d61707f0d62c745d57c1ba58e
287e479415872e0e92e8a061da6b7aa97848ef37
'2011-12-30T19:20:03-05:00'
describe
'508' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFK' 'sip-files00016.txt'
6642741487df3bf192b6c6374ace725a
3595dc320c6e7bd7abc5af625545947767f3b8b5
'2011-12-30T19:19:25-05:00'
describe
'4832' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFL' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
94e848a6177ab9a11fd3b7d7916829b4
5b612178c916b88f8b3633ec131f5a4b173ac0ef
'2011-12-30T19:17:36-05:00'
describe
'448966' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFM' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
99f4ac800fea23dbeca0aec0cb00232b
adbb43b37d09a2ed2879cae3aac5cd2f28252d49
'2011-12-30T19:24:39-05:00'
describe
'75794' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFN' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
05c52cd058ddc51273e67cd3f3324648
bfeda2236441b5183fdc1031d80d9835fd1e18d0
'2011-12-30T19:20:13-05:00'
describe
'21932' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFO' 'sip-files00017.pro'
54022229e2e786746e294f1a085405e7
2aa10af9462ef26e56e87013b3aec3920eb56043
describe
'21880' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFP' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
35cc980379d92e426076c73c3adaaba6
a71c8f00fde9314aa358b3f2a112c279a7ae2c7c
'2011-12-30T19:17:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFQ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
4831a8f3a5f4460cd4c1a0a25c04de9f
d3f0adb6ee6702c5ea220276856d9ea9db1b700d
'2011-12-30T19:23:09-05:00'
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFR' 'sip-files00017.txt'
0f3d8cc42fda96631b7b09b8e25d16ff
250be643d5ab19b13c640b1157d886aae93481df
'2011-12-30T19:22:50-05:00'
describe
'5978' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFS' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
9cfcb6b3e8e81f2ed657fcf75ae16aea
d6077d6fa725b26424b7eefaab981a1cccbecfa5
'2011-12-30T19:19:07-05:00'
describe
'448898' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFT' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
6627fb9d01697a8ec7b8861b5bcaf988
4a1d8339b7ace255b61bc1c16de902469de0e055
'2011-12-30T19:25:34-05:00'
describe
'98454' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFU' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
7e391f22dc82d0f6b49987ce72a81621
731acf292753264ab424b73f3b6e57e87863b1ad
describe
'16097' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFV' 'sip-files00019.pro'
b5a82625991cf50c58581efd3e4e2d23
b289fbbcf131648bf0340533f296ae932b5a0732
'2011-12-30T19:19:36-05:00'
describe
'27147' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFW' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
3c540b43e165b36ef941658c45d784a7
78d50ea6e2cd776a7770a7cbe15690273372092e
'2011-12-30T19:19:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFX' 'sip-files00019.tif'
c5b53f14bfb2540b918f55512c35dc7c
86d20809b15c3cced1acaadc169beb8a6707c9c9
'2011-12-30T19:17:43-05:00'
describe
'755' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFY' 'sip-files00019.txt'
155c05f43fbc2f58d22f2ee9ed53fecf
f2afaabcfefc7e81322b56dac7f8ab52e42388cb
'2011-12-30T19:22:26-05:00'
describe
'6908' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDFZ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
4670684943039b5abd60fd14560fc93f
6d6137cec04932cc3ebfe978fe64b97507064f33
'2011-12-30T19:22:31-05:00'
describe
'448919' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGA' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
5a6e8e4628500b743f9dace08de7b115
bbe8ee9d4294e2a5dc6079b155a647910f78619a
'2011-12-30T19:23:43-05:00'
describe
'112965' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGB' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
16b5956261b67b78ff0c9afaa6ee2584
691160323617a20f2649cb00226d91ccdded5b50
'2011-12-30T19:25:03-05:00'
describe
'38677' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGC' 'sip-files00020.pro'
6088b0d9ed9a3569e2fb4846cb68ea67
1f66cd25358de34addb08b81bbd92c235ef19b03
'2011-12-30T19:19:58-05:00'
describe
'34955' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGD' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
d3bd7dcb4f6a520c85dec10ea78893b6
4bbe24d9d9a2f1ca32362aaad71890b9ff621d9d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGE' 'sip-files00020.tif'
d46f1d94777fcdd166aec6e07e729a89
ae2358ef8f74f2037fbb3c3dffaeb0de84f48502
'2011-12-30T19:21:59-05:00'
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGF' 'sip-files00020.txt'
ba16adf6be5611e61db6a1f295e6d198
c8b1d533d0914c3a130900b260ea1d4bb3a4857d
'2011-12-30T19:26:11-05:00'
describe
'8265' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGG' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
8b2667d0ee1e667dc629a4cda3c4448e
3bfffbfaef119f87df755f4282ec7c2e61dda2f9
'2011-12-30T19:24:06-05:00'
describe
'448931' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGH' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
88ad4347656cbeb6968a9ede343dd9f6
ba2546280d38afa3636220afe7c746f1b64c56b9
'2011-12-30T19:19:06-05:00'
describe
'117174' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGI' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
30cf633002686429d08890a8e61eb66d
fd88f2fe292fe96d3ef1318cbe75c305054c446d
'2011-12-30T19:22:39-05:00'
describe
'38019' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGJ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
72bf73d1c0027ee38fab8819e4669221
e1e37738742546239b750b99445009eb2606dfc7
'2011-12-30T19:22:45-05:00'
describe
'35860' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGK' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
e68af4a8b4cd24826776dd32451ad540
8127757a21e7d27e7fb9289c93f26f1e3f7c3096
'2011-12-30T19:19:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGL' 'sip-files00021.tif'
66fb6a201bce72536b03ffec3a4fd786
7aa812db4229e70eef9ee12d7c3cf1ad78ce6666
'2011-12-30T19:22:24-05:00'
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGM' 'sip-files00021.txt'
cbb487984fef7ec8567802effd482ee1
a4f05be46a4f847c7f320fa5b01c1a8ac8709f03
'2011-12-30T19:23:56-05:00'
describe
'8704' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGN' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
84ad4e86695345d99d96108334184954
acd3dc84c123bf312527d1c75df09147c150a61f
'2011-12-30T19:20:05-05:00'
describe
'448964' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGO' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
2fcb33b3ab8c72c5cb4bdaa63e966e10
bf1dcdbe9a4a2be75a80f59a7d6b37329d138f95
'2011-12-30T19:17:48-05:00'
describe
'108127' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGP' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
0b7be9b1a02ee859316b331d0a00cd09
ebec83ef148f1700740b59cda8038ed2bcafa866
'2011-12-30T19:17:19-05:00'
describe
'36944' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGQ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
b19bf5b918b833a602e1bac30e960ff5
b63b0615592431d79b7862db086aae2fabc902d9
'2011-12-30T19:20:27-05:00'
describe
'33352' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGR' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
7144ea5e2ee4e44bf36dd0694e8ea9ad
1fd44b77013476d7d04bcc946d1160172174b185
'2011-12-30T19:23:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGS' 'sip-files00022.tif'
3e6a0a3b0491ac53a139d026b418638c
452088fab609abfd61eb9164eacd5a2e4d620aa8
'2011-12-30T19:21:34-05:00'
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGT' 'sip-files00022.txt'
7120bd816d37187a5f1a742de5ba1668
46e0fd73d15f78e7c30158772b58f27a8e783199
'2011-12-30T19:19:21-05:00'
describe
'8141' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGU' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
57740ef1c7f6d59ca3bcdd63476b876a
65325957c75e3af10e238a3a898d60af39ff2b91
'2011-12-30T19:23:08-05:00'
describe
'448984' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGV' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
677119eb799e2456cc48ab99d05c6067
6587fe5f3fbcce43cfff3e050c8301b3836d8abf
'2011-12-30T19:20:18-05:00'
describe
'97346' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGW' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
fcd80aec0bc90548e9886e22cd7c8cd3
1eec07bf9eaae6e0a8582aa7dd43880f75508471
'2011-12-30T19:18:03-05:00'
describe
'31293' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGX' 'sip-files00023.pro'
a70beafd53b6946726a4328d8e328588
ea0b1d3cecf74d8c6ec906bf3c6ce7908693f580
'2011-12-30T19:21:04-05:00'
describe
'29202' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGY' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
753121873f861b1475730114ca13d81c
dcc34c1f8f13e0984402daace3c3f0771ee66367
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDGZ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
f9178bca303ba97b81ef8e712d4b959c
378639a81e77343e39df044f5805693bbe205f8c
'2011-12-30T19:19:05-05:00'
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHA' 'sip-files00023.txt'
5d7d2304d9f8b4b44da0894176cb1b70
7efe69faa0f3bb9d6ce3a9bf3c43308bbb381f6c
'2011-12-30T19:22:59-05:00'
describe
'7468' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHB' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
7f827666ec34fc6f30b589d09650626c
84612d3ef8dc958465fdb8209226c5d2a0266209
'2011-12-30T19:18:42-05:00'
describe
'425034' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHC' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
1087280b89fa2b59e30814a142efb2c6
7e10ebce65d460696d1b0b79413dfff678eabcbb
'2011-12-30T19:18:39-05:00'
describe
'101784' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHD' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
8caf1f0fca5e33c1cd0279e57d75c9e5
d6546b6fc8615b605a8a21b3181388902e1c0309
'2011-12-30T19:23:48-05:00'
describe
'31519' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHE' 'sip-files00024.pro'
abae4eb01abb0d0e9b4e14b530a1cc33
aefc859bf5f676fda61088d94134d649b82b66ee
'2011-12-30T19:17:07-05:00'
describe
'31945' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHF' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
2d9efa4c3fc3402104e6e84997493db0
64670052b5fdb2e377b4b856e4fcd32a2f2d682e
'2011-12-30T19:18:50-05:00'
describe
'3417192' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHG' 'sip-files00024.tif'
e69d03b75fb380646e2545c58ce467ac
d9e0fe5c73df290cf7fa7cb934b5c60d32462c53
'2011-12-30T19:21:51-05:00'
describe
'1272' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHH' 'sip-files00024.txt'
5ae28117f6256477cf470f48687cf36b
59ad53723c7a3a500bb965cdac41f6042d02e526
'2011-12-30T19:20:42-05:00'
describe
'8496' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHI' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
b0b08c745ef4d8d4ae5a25d666ebbd0d
d43c5afc8fb3b9c37770e54deec9152bfb66caff
'2011-12-30T19:17:35-05:00'
describe
'448862' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHJ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
254495adf322ddd4a0aa2bfd25172aa1
8dca17555c95589fa60cc9e1607f43f0f91b8a48
'2011-12-30T19:24:54-05:00'
describe
'109746' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHK' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
79ef42e1d92ea5b0b32b21701973984b
1dc3baacdcbc1694e882dbed6ce0c212ac6b19d8
'2011-12-30T19:22:01-05:00'
describe
'35136' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHL' 'sip-files00025.pro'
23b20ea017461f08d2aebdc7a0c076fc
d552d641ebf10f5500730180521e72f51c06734d
describe
'33249' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHM' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
80d1fc4128d3e141a94ae411c4457d3d
da0a76d00cd21772b4fd6f71ddde38d94dd6ccff
'2011-12-30T19:18:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHN' 'sip-files00025.tif'
ac9f4162f7132a46f94ad88a2637d7dd
aac4170c8843ff1351db6bfda839493e0d2f744b
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHO' 'sip-files00025.txt'
a6bc19d10de37509ca5c8e6860d6bcb2
0e12b41d1384f29d17a140a31b0a7b0fa4c4b341
'2011-12-30T19:26:01-05:00'
describe
'8259' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHP' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
4e850b860951628c04c0bb30554e0819
e549b9cba4c2f2c809789f62df85a0db8a627766
'2011-12-30T19:22:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHQ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
6a437fb62816aa8bae4f32011181f9fc
09357add479db926e6fd601b796fbb21a755aeb3
'2011-12-30T19:17:15-05:00'
describe
'109961' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHR' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
f1534e4bff6b17e3a6d19031549cf6e9
87edd25a629b05c5ea056e55dda0e6f05eaac8b7
describe
'36355' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHS' 'sip-files00026.pro'
32d2c444e4df72addf9f392cbca4144e
7939b6cdce18bea766eebc712b3303c7828c0f00
'2011-12-30T19:24:55-05:00'
describe
'34345' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHT' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
af281c73b8df1d4cefb543a08436ef85
3b8f3a684205e7f9f2dd11ba97af10547f9f12e5
'2011-12-30T19:25:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHU' 'sip-files00026.tif'
12d52042f107537fef0a477f0ba06847
110be522ebb904aff8942a42b31746407d71e0af
'2011-12-30T19:17:49-05:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHV' 'sip-files00026.txt'
a892f4e6f359b50edbf33f3cfa310f60
338dced08500ce10498a8bb31695b92649b7d4ed
'2011-12-30T19:18:32-05:00'
describe
'8380' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHW' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
26894fa310a5439b73496bf5b1d05243
488d61b1b2de47fd1db36895f74bbc47cfd90561
'2011-12-30T19:24:28-05:00'
describe
'448967' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHX' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
3abb0cd611363499703a7a2f6ec4e998
fb592f2af82959a206eb9fc427972290ca891e6a
'2011-12-30T19:19:44-05:00'
describe
'115968' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHY' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
d3d7930af3f86621bbd95d45433bd01a
02ef7251ca24fe19860db81b05b8334aa3ed831a
describe
'38207' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDHZ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
4da941944e82d68adfbe84e86434e576
fd65f74a35e0eedb5d02a5a2c44a223c1516ad82
'2011-12-30T19:21:35-05:00'
describe
'34496' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIA' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
e681b7fa82c64cc261f0b08271a8cb1f
0d1b5405162a3fb73cf1bad429fa94cf0636d916
'2011-12-30T19:21:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIB' 'sip-files00027.tif'
8ef97cb3b1bc353392039a21c35a493d
409c6e5b991a6cc0fd4029651eada85ca876a13c
'2011-12-30T19:24:49-05:00'
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIC' 'sip-files00027.txt'
4fc1488faaa70f73b70fb122e57684af
548a32541571e4ab1b2b3ab8e4b6ce584cc77e9c
'2011-12-30T19:18:29-05:00'
describe
'8542' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDID' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
d50c5c8dffc0bec231f5e5581e17b8c8
648ee3edd376d200241fe85549d642212485da1c
describe
'448950' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIE' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
420d694183637c446421e9e5bc38f064
1fa3b36560cb0e8c8aff3c3249d3f3ae44f39abb
'2011-12-30T19:20:15-05:00'
describe
'102297' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIF' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
32381b390f67456c596d769958ee9efb
1bb6823950cbb61e32905e1564b5db2cc0b4a2c8
'2011-12-30T19:22:53-05:00'
describe
'32599' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIG' 'sip-files00028.pro'
c000647db411faaddac480a342152dbd
f0077944b5583591d553e0694de23500f3976bb4
'2011-12-30T19:18:11-05:00'
describe
'30895' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIH' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
609d8e7a5f7a003c0c7031c015488e5a
5c790485a8ed9268e6797810e8575f2eb3d8dee7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDII' 'sip-files00028.tif'
cfd2070c6498d1ff5df4f1d5951f9d8f
f113c5cf800e048528fadc06fd11534c942f839b
'2011-12-30T19:22:21-05:00'
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIJ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
acc4fb7d4d452b9ad198017adbb5105b
370898038b90af4566f10a9564944515eb39197a
describe
'8188' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIK' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
e6a8e98bc863a378e3f97f18ad087836
a7a38223c3cf892f3cd438c18631de53e0721082
describe
'448952' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIL' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
0547a4f859764ae88ecc9d149a0dc61b
02b8547537ccc2cb9798108f817bb36539876877
'2011-12-30T19:20:33-05:00'
describe
'98092' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIM' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
934a10bb2ea2739c348a02f03185b477
5d4869ba18500bd71c685bda32b7d48aead14c8c
'2011-12-30T19:19:00-05:00'
describe
'30750' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIN' 'sip-files00029.pro'
941f04ef5f17bb15c360b7031ea32cc9
34fedfa26b0f698d3b71e1a4aa19dc95bd21d90d
'2011-12-30T19:18:47-05:00'
describe
'30281' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIO' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
bc69845f1903c1e50bdd4f86aadae242
ce68aefb3b1e427b3b4a75be4688b67236b45ab4
'2011-12-30T19:17:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIP' 'sip-files00029.tif'
6821fe0511be063b2df1130e7cc94bdc
9a31a1304d5fa9bfa549acf7bfe38e74b5f2b013
'2011-12-30T19:19:19-05:00'
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIQ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
ff7c45953c5eec5dc4dc0f19ebc5e76a
d4e275a6dededf077207891b5be6d4f85b9e4974
'2011-12-30T19:17:54-05:00'
describe
'7143' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIR' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
f16fe1d93b78942627535feabf913da1
712e9621456f2cc8b37aaa81df4c2296b1832618
'2011-12-30T19:20:55-05:00'
describe
'448925' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIS' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
29ff179c13ba9c40ba3c93dfd561959d
8d5401b0c9b07568a479111e3319d971bcd75c47
'2011-12-30T19:22:00-05:00'
describe
'113826' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIT' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
58dd5f5c7edfa84c1fabd71804dac65e
53e2d20f8eaef7bc3ef819efb3b82329d03d5f80
'2011-12-30T19:21:21-05:00'
describe
'37793' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIU' 'sip-files00030.pro'
db398838d91d8369db5c860d053a059e
60210a3a13d969c5d4d4e74942a237c78b53ead3
'2011-12-30T19:17:24-05:00'
describe
'35173' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIV' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
8e1c042620e458b7e520b21243d5bbf0
414ba16caaf910d230b0e6deb133e111a9560004
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIW' 'sip-files00030.tif'
a52327bbfd614c4f42597968aa85bef4
d12287d666b868dd1857fbd13a12ea9cab68a967
'2011-12-30T19:21:22-05:00'
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIX' 'sip-files00030.txt'
79e728618dc42db70bd7dbbd5fc150a4
f5896ecd3b7221ad8b65232969d2c416679b3a12
'2011-12-30T19:24:29-05:00'
describe
'8511' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIY' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
0d41ef82cf129e4f72bc378e898e8d58
99186bdd8d2dce977d7e1f1e7c6f9284f40dc363
'2011-12-30T19:19:34-05:00'
describe
'440407' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDIZ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
9063bdd59439dcf67b1865959cc5ea02
b4ced0eb786416c769cbf79e4e2b346f32ff54e7
describe
'110168' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJA' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
8f1fcffd5fb081eed0e98bd6877163dd
1ca7f1e7ec44fc260b77b79608b13397c75f8fc5
'2011-12-30T19:19:11-05:00'
describe
'37676' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJB' 'sip-files00031.pro'
ed0e6e227b793602762aee5eb51ea355
bdb892f82c1a05e8f7fbf5ff52b3646daecf35ee
'2011-12-30T19:22:38-05:00'
describe
'34504' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJC' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
c7e270e4e6511918a9e9ff0ab35bafa8
c8942f7adf77d89d219affa73d58f36bf00bb8aa
'2011-12-30T19:18:15-05:00'
describe
'3540312' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJD' 'sip-files00031.tif'
9c9b7038f4d631554f499cb131336adf
ed545cd3eade4ade9460a784592e2c9003f342e3
'2011-12-30T19:22:22-05:00'
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJE' 'sip-files00031.txt'
7fdf4757ec0ae998f6ea03edf9221fac
3deb80214279e98b4dedda607fadc25c7834cc57
'2011-12-30T19:21:15-05:00'
describe
'8390' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJF' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
5da4a645bcdec231eb24ebfbf35cc07b
e4cd4e768e425204a30a9852fc9ef48be1568233
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJG' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
e3208420f2064003cdaff14c71d8a414
362a48763c8776c91f4ad38b412bd8821ceb58b5
describe
'101715' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJH' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
0070ba7abe64eb408755181cb5b02608
3919e0880e0cd5830c10789865d3691bc968aac5
'2011-12-30T19:22:37-05:00'
describe
'32984' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJI' 'sip-files00032.pro'
c18ffc92abc5827b95db0a0d8709e1ee
5903081357fb400ecd9e3a3a5aa1a6e71ad8b15e
'2011-12-30T19:21:10-05:00'
describe
'29922' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJJ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
8fe9dcfc57555d480ad07f97bdf7ad51
7c5094aedd0224b79348b6a3379b3ed1fd5b0f80
'2011-12-30T19:20:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJK' 'sip-files00032.tif'
8f0d0e0bfa87eb4d113905a1e1f28a3c
5668e51c463545fdbb339b7b3c75107349d8ad9b
'2011-12-30T19:18:18-05:00'
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJL' 'sip-files00032.txt'
86bd1885143556f0dec5750810cbc8ab
269ffb4dd6cf5c6e23d4ad73f10fa3590398db94
'2011-12-30T19:19:47-05:00'
describe
'7922' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJM' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
f28eef100a8d5c4a58cde7c2f8504fc2
11bdcc7dad627ca796c6651d3ba6e639c32f36e1
describe
'448976' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJN' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
8af1cb6840d7f3cc9cf97bb1444a14c8
9db75ea994a065ddf710a73426c94488b64f9f13
'2011-12-30T19:24:31-05:00'
describe
'113835' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJO' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
f7b8781a41104b10d67208ca8527850d
4d8ace9e41dc8dac51c9197a956689539c374698
'2011-12-30T19:22:19-05:00'
describe
'37351' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJP' 'sip-files00033.pro'
d3ad0500429c8c64b006c089e6c95bf5
9d4a3f7480ba8d0fa38427ec873e722b99eb2e06
'2011-12-30T19:24:04-05:00'
describe
'34760' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJQ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
6fe1115a4417757341627b7f4edb95ca
ca2aa113ebffddfdbd86689277d6fee6aa1a7505
'2011-12-30T19:26:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJR' 'sip-files00033.tif'
9843f4df36f457efaa816c3bb0c9b9f9
8e374ac9d285fe1a61adfa029719e0a732a8ae8b
'2011-12-30T19:24:01-05:00'
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJS' 'sip-files00033.txt'
117ce23f86a76e8cb5f0f40c1be648ff
76ae37cc6ab9f99b5ad8e5853537036703961779
describe
'8616' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJT' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
8273e942964c4febdc80d2751c371f45
87caeff8896e895d902d8b844db6e68287e5e860
describe
'448975' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJU' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
8466bda4df297f46c1ef9a45b0b5366f
1b84d86223b5b9d301d97d8d9966dcd1519874e9
'2011-12-30T19:20:58-05:00'
describe
'114106' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJV' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
1ae7718c443b103780dfa38e45ae5ff3
c3f03cf97b93d5e5679e2a172f124ff21232486d
describe
'38587' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJW' 'sip-files00036.pro'
5ab083008aa7eb0bd5c070293df904c2
0222462daa1c126f22b2ddb841a8388033debebd
'2011-12-30T19:24:09-05:00'
describe
'34304' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJX' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
70b033ef38bb2769e8d6e46d71c9622f
785987f8a0ac6410e5a69d08d07c41e07a0e6ea2
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJY' 'sip-files00036.tif'
575a21f0d1bd42caafa731fbf0a48697
b9196666785cc4a30cadc62c215dd29b2dea168d
describe
'1518' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDJZ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
bd4d3fb80fe61d7f34ccce771e9e51fc
ad719570fe170ed879a38db87edfda3652f4e958
'2011-12-30T19:25:58-05:00'
describe
'8045' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKA' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
59853b341a56d3dce694f7d170b7f117
3fc462001f772dcd66853282bc788b6140ce61c9
'2011-12-30T19:21:31-05:00'
describe
'448798' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKB' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
e61f2ae9d32dd57ea3d9f62a0130bb7c
a96f29fe785dd36bbdda1f82e0351f4cb55aa9a1
describe
'85527' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKC' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
2a2dd84ad96336d677ba443f96482dee
5ea688ec760f417925961e08ecfb8eb9748e9ecf
'2011-12-30T19:23:03-05:00'
describe
'26495' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKD' 'sip-files00037.pro'
79f525ca65c497922135e40dddd2c48e
e382212abc34ebc0a74a4dfe2db1e658547c21f2
'2011-12-30T19:21:50-05:00'
describe
'25166' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKE' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
5e6f2c1bb4eb44bc6bdfd88e63d4ad3f
671e778c51d148f1cdf573077aff18cbf97ca72e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKF' 'sip-files00037.tif'
75eb791ebf14863a494c3039cc2dfb5b
c846206d15f0ae4e7d64f11125c3617fffc80199
'2011-12-30T19:19:22-05:00'
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKG' 'sip-files00037.txt'
2c25f8d26656f267f064536e7ddbfa4f
05228984e30d1b993cfac79863d4df75ebcce916
'2011-12-30T19:17:55-05:00'
describe
'6413' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKH' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
c9e0b996f8b3f434c48d7bf1509f8c2c
90c63f7f443f3e237baf92c3c01d2faf86d9cc92
describe
'448980' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKI' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
c8ffb6c10efc3af21636bc188ffbf9cb
945cb805638668054cd45596bd6339c3a06aac10
'2011-12-30T19:17:41-05:00'
describe
'85877' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKJ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
a33bbfb57da349cd2be912541a20a215
52554fd00634126138a342e4ac4ddb69d3d82bb6
'2011-12-30T19:18:28-05:00'
describe
'26504' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKK' 'sip-files00038.pro'
b91b4f02a618b3312841387534ce2f54
de1573d6e6f04b3ae1adbc2dbf08d38163b5ca64
'2011-12-30T19:17:32-05:00'
describe
'25169' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKL' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
d510685c69d978e4216a0cdf3d50c118
55275c29768df4ca9c02993af48380d57d9d5011
'2011-12-30T19:22:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKM' 'sip-files00038.tif'
74e14f650a0ff0d53066e515bcf00b24
5c61e52e40c4feef7aa31c8e264128acadeda5c2
'2011-12-30T19:19:51-05:00'
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKN' 'sip-files00038.txt'
c574cd4f01ef61f2dee57caf69d19825
8dedb9ef6b24047153549b09738c10d1b3c4c6fd
'2011-12-30T19:22:54-05:00'
describe
'6081' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKO' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
820634ad29872122ac51f66c8ea2e0ad
43e764b95d1d67c08cfbeb373ec4c10ae320656e
'2011-12-30T19:24:45-05:00'
describe
'448957' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKP' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
ee8191082571c3bc03c6d5fcd5a07db9
3c4e4ddc5b6e6d31d3c972e59fa6053ade703c7e
'2011-12-30T19:22:42-05:00'
describe
'106638' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKQ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
622603acdfb4c446d3c303a33ff0b4f3
ed0e7245f1fb61cb9ffef9eedd3137e438e9a6d9
'2011-12-30T19:22:56-05:00'
describe
'35187' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKR' 'sip-files00039.pro'
6c68f9b02a24b769e5fb086bf0337a50
da3e7ced829715377e7b7edfe6a82f5bda0b9fc9
'2011-12-30T19:21:26-05:00'
describe
'32720' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKS' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
9a0d84441487792212ad26129b8b6304
7f3c443645ba7906baf5ad4bf6c775fd2ba8611e
'2011-12-30T19:22:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKT' 'sip-files00039.tif'
10a798184e581cad64d612d322057105
59821113f34fc41e318a073bf64f3a422f2c7251
'2011-12-30T19:18:37-05:00'
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKU' 'sip-files00039.txt'
bf1ef4d31f330e3dbcc82e2d5f8c8c09
275ea0258e5b286301004af7afba10e88ba34698
describe
'8224' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKV' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
1cc76d406529e01382dde408a7bd4b3a
adf7b48798bea5d42b8f60e3a21742daa082a616
describe
'448942' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKW' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
37afa20bba0b1a3cfe51e454d9ddc7c1
9d37130590d490a9a896f054730c03744f740e4a
'2011-12-30T19:22:18-05:00'
describe
'108495' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKX' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
3a37cf6047be5f3bb7396826db76fd94
b045213edd756b9ef82a5b76299a8a2ab051f3ed
'2011-12-30T19:26:12-05:00'
describe
'36312' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKY' 'sip-files00040.pro'
e1ae9f71f46096410146b47fbfc8783f
d4c73bb87b7cc54e0520cf67cab7c06e239d472b
describe
'32772' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDKZ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
36e92d3ef8623540e3f3b47c75689d26
27a5b1b30ad3b32a27191de1f51e27d9540565be
'2011-12-30T19:23:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLA' 'sip-files00040.tif'
89a58425fec7327768cb03c3e7a2f899
5819dfe4f879c0d19df9e068fca107840203551a
'2011-12-30T19:21:06-05:00'
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLB' 'sip-files00040.txt'
a70fc6d5b7aaad37e0252b73c9b1506d
809c763db0b9899d7fec34cbdf825b7547c8b140
'2011-12-30T19:21:07-05:00'
describe
'7967' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLC' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
c176694d12aac2d8c4fa76de708723c1
64e56002d241fcb4041115ebbcba83bf4c58c272
'2011-12-30T19:20:12-05:00'
describe
'448923' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLD' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
c45cc343972a0b642296ca26223c7c26
18f4cc8533ab1fef7325deaa4ed6afeae07440b9
'2011-12-30T19:18:48-05:00'
describe
'109568' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLE' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
d0966bc3802fd3510b82c900849441b4
03902e1eb29b159dc61c9b018a66188a767584eb
'2011-12-30T19:17:51-05:00'
describe
'37500' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLF' 'sip-files00041.pro'
75d9d75825717bc2ab37b4efd8431ea4
442222bb3357e9e6aa2fe7734aa81fee43b26658
describe
'33391' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLG' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
00e2e205fcfac5aecd97572a0329f2ab
fec5168f675431e2cf432d74ca26bd8e1efbc320
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLH' 'sip-files00041.tif'
36d5d0a827cd9c0c468c637622116a24
2c2076a3c4856d81444193e4affa12a08ae03550
'2011-12-30T19:17:26-05:00'
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLI' 'sip-files00041.txt'
ea47c7ecb32c954d7fec3f40f6b6d766
8cf670d2edddc289664e2ff8b3860955282fd90b
describe
'8093' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLJ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
598b2a2cc5362dc2452a30820f74c67d
a4438a7b78e8321010fd930a00dcd9bf1bbccad8
describe
'448969' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLK' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
cb55daad835c499de28dd7446b26aa9f
fd19adfb9636d74bc3334156000217e246547913
'2011-12-30T19:19:16-05:00'
describe
'112599' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLL' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
8c2c5f9097a056384c95b8d228a46888
f81a97508fc8af13e97e36789140ec8ac52f7ba5
'2011-12-30T19:19:27-05:00'
describe
'37601' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLM' 'sip-files00042.pro'
fd896d67959ee1761a0430d4e47f2acd
d22c366a219346966d151f43bd3936adf2ca4713
'2011-12-30T19:17:29-05:00'
describe
'35388' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLN' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
a1f0a899c52260a930ce0de7ca640a4a
d2689b11d3aba0c368d2dc949fb1f2a6d01c3f67
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLO' 'sip-files00042.tif'
81c5c8cd551d572d3e14a9cadea6e0b4
7fdd06c75cfa47272f66df369cfd7b44bbe8b6ce
'2011-12-30T19:26:06-05:00'
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLP' 'sip-files00042.txt'
1df55a34694d85ec4ea01086d716bf91
feb506634958448d96ccd10323b3547cbd9282b1
'2011-12-30T19:18:36-05:00'
describe
'8312' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLQ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
271ade2fe1bf9c0397683763bec36a55
9fda74db520ad19de15e46048c1584cf09e3e174
describe
'448971' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLR' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
3d77d651042b7cb7a2adfb062f572bce
801cba519552474d6305471c1045128af6de8a7a
describe
'108694' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLS' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
19938bb1aa208ff187df197cfa69bc21
5a92758878c3488f4583f7ce33cdaf3197b65bea
'2011-12-30T19:18:20-05:00'
describe
'35486' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLT' 'sip-files00043.pro'
e185c176c097aa3d4b0709ac1c2c69d8
5df425d31e5092b98289b37d2e0d53fee3af26c6
'2011-12-30T19:26:23-05:00'
describe
'32609' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLU' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
688b5d0a6a7f68e4b111080af78bdcc8
1bac53a015dc5ad0de2ae27f02ce61e1d1b06463
'2011-12-30T19:17:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLV' 'sip-files00043.tif'
739d93011b13523e000efa76c7fa2e67
de1e4611e431d38567f6e684a32106fc6944ede1
'2011-12-30T19:17:50-05:00'
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLW' 'sip-files00043.txt'
9c22984f1bab5daa55658239b72808f3
8cb91f73ed3e75b355e6437b87163876a4c36b12
'2011-12-30T19:22:30-05:00'
describe
'8114' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLX' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
2b20639329c259372c2af2b04a8b8668
7086b14f6d104055082c3dee1d303e31ed862a80
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLY' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
63f5b5345f87c05afdb6b7a956166e7b
884714014179e6cfcfa107d122c66360b6b1795c
'2011-12-30T19:25:01-05:00'
describe
'107704' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDLZ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
2afc1324b44d61f32b98bb99fdaa3b13
eae30ecbe1db5e6bdb6256fca4ff33ee502fd936
'2011-12-30T19:17:20-05:00'
describe
'35886' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMA' 'sip-files00044.pro'
52d9d78fd1e95eb1cbbf8e7fc1b63146
cb059625ac8e9905584bce7a25e7597ef37361a3
'2011-12-30T19:18:22-05:00'
describe
'31914' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMB' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
13c7b01c94641371ccb93794474e8013
e42ae7c6c2c729ad265b1ea46ae17002dfb74d2d
'2011-12-30T19:18:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMC' 'sip-files00044.tif'
ab0bc29d1ca950e71eedc873f1497159
787baa5bd57d681f808b6df5fe1c1b1fb31f2b00
'2011-12-30T19:23:28-05:00'
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMD' 'sip-files00044.txt'
e0477f242ecc60bbfc175ed11211193b
af69d62b1fb0be1665c025daee169acd88aca3fa
'2011-12-30T19:24:23-05:00'
describe
'8041' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDME' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
d2cf793fcc977ac02b8aef57c80392a2
37c7973cb2d2ee742dfa739e45e0db8b33003433
describe
'451725' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMF' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
0560d81edf691bed1010dc66d1581f8a
42f9bfcc4cb881ced056a67b043b09e810d98ad4
'2011-12-30T19:25:31-05:00'
describe
'62251' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMG' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
5eee90d93c5afedbd58daa7b0475b970
83bd8886f72e5d2d0353fd38e45022068e6a93af
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMH' 'sip-files00046.pro'
c0099871f70c22152cae6ad17f68d68e
4f1cf3438868cf0b1a88ac21fcea85af116dc044
describe
'15339' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMI' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
14db959643f9f50fcce8b8d2e2a16af1
9df62900dab08afaf4d76c33165eb95591b6611c
'2011-12-30T19:20:11-05:00'
describe
'3630872' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMJ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
a556b7d4e703bd20afd3c01f0ed46d9f
48876c1e43a35582b948f3151e285d159f1bd885
describe
'114' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMK' 'sip-files00046.txt'
e3052d6e1f83689d81658f0ff6c23802
9dfeb4fc77ed42dcf64938a03af2130a0cfb1000
describe
'4249' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDML' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
bb40a65226b52d9adb8109cd01a49cdd
70aea298528085579907cbcab0b5eab884c3f95e
'2011-12-30T19:19:42-05:00'
describe
'448955' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMM' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
bcf761860e909c44a7a9bf5cd8bda6a0
70cf1949b864b1a1ff7e04ef8ffbdace018283d5
'2011-12-30T19:18:24-05:00'
describe
'110320' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMN' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
8f95df27a964bee41dac427ce689a671
cb3076454d3b94a4ff71b57ac27a2ee8337cbb89
'2011-12-30T19:25:42-05:00'
describe
'36427' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMO' 'sip-files00047.pro'
daf80cdfa238d36505eea81a4ad428ec
9c6835a36ab579e468b9695c4c48f9f8bc2a8a47
'2011-12-30T19:20:43-05:00'
describe
'33108' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMP' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
1a6c5c5694ec03142fb6f3c207035929
3e1850ca374e10077a39025c6118aa85a32ec2d1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMQ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
5cbb3b61b169475b6d9eb72d462e71d0
c47df5c784eca410d70a8ddf6da15f5cd40df99c
'2011-12-30T19:20:10-05:00'
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMR' 'sip-files00047.txt'
0038271ebab06e788729b90ab366ed88
9fadd6d6819f359500542db7ff98d37e97b2a3f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMS' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
8e381e21f7e5806ef28a3e436f16c5e0
b77e7e79906fe883d1ce4d7682912b6fa7f87652
'2011-12-30T19:24:18-05:00'
describe
'448857' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMT' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
38dd4bcbfa5dc904d1bf528d535b6edf
880ed765e81b0880ec9c3be98659330436f59e34
describe
'111368' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMU' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
68f8924916d53cc02e6da7b1954b1ecb
90662dac96876144bba7bba4f414c83595824b4f
describe
'35791' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMV' 'sip-files00048.pro'
eb1327b7e83d0fcb186dbb3a1f96f030
d0631c9660d3cb6724e36ec4b6a8c0f1a0e303c1
'2011-12-30T19:23:38-05:00'
describe
'33123' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMW' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
eecabccb228c1fd666a84f92e8958b93
78e958f8152163394d65f89de34e4fb0946f9f01
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMX' 'sip-files00048.tif'
e16d558e9c23cc0ff7fa60edfc3f6033
21add700c52e472519ef8dc22c811e2b4390710d
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMY' 'sip-files00048.txt'
9128b311aa87e9d8a8c7741e929c3336
6c2dce8b697c2914c7771b3cb751fc01c1cf02e9
describe
'8044' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDMZ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
6a0997121554f5708a774ffb9edc3eb1
f24ecad28163e6d43d9c55998080e7a11d89cb57
'2011-12-30T19:19:39-05:00'
describe
'448979' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNA' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
ae1d945d41c68f7bf99abf390c99400b
22484752c935da3b9c3c824c75605d2d67f64a7f
'2011-12-30T19:20:16-05:00'
describe
'111789' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNB' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
a724489b35961dc2254be85fd129a64e
e790e0d4d5d7e3b456eb93da11f4a2ff0c59563d
describe
'36221' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNC' 'sip-files00049.pro'
c3f61608c06ebfe30635ca1f57727b3d
f47a3694edadb547793776c69767cde369860598
describe
'34010' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDND' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
a42911ae6aebdae50d64b6a0d4e42f02
970059bffcb7addbd271fc8c67113f237a330252
'2011-12-30T19:18:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNE' 'sip-files00049.tif'
0b605d334998943194a6d89d53015c88
baa508f07171888416e10edbe39535ac4f84e99f
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNF' 'sip-files00049.txt'
e9693502427578bab529392a3fa1e97d
9a7e903fa8efc009928d397d6aee94560172c3db
'2011-12-30T19:20:30-05:00'
describe
'8108' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNG' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
11bde82cfe8f3672d37c5d11cf921220
632e30e4f1125441c038cb7f91158ac8ef455a6f
'2011-12-30T19:23:07-05:00'
describe
'448946' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNH' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
44c9b6c46f607d268a265ff504364144
12ca4c95e42bf75398e8cb76b781d8d615354a87
'2011-12-30T19:23:31-05:00'
describe
'108911' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNI' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
84cd53e5075d64d5d5edd03d69e2b8af
87e8f5453b7648b2f3404807a93660582edf026c
'2011-12-30T19:22:08-05:00'
describe
'36518' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNJ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
05bf38ec60d045674150df2ff257bea0
2af972bf6204ecfafd29611b96d45004e8e22fd7
'2011-12-30T19:24:51-05:00'
describe
'33428' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNK' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
a12e54b55bac89c1fb55427022eddf45
3c13295db8d34fd54c487e06a232c7d8f3962675
'2011-12-30T19:22:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNL' 'sip-files00050.tif'
94e787f33b3fc088e88e547575d91bab
94d37ab1dfadbbb3e8543b40be4040e9496cf983
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNM' 'sip-files00050.txt'
d47370eb08a48f6960dc6ffadd43fc50
605fab5f9a268e2aa3e191429c9f9e388d672c29
'2011-12-30T19:24:17-05:00'
describe
'8125' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNN' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
3e48fd6c9b64b480051744d3c589f31f
512da3112957f0957fb830efd186aeae501e5e31
describe
'448938' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNO' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
c5da9219bc17587978afb33a3e60fc1d
83ec6bd07ba1468810a52efd89f67167a3a8689e
describe
'102710' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNP' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
b294f735aa0e1390de329586d132a67d
8c4691d3f53fc1cdc91c2ba6fb13d5bf21ee6339
'2011-12-30T19:21:20-05:00'
describe
'34696' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNQ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
5835f00e469c74619e1aa08f0631b70e
82336966c5e8240660ca492599f56716279f51ff
describe
'30874' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNR' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
758060e482954e5575c04c9bb973eef0
6c307ec719af53699b1c86b563c1452d7ccb05ab
'2011-12-30T19:19:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNS' 'sip-files00051.tif'
a1ffa17507c02bce9f85eced1af80b14
2052828947cc9b7228f08a7e4e4924552a9d944a
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNT' 'sip-files00051.txt'
e75b70053b218633bb29e748d91cc641
03dea4e6373753c58896f044e36d4a0b29d55f9b
'2011-12-30T19:24:15-05:00'
describe
'7548' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNU' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
0da6bd6c81ee067101a74e31fd910e72
fc8f20a09f888a07c4762a038ae748ef4493e60c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNV' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
a0a80153cdeb48b5d9e3c97bc32d99ef
13f87f623349e7a5d70437710478313719aa6496
describe
'96255' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNW' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
1fc36a20d5e39cbcef12c7634ae4f5f8
170b2f061e7e23c040a3ca74df8bb41636251806
'2011-12-30T19:18:02-05:00'
describe
'29921' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNX' 'sip-files00052.pro'
1056e59674bde5715ab60424a79ce4b1
446de34ac5759805979d6da8504dd91ce88bb892
'2011-12-30T19:26:07-05:00'
describe
'28397' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNY' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
cf594f4dd81a75022f6cc5cece409b76
20f4eb81f52aaecb590b0d204e5b05aa788f6a73
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDNZ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
2f6ca657e133032ab6565a05a8478f7b
e2d631d1fc6220c7996f18248d09da186c13be8c
'2011-12-30T19:18:43-05:00'
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOA' 'sip-files00052.txt'
a4285ade718402f5391cb141e56439bf
8da04175fbb94117e511273a0af99708fa62f4d6
'2011-12-30T19:20:48-05:00'
describe
'7455' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOB' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
20635139cd60fa68b3acf018a5b3676e
339dbbbf97ab550268630a43e65d80a3839b7da0
'2011-12-30T19:23:46-05:00'
describe
'448956' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOC' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
b77f20ce9061e8149e7c5c11079beff4
574afac4955d0cb07c13b0ee85bef39aaa6bc7b7
describe
'99110' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOD' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
9496f0a16eefe58fe4b9ac03e0fe5837
8ada4f986f38e650bfdb146f9844a83c2f0916c0
describe
'31312' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOE' 'sip-files00053.pro'
c88bca308e4371758655df1ebb87b052
5b0119dc19c4bc8d71bacb1cc2277b8962dd9874
'2011-12-30T19:18:45-05:00'
describe
'29806' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOF' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
5383b6126c3c94d7b207a8e321e8ecf2
575ce5281e93d0475ae14ad164e5ce812fe2251d
'2011-12-30T19:22:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOG' 'sip-files00053.tif'
280c5eb2e2f5e1688bb77016a0f5025e
bfc594050923d46eceaf86bf45e3475ba5a60abe
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOH' 'sip-files00053.txt'
3edae4a3331f0c72d156c5bd1cb493b0
5cba98a6ae0538db6f7c35bc50cdff8e2597793b
'2011-12-30T19:23:58-05:00'
describe
'7018' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOI' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
917e5b3348620e2d0e7dc654aaa9a4f0
8acab13bab7867b00d0e8272f7e914360fca882a
describe
'448926' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOJ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
e9e6c7978ec02f0e4302af4500bed5e2
401687d78f1bb07824095176b587eb170cd559c4
'2011-12-30T19:23:26-05:00'
describe
'106994' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOK' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
f1ebcb720d5346fdb6c0c34ad29eaf82
a6c8911402ab7df955a263b10f6cbb4ecb3023c9
'2011-12-30T19:23:12-05:00'
describe
'35237' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOL' 'sip-files00054.pro'
ef4f72bca5d2afb2314eee3d8ece7e5b
e5935351c0ee9bdb72bf1136d65ef6a3f3b11c80
'2011-12-30T19:18:00-05:00'
describe
'32193' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOM' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
34404dd5a0e668c70f1770d411aa9ce5
daabae9d95fd7fe777115ebe7b8b7421aa1f3c99
'2011-12-30T19:21:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDON' 'sip-files00054.tif'
c65697b61fef5100f1673e2778c528d2
da381dd11dca836e9368af88e86b8804a9de568b
'2011-12-30T19:21:57-05:00'
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOO' 'sip-files00054.txt'
e78484d313fd7f1171dbd8ebfa0c8b8e
63f088eab56eaa058397048ed4812f19e4cf93ec
describe
'8046' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOP' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
276b4eb92ee448adcccf0dbf3a6760ae
c22adb17de2690cb7009644ea72170bcec60c753
'2011-12-30T19:19:29-05:00'
describe
'448939' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOQ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
5526a419eea0f6aa5dea8743ffd88b3c
acc868a582e9c751ad376d69ef50d113377643a1
'2011-12-30T19:21:46-05:00'
describe
'108463' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOR' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
e04fde65b1e2bf2a8ee96ef4659a6005
1a03bad3da4c4295f56de7722d6cdf580decead6
'2011-12-30T19:20:09-05:00'
describe
'36892' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOS' 'sip-files00055.pro'
ad8dcffb4785fe504c8691d90c1e7b2f
30eb701f459d4bb8ccba87b7efcc8ce9acfd1ac3
'2011-12-30T19:17:08-05:00'
describe
'33264' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOT' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
bb0a1b5516d6de4ace29ed1322fd610c
361654d364d6355fc3adcc01dc192e494d657394
'2011-12-30T19:19:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOU' 'sip-files00055.tif'
9d32a21ba65f155b4fe9d07779f75993
d60db2456714ab86013c212c394a54e6eb9c5d00
'2011-12-30T19:19:52-05:00'
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOV' 'sip-files00055.txt'
e5bf61cb91cfa2d9f52a6b3e1265e26b
81e2b61eb22f2cabce9496a415ddc7626e327093
'2011-12-30T19:18:41-05:00'
describe
'8184' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOW' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
32a6fea0a0cb7073f7483b44ded84898
a29f38320fd82deaf4c72052df9d81710323c61d
'2011-12-30T19:20:04-05:00'
describe
'448958' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOX' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
cf19933fa8509981fe01adf593e4deeb
2b310c128ed2b397a10e4546835c92f6926db007
describe
'113928' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOY' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
7d41c5a99a4087aaddedea4b8fec170e
5834800d378d946524047980529e6c724d048bfb
describe
'37143' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDOZ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
225cc6036265883cc16ebc1f9819ce36
e981a211ae6464ad366f8acde6a07b3aa7e8fc5a
'2011-12-30T19:19:33-05:00'
describe
'34729' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPA' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
a5a5e7d0eaa331cca41b2eee3f633c46
1c2f058527b6f49948ba3db26495a60acb550cac
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPB' 'sip-files00056.tif'
4ff7c58c3d3a6cabec1ac68ae29c0939
810ffe63bdfd395c5391a6903fd0121567de57ee
'2011-12-30T19:22:05-05:00'
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPC' 'sip-files00056.txt'
b598c270abe508fc557109239c4dd533
389f40b83e54f7ed6ba9361ac8ac5afcd5df7876
describe
'8332' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPD' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
bdcfb263b904d88cf53c58b4d9ba5d5c
08c316b3728dbfe32d32e9aa32b3aad9df388511
describe
'448890' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPE' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
e6709b9453efde2d15c683b10667fbde
a3799bdf05c44cdb38fe9bef17cb089d95d7fe99
'2011-12-30T19:18:14-05:00'
describe
'107029' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPF' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
2bed7be9611837be5d2088798cc32b84
8947d4db7d5fb4b002c5552aac958b28f7c4b079
describe
'35019' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPG' 'sip-files00057.pro'
39de60564bcfc9402cae0180993d03d3
e88c4b721dde27f6d4985cdcf156c77ad919f993
describe
'32462' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPH' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
12466e19f337efd59bfff4ce5b80dbd2
5c3076351e24baf687597ada38dc994a8df03f13
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPI' 'sip-files00057.tif'
0349e77f9baf3158afefb18c7567b577
32ebdc8059fad661b48126a576af420a7921c716
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPJ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
166e6bb8b0b1bef7cbcde14b4cccaca6
396632c9e8f2f7ede4ad6f2b0d68fd6f65762217
'2011-12-30T19:25:17-05:00'
describe
'7975' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPK' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
1d6f84040b7f4c25538d1550c5413eac
686838044f12702cc2e25102a038bdb1d0093473
'2011-12-30T19:23:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPL' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
1104ac641e2ac6f2124c31aa1854cd41
602b90987082b7e316e6c17184d6bc6a7dcedc4b
describe
'104073' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPM' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
718185dcac6dbbb61ecf4f869894b408
7d21d1deb2e70d82d58db519089698ba40adfb56
'2011-12-30T19:18:33-05:00'
describe
'35065' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPN' 'sip-files00058.pro'
ed80ead15e64245218937d3426785236
506cd1f14b47be4c6c1ab7111092ead66554b7b7
'2011-12-30T19:20:52-05:00'
describe
'31888' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPO' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
abbcda60787a4754619db4ceb79f5838
f526999c79b73ab625e9c53b25ca5bb4faedbb3c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPP' 'sip-files00058.tif'
fe5834f43862d64de491a4d76d9334a2
4e654cc6b0937809ea3476736eefefe1cc63c5af
'2011-12-30T19:18:55-05:00'
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPQ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
f0dac661388f7de066112621b8017503
6584ae5dd002bbdac44e5c3a038290ee40b328ee
'2011-12-30T19:24:34-05:00'
describe
'7999' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPR' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
932c82c27d4441b41a577b0fe1f9e913
a69cfb7a9eed83989c8ef765dc7a90a268cd675d
'2011-12-30T19:22:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPS' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
01bce02290a82cf3ade66035b1436332
a1ca9a5f5e39895f11d91add7b7a20e181dc6a9d
'2011-12-30T19:22:02-05:00'
describe
'101738' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPT' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
171c410837d3efe67287567c6ba142bd
803273d46c945e72a90c8b150976c0f3b078a255
describe
'34318' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPU' 'sip-files00059.pro'
a622e3798a0fdc7386abd1318bb61855
d4f9887fe6262a0ae67cf28082c6d9fed152ddc9
describe
'30820' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPV' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
c3903a3aed3e77b22a6575fe75da3037
4cb7be9fd5636a70c085645725f986b0c03d9985
'2011-12-30T19:17:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPW' 'sip-files00059.tif'
6f1d4bbd05542a35c7947e6bfadc731c
a48af066da64d05f02776163df12954a22f0e430
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPX' 'sip-files00059.txt'
9458a0fc99962d4ea4f6abcde1014dc8
02da4d18701db7791b383d1d55dcbdbcd34bcddb
'2011-12-30T19:19:04-05:00'
describe
'7568' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPY' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
280752a2193a18401ec59e49da93bfa8
edf70f79dd70fcc942e9f719a5bc7d32ee2fd4a2
'2011-12-30T19:20:46-05:00'
describe
'448767' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDPZ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
cb959b3db18e85c4bd6cb5c3a72cbba9
fd1a98ae1af124d7c34964d9aeaeb1c0ac318e75
describe
'49222' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQA' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
2a1b42ed0e36062c7626d6f82c882306
79d75ff6c381a32056f2f4508f6a650e54558d7a
'2011-12-30T19:23:04-05:00'
describe
'10148' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQB' 'sip-files00060.pro'
41e96191d54a9b928bbeccbdc934b367
c47405534b4e7391a2d9c1530b7840cc27365b85
'2011-12-30T19:21:29-05:00'
describe
'13068' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQC' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
6f51663a9a83a5f6a4b8c1f08fa78c31
0b6644156cb3d9c0c0e12c7508897eac0ca9e35e
'2011-12-30T19:21:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQD' 'sip-files00060.tif'
8f01e4cbf508bcca27b83ae7c3c3ce49
65d4d8a77c75ca2ee3cd973dcac5051b2fa68660
describe
'411' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQE' 'sip-files00060.txt'
45305f39c15494e30f59835c061b7440
cf424ec0436aa63dc647feb59e5bb27c4f07423a
describe
'3368' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQF' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
5c91bb8321457f140e08c62a1099c858
97b5abfdf1dbb1bd21310bbcff128915d92cfae4
describe
'448894' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQG' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
c179cef0b51eac34ddc052cdb23f6e54
481a66b8a3bad5150c475a23fa4bff2137ad0322
'2011-12-30T19:24:16-05:00'
describe
'94680' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQH' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
370312c7e1fe3e81d6c2435513539534
85747a3fe0a21dcb704e38fe1ca1791de7d55fcc
'2011-12-30T19:25:52-05:00'
describe
'30047' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQI' 'sip-files00061.pro'
aea881ee8d9c458a86a4140d1e5c671f
eaa9c400434dfbc5de69fa22e774a2accba5bd4d
'2011-12-30T19:18:49-05:00'
describe
'28474' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQJ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
5f9f5fa33ebfafc4140be6cd3165798d
95f1c57e2831267aee95416512743aa45fe3b433
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQK' 'sip-files00061.tif'
972045f1593571b3a173dcabf009ca55
d5d7109ff454818d0fcd9c0f5a598a639f8f06f1
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQL' 'sip-files00061.txt'
8f625cb819c9a9cb50b3c5affb07ce1c
2b26f0a73cb5004f07b3e204e40fb77247aac6ec
describe
'6907' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQM' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
5b584633c4bf269b493163630617bcb5
0ca2433858fa1b579027f841293f710984125bc0
describe
'448792' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQN' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
9ddadca60463496f27baad5f6675bbf8
f343a58d1e2572a096b7b894b3a56407c5beda0d
'2011-12-30T19:25:55-05:00'
describe
'110589' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQO' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
b2b1ae1f83c6eef29fff0b26b9852d80
ad20e81e12b3160dea82b2eed26f1b716f1d1ce2
describe
'35809' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQP' 'sip-files00062.pro'
a71cb5efadde760e3d609adfb09f889d
cfd1ca8eee0a53d7bbbfc92862367d77c2c87b44
describe
'33002' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQQ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
7f563f24b2995ad2b1b2ecdc8e2c1386
c873c64f50a423eac797cede78f2ed5aad4389da
'2011-12-30T19:17:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQR' 'sip-files00062.tif'
fbe1167086d9dc007b8602048cb97c9f
41146e29a009817d2f5437800761a025490e28a9
'2011-12-30T19:17:44-05:00'
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQS' 'sip-files00062.txt'
dc734ce406cee81edbd1dd555a45b839
13f8b438e94adf50c145c32c26f7a3055ae7d95c
'2011-12-30T19:24:02-05:00'
describe
'8152' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQT' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
8a630d78336a480872037a177de0028f
b886545f46480e343aa18d4d9918ee786b552755
'2011-12-30T19:20:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQU' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
a59ff181d2118bad3796a168e625c283
c31479091be1dacf5f4e260a4458b0adcd8d4f5a
describe
'103239' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQV' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
7c11bc0b6226c3191fc7da13a97d454a
15d1af76b4060d5b3647c429019b39396b5f03f2
describe
'33441' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQW' 'sip-files00063.pro'
ecebd77fe580a3038d455d4cb8dadff2
6b52cff46401c68fa87394a6d8ac09cfc525a441
'2011-12-30T19:21:13-05:00'
describe
'30181' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQX' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
d4f6e8e38ef0709a258a7c4ce40e27f9
dfc8a78da32b37c27155680b392a1132f3cb530f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQY' 'sip-files00063.tif'
7b143866243bc91bdc2a50c797bdc63a
6211b37ea14ea44d9da750e9716e6c41abade10a
'2011-12-30T19:18:46-05:00'
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDQZ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
18266be4683b0a0e35c4c9d8324de4d1
2eef7c3caacaeebb0ac402576afb7f167abfb2ed
'2011-12-30T19:24:10-05:00'
describe
'7607' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRA' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
84e4d9bd78e5abae5c23e22d213705a3
fc27270fe1668a3e21eb8d8458cabbc849aa3d86
describe
'448963' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRB' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
a5ecf46e897dbfd3533a06128ddf4333
d6b671f0c60e74474401aa75b403de5c6040d7d5
'2011-12-30T19:17:06-05:00'
describe
'106082' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRC' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
e88ffc3979318b12f1a0e1519e9f7919
aa8b52830cda79fb5d799958807fd0b2a13a6ade
describe
'34687' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRD' 'sip-files00064.pro'
ee76ea4aec7670ecb9386713cf590a65
bdbe2032ad47fd05cdf0e44a4ffd369ea6f6ff60
describe
'32798' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRE' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
b4037f9156857bb856892e1d1cc95a85
608fa913ccbc79f781ba446765cfa9fc157a6f35
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRF' 'sip-files00064.tif'
fc2aeff13fab48ed3c5865d630c77f26
f6060716ae12891f8622dd8dbc45b9eef9638721
'2011-12-30T19:20:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRG' 'sip-files00064.txt'
55cb62d72c59d8622f02083e9e6c351f
9a6510f66692cb251e8d96da8c5dc32af93a7e83
'2011-12-30T19:25:43-05:00'
describe
'8263' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRH' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
15fc763aa1433eada507d9bac191495f
9f54a14714706eb79b3e4c414f002c8db5607f37
'2011-12-30T19:18:40-05:00'
describe
'450375' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRI' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
7e77b918910ea64eaee2fa43a0b31b23
840b01b11d9bb28fa09205bea8f6917ba30ece2d
describe
'49065' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRJ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
b3d4bf159993101e3879d42248e42182
7a6b420ce60cb0a0a10495cd2467378b7e008e3f
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRK' 'sip-files00065.pro'
42f4ab941988fad29c3dc55d9381bdab
ec1d3d3f84f48fdcea97e523115b476ca96d870a
'2011-12-30T19:21:11-05:00'
describe
'12266' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRL' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
4e869a5d75ad46b0f1cdeb6ff7914e19
d46bd026bdc7d182257b59f13e689d5533797ed9
'2011-12-30T19:23:54-05:00'
describe
'3621480' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRM' 'sip-files00065.tif'
45fedad98e437ec352d45381229c3319
1a57dadbd064f8da10f277864976ea42abff0b5e
describe
'110' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRN' 'sip-files00065.txt'
120f9e50b928ce6cb1515c5d4213eee1
3aba96ea81bab1e470b157e61d36d8dcffa4a86a
describe
'3608' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRO' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
41d7a68a9b808fab3da5f107f7a00c5e
aeeab8c84c078dbe823dfa377228e586aaca25ae
'2011-12-30T19:24:00-05:00'
describe
'448965' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRP' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
bf12d21c7e99818c93b33f62cf8f24dc
3f101c6ba5dc91048275d42020c534902c32a026
describe
'106156' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRQ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
c0dd5991e22f524003f1a60d975c790a
54fd55a051db2f3698f4607948079653bc5484e0
describe
'34132' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRR' 'sip-files00067.pro'
f21346e8f0b70670caed54aabf0cd404
e0c96d9cfaf132851da9c610cfaeacf823406097
'2011-12-30T19:25:53-05:00'
describe
'31784' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRS' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
d1cf60ad0cdb5a836b598e7fa9cc8208
249bbb4fbe8d2b58d9596f2250de76b6acb011c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRT' 'sip-files00067.tif'
fed798498eb3286b84db872a3fbd2c32
8cefa5d963772fbbce04a8b65c9151ebcc727cef
'2011-12-30T19:24:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRU' 'sip-files00067.txt'
43c48b8e30bc078db6562fc266fbed6d
1b485aad5df49486a14111251488f110f9de0726
'2011-12-30T19:19:49-05:00'
describe
'7992' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRV' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
9ce80a30e23b561045cf30e4dc22873e
6106fa502bdfaa39a98ce910860a1b351a2c67ae
'2011-12-30T19:23:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRW' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
43edbf3de4132231b258a328b132057a
b97367893bbe8c3b5bcf640073ea97531b27f866
describe
'105938' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRX' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
4a4f37b445f22aafbdd30b9959a2b106
6fae06bcdf05df71abf2d9a3ebc0d1494e6db8e7
describe
'34242' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRY' 'sip-files00068.pro'
7b514dc6e96f65993d16fbcaca6ec9bf
1042aafe04c254db406ead569002861c2095ea1a
describe
'32000' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDRZ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
4c9a4cae72d3bbbbad92c8decc65c237
4613145d2323d862d026141ec5003f2339cad4b5
'2011-12-30T19:20:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSA' 'sip-files00068.tif'
8d043e21a69de84102652255d359bda9
5623aae5db8da8560978862838b29f1a29c004bf
'2011-12-30T19:23:11-05:00'
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSB' 'sip-files00068.txt'
d58c1342a37153ee35657a68b095bead
ffae3d3d482f06a0d2063c305840d41b82abc065
'2011-12-30T19:19:46-05:00'
describe
'7683' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSC' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
6209c5499abd0065641389d9b07de5cf
11fe58e6850ca515eb59e44a54f28e3466d5fbb7
'2011-12-30T19:18:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSD' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
4da82b572c22825798ba02cafd2dc8e6
abd0b92e504dd01c775916dffaa5a62fe3f26bfc
'2011-12-30T19:21:14-05:00'
describe
'72010' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSE' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
749738595550792216863a5ca1b3498a
19a94435c39637090fb90cd5232b925faa5c1f33
describe
'19440' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSF' 'sip-files00069.pro'
1a5a33c6331446b90a05336461dae32b
d7fdc101ac5c4b61a04b5876ade36947d6f71ed0
'2011-12-30T19:18:05-05:00'
describe
'20172' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSG' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
c47d25fae48831dd27ab7602886c3374
be3b90873495cbc1bff7728dd6390090cbc02963
'2011-12-30T19:20:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSH' 'sip-files00069.tif'
024e5e80aa11b37f22ca12665cb8dc19
cd8a48c29c69f073d4f6323fd6ef2257c6d9e804
'2011-12-30T19:24:08-05:00'
describe
'781' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSI' 'sip-files00069.txt'
97bea3bb7ca4121039a142b738a01d16
ea1a9303ed308c10d14f0df4ca5ae4e8aeced71d
'2011-12-30T19:21:05-05:00'
describe
'5127' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSJ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
db5dac7d9baad90d5fe29e61fb58b817
75c78e647656239e7f061c8d96fd625ad7abe8d6
'2011-12-30T19:25:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSK' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
101bdb42a00f759419199f9b05b008ca
3c69c4137d5ec91c45f1315f49b880168ced4f3a
'2011-12-30T19:21:47-05:00'
describe
'95757' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSL' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
4c26ff0d177495161046f5b07c3cdac2
f12f0f6ab5d650423ad05f737dd50a49f8322d8f
'2011-12-30T19:20:25-05:00'
describe
'30781' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSM' 'sip-files00070.pro'
212c58b7420a2ac0fcecd85a05d45e47
6eadd01c91d36be2d263e1390ccc270d1e849b85
describe
'28722' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSN' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
568aa48b980b0c49328920eb101a29f0
7ef75576214c598e9e658e983ab21195e0f1adc4
describe
'3608704' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSO' 'sip-files00070.tif'
988d1b847028c80647fae58874bf89de
cebabc3dc8b4a776092a8b506779afb373da8d74
'2011-12-30T19:20:22-05:00'
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSP' 'sip-files00070.txt'
f5c3440861cb0b70d1b7fbef9790843b
b5447cfae97f1f816cf9c0a57a1adb98a511d5be
describe
'7110' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSQ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
ede0d49b5cb9e699ae81bc5c94456bf8
9e072bef7e147e7b9131e459a54bbdf0e0523b01
describe
'448891' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSR' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
d05e1ac115bb6a559467bb257722beae
c4f56c0d722aaab2af63bc11522fe6335ac738a6
'2011-12-30T19:19:02-05:00'
describe
'111902' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSS' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
f8a0a8b3b45277382e291d7023c9a3f0
dd37cef3f376968731511768b7ffcdb4b4f3a519
describe
'37188' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDST' 'sip-files00071.pro'
955ad4e4f73f5fa01beabecd69a382f3
fd972ad129f36a7b04bad799513c21db0c5b935d
describe
'33453' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSU' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
8e2f06c3bd69550657b12d91ea22c3b3
5089ba4b9d4f14c544874c431581b720922968c5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSV' 'sip-files00071.tif'
74b33f608deefadaa11ed07faf59304a
16d6ae650b6cd0862acb197b964caf83f63ae3bd
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSW' 'sip-files00071.txt'
e025443ca83af6db1a2114a90c9d7c42
a401b4cfee800e3699ef1dce2bc37f1710cd2fa9
describe
'8241' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSX' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
153d0f1b3da03ee338e8ac496383ad90
bd164dc24f5a1acbd3cbc550b4fc9afc7f8870c7
'2011-12-30T19:21:25-05:00'
describe
'448961' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSY' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
3c2e9778465b1842e99ad34cbcc4f294
5b841837ea184bb1f02d26117c22d4ee413b4526
describe
'104836' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDSZ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
b6040eb30545292227cd362286d2fdc6
beffcac125203ccfe1b93bd1d77b3cad4f10ba4f
'2011-12-30T19:19:59-05:00'
describe
'34439' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTA' 'sip-files00072.pro'
501882096606fddaf487cbb8f4189ddc
04092942048177a4b621f2d80bf546713f2d01df
'2011-12-30T19:24:30-05:00'
describe
'31964' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTB' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
abd99c8d526f4da37cc661632d104997
eec3c657f28679f04d4a68ff06279c7f03b87c48
'2011-12-30T19:19:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTC' 'sip-files00072.tif'
ccd4e8afdbf959aec86b2417f3733efd
77633778c75f9d5d9c30d64b185e211ea4867329
'2011-12-30T19:23:00-05:00'
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTD' 'sip-files00072.txt'
3ca8583e61bca58bb6716fcd16c05208
c19547f73090ce0a3a2ca902172929bb7e219bed
describe
'7596' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTE' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
9d4b52deb32521c475609ef507653c60
b2336d1a301c88ccafcae93bfc7ba6fe616b2329
'2011-12-30T19:23:13-05:00'
describe
'448855' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTF' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
7083a2dd48c3e9359f28484770c22012
04b8f4a72e04a2903e868034f622572aa5838c94
'2011-12-30T19:23:51-05:00'
describe
'110016' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTG' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
834d0dccdc6302b814ee32f287ee585d
8ceed6fc952a1c0fea3603e28417c035a8a7cfda
describe
'36071' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTH' 'sip-files00073.pro'
603c30efa41b9b30f9a1b82633607d9c
10db7f797a6a82daf98a9c57427074914de18fe9
'2011-12-30T19:23:18-05:00'
describe
'33897' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTI' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
e730cf721c8d1fea256d4b42e88bce71
597f4690653dd1db0cb6f190c3978d23b283a679
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTJ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
b08cd553f5e27d83c401f51d24758cde
4fa598cf1689e926085aa91309f77ef62a9cfbb8
'2011-12-30T19:20:26-05:00'
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTK' 'sip-files00073.txt'
22f30d8e52ce2a3634854c69efca4d6c
0144e42ea8127a63c8e86bccd3a02a885f21054b
'2011-12-30T19:25:51-05:00'
describe
'8414' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTL' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
a6f706224f3fdeebd40180852355c36d
fade4f6f4b2012dc50b19c6534004d7707eacb5f
'2011-12-30T19:26:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTM' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
1b0468a9a1d8a40e6fcc9b1e189f437e
4d0a4c73577b9b67ecde59dc60e7bf1638d0fd89
'2011-12-30T19:21:55-05:00'
describe
'111399' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTN' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
12992afb55f50943d3e70fac51eedb91
8bd1c1458d1c89deb179923fcdf4b2bbc34cb1d5
describe
'37925' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTO' 'sip-files00074.pro'
1c3c28b7b26fea348bea784d76c3db85
5c1e2333d70ff8de4cd65ad8eeb417d4e1f23800
describe
'33981' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTP' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
ebde306b4c028d9c0b0279d73fcc221e
4eae615bb833d01064588ba81402bab64c863eba
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTQ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
1dfff3a09531ffcf2b93bd09a7546fc4
64043d1c13f7ccc259808266ba83d88d8668fd3e
'2011-12-30T19:26:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTR' 'sip-files00074.txt'
23684f46c39668d546b7ba8f99d7d8cf
d114cebf20db925c0b4f7f4089902bb6ea08c72b
'2011-12-30T19:25:49-05:00'
describe
'8194' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTS' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
aa63b92d5d542c292f28221e0c92d179
7f6b408bfb95a90b3550defb44c377ad1da5eb29
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTT' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
f0fd24b5587f681a3c5c98b48b59f7c4
78d7e27480303b9122093092f3253b39dc5c2e14
'2011-12-30T19:23:50-05:00'
describe
'112011' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTU' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
809993ce9ea13f7dc69afc538f5aec16
376ab74d23a71e8615aa745f3a9d19a4beb0fe2b
describe
'36935' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTV' 'sip-files00075.pro'
1462bd072d744c263b27bbffcfe6fcb2
13bcc4c4b9f3509533c64c722dc4513e9758ce80
'2011-12-30T19:25:04-05:00'
describe
'34636' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTW' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
fe571123837ebe0fdd50eaaec4f84921
be41ad8efc75d74d734309b6c95e9124165e162e
'2011-12-30T19:21:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTX' 'sip-files00075.tif'
b9b27c1d82e28ccffdfa06d8b109d9ad
986a1925156914ca220246245f90be1635070dd5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTY' 'sip-files00075.txt'
018c57a838ab417a5470a77fa425529b
93bd45614be1a395fa893d1cc7a04e68a44999c7
'2011-12-30T19:19:01-05:00'
describe
'8370' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDTZ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
85b4355be917a52af81e7fcd852f50b3
3b1d7990e19b2feaa8f1511ee48039efc2c18d03
'2011-12-30T19:18:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUA' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
d314e7f7b18189960e18f35b5a4f17d3
3d2ed88def7b79d8784deaa03473c3fae00e5827
describe
'97998' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUB' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
520a2eac6a131243da89bb53fee4e571
a9fd3d02c864335533a1c1d253d5200b4ee5d175
'2011-12-30T19:23:57-05:00'
describe
'33094' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUC' 'sip-files00076.pro'
74c87d64b2a7c0a79474b6a3b17c14cf
ea684191b740d98878fc2e7b45f0a861d23fd7fd
describe
'31005' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUD' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
fb2558d3f73897a0b5bd040c261e956e
ed94caffd6262bc0ab4fc0e525950c88c2cdaa45
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUE' 'sip-files00076.tif'
3bc100a3b8fec088adaff8e757c946fa
67bf06efe2e46e8c91754f36ceaeb09aba00e5cf
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUF' 'sip-files00076.txt'
0a55d2fec7438805cac090e69050e01e
ffb9cf931b01fdc52362440a2be5a3f5ff32bb84
describe
'8180' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUG' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
58bf3fe5becad10a04d48c1ad75329c9
a1b14532fae7dc792246c4bb0dbaf9e07ab97177
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUH' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
1ea0889683ccc4cc50db47412a9740e9
dfb4d5c8d65d65d06677df1134c6944add22c4a0
describe
'108702' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUI' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
0f4710ed35842f6f8c4af422e7709861
6148a59009dc7ca18d24dabcd87bf42204db9757
'2011-12-30T19:24:32-05:00'
describe
'36947' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUJ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
d362a4cc89e319bd134aa6d17338a033
6767aa52b8f6d46d4efc004409d23659d942752c
describe
'33389' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUK' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
6cd2f3ae45df6bd12f5bcc3d7269550f
5f35dec9fe666ee98b0c348848924f6209d9ba6e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUL' 'sip-files00077.tif'
4d9df32bf203db07d68eb7cf8120d2fa
80f19d0bc61f7ea197935adaa8dd83cd3ac10ec7
'2011-12-30T19:18:54-05:00'
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUM' 'sip-files00077.txt'
6f63ae4845e26d15d3134cd1c7b934a0
0646b5fd8b33a2cf330dac060132bef54243eb63
'2011-12-30T19:21:41-05:00'
describe
'8177' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUN' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
12bbf17c407387d9645fb5e0f18c252b
74ab0be6962243186a5672bce89b53287314387e
'2011-12-30T19:26:02-05:00'
describe
'448948' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUO' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
ae7a038bf495182f66f7d0ef80e88e4b
5a07c876ffeeb49c3f9564986212dcba3e949f21
describe
'108821' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUP' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
0ca470414bd2ac03d61a1c12579cfbe6
0b3899b93d3efbbfe203a069116de81df5dd69be
'2011-12-30T19:18:06-05:00'
describe
'37453' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUQ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
47a888d3b7726b80615f431e51bfa252
8448bce3d0805d2e4085ad946798f29a68b9ceb5
describe
'34879' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUR' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
ee2e0bd7d3f8b1d1bc6c56fc03973d78
4c8fba438abc4eec52dcab51137dc7355ac4bb49
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUS' 'sip-files00078.tif'
d1518cf681a163a2231543dd753c5ce7
fe9dd38dd0adb0176da800b7ca5b28a59c3c74de
'2011-12-30T19:24:43-05:00'
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUT' 'sip-files00078.txt'
39594a588f67f8e3328f2072b7786dd6
6d024c688cf4ab529d63deacf11acd0f57bf53a2
describe
'8592' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUU' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
60e0eab95b4bc7a8dc8de737423b4ae6
9153c33324cf7efa06b0e32b358a7fc4f7f98063
'2011-12-30T19:25:45-05:00'
describe
'448978' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUV' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
00269a97d753b5f5960b27c8d8d839e6
e5856e04204af0a4f1189610a4ce942556a46295
describe
'99077' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUW' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
7170a2a1ccb8ca6fe026cacc2235f95e
c5b741973a4c58dc2c0e3449187ec560d0e75b40
'2011-12-30T19:26:15-05:00'
describe
'31185' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUX' 'sip-files00079.pro'
d7b57633536f13117a93a56ca7064ce1
90276956960f4d13b4ad50020cd37edd5b890dea
'2011-12-30T19:26:17-05:00'
describe
'29718' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUY' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
da3eb56c93226f051c99dbcb30094888
59831bab8bf2cac189c890bd56f7d12363d62df7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDUZ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
9d0cc38d560e1474bf8e38b014148834
92f3c5f6f8f9073e248561893b0c504b59c7796f
'2011-12-30T19:25:15-05:00'
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVA' 'sip-files00079.txt'
a0d16fefef273772e552b3b28848fb71
243c2e0ffb448e361780fb94f02e28e9033b4a1e
describe
'7152' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVB' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
c48829e6dfdfd1d10dd5b34cd82bdff1
c5d46bf9c2f744995ff34b10bcfe06d7038e0a26
'2011-12-30T19:25:28-05:00'
describe
'448848' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVC' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
2ca863d774dd3d7538d3000996fbdff0
897a4e721762f047a206f6508de5bb4381ef095d
'2011-12-30T19:19:13-05:00'
describe
'85637' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVD' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
48707650aaa967e0ac10e626185eaa63
9ab7b994b1ebed22a5b271af757bd66991c19f38
describe
'27840' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVE' 'sip-files00080.pro'
808fe36f947c8eaafc4d22b00f6cbea9
9cc3397c2e167ff6fdc1bb013f242ad5fc7ca0a6
'2011-12-30T19:20:40-05:00'
describe
'25424' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVF' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
dbab0b7f9e2fb469254c8d3c84d4aed2
69b8938ea29d0505f4ad33ec934c2daf1114f40f
'2011-12-30T19:19:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVG' 'sip-files00080.tif'
d2d09f4c7c9f2caca5b59a764d0bb1f7
1e8cd43e908827d7d6cc98f8c5f10d3b7776245b
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVH' 'sip-files00080.txt'
9a37085f34fe3e0963875660bfb1b640
4f22c63c87ab63fd1b6a34b63d3de09ebb0bb15e
describe
'6602' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVI' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
7ad556f8feb32ab355d53f6c8a7713c4
340feab0f95b02f6a01ac119d465cf50141c66ec
'2011-12-30T19:24:36-05:00'
describe
'448937' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVJ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
ed5ad331a64c6dc41dbc6b5cb1a5e6c4
cf3a2b6194704fa3a8b440ab30302c35f89f0ae2
describe
'109056' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVK' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
b24bbada388ffa856cc3c0747c66a6fe
739ca62c5fe27973404c6824ff77d8f66d10438d
describe
'35835' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVL' 'sip-files00081.pro'
0014b922fba7e4ad07c7dfab1916e320
99203df3a4186e715340b6aaa6c3f57e52b7f511
describe
'33019' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVM' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
66e893a5ebe08d6b980e45c87e72ac04
4a2f576ce4b3de06877b7c9dbc18951b215d2c90
'2011-12-30T19:23:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVN' 'sip-files00081.tif'
58e9de04329dd815207a43a1b0483d1c
4cc7984177e1e6d60c7bd64cdf7d5db4a3d10528
'2011-12-30T19:23:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVO' 'sip-files00081.txt'
1b343cddd08c6ab27540ef0a9bdccfa4
7af30f4a979e47ca2ce52af0510e0bf815929e7d
describe
'8449' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVP' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
b19fe06af06e6f13b398fd0b55c813a6
92b3c5ac14a852f9186848c24b03dd3f46ed6d92
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVQ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
9055f537598d2f4abfcc67fe048c5c40
1a887744a76b8f2f2d9d037dbbfa9e2a8b96fcea
describe
'103726' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVR' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
b944593f0c8b2c7ce250d7ae145da347
35d298cb4363ad017521da92fc10825b59a42e90
describe
'37014' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVS' 'sip-files00082.pro'
ba195282d2c8063311043dec830fe3f1
22e52194ec3828a55026ca1db70f05d969f0e670
'2011-12-30T19:23:14-05:00'
describe
'32508' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVT' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
78bb1a43c064a6cba6c45a1c34a47540
e7e3d3d1990813c6f038c26f74b542c5180c3adb
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVU' 'sip-files00082.tif'
378ab14ef555cfda1dbc2e8c418d1b44
a46707565189947bc2e796c73a5cccda8addca29
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVV' 'sip-files00082.txt'
5574a257ae47e1a7655bbc82a1829d39
4d8f32cccd397bab1d9ade9cb9489b4073c68d1f
'2011-12-30T19:24:58-05:00'
describe
'8127' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVW' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
c25ccab724994f613f4eef155a42e56c
357631b58f1e685267c311426d508f3f8c2f6a63
'2011-12-30T19:20:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVX' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
57e32f2bba628c018a10a75e73643c8d
7e7afbb2bf7eafad1d1022f21806517eaded907f
'2011-12-30T19:24:05-05:00'
describe
'112403' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVY' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
3b6d45ca9de9dc57cd33d7c8a2cb0318
f03a0492e8f31fc81c9f95847e2882b56f0d1850
describe
'35512' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDVZ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
2dfac0815811dd3f52c9c2d605a24a77
d286255aa443fdd6543f5586fd80685d44d24358
'2011-12-30T19:20:41-05:00'
describe
'33701' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWA' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
bcb4859580f855a16d53d9fed2d8dd09
77359e63bdb445a4e81b1812810756cee0f67501
'2011-12-30T19:19:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWB' 'sip-files00083.tif'
7cc44cea0f48d83778f1c3f6c71f2e10
8f38f906cbb35aa5dec6569bcfbf928076344071
'2011-12-30T19:22:51-05:00'
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWC' 'sip-files00083.txt'
c1f21ac670a6f6fac2623c4facd1fbeb
c725973f2a84ef6dfd569a7e1d6a9e795616154b
describe
'8742' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWD' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
e3cc24737981853073b46a1f509c75b0
0748f8ab766282342cac304e67e90a4ec475e4e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWE' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
7c7acb62f2c224e7bf314be33a4f6f6b
50c4e43761ffeddbb9c6288dea61bbad1d40f296
describe
'108493' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWF' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
64a7bebe29f8314e324b9d89c54f32ab
6836942d444317f943a8fe009719ccb47c0bef8d
'2011-12-30T19:19:38-05:00'
describe
'35808' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWG' 'sip-files00084.pro'
312888ba03546134924e82382c68a7d2
b06530db9ee968ddd053e22eddc48bbc133eb077
describe
'33202' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWH' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
53eef9b20f07cccd1284ecc309993be6
460362a4b1c6c8b15e686db9fcd35d388b236896
'2011-12-30T19:17:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWI' 'sip-files00084.tif'
5d4e59d6bac8ec94493deb668118467e
12059fbe7fb791a624e9a3fc9977fc90e76c550b
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWJ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
dc53bd997fab54dc61924ca8148e7497
82cbc75c3c794246ad24bcb69fe9f3827eb647b5
'2011-12-30T19:25:27-05:00'
describe
'8244' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWK' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
5dd8990439901af03054ac75c0020f2d
d8fb472ff23f4924b2021ba06c293c55bbf3da32
'2011-12-30T19:17:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWL' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
ac789eebeb27c26a23dea3bb3f982978
47a29d16613533d77f01f3d49ed961b67876563a
describe
'110682' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWM' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
587faaec6adb53dcfadb794621b59aa9
31c65bcad399d2de5d2a8d8572c8fc595b3f6d1d
describe
'35995' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWN' 'sip-files00085.pro'
91de8c381d8d104a2e73182629110427
9b3306f25188db7e6bc8df900b30542311e3be72
'2011-12-30T19:23:44-05:00'
describe
'34777' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWO' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
9ec531073bd99d11514f52eb893deed5
db67d091daf5cc4fbb7fac77127dd17e4858b3aa
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWP' 'sip-files00085.tif'
18a3eefde406e54310c3bd25106f592b
f7758ec3b3b36f6f608d567e523e809c07fc0987
'2011-12-30T19:18:10-05:00'
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWQ' 'sip-files00085.txt'
b1beac372126f85578d2a26b23f025ef
8aedee7c491f526105a8fd4b7704f92398398901
'2011-12-30T19:23:02-05:00'
describe
'8861' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWR' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
a91d2aaad841a590ef14e31be84c4451
8b44f3cdbdde180f7153426b72f8a7351bda41c9
describe
'448693' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWS' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
2997a51710e0d360b6feb7f87b691d17
fe105e09e2211668bb0a6da37824442facee14f4
describe
'111645' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWT' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
50e6f62c8e5ee1e183b81c00df6a7c7d
674d28783324228fdd745395dc8f7d67f80fe918
'2011-12-30T19:21:30-05:00'
describe
'36493' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWU' 'sip-files00086.pro'
22e5486a87fbeaef4917176bfa3425da
f8d29cfe61c75db13dddd079cb4e5ada61836198
describe
'33921' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWV' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
18105e0c74273a079024e9f310048a7c
0ee48d19dc3ac6844949c435bca4989cd483df98
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWW' 'sip-files00086.tif'
1478da07a8b7f185430f9a05b8464f18
26d15998c9f0a732c6ee471a8ff6fa312617caa6
'2011-12-30T19:18:57-05:00'
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWX' 'sip-files00086.txt'
676057fd554bf6879712b5cc6ddf2ddc
03b5d947985670e203a30af026ddbeae896659e3
describe
'8133' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWY' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
fba9062ffc3f33a10ac85d775443ec7a
bafa0cb6c5cc723ad2b495213358f61c8926d34f
'2011-12-30T19:17:46-05:00'
describe
'448983' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDWZ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
2df868c2a4a2a368ed995b3d7d1cded3
94c768b215bf5fc23a843dedcbc0850328e8a50b
describe
'106886' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXA' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
57eeb095ee74eadba0bc4ac2b4da605a
c65830508cdb075008f91d6d479c8f83e77c47b6
describe
'34411' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXB' 'sip-files00087.pro'
0242e2de4a7029bd3fb4a4a7210612dd
f149e2a83d735ef1197211a5149731d801b7b397
'2011-12-30T19:24:53-05:00'
describe
'33674' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXC' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
1dbb02f48699e2885e7d37df720616b5
1f09391ad6024147ac701b8e64d84c9693cabf98
'2011-12-30T19:18:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXD' 'sip-files00087.tif'
dd2d81da1173ad61215889f085ef5bce
2db0634d312f7c3812f15d6d0118a07653a88e42
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXE' 'sip-files00087.txt'
6166dafddd84e0253c189498eaa81b05
6da2ee8acd73394ec9030fac56482769d66d55dd
describe
'8267' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXF' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
df6c05cf06272538aa86cc6af9e7a1ad
b954d6d8e75d6952ab7cf7d855681a00dd114c74
'2011-12-30T19:22:12-05:00'
describe
'448922' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXG' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
ea87e4b264d623dac53a58b40e1c04e6
d207ad2074d506a93ac94400a9df797c10d94f14
describe
'38598' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXH' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
a7c366c82299fd6e70298a90ca81752e
90018568911a86ecfe78f3385268616ef9f0b552
'2011-12-30T19:25:08-05:00'
describe
'7114' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXI' 'sip-files00088.pro'
e2014b5ae5244f4afaeaa1423ef53f02
c53a865efc5affccfd70734186804c5d4bf15e54
'2011-12-30T19:17:03-05:00'
describe
'10026' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXJ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
47c7ee9d0738fbf0324d2ace7b82004a
9ad9d2cf834ab287e58f1f9971c2d5042b783b9a
'2011-12-30T19:22:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXK' 'sip-files00088.tif'
f95e8904f1c2952d6d85da8c57517741
0740350d28dc28b8c8a55d54652018b0e338c0dc
describe
'288' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXL' 'sip-files00088.txt'
c0c1352fe5c6ab6295b2491a92945a2a
d3dcb25c4a2e9b73a708cf6f5adf70ee030b7b62
'2011-12-30T19:18:34-05:00'
describe
'2550' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXM' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
db858eb7d5eee61512c56f0fb976bda2
ab0e30671c19ab268bdf487ef6d91f85194ee6eb
'2011-12-30T19:17:21-05:00'
describe
'448863' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXN' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
9c865e99b4e2378964858408a2ee1405
c691c9f75a5b7168f85f66b804a8efedfa12ae66
'2011-12-30T19:20:53-05:00'
describe
'83482' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXO' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
a36dc296631b3c3b2859bcd0357d8e50
338252b6c256636e9abe4b376441337636722510
describe
'26017' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXP' 'sip-files00089.pro'
54a412941393cba287d8c3d7097af5a5
b18db784308eea0cf894554e7659cfe87925ec23
describe
'24923' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXQ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
daffad432dcc32d27e021bc9cba91d32
60db9de81ea19fff7d8c4864fb63c22f853b463b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXR' 'sip-files00089.tif'
1a7463f042eef87c830052ccc20d89c5
aa0922e46f8b4eb5f834f82e4c84c5bbe0ee35ec
'2011-12-30T19:22:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXS' 'sip-files00089.txt'
413ba5f7f54fc4a40d073f0a0c2aac7c
9b9a05ee0917c43f5c4e3cdccd595099f415d7e1
describe
'6704' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXT' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
76ac39e9fb2614e194a89674ff1fe8e5
07d9aade259ad802ca3040f69bbedee1361fadaf
'2011-12-30T19:20:24-05:00'
describe
'448973' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXU' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
1de303377e159108b4e5a4045b4d3cef
d82e31f3baaba9135c789ec2fb1d2bc6f241b999
'2011-12-30T19:22:52-05:00'
describe
'99152' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXV' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
2ffeeb8843d06f2185a2fd2b8b1b368a
677ab5b30629e2b21ee7dc8d7244f27d90d8e5b5
describe
'34853' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXW' 'sip-files00090.pro'
5d28011e9c20fa7298d1d3a64ce8bf72
6c5b5071b47d4ce19f16f21d43ea22e463a63853
'2011-12-30T19:20:19-05:00'
describe
'30931' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXX' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
b427260f2d270361daff6a8a310b5783
b3d001fb376ae2ccdea9bad1717d093fa5e8f66a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXY' 'sip-files00090.tif'
ad9e2d171935e08837ad38192a1cfdaf
55de22ec8a8cd055046ebc23029c5dc189042e8c
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDXZ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
beca48567d8f34c84e1811dbe30954d0
d730d569d65a802888d539eff945c7b488704627
describe
'7905' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYA' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
606dd47e991248529cd43dbaa57abf8f
4328bbca2f5ed449fd3f87363e13cc42bb86efb7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYB' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
7b6e0e9fd5150cf1bf4df208a4213bbe
29fe5867cf5d4310ef888ee92a2c3370fe7a7dac
describe
'94955' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYC' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
e10f134915e68746de92571f9d5ea657
e0d1b71d9d49e0c4be914d149e351f3ed3a03d53
describe
'30450' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYD' 'sip-files00091.pro'
76425280278ffbd37a64d74e1e241d12
8a178dfbd960d49e3217b8ca81c9716cacf69c53
describe
'29021' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYE' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
5738063bdc7432adc1416d8619f10e19
340bdad622564afc25de63a5c4f2414afd225b1d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYF' 'sip-files00091.tif'
7f099d875362f540c7594cd7c3f12787
cc4f7225863cd9c64ad11225d3ec9e31149476f4
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYG' 'sip-files00091.txt'
6b37299fa53ae9c03231a2b121404741
61764d0b6adf9fec7c80423b0af4a49535821331
'2011-12-30T19:25:18-05:00'
describe
'7321' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYH' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
93312f78473e5b6eecf9d485abf8ceff
b4fa592ad95854070419c083cdbf43176eb67cb3
describe
'448968' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYI' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
4b0dba6dc69a741379a9c9b1746e1d04
8850cc0a82800588f42ad95e4c8dc8b71a6a2ca5
describe
'104272' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYJ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
68fb49907729fceccace3a0fd4fce7e3
0c78944947ce2d8b1f16c2708e42a320ebb6c1f1
describe
'34338' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYK' 'sip-files00092.pro'
a064b7b0f9ec6d351ffe3d67aed0fec0
7837be7c7cc4f0cf0912e26a327c433192024571
describe
'31482' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYL' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
24ff823c4b787440462d30effbe8c609
d228bb967c5b93d367d68a013fb9f1a52054dbee
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYM' 'sip-files00092.tif'
58964384fea82641e651782ab69bd7ee
91fea055cef9b4a11ba5690418d7cae9a6e7c15f
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYN' 'sip-files00092.txt'
1f70ae34120c1940b4882eb4415d61dd
01af96a56ca573efe152d3710ae86410fab2ca76
describe
'7938' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYO' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
359e8c8690dc2a20b6aee23fa4a419db
18f400d142f2be9ad548358312c1b0678d8e9f4a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYP' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
e221b334a917bcdbc4b22df305f3724f
c8d9e112b6c2bc191467bd7716ab9348f28dcbb0
describe
'97562' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYQ' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
2bb83a166cf0f9d123eb93cdd139a343
fd9537de0435e42c27a751f40ccc41d5b34aa496
'2011-12-30T19:26:24-05:00'
describe
'31648' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYR' 'sip-files00093.pro'
62ff34b1aa7d91ecc2b512a1394a7e65
65ba47be50cbd60f91521e2842a9360195838885
describe
'29905' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYS' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
543da353ddd42240c0253ad3a9c26d9b
f2d7d100f5e7770c1705236ec2483451bfbe6ddf
'2011-12-30T19:24:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYT' 'sip-files00093.tif'
cee8940630845e5ede0e25490c895523
7ce5ee4c6cfaf9f918bfac7febbd927dcf62359d
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYU' 'sip-files00093.txt'
dfc7adb7ad543400603f9105b96bb61b
dcd6f150a14a01d5c0f5b8eeb0ac0821dad8ea8e
describe
'8039' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYV' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
f101fa1ea23e8ac7128f487808e1329a
ab811227524cf7393aa2fab95b6bfcdbb1ca9a4b
describe
'448936' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYW' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
e9dab5eccb35e0e2feac3dcc6c514841
a02d79454ed3ce73e9dbfbc09b3016074f7311d8
'2011-12-30T19:18:59-05:00'
describe
'69437' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYX' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
44bdc69672c842d8b82bc1e80dc49cdb
9bd4c1a206a79392bc93b0a89c9975204c6fcc76
describe
'18770' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYY' 'sip-files00094.pro'
a0fd9c60f6bed5f99dbf438f8b2743d9
8a1b94129fa387a1354e78d920e9931d9750fbc5
'2011-12-30T19:19:14-05:00'
describe
'19292' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDYZ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
0573f14d9c80732075e7140a2a993bb3
07f64b051b70a07ff5ddc129a6ddcc986c9b13a9
'2011-12-30T19:25:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZA' 'sip-files00094.tif'
fc56bcf36908fe7c1021a33cb63952d4
9cfb55ed2b6d19b9d9fa7a95bc3e75831027debe
'2011-12-30T19:20:54-05:00'
describe
'760' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZB' 'sip-files00094.txt'
a5d54caf4d3ad6aa254a73b3bbe52da8
78856a91c7ae46713e692e9f824753e53a412fbd
'2011-12-30T19:21:24-05:00'
describe
'5232' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZC' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
ec64481f826c174dcaefc9c6304681e1
5e6564cde7762d8b0c4b4a4b8b9f21448d2ad639
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZD' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
24d3f080096e6afd6260fc0cb555f08d
dab28dce1e7ace3e2023a95a928b81671e70e531
describe
'92975' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZE' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
27e88100ab64761965a312827e2a2b85
c4f47d8912bbc5008a84fc68d56e014fc1055a7b
describe
'28350' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZF' 'sip-files00095.pro'
8cb56f7baad60b9aeb0768600874feb7
74b695c3640f100fa35bddd19950169e6a8b8fa0
describe
'27343' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZG' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
742539519f3fcfb4ce91dee0cb59ff55
e5f60d7c9215cfe870044769834fb4cd07138ccc
'2011-12-30T19:24:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZH' 'sip-files00095.tif'
acb09f4a7a3211a16dd09119d259ce8a
b2ca09fde6b1312f5f6a972ea21218241c9b4c74
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZI' 'sip-files00095.txt'
ddd1ce86d9f0efd48dafaac115b17ecc
b20f89742e20af400c6b784d5b12e1feb65e54cd
describe
'6971' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZJ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
15350799d0d6cf754ea3a25d072776e1
92140207339b618ac767c596c953b4833062c8b6
'2011-12-30T19:18:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZK' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
e8a7b90392bc2cf947a24cae49943b3a
e4939e7f57c0f0315444cffcd393cf43bf50e8c7
describe
'98897' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZL' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
b4078d34665bdc68bef00ff4237da1b4
32f14ffc8bf669b12940d039b36e9a393119053d
describe
'32377' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZM' 'sip-files00096.pro'
c2231fca1d81fe8d530b275b92e79376
95896951160c0ad08ad18bd988f0406371987f3c
describe
'29851' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZN' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
e272e5547456f6d1d4984fe25a0004c3
1e6187c773383639ecc1f61ad0dfea4ce8db99e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZO' 'sip-files00096.tif'
c1a7ab79758cf114bec8c3b3495f3b25
7b97fd07e779c7486f552469de29161385f17f8d
'2011-12-30T19:24:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZP' 'sip-files00096.txt'
e57ad42be14700b452f5779a32244eef
f1bf803ecc2c217d4f7518228ccc8ba63a14a5f7
describe
'7740' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZQ' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
2385007670f2dc01470ce10417a7ff5b
91ba98bc9c2fb852e0b768048b716dd43a41b76d
'2011-12-30T19:21:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZR' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
b84ea16ee9663788b39b83dc48e4b53e
254f9563aa8c0f2e138e8a4e4531365afdacc29b
'2011-12-30T19:17:37-05:00'
describe
'96320' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZS' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
814b45f965aa290258268fe48bbc8e8a
5b43ccf2860b358478a317f67054be3c8e9ec560
'2011-12-30T19:25:07-05:00'
describe
'31323' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZT' 'sip-files00097.pro'
ea0a73416e16d078834b7f23e7fbfec2
b1f444c8dcf2971ffd55311e9320ba567c26808c
'2011-12-30T19:25:09-05:00'
describe
'29741' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZU' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
e315934409725e15ea008bd030288194
8cb20b03893fd026cbeefe60db63770b0df4580b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZV' 'sip-files00097.tif'
cc5983c03f2f0bd38deb80fad5fc936d
d3f24c37486a80259cf58ee777927ae3fc3a08a9
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZW' 'sip-files00097.txt'
f578006cbf91ebaee977d29184da4a48
c0ee9fd231de12d219459f738da58958c32e8f06
'2011-12-30T19:21:28-05:00'
describe
'7701' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZX' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
9cc10c69610851cd11ad26091599fbde
6582bc663d8db26ebfa0d4e30f06b00b7c36f92b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZY' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
6e6343e3456626f82bff05e4ccc482ed
5242aad50e1496dea345f1768917166adcd17c70
describe
'104986' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABDZZ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
9d5bd5eaddc929771bf798135e79396d
65186223858df60ef7a4da4fbb7e4d460be4299c
'2011-12-30T19:20:56-05:00'
describe
'33557' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAA' 'sip-files00098.pro'
ef3c56275a08db292e3940b97efe8da0
ea603b2363473a7a849b5a01a249f4b5cd898ce7
'2011-12-30T19:17:45-05:00'
describe
'31366' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAB' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
cc2be0c57eab9336eab2df27f58bf2ea
0625b0b35ba4f23920186df8ec10e5f389c9a236
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAC' 'sip-files00098.tif'
a5216f627abc4b66154a292502888d77
a5046297806db3678c214e4b41ad187b043ab83a
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAD' 'sip-files00098.txt'
f16bebae4dc156aa2057687cf6c08120
6cded7f57b8d7306c08bc13ebe2b333b6c514b0c
'2011-12-30T19:18:31-05:00'
describe
'7776' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAE' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
efb614e56e85acc43b5b817f16b1a38d
1a7fcf7ea5b3df95942c9e2d17bc169fd8534af4
describe
'448960' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAF' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
5b6705ea72cb9f41dfacda502aa253a4
6c54b528d88c642455fb42f515055e1b1b42692f
describe
'105539' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAG' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
1a7e1528beb96e69ccc9dcb96c7dab92
c301a0a4d08779dceab1723644d6cf647e855174
describe
'33666' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAH' 'sip-files00099.pro'
e608fd0a114c86f0d070d56c2746e6e5
68ff9ca64e64dad13c5a7c518c5ebc3aa20a9015
describe
'31954' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAI' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
0388005db1212e4b38a0034e1e904b65
beda003ca08e14d9c64c692bfc56fb91c234cb7c
'2011-12-30T19:24:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAJ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
5d5bfbce17ad3662d95db93d4d68f4ba
580d821de375d55ddcef294d7a6f1d0eb4f4a14d
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAK' 'sip-files00099.txt'
97886cc57b59782f6943631a09136f46
aff797afbef9df2e920ff53f070d60f9d769650f
'2011-12-30T19:22:06-05:00'
describe
'8149' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAL' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
b5a0df18af233847766f39bdd93005ac
c787ff8bdc8d979e7f4c2e3c66a0a6780ec546ca
describe
'448902' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAM' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
065f010d8045ad470610eb8445d83f2d
3ede2af68beea031ab54453c0cbc3ca15c4edf06
describe
'105339' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAN' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
da3b410463d63cb562b8639823e779b9
6ce90b6421d519b7db24f755a6daa29de8896152
'2011-12-30T19:23:27-05:00'
describe
'35779' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAO' 'sip-files00100.pro'
f0a57f73faf4cb2b5455d2feaf9825f8
a4f87d0e1b9f4c6dcc5f352b550caeed5af100e1
describe
'32672' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAP' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
262adfdc14c706320d37efcc571227b7
6c4c07cd60ad2715dcc5694b45b5ba03be1f4562
'2011-12-30T19:21:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAQ' 'sip-files00100.tif'
e52885906c67bb76c42dd516331d487f
f98b0e48421e1c7c83d7e853f081124ab0d2579d
'2011-12-30T19:25:00-05:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAR' 'sip-files00100.txt'
986612b92e314d3752e63b9ab54e1e11
c4dc021ccb7d114b0f937717234a944d9632b2ce
describe
'8083' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAS' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
96abee8467a52bd70672c3bb2a6ef3dd
f9fecdcb2d32df1843208cd3b01f7256646f1abd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAT' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
f60338cba8e633784aa1913a59767bd4
223e6b21dc6e26e851fb5a08a6f623f1520e5007
describe
'101827' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAU' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
89a4ab59031e2c19a3f129bc7fa5cc28
e8b4fe929d839ff453076830483155bdd43aa059
'2011-12-30T19:21:49-05:00'
describe
'33700' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAV' 'sip-files00101.pro'
081e84446356025d85c9a4e82765fbec
da734ba0188ab9f21796ef347cbbfab7c507b4df
'2011-12-30T19:21:37-05:00'
describe
'31965' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAW' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
5b0ca46e351d6fefef33bf50d9117dcf
313802f8a3708fa8bf66db4c273f0ffbe5f03b59
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAX' 'sip-files00101.tif'
b53120b0aa4acc2d1895ce2c7674ae43
bdfd9ad2b2f057d84eb0a3398606b1ca54ceb8fe
'2011-12-30T19:25:05-05:00'
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAY' 'sip-files00101.txt'
d99e187cdaaf82db950aa58001fa2b97
8f07bf8237812879c9ed5992804268817aa2bac5
describe
'7822' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEAZ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
20b270d834f05c9fc93e490088b78b9a
060871d57b4b3139c98c82fe895dc3c4060668d7
describe
'448972' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBA' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
644e31efd3d64c99b2798dbea301477e
f1f59241ad470c48f039c00dbb00a617ee49db34
describe
'108346' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBB' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
5786a7de79d0aae3406c9603ac7914c6
979019f15f4a2427ad48de8cde961fc84184be5d
'2011-12-30T19:19:17-05:00'
describe
'35941' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBC' 'sip-files00102.pro'
961d8e9a954be39f0b4e820d6cfdd654
6f0f7b74f36a7bb137cfb41c3d217ecd747de5a2
describe
'32157' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBD' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
77b278f0c54ba8dd775e07f3ef0151d9
991f302fef3cffb3ae0591b8915610f8519afd21
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBE' 'sip-files00102.tif'
9c50ff87a2da2151e61d52724b8f00c1
874027824a1dd83fa9d065b015df2b133c1dc431
'2011-12-30T19:17:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBF' 'sip-files00102.txt'
b0b25b88cabe778307b9de26db59bda9
44b9f0f6a3184dc522fdb242feef7bff1b9fa0ea
'2011-12-30T19:21:58-05:00'
describe
'8279' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBG' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
80276f2f39cae99d52c729a6b1442a77
83f8c8368c3867675282cf3d3f841e88dde0171c
describe
'448757' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBH' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
3438a6234be875f52e89d537ddcf1380
5d7dc9f92ec84a73bd970afb3fc51dee2960dfea
describe
'78437' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBI' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
3377dac3f0dc4449792854593e017732
ee3d596fe363958602d561ae331b03e3c838091b
describe
'23435' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBJ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
37f37ee46b0e09d529fbdf6ed54469a8
35e4b5e93fd9471158f33a67df37c0b7b4183188
'2011-12-30T19:24:33-05:00'
describe
'23091' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBK' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
6c4af373948563e67e9f84d33eb3f385
67fd88719a9260005b218944df7adbf6c2cd1c7e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBL' 'sip-files00103.tif'
bfd515a3de516314f0232a029946fac0
7294ebe9b937d08eb243447ca8c8dce6b79eaa8d
describe
'943' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBM' 'sip-files00103.txt'
7394d2c71fe700f2090f56ddb1a76bbf
af7658ba487ddcb495d95b27b180d0c21da522b0
describe
'5542' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBN' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
404ae9a15793f5b8bc135a1ec39589f2
3cc7d3cbee357423a4c7c33354c78cb8e4e61adc
describe
'448758' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBO' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
aa118135112c3b7aa564982138437395
34a9546057bc982c027295ff647d6647d5c89354
describe
'87121' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBP' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
c82bb6adb6843c3f41788fb62967d580
b9f442e6c847d12efeb52da3a8507e72f66b091c
describe
'27413' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBQ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
91ccc8338783a041707fbfa7561e0e3d
166fba4f32806906d4b1f6a7048b9714c5c1f824
'2011-12-30T19:22:13-05:00'
describe
'25874' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBR' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
243cc096652415476696b56340c803e3
322def12d4129512326f7aa54436bbad48d5ad15
'2011-12-30T19:17:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBS' 'sip-files00104.tif'
270c407a76360791e79a60c73a3e2b7d
1ef09004981991c172dc792395086f605a37813e
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBT' 'sip-files00104.txt'
0c811e802565b7350ffc8caa8de2f6fb
c95433fd9cdaaf3cdc9c20019c4f53040239c411
describe
'6300' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBU' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
4c50fef104a5c0bf9aaa07995a513d80
d4ad95290a1f85924ac4b6dd5d5657173f8b69c6
'2011-12-30T19:20:34-05:00'
describe
'448943' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBV' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
9b90eb87123bf68918005c0e2eefbdbd
5d5a1d034e6b1d8f83969546ecd01f073edc406c
describe
'98411' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBW' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
39674794d419137a812f0e30c84d8bad
7beced9b419d75f5ac02c219b22cccde532357e1
describe
'32172' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBX' 'sip-files00105.pro'
ac4dfbfbe77073e835a0e1ad0484ae77
38b8c16c4e3bb705fb051e2ddd28c5c1d20b2c2e
'2011-12-30T19:19:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBY' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
0b381008be952204a676193e7ccc2c70
95a7c9afdecafca6c12bdcdb34a775da683d8268
'2011-12-30T19:17:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEBZ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
7c0a49bc4166b493f4c244d4955b8360
e2f9fc63d08c28f03139b71f576d5c55c3bd99f4
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECA' 'sip-files00105.txt'
9a2e961acee231b39d8b18780cf51ace
25ff53a4d9f43bd696f68f6b3afc0be747478981
describe
'7390' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECB' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
ef91efa1157c1b8673cffd899c33680c
ef2860725c0f0b1ad152be0893fd30f64a86d976
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECC' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
306fa0dd9e66c9a7cc6e769af13a41a4
c2d05f325af3c9a44cabc8e6ad03ff1fa9fc2f7d
describe
'108592' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECD' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
c90efdac99e3911b9c4590a265f30c5d
9a1f9bbf4b2fe49efd87e9390bd1202be8a85a71
'2011-12-30T19:17:23-05:00'
describe
'34933' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECE' 'sip-files00106.pro'
260c70801e78442614541c60d9f0e6be
384ecad102a68cb7eebe6412291efb17e52953c0
describe
'33060' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECF' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
499b69181216c83ceee76a3d79b9466a
98c14d890e0ebe8189e0da2dc6df2f6427b37038
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECG' 'sip-files00106.tif'
71aab1a72c333803e17224b288b559c9
e580c808804d2364a950ae6b34e14f811d3cb2e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECH' 'sip-files00106.txt'
3db93015b7ae9ec5c83577291fcd79a5
d77f635d5bb5fdf443d7057b219bade98cbd3a39
'2011-12-30T19:21:38-05:00'
describe
'8092' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECI' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
e657002a0618236e4e077dace987e12e
d5011cf9fce5f83d10af25267701e9ae59682d15
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECJ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
fe0ef92f1a0d54bcb180505a6173d11c
fb4f7494d786908bfc0e42bca18146ddd19e389b
describe
'104818' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECK' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
6068652f8f510ff1135bd3312940aa21
a1442b1883185e156424f5907bcb7e07cfc98de7
describe
'34122' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECL' 'sip-files00107.pro'
7d4b470eae610b99b1c2c38ab217e49a
6862d9880822417fc3df18f55c3a84416e98116b
'2011-12-30T19:25:10-05:00'
describe
'32729' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECM' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
6543e37f0f81c31de8c4b8520c4a89de
203d9ce60d466c2a50cc26c6c68152a571dee4fd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECN' 'sip-files00107.tif'
ba0108bae2affa301412a1543825d9a9
d1a7d8e0db518332fedea350693b58c0f1e06fdc
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECO' 'sip-files00107.txt'
22426924784d5beae765c569a526b0e0
5c4b2f6d28affb282212b245263384874c8fabd5
describe
'7908' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECP' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
5eedd5507a729852e3c3c189a4e927d5
c26da65eb3a38925b6933a2acf5d83667acf945a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECQ' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
92ce02d446d3921b95a343bdf3518063
2cf48afaca829b6eff66d3df58a9c03cc9263fdc
describe
'106867' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECR' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
5d4c6021a9f09077479f2b19f5697654
23c97cfc750782b40edc7317a904ff2384608fcb
'2011-12-30T19:19:56-05:00'
describe
'36582' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECS' 'sip-files00108.pro'
5d21f3ea96ec9b743324fe077c49b3ef
5018b5bbc9aa1948cacb346740123a9b27aa0b03
'2011-12-30T19:25:50-05:00'
describe
'32810' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECT' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
7524cada0b86269cfafcb5767f061dd3
5644242796eb4cd2f32850d8cff6c2c95831a0f4
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECU' 'sip-files00108.tif'
1e6caa9dd466f067ab687b3e03d6935f
1283c547e9d32cd55fe8529143a5376b31b610a4
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECV' 'sip-files00108.txt'
154f5304e085e7d4e3321f993a50fd5d
bdf081835e8672512ff38798befe9b13ef795ca9
describe
'8170' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECW' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
40c1adaa44ce05fdb6675ae31295a3bc
ab2e406cfd930810371ad2d9ae67ca342377aa26
describe
'448981' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECX' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
e74ec3767ecec8d71caa44478b06868c
462cc5b232cd02a2808e5c951da7b5e5a620d170
describe
'98150' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECY' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
d3a07d0e078fbc6a5478d65e4d12da7e
c367a43d647b91c2753da7d2880c22a7676f2682
'2011-12-30T19:23:41-05:00'
describe
'32759' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABECZ' 'sip-files00109.pro'
b69fa1d3759dec88e8130b21a7c5990f
b733932ae63344ef5f086ad5181f92c8fbda939b
describe
'29670' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDA' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
cba989a79d8be153bcdf35ae39ed724c
c6d2d5e98d69677efdc23b5d9e706b2869d1f3bf
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDB' 'sip-files00109.tif'
2245bc449e044f9bae48075ed25c7cd5
ec20158a02ce0b5f64a0f6192f8926aa8c33e395
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDC' 'sip-files00109.txt'
9a2d8b102217186d3092cfc2b2808dde
1cf45bab96c8d213948d50c1b170b7c60ecbd844
describe
'7713' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDD' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
80cf3808648c78c466e64ea4ab23a939
f9e6ff8833177a5e2b4397f65339f749a9644f1d
'2011-12-30T19:19:20-05:00'
describe
'448970' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDE' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
31b6662e42125ed166d6b506745f19c8
1a2bb73051d593c0ea5a8d50e79ebdc55cbb24b4
describe
'105203' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDF' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
52adee17fd1ee914513af1b8be30ae59
bd11421e4d0da3f50d7af64501610a93342761cd
describe
'34205' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDG' 'sip-files00110.pro'
e5c334e622b0d17de21b22b89218b646
e600ed0942cecf3176d47357c62bdacbcca94924
describe
'31730' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDH' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
05b2e9375cb52e03600e072c66675e82
a33da0d90151b025df1a911fbdf53c17d611a00c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDI' 'sip-files00110.tif'
923fa9cb26ef45d6077e58ceac1371e1
beb1772334f205c29e3c1da78727f4d8791aa5b3
'2011-12-30T19:25:22-05:00'
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDJ' 'sip-files00110.txt'
ac76c509de879fdc06762200eedae598
94873a71b37b3034b20056182022b212a17c650c
'2011-12-30T19:24:26-05:00'
describe
'7891' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDK' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
75b5c562c2253546adb1624d3377ec9f
d26f3a0ae59bdea8d42f7ee523f48ee7445a371a
'2011-12-30T19:23:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDL' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
7108c46660d6bfca592d4b045946e371
c9840e0d1776a48d1eb174ba8c292ce40cd2889a
describe
'100611' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDM' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
544871d05b4e8270474c87818185989d
3b34e37960543f0be2500aba4308c56d02a30245
describe
'32290' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDN' 'sip-files00111.pro'
d44496815a4069a4d3f9118221e3f35d
a9feb9bd51e58937ce8731a932e746ad0fc38230
'2011-12-30T19:22:09-05:00'
describe
'30018' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDO' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
021e5e237bbba20e64de0a0185cff0a6
3953bba65862bb7fb4e08ebc5903d5811733a1b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDP' 'sip-files00111.tif'
863826520b98a103944b20511057a04f
1bb423b67865ae63846c457dc0081cc3f4a61ac2
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDQ' 'sip-files00111.txt'
814380ce078b25d449557196e7a2b41a
bd29ec7b28c40265264e5968db843e9aa7a61ff1
'2011-12-30T19:25:14-05:00'
describe
'7610' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDR' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
cd150cf620d8ea60fb56ffd0e67def9c
e52e2e248c276265e05764fe79d4914d15bbc425
'2011-12-30T19:20:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDS' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
1e05922a5b3e812c181514df56ce63c4
8f57af22d41a7eeee2dd1f3afbe1987566739227
'2011-12-30T19:17:14-05:00'
describe
'103121' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDT' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
11835ab69808fb9a7ee54f7c1db03a07
7686a47224a66d29002fe60b9bc30988a775e1d2
describe
'32903' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDU' 'sip-files00112.pro'
f4dca7105e95a2946cd9042efb8f9aea
e5df8b55d02fdad58a300874d553696344f4b152
'2011-12-30T19:19:18-05:00'
describe
'30898' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDV' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
4c21a90c8b8d4a30921449cf134c724c
6c65b7511bf7e9fb0d81c25eeffd8f8c58e5500d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDW' 'sip-files00112.tif'
7b16f39b49172ffb5d4c7683bfed0943
d164d49bec044da6ad236a7e2c594364be0a8fce
'2011-12-30T19:23:47-05:00'
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDX' 'sip-files00112.txt'
c1355fc57615a2064ff1a96aa9151aab
17448c3e3dbaea389eb9e8c8f7e8475e5113ced5
'2011-12-30T19:17:56-05:00'
describe
'7526' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDY' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
b59b2d310d07b3da5c89ecea3ac95305
819a89319e9a8ce46f3d8df7774e732a55276cb5
'2011-12-30T19:24:03-05:00'
describe
'448953' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEDZ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
482ff7d5b15624784da015f50b6ece99
a6bed296dac5cc0708dbb0c0de876fb4764b4f92
describe
'89923' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEA' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
2e495d9421e2e69977d7057ffd4c89e5
1a8d2c2583f0648db07ce6cf176a3631136dce05
describe
'29028' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEB' 'sip-files00113.pro'
2a6bb6c8be5a188de2ecc85714c9951d
45f4a62b3899963b84023a3a7c3998158caa581b
describe
'26885' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEC' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
795919ae67f625bfb451b3bdc22d19c4
4ae45f81d0238550258ae536f10661d001d41af4
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEED' 'sip-files00113.tif'
ca86f61503e5bead7898def1148093f7
c3b163f8522973ea6e78402766bc86dd1f1d448c
'2011-12-30T19:18:25-05:00'
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEE' 'sip-files00113.txt'
5df226459d23bca7532b09bfa23b3bf7
e35883421c229465ab00865e9b2a423e93ed032d
'2011-12-30T19:18:38-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6961' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEF' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
ee83fcadaca725bc3c3c751a81818bf3
40b67def2e673d69fa75cba48c10b271420c27e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEG' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
8fefd1146c1f165686e9add0d1bdc703
561dfbb47e0ff0b4fa5f7606a3d4e7310b620189
describe
'116408' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEH' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
af6f36b20921af30734b1d38ed7992bd
d370581fd2ee0050d190d03d28fa70fed6480b86
describe
'38053' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEI' 'sip-files00114.pro'
4263617356a39181ead410c3618dd24c
bc195cc75ebeaef70eb11f2c8aa92c91cf348ea8
describe
'34752' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEJ' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
5ee2790f7b298c67f135c9ead6d2c9c8
84502a2164bdb41dbd4bb4d324a01553f2882e7c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEK' 'sip-files00114.tif'
8a3ca60b644c288a46fca583865cc611
24bf0ff9033daff2beab81beb2cd763160c78a85
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEL' 'sip-files00114.txt'
e2b9d2fe01a17a8433f768015fcf5e90
3d5474f065bab79fab5b13ee64222f78b1e15147
describe
'8426' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEM' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
b9c7fbcf08bb9f5d971f494fcb7501bd
fb82a87334d19a82ce2908ea68a28f3f141ce97f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEN' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
bf44992234d31a3f03d78245c989af57
e41b0ed667e2179b312e30ce03cb9f918e0e0fc6
'2011-12-30T19:22:20-05:00'
describe
'94106' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEO' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
1bc5911f54a134c0d244ca50f2670f48
65380404be9acfe3cbc7171dcd64cc92e2d7be83
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEP' 'sip-files00115.pro'
e78e5b4d7506005f5ccfa711dcfc28c6
c8a7de8edf55eebd509d4266504f3d61213b2342
describe
'24593' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEQ' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
f177d98e8ee0b73e0652b8e373f58903
c86d96a7f8ca6de125c155b690cb52af854adc26
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEER' 'sip-files00115.tif'
aaf5a46dbac2341884cb41c9dc859eb7
b0a3dd1c5baf1b2cb5836fafb78cd05f4df95ecf
describe
'150' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEES' 'sip-files00115.txt'
edaadd487814ffff9d7c56bf18255522
a22f005f2823a6f70c97fc6bdced383c2e9695ca
describe
'7129' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEET' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
edda8ad2a51890f3ca69191b807fbf30
c7d1f0269ec56f665c9039287da88dc4acc64d8d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEU' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
f015952ca7b9960709c34085286df0da
f0cba71732718df13f16849502ba728055dd801c
describe
'108205' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEV' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
d0ea3b6dd0630f1bd723ad1579bdb28d
1fd28dceb82142ee66c8ea7a7faa77ff1cab36a8
'2011-12-30T19:17:04-05:00'
describe
'36138' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEW' 'sip-files00117.pro'
083e8e9577fb135ff43b02968dc82f2a
486931cea5fcfcc9616beb003926342031491988
describe
'33331' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEX' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
1fdb42e8296a463148f8b7efe7169a7f
8bb3cc51c0e840b8cc07415fa27b7bb13460b76a
'2011-12-30T19:25:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEY' 'sip-files00117.tif'
85e30c9a85f6eac5b9cac99b94f80180
57c2be71e0457c61c9808e40e84e712a73c48945
'2011-12-30T19:19:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEEZ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
4aa2d97e14a34828afabaaeb0e8ae298
aa0593d1af4d623c018353559a429d66d218a549
describe
'7946' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFA' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
d6f49a498337cf8af328c1a5d2c5a0b1
c6af0da85a8e708693d8f97c2142d181195badbb
'2011-12-30T19:26:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFB' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
57a9814cff73bd379c4837afdc531f18
765ffd2ae77a27cba6a08514a9e4b273a11b2bb7
describe
'116348' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFC' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
6557d1e38fa83e366628eda0e484322a
b03d01197065b83a82d5b705fc476972a04e54c9
describe
'37965' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFD' 'sip-files00118.pro'
6ac817d866feb4ef1bc51543c9ee4b96
63e13add424c807bed8f492e79372c4f2ca9be45
describe
'35679' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFE' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
48663e0848b3a6b15550d09b80efde07
847fff96044b4dae7650a55740c233f624c4fcab
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFF' 'sip-files00118.tif'
69988b5c87f471a4bf2464bedc2ee81e
64d6029cb9dab4f641d3b92b710e337e4ce57ab7
describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFG' 'sip-files00118.txt'
5cedbfa8a326a9ce69670b737d47270e
ca6f4b32fc036038087c43911a83e0646f5c6c52
describe
'8531' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFH' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
6ff38a4174de2a23ec90996e95089c71
230725f3ccab8366b9eb7a7bb7d3176f9d0139fe
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFI' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
a6dc2fe524df7b3a2fe8bd5214dad249
9afcf40f368a0cd7acf5e0b85f3df611ac5b0c07
describe
'89262' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFJ' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
c3980a5571d6b2e1d9c727a048ddb82f
c27a878afa4d5b2c78287c02cf0b429138b705e0
describe
'16771' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFK' 'sip-files00119.pro'
31f997f90495f287c19de47ce402d049
a96de8c1fa2b87a3f8554e8726d6be45cc8e591b
describe
'28824' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFL' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
880eee2da5dab08f25187ed5d444cc78
bd8271bdfafb1b674c038138f8e60d08f21b83c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFM' 'sip-files00119.tif'
0e22e102a9129c4ceee60dfc53262b9c
68c5dfee9ca8954ef41d1c1a94fa5e33f92b2d58
describe
'676' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFN' 'sip-files00119.txt'
781d573d656e146249ffdb6404769b69
d4210c1e3e44b136e4a725aca592b2106317d829
describe
'7870' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFO' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
43e5e6781834e7c68667244ca8f9b19b
67ccbc33f2efb66bb71d47ffbb6f76488310a9b4
describe
'448865' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFP' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
85857233a84127dbbab7f83f96d02e45
c62d01d03e3a87bc72e0397967b9b7c65e74df9e
'2011-12-30T19:25:41-05:00'
describe
'107758' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFQ' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
508cf7773500f0402734f92228a2c649
08f00f42ae1829bb0a3fc77963d08311914917cc
'2011-12-30T19:25:44-05:00'
describe
'35046' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFR' 'sip-files00120.pro'
c2b0fdae9de7c2aa252fa742b8cc9b83
fdfa13fc729fb3ca11216dd6bee880b33a1a5e93
describe
'32660' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFS' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
d271d710cc2d275d3911af5265b079af
fcf6a9841c00a8d9a8c2352eafcc6df7713017d7
'2011-12-30T19:19:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFT' 'sip-files00120.tif'
b4e4553b4942192a9bc1fea97fa0ce7c
2a4963c4cc3afec1202be91f379297a5c5a5d16a
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFU' 'sip-files00120.txt'
6d123d7f34ceae93d5ae4121b59d665b
cd114a575ef9d5a629df0ece2a326456731b7c34
describe
'8226' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFV' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
b4cacc858386da135d8df75215866c94
251a09dcaeff57ff81621b15b1869fc65e2da251
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFW' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
3c6bc5cb40cb60497ce1b10b7ed2263f
d495951f85ad67f842525e079f97effdb4899936
describe
'99500' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFX' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
9a73a70c1427f92c3efe7f4e9c169e6d
3183500a72827a5477da50d2b1fab7681eba7a7c
describe
'32120' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFY' 'sip-files00121.pro'
2ad5f298e616fed3ea7fae5cc5f7dc3d
8a310b49e80e149e74c2e94481a445ee9208ad6b
describe
'31071' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEFZ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
b5868fb96d9c9aedf4cd27f7e39b60b7
210bf6784e32c75782d8e013471bd5f84088e479
'2011-12-30T19:18:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGA' 'sip-files00121.tif'
10d90ce91ddc611b5a93c67e7cbfbcf0
9ccb6238fc432c8482d30f8b2ded032fc4a111d3
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGB' 'sip-files00121.txt'
ff426f7e5a7b2170dfcd6a308024650e
25addce4e9f93e11b6f87b593bb66da45bdd0e48
describe
'7707' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGC' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
43ece10546512b30149027d639388b93
b030ca6da29c9348ad3d2cf7e4e482e8138c7ba1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGD' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
60141da1604e4547acf2ec3e0a8c9e23
13faa58d431181a0c3d7f25583781b2c354de1db
describe
'76750' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGE' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
e04992fd3cb41db2957928eff2d29445
e75b237be206ce02ef5adb04e62b94a1c31e0c6b
describe
'25295' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGF' 'sip-files00122.pro'
aa497819fa9cc11f639488c80e4c64f6
a1dd98856b82abb58b6b0ddc8f503208280c868d
describe
'23605' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGG' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
7de379eef25d48369ef0cd8d028e56fa
6772990d3e0f6b6e5349547598261eeb3d43e82a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGH' 'sip-files00122.tif'
9a5b3885b376585a1156f33fe406af06
50514ea2a0218db3db8c0b5b7d3e009135136513
'2011-12-30T19:25:54-05:00'
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGI' 'sip-files00122.txt'
f998c4ce71ce61e1448f644d9e5abcbc
8ffa4374a18f2b1472a3b7fa9582da6dd0473508
describe
'6030' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGJ' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
56ab850541d11dd8a6d56b0f4c7c1607
b16519111ffca3da1255597b5cbe875960defb0f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGK' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
e91c37b1d94b4364731f14801a806508
9f00fed01fbd7006a1ef4a63ab5cdffb3d2413c2
'2011-12-30T19:25:30-05:00'
describe
'90748' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGL' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
80fbd7c98128c67e43615ca0fe770f14
77e93f1fd453b7e42d60709305ff26692e19341a
describe
'28665' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGM' 'sip-files00123.pro'
575f46c3a4f768c7163907ac4a88d801
18bb9b28769b8954d3dc75d7f01104721925f778
describe
'26898' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGN' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
5bd584bb44678091b8adbd60d9562e3d
90dc547e4715e50380833fc68614b0ba4a669a5a
'2011-12-30T19:19:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGO' 'sip-files00123.tif'
eac82750874420d9db119512a0919714
ca623924bff81d35a0f235c7cf463f1989cbd816
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGP' 'sip-files00123.txt'
d2285c5a16b708f5339e0369dd1ae356
56015da29982f39637fdaacc275fcbe6317b3f87
describe
'6584' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGQ' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
a3bce7e996d7ea9cfd4dae5276b41548
4cca8caeafb83881f1fb4ecd3eff776787881bfc
describe
'448703' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGR' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
4b065c909331085b33f5f57d49f13b87
1b75d624d37620ef6c94772e9af505bb057e587c
describe
'111884' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGS' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
2a4cac216a978e39e19142cc96286186
7c567c187932e9436bdf353e7146679b8bcbfd20
describe
'37117' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGT' 'sip-files00124.pro'
2385809655f4e52892c4b35a5aad8637
624fb69c508def8208ef7f94805702756dc7db4f
describe
'33793' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGU' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
0859d87d2b94ee15d4e141de590f0c0a
0b6250908794b77d10f7cba389d4fc4341da2cd9
'2011-12-30T19:20:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGV' 'sip-files00124.tif'
c94926db91459f22166274437faec57d
3103d23d547bae766569abd3b2c50c901200ae2a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGW' 'sip-files00124.txt'
7b980f59929ed6925a630e4ed2914951
9b48fa259485a29005f4250cb045d9175d890156
'2011-12-30T19:25:19-05:00'
describe
'8427' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGX' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
9550c8a9e3ec5d4208679aa7f003a486
8e348caf09323d9f7d70a40312b17a1e005b2f4a
'2011-12-30T19:18:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGY' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
4572e96639f508d37fd6a2fbbb404995
3b0cfd771899164f9db947374a5d39cd25d7c96d
describe
'104941' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEGZ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
348ef9e39626f9396e2cd34e94dcce17
f881f65e2455c9eac8b8b841686627de6d24db38
describe
'34722' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHA' 'sip-files00125.pro'
d0c874109bb73e48e6f60a217dbe30c4
4ab65e9107ae1fb7e24352400ec61d72d01650bb
'2011-12-30T19:23:59-05:00'
describe
'32787' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHB' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
d1352eededc700f90e051afb34b88e51
ffaffdde337bc7ddf877ef5838387fc428369493
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHC' 'sip-files00125.tif'
3afa1756f1ba8a62495ae269308074a8
638c843d66db64669fcd33d539c672711e9a5ea9
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHD' 'sip-files00125.txt'
9c14a8b5c56e172953049728d502ba4a
ec093febfa49c32d7233d2ac3cf2e871ff9d1224
describe
'8173' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHE' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
bc2764d96d022fc0f77aeff7bceac5a0
867f136592d5cf48b26d0cbb989290f14f1cef17
'2011-12-30T19:25:24-05:00'
describe
'448927' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHF' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
53a0c4161a4ef12aa5c8fb436c04fd91
2fb6ca9faf7ba37ff654823bcb9a678fabc31ce3
describe
'104899' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHG' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
d91e8e87e8e8d4cbdbd37a0386aab0ab
7f6134d919a18aaf07786d5e655ec40dc14d99e1
'2011-12-30T19:21:40-05:00'
describe
'35102' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHH' 'sip-files00126.pro'
67d6564450b375692a14f390c3ca5ea8
f57b9d0a33aa65b270b92e6c5c07a174fb4fc6fc
describe
'32092' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHI' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
fad522b5912bfb185706344296ab8ce5
0586f3718243c23d0706e28cd6714f8f6795b294
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHJ' 'sip-files00126.tif'
c4b4c06c429a05601acb30c2f0d8563c
941f3605b11efd8475d14f68de9ca1759272edfa
'2011-12-30T19:25:57-05:00'
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHK' 'sip-files00126.txt'
35a803077d72ce74a96ebf01e94a513e
b428b0b1072074f870d35ada73e51071e1fc16b0
describe
'8146' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHL' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
2933f0455a9eaf7bccebb9ea5b5df62a
f7fdfcc18e182be2c7d97fe17507b78f88395318
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHM' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
843a770670ba8201aed70eddde44aef9
328837fc7ad9a4636bd2426430f45b0ed36fc347
describe
'100339' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHN' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
231fe9404b9ba221bd527ec51dba1013
b2681e02d155e9138d98634bbb5aefa76a5586cd
describe
'32724' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHO' 'sip-files00127.pro'
056d6895bd449539bb1144637b7c509d
41823f7b67b56f62e95ccdc7d37f362eea9fcd7c
'2011-12-30T19:22:28-05:00'
describe
'31042' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHP' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
63d8e44f0fbc586d5d9f8c3c5065dc00
df94cb19a76b29eaae9059140222d58cdae18781
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHQ' 'sip-files00127.tif'
a6a47bb17e7cc961c340bdbe5c4574a9
5c92a72545777e377e7ab0da135e1d898680d92b
'2011-12-30T19:23:01-05:00'
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHR' 'sip-files00127.txt'
f53cf8f8b10ff15479938dfe55a36e89
277a586797b5eda946777307b156e6da1150eb86
describe
'7697' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHS' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
67f36c117d0c2e1becbf1ccae9df6381
006d9db9c11259b71ab0994e96b4d22da9d97c2c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHT' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
a83d4f53e1c01087c22ac7d3418a8669
60937ba66b0159452768a8fd8a07ebcf3336af65
describe
'101452' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHU' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
318622f14d1a0696f1094c0003807e09
b7ce25a2491adc72a277babad0533a84c9ad57b0
describe
'32348' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHV' 'sip-files00128.pro'
312c444503a174e7f37b7798271d7ee3
bfb65ebfca96f11a7320dd31ff4f254c925d5576
describe
'30745' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHW' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
5a92e16162268c8163738d7f73fde844
85271e4c1461ece9cd30405c336d6a0c05f3c88b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHX' 'sip-files00128.tif'
14ac616dd622149080ef1d1cf7e67e3f
ac1ecdfc9f2b5029fcaedaa71422952a53893034
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHY' 'sip-files00128.txt'
151c0e9b7290b12c261a90c0c3c31521
f678bb77d0c6f93adb6cb3255750b9be689c7b27
'2011-12-30T19:24:35-05:00'
describe
'8064' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEHZ' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
f5ebad2795f5ab253565f030ab88a4d6
d390d29bc96b4f58dc62ba4e6ad7b4cf096c807d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIA' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
7e4d8f6cddcae19237529d097427a004
a9f89cfee9e210d8c271b158157ccd3ba2251956
describe
'115351' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIB' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
8551d9bee054497fd28d43b5e04f5c79
a14f861a4c69d05d58c61900419d319096f02562
describe
'38145' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIC' 'sip-files00129.pro'
7fdd44ce4b09c231611615b210b71833
45e35dc542fd499419f02df0336b788bf3d0da68
describe
'35609' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEID' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
9436c968ee103e51cd21cbcf916b8f45
ef88a939e1a78a3f166f2bd677f5e280c3a7f98a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIE' 'sip-files00129.tif'
31e28e69ab7586e46725e65ad0abc9ed
79f447c7ce82a159a080e9bb041255acf94732b7
describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIF' 'sip-files00129.txt'
94aa6e11557bbf90d36c338269f85255
af6b2e1c9cac25c14a97706d00d47778d6304a8f
describe
'8539' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIG' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
28bfa485fcce129a2f8d85e37e6f5c6c
6b765ba99ddae8fb3c28b778ec1886b9b7bb08e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIH' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
6ba2233a0a2f8958ab1e095eb4d3a13c
7b4a356c2ba2e0e7ef29e0881241fdb3de9f5e8e
describe
'106310' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEII' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
e1995036537b1c8f489758e7ffe36faf
dadba72c06a0696eb6a4a1c3910fd008318d636a
'2011-12-30T19:22:44-05:00'
describe
'35443' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIJ' 'sip-files00130.pro'
d123806611c4860ecb1398752e8404af
4a0e62a6f464f46746d1f27e5bdf3ffdc90bb661
describe
'33091' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIK' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
cf7d3f73419975f535b1dbfa6bcfc5f0
a3c7cf02eb842f656de2b4c18ed1efc7161f3130
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIL' 'sip-files00130.tif'
53acbc86b45dbeb9ac69ac4a0b8b763f
14e51dca1365e462b02ae22de9f4ff0007931bd5
'2011-12-30T19:20:29-05:00'
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIM' 'sip-files00130.txt'
e874f57e672715478b01b3a7a7004919
f05d5fcbb2c35e5ff8e1a307ccac15fb35132676
describe
'8088' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIN' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
f51840ed50e8a48dc0052cb8985e4473
2de8f27af53e7003767b30b77e0177ac230d9997
describe
'452537' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIO' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
9a4d6bd0d0a5dcb2d4325f1ff8cf6e67
bb8caa2d37ccdc8cea554a42fc6c10d9bc9b0138
'2011-12-30T19:17:58-05:00'
describe
'57077' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIP' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
2ab467cd81f7265f2419b811016bafca
d987847af386c37a5df7a50e5f7e78134b46c8cd
describe
'4086' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIQ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
be71c05c85c73811e517af80d5602da4
72daa220bd7715b0391bb429157b60c24333bdfa
describe
'14297' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIR' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
4f198f0c00001189f7480272598c390a
bc779c1c33490912bcb7de6d98c565c6ee7336ce
describe
'3637284' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIS' 'sip-files00132.tif'
afe8074d5722038a26f61833cdf68a09
a59d0d47393f8bd29a21c3cae69a109ffff0d0f6
'2011-12-30T19:17:27-05:00'
describe
'324' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIT' 'sip-files00132.txt'
a5f5b934a350161ccb9648a719554eba
dc43c3dcc0fc0f3c99ca488125e62a8c56afc6bf
describe
Invalid character
'3742' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIU' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
e36efcfefef264cdae8e87c258fa9977
f8f90cf9997a10aeb299c74eeb769cb0433a04e3
describe
'448714' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIV' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
0b6b9cef460ab6396ac70fd420b015b8
33ae79473ca1ef06ddab92d681eec1ec752460d3
describe
'112819' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIW' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
65f9570099c38a9ed71cd437f6c9353f
eec54526eb6dfb729b4806e5e17ad295242dd64a
'2011-12-30T19:25:59-05:00'
describe
'37144' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIX' 'sip-files00133.pro'
f392297a80bd70d331de7227c56c1bfe
dfe22cbe3b7684da5107b7694803f894a1eef025
describe
'34440' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIY' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
76a4334d95e8bfa1e51cc37d6bde5155
f6e60bc1252100072ec816266089df024844ce4c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEIZ' 'sip-files00133.tif'
b36009af1e1245a8dd448af8b53870b3
02b8cea281a0e3e884700ba27deb9c2b67e32413
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJA' 'sip-files00133.txt'
eb9fe7a544923f06bc3f97db2cb3f63b
0f772f879fd6b0e960a483aa184ebf2fce4f4916
describe
'8402' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJB' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
39ff5d80dfaf16dfb99be61157456f8d
e7595142f1b5e04984ef1d808656b94a19dc39e8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJC' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
41c570ac0b0441578aa882dc5ea4ed43
50ef7e827d2c646079f0da641a9f66104fa4e277
describe
'91173' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJD' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
9fad1175174dc06986cacc62fe12b042
0f90afff43e56b62d11386e70165f33fb23bd893
'2011-12-30T19:23:55-05:00'
describe
'27407' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJE' 'sip-files00134.pro'
a9d0ba0a16087439278b226ceff82ceb
2fb041467a743528d51addde4f50c90ea1b8e089
'2011-12-30T19:19:37-05:00'
describe
'26906' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJF' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
d678f7b867853f0f1980b13014006df6
c34be711c5ed63c797d8b5af222cb1dfd23adeab
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJG' 'sip-files00134.tif'
41b39f1bb31292f645dcc796dc68d01a
9c2a28cd57def9d5e774de3cb74a619e99d75d66
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJH' 'sip-files00134.txt'
44d62a91a67d03b149966d7d27b73cfa
4e7be3a243dcc0501f863501fd00526ee72cad82
'2011-12-30T19:22:34-05:00'
describe
'6480' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJI' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
7157ef886092600ec419c7cac132c76d
760902eb5d2e889eafc98cf14ad38aca2820302f
describe
'448944' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJJ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
dc668aa3d1686d7d7fa49a989779ce01
c6be89accf38a27f24554fdef7b92e62ab914b08
'2011-12-30T19:21:23-05:00'
describe
'113127' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJK' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
2dfc59a605a6901c833a10192ce86891
134ce4f17fe7b8172d95cfce9213db2dd30f302d
describe
'37138' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJL' 'sip-files00135.pro'
49ade9d25b108d2a71053654d8281294
bffbf8a32fa81d220a3cf6f2f2ae732dcf1ca403
describe
'35033' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJM' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
f33fbbd0e0e3b41915381a7912a40c38
282cadab3f14e94c450cea76f7e4ef96e5573cd9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJN' 'sip-files00135.tif'
732533074ff2229e841a555365d59b97
e751d5454c37086050e9ccac76059a680f7d46dc
'2011-12-30T19:18:09-05:00'
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJO' 'sip-files00135.txt'
51000de4ded40d12ee924b0a4807baef
f73aa5ede7ef35af5a0efe3c6663cbadad056702
describe
'8578' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJP' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
31c371506a5be6397cb2a6cd73ff2a19
fe3bc0f2cd9ea5f8a606ee65cc935c9c41eaa477
'2011-12-30T19:24:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJQ' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
2ed9adef76efc6e6c99c00ac6ae0f546
fbd9e169f8dfd2161dda0ac5bbd02f55630c8c82
describe
'99055' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJR' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
1bc429b21471749c4f56e8f0031fd1b5
f4f59ec135de773f497e6e7554a7eef0567c27a6
describe
'32657' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJS' 'sip-files00136.pro'
ced8a9384e4098f08a6f2ae9613d6637
a90fc1caa8f6f8b7f4fa982941941f76ebb1a5d0
describe
'30501' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJT' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
d99788755b93447303e2be0d3184aafd
594e952556d42275ee46a88dc18bdaa277360b56
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJU' 'sip-files00136.tif'
74ec8528288656cf3c9e7cf97c20e896
c5504c7f77593dfbda702167578fb4082734cc60
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJV' 'sip-files00136.txt'
6b36052b8d5b7e5b95e67cd971ba9949
48300d862b2e4c7d1f05b8cd484a9947a854fa5b
describe
'8166' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJW' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
f4b2ea254bd79bf9747dc7b29eb833e6
3ab73de9f6e389a2feb53f1a6a2a163875ff489f
describe
'448933' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJX' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
fd818ea718ce64f4ee9639e35e7aecec
43b8c56bd9207cd1519e04b3b5ac3756f7104763
describe
'98697' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJY' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
e8993431ded3b65bb2475028e2a3ba2f
35517291db8d0c766b165c5d585deff874ac5ae8
'2011-12-30T19:23:37-05:00'
describe
'32461' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEJZ' 'sip-files00137.pro'
cd6a4729269308166c186ffce819041a
8f8ae85636283e2f017335af2ca502484d793bf1
describe
'30508' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKA' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
cb4dda57b34c67f78e937ed47a91f26f
fefb6994484d9104b3255182051a0c4ca9ba6293
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKB' 'sip-files00137.tif'
365188798fa724783607433ba9995192
ccdf5e19a5e807f2c0201acbb3db16209c8c735e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKC' 'sip-files00137.txt'
ac49e9be8d63abe8f63505963c114885
b5432e5f55cba5c74120d5421499a48f7d59aca2
describe
'7906' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKD' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
1d5cc0a7844333ae2caf1148f5e7aa8d
ad03284fcd116d4ea5fc9d66d40f9cd983ab3720
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKE' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
10831cf9b5ef0906cb7c9bcdb6410b64
167cc52ca96b765612a9dda635c7caedde6d6e17
describe
'102519' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKF' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
29a78414f711378a64837e41b5786dff
84d3acdbce46f5a5d8c91d66f423bacaa26e2bc3
describe
'32911' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKG' 'sip-files00138.pro'
451ba48deeb5bef5059f037f81d54a69
0434028d26fab496c5e74e550c4dec5a12332ba6
'2011-12-30T19:26:22-05:00'
describe
'30737' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKH' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
194398b44a4d80e5dda6bcf76d3473a1
c017dc6386e3335b587b954eae1b4df7ed793db1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKI' 'sip-files00138.tif'
c0c0b049060cbfc1ec9f6421e2008067
f5fe42df193cf8349eb21f41527d4b1df6510259
'2011-12-30T19:24:57-05:00'
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKJ' 'sip-files00138.txt'
5002379f138da601bdf4ff6aada25b0e
d58a955cecbfb7f76edd3b1f2ac8e85cf3fa3e47
describe
'7595' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKK' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
199a5a49d2a42a671698354904b1946c
f62c92ad3238d4ffb76c425290f8ad9d2cb4a353
describe
'448897' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKL' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
00a1927a89955e93457e69f09b77a66c
54832171475859608fdaaebfe5093920f432b40f
describe
'111541' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKM' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
2fb68d26a37831a29846f457c23c14a8
3587e95922e9d064ce47705be21a66d0a1618440
describe
'37775' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKN' 'sip-files00139.pro'
f4b93b41748d3d2daf74b3f05a8e28a8
3d76c14968d77b1cd8d54e59e47e5db160a4000b
describe
'34316' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKO' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
93296ba5964bb352dd1cc72debb71676
c9cc6b36f113cf418b7e4ba76804220227c2e77a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKP' 'sip-files00139.tif'
0bf2c2d91e20b0ff49087fee168fa1c4
6958639ab0606e2e720d260d7059ea7939a5cf4b
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKQ' 'sip-files00139.txt'
5362a14f34926a5b64aab88ff4813878
1742376e2850178603378be8c8a930044ac47c2a
describe
'8409' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKR' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
d771e2dd79dac7607844524a8c9690bd
c4a7e440d0dc6595b7a8d02a0be23d7b75c8b15e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKS' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
b291a37709f2ce38922c71be95205c55
43daf388156942b58449f811902af8a2e5d94f46
'2011-12-30T19:24:41-05:00'
describe
'113798' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKT' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
891fd93a60876d255f5bcdcea22f0b00
2bea5a6d6180fdf4914aa12af9edeb5a882e681a
describe
'38375' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKU' 'sip-files00140.pro'
1a73a4d65564c362b87b97660a2d8348
b044c0905ef3dd7336d3f98673b56bbfed26358e
'2011-12-30T19:23:40-05:00'
describe
'33832' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKV' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
2b5f289ccc9d5e4d8d7a606ce79b6f3d
6e43c0fbba82509532980c7a2a9e8975f6933ed0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKW' 'sip-files00140.tif'
e8e8f9a52756a43a779e6e5fc499dd1d
bcf3357a50e2e81224f8de54733e394ef5d70f11
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKX' 'sip-files00140.txt'
3b3a11886072c8f460a292d90f72c471
f0d83d577efb0d091622182cde57cd4ce31494fc
describe
'8388' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKY' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
17dd77b6370ce2a4323a7a74bb21b497
ecfff4f8acc04e3d006c11d056cb618575d53aaa
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEKZ' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
46bb891a4f2353252087e9a0c3d5ba3b
92f4c16b81a1fa9480b1467478591eb3037d9678
describe
'101056' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELA' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
ed58832407866a0203b1bc34c39398a7
4f68a11420a9dfd1f4d9566f76f768b8012afd05
describe
'33625' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELB' 'sip-files00141.pro'
28eaa41dd643ab8aec410b8221834eb7
27d8d80a6b3471ca6613d3290ae20731e501ea26
describe
'30558' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELC' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
c473b9a0ebbd389e78261247fef73288
a7a8eef7e496bcfbc35be7918519b9d99ed4e5c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELD' 'sip-files00141.tif'
3504ce5984c258830a9cb4e565096551
efc0981322d489ae27b2f0c507fb4bd3f93605bd
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELE' 'sip-files00141.txt'
a66580f5ddd973f8a84171701a0851bf
a06b0746d125459ccd9c0d88ac2b65c37e8ccea3
describe
'7943' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELF' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
6bfaa8436eb496a67a6f82202b8ddec7
3ff8419ebcae8496f82bded3faa630d9c91a0cf3
describe
'448986' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELG' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
01b31856f30af8aa067a7a5adecda97d
f980e27d08a4e550edd2ab1cba2bcccdf150ca1f
describe
'81325' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELH' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
5a39ac42f68a23ef4225514c4f171da6
376129b765a30a1317dcf65da1eb29da3286a996
describe
'24104' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELI' 'sip-files00142.pro'
68c249b43c8e0e16e324a0003def9653
17b9d59f3cc7bbece1c98a26244fc3d96031e2a4
describe
'24163' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELJ' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
17ab5ea5b4030a7e161baabd95289f5f
ea1fe56b0fcecd9fa517ea2f7ff7f80c6c556503
'2011-12-30T19:26:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELK' 'sip-files00142.tif'
b27d85c50947e13a4e75906886dcb361
42e9ea74cf6b338c8a696b0d48436c1fde16da77
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELL' 'sip-files00142.txt'
3124f331186dbf2dcba1897935b23253
ccfe6ed891fc824e7b74bf039efb7d4906932d61
describe
'6416' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELM' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
d7c5cb86e4435d1869779020a5c37261
2e2be52be0ca898fc3e145c9ce50c18b895ec358
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELN' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
a4c23ab537fb34b95b71d10a8ae484c9
d071908401dc7973fbe72552d59b947a14115814
describe
'51458' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELO' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
e6c1a7a685f433a7d548cee366b8de53
28e42132d823e0e294a6ea0fd6597e89215b4383
describe
'11589' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELP' 'sip-files00143.pro'
8f5af7c88804f5c9ded6b4ab265f1090
64919a5f2a52b50e94f23b8ee6dc9828e9f037bd
describe
'13799' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELQ' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
9bd968d589b5ebf13e24fd25d0dae1cb
4fad9dd7970bed46c64cad68f1112610ad44a9ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELR' 'sip-files00143.tif'
908047e2672e770f9fc0cd46c9750b28
f4ddd9a9364e1d32310a301945870953530289ba
describe
'489' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELS' 'sip-files00143.txt'
9684bb01827abbb85ee37fa4377f003c
11a9914be52f33039618abdf3ac2cd175b02cb54
'2011-12-30T19:17:17-05:00'
describe
'3437' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELT' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
ffb558bf2d1abe9716a586bc38957726
92e9e8a3b2f5ce3710f3faed438105775964aeeb
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELU' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
4031e09bd203c314cf1dbb9901644910
b157e769c142b234f4deced47a30ab1cd70a877b
describe
'89671' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELV' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
9524dc9a19d737346ba4e21c291f2c17
ba22e409e9a01ccebe0ea668054149ebf8d59874
'2011-12-30T19:25:20-05:00'
describe
'29016' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELW' 'sip-files00144.pro'
5c0ce99963484871770f8ff73114363f
adb048b36dc2e843c0ade2087195540739809fc7
describe
'26538' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELX' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
525a16653b3f0647d2d88b43393a5db7
434f7a70978fab0c033954deab985cbcbec5bd9b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELY' 'sip-files00144.tif'
6089ae46fba163567a3cc6be4e8c6d4c
3646acea6256b8ebe6bfa8b298080b1bea65d513
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABELZ' 'sip-files00144.txt'
371ebf98777211d043cb13155ac57227
a2830f0cc565fb7812433c73ef5a8860470ee3ad
'2011-12-30T19:17:09-05:00'
describe
'6701' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMA' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
3aac740f945d446f6ec82729c67f2f96
e62f0f83921ff42bd96bcf90e719f7c7dcd54ab0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMB' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
b0f994d0fc5558e356202ceb23d6978c
9ff8eae5fce83772cae27652a5a2a226e27b64e4
describe
'107041' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMC' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
9662e507432aa4df824592ee50308867
2db34695a8f573cc82f01001e7535218dc107de2
describe
'35714' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMD' 'sip-files00145.pro'
81fd43cec33c298dca8e1aecf0ccb5cc
3da1fa461303d033dd12ace5f2a1d6e2497b00e6
'2011-12-30T19:25:06-05:00'
describe
'33034' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEME' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
aeaff44fb799ce0386c429fa1c2475ff
503467a6014b3e2ac6c9a2acfe4da2405f3ab2a7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMF' 'sip-files00145.tif'
e9766332f427397cffebed9421088896
c5ccc7c1ad79646734b816fb60081ee41baf0a11
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMG' 'sip-files00145.txt'
8f42b906853d8c5d37e3e630aeb939d2
bf211fbc856117deb9629947c412e3e3fe1d512a
describe
'8235' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMH' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
046bdb240463de0be0af135cd5193039
1bbec8bd4e8f22e70ce0883c4ba78213bb0eb42f
describe
'448627' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMI' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
ec237ee783997886b858a18bbab5b026
146f21d7395aa3e4aa25686174c61e5cc9a24988
'2011-12-30T19:20:02-05:00'
describe
'113976' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMJ' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
cd28230dfe200d64d8f85659079a6632
87294d2abda62569fe6e7e15960d78cbbf149645
describe
'38183' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMK' 'sip-files00146.pro'
583bb1a8d1f875a534097c734704e74e
828c0615d2067855480cbe985a7c228ffdcab29f
'2011-12-30T19:26:26-05:00'
describe
'34992' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEML' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
712f77f000e48d2d020515110a2a4c4b
cbdf6c9b5c84ff329446fe12f49e80f7d897de36
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMM' 'sip-files00146.tif'
79f83bb063010ad3684440c6e9ffc4c8
b858078bace6197f2aa51b3fb2f0ea8cc880bb4f
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMN' 'sip-files00146.txt'
db61941398328f39310d953bf11df3a0
b4898dd29fe45a818dbd6f4ffaae8b9aa3aaabe1
'2011-12-30T19:26:20-05:00'
describe
'8394' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMO' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
f8a24220237075a759f0ed46d0301554
a3664a6333c972c3cf9e54530f09eaceef5c7b53
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMP' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
a8db445bb697070a83ff7322e01bfe35
4b33ffd7e2291cc68953eb231a11b492e7d298d1
describe
'112969' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMQ' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
1eeeed62a8539bba61830c80a43fd89c
803b3a63e08be042337a3ca1e5d33f494f83e35a
describe
'38154' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMR' 'sip-files00147.pro'
6b25652d5d6bb08aeea691e9128faa92
26590a79019f950dc81af18290edfdf55a221681
describe
'34576' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMS' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
83ae56ba22316eb10d12c37e4e5ae8bd
063f11397d68df568adffd34d22db948acdd185a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMT' 'sip-files00147.tif'
abbf53d63cdf7dca12ffd5faf58eded4
51596238b0bfd7de4cdd79041d105a65e62b5ea9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMU' 'sip-files00147.txt'
fb2530c19e7fcbc33b73711826641220
cbc93c549d4b46c3a5fd370a1fcca02b022f2b29
describe
'8486' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMV' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
02becdbd0226762300074e99d261211d
f8340236341b5b73c7a6cb28cb1bcf62bd923ba4
describe
'448945' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMW' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
37e7bd53c0a405112f677d5af7ab6fd6
e858537dd0aa45a5c3bc7b3c39416e33d6a307ce
'2011-12-30T19:20:44-05:00'
describe
'105572' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMX' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
bea83fa01ff4060734d03da309534805
c5ab0db687f040c55e3eaaf7cfa2e7c763fd4f4e
describe
'33977' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMY' 'sip-files00148.pro'
180074f8342da766f2bbdcb6c343e94e
faa2f527693bc1dc4535e8306959efdd68d73537
describe
'31681' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEMZ' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
9d66adce93d193bd302cb92c4459d8a0
379fde223cfe7aa385992095c29f6626c22d5c0b
'2011-12-30T19:22:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENA' 'sip-files00148.tif'
383aa7bf21437a1b5f46d7e0b1abf545
3270215d80e51b8028180d50959ba44bd25e7c63
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENB' 'sip-files00148.txt'
4278f9549011e60e09d52f46573935d3
6a91fb0ab70c875e73209098f39f4f08aaae345c
describe
'7909' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENC' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
8d6625a5543d5c4cd7e8eefa4ac9c688
d30ad35d5bbe228e0152336967f393c31ecd5b4d
describe
'448928' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEND' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
25c0aefcc655b2e5524f5e7547ab0498
b1cc92d7847e769aef7bf57e86d4f5c6373bd51c
'2011-12-30T19:26:21-05:00'
describe
'97718' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENE' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
723ef46736c384ec105906c00424089d
a0c47fc796482c8e928b1799c4e7926bc9b9bb40
describe
'30044' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENF' 'sip-files00149.pro'
bc52e3e451423ce1e79a15247bb4ca8b
f8e362ad5722f0e6794bfe4209028b6e6aa5ab15
describe
'30437' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENG' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
a1832421abbde3cbda47f071ce1e7840
849948ba2dd4f9a770e9a749727fb71d2bca0e17
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENH' 'sip-files00149.tif'
34a9682b061bf9d462608bbd7f166d50
954b6a8689e90699bf514a76cb61e046eb4aa655
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENI' 'sip-files00149.txt'
5e55cf2b2c280eaf5122aa78bfa522c7
bbeb8a0b1bcc41bb05825f4d525d973fc2414d10
describe
'7685' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENJ' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
9bb6456999987425515a8d9d2851f775
cb1e58d526823da8b5990241adf51a5d57ab9ed3
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENK' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
7d86726bc6fd00e6bce5d34292dde7ee
2b01a3b3daf9eef48d8f564c4987c876a72c7790
describe
'112551' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENL' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
b004b59817f4863b753718d8d1e60770
6f9307381b5e3014fdbb449d9fe79d98ed69d1ed
describe
'37715' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENM' 'sip-files00150.pro'
ac5c197af6c7d79ad87401ca9e4592a7
c4b224321897d32edabe578b3dce8dbcf8c6fc56
describe
'33757' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENN' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
4818836a1716696ce275a90fc7b1bf60
d334526049ab82fc42e03ec086bc39d069f8f231
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENO' 'sip-files00150.tif'
4af36c8c44ff6dd39161b3249b09db54
a4ec97eca43fcc48d5f42a99842866205e5549bf
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENP' 'sip-files00150.txt'
874abb9cf875887b45e562e1f0b52e92
b7a7bf3d6fadcb70ac22274da5095b390b38e9ea
describe
'8136' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENQ' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
8ec33cffea3925064b5323d6eb91caa2
53e54bd6cfa3c7d0e30df3e8adfc80b3ac24ba15
describe
'448842' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENR' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
7b3e13134c6155ab36ea7e45efb0b8d7
16d23c0d47fac40dede4df476799c655529c3b0d
describe
'52502' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENS' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
eac320d5a54b972b6442a64da8fdf221
2ca8c95f724d9937627d618de53e9fbafe69de0a
describe
'13251' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENT' 'sip-files00151.pro'
3de2ca8616bc0b8b931e3cd4e40cb578
e61cb125102c532a280ade9e369b755e25855012
'2011-12-30T19:24:44-05:00'
describe
'14324' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENU' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
0ac2a358fd2d4e256369945171b3b8bd
fc344e83a9eaae8a68a29c14ba8148b655434609
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENV' 'sip-files00151.tif'
e0ffb4ba451a7a5fab6d5ec2154fe961
19fe6773638a088f93a90d95e77bf20118029252
describe
'540' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENW' 'sip-files00151.txt'
c58ee6e0e9b2d47a886de137e6be1057
02619c4529dd8faf864aafe8eb1c9ecae2ecf80d
describe
'3729' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENX' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
86ea3195f625688cb79f56bbccca2e67
dd017aed43b72a36c7f0f3bd97f9e12926618d31
describe
'448839' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENY' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
84c3a829516a1c32c38afe0b83b100f2
e78d7cfaccd607b5578f5572ff4ba19f5449c2d3
describe
'90657' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABENZ' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
d67245adcfac4912aac9a235642a5e84
8b347e43e3598a2e9b3aca6d8140d13e8f70c48b
'2011-12-30T19:21:01-05:00'
describe
'28087' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOA' 'sip-files00152.pro'
9ad3b632e51edc6fb0f554c8940a27e3
524f801cf0d66d9054aee812e07776e895878ce1
describe
'26804' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOB' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
f970550082ccb684a5c39878c52b7cd8
f28c5f3c67f0696d633be29780674d5dc5203084
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOC' 'sip-files00152.tif'
77d7dd359787cfe7fe5371c501a6f843
000870eccca6337c9105a711213e1cabba3bed94
'2011-12-30T19:20:17-05:00'
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOD' 'sip-files00152.txt'
a48d943e764c20e34b5863a7bfde0a8a
374f7920a32b89d2ca391d9046921d884c78970a
'2011-12-30T19:25:11-05:00'
describe
'6828' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOE' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
c81f91c74417918e6208612eceeb9fc4
4ac050796d7f600fe59524883a17c637e530b550
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOF' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
136a9cb67358b814fa91d2b5a68eb66b
d4c56c5bfab82366e22915c91679ca8c1471c4f5
'2011-12-30T19:21:48-05:00'
describe
'110797' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOG' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
e5d17326da2e8026d41002d8c8eefd76
10787aad980f96f61627e984a7aeed2a45b53bc1
describe
'36596' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOH' 'sip-files00153.pro'
2fa9139f6688a8a1166c6da3718aa14a
b340454d9a7c8691f3648972664db341f65cb2f4
describe
'35003' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOI' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
827c756451b060b9ee1ebcb684444551
1fa584a0b1fdc903d48695ad616b3225dfd49ce1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOJ' 'sip-files00153.tif'
b39b956ad50cef025564cfa66a0c986b
77c57a997fba58fd794f15655c72e3310a31e30e
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOK' 'sip-files00153.txt'
be02c704998f4537afc04f9a8e279a47
b6909832e65879f708cd369a6a04f6585916f7b9
'2011-12-30T19:20:32-05:00'
describe
'8403' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOL' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
045628e2dcb5d0001abce0f7058705e5
d1f666904dd28cd6e1508b801e336054df980d0b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOM' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
de5e6bbe9b28705c78a2a25ff5516d02
ce27d2937c6f9187d59ba32719da3c90903a2c0a
describe
'120098' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEON' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
30640e5ed9d8805d4f8e1c6a7078d6fb
8d856b936b133e8aa38d48bdf2c58c976f9c041e
describe
'41637' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOO' 'sip-files00154.pro'
9a132b96a72e5cf4d5a963d5a1b7bb04
68f03131874c017083c0909ec793ac88624d39cb
'2011-12-30T19:17:52-05:00'
describe
'36801' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOP' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
44b7667fc23c1d62e2a18729ed234ecd
36cc10593364af2d8250ec71344129d0fa0dea95
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOQ' 'sip-files00154.tif'
f12262fa3837a05b24398f18bed8e122
fe60c531b5a19ae9f272dd85b8a3f6937acaaf90
describe
'1636' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOR' 'sip-files00154.txt'
415dbf4c1e21ec9794c2f02b685fae26
a300c8249af48ab9e312b294abff246e7a80d154
describe
'8817' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOS' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
3e961690d77c163787aafa99eaaa5303
13f3aaf31bbacb8a3bcd3ee4598928bd5ac2c2df
describe
'448982' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOT' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
5af93e308ac452af99b294f485381f5f
6cdbd01cffb1754e3cac022e3ce8a9401fe97963
describe
'99146' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOU' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
b8af8962bdeabc4b8795c0e46a1f2f24
148284919fa038d92aa7b26a0e6175daf0e91db1
describe
'31992' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOV' 'sip-files00155.pro'
7bd49cc71013b5689b1144e67a52c0cb
b9f87f1a8550e32d55f221effbe1d8775413533e
describe
'29358' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOW' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
4e645bcfe47c13b01652eae30e6a9a67
57b892e612796aaa032c670ba028d5f1f80fa6d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOX' 'sip-files00155.tif'
ecf3af1a7ba8ceb4606b1220ef28b431
2f52471c74e05170522b8ef9cee9578dee5c61ba
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOY' 'sip-files00155.txt'
ea9aed6b84e0c2217bb42559f6c933b2
7de67fcae112b2e61f7e5b5f918afaa9abee3b95
describe
'7917' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEOZ' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
8d2ecff5edae851f834184172289eea0
360581b93cd8954239586538332f21bc83afbcb9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPA' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
42b17df3794bbe670f67f261cbc6c3ca
a94d5e5b04508ea2930f206a0f96f0854ab9531e
'2011-12-30T19:23:45-05:00'
describe
'100125' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPB' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
5799132d0408a3f8d504f4be189d98f6
82fa8b5cf1444730de02076428af2962e8a073d4
describe
'32164' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPC' 'sip-files00156.pro'
a6293f4b5baa4b6b9f5d81fd5dd05570
11190f67885983831203641e785f9054f7632ff3
describe
'30921' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPD' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
04bf4e1a1efb93128becba98d86ecc74
1ae11827734b6c77626a92b7b42098f93dc881f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPE' 'sip-files00156.tif'
d7babf627e6cbd577772429ea69fe3f7
79e5adfe5cdb1769043d1338f772345bbd9e2944
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPF' 'sip-files00156.txt'
6f0ce4fdbaf487df4bb9d02e5b492215
12d07e51b7d7a3acb147cfc0ae68b19875456ef6
describe
'8172' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPG' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
afa59f5049a437021a804bd4b471db7b
c2060de594f3e8c1d136f157f66bb324b5727d4a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPH' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
39ee0ba2087aefe79b92da4f5514b715
53bd3ba8246e3991049637664e3059d35b60ee6e
describe
'115908' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPI' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
0c20d7929692c2b2b0f83427ee1ce31e
234241f1bc85be0bf04014e959dea4880b41b45a
describe
'38273' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPJ' 'sip-files00157.pro'
946caf5fced6a210637af9b2da092933
e9de82d645e5bea89a9c5c122ef3221def666b31
describe
'34831' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPK' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
8c5f8fcf55d35dbed7f812b3296a0403
e508dabe143c3c0c894c547b261ab36c400f5c2f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPL' 'sip-files00157.tif'
5a29ac5418499347d15ee515ed7a2c1f
2e67d3d060186a5dcde4b4e6cc8aed3dcc98a2a5
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPM' 'sip-files00157.txt'
8c00b7ec34a197e87193797c8eab230b
659e38d11f8378217828966f2e56e7a7761c4a81
describe
'8329' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPN' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
ebcc3954c960cb0076a3f5a93036032a
9a634e954c132eb836c08c56f944b1de38f4f80e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPO' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
f7246fd7a87d3ad909c77d8e4ca0adf0
812031a0a222ae8b0ba0d7cfe8845bbdaa5d8807
describe
'90633' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPP' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
823dbe2d49edb95834814751f7bd627d
e0cf6b9b7a8db74c8070856f8c5d5c118febaf1a
describe
'27532' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPQ' 'sip-files00158.pro'
186dc18a67655f2e459ec3ff7237e017
6a2642f91412ab2c53e738f4a2dd69afcd0ea538
describe
'27098' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPR' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
04c906d944212fec2cf858c1c163be5c
fa9a6e6fabdac8ec12b31640cc2c850d06da82ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPS' 'sip-files00158.tif'
e91b518deb6867cc4b32cee9a6db1a87
1d068a8d73fc1b5ae88ff97e9525d5544bf0a59d
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPT' 'sip-files00158.txt'
70396c946adbd9ea691c5f67720fabb9
dc3705cd3abc466c92d2f58ee59368ad6134f6d6
describe
'6555' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPU' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
436cffb0c9b7e0a3935c2ebbaf3bb74b
4ca9d486f7fb36414cc58e83510f1488fddf364b
describe
'465021' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPV' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
bc032ec7c11d1af6cd2ce20cc35feb4e
d367fafaef3de3286de8de4d7f031cad9661f776
describe
'60835' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPW' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
54ee19c9664fe09d7ec0137cd6e1442e
ad4e3b9ae5b3d2ba9b7c71ff950a723f64fce1aa
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPX' 'sip-files00160.pro'
0aecff3bad140c712e288122c7d16911
4eb5664efc1de086f69992a85db9f4f797904d6e
describe
'14426' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPY' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
60865742594a135f7ec19289a3a4a924
d153368a97d1e6541a01fe7654c019f369dc10e3
describe
'3737908' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEPZ' 'sip-files00160.tif'
fcc22a10070184c02bcb74f15596dea6
d0ace66759948fa1ca9497f3096fa9d72b7c32d9
describe
'103' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQA' 'sip-files00160.txt'
8955e2079efbec29c7209794ea530436
628961e634abad25fd8c8278b499f671d723c6e8
describe
Invalid character
'3925' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQB' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
cd3b97fdd9ce5609635e28c50d2361bf
ae50be25dbf95183ccb46d2f4088643977e4da44
describe
'448913' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQC' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
1cadfb2508ed88dc46e518be26b1cf08
2abe39515e14f888072d6090946110b4264ee43a
describe
'100811' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQD' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
baec90cf0512880a6c9e42fccf90945c
43687ab464981aefb861c5247c6885851ae9b919
'2011-12-30T19:19:10-05:00'
describe
'30929' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQE' 'sip-files00161.pro'
37f7f8461526c122f1c8ca8d6b21f10d
c43297194080b397dc99beb42b0806c6432d8f4b
describe
'30846' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQF' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
c31839c133feea756dcc23b8c8188351
61a9679cbfa8bf6544ccb249080244fa9e7f042d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQG' 'sip-files00161.tif'
2f17cffbdbea88d410d480a04c2a6305
32bdc5dca8079736935da6a7e08afd8cf388e6f9
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQH' 'sip-files00161.txt'
961af5e23e4eebea2b841513928d75b6
c0cfdb0b9a5172ab3b0488b6b5b734156c0e7cc4
describe
'7659' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQI' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
4ca0cb97e0ba10808b949f9cede20e3d
8dc3518b31b0f52b543afb620493b7e473a30a8f
describe
'448929' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQJ' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
90dbb8e459a87d68176d2e45c659a098
db9550a41734a04686a62580c94a866d9c2f684a
describe
'110733' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQK' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
071148b0a5563d865fa21faa66ce569f
95e8428b78ac49817ec969403754c8e12b01e11c
describe
'37402' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQL' 'sip-files00162.pro'
8b171b70fca7c59706cd3acf83e2fa3f
b24cca6eaf8083f412b58f4b4661877858fc13bd
describe
'33844' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQM' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
8325d860e3ed98623abadf12024517af
b67af7714bd9e9dc7ae582fe0debc4118a8f2d45
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQN' 'sip-files00162.tif'
3e6a71f5e7179b2601badc38cd4cad4e
bd3a75cfd0292cd57b3f8865915c7364a11b924a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQO' 'sip-files00162.txt'
a7afdcd1c32f97e0e3c6d28b2ae9d01b
edf46876b420f67704c26e88a959714eb2e66bec
describe
'8417' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQP' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
c74add1c860c58c20e800dd458514024
0d16b4b6287fb255ac480d8cac4abf45e908ed45
'2011-12-30T19:18:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQQ' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
0c6e35dd2db00dd31aa98904148249a0
3a268757162ce404459c460431d12eba35f89d53
describe
'107131' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQR' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
5fe0c85e88c9cbf968490d63560bba46
6eeb9efd7f295c232080cb3ad1b6694a1afaac34
describe
'34633' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQS' 'sip-files00163.pro'
6ebd252609c476ffeeeb350c20ba05d6
b5914f5dfbc372980dfd47178c7e997e43015d6f
'2011-12-30T19:17:16-05:00'
describe
'32434' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQT' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
8157190567383498df04b4a57743a9b8
b6ebf5cf1d9dc24d0d9c4ae689b1fc562fc7ffb8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQU' 'sip-files00163.tif'
98b557b5794b903a7a6a890ad40c177e
45f61e81c920eee4727f7f1210f984046b6682a4
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQV' 'sip-files00163.txt'
07acb4da32b6ffcfaba3118953b3a0d6
13c5d7fd5cbc1ec8e1c442033d1762da2e8a5b3e
describe
'7877' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQW' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
dc756c5e8db83ed4b6832e9f123475ad
b8333843774cf0c593c48591bd10a086dbc203ec
'2011-12-30T19:24:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQX' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
db2c5956ccb23fa6656929e58da27115
72f8265116be1d81a430e67b34957dba9c071786
describe
'101224' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQY' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
3b8d89c30a5c1143e5d0fb59f95eefd6
48d0e3b67cc06bd276e4fa0e24d65dfcebdcddfb
describe
'33819' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEQZ' 'sip-files00164.pro'
791e0225fa84515177459cb49bed1656
8c5b4642cb3206a68f568a1834d0df9b6622f6ae
describe
'30972' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERA' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
585508381d2d6b0f8ffc8c087a951dd9
74d1f37b3917b50c68e6c44e589b6af74f49410c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERB' 'sip-files00164.tif'
546d6fcd3350ff2b71f40363362a0f5f
47c510bde0e9d9e5109c76b2cbe1eded55be3633
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERC' 'sip-files00164.txt'
8760ebc9667d0269eb2915ddece67deb
28d3d9cc607a85185e5dfad3280183a20e59f3b7
describe
'7948' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERD' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
cd3c078ada39ec0a726d887501b22ca5
917b2eca2bbf041ac9fc1fba3a43940aaeb8603f
'2011-12-30T19:24:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERE' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
8a7f0ae247cb090774706a170d9192bc
654d06c297fa386260acf76858f81f348d7e2226
'2011-12-30T19:21:45-05:00'
describe
'106754' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERF' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
3b9aaea0961b5fe0779c68f05d064f46
e824f923a490c8d574f3934673aa35a3018405bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERG' 'sip-files00165.pro'
c1f8eaaf344406c3cc6f80bb273dd00e
037186aa7edcb0743437cc312e509dc4cc7ccdf7
describe
'33370' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERH' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
f419163d1e125ebfe6e2d7811b93c300
776f4c784b759ca0d558773dca00fd3f62962569
'2011-12-30T19:22:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERI' 'sip-files00165.tif'
5c05f42381ae6dd000847ebcbba70b78
b55edb00df2b95b7aae4b3a67d1277a0b276a4e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERJ' 'sip-files00165.txt'
c2bf9a8418253dbef6fcc3e1bf178b35
c6a281dcf2510f676b7fa22ad98a028e38cc87c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERK' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
9aa99b26c584b3a9edf733865f2847ba
2e00c8767d632632d41a057c5f40de01ecff86b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERL' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
e7aad8e9fd8f6f1162d13b7431a1ac2f
3919972d9c82ce63091f1f0f2c3cc6e72619f757
describe
'103634' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERM' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
f758739bff1bdf6e8e3625d453015ba1
b99179b30d91adfb2e7efc9c77378c16aee0db66
describe
'34009' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERN' 'sip-files00166.pro'
54e06a2ba97369cec442389b4a13adf6
49e844bdb471426e5bf28230dbd0a6cc4fa7e617
describe
'31057' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERO' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
bd5a8d885af6d1e40f8ab2f8ecdd17fc
a72a76c00d840183993d786f543190055c2cff2b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERP' 'sip-files00166.tif'
89fbe9515b422dc7848e6b73dd8c3c51
da0132891e8180b82ecdf6dda64947465a03aa58
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERQ' 'sip-files00166.txt'
ef97a0ef71e406d4285849f353e097ae
61bc9e3c86243b99a584a2124638d7d0a8315ced
describe
'7542' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERR' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
77725421de30f0bed423d3f3e094d2b8
7125607bac8d7ebc0d35edde5fbb0da4dae07a6d
describe
'448743' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERS' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
45328d76ee45dd91a5c9199969e22c48
e8b85f81bc22cf2c9d5cd779a178d4f7a7ff3b3a
describe
'101165' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERT' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
cd8a260b9ed9aef3d148116f3388775d
b325b9449a75f9a2b815530fa8954f5aa23814e3
describe
'4090' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERU' 'sip-files00167.pro'
374b133fdcda6aa2fdfa3f4239b12a6f
f1f9049a19fcb92162a450624ad6d06f49c1202d
describe
'23479' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERV' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
fda0edb5dcfbbc0a26a6babebdea9fb0
6d3fc1ba2fd2ddd5e7611c1f94c0599001d9f5f4
'2011-12-30T19:17:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERW' 'sip-files00167.tif'
0db33da6b665101e1c8071d85f2789bc
5c1ebaef00143c2a70c3be45672696e593ba4e87
describe
'176' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERX' 'sip-files00167.txt'
2eb5e8ce48e8358a101bd58cb3e42b3f
4a4021fa52d933a7dc335630ed56d63c27935084
describe
'6215' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERY' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
c46a01fc14e8d85458928f22edf43b67
80b02ed457848e24ce42017a8633d2e105b25cdd
describe
'448740' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABERZ' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
7c3891fbf3f865a0e8872e820ab6a1c6
77745c01a8ecfbb235aa4b0072f2b5a3db3d3eac
describe
'116314' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESA' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
ed61070601e0360d04b3e5717f400132
47c03bf8d3ca3e10477561673464133cee5430ae
describe
'38469' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESB' 'sip-files00169.pro'
3e3cdb5e74f0a1318fd9466a2502cfc0
69a9d4b761220af45af4c2a10359b2d55f82b1d5
describe
'35986' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESC' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
284d97d0c63564e3f431823db9764084
b87f01591e37a0490be0225cca57fd2a0644ad78
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESD' 'sip-files00169.tif'
25739d9530ea052d2b488550248e61d2
ac372736a4d21a0fcbffcc25b79f9abf619782a0
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESE' 'sip-files00169.txt'
ac9402796e90bb4bff25e4a6387419b5
85a5af3e910a54705c5ff7d576ec74f4197e42ff
describe
'8507' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESF' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
ac1de4546eb502f6daf522d564ab6bd6
6ef10cfd8bad67f2251a62c37a9f288f3e062254
'2011-12-30T19:22:10-05:00'
describe
'448843' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESG' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
0d876a3b714b3f951bcbb2e64d1deafb
f6a1816ffd4d37b9da9b17532d709e68dbdb93aa
describe
'45630' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESH' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
2ca9b1617a5e77acaaf7d3cc95c13d50
b883b6835a68284e0c68c691db7d9e74cdc02c93
describe
'8422' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESI' 'sip-files00170.pro'
5bc872ca11b31ba9d84193d92b4e1a58
19a18b7b67da472d31056348b2df96461c1de34d
describe
'11888' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESJ' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
9ba0f51acc6c83e5f117934d107cb10d
e8bb2d5cbd3ca61170a6dd4111bc8d40d9446306
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESK' 'sip-files00170.tif'
27dd23eb1e7cd2ea1f1cfec8c052f2c2
e0c3c3efa6dbc1f2e4574efbe4101981a8df4adc
describe
'338' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESL' 'sip-files00170.txt'
2ba375fe67ccb1677fab0ee81d6bd71f
531131587b735fbdfb6465a7af8ac207a5b86aa2
'2011-12-30T19:25:40-05:00'
describe
'2979' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESM' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
f56d4c22f8580c02e7e984d76196656a
e894fd5311c340f0521049977a326313dd50a462
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESN' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
baba320b602f6cec77acb7e94f066a6f
759da8616f17cc84920f4c617e96bf4d938bc0ee
'2011-12-30T19:23:32-05:00'
describe
'88526' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESO' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
65069650cd0bb84d3710d10cb5845f29
b031d199dafe2b77a428c6d49c33d9b507a8acd7
describe
'26743' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESP' 'sip-files00171.pro'
0854b0445dfa0b9fa1eae272f1bab8bb
7f5a076dfddd799c5ace98ba8bc746a5a29aa2f4
describe
'26996' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESQ' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
c8d238e4f857b203fc2a34a99c5e04ad
83527f09d68fae88962967822acf211355c629d8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESR' 'sip-files00171.tif'
8ab527838cd4331c60038c02621a8ef6
c32f8125ba8f99cbebdf708250f331314139c66f
'2011-12-30T19:26:05-05:00'
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESS' 'sip-files00171.txt'
340b15d1d825c70c9b21af5ab65b4571
bf709ea8c9119d0153ba74f03b9e705647d34fac
describe
'6912' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEST' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
c03551d6a62260a8aac71a47035e3ab3
f35bebc544c4fc9ad5aff528deeae3aab0fec54d
describe
'448853' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESU' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
92c3c2355e16095fdffa2b863f5b93e8
6078536ce70063c9269d39536cf657343ea0cde5
describe
'105887' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESV' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
b90b633796240903b93b66a4926cfc89
7c3d383cafcf7d395d6f874a81949d9caff2de4d
describe
'34290' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESW' 'sip-files00172.pro'
70f4a377c803d1876e8376a13f59374b
97fd39c25ed4fab4a28af2000ee734c342c745ee
describe
'32556' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESX' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
43a473786c50b5d7c029871b422cf1b0
0df6ff6db8bb21442e456dc1ad15ca37264f8a97
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESY' 'sip-files00172.tif'
0ef34d7a2ca9c817749154e638e851de
7ab464e32c7048e831cdfc76d464d9fe0f410ab9
'2011-12-30T19:19:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABESZ' 'sip-files00172.txt'
734dee35491ae6b82caf5a165bcf0771
262e525a0a5eb94610b30542e006f6a247f01011
describe
'8020' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETA' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
3dcf48e543008668daaa6f34e3996816
15de7151edb16c267a8b03afe93f90e51551e5c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETB' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
100cdcf12b99d4225f1f5eaf4d861be9
68f39ae21fd59f863999c4eb2fbf25a57251c7bf
describe
'111967' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETC' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
cc3ebae993e71a5c3f81e94316864612
6fb36ddfdb08b2eab7ec28f20d4717040109ddee
'2011-12-30T19:17:59-05:00'
describe
'38634' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETD' 'sip-files00173.pro'
050bfba9b2326a443f89dfef6a871305
657f803cc8e8139fa11feab5d3211b3f7fc263eb
describe
'35253' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETE' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
99b9a886cc73b34d3baf8a8ee5d96787
4ec2a66608bbe0bba39070cfa74347037322d159
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETF' 'sip-files00173.tif'
819fd6bf3e50c8551fc5f95ece597953
ceda92dc09a0c5f5fa877a1e50c28eceef0bc222
describe
'1544' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETG' 'sip-files00173.txt'
0a4e76a1261105d6316cfa67d90f75f3
d5e4f1f7d59842fe552413212c0edd28cd03781e
describe
'8723' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETH' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
072a201db6ab529032711a553f95ea42
d055789cb3ab1d87595e964b0324ec56e909ad0f
'2011-12-30T19:22:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETI' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
bf8b179d1c28d7315f156b9571c1368b
6bb3ab0a045f5564e56e9b580cbb106980c54251
describe
'97464' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETJ' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
1dfd92e4502e540a6fea29de70843c97
6da87fa33698b4b4b361aab9f4ae39fcb0c36ec8
describe
'34466' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETK' 'sip-files00174.pro'
72fb262434f3ee4e9fd4f8f831248126
022e18aa7cdf88a048776f2b8af123aa5d07694a
describe
'31257' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETL' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
2d9b5e1c3caa82975e8c17e50709178b
5b484fe91dc45948029abc53e6f59e19728fc42d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETM' 'sip-files00174.tif'
4d31b7ba4ad54c4722fc61708e24aa4f
62c05b31eef421cb7913fe90e12a31f274b6b8f6
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETN' 'sip-files00174.txt'
9b443450145f1f4f084ac8ebf71aea0e
cd7b3d611f5e04f5d8af41cdb23c588a473ca257
'2011-12-30T19:25:39-05:00'
describe
'8087' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETO' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
4858a61d51368b442d08d44eca85e5cd
51ed8d7dd2f1aa6adaf72e9db4db753b33b6d408
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETP' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
1ebcdd407b5018626c8f313bd14ab1c8
743c8d6e5f126e635bf4c472bc9e586d1f2d8e1a
'2011-12-30T19:18:56-05:00'
describe
'108405' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETQ' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
2bc49c259d22f667489bf5be6e842302
014f255c1d03cb2bcacf4d8b503270f5a39659dd
describe
'36684' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETR' 'sip-files00175.pro'
c05c37e175f9f793302a71004c3d45ec
9d1834f9cef3ffe05dd0c3b43554bd6599ffee74
describe
'34520' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETS' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
86330f2b7c419c7c2975afc0319b6c81
a805606a83af5c94bb42be1e43d8b0a6f205e3e2
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETT' 'sip-files00175.tif'
885a4621c214b31c77bb8a0004dca34f
d44dc60ce5a3b1a9538cb0434e43e95f721f0ea2
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETU' 'sip-files00175.txt'
85295b48b42f9db262ccc99ed7c972f2
8a33218a1fe8a6dce715f76e34e15f68d791a571
describe
'8455' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETV' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
1bbca719e978c14e954f2b92d81d0eeb
5223c6c6bd9296e42096fe100a6d268d479c802c
describe
'448875' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETW' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
f659c75289bb44dac50d3b10bbe3c546
d08b9554e480387eedbe69e341112d559ec6df85
'2011-12-30T19:22:07-05:00'
describe
'113679' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETX' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
333519fba5643acfb887c9fce603458c
ab7a58ac4be9466b4d17f4aeb11915cb37f87450
describe
'38442' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETY' 'sip-files00176.pro'
670d54b36ddbfb36db409da74091c1c5
9a3bef993932a55b0ab97bd682abc74ea8adbe64
describe
'34213' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABETZ' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
388627dd70c7cc40c78da509da21d652
ee4fc8f96af323b22a0f73774832ade66f7d5d03
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUA' 'sip-files00176.tif'
9d03907cc111a67ff5bb9f7784f7b24a
89c947730830c29a0ff1381470a8501625b6757e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUB' 'sip-files00176.txt'
1225efc055fbc05dc7d1809539891792
802dbd79814283e7db954eb1e09759bd2db1ae17
describe
'8055' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUC' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
c386877f5944aaecd5a8d9413fc80fd7
b4a8e99e6efa3695d03d8803ce49221fd9f960c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUD' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
cb351dbc6482a1b57955915f74e42d6d
79af746116975e891376c5d24b91bdd8d60f5268
describe
'98511' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUE' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
a5dcc5953bf4feaefe40869c576731b8
f394667c297db2d18db0204ca0a4c014f89e7f56
describe
'31719' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUF' 'sip-files00177.pro'
5ec8390f54a3f351e1088c4565f8e16f
d204046c00e87d0359cc4c2c5cf792c03c307734
describe
'29607' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUG' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
7a6d36c7f66b43d234d9681b8e9e02ad
7f9ae315522eec874cc8c7c895b6fdf19353dc5d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUH' 'sip-files00177.tif'
00f08b14013ac100bb1d075a873034b3
d7176f82030b1169bd032ad124ef7478598fb596
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUI' 'sip-files00177.txt'
24d96ad0a83d5d92aef240e4127a4ba7
2c21ea5f38f2bd6ef6636e2f93369c203aadada8
describe
'7396' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUJ' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
0291c5b9c74df01fa6520fdf966b9b05
f5d46a8188a7597b32ced64a6adc81fe62994450
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUK' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
285078db2fb6f2d673f17ad7977a8cde
e83b9125cee0a670e0b6a5cd3af02b14ac87d346
describe
'103225' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUL' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
239ce607d7693eb7d289a89bafaf6360
fadf66da056b9b0bade21573f702423c6d0a97ae
describe
'32494' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUM' 'sip-files00178.pro'
2f934e41f512aed31e0930a63bc5dda7
24be19f4ce150b79e500317e9e2e5eacf1a03772
describe
'30727' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUN' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
442e8ef8797cb587c2a4d856c45dc71a
be5033e764ea4000b2d073ca49a6f647033a47e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUO' 'sip-files00178.tif'
32233dd62269aa9515c8ca78c1d2d223
f6724f5ff26932af3a268634e6d9c939bfa56c8f
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUP' 'sip-files00178.txt'
b0134408b56825b3369d026242a90673
8dcc05149cf8ab0b5b9ffad75013ab1e08d2797a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUQ' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
bba20dedb42d942d22daabf47ec5a8f9
918206713af45ab660491a26e2817490ce9b0325
'2011-12-30T19:26:19-05:00'
describe
'448915' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUR' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
19b5304d5cd87eaaa9de7891608e0bf4
de735463649975fe1a8cf710a0544c661fc89086
describe
'95177' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUS' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
46803bb96c841ad0fd908605f127d6c4
9a4eeb320a0185fdf48081e2bf2fd03dac74319a
describe
'30194' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUT' 'sip-files00179.pro'
bcd4e8a913297af958d027d4ea7c33a3
598a2e6014f94746698b4006c06f7f14c91c014e
describe
'29221' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUU' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
72dad50a51f4cb4b86b8b941995a6088
974ecf555c82422d90a3aa8141d5167e7a100933
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUV' 'sip-files00179.tif'
f328d22530c9806b2f2792263f06d485
74a8e3ea50827db64224a2257518e924e63dc848
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUW' 'sip-files00179.txt'
1204a7541d5919867227e5176a69087e
cf9dacd6df66ee1fd9c681927766c79c4c20ffa3
describe
'6974' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUX' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
787d91e40fc2835f2aa6971e6ae21bd9
81806e6463a3befa8ecabc21f40360bbcdc77809
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUY' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
5dfd03753d4daca735db04c153b9739c
eb78ff39b0a3e84e5a647851d94e57aff937b368
describe
'100543' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEUZ' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
ea84bad0b84f7b147e60e1d82f78ef1c
0bd849668c54ec7e2afa57473ba5b7d341fba701
describe
'31868' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVA' 'sip-files00180.pro'
b5e7bac5d78129c3ce0711db4151de6f
85f897831e88a024d7d97054497e29ee1b181a8f
describe
'30364' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVB' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
fcd16087f6c7a9c4f45ce47a302c257f
afa8abcbd325e60ab2b4201d59e44c5980ebb3dd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVC' 'sip-files00180.tif'
42ff29bdf45dc3b7f8cfd1862971d5b6
cf5287de6ec110048790ff1a9d926fb79933c3e9
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVD' 'sip-files00180.txt'
68b5048dc0230daf66bad3eb77feea2a
cd9d8166198b310fc7253b5bc0cc01c0a01990d3
describe
'7788' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVE' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
d6e9bb47e887e432d4083178c80e90d6
d32b05fc8ed601f267f4b8f05f1dbaba21b063e8
describe
'453102' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVF' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
4e1934e1c8e97aaf12868261f7517afd
95f32f7f7c164a1d36085cf308a0cbf53c33d9f5
describe
'51582' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVG' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
e2ec0d4dd03237fdb76552084069c7d1
bdbb1cf406849fd7b38336552214b215e41b68a3
describe
'982' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVH' 'sip-files00182.pro'
33aeb9b510fef6483eda26bbbfaeec33
b6e435c38a2b1016ae29b8165a2b4244d2e2bac4
describe
'12591' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVI' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
ed6e4538b85818492c9eff2dca26843d
e1624b408769ea71f031fbe2170d839dd27cf1f0
describe
'3643812' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVJ' 'sip-files00182.tif'
e8b64955c4f7753c42c85063d8c1d387
04ba6a2743f22c7d162fb7163f470908c9e5eb32
describe
'111' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVK' 'sip-files00182.txt'
6b94b044e78c353d1cea4be998358bcc
10c848223ea04fa189c91ebf4609cdc910df16c7
describe
'3447' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVL' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
6bef9d9c65c5d7c322e66bbb94f285be
38e9789b76b8d8e93f51ef16ace05391be9e781b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVM' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
e1ba0725e27973558f0e1014531b6e8b
fea16ee6faafe77b1f17b29b6c15ebefb5a618ac
'2011-12-30T19:21:09-05:00'
describe
'120374' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVN' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
974b067e47f75327c7596ff5d51717be
9da57894bb33d6f4d6e39dc328b07b48e94707a7
describe
'39467' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVO' 'sip-files00183.pro'
5ca4c2ab7fd599bb846744f53aa103da
a81826b546f9c215cef9257f1652dad4d6c351d5
describe
'36943' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVP' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
de696518c547cd3599753f039dd0c3be
bba0d0c700456a1534adcda25d65762974db9a33
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVQ' 'sip-files00183.tif'
215628cd8c0ab0d4fc43ca4569fd30f7
498faf1924bc049e3210841e847a37ff0771f9e9
'2011-12-30T19:22:25-05:00'
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVR' 'sip-files00183.txt'
4f5a7fc5c5937dc83f77d22eecdd2a27
c46e3e9d883d2f19fc2266375c46765df05c303e
describe
'8763' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVS' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
ce90e9ca1b3293d12d6b44e370037a1e
1fec53a4b3ee4a7281297119890162fec93fb121
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVT' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
2d0150fda725af19db17b7d940012057
4dfef6e90016928e5e1fc7cdc459b2059812c2c0
describe
'118184' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVU' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
c86242bbe1898589b5f052c1178eb9ee
132f7dbe09c93217c224ba4b1d65cd54d4718d40
describe
'39566' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVV' 'sip-files00184.pro'
40c513e7a3399ff57c0a853b1819c513
f7b9c9c62e0e8bba66186c251814c8bcbcd429e2
describe
'35269' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVW' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
e061ee1c98368d86b90f3dfd8c6f141a
3b527cf0ca9f8b827565ccf629c443f43bfba26e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVX' 'sip-files00184.tif'
26977b651afb06b0b8430742dd406a7d
bded395ab41d66156721e852d99acb9df6597b71
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVY' 'sip-files00184.txt'
67621b83dd5050827ccef040d6bb3738
71c87b1756727e95177f416a96b8a011d67d5daa
describe
'8378' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEVZ' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
5eba7aae3a3a6177767710b328a77843
b052395dd3947e3f433b44658b6eb366bf1ab1fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWA' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
41ef93f860e53d2dc30a652c0d33c048
ea26bb8bf51498159e46f96a29aa89c5eb8a01d2
describe
'108852' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWB' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
3a2a3887529e9adefc3e1617aafde1aa
7ddd69e65c3c2aac1f6648cf7f1c612a45c361df
describe
'36309' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWC' 'sip-files00185.pro'
884538946d5190f715dd2c3f9bcf677d
fa39d2542cd766b9c6da3028e15bb05dcf2ac7ff
describe
'33464' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWD' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
03522452a80e8d9181b117e407437f55
48c867084339cfa56c145ac3b41f5ed2f59b5c71
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWE' 'sip-files00185.tif'
b8a0b10fb13d618e87a4959f39c039d7
cd7bb691348148cd41f983f4e83f1e31652d604b
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWF' 'sip-files00185.txt'
03eabde9b02b52ad902e5bbb32ef232c
74be3755924dfdea77ae9559157c3266da4d968a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWG' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
39275e644bf68fe357146c7007f421c6
8fece6f21e35eccb46263f14e074aa0cde5596c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWH' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
a2b87ab26d6345110f83c75aee0452c4
40de2e4ddc2abd77f80ff0a1697b5211ccfbe332
'2011-12-30T19:21:36-05:00'
describe
'96060' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWI' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
4b4c2e684025ff9bffa7609f3a28e922
49bc3360dd08d1030f63196d1606bdc9bc98ef79
describe
'30713' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWJ' 'sip-files00186.pro'
a7c0bd834795e958148a87f39daace85
8f8da940f7a942c086fc8bff4534fd688daa9bae
'2011-12-30T19:23:23-05:00'
describe
'28766' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWK' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
fb845f5835b66b2a52115bad3ab2be4a
f41f0191a6a2b29fde312b82b8ef7eb986d91552
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWL' 'sip-files00186.tif'
5e61e481e6c049147cf51c3bef0f2fa1
dfd7e6665fde49e018e8fa2e42ea0cef49c8584f
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWM' 'sip-files00186.txt'
6fbe84ed6e8ed56727a4f51fe0fa1790
9db34ef05f68f98f79d04e3dd9ef4056585d5598
describe
'7008' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWN' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
0dd4b6d6dd2203f2d7d0cd70418206c1
c029a66467caa67451a7386fd6433a7cfe42c694
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWO' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
b35697a3b8d4b084126378ee6f774104
ef12e06525e2985e6a177fa73c636f26eca86065
describe
'92413' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWP' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
b1d2b19d3f87f24bc4a908aaa15525d1
f82637a61444188007843cdb5bbc19e2ad1d62f7
describe
'28616' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWQ' 'sip-files00187.pro'
3083ca0cf87e2a07f240708900cf1884
1ac53e46450ab0b242e67a5b9f52ee2837534da5
describe
'27743' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWR' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
5d470ce7574116f4804f4ae2857f3baf
479323f9b88071abdc5ec61b1ff4fe306aaae9f9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWS' 'sip-files00187.tif'
1c15b2add455660f43083510d932eab7
5d8868f196f65d21d6f47ac919ae9060ed25c3d2
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWT' 'sip-files00187.txt'
b8c5ce6dd6bb00fac48e3294925e42c9
1c70b4163e21d85c879a0df4167b78c3a2d3f453
describe
'7054' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWU' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
d3069623ea361231293a0c05ee9e1171
227df833320ee767e234ad21f00a42e420f1298b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWV' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
577b2fa590e8cc5b8650895857560818
fbe4e064b74d6f99d36092f06d5f2857f7cf1624
describe
'101417' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWW' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
e911a22aa092d7079733e53d171db1e7
034347c98e07cbcb5c241a92da9a323b3bdfd324
describe
'32817' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWX' 'sip-files00190.pro'
6d91e1a9070e9dcd815383a70f486211
b2553c2299eb9b1e8c231ac2f38a2233fa8cf278
describe
'31666' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWY' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
ba895c76698a0c80ad5ec016a8bf6d64
7f3411bdd12272ce379077d0bddf571f764404c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEWZ' 'sip-files00190.tif'
cd3f8daebd8841701582ff512e6242f1
0b6cbe809b4d63378a1750d554f62f18146d7e70
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXA' 'sip-files00190.txt'
a7f93d50041b101134aa1871e85e1e88
37b4ea210cab5629c3f25c5ce10fb495126304d6
describe
'7725' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXB' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
5a7dbcd9b7577543cd49734d36e8c3d3
d359e4f70a1cee4e8363685937a2d826f4f0ed21
'2011-12-30T19:18:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXC' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
5bdacd23da9c599f60f24dd8ddc6577c
081ce3d3e76c9b653b6e6f7dbd53132d7c3bba03
describe
'99293' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXD' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
a833db16afd7ddc198539e6a1855593d
3f6c78c2290687d51da50f3d5029452467ab179c
describe
'33064' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXE' 'sip-files00191.pro'
6a8a8f17596027a0dab90838b0063e0b
6811794ef55e40b5f128efa8ac6f419fe00c6c80
describe
'29958' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXF' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
77ed63c277fb3db821191aa399e9dd6e
f1956e2088f3a2759cc435d58a371da607d45960
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXG' 'sip-files00191.tif'
3b3d9947cef0eeaf723db411638197d0
b9e071da79c3cfc109281f3f0d6434d6dbd1d915
'2011-12-30T19:20:47-05:00'
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXH' 'sip-files00191.txt'
6e00b6386a97e6b90e348cb7624c6912
75230328185338be236d9539af16add6e52720b9
describe
'7674' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXI' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
5cd343f3da429d5f6b833db5529752f6
fc30895cc2409ab96ff4e1dce9b9e269a8634c48
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXJ' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
770b1fbdd68ff0084e0d4cbcda13c9b4
4b26547b674827f444615edea1c486d33d814520
'2011-12-30T19:24:40-05:00'
describe
'98691' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXK' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
6d8e4a5d17a00097e74576eaa8d4f1b5
ca12fc8b2b815043ec7574b4e8481adc92b44417
describe
'30762' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXL' 'sip-files00192.pro'
60a6f6eff91655cbc8ad4eaf21fcdb44
d1a945aa8866287c29e1ac02e3bba1e86afd8a96
describe
'29845' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXM' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
94e2e6c6b783d3063a71050a67d89282
3bda7a975caf903860d75ed270e1f5d68b4fca14
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXN' 'sip-files00192.tif'
9282eb28af2f14f0b5ded6b31dff0e6c
d9e6c5f0007e711bc23413dcab93c306cf52a98c
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXO' 'sip-files00192.txt'
ef919e0544d2b3bdceee5a02b6246f69
441dbf4564019a06e8c85f7a56ecb12b5bb09b29
describe
'7492' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXP' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
4ab48532c9f041a3fbeba74b50674030
b8025d04048e106a28c3276d6d84707f47ff3376
describe
'448747' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXQ' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
4485e96fed55b8522119624f399ec6c8
2748c4f3418edfa9d3bc0549fc1c067f8a31067c
describe
'57565' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXR' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
cfb4a5fbed51e5ca789c63d733e4642d
7263f7beab0b556337a64be5e49af8341b32ebb2
describe
'14148' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXS' 'sip-files00193.pro'
9faa4d6d54686c49ce16bc22e057d79f
5e36791ee15fb6a5b3f3999fb5e1f13c4884d8fc
describe
'15941' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXT' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
0c1adf515d10946cfcecb65ee65d60f6
cfed54fbbc951233d403f2da11747ff4747d1d6a
'2011-12-30T19:25:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXU' 'sip-files00193.tif'
c12b077b67c8beb08fdae9b395521e67
43970cdb1010e58f7b2f237632b1b33a61f4d3e1
describe
'596' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXV' 'sip-files00193.txt'
f7ea64c6664298f0b4e86a4fdcef2e05
73eb46194fdb778c9bd2a79dbb1c878d3a0b9c56
describe
'4335' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXW' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
717770f46f0b38dac01c5a09fa616b0f
80960be8381f5a9a101504493b1f82c287639d75
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXX' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
9be39529b640015215bc6698ade0e699
025426fa945f7244f68aaf45185173d06ba4a32c
'2011-12-30T19:26:13-05:00'
describe
'91722' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXY' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
020780d569fec8bacf7177ae9912508c
82bfbda3eeee836bfa2505c36df96cd29e7957fb
describe
'29555' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEXZ' 'sip-files00194.pro'
1aa9a057dd8710b458a05d1ad9a50105
45d855f1b3368b6bd3370c0d538763c1959d8dda
describe
'27914' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYA' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
a439a03e2834a08c5b0f80944fa038f3
eed77b51a606b02315b48741c51485cc6a960aeb
'2011-12-30T19:24:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYB' 'sip-files00194.tif'
e6a1c4ee4be82161b0c54d657f93fe5f
095d09e125f1f0167c20cc4daa23cce15e44c852
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYC' 'sip-files00194.txt'
72a9475fd0637442dd40c7f347979f49
70187f6ff87d03037c05ab1e629d9ece6d3f656d
describe
'6773' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYD' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
e87b795d89e879ca9400edccb2b8c307
41646eff6ce01061eb992180d3f9bbc768026636
'2011-12-30T19:21:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYE' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
93af294bb31a12b2ce6d042be19a6c90
962b292e3b1741d2d12e628c820bc8828bf47ba2
describe
'101179' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYF' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
138693235f58f1b622e6b6e1626034c4
f88234ffce785c2c7ee0d7ab14831d726ec0f453
describe
'33654' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYG' 'sip-files00195.pro'
3cef9960fd4fc16396ece7618c074719
8cb07f0e6d2a5f033d5ff3a163ce9fcde42cd733
describe
'29884' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYH' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
1c075b7b86a5564e74a23ee38b79a43f
752e9304a441eebdb3d21f80b65a2ac9adaadc79
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYI' 'sip-files00195.tif'
ef0dcaa4e4d6a04433b5b75fd78c8b29
5acba9a5b9a746081a49f428499070915ee84ea5
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYJ' 'sip-files00195.txt'
9ad9db88789b2289ac26a38a3c70f8b4
447d3a485c875293b9887a3512fd8402c5449255
describe
'7888' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYK' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
2543fcebb716e15e90b2bd1e7f4b8f7b
777e7baf7a6cb69c5fa86344bd92e0dd62edd4a0
describe
'448954' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYL' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
fd4363cdf5a6c48301826a39b4f3640a
5f01d7fbe5b6a8b01d91f9c3ecda774f06cdcbec
describe
'101930' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYM' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
f5b444471ce9e7a476d12b135d753333
5a942a484243aa032330554476edb8969237a10c
describe
'32535' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYN' 'sip-files00196.pro'
bd58ff17652e2476680d5821d5f08251
3b3317c4778b70dc7324027272b306a8414a61be
describe
'30667' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYO' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
af714e00e40ca7ed348a78777419d040
9444b949e9750b12c05c43bc5e6ccad85b4a9839
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYP' 'sip-files00196.tif'
2f52b5c535a44c9ceec2b969482a1490
4d57d0b909b6d502543b88be47c9ae800aec6b54
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYQ' 'sip-files00196.txt'
0885d6c57d27aa5f0d4be493b429d03e
a626529dfd37ef72da9fa95d7cfa03b265dc53ba
describe
'7997' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYR' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
bf5e130de48173f82439c1e5c9781aca
8072fa3dac11a176aaeffb8e6433a3cdf8d8e6a0
describe
'448900' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYS' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
042444b7585fd5bc0aefa7e3845fb7ff
9a679210f65c28b5cad818eb577c17e32f926839
describe
'97676' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYT' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
e902d8e2a6a809c4ac9d8c5d7f84b3e9
da0b82bc1e66267113133c3d4f4843f3b8d9bb70
describe
'30911' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYU' 'sip-files00197.pro'
fa8caa022c14762436e6efa875b7d07d
bcca1ca8b57fcf21346fac0ae1f327c2d6e9375d
describe
'29935' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYV' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
8b3893432e258fe1d27e7b04174e5e29
8842331004260a9e61df22635771ff0fa543d16b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYW' 'sip-files00197.tif'
23108d883ecde71a754a6860297d06a7
579e7d1c276cb5d09ab4757ea36d630d5b4a967a
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYX' 'sip-files00197.txt'
be689556497339e02fc693ba4e6fc546
387828ecca4567a0f63b1cf8b48143dac81192ec
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYY' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
630a02d5402410aae996f3db3163362e
3f374e0af80d2d79d5a9280d0d22caf9ee8cd749
describe
'448781' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEYZ' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
3d470e39337aca33f862e845f7b4414c
2a7b574752212a1a76df9950a90f5758ae6e29c4
describe
'91969' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZA' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
6e188eaed65b9e48814cf4543972dc9d
e4019217f828caaeaf073cbab5f789394789f66e
describe
'30488' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZB' 'sip-files00200.pro'
1658b9798cc4648f0a912d53fc179b56
f6f12740f44763c9a47cc84daa1cc74edcb26dc9
describe
'28067' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZC' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
68ed88db74fc71fa12dbced71b6e2e91
d688cbd5ab9cef49065acc875cfdd8fcf24eb5e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZD' 'sip-files00200.tif'
066b3fe8023dbdf08c0b9e7b74c6b336
baa8ddb4f86045d724185b502db41c557105f321
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZE' 'sip-files00200.txt'
8f381d60aaf16415fb909e5af3e894a2
567a7989c9123f9e96a326415fb63ef5372aa351
describe
'7186' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZF' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
1760d3f76b8bb2d78e66722ba2c28bbc
ec227e6378e9a68cbd0734229846eda344df0945
describe
'448959' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZG' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
d4b01d33d1f2fc75498f65c8aaac5a1c
73dee4f6a0e61ecae4bba676fb16abdaae05c015
describe
'88430' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZH' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
896d9d5ab4e4c16ec0ab9bbf4966c384
d1fb7f8d8ee8b7b8452623a88e8c58bdc069f2e1
describe
'29010' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZI' 'sip-files00201.pro'
b01859e9aeec57dd6b133d2c0132bb13
9359d2fea0579048edf5ee0edf9679067ce70e81
describe
'27239' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZJ' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
76b39eacac44d248184e5c23e66fdd36
b9d51002a8d214ba778e00dd80ad8d78a5030d2d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZK' 'sip-files00201.tif'
a2af2ab590384c8da58ee16a6f788d42
e52939c4a293759536b8c2d185841ecf50049f26
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZL' 'sip-files00201.txt'
3dacd54dfdc45d01618f8cea3560b96b
4913e60be9724c60948f5f6ee671d09f1fb30214
describe
'7020' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZM' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
5520bb78ed64c4b6dc1ea503a548eb68
d08e7e18e561071d55b1e30bf48110705914b79e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZN' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
34d8fdc38594e39dd190dc766d720021
0b4f04e646ab89ac99166ef5b84ae5a38a0edf9f
'2011-12-30T19:23:33-05:00'
describe
'84995' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZO' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
a191359b94ce8f1e1e861a09678ee162
a3fc4bd9d0d9a80f0ccb4576c1f73b7b86875c3e
describe
'27471' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZP' 'sip-files00202.pro'
6417a8256b8253dba76b1c670ff14ad4
9f869c66dca42a8bb42b46cb7b887b5d94a53319
describe
'26407' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZQ' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
b095bac69e558694757e25eb69faebef
0073bf4b3d528c27474d6d5e5cae45da650e8c0c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZR' 'sip-files00202.tif'
9501a89535698b770ddb86b5261c1dc4
d7ee841d8edaedbd706ea5a346dbf65d20a77dc9
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZS' 'sip-files00202.txt'
7540fd6e139257b93720930d8c0d347e
6b9d6a5dd660bf1a60bf4ebaf36dcc519474c77f
describe
'6371' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZT' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
a5582215bdd6b3fd8c698755588f5d33
932399cd3643f8548329eb9290454ea293be1cd7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZU' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
9262547e87e287720198ed585a8a5de6
549da25c611c5d05c4e5673161b617f0ec545eef
describe
'87408' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZV' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
cb0db6ea1bb223662bb7779d9bc5a145
460ccbcf2f16543b06c4b1a08f007528bf61f8be
describe
'26882' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZW' 'sip-files00203.pro'
aa19559a3a24ccbef930441693e67db1
1b948394e7dfcab7dd296bdf68f2c88e1fc5a55d
describe
'26422' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZX' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
01d2a960946a7d6499fc951658beb9ed
4e1bf65f899bca7eab4f31414e470f9032eff945
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZY' 'sip-files00203.tif'
0dd1d528fd3fd6848dba75f0888bea06
c3d10de8f92db4b18e8277975171a69adfce681b
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABEZZ' 'sip-files00203.txt'
dc8c24c8b49917e36f47318a9ac5ffef
1913fe5e8e9c888f753ccaeb0b4a683dad3e0041
describe
'6563' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAA' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
fa76dc360c85e2558039608876fbec04
725a4278ddcf9ac1cade2921b8b6a73ed038af49
'2011-12-30T19:23:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAB' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
f05153c9ac5e2515caf3c9c3d5ac641f
7262c9d11d9834e9431cb3238ea2b25b7fa521b0
describe
'98624' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAC' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
7dcb5dc9f3dd545a267db08acb74d566
187be68c3f00d05d264bb8b13d8a259818e34306
describe
'35115' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAD' 'sip-files00204.pro'
97f14c13ce4754f1e45ef223b65b03c8
114c3e305f17fef55b0188c94de743b2636eeebd
describe
'32015' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAE' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
b502bcc16a32fd5df0e97531bb5aeba3
217c7ee4748a723d3a8d4f1974f0fc0f3576ba09
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAF' 'sip-files00204.tif'
1fbe4a205165ad1b321c4393bb156d8c
84eecbfe7190d6909ec7f000e8fe9e56cca71ae9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAG' 'sip-files00204.txt'
39b02b17bc866fadb9a923e4c9c3c526
ddd84c3ff05eee1d7626c75e0e37f1960e652c58
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAH' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
7de272fc2ef8f8654e580f33008fc101
4321505327a959f95613e4cdd25d59d45d82fe62
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAI' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
d11ec2fdce1562a23c10da1cc396568d
5712b0f41707b606f7f6ac7a40642cde20bc7b66
describe
'95292' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAJ' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
910f6dc291683104b443ece408868827
41934f5cf0d78d7b6044feaf0856d9efe8341795
describe
'31396' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAK' 'sip-files00205.pro'
3e7d8a197e20482280a118dcff968e30
23b2814eadbe9a389a907cfef682afaa94f35f10
describe
'28695' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAL' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
8e002177098f6c80ecdb0c87ec1924d0
081d0dd142378de41dc5e2e954d813b2e2c8e71d
'2011-12-30T19:20:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAM' 'sip-files00205.tif'
456d3cc259762d33f2394d9374a1b7b5
74915531d8a61395406e8d600d0eddfc54703c1b
'2011-12-30T19:24:47-05:00'
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAN' 'sip-files00205.txt'
901ff54a6094d4c906180842cc41b639
468282dff5664b90d0d162d49fefd5a5d657b6d7
describe
'7690' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAO' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
dbc3d17c04b968608f784469bbd7d9f2
c9f1a307bcf5f95b008be6d7bdafe661d9d5ca2f
describe
'448816' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAP' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
6c7a85cd138f55d5f64659c5473ebae2
254bf95be730ebd3eacbc7e05bb6315fee3c108a
describe
'113846' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAQ' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
8a25d4a201eb4909f62331a56c5b8b07
96718182f629db7444cf96736dac10f1d70854ba
describe
'39706' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAR' 'sip-files00206.pro'
f6cde9a8e589c539e09a7cde035597e2
bddfedb0278796432f45ad57a752be8262ff094c
describe
'34798' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAS' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
a0c099ff297324f01dcd0f3e51358df9
eea24120947f600bcd22e4484d52f68240f6f9b0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAT' 'sip-files00206.tif'
f99a053b57871f1a253057553f1c5873
04553afe5fa88ae593abde07b90993cf55e2acbe
'2011-12-30T19:26:18-05:00'
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAU' 'sip-files00206.txt'
c7489daf83e3594e9c5e7bcbf1dbc172
e50625b7fe1fc234428b91b7f9ee4822e6ebcf7a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAV' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
7dc39afe87878500e6155fac95c38e0d
d80af0a5d29e171f7fa12180050056cb0fa94be5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAW' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
fa5542401609543525f1ea142b13c819
7c58b9078b545767acfbffc52f34c2b783660c34
describe
'105987' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAX' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
f66652342dcc4aa6f9c90fd141ea96c4
f62df4600bb42df9bf9095bdcb55a8dbba45ccda
describe
'35956' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAY' 'sip-files00207.pro'
e6302a0519c302740f029b2578f4a0eb
34b29ca2540e354bd0efc6eee8fa9e600f6f2cc7
describe
'32396' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFAZ' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
88530bc74f5fac9159b03656af9d532a
06bcd890869588b9b7a6f69241306b65bdd2bfd8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBA' 'sip-files00207.tif'
37080ca97e6eace11ff6184be538525c
8bc6ae62ff9b03ae84f47c593eef4dac8bdc3464
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBB' 'sip-files00207.txt'
17ff71c1c0d585f57dc45da7b802c7e4
a89d6978204c00c23501e7a4c30ee31abcb98f98
describe
'8096' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBC' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
be87d1dd0e9e927e38f8157536110bd8
aa25b7af6c47f6ee5a049aa01a5ae059793aca82
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBD' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
e9eeadc8facd6693b9b4a7bf2e19362e
e36348f599fb1cc7fa446004913158c78e3526e7
describe
'97937' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBE' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
4671d1f706cdf474d06bf90b395e4627
efee779f050f5bcba47e1c6db3603bca3cc11d18
describe
'31634' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBF' 'sip-files00208.pro'
a44c48fb226261e9236aca7e489a6b82
e1ad660161af28475cb50b95445baab17a159ce8
describe
'30192' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBG' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
9eb561c1022100ccf0702732be00c3cd
20a45a97ba8aad46cfe4338e8238dfc809596ffe
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBH' 'sip-files00208.tif'
31aead1cdd5a08ba7a62062e5238f395
028961619716fcffb4fe2f31f7753237293dd387
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBI' 'sip-files00208.txt'
0f8f4def20a408a285b2a2e0411f11c5
1dd07932796a0e40e6dfbb520dbb9c6615e79fc3
describe
'7934' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBJ' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
a5ae7935a3769a022476f751936ca510
e3833c1f9c769b45ad6954941f476bd1b2b66880
describe
'441013' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBK' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
a0b46955c5a6a133bf7ab1cd9b0a4b70
e2839cf88273cd9effc2aa515e8c89cd6bf7cb11
describe
'61603' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBL' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
3b79ffc4e0e42af789b3142943c6aaf8
76b9f4693a74d935f58baa9189b50e680d86e761
describe
'4344' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBM' 'sip-files00209.pro'
5787e11e39ae1d832d2c55d529e3219f
ca50c8248086033fa835d759c6cbe6498a5d0b96
describe
'14782' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBN' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
65aa03c5316b3fe7ffc52bd85866889e
600546e7456bf1d27e5647402554ddf07bbbb4f8
describe
'3545808' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBO' 'sip-files00209.tif'
d217a1d4e772cacb3a229d3affc78d6e
9f4be5435c6c74c81da7228a64bf9181814f0593
'2011-12-30T19:25:47-05:00'
describe
'420' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBP' 'sip-files00209.txt'
80bbdaa69e1513a287c34894075116bd
37264d08df9eb5d8dd69f865e5ba9f05bb785d6e
describe
Invalid character
'3863' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBQ' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
744db8108eb6d749969fa07e0c0f68ff
69c9c3a019677c4535476ea1a506894fb9ffe887
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBR' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
3b529208919c6edeaa934cc84967ce5c
681b49a9ef347018002aa7fddb76a2c6bab45b2d
describe
'99300' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBS' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
305d579559ee69198dee58db55ab4dec
6ef929b255d9580f3a61cce89a9c2a549bee34c8
describe
'33195' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBT' 'sip-files00211.pro'
bf2851a1cd445928c3d4857106009e86
4f01d039a591e866c8a1f3f0c4701412bbd754b7
describe
'30907' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBU' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
318a03e91add302ed2780bf0271060a8
4c8e39564534d6448440088e171674f910212737
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBV' 'sip-files00211.tif'
7d8cbb448a80f5265af587166d6cc804
d2d6b7ecee27b084580c656d3f6b9de5778c56a5
'2011-12-30T19:18:23-05:00'
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBW' 'sip-files00211.txt'
961045a6751c738b05de204841deb488
8755047b5180bfbaf8257259c41dbe3d57b9cca6
describe
'7900' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBX' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
b1ee0bf87ab78b32bd2302a887ff338d
d20cd76119359f90da8c8c8bfa5407a582a10bb0
describe
'448823' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBY' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
c2b99747a795d544b7dd7444a5daef26
7e6dbcd5b31384dcfc82130602567c2a72655ef5
describe
'80828' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFBZ' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
328d1f54c16f919191b9c780d3c5daa2
e81028f00e6667f6124972ff5b07d12699163084
describe
'24448' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCA' 'sip-files00212.pro'
b76e3c48bc18fbacfb2b4d0641941279
fcaa8909c5bebac967ab40110aee56ef0309e522
describe
'23234' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCB' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
ec79686163feef23d6991eeda9bd6d16
4f5222c477d2833418faab26455e113786a5c2a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCC' 'sip-files00212.tif'
85a4e6434291e578c454a022880164b9
8f0e22d3acf43b3e3ede4f734cc23096563c50b6
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCD' 'sip-files00212.txt'
163379700afe09231fabfcba2365454a
576e97466fb73681ccd08452e50ee7f3be61f6c6
describe
'5918' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCE' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
cb5701d5e8eecaca5bd2d38d51b83b4d
990d550143854e76730f4dad6bd2615d0cdd6860
describe
'448845' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCF' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
1c36bfc406e1802c0ba5765d91092b43
3fae4a8a8d9bb7f0fde7302f4cf20a92d616ef21
describe
'82668' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCG' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
c511e46cf2e29ca556b3930868923c6a
14d17afaaa4d2cfa1585bba9a4837afb3c7a0805
describe
'24451' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCH' 'sip-files00213.pro'
f7826b73fc21c2175b75c7b6fb1be2d0
d5c7a31797d7d95fca7b04080dc5f18fd78f2432
describe
'24832' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCI' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
e3dbec5517ca1b5b51ae30adfd90b3d8
5480aeb42e561624b324b0a3673c8c179314f73c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCJ' 'sip-files00213.tif'
c35f94463337aaa85a07b5bd74650563
6ec316882af000478a017e1cdb4869ba31025a7d
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCK' 'sip-files00213.txt'
6739f12b34489d12a82421df6ad320ef
48e7659f01145da1b7fc4681c5b55e68cc2cb0f8
describe
'6051' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCL' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
3be298a5e28064745c4e12b5a90336a7
41580ec468179ff782c75203e0fdebfe86087906
describe
'448962' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCM' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
55024afc340462ddb8ec8919836aa980
c6dbe6a1fc204013aea975a7aaadf2b28c49ebb4
describe
'105825' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCN' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
ff5969ab4694cf3ca575b18ed29855d2
efc637958c68a3e9c1811c14a26647732765fa23
describe
'36141' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCO' 'sip-files00214.pro'
181a1aced44ec79b1a4b9103ef808afa
be667bb9befaba212d87102543a5ce77d20219d4
describe
'32546' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCP' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
d6e418158e3a9b4f4dbc37228e1d8ab1
94edc45abbb16f595bfbc58456a989b1b9f77e03
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCQ' 'sip-files00214.tif'
6dfccd8e039e201df14ed4cf48f32abe
37a3dda3669c3d39b3252d4b07a98721e5aca5fc
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCR' 'sip-files00214.txt'
712174aa3cdedaf655ce9714be3cc409
6e61e6d0f09b08a577b854c701ea36200f319af4
describe
'8765' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCS' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
3120ec6953c8ca59a43a5f4d2cbd77b9
6ce58f4317e2a08608ea66757d4383b3ce2705bf
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCT' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
4a40d8435dac6da321aeaf29def65573
76e945d0d398b899ad59e6b8189bc8b19b0e2b6a
describe
'105041' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCU' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
52c909f3da09acbba13986eb7c0328e5
adc369593b0d31bf187c2e9c0c596755ea73fd3d
describe
'35257' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCV' 'sip-files00215.pro'
a23f0fce90fe09dcaed34bb203b0d4c2
edc072fed36966ab9209ccc2d13f4461c2a9801d
describe
'32701' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCW' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
0dcfd77276aba8d0e683bdca6b61daef
a57fcb7f3ebde73a9ad23010951607a6f83253f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCX' 'sip-files00215.tif'
ce483c8059a1be50c767e65d8b252f47
88195f52c052b08e62d2d3aea16ca6d95b8358ba
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCY' 'sip-files00215.txt'
33146e1607214fc80001245b107b5cdd
4a3ec33c65f6d7ee581d6f4a96ae6fdfd177b4ad
describe
'8438' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFCZ' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
d0c9c2d24834a02de9df584f23bb4882
80728402f2ca852d4dd77020eee7541c5f8e0838
'2011-12-30T19:22:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDA' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
791a642d2bc57acd5b1c152db1e05bea
bf9a68e610e39bc2cd9136eaad37daa2f5a6b01f
'2011-12-30T19:17:02-05:00'
describe
'107868' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDB' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
3bf0840cb03202a49b064726215bea01
4813b331aa65c67e8355c3f8e0615bb13bff5b27
describe
'35454' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDC' 'sip-files00216.pro'
f1e7ea45dd858fe659bb8f4f919c7132
a0b1b079e9e3a1d74f1b32a76d86cb6d3d834574
describe
'32484' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDD' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
1f5f24bcad5055144ed73e2f9dfc9995
a8563b42fa0e01947571e4b6b33f6b4075c316c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDE' 'sip-files00216.tif'
2f7685346f008af4127d97db3a99de3e
48e9635bdec381e7d96e920fef24f0676e3ab281
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDF' 'sip-files00216.txt'
1bfcb3c4214c60f7607409c0eec77e82
60b5f6cbc4d986dc7bf0ae81c8c916293fa0ae7f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDG' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
c543d1493fa0d85768a3ec5bc97beba2
2cc9baea4b15b8c639fb160db605eec0335e1c17
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDH' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
1960d8f44ed1214ebf5793d0c5406dcc
c43b544c6be2a492a03356ac7ece68661f13b66c
describe
'100002' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDI' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
8a018d10c7b75ef46110e6880bd975a3
a52df518e6e84f5b2fcbd95af302fa7b2d1ff051
describe
'32228' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDJ' 'sip-files00217.pro'
54f349a2399331c4b1e7a66eb98ebd00
64c03c36c54ba56a7b5faabada22cde851c0b5eb
describe
'29999' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDK' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
6603bdc5efe01856a4de7b18e79185a9
27bed34934667ec82c123556f046a7ae706a60ea
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDL' 'sip-files00217.tif'
eda720eb99b0dff97743589456059bb4
78f444a7419daa072a10a676be036497d0e360cd
'2011-12-30T19:24:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDM' 'sip-files00217.txt'
22fc844a00bc8d07adfb094701e75301
484ab6f42ee7de571a396639c19182db9e7e97b7
describe
'7428' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDN' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
ddbf3da898c5a84a059702f8678822fe
97c3a1f495656337fdcb8e5e6a2ae0b97d18bf22
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDO' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
238d4e4d1f4d38d68ca5367096ce9e42
39c166b1d4b2076214756959a16a32fd9d58a7d7
describe
'105118' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDP' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
57894d00aa77c7dbd8183bfa77c7cef5
338ca3fb39d345e1401260777ae5c60fa5ee6ff0
describe
'35547' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDQ' 'sip-files00218.pro'
befaf0b8adc1ba8fc22080880bd3b2a5
49cce32b9e42cae9eff2fa15ae8e262d38a4d386
describe
'31260' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDR' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
a8417b104b1c25827c3dc8663dbbe50f
6a2ea4f36e7d15f5b96f2eb6ec20c201184b327e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDS' 'sip-files00218.tif'
ade91ceb5b3adb541309fd3073d848ea
24aaf30d8287b89befb18700e1fe0a57f747b964
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDT' 'sip-files00218.txt'
44d9e0a31bba5c511f158fcebf55e7a8
773d8ff092b729661ba41140045a1a0301ff6c68
'2011-12-30T19:24:48-05:00'
describe
'7811' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDU' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
bd75da3d393aedb456c2c782f451a5ef
81e2954cbf0756f5db18baad8f2fbfaecbf19197
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDV' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
c3f66dee87e4067f4343a1b1b9bbc8de
e716169130d65493932fe5def3f33f0cce5e44d0
describe
'106224' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDW' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
9778a849cdfd915008375973110ec062
d497a3889f0c9ec6ed215de5840f9ed79d3e7a35
describe
'34292' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDX' 'sip-files00219.pro'
554f7422a7bf424581b87ebd542094ee
85f9c38b05fee421e9fb4257bbc64e41d379f1b5
describe
'33636' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDY' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
8cc7063419adb4e017629eb998ede961
720272ae96d43f051ec069bd7521fbc2399dc892
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFDZ' 'sip-files00219.tif'
4ec5df375fa1c75cbe23f83c56654573
8ea177afe75adf5d486f1caa2e702489e21bd353
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEA' 'sip-files00219.txt'
1ee3a8e2189b83b03f6a890f5b6d6c00
c05e93f685d55b69211c967cb710e82a1b9a5391
describe
'8470' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEB' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
00b9faf78af6d6396751d7e336c35bfe
5ba98b5aeccaaf8f599b1a7d72d3f8bdc7c510cc
'2011-12-30T19:20:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEC' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
e1d85b7a2a7dbf706bcc066b3673b269
46cbf2629b1858825d6c49707ad5818368ea8b0e
describe
'97571' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFED' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
69ee5aa911a9112528a54c182834a1a0
ad6ad2fe59f5dd31a3cbf6c7dc02774d9f75515d
describe
'31736' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEE' 'sip-files00220.pro'
1746c48f3c7f4c1016904b1f869b0e84
cf8f96ce7ef07b346ab36500deee69c9526c12c3
describe
'29489' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEF' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
1bfa786f7a2bd3962e39cb35f38a70ca
f5354a6b7d2c87e615ff59fb28584b3e186f148a
'2011-12-30T19:21:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEG' 'sip-files00220.tif'
7e9e7dcda470378bd98d4edd59ff8abc
0d47088b9dc0b4d701b9d521254cbd31b6c71617
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEH' 'sip-files00220.txt'
6691f4bcb42c4ed0cdd40493e75d03c1
fa931eab746c091072a37432669f3f6bb131232f
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEI' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
469f28910ce7c847de04f65318a81820
8ffdb8186a0e12bfb1cddc015176df100eb80625
describe
'448733' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEJ' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
eccb2e5b73fe0170101662649af2ccf1
30560051cb0248df4158cd9ee8dad24b975119ea
describe
'107811' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEK' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
9671a106aa53c6662927f7c296bb1360
7e444020e447e33c45399d5e876d72af36219fd1
describe
'35565' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEL' 'sip-files00221.pro'
671021837d0046229020edf9620280aa
a0e2b041353f7175f8a5ad8fe76c5cd5c448f722
'2011-12-30T19:19:53-05:00'
describe
'33145' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEM' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
7c7bd1483dfd39af9cca73e8072732db
f8819568e92801ee5c5e54926558ec203aa9c08c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEN' 'sip-files00221.tif'
964ad8e4ccc0150e683645bf6072f431
ec0f9b09c676daafa9713bbb7f52fc74594e6eb6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEO' 'sip-files00221.txt'
67cd57cd231f710cb98a18c998d1bac8
0f138fca57c6b09d1bbaf267f0ed2321a65e07bc
describe
'8052' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEP' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
6314af6e53d3300e077d2995785a4326
703484ada6c39076786a6c3e065f92d61fa7fb57
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEQ' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
5cea9ea2f806c715c7c308a12d549583
b38fca3daee520f72cb9f3071c8835571e39f681
describe
'96530' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFER' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
41f8b66d14a948e7f690d19e4f6e8612
3ae8eab1a782462247c12068b51ca95a1fc7a86c
describe
'31131' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFES' 'sip-files00222.pro'
c8b8c74481408a544b81e7713a7523e1
f1607d80a68cb3c67586c54b669723259d9b03ce
describe
'29135' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFET' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
5753c7727c733d51b4c679771fc345f8
0cac72194aa655f39c2a44b4ccc5819fc1a1fa6a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEU' 'sip-files00222.tif'
5a5afedbc8cdf686c068fd6217b9d63b
c94787c2098d11f059b899410c03549e566d2dbf
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEV' 'sip-files00222.txt'
af254ceba5319bdd0ad2fde4585e00dc
1d39d2fbfa472f16abf04a1543f429d6c06f8518
describe
'7535' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEW' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
21fd44d7a39d966c39e484ed72511dbc
5a819134340064bd29de4fe344456240d7ec3c62
describe
'448686' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEX' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
584faa0ffa40b6a6935234f6e06355de
7e9bb559e992044607698c63ed16fbbe1e2a8441
describe
'43333' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEY' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
97aad05dc7842f5d274427013bed35b4
17137ebc6d0e2ee8bada159bdd8e8992390dda5a
describe
'7854' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFEZ' 'sip-files00223.pro'
2efbea45c24cbeafd07f0f47da628e73
db3103dc080e66e78ffdf023936528fee179a19b
describe
'11513' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFA' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
86c5a77e27841527bc070e50aa34cdd5
27df0f629af646c7164b0fd389feeecd60b26bfa
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFB' 'sip-files00223.tif'
cb99965eacec4789ac9e7933bf9fb187
bdcdcc8e25b83fc395995f5d22554e98bd39d1c5
describe
'317' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFC' 'sip-files00223.txt'
10824289735499caed82c8676a14d753
af608a857f9e125762f17351a28f7cf538d549d9
describe
'3012' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFD' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
f62707c68bf189bd1b5a1f67136b5c7f
0ac35eb61086512e6a8f4c1cf0b646f184cb3555
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFE' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
e9fdb7bf24b7b3b3448589d09ea06b0b
c6404d8f3ba6167f2f778ad9cc1942386e05c5b2
'2011-12-30T19:22:17-05:00'
describe
'96872' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFF' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
7b3ce9fcab38e4b7b5b39d83fdea8116
4888c33e978cb634f51f8d621c782ddd605e287f
describe
'30879' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFG' 'sip-files00224.pro'
62a96e9bd20181c773a164b9ad442b26
b545806b96807888ba47d85e74f8445299e76ffc
describe
'28734' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFH' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
c6e311520805a17507b0485218eca490
44f8aacb9e6240149be6516090f01227e446d753
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFI' 'sip-files00224.tif'
efe0bc8544198c45094365316c29bed5
572c92116b711be7740335d390b8573067472614
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFJ' 'sip-files00224.txt'
f236a0366722d73c28666db3af899518
c6ccb3a96e87f415713fb77cd0060540a1aefeec
describe
'6901' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFK' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
700628325c2bc2dea2b86b08b84cc7dd
601ac6b40d0735945386203ff46d7bca28d9c4bd
describe
'448438' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFL' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
d784a712d60d65acc9f60c2565fce2fd
eb0a7f44699a336b6f5a0fb5eaa48526a25cb0f1
describe
'50867' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFM' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
f3cf79e37ec6d0ae6fb220b99515595e
4e6a6a6f62a6208d1e01026da01447cf139e475b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFN' 'sip-files00226.pro'
1a394e85cdd08cb23ad33d02dd6a9df5
5a25f79ac3325fa1827712cc2770c7480043b986
describe
'12276' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFO' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
8f1c1c1f9d938983a716e17e9252e041
2259d8f59966462735e0af8889b6d40d5034191e
'2011-12-30T19:20:08-05:00'
describe
'3605016' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFP' 'sip-files00226.tif'
c42f47cf5bfa967bbf7218a0b11b13f6
3ab7618c5094611d1e03e489912d4827bc20ab3b
describe
'68' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFQ' 'sip-files00226.txt'
774ec37d836681b028acb8e048218741
be84959c32c188f62ec9a1af91de39bf999f6857
'2011-12-30T19:21:02-05:00'
describe
'3129' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFR' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
822c6a16fb075c7e049e503064f7b8ff
14c691dbc527548d49c87b00f5c5c60f3c0b5705
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFS' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
c2d0cd0beae675e3fbb13b83ace21ee0
9d99b347e2c8375709a1db9f9ada821df257dd12
describe
'106059' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFT' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
5a724ee3544995b38e82839882cdfa50
11f702877d280b87e41252435ec9f12b181ca9c1
describe
'34189' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFU' 'sip-files00227.pro'
5e892650119f8c76606168aed518dbd7
7d3295f0fa6282f95148fa72a9dedc465722fc5e
describe
'31812' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFV' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
254c74d01c47910383c7d9a50e5d9b8e
1e57c25e37b968302bf66e8697277e51d087ac01
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFW' 'sip-files00227.tif'
bd41d6d27b1dcc355a34a3c80629ac47
ad43871beff783d71072835a3fe2f2cbe8939f8e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFX' 'sip-files00227.txt'
ea4ddea4d2ac7217b774de8942145b1e
a9fc0e7687c7b8d527da047236a6f4c05284fbbf
describe
'8138' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFY' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
f3cbfbb9ce258ddc9d21030f7b8bf164
20d5c132ced6be80da279d7ac62e9e780e44594e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFFZ' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
d21146bd067fdf98b433a7c71ccae600
a2a53fdb3d455e3daff329cfc9beec8b2a2475d7
describe
'105446' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGA' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
2e92a18addc80676bc5cb28a530f8724
1c532b2e31185760cfffad0ad9a3618c42227b87
describe
'34232' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGB' 'sip-files00228.pro'
b1ada0aa468323fc1669122b3f794aa6
98a3ef426c7df804f7a5fd4f6ca0738ae5f09173
describe
'32363' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGC' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
dfa1d51bdc564cc6d14a4871d20f31d8
170de78fc1536545db266f80660c02267f00d9dd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGD' 'sip-files00228.tif'
bce8362bdde35a0038d11fdd4f8ea5e2
c8ac9dd20b835f24514168d44dd7696e6591fdd8
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGE' 'sip-files00228.txt'
f5c5548ca92cce5d7c2812b88b3b98a2
cb748afd89f19b4217ddddbdda9f469a577e1322
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGF' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
8ac1227358d70987eab3712de0dc7bef
4a40cde4e6fcaaed19c08e410a9c36fc6ff66e10
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGG' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
62c258abd0cc4e3579dab7a638ab256d
083ce99d61a490e4bda4aab9a0d68a576bf66128
describe
'107601' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGH' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
4f54d675e00bcf48e2ee6abd12cfdb23
4eb23b8af96b56153e29a8c7c10fe389ac1e89f4
describe
'34585' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGI' 'sip-files00229.pro'
536b68d9229b50f01756d41db985f6ef
fa2aaf8ef32203130c4613d8020cfe3cb52b7768
'2011-12-30T19:23:24-05:00'
describe
'33360' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGJ' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
d10cacbb2bc1bdf91471acea50d55338
4b42c19f1c75837bf179a900c5ef0f2622546278
'2011-12-30T19:22:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGK' 'sip-files00229.tif'
15fccec11116645a158746771b716bfa
d3d0887342f01c8447583d114edda6c129a2e0f2
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGL' 'sip-files00229.txt'
3c3b51193aa14f61233cdf7157c675dc
0e5eb8c9f86fdb900976aba17dc4b019efaf0467
describe
'8162' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGM' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
ad0c37609533c8c5d662e1d78d9ef217
646442fc4d15d8bfcddf7216d0e15d9d30bf32d6
describe
'448920' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGN' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
88ce6bc34f510a8c14203824e903bd74
e9d261e197c358e17c173b4a2621948c69283bec
describe
'106850' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGO' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
4dc4d9ea741aa03ba2d67687d4524a6a
8d17bf9b689af3ce82acec789ae246aa59e1b7ae
describe
'36026' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGP' 'sip-files00230.pro'
45fa01115b8c63fd17cdf18e51f9a8b7
b2a0596747edc7dd90f871d1f51dc3d6413271c9
describe
'33512' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGQ' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
9248d5a3ae8771ef06080c0b46464a38
e9e086d3de4325671a587246a5fd9728a28ff9f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGR' 'sip-files00230.tif'
37e78959cb0e28731c039e735dfc8771
8438d84e6ac0c8b895cb01a339779cc60eb20340
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGS' 'sip-files00230.txt'
864c8f16173f213a79e55c43497779f1
1d2536896297f966ecfceb3add5e982324c187f3
describe
'8434' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGT' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
4e1c9e82f01e68454d12f0f5e62a0d88
379acf3311aaaebf5ded07243c7ce179a3673fe0
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGU' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
522bf894148085ebc2d70402afc08d64
194f9d35f6a3fd976ecf4cf28f73b5a28cef0564
describe
'100587' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGV' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
d871a3cbdb92b1892583c65a4032282a
114bf9ac70a41c0302e20fb978b67d9a5fdb8012
describe
'32907' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGW' 'sip-files00231.pro'
bd85dd8a3c8b6ec049151fddbe49629e
09fac89ead807f7c2a665383f954630c555f5190
describe
'31102' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGX' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
c528ff59ed60252765b40dd298ffcc60
9d8706e4e20f65e77074ccdd17bab8584b3ff8fe
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGY' 'sip-files00231.tif'
e4f2de2610dbd57ade072db05f9ad3bb
37c98e670a7a202134d82f95f89f2d9b2c16b6a9
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFGZ' 'sip-files00231.txt'
c88a329299106fcb969a803700a67639
fffa75c6104dc5447979a07a603fedcff529c73e
describe
'8079' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHA' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
efca64cb56b12576816c027683cb1dbd
fe0332f5c84df9c2360d3f195e5288df3030b13a
describe
'448849' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHB' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
3d47cd3a7ff78db4b759bc4101fd9c29
c804e63fafc2e70ed02f4facae7cd651a78befb2
describe
'110451' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHC' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
0e7141c69f6c7c1d024db0e5c153c3ff
fd0a4d27807e002551c7125f1f6511e70ff462e1
describe
'35937' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHD' 'sip-files00232.pro'
d11267c85dbde577bf88b1c29c0d3628
b4e24646a4c18df3f5e49921500d6d38ff588028
describe
'33923' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHE' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
29facb23206835701a5f4bdb88788794
2c6177fadb8472645759ef66cc55a67c2fac0552
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHF' 'sip-files00232.tif'
477e7d4990f157a658103975d0e45950
fc4db50c0dff803b4253fcd2e95925a87da277db
'2011-12-30T19:24:56-05:00'
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHG' 'sip-files00232.txt'
dcb6815aa986a85f1915eb2224a5c3f5
62db8ee2b3ddc62434c3f80a2ab718117f8467f4
describe
'8005' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHH' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
fb7a59f798fe28864d18f1e76adc043a
6ba61b0154309d7e03deb32057fe30967ea5ac95
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHI' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
e592326545114fdee4b2f81318a99ebb
566146464fd855549fe0e57e9e84fadbf0328859
describe
'107110' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHJ' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
517ecc041d23ec19d849bc2f2b5a5076
4e2c8672f4729f253b7385183a6d3e1ea7204ca6
describe
'34401' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHK' 'sip-files00233.pro'
d0e767a1cc067110373e2f9eea83cf8d
32f2bc6397391dd26f4c198e9850e4db08ea71f7
describe
'32658' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHL' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
04d5ab2101ccf295c8df4bcfc33bef08
dfac1055c53baee2ff50f811b1661c01681f5bbc
'2011-12-30T19:26:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHM' 'sip-files00233.tif'
67b9fc437b2f19e55bae17c66a5759a5
72791d694e9a3fca75431d991df7524b7bd00210
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHN' 'sip-files00233.txt'
6ba7eb974db65fdaa19ed0255760be35
7203d094f95c412dde5040259fae80ad9c336514
describe
'7857' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHO' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
6a2bf9ca9ea391365e31118b5c6af3fa
f46437b7965c9245e3645dc4e5d3588f6c109037
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHP' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
ad2a347f92f50311900768221c7acb8a
12d63ee9e2695e7bb413bf6a99b2b2c96106ff90
describe
'102266' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHQ' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
1512282b0520a6863ddb3029532957ff
d7d695638c17a11a18088bd840b7e69de9dcb8b4
describe
'34519' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHR' 'sip-files00234.pro'
75865b485bc56291a0929503cb11e2b5
54096340c824d111536c9ce0beb55336e82d0515
describe
'31167' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHS' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
0bd8d2b6d8de9efce3a2cd3ab517ddb2
36e24a29bae5aa1e89e274e6795a847d36ac758b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHT' 'sip-files00234.tif'
f67bf9ab626b0c26254ad4b3cbae4464
4475da058845535b753e31460ea591bdba62c0fd
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHU' 'sip-files00234.txt'
14fe2c3b25e5053aa56a700c3e54119e
cadfd8cc010e500ae0afd42132a2462bad57fa4a
describe
'7924' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHV' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
d22d213e514afb69a41aecde5afff61f
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describe
'448884' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHW' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
30e9da5b5548f1307a675c3bcbc90ca8
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describe
'114241' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHX' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
86268759973eb9994c5b65b449723b5a
d86fa5331f75736796a157810ac46aa674152119
describe
'38092' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHY' 'sip-files00235.pro'
1a646cb55afa8cfc7be2d93de6373f9f
509140a7f04ee9a519c1cbb6c6a280a302200999
describe
'35089' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFHZ' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
c191332e18ca775ffc0f4d9d6639bc10
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIA' 'sip-files00235.tif'
9f8165915162b721c92242ed822a7b64
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIB' 'sip-files00235.txt'
562217649798ae55dd0bf8599f407c5b
1c89258a10c88e94fe88f69f2251261856aa49a0
describe
'8310' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIC' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
acedc3a489bbfbfd20b6b6a2011ed61b
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFID' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
2a26410c6a3ad1a1816c22228c9d64e6
2aee17140f260db25a53ddb2c060054a6e6c6ac7
describe
'66751' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIE' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
70efda879a73ed6fc0d2bf83c07178ae
042adf697b36d785c415240c5bd293e04cea25cc
describe
'17565' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIF' 'sip-files00236.pro'
ba871566c132d2d9159b69af043d22d5
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describe
'18489' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIG' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
75a4326cbac9ad1558e6e0626aa48d6e
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIH' 'sip-files00236.tif'
2593a2ef01ef5492d81719cfbfe913e5
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describe
'702' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFII' 'sip-files00236.txt'
24a7409dc1f293e3324431c15a9d6eef
479dd36993e48ea9d5af4fb260cf099bb3bd44fa
describe
'4764' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIJ' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIK' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
f54efe9dfbe70dedcab1e64e990318af
c1b56c75c4428f6824926daab448ee933380cbed
describe
'88997' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIL' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
0f65900e03146c7856e6f33adca894e9
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describe
'27751' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIM' 'sip-files00237.pro'
cb172654679732fffd4482ad17beef03
187db6850213110400112dc3b396e696f159a71c
describe
'26588' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIN' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
017d11bc7e9daf127f30dc1ba5eb235b
fefd8af46c6d076f4d87f7af98e5967693b4f96d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIO' 'sip-files00237.tif'
714cb370148879aaa07d13d6f44d917b
f9791d69f2384cef8cc70596a730df5d61cabe14
'2011-12-30T19:23:42-05:00'
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIP' 'sip-files00237.txt'
961cac7c7eb3520ae5e9c61b131f2c1f
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describe
'6718' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIQ' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
7dee4e9fca8b53a4d1d5a91d84f9d34b
bb6c5cf7d17483c425395f6e7ffea4af02f2b5ce
describe
'448885' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIR' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
6f0825c849d2229e63cb70aa512cf2ca
d32ab37ed104e7cddb4f88d11fad3706f26af750
describe
'107916' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIS' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
c2f18dca19207af00ee9c3187f00d925
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describe
'36303' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIT' 'sip-files00238.pro'
fafe06a602bb4584d2be485dfe3e1ffc
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describe
'32920' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIU' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIV' 'sip-files00238.tif'
ea2c0f5e5ffe0c2f438b56fe4e31f72b
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIW' 'sip-files00238.txt'
ba7b3c2b3ae5b0f60e1ac2203b2878aa
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describe
'8025' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIX' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
bba8b52b90838b86770a7bc8046ee875
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIY' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
5101332e7f9e495df60b8826a107841c
f525e89a3608120607ab58e0347857819f30798b
describe
'100186' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFIZ' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
2fe3670011c1d13dbd6152ab257a48f1
b22458537aa5fc53be583d29b186c61549acfdcb
describe
'33077' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJA' 'sip-files00239.pro'
3609a43af3b2f1e10d10b2675279c938
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describe
'30831' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJB' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
0d159cd27c1707360efcccea4bd7cf4e
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJC' 'sip-files00239.tif'
45e603b5767e7751fc73e6825a53da5b
ece46e5c26d208eae9ef0cb22a260b0f77d4a3c0
'2011-12-30T19:20:37-05:00'
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJD' 'sip-files00239.txt'
96ae65fb93f16c690449f6245887a322
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describe
'7606' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJE' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
ef675bdb5aa4f9cb81c3369b5c37120f
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describe
'448912' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJF' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
0dc7b04d7b17bd97a426bccb7a92c38a
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describe
'102660' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJG' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
624ad10ab9750d7d4552a711ef6d422f
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describe
'32933' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJH' 'sip-files00240.pro'
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describe
'30226' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJI' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
f8fa9ce3ba5383b47b6e5e7c54e25b00
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJJ' 'sip-files00240.tif'
ef1b9e292ecb2dc78445102899c18e8a
acea3a0cdfa5249848416bddaa7b7b3821ac1686
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJK' 'sip-files00240.txt'
07d61cf30a12a757e0c8c3f48f96f15a
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describe
'7812' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJL' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
cd0d0e3b0b1cffeaad96b8200afe0c25
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJM' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
bdf9e88c71b42dac3eb21274451909d1
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describe
'107686' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJN' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
9949f1809661c4bca32bfc7afb7f3d09
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describe
'35878' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJO' 'sip-files00241.pro'
f37635bda923b39d960463d5a2d56e0d
c0943d9e4819ac3715f1fd35c80f275af5443be2
'2011-12-30T19:23:06-05:00'
describe
'32447' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJP' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
06b4c4849627d586055414a754bed5c0
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJQ' 'sip-files00241.tif'
8cf70b65c56afaf30825561c970faa5e
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describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJR' 'sip-files00241.txt'
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describe
'8437' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJS' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
ce63f546392ef9ce222be70c7faa7fcf
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describe
'442075' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJT' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
230a0566e9fff4b3a2eaffb959cc8940
595ede2645ae079119123e9e6cebe33a9d69cdd0
'2011-12-30T19:21:27-05:00'
describe
'107591' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJU' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
7707165732009a72ec1ef24affe449e9
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describe
'34723' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJV' 'sip-files00242.pro'
62d5d2ed81a481350dc618165e546a75
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describe
'33706' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJW' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
aeb9807ef4084730b5c1990762c67e4b
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJX' 'sip-files00242.tif'
0e37fce0854da285c46875b44afcc831
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJY' 'sip-files00242.txt'
996a7090a44cd5c62e91db59b3dc3cb1
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describe
'8205' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFJZ' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
b6d4c71386f2627845b7bf56cfb8f83b
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKA' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
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describe
'106139' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKB' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
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describe
'35218' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKC' 'sip-files00243.pro'
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describe
'32588' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKD' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKE' 'sip-files00243.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKF' 'sip-files00243.txt'
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describe
'8123' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKG' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKH' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
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describe
'82607' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKI' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
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describe
'26199' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKJ' 'sip-files00244.pro'
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describe
'24487' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKK' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKL' 'sip-files00244.tif'
4ff583ac5ccf0cbbced4cfc10dfbb19c
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'2011-12-30T19:19:15-05:00'
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKM' 'sip-files00244.txt'
a6e2582ac0af5d1ac10fb98a62ddd06e
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describe
'6160' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKN' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
ae6d6707eac80f2361060598f4e6253e
ca911be62ba9dd531b83d621cc20614406fb320d
'2011-12-30T19:21:52-05:00'
describe
'448818' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKO' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
cd388a41327f7b8677894e8e51462487
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describe
'86945' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKP' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
9f6082f1485e39b95a9fa23a4cf6ae83
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describe
'27524' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKQ' 'sip-files00245.pro'
3a51bb6964f7b8d7fd6b6c668033626c
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describe
'26691' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKR' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKS' 'sip-files00245.tif'
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describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKT' 'sip-files00245.txt'
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describe
'6680' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKU' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
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'2011-12-30T19:24:46-05:00'
describe
'448887' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKV' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
7a1f6898b16bc8fdaca28e5eebc219de
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describe
'100370' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKW' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
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describe
'35583' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKX' 'sip-files00246.pro'
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describe
'31586' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKY' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFKZ' 'sip-files00246.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLA' 'sip-files00246.txt'
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describe
'8069' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLB' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLC' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
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describe
'107828' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLD' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
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describe
'36648' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLE' 'sip-files00247.pro'
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describe
'33910' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLF' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
2f18befb053f4c2c8970186a521eccb2
383108a2374221d7b108730f441057d12a561b31
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLG' 'sip-files00247.tif'
f08ac9fae8237064b793f4f564094165
7037f9560bf74da975b78e27d017af22627cb59a
'2011-12-30T19:25:12-05:00'
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLH' 'sip-files00247.txt'
09afd793f944bc9e891cddc0e3f0593f
2e9942e75630c0b5bcb4b04ef64f05779e395094
describe
'8276' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLI' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
256122f22ee0236dba362be1596d4572
f3d3931737ce8890ff993378b83a9fbdcfdfcdc2
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLJ' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
75e97b127cf8b08e829940d506236fb5
9653e2ad465f72b12ac4c9f00d7cd64e452dc9ac
describe
'99288' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLK' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
02f54304545a58ffca359d6149a9239f
ac496b73815871cfb5f5444f3a9798c3cbadc179
describe
'35141' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLL' 'sip-files00248.pro'
9fc732ef3ac6bead201c1469074874a1
ddb36b90914b266fb382f7136e617a3fd8384386
describe
'32536' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLM' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
c31b02056259d60e38e3b03fca9d7e24
9bd44e260fe99466f6b5dff68fcf5f15200e9d68
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLN' 'sip-files00248.tif'
e8ca2e62a2f8c880938061ab31c68e55
498a1bea29b88957bf2bacf825ce908ff4f781ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLO' 'sip-files00248.txt'
2e95e33323172f12f92b838a9f87a8d6
a4e3233fe7d97f0bfefc70116cdada9ebb5df12f
describe
'7970' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLP' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
2da6c68bc34d58588f93c1ceeede283f
e1643013b86850479f247355c729ce77e20af01c
describe
'448734' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLQ' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
e6ad346ac5df749422b15580842c60c5
44bf171ee54dae86312f6a1d514c6255f8d5ee10
describe
'89556' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLR' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
d4ce148f0baca8a8a6c3b744e70541f9
d951b9fdede97fa2fa6641ce1bf3e7b4a7d6d6b1
describe
'30393' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLS' 'sip-files00249.pro'
7ab3114d0a928a953ecd4cb6641ebb82
15152715232d7805aa0d27f38cafa0736dd391f3
describe
'28303' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLT' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
e89062d954931821c4331c2838660e3b
b3bde57133166dbdd8cbf9175e37c135aa6cee06
'2011-12-30T19:23:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLU' 'sip-files00249.tif'
9b53bffd501d55d297d510a07ccf3592
66b52e15113787adcb377a1fddcc9dccf8735933
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLV' 'sip-files00249.txt'
3dc391f18f2024213ec0e337fb945613
1717400615bfd4ba8a4c7291882ddc78b154147a
describe
'7552' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLW' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
4c017e28c6c0f1d700d285bd87b76723
48fe92127052fc5eac7914216d9c7aaacde58799
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLX' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
2a4228ce36ad00ede88d064a78f266ef
f423304cb8c96c7439baba6e1b6a6d3622c94826
'2011-12-30T19:17:53-05:00'
describe
'92391' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLY' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
b114d64090766c069c5356465d9c2e34
1df3864f2c78f2bdf63e0ee3dddf3ab2ad221850
describe
'33139' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFLZ' 'sip-files00250.pro'
ff03870f01cd47de878849196644ddd6
3aba58decf580bafc6a3b03ad60bec7cd866a039
describe
'29708' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMA' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
366e733ac684f394e24915204c676bfb
ee807d3b60e7869596e34a21c83d6af183ff77c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMB' 'sip-files00250.tif'
f9ec5b52ded761fe20bd26480bc2f0cc
377992813269dd221d607e8b256a9cc6a9248867
'2011-12-30T19:21:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMC' 'sip-files00250.txt'
624c22c8027fb7f63cfa2bf5bf1df6bf
d06ec0c1246a9a23e432e4791eb0370f8bb5bb1a
describe
'7787' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMD' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
248dad46b6138fcbe5bfe8d433867557
1ecfea42d28004c2a8a3990ac0f75445e0910f05
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFME' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
2e70b81193fa774906e9a44e7c60f767
3da0c3183ccd5732548a8b60b947f2366442febd
describe
'36843' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMF' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
e78a2b89cb479f05e7b76b0ac4c59daf
d823bc72c980f88997213d0cd905411db1b9c448
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMG' 'sip-files00251.pro'
bc9c0212957a9eb8a330f99e25a3369d
df3f7b564cd6bbd2292eab4c0169b9880cb23eb4
describe
'10173' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMH' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
43a18cd53cb94bbc988869c209b47284
6700d0e8264291e6149fc935178ace3e71e31e3f
'2011-12-30T19:25:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMI' 'sip-files00251.tif'
5a01b011014eec58faae21f1e3556bd4
943252205e49e18d01303c5713ed530eb0f079da
describe
'343' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMJ' 'sip-files00251.txt'
3f14e841e3017722d4e361855ede216d
b175b77af1e4ef4143e3eaeef7b8ec331ce71070
describe
'2737' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMK' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
16bb4fb5ce30df85075f6d1584bddd17
ff77f563b3cb52d19e4946c7d2eeaa1c71ccafae
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFML' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
554f3045771778c512a2af6464293172
5d945a683437397cb2f967d89b78a64e646529c9
describe
'78027' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMM' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
4f155c1931a7b923e79e2886a7aea7a2
23108f9777a8d3a52a21e5dac8a8a1cb94ff331d
describe
'24730' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMN' 'sip-files00252.pro'
a72f171eb44829db98f1477123712458
4daf5b8ac11a01b9db9e6a07e737e4aa795e6220
describe
'23642' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMO' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
597c20709b3708014e4a0796d1edbf0e
eb93590950da66954f8e56249cc5efbb78e7011b
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMP' 'sip-files00252.tif'
42b7d4135509f9262c326ede0c396fdc
6c8e76136c86bf3500d7d32583405c5b06137cf6
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMQ' 'sip-files00252.txt'
f01afca8429583d2a05764de6f901194
04d418f434e5de1b730fba5f41ae6459d52a83ec
describe
'5961' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMR' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
95806f71105bdd5a3919f85781972d7d
04c946d2414519594f0c77ecdec4756cfc4a5d11
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMS' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
a86a6e371fb79220e9b9c1eb9065cc2f
01c77a46d165eabebf1d93503be8f71f83e88d50
describe
'102689' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMT' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
ca53d35b4fdf4de96e5fba9dfbc36852
7c11f7892c84d8df3451de2e7a5e0ba583908191
'2011-12-30T19:23:21-05:00'
describe
'33857' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMU' 'sip-files00253.pro'
55539f393d5da3d88ea270865ebb9424
fc0ccb72da2dfb7449f7d744dccc755eaede5bb3
describe
'30885' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMV' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
a08cf0e8982bec98f7260bd5032f637a
1e64cdb3a3e348f98d7a4ed599fdd844182e7053
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMW' 'sip-files00253.tif'
85dce943cca2a986049df9d3041a5806
5e71d580e43f05b97b0df3a8911f04ad7b85dd78
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMX' 'sip-files00253.txt'
6552814e9926b3d45bcabb9ece101b4d
6d93d5ce1296135f070733cf26c9e34dc6feedde
'2011-12-30T19:25:21-05:00'
describe
'7859' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMY' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
5e07a8db852e139590ed3184c19f6b86
0172073466da9d1cf36abdae7c4db288349678fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFMZ' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
fba4afa0def6686e1857c95ae6e0b038
42a84555de5d68a8e53f3ec3af847e02967c8b5b
describe
'110489' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNA' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
078e065aaad02956428841f89f158149
0ac8065b6e3f7b06ae4fa2ed5d6eda381b95edf8
describe
'36811' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNB' 'sip-files00254.pro'
5e5a471acdc3b07cf54f12186a89ee09
f3d0e537b5799b57fb0693b08b661dd99c88b3a2
describe
'33771' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNC' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
9f7606b656be75ae5bac2ead295695ae
bfcb3cf7bb9195a6d08707eca087e00885c9095d
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFND' 'sip-files00254.tif'
7ffba6a6609b983773ca0b354d113a3f
3ce30ea456833e72c23eb358aca75ad648eebd2a
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNE' 'sip-files00254.txt'
a31d400f578f38324271e0ac28336101
6b1532d093f154b25fad527cba970c64830fcce6
describe
'8569' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNF' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
5de7cb10d5bb0acc4bcfbe99dc1c9241
2f58860b8ca658ff6783d1d885f35ce203e881ea
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNG' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
dbb102da22616c52fbd97e44b7879d99
f8739b7a49bc76c08446ff672440450a3582c285
describe
'105073' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNH' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
4196dc0fb44999859de376735a581201
8d80a93f4dcacc440b1ec08d1feffcf31ce7a92b
describe
'34320' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNI' 'sip-files00255.pro'
5bb53be0c30901097296c51f444227ec
8c4a604b3669b9868041abe0e948b03c1791d969
describe
'32442' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNJ' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
e97bdd728a28a51d6160ff00cf41c23b
fae9a7c05b21c1c07c42f707b2c278fd0809cee9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNK' 'sip-files00255.tif'
778f7b91331a8783dc1bd1438604ed7f
6aa9f949033b47cb846acd2932cd81cc786bfe45
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNL' 'sip-files00255.txt'
4fac936c0c52a625581cecd8d908b1af
4ec33633ba25f5e02528c73c51eacd0a3e42f53c
describe
'7789' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNM' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
7a2ddbcc29820ca7c13c4d308039d985
091486cbc4ddcff64e669d1f6f48daa5b6d6ccb9
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNN' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
35a46ccda3ae40fca032014e2ffba719
85459d3eed315392e8bda57368b53b2d5307389e
'2011-12-30T19:24:24-05:00'
describe
'110950' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNO' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
fdd9d9da64167631fd34229ea6e78617
f94c90fb0bc69c5fcc09ef897f0755cd38e01629
describe
'39303' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNP' 'sip-files00256.pro'
d563824c6fea60d8079973de1240f2b5
19d9ae869d27eac0a0da5b994bcc71f113c96983
describe
'35944' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNQ' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
425f0c3dfd2fb266cc2d6b9c1734f37a
87e9208d661ca2466478efc62c7a4fc52149774c
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNR' 'sip-files00256.tif'
de36bf2431d43b81fb349654e43c45bd
4cd49313b3221f99f8f74ebfa3779ac19930e240
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNS' 'sip-files00256.txt'
fb957a071f69cce091b8cc270413c1af
b3a12c965dbe8ace7d53792166ce470416acec06
describe
'8336' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNT' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
433e366580b21053e6665d527cf9b8f3
d1d501a2764c51e406e1f6348e5ee3c9645ff8e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNU' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
9b717480af47c2ca2a664de5b6072acd
ee38e6d94bc4d87cf6982a5a30a3e1dc7e630287
describe
'100498' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNV' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
6cfc2ddab46bfb12383a71a9c5d50fec
b87a69a38415807b54f9154cc439b7802d79cedb
describe
'33798' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNW' 'sip-files00257.pro'
4de392e7042d62d9f897c954d917b9ae
5ef853fc42743e73330bfd89695d10eb981891a8
describe
'31291' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNX' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
97c8b2302fb693bbd1dcdd8b2d52f79e
7eb02e2414dd3f9b090384bdd955101b5d0bd17a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNY' 'sip-files00257.tif'
3f5b560ae9928ed5e5f54733128d2382
87bd312000424f5b2829fb4156c1e2853a46ffed
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFNZ' 'sip-files00257.txt'
0b6b27b4d8a08a5bb0548b37e1533fdd
81d2a6da6421cc3ca6c9609ace309af923e04749
describe
'7894' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOA' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
76305ae71030e2c8d7b67242a45d8868
9a5bbb4f0347172a4978f2b957fd3fbd2555f4bf
describe
'448941' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOB' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
2c237a8ae17b9f04d854f180e2cf2781
7784b63fd67002753d70bd3fd1371409068515a7
describe
'103468' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOC' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
00da25badfe8e9dccf855b7136d8aec9
21b06b6fa4ff05087887aa00d4a2b4ed2989a889
describe
'33420' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOD' 'sip-files00258.pro'
176481d9d5a78cd9c63c8a2e08a60f67
169f06e0dad58e2d85f6f043aef3b6703bbcbe0a
describe
'31372' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOE' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
5befda300863388eec09f07be12cfc14
5b48b8e94bbf58a2ff3b7890ccc3b581a09190a6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOF' 'sip-files00258.tif'
af74d2762b0f0349c236baa82a6c0fe0
755f41dced3a302daf0f2322ca00e96f5b01a8df
'2011-12-30T19:23:10-05:00'
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOG' 'sip-files00258.txt'
29910ad23d65d3c1405b5314dd368277
06e13eb0b46f330b0258329588599aa2f4aed4b2
describe
'8261' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOH' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
acbaac73a5fae49b545c9e25921dd2a9
db13b76c6f36aa051026e02e5958cda5f45d1a39
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOI' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
cc933583adc9c525aa2803daf302bf39
4cd5da89f8e91b5158de677257a05ad737c44a2a
describe
'128568' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOJ' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
d4ca03e942127e10ee6fef47ab6261d6
c2d1b4ca940b6c7fa787a0098351dc5e9c7c1ac7
describe
'1951' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOK' 'sip-files00259.pro'
e353c112d49c40d6635f7b6fd9d878b1
7e97b6f96290e3d75fd42bc267b8aa2f8952d05f
describe
'32331' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOL' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
c9c91d3951ad153f27d879ecc1b568d5
39cc06723d52febe07984c95fa94cc22fa298cfa
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOM' 'sip-files00259.tif'
85bb6c9d1c650c2139bc983cbf96bba3
71d6b236faa991f4181ff030c0d2d8f47f01d21d
describe
'187' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFON' 'sip-files00259.txt'
6fc0857672ea1ad8edefe40bbd91cf57
0dfef99286632beefc0c21fec5b54b58c6486591
describe
Invalid character
'8407' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOO' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
796692ae8ef4f001d17051d46c0df202
2a81be18e53b240a9873f0f1854469d13eac16b0
describe
'448861' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOP' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
bbd1144fe55c6cdd368020b9a32338c8
d197cf24a14c1f385289da11d4e4561f9b6c9cc1
describe
'110283' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOQ' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
d437c43c982727dcb3f01a7eec2d75d5
f4ef5835faff773a605e13ec190b91ca8331a962
describe
'35205' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOR' 'sip-files00261.pro'
4232fa5d456623eb5c133c1091908e92
3544e9803d3f4f9128a7c2b7b136822860764b3a
describe
'33716' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOS' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
d3b65a2b8e4171e7c57071f1b0937063
7dd204212313def8fb5e1e0225496af0f980b4c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOT' 'sip-files00261.tif'
12ceed9cad887f4f795758ade83fe898
989e4817bfb61147a57779b1fa2c22fa486c8c98
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOU' 'sip-files00261.txt'
f79198f291a7a507966db1bf1267ce21
f7bc300fa27a2a03db65322b82bfd256e47bf786
describe
'8333' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOV' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
fd36668da235f30a69b49f06835845e1
c17bcd08df9ae8ab54eceb157b5e2d2ee41d8448
describe
'448935' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOW' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
755ffedad07bb2cf38966a079c3e7e27
9c8aefbab63863b44c64f6265c52860e5a87b1bd
describe
'105252' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOX' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
bd217b60c473e266fbf9809e930c333e
f7c7e390abc70b8f8d8f68d47549d571f72ba587
describe
'35688' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOY' 'sip-files00262.pro'
257801f688f999896c89d47e981e96bb
642d48f3702d7595db4c8a79c53e3ad75e436b26
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFOZ' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
67d69bc2a1d5bb9eb11db9a3ec443b32
59d5a8558ceca88c7568347fdc40b2700e8a5261
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPA' 'sip-files00262.tif'
16a8194f919e75dbbe34f469f9a661ab
d4117a4948524795882f37411367613dd8d74f09
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPB' 'sip-files00262.txt'
5f0fdde9369996fad229c2af9f6e94e1
ee3e72fa8508ab995d4f5f5a682ba8f4b000d27e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPC' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
241d40a49e22a41e68fef3307f64e0ce
cb3132e37a83efd144dc2918c77b2ddfd4b05525
describe
'448748' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPD' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
f2648bb8d22f581b5b191aa232e07387
9f07b74321a0a9c110855d971e54e87e65bfbe81
describe
'68060' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPE' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
0b9dd19eab3744577499364a5f56b77a
7b32dd6267c023008c753ba89fa14dc262215830
describe
'18547' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPF' 'sip-files00263.pro'
31be4e914043bb63c9a9c1974e9340d3
39ef9a605a3a756ba24b05ce7dc3715bf91a0d72
describe
'18950' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPG' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
9b2f0815d9b0cef3c3905e22237ed64f
2d9442f36b8b05944ba46ccf8ae9a741b96bd5d8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPH' 'sip-files00263.tif'
898c8059b4a4634406654013f45d336c
748750c8f1cc16d48bef9d12fd8a32d8d95c5561
describe
'744' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPI' 'sip-files00263.txt'
f55a5b8783c0788ef22cdf2a6e144629
d262da6a45969f0b70d329de5be88e080ead161c
describe
'4731' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPJ' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
b42eb02072b525e9bb4de384e0f54360
5b3582bba62b837ac76a60b93d3ff55fb12a4095
describe
'442103' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPK' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
0e90b4dc5ad237368f4e48ae9a9dde05
e7dab8fb737770202db2b143b85dd6318f8d65de
describe
'85337' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPL' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
fc39ffbaecd56cbc057d980bdb2f93f1
34bbf15caa837b4b4fd8761e2ac8e29d788c0304
describe
'29174' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPM' 'sip-files00264.pro'
aea69ad6d0d20d7f61a63dcb2a214af6
b1253daf72a76899119d8151f2ef348905dac4c3
describe
'28116' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPN' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
417057b9ac7113e951db5cd6c0fca9d2
5600d5aadf0c34b43c19b0febf8a3098830c889e
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPO' 'sip-files00264.tif'
47e7b258c17a1d90617f37bde0bf1604
37de9ef987fa6b5717be2267b5c23bcc3fcbf010
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPP' 'sip-files00264.txt'
3d40cf0628bbebc87c779e03b0bf8964
92dd605ad9398f9315e12d56b52b3f1e03adcc96
describe
'6931' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPQ' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
aae750fa2bd11ed4eb092b35407b0203
dd7def30730ed035bd98c94ae6ad1acf563d6ab1
describe
'448860' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPR' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
0653fbf6bd4c7774e1c27376fc8f353c
aa0bda256e9f7149932f71df2d7d7eed2b580aba
describe
'99715' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPS' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
424854b4e2c14816285446d2f09fd189
62a538b331b76023277dbe87139240fe0b7d19f7
describe
'34216' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPT' 'sip-files00265.pro'
9e1fb83177dd1bc921cc1a40373283b0
e56c63e2845de009d3a4082dfc9af3d827a5f182
describe
'32097' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPU' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
2a8716724f13ad912518cfdcc612bb21
95361377d8fde4fccab1bfaeb7f25bf5c427b2ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPV' 'sip-files00265.tif'
9fe41f230625f44c11dd9c84308d701f
1063419234080ba5a90c40ca9e01c54a3e83e501
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPW' 'sip-files00265.txt'
cc97426334b6b56590b15e7cb90d1b68
1520e6c2aa86e1a4ab9dda57d8f4f4f216fa3b87
describe
'7730' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPX' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
fcbd94ec887b9beee16aae9a3ee4463a
6cbd6ebfdee9e92d34319bcf45d2639b3dbc6a93
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPY' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
3f0acf55bd7b0c34acde9a46108f4a9f
6bb178b2f3945eb9668640ac8a80339d7cabeb3a
describe
'93736' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFPZ' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
a18705f204db81a84a4d206c0ce2a85a
ee87c4ce698b69b3ee59bf57a0b2212131ea1963
describe
'30575' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQA' 'sip-files00266.pro'
bf46e3dc4b79ea6578c2583b5cbf6fb2
4a24dd10443ecd373571a1e57cb85ac274a517fd
'2011-12-30T19:24:20-05:00'
describe
'29074' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQB' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
d6a39bdad32821e51141b7cf4625c16e
7a03945792005c0737f3dfff1c3140ac14e8f8e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQC' 'sip-files00266.tif'
789adbf2d5dec007612989bd51db0216
ac3cebaf1ee1afef944f29910e90a2533b0e48de
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQD' 'sip-files00266.txt'
107126065fcedbe7d79fdc9dd8ffaa07
e57b0def96a4c0db108cf6836b1e51e4cad0df68
describe
'7743' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQE' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
a3271f976c7b91e5498b18e8043eead8
3d302f371734a28b1898619f0b62e82574c3570a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQF' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
e183a7675094e2066180757bb76f9be7
007312ad3951b421f426ed2dc0bed75794aace78
describe
'103038' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQG' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
2d9ffcb11cb3e5161e3931ed029b76e4
b65481db50d06c3f3884ab93ab2f37cedf9986cf
describe
'33524' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQH' 'sip-files00267.pro'
7825abf4c36eb7c6118300653dd9442c
03137292566794a0974522dc1f96b2a0b7c46bb3
describe
'31445' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQI' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
c8fdc806bcc817dd3810e4c91455744d
f99bd11977c1d176456cbb4d957f360c1e25e8d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQJ' 'sip-files00267.tif'
5ccb34430c6e427b46234823cae84962
50e10c5070957a9f720a470ad30e95b6dd8d8af3
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQK' 'sip-files00267.txt'
0205bc0101716575f320a2afb257d4a7
db963ecfdd495483a6ea46dda0b3c64b7b55d0b8
describe
'7947' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQL' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
2d1ff813df4dc28ce5d1934ecb130a99
9231099c623b3f41f16ae46aefdbedb5ab5f8aeb
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQM' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
1676d10c67957c5fa9384a7ff6ca613a
91306fdb58c9b85d15ba972b43ac870a3f49b01a
describe
'96926' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQN' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
411e7db08fbc667c8953420547c91c24
d9ff4eca0d0f726a4199630251f6af54502ad3b4
describe
'32932' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQO' 'sip-files00268.pro'
f12eba89ee5ded028691838322409940
104ef29d2dc7bd9a074a3a911869d2ac1801e679
describe
'31067' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQP' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
1f17dde00f822c1b4dfe68406b807a8e
083fc3a505329c2da57a597292e1f8c0e991d073
'2011-12-30T19:25:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQQ' 'sip-files00268.tif'
0baaf77b84d6c523ac46a1416fad4661
27b01a9448618a0bc1139ac68b4f9fbc073a1cb8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQR' 'sip-files00268.txt'
8b7edb2f6061d5a8966ea221a4e8ede1
3d7db75b9ed47488bce56c8eb8782aadacebc664
describe
'7795' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQS' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
c3d2545d09896f5d491541dc9bd7700e
068a59f7df440f6d3919a2951b1e2a519fc0fef6
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQT' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
c77dbf2eb068ab0c000350f0337721c1
331592ac758aa8f6d5c6c1ad0993b01b88cd9d3a
describe
'107864' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQU' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
03a290f4726ca66a1cdafaccdb807e11
73a1fa024496771917b2fad74531d27d10b1cfb4
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQV' 'sip-files00269.pro'
40e71725b855b019ed37f75e4416a94c
a123b94850b72dc3c7a8aee1b8f6f384a3a45fc2
describe
'32895' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQW' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
05ae5e3fc2c44dddc38ccdee56533c1e
a7811e910b6b0c9782069e6c3889e1ee25d6c488
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQX' 'sip-files00269.tif'
7ae9ae77878026f51e6c7a836c0efa98
4027314529583232b83bc8c22d46debe30685a11
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQY' 'sip-files00269.txt'
4a854f4a8bf03d11d84fdf87d33bb631
4077fe68ac8ffff408f2aedad96d6cd9d156d738
describe
'7994' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFQZ' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
f873c51e3617f8f336f975f5d2dafa0e
85cdf911facaaa965a6e6146d42b6cef81e76b8e
'2011-12-30T19:23:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRA' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
50f5526cf7e85786a14f174ee426fabc
1189d8196a53cff0d66f84d9b81f7170a45ab2c1
describe
'110104' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRB' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
33503b8d3bebbd3287f27c913e0ad245
797a4cc8a88b5349877014d039cbd3a16dda1825
describe
'36467' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRC' 'sip-files00270.pro'
7ea87d6abbaf78bd92822ad949231676
cc970b7837d478d28fb6d78bdb4b62f5a0dc9d0a
describe
'33418' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRD' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
43df8b3981a250e0b1514fe3f6904bb3
dbc71fb361ddb889a8b61ad3dad27e4611e5e944
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRE' 'sip-files00270.tif'
d6c194373ef648966e9b640d118585cd
2198058f6473d7f1ab0837475ea17222a2bde4bb
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRF' 'sip-files00270.txt'
55c5ead126fca61d8b4ec3f9f3c2196b
3fee3119e715ac193b7eaa88898d64e9e5844435
describe
'8290' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRG' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
db8f880fbccbc90ac51a0e530fb01738
3503dc86448f0c96a83ba3f7954ba2ab022a0e1a
describe
'448874' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRH' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
1b15ed595dbbff63d0b9c853ed2ee6a7
9bd82b9346dd5a7369f0989b52f3af5d2d725a80
describe
'107191' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRI' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
681958fa2366ba5c6045cd34ae2f44c0
0632814f76cf47b9edfae5704a2d339d4bf31c2d
describe
'35223' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRJ' 'sip-files00271.pro'
f7ec1fd174e89359dd82889131b520c6
d3e2ef846ae5bbcf2d81b578db71f0c84e614a10
describe
'33684' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRK' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
ed82628ab67e7dc1007b579b89d6c302
96cd7dffa6b848de99ce2206eeb6ceeb8ab1b626
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRL' 'sip-files00271.tif'
a445d4b225f374657807e770c0232e3a
bf82df2f7fce9d9af3283a99648ffe067292dce7
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRM' 'sip-files00271.txt'
0b17d7efd82185ec051c0527d713aca2
f97ebefbc5e8b4b5af94464797d29e5492c99c9d
describe
'8219' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRN' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
866e76c2a412ed4721b26a7c22d8eefd
5dacc79f5c8fb9f9ae2ff712c98dd9116e203469
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRO' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
c155e2556f3f178d38e56ba5b630a6b1
9db4b763b11f6598288073fed4425bb76a74a0c5
describe
'40167' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRP' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
2acb23f281807995dfd53cd3d04f30d0
e4325fa94a60361bb81ad7a6ce3ffaf09b4aca24
describe
'6945' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRQ' 'sip-files00272.pro'
b4d928fc6ab110d53d3870a7bdf4bd6c
c753ea320b2620c521aec1720cc50867348cb5a4
describe
'10024' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRR' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
3d0cc08714a7b8dccaecaf610e50dece
8b50c93ac8c64f9dd6a82387527aa589e9c0e8f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRS' 'sip-files00272.tif'
ebbcc715bfa61cf0d45fd72486e76d18
abfecaa6d521866b1e2458641dbe2bff52e48b8b
describe
'284' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRT' 'sip-files00272.txt'
8abf886a4c407177dd5efaad9305a7c9
d6b6e75bd03ce9eec241b2922cb161f0d6e6b36d
describe
'2580' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRU' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
9c2e77b04e3a78391a2cdaef68426391
0d0bc8775a6666638fcc383f59a79645f7f53ab1
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRV' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
7d221e45fac47937644273a149a7411d
bb59bb6fcb83bcc82ac7cbe6baa3bb52320ea959
describe
'81897' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRW' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
c4d320bb74d09cef28dfa4b5e77ff6f3
859f285a5da0d7fbb610ef19961454b7c033f9ad
describe
'24067' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRX' 'sip-files00273.pro'
262c8224047b704ceadf3b710344edd7
54692213a747c1c5b009b80c55b1d999cace9443
describe
'24853' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRY' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
7c854239b4766aa8b852c077d5f3e699
e4f556b02fadde45b048df161f82d08eb94a003a
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFRZ' 'sip-files00273.tif'
14b5a1b4eb83aa9368cbca8a974bcfc5
3edaf42cb81a22483b427f8762a5d124e9663929
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSA' 'sip-files00273.txt'
114a50a73d57abb03d90fb28a2c3ddca
97ae0b49c4ed3a2e81df612b1b8c8e505d4f2abf
describe
'6008' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSB' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
e01aa23ae68530dfde812304025037e7
4318458c29aaaf2969ccd8ae5843aa927865f6ff
describe
'448947' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSC' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
248f8b3550b196bc64b750a100b38c8e
5396a763a27c6467b4e1163c974341b09877f7a6
describe
'108880' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSD' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
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8248e336e97ce12645b04446f7404eb8dce93743
describe
'35898' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSE' 'sip-files00274.pro'
0acf4296d836b0e848aac25f6bd0f938
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describe
'33253' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSF' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSG' 'sip-files00274.tif'
b95a9259bdd2bf4aedf1aad0ef08abbd
345729410861ffe6b5308c67b46430539dbe40e6
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSH' 'sip-files00274.txt'
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describe
'8274' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSI' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
774eb0ffa5fbd813ad5dcbe976d68be1
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describe
'448906' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSJ' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
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describe
'99398' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSK' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
fe7946fa38caefef46be7510bd126539
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSL' 'sip-files00275.pro'
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describe
'29530' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSM' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
f4b6c4c22320835f05e08dd551f4817d
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSN' 'sip-files00275.tif'
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describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSO' 'sip-files00275.txt'
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describe
'7628' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSP' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSQ' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
16dfe2b7dc5f2b5751686de163ab39fa
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describe
'103692' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSR' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
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describe
'33466' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSS' 'sip-files00276.pro'
eda894b09497e8c06be2b819b76c35d8
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describe
'31486' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFST' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSU' 'sip-files00276.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSV' 'sip-files00276.txt'
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describe
'7965' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSW' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
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describe
'448841' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSX' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
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describe
'71700' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSY' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
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describe
'20292' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFSZ' 'sip-files00277.pro'
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describe
'20763' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTA' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTB' 'sip-files00277.tif'
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describe
'809' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTC' 'sip-files00277.txt'
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describe
'5172' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTD' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
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describe
'448772' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTE' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
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describe
'90736' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTF' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
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describe
'29432' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTG' 'sip-files00278.pro'
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describe
'27458' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTH' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
3778dde22fe28c45f5ce9f31d0a553e2
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTI' 'sip-files00278.tif'
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describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTJ' 'sip-files00278.txt'
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describe
'6565' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTK' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTL' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
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describe
'106885' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTM' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
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describe
'34707' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTN' 'sip-files00279.pro'
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describe
'33026' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTO' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
25d45e9e5d095a6bdf9737d8b494ea04
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTP' 'sip-files00279.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTQ' 'sip-files00279.txt'
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describe
'8246' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTR' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTS' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
f1b98da58da6d0bf0366f544530b2933
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describe
'110336' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTT' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
f113772298fac0c3e4d808ce7f3a61a1
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describe
'36042' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTU' 'sip-files00280.pro'
01a2dee70ee0c36672b5c3adc68e255f
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describe
'33035' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTV' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTW' 'sip-files00280.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTX' 'sip-files00280.txt'
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describe
'8410' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTY' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFTZ' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
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describe
'104911' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUA' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
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describe
'32995' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUB' 'sip-files00281.pro'
4e9cefd44a46f816597abff40b12355f
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describe
'32233' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUC' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
cc2413be8bca0516dc492dbee5b1067c
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUD' 'sip-files00281.tif'
42b6225fa657818209a5e133635725a1
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUE' 'sip-files00281.txt'
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describe
'7651' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUF' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
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describe
'448911' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUG' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
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describe
'110235' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUH' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
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describe
'38346' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUI' 'sip-files00282.pro'
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describe
'34594' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUJ' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
d6cfe0c4a24f1c355bac1ae7bbb17121
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUK' 'sip-files00282.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUL' 'sip-files00282.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUM' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUN' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
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describe
'96638' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUO' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
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describe
'31799' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUP' 'sip-files00283.pro'
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describe
'28608' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUQ' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUR' 'sip-files00283.tif'
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describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUS' 'sip-files00283.txt'
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describe
'6858' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUT' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUU' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
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describe
'94693' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUV' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
1c9eaaae47265e3290a74b5d342b1668
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describe
'29308' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUW' 'sip-files00284.pro'
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describe
'27628' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUX' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUY' 'sip-files00284.tif'
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describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFUZ' 'sip-files00284.txt'
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describe
'6519' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVA' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
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describe
'448824' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVB' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
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describe
'107278' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVC' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
af2ccfe4f99cb3f3cd251f462e243282
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describe
'34874' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVD' 'sip-files00285.pro'
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describe
'31950' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVE' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
eb92afd6d8491356024d3887040cdee9
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVF' 'sip-files00285.tif'
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describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVG' 'sip-files00285.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVH' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
85ec4de28c0cb70e211226bae0d15cc5
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVI' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
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describe
'104039' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVJ' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
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describe
'34870' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVK' 'sip-files00286.pro'
258800f4c0792478f79bfaaa48ee7fa6
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVL' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
3624faee34c5c96dedbc72c740dc7ed9
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVM' 'sip-files00286.tif'
3dcd0d7e70cfc4a31494d1007f103cf9
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVN' 'sip-files00286.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVO' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
4597c85740ad9b277a795e6ca5fc4bf0
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVP' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
593e4adeb2be5f3561dae5c9f95ce642
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describe
'55373' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVQ' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
e1f26904b1435af153ca975475fdf972
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describe
'13823' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVR' 'sip-files00287.pro'
0f054120b32039863d3012c7f273d04b
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describe
'14794' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVS' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
ae490538d4c8c9dc40204d24cd1c1f69
0463f753156f6e868f24b331fc57659c722f3a72
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVT' 'sip-files00287.tif'
da14f4806568346714a8d4643b2dc43c
dd35a0e9565258ea7a485b87dd758053a38249ec
describe
'577' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVU' 'sip-files00287.txt'
d54e5ea03291dac7412f623e9caa4836
482c196c7774ce2221c99cfce4716bcd9b148621
describe
'3649' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVV' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVW' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
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describe
'109537' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVX' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
f778eaa0c8590c3b7575185c9beb2737
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describe
'34442' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVY' 'sip-files00288.pro'
1f785446d6b023b0a65aca2396188532
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describe
'30923' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFVZ' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWA' 'sip-files00288.tif'
bed0441de454e9302ecd58d8f08a90c3
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describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWB' 'sip-files00288.txt'
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describe
'7035' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWC' 'sip-files00288thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWD' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
a166f82ced7249507871d6de02c39ac7
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describe
'70544' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWE' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
dfb6d78294732195f6edbf360f8840c4
b5da84636458c512c94149d819ec4387edde37c8
'2011-12-30T19:25:33-05:00'
describe
'2597' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWF' 'sip-files00289.pro'
adecf6dccfce703df3faae6e64f3bbc2
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describe
'16467' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWG' 'sip-files00289.QC.jpg'
860f86c080f665a74f5b4c51287d6546
21da6875dfe7a539fae6450637c2cf83e8ef2aa8
describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWH' 'sip-files00289.tif'
53076db58b308b7c93295c289127a614
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describe
'136' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWI' 'sip-files00289.txt'
1352705dcfdff7039609cfbc950533a1
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describe
'4536' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWJ' 'sip-files00289thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWK' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
1ae7ac1a5372715f8f1b085a457ffff3
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describe
'131413' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWL' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
b56f4ce8db5bddcea54762858662532f
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describe
'44416' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWM' 'sip-files00291.pro'
3f3bc5ecaa64ec6c4454e151b1a16364
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describe
'39122' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWN' 'sip-files00291.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWO' 'sip-files00291.tif'
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describe
'1755' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWP' 'sip-files00291.txt'
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describe
'8819' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWQ' 'sip-files00291thm.jpg'
c72055a898441c5454a48f034935fd8f
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWR' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
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describe
'78900' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWS' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
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describe
'22716' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWT' 'sip-files00292.pro'
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describe
'22326' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWU' 'sip-files00292.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWV' 'sip-files00292.tif'
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describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWW' 'sip-files00292.txt'
0f5213e7f9a76d5e9828dcff3b9f0d77
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describe
'5670' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWX' 'sip-files00292thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWY' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
02ff960004ffdbf622abaf0e2b1f4d0b
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describe
'77032' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFWZ' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
fe0cd28a6250d36faaf164be5a4880ed
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describe
'21834' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXA' 'sip-files00293.pro'
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describe
'20865' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXB' 'sip-files00293.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXC' 'sip-files00293.tif'
99e0be2da5b940ff2b12b366f0a55ec8
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describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXD' 'sip-files00293.txt'
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describe
'5588' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXE' 'sip-files00293thm.jpg'
c17f1804b1fee976d1d54a018cba7056
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXF' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
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describe
'125340' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXG' 'sip-files00294.jpg'
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describe
'42507' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXH' 'sip-files00294.pro'
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describe
'35467' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXI' 'sip-files00294.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXJ' 'sip-files00294.tif'
fac4e86832364dbe815882ab435801d6
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describe
'1714' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXK' 'sip-files00294.txt'
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describe
'8071' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXL' 'sip-files00294thm.jpg'
1ff2a4ae8a2464a938d0977782a086ad
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describe
'448879' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXM' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
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describe
'121242' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXN' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
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describe
'60280' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXO' 'sip-files00295.pro'
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describe
'33359' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXP' 'sip-files00295.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXQ' 'sip-files00295.tif'
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describe
'2577' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXR' 'sip-files00295.txt'
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describe
'8126' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXS' 'sip-files00295thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXT' 'sip-files00296.jp2'
3d968250ca26ce1c7e368c9353c77aa8
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describe
'114526' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXU' 'sip-files00296.jpg'
d113504b9bab4a707941ea4f219e9c9b
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describe
'58753' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXV' 'sip-files00296.pro'
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describe
'32446' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXW' 'sip-files00296.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXX' 'sip-files00296.tif'
9eb0ae23f772457bec7e466ea97f345a
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describe
'2501' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXY' 'sip-files00296.txt'
786f4a81ba1f3223bf5044260ce4ae78
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describe
'7668' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFXZ' 'sip-files00296thm.jpg'
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describe
'448867' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYA' 'sip-files00297.jp2'
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describe
'102251' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYB' 'sip-files00297.jpg'
12bc92f60a3f28f052bdbfdc2cf86f90
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describe
'42392' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYC' 'sip-files00297.pro'
242d60726db960d349b49ee06006ab83
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describe
'27913' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYD' 'sip-files00297.QC.jpg'
b4d0ca4da114014b3d5bfdae14ae730b
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYE' 'sip-files00297.tif'
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describe
'1837' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYF' 'sip-files00297.txt'
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describe
'7581' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYG' 'sip-files00297thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYH' 'sip-files00298.jp2'
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describe
'132591' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYI' 'sip-files00298.jpg'
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describe
'81192' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYJ' 'sip-files00298.pro'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYK' 'sip-files00298.QC.jpg'
afda82c1fb01c169c5fb6da0bbe64185
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYL' 'sip-files00298.tif'
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describe
'3439' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYM' 'sip-files00298.txt'
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describe
'8006' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYN' 'sip-files00298thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYO' 'sip-files00299.jp2'
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describe
'137521' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYP' 'sip-files00299.jpg'
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describe
'86161' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYQ' 'sip-files00299.pro'
44f4f62ac0a331e3c974670018ed78b0
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describe
'35163' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYR' 'sip-files00299.QC.jpg'
0ff74c12c71afb43907b0a18d5c2315a
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYS' 'sip-files00299.tif'
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describe
'3613' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYT' 'sip-files00299.txt'
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describe
'8278' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYU' 'sip-files00299thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYV' 'sip-files00300.jp2'
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describe
'121816' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYW' 'sip-files00300.jpg'
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describe
'78163' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYX' 'sip-files00300.pro'
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describe
'32583' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYY' 'sip-files00300.QC.jpg'
a4155b748898efcb5feaca40300bd7b9
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describe
'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFYZ' 'sip-files00300.tif'
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describe
'3273' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZA' 'sip-files00300.txt'
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describe
'8078' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZB' 'sip-files00300thm.jpg'
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describe
'519087' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZC' 'sip-files00305.jp2'
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describe
'52312' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZD' 'sip-files00305.jpg'
57b78205f7da914dab055388f2a7f729
a66ad7df5ae5b8a4979e28b40dfa7665604eb436
describe
'10964' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZE' 'sip-files00305.QC.jpg'
056218484a3221666d66851420766a81
425c492d2e83aab02753d18808a8e7ccd84a77e7
describe
'12464744' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZF' 'sip-files00305.tif'
037cb0b5d90b7fdf637bfccaf711d338
9c01e5bbde70b3d346d4cb9ed2258ae8b0db95b0
'2011-12-30T19:24:12-05:00'
describe
'2847' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZG' 'sip-files00305thm.jpg'
15f946f25de62c49ed6b17fec0b880de
2239f15c121e26edd7c13eb2bac1d841e791174e
describe
'516741' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZH' 'sip-files00306.jp2'
b3d149b90c4fcc892e7cb2cf13dd4439
a06363d134fe939b17cb609c4c844503c289a235
describe
'57909' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZI' 'sip-files00306.jpg'
dd480c35a504a45818cec4f5e6d0c253
4353dff51cf80015e6b9ce98d46b022efa3b425d
describe
'11258' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZJ' 'sip-files00306.QC.jpg'
875b49319ba5aa938b01d312d6a4ec03
ef292d31797dcfdb5ada1d9c66d8b36df18fc171
describe
'12408428' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZK' 'sip-files00306.tif'
79144673289e3b8a4dd7de7da2de437a
c11d1f07447d024cd8d83b05de48fba584c0f04f
describe
'2637' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZL' 'sip-files00306thm.jpg'
fbf4c62e68ae7ca4d378886ef7e1edbc
5b3a2a80ddcc241be85451752aa0f53491e0b39f
describe
'153549' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZM' 'sip-files00307.jp2'
6097034efe03da0591cd48731593569b
6844c5d77d7fe45b7d15dd12fd671292b9161af0
describe
'46104' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZN' 'sip-files00307.jpg'
08c57adfd54b755a10ec8a5bd13ae1b8
6c2a58bc45d0a2642b6962cb5e1fd026ddc62676
describe
'734' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZO' 'sip-files00307.pro'
23957b98a95f46b5cb9ed2a2bc049ddb
dd6b302a6c140c3a9ecf9d6875145cb67c14016f
describe
'12034' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZP' 'sip-files00307.QC.jpg'
615640e40296663b53687c220f8e6c8b
a30a7f2131fd6107599622a67e403af8f59590a6
describe
'3692688' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZQ' 'sip-files00307.tif'
897830f8483902ea3b72a358d7b94733
5c5040381b3f86cef73488a68cc625435085fc62
describe
'89' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZR' 'sip-files00307.txt'
3ffe2fcf80d09de076612b82f9dbd3b0
a43578e4964ea2716dbbcfe4e9f3aed999a06de0
describe
'4740' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZS' 'sip-files00307thm.jpg'
4da2441ad2a119a4ff0de3d322f68be2
ff9f330a0f2777f77dd6f31b02c2fbbbb56579fb
describe
'16' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZT' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
e7af687fb8a01194dbf7f0c30a85ae48
bc54d02bcedae4549ec67b6b83dc375f7e3817cb
describe
'413428' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZU' 'sip-filesUF00087073_00001.mets'
844aacd916db1919e9018b24b945ea7c
194e421f7be3fa77aa64d07254a2244d4ccda802
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T18:15:38-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'538476' 'info:fdaE20090120_AAAATCfileF20090121_AABFZX' 'sip-filesUF00087073_00001.xml'
d6e186b9639c5180c61b0ef94951a96b
a619d5a0a67b915689edee75e2f54a3214592b89
describe
'2013-12-13T18:15:42-05:00'
xml resolution


xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008707300001datestamp 2008-10-21setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title The pilot of the Mayflower : a tale of the children of the pilgrim republicdc:creator Butterworth, Hezekiahdc:publisher D. Appleton and Companydc:date 1898dc:type Bookdc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00087073&v=00001dc:source University of Floridadc:language English